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Sample records for postinfarction scar size

  1. Rapid Surface Cooling by ThermoSuit System Dramatically Reduces Scar Size, Prevents Post-Infarction Adverse Left Ventricular Remodeling, and Improves Cardiac Function in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Wangde; Herring, Michael J; Hale, Sharon L; Kloner, Robert A

    2015-01-01

    Background The long-term effects of transient hypothermia by the non-invasive ThermoSuit apparatus on myocardial infarct (MI) scar size, left ventricular (LV) remodeling, and LV function were assessed in rat MI model. Methods and Results Rats were randomized to normothermic or hypothermic groups (n=14 in each group) and subjected to 30 minutes coronary artery occlusion and 6 weeks of reperfusion. For hypothermia therapy, rats were placed into the ThermoSuit apparatus at 2 minutes after the onset of coronary artery occlusion, were taken out of the apparatus when the core body temperature reached 32°C (in ≈8 minutes), and were then allowed to rewarm. After 6 weeks of recovery, rats treated with hypothermia demonstrated markedly reduced scar size (expressed as % of left ventricular area: hypothermia, 6.5±1.1%; normothermia, 19.4±1.7%; P=1.3×10−6); and thicker anterior LV wall (hypothermia, 1.57±0.09 mm; normothermia, 1.07±0.05 mm; P=3.4×10−5); decreased postmortem left ventricular volume (hypothermia, 0.45±0.04 mL; normothermia, 0.6±0.03 mL; P=0.028); and better LV fractional shortening by echocardiography (hypothermia, 37.2±2.8%; normothermia, 18.9±2.3%; P=0.0002) and LV ejection fraction by LV contrast ventriculography (hypothermia, 66.8±2.3%; normothermia, 56.0±2.0%; P=0.0014). Conclusions Rapid, transient non-invasive surface cooling with the ThermoSuit apparatus in the acute phase of MI decreased scar size by 66.5%, attenuated adverse post-infarct left ventricular dilation and remodeling, and improved cardiac function in the chronic phase of experimental MI. PMID:26116692

  2. Imaging techniques in the evaluation of post-infarction function and scar.

    PubMed

    Pozo, Eduardo; Sanz, Javier

    2014-09-01

    Imaging techniques are essential in the clinical evaluation of patients with a myocardial infarction. They are of value for both initial assessment of the ischemic injury and for detection of the subgroup of patients at higher risk of developing cardiovascular events during follow-up. Echocardiography remains the technique of choice for the initial evaluation, owing to its bedside capability to determine strong predictors, such as ventricular volumes, global and regional systolic function, and valvular regurgitation. New techniques for evaluating ventricular mechanics, mainly assessment of ventricular deformation, are revealing important aspects of post-infarction ventricular adaptation. The main alternative to echocardiography is cardiac magnetic resonance imaging. This technique is highly accurate for determining ventricular volumes and ventricular function and has the additional advantage of being able to characterize the myocardium and demonstrate changes associated with the ischemic insult such as necrosis/fibrosis, edema, microvascular obstruction, and intramyocardial hemorrhage. These features not only allow detection and quantification of the infarct size, but also reveal additional characteristics of the scar tissue with prognostic value. Copyright © 2014 Sociedad Española de Cardiología. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  3. A Prospective Study of Ripple Mapping the Post-Infarct Ventricular Scar to Guide Substrate Ablation for Ventricular Tachycardia.

    PubMed

    Luther, Vishal; Linton, Nick W F; Jamil-Copley, Shahnaz; Koa-Wing, Michael; Lim, Phang Boon; Qureshi, Norman; Ng, Fu Siong; Hayat, Sajad; Whinnett, Zachary; Davies, D Wyn; Peters, Nicholas S; Kanagaratnam, Prapa

    2016-06-01

    Post-infarct ventricular tachycardia is associated with channels of surviving myocardium within scar characterized by fractionated and low-amplitude signals usually occurring late during sinus rhythm. Conventional automated algorithms for 3-dimensional electro-anatomic mapping cannot differentiate the delayed local signal of conduction within the scar from the initial far-field signal generated by surrounding healthy tissue. Ripple mapping displays every deflection of an electrogram, thereby providing fully informative activation sequences. We prospectively used CARTO-based ripple maps to identify conducting channels as a target for ablation. High-density bipolar left ventricular endocardial electrograms were collected using CARTO3v4 in sinus rhythm or ventricular pacing and reviewed for ripple mapping conducting channel identification. Fifteen consecutive patients (median age 68 years, left ventricular ejection fraction 30%) were studied (6 month preprocedural implantable cardioverter defibrillator therapies: median 19 ATP events [Q1-Q3=4-93] and 1 shock [Q1-Q3=0-3]). Scar (<1.5 mV) occupied a median 29% of the total surface area (median 540 points collected within scar). A median of 2 ripple mapping conducting channels were seen within each scar (length 60 mm; initial component 0.44 mV; delayed component 0.20 mV; conduction 55 cm/s). Ablation was performed along all identified ripple mapping conducting channels (median 18 lesions) and any presumed interconnected late-activating sites (median 6 lesions; Q1-Q3=2-12). The diastolic isthmus in ventricular tachycardia was mapped in 3 patients and colocated within the ripple mapping conducting channels identified. Ventricular tachycardia was noninducible in 85% of patients post ablation, and 71% remain free of ventricular tachycardia recurrence at 6-month median follow-up. Ripple mapping can be used to identify conduction channels within scar to guide functional substrate ablation. © 2016 American Heart Association

  4. Scars

    MedlinePlus

    ... Surgery Conditions Acne Scars Aging Hands Age Spots Aging Skin Birthmarks Burn Scars Cellulite Crow's Feet Droopy Eyelids ... Surgery Conditions Acne Scars Aging Hands Age Spots Aging Skin Birthmarks Burn Scars Cellulite Crow's Feet Droopy Eyelids ...

  5. Improved border sharpness of post-infarct scar by a novel self-navigated free-breathing high-resolution 3D whole-heart inversion recovery magnetic resonance approach.

    PubMed

    Rutz, Tobias; Piccini, Davide; Coppo, Simone; Chaptinel, Jerome; Ginami, Giulia; Vincenti, Gabriella; Stuber, Matthias; Schwitter, Juerg

    2016-12-01

    The border zone of post-infarction myocardial scar as identified by late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) has been identified as a substrate for arrhythmias and consequently, high-resolution 3D scar information is potentially useful for planning of electrophysiological interventions. This study evaluates the performance of a novel high-resolution 3D self-navigated free-breathing inversion recovery magnetic resonance pulse sequence (3D-SN-LGE) vs. conventional 2D breath-hold LGE (2D-LGE) with regard to sharpness of borders (SBorder) of post-infarction scar. Patients with post-infarction scar underwent two magnetic resonance examinations for conventional 2D-LGE and high-resolution 3D-SN-LGE acquisitions (both 15 min after 0.2 mmol/kg Gadobutrol IV) at 1.5T. In the prototype 3D-SN-LGE sequence, each ECG-triggered radial steady-state-free-precession read-out segment is preceded by a non-slice-selective inversion pulse. Scar volume and SBorder were assessed on 2D-LGE and matching reconstructed high-resolution 3D-SN-LGE short-axis slices. In 16 patients (four females, 58 ± 10y) all scars visualized by 2D-LGE could be identified on 3D-SN-LGE (time between 2D-LGE and 3D-SN-LGE 48 ± 53 days). A good agreement of scar volume by 3D-SN-LGE vs. 2D-LGE was found (Bland-Altman: -3.7 ± 3.4 ml, correlation: r = 0.987, p < 0.001) with a small difference in scar volume (20.5 (15.8, 35.2) ml vs. 24.5 (20.0, 41.9)) ml, respectively, p = 0.002] and a good intra- and interobserver variability (1.1 ± 4.1 and -1.1 ± 11.9 ml, respectively). SBorder of border "scar to non-infarcted myocardium" was superior on 3D-SN-LGE vs. 2D-LGE: 0.180 ± 0.044 vs. 0.083 ± 0.038, p < 0.001. Detection and quantification of myocardial scar by 3D-SN-LGE is feasible and accurate in comparison to 2D-LGE. The high spatial resolution of the 3D sequence improves delineation of scar borders.

  6. Postinfarct Left Ventricular Remodelling: A Prevailing Cause of Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Galli, Alessio; Lombardi, Federico

    2016-01-01

    Heart failure is a chronic disease with high morbidity and mortality, which represents a growing challenge in medicine. A major risk factor for heart failure with reduced ejection fraction is a history of myocardial infarction. The expansion of a large infarct scar and subsequent regional ventricular dilatation can cause postinfarct remodelling, leading to significant enlargement of the left ventricular chamber. It has a negative prognostic value, because it precedes the clinical manifestations of heart failure. The characteristics of the infarcted myocardium predicting postinfarct remodelling can be studied with cardiac magnetic resonance and experimental imaging modalities such as diffusion tensor imaging can identify the changes in the architecture of myocardial fibers. This review discusses all the aspects related to postinfarct left ventricular remodelling: definition, pathogenesis, diagnosis, consequences, and available therapies, together with experimental interventions that show promising results against postinfarct remodelling and heart failure. PMID:26989555

  7. New Atrophic Acne Scar Classification: Reliability of Assessments Based on Size, Shape, and Number.

    PubMed

    Kang, Sewon; Lozada, Vicente Torres; Bettoli, Vincenzo; Tan, Jerry; Rueda, Maria Jose; Layton, Alison; Petit, Lauren; Dréno, Brigitte

    2016-06-01

    Post-acne atrophic scarring is a major concern for which standardized outcome measures are needed. Traditionally, this type of scar has been classified based on shape; but survey of practicing dermatologists has shown that atrophic scar morphology has not been well enough defined to allow good agreement in clinical classification. Reliance on clinical assessment is still needed at the current time, since objective tools are not yet available in routine practice.
    Evaluate classification for atrophic acne scars by shape, size, and facial location and establish reliability in assessments.
    We conducted a non-interventional study with dermatologists performing live clinical assessments of atrophic acne scars. To objectively compare identification of lesions, individual lesions were marked on a high-resolution photo of the patient that was displayed on a computer during the clinical evaluation. The Jacob clinical classification system was used to define three primary shapes of scars 1) icepick, 2) boxcar, and 3) rolling. To determine agreement for classification by size, independent technicians assessed the investigators' markings on digital images. Identical localization of scars was denoted if the maximal distance between their centers was ≤ 60 pixels (approximately 3 mm). Raters assessed scars on the same patients twice (morning/afternoon). Aggregate models of rater assessments were created and analyzed for agreement.
    Raters counted a mean scar count per subject ranging from 15.75 to 40.25 scars. Approximately 50% of scars were identified by all raters and ~75% of scars were identified by at least 2 of 3 raters (weak agreement, Kappa pairwise agreement 0.30). Agreement between consecutive counts was moderate, with Kappa index ranging from 0.26 to 0.47 (after exclusion of one outlier investigator who had significantly higher counts than all others). Shape classifications of icepick, boxcar, and rolling differed significantly between raters and even

  8. Catheter Ablation of Ventricular Tachycardia in Patients with Post-Infarction Cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Nazer, Babak

    2014-01-01

    Monomorphic ventricular tachycardia (VT) in patients with post-infarction cardiomyopathy (CMP) is caused by reentry through slowly conducting tissue with in areas of myocardial scar. The use of implantable cardioverter-defibrillators (ICDs) has helped to decrease the risk of arrhythmic death in patients with post-infarction CMP, but the symptomatic and psychological burden of ICD shocks remains significant. Experience with catheter ablation has progressed substantially in the past 20 years, and is now routinely used to treat patients with post-infarction CMP who experience VT or receive ICD therapy. Depending on the hemodynamic tolerance of VT, a variety of mapping techniques may be used to identify sites for catheter ablation, including activation and entrainment mapping for mappable VTs, or substrate mapping for unmappable VTs. In this review, we discuss the pathophysiology of VT in post-infarction CMP patients, and the contemporary practice of catheter ablation. PMID:25089131

  9. Mating scars reveal mate size in immature female blue shark Prionace glauca.

    PubMed

    Calich, H J; Campana, S E

    2015-06-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the size and maturity status of the male blue sharks Prionace glauca attempting to mate with small, immature females in the north-west Atlantic Ocean. The relationship between male curved fork length (LFC ) and jaw gape was used in conjunction with the diameter of the mating scar to estimate the LFC and infer the maturity status of the male shark that produced the mating scar. The results indicate that mature males with a mean ± s.d. LFC of 218 cm ± 23 cm were attempting to mate with sexually immature females.

  10. Glial scar size, inhibitor concentration, and growth of regenerating axons after spinal cord transection☆

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Weiping; Sun, Yanping; Chen, Xuning; Feng, Shiliang

    2012-01-01

    A mathematical model has been formulated in accordance with cell chemotaxis and relevant experimental data. A three-dimensional lattice Boltzmann method was used for numerical simulation. The present study observed the effects of glial scar size and inhibitor concentration on regenerative axonal growth following spinal cord transection. The simulation test comprised two parts: (1) when release rates of growth inhibitor and promoter were constant, the effects of glial scar size on axonal growth rate were analyzed, and concentrations of inhibitor and promoters located at the moving growth cones were recorded. (2) When the glial scar size was constant, the effects of inhibitor and promoter release rates on axonal growth rate were analyzed, and inhibitor and promoter concentrations at the moving growth cones were recorded. Results demonstrated that (1) a larger glial scar and a higher release rate of inhibitor resulted in a reduced axonal growth rate. (2) The axonal growth rate depended on the ratio of inhibitor to promoter concentrations at the growth cones. When the average ratio was < 1.5, regenerating axons were able to grow and successfully contact target cells. PMID:25657689

  11. Facial Scar Revision: Understanding Facial Scar Treatment

    MedlinePlus

    ... scar tissue. The appearance of the scar can range from nearly invisible to very obvious and disfiguring. ... treated first with injection of medications to reduce size. If this is not satisfactory, the scars can ...

  12. [Ischemic heart disease: structural changes of the atria in preinfarction and postinfarction stages].

    PubMed

    Pangonyte, Dalia; Morkūnaite, Kristina; Stalioraityte, Elena; Zaikauskiene, Jolanta

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine atrial structural remodeling during the development of ischemic heart disease. Quantitative histomorphometric parameters of interstitial collagen network (the percentage volume, perimeter, number of fibers per field and collagen-cardiomyocyte volume ratio) of the atria of 132 autopsied men (mean age 49.7+/-8.9 years) who had died suddenly (within 6 hours since the onset of terminal heart attack symptoms) due to the first (no postinfarction scars) and repeated (postinfarction scars present) acute "pure" ischemic heart disease were investigated. The main remodeling feature of the wall of the both atria among ischemic heart disease subjects is hypertrophy of cardiomyocytes and hyperplasia of interstitial fibrillar collagen network with the maintenance of the same proportion of contractile myocardium and fibrillar collagen network volume. This proportion in the case of the left atrium persists in both pre- and postinfarction ischemic heart disease groups, while myocardium of the right atrium in preinfarction group subjects is characterized by an excess increase of collagen network as compared to cardiomyocyte hypertrophy, which levels again with that of the control in postinfarction group. At preinfarction stage of ischemic heart disease, remodeling of both atria develops and progresses in the left atrium at postinfarction stage in the relationship with increase of left ventricular dysfunction.

  13. Coupling of the Functional Stability of Rat Myocardium and Activity of Lipid Peroxidation in Combined Development of Postinfarction Remodeling and Diabetes Mellitus.

    PubMed

    Afanasiev, S A; Kondratieva, D S; Rebrova, T Yu; Batalov, R E; Popov, S V

    2016-01-01

    Coupling of the functional stability of rat myocardium and activity of lipid peroxidation processes in combined development of postinfarction remodeling and diabetes mellitus has been studied. The functional stability of myocardium was studied by means of the analysis of inotropic reaction on extrasystolic stimulus, the degree of left ventricular hypertrophy, and the size of scar zone. It was shown that in combined development of postinfarction cardiac remodeling of heart (PICR) with diabetes mellitus (DM) animal body weight decreased in less degree than in diabetic rats. Animals with combined pathology had no heart hypertrophy. The amplitude of extrasystolic contractions in rats with PICR combined with DM had no differences compared to the control group. In myocardium of rats with PICR combined with DM postextrasystolic potentiation was observed in contrast with the rats with PICR alone. The rats with combined pathology had the decreased value of TBA-active products. Thus, the results of study showed that induction of DM on the stage of the development of postinfarction remodeling increases adaptive ability of myocardium. It is manifested in inhibition of increase of LPO processes activity and maintaining of force-interval reactions of myocardium connected with calcium transport systems of sarcoplasmic reticulum of cardiomyocytes.

  14. Tachycardia in post-infarction hearts: insights from 3D image-based ventricular models.

    PubMed

    Arevalo, Hermenegild; Plank, Gernot; Helm, Patrick; Halperin, Henry; Trayanova, Natalia

    2013-01-01

    Ventricular tachycardia, a life-threatening regular and repetitive fast heart rhythm, frequently occurs in the setting of myocardial infarction. Recently, the peri-infarct zones surrounding the necrotic scar (termed gray zones) have been shown to correlate with ventricular tachycardia inducibility. However, it remains unknown how the latter is determined by gray zone distribution and size. The goal of this study is to examine how tachycardia circuits are maintained in the infarcted heart and to explore the relationship between the tachycardia organizing centers and the infarct gray zone size and degree of heterogeneity. To achieve the goals of the study, we employ a sophisticated high-resolution electrophysiological model of the infarcted canine ventricles reconstructed from imaging data, representing both scar and gray zone. The baseline canine ventricular model was also used to generate additional ventricular models with different gray zone sizes, as well as models in which the gray zone was represented as different heterogeneous combinations of viable tissue and necrotic scar. The results of the tachycardia induction simulations with a number of high-resolution canine ventricular models (22 altogether) demonstrated that the gray zone was the critical factor resulting in arrhythmia induction and maintenance. In all models with inducible arrhythmia, the scroll-wave filaments were contained entirely within the gray zone, regardless of its size or the level of heterogeneity of its composition. The gray zone was thus found to be the arrhythmogenic substrate that promoted wavebreak and reentry formation. We found that the scroll-wave filament locations were insensitive to the structural composition of the gray zone and were determined predominantly by the gray zone morphology and size. The findings of this study have important implications for the advancement of improved criteria for stratifying arrhythmia risk in post-infarction patients and for the development of

  15. Delayed, oral pharmacological inhibition of calpains attenuates adverse post-infarction remodelling.

    PubMed

    Poncelas, Marcos; Inserte, Javier; Aluja, David; Hernando, Victor; Vilardosa, Ursula; Garcia-Dorado, David

    2017-07-01

    Calpains activate during myocardial ischemia-reperfusion and contribute to reperfusion injury. Studies in transgenic animals with altered calpain/calpastatin system subjected to permanent ischemia suggest that calpains are also involved in post-infarction remodelling and heart failure. To determine whether delayed oral administration of the calpain inhibitor SNJ-1945 reduces adverse myocardial remodelling and dysfunction following transient coronary occlusion. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were subjected to 30 min of ischemia followed by 21 days of reperfusion and received the calpain inhibitor SNJ-1945 intraperitoneally at the onset of reperfusion (Acute group), orally starting after 24 h of reperfusion and for 14 days (Chronic group), or the combination of both treatments. Calpain-1 and calpain-2 protein content increased and correlated with higher calpain activity in control hearts. Administration of SNJ-1945 attenuated calpain activation, and reduced scar expansion, ventricular dilation and dysfunction in both acute and chronic groups. Acute treatment reduced infarct size in hearts reperfused for 24 h and inflammation measured after 3 days. Delayed, chronic oral administration of SNJ-1945 attenuated inflammation, cardiomyocyte hypertrophy and collagen infiltration in the non-infarcted myocardium at 21 days in correlation with increased levels of IĸB and reduced NF-ĸB activation. In cultured fibroblasts, SNJ-1945 attenuated TGF-β1-induced fibroblast activation. Our data demonstrate for the first time that long-term calpain inhibition is possible with delayed oral treatment, attenuates adverse post-infarction remodelling, likely through prevention of NF-ĸB activation, and may be a promising therapeutic intervention to prevent adverse remodelling and heart failure in patients with acute myocardial infarction.

  16. Durable Scar Size Reduction Due to Allogeneic Mesenchymal Stem Cell Therapy Regulates Whole‐Chamber Remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Adam R.; Suncion, Viky Y.; McCall, Frederic; Guerra, Danny; Mather, Jacques; Zambrano, Juan P.; Heldman, Alan W.; Hare, Joshua M.

    2013-01-01

    Background Intramyocardial injection of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) in chronic ischemic cardiomyopathy is associated with reverse remodeling in experimental models and humans. Here, we tested the hypothesis that allogeneic MSC therapy drives ventricular remodeling by producing durable and progressive scar size reduction in ischemic cardiomyopathy. Methods and Results Gottingen swine (n=12) underwent left anterior descending coronary artery myocardial infarction (MI), and 3 months post‐MI animals received either intramyocardial allogeneic MSC injection (200 mol/L cells; n=6) or left ventricle (LV) catheterization without injection (n=6). Swine were followed with serial cardiac magnetic resonance imaging for 9 months to assess structural and functional changes of the LV. Intramyocardial injection was performed using an integrated imaging platform combining electroanatomical mapping unipolar voltage and 3‐dimensional cardiac magnetic resonance imaging angiography–derived anatomy to accurately target infarct border zone injections. MSC‐treated animals had a 19.62±2.86% reduction in scar size at 3 months postinjection, which progressed to 28.09±2.31% from 3 to 6 months postinjection (P<0.0001). MSC‐treated animals had unchanged end‐diastolic volume (EDV; P=0.08) and end‐systolic volume (ESV; P=0.28) from preinjection to 6 months postinjection, whereas controls had progressive dilatation in both EDV (P=0.0002) and ESV (P=0.0002). In addition, MSC‐treated animals had improved LV sphericity index. Percentage change in infarct size correlated with percentage change in EDV (r=0.68; P=0.01) and ESV (r=0.77; P=0.001). Ejection fraction increased from 29.69±1.68% to 35.85±2.74% at 3 months post‐MSC injection and progressed to 39.02±2.42% 6 months postinjection (P=0.0001), whereas controls had a persistently depressed ejection fraction during follow‐up (P=0.33). Conclusion Intramyocardial injection of allogeneic MSCs leads to a sustained and

  17. Resin duct size and density as ecophysiological traits in fire scars of Pseudotsuga menziesii and Larix occidentalis

    Treesearch

    Estelle Arbellay; Markus Stoffel; Elaine K. Sutherland; Kevin T. Smith; Donald A. Falk

    2014-01-01

    Resin ducts (RDs) are features present in most conifer species as defence structures against pests and pathogens; however, little is known about RD expression in trees following fire injury. This study investigates changes in RD size and density in fire scars of Douglas fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii) and western larch (Larix occidentalis) as a means to evaluate the...

  18. Comparing a novel automatic 3D method for LGE-CMR quantification of scar size with established methods.

    PubMed

    Woie, Leik; Måløy, Frode; Eftestøl, Trygve; Engan, Kjersti; Edvardsen, Thor; Kvaløy, Jan Terje; Ørn, Stein

    2014-02-01

    Current methods for the estimation of infarct size by late-enhanced cardiac magnetic imaging are based upon 2D analysis that first determines the size of the infarction in each slice, and thereafter adds the infarct sizes from each slice to generate a volume. We present a novel, automatic 3D method that estimates infarct size by a simultaneous analysis of all pixels from all slices. In a population of 54 patients with ischemic scars, the infarct size estimated by the automatic 3D method was compared with four established 2D methods. The new 3D method defined scar as the sum of all pixels with signal intensity (SI) ≥35 % of max SI from the complete myocardium, border zone: SI 35-50 % of max SI and core as SI ≥50 % of max SI. The 3D method yielded smaller infarct size (-2.8 ± 2.3 %) and core size (-3.0 ± 1.7 %) than the 2D method most similar to ours. There was no difference in the size of the border zone (0.2 ± 1.4 %). The 3D method demonstrated stronger correlations between scar size and left ventricular (LV) remodelling parameters (LV ejection fraction: r = -0.71, p < 0.0005, LV end-diastolic index: r = 0.54, p < 0.0005, and LV end-systolic index: r = 0.59, p < 0.0005) compared with conventional 2D methods. Infarct size estimation by our novel 3D automatic method is without the need for manual demarcation of the scar; it is less time-consuming and has a stronger correlation with remodelling parameters compared with existing methods.

  19. Acne Scars

    MedlinePlus

    ... Surgery Conditions Acne Scars Aging Hands Age Spots Aging Skin Birthmarks Burn Scars Cellulite Crow's Feet Droopy Eyelids ... Surgery Conditions Acne Scars Aging Hands Age Spots Aging Skin Birthmarks Burn Scars Cellulite Crow's Feet Droopy Eyelids ...

  20. Carcinoma and atypical hyperplasia in radial scars and complex sclerosing lesions: importance of lesion size and patient age.

    PubMed

    Sloane, J P; Mayers, M M

    1993-09-01

    One hundred and twenty-six radial scars and complex sclerosing lesions from 91 women were examined to determine the incidence of and the clinical and pathological factors associated with the development of carcinoma and atypical hyperplasia within them. There was a clear relationship between the presence of carcinoma and atypical hyperplasia and the size of the lesion. This was not, however, a progressive relationship, there being a cut-off point about 6-7 mm, below which carcinoma was very uncommon and above which it was relatively frequent. A similar relationship was seen with patient age. Carcinoma was not seen in lesions removed from women under 40, was rare in the decade 41-50 and was relatively common above this age but with no further increase in the over 60s. A significantly higher incidence of carcinoma and atypical hyperplasia was encountered in scars detected by mammographic screening and could be explained by lesion size and the ages of the patients from which they were removed. No relationship was found between the presence of carcinoma within radial scars and complex sclerosing lesions and the existence of carcinoma in the residual breast tissue when direct extension was excluded. The carcinomas identified in the scars were of variable type and included small and large cell ductal carcinoma in situ, lobular carcinoma in situ and invasive carcinoma of tubular and ductal types. In situ carcinoma and atypical hyperplasia involved a very variable percentage of the epithelium of the lesions with mean values for ductal carcinoma in situ of 32%, lobular carcinoma in situ 25% and atypical hyperplasia 25%.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  1. Preparation and characterization of different sizes of ethosomes encapsulated with 5-fluorouracil and its experimental study of permeability in hypertrophic scar.

    PubMed

    Mao, Xiaohui; Wo, Yan; He, Rong; Qian, Yunliang; Zhang, Yixin; Cui, Daxiang

    2010-07-01

    With the aim of investigating scar penetration efficiency of different sizes of ethosomes encapsulated with Fluorouracil, three kinds of ethosomes with different sizes were prepared by extruding the vesicles through polycarbonate membrane filters, their encapsulation efficiency of Fluorouracil (5-FU) were investigated by dialysis method, their scar-penetration efficiencies were analyzed by filling Rodanmin 6GO into ethosomes and using confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM). The prepared ethosomes were 216 +/- 19 nm, 107 +/- 13 nm, and 65 +/- 10 nm in diameter respectively, and exhibited good dispersibility. Their encapsulation efficiency of 5-FU were 12%, 34%, and 41%, respectively. The results indicated that the 5-FU penetration was reversely related to the size of the size of the ethosomes. The ethosomes of 65 nm in diameter exhibited maximal fluorescence penetration efficiency which could reach the deep layer of dermis of hypertrophic scar. In conclusion, three different sizes of 5-FU ethosomes were prepared successfully, the ethosomes of 65 nm in diameter with 5-FU can penetrate scar high efficiently, which has potential in application such as anti-scar drug carriers in scar therapy in near future.

  2. Pax7 expressing cells contribute to dermal wound repair, regulating scar size through a β-catenin mediated process.

    PubMed

    Amini-Nik, Saeid; Glancy, Dylan; Boimer, Corey; Whetstone, Heather; Keller, Charles; Alman, Benjamin A

    2011-09-01

    During skin wound healing, fibroblast-like cells reconstitute the dermal compartment of the repaired skin filling the wound gap. A subset of these cells are transcriptionally active for β-catenin/T-cell factor (TCF) signaling during the proliferative phase of the repair process, and β-catenin levels control the size of the scar that ultimately forms by regulating the number of dermal fibroblasts. Here, we performed cell lineage studies to reveal a source of the dermal cells in which β-catenin signaling is activated during wound repair. Using a reporter mouse, we found that cells in the early wound in which TCF-dependent transcription is activated express genes involved in muscle development. Using mice in which cells express Pax7 (muscle progenitors) or Mck (differentiated myocytes) are permanently labeled, we showed that one quarter of dermal cells in the healing wound are Pax7 expressing progeny, but none are Mck progeny. Removing one allele of β-catenin in Pax7 expressing progeny resulted in a significantly smaller scar size with fewer Pax7 expressing progeny cell contributing to wound repair. During wound healing, β-catenin activation causes muscle satellite cells to adopt a fibrotic phenotype and this is a source of dermal cells in the repair process. Copyright © 2011 AlphaMed Press.

  3. Predilation technique with balloon angioplasty to facilitate percutaneous groin access of large size sheath through scar tissue.

    PubMed

    Pecoraro, Felice; Krishnaswamy, Mayur; Steuer, Johnny; Puippe, Gilbert; Mangialardi, Nicola; Pfammatter, Thomas; Rancic, Zoran; Veith, Frank J; Cayne, Neal S; Lachat, Mario

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Percutaneous remote access for endovascular aortic repair is an advantageous alternative to open access. Previous surgery in the femoral region and the presence of synthetic vascular grafts in the femoral/iliac arteries represent major limitations to percutaneous remote access. The aim of this study was to evaluate an original technique used for enabling percutaneous remote access for thoracic or abdominal endovascular aortic repair in patients with scar tissue and/or a vascular graft in the groin. Methods Twenty-five consecutive patients with a thoracic (11/25; 44%) or an aortic aneurysm (14/25; 66%) and with a synthetic vascular graft in the groin (16/25; 64%) or a redo groin access (9/25; 36%) were managed through the percutaneous remote access. In all patients, a percutaneous transluminal angioplasty balloon was used to predilate the scar tissue and the femoral artery or the synthetic vascular graft after preclosing (ProGlide®; Abbott Vascular, Santa Clara, CA, USA). In 10 patients, requiring a 20 Fr sheath, a 6 mm percutaneous transluminal angioplasty balloon was used; and in the remaining 15, requiring a 24 Fr sheath, an 8 mm percutaneous transluminal angioplasty balloon. Preclosing was exclusively performed using ProGlide®. Mean follow-up was 15 months. Results In all cases, stent-graft deployment was successful. There was one surgical conversion (4%; 1/25) due to bleeding from a femoral anastomosis. Two cases required additional percutaneous maneuvers (postclosing with another system in one patient and endoluminal shielding with stent-graft in the other patient). No pseudoaneurysm or access complication occurred during the follow-up. Conclusions Percutaneous access in redo groins with scar tissue and/or synthetic vascular graft using ultrasound-guided punction, preclosing with ProGlide® system and predilation with percutaneous transluminal angioplasty balloon to introduce large size sheath as used for endovascular aortic repair showed to be

  4. Scar revision

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Mohit; Wakure, Abhijeet

    2013-01-01

    Most surgical patients end up with a scar and most of these would want at least some improvement in the appearance of the scar. Using sound techniques for wound closure surgeons can, to a certain extent, prevent suboptimal scars. This article reviews the principles of prevention and treatment of suboptimal scars. Surgical techniques of scar revision, i.e., Z plasty, W plasty, and geometrical broken line closure are described. Post-operative care and other adjuvant therapies of scars are described. A short description of dermabrasion and lasers for management of scars is given. It is hoped that this review helps the surgeon to formulate a comprehensive plan for management of scars of these patients. PMID:24516292

  5. Resin duct size and density as ecophysiological traits in fire scars of Pseudotsuga menziesii and Larix occidentalis

    PubMed Central

    Arbellay, Estelle; Stoffel, Markus; Sutherland, Elaine K.; Smith, Kevin T.; Falk, Donald A.

    2014-01-01

    Background and Aims Resin ducts (RDs) are features present in most conifer species as defence structures against pests and pathogens; however, little is known about RD expression in trees following fire injury. This study investigates changes in RD size and density in fire scars of Douglas fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii) and western larch (Larix occidentalis) as a means to evaluate the ecophysiological significance of traumatic resinosis for tree defence and survival. Methods Transverse and tangential microsections were prepared for light microscopy and image analysis in order to analyse axial and radial RDs, respectively. Epithelial cells of RDs and fusiform rays associated with radial RDs were also examined. RDs were compared between normal xylem and wound xylem at four different section heights along the fire-injured stem. Key Results Following fire injury, P. menziesii axial RDs narrowed by 38–43 % in the first year after injury, and the magnitude of this change increased with stem height. Larix occidentalis axial RDs widened by 46–50 % in the second year after injury. Radial RDs were of equivalent size in P. menziesii, but widened by 162–214 % in L. occidentalis. Fusiform rays were larger following fire injury, by 4–14 % in P. menziesii and by 23–38 % in L. occidentalis. Furthermore, axial RD density increased in both species due to the formation of tangential rows of traumatic RDs, especially in the first and second years after injury. However, radial RD density did not change significantly. Conclusions These results highlight traumatic resinosis as a species-specific response. Pseudotsuga menziesii produce RDs of equivalent or reduced size, whereas L. occidentalis produce wider RDs in both the axial and radial duct system, thereby increasing resin biosynthesis and accumulation within the whole tree. Larix occidentalis thus appears to allocate more energy to defence than P. menziesii. PMID:25122653

  6. Scar revision

    MedlinePlus

    ... corrects skin changes (disfigurement) caused by an injury, wound, poor healing, or previous surgery. Description Scar tissue forms as ... stiffening of the joint, you may need physical therapy after surgery. Apply sunscreen to keep sunlight from permanently ... Keloid revision; Hypertrophic scar revision; ...

  7. Human Cardiac Mesenchymal Stromal Cells with CD105+CD34- Phenotype Enhance the Function of Post-Infarction Heart in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Wiśniewska, Ewa; Jarosz-Biej, Magdalena; Smolarczyk, Ryszard; Cichoń, Tomasz; Głowala-Kosińska, Magdalena; Śliwka, Joanna; Garbacz, Marcin; Szczypior, Mateusz; Jaźwiec, Tomasz; Langrzyk, Agnieszka; Zembala, Michał; Szala, Stanisław

    2016-01-01

    Aims The aim of the present study was to isolate mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC) with CD105+CD34- phenotype from human hearts, and to investigate their therapeutic potential in a mouse model of hindlimb ischemia and myocardial infarction (MI). The study aimed also to investigate the feasibility of xenogeneic MSCs implantation. Methods and Results MSC isolated from human hearts were multipotent cells. Separation of MSC with CD105+CD34- phenotype limited the heterogeneity of the originally isolated cell population. MSC secreted a number of anti-inflammatory and proangiogenic cytokines (mainly IL-6, IL-8, and GRO). Human MSC were transplanted into C57Bl/6NCrl mice. Using the mouse model of hindlimb ischemia it was shown that human MSC treated mice demonstrated a higher capillary density 14 days after injury. It was also presented that MSC administrated into the ischemic muscle facilitated fast wound healing (functional recovery by ischemic limb). MSC transplanted into an infarcted myocardium reduced the post-infarction scar, fibrosis, and increased the number of blood vessels both in the border area, and within the post-infarction scar. The improvement of left ventricular ejection fraction was also observed. Conclusion In two murine models (hindlimb ischemia and MI) we did not observe the xenotransplant rejection. Indeed, we have shown that human cardiac mesenchymal stromal cells with CD105+CD34- phenotype exhibit therapeutic potential. It seems that M2 macrophages are essential for healing and repair of the post-infarcted heart. PMID:27415778

  8. Induced pluripotent stem cell intervention rescues ventricular wall motion disparity, achieving biological cardiac resynchronization post-infarction

    PubMed Central

    Yamada, Satsuki; Nelson, Timothy J; Kane, Garvan C; Martinez-Fernandez, Almudena; Crespo-Diaz, Ruben J; Ikeda, Yasuhiro; Perez-Terzic, Carmen; Terzic, Andre

    2013-01-01

    Dyssynchronous myocardial motion aggravates cardiac pump function. Cardiac resynchronization using pacing devices is a standard-of-care in the management of heart failure. Post-infarction, however, scar tissue formation impedes the efficacy of device-based therapy. The present study tests a regenerative approach aimed at targeting the origin of abnormal motion to prevent dyssynchronous organ failure. Induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells harbour a reparative potential, and were here bioengineered from somatic fibroblasts reprogrammed with the stemness factors OCT3/4, SOX2, KLF4, and c-MYC. In a murine infarction model, within 30 min of coronary ligation, iPS cells were delivered to mapped infarcted areas. Focal deformation and dysfunction underlying progressive heart failure was resolved prospectively using speckle-tracking imaging. Tracked at high temporal and spatial resolution, regional iPS cell transplantation restored, within 10 days post-infarction, the contractility of targeted infarcted foci and nullified conduction delay in adjacent non-infarcted regions. Local iPS cell therapy, but not delivery of parental fibroblasts or vehicle, prevented or normalized abnormal strain patterns correcting the decrease in peak strain, disparity of time-to-peak strain, and pathological systolic stretch. Focal benefit of iPS cell intervention translated into improved left ventricular conduction and contractility, reduced scar, and reversal of structural remodelling, protecting from organ decompensation. Thus, in ischaemic cardiomyopathy, targeted iPS cell transplantation synchronized failing ventricles, offering a regenerative strategy to achieve biological resynchronization. PMID:23568891

  9. [Surgical treatment of postinfarction ventricular septal rupture].

    PubMed

    Uchida, T; Fukasawa, M; Kawahara, Y

    2011-05-01

    Postinfarction ventricular septal rupture (VSR) is a lethal complication with high mortality. The aim of this study was to evaluate our surgical strategy and results of VSR. Between 1996 and 2008, 13 consecutive patients underwent operation for VSR at our hospital. All patients required emergent operation because of severe cardiogenic shock. Surgical procedure consisted of endocardial patch repair with infarct exclusion, so called "Komeda-David operation". In patients with multiple coronary artery disease, myocardial revascularization was done simultaneously. These patients were divided into 2 groups according to the location of VSR. There were 9 patients of anterior VSR. Two of them could not be weaned from cardiopulmonary bypass and died of severe low output syndrome (LOS) at early postoperative period. The site of infarction in both patients was broad anteroseptal region including right ventricle. On the other hand, there were 4 patients of inferior VSP. Two of these patients were lost due to LOS. One patient was complicated with left ventricular free wall rupture. In another patient, infarction was extended proximally toward the mitral annulus and papillary muscles. Both cardiopulmonary bypass time and aortic crossclamp time were significantly longer in inferior VSR than in anterior region. There was no late death in 2 groups. Despite improvements of surgical procedures, such as infarct exclusion technique, the operative mortality remains high in cases with broad infarction and/or right ventricular infarction. In these particular circumstances, in should be mandatory to consider the optimal timing of operation and the modification of surgical technique itself.

  10. The number of circulating CD14+ cells is related to infarct size and postinfarct volumes in ST segment elevation myocardial infarction but not non-ST segment elevation myocardial infarction

    PubMed Central

    Montange, Damien; Davani, Siamak; Deschaseaux, Frédéric; Séronde, Marie France; Chopard, Romain; Schiele, François; Jehl, Jérome; Bassand, Jean Pierre; Kantelip, Jean-Pierre; Meneveau, Nicolas

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the relationship between the number of CD14+ cells, myocardial infarct (MI) size and left ventricular (LV) volumes in ST segment elevation MI (STEMI) and non-ST segment elevation MI (NSTEMI) patients. METHODS: A total of 62 patients with STEMI (n=34) or NSTEMI (n=28) were enrolled. The number of CD14+ cells was assessed at admission. Infarct size, left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) and LV volumes were measured using magnetic resonance imaging five days after MI and six months after MI. Results: In STEMI patients, the number of CD14+ cells was positively and significantly correlated with infarct size at day 5 (r=0.40; P=0.016) and after six months (r=0.34; P=0.047), negatively correlated with LVEF at day 5 (r=−0.50; P=0.002) and after six months (r=−0.46; P=0.005) and positively correlated with end-diastolic (r=0.38; P=0.02) and end-systolic (r=0.49; P=0.002) volumes after six months. In NSTEMI patients, no significant correlation was found between the number of CD14+ cells and infarct size, LVEF or LV volumes at day 5 or after six months. CONCLUSIONS: The number of CD14+ cells at admission was associated with infarct size and LV remodelling in STEMI patients with large infarct size, whereas in NSTEMI patients, no relationship was observed between numbers of CD14+ cells and LV remodelling. PMID:23620701

  11. Successful device closure of a post-infarction ventricular septal defect

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Si-Wan; Han, Ji Hye; Jin, Seon-Ah; Kim, Mijoo; Lee, Jae-Hwan; Jeong, Jin-Ok

    2016-01-01

    Ventricular septal defect (VSD) is a lethal complication of myocardial infarction. The event occurs 2–8 days after an infarction and patients should undergo emergency surgical treatment. We report on successful device closure of post-infarction VSD. A previously healthy 66-year-old male was admitted with aggravated dyspnea. Echocardiography showed moderate left ventricular (LV) systolic dysfunction with akinesia of the left anterior descending (LAD) territory and muscular VSD size approximately 2 cm. Coronary angiography showed mid-LAD total occlusion without collaterals. Without percutaneous coronary intervention due to time delay, VSD repair was performed. However, a murmur was heard again and pulmonary edema was not controlled 3 days after the operation. Echocardiography showed remnant VSD, and medical treatment failed. Percutaneous treatment using a septal occluder device was decided on. After the procedure, heart failure was controlled and the patient was discharged without complications. This is the first report on device closure of post-infarction VSD in Korea. PMID:27462148

  12. Facial Scar Revision: Understanding Facial Scar Treatment

    MedlinePlus

    ... Contact Us Trust your face to a facial plastic surgeon Facial Scar Revision Understanding Facial Scar Treatment When ... face like the eyes or lips. A facial plastic surgeon has many options for treating and improving facial ...

  13. Physiological Implications of Myocardial Scar Structure

    PubMed Central

    Richardson, WJ; Clarke, SA; Quinn, TA; Holmes, JW

    2016-01-01

    Once myocardium dies during a heart attack, it is replaced by scar tissue over the course of several weeks. The size, location, composition, structure and mechanical properties of the healing scar are all critical determinants of the fate of patients who survive the initial infarction. While the central importance of scar structure in determining pump function and remodeling has long been recognized, it has proven remarkably difficult to design therapies that improve heart function or limit remodeling by modifying scar structure. Many exciting new therapies are under development, but predicting their long-term effects requires a detailed understanding of how infarct scar forms, how its properties impact left ventricular function and remodeling, and how changes in scar structure and properties feed back to affect not only heart mechanics but also electrical conduction, reflex hemodynamic compensations, and the ongoing process of scar formation itself. In this article, we outline the scar formation process following an MI, discuss interpretation of standard measures of heart function in the setting of a healing infarct, then present implications of infarct scar geometry and structure for both mechanical and electrical function of the heart and summarize experiences to date with therapeutic interventions that aim to modify scar geometry and structure. One important conclusion that emerges from the studies reviewed here is that computational modeling is an essential tool for integrating the wealth of information required to understand this complex system and predict the impact of novel therapies on scar healing, heart function, and remodeling following myocardial infarction. PMID:26426470

  14. Long-term outcome after transcatheter closure of postinfarction ventricular septal rupture.

    PubMed

    Heiberg, Johan; Hjortdal, Vibeke Elisabeth; Nielsen-Kudsk, Jens Erik

    2014-10-01

    We report the long-term all-cause mortality and procedure-related complication rate following transcatheter closure of postinfarction ventricular septal rupture (VSR) in a single tertiary center. VSR is an exceedingly serious and deathly complication to myocardial infarction. Surgical closure has previously been the treatment of choice, but in the last decade a transcatheter approach has gained ground. However, reports on long-term survival are still sparse and experience is often restricted to large tertiary centers with high flow of patients. From January 2000 to April 2013, 9 patients underwent transcatheter closure of a VSR at Aarhus University Hospital. Primary device closure was chosen mainly because of significant risk factors against surgery. Our major endpoints were 30-day, 1-year, and 5-year mortality and years of survival until time of evaluation. Our cohort had a mean age of 75.1 ± 8.4 years, and the median time from VSR to closure was 16 days (2-346). The 30-day, 1-year, and 5-year mortality rates were 11.1%, 33.3%, and 62.5%, respectively. Mean time of postprocedural survival was 4.6 ± 4.4 years at the time of review. Three patients were still alive at the time of review, 1 with a shock-index <1 at the time of VSR closure. As a single medium-sized tertiary center, we report lower short- and long-term mortality rates compared with most published data on outcome after surgical closure. Our results are comparable to the few previously published reports on transcatheter closure of postinfarction VSRs. © 2014, Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Role of phospholipase A2 in activation of isolated cardiomyocyte respiration in postinfarction cardiosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Egorova, M V; Afanas'ev, S A; Popov, S V

    2008-12-01

    The rate of oxygen consumption by isolated cardiomyocytes was studied in rats with experimental postinfarction cardiosclerosis. The increase in oxygen consumption under these condition was comparable to that in melittin- and arachidonic acid-induced activation of phospholipase A2 in cardiomyocytes of intact animals. Bromophenacyl bromide inhibition of phospholipase A2 in cardiomyocytes of rats with postinfarction cardiosclerosis led to reduction of oxygen consumption rate to values characteristic of intact animal cardiomyocytes. The results confirm the hypothesis according to which high oxygen consumption in postinfarction cardiosclerosis is related to increased activity of phospholipase A2.

  16. Acne scar subcision.

    PubMed

    Chandrashekar, Bs; Nandini, As

    2010-05-01

    Subcision is a simple and safe office surgery procedure for treatment of depressed acne scars. It can easily be combined with other treatments such as laser, dermaroller and scar revisions for maximum efficacy.

  17. Acne Scar Subcision

    PubMed Central

    Chandrashekar, BS; Nandini, AS

    2010-01-01

    Subcision is a simple and safe office surgery procedure for treatment of depressed acne scars. It can easily be combined with other treatments such as laser, dermaroller and scar revisions for maximum efficacy. PMID:21031076

  18. Scar contractures, hypertrophic scars, and keloids.

    PubMed

    Brissett, A E; Sherris, D A

    2001-11-01

    A scar contracture is the result of a contractile wound-healing process occurring in a scar that has already been reepithelialized and adequately healed. Keloids and hypertrophic scars (HTSs) are fibrous tissue outgrowths that result from a derailment in the normal wound-healing process. The exact incidence of keloids and HTSs remains unknown. Beyond the common belief that trauma is the initiating event of keloid and hypertrophic scar formation, the remainder of the process remains uncertain. A combination of biochemical factors, skin tension, endocrinologic factors, and genetic factors are the likely culprits. Treatment begins by educating the patient about the etiology of the scarring process. All treatment protocols are individualized, but the standard approach to keloids and HTSs begins with corticosteroid injection followed by surgical excision, pressure dressings, and long-term follow-up.

  19. California Burn Scars

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2014-05-15

    article title:  Burn Scars Across Southern California     ... California between October 21 and November 18, 2003. Burn scars and vegetation changes wrought by the fires are illustrated in these ... and Nov 18, 2003 Images:  California Burn Scars location:  United States region:  ...

  20. Postoperative recurrence of postinfarction true and false ventricular aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Arnáiz-García, María Elena; González-Santos, José María; Iscar-Galán, Alberto; Fernández García-Hierro, José María; Dalmau-Sorlí, María José; López-Rodríguez, Javier

    2016-05-01

    Progressive dyspnea after myocardial infarction can suggests the presence of left ventricular (LV) dysfunction or a left ventricular aneurysm (LVA). Surgical treatment of LVA aims to reduce its volume and to restore the ventricle. Recurrence of LVA after previous repair is extremely rare and the occurrence of concomitant postoperative true and false aneurysms is extraordinary. Surgery is usually challenging because of LV dysfunction and cardiac adherences in reoperations. We describe the simultaneous occurrence in a patient of a recurrent true and false LVA after surgical repair of a postinfarction LVA. Five years postoperatively, the patient remains alive and healthy. Copyright © 2016 Sociedade Portuguesa de Cardiologia. Published by Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  1. Laser radiation of blood in treating patients with postinfarction heart

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tashchuk, V.; Polyanskaya, O.; Chaplinsky, R.; Ilashchuk, I.; Kulyk, T.

    1999-11-01

    168 patients on the postclinical stage of treatment of acute myocardial infarction were examined by means of the use of basic antiischemic therapy and intravenous laser radiation of blood (LRB). All patients were studied with the help of transesophageal electrocardiostimulation, bicycle ergometry, echocardiography and Holter ECG monitoring in the dynamics of prolonged observation and treatment. The analysis of efficiency of the LRB has shown that the most minimal degree of myocardial ischemization was marked in patients after intravenous LRB. The patients before LRB had the greater reduction of coronary reserve. The use of LRB has given the possibility to the optimization of therapy in patients on the stage of the forming of `the postinfarction heart'.

  2. Post-burn scars and scar contractures

    PubMed Central

    Goel, Arun; Shrivastava, Prabhat

    2010-01-01

    The mortality and morbidity from burns have diminished tremendously over the last six to seven decades. However, these do not truly reflect whether the victim could go back to society as a useful person or not and lead a normal life because of the inevitable post-burn scars, contractures and other deformities which collectively have aesthetic and functional considerations. This article gives an overview of the post-burn scars and scar contractures, especially their prevention, minimisation and principles of management. PMID:21321660

  3. Physiological Implications of Myocardial Scar Structure.

    PubMed

    Richardson, William J; Clarke, Samantha A; Quinn, T Alexander; Holmes, Jeffrey W

    2015-09-20

    Once myocardium dies during a heart attack, it is replaced by scar tissue over the course of several weeks. The size, location, composition, structure, and mechanical properties of the healing scar are all critical determinants of the fate of patients who survive the initial infarction. While the central importance of scar structure in determining pump function and remodeling has long been recognized, it has proven remarkably difficult to design therapies that improve heart function or limit remodeling by modifying scar structure. Many exciting new therapies are under development, but predicting their long-term effects requires a detailed understanding of how infarct scar forms, how its properties impact left ventricular function and remodeling, and how changes in scar structure and properties feed back to affect not only heart mechanics but also electrical conduction, reflex hemodynamic compensations, and the ongoing process of scar formation itself. In this article, we outline the scar formation process following a myocardial infarction, discuss interpretation of standard measures of heart function in the setting of a healing infarct, then present implications of infarct scar geometry and structure for both mechanical and electrical function of the heart and summarize experiences to date with therapeutic interventions that aim to modify scar geometry and structure. One important conclusion that emerges from the studies reviewed here is that computational modeling is an essential tool for integrating the wealth of information required to understand this complex system and predict the impact of novel therapies on scar healing, heart function, and remodeling following myocardial infarction. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  4. [Mastopexy with minimal scar].

    PubMed

    Tepavicharova-Romanska, P; Romanski, R K

    2004-01-01

    The image of the breast as a symbol of femininity plays an essential role in the way a woman looks at herself and contributes to her personal and social development. Fashion nowadays uncovers rather than covers a woman's body, and long scars resulting from mammaplasty are less accepted now than they were in the past, more so because the scar quality is unforeseeable. The main concern of mastopexy is to limit the scars, creating a nice breast shape. Ideally scarring is confined to the periareolar circle.

  5. Surgical Treatment of Post-Infarction Left Ventricular Pseudoaneurysm

    PubMed Central

    Eren, Ercan; Bozbuga, Nilgun; Toker, Mehmet Erdem; Keles, Cuneyt; Rabus, Murat Bulent; Yildirim, Ozgur; Guler, Mustafa; Balkanay, Mehmet; Isik, Omer; Yakut, Cevat

    2007-01-01

    Herein, we present a retrospective analysis of our experience with acquired pseudoaneurysms of the left ventricle over a 20-year period. From February 1985 through September 2004, 14 patients underwent operation for left ventricular pseudoaneurysm in our clinic. All pseudoaneurysms (12 chronic, 2 acute) were caused by myocardial infarction. The mean interval between myocardial infarction and diagnosis of pseudoaneurysm was 7 months (range, 1–11 mo). The pseudoaneurysm was located in the inferior or posterolateral wall in 11 of 14 patients (78.6%). In all patients, the pseudoaneurysm was resected and the ventricular wall defect was closed with direct suture (6 patients) or a patch (8 patients). Most patients had 3-vessel coronary artery disease. Coronary artery bypass grafting was performed in all patients. Five patients died (postoperative mortality rate, 35.7%) after repair of a pseudoaneurysm (post-infarction, 2 patients; chronic, 3 patients). Two patients died during follow-up (median, 42 mo), due to cancer in 1 patient and sudden death in the other. Although repair of left ventricular pseudoaneurysm is still a surgical challenge, it can be performed with acceptable results in most patients. Surgical repair is warranted particularly in cases of large or expanding pseudoaneurysms because of the propensity for fatal rupture. PMID:17420793

  6. [Physical therapy for scars].

    PubMed

    Masanovic, Marguerite Guillot

    2013-01-01

    Physical therapy consists notably of hand or mechanical massages, pressure therapy using various fabrics or splints, cryotherapy, laser therapy, etc. It forms part of the range of therapies used to treat pathological scars, including medical and surgical treatment. While the results are often satisfactory for hypertrophic scars, they remain uncertain for major keloids.

  7. Improving posttraumatic facial scars.

    PubMed

    Ardeshirpour, Farhad; Shaye, David A; Hilger, Peter A

    2013-10-01

    Posttraumatic soft-tissue injuries of the face are often the most lasting sequelae of facial trauma. The disfigurement of posttraumatic scarring lies in both their physical deformity and psychosocial ramifications. This review outlines a variety of techniques to improve facial scars and limit their lasting effects. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Laser scar revision.

    PubMed

    Lupton, Jason R; Alster, Tina S

    2002-01-01

    A variety of lasers can be used to treat scars and striae effectively. It is of paramount importance that the type of scar be properly classified on initial examination so that the most appropriate method of treatment can be chosen. Classification also allows the laser surgeon to discuss with the patient the anticipated response to treatment. The 585-nm pulsed dye laser (PDL) is the most appropriate system for treating hypertrophic scars, keloids, erythematous scars, and striae. The PDL carries a low risk of side effects and complications when operated at appropriate treatment parameters and time intervals. Atrophic scars are best treated with ablative CO2 and Er:YAG lasers; however, proliferative keloids and hypertrophic scars should not be vaporized because of the high risk of scar recurrence or progression. The appropriate choice and use of lasers can significantly improve most scars. As research in laser-skin interaction continues, further refinements in laser technology coupled with the addition of alternate treatment procedures will allow improved clinical efficacy and predictability.

  9. Laser Scar Management Technique

    PubMed Central

    Ohshiro, Toshio; Sasaki, Katsumi

    2013-01-01

    Background and Aims: Scars are common and cause functional problems and psychological morbidity. Recent advances in optical technologies have produced various laser systems capable of revising the appearance of scars from various etiologies to optimize their appearance. Methods: Laser treatment can commence as early as the time of the initial injury and as late as several years after the injury. Several optical technologies are currently available and combined laser/light treatments are required for treatment of scars. Since 2006, we have set up a scar management department in our clinic and more than 2000 patients have been treated by our combined laser irradiation techniques. Herein, we review several available light technologies for treatment of surgical, traumatic, and inflammatory scars, and discuss our combined laser treatment of scars, based upon our clinical experience. Results and Conclusions: Because scars have a variety of potential aetiologies and take a number of forms, no single approach can consistenty provide good scar treatment and management. The combination of laser and devices is essential, the choice of wavelength and approach being dictated by each patient as an individual. PMID:24511202

  10. Mechanobiology of scarring.

    PubMed

    Ogawa, Rei

    2011-09-01

    The mechanophysiological conditions of injured skin greatly influence the degree of scar formation, scar contracture, and abnormal scar progression/generation (e.g., keloids and hypertrophic scars). It is important that scar mechanobiology be understood from the perspective of the extracellular matrix and extracellular fluid, in order to analyze mechanotransduction pathways and develop new strategies for scar prevention and treatment. Mechanical forces such as stretching tension, shear force, scratch, compression, hydrostatic pressure, and osmotic pressure can be perceived by two types of skin receptors. These include cellular mechanoreceptors/mechanosensors, such as cytoskeleton (e.g., actin filaments), cell adhesion molecules (e.g., integrin), and mechanosensitive (MS) ion channels (e.g., Ca(2+) channel), and sensory nerve fibers (e.g., MS nociceptors) that produce the somatic sensation of mechanical force. Mechanical stimuli are received by MS nociceptors and signals are transmitted to the dorsal root ganglia that contain neuronal cell bodies in the afferent spinal nerves. Neuropeptides are thereby released from the peripheral terminals of the primary afferent sensory neurons in the skin, modulating scarring via skin and immune cell functions (e.g., cell proliferation, cytokine production, antigen presentation, sensory neurotransmission, mast cell degradation, vasodilation, and increased vascular permeability under physiological or pathophysiological conditions). Mechanoreceptor or MS nociceptor inhibition and mechanical force reduction should propel the development of novel methods for scar prevention and treatment. © 2011 by the Wound Healing Society.

  11. Atrophic Acne Scarring

    PubMed Central

    Graber, Emmy M.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Scarring is an unfortunate and frequent complication of acne, resulting in significant psychological distress for patients. Fortunately, numerous treatment options exist for acne scarring. Objectives: To extensively review the literature on treatment options for atrophic acne scarring. Materials and methods: A comprehensive literature search was conducted on the following topics: dermabrasion, subcision, punch techniques, chemical peels, tissue augmentation, and lasers. Results: The literature supports the use of various treatment modalities; superior results may be achieved when multiple modalities are combined for a multi-step approach to scarring. Conclusion: The safety and efficacy of various treatment devices for acne scarring is well established, but there is a paucity of split-face trials comparing modalities. PMID:25610524

  12. Forensic analysis of rockfall scars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Vilder, Saskia J.; Rosser, Nick J.; Brain, Matthew J.

    2017-10-01

    We characterise and analyse the detachment (scar) surfaces of rockfalls to understand the mechanisms that underpin their failure. Rockfall scars are variously weathered and comprised of both discontinuity release surfaces and surfaces indicative of fracturing through zones of previously intact rock, known as rock bridges. The presence of rock bridges and pre-existing discontinuities is challenging to quantify due to the difficulty in determining discontinuity persistence below the surface of a rock slope. Rock bridges form an important control in holding blocks onto rockslopes, with their frequency, extent and location commonly modelled from the surface exposure of daylighting discontinuities. We explore an alternative approach to assessing their role, by characterising failure scars. We analyse a database of multiple rockfall scar surfaces detailing the areal extent, shape, and location of broken rock bridges and weathered surfaces. Terrestrial laser scanning and gigapixel imagery were combined to record the detailed texture and surface morphology. From this, scar surfaces were mapped via automated classification based on RGB pixel values. Our analysis of the resulting data from scars on the North Yorkshire coast (UK) indicates a wide variation in both weathering and rock bridge properties, controlled by lithology and associated rock mass structure. Importantly, the proportion of rock bridges in a rockfall failure surface does not increase with failure size. Rather larger failures display fracturing through multiple rock bridges, and in contrast smaller failures fracture occurs only through a single critical rock bridge. This holds implications for how failure mechanisms change with rockfall size and shape. Additionally, the location of rock bridges with respect to the geometry of an incipient rockfall is shown to determine failure mode. Weathering can occur both along discontinuity surfaces and previously broken rock bridges, indicating the sequential stages of

  13. Scar formation and ligament healing.

    PubMed

    Hildebrand, K A; Frank, C B

    1998-12-01

    Ligaments are highly organized, dense, fibrous connective-tissue structures that provide stability to joints and participate in joint proprioception. Injuries to ligaments induce a healing response that is characterized by the formation of a scar. The scar tissue is weaker, larger and creeps more than normal ligament and is associated with an increased amount of minor collagens (types III, V and VI), decreased collagen cross-links and an increased amount of glycosaminoglycans. Studies have shown that certain surgical variables alter the healing of ligaments. Such factors include the size of gap between the healing ligament, ends, the use of motion in a stable joint and the presence of multiple ligamentous injuries. Research on ligament healing includes studies on low-load and failure-load properties, alterations in the expression of matrix molecules, cytokine modulation of healing and gene therapy as a method to alter matrix protein and cytokine production.

  14. Laser scar revision: A review.

    PubMed

    Khatri, Khalil A; Mahoney, Danielle L; McCartney, Melissa J

    2011-04-01

    Surgery, burns, wounds, and inflammatory processes can lead to the development of a variety of different scars. Scars are categorized as hypertrophic, keloid, atrophic and acne scars. Different treatments are utilized for each scar type. The evolution of scar treatment has led to the advancement of lasers for the improvement of all scar types. Non-ablative lasers such as the pulsed dye laser have been shown to be effective in the treatment of hypertrophic and erythematous scars. Ablative lasers, the carbon dioxide (CO(2)) and erbium:YAG (Er:YAG), were some of the first lasers that were proven to be effective in the treatment of atrophic acne scars. Further developments in laser technology have led to non-ablative and ablative fractional devices that improve scar appearance and are better tolerated than ablative CO(2) and Er:YAG. This article will review scars and the laser options for scar revision.

  15. [Unusual breast scars].

    PubMed

    Petit, F; Divaris, M; Guilbert, F

    1999-12-01

    The authors report the case of an unusual form of skin tattoo, discovered on the breasts of a young woman, corresponding to several scars forming a symbolic image, performed deliberately with a burning object. This form of mutilation is called "branding". Imported from England, it is developing in France as a result of fashion, but its followers could one day regret the permanent scars left by this deep burn.

  16. Burn scar carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chun-Yuan; Feng, Chung-Ho; Hsiao, Yen-Chang; Chuang, Shiow Shuh; Yang, Jui-Yung

    2010-11-01

    Since Jean-Nicolas Marjolin reported carcinoma arising in post-traumatic scars in 1828, the term 'Marjolin ulcer' has been applied to malignant changes in burn scars. Although many papers have been published already in this field, there are few reports from Oriental people. From 1989 to 2008, there were 11 cases noted as burn scar carcinoma in Chang Gung Memorial Hospital. Ten were reported as squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) and the one was verrucous carcinoma. Most of the cases occurred in the extremities (10/11). Ten cases underwent an operation initially with wide excision and skin graft or local flap for coverage. Forefoot amputation was performed in one patient. One patient received above-knee amputation and adjuvant therapy because recurrent verrucous carcinoma occurred 2 years later. One patient suffered from a new lesion 8 years later and another case had inguinal lymph node metastasis 8 months later. Five patients were lost to follow-up and six cases were tumor-free during the follow-up period. Most scar malignancies are SCC while other cell types are rarer. The casual association between burn injuries and a later risk of basal cell carcinoma is questionable. Owing to poor prognosis in advanced scar cancer, the best treatment for scar carcinoma is to prevent the scar from developing repeated ulceration by performing aggressive initial burn wound care: early grafting by surgeons and daily scar care with regular follow-up for patients. This may be why a lower incidence has been noted in recent years.

  17. Flattening of atrophic acne scars by using tretinoin by iontophoresis.

    PubMed

    Knor, Tanja

    2004-01-01

    Atrophic scars are a frequent consequence of acne, with a negative esthetic and psychological influence. Treatment of atrophic acne scars includes different invasive methods. In our study, we used a noninvasive method with local application of 0.05% tretinoin gel by iontophoresis. In patients with a tendency towards exacerbation, we performed mild peeling with 5% trichloroacetic acid (TCA) solution 3-4 times during the treatment. Twenty-minute treatments were applied on 38 patients, 29 women and 9 men, during 3.5 months on average. Median age of patients was 21 years (range, 16-29). Clinical assessment included an assessment of scars, pore size, skin moisture, vascularization, and skin firmness and elasticity. As confirmed by photographs taken before and after therapy, the treatment proved to be clinically effective in decreasing acne scars and persistence of effects. Flattening of acne scars was observed in 79% of the patients. The results depended on duration of scars persistence as well as on a the type of scars. The best results were achieved with younger scars as well as with superficial and ice pick scars. Side effects involved a very mild retinoid dermatitis and more often acne exacerbation. The therapy was clinically effective and the patients accepted the treatment very easily. Local therapy of acne scars with tretinoin by iontophoresis can in some cases successfully replace invasive techniques, and could also be combined with those techniques.

  18. New Patient-Oriented Tools for Assessing Atrophic Acne Scarring.

    PubMed

    Layton, Alison; Dréno, Brigitte; Finlay, Andrew Y; Thiboutot, Diane; Kang, Sewon; Lozada, Vicente Torres; Bourdès, Valerie; Bettoli, Vincenzo; Petit, Laurent; Tan, Jerry

    2016-06-01

    Scarring on visible areas such as the face is associated with negative psychological impact. Many patients with acne have clinically relevant scarring for which they seek treatment, implying that there is an impact on their lives. Currently there are no validated tools to assess the burden of atrophic acne scarring from the patient's perspective or to assess treatment benefit. Two patient-reported outcome measures, the self-assessment of clinical acne-related scars (SCARS) and the facial acne scar quality of life (FASQoL) tools, both specific to facial atrophic acne scarring, were developed according to Food and Drug Administration guidance methodology. Patient interviews were conducted first to elicit patient-important concepts about scarring, then to validate patients' understanding of wording in the tools. These tools focus on symptoms (SCARS) and psychological and social well-being (FASQoL) and were designed to be suitable for self-completion and to be rapidly completed (2-5 min) within a clinical research setting. Concept elicitation interviews were conducted with 30 subjects and cognitive interviews with 20 subjects. With acne scarring, important concepts for patients included size, surface area affected, counts, and depth. The SCARS and FASQoL tools were shown to address relevant concepts that were easily understood by patients. Two patient-reported measures, SCARS and FASQoL, have been developed to help clinicians assess the severity and impact of acne scars. Responsivity of these instruments to treatment will require further evaluation. Galderma R&D, Sophia Antipolis, France.

  19. The number of unrecognized myocardial infarction scars detected at DE-MRI increases during a 5-year follow-up.

    PubMed

    Themudo, Raquel; Johansson, Lars; Ebeling-Barbier, Charlotte; Lind, Lars; Ahlström, Håkan; Bjerner, Tomas

    2017-02-01

    In an elderly population, the prevalence of unrecognized myocardial infarction (UMI) scars found via late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) imaging was more frequent than expected. This study investigated whether UMI scars detected with LGE-CMR at age 70 would be detectable at age 75 and whether the scar size changed over time. From 248 participants that underwent LGE-CMR at age 70, 185 subjects underwent a follow-up scan at age 75. A myocardial infarction (MI) scar was defined as late enhancement involving the subendocardium. In the 185 subjects that underwent follow-up, 42 subjects had a UMI scar at age 70 and 61 subjects had a UMI scar at age 75. Thirty-seven (88 %) of the 42 UMI scars seen at age 70 were seen in the same myocardial segment at age 75. The size of UMI scars did not differ between age 70 and 75. The prevalence of UMI scars detected at LGE-CMR increases with age. During a 5-year follow-up, 88 % (37/42) of the UMI scars were visible in the same myocardial segment, reassuring that UMI scars are a consistent finding. The size of UMI scars detected during LGE-CMR did not change over time. • UMI scars detected by LGE-CMR are frequent in elderly. • The prevalence of UMI scars detected with LGE-CMR increases with age. • UMI scar size does not change over time.

  20. Pseudopod growth and evolution during cell movement is controlled through SCAR/WAVE dephosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Ura, Seiji; Pollitt, Alice Y.; Veltman, Douwe M.; Morrice, Nicholas A.; Machesky, Laura M.; Insall, Robert H.

    2016-01-01

    Background SCAR/WAVE is a principal regulator of pseudopod growth in crawling cells. It exists in a stable pentameric complex, which is regulated at multiple levels that are only beginning to be understood. SCAR/WAVE is phosphorylated at multiple sites, but how this affects its biological activity is unclear. Here we show that dephosphorylation of Dictyostelium SCAR controls normal pseudopod dynamics. Results We demonstrate that the C-terminal acidic domain of most Dictyostelium SCAR is basally phosphorylated at four serine residues. A small amount of singly phosphorylated SCAR is also found. SCAR phosphorylation site mutants cannot replace SCAR’s role in the pseudopod cycle, though they rescue cell size and growth. Unphosphorylatable SCAR is hyperactive – excessive recruitment to the front gives large pseudopods that fail to bifurcate because they continually grow forwards. Conversely, phosphomimetic SCAR is weakly active, causing frequent small, disorganised pseudopods. Even in its regulatory complex, SCAR is normally held inactive by an interaction between the phosphorylated acidic and basic domains. Loss of basic residues complementary to the acidic phosphosites yields a hyperactive protein similar to unphosphorylatable SCAR. Conclusions Regulated dephosphorylation of a fraction of the cellular SCAR pool is a key step in SCAR activation during pseudopod growth. Phosphorylation increases autoinhibition of the intact complex. Dephosphorylation weakens this interaction and facilitates SCAR activation, but also destabilizes the protein. We show that SCAR is specifically dephosphorylated in pseudopods, increasing activation by Rac and lipids and supporting positive feedback of pseudopod growth. PMID:22386315

  1. Can Acne Scars Be Removed?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Surgery? A Week of Healthy Breakfasts Shyness Can Acne Scars Be Removed? KidsHealth > For Teens > Can Acne ... eliminar las cicatrices del acné? Different Types of Acne Scars from acne can seem like double punishment — ...

  2. Surgical Scar Revision: An Overview

    PubMed Central

    Garg, Shilpa; Dahiya, Naveen; Gupta, Somesh

    2014-01-01

    Scar formation is an inevitable consequence of wound healing from either a traumatic or a surgical intervention. The aesthetic appearance of a scar is the most important criteria to judge the surgical outcome. An understanding of the anatomy and wound healing along with experience, meticulous planning and technique can reduce complications and improve the surgical outcome. Scar revision does not erase a scar but helps to make it less noticeable and more acceptable. Both surgical and non-surgical techniques, used either alone or in combination can be used for revising a scar. In planning a scar revision surgeon should decide on when to act and the type of technique to use for scar revision to get an aesthetically pleasing outcome. This review article provides overview of methods applied for facial scar revision. This predominantly covers surgical methods. PMID:24761092

  3. Scar revision - slideshow

    MedlinePlus

    ... anatomy URL of this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/presentations/100098.htm Scar revision - series—Normal anatomy To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Go to slide 1 out of 4 Go to slide 2 ...

  4. [Scars, physiology, classification and assessment].

    PubMed

    Roques, Claude

    2013-01-01

    A skin scar is the sign of tissue repair following damage to the skin. Once formed, it follows a process of maturation which, after several months, results in a mature scar. This can be pathological with functional and/or aesthetic consequences. It is important to assess the scar as it matures in order to adapt the treatment to its evolution.

  5. [Immediate and remote results of endovascular treatment of patients with postinfarction cardiosclerosis].

    PubMed

    Patrikeev, A V; Rudman, V Ia; Maksimkin, D A; Baranovich, V Iu; Faĭbushevich, A G; Veretnik, G I; Mambetov, A V; Shugushev, Z Kh

    2015-01-01

    Two approaches in treatment of 131 patients with postinfarction cardiosclerosis are compared in the work. Tactics of "total" myocardial revascularization means restoration of coronary blood flow in all arteries with hemodynamically significant lesion while "selective" revascularization provides restoration of coronary blood flow only in those arteries which have a viable myocardium in their pool. It was concluded that restoration of coronary blood flow in patients after myocardial infarction permits to prevent postinfarction heart remodeling, development of heart failure thereby affecting on the prognosis. Evaluation of myocardial viability in the area of suggested surgery increases efficiency of revascularization, reduces number of implantable stents and decreases frequency of unfounded coronary interventions. Elimination of ischemia in the area of hibernation provides a rapid restoration of myocardial contractility in most of left ventricle segments with initially impaired kinetics. It was revealed that terms of contractility restoration of hibernating myocardium depend on duration of hibernation period up to revascularization.

  6. Left ventricular infarct size, peri-infarct zone, and papillary scar measurements: A comparison of high-resolution 3D and conventional 2D late gadolinium enhancement cardiac MR.

    PubMed

    Peters, Dana C; Appelbaum, Evan A; Nezafat, Reza; Dokhan, Basem; Han, Yuchi; Kissinger, Kraig V; Goddu, Beth; Manning, Warren J

    2009-10-01

    To compare higher spatial resolution 3D late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) cardiovascular magnetic resonance (Cardiac MR) with 2D LGE in patients with prior myocardial infarction. Fourteen patients were studied using high spatial resolution 3D LGE (1.3 x 1.3 x 5.0 mm(3)) and conventional 2D LGE (2 x 2 x 8 mm(3)) scans. The signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) were measured. Total infarct volume, peri-infarct volume measured in a limited slab, and papillary muscle scar volume were compared using Bland-Altman analysis. Image quality was graded. 3D LGE had higher scar SNR (P < 0.001), higher myocardial SNR (P = 0.001), higher papillary scar-blood CNR (P = 0.01), and greater sharpness (P = 0.01). The scar volumes agreed (14.5 +/- 8.2 for 2D, vs. 13.2 +/- 8.8 for 3D), with bias +/- 2 standard deviations (SDs) of 0.5 +/- 6.8 mL, P = 0.59 R = 0.91. The peri-infarct volumes correlated but less strongly than scar (P = 0.40, R = 0.77). For patients with more heterogeneous scar, larger peri-infarct volumes were measured by 3D (1.9 +/- 1.1 mL for 2D vs. 2.4 +/- 1.6 mL for 3D, P = 0.15, in the matched region). Papillary scar, present in 6/14 (42%) patients, was more confidently identified on 3D LGE. Higher spatial resolution 3D LGE provides sharper images and higher SNR, but less myocardial nulling. Scar volumes agree well, with peri-infarct volumes correlating less well. 3D LGE may be superior in visualization of papillary muscle scar. (c) 2009 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  7. Post-infarction ventricular septal defect: surgical outcomes in the last decade.

