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Sample records for postinfarction scar size

  1. Rapid Surface Cooling by ThermoSuit System Dramatically Reduces Scar Size, Prevents Post-Infarction Adverse Left Ventricular Remodeling, and Improves Cardiac Function in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Wangde; Herring, Michael J; Hale, Sharon L; Kloner, Robert A

    2015-01-01

    Background The long-term effects of transient hypothermia by the non-invasive ThermoSuit apparatus on myocardial infarct (MI) scar size, left ventricular (LV) remodeling, and LV function were assessed in rat MI model. Methods and Results Rats were randomized to normothermic or hypothermic groups (n=14 in each group) and subjected to 30 minutes coronary artery occlusion and 6 weeks of reperfusion. For hypothermia therapy, rats were placed into the ThermoSuit apparatus at 2 minutes after the onset of coronary artery occlusion, were taken out of the apparatus when the core body temperature reached 32°C (in ≈8 minutes), and were then allowed to rewarm. After 6 weeks of recovery, rats treated with hypothermia demonstrated markedly reduced scar size (expressed as % of left ventricular area: hypothermia, 6.5±1.1%; normothermia, 19.4±1.7%; P=1.3×10−6); and thicker anterior LV wall (hypothermia, 1.57±0.09 mm; normothermia, 1.07±0.05 mm; P=3.4×10−5); decreased postmortem left ventricular volume (hypothermia, 0.45±0.04 mL; normothermia, 0.6±0.03 mL; P=0.028); and better LV fractional shortening by echocardiography (hypothermia, 37.2±2.8%; normothermia, 18.9±2.3%; P=0.0002) and LV ejection fraction by LV contrast ventriculography (hypothermia, 66.8±2.3%; normothermia, 56.0±2.0%; P=0.0014). Conclusions Rapid, transient non-invasive surface cooling with the ThermoSuit apparatus in the acute phase of MI decreased scar size by 66.5%, attenuated adverse post-infarct left ventricular dilation and remodeling, and improved cardiac function in the chronic phase of experimental MI. PMID:26116692

  2. Imaging techniques in the evaluation of post-infarction function and scar.

    PubMed

    Pozo, Eduardo; Sanz, Javier

    2014-09-01

    Imaging techniques are essential in the clinical evaluation of patients with a myocardial infarction. They are of value for both initial assessment of the ischemic injury and for detection of the subgroup of patients at higher risk of developing cardiovascular events during follow-up. Echocardiography remains the technique of choice for the initial evaluation, owing to its bedside capability to determine strong predictors, such as ventricular volumes, global and regional systolic function, and valvular regurgitation. New techniques for evaluating ventricular mechanics, mainly assessment of ventricular deformation, are revealing important aspects of post-infarction ventricular adaptation. The main alternative to echocardiography is cardiac magnetic resonance imaging. This technique is highly accurate for determining ventricular volumes and ventricular function and has the additional advantage of being able to characterize the myocardium and demonstrate changes associated with the ischemic insult such as necrosis/fibrosis, edema, microvascular obstruction, and intramyocardial hemorrhage. These features not only allow detection and quantification of the infarct size, but also reveal additional characteristics of the scar tissue with prognostic value.

  3. Improved border sharpness of post-infarct scar by a novel self-navigated free-breathing high-resolution 3D whole-heart inversion recovery magnetic resonance approach.

    PubMed

    Rutz, Tobias; Piccini, Davide; Coppo, Simone; Chaptinel, Jerome; Ginami, Giulia; Vincenti, Gabriella; Stuber, Matthias; Schwitter, Juerg

    2016-12-01

    The border zone of post-infarction myocardial scar as identified by late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) has been identified as a substrate for arrhythmias and consequently, high-resolution 3D scar information is potentially useful for planning of electrophysiological interventions. This study evaluates the performance of a novel high-resolution 3D self-navigated free-breathing inversion recovery magnetic resonance pulse sequence (3D-SN-LGE) vs. conventional 2D breath-hold LGE (2D-LGE) with regard to sharpness of borders (SBorder) of post-infarction scar. Patients with post-infarction scar underwent two magnetic resonance examinations for conventional 2D-LGE and high-resolution 3D-SN-LGE acquisitions (both 15 min after 0.2 mmol/kg Gadobutrol IV) at 1.5T. In the prototype 3D-SN-LGE sequence, each ECG-triggered radial steady-state-free-precession read-out segment is preceded by a non-slice-selective inversion pulse. Scar volume and SBorder were assessed on 2D-LGE and matching reconstructed high-resolution 3D-SN-LGE short-axis slices. In 16 patients (four females, 58 ± 10y) all scars visualized by 2D-LGE could be identified on 3D-SN-LGE (time between 2D-LGE and 3D-SN-LGE 48 ± 53 days). A good agreement of scar volume by 3D-SN-LGE vs. 2D-LGE was found (Bland-Altman: -3.7 ± 3.4 ml, correlation: r = 0.987, p < 0.001) with a small difference in scar volume (20.5 (15.8, 35.2) ml vs. 24.5 (20.0, 41.9)) ml, respectively, p = 0.002] and a good intra- and interobserver variability (1.1 ± 4.1 and -1.1 ± 11.9 ml, respectively). SBorder of border "scar to non-infarcted myocardium" was superior on 3D-SN-LGE vs. 2D-LGE: 0.180 ± 0.044 vs. 0.083 ± 0.038, p < 0.001. Detection and quantification of myocardial scar by 3D-SN-LGE is feasible and accurate in comparison to 2D-LGE. The high spatial resolution of the 3D sequence improves delineation of scar borders.

  4. Postinfarct Left Ventricular Remodelling: A Prevailing Cause of Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Galli, Alessio; Lombardi, Federico

    2016-01-01

    Heart failure is a chronic disease with high morbidity and mortality, which represents a growing challenge in medicine. A major risk factor for heart failure with reduced ejection fraction is a history of myocardial infarction. The expansion of a large infarct scar and subsequent regional ventricular dilatation can cause postinfarct remodelling, leading to significant enlargement of the left ventricular chamber. It has a negative prognostic value, because it precedes the clinical manifestations of heart failure. The characteristics of the infarcted myocardium predicting postinfarct remodelling can be studied with cardiac magnetic resonance and experimental imaging modalities such as diffusion tensor imaging can identify the changes in the architecture of myocardial fibers. This review discusses all the aspects related to postinfarct left ventricular remodelling: definition, pathogenesis, diagnosis, consequences, and available therapies, together with experimental interventions that show promising results against postinfarct remodelling and heart failure. PMID:26989555

  5. Mating scars reveal mate size in immature female blue shark Prionace glauca.

    PubMed

    Calich, H J; Campana, S E

    2015-06-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the size and maturity status of the male blue sharks Prionace glauca attempting to mate with small, immature females in the north-west Atlantic Ocean. The relationship between male curved fork length (LFC ) and jaw gape was used in conjunction with the diameter of the mating scar to estimate the LFC and infer the maturity status of the male shark that produced the mating scar. The results indicate that mature males with a mean ± s.d. LFC of 218 cm ± 23 cm were attempting to mate with sexually immature females.

  6. Glial scar size, inhibitor concentration, and growth of regenerating axons after spinal cord transection☆

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Weiping; Sun, Yanping; Chen, Xuning; Feng, Shiliang

    2012-01-01

    A mathematical model has been formulated in accordance with cell chemotaxis and relevant experimental data. A three-dimensional lattice Boltzmann method was used for numerical simulation. The present study observed the effects of glial scar size and inhibitor concentration on regenerative axonal growth following spinal cord transection. The simulation test comprised two parts: (1) when release rates of growth inhibitor and promoter were constant, the effects of glial scar size on axonal growth rate were analyzed, and concentrations of inhibitor and promoters located at the moving growth cones were recorded. (2) When the glial scar size was constant, the effects of inhibitor and promoter release rates on axonal growth rate were analyzed, and inhibitor and promoter concentrations at the moving growth cones were recorded. Results demonstrated that (1) a larger glial scar and a higher release rate of inhibitor resulted in a reduced axonal growth rate. (2) The axonal growth rate depended on the ratio of inhibitor to promoter concentrations at the growth cones. When the average ratio was < 1.5, regenerating axons were able to grow and successfully contact target cells. PMID:25657689

  7. Coupling of the Functional Stability of Rat Myocardium and Activity of Lipid Peroxidation in Combined Development of Postinfarction Remodeling and Diabetes Mellitus.

    PubMed

    Afanasiev, S A; Kondratieva, D S; Rebrova, T Yu; Batalov, R E; Popov, S V

    2016-01-01

    Coupling of the functional stability of rat myocardium and activity of lipid peroxidation processes in combined development of postinfarction remodeling and diabetes mellitus has been studied. The functional stability of myocardium was studied by means of the analysis of inotropic reaction on extrasystolic stimulus, the degree of left ventricular hypertrophy, and the size of scar zone. It was shown that in combined development of postinfarction cardiac remodeling of heart (PICR) with diabetes mellitus (DM) animal body weight decreased in less degree than in diabetic rats. Animals with combined pathology had no heart hypertrophy. The amplitude of extrasystolic contractions in rats with PICR combined with DM had no differences compared to the control group. In myocardium of rats with PICR combined with DM postextrasystolic potentiation was observed in contrast with the rats with PICR alone. The rats with combined pathology had the decreased value of TBA-active products. Thus, the results of study showed that induction of DM on the stage of the development of postinfarction remodeling increases adaptive ability of myocardium. It is manifested in inhibition of increase of LPO processes activity and maintaining of force-interval reactions of myocardium connected with calcium transport systems of sarcoplasmic reticulum of cardiomyocytes.

  8. Tachycardia in post-infarction hearts: insights from 3D image-based ventricular models.

    PubMed

    Arevalo, Hermenegild; Plank, Gernot; Helm, Patrick; Halperin, Henry; Trayanova, Natalia

    2013-01-01

    Ventricular tachycardia, a life-threatening regular and repetitive fast heart rhythm, frequently occurs in the setting of myocardial infarction. Recently, the peri-infarct zones surrounding the necrotic scar (termed gray zones) have been shown to correlate with ventricular tachycardia inducibility. However, it remains unknown how the latter is determined by gray zone distribution and size. The goal of this study is to examine how tachycardia circuits are maintained in the infarcted heart and to explore the relationship between the tachycardia organizing centers and the infarct gray zone size and degree of heterogeneity. To achieve the goals of the study, we employ a sophisticated high-resolution electrophysiological model of the infarcted canine ventricles reconstructed from imaging data, representing both scar and gray zone. The baseline canine ventricular model was also used to generate additional ventricular models with different gray zone sizes, as well as models in which the gray zone was represented as different heterogeneous combinations of viable tissue and necrotic scar. The results of the tachycardia induction simulations with a number of high-resolution canine ventricular models (22 altogether) demonstrated that the gray zone was the critical factor resulting in arrhythmia induction and maintenance. In all models with inducible arrhythmia, the scroll-wave filaments were contained entirely within the gray zone, regardless of its size or the level of heterogeneity of its composition. The gray zone was thus found to be the arrhythmogenic substrate that promoted wavebreak and reentry formation. We found that the scroll-wave filament locations were insensitive to the structural composition of the gray zone and were determined predominantly by the gray zone morphology and size. The findings of this study have important implications for the advancement of improved criteria for stratifying arrhythmia risk in post-infarction patients and for the development of

  9. Durable Scar Size Reduction Due to Allogeneic Mesenchymal Stem Cell Therapy Regulates Whole‐Chamber Remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Adam R.; Suncion, Viky Y.; McCall, Frederic; Guerra, Danny; Mather, Jacques; Zambrano, Juan P.; Heldman, Alan W.; Hare, Joshua M.

    2013-01-01

    Background Intramyocardial injection of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) in chronic ischemic cardiomyopathy is associated with reverse remodeling in experimental models and humans. Here, we tested the hypothesis that allogeneic MSC therapy drives ventricular remodeling by producing durable and progressive scar size reduction in ischemic cardiomyopathy. Methods and Results Gottingen swine (n=12) underwent left anterior descending coronary artery myocardial infarction (MI), and 3 months post‐MI animals received either intramyocardial allogeneic MSC injection (200 mol/L cells; n=6) or left ventricle (LV) catheterization without injection (n=6). Swine were followed with serial cardiac magnetic resonance imaging for 9 months to assess structural and functional changes of the LV. Intramyocardial injection was performed using an integrated imaging platform combining electroanatomical mapping unipolar voltage and 3‐dimensional cardiac magnetic resonance imaging angiography–derived anatomy to accurately target infarct border zone injections. MSC‐treated animals had a 19.62±2.86% reduction in scar size at 3 months postinjection, which progressed to 28.09±2.31% from 3 to 6 months postinjection (P<0.0001). MSC‐treated animals had unchanged end‐diastolic volume (EDV; P=0.08) and end‐systolic volume (ESV; P=0.28) from preinjection to 6 months postinjection, whereas controls had progressive dilatation in both EDV (P=0.0002) and ESV (P=0.0002). In addition, MSC‐treated animals had improved LV sphericity index. Percentage change in infarct size correlated with percentage change in EDV (r=0.68; P=0.01) and ESV (r=0.77; P=0.001). Ejection fraction increased from 29.69±1.68% to 35.85±2.74% at 3 months post‐MSC injection and progressed to 39.02±2.42% 6 months postinjection (P=0.0001), whereas controls had a persistently depressed ejection fraction during follow‐up (P=0.33). Conclusion Intramyocardial injection of allogeneic MSCs leads to a sustained and

  10. Comparing a novel automatic 3D method for LGE-CMR quantification of scar size with established methods.

    PubMed

    Woie, Leik; Måløy, Frode; Eftestøl, Trygve; Engan, Kjersti; Edvardsen, Thor; Kvaløy, Jan Terje; Ørn, Stein

    2014-02-01

    Current methods for the estimation of infarct size by late-enhanced cardiac magnetic imaging are based upon 2D analysis that first determines the size of the infarction in each slice, and thereafter adds the infarct sizes from each slice to generate a volume. We present a novel, automatic 3D method that estimates infarct size by a simultaneous analysis of all pixels from all slices. In a population of 54 patients with ischemic scars, the infarct size estimated by the automatic 3D method was compared with four established 2D methods. The new 3D method defined scar as the sum of all pixels with signal intensity (SI) ≥35 % of max SI from the complete myocardium, border zone: SI 35-50 % of max SI and core as SI ≥50 % of max SI. The 3D method yielded smaller infarct size (-2.8 ± 2.3 %) and core size (-3.0 ± 1.7 %) than the 2D method most similar to ours. There was no difference in the size of the border zone (0.2 ± 1.4 %). The 3D method demonstrated stronger correlations between scar size and left ventricular (LV) remodelling parameters (LV ejection fraction: r = -0.71, p < 0.0005, LV end-diastolic index: r = 0.54, p < 0.0005, and LV end-systolic index: r = 0.59, p < 0.0005) compared with conventional 2D methods. Infarct size estimation by our novel 3D automatic method is without the need for manual demarcation of the scar; it is less time-consuming and has a stronger correlation with remodelling parameters compared with existing methods.

  11. Preparation and characterization of different sizes of ethosomes encapsulated with 5-fluorouracil and its experimental study of permeability in hypertrophic scar.

    PubMed

    Mao, Xiaohui; Wo, Yan; He, Rong; Qian, Yunliang; Zhang, Yixin; Cui, Daxiang

    2010-07-01

    With the aim of investigating scar penetration efficiency of different sizes of ethosomes encapsulated with Fluorouracil, three kinds of ethosomes with different sizes were prepared by extruding the vesicles through polycarbonate membrane filters, their encapsulation efficiency of Fluorouracil (5-FU) were investigated by dialysis method, their scar-penetration efficiencies were analyzed by filling Rodanmin 6GO into ethosomes and using confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM). The prepared ethosomes were 216 +/- 19 nm, 107 +/- 13 nm, and 65 +/- 10 nm in diameter respectively, and exhibited good dispersibility. Their encapsulation efficiency of 5-FU were 12%, 34%, and 41%, respectively. The results indicated that the 5-FU penetration was reversely related to the size of the size of the ethosomes. The ethosomes of 65 nm in diameter exhibited maximal fluorescence penetration efficiency which could reach the deep layer of dermis of hypertrophic scar. In conclusion, three different sizes of 5-FU ethosomes were prepared successfully, the ethosomes of 65 nm in diameter with 5-FU can penetrate scar high efficiently, which has potential in application such as anti-scar drug carriers in scar therapy in near future.

  12. Predilation technique with balloon angioplasty to facilitate percutaneous groin access of large size sheath through scar tissue.

    PubMed

    Pecoraro, Felice; Krishnaswamy, Mayur; Steuer, Johnny; Puippe, Gilbert; Mangialardi, Nicola; Pfammatter, Thomas; Rancic, Zoran; Veith, Frank J; Cayne, Neal S; Lachat, Mario

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Percutaneous remote access for endovascular aortic repair is an advantageous alternative to open access. Previous surgery in the femoral region and the presence of synthetic vascular grafts in the femoral/iliac arteries represent major limitations to percutaneous remote access. The aim of this study was to evaluate an original technique used for enabling percutaneous remote access for thoracic or abdominal endovascular aortic repair in patients with scar tissue and/or a vascular graft in the groin. Methods Twenty-five consecutive patients with a thoracic (11/25; 44%) or an aortic aneurysm (14/25; 66%) and with a synthetic vascular graft in the groin (16/25; 64%) or a redo groin access (9/25; 36%) were managed through the percutaneous remote access. In all patients, a percutaneous transluminal angioplasty balloon was used to predilate the scar tissue and the femoral artery or the synthetic vascular graft after preclosing (ProGlide®; Abbott Vascular, Santa Clara, CA, USA). In 10 patients, requiring a 20 Fr sheath, a 6 mm percutaneous transluminal angioplasty balloon was used; and in the remaining 15, requiring a 24 Fr sheath, an 8 mm percutaneous transluminal angioplasty balloon. Preclosing was exclusively performed using ProGlide®. Mean follow-up was 15 months. Results In all cases, stent-graft deployment was successful. There was one surgical conversion (4%; 1/25) due to bleeding from a femoral anastomosis. Two cases required additional percutaneous maneuvers (postclosing with another system in one patient and endoluminal shielding with stent-graft in the other patient). No pseudoaneurysm or access complication occurred during the follow-up. Conclusions Percutaneous access in redo groins with scar tissue and/or synthetic vascular graft using ultrasound-guided punction, preclosing with ProGlide® system and predilation with percutaneous transluminal angioplasty balloon to introduce large size sheath as used for endovascular aortic repair showed to be

  13. Scar revision

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Mohit; Wakure, Abhijeet

    2013-01-01

    Most surgical patients end up with a scar and most of these would want at least some improvement in the appearance of the scar. Using sound techniques for wound closure surgeons can, to a certain extent, prevent suboptimal scars. This article reviews the principles of prevention and treatment of suboptimal scars. Surgical techniques of scar revision, i.e., Z plasty, W plasty, and geometrical broken line closure are described. Post-operative care and other adjuvant therapies of scars are described. A short description of dermabrasion and lasers for management of scars is given. It is hoped that this review helps the surgeon to formulate a comprehensive plan for management of scars of these patients. PMID:24516292

  14. Acne Scars

    MedlinePlus

    ... How to Choose the Best Skin Care Products Acne Scars Treatment Options Learn more about treatment options ... and flawless as the original skin. Why treat acne scarring Physical, emotional and social reasons for treating ...

  15. Human Cardiac Mesenchymal Stromal Cells with CD105+CD34- Phenotype Enhance the Function of Post-Infarction Heart in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Wiśniewska, Ewa; Jarosz-Biej, Magdalena; Smolarczyk, Ryszard; Cichoń, Tomasz; Głowala-Kosińska, Magdalena; Śliwka, Joanna; Garbacz, Marcin; Szczypior, Mateusz; Jaźwiec, Tomasz; Langrzyk, Agnieszka; Zembala, Michał; Szala, Stanisław

    2016-01-01

    Aims The aim of the present study was to isolate mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC) with CD105+CD34- phenotype from human hearts, and to investigate their therapeutic potential in a mouse model of hindlimb ischemia and myocardial infarction (MI). The study aimed also to investigate the feasibility of xenogeneic MSCs implantation. Methods and Results MSC isolated from human hearts were multipotent cells. Separation of MSC with CD105+CD34- phenotype limited the heterogeneity of the originally isolated cell population. MSC secreted a number of anti-inflammatory and proangiogenic cytokines (mainly IL-6, IL-8, and GRO). Human MSC were transplanted into C57Bl/6NCrl mice. Using the mouse model of hindlimb ischemia it was shown that human MSC treated mice demonstrated a higher capillary density 14 days after injury. It was also presented that MSC administrated into the ischemic muscle facilitated fast wound healing (functional recovery by ischemic limb). MSC transplanted into an infarcted myocardium reduced the post-infarction scar, fibrosis, and increased the number of blood vessels both in the border area, and within the post-infarction scar. The improvement of left ventricular ejection fraction was also observed. Conclusion In two murine models (hindlimb ischemia and MI) we did not observe the xenotransplant rejection. Indeed, we have shown that human cardiac mesenchymal stromal cells with CD105+CD34- phenotype exhibit therapeutic potential. It seems that M2 macrophages are essential for healing and repair of the post-infarcted heart. PMID:27415778

  16. Induced pluripotent stem cell intervention rescues ventricular wall motion disparity, achieving biological cardiac resynchronization post-infarction

    PubMed Central

    Yamada, Satsuki; Nelson, Timothy J; Kane, Garvan C; Martinez-Fernandez, Almudena; Crespo-Diaz, Ruben J; Ikeda, Yasuhiro; Perez-Terzic, Carmen; Terzic, Andre

    2013-01-01

    Dyssynchronous myocardial motion aggravates cardiac pump function. Cardiac resynchronization using pacing devices is a standard-of-care in the management of heart failure. Post-infarction, however, scar tissue formation impedes the efficacy of device-based therapy. The present study tests a regenerative approach aimed at targeting the origin of abnormal motion to prevent dyssynchronous organ failure. Induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells harbour a reparative potential, and were here bioengineered from somatic fibroblasts reprogrammed with the stemness factors OCT3/4, SOX2, KLF4, and c-MYC. In a murine infarction model, within 30 min of coronary ligation, iPS cells were delivered to mapped infarcted areas. Focal deformation and dysfunction underlying progressive heart failure was resolved prospectively using speckle-tracking imaging. Tracked at high temporal and spatial resolution, regional iPS cell transplantation restored, within 10 days post-infarction, the contractility of targeted infarcted foci and nullified conduction delay in adjacent non-infarcted regions. Local iPS cell therapy, but not delivery of parental fibroblasts or vehicle, prevented or normalized abnormal strain patterns correcting the decrease in peak strain, disparity of time-to-peak strain, and pathological systolic stretch. Focal benefit of iPS cell intervention translated into improved left ventricular conduction and contractility, reduced scar, and reversal of structural remodelling, protecting from organ decompensation. Thus, in ischaemic cardiomyopathy, targeted iPS cell transplantation synchronized failing ventricles, offering a regenerative strategy to achieve biological resynchronization. PMID:23568891

  17. The number of circulating CD14+ cells is related to infarct size and postinfarct volumes in ST segment elevation myocardial infarction but not non-ST segment elevation myocardial infarction

    PubMed Central

    Montange, Damien; Davani, Siamak; Deschaseaux, Frédéric; Séronde, Marie France; Chopard, Romain; Schiele, François; Jehl, Jérome; Bassand, Jean Pierre; Kantelip, Jean-Pierre; Meneveau, Nicolas

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the relationship between the number of CD14+ cells, myocardial infarct (MI) size and left ventricular (LV) volumes in ST segment elevation MI (STEMI) and non-ST segment elevation MI (NSTEMI) patients. METHODS: A total of 62 patients with STEMI (n=34) or NSTEMI (n=28) were enrolled. The number of CD14+ cells was assessed at admission. Infarct size, left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) and LV volumes were measured using magnetic resonance imaging five days after MI and six months after MI. Results: In STEMI patients, the number of CD14+ cells was positively and significantly correlated with infarct size at day 5 (r=0.40; P=0.016) and after six months (r=0.34; P=0.047), negatively correlated with LVEF at day 5 (r=−0.50; P=0.002) and after six months (r=−0.46; P=0.005) and positively correlated with end-diastolic (r=0.38; P=0.02) and end-systolic (r=0.49; P=0.002) volumes after six months. In NSTEMI patients, no significant correlation was found between the number of CD14+ cells and infarct size, LVEF or LV volumes at day 5 or after six months. CONCLUSIONS: The number of CD14+ cells at admission was associated with infarct size and LV remodelling in STEMI patients with large infarct size, whereas in NSTEMI patients, no relationship was observed between numbers of CD14+ cells and LV remodelling. PMID:23620701

  18. Scar revision

    MedlinePlus

    ... an entire, full thickness of skin, fat, nerves, blood vessels, and muscle from a healthy part of the body to the injured site. These techniques are used when a large amount of skin has been lost in the original injury, when a thin scar ...

  19. Successful device closure of a post-infarction ventricular septal defect

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Si-Wan; Han, Ji Hye; Jin, Seon-Ah; Kim, Mijoo; Lee, Jae-Hwan; Jeong, Jin-Ok

    2016-01-01

    Ventricular septal defect (VSD) is a lethal complication of myocardial infarction. The event occurs 2–8 days after an infarction and patients should undergo emergency surgical treatment. We report on successful device closure of post-infarction VSD. A previously healthy 66-year-old male was admitted with aggravated dyspnea. Echocardiography showed moderate left ventricular (LV) systolic dysfunction with akinesia of the left anterior descending (LAD) territory and muscular VSD size approximately 2 cm. Coronary angiography showed mid-LAD total occlusion without collaterals. Without percutaneous coronary intervention due to time delay, VSD repair was performed. However, a murmur was heard again and pulmonary edema was not controlled 3 days after the operation. Echocardiography showed remnant VSD, and medical treatment failed. Percutaneous treatment using a septal occluder device was decided on. After the procedure, heart failure was controlled and the patient was discharged without complications. This is the first report on device closure of post-infarction VSD in Korea. PMID:27462148

  20. Facial Scar Revision: Understanding Facial Scar Treatment

    MedlinePlus

    ... Contact Us Trust your face to a facial plastic surgeon Facial Scar Revision Understanding Facial Scar Treatment When ... face like the eyes or lips. A facial plastic surgeon has many options for treating and improving facial ...

  1. Facial Scar Revision: Understanding Facial Scar Treatment

    MedlinePlus

    ... Contact Us Trust your face to a facial plastic surgeon Facial Scar Revision Understanding Facial Scar Treatment ... face like the eyes or lips. A facial plastic surgeon has many options for treating and improving ...

  2. Physiological Implications of Myocardial Scar Structure.

    PubMed

    Richardson, William J; Clarke, Samantha A; Quinn, T Alexander; Holmes, Jeffrey W

    2015-09-20

    Once myocardium dies during a heart attack, it is replaced by scar tissue over the course of several weeks. The size, location, composition, structure, and mechanical properties of the healing scar are all critical determinants of the fate of patients who survive the initial infarction. While the central importance of scar structure in determining pump function and remodeling has long been recognized, it has proven remarkably difficult to design therapies that improve heart function or limit remodeling by modifying scar structure. Many exciting new therapies are under development, but predicting their long-term effects requires a detailed understanding of how infarct scar forms, how its properties impact left ventricular function and remodeling, and how changes in scar structure and properties feed back to affect not only heart mechanics but also electrical conduction, reflex hemodynamic compensations, and the ongoing process of scar formation itself. In this article, we outline the scar formation process following a myocardial infarction, discuss interpretation of standard measures of heart function in the setting of a healing infarct, then present implications of infarct scar geometry and structure for both mechanical and electrical function of the heart and summarize experiences to date with therapeutic interventions that aim to modify scar geometry and structure. One important conclusion that emerges from the studies reviewed here is that computational modeling is an essential tool for integrating the wealth of information required to understand this complex system and predict the impact of novel therapies on scar healing, heart function, and remodeling following myocardial infarction.

  3. Physiological Implications of Myocardial Scar Structure

    PubMed Central

    Richardson, WJ; Clarke, SA; Quinn, TA; Holmes, JW

    2016-01-01

    Once myocardium dies during a heart attack, it is replaced by scar tissue over the course of several weeks. The size, location, composition, structure and mechanical properties of the healing scar are all critical determinants of the fate of patients who survive the initial infarction. While the central importance of scar structure in determining pump function and remodeling has long been recognized, it has proven remarkably difficult to design therapies that improve heart function or limit remodeling by modifying scar structure. Many exciting new therapies are under development, but predicting their long-term effects requires a detailed understanding of how infarct scar forms, how its properties impact left ventricular function and remodeling, and how changes in scar structure and properties feed back to affect not only heart mechanics but also electrical conduction, reflex hemodynamic compensations, and the ongoing process of scar formation itself. In this article, we outline the scar formation process following an MI, discuss interpretation of standard measures of heart function in the setting of a healing infarct, then present implications of infarct scar geometry and structure for both mechanical and electrical function of the heart and summarize experiences to date with therapeutic interventions that aim to modify scar geometry and structure. One important conclusion that emerges from the studies reviewed here is that computational modeling is an essential tool for integrating the wealth of information required to understand this complex system and predict the impact of novel therapies on scar healing, heart function, and remodeling following myocardial infarction. PMID:26426470

  4. Acne scar subcision.

    PubMed

    Chandrashekar, Bs; Nandini, As

    2010-05-01

    Subcision is a simple and safe office surgery procedure for treatment of depressed acne scars. It can easily be combined with other treatments such as laser, dermaroller and scar revisions for maximum efficacy.

  5. Acne Scar Subcision

    PubMed Central

    Chandrashekar, BS; Nandini, AS

    2010-01-01

    Subcision is a simple and safe office surgery procedure for treatment of depressed acne scars. It can easily be combined with other treatments such as laser, dermaroller and scar revisions for maximum efficacy. PMID:21031076

  6. Scar contractures, hypertrophic scars, and keloids.

    PubMed

    Brissett, A E; Sherris, D A

    2001-11-01

    A scar contracture is the result of a contractile wound-healing process occurring in a scar that has already been reepithelialized and adequately healed. Keloids and hypertrophic scars (HTSs) are fibrous tissue outgrowths that result from a derailment in the normal wound-healing process. The exact incidence of keloids and HTSs remains unknown. Beyond the common belief that trauma is the initiating event of keloid and hypertrophic scar formation, the remainder of the process remains uncertain. A combination of biochemical factors, skin tension, endocrinologic factors, and genetic factors are the likely culprits. Treatment begins by educating the patient about the etiology of the scarring process. All treatment protocols are individualized, but the standard approach to keloids and HTSs begins with corticosteroid injection followed by surgical excision, pressure dressings, and long-term follow-up.

  7. Laser radiation of blood in treating patients with postinfarction heart

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tashchuk, V.; Polyanskaya, O.; Chaplinsky, R.; Ilashchuk, I.; Kulyk, T.

    1999-11-01

    168 patients on the postclinical stage of treatment of acute myocardial infarction were examined by means of the use of basic antiischemic therapy and intravenous laser radiation of blood (LRB). All patients were studied with the help of transesophageal electrocardiostimulation, bicycle ergometry, echocardiography and Holter ECG monitoring in the dynamics of prolonged observation and treatment. The analysis of efficiency of the LRB has shown that the most minimal degree of myocardial ischemization was marked in patients after intravenous LRB. The patients before LRB had the greater reduction of coronary reserve. The use of LRB has given the possibility to the optimization of therapy in patients on the stage of the forming of `the postinfarction heart'.

  8. [Mastopexy with minimal scar].

    PubMed

    Tepavicharova-Romanska, P; Romanski, R K

    2004-01-01

    The image of the breast as a symbol of femininity plays an essential role in the way a woman looks at herself and contributes to her personal and social development. Fashion nowadays uncovers rather than covers a woman's body, and long scars resulting from mammaplasty are less accepted now than they were in the past, more so because the scar quality is unforeseeable. The main concern of mastopexy is to limit the scars, creating a nice breast shape. Ideally scarring is confined to the periareolar circle.

  9. Surgical Treatment of Post-Infarction Left Ventricular Pseudoaneurysm

    PubMed Central

    Eren, Ercan; Bozbuga, Nilgun; Toker, Mehmet Erdem; Keles, Cuneyt; Rabus, Murat Bulent; Yildirim, Ozgur; Guler, Mustafa; Balkanay, Mehmet; Isik, Omer; Yakut, Cevat

    2007-01-01

    Herein, we present a retrospective analysis of our experience with acquired pseudoaneurysms of the left ventricle over a 20-year period. From February 1985 through September 2004, 14 patients underwent operation for left ventricular pseudoaneurysm in our clinic. All pseudoaneurysms (12 chronic, 2 acute) were caused by myocardial infarction. The mean interval between myocardial infarction and diagnosis of pseudoaneurysm was 7 months (range, 1–11 mo). The pseudoaneurysm was located in the inferior or posterolateral wall in 11 of 14 patients (78.6%). In all patients, the pseudoaneurysm was resected and the ventricular wall defect was closed with direct suture (6 patients) or a patch (8 patients). Most patients had 3-vessel coronary artery disease. Coronary artery bypass grafting was performed in all patients. Five patients died (postoperative mortality rate, 35.7%) after repair of a pseudoaneurysm (post-infarction, 2 patients; chronic, 3 patients). Two patients died during follow-up (median, 42 mo), due to cancer in 1 patient and sudden death in the other. Although repair of left ventricular pseudoaneurysm is still a surgical challenge, it can be performed with acceptable results in most patients. Surgical repair is warranted particularly in cases of large or expanding pseudoaneurysms because of the propensity for fatal rupture. PMID:17420793

  10. Mechanobiology of scarring.

    PubMed

    Ogawa, Rei

    2011-09-01

    The mechanophysiological conditions of injured skin greatly influence the degree of scar formation, scar contracture, and abnormal scar progression/generation (e.g., keloids and hypertrophic scars). It is important that scar mechanobiology be understood from the perspective of the extracellular matrix and extracellular fluid, in order to analyze mechanotransduction pathways and develop new strategies for scar prevention and treatment. Mechanical forces such as stretching tension, shear force, scratch, compression, hydrostatic pressure, and osmotic pressure can be perceived by two types of skin receptors. These include cellular mechanoreceptors/mechanosensors, such as cytoskeleton (e.g., actin filaments), cell adhesion molecules (e.g., integrin), and mechanosensitive (MS) ion channels (e.g., Ca(2+) channel), and sensory nerve fibers (e.g., MS nociceptors) that produce the somatic sensation of mechanical force. Mechanical stimuli are received by MS nociceptors and signals are transmitted to the dorsal root ganglia that contain neuronal cell bodies in the afferent spinal nerves. Neuropeptides are thereby released from the peripheral terminals of the primary afferent sensory neurons in the skin, modulating scarring via skin and immune cell functions (e.g., cell proliferation, cytokine production, antigen presentation, sensory neurotransmission, mast cell degradation, vasodilation, and increased vascular permeability under physiological or pathophysiological conditions). Mechanoreceptor or MS nociceptor inhibition and mechanical force reduction should propel the development of novel methods for scar prevention and treatment.

  11. Laser scar revision.

    PubMed

    Lupton, Jason R; Alster, Tina S

    2002-01-01

    A variety of lasers can be used to treat scars and striae effectively. It is of paramount importance that the type of scar be properly classified on initial examination so that the most appropriate method of treatment can be chosen. Classification also allows the laser surgeon to discuss with the patient the anticipated response to treatment. The 585-nm pulsed dye laser (PDL) is the most appropriate system for treating hypertrophic scars, keloids, erythematous scars, and striae. The PDL carries a low risk of side effects and complications when operated at appropriate treatment parameters and time intervals. Atrophic scars are best treated with ablative CO2 and Er:YAG lasers; however, proliferative keloids and hypertrophic scars should not be vaporized because of the high risk of scar recurrence or progression. The appropriate choice and use of lasers can significantly improve most scars. As research in laser-skin interaction continues, further refinements in laser technology coupled with the addition of alternate treatment procedures will allow improved clinical efficacy and predictability.

  12. Scar formation and ligament healing.

    PubMed

    Hildebrand, K A; Frank, C B

    1998-12-01

    Ligaments are highly organized, dense, fibrous connective-tissue structures that provide stability to joints and participate in joint proprioception. Injuries to ligaments induce a healing response that is characterized by the formation of a scar. The scar tissue is weaker, larger and creeps more than normal ligament and is associated with an increased amount of minor collagens (types III, V and VI), decreased collagen cross-links and an increased amount of glycosaminoglycans. Studies have shown that certain surgical variables alter the healing of ligaments. Such factors include the size of gap between the healing ligament, ends, the use of motion in a stable joint and the presence of multiple ligamentous injuries. Research on ligament healing includes studies on low-load and failure-load properties, alterations in the expression of matrix molecules, cytokine modulation of healing and gene therapy as a method to alter matrix protein and cytokine production.

  13. Scars and Wounds

    MedlinePlus

    ... Skin Problems Dry Skin Itching Skin Color Changes Pressure Sores Scars and Wounds Treatments and Side Effects Managing ... purple bruising of skin Scaly, broken skin (see Pressure Sores ) Crusts, scabs, or cuts in the skin Bleeding ...

  14. [Unusual breast scars].

    PubMed

    Petit, F; Divaris, M; Guilbert, F

    1999-12-01

    The authors report the case of an unusual form of skin tattoo, discovered on the breasts of a young woman, corresponding to several scars forming a symbolic image, performed deliberately with a burning object. This form of mutilation is called "branding". Imported from England, it is developing in France as a result of fashion, but its followers could one day regret the permanent scars left by this deep burn.

  15. Pseudopod growth and evolution during cell movement is controlled through SCAR/WAVE dephosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Ura, Seiji; Pollitt, Alice Y.; Veltman, Douwe M.; Morrice, Nicholas A.; Machesky, Laura M.; Insall, Robert H.

    2016-01-01

    Background SCAR/WAVE is a principal regulator of pseudopod growth in crawling cells. It exists in a stable pentameric complex, which is regulated at multiple levels that are only beginning to be understood. SCAR/WAVE is phosphorylated at multiple sites, but how this affects its biological activity is unclear. Here we show that dephosphorylation of Dictyostelium SCAR controls normal pseudopod dynamics. Results We demonstrate that the C-terminal acidic domain of most Dictyostelium SCAR is basally phosphorylated at four serine residues. A small amount of singly phosphorylated SCAR is also found. SCAR phosphorylation site mutants cannot replace SCAR’s role in the pseudopod cycle, though they rescue cell size and growth. Unphosphorylatable SCAR is hyperactive – excessive recruitment to the front gives large pseudopods that fail to bifurcate because they continually grow forwards. Conversely, phosphomimetic SCAR is weakly active, causing frequent small, disorganised pseudopods. Even in its regulatory complex, SCAR is normally held inactive by an interaction between the phosphorylated acidic and basic domains. Loss of basic residues complementary to the acidic phosphosites yields a hyperactive protein similar to unphosphorylatable SCAR. Conclusions Regulated dephosphorylation of a fraction of the cellular SCAR pool is a key step in SCAR activation during pseudopod growth. Phosphorylation increases autoinhibition of the intact complex. Dephosphorylation weakens this interaction and facilitates SCAR activation, but also destabilizes the protein. We show that SCAR is specifically dephosphorylated in pseudopods, increasing activation by Rac and lipids and supporting positive feedback of pseudopod growth. PMID:22386315

  16. Surgical Scar Revision: An Overview

    PubMed Central

    Garg, Shilpa; Dahiya, Naveen; Gupta, Somesh

    2014-01-01

    Scar formation is an inevitable consequence of wound healing from either a traumatic or a surgical intervention. The aesthetic appearance of a scar is the most important criteria to judge the surgical outcome. An understanding of the anatomy and wound healing along with experience, meticulous planning and technique can reduce complications and improve the surgical outcome. Scar revision does not erase a scar but helps to make it less noticeable and more acceptable. Both surgical and non-surgical techniques, used either alone or in combination can be used for revising a scar. In planning a scar revision surgeon should decide on when to act and the type of technique to use for scar revision to get an aesthetically pleasing outcome. This review article provides overview of methods applied for facial scar revision. This predominantly covers surgical methods. PMID:24761092

  17. Can Acne Scars Be Removed?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Surgery? A Week of Healthy Breakfasts Shyness Can Acne Scars Be Removed? KidsHealth > For Teens > Can Acne ... eliminar las cicatrices del acné? Different Types of Acne Scars from acne can seem like double punishment — ...

  18. Scar revision - slideshow

    MedlinePlus

    ... anatomy URL of this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/presentations/100098.htm Scar revision - series—Normal anatomy To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Go to slide 1 out of 4 Go to slide 2 ...

  19. Emerging Therapies for Scar Prevention

    PubMed Central

    Block, Lisa; Gosain, Ankush; King, Timothy W.

    2015-01-01

    Significance: There are ∼12 million traumatic lacerations treated in the United States emergency rooms each year, 250 million surgical incisions created worldwide every year, and 11 million burns severe enough to warrant medical treatment worldwide. In the United States, over $20 billion dollars per year are spent on the treatment and management of scars. Recent Advances: Investigations into the management of scar therapies over the last decade have advanced our understanding related to the care of cutaneous scars. Scar treatment methods are presented including topical, intralesional, and mechanical therapies in addition to cryotherapy, radiotherapy, and laser therapy. Critical Issues: Current treatment options for scars have significant limitations. This review presents the current and emerging therapies available for scar management and the scientific evidence for scar management is discussed. Future Directions: Based upon our new understanding of scar formation, innovative scar therapies are being developed. Additional research on the basic science of scar formation will lead to additional advances and novel therapies for the treatment of cutaneous scars. PMID:26487979

  20. Update on hypertrophic scar treatment

    PubMed Central

    Rabello, Felipe Bettini; Souza, Cleyton Dias; Júnior, Jayme Adriano Farina

    2014-01-01

    Scar formation is a consequence of the wound healing process that occurs when body tissues are damaged by a physical injury. Hypertrophic scars and keloids are pathological scars resulting from abnormal responses to trauma and can be itchy and painful, causing serious functional and cosmetic disability. The current review will focus on the definition of hypertrophic scars, distinguishing them from keloids and on the various methods for treating hypertrophic scarring that have been described in the literature, including treatments with clearly proven efficiency and therapies with doubtful benefits. Numerous methods have been described for the treatment of abnormal scars, but to date, the optimal treatment method has not been established. This review will explore the differences between different types of nonsurgical management of hypertrophic scars, focusing on the indications, uses, mechanisms of action, associations and efficacies of the following therapies: silicone, pressure garments, onion extract, intralesional corticoid injections and bleomycin. PMID:25141117

  1. Outcome of Dermal Grafting in the Management of Atrophic Facial Scars

    PubMed Central

    Shilpa, Kanathur; Sacchidanand, S; Leelavathy, Budamakuntla; Shilpashree, Padmanabha; Divya, Gorur; Ranjitha, Rammurthy; Lakshmi, DV

    2016-01-01

    Background: Scars over the face are cosmetically and psychologically disturbing. Various techniques have been described and are being practiced in the management of these scars. Aims and Objectives: This study was undertaken to study the safety, effectiveness of using dermal grafts as fillers in the management of facial scars due to acne, chickenpox, trauma or any others. Materials and Methods: Fifteen patients with atrophic facial scars of varied aetiology and willing for surgery were considered for dermal graft technique. After pre-operative workup, subcision was done 2 weeks before planned surgery. Depending on the type of scar, grafts were inserted using pocket or road railing techniques. Scar improvement was assessed based on patient satisfaction. Results: Linear scars showed excellent improvement. Acne, varicella and traumatic scars also showed good improvement. However, two patients did not appreciate improvement due to marked surface irregularities as the scars were elevated. They were further subjected to LASER and chemical peel resurfacing. Conclusion: Dermal grafting can be used in the management of any round to oval facial scar which is soft, prominent and at least 4–5 mm across; linear scars at least 2–3 mm across and 3–4 cm in length. However, scars with prominent surface irregularities need further resurfacing techniques along with dermal grafting. Limitations: Limitations of the study include small sample size, and only subjective assessment of the scar has been taken into consideration to assess the outcome. PMID:28163456

  2. Coupled agent-based and finite-element models for predicting scar structure following myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Rouillard, Andrew D; Holmes, Jeffrey W

    2014-08-01

    Following myocardial infarction, damaged muscle is gradually replaced by collagenous scar tissue. The structural and mechanical properties of the scar are critical determinants of heart function, as well as the risk of serious post-infarction complications such as infarct rupture, infarct expansion, and progression to dilated heart failure. A number of therapeutic approaches currently under development aim to alter infarct mechanics in order to reduce complications, such as implantation of mechanical restraint devices, polymer injection, and peri-infarct pacing. Because mechanical stimuli regulate scar remodeling, the long-term consequences of therapies that alter infarct mechanics must be carefully considered. Computational models have the potential to greatly improve our ability to understand and predict how such therapies alter heart structure, mechanics, and function over time. Toward this end, we developed a straightforward method for coupling an agent-based model of scar formation to a finite-element model of tissue mechanics, creating a multi-scale model that captures the dynamic interplay between mechanical loading, scar deformation, and scar material properties. The agent-based component of the coupled model predicts how fibroblasts integrate local chemical, structural, and mechanical cues as they deposit and remodel collagen, while the finite-element component predicts local mechanics at any time point given the current collagen fiber structure and applied loads. We used the coupled model to explore the balance between increasing stiffness due to collagen deposition and increasing wall stress due to infarct thinning and left ventricular dilation during the normal time course of healing in myocardial infarcts, as well as the negative feedback between strain anisotropy and the structural anisotropy it promotes in healing scar. The coupled model reproduced the observed evolution of both collagen fiber structure and regional deformation following coronary

  3. Management of scar contractures, hypertrophic scars, and keloids.

    PubMed

    Sherris, D A; Larrabee, W F; Murakami, C S

    1995-10-01

    Aberrant fibrous tissue formation after surgery or trauma still presents a challenge to surgeons. Current research hopes to identify the characteristics of the population of fibroblasts that lead to hypertrophic or keloid scar formation. Surgical procedures and laser therapy followed by intralesional steroid treatments still are the foundation of treatment; but new modalities are being applied. The pathogenesis and management of hypertrophic scars, keloids, and scar contractures are discussed in this article.

  4. Predictive value of advanced glycation end products for the development of post-infarction heart failure: a preliminary report

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Since post-infarction heart failure (HF) determines a great morbidity and mortality, and given the physiopathology implications of advanced glycation end products (AGE) in the genesis of myocardial dysfunction, it was intended to analyze the prognostic value of these molecules in order to predict post-infarction HF development. Methods A prospective clinical study in patients after first acute coronary syndrome was conducted. The follow-up period was consisted in 1 year. In 194 patients consecutively admitted in the coronary unit for myocardial infarct fluorescent AGE levels were measured. The association between glycaemic parameters and the development of post-infarction HF were analyzed in those patients. Finally, we identified the variables with independent predictor value by performing a multivariate analysis of Hazard ratio for Cox regression. Results Eleven out of 194 patients (5.6%) developed HF during follow-up (median: 1.0 years [0.8 - 1.5 years]). Even though basal glucose, fructosamine and glycated haemoglobin were significant predictive factors in the univariate analysis, after being adjusted by confounding variables and AGE they lost their statistical signification. Only AGE (Hazard Ratio 1.016, IC 95%: 1.006-1.026; p<0,001), together with NT-proBNP and the infarct extension were predictors for post-infarction HF development, where AGE levels over the median value 5-fold increased the risk of HF development during follow-up. Conclusions AGE are an independent marker of post-infarction HF development risk. PMID:22909322

  5. Defect Scars on Flexible Surfaces with Crystalline Order

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohyama, Tamotsu; Gompper, Gerhard

    2007-05-01

    The crystallography of two-dimensional particle packings on flexible surfaces of spherical topology is investigated. Examples are viral capsids and crystalline vesicles. Computer simulations of dynamically triangulated surfaces are employed to study the shape and structure of lattice defects as a function of the Föppl von Kármán number γ. We find that grain-boundary scars become much more fuzzy with increasing temperature, that the size of grain-boundary scars saturates with increasing vesicle radius, and that the buckling transition shifts to higher values of γ due to the presence of scars.