    PubMed

    Yam, Nicholson; Au, Timmy Wing-Kuk; Cheng, Lik-Cheung

    2013-10-01

    Post-infarction ventricular septal defects require surgical closure. Only a few studies have been conducted in Asian populations. This study reports the current outcomes and determinants affecting survival. Between January 1995 and January 2012, 40 patients underwent surgery for post-infarction ventricular septal defect. We analyzed demographics, clinical, angiographic, and echocardiographic parameters, operative data, postoperative morbidity, and survival. Mean follow-up was 5.2 ± 5.3 years. Univariate and multivariate analyses were used to determine the factors affecting 30-day mortality and long-term survival. There was no intraoperative death. Our 30-day mortality was 20%. Single-vessel disease was found on coronary angiography in 63% of patients. Eight patients had concomitant coronary artery bypass grafting. Overall survival at 1, 5, and 10 years was 68%, 55%, and 42%, respectively. Event-free survival from subsequent angina, myocardial infarction, congestive heart failure, or percutaneous interventions at 1, 5, and 10 years was 66%, 43%, and 25%, respectively. Preoperative oliguria and postoperative sepsis were independent predictors of 30-days mortality on multivariate analysis (p = 0.02). Preoperative left ventricular function was associated with long-term survival (p = 0.048). We had good results of current postinfarction ventricular septal defect repair. Selected patients had concomitant coronary artery bypass grafting. Preoperative oliguria and postoperative sepsis were independent predictors of 30-day mortality, while left ventricular function was related to long-term survival.

  8. CaM Kinase II mediates maladaptive post-infarct remodeling and pro-inflammatory chemoattractant signaling but not acute myocardial ischemia/reperfusion injury

    PubMed Central

    Weinreuter, Martin; Kreusser, Michael M; Beckendorf, Jan; Schreiter, Friederike C; Leuschner, Florian; Lehmann, Lorenz H; Hofmann, Kai P; Rostosky, Julia S; Diemert, Nathalie; Xu, Chang; Volz, Hans Christian; Jungmann, Andreas; Nickel, Alexander; Sticht, Carsten; Gretz, Norbert; Maack, Christoph; Schneider, Michael D; Gröne, Hermann-Josef; Müller, Oliver J; Katus, Hugo A; Backs, Johannes

    2014-01-01

    CaMKII was suggested to mediate ischemic myocardial injury and adverse cardiac remodeling. Here, we investigated the roles of different CaMKII isoforms and splice variants in ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury by the use of new genetic CaMKII mouse models. Although CaMKIIδC was upregulated 1 day after I/R injury, cardiac damage 1 day after I/R was neither affected in CaMKIIδ-deficient mice, CaMKIIδ-deficient mice in which the splice variants CaMKIIδB and C were re-expressed, nor in cardiomyocyte-specific CaMKIIδ/γ double knockout mice (DKO). In contrast, 5 weeks after I/R, DKO mice were protected against extensive scar formation and cardiac dysfunction, which was associated with reduced leukocyte infiltration and attenuated expression of members of the chemokine (C-C motif) ligand family, in particular CCL3 (macrophage inflammatory protein-1α, MIP-1α). Intriguingly, CaMKII was sufficient and required to induce CCL3 expression in isolated cardiomyocytes, indicating a cardiomyocyte autonomous effect. We propose that CaMKII-dependent chemoattractant signaling explains the effects on post-I/R remodeling. Taken together, we demonstrate that CaMKII is not critically involved in acute I/R-induced damage but in the process of post-infarct remodeling and inflammatory processes. PMID:25193973

  9. CaM Kinase II mediates maladaptive post-infarct remodeling and pro-inflammatory chemoattractant signaling but not acute myocardial ischemia/reperfusion injury.

    PubMed

    Weinreuter, Martin; Kreusser, Michael M; Beckendorf, Jan; Schreiter, Friederike C; Leuschner, Florian; Lehmann, Lorenz H; Hofmann, Kai P; Rostosky, Julia S; Diemert, Nathalie; Xu, Chang; Volz, Hans Christian; Jungmann, Andreas; Nickel, Alexander; Sticht, Carsten; Gretz, Norbert; Maack, Christoph; Schneider, Michael D; Gröne, Hermann-Josef; Müller, Oliver J; Katus, Hugo A; Backs, Johannes

    2014-10-01

    CaMKII was suggested to mediate ischemic myocardial injury and adverse cardiac remodeling. Here, we investigated the roles of different CaMKII isoforms and splice variants in ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury by the use of new genetic CaMKII mouse models. Although CaMKIIδC was upregulated 1 day after I/R injury, cardiac damage 1 day after I/R was neither affected in CaMKIIδ-deficient mice, CaMKIIδ-deficient mice in which the splice variants CaMKIIδB and C were re-expressed, nor in cardiomyocyte-specific CaMKIIδ/γ double knockout mice (DKO). In contrast, 5 weeks after I/R, DKO mice were protected against extensive scar formation and cardiac dysfunction, which was associated with reduced leukocyte infiltration and attenuated expression of members of the chemokine (C-C motif) ligand family, in particular CCL3 (macrophage inflammatory protein-1α, MIP-1α). Intriguingly, CaMKII was sufficient and required to induce CCL3 expression in isolated cardiomyocytes, indicating a cardiomyocyte autonomous effect. We propose that CaMKII-dependent chemoattractant signaling explains the effects on post-I/R remodeling. Taken together, we demonstrate that CaMKII is not critically involved in acute I/R-induced damage but in the process of post-infarct remodeling and inflammatory processes. © 2014 The Authors. Published under the terms of the CC BY 4.0 license.

  10. Interventions for acne scars.

    PubMed

    Abdel Hay, Rania; Shalaby, Khalid; Zaher, Hesham; Hafez, Vanessa; Chi, Ching-Chi; Dimitri, Sandra; Nabhan, Ashraf F; Layton, Alison M

    2016-04-03

    Acne scarring is a frequent complication of acne and resulting scars may negatively impact on an affected person's psychosocial and physical well-being. Although a wide range of interventions have been proposed, there is a lack of high-quality evidence on treatments for acne scars to better inform patients and their healthcare providers about the most effective and safe methods of managing this condition. This review aimed to examine treatments for atrophic and hypertrophic acne scars, but we have concentrated on facial atrophic scarring. To assess the effects of interventions for treating acne scars. We searched the following databases up to November 2015: the Cochrane Skin Group Specialised Register, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) in the Cochrane Library (2015, Issue 10), MEDLINE (from 1946), EMBASE (from 1974), and LILACS (from 1982). We also searched five trials registers, and checked the reference lists of included studies and relevant reviews for further references to randomised controlled trials. We include randomised controlled trials (RCTs) which allocated participants (whether split-face or parallel arms) to any active intervention (or a combination) for treating acne scars. We excluded studies dealing only or mostly with keloid scars. Three review authors independently extracted data from each of the studies included in this review and evaluated the risks of bias. We resolved disagreements by discussion and arbitration supported by a method expert as required. Our primary outcomes were participant-reported scar improvement and any adverse effects serious enough to cause participants to withdraw from the study. We included 24 trials with 789 adult participants aged 18 years or older. Twenty trials enrolled men and women, three trials enrolled only women and one trial enrolled only men. We judged eight studies to be at low risk of bias for both sequence generation and allocation concealment. With regard to blinding we judged

  11. Emerging Therapies for Scar Prevention

    PubMed Central

    Block, Lisa; Gosain, Ankush; King, Timothy W.

    2015-01-01

    Significance: There are ∼12 million traumatic lacerations treated in the United States emergency rooms each year, 250 million surgical incisions created worldwide every year, and 11 million burns severe enough to warrant medical treatment worldwide. In the United States, over $20 billion dollars per year are spent on the treatment and management of scars. Recent Advances: Investigations into the management of scar therapies over the last decade have advanced our understanding related to the care of cutaneous scars. Scar treatment methods are presented including topical, intralesional, and mechanical therapies in addition to cryotherapy, radiotherapy, and laser therapy. Critical Issues: Current treatment options for scars have significant limitations. This review presents the current and emerging therapies available for scar management and the scientific evidence for scar management is discussed. Future Directions: Based upon our new understanding of scar formation, innovative scar therapies are being developed. Additional research on the basic science of scar formation will lead to additional advances and novel therapies for the treatment of cutaneous scars. PMID:26487979

  12. Nd:YAG Laser Treatment of Keloids and Hypertrophic Scars

    PubMed Central

    Akaishi, Satoshi; Koike, Sachiko; Dohi, Teruyuki; Kobe, Kyoko; Hyakusoku, Hiko; Ogawa, Rei

    2012-01-01

    Pathological cutaneous scars such as keloids and hypertrophic scars (HSs) are characterized by a diffuse redness that is caused by the overgrowth of capillary vessels due to chronic inflammation. Our group has been using long-pulsed, 1064-nm Nd:YAG laser in noncontact mode with low fluence and a submillisecond pulse duration to treat keloids and hypertrophic scars since 2006 with satisfactory results. The present study examined the efficacy of this approach in 22 Japanese patients with keloids (n = 16) or hypertrophic scars (n = 6) who were treated every 3 to 4 weeks. Treatment settings were as follows: 5 mm spot size diameter; 14 J/cm2 energy density; 300 μs exposure time per pulse; and 10 Hz repetition rate. The responses of the pathological scars to the treatment were assessed by measuring their erythema, hypertrophy, hardness, itching, and pain or tenderness. Moreover, skin samples from 3 volunteer patients were subjected to histological evaluation and 5 patients underwent thermography during therapy. The average total scar assessment score dropped from 9.86 to 6.34. Hematoxylin and eosin staining and Elastica Masson-Goldner staining showed that laser treatment structurally changed the tissue collagen. This influence reached a depth of 0.5 to 1 mm. Electron microscopy revealed plasma protein leakage, proteoglycan particles, and a change in the collagen fiber fascicles. Further analyses revealed that noncontact mode Nd:YAG laser treatment is highly effective for keloids and hypertrophic scars regardless of patient age, the origin and multiplicity of scarring, the location of the scar(s), or the tension on the scar. PMID:22259645

  13. Update on hypertrophic scar treatment

    PubMed Central

    Rabello, Felipe Bettini; Souza, Cleyton Dias; Júnior, Jayme Adriano Farina

    2014-01-01

    Scar formation is a consequence of the wound healing process that occurs when body tissues are damaged by a physical injury. Hypertrophic scars and keloids are pathological scars resulting from abnormal responses to trauma and can be itchy and painful, causing serious functional and cosmetic disability. The current review will focus on the definition of hypertrophic scars, distinguishing them from keloids and on the various methods for treating hypertrophic scarring that have been described in the literature, including treatments with clearly proven efficiency and therapies with doubtful benefits. Numerous methods have been described for the treatment of abnormal scars, but to date, the optimal treatment method has not been established. This review will explore the differences between different types of nonsurgical management of hypertrophic scars, focusing on the indications, uses, mechanisms of action, associations and efficacies of the following therapies: silicone, pressure garments, onion extract, intralesional corticoid injections and bleomycin. PMID:25141117

  14. Update on hypertrophic scar treatment.

    PubMed

    Rabello, Felipe Bettini; Souza, Cleyton Dias; Farina Júnior, Jayme Adriano

    2014-08-01

    Scar formation is a consequence of the wound healing process that occurs when body tissues are damaged by a physical injury. Hypertrophic scars and keloids are pathological scars resulting from abnormal responses to trauma and can be itchy and painful, causing serious functional and cosmetic disability. The current review will focus on the definition of hypertrophic scars, distinguishing them from keloids and on the various methods for treating hypertrophic scarring that have been described in the literature, including treatments with clearly proven efficiency and therapies with doubtful benefits. Numerous methods have been described for the treatment of abnormal scars, but to date, the optimal treatment method has not been established. This review will explore the differences between different types of nonsurgical management of hypertrophic scars, focusing on the indications, uses, mechanisms of action, associations and efficacies of the following therapies: silicone, pressure garments, onion extract, intralesional corticoid injections and bleomycin.

  15. Outcome of Dermal Grafting in the Management of Atrophic Facial Scars

    PubMed Central

    Shilpa, Kanathur; Sacchidanand, S; Leelavathy, Budamakuntla; Shilpashree, Padmanabha; Divya, Gorur; Ranjitha, Rammurthy; Lakshmi, DV

    2016-01-01

    Background: Scars over the face are cosmetically and psychologically disturbing. Various techniques have been described and are being practiced in the management of these scars. Aims and Objectives: This study was undertaken to study the safety, effectiveness of using dermal grafts as fillers in the management of facial scars due to acne, chickenpox, trauma or any others. Materials and Methods: Fifteen patients with atrophic facial scars of varied aetiology and willing for surgery were considered for dermal graft technique. After pre-operative workup, subcision was done 2 weeks before planned surgery. Depending on the type of scar, grafts were inserted using pocket or road railing techniques. Scar improvement was assessed based on patient satisfaction. Results: Linear scars showed excellent improvement. Acne, varicella and traumatic scars also showed good improvement. However, two patients did not appreciate improvement due to marked surface irregularities as the scars were elevated. They were further subjected to LASER and chemical peel resurfacing. Conclusion: Dermal grafting can be used in the management of any round to oval facial scar which is soft, prominent and at least 4–5 mm across; linear scars at least 2–3 mm across and 3–4 cm in length. However, scars with prominent surface irregularities need further resurfacing techniques along with dermal grafting. Limitations: Limitations of the study include small sample size, and only subjective assessment of the scar has been taken into consideration to assess the outcome. PMID:28163456

  16. What is the prevalence of hypertrophic scarring following burns?

    PubMed

    Bombaro, Kristine M; Engrav, Loren H; Carrougher, Gretchen J; Wiechman, Shelly A; Faucher, Lee; Costa, Beth A; Heimbach, David M; Rivara, Frederick P; Honari, Shari

    2003-06-01

    Hypertrophic scarring after burns remains a major problem and is considered to be "common". Pressure garments are commonly used as treatment even though there is little sound data that they reduce the prevalence or magnitude of the scarring. In 1999 we began a study of the efficacy of pressure garments on forearm burns. After studying 30 patients, mainly white adults, we found no hypertrophic scar in either those treated with pressure or without. This prompted us to review the literature on the prevalence of hypertrophic scarring after burns and found only four articles with a relatively small number of patients and only three geographical locations. It became clear that the prevalence of hypertrophic scarring is really unknown. We then did a retrospective study of 110 burn survivors and counted all hypertrophic scars of all sizes and locations in all races and found the prevalence hypertrophic scarring to be 67% which conflicts with the published reports and our prospective study and suggests that further research is necessary. We concluded that a worldwide, prospective survey is necessary to establish the prevalence of hypertrophic scarring after burns. In this article we are calling for and offering to organize this survey.

  17. Management of scar contractures, hypertrophic scars, and keloids.

    PubMed

    Sherris, D A; Larrabee, W F; Murakami, C S

    1995-10-01

    Aberrant fibrous tissue formation after surgery or trauma still presents a challenge to surgeons. Current research hopes to identify the characteristics of the population of fibroblasts that lead to hypertrophic or keloid scar formation. Surgical procedures and laser therapy followed by intralesional steroid treatments still are the foundation of treatment; but new modalities are being applied. The pathogenesis and management of hypertrophic scars, keloids, and scar contractures are discussed in this article.

  18. Predictive value of advanced glycation end products for the development of post-infarction heart failure: a preliminary report

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Since post-infarction heart failure (HF) determines a great morbidity and mortality, and given the physiopathology implications of advanced glycation end products (AGE) in the genesis of myocardial dysfunction, it was intended to analyze the prognostic value of these molecules in order to predict post-infarction HF development. Methods A prospective clinical study in patients after first acute coronary syndrome was conducted. The follow-up period was consisted in 1 year. In 194 patients consecutively admitted in the coronary unit for myocardial infarct fluorescent AGE levels were measured. The association between glycaemic parameters and the development of post-infarction HF were analyzed in those patients. Finally, we identified the variables with independent predictor value by performing a multivariate analysis of Hazard ratio for Cox regression. Results Eleven out of 194 patients (5.6%) developed HF during follow-up (median: 1.0 years [0.8 - 1.5 years]). Even though basal glucose, fructosamine and glycated haemoglobin were significant predictive factors in the univariate analysis, after being adjusted by confounding variables and AGE they lost their statistical signification. Only AGE (Hazard Ratio 1.016, IC 95%: 1.006-1.026; p<0,001), together with NT-proBNP and the infarct extension were predictors for post-infarction HF development, where AGE levels over the median value 5-fold increased the risk of HF development during follow-up. Conclusions AGE are an independent marker of post-infarction HF development risk. PMID:22909322

  19. Coupled agent-based and finite-element models for predicting scar structure following myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Rouillard, Andrew D; Holmes, Jeffrey W

    2014-08-01

    Following myocardial infarction, damaged muscle is gradually replaced by collagenous scar tissue. The structural and mechanical properties of the scar are critical determinants of heart function, as well as the risk of serious post-infarction complications such as infarct rupture, infarct expansion, and progression to dilated heart failure. A number of therapeutic approaches currently under development aim to alter infarct mechanics in order to reduce complications, such as implantation of mechanical restraint devices, polymer injection, and peri-infarct pacing. Because mechanical stimuli regulate scar remodeling, the long-term consequences of therapies that alter infarct mechanics must be carefully considered. Computational models have the potential to greatly improve our ability to understand and predict how such therapies alter heart structure, mechanics, and function over time. Toward this end, we developed a straightforward method for coupling an agent-based model of scar formation to a finite-element model of tissue mechanics, creating a multi-scale model that captures the dynamic interplay between mechanical loading, scar deformation, and scar material properties. The agent-based component of the coupled model predicts how fibroblasts integrate local chemical, structural, and mechanical cues as they deposit and remodel collagen, while the finite-element component predicts local mechanics at any time point given the current collagen fiber structure and applied loads. We used the coupled model to explore the balance between increasing stiffness due to collagen deposition and increasing wall stress due to infarct thinning and left ventricular dilation during the normal time course of healing in myocardial infarcts, as well as the negative feedback between strain anisotropy and the structural anisotropy it promotes in healing scar. The coupled model reproduced the observed evolution of both collagen fiber structure and regional deformation following coronary

  20. Minimal-scar handlift: a new surgical approach.

    PubMed

    Handle, Markus; Bonfatti-Ribeiro, Luiz M; Barcaro-Machado, Bárbara H; Pitanguy, Ivo

    2011-11-01

    Removal of excess skin from the aging hand can cause scarring in one of the body's most visible areas, which is highly undesirable for patients. A minimal-scar approach to tightening this skin, in conjunction with the rejuvenating effects of minimally-invasive procedures, is therefore needed. The authors describe a new technique for limiting scar size and visibility by locating the incision in a unique position on the ulnar side of the dorsum of the hand. Eleven patients were treated with the authors' method between March and September 2009. Both hands were treated for each patient, but these procedures occurred separately, at an interval of two to four months. The surgical approach included skin flap advancement and rotation, and the procedure took place under local anesthesia and sedation. The resultant scar was S-shaped. Changes in postoperative stress ratio were visualized. Patients reported being highly satisfied with this procedure with regard to scar size, quality, and location. No major complications were observed, such as infection, flap necrosis, and nerve damage. All minor complications were treated conservatively. Patients with Fitzpatrick skin types I-III profited from less scar visibility in their outcomes. All patients experienced quick recovery with minimal downtime, independent of skin type. The minimal-scar handlift technique is an effective surgical approach to rejuvenating the hand and can be implemented concurrently with minimally-invasive techniques for volume restoration. The complication rate is low, and patient/surgeon satisfaction with outcomes is high.

  1. Acne Scar Treatment: A Multimodality Approach Tailored to Scar Type.

    PubMed

    Zaleski-Larsen, Lisa A; Fabi, Sabrina G; McGraw, Timothy; Taylor, Mark

    2016-05-01

    Acne scarring can be classified into atrophic icepick, boxcar, and rolling scars in addition to keloidal and hypertrophic scars. Additionally, these scars can be erythematous, hyperpigmented, and/or hypopigmented. Each scar type has a different structural cause warranting a customized approach. Many cosmetic options exist to address these changes individually, but little literature exists about the safety and efficacy of combining such procedures and devices. A Medline search was performed on combination treatments because it relates to facial acne scarring, and results are summarized. Practical applications for these combinations of procedures are also discussed. Studies examining the efficacy and safety of ablative, nonablative, fractionated, and nonfractionated lasers, dermabrasion, chemical peels, needling, subcision, radiofrequency, stem cell therapy, fat transplantation, platelet-rich plasma, and hyaluronic acid dermal fillers for acne scars were found. The authors review their experience in combining these techniques. Review of the literature revealed multiple single options for facial acne scarring treatment with minimal evidence in the literature found on the safety and efficacy of combining such procedures and devices. The authors' experience is that combining acne scar treatment techniques can be performed safely and synergistically with optimal patient outcomes.

  2. Scar Homogenization Versus Limited-Substrate Ablation in Patients With Nonischemic Cardiomyopathy and Ventricular Tachycardia.

    PubMed

    Gökoğlan, Yalçın; Mohanty, Sanghamitra; Gianni, Carola; Santangeli, Pasquale; Trivedi, Chintan; Güneş, Mahmut F; Bai, Rong; Al-Ahmad, Amin; Gallinghouse, G Joseph; Horton, Rodney; Hranitzky, Patrick M; Sanchez, Javier E; Beheiry, Salwa; Hongo, Richard; Lakkireddy, Dhanunjaya; Reddy, Madhu; Schweikert, Robert A; Dello Russo, Antonio; Casella, Michela; Tondo, Claudio; Burkhardt, J David; Themistoclakis, Sakis; Di Biase, Luigi; Natale, Andrea

    2016-11-01

    Scar homogenization improves long-term ventricular arrhythmia-free survival compared with standard limited-substrate ablation in patients with post-infarction ventricular tachycardia (VT). Whether such benefit extends to patients with nonischemic cardiomyopathy and scar-related VT is unclear. The aim of this study was to assess the long-term efficacy of an endoepicardial scar homogenization approach compared with standard ablation in this population. Consecutive patients with dilated nonischemic cardiomyopathy (n = 93), scar-related VTs, and evidence of low-voltage regions on the basis of pre-defined criteria on electroanatomic mapping (i.e., bipolar voltage <1.5 mV) underwent either standard VT ablation (group 1 [n = 57]) or endoepicardial ablation of all abnormal potentials within the electroanatomic scar (group 2 [n = 36]). Acute procedural success was defined as noninducibility of any VT at the end of the procedure; long-term success was defined as freedom from any ventricular arrhythmia at follow-up. Acute procedural success rates were 69.4% and 42.1% after scar homogenization and standard ablation, respectively (p = 0.01). During a mean follow-up period of 14 ± 2 months, single-procedure success rates were 63.9% after scar homogenization and 38.6% after standard ablation (p = 0.031). After multivariate analysis, scar homogenization and left ventricular ejection fraction were predictors of long-term success. During follow-up, the rehospitalization rate was significantly lower in the scar homogenization group (p = 0.035). In patients with dilated nonischemic cardiomyopathy, scar-related VT, and evidence of low-voltage regions on electroanatomic mapping, endoepicardial homogenization of the scar significantly increased freedom from any recurrent ventricular arrhythmia compared with a standard limited-substrate ablation. However, the success rate with this approach appeared to be lower than previously reported with ischemic cardiomyopathy, presumably

  3. Update on Postsurgical Scar Management

    PubMed Central

    Commander, Sarah Jane; Chamata, Edward; Cox, Joshua; Dickey, Ryan M.; Lee, Edward I.

    2016-01-01

    Postoperative scar appearance is often a significant concern among patients, with many seeking advice from their surgeons regarding scar minimization. Numerous products are available that claim to decrease postoperative scar formation and improve wound healing. These products attempt to create an ideal environment for wound healing by targeting the three phases of wound healing: inflammation, proliferation, and remodeling. With that said, preoperative interventions, such as lifestyle modifications and optimization of medical comorbidities, and intraoperative interventions, such as adherence to meticulous operative techniques, are equally important for ideal scarring. In this article, the authors review the available options in postoperative scar management, addressing the benefits of multimodal perioperative intervention. Although numerous treatments exist, no single modality has been proven superior over others. Therefore, each patient should receive a personalized treatment regimen to optimize scar management. PMID:27478420

  4. Cutaneous Scar Prevention and Management

    PubMed Central

    Al-Shaqsi, Sultan; Al-Bulushi, Taimoor

    2016-01-01

    Cutaneous scarring is common after trauma, surgery and infection and occurs when normal skin tissue is replaced by fibroblastic tissue during the healing process. The pathophysiology of scar formation is not yet fully understood, although the degree of tension across the wound edges and the speed of cell growth are believed to play central roles. Prevention of scars is essential and can be achieved by attention to surgical techniques and the use of measures to reduce cell growth. Grading and classifying scars is important to determine available treatment strategies. This article presents an overview of the current therapies available for the prevention and treatment of scars. It is intended to be a practical guide for surgeons and other health professionals involved with and interested in scar management. PMID:26909210

  5. Defect Scars on Flexible Surfaces with Crystalline Order

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohyama, Tamotsu; Gompper, Gerhard

    2007-05-01

    The crystallography of two-dimensional particle packings on flexible surfaces of spherical topology is investigated. Examples are viral capsids and crystalline vesicles. Computer simulations of dynamically triangulated surfaces are employed to study the shape and structure of lattice defects as a function of the Föppl von Kármán number γ. We find that grain-boundary scars become much more fuzzy with increasing temperature, that the size of grain-boundary scars saturates with increasing vesicle radius, and that the buckling transition shifts to higher values of γ due to the presence of scars.

  6. Longitudinal burn scar quantification.

    PubMed

    Nedelec, Bernadette; Correa, José A; de Oliveira, Ana; LaSalle, Leo; Perrault, Isabelle

    2014-12-01

    Quantitative studies of the clinical recovery of burn scars are currently lacking. Previous reports validate the objective, precise, diagnostic capabilities of high-frequency ultrasound to measure thickness, the Cutometer(®) to measure pliability and the Mexameter(®) to measure erythema and pigmentation of scars. Thus, we prospectively quantified clinical characteristics of patient-matched, after burn hypertrophic scar (HSc), donor site scar (D) and normal skin (N) using these instruments. One investigator measured 3 sites (HSc, D, N) in 46 burn survivors at 3, 6, and 12 months after-burn. A mixed model regression analysis, adjusting p-values for multiplicity of testing, was used to compare means among sites and time points. Participants were 41.2±13.5 years old, 87% males, predominantly Caucasian, with an average of 19.5% body surface area burned. HSc thickness decreased significantly between 3 and 6, 6 and 12, and 3 and 12 months (all p<0.0001), but remained thicker than D and N skin (all p<0.0001). Pliability differed significantly between HSc, D and N sites at all time points (all p<0.0001), with HSc and D increasing between 3 and 12 months (p<0.05) but not reaching normal. HSc and D sites were significantly more erythematous than normal skin (p<0.05) at 3 and 6 months but D sites approached normal by 12 months. The only time points at which pigmentation significantly differed were the HSc and D sites at 6 months. Thickness, pliability, erythema and pigmentation of N skin remained similar over the 12 months. We found that post-burn HSc thickness, pliability and erythema differed significantly from D and N skin at 3, 6, and 12 months and does not return to normal by 12 months after-injury; however, significant improvements towards normal can be expected. Donor sites are redder than normal skin at 3 and 6 months but can be expected to return to normal by 12 months. Although the color of HSc and D sites change markedly with time these color changes are

  7. Dune Avalanche Scars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    05 August 2004 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows large, low albedo (dark) sand dunes in Kaiser Crater near 47.2oS, 340.4oW. The dunes are--ever so slowly--moving east to west (right to left) as sand avalanches down the steeper, slip face slopes of each. Avalanching sand in the Kaiser dune field has left deep scars on these slopes, suggesting that the sand is not loose but is instead weakly cemented. The image covers an area approximately 3 km (1.9 mi) wide and is illuminated by sunlight from the upper left.

  8. Periorbital Scar Correction.

    PubMed

    Chambers, Christopher B; Moe, Kristen S

    2017-02-01

    Periorbital scarring with eyelid retraction can have serious visual effects and can lead to loss of vision or even loss of the eye. Understanding of eyelid anatomy and the delicate balance of its structural supports is critical for the identification of the eyelid disorder responsible for the cicatrix and helps to guide treatment. The 2-finger test and lateral distraction of the lid can also be of significant help in proper diagnosis of the underlying disorder. Proper reconstruction with respect to the anterior and posterior lamellae helps to ensure a favorable outcome. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. 9 CFR 11.3 - Scar rule.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... WELFARE HORSE PROTECTION REGULATIONS § 11.3 Scar rule. The scar rule applies to all horses born on or after October 1, 1975. Horses subject to this rule that do not meet the following scar rule criteria...

  10. 9 CFR 11.3 - Scar rule.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... WELFARE HORSE PROTECTION REGULATIONS § 11.3 Scar rule. The scar rule applies to all horses born on or after October 1, 1975. Horses subject to this rule that do not meet the following scar rule criteria...

  11. 9 CFR 11.3 - Scar rule.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... WELFARE HORSE PROTECTION REGULATIONS § 11.3 Scar rule. The scar rule applies to all horses born on or after October 1, 1975. Horses subject to this rule that do not meet the following scar rule criteria...

  12. 9 CFR 11.3 - Scar rule.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... WELFARE HORSE PROTECTION REGULATIONS § 11.3 Scar rule. The scar rule applies to all horses born on or after October 1, 1975. Horses subject to this rule that do not meet the following scar rule criteria...

  13. 9 CFR 11.3 - Scar rule.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... WELFARE HORSE PROTECTION REGULATIONS § 11.3 Scar rule. The scar rule applies to all horses born on or after October 1, 1975. Horses subject to this rule that do not meet the following scar rule criteria...

  14. Efficacy of Contractubex gel in the treatment of fresh scars after thoracic surgery in children and adolescents.

    PubMed

    Willital, G H; Heine, H

    1994-01-01

    Scar development was investigated in 45 young patients who had undergone thoracic surgery. Patients were randomly assigned either to a group which was treated topically with Contractubex gel (Merz + Co., D-Frankfurt/Main), containing 10% onion extract, 50/U of sodium heparin per one g of gel and 1% allantoin, or to a group receiving no treatment. The treatment began on average 26 days after the operation and was continued for one year. The scars of all treated and untreated patients were evaluated at monthly intervals. The appearance of the scar, including scar type and scar size as well as scar colour, was assessed by the physician. A reduction of the increase of scar width was seen in the Contractubex-treated group as compared with the untreated group. Further, physiological scars and skin-coloured scars were more frequent in the treated group than in the untreated group. Hypertrophic or keloidal scars were less frequent in the treated group. No differences in scar length and scar height were seen. At the end of the observation period, the clinical course of scar development was rated as "very good" or "good" in more than 90% of the treated patients, "good" in less than 40% and "moderate" or "bad" in more than 60% of the untreated cases. The tolerability of the drug was "good" or "very good" in all cases. In conclusion, Contractubex gel is useful in scar treatment after thoracic surgery.

  15. New innovations in scar management.

    PubMed

    Widgerow, A D; Chait, L A; Stals, R; Stals, P J

    2000-01-01

    As current aesthetic surgical techniques become more standardized and results more predictable, a fine scar may be the demarcating line between acceptable and unacceptable aesthetic results. With this in mind, a scar management program has been adopted based on the modalities of wound support, hydration, and hastened maturity, all factors gleaned from scientific evidence published over the past 25 years. Tension on a scar in one axis will result in a stretched scar, probably initiated by neutrophils and their neutral proteases [18,26]. Tension on a scar from many directions or intermittently will result in a hypertrophic scar, possibly initiated by lymphocytes but definitely related to a prolongation of the inflammatory process, with increased fibroblast activity and overabundant extracellular matrix secretion [24,26]. The common initiating factor is the tension on the scar, and the critical element needed to counteract this tension is scar support. Clinical experience has shown us that the most reliable way to support a scar is by using microporous tape. Hydration is a second beneficial influence on scar control and is the basis of the use of silicone sheeting and gel [7,29,36]. Alpha Centella cream has two main components. The first is an extract from the plant Bulbine frutescens. This increases hydration under the tape by leaving a layer of fatty vesicles of glycoprotein on the skin surface. This also has antibacterial properties. The second component is the principal terpenoids extracted from the Centella asiatica plant. These include asiatic acid, madecassic acid, and asiaticoside. Centella asiatica has been documented to aid wound healing in a large number of scientific reports [5,12,21,22,33,34,40]. The most beneficial effect appears to be the stimulation of maturation of the scar by the production of type I collagen [4,19] and the resulting decrease in the inflammatory reaction and myofibroblast production. Thus these components have been incorporated into

  16. Scars of Erosion

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-02-16

    This large crescent dune in Kaiser Crater shows the scars of many types of seasonal erosional activities. Along its downwind slope are large gullies which are active during winter, when frost drives dune material downslope, carving out channels and creating fan-shaped aprons. On the upwind slope (bottom), dust devil tracks are visible: dark lines and curliques created during the spring season by small wind vortices vacuuming up a thin layer of dust and exposing the dark dune sand. Note: Both the cutout and the above image are rotated so that North is to the right. The map is projected here at a scale of 25 centimeters (9.8 inches) per pixel. [The original image scale is 25.3 centimeters (10 inches) per pixel (with 1 x 1 binning); objects on the order of 76 centimeters (30 inches) across are resolved.] North is up. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA21458

  17. Keloids: scar revision.

    PubMed

    Brown, L A; Pierce, H E

    1986-01-01

    The treatment of keloids can be a long-term, and at times, vexing, dermatologic surgical management problem arising in both white and non-white patients. This paper reviews a number of conventional, as well as novel, therapeutic approaches for the management of this disease of uncontrolled scar growth. Additionally, fundamental aspects of this disease are covered, including clinical, histologic, biochemical, immunologic, endocrinologic, and epidemiologic factors. An understanding of these latter aspects may be useful to the clinician in realizing the best possible therapeutic results. It must be emphasized that, regardless of the technique employed, an observation period of at least 2 years is necessary to effectively limit the chance and degree of recurrence.

  18. Scar management practice and science: a comprehensive approach to controlling scar tissue and avoiding hypertrophic scarring.

    PubMed

    Widgerow, Alan David; Chait, Laurence A

    2011-12-01

    A meta-analysis of the literature forms the basis of a treatment regimen focused on the principles of support, controlled inflammation, hydration, and hastened collagen remodeling. The presented clinical trial avoided hypertrophic scarring in more than 80% of cases, validating the theory of targeting many areas of scar control in 1 approach.

  19. Umbilical scarring in hatchling American alligators

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wiebe, J.J.; Sepulveda, M.S.; Buckland, J.E.; Anderson, S.R.; Gross, T.S.

    2004-01-01

    Umbilical scarring is the presence of excess scar tissue deposited between abdominal dermal layers at the site of yolk sac absorption in hatchling American alligators (Alligator mississippiensis). The presence of this dermal condition plays a key evaluatory role in the overall quality and subsequent value for various commercial leather products. Despite the prevalent nature of this condition, currently the industry has no standardized protocols for its quantification. The objectives of this study were to examine the relationship between hatchling weight and age and incidence of umbilical scarring and to develop a quantifiable and reproducible technique to measure this dermal condition in hatchling American alligators. Thirty eggs from each of nine clutches were incubated in two separate incubators at different facilities and hatchling umbilical scarring was measured at 2 and 10 days of age using digital calipers. Umbilical area was calculated by multiplying umbilical length times umbilical width. There was a significant effect of both age and clutch on umbilical area (overall decline of 64%) by 10 days post-hatch. However, only five of the nine clutches utilized expressed a noticeable decline in the size of this dermal condition (range 67-74%). We had hypothesized that larger hatchlings would have larger umbilical areas and a slower rate of improvement in this condition during the first few days post-hatch. The differences in umbilical area and percent decline with age across clutches, however, were not associated with differences in initial hatchling weights. Within clutches and time periods, hatchling weight had no significant effect on the size and/or rate of decline of this condition. ?? 2004 Published by Elsevier B.V.

  20. Increased Activity of the Intracardiac Oxytocinergic System in the Development of Postinfarction Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Kasarello, Kaja; Kuch, Marek; Gala, Kamila

    2016-01-01

    Aim. The present study was designed to test the hypothesis that the development of postinfarction heart failure is associated with a change of activity of the intracardiac oxytocinergic system. Methods. Experiments were performed on male Sprague-Dawley rats subjected to myocardial infarction or sham surgery. Four weeks after the surgery, blood samples were collected and the samples of the left ventricle (LV) and right ventricle (RV) were harvested for evaluation of the mRNA expression (RT-PCR) of oxytocin (OT), oxytocin receptor (OTR), natriuretic peptides, and the level of OT and OTR protein (ELISA). The concentration of N-terminal B-type natriuretic peptide was measured to determine the presence of heart failure. Results. Plasma NT-proBNP concentration was higher in the infarcted rats. In the infarcted rats, the expression of OT mRNA and the OT protein level were higher in the RV. There were no significant differences between infarcted and noninfarcted rats in the expression of OT mRNA and in the OT protein level in the fragments of the LV. In both the left and the right ventricles, OTR mRNA expression was lower but the level of OTR protein was higher in the infarcted rats. Conclusions. In the present study, we indicate that postinfarction heart failure is associated with an increased activity of the intracardiac oxytocinergic system. PMID:27957495

  1. Hybrid closure of postinfarction ventricular septal rupture enlargement after transcathether closure with Amplatzer occluder.

    PubMed

    Jorge, Cláudia; de Oliveira, Eduardo Infante; Martins, Susana Robalo; Nobre, Angelo; da Silva, Pedro Canas; Diogo, António Nunes

    2012-04-01

    Ventricular septal rupture (VSR) is nowadays a rare complication of myocardial infarction (MI), but with a mortality rate still very high. Urgent surgical correction is recommended, although in specific cases percutaneous closure of a post-infarct VSR is a therapeutic option or a bridge to surgical correction. We report a case of an 80-year-old woman, with a subacute anterior MI with an antero-septal VSR. Rapid clinical deterioration in a high-surgical-risk patient led us to attempt percutaneous VSR closure at day 8 post MI. A 16-mm Amplatzer post-infarction (PI) muscular VSD closed the defect with intra-cardiac echocardiography guidance, that allowed conscious sedation. Clinical and haemodynamic improvement was immediate. Unfortunately, a small orifice distal to the device persisted, which enlarged to 8 mm over the following days, with a Qp/Qs shunt of 1.9. At day 17 post MI, the VSR was surgically closed by suturing the Amplatzer device to the septum. A residual shunt was evident, but with no progression, being the patient discharged in NYHA class I. Percutaneous closure of a post-MI VSR as a bridge to surgery is a therapeutic option in patients with high surgical risk, allowing haemodynamic stabilization and thus gaining time for a further surgical intervention if needed, improving these patients grim prognosis. Intra-cardiac echocardiography for monitoring the percutaneous procedure instead of a transoesophageal approach, as well as the surgical technique, make this case unique.

  2. Restriction of food intake prevents postinfarction heart failure by enhancing autophagy in the surviving cardiomyocytes.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Takatomo; Takemura, Genzou; Kanamori, Hiromitsu; Goto, Kazuko; Tsujimoto, Akiko; Okada, Hideshi; Kawamura, Itta; Ogino, Atsushi; Takeyama, Toshiaki; Kawaguchi, Tomonori; Morishita, Kentaro; Ushikoshi, Hiroaki; Kawasaki, Masanori; Mikami, Atsushi; Fujiwara, Takako; Fujiwara, Hisayoshi; Minatoguchi, Shinya

    2014-05-01

    We investigated the effect of restriction of food intake, a potent inducer of autophagy, on postinfarction cardiac remodeling and dysfunction. Myocardial infarction was induced in mice by left coronary artery ligation. At 1 week after infarction, mice were randomly divided into four groups: the control group was fed ad libitum (100%); the food restriction (FR) groups were fed 80%, 60%, or 40% of the mean amount of food consumed by the control mice. After 2 weeks on the respective diets, left ventricular dilatation and hypofunction were apparent in the control group, but both parameters were significantly mitigated in the FR groups, with the 60% FR group showing the strongest therapeutic effect. Cardiomyocyte autophagy was strongly activated in the FR groups, as indicated by up-regulation of microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3-II, autophagosome formation, and myocardial ATP content. Chloroquine, an autophagy inhibitor, completely canceled the therapeutic effect of FR. This negative effect was associated with reduced activation of AMP-activated protein kinase and of ULK1 (a homolog of yeast Atg1), both of which were enhanced in hearts from the FR group. In vitro, the AMP-activated protein kinase inhibitor compound C suppressed glucose depletion-induced autophagy in cardiomyocytes, but did not influence activity of chloroquine. Our findings imply that a dietary protocol with FR could be a preventive strategy against postinfarction heart failure. Copyright © 2014 American Society for Investigative Pathology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Thermal Injury Model in the Rabbit Ear with Quantifiable Burn Progression and Hypertrophic Scar.

    PubMed

    Friedrich, Emily E; Niknam-Bienia, Solmaz; Xie, Ping; Jia, Sheng-Xian; Hong, Seok Jong; Mustoe, Thomas A; Galiano, Robert D

    2017-04-01

    Hypertrophic scar is a major clinical outcome of deep-partial thickness to full thickness thermal burn injury. Appropriate animal models are a limitation to burn research due to the lack of, or access to, animal models which address the endpoint of hypertrophic scar. Lower species, such as rodents, heal mainly by contracture, which limits the duration of study. Higher species, such as pigs, heal more similarly to humans, but are associated with high cost, long duration for scar development, challenges in quantifying scar hypertrophy, and poor manageability. Here we present a quantifiable deep-partial thickness burn model in the rabbit ear. Burns were created using a dry-heated brass rod for 10 s and 20 s at 90°C. At the time of eschar excision on day 3, excisional wounds were made on the contralateral ear for comparison. Burn wound progression, in which the wound size expands over time is a major distinction between excisional and thermal injuries, was quantified at 1 h and 3 d after the injuries using calibrated photographs and histology and the size of the wounds was found to be unchanged from the initial wound size at 1 h, but 10% in the 20 s burn wounds at 3 d. A quantifiable hypertrophic scar, measured by histology as the scar elevation index, was present in both 20 s burn wounds and excisional wounds at day 35. ImageJ measurements revealed that the 20 s burn wound scars were 22% larger than the excisional wound scars and the 20 s burn scar area measurements from histology were 26% greater than in the excisional wound scar. The ability to measure both burn progression and scar hypertrophy over a 35-day time frame suits this model to screening early intervention burn wound therapeutics or scar treatments in a burn-specific scar model. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  4. OSM mitigates post-infarction cardiac remodeling and dysfunction by up-regulating autophagy through Mst1 suppression.

    PubMed

    Hu, Jianqiang; Zhang, Lei; Zhao, Zhijing; Zhang, Mingming; Lin, Jie; Wang, Jiaxing; Yu, Wenjun; Man, Wanrong; Li, Congye; Zhang, Rongqing; Gao, Erhe; Wang, Haichang; Sun, Dongdong

    2016-11-04

    The incidence and prevalence of heart failure (HF) in the world are rapidly rising possibly attributed to the worsened HF following myocardial infarction (MI) in recent years. Here we examined the effects of oncostatin M (OSM) on postinfarction cardiac remodeling and the underlying mechanisms involved. MI model was induced using left anterior descending coronary artery (LAD) ligation. In addition, cultured neonatal mouse cardiomyocytes were subjected to simulated MI. Our results revealed that OSM alleviated left ventricular remodeling, promoted cardiac function, restored mitochondrial cristae density and architecture disorders after 4weeks of MI. Enhanced autophagic flux was indicated in cardiomyocytes transduced with Ad-GFP -LC3 in the OSM treated group as compared with the MI group. OSM receptor Oβ knockout blocked the beneficial effects of OSM in postinfarction cardiac remodeling and cardiomyocytes autophagy. OSM pretreatment significantly alleviated left ventricular remodeling and dysfunction in Mst1 transgenic mice, while it failed to reverse further the postinfarction left ventricular dilatation and cardiac function in the Mst1 knockout mice. Our data revealed that OSM alleviated postinfarction cardiac remodeling and dysfunction by enhancing cardiomyocyte autophagy. OSM holds promise as a therapeutic target in treating HF after MI through Oβ receptor by inhibiting Mst1 phosphorylation.

  5. MALIGNANT DEGENERATION IN BURN SCARS

    PubMed Central

    Castañares, Salvador

    1961-01-01

    The malignant potential of burn scars has been recognized since Marjolin's classical description of cancer arising in several types of post-traumatic scars. With improved burn therapy since the last war, there has been a higher survival rate of severe burns with proportionate increase in cancer associated with burn scars. This will create increasing problems of permanent disability and compensation. The younger the patient at the time of the burn, the longer the time required for the cancer to develop. Acute cancer development in burn scars has been reported after a four-week interval. Cancer may develop from six weeks to fifty years or more. The etiology of cancer in burn scars is not known. The most important clinical finding is the fact that most of the burn cancers occur in areas which were not grafted. The most common type of cancer encountered in burn scars is squamous cell carcinoma, which forms in Marjolin ulcers. Basal cell carcinoma may develop in the most superficial of burn scars. Treatment should be directed primarily to prompt and adequate skin grafting in all deep burns in order to prevent malignant degeneration of the burn scars. Once it has developed the treatment is the same as for other malignancies which are not associated with burns. Wide surgical excision with block dissection of the regional lymph nodes when they are involved is the treatment of choice. The prognosis of burn scar cancer is poor, once the process has extended because of early and distant metastasis. ImagesFigure 1.Figure 2.Figure 2.Figure 3.Figure 3.Figure 4. PMID:13691372

  6. Cardioprotective role of growth/differentiation factor 1 in post-infarction left ventricular remodelling and dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Bao, Ming-Wei; Zhang, Xiao-Jing; Li, Liangpeng; Cai, Zhongxiang; Liu, Xiaoxiong; Wan, Nian; Hu, Gangying; Wan, Fengwei; Zhang, Rui; Zhu, Xueyong; Xia, Hao; Li, Hongliang

    2015-07-01

    Growth/differentiation factor 1 (GDF1) is a secreted glycoprotein of the transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) superfamily that mediates cell differentiation events during embryonic development. GDF1 is expressed in several tissues, including the heart. However, the functional role of GDF1 in myocardial infarction (MI)-induced cardiac remodelling and dysfunction is not known. Here, we performed gain-of-function and loss-of-function studies using cardiac-specific GDF1 transgenic (TG) and knockout (KO) mice to determine the role of GDF1 in the pathogenesis of functional and architectural cardiac remodelling after MI, which was induced by surgical left anterior descending coronary artery ligation. Our results demonstrate that overexpression of GDF1 in the heart causes a significant decrease in MI-derived mortality post-MI and leads to attenuated infarct size expansion, left ventricular (LV) dilatation, and cardiac dysfunction at 1 week and 4 weeks after MI injury. Compared with control animals, cardiomyocyte apoptosis, inflammation, hypertrophy, and interstitial fibrosis were all remarkably reduced in the GDF1-TG mice following MI. In contrast, GDF1 deficiency greatly exacerbated the pathological cardiac remodelling response after infarction. Further analysis of the in vitro and in vivo signalling events indicated that the beneficial role of GDF1 in MI-induced cardiac dysfunction and LV remodelling was associated with the inhibition of non-canonical (MEK-ERK1/2) and canonical (Smad) signalling cascades. Overall, our data reveal that GDF1 in the heart is a novel mediator that protects against the development of post-infarction cardiac remodelling via negative regulation of the MEK-ERK1/2 and Smad signalling pathways. Thus, GDF1 may serve as a valuable therapeutic target for the treatment of MI. Copyright © 2015 Pathological Society of Great Britain and Ireland. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  7. Noninvasive stratification of postinfarction rats based on the degree of cardiac dysfunction using magnetic resonance imaging and echocardiography.

    PubMed

    Aronsen, Jan Magnus; Espe, Emil Knut Stenersen; Skårdal, Kristine; Hasic, Almira; Zhang, Lili; Sjaastad, Ivar

    2017-05-01

    The myocardial infarction (MI) rat model plays a crucial role in modern cardiovascular research, but the inherent heterogeneity of this model represents a challenge. We sought to identify subgroups among the post-MI rats and establish simple noninvasive stratification protocols for such subgroups. Six weeks after induction of MI, 49 rats underwent noninvasive examinations using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and echocardiography. Twelve sham-operated rats served as controls. Increased end-diastolic left ventricular (LV) pressure and lung weight served as indicators for congestive heart failure (CHF). A clustering algorithm using 13 noninvasive and invasive parameters was used to identify distinct groups among the animals. The cluster analysis revealed four distinct post-MI phenotypes; two without congestion but with different degree of LV dilatation, and two with different degree of congestion and right ventricular (RV) affection. Among the MRI parameters, RV mass emerged as robust noninvasive marker of CHF with 100% specificity/sensitivity. Moreover, LV infarct size and RV ejection fraction further predicted subgroup among the non-CHF and CHF rats with excellent specificity/sensitivity. Of the echocardiography parameters, left atrial diameter predicted CHF. Moreover, LV end-diastolic diameter predicted the subgroups among the non-CHF rats. We propose two simple noninvasive schemes to stratify post-MI rats, based on the degree of heart failure; one for MRI and one for echocardiography.NEW & NOTEWORTHY In vivo phenotyping of rats is essential for robust and reliable data. Here, we present two simple noninvasive schemes for the stratification of postinfarction rats based on the degree of heart failure: one using magnetic resonance imaging and one based on echocardiography. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  8. Phospholemman deficiency in postinfarct hearts: enhanced contractility but increased mortality.

    PubMed

    Mirza, M Ayoub; Lane, Susan; Yang, Zequan; Karaoli, Themis; Akosah, Kwame; Hossack, John; McDuffie, Marcia; Wang, JuFang; Zhang, Xue-Qian; Song, Jianliang; Cheung, Joseph Y; Tucker, Amy L

    2012-06-01

    Phospholemman (PLM) regulates [Na(+) ](i), [Ca(2+)](i) and contractility through its interactions with Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase (NKA) and Na(+) /Ca(2+) exchanger (NCX1) in the heart. Both expression and phosphorylation of PLM are altered after myocardial infarction (MI) and heart failure. We tested the hypothesis that absence of PLM regulation of NKA and NCX1 in PLM-knockout (KO) mice is detrimental. Three weeks after MI, wild-type (WT) and PLM-KO hearts were similarly hypertrophied. PLM expression was lower but fractional phosphorylation was higher in WT-MI compared to WT-sham hearts. Left ventricular ejection fraction was severely depressed in WT-MI but significantly less depressed in PLM-KO-MI hearts despite similar infarct sizes. Compared with WT-sham myocytes, the abnormal [Ca(2+) ], transient and contraction amplitudes observed in WT-MI myocytes were ameliorated by genetic absence of PLM. In addition, NCX1 current was depressed in WT-MI but not in PLM-KO-MI myocytes. Despite improved myocardial and myocyte performance, PLM-KO mice demonstrated reduced survival after MI. Our findings indicate that alterations in PLM expression and phosphorylation are important adaptations post-MI, and that complete absence of PLM regulation of NKA and NCX1 is detrimental in post-MI animals.

  9. Phospholemman Deficiency in Postinfarct Hearts: Enhanced Contractility but Increased Mortality

    PubMed Central

    Mirza, M. Ayoub; Lane, Susan; Yang, Zequan; Karaoli, Themis; Akosah, Kwame; Hossack, John; McDuffie, Marcia; Wang, JuFang; Zhang, Xue-Qian; Song, Jianliang; Cheung, Joseph Y.; Tucker, Amy L.

    2013-01-01

    Phospholemman (PLM) regulates [Na+]i, [Ca2+]i and contractility through its interactions with Na+-K+-ATPase (NKA) and Na+/Ca2+ exchanger (NCX1) in the heart. Both expression and phosphorylation of PLM are altered after myocardial infarction (MI) and heart failure. We tested the hypothesis that absence of PLM regulation of NKA and NCX1 in PLM-knockout (KO) mice is detrimental. Three weeks after MI, wild-type (WT) and PLM-KO hearts were similarly hypertrophied. PLM expression was lower but fractional phosphorylation was higher in WT-MI compared to WT-sham hearts. Left ventricular ejection fraction was severely depressed in WT-MI but significantly less depressed in PLM-KO-MI hearts despite similar infarct sizes. Compared with WT-sham myocytes, the abnormal [Ca2+]i transient and contraction amplitudes observed in WT-MI myocytes were ameliorated by genetic absence of PLM. In addition, NCX1 current was depressed in WT-MI but not in PLM-KO-MI myocytes. Despite improved myocardial and myocyte performance, PLM-KO mice demonstrated reduced survival after MI. Our findings indicate that alterations in PLM expression and phosphorylation are important adaptations post-MI, and that complete absence of PLM regulation of NKA and NCX1 is detrimental in post-MI animals. PMID:22686200

  10. [The scars of Andy Warhol].

    PubMed

    Scholz, A

    1996-02-01

    The biographical and artistic documents describing to the attempted assassination of the artist Andy Warhol are reviewed. The visible scars are interpreted as symbols of the damaged integrity of the skin.

  11. Burn Scars Across Southern California

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-11-26

    Brush fires consumed nearly 750,000 acres across Southern California between October 21 and November 18, 2003. Burn scars and vegetation changes wrought by the fires are illustrated in these false-color images from NASA Terra spacecraft.

  12. Skin to serosa: scar endometrioma.

    PubMed

    Menon, Maya; T A, Sridevi; P N, Chandrika; Selvakumar A, Sathish

    2014-10-01

    Extra pelvic endometriosis, an underappreciated and misdiagnosed gynaecological problem has been reported here for its rare location. Patient presented with swelling and cyclical pain over vertical scar (caesarean). Diagnosis was made on high index of clinical suspicion which was complimented by Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI). Scar endometrioma extended from the skin upto the uterine serosa which is extremely rare. Wide excision of endometrioma followed by mesh repair was done. Histopathology confirmed the diagnosis.

  13. Outcome and survival analysis of surgical repair of post-infarction ventricular septal rupture.

    PubMed

    Pang, Philip Y K; Sin, Yoong Kong; Lim, Chong Hee; Tan, Teing Ee; Lim, See Lim; Chao, Victor T T; Su, Jang Wen; Chua, Yeow Leng

    2013-03-09

    To review the experience of surgical repair of post-infarction ventricular septal rupture (VSR) and analyze the associated outcomes and prognostic factors. Following approval from the Singhealth Centralised Institutional Review Board (reference: 2011/881/C), a retrospective review was performed on 38 consecutive patients who had undergone surgical repair of post-infarction VSR between 1999 and 2011. Continuous variables were expressed as either mean ± standard deviation or median with 25th and 75th percentiles. These were compared using two-tailed t-test or Mann-Whitney U test respectively. Categorical variables were compared using chi-square or Fisher's exact test. To identify predictors of operative mortality, univariate analysis of perioperative variables followed by multivariate analysis of significant univariate risk factors was performed. A two-tailed p-value < 0.05 was used to indicate statistical significance. Mean age was 65.7 ± 9.4 years with 52.6% males. The VSR was anterior in 28 (73.7%) and posterior in 10 patients. Median interval from myocardial infarction to VSR was 1 day (1, 4). Pre-operative intra-aortic balloon pump was inserted in 37 patients (97.8%). Thirty-six patients (94.7%) underwent coronary angiography.Thirty-five patients (92.1%) underwent patch repair. Mean aortic cross clamp time was 82 ± 40 minutes and mean cardiopulmonary bypass time was 152 ± 52 minutes. Coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) was performed in 19 patients (50%), with a mean of 1.5 ± 0.7 distal anastomoses. Operative mortality within 30 days was 39.5%.Univariate analysis identified emergency surgery, New York Heart Association (NYHA) class, inotropic support, right ventricular dysfunction, EuroSCORE II, intra-operative red cell transfusion, post-operative renal failure and renal replacement therapy (RRT) as predictors of operative mortality. Multivariate analysis identified NYHA class and post-operative RRT as predictors of operative mortality.Ten year overall

  14. Current therapeutic approach to acne scars.

    PubMed

    Basta-Juzbašić, Aleksandra

    2010-01-01

    The occurrence and incidence of acne scarring is different. Lasting for years, acne can cause both physical and psychological scarring. Scarring frequently results from severe inflammatory nodulocystic acne but may also result from more superficial inflamed lesions or from self-manipulation. There are two general types of acne scars: hypertrophic (keloid) scars, and atrophic (icepick, rolling and boxcar) scars. The management of acne scarring includes various types of resurfacing (chemical peels, lasers, lights, cryotherapy), use of dermal fillers, and surgical methods such as dermabrasion, subcision or punch excision. Individual scar characteristics, including color, texture and morphology, determine the treatment choice. Combining treatment methods may provide additional improvement compared with one method alone. It should be noted that none of the currently available treatments can achieve complete resolution of the scar. The best method of preventing or limiting scarring is to treat acne early enough to minimize the extent and duration of inflammation.

  15. Fillers for the improvement in acne scars

    PubMed Central

    Wollina, Uwe; Goldman, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    Acne is a common inflammatory disease. Scarring is an unwanted end point of acne. Both atrophic and hypertrophic scar types occur. Soft-tissue augmentation aims to improve atrophic scars. In this review, we will focus on the use of dermal fillers for acne scar improvement. Therefore, various filler types are characterized, and available data on their use in acne scar improvement are analyzed. PMID:26491364

  16. Prostaglandin E₂ promotes post-infarction cardiomyocyte replenishment by endogenous stem cells.

    PubMed

    Hsueh, Ying-Chang; Wu, Jasmine M F; Yu, Chun-Keung; Wu, Kenneth K; Hsieh, Patrick C H

    2014-04-01

    Although self-renewal ability of adult mammalian heart has been reported, few pharmacological treatments are known to promote cardiomyocyte regeneration after injury. In this study, we demonstrate that the critical period of stem/progenitor cell-mediated cardiomyocyte replenishment is initiated within 7 days and saturates on day 10 post-infarction. Moreover, blocking the inflammatory reaction with COX-2 inhibitors may also reduce the capability of endogenous stem/progenitor cells to repopulate lost cells. Injection of the COX-2 product PGE2 enhances cardiomyocyte replenishment in young mice and recovers cell renewal through attenuating TGF-β1 signaling in aged mice. Further analyses suggest that cardiac stem cells are PGE2-responsive and that PGE2 may regulate stem cell activity directly through the EP2 receptor or indirectly by modulating its micro-environment in vivo. Our findings provide evidence that PGE2 holds great potential for cardiac regeneration.

  17. Delivery of intramyocardial diffused laser light for treatment of postinfarction ventricular tachycardia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ware, David L.; Yang, Chunjie; Gowda, Ashok; Bell, Brent A.; Boor, Paul; Motamedi, Massoud

    1997-05-01

    Ventricular tachycardia (VT) is a rapid and life-threatening cardiac arrhythmia that most often occurs after healing of myocardial infarction. The same catheter techniques that use resistive endocardial heating to treat supraventricular tachycardias are less effective against post-infarction VT, in part because cure of the latter arrhythmia requires large volume, deep tissue coagulation. Greater risk may also be incurred when standard percutaneous methods are used to induce deep tissue heating, because excess endocardial damage can cause mural thrombi, and a large area of non-lethal endocardial injury may itself generate VT. To address these problems we have developed a unique optical fiber for direct intramyocardial photocoagulation which, when coupled to a diode laser (805 nm), can generate lesions up to 1 cm deep and wide without disruption of the endocardium. With further refinement this system may effectively and safely cure post- infarction VT.

  18. Scarring effects on tunneling in chaotic double-well potentials

    SciTech Connect

    Bies, W. E.; Kaplan, L.; Heller, E. J.

    2001-07-01

    The connection between scarring and tunneling in chaotic double-well potentials is studied in detail through the distribution of level splittings. The mean level splitting is found to have oscillations as a function of energy, as expected if scarring plays a role in determining the size of the splittings, and the spacing between peaks is observed to be periodic of period 2{pi}{Dirac_h} in action. Moreover, the size of the oscillations is directly correlated with the strength of scarring. These results are interpreted within the theoretical framework of Creagh and Whelan. The semiclassical limit and finite-{Dirac_h} effects are discussed, and connections are made with reaction rates and resonance widths in metastable wells.

  19. Scar remodeling after strabismus surgery.

    PubMed Central

    Ludwig, I H

    1999-01-01

    PURPOSE: Patients with overcorrected strabismus (and several patients with undercorrection after extraocular muscle resection) underwent exploration of previously operated muscles, with the intention of advancing their tendons to prevent the need for surgery on additional muscles. Unexpectedly, it was found that, in many cases, an elongated scar segment of variable length was interposed between the muscle and its insertion site on the sclera. Laboratory investigations were carried out to elucidate the underlying mechanism(s) and to create an animal model of the disorder. METHODS: Lengthened scars were repaired on 198 muscles during 134 procedures performed on 123 patients. The scars consisted of amorphous connective tissue interposed between the globe and normal tendon. Repair was accomplished by excision of the scar and reattachment of the muscle to sclera, using absorbable sutures in 64 cases and nonabsorbable sutures in 70 cases. Histopathologic examination was performed on 82 clinical specimens, and tissue culture studies were performed on 7 specimens. To develop an animal model, 10 New Zealand white rabbits underwent bilateral superior rectus resection. Half of the eyes received sub-Tenon's injections of collagenase over the operative site during weeks 2, 3, 5, and 6 postoperatively; the other half received saline solution injections on the same schedule. At 10 weeks, half the sites were studied histologically, and the other half underwent collagen creep analysis. In a second study, the use of absorbable versus nonabsorbable sutures was compared in the rabbit model. RESULTS: In the clinical cases, the mean length of the elongated scar segments was 4.2 mm. A total of 105 of the 134 repair procedures were judged successful. Thirty-one procedures resulted in recurrence of the original overcorrection; 7 of these had documented restretches. Factors that distinguished patients with stretched scars from patients with classic slipped muscles included minimal or no

  20. Genetic risk factors for hypertrophic scar development.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Callie M; Hocking, Anne M; Honari, Shari; Muffley, Lara A; Ga, Maricar; Gibran, Nicole S

    2013-01-01

    Hypertrophic scars (HTSs) occur in 30 to 72% patients after thermal injury. Risk factors include skin color, female sex, young age, burn site, and burn severity. Recent correlations between genetic variations and clinical conditions suggest that single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) may be associated with HTS formation. The authors hypothesized that an SNP in the p27 gene (rs36228499) previously associated with decreased restenosis after coronary stenting would be associated with lower Vancouver Scar Scale (VSS) measurements and decreased itching. Patient and injury characteristics were collected from adults with thermal burns. VSS scores were calculated at 4 to 9 months after injury. Genotyping was performed using real-time polymerase chain reaction. Logistic regression was used to determine risk factors for HTS as measured by a VSS score >7. Three hundred subjects had a median age of 39 years (range, 18-91); 69% were male and median burn size was 7% TBSA (range, 0.25-80). Consistent with literature, the p27 variant SNP had an allele frequency of 40%, but was not associated with reduced HTS formation or lower itch scores in any genetic model. HTS formation was associated with American Indian/Alaskan Native race (odds ratio [OR], 12.2; P = .02), facial burns (OR, 9.4; P = .04), and burn size ≥20% TBSA (OR, 1.99; P = .03). Although the p27 SNP may protect against vascular fibroproliferation, the effect cannot be generalized to cutaneous scars. This study suggests that American Indian/Alaskan Native race, facial burns, and higher %TBSA are independent risk factors for HTS. The American Indian/Alaskan Native association suggests that there are potentially yet-to-be-identified genetic variants.

  1. Burns, hypertrophic scar and galactorrhea.

    PubMed

    Karimi, Hamid; Nourizad, Samad; Momeni, Mahnoush; Rahbar, Hosein; Momeni, Mazdak; Farhadi, Khosro

    2013-07-01

    An 18-year-old woman was admitted to Motahari Burn Center suffering from 30% burns. Treatment modalities were carried out for the patient and she was discharged after 20 days. Three to four months later she developed hypertrophic scar on her chest and upper limbs. At the same time she developed galactorrhea in both breasts and had a disturbed menstrual cycle four months post-burn. On investigation, we found hyperprolactinemia and no other reasons for the high level of prolactin were detected.She received treatment for both the hypertrophic scar and the severe itching she was experiencing. After seven months, her prolactin level had decreased but had not returned to the normal level. It seems that refractory hypertrophic scar is related to the high level of prolactin in burns patients.

  2. Burns, hypertrophic scar and galactorrhea

    PubMed Central

    Karimi, Hamid; Nourizad, Samad; Momeni, Mahnoush; Rahbar, Hosein; Momeni, Mazdak; Farhadi, Khosro

    2013-01-01

    Abstract: An 18-year old woman was admitted to Motahari Burn Center suffering from 30% burns. Treatment modalities were carried out for the patient and she was discharged after 20 days. Three to four months later she developed hypertrophic scar on her chest and upper limbs. At the same time she developed galactorrhea in both breasts and had a disturbed menstrual cycle four months post-burn. On investigation, we found hyperprolactinemia and no other reasons for the high level of prolactin were detected. She received treatment for both the hypertrophic scar and the severe itching she was experiencing. After seven months, her prolactin level had decreased but had not returned to the normal level. It seems that refractory hypertrophic scar is related to the high level of prolactin in burns patients. PMID:23456048

  3. [The architectonics of the left heart ventricle and the characteristics of the blood flow in a postinfarct aneurysm].

    PubMed

    Roeva, L A; Chubarova, E Ia

    1998-01-01

    The paper analyzes left ventricular structure-fraction relationships in the development of postinfarct aneurysm. The altered internal architectonics induces to systemic hemodynamic changes, drastically elevated intraventricular pressure. This is caused by to the dysfunction of the papillary-trabecular complex in the left ventricular cavity, which in turn. This leads to the fact that the heart work as a positive-displacement pump, by losing its capacity as a centrifugal component, by making the myocardium require additional energy expenditures, which in turn appears as varying heart failure. This investigation is of definite practical value in developing adequate correction methods for postinfarct aneurysm which can occur with the retained or formed certain ratios of cardiac structures.

  4. Postmastectomy radiotherapy with integrated scar boost using helical tomotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Rong Yi; Yadav, Poonam; Welsh, James S.; Fahner, Tasha; Paliwal, Bhudatt

    2012-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate helical tomotherapy dosimetry in postmastectomy patients undergoing treatment for chest wall and positive nodal regions with simultaneous integrated boost (SIB) in the scar region using strip bolus. Six postmastectomy patients were scanned with a 5-mm-thick strip bolus covering the scar planning target volume (PTV) plus 2-cm margin. For all 6 cases, the chest wall received a total cumulative dose of 49.3-50.4 Gy with daily fraction size of 1.7-2.0 Gy. Total dose to the scar PTV was prescribed to 58.0-60.2 Gy at 2.0-2.5 Gy per fraction. The supraclavicular PTV and mammary nodal PTV received 1.7-1.9 dose per fraction. Two plans (with and without bolus) were generated for all 6 cases. To generate no-bolus plans, strip bolus was contoured and overrode to air density before planning. The setup reproducibility and delivered dose accuracy were evaluated for all 6 cases. Dose-volume histograms were used to evaluate dose-volume coverage of targets and critical structures. We observed reduced air cavities with the strip bolus setup compared with what we normally see with the full bolus. The thermoluminescence dosimeters (TLD) in vivo dosimetry confirmed accurate dose delivery beneath the bolus. The verification plans performed on the first day megavoltage computed tomography (MVCT) image verified that the daily setup and overall dose delivery was within 2% accuracy compared with the planned dose. The hotspot of the scar PTV in no-bolus plans was 111.4% of the prescribed dose averaged over 6 cases compared with 106.6% with strip bolus. With a strip bolus only covering the postmastectomy scar region, we observed increased dose uniformity to the scar PTV, higher setup reproducibility, and accurate dose delivered beneath the bolus. This study demonstrates the feasibility of using a strip bolus over the scar using tomotherapy for SIB dosimetry in postmastectomy treatments.

  5. Inhibition of Let-7 microRNA attenuates myocardial remodeling and improves cardiac function postinfarction in mice.

    PubMed

    Tolonen, Anna-Maria; Magga, Johanna; Szabó, Zoltán; Viitala, Pirkko; Gao, Erhe; Moilanen, Anne-Mari; Ohukainen, Pauli; Vainio, Laura; Koch, Walter J; Kerkelä, Risto; Ruskoaho, Heikki; Serpi, Raisa

    2014-08-01

    The members of lethal-7 (Let-7) microRNA (miRNA) family are involved in regulation of cell differentiation and reprogramming of somatic cells into induced pluripotent stem cells. However, their function in the heart is not known. In this study, we examined the effect of inhibiting the function of Let-7c miRNA on the progression of postinfarction left ventricular (LV) remodeling in mice. Myocardial infarction was induced with permanent ligation of left anterior descending coronary artery with a 4-week follow-up period. Let-7c miRNA was inhibited with a specific antagomir administered intravenously. The inhibition of Let-7c miRNA downregulated the levels of mature Let-7c miRNA and its other closely related members of Let-7 family in the heart and resulted in increased expression of pluripotency-associated genes Oct4 and Sox2 in cardiac fibroblasts in vitro and in adult mouse heart in vivo. Importantly, Let-7c inhibitor prevented the deterioration of cardiac function postinfarction, as demonstrated by preserved LV ejection fraction and elevated cardiac output. Improvement in cardiac function by Let-7c inhibitor postinfarction was associated with decreased apoptosis, reduced fibrosis, and reduction in the number of discoidin domain receptor 2-positive fibroblasts, while the number of c-kit(+) cardiac stem cells and Ki-67(+) proliferating cells remained unaltered. In conclusion, inhibition of Let-7 miRNA may be beneficial for the prevention of postinfarction LV remodeling and progression of heart failure.

  6. Inhibition of Let-7 microRNA attenuates myocardial remodeling and improves cardiac function postinfarction in mice

    PubMed Central

    Tolonen, Anna-Maria; Magga, Johanna; Szabó, Zoltán; Viitala, Pirkko; Gao, Erhe; Moilanen, Anne-Mari; Ohukainen, Pauli; Vainio, Laura; Koch, Walter J; Kerkelä, Risto; Ruskoaho, Heikki; Serpi, Raisa

    2014-01-01

    The members of lethal-7 (Let-7) microRNA (miRNA) family are involved in regulation of cell differentiation and reprogramming of somatic cells into induced pluripotent stem cells. However, their function in the heart is not known. In this study, we examined the effect of inhibiting the function of Let-7c miRNA on the progression of postinfarction left ventricular (LV) remodeling in mice. Myocardial infarction was induced with permanent ligation of left anterior descending coronary artery with a 4-week follow-up period. Let-7c miRNA was inhibited with a specific antagomir administered intravenously. The inhibition of Let-7c miRNA downregulated the levels of mature Let-7c miRNA and its other closely related members of Let-7 family in the heart and resulted in increased expression of pluripotency-associated genes Oct4 and Sox2 in cardiac fibroblasts in vitro and in adult mouse heart in vivo. Importantly, Let-7c inhibitor prevented the deterioration of cardiac function postinfarction, as demonstrated by preserved LV ejection fraction and elevated cardiac output. Improvement in cardiac function by Let-7c inhibitor postinfarction was associated with decreased apoptosis, reduced fibrosis, and reduction in the number of discoidin domain receptor 2–positive fibroblasts, while the number of c-kit+ cardiac stem cells and Ki-67+ proliferating cells remained unaltered. In conclusion, inhibition of Let-7 miRNA may be beneficial for the prevention of postinfarction LV remodeling and progression of heart failure. PMID:25505600

  7. Modified Dovetail-Plasty in Scar Revision

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Suk Joon; Yang, Jihoon; Kim, Seon Gyu; Jung, Sung Won; Koh, Sung Hoon

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Scar revision is one of the fundamental techniques in the field of plastic and reconstructive surgery. Local flaps, such as a Z-plasty, W-plasty, or geometric broken-line closure, have been used for scar revision. Camouflaging a scar during scar revision for marginal scars from skin grafts and flaps, trapdoor scars, and linear scars is difficult. We describe our experience with the use of modified dovetail-plasty for scar revision in these difficult areas. Our study group consisted of 28 cases among 22 patients (9 males and 13 females) with a mean age of 33.6 years (range, 6–61 years). The conspicuous scars were located on the face (50%) and extremities (50%). The authors designed Y-shaped incision lines to relax the skin tension lines on one side of the excision line and trapezoid incision lines on the other side. There were 16 follow-up operations performed over 6 months after the initial operation among a total of 22 patients. There were scar depressions (2 patients) and a hypertrophic scar (1 patient) at the interval area between the dovetail flaps. A diffuse hypertrophic scar occurred in 1 patient with a dorsal foot scar. The overall success rates of the procedure as assessed by the surgeons were as follows: excellent (75%), good (12.4%), fair (6.3%), and poor (6.3%). This new local flap can achieve an inconspicuous scar using a blurred scar line and reducing tension. The authors recommend a modified dovetail-plasty for the revision of trapdoor scars and scars under excessive tension. PMID:24577307

  8. An assessment of the correlation between early postinfarction pyramidal tract Wallerian degeneration and nerve function recovery using diffusion tensor imaging.

    PubMed

    Guo, A H; Hao, F L; Liu, L F; Wang, B J; Jiang, X F

    2017-01-23

    This study aimed to evaluate the clinical significance of diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) in the early diagnosis of pyramidal tract Wallerian degeneration (WD) and assessment of neurological recovery following cerebral infarction. This study included 23 patients with acute cerebral infarction and 10 healthy adult controls. All participants underwent both magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and DTI scans. DTI images were analyzed using the Functional MRI of the Brain Software Library to determine the regions of interest (ROI) and obtain the mean diffusivity (MD) and fractional anisotropy (FA) value for each ROI. The correlation between FA or MD and postinfarction functional recovery of the nervous system was further analyzed to assess the feasibility of using a DTI scan in the evaluation of functional recovery of the nervous system in patients with cerebral infarction. DTI may be useful in detecting signals of early postinfarction pyramidal tract WD and is useful for the evaluation of postinfarction neurological recovery. Cerebral lesions were detected using MRI in all patients. It was found that in some patients, the FA value of the ipsilateral pyramidal tract on DTI was decreased as early as day 3 after the onset of infarction and in all patients by day 7. Subsequent correlation studies showed that the FA value of the ipsilateral pyramidal tract on day 13 was negatively correlated with the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale score, but positively correlated with the Barthel Index, motricity index, and modified Rankin Scale scores.