  6. Dune Avalanche Scars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    05 August 2004 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows large, low albedo (dark) sand dunes in Kaiser Crater near 47.2oS, 340.4oW. The dunes are--ever so slowly--moving east to west (right to left) as sand avalanches down the steeper, slip face slopes of each. Avalanching sand in the Kaiser dune field has left deep scars on these slopes, suggesting that the sand is not loose but is instead weakly cemented. The image covers an area approximately 3 km (1.9 mi) wide and is illuminated by sunlight from the upper left.

  7. Longitudinal burn scar quantification.

    PubMed

    Nedelec, Bernadette; Correa, José A; de Oliveira, Ana; LaSalle, Leo; Perrault, Isabelle

    2014-12-01

    Quantitative studies of the clinical recovery of burn scars are currently lacking. Previous reports validate the objective, precise, diagnostic capabilities of high-frequency ultrasound to measure thickness, the Cutometer(®) to measure pliability and the Mexameter(®) to measure erythema and pigmentation of scars. Thus, we prospectively quantified clinical characteristics of patient-matched, after burn hypertrophic scar (HSc), donor site scar (D) and normal skin (N) using these instruments. One investigator measured 3 sites (HSc, D, N) in 46 burn survivors at 3, 6, and 12 months after-burn. A mixed model regression analysis, adjusting p-values for multiplicity of testing, was used to compare means among sites and time points. Participants were 41.2±13.5 years old, 87% males, predominantly Caucasian, with an average of 19.5% body surface area burned. HSc thickness decreased significantly between 3 and 6, 6 and 12, and 3 and 12 months (all p<0.0001), but remained thicker than D and N skin (all p<0.0001). Pliability differed significantly between HSc, D and N sites at all time points (all p<0.0001), with HSc and D increasing between 3 and 12 months (p<0.05) but not reaching normal. HSc and D sites were significantly more erythematous than normal skin (p<0.05) at 3 and 6 months but D sites approached normal by 12 months. The only time points at which pigmentation significantly differed were the HSc and D sites at 6 months. Thickness, pliability, erythema and pigmentation of N skin remained similar over the 12 months. We found that post-burn HSc thickness, pliability and erythema differed significantly from D and N skin at 3, 6, and 12 months and does not return to normal by 12 months after-injury; however, significant improvements towards normal can be expected. Donor sites are redder than normal skin at 3 and 6 months but can be expected to return to normal by 12 months. Although the color of HSc and D sites change markedly with time these color changes are

  8. New innovations in scar management.

    PubMed

    Widgerow, A D; Chait, L A; Stals, R; Stals, P J

    2000-01-01

    As current aesthetic surgical techniques become more standardized and results more predictable, a fine scar may be the demarcating line between acceptable and unacceptable aesthetic results. With this in mind, a scar management program has been adopted based on the modalities of wound support, hydration, and hastened maturity, all factors gleaned from scientific evidence published over the past 25 years. Tension on a scar in one axis will result in a stretched scar, probably initiated by neutrophils and their neutral proteases [18,26]. Tension on a scar from many directions or intermittently will result in a hypertrophic scar, possibly initiated by lymphocytes but definitely related to a prolongation of the inflammatory process, with increased fibroblast activity and overabundant extracellular matrix secretion [24,26]. The common initiating factor is the tension on the scar, and the critical element needed to counteract this tension is scar support. Clinical experience has shown us that the most reliable way to support a scar is by using microporous tape. Hydration is a second beneficial influence on scar control and is the basis of the use of silicone sheeting and gel [7,29,36]. Alpha Centella cream has two main components. The first is an extract from the plant Bulbine frutescens. This increases hydration under the tape by leaving a layer of fatty vesicles of glycoprotein on the skin surface. This also has antibacterial properties. The second component is the principal terpenoids extracted from the Centella asiatica plant. These include asiatic acid, madecassic acid, and asiaticoside. Centella asiatica has been documented to aid wound healing in a large number of scientific reports [5,12,21,22,33,34,40]. The most beneficial effect appears to be the stimulation of maturation of the scar by the production of type I collagen [4,19] and the resulting decrease in the inflammatory reaction and myofibroblast production. Thus these components have been incorporated into

  9. Umbilical scarring in hatchling American alligators

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wiebe, J.J.; Sepulveda, M.S.; Buckland, J.E.; Anderson, S.R.; Gross, T.S.

    2004-01-01

    Umbilical scarring is the presence of excess scar tissue deposited between abdominal dermal layers at the site of yolk sac absorption in hatchling American alligators (Alligator mississippiensis). The presence of this dermal condition plays a key evaluatory role in the overall quality and subsequent value for various commercial leather products. Despite the prevalent nature of this condition, currently the industry has no standardized protocols for its quantification. The objectives of this study were to examine the relationship between hatchling weight and age and incidence of umbilical scarring and to develop a quantifiable and reproducible technique to measure this dermal condition in hatchling American alligators. Thirty eggs from each of nine clutches were incubated in two separate incubators at different facilities and hatchling umbilical scarring was measured at 2 and 10 days of age using digital calipers. Umbilical area was calculated by multiplying umbilical length times umbilical width. There was a significant effect of both age and clutch on umbilical area (overall decline of 64%) by 10 days post-hatch. However, only five of the nine clutches utilized expressed a noticeable decline in the size of this dermal condition (range 67-74%). We had hypothesized that larger hatchlings would have larger umbilical areas and a slower rate of improvement in this condition during the first few days post-hatch. The differences in umbilical area and percent decline with age across clutches, however, were not associated with differences in initial hatchling weights. Within clutches and time periods, hatchling weight had no significant effect on the size and/or rate of decline of this condition. ?? 2004 Published by Elsevier B.V.

  10. Thermal Injury Model in the Rabbit Ear with Quantifiable Burn Progression and Hypertrophic Scar.

    PubMed

    Friedrich, Emily E; Niknam-Bienia, Solmaz; Xie, Ping; Jia, Sheng-Xian; Hong, Seok Jong; Mustoe, Thomas A; Galiano, Robert D

    2017-04-01

    Hypertrophic scar is a major clinical outcome of deep-partial thickness to full thickness thermal burn injury. Appropriate animal models are a limitation to burn research due to the lack of, or access to, animal models which address the endpoint of hypertrophic scar. Lower species, such as rodents, heal mainly by contracture, which limits the duration of study. Higher species, such as pigs, heal more similarly to humans, but are associated with high cost, long duration for scar development, challenges in quantifying scar hypertrophy, and poor manageability. Here we present a quantifiable deep-partial thickness burn model in the rabbit ear. Burns were created using a dry-heated brass rod for 10 s and 20 s at 90°C. At the time of eschar excision on day 3, excisional wounds were made on the contralateral ear for comparison. Burn wound progression, in which the wound size expands over time is a major distinction between excisional and thermal injuries, was quantified at 1 h and 3 d after the injuries using calibrated photographs and histology and the size of the wounds was found to be unchanged from the initial wound size at 1 h, but 10% in the 20 s burn wounds at 3 d. A quantifiable hypertrophic scar, measured by histology as the scar elevation index, was present in both 20 s burn wounds and excisional wounds at day 35. ImageJ measurements revealed that the 20 s burn wound scars were 22% larger than the excisional wound scars and the 20 s burn scar area measurements from histology were 26% greater than in the excisional wound scar. The ability to measure both burn progression and scar hypertrophy over a 35-day time frame suits this model to screening early intervention burn wound therapeutics or scar treatments in a burn-specific scar model. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  11. Increased Activity of the Intracardiac Oxytocinergic System in the Development of Postinfarction Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Kasarello, Kaja; Kuch, Marek; Gala, Kamila

    2016-01-01

    Aim. The present study was designed to test the hypothesis that the development of postinfarction heart failure is associated with a change of activity of the intracardiac oxytocinergic system. Methods. Experiments were performed on male Sprague-Dawley rats subjected to myocardial infarction or sham surgery. Four weeks after the surgery, blood samples were collected and the samples of the left ventricle (LV) and right ventricle (RV) were harvested for evaluation of the mRNA expression (RT-PCR) of oxytocin (OT), oxytocin receptor (OTR), natriuretic peptides, and the level of OT and OTR protein (ELISA). The concentration of N-terminal B-type natriuretic peptide was measured to determine the presence of heart failure. Results. Plasma NT-proBNP concentration was higher in the infarcted rats. In the infarcted rats, the expression of OT mRNA and the OT protein level were higher in the RV. There were no significant differences between infarcted and noninfarcted rats in the expression of OT mRNA and in the OT protein level in the fragments of the LV. In both the left and the right ventricles, OTR mRNA expression was lower but the level of OTR protein was higher in the infarcted rats. Conclusions. In the present study, we indicate that postinfarction heart failure is associated with an increased activity of the intracardiac oxytocinergic system. PMID:27957495

  12. OSM mitigates post-infarction cardiac remodeling and dysfunction by up-regulating autophagy through Mst1 suppression.

    PubMed

    Hu, Jianqiang; Zhang, Lei; Zhao, Zhijing; Zhang, Mingming; Lin, Jie; Wang, Jiaxing; Yu, Wenjun; Man, Wanrong; Li, Congye; Zhang, Rongqing; Gao, Erhe; Wang, Haichang; Sun, Dongdong

    2016-11-04

    The incidence and prevalence of heart failure (HF) in the world are rapidly rising possibly attributed to the worsened HF following myocardial infarction (MI) in recent years. Here we examined the effects of oncostatin M (OSM) on postinfarction cardiac remodeling and the underlying mechanisms involved. MI model was induced using left anterior descending coronary artery (LAD) ligation. In addition, cultured neonatal mouse cardiomyocytes were subjected to simulated MI. Our results revealed that OSM alleviated left ventricular remodeling, promoted cardiac function, restored mitochondrial cristae density and architecture disorders after 4weeks of MI. Enhanced autophagic flux was indicated in cardiomyocytes transduced with Ad-GFP -LC3 in the OSM treated group as compared with the MI group. OSM receptor Oβ knockout blocked the beneficial effects of OSM in postinfarction cardiac remodeling and cardiomyocytes autophagy. OSM pretreatment significantly alleviated left ventricular remodeling and dysfunction in Mst1 transgenic mice, while it failed to reverse further the postinfarction left ventricular dilatation and cardiac function in the Mst1 knockout mice. Our data revealed that OSM alleviated postinfarction cardiac remodeling and dysfunction by enhancing cardiomyocyte autophagy. OSM holds promise as a therapeutic target in treating HF after MI through Oβ receptor by inhibiting Mst1 phosphorylation.

  13. Phospholemman Deficiency in Postinfarct Hearts: Enhanced Contractility but Increased Mortality

    PubMed Central

    Mirza, M. Ayoub; Lane, Susan; Yang, Zequan; Karaoli, Themis; Akosah, Kwame; Hossack, John; McDuffie, Marcia; Wang, JuFang; Zhang, Xue-Qian; Song, Jianliang; Cheung, Joseph Y.; Tucker, Amy L.

    2013-01-01

    Phospholemman (PLM) regulates [Na+]i, [Ca2+]i and contractility through its interactions with Na+-K+-ATPase (NKA) and Na+/Ca2+ exchanger (NCX1) in the heart. Both expression and phosphorylation of PLM are altered after myocardial infarction (MI) and heart failure. We tested the hypothesis that absence of PLM regulation of NKA and NCX1 in PLM-knockout (KO) mice is detrimental. Three weeks after MI, wild-type (WT) and PLM-KO hearts were similarly hypertrophied. PLM expression was lower but fractional phosphorylation was higher in WT-MI compared to WT-sham hearts. Left ventricular ejection fraction was severely depressed in WT-MI but significantly less depressed in PLM-KO-MI hearts despite similar infarct sizes. Compared with WT-sham myocytes, the abnormal [Ca2+]i transient and contraction amplitudes observed in WT-MI myocytes were ameliorated by genetic absence of PLM. In addition, NCX1 current was depressed in WT-MI but not in PLM-KO-MI myocytes. Despite improved myocardial and myocyte performance, PLM-KO mice demonstrated reduced survival after MI. Our findings indicate that alterations in PLM expression and phosphorylation are important adaptations post-MI, and that complete absence of PLM regulation of NKA and NCX1 is detrimental in post-MI animals. PMID:22686200

  14. Phospholemman deficiency in postinfarct hearts: enhanced contractility but increased mortality.

    PubMed

    Mirza, M Ayoub; Lane, Susan; Yang, Zequan; Karaoli, Themis; Akosah, Kwame; Hossack, John; McDuffie, Marcia; Wang, JuFang; Zhang, Xue-Qian; Song, Jianliang; Cheung, Joseph Y; Tucker, Amy L

    2012-06-01

    Phospholemman (PLM) regulates [Na(+) ](i), [Ca(2+)](i) and contractility through its interactions with Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase (NKA) and Na(+) /Ca(2+) exchanger (NCX1) in the heart. Both expression and phosphorylation of PLM are altered after myocardial infarction (MI) and heart failure. We tested the hypothesis that absence of PLM regulation of NKA and NCX1 in PLM-knockout (KO) mice is detrimental. Three weeks after MI, wild-type (WT) and PLM-KO hearts were similarly hypertrophied. PLM expression was lower but fractional phosphorylation was higher in WT-MI compared to WT-sham hearts. Left ventricular ejection fraction was severely depressed in WT-MI but significantly less depressed in PLM-KO-MI hearts despite similar infarct sizes. Compared with WT-sham myocytes, the abnormal [Ca(2+) ], transient and contraction amplitudes observed in WT-MI myocytes were ameliorated by genetic absence of PLM. In addition, NCX1 current was depressed in WT-MI but not in PLM-KO-MI myocytes. Despite improved myocardial and myocyte performance, PLM-KO mice demonstrated reduced survival after MI. Our findings indicate that alterations in PLM expression and phosphorylation are important adaptations post-MI, and that complete absence of PLM regulation of NKA and NCX1 is detrimental in post-MI animals.

  15. [The scars of Andy Warhol].

    PubMed

    Scholz, A

    1996-02-01

    The biographical and artistic documents describing to the attempted assassination of the artist Andy Warhol are reviewed. The visible scars are interpreted as symbols of the damaged integrity of the skin.

  16. Prostaglandin E₂ promotes post-infarction cardiomyocyte replenishment by endogenous stem cells.

    PubMed

    Hsueh, Ying-Chang; Wu, Jasmine M F; Yu, Chun-Keung; Wu, Kenneth K; Hsieh, Patrick C H

    2014-04-01

    Although self-renewal ability of adult mammalian heart has been reported, few pharmacological treatments are known to promote cardiomyocyte regeneration after injury. In this study, we demonstrate that the critical period of stem/progenitor cell-mediated cardiomyocyte replenishment is initiated within 7 days and saturates on day 10 post-infarction. Moreover, blocking the inflammatory reaction with COX-2 inhibitors may also reduce the capability of endogenous stem/progenitor cells to repopulate lost cells. Injection of the COX-2 product PGE2 enhances cardiomyocyte replenishment in young mice and recovers cell renewal through attenuating TGF-β1 signaling in aged mice. Further analyses suggest that cardiac stem cells are PGE2-responsive and that PGE2 may regulate stem cell activity directly through the EP2 receptor or indirectly by modulating its micro-environment in vivo. Our findings provide evidence that PGE2 holds great potential for cardiac regeneration.

  17. Scar remodeling after strabismus surgery.

    PubMed Central

    Ludwig, I H

    1999-01-01

    PURPOSE: Patients with overcorrected strabismus (and several patients with undercorrection after extraocular muscle resection) underwent exploration of previously operated muscles, with the intention of advancing their tendons to prevent the need for surgery on additional muscles. Unexpectedly, it was found that, in many cases, an elongated scar segment of variable length was interposed between the muscle and its insertion site on the sclera. Laboratory investigations were carried out to elucidate the underlying mechanism(s) and to create an animal model of the disorder. METHODS: Lengthened scars were repaired on 198 muscles during 134 procedures performed on 123 patients. The scars consisted of amorphous connective tissue interposed between the globe and normal tendon. Repair was accomplished by excision of the scar and reattachment of the muscle to sclera, using absorbable sutures in 64 cases and nonabsorbable sutures in 70 cases. Histopathologic examination was performed on 82 clinical specimens, and tissue culture studies were performed on 7 specimens. To develop an animal model, 10 New Zealand white rabbits underwent bilateral superior rectus resection. Half of the eyes received sub-Tenon's injections of collagenase over the operative site during weeks 2, 3, 5, and 6 postoperatively; the other half received saline solution injections on the same schedule. At 10 weeks, half the sites were studied histologically, and the other half underwent collagen creep analysis. In a second study, the use of absorbable versus nonabsorbable sutures was compared in the rabbit model. RESULTS: In the clinical cases, the mean length of the elongated scar segments was 4.2 mm. A total of 105 of the 134 repair procedures were judged successful. Thirty-one procedures resulted in recurrence of the original overcorrection; 7 of these had documented restretches. Factors that distinguished patients with stretched scars from patients with classic slipped muscles included minimal or no

  18. Postmastectomy radiotherapy with integrated scar boost using helical tomotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Rong Yi; Yadav, Poonam; Welsh, James S.; Fahner, Tasha; Paliwal, Bhudatt

    2012-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate helical tomotherapy dosimetry in postmastectomy patients undergoing treatment for chest wall and positive nodal regions with simultaneous integrated boost (SIB) in the scar region using strip bolus. Six postmastectomy patients were scanned with a 5-mm-thick strip bolus covering the scar planning target volume (PTV) plus 2-cm margin. For all 6 cases, the chest wall received a total cumulative dose of 49.3-50.4 Gy with daily fraction size of 1.7-2.0 Gy. Total dose to the scar PTV was prescribed to 58.0-60.2 Gy at 2.0-2.5 Gy per fraction. The supraclavicular PTV and mammary nodal PTV received 1.7-1.9 dose per fraction. Two plans (with and without bolus) were generated for all 6 cases. To generate no-bolus plans, strip bolus was contoured and overrode to air density before planning. The setup reproducibility and delivered dose accuracy were evaluated for all 6 cases. Dose-volume histograms were used to evaluate dose-volume coverage of targets and critical structures. We observed reduced air cavities with the strip bolus setup compared with what we normally see with the full bolus. The thermoluminescence dosimeters (TLD) in vivo dosimetry confirmed accurate dose delivery beneath the bolus. The verification plans performed on the first day megavoltage computed tomography (MVCT) image verified that the daily setup and overall dose delivery was within 2% accuracy compared with the planned dose. The hotspot of the scar PTV in no-bolus plans was 111.4% of the prescribed dose averaged over 6 cases compared with 106.6% with strip bolus. With a strip bolus only covering the postmastectomy scar region, we observed increased dose uniformity to the scar PTV, higher setup reproducibility, and accurate dose delivered beneath the bolus. This study demonstrates the feasibility of using a strip bolus over the scar using tomotherapy for SIB dosimetry in postmastectomy treatments.

  19. [The architectonics of the left heart ventricle and the characteristics of the blood flow in a postinfarct aneurysm].

    PubMed

    Roeva, L A; Chubarova, E Ia

    1998-01-01

    The paper analyzes left ventricular structure-fraction relationships in the development of postinfarct aneurysm. The altered internal architectonics induces to systemic hemodynamic changes, drastically elevated intraventricular pressure. This is caused by to the dysfunction of the papillary-trabecular complex in the left ventricular cavity, which in turn. This leads to the fact that the heart work as a positive-displacement pump, by losing its capacity as a centrifugal component, by making the myocardium require additional energy expenditures, which in turn appears as varying heart failure. This investigation is of definite practical value in developing adequate correction methods for postinfarct aneurysm which can occur with the retained or formed certain ratios of cardiac structures.

  20. Clinical and histological results in the treatment of atrophic and hypertrophic scars using a combined method of radiofrequency, ultrasound, and transepidermal drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Trelles, Mario A; Martínez-Carpio, Pedro A

    2016-08-01

    Scars are problematic for thousands of patients. Scarring is a natural part of the healing process after an injury. However, the appearance of a scar and its treatment depend on multiple factors and on the experience of the therapist and the options available. Despite a plethora of rapidly evolving treatment options and technical advances, the management of atrophic and hypertrophic scars remains difficult. Innovative technologies provide an attractive alternative to conventional methods in the treatment of scars. The purpose of this trial was to determine the clinical and histological results of a method of treatment that combines radiofrequency, ultrasound, and transepidermal drug delivery. This was a prospective study conducted on 14 patients with scars of different sizes, types, and characteristics. All patients underwent six treatment sessions with the Legato device. Atrophic scars were treated with retinoic acid and hypertrophic scars with triamcinolone. Photographs and biopsies were taken before treatment and at 6 months after the last treatment session. The scars improved significantly (P < 0.0001). The mean attenuation in the severity of scars was 67% (range: 50-75%), where 100% indicates complete disappearance of the scar. Clinical and histological images of scar tissue in six patients in whom attenuation in the range of 55-75% was achieved are shown. Biopsies show regenerative changes in the scar tissue, in both the epidermis and dermis. The method makes it possible to treat extensive, heterogeneous scars on different sites with good results that are similar and predictable.

  1. Mapping Fire Scars in the Brazilian Cerrado Using AVHRR Imagery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hlavka, C. A.; Ambrosia, V. G.; Brass, J. A.; Rezendez, A.; Alexander, S.; Guild, L. S.; Peterson, David L. (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    The Brazilian cerrado, or savanna, spans an area of 1,800,000 square kilometers on the great plateau of Central Brazil. Large fires covering hundreds of square kilometers, frequently occur in wildland areas of the cerrado, dominated by grasslands or grasslands mixed with shrubs and small trees, and also within area in the cerrado used for agricultural purposes, particularly for grazing. Smaller fires, typically extending over arm of a few square kilometers or less, are associated with the clewing of crops, such as dry land rice. A method for mapping fire scars and differentiating them from extensive areas of bare sod with AVHRR bands 1 (.55 -.68 micrometer) and 3 (3.5 - 3.9 micrometers) and measures of performance based on comparison with maps of fires with Landsat imagery will be presented. Methods of estimating total area burned from the AVHRR fire scar map will be discussed and related to land use and scar size.

  2. Soft tissue trauma and scar revision.

    PubMed

    Mobley, Steven R; Sjogren, Phayvanh P

    2014-11-01

    Numerous techniques and treatments have been described for scar revision, with most studies focusing on the adult population. A comprehensive review of the literature reveals a paucity of references related specifically to scar revision in children. This review describes the available modalities in pediatric facial scar revision. The authors have integrated current practices in soft tissue trauma and scar revision, including closure techniques and materials, topical therapy, steroid injection, cutaneous laser therapy, and tissue expanders.

  3. Intrauterine endometriotic cyst at the site of previous cesarean scar; scar endometriosis.

    PubMed

    Isci, H; Gonenc, G; Yigiter, A B; Guducu, N; Dünder, I

    2015-01-01

    Uterine scar endometriosis is an extremely rare entitiy. As the surgical procedures of the uterus increases through time, scar endometriosis may be diagnosed more often in the future. A case of uterine scar endometriosis is presented with complaints of menstruation lasting one day with associated pelvic pain. When a cystic mass in the site of previous surgery is diagnosed, scar endometriosis must be considered.

  4. A Mathematical Model of Regenerative Axon Growing along Glial Scar after Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xuning; Zhu, Weiping

    2016-01-01

    A major factor in the failure of central nervous system (CNS) axon regeneration is the formation of glial scar after the injury of CNS. Glial scar generates a dense barrier which the regenerative axons cannot easily pass through or by. In this paper, a mathematical model was established to explore how the regenerative axons grow along the surface of glial scar or bypass the glial scar. This mathematical model was constructed based on the spinal cord injury (SCI) repair experiments by transplanting Schwann cells as bridge over the glial scar. The Lattice Boltzmann Method (LBM) was used in this model for three-dimensional numerical simulation. The advantage of this model is that it provides a parallel and easily implemented algorithm and has the capability of handling complicated boundaries. Using the simulated data, two significant conclusions were made in this study: (1) the levels of inhibitory factors on the surface of the glial scar are the main factors affecting axon elongation and (2) when the inhibitory factor levels on the surface of the glial scar remain constant, the longitudinal size of the glial scar has greater influence on the average rate of axon growth than the transverse size. These results will provide theoretical guidance and reference for researchers to design efficient experiments. PMID:27274762

  5. Stimulated infrared thermography applied to differentiate scar tissue from peri-scar tissue: a preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Riquet, Damien; Houel, Nicolas; Bodnar, Jean-Luc

    2016-08-01

    Every human injury leads to a scar formation. The healing process leads to the formation of new tissue: the scar, which is different from the original tissue. This process is influenced by mechanical strength and the local vasculature is modified. The purpose of this study is to show that there are various temperatures between the scar and the peri-scar area associated with the healing process that can be estimated using the thermal infrared camera. In the study, 12 scars were stimulated by cold. Several changes of temperature were observed between scar and peri-scar area for 10 min. Scars appeared significantly colder with a Wilcoxon test (p = 0.01). Results showed that stimulated infrared thermography can be used to monitor the temperature difference between the scar and peri-scar tissue.

  6. The effect of high-intensity aerobic interval training on postinfarction left ventricular remodelling

    PubMed Central

    Godfrey, Richard; Theologou, Thomas; Dellegrottaglie, Santo; Binukrishnan, Sukumaran; Wright, Jay; Whyte, Gregory; Ellison, Georgina

    2013-01-01

    This is the third in a series of case studies on an individual with normal coronaries who sustained an idiopathic acute myocardial infarction . Bilateral pulmonary emboli almost 2 years post-myocardial infarction (MI) revealed coagulopathy as the cause. The original MI resulted in 16% myocardial scar tissue. An increasing number of patients are surviving MI, hence the burden for healthcare often shifts to heart failure. Accumulating evidence suggests high-intensity aerobic interval exercise (AHIT) is efficacious in improving cardiac function in health and disease. However, its impact on MI scar has never been assessed. Accordingly, the 50-year-old subject of this case study undertook 60 weeks of regular AHIT. Successive cardiac MRI results demonstrate, for the first time, a decrease in MI scar with exercise and, alongside mounting evidence of high efficacy and low risk, suggests AHIT may be increasingly important in future prevention and reversing of disease and or amelioration of symptoms. PMID:23413285

  7. Involvement of impaired desmosome-related proteins in hypertrophic scar intraepidermal blister formation.

    PubMed

    Tan, Jianglin; He, Weifeng; Luo, Gaoxing; Wu, Jun

    2015-11-01

    Hypertrophic scar is one of the unique fibrotic diseases in human. Intraepidermal blister is a common clinical symptom following the hypertrophic scar formation. However, little is known about the reason of blister creation. In this study, we selected three patients with hypertrophic scar as manifested by raised, erythematous, pruritic, blister and thickened appearance undergoing scar resection. The first scar sample was 6 months after burn from the neck of a 3 years old male patient with 10 score by Vancouver Scar Scale (VSS). The second scar sample was 12 months after burn from the dorsal foot of a 16 years old female patient with 13 score by VSS. The third one was 9 months after burn from the elbow of a 34 years old male patients with 13 score by VSS. In order to understand the molecular mechanism of blister formation, we screened the different protein expression between hypertrophic scar and normal skin tissue by means of isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantitation (iTRAQ) labeling technology and high throughput 2D LC-MS/MS. There were 48 proteins found to be downregulated in hypertrophic scar. Among the downregulated ones, plakophilin1 (PKP1), plakophilin3 (PKP3) and desmoplakin (DSP) were the desmosome-related proteins which were validated by immunohistochemistry and western blotting assay. Transmission electron microscopy further showed the considerably reduced size and intensity of hemidesmosome and desmosome in hypertrophic scar tissue, compared to control normal skin. Our data indicted for the first time that downregulation of DSP, PKP1 and PKP3 in hypertrophic scar might be responsible for intraepidermal blister formation.

  8. Psychophysiological stress testing in postinfarction patients. Psychological correlates of cardiovascular arousal and abnormal cardiac responses.

    PubMed

    Zotti, A M; Bettinardi, O; Soffiantino, F; Tavazzi, L; Steptoe, A

    1991-04-01

    The psychophysiological responses to two mental stress tests (mental arithmetic and an interactive concentration task) were assessed in 168 unmedicated, male, postinfarction patients 36-69 years old. Patients also completed a standard battery of psychological tests. Psychophysiological responses were generally unrelated to age and education. Comparison of patients scoring high (more than 75%) and low (less than 25%) relative to the normal population on psychological measures indicated that heart rate and blood pressure responses to mental stress tests were significantly greater in those reporting low than in those reporting high neuroticism. The study population was subsequently divided into high, medium, and low cardiovascular responders on the basis of rate-pressure product reactions to the two stress tests. The three cardiovascular response groups did not differ in age, interval between myocardial infarction and stress testing, ejection fraction, incidence of exercise-induced ischemia, or ischemic signs during Holter monitoring. However, the high cardiovascular responders were more likely to manifest possible or definite electrocardiographic signs of ischemia or significant arrhythmia during mental stress testing than were the medium or low cardiovascular responders (50% versus 19.6% and 7%, respectively). High cardiovascular responders also reported lower levels of trait anxiety, neuroticism, psychophysiological symptoms, and depression.

  9. Urgent Coronary Artery Bypass Surgery in a Patient with Postinfarction Angina and Active Myelomonocytic Leukaemia

    PubMed Central

    Galea, Samuel Anthony; Galea, Joseph

    2016-01-01

    Chronic myelomonocytic leukaemia (CMML) is a myelodysplastic/myeloproliferative neoplasm affecting the production and differentiation of the monocyte cell lineage. Cardiac surgery in the context of CMML poses challenges that are not routinely encountered. This is the first reported case in the literature of a patient with active CMML undergoing urgent on-pump coronary artery bypass grafting. A 68-year-old Caucasian man with a history of hypertension, hyperlipidaemia, hypothyroidism, and hypercholesterolaemia, who had been diagnosed by the haematologists with CMML a few months earlier but had remained untreated, underwent urgent surgical coronary revascularisation because of postinfarction angina following a non-ST elevation myocardial infarction associated with troponin I rise. The patient had fulminant postoperative myelomonocytic leukaemoid reaction, with a clinical picture of severe systemic inflammatory response syndrome and multiple organ dysfunction syndrome. This led to extensive vasodilation and heart failure that resulted in the death of the patient. Various authors have suggested different techniques and treatment options, each attempting to mitigate the effect of the postoperative inflammatory response. However, this is a high-risk endeavour with a myriad of inflammatory signals mobilised into action because of the surgical insult. Off-pump surgery or preoperative pharmacological attenuation of CMML activity might have dampened this response and resulted in a positive outcome for the patient. PMID:27990115

  10. Attenuation of post-infarction remodeling in rats by sustained myocardial growth hormone administration.

    PubMed

    Daskalopoulos, Evangelos P; Vilaeti, Agapi D; Barka, Eleonora; Mantzouratou, Polixeni; Kouroupis, Dimitrios; Kontonika, Marianthi; Tourmousoglou, Christos; Papalois, Apostolos; Pantos, Constantinos; Blankesteijn, W Matthijs; Agathopoulos, Simeon; Kolettis, Theofilos M

    2015-01-01

    Prevention of left ventricular remodeling is an important therapeutic target post-myocardial infarction. Experimentally, treatment with growth hormone (GH) is beneficial, but sustained local administration has not been thoroughly investigated. We studied 58 rats (322 ± 4 g). GH was administered via a biomaterial-scaffold, following in vitro and in vivo evaluation of degradation and drug-release curves. Treatment consisted of intra-myocardial injection of saline or alginate-hydrogel, with or without GH, 10 min after permanent coronary artery ligation. Echocardiographic and histologic remodeling-indices were examined 3 weeks post-ligation, followed by immunohistochemical evaluation of angiogenesis, collagen, macrophages and myofibroblasts. GH-release completed at 3 days and alginate-degradation at ∼7 days. Alginate + GH consistently improved left ventricular end-diastolic and end-systolic diameters, ventricular sphericity, wall tension index and infarct-thickness. Microvascular-density and myofibroblast-count in the infarct and peri-infarct areas were higher after alginate + GH. Macrophage-count and collagen-content did not differ between groups. Early, sustained GH-administration enhances angiogenesis and myofibroblast-activation and ameliorates post-infarction remodeling.

  11. Outcomes of ablative fractional laser scar treatment.

    PubMed

    Kim, Deok-Woo; Hwang, Na-Hyun; Yoon, Eul-Sik; Dhong, Eun-Sang; Park, Seung-Ha

    2015-04-01

    Ablative fractional laser (AFL) systems are commonly used to treat various scars, and recent reports have indicated that early scar treatment with fractional lasers has good aesthetic results. Some scars respond dramatically to AFL treatment, incurring high levels of patient satisfaction; however, other scars respond poorly or became worse after treatment. This study was designed to clarify prognostic factors that predict AFL scar treatment outcomes. A total of 108 patients were included in this study. The fractional laser treatments were repeated every 4 weeks until the scar site was acceptable and no additional improvement was expected or the patient discontinued the treatment. The scar improvements were defined as changes in the Manchester scar scale (MSS) from before to after laser treatment. A digital camera was used to acquire digital photographs of the scars under the same light source, the same background, exposure, and white balance. This study developed a modification of the MSS for image analysis in which colour assessment was based on L*a*b* colour co-ordinates of the digital images. The mean MSS values prior to and after laser treatments were 11.6 ± 3.6 and 9.5 ± 2.9, respectively (p < 0.01). AFL treatment improved the qualities of each scar, and the improvements were evident in colour and contour. Scar elevation, pigmentation, high vascularity, early onset of treatment, and the number of treatment sessions were directly related to scar improvement after AFL therapy (p < 0.05). AFL treatments were effective methods for scar treatment. Clinicians can use these prognostic factors to determine treatment plans and to estimate scar improvement after AFL treatment.

  12. Two dimensional unstable scar statistics.

    SciTech Connect

    Warne, Larry Kevin; Jorgenson, Roy Eberhardt; Kotulski, Joseph Daniel; Lee, Kelvin S. H. (ITT Industries/AES Los Angeles, CA)

    2006-12-01

    This report examines the localization of time harmonic high frequency modal fields in two dimensional cavities along periodic paths between opposing sides of the cavity. The cases where these orbits lead to unstable localized modes are known as scars. This paper examines the enhancements for these unstable orbits when the opposing mirrors are both convex and concave. In the latter case the construction includes the treatment of interior foci.

  13. Quantification of scar margin in keloid different from atrophic scar by multiphoton microscopic imaging.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xiaoqin; Zhuo, Shuangmu; Zheng, Liqin; Jiang, Xingshan; Chen, Jianxin; Lin, Bifang

    2011-01-01

    Multiphoton microscopy (MPM) was applied to examine the marginal region at dermis of keloid compared with atrophic scar. High-resolution large-area image showed an obvious boundary at the scar margin and different morphological patterns of elastin and collagen on the two sides, further visualized by the focused three-dimensional images. Content alteration of elastin or collagen between the two sides of boundary was quantified to show significant difference between keloid and atrophic scar. Owing to the raised property of keloid with overproduced collagen on the scar side, the content alteration was positive for elastin and negative for collagen. On the contrary, the content alteration was negative for elastin and positive for collagen in the atrophic scar case due to the atrophic collagen on the scar side. It indicated that examination of the scar margin by MPM may lead a new way to discriminate different types of scars and better understand the scarring mechanisms.

  14. Clustered parrotfish feeding scars trigger partial coral mortality of massive Porites colonies on the inshore Great Barrier Reef

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welsh, J. Q.; Bonaldo, R. M.; Bellwood, D. R.

    2015-03-01

    Coral predation by parrotfishes can cause damage to coral colonies, but research into the dynamics of their feeding scars on Indo-Pacific corals is limited. We monitored feeding scars of the parrotfish Chlorurus microrhinos on massive Porites colonies at Orpheus Island (inshore Great Barrier Reef) over 4 months. Of the 30 marks monitored, 11 were single feeding scars, which all healed completely. The remaining 19 feeding marks consisted of clusters of scars. Eight began to recover, while 11 increased in size by 1,576 ± 252 % (mean ± SE). A logistic regression predicted that a single feeding scar on a Porites colony had a 97 % probability of healing; however, where more than three feeding scars were present, this dropped below 50 %. As excavating parrotfishes in the Indo-Pacific often take multiple focused bites, they may have a significant impact on the growth and mortality of massive Porites colonies at Orpheus Island.

  15. Acne Scars: Pathogenesis, Classification and Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Fabbrocini, Gabriella; Annunziata, M. C.; D'Arco, V.; De Vita, V.; Lodi, G.; Mauriello, M. C.; Pastore, F.; Monfrecola, G.

    2010-01-01

    Acne has a prevalence of over 90% among adolescents and persists into adulthood in approximately 12%–14% of cases with psychological and social implications. Possible outcomes of the inflammatory acne lesions are acne scars which, although they can be treated in a number of ways, may have a negative psychological impact on social life and relationships. The main types of acne scars are atrophic and hypertrophic scars. The pathogenesis of acne scarring is still not fully understood, but several hypotheses have been proposed. There are numerous treatments: chemical peels, dermabrasion/microdermabrasion, laser treatment, punch techniques, dermal grafting, needling and combined therapies for atrophic scars: silicone gels, intralesional steroid therapy, cryotherapy, and surgery for hypertrophic and keloidal lesions. This paper summarizes acne scar pathogenesis, classification and treatment options. PMID:20981308

  16. Electrocardiographic markers of ischemia during mental stress testing in postinfarction patients. Role of body surface mapping

    SciTech Connect

    Bosimini, E.; Galli, M.; Guagliumi, G.; Giubbini, R.; Tavazzi, L. )

    1991-04-01

    In patients with coronary artery disease, radionuclide investigations have documented a high incidence of mental stress-induced myocardial ischemia in the absence of significant electrocardiographic changes and/or angina. To investigate the causes of the low electrocardiographic sensitivity, we recorded body surface maps during mental arithmetic in 22 normal volunteers and 37 postinfarction patients with residual exercise ischemia. Myocardial perfusion was studied with thallium-201 or technetium-99 (SESTAMIBI) planar scans. In 14 patients, body surface maps were also recorded during atrial pacing at the heart rate values achieved during mental stress. While taking the body surface maps, the area from J point to 80 msec after this point (ST-80) was analyzed by integral maps, difference maps, and departure maps. The body surface mapping criteria for ischemia were a new negative area on the integral maps, a negative potential of more than 2 SD from mean normal values on the difference maps, and a negative departure index of more than 2. Scintigraphy showed asymptomatic myocardial hypoperfusion in 33 patients. Eight patients had significant ST segment depression. The ST-80 integral and difference maps identified 17 ischemic patients. Twenty-four patients presented abnormal departure maps. One patient presented ST depression and abnormal body surface maps without reversible tracer defect. In 14 of 14 patients, atrial pacing did not reproduce the body surface map abnormalities. The analyses of the other electrocardiographic variables showed that in patients with mental stress-induced perfusion defects, only changes of T apex-T offset (aT-eT) interval in Frank leads and changes of maximum negative potential value of aT-eT integral maps significantly differed from those of normal subjects.

  17. Effective Treatments of Atrophic Acne Scars

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Bingrong

    2015-01-01

    Atrophic scarring is often an unfortunate and permanent complication of acne vulgaris. It has high prevalence, significant impact on quality of life, and therapeutic challenge for dermatologists. The treatment of atrophic acne scars varies depending on the types of acne scars and the limitations of the treatment modalities in their ability to improve scars. Therefore, many options are available for the treatment of acne scarring, including chemical peeling, dermabrasion, laser treatment, punch techniques, fat transplantation, other tissue augmenting agents, needling, subcision, and combined therapy. Various modalities have been used to treat scars, but limited efficacy and problematic side effects have restricted their application. In order to optimally treat a patient’s scar, we need to consider which treatment offers the most satisfactory result. There are also promising procedures in the future, such as stem cell therapy. In this article, the authors review the different treatment options of atrophic acne scars. This may be useful for selecting the best therapeutic strategy, whether it be single or combined therapy, in the treatment of atrophic acne scars while reducing or avoiding the side effects and complications. PMID:26029333

  18. Scars

    MedlinePlus

    ... Stretch Marks Sun-damaged Skin Unwanted Hair Unwanted Tattoos Varicose Veins Vitiligo Wrinkles Treatments and Procedures Ambulatory ... Stretch Marks Sun-damaged Skin Unwanted Hair Unwanted Tattoos Varicose Veins Vitiligo Wrinkles Treatments and Procedures Ambulatory ...

  19. Utilizing topical therapies and mitomycin to reduce scars.

    PubMed

    Cupp, Craig; Gaball, Curtis Wesley

    2012-10-01

    Minimizing scar size, width, and contour of elevation is a common goal for the facial plastic surgeon. Various standard techniques are employed to reduce tension and enhance the rapid and uneventful healing of incisions. In some cases, these routine measures are not judged to be adequate, and additional intraoperative and postsurgical measures are employed to control the body's innate healing processes. Mitomycin C and self-drying silicone gel have been particularity useful in our practice.

  20. [Molecular mechanisms of wound scarring].

    PubMed

    Borel, J P; Maquart, F X

    1998-01-01

    A few years ago, the discovery of growth factors, their pharmaceutical obtention at a purified grade, their powerful effects on cells in vitro, resulted in demeasured hopes that they could be applied easily and successfully to the treatment of wounds. Now, the process of healing is still uncompletely understood. The interplay of epithelial and matrix cells, the multiplicity of cell types involved, the huge number of growth factors implicated and the difficulties in describing the specific timing of their action on the cells present in wounds, explain why therapy of wound has not yet been revolutioned. An important distinction must be made between normal healing, which leads to a solid functional, reparation tissue, and scarring which opposes any functional healing by making extensive granulation tissue or even keloids. Recent studies pointed out the necessity of a convenient balance between the concentrations of growth factors present in the wound during the different stages of healing. Excess connective tissue production (scarring) would be more particularly due to an excess of TGF beta 1, whereas predominance of TGF beta 3 conducts to harmonious healing.

  1. The cost of post-burn scarring.

    PubMed

    Mirastschijski, U; Sander, J T; Zier, U; Rennekampff, H O; Weyand, B; Vogt, P M

    2015-09-30

    Deep burns lead to scarring and contractures for which there is little or no published data on treatment costs. The purpose of this study was to fill this gap by analysing treatment costs for burn sequelae. To do this, German-DRG for in-patient treatment was collected from the Burn Centre Lower Saxony. DRG-related T95.-coding served as a tool for burn-associated sequelae. Data on scar occurrence, plastic-reconstructive surgery and sick leave were collected by a questionnaire. The findings showed that 44.6% patients reported post-burn scarring and 31% needed surgical intervention. The expected risk for readmission was significantly higher (p=0.0002) with scars compared to without. Significantly higher costs for pressure garments were noted for scarred patients (p=0.04). No differences were found for ointments, silicone dressings or pain medication. Treatment costs for patients with scars were 5.6 times higher compared with no scar assessed by G-DRG. No differences were stated subsuming multiple readmissions for post-burn treatment per individual. Significantly higher costs (p=0.03) were noted for patients with burn sequelae other than scars with regard to individual readmissions. It has been revealed that treatment of scars causes higher costs than for other burn sequelae because of multiple surgical interventions. To reduce post-burn scarring and costs, specialized burn centres provide optimal and state-of-the-art treatment. As well as this, more emphasis should be laid on promoting research for the development of novel anti-scarring therapies.

  2. Prevention and treatment of excessive dermal scarring.

    PubMed Central

    Roseborough, Ingrid E.; Grevious, Mark A.; Lee, Raphael C.

    2004-01-01

    Today, wound management to avoid excessive scar formation is increasingly important, especially in populations with Fitzpatrick 3 or higher skin pigmentation. Medical science and industrial development are devoting more effort toward understanding and offering better therapy to control scars. However, advances in scar management have been hampered by the confusing or ambiguous terminology. There is no consensus on what amount of post-traumatic skin scar formation is "normal" and what should be considered "hypertrophic". In the World Health Organization's ICD-9, there is no diagnostic code for hypertrophic scar--only keloid is listed. Yet, the medical and scientific literature distinguishes them as different conditions. Our experience suggests that the diagnosis of keloid disease is greatly over-rendered. For black patients, an elevated scar seems, by default, diagnosed as keloid by most. This confusion results in inappropriate management of scar formation, and occasionally contributes to decision making related to elective or cosmetic surgery. Given that patients are expecting better outcomes from wound care today than in the past, this review article attempts to capture the essential biological factors related to wound scar production and discusses treatment options and indications used by the authors. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:14746360

  3. Endometriosis of episiotomy scar: a case report.

    PubMed

    Mihmanli, V; Ózkan, T; Genc, S; Cetinkaya, N; Uctas, H

    2015-01-01

    Endometriosis is characterized by the presence of histologically normal endometrial glands and stroma outside the uterine cavity. Endometriosis predominantly locates on peritoneal surfaces, but it also affects the vagina, vulva, and perineum, usually secondary to surgical or obstetric trauma. Endometriosis in an episiotomy scar is a fairly rare phenomenon. The authors present a case of endometriosis in an episiotomy scar.

  4. The Northwestern Abdominoplasty Scar Model: A Novel Human Model for Scar Research and Therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Lanier, Steven T; Liu, Jing; Chavez-Munoz, Claudia; Mustoe, Thomas A; Galiano, Robert D

    2016-09-01

    There is a growing interest in the development and evaluation of therapeutic agents that improve the cosmetic appearance of scars. Existing nonhuman animal models to study scarring, while valuable, have well-acknowledged limitations, as it is accepted that the biology of human scarring differs significantly from scarring in other species. Moreover, human clinical trials of scarring require large numbers of subjects to achieve statistical power and are plagued by inherent intersubject variability because of the complex nature of wound healing in human beings. As a better alternative, we have developed the Northwestern Abdominoplasty Scar Model-a novel human clinical model that permits analysis of up to 20 cutaneous scars in a single subject and allows for not only visual scar comparison, but also histologic and molecular analyses of factors involved in scarring and wound healing. We have utilized this model in 5 early phase clinical trials designed to test the safety and efficacy of a variety of scar therapeutics without any complications to date. The model not only is applicable to scar therapeutics, but also can be utilized for other applications, such as the testing of implantable biomaterials, injectable products, therapies such as lasers, or even for in vivo study of wound healing processes in humans.

  5. Strong quantum scarring by local impurities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luukko, Perttu J. J.; Drury, Byron; Klales, Anna; Kaplan, Lev; Heller, Eric J.; Räsänen, Esa

    2016-11-01

    We discover and characterise strong quantum scars, or quantum eigenstates resembling classical periodic orbits, in two-dimensional quantum wells perturbed by local impurities. These scars are not explained by ordinary scar theory, which would require the existence of short, moderately unstable periodic orbits in the perturbed system. Instead, they are supported by classical resonances in the unperturbed system and the resulting quantum near-degeneracy. Even in the case of a large number of randomly scattered impurities, the scars prefer distinct orientations that extremise the overlap with the impurities. We demonstrate that these preferred orientations can be used for highly efficient transport of quantum wave packets across the perturbed potential landscape. Assisted by the scars, wave-packet recurrences are significantly stronger than in the unperturbed system. Together with the controllability of the preferred orientations, this property may be very useful for quantum transport applications.

  6. Solanidine and tomatidine trigger scar pruritus.

    PubMed

    Alonso, Pedro E; Rioja, Luis F

    2016-05-01

    Scar pruritus is frequently encountered in clinical practice (particularly in burn patients) owing to its poorly known pathogenesis and difficult treatment. In previous work, we demonstrated the usefulness of a diet excluding edible solanaceae (viz., potatoes, tomatoes, peppers and aubergines) in patients with antihistamine-resistant scar pruritus. We hypothesized that alkaloids in solanaceae (particularly their secondary metabolites or aglycones) might be the actual pruritogens. In order to test this hypothesis, we conducted a single-blind prospective study on patients responding favourably to a solanaceae-free diet whose scar pruritus could be ascribed to one of the four foods. The study involved applying the aglycones solanidine and tomatidine to each scar and checking whether, and which, had a pruritogenic effect. A total of 18 patients (90%) responded by developing pruritus; also, the triggering aglycone coincided with that prevailing in the pruritogenic food. We concluded that solanaceae aglycones are directly involved in the pathogenesis of scar pruritus.

  7. Strong quantum scarring by local impurities

    PubMed Central

    Luukko, Perttu J. J.; Drury, Byron; Klales, Anna; Kaplan, Lev; Heller, Eric J.; Räsänen, Esa

    2016-01-01

    We discover and characterise strong quantum scars, or quantum eigenstates resembling classical periodic orbits, in two-dimensional quantum wells perturbed by local impurities. These scars are not explained by ordinary scar theory, which would require the existence of short, moderately unstable periodic orbits in the perturbed system. Instead, they are supported by classical resonances in the unperturbed system and the resulting quantum near-degeneracy. Even in the case of a large number of randomly scattered impurities, the scars prefer distinct orientations that extremise the overlap with the impurities. We demonstrate that these preferred orientations can be used for highly efficient transport of quantum wave packets across the perturbed potential landscape. Assisted by the scars, wave-packet recurrences are significantly stronger than in the unperturbed system. Together with the controllability of the preferred orientations, this property may be very useful for quantum transport applications. PMID:27892510

  8. DERMABRASIVE ABLATION OF ACNE SCARS

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Adolph M.

    1958-01-01

    Dermabrasion offers cosmetic improvement of acne pits and scars, but only well-adjusted patients should be selected for this esthetic improvement. In the dermabrasion operation the deep cup-shaped pits are made shallow by saucerization, for the deep sharp shadows are eliminated as the pits are shallowed. It is the elimination of the shadow effect which is so gratifying to the patient. Although dermabrasion is a superficial skin operation, it involves dangerous instruments and thousands of minute incisions. The procedure is a surgical operation, whether done in an office or in a hospital. The author performs the operation entirely as a hospital procedure, using pentothal anesthesia with meperidine added in small increments during the operation. Thus the operation may be unhurriedly and meticulously performed. ImagesFigure 1.Figure 2. PMID:13561125

  9. Analysis of frequency of use of different scar assessment scales based on the scar condition and treatment method.

    PubMed

    Bae, Seong Hwan; Bae, Yong Chan

    2014-03-01

    Analysis of scars in various conditions is essential, but no consensus had been reached on the scar assessment scale to select for a given condition. We reviewed papers to determine the scar assessment scale selected depending on the scar condition and treatment method. We searched PubMed for articles published since 2000 with the contents of the scar evaluation using a scar assessment scale with a Journal Citation Report impact factor >0.5. Among them, 96 articles that conducted a scar evaluation using a scar assessment scale were reviewed and analyzed. The scar assessment scales were identified and organized by various criteria. Among the types of scar assessment scales, the Patient and Observer Scar Assessment Scale (POSAS) was found to be the most frequently used scale. As for the assessment of newly developed operative scars, the POSAS was most used. Meanwhile, for categories depending on the treatment methods for preexisting scars, the Vancouver Scar Scale (VSS) was used in 6 studies following a laser treatment, the POSAS was used in 7 studies following surgical treatment, and the POSAS was used in 7 studies following a conservative treatment. Within the 12 categories of scar status, the VSS showed the highest frequency in 6 categories and the POSAS showed the highest frequency in the other 6 categories. According to our reviews, the POSAS and VSS are the most frequently used scar assessment scales. In the future, an optimal, universal scar scoring system is needed in order to better evaluate and treat pathologic scarring.

  10. Values of a Patient and Observer Scar Assessment Scale to Evaluate the Facial Skin Graft Scar

    PubMed Central

    Chae, Jin Kyung; Kim, Eun Jung; Park, Kun

    2016-01-01

    Background The patient and observer scar assessment scale (POSAS) recently emerged as a promising method, reflecting both observer's and patient's opinions in evaluating scar. This tool was shown to be consistent and reliable in burn scar assessment, but it has not been tested in the setting of skin graft scar in skin cancer patients. Objective To evaluate facial skin graft scar applied to POSAS and to compare with objective scar assessment tools. Methods Twenty three patients, who diagnosed with facial cutaneous malignancy and transplanted skin after Mohs micrographic surgery, were recruited. Observer assessment was performed by three independent rates using the observer component of the POSAS and Vancouver scar scale (VSS). Patient self-assessment was performed using the patient component of the POSAS. To quantify scar color and scar thickness more objectively, spectrophotometer and ultrasonography was applied. Results Inter-observer reliability was substantial with both VSS and the observer component of the POSAS (average measure intraclass coefficient correlation, 0.76 and 0.80, respectively). The observer component consistently showed significant correlations with patients' ratings for the parameters of the POSAS (all p-values<0.05). The correlation between subjective assessment using POSAS and objective assessment using spectrophotometer and ultrasonography showed low relationship. Conclusion In facial skin graft scar assessment in skin cancer patients, the POSAS showed acceptable inter-observer reliability. This tool was more comprehensive and had higher correlation with patient's opinion. PMID:27746642

  11. Phase and Texture Characterizations of Scar Collagen Second-Harmonic Generation Images Varied with Scar Duration.

    PubMed

    Chen, Guannan; Liu, Yao; Zhu, Xiaoqin; Huang, Zufang; Cai, Jianyong; Chen, Rong; Xiong, Shuyuan; Zeng, Haishan

    2015-08-01

    This work developed a phase congruency algorithm combined with texture analysis to quantitatively characterize collagen morphology in second-harmonic generation (SHG) images from human scars. The extracted phase and texture parameters of the SHG images quantified collagen directionality, homogeneity, and coarseness in scars and varied with scar duration. Phase parameters showed an increasing tendency of the mean of phase congruency with scar duration, indicating that collagen fibers are better oriented over time. Texture parameters calculated from local difference local binary pattern (LD-LBP) and Haar wavelet transform, demonstrated that the LD-LBP variance decreased and the energy of all subimages increased with scar duration. It implied that collagen has a more regular pattern and becomes coarser with scar duration. In addition, the random forest regression was used to predict scar duration, demonstrating reliable performance of the extracted phase and texture parameters in characterizing collagen morphology in scar SHG images. Results indicate that the extracted parameters using the proposed method can be used as quantitative indicators to monitor scar progression with time and can help understand the mechanism of scar progression.

  12. Microneedling Therapy for Atrophic Acne Scars

    PubMed Central

    Barakat, Manal; Awad, Sherif; Medhat, Walid; El-Fakahany, Hasan; Farag, Hanna

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Treatment of acne scarring is always a challenge. Microneedling therapy or percutaneous collagen induction is a new addition to the treatment modalities for such scars and has been reported to be simple and effective in atrophic acne scar treatment. The aim of this study is to evaluate the clinical effect and objectively quantify the histological changes of acne scarring in response to skin microneedling. Design: A prospective clinical study. Participants: Ten patients with different types of atrophic acne scars were subjected to three months of skin microneedling treatment (six sessions at two-week intervals). Measurements: Patients were photographed, and skin biopsies were obtained at baseline as well as one and three months from the start of treatment. Histometry for epidermal thickness and quantitative evaluation of total elastin; newly synthesized tropoelastin; collagen types I, III, and VII; and newly synthesized collagen were performed for all biopsies. Results: Compared to the baseline, patients’ evaluations revealed noticeable clinical improvement in atrophic post-acne scars in response to skin microneedling. There was a statistically significant increase (p<0.05) in the mean of collagen types I, III, and VII and newly synthesized collagen, while total elastin was significantly decreased (p<0.05) after the end of treatment. Conclusions: Multiple minimally invasive sessions of skin microneedling are an effective treatment for post-acne atrophic scars as it stimulates the repair processes with the advantage of being a relatively risk-free, in-office procedure with minimal patient recovery time. PMID:26203319

  13. Astrocyte scar formation aids CNS axon regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Mark A.; Burda, Joshua E.; Ren, Yilong; Ao, Yan; O’Shea, Timothy M.; Kawaguchi, Riki; Coppola, Giovanni; Khakh, Baljit S.; Deming, Timothy J.; Sofroniew, Michael V.

    2017-01-01

    Summary Transected axons fail to regrow in the mature central nervous system (CNS). Astrocyte scars are widely regarded as causal in this failure. Here, using three genetically targeted loss-of-function manipulations in adult mice, we show that preventing astrocyte scar formation, attenuating scar-forming astrocytes, or deleting chronic astrocyte scars all failed to result in spontaneous regrowth of transected corticospinal, sensory or serotonergic axons through severe spinal cord injury (SCI) lesions. In striking contrast, sustained local delivery via hydrogel depots of required axon-specific growth factors not present in SCI lesions, plus growth-activating priming injuries, stimulated robust, laminin-dependent sensory axon regrowth past scar-forming astrocytes and inhibitory molecules in SCI lesions. Preventing astrocyte scar formation significantly reduced this stimulated axon regrowth. RNA sequencing revealed that astrocytes and non-astrocyte cells in SCI lesions express multiple axon-growth supporting molecules. Our findings show that contrary to prevailing dogma, astrocyte scar formation aids rather than prevents CNS axon regeneration. PMID:27027288

  14. A quantitative approach to scar analysis.

    PubMed

    Khorasani, Hooman; Zheng, Zhong; Nguyen, Calvin; Zara, Janette; Zhang, Xinli; Wang, Joyce; Ting, Kang; Soo, Chia

    2011-02-01

    Analysis of collagen architecture is essential to wound healing research. However, to date no consistent methodologies exist for quantitatively assessing dermal collagen architecture in scars. In this study, we developed a standardized approach for quantitative analysis of scar collagen morphology by confocal microscopy using fractal dimension and lacunarity analysis. Full-thickness wounds were created on adult mice, closed by primary intention, and harvested at 14 days after wounding for morphometrics and standard Fourier transform-based scar analysis as well as fractal dimension and lacunarity analysis. In addition, transmission electron microscopy was used to evaluate collagen ultrastructure. We demonstrated that fractal dimension and lacunarity analysis were superior to Fourier transform analysis in discriminating scar versus unwounded tissue in a wild-type mouse model. To fully test the robustness of this scar analysis approach, a fibromodulin-null mouse model that heals with increased scar was also used. Fractal dimension and lacunarity analysis effectively discriminated unwounded fibromodulin-null versus wild-type skin as well as healing fibromodulin-null versus wild-type wounds, whereas Fourier transform analysis failed to do so. Furthermore, fractal dimension and lacunarity data also correlated well with transmission electron microscopy collagen ultrastructure analysis, adding to their validity. These results demonstrate that fractal dimension and lacunarity are more sensitive than Fourier transform analysis for quantification of scar morphology.

  15. The evidence for natural therapeutics as potential anti-scarring agents in burn-related scarring.

    PubMed

    Mehta, M; Branford, O A; Rolfe, K J

    2016-01-01

    Though survival rate following severe thermal injuries has improved, the incidence and treatment of scarring have not improved at the same speed. This review discusses the formation of scars and in particular the formation of hypertrophic scars. Further, though there is as yet no gold standard treatment for the prevention or treatment of scarring, a brief overview is included. A number of natural therapeutics have shown beneficial effects both in vivo and in vitro with the potential of becoming clinical therapeutics in the future. These natural therapeutics include both plant-based products such as resveratrol, quercetin and epigallocatechin gallate as examples and includes the non-plant-based therapeutic honey. The review also includes potential mechanism of action for the therapeutics, any recorded adverse events and current administration of the therapeutics used. This review discusses a number of potential 'treatments' that may reduce or even prevent scarring particularly hypertrophic scarring, which is associated with thermal injuries without compromising wound repair.

  16. Swine (Sus scrofa) as a Model of Postinfarction Mitral Regurgitation and Techniques to Accommodate Its Effects during Surgical Repair

    PubMed Central

    Sarin, Eric L; Shi, Weiwei; Duara, Rajnish; Melone, Todd A; Kalra, Kanika; Strong, Ashley; Girish, Apoorva; McIver, Bryant V; Thourani, Vinod H; Guyton, Robert A; Padala, Muralidhar

    2016-01-01

    Mitral regurgitation (MR) is a common heart-valve lesion after myocardial infarction in humans. Because it is considered a risk factor for accelerated heart failure and death, various surgical approaches and catheter-based devices to correct it are in development. Lack of a reproducible animal model of MR after myocardial infarction and reliable techniques to perform open-heart surgery in these diseased models led to the use of healthy animals to test new devices. Thus, most devices that are deemed safe in healthy animals have shown poor results in human efficacy studies, hampering progress in this area of research. Here we report our experience with a swine model of postinfarction MR, describe techniques to induce regurgitation and perform open-heart surgery in these diseased animals, and discuss our outcomes, complications, and solutions. PMID:27538860

  17. Swine (Sus scrofa) as a Model of Postinfarction Mitral Regurgitation and Techniques to Accommodate Its Effects during Surgical Repair.

    PubMed

    Sarin, Eric L; Shi, Weiwei; Duara, Rajnish; Melone, Todd A; Kalra, Kanika; Strong, Ashley; Girish, Apoorva; McIver, Bryant V; Thourani, Vinod H; Guyton, Robert A; Padala, Muralidhar

    2016-01-01

    Mitral regurgitation (MR) is a common heart-valve lesion after myocardial infarction in humans. Because it is considered a risk factor for accelerated heart failure and death, various surgical approaches and catheter-based devices to correct it are in development. Lack of a reproducible animal model of MR after myocardial infarction and reliable techniques to perform open-heart surgery in these diseased models led to the use of healthy animals to test new devices. Thus, most devices that are deemed safe in healthy animals have shown poor results in human efficacy studies, hampering progress in this area of research. Here we report our experience with a swine model of postinfarction MR, describe techniques to induce regurgitation and perform open-heart surgery in these diseased animals, and discuss our outcomes, complications, and solutions.

  18. Medical makeup for concealing facial scars.

    PubMed

    Mee, Donna; Wong, Brian J F

    2012-10-01

    Surgical, laser, and pharmacological therapies are all used to correct scars and surgical incisions, though have limits with respect to how well facial skin can be restored or enhanced. The use of cosmetics has long been a relevant adjunct to all scar treatment modalities. In recent years, technical advancements in the chemistry and composition of cosmetic products have provided the patient with a broader range of products to employ for concealing scars. This review will provide an overview of contemporary methods for concealing facial scars, birthmarks, and pigmentary changes without the use of traditional/dated, heavy appearing camouflage products. Additionally, general guidelines and information will be provided with respect to identifying competent makeup artists for care of the medical patient. The article by no means is meant to be a tutorial, but rather serves as a starting point in this allied field of medicine.

  19. Proceedings of the SCAR Conference, Part 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    The Supersonic Cruise Aircraft Research (SCAR) team analyzed six major topics: (1) aerodynamics, (2) stability and control, (3) propulsion, (4) environmental factor, (5) airframe structures and materials, and (6) design integration.

  20. Answers to Common Questions about Scars

    MedlinePlus

    ... off the skin and fairly stiff to the touch. Reaching a peak after several months, the scar ... have received your message and will be in touch as soon as possible. Cleft Connection An Interview ...

  1. Differences in quantitative assessment of myocardial scar and gray zone by LGE-CMR imaging using established gray zone protocols.

    PubMed

    Mesubi, Olurotimi; Ego-Osuala, Kelechi; Jeudy, Jean; Purtilo, James; Synowski, Stephen; Abutaleb, Ameer; Niekoop, Michelle; Abdulghani, Mohammed; Asoglu, Ramazan; See, Vincent; Saliaris, Anastasios; Shorofsky, Stephen; Dickfeld, Timm

    2015-02-01

    Late gadolinium enhancement cardiac magnetic resonance (LGE-CMR) imaging is the gold standard for myocardial scar evaluation. Heterogeneous areas of scar ('gray zone'), may serve as arrhythmogenic substrate. Various gray zone protocols have been correlated to clinical outcomes and ventricular tachycardia channels. This study assessed the quantitative differences in gray zone and scar core sizes as defined by previously validated signal intensity (SI) threshold algorithms. High quality LGE-CMR images performed in 41 cardiomyopathy patients [ischemic (33) or non-ischemic (8)] were analyzed using previously validated SI threshold methods [Full Width at Half Maximum (FWHM), n-standard deviation (NSD) and modified-FWHM]. Myocardial scar was defined as scar core and gray zone using SI thresholds based on these methods. Scar core, gray zone and total scar sizes were then computed and compared among these models. The median gray zone mass was 2-3 times larger with FWHM (15 g, IQR: 8-26 g) compared to NSD or modified-FWHM (5 g, IQR: 3-9 g; and 8 g. IQR: 6-12 g respectively, p < 0.001). Conversely, infarct core mass was 2.3 times larger with NSD (30 g, IQR: 17-53 g) versus FWHM and modified-FWHM (13 g, IQR: 7-23 g, p < 0.001). The gray zone extent (percentage of total scar that was gray zone) also varied significantly among the three methods, 51 % (IQR: 42-61 %), 17 % (IQR: 11-21 %) versus 38 % (IQR: 33-43 %) for FWHM, NSD and modified-FWHM respectively (p < 0.001). Considerable variability exists among the current methods for MRI defined gray zone and scar core. Infarct core and total myocardial scar mass also differ using these methods. Further evaluation of the most accurate quantification method is needed.

  2. The "Sea" should not be operated on in scar revision for "Island-Like" scars.

    PubMed

    Nagasao, Tomohisa; Hamamoto, Yusuke; Tamai, Motoki; Kudo, Hiroo; Ensako, Toshiya; Kogure, Tetsukuni; Takano, Naoki; Tanaka, Yoshio

    2015-08-01

    Scars developing on body surfaces not only restrict body movement, but are also problematic from a cosmetic standpoint. Hence, revision is conducted by removing the scar and re-suturing the resultant defects. In performing scar revision, care should be taken to prevent the re-sutured wounds from developing hypertrophy again. Scars often present a pattern where hard, red parts are separated by soft parts in between. As the hard and soft parts may be analogized as islands and seas respectively, we call this the "Island-Like" scar. Two strategies can be taken to treat scars of this type. The first is to remove the entire scar-including both hard and soft parts; the second is to remove only the hard parts and leave the soft parts untouched. The authors conducted a biomechanical study using finite element analyses and found that as a body moves, greater stresses occur in the peri-wound regions with the first strategy than with the second strategy. A wound's likelihood to develop hypertrophy increases as the stresses working on it increase. Hence, it is hypothesized that the second strategy carries less risk of the operated wounds developing re-hypertrophy than the first strategy. Based on this logic, in performing scar revision for scars consisting of hard and soft parts, it is recommended only to remove only hard parts and not to operate on soft parts in between.

  3. Outcome after burns: an observational study on burn scar maturation and predictors for severe scarring.

    PubMed

    van der Wal, Martijn B A; Vloemans, Jos F P M; Tuinebreijer, Wim E; van de Ven, Peter; van Unen, Ella; van Zuijlen, Paul P M; Middelkoop, Esther

    2012-01-01

    Long-term outcome of burn scars as well as the relation with clinically relevant parameters has not been studied quantitatively. Therefore, we conducted a detailed analysis on the clinical changes of burn scars in a longitudinal setup. In addition, we focused on the differences in scar quality in relation to the depth, etiology of the burn wound and age of the patient. Burn scars of 474 patients were subjected to a scar assessment protocol 3, 6, and 12 months postburn. Three different age groups were defined (≤5, 5-18, and ≥18 years). The observer part of the patient and observer scar assessment scale revealed a significant (p < 0.001) improvement in scar quality at 12 months compared with the 3- and 6-month data. Predictors for severe scarring are depth of the wound (p < 0.001) and total body surface area burned (p < 0.001). Etiology (p = 0.753) and age (p > 0.230) have no significant influence on scar quality when corrected for sex, total body surface area burned, time, and age or etiology, respectively.

  4. Chemical Peels for Acne and Acne Scars in Asians: Evidence Based Review

    PubMed Central

    Handog, Evangeline B; Datuin, Maria Suzanne L; Singzon, Ivan A

    2012-01-01

    Chemical peeling is a widely used procedure in the management of acne and acne scars, but there are very few studies on Asian populations who are more prone to develop hyper pigmentation. This article aims to summarize and evaluate the existing studies on the role of chemical peels in the treatment of acne and acne scars among Asians. An online search was conducted to identify prospective studies published in English that evaluated the use of chemical peels in active acne and acne scars in Asian populations. There were six studies for acne and eight studies for acne scars that were identified using our search parameters. Most were single-centre, open label and with small sample sizes. Acne severity was not uniformly reported and the objective outcome measures of some studies were not explicitly reported as well. The general trend of the results of the studies support the safety and efficacy of chemical peels for acne and acne scars including those of darker skin types. The existing studies support the use of chemical peels in the treatment of acne and acne scars in Asians. Further clinical trials with better study design and more subjects are needed to further establish the role of chemical peels in Asian acne patients. PMID:23378705

  5. Enhanced in Vivo Delivery of 5-Fluorouracil by Ethosomal Gels in Rabbit Ear Hypertrophic Scar Model

    PubMed Central

    Wo, Yan; Zhang, Zheng; Zhang, Yixin; Zhang, Zhen; Wang, Kan; Mao, Xiaohui; Su, Weijie; Li, Ke; Cui, Daxiang; Chen, Jun

    2014-01-01

    Applying Ethosomal Gels (EGs) in transdermal drug delivery systems has evoked considerable interest because of their good water-solubility and biocompatibility. However, there has not been an explicit description of applying EGs as a vehicle for hypertrophic scars treatment. Here, a novel transdermal EGs loaded with 5-fluorouracil (5-FU EGs) was successfully prepared and characterized. The stability assay in vitro revealed that 5-FU EGs stored for a period of 30 days at 4 ± 1 °C had a better size stability than that at 25 ± 1 °C. Furthermore, using confocal laser scanning microscopy, EGs labeled with Rhodamine 6 G penetrated into the deep dermis of the hypertrophic scar within 24 h in the rabbit ear hypertrophic model suggested that the EGs were an optional delivery carrier through scar tissues. In addition, the value of the Scar Elevation Index (SEI) of 5-FU EGs group in the rabbit ear scar model was lower than that of 5-FU Phosphate Buffered Saline gel and Control groups. To conclude, these results suggest that EGs delivery system loaded 5-fluorouracil is a perfect candidate drug for hypertrophic scars therapy in future. PMID:25501333

  6. Smoke, Clouds, and Radiation-Brazil (SCAR-B) Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaufman, Y. J.; Hobbs, P. V.; Kirchoff, V. W. J. H.; Artaxo, P.; Remer, L. A.; Holben, B. N.; King, M. D.; Ward, D. E.; Prins, E. M.; Longo, K. M.; Mattos, L. F.; Nobre, C. A.; Spinhirne, J. D.; Ji, Q.; Thompson, A. M.; Gleason, J. F.; Christopher, S. A.; Tsay, S.-C.

    1998-01-01

    The Smoke, Clouds, and Radiation-Brazil (SCAR-B) field project took place in the Brazilian Amazon and cerrado regions in August-September 1995 as a collaboration between Brazilian and American scientists. SCAR-B, a comprehensive experiment to study biomass burning, emphasized measurements of surface biomass, fires, smoke aerosol and trace gases, clouds, and radiation. their climatic effects, and remote sensing from aircraft and satellites. It included aircraft and ground-based in situ measurements of smoke emission factors and the compositions, sizes, and optical properties of the smoke particles; studies of the formation of ozone; the transport and evolution of smoke; and smoke interactions with water vapor and clouds. This overview paper introduces SCAR-B and summarizes some of the main results obtained so far. (1) Fires: measurements of the size distribution of fires, using the 50 m resolution MODIS Airborne Simulator, show that most of the fires are small (e.g. 0.005 square km), but the satellite sensors (e.g., AVHRR and MODIS with I km resolution) can detect fires in Brazil which are responsible for 60-85% of the burned biomass: (2) Aerosol: smoke particles emitted from fires increase their radius by as much as 60%, during their first three days in the atmosphere due to condensation and coagulation, reaching a mass median radius of 0.13-0.17 microns: (3) Radiative forcing: estimates of the globally averaged direct radiative forcing due to smoke worldwide, based on the properties of smoke measured in SCAR-B (-O.l to -0.3 W m(exp -2)), are smaller than previously modeled due to a lower single-scattering albedo (0.8 to 0.9), smaller scattering efficiency (3 square meters g(exp -2) at 550 nm), and low humidification factor; and (4) Effect on clouds: a good relationship was found between cloud condensation nuclei and smoke volume concentrations, thus an increase in the smoke emission is expected to affect cloud properties. In SCAR-B, new techniques were developed

  7. Overview of surgical scar prevention and management.

    PubMed

    Son, Daegu; Harijan, Aram

    2014-06-01

    Management of incisional scar is intimately connected to stages of wound healing. The management of an elective surgery patient begins with a thorough informed consent process in which the patient is made aware of personal and clinical circumstances that cannot be modified, such as age, ethnicity, and previous history of hypertrophic scars. In scar prevention, the single most important modifiable factor is wound tension during the proliferative and remodeling phases, and this is determined by the choice of incision design. Traditional incisions most often follow relaxed skin tension lines, but no such lines exist in high surface tension areas. If such incisions are unavoidable, the patient must be informed of this ahead of time. The management of a surgical incision does not end when the sutures are removed. Surgical scar care should be continued for one year. Patient participation is paramount in obtaining the optimal outcome. Postoperative visits should screen for signs of scar hypertrophy and has a dual purpose of continued patient education and reinforcement of proper care. Early intervention is a key to control hyperplastic response. Hypertrophic scars that do not improve by 6 months are keloids and should be managed aggressively with intralesional steroid injections and alternate modalities.

  8. Effectiveness of Onion Extract Gel on Surgical Scars in Asians

    PubMed Central

    Chanprapaph, Kumutnart; Tanrattanakorn, Somsak; Wattanakrai, Penpun; Wongkitisophon, Pranee; Vachiramon, Vasanop

    2012-01-01

    Background. Onion extracts have been shown in vitro to accelerate wound healing. Results from clinical studies on surgical scars in Caucasians were disappointing. The aim of this study is to evaluate the effectiveness of onion extract gel in improving the cosmetic and symptoms of surgical scars in Asians. Patients/Methods. Twenty Asians who had new Pfannenstiel's cesarean section scars were recruited in this prospective double-blinded, split-scar study. Each side was randomly assigned treatment with onion extract gel or placebo at 7 days after surgery. The product was applied three times daily for 12 weeks. Subjects were evaluated at baseline and 4th and 12th weeks. Scar redness was assessed by calorimeter, scar height and pliability were assessed by blinded investigators, and scar symptoms and overall cosmetic improvement were assessed by subjects. Results. Sixteen subjects completed the study. A statistically significant difference between two sides of scar in terms of scar height and scar symptoms was found. There was no statistically significant difference in scar redness, scar pliability, and overall cosmetic appearance between two sides. Conclusions. The early use of topical 12% onion extract gel on Pfannenstiel's cesarean section scar in Asians resulted in the improvement of scar height and scar symptoms. PMID:22924037

  9. [The influence of ozone therapy on oxygen metabolism kinetics and the microcirculation system during spa and resort treatment of the post-infarction patients].

    PubMed

    Sycheva, E I; Khodasevich, L S; Solomina, O E; Zubareva, M I

    2013-01-01

    This study was designed to estimate the influence of ozone therapy on oxygen metabolism kinetics and the circulation system during spa and resort treatment of 145 post-infarction patients who survived myocardial infarction. All of them were given routine spa-and-resort therapy; 56 patients received pharmacotherapy, in the remaining 89 it was supplemented with ozone-therapy. The clinical examination included electrocardiography, veloergometry, echocardiography; kinetics of oxygen metabolism was evaluated by transcutaneous polarography, laser Doppler flowmetry, and computed capillaroscopy. The results of the study indicate that ozonetherapy in combination with medicamental treatment reduces the period of post-infarction rehabilitation, decreases tissue hypoxia, improves characteristics of microcirculation and general health status of the patients.

  10. Papular Acne Scars of the Nose and Chin: An Under-recognised Variant of Acne Scarring

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Faisal R; Kirk, Michael; Madan, Vishal

    2016-01-01

    Background: Scarring following acne vulgaris is common and can be of profound psychosocial consequence. Aims and Objectives: We have clinically noted a variant of acne scarring, overlooked by previous categorisation schemes, which we have denominated as papular acne scars of the nose and chin. We sought to characterise these novel entities further. Materials and Methods: Initially, we identified 14 patients with papular acne scars of the nose and chin in a cosmetic dermatology clinic, of whom two were female and rest were male. We then prospectively evaluated 100 consecutive patients attending our tertiary referral acne isotretinoin clinic and 49 patients attending a general dermatology clinic. Results: Amongst 149 patients, from a general dermatology and tertiary acne clinic, soft papular scars were noted in four patients, distributed on the nose and chin. Three of the four patients were male, three patients had additional acne scars and the median age was 23.5. Conclusions: We have identified 18 patients with papular acne scars of the nose and chin and propose that this new category should be added to acne scarring classification schemes. Future work should be directed at corroborating the epidemiology of such lesions and describing effective treatment modalities. PMID:28163455

  11. Sirtuin1-p53, forkhead box O3a, p38 and post-infarct cardiac remodeling in the spontaneously diabetic Goto-Kakizaki rat

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Diabetes is associated with changes in myocardial stress-response pathways and is recognized as an independent risk factor for cardiac remodeling. Using spontaneously diabetic Goto Kakizaki rats as a model of type 2 DM we investigated whether post-translational modifications in the Akt - FOXO3a pathway, Sirt1 - p53 pathway and the mitogen activated protein kinase p38 regulator are involved in post-infarct cardiac remodeling Methods Experimental myocardial infarction (MI) was induced by left anterior descending coronary artery ligation in spontaneously diabetic Goto-Kakizaki rats and non-diabetic Wistar controls. Cardiac function was studied by echocardiography. Myocardial hypertrophy, cardiomyocyte apoptosis and cardiac fibrosis were determined histologically 12 weeks post MI or Sham operation. Western blotting was used to study Caspase-3, Bax, Sirt1, acetylation of p53 and phosphorylation of p38, Akt and FOXO3a. Electrophoretic mobility shift assay was used to assess FOXO3a activity and its nuclear localization. Results Post-infarct heart failure in diabetic GK rats was associated with pronounced cardiomyocyte hypertrophy, increased interstitial fibrosis and sustained cardiomyocyte apoptosis as compared with their non-diabetic Wistar controls. In the GK rat myocardium, Akt- and FOXO3a-phosphorylation was decreased and nuclear localization of FOXO3a was increased concomitantly with increased PTEN protein expression. Furthermore, increased Sirt1 protein expression was associated with decreased p53 acetylation, and phosphorylation of p38 was increased in diabetic rats with MI. Conclusions Post-infarct heart failure in diabetic GK rats was associated with more pronounced cardiac hypertrophy, interstitial fibrosis and sustained cardiomyocyte apoptosis as compared to their non-diabetic controls. The present study suggests important roles for Akt-FOXO3a, Sirt1 - p53 and p38 MAPK in the regulation of post-infarct cardiac remodeling in type 2 diabetes. PMID

  12. Screening for Cardiac Magnetic Resonance Scar Features by 12-lead ECG, in Patients with Preserved Ejection Fraction

    PubMed Central

    Mewton, Nathan; Strauss, David G.; Rizzi, Patricia; Verrier, Richard L.; Liu, Chia Ying; Tereshchenko, Larisa G.; Nearing, Bruce; Volpe, Gustavo J.; Marchlinski, Francis E.; Moxley, John; Killian, Tony; Wu, Katherine C.; Spooner, Peter; Lima, João A.C.

    2015-01-01

    Background Increased QRS score and wide spatial QRS-T angle are independent predictors of cardiovascular mortality in the general population. Our main objective was to assess whether a QRS score ≥5 and/or QRS-T angle ≥105° enable screening of patients for myocardial scar features. Methods 77 patients age ≤70 years with QRS score ≥5 AND/OR spatial QRS-T angle ≥105° as well as left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) >35% were enrolled in the study. All participants underwent complete clinical examination, signal averaged ECG (SAECG), 30-minute ambulatory ECG recording for T wave alternans (TWA), and late gadolinium enhancement cardiac magnetic resonance (LGE-CMR). Relationship between QRS score, QRS-T angle with scar presence and pattern, as well as gray zone, core, and total scar size by LGE-CMR were assessed. Results Myocardial scar was present in 41 (53%) patients, of whom 19 (46%) exhibited a typical ischemic pattern. QRS score but not QRS-T angle was related to total scar size and gray zone size (R2=0.12, P=0.002; R2=0.17; P ≤0.0001 respectively). Patients with QRS scores ≥6 had significantly greater myocardial scar and gray zone size, increased QRS duration and QRS-T angle, a higher prevalence of late potentials (LP) presence, increased LV end-diastolic volume and decreased LVEF. There was a significant independent and positive association between TWA value and total scar (P=0.001) and gray zone size (P=0.01). Conclusion Patients with preserved LVEF and myocardial scar by CMR also have electrocardiographic features that could be involved in ventricular arrhythmogenesis. PMID:26806840

  13. [Burn scars: rehabilitation and skin care].

    PubMed

    Rochet, Jean-Michel; Zaoui, Affif

    2002-12-15

    Burn rehabilitation main goal is to minimize the consequences of hypertrophic scars and concomitant contractures. The treatment principles rely on the association of joint posture, continuous pressure completed with range of motion to prevent joint fusion (which happens to adults but not to children). Throughout the different treatment phases and wound evolution, reassessment is necessary to review rehabilitation goals and activities. During the acute phase the alternance of positioning is prioritized in order to keep the affected extremities in antideformity position using splint or other devices. At the rehabilitation phase, treatment is focussed on active/passive range of motion (skin posture) strengthening exercises and use of dynamic splint is introduced to correct contractures. After their discharge home, patients benefit from outpatient rehab until scar maturation (approximately 18 months). The treatment consists mainly on active/passive range of motion, scar massage, strengthening exercise and endurance retraining. Also modalities (such as thermal bath and high pressure water spray) are used to address itching problems and for scar softening. Finally, reconstructive surgery can be performed to correct excessive scarring or joint contracture for better functional or cosmetic outcome.

  14. Transforming medical imaging: the first SCAR TRIP conference a position paper from the SCAR TRIP subcommittee of the SCAR research and development committee.

    PubMed

    Andriole, Katherine P; Morin, Richard L

    2006-03-01

    The First Society for Computer Applications in Radiology (SCAR) Transforming the Radiological Interpretation Process (TRIP) Conference and Workshop, "Transforming Medical Imaging" was held on January 31-February 1, 2005 in Bethesda, MD. Representatives from all areas of medical and scientific imaging-academia, research, industry, and government agencies-joined together to discuss the future of medical imaging and potential new ways to manage the explosion in numbers, size, and complexity of images generated by today's continually advancing imaging technologies. The two-day conference included plenary, scientific poster, and breakout sessions covering six major research areas related to TRIP. These topic areas included human perception, image processing and computer-aided detection, data visualization, image set navigation and usability, databases and systems integration, and methodology evaluation and performance validation. The plenary presentations provided a general status review of each broad research field to use as a starting point for discussion in the breakout sessions, with emphasis on specific topics requiring further study. The goals for the breakout sessions were to define specific research questions in each topic area, to list the impediments to carrying out research in these fields, to suggest possible solutions and near- and distant-future directions for each general topic, and to report back to the general session. The scientific poster session provided another mechanism for presenting and discussing TRIP-related research. This report summarizes each plenary and breakout session, and describes the group recommendations as to the issues facing the field, major impediments to progress, and the outlook for radiology in the short and long term. The conference helped refine the definition of the SCAR TRIP Initiative and the problems facing radiology with respect to the dramatic growth in medical imaging data, and it underscored a present and future need

  15. Inflammation and cutaneous nervous system involvement in hypertrophic scarring

    PubMed Central

    Li, Shao-hua; Yang, Heng-lian; Xiao, Hu; Wang, Yi-bing; Wang, De-chang; Huo, Ran

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to use a mouse model of hypertrophic scarring by mechanical loading on the dorsum of mice to determine whether the nervous system of the skin and inflammation participates in hypertrophic scarring. Results of hematoxylin-eosin and immunohistochemical staining demonstrated that inflammation contributed to the formation of a hypertrophic scar and increased the nerve density in scar tissue.Western blot assay verified that interleukin-13 expression was increased in scar tissue. These findings suggest that inflammation and the cutaneous nervous system play a role in hypertrophic scar formation. PMID:26692869

  16. Fraxelated radiofrequency device for acne scars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, Babar K.; Khokher, Sairah

    2012-09-01

    Acne scars can be improved with various treatments such as topical creams, chemical peels, dermal fillers, microdermabrasion, laser, and radiofrequency devices. Some of these treatments especially lasers and deep chemical peels can have significant side effects such as post inflammatory hyperpigmentation in darker skin types. Fraxelated RF Laser devices have been reported to have lower incidence of side effects in all skin phototypes. Nine patients between ages 18 and 35 of various skin phototypes were selected from a private practice and treated with a RF fraxelated device (E-matrix) for acne scars. Outcomes were measured by physician observation, subjective feedback received by patients, and comparison of before and after photographs. In this small group of patients with various skin phototypes, fraxelated radiofrequency device improved acne scars with minimal side effects and downtime.

  17. [Surgical therapy of wounds and scars].

    PubMed

    Koller, J

    2013-08-01

    Surgery can be very useful in all phases of wound healing and in treating scars. It can be employed along with conservative therapy, either simultaneously or in a sequential manner. The spectrum of surgical measures includes debridement with excision of wound edges or necrotic areas, skin transplantation to cover granulating wounds, and simple excision or complex reconstructive approaches to scars. The advantages of surgical treatment are seen in all phases of wound healing and include rapid onset of action, avoidance of secondary infection and improved function. The shortened healing time helps save personal and material costs.

  18. Scar treatment variations by skin type.

    PubMed

    Visscher, Marty O; Bailey, J Kevin; Hom, David B

    2014-08-01

    Patients and clinicians use skin color attributes such as color uniformity, color distribution, and texture to infer physiologic health status. Normalization of skin color, surface texture, and height are important treatment goals in the treatment of scars. Skin color, structure, and response to trauma, vary with ethnicity. The incidence of hypertrophic and keloid scar formation is influenced by these inherent skin attributes. Skin type influences the response to various modalities including laser therapy and surgical intervention, and skin differences must be considered in treatment planning to achieve optimal results.

  19. Successful human scar regeneration by topical iodine: a case report: an interim (3.5 year) summary.

    PubMed

    Derry, David M

    2009-05-01

    Control of regeneration and wound healing are scientific and clinical objectives. In 1997, topical Lugol's iodine solution applied daily for 3 days to a 50 year old facial scar lead to hyperemic scar tissue. As a working hypothesis, the author proposed topical iodine could initiate, control and complete human scar regeneration. In 2005, after collecting three more surgical scars, topical iodine applications began. Within 3 days all four scars started regenerating. Stopping topical iodine halted the process. Within a week an appropriate adult scar formed. Digital cameras recorded events. Regeneration is complex and slow. Its appearance depends on whether scar is covered with plastic or open. Iodine's chemical properties are discussed along with their reaction with epithelial cells. As there are no visible signs detectable changes from oral iodine on regeneration, details of iodine staining are more thoroughly described. Not all, but most important results are presented. Topical iodine induces hair growth in and around scars. Hair is regeneration's workhorse, moving purposefully in all directions under arrector pili muscle power delivering regenate material accurately to scar tissues and coordinating centers. In addition, hair repeatedly self amputates possibly strengthening regenerating tissues. Two types of regenate material show under plastic wrap: white and globular. The white regenate appears and behaves somewhat like snow, but can be yellow, green or brown depending iodine content. The globular form of regenate material maybe derived from white regenate material with hair's help. Globular regenate material is larger, nondescript, variable in size and color (depends on iodine content) and seemed usually associated with hair. There are two centrally placed coordinating centers 5 mm apart on major scars. Wrist centers have a palpable, but not visible ridge, between them whereas abdominal centers do not. Wrist centers lasted through all regeneration of the wrist

  20. Differences in collagen architecture between keloid, hypertrophic scar, normotrophic scar, and normal skin: An objective histopathological analysis.

    PubMed

    Verhaegen, Pauline D H M; van Zuijlen, Paul P M; Pennings, Noor M; van Marle, Jan; Niessen, Frank B; van der Horst, Chantal M A M; Middelkoop, Esther

    2009-01-01

    Normotrophic, hypertrophic, and keloidal scars are different types of scar formation, which all need a different approach in treatment. Therefore, it is important to differentiate between these types of scar, not only clinically but also histopathologically. Differences were explored for collagen orientation and bundle thickness in 25 normal skin, 57 normotrophic scar, 56 hypertrophic scar, and 56 keloid biopsies, which were selected on clinical diagnosis. Image analysis was performed by fast fourier transformation. The calculated collagen orientation index ranged from 0 (random orientation) to 1 (parallel orientation). The bundle distance was calculated by the average distance between the centers of the collagen bundles. The results showed that compared with all three types of scars, the collagen orientation index was significantly lower in normal skin, which indicates that scars are organized in a more parallel manner. No differences were found between the different scars. Secondly, compared with normal skin, normotrophic scar, and hypertrophic scar, the bundle distance was significantly larger in keloidal scar, which suggests that thicker collagen bundles are present in keloidal scar. This first extensive histological study showed objective differences between normal skin, normotrophic, hypertrophic, and keloidal scar.

  1. Omentum-derived stromal cells improve myocardial regeneration in pig post-infarcted heart through a potent paracrine mechanism

    SciTech Connect

    De Siena, Rocco; Balducci, Luigi; Blasi, Antonella; Montanaro, Manuela Gessica; Saldarelli, Marilisa; Saponaro, Vittorio; Martino, Carmela; Logrieco, Gaetano; Soleti, Antonio; Fiobellot, Simona; Madeddu, Paolo; Rossi, Giacomo; Ribatti, Domenico; Crovace, Antonio; Cristini, Silvia; Invernici, Gloria; Parati, Eugenio Agostino; Alessandri, Giulio

    2010-07-01

    Cell-based therapy could be a valid option to treat myocardial infarct (MI). Adipose-derived stromal cells (ADStCs) have demonstrated tissue regenerative potential including cardiomyogenesis. Omentum is an extremely rich source of visceral fat and its accumulation seems to correlate with cardiovascular diseases. We investigated the capacity of human fat Omentum-derived StCs (FOStCs) to affect heart function upon acute infarct in pigs induced by permanent ligation of the anterior interventricular artery (IVA). We demonstrated for the first time that the local injection of 50 x 10{sup 6} of FOStCs ameliorates the functional parameters of post-infarct heart. Most importantly, histology of FOStCs treated hearts demonstrated a substantial improvement of cardiomyogenesis. In culture, FOStCs produced an impressive number and amount of angiogenic factors and cytokines. Moreover, the conditioned medium of FOStCs (FOStCs-CM) stimulates in vitro cardiac endothelial cells (ECs) proliferation and vascular morphogenesis and inhibits monocytes, EC activation and cardiomyocyte apoptosis. Since FOStCs in vivo did not trans-differentiate into cardiomyocyte-like cells, we conclude that FOStCs efficacy was presumably mediated by a potent paracrine mechanism involving molecules that concomitantly improved angiogenesis, reduced inflammation and prevented cardiomyocytes death. Our results highlight for the first time the important role that human FOStCs may have in cardiac regeneration.

  2. Laparoscopic Treatment of Cesarean Scar Ectopic Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Felsingerová, Zuzana; Felsinger, Michal; Jandakova, Eva

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Background: An ectopic pregnancy within a Cesarean scar represents a rare type of extrauterine pregnancy in which the fertilized egg nidates in the myometrium of the uterine wall within a scar left from a previous Cesarean delivery. An unrecognized growing Cesarian scar pregnancy may result in uterine rupture, uncontrollable metrorrhagia, and bleeding into the abdominal cavity; therefore, early diagnosis and therapy are necessary to prevent the development of severe complications. Case: A 34-year-old woman after a previous Cesarean delivery presented with amenorrhoa of 7 weeks' duration. Transvaginal ultrasonography revealed an ectopic pregnancy in the Cesarean scar, and a laparoscopic removal of the gestational sac was performed with no complications. Results: Three months later, another laparoscopy with chromopertubation showed no signs of penetration in the suture, both the Fallopian tubes being bilaterally passable. The patient was advised that she could try to achieve pregnancy through spontaneous conception, after which monitoring of the gestational development and a careful assessment of the nidation site would be needed. Conclusions: Laparoscopic surgical management of a viable ectopic pregnancy is technically simple, and is followed by a good recovery. (J GYNECOL SURG 30:309) PMID:25336858

  3. Botulinum toxin to minimize facial scarring.

    PubMed

    Jablonka, Eric M; Sherris, David A; Gassner, Holger G

    2012-10-01

    Chemoimmobilization with botulinum toxin A is an ideal biochemical agent that allows near-total elimination of muscle pull on the healing facial wound. The goal of chemoimmobilization of facial cutaneous wounds is to eliminate dynamic tension on the healing tissues to improve wound healing and minimize scarring for optimal aesthetic results.

  4. Microtopography of the skin and scar formation.

    PubMed

    Tring, F C

    1976-11-01

    The surface microtopography of normal human skin varies from one anatomical region to another. The patterns at different sites are considered to reflect different orientations of dermal fibers. A simple technique is described that enables such orientations to be accurately delineated. Various scars resulting from lacerations, surgical incisions, and steroid-induced striae were examined in the manner described.

  5. Necrobiotic xanthogranuloma occurring in an eyelid scar.

    PubMed

    Rayner, S A; Duncombe, A S; Keefe, M; Theaker, J; Manners, R M

    2008-01-01

    We present a case report of necrobiotic xanthogranuloma (NXG) in a 76-year-old Caucasian lady occurring as a nodule in a blepharoplasty scar. NXG is a rare histiocytic disease with progressive orbital and systemic features. Management options of excision biopsy or chemotherapy are discussed.

  6. 9 CFR 11.3 - Scar rule.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Scar rule. 11.3 Section 11.3 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE ANIMAL... inflammation, and, other bilateral evidence of abuse indicative of soring including, but not limited...

  7. 9 CFR 11.3 - Scar rule.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Scar rule. 11.3 Section 11.3 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE ANIMAL... inflammation, and, other bilateral evidence of abuse indicative of soring including, but not limited...

  8. 9 CFR 11.3 - Scar rule.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Scar rule. 11.3 Section 11.3 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE ANIMAL... inflammation, and, other bilateral evidence of abuse indicative of soring including, but not limited...

  9. 9 CFR 11.3 - Scar rule.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Scar rule. 11.3 Section 11.3 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE ANIMAL... inflammation, and, other bilateral evidence of abuse indicative of soring including, but not limited...

  10. 9 CFR 11.3 - Scar rule.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Scar rule. 11.3 Section 11.3 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE ANIMAL... inflammation, and, other bilateral evidence of abuse indicative of soring including, but not limited...