  9. Clinical and histological results in the treatment of atrophic and hypertrophic scars using a combined method of radiofrequency, ultrasound, and transepidermal drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Trelles, Mario A; Martínez-Carpio, Pedro A

    2016-08-01

    Scars are problematic for thousands of patients. Scarring is a natural part of the healing process after an injury. However, the appearance of a scar and its treatment depend on multiple factors and on the experience of the therapist and the options available. Despite a plethora of rapidly evolving treatment options and technical advances, the management of atrophic and hypertrophic scars remains difficult. Innovative technologies provide an attractive alternative to conventional methods in the treatment of scars. The purpose of this trial was to determine the clinical and histological results of a method of treatment that combines radiofrequency, ultrasound, and transepidermal drug delivery. This was a prospective study conducted on 14 patients with scars of different sizes, types, and characteristics. All patients underwent six treatment sessions with the Legato device. Atrophic scars were treated with retinoic acid and hypertrophic scars with triamcinolone. Photographs and biopsies were taken before treatment and at 6 months after the last treatment session. The scars improved significantly (P < 0.0001). The mean attenuation in the severity of scars was 67% (range: 50-75%), where 100% indicates complete disappearance of the scar. Clinical and histological images of scar tissue in six patients in whom attenuation in the range of 55-75% was achieved are shown. Biopsies show regenerative changes in the scar tissue, in both the epidermis and dermis. The method makes it possible to treat extensive, heterogeneous scars on different sites with good results that are similar and predictable. © 2016 The International Society of Dermatology.

  10. Mapping Fire Scars in the Brazilian Cerrado Using AVHRR Imagery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hlavka, C. A.; Ambrosia, V. G.; Brass, J. A.; Rezendez, A.; Alexander, S.; Guild, L. S.; Peterson, David L. (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    The Brazilian cerrado, or savanna, spans an area of 1,800,000 square kilometers on the great plateau of Central Brazil. Large fires covering hundreds of square kilometers, frequently occur in wildland areas of the cerrado, dominated by grasslands or grasslands mixed with shrubs and small trees, and also within area in the cerrado used for agricultural purposes, particularly for grazing. Smaller fires, typically extending over arm of a few square kilometers or less, are associated with the clewing of crops, such as dry land rice. A method for mapping fire scars and differentiating them from extensive areas of bare sod with AVHRR bands 1 (.55 -.68 micrometer) and 3 (3.5 - 3.9 micrometers) and measures of performance based on comparison with maps of fires with Landsat imagery will be presented. Methods of estimating total area burned from the AVHRR fire scar map will be discussed and related to land use and scar size.

  11. Mapping Fire Scars in the Brazilian Cerrado Using AVHRR Imagery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hlavka, C. A.; Ambrosia, V. G.; Brass, J. A.; Rezendez, A.; Alexander, S.; Guild, L. S.; Peterson, David L. (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    The Brazilian cerrado, or savanna, spans an area of 1,800,000 square kilometers on the great plateau of Central Brazil. Large fires covering hundreds of square kilometers, frequently occur in wildland areas of the cerrado, dominated by grasslands or grasslands mixed with shrubs and small trees, and also within area in the cerrado used for agricultural purposes, particularly for grazing. Smaller fires, typically extending over arm of a few square kilometers or less, are associated with the clewing of crops, such as dry land rice. A method for mapping fire scars and differentiating them from extensive areas of bare sod with AVHRR bands 1 (.55 -.68 micrometer) and 3 (3.5 - 3.9 micrometers) and measures of performance based on comparison with maps of fires with Landsat imagery will be presented. Methods of estimating total area burned from the AVHRR fire scar map will be discussed and related to land use and scar size.

  12. Answers to Common Questions about Scars

    MedlinePlus

    ... Donation Volunteer Efforts Answers to Common Questions About Scars skip to submenu What We Do Cleft & Craniofacial Educational Materials Answers to Common Questions About Scars To download the PDF version of this factsheet, ...

  13. Before and After Photos: Treatment of Hypertrophic Scars

    MedlinePlus

    ... Surgery Conditions Acne Scars Aging Hands Age Spots Aging Skin Birthmarks Burn Scars Cellulite Crow's Feet Droopy Eyelids ... Surgery Conditions Acne Scars Aging Hands Age Spots Aging Skin Birthmarks Burn Scars Cellulite Crow's Feet Droopy Eyelids ...

  14. Soft tissue trauma and scar revision.

    PubMed

    Mobley, Steven R; Sjogren, Phayvanh P

    2014-11-01

    Numerous techniques and treatments have been described for scar revision, with most studies focusing on the adult population. A comprehensive review of the literature reveals a paucity of references related specifically to scar revision in children. This review describes the available modalities in pediatric facial scar revision. The authors have integrated current practices in soft tissue trauma and scar revision, including closure techniques and materials, topical therapy, steroid injection, cutaneous laser therapy, and tissue expanders.

  15. Midcervical scar satisfaction in thyroidectomy patients.

    PubMed

    Best, Amy R; Shipchandler, Taha Z; Cordes, Susan R

    2017-05-01

    Assess long-term patient satisfaction with conventional thyroidectomy scars and the impact of thyroidectomy scars on patient quality of life. Validated survey administration and retrospective review of clinical and demographic data. Patients who underwent conventional thyroidectomy through years 2000 to 2010 were identified and administered the validated Patient Scar Assessment Questionnaire. Mean satisfaction, appearance and scar-consciousness scores were determined. Thirty-seven patients also measured the length of their current scar. Patient demographic and operative data were collected retrospectively from the medical record. Data were analyzed with one-way analysis of variance and independent samples t testing. Sixty of 69 patients perceived the appearance of their scar to be "good" or "excellent." Sixty-three patients (91.3%) were satisfied with all scar outcomes; 67 (97.1%) were satisfied with the overall appearance of their scar. Mean total satisfaction score was 17.3 (<26 indicates a high level of satisfaction). Fifty-six (81.2%) were "not at all" self-conscious of their scar; 65 (94.2%) reported no attempt to hide their scar. Seven patients (10.1%) indicated any likelihood of pursuing scar revision. Females had significantly higher total satisfaction scores, consciousness scores, and satisfaction with appearance scores. The effect of perceived scar length was significant for scar-consciousness, not patient satisfaction. The majority of patients were satisfied with their thyroidectomy scar appearance. Few patients reported a desire to hide the scar or pursue revision. Women were more likely to be dissatisfied than men. Length may play a role in scar consciousness. 4 Laryngoscope, 127:1247-1252, 2017. © 2016 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  16. Scar contractures of the hand.

    PubMed

    Hegge, Theresa; Henderson, Megan; Amalfi, Ashley; Bueno, Reuben A; Neumeister, Michael W

    2011-10-01

    This article discusses scar contracture of the hand. It contains a brief outline of the anatomy of the hand and upper extremities and the types of injuries involved. Hand reconstruction, including examination, nonoperative treatment, surgery, excision and skin grafting, flaps, postoperative management, and complications, are covered. 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Intrauterine endometriotic cyst at the site of previous cesarean scar; scar endometriosis.

    PubMed

    Isci, H; Gonenc, G; Yigiter, A B; Guducu, N; Dünder, I

    2015-01-01

    Uterine scar endometriosis is an extremely rare entitiy. As the surgical procedures of the uterus increases through time, scar endometriosis may be diagnosed more often in the future. A case of uterine scar endometriosis is presented with complaints of menstruation lasting one day with associated pelvic pain. When a cystic mass in the site of previous surgery is diagnosed, scar endometriosis must be considered.

  18. A Mathematical Model of Regenerative Axon Growing along Glial Scar after Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xuning; Zhu, Weiping

    2016-01-01

    A major factor in the failure of central nervous system (CNS) axon regeneration is the formation of glial scar after the injury of CNS. Glial scar generates a dense barrier which the regenerative axons cannot easily pass through or by. In this paper, a mathematical model was established to explore how the regenerative axons grow along the surface of glial scar or bypass the glial scar. This mathematical model was constructed based on the spinal cord injury (SCI) repair experiments by transplanting Schwann cells as bridge over the glial scar. The Lattice Boltzmann Method (LBM) was used in this model for three-dimensional numerical simulation. The advantage of this model is that it provides a parallel and easily implemented algorithm and has the capability of handling complicated boundaries. Using the simulated data, two significant conclusions were made in this study: (1) the levels of inhibitory factors on the surface of the glial scar are the main factors affecting axon elongation and (2) when the inhibitory factor levels on the surface of the glial scar remain constant, the longitudinal size of the glial scar has greater influence on the average rate of axon growth than the transverse size. These results will provide theoretical guidance and reference for researchers to design efficient experiments. PMID:27274762

  19. The association between Bacillus Calmette-Guérin vaccination (1331 SSI) skin reaction and subsequent scar development in infants.

    PubMed

    Birk, Nina Marie; Nissen, Thomas Nørrelykke; Ladekarl, Monica; Zingmark, Vera; Kjærgaard, Jesper; Jensen, Trine Mølbæk; Jensen, Signe Kjeldgaard; Thøstesen, Lisbeth Marianne; Kofoed, Poul-Erik; Stensballe, Lone Graff; Andersen, Andreas; Pryds, Ole; Nielsen, Susanne Dam; Benn, Christine Stabell; Jeppesen, Dorthe Lisbeth

    2017-08-03

    The Bacillus Calmette-Guérin vaccine (BCG) against tuberculosis is administered intradermally, and vaccination is often followed by a scar at the injection site. Among BCG-vaccinated individuals, having a scar has been associated with lower mortality. We aimed to examine the impact of vaccination technique for scarring in a high income setting, by assessing the associations between the post injection reaction, the wheal size, and the probability of developing a scar, and scar size. This study was nested within a clinical multicenter study randomizing 4262 infants to either BCG vaccination (BCG 1331 SSI) or no intervention. In this substudy, including 492 vaccinated infants, the immediate post BCG vaccination reaction was registered as either wheal (a raised, blanched papule at the injection site), bulge (a palpable element at the injection site), or no reaction. The presence or absence of a BCG scar and the size the scar was measured at 13 months of age. Of 492 infants included, 87% had a wheal after vaccination, 11% had a bulge, and 2% had no reaction. The mean wheal size was 3.8 mm (95% confidence interval 3.7-3.9). Overall, 95% (442/466, 26 lost to follow-up) of BCG-vaccinated infants had a scar at 13 months of age. In infants with a wheal, the probability of developing a scar was 96%, declining to 87% in the case of a bulge, and to 56% in the case of no reaction (p for same probability = 0.03). Wheal size was positively correlated with the probability of getting a scar and scar size. Scarring after BCG vaccination has been associated with lower infant mortality. In a high-income setting, we found that correct injection technique is highly important for the development of a BCG scar and that registration of the category of BCG skin reaction (as wheal, bulge, or no reaction) may be used to identify infants at risk of scar failure. Finally, the wheal size was positively associated with both the probability of getting a scar and scar size. The study was

  20. Stimulated infrared thermography applied to differentiate scar tissue from peri-scar tissue: a preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Riquet, Damien; Houel, Nicolas; Bodnar, Jean-Luc

    2016-08-01

    Every human injury leads to a scar formation. The healing process leads to the formation of new tissue: the scar, which is different from the original tissue. This process is influenced by mechanical strength and the local vasculature is modified. The purpose of this study is to show that there are various temperatures between the scar and the peri-scar area associated with the healing process that can be estimated using the thermal infrared camera. In the study, 12 scars were stimulated by cold. Several changes of temperature were observed between scar and peri-scar area for 10 min. Scars appeared significantly colder with a Wilcoxon test (p = 0.01). Results showed that stimulated infrared thermography can be used to monitor the temperature difference between the scar and peri-scar tissue.

  1. Matrix metalloproteinases and tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinases in patients with different types of scars and keloids.

    PubMed

    Ulrich, Dietmar; Ulrich, Franziska; Unglaub, Frank; Piatkowski, Andrzej; Pallua, Norbert

    2010-06-01

    Hypertrophic scars and keloids are fibroproliferative skin disorders characterised by progressive deposition of collagen. Our study is designed to investigate the expression and concentration of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinases (TIMPs) in different types of scars and keloids. Total RNA from 19 proliferative hypertrophic scar samples of patients with extended burns (total body surface area (TBSA): 21+/-12%), 18 mature hypertrophic scar samples from patients after elective surgery, 14 keloid samples and 18 normotrophic scar samples was, respectively, extracted, and then mRNA was isolated. Besides, biopsies were obtained from non-scarred skin of the patients and extraction of total RNA performed. Relative mRNA expression of MMP 2, MMP 9, TIMP 1 and TIMP 2 was measured with reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Serum concentrations of MMP-1, -2, -9, TIMP-1, and -2 were determined using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Patients with extended hypertrophic scars after burn trauma presented a significantly higher TIMP-1 concentration (p<0.05) in their sera than the other patients. The relative expression of MMP 2 was significantly higher in samples of proliferative hypertrophic scars after burn injury. The relative expression of TIMP 1 and TIMP 2 was significantly higher in scar tissue of patients with proliferative and mature hypertrophic scars and keloids than in their regular skin and in scar samples of patients with normotrophic scars. The expression of TIMP 1 was significantly higher in samples of patients with keloids than in patients with hypertrophic scars. The concentration of TIMP-1 in sera of patients varies depending on the size of the involved fibrotic scar tissue. A decrease in MMP-to-TIMP expression in scar tissue may contribute to increased synthesis and deposition of collagen, leading to a severe fibrotic reaction with pathologic scar formation. The results implicate non

  2. The effect of high-intensity aerobic interval training on postinfarction left ventricular remodelling

    PubMed Central

    Godfrey, Richard; Theologou, Thomas; Dellegrottaglie, Santo; Binukrishnan, Sukumaran; Wright, Jay; Whyte, Gregory; Ellison, Georgina

    2013-01-01

    This is the third in a series of case studies on an individual with normal coronaries who sustained an idiopathic acute myocardial infarction . Bilateral pulmonary emboli almost 2 years post-myocardial infarction (MI) revealed coagulopathy as the cause. The original MI resulted in 16% myocardial scar tissue. An increasing number of patients are surviving MI, hence the burden for healthcare often shifts to heart failure. Accumulating evidence suggests high-intensity aerobic interval exercise (AHIT) is efficacious in improving cardiac function in health and disease. However, its impact on MI scar has never been assessed. Accordingly, the 50-year-old subject of this case study undertook 60 weeks of regular AHIT. Successive cardiac MRI results demonstrate, for the first time, a decrease in MI scar with exercise and, alongside mounting evidence of high efficacy and low risk, suggests AHIT may be increasingly important in future prevention and reversing of disease and or amelioration of symptoms. PMID:23413285

  3. [The method for the postmortem verification of ventricular fibrillation as a mechanism of death from myocardial infarction and post-infarction cardiosclerosis].

    PubMed

    Korneva, Yu S; Dorosevich, A E

    2015-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to develop the objective method for the verification of death from ventricular fibrillation (VF) as a complication of myocardial infarction and post-infarction cardiosclerosis (PICS). A total of 20 cases of death during different periods after myocardial infarction and PICS were available for the analysis in which EGC-confirmed ventricular fibrillation was the immediate cause of the fatal outcome. The control group was comprised of 29 cases of death from other complications. The special emphasis was laid on the investigation of the affected region, the boundary areas, and intact zones of the heart. The size of cardiac cell populations surrounding capillaries was determined. The statistical treatment of the results of the study revealed the difference in the cellular infiltrate composition between the groups of patients who had died from ventricular fibrillation and other causes. The differences were largely reduced to the number of lymphocytes, neutrophils, and leukocytes. The data thus obtained provided a basis for the development of the method for the objective postmortem verification of the complication being considered.

  4. [Integrated diagnosis and treatment of scar].

    PubMed

    Cen, Y; Chen, J J

    2016-11-20

    Scar is the common disease in the field of burn and plastic surgery, and its diagnosis and treatment should be involved in overwhelming majority hospitals. There are many substandard methods and medical hidden dangers in diagnosis and treatment of scar, due to the unevenness of doctors' clinical experience. According to the classification of integral scar and diabrotic scar, the problems related to diagnosis and treatment of scar are systemically summarized and normalized in this article for decrease in the incidence of adverse events and medical hidden dangers.

  5. [Prevention and treatment of pathological scars].

    PubMed

    Petit Jornet, Jesep M; Teixidó Vidal, Xavier; Magrans Abril, Astrid; Cuixart Llopis, Salvador

    2004-01-01

    At times, the appearance of a pathological scar is a result of the scar process itself which can bring with it important physical and psychological complications for an affected person. The appearance of such a scar is more frequent in injuries which have followed a scar process caused as the consequence of a second operation and a disgraceful healing process. Preventive measures should be taken right at the start of treatment of the injury and continue during a set time after its initial closure. When, in spite of everything, a pathological scar appears, there are various materials and treatment techniques which provide different degrees of effectiveness.

  6. Melatonin alleviates postinfarction cardiac remodeling and dysfunction by inhibiting Mst1.

    PubMed

    Hu, Jianqiang; Zhang, Lei; Yang, Yang; Guo, Yanjie; Fan, Yanhong; Zhang, Mingming; Man, Wanrong; Gao, Erhe; Hu, Wei; Reiter, Russel J; Wang, Haichang; Sun, Dongdong

    2017-01-01

    Melatonin reportedly protects against several cardiovascular diseases including ischemia/reperfusion (I/R), atherosclerosis, and hypertension. The present study investigated the effects and mechanisms of melatonin on cardiomyocyte autophagy, apoptosis, and mitochondrial injury in the context of myocardial infarction (MI). We demonstrated that melatonin significantly alleviated cardiac dysfunction after MI. Four weeks after MI, echocardiography and Masson staining indicated that melatonin notably mitigated adverse left ventricle remodeling. The mechanism may be associated with increased autophagy, reduced apoptosis, and alleviated mitochondrial dysfunction. Furthermore, melatonin significantly inhibited Mst1 phosphorylation while promoting Sirt1 expression after MI, which indicates that Mst1/Sirt1 signaling may serve as the downstream target of melatonin. We thus constructed a MI model using Mst1 transgenic (Mst1 Tg) and Mst1 knockout (Mst1(-/-) ) mice. The absence of Mst1 abolished the favorable effects of melatonin on cardiac injury after MI. Consistently, melatonin administration did not further increase autophagy, decrease apoptosis, or alleviate mitochondrial integrity and biogenesis in Mst1 knockout mice subjected to MI injury. These results suggest that melatonin alleviates postinfarction cardiac remodeling and dysfunction by upregulating autophagy, decreasing apoptosis, and modulating mitochondrial integrity and biogenesis. The attributed mechanism involved, at least in part, Mst1/Sirt1 signaling. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Regional Myocardial Three-Dimensional Principal Strains During Post-Infarction Remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Pilla, James J; Koomalsingh, Kevin J; McGarvey, Jeremy R.; Witschey, Walter RT; Dougherty, Larry; Gorman, Joseph H.; Gorman, Robert C.

    2015-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to quantify myocardial 3D principal strains as the left ventricle (LV) remodels after myocardial infarction (MI). Serial quantification of myocardial strains is important for understanding the mechanical response of the LV to MI. Principal strains convert the 3D LV wall-based strain matrix with 3 normal and 3 shear elements, to a matrix with three non-zero normal elements, thereby eliminating the shear elements which are difficult to physically interpret. Methods The study was designed to measure principal strains of the remote, BZ and infarct regions in a porcine model of post- MI LV remodeling. MRI was used to measure function and strain at baseline, one-week, and four-week post-infarct. Principal strain was measured using 3D acquisition and optical flow method (OFM) for displacement tracking. Results Principal strains where altered as the LV remodeled. Maximum principal strain magnitude decreased in all regions including the non-infarcted remote while maximum principal strain angles rotated away from the radial direction in the BZ and infarct. Minimum principal strain magnitude followed a similar pattern however strain angles where altered in all regions. Evolution of principal strains correlated with adverse LV remodeling.. Conclusions Using a state-of-the-art Imaging and OFM technique 3D principal strains can be measured serially after MI in Pigs. Results are consistent with progressive infarct stretching as well as decreased contractile function in the BZ and remote myocardial regions. PMID:25620591

  8. Psychophysiological stress testing in postinfarction patients. Psychological correlates of cardiovascular arousal and abnormal cardiac responses.

    PubMed

    Zotti, A M; Bettinardi, O; Soffiantino, F; Tavazzi, L; Steptoe, A

    1991-04-01

    The psychophysiological responses to two mental stress tests (mental arithmetic and an interactive concentration task) were assessed in 168 unmedicated, male, postinfarction patients 36-69 years old. Patients also completed a standard battery of psychological tests. Psychophysiological responses were generally unrelated to age and education. Comparison of patients scoring high (more than 75%) and low (less than 25%) relative to the normal population on psychological measures indicated that heart rate and blood pressure responses to mental stress tests were significantly greater in those reporting low than in those reporting high neuroticism. The study population was subsequently divided into high, medium, and low cardiovascular responders on the basis of rate-pressure product reactions to the two stress tests. The three cardiovascular response groups did not differ in age, interval between myocardial infarction and stress testing, ejection fraction, incidence of exercise-induced ischemia, or ischemic signs during Holter monitoring. However, the high cardiovascular responders were more likely to manifest possible or definite electrocardiographic signs of ischemia or significant arrhythmia during mental stress testing than were the medium or low cardiovascular responders (50% versus 19.6% and 7%, respectively). High cardiovascular responders also reported lower levels of trait anxiety, neuroticism, psychophysiological symptoms, and depression.

  9. Surgical treatment of post-infarction left ventricular pseudoaneurysm: Case series highlighting various surgical strategies.

    PubMed

    Prifti, Edvin; Bonacchi, Massimo; Baboci, Arben; Giunti, Gabriele; Veshti, Altin; Demiraj, Aurel; Zeka, Merita; Rruci, Edlira; Bejko, Ervin

    2017-04-01

    The left ventricular pseudoaneurysm (LVP) is rare, the surgical experience is limited and its surgical treatment remains still a challenge with an elevated mortality. Herein, it is presented a retrospective analysis of our experience with acquired post infarct LVP over a10-year period. Between January 2006 through August 2016, a total of 13 patients underwent operation for post infarct pseudoaneurysm of the left ventricle. There were 10 men and 3 women and the mean age was 61 ± 7.6 years. 4 patients presented acute LVP. Two patients had preoperative intraortic balloon pump implantation. Various surgical techniques were used to obliterate the pseudoaneurysm such as direct pledgeted sutures buttressed by polytetrafluoroethylene felt, a Gore-Tex or Dacron patch, transatrial closure of LVP neck in submitral pseudoaneurysm, or linear closure in cases presenting associated postinfarct ventricular septal defect. Concomitant coronary artery bypasses were performed for significant stenoses in 12 patients, ventricular septal defect closure in 4 patients, mitral valve replacement in 3 and aortic valve replacement in 1 patient. Operative mortality was 30.8% (4 patients). Three of them were acute LVP. Three patients required the continuous hemodyalisis and 8 patients required intra-aortic balloon pump. At follow-up two deaths occurred at 1 and 3 years after surgery. In conclusion, this study revealed that surgical repair of post infarct left ventricular pseudoaneurysm was associated with an acceptable surgical mortality rate, that cardiac rupture did not occur in surgically treated patients.

  10. Postinfarction ventricular septal rupture: can we improve clinical outcome of surgical repair?

    PubMed

    Asai, Tohru

    2016-03-01

    Postinfarction ventricular septal rupture (VSR) is a lethal structural complication following acute myocardial infarction (AMI). Surgical repair of VSR was first reported in 1957 by Cooley. Since then, many methods have been introduced, variously using right and/or left ventriculotomy. Daggett used infarctectomy and septal reconstruction via left ventriculotomy, reporting 52% operative mortality when repair was attempted within 21 days, but only 7% when done after 3 weeks. Komeda and David described single pericardial patch infarct exclusion without infarctectomy through a left ventriculotomy in 1990. It seemed conceptually simple, and became a standard technique. Modifications of that technique and development of other methods have been reported by many surgeons. Nonetheless, recent clinical outcomes of surgical repairs demonstrated operative mortality from 19 to 81%. Predictors for poor survival include cardiogenic shock, the need for repair within 7 days after AMI, posterior VSR and shunt recurrence. Reasons for poor outcomes after surgical repair of VSR include preoperative cardiogenic shock, the unclear boundary between infarction and viable myocardium in the acute phase, and frequent shunt recurrence. Surgical complications such as bleeding from an LV incision and low output syndrome are significant concerns as well. We propose that the fundamental requirements for VSR closure include a sufficiently large patch securely fixed on the LV side of the septum, minimal damage to LV function, and simplicity of technique. Our "extended sandwich patch technique" fulfills those requirements, and has yielded improved outcomes without shunt recurrence, even within 7 days following onset, and for posterior VSR.

  11. Urgent Coronary Artery Bypass Surgery in a Patient with Postinfarction Angina and Active Myelomonocytic Leukaemia

    PubMed Central

    Galea, Samuel Anthony; Galea, Joseph

    2016-01-01

    Chronic myelomonocytic leukaemia (CMML) is a myelodysplastic/myeloproliferative neoplasm affecting the production and differentiation of the monocyte cell lineage. Cardiac surgery in the context of CMML poses challenges that are not routinely encountered. This is the first reported case in the literature of a patient with active CMML undergoing urgent on-pump coronary artery bypass grafting. A 68-year-old Caucasian man with a history of hypertension, hyperlipidaemia, hypothyroidism, and hypercholesterolaemia, who had been diagnosed by the haematologists with CMML a few months earlier but had remained untreated, underwent urgent surgical coronary revascularisation because of postinfarction angina following a non-ST elevation myocardial infarction associated with troponin I rise. The patient had fulminant postoperative myelomonocytic leukaemoid reaction, with a clinical picture of severe systemic inflammatory response syndrome and multiple organ dysfunction syndrome. This led to extensive vasodilation and heart failure that resulted in the death of the patient. Various authors have suggested different techniques and treatment options, each attempting to mitigate the effect of the postoperative inflammatory response. However, this is a high-risk endeavour with a myriad of inflammatory signals mobilised into action because of the surgical insult. Off-pump surgery or preoperative pharmacological attenuation of CMML activity might have dampened this response and resulted in a positive outcome for the patient. PMID:27990115

  12. Attenuation of post-infarction remodeling in rats by sustained myocardial growth hormone administration.

    PubMed

    Daskalopoulos, Evangelos P; Vilaeti, Agapi D; Barka, Eleonora; Mantzouratou, Polixeni; Kouroupis, Dimitrios; Kontonika, Marianthi; Tourmousoglou, Christos; Papalois, Apostolos; Pantos, Constantinos; Blankesteijn, W Matthijs; Agathopoulos, Simeon; Kolettis, Theofilos M

    2015-01-01

    Prevention of left ventricular remodeling is an important therapeutic target post-myocardial infarction. Experimentally, treatment with growth hormone (GH) is beneficial, but sustained local administration has not been thoroughly investigated. We studied 58 rats (322 ± 4 g). GH was administered via a biomaterial-scaffold, following in vitro and in vivo evaluation of degradation and drug-release curves. Treatment consisted of intra-myocardial injection of saline or alginate-hydrogel, with or without GH, 10 min after permanent coronary artery ligation. Echocardiographic and histologic remodeling-indices were examined 3 weeks post-ligation, followed by immunohistochemical evaluation of angiogenesis, collagen, macrophages and myofibroblasts. GH-release completed at 3 days and alginate-degradation at ∼7 days. Alginate + GH consistently improved left ventricular end-diastolic and end-systolic diameters, ventricular sphericity, wall tension index and infarct-thickness. Microvascular-density and myofibroblast-count in the infarct and peri-infarct areas were higher after alginate + GH. Macrophage-count and collagen-content did not differ between groups. Early, sustained GH-administration enhances angiogenesis and myofibroblast-activation and ameliorates post-infarction remodeling.

  13. Involvement of impaired desmosome-related proteins in hypertrophic scar intraepidermal blister formation.

    PubMed

    Tan, Jianglin; He, Weifeng; Luo, Gaoxing; Wu, Jun

    2015-11-01

    Hypertrophic scar is one of the unique fibrotic diseases in human. Intraepidermal blister is a common clinical symptom following the hypertrophic scar formation. However, little is known about the reason of blister creation. In this study, we selected three patients with hypertrophic scar as manifested by raised, erythematous, pruritic, blister and thickened appearance undergoing scar resection. The first scar sample was 6 months after burn from the neck of a 3 years old male patient with 10 score by Vancouver Scar Scale (VSS). The second scar sample was 12 months after burn from the dorsal foot of a 16 years old female patient with 13 score by VSS. The third one was 9 months after burn from the elbow of a 34 years old male patients with 13 score by VSS. In order to understand the molecular mechanism of blister formation, we screened the different protein expression between hypertrophic scar and normal skin tissue by means of isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantitation (iTRAQ) labeling technology and high throughput 2D LC-MS/MS. There were 48 proteins found to be downregulated in hypertrophic scar. Among the downregulated ones, plakophilin1 (PKP1), plakophilin3 (PKP3) and desmoplakin (DSP) were the desmosome-related proteins which were validated by immunohistochemistry and western blotting assay. Transmission electron microscopy further showed the considerably reduced size and intensity of hemidesmosome and desmosome in hypertrophic scar tissue, compared to control normal skin. Our data indicted for the first time that downregulation of DSP, PKP1 and PKP3 in hypertrophic scar might be responsible for intraepidermal blister formation.

  14. Natural history and clinical evaluation of the lumpectomy scar.

    PubMed

    Cox, C E; Greenberg, H; Fleisher, D; Clark, R; Berman, C; Nicosia, S; Ku, N N; Fiorica, J; Reintgen, D

    1993-01-01

    After lumpectomy with axillary dissection and radiation therapy, there are numerous changes that occur to the breast that, if unrecognized as routine, post-treatment changes, can lead to inappropriate intervention by the physician. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the time required to achieve stable post-treatment mammographic and physical findings. One hundred twenty-three patients age 56.6 years with a mean tumor size of 15.9 +/- 8.2 mm were observed every 6 months with a mean change in scar size of 16.7 +/- 10.6 mm. A scar never developed in 27 per cent and completely resolved or decreased in 90 per cent. Calcifications developed in 16 per cent of the patients; 40 per cent in the scar, 60 per cent outside the scar. Recurrence developed in 2 per cent of the patients at a mean time of 53 months and was believed to be favorably influenced by cytologic evaluation of the resection margins at the time of tumor excision. Stabilization or resolution of the post-treatment changes occurred within 24 to 36 months. The conclusion is for careful surgical and radiologic follow-up with examinations, fine-needle aspirations, and meticulous mammograms guiding the need for biopsy.

  15. Reliability and Photographic Equivalency of the Scar Cosmesis Assessment and Rating (SCAR) Scale, an Outcome Measure for Postoperative Scars.

    PubMed

    Kantor, Jonathan

    2017-01-01

    Until recently, no ideal valid, feasible, and reliable scar scale existed to effectively assess the quality of postoperative linear scars. The Scar Cosmesis Assessment and Rating (SCAR) scale was developed and validated as a tool to assess the quality of postoperative scars in clinical and research settings. To assess the reliability of using photographs in lieu of live patient scar rating assessments, and to determine the interrater and intrarater reliability of the SCAR scale. This was a reliability study to assess clinicians' interrater and intrarater reliability, as well as the reliability of using high-quality macrophotographs of postoperative scars. Patients were from a private practice dermatology clinic, with assessed scars representing a range of surgical procedures including those performed by dermatologists, plastic surgeons, and general surgeons. Assessments were performed by an international multidisciplinary team from dermatology, plastic surgery, surgical oncology, emergency medicine, and physiatry, using photographs and live patient assessments. A single photograph was assessed for each patient's scar. Data were obtained between August 3, 2015, and January 18, 2016. Data analysis occurred between January 18, 2016, and July 29, 2016. Using the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC), the scale was tested for photographic equivalency as well as interrater reliability and intrarater reliability by 5 raters on a set of 80 total patient scars, 20 of which were analyzed for photographic equivalency and the remaining 60 of which were analyzed for interrater and intrarater reliability. The SCAR scale that measures postoperative scar cosmesis, with scores ranging from 0 (best possible scar) to 15 (worst possible scar), based on 6 clinician and 2 patient items was used. Of those 60 in the photographic subgroup, 10 were rated using not only the SCAR scale but also the Patient and Observer Scar Assessment Scale and the Vancouver Scar Scale, and 10 were

  16. Outcomes of ablative fractional laser scar treatment.

    PubMed

    Kim, Deok-Woo; Hwang, Na-Hyun; Yoon, Eul-Sik; Dhong, Eun-Sang; Park, Seung-Ha

    2015-04-01

    Ablative fractional laser (AFL) systems are commonly used to treat various scars, and recent reports have indicated that early scar treatment with fractional lasers has good aesthetic results. Some scars respond dramatically to AFL treatment, incurring high levels of patient satisfaction; however, other scars respond poorly or became worse after treatment. This study was designed to clarify prognostic factors that predict AFL scar treatment outcomes. A total of 108 patients were included in this study. The fractional laser treatments were repeated every 4 weeks until the scar site was acceptable and no additional improvement was expected or the patient discontinued the treatment. The scar improvements were defined as changes in the Manchester scar scale (MSS) from before to after laser treatment. A digital camera was used to acquire digital photographs of the scars under the same light source, the same background, exposure, and white balance. This study developed a modification of the MSS for image analysis in which colour assessment was based on L*a*b* colour co-ordinates of the digital images. The mean MSS values prior to and after laser treatments were 11.6 ± 3.6 and 9.5 ± 2.9, respectively (p < 0.01). AFL treatment improved the qualities of each scar, and the improvements were evident in colour and contour. Scar elevation, pigmentation, high vascularity, early onset of treatment, and the number of treatment sessions were directly related to scar improvement after AFL therapy (p < 0.05). AFL treatments were effective methods for scar treatment. Clinicians can use these prognostic factors to determine treatment plans and to estimate scar improvement after AFL treatment.

  17. Scar formation following excisional and burn injuries in a red Duroc pig model.

    PubMed

    Blackstone, Britani N; Kim, Jayne Y; McFarland, Kevin L; Sen, Chandan K; Supp, Dorothy M; Bailey, J Kevin; Powell, Heather M

    2017-07-20

    Scar research is challenging because rodents do not naturally form excessive scars, and burn depth, size, and location cannot be controlled in human longitudinal studies. The female, red Duroc pig model has been shown to form robust scars with biological and anatomical similarities to human hypertrophic scars. To more closely mimic the mode of injury, recreate the complex chemical milieu of the burn wound environment and enhance scar development, an animal model of excessive burn-induced scarring was developed and compared with the more commonly used model, which involves excisional wounds created via dermatome. Standardized, full-thickness thermal wounds were created on the dorsum of female, red Duroc pigs. Wounds for the dermatome model were created using two different total dermatome settings: ∼1.5 mm and ≥ 1.9 mm. Results from analysis over 150 days showed that burn wounds healed at much slower rate and contracted more significantly than dermatome wounds of both settings. The burn scars were hairless, had mixed pigmentation, and displayed fourfold and twofold greater excess erythema values, respectively, compared with ∼1.5 mm and ≥ 1.9 mm deep dermatome injuries. Burn scars were less elastic, less pliable, and weaker than scars resulting from excisional injuries. Decorin and versican gene expression levels were elevated in the burn group at day 150 compared with both dermatome groups. In addition, transforming growth factor-beta 1 was significantly up-regulated in the burn group vs. the ∼1.5 mm deep dermatome group at all time points, and expression remained significantly elevated vs. both dermatome groups at day 150. Compared with scars from dermatome wounds, the burn scar model described here demonstrates greater similarity to human hypertrophic scar. Thus, this burn scar model may provide an improved platform for studying the pathophysiology of burn-related hypertrophic scarring, investigating current anti-scar therapies, and development of

  18. Two dimensional unstable scar statistics.

    SciTech Connect

    Warne, Larry Kevin; Jorgenson, Roy Eberhardt; Kotulski, Joseph Daniel; Lee, Kelvin S. H. (ITT Industries/AES Los Angeles, CA)

    2006-12-01

    This report examines the localization of time harmonic high frequency modal fields in two dimensional cavities along periodic paths between opposing sides of the cavity. The cases where these orbits lead to unstable localized modes are known as scars. This paper examines the enhancements for these unstable orbits when the opposing mirrors are both convex and concave. In the latter case the construction includes the treatment of interior foci.

  19. Quantification of scar margin in keloid different from atrophic scar by multiphoton microscopic imaging.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xiaoqin; Zhuo, Shuangmu; Zheng, Liqin; Jiang, Xingshan; Chen, Jianxin; Lin, Bifang

    2011-01-01

    Multiphoton microscopy (MPM) was applied to examine the marginal region at dermis of keloid compared with atrophic scar. High-resolution large-area image showed an obvious boundary at the scar margin and different morphological patterns of elastin and collagen on the two sides, further visualized by the focused three-dimensional images. Content alteration of elastin or collagen between the two sides of boundary was quantified to show significant difference between keloid and atrophic scar. Owing to the raised property of keloid with overproduced collagen on the scar side, the content alteration was positive for elastin and negative for collagen. On the contrary, the content alteration was negative for elastin and positive for collagen in the atrophic scar case due to the atrophic collagen on the scar side. It indicated that examination of the scar margin by MPM may lead a new way to discriminate different types of scars and better understand the scarring mechanisms. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Early postoperative single treatment ablative fractional lasing of Mohs micrographic surgery facial scars: a split-scar, evaluator-blinded study.

    PubMed

    Sobanko, Joseph F; Vachiramon, Vasanop; Rattanaumpawan, Pinyo; Miller, Christopher J

    2015-01-01

    Despite precise surgical technique, some postoperative facial scars will depress and widen over time, likely due to weakened or inadequately replaced collagen fibers in the underlying dermis. The purpose of this study is to evaluate whether a 10,600 nm ablative carbon dioxide (CO2 ) fractional laser used early in the post-surgical setting results in improved postoperative facial scars after a single treatment session. A prospective randomized, comparative split-scar study was conducted on 20 subjects between the ages of 20-90. Subjects underwent Mohs surgery for nonmelanoma skin cancer of the face. Subsequent to tumor removal, subjects with a linear scar of 4 cm or greater were enrolled. On the day of suture removal, all subjects had one-half of their scar randomly selected and treated with a 10,600 nm CO2 fractional laser (energy = 10 mJ; density = 10%; spot size = 7 mm; pulse = 1). The untreated scar half served as a control. Scars were re-evaluated 12 weeks later. An independent blinded observer graded the scar halves with the Vancouver scar scale (VSS) immediately prior to treatment and 12 weeks after treatment. Subjects completed a visual analog scale (VAS) at the same time points. Three months after laser treatment, a significant decrease in VSS and 3 of the 4 of its individual parameters were detected in both control and treated halves of the scar. When comparing the laser group versus the control group, a statistically significant difference was not noted in VSS (P = 0.31) but a statistically significant difference in patient VAS was detected (P = 0.002). No side effects of the laser treatment were noted. Facial wounds sutured in a layered manner heal well. Patients prefer early fractional CO2 lasing of surgical scars, though use of the VSS failed to detect an objective difference between laser and control halves of scars. Conservative laser settings, a single session treatment, and VSS insensitivity for surgical scars may influence these findings. © 2015

  1. Prevalence and Correlates of Myocardial Scar in a US Cohort.

    PubMed

    Turkbey, Evrim B; Nacif, Marcelo S; Guo, Mengye; McClelland, Robyn L; Teixeira, Patricia B R P; Bild, Diane E; Barr, R Graham; Shea, Steven; Post, Wendy; Burke, Gregory; Budoff, Matthew J; Folsom, Aaron R; Liu, Chia-Ying; Lima, João A; Bluemke, David A

    2015-11-10

    Myocardial scarring leads to cardiac dysfunction and poor prognosis. The prevalence of and factors associated with unrecognized myocardial infarction and scar have not been previously defined using contemporary methods in a multiethnic US population. To determine prevalence of and factors associated with myocardial scar in middle- and older-aged individuals in the United States. The Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA) study is a population-based cohort in the United States. Participants were aged 45 through 84 years and free of clinical cardiovascular disease (CVD) at baseline in 2000-2002. In the 10th year examination (2010-2012), 1840 participants underwent cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) imaging with gadolinium to detect myocardial scar. Cardiovascular disease risk factors and coronary artery calcium (CAC) scores were measured at baseline and year 10. Logistic regression models were used to estimate adjusted odds ratios (ORs) for myocardial scar. Cardiovascular risk factors, CAC scores, left ventricle size and function, and carotid intima-media thickness. Myocardial scar detected by CMR imaging. Of 1840 participants (mean [SD] age, 68 [9] years, 52% men), 146 (7.9%) had myocardial scars, of which 114 (78%) were undetected by electrocardiogram or by clinical adjudication. In adjusted models, age, male sex, body mass index, hypertension, and current smoking at baseline were associated with myocardial scar at year 10. The OR per 8.9-year increment was 1.61 (95% CI, 1.36-1.91; P < .001); for men vs women: OR, 5.76 (95% CI, 3.61-9.17; P < .001); per 4.8-SD body mass index: OR, 1.32 (95% CI, 1.09-1.61, P = .005); for hypertension: OR, 1.61 (95% CI, 1.12-2.30; P = .009); and for current vs never smokers: 2.00 (95% CI, 1.22-3.28; P = .006). Age-, sex-, and ethnicity-adjusted CAC scores at baseline were also associated with myocardial scar at year 10. Compared with a CAC score of 0, the OR for scores from 1 through 99 was 2.4 (95% CI, 1.5-3.9); from

  2. Validation of a new device to measure postsurgical scar adherence.

    PubMed

    Ferriero, Giorgio; Vercelli, Stefano; Salgovic, Ludovit; Stissi, Valeria; Sartorio, Francesco

    2010-05-01

    Scarring after surgery can lead to a wide range of disorders. At present, the degree of scar adhesion is assessed manually and by ordinal scales. This article describes a new device (the Adheremeter) to measure scar adhesion and assesses its validity, reliability, and sensitivity to change. This was a reliability and validity study. The study was conducted at the Scientific Institute of Veruno. Two independent raters, a physical therapist and a physical therapist student, used the Adheremeter to measure scar mobility and contralateral normal skin in a sample of 25 patients with adherent postsurgical scars before (T1) and after (T2) physical therapy. Two indexes of scar mobility, the adherence's surface mobility index (SM(A)) and the adherence severity index (AS), were calculated. Their correlation with the Vancouver Scar Scale (VSS) and its pliability subscale (PL-VSS) was assessed for the validity analysis. Both the SM(A) and the AS showed good-to-excellent intrarater reliability (intraclass correlation coefficient [ICC]=.96) and interrater reliability (SM(A): ICC=.97 and .99; AS: ICC=.87 and .87, respectively, at T1 and T2), correlated moderately with the VSS and PL-VSS only at T1 (r(s)=-.58 to -.66), and were able to detect changes (physical therapist/physical therapist student): z score=-4.09/-3.88 for the SM(A) and -4.32/-4.24 for the AS; effect size=0.6/0.4 for the SM(A) and 1.4/1.2 for the AS; standard error of measurement=4.59/4.79 mm(2) for the SM(A) and 0.05/0.06 for the AS; and minimum detectable change=12.68/13.23 mm(2) for the SM(A) and 0.14/0.17 for the AS. The measurement is based on the rater's evaluation of force to stretch the skin and on the patient's judgment of comfort. The Adheremeter showed a good level of reliability, validity, and sensitivity to change. Further studies are needed to confirm these results in larger cohorts and to assess the device's validity for other types of scars.

  3. Cutaneous scarring: Pathophysiology, molecular mechanisms, and scar reduction therapeutics Part II. Strategies to reduce scar formation after dermatologic procedures.

    PubMed

    Tziotzios, Christos; Profyris, Christos; Sterling, Jane

    2012-01-01

    The evidence base underpinning most traditional scar reduction approaches is limited, but some of the novel strategies are promising and accumulating. We review a number of commonly adopted strategies for scar reduction. The outlined novel agents are paradigmatic of the value of translational medical research and are likely to change the scenery in the much neglected but recently revived field of scar reduction therapeutics. Copyright © 2012 American Academy of Dermatology, Inc. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Wave pattern and weak localization of chaotic versus scarred modes in stadium-shaped surface-emitting lasers.

    PubMed

    Yu, Y T; Tuan, P H; Chiang, P Y; Liang, H C; Huang, K F; Chen, Y F

    2011-11-01

    We explore the lasing mode selection between the chaotic and scarred modes in stadium-shaped vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers (VCSELs). Experimental results reveal that the spatial gain distribution in the active layer of a VCSEL can be modified via the aperture size to favor the generation of either the chaotic or the scarred modes. Experimentally obtained chaotic and scarred modes are further employed to perform statistical analysis of wave function intensities for making a comparison with predictions based on the nonlinear σ model. We verify that the scarring effect can be quantitatively relevant to the weak-localization correction in the intensity probability distribution.

  5. CARDIAC MRI SCAR PATTERNS DIFFER BY GENDER IN AN IMPLANTABLE CARDIOVERTER DEFIBRILLATOR AND CARDIAC RESYNCHRONIZATION COHORT

    PubMed Central

    Loring, Zak; Strauss, David G.; Gerstenblith, Gary; Tomaselli, Gordon F.; Weiss, Robert G.; Wu, Katherine C.

    2013-01-01

    Background Recent meta-analyses suggest that the effectiveness of cardiac devices may differ between genders. Compared to men, women may not benefit as much from implantable defibrillators (ICDs), yet benefit more from cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT). Myocardial scar burden is associated with increased incidence of appropriate ICD shocks but decreased response to CRT and may explain gender differences in device benefit. Objective To test the hypothesis that the extent of myocardial scar is less in women than men. Methods In 235 patients referred for primary prevention ICDs who underwent cardiac magnetic resonance imaging, we compared scar size by gender. Analyses were performed for all patients (ICD cohort) and those receiving biventricular pacemakers (CRT subgroup). Results In the ICD cohort, women (vs. men) had a higher prevalence of non-ischemic cardiomyopathy (NICM, 64% vs. 39%, p<0.001) which accounted for a smaller overall scar burden (0.5% vs 13%, p<0.01). Likewise, in the CRT subgroup, the higher prevalence of NICM in women (83% vs. 46%, p=0.01) also contributed to a smaller scar size (0 vs 13%, p<0.01). Women also had significantly less scarring of the inferolateral LV wall. Conclusions In a cohort of patients undergoing clinically indicated ICD and CRT, women had less myocardial scar than men. This difference was primarily driven by a higher prevalence of NICM in women. These findings may have important implications for the future study of gender disparities in ICD and CRT outcomes. PMID:23313802

  6. Clustered parrotfish feeding scars trigger partial coral mortality of massive Porites colonies on the inshore Great Barrier Reef

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welsh, J. Q.; Bonaldo, R. M.; Bellwood, D. R.

    2015-03-01

    Coral predation by parrotfishes can cause damage to coral colonies, but research into the dynamics of their feeding scars on Indo-Pacific corals is limited. We monitored feeding scars of the parrotfish Chlorurus microrhinos on massive Porites colonies at Orpheus Island (inshore Great Barrier Reef) over 4 months. Of the 30 marks monitored, 11 were single feeding scars, which all healed completely. The remaining 19 feeding marks consisted of clusters of scars. Eight began to recover, while 11 increased in size by 1,576 ± 252 % (mean ± SE). A logistic regression predicted that a single feeding scar on a Porites colony had a 97 % probability of healing; however, where more than three feeding scars were present, this dropped below 50 %. As excavating parrotfishes in the Indo-Pacific often take multiple focused bites, they may have a significant impact on the growth and mortality of massive Porites colonies at Orpheus Island.

  7. Investigating histological aspects of scars in children.

    PubMed

    Westra, I; Verhaegen, P D H M; Ibrahim Korkmaz, H; Braam, K I; Kaspers, G J L; Niessen, H W M; Niessen, F B

    2017-05-02

    Very little is known about histological aspects of paediatric scars and the possible role of the immune system during their formation. In this study, the histology thoracic scars caused by the placement of an implantable central venous access device in children who underwent treatment for cancer was assessed. The amount and type of collagen, the collagen orientation, the type of elastic fibres, the vascularsation, and the count of neutrophils, macrophages, and lymphocytes were analysed. The severity of scarring was assessed using the Vancouver scar scale (VSS). To evaluate the role of the immune system on scar severity and histology, the scars of children suffering from acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) were compared with the scars of children suffering from other types of childhood cancer. Our results showed an extremely random orientation of the collagen fibres of the paediatric scars with a mean collagen orientation index of 0.22 (standard deviation (SD) 0.10, zero indicating a perfectly random orientation and a perfectly parallel orientation). A lower collagen orientation index was seen in scars with a lower VSS score (VSS score <3: 0.19 versus VSS score ≥3 0.29, p=0.037). A higher total VSS score, resembling a worse scar, was assessed to the scars in the non-ALL group compared with the children with ALL (mean ALL: 0.91 (0-3) versus mean non-ALL: 2.50 (0-6), p=0.037). To our knowledge, this is the first study investigating a wide array of histological aspects in paediatric scars. Compared with adult scars, an extremely random collagen orientation was found (0.22 in children versus 0.41 and 0.46 adult normotrophic and hypertrophic scars, respectively). A lower collagen orientation index was found in scars with a lower VSS score. In addition, less severe scarring was measured in children suffering from ALL compared with children suffering from other types of childhood cancer. This suggests that the immune system could play a role in the development of

  8. Electrocardiographic markers of ischemia during mental stress testing in postinfarction patients. Role of body surface mapping

    SciTech Connect

    Bosimini, E.; Galli, M.; Guagliumi, G.; Giubbini, R.; Tavazzi, L. )

    1991-04-01

    In patients with coronary artery disease, radionuclide investigations have documented a high incidence of mental stress-induced myocardial ischemia in the absence of significant electrocardiographic changes and/or angina. To investigate the causes of the low electrocardiographic sensitivity, we recorded body surface maps during mental arithmetic in 22 normal volunteers and 37 postinfarction patients with residual exercise ischemia. Myocardial perfusion was studied with thallium-201 or technetium-99 (SESTAMIBI) planar scans. In 14 patients, body surface maps were also recorded during atrial pacing at the heart rate values achieved during mental stress. While taking the body surface maps, the area from J point to 80 msec after this point (ST-80) was analyzed by integral maps, difference maps, and departure maps. The body surface mapping criteria for ischemia were a new negative area on the integral maps, a negative potential of more than 2 SD from mean normal values on the difference maps, and a negative departure index of more than 2. Scintigraphy showed asymptomatic myocardial hypoperfusion in 33 patients. Eight patients had significant ST segment depression. The ST-80 integral and difference maps identified 17 ischemic patients. Twenty-four patients presented abnormal departure maps. One patient presented ST depression and abnormal body surface maps without reversible tracer defect. In 14 of 14 patients, atrial pacing did not reproduce the body surface map abnormalities. The analyses of the other electrocardiographic variables showed that in patients with mental stress-induced perfusion defects, only changes of T apex-T offset (aT-eT) interval in Frank leads and changes of maximum negative potential value of aT-eT integral maps significantly differed from those of normal subjects.

  9. [Clinicoimmunological disorders in patients with postinfarction left ventricular remodeling and chronic cardiac failure].

    PubMed

    Teplliakov, A T; Bolotskaia, L A; Dibirov, M M; Stepacheva, T A; Karaman, N V; Vdovina, T V; Shilov, S N; Kuznetsova, A V

    2008-01-01

    To characterize clinical and immune disorders in patients with ischemic heart disease (IHD), postinfarction left ventricular remodeling (PLVR), clinical manifestations of chronic cardiac failure (CCF). A comparative clinical controlled trial of immune system was made. The immune system was assessed by diagnostic and prognostic significance of changes in population composition of T- and B-lymphocytes, by activation of proinflammatory cytokines (IL-1alpha, IL-2, IL-6, IL-8, Inf-alpha, TNF-alpha); high expression of circulating immune complexes (CIC), autoimmune complexes to cardiolipin (CL) in 94 CCF patients with PLVR. The patients were divided into 3 groups according to severity of CCF. Group 1 consisted of 32 patients with CCF (FCII by NYHA) and normal ejection fraction (EF) of the left ventricle (52.0 +/- 2.8%). Group 2--31 CCF (FCIII) patients with decreased EF (by 43.8%) (36 +/- 4.3%). Group 3--31 CCF (FCIV) patients with low (25 +/- 3.8%) EF of the left ventricle. The protocol required conduction of echocardiographic parameters, paired bicycle exercise tests, 6-min walk tests, 24-h ECG monitoring, population cell composition of T- and B-lymphocytes, concentrations of cytokines, IgG and IgG autoantibodies to CL. A dominating hyperactivation of cytokines TNFalpha, IL-1alpha, IL-2, IL-6 with high expression of CIC and autoAB to CL was associated with moderate or severe CCF (FCII-IV by NYHA), declined inotropic function of the left ventricle (EF 38-23%), low exercise tolerance and remodeling of the left ventricle. Immune disorders in the form of hyperactivation of proinflammatory cytokines (most of all TNFalpha, IL-1alpha, IL-2, IL-6), enhanced expression of CIC and autoAB to CL growing with severity of CCF and abnormal heart pump function play an important role in CCF pathogenesis in IHD patients with LCPR and can be markers of the disease progression.

  10. Acne Scars: Pathogenesis, Classification and Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Fabbrocini, Gabriella; Annunziata, M. C.; D'Arco, V.; De Vita, V.; Lodi, G.; Mauriello, M. C.; Pastore, F.; Monfrecola, G.

    2010-01-01

    Acne has a prevalence of over 90% among adolescents and persists into adulthood in approximately 12%–14% of cases with psychological and social implications. Possible outcomes of the inflammatory acne lesions are acne scars which, although they can be treated in a number of ways, may have a negative psychological impact on social life and relationships. The main types of acne scars are atrophic and hypertrophic scars. The pathogenesis of acne scarring is still not fully understood, but several hypotheses have been proposed. There are numerous treatments: chemical peels, dermabrasion/microdermabrasion, laser treatment, punch techniques, dermal grafting, needling and combined therapies for atrophic scars: silicone gels, intralesional steroid therapy, cryotherapy, and surgery for hypertrophic and keloidal lesions. This paper summarizes acne scar pathogenesis, classification and treatment options. PMID:20981308

  11. Chiral Scars in Chaotic Dirac Fermion Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Hongya; Huang, Liang; Lai, Ying-Cheng; Grebogi, Celso

    2013-02-01

    Do relativistic quantum scars in classically chaotic systems possess unique features that are not shared by nonrelativistic quantum scars? We report a class of relativistic quantum scars in massless Dirac fermion systems whose phases return to the original values or acquire a 2π change only after circulating twice about some classical unstable periodic orbits. We name such scars chiral scars, the successful identification of which has been facilitated tremendously by our development of an analytic, conformal-mapping-based method to calculate an unprecedentedly large number of eigenstates with high accuracy. Our semiclassical theory indicates that the physical origin of chiral scars can be attributed to a combined effect of chirality intrinsic to massless Dirac fermions and the geometry of the underlying classical orbit.

  12. Fire scar growth and closure rates in white oak (Quercus alba) and the implications for prescribed burning

    Treesearch

    Michael C. Stambaugh; Kevin T. Smith; Daniel C. Dey

    2017-01-01

    In burned forestlands, fire scar wounds commonly occur on tree stems as a result of cambial heating. In hardwood forests in particular, wounding can lead to stem decay with the extent of decay being related to scar size and exposure time. Therefore, wound closure rates are important to understand in the context of fire management such that allowing sufficient time for...

  13. [Aesthetic reconstruction strategy for postburn facial scar and its clinical effect].

    PubMed

    Ma, X J; Li, W Y; Liu, C H; Li, Y

    2016-08-20

    To explore the aesthetic reconstruction strategy for postburn facial scar and its clinical effect. Three hundred and forty-two patients with postburn facial scars were hospitalized from January 2000 to December 2015. Local expanded flap or deltopectoral expanded flap was used for reconstruction according to the location and size of the facial scar. The forehead expanded flap could be chosen for the scar in dorsum nasi or inferior eyelid. The local expanded flap was chosen when the scar width was smaller than 5 cm in cheek, chin, and marginal mandible region. The expanded deltopectoral flap was chosen when the scar width was larger than 5 cm in cheek, chin, and marginal mandible region or the scar contracture was too serious to cause displacement of lips, nose, or eyelid, and the wound width was larger than 5 cm after release. The facial scars of 82 patients, with size ranged from 6.0 cm×2.5 cm to 15.0 cm×10.0 cm, were reconstructed with expanded local flaps. The facial scars of 260 patients, with size ranged from 8.0 cm×7.0 cm to 38.0 cm×13.0 cm, were reconstructed with expanded deltopectoral flaps. After expansion of 2 to 6 months, the facial scars were excised and completely released first of all. The transfer way of local flap and size of deltopectoral flap with pedicle were designed according to the size and shape of the wound. Three weeks after transfer of deltopectoral flap, flap delay procedure was conducted. One week later, the pedicle was severed from the flap to reconstruct the remaining scar. Anti-scar medicine, laser therapy, and elasticized fabric were used postoperatively on the scars in both donor and recipient sites. During the postoperative follow-up for 3 to 12 months, the flaps of 40 out of 82 cases reconstructed with expanded local flaps were in good color and texture. Before 2008, mild scar hyperplasia was observed in the incision of 19 patients; with application of laser after 2008, the number of patients with scar hyperplasia was

  14. Scar Revision Surgery: The Patient's Perspective.

    PubMed

    Miranda, Benjamin H; Allan, Anna Y; Butler, Daniel P; Cussons, Paul D

    2015-11-01

    Insufficient satisfaction outcome literature exists to assist consultations for scar revision surgery; such outcomes should reflect the patient's perspective. The aim of this study was to prospectively investigate scar revision patient satisfaction outcomes, according to specified patient-selection criteria. Patients (250) were randomly selected for telephone contacting regarding scar revisions undertaken between 2007-2011. Visual analogue scores were obtained for scars pre- and post-revision surgery. Surgery selection criteria were; 'presence' of sufficient time for scar maturation prior to revision, technical issues during or wound complications from the initial procedure that contributed to poor scarring, and 'absence' of site-specific or patient factors that negatively influence outcomes. Patient demographics, scar pathogenesis (elective vs. trauma), underlying issue (functional/symptomatic vs. cosmetic) and revision surgery details were also collected with the added use of a real-time, hospital database. Telephone contacting was achieved for 211 patients (214 scar revisions). Satisfaction outcomes were '2% worse, 16% no change, and 82% better'; a distribution maintained between body sites and despite whether surgery was functional/symptomatic vs. cosmetic. Better outcomes were reported by patients who sustained traumatic scars vs. those who sustained scars by elective procedures (91.80% vs. 77.78%, P=0.016) and by females vs. males (85.52% vs. 75.36%, P<0.05), particularly in the elective group where males (36.17%) were more likely to report no change or worse outcomes versus females (16.04%) (P<0.01). Successful scar revision outcomes may be achieved using careful patient selection. This study provides useful information for referring general practitioners, and patient-surgeon consultations, when planning scar revision.

  15. Prevalence of scars and "mini-scars", and their impact on quality of life in Japanese patients with acne.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Nobukazu; Miyachi, Yoshiki; Kawashima, Makoto

    2015-07-01

    There have been very few studies on the prevalence and severity of acne scars in Japanese patients. The aim of the present study was to investigate the prevalence of acne scars and their impact on the quality of life (QOL) in Japanese acne patients. Acne scars were classified as mini-scars (atrophic scars of ≥0.5 and <2 mm in diameter) atrophic scars (≥2 mm in diameter), and hypertrophic scars. The severity of acne and acne scars were evaluated. The background of patients and their QOL in relation to acne were assessed. Of 240 subjects, 218 (90.8%) had scars. All patients with scars had mini-scars; 61.2% and 14.2% of 240 had atrophic scars and hypertrophic scars, respectively. Severe scarring was found in patients who had experienced severe acne symptoms, although 15.0% of patients with scars had experienced only mild acne symptoms. The total Dermatology Life Quality Index score was significantly higher in patients with scars than in patients without scars (5.9 ± 4.4 vs 4.2 ± 4.1). Almost all the patients had small atrophic scars with a diameter of 0.5 or more and less than 2 mm, which we have termed "mini-scars". Acne scars had a negative impact on patient QOL. Early initiation of treatment is recommended to avoid acne scars. © 2015 Japanese Dermatological Association.

  16. Utilizing topical therapies and mitomycin to reduce scars.

    PubMed

    Cupp, Craig; Gaball, Curtis Wesley

    2012-10-01

    Minimizing scar size, width, and contour of elevation is a common goal for the facial plastic surgeon. Various standard techniques are employed to reduce tension and enhance the rapid and uneventful healing of incisions. In some cases, these routine measures are not judged to be adequate, and additional intraoperative and postsurgical measures are employed to control the body's innate healing processes. Mitomycin C and self-drying silicone gel have been particularity useful in our practice.

  17. Effective Treatments of Atrophic Acne Scars

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Bingrong

    2015-01-01

    Atrophic scarring is often an unfortunate and permanent complication of acne vulgaris. It has high prevalence, significant impact on quality of life, and therapeutic challenge for dermatologists. The treatment of atrophic acne scars varies depending on the types of acne scars and the limitations of the treatment modalities in their ability to improve scars. Therefore, many options are available for the treatment of acne scarring, including chemical peeling, dermabrasion, laser treatment, punch techniques, fat transplantation, other tissue augmenting agents, needling, subcision, and combined therapy. Various modalities have been used to treat scars, but limited efficacy and problematic side effects have restricted their application. In order to optimally treat a patient’s scar, we need to consider which treatment offers the most satisfactory result. There are also promising procedures in the future, such as stem cell therapy. In this article, the authors review the different treatment options of atrophic acne scars. This may be useful for selecting the best therapeutic strategy, whether it be single or combined therapy, in the treatment of atrophic acne scars while reducing or avoiding the side effects and complications. PMID:26029333

  18. [Keloid scars of the head and neck].

    PubMed

    Beogo, R; Guiébré, Y M C; Sérémé, M; Ouoba, K; Zwetyenga, N

    2012-06-01

    A keloid scar is a benign proliferative lesion of dermic collagen. It is predominant in black skin patients. It is most commonly located on the head and neck. Skin trauma and a genetic predisposition may be responsible for the keloid scar. Nevertheless, the pathogenesis of keloid scar is still unclear, and no currently available treatment is 100% effective. The authors had for aim to review the current data on keloid scar pathogenesis and treatment for an optimal management of this condition. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  19. Psoriatic scarring alopecia: observations in four patients.

    PubMed

    Bardazzi, F; Fanti, P A; Orlandi, C; Chieregato, C; Misciali, C

    1999-10-01

    Although acute or chronic hair loss in psoriasis of the scalp can be a symptom of the disease, until now there has been no agreement as to whether or not it is only restricted to erythrodermic, generalized pustular and scalp plaque psoriasis. The purpose of this study was to evaluate patients with chronic scalp psoriasis and alopecia and to determine if the alopecia was of the scarring type. We report four cases of psoriatic scarring alopecia and describe the clinical and histologic features of these patients. The diagnosis was made by scalp biopsies (vertical and transverse sections) and other causes of scarring alopecia were excluded. Psoriasis can cause scarring alopecia.

  20. Condition of live fire-scarred ponderosa pine eleven years after removing partial cross-sections

    Treesearch

    Emily K. Heyerdahl; Steven J. McKay

    2008-01-01

    Our objective is to report mortality rates for ponderosa pine trees in Oregon ten to eleven years after removing a fire-scarred partial cross-section from them, and five years after an initial survey of post-sampling mortality. We surveyed 138 live trees from which we removed fire-scarred partial crosssections in 1994/95 and 387 similarly sized, unsampled neighbor...

  1. The cost of post-burn scarring

    PubMed Central

    Mirastschijski, U.; Sander, J.T.; Zier, U.; Rennekampff, H.O.; Weyand, B.; Vogt, P.M.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Deep burns lead to scarring and contractures for which there is little or no published data on treatment costs. The purpose of this study was to fill this gap by analysing treatment costs for burn sequelae. To do this, German-DRG for in-patient treatment was collected from the Burn Centre Lower Saxony. DRG-related T95.-coding served as a tool for burn-associated sequelae. Data on scar occurrence, plastic-reconstructive surgery and sick leave were collected by a questionnaire. The findings showed that 44.6% patients reported post-burn scarring and 31% needed surgical intervention. The expected risk for readmission was significantly higher (p=0.0002) with scars compared to without. Significantly higher costs for pressure garments were noted for scarred patients (p=0.04). No differences were found for ointments, silicone dressings or pain medication. Treatment costs for patients with scars were 5.6 times higher compared with no scar assessed by G-DRG. No differences were stated subsuming multiple readmissions for post-burn treatment per individual. Significantly higher costs (p=0.03) were noted for patients with burn sequelae other than scars with regard to individual readmissions. It has been revealed that treatment of scars causes higher costs than for other burn sequelae because of multiple surgical interventions. To reduce post-burn scarring and costs, specialized burn centres provide optimal and state-of-the-art treatment. As well as this, more emphasis should be laid on promoting research for the development of novel anti-scarring therapies. PMID:27279810

  2. The cost of post-burn scarring.

    PubMed

    Mirastschijski, U; Sander, J T; Zier, U; Rennekampff, H O; Weyand, B; Vogt, P M

    2015-09-30

    Deep burns lead to scarring and contractures for which there is little or no published data on treatment costs. The purpose of this study was to fill this gap by analysing treatment costs for burn sequelae. To do this, German-DRG for in-patient treatment was collected from the Burn Centre Lower Saxony. DRG-related T95.-coding served as a tool for burn-associated sequelae. Data on scar occurrence, plastic-reconstructive surgery and sick leave were collected by a questionnaire. The findings showed that 44.6% patients reported post-burn scarring and 31% needed surgical intervention. The expected risk for readmission was significantly higher (p=0.0002) with scars compared to without. Significantly higher costs for pressure garments were noted for scarred patients (p=0.04). No differences were found for ointments, silicone dressings or pain medication. Treatment costs for patients with scars were 5.6 times higher compared with no scar assessed by G-DRG. No differences were stated subsuming multiple readmissions for post-burn treatment per individual. Significantly higher costs (p=0.03) were noted for patients with burn sequelae other than scars with regard to individual readmissions. It has been revealed that treatment of scars causes higher costs than for other burn sequelae because of multiple surgical interventions. To reduce post-burn scarring and costs, specialized burn centres provide optimal and state-of-the-art treatment. As well as this, more emphasis should be laid on promoting research for the development of novel anti-scarring therapies.

  3. [Interest of saline contrast sonohysterography for the diagnosis of cesarean scar defects].

    PubMed

    Giral, E; Capmas, P; Levaillant, J-M; Berman, A; Fernandez, H

    2015-11-01

    To determine the interest of saline contrast sonohysterography in the evaluation of number, size and shape of cesarean scar defects in comparison with 3D-transvaginal ultrasound examination. Patients who had surgical reparation of cesarean scar defect by operative hysteroscopy were included in this retrospective study. Before surgery, they all had 3D-transvaginal ultrasound examination and saline contrast sonohysterography to establish the diagnosis. Then those two exams were compared to determine which one is better for cesarean scar defect evaluation, in terms of diagnosis and severity. Fourteen patients were enrolled, they underwent transvaginal ultrasound and saline contrast sonohysterography before the surgery. 3D-transvaginal ultrasound examination made the diagnosis in 50% of patients with cesarean scar defect, whereas saline contrast sonohysterography enabled to detect 86% of defects, in comparison with hysteroscopy (100%). In 29% of patients, the size and depth of the cesarean scar defect was more important with saline contrast sonohysterography and hysteroscopy than expected by 3D-transvaginal ultrasound examination. After surgical repair, symptoms improvement was found in 82% of case (pain or abnormal uterine bleeding), and fertility was restored in 67%. Saline contrast sonohysterography is better to characterize cesarean scar defects than 3D-transvaginal ultrasound, with a higher sensibility. Moreover, it evaluates more precisely the size and shape of the defect, thus severity.

  4. Effectiveness of Autologous Fat Grafting in Adherent Scars: Results Obtained by a Comprehensive Scar Evaluation Protocol.

    PubMed

    Jaspers, Mariëlle E H; Brouwer, Katrien M; van Trier, Antoine J M; Groot, Marloes L; Middelkoop, Esther; van Zuijlen, Paul P M

    2017-01-01

    Nowadays, patients normally survive severe traumas such as burn injuries and necrotizing fasciitis. Large skin defects can be closed but the scars remain. Scars may become adherent to underlying structures when the subcutical fat layer is damaged. Autologous fat grafting provides the possibility of reconstructing a functional sliding layer underneath the scar. Autologous fat grafting is becoming increasingly popular for scar treatment, although large studies using validated evaluation tools are lacking. The authors therefore objectified the effectiveness of single-treatment autologous fat grafting on scar pliability using validated scar measurement tools. Forty patients with adherent scars receiving single-treatment autologous fat grafting were measured preoperatively and at 3-month follow-up. The primary outcome parameter was scar pliability, measured using the Cutometer. Scar quality was also evaluated by the Patient and Observer Scar Assessment Scale and the DSM II ColorMeter. To prevent selection bias, measurements were performed following a standardized algorithm. The Cutometer parameters elasticity and maximal extension improved 22.5 percent (p < 0.001) and 15.6 percent (p = 0.001), respectively. Total Patient and Observer Scar Assessment Scale scores improved from 3.6 to 2.9 on the observer scale, and from 5.1 to 3.8 on the patient scale (both p < 0.001). Color differences between the scar and normal skin remained unaltered. For the first time, the effect of autologous fat grafting on functional scar parameters was ascertained using a comprehensive scar evaluation protocol. The improved scar pliability supports the authors' hypothesis that the function of the subcutis can be restored to a certain extent by single-treatment autologous fat grafting. Therapeutic, IV.

  5. Lamellipodin and the Scar/WAVE complex cooperate to promote cell migration in vivo.

    PubMed

    Law, Ah-Lai; Vehlow, Anne; Kotini, Maria; Dodgson, Lauren; Soong, Daniel; Theveneau, Eric; Bodo, Cristian; Taylor, Eleanor; Navarro, Christel; Perera, Upamali; Michael, Magdalene; Dunn, Graham A; Bennett, Daimark; Mayor, Roberto; Krause, Matthias

    2013-11-25

    Cell migration is essential for development, but its deregulation causes metastasis. The Scar/WAVE complex is absolutely required for lamellipodia and is a key effector in cell migration, but its regulation in vivo is enigmatic. Lamellipodin (Lpd) controls lamellipodium formation through an unknown mechanism. Here, we report that Lpd directly binds active Rac, which regulates a direct interaction between Lpd and the Scar/WAVE complex via Abi. Consequently, Lpd controls lamellipodium size, cell migration speed, and persistence via Scar/WAVE in vitro. Moreover, Lpd knockout mice display defective pigmentation because fewer migrating neural crest-derived melanoblasts reach their target during development. Consistently, Lpd regulates mesenchymal neural crest cell migration cell autonomously in Xenopus laevis via the Scar/WAVE complex. Further, Lpd's Drosophila melanogaster orthologue Pico binds Scar, and both regulate collective epithelial border cell migration. Pico also controls directed cell protrusions of border cell clusters in a Scar-dependent manner. Taken together, Lpd is an essential, evolutionary conserved regulator of the Scar/WAVE complex during cell migration in vivo.

  6. Lamellipodin and the Scar/WAVE complex cooperate to promote cell migration in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Law, Ah-Lai; Vehlow, Anne; Kotini, Maria; Dodgson, Lauren; Soong, Daniel; Theveneau, Eric; Bodo, Cristian; Taylor, Eleanor; Navarro, Christel; Perera, Upamali; Michael, Magdalene; Dunn, Graham A.; Bennett, Daimark; Mayor, Roberto

    2013-01-01

    Cell migration is essential for development, but its deregulation causes metastasis. The Scar/WAVE complex is absolutely required for lamellipodia and is a key effector in cell migration, but its regulation in vivo is enigmatic. Lamellipodin (Lpd) controls lamellipodium formation through an unknown mechanism. Here, we report that Lpd directly binds active Rac, which regulates a direct interaction between Lpd and the Scar/WAVE complex via Abi. Consequently, Lpd controls lamellipodium size, cell migration speed, and persistence via Scar/WAVE in vitro. Moreover, Lpd knockout mice display defective pigmentation because fewer migrating neural crest-derived melanoblasts reach their target during development. Consistently, Lpd regulates mesenchymal neural crest cell migration cell autonomously in Xenopus laevis via the Scar/WAVE complex. Further, Lpd’s Drosophila melanogaster orthologue Pico binds Scar, and both regulate collective epithelial border cell migration. Pico also controls directed cell protrusions of border cell clusters in a Scar-dependent manner. Taken together, Lpd is an essential, evolutionary conserved regulator of the Scar/WAVE complex during cell migration in vivo. PMID:24247431

  7. Poor scar formation after ablation is associated with atrial fibrillation recurrence.

    PubMed

    Parmar, Bhrigu R; Jarrett, Tyler R; Kholmovski, Eugene G; Hu, Nan; Parker, Dennis; MacLeod, Rob S; Marrouche, Nassir F; Ranjan, Ravi

    2015-12-01

    Patients routinely undergo ablation for atrial fibrillation (AF) but the recurrence rate remains high. We explored in this study whether poor scar formation as seen on late-gadolinium enhancement magnetic resonance imaging (LGE-MRI) correlates with AF recurrence following ablation. We retrospectively identified 94 consecutive patients who underwent their initial ablation for AF at our institution and had pre-procedural magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) merged with left atrial (LA) anatomy in an electroanatomic mapping (EAM) system, ablated areas marked intraprocedurally in EAM, 3-month post-ablation LGE-MRI for assessment of scar, and minimum of 3-months of clinical follow-up. Ablated area was quantified retrospectively in EAM and scarred area was quantified in the 3-month post-ablation LGE-MRI. With the mean follow-up of 336 days, 26 out of 94 patients had AF recurrence. Age, hypertension, and heart failure were not associated with AF recurrence, but LA size and difference between EAM ablated area and LGE-MRI scar area was associated with higher AF recurrence. For each percent higher difference between EAM ablated area and LGE-MRI scar area, there was a 7-9% higher AF recurrence (p values 0.001-0.003) depending on the multivariate analysis. In AF ablation, poor scar formation as seen on LGE-MRI was associated with AF recurrence. Improved mapping and ablation techniques are necessary to achieve the desired LA scar and reduce AF recurrence.

  8. Risk of Scar in the Comparison of Age-related Macular Degeneration Treatments Trials

    PubMed Central

    Daniel, Ebenezer; Toth, Cynthia A.; Grunwald, Juan E.; Jaffe, Glenn J.; Martin, Daniel F.; Fine, Stuart L.; Huang, Jiayan; Ying, Gui-shuang; Hagstrom, Stephanie A.; Winter, Katrina; Maguire, Maureen G.

    2013-01-01

    .6% of eyes. Baseline risk factors for the scar types were similar except that eyes with larger lesion size or visual acuity <20/40 were more likely to develop fibrotic scars. Conclusions Approximately half of eyes enrolled in CATT developed scar by 2 years. Eyes with classic neovascularization, a thicker retina, and more fluid or material under the foveal center of the retina are more likely to develop scar. PMID:24314839

  9. Risk of scar in the comparison of age-related macular degeneration treatments trials.

    PubMed

    Daniel, Ebenezer; Toth, Cynthia A; Grunwald, Juan E; Jaffe, Glenn J; Martin, Daniel F; Fine, Stuart L; Huang, Jiayan; Ying, Gui-shuang; Hagstrom, Stephanie A; Winter, Katrina; Maguire, Maureen G

    2014-03-01

    eyes with larger lesion size or visual acuity <20/40 were more likely to develop fibrotic scars. Approximately half of eyes enrolled in CATT developed scar by 2 years. Eyes with classic neovascularization, a thicker retina, and more fluid or material under the foveal center of the retina are more likely to develop scar. Copyright © 2014 American Academy of Ophthalmology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. [Hyperplastic scars and keloids. Part I: basics and prevention].

    PubMed

    Baisch, A; Riedel, F

    2006-11-01

    Aberrant wound healing results in unsightly scarring, hypertrophic scarring, and keloid formation, causing functional and cosmetic deformities, discomfort, psychological stress, and patient dissatisfaction. Scar prevention and management continue to be important issues for the facial plastic surgeon. This article presents an overview on the pathogenesis of a scar and of the different types of scars. Differences between keloids, hypertrophic scars and normal scars include distinct scar appearance, histologic morphology and cellular function in response to growth factors. Recent advances in our understanding of the wound healing process reveal possible causes for hypertrophic scars and keloids. This information might assist in the development of efficacious prevention and treatment for hypertrophic scar and keloid formation. This article also describes the strategies available for scar prevention. Recommendations focus on the management of hypertrophic scars and keloids.

  11. Effect of human adipose derived stem cells on scar formation and remodeling in a pig model: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Yun, In Sik; Jeon, Yeo Reum; Lee, Won Jai; Lee, Jae Wook; Rah, Dong Kyun; Tark, Kwan Chul; Lew, Dae Hyun

    2012-10-01

    Adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs) have positive effects in the wound healing process. To clarify whether ASCs positively mitigate scar formation in the wound remodeling process. Full-thickness skin defects were created on the dorsal skin of Yorkshire pigs. After the defects were transformed into early scars, ASCs were injected, and the same amount of phosphate buffered saline (PBS) was injected in the control group. Clinical and histologic examinations were performed. In the experimental group, the areas of scars were smaller than those of control groups. The color of scars was more similar to that of the surrounding normal tissue, and scar pliability was better. The number of mast cells decreased, and more-mature collagen arrangement was noted. In the early period of scar remodeling, the expression of transforming growth factor beta (TGF-β)3 and matrix metalloproteinase 1 (MMP1) was greater in the experimental group than in control group. In the late period, the level of alpha smooth muscle actin and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase 1 were dramatically less, although the level of MMP1 was lower in the experimental group than in control group. Local injection of ASCs decreases scar size and provides better color quality and scar pliability. It decreases the activity of mast cells and inhibits the action of TGF-β against fibroblasts and positively stimulates scar remodeling through greater expression of MMP molecules. © 2012 by the American Society for Dermatologic Surgery, Inc. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Endometriosis of episiotomy scar: a case report.

    PubMed

    Mihmanli, V; Ózkan, T; Genc, S; Cetinkaya, N; Uctas, H

    2015-01-01

    Endometriosis is characterized by the presence of histologically normal endometrial glands and stroma outside the uterine cavity. Endometriosis predominantly locates on peritoneal surfaces, but it also affects the vagina, vulva, and perineum, usually secondary to surgical or obstetric trauma. Endometriosis in an episiotomy scar is a fairly rare phenomenon. The authors present a case of endometriosis in an episiotomy scar.

  13. Prevention and treatment of excessive dermal scarring.

    PubMed Central

    Roseborough, Ingrid E.; Grevious, Mark A.; Lee, Raphael C.

    2004-01-01

    Today, wound management to avoid excessive scar formation is increasingly important, especially in populations with Fitzpatrick 3 or higher skin pigmentation. Medical science and industrial development are devoting more effort toward understanding and offering better therapy to control scars. However, advances in scar management have been hampered by the confusing or ambiguous terminology. There is no consensus on what amount of post-traumatic skin scar formation is "normal" and what should be considered "hypertrophic". In the World Health Organization's ICD-9, there is no diagnostic code for hypertrophic scar--only keloid is listed. Yet, the medical and scientific literature distinguishes them as different conditions. Our experience suggests that the diagnosis of keloid disease is greatly over-rendered. For black patients, an elevated scar seems, by default, diagnosed as keloid by most. This confusion results in inappropriate management of scar formation, and occasionally contributes to decision making related to elective or cosmetic surgery. Given that patients are expecting better outcomes from wound care today than in the past, this review article attempts to capture the essential biological factors related to wound scar production and discusses treatment options and indications used by the authors. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:14746360

  14. Breeding Strategy Determines Rupture Incidence in Post-Infarct Healing WARPing Cardiovascular Research

    PubMed Central

    Deckx, Sophie; Carai, Paolo; Bateman, John; Heymans, Stephane; Papageorgiou, Anna-Pia

    2015-01-01

    Background Von Willebrand A domain Related Protein (WARP), is a recently identified extracellular matrix protein. Based upon its involvement in matrix biology and its expression in the heart, we hypothesized that WARP regulates cardiac remodeling processes in the post-infarct healing process. Methods and results In the mouse model of myocardial infarction (MI), WARP expression increased in the infarcted area 3-days post-MI. In the healthy myocardium WARP localized with perlecan in the basement membrane, which was disrupted upon injury. In vitro studies showed high expression of WARP by cardiac fibroblasts, which further increases upon TGFβ stimulation. Furthermore, WARP expression correlated with aSMA and COL1 expression, markers of fibroblast to myofibroblast transition, in vivo and in vitro. Finally, WARP knockdown in vitro affected extra- and intracellular basic fibroblast growth factor production in myofibroblasts. To investigate the function for WARP in infarction healing, we performed an MI study in WARP knockout (KO) mice backcrossed more than 10 times on an Australian C57Bl/6-J background and bred in-house, and compared to wild type (WT) mice of the same C57Bl/6-J strain but of commercial European origin. WARP KO mice showed no mortality after MI, whereas 40% of the WT mice died due to cardiac rupture. However, when WARP KO mice were backcrossed on the European C57Bl/6-J background and bred heterozygous in-house, the previously seen protective effect in the WARP KO mice after MI was lost. Importantly, comparison of the cardiac response post-MI in WT mice bred heterozygous in-house versus commercially purchased WT mice revealed differences in cardiac rupture. Conclusion These data demonstrate a redundant role for WARP in the wound healing process after MI but demonstrate that the continental/breeding/housing origin of mice of the same C57Bl6-J strain is critical in determining the susceptibility to cardiac rupture and stress the importance of using the

  15. Influence of mental stress on ventricular pump function in postinfarction patients. An invasive hemodynamic investigation.

    PubMed

    Mazzuero, G; Temporelli, P L; Tavazzi, L

    1991-04-01

    To assess the influence of mental stress on ventricular pump function in coronary patients, 88 postinfarction patients (mean age, 53 +/- 10 years) performed mental arithmetic during Swan-Ganz catheterization monitoring a mean of 44 +/- 16 days after myocardial infarction. The test lasted 3 minutes in 66 patients and 10 minutes in 22 patients. Two patients suffered acute pulmonary edema a few minutes after mental arithmetic, but no others complained of symptoms. Mean heart rate increased from 76 +/- 14 to 92 +/- 17 beats/min, mean systolic blood pressure increased from 138 +/- 22 to 160 +/- 27 mm Hg, mean diastolic blood pressure increased from 89 +/- 10 to 101 +/- 15 mm Hg, mean pulmonary wedge pressure increased from 13 +/- 6 to 19 +/- 8 mm Hg (p less than 0.001), and mean stroke volume decreased from 72 +/- 18 to 65 +/- 18 ml (p less than 0.001) during mental arithmetic. The changes in central hemodynamics during mental arithmetic were not predictable from noninvasive parameters. In the 22 patients who performed 10-minute mental arithmetic, the changes persisted throughout mental exercise. Eighty-one patients underwent supine bicycle ergometry after mental arithmetic: Absolute mental arithmetic-pulmonary wedge pressure values correlated with those during exercise at the first stage (25 W) (r = 0.63, p less than 0.001) and at maximal load (77 +/- 29 W) (r = 0.49, p less than 0.001), and pulmonary wedge pressure change between stress values and baseline during mental arithmetic did not correlate with those during the first stage of exercise (r = 0.09, p = NS) or during maximal load (r = 0.11, p = NS). Twenty-nine patients repeated the study 1 year after myocardial infarction, and the same hemodynamic changes were observed during mental arithmetic. In conclusion, it appears that mental stress can cause deteriorations of central hemodynamics that can be independent of changes in heart rate and blood pressure and are not predictable from exercise-induced changes

  16. The Northwestern Abdominoplasty Scar Model: A Novel Human Model for Scar Research and Therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Lanier, Steven T; Liu, Jing; Chavez-Munoz, Claudia; Mustoe, Thomas A; Galiano, Robert D

    2016-09-01

    There is a growing interest in the development and evaluation of therapeutic agents that improve the cosmetic appearance of scars. Existing nonhuman animal models to study scarring, while valuable, have well-acknowledged limitations, as it is accepted that the biology of human scarring differs significantly from scarring in other species. Moreover, human clinical trials of scarring require large numbers of subjects to achieve statistical power and are plagued by inherent intersubject variability because of the complex nature of wound healing in human beings. As a better alternative, we have developed the Northwestern Abdominoplasty Scar Model-a novel human clinical model that permits analysis of up to 20 cutaneous scars in a single subject and allows for not only visual scar comparison, but also histologic and molecular analyses of factors involved in scarring and wound healing. We have utilized this model in 5 early phase clinical trials designed to test the safety and efficacy of a variety of scar therapeutics without any complications to date. The model not only is applicable to scar therapeutics, but also can be utilized for other applications, such as the testing of implantable biomaterials, injectable products, therapies such as lasers, or even for in vivo study of wound healing processes in humans.

  17. Strong quantum scarring by local impurities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luukko, Perttu J. J.; Drury, Byron; Klales, Anna; Kaplan, Lev; Heller, Eric J.; Räsänen, Esa

    2016-11-01

    We discover and characterise strong quantum scars, or quantum eigenstates resembling classical periodic orbits, in two-dimensional quantum wells perturbed by local impurities. These scars are not explained by ordinary scar theory, which would require the existence of short, moderately unstable periodic orbits in the perturbed system. Instead, they are supported by classical resonances in the unperturbed system and the resulting quantum near-degeneracy. Even in the case of a large number of randomly scattered impurities, the scars prefer distinct orientations that extremise the overlap with the impurities. We demonstrate that these preferred orientations can be used for highly efficient transport of quantum wave packets across the perturbed potential landscape. Assisted by the scars, wave-packet recurrences are significantly stronger than in the unperturbed system. Together with the controllability of the preferred orientations, this property may be very useful for quantum transport applications.

  18. Strong quantum scarring by local impurities

    PubMed Central

    Luukko, Perttu J. J.; Drury, Byron; Klales, Anna; Kaplan, Lev; Heller, Eric J.; Räsänen, Esa

    2016-01-01

    We discover and characterise strong quantum scars, or quantum eigenstates resembling classical periodic orbits, in two-dimensional quantum wells perturbed by local impurities. These scars are not explained by ordinary scar theory, which would require the existence of short, moderately unstable periodic orbits in the perturbed system. Instead, they are supported by classical resonances in the unperturbed system and the resulting quantum near-degeneracy. Even in the case of a large number of randomly scattered impurities, the scars prefer distinct orientations that extremise the overlap with the impurities. We demonstrate that these preferred orientations can be used for highly efficient transport of quantum wave packets across the perturbed potential landscape. Assisted by the scars, wave-packet recurrences are significantly stronger than in the unperturbed system. Together with the controllability of the preferred orientations, this property may be very useful for quantum transport applications. PMID:27892510

  19. Flightless I is a key regulator of the fibroproliferative process in hypertrophic scarring and a target for a novel antiscarring therapy.

    PubMed

    Cameron, A M; Turner, C T; Adams, D H; Jackson, J E; Melville, E; Arkell, R M; Anderson, P J; Cowin, A J

    2016-04-01

    Hypertrophic scarring carries a large burden of disease, including disfigurement, pain and disability. There is currently no effective medical treatment to reduce or prevent hypertrophic scarring. Flightless I (Flii), a member of the gelsolin family of actin remodelling proteins, is an important negative regulator of wound repair. The objective of this study was to investigate the role of Flii as a potential regulator of hypertrophic scarring. Using human skin samples and an animal model of bleomycin-induced hypertrophic scarring in mice that overexpress or have reduced expression of Flii, we investigated its effect on dermal fibrosis and hypertrophic scarring. Flii expression was increased in human burns and hypertrophic scars. A similar increase in Flii was observed in hypertrophic scars formed in mice post-treatment with bleomycin. However, Flii-deficient (Flii(+/-) ) mice had reduced scarring in response to bleomycin evidenced by decreased dermal thickness, smaller cross-sectional scar areas, fewer myofibroblasts and a decreased collagen I/III ratio. In contrast, bleomycin-treated Flii-overexpressing mice (Flii(Tg/Tg) ) showed increased scar dermal thickness, larger cross-sectional scar areas, more myofibroblasts and an increased collagen I/III ratio. Injecting developing scars with a Flii neutralizing antibody led to a significant reduction in the size of the scars and a reduction in the collagen I/III ratio. This study identifies Flii as a profibrotic agent that contributes to excessive scar formation. Reducing its activity using neutralizing antibodies is a promising approach for reducing hypertrophic scarring. © 2015 British Association of Dermatologists.

  20. DERMABRASIVE ABLATION OF ACNE SCARS

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Adolph M.

    1958-01-01

    Dermabrasion offers cosmetic improvement of acne pits and scars, but only well-adjusted patients should be selected for this esthetic improvement. In the dermabrasion operation the deep cup-shaped pits are made shallow by saucerization, for the deep sharp shadows are eliminated as the pits are shallowed. It is the elimination of the shadow effect which is so gratifying to the patient. Although dermabrasion is a superficial skin operation, it involves dangerous instruments and thousands of minute incisions. The procedure is a surgical operation, whether done in an office or in a hospital. The author performs the operation entirely as a hospital procedure, using pentothal anesthesia with meperidine added in small increments during the operation. Thus the operation may be unhurriedly and meticulously performed. ImagesFigure 1.Figure 2. PMID:13561125

  1. Analysis of frequency of use of different scar assessment scales based on the scar condition and treatment method.

    PubMed

    Bae, Seong Hwan; Bae, Yong Chan

    2014-03-01

    Analysis of scars in various conditions is essential, but no consensus had been reached on the scar assessment scale to select for a given condition. We reviewed papers to determine the scar assessment scale selected depending on the scar condition and treatment method. We searched PubMed for articles published since 2000 with the contents of the scar evaluation using a scar assessment scale with a Journal Citation Report impact factor >0.5. Among them, 96 articles that conducted a scar evaluation using a scar assessment scale were reviewed and analyzed. The scar assessment scales were identified and organized by various criteria. Among the types of scar assessment scales, the Patient and Observer Scar Assessment Scale (POSAS) was found to be the most frequently used scale. As for the assessment of newly developed operative scars, the POSAS was most used. Meanwhile, for categories depending on the treatment methods for preexisting scars, the Vancouver Scar Scale (VSS) was used in 6 studies following a laser treatment, the POSAS was used in 7 studies following surgical treatment, and the POSAS was used in 7 studies following a conservative treatment. Within the 12 categories of scar status, the VSS showed the highest frequency in 6 categories and the POSAS showed the highest frequency in the other 6 categories. According to our reviews, the POSAS and VSS are the most frequently used scar assessment scales. In the future, an optimal, universal scar scoring system is needed in order to better evaluate and treat pathologic scarring.

  2. [Effectiveness of dorsal metacarpal island flap for treating scar contracture of finger web].

    PubMed

    Qian, Jun; Rui, Yongjun; Zhang, Quanrong; Xue, Mingyu; Zhang, Zhihai

    2011-11-01

    To investigate the effectiveness of dorsal metacarpal island flap for treating scar contracture of the finger web. Between June 2009 and December 2010, 10 patients with scar contracture of the finger web were treated. There were 6 males and 4 females with an average age of 30 years (range, 14-57 years). Scar contracture was caused by injury in 8 cases, by burn in 1 case, and by operation in 1 case. The locations were the 1st web space in 1 case, the 2nd web space in 3 cases, the 3rd web space in 5 cases, and the 4th web space in 1 case. The disease duration was 3 to 9 months with an average of 5 months. The maximum abduction was 10-20 degrees. After web space scar release, the dorsal metacarpal island flap (3.5 cm x 1.2 cm-4.0 cm x 2.0 cm in size) was used to reconstruct web space (2.0 cm x 1.0 cm-3.0 cm x 1.8 cm in size). The donor site was directly sutured or repaired with local flaps. At 2 days after operation, necrosis occurred in 1 flap, which healed by extractive treatment. The other flaps survived and wound healed by first intention; all the flaps at donor sites survived and incision healed by first intention. Ten patients were followed up 6 to 15 months (mean, 9 months). The reconstructed web space had good appearance, the maximum abduction was 80 degrees in 1 case of the 1st web space scars contracture, and the maximum abduction was 35-45 degrees (mean, 40 degrees) in the other 9 cases. In 8 scar patients causing by injury, no scar contracture recurred during follow-up. It can achieve good results in appearance and function to use dorsal metacarpal island flap for treating scar contracture of the finger web.

  3. The effect of topical scar treatment on postoperative scar pain and pruritus after total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Kong, Chae-Gwan; Kim, Geon-Hyeong; Kim, Dong-Wook; In, Yong

    2014-04-01

    The surgical wound of total knee arthroplasty (TKA) needs continuous flexion and extension movement. Silicone gel treatment is widely used to treat hypertrophic scars and keloids since it is easily applied and prevents scar pain and itching. The aim of this study was to evaluate the clinical efficacy and safety of silicone gel applied to surgical scars of TKA on postoperative scar pain and pruritus. One hundred TKAs were randomized into a silicone gel group (silicone gel was applied to the wound after stitch-out for 1 month) or a placebo group. The postoperative scar pain and pruritus were evaluated with the use of a visual analog scale (VAS) at postoperative 3 months, 6 months and 1 year. Scar assessment was done using the Vancouver scar scale by evaluating scar pigmentation, vascularity, pliability, and height. Although silicone gel group showed better pigmentation and height scales than placebo group (P < 0.05), there were no significant differences in the postoperative scar pain and pruritus VAS scores between the groups (P > 0.05). Application of silicone gel had no beneficial effects on scar pain and itching relief during the early postoperative period of TKA. I-Randomized Controlled Trial.

  4. Phase and Texture Characterizations of Scar Collagen Second-Harmonic Generation Images Varied with Scar Duration.

    PubMed

    Chen, Guannan; Liu, Yao; Zhu, Xiaoqin; Huang, Zufang; Cai, Jianyong; Chen, Rong; Xiong, Shuyuan; Zeng, Haishan

    2015-08-01

    This work developed a phase congruency algorithm combined with texture analysis to quantitatively characterize collagen morphology in second-harmonic generation (SHG) images from human scars. The extracted phase and texture parameters of the SHG images quantified collagen directionality, homogeneity, and coarseness in scars and varied with scar duration. Phase parameters showed an increasing tendency of the mean of phase congruency with scar duration, indicating that collagen fibers are better oriented over time. Texture parameters calculated from local difference local binary pattern (LD-LBP) and Haar wavelet transform, demonstrated that the LD-LBP variance decreased and the energy of all subimages increased with scar duration. It implied that collagen has a more regular pattern and becomes coarser with scar duration. In addition, the random forest regression was used to predict scar duration, demonstrating reliable performance of the extracted phase and texture parameters in characterizing collagen morphology in scar SHG images. Results indicate that the extracted parameters using the proposed method can be used as quantitative indicators to monitor scar progression with time and can help understand the mechanism of scar progression.

  5. Comparative study of Langerhans cells in normal and pathological human scars. I. Atrophic scars.

    PubMed

    Cracco, C; Stella, M; Teich Alasia, S; Filogamo, G

    1992-01-01

    In the present study, we investigated Langerhans cells (LCs) in the epidermal component of human atrophic scars, comparing them with those in control skin and normotrophic scars. A preliminary analysis of the histological features was first carried out on vertical serial sections, stained with hematoxylin and eosin. The total epidermal thickness and the thickness of the single epidermal layers were then measured, by means of a digitizing tablet and a morphometric program run on an Apple IIe computer. These parameters were found to be significantly lower (40%) in atrophic scars, if compared to control skin and normotrophic scars (p less than 0.05). CDla-positive and HLA-DR-positive LCs were marked by indirect immunofluorescence. Their position among the epidermal layers, their dimensions, their density and their morphology were examined. In atrophic scars, LCs were densely and evenly distributed in all the epidermal layers. Their density was increased (about 1200 cells/mm2 of epidermal area), if compared to control skin and normotrophic scars (both 300-400 cells/mm2 of epidermal area; p less than 0.001). The CDla-positive definite cell bodies, exhibiting an unstained nucleus, were as large as those evidentiated in the normotrophic scars and twice as much the control skin values (p less than 0.001). The present results provide morphological data that distinguish atrophic scars from control skin and normotrophic scars, and suggest an involvement of the Langerhans cells in this particular case of pathological scarring.

  6. Values of a Patient and Observer Scar Assessment Scale to Evaluate the Facial Skin Graft Scar

    PubMed Central

    Chae, Jin Kyung; Kim, Eun Jung; Park, Kun

    2016-01-01

    Background The patient and observer scar assessment scale (POSAS) recently emerged as a promising method, reflecting both observer's and patient's opinions in evaluating scar. This tool was shown to be consistent and reliable in burn scar assessment, but it has not been tested in the setting of skin graft scar in skin cancer patients. Objective To evaluate facial skin graft scar applied to POSAS and to compare with objective scar assessment tools. Methods Twenty three patients, who diagnosed with facial cutaneous malignancy and transplanted skin after Mohs micrographic surgery, were recruited. Observer assessment was performed by three independent rates using the observer component of the POSAS and Vancouver scar scale (VSS). Patient self-assessment was performed using the patient component of the POSAS. To quantify scar color and scar thickness more objectively, spectrophotometer and ultrasonography was applied. Results Inter-observer reliability was substantial with both VSS and the observer component of the POSAS (average measure intraclass coefficient correlation, 0.76 and 0.80, respectively). The observer component consistently showed significant correlations with patients' ratings for the parameters of the POSAS (all p-values<0.05). The correlation between subjective assessment using POSAS and objective assessment using spectrophotometer and ultrasonography showed low relationship. Conclusion In facial skin graft scar assessment in skin cancer patients, the POSAS showed acceptable inter-observer reliability. This tool was more comprehensive and had higher correlation with patient's opinion. PMID:27746642

  7. Cutaneous leiomyosarcoma arising in a smallpox scar.

    PubMed

    Pol, Robert A; Dannenberg, Hilde; Robertus, Jan-Lukas; van Ginkel, Robert J

    2012-07-16

    Cutaneous leiomyosarcoma (CLM) is a very rare smooth muscle tumour that accounts for about 2-3% of all superficial soft tissue sarcomas. Although the development of various malignancies in scar tissue is well known, we report the first case of a CLM developing in a small pox scar. A 66-year-old man presented with a painless, slow-growing lump in a small pox scar on his left shoulder. Histological biopsies showed the lesion to be a primary, well-differentiated cutaneous leiomyosarcoma. A CT scan of the thorax was conducted, which showed no signs of metastases. The complete lesion was then surgically excised, and histopathological examination revealed a radically excised cutaneous type leiomyosarcoma After 13 months' review the patient was doing well with no evidence of tumour recurrence. This is the first report of a CLM arising in a small pox scar. Although the extended time interval between scarring and malignant changes makes it difficult to advise strict follow-up for patients with small pox scars, one should be aware that atypical changes and/or symptoms occurring in a small pox scar could potentially mean malignant transformation.

  8. Microneedling Therapy for Atrophic Acne Scars

    PubMed Central

    Barakat, Manal; Awad, Sherif; Medhat, Walid; El-Fakahany, Hasan; Farag, Hanna

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Treatment of acne scarring is always a challenge. Microneedling therapy or percutaneous collagen induction is a new addition to the treatment modalities for such scars and has been reported to be simple and effective in atrophic acne scar treatment. The aim of this study is to evaluate the clinical effect and objectively quantify the histological changes of acne scarring in response to skin microneedling. Design: A prospective clinical study. Participants: Ten patients with different types of atrophic acne scars were subjected to three months of skin microneedling treatment (six sessions at two-week intervals). Measurements: Patients were photographed, and skin biopsies were obtained at baseline as well as one and three months from the start of treatment. Histometry for epidermal thickness and quantitative evaluation of total elastin; newly synthesized tropoelastin; collagen types I, III, and VII; and newly synthesized collagen were performed for all biopsies. Results: Compared to the baseline, patients’ evaluations revealed noticeable clinical improvement in atrophic post-acne scars in response to skin microneedling. There was a statistically significant increase (p<0.05) in the mean of collagen types I, III, and VII and newly synthesized collagen, while total elastin was significantly decreased (p<0.05) after the end of treatment. Conclusions: Multiple minimally invasive sessions of skin microneedling are an effective treatment for post-acne atrophic scars as it stimulates the repair processes with the advantage of being a relatively risk-free, in-office procedure with minimal patient recovery time. PMID:26203319

  9. Astrocyte scar formation aids CNS axon regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Mark A.; Burda, Joshua E.; Ren, Yilong; Ao, Yan; O’Shea, Timothy M.; Kawaguchi, Riki; Coppola, Giovanni; Khakh, Baljit S.; Deming, Timothy J.; Sofroniew, Michael V.

    2017-01-01

    Summary Transected axons fail to regrow in the mature central nervous system (CNS). Astrocyte scars are widely regarded as causal in this failure. Here, using three genetically targeted loss-of-function manipulations in adult mice, we show that preventing astrocyte scar formation, attenuating scar-forming astrocytes, or deleting chronic astrocyte scars all failed to result in spontaneous regrowth of transected corticospinal, sensory or serotonergic axons through severe spinal cord injury (SCI) lesions. In striking contrast, sustained local delivery via hydrogel depots of required axon-specific growth factors not present in SCI lesions, plus growth-activating priming injuries, stimulated robust, laminin-dependent sensory axon regrowth past scar-forming astrocytes and inhibitory molecules in SCI lesions. Preventing astrocyte scar formation significantly reduced this stimulated axon regrowth. RNA sequencing revealed that astrocytes and non-astrocyte cells in SCI lesions express multiple axon-growth supporting molecules. Our findings show that contrary to prevailing dogma, astrocyte scar formation aids rather than prevents CNS axon regeneration. PMID:27027288

  10. Scar assessment scales: a dermatologic overview.

    PubMed

    Idriss, Nayla; Maibach, Howard I

    2009-02-01

    This overview critically compares subjective assessment tools and available objective measurement tools with potential devices becoming available. Our goal is to lay out the benefits of each scar assessment scale in order to propose good management skills for scars along with strong metric skills. Classifying a scar is important in daily clinical practice. Ultimately choosing which treatment modality best fits can become a challenge. Scar classification needs a more detailed and systematic approach. We researched all different factors contributing to scar formation to come up with a more detailed criteria. Such factors included pigmentation/vascularity, surface texture, surface area, thickness (scar height), and pliability. Few studies have assessed scars; each provided an assessment scale of their own. Each scale is compared on the basis of accuracy, reliability, convenience in terms of feasibility and price. There remains still no ideal objective measurement out there despite promise seen in subjective evaluation. Method refinement will however accelerate our knowledge and interventions - based on increasing study power with enhanced metrics.

  11. A quantitative approach to scar analysis.

    PubMed

    Khorasani, Hooman; Zheng, Zhong; Nguyen, Calvin; Zara, Janette; Zhang, Xinli; Wang, Joyce; Ting, Kang; Soo, Chia

    2011-02-01

    Analysis of collagen architecture is essential to wound healing research. However, to date no consistent methodologies exist for quantitatively assessing dermal collagen architecture in scars. In this study, we developed a standardized approach for quantitative analysis of scar collagen morphology by confocal microscopy using fractal dimension and lacunarity analysis. Full-thickness wounds were created on adult mice, closed by primary intention, and harvested at 14 days after wounding for morphometrics and standard Fourier transform-based scar analysis as well as fractal dimension and lacunarity analysis. In addition, transmission electron microscopy was used to evaluate collagen ultrastructure. We demonstrated that fractal dimension and lacunarity analysis were superior to Fourier transform analysis in discriminating scar versus unwounded tissue in a wild-type mouse model. To fully test the robustness of this scar analysis approach, a fibromodulin-null mouse model that heals with increased scar was also used. Fractal dimension and lacunarity analysis effectively discriminated unwounded fibromodulin-null versus wild-type skin as well as healing fibromodulin-null versus wild-type wounds, whereas Fourier transform analysis failed to do so. Furthermore, fractal dimension and lacunarity data also correlated well with transmission electron microscopy collagen ultrastructure analysis, adding to their validity. These results demonstrate that fractal dimension and lacunarity are more sensitive than Fourier transform analysis for quantification of scar morphology.

  12. Hair follicle transplantation on scar tissue.

    PubMed

    Jung, Soyeon; Oh, Suk Joon; Hoon Koh, Sung

    2013-07-01

    Hair transplantation is a continuously evolving field. The procedure was originally developed by Dr. Orentreich in 1959, but he applied it only to the androgenic alopecia. Potential applications for hair grafting extend beyond treatment of hair loss. Our study group consisted of 25 cases of 23 patients. The causes of scar resulting to hair loss were burns, operation, and trauma. The scalp strips or follicular unit extracts were harvested from occipital, posterior auricular, dog-eared scalp, adjacent scalp area, and nuchal area. The recipient sites were scalp, eyebrow, lip, and eyelid. The follow-up cases over 6 months after operation were 18 among total 25 cases. The result after hair follicle transplantation was excellent (44.4%), good (38.9%), fair (11.1%), and poor (5.6%). The hair follicle transplantation on the scar tissue is more difficult than grafting on normal tissue because the scar is accompanied by poor blood circulation and stiffness of tissue. The patients with burned scar achieved more favorable result than did others. Incision scars are deeper than burned scars, and their success rates are poor. We should recommend the patients that hair follicle transplantation on the scar may need secondary or more operations for the aesthetically better result.

  13. A Quantitative Approach to Scar Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Khorasani, Hooman; Zheng, Zhong; Nguyen, Calvin; Zara, Janette; Zhang, Xinli; Wang, Joyce; Ting, Kang; Soo, Chia

    2011-01-01

    Analysis of collagen architecture is essential to wound healing research. However, to date no consistent methodologies exist for quantitatively assessing dermal collagen architecture in scars. In this study, we developed a standardized approach for quantitative analysis of scar collagen morphology by confocal microscopy using fractal dimension and lacunarity analysis. Full-thickness wounds were created on adult mice, closed by primary intention, and harvested at 14 days after wounding for morphometrics and standard Fourier transform-based scar analysis as well as fractal dimension and lacunarity analysis. In addition, transmission electron microscopy was used to evaluate collagen ultrastructure. We demonstrated that fractal dimension and lacunarity analysis were superior to Fourier transform analysis in discriminating scar versus unwounded tissue in a wild-type mouse model. To fully test the robustness of this scar analysis approach, a fibromodulin-null mouse model that heals with increased scar was also used. Fractal dimension and lacunarity analysis effectively discriminated unwounded fibromodulin-null versus wild-type skin as well as healing fibromodulin-null versus wild-type wounds, whereas Fourier transform analysis failed to do so. Furthermore, fractal dimension and lacunarity data also correlated well with transmission electron microscopy collagen ultrastructure analysis, adding to their validity. These results demonstrate that fractal dimension and lacunarity are more sensitive than Fourier transform analysis for quantification of scar morphology. PMID:21281794

  14. A Randomized Controlled Trial of the embrace Advanced Scar Therapy Device to Reduce Incisional Scar Formation

    PubMed Central

    Longaker, Michael T.; Rohrich, Rod J.; Greenberg, Lauren; Furnas, Heather; Wald, Robert; Bansal, Vivek; Seify, Hisham; Tran, Anthony; Weston, Jane; Korman, Joshua M.; Chan, Rodney; Kaufman, David; Dev, Vipul R.; Mele, Joseph A.; Januszyk, Michael; Cowley, Christy; McLaughlin, Peggy; Beasley, Bill; Gurtner, Geoffrey C.; Longaker, Michael T.; Gurtner, Geoffrey C.

    2015-01-01

    Background Scarring represents a significant biomedical burden in clinical medicine. Mechanomodulation has been linked to scarring through inflammation, but until now a systematic approach to attenuate mechanical force and reduce scarring has not been possible. Methods The authors conducted a 12-month, prospective, open-label, randomized, multicenter clinical trial to evaluate abdominoplasty scar appearance following postoperative treatment with the embrace Advanced Scar Therapy device to reduce mechanical forces on healing surgical incisions. Incisions from 65 healthy adult subjects were randomized to receive embrace treatment on one half of an abdominoplasty incision and control treatment (surgeon's optimal care methods) on the other half. The primary endpoint for this study was the difference between assessments of scar appearance for the treated and control sides using the visual analogue scale scar score. Results Final 12-month study photographs were obtained from 36 subjects who completed at least 5 weeks of dressing application. The mean visual analogue scale score for embrace-treated scars (2.90) was significantly improved compared with control-treated scars (3.29) at 12 months (difference, 0.39; 95 percent confidence interval, 0.14 to 0.66; p = 0.027). Both subjects and investigators found that embrace-treated scars demonstrated significant improvements in overall appearance at 12 months using the Patient and Observer Scar Assessment Scale evaluation (p = 0.02 and p < 0.001, respectively). No serious adverse events were reported. Conclusions These results demonstrate that the embrace device significantly reduces scarring following abdominoplasty surgery. To the authors’ knowledge, this represents the first level I evidence for postoperative scar reduction. PMID:24804638

  15. Controllable quantum scars in semiconductor quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keski-Rahkonen, J.; Luukko, P. J. J.; Kaplan, L.; Heller, E. J.; Räsänen, E.

    2017-09-01

    Quantum scars are enhancements of quantum probability density along classical periodic orbits. We study the recently discovered phenomenon of strong perturbation-induced quantum scarring in the two-dimensional harmonic oscillator exposed to a homogeneous magnetic field. We demonstrate that both the geometry and the orientation of the scars are fully controllable with a magnetic field and a focused perturbative potential, respectively. These properties may open a path into an experimental scheme to manipulate electric currents in nanostructures fabricated in a two-dimensional electron gas.

  16. Marjolin's ulcer and chronic burn scarring.

    PubMed

    Akgüner, M; Barutçu, A; Yilmaz, M; Karataş, O; Vayvada, H

    1998-03-01

    Marjolin's ulcer is a term used to describe squamous cell carcinomas which develop in chronic wounds. These carcinomas may also develop at the site of long-standing irritation, such as unstable burn scars. Development times for burn scar carcinomas of more than 30 years have been noted. This evaluation describes the treatment of 10 patients with burn scar carcinomas who have been treated using wide excision and closure of the defect with skin grafts or flaps, plus regional lymph node dissection if required. Results indicate a mean carcinoma development time of 26 years. Local recurrence occurred in only one patient.

  17. Scar State on Time-evolving Wavepacket

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomiya, Mitsuyoshi; Tsuyuki, Hiroyoshi; Kawamura, Kentaro; Sakamoto, Shoichi; Heller, Eric J.

    2015-09-01

    The scar-like enhancement is found in the accumulation of the time-evolving wavepacket in stadium billiard. It appears close to unstable periodic orbits, when the wavepackets are launched along the orbits. The enhancement is essentially due to the same mechanism of the well-known scar states in stationary eigenstates. The weighted spectral function reveals that the enhancement is the pileup of contributions from scar states on the same periodic orbit. The availavility of the weighted spectrum to the semiclassical approximation is also disscussed.

  18. Swine (Sus scrofa) as a Model of Postinfarction Mitral Regurgitation and Techniques to Accommodate Its Effects during Surgical Repair

    PubMed Central

    Sarin, Eric L; Shi, Weiwei; Duara, Rajnish; Melone, Todd A; Kalra, Kanika; Strong, Ashley; Girish, Apoorva; McIver, Bryant V; Thourani, Vinod H; Guyton, Robert A; Padala, Muralidhar

    2016-01-01

    Mitral regurgitation (MR) is a common heart-valve lesion after myocardial infarction in humans. Because it is considered a risk factor for accelerated heart failure and death, various surgical approaches and catheter-based devices to correct it are in development. Lack of a reproducible animal model of MR after myocardial infarction and reliable techniques to perform open-heart surgery in these diseased models led to the use of healthy animals to test new devices. Thus, most devices that are deemed safe in healthy animals have shown poor results in human efficacy studies, hampering progress in this area of research. Here we report our experience with a swine model of postinfarction MR, describe techniques to induce regurgitation and perform open-heart surgery in these diseased animals, and discuss our outcomes, complications, and solutions. PMID:27538860

  19. Swine (Sus scrofa) as a Model of Postinfarction Mitral Regurgitation and Techniques to Accommodate Its Effects during Surgical Repair.

    PubMed

    Sarin, Eric L; Shi, Weiwei; Duara, Rajnish; Melone, Todd A; Kalra, Kanika; Strong, Ashley; Girish, Apoorva; McIver, Bryant V; Thourani, Vinod H; Guyton, Robert A; Padala, Muralidhar

    2016-01-01

    Mitral regurgitation (MR) is a common heart-valve lesion after myocardial infarction in humans. Because it is considered a risk factor for accelerated heart failure and death, various surgical approaches and catheter-based devices to correct it are in development. Lack of a reproducible animal model of MR after myocardial infarction and reliable techniques to perform open-heart surgery in these diseased models led to the use of healthy animals to test new devices. Thus, most devices that are deemed safe in healthy animals have shown poor results in human efficacy studies, hampering progress in this area of research. Here we report our experience with a swine model of postinfarction MR, describe techniques to induce regurgitation and perform open-heart surgery in these diseased animals, and discuss our outcomes, complications, and solutions.

  20. A rationale for early extracorporeal membrane oxygenation in patients with postinfarction ventricular septal rupture complicated by cardiogenic shock.

    PubMed

    Rob, Daniel; Špunda, Rudolf; Lindner, Jaroslav; Rohn, Vilém; Kunstýř, Jan; Balík, Martin; Rulíšek, Jan; Kopecký, Petr; Lipš, Michal; Šmíd, Ondřej; Kovárník, Tomáš; Mlejnský, František; Linhart, Aleš; Bělohlávek, Jan

    2017-05-01

    Ventricular septal rupture (VSR) became a rare mechanical complication of myocardial infarction in the era of percutaneous coronary interventions but is associated with extreme mortality in patients who present with cardiogenic shock (CS). Promising outcomes have been reported with the use of circulatory support allowing haemodynamic stabilization, followed by delayed repair. Therefore, we analysed our experience with an early use of Veno-Arterial Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation (V-A ECMO) for postinfarction VSR. We conducted a retrospective search of institutional database for patients presenting with postinfarction VSR from January 2007 to June 2016. Data from 31 consecutive patients (mean age 69.5 ± 9.1 years) who were admitted to hospital were analysed. Seven out of 31 patients with VSR who were in refractory CS received V-A ECMO support preoperatively. ECMO improved end-organ perfusion with decreased lactate levels 24 hours after implantation (7.9 mmol/L vs. 1.6 mmol/L, p = 0.01), normalized arterial pH (7.25 vs. 7.40, p < 0.04), improved mean arterial pressure (64 mmHg vs. 83 mmHg, p < 0.01) and lowered heart rate (115/min vs. 68/min, p < 0.01). Mean duration of ECMO support was 12 days, 5 out of 7 patients underwent surgical repair, 4 were weaned from ECMO, 3 survived 30 days and 2 survived more than 1 year. The most frequent complication (5 patients) and the cause of death (3 patients) was bleeding. Our experience suggests that early V-A ECMO in patients with VSR and refractory CS might prevent irreversible multiorgan failure by improved end-organ perfusion. Bleeding complications remain an important limitation of this approach. © 2017 The Authors. European Journal of Heart Failure © 2017 European Society of Cardiology.

  1. The evidence for natural therapeutics as potential anti-scarring agents in burn-related scarring.

    PubMed

    Mehta, M; Branford, O A; Rolfe, K J

    2016-01-01

    Though survival rate following severe thermal injuries has improved, the incidence and treatment of scarring have not improved at the same speed. This review discusses the formation of scars and in particular the formation of hypertrophic scars. Further, though there is as yet no gold standard treatment for the prevention or treatment of scarring, a brief overview is included. A number of natural therapeutics have shown beneficial effects both in vivo and in vitro with the potential of becoming clinical therapeutics in the future. These natural therapeutics include both plant-based products such as resveratrol, quercetin and epigallocatechin gallate as examples and includes the non-plant-based therapeutic honey. The review also includes potential mechanism of action for the therapeutics, any recorded adverse events and current administration of the therapeutics used. This review discusses a number of potential 'treatments' that may reduce or even prevent scarring particularly hypertrophic scarring, which is associated with thermal injuries without compromising wound repair.

  2. Differences in quantitative assessment of myocardial scar and gray zone by LGE-CMR imaging using established gray zone protocols.

    PubMed

    Mesubi, Olurotimi; Ego-Osuala, Kelechi; Jeudy, Jean; Purtilo, James; Synowski, Stephen; Abutaleb, Ameer; Niekoop, Michelle; Abdulghani, Mohammed; Asoglu, Ramazan; See, Vincent; Saliaris, Anastasios; Shorofsky, Stephen; Dickfeld, Timm

    2015-02-01

    Late gadolinium enhancement cardiac magnetic resonance (LGE-CMR) imaging is the gold standard for myocardial scar evaluation. Heterogeneous areas of scar ('gray zone'), may serve as arrhythmogenic substrate. Various gray zone protocols have been correlated to clinical outcomes and ventricular tachycardia channels. This study assessed the quantitative differences in gray zone and scar core sizes as defined by previously validated signal intensity (SI) threshold algorithms. High quality LGE-CMR images performed in 41 cardiomyopathy patients [ischemic (33) or non-ischemic (8)] were analyzed using previously validated SI threshold methods [Full Width at Half Maximum (FWHM), n-standard deviation (NSD) and modified-FWHM]. Myocardial scar was defined as scar core and gray zone using SI thresholds based on these methods. Scar core, gray zone and total scar sizes were then computed and compared among these models. The median gray zone mass was 2-3 times larger with FWHM (15 g, IQR: 8-26 g) compared to NSD or modified-FWHM (5 g, IQR: 3-9 g; and 8 g. IQR: 6-12 g respectively, p < 0.001). Conversely, infarct core mass was 2.3 times larger with NSD (30 g, IQR: 17-53 g) versus FWHM and modified-FWHM (13 g, IQR: 7-23 g, p < 0.001). The gray zone extent (percentage of total scar that was gray zone) also varied significantly among the three methods, 51 % (IQR: 42-61 %), 17 % (IQR: 11-21 %) versus 38 % (IQR: 33-43 %) for FWHM, NSD and modified-FWHM respectively (p < 0.001). Considerable variability exists among the current methods for MRI defined gray zone and scar core. Infarct core and total myocardial scar mass also differ using these methods. Further evaluation of the most accurate quantification method is needed.

  3. Answers to Common Questions about Scars

    MedlinePlus

    ... off the skin and fairly stiff to the touch. Reaching a peak after several months, the scar ... have received your message and will be in touch as soon as possible. Cleft Connection An Interview ...

  4. Medical makeup for concealing facial scars.

    PubMed

    Mee, Donna; Wong, Brian J F

    2012-10-01

    Surgical, laser, and pharmacological therapies are all used to correct scars and surgical incisions, though have limits with respect to how well facial skin can be restored or enhanced. The use of cosmetics has long been a relevant adjunct to all scar treatment modalities. In recent years, technical advancements in the chemistry and composition of cosmetic products have provided the patient with a broader range of products to employ for concealing scars. This review will provide an overview of contemporary methods for concealing facial scars, birthmarks, and pigmentary changes without the use of traditional/dated, heavy appearing camouflage products. Additionally, general guidelines and information will be provided with respect to identifying competent makeup artists for care of the medical patient. The article by no means is meant to be a tutorial, but rather serves as a starting point in this allied field of medicine. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  5. Proceedings of the SCAR Conference, Part 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    The Supersonic Cruise Aircraft Research (SCAR) team analyzed six major topics: (1) aerodynamics, (2) stability and control, (3) propulsion, (4) environmental factor, (5) airframe structures and materials, and (6) design integration.

  6. The semiclassical limit of scar intensities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vergini, Eduardo G.

    2015-04-01

    By using a simple statistical model we find the distribution of scar intensities surviving the semiclassical limit. The obtained distribution is verified in a wide energy range of the quantum Bunimovich stadium billiard.

  7. Outcome after burns: an observational study on burn scar maturation and predictors for severe scarring.

    PubMed

    van der Wal, Martijn B A; Vloemans, Jos F P M; Tuinebreijer, Wim E; van de Ven, Peter; van Unen, Ella; van Zuijlen, Paul P M; Middelkoop, Esther

    2012-01-01

    Long-term outcome of burn scars as well as the relation with clinically relevant parameters has not been studied quantitatively. Therefore, we conducted a detailed analysis on the clinical changes of burn scars in a longitudinal setup. In addition, we focused on the differences in scar quality in relation to the depth, etiology of the burn wound and age of the patient. Burn scars of 474 patients were subjected to a scar assessment protocol 3, 6, and 12 months postburn. Three different age groups were defined (≤5, 5-18, and ≥18 years). The observer part of the patient and observer scar assessment scale revealed a significant (p < 0.001) improvement in scar quality at 12 months compared with the 3- and 6-month data. Predictors for severe scarring are depth of the wound (p < 0.001) and total body surface area burned (p < 0.001). Etiology (p = 0.753) and age (p > 0.230) have no significant influence on scar quality when corrected for sex, total body surface area burned, time, and age or etiology, respectively.

  8. The "Sea" should not be operated on in scar revision for "Island-Like" scars.

    PubMed

    Nagasao, Tomohisa; Hamamoto, Yusuke; Tamai, Motoki; Kudo, Hiroo; Ensako, Toshiya; Kogure, Tetsukuni; Takano, Naoki; Tanaka, Yoshio

    2015-08-01

    Scars developing on body surfaces not only restrict body movement, but are also problematic from a cosmetic standpoint. Hence, revision is conducted by removing the scar and re-suturing the resultant defects. In performing scar revision, care should be taken to prevent the re-sutured wounds from developing hypertrophy again. Scars often present a pattern where hard, red parts are separated by soft parts in between. As the hard and soft parts may be analogized as islands and seas respectively, we call this the "Island-Like" scar. Two strategies can be taken to treat scars of this type. The first is to remove the entire scar-including both hard and soft parts; the second is to remove only the hard parts and leave the soft parts untouched. The authors conducted a biomechanical study using finite element analyses and found that as a body moves, greater stresses occur in the peri-wound regions with the first strategy than with the second strategy. A wound's likelihood to develop hypertrophy increases as the stresses working on it increase. Hence, it is hypothesized that the second strategy carries less risk of the operated wounds developing re-hypertrophy than the first strategy. Based on this logic, in performing scar revision for scars consisting of hard and soft parts, it is recommended only to remove only hard parts and not to operate on soft parts in between.

  9. Frequency of placenta previa in previously scarred and non scarred uterus

    PubMed Central

    Majeed, Tayyaba; Waheed, Fatima; Mahmood, Zahid; Saba, Kanwal; Mahmood, Hamis; Bukhari, Mulazim Hussain

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To determine the frequency of placenta Previa in patients coming to a tertiary care unit with previously scarred and non-scarred uterus. Methods: A descriptive cross sectional study was carried on 114 cases who underwent caesarean sections (37 cases out of 645 cases with non scarred uterus and 77 cases from 721 cases with scarred uterus) in the department of obstetrics and gynecology Lady Willingdon Hospital from January 2008– December 2011. Results: Most patients (47.36%) were between 26-30 years age group, presented with gestational age between 36-40 weeks (70.17%), were mostly G2-4, while frequency of placenta Previa in non-scarred uterus was 32.45% (37 cases), and frequency in previously scarred uterus was 67.54% (77 cases). Major degree Previa was found in 88 cases (77.19%). There were 5.70% cases of placenta Previa from non-scarred uteruses and 10.67% cases of placenta Previa (10.67%) from already scarred uteruses. Stratification revealed a higher trend of the morbidity with the increase in number of previous caesarean sections. Conclusion: A significantly higher frequency of placenta Previa was found among patients coming to a tertiary care hospital with previously scarred uterus. PMID:26101491

  10. Frequency of placenta previa in previously scarred and non scarred uterus.

    PubMed

    Majeed, Tayyaba; Waheed, Fatima; Mahmood, Zahid; Saba, Kanwal; Mahmood, Hamis; Bukhari, Mulazim Hussain

    2015-01-01

    To determine the frequency of placenta Previa in patients coming to a tertiary care unit with previously scarred and non-scarred uterus. A descriptive cross sectional study was carried on 114 cases who underwent caesarean sections (37 cases out of 645 cases with non scarred uterus and 77 cases from 721 cases with scarred uterus) in the department of obstetrics and gynecology Lady Willingdon Hospital from January 2008- December 2011. Most patients (47.36%) were between 26-30 years age group, presented with gestational age between 36-40 weeks (70.17%), were mostly G2-4, while frequency of placenta Previa in non-scarred uterus was 32.45% (37 cases), and frequency in previously scarred uterus was 67.54% (77 cases). Major degree Previa was found in 88 cases (77.19%). There were 5.70% cases of placenta Previa from non-scarred uteruses and 10.67% cases of placenta Previa (10.67%) from already scarred uteruses. Stratification revealed a higher trend of the morbidity with the increase in number of previous caesarean sections. A significantly higher frequency of placenta Previa was found among patients coming to a tertiary care hospital with previously scarred uterus.

  11. Effect of systemic enzymotherapy on Cesarean section scar healing.

    PubMed

    Dosedla, E; Grendelova, A; Calda, P

    2016-01-01

    The aim of our study was to monitor changes in the healing of Caesarean section scars in patients using systemic enzymotherapy in comparison with patients not treated with systemic enzymotherapy (Wobenzym). A prospective cohort study was conducted in 60 primiparous women delivered by CS. We compared the following outcomes: scar thickness after the Caesarean section, dehiscence risk coefficient (DRC), severity of the Caesarean section scar defect, uterine cavity dilation, post-operative pain, C-reactive protein level and febrility. The scar thickness 6 weeks after CS was significantly greater in the group of patients taking Wobenzym (7.1±0.9 mm; mean ± SD) than in the patients without Wobenzym (5.3±0.7 mm) (p = 0.01). Severe Caesarean section scar defects were observed in 1/30 (3.3%) Wobenzym users and in 5/30 (16.7%) patients who did not use Wobenzym, with no statistically significant difference (p = 0.195). Despite the percentage of patients with a severe CS scar defect being apparently lower in the group treated with Wobenzym, the difference did not reach statistical significance due to the small size of the study population.

  12. Chemical Peels for Acne and Acne Scars in Asians: Evidence Based Review

    PubMed Central

    Handog, Evangeline B; Datuin, Maria Suzanne L; Singzon, Ivan A

    2012-01-01

    Chemical peeling is a widely used procedure in the management of acne and acne scars, but there are very few studies on Asian populations who are more prone to develop hyper pigmentation. This article aims to summarize and evaluate the existing studies on the role of chemical peels in the treatment of acne and acne scars among Asians. An online search was conducted to identify prospective studies published in English that evaluated the use of chemical peels in active acne and acne scars in Asian populations. There were six studies for acne and eight studies for acne scars that were identified using our search parameters. Most were single-centre, open label and with small sample sizes. Acne severity was not uniformly reported and the objective outcome measures of some studies were not explicitly reported as well. The general trend of the results of the studies support the safety and efficacy of chemical peels for acne and acne scars including those of darker skin types. The existing studies support the use of chemical peels in the treatment of acne and acne scars in Asians. Further clinical trials with better study design and more subjects are needed to further establish the role of chemical peels in Asian acne patients. PMID:23378705

  13. Enhanced in Vivo Delivery of 5-Fluorouracil by Ethosomal Gels in Rabbit Ear Hypertrophic Scar Model

    PubMed Central

    Wo, Yan; Zhang, Zheng; Zhang, Yixin; Zhang, Zhen; Wang, Kan; Mao, Xiaohui; Su, Weijie; Li, Ke; Cui, Daxiang; Chen, Jun

    2014-01-01

    Applying Ethosomal Gels (EGs) in transdermal drug delivery systems has evoked considerable interest because of their good water-solubility and biocompatibility. However, there has not been an explicit description of applying EGs as a vehicle for hypertrophic scars treatment. Here, a novel transdermal EGs loaded with 5-fluorouracil (5-FU EGs) was successfully prepared and characterized. The stability assay in vitro revealed that 5-FU EGs stored for a period of 30 days at 4 ± 1 °C had a better size stability than that at 25 ± 1 °C. Furthermore, using confocal laser scanning microscopy, EGs labeled with Rhodamine 6 G penetrated into the deep dermis of the hypertrophic scar within 24 h in the rabbit ear hypertrophic model suggested that the EGs were an optional delivery carrier through scar tissues. In addition, the value of the Scar Elevation Index (SEI) of 5-FU EGs group in the rabbit ear scar model was lower than that of 5-FU Phosphate Buffered Saline gel and Control groups. To conclude, these results suggest that EGs delivery system loaded 5-fluorouracil is a perfect candidate drug for hypertrophic scars therapy in future. PMID:25501333

  14. Do postsurgical interventions optimize ultimate scar cosmesis.

    PubMed

    Viera, M H; Amini, S; Konda, S; Berman, B

    2009-06-01

    Keloids and other scars are different manifestations of the normal wound healing process. If located in visible areas, scars may have a psychological impact that could affect the quality of life of the scar-bearing population. Good preoperatory planning including hiding incisions in natural anatomical landmarks or placing them parallel to relaxed skin tension lines are among the techniques used to improve the cosmesis of scars. Once a prominent or noticeable scar has developed, multiple therapeutic modalities can be applied including surgical excision, although high recurrence rates precludes its use as monotherapy. Several advanced surgical correction techniques including Z-plasty and W-plasty may be useful in repositioning scars. Other modalities that have been reported to improve scar cosmesis include cryosurgery, radiotherapy, lasers, and skin substitute grafts. Adjuvant postsurgical treatment modalities have reduced dramatically the recurrence rates associated with the removal of the scar. In this review of the literature the authors discuss evidence based data related to the abovementioned modalities and other topical and intralesional therapies including occlusion, compression, silicone, corticosteroids, interferons, imiquimod, resiquimod, tacrolimus, 5-fluorouracil, retinoids, as well as the role of several over-the-counter agents such as onion extract, vitamin E and the combination of hydrocortisone, vitamin E and silicone. Finally, they address newer modalities including vascular endothelial growth factor inhibitor, transforming growth factor-3, interleukin-10, mannose-6-phosphate, UVA-1, narrowband UVB, intense pulsed light and photodynamic therapy. Ultimately, the decision of choosing the most appropriate postexcisional management treatment should be taken by physicians on a case-by-case basis in order to obtain the best cosmetically acceptable results.

  15. Burn Scar Biomechanics Following Pressure Garment Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jayne Y.; Willard, James J.; Supp, Dorothy M.; Roy, Sashwati; Gordillo, Gayle M.; Sen, Chandan K.; Powell, Heather M.

    2015-01-01

    Background The current standard of care for the prevention and treatment of scarring following burn injury is pressure garment therapy (PGT). Although this therapy has been used clinically for many years, controversy remains regarding its efficacy. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of PGT in a female Red Duroc pig (fRDP) burn model where wound depth could be tightly controlled. Methods Full-thickness burn wounds were generated on fRDPs. At day 28 post-burn, PGT was applied to half of the wounds (10 mmHg), with control wounds covered with garments exerting no compression. Scar area, perfusion, hardness, and elasticity were quantified at days 0, 28, 42, 56, and 72 using computerized planimetry, Laser Doppler and torsional ballistometry. Scar morphology was assessed at days 28, 56 and 76 using histology, immunohistochemistry and transmission electron microscopy. Results Pressure garment therapy significantly hindered scar contraction with control scars contracting to 64.6 + 13.9% original area at day 72 while PGT scars contracted to 82.7 + 17.9% original area. PGT significantly reduced skin hardness and increased skin strength by 1.3X. No difference in perfusion or blood vessel density was observed. Average collagen fiber diameter was greater in control burns than PGT. Conclusions PGT was effective at reducing scar contraction and improving biomechanics compared to control scars. These results confirm the efficacy of pressure garments and highlight the need to further investigate the role of pressure magnitude and time of therapy application to enhance their efficacy for optimal biomechanics and patient mobility. PMID:25989300

  16. Smoke, Clouds, and Radiation-Brazil (SCAR-B) Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaufman, Y. J.; Hobbs, P. V.; Kirchoff, V. W. J. H.; Artaxo, P.; Remer, L. A.; Holben, B. N.; King, M. D.; Ward, D. E.; Prins, E. M.; Longo, K. M.; Mattos, L. F.; Nobre, C. A.; Spinhirne, J. D.; Ji, Q.; Thompson, A. M.; Gleason, J. F.; Christopher, S. A.; Tsay, S.-C.

    1998-01-01

    The Smoke, Clouds, and Radiation-Brazil (SCAR-B) field project took place in the Brazilian Amazon and cerrado regions in August-September 1995 as a collaboration between Brazilian and American scientists. SCAR-B, a comprehensive experiment to study biomass burning, emphasized measurements of surface biomass, fires, smoke aerosol and trace gases, clouds, and radiation. their climatic effects, and remote sensing from aircraft and satellites. It included aircraft and ground-based in situ measurements of smoke emission factors and the compositions, sizes, and optical properties of the smoke particles; studies of the formation of ozone; the transport and evolution of smoke; and smoke interactions with water vapor and clouds. This overview paper introduces SCAR-B and summarizes some of the main results obtained so far. (1) Fires: measurements of the size distribution of fires, using the 50 m resolution MODIS Airborne Simulator, show that most of the fires are small (e.g. 0.005 square km), but the satellite sensors (e.g., AVHRR and MODIS with I km resolution) can detect fires in Brazil which are responsible for 60-85% of the burned biomass: (2) Aerosol: smoke particles emitted from fires increase their radius by as much as 60%, during their first three days in the atmosphere due to condensation and coagulation, reaching a mass median radius of 0.13-0.17 microns: (3) Radiative forcing: estimates of the globally averaged direct radiative forcing due to smoke worldwide, based on the properties of smoke measured in SCAR-B (-O.l to -0.3 W m(exp -2)), are smaller than previously modeled due to a lower single-scattering albedo (0.8 to 0.9), smaller scattering efficiency (3 square meters g(exp -2) at 550 nm), and low humidification factor; and (4) Effect on clouds: a good relationship was found between cloud condensation nuclei and smoke volume concentrations, thus an increase in the smoke emission is expected to affect cloud properties. In SCAR-B, new techniques were developed

  17. Smoke, Clouds, and Radiation-Brazil (SCAR-B) Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaufman, Y. J.; Hobbs, P. V.; Kirchoff, V. W. J. H.; Artaxo, P.; Remer, L. A.; Holben, B. N.; King, M. D.; Ward, D. E.; Prins, E. M.; Longo, K. M.; hide

    1998-01-01

    The Smoke, Clouds, and Radiation-Brazil (SCAR-B) field project took place in the Brazilian Amazon and cerrado regions in August-September 1995 as a collaboration between Brazilian and American scientists. SCAR-B, a comprehensive experiment to study biomass burning, emphasized measurements of surface biomass, fires, smoke aerosol and trace gases, clouds, and radiation. their climatic effects, and remote sensing from aircraft and satellites. It included aircraft and ground-based in situ measurements of smoke emission factors and the compositions, sizes, and optical properties of the smoke particles; studies of the formation of ozone; the transport and evolution of smoke; and smoke interactions with water vapor and clouds. This overview paper introduces SCAR-B and summarizes some of the main results obtained so far. (1) Fires: measurements of the size distribution of fires, using the 50 m resolution MODIS Airborne Simulator, show that most of the fires are small (e.g. 0.005 square km), but the satellite sensors (e.g., AVHRR and MODIS with I km resolution) can detect fires in Brazil which are responsible for 60-85% of the burned biomass: (2) Aerosol: smoke particles emitted from fires increase their radius by as much as 60%, during their first three days in the atmosphere due to condensation and coagulation, reaching a mass median radius of 0.13-0.17 microns: (3) Radiative forcing: estimates of the globally averaged direct radiative forcing due to smoke worldwide, based on the properties of smoke measured in SCAR-B (-O.l to -0.3 W m(exp -2)), are smaller than previously modeled due to a lower single-scattering albedo (0.8 to 0.9), smaller scattering efficiency (3 square meters g(exp -2) at 550 nm), and low humidification factor; and (4) Effect on clouds: a good relationship was found between cloud condensation nuclei and smoke volume concentrations, thus an increase in the smoke emission is expected to affect cloud properties. In SCAR-B, new techniques were developed

  18. Radial Scar at Percutaneous Breast Biopsy That Does Not Require Surgery.

    PubMed

    Leong, Rachelle Y; Kohli, Manpreet K; Zeizafoun, Nebraz; Liang, Amy; Tartter, Paul I

    2016-11-01

    Surgical excision is currently recommended after pathologic radial scar is found on breast core needle biopsy because surgical upgrade to carcinoma is not uncommon. The goal of our study was to identify the true pathologic upgrade rate for a "pure" radial scar, those without associated proliferative lesion, based on indication for biopsy, biopsy type, and needle size. The pathology database of Continuum Health Partners was searched for the terms radial scar and radial sclerosing lesion, from January 2007 to December 2015. From review of 1,513 pathology reports, 292 cases of core biopsies without malignancy were identified. Age, indication for biopsy, type of biopsy, and excisional pathology were obtained. Data were then analyzed using SPSS. Two hundred nineteen (75%) of the 292 core biopsies showed pure radial scar without associated proliferative lesion, and 161 (74%) of these patients had surgical excision. Only 1 of these patients had disease that was upgraded to ductal carcinoma in situ-a 2-mm focus located 5 mm away from the radial scar biopsy cavity. This patient also had residual calcifications on mammography after the stereotactic biopsy. Six additional malignant upgrades were found in patients who had radial scar associated with atypical ductal hyperplasia (n = 5) or lobular neoplasia (n = 1) on needle biopsy. Surgical excision is unnecessary when radial scar is found at percutaneous needle biopsy without an associated proliferative lesion. Surgical excision is still indicated when radial scar is associated with atypical ductal hyperplasia or lobular neoplasia. Copyright © 2016 American College of Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Overview of surgical scar prevention and management.

    PubMed

    Son, Daegu; Harijan, Aram

    2014-06-01

    Management of incisional scar is intimately connected to stages of wound healing. The management of an elective surgery patient begins with a thorough informed consent process in which the patient is made aware of personal and clinical circumstances that cannot be modified, such as age, ethnicity, and previous history of hypertrophic scars. In scar prevention, the single most important modifiable factor is wound tension during the proliferative and remodeling phases, and this is determined by the choice of incision design. Traditional incisions most often follow relaxed skin tension lines, but no such lines exist in high surface tension areas. If such incisions are unavoidable, the patient must be informed of this ahead of time. The management of a surgical incision does not end when the sutures are removed. Surgical scar care should be continued for one year. Patient participation is paramount in obtaining the optimal outcome. Postoperative visits should screen for signs of scar hypertrophy and has a dual purpose of continued patient education and reinforcement of proper care. Early intervention is a key to control hyperplastic response. Hypertrophic scars that do not improve by 6 months are keloids and should be managed aggressively with intralesional steroid injections and alternate modalities.

  20. Mastectomy scar histopathology of limited clinical value.

    PubMed

    Alam, Munir; Kiely, Clare; Shah, Syed H; Lawlor, Catriona; O'Donnell, Margaret

    2006-10-01

    This study assesses whether the routine submission of mastectomy scars for histologic examination at the time of delayed breast reconstruction is useful. A retrospective review was performed of all delayed breast reconstructions for breast cancer performed by a single surgeon over a 5-year period from January 2000 to December 2004. One hundred eighty-eight patients underwent delayed breast reconstruction during this period, and of these, 133 scars (1 patient had bilateral scars excised) were submitted for histology where the reconstruction was performed by either transversus rectus abdominus muscle flap (TRAM) or latissimus dorsi myocutaneous flap (LDF) +/- implant. Fifty-six patients had reconstruction performed by tissue expander through the inframammary crease where the original mastectomy scar was not excised and were excluded from the study. One mastectomy scar specimen showed a 2-mm suspicious area of invasive ductal carcinoma consistent with same histopathology at the time of mastectomy. This study corroborates evidence that it is questionable whether routine histopathology of mastectomy scar at the time of delayed breast reconstruction should not be a standard practice.

  1. [International clinical recommendations on scar management].

    PubMed

    Ziegler, U E

    2004-08-01

    Many techniques for management of hypertrophic scars and keloids have been proven through extensive use, but few have been supported by prospective studies with adequate control groups. Several new therapies showed good results in small-scale trials, but these have not been repeated in larger trials with long-term follow-up. This article reports a qualitative overview of the available clinical literature by an international panel of experts using standard methods of appraisal. The article provides evidence- based recommendations on prevention and treatment of abnormal scarring and, where studies are insufficient, consensus on best practice. The recommendations focus on the management of hypertrophic scars and keloids, and are internationally applicable in a range of clinical situations. These recommendations support a move to a more evidence-based approach in scar management. This approach highlights a primary role for silicon gel sheeting and intralesional corticosteroids in the management of a wide variety of abnormal scars. The authors concluded that these are the only treatments for which sufficient evidence exists to make evidence-based recommendations. A number of other therapies that are in common use have achieved acceptance by the authors as standard practice. However, it is highly desirable that many standard practice and new emerging therapies undergo large-scale studies with long-term follow-up before being recommended conclusively as alternative therapies for scar management.

  2. Resurfacing the acne-scarred face.

    PubMed

    Fulton, J E; Silverton, K

    1999-05-01

    : Dermabrasion has been a useful method for the improvement of acne scars since 1953. However, the improvement is often limited. Adjuvant procedures are often necessary to improve results. : To improve the results of resurfacing the acne scarred face. By combining the techniques of subcutaneous filling, laser shrinkage of collagen, dermabrasion, and excision, we hope to achieve better results. A Jessner/TCA peel is performed on the neck and décolleté area after the skin has been preconditioned with vitamin A conditioning lotions. The acne scars are subcised with a semi-blunt needle, and the developed pockets are filled with adipose tissue. Following this, the surface skin is vaporized with three passes of the CO2 laser, and the deeper acne scars in the mid-face region are sanded with a diamond fraise. Residual scars are excised and sutured. A semi-occlusive dressing is used for 5 days, then replaced with an ointment-based moisturizer. After 10 days, a moisturizer-sunscreen is used, followed with a bleaching cream at 15 days. Make-up may be applied after 14 days. : By combining these multiple modalities it is possible to produce a dramatic improvement of the acne-scarred complexion.

  3. Effectiveness of Onion Extract Gel on Surgical Scars in Asians

    PubMed Central

    Chanprapaph, Kumutnart; Tanrattanakorn, Somsak; Wattanakrai, Penpun; Wongkitisophon, Pranee; Vachiramon, Vasanop

    2012-01-01

    Background. Onion extracts have been shown in vitro to accelerate wound healing. Results from clinical studies on surgical scars in Caucasians were disappointing. The aim of this study is to evaluate the effectiveness of onion extract gel in improving the cosmetic and symptoms of surgical scars in Asians. Patients/Methods. Twenty Asians who had new Pfannenstiel's cesarean section scars were recruited in this prospective double-blinded, split-scar study. Each side was randomly assigned treatment with onion extract gel or placebo at 7 days after surgery. The product was applied three times daily for 12 weeks. Subjects were evaluated at baseline and 4th and 12th weeks. Scar redness was assessed by calorimeter, scar height and pliability were assessed by blinded investigators, and scar symptoms and overall cosmetic improvement were assessed by subjects. Results. Sixteen subjects completed the study. A statistically significant difference between two sides of scar in terms of scar height and scar symptoms was found. There was no statistically significant difference in scar redness, scar pliability, and overall cosmetic appearance between two sides. Conclusions. The early use of topical 12% onion extract gel on Pfannenstiel's cesarean section scar in Asians resulted in the improvement of scar height and scar symptoms. PMID:22924037

  4. [The influence of ozone therapy on oxygen metabolism kinetics and the microcirculation system during spa and resort treatment of the post-infarction patients].

    PubMed

    Sycheva, E I; Khodasevich, L S; Solomina, O E; Zubareva, M I

    2013-01-01

    This study was designed to estimate the influence of ozone therapy on oxygen metabolism kinetics and the circulation system during spa and resort treatment of 145 post-infarction patients who survived myocardial infarction. All of them were given routine spa-and-resort therapy; 56 patients received pharmacotherapy, in the remaining 89 it was supplemented with ozone-therapy. The clinical examination included electrocardiography, veloergometry, echocardiography; kinetics of oxygen metabolism was evaluated by transcutaneous polarography, laser Doppler flowmetry, and computed capillaroscopy. The results of the study indicate that ozonetherapy in combination with medicamental treatment reduces the period of post-infarction rehabilitation, decreases tissue hypoxia, improves characteristics of microcirculation and general health status of the patients.

  5. Sirtuin1-p53, forkhead box O3a, p38 and post-infarct cardiac remodeling in the spontaneously diabetic Goto-Kakizaki rat

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Diabetes is associated with changes in myocardial stress-response pathways and is recognized as an independent risk factor for cardiac remodeling. Using spontaneously diabetic Goto Kakizaki rats as a model of type 2 DM we investigated whether post-translational modifications in the Akt - FOXO3a pathway, Sirt1 - p53 pathway and the mitogen activated protein kinase p38 regulator are involved in post-infarct cardiac remodeling Methods Experimental myocardial infarction (MI) was induced by left anterior descending coronary artery ligation in spontaneously diabetic Goto-Kakizaki rats and non-diabetic Wistar controls. Cardiac function was studied by echocardiography. Myocardial hypertrophy, cardiomyocyte apoptosis and cardiac fibrosis were determined histologically 12 weeks post MI or Sham operation. Western blotting was used to study Caspase-3, Bax, Sirt1, acetylation of p53 and phosphorylation of p38, Akt and FOXO3a. Electrophoretic mobility shift assay was used to assess FOXO3a activity and its nuclear localization. Results Post-infarct heart failure in diabetic GK rats was associated with pronounced cardiomyocyte hypertrophy, increased interstitial fibrosis and sustained cardiomyocyte apoptosis as compared with their non-diabetic Wistar controls. In the GK rat myocardium, Akt- and FOXO3a-phosphorylation was decreased and nuclear localization of FOXO3a was increased concomitantly with increased PTEN protein expression. Furthermore, increased Sirt1 protein expression was associated with decreased p53 acetylation, and phosphorylation of p38 was increased in diabetic rats with MI. Conclusions Post-infarct heart failure in diabetic GK rats was associated with more pronounced cardiac hypertrophy, interstitial fibrosis and sustained cardiomyocyte apoptosis as compared to their non-diabetic controls. The present study suggests important roles for Akt-FOXO3a, Sirt1 - p53 and p38 MAPK in the regulation of post-infarct cardiac remodeling in type 2 diabetes. PMID

  6. Screening for Cardiac Magnetic Resonance Scar Features by 12-lead ECG, in Patients with Preserved Ejection Fraction

    PubMed Central

    Mewton, Nathan; Strauss, David G.; Rizzi, Patricia; Verrier, Richard L.; Liu, Chia Ying; Tereshchenko, Larisa G.; Nearing, Bruce; Volpe, Gustavo J.; Marchlinski, Francis E.; Moxley, John; Killian, Tony; Wu, Katherine C.; Spooner, Peter; Lima, João A.C.

    2015-01-01

    Background Increased QRS score and wide spatial QRS-T angle are independent predictors of cardiovascular mortality in the general population. Our main objective was to assess whether a QRS score ≥5 and/or QRS-T angle ≥105° enable screening of patients for myocardial scar features. Methods 77 patients age ≤70 years with QRS score ≥5 AND/OR spatial QRS-T angle ≥105° as well as left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) >35% were enrolled in the study. All participants underwent complete clinical examination, signal averaged ECG (SAECG), 30-minute ambulatory ECG recording for T wave alternans (TWA), and late gadolinium enhancement cardiac magnetic resonance (LGE-CMR). Relationship between QRS score, QRS-T angle with scar presence and pattern, as well as gray zone, core, and total scar size by LGE-CMR were assessed. Results Myocardial scar was present in 41 (53%) patients, of whom 19 (46%) exhibited a typical ischemic pattern. QRS score but not QRS-T angle was related to total scar size and gray zone size (R2=0.12, P=0.002; R2=0.17; P ≤0.0001 respectively). Patients with QRS scores ≥6 had significantly greater myocardial scar and gray zone size, increased QRS duration and QRS-T angle, a higher prevalence of late potentials (LP) presence, increased LV end-diastolic volume and decreased LVEF. There was a significant independent and positive association between TWA value and total scar (P=0.001) and gray zone size (P=0.01). Conclusion Patients with preserved LVEF and myocardial scar by CMR also have electrocardiographic features that could be involved in ventricular arrhythmogenesis. PMID:26806840

  7. Screening for Cardiac Magnetic Resonance Scar Features by 12-Lead ECG, in Patients with Preserved Ejection Fraction.

    PubMed

    Mewton, Nathan; Strauss, David G; Rizzi, Patricia; Verrier, Richard L; Liu, Chia Ying; Tereshchenko, Larisa G; Nearing, Bruce; Volpe, Gustavo J; Marchlinski, Francis E; Moxley, John; Killian, Tony; Wu, Katherine C; Spooner, Peter; Lima, João A C

    2016-01-01

    Increased QRS score and wide spatial QRS-T angle are independent predictors of cardiovascular mortality in the general population. Our main objective was to assess whether a QRS score ≥ 5 and/or QRS-T angle ≥ 105° enable screening of patients for myocardial scar features. Seventy-seven patients of age ≤ 70 years with QRS score ≥ 5 and/or spatial QRS-T angle ≥ 105° as well as left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) >35% were enrolled in the study. All participants underwent complete clinical examination, signal-averaged ECG (SAECG), 30-minute ambulatory ECG recording for T-wave alternans (TWA), and late gadolinium enhancement cardiac magnetic resonance (LGE-CMR). Relationship between QRS score, QRS-T angle with scar presence and pattern, as well as gray zone, core, and total scar size by LGE-CMR were assessed. Myocardial scar was present in 41 (53%) patients, of whom 19 (46%) exhibited a typical ischemic pattern. QRS score but not QRS-T angle was related to total scar size and gray zone size (R(2) = 0.12, P = 0.002; R(2) = 0.17; P ≤ 0.0001, respectively). Patients with QRS scores ≥ 6 had significantly greater myocardial scar and gray zone size, increased QRS duration and QRS-T angle, a higher prevalence of late potentials (LPs) presence, increased LV end-diastolic volume and decreased LVEF. There was a significant independent and positive association between TWA value and total scar (P = 0.001) and gray zone size (P = 0.01). Patients with preserved LVEF and myocardial scar by CMR also have electrocardiographic features that could be involved in ventricular arrhythmogenesis. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Nonablative acne scar reduction after a series of treatments with a short-pulsed 1,064-nm neodymium:YAG laser.