  11. A Rat Excised Larynx Model of Vocal Fold Scar

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Welham, Nathan V.; Montequin, Douglas W.; Tateya, Ichiro; Tateya, Tomoko; Choi, Seong Hee; Bless, Diane M.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To develop and evaluate a rat excised larynx model for the measurement of acoustic, aerodynamic, and vocal fold vibratory changes resulting from vocal fold scar. Method: Twenty-four 4-month-old male Sprague-Dawley rats were assigned to 1 of 4 experimental groups: chronic vocal fold scar, chronic vocal fold scar treated with 100-ng basic…

  12. Combination Therapy in the Management of Atrophic Acne Scars

    PubMed Central

    Garg, Shilpa; Baveja, Sukriti

    2014-01-01

    Background: Atrophic acne scars are difficult to treat. The demand for less invasive but highly effective treatment for scars is growing. Objective: To assess the efficacy of combination therapy using subcision, microneedling and 15% trichloroacetic acid (TCA) peel in the management of atrophic scars. Materials and Methods: Fifty patients with atrophic acne scars were graded using Goodman and Baron Qualitative grading. After subcision, dermaroller and 15% TCA peel were performed alternatively at 2-weeks interval for a total of 6 sessions of each. Grading of acne scar photographs was done pretreatment and 1 month after last procedure. Patients own evaluation of improvement was assessed. Results: Out of 16 patients with Grade 4 scars, 10 (62.5%) patients improved to Grade 2 and 6 (37.5%) patients improved to Grade 3 scars. Out of 22 patients with Grade 3 scars, 5 (22.7%) patients were left with no scars, 2 (9.1%) patients improved to Grade 1and 15 (68.2%) patients improved to Grade 2. All 11 (100%) patients with Grade 2 scars were left with no scars. There was high level of patient satisfaction. Conclusion: This combination has shown good results in treating not only Grade 2 but also severe Grade 4 and 3 scars. PMID:24761094

  13. Myocardial Scar Detection by Standard CT Coronary Angiography

    PubMed Central

    Jeevarethinam, Anand; Venuraju, Shreenidhi; Mehta, Vishal Shahil; Atwal, Satvir; Raval, Usha; Rakhit, Roby; Davar, Joseph; Lahiri, Avijit

    2014-01-01

    We have described a myocardial infarct scar identified by a standard dual source CT coronary angiography (CTCA). We were able to detect the scar during the routine coronary assessment without contrast late enhancement and without additional radiation exposure. It is therefore feasible to assess chronic scar using a standard CTCA technique.

  14. Scar formation and revision after the removal of orthodontic miniscrews

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Yoon Jeong; Lee, Dong-Won; Kim, Kyung-Ho

    2015-01-01

    Many clinicians expect complete healing after the removal of temporary anchorage devices, but clinical examination may reveal scar-like tissue. This report presents the typical features of scarring detected after the removal of miniscrews, and the clinical outcome of scar revision along with its pathologic features. PMID:26023543

  15. The Use of Silicone Adhesives for Scar Reduction

    PubMed Central

    Bleasdale, Benjamin; Finnegan, Simon; Murray, Kathyryn; Kelly, Sean; Percival, Steven L.

    2015-01-01

    Significance: This article discusses the history and developments of silicone gel sheeting (SGS) scar therapy. Furthermore, we review a breadth of literature to gain an insight into how and why topical silicone gels remain the favored treatment of medical experts in scar management. We also analyze an ever increasing number of alternative therapies claiming to provide enhanced scar reduction performance. Recent Advances: Topical silicone gel treatments seem to remain the first point of clinical recommendation in scar management. SGS has been used in scar therapy for over 30 years, during which its efficacy has been the subject of numerous clinical evaluations. Critical Issues: While the exact mechanisms by which SGS improves hypertrophic scars, keloid development and recovery are yet to be fully agreed upon, its ability to do so remains largely undisputed at present. However, there still is ongoing deliberation over the exact mechanism of action of silicone in improving a scar. At present it is likely that through occlusion of the scar site and hydration of the wound bed, the overactivity of scar-related cells is suppressed, and their activity normalized. Future Direction: The clinical support of topical silicone gel products, relative to all alternative scar therapies, is considered the internationally recommended first-line form of scar management, and favored by consensus among healthcare professionals. However, there still remains the need for further clinical evidence and a better understanding of the mechanism behind the benefit of silicone gel for use in the prevention of abnormal scarring. PMID:26155385

  16. Vertical scar versus the inverted-T scar reduction mammaplasty: a 10-year follow-up.

    PubMed

    Bouwer, Lesley R; van der Biezen, Jan Jaap; Spronk, Cees A; van der Lei, Berend

    2012-10-01

    A retrospective study was undertaken to evaluate whether the initial outcome of two types of reduction mammaplasty techniques (vertical scar reduction mammaplasty vs. the inverted-T scar reduction mammaplasty) remains stable in the long term: Sixty-nine patients who had undergone breast reduction surgery in the period 1997-2000 at the Department of Reconstructive Plastic Surgery at the Medical Center of Leeuwarden were willing and able to participate in this study. A structured questionnaire was used to assess the degree of patient satisfaction. For subjective evaluation, the Strasser Grading System on photographs at the 3 months after surgery and after long-term follow-up (10 years) was used. The median general appreciation mark for the entire surgical procedure given by patients was 8 (1-10) on a scale from 1 to 10. Forty-six of the 69 patients could be scored according to Strasser: at 3 months in 17 patients (37%) the result was 'good', in 21 patients (46%) 'mediocre' and in eight patients (17%) 'poor'. After 10 years, in 37 of the patients (80%) the result was 'good', in six patients (13%) 'mediocre' and in three patients (7%) 'poor'. At 3 months, there was a higher incidence of bottoming out in the vertical scar group (one on two patients) as compared to the inverted-T scar group (one on 10 patients); however, at the 10-years follow-up bottoming out was 50% in the inverted-T scar group and 20% in the vertical scar group. Despite bottoming out, in both the vertical scar reduction mammaplasty technique and the inverted-T scar reduction mammaplasty technique, high patient satisfaction rates are achieved that remains for years.

  17. Anesthetic Practices for Laser Rehabilitation of Pediatric Hypertrophic Burn Scars.

    PubMed

    Wong, Brendan M; Keilman, Jeffrey; Zuccaro, Jennifer; Kelly, Charis; Maynes, Jason T; Fish, Joel S

    The use of ablative fractional carbon dioxide laser therapy and pulsed dye laser therapy has led to significant improvements in the rehabilitation of hypertrophic burn scars. However, laser procedures are associated with appreciable pain among pediatric patients. Clinical consensus suggests using general anesthesia for pediatric laser procedures; however, guidelines for perioperative care are lacking. The objective of this quality improvement study is to determine whether a difference exists in postoperative pain outcomes in pediatric patients who receive intraoperative opioid regimens compared with patients who receive opioid-sparing regimens for laser therapy of hypertrophic burn scars. A retrospective review of patients who received laser therapy at a pediatric burn center from April 2014 to May 2015 was performed. Overall, 88 of the 92 procedures reviewed were included. A statistically significant difference was not found between the likelihood of postoperative pain when intraoperative opioid regimens (n = 63) were given compared with opioid-sparing regimens (n = 25) X (1, n = 88) = 2.870, P = .0902. There was also no difference between short-acting (n = 48), long-acting (n = 9), or combination (n = 6) intraoperative opioids compared with opioid-sparing regimens (n = 25) in the likelihood of postoperative pain. Despite the small sample size, the low number of postoperative pain cases is encouraging. Ultimately, these data provide a foundation for developing anesthetic guidelines for pediatric laser procedures. Specifically, clinicians should consider the potential to deliver adequate perioperative care via an opioid-sparing regimen ± adjuvant.

  18. Postinfarction Functional Recovery Driven by a Three-Dimensional Engineered Fibrin Patch Composed of Human Umbilical Cord Blood-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Roura, Santiago; Soler-Botija, Carolina; Bagó, Juli R.; Llucià-Valldeperas, Aida; Férnandez, Marco A.; Gálvez-Montón, Carolina; Prat-Vidal, Cristina; Perea-Gil, Isaac; Blanco, Jerónimo

    2015-01-01

    Considerable research has been dedicated to restoring myocardial cell slippage and limiting ventricular remodeling after myocardial infarction (MI). We examined the ability of a three-dimensional (3D) engineered fibrin patch filled with human umbilical cord blood-derived mesenchymal stem cells (UCBMSCs) to induce recovery of cardiac function after MI. The UCBMSCs were modified to coexpress luciferase and fluorescent protein reporters, mixed with fibrin, and applied as an adhesive, viable construct (fibrin-cell patch) over the infarcted myocardium in mice (MI-UCBMSC group). The patch adhered well to the heart. Noninvasive bioluminescence imaging demonstrated early proliferation and differentiation of UCBMSCs within the construct in the postinfarct mice in the MI-UCBMSC group. The implanted cells also participated in the formation of new, functional microvasculature that connected the fibrin-cell patch to both the subjacent myocardial tissue and the host circulatory system. As revealed by echocardiography, the left ventricular ejection fraction and fractional shortening at sacrifice were improved in MI-UCBMSC mice and were markedly reduced in mice treated with fibrin alone and untreated postinfarction controls. In conclusion, a 3D engineered fibrin patch composed of UCBMSCs attenuated infarct-derived cardiac dysfunction when transplanted locally over a myocardial wound. Significance Ischemic heart failure (HF) is the end stage of many cardiovascular diseases, including myocardial infarction. The only definitive treatment for HF is cardiac transplant, which is hampered by limited number of heart donors and graft rejection. In recent times, cellular cardiomyoplasty has been expected to repair infarcted myocardium by implantation of different sources of stem or progenitor cells. However, low cell survival and myocardial implantation rates have motivated the emergence of novel approaches with the objective of generating graftable cell-based implants. Here, the potential

  19. Repigmentation of cutaneous scars depends on original wound type

    PubMed Central

    Chadwick, Sarah L; Yip, Christina; Ferguson, Mark W J; Shah, Mamta

    2013-01-01

    Cutaneous scarring is currently an inevitable outcome following skin injury. Abnormal pigmentation within scars makes them more noticeable, causing distress for patients, particularly as there is no reliable and effective treatment available to date. The Duroc pig, known to scar badly, was used to investigate repigmentation of scars resulting from three different wound types: incisional, partial thickness excisional and full thickness excisional. Wounds were created on the backs of Duroc pigs and the resulting scars harvested at days 35, 56, 70 and 90 days post-injury. Scars were processed for histology and immunohistochemistry, quantitatively analysed using image analysis software and subjected to statistical analysis. Photographs of the macroscopic appearance of scars were scored for pigmentation using a visual analogue scale. Results demonstrated temporal and spatial differences in melanocyte repopulation and function within scars from different wound types. The microscopic pigment deposition did not correlate with macroscopic appearances in mature scars. Pigmentation of scars is dependent on the width and depth of wounds. This study has provided important information on which we can base future studies to investigate factors controlling the repigmentation of scars. PMID:23668313

  20. Suppressed inflammatory gene expression during human hypertrophic scar compared to normotrophic scar formation.

    PubMed

    van den Broek, Lenie J; van der Veer, Willem M; de Jong, Etty H; Gibbs, Susan; Niessen, Frank B

    2015-08-01

    Hypertrophic scar formation is a result of adverse cutaneous wound healing. The pathogenesis of hypertrophic scar formation is still poorly understood. A problem next to the lack of suitable animal models is that often normal skin is compared to hypertrophic scar (HTscar) and not to normotrophic scar (NTscar) tissue. Another drawback is that often only one time period after wounding is studied, while scar formation is a dynamic process over a period of several months. In this study, we compared the expression of genes involved in inflammation, angiogenesis and extracellular matrix (ECM) formation and also macrophage infiltration in biopsies obtained before and up to 52 weeks after standard surgery in five patients who developed HTscar and six patients who developed NTscar. It was found that HTscar formation coincided with a prolonged decreased expression of inflammatory genes (TNFα, IL-1α, IL-1RN, CCL2, CCL3, CXCL2, CXCR2, C3 and IL-10) and an extended increased expression of ECM-related genes (PLAU, Col3A1, TGFβ3). This coincided with a delayed but prolonged infiltration of macrophages (type 2) in HTscar tissue compared to NTscar tissue. These findings were supported by immunohistochemical localization of proteins coding for select genes named above. Our study emphasizes that human cutaneous wound healing is a dynamic process that is needed to be studied over a period of time rather than a single point of time. Taken together, our results suggest innate immune stimulatory therapies may be a better option for improving scar quality than the currently used anti-inflammatory scar therapies.

  1. Incidences of malignancy in chronic burn scar ulcers: experience from Bangladesh.

    PubMed

    Das, Kishore Kumar; Chakaraborty, Anjana; Rahman, Ashrafur; Khandkar, Sazzad

    2015-09-01

    Malignant transformation on any scar tissue is known as Marjolin's ulcer. Most cases of Marjolin's ulcer reported so far occur in post-burn scars but not all ulcers that occur in post-burn scar are malignant. One hundred and forty cases of chronic non-healing ulcers in post-burn scar were included in this prospective observational study. The study was conducted in the Department of Burn and Plastic Surgery Unit of Dhaka Medical College Hospital. Mean age of the patients was 40.63±18.44 with a range from 12 to 75 years. Two third of the patients were male. All patients underwent excision biopsy and coverage with either split thickness skin graft or flap. Histopathological analysis of the resected specimen revealed malignancy in 46 cases and pseudoepitheliomatous hyperplasia in four cases and verruca plantaris in one case. The rest of the cases were chronic non-healing benign ulcers. All 46 cases of Marjolin's ulcer were squamous cell carcinoma with a mean latency period of 26.73 years. The commonest site of chronic ulcer was in the lower extremities (n-80, 57%), and malignancy was also found to be more common there (n-18). The most common type of burn was flame burn (68.57%). The Marjolin's ulcers were significantly larger in size than benign ulcers, and were mostly exophytic or ulcerative in appearance whereas benign ulcers were mostly flat. A non-healing ulcer in a post-burn scar should be addressed promptly because of its potential to develop into a malignant ulcer. Emphasis should be given to early surgical treatment of deep partial to full thickness burns to prevent scar formation, particularly over joints, and thus reduce the risk of development of Marjolin's ulcer.

  2. Translation into Brazilian Portuguese and validation of the "Quantitative Global Scarring Grading System for Post-acne Scarring" *

    PubMed Central

    Cachafeiro, Thais Hofmann; Escobar, Gabriela Fortes; Maldonado, Gabriela; Cestari, Tania Ferreira

    2014-01-01

    The "Quantitative Global Scarring Grading System for Postacne Scarring" was developed in English for acne scar grading, based on the number and severity of each type of scar. The aims of this study were to translate this scale into Brazilian Portuguese and verify its reliability and validity. The study followed five steps: Translation, Expert Panel, Back Translation, Approval of authors and Validation. The translated scale showed high internal consistency and high test-retest reliability, confirming its reproducibility. Therefore, it has been validated for our population and can be recommended as a reliable instrument to assess acne scarring. PMID:25184939

  3. Botulinum toxin to minimize facial scarring.

    PubMed

    Sherris, David A; Gassner, Holger G

    2002-02-01

    Botulinum toxin injection has been used for a variety of indications in humans, including blepharospasm and hyperfunctional facial lines. This article describes a novel formulation of botulinum toxin, which supplies immediate feedback to the injecting physician. Additionally, recent findings are described that indicate the immediate injection of botulinum toxin into the muscles underlying a wound can improve the cosmetic outcome of the facial cutaneous scar. Future applications of these findings are discussed.

  4. Digital imaging analysis to assess scar phenotype.

    PubMed

    Smith, Brian J; Nidey, Nichole; Miller, Steven F; Moreno Uribe, Lina M; Baum, Christian L; Hamilton, Grant S; Wehby, George L; Dunnwald, Martine

    2014-01-01

    In order to understand the link between the genetic background of patients and wound clinical outcomes, it is critical to have a reliable method to assess the phenotypic characteristics of healed wounds. In this study, we present a novel imaging method that provides reproducible, sensitive, and unbiased assessments of postsurgical scarring. We used this approach to investigate the possibility that genetic variants in orofacial clefting genes are associated with suboptimal healing. Red-green-blue digital images of postsurgical scars of 68 patients, following unilateral cleft lip repair, were captured using the 3dMD imaging system. Morphometric and colorimetric data of repaired regions of the philtrum and upper lip were acquired using ImageJ software, and the unaffected contralateral regions were used as patient-specific controls. Repeatability of the method was high with intraclass correlation coefficient score > 0.8. This method detected a very significant difference in all three colors, and for all patients, between the scarred and the contralateral unaffected philtrum (p ranging from 1.20(-05) to 1.95(-14) ). Physicians' clinical outcome ratings from the same images showed high interobserver variability (overall Pearson coefficient = 0.49) as well as low correlation with digital image analysis results. Finally, we identified genetic variants in TGFB3 and ARHGAP29 associated with suboptimal healing outcome.

  5. Digital imaging analysis to assess scar phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Brian J.; Nidey, Nichole; Miller, Steven F.; Moreno, Lina M.; Baum, Christian L.; Hamilton, Grant S.; Wehby, George L.; Dunnwald, Martine

    2015-01-01

    In order to understand the link between the genetic background of patients and wound clinical outcomes, it is critical to have a reliable method to assess the phenotypic characteristics of healed wounds. In this study, we present a novel imaging method that provides reproducible, sensitive and unbiased assessments of post-surgical scarring. We used this approach to investigate the possibility that genetic variants in orofacial clefting genes are associated with suboptimal healing. Red-green-blue (RGB) digital images of post-surgical scars of 68 patients, following unilateral cleft lip repair, were captured using the 3dMD image system. Morphometric and colorimetric data of repaired regions of the philtrum and upper lip were acquired using ImageJ software and the unaffected contralateral regions were used as patient-specific controls. Repeatability of the method was high with interclass correlation coefficient score > 0.8. This method detected a very significant difference in all three colors, and for all patients, between the scarred and the contralateral unaffected philtrum (P ranging from 1.20−05 to 1.95−14). Physicians’ clinical outcome ratings from the same images showed high inter-observer variability (overall Pearson coefficient = 0.49) as well as low correlation with digital image analysis results. Finally, we identified genetic variants in TGFB3 and ARHGAP29 associated with suboptimal healing outcome. PMID:24635173

  6. Inhibition of ischemic cardiomyocyte apoptosis through targeted ablation of Bnip3 restrains postinfarction remodeling in mice

    PubMed Central

    Diwan, Abhinav; Krenz, Maike; Syed, Faisal M.; Wansapura, Janaka; Ren, Xiaoping; Koesters, Andrew G.; Li, Hairong; Kirshenbaum, Lorrie A.; Hahn, Harvey S.; Robbins, Jeffrey; Jones, W. Keith; Dorn, Gerald W.

    2007-01-01

    Following myocardial infarction, nonischemic myocyte death results in infarct expansion, myocardial loss, and ventricular dysfunction. Here, we demonstrate that a specific proapoptotic gene, Bnip3, minimizes ventricular remodeling in the mouse, despite having no effect on early or late infarct size. We evaluated the effects of ablating Bnip3 on cardiomyocyte death, infarct size, and ventricular remodeling after surgical ischemia/reperfusion (IR) injury in mice. Immediately following IR, no significant differences were observed between Bnip3–/– and WT mice. However, at 2 days after IR, apoptosis was diminished in Bnip3–/– periinfarct and remote myocardium, and at 3 weeks after IR, Bnip3–/– mice exhibited preserved LV systolic performance, diminished LV dilation, and decreased ventricular sphericalization. These results suggest myocardial salvage by inhibition of apoptosis. Forced cardiac expression of Bnip3 increased cardiomyocyte apoptosis in unstressed mice, causing progressive LV dilation and diminished systolic function. Conditional Bnip3 overexpression prior to coronary ligation increased apoptosis and infarct size. These studies identify postischemic apoptosis by myocardial Bnip3 as a major determinant of ventricular remodeling in the infarcted heart, suggesting that Bnip3 may be an attractive therapeutic target. PMID:17909626

  7. Periostin induces fibroblast proliferation and myofibroblast persistence in hypertrophic scarring.

    PubMed

    Crawford, Justin; Nygard, Karen; Gan, Bing Siang; O'Gorman, David Brian

    2015-02-01

    Hypertrophic scarring is characterized by the excessive development and persistence of myofibroblasts. These cells contract the surrounding extracellular matrix resulting in the increased tissue density characteristic of scar tissue. Periostin is a matricellular protein that is abnormally abundant in fibrotic dermis, however, its roles in hypertrophic scarring are largely unknown. In this report, we assessed the ability of matrix-associated periostin to promote the proliferation and myofibroblast differentiation of dermal fibroblasts isolated from the dermis of hypertrophic scars or healthy skin. Supplementation of a thin type-I collagen cell culture substrate with recombinant periostin induced a significant increase in the proliferation of hypertrophic scar fibroblasts but not normal dermal fibroblasts. Periostin induced significant increases in supermature focal adhesion formation, α smooth muscle actin levels and collagen contraction in fibroblasts cultured from hypertrophic scars under conditions of increased matrix tension in three-dimensional type-I collagen lattices. Inhibition of Rho-associated protein kinase activity significantly attenuated the effects of matrix-associated periostin on hypertrophic scar fibroblasts and myofibroblasts. Depletion of endogenous periostin expression in hypertrophic scar myofibroblasts resulted in a sustained decrease in α smooth muscle actin levels under conditions of reducing matrix tension, while matrix-associated periostin levels caused the cells to retain high levels of a smooth muscle actin under these conditions. These findings indicate that periostin promotes Rho-associated protein kinase-dependent proliferation and myofibroblast persistence of hypertrophic scar fibroblasts and implicate periostin as a potential therapeutic target to enhance the resolution of scars.

  8. Mathematical modeling of chemotaxis and glial scarring around implanted electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silchenko, Alexander N.; Tass, Peter A.

    2015-02-01

    It is well known that the implantation of electrodes for deep brain stimulation or microelectrode probes for the recording of neuronal activity is always accompanied by the response of the brain’s immune system leading to the formation of a glial scar around the implantation sites. The implantation of electrodes causes massive release of adenosine-5‧-triphosphate (ATP) and different cytokines into the extracellular space and activates the microglia. The released ATP and the products of its hydrolysis, such as ADP and adenosine, become the main elements mediating chemotactic sensitivity and motility of microglial cells via subsequent activation of P2Y2,12 as well as A3A/A2A adenosine receptors. The size and density of an insulating sheath around the electrode, formed by microglial cells, are important criteria for the optimization of the signal-to-noise ratio during microelectrode recordings or parameters of electrical current delivered to the brain tissue. Here, we study a purinergic signaling pathway underlying the chemotactic motion of microglia towards implanted electrodes as well as the possible impact of an anti-inflammatory coating consisting of the interleukin-1 receptor antagonist. We present a model describing the formation of a stable aggregate around the electrode due to the joint chemo-attractive action of ATP and ADP and the mixed influence of extracellular adenosine. The bioactive coating is modeled as a source of chemo-repellent located near the electrode surface. The obtained analytical and numerical results allowed us to reveal the dependences of size and spatial location of the insulating sheath on the amount of released ATP and estimate the impact of immune suppressive coating on the scarring process.

  9. The Structural Basis of Functional Improvement in Response to Human Umbilical Cord Blood Stem Cell Transplantation in Hearts with Post-Infarct LV Remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yong; Ye, Lei; Zhong, Jia; Li, Xin; Yan, Chen; Chandler, Margaret P.; Calvin, Steve; Xiao, Feng; Negia, Mesfin; Low, Walter C.; Zhang, Jianyi; Yu, Xin

    2015-01-01

    Cellular therapy for myocardial repair has been one of the most intensely investigated interventional strategies for acute myocardium infarction. Although the therapeutic potential of stem cells has been demonstrated in various studies, the underlying mechanisms for such improvement are poorly understood. In the present study, we investigated the long-term effects of stem cell therapy on both myocardial fiber organization and regional contractile function using a rat model of post-infarct remodeling. Human non-hematopoietic umbilical cord blood stem cells (nh-UCBSCs) were administered via tail vein to rats 2 days after infarct surgery. Animals were maintained without immunosuppressive therapy. In vivo and ex vivo MR imaging was performed on infarct hearts ten months after cell transplantation. Compared to the age-matched rats exposed to the identical surgery, both global and regional cardiac function of the nh-UCBSC-treated hearts, such as ejection fraction, ventricular strain and torsion, were significantly improved. More importantly, the treated hearts exhibited preserved fiber orientation and water diffusivities that were similar to those in sham-operated control hearts. These data provide the first evidence that nh-UCBSC treatment may prevent/delay untoward structural remodeling in post-infarct hearts, which supports the improved LV function observed in vivo in the absence of immunosuppression, suggesting a beneficial paracrine effect that occurred with the cellular therapy. PMID:24332083

  10. Unusually large colon cancer cutaneous and subcutaneous metastases occurring in resection scars.

    PubMed

    Alexandrescu, Doru T; Vaillant, Juan; Yahr, Laura J; Kelemen, Pond; Wiernik, Peter H

    2005-08-01

    Development of cutaneous metastases from colon cancer is a rare event, usually occurring in the setting of diffusely-disseminated disease and commonly carrying a dismal prognosis. Cutaneous and subcutaneous metastases in surgical scars occur extremely rarely, with only a few cases reported. We describe two cases of cutaneous metastases from colon cancer. A 62-year-old woman developed an 11-cm midline abdominal mass that slowly grew on the skin surface. The mass occurred at the scar site of her previous surgery performed 5 years prior for resection of a colon adenocarcinoma. A 46-year-old male presented with a subcutaneous 4.5-cm nodule in midline-abdominal scar, 3 years after resection of the primary colon cancer. These cases illustrate the pathological features and natural history of cutaneous metastases observed until the tumors have reached a very large size. Particular features of cutaneous scar metastases from colon cancer observed in our cases are a superficial pattern of spread, strong positivity for EGFR, low serum carcinoembrionic antigen, and long survival of the patients, possibly contributed to by the use of chemotherapy.

  11. Nondestructive measurements of the properties of healing burn scars.

    PubMed

    Chu, B M; Brody, G

    1975-01-01

    A testing protocol and the requisite instrumentation have been developed to nondestructively monitor the temporal and mechanical properties of maturing scar. The maturing scar can become progressively and unpredictably adherent or contractured, producing varying degrees of functional impairment. By plotting these mechanical changes as a temporal function of limb motion history, more accurate prediction and control of the ultimate scarring may result. These same techniques could also be used to study normal skin aging. Extrapolation could be made to connective tissue scars in tendons, ligaments, and other structural elements. Scar contractures may develop slowly along lines of tension or areas of maximum skin defect in large maturing scars once the patient has recovered sufficiently to exercise the underlying joints. Since the present endeavor to monitor potential contractures requires measurement of the "in-plane" stresses and strains, we have chosen to utilize an in situ strip biaxial test configuration.

  12. Novel Insights on Understanding of Keloid Scar: Article Review.

    PubMed

    Mari, Walid; Alsabri, Sami G; Tabal, Najib; Younes, Sara; Sherif, Abdulamagid; Simman, Richard

    2015-12-01

    Keloid scar, dermal benign fibro-proliferative growth that extends outside the original wound and invades adjacent dermal tissue due to extensive production of extracellular matrix, especially collagen, which caused by over expression of cytokines and growth factors. Although many attempts were made to understand the exact pathophysiology and the molecular abnormalities, the pathogenesis of keloid scar is yet to be determined. Even though there are several treatment options for keloid scars include combination of medical and surgical therapies like combination of surgical removal followed by cryotherapy or intralesional steroid therapy, the reoccurrence rate is still high despite the present treatment. In this review, PubMed, clinical key and Wright State Library web site have been used to investigate any update regarding Keloid disease. We used Keloid, scar formation, hypertrophic scar and collagen as key words. More than 40 articles have been reviewed. This paper reviews literature about keloid scar formation mechanism, the most recent therapeutic options including the ones under research.

  13. Beta-blockade improves adjacent regional sympathetic innervation during postinfarction remodeling.

    PubMed

    Kramer, C M; Nicol, P D; Rogers, W J; Seibel, P S; Park, C S; Reichek, N

    1999-10-01

    The effect of beta-blockade on left ventricular (LV) remodeling, when added to angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibition (ACEI) after anterior myocardial infarction (MI), is incompletely understood. On day 2 after coronary ligation-induced anteroapical infarction, 17 sheep were randomized to ramipril (ACEI, n = 8) or ramipril and metoprolol (ACEI-beta, n = 9). Magnetic resonance imaging was performed before and 8 wk after MI to measure changes in LV end-diastolic, end-systolic, and stroke volume indexes, LV mass index, ejection fraction (EF), and regional percent intramyocardial circumferential shortening. (123)I-labeled m-iodobenzylguanidine (MIBG) and fluorescent microspheres before and after adenosine were infused before death at 8 wk post-MI for quantitation of sympathetic innervation, blood flow, and blood flow reserve in adjacent and remote noninfarcted regions. Infarct size, regional blood flow, blood flow reserve, and the increase in LV mass and LV end-diastolic and end-systolic volume indexes were similar between groups. However, EF fell less over the 8-wk study period in the ACEI-beta group (-13 +/- 11 vs. -22 +/- 4% in ACEI, P < 0.05). The ratio of adjacent to remote region (123)I-MIBG uptake was greater in ACEI-beta animals than in the ACEI group (0.93 +/- 0.06 vs. 0.86 +/- 0.07, P < 0.04). When added to ACE inhibition after transmural anteroapical MI, beta-blockade improves EF and adjacent regional sympathetic innervation but does not alter LV size.

  14. Analysis of state of vehicular scars on Arctic Tundra, Alaska

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lathram, E. H.

    1974-01-01

    Identification on ERTS images of severe vehicular scars in the northern Alaska tundra suggests that, if such scars are of an intensity or have spread to a dimension such that they can be resolved by ERTS sensors (20 meters), they can be identified and their state monitored by the use of ERTS images. Field review of the state of vehicular scars in the Umiat area indicates that all are revegetating at varying rates and are approaching a stable state.

  15. Dermal tunneling: a proposed treatment for depressed scars.

    PubMed

    Lima, Emerson Vasconcelos de Andrade

    2016-01-01

    Depressed facial scars are still a challenge in medical literature, despite the wide range of proposed treatments. Subcision is a technique that is frequently performed to improve this type of lesions. This article proposes a new method to release depressed scars, reported and named by the author as dermal tunneling. This study presents a simple and didactic manner to perform this method. The results in 17 patients with facial scars were considered promising. Thus, the technique was deemed to be safe and reproducible.

  16. Interactive visualization for scar transmurality in cardiac resynchronization therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reiml, Sabrina; Toth, Daniel; Panayiotou, Maria; Fahn, Bernhard; Karim, Rashed; Behar, Jonathan M.; Rinaldi, Christopher A.; Razavi, Reza; Rhode, Kawal S.; Brost, Alexander; Mountney, Peter

    2016-03-01

    Heart failure is a serious disease affecting about 23 million people worldwide. Cardiac resynchronization therapy is used to treat patients suffering from symptomatic heart failure. However, 30% to 50% of patients have limited clinical benefit. One of the main causes is suboptimal placement of the left ventricular lead. Pacing in areas of myocardial scar correlates with poor clinical outcomes. Therefore precise knowledge of the individual patient's scar characteristics is critical for delivering tailored treatments capable of improving response rates. Current research methods for scar assessment either map information to an alternative non-anatomical coordinate system or they use the image coordinate system but lose critical information about scar extent and scar distribution. This paper proposes two interactive methods for visualizing relevant scar information. A 2-D slice based approach with a scar mask overlaid on a 16 segment heart model and a 3-D layered mesh visualization which allows physicians to scroll through layers of scar from endocardium to epicardium. These complementary methods enable physicians to evaluate scar location and transmurality during planning and guidance. Six physicians evaluated the proposed system by identifying target regions for lead placement. With the proposed method more target regions could be identified.

  17. Intralesional Cryotherapy for the Treatment of Keloid Scars: Evaluating Effectiveness

    PubMed Central

    Bulstra, Anne Eva J.; Ket, Johannes C. F.; Ritt, Marco J. P. F.; van Leeuwen, Paul A. M.; Niessen, Frank B.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Intralesional (IL) cryotherapy is a novel treatment technique for keloid scars, in which the scar is frozen from inside. Over the past decade, several studies have been published with varying outcomes. A critical analysis of the current literature is, therefore, warranted to determine whether IL cryotherapy is an alternative to established keloid scar treatments. Methods: A comprehensive review was performed, based on the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analysis. PubMed and EMBASE were searched from inception. Studies and level of recommendation were graded according to the American Society of Plastic Surgeons criteria. Results: Eight studies meeting the inclusion criteria were selected. The average scar volume decrease ranged from 51% to 63%, but no complete scar eradication was achieved on average. Scar recurrence ranged from 0% to 24%. Hypopigmentation posttreatment was seen mostly in Fitzpatrick 4–6 skin type patients. Finally, complaints of pain and pruritus decreased significantly in most studies. Conclusions: IL cryotherapy for the treatment of keloid scars shows favorable results in terms of volume reduction and alleviated complaints of pain and pruritus. However, no complete scar eradication is established, and recurrences are seen. Also, persistent hypopigmentation proved a problem in Fitzpatrick 4–6 skin type patients. Summarized, the evidence proved limited and inconsistent resulting in an American Society of Plastic Surgeons grade C recommendation for this type of treatment of keloid scars. PMID:26180738

  18. The role of scar origin in shaping men's body image.

    PubMed

    Dyer, Anne; Mayer-Eckhard, Lennart; White, Andrew J; Alpers, Georg W

    2015-03-01

    Men generally have a more positive body image than women. However, the extent to which scars negatively influence men's body image is uncertain. The aim of the current study was to assess body image in men with and without scars while taking scar origin into account (nonsuicidal self-harming injuries [NSSI] vs. accidents or surgery). One hundred and nine men (n = 19 with NSSI) and 185 women (n = 96 with NSSI) filled in multidimensional body image questionnaires. Results indicate that on most clinical subscales women had a significantly more negative body image compared with men. However, within a subsample whose scars resulted from NSSI, gender differences vanished. Among men, scar origin was significantly associated with negative body image after partialling out scar characteristics, age, and borderline symptomatology. The visibility of scars was not associated with more severe body image disturbances. The results of our study indicate that self-inflicted scars adversely affect body image. Although women generally reported having a more negative body image, disturbances in body image should not be neglected among men, especially in those who have self-inflicted scars.

  19. NEW MOLECULAR MEDICINE-BASED SCAR MANAGEMENT STRATEGIES

    PubMed Central

    Arno, Anna I; Gauglitz, Gerd G; Barret, Juan P; Jeschke, Marc G

    2014-01-01

    Keloids and hypertrophic scars are prevalent disabling conditions with still suboptimal treatments. Basic science and molecular-based medicine research has contributed to unravel new bench-to-bedside scar therapies, and to dissect the complex signaling pathways involved. Peptides such as transforming growth factor beta (TGF-β) superfamily, with SMADs, Ski, SnoN, Fussels, endoglin, DS-Sily, Cav-1p, AZX100, thymosin-β4 and other related molecules may emerge as targets to prevent and treat keloids and hypertrophic scars. The aim of this review is to describe the basic complexity of these new molecular scar management strategies, and point out new fibrosis research lines. PMID:24438742

  20. Abnormal pigmentation within cutaneous scars: A complication of wound healing

    PubMed Central

    Chadwick, Sarah; Heath, Rebecca; Shah, Mamta

    2012-01-01

    Abnormally pigmented scars are an undesirable consequence of cutaneous wound healing and are a complication every single individual worldwide is at risk of. They present a challenge for clinicians, as there are currently no definitive treatment options available, and render scars much more noticeable making them highly distressing for patients. Despite extensive research into both wound healing and the pigment cell, there remains a scarcity of knowledge surrounding the repigmentation of cutaneous scars. Pigment production is complex and under the control of many extrinsic and intrinsic factors and patterns of scar repigmentation are unpredictable. This article gives an overview of human skin pigmentation, repigmentation following wounding and current treatment options. PMID:23162241

  1. Efficacy and Safety of a Novel 100% Silicone Scar Gel Treatment for Early Intervention in Scar Management

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the efficacy and safety of a new topical silicone gel for the early intervention in the management of scars. Design: In this 12-week, observational study, healthy subjects (n=15) with an accessible linear or hypertrophic scar were given the test product and instructed to apply twice daily. Subjects returned 14, 28, 56, and 84 days later for evaluation and recording of adverse events. Setting: Private practice of the author. Participants: Eligible subjects had a scar with a Vancouver Scar Scale total score ≥3 at baseline. Measurements: Improvement was evaluated by the Vancouver Scar Scale and Observer Scar Assessment Scale at baseline and at four follow-up visits. Results: The median total Vancouver Scar Scale score and median total Observer Scar Assessment Scale score decreased significantly from baseline at each visit, showing rapid and continuing improvement in the appearance of the scars. For Vancouver Scar Scale, significant differences of individual parameters from baseline began at 28 days for pliability and height, 56 days for vascularity, and 84 days for pigmentation. For Observer Scar Assessment Scale parameters, significant differences from baseline began at 14 days and continued until 84 days for vascularization, thickness, and pigmentation. Pain and pruritis scores were low at each visit. Overall, 84.6 percent of subjects rated the treatment as excellent, very good, or good after three months of treatment. No adverse events were reported. Conclusion: The test product improved the appearance of scars after three months of twice-daily treatment and without adverse events. PMID:28210394

  2. Management of scars: updated practical guidelines and use of silicones.

    PubMed

    Meaume, Sylvie; Le Pillouer-Prost, Anne; Richert, Bertrand; Roseeuw, Diane; Vadoud, Javid

    2014-01-01

    Hypertrophic scars and keloids resulting from surgery, burns, trauma and infection can be associated with substantial physical and psychological distress. Various non-invasive and invasive options are currently available for the prevention and treatment of these scars. Recently, an international multidisciplinary group of 24 experts on scar management (dermatologists; plastic and reconstructive surgeons; general surgeons; physical medicine, rehabilitation and burns specialists; psychosocial and behavioural researchers; epidemiologists; beauticians) convened to update a set of practical guidelines for the prevention and treatment of hypertrophic and keloid scars on the basis of the latest published clinical evidence on existing scar management options. Silicone-based products such as sheets and gels are recommended as the gold standard, first-line, non-invasive option for both the prevention and treatment of scars. Other general scar preventative measures include avoiding sun exposure, compression therapy, taping and the use of moisturisers. Invasive treatment options include intralesional injections of corticosteroids and/or 5-fluorouracil, cryotherapy, radiotherapy, laser therapy and surgical excision. All of these options may be used alone or as part of combination therapy. Of utmost importance is the regular re-evaluation of patients every four to eight weeks to evaluate whether additional treatment is warranted. The amount of scar management measures that are applied to each wound depends on the patient's risk of developing a scar and their level of concern about the scar's appearance. The practical advice presented in the current guidelines should be combined with clinical judgement when deciding on the most appropriate scar management measures for an individual patient.

  3. Does the placement of an Amplatzer septal occluder device confer benefit in patients with a post-infarction ventricular septal defect?

    PubMed

    Dawson, Alan G; Williams, Stuart G; Cole, Daisy

    2014-12-01

    A best evidence topic in cardiac surgery was written according to a structured protocol. The question addressed was 'Is the placement of an Amplatzer septal occluder device across a post-infarction ventricular septal defect a suitable alternative for patients not eligible for surgical repair?' Altogether, 31 papers were found using the reported search, of which 17 represented the best evidence to answer the clinical question. The authors, journal, date and country of publication, patient group studied, study type, relevant outcomes and results of these papers are tabulated. We conclude that the insertion of an Amplatzer occluder device in patients with a post-infarction ventricular septal defect (VSD) not amenable to surgical repair can offer benefit in selected patients. Patients with cardiogenic shock frequently have an unfavourable outcome and closure should be considered cautiously. From the literature available, patients have a better outcome if the intervention is delayed by 2 weeks or more possibly due to the maturation of the VSD and recovery of myocardial function. In certain situations, device closure may be complicated by device dislocation or embolization, residual shunting or a tortuous course not amenable to device implantation. In such settings, surgical repair is the only option. In patients who proceed straight to surgical repair with no attempt at percutaneous closure, the overall mortality lies in the region of 43% and similar to percutaneous closure, there is an association observed between those operated within 7 days of the VSD occurrence and those greater than this time. Patients presenting in cardiogenic shock experienced an increased risk of death and if the timing of myocardial infarction to VSD closure could be delayed by 3 weeks, there was a statistically significant reduction in operative mortality. Percutaneous closure of a post-infarction VSD may avoid the requirement for surgical closure. However, in some cases, it provides time to

  4. Cosmetic evaluation of surgical scars after external dacryocystorhinostomy

    PubMed Central

    Rizvi, Syed Ali Raza; Saquib, Mohammad; Maheshwari, Rakesh; Gupta, Yogesh; Iqbal, Zafar; Maheshwari, Puneet

    2016-01-01

    AIM To evaluate the surgical scars of external dacryocystorhinostomy (DCR) cosmetically. METHODS Totally 50 consecutive cases of primary acquired nasolacrimal duct obstruction (PANDO) were included in the study. Surgical scars were assessed by the patients and two independent observers at 2, 6 and 12wk postoperatively on the basis of visibility of the scars and still photographs respectively and were graded from 0-3. Kappa test was utilised to check the agreement of scar grading between the two observers. Wilcoxan signed ranks test was used to analyse the improvement of scar grading. RESULTS Thirty-four (68%) patients graded their incision site as very visible (grade 3) at 2wk. At 6 and 12wk, incision site was observed as grade 3 by 7 (14%) and 1 (2%) patients respectively. Photographic evaluation of patients by 2 observers showed an average score of 2.75, 1.94 and 0.94 at 2, 6 and 12wk respectively. Change in scar grading from grade 3 to grade 0 in consecutive follow-up (2, 6 and 12wk) was found to be highly significant both for the patient as well for the observers (P<0.0001). CONCLUSION The external DCR is a highly effective and safe procedure and in view of low percentage of cases who complained of marked scarring in the present study, thus scarring should not be the main ground for deciding the approach to DCR surgery, even in young cosmetically conscious patients. PMID:28003973

  5. Fractional Carbon Dioxide Laser in Treatment of Acne Scars

    PubMed Central

    Petrov, Andrej; Pljakovska, Vesna

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Scars appear as a result of skin damage during the process of the skin healing. There are two types of acne scars, depending on whether there is a loss or accumulation of collagen: atrophic and hypertrophic. In 80-90% it comes to scars with loss of collagen compared to smaller number of hypertrophic scars and keloids. AIM: The aim of the study was to determine efficiency and safety of fractional carbon dioxide laser in the treatment of acne scars. MATERIAL AND METHODS: The study was carried out in Acibadem Sistina Clinical Hospital, Skopje at the Department of Dermatovenerology, with a total of 40 patients treated with fractional carbon dioxide laser (Lutronic eCO2). The study included patients with residual acne scars of a different type. RESULTS: Comedogenic and papular acne in our material were proportionately presented in 50% of cases, while the other half were the more severe clinical forms of acne - pustular inflammatory acne and nodulocystic acne that leave residual lesions in the form of second, third and fourth grade of scars. CONCLUSION: The experiences of our work confirm the world experiences that the best result with this method is achieved in dotted ice pick or V-shaped acne scars. PMID:27275326

  6. Scar-modulating treatments for central nervous system injury.

    PubMed

    Shen, Dingding; Wang, Xiaodong; Gu, Xiaosong

    2014-12-01

    Traumatic injury to the adult mammalian central nervous system (CNS) leads to complex cellular responses. Among them, the scar tissue formed is generally recognized as a major obstacle to CNS repair, both by the production of inhibitory molecules and by the physical impedance of axon regrowth. Therefore, scar-modulating treatments have become a leading therapeutic intervention for CNS injury. To date, a variety of biological and pharmaceutical treatments, targeting scar modulation, have been tested in animal models of CNS injury, and a few are likely to enter clinical trials. In this review, we summarize current knowledge of the scar-modulating treatments according to their specific aims: (1) inhibition of glial and fibrotic scar formation, and (2) blockade of the production of scar-associated inhibitory molecules. The removal of existing scar tissue is also discussed as a treatment of choice. It is believed that only a combinatorial strategy is likely to help eliminate the detrimental effects of scar tissue on CNS repair.

  7. Regenerative healing, scar-free healing and scar formation across the species: current concepts and future perspectives.

    PubMed

    Ud-Din, Sara; Volk, Susan W; Bayat, Ardeshir

    2014-09-01

    All species have evolved mechanisms of repair to restore tissue function following injury. Skin scarring is an inevitable and permanent endpoint for many postnatal organisms except for non-amniote vertebrates such as amphibians, which are capable of tissue regeneration. Furthermore, mammalian foetuses through mid-gestation are capable of rapid wound repair in the absence of scar formation. Notably, excessive cutaneous scar formation, such as hypertrophic and keloid scars, is a species limited clinical entity as it occurs only in humans, although wounds on the distal limbs of horses are also prone to heal with fibroproliferative pathology known as equine exuberant granulation tissue. Currently, there are no reliable treatment options to eradicate or prevent scarring in humans and vertebrates. The limited number of vertebrate models for either hypertrophic or keloid scarring has been an impediment to mechanistic studies of these diseases and the development of therapies. In this viewpoint essay, we highlight the current concepts of regenerative, scar-free and scar-forming healing compared across a number of species and speculate on areas for future research. Furthermore, in-depth investigative research into the mechanisms of scarless repair may allow for the development of improved animal models and novel targets for scar prevention. As the ability to heal in both a scarless manner and propensity for healing with excessive scar formation is highly species dependent, understanding similarities and differences in healing across species as it relates to the regenerative process may hold the key to improve scarring and guide translational wound-healing studies.

  8. Old-scar mass and changing surgical perspective: Sarcoidosis

    PubMed Central

    Aktimur, Recep; Aktimur, Sude Hatun; Çolak, Elif; Alıcı, Ömer; Demirağ, Mehmet Derya

    2015-01-01

    Sarcoidosis is a systemic inflammatory disease of an unknown etiology. Skin is involved in 25% of all cases, and 29% of them present as a scar sarcoidosis. Asymptomatic old-scar masses are generally regarded as a foreign body reaction by surgeons and often result in excisional biopsy. We describe a case of a patient who developed sarcoidosis in a 34-year-old appendectomy scar and adjacent inguinal lymph nodes without any local or systemic symptom and radiologic finding. Surgeons should not underestimate the importance of such lesions as a simple condition. Scar sarcoidosis may resolve spontaneously, or the treatment with some topical agents is effective. Furthermore, scar sarcoidosis may be the initial manifestation of systemic sarcoidosis. PMID:25931946

  9. Causes of shell scarring in dog cockles Glycymeris glycymeris L.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramsay, K.; Richardson, C. A.; Kaiser, M. J.

    2001-05-01

    Experimental studies were conducted to investigate the possible causes of shell scars in the bivalve mollusc Glycymeris glycymeris, including fishing disturbance, predator attacks and burrowing activity. Individuals collected from an area of sea bed experimentally fished once by a scallop dredge 12 months previously did not display significantly more shell scars than those collected before fishing or from a control area. In the laboratory, Glycymeris offered to the predatory crab Cancer pagurus had a significantly higher incidence of scars seen in acetate peels of shell cross-sections than control shells. However, scarring on Glycymeris excavated from the sediment and left to reburrow was not significantly different from those in an undisturbed control group. Currently, it is not possible in G. glycymeris to differentiate between scars caused by fishing disturbance or natural disturbances, either on the grounds of visual appearance or position of damage.