    PubMed

    Lipper, Graeme M; Perez, Maritza

    2006-08-01

    Effective treatment of facial acne scarring presents a major challenge. Nonablative lasers and radiofrequency devices work by thermally stimulating dermal collagen remodeling, thereby softening acne scars in a minimally invasive fashion. One such laser, a 1,064-nm short-pulsed Nd:YAG, uses rapidly scanned low-energy infrared pulses to heat the dermis selectively through the normal dermal microvasculature. In this pilot study, the safety and efficacy of a novel short-pulsed Nd:YAG laser were investigated for the treatment of moderate to severe facial acne scarring. Nine of 10 enrolled patients with moderate to severe facial acne scarring received eight sequential 1,064-nm Nd:YAG treatments (laser parameters 14 J/cm2, 0.3 milliseconds, 5-mm spot size, 7-Hz pulse rate, 2,000 pulses per side of face). Patients were graded for the presence and severity of three scar morphologies: superficial (rolling), medium-depth (boxcar), and deep (ice pick). Outcome measures included blinded evaluation of before and after photographs by three physician observers (scar severity score) and patient self-assessment. Acne scarring improved in 100% of the nine patients completing the study. Scar severity scores improved by a mean of 29.36% (95% confidence interval, 16.93%-41.79%; p = .006); 89% of patients noted greater than 10% scar improvement. No treatment-related adverse events were seen. Our findings support the use of a short-pulsed, low-fluence 1,064-nm Nd:YAG laser as a safe, effective treatment for facial acne scarring. Scar improvement was noted in all treated subjects with minimal discomfort and no downtime. This protocol appears to be most effective at reducing scar depth and softening scar contours. A laser upgrade needed for the study was provided to the authors at a reduced price.

  9. Quality of life and psychosocial impact of scarring and non-scarring alopecia in women.

    PubMed

    Katoulis, Alexandros C; Christodoulou, Christos; Liakou, Aikaterini I; Kouris, Anargyros; Korkoliakou, Panagiota; Kaloudi, Eythymia; Kanelleas, Antonios; Papageorgiou, Charalabos; Rigopoulos, Dimitrios

    2015-02-01

    Alopecia is a common dermatological condition with mostly cosmetic consequences that, nevertheless, has significant psychological and psychosocial impact. To assess the impact of alopecia on quality of life and certain psychological domains and to compare it between scarring and non-scarring alopecia in Greek adult women. Forty-four women, aged 18-70 years, with scarring (n = 19) or non-scarring alopecia (n = 25) were recruited. All patients were evaluated by Dermatology Life Quality Index (DLQI), Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS), Rosenberg Self-esteem Scale (RSES) and UCLA Loneliness Scale (UCLA-LS). Women with scarring alopecia had higher scores in DLQI, HADS and UCLA- LS and lower scores in RSES, compared to women with non-scarring alopecia. A statistically significant difference between the two groups was documented for DLQI (p = 0.0067), HADS (p = 0.0008), and HADS-Anxiety (HADS-A) (p < 0.05) and HADS-Depression (HADS-D) (p < 0.01) subscales. The psychological burden is heavier and quality of life is more severely impaired among women with scarring alopecia compared with non-scarring alopecia, probably depicting the poorer prognosis of the former. © 2015 Deutsche Dermatologische Gesellschaft (DDG). Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Reflectance confocal microscopy for scarring and non-scarring alopecia real-time assessment.

    PubMed

    Ardigò, Marco; Agozzino, Marina; Franceschini, Chiara; Donadio, Carlo; Abraham, Leonardo Spagnol; Barbieri, Luca; Sperduti, Isabella; Berardesca, Enzo; González, Salvador

    2016-07-01

    Clinical management of alopecia represents one of the major issues in dermatology. Scalp biopsies are not easily accepted because of the high bleeding and sensitive anatomical area. Trichoscopy is routinely used for diagnosis of alopecia, but in several cases lack to provide sufficient information on the status of the disease. Recently, reflectance confocal microscopy demonstrated its usefulness for the evaluation of several inflammatory skin condition and preliminary reports about alopecia have been proposed in the literature. The aim was to identify the confocal features characterizing scarring and non-scarring alopecia. Reflectance confocal microscopy from 86 patients affected by scarring (28 lichen planopilaris and 9 lupus erythematosus) and non-scarring alopecia (30 androgenic alopecia and 19 alopecia areata), were retrospectively, blinded evaluated. Good concordance between different readers on the confocal criteria has been assessed. Statistical significant features, specific for scarring alopecia and non-scarring alopecia have been identified. In this study, data on reflectance confocal microscopy features useful for the differential diagnosis between scarring and non-scarring alopecia have been identified. Further studies focusing on the use of this non-invasive technique in the therapeutic follow-up and distinction of sub-entities of alopecia are still required.

  11. Papular Acne Scars of the Nose and Chin: An Under-recognised Variant of Acne Scarring

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Faisal R; Kirk, Michael; Madan, Vishal

    2016-01-01

    Background: Scarring following acne vulgaris is common and can be of profound psychosocial consequence. Aims and Objectives: We have clinically noted a variant of acne scarring, overlooked by previous categorisation schemes, which we have denominated as papular acne scars of the nose and chin. We sought to characterise these novel entities further. Materials and Methods: Initially, we identified 14 patients with papular acne scars of the nose and chin in a cosmetic dermatology clinic, of whom two were female and rest were male. We then prospectively evaluated 100 consecutive patients attending our tertiary referral acne isotretinoin clinic and 49 patients attending a general dermatology clinic. Results: Amongst 149 patients, from a general dermatology and tertiary acne clinic, soft papular scars were noted in four patients, distributed on the nose and chin. Three of the four patients were male, three patients had additional acne scars and the median age was 23.5. Conclusions: We have identified 18 patients with papular acne scars of the nose and chin and propose that this new category should be added to acne scarring classification schemes. Future work should be directed at corroborating the epidemiology of such lesions and describing effective treatment modalities. PMID:28163455

  12. [Burn scars: rehabilitation and skin care].

    PubMed

    Rochet, Jean-Michel; Zaoui, Affif

    2002-12-15

    Burn rehabilitation main goal is to minimize the consequences of hypertrophic scars and concomitant contractures. The treatment principles rely on the association of joint posture, continuous pressure completed with range of motion to prevent joint fusion (which happens to adults but not to children). Throughout the different treatment phases and wound evolution, reassessment is necessary to review rehabilitation goals and activities. During the acute phase the alternance of positioning is prioritized in order to keep the affected extremities in antideformity position using splint or other devices. At the rehabilitation phase, treatment is focussed on active/passive range of motion (skin posture) strengthening exercises and use of dynamic splint is introduced to correct contractures. After their discharge home, patients benefit from outpatient rehab until scar maturation (approximately 18 months). The treatment consists mainly on active/passive range of motion, scar massage, strengthening exercise and endurance retraining. Also modalities (such as thermal bath and high pressure water spray) are used to address itching problems and for scar softening. Finally, reconstructive surgery can be performed to correct excessive scarring or joint contracture for better functional or cosmetic outcome.

  13. Solanidine and tomatidine trigger scar pruritus.

    PubMed

    Alonso, Pedro E; Rioja, Luis F

    2016-05-01

    Scar pruritus is frequently encountered in clinical practice (particularly in burn patients) owing to its poorly known pathogenesis and difficult treatment. In previous work, we demonstrated the usefulness of a diet excluding edible solanaceae (viz., potatoes, tomatoes, peppers and aubergines) in patients with antihistamine-resistant scar pruritus. We hypothesized that alkaloids in solanaceae (particularly their secondary metabolites or aglycones) might be the actual pruritogens. In order to test this hypothesis, we conducted a single-blind prospective study on patients responding favourably to a solanaceae-free diet whose scar pruritus could be ascribed to one of the four foods. The study involved applying the aglycones solanidine and tomatidine to each scar and checking whether, and which, had a pruritogenic effect. A total of 18 patients (90%) responded by developing pruritus; also, the triggering aglycone coincided with that prevailing in the pruritogenic food. We concluded that solanaceae aglycones are directly involved in the pathogenesis of scar pruritus. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

  14. Inflammation drives renal scarring in experimental pyelonephritis.

    PubMed

    Li, Birong; Haridas, Babitha; Jackson, Ashley R; Cortado, Hanna; Mayne, Nicholas; Kohnken, Rebecca; Bolon, Brad; McHugh, Kirk M; Schwaderer, Andrew L; Spencer, John David; Ching, Christina B; Hains, David S; Justice, Sheryl S; Partida-Sanchez, Santiago; Becknell, Brian

    2017-01-01

    Acquired renal scarring occurs in a subset of patients following febrile urinary tract infections and is associated with hypertension, proteinuria, and chronic kidney disease. Limited knowledge of histopathology, immune cell recruitment, and gene expression changes during pyelonephritis restricts the development of therapies to limit renal scarring. Here, we address this knowledge gap using immunocompetent mice with vesicoureteral reflux. Transurethral inoculation of uropathogenic Escherichia coli in C3H/HeOuJ mice leads to renal mucosal injury, tubulointerstitial nephritis, and cortical fibrosis. The extent of fibrosis correlates most significantly with inflammation at 7 and 28 days postinfection. The recruitment of neutrophils and inflammatory macrophages to infected kidneys is proportional to renal bacterial burden. Transcriptome analysis reveals molecular signatures associated with renal ischemia-reperfusion injury, immune cell chemotaxis, and leukocyte activation. This murine model recapitulates the cardinal histopathological features observed in humans with acquired renal scarring following pyelonephritis. The integration of histopathology, quantification of cellular immune influx, and unbiased transcriptional profiling begins to define potential mechanisms of tissue injury during pyelonephritis in the context of an intact immune response. The clear relationship between inflammatory cell recruitment and fibrosis supports the hypothesis that acquired renal scarring arises as a consequence of excessive host inflammation and suggests that immunomodulatory therapies should be investigated to reduce renal scarring in patients with pyelonephritis. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  15. Evaluating evidence for atrophic scarring treatment modalities

    PubMed Central

    McGrouther, Duncan; Chakrabarty, Kaushik

    2014-01-01

    Summary Introduction Atrophic scars cause significant patient morbidity. Whilst there is evidence to guide treatment, there does not appear to be a systematic review to analyse the efficacy of treatment options. Objectives To retrieve all evidence relating to atrophic scar treatment and evaluate using the Clinical Evidence GRADE score in order to allow clinicians to make evidence-based treatment choices. Method Searches were performed in Medline, EMBASE, CINHL and Cochrane to identify all English studies published evaluating treatment of atrophic scars on adults excluding journal letters. Each study was allocated a GRADE score based on type of study, quality, dose response, consistency of results and significance of results. The end score allowed categorisation of evidence into high, moderate, low or very low quality. Results A total of 41 studies were retrieved from searches including randomised controlled trials, observational studies, retrospective analyses and case reports of which 7% were allocated a high-quality score, 10% a moderate score, 7% a low score and 75% a very low score. Treatment modalities included ablative laser therapy, non-ablative laser therapy, autologous fat transfer, dermabrasion, chemical peels, injectables, subcision, tretinoin iontophoresis and combination therapy. Conclusion There is a paucity of good-quality clinical evidence evaluating treatment modalities for atrophic scarring. Evidence supports efficacy of laser, surgery and peel therapy. Further biomolecular research is required to identify targeted treatment options and more randomised controlled trials would make the evidence base for atrophic scar treatment more robust. PMID:25352991

  16. Transforming medical imaging: the first SCAR TRIP conference a position paper from the SCAR TRIP subcommittee of the SCAR research and development committee.

    PubMed

    Andriole, Katherine P; Morin, Richard L

    2006-03-01

    The First Society for Computer Applications in Radiology (SCAR) Transforming the Radiological Interpretation Process (TRIP) Conference and Workshop, "Transforming Medical Imaging" was held on January 31-February 1, 2005 in Bethesda, MD. Representatives from all areas of medical and scientific imaging-academia, research, industry, and government agencies-joined together to discuss the future of medical imaging and potential new ways to manage the explosion in numbers, size, and complexity of images generated by today's continually advancing imaging technologies. The two-day conference included plenary, scientific poster, and breakout sessions covering six major research areas related to TRIP. These topic areas included human perception, image processing and computer-aided detection, data visualization, image set navigation and usability, databases and systems integration, and methodology evaluation and performance validation. The plenary presentations provided a general status review of each broad research field to use as a starting point for discussion in the breakout sessions, with emphasis on specific topics requiring further study. The goals for the breakout sessions were to define specific research questions in each topic area, to list the impediments to carrying out research in these fields, to suggest possible solutions and near- and distant-future directions for each general topic, and to report back to the general session. The scientific poster session provided another mechanism for presenting and discussing TRIP-related research. This report summarizes each plenary and breakout session, and describes the group recommendations as to the issues facing the field, major impediments to progress, and the outlook for radiology in the short and long term. The conference helped refine the definition of the SCAR TRIP Initiative and the problems facing radiology with respect to the dramatic growth in medical imaging data, and it underscored a present and future need

  17. Inflammation and cutaneous nervous system involvement in hypertrophic scarring

    PubMed Central

    Li, Shao-hua; Yang, Heng-lian; Xiao, Hu; Wang, Yi-bing; Wang, De-chang; Huo, Ran

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to use a mouse model of hypertrophic scarring by mechanical loading on the dorsum of mice to determine whether the nervous system of the skin and inflammation participates in hypertrophic scarring. Results of hematoxylin-eosin and immunohistochemical staining demonstrated that inflammation contributed to the formation of a hypertrophic scar and increased the nerve density in scar tissue.Western blot assay verified that interleukin-13 expression was increased in scar tissue. These findings suggest that inflammation and the cutaneous nervous system play a role in hypertrophic scar formation. PMID:26692869

  18. Fraxelated radiofrequency device for acne scars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, Babar K.; Khokher, Sairah

    2012-09-01

    Acne scars can be improved with various treatments such as topical creams, chemical peels, dermal fillers, microdermabrasion, laser, and radiofrequency devices. Some of these treatments especially lasers and deep chemical peels can have significant side effects such as post inflammatory hyperpigmentation in darker skin types. Fraxelated RF Laser devices have been reported to have lower incidence of side effects in all skin phototypes. Nine patients between ages 18 and 35 of various skin phototypes were selected from a private practice and treated with a RF fraxelated device (E-matrix) for acne scars. Outcomes were measured by physician observation, subjective feedback received by patients, and comparison of before and after photographs. In this small group of patients with various skin phototypes, fraxelated radiofrequency device improved acne scars with minimal side effects and downtime.

  19. Current Therapeutic Approach to Hypertrophic Scars

    PubMed Central

    Mokos, Zrinka Bukvić; Jović, Anamaria; Grgurević, Lovorka; Dumić-Čule, Ivo; Kostović, Krešimir; Čeović, Romana; Marinović, Branka

    2017-01-01

    Abnormal scarring and its accompanying esthetic, functional, and psychological sequelae still pose significant challe nges. To date, there is no satisfactory prevention or treatment option for hypertrophic scars (HSs), which is mostly due to not completely comprehending the mechanisms underlying their formation. That is why the apprehension of regular and controlled physiological processes of scar formation is of utmost importance when facing hypertrophic scarring, its pathophysiology, prevention, and therapeutic approach. When treating HSs and choosing the best treatment and prevention modality, physicians can choose from a plethora of therapeutic options and many commercially available products, among which currently there is no efficient option that can successfully overcome impaired skin healing. This article reviews current therapeutic approach and emerging therapeutic strategies for the management of HSs, which should be individualized, based on an evaluation of the scar itself, patients’ expectations, and practical, evidence-based guidelines. Clinicians are encouraged to combine various prevention and treatment modalities where combination therapy that includes steroid injections, 5-fluorouracil, and pulsed-dye laser seems to be the most effective. On the other hand, the current therapeutic options are usually empirical and their results are unreliable and unpredictable. Therefore, there is an unmet need for an effective, targeted therapy and prevention, which would be based on an action or a modulation of a particular factor with clarified mechanism of action that has a beneficial effect on wound healing. As the extracellular matrix has a crucial role in cellular and extracellular events that lead to pathological scarring, targeting its components mostly by regulating bone morphogenetic proteins may throw up new therapeutic approach for reduction or prevention of HSs with functionally and cosmetically acceptable outcome. PMID:28676850

  20. Comparing kinematically detachable rock masses and rockfall scar volumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mavrouli, O.; Corominas, J.

    2015-09-01

    In rockfall prone areas the evaluation of the risk due to worst case scenarios requires the establishment of maximum thresholds for the expected rockfall volumes. The magnitude of such instabilities is often related to the properties of the jointed rock mass, with the characteristics of the existing unfavorably dipping joint sets playing a major role. The study- site here is the chute of Forat Negre in Andorra. The size distribution of the missing volumes from the scars was calculated using terrestrial laser scanner point cloud data and reaches up to few thousands of m3. On the other hand, the application of Markland criteria on a Digital Elevation Model of the zone indicated the kinematically detachable rock masses to be up to tens of thousands of m3. As the size of the scar areas does not indicate the occurrence of such events in the past, the effect of the joint persistence as assumed for the two analyses is discussed here. The areas of the exposed joint surfaces belonging to each discontinuity set are obtained and their use as a measure of the relative persistence of each set is proposed. The average and median length of the sets F3 and F5 (sliding planes) are found to be similar to the average and median spacing of the intersecting set F7 (tension crack), suggesting that the F7 set exerts a control over the persistence of the former ones.

  1. [Scar endometriosis in the rectus abdominis muscle].

    PubMed

    Barlas, Dündar; Bozkurt, Süleyman; Kaya, Mehmet Altan; Celik, Faik

    2010-07-01

    Endometriosis is defined as the presence of ectopic functional endometrial tissue outside the uterine cavity. The most common locations are within the pelvis. Unusual sites ofendometriosis outside the pelvis have been reported, including the bladder, intestine, appendix, surgical scars, hernia sac, lung, kidney, and extremities. The diagnosis of scar endometriosis is usually not difficult and is based on history and physical examination. We report here two cases who developed endometriosis on the abdominal wall in the rectus abdominis muscle and were treated with local excisions.

  2. Scar treatment variations by skin type.

    PubMed

    Visscher, Marty O; Bailey, J Kevin; Hom, David B

    2014-08-01

    Patients and clinicians use skin color attributes such as color uniformity, color distribution, and texture to infer physiologic health status. Normalization of skin color, surface texture, and height are important treatment goals in the treatment of scars. Skin color, structure, and response to trauma, vary with ethnicity. The incidence of hypertrophic and keloid scar formation is influenced by these inherent skin attributes. Skin type influences the response to various modalities including laser therapy and surgical intervention, and skin differences must be considered in treatment planning to achieve optimal results. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. [Surgical therapy of wounds and scars].

    PubMed

    Koller, J

    2013-08-01

    Surgery can be very useful in all phases of wound healing and in treating scars. It can be employed along with conservative therapy, either simultaneously or in a sequential manner. The spectrum of surgical measures includes debridement with excision of wound edges or necrotic areas, skin transplantation to cover granulating wounds, and simple excision or complex reconstructive approaches to scars. The advantages of surgical treatment are seen in all phases of wound healing and include rapid onset of action, avoidance of secondary infection and improved function. The shortened healing time helps save personal and material costs.

  4. Functional Regeneration Beyond the Glial Scar

    PubMed Central

    Cregg, Jared M.; DePaul, Marc A.; Filous, Angela R.; Lang, Brad T.; Tran, Amanda; Silver, Jerry

    2014-01-01

    Astrocytes react to CNS injury by building a dense wall of filamentous processes around the lesion. Stromal cells quickly take up residence in the lesion core and synthesize connective tissue elements that contribute to fibrosis. Oligodendrocyte precursor cells proliferate within the lesion and help to entrap dystrophic axon tips. Here we review evidence that this aggregate scar acts as the major barrier to regeneration of axons after injury. We also consider several exciting new interventions that allow axons to regenerate beyond the glial scar, and discuss the implications of this work for the future of regeneration biology. PMID:24424280

  5. Chronic caesarian section scar pain treated with fascial scar release techniques: A case series.

    PubMed

    Wasserman, Jennifer B; Steele-Thornborrow, Jessica L; Yuen, Jeremy S; Halkiotis, Melissa; Riggins, Elizabeth M

    2016-10-01

    To describe outcomes of two subjects with chronically painful Caesarian section (C-section) scars following an intervention of specific myofascial scar release techniques. Case series. Over 1.3 million C-sections are performed annually in the US. Anywhere from 7 to 18% of those will develop chronic scar pain. Although anecdotal evidence supporting the use of fascial release in reducing surgical scar pain exists, almost no research has been published. Two subjects who both underwent two C-sections resulting in chronic discomfort of 6-9 years duration participated in this study. Both reported premenstrual pain, pain upon pressure to the lower abdomen, and pain during bowel movements. Subject 1 also reported sharp pain with bed mobility. Four, 30-min treatment sessions over a period of two weeks consisted of stretching the scar until a release in tissue tension was felt by the treating therapist. Outcome measures included pain and pressure tolerance using a Pressure Algometer, measurements of scar flexibility using an Adheremeter, and the Numeric Pain Rating Scale (NPRS). These measures were collected at baseline, five days after the final treatment and at four weeks. Both subjects demonstrated improvements in all outcome measures. At four weeks, pressure tolerance at all point improved as much as 79% (p < 0.0001) and scar mobility increased in all directions at all points as much as 200% (p < 0.0001). Following treatment, both subjects rated their premenstrual pain for all previously painful activities at 0/10 for the first time since their surgeries. These results suggest that scar release techniques may help reduce chronic scar pain in women who have had C-section surgery. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Successful human scar regeneration by topical iodine: a case report: an interim (3.5 year) summary.

    PubMed

    Derry, David M

    2009-05-01

    Control of regeneration and wound healing are scientific and clinical objectives. In 1997, topical Lugol's iodine solution applied daily for 3 days to a 50 year old facial scar lead to hyperemic scar tissue. As a working hypothesis, the author proposed topical iodine could initiate, control and complete human scar regeneration. In 2005, after collecting three more surgical scars, topical iodine applications began. Within 3 days all four scars started regenerating. Stopping topical iodine halted the process. Within a week an appropriate adult scar formed. Digital cameras recorded events. Regeneration is complex and slow. Its appearance depends on whether scar is covered with plastic or open. Iodine's chemical properties are discussed along with their reaction with epithelial cells. As there are no visible signs detectable changes from oral iodine on regeneration, details of iodine staining are more thoroughly described. Not all, but most important results are presented. Topical iodine induces hair growth in and around scars. Hair is regeneration's workhorse, moving purposefully in all directions under arrector pili muscle power delivering regenate material accurately to scar tissues and coordinating centers. In addition, hair repeatedly self amputates possibly strengthening regenerating tissues. Two types of regenate material show under plastic wrap: white and globular. The white regenate appears and behaves somewhat like snow, but can be yellow, green or brown depending iodine content. The globular form of regenate material maybe derived from white regenate material with hair's help. Globular regenate material is larger, nondescript, variable in size and color (depends on iodine content) and seemed usually associated with hair. There are two centrally placed coordinating centers 5 mm apart on major scars. Wrist centers have a palpable, but not visible ridge, between them whereas abdominal centers do not. Wrist centers lasted through all regeneration of the wrist

  7. The clinical outcome of cesarean scar pregnancies implanted "on the scar" versus "in the niche".

    PubMed

    Kaelin Agten, Andrea; Cali, Giuseppe; Monteagudo, Ana; Oviedo, Johana; Ramos, Joanne; Timor-Tritsch, Ilan

    2017-05-01

    The term cesarean scar pregnancy refers to placental implantation within the scar of a previous cesarean delivery. The rising numbers of cesarean deliveries in the last decades have led to an increased incidence of cesarean scar pregnancy. Complications of cesarean scar pregnancy include morbidly adherent placenta, uterine rupture, severe hemorrhage, and preterm labor. It is suspected that cesarean scar pregnancies that are implanted within a dehiscent scar ("niche") behave differently compared with those implanted on top of a well-healed scar. To date there are no studies that have compared pregnancy outcomes between cesarean scar pregnancies implanted either "on the scar" or "in the niche." The purpose of this study was to determine the pregnancy outcome of cesarean scar pregnancy implanted either "on the scar" or "in the niche." This was a retrospective 2-center study of 17 patients with cesarean scar pregnancy that was diagnosed from 5-9 weeks gestation (median, 8 weeks). All cesarean scar pregnancies were categorized as either implanted or "on the scar" (group A) or "in the niche" (group B), based on their first-trimester transvaginal ultrasound examination. Clinical outcomes based on gestational age at delivery, mode of delivery, blood loss at delivery, neonate weight and placental histopathologic condition were compared between the groups with the use of the Mann-Whitney U test. Myometrial thickness overlying the placenta was compared among all the patients who required hysterectomy and those who did not with the use of the Mann-Whitney U test. Myometrial thickness was also correlated with gestational age at delivery with the use of Spearman's correlation. Group A consisted of 6 patients; group B consisted of 11 patients. Gestational age at delivery was lower in group B (median, 34 weeks; range, 20-36 weeks) than in group A (median, 38 weeks; range, 37-39 weeks; P=.001). In group A, 5 patients were delivered via cesarean delivery (with normal placenta), and

  8. Omentum-derived stromal cells improve myocardial regeneration in pig post-infarcted heart through a potent paracrine mechanism

    SciTech Connect

    De Siena, Rocco; Balducci, Luigi; Blasi, Antonella; Montanaro, Manuela Gessica; Saldarelli, Marilisa; Saponaro, Vittorio; Martino, Carmela; Logrieco, Gaetano; Soleti, Antonio; Fiobellot, Simona; Madeddu, Paolo; Rossi, Giacomo; Ribatti, Domenico; Crovace, Antonio; Cristini, Silvia; Invernici, Gloria; Parati, Eugenio Agostino; Alessandri, Giulio

    2010-07-01

    Cell-based therapy could be a valid option to treat myocardial infarct (MI). Adipose-derived stromal cells (ADStCs) have demonstrated tissue regenerative potential including cardiomyogenesis. Omentum is an extremely rich source of visceral fat and its accumulation seems to correlate with cardiovascular diseases. We investigated the capacity of human fat Omentum-derived StCs (FOStCs) to affect heart function upon acute infarct in pigs induced by permanent ligation of the anterior interventricular artery (IVA). We demonstrated for the first time that the local injection of 50 x 10{sup 6} of FOStCs ameliorates the functional parameters of post-infarct heart. Most importantly, histology of FOStCs treated hearts demonstrated a substantial improvement of cardiomyogenesis. In culture, FOStCs produced an impressive number and amount of angiogenic factors and cytokines. Moreover, the conditioned medium of FOStCs (FOStCs-CM) stimulates in vitro cardiac endothelial cells (ECs) proliferation and vascular morphogenesis and inhibits monocytes, EC activation and cardiomyocyte apoptosis. Since FOStCs in vivo did not trans-differentiate into cardiomyocyte-like cells, we conclude that FOStCs efficacy was presumably mediated by a potent paracrine mechanism involving molecules that concomitantly improved angiogenesis, reduced inflammation and prevented cardiomyocytes death. Our results highlight for the first time the important role that human FOStCs may have in cardiac regeneration.

  9. Will stem cells bring hope to pathological skin scar treatment?

    PubMed

    Li, Qiankun; Zhang, Cuiping; Fu, Xiaobing

    2016-08-01

    Pathological skin scars, such as keloids, aesthetically and psychosocially affect patients. The quest for scar reduction and the increasing recognition of patient satisfaction has led to the continued exploration of scar treatment. Stem cells are a promising source for tissue repair and regeneration. The multi-potency and secretory functions of these cells could offer possible treatments for pathological scars and have been examined in recent studies. Here, we analyze the factors that influence the formation of pathological skin scars, summarize recent research on pathological scar treatment with stem cells and elaborate on the possible mechanisms of this treatment. Additionally, other effects of stem cell treatments are also presented while evaluating potential side effects of stem cell-based pathological scar treatments. Thus, this review may provide meaningful guidance in the clinic for scar treatments with stem cells. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  10. Differences in collagen architecture between keloid, hypertrophic scar, normotrophic scar, and normal skin: An objective histopathological analysis.

    PubMed

    Verhaegen, Pauline D H M; van Zuijlen, Paul P M; Pennings, Noor M; van Marle, Jan; Niessen, Frank B; van der Horst, Chantal M A M; Middelkoop, Esther

    2009-01-01

    Normotrophic, hypertrophic, and keloidal scars are different types of scar formation, which all need a different approach in treatment. Therefore, it is important to differentiate between these types of scar, not only clinically but also histopathologically. Differences were explored for collagen orientation and bundle thickness in 25 normal skin, 57 normotrophic scar, 56 hypertrophic scar, and 56 keloid biopsies, which were selected on clinical diagnosis. Image analysis was performed by fast fourier transformation. The calculated collagen orientation index ranged from 0 (random orientation) to 1 (parallel orientation). The bundle distance was calculated by the average distance between the centers of the collagen bundles. The results showed that compared with all three types of scars, the collagen orientation index was significantly lower in normal skin, which indicates that scars are organized in a more parallel manner. No differences were found between the different scars. Secondly, compared with normal skin, normotrophic scar, and hypertrophic scar, the bundle distance was significantly larger in keloidal scar, which suggests that thicker collagen bundles are present in keloidal scar. This first extensive histological study showed objective differences between normal skin, normotrophic, hypertrophic, and keloidal scar.

  11. Management of Cesarean Scar Pregnancy Using Ultrasound-Guided Dilation and Curettage.

    PubMed

    Liu, Suqing; Sun, Jing; Cai, Bin; Xi, Xiaowei; Yang, Liu; Sun, Yunyan

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the potential risk factors associated with failed ultrasound-guided dilation and curettage (D&C) treatment of cesarean scar pregnancy (CSP). Retrospective study. University hospital. Fifty-one patients diagnosed with CSP and treated with ultrasound-guided D&C at Shanghai General Hospital of Shanghai Jiao Tong University. Lesion resection using ultrasound-guided D&C. Clinical characteristics, vaginal bleeding, abdominal pain, the size of the gestational sac, cardiac motion, blood flow around the gestational sac, cesarean scar thickness, and serum β-human chorionic gonadotropin (β-hCG) levels were compared between the successful operation group and the failed operation group. Cesarean scar thickness was the main risk factor that determined the success of ultrasound-guided D&C. The success rates were 50% and 97.67% for those with cesarean scars <3 mm thick and those with scars >3 mm thick, respectively (p = .001). The success rate was also associated with the abundance of blood flow surrounding the capsule and size of the gestational sac (p < .005). Surgical success was not affected by abnormal vaginal bleeding, abdominal pain, cardiac motion, or serum β-hCG levels. Ultrasound-guided D&C is the first choice for treating CSP if the cesarean scar is >3 mm thick, blood flow is not abundant, and the maximum diameter of the gestational sac is <30 mm. A transabdominal procedure is preferred for patients with high-risk factors. Copyright © 2016 AAGL. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Laparoscopic Treatment of Cesarean Scar Ectopic Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Felsingerová, Zuzana; Felsinger, Michal; Jandakova, Eva

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Background: An ectopic pregnancy within a Cesarean scar represents a rare type of extrauterine pregnancy in which the fertilized egg nidates in the myometrium of the uterine wall within a scar left from a previous Cesarean delivery. An unrecognized growing Cesarian scar pregnancy may result in uterine rupture, uncontrollable metrorrhagia, and bleeding into the abdominal cavity; therefore, early diagnosis and therapy are necessary to prevent the development of severe complications. Case: A 34-year-old woman after a previous Cesarean delivery presented with amenorrhoa of 7 weeks' duration. Transvaginal ultrasonography revealed an ectopic pregnancy in the Cesarean scar, and a laparoscopic removal of the gestational sac was performed with no complications. Results: Three months later, another laparoscopy with chromopertubation showed no signs of penetration in the suture, both the Fallopian tubes being bilaterally passable. The patient was advised that she could try to achieve pregnancy through spontaneous conception, after which monitoring of the gestational development and a careful assessment of the nidation site would be needed. Conclusions: Laparoscopic surgical management of a viable ectopic pregnancy is technically simple, and is followed by a good recovery. (J GYNECOL SURG 30:309) PMID:25336858

  13. Cell therapy and vocal fold scarring.

    PubMed

    Mattei, A; Magalon, J; Bertrand, B; Philandrianos, C; Veran, J; Giovanni, A

    2017-10-01

    Vocal fold microstructure is complex and can be affected by laryngeal microsurgery, inducing scarring that prevents mechanical uncoupling of epithelium and muscle, leading to vibration disorder and disabling dysphonia. Treatment options presently are few, and often without efficacy for vibration, having only an impact on volume to reduce glottal closure defect. The present review of the literature had two aims: (i) to report the current state of the literature on cell therapy in vocal fold scarring; and (ii) to analyze the therapeutic interest of the adipose-derived stromal vascular fraction in the existing therapeutic armamentarium. A PubMed(®) search conducted in September 2016 retrieved English or French-language original articles on the use of stem cells to treat vocal fold scarring. Twenty-seven articles published between 2003 and 2016 met the study selection criteria. Mesenchymal stem cells were most widely used, mainly derived from bone marrow or adipose tissue. Four studies were performed in vitro on fibroblasts, and 18 in vivo on animals. End-points comprised: (i) scar analysis (macro- and micro-scopic morphology, viscoelastic properties, extracellular matrix, fibroblasts); and (ii) assessment of stem cell survival and differentiation. The studies testified to the benefit of mesenchymal stem cells, and especially those of adipose derivation. The stromal vascular fraction exhibits properties that might improve results by facilitating production logistics. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  14. Necrobiotic xanthogranuloma occurring in an eyelid scar.

    PubMed

    Rayner, S A; Duncombe, A S; Keefe, M; Theaker, J; Manners, R M

    2008-01-01

    We present a case report of necrobiotic xanthogranuloma (NXG) in a 76-year-old Caucasian lady occurring as a nodule in a blepharoplasty scar. NXG is a rare histiocytic disease with progressive orbital and systemic features. Management options of excision biopsy or chemotherapy are discussed.

  15. Microtopography of the skin and scar formation.

    PubMed

    Tring, F C

    1976-11-01

    The surface microtopography of normal human skin varies from one anatomical region to another. The patterns at different sites are considered to reflect different orientations of dermal fibers. A simple technique is described that enables such orientations to be accurately delineated. Various scars resulting from lacerations, surgical incisions, and steroid-induced striae were examined in the manner described.

  16. Botulinum toxin to minimize facial scarring.

    PubMed

    Jablonka, Eric M; Sherris, David A; Gassner, Holger G

    2012-10-01

    Chemoimmobilization with botulinum toxin A is an ideal biochemical agent that allows near-total elimination of muscle pull on the healing facial wound. The goal of chemoimmobilization of facial cutaneous wounds is to eliminate dynamic tension on the healing tissues to improve wound healing and minimize scarring for optimal aesthetic results.

  17. Tretinoin-iontophoresis in atrophic acne scars.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, J B; Donath, P; Hannes, J; Perl, S; Neumayer, R; Reiner, A

    1999-02-01

    Atrophic acne scars are a frequent problem after acne. Hitherto, mainly invasive treatment measures were possible. In a recent paper, we demonstrated the positive effects of iontophoresis with 0.025% tretinoin gel vs. estriol 0.03%. In this further study, the recording of the clinical effects of iontophoresis with 0.025% tretinoin gel in atrophic acne scars was supplemented by immunohistochemistry investigations of collagen I and III, proliferation markers, and the estimation of epidermal thickness. The treatment was performed twice weekly in 32 volunteer patients for a period of 3 months by application of the substance under a constant direct current of 3 mA for 20 min. Skin biopsies prior to and at the end of treatment were performed in 32 voluntary patients in order to investigate collagen I/III and proliferation markers by immunohistochemistry methods. Clinically, at the end of treatment, in 94% of patients a significant decrease in the scar depth was observed. Neither epidermal thickness nor proliferation markers revealed a significant increase at the end of treatment. Furthermore, collagen I and collagen III showed no common trend, as expressed statistically by a lack of significance. In some cases, increases in collagen III became evident at the end of treatment. Tretinoin-iontophoresis is an effective, noninvasive treatment of atrophic acne scars without causing disturbing side-effects.

  18. Scar formation and revision after the removal of orthodontic miniscrews

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Yoon Jeong; Lee, Dong-Won; Kim, Kyung-Ho

    2015-01-01

    Many clinicians expect complete healing after the removal of temporary anchorage devices, but clinical examination may reveal scar-like tissue. This report presents the typical features of scarring detected after the removal of miniscrews, and the clinical outcome of scar revision along with its pathologic features. PMID:26023543

  19. Fire-scar formation and compartmentalization in oak

    Treesearch

    Kevin T. Smith; Elaine Kennedy. Sutherland

    1999-01-01

    Fire scars result from the death of the vascular cambium resulting from excessive heating, which exposes sapwood to infection and initiates the wood decay process. In southeastern Ohio, prescribed fires in April 1995 and 1997 scarred Quercus prinus L. and Q. velutina Lam. Low-intensity fires scorched bark and produced scars, primarily on the downslope side of the stem...

  20. A Rat Excised Larynx Model of Vocal Fold Scar

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Welham, Nathan V.; Montequin, Douglas W.; Tateya, Ichiro; Tateya, Tomoko; Choi, Seong Hee; Bless, Diane M.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To develop and evaluate a rat excised larynx model for the measurement of acoustic, aerodynamic, and vocal fold vibratory changes resulting from vocal fold scar. Method: Twenty-four 4-month-old male Sprague-Dawley rats were assigned to 1 of 4 experimental groups: chronic vocal fold scar, chronic vocal fold scar treated with 100-ng basic…

  1. Combination Therapy in the Management of Atrophic Acne Scars

    PubMed Central

    Garg, Shilpa; Baveja, Sukriti

    2014-01-01

    Background: Atrophic acne scars are difficult to treat. The demand for less invasive but highly effective treatment for scars is growing. Objective: To assess the efficacy of combination therapy using subcision, microneedling and 15% trichloroacetic acid (TCA) peel in the management of atrophic scars. Materials and Methods: Fifty patients with atrophic acne scars were graded using Goodman and Baron Qualitative grading. After subcision, dermaroller and 15% TCA peel were performed alternatively at 2-weeks interval for a total of 6 sessions of each. Grading of acne scar photographs was done pretreatment and 1 month after last procedure. Patients own evaluation of improvement was assessed. Results: Out of 16 patients with Grade 4 scars, 10 (62.5%) patients improved to Grade 2 and 6 (37.5%) patients improved to Grade 3 scars. Out of 22 patients with Grade 3 scars, 5 (22.7%) patients were left with no scars, 2 (9.1%) patients improved to Grade 1and 15 (68.2%) patients improved to Grade 2. All 11 (100%) patients with Grade 2 scars were left with no scars. There was high level of patient satisfaction. Conclusion: This combination has shown good results in treating not only Grade 2 but also severe Grade 4 and 3 scars. PMID:24761094

  2. Myocardial Scar Detection by Standard CT Coronary Angiography

    PubMed Central

    Jeevarethinam, Anand; Venuraju, Shreenidhi; Mehta, Vishal Shahil; Atwal, Satvir; Raval, Usha; Rakhit, Roby; Davar, Joseph; Lahiri, Avijit

    2014-01-01

    We have described a myocardial infarct scar identified by a standard dual source CT coronary angiography (CTCA). We were able to detect the scar during the routine coronary assessment without contrast late enhancement and without additional radiation exposure. It is therefore feasible to assess chronic scar using a standard CTCA technique.

  3. Fire scars reveal variability and dynamics of eastern fire regimes

    Treesearch

    Richard P. Guyette; Daniel C. Dey; Michael C. Stambaugh; Rose-Marie Muzika

    2006-01-01

    Fire scar evidence in eastern North America is sparse and complex but shows promise in defining the dynamics of these fire regimes and their influence on ecosystems. We review fire scar data, methods, and limitations, and use this information to identify and examine the factors influencing fire regimes. Fire scar data from studies at more than 40 sites in Eastern North...

  4. A Rat Excised Larynx Model of Vocal Fold Scar

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Welham, Nathan V.; Montequin, Douglas W.; Tateya, Ichiro; Tateya, Tomoko; Choi, Seong Hee; Bless, Diane M.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To develop and evaluate a rat excised larynx model for the measurement of acoustic, aerodynamic, and vocal fold vibratory changes resulting from vocal fold scar. Method: Twenty-four 4-month-old male Sprague-Dawley rats were assigned to 1 of 4 experimental groups: chronic vocal fold scar, chronic vocal fold scar treated with 100-ng basic…

  5. The Use of Silicone Adhesives for Scar Reduction

    PubMed Central

    Bleasdale, Benjamin; Finnegan, Simon; Murray, Kathyryn; Kelly, Sean; Percival, Steven L.

    2015-01-01

    Significance: This article discusses the history and developments of silicone gel sheeting (SGS) scar therapy. Furthermore, we review a breadth of literature to gain an insight into how and why topical silicone gels remain the favored treatment of medical experts in scar management. We also analyze an ever increasing number of alternative therapies claiming to provide enhanced scar reduction performance. Recent Advances: Topical silicone gel treatments seem to remain the first point of clinical recommendation in scar management. SGS has been used in scar therapy for over 30 years, during which its efficacy has been the subject of numerous clinical evaluations. Critical Issues: While the exact mechanisms by which SGS improves hypertrophic scars, keloid development and recovery are yet to be fully agreed upon, its ability to do so remains largely undisputed at present. However, there still is ongoing deliberation over the exact mechanism of action of silicone in improving a scar. At present it is likely that through occlusion of the scar site and hydration of the wound bed, the overactivity of scar-related cells is suppressed, and their activity normalized. Future Direction: The clinical support of topical silicone gel products, relative to all alternative scar therapies, is considered the internationally recommended first-line form of scar management, and favored by consensus among healthcare professionals. However, there still remains the need for further clinical evidence and a better understanding of the mechanism behind the benefit of silicone gel for use in the prevention of abnormal scarring. PMID:26155385

  6. Evaluation of nonablative fractional laser treatment in scar reduction.

    PubMed

    Gokalp, Hilal

    2017-08-12

    Fractional lasers have been used for the improvement of scar tissue in the recent years but there has not been extensive research on their impact. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of nonablative fractional laser (NAFL) on acne, burn, and surgery/traumatic scar. The scars were also categorized as atrophic, hypertrophic, and keloid, and treatment efficacy was investigated accordingly. This is a retrospective, single-center study. Scar tissues were treated using a nonablative fractional 1550-nm Erbium glass laser in high-energy parameters at 4-week interval for 4-8 sessions. The scar regression score (SRS) was used to determine the decrease in scar appearance. Forty-six patients with acne (n:18), burn (n:13), or surgery/traumatic (n:15) scar were included. The number of sessions was higher for burn patients while SRS in burn patients was lower than in patients with acne or a surgical/traumatic scar. Evaluation according to scar types showed that atrophic scars had a significantly better response to NAFL treatment. This study indicates that NAFL treatment with the high-energy parameters has better outcomes in atrophic acne scars, while the success rate is considerably low in post-burn and keloid scars.

  7. Comparison the efficacy of ablative CO2 laser and fractional CO2 laser on the healing of cutaneous leishmaniasis scars

    PubMed Central

    Nilforoushzadeh, Mohammad Ali; Minaravesh, Shahriar; Jaffary, Fariba; Siadat, Amir Hossein; Haftbaradaran, Elaheh

    2014-01-01

    Background: The aim of this study is to compare ablative CO2 laser with fractional CO2 laser on healing of the wound and the size of cutaneous leishmaniasis scars. Materials and Methods: This prospective randomized clinical trial study was done on 120 patients in two groups evaluated in Sedigheh Tahereh Hospital in Isfahan. The patients in case group underwent one session ablative CO2 laser for treatment of leishmaniasis scars and the patients in control group underwent six 3-weeks interval sessions fractional CO2 laser for treatment of leishmaniasis scars. All cases were evaluated from size and other aspects of scar by a questionnaire, and before and 6 months after photos were evaluated by blinded dermatologist. The data collected in the check list was then analyzed by t-test and Chi-square with SPSS 20. Results: There were 60 people in case group and 60 in control group. The mean age was 27.21 ± 11.2. Our results show that fractional CO2 laser is better than ablative CO2 laser in various aspect of treatment of leishmaniasis scars (P < 0.05). Conclusions: Fractional CO2 laser is better than ablative CO2 laser in variants aspect of treatment of leishmaniasis scars. PMID:25625098

  8. Is routine histological examination of mastectomy scars justified? An analysis of 619 scars.

    PubMed

    Momeni, Arash; Tran, Pelu; Dunlap, Jonathan; Lee, Gordon K

    2013-02-01

    The increasing incidence of breast cancer is paralleled by an increasing demand for post-mastectomy breast reconstruction. At the time of breast reconstruction routine submission of mastectomy scars has been considered appropriate clinical practice to ensure that no residual cancer exists. However, this practice has been challenged by some and has become the topic of controversy. In a retrospective analysis we wished to assess whether routine submission of mastectomy scars altered treatment. Utilizing the Stanford Translational Research Integrated Database Environment (STRIDE) all patients who underwent implant-based breast reconstruction with routine histological analysis of mastectomy scars were identified. The following parameters were retrieved and analyzed: age, cancer histology, cancer stage (according to the American Joint Committee on Cancer staging system), receptor status (estrogen receptor [ER], progesterone receptor [PR], Her2neu), time interval between mastectomy and reconstruction, and scar histology. A total of 442 patients with a mean age of 45.9 years (range, 22-73 years) were included in the study. Mastectomy with subsequent reconstruction was performed for in-situ disease and invasive cancer in 83 and 359 patients, respectively. A total of 619 clinically unremarkable mastectomy scars were sent for histological analysis, with the most common finding being unremarkable scar tissue (i.e. collagen fibers). Of note, no specimen revealed the presence of carcinoma. According to published reports routine histological examination of mastectomy scars may detect early local recurrence. However, we were not able to detect this benefit in our patient population. As such, particularly in the current health-care climate the cost-effectiveness of this practice deserves further attention. A more selective use of histological analysis of mastectomy scars in patients with tumors that display poor prognostic indicators may be a more reasonable utilization of

  9. Is Routine Histological Examination of Mastectomy Scars Justified? – An Analysis of 619 Scars

    PubMed Central

    Momeni, Arash; Tran, Pelu; Dunlap, Jonathan; Lee, Gordon K.

    2012-01-01

    Background The increasing incidence of breast cancer is paralleled by an increasing demand for post-mastectomy breast reconstruction. At the time of breast reconstruction routine submission of mastectomy scars has been considered appropriate clinical practice to ensure that no residual cancer exists. However, this practice has been challenged by some and has become the topic of controversy. In a retrospective analysis we wished to assess whether routine submission of mastectomy scars altered treatment. Methods Utilizing the Stanford Translational Research Integrated Database Environment (STRIDE) all patients who underwent implant-based breast reconstruction with routine histological analysis of mastectomy scars were identified. The following parameters were retrieved and analyzed: age, cancer histology, cancer stage (according to the American Joint Committee on Cancer staging system), receptor status (estrogen receptor [ER], progesterone receptor [PR], Her2neu), time interval between mastectomy and reconstruction, and scar histology. Results A total of 442 patients with a mean age of 45.9 years (range, 22 to 73 years) were included in the study. Mastectomy with subsequent reconstruction was performed for in-situ disease and invasive cancer in 83 and 359 patients, respectively. A total of 619 clinically unremarkable mastectomy scars were sent for histological analysis, with the most common finding being unremarkable scar tissue (i.e. collagen fibers). Of note, no specimen revealed the presence of carcinoma. Conclusion According to published reports routine histological examination of mastectomy scars may detect early local recurrence. However, we were not able to detect this benefit in our patient population. As such, particularly in the current health-care climate the cost-effectiveness of this practice deserves further attention. A more selective use of histological analysis of mastectomy scars in patients with tumors that display poor prognostic indicators may be

  10. Vertical scar versus the inverted-T scar reduction mammaplasty: a 10-year follow-up.

    PubMed

    Bouwer, Lesley R; van der Biezen, Jan Jaap; Spronk, Cees A; van der Lei, Berend

    2012-10-01

    A retrospective study was undertaken to evaluate whether the initial outcome of two types of reduction mammaplasty techniques (vertical scar reduction mammaplasty vs. the inverted-T scar reduction mammaplasty) remains stable in the long term: Sixty-nine patients who had undergone breast reduction surgery in the period 1997-2000 at the Department of Reconstructive Plastic Surgery at the Medical Center of Leeuwarden were willing and able to participate in this study. A structured questionnaire was used to assess the degree of patient satisfaction. For subjective evaluation, the Strasser Grading System on photographs at the 3 months after surgery and after long-term follow-up (10 years) was used. The median general appreciation mark for the entire surgical procedure given by patients was 8 (1-10) on a scale from 1 to 10. Forty-six of the 69 patients could be scored according to Strasser: at 3 months in 17 patients (37%) the result was 'good', in 21 patients (46%) 'mediocre' and in eight patients (17%) 'poor'. After 10 years, in 37 of the patients (80%) the result was 'good', in six patients (13%) 'mediocre' and in three patients (7%) 'poor'. At 3 months, there was a higher incidence of bottoming out in the vertical scar group (one on two patients) as compared to the inverted-T scar group (one on 10 patients); however, at the 10-years follow-up bottoming out was 50% in the inverted-T scar group and 20% in the vertical scar group. Despite bottoming out, in both the vertical scar reduction mammaplasty technique and the inverted-T scar reduction mammaplasty technique, high patient satisfaction rates are achieved that remains for years. Copyright © 2012 British Association of Plastic, Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. [Perioperative interstitial brachytherapy for recurrent keloid scars].

    PubMed

    Rio, E; Bardet, E; Peuvrel, P; Martinet, L; Perrot, P; Baraer, F; Loirat, Y; Sartre, J-Y; Malard, O; Ferron, C; Dreno, B

    2010-01-01

    Evaluation of the results of perioperative interstitial brachytherapy with low dose-rate (LDR) Ir-192 in the treatment of keloid scars. We performed a retrospective analysis of 73 histologically confirmed keloids (from 58 patients) resistant to medicosurgical treated by surgical excision plus early perioperative brachytherapy. All lesions were initially symptomatic. Local control was evaluated by clinical evaluation. Functional and cosmetic results were assessed in terms of patient responses to a self-administered questionnaire. Median age was 28 years (range 13-71 years). Scars were located as follows: 37% on the face, 32% on the trunk or abdomen, 16% on the neck, and 15% on the arms or legs. The mean delay before loading was four hours (range, 1-6h). The median dose was 20Gy (range, 15-40Gy). Sixty-four scars (from 53 patients) were evaluated. Local control was 86% (follow-up, 44.5 months; range, 14-150 months). All relapses occurred early - within 2 years posttreatment. At 20 months, survival without recurrence was significantly lower when treated lengths were more than 6cm long. The rate was 100% for treated scars below 4.5cm in length, 95% (95% CI: 55-96) for those 4.5-6cm long, and 75% (95% CI: 56-88) beyond 6cm (p=0.038). Of the 35 scars (28 patients) whose results were reassessed, six remained symptomatic and the esthetic results were considered to be good in 51% (18/35) and average in 37% (13/35) (median follow-up, 70 months; range, 16-181 months). Early perioperative LDR brachytherapy delivering 20Gy at 5mm reduced the rate of recurrent keloids resistant to other treatments and gave good functional results. 2009 Société française de radiothérapie oncologique (SFRO). Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  12. Electroanatomical voltage and morphology characteristics in postinfarction patients undergoing ventricular tachycardia ablation: pragmatic approach favoring late potentials abolition.

    PubMed

    Tsiachris, Dimitris; Silberbauer, John; Maccabelli, Giuseppe; Oloriz, Teresa; Baratto, Francesca; Mizuno, Hiroya; Bisceglia, Caterina; Vergara, Pasquale; Marzi, Alessandra; Sora, Nicoleta; Guarracini, Fabrizio; Radinovic, Andrea; Cireddu, Manuela; Sala, Simone; Gulletta, Simone; Paglino, Gabriele; Mazzone, Patrizio; Trevisi, Nicola; Della Bella, Paolo

    2015-08-01

    Catheter ablation is an important therapeutic option in postmyocardial infarction patients with ventricular tachycardia (VT). We analyzed the endo-epicardial electroanatomical mapping (EAM) voltage and morphology characteristics, their association with clinical data and their prognostic value in a large cohort of postmyocardial infarction patients. We performed total and segmental analysis of voltage (bipolar dense scar [DS] and low voltage areas, unipolar low voltage and penumbra areas) and morphology characteristics (presence of abnormal late potentials [LPs] and early potentials [EPs]) in 100 postmyocardial infarction patients undergoing electroanatomical mapping-based VT ablation (26 endo-epicardial procedures) from 2010-2012. All patients had unipolar low voltage areas, whereas 18% had no identifiable endocardial bipolar DS areas. Endocardial bipolar DS area >22.5 cm(2) best predicted scar transmurality. Endo-epicardial LPs were recorded in 2/3 patients, more frequently in nonseptal myocardial segments and were abolished in 51%. Endocardial bipolar DS area >7 cm(2) and endocardial bipolar scar density >0.35 predicted epicardial LPs. Isolated LPs are located mainly epicardially and EPs endocardially. As a primary strategy, LPs and VT-mapping ablation occurred in 48%, only VT-mapping ablation in 27%, only LPs ablation in 17%, and EPs ablation in 6%. Endocardial LP abolition was associated with reduced VT recurrence and increased unipolar penumbra area predicted cardiac death. Endocardial scar extension and density predict scar transmurality and endo-epicardial presence of LPs, although DS is not always identified in postmyocardial infarction patients. LPs, most frequently located in nonseptal myocardial segments, were abolished in 51% resulting in improved outcome. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  13. Characterization of human vocal fold fibroblasts derived from chronic scar.

    PubMed

    Jetté, Marie E; Hayer, Supriya D; Thibeault, Susan L

    2013-03-01

    In vitro modeling of cell-matrix interactions that occur during human vocal fold scarring is uncommon, as primary human vocal fold scar fibroblast cell lines are difficult to acquire. The purpose of this study was to characterize morphologic features, growth kinetics, contractile properties, α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) protein expression and gene expression profile of human vocal fold fibroblasts derived from scar (sVFF) relative to normal vocal fold fibroblasts (nVFF). In vitro. We successfully cultured human vocal fold fibroblasts from tissue explants of scarred vocal folds from a 56-year-old female and compared these to normal fibroblasts from a 59-year-old female. Growth and proliferation were assessed by daily cell counts, and morphology was compared at 60% confluence for 5 days. Gel contraction assays were evaluated after seeding cells within a collagen matrix. α-SMA was measured using western blotting and immunocytochemistry (ICC). Quantitative reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) was used to assess differential extracellular matrix gene expression between the two cell types. sVFF were morphologically indistinguishable from nVFF. sVFF maintained significantly lower proliferation rates relative to nVFF on days 3 to 6 (day 3: P = .0138; days 4, 5, and 6: P < .0001). There were no significant differences in contractile properties between the two cell types at any time point (0 hours: P = .70, 24 hours: P = .79, 48 hours: P = .58). ICC and western blot analyses revealed increased expression of α-SMA in sVFF as compared with nVFF at passages 4 and 5, but not at passage 6 (passage 4: P = .006, passage 5: P = .0015, passage 6: P = .8860). Analysis of 84 extracellular matrix genes using qRT-PCR revealed differential expression of 15 genes (P < .01). nVFF and sVFF displayed differences in proliferation rates, α-SMA expression, and gene expression, whereas no differences were observed in contractile properties or morphology. Further

  14. Anesthetic Practices for Laser Rehabilitation of Pediatric Hypertrophic Burn Scars.

    PubMed

    Wong, Brendan M; Keilman, Jeffrey; Zuccaro, Jennifer; Kelly, Charis; Maynes, Jason T; Fish, Joel S

    The use of ablative fractional carbon dioxide laser therapy and pulsed dye laser therapy has led to significant improvements in the rehabilitation of hypertrophic burn scars. However, laser procedures are associated with appreciable pain among pediatric patients. Clinical consensus suggests using general anesthesia for pediatric laser procedures; however, guidelines for perioperative care are lacking. The objective of this quality improvement study is to determine whether a difference exists in postoperative pain outcomes in pediatric patients who receive intraoperative opioid regimens compared with patients who receive opioid-sparing regimens for laser therapy of hypertrophic burn scars. A retrospective review of patients who received laser therapy at a pediatric burn center from April 2014 to May 2015 was performed. Overall, 88 of the 92 procedures reviewed were included. A statistically significant difference was not found between the likelihood of postoperative pain when intraoperative opioid regimens (n = 63) were given compared with opioid-sparing regimens (n = 25) X (1, n = 88) = 2.870, P = .0902. There was also no difference between short-acting (n = 48), long-acting (n = 9), or combination (n = 6) intraoperative opioids compared with opioid-sparing regimens (n = 25) in the likelihood of postoperative pain. Despite the small sample size, the low number of postoperative pain cases is encouraging. Ultimately, these data provide a foundation for developing anesthetic guidelines for pediatric laser procedures. Specifically, clinicians should consider the potential to deliver adequate perioperative care via an opioid-sparing regimen ± adjuvant.

  15. Prevalence of and factors associated with myocardial scar in a U.S. Cohort

    PubMed Central

    Turkbey, Evrim B.; Nacif, Marcelo S.; Guo, Mengye; McClelland, Robyn L.; Teixeira, Patricia BRP; Bild, Diane E.; Barr, R. Graham; Shea, Steven; Post, Wendy; Burke, Gregory; Budoff, Matthew; Folsom, Aaron R.; Liu, Chia-Ying; Lima, João A; Bluemke, David A.

    2016-01-01

    Importance Myocardial scarring leads to cardiac dysfunction and poor prognosis. The prevalence of and factors associated with unrecognized myocardial infarction and scar have not been previously defined using current methods in a multi-ethnic US population. Objective To determine prevalence of and factors associated with myocardial scar in middle and older aged individuals in the United States (U.S). Design, Setting, and Participants Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA) is a population based cohort in the U.S. MESA participants were 45-84 years old and free of clinical cardiovascular disease (CVD) at baseline in 2000-2002. In the 10th year examination of MESA (2010-2012), 1840 participants underwent cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (CMR) with gadolinium to detect myocardial scar. CVD risk factors and coronary artery calcium scores were measured at baseline and year 10. Logistic regression models were used to estimate adjusted odds ratios for myocardial scar. Exposures Cardiovascular risk factors, coronary artery calcium, left ventricle size and function, carotid intima media thickness Main Outcome Measure Myocardial scar detected by CMR. Results Of 1840 participants (mean age 68±9 yrs, 52% male), 146 had myocardial scars (7.9%). Most myocardial scars (114/146, 78%) were undetected by electrocardiogram or by clinical adjudication. In adjusted models, age, male gender, body mass index, hypertension, and current smoking at baseline were associated with myocardial scar at year 10 [OR (95% CI): 1.6 (1.4, 1.9) per 8.9 years, p<0.001; 5.8 (3.6, 9.2) men vs. women, p<0.001; 1.3 (1.1, 1.6) per 4.8 kg/m2, p=0.005, 1.6 (1.1, 2.3) for hypertension present, p=0.009; 2.0 (1.2, 3.3) current vs. never smokers, p=0.006, respectively]. Age, gender and ethnicity adjusted CAC score at baseline was also associated with myocardial scar at year 10 [CAC categories of 1-99, 100-399 and ≥ 400 vs. CAC =0: OR (95% CI): 2.4 (1.5, 3.9), 3.0 (1.7, 5.1), 3.3 (1.7, 6.1), respectively

  16. Postinfarction Functional Recovery Driven by a Three-Dimensional Engineered Fibrin Patch Composed of Human Umbilical Cord Blood-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Roura, Santiago; Soler-Botija, Carolina; Bagó, Juli R.; Llucià-Valldeperas, Aida; Férnandez, Marco A.; Gálvez-Montón, Carolina; Prat-Vidal, Cristina; Perea-Gil, Isaac; Blanco, Jerónimo

    2015-01-01

    Considerable research has been dedicated to restoring myocardial cell slippage and limiting ventricular remodeling after myocardial infarction (MI). We examined the ability of a three-dimensional (3D) engineered fibrin patch filled with human umbilical cord blood-derived mesenchymal stem cells (UCBMSCs) to induce recovery of cardiac function after MI. The UCBMSCs were modified to coexpress luciferase and fluorescent protein reporters, mixed with fibrin, and applied as an adhesive, viable construct (fibrin-cell patch) over the infarcted myocardium in mice (MI-UCBMSC group). The patch adhered well to the heart. Noninvasive bioluminescence imaging demonstrated early proliferation and differentiation of UCBMSCs within the construct in the postinfarct mice in the MI-UCBMSC group. The implanted cells also participated in the formation of new, functional microvasculature that connected the fibrin-cell patch to both the subjacent myocardial tissue and the host circulatory system. As revealed by echocardiography, the left ventricular ejection fraction and fractional shortening at sacrifice were improved in MI-UCBMSC mice and were markedly reduced in mice treated with fibrin alone and untreated postinfarction controls. In conclusion, a 3D engineered fibrin patch composed of UCBMSCs attenuated infarct-derived cardiac dysfunction when transplanted locally over a myocardial wound. Significance Ischemic heart failure (HF) is the end stage of many cardiovascular diseases, including myocardial infarction. The only definitive treatment for HF is cardiac transplant, which is hampered by limited number of heart donors and graft rejection. In recent times, cellular cardiomyoplasty has been expected to repair infarcted myocardium by implantation of different sources of stem or progenitor cells. However, low cell survival and myocardial implantation rates have motivated the emergence of novel approaches with the objective of generating graftable cell-based implants. Here, the potential

  17. [Surgical strategy for postburn cervical scar contracture].

    PubMed

    Feng, Shaoqing; Su, Weijie; Xi, Wenjing; Min, Peiru; Pu, Zheming; Zhang, Yan; Zhang, Yixin

    2015-08-01

    To explore the surgical strategy for postburn cervical scar contracture. Sixty-five patients with scar contracture as a result of burn injury in the neck were hospitalized from July 2013 to July 2014. Release of cervical scar contracture was conducted according to different demands of the 3 anatomic subunits of neck, i.e. lower lip vermilion border-supramaxillary region, submaxillary region, and anterior region of neck. After release of contracture, platysma was released. For some cases with chin retrusion, genioplasty with horizontal osteotomy was performed. The coverage of wound followed the principle of similarity, i.e. the skin tissue covering the wound in the neck should be similar to the characters of skin around the wound in terms of color, texture, and thickness. Based on this principle, except for the preschool children in whom skin grafting was performed, the wounds of the other patients were covered by local skin flaps, adjacent skin flaps, or free skin flaps. All patients underwent release of scar and platysma, while 9 patients underwent genioplasty with horizontal osteotomy. Wounds were covered with local skin flaps in 32 patients, with adjacent skin flaps in 7 patients, with free skin flaps in 11 patients, and with skin grafts in 15 patients. All skin grafts and flaps survived. Good range of motion was achieved in the neck of all patients, with the cervicomental angle after reconstruction ranging from 90 to 120°. All patients were followed up for 6 to 24 months. Six patients who had undergone skin grafting were found to have some degrees of skin contracture, while none of the patients who had undergone flap coverage showed any signs of contracture recurrence. Restoration of the cervicomental angle is critical in the treatment of postburn cervical scar contracture, and the release of scar contracture should conform to the subunit principle. The coverage of wound should be based on the principle of similarity, with repair by skin flaps as the first

  18. Repigmentation of cutaneous scars depends on original wound type

    PubMed Central

    Chadwick, Sarah L; Yip, Christina; Ferguson, Mark W J; Shah, Mamta

    2013-01-01

    Cutaneous scarring is currently an inevitable outcome following skin injury. Abnormal pigmentation within scars makes them more noticeable, causing distress for patients, particularly as there is no reliable and effective treatment available to date. The Duroc pig, known to scar badly, was used to investigate repigmentation of scars resulting from three different wound types: incisional, partial thickness excisional and full thickness excisional. Wounds were created on the backs of Duroc pigs and the resulting scars harvested at days 35, 56, 70 and 90 days post-injury. Scars were processed for histology and immunohistochemistry, quantitatively analysed using image analysis software and subjected to statistical analysis. Photographs of the macroscopic appearance of scars were scored for pigmentation using a visual analogue scale. Results demonstrated temporal and spatial differences in melanocyte repopulation and function within scars from different wound types. The microscopic pigment deposition did not correlate with macroscopic appearances in mature scars. Pigmentation of scars is dependent on the width and depth of wounds. This study has provided important information on which we can base future studies to investigate factors controlling the repigmentation of scars. PMID:23668313

  19. Inflammatory markers modify the risk of recurrent coronary events associated with apolipoprotein A-I in postinfarction patients.

    PubMed

    Wang, Meng; Corsetti, James; McNitt, Scott; Rich, David Q; Sparks, Charles E; Moss, Arthur J; Zareba, Wojciech

    Laboratory findings have suggested that systemic and vascular inflammation can impair the antiatherogenic function of high-density lipoproteins (HDLs). However, evidence from population studies is sparse. The objective of the study was to assess if blood inflammatory markers modify the risk of recurrent coronary events associated with apolipoprotein A-I (apoA-I) and HDL cholesterol (HDL-C) among postinfarction patients. ApoA-I, HDL-C, and inflammatory markers (C-reactive protein [CRP], serum amyloid A (SAA), fibrinogen, von Willebrand factor [vWF], and D-dimer) were measured from blood samples of 1028 patients drawn 2 months after an index myocardial infarction (MI). Patients were followed up for the composite coronary endpoint (nonfatal MI, coronary death, or unstable angina) for an average of 26 months. Cox proportional hazard models were used to assess effect modifications for the association of apoA-I and HDL-C with coronary risk by each inflammatory marker. CRP significantly modified the risk of recurrent coronary events associated with apoA-I. Among the entire population, multivariable-adjusted hazard ratios associated with each standard deviation increase in apoA-I for those with low and high CRP levels were 0.89 and 1.35, respectively (P value for interaction = .008). vWF was a significant effect modifier of the apoA-I/coronary risk association only among diabetic patients (hazard ratios were 0.56 and 1.43, for diabetic patients with low and high vWF levels, respectively; P value for interaction = .002). No effect modification was observed for the HDL-C/coronary risk association. Among stable post-MI patients, CRP modified the risk of recurrent coronary events associated with apoA-I. VWF modified this association only among the diabetic subgroup. Copyright © 2017 National Lipid Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Suppressed inflammatory gene expression during human hypertrophic scar compared to normotrophic scar formation.

    PubMed

    van den Broek, Lenie J; van der Veer, Willem M; de Jong, Etty H; Gibbs, Susan; Niessen, Frank B

    2015-08-01

    Hypertrophic scar formation is a result of adverse cutaneous wound healing. The pathogenesis of hypertrophic scar formation is still poorly understood. A problem next to the lack of suitable animal models is that often normal skin is compared to hypertrophic scar (HTscar) and not to normotrophic scar (NTscar) tissue. Another drawback is that often only one time period after wounding is studied, while scar formation is a dynamic process over a period of several months. In this study, we compared the expression of genes involved in inflammation, angiogenesis and extracellular matrix (ECM) formation and also macrophage infiltration in biopsies obtained before and up to 52 weeks after standard surgery in five patients who developed HTscar and six patients who developed NTscar. It was found that HTscar formation coincided with a prolonged decreased expression of inflammatory genes (TNFα, IL-1α, IL-1RN, CCL2, CCL3, CXCL2, CXCR2, C3 and IL-10) and an extended increased expression of ECM-related genes (PLAU, Col3A1, TGFβ3). This coincided with a delayed but prolonged infiltration of macrophages (type 2) in HTscar tissue compared to NTscar tissue. These findings were supported by immunohistochemical localization of proteins coding for select genes named above. Our study emphasizes that human cutaneous wound healing is a dynamic process that is needed to be studied over a period of time rather than a single point of time. Taken together, our results suggest innate immune stimulatory therapies may be a better option for improving scar quality than the currently used anti-inflammatory scar therapies. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Scar dechanneling: new method for scar-related left ventricular tachycardia substrate ablation.

    PubMed

    Berruezo, Antonio; Fernández-Armenta, Juan; Andreu, David; Penela, Diego; Herczku, Csaba; Evertz, Reinder; Cipolletta, Laura; Acosta, Juan; Borràs, Roger; Arbelo, Elena; Tolosana, Jose María; Brugada, Josep; Mont, Lluis

    2015-04-01

    Ventricular tachycardia (VT) substrate ablation usually requires extensive ablation. Scar dechanneling technique may limit the extent of ablation needed. The study included 101 consecutive patients with left ventricular scar-related VT (75 ischemic patients; left ventricular ejection fraction, 36 ± 13%). Procedural end point was the elimination of all identified conducting channels (CCs) by ablation at the CC entrance followed by abolition of residual inducible VTs. By itself, scar dechanneling rendered noninducibility in 54.5% of patients; ablation of residual inducible VT increased noninducibility to 78.2%. Patients needing only scar dechanneling had a shorter procedure (213 ± 64 versus 244 ± 71 minutes; P = 0.027), fewer radiofrequency applications (19 ± 11% versus 27 ± 18%; P = 0.01), and external cardioversion/defibrillation shocks (20% versus 65.2%; P < 0.001). At 2 years, patients needing scar dechanneling alone had better event-free survival (80% versus 62%) and lower mortality (5% versus 11%). Incomplete CC-electrogram elimination was the only independent predictor (hazard ratio, 2.54 [1.06-6.10]) for the primary end point. Higher end point-free survival rates were observed in patients noninducible after scar dechanneling (log-rank P = 0.013) and those with complete CC-electrogram elimination (log-rank P = 0.013). The complications rate was 6.9%, with no deaths. Scar dechanneling alone results in low recurrence and mortality rates in more than half of patients despite the limited ablation extent required. Residual inducible VT ablation improves acute results, but patients who require it have worse outcomes. Recurrences are mainly related to incomplete CC-electrogram elimination. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  2. Incidences of malignancy in chronic burn scar ulcers: experience from Bangladesh.

    PubMed

    Das, Kishore Kumar; Chakaraborty, Anjana; Rahman, Ashrafur; Khandkar, Sazzad

    2015-09-01

    Malignant transformation on any scar tissue is known as Marjolin's ulcer. Most cases of Marjolin's ulcer reported so far occur in post-burn scars but not all ulcers that occur in post-burn scar are malignant. One hundred and forty cases of chronic non-healing ulcers in post-burn scar were included in this prospective observational study. The study was conducted in the Department of Burn and Plastic Surgery Unit of Dhaka Medical College Hospital. Mean age of the patients was 40.63±18.44 with a range from 12 to 75 years. Two third of the patients were male. All patients underwent excision biopsy and coverage with either split thickness skin graft or flap. Histopathological analysis of the resected specimen revealed malignancy in 46 cases and pseudoepitheliomatous hyperplasia in four cases and verruca plantaris in one case. The rest of the cases were chronic non-healing benign ulcers. All 46 cases of Marjolin's ulcer were squamous cell carcinoma with a mean latency period of 26.73 years. The commonest site of chronic ulcer was in the lower extremities (n-80, 57%), and malignancy was also found to be more common there (n-18). The most common type of burn was flame burn (68.57%). The Marjolin's ulcers were significantly larger in size than benign ulcers, and were mostly exophytic or ulcerative in appearance whereas benign ulcers were mostly flat. A non-healing ulcer in a post-burn scar should be addressed promptly because of its potential to develop into a malignant ulcer. Emphasis should be given to early surgical treatment of deep partial to full thickness burns to prevent scar formation, particularly over joints, and thus reduce the risk of development of Marjolin's ulcer.

  3. Implementation of a burn scar assessment system by ultrasound techniques.

    PubMed

    Du, Yi-Chun; Lin, Chih-Ming; Chen, Yung-Fu; Chen, Chung-Lin; Chen, Tainsong

    2006-01-01

    Tissue injury and its ensuing healing process cause scar formation. In addition to physical disability, the subsequent disfigurements from burns often bring negative psychological impacts on the survivors. Scar hypertrophy and contracture limit the joint motion and body function of the patient. With fast development of the current available technologies regarding the scar therapies, not only the process of wound healing has to be focused, but also the cosmetic and functional outcomes need to be emphasized. Therefore, proper evaluation and assessment of the healing process to nil scar status is highly recommended. However, the currently employed tools for scar evaluation are mostly subjective. For example, Vancouver General Hospital (VGH) scar index uses color, pigmentation, vascularity, pliability, and depth of the scar as dependent variables for scar evaluation. These parameters only estimate the superficial surface of the scar, but they can not evaluate the deeper tissue within dermis. Ultrasound is a safe, inexpensive, and multifunctional technique for probing tissue characteristics. In addition, its resolution is not inferior to other measurement techniques. Although 3D-ultrasound is available in clinical application, it's still not widely used in scar evaluation because of its high cost. In this study, we proposed a system for scar assessment using B-mode ultrasonic technique. By utilizing the reconstruction methods to search the scar border, many characteristic parameters, including depth, area and volume, can be estimated. The proposed method is useful in assisting the clinician to evaluate the treatment effect and to plan further therapeutic strategy more objectively. In this report, the quantitative assessment system was used to evaluate the scar of a seriously burned patient. In order to verify the reliability of systematic reconstruction method, we constructed a phantom to imitate the scar tissue. The results show that it can achieve more than 90% in

  4. [Classification of massive postburn scars on neck and the reconstruction strategy using pre-expanded perforator flaps from the back].

    PubMed

    Zan, T; Gao, Y S; Li, H Z; Gu, B; Xie, F; Zhu, H N; Li, Q F

    2016-08-20

    To explore the classification of massive postburn scars on neck and the reconstruction strategy using pre-expanded perforator flaps from the back. Thirty-seven patients with massive postburn scars on neck were admitted from January 2010 to December 2014 and treated by our treatment group. The massive postburn scars on neck were categorized into three types according to their size and location. Based on the principles of reconstructive ladder, matching in color and texture between donor site skin and neck skin, large size and thinner thickness of tissue of donor site skin, donor-recipient sites balance, and dominant supplying vessel, we proposed the following treatment strategy for choosing perforator flaps from the back. (1) In view of central cervical scar involving the central area (mainly in this area) and one side of peripheral zone, the free circumflex scapular artery perforator flap was chosen. (2) In view of peripheral cervical scar involving the central area and one side of peripheral zone (mainly in this area), the pedicled superficial cervical artery perforator flap was the first choice. In case the pedicled superficial cervical artery perforator flap was unavailable because of the absence of superficial cervical artery perforator or scarring within its vascular territory, the pedicled occipital artery perforator flap, pedicled dorsal scapular artery perforator flap, and free circumflex scapular artery perforator flap were chosen as alternative options considering specific condition. (3) In view of total cervical scar involving the central area and both sides of peripheral zone, the circumflex scapular artery perforator supercharged pedicled superficial cervical artery perforator flap was chosen. Tissue expansion was performed in the first stage for all the patients. In the second stage, after excision of the cervical scars, the flaps were transferred to cover the wounds. Among the 37 patients, 7 were with central cervical scar, 12 with total cervical

  5. Inhibition of ischemic cardiomyocyte apoptosis through targeted ablation of Bnip3 restrains postinfarction remodeling in mice

    PubMed Central

    Diwan, Abhinav; Krenz, Maike; Syed, Faisal M.; Wansapura, Janaka; Ren, Xiaoping; Koesters, Andrew G.; Li, Hairong; Kirshenbaum, Lorrie A.; Hahn, Harvey S.; Robbins, Jeffrey; Jones, W. Keith; Dorn, Gerald W.

    2007-01-01

    Following myocardial infarction, nonischemic myocyte death results in infarct expansion, myocardial loss, and ventricular dysfunction. Here, we demonstrate that a specific proapoptotic gene, Bnip3, minimizes ventricular remodeling in the mouse, despite having no effect on early or late infarct size. We evaluated the effects of ablating Bnip3 on cardiomyocyte death, infarct size, and ventricular remodeling after surgical ischemia/reperfusion (IR) injury in mice. Immediately following IR, no significant differences were observed between Bnip3–/– and WT mice. However, at 2 days after IR, apoptosis was diminished in Bnip3–/– periinfarct and remote myocardium, and at 3 weeks after IR, Bnip3–/– mice exhibited preserved LV systolic performance, diminished LV dilation, and decreased ventricular sphericalization. These results suggest myocardial salvage by inhibition of apoptosis. Forced cardiac expression of Bnip3 increased cardiomyocyte apoptosis in unstressed mice, causing progressive LV dilation and diminished systolic function. Conditional Bnip3 overexpression prior to coronary ligation increased apoptosis and infarct size. These studies identify postischemic apoptosis by myocardial Bnip3 as a major determinant of ventricular remodeling in the infarcted heart, suggesting that Bnip3 may be an attractive therapeutic target. PMID:17909626

  6. Botulinum toxin to minimize facial scarring.

    PubMed

    Sherris, David A; Gassner, Holger G

    2002-02-01

    Botulinum toxin injection has been used for a variety of indications in humans, including blepharospasm and hyperfunctional facial lines. This article describes a novel formulation of botulinum toxin, which supplies immediate feedback to the injecting physician. Additionally, recent findings are described that indicate the immediate injection of botulinum toxin into the muscles underlying a wound can improve the cosmetic outcome of the facial cutaneous scar. Future applications of these findings are discussed.

  7. Digital imaging analysis to assess scar phenotype.

    PubMed

    Smith, Brian J; Nidey, Nichole; Miller, Steven F; Moreno Uribe, Lina M; Baum, Christian L; Hamilton, Grant S; Wehby, George L; Dunnwald, Martine

    2014-01-01

    In order to understand the link between the genetic background of patients and wound clinical outcomes, it is critical to have a reliable method to assess the phenotypic characteristics of healed wounds. In this study, we present a novel imaging method that provides reproducible, sensitive, and unbiased assessments of postsurgical scarring. We used this approach to investigate the possibility that genetic variants in orofacial clefting genes are associated with suboptimal healing. Red-green-blue digital images of postsurgical scars of 68 patients, following unilateral cleft lip repair, were captured using the 3dMD imaging system. Morphometric and colorimetric data of repaired regions of the philtrum and upper lip were acquired using ImageJ software, and the unaffected contralateral regions were used as patient-specific controls. Repeatability of the method was high with intraclass correlation coefficient score > 0.8. This method detected a very significant difference in all three colors, and for all patients, between the scarred and the contralateral unaffected philtrum (p ranging from 1.20(-05) to 1.95(-14) ). Physicians' clinical outcome ratings from the same images showed high interobserver variability (overall Pearson coefficient = 0.49) as well as low correlation with digital image analysis results. Finally, we identified genetic variants in TGFB3 and ARHGAP29 associated with suboptimal healing outcome.

  8. Digital imaging analysis to assess scar phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Brian J.; Nidey, Nichole; Miller, Steven F.; Moreno, Lina M.; Baum, Christian L.; Hamilton, Grant S.; Wehby, George L.; Dunnwald, Martine

    2015-01-01

    In order to understand the link between the genetic background of patients and wound clinical outcomes, it is critical to have a reliable method to assess the phenotypic characteristics of healed wounds. In this study, we present a novel imaging method that provides reproducible, sensitive and unbiased assessments of post-surgical scarring. We used this approach to investigate the possibility that genetic variants in orofacial clefting genes are associated with suboptimal healing. Red-green-blue (RGB) digital images of post-surgical scars of 68 patients, following unilateral cleft lip repair, were captured using the 3dMD image system. Morphometric and colorimetric data of repaired regions of the philtrum and upper lip were acquired using ImageJ software and the unaffected contralateral regions were used as patient-specific controls. Repeatability of the method was high with interclass correlation coefficient score > 0.8. This method detected a very significant difference in all three colors, and for all patients, between the scarred and the contralateral unaffected philtrum (P ranging from 1.20−05 to 1.95−14). Physicians’ clinical outcome ratings from the same images showed high inter-observer variability (overall Pearson coefficient = 0.49) as well as low correlation with digital image analysis results. Finally, we identified genetic variants in TGFB3 and ARHGAP29 associated with suboptimal healing outcome. PMID:24635173

  9. Utility of multiparametric MRI in Caesarean section scar characterization and preoperative prediction of scar dehiscence: a prospective study.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Ishan; Verma, Ashish; Matah, Manjari; Satpathy, Gayatri

    2017-07-01

    Background Post-Caesarean uterine scar rupture during vaginal birth after Caesarean section (VBAC) is a potentially life-threatening complication. Prediction of scar dehiscence and scar rupture is vital in treatment planning and selecting candidates of trial of labor after a Caesarean section (CS). Purpose To assess the accuracy of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for evaluation of post-Caesarean uterine scar and to predict scar dehiscence during repeat CS. Material and Methods Thirty patients with a history of at least one previous CS underwent pelvic MRI for assessment of uterine scar during a subsequent gestation, all of whom underwent lower segment Caesarean section (LSCS) subsequently due to one of the established indications of CSs. Thickness, T1, T2 signal intensity ratio (SER), and apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) value of scar site were charted. The lower uterine segment was assessed and graded intraoperatively and findings were correlated with MRI findings. Results A total of 30 participants were included in this study, of which nine were classified as having an abnormal scar (of various grades) based on surgical observations. T2 SER with a cutoff value of 0.935 showed the highest sensitivity of 100% and scar thickness value of 3.45 mm showed highest specificity of 91% in prediction of abnormal scar. On drawing a receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve, T2 signal intensity ratio showed the highest area under the curve (AUC) closely followed by scar thickness values. Conclusion MRI derived parameters may be utilized for differentiation of an abnormal post-Caesarean uterine scar from a normal one. Both scar thickness and T2 SER measured on MRI can be used to predict scar dehiscence. However, T2 SER can serve as a more standardized and objective criterion.

  10. Mathematical modeling of chemotaxis and glial scarring around implanted electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silchenko, Alexander N.; Tass, Peter A.

    2015-02-01

    It is well known that the implantation of electrodes for deep brain stimulation or microelectrode probes for the recording of neuronal activity is always accompanied by the response of the brain’s immune system leading to the formation of a glial scar around the implantation sites. The implantation of electrodes causes massive release of adenosine-5‧-triphosphate (ATP) and different cytokines into the extracellular space and activates the microglia. The released ATP and the products of its hydrolysis, such as ADP and adenosine, become the main elements mediating chemotactic sensitivity and motility of microglial cells via subsequent activation of P2Y2,12 as well as A3A/A2A adenosine receptors. The size and density of an insulating sheath around the electrode, formed by microglial cells, are important criteria for the optimization of the signal-to-noise ratio during microelectrode recordings or parameters of electrical current delivered to the brain tissue. Here, we study a purinergic signaling pathway underlying the chemotactic motion of microglia towards implanted electrodes as well as the possible impact of an anti-inflammatory coating consisting of the interleukin-1 receptor antagonist. We present a model describing the formation of a stable aggregate around the electrode due to the joint chemo-attractive action of ATP and ADP and the mixed influence of extracellular adenosine. The bioactive coating is modeled as a source of chemo-repellent located near the electrode surface. The obtained analytical and numerical results allowed us to reveal the dependences of size and spatial location of the insulating sheath on the amount of released ATP and estimate the impact of immune suppressive coating on the scarring process.

  11. Laparoscopic Repair of Cesarean Scar Defect "Isthmocele".

    PubMed

    Urman, Bulent; Arslan, Tonguc; Aksu, Sertan; Taskiran, Cagatay

    2016-01-01

    To demonstrate the technique of laparoscopic repair of a large cesarean scar defect (isthmocele). Case report (Canadian Task Force classification III). Cesarean scar defect, also known as an isthmocele, is the result of incomplete healing of the isthmic myometrium after a low transverse uterine incision performed for cesarean section. Although mostly asymptomatic, it may cause menstrual abnormalities (typically postmenstrual spotting), chronic pelvic pain, and secondary infertility. Scar tissue dehiscence, scar pregnancy, and abnormally adherent placenta are some of the obstetric complications associated with this defect. No standardized treatment has yet been accepted. Hysteroscopy and laparoscopy are the minimally invasive approaches currently used to repair the defect. A 40-year-old patient, G2P2, presented with postmenstrual spotting and secondary infertility for the past 2 years. She had a history of 2 previous cesarean deliveries. Transvaginal ultrasound revealed a large (2.5 × 1.5 cm) niche. Thickness of the myometrium over the defect was 3 mm. Laparoscopic repair of the uterine defect was performed. The bladder that was densely adherent to the lower uterine segment was freed by careful dissection. The defect was then localized with a sharp curette placed transcervically into the uterus. The curette was pushed anteriorly to delineate the margins of the defect and puncture the ceiling of the isthmocele cavity. The fibrotic tissue that formed the ceiling and the lateral borders of the defect was excised using laparoscopic scissors. Reapproximation of the edges was done with continuous nonlocking 3-0 V-Loc sutures. The procedure took 90 minutes, and there were no associated complications. Postoperative ultrasound performed in the second month after the operation showed a minimal defect measuring 0.5 cm, with a residual myometrial thickness of 7 mm. At the time of this writing, the patient was free of symptoms. Laparoscopic repair, although not

  12. Laparoscopic Resection of Cesarean Scar Ectopic Pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Ades, Alex; Parghi, Sneha

    To demonstrate a technique for the laparoscopic surgical management of cesarean section scar ectopic pregnancy. Step-by-step presentation of the procedure using video (Canadian Task Force classification III). Cesarean section scar ectopic pregnancy is a rare form of ectopic pregnancy with an incidence ranging from 1:1800 to 1:2216. Over the last decade, the incidence seems to be on the rise with increasing rates of cesarean deliveries and early use of Doppler ultrasound. These pregnancies can lead to life-threatening hemorrhage, uterine rupture, and hysterectomy if not managed promptly. Local or systemic methotrexate therapy has been used successfully but can result in prolonged hospitalization, requires long-term follow-up, and in some cases treatment can fail. In the hands of a trained operator, laparoscopic resection can be performed to manage this type of pregnancy. Consent was obtained from the patient, and exemption was granted from the local Internal Review Board (The Womens' Hospital, Parkville). In this video we describe our technique for laparoscopic management of a cesarean scar ectopic pregnancy. We present the case of a 34-year-old G4P2T1 with the finding of a live 8-week pregnancy embedded in the cesarean section scar. The patient had undergone 2 previous uncomplicated cesarean sections at term. On presentation her β-human chorionic gonadotropin (β-hCG) level was 52 405 IU/L. She was initially managed with an intragestational sac injection of potassium chloride and methotrexate, followed by 4 doses of intramuscular methotrexate. Despite these conservative measures, the level of β-hCG did not adequately fall and an ultrasound showed a persistent 4-cm mass. A decision was made to proceed with surgical treatment in the form of a laparoscopic resection of the ectopic pregnancy. The surgery was uneventful, and the patient was discharged home within 24 hours of her procedure. Her serial β-hCG levels were followed until complete resolution

  13. Update on scar management: guidelines for treating Asian patients.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sukwha; Choi, Tae Hyun; Liu, Wei; Ogawa, Rei; Suh, Jeong Seok; Mustoe, Thomas A

    2013-12-01

    Following injury, Asian skin has a tendency towards hyper-pigmentation and scar formation, and therefore the prevention of scarring is particularly important in Asian patients. Since publication of an International Clinical Recommendation on Scar Management in 2002, there have been numerous publications in the field of scar management. Advances in understanding scar formation have also led to the introduction of new treatments as well as a better understanding of established therapeutic options. A literature search for abstracts, clinical trials and meta-analyses evaluating scar prevention and treatment was performed using PubMed and the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews. Based on this data a panel of experts formulated treatment recommendations for Asian patients. Following surgery, scar prevention should be initiated in all Asian patients due to the high risk of poor scars. There is strong evidence for the efficacy of silicone based products, and due to their ease of use, they can be considered first-line therapy. Silicone gel (versus silicone gel sheets) products have demonstrated efficacy. For patients who fail to respond to first-line therapy, intralesional steroid injections, radiation therapy, and intralesional 5-flourouracil injections have achieved widespread acceptance. Laser treatments have been increasingly used, although the evidence remains largely anecdotal without a clear consensus on optimal wavelength, or amount of energy. Surgical approaches have increased in sophistication with recognition of the impact that tension has on scar formation. Updated scar management recommendations will benefit practitioners making decisions regarding optimal, evidence-based treatment strategies for their patients.

  14. Periostin induces fibroblast proliferation and myofibroblast persistence in hypertrophic scarring.

    PubMed

    Crawford, Justin; Nygard, Karen; Gan, Bing Siang; O'Gorman, David Brian

    2015-02-01

    Hypertrophic scarring is characterized by the excessive development and persistence of myofibroblasts. These cells contract the surrounding extracellular matrix resulting in the increased tissue density characteristic of scar tissue. Periostin is a matricellular protein that is abnormally abundant in fibrotic dermis, however, its roles in hypertrophic scarring are largely unknown. In this report, we assessed the ability of matrix-associated periostin to promote the proliferation and myofibroblast differentiation of dermal fibroblasts isolated from the dermis of hypertrophic scars or healthy skin. Supplementation of a thin type-I collagen cell culture substrate with recombinant periostin induced a significant increase in the proliferation of hypertrophic scar fibroblasts but not normal dermal fibroblasts. Periostin induced significant increases in supermature focal adhesion formation, α smooth muscle actin levels and collagen contraction in fibroblasts cultured from hypertrophic scars under conditions of increased matrix tension in three-dimensional type-I collagen lattices. Inhibition of Rho-associated protein kinase activity significantly attenuated the effects of matrix-associated periostin on hypertrophic scar fibroblasts and myofibroblasts. Depletion of endogenous periostin expression in hypertrophic scar myofibroblasts resulted in a sustained decrease in α smooth muscle actin levels under conditions of reducing matrix tension, while matrix-associated periostin levels caused the cells to retain high levels of a smooth muscle actin under these conditions. These findings indicate that periostin promotes Rho-associated protein kinase-dependent proliferation and myofibroblast persistence of hypertrophic scar fibroblasts and implicate periostin as a potential therapeutic target to enhance the resolution of scars.

  15. Laser therapy for prevention and treatment of pathologic excessive scars.

    PubMed

    Jin, Rui; Huang, Xiaolu; Li, Hua; Yuan, Yuwen; Li, Bin; Cheng, Chen; Li, Qingfeng

    2013-12-01

    The management of hypertrophic scars and keloids remains a therapeutic challenge. Treatment regimens are currently based on clinical experience rather than substantiated evidence. Laser therapy is an emerging minimally invasive treatment that has recently gained attention. A meta-analysis was conducted to evaluate the effectiveness of various laser therapies. The pooled response rate, pooled standardized mean difference of Vancouver Scar Scale scores, scar height, erythema, and pliability were reported. Twenty-eight well-designed clinical trials with 919 patients were included in the meta-analysis. The overall response rate for laser therapy was 71 percent for scar prevention, 68 percent for hypertrophic scar treatment, and 72 percent for keloid treatment. The 585/595-nm pulsed-dye laser and 532-nm laser subgroups yielded the best responses among all laser systems. The pooled estimates of hypertrophic scar studies also showed that laser therapy reduced total Vancouver Scar Scale scores, scar height, and scar erythema of hypertrophic scars. Regression analyses of pulsed-dye laser therapy suggested that the optimal treatment interval is 5 to 6 weeks. In addition, the therapeutic effect of pulsed-dye laser therapy is better on patients with lower Fitzpatrick skin type scores. This study presents the first meta-analysis to confirm the efficacy and safety of laser therapy in hypertrophic scar management. The level of evidence for laser therapy as a keloid treatment is low. Further research is required to determine the mechanism of action for different laser systems and to examine the efficacy in quantifiable parameters, such as scar erythema, scar texture, degrees of symptom relief, recurrence rates, and adverse effects.

  16. The Structural Basis of Functional Improvement in Response to Human Umbilical Cord Blood Stem Cell Transplantation in Hearts with Post-Infarct LV Remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yong; Ye, Lei; Zhong, Jia; Li, Xin; Yan, Chen; Chandler, Margaret P.; Calvin, Steve; Xiao, Feng; Negia, Mesfin; Low, Walter C.; Zhang, Jianyi; Yu, Xin

    2015-01-01

    Cellular therapy for myocardial repair has been one of the most intensely investigated interventional strategies for acute myocardium infarction. Although the therapeutic potential of stem cells has been demonstrated in various studies, the underlying mechanisms for such improvement are poorly understood. In the present study, we investigated the long-term effects of stem cell therapy on both myocardial fiber organization and regional contractile function using a rat model of post-infarct remodeling. Human non-hematopoietic umbilical cord blood stem cells (nh-UCBSCs) were administered via tail vein to rats 2 days after infarct surgery. Animals were maintained without immunosuppressive therapy. In vivo and ex vivo MR imaging was performed on infarct hearts ten months after cell transplantation. Compared to the age-matched rats exposed to the identical surgery, both global and regional cardiac function of the nh-UCBSC-treated hearts, such as ejection fraction, ventricular strain and torsion, were significantly improved. More importantly, the treated hearts exhibited preserved fiber orientation and water diffusivities that were similar to those in sham-operated control hearts. These data provide the first evidence that nh-UCBSC treatment may prevent/delay untoward structural remodeling in post-infarct hearts, which supports the improved LV function observed in vivo in the absence of immunosuppression, suggesting a beneficial paracrine effect that occurred with the cellular therapy. PMID:24332083

  17. Beta-blockade improves adjacent regional sympathetic innervation during postinfarction remodeling.

    PubMed

    Kramer, C M; Nicol, P D; Rogers, W J; Seibel, P S; Park, C S; Reichek, N

    1999-10-01

    The effect of beta-blockade on left ventricular (LV) remodeling, when added to angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibition (ACEI) after anterior myocardial infarction (MI), is incompletely understood. On day 2 after coronary ligation-induced anteroapical infarction, 17 sheep were randomized to ramipril (ACEI, n = 8) or ramipril and metoprolol (ACEI-beta, n = 9). Magnetic resonance imaging was performed before and 8 wk after MI to measure changes in LV end-diastolic, end-systolic, and stroke volume indexes, LV mass index, ejection fraction (EF), and regional percent intramyocardial circumferential shortening. (123)I-labeled m-iodobenzylguanidine (MIBG) and fluorescent microspheres before and after adenosine were infused before death at 8 wk post-MI for quantitation of sympathetic innervation, blood flow, and blood flow reserve in adjacent and remote noninfarcted regions. Infarct size, regional blood flow, blood flow reserve, and the increase in LV mass and LV end-diastolic and end-systolic volume indexes were similar between groups. However, EF fell less over the 8-wk study period in the ACEI-beta group (-13 +/- 11 vs. -22 +/- 4% in ACEI, P < 0.05). The ratio of adjacent to remote region (123)I-MIBG uptake was greater in ACEI-beta animals than in the ACEI group (0.93 +/- 0.06 vs. 0.86 +/- 0.07, P < 0.04). When added to ACE inhibition after transmural anteroapical MI, beta-blockade improves EF and adjacent regional sympathetic innervation but does not alter LV size.

  18. Multielectrode contact mapping to assess scar modification in post-myocardial infarction ventricular tachycardia patients.

    PubMed

    Della Bella, Paolo; Bisceglia, Caterina; Tung, Roderick

    2012-08-01

    Substrate-based approaches for ablation of unmappable ventricular tachycardia (VT) are strictly dependent on high-density mapping of the scar. Ultra-high-density mapping with multielectrode catheters facilitates an accurate and faster definition of sites critical for re-entry, due to the possibility of simultaneous recordings of local potential from different pairs of electrodes. Multipolar catheters can be advanced to map the endocardial or the epicardial surface. A strong correlation between the scar area determined by electroanatomical mapping and the histopathological scar size has been demonstrated. A double-transeptal technique allows for an accurate definition of target sites. The complex scar architecture has been investigated by ultra-high-density mapping, let the identification of islets of heterogeneity where electrograms adjacent to the preserved myocardium have an higher incidence of late potentials. Pacing manoeuvres can easily be performed from any pair of electrode, to demonstrate the involvement of late potentials into the VT circuit. This strategy allows for a clear-cut validation of late potential abolishment, and may offer advantages to shorten procedural and fluoroscopy times. Large series are necessary to definitively assess the potential role of multielectrode mapping as a guide for the substrate ablation approach in post-myocardial infarction VT patients.

  19. Left atrial function and scar after catheter ablation of atrial fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Wylie, John V; Peters, Dana C; Essebag, Vidal; Manning, Warren J; Josephson, Mark E; Hauser, Thomas H

    2008-05-01

    Catheter ablation of atrial fibrillation (AF) involves extensive radiofrequency ablation (RFA) of the left atrium (LA) around the pulmonary veins. The effect of this therapy on LA function is not fully characterized. The purpose of this study was to determine whether catheter ablation of AF is associated with a change in LA function. LA and right atrial (RA) systolic function was assessed in 33 consecutive patients with paroxysmal or persistent AF referred for ablation using cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) imaging. Steady-state free precession ECG cine CMR imaging was performed before and after (mean 48 days) AF ablation. All patients underwent circumferential pulmonary vein isolation using an 8-mm tip RFA catheter. High spatial resolution late gadolinium enhancement CMR images of LA scar were obtained in 16 patients. Maximum LA volume decreased by 15% (P <.001), and LA ejection fraction decreased by 14% (P <.001) after AF ablation. Maximum RA volume decreased by 13% (P = .018), but RA ejection fraction increased by 5% (P = .008). Mean LA scar volume was 8.1 +/- 3.7 mL. A linear correlation was observed between change in LA ejection fraction and scar volume (r = -0.75, P <.001). Catheter ablation of AF is associated with decreased LA size and reduced atrial systolic function. This change strongly correlates with the volume of LA scar. This finding may have implications for postprocedural thromboembolic risk and for procedures involving more extensive RFA.

  20. Unusually large colon cancer cutaneous and subcutaneous metastases occurring in resection scars.

    PubMed

    Alexandrescu, Doru T; Vaillant, Juan; Yahr, Laura J; Kelemen, Pond; Wiernik, Peter H

    2005-08-01

    Development of cutaneous metastases from colon cancer is a rare event, usually occurring in the setting of diffusely-disseminated disease and commonly carrying a dismal prognosis. Cutaneous and subcutaneous metastases in surgical scars occur extremely rarely, with only a few cases reported. We describe two cases of cutaneous metastases from colon cancer. A 62-year-old woman developed an 11-cm midline abdominal mass that slowly grew on the skin surface. The mass occurred at the scar site of her previous surgery performed 5 years prior for resection of a colon adenocarcinoma. A 46-year-old male presented with a subcutaneous 4.5-cm nodule in midline-abdominal scar, 3 years after resection of the primary colon cancer. These cases illustrate the pathological features and natural history of cutaneous metastases observed until the tumors have reached a very large size. Particular features of cutaneous scar metastases from colon cancer observed in our cases are a superficial pattern of spread, strong positivity for EGFR, low serum carcinoembrionic antigen, and long survival of the patients, possibly contributed to by the use of chemotherapy.

  1. [Mechanism of scar formation and strategy of treatment].

    PubMed

    Lu, Shu-liang

    2013-04-01

    So far, studies on the mechanism of scar formation have mainly focused on cells, cytokines and extracellular matrix. Some studies have shown that fibroblast is one of the most important element in the process of scar formation, while epidermal and endothelial cells exert synergistic effects as well. Genetic factor can not be ignored in scar formation, either. Recently, studies have shown decisively the loss or damage of the three-dimensional structure of dermal tissue is the initiator of scar formation. Thus, the defect of epidermis template is proposed as a theory in order to explain the mechanism of scar formation. There are various techniques for scar treatment. The commonly accepted methods are physical therapy, pressure therapy, pharmaceutical therapy, radiotherapy, etc.

  2. Cutaneous Scar Prevention and Management: Overview of current therapies.

    PubMed

    Al-Shaqsi, Sultan; Al-Bulushi, Taimoor

    2016-02-01

    Cutaneous scarring is common after trauma, surgery and infection and occurs when normal skin tissue is replaced by fibroblastic tissue during the healing process. The pathophysiology of scar formation is not yet fully understood, although the degree of tension across the wound edges and the speed of cell growth are believed to play central roles. Prevention of scars is essential and can be achieved by attention to surgical techniques and the use of measures to reduce cell growth. Grading and classifying scars is important to determine available treatment strategies. This article presents an overview of the current therapies available for the prevention and treatment of scars. It is intended to be a practical guide for surgeons and other health professionals involved with and interested in scar management.

  3. Nondestructive measurements of the properties of healing burn scars.

    PubMed

    Chu, B M; Brody, G

    1975-01-01

    A testing protocol and the requisite instrumentation have been developed to nondestructively monitor the temporal and mechanical properties of maturing scar. The maturing scar can become progressively and unpredictably adherent or contractured, producing varying degrees of functional impairment. By plotting these mechanical changes as a temporal function of limb motion history, more accurate prediction and control of the ultimate scarring may result. These same techniques could also be used to study normal skin aging. Extrapolation could be made to connective tissue scars in tendons, ligaments, and other structural elements. Scar contractures may develop slowly along lines of tension or areas of maximum skin defect in large maturing scars once the patient has recovered sufficiently to exercise the underlying joints. Since the present endeavor to monitor potential contractures requires measurement of the "in-plane" stresses and strains, we have chosen to utilize an in situ strip biaxial test configuration.

  4. Scar Management in the Pediatric and Adolescent Populations.

    PubMed

    Krakowski, Andrew C; Totri, Christine R; Donelan, Matthias B; Shumaker, Peter R

    2016-02-01

    For most children and adolescents who have developed symptomatic scars, cosmetic concerns are only a portion of the motivation that drives them and their caregivers to obtain treatment. In addition to the potential for cosmetic disfigurement, scars may be associated with a number of physical comorbidities including hypertrichosis, dyshidrosis, tenderness/pain, pruritus, dysesthesias, and functional impairments such as contractures, all of which may be compounded by psychosocial factors. Although a plethora of options for treating scars exists, specific management guidelines for the pediatric and adolescent populations do not, and evidence must be extrapolated from adult studies. New modalities such as the scar team approach, autologous fat transfer, and ablative fractional laser resurfacing suggest a promising future for children who suffer symptomatically from their scars. In this state-of-the-art review, we summarize cutting-edge scar treatment strategies as they relate to the pediatric and adolescent populations. Copyright © 2016 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  5. Novel Insights on Understanding of Keloid Scar: Article Review.

    PubMed

    Mari, Walid; Alsabri, Sami G; Tabal, Najib; Younes, Sara; Sherif, Abdulamagid; Simman, Richard

    2015-12-01

    Keloid scar, dermal benign fibro-proliferative growth that extends outside the original wound and invades adjacent dermal tissue due to extensive production of extracellular matrix, especially collagen, which caused by over expression of cytokines and growth factors. Although many attempts were made to understand the exact pathophysiology and the molecular abnormalities, the pathogenesis of keloid scar is yet to be determined. Even though there are several treatment options for keloid scars include combination of medical and surgical therapies like combination of surgical removal followed by cryotherapy or intralesional steroid therapy, the reoccurrence rate is still high despite the present treatment. In this review, PubMed, clinical key and Wright State Library web site have been used to investigate any update regarding Keloid disease. We used Keloid, scar formation, hypertrophic scar and collagen as key words. More than 40 articles have been reviewed. This paper reviews literature about keloid scar formation mechanism, the most recent therapeutic options including the ones under research.

  6. Scar tissue classification using nonlinear optical microscopy and discriminant analysis.

    PubMed

    Kelf, Timothy Andrew; Gosnell, Martin; Sandnes, Bjornar; Guller, Anna E; Shekhter, Anatoly B; Zvyagin, Andrei V

    2012-02-01

    This paper addresses the scar tissue maturation process that occurs stepwise, and calls for reliable classification. The structure of collagen imaged by nonlinear optical microscopy (NLOM) in post-burn hypertrophic and mature scar, as well as in normal skin, appeared to distinguish these maturation steps. However, it was a discrimination analysis, demonstrated here, that automated and quantified the scar tissue maturation process. The achieved scar classification accuracy was as high as 96%. The combination of NLOM and discrimination analysis is believed to be instrumental in gaining insight into the scar formation, for express diagnosis of scar and surgery planning. Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. Cesarean scar ectopic pregnancy. Laparoscopic resection and total scar dehiscence repair. A case report.

    PubMed

    Mahgoub, Sara; Gabriele, Victor; Faller, Emilie; Langer, Bruno; Wattiez, Arnaud; Lecointre, Lise; Akladios, Cherif

    2017-02-04

    Illustrate laparoscopic technique for resection of cesarean scar ectopic pregnancy, associated with isthmocele repair. Case report SETTING: Tertiary referral centre in Strasbourg, France. The study was approved by the local IRB. Cesarean scar pregnancy is a rare form of ectopic pregnancy. The major risk of this type of pregnancy is the early uterine rupture with massive bleeding and maternal life-threatening. It is therefore crucial to manage actively these pregnancies as soon as they are diagnosed. Therapeutic options can be medical, surgical, or a combination of both. Many case reports or case series are found in the literature, but only few clinical studies, too difficult to carry out because of cases rarity and inconclusiveness. "Systematic review: What is the best first-line approach for cesarean section ectopic pregnancy?" is a meta-analysis that was published in 2016, and includes 194 studies between 1978 and 2014 (126 case reports, 45 cases series and 23 clinical studies). According to this systematic review, hysteroscopy or laparoscopic hysterotomy seems to be the best first-line approach to treat cesarean scar ectopic pregnancy. Uterine artery embolization seems to be reserved for significant bleeding and/or a high suspicion index for arteriovenous malformation. There is however no consensus on treatment of reference. The case concerns a 38-year-old primiparous women with cesarean section in 2010, who was diagnosed by US scan at 7 WG as cesarean scar ectopic pregnancy, confirmed by pelvic MRI. The patient has initially received medical treatment with two intramuscular injections of Methotrexate and one local intra-gestational injection of KCl. Initial rate of HCG was 82000 IU/L. Through a rigorous weekly biological and US scan monitoring, it has been observed an involution of the ectopic pregnancy at ultrasonography associated to HCG decreasing. No bleeding or infectious complications occurred during this period. After 10 weeks of monitoring, because of a

  8. Model of unidirectional block formation leading to reentrant ventricular tachycardia in the infarct border zone of postinfarction canine hearts

    PubMed Central

    Ciaccio, Edward J.; Coromilas, James; Ashikaga, Hiroshi; Cervantes, Daniel O.; Wit, Andrew L.; Peters, Nicholas S.; McVeigh, Elliot R.; Garan, Hasan

    2015-01-01

    Background When the infarct border zone is stimulated prematurely, a unidirectional block line (UBL) can form and lead to double-loop (figure-of-eight) reentrant ventricular tachycardia (VT) with a central isthmus. The isthmus is composed of an entrance, center, and exit. It was hypothesized that for certain stimulus site locations and coupling intervals, the UBL would coincide with the isthmus entrance boundary, where infarct border zone thickness changes from thin-to-thick in the travel direction of the premature stimulus wavefront. Method A quantitative model was developed to describe how thin-to-thick changes in the border zone result in critically convex wavefront curvature leading to conduction block, which is dependent upon coupling interval. The model was tested in 12 retrospectively analyzed postinfarction canine experiments. Electrical activation was mapped for premature stimulation and for the first reentrant VT cycle. The relationship of functional conduction block forming during premature stimulation to functional block during reentrant VT was quantified. Results For an appropriately placed stimulus, in accord with model predictions: (1) The UBL and reentrant VT isthmus lateral boundaries overlapped (error: 4.8±5.7 mm). (2) The UBL leading edge coincided with the distal isthmus where the center-entrance boundary would be expected to occur. (3) The mean coupling interval was 164.6±11.0 ms during premature stimulation and 190.7±20.4 ms during the first reentrant VT cycle, in accord with model calculations, which resulted in critically convex wavefront curvature with functional conduction block, respectively, at the location of the isthmus entrance boundary and at the lateral isthmus edges. Discussion Reentrant VT onset following premature stimulation can be explained by the presence of critically convex wavefront curvature and unidirectional block at the isthmus entrance boundary when the premature stimulation interval is sufficiently short. The

  9. Model of unidirectional block formation leading to reentrant ventricular tachycardia in the infarct border zone of postinfarction canine hearts.

    PubMed

    Ciaccio, Edward J; Coromilas, James; Ashikaga, Hiroshi; Cervantes, Daniel O; Wit, Andrew L; Peters, Nicholas S; McVeigh, Elliot R; Garan, Hasan

    2015-07-01

    When the infarct border zone is stimulated prematurely, a unidirectional block line (UBL) can form and lead to double-loop (figure-of-eight) reentrant ventricular tachycardia (VT) with a central isthmus. The isthmus is composed of an entrance, center, and exit. It was hypothesized that for certain stimulus site locations and coupling intervals, the UBL would coincide with the isthmus entrance boundary, where infarct border zone thickness changes from thin-to-thick in the travel direction of the premature stimulus wavefront. A quantitative model was developed to describe how thin-to-thick changes in the border zone result in critically convex wavefront curvature leading to conduction block, which is dependent upon coupling interval. The model was tested in 12 retrospectively analyzed postinfarction canine experiments. Electrical activation was mapped for premature stimulation and for the first reentrant VT cycle. The relationship of functional conduction block forming during premature stimulation to functional block during reentrant VT was quantified. For an appropriately placed stimulus, in accord with model predictions: (1) The UBL and reentrant VT isthmus lateral boundaries overlapped (error: 4.8±5.7mm). (2) The UBL leading edge coincided with the distal isthmus where the center-entrance boundary would be expected to occur. (3) The mean coupling interval was 164.6±11.0ms during premature stimulation and 190.7±20.4ms during the first reentrant VT cycle, in accord with model calculations, which resulted in critically convex wavefront curvature with functional conduction block, respectively, at the location of the isthmus entrance boundary and at the lateral isthmus edges. Reentrant VT onset following premature stimulation can be explained by the presence of critically convex wavefront curvature and unidirectional block at the isthmus entrance boundary when the premature stimulation interval is sufficiently short. The double-loop reentrant circuit pattern is a

  10. Which patients might be suitable for a septal occluder device closure of postinfarction ventricular septal rupture rather than immediate surgery?

    PubMed

    Attia, Rizwan; Blauth, Christopher

    2010-11-01

    A best evidence topic in cardiac surgery was written according to a structured protocol. The question addressed was: which patients might be suitable for a transcatheter closure (TCC) of their postinfarction ventricular septal rupture (VSR) rather than immediate surgery? Thirty papers were found using the reported search, five of which represented the best evidence to answer the clinical question. The main limitations were the paucity of level 1 evidence on this topic. Only one study provided a prospective series as part of a registry; the remaining were retrospective cohort analyses. Although multivariate analysis may adequately control for measurable biases, unmeasured bias may still exist and influence the results. All studies agreed that timing of intervention is critical in determining the outcome. Patient's preoperative haemodynamic status was a major determinant of postoperative survival. Successful outcome after TCC was in patients with simple defects, <15 mm in diameter that were in the sub-acute (>3.5 weeks) or chronic stage following acute myocardial infarct (AMI). Procedural success rate varied from 73.6% to 91%. Three of five studies looking at TCC closure concluded that procedural success does not necessarily translate to improved outcome. TCC in the acute setting (within four weeks of AMI) led to a high mortality (18%-65%) and increased incidence of complications (up to 41%). These included device embolization, major residual shunting, left ventricular rupture and malignant arrhythmias. One recent study correlated mortality to residual VSR [odds ratio (OR) 0.071, P=0.02], increased time from myocardial infarction to VSR diagnosis (OR 0.757, P=0.04) and increased time from VSR diagnosis to treatment (OR 0.758, P=0.04). The overwhelming recommendations were for immediate surgical intervention in cases of large VSR≥15 mm or where another indication for surgery exists. Three of five studies commented on a lack of a suitable device for PIVSR closure

  11. Layered smooth muscle cell-endothelial progenitor cell sheets derived from the bone marrow augment postinfarction ventricular function.

    PubMed

    Shudo, Yasuhiro; Goldstone, Andrew B; Cohen, Jeffrey E; Patel, Jay B; Hopkins, Michael S; Steele, Amanda N; Edwards, Bryan B; Kawamura, Masashi; Miyagawa, Shigeru; Sawa, Yoshiki; Woo, Y Joseph

    2017-09-01

    The angiogenic potential of endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) may be limited by the absence of their natural biologic foundation, namely smooth muscle pericytes. We hypothesized that joint delivery of EPCs and smooth muscle cells (SMCs) in a novel, totally bone marrow-derived cell sheet will mimic the native architecture of a mature blood vessel and act as an angiogenic construct to limit post infarction ventricular remodeling. Primary EPCs and mesenchymal stem cells were isolated from bone marrow of Wistar rats. Mesenchymal stem cells were transdifferentiated into SMCs by culture on fibronectin-coated culture dishes. Confluent SMCs topped with confluent EPCs were detached from an Upcell dish to create a SMC-EPC bi-level cell sheet. A rodent model of ischemic cardiomyopathy was then created by ligating the left anterior descending artery. Rats were randomized into 3 groups: cell sheet transplantation (n = 9), no treatment (n = 12), or sham surgery control (n = 7). Four weeks postinfarction, mature vessel density tended to increase in cell sheet-treated animals compared with controls. Cell sheet therapy significantly attenuated the extent of cardiac fibrosis compared with that of the untreated group (untreated vs cell sheet, 198 degrees [interquartile range (IQR), 151-246 degrees] vs 103 degrees [IQR, 92-113 degrees], P = .04). Furthermore, EPC-SMC cell sheet transplantation attenuated myocardial dysfunction, as evidenced by an increase in left ventricular ejection fraction (untreated vs cell sheet vs sham, 33.5% [IQR, 27.8%-35.7%] vs 45.9% [IQR, 43.6%-48.4%] vs 59.3% [IQR, 58.8%-63.5%], P = .001) and decreases in left ventricular dimensions. The bone marrow-derived, spatially arranged SMC-EPC bi-level cell sheet is a novel, multilineage cellular therapy obtained from a translationally practical source. Interactions between SMCs and EPCs augment mature neovascularization, limit adverse remodeling, and improve ventricular function after myocardial

  12. Clinical and ultrasound parameters in prediction of excessive hemorrhage during management of cesarean scar pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Gui, Ting; Peng, Ping; Liu, Xinyan; Jin, Li; Chen, Weilin

    2017-01-01

    During the management of cesarean scar pregnancy, gestational mass size >6 cm, uterine scar thickness <0.2 cm, peak systolic velocity >70 cm/s, and resistance index <0.35 are independent risk factors for excessive hemorrhage. The objective of this study was to investigate risk factors associated with excessive hemorrhage during the management of cesarean scar pregnancy (CSP). A retrospective case-control study was conducted, including 40 patients who experienced excessive bleeding and 80 controls without severe hemorrhage. Six parameters (two clinical and four ultrasound parameters) potentially related to excessive hemorrhage were analyzed. Single-variable statistical analyses showed that the case group had higher gestational age (74.1±23.6 days), higher pretreatment serum β-human chorionic gonadotropin (HCG) level (46,201±32,294 mIU/mL), larger gestational mass size (6.5±2.2 cm), thinner uterine scar thickness (0.17±0.12 cm), and richer peritrophoblastic perfusion (peak systolic velocity [PSV] 72.8±33.7 cm/s, resistance index [RI] 0.35±0.12), showing statistical significance compared with the control group. Further multivariable logistic regression analysis of the association between each of the risk factors and hemorrhage confirmed that increased gestational mass size and PSV were risk factors for hemorrhage (odds ratio [OR] 3.624, 95% confidence interval [CI] [1.179-11.138] and OR 1.062, 95% CI [1.007-1.121]) and increased uterine scar thickness and RI were protective factors against hemorrhage (OR 0.181, 95% CI [0.034-0.957] and OR 0.851, 95% CI [0.729-0.994]); however, there was no statistical significance between the two clinical parameters. Gestational mass size >6 cm, uterine scar thickness <0.2 cm, PSV >70 cm/s, and RI <0.35 are independent risk factors for excessive hemorrhage during the management of CSP.

  13. Analysis of state of vehicular scars on Arctic Tundra, Alaska

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lathram, E. H.

    1974-01-01

    Identification on ERTS images of severe vehicular scars in the northern Alaska tundra suggests that, if such scars are of an intensity or have spread to a dimension such that they can be resolved by ERTS sensors (20 meters), they can be identified and their state monitored by the use of ERTS images. Field review of the state of vehicular scars in the Umiat area indicates that all are revegetating at varying rates and are approaching a stable state.

  14. Dermal tunneling: a proposed treatment for depressed scars.

    PubMed

    Lima, Emerson Vasconcelos de Andrade

    2016-01-01

    Depressed facial scars are still a challenge in medical literature, despite the wide range of proposed treatments. Subcision is a technique that is frequently performed to improve this type of lesions. This article proposes a new method to release depressed scars, reported and named by the author as dermal tunneling. This study presents a simple and didactic manner to perform this method. The results in 17 patients with facial scars were considered promising. Thus, the technique was deemed to be safe and reproducible.

  15. Successful treatment of atrophic postoperative and traumatic scarring with carbon dioxide ablative fractional resurfacing: quantitative volumetric scar improvement.

    PubMed

    Weiss, Elliot T; Chapas, Anne; Brightman, Lori; Hunzeker, Christopher; Hale, Elizabeth K; Karen, Julie K; Bernstein, Leonard; Geronemus, Roy G

    2010-02-01

    To assess the safety and efficacy of ablative fractional resurfacing (AFR) for nonacne atrophic scarring. In this before-and-after trial, each scar received 3 AFR treatments and 6 months of follow-up. Private academic practice. Fifteen women with Fitzpatrick skin types I to IV, aged 21 to 66 years, presented with 22 nonacne atrophic scars between June 1 and November 30, 2007. Three patients (3 scars) were excluded from the study after receiving 1 AFR treatment and not returning for follow-up visits. The remaining 12 patients (19 scars) completed all 3 treatments and 6 months of follow-up. Each scar received 3 AFR treatments at 1- to 4-month intervals. Erythema, edema, petechiae, scarring, crusting, and dyschromia were graded after treatment and through 6 months of follow-up. Skin texture, pigmentation, atrophy, and overall appearance were evaluated after treatment and through 6 months of follow-up by the patient and a nonblinded investigator. A 3-dimensional optical profiling system generated high-resolution topographic representations of atrophic scars for objective measurement of changes in scar volume and depth. Adverse effects of treatment were mild to moderate, and no scarring or delayed-onset hypopigmentation was observed. At the 6-month follow-up visit, patient and investigator scores demonstrated improvements in skin texture for all scars (patient range, 1-4 [mean, 2.79]; investigator range, 2-4 [mean, 2.95]), pigmentation for all scars (patient range, 1-4 [mean, 2.32]; investigator range, 1-4 [mean, 2.21]), atrophy for all scars (patient range, 1-4 [mean, 2.26]; investigator range, 2-4 [mean, 2.95]), and overall scar appearance for all scars (patient range, 2-4 [mean, 2.89]; investigator range, 2-4 [mean, 3.05]). Image analysis revealed a 38.0% mean reduction of volume and 35.6% mean reduction of maximum scar depth. The AFR treatments represent a safe, effective treatment modality for improving atrophic scarring due to surgery or trauma.

  16. Postinfarct intramyocardial injection of mesenchymal stem cells pretreated with TGF-α improves acute myocardial function

    PubMed Central

    Herrmann, Jeremy L.; Abarbanell, Aaron M.; Weil, Brent R.; Wang, Yue; Poynter, Jeffrey A.; Manukyan, Mariuxi C.

    2010-01-01

    Stem cell-based therapies offer promising potential for myocardial infarction (MI), but endogenous molecules released in response to injury likely impair posttransplantation stem cell function. Stem cell-mediated cardioprotection occurs in part via paracrine effects, and transforming growth factor-α (TGF-α) has been shown to enhance paracrine function. However, it is unknown whether pretreating stem cells with TGF-α increases stem cell-mediated cardioprotection after acute MI. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) were treated with TGF-α (250 ng/ml) for 24 h. Adult male Sprague-Dawley rat hearts were isolated and perfused using the Langendorff method. MI was induced by ligating the left anterior descending coronary artery. Postligation (30 min), vehicle or 1 × 106 MSCs with or without pretreatment were injected in the infarct border zones, and the hearts were perfused for an additional 60 min. Left ventricular function was continuously measured, and infarct size was assessed with Evans blue dye and 2,3,5-triphenyltetrazolium chloride staining. Myocardial production of interleukin (IL)-1β and IL-6 and caspase 3 activation was also measured. Left ventricular function decreased significantly following coronary artery ligation but improved following injection of untreated MSCs and to a greater extent after injection of pretreated MSCs. In addition, the infarct area, myocardial caspase 3 activation, and IL-6 production were lowest in hearts injected with pretreated cells. Intramyocardial injection of TGF-α-pretreated MSCs after acute MI is associated with increased myocardial function and decreased myocardial injury. This strategy may be useful for optimizing the therapeutic efficacy of stem cells for the treatment of acute MI. PMID:20484699

  17. Condition of live fire-scarred ponderosa pine trees six years after removing partial cross sections

    Treesearch

    Emily K. Heyerdahl; Steven J. McKay

    2001-01-01

    Our objective was to document the effect of fire-history sampling on the mortality of mature ponderosa pine trees in Oregon. We examined 138 trees from which fire-scarred partial cross sections had been removed five to six years earlier, and 386 similarly sized, unsampled neighbor trees, from 78 plots distributed over about 5,000 ha. Mortality was low for both groups....

  18. Skin wound healing and scarring: fetal wounds and regenerative restitution.

    PubMed

    Yates, Cecelia C; Hebda, Patricia; Wells, Alan

    2012-12-01

    The adverse physiological and psychological effects of scars formation after healing of wounds are broad and a major medical problem for patients. In utero, fetal wounds heal in a regenerative manner, though the mechanisms are unknown. Differences in fetal scarless regeneration and adult repair can provide key insight into reduction of scarring therapy. Understanding the cellular and extracellular matrix alterations in excessive adult scarring in comparison to fetal scarless healing may have important implications. Herein, we propose that matrix can be controlled via cellular therapy to resemble a fetal-like matrix that will result in reduced scarring. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Acne scarring: a review and current treatment modalities.

    PubMed

    Rivera, Albert E

    2008-10-01

    Acne is a prevalent condition in society and often results in secondary damage in the form of scarring. Of course, prevention is the optimal method to avoid having to correct the physically or emotionally troublesome scars. However, even with the best efforts, scars will certainly arise. This article attempts to give a broad overview of multiple management options, whether medically, surgically, or procedurally based. The hope is that a general knowledge of the current available alternatives will be of value to the physician when confronted with the difficult task of developing a treatment plan for acne-scarred individuals, even in challenging cases.

  20. NEW MOLECULAR MEDICINE-BASED SCAR MANAGEMENT STRATEGIES

    PubMed Central

    Arno, Anna I; Gauglitz, Gerd G; Barret, Juan P; Jeschke, Marc G

    2014-01-01

    Keloids and hypertrophic scars are prevalent disabling conditions with still suboptimal treatments. Basic science and molecular-based medicine research has contributed to unravel new bench-to-bedside scar therapies, and to dissect the complex signaling pathways involved. Peptides such as transforming growth factor beta (TGF-β) superfamily, with SMADs, Ski, SnoN, Fussels, endoglin, DS-Sily, Cav-1p, AZX100, thymosin-β4 and other related molecules may emerge as targets to prevent and treat keloids and hypertrophic scars. The aim of this review is to describe the basic complexity of these new molecular scar management strategies, and point out new fibrosis research lines. PMID:24438742

  1. Skin Wound Healing and Scarring: Fetal Wounds and Regenerative Restitution

    PubMed Central

    Yates, Cecelia C.; Hebda, Patricia; Wells, Alan

    2014-01-01

    The adverse physiological and psychological effects of scars formation after healing of wounds are broad and a major medical problem for patients. In utero, fetal wounds heal in a regenerative manner, though the mechanisms are unknown. Differences in fetal scarless regeneration and adult repair can provide key insight into reduction of scarring therapy. Understanding the cellular and extracellular matrix alterations in excessive adult scarring in comparison to fetal scarless healing may have important implications. Herein, we propose that matrix can be controlled via cellular therapy to resemble a fetal-like matrix that will result in reduced scarring. PMID:24203921

  2. Intralesional Cryotherapy for the Treatment of Keloid Scars: Evaluating Effectiveness

    PubMed Central

    Bulstra, Anne Eva J.; Ket, Johannes C. F.; Ritt, Marco J. P. F.; van Leeuwen, Paul A. M.; Niessen, Frank B.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Intralesional (IL) cryotherapy is a novel treatment technique for keloid scars, in which the scar is frozen from inside. Over the past decade, several studies have been published with varying outcomes. A critical analysis of the current literature is, therefore, warranted to determine whether IL cryotherapy is an alternative to established keloid scar treatments. Methods: A comprehensive review was performed, based on the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analysis. PubMed and EMBASE were searched from inception. Studies and level of recommendation were graded according to the American Society of Plastic Surgeons criteria. Results: Eight studies meeting the inclusion criteria were selected. The average scar volume decrease ranged from 51% to 63%, but no complete scar eradication was achieved on average. Scar recurrence ranged from 0% to 24%. Hypopigmentation posttreatment was seen mostly in Fitzpatrick 4–6 skin type patients. Finally, complaints of pain and pruritus decreased significantly in most studies. Conclusions: IL cryotherapy for the treatment of keloid scars shows favorable results in terms of volume reduction and alleviated complaints of pain and pruritus. However, no complete scar eradication is established, and recurrences are seen. Also, persistent hypopigmentation proved a problem in Fitzpatrick 4–6 skin type patients. Summarized, the evidence proved limited and inconsistent resulting in an American Society of Plastic Surgeons grade C recommendation for this type of treatment of keloid scars. PMID:26180738

  3. Interactive visualization for scar transmurality in cardiac resynchronization therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reiml, Sabrina; Toth, Daniel; Panayiotou, Maria; Fahn, Bernhard; Karim, Rashed; Behar, Jonathan M.; Rinaldi, Christopher A.; Razavi, Reza; Rhode, Kawal S.; Brost, Alexander; Mountney, Peter

    2016-03-01

    Heart failure is a serious disease affecting about 23 million people worldwide. Cardiac resynchronization therapy is used to treat patients suffering from symptomatic heart failure. However, 30% to 50% of patients have limited clinical benefit. One of the main causes is suboptimal placement of the left ventricular lead. Pacing in areas of myocardial scar correlates with poor clinical outcomes. Therefore precise knowledge of the individual patient's scar characteristics is critical for delivering tailored treatments capable of improving response rates. Current research methods for scar assessment either map information to an alternative non-anatomical coordinate system or they use the image coordinate system but lose critical information about scar extent and scar distribution. This paper proposes two interactive methods for visualizing relevant scar information. A 2-D slice based approach with a scar mask overlaid on a 16 segment heart model and a 3-D layered mesh visualization which allows physicians to scroll through layers of scar from endocardium to epicardium. These complementary methods enable physicians to evaluate scar location and transmurality during planning and guidance. Six physicians evaluated the proposed system by identifying target regions for lead placement. With the proposed method more target regions could be identified.

  4. The role of scar origin in shaping men's body image.

    PubMed

    Dyer, Anne; Mayer-Eckhard, Lennart; White, Andrew J; Alpers, Georg W

    2015-03-01

    Men generally have a more positive body image than women. However, the extent to which scars negatively influence men's body image is uncertain. The aim of the current study was to assess body image in men with and without scars while taking scar origin into account (nonsuicidal self-harming injuries [NSSI] vs. accidents or surgery). One hundred and nine men (n = 19 with NSSI) and 185 women (n = 96 with NSSI) filled in multidimensional body image questionnaires. Results indicate that on most clinical subscales women had a significantly more negative body image compared with men. However, within a subsample whose scars resulted from NSSI, gender differences vanished. Among men, scar origin was significantly associated with negative body image after partialling out scar characteristics, age, and borderline symptomatology. The visibility of scars was not associated with more severe body image disturbances. The results of our study indicate that self-inflicted scars adversely affect body image. Although women generally reported having a more negative body image, disturbances in body image should not be neglected among men, especially in those who have self-inflicted scars.

  5. Quantitative analysis of a scar's pliability, perfusion and metrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzalez, Mariacarla; Sevilla, Nicole; Chue-Sang, Joseph; Ramella-Roman, Jessica C.

    2017-02-01

    The primary effect of scarring is the loss of function in the affected area. Scarring also leads to physical and psychological problems that could be devastating to the patient's life. Currently, scar assessment is highly subjective and physician dependent. The examination relies on the expertise of the physician to determine the characteristics of the scar by touch and visual examination using the Vancouver scar scale (VSS), which categorizes scars depending on pigmentation, pliability, height and vascularity. In order to establish diagnostic guidelines for scar formation, a quantitative, accurate assessment method needs to be developed. An instrument capable of measuring all categories was developed; three of the aforementioned parameters will be explored. In order to look at pliability, a durometer which measures the amount of resistance a surface exerts to prevent the permanent indentation of the surface is used due to its simplicity and quantitative output. To look at height and vascularity, a profilometry system that collects the location of the scar in three-dimensions and laser speckle imaging (LSI), which shows the dynamic changes in perfusion, respectively, are used. Gelatin phantoms were utilized to measure pliability. Finally, dynamic changes in skin perfusion of volunteers' forearms undergoing pressure cuff occlusion were measured, along with incisional scars.

  6. Scarred resonances and steady probability distribution in a chaotic microcavity

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Soo-Young; Rim, Sunghwan; Kim, Chil-Min; Ryu, Jung-Wan; Kwon, Tae-Yoon

    2005-12-15

    We investigate scarred resonances of a stadium-shaped chaotic microcavity. It is shown that two components with different chirality of the scarring pattern are slightly rotated in opposite ways from the underlying unstable periodic orbit, when the incident angles of the scarring pattern are close to the critical angle for total internal reflection. In addition, the correspondence of emission pattern with the scarring pattern disappears when the incident angles are much larger than the critical angle. The steady probability distribution gives a consistent explanation about these interesting phenomena and makes it possible to expect the emission pattern in the latter case.

  7. Abnormal pigmentation within cutaneous scars: A complication of wound healing

    PubMed Central

    Chadwick, Sarah; Heath, Rebecca; Shah, Mamta

    2012-01-01

    Abnormally pigmented scars are an undesirable consequence of cutaneous wound healing and are a complication every single individual worldwide is at risk of. They present a challenge for clinicians, as there are currently no definitive treatment options available, and render scars much more noticeable making them highly distressing for patients. Despite extensive research into both wound healing and the pigment cell, there remains a scarcity of knowledge surrounding the repigmentation of cutaneous scars. Pigment production is complex and under the control of many extrinsic and intrinsic factors and patterns of scar repigmentation are unpredictable. This article gives an overview of human skin pigmentation, repigmentation following wounding and current treatment options. PMID:23162241

  8. [Effects of scar excision combined with negative-pressure on repair of hypertrophic scar in burn children].

    PubMed

    Cai, J H; Deng, H P; Shen, Z A; Sun, T J; Li, D J; Li, D W; He, L X; Wang, L; Jin, X

    2017-07-20

    Objective: To explore the effects of scar excision combined with negative-pressure on repair of hypertrophic scar in burn children. Methods: From October 2010 to August 2016, 25 children with hypertrophic scar after deep burn were hospitalized, with scar course ranging from 3 months to 11 years and scar area ranging from 35 to 427 [83(51, 98)]cm(2). A total of 35 scars of 25 children were located in trunk (11 scars), upper limb (11 scars), and lower limb (13 scars). All children received scar excision operation and negative-pressure treatment (negative-pressure value ranged from -40 to -20 kPa), among which 6 cases received scar excision operation and negative-pressure treatment for two times for further removal of scars. After scar excision, electronic spring scale was used to measure the tension of the incision. The tension value of children ranged from 3.43 to 23.84 [7.16 (5.59, 9.12)] N, and then the incision was closed with appropriate suture according to the value of the tension. The incision with smaller tension was firstly opened on post operation day (POD) 8. After removing the suture, negative-pressure was conducted to POD 14. The incision with larger tension was firstly opened on POD 12. After removing the suture, biological semi-membrane was used to reduce tension to POD 16. All healed incisions were performed with anti-scar treatment for 1 year and relaxation and fixation for 3 months. General condition of the incision was observed after operation. The reduction percentage of scar area was calculated half-year after operation. The Patient and Observer Scar Assessment Scale was used to record the overall score of scar and scar score of trunk, upper limb, and lower limb before operation and half-year after operation. Data were processed with paired t test and Wilcoxon rank sum test. Results: After removing the suture, all incisions of children healed well without redness, effusion, and rupture. Half-year after operation, the appearance and deformity of

  9. Efficacy and Safety of a Novel 100% Silicone Scar Gel Treatment for Early Intervention in Scar Management

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the efficacy and safety of a new topical silicone gel for the early intervention in the management of scars. Design: In this 12-week, observational study, healthy subjects (n=15) with an accessible linear or hypertrophic scar were given the test product and instructed to apply twice daily. Subjects returned 14, 28, 56, and 84 days later for evaluation and recording of adverse events. Setting: Private practice of the author. Participants: Eligible subjects had a scar with a Vancouver Scar Scale total score ≥3 at baseline. Measurements: Improvement was evaluated by the Vancouver Scar Scale and Observer Scar Assessment Scale at baseline and at four follow-up visits. Results: The median total Vancouver Scar Scale score and median total Observer Scar Assessment Scale score decreased significantly from baseline at each visit, showing rapid and continuing improvement in the appearance of the scars. For Vancouver Scar Scale, significant differences of individual parameters from baseline began at 28 days for pliability and height, 56 days for vascularity, and 84 days for pigmentation. For Observer Scar Assessment Scale parameters, significant differences from baseline began at 14 days and continued until 84 days for vascularization, thickness, and pigmentation. Pain and pruritis scores were low at each visit. Overall, 84.6 percent of subjects rated the treatment as excellent, very good, or good after three months of treatment. No adverse events were reported. Conclusion: The test product improved the appearance of scars after three months of twice-daily treatment and without adverse events. PMID:28210394

  10. High-sensitivity troponin T predicts infarct scar characteristics and adverse left ventricular function by cardiac magnetic resonance imaging early after reperfused acute myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Tuan L; Phan, Justin A K; Hee, Leia; Moses, Daniel A; Otton, James; Terreblanche, Owen D; Xiong, Jessica; Premawardhana, Upul; Rajaratnam, Rohan; Juergens, Craig P; Dimitri, Hany R; French, John K; Richards, David A B; Thomas, Liza

    2015-10-01

    Late gadolinium enhancement cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (CMRI) is the current standard for evaluation of myocardial infarct scar size and characteristics. Because post-ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) troponin levels correlate with clinical outcomes, we sought to determine the sampling period for high-sensitivity troponin T (hs-TnT) that would best predict CMRI-measured infarct scar characteristics and left ventricular (LV) function. Among 201 patients with first presentation with STEMI who were prospectively recruited, we measured serial hs-TnT levels at admission, peak, 24 hours, 48 hours, and 72 hours after STEMI. Indexed LV volumes, LV ejection fraction (LVEF) and infarct scar characteristics (scar size, scar heterogeneity, myocardial salvage index, and microvascular obstruction) were evaluated by CMRI at a median of 4 days post-STEMI. Peak and serial hs-TnT levels correlated positively with early indexed LV volumes and infarct scar characteristics, and negatively correlated with myocardial salvage index and LVEF. Both 48- and 72-hour hs-TnT levels similarly predicted "large" total infarct scar size (odds ratios [ORs] 3.08 and 3.53, both P < .001), myocardial salvage index (ORs 1.68 and 2.30, both P < .001), and LVEF <40% (ORs 2.16 and 2.17, both P < .001) on univariate analyses. On multivariate analyses, 48- and 72-hour hs-TnT levels independently predicted large infarct scar size (ORs 2.05 and 2.31, both P < .001), reduced myocardial salvage index (OR 1.39 [P = .031] and OR 1.55 [P = .009]), and LVEF <40% (OR 1.47 [P = .018] and OR 1.43 [P = .026]). All measured hs-TnT levels had a modest association and similar capacity to predict microvascular obstruction. Levels of hs-TnT at 48 and 72 hours, measured during the "plateau phase" post-STEMI, predicted infarct scar size, poor myocardial salvage, and LVEF. These levels also correlated with scar heterogeneity and microvascular obstruction post-STEMI. Since ascertaining peak levels after

  11. Semiclassical quantization of highly excited scar states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vergini, Eduardo G.

    2017-04-01

    The semiclassical quantization of Hamiltonian systems with classically chaotic dynamics is restricted to low excited states, close to the ground state, because the number of required periodic orbits grows exponentially with energy. Nevertheless, here we demonstrate that it is possible to find eigenenergies of highly excited states scarred by a short periodic orbit. Specifically, by using 18146 homoclinic orbits (HO)s of the shortest periodic orbit of the hyperbola billiard, we find eigenenergies of the strongest scars over a range which includes 630 even eigenfunctions. The analysis of data reveals that the used semiclassical formula presents two regimes. First, when all HOs with excursion time smaller than the Heisenberg time t H are included, the error is around 3.3% of the mean level spacing. Second, in the energy region defined by \\tilde{t}/ tH > 0.13 , where \\tilde{t} is the maximum excursion time included in the calculation, the error is around 15% of the mean level spacing.

  12. Cesarean Scar Pregnancy: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez, Natalia; Tulandi, Togas

    A relatively new type of ectopic pregnancy is cesarean scar pregnancy (CSP). This is related to the increasing number of cesarean deliveries and the advances in imaging. There are 2 types of CSP: CSP with progression to the cervicoisthmic space or uterine cavity (type I, endogenic type) or with deep invasion of scar defect with progression toward the bladder and abdominal cavity (type II, exogenic type). The endogenic type of CSP could result in a viable pregnancy, yet with a high risk of bleeding at the placental site. The exogenic type could be complicated with uterine rupture and bleeding early in pregnancy. Because early diagnosis and treatment are important for the best outcome, every pregnant woman with a history of cesarean delivery should be screened early in the first trimester of pregnancy. Diagnosis can be achieved with ultrasound and Doppler imaging. To date, there have been only 5 randomized studies on CSP, and evidence-based management remains unclear. Until then, treatment should be individualized according to many factors including clinical presentation, beta-human chorionic gonadotropin levels, imaging features, and the surgeon's skill. Copyright © 2017 AAGL. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Functional and mechanistic investigation of Shikonin in scarring.

    PubMed

    Xie, Yan; Fan, Chen; Dong, Ying; Lynam, Emily; Leavesley, David I; Li, Kun; Su, Yonghua; Yang, Yinxue; Upton, Zee

    2015-02-25

    Scarring is a significant medical burden; financially to the health care system and physically and psychologically for patients. Importantly, there have been numerous case reports describing the occurrence of cancer in burn scars. Currently available therapies are not satisfactory due to their undesirable side-effects, complex delivery routes, requirements for long-term use and/or expense. Radix Arnebiae (Zi Cao), a perennial herb, has been clinically applied to treat burns and manage scars for thousands of years in Asia. Shikonin, an active component extracted from Radix Arnebiae, has been demonstrated to induce apoptosis in cancer cells. Apoptosis is an essential process during scar tissue remodelling. It was therefore hypothesized that Shikonin may induce apoptosis in scar-associated cells. This investigation presents the first detailed in vitro study examining the functional responses of scar-associated cells to Shikonin, and investigates the mechanisms underlying these responses. The data obtained suggests that Shikonin inhibits cell viability and proliferation and reduces detectable collagen in scar-derived fibroblasts. Further investigation revealed that Shikonin induces apoptosis in scar fibroblasts by differentially regulating the expression of caspase 3, Bcl-2, phospho-Erk1/2 and phospho-p38. In addition, Shikonin down-regulates the expression of collagen I, collagen III and alpha-smooth muscle actin genes hence attenuating collagen synthesis in scar-derived fibroblasts. In summary, it is demonstrated that Shikonin induces apoptosis and decreases collagen production in scar-associated fibroblasts and may therefore hold potential as a novel scar remediation therapy. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Management of scars: updated practical guidelines and use of silicones.

    PubMed

    Meaume, Sylvie; Le Pillouer-Prost, Anne; Richert, Bertrand; Roseeuw, Diane; Vadoud, Javid

    2014-01-01

    Hypertrophic scars and keloids resulting from surgery, burns, trauma and infection can be associated with substantial physical and psychological distress. Various non-invasive and invasive options are currently available for the prevention and treatment of these scars. Recently, an international multidisciplinary group of 24 experts on scar management (dermatologists; plastic and reconstructive surgeons; general surgeons; physical medicine, rehabilitation and burns specialists; psychosocial and behavioural researchers; epidemiologists; beauticians) convened to update a set of practical guidelines for the prevention and treatment of hypertrophic and keloid scars on the basis of the latest published clinical evidence on existing scar management options. Silicone-based products such as sheets and gels are recommended as the gold standard, first-line, non-invasive option for both the prevention and treatment of scars. Other general scar preventative measures include avoiding sun exposure, compression therapy, taping and the use of moisturisers. Invasive treatment options include intralesional injections of corticosteroids and/or 5-fluorouracil, cryotherapy, radiotherapy, laser therapy and surgical excision. All of these options may be used alone or as part of combination therapy. Of utmost importance is the regular re-evaluation of patients every four to eight weeks to evaluate whether additional treatment is warranted. The amount of scar management measures that are applied to each wound depends on the patient's risk of developing a scar and their level of concern about the scar's appearance. The practical advice presented in the current guidelines should be combined with clinical judgement when deciding on the most appropriate scar management measures for an individual patient.

  15. Reliable scar scoring system to assess photographs of burn patients

    PubMed Central

    Mecott, Gabriel A.; Finnerty, Celeste C.; Herndon, David N.; Al-Mousawi, Ahmed M.; Branski, Ludwik K.; Hegde, Sachin; Kraft, Robert; Williams, Felicia N.; Maldonado, Susana A.; Rivero, Haidy G.; Rodriguez-Escobar, Noe; Jeschke, Marc G.

    2015-01-01

    Background Several scar-scoring scales exist to clinically monitor burn scar development and maturation. Although scoring scars through direct clinical examination is ideal, scars must sometimes be scored from photographs. No scar scale currently exists for the latter purpose. Materials and methods We modified a previously described scar scale (Yeong et al., J Burn Care Rehabil 1997) and tested the reliability of this new scale in assessing burn scars from photographs. The new scale consisted of three parameters: scar height, surface appearance, and color mismatch. Each parameter was assigned a score of 1 (best) to 4 (worst), generating a total score of 3 to 12. Five physicians with burns training scored 120 representative photographs using the original and modified scales. Reliability was analyzed using coefficient of agreement, Cronbach’s alpha, intraclass correlation coefficient, variance, and coefficient of variance. Analysis of variance was performed using the Kruskal-Wallis test. Color mismatch and scar height scores were validated by analyzing actual height and color differences. Results The intraclass correlation coefficient, the coefficient of agreement, and Cronbach’s alpha were higher for the modified scale than the original scale. The original scale produced more variance than the modified scale. Sub-analysis demonstrated that, for all categories, the modified scale had greater correlation and reliability than the original scale. The correlation between color mismatch scores and actual color differences was 0.84 and between scar height scores and actual height was 0.81. Conclusions The modified scar scale is a simple, reliable, and useful scale for evaluating photographs of burn patients. PMID:26092214

  16. Reliable scar scoring system to assess photographs of burn patients.

    PubMed

    Mecott, Gabriel A; Finnerty, Celeste C; Herndon, David N; Al-Mousawi, Ahmed M; Branski, Ludwik K; Hegde, Sachin; Kraft, Robert; Williams, Felicia N; Maldonado, Susana A; Rivero, Haidy G; Rodriguez-Escobar, Noe; Jeschke, Marc G

    2015-12-01

    Several scar-scoring scales exist to clinically monitor burn scar development and maturation. Although scoring scars through direct clinical examination is ideal, scars must sometimes be scored from photographs. No scar scale currently exists for the latter purpose. We modified a previously described scar scale (Yeong et al., J Burn Care Rehabil 1997) and tested the reliability of this new scale in assessing burn scars from photographs. The new scale consisted of three parameters as follows: scar height, surface appearance, and color mismatch. Each parameter was assigned a score of 1 (best) to 4 (worst), generating a total score of 3-12. Five physicians with burns training scored 120 representative photographs using the original and modified scales. Reliability was analyzed using coefficient of agreement, Cronbach alpha, intraclass correlation coefficient, variance, and coefficient of variance. Analysis of variance was performed using the Kruskal-Wallis test. Color mismatch and scar height scores were validated by analyzing actual height and color differences. The intraclass correlation coefficient, the coefficient of agreement, and Cronbach alpha were higher for the modified scale than those of the original scale. The original scale produced more variance than that in the modified scale. Subanalysis demonstrated that, for all categories, the modified scale had greater correlation and reliability than the original scale. The correlation between color mismatch scores and actual color differences was 0.84 and between scar height scores and actual height was 0.81. The modified scar scale is a simple, reliable, and useful scale for evaluating photographs of burn patients. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Catheter ablation of postinfarction ventricular tachycardia: ten-year trends in utilization, in-hospital complications, and in-hospital mortality in the United States.

    PubMed

    Palaniswamy, Chandrasekar; Kolte, Dhaval; Harikrishnan, Prakash; Khera, Sahil; Aronow, Wilbert S; Mujib, Marjan; Mellana, William Michael; Eugenio, Paul; Lessner, Seth; Ferrick, Aileen; Fonarow, Gregg C; Ahmed, Ali; Cooper, Howard A; Frishman, William H; Panza, Julio A; Iwai, Sei

    2014-11-01

    There is a paucity of data regarding the complications and in-hospital mortality after catheter ablation for ventricular tachycardia (VT) in patients with ischemic heart disease. The purpose of this study was to determine the temporal trends in utilization, in-hospital mortality, and complications of catheter ablation of postinfarction VT in the United States. We used the 2002-2011 Nationwide Inpatient Sample (NIS) database to identify all patients ≥18 years of age with a primary diagnosis of VT (International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Edition, Clinical Modification [ICD-9-CM] code 427.1) and who also had a secondary diagnosis of prior history of myocardial infarction (ICD-9-CM 412). Patients with supraventricular arrhythmias were excluded. Patients who underwent catheter ablation were identified using ICD-9-CM procedure code 37.34. Temporal trends in catheter ablation, in-hospital complications, and in-hospital mortality were analyzed. Of 81,539 patients with postinfarct VT, 4653 (5.7%) underwent catheter ablation. Utilization of catheter ablation increased significantly from 2.8% in 2002 to 10.8% in 2011 (Ptrend < .001). The overall rate of any in-hospital complication was 11.2% (523/4653), with vascular complications in 6.9%, cardiac in 4.3%, and neurologic in 0.5%. In-hospital mortality was 1.6% (75/4653). From 2002 to 2011, there was no significant change in the overall complication rates (8.4% to 10.2%, Ptrend = .101; adjusted odds ratio [per year] 1.02, 95% confidence interval 0.98-1.06) or in-hospital mortality (1.3% to 1.8%, Ptrend = .266; adjusted odds ratio [per year] 1.03, 95% confidence interval 0.92-1.15). The utilization rate of catheter ablation as therapy for postinfarct VT has steadily increased over the past decade. However, procedural complication rates and in-hospital mortality have not changed significantly during this period. Copyright © 2014 Heart Rhythm Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Does the placement of an Amplatzer septal occluder device confer benefit in patients with a post-infarction ventricular septal defect?