  10. Ablative fractional laser resurfacing helps treat restrictive pediatric scar contractures.

    PubMed

    Krakowski, Andrew C; Goldenberg, Alina; Eichenfield, Lawrence F; Murray, Jill-Peck; Shumaker, Peter R

    2014-12-01

    Conventional management of debilitating pediatric scar contractures, including hand therapy and surgery, may often be beset by delayed treatment, suboptimal results, and additional surgical morbidity. Ablative fractional laser resurfacing is an emerging adjunctive procedural option for scar contractures because of its promising efficacy and safety profile. However, its use to improve function has not been studied in the pediatric population. Herein we report 2 pediatric patients with recalcitrant scar contractures, causing persistent functional deficits, treated with an ablative fractional laser protocol. Both patients experienced rapid and cumulative subjective and objective improvements in range of motion and function as measured by an independent occupational therapist without reported complications. We highlight ablative fractional laser resurfacing as a novel and promising tool in the management of function-limiting scar contractures in children and propose that the technique be incorporated into existing scar treatment paradigms, guided by future research.

  11. Endometrial cancer implanted within a cesarean section scar.

    PubMed

    Baba, Tsukasa; Mandai, Masaki; Yamanishi, Yukio; Suzuki, Ayako; Kang, Hyun Sook; Konishi, Ikuo

    2011-03-01

    Several reports have documented adenocarcinoma arising from endometriotic implants within cesarean section (C-S) scars on the serosal surface of the uterus; however, endometrial cancer invading the C-S scar from the uterine cavity has not been described. We report a case of a grade 1 endometrioid adenocarcinoma 'drop' lesion invading a previous C-S scar with resultant cervical stromal invasion. Using both MR images and a thorough review of the pathology, the tumor at the C-S scar was determined to be an implant derived from a primary lesion at the uterine fundus. With increases in the incidence of both endometrial cancer and births by C-S, it is likely we will encounter more cases of iatrogenic implants of endometrial cancers in C-S scars.

  12. Development of novel SCAR markers for genetic characterization of Lonicera japonica from high GC-RAMP-PCR and DNA cloning.

    PubMed

    Cheng, J L; Li, J; Qiu, Y M; Wei, C L; Yang, L Q; Fu, J J

    2016-04-28

    Sequence-characterized amplified region (SCAR) markers were further developed from high-GC primer RAMP-PCR-amplified fragments from Lonicera japonica DNA by molecular cloning. The four DNA fragments from three high-GC primers (FY-27, FY-28, and FY-29) were successfully cloned into a pGM-T vector. The positive clones were sequenced; their names, sizes, and GenBank numbers were JYHGC1-1, 345 bp, KJ620024; YJHGC2-1, 388 bp, KJ620025; JYHGC7-2, 1036 bp, KJ620026; and JYHGC6-2, 715 bp, KJ620027, respectively. Four novel SCAR markers were developed by designing specific primers, optimizing conditions, and PCR validation. The developed SCAR markers were used for the genetic authentication of L. japonica from its substitutes. This technique provides another means of developing DNA markers for the characterization and authentication of various organisms including medicinal plants and their substitutes.

  13. Effect of laser infrared therapy on several rheological indices of blood and on the homeostasis of patients with post-infarction cardiosclerosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volov, N. A.; Kudinova, M. A.; Fedulaeva, A. I.; Fedulaev, Yu. N.; Gordeev, I. G.

    2001-04-01

    An investigation was made on 38 patients affected by exertion angina pectoris of the I-III functional classes. The patients survived a Q-associated myocardial infarction not earlier than 1 year ago. The patients were treated according to a 10-session course of laser infrared therapy. The dynamics of several hemorheological indices (such as blood viscosity, the hematocrit of venous blood, fibrinogen, fibronectine, thrombocyte aggregation, antithrombin III, and the activated partial thrombplastin time) was estimated prior to the treatment, 5 - 7 days after the beginning of laser therapy, and 30 days after the beginning of laser therapy treatment. It was found that laser therapy was capable of producing a significant decrease in the blood viscosity, fibrinogen level, and in the aggregation of thrombocytes. Moreover, laser infrared therapy carried out on patients affected by post-infarction cardiosclerosis and by stable exertion stenocardia of the I-III functional classes produced a reliable normalization of hemorheological indices of the blood.

  14. Assessment of vaccination coverage, vaccination scar rates, and smallpox scarring in five areas of West Africa*

    PubMed Central

    Henderson, Ralph H.; Davis, Hillard; Eddins, Donald L.; Foege, William H.

    1973-01-01

    In 1966, nineteen countries of West and Central Africa began a regional smallpox eradication and measles control programme in cooperation with the World Health Organization. This paper summarizes sample survey data collected to assess the results of the programme in Northern Nigeria (Sokoto and Katsina Provinces), Western Nigeria, Niger, Dahomey, and Togo. These data indicate that the programme, which used mass vaccination campaigns based on a collecting-point strategy, was generally successful in reaching a high proportion of the population. Analysis of vaccination coverage and vaccination scar rates by age underlined the importance to the programme of newborn children who accumulate rapidly following the mass campaign. Of all persons without vaccination scars at the time of the surveys, 34.4% were under 5 years of age; in the absence of a maintenance programme, this figure would rise to 40% after 1 year. PMID:4541684

  15. Surgery for postinfarction ventricular tachycardia in the pre-implantable cardioverter defibrillator era: early and long term outcomes in 100 consecutive patients

    PubMed Central

    Bourke, J; Campbell, R; McComb, J; Furniss, S; Doig, J; Hilton, C

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—To report outcome following surgery for postinfarction ventricular tachycardia undertaken in patients before the use of implantable defibrillators.
DESIGN—A retrospective review, with uniform patient selection criteria and surgical and mapping strategy throughout. Complete follow up. Long term death notification by OPCS (Office of Population Censuses and Statistics) registration.
SETTING—Tertiary referral centre for arrhythmia management.
PATIENTS—100 consecutive postinfarction patients who underwent map guided endocardial resection at this hospital in the period 1981-91 for drug refractory ventricular tachyarrhythmias.
RESULTS—Emergency surgery was required for intractable arrhythmias in 28 patients, and 32 had surgery within eight weeks of infarction ("early"). Surgery comprised endocardial resections in all, aneurysmectomy in 57, cryoablations in 26, and antiarrhythmic ventriculotomies in 11. Twenty five patients died < 30 days after surgery, 21 of cardiac failure. This high mortality reflects the type of patients included in the series. Only 12 received antiarrhythmic drugs after surgery. Perioperative mortality was related to preoperative left ventricular function and the context of surgery. Mortality rates for elective surgery more than eight weeks after infarction, early surgery, emergency surgery, and early emergency surgery were 18%, 31%, 46%, and 50%, respectively. Actuarial survival rates at one, three, five, and 10 years after surgery were 66%, 62%, 57%, and 35%.
CONCLUSIONS—Surgery offers arrhythmia abolition at a risk proportional to the patient's preoperative risk of death from ventricular arrhythmias. The long term follow up results suggest a continuing role for surgery in selected patients even in the era of catheter ablation and implantable defibrillators.


Keywords: arrhythmias; myocardial infarction; surgical management PMID:10409528

  16. 31P NMR 2D Mapping of Creatine Kinase Forward Flux Rate in Hearts with Postinfarction Left Ventricular Remodeling in Response to Cell Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Ling; Cui, Weina; Zhang, Pengyuan; Jang, Albert; Zhu, Wuqiang; Zhang, Jianyi

    2016-01-01

    Utilizing a fast 31P magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) 2-dimensional chemical shift imaging (2D-CSI) method, this study examined the heterogeneity of creatine kinase (CK) forward flux rate of hearts with postinfarction left ventricular (LV) remodeling. Immunosuppressed Yorkshire pigs were assigned to 4 groups: 1) A sham-operated normal group (SHAM, n = 6); 2) A 60 minutes distal left anterior descending coronary artery ligation and reperfusion (MI, n = 6); 3) Open patch group; ligation injury plus open fibrin patch over the site of injury (Patch, n = 6); and 4) Cell group, hiPSCs-cardiomyocytes, -endothelial cells, and -smooth muscle cells (2 million, each) were injected into the injured myocardium pass through a fibrin patch (Cell+Patch, n = 5). At 4 weeks, the creatine phosphate (PCr)/ATP ratio, CK forward flux rate (Flux PCr→ATP), and k constant of CK forward flux rate (kPCr→ATP) were severely decreased at border zone myocardium (BZ) adjacent to MI. Cell treatment results in significantly increase of PCr/ATP ratio and improve the value of kPCr→ATP and Flux PCr→ATP in BZ myocardium. Moreover, the BZ myocardial CK total activity and protein expression of CK mitochondria isozyme and CK myocardial isozyme were significantly reduced, but recovered in response to cell treatment. Thus, cell therapy results in improvement of BZ bioenergetic abnormality in hearts with postinfarction LV remodeling, which is accompanied by significantly improvements in BZ CK activity and CK isozyme expression. The fast 2D 31P MR CSI mapping can reliably measure the heterogeneity of bioenergetics in hearts with post infarction LV remodeling. PMID:27606901

  17. Phospholemman Overexpression Inhibits Na+-K+-ATPase in Adult Rat Cardiac Myocytes: Relevance to Decreased Na+ pump Activity in Post-Infarction Myocytes

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xue-Qian; Moorman, J. Randall; Ahlers, Belinda A.; Carl, Lois L.; Lake, Douglas E.; Song, Jianliang; Mounsey, J. Paul; Tucker, Amy L.; Chan, Yiu-mo; Rothblum, Lawrence I.; Stahl, Richard C.; Carey, David J.; Cheung, Joseph Y.

    2005-01-01

    Messenger RNA levels of phospholemman (PLM), a member of the FXYD family of small single-span membrane proteins with putative ion-transport regulatory properties, were increased in postinfarction (MI) rat myocytes. We tested the hypothesis that the previously observed reduction in Na+-K+-ATPase activity in MI rat myocytes was due to PLM overexpression. In rat hearts harvested 3 and 7 days post-MI, PLM protein expression was increased by 2- and 4-fold, respectively. To simulate increased PLM expression post-MI, PLM was overexpressed in normal adult rat myocytes by adenovirus-mediated gene transfer. PLM overexpression did not affect the relative level of phosphorylation on serine68 of PLM. Na+-K+-ATPase activity was measured as ouabain-sensitive Na+-K+ pump current (Ip). Compared to control myocytes overexpressing green fluorescent protein alone, Ip measured in myocytes overexpressing PLM was significantly (P<0.0001) lower at similar membrane voltages, pipette Na+ ([Na+]pip) and extracellular K+ concentrations ([K+]o). From −70 to +60 mV, neither [Na+]pip nor [K+]o required to attain half-maximal Ip was significantly different between control and PLM myocytes. This phenotype of decreased Vmax without appreciable changes in Km for Na+ and K+ in PLM overexpressed myocytes was similar to that observed in MI rat myocytes. Inhibition of Ip by PLM overexpression was not due to decreased Na+-K+-ATPase expression since there were no changes in either protein or messenger RNA levels of either α1 or α2 isoforms of Na+-K+-ATPase. In native rat cardiac myocytes, PLM co-immunoprecipitated with α-subunits of Na+-K+-ATPase. Inhibition of Na+-K+-ATPase by PLM overexpression, in addition to previously reported decrease in Na+-K+-ATPase expression, may explain altered Vmax but not Km of Na+-K+-ATPase in postinfarction rat myocytes. PMID:16195392

  18. Subcutaneous sarcoidosis in a rhinoplasty scar

    PubMed Central

    Dulguerov, Nicolas; Vankatova, Lenka; Landis, Basile Nicolas

    2015-01-01

    The presence of a subcutaneous hard bony-like lump at the lateral nasal wall after a septorhinoplasty procedure is an unfavourable result. The reported patient developed this complication 2 years after a revision surgery, in which percutaneous osteotomies were performed. An excision biopsy of the lump took place and the histopathological analysis revealed a granulomatous gigantocellular inflammation with absence of birefringent particles on polarised lamp and negative mycobacteria culture. After additional investigations, the final diagnosis was consistent with grade 2 pulmonary sarcoidosis associated with subcutaneous sarcoidosis. No treatment was initiated. The facial symptoms resolved without any additional treatment and the pulmonary function tests have not deteriorated after 1 year of follow-up. The polymorphism of cutaneous lesions in sarcoidosis, the absence of systemic symptoms and the unrecognised entity of subcutaneous sarcoidosis in a scar illustrate the diagnostic challenge with this patient. PMID:25819832

  19. Detecting Moorland Wildfire Scars and their Persistence in the Landscape using Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) in the Peak District National Park, UK

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Millin-chalabi, G. R.; McMorrow, J.; Agnew, C.

    2012-12-01

    The overall aim of this research is to assess the ability of SAR to detect moorland wildfire scars and their persistence in the landscape using the Peak District National Park (PDNP) in the UK as a case study. Spatially-robust data to monitor wildfire scar size and severity in UK moorlands is currently rare. Fires can burn deep into peat soils and contribute to the release of carbon dioxide into the atmosphere and may also affect the water quality of nearby streams. Information on fire extent would be useful for conservation organisations such as Moors For The Future who are trying to preserve the delicate peatland environment. Knowing the size and location of fire scars would help the Fire and Rescue Service to plan future response to moorland fires. Fire scar boundaries can be mapped in the field using Global Positioning Systems (GPS), however this is labour intensive. Indeed in the PDNP wildfire scar mapping is conducted by park rangers which provides essential ground truth data for assessing against the SAR data. Therefore this particular area provides a unique opportunity for testing an alternative SAR technique for monitoring wildfire scars in the moorland landscape. Previous research shows that SAR has been successfully applied for wildfire scar detection in other types of environments such as boreal (Bourgeau-Chavez et al, 1997) and the tropics (Huang and Siegert, 2004). This research presents some of the first results of the project which tests the capability of ERS 2; ASAR (C-band) and PALSAR (L-band) data to detect several wildfire scars from 2003 - 2008 of various spatial scales and fire severity. Some of the key areas of interest the paper will explore are at Bleaklow and the Kinder plateau. The Bleaklow peat fire of 18th April 2003 was larger (7km2) and more severe than at Kinder, which burned between 26-29th May 2008 and covered an area of 10 ha. All the wildfire scars were GPS, mapped just after the fire event. Archival time-series SAR imagery was

  20. Modeling fibrosis using fibroblasts isolated from scarred rat vocal folds

    PubMed Central

    Kishimoto, Yo; Kishimoto, Ayami Ohno; Ye, Shuyun; Kendziorski, Christina; Welham, Nathan V.

    2016-01-01

    Following injury, pathologically activated vocal fold fibroblasts (VFFs) can engage in disordered extracellular matrix (ECM) remodeling, leading to VF fibrosis and impaired voice function. Given the importance of scar VFFs to phenotypically appropriate in vitro modeling of VF fibrosis, we pursued detailed characterization of scar VFFs obtained from surgically injured rat VF mucosae, compared to those obtained from experimentally naïve, age-matched tissue. Scar VFFs initially exhibited a myofibroblast phenotype characterized by increased proliferation, increased Col1a1 transcription and collagen, type I synthesis, increased Acta2 transcription and α-smooth muscle actin synthesis, and enhanced contractile function. These features were most distinct at passage 1 (P1); we observed a coalescence of the scar and naïve VFF phenotypes at later passages. An empirical Bayes statistical analysis of the P1 cell transcriptome identified 421 genes that were differentially expressed by scar, compared to naïve, VFFs. These genes were primarily associated with the wound response, ECM regulation, and cell proliferation. Follow-up comparison of P1 scar VFFs and their in vivo tissue source showed substantial transcriptomic differences. Finally, P1 scar VFFs responded to treatment with hepatocyte growth factor and transforming growth factor-β3, two biologics with reported therapeutic value. Despite the practical limitations inherent to working with early passage cells, this experimental model is easily implemented in any suitably equipped laboratory and has the potential to improve the applicability of preclinical VF fibrosis research. PMID:27111284

  1. Acute Marjolin's Ulcer in a Postauricular Scar after Mastoidectomy

    PubMed Central

    Bukhari, Sumaiyah M.; Hajjaj, Mutawakel F.

    2016-01-01

    Background. Marjolin's ulcer is a rare, aggressive cutaneous malignancy that arises primarily in burn scars but can occur in other types of scars. Squamous cell carcinoma is the most common variant, and while malignant degeneration usually takes a long time, it can develop acutely. Case Report. a 30-year-old man who developed Marjolin's ulcer acutely in a right postauricular scar after mastoidectomy and the incision and drainage of a mastoid abscess. To the best of our knowledge, this report is the first to describe a Marjolin's ulcer in a postauricular surgical scar. However, it has been reported in others areas in the head and neck. Conclusion. Marjolin's ulcer is most commonly observed after postburn scars, but it may be observed after any type of scars, as our patient developed an SCC with a postsurgical scar. Early diagnosis is essential, and a biopsy should be performed on any nonhealing wound or chronic wound that undergoes a sudden change. Tissue samples should be taken from both the centre and the margins of the wound. PMID:28050297

  2. Preventing Scars after Injury with Partial Irreversible Electroporation.

    PubMed

    Golberg, Alexander; Villiger, Martin; Khan, Saiqa; Quinn, Kyle P; Lo, William C Y; Bouma, Brett E; Mihm, Martin C; Austen, William G; Yarmush, Martin L

    2016-11-01

    Preventing the formation of hypertrophic scars, especially those that are a result of major trauma or burns, would have enormous impact in the fields of regenerative and trauma medicine. In this report, we introduce a noninvasive method to prevent scarring based on nonthermal partial irreversible electroporation. Contact burn injuries in rats were treated with varying treatment parameters to optimize the treatment protocol. Scar surface area and structural properties of the scar were assessed with histology and non-invasive, longitudinal imaging with polarization-sensitive optical coherence tomography. We found that partial irreversible electroporation using 200 pulses of 250 V and 70 μs duration, delivered at 3 Hz every 20 days during a total of five therapy sessions after the initial burn injury, resulted in a 57.9% reduction of the scar area compared with untreated scars and structural features approaching those of normal skin. Unlike humans, rats do not develop hypertrophic scars. Therefore, the use of a rat animal model is the limiting factor of this work.

  3. Medicinal Plants for the Treatment of Hypertrophic Scars

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Qi; Wang, Su-Juan; Chen, Jian-Yu; Xin, Hai-Liang; Zhang, Hong

    2015-01-01

    Hypertrophic scar is a complication of wound healing and has a high recurrence rate which can lead to significant abnormity in aesthetics and functions. To date, no ideal treatment method has been established. Meanwhile, the underlying mechanism of hypertrophic scarring has not been clearly defined. Although a large amount of scientific research has been reported on the use of medicinal plants as a natural source of treatment for hypertrophic scarring, it is currently scattered across a wide range of publications. Therefore, a systematic summary and knowledge for future prospects are necessary to facilitate further medicinal plant research for their potential use as antihypertrophic scar agents. A bibliographic investigation was accomplished by focusing on medicinal plants which have been scientifically tested in vitro and/or in vivo and proved as potential agents for the treatment of hypertrophic scars. Although the chemical components and mechanisms of action of medicinal plants with antihypertrophic scarring potential have been investigated, many others remain unknown. More investigations and clinical trials are necessary to make use of these medical plants reasonably and phytotherapy is a promising therapeutic approach against hypertrophic scars. PMID:25861351

  4. Microneedling Therapy in Atrophic Facial Scars: An Objective Assessment

    PubMed Central

    Majid, Imran

    2009-01-01

    Background: Atrophic facial scars are always a challenge to treat, especially the ones that are deep-seated and/or involve much of the face. Microneedling or dermaroller therapy is a new addition to the treatment armamentarium for such scars that offers a simple and reportedly effective management of these scars. Aims: The aim of the present study was to perform an objective evaluation of the efficacy of dermaroller treatment in atrophic facial scars of varying etiology. Materials and Methods: Thirty-seven patients of atrophic facial scarring were offered multiple sittings of microneedling (dermaroller) treatment and their scars were evaluated and graded clinically and by serial photography at the start as well as at two months after the conclusion of the treatment protocol. Any change in the grading of scars after the end of treatment and follow-up period was noted down. The patients were also asked to evaluate the effectiveness of the treatment received on a 1-10 point scale. The efficacy of dermaroller treatment was thus assessed both subjectively by the patients as well as objectively by a single observer. Results: Overall 36 out of the total of 37 patients completed the treatment schedule and were evaluated for its efficacy. Out of these 36 patients, 34 achieved a reduction in the severity of their scarring by one or two grades. More than 80% of patients assessed their treatment as ‘excellent’ on a 10-point scale. No significant adverse effects were noted in any patient. Conclusions: Microneedling therapy seems to be a simple and effective treatment option for the management of atrophic facial scars. PMID:20300368

  5. External rhinoplasty for the Arabian nose: a columellar scar analysis.

    PubMed

    Foda, Hossam M T

    2004-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate columellar scar problems after external rhinoplasty in the Arabian population, and to analyze the technical factors that help prevent such problems and maximize the scar cosmesis. The investigation was conducted in university and private practice settings of the author in Alexandria, Egypt. A total of 600 Arab patients who underwent external rhinoplasty were included in the study. All the patients underwent surgery using the external rhinoplasty approach, in which bilateral alar marginal incisions were connected by an inverted V-shaped transcolumellar incision. At completion of the procedure, a two-layer closure of the columellar incision was performed. At a minimum of 1 year postoperatively, the columellar scar was evaluated subjectively by means of a patient questionnaire, and objectively by clinical examination and comparison of the close-up pre- and postoperative basal view photographs. Objectively, anything less than a barely visible, leveled, thin, linear scar was considered unsatisfactory. Subjectively, 95.5% of the patients rated the scar as unnoticeable, 3% as noticeable but acceptable, and 1.5% as unacceptable. Objectively, the scar was unsatisfactory in 7% of the cases. This was because of scar widening with or without depression (5%), hyperpigmentation (1.5%), and columellar rim notching (0.5%). The use of a deep 6/0 polydioxanon (PDS) suture significantly decreased the incidence of scar widening (p < 0.005).The columellar incision can be used safely in the Arab population regardless of their thick, dark, and oily skin. Technical factors that contributed to the favorable outcome of the columellar scar included proper planning of location and design of the incision used, precise execution, meticulous multilayered closure, and good postoperative care.

  6. Efficacy of fractional CO2 laser in treatment of atrophic scar of cutaneous leishmaniasis.

    PubMed

    Banihashemi, Mahnaz; Nahidi, Yalda; Maleki, Masoud; Esmaily, Habibollah; Moghimi, Hamid Reza

    2016-05-01

    Cutaneous leishmaniasis is an endemic disease in Iran. Unfortunately, it can lead to unsightly atrophic scars with limited treatment options. Fractional CO2 laser is accepted for treatment of atrophic acne scars and recently has been used to treat cutaneous leishmaniasis, so we planned to use fractional CO2 laser on leishmaniasis scar. We conducted this study on 60 leishmaniasis scars on the face of 40 patients. The lesions were treated by a fractional CO2 laser with beam size of 120 μm, with energy of 50-90 mJ, and 50-100 spots/cm(2) density with two passes in three monthly sessions. Evaluation was done in the first and second months after the first treatment and 3 and 6 months after the last treatment. Digital photography was performed at each visit. Assessment of improvement rate by patient and physician was rated separately as follows: no improvement (0%), mild (<25%), moderate (25-50%), good (51-75%), and excellent (76-100%). Based on patients' opinion, in the first and second follow-up, 48.3 and 90% of them reported moderate to excellent healing, respectively (p < 0.001). In 3 and 6 months follow-up after the end of the experiment, most of the patients (88.3 and 95%, respectively) reported moderate to excellent healing of scars. Based on two observers' opinion, healing in the first follow-up in most of the patients (65%) was mild to moderate and 33% were reported as having no healing. In the second follow-up, only 5% of the patients were reported with no healing and 60% were reported as having moderate healing (p < 0.001). In 3 and 6 months follow-up, most of the patients (95 and 96.6%) were reported as having moderate to excellent healing (p = <0.001). Our results underlined the high efficacy of fractional CO2 laser for leishmaniasis scar. No significant adverse effects were noted.

  7. Dermal tunneling: a proposed treatment for depressed scars*

    PubMed Central

    Lima, Emerson Vasconcelos de Andrade

    2016-01-01

    Depressed facial scars are still a challenge in medical literature, despite the wide range of proposed treatments. Subcision is a technique that is frequently performed to improve this type of lesions. This article proposes a new method to release depressed scars, reported and named by the author as dermal tunneling. This study presents a simple and didactic manner to perform this method. The results in 17 patients with facial scars were considered promising. Thus, the technique was deemed to be safe and reproducible. PMID:27828658

  8. Corneal tattooing: an alternative treatment for disfiguring corneal scars

    PubMed Central

    Pitz, S; Jahn, R; Frisch, L; Duis, A; Pfeiffer, N

    2002-01-01

    Background: The performance and results of corneal tattooing are described in a case series of 11 patients suffering from a disfiguring corneal scar using a technique similar to conventional dermatography. Methods: Drawing ink in different shades was applied into the anterior corneal stroma by punctures performed with a conventional spatula needle. Results: Up to 4 years after surgery all patients still had satisfactory staining of the formerly cosmetically disfiguring corneal scar. Conclusion: Tattooing of unsightly corneal scars proved to be an efficient and easy to perform technique, yielding acceptable results during follow up. PMID:11914207

  9. Prospective study concerning 71 cases of caesarean scar endometriosis (CSE).

    PubMed

    Pas, Katarzyna; Joanna, Skręt-Magierło; Renata, Raś; Skręt, Andrzej; Barnaś, Edyta

    2017-04-11

    A prospective study was undertaken involving 71 patients with caesarean scar endometriosis (CSE) between the years 2007 and 2013. A prospective study enabled us to find out: mean age of patients with CSE; 34.0 years (range 22.0-48.0), time between CS and diagnosis of CSE; 12.0 months (range 19.0-39.0), duration between symptoms and surgery; 24.0 months (range 1.0-204.0), mean operation time; 40.0 min. (range 15.0-160.0), and mean lesion size; 54.4 ± 42.3 mm(3). In three patients (4.2%) a large deficit in the abdominal wall was closed by means of polypropylene mesh. One of them conceived a year later. Surgical excision is the only effective treatment in patients with CSE. Wide local excision with clear margins is the key to prevent recurrence. Repair of large post-excisional deficits with mesh may also be offered to woman planning their next pregnancy. Impact statement • What is already known on this subject? Endometriosis in the scar may occur after various abdominal surgeries, more frequently after caesarean sections. The excision of large nodules is connected with suboptimal cosmetic outcomes and the possibility of recurrence. • What the results of this study add? In this study including 71 patients with CSE, wide excision with electrocoagulatory was associated with a single recurrence in 12-month follow-up. In three patients (4.2%) large deficits in the abdominal wall were closed with the use of polypropylene mesh. One of them conceived a year later and had a successful pregnancy. • What the implications are of these findings for clinical practice and/or futher research? Surgical excision is the only effective treatment in patients with CSE. Wide local excision with clear margins is the key to preventing recurrence. Repair of large post excisional deficit with mesh may be offered also to woman planning pregnancy.

  10. Use of Vicryl (polyglactin 910) mesh to limit epidural scar formation after laminectomy.

    PubMed

    Nussbaum, C E; McDonald, J V; Baggs, R B

    1990-04-01

    A variety of substances have been used at laminectomy sites to prevent postoperative epidural scarring. Free grafts of autologous subcutaneous fat are commonly used both clinically and experimentally. The free fat grafts usually survive, but decrease in size by about 50%. Postoperatively, subcutaneous seroma has been observed with the use of fat grafts, as well as recurrent symptoms of neural compression by the graft that required additional operations. When compared to the use of free grafts after laminectomy in dogs, Vicryl mesh produced slightly more scarring, but consistently less than that observed in control animals. The Vicryl mesh was resorbed by a minimal chronic inflammatory response over about 45 days. Seven of 11 fat-grafted zones showed signs of necrosis, at times with a greater collection of inflammatory cells than that associated with the Vicryl mesh. Of the 4 fat-grafted zones that showed good survival, 2 had gross evidence of neural compression. No surgical zone treated with Vicryl mesh exhibited evidence of neural compression. In view of these results, the use of Vicryl mesh at laminectomy sites may be a safer method of limiting postoperative epidural scar formation.

  11. Elastic Stiffness of Grain Boundary Scars and Dislocation Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Homin; Bowick, Mark

    2006-03-01

    We analytically calculate the stiffness of finite-length grain boundaries (scars) on a spherical crystal within the continuum elasticity theory. The scar is composed of an isolated disclination with +1 topological charge together with a finite number of dislocations. We determine the elastic free energy of a single finite-grain boundary scar by considering interacting defects, such as Disclination-Disclination (D-D), Disclination-dislocation (D-d), and dislocation-dislocation (d-d). The harmonic potential binding dislocations to the scar is obtained by determining the free energy of a single dislocation perturbed away from its equilibrium position. The elastic spring constants so obtained are compared to experimental data on dislocation dynamics [1]. We conclude with some comments on interstitial dynamics. [1] Lipowsky, P., Bowick, M. J., Meinke, J. H., Nelson, D. R. and Bausch, A. R. Nature Mater. 4, 407-411 (2005).

  12. Innovative Therapies in the Treatment of Keloids and Hypertrophic Scars

    PubMed Central

    Viera, Martha H.; Amini, Sadegh; Valins, Whitney

    2010-01-01

    Keloids and hypertrophic scars are benign fibrous overgrowths of scar tissue, which results from an abnormal response to trauma. Several therapeutic modalities have been described for the treatment and prevention of these conditions, but the optimal management approach has not yet been defined. This article reviews the most recent, innovative, therapeutic strategies for the management of hypertrophic scars and keloids, including mitomycin-C, tamoxifen citrate, methotrexate, imidazolaquinolines, retinoids, calcineurin inhibitors, phenylakylamine calcium channel blockers, botulinum toxin, vascular endothelial growth factor inhibitors, hepatocyte growth factor, basic fibroblast growth factor, interleukin-10, manosa-6-phosphate, transforming growth factor beta, antihistamines, and prostaglandin E2. No consensus in treatment regimens has been reached due to the limited evidence-based information found in the literature. Most therapeutic options have potential effectiveness as both monotherapy and as combination therapy. However, recent reports offer novel modalities that may approach scarring from different angles. PMID:20725565

  13. Extensive Burn Scars in Russia's Amur Region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Vast areas of southeastern Russia have been scorched by fires over the last few weeks. All across Siberia fires have been raging, and this Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) image from May 15, 2002, shows extensive, dark burn scars along with actively burning fires (red dots) on the north side of the Amur River, which separates Russia (north) and China (south). The southern Amur region is largely devoted to farming and other agriculture, and these fires may have been set intentionally to prepare the land for the growing season. Fire is often used to clear land of unwanted vegetation, and to return the nutrients stored in vegetation back to the soil. However, fires that are too frequent or severe can devastate the soil, eventually making it unsuitable for farming or grazing. Fires can also escape control and spread into protected areas. In this image, fires are mostly concentrated in a lowland area within the drainage basin of the Zeya River, which drains from the frozen lake at the top of the image. Image courtesy Jacques Descloitres, MODIS Land Rapid Response Team at NASA GSFC

  14. Scarring, stem cells, scaffolds and skin repair.

    PubMed

    Markeson, Daniel; Pleat, Jonathon M; Sharpe, Justin R; Harris, Adrian L; Seifalian, Alexander M; Watt, Suzanne M

    2015-06-01

    The treatment of full thickness skin loss, which can be extensive in the case of large burns, continues to represent a challenging clinical entity. This is due to an on-going inability to produce a suitable tissue engineered substrate that can satisfactorily replicate the epidermal and dermal in vivo niches to fulfil both aesthetic and functional demands. The current gold standard treatment of autologous skin grafting is inadequate because of poor textural durability, scarring and associated contracture, and because of a paucity of donor sites in larger burns. Tissue engineering has seen exponential growth in recent years with a number of 'off-the-shelf' dermal and epidermal substitutes now available. Each has its own limitations. In this review, we examine normal wound repair in relation to stem/progenitor cells that are intimately involved in this process within the dermal niche. Endothelial precursors, in particular, are examined closely and their phenotype, morphology and enrichment from multiple sources are described in an attempt to provide some clarity regarding the controversy surrounding their classification and role in vasculogenesis. We also review the role of the next generation of cellularized scaffolds and smart biomaterials that attempt to improve the revascularisation of artificial grafts, the rate of wound healing and the final cosmetic and functional outcome.

  15. Suppression of scarring in peripheral nerve implants by drug elution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    FitzGerald, James J.

    2016-04-01

    Objective. Medical implants made of non-biological materials provoke a chronic inflammatory response, resulting in the deposition of a collagenous scar tissue (ST) layer on their surface, that gradually thickens over time. This is a critical problem for neural interfaces. Scar build-up on electrodes results in a progressive decline in signal level because the scar tissue gradually separates axons away from the recording contacts. In regenerative sieves and microchannel electrodes, progressive scar deposition will constrict and may eventually choke off the sieve hole or channel lumen. Interface designs need to address this issue if they are to be fit for long term use. This study examines a novel method of inhibiting the formation and thickening of the fibrous scar. Approach. Research to date has mainly focused on methods of preventing stimulation of the foreign body response by implant surface modification. In this paper a pharmacological approach using drug elution to suppress chronic inflammation is introduced. Microchannel implants made of silicone doped with the steroid drug dexamethasone were implanted in the rat sciatic nerve for periods of up to a year. Tissue from within the microchannels was compared to that from control devices that did not release any drug. Main results. In the drug eluting implants the scar layer was significantly thinner at all timepoints, and unlike the controls it did not continue to thicken after 6 months. Control implants supported axon regeneration well initially, but axon counts fell rapidly at later timepoints as scar thickened. Axon counts in drug eluting devices were initially much lower, but increased rather than declined and by one year were significantly higher than in controls. Significance. Drug elution offers a potential long term solution to the problem of performance degradation due to scarring around neural implants.

  16. Quantitative measurement of hypertrophic scar: interrater reliability and concurrent validity.

    PubMed

    Nedelec, Bernadette; Correa, José A; Rachelska, Grazyna; Armour, Alexis; LaSalle, Léo

    2008-01-01

    Research into the pathophysiology and treatment of hypertrophic scar (HSc) remains limited by the heterogeneity of scar and the imprecision with which its severity is measured. The objective of this study was to test the interrater reliability and concurrent validity of the Cutometer measurement of elasticity, the Mexameter measurement of erythema and pigmentation, and total thickness measure of the DermaScan C relative to the modified Vancouver Scar Scale (mVSS) in patient-matched normal skin, normal scar, and HSc. Three independent investigators evaluated 128 sites (severe HSc, moderate or mild HSc, donor site, and normal skin) on 32 burn survivors using all of the above measurement tools. The intraclass correlation coefficient, which was used to measure interrater reliability, reflects the inherent amount of error in the measure and is considered acceptable when it is >0.75. Interrater reliability of the totals of the height, pliability, and vascularity subscales of the mVSS fell below the acceptable limit ( congruent with0.50). The individual subscales of the mVSS fell well below the acceptable level (< or =0.3). The Cutometer reading of elasticity provided acceptable reliability (>0.89) for each study site with the exception of severe scar. Mexameter and DermaScan C reliability measurements were acceptable for all sites (>0.82). Concurrent validity correlations with the mVSS were significant except for the comparison of the mVSS pliability subscale and the Cutometer maximum deformation measure comparison in severe scar. In conclusion, the Mexameter and DermaScan C measurements of scar color and thickness of all sites, as well as the Cutometer measurement of elasticity in all but the most severe scars shows high interrater reliability. Their significant concurrent validity with the mVSS confirms that these tools are measuring the same traits as the mVSS, and in a more objective way.

  17. Scar tissue and microvolt T-wave alternans.

    PubMed

    Kraaier, Karin; Olimulder, Marlon A G M; Galjee, Michel A; van Dessel, Pascal F H M; van der Palen, Job; Wilde, Arthur A M; Scholten, Marcoen F

    2014-04-01

    Microvolt T-wave alternans (MTWA) is an electrocardiographic marker for predicting sudden cardiac death. In this study, we aimed to study the relation between MTWA and scar assessed with cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (CMR) in patients with ischemic cardiomyopathy (ICM) or dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM). Sixty-eight patients with positive or negative MTWA and analysable CMR examination were included. Using CMR and the delayed enhancement technique, left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF), volumes, wall motion and scar characteristics were assessed. Overall, positive MTWA (n = 40) was related to male gender (p = 0.04), lower LVEF (p = 0.04) and increased left ventricular end-diastolic volume (LVEDV) (p < 0.01). After multivariate analysis, male gender (p = 0.01) and lower LVEF remained significant (p = 0.02). Scar characteristics (presence, transmurality, and scar score) were not related to MTWA (all p > 0.5). In the patients with ICM (n = 40) scar was detected in 38. Positive MTWA (n = 18) was related to higher LVEDV (p = 0.05). In patients with DCM (n = 28), scar was detected in 11. Trends were found between positive MTWA (n = 15) and male gender (p = 0.10), lower LVEF (p = 0.10), and higher LVEDV (p = 0.09). In both subgroups, the presence, transmurality or extent of scar was not related to MTWA (all p > 0.45). In this small study, neither in patients with ICM or DCM a relation was found between the occurrence of MTWA and the presence, transmurality or extent of myocardial scar. Overall there was a significant relation between heart failure remodeling parameters and positive MTWA.

  18. Perennial plate tectonics with lasting mantle lithosphere scars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heron, P.; Pysklywec, R. N.; Stephenson, R.

    2015-12-01

    Although the conventional theory of plate tectonics can explain non-rigid behaviour at plate boundaries, it cannot adequately explain the processes involved in deformation and seismicity within plate interiors. Here, we consider that the pre-existing deformation or "scarring" within the mantle lithosphere may have a very long lived presence that could incorporate deformation of the plate interior and plate boundary. Mantle lithosphere scars from continent-continent collisions could generate virtual plate boundaries that remain over long timescales, producing "perennial" plate tectonics. Local geophysical studies can map the crustal environment well, and global whole mantle tomography models are rapidly improving, yet high-resolution images of the mantle lithosphere are often not available in regions where scarring may be present. Where mantle lithosphere heterogeneities have been observed (usually interpreted simply as subduction scars), the same attention has not been afforded to them as, for example, re-activation of faults within the Earth's crust. In idealized numerical simulations, we compare how relic scarring at varying depths in the lithosphere affects patterns of deformation. High-resolution thermal-mechanical numerical experiments explore continental lithospheric deformation featuring a weakened crust and mantle lithosphere scars. Our models show that deep lithospheric scars can control the tectonic evolution of a region over shallow geological features, indicating the importance of mantle lithosphere heterogeneities. The Altyn Tagh Fault (ATF) in central China is an example of an ancient continental collision zone that undergoes periodic deformation during times of regional compression. We suggest that the ATF may be a locale where a long-lasting mantle lithosphere scar can control the subsequent crustal evolution and deformation, with ancient plate boundaries having a "perennial" plate tectonic presence.

  19. Scar Functions, Barriers for Chemical Reactivity, and Vibrational Basis Sets.

    PubMed

    Revuelta, F; Vergini, E; Benito, R M; Borondo, F

    2016-07-14

    The performance of a recently proposed method to efficiently calculate scar functions is analyzed in problems of chemical interest. An application to the computation of wave functions associated with barriers relevant for the LiNC ⇄ LiCN isomerization reaction is presented as an illustration. These scar functions also constitute excellent elements for basis sets suitable for quantum calculation of vibrational energy levels. To illustrate their efficiency, a calculation of the LiNC/LiCN eigenfunctions is also presented.

  20. Comparison of quality of facial scars after single low-level laser therapy and combined low-level with high-level (PDL 595 nm) laser therapy.

    PubMed

    Vranova, Jana; Remlova, Eva; Jelinkova, Helena; Rosina, Jozef; Dostalova, Tatjana

    2015-01-01

    The main goal of our study was to compare the quality of resulting facials scar 12 weeks after single and combined laser therapy. Forty-one children from age 1.5 to 5 years with facial scars after injury participated in the study. Thirty-one underwent laser therapy, 14 were treated using single low-level laser therapy (670 nm, fluence 3-5 J/cm(-2) ), and 17 underwent combined high-level laser therapy with non-ablative pulsed dye laser (PDL; 595 nm, spot size 7 mm, delay 0.45 ms or 1.5 ms, fluence 9-11 J/cm(-2) , cryogen spray/delay 20/30 ms) and low-level laser therapy. The control group consisted of 10 untreated children. Before treatment and at week 4, 8, and, 12 the scars were evaluated using the POSAS questionnaire. A statistically significant improvement in scars (between ratings before treatment and 4 weeks after therapy, before treatment and 8 weeks after therapy and before treatment and 12 weeks after therapy) was observed in all parameters in both treatment groups (p < 0.0001). For the HLLT+LLLT group the most significant enhancement in the quality of scars was found for all items and at all evaluations, except pigmentation and pliability. There was no improvement observed in quality of facial scars in the control group.

  1. Comparison of scar thickness measurements using trans-vaginal sonography and MRI in cases of pregnancy with previous caesarean section. Do they correlate with actual scar thickness?

    PubMed

    Singh, N; Tripathi, R; Mala, Y M; Dixit, R; Tyagi, S; Batra, A

    2013-11-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate scar thickness in cases of pregnancy with previous caesarean section, by trans-vaginal sonography (TVS) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and to correlate precision of radiologically-measured scar thickness with actual measurement of scar thickness. A total of 35 pregnant patients with previous caesarean section planned for elective caesarean section, were evaluated prospectively. Their scar thickness was measured by TVS and MRI on the day of elective repeat caesarean section. These measurements were correlated with each other and with scar thickness measured during elective repeat caesarean section by using a caliper. The correlation coefficients between scar thickness measured by TVS and MRI with peroperative evaluation with a caliper, were +0.72 and +0.59, respectively. The study concluded that as MRI is a costlier modality and TVS has better correlation coefficient with actual scar thickness, TVS can be considered to be the better modality for antenatal scar thickness measurement.

  2. Scar prevention and remodeling: a review of the medical, surgical, topical and light treatment approaches.

    PubMed

    Kerwin, Leonard Y; El Tal, Abdel Kader; Stiff, Mark A; Fakhouri, Tarek M

    2014-08-01

    Cosmetic, functional, and structural sequelae of scarring are innumerable, and measures exist to optimize and ultimately minimize these sequelae. To evaluate the innumerable methods available to decrease the cosmetic, functional, and structural repercussions of scarring, pubMed search of the English literature with key words scar, scar revision, scar prevention, scar treatment, scar remodeling, cicatrix, cicatrix treatment, and cicatrix remodeling was done. Original articles and reviews were examined and included. Seventy-nine manuscripts were reviewed. Techniques, comparisons, and results were reviewed and tabulated. Overall, though topical modalities are easier to use and are usually more attractive to the patient, the surgical approaches still prove to be superior and more reliable. However, advances in topical medications for scar modification are on the rise and a change towards medical treatment of scars may emerge as the next best approach. Comparison studies of the innumerable specific modalities for scar revision and prevention are impossible. Standardization of techniques is lacking. Scarring, the body's natural response to a wound, can create many adverse effects. At this point, the practice of sound, surgical fundamentals still trump the most advanced preventative methods and revision techniques. Advances in medical approaches are available, however, to assist the scarring process, which even the most advanced surgical fundamentals will ultimately lead to. Whether through newer topical therapies, light treatment, or classical surgical intervention, our treatment armamentarium of scars has expanded and will allow us to maximize scar prevention and to minimize scar morbidity.

  3. Combination Therapy for Acne Scarring: Personal Experience and Clinical Suggestions.

    PubMed

    Kroepfl, Lucija; Emer, Jason J

    2016-11-01

    Acne is one of the most prevalent skin conditions seen by dermatologists. The cosmetic sequelae of severe acne, including scarring and pigmentation, have a profound psychological impact on those in icted. Topical (eg, retinoids, antibiotics, dapsone, hydroxyacids) and oral treatments (eg, antibiotics and/or spironolactone) are often bene cial to control acne or in the instance of oral isotretinoin use, rid the acne permanently; however, these treatments have very little affect on the ultimate cosmetic outcome of the acne scarring and skin texture that results. Given the variety of scar types that can form and the variability of responses seen in various skin types and textures, treatment options are vast without appropriate guidelines for pathways that dictate best timing, combinations, and options in given clinical scenarios. Current treatment options include solo or combina- tions of energy-based (eg, laser, radiofrequency), chemical-based (eg, peels, TCA cross), surgical-based options (eg, subcision, punch excision), microneedling, and llers and/or fat injections. Most recently, fractional radiofrequency-based treatments have been used to improve acne scarring with less reported downtime as compared to lasers or chemical peels and the ability to treat darker or sensitive skin types with less risk of scarring or hyperpigmentation. In severe cystic ares, scarring treatments are often postposed till the acne is under control and in many instances this can limit the dermatologists ability to affect future cosmetic treatments. Based on personal experience of various clinical scenarios in a busy laser practice that treats a signi cant number of patients with acne scarring, fractional radiofrequency is an excellent choice for treating all forms of acne scars with minimal risk to patients, even those on concurrent treatments such as isotretinoin. Additionally, fractional radiofrequency can be used in combination with all other treatment options to speed the time to

  4. Quantitative measurement of hypertrophic scar: intrarater reliability, sensitivity, and specificity.

    PubMed

    Nedelec, Bernadette; Correa, José A; Rachelska, Grazyna; Armour, Alexis; LaSalle, Léo

    2008-01-01

    The comparison of scar evaluation over time requires measurement tools with acceptable intrarater reliability and the ability to discriminate skin characteristics of interest. The objective of this study was to evaluate the intrarater reliability and sensitivity and specificity of the Cutometer, the Mexameter, and the DermaScan C relative to the modified Vancouver Scar Scale (mVSS) in patient-matched normal skin, normal scar (donor sites), and hypertrophic scar (HSc). A single investigator evaluated four tissue types (severe HSc, less severe HSc, donor site, and normal skin) in 30 burn survivors with all four measurement tools. The intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) for the Cutometer was acceptable (> or =0.75) for the maximum deformation measure for the donor site and normal skin (>0.78) but was below the acceptable range for the HSc sites and all other parameters. The ICC for the Mexameter erythema (>0.75) and melanin index (>0.89) and the DermaScan C total thickness measurement (>0.82) were acceptable for all sites. The ICC for the total of the height, pliability, and vascularity subscales of the mVSS was acceptable (0.81) for normal scar but below the acceptable range for the scar sites. The DermaScan C was clearly able to discriminate HSc from normal scar and normal skin based on the total thickness measure. The Cutometer was less discriminating but was still able to discriminate HSc from normal scar and normal skin. The Mexameter erythema index was not a good discriminator of HSc and normal scar. Receiver operating characteristic curves were generated to establish the best cutoff point for the DermaScan C total thickness and the Cutometer maximum deformation, which were 2.034 and 0.387 mm, respectively. This study showed that although the Cutometer, the DermaScan C, and the Mexameter have measurement properties that make them attractive substitutes for the mVSS, caution must be used when interpreting results since the Cutometer has a ceiling effect when

  5. Clinical relevance of aberrant polypoid nodule scar after endoscopic submucosal dissection

    PubMed Central

    Arantes, Vitor; Uedo, Noriya; Pedrosa, Moises Salgado; Tomita, Yasuhiko

    2016-01-01

    AIM To describe a series of patients with aberrant polypoid nodule scar developed after gastric endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD), and to discuss its pathogenesis and clinical management. METHODS We reviewed retrospectively the endoscopic database of two academic institutions located in Brazil and Japan and searched for all patients that underwent ESD to manage gastric neoplasms from 2003 to 2015. The criteria for admission in the study were: (1) successful en bloc ESD procedure with R0 and curative resection confirmed histologically; (2) postoperative endoscopic examination with identification of a polypoid nodule scar (PNS) at ESD scar; (3) biopsies of the PNS with hyperplastic or regenerative tissue, reviewed by two independent experienced gastrointestinal pathologists, one from each Institution. Data were examined for patient demographics, Helicobacter pylori status, precise neoplastic lesion location in the stomach, tumor size, histopathological assessment of the ESD specimen, and postoperative information including medical management, endoscopic and histological findings, and clinical outcome. RESULTS A total of 14 patients (10 men/4 women) fulfilled the inclusion criteria and were enrolled in this study. One center contributed with 8 cases out of 60 patients (13.3%) from 2008 to 2015. The second center contributed with 6 cases (1.7%) out of 343 patients from 2003 to 2015. Postoperative endoscopic follow-up revealed similar findings in all patients: A protruded polypoid appearing nodule situated in the center of the ESD scar surrounded by convergence of folds. Biopsies samples were taken from PNS, and histological assessment revealed in all cases regenerative and hyperplastic tissue, without recurrent tumor or dysplasia. Primary neoplastic lesions were located in the antrum in 13 patients and in the angle in one patient. PNS did not develop in any patient after ESD undertaken for tumors located in the corpus, fundus or cardia. All patients have been

  6. Noninvasive electrocardiographic imaging of chronic myocardial infarct scar§

    PubMed Central

    Horáček, B. Milan; Wang, Linwei; Dawoud, Fady; Xu, Jingjia; Sapp, John L.

    2015-01-01

    Background Myocardial infarction (MI) scar constitutes a substrate for ventricular tachycardia (VT), and an accurate delineation of infarct scar may help to identify reentrant circuits and thus facilitate catheter ablation. One of the recent advancements in characterization of a VT substrate is its volumetric delineation within the ventricular wall by noninvasive electrocardiographic imaging. This paper compares, in four specific cases, epicardial and volumetric inverse solutions, using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with late gadolinium enhancement as a gold standard. Methods For patients with chronic MI, who presented at Glasgow Western Infirmary, delayed-enhancement MRI and 120-lead body surface potential mapping (BSPM) data were acquired and 4 selected cases were later made available to a wider community as part of the 2007 PhysioNet/Computers in Cardiology Challenge. These data were used to perform patient-specific inverse solutions for epicardial electrograms and morphology-based criteria were applied to delineate infarct scar on the epicardial surface. Later, the Rochester group analyzed the same data by means of a novel inverse solution for reconstructing intramural transmembrane potentials, to delineate infarct scar in three dimensions. Comparison of the performance of three specific inverse-solution algorithms is presented here, using scores based on the 17-segment ventricular division scheme recommended by the American Heart Association. Results The noninvasive methods delineating infarct scar as three-dimensional (3D) intramural distribution of transmembrane action potentials outperform estimates providing scar delineation on the epicardial surface in all scores used for comparison. In particular, the extent of infarct scar (its percentage mass relative to the total ventricular mass) is rendered more accurately by the 3D estimate. Moreover, the volumetric rendition of scar border provides better clues to potential targets for catheter ablation

  7. Drought and Burn Scars in Southeastern Australia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    More than 2 million acres were consumed by hundreds of fires between December 2002 and February 2003 in southeastern Australia's national parks, forests, foothills and city suburbs. These images were acquired on February 14, 2002 (left) and February 17, 2003 (right) by the Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR) instrument onboard NASA's Terra satellite. The year 2002 was one of Australia's hottest and driest on record, and the acreage burnt during the summer 2002-2003 fire season in Victoria, the Australian Capital Territory and southern New South Wales, is the largest since 1938-1939, when more than 3 million acres were scorched.

    The extent of the burnt area and the dry conditions as of February 2003 are indicated by these contrasting false-color views. Both image panels display data from the near-infrared, red and blue spectral bands of MISR's downward-viewing (nadir) camera, as red, green and blue, respectively. This display technique causes healthy vegetation to appear red and burnt areas to show as dark brown. The data displayed from the two dates were processed identically to preserve relative brightness variations. Vegetation changes related to the dry conditions (not related to the brown burn scars) are also indicated in the February 2003 panel, where many previously red areas exhibit instead the pale yellow-brown of the underlying soils and geology. Significant reduction in the surface area of several large and important water bodies are also apparent. The diminished extent of Lake Hume (along the left-hand edge) in the later date provides a good example.

    The Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer observes the daylit Earth continuously and every 9 days views the entire globe between 82 degrees north and 82 degrees south latitude. These data products were generated from a portion of the imagery acquired during Terra orbits 14999 and 16858. The panels cover an area of about 208 kilometers x 286 kilometers, and utilize data from blocks 118 to

  8. The Living Scar – Cardiac Fibroblasts and the Injured Heart

    PubMed Central

    Rog-Zielinska, Eva A; Norris, Russell A; Kohl, Peter; Markwald, Roger

    2015-01-01

    Cardiac scars, often perceived as “dead” tissue, are very much alive, with heterocellular activity ensuring the maintenance of structural and mechanical integrity following heart injury. To form a scar, non-myocytes such as fibroblasts, proliferate and are recruited from intra- and extra-cardiac sources. Fibroblasts perform important autocrine and paracrine signalling functions. They also establish mechanical and, as is increasingly evident, electrical junctions with other cells. While fibroblasts were previously thought to act simply as electrical insulators, they may be electrically connected among themselves and, under certain circumstances, to other cells, including cardiomyocytes. A better understanding of these interactions will help target scar structure and function and facilitate the development of novel therapies aimed at modifying scar properties for patient benefit. This review explores available insight and recent concepts on fibroblast integration in the heart, and highlights potential avenues for harnessing their roles to optimise scar function following heart injury such as infarction, and therapeutic interventions such as ablation. PMID:26776094

  9. Closure of supporting cell scar formations requires dynamic actin mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Hordichok, Andrew J.; Steyger, Peter S.

    2007-01-01

    In many vertebrate inner ear sensory epithelia, dying sensory hair cells are extruded, and the apices of surrounding supporting cells converge to re-seal the epithelial barrier between the electrochemically-distinct endolymph and perilymph. These cellular mechanisms remain poorly understood. Dynamic microtubular mechanisms have been proposed for hair cell extrusion; while contractile actomyosin-based mechanisms are required for cellular extrusion and closure in epithelial monolayers. The hypothesis that cytoskeletal mechanisms are required for hair cell extrusion and supporting cell scar formation was tested using bullfrog saccules incubated with gentamicin (6 hours), and allowed to recover (18 hours). Explants were then fixed, labeled for actin and cytokeratins, and viewed with confocal microscopy. To block dynamic cytoskeletal processes, disruption agents for microtubules (colchicine, paclitaxel) myosin (Y-27632, ML-9) or actin (cytochalasin D, latrunculin A) were added during treatment and recovery. Microtubule disruption agents had no effect on hair cell extrusion or supporting cell scar formation. Myosin disruption agents appeared to slow down scar formation but not hair cell extrusion. Actin disruption agents blocked scar formation, and largely prevented hair cell extrusion. These data suggest that actin-based cytoskeletal processes are required for hair cell extrusion and supporting cell scar formation in bullfrog saccules. PMID:17716843

  10. The impact of Pfannenstiel scars on TRAM flap complications.

    PubMed

    Dayhim, Fariba; Wilkins, Edwin G

    2004-11-01

    For the past two decades, the transverse rectus abdominis musculocutaneous (TRAM) flap has been a mainstay of postmastectomy breast reconstruction. Because the flap depends on musculocutaneous perforating vessels from the rectus muscle for survival, some authors have raised concerns about increased risks of TRAM flap loss in patients with scars from previous abdominal surgeries, particularly those with Pfannenstiel scars. To assess the effects of Pfannenstiel scars on complication rates, we retrospectively evaluated the inpatient and outpatient records of 241 patients undergoing TRAM reconstruction in a single institution over an 11-year period. Of these patients, 51 had previous Pfannenstiel scars. while 190 did not. Controlling for potential confounding variables (body mass index and timing of reconstruction), logistic regressions found no significant differences between the Pfannenstiel and nonPfannenstiel cohorts in the rate of flap loss (15.7% and 20%, respectively; P = 0.376) or in the incidence of postoperative abdominal donor site laxity (17.6% and 12.1%, respectively; P= 0.361). Within the Pfannenstiel group, the type of TRAM reconstruction (ie, pedicle versus free flaps) did not have a significant effect on complication rates. We conclude that previous concerns over the impact of preexisting Pfannenstiel scars on TRAM flap complications are unfounded.

  11. Computational Representations of Myocardial Infarct Scars and Implications for Arrhythmogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Connolly, Adam J.; Bishop, Martin J.

    2016-01-01

    Image-based computational modeling is becoming an increasingly used clinical tool to provide insight into the mechanisms of reentrant arrhythmias. In the context of ischemic heart disease, faithful representation of the electrophysiological properties of the infarct region within models is essential, due to the scars known for arrhythmic properties. Here, we review the different computational representations of the infarcted region, summarizing the experimental measurements upon which they are based. We then focus on the two most common representations of the scar core (complete insulator or electrically passive tissue) and perform simulations of electrical propagation around idealized infarct geometries. Our simulations highlight significant differences in action potential duration and focal effective refractory period (ERP) around the scar, driven by differences in electrotonic loading, depending on the choice of scar representation. Finally, a novel mechanism for arrhythmia induction, following a focal ectopic beat, is demonstrated, which relies on localized gradients in ERP directly caused by the electrotonic sink effects of the neighboring passive scar. PMID:27486348

  12. Understanding the NG2 Glial Scar after Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Hackett, Amber R.; Lee, Jae K.

    2016-01-01

    NG2 cells, also known as oligodendrocyte progenitor cells, are located throughout the central nervous system and serve as a pool of progenitors to differentiate into oligodendrocytes. In response to spinal cord injury (SCI), NG2 cells increase their proliferation and differentiation into remyelinating oligodendrocytes. While astrocytes are typically associated with being the major cell type in the glial scar, many NG2 cells also accumulate within the glial scar but their function remains poorly understood. Similar to astrocytes, these cells hypertrophy, upregulate expression of chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans, inhibit axon regeneration, contribute to the glial-fibrotic scar border, and some even differentiate into astrocytes. Whether NG2 cells also have a role in other astrocyte functions, such as preventing the spread of infiltrating leukocytes and expression of inflammatory cytokines, is not yet known. Thus, NG2 cells are not only important for remyelination after SCI but are also a major component of the glial scar with functions that overlap with astrocytes in this region. In this review, we describe the signaling pathways important for the proliferation and differentiation of NG2 cells, as well as the role of NG2 cells in scar formation and tissue repair. PMID:27895617

  13. Use of a non-contact 3D digitiser to measure the volume of keloid scars: a useful tool for scar assessment.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Ben; McGrouther, D Angus; Bayat, Ardeshir

    2007-01-01

    Keloid scars often fail to respond to treatment, so research into new therapeutic regimes is important. However, research is limited by a scarcity of reliable, objective scar assessment tools. The volume of a keloid scar should decrease with successful treatment. This study demonstrates the use of a non-contact 3D digitiser to measure digitally the volume of a keloid scar. The scanner was used to scan 62 keloid scars and one fine-line normal scar. The scan took approximately 9s to complete. The volume was measured using 3D reverse modelling software. A previously validated scar assessment scale was used to score the scars according to their physical parameters. A significant correlation was found between volume and the scar score (Pearson's r=0.627, p<0.001). Linear regression was also statistically significant (p<0.001, R(2)=0.44). Therefore it was possible to predict the scar score from the measured volume. This technique could allow monitoring of a patient on treatment, or comparison of treatments in a research setting. It overcomes previous problems with the measurement of scar volume as it is quantitatively objective and well-tolerated.

  14. The Modified POSAS: A Novel Approach to Defining Pathologic and Non-Pathologic Scarring

    PubMed Central

    Fearmonti, Regina; Bond, Jennifer; Erdmann, Detlev; Levin, L. Scott; Pizzo, Salvatore V; Levinson, Howard

    2010-01-01

    Background Scarring is a highly prevalent and multifactorial process, yet no studies to date have attempted to distinguish pathologic from non-pathologic scarring. Methods This article defines and proposes methods of classifying pathologic scarring as it pertains to clinical presentation. Results We propose a new scar scale that incorporates pain and functional impairment. Conclusion The modified POSAS scar assessment scale is the first of its kind to factor in the functional deficits, pain and pruritus of scarring into measurements of associated morbidity. This has great potential in evaluating patient response to treatment and analyzing clinical outcomes. PMID:21200219

  15. The Scarbase Duo(®): Intra-rater and inter-rater reliability and validity of a compact dual scar assessment tool.

    PubMed

    Fell, Matthew; Meirte, Jill; Anthonissen, Mieke; Maertens, Koen; Pleat, Jonathon; Moortgat, Peter

    2016-03-01

    Objective scar assessment tools were designed to help identify problematic scars and direct clinical management. Their use has been restricted by their measurement of a single scar property and the bulky size of equipment. The Scarbase Duo(®) was designed to assess both trans-epidermal water loss (TEWL) and colour of a burn scar whilst being compact and easy to use. Twenty patients with a burn scar were recruited and measurements taken using the Scarbase Duo(®) by two observers. The Scarbase Duo(®) measures TEWL via an open-chamber system and undertakes colorimetry via narrow-band spectrophotometry, producing values for relative erythema and melanin pigmentation. Validity was assessed by comparing the Scarbase Duo(®) against the Dermalab(®) and the Minolta Chromameter(®) respectively for TEWL and colorimetry measurements. The intra-class correlation coefficient (ICC) was used to assess reliability with standard error of measurement (SEM) used to assess reproducibility of measurements. The Pearson correlation coefficient (r) was used to assess the convergent validity. The Scarbase Duo(®) TEWL mode had excellent reliability when used on scars for both intra- (ICC=0.95) and inter-rater (ICC=0.96) measurements with moderate SEM values. The erythema component of the colorimetry mode showed good reliability for use on scars for both intra-(ICC=0.81) and inter-rater (ICC=0.83) measurements with low SEM values. Pigmentation values showed excellent reliability on scar tissue for both intra- (ICC=0.97) and inter-rater (ICC=0.97) with moderate SEM values. The Scarbase Duo(®) TEWL function had excellent correlation with the Dermalab(®) (r=0.93) whilst the colorimetry erythema value had moderate correlation with the Minolta Chromameter (r=0.72). The Scarbase Duo(®) is a reliable and objective scar assessment tool, which is specifically designed for burn scars. However, for clinical use, standardised measurement conditions are recommended.

  16. Chemical peels in active acne and acne scars.

    PubMed

    Kontochristopoulos, Georgios; Platsidaki, Eftychia

    Chemical peeling is a widely used procedure in the management of acne and acne scars. It causes controlled destruction of a part of or the entire epidermis, with or without the dermis, leading to exfoliation and removal of superficial lesions, followed by regeneration of new epidermal and dermal tissues. The most frequently used peeling agents are salicylic acid, glycolic acid, pyruvic acid, lactic acid, mandelic acid, Jessner solution, trichloroacetic acid, and phenol. The appropriate peel is chosen based on the patient's skin type, acne activity, and type of acne scars. Combination peels minimize side effects. In acne scars, chemical peels may be combined with other procedures to achieve better clinical results. A series of chemical peels can lead to significant improvement over a short period, leading to patient satisfaction and maintenance of clinical results. © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. A multidisciplinary approach to scars: a narrative review

    PubMed Central

    Zanier, Emiliano; Bordoni, Bruno

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to carry out a narrative review regarding the approach to scars through complementary and alternative medicine focusing on osteopathy, naturopathy, and other minor methods and traditional rehabilitative medicines, such as physiotherapy and manual therapies. We analyzed the existing literature regarding the possible influences of techniques relaxing the diaphragm – both manual and psychophysical relaxing techniques – and the consequent local response to events leading to scar tissue healing. The objective of the study is to become a useful instrument of knowledge for those manual therapists and professionals who deal with patients affected by discontinuity of the skin surface due to trauma or surgery. This article also intends to stimulate research in order to find and propose new methods of scar treatment, taking into consideration the information gained so far from other complementary and alternative disciplines. PMID:26316774

  18. The SCAR Astronomy & Astrophysics from Antarctica Scientific Research Programme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Storey, John W. V.; Abe, Lyu; Andersen, Michael; Anderson, Philip; Burton, Michael; Cui, Xiangqun; Ichikawa, Takashi; Karle, Albrecht; Lloyd, James; Masi, Silvia; Steinbring, Eric; Travouillon, Tony; Tuthill, Peter; Zhou, HongYang

    2013-01-01

    SCAR, the Scientific Committee on Antarctic Research, is, like the IAU, a committee of ICSU, the International Council for Science. For over 30 years, SCAR has provided scientific advice to the Antarctic Treaty System and made numerous recommendations on a variety of matters. In 2010, Astronomy and Astrophysics from Antarctica was recognized as one of SCAR's five Scientific Research Programs. Broadly stated, the objectives of Astronomy & Astrophysics from Antarctica are to coordinate astronomical activities in Antarctica in a way that ensures the best possible outcomes from international investment in Antarctic astronomy, and maximizes the opportunities for productive interaction with other disciplines. There are four Working Groups, dealing with site testing, Arctic astronomy, science goals, and major new facilities. Membership of the Working Groups is open to any professional working in astronomy or a related field.

  19. Reduced scar maturation and contractility lead to exaggerated left ventricular dilation after myocardial infarction in mice lacking AMPKα1.

    PubMed

    Noppe, Gauthier; Dufeys, Cécile; Buchlin, Patricia; Marquet, Nicolas; Castanares-Zapatero, Diego; Balteau, Magali; Hermida, Nerea; Bouzin, Caroline; Esfahani, Hrag; Viollet, Benoit; Bertrand, Luc; Balligand, Jean-Luc; Vanoverschelde, Jean-Louis; Beauloye, Christophe; Horman, Sandrine

    2014-09-01

    Cardiac fibroblasts (CF) are crucial in left ventricular (LV) healing and remodeling after myocardial infarction (MI). They are typically activated into myofibroblasts that express alpha-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) microfilaments and contribute to the formation of contractile and mature collagen scars that minimize the adverse dilatation of infarcted areas. CF predominantly express the α1 catalytic subunit of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPKα1), while AMPKα2 is the major catalytic isoform in cardiomyocytes. AMPKα2 is known to protect the heart by preserving the energy charge of cardiac myocytes during injury, but whether AMPKα1 interferes with maladaptative heart responses remains unexplored. In this study, we investigated the role of AMPKα1 in modulating LV dilatation and CF fibrosis during post-MI remodeling. AMPKα1 knockout (KO) and wild type (WT) mice were subjected to permanent ligation of the left anterior descending coronary artery. The absence of AMPKα1 was associated with increased CF proliferation in infarcted areas, while expression of the myodifferentiation marker α-SMA was decreased. Faulty maturation of myofibroblasts might derive from severe down-regulation of the non-canonical transforming growth factor-beta1/p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (TGF-β1/p38 MAPK) pathway in KO infarcts. In addition, lysyl oxidase (LOX) protein expression was dramatically reduced in the scar of KO hearts. Although infarct size was similar in AMPK-KO and WT hearts subjected to MI, these changes resulted in compromised scar contractility, defective scar collagen maturation, and exacerbated adverse remodeling, as indicated by increased LV diastolic dimension 30days after MI. Our data genetically demonstrate the centrality of AMPKα1 in post-MI scar formation and highlight the specificity of this catalytic isoform in cardiac fibroblast/myofibroblast biology.

  20. Recontouring, resurfacing, and scar revision in skin cancer reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Brenner, Michael J; Perro, Christopher A

    2009-08-01

    Residual disfigurement is a common problem for patients who have undergone skin cancer reconstruction. Restoring form and function in these patients is an artistic and technical endeavor. The efficacy of surgical scar revision, dermabrasion, chemical peels, and laser resurfacing is predicated upon the skin's innate ability to regenerate over time in response to mechanical, chemical, and thermal or ablative stresses. The patient and surgeon should be accepting of a process that is often gradual and may proceed in stages. Achieving proficiency with the secondary procedures for improving scars and local flaps may allow the motivated surgeon to mold an initially passable surgical result into an excellent one.

  1. Standardized approach for imaging and measuring Cesarean section scars using ultrasonography.

    PubMed

    Naji, O; Abdallah, Y; Bij De Vaate, A J; Smith, A; Pexsters, A; Stalder, C; McIndoe, A; Ghaem-Maghami, S; Lees, C; Brölmann, H A M; Huirne, J A F; Timmerman, D; Bourne, T

    2012-03-01

    Incomplete healing of the scar is a recognized sequel of Cesarean section (CS) and may be associated with complications in later pregnancies. These complications can include scar pregnancy, a morbidly adherent placenta, scar dehiscence or rupture. To date there is uncertainty relating to the factors that lead to poor scar healing and how to recognize it. In recent years, there has been an increase in studies using ultrasound that describe scars as deficient, or poorly, incompletely or inadequately healed with few data to associate the morphology of the scar with the functional integrity of the lower segment of the uterus. There have been multiple attempts to describe CS scars using ultrasonography. Different terminology, methods and results have been reported, yet there is still no consensus regarding the prevalence, clinical significance or most appropriate method to describe the appearances of these scars. Developing a test that can predict the likelihood of women having problems associated with a CS scar is becoming increasingly important. On the other hand, understanding whether the ultrasound appearances of the scar can tell us anything about its integrity is not well supported by the research evidence. In this article we present an overview of ultrasound-based definitions and methods used to describe CS scars. We also present information relating to the performance of alternative techniques used to evaluate CS scars. Having examined the current evidence we suggest a standardized approach to describe CS scars using ultrasound so that future studies can be meaningfully compared.

  2. Scar-free cutaneous wound healing in the leopard gecko, Eublepharis macularius.

    PubMed

    Peacock, Hanna M; Gilbert, Emily A B; Vickaryous, Matthew K

    2015-11-01

    Cutaneous wounds heal with two possible outcomes: scarification or near-perfect integumentary restoration. Whereas scar formation has been intensively investigated, less is known about the tissue-level events characterising wounds that spontaneously heal scar-free, particularly in non-foetal amniotes. Here, a spatiotemporal investigation of scar-free cutaneous wound healing following full-thickness excisional biopsies to the tail and body of leopard geckos (Eublepharis macularius) is provided. All injuries healed without scarring. Cutaneous repair involves the development of a cell-rich aggregate within the wound bed, similar to scarring wounds. Unlike scar formation, scar-free healing involves a more rapid closure of the wound epithelium, and a delay in blood vessel development and collagen deposition within the wound bed. It was found that, while granulation tissue of scarring wounds is hypervascular, scar-free wound healing conspicuously does not involve a period of exuberant blood vessel formation. In addition, during scar-free wound healing the newly formed blood vessels are typically perivascular cell-supported. Immunohistochemistry revealed widespread expression of both the pro-angiogenic factor vascular endothelial growth factor A and the anti-angiogenic factor thrombospondin-1 within the healing wound. It was found that scar-free wound healing is an intrinsic property of leopard gecko integument, and involves a modulation of the cutaneous scar repair program. This proportional revascularisation is an important factor in scar-free wound healing.

  3. Sequential treatment with intradermal incision (intracision) and 2,940-nm Er:YAG laser for chicken pox scars.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sang Ju; Kim, Young Koo; Choi, Sun Young; Park, Kui Young; Seo, Seong Jun

    2014-01-01

    Boxcar scars, such as chicken pox scars, are round to oval depressions with sharply defined vertical edges. Subcision is a simple and safe procedure for treatment of atrophic and depressed scars, but boxcar scars are generally not eliminated by subcision. Intradermal incision technique (intracision) can treat chicken pox scars by untethering fibrotic strands, raising collagen synthesis, and having additional intradermal blood pocket formation. We have found that chicken pox scars further improve when intracision is followed by laser skin resurfacing.

  4. In vivo assessment of human burn scars through automated quantification of vascularity using optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liew, Yih Miin; McLaughlin, Robert A.; Gong, Peijun; Wood, Fiona M.; Sampson, David D.

    2013-06-01

    In scars arising from burns, objective assessment of vascularity is important in the early identification of pathological scarring, and in the assessment of progression and treatment response. We demonstrate the first clinical assessment and automated quantification of vascularity in cutaneous burn scars of human patients in vivo that uses optical coherence tomography (OCT). Scar microvasculature was delineated in three-dimensional OCT images using speckle decorrelation. The diameter and area density of blood vessels were automatically quantified. A substantial increase was observed in the measured density of vasculature in hypertrophic scar tissues (38%) when compared against normal, unscarred skin (22%). A proliferation of larger vessels (diameter≥100 μm) was revealed in hypertrophic scarring, which was absent from normal scars and normal skin over the investigated physical depth range of 600 μm. This study establishes the feasibility of this methodology as a means of clinical monitoring of scar progression.

  5. Chromatic analysis of burn scar based on ANN by using photoelectrical technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan, Baikun; Qi, Hongzhi; Ming, Dong; Zhang, Mingjian; Wang, Qifang

    2005-01-01

    In this paper a novel method for the chromatic analysis of burn scar is proposed. The aim of the algorithm is to evaluate the curative effect and set up the treatment plan pertinently, because the scar color is an impersonal parameter reflects the degree of scar hypertrophy. The method is based on artificial neural network (ANN) by using photoelectrical technique, and composed of three main parts: firstly capture the digital color images of the burn scar using CCD camera, then change the RGB color data of the burn scar into that of HSB color space and emend it using ANN, lastly judge the degree of burn scar hypertrophy by chromatic analysis using ANN again. The experimental results were good conformed to the degrees of scar hypertrophy given by clinical evaluations. It suggests that the chromatic analysis technique of the burn scar is valuable for further study and apply to the clinical engineering.

  6. A SCAR MOLECULAR MARKER SPECIFICALLY RELATED TO THE FEMALE GAMETOPHYTES OF SACCHARINA (LAMINARIA) JAPONICA (PHAEOPHYTA)(1).

    PubMed

    Liu, Y-S; Li, L-H; Wu, W-K; Zhou, Z-G

    2009-08-01

    PCR amplification was employed to identify female or male gametophyte associated markers in Saccharina japonica (Aresch.) C. E. Lane, C. Mayes et G. W. Saunders (=Laminaria japonica Aresch.). One pair of the primers, P5, was screened from five pairs designed based on a specific sequence (GenBank accession no. AB069714) of Marchantia polymorpha Y chromosome, resulting in a differential band ∼500 bp in size between female and male gametophytes of Rongfu strain of S. japonica. According to the SCAR (sequence-characterized amplified regions) strategies, one pair of primers, P51, was designed on the basis of the sequence of this band that was only present in female gametophytes. A SCAR marker, designated FRML-494 (494-bp Female-Related Marker of S. japonica, GenBank accession no. EU931619), was developed successfully by PCR amplification using the designed P51 primer pair. The SCAR marker was verified to be present only in female gametophytes of another variety 901 of this kelp that was a hybrid between S. japonica as paternal and S. longissima (Miyabe) C. E. Lane, C. Mayes, Druehl et G. W. Saunders (=Laminaria longissima Miyabe) as maternal, suggesting that the FRML-494 marker was specifically related to female gametophytes of the genus. This marker is the first molecular tool reported for sex identification in kelps. This study was beneficial for identifying gametophyte gender during vegetative growth and for judging whether the monogenetic sporophytes came from exclusive male or female gametophytes, as well as for further research on sex determination at the molecular level in kelps.

  7. The evolution of laser surgery for acne and other scarring processes.

    PubMed

    Morton, Laurel M

    2014-12-01

    The treatment of acne scars is an important part of a laser specialist's practice. For the last 20 years, the technology available for this application has progressed from nonablative to ablative and eventually to fractional lasers that are effective for a range of scar types. Although patients with mild to severe acne scarring have long been good laser candidates, we are beginning to understand the use of lasers for severe traumatic scars which can be disfiguring and functionally limiting in nature.

  8. 8. VIEW OF BASIN BEHIND DAM, SHOWING SCARS FROM EARTH ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. VIEW OF BASIN BEHIND DAM, SHOWING SCARS FROM EARTH MOVING TO CONSTRUCT DAM, LOOKING NORTH - High Mountain Dams in Upalco Unit, East Timothy Lake Dam, Ashley National Forest, 8.4 miles North of Swift Creek Campground, Mountain Home, Duchesne County, UT

  9. 4. VIEW OF DOWNSTREAM FACE OF DAM, WITH SCARS FROM ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. VIEW OF DOWNSTREAM FACE OF DAM, WITH SCARS FROM EARTH MOVING TO CONSTRUCT DAM IN FOREGROUND, LOOKING NORTHWEST - High Mountain Dams in Upalco Unit, Five Point Lake Dam, Ashley National Forest, 12 miles Northwest of Swift Creek Campground, Mountain Home, Duchesne County, UT

  10. 9. VIEW OF BASIN BEHIND DAM, SHOWING SCARS FROM EARTH ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. VIEW OF BASIN BEHIND DAM, SHOWING SCARS FROM EARTH MOVING TO CONSTRUCT DAM, LOOKING EAST - High Mountain Dams in Upalco Unit, East Timothy Lake Dam, Ashley National Forest, 8.4 miles North of Swift Creek Campground, Mountain Home, Duchesne County, UT

  11. Biologicals and Fetal Cell Therapy for Wound and Scar Management

    PubMed Central

    Hirt-Burri, Nathalie; Ramelet, Albert-Adrien; Raffoul, Wassim; de Buys Roessingh, Anthony; Scaletta, Corinne; Pioletti, Dominique; Applegate, Lee Ann

    2011-01-01

    Few biopharmaceutical preparations developed from biologicals are available for tissue regeneration and scar management. When developing biological treatments with cellular therapy, selection of cell types and establishment of consistent cell banks are crucial steps in whole-cell bioprocessing. Various cell types have been used in treatment of wounds to reduce scar to date including autolog and allogenic skin cells, platelets, placenta, and amniotic extracts. Experience with fetal cells show that they may provide an interesting cell choice due to facility of outscaling and known properties for wound healing without scar. Differential gene profiling has helped to point to potential indicators of repair which include cell adhesion, extracellular matrix, cytokines, growth factors, and development. Safety has been evidenced in Phase I and II clinical fetal cell use for burn and wound treatments with different cell delivery systems. We present herein that fetal cells present technical and therapeutic advantages compared to other cell types for effective cell-based therapy for wound and scar management. PMID:22363853

  12. Prediction of scar integrity and vaginal birth after caesarean delivery.

    PubMed

    Valentin, Lil

    2013-04-01

    A statistically significant association with uterine rupture during a trial of labour after caesarean delivery was found in at least two studies for the following variables: inter-delivery interval (higher risk with short interval), birth weight (higher risk if 4000 g or over), induction of labour (higher risk), oxytocin dose (higher risk with higher doses), and previous vaginal delivery (lower risk). However, no clinically useful risk estimation model that includes clinical variables has been published. A thin lower uterine segment at 35-40 weeks, as measured by ultrasound in women with a caesarean hysterotomy scar, increases the risk of uterine rupture or dehiscence. No cut-off for lower uterine segment thickness, however, can be suggested because of study heterogeneity, and because prospective validation is lacking. Large caesarean hysterotomy scar defects in non-pregnant women seen at ultrasound examination increase the risk of uterine rupture or dehiscence in subsequent pregnancy, but the strength of the association is unknown. To sum up, we currently lack a method that can provide a reliable estimate of the risk of uterine rupture or dehiscence during a trial of labour in women with caesarean hysterotomy scar(s).

  13. Histologic features of alopecias: part II: scarring alopecias.

    PubMed

    Bernárdez, C; Molina-Ruiz, A M; Requena, L

    2015-05-01

    The diagnosis of disorders of the hair and scalp can generally be made on clinical grounds, but clinical signs are not always diagnostic and in some cases more invasive techniques, such as a biopsy, may be necessary. This 2-part article is a detailed review of the histologic features of the main types of alopecia based on the traditional classification of these disorders into 2 major groups: scarring and nonscarring alopecias. Scarring alopecias are disorders in which the hair follicle is replaced by fibrous scar tissue, a process that leads to permanent hair loss. In nonscarring alopecias, the follicles are preserved and hair growth can resume when the cause of the problem is eliminated. In the second part of this review, we describe the histologic features of the main forms of scarring alopecia. Since a close clinical-pathological correlation is essential for making a correct histopathologic diagnosis of alopecia, we also include a brief description of the clinical features of the principal forms of this disorder.

  14. Basal Cell Carcinoma Arising in a Breast Augmentation Scar.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Lisa R; Cresce, Nicole D; Russell, Mark A

    2017-04-01

    We report a case of a 46-year-old female who presented with a persistent lesion on the inferior right breast. The lesion was located within the scar from a breast augmentation procedure 12 years ago. The lesion had been treated as several conditions with no improvement. Biopsy revealed a superficial and nodular basal cell carcinoma, and the lesion was successfully removed with Mohs micrographic surgery. Basal cell carcinoma arising in a surgical scar is exceedingly rare with only 13 reported cases to date. This is the first reported case of basal cell carcinoma arising in a breast augmentation scar. We emphasize the importance of biopsy for suspicious lesions or those refractory to treatment, particularly those lesions that form within a scar. Level of Evidence V This journal requires that authors assign a level of evidence to each article. For a full description of these Evidence-Based Medicine ratings, please refer to the Table of Contents or the online Instructions to Authors www.springer.com/00266 .

  15. The role of apelin in central cardiovascular regulation in rats with post-infarct heart failure maintained on a normal fat or high fat diet.

    PubMed

    Czarzasta, Katarzyna; Cudnoch-Jedrzejewska, Agnieszka; Szczepanska-Sadowska, Ewa; Fus, Lukasz; Puchalska, Liana; Gondek, Agata; Dobruch, Jakub; Gomolka, Ryszard; Wrzesien, Robert; Zera, Tymoteusz; Gornicka, Barbara; Kuch, Marek

    2016-10-01

    Based on the available literature, it can be assumed that in cases of post-infarct heart failure (HF) and obesity, a significant change in the central regulation of the cardiovascular system takes place with, among others, the involvement of the apelinergic system. The main objective of the present study was to clarify the role of apelin-13 in the central regulation of the cardiovascular system in Sprague Dawley rats with HF or sham operated (SO) and fed on a normal fat (NFD) or a high fat diet (HFD). The study was divided into two parts: Part I, hemodynamic studies; and Part II, biochemical and molecular studies. The animals were subjected to the following research procedures. Part I and II: feeding NFD or HFD; experimental induction of HF or SO; Part I: intracerebroventricular (ICV) infusion of the examined substances, monitoring of mean arterial blood pressure (MABP) and heart rate (HR); Part II: venous blood and tissue samples collected. ICV infusion of apelin-13 caused significantly higher changes in ΔMABP in the SO NFD group. No changes were noted in ΔHR in any of the studied groups. Apelin and apelin receptor (APJ) mRNA expression in the brain and adipose tissues was higher in the HF rats. HFD causes significant increase in expression of apelin and APJ mRNA in the left ventricle. In conclusion, HF and HFD appear to play an important role in modifying the activity of the central apelinergic system and significant changes in mRNA expression of apelin and APJ receptor.

  16. Post-infarct treatment with [Pyr(1)]apelin-13 improves myocardial function by increasing neovascularization and overexpression of angiogenic growth factors in rats.

    PubMed

    Azizi, Yaser; Faghihi, Mahdieh; Imani, Alireza; Roghani, Mehrdad; Zekri, Ali; Mobasheri, Maryam Beigom; Rastgar, Tayebeh; Moghimian, Maryam

    2015-08-15

    Ischemic heart disease is the leading cause of mortality in the world. Angiogenesis is important for cardiac repair after myocardial infarction (MI) as restores blood supply to the ischemic myocardium and preserves cardiac function. Apelin is a peptide that has been recently shown to potentiate angiogenesis. The aim of this study was to investigate angiogenic effects of [Pyr(1)]apelin-13 in the rat model of post-MI. Male Wistar rats (n=36) were randomly divided into three groups: (1) sham (2) MI and (3) MI treated with [Pyr(1)]apelin-13 (MI+Apel). MI animals were subjected to 30min left anterior descending coronary artery (LAD) ligation and 14 days of reperfusion. Twenty-four hours after LAD ligation, [Pyr(1)]apelin-13 (10nmol/kg/day) was administered i.p. for 5 days. Hemodynamic functions by catheter introduced into the left ventricle (LV), myocardial fibrosis by Masson׳s trichrome staining, gene expression of vascular endothelial growth factor-A (VEGFA), VEGF receptor-2 (Kdr), Ang-1 (angiopoietin-1), Tie2 (tyrosine kinase with immunoglobulin and epidermal growth factor homology domains 2) and eNOS by Real-time polymerase chain reaction (Real-Time PCR) and myocardial angiogenesis by CD31 imunostaining were assessed at day 14 post-MI. Post-infarct treatment with [Pyr(1)]apelin-13 improved LV function and decreased myocardial fibrosis. [Pyr(1)]apelin-13 treatment led to a significant increase in the expression of VEGFA, Kdr, Ang-1, Tie2 and eNOS. Further, treatment with [Pyr(1)]apelin-13 promoted capillary density. [Pyr(1)]apelin-13 has angiogenic and anti-fibrotic activity via formation of new blood vessels and overexpression of VEGFA, Kdr, Ang-1, Tie2 and eNOS in the infarcted myocardium which could in turn repair myocardium and improve LV function.

  17. Noradrenaline-induced increases in calcium and tension in skeletal muscle conductance and resistance arteries from rats with post-infarction heart failure.

    PubMed

    Trautner, Simon; Amtorp, Ole; Boesgaard, Soren; Andersen, Claus B; Galbo, Henrik; Haunsoe, Stig; Sheykhzade, Majid

    2006-05-10

    We tested the hypothesis that arterial reactivity to noradrenaline is augmented in congestive heart failure (CHF), which could contribute to the deleterious changes in peripheral vascular resistance and compliance in this condition. From male Wistar rats with post-infarction CHF and sham-operated rats, skeletal muscle conductance and resistance arteries (mean lumen diameters: 514 and 186 microm) were isolated and mounted on wire myographs, and wall tension was recorded in response to cumulative application of acetylcholine and noradrenaline to the vessel segments. In a subset of experiments, wall tension and cytosolic free calcium ion concentration [Ca(2+)](i) were recorded simultaneously during noradrenaline application, using wire myography and the FURA-2 technique. No significant differences were found in the arterial baseline levels of [Ca(2+)](i) or tension between CHF and sham rats. In the resistance arteries of CHF rats, the noradrenaline-induced increases in [Ca(2+)](i) were significantly enhanced (P=0.003). Despite the augmented [Ca(2+)](i) levels, the tension responses to noradrenaline were unaltered in these arteries. In the conductance arteries, there were no significant differences in noradrenaline-induced [Ca(2+)](i) or tension responses between CHF and control rats. CHF did not alter vascular morphology or change vascular relaxations to acetylcholine in either type of artery. In conclusion, these results do not support the contention that arterial reactivity to noradrenaline is augmented in the skeletal muscle vascular bed in CHF. On the contrary, the unchanged contractile responsiveness in the resistance arteries despite the enhanced levels of [Ca(2+)](i) during noradrenaline application suggests that the contractile function of these vessels is compromised in CHF. Neither vascular remodeling, endothelial dysfunction nor changes in baseline vascular tone could be demonstrated in the skeletal muscle vascular bed of this animal model of heart failure.

  18. Malignant Melanoma on a Thermal Burn Scar with an Interval of More Than 70 Years

    PubMed Central

    Uchida, Shusuke; Oiso, Naoki; Shiga, Kuriko; Narita, Tomohiko; Kawada, Akira

    2016-01-01

    Cases of malignant melanoma on thermal burn scars have occasionally been reported. We report a 78-year-old Japanese female with malignant melanoma on a thermal burn scar with an interval of more than 70 years. Our case reemphasizes the importance of regular examinations in persons with thermal burn scars. PMID:27721752

  19. Updated scar management practical guidelines: non-invasive and invasive measures.

    PubMed

    Monstrey, Stan; Middelkoop, Esther; Vranckx, Jan Jeroen; Bassetto, Franco; Ziegler, Ulrich E; Meaume, Sylvie; Téot, Luc

    2014-08-01

    Hypertrophic scars and keloids can be aesthetically displeasing and lead to severe psychosocial impairment. Many invasive and non-invasive options are available for the plastic (and any other) surgeon both to prevent and to treat abnormal scar formation. Recently, an updated set of practical evidence-based guidelines for the management of hypertrophic scars and keloids was developed by an international group of 24 experts from a wide range of specialities. An initial set of strategies to minimize the risk of scar formation is applicable to all types of scars and is indicated before, during and immediately after surgery. In addition to optimal surgical management, this includes measures to reduce skin tension, and to provide taping, hydration and ultraviolet (UV) protection of the early scar tissue. Silicone sheeting or gel is universally considered as the first-line prophylactic and treatment option for hypertrophic scars and keloids. The efficacy and safety of this gold-standard, non-invasive therapy has been demonstrated in many clinical studies. Other (more specialized) scar treatment options are available for high-risk patients and/or scars. Pressure garments may be indicated for more widespread scarring, especially after burns. At a later stage, more invasive or surgical procedures may be necessary for the correction of permanent unaesthetic scars and can be combined with adjuvant measures to achieve optimal outcomes. The choice of scar management measures for a particular patient should be based on the newly updated evidence-based recommendations taking individual patient and wound characteristics into consideration.

  20. 77 FR 2909 - Schedule for Rating Disabilities; Evaluation of Scars; Correction

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-20

    ... AFFAIRS 38 CFR Part 4 RIN 2900-AM55 Schedule for Rating Disabilities; Evaluation of Scars; Correction... clearly reflected VA's policies concerning the evaluation of scars. In the preamble of that document, VA... criteria for the evaluation of scars. In the DATES section of the rule document, we incorrectly stated...

  1. 77 FR 2910 - Schedule for Rating Disabilities; Evaluation of Scars; Correction

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-20

    ... AFFAIRS 38 CFR Part 4 RIN 2900-AM55 Schedule for Rating Disabilities; Evaluation of Scars; Correction... it more clearly reflected VA's policies concerning the evaluation of scars. In the preamble of that... addresses the Skin, 38 CFR 4.118, by revising the criteria for the evaluation of scars. In the dates...

  2. Save the skin and improve the scar: a simple technique to minimize the scar from a temporary stoma.

    PubMed

    Keating, John; Kelly, Erica Whineray; Hunt, Ian

    2003-10-01

    Reversal of a loop ileostomy is not infrequently associated with wound infection and delayed wound healing. This in turn may lead to a disappointing scar. A simple modification to the technique of stoma construction simplifies wound closure, reduces the rate of wound morbidity, and improves the cosmetic result.

  3. Health professionals' and consumers' opinion: what is considered important when rating burn scars from photographs?

    PubMed

    Simons, Megan; Tyack, Zephanie

    2011-01-01

    With advances in wound care technology, there is a trend toward patients undertaking specialist burns treatment in an outpatient capacity. Photographic scar evaluation is a part of this trend in some health services because it permits scar assessment by different health professionals, both within and across outpatient services, to assess the impact of scar management strategies. The aim of this study was to explore the parameters considered integral to scar assessment when completing photographic scar evaluation. First, opinions were sought from 38 burn health professionals in 2 tertiary pediatric hospitals who participated in focus groups where in-person and in-photograph scar rating were completed using three burn scar rating scales (modified Vancouver scar scale, Manchester scar scale, and patient and observer scar assessment scale) presented with a standard format and instructions. Second, 36 occupational therapists and physiotherapists from Australia and New Zealand completed questionnaires. Third, 10 healthcare consumers from 1 tertiary pediatric hospital participated in face-to-face or telephone interviews. Parameters believed to be assessed using photographic evaluation of burns scarring were vascularity, surface area, color, contour, height, and overall opinion. However, surface area was considered questionable as an indicator of scar maturity. These parameters mostly differ from those considered important in a burn scar outcome measure when rating scars in-person: height/thickness, vascularity, color, pliability, joint function, and patient/client opinion. A categorical scale with visual descriptors, as well as specific strategies to improve photographic technique, may go some way to addressing the perceived difficulty in rating these parameters using burn scar photographs.

  4. Use of makeup, hairstyles, glasses, and prosthetics as adjuncts to scar camouflage.

    PubMed

    Sidle, Douglas M; Decker, Jennifer R

    2011-08-01

    Scars after facial trauma or surgery can be a source of distress for patients, and facial plastic surgeons are frequently called upon to help manage them. Although no technique can remove a scar, numerous treatment modalities have been developed to improve facial scar appearance with varying levels of invasiveness. This article reviews techniques that camouflage scars without surgical intervention. Topical scar treatments, camouflage cosmetics, use of hairstyling and glasses, and facial prosthetics are discussed. In addition, professional counseling is provided on selection and application of topical cosmetics for use as part of an office practice.

  5. [Evaluation of Cepan Cream after 15 years of treatment of burn scars].

    PubMed

    Stozkowska, Wiesława

    2002-01-01

    Cepan Cream is used for the topical treatment of scars and keloids resulting from burns, post-operative scars, and contractures. Cepan Cream makes scars more elastic, softer and paler. Plant extracts, heparin and allantoin in Cepan act on the biochemical processes in the developing connective tissue, preventing the formation of hyperplastic scars. These active ingredients enhance swelling, softening and loosening of connective tissue. It exerts softening and smoothing action on indurated and hyperplastic scar tissue, improving collagen structure. It promotes tissue regeneration and reduces exuberant granulation. Cepan is well tolerated.

  6. Predictors of renal scar in children with urinary infection and vesicoureteral reflux.

    PubMed

    Soylu, Alper; Demir, Belde Kasap; Türkmen, Mehmet; Bekem, Ozlem; Saygi, Murat; Cakmakçi, Handan; Kavukçu, Salih

    2008-12-01

    We evaluated the predictors of renal scar in children with urinary tract infections (UTIs) having primary vesicoureteral reflux (VUR). Data of patients who were examined by dimercaptosuccinic acid (DMSA) scintigraphy between 1995 and 2005 were evaluated retrospectively. Gender, age, reflux grade, presence/development of scarring, breakthrough UTIs, and resolution of reflux, were recorded. The relation of gender, age and VUR grade to preformed scarring and the relation of gender, age, VUR grade, presence of preformed scarring, number of breakthrough UTIs and reflux resolution to new scarring were assessed. There were 138 patients [male/female (M/F) 53/85]. Multivariate analysis showed that male gender [odds ratio (OR) 2.5], age > or = 27 months in girls (OR 4.2) and grades IV-V reflux (OR 12.4) were independent indicators of renal scarring. On the other hand, only the presence of previous renal scarring was found to be an independent indicator for the development of new renal scar (OR 13.4). In conclusion, while the most predictive variables for the presence of renal scarring among children presenting with a UTI were male gender, age > or = 27 months in girls, and grades IV-V reflux, the best predictor of new scar formation was presence of previous renal scarring.

  7. Retinoic acid and glycolic acid combination in the treatment of acne scars

    PubMed Central

    Chandrashekar, BS; Ashwini, KR; Vasanth, Vani; Navale, Shreya

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Acne is a prevalent condition in society affecting nearly 80-90% of adolescents often resulting in secondary damage in the form of scarring. Retinoic acid (RA) is said to improve acne scars and reduce postinflammatory hyperpigmentation while glycolic acid (GA) is known for its keratolytic properties and its ability to reduce atrophic acne scars. There are studies exploring the combined effect of retinaldehyde and GA combination with positive results while the efficacy of retinoic acid and GA (RAGA) combination remains unexplored. Aim: The aim of this study remains to retrospectively assess the efficacy of RAGA combination on acne scars in patients previously treated for active acne. Materials and Methods: A retrospective assessment of 35 patients using topical RAGA combination on acne scars was done. The subjects were 17-34 years old and previously treated for active acne. Case records and photographs of each patient were assessed and the acne scars were graded as per Goodman and Baron's global scarring grading system (GSGS), before the start and after 12 weeks of RAGA treatment. The differences in the scar grades were noted to assess the improvement. Results: At the end of 12 weeks, significant improvement in acne scars was noticed in 91.4% of the patients. Conclusion: The RAGA combination shows efficacy in treating acne scars in the majority of patients, minimizing the need of procedural treatment for acne scars. PMID:25821727

  8. Clinimetric properties and clinical utility in rehabilitation of postsurgical scar rating scales: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Vercelli, Stefano; Ferriero, Giorgio; Sartorio, Francesco; Cisari, Carlo; Bravini, Elisabetta

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this study was to review and critically assess the most used and clinimetrically sound outcome measures currently available for postsurgical scar assessment in rehabilitation. We performed a systematic review of the Medline and Embase databases to June 2015. All published peer-reviewed studies referring to the development, validation, or clinical use of scales or questionnaires in patients with linear scars were screened. Of 922 articles initially identified in the literature search, 48 full-text articles were retrieved for assessment. Of these, 16 fulfilled the inclusion criteria for data collection. Data were collected pertaining to instrument item domains, validity, reliability, and Rasch analysis. The eight outcome measures identified were as follows: Vancouver Scar Scale, Dermatology Life Quality Index, Manchester Scar Scale, Patient and Observer Scar Assessment Scale, Bock Quality of Life (Bock QoL) questionnaire, Stony Brook Scar Evaluation Scale, Patient-Reported Impact of Scars Measure, and Patient Scar Assessment Questionnaire. Scales were examined for their clinimetric properties, and recommendations for their clinical or research use and selection were made. There is currently no absolute gold standard to be used in rehabilitation for the assessment of postsurgical scars, although the Patient and Observer Scar Assessment Scale and the Patient-Reported Impact of Scars Measure emerged as the most robust scales.

  9. Comparison of different laser systems in the treatment of hypertrophic and atrophic scars and keloids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scharschmidt, D.; Algermissen, Bernd; Willms-Jones, J.-C.; Philipp, Carsten M.; Berlien, Hans-Peter

    1997-12-01

    Different laser systems and techniques are used for the treatment of hypertrophic scars, keloids and acne scars. Significant criteria in selecting a suitable laser system are the scar's vascularization, age and diameter. Flashlamp- pumped dye-lasers, CO2-lasers with scanner, Argon and Nd:YAG-lasers are used. Telangiectatic scars respond well to argon lasers, erythematous scars and keloids to dye-laser treatment. Using interstitial Nd:YAG-laser vaporization, scars with a cross-section over 1 cm can generally be reduced. For the treatment of atrophic and acne scars good cosmetic results are achieved with a CO2-laser/scanner system, which allows a precise ablation of the upper dermis with low risk of side-effects.

  10. Management of complex pediatric burn scars in a humanitarian collaboration.

    PubMed

    Bassetto, F; Staffieri, A; Reho, F; Facchin, F; Shehata, J; Maged, D; Tiengo, C

    2015-03-31

    Burn scars still represent a challenge to the reconstructive surgeon. Their management requires a specific expertise and set up involving the possibility of long term rehabilitation and follow up. Cases encountered in humanitarian missions present additional issues. Often the local environment is not suitable for an appropriate treatment plan, requiring the case to be transferred to a foreign country for surgical care as part of an integrated international and multidisciplinary management. We present the case of a three year-old patient injured in a bomb explosion during the Arab Spring and suffering from severe scar contracture limiting thoracic and upper limb movement. After initial consultation at distance, transfer to our country was organized and an intensive surgical and rehabilitative program was carried out over three months. After five months, the patient returned to his home country where a supportive network had been set up for continued rehabilitation, ensuring follow up for over a year and ultimate success.

  11. Management of complex pediatric burn scars in a humanitarian collaboration

    PubMed Central

    Bassetto, F.; Staffieri, A.; Reho, F.; Facchin, F.; Shehata, J.; Maged, D.; Tiengo, C.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Burn scars still represent a challenge to the reconstructive surgeon. Their management requires a specific expertise and set up involving the possibility of long term rehabilitation and follow up. Cases encountered in humanitarian missions present additional issues. Often the local environment is not suitable for an appropriate treatment plan, requiring the case to be transferred to a foreign country for surgical care as part of an integrated international and multidisciplinary management. We present the case of a three year-old patient injured in a bomb explosion during the Arab Spring and suffering from severe scar contracture limiting thoracic and upper limb movement. After initial consultation at distance, transfer to our country was organized and an intensive surgical and rehabilitative program was carried out over three months. After five months, the patient returned to his home country where a supportive network had been set up for continued rehabilitation, ensuring follow up for over a year and ultimate success. PMID:26668562

  12. Evaluating lubricant performance by 3D profilometry of wear scars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Georgescu, C.; Deleanu, L.; Pirvu, C.

    2016-08-01

    Due to improvement in analysing surface texture and optical instruments for investigating the texture surface, the authors propose to evaluate the lubricant performance by analysing the change in several 3D parameters in comparison to an analysis on 2D profile. All the surface of the wear scar generated on the four ball machine is investigated and the conclusion is that from the tribological point of view, the 3D parameters reflect better the surface quality evolution after testing. Investigation was done on the wear scars generated on the three fixed balls, for five lubricants: a non-additivated transmission mineral oil (T90), two grades of rapeseed oil (coarse degummed and refined) and two grades of soybean oil (coarse and degummed).

  13. Skin, fascias, and scars: symptoms and systemic connections

    PubMed Central

    Bordoni, Bruno; Zanier, Emiliano

    2014-01-01

    Every element or cell in the human body produces substances that communicate and respond in an autocrine or paracrine mode, consequently affecting organs and structures that are seemingly far from each other. The same also applies to the skin. In fact, when the integrity of the skin has been altered, or when its healing process is disturbed, it becomes a source of symptoms that are not merely cutaneous. The skin is an organ, and similar to any other structure, it has different functions in addition to connections with the central and peripheral nervous system. This article examines pathological responses produced by scars, analyzing definitions and differences. At the same time, it considers the subcutaneous fascias, as this connective structure is altered when there is a discontinuous cutaneous surface. The consequence is an ample symptomatology, which is not limited to the body area where the scar is located, such as a postural or trigeminal disorder. PMID:24403836

  14. Overcoming the Low-Learning Scar Effect: Narratives of Learning and Resilience of Italian Low-Skilled

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tomassini, Massimo

    2016-01-01

    The idea of the "low-learning scar" is borrowed from recent labour economics literature in which concepts such as "unemployment scarring", "wage scarring" and "scarred generation" are increasingly used for the interpretation of problems (the NEETs problem, for instance) which presently plague all Western…

  15. Risk Factors for Recurrent Urinary Tract Infection and Renal Scarring

    PubMed Central

    Shaikh, Nader; Pohl, Hans; Gravens-Mueller, Lisa; Ivanova, Anastasia; Zaoutis, Lisa; Patel, Melissa; deBerardinis, Rachel; Parker, Allison; Bhatnagar, Sonika; Haralam, Mary Ann; Pope, Marcia; Kearney, Diana; Sprague, Bruce; Barrera, Raquel; Viteri, Bernarda; Egigueron, Martina; Shah, Neha; Hoberman, Alejandro

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To identify risk factors for recurrent urinary tract infection (UTI) and renal scarring in children who have had 1 or 2 febrile or symptomatic UTIs and received no antimicrobial prophylaxis. METHODS: This 2-year, multisite prospective cohort study included 305 children aged 2 to 71 months with vesicoureteral reflux (VUR) receiving placebo in the RIVUR (Randomized Intervention for Vesicoureteral Reflux) study and 195 children with no VUR observed in the CUTIE (Careful Urinary Tract Infection Evaluation) study. Primary exposure was presence of VUR; secondary exposures included bladder and bowel dysfunction (BBD), age, and race. Outcomes were recurrent febrile or symptomatic urinary tract infection (F/SUTI) and renal scarring. RESULTS: Children with VUR had higher 2-year rates of recurrent F/SUTI (Kaplan-Meier estimate 25.4% compared with 17.3% for VUR and no VUR, respectively). Other factors associated with recurrent F/SUTI included presence of BBD at baseline (adjusted hazard ratio: 2.07 [95% confidence interval (CI): 1.09–3.93]) and presence of renal scarring on the baseline 99mTc-labeled dimercaptosuccinic acid scan (adjusted hazard ratio: 2.88 [95% CI: 1.22–6.80]). Children with BBD and any degree of VUR had the highest risk of recurrent F/SUTI (56%). At the end of the 2-year follow-up period, 8 (5.6%) children in the no VUR group and 24 (10.2%) in the VUR group had renal scars, but the difference was not statistically significant (adjusted odds ratio: 2.05 [95% CI: 0.86–4.87]). CONCLUSIONS: VUR and BBD are risk factors for recurrent UTI, especially when they appear in combination. Strategies for preventing recurrent UTI include antimicrobial prophylaxis and treatment of BBD. PMID:26055855

  16. The Use of Chemotherapeutics for the Treatment of Keloid Scars

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Christopher David; Guiot, Luke; Samy, Mike; Gorman, Mark; Tehrani, Hamid

    2015-01-01

    Keloid scars are pathological scars, which develop as a result of exaggerated dermal tissue proliferation following cutaneous injury and often cause physical, psychological and cosmetic problems. Various theories regarding keloidogenesis exist, however the precise pathophysiological events remain unclear. Many different treatment modalities have been implicated in their management, but currently there is no entirely satisfactory method for treating all keloid lesions. We review a number of different chemotherapeutic agents which have been proposed for the treatment of keloid and hypertrophic scars while giving insight into some of the novel chemotherapeutic drugs which are currently being investigated. Non-randomized trials evaluating the influence of different chemotherapeutic agents, such as 5-fluorouracil (5-FU); mitomycin C; bleomycin and steroid injection, either alone or in combination with other chemotherapeutic agents or alternative treatment modalities, for the treatment of keloids were identified using a predefined PubMed search strategy. Twenty seven papers were identified. Scar improvement ≥50% was found in the majority of cases treated with 5-FU, with similar results found for mitomycin C, bleomycin and steroid injection. Combined intralesional 5-FU and steroid injection produced statistically significant improvements when compared to monotherapy. Monotherapy recurrence rates ranged from 0-47% for 5-FU, 0-15% for bleomycin and 0-50% for steroid injection. However, combined therapy in the form of surgical excision and adjuvant 5-FU or steroid injections demonstrated lower recurrence rates; 19% and 6% respectively. Currently, most of the literature supports the use of combination therapy (usually surgery and adjuvant chemotherapy) as the mainstay treatment of keloids, however further investigation is necessary to determine success rates over longer time frames. Furthermore, there is the potential for novel therapies, but further investigation is

  17. Pressure effects on the growth of human scar fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Chang, Liang-Wey; Deng, Win-Ping; Yeong, Eng-Kean; Wu, Ching-Yuan; Yeh, Shih-Wei

    2008-01-01

    Although pressure therapy is the mainstay of treatment for hypertrophic scars, its actual mechanism remains unknown. An in vitro study was designed to investigate the effects of positive pressure on the growth of human scar-derived fibroblasts through its transforming growth factor beta1 (TGF-beta1) secretion. A pneumatic pressure system connecting to a cell culture chamber was designed. Six-well cultured plates with fibroblasts implanted were treated with different pressure settings. Cells were treated with constant pressure 20 mm Hg above atmosphere pressure (group A n = 18) or with 40 mm Hg above atmosphere pressure (group B n = 18) daily for nine successive days. Cells without pressure were treated as the control study (group C n = 6). Each experimental group was divided into daily pressure applied at 24 hours (n = 6), 18 hours (n = 6), and 12 hours (n = 6). Cell counting was performed on the 2nd, 4th, 7th, 9th, 11th, and 14th day after implantation. On day 4, the concentration of transforming growth factor beta1 was measured, and cell doubling time was calculated. Compared with the control group, there was a significant decrease in cell count and the concentration in the 18-hour and 24-hour 20 mm Hg or 40 mm Hg pressure treated group. The cell doubling time was significantly increased in the 24-hour 20 mm Hg or 40 mm Hg pressure treated groups, and the 18-hour 40 mm Hg pressure treated group. (P < .05) Pressure inhibits the growth and activity of human scar fibroblasts, and a higher pressure application can shorten the daily application period. There should be an optimal pressure level corresponding to a daily application period to achieve the most effective results on pressure therapy for scars.

  18. Slippery Scar: A New Mushroom Disease in Auricularia polytricha

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Jie

    2012-01-01

    A new disease, the slippery scar, was investigated in cultivated bags of Auricularia polytricha. This fungus was isolated from the infected mycelia of cultivated bags. Based on morphological observation, rDNA-internal transcribed spacer and 18S sequence analysis, this pathogen was identified as the Ascomycete Scytalidium lignicola. According to Koch's Postulation, the pathogenicity of S. lignicola to the mycelia of A. polytricha was confirmed. The parasitism of this fungus on mushroom mycelia in China has not been reported before. PMID:22870056

  19. Three-Dimensional Electromagnetic High Frequency Axisymmetric Cavity Scars.

    SciTech Connect

    Warne, Larry Kevin; Jorgenson, Roy Eberhardt

    2014-10-01

    This report examines the localization of high frequency electromagnetic fi elds in three-dimensional axisymmetric cavities along periodic paths between opposing sides of the cavity. The cases where these orbits lead to unstable localized modes are known as scars. This report treats both the case where the opposing sides, or mirrors, are convex, where there are no interior foci, and the case where they are concave, leading to interior foci. The scalar problem is treated fi rst but the approximations required to treat the vector fi eld components are also examined. Particular att ention is focused on the normalization through the electromagnetic energy theorem. Both projections of the fi eld along the scarred orbit as well as point statistics are examined. Statistical comparisons are m ade with a numerical calculation of the scars run with an axisymmetric simulation. This axisymmetric cas eformstheoppositeextreme(wherethetwomirror radii at each end of the ray orbit are equal) from the two -dimensional solution examined previously (where one mirror radius is vastly di ff erent from the other). The enhancement of the fi eldontheorbitaxiscanbe larger here than in the two-dimensional case. Intentionally Left Blank

  20. Fire scars and ancient sand dunes in southern Australia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    The rectangular green areas in this view of southern Australia are protected areas of natural forest (national parks and biospheric reserves), and the lighter surrounding colors (tan-brown) are agricultural croplands occupying land which once must have looked as green as the nature reserves but are now cleared of forest. The major green patch has been recently burned, as shown by the irregular pattern of a large, multiple burn scar. The pattern of the fire scar indicates that the fires were driven by winds blowing from left to right. Close examination of the view shows that the forests are rooted in a soil made up of a widespread sheet of ancient dune sand. The dunes can be seen best within the area of the large fire scar where the characteristic wavy, scalloped pattern of crescent dunes can be detected. The crescents indicate that the sand was heaped up by winds blowing from right to left in this view, in the opposite direction to the winds which fanned the fires. A few straight dunes

  1. Reprint of 'Model of unidirectional block formation leading to reentrant ventricular tachycardia in the infarct border zone of postinfarction canine hearts'

    PubMed Central

    Ciaccio, Edward J.; Coromilas, James; Ashikaga, Hiroshi; Cervantes, Daniel O.; Wit, Andrew L.; Peters, Nicholas S.; McVeigh, Elliot R.; Garan, Hasan

    2015-01-01

    Background When the infarct border zone is stimulated prematurely, a unidirectional block line (UBL) can form and lead to double-loop (figure-of-eight) reentrant ventricular tachycardia (VT) with a central isthmus. The isthmus is composed of an entrance, center, and exit. It was hypothesized that for certain stimulus site locations and coupling intervals, the UBL would coincide with the isthmus entrance boundary, where infarct border zone thickness changes from thin-to-thick in the travel direction of the premature stimulus wavefront. Method A quantitative model was developed to describe how thin-to-thick changes in the border zone result in critically convex wavefront curvature leading to conduction block, which is dependent upon coupling interval. The model was tested in 12 retrospectively analyzed postinfarction canine experiments. Electrical activation was mapped for premature stimulation and for the first reentrant VT cycle. The relationship of functional conduction block forming during premature stimulation to functional block during reentrant VT was quantified. Results For an appropriately placed stimulus, in accord with model predictions: 1. The UBL and reentrant VT isthmus lateral boundaries overlapped (error: 4.8±5.7 mm). 2. The UBL leading edge coincided with the distal isthmus where the center-entrance boundary would be expected to occur. 3. The mean coupling interval was 164.6±11.0 ms during premature stimulation and 190.7±20.4 ms during the first reentrant VT cycle, in accord with model calculations, which resulted in critically convex wavefront curvature and functional conduction block, respectively, at the location of the isthmus entrance boundary and at the lateral isthmus edges. Discussion Reentrant VT onset following premature stimulation can be explained by the presence of critically convex wavefront curvature and unidirectional block at the isthmus entrance boundary when the premature stimulation interval is sufficiently short. The double

  2. The inhibition of postinfarct ventricle remodeling without polycythaemia following local sustained intramyocardial delivery of erythropoietin within a supramolecular hydrogel.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tao; Jiang, Xue-Jun; Lin, Tao; Ren, Shan; Li, Xiao-Yan; Zhang, Xian-Zheng; Tang, Qi-zhu

    2009-09-01

    Erythropoietin (EPO) can protect myocardium from ischemic injury, but it also plays an important role in promoting polycythaemia, the potential for thrombo-embolic complications. Local sustained delivery of bioactive agents directly to impaired tissues using biomaterials is an approach to limit systemic toxicity and improve the efficacy of therapies. The present study was performed to investigate whether local intramyocardial injection of EPO with hydrogel could enhance cardioprotective effect without causing polycythaemia after myocardial infarction (MI). To test the hypothesis, phosphate buffered solution (PBS), alpha-cyclodextrin/MPEG-PCL-MPEG hydrogel, recombined human erythropoietin (rhEPO) in PBS, or rhEPO in hydrogel were injected into the infarcted area immediately after MI in rats. The hydrogel allowed a sustained release of EPO, which inhibited cell apoptosis and increased neovasculature formation, and subsequently reduced infarct size and improved cardiac function compared with other groups. Notably, there was no evidence of polycythaemia from this therapy, with no differences in erythrocyte count and hematocrit compared with the animals received PBS or hydrogel blank injection. In conclusion, intramyocardial delivery of rhEPO with alpha-cyclodextrin/MPEG-PCL-MPEG hydrogel may lead to cardiac performance improvement after MI without apparent adverse effect.

  3. Non-invasive stratification of postinfarction rats based on degree of cardiac dysfunction using magnetic resonance imaging and echocardiography.

    PubMed

    Aronsen, Jan Magnus; Espe, Emil Knut Stenersen; Skårdal, Kristine; Hasic, Almira; Zhang, Lili; Sjaastad, Ivar

    2017-02-10

    The myocardial infarction (MI) rat model plays a crucial role in modern cardiovascular research, but the inherent heterogeneity of this model represents a challenge. We sought to identify subgroups among the post-MI rats, and establish simple non-invasive stratification protocols for such subgroups. Six weeks after induction of MI, 49 rats underwent non-invasive examinations using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and echocardiography. 12 sham-operated rats served as controls. Increased end-diastolic left ventricular (LV) pressure and lung weight served as indicators for congestive heart failure (CHF). A clustering algorithm using thirteen non-invasive and invasive parameters was used to identify distinct groups among the animals. The cluster analysis revealed four distinct post-MI phenotypes; two without congestion but with different degree of LV dilatation, and two with different degree of congestion and right ventricular (RV) affection. Among the MRI parameters, RV mass emerged as robust non-invasive marker of CHF with 100% specificity/sensitivity. Moreover, LV infarct size and RV ejection fraction further predicted subgroup among the non-CHF and CHF rats with excellent specificity/sensitivity. Of the echocardiography parameters, left atrial diameter predicted CHF. Moreover, MRI-derived LV end-diastolic diameter predicted the subgroups among the non-CHF rats. We propose two simple non-invasive schemes to stratify post-MI rats, based on the degree of heart failure; one for MRI and one for echocardiography.

  4. 3-D analysis of breast morphology changes after inverted T-scar and vertical-scar reduction mammaplasty over 12 months.

    PubMed

    Eder, Maximilian; Klöppel, Markus; Müller, Daniel; Papadopulos, Nikolaos A; Machens, Hans-Günther; Kovacs, Laszlo

    2013-06-01

    One major objective of all types of breast reduction procedures is to achieve a long-lasting, stable and aesthetically pleasing three-dimensional (3-D) breast shape, but current surgical outcome evaluation is limited. This study compares the extent of soft-tissue oedema and breast tissue migration related to 3-D breast morphology changes after inverted T-scar and vertical-scar breast reduction over 12 months. 3-D breast surface scans of patients undergoing inverted T-scar (n=52 breasts) and vertical-scar (n=44 breasts) reduction mammaplasty were obtained preoperatively and 2-3 days, 1 week, 1 month, 3 months, 6 months, 9 months and 12 months postoperatively. 3-D images were analysed at each time point comparing distances, 3-D breast contour deviations (%), breast surface (cm2) and volume (cc) measurements including volumetric distribution between the upper portion (UP) and the lower portion (LP) of the breast (%). Total postoperative breast volume decreased by 11.7% (T-scar) and by 7.8% (vertical-scar) during the first 3 months (both p<0.001) without relevant changes in the following months, indicating that soft-tissue oedema is resolved after 3 months. The T-scar (vertical-scar) group showed a preoperative UP to LP volumetric distribution of 43:57% (45:55%) versus 86:14% (91:9%) immediately after surgery. Breast tissue significantly redistributes (both p=0.001) from the UP to the LP during the first postoperative year by 16.5% (T-scar) and 21% (vertical-scar), resulting in a final UP to LP ratio of 70:30% for both techniques, without further breast contour deviations (both p>0.05) after 6 months (T-scar) and 9 months (vertical-scar). Breast morphological changes after reduction mammaplasty are completed after a period of 3-6 months in the T-scar group and 6-9 months in the vertical-scar group.

  5. Non-invasive evaluation of therapeutic response in keloid scar using diffuse reflectance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Chao-Kai; Tzeng, Shih-Yu; Yang, Chao-Chun; Lee, Julia Yu-Yun; Huang, Lynn Ling-Huei; Chen, Wan-Rung; Hughes, Michael; Chen, Yu-Wen; Liao, Yu-Kai; Tseng, Sheng-Hao

    2015-02-01

    The pathogenesis and ideal treatment of keloid are still largely unknown, and it is essential to develop an objective assessment of keloid severity to evaluate the therapeutic response. We previously reported that our diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (DRS) system could assist clinicians in understanding the functional and structural condition of keloid scars. The purpose of this study was to understand clinical applicability of our DRS system on evaluating the scar severity and therapeutic response of keloid. We analyzed 228 spectral data from 71 subjects with keloid scars. The scars were classified into mild (0-3), moderate (4-7) and severe (8-11) according to the Vancouver scar scale. We found that as the severity of the scar increased, collagen concentration and water content increased, and the reduced scattering coefficient at 800 nm and oxygen saturation (SaO2) decreased. Using the DRS system, we found that collagen bundles aligned in a specific direction in keloid scars, but not in normal scars. Water content and SaO2 may be utilized as reliable parameters for evaluating the therapeutic response of keloid. In conclusion, the results obtained here suggest that the DRS has potential as an objective technique with which to evaluate keloid scar severity. In addition, it may be useful as a tool with which to track longitudinal response of scars in response to various therapeutic interventions.

  6. A review of strategies for infarct size reduction during acute myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Parviz, Yasir; Vijayan, Sethumadhavan; Lavi, Shahar

    2017-02-08

    Advances in medical and interventional therapy over the last few decades have revolutionized the treatment of acute myocardial infarction. Despite the ability to restore epicardial coronary artery patency promptly through percutaneous coronary intervention, tissue level damage may continue. The reported 30-day mortality after all acute coronary syndromes is 2 to 3%, and around 5% following myocardial infarction. Post-infarct complications such as heart failure continue to be a major contributor to cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Inadequate microvascular reperfusion leads to worse clinical outcomes and potentially strategies to reduce infarct size during periods of ischemia-reperfusion can improve outcomes. Many strategies have been tested, but no single strategy alone has shown a consistent result or benefit in large scale randomised clinical trials. Herein, we review the historical efforts, current strategies, and potential novel concepts that may improve myocardial protection and reduce infarct size.

  7. The successful treatment of pain associated with scar tissue using acupuncture.

    PubMed

    Fang, Sheng

    2014-10-01

    In this case report, a 48-year-old female who had suffered severe scar pain for 3 months was treated with acupuncture using the Wei Ci technique (surrounding the dragon). Scar tissue usually forms after deep trauma, such as piercings, burns, and surgery, to the dermis. In Chinese Medicine, scar tissue causes local Qi and blood stagnation which lead to pain. The Wei Ci technique (surrounding the dragon) and distal points Hegu-LI-4, Taichong-LIV-3, Zusanli-ST-36 were used. The patient received a total of eight treatments in 5 weeks. The scar pain decreased from 7 to 1 or 2 on a Likert scale of 0-10, with 0 being no pain and 10 being the worst pain. Acupuncture may have a good short-term pain-relieving effect on scar pain but its long-term scar-pain-relieving effects are still unclear.

  8. The Immunomodulatory Effects of Mesenchymal Stem Cells in Prevention or Treatment of Excessive Scars

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Sung-No

    2016-01-01

    Excessive scars, including keloids and hypertrophic scars, result from aberrations in the process of physiologic wound healing. An exaggerated inflammatory process is one of the main pathophysiological contributors. Scars may cause pain, and pruritis, limit joint mobility, and cause a range of cosmetic deformities that affect the patient's quality of life. Extensive research has been done on hypertrophic scar and keloid formation that has resulted in the plethora of treatment and prevention methods practiced today. Mesenchymal stem cells, among their multifunctional roles, are known regulators of inflammation and have been receiving attention as a major candidate for cell therapy to treat or prevent excessive scars. This paper extensively reviews the body of research examining the mechanism and potential of stem cell therapy in the treatment of excessive scars. PMID:26839566

  9. Severe hypoxia and malnutrition collectively contribute to scar fibroblast inhibition and cell apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Lynam, Emily C; Xie, Yan; Dawson, Rebecca; Mcgovern, Jacqui; Upton, Zee; Wang, XiQiao

    2015-09-01

    This study aims to investigate whether severe hypoxia and malnutrition in scar tissue play key roles to induce hypertrophic scar regression. And scar-derived fibroblasts were treated with moderate/severe hypoxia and malnutrition to model condition of proliferative and regressive scar (5%O2 +5%FCS and 0.5%O2  + 0.5%FCS), and normoxia with well nutrition as control (10%O2  + 10%FCS). Our results demonstrated that severe hypoxia and malnutrition resulted in significantly reduced cell viability and collagen production, as well as HIF-1, VEGF, TGF-β1, and Bcl-2 protein expression when compared with control, and cell apoptosis occurred. Therefore, the severe hypoxia and malnutrition in scar tissue contribute to fibroblast inhibition and cell apoptosis, which is correlated with scar regression.

  10. Hypertrophic Scarring and Keloids: Pathomechanisms and Current and Emerging Treatment Strategies

    PubMed Central

    Gauglitz, Gerd G; Korting, Hans C; Pavicic, Tatiana; Ruzicka, Thomas; Jeschke, Marc G

    2011-01-01

    Excessive scars form as a result of aberrations of physiologic wound healing and may arise following any insult to the deep dermis. By causing pain, pruritus and contractures, excessive scarring significantly affects the patient’s quality of life, both physically and psychologically. Multiple studies on hypertrophic scar and keloid formation have been conducted for decades and have led to a plethora of therapeutic strategies to prevent or attenuate excessive scar formation. However, most therapeutic approaches remain clinically unsatisfactory, most likely owing to poor understanding of the complex mechanisms underlying the processes of scarring and wound contraction. In this review we summarize the current understanding of the pathophysiology underlying keloid and hypertrophic scar formation and discuss established treatments and novel therapeutic strategies. PMID:20927486

  11. A Modeling Approach for Burn Scar Assessment Using Natural Features and Elastic Property

    SciTech Connect

    Tsap, L V; Zhang, Y; Goldgof, D B; Sarkar, S

    2004-04-02

    A modeling approach is presented for quantitative burn scar assessment. Emphases are given to: (1) constructing a finite element model from natural image features with an adaptive mesh, and (2) quantifying the Young's modulus of scars using the finite element model and the regularization method. A set of natural point features is extracted from the images of burn patients. A Delaunay triangle mesh is then generated that adapts to the point features. A 3D finite element model is built on top of the mesh with the aid of range images providing the depth information. The Young's modulus of scars is quantified with a simplified regularization functional, assuming that the knowledge of scar's geometry is available. The consistency between the Relative Elasticity Index and the physician's rating based on the Vancouver Scale (a relative scale used to rate burn scars) indicates that the proposed modeling approach has high potentials for image-based quantitative burn scar assessment.

  12. Preparation of ethosomes and deformable liposomes encapsulated with 5-fluorouracil and their investigation of permeability and retention in hypertrophic scar.

    PubMed

    Wo, Yan; Zhang, Zhen; Zhang, Yixin; Wang, Danru; Pu, Zheming; Su, Weijie; Qian, Yunliang; Li, Yunwu; Cui, Daxiang

    2011-09-01

    With the aim of comparing scar penetration efficiency and retention between ethosomes and deformable liposomes both encapsulated with 5-fluorouracil (5-FU), the 5-FU ethosomal suspensions (5-FU ES, 81.74 +/- 9.37 nm) and the 5-FU Deformable Liposomal Suspensions (5-FU DS, 73.7 +/- 9.45 nm) were prepared respectively by Touitou method and Cevc method, their sizes were determined by Particle Sizer System (PSS), and their entrapment Efficiency (EE) was detected by ultracentrifugation and microcolumn centrifugation. Their transdermal delivery experiments were done in hypertrophic scars in vitro. The permeated amount of 5-FU and retention contents of 5-FU were both calculated by High Performance Liquid Chromatography (HPLC). Fluorescence intensities of ES and DS labeled with Rodanmin 6GO (Rho) were measured by Laser Scanning Microscopy (LSM). The control groups such as the 5-FU and empty ethosomal vesicles (5-FU + EEV), the 5-FU and empty deformable liposomal vesicles (5-FU + EDV) and 5-FU PBS Solution (5-FU Sol) were set up. Results showed that, prepared 5-FU ES was 81.74 +/- 9.37 nm in size, 5-FU DS was 73.7 +/- 9.45 nm, EE of 5-FU ES was 10.95%, EE of 5-FU DS was 15.05%. Within 24 hours, in the group of 5-FU ES, the penetration amount of 5-FU in scar was 14.12 +/- 0.1 microg/mL/cm2, the retention contents of 5-FU was 10.74 +/- 1.17 microg/cm2, and the fluorescence intensity of Rho in hypertrophic scar tissues were 182 +/- 18.3; in the group of 5-FU DS: the penetration amount of 5-FU was 12.35 +/- 1.21 microg/mLcm2; the retention contents of 5-FU was 17.48 +/- 0.82 microg/cm2, and the fluorescence intensity of Rho was 241.45 +/- 7.63; there existed statistical difference between penetration amount in the group of 5-FU ES and that in the group of 5-FU DS as well as control groups (P < 0.05, P < 0.01), the penetration amount in the group of ES is markedly higher than DS group or control groups. Conversely, the retention contents of 5-FU and the fluorescence intensity of

  13. Treatment of hypertrophic scars using a long-pulsed dye laser with cryogen-spray cooling.

    PubMed

    Kono, Taro; Erçöçen, Ali Rza; Nakazawa, Hiroaki; Nozaki, Motohiro

    2005-05-01

    Hypertrophic scars are common and cause functional and psychologic morbidity. The conventional pulsed dye laser (585 nm) has been shown previously to be effective in the treatment of a variety of traumatic and surgical scars, with improvement in scar texture, color, and pliability, with minimal side effects. This prospective study was performed to determine the effectiveness of the long-pulsed dye laser (595 nm) with cryogen-spray cooling device in the treatment of hypertrophic scars. Fifteen Asian patients with 22 hypertrophic scars were treated by the long-pulsed dye laser (595 nm) with cryogen-spray cooling device. In 5 patients, the scar area was divided into halves, one half of which was treated with the laser, whereas the other half was not treated and was used as a negative control. All patients received 2 treatments at 4-week intervals, and evaluations were done by photographic and clinical assessment and histologic evaluation before the treatment and 1 month after the last laser treatment. Treatment outcome was graded by a blind observer using the Vancouver General Hospital (VGH) Burn Scar Assessment Scale. Symptoms such as pain, pruritus, and burning of the scar improved significantly. VGH scores improved in all treated sites, and there was a significant difference between the baseline and posttreatment scores, corresponding to an improvement of 51.4 +/- 14.7% (P < 0.01). Compared with the baseline, the mean percentage of scar flattening and erythema elimination was 40.7 +/- 20.7 and 65.3 +/- 25.5%, respectively (P < 0.01). The long-pulsed dye laser (595-nm) equipped with cryogen spray cooling device is an effective treatment of hypertrophic scars and can improve scar pliability and texture and decrease scar erythema and associated symptoms.

  14. Axonal regeneration through the fibrous scar in lesioned goldfish spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Takeda, A; Atobe, Y; Kadota, T; Goris, R C; Funakoshi, K

    2015-01-22

    Spontaneous nerve regeneration beyond the scar frequently occurs in fish after spinal cord lesions, in contrast to mammals. Here we examined the spatiotemporal relationship between the fibrous scar and axonal regeneration in the goldfish. Within 1 week after hemisection of the spinal cord, the open wound was closed by a fibrous scar that was demarcated from the surrounding nervous tissue by the glia limitans, which was immunoreactive for laminin. Within 1 week after hemisection, regenerating axons entered the fibrous scar, and were surrounded by laminin-coated tubular structures continuous with the glia limitans. Regenerating axons that initially entered the fibrous scar were usually accompanied by glial processes. Within 2-3 weeks after hemisection, the tubular structures became enlarged, and the regenerating axons increased in number, fasciculating in the tubules. Glial processes immunoreactive for glial fibrillary acid protein and 5-hydroxytryptamine neurons then entered the tubular structures to associate with the regenerating axons. The tubular structures developed further, creating tunnels that penetrated the fibrous scar, through which the regenerating axons passed. At 6-12 weeks after hemisection, the fibrous scar was smaller and the enlarged tunnels contained many glial processes and several axons. The findings of present study demonstrated that, following spinal lesions in goldfish, regenerating axons enter and pass the scar tissue. The regenerating axons first enter the fibrous scar with glial elements and then grow through laminin-coated tubular structures within the fibrous scar. Invasion by glial processes and neuronal elements into the tubular structures reduces the fibrous scar area and allows for more regenerating axons to pass beyond the fibrous scar.

  15. Ablative fractional resurfacing for the treatment of traumatic scars and contractures.

    PubMed

    Uebelhoer, Nathan S; Ross, E Victor; Shumaker, Peter R

    2012-06-01

    After a decade of military conflict, thousands of wounded warriors have suffered debilitating and cosmetically disfiguring scars and scar contractures. Clearly, there is a need for effective scar treatment regimens to assist in the functional and cosmetic rehabilitation of these patients. Traditional treatments, including aggressive physical and occupational therapy and dedicated wound care, are essential. Adjunctive treatments with established laser technologies, such as vascular lasers and full-field ablative lasers, have had a somewhat limited role in scar contractures due to modest efficacy and/or an unacceptable side effect profile in compromised skin. Refractory scar contractures often require surgical revision, which can be effective, but is associated with additional surgical morbidity and a significant risk of recurrence. Furthermore, current scar treatment paradigms often dictate scar maturation for approximately a year to allow for spontaneous improvement before surgical intervention. Since 2009, the Dermatology Clinic at the Naval Medical Center San Diego has been treating scars and scar contractures in wounded warriors and others using ablative fractionated laser technology. Although traditionally associated with the rejuvenation of aged and photo-damaged skin, our clinical experience and a handful of early reports indicate that laser ablative fractional resurfacing demonstrates promising efficacy and an excellent side effect profile when applied to the functional and cosmetic enhancement of traumatic scars and contractures. This article discusses our clinical experience with ablative fractional resurfacing and its potential prominent role in rehabilitation from traumatic injuries, including a possible shift in scar treatment paradigms toward earlier procedural intervention. Potential benefits include the optimization of scar trajectory and higher levels of full or adapted function in a more favorable time course.

  16. Anti-scarring properties of different tryptophan derivatives.

    PubMed

    Poormasjedi-Meibod, Malihe-Sadat; Hartwell, Ryan; Kilani, Ruhangiz Taghi; Ghahary, Aziz

    2014-01-01

    Hypertrophic scars are associated with prolonged extracellular matrix (ECM) production, aberrant ECM degradation and high tissue cellularity. Routinely used antifibrotic strategies aim to reduce ECM deposition and enhance matrix remodeling. Our previous study investigating the antifibrotic effects of indoleamine2, 3 dioxygenase (IDO) led to the identification of kynurenine (Kyn) as an antiscarring agent. A topical antifibrogenic therapy using Kyn is very attractive; however, it is well established that Kyn passes the blood brain barrier (BBB) which causes complications including excitatory neuronal death. Here we investigated the antiscarring properties of kynurenic acid (KynA), a downstream end product of Kyn that is unlikely to pass the BBB, as an effective and safe replacement for Kyn. Our results indicated that while not having any adverse effect on dermal cell viability, KynA significantly increases the expression of matrix metalloproteinases (MMP1 and MMP3) and suppresses the production of type-I collagen and fibronectin by fibroblasts. Topical application of cream containing KynA in fibrotic rabbit ear significantly decreased scar elevation index (1.13±0.13 vs. 1.61±0.12) and tissue cellularity (221.38±21.7 vs. 314.56±8.66 cells/hpf) in KynA treated wounds compared to controls. KynA treated wounds exhibited lower levels of collagen deposition which is accompanied with a significant decrease in type-I collagen and fibronectin expression, as well as an increase in MMP1 expression compared to untreated wounds or wounds treated with cream only. The results of this study provided evidence for the first time that KynA is promising candidate antifibrogenic agent to improve healing outcome in patients at risk of hypertrophic scarring.

  17. Anti-Scarring Properties of Different Tryptophan Derivatives

    PubMed Central

    Poormasjedi-Meibod, Malihe-Sadat; Hartwell, Ryan; Taghi Kilani, Ruhangiz; Ghahary, Aziz

    2014-01-01

    Hypertrophic scars are associated with prolonged extracellular matrix (ECM) production, aberrant ECM degradation and high tissue cellularity. Routinely used antifibrotic strategies aim to reduce ECM deposition and enhance matrix remodeling. Our previous study investigating the antifibrotic effects of indoleamine2, 3 dioxygenase (IDO) led to the identification of kynurenine (Kyn) as an antiscarring agent. A topical antifibrogenic therapy using Kyn is very attractive; however, it is well established that Kyn passes the blood brain barrier (BBB) which causes complications including excitatory neuronal death. Here we investigated the antiscarring properties of kynurenic acid (KynA), a downstream end product of Kyn that is unlikely to pass the BBB, as an effective and safe replacement for Kyn. Our results indicated that while not having any adverse effect on dermal cell viability, KynA significantly increases the expression of matrix metalloproteinases (MMP1 and MMP3) and suppresses the production of type-I collagen and fibronectin by fibroblasts. Topical application of cream containing KynA in fibrotic rabbit ear significantly decreased scar elevation index (1.13±0.13 vs. 1.61±0.12) and tissue cellularity (221.38±21.7 vs. 314.56±8.66 cells/hpf) in KynA treated wounds compared to controls. KynA treated wounds exhibited lower levels of collagen deposition which is accompanied with a significant decrease in type-I collagen and fibronectin expression, as well as an increase in MMP1 expression compared to untreated wounds or wounds treated with cream only. The results of this study provided evidence for the first time that KynA is promising candidate antifibrogenic agent to improve healing outcome in patients at risk of hypertrophic scarring. PMID:24637853

  18. Relationship Between Scarring and Dog Aggression in Pit Bull-Type Dogs Involved in Organized Dogfighting.

    PubMed

    Miller, Katherine A; Touroo, Rachel; Spain, C Victor; Jones, Kelly; Reid, Pamela; Lockwood, Randall

    2016-11-15

    When pit bull-type dogs are seized in an investigation of organized dogfighting, heavily scarred dogs are often assumed to be highly dog aggressive due to a history of fighting. These dogs may be deemed dangerous and euthanized based on scarring alone. We analyzed our existing data on dogs seized from four dogfighting investigations, examining the relationship between the dogs' scars with aggression towards other dogs. Scar and wound data were tallied in three body zones where dogfighting injuries tend to be concentrated. Dog aggression was assessed using a model dog and a friendly stimulus dog in a standardized behavior evaluation. Scarring and dog aggression were significantly related, more strongly among male (Fisher's Exact p < 0.001) than female dogs (Fisher's Exact p = 0.05). Ten or more scars in the three body zones was a reasonable threshold with which to classify a dog as high risk for dog aggression: 82% of males and 60% of females with such scarring displayed dog aggression. However, because many unscarred dogs were dog aggressive while some highly scarred dogs were not, we recommend collecting behavioral information to supplement scar counts when making disposition decisions about dogs seized in dogfighting investigations.

  19. Comparative efficacy of intralesional verapamil hydrochloride and triamcinolone acetonide in hypertrophic scars and keloids.

    PubMed

    Ahuja, Rajeev B; Chatterjee, Pallab

    2014-06-01

    There is not much level 1 evidence based literature to guide management of hypertrophic scars and keloids despite an array of therapeutic modalities at disposal. Intralesional (i/l) triamcinolone injections have remained a gold standard in non surgical management. Sporadic reports on use of i/l verapamil suggest its efficacy. Since verapamil has not found sufficient mention as an effective alternative modality, it was decided to undertake a randomized study which could also address some additional clinical parameters. A randomized, parallel group and observer blinded comparison with 40 patients (48 scars) was carried out to compare the effects of i/l triamcinolone (T) (22 scars) and verapamil injections (V) (26 scars). 1.5 ml was the maximum indicative volume decided in the study protocol for both the drugs (triamcinolone @40 mg/ml and verapamil @ 2.5 mg/ml). Patients included were aged between 15-60 years with scars ranging between 0.5-5 cm (but total area roughly <6 cm(2)), and scars under 2 years duration. Patients with keloidal diathesis were excluded. Injections were scheduled every three weeks until complete flattening of the scar or eight sessions, which ever came earlier. No concomitant therapies like massage, silicone gel or pressure garments were used. Scar evaluation at each stage was done by serial photographic records as well as by Vancouver Scar Scale (VSS). Comparative survival analysis between the two drugs was done using Kaplan Meier curves, and VSS scores were analyzed using Wilcoxon test and log rank test. Mean zero VSS scores were achieved with treatments in respect of scar height (T-12 weeks, V-21 weeks), vascularity (T-15 weeks, V-18 weeks) and pliability (T-15 weeks, V-21 weeks). The improvement in scar vascularity and pliability kept pace with decrease in scar height, in both the groups. There was not much difference in the rate of change of scar pigmentation with either drug but almost 60% patients in both the groups regained normal

  20. Comparison of the histological morphology between normal skin and scar tissue.

    PubMed

    Yang, Shao-wei; Geng, Zhi-jun; Ma, Kui; Sun, Xiao-yan; Fu, Xiao-bing

    2016-04-01

    Skin wound healing is a complex event, and interrupted wound healing process could lead to scar formation. The aim of this study was to examine the morphological changes of scar tissue. Pathological staining (HE staining, Masson's trichrome staining, methenamine silver staining) was used to evaluate the morphological changes of regenerating epidermis in normal skin and scar tissue, and immunofluorescence staining to detect the expression of collagen IV, a component of basement membrane (BM), and the expression of integrinβ4, a receptor for BM laminins. Additionally, the expression of CK14, CK5, and CK10 was measured to evaluate the proliferation and differentiation of keratinocytes in normal skin and scar tissue. The results showed that the structure of the skin was histologically changed in scar tissue. Collagen IV, expressed under the epidermis of normal skin, was reduced distinctly in scar tissue. Integrinβ4, expressed in the basal layer of normal skin, was found absent in the basal layer of scar tissue. Additionally, it was found that keratinocytes in scarring epidermis were more proliferative than in normal skin. These results indicate that during the skin wound healing, altered formation of BM may affect the proliferation of keratinocytes, reepithelial and tissue remodeling, and then result in scar formation. Thus, remodeling BM structure during wound repair may be beneficial for improving healing in cutaneous wounds during clinical practice.

  1. Autologous Smashed Dermal Graft with Epidermal Re-closure: Modified Technique for Acne Scars

    PubMed Central

    Nagaraju, Umashankar; Chikkaiah, Mahesh K; Raju, Belliappa P; Agarwal, Priyanka

    2016-01-01

    Conventional technique of dermal grafting for acne scars where the source of filler material used is the patient's own dermis requires longer surgical time, recovery period and can result in unsightly scars at the donor area. Hence, it is not suitable for treating a larger number of scars. Furthermore, these dermal grafts are firm and cannot be contoured to fit all types of acne scars. Occurrence of epidermal cyst and secondary infection is another complication if epidermis is not completely removed. Enzymatic techniques need trypsinisation which is expensive and requires laboratory facilities. PMID:28163459

  2. Analysis of scar formation after lower limb lengthening: influence on cosmesis and patient satisfaction.

    PubMed

    Karlen, Law Ka Pui; Yinusa, Wahab; Yan, Lam Shuk; Wang, Kwan Wing; Hoi, Li Yun; John, Leong Chi Yan

    2004-01-01

    Limb lengthening aims to reduce limb length discrepancy, improve cosmesis, and permit more functional mobility. Scarring, however, is a major concern of patients. In this study 25 patients (27 lengthening sites) were assessed; 6 sites were lengthened with Orthofix and 21 sites with Ilizarov. Altogether, 452 pin tract scars were assessed. The mean scar length was 11.5 mm in the Ilizarov group (n=415) and 54.1 mm in the Orthofix group (n=37). The mean scar width was 5.6 mm in the Ilizarov group and 11.5 mm in the Orthofix group. The mean patient satisfaction was 7.3 in the Orthofix group and 5.5 in the Ilizarov group. The mean Vancouver score was 0.66 in the Ilizarov group and 3.1 in the Orthofix group. The scars were shorter and cosmetically better in the Ilizarov group, but patients were more satisfied in the Orthofix group because there were fewer scars. Patients were also more satisfied with the thigh scars than with the leg scars because clothing can easily cover the thigh scars.

  3. Actinic Granuloma Annulare With Scarring and Open Comedones.

    PubMed

    Gavioli, Cfb; Valente, Nys; Sangueza, M; Nico, M M

    2017-02-14

    Actinic granuloma and annular elastolytic giant cell granuloma are variants of granuloma annulare affecting, respectively, sun-exposed and sun-covered skin sites on where, besides classical findings, abundant elastophagocytosis is observed. Here, we report a case of exuberant actinic granuloma annulare that, in addition to extensive scarring, showed multiple overlying open comedones. Markedly dilated follicular infundibula filled with compact masses of laminated keratinous material were observed in proximity to dermal inflammation composed of many histiocytes and multinucleated giant cells in close association with degenerated elastic fibers and abundant elastophagocytosis.

  4. Changes in tracheid and ray traits in fire scars of North American conifers and their ecophysiological implications

    PubMed Central

    Arbellay, Estelle; Stoffel, Markus; Sutherland, Elaine K.; Smith, Kevin T.; Falk, Donald A.

    2014-01-01

    Background and Aims Fire scars have been widely used as proxies for the reconstruction of fire history; however, little is known about the impact of fire injury on wood anatomy. This study investigates changes in tracheid and ray traits in fire scars of Douglas fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii), western larch (Larix occidentalis) and ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa), and discusses their ecophysiological implications for tree recovery from fire. Methods Transverse and tangential microsections were prepared for light microscopy and image analysis. Measurements of tracheids and rays were made in the three spatial dimensions: axially (at different section heights), radially (in different rings) and tangentially (with increasing distance from the wound margin). Key Results Changes were strongest in the first year after fire injury, with a decrease in tracheid size (by 25–30 %) and an increase in tracheid density (by 21–53 %) for the three species. In addition, an increase in ray size (by 5–27 %) and an increase in ray density (by 19–36 %) were found in P. menziesii and L. occidentalis. Changes were comparable along the fire-injured stem and were often most marked close to the fire scar. Conclusions The differentiation after fire injury of narrower and more numerous tracheids expresses a trade-off between hydraulic safety and hydraulic efficiency, while that of larger and more numerous rays serves compartmentalization and wound closure, mechanical strength and defence responses. Pinus ponderosa does not generally produce more ray tissue after fire injury and thus appears to be more adapted to fire. PMID:24941999

  5. Wetland fire scar monitoring and analysis using archival Landsat data for the Everglades

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jones, John W.; Hall, Annette E.; Foster, Ann M.; Smith, Thomas J.

    2013-01-01

    The ability to document the frequency, extent, and severity of fires in wetlands, as well as the dynamics of post-fire wetland land cover, informs fire and wetland science, resource management, and ecosystem protection. Available information on Everglades burn history has been based on field data collection methods that evolved through time and differ by land management unit. Our objectives were to (1) design and test broadly applicable and repeatable metrics of not only fire scar delineation but also post-fire land cover dynamics through exhaustive use of the Landsat satellite data archives, and then (2) explore how those metrics relate to various hydrologic and anthropogenic factors that may influence post-fire land cover dynamics. Visual interpretation of every Landsat scene collected over the study region during the study time frame produced a new, detailed database of burn scars greater than 1.6 ha in size in the Water Conservation Areas and post-fire land cover dynamics for Everglades National Park fires greater than 1.6 ha in area. Median burn areas were compared across several landscape units of the Greater Everglades and found to differ as a function of administrative unit and fire history. Some burned areas transitioned to open water, exhibiting water depths and dynamics that support transition mechanisms proposed in the literature. Classification tree techniques showed that time to green-up and return to pre-burn character were largely explained by fire management practices and hydrology. Broadly applicable as they use data from the global, nearly 30-year-old Landsat archive, these methods for documenting wetland burn extent and post-fire land cover change enable cost-effective collection of new data on wetland fire ecology and independent assessment of fire management practice effectiveness.

  6. Fat Grafting in Burn Scar Alleviates Neuropathic Pain via Anti-Inflammation Effect in Scar and Spinal Cord

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Shu-Hung; Wu, Sheng-Hua; Lee, Su-Shin; Chang, Kao-Ping; Chai, Chee-Yin; Yeh, Jwu-Lai; Lin, Sin-Daw; Kwan, Aij-Lie; David Wang, Hui-Min; Lai, Chung-Sheng

    2015-01-01

    Burn-induced neuropathic pain is complex, and fat grafting has reportedly improved neuropathic pain. However, the mechanism of fat grafting in improving neuropathic pain is unclear. Previous investigations have found that neuroinflammation causes neuropathic pain, and anti-inflammatory targeting may provide potential therapeutic opportunities in neuropathic pain. We hypothesized that fat grafting in burn scars improves the neuropathic pain through anti-inflammation. Burn-induced scar pain was confirmed using a mechanical response test 4 weeks after burn injuries, and autologous fat grafting in the scar area was performed simultaneously. After 4 weeks, the animals were sacrificed, and specimens were collected for the inflammation test, including COX-2, iNOS, and nNOS in the injured skin and spinal cord dorsal horns through immunohistochemistry and Western assays. Furthermore, pro-inflammatory cytokines (IL-1 β and TNF-α) in the spinal cord were collected. Double immunofluorescent staining images for measuring p-IκB, p-NFκB, p-JNK, and TUNEL as well as Western blots of AKT, Bax/Bcl-2 for the inflammatory process, and apoptosis were analyzed. Fat grafting significantly reduced COX2, nNOS, and iNOS in the skin and spinal cord dorsal horns, as well as IL-1β and TNF-α, compared with the burn group. Moreover, regarding the anti-inflammatory effect, the apoptosis cells in the spinal cord significantly decreased after the fat grafting in the burn injury group. Fat grafting was effective in treating burn-induced neuropathic pain through the alleviation of neuroinflammation and ameliorated spinal neuronal apoptosis. PMID:26368011

  7. Lysyl oxidase activity in human normal skins and postburn scars.

    PubMed

    Hayakawa, T; Hino, N; Fuyamada, H; Nagatsu, T; Aoyama, H

    1976-09-06

    Lysyl oxidase activity of human normal skins derived from the frontal thighs of 33 subjects showed large variations and the mean value was 11 455 +/- 7 172 (S.D.) cpm/g of wet weight tissue. The age of lesion affected the lysyl oxidase activity in postburn scars. Granulation tissues showed a fairly low activity; however, the activity increased sharply within 2--3 months, and reached a significantly higher value than that of normal skin. The high level of activity continued for up to 2--3 years, then gradually decreased to normal range after 5 years or so. Lysyl oxidase activity was detected only after 4 M urea treatment of tissues. Benzylamine oxidase activity also showed large variations in both normal skins and postburn scars, with mean values of: 0.128 +/- 0.077 (S.D.) and 0.145 +/- 0.090 (S.D.) mmol/g of wet weight/h, respectively. No correlation was observed between lysyl oxidase and benzylamine oxidase activities. The granulation tissues showed significantly high values of benzylamine oxidase activity in contrast to the low values of lysyl oxidase activity.

  8. Anti-inflammatory cytokine TSG-6 inhibits hypertrophic scar formation in a rabbit ear model.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hui; Chen, Zhao; Li, Xiao-Jing; Ma, Li; Tang, Yue-Ling

    2015-03-15

    Hypertrophic scars are characterized by excessive fibrosis and extracellular matrix (ECM) deposition and can be functionally and cosmetically problematic; however, there are few satisfactory treatments for controlling hypertrophic scars. The inflammatory cells and cytokines involved in excessive inflammation during wound healing facilitate fibroblast proliferation and collagen deposition, leading to pathologic scar formation. TSG-6 exhibits anti-inflammatory activity. This study examined the effect of recombinant TSG-6 on inflammation in hypertrophic scars using a rabbit ear model. Six 7-mm, full-thickness, circular wounds were made on the ears of 12 rabbits. TSG-6 and PBS were intradermally injected into the right and left ear wounds, respectively. The methods of TEM and TUNEL were used to detect fibroblast apoptosis. The expressions of inflammatory factors: IL-1β, IL-6 and TNF-α, were detected by immunohistochemistry and real time polymerase chain reaction. Collagen I and III expression detected by immunohistochemistry and Masson׳s trichrome staining and SEI (scar elevation index) was used to evaluate the extent of scarring. TSG-6 injection mitigated the formation of a hypertrophic scar in the rabbit ear. TSG-6-treated wounds exhibited decreased inflammation compared with the control group, as evidenced by the lower levels of IL-1β, IL-6, TNF-α and MPO. The SEI and the synthesis of collagens I and III were significantly decreased in the TSG-6-treated scars compared with control scars. The apoptosis rate was higher in the TSG-6-treated scars. TSG-6 exhibited anti-inflammatory effects during the wound healing process and cicatrization and significantly diminished hypertrophic scar formation in a rabbit ear model.

  9. A novel immune competent murine hypertrophic scar contracture model: a tool to elucidate disease mechanism and develop new therapies.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, Mohamed Magdy; Bond, Jennifer; Bergeron, Andrew; Miller, Kyle J; Ehanire, Tosan; Quiles, Carlos; Lorden, Elizabeth R; Medina, Manuel A; Fisher, Mark; Klitzman, Bruce; Selim, M Angelica; Leong, Kam W; Levinson, Howard

    2014-01-01

    Hypertrophic scar (HSc) contraction following burn injury causes contractures. Contractures are painful and disfiguring. Current therapies are marginally effective. To study pathogenesis and develop new therapies, a murine model is needed. We have created a validated immune-competent murine HSc model. A third-degree burn was created on dorsum of C57BL/6 mice. Three days postburn, tissue was excised and grafted with ear skin. Graft contraction was analyzed and tissue harvested on different time points. Outcomes were compared with human condition to validate the model. To confirm graft survival, green fluorescent protein (GFP) mice were used, and histologic analysis was performed to differentiate between ear and back skin. Role of panniculus carnosus in contraction was analyzed. Cellularity was assessed with 4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole. Collagen maturation was assessed with Picro-sirius red. Mast cells were stained with Toluidine blue. Macrophages were detected with F4/80 immune. Vascularity was assessed with CD31 immune. RNA for contractile proteins was detected by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR). Elastic moduli of skin and scar tissue were analyzed using a microstrain analyzer. Grafts contracted to ∼45% of their original size by day 14 and maintained their size. Grafting of GFP mouse skin onto wild-type mice, and analysis of dermal thickness and hair follicle density, confirmed graft survival. Interestingly, hair follicles disappeared after grafting and regenerated in ear skin configuration by day 30. Radiological analysis revealed that panniculus carnosus doesn't contribute to contraction. Microscopic analyses showed that grafts show increase in cellularity. Granulation tissue formed after day 3. Collagen analysis revealed increases in collagen maturation over time. CD31 stain revealed increased vascularity. Macrophages and mast cells were increased. qRT-PCR showed up-regulation of transforming growth factor beta, alpha smooth muscle

  10. Tissue tonometry is a simple, objective measure for pliability of burn scar: is it reliable?

    PubMed

    Lye, Ian; Edgar, Dale W; Wood, Fiona M; Carroll, Sara

    2006-01-01

    Objective measurement of burn scar response to treatment is important to facilitate individual patient care, research, and service development. This work examines the validity and reliability of the tonometer as a means of quantifying scar pliability. Ten burn survivors were recruited into the study. Triplicate measures were taken for each of four scar and one normal skin point. The pliability score from the Vancouver Scar Scale also was used as a comparison. The tonometer demonstrated a high degree of reliability (intraclass correlation coefficients 0.91-0.94). It also was shown to provide a valid measure of pliability by quantifying decreased tissue deformation for scar (2.04 +/- 0.45 mm) compared with normal tissue (3.02 +/- 0.92 mm; t = 4.28, P = .004) and a moderate correlation with Vancouver Scar Scale scores. The tissue tonometer provides a repeatable, objective index of burn scar pliability. Using the methods described, it is a simple, clinically useful technique for monitoring an individual's scar.

  11. Rupture of uterine scar 3 weeks after vaginal birth after cesarean section (VBAC).

    PubMed

    El-Kehdy, Georges I; Ghanem, Joseph K; El-Rahi, Chadi C; Nakad, Toufic I

    2006-06-01

    Uterine scar rupture in vaginal birth after cesarean section (VBAC) usually occurs during labor or after placental extraction. We report herein the case of a patient who had a cesarean section in her first pregnancy and a VBAC in her second. The present one also ended with a normal VBAC and a documented intact scar, which then ruptured three weeks later.

  12. Connexin43 contributes to electrotonic conduction across scar tissue in the intact heart

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahoney, Vanessa M.; Mezzano, Valeria; Mirams, Gary R.; Maass, Karen; Li, Zhen; Cerrone, Marina; Vasquez, Carolina; Bapat, Aneesh; Delmar, Mario; Morley, Gregory E.

    2016-05-01

    Studies have demonstrated non-myocytes, including fibroblasts, can electrically couple to myocytes in culture. However, evidence demonstrating current can passively spread across scar tissue in the intact heart remains elusive. We hypothesize electrotonic conduction occurs across non-myocyte gaps in the heart and is partly mediated by Connexin43 (Cx43). We investigated whether non-myocytes in ventricular scar tissue are electrically connected to surrounding myocardial tissue in wild type and fibroblast-specific protein-1 driven conditional Cx43 knock-out mice (Cx43fsp1KO). Electrical coupling between the scar and uninjured myocardium was demonstrated by injecting current into the myocardium and recording depolarization in the scar through optical mapping. Coupling was significantly reduced in Cx43fsp1KO hearts. Voltage signals were recorded using microelectrodes from control scars but no signals were obtained from Cx43fsp1KO hearts. Recordings showed significantly decreased amplitude, depolarized resting membrane potential, increased duration and reduced upstroke velocity compared to surrounding myocytes, suggesting that the non-excitable cells in the scar closely follow myocyte action potentials. These results were further validated by mathematical simulations. Optical mapping demonstrated that current delivered within the scar could induce activation of the surrounding myocardium. These data demonstrate non-myocytes in the scar are electrically coupled to myocytes, and coupling depends on Cx43 expression.

  13. Burn Patient Acuity Demographics, Scar Contractures and Rehabilitation Treatment Time Related to Patient Outcomes (ACT)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-10-01

    Patient Acuity Demographics, Scar Contractures and Rehabilitation Treatment Time Related to Patient Outcomes (ACT) Mr. Reginald Richard American Burn...and Rehabilitation Treatment Time Related to Patient Outcomes, conveniently referred to as the ACT representing Acuity, Contractures and Time, is...wound leading to scar contracture begins almost immediately after the burning process stops. Rehabilitation treatment delivered prior to beginning

  14. Lesion of a lower lip scar--an initial presentation of sarcoidosis.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro de Castro, Maria Cristina; Maya, Tullia Cuzzi; Pereira, Lea Freitas; Lugon, Nilza Viana; Ramos-e-Silva, Marcia

    2002-09-01

    The development of sarcoidosis at the site of previous scar is unusual and may be the first sign of systemic disease. Sarcoidosis on a lower lip scar persisting for 13 years, which pointed to examination for internal manifestations, is presented along with a review of the subject

  15. Keratosis follicularis spinulosa decalvans: a rare cause of scarring alopecia in two young Indian girls.

    PubMed

    Maheswari, Uma G; Chaitra, V; Mohan, Subbiah S

    2013-01-01

    Keratosis follicularis spinulosa decalvans (KFSD) is an X-linked xenodermatosis characterized by scarring alopecia and follicular hyperkeratosis. This condition mainly affects males with females being carriers and will have milder symptoms. We present two sisters with severe form of KFSD, progressing to scarring alopecia.

  16. Keratosis Follicularis Spinulosa Decalvans: A Rare Cause of Scarring Alopecia in Two Young Indian Girls

    PubMed Central

    Maheswari, Uma G; Chaitra, V; Mohan, Subbiah S

    2013-01-01

    Keratosis follicularis spinulosa decalvans (KFSD) is an X-linked xenodermatosis characterized by scarring alopecia and follicular hyperkeratosis. This condition mainly affects males with females being carriers and will have milder symptoms. We present two sisters with severe form of KFSD, progressing to scarring alopecia. PMID:23960394

  17. Long-term Observation of Soil Creep Activity around a Landslide Scar

    EPA Science Inventory

    Rate of sediment infilling into landslide scars by soil creep is needed to estimate the timing of subsequent landslide activity at a particular site. However, knowledge about the spatial distribution of its activity around the landslide scar is scarce. Additionally, there are few...

  18. Inactivation of Salmonella on tomato stem scars by acidic sanitizing solutions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Tomato stem scars are a likely contamination point for Salmonella, although they are recalcitrant to decontamination. Investigating stem scar sanitation may represent a worst-case-scenario model for inactivating Salmonella from externally-contaminated tomatoes. A composite of Salmonella Saintpau...

  19. Effective treatment of acne scars using pneumatic injection of hyaluronic acid.

    PubMed

    Patel, Tapan; Tevet, Oren

    2015-01-01

    Acne scars remain a challenging condition to treat despite multiple currently available technologies. This study evaluated the clinical efficacy and safety of pneumatic injections of Hyaluronic Acid in the treatment of acne scars. Two patients (Fitzpatrick skin type IV-V) with acne scars received two sessions of pneumatic, needleless injections of crosslinked hyaluronic acid (HA) at 4-week intervals. The treatment response was assessed by comparing pre- and 3-month posttreatment clinical photography. The patients' acne scar grade improved from 2 to 1 in the first case, and 3 to 2 in the second case, based on independent physician assessment. Patient degree of satisfaction was similar to the physicians' assessment. No significant adverse events were noted. We conclude that pneumatic injection technology to deliver HA to the tissue is an effective and safe method for improving acne scars, even in patients with dark complexion.

  20. Ineffectual Medical Treatment of Cesarean Scar Ectopic Pregnancy With Systemic Methotrexate: A Report of Two Cases.

    PubMed

    Kelekçi, Sefa; Aydoğmuş, Serpil; Aydoğmuş, Hüseyin; Eriş, Serenat; Demirel, Emine; Şen Selim, Halime

    2014-01-01

    The implantation of a pregnancy within the scar of a previous cesarean section is known as a "cesarean scar pregnancy." Its incidence was reported to be 6.1%. However, with the increasing rates of cesarean sections, the incidence is expected to rise. A variety of conservative and surgical treatment modalities have been proposed for the management of cesarean scar pregnancy; however, there are no optimal universal treatment guidelines because of its rarity. Treatment should be tailored to the individual patient. It is obvious that more scar pregnancies will be seen in the future and therefore a set of criteria for the choice of various modes of management should be developed. Here, we present 2 cases of cesarean scar pregnancies treated with a local injection of potassium chloride after the failure of methotrexate administration.

  1. Targeted killing of myofibroblasts by biosurfactant di-rhamnolipid suggests a therapy against scar formation

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Chong; Jiang, Lifang; Shao, Huawei; You, Chuangang; Zhang, Guoliang; Ding, Sitong; Bian, Tingwei; Han, Chunmao; Meng, Qin

    2016-01-01

    Pathological myofibroblasts are often involved in skin scarring via generating contractile force and over-expressing collagen fibers, but no compound has been found to inhibit the myofibroblasts without showing severe toxicity to surrounding physiological cells. Here we report that di-rhamnolipid, a biosurfactant secreted by Pseudomonas aeruginosa, showed potent effects on scar therapy via a unique mechanism of targeted killing the myofibroblasts. In cell culture, the fibroblasts-derived myofibroblasts were more sensitive to di-rhamnolipid toxicity than fibroblasts at a concentration-dependent manner, and could be completely inhibited of their specific functions including α-SMA expression and collagen secretion/contraction. The anti-fibrotic function of di-rhamnolipid was further verified in rabbit ear hypertrophic scar models by presenting the significant reduction of scar elevation index, type I collagen fibers and α-SMA expression. In this regard, di-rhamnolipid treatment could be suggested as a therapy against skin scarring. PMID:27901027

  2. Successful pregnancy after excision of cesarean scar endometriosis with uterovesicocutaneous fistula: A rare case report

    PubMed Central

    Juneja, Sunil Kumar; Tandon, Pooja; Chopra, Isha

    2016-01-01

    Scar endometriosis is an infrequent type of extrapelvic endometriosis. The most common extrapelvic form of endometriosis is cutaneous endometriosis, involving scar tissues occurring after obstetric or gynecologic procedures such as episiotomy, hysterotomy, cesarean section, and even laparoscopic surgery. The clinical presentation of scar endometriosis, i.e., tender swellings, mimics other dermatological and/or surgical conditions and delays the diagnosis. Scar endometriosis very rarely can get complicated with uterocutaneous fistula with a reported incidence of very few cases in world literature. We report a case of a 36-year-old woman presenting with scar endometriosis with complicated uterocutaneous fistula 11 years after her last lower segment cesarean section, managed successfully with laparotomy-fistulectomy and sleeve resection of the bladder with repair followed by successful subsequent spontaneous conception and pregnancy terminated by lower segment cesarean section. PMID:27857904

  3. Fractional CO2 lasers for the treatment of atrophic acne scars: a review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Magnani, Lauren Rose; Schweiger, Eric S

    2014-04-01

    This review examines the efficacy and safety of fractional CO2 lasers for the treatment of atrophic scarring secondary to acne vulgaris. We reviewed 20 papers published between 2008 and 2013 that conducted clinical studies using fractional CO2 lasers to treat atrophic scarring. We discuss the prevalence and pathogenesis of acne scarring, as well as the laser mechanism. The histologic findings are included to highlight the ability of these lasers to induce the collagen reorganization and formation that improves scar appearance. We considered the number of treatments and different laser settings to determine which methods achieve optimal outcomes. We noted unique treatment regimens that yielded superior results. An overview of adverse effects is included to identify the most common ones. We concluded that more studies need to be done using uniform treatment parameters and reporting in order to establish which fractional CO2 laser treatment approaches allow for the greatest scar improvement.

  4. Follicular density and ratios in scarring and nonscarring alopecia.

    PubMed

    Horenstein, Marcelo G; Bacheler, Christian J

    2013-12-01

    Follicular counts from transverse sectioning of scalp biopsies have not been statistically scrutinized across disease entities in a standardized fashion. We applied uniform histological criteria and strict statistical measures to compare nonscarring and scarring alopecia. We studied 700 consecutive cases including 355 nonscarring alopecia [136 telogen effluvium, 115 alopecia areata (AA), 95 androgenetic alopecia, and 9 trichotillosis] and 345 scarring alopecia [238 central centrifugal cicatricial alopecia, 29 traction alopecia, 26 lichen planopilaris, 21 end-stage alopecia, 20 lupus erythematosus, 11 folliculitis decalvans]. We counted follicular units, anagen, catagen/telogen, and vellus-like follicles at the central follicular unit level. We calculated follicular density per square centimeter, anagen percentage, telogen percentage, anagen to telogen ratio, and terminal to vellus ratio (TVR). The following achieved statistical significance (P < 0.05): follicular density was 249.4 ± 4.6 in nonscarring alopecia versus 120.1 ± 3.8 in scarring alopecia, follicular density of telogen effluvium was 273.5 ± 7.0 (36.5 ± 12.5 above nonscarring alopecia mean), TVR of androgenetic alopecia was 1.6 ± 0.1 (3.6 ± 0.5 below nonscarring alopecia mean), TVR of AA was 3.2 ± 0.4 (1.5 ± 0.6 below nonscarring alopecia mean), anagen percentage of AA was 26.8 ± 1.8 (26.3 ± 3.0 below nonscarring alopecia mean), anagen to telogen ratio of AA was 1.6 ± 0.4 (3.9 ± 0.7 below nonscarring alopecia mean), and telogen percentage of AA was 59.0 ± 2.3 (31.0 ± 3.5 above nonscarring alopecia mean). There exists a great overlap of densities and ratios across the various disorders due to the limited nature of the punch biopsy sample, variations in scalp anatomy, disease biology and duration, patient gender, and age, etc. Our data provide a bell curve distribution that helps analyze hair counts in the clinicopathologic context.

  5. Characterization and structure of the manganese-responsive transcriptional regulator ScaR.

    PubMed

    Stoll, Kate E; Draper, William E; Kliegman, Joseph I; Golynskiy, Misha V; Brew-Appiah, Rhoda A T; Phillips, Rebecca K; Brown, Hattie K; Breyer, Wendy A; Jakubovics, Nicholas S; Jenkinson, Howard F; Brennan, Richard G; Cohen, Seth M; Glasfeld, Arthur

    2009-11-03

    The streptococcal coaggregation regulator (ScaR) of Streptococcus gordonii is a manganese-dependent transcriptional regulator. When intracellular manganese concentrations become elevated, ScaR represses transcription of the scaCBA operon, which encodes a manganese uptake transporter. A member of the DtxR/MntR family of metalloregulators, ScaR shares sequence similarity with other family members, and many metal-binding residues are conserved. Here, we show that ScaR is an active dimer, with two dimers binding the 46 base pair scaC operator. Each ScaR subunit binds two manganese ions, and the protein is activated by a variety of other metal ions, including Cd(2+), Co(2+), and Ni(2+) but not Zn(2+). The crystal structure of apo-ScaR reveals a tertiary and quaternary structure similar to its homologue, the iron-responsive regulator DtxR. While each DtxR subunit binds a metal ion in two sites, labeled primary and ancillary, crystal structures of ScaR determined in the presence of Cd(2+) and Zn(2+) show only a single occupied metal-binding site that is novel to ScaR. The site analogous to the primary site in DtxR is unoccupied, and the ancillary site is absent from ScaR. Instead, metal ions bind to ScaR at a site labeled "secondary", which is composed of Glu80, Cys123, His125, and Asp160 and lies roughly 5 A away from where the ancillary site would be predicted to exist. This difference suggests that ScaR and its closely related homologues are activated by a mechanism distinct from that of either DtxR or MntR.

  6. Lasting mantle scars lead to perennial plate tectonics

    PubMed Central

    Heron, Philip J.; Pysklywec, Russell N.; Stephenson, Randell

    2016-01-01

    Mid-ocean ridges, transform faults, subduction and continental collisions form the conventional theory of plate tectonics to explain non-rigid behaviour at plate boundaries. However, the theory does not explain directly the processes involved in intraplate deformation and seismicity. Recently, damage structures in the lithosphere have been linked to the origin of plate tectonics. Despite seismological imaging suggesting that inherited mantle lithosphere heterogeneities are ubiquitous, their plate tectonic role is rarely considered. Here we show that deep lithospheric anomalies can dominate shallow geological features in activating tectonics in plate interiors. In numerical experiments, we found that structures frozen into the mantle lithosphere through plate tectonic processes can behave as quasi-plate boundaries reactivated under far-field compressional forcing. Intraplate locations where proto-lithospheric plates have been scarred by earlier suturing could be regions where latent plate boundaries remain, and where plate tectonics processes are expressed as a ‘perennial' phenomenon. PMID:27282541

  7. Lasting mantle scars lead to perennial plate tectonics.

    PubMed

    Heron, Philip J; Pysklywec, Russell N; Stephenson, Randell

    2016-06-10

    Mid-ocean ridges, transform faults, subduction and continental collisions form the conventional theory of plate tectonics to explain non-rigid behaviour at plate boundaries. However, the theory does not explain directly the processes involved in intraplate deformation and seismicity. Recently, damage structures in the lithosphere have been linked to the origin of plate tectonics. Despite seismological imaging suggesting that inherited mantle lithosphere heterogeneities are ubiquitous, their plate tectonic role is rarely considered. Here we show that deep lithospheric anomalies can dominate shallow geological features in activating tectonics in plate interiors. In numerical experiments, we found that structures frozen into the mantle lithosphere through plate tectonic processes can behave as quasi-plate boundaries reactivated under far-field compressional forcing. Intraplate locations where proto-lithospheric plates have been scarred by earlier suturing could be regions where latent plate boundaries remain, and where plate tectonics processes are expressed as a 'perennial' phenomenon.

  8. Lasting mantle scars lead to perennial plate tectonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heron, Philip J.; Pysklywec, Russell N.; Stephenson, Randell

    2016-06-01

    Mid-ocean ridges, transform faults, subduction and continental collisions form the conventional theory of plate tectonics to explain non-rigid behaviour at plate boundaries. However, the theory does not explain directly the processes involved in intraplate deformation and seismicity. Recently, damage structures in the lithosphere have been linked to the origin of plate tectonics. Despite seismological imaging suggesting that inherited mantle lithosphere heterogeneities are ubiquitous, their plate tectonic role is rarely considered. Here we show that deep lithospheric anomalies can dominate shallow geological features in activating tectonics in plate interiors. In numerical experiments, we found that structures frozen into the mantle lithosphere through plate tectonic processes can behave as quasi-plate boundaries reactivated under far-field compressional forcing. Intraplate locations where proto-lithospheric plates have been scarred by earlier suturing could be regions where latent plate boundaries remain, and where plate tectonics processes are expressed as a `perennial' phenomenon.

  9. [Cause and prevention of surgical site infection and hypertrophic scars].

    PubMed

    Ogawa, Rei

    2012-03-01

    Surgical site infection (SSI) occurs at the site of surgery within 1 month of an operation or within 1 year of an operation if a foreign body is implanted as part of the surgery. Most SSIs (about 70%) are superficial infections involving the skin and subcutaneous tissues only. The remaining infections are more serious and can involve tissues under the skin, organs, or implanted material. Hypertrophic scars( HSs) occur frequently on particular sites, including the anterior chest wall. The anterior chest wall is frequently subjected to skin stretching caused by the natural daily movements of the body. Most cases of SSIs and HSs can be prevented by (1) suture technique modification to prevent high stretching tension and ischemia, and (2) appropriate wound care after surgery. It would be useful to avoid subjecting wounded skin to sustained mechanical force, thereby permitting the wound to rest and heal normally.

  10. Fire Scars Area Estimation Using CHRIS PROBA Satellite Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filchev, Lachezar; Dimitrov, Petar

    2013-12-01

    The dawn of 21st century is marked by severe and unpredictable natural and man - made hazards and disasters linked as to climate change as to human impact on environment. To study their effects on natural landscapes and protected areas it is important to perform, in some restrict regime protected areas, a continuous monitoring. Earth observation by satellites is one of the most promising instruments for this as it has the necessary time, spatial, and spectral resolution for this as well as it provides for non-contact estimation of the overall condition of the environment. This study presents preliminary results of fire scars area estimation on the territory of Bistrishko Branishte UNESCO Man and Biosphere (MAB) reserve in Vitosha Mountain, Bulgaria using CHRIS/PROBA satellite data. During the summer and early autumn of 2012 CHRIS/PROBA instrument was tasked to perform a series of acquisitions with a view to study the vegetation structure. The study uses two CHRIS/PROBA scenes acquired subsequently on 22 June 2012 and on 28 September 2012. The wildfire, which effects are studied, took place during the first two weeks of July 2012. After it was settled the second acquisition of CHRIS/PROBA instrument made possible the analysis of the post fire situation. The methods used for the study are the standard methods for image change detection based on spectral data employed in ENVI software (Academic license). In order to perform the change detection, the CHRIS/PROBA source data was geometrically and atmospherically corrected as well as co-registered. The multi angle product of CHRIS/PROBA Mode 1, consisting of 5 images, was used to check to what extent the five viewing angles affect the area estimation of the fire scars in the mountainous area following same procedures. The results from the analysis shown that almost 60 hectares from the coniferous vegetation (dead and healthy tree stands) were devastated by the wildfire.

  11. Inhibitory effect of biopolymer materials on scar formation following trabeculectomy

    PubMed Central

    Sha, Qian; Jiao, Guang-Yu; Cui, Hai-Bin; Jie, Wang; Sun, Li-Bin; Chen, Ming; Fu, Song-Bin

    2011-01-01

    AIM To investigate the inhibitory effects of amniotic membrane, polylactic acid membrane and chitosan membrane on scar formation following trabeculectomy. METHODS A total of 24 New Zealand white rabbits (48 eyes) were randomly divided into 4 groups: amniotic membrane group, polylactic acid membrane group, chitosan membrane group, and control group, with 6 rabbits (12 eyes) in each group. The left eyes underwent routine trabeculectomy, and the right eyes were considered as controls. Amniotic membrane, polylactic acid membrane and chitosan membrane were respectively installed under sclera flap in three groups, but any treatment was not applied in control group. Intraocular pressure, conjunctival filtering bleb, and anterior chamber inflammation responses were monitored at day 1, 3, 7, 14, 28 and 56 post-operatively. Eyeball tissue underwent histopathological examination at day 56 post-operatively. RESULTS Fibrocytes and inflammatory cells were reduced in amniotic membrane, polylactic acid membrane and chitosan membrane groups compared to that in control group. At day 1 post-operatively, intraocular pressure was decreased in three membrane groups compared to that in control group. At day 14 post-operatively, the intraocular pressure was decreased significantly, while it of three membrane groups was significantly lower than that of preoperative (P<0.01). There were no significant differences among three membrane groups (P>0.05). Filtering bleb of four groups was clearly observed at day 7 post-operatively, but there was no significant difference in pair-wise comparison. At day 28 and 56 post-operatively, filtering bleb in control group was significantly narrowed compared to that in three membrane groups (P<0.05), but there was no significant difference in pair-wise comparison of three membrane groups. CONCLUSION All amniotic membrane, polylactic acid membrane and chitosan membrane can effectively inhibit scar formation following trabeculectomy, the effect of amniotic

  12. Patterns in composition, abundance and scarring of whale sharks Rhincodon typus near Holbox Island, Mexico.

    PubMed

    Ramírez-Macías, D; Meekan, M; De La Parra-Venegas, R; Remolina-Suárez, F; Trigo-Mendoza, M; Vázquez-Juárez, R

    2012-04-01

    Photo-identification and conventional tagging were used to estimate population size and structure of the whale shark Rhincodon typus near Holbox Island, Mexico. From 2005 to 2008, photographs of spot patterns behind the last gill slit and in a lateral view on the left side of each animal were used to identify individuals. Additionally, 578 R. typus were tagged using conventional marker tags. Of these and the 350 R. typus that were identified from 1184 photographs, 65% were male; 27%, female and 8%, indeterminate sex. Photographed R. typus ranged in size from 2·5 to 9·5 m total length. Size was bimodal with a large peak at 6 m and a smaller peak at 7 m. Photo-identification showed that there was considerable loss of marker tags. Few of these remained on the animals for more than a year, so that interannual re-sights using tagging could not be used in population modelling. Forty six interannual re-sightings were found in the photographic library; the interval between these re-sightings was typically 1 year. It was estimated that the R. typus aggregation near Holbox Island ranged from 521 to 809 individuals, based on mark-recapture models. From 13 to 33% of R. typus photographed had scars that were attributable to boat strikes. This study provides a baseline for assessing the status of R. typus near Holbox Island. This information is useful to understand drivers of local population size and distribution and potential concerns about increasing effects of tourism on R. typus in this area and for designing better management programmes for R. typus conservation.

  13. In vitro mechanical compression induces apoptosis and regulates cytokines release in hypertrophic scars.

    PubMed

    Renò, Filippo; Sabbatini, Maurizio; Lombardi, Francesca; Stella, Maurizio; Pezzuto, Carla; Magliacani, Gilberto; Cannas, Mario

    2003-01-01

    Hypertrophic scars resulting from severe burns are usually treated by continuous elastic compression. Although pressure therapy reaches success rates of 60-85% its mechanisms of action are still poorly understood. In this study, apoptosis induction and release of interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta) and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) were evaluated in normal (n = 3) and hypertrophic (=7) scars from burns after in vitro mechanical compression. In the absence of compression (basal condition) apoptotic cells, scored using terminal deoxyribonucleotidyl transferase assay, were present after 24 hours in the derma of both normal scar (23 +/- 0.4% of total cell) and hypertrophic scar (11.3 +/- 1.4%). Mechanical compression (constant pressure of 35 mmHg for 24 hours) increased apoptotic cell percentage both in normal scar (29.5 +/- 0.4%) and hypertrophic scar (29 +/- 1.7%). IL-1beta released in the medium was undetectable in normal scar under basal conditions while in hypertrophic scar the IL-1beta concentration was 3.48 +/- 0.2 ng/g. Compression in hypertrophic scar-induced secretion of IL-1beta twofold higher compared to basal condition. (7.72 +/- 0.2 ng/g). TNF-alpha basal concentration measured in normal scar medium was 8.52 +/- 4.01 ng/g and compression did not altered TNF-alpha release (12.86 +/- 7.84 ng/g). TNF-alpha basal release was significantly higher in hypertrophic scar (14.74 +/- 1.42 ng/g) compared to normal scar samples and TNF-alpha secretion was diminished (3.52 +/- 0.97 ng/g) after compression. In conclusion, in our in vitro model, mechanical compression resembling the clinical use of elastocompression was able to strongly increase apoptosis in the hypertrophic scar derma as observed during granulation tissue regression in normal wound healing. Moreover, the observed modulation of IL-1beta and TNF-alpha release by mechanical loading could play a key role in hypertrophy regression induced by elastocompression.

  14. Should Cesarean Scar Defect Be Treated Laparoscopically? A Case Report and Review of the Literature.

    PubMed

    Api, Murat; Boza, Aysen; Gorgen, Husnu; Api, Olus

    2015-01-01

    Several obstetric complications due to inappropriately healed cesarean scar such as placenta accreta, scar dehiscence, and ectopic scar pregnancy are increasingly reported along with rising cesarean rates. Furthermore, many gynecologic conditions, including abnormal uterine bleeding, pelvic pain and infertility, are imputed to deficient cesarean scar healing. Hysteroscopy is the most commonly reported approach for the revision of cesarean scar defects (CSDs). Nevertheless, existing evidence is inadequate to conclude that either hysteroscopy or laparoscopy is effective or superior to each other. Although several management options have been suggested recently, the laparoscopic approach has not been thoroughly scrutinized. We present a case and reviewed the data related to the laparoscopic repair of CSDs and compared the hysteroscopic and laparoscopic management options based on the data from previously published articles. As a result of our analyses, the laparoscopic approach increases uterine wall thickness when compared with the hysteroscopic approach, and both surgical techniques seem to be effective for the resolution of gynecologic symptoms. Hysteroscopic treatment most likely corrects the scar defect but does not strengthen the uterine wall; thus, the potential risk of dehiscence or rupture in subsequent pregnancies does not seem to be improved. Because large uterine defects are known risk factors for scar dehiscence, the repair of the defect to reinforce the myometrial endurance seems to be an appropriate method of treatment.

  15. Use of radiofrequency in cosmetic dermatology: focus on nonablative treatment of acne scars

    PubMed Central

    Simmons, Brian J; Griffith, Robert D; Falto-Aizpurua, Leyre A; Nouri, Keyvan

    2014-01-01

    Acne is a common affliction among many teens and some adults that usually resolves over time. However, the severe sequela of acne scarring can lead to long-term psychological and psychiatric problems. There exists a multitude of modalities to treat acne scars such as more invasive surgical techniques, subcision, chemical peels, ablative lasers, fractional lasers, etc. A more recent technique for the treatment of acne scars is nonablative radiofrequency (RF) that works by passing a current through the dermis at a preset depth to produce small thermal wounds in the dermis which, in turn, stimulates dermal remodeling to produce new collagen and soften scar defects. This review article demonstrates that out of all RF modalities, microneedle bipolar RF and fractional bipolar RF treatments offers the best results for acne scarring. An improvement of 25%–75% can be expected after three to four treatment sessions using one to two passes per session. Treatment results are optimal approximately 3 months after final treatment. Common side effects can include transient pain, erythema, and scabbing. Further studies are needed to determine what RF treatment modalities work best for specific scar subtypes, so that further optimization of RF treatments for acne scars can be determined. PMID:25540589

  16. A SCAR-based method for rapid identification of four major lepidopterous stored-product pests.

    PubMed

    Yao, Me-Chi; Chang, Shu-Chen; Lee, Chi-Yang; Lu, Kuang-Hui

    2012-06-01

    Since Taiwan became a World Trade Organization member in 2002, large quantities of grain have been imported from different countries, and insect pests are frequently intercepted from these imported commodities in quarantine inspection. Because most insects are intercepted as immature forms, morphological identification is problematic; therefore, we developed a DNA identification method based on a sequence-characterized amplified region- polymerase chain reaction (SCAR-PCR). Three sets of multiplex SCAR-PCR mixtures, namely SCAR-I, -II, and -III, were developed with each set composed of four species-specific primer pairs derived from the genomic DNA of four major lepidopterous stored-product pests: Corcyra cephalonica (Stainton), Cadra cautella (Walker), Sitotroga cerealella Oliver, and Plodia interpunctella (Hübner). The SCAR-I amplicons of C. cephalonica, C. cautella, S. cerealella, and P. interpunctella were 205, 550, 324, 382 bp, respectively, while those of SCAR-II were 341, 565, 261, and 170 bp, and those of SCAR-III were 514, 555, 445, and 299 bp. These multiplex PCR mixtures could sensitively and unambiguously detect and identify in approximately 5 h individuals among the four lepidopterous pests intercepted in imported stored-products. In summary, the SCAR-PCR method we developed represents a rapid, sensitive and accurate technique for identifying insect species of stored products in plant quarantine operation.

  17. The persistence of epiphyseal scars in the distal radius in adult individuals.

    PubMed

    Davies, Catriona; Hackman, Lucina; Black, Sue

    2016-01-01

    The use of radiographic imaging in the estimation of chronological age facilitates the analysis of structures not visible on gross morphological inspection. Following the completion of epiphyseal fusion, a thin radio-opaque band, the epiphyseal scar, may be observed at the locus of the former growth plate. The obliteration of this feature has previously been interpreted as the final stage of skeletal maturation and consequently has been included as a criterion in several methods of age estimation, particularly from the distal radius. Due to the recommendations relating to age estimation in living individuals, accurate assessment of age from the distal radius is of great importance in human identification; however, the validity of the interpretation of the obliteration of the epiphyseal scar as an age-related process has not been tested. A study was undertaken to assess the persistence of epiphyseal scars in adults between 20 and 50 years of age through the assessment of 616 radiographs of left and right distal radii from a cross-sectional population. This study found that 86% of females and 78% of males retained some remnant of the epiphyseal scar in the distal radius. The relationships between chronological age, biological sex and the persistence of the epiphyseal scar were not statistically significant. The findings of this study indicate that the epiphyseal scars may persist in adult individuals until at least 50 years of age. No maximum age should therefore be applied to the persistence of an epiphyseal scar in the distal radius.

  18. Effect of intense pulsed light on immature burn scars: A clinical study

    PubMed Central

    Sarkar, Arindam; Dewangan, Yatindra Kumar; Bain, Jayanta; Rakshit, Pritha; Dhruw, Krishnanand; Basu, Sandip Kanti; Saha, Jayanta Kumar; Majumdar, Bijay Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: As intense pulsed light (IPL) is widely used to treat cutaneous vascular malformations and also used as non-ablative skin rejunuvation to remodel the skin collagen. A study has been undertaken to gauze the effect of IPL on immature burn scars with regard to vascularity, pliability and height. Materials and Methods: This study was conducted between June 2013 and May 2014, among patients with immature burn scars that healed conservatively within 2 months. Photographic evidence of appearance of scars and grading and rating was done with Vancouver Scar Scale parameters. Ratings were done for both case and control scar after the completion of four IPL treatment sessions and were compared. Results: Out of the 19 cases, vascularity, pliability and height improved significantly (P < 0.05) in 13, 14 and 11 scars respectively following IPL treatment. Conclusions: Intense pulsed light was well-tolerated by patients, caused good improvement in terms of vascularity, pliability, and height of immature burn scar. PMID:25593424

  19. Establishing a Reproducible Hypertrophic Scar following Thermal Injury: A Porcine Model

    PubMed Central

    Rapp, Scott J.; Rumberg, Aaron; Visscher, Marty; Billmire, David A.; Schwentker, Ann S.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Our complete understanding of hypertrophic scarring is still deficient, as portrayed by the poor clinical outcomes when treating them. To address the need for alternative treatment strategies, we assess the swine animal burn model as an initial approach for immature scar evaluation and therapeutic application. Methods: Thermal contact burns were created on the dorsum of 3 domestic swine with the use of a branding iron at 170°F for 20 seconds. Deep partial-thickness burns were cared for with absorptive dressings over 10 weeks and wounds evaluated with laser and negative pressure transduction, histology, photographic analysis, and RNA isolation. Results: Overall average stiffness (mm Hg/mm) increased and elasticity (mm) decreased in the scars from the initial burn injury to 8 weeks when compared with normal skin (P < 0.01). Scars were thicker, more erythematous, and uniform in the caudal dorsum. The percent change of erythema in wounds increased from weeks 6 to 10. Histology demonstrated loss of dermal papillae, increased myofibroblast presence, vertically oriented vessels, epidermal and dermal hypercellularity, and parallel-layered collagen deposition. Immature scars remained elevated at 10 weeks, and minimal RNA was able to be isolated from the tissue. Conclusions: Deep partial-thickness thermal injury to the back of domestic swine produces an immature hypertrophic scar by 10 weeks following burn with thickness appearing to coincide with the location along the dorsal axis. With minimal pig to pig variation, we describe our technique to provide a testable immature scar model. PMID:25750848

  20. Echocardiography as a Screening Test for Myocardial Scarring in Children with Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Nield, Lynne; Dragulescu, Andreea; Benson, Lee

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is burdened with morbidity and mortality including tachyarrhythmias and sudden cardiac death. These complications are attributed in part to the formation of proarrhythmic scars in the myocardium. The presence of extensive LGE is a risk factor for adverse outcomes in HCM. Late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (cMRI) is the standard for the noninvasive evaluation of myocardial scars. However, echocardiography represents an attractive screening tool for myocardial scarring. The aim of this study was to compare the suitability of echocardiography to detect myocardial scars to the standard of cMRI-LGE. Methods. The cMRI studies and echocardiograms from 56 consecutive children with HCM were independently evaluated for the presence of cMRI-LGE and echocardiographic evidence of scarring by expert readers. Results. Echocardiography had a high sensitivity (93%) and negative predictive value (94%) in comparison to LGE. The false positive rate was high, leading to a low specificity (37%) and a low positive predictive value (35%). Conclusions. Given the poor specificity and positive predictive value, echocardiography is not a suitable screening test for the presence of myocardial scarring in children with HCM. However, children without echocardiographic evidence of myocardial scarring may not need to undergo cardiac magnetic resonance imaging to “rule in” LGE. PMID:27974896

  1. Making better scar: Emerging approaches for modifying mechanical and electrical properties following infarction and ablation.

    PubMed

    Holmes, Jeffrey W; Laksman, Zachary; Gepstein, Lior

    2016-01-01

    Following myocardial infarction (MI), damaged myocytes are replaced by collagenous scar tissue, which serves an important mechanical function - maintaining integrity of the heart wall against enormous mechanical forces - but also disrupts electrical function as structural and electrical remodeling in the infarct and borderzone predispose to re-entry and ventricular tachycardia. Novel emerging regenerative approaches aim to replace this scar tissue with viable myocytes. Yet an alternative strategy of therapeutically modifying selected scar properties may also prove important, and in some cases may offer similar benefits with lower risk or regulatory complexity. Here, we review potential goals for such modifications as well as recent proof-of-concept studies employing specific modifications, including gene therapy to locally increase conduction velocity or prolong the refractory period in and around the infarct scar, and modification of scar anisotropy to improve regional mechanics and pump function. Another advantage of scar modification techniques is that they have applications well beyond MI. In particular, ablation treats electrical abnormalities of the heart by intentionally generating scar to block aberrant conduction pathways. Yet in diseases such as atrial fibrillation (AF) where ablation can be extensive, treating the electrical disorder can significantly impair mechanical function. Creating smaller, denser scars that more effectively block conduction, and choosing the location of those lesions by balancing their electrical and mechanical impacts, could significantly improve outcomes for AF patients. We review some recent advances in this area, including the use of computational models to predict the mechanical effects of specific lesion sets and gene therapy for functional ablation. Overall, emerging techniques for modifying scar properties represents a potentially important set of tools for improving patient outcomes across a range of heart diseases

  2. Semi-automated scar detection in delayed enhanced cardiac magnetic resonance images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morisi, Rita; Donini, Bruno; Lanconelli, Nico; Rosengarden, James; Morgan, John; Harden, Stephen; Curzen, Nick

    2015-06-01

    Late enhancement cardiac magnetic resonance images (MRI) has the ability to precisely delineate myocardial scars. We present a semi-automated method for detecting scars in cardiac MRI. This model has the potential to improve routine clinical practice since quantification is not currently offered due to time constraints. A first segmentation step was developed for extracting the target regions for potential scar and determining pre-candidate objects. Pattern recognition methods are then applied to the segmented images in order to detect the position of the myocardial scar. The database of late gadolinium enhancement (LE) cardiac MR images consists of 111 blocks of images acquired from 63 patients at the University Hospital Southampton NHS Foundation Trust (UK). At least one scar was present for each patient, and all the scars were manually annotated by an expert. A group of images (around one third of the entire set) was used for training the system which was subsequently tested on all the remaining images. Four different classifiers were trained (Support Vector Machine (SVM), k-nearest neighbor (KNN), Bayesian and feed-forward neural network) and their performance was evaluated by using Free response Receiver Operating Characteristic (FROC) analysis. Feature selection was implemented for analyzing the importance of the various features. The segmentation method proposed allowed the region affected by the scar to be extracted correctly in 96% of the blocks of images. The SVM was shown to be the best classifier for our task, and our system reached an overall sensitivity of 80% with less than 7 false positives per patient. The method we present provides an effective tool for detection