    PubMed

    Dawson, Alan G; Williams, Stuart G; Cole, Daisy

    2014-12-01

    A best evidence topic in cardiac surgery was written according to a structured protocol. The question addressed was 'Is the placement of an Amplatzer septal occluder device across a post-infarction ventricular septal defect a suitable alternative for patients not eligible for surgical repair?' Altogether, 31 papers were found using the reported search, of which 17 represented the best evidence to answer the clinical question. The authors, journal, date and country of publication, patient group studied, study type, relevant outcomes and results of these papers are tabulated. We conclude that the insertion of an Amplatzer occluder device in patients with a post-infarction ventricular septal defect (VSD) not amenable to surgical repair can offer benefit in selected patients. Patients with cardiogenic shock frequently have an unfavourable outcome and closure should be considered cautiously. From the literature available, patients have a better outcome if the intervention is delayed by 2 weeks or more possibly due to the maturation of the VSD and recovery of myocardial function. In certain situations, device closure may be complicated by device dislocation or embolization, residual shunting or a tortuous course not amenable to device implantation. In such settings, surgical repair is the only option. In patients who proceed straight to surgical repair with no attempt at percutaneous closure, the overall mortality lies in the region of 43% and similar to percutaneous closure, there is an association observed between those operated within 7 days of the VSD occurrence and those greater than this time. Patients presenting in cardiogenic shock experienced an increased risk of death and if the timing of myocardial infarction to VSD closure could be delayed by 3 weeks, there was a statistically significant reduction in operative mortality. Percutaneous closure of a post-infarction VSD may avoid the requirement for surgical closure. However, in some cases, it provides time to

  19. Comparison of semi-automated scar quantification techniques using high-resolution, 3-dimensional late-gadolinium-enhancement magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Rajchl, Martin; Stirrat, John; Goubran, Maged; Yu, Jeff; Scholl, David; Peters, Terry M; White, James A

    2015-02-01

    The quantification and modeling of myocardial scar is of expanding interest for image-guided therapy, particularly in the field of arrhythmia management. Migration towards high-resolution, three-dimensional (3D) MRI techniques for spatial mapping of myocardial scar provides superior spatial registration. However, to date no systematic comparison of available approaches to 3D scar quantification have been performed. In this study we compare the reproducibility of six 3D scar segmentation algorithms for determination of left ventricular scar volume. Additionally, comparison to two-dimensional (2D) scar quantification and 3D manual segmentation is performed. Thirty-five consecutive patients with ischemic cardiomyopathy were recruited and underwent conventional 2D late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) and 3D isotropic LGE imaging (voxel size 1.3 mm(3)) using a 3 T scanner. 3D LGE datasets were analyzed using six semi-automated segmentation techniques, including the signal threshold versus reference mean (STRM) technique at >2, >3, >5 and >6 standard deviations (SD) above reference myocardium, the full width at half maximum (FWHM) technique, and an optimization-based technique called hierarchical max flow (HMF). The mean ejection fraction was 32.1 ± 12.7 %. Reproducibility was greatest for HMF and FWHM techniques with intra-class correlation coefficient values ≥0.95. 3D scar quantification and modeling is clinically feasible in patients with ischemic cardiomyopathy. While several approaches show acceptable reproducibility, HMF appears superior due to maintenance of accuracy towards manual segmentations.

  20. Treatment of symptomatic abnormal skin scars with electrical stimulation.

    PubMed

    Perry, D; Colthurst, J; Giddings, P; McGrouther, D A; Morris, J; Bayat, A

    2010-10-01

    To evaluate the effect of non-invasive biofeedback electrical stimulation on symptomatic abnormal skin scars. Thirty patients with over 140 scars with long-term pain and itch were recruited into the study. Patients monitored the intensity of symptoms (pain and itching) on a numerical rating scale. In addition, a modified Manchester scar scale was used to objectively assess digital photographs of each scar in terms of colour, contour, distortion and texture, while a non-invasive spectrophotometric intracutaneous analysis was used to monitor the scars' physical characteristics. The electrical stimulation device resulted in a clinically and statistically significant (p < 0.05) reduction of symptoms and scar scores. Pain and itch scores were both reduced to a median score of 0 by 2 months, from a baseline of 7 and 6 respectively. Scar scores were reduced from a baseline of 14 to a median score of 11 by 2 months. These results give a preliminary indication of the potential role of non-invasive biofeedback electrical stimulation in the management of chronic scar pain and itch. However, further large scale controlled studies are warranted to elucidate its overall efficacy and mechanistic action. Funding was provided from Fenzian Ltd for this study.

  1. Efficacy of low-level laser therapy on scar tissue.

    PubMed

    Freitas, Carla P; Melo, Cristina; Alexandrino, Ana M; Noites, Andreia

    2013-06-01

    Physiotherapy has a very important role in the maintenance of the integumentary system integrity. There is very few evidence in humans. Nevertheless, there are some studies about tissue regeneration using low-level laser therapy (LLLT). To analyze the effectiveness of LLLT on scar tissue. Seventeen volunteers were stratified by age of their scars, and then randomly assigned to an experimental group (EG) - n = 9 - and a placebo group (PG) - n = 8. Fifteen sessions were conducted to both the groups thrice a week. However, in the PG, the laser device was switched off. Scars' thickness, length, width, macroscopic aspect, pain threshold, pain perception, and itching were measured. After 5 weeks, there were no statistically significant differences in any variable between both the groups. However, analyzing independently each group, EG showed a significant improvement in macroscopic aspect (p = 0.003) using LLLT. Taking into account the scars' age, LLLT showed a tendency to decrease older scars' thickness in EG. The intervention with LLLT appears to have a positive effect on the macroscopic scars' appearance, and on old scars' thickness, in the studied sample. However, it cannot be said for sure that LLLT has influence on scar tissue.

  2. External charring and fire scarring in three western conifers

    Treesearch

    E. K. Sutherland; Josh Farella; David K Wright; Ian Hyp; K. T. Smith; Donald A. Falk; Estelle Arbellay; Markus Stoffel

    2013-01-01

    Fires that injure but do not kill trees cause scars used as proxies for the reconstruction of wildfire history. Understanding about these wildfires - and their relationship to vegetation dynamics and climate - has profoundly affected wildfire and land management policy globally. To better understand scarring in the context of wildfire behavior, landscape and biological...

  3. The distribution and implications of BCG scars in northern Malawi.

    PubMed Central

    Fine, P. E.; Ponnighaus, J. M.; Maine, N.

    1989-01-01

    Reported are data on the BCG scar status of more than 112,000 individuals who were surveyed in Karonga District, northern Malawi, between 1979 and 1984. The age and sex patterns of apparent BCG scars reflect the history of BCG vaccination activities in the district. Repeated independent examinations of large numbers of people revealed that the proportions remaining with the same observed scar status among those initially classified as being scar "positive" or scar "negative" were each approximately 90%. The repeatability of positive scar reading was lower among children and older adults than among young adults aged 15-24 years, and blind follow-up of children known to have been vaccinated as infants in child health clinics indicated that less than 60% had a detectable scar 3 years after receiving the vaccine. "Negative" repeatability increased consistently with age. The implications of these findings for estimating BCG vaccine uptake and for assessing its efficacy in case-control and cohort studies are discussed. The finding that BCG scars may be difficult to read suggests there is a danger of observer bias that could lead to distortion--in particular, to overestimates of vaccine efficacy. PMID:2706726

  4. Fractional Carbon Dioxide Laser in Treatment of Acne Scars.

    PubMed

    Petrov, Andrej; Pljakovska, Vesna

    2016-03-15

    Scars appear as a result of skin damage during the process of the skin healing. There are two types of acne scars, depending on whether there is a loss or accumulation of collagen: atrophic and hypertrophic. In 80-90% it comes to scars with loss of collagen compared to smaller number of hypertrophic scars and keloids. The aim of the study was to determine efficiency and safety of fractional carbon dioxide laser in the treatment of acne scars. The study was carried out in Acibadem Sistina Clinical Hospital, Skopje at the Department of Dermatovenerology, with a total of 40 patients treated with fractional carbon dioxide laser (Lutronic eCO2). The study included patients with residual acne scars of a different type. Comedogenic and papular acne in our material were proportionately presented in 50% of cases, while the other half were the more severe clinical forms of acne - pustular inflammatory acne and nodulocystic acne that leave residual lesions in the form of second, third and fourth grade of scars. The experiences of our work confirm the world experiences that the best result with this method is achieved in dotted ice pick or V-shaped acne scars.

  5. Dipeptidyl Peptidase-4, Wound Healing, Scarring, and Fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Hu, Michael S; Longaker, Michael T

    2016-11-01

    Scarring and fibrosis are an enormous public health concern, resulting in excessive morbidity and mortality in addition to countless lost health care dollars. Recent advances in cell and developmental biology promise a better understanding of scarring and fibrosis and may translate to new clinical therapies.

  6. Scar-modulating treatments for central nervous system injury.

    PubMed

    Shen, Dingding; Wang, Xiaodong; Gu, Xiaosong

    2014-12-01

    Traumatic injury to the adult mammalian central nervous system (CNS) leads to complex cellular responses. Among them, the scar tissue formed is generally recognized as a major obstacle to CNS repair, both by the production of inhibitory molecules and by the physical impedance of axon regrowth. Therefore, scar-modulating treatments have become a leading therapeutic intervention for CNS injury. To date, a variety of biological and pharmaceutical treatments, targeting scar modulation, have been tested in animal models of CNS injury, and a few are likely to enter clinical trials. In this review, we summarize current knowledge of the scar-modulating treatments according to their specific aims: (1) inhibition of glial and fibrotic scar formation, and (2) blockade of the production of scar-associated inhibitory molecules. The removal of existing scar tissue is also discussed as a treatment of choice. It is believed that only a combinatorial strategy is likely to help eliminate the detrimental effects of scar tissue on CNS repair.

  7. Artificial hair fiber restoration in the treatment of scalp scars.

    PubMed

    Santiago, Mariangela; Pérez-Rangel, Roberto; D'Ugo, Angelo; Griselli, Giampiero; Igitian, Garigin; Martin, Ildefonso Garcia; Nesheim, Geir B; Eddin, Usama Saad; Smith, Geoff; Brady, Gerard W; Chaker, Cherine

    2007-01-01

    There is presently no treatment for scalp scars that is fully satisfactory. The modalities of treatment currently in use are surgery, hair transplantation, and micropigmentation. Scalp implantation with artificial hair fibers is used by some physicians as an adjunctive treatment. The objective was to assess the utility of artificial hair fibers to treat scalp scars. Data were collected by the principal author from 10 hair restoration practitioners who tested polyamide hair fiber (Biofibre CE 0373/TGA by Medicap Ltd., Carpi (MO), Italy) implantation for scalp scars. Artificial hair fiber implantation occurred between June 1996 and December 2000, and observations continued until December 2004. Data from 54 scars from 44 patients treated showed: (1) no complications in 49 scars (90.7%); (2) mild adverse outcomes in 4 scars (7.4%)-temporary superficial inflammation-infection that subsided following topical cortisone and local/systemic antibiotic treatment; and (3) moderately adverse outcomes in 1 scar (1.9%)-significant inflammation and generalized infection requiring removal of artificial implant to alleviate. Occasional minor skin reactions, sebum plugs, and hyperseborrhea were successfully controlled and well accepted by patients. Fiber fall rate was 20% on average per annum. Data show that polyamide hair fiber restoration can be considered an adjunctive treatment for scalp scars in selected cases.

  8. Cosmetic evaluation of surgical scars after external dacryocystorhinostomy

    PubMed Central

    Rizvi, Syed Ali Raza; Saquib, Mohammad; Maheshwari, Rakesh; Gupta, Yogesh; Iqbal, Zafar; Maheshwari, Puneet

    2016-01-01

    AIM To evaluate the surgical scars of external dacryocystorhinostomy (DCR) cosmetically. METHODS Totally 50 consecutive cases of primary acquired nasolacrimal duct obstruction (PANDO) were included in the study. Surgical scars were assessed by the patients and two independent observers at 2, 6 and 12wk postoperatively on the basis of visibility of the scars and still photographs respectively and were graded from 0-3. Kappa test was utilised to check the agreement of scar grading between the two observers. Wilcoxan signed ranks test was used to analyse the improvement of scar grading. RESULTS Thirty-four (68%) patients graded their incision site as very visible (grade 3) at 2wk. At 6 and 12wk, incision site was observed as grade 3 by 7 (14%) and 1 (2%) patients respectively. Photographic evaluation of patients by 2 observers showed an average score of 2.75, 1.94 and 0.94 at 2, 6 and 12wk respectively. Change in scar grading from grade 3 to grade 0 in consecutive follow-up (2, 6 and 12wk) was found to be highly significant both for the patient as well for the observers (P<0.0001). CONCLUSION The external DCR is a highly effective and safe procedure and in view of low percentage of cases who complained of marked scarring in the present study, thus scarring should not be the main ground for deciding the approach to DCR surgery, even in young cosmetically conscious patients. PMID:28003973

  9. Fractional Carbon Dioxide Laser in Treatment of Acne Scars

    PubMed Central

    Petrov, Andrej; Pljakovska, Vesna

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Scars appear as a result of skin damage during the process of the skin healing. There are two types of acne scars, depending on whether there is a loss or accumulation of collagen: atrophic and hypertrophic. In 80-90% it comes to scars with loss of collagen compared to smaller number of hypertrophic scars and keloids. AIM: The aim of the study was to determine efficiency and safety of fractional carbon dioxide laser in the treatment of acne scars. MATERIAL AND METHODS: The study was carried out in Acibadem Sistina Clinical Hospital, Skopje at the Department of Dermatovenerology, with a total of 40 patients treated with fractional carbon dioxide laser (Lutronic eCO2). The study included patients with residual acne scars of a different type. RESULTS: Comedogenic and papular acne in our material were proportionately presented in 50% of cases, while the other half were the more severe clinical forms of acne - pustular inflammatory acne and nodulocystic acne that leave residual lesions in the form of second, third and fourth grade of scars. CONCLUSION: The experiences of our work confirm the world experiences that the best result with this method is achieved in dotted ice pick or V-shaped acne scars. PMID:27275326

  10. Macroanatomy of compartmentalization in fire scars of three western conifers

    Treesearch

    Kevin T. Smith; Elaine Sutherland; Estelle Arbellay; Markus Stoffel; Donald. Falk

    2013-01-01

    Fire scars are visible evidence of compartmentalization and closure processes that contribute to tree survival after fire injury. Preliminary observations of dissected fire scars from trees injured within the last decade showed centripetal development of wound-initiated discoloration (WID) through 2-3 decades of former sapwood in Larix occidentalis and Pseudotsuga...

  11. Predicting fire scars in Ozark timber species following prescribed burning

    Treesearch

    Aaron P. Stevenson; Richard P. Guyette; Rose-Marie Muzika

    2009-01-01

    A potential consequence of using prescribed fire is heat-related injury to timber trees. Scars formed following fire injuries are often associated with extensive decay in hardwoods. The ability to predict scarring caused by prescribed fire is important when multiple management goals are incorporated on a single forest site.

  12. Regenerative healing, scar-free healing and scar formation across the species: current concepts and future perspectives.

    PubMed

    Ud-Din, Sara; Volk, Susan W; Bayat, Ardeshir

    2014-09-01

    All species have evolved mechanisms of repair to restore tissue function following injury. Skin scarring is an inevitable and permanent endpoint for many postnatal organisms except for non-amniote vertebrates such as amphibians, which are capable of tissue regeneration. Furthermore, mammalian foetuses through mid-gestation are capable of rapid wound repair in the absence of scar formation. Notably, excessive cutaneous scar formation, such as hypertrophic and keloid scars, is a species limited clinical entity as it occurs only in humans, although wounds on the distal limbs of horses are also prone to heal with fibroproliferative pathology known as equine exuberant granulation tissue. Currently, there are no reliable treatment options to eradicate or prevent scarring in humans and vertebrates. The limited number of vertebrate models for either hypertrophic or keloid scarring has been an impediment to mechanistic studies of these diseases and the development of therapies. In this viewpoint essay, we highlight the current concepts of regenerative, scar-free and scar-forming healing compared across a number of species and speculate on areas for future research. Furthermore, in-depth investigative research into the mechanisms of scarless repair may allow for the development of improved animal models and novel targets for scar prevention. As the ability to heal in both a scarless manner and propensity for healing with excessive scar formation is highly species dependent, understanding similarities and differences in healing across species as it relates to the regenerative process may hold the key to improve scarring and guide translational wound-healing studies. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. The Use of Autologous Fat Grafting for Treatment of Scar Tissue and Scar-Related Conditions: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Negenborn, Vera L; Groen, Jan-Willem; Smit, Jan Maerten; Niessen, Frank B; Mullender, Margriet G

    2016-01-01

    Scar tissue can cause cosmetic impairments, functional limitations, pain, and itch. It may also cause emotional, social, and behavioral problems, especially when it is located in exposed areas. To date, no gold standard exists for the treatment of scar tissue. Autologous fat grafting has been introduced as a promising treatment option for scar tissue-related symptoms. However, the scientific evidence for its effectiveness remains unclear. This systematic review aims to evaluate the available evidence regarding the effectiveness of autologous fat grafting for the treatment of scar tissue and scar-related conditions. A systematic literature review was performed using MEDLINE, Cochrane Library, EMBASE, and Web of Science. No language restrictions were imposed. Twenty-six clinical articles were included, reporting on 905 patients in total. Meta-analysis was not performed because of the heterogeneous methodology demonstrated among the articles. Main outcome measures were scar appearance and skin characteristics, restoration of volume and/or (three-dimensional) contour, itch, and pain. All publications report a beneficial effect of autologous fat grafting on scar tissue. There is statistical significant improvement of the scar appearance, skin characteristics, and pain. Itch and restoration of volume and three-dimensional contour also improved. Autologous fat grafting is used to improve a variety of symptoms related to scar tissue. This systematic review suggests that autologous fat grafting provides beneficial effects with limited side effects. However, the level of evidence and methodological quality are quite low. Future randomized controlled trials with a methodologically strong design are necessary to confirm the effects of autologous fat grafting on scar tissue and scar-related conditions.

  14. Development of novel SCAR markers for genetic characterization of Lonicera japonica from high GC-RAMP-PCR and DNA cloning.

    PubMed

    Cheng, J L; Li, J; Qiu, Y M; Wei, C L; Yang, L Q; Fu, J J

    2016-04-28

    Sequence-characterized amplified region (SCAR) markers were further developed from high-GC primer RAMP-PCR-amplified fragments from Lonicera japonica DNA by molecular cloning. The four DNA fragments from three high-GC primers (FY-27, FY-28, and FY-29) were successfully cloned into a pGM-T vector. The positive clones were sequenced; their names, sizes, and GenBank numbers were JYHGC1-1, 345 bp, KJ620024; YJHGC2-1, 388 bp, KJ620025; JYHGC7-2, 1036 bp, KJ620026; and JYHGC6-2, 715 bp, KJ620027, respectively. Four novel SCAR markers were developed by designing specific primers, optimizing conditions, and PCR validation. The developed SCAR markers were used for the genetic authentication of L. japonica from its substitutes. This technique provides another means of developing DNA markers for the characterization and authentication of various organisms including medicinal plants and their substitutes.

  15. Effect of laser infrared therapy on several rheological indices of blood and on the homeostasis of patients with post-infarction cardiosclerosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volov, N. A.; Kudinova, M. A.; Fedulaeva, A. I.; Fedulaev, Yu. N.; Gordeev, I. G.

    2001-04-01

    An investigation was made on 38 patients affected by exertion angina pectoris of the I-III functional classes. The patients survived a Q-associated myocardial infarction not earlier than 1 year ago. The patients were treated according to a 10-session course of laser infrared therapy. The dynamics of several hemorheological indices (such as blood viscosity, the hematocrit of venous blood, fibrinogen, fibronectine, thrombocyte aggregation, antithrombin III, and the activated partial thrombplastin time) was estimated prior to the treatment, 5 - 7 days after the beginning of laser therapy, and 30 days after the beginning of laser therapy treatment. It was found that laser therapy was capable of producing a significant decrease in the blood viscosity, fibrinogen level, and in the aggregation of thrombocytes. Moreover, laser infrared therapy carried out on patients affected by post-infarction cardiosclerosis and by stable exertion stenocardia of the I-III functional classes produced a reliable normalization of hemorheological indices of the blood.

  16. [Study of the cutaneous scar after external dacryocystorhinostomy].

    PubMed

    Mjarkesh, M M; Morel, X; Renard, G

    2012-02-01

    To objectively analyze the cutaneous scar after external dacryocystorhinostomy and to compare the cosmetic result of a nasal incision and an inferior eyelid incision. All patients consecutively operated between January 2007 and December 2009 were notified of an examination. The cutaneous scar was photographed and de visu analyzed by the two authors who gave marks : 20, no visible scar ; 10, visible scar but cosmetically considered not detrimental ; 0, visible scar and considered unesthetic. Eighteen of the 60 patients notified came for examination. One hundred percent of ten patients operated via an inferior eyelid incision were graded 20 versus 25% of eight patients operated via a nasal incision. Of these patients, 62.5% were graded 10. Only one patient was marked 0 (nasal incision). The inferior eyelid incision seemed to give much better cosmetic results than the nasal incision. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  17. Ablative fractional laser resurfacing helps treat restrictive pediatric scar contractures.

    PubMed

    Krakowski, Andrew C; Goldenberg, Alina; Eichenfield, Lawrence F; Murray, Jill-Peck; Shumaker, Peter R

    2014-12-01

    Conventional management of debilitating pediatric scar contractures, including hand therapy and surgery, may often be beset by delayed treatment, suboptimal results, and additional surgical morbidity. Ablative fractional laser resurfacing is an emerging adjunctive procedural option for scar contractures because of its promising efficacy and safety profile. However, its use to improve function has not been studied in the pediatric population. Herein we report 2 pediatric patients with recalcitrant scar contractures, causing persistent functional deficits, treated with an ablative fractional laser protocol. Both patients experienced rapid and cumulative subjective and objective improvements in range of motion and function as measured by an independent occupational therapist without reported complications. We highlight ablative fractional laser resurfacing as a novel and promising tool in the management of function-limiting scar contractures in children and propose that the technique be incorporated into existing scar treatment paradigms, guided by future research.

  18. Causes of shell scarring in dog cockles Glycymeris glycymeris L.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramsay, K.; Richardson, C. A.; Kaiser, M. J.

    2001-05-01

    Experimental studies were conducted to investigate the possible causes of shell scars in the bivalve mollusc Glycymeris glycymeris, including fishing disturbance, predator attacks and burrowing activity. Individuals collected from an area of sea bed experimentally fished once by a scallop dredge 12 months previously did not display significantly more shell scars than those collected before fishing or from a control area. In the laboratory, Glycymeris offered to the predatory crab Cancer pagurus had a significantly higher incidence of scars seen in acetate peels of shell cross-sections than control shells. However, scarring on Glycymeris excavated from the sediment and left to reburrow was not significantly different from those in an undisturbed control group. Currently, it is not possible in G. glycymeris to differentiate between scars caused by fishing disturbance or natural disturbances, either on the grounds of visual appearance or position of damage.

  19. Old-scar mass and changing surgical perspective: Sarcoidosis

    PubMed Central

    Aktimur, Recep; Aktimur, Sude Hatun; Çolak, Elif; Alıcı, Ömer; Demirağ, Mehmet Derya

    2015-01-01

    Sarcoidosis is a systemic inflammatory disease of an unknown etiology. Skin is involved in 25% of all cases, and 29% of them present as a scar sarcoidosis. Asymptomatic old-scar masses are generally regarded as a foreign body reaction by surgeons and often result in excisional biopsy. We describe a case of a patient who developed sarcoidosis in a 34-year-old appendectomy scar and adjacent inguinal lymph nodes without any local or systemic symptom and radiologic finding. Surgeons should not underestimate the importance of such lesions as a simple condition. Scar sarcoidosis may resolve spontaneously, or the treatment with some topical agents is effective. Furthermore, scar sarcoidosis may be the initial manifestation of systemic sarcoidosis. PMID:25931946

  20. Endometrial cancer implanted within a cesarean section scar.

    PubMed

    Baba, Tsukasa; Mandai, Masaki; Yamanishi, Yukio; Suzuki, Ayako; Kang, Hyun Sook; Konishi, Ikuo

    2011-03-01

    Several reports have documented adenocarcinoma arising from endometriotic implants within cesarean section (C-S) scars on the serosal surface of the uterus; however, endometrial cancer invading the C-S scar from the uterine cavity has not been described. We report a case of a grade 1 endometrioid adenocarcinoma 'drop' lesion invading a previous C-S scar with resultant cervical stromal invasion. Using both MR images and a thorough review of the pathology, the tumor at the C-S scar was determined to be an implant derived from a primary lesion at the uterine fundus. With increases in the incidence of both endometrial cancer and births by C-S, it is likely we will encounter more cases of iatrogenic implants of endometrial cancers in C-S scars.

  1. 31P NMR 2D Mapping of Creatine Kinase Forward Flux Rate in Hearts with Postinfarction Left Ventricular Remodeling in Response to Cell Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Ling; Cui, Weina; Zhang, Pengyuan; Jang, Albert; Zhu, Wuqiang; Zhang, Jianyi

    2016-01-01

    Utilizing a fast 31P magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) 2-dimensional chemical shift imaging (2D-CSI) method, this study examined the heterogeneity of creatine kinase (CK) forward flux rate of hearts with postinfarction left ventricular (LV) remodeling. Immunosuppressed Yorkshire pigs were assigned to 4 groups: 1) A sham-operated normal group (SHAM, n = 6); 2) A 60 minutes distal left anterior descending coronary artery ligation and reperfusion (MI, n = 6); 3) Open patch group; ligation injury plus open fibrin patch over the site of injury (Patch, n = 6); and 4) Cell group, hiPSCs-cardiomyocytes, -endothelial cells, and -smooth muscle cells (2 million, each) were injected into the injured myocardium pass through a fibrin patch (Cell+Patch, n = 5). At 4 weeks, the creatine phosphate (PCr)/ATP ratio, CK forward flux rate (Flux PCr→ATP), and k constant of CK forward flux rate (kPCr→ATP) were severely decreased at border zone myocardium (BZ) adjacent to MI. Cell treatment results in significantly increase of PCr/ATP ratio and improve the value of kPCr→ATP and Flux PCr→ATP in BZ myocardium. Moreover, the BZ myocardial CK total activity and protein expression of CK mitochondria isozyme and CK myocardial isozyme were significantly reduced, but recovered in response to cell treatment. Thus, cell therapy results in improvement of BZ bioenergetic abnormality in hearts with postinfarction LV remodeling, which is accompanied by significantly improvements in BZ CK activity and CK isozyme expression. The fast 2D 31P MR CSI mapping can reliably measure the heterogeneity of bioenergetics in hearts with post infarction LV remodeling. PMID:27606901

  2. Phospholemman Overexpression Inhibits Na+-K+-ATPase in Adult Rat Cardiac Myocytes: Relevance to Decreased Na+ pump Activity in Post-Infarction Myocytes

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xue-Qian; Moorman, J. Randall; Ahlers, Belinda A.; Carl, Lois L.; Lake, Douglas E.; Song, Jianliang; Mounsey, J. Paul; Tucker, Amy L.; Chan, Yiu-mo; Rothblum, Lawrence I.; Stahl, Richard C.; Carey, David J.; Cheung, Joseph Y.

    2005-01-01

    Messenger RNA levels of phospholemman (PLM), a member of the FXYD family of small single-span membrane proteins with putative ion-transport regulatory properties, were increased in postinfarction (MI) rat myocytes. We tested the hypothesis that the previously observed reduction in Na+-K+-ATPase activity in MI rat myocytes was due to PLM overexpression. In rat hearts harvested 3 and 7 days post-MI, PLM protein expression was increased by 2- and 4-fold, respectively. To simulate increased PLM expression post-MI, PLM was overexpressed in normal adult rat myocytes by adenovirus-mediated gene transfer. PLM overexpression did not affect the relative level of phosphorylation on serine68 of PLM. Na+-K+-ATPase activity was measured as ouabain-sensitive Na+-K+ pump current (Ip). Compared to control myocytes overexpressing green fluorescent protein alone, Ip measured in myocytes overexpressing PLM was significantly (P<0.0001) lower at similar membrane voltages, pipette Na+ ([Na+]pip) and extracellular K+ concentrations ([K+]o). From −70 to +60 mV, neither [Na+]pip nor [K+]o required to attain half-maximal Ip was significantly different between control and PLM myocytes. This phenotype of decreased Vmax without appreciable changes in Km for Na+ and K+ in PLM overexpressed myocytes was similar to that observed in MI rat myocytes. Inhibition of Ip by PLM overexpression was not due to decreased Na+-K+-ATPase expression since there were no changes in either protein or messenger RNA levels of either α1 or α2 isoforms of Na+-K+-ATPase. In native rat cardiac myocytes, PLM co-immunoprecipitated with α-subunits of Na+-K+-ATPase. Inhibition of Na+-K+-ATPase by PLM overexpression, in addition to previously reported decrease in Na+-K+-ATPase expression, may explain altered Vmax but not Km of Na+-K+-ATPase in postinfarction rat myocytes. PMID:16195392

  3. Surgery for postinfarction ventricular tachycardia in the pre-implantable cardioverter defibrillator era: early and long term outcomes in 100 consecutive patients

    PubMed Central

    Bourke, J; Campbell, R; McComb, J; Furniss, S; Doig, J; Hilton, C

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—To report outcome following surgery for postinfarction ventricular tachycardia undertaken in patients before the use of implantable defibrillators.
DESIGN—A retrospective review, with uniform patient selection criteria and surgical and mapping strategy throughout. Complete follow up. Long term death notification by OPCS (Office of Population Censuses and Statistics) registration.
SETTING—Tertiary referral centre for arrhythmia management.
PATIENTS—100 consecutive postinfarction patients who underwent map guided endocardial resection at this hospital in the period 1981-91 for drug refractory ventricular tachyarrhythmias.
RESULTS—Emergency surgery was required for intractable arrhythmias in 28 patients, and 32 had surgery within eight weeks of infarction ("early"). Surgery comprised endocardial resections in all, aneurysmectomy in 57, cryoablations in 26, and antiarrhythmic ventriculotomies in 11. Twenty five patients died < 30 days after surgery, 21 of cardiac failure. This high mortality reflects the type of patients included in the series. Only 12 received antiarrhythmic drugs after surgery. Perioperative mortality was related to preoperative left ventricular function and the context of surgery. Mortality rates for elective surgery more than eight weeks after infarction, early surgery, emergency surgery, and early emergency surgery were 18%, 31%, 46%, and 50%, respectively. Actuarial survival rates at one, three, five, and 10 years after surgery were 66%, 62%, 57%, and 35%.
CONCLUSIONS—Surgery offers arrhythmia abolition at a risk proportional to the patient's preoperative risk of death from ventricular arrhythmias. The long term follow up results suggest a continuing role for surgery in selected patients even in the era of catheter ablation and implantable defibrillators.


Keywords: arrhythmias; myocardial infarction; surgical management PMID:10409528

  4. Thyroid hormone improves the mechanical performance of the post-infarcted diabetic myocardium: a response associated with up-regulation of Akt/mTOR and AMPK activation.

    PubMed

    Mourouzis, Iordanis; Giagourta, Irini; Galanopoulos, Georgios; Mantzouratou, Polixeni; Kostakou, Erietta; Kokkinos, Alexandros D; Tentolouris, Nikolaos; Pantos, Constantinos

    2013-10-01

    Thyroid hormone (TH) is shown to be protective against cardiac and pancreatic injury. Thus, this study explored the potential effects of TH treatment on the functional status of the postinfarcted diabetic myocardium. Diabetic patients have worse prognosis after acute myocardial infarction (AMI). AMI was induced by left coronary ligation in rats previously treated with 35 mg/kg streptozotocin (STZ), (DM-AMI). TH treatment was initiated at 2 weeks after AMI and continued for 6 weeks (DM-AMI+TH), while sham-operated animals served as control (DM-SHAM). TH treatment increased cardiac mass, improved wall stress and favorably changed cardiac geometry. TH significantly increased echocardiographic left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF%): [54.2 (6.5) for DM-AMI+TH vs 37 (2.0) for DM-AMI, p<0.05]. TH treatment resulted in significantly increased insulin and decreased glucose levels in serum. The ratios of phosphorylated (p)-Akt/total Akt and p-mTOR/total mTOR were increased 2.0 fold and 2.7 fold in DM-AMI+TH vs DM-AMI respectively, p<0.05. Furthermore, the ratio of p-AMPK/total AMPK was found to be increased 1.6 fold in DM-AMI+TH vs DM-AMI, p<0.05. TH treatment improved the mechanical performance of the post-infarcted myocardium in rats with STZ-induced diabetes, an effect which was associated with Akt/mTOR and AMPK activation. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. ULTRASOUND EVALUATION OF UTERINE SCAR AFTER CESAREAN SECTION

    PubMed Central

    Basic, Ejub; Basic-Cetkovic, Vesna; Kozaric, Hadzo; Rama, Admir

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: The rate of attempted vaginal birth after previous cesarean delivery has decreased, while the success rate of such births increased. Advances in surgical techniques, the development of anesthesiology services, particularly endotracheal anesthesia, very quality postoperative care with cardiovascular, respiratory and biochemical resuscitation, significantly reduce maternal mortality and morbidity after cesarean section. Progress and development of neonatal services, and intensive care of newborns is enabled and a high survival of newborn infants. Complications after cesarean section were reduced, and the introduction of prophylaxis and therapy of powerful antibiotics, as well as materials for sewing drastically reduce all forms of puerperal infection. Goal: Goal was to establish a measurement value of the parameters that are evaluated by ultrasound. Material and methods: Each of the measured parameters was scored. The sum of points is shown in tables. Based on the sum of points was done an estimate of the scar on the uterus after previous caesarian section and make the decision whether to complete delivery naturally or repeat cesarean section. We conducted a prospective study of 108 pregnant women. Analyzed were: shape scar thickness (thickening), continuity, border scar out, echoing the structure of the lower uterine segment and scar volume Results: The study showed that scar thickness of 3.5 mm or more, the homogeneity of the scar, scar triangular shape, qualitatively richer perfusion, and scar volume verified by 3D technique up to10 cm are attributes of the quality of the scar. Conclusion: Based on the obtained results we conclude that ultrasound evaluation of the quality of the scar has practical application in the decision on the mode of delivery in women who had previously given birth by Caesarean section. PMID:23322970

  6. Assessment of vaccination coverage, vaccination scar rates, and smallpox scarring in five areas of West Africa*

    PubMed Central

    Henderson, Ralph H.; Davis, Hillard; Eddins, Donald L.; Foege, William H.

    1973-01-01

    In 1966, nineteen countries of West and Central Africa began a regional smallpox eradication and measles control programme in cooperation with the World Health Organization. This paper summarizes sample survey data collected to assess the results of the programme in Northern Nigeria (Sokoto and Katsina Provinces), Western Nigeria, Niger, Dahomey, and Togo. These data indicate that the programme, which used mass vaccination campaigns based on a collecting-point strategy, was generally successful in reaching a high proportion of the population. Analysis of vaccination coverage and vaccination scar rates by age underlined the importance to the programme of newborn children who accumulate rapidly following the mass campaign. Of all persons without vaccination scars at the time of the surveys, 34.4% were under 5 years of age; in the absence of a maintenance programme, this figure would rise to 40% after 1 year. PMID:4541684

  7. Collagen nerve wrap for median nerve scarring.

    PubMed

    Kokkalis, Zinon T; Mavrogenis, Andreas F; Ballas, Efstathios G; Papagelopoulos, Panayiotis J; Soucacos, Panayotis N

    2015-02-01

    Nerve wrapping materials have been manufactured to inhibit nerve tissue adhesions and diminish inflammatory and immunologic reactions in nerve surgery. Collagen nerve wrap is a biodegradable type I collagen material that acts as an interface between the nerve and the surrounding tissues. Its main advantage is that it stays in place during the period of tissue healing and is then gradually absorbed once tissue healing is completed. This article presents a surgical technique that used a collagen nerve wrap for the management of median nerve tissue adhesions in 2 patients with advanced carpal tunnel syndrome due to median nerve scarring and adhesions. At last follow-up, both patients had complete resolution with no recurrence of their symptoms. Complications related to the biodegradable material were not observed. Copyright 2015, SLACK Incorporated.

  8. Subcutaneous sarcoidosis in a rhinoplasty scar

    PubMed Central

    Dulguerov, Nicolas; Vankatova, Lenka; Landis, Basile Nicolas

    2015-01-01

    The presence of a subcutaneous hard bony-like lump at the lateral nasal wall after a septorhinoplasty procedure is an unfavourable result. The reported patient developed this complication 2 years after a revision surgery, in which percutaneous osteotomies were performed. An excision biopsy of the lump took place and the histopathological analysis revealed a granulomatous gigantocellular inflammation with absence of birefringent particles on polarised lamp and negative mycobacteria culture. After additional investigations, the final diagnosis was consistent with grade 2 pulmonary sarcoidosis associated with subcutaneous sarcoidosis. No treatment was initiated. The facial symptoms resolved without any additional treatment and the pulmonary function tests have not deteriorated after 1 year of follow-up. The polymorphism of cutaneous lesions in sarcoidosis, the absence of systemic symptoms and the unrecognised entity of subcutaneous sarcoidosis in a scar illustrate the diagnostic challenge with this patient. PMID:25819832

  9. Bastrop County Complex Fire Burn Scar

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-09-27

    NASA image acquired September 12, 2011 To view more images from this event go to: earthobservatory.nasa.gov/NaturalHazards/event.php?id=52029 The Bastrop County Complex Fire in southern Texas started on September 4, 2011. By September 13, 2011, the fire was 70 percent contained, but had scorched 34,068 acres (13,787 hectares). The Advanced Land Imager (ALI) on NASA’s Earth Observing-1 (EO-1) satellite captured this image of the affected region on September 12, 2011. This false-color image shows a wide-area view of the fire. Vegetation is bright green, and sparsely vegetated or bare land is green-yellow. The burn scar appears in shades of red and orange. The burn scar is far from uniform; burned areas are separated by unburned expanses. As of September 13, a re-entry plan had been established for residents of the region, the Incident Information System reported. Residents were warned, however, that they might see vegetation still smoldering or burning. Ongoing drought set the stage for severe fires in Texas in the slate summer of 2011. In early September, Tropical Storm Lee, which drenched other parts of the United States, brought strong winds to Texas, worsening the fires. NASA Earth Observatory image created by Jesse Allen and Robert Simmon, using EO-1 ALI data provided courtesy of the NASA EO-1 team. Caption by Michon Scott. Instrument: EO-1 - ALI Credit: NASA Earth Observatory NASA image use policy. NASA Goddard Space Flight Center enables NASA’s mission through four scientific endeavors: Earth Science, Heliophysics, Solar System Exploration, and Astrophysics. Goddard plays a leading role in NASA’s accomplishments by contributing compelling scientific knowledge to advance the Agency’s mission. Follow us on Twitter Like us on Facebook Find us on Instagram

  10. Detecting Moorland Wildfire Scars and their Persistence in the Landscape using Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) in the Peak District National Park, UK

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Millin-chalabi, G. R.; McMorrow, J.; Agnew, C.

    2012-12-01

    The overall aim of this research is to assess the ability of SAR to detect moorland wildfire scars and their persistence in the landscape using the Peak District National Park (PDNP) in the UK as a case study. Spatially-robust data to monitor wildfire scar size and severity in UK moorlands is currently rare. Fires can burn deep into peat soils and contribute to the release of carbon dioxide into the atmosphere and may also affect the water quality of nearby streams. Information on fire extent would be useful for conservation organisations such as Moors For The Future who are trying to preserve the delicate peatland environment. Knowing the size and location of fire scars would help the Fire and Rescue Service to plan future response to moorland fires. Fire scar boundaries can be mapped in the field using Global Positioning Systems (GPS), however this is labour intensive. Indeed in the PDNP wildfire scar mapping is conducted by park rangers which provides essential ground truth data for assessing against the SAR data. Therefore this particular area provides a unique opportunity for testing an alternative SAR technique for monitoring wildfire scars in the moorland landscape. Previous research shows that SAR has been successfully applied for wildfire scar detection in other types of environments such as boreal (Bourgeau-Chavez et al, 1997) and the tropics (Huang and Siegert, 2004). This research presents some of the first results of the project which tests the capability of ERS 2; ASAR (C-band) and PALSAR (L-band) data to detect several wildfire scars from 2003 - 2008 of various spatial scales and fire severity. Some of the key areas of interest the paper will explore are at Bleaklow and the Kinder plateau. The Bleaklow peat fire of 18th April 2003 was larger (7km2) and more severe than at Kinder, which burned between 26-29th May 2008 and covered an area of 10 ha. All the wildfire scars were GPS, mapped just after the fire event. Archival time-series SAR imagery was

  11. Infiltrated cardiac lipids impair myofibroblast-induced healing of the myocardial scar post-myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Vilahur, Gemma; Casani, Laura; Juan-Babot, Oriol; Guerra, Jose M; Badimon, Lina

    2012-10-01

    Lipids have been detected in the ischemic myocardium of patients' post-myocardial infarction (MI). However, their effect on the cardiac healing process remains unknown. We investigated whether intramyocardial lipids affect the signaling pathways involved in the fibrotic reparative response impairing cardiac healing post-MI. Pigs, fed either a high-cholesterol diet (HC) or a regular-chow (NC), were subjected to experimentally-induced acute MI (90 min mid-LAD balloon occlusion) and then, upon reperfusion (R), maintained for 21 days with the same diet regime (HC/R(+) and NC/R(+), respectively). A group of hypercholesterolemic animals were sacrificed after ischemia without reperfusion (HC/R(-)). Cardiac tissue was obtained for molecular/cellular/histological analysis. Infarct size and echocardiography were assessed. At the time of acute MI, hypercholesterolemic animals showed a higher incidence of ventricular dysrhythmias. At sacrifice, intramyocardial lipids were absent in HC/R(-). HC/R(+) showed higher lipid content (ApoB, cholesteryl-ester and triglycerides) and lower expression/activity of the TGFβ/TβRII/Smad2/3 pathway (involved in scar reparative fibrosis) than NC/R(+) in the forming scar. Collagen synthesis was accordingly reduced in the scar of HC/R(+). Infarct size was 44% larger in HC/R(+) which had higher apoptosis and lower Akt/eNOS activity in the jeopardized myocardium. Systolic function was similarly deteriorated post-MI in all animals whereas no changes were detected in diastolic-related parameters. No changes were detected in systolic parameters 21 days post-MI in NC/R(+) animals. In contrast, both systolic- and diastolic-related parameters were further deteriorated in HC/R(+) animals. Intramyocardial lipid accumulation impairs TGFβ/TβRII/Smad2/3 signaling altering the fibrotic reparative process of the scar resulting in larger infarcts and cardiac dysfunction. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Reliability and validity testing of the Patient and Observer Scar Assessment Scale in evaluating linear scars after breast cancer surgery.

    PubMed

    Truong, Pauline T; Lee, Junella C; Soer, Benjamin; Gaul, Catherine A; Olivotto, Ivo A

    2007-02-01

    The Patient and Observer Scar Assessment Scale is a promising new method incorporating observer and patient ratings in evaluating burn scars. The authors compared this tool to the Vancouver Scar Scale in a cohort of women with linear scars from breast cancer surgery. Twenty women with newly diagnosed breast cancer were prospectively accrued. Thirty-one scars were evaluated. The median time from surgery to scar assessment was 8 weeks (range, 3 to 25 weeks). Observer assessment was performed by three independent raters using the Vancouver scale and the observer component of the new tool. Patient self-assessment was performed using the patient component of the tool. Internal consistency, interobserver reliability, and convergent validity were examined. Internal consistency was acceptable for the Vancouver scale and both components of the new tool (Cronbach's alpha, 0.71, 0.74, and 0.77, respectively). Interobserver reliability was substantial with both the Vancouver scale and the observer tool (average measure intraclass coefficient correlation, 0.78 and 0.60, respectively). The observer tool and Vancouver scale correlated significantly with each other (p < 0.001), but only the observer tool correlated well with patients' ratings (p = 0.04). In surgical scar assessment, the new Patient and Observer Scar Assessment Scale and Vancouver Scar Scale were both associated with acceptable internal consistency and interobserver reliability. The new tool is more comprehensive and has higher correlation with patients' ratings. These findings support the use of the new tool as a reliable, valid, and comprehensive approach to assess linear surgical scars.

  13. Electrophysiologic Scar Substrate in Relation to VT: Noninvasive High-Resolution Mapping and Risk Assessment with ECGI.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Junjie; Cooper, Daniel H; Desouza, Kavit A; Cuculich, Phillip S; Woodard, Pamela K; Smith, Timothy W; Rudy, Yoram

    2016-08-01

    Ischemic cardiomyopathy (ICM) can provide the substrate for ventricular tachycardia (VT). To map noninvasively with high resolution the electrophysiologic (EP) scar substrate, identify its relationship to reentry circuits during VT, and stratify VT risk in ICM patients. Noninvasive high-resolution epicardial mapping with electrocardiographic imaging (ECGI) was performed in 32 ICM patients (17 with clinical VT, 15 without VT). Abnormal scar EP substrate was determined based on electrogram (EGM) amplitude (as percentage of maximal peak-to-peak voltage over the entire ventricular epicardium; total scar [TS] < 30%; dense scar [DS] < 15%), fractionation, and presence of late potentials (LPs). Scar burden was defined as the ratio of the scar size to the total epicardial surface area. The VT activation pattern was mapped and correlated with the EP substrate to identify components of the reentry circuit. Patients with VT had higher scar burden (TS: 51.0 ± 9.3% vs 36.5 ± 5.4%, P < 0.05; DS: 29.5 ± 7.3% vs 16.8 ± 6.8%, P < 0.05) with lower normalized unipolar EGM voltage (TS: 0.107 ± 0.027 vs 0.153 ± 0.031, P < 0.05; DS: 0.073 ± 0.023 vs 0.098 ± 0.026, P < 0.05), greater prevalence of fractionated EGMs (TS: 44.1 ± 10.6% vs 26.8 ± 6.3%, P < 0.05; DS: 50.8 ± 10.8% vs 30.9 ± 7.0%, P < 0.05), and LPs (TS: 26.8 ± 10.7% vs 15.8 ± 5.3, P < 0.05). VTs were mapped in eight patients; the reentry circuits were closely related to the EP substrate. ECGI noninvasively identified scar EP substrate that underlies abnormal conduction in ICM patients. It identified regions within the scar that aligned with critical elements of the reentry circuit during VT. ECGI can potentially be used for VT risk stratification in ICM patients. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Medicinal Plants for the Treatment of Hypertrophic Scars

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Qi; Wang, Su-Juan; Chen, Jian-Yu; Xin, Hai-Liang; Zhang, Hong

    2015-01-01

    Hypertrophic scar is a complication of wound healing and has a high recurrence rate which can lead to significant abnormity in aesthetics and functions. To date, no ideal treatment method has been established. Meanwhile, the underlying mechanism of hypertrophic scarring has not been clearly defined. Although a large amount of scientific research has been reported on the use of medicinal plants as a natural source of treatment for hypertrophic scarring, it is currently scattered across a wide range of publications. Therefore, a systematic summary and knowledge for future prospects are necessary to facilitate further medicinal plant research for their potential use as antihypertrophic scar agents. A bibliographic investigation was accomplished by focusing on medicinal plants which have been scientifically tested in vitro and/or in vivo and proved as potential agents for the treatment of hypertrophic scars. Although the chemical components and mechanisms of action of medicinal plants with antihypertrophic scarring potential have been investigated, many others remain unknown. More investigations and clinical trials are necessary to make use of these medical plants reasonably and phytotherapy is a promising therapeutic approach against hypertrophic scars. PMID:25861351

  15. The persistence of epiphyseal scars in the adult tibia.

    PubMed

    Davies, Catriona; Hackman, Lucina; Black, Sue

    2014-03-01

    Estimation of chronological age from skeletal material is dependent upon estimation of maturational stage observed. Following completion of epiphyseal fusion, a transverse radio-opaque line, termed "epiphyseal scar", may be observed in the region of the former growth plate. According to the literature, this line is likely to become obliterated shortly after completion of epiphyseal fusion. Consequently, presence of an epiphyseal scar has been interpreted as an indication of recent epiphyseal fusion; however, this has not been validated by quantitative research. A study was undertaken to determine persistence of the epiphyseal scars in a cross-sectional population of adults between 20 and 50 years of age. This study examined 1,216 radiographs of proximal and distal tibiae from both sexes and sides of the body. This study suggested that 98.05% of females and 97.74% of males retained some remnant of the epiphyseal scar at the proximal tibia whilst 92.72% of females and 92.95% of males retained some remnant of the epiphyseal scar at the distal tibia. General linear model (GLM) analysis determined that chronological age accounted for 2.7% and 7.6% of variation in persistence of the epiphyseal scar at the proximal and distal tibiae, respectively. This study suggests that obliteration of the epiphyseal scar is not as dependent on chronological age as previously thought. It is, therefore, recommended that this feature not be used as an indicator of chronological age during forensic age assessment.

  16. Prevalence of scar contractures after burn: A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Oosterwijk, Anouk M; Mouton, Leonora J; Schouten, Hennie; Disseldorp, Laurien M; van der Schans, Cees P; Nieuwenhuis, Marianne K

    2017-02-01

    Burn scar contractures are the pathological outcome of excessive scarring and ongoing scar contraction. Impairment of joint range of motion is a threat to performing activities in daily living. To direct treatment strategies to prevent and/or correct such contractures, insight into the prevalence, course, and determinants is essential. A literature search was conducted including Pubmed, Cochrane library, CINAHL, and PEDro. Articles were included if they provided burn scar contracture data to calculate the point prevalence. The quality of the articles was scored. Data were extracted regarding study, subject and burn characteristics, method of scar contracture assessment, point prevalence, and possible determinants. Nine articles and one abstract could be included for data extraction. The prevalence at discharge was 38-54%, but with a longer time after burn, the prevalence was lower. Contractures were more likely to occur in more severe burns, flame burns, children, female, the cervical spine, and the upper extremity. The prevalence of burn scar contractures varies considerably between studies. When prevalence is unclear, it is also difficult to investigate potential determinants and evaluate changes in interventions. There is a need for extensive, well-designed longitudinal (inter)national studies that investigate prevalence of scar contractures, their evolvement over time, and risk factors. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

  17. Preventing Scars after Injury with Partial Irreversible Electroporation.

    PubMed

    Golberg, Alexander; Villiger, Martin; Khan, Saiqa; Quinn, Kyle P; Lo, William C Y; Bouma, Brett E; Mihm, Martin C; Austen, William G; Yarmush, Martin L

    2016-11-01

    Preventing the formation of hypertrophic scars, especially those that are a result of major trauma or burns, would have enormous impact in the fields of regenerative and trauma medicine. In this report, we introduce a noninvasive method to prevent scarring based on nonthermal partial irreversible electroporation. Contact burn injuries in rats were treated with varying treatment parameters to optimize the treatment protocol. Scar surface area and structural properties of the scar were assessed with histology and non-invasive, longitudinal imaging with polarization-sensitive optical coherence tomography. We found that partial irreversible electroporation using 200 pulses of 250 V and 70 μs duration, delivered at 3 Hz every 20 days during a total of five therapy sessions after the initial burn injury, resulted in a 57.9% reduction of the scar area compared with untreated scars and structural features approaching those of normal skin. Unlike humans, rats do not develop hypertrophic scars. Therefore, the use of a rat animal model is the limiting factor of this work.

  18. Modeling fibrosis using fibroblasts isolated from scarred rat vocal folds

    PubMed Central

    Kishimoto, Yo; Kishimoto, Ayami Ohno; Ye, Shuyun; Kendziorski, Christina; Welham, Nathan V.

    2016-01-01

    Following injury, pathologically activated vocal fold fibroblasts (VFFs) can engage in disordered extracellular matrix (ECM) remodeling, leading to VF fibrosis and impaired voice function. Given the importance of scar VFFs to phenotypically appropriate in vitro modeling of VF fibrosis, we pursued detailed characterization of scar VFFs obtained from surgically injured rat VF mucosae, compared to those obtained from experimentally naïve, age-matched tissue. Scar VFFs initially exhibited a myofibroblast phenotype characterized by increased proliferation, increased Col1a1 transcription and collagen, type I synthesis, increased Acta2 transcription and α-smooth muscle actin synthesis, and enhanced contractile function. These features were most distinct at passage 1 (P1); we observed a coalescence of the scar and naïve VFF phenotypes at later passages. An empirical Bayes statistical analysis of the P1 cell transcriptome identified 421 genes that were differentially expressed by scar, compared to naïve, VFFs. These genes were primarily associated with the wound response, ECM regulation, and cell proliferation. Follow-up comparison of P1 scar VFFs and their in vivo tissue source showed substantial transcriptomic differences. Finally, P1 scar VFFs responded to treatment with hepatocyte growth factor and transforming growth factor-β3, two biologics with reported therapeutic value. Despite the practical limitations inherent to working with early passage cells, this experimental model is easily implemented in any suitably equipped laboratory and has the potential to improve the applicability of preclinical VF fibrosis research. PMID:27111284

  19. Acute Marjolin's Ulcer in a Postauricular Scar after Mastoidectomy

    PubMed Central

    Bukhari, Sumaiyah M.; Hajjaj, Mutawakel F.

    2016-01-01

    Background. Marjolin's ulcer is a rare, aggressive cutaneous malignancy that arises primarily in burn scars but can occur in other types of scars. Squamous cell carcinoma is the most common variant, and while malignant degeneration usually takes a long time, it can develop acutely. Case Report. a 30-year-old man who developed Marjolin's ulcer acutely in a right postauricular scar after mastoidectomy and the incision and drainage of a mastoid abscess. To the best of our knowledge, this report is the first to describe a Marjolin's ulcer in a postauricular surgical scar. However, it has been reported in others areas in the head and neck. Conclusion. Marjolin's ulcer is most commonly observed after postburn scars, but it may be observed after any type of scars, as our patient developed an SCC with a postsurgical scar. Early diagnosis is essential, and a biopsy should be performed on any nonhealing wound or chronic wound that undergoes a sudden change. Tissue samples should be taken from both the centre and the margins of the wound. PMID:28050297

  20. 1550-nm nonablative laser resurfacing for facial surgical scars.

    PubMed

    Pham, Annette M; Greene, Ryan M; Woolery-Lloyd, Heather; Kaufman, Joely; Grunebaum, Lisa D

    2011-01-01

    To investigate the efficacy of 1550-nm (Fraxel SR1500 RE:Store; Solta Medical, Hayward, California) nonablative laser treatment of facial surgical scars. In this prospective clinical study, a volunteer sample of 13 adults with Fitzpatrick skin types I to III and facial surgical scars with a postoperative duration longer than 6 months were enrolled. Subjects were treated once every 4 weeks for a total of 4 treatments. Initial settings for the 1550-nm nonablative laser were at energy level 40 mJ and treatment level 4 and were subsequently increased on each visit according to the patients' tolerance level. Using a previously validated Patient and Observer Scar Assessment Scale (POSAS), the study subject and an independent evaluator completed assessments of the scar at each visit. According to the Friedman test on ratings across all occasions after the first treatment to the last evaluation, there was a statistically significant improvement in the patient's assessment of the color, stiffness, thickness, and irregularity of the scar but not for pain or itching. For the observer's ratings, there was a statistically significant improvement in pigmentation, thickness, relief, and pliability but not for vascularization. Preliminary data suggest improved aesthetic results, demonstrating the potential use of fractional photothermolysis as a scar revision technique. Future studies with a longer follow-up period could elucidate the role of fractional photothermolysis in more permanent scar improvements.

  1. The neck burn scar contracture: a concept of effective treatment.

    PubMed

    Akita, Sadanori; Hayashida, Kenji; Takaki, Satoshi; Kawakami, Yoshihisa; Oyama, Takuto; Ohjimi, Hiroyuki

    2017-01-01

    A neck scar contracture can severely and negatively affect the function of mastication, phonic, or breathing and result in neck pain and issues with esthetics. The best way is of course to avoid such contracture by means of non-surgical treatment such as use of a growth factor. The basic fibroblastic growth factor is clinically well proven in decreasing scar formation and improving healing. There are numerous reconstructive methods for neck contracture, especially when the lesions are relatively limited in part of the neck. However, a very severe and full circumferential scar contracture requires extensive reconstruction. The thin groin flap is one of the answers and well matches with the tissue texture and maintains the flexibility. Even with extensive burns and delayed reconstructions due to resuscitation first, the groin area is well preserved and can be safely harvested by dual vasculature systems of the superficial circumflex iliac artery and superficial epigastric artery, which warrant more reliability compared to the perforator flaps in this area. More demanding and stringent forms of the neck burn scar contracture are the sequelae of radiation. A radiation burn or radiation injury can be progressing and hard to heal. Adipose-derived stem cells can reverse the scar contracture as the surrounding tissue is softened and can accelerate wound healing. In this review, different types of neck burn scar contracture and reconstructive methods are summarized, including innovative use of bFGF and ADSCs in the management of difficult wound healing and scar contracture.

  2. Different effects of BCG strains - A natural experiment evaluating the impact of the Danish and the Russian BCG strains on morbidity and scar formation in Guinea-Bissau.

    PubMed

    Frankel, H; Byberg, S; Bjerregaard-Andersen, M; Martins, C L; Aaby, P; Benn, C S; Fisker, A B

    2016-08-31

    Different Bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG) vaccine strains may have different non-specific effects. We assessed the effect of two BCG strains (Danish and Russian) on childhood morbidity and BCG scarification in Guinea-Bissau. During 2011-2013, infants in the Bandim Health Project's urban study area received the Danish or Russian BCG in a natural experiment. Health center consultations were registered at point of care and scar status and size at age 4½ months. We assessed the effect of strain on consultation rates between vaccination and age 45days in Cox proportional hazards models. Scar prevalence and size were compared using binomial regression and ranksum tests. Among 1206 children, 18% received Danish BCG (n=215) and 82% Russian BCG (n=991). The adjusted hazard ratio (aHR) for consultations was 0.94 (95% CI 0.60-1.46) for Danish BCG compared with Russian BCG. Girls vaccinated with Danish BCG tended to have lower consultation rates compared with girls vaccinated with Russian BCG (aHR 0.56 (0.25-1.24)), whereas the effect was opposite for boys (aHR 1.24 (0.74-2.11)), p=0.09. Children vaccinated with Danish BCG were more likely to develop a scar (97%) than children vaccinated with Russian BCG (87%), the relative risk (RR) being 1.11 (1.06-1.16). The effect was stronger in girls, and BCG scar size was larger among infants vaccinated with the Danish strain. BCG strain influences scar prevalence and scar size, and may have sex differential effects on morbidity. BCG strains are currently used interchangeably, but BCG scarring has been linked to subsequent survival. Hence, more research into the health effects of different BCG strains is warranted. Small adjustments of BCG production could potentially lower childhood morbidity and mortality at low cost. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. MRI evaluation of RF ablation scarring for atrial fibrillation treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishihara, Yuri; Nazafat, Reza; Wylie, John V.; Linguraru, Marius G.; Josephson, Mark E.; Howe, Robert D.; Manning, Warren J.; Peters, Dana C.

    2007-03-01

    This study presents a multi-modality image registration method that evaluates left atrial scarring after radiofrequency (RF) ablation for pulmonary vein (PV) isolation. Our group has recently developed a delayed enhancement magnetic resonance imaging (DE-MRI) method with the potential to visualize and monitor non-invasively post-ablation scarring in the left atrium and the PV ostia. We wished to compare the 3D configuration of scarring in the DE-MRI image and the ablation points recorded by electroanatomical mapping (EAM) system, hypothesizing that scarring detected by DE-MRI overlaps with ablation points recorded by the EAM system used in the procedure. Methods and Results: Three data sets, DE-MRI images and pulmonary vein MR angiography (PV-MRA) images, and EAM data (CARTO-XP, Biosense-Webster, Inc., Diamond Bar, CA) from a patient who underwent PV ablation, were used for the multi-modal image registration. Contrast-enhanced MR imaging was performed 38 days after the ablation procedure. PV-MRA and DE-MRI were fused by intensity-based rigid registration. Scar tissue was extracted from the DE-MRI images using multiple threshold values. EAM data was further fused with segmented PV-MRA by the iterative closest point algorithm (ICP). After registration, the distance from PV-MRA to the scar was 2.6 +/- 2.1 mm, and from ablation points to the surface of the scar was 2.5 +/- 2.3 mm. The fused image demonstrates the 3D relationship between the PV ostia, the scar and the EAM recording of ablation points. Conclusion: Multimodal data fusion indicated that the scar tissue lesion after PV isolation showed good overlap with the ablation points.

  4. Nonlinear optics for the study of human scar tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferro, D. P.; Vieira-Damiani, G.; Adam, R. L.; Cesar, C. L.; Metze, Konradin

    2012-03-01

    Collagen fibers are an essential component of the dynamic process of scarring, which accompanies various diseases. Scar tissue may reveal different morphologic expressions, such as hypertrophic scars or keloids. Collagen fibers can be visualized by fluorescent light when stained with eosin. Second Harmonic Generation (SHG) creates a non linear signal that occurs only in molecules without inversion symmetry and is particularly strong in the collagen fibers arranged in triple helices. The aim of this study was to describe the methodology for the analysis of the density and texture of collagen in keloids, hypertrophic scars and conventional scars. Samples were examined in the National Institute of Science and Technology on Photonics Applied to Cell Biology (INFABIC) at the State University of Campinas. The images were acquired in a multiphoton microscopy LSM 780-NLO Zeiss 40X. Both signals, two-photon fluorescence (TPEF) and SHG, were excited by a Mai-Tai Ti:Sapphire laser at 940 nm. We used a LP490/SP485 NDD filter for SHG, and a BP565-610 NDD filter for fluorescence In each case, ten images were acquired serially (512×512 μm) in Z-stack and joined together to one patchwork-image . Image analysis was performed by a gliding-box-system with in-house made software. Keloids, hypertrophic scars and normal scar tissue show different collagen architecture. Inside an individual case differences of the scar process may be found between central and peripheral parts. In summary, the use of nonlinear optics is a helpful tool for the study of scars tissue.

  5. [Corneal scar development after cross-linking in keratoconus].

    PubMed

    Raiskup, F; Kissner, A; Hoyer, A; Spörl, E; Pillunat, L E

    2010-09-01

    Corneal scar development after riboflavin-UVA-induced corneal collagen cross-linking (CXL) was retrospectively evaluated. A total of 163 CXL-treated eyes in 127 patients with stage 1-3 keratoconus according to Krumeich's classification were included in this retrospective analysis. The follow-up period was 1 year. At the first and at all follow-up examinations uncorrected visual acuity (UCVA), best corrected visual acuity (BCVA), biomicroscopic findings, corneal topography and corneal thickness were recorded. At 1 year following CXL, 149 eyes (91.4%) of 114 patients had a clear cornea without corneal scar (control group), while 14 eyes (8.6%) of 13 patients developed clinically significant corneal scar (scar group). Preoperatively, the mean K value of the apex was 62.1 ± 13.8 D in the control group and 71.1 ± 13.2 D in the scar group (P=.02). The mean value of corneal thickness before the procedure was 478.1 ± 52.4 μm in the control group and 420.0 ± 33.9 μm in the scar group (P=.001). The UCVA and BCVA, which were preoperatively similar between groups (P=.59, P=.75 respectively), were postoperatively improved in the control group (P=.023, P=.001 respectively), but reduced in the scar group (P=.012, P=.004 respectively). K-values and corneal thickness could be considered as predictive factors for the possible development of corneal scarring after riboflavin-UVA-induced CXL. Advanced keratoconus appears to be associated with a higher risk of corneal scar development due to lower corneal thickness, greater curvature and intrinsic tissue characteristics.

  6. Microneedling Therapy in Atrophic Facial Scars: An Objective Assessment

    PubMed Central

    Majid, Imran

    2009-01-01

    Background: Atrophic facial scars are always a challenge to treat, especially the ones that are deep-seated and/or involve much of the face. Microneedling or dermaroller therapy is a new addition to the treatment armamentarium for such scars that offers a simple and reportedly effective management of these scars. Aims: The aim of the present study was to perform an objective evaluation of the efficacy of dermaroller treatment in atrophic facial scars of varying etiology. Materials and Methods: Thirty-seven patients of atrophic facial scarring were offered multiple sittings of microneedling (dermaroller) treatment and their scars were evaluated and graded clinically and by serial photography at the start as well as at two months after the conclusion of the treatment protocol. Any change in the grading of scars after the end of treatment and follow-up period was noted down. The patients were also asked to evaluate the effectiveness of the treatment received on a 1-10 point scale. The efficacy of dermaroller treatment was thus assessed both subjectively by the patients as well as objectively by a single observer. Results: Overall 36 out of the total of 37 patients completed the treatment schedule and were evaluated for its efficacy. Out of these 36 patients, 34 achieved a reduction in the severity of their scarring by one or two grades. More than 80% of patients assessed their treatment as ‘excellent’ on a 10-point scale. No significant adverse effects were noted in any patient. Conclusions: Microneedling therapy seems to be a simple and effective treatment option for the management of atrophic facial scars. PMID:20300368

  7. Compression therapy affects collagen type balance in hypertrophic scar.

    PubMed

    Tejiram, Shawn; Zhang, Jenny; Travis, Taryn E; Carney, Bonnie C; Alkhalil, Abdulnaser; Moffatt, Lauren T; Johnson, Laura S; Shupp, Jeffrey W

    2016-04-01

    The effects of pressure on hypertrophic scar are poorly understood. Decreased extracellular matrix deposition is hypothesized to contribute to changes observed after pressure therapy. To examine this further, collagen composition was analyzed in a model of pressure therapy in hypertrophic scar. Hypertrophic scars created on red Duroc swine (n = 8) received pressure treatment (pressure device mounting and delivery at 30 mm Hg), sham treatment (device mounting and no delivery), or no treatment for 2 wk. Scars were assessed weekly and biopsied for histology, hydroxyproline quantification, and gene expression analysis. Transcription levels of collagen precursors COL1A2 and COL3A1 were quantified using reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. Masson trichrome was used for general collagen quantification, whereas immunofluorescence was used for collagen types I and III specific quantification. Total collagen quantification using hydroxyproline assay showed a 51.9% decrease after pressure initiation. Masson trichrome staining showed less collagen after 1 (P < 0.03) and 2 wk (P < 0.002) of pressure application compared with sham and untreated scars. Collagen 1A2 and 3A1 transcript decreased by 41.9- and 42.3-fold, respectively, compared with uninjured skin after pressure treatment, whereas a 2.3- and 1.3-fold increase was seen in untreated scars. This decrease was seen in immunofluorescence staining for collagen types I (P < 0.001) and III (P < 0.04) compared with pretreated levels. Pressure-treated scars also had lower levels of collagen I and III after pressure treatment (P < 0.05) compared with sham and untreated scars. These results demonstrate the modulation of collagen after pressure therapy and further characterize its role in scar formation and therapy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Ankle dorsiflexion postburn scar contractures: anatomy and reconstructive techniques.

    PubMed

    Grishkevich, Viktor M

    2012-09-01

    Postburn ankle scar contractures cause functional limitations of all lower extremities and create a serious cosmetic defect, not allowing patients to use normal foot wear, and, therefore, needing surgical reconstruction. The anatomic features of ankle dorsiflexion contractures and their treatment have been covered in the literature far less than other joint contractures, and their treatment is still a challenge for many surgeons. A common treatment method is incisional release of the contracture and defect resurfacing with skin graft. Rarely, distally based sural or free flaps and Ilizarov fixator are used. Anatomy of postburn ankle scar contractures in 55 patients was studied and contractures were surgically treated using a specific approach and technique. Follow-up results were observed from 6 months to 16 years. According to the anatomic features, dorsiflexion scar contractures were divided into three types: edge, medial, and total. Edge contractures were caused by burns and scars located on the lateral or medial ankle surface and were characterized by the presence of the fold along the anterior edge ankle; the skin of the anterior ankle surface was not injured. Medial contractures were caused by scars located on the anterior ankle surface and were characterized by the presence of the fold along the medial ankle line. Total contractures were caused by scars tightly surrounding the ankle. In fold's sheets of edge and medial contractures there is a trapeze-shaped surface deficit in length (cause of contracture) and a surface surplus in width which allows contracture release with local trapezoid flaps. For total contractures, wide scar excision and skin grafting were indicated. Three anatomic types of ankle dorsiflexion scar contractures were identified: edge, medial, and total. An anatomically justified technique for edge and medial contractures is trapeze-flap plasty; total contractures are effectively eliminated with scar excision and skin grafting. Copyright

  9. External rhinoplasty for the Arabian nose: a columellar scar analysis.

    PubMed

    Foda, Hossam M T

    2004-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate columellar scar problems after external rhinoplasty in the Arabian population, and to analyze the technical factors that help prevent such problems and maximize the scar cosmesis. The investigation was conducted in university and private practice settings of the author in Alexandria, Egypt. A total of 600 Arab patients who underwent external rhinoplasty were included in the study. All the patients underwent surgery using the external rhinoplasty approach, in which bilateral alar marginal incisions were connected by an inverted V-shaped transcolumellar incision. At completion of the procedure, a two-layer closure of the columellar incision was performed. At a minimum of 1 year postoperatively, the columellar scar was evaluated subjectively by means of a patient questionnaire, and objectively by clinical examination and comparison of the close-up pre- and postoperative basal view photographs. Objectively, anything less than a barely visible, leveled, thin, linear scar was considered unsatisfactory. Subjectively, 95.5% of the patients rated the scar as unnoticeable, 3% as noticeable but acceptable, and 1.5% as unacceptable. Objectively, the scar was unsatisfactory in 7% of the cases. This was because of scar widening with or without depression (5%), hyperpigmentation (1.5%), and columellar rim notching (0.5%). The use of a deep 6/0 polydioxanon (PDS) suture significantly decreased the incidence of scar widening (p < 0.005).The columellar incision can be used safely in the Arab population regardless of their thick, dark, and oily skin. Technical factors that contributed to the favorable outcome of the columellar scar included proper planning of location and design of the incision used, precise execution, meticulous multilayered closure, and good postoperative care.

  10. Efficacy of fractional CO2 laser in treatment of atrophic scar of cutaneous leishmaniasis.

    PubMed

    Banihashemi, Mahnaz; Nahidi, Yalda; Maleki, Masoud; Esmaily, Habibollah; Moghimi, Hamid Reza

    2016-05-01

    Cutaneous leishmaniasis is an endemic disease in Iran. Unfortunately, it can lead to unsightly atrophic scars with limited treatment options. Fractional CO2 laser is accepted for treatment of atrophic acne scars and recently has been used to treat cutaneous leishmaniasis, so we planned to use fractional CO2 laser on leishmaniasis scar. We conducted this study on 60 leishmaniasis scars on the face of 40 patients. The lesions were treated by a fractional CO2 laser with beam size of 120 μm, with energy of 50-90 mJ, and 50-100 spots/cm(2) density with two passes in three monthly sessions. Evaluation was done in the first and second months after the first treatment and 3 and 6 months after the last treatment. Digital photography was performed at each visit. Assessment of improvement rate by patient and physician was rated separately as follows: no improvement (0%), mild (<25%), moderate (25-50%), good (51-75%), and excellent (76-100%). Based on patients' opinion, in the first and second follow-up, 48.3 and 90% of them reported moderate to excellent healing, respectively (p < 0.001). In 3 and 6 months follow-up after the end of the experiment, most of the patients (88.3 and 95%, respectively) reported moderate to excellent healing of scars. Based on two observers' opinion, healing in the first follow-up in most of the patients (65%) was mild to moderate and 33% were reported as having no healing. In the second follow-up, only 5% of the patients were reported with no healing and 60% were reported as having moderate healing (p < 0.001). In 3 and 6 months follow-up, most of the patients (95 and 96.6%) were reported as having moderate to excellent healing (p = <0.001). Our results underlined the high efficacy of fractional CO2 laser for leishmaniasis scar. No significant adverse effects were noted.

  11. Corticosteroids for renal scar prevention in children with acute pyelonephritis.

    PubMed

    Sakulchit, Teeranai; Goldman, Ran D

    2017-04-01

    Question Acute pyelonephritis in children is of great concern and I usually refer these patients to a pediatrician or send them to the emergency department owing to the risk of renal scarring. Are steroids an acceptable treatment to reduce risk of scarring? Answer Several agents have been studied in an effort to prevent renal scar formation following acute pyelonephritis in children. Use of corticosteroids, in conjunction with standard therapy for acute pyelonephritis, shows promising findings. However, evidence is very limited and steroids should not be offered on a regular basis as part of treatment. Copyright© the College of Family Physicians of Canada.

  12. Dermal tunneling: a proposed treatment for depressed scars*

    PubMed Central

    Lima, Emerson Vasconcelos de Andrade

    2016-01-01

    Depressed facial scars are still a challenge in medical literature, despite the wide range of proposed treatments. Subcision is a technique that is frequently performed to improve this type of lesions. This article proposes a new method to release depressed scars, reported and named by the author as dermal tunneling. This study presents a simple and didactic manner to perform this method. The results in 17 patients with facial scars were considered promising. Thus, the technique was deemed to be safe and reproducible. PMID:27828658

  13. Corneal tattooing: an alternative treatment for disfiguring corneal scars

    PubMed Central

    Pitz, S; Jahn, R; Frisch, L; Duis, A; Pfeiffer, N

    2002-01-01

    Background: The performance and results of corneal tattooing are described in a case series of 11 patients suffering from a disfiguring corneal scar using a technique similar to conventional dermatography. Methods: Drawing ink in different shades was applied into the anterior corneal stroma by punctures performed with a conventional spatula needle. Results: Up to 4 years after surgery all patients still had satisfactory staining of the formerly cosmetically disfiguring corneal scar. Conclusion: Tattooing of unsightly corneal scars proved to be an efficient and easy to perform technique, yielding acceptable results during follow up. PMID:11914207

  14. Prospective study concerning 71 cases of caesarean scar endometriosis (CSE).

    PubMed

    Pas, Katarzyna; Joanna, Skręt-Magierło; Renata, Raś; Skręt, Andrzej; Barnaś, Edyta

    2017-04-11

    A prospective study was undertaken involving 71 patients with caesarean scar endometriosis (CSE) between the years 2007 and 2013. A prospective study enabled us to find out: mean age of patients with CSE; 34.0 years (range 22.0-48.0), time between CS and diagnosis of CSE; 12.0 months (range 19.0-39.0), duration between symptoms and surgery; 24.0 months (range 1.0-204.0), mean operation time; 40.0 min. (range 15.0-160.0), and mean lesion size; 54.4 ± 42.3 mm(3). In three patients (4.2%) a large deficit in the abdominal wall was closed by means of polypropylene mesh. One of them conceived a year later. Surgical excision is the only effective treatment in patients with CSE. Wide local excision with clear margins is the key to prevent recurrence. Repair of large post-excisional deficits with mesh may also be offered to woman planning their next pregnancy. Impact statement • What is already known on this subject? Endometriosis in the scar may occur after various abdominal surgeries, more frequently after caesarean sections. The excision of large nodules is connected with suboptimal cosmetic outcomes and the possibility of recurrence. • What the results of this study add? In this study including 71 patients with CSE, wide excision with electrocoagulatory was associated with a single recurrence in 12-month follow-up. In three patients (4.2%) large deficits in the abdominal wall were closed with the use of polypropylene mesh. One of them conceived a year later and had a successful pregnancy. • What the implications are of these findings for clinical practice and/or futher research? Surgical excision is the only effective treatment in patients with CSE. Wide local excision with clear margins is the key to preventing recurrence. Repair of large post excisional deficit with mesh may be offered also to woman planning pregnancy.

  15. The effectiveness of moisturizers in the management of burn scars following burn injury: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Klotz, Tanja; Kurmis, Rochelle; Munn, Zachary; Heath, Kathryn; Greenwood, John E

    2015-11-13

    The common mantra with which patients often leave a burns unit is "moisturize and massage". Various products have been reported for use in practice including aqueous cream BP, bees wax and herbal oil creams, silicone based creams, paraffin/petroleum/mineral oil based products and aloe vera gels. Often combined with other scar management techniques such as pressure therapy, massage and contact media, moisturizers convey active properties of their own.  To date no published review on the optimal moisturizer for burn scar management has been identified via searches of recognized databases. The objective of this review was to identify and synthesize the best available evidence on the effectiveness of moisturizer use in the management of active burn scars following burn injury.  More specifically, this review focused on the following questions:  Does moisturizer use have an effect on scar outcomes following burn injury, including scar formation, skin breakdown, patient acceptance and water loss?  What is the optimal base composition of moisturizers used in scar management for patients who have sustained a burn injury? Types of participants:  Patients of any age who have sustained a burn injury of any size, and have been admitted to a hospital or regional burn unit or burn centre for the management of their injury.  Types of intervention(s)/phenomena of interest:  Studies evaluating moisturizer applied to healed skin following burn injury were considered for inclusion. Moisturizer may have been compared to usual care as defined by the individual study, other interventions, or a different type of moisturizer. Studies comparing moisturizer and massage compared to moisturizer alone were excluded.  Types of studies:  This review primarily considered experimental study designs, including randomized and pseudo-randomized controlled trials.  Types of outcomes:  Primary outcomes for examination in this review included scar formation and skin breakdown, measured by

  16. Use of Vicryl (polyglactin 910) mesh to limit epidural scar formation after laminectomy.

    PubMed

    Nussbaum, C E; McDonald, J V; Baggs, R B

    1990-04-01

    A variety of substances have been used at laminectomy sites to prevent postoperative epidural scarring. Free grafts of autologous subcutaneous fat are commonly used both clinically and experimentally. The free fat grafts usually survive, but decrease in size by about 50%. Postoperatively, subcutaneous seroma has been observed with the use of fat grafts, as well as recurrent symptoms of neural compression by the graft that required additional operations. When compared to the use of free grafts after laminectomy in dogs, Vicryl mesh produced slightly more scarring, but consistently less than that observed in control animals. The Vicryl mesh was resorbed by a minimal chronic inflammatory response over about 45 days. Seven of 11 fat-grafted zones showed signs of necrosis, at times with a greater collection of inflammatory cells than that associated with the Vicryl mesh. Of the 4 fat-grafted zones that showed good survival, 2 had gross evidence of neural compression. No surgical zone treated with Vicryl mesh exhibited evidence of neural compression. In view of these results, the use of Vicryl mesh at laminectomy sites may be a safer method of limiting postoperative epidural scar formation.

  17. Histamine promotes locomotion recovery after spinal cord hemisection via inhibiting astrocytic scar formation.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yan-Yan; Yuan, Yang; Chen, Ying; Jiang, Lei; Liao, Ru-Jia; Wang, Lu; Zhang, Xiang-Nan; Ohtsu, Hiroshi; Hu, Wei-Wei; Chen, Zhong

    2015-05-01

    This study investigated whether histamine could play a protective role in pathophysiological response of spinal cord injury (SCI) and regulate the glial scar formation. Functional assessment and histological analyses were performed to investigate the effect of histamine after SCI. Histidine decarboxylase knockout (HDC(-/-)) mice were used to confirm the action of histamine. Selective antagonists for H1 and H2 receptors were utilized in vivo and in vitro to verify the functional properties of histamine on astrogliosis. The local administration of histamine significantly attenuated the tissue damage and glial scar formation after SCI. In particular, the astrogliosis and neurocan expression found around the lesion were significantly suppressed by histamine. Immunofluorescent staining for neurofilament showed that histamine promoted axonal growth across the glial scar. The HDC(-/-) mice, lacking in endogenous histamine, showed lower behavior score, increased lesion size and astrogliosis, as compared with the wild types. The effect of histamine on locomotor recovery and reactive astrogliosis is reversed by H1 receptor antagonist but not H2 receptor antagonist. Our results indicate that histamine significantly improved the chronic locomotor recovery via attenuating astrogliosis after SCI by stimulating histamine H1 receptor. This study highlights a therapeutic potential of histamine and its related drugs for SCI. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Impact of postthyroidectomy scar on the quality of life of thyroid cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Choi, Yuri; Lee, Ji Hye; Kim, Yeon Hee; Lee, Yong Sang; Chang, Hang-Seok; Park, Cheong Soo; Roh, Mi Ryung

    2014-12-01

    Surgical scars are crucial cosmetic problem, especially when in exposed areas such as the anterior neck following thyroidectomy. To evaluate the impact of post-thyroidectomy scars on quality of life (QoL) of thyroid cancer patients and identify the relationship between scar characteristics and QoL. Patients with post-thyroidectomy scars on the neck were recruited. QoL was measured using the Dermatology Life Quality Index (DLQI). Scar characteristics were graded according to Vancouver scar scale (VSS) score. Ninety-seven patients completed a battery of questions at the time of enrollment. Post-thyroidectomy scars were classified according to morphology as linear flat scars, linear bulging scars, hypertrophic scars or adhesive scars. There were 32 patients (33.0%), 9 patients (9.3%), 41 patients (42.3%) and 15 patients (15.5%), respectively, in each group. The mean total DLQI score was 9.02. Domain 2 (daily activities, 2.87 points), which includes questions about clothing, was the most greatly impacted among patients. The total DLQI scores of patients who have experienced scar-related symptoms were significantly higher than those of patients without symptoms (p<0.05). The VSS scores were 3.09 for linear flat scars, 6.89 for linear bulging scars, 6.29 for hypertrophic scars and 5.60 for adhesive scars. However, the DLQI scores did not significantly differ among scar types or VSS scores. Post-thyroidectomy scars on the neck affect the QoL of thyroid cancer patients regardless of scar type. Therefore, clinicians should pay attention to the psychological effects of scars on patients and take care to minimize post-thyroidectomy scar.

  19. Genome-wide Association Study of Postburn Scarring Identifies a Novel Protective Variant.

    PubMed

    Sood, Ravi F; Hocking, Anne M; Muffley, Lara A; Ga, Maricar; Honari, Shari; Reiner, Alexander P; Gibran, Nicole S

    2015-10-01

    To identify genetic variants associated with the severity of postburn hypertrophic scarring (HTS) using a genome-wide approach. Risk of severe postburn HTS is known to depend on race, but the genetic determinants of HTS are unknown. We conducted a genome-wide association study (GWAS) in a prospective cohort of adults admitted with deep-partial-thickness burns from 2007 through 2014. Scar severity was assessed over time using the Vancouver Scar Scale (VSS), and DNA was genotyped with a >500,000-marker array. We performed association testing of single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) with minor allele frequency (MAF) >0.01 using linear regression of VSS height score on genotype adjusted for patient and injury characteristics as well as population genetic structure. Array-wide significance was based on Bonferroni correction for multiple testing. Of 538 patients (median age 40 years, median burn size 6.0% of body surface area), 71% were men and 76% were White. The mean VSS height score was 1.2 (range: 0-3). Of 289,639 SNPs tested, a variant in the CUB and Sushi multiple domains 1 (CSMD1) gene (rs11136645; MAF = 0.49), was significantly associated with decreased scar height (regression coefficient = -0.23, P = 7.9 × 10). In the first published GWAS of HTS, we report that a common intronic variant in the CSMD1 gene is associated with reduced severity of postburn HTS. If this association is confirmed in an independent cohort, investigating the potential role of CSMD1 in wound healing may elucidate HTS pathophysiology.

  20. [EFFECTIVENESS OF DIFFERENT FLAPS FOR REPAIR OF SEVERE PALM SCAR CONTRACTURE DEFORMITY].

    PubMed

    Pang, Mengru; Xiao, Haitao; Wang, Huaisheng; Liu, Xiaoxue; Chen, Junjie; Cen, Ying

    2016-03-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness of different flaps for repair of severe palm scar contracture deformity. Between February 2013 and March 2015, thirteen cases of severe palm scar contracture deformity were included in the retrospective review. There were 10 males and 3 females, aged from 14 to 54 years (mean, 39 years). The causes included burn in 9 cases, hot-crush injury in 2 cases, chemical burn in 1 case, and electric burn in 1 case. The disease duration was 6 months to 6 years (mean, 2.3 years). After excising scar, releasing contracture and interrupting adherent muscle and tendon, the soft tissues and skin defects ranged from 6.0 cm x 4.5 cm to 17.0 cm x 7.5 cm. The radial artery retrograde island flap was used in 2 cases, the pedicled abdominal flaps in 4 cases, the thoracodorsal artery perforator flap in 2 cases, the anterolateral thigh flap in 1 case, and the scapular free flap in 4 cases. The size of flap ranged from 6.0 cm x 4.5 cm to 17.0 cm x 7.5 cm. All flaps survived well. Venous thrombosis of the pedicled abdominal flaps occurred in 1 case, which was cured after dressing change, and healing by first intention was obtained in the others. The mean follow-up time was 8 months (range, 6-14 months). Eight cases underwent operation for 1-3 times to make the flap thinner. At last follow-up, the flaps had good color, and the results of appearance and function were satisfactory. Severe palm scar contracture deformity can be effectively repaired by proper application of different flaps.

  1. EphA4 deficient mice maintain astroglial-fibrotic scar formation after spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Herrmann, Julia E.; Shah, Ravi R.; Chan, Andrea F.; Zheng, Binhai

    2010-01-01

    One important aspect of recovery and repair after spinal cord injury (SCI) lies in the complex cellular interactions at the injury site that leads to the formation of a lesion scar. EphA4, a promiscuous member of the EphA family of repulsive axon guidance receptors, is expressed by multiple cell types in the injured spinal cord, including astrocytes and neurons. We hypothesized that EphA4 contributes to aspects of cell-cell interactions at the injury site after SCI, thus modulating the formation of the astroglial-fibrotic scar. To test this hypothesis, we studied tissue responses to a thoracic dorsal hemisection SCI in an EphA4 mutant mouse line. We found that EphA4 expression, as assessed by β-galactosidase reporter gene activity, is associated primarily with astrocytes in the spinal cord, neurons in the cerebral cortex and, to a lesser extent, spinal neurons, before and after SCI. However, we did not observe any overt reduction of glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) expression in the injured area of EphA4 mutants in comparison with controls following SCI. Furthermore, there was no evident disruption of the fibrotic scar, and the boundary between reactive astrocytes and meningeal fibroblasts appeared unaltered in the mutants, as were lesion size, neuronal survival and inflammation marker expression. Thus, genetic deletion of EphA4 does not significantly alter the astroglial response or the formation of the astroglial-fibrotic scar following a dorsal hemisection SCI in mice. In contrast to what has been proposed, these data do not support a major role for EphA4 in reactive astrogliosis following SCI. PMID:20170651

  2. EphA4 deficient mice maintain astroglial-fibrotic scar formation after spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Herrmann, Julia E; Shah, Ravi R; Chan, Andrea F; Zheng, Binhai

    2010-06-01

    One important aspect of recovery and repair after spinal cord injury (SCI) lies in the complex cellular interactions at the injury site that leads to the formation of a lesion scar. EphA4, a promiscuous member of the EphA family of repulsive axon guidance receptors, is expressed by multiple cell types in the injured spinal cord, including astrocytes and neurons. We hypothesized that EphA4 contributes to aspects of cell-cell interactions at the injury site after SCI, thus modulating the formation of the astroglial-fibrotic scar. To test this hypothesis, we studied tissue responses to a thoracic dorsal hemisection SCI in an EphA4 mutant mouse line. We found that EphA4 expression, as assessed by beta-galactosidase reporter gene activity, is associated primarily with astrocytes in the spinal cord, neurons in the cerebral cortex and, to a lesser extent, spinal neurons, before and after SCI. However, we did not observe any overt reduction of glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) expression in the injured area of EphA4 mutants in comparison with controls following SCI. Furthermore, there was no evident disruption of the fibrotic scar, and the boundary between reactive astrocytes and meningeal fibroblasts appeared unaltered in the mutants, as were lesion size, neuronal survival and inflammation marker expression. Thus, genetic deletion of EphA4 does not significantly alter the astroglial response or the formation of the astroglial-fibrotic scar following a dorsal hemisection SCI in mice. In contrast to what has been proposed, these data do not support a major role for EphA4 in reactive astrogliosis following SCI. Copyright (c) 2009 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Elastic Stiffness of Grain Boundary Scars and Dislocation Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Homin; Bowick, Mark

    2006-03-01

    We analytically calculate the stiffness of finite-length grain boundaries (scars) on a spherical crystal within the continuum elasticity theory. The scar is composed of an isolated disclination with +1 topological charge together with a finite number of dislocations. We determine the elastic free energy of a single finite-grain boundary scar by considering interacting defects, such as Disclination-Disclination (D-D), Disclination-dislocation (D-d), and dislocation-dislocation (d-d). The harmonic potential binding dislocations to the scar is obtained by determining the free energy of a single dislocation perturbed away from its equilibrium position. The elastic spring constants so obtained are compared to experimental data on dislocation dynamics [1]. We conclude with some comments on interstitial dynamics. [1] Lipowsky, P., Bowick, M. J., Meinke, J. H., Nelson, D. R. and Bausch, A. R. Nature Mater. 4, 407-411 (2005).

  4. Innovative Therapies in the Treatment of Keloids and Hypertrophic Scars

    PubMed Central

    Viera, Martha H.; Amini, Sadegh; Valins, Whitney

    2010-01-01

    Keloids and hypertrophic scars are benign fibrous overgrowths of scar tissue, which results from an abnormal response to trauma. Several therapeutic modalities have been described for the treatment and prevention of these conditions, but the optimal management approach has not yet been defined. This article reviews the most recent, innovative, therapeutic strategies for the management of hypertrophic scars and keloids, including mitomycin-C, tamoxifen citrate, methotrexate, imidazolaquinolines, retinoids, calcineurin inhibitors, phenylakylamine calcium channel blockers, botulinum toxin, vascular endothelial growth factor inhibitors, hepatocyte growth factor, basic fibroblast growth factor, interleukin-10, manosa-6-phosphate, transforming growth factor beta, antihistamines, and prostaglandin E2. No consensus in treatment regimens has been reached due to the limited evidence-based information found in the literature. Most therapeutic options have potential effectiveness as both monotherapy and as combination therapy. However, recent reports offer novel modalities that may approach scarring from different angles. PMID:20725565

  5. Hypertrophic scarring: the greatest unmet challenge following burn injury

    PubMed Central

    Finnerty, Celeste C; Jeschke, Marc G; Branski, Ludwik K; Barret, Juan P.; Dziewulski, Peter; Herndon, David N

    2017-01-01

    Summary Improvements in acute burn care have enabled patients to survive massive burns which would have once been fatal. Now up to 70% of patients develop hypertrophic scars following burns. The functional and psychosocial sequelae remain a major rehabilitative challenge, decreasing quality of life and delaying reintegration into society. The current approach is to optimise the healing potential of the burn wound using targeted wound care and surgery in order to minimise the development of hypertrophic scarring. This approach often fails, and modulation of established scar is continued although the optimal indication, timing, and combination of therapies have yet to be established. The need for novel treatments is paramount, and future efforts to improve outcomes and quality of life should include optimisation of wound healing to attenuate or prevent hypertrophic scarring, well-designed trials to confirm treatment efficacy, and further elucidation of molecular mechanisms to allow development of new preventative and therapeutic strategies. PMID:27707499

  6. Anatomopathological findings in scars: comparative study between different specimens.

    PubMed

    Munteanu, Andrada Despina; Bedereag, Ştefan Iulian; NiŢescu, Cristian; Florescu, Ioan Petre

    2015-01-01

    In spite of the remarkable progress science and medicine have experienced, many facts concerning healing processes and pathological scars are still unknown or incompletely explained. This paper is part of a larger study (research for a PhD thesis) concerning new approaches in the prevention and treatment of pathological post-burn scars. We present and analyze the cases of some patients who developed abnormal scars in order to understand and point out the characteristics, that different types of pathological scars have in common and how we can differentiate them. Knowing what issue to address is the key to any successful therapy. Thus, the information we obtained will help us in applying more appropriate and efficient methods of treatment and in our further research: comparing the efficiency of newer therapies to that of older ones.

  7. Impact Scars from MSL Cruise Stage and Two Balance Weights

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-12-05

    These images from the NASA Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter show several impact scars on Mars made by pieces of the NASA Mars Science Laboratory spacecraft that the spacecraft shed just before entering the Martian atmosphere.

  8. Scarring, stem cells, scaffolds and skin repair.

    PubMed

    Markeson, Daniel; Pleat, Jonathon M; Sharpe, Justin R; Harris, Adrian L; Seifalian, Alexander M; Watt, Suzanne M

    2015-06-01

    The treatment of full thickness skin loss, which can be extensive in the case of large burns, continues to represent a challenging clinical entity. This is due to an on-going inability to produce a suitable tissue engineered substrate that can satisfactorily replicate the epidermal and dermal in vivo niches to fulfil both aesthetic and functional demands. The current gold standard treatment of autologous skin grafting is inadequate because of poor textural durability, scarring and associated contracture, and because of a paucity of donor sites in larger burns. Tissue engineering has seen exponential growth in recent years with a number of 'off-the-shelf' dermal and epidermal substitutes now available. Each has its own limitations. In this review, we examine normal wound repair in relation to stem/progenitor cells that are intimately involved in this process within the dermal niche. Endothelial precursors, in particular, are examined closely and their phenotype, morphology and enrichment from multiple sources are described in an attempt to provide some clarity regarding the controversy surrounding their classification and role in vasculogenesis. We also review the role of the next generation of cellularized scaffolds and smart biomaterials that attempt to improve the revascularisation of artificial grafts, the rate of wound healing and the final cosmetic and functional outcome.

  9. Extensive Burn Scars in Russia's Amur Region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Vast areas of southeastern Russia have been scorched by fires over the last few weeks. All across Siberia fires have been raging, and this Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) image from May 15, 2002, shows extensive, dark burn scars along with actively burning fires (red dots) on the north side of the Amur River, which separates Russia (north) and China (south). The southern Amur region is largely devoted to farming and other agriculture, and these fires may have been set intentionally to prepare the land for the growing season. Fire is often used to clear land of unwanted vegetation, and to return the nutrients stored in vegetation back to the soil. However, fires that are too frequent or severe can devastate the soil, eventually making it unsuitable for farming or grazing. Fires can also escape control and spread into protected areas. In this image, fires are mostly concentrated in a lowland area within the drainage basin of the Zeya River, which drains from the frozen lake at the top of the image. Image courtesy Jacques Descloitres, MODIS Land Rapid Response Team at NASA GSFC

  10. Extensive Burn Scars in Russia's Amur Region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Vast areas of southeastern Russia have been scorched by fires over the last few weeks. All across Siberia fires have been raging, and this Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) image from May 15, 2002, shows extensive, dark burn scars along with actively burning fires (red dots) on the north side of the Amur River, which separates Russia (north) and China (south). The southern Amur region is largely devoted to farming and other agriculture, and these fires may have been set intentionally to prepare the land for the growing season. Fire is often used to clear land of unwanted vegetation, and to return the nutrients stored in vegetation back to the soil. However, fires that are too frequent or severe can devastate the soil, eventually making it unsuitable for farming or grazing. Fires can also escape control and spread into protected areas. In this image, fires are mostly concentrated in a lowland area within the drainage basin of the Zeya River, which drains from the frozen lake at the top of the image. Image courtesy Jacques Descloitres, MODIS Land Rapid Response Team at NASA GSFC

  11. Visible vs hidden scars and their relation to body esteem.

    PubMed

    Lawrence, John W; Fauerbach, James A; Heinberg, Leslie; Doctor, Marion

    2004-01-01

    This study examined the relationship among burn scarring, severity and visibility, and body esteem. Previous work addressing this question has relied on case studies and small samples. We mailed a survey to 2500 members of a national burn survivor support group. Survivors were asked to complete and return the mailed survey or complete the survey on line at our Web site. Three hundred sixty-one survivors completed all questionnaires in the survey relevant to this study, which included measures of burn characteristics, social stigmatization, social support, depression, and body esteem. The sample characteristics were as follows: 52% were women, the mean age was 44.1 years, the mean age burned was 26 years, 88% were European American, 5% were African American, 4% were multiracial, 3% were other, the average TBSA was 48%, and the mean educational level was high school graduate. We measured scar visibility by asking survivors to rate "how often are your burn scars visible to others" on a six-point scale. We also asked them to rate the presence or absence of scars on 15 body parts, total TBSA, and number of surgeries. The correlation between visible scarring and different aspects of body esteem, that is, self-satisfaction with appearance (-.19) and perception of others reaction to your appearance (-.27), was statistically significant but low. Visible scarring was unrelated to self-satisfaction with weight (.01). Visible scarring had a low but significant correlation with perceived stigmatization (.23) and was not correlated with depression (0.01). Other measures of scarring also had low correlations with social and emotional outcome variables. Because scar severity and visibility are hypothesized to be particularly relevant to body esteem, we performed a multiple regression predicting body esteem. We entered the variables in three blocks: burn characteristics, demographic characteristics, and social and emotional characteristics. Burn characteristics accounted for less

  12. Columellar Incision Scars in Asian Patients Undergoing Open Rhinoplasty.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ho Chan; Jang, Yong Ju

    2016-05-01

    An open approach has been adopted for rhinoplasty because of its wide and undistorted exposure. The formation of a columellar incision scar is the main drawback of this approach. To evaluate the incidence and evolution of and risk factors for columellar incision scars in an Asian population. A retrospective case series of 529 patients who underwent open rhinoplasty was performed in a tertiary care referral center in South Korea from January 1, 2011, to May 31, 2014. Problematic transcolumellar incision scars were categorized into wide and depressed, notching, and hyperpigmented wound types. Follow-up was complete on January 28, 2015, and data were assessed from July 1, 2014, to May 29, 2015. The incidence of each problematic scar and the time course of erythema evolution were evaluated. Factors affecting the formation of a problematic scar were also evaluated. Of 529 patients (176 female and 353 male patients; mean age, 31 [range, 5-70] years), 234 patients with at least 6 months of follow-up underwent evaluation for a problematic scar. Fourteen of the 234 patients (6.0%) had problematic incision scarring (wide and depressed wound, 4 [1.7%]; notching wound, 3 [1.3%]; hyperpigmentation, 4 [1.7%]; marginal incision hypertrophic scar, 2 [0.8%]; and columellar skin necrosis, 1 [0.4%]). Of the 243 patients with regular follow-up who underwent evaluation for erythema evolution, erythematous wounds were found in almost all in the immediate postoperative period and had normalized by a mean (SD) of 66.7 (37.4) postoperative days. Use of costal cartilage as tip graft material was associated with a problematic incision scar (2 of 25 patients [8.0%] vs 6 of 180 patients with other graft material [3.3%]; P = .02). In this cohort of Asian patients, the incisions used for an open rhinoplasty approach had some problems. However, the low incidence of problematic scars indicates that open rhinoplasty should not be discouraged because of the incision scar. 4.

  13. Comparison of quality of facial scars after single low-level laser therapy and combined low-level with high-level (PDL 595 nm) laser therapy.

    PubMed

    Vranova, Jana; Remlova, Eva; Jelinkova, Helena; Rosina, Jozef; Dostalova, Tatjana

    2015-01-01

    The main goal of our study was to compare the quality of resulting facials scar 12 weeks after single and combined laser therapy. Forty-one children from age 1.5 to 5 years with facial scars after injury participated in the study. Thirty-one underwent laser therapy, 14 were treated using single low-level laser therapy (670 nm, fluence 3-5 J/cm(-2) ), and 17 underwent combined high-level laser therapy with non-ablative pulsed dye laser (PDL; 595 nm, spot size 7 mm, delay 0.45 ms or 1.5 ms, fluence 9-11 J/cm(-2) , cryogen spray/delay 20/30 ms) and low-level laser therapy. The control group consisted of 10 untreated children. Before treatment and at week 4, 8, and, 12 the scars were evaluated using the POSAS questionnaire. A statistically significant improvement in scars (between ratings before treatment and 4 weeks after therapy, before treatment and 8 weeks after therapy and before treatment and 12 weeks after therapy) was observed in all parameters in both treatment groups (p < 0.0001). For the HLLT+LLLT group the most significant enhancement in the quality of scars was found for all items and at all evaluations, except pigmentation and pliability. There was no improvement observed in quality of facial scars in the control group.

  14. Evaluation of Acne Scars: How to Assess Them and What to Tell the Patient.

    PubMed

    Fife, Douglas

    2016-04-01

    The prevalence and emotional impact of acne scarring are underestimated by the medical community. Dermatology providers should be able to evaluate the acne scar patient and discuss treatment options. Important aspects of the patient history include current treatments, prior acne scar procedures, and the patient's goals for treatment. During the physical examination, the scars are assessed and classified by scar morphology and overall severity of scarring. Finally, a treatment plan is developed in which the most appropriate procedures are matched with the scars that will work the best. Helping the patient understand likely expectations for improvement will increase overall satisfaction. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Keloids and Hypertrophic Scars: Pathophysiology, Classification, and Treatment.

    PubMed

    Berman, Brian; Maderal, Andrea; Raphael, Brian

    2017-01-01

    Keloid and hypertrophic scars represent an aberrant response to the wound healing process. These scars are characterized by dysregulated growth with excessive collagen formation, and can be cosmetically and functionally disruptive to patients. Objectives are to describe the pathophysiology of keloid and hypertrophic scar, and to compare differences with the normal wound healing process. The classification of keloids and hypertrophic scars are then discussed. Finally, various treatment options including prevention, conventional therapies, surgical therapies, and adjuvant therapies are described in detail. Literature review was performed identifying relevant publications pertaining to the pathophysiology, classification, and treatment of keloid and hypertrophic scars. Though the pathophysiology of keloid and hypertrophic scars is not completely known, various cytokines have been implicated, including interleukin (IL)-6, IL-8, and IL-10, as well as various growth factors including transforming growth factor-beta and platelet-derived growth factor. Numerous treatments have been studied for keloid and hypertrophic scars,which include conventional therapies such as occlusive dressings, compression therapy, and steroids; surgical therapies such as excision and cryosurgery; and adjuvant and emerging therapies including radiation therapy, interferon, 5-fluorouracil, imiquimod, tacrolimus, sirolimus, bleomycin, doxorubicin, transforming growth factor-beta, epidermal growth factor, verapamil, retinoic acid, tamoxifen, botulinum toxin A, onion extract, silicone-based camouflage, hydrogel scaffold, and skin tension offloading device. Keloid and hypertrophic scars remain a challenging condition, with potential cosmetic and functional consequences to patients. Several therapies exist which function through different mechanisms. Better understanding into the pathogenesis will allow for development of newer and more targeted therapies in the future.

  16. Suppression of scarring in peripheral nerve implants by drug elution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    FitzGerald, James J.

    2016-04-01

    Objective. Medical implants made of non-biological materials provoke a chronic inflammatory response, resulting in the deposition of a collagenous scar tissue (ST) layer on their surface, that gradually thickens over time. This is a critical problem for neural interfaces. Scar build-up on electrodes results in a progressive decline in signal level because the scar tissue gradually separates axons away from the recording contacts. In regenerative sieves and microchannel electrodes, progressive scar deposition will constrict and may eventually choke off the sieve hole or channel lumen. Interface designs need to address this issue if they are to be fit for long term use. This study examines a novel method of inhibiting the formation and thickening of the fibrous scar. Approach. Research to date has mainly focused on methods of preventing stimulation of the foreign body response by implant surface modification. In this paper a pharmacological approach using drug elution to suppress chronic inflammation is introduced. Microchannel implants made of silicone doped with the steroid drug dexamethasone were implanted in the rat sciatic nerve for periods of up to a year. Tissue from within the microchannels was compared to that from control devices that did not release any drug. Main results. In the drug eluting implants the scar layer was significantly thinner at all timepoints, and unlike the controls it did not continue to thicken after 6 months. Control implants supported axon regeneration well initially, but axon counts fell rapidly at later timepoints as scar thickened. Axon counts in drug eluting devices were initially much lower, but increased rather than declined and by one year were significantly higher than in controls. Significance. Drug elution offers a potential long term solution to the problem of performance degradation due to scarring around neural implants.

  17. Scar tissue and microvolt T-wave alternans.

    PubMed

    Kraaier, Karin; Olimulder, Marlon A G M; Galjee, Michel A; van Dessel, Pascal F H M; van der Palen, Job; Wilde, Arthur A M; Scholten, Marcoen F

    2014-04-01

    Microvolt T-wave alternans (MTWA) is an electrocardiographic marker for predicting sudden cardiac death. In this study, we aimed to study the relation between MTWA and scar assessed with cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (CMR) in patients with ischemic cardiomyopathy (ICM) or dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM). Sixty-eight patients with positive or negative MTWA and analysable CMR examination were included. Using CMR and the delayed enhancement technique, left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF), volumes, wall motion and scar characteristics were assessed. Overall, positive MTWA (n = 40) was related to male gender (p = 0.04), lower LVEF (p = 0.04) and increased left ventricular end-diastolic volume (LVEDV) (p < 0.01). After multivariate analysis, male gender (p = 0.01) and lower LVEF remained significant (p = 0.02). Scar characteristics (presence, transmurality, and scar score) were not related to MTWA (all p > 0.5). In the patients with ICM (n = 40) scar was detected in 38. Positive MTWA (n = 18) was related to higher LVEDV (p = 0.05). In patients with DCM (n = 28), scar was detected in 11. Trends were found between positive MTWA (n = 15) and male gender (p = 0.10), lower LVEF (p = 0.10), and higher LVEDV (p = 0.09). In both subgroups, the presence, transmurality or extent of scar was not related to MTWA (all p > 0.45). In this small study, neither in patients with ICM or DCM a relation was found between the occurrence of MTWA and the presence, transmurality or extent of myocardial scar. Overall there was a significant relation between heart failure remodeling parameters and positive MTWA.

  18. Tuberculin reaction and BCG scar: association with infant mortality.

    PubMed

    Timmermann, Clara Amalie Gade; Biering-Sørensen, Sofie; Aaby, Peter; Fisker, Ane Baerent; Monteiro, Ivan; Rodrigues, Amabelia; Benn, Christine Stabell; Ravn, Henrik

    2015-12-01

    To test the hypothesis that having a scar and a positive tuberculin skin test (TST) response after vaccination with Bacille Calmette-Guérin (BCG) is associated with reduced infant mortality. We studied cohorts of 2709 normal-birthweight (NBW) and 1102 low-birthweight (LBW) infants in Guinea-Bissau. Children were enrolled in randomised trials between year 2002 and 2008 and received BCG vaccination at birth. BCG scars and TST responses were assessed at 2 and 6 months of age. The infants were followed for mortality to 12 months of age, and survival was analysed using Cox regression. At age 2 months, 88% of NBW children and 91% of LBW children had a BCG scar, and 36% and 17% had a TST response, respectively. The LBW infants had nearly twofold higher mortality (4.5%) than the NBW infants (2.8%) between 2 and 12 months of age. In the LBW cohort, the adjusted mortality rate ratio (MRR) comparing children with a BCG scar with those without was 0.42 (95% CI = 0.19; 0.93). There was a similar tendency for TST positivity: MRR = 0.47 (95% CI = 0.14; 1.54). For LBW children who had both a positive TST reaction and a scar, the MRR was 0.22 (95% CI = 0.05; 0.87). For NBW children, a scar and a positive TST were associated with 20% reductions in mortality, which did not reach statistical significance. We confirmed previous observations that having a scar and a TST response after BCG vaccination is associated with lower mortality risk. The possibility of revaccinating scar-negative children should be considered. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Quantitative measurement of hypertrophic scar: interrater reliability and concurrent validity.

    PubMed

    Nedelec, Bernadette; Correa, José A; Rachelska, Grazyna; Armour, Alexis; LaSalle, Léo

    2008-01-01

    Research into the pathophysiology and treatment of hypertrophic scar (HSc) remains limited by the heterogeneity of scar and the imprecision with which its severity is measured. The objective of this study was to test the interrater reliability and concurrent validity of the Cutometer measurement of elasticity, the Mexameter measurement of erythema and pigmentation, and total thickness measure of the DermaScan C relative to the modified Vancouver Scar Scale (mVSS) in patient-matched normal skin, normal scar, and HSc. Three independent investigators evaluated 128 sites (severe HSc, moderate or mild HSc, donor site, and normal skin) on 32 burn survivors using all of the above measurement tools. The intraclass correlation coefficient, which was used to measure interrater reliability, reflects the inherent amount of error in the measure and is considered acceptable when it is >0.75. Interrater reliability of the totals of the height, pliability, and vascularity subscales of the mVSS fell below the acceptable limit ( congruent with0.50). The individual subscales of the mVSS fell well below the acceptable level (< or =0.3). The Cutometer reading of elasticity provided acceptable reliability (>0.89) for each study site with the exception of severe scar. Mexameter and DermaScan C reliability measurements were acceptable for all sites (>0.82). Concurrent validity correlations with the mVSS were significant except for the comparison of the mVSS pliability subscale and the Cutometer maximum deformation measure comparison in severe scar. In conclusion, the Mexameter and DermaScan C measurements of scar color and thickness of all sites, as well as the Cutometer measurement of elasticity in all but the most severe scars shows high interrater reliability. Their significant concurrent validity with the mVSS confirms that these tools are measuring the same traits as the mVSS, and in a more objective way.

  20. Perennial plate tectonics with lasting mantle lithosphere scars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heron, P.; Pysklywec, R. N.; Stephenson, R.

    2015-12-01

    Although the conventional theory of plate tectonics can explain non-rigid behaviour at plate boundaries, it cannot adequately explain the processes involved in deformation and seismicity within plate interiors. Here, we consider that the pre-existing deformation or "scarring" within the mantle lithosphere may have a very long lived presence that could incorporate deformation of the plate interior and plate boundary. Mantle lithosphere scars from continent-continent collisions could generate virtual plate boundaries that remain over long timescales, producing "perennial" plate tectonics. Local geophysical studies can map the crustal environment well, and global whole mantle tomography models are rapidly improving, yet high-resolution images of the mantle lithosphere are often not available in regions where scarring may be present. Where mantle lithosphere heterogeneities have been observed (usually interpreted simply as subduction scars), the same attention has not been afforded to them as, for example, re-activation of faults within the Earth's crust. In idealized numerical simulations, we compare how relic scarring at varying depths in the lithosphere affects patterns of deformation. High-resolution thermal-mechanical numerical experiments explore continental lithospheric deformation featuring a weakened crust and mantle lithosphere scars. Our models show that deep lithospheric scars can control the tectonic evolution of a region over shallow geological features, indicating the importance of mantle lithosphere heterogeneities. The Altyn Tagh Fault (ATF) in central China is an example of an ancient continental collision zone that undergoes periodic deformation during times of regional compression. We suggest that the ATF may be a locale where a long-lasting mantle lithosphere scar can control the subsequent crustal evolution and deformation, with ancient plate boundaries having a "perennial" plate tectonic presence.

  1. Scar Functions, Barriers for Chemical Reactivity, and Vibrational Basis Sets.

    PubMed

    Revuelta, F; Vergini, E; Benito, R M; Borondo, F

    2016-07-14

    The performance of a recently proposed method to efficiently calculate scar functions is analyzed in problems of chemical interest. An application to the computation of wave functions associated with barriers relevant for the LiNC ⇄ LiCN isomerization reaction is presented as an illustration. These scar functions also constitute excellent elements for basis sets suitable for quantum calculation of vibrational energy levels. To illustrate their efficiency, a calculation of the LiNC/LiCN eigenfunctions is also presented.

  2. A paired comparison analysis of third-party rater thyroidectomy scar preference.

    PubMed

    Rajakumar, C; Doyle, P C; Brandt, M G; Moore, C C; Nichols, A; Franklin, J H; Yoo, J; Fung, K

    2017-01-01

    To determine the length and position of a thyroidectomy scar that is cosmetically most appealing to naïve raters. Images of thyroidectomy scars were reproduced on male and female necks using digital imaging software. Surgical variables studied were scar position and length. Fifteen raters were presented with 56 scar pairings and asked to identify which was preferred cosmetically. Twenty duplicate pairings were included to assess rater reliability. Analysis of variance was used to determine preference. Raters preferred low, short scars, followed by high, short scars, with long scars in either position being less desirable (p < 0.05). Twelve of 15 raters had acceptable intra-rater and inter-rater reliability. Naïve raters preferred low, short scars over the alternatives. High, short scars were the next most favourably rated. If other factors influencing incision choice are considered equal, surgeons should consider these preferences in scar position and length when planning their thyroidectomy approach.

  3. Effects of Noscarna™ on hypertrophic scarring in the rabbit ear model: histopathological aspects.

    PubMed

    Lee, Dong Won; Ku, Sae Kwang; Cho, Hyuk Jun; Kim, Jeong Hwan; Hiep, Tran Tuan; Han, Sang Duk; Kim, Bo Gyun; Kang, Min Kyung; Do, Eui Seon; Jun, Joon Ho; Jang, Sun Woo; Son, Mi-Won; Sohn, Young Taek; Choi, Han-Gon; Yong, Chul Soon; Kim, Jong Oh

    2012-11-01

    In this study, we evaluated the effects of silicone-based gel on the healing of hypertrophic scars in the rabbit ear model. After 4-week application of silicone-based gel containing allantoin, dexpanthenol and heparin (Noscarna™) to scars in a rabbit ear model of hypertrophic scarring, significant improvements in hypertrophic scar healing and a great loss of skin pigment were observed compared to the non-treated control, base or silicone control-treated scars. Furthermore, histological analysis of Noscarna™-treated scars revealed a significant reduction in scar elevation index (SEI), anterior skin and epithelial thicknesses, inflammatory cells, vessels, collagen disorganization and fibroblasts compared to all control hypertrophic scars. Furthermore, Noscarna™ showed more favorable effects on hypertrophic scars than a commercial product, Contractubex®. Therefore, these results clearly demonstrated that the newly developed silicone-based gel, Noscarna™, could be a promising formulation as an effective therapeutic agent for hypertrophic scars.

  4. Short and long-term cosmesis of cervical thyroidectomy scars.

    PubMed

    Dordea, M; Aspinall, S R

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Multiple surgical approaches to the thyroid gland have been described via cervical or extracervical routes. Improved cosmesis, patient satisfaction, reduced pain (procedure dependent) and early discharge have all been reported for minimally invasive approaches with similar safety profiles and long-term outcomes to conventional surgery. This review summarises the current evidence base for improved cosmesis with minimally invasive cervical approaches to the thyroid gland compared with conventional surgery. Methods A systematic review was undertaken. The MEDLINE(®), Embase™ and Cochrane databases were searched for relevant articles. Results A total of 57 papers thyroid papers were identified. Of those, 20 reported some form of cosmetic outcome assessment. There were 6 randomised controlled trials with 412 patients (evidence level 2B), 7 cohort studies with 3,073 patients (level 3B) and 7 non-comparative case series with 1,575 patients (level 4). There was significant heterogeneity between studies in terms of wound closure technique, timing of scar assessment and scar assessment scales (validated and non-validated). Most studies performed early scar assessments, some using non-validated scar assessment tools. Conclusions Assessment of cosmesis is complex and requires rigorous methodology. Evidence from healing/remodelling studies suggests scar maturation is a long-term process. This calls into question the value of early scar assessment. Current evidence does not support minimally invasive surgical approaches to the thyroid gland if improved long-term cosmesis is the goal.

  5. Mast Cells Contribute to Scar Formation During Fetal Wound Healing

    PubMed Central

    Wulff, Brian C.; Parent, Allison E.; Meleski, Melissa A.; DiPietro, Luisa A.; Schrementi, Megan E.; Wilgus, Traci A.

    2011-01-01

    Scar formation is a potentially detrimental process of tissue restoration in adults, affecting organ form and function. During fetal development, cutaneous wounds heal without inflammation or scarring at early stages of development, but begin to heal with significant inflammation and scarring as the skin becomes more mature. One possible cell type that could regulate the change from scarless to fibrotic healing is the mast cell. We show here that dermal mast cells in scarless wounds generated at embryonic day 15 (E15) are fewer in number, less mature and do not degranulate in response to wounding as effectively as mast cells of fibrotic wounds made at embryonic day 18 (E18). Differences were also observed between cultured mast cells from E15 and E18 skin with regard to degranulation and preformed cytokine levels. Injection of mast cell lysates into E15 wounds disrupted scarless healing, suggesting that mast cells interfere with scarless repair. Finally, wounds produced at E18, which normally heal with a scar, healed with significantly smaller scars in mast cell-deficient KitW/W-v mice compared to Kit+/+ littermates. Together, these data suggest that mast cells enhance scar formation, and that these cells may mediate the transition from scarless to fibrotic healing during fetal development. PMID:21993557

  6. Short and long-term cosmesis of cervical thyroidectomy scars

    PubMed Central

    Dordea, M; Aspinall, SR

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Multiple surgical approaches to the thyroid gland have been described via cervical or extracervical routes. Improved cosmesis, patient satisfaction, reduced pain (procedure dependent) and early discharge have all been reported for minimally invasive approaches with similar safety profiles and long-term outcomes to conventional surgery. This review summarises the current evidence base for improved cosmesis with minimally invasive cervical approaches to the thyroid gland compared with conventional surgery. Methods A systematic review was undertaken. The MEDLINE®, Embase™ and Cochrane databases were searched for relevant articles. Results A total of 57 papers thyroid papers were identified. Of those, 20 reported some form of cosmetic outcome assessment. There were 6 randomised controlled trials with 412 patients (evidence level 2B), 7 cohort studies with 3,073 patients (level 3B) and 7 non-comparative case series with 1,575 patients (level 4). There was significant heterogeneity between studies in terms of wound closure technique, timing of scar assessment and scar assessment scales (validated and non-validated). Most studies performed early scar assessments, some using non-validated scar assessment tools. Conclusions Assessment of cosmesis is complex and requires rigorous methodology. Evidence from healing/remodelling studies suggests scar maturation is a long-term process. This calls into question the value of early scar assessment. Current evidence does not support minimally invasive surgical approaches to the thyroid gland if improved long-term cosmesis is the goal. PMID:26688393

  7. Case Report: Pediatric Scar Management After Open-heart Surgery.

    PubMed

    Phan, Ha; Harger, Beau; Estrada, Nick

    2016-01-01

    Tetralogy of Fallot is a congenital disease caused by structural defects within the heart that can lead to cyanosis. The purpose of this case report is to discuss the use of PracaSil-Plus, a proprietary topical anhydrous silicone base containing pracaxi oil, in scar-management therapy, following open-heart surgery on a pediatric patient with tetralogy of Fallot. The Patient and Observer Scar Assessment Scale was the research instrument used to evaluate for efficacy of the scar therapy. Following 8 weeks of treatment with PracaSil-Plus, reduction in scores were observed for scar color, stiffness, thickness, and irregularity, with improvements of 87.5%, 90.0%, 66.7%, and 66.7% from baseline, respectively. The post-treatment scar was similar to normal skin in appearance, with a 77.8% improvement in the total score. These results show that PracaSil-Plus may be a valuable option for practitioners and pharmacists to consider in pediatric scar-management therapy. Copyright© by International Journal of Pharmaceutical Compounding, Inc.

  8. [Scar revision in children: Clinical situations and solutions].

    PubMed

    Duquennoy-Martinot, V; Belkhou, A; Pasquesoone, L; Depoortère, C; Guerreschi, P

    2016-10-01

    The scar of soft tissues is a permanent stigma of a trauma but it can sometimes be improved. It is more or less accepted by the patient and may be the source of a significant physical and psychosocial impact that leads to a request for a scar revision. Even if the child presents generally an excellent ability to heal, the quality of the scar depends on many factors such as the age, the type of scar or trauma and the affected body area. Thus, its aesthetic impact, functional but also on the growth of the child will be different. Moreover, these scars have a number of origins: neonatal surgery, natural history of congenital lesions or after a surgical management; surgeries for orthopedic, cardiac, craniofacial or hand birth defects and congenital malformations; or infectious or traumatic as in the case of burns and animal bites. We have many ways to try to correct or improve these scars, which use all the plastic surgery techniques. However, we need to establish for each case an appropriate management strategy with the objective of not inducing additional sequelae, respecting the growth of the child. Several techniques can be combined and the chronology of the surgical procedures must consider the school, social and family integration of the child. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  9. Comparison of scar thickness measurements using trans-vaginal sonography and MRI in cases of pregnancy with previous caesarean section. Do they correlate with actual scar thickness?

    PubMed

    Singh, N; Tripathi, R; Mala, Y M; Dixit, R; Tyagi, S; Batra, A

    2013-11-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate scar thickness in cases of pregnancy with previous caesarean section, by trans-vaginal sonography (TVS) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and to correlate precision of radiologically-measured scar thickness with actual measurement of scar thickness. A total of 35 pregnant patients with previous caesarean section planned for elective caesarean section, were evaluated prospectively. Their scar thickness was measured by TVS and MRI on the day of elective repeat caesarean section. These measurements were correlated with each other and with scar thickness measured during elective repeat caesarean section by using a caliper. The correlation coefficients between scar thickness measured by TVS and MRI with peroperative evaluation with a caliper, were +0.72 and +0.59, respectively. The study concluded that as MRI is a costlier modality and TVS has better correlation coefficient with actual scar thickness, TVS can be considered to be the better modality for antenatal scar thickness measurement.

  10. Scar prevention by laser-assisted scar healing (LASH) using thermal post-conditioning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gossé, Alban; Iarmarcovai, Gwen; Capon, Alexandre; Cornil, Alain; Mordon, Serge

    2009-02-01

    An 810-nm diode laser system was developed to accelerate and improve the healing process in surgical scars. Using thermal post-conditioning, the laser system provides a localised moderate heating whose maximum temperature is controlled to prevent tissue damage and stimulate the heat shock proteins (HSP) synthesis. The 810-nm wavelength allows a deep penetration of the light into the dermis, without damaging the epidermis. The time along which surgical incision is treated (continuous wave) must therefore be selected carefully with respect to the temperature precision achieved within the heated volume. A top-hat profile is preferred to a Gaussian profile in order to ensure the skin surface temperature is homogenised, as is the temperature of the heated volume. The spot shape will depend on the medical indication. The treatment should be made safe and controlled by means of a safety strip containing an RFID chip which will transmit the various operating settings to the laser device. A clinical trial aims at evaluating the 810 nm-diode laser in surgical incisions, with only one laser treatment immediately after skin closure, of patients with Fitzpatrick skin types I to IV. Surgical incisions were divided into two fields, with only portions randomly selected receiving laser treatment. At the final scar analysis (12 months) of the pilot study, the treated portion scored significantly better for both surgeon (P = 0.046) and patients (P = 0.025). Further studies may be warranted to better understand the cellular mechanisms leading to Laser-Assisted Skin Healing (LASH).

  11. Scar prevention and remodeling: a review of the medical, surgical, topical and light treatment approaches.

    PubMed

    Kerwin, Leonard Y; El Tal, Abdel Kader; Stiff, Mark A; Fakhouri, Tarek M

    2014-08-01

    Cosmetic, functional, and structural sequelae of scarring are innumerable, and measures exist to optimize and ultimately minimize these sequelae. To evaluate the innumerable methods available to decrease the cosmetic, functional, and structural repercussions of scarring, pubMed search of the English literature with key words scar, scar revision, scar prevention, scar treatment, scar remodeling, cicatrix, cicatrix treatment, and cicatrix remodeling was done. Original articles and reviews were examined and included. Seventy-nine manuscripts were reviewed. Techniques, comparisons, and results were reviewed and tabulated. Overall, though topical modalities are easier to use and are usually more attractive to the patient, the surgical approaches still prove to be superior and more reliable. However, advances in topical medications for scar modification are on the rise and a change towards medical treatment of scars may emerge as the next best approach. Comparison studies of the innumerable specific modalities for scar revision and prevention are impossible. Standardization of techniques is lacking. Scarring, the body's natural response to a wound, can create many adverse effects. At this point, the practice of sound, surgical fundamentals still trump the most advanced preventative methods and revision techniques. Advances in medical approaches are available, however, to assist the scarring process, which even the most advanced surgical fundamentals will ultimately lead to. Whether through newer topical therapies, light treatment, or classical surgical intervention, our treatment armamentarium of scars has expanded and will allow us to maximize scar prevention and to minimize scar morbidity.

  12. New diagnostic criteria and operative strategy for cesarean scar syndrome: Endoscopic repair for secondary infertility caused by cesarean scar defect.

    PubMed

    Tanimura, Satoshi; Funamoto, Hiroshi; Hosono, Takashi; Shitano, Yasushi; Nakashima, Masao; Ametani, Yuka; Nakano, Takashi

    2015-09-01

    The aim of the present study was to assess the efficacy of endoscopic repair for secondary infertility caused by post-cesarean scar defect (PCSD). Our investigation focused on the validity of new diagnostic criteria and selection methods. The subjects were 22 women with secondary infertility due to PCSD with retention of bloody fluid in the uterine cavity. Women with a residual myometrial thickness of ≥ 2.5 mm and an anteflexed or straight uterus underwent hysteroscopic surgery, while all others underwent laparoscopic repair. Hysteroscopic surgery involved resection and coagulation of scarred areas, whereas laparoscopic surgery involved removal of scarred areas combined with hysteroscopy, followed by resuturing. Fourteen of the 22 women (63.6%) who were followed up for ≥ 1 year after surgery achieved pregnancy. Pregnancies occurred in all four women (100%) who underwent hysteroscopic surgery and in 10 of the 18 women (55.6%) who underwent laparoscopic surgery. Three out of four women who underwent hysteroscopic surgery had term deliveries. Among the women who underwent laparoscopic surgery, five had term deliveries. No cases of uterine rupture were experienced, and the delivery method was cesarean section in all cases. We propose that infertility associated with PCSD, cesarean scar syndrome, is caused by the retention of bloody fluid in the uterine cavity and scarring. Endoscopic treatment, such as hysteroscopy or laparoscopy, was effective for cesarean scar syndrome. © 2015 Japan Society of Obstetrics and Gynecology.

  13. "Optimizing Your Post-Surgical Scars: A Systematic Review on Best Practices in Preventative Scar Management"1.

    PubMed

    Perez, Justin L; Rohrich, Rod J

    2017-08-03

    Scar management is critical for every plastic surgeon's practice and, ultimately, the patient's satisfaction with his or her aesthetic result. Despite the critical nature of this component of routine post-operative care, there has yet to be a comprehensive analysis of the available literature over the last decade to assess the best algorithmic approach to scar care. To this end, a systematic review of best practices in preventative scar management was conducted to elucidate the highest level of evidence available on this subject to date. A computerized MEDLINE search was performed for clinical studies addressing scar management. The resulting publications were screened randomized clinical trials that met our specified inclusion/exclusion criteria. This systematic review was performed in May 2016. The initial search for MeSH term "cicatrix" and modifiers "therapy, radiotherapy, surgery, drug therapy, prevention and control" yielded 13,101 initial articles. Applying our inclusion/exclusion criteria resulted in 12 relevant articles. All included articles are randomized, controlled clinical trials. Optimal scar care requires taking into account factors such as incisional tension, anatomic location, and Fitzpatrick skin type. We present a streamlined algorithm for scar prophylaxis based on contemporary level I and II evidence to guide clinical practice.

  14. Combination Therapy for Acne Scarring: Personal Experience and Clinical Suggestions.

    PubMed

    Kroepfl, Lucija; Emer, Jason J

    2016-11-01

    Acne is one of the most prevalent skin conditions seen by dermatologists. The cosmetic sequelae of severe acne, including scarring and pigmentation, have a profound psychological impact on those in icted. Topical (eg, retinoids, antibiotics, dapsone, hydroxyacids) and oral treatments (eg, antibiotics and/or spironolactone) are often bene cial to control acne or in the instance of oral isotretinoin use, rid the acne permanently; however, these treatments have very little affect on the ultimate cosmetic outcome of the acne scarring and skin texture that results. Given the variety of scar types that can form and the variability of responses seen in various skin types and textures, treatment options are vast without appropriate guidelines for pathways that dictate best timing, combinations, and options in given clinical scenarios. Current treatment options include solo or combina- tions of energy-based (eg, laser, radiofrequency), chemical-based (eg, peels, TCA cross), surgical-based options (eg, subcision, punch excision), microneedling, and llers and/or fat injections. Most recently, fractional radiofrequency-based treatments have been used to improve acne scarring with less reported downtime as compared to lasers or chemical peels and the ability to treat darker or sensitive skin types with less risk of scarring or hyperpigmentation. In severe cystic ares, scarring treatments are often postposed till the acne is under control and in many instances this can limit the dermatologists ability to affect future cosmetic treatments. Based on personal experience of various clinical scenarios in a busy laser practice that treats a signi cant number of patients with acne scarring, fractional radiofrequency is an excellent choice for treating all forms of acne scars with minimal risk to patients, even those on concurrent treatments such as isotretinoin. Additionally, fractional radiofrequency can be used in combination with all other treatment options to speed the time to

  15. Quantitative measurement of hypertrophic scar: intrarater reliability, sensitivity, and specificity.

    PubMed

    Nedelec, Bernadette; Correa, José A; Rachelska, Grazyna; Armour, Alexis; LaSalle, Léo

    2008-01-01

    The comparison of scar evaluation over time requires measurement tools with acceptable intrarater reliability and the ability to discriminate skin characteristics of interest. The objective of this study was to evaluate the intrarater reliability and sensitivity and specificity of the Cutometer, the Mexameter, and the DermaScan C relative to the modified Vancouver Scar Scale (mVSS) in patient-matched normal skin, normal scar (donor sites), and hypertrophic scar (HSc). A single investigator evaluated four tissue types (severe HSc, less severe HSc, donor site, and normal skin) in 30 burn survivors with all four measurement tools. The intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) for the Cutometer was acceptable (> or =0.75) for the maximum deformation measure for the donor site and normal skin (>0.78) but was below the acceptable range for the HSc sites and all other parameters. The ICC for the Mexameter erythema (>0.75) and melanin index (>0.89) and the DermaScan C total thickness measurement (>0.82) were acceptable for all sites. The ICC for the total of the height, pliability, and vascularity subscales of the mVSS was acceptable (0.81) for normal scar but below the acceptable range for the scar sites. The DermaScan C was clearly able to discriminate HSc from normal scar and normal skin based on the total thickness measure. The Cutometer was less discriminating but was still able to discriminate HSc from normal scar and normal skin. The Mexameter erythema index was not a good discriminator of HSc and normal scar. Receiver operating characteristic curves were generated to establish the best cutoff point for the DermaScan C total thickness and the Cutometer maximum deformation, which were 2.034 and 0.387 mm, respectively. This study showed that although the Cutometer, the DermaScan C, and the Mexameter have measurement properties that make them attractive substitutes for the mVSS, caution must be used when interpreting results since the Cutometer has a ceiling effect when

  16. Skin regeneration for children with burn scar contracture using autologous cultured dermal substitutes and superthin auto-skin grafts: preliminary clinical study.

    PubMed

    Fujimori, Yasushi; Ueda, Koichi; Fumimoto, Hiromichi; Kubo, Kentaro; Kuroyanagi, Yoshimitsu

    2006-10-01

    We have evaluated a novel treatment of burn scar contracture in children. This method involves the application of an autologous cultured dermal substitute (CDS), followed by a graft of superthin split-thickness skin. In the first operation, the autologous CDS was applied to the skin defect that had occurred after releasing the scar contracture. In the second operation, a superthin thickness skin graft (4 approximately 6/1000 inches) was applied 5 approximately 12 days after the first operation. The autologous CDS was applied to 10 sites of 5 children. On 8 sites, the skin grafts were contracted to some extent at an early stage. However, these skin grafts were stretched gradually to a range from 60% to 100% of an original size. At 2 sites, the skin grafts had stretched from 110% to 130% of the original size. This strategy may be useful for the treatment of burn scar contracture in children.

  17. Speckle-tracking echocardiography correctly identifies segmental left ventricular dysfunction induced by scarring in a rat model of myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Popović, Zoran B; Benejam, Carlos; Bian, Jing; Mal, Niladri; Drinko, Jeannie; Lee, Kwangdeok; Forudi, Farhad; Reeg, Rachel; Greenberg, Neil L; Thomas, James D; Penn, Marc S

    2007-06-01

    Speckle-tracking echocardiography (STE) uses a two-dimensional echocardiographic image to estimate two orthogonal strain components. The aim of this study was to assess sensitivity of circumferential (S(circ)) and radial (S(rad)) strains to infarct-induced left ventricular (LV) remodeling and scarring of the LV in a rat. To assess the relationship among S(circ), S(rad), and scar size, two-dimensional echocardiographic LV short-axis images (12 MHz transducer, Vivid 7 echo machine) were collected in 34 Lewis rats 4 to 10 wk after ligation of the left anterior descending artery. Percent segmental fibrosis was assessed from histological LV cross sections stained by Masson trichrome. Ten normal rats served as echocardiographic controls. S(circ) and S(rad) were assessed by STE. Histological data showed consistent scarring of anterior and lateral segments with variable extension to posterior and inferior segments. Both S(circ) and S(rad) significantly decreased after myocardial infarction (P<0.0001 for both). As anticipated, S(circ) and S(rad) were lowest in the infarcted segments. Multiple linear regression showed that segmental S(circ) were similarly dependent on segmental fibrosis and end-systolic diameter (P<0.0001 for both), whereas segmental S(rad) measurements were more dependent on end-systolic diameter (P<0.0001) than on percent fibrosis (P<0.002). STE correctly identifies segmental LV dysfunction induced by scarring that follows myocardial infarction in rats.

  18. Outcomes of Cutaneous Scar Revision During Surgical Implant Removal in Children with Cerebral Palsy.

    PubMed

    Davids, Jon R; Diaz, Kevin; Leba, Thu-Ba; Adams, Samuel; Westberry, David E; Bagley, Anita M

    2016-08-17

    Children who have had surgery involving the placement of an implant frequently undergo a subsequent surgery for hardware removal. The cosmesis of surgical scars following initial and subsequent surgeries is unpredictable. Scar incision (subsequent surgical incision through the initial scar) or excision (around the initial scar) is selected on the basis of the quality of the initial scar. The outcomes following these techniques have not been determined. This prospective, consecutive case series was designed to compare outcomes following surgical scar incision versus excision at the time of implant removal in children with cerebral palsy. Photographs of the scars were made preoperatively and at 6 and 12 months following implant removal and were graded for scar quality utilizing the modified Stony Brook Scar Evaluation Scale (SBSES). Parental assessment of scar appearance was performed at the same time points utilizing a visual analog cosmetic scale (VACS). The scars that were selected for incision had significantly worse SBSES scores at 6 and 12 months following the second surgery compared with preoperative values. However, parents' VACS scores of the incised scars, although worse at 6 months, were comparable with preoperative scores at 12 months. Scars that were selected for excision had significantly worse SBSES scores at 6 months but scores that were comparable with preoperative values at 12 months. VACS scores for the excised scars were comparable at the 3 time points. Surgical incisions that initially healed with good scar quality generally healed well (from the parents' perspective) following subsequent incision through the previous scar. Surgical incisions that initially healed with poor scar quality did not heal better following excision of the previous scar. In such situations, surgical excision of the existing scar should occur in conjunction with additional adjuvant therapies to improve cosmesis. Therapeutic Level II. See Instructions for Authors for a

  19. Percutaneous collagen induction therapy: an alternative treatment for burn scars.

    PubMed

    Aust, Matthias C; Knobloch, Karsten; Reimers, Kerstin; Redeker, Jörn; Ipaktchi, Ramin; Altintas, Mehmet Ali; Gohritz, Andreas; Schwaiger, Nina; Vogt, Peter M

    2010-09-01

    This study aims to evaluate percutaneous collagen induction (PCI) in post-burn scarring. Patients with scarring after burn frequently request help in improving the aesthetic appearance of their residual cicatricial deformity. Their scars are generally treated by tissue transfer, W- and Z-plasties, flaps, cortisone injections or ablative procedures that injure or destroy the epidermis and its basement membrane and subsequently lead to fibrosis of the papillary dermis. The ideal treatment would be to preserve the epidermis and promote normal collagen and elastin formation in the dermis. A total of 16 consecutive patients (average age: 37+/-15.5 years, average body mass index (BMI): 25.7) in Germany with post-burn scarring. PCI using the Medical Roll-CIT (Vivida, Cape Town, South Africa). This device was designed to multiply-puncture the skin to the level of the dermal scar to institute remodelling. Patients were prepared with topical vitamin A and C cosmetic creams for a minimum of 4 weeks preoperatively to maximise collagen stimulation. The outcome was measured rating (visual analogue scale (VAS) and Vancouver Scar Scale (VSS)), histological specimen 12 months after intervention. On average, patients rated their improvement as a mean of 80% better (+/-15.5) than before treatment. Histologic examination revealed considerable increase in collagen and elastin deposition 12 months postoperatively. The epidermis demonstrated 45% thickening of stratum spinosum and normal rete ridges as well as the normalisation of the collagen/elastin matrix in the reticular dermis at 1 year postoperatively. This pilot study shows that PCI appears to be a safe method for treating post-burn scarring without destroying the epidermis. The procedure can be repeated safely and is also applicable in regions where laser treatments and deep peels are of limited use. However, it is necessary to initiate an efficacy trial to prove the data of this pilot study. 2009 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights

  20. Clinical relevance of aberrant polypoid nodule scar after endoscopic submucosal dissection

    PubMed Central

    Arantes, Vitor; Uedo, Noriya; Pedrosa, Moises Salgado; Tomita, Yasuhiko

    2016-01-01

    AIM To describe a series of patients with aberrant polypoid nodule scar developed after gastric endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD), and to discuss its pathogenesis and clinical management. METHODS We reviewed retrospectively the endoscopic database of two academic institutions located in Brazil and Japan and searched for all patients that underwent ESD to manage gastric neoplasms from 2003 to 2015. The criteria for admission in the study were: (1) successful en bloc ESD procedure with R0 and curative resection confirmed histologically; (2) postoperative endoscopic examination with identification of a polypoid nodule scar (PNS) at ESD scar; (3) biopsies of the PNS with hyperplastic or regenerative tissue, reviewed by two independent experienced gastrointestinal pathologists, one from each Institution. Data were examined for patient demographics, Helicobacter pylori status, precise neoplastic lesion location in the stomach, tumor size, histopathological assessment of the ESD specimen, and postoperative information including medical management, endoscopic and histological findings, and clinical outcome. RESULTS A total of 14 patients (10 men/4 women) fulfilled the inclusion criteria and were enrolled in this study. One center contributed with 8 cases out of 60 patients (13.3%) from 2008 to 2015. The second center contributed with 6 cases (1.7%) out of 343 patients from 2003 to 2015. Postoperative endoscopic follow-up revealed similar findings in all patients: A protruded polypoid appearing nodule situated in the center of the ESD scar surrounded by convergence of folds. Biopsies samples were taken from PNS, and histological assessment revealed in all cases regenerative and hyperplastic tissue, without recurrent tumor or dysplasia. Primary neoplastic lesions were located in the antrum in 13 patients and in the angle in one patient. PNS did not develop in any patient after ESD undertaken for tumors located in the corpus, fundus or cardia. All patients have been

  1. Comparison and combination of late potentials and spectral turbulence analysis to predict arrhythmic events after myocardial infarction in the Post-Infarction Late Potential (PILP) Study.

    PubMed

    Mäkijärvi, M; Fetsch, T; Reinhardt, L; Martinez-Rubio, A; Shenasa, M; Borggrefe, M; Breithardt, G

    1995-05-01

    Ventricular late potentials detected at the end of the QRS complex by the signal-averaged ECG have been shown to predict arrhythmic events after acute myocardial infarction. Spectral turbulence analysis is a novel technique for detecting abnormalities of cardiac electric activation inside the QRS complex. The purpose of this study was to combine these two analysis methods in order to increase the predictive power of the signal-averaged ECG in post-infarction patients. The study comprised a prospective series of 778 males under 66 years of age who survived the acute phase of myocardial infarction. Signal-averaged ECG recordings were performed before hospital discharge 2 to 3 weeks after infarction. The original Simson method was used for recording and analysing the time-domain signal-averaged ECG. Spectral turbulence analysis was performed using the same averaged vector magnitude QRS complexes (Del Mar Avionics). During the follow-up period of 6 months, 33 patients (4.2%) had an arrhythmic event (sustained monomorphic ventricular tachycardia in 13 cases, ventricular fibrillation in eight cases and sudden cardiac death in 12 cases). The predictive power of late potentials in the time domain, spectral turbulence analysis and their combinations were tested together with clinical variables using the Cox regression method.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  2. Routine histologic examination of 728 mastectomy scars: did it benefit our patients?

    PubMed

    Woerdeman, Leonie A E; Kortmann, Jan B J; Hage, J Joris

    2006-11-01

    Routine histologic examination of secondarily excised mastectomy scars is considered good practice, even though the microscopic detection of a metastasis in clinically unsuspected mastectomy scars is rare. Because cost-effective use of histologic services is required, the occurrence rate of metastases in such scars needs to be established to assess the possible benefit of such routine examination. The histologic observations on 728 clinically unsuspected scars from prophylactic (n = 151) or curative (n = 395) mastectomy or breast-conservation treatment in 424 patients were traced and correlated to the indication of initial breast surgery, possible adjuvant therapy, and time lapse between initial surgery and scar examination. In none of the 728 scars was a scar metastasis or de novo tumor found. Routine histologic examination of clinically unsuspected scars excised at the time of breast reconstruction or scar correction after prophylactic or curative breast surgery did not benefit the authors' patients.

  3. [Application of distal palm perforator mini-flap in repair of scar contracture of digital web-spaces].

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xiao; Xu, Yajun; Rui, Yongjun; Shou, Kuishui; Yao, Qun

    2011-02-01

    To discuss the effectiveness of distal palm perforator mini-flap in the treatment of scar contracture of digital web-spaces. Between August 2008 and March 2010, 6 cases of scar contracture of digital web-spaces were treated, including 4 males and 2 females and aging 16-68 years (mean, 45 years). The causes were burn injury, twisting injury, and crush injury in 2 cases, respectively. The disease duration was from 3 months to 3 years. The affected digital web-spaces were from index finger to middle finger in 2 cases, from middle finger to ring finger in 3 cases, and from ring finger to small finger in 1 case. The maximum abduction degree of digital web-spaces was 5-10 degrees. The sizes and the depths of reshape of digital web-spaces disappeared. The defect size ranged from 20 mm x 8 mm to 30 mm x 13 mm after opening digital web-spaces. The size of the distal palm perforator mini-flap ranged from 25 mm x 10 mm to 35 mm x 15 mm. The donor sites were sutured directly. All 6 flaps survived and got primary healing. Incisions at donor sites healed by first intention. All patients were followed up 6-12 months. The reconstructed digital web-spaces had good appearance and soft texture. The range of motion of metacarpophalangeal joint was normal. The sizes and the depths of reshape of digital web-spaces were similar to normal ones. The maximum abduction degree of digital web-spaces was 40-60 degrees. There was no scar contracture of incision of palm. The shape of flaps and function of the fingers were satisfactory after 6-12 months of follow-up. It is an ideal method to treat scar contracture of digital web-spaces with distal palm perforator mini-flap.

  4. Noninvasive electrocardiographic imaging of chronic myocardial infarct scar.

    PubMed

    Horáček, B Milan; Wang, Linwei; Dawoud, Fady; Xu, Jingjia; Sapp, John L

    2015-01-01

    Myocardial infarction (MI) scar constitutes a substrate for ventricular tachycardia (VT), and an accurate delineation of infarct scar may help to identify reentrant circuits and thus facilitate catheter ablation. One of the recent advancements in characterization of a VT substrate is its volumetric delineation within the ventricular wall by noninvasive electrocardiographic imaging. This paper compares, in four specific cases, epicardial and volumetric inverse solutions, using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with late gadolinium enhancement as a gold standard. For patients with chronic MI, who presented at Glasgow Western Infirmary, delayed-enhancement MRI and 120-lead body surface potential mapping (BSPM) data were acquired and 4 selected cases were later made available to a wider community as part of the 2007 PhysioNet/Computers in Cardiology Challenge. These data were used to perform patient-specific inverse solutions for epicardial electrograms and morphology-based criteria were applied to delineate infarct scar on the epicardial surface. Later, the Rochester group analyzed the same data by means of a novel inverse solution for reconstructing intramural transmembrane potentials, to delineate infarct scar in three dimensions. Comparison of the performance of three specific inverse-solution algorithms is presented here, using scores based on the 17-segment ventricular division scheme recommended by the American Heart Association. The noninvasive methods delineating infarct scar as three-dimensional (3D) intramural distribution of transmembrane action potentials outperform estimates providing scar delineation on the epicardial surface in all scores used for comparison. In particular, the extent of infarct scar (its percentage mass relative to the total ventricular mass) is rendered more accurately by the 3D estimate. Moreover, the volumetric rendition of scar border provides better clues to potential targets for catheter ablation. Electrocardiographic inverse

  5. Noninvasive electrocardiographic imaging of chronic myocardial infarct scar§

    PubMed Central

    Horáček, B. Milan; Wang, Linwei; Dawoud, Fady; Xu, Jingjia; Sapp, John L.

    2015-01-01

    Background Myocardial infarction (MI) scar constitutes a substrate for ventricular tachycardia (VT), and an accurate delineation of infarct scar may help to identify reentrant circuits and thus facilitate catheter ablation. One of the recent advancements in characterization of a VT substrate is its volumetric delineation within the ventricular wall by noninvasive electrocardiographic imaging. This paper compares, in four specific cases, epicardial and volumetric inverse solutions, using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with late gadolinium enhancement as a gold standard. Methods For patients with chronic MI, who presented at Glasgow Western Infirmary, delayed-enhancement MRI and 120-lead body surface potential mapping (BSPM) data were acquired and 4 selected cases were later made available to a wider community as part of the 2007 PhysioNet/Computers in Cardiology Challenge. These data were used to perform patient-specific inverse solutions for epicardial electrograms and morphology-based criteria were applied to delineate infarct scar on the epicardial surface. Later, the Rochester group analyzed the same data by means of a novel inverse solution for reconstructing intramural transmembrane potentials, to delineate infarct scar in three dimensions. Comparison of the performance of three specific inverse-solution algorithms is presented here, using scores based on the 17-segment ventricular division scheme recommended by the American Heart Association. Results The noninvasive methods delineating infarct scar as three-dimensional (3D) intramural distribution of transmembrane action potentials outperform estimates providing scar delineation on the epicardial surface in all scores used for comparison. In particular, the extent of infarct scar (its percentage mass relative to the total ventricular mass) is rendered more accurately by the 3D estimate. Moreover, the volumetric rendition of scar border provides better clues to potential targets for catheter ablation

  6. Human hypertrophic and keloid scar models: principles, limitations and future challenges from a tissue engineering perspective

    PubMed Central

    van den Broek, Lenie J; Limandjaja, Grace C; Niessen, Frank B; Gibbs, Susan

    2014-01-01

    Most cutaneous wounds heal with scar formation. Ideally, an inconspicuous normotrophic scar is formed, but an abnormal scar (hypertrophic scar or keloid) can also develop. A major challenge to scientists and physicians is to prevent adverse scar formation after severe trauma (e.g. burn injury) and understand why some individuals will form adverse scars even after relatively minor injury. Currently, many different models exist to study scar formation, ranging from simple monolayer cell culture to 3D tissue-engineered models even to humanized mouse models. Currently, these high-/medium-throughput test models avoid the main questions referring to why an adverse scar forms instead of a normotrophic scar and what causes a hypertrophic scar to form rather than a keloid scar and also, how is the genetic predisposition of the individual and the immune system involved. This information is essential if we are to identify new drug targets and develop optimal strategies in the future to prevent adverse scar formation. This viewpoint review summarizes the progress on in vitro and animal scar models, stresses the limitations in the current models and identifies the future challenges if scar-free healing is to be achieved in the future. PMID:24750541

  7. Human hypertrophic and keloid scar models: principles, limitations and future challenges from a tissue engineering perspective.

    PubMed

    van den Broek, Lenie J; Limandjaja, Grace C; Niessen, Frank B; Gibbs, Susan

    2014-06-01

    Most cutaneous wounds heal with scar formation. Ideally, an inconspicuous normotrophic scar is formed, but an abnormal scar (hypertrophic scar or keloid) can also develop. A major challenge to scientists and physicians is to prevent adverse scar formation after severe trauma (e.g. burn injury) and understand why some individuals will form adverse scars even after relatively minor injury. Currently, many different models exist to study scar formation, ranging from simple monolayer cell culture to 3D tissue-engineered models even to humanized mouse models. Currently, these high-/medium-throughput test models avoid the main questions referring to why an adverse scar forms instead of a normotrophic scar and what causes a hypertrophic scar to form rather than a keloid scar and also, how is the genetic predisposition of the individual and the immune system involved. This information is essential if we are to identify new drug targets and develop optimal strategies in the future to prevent adverse scar formation. This viewpoint review summarizes the progress on in vitro and animal scar models, stresses the limitations in the current models and identifies the future challenges if scar-free healing is to be achieved in the future. © 2014 The Authors. Experimental Dermatology. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Drought and Burn Scars in Southeastern Australia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    More than 2 million acres were consumed by hundreds of fires between December 2002 and February 2003 in southeastern Australia's national parks, forests, foothills and city suburbs. These images were acquired on February 14, 2002 (left) and February 17, 2003 (right) by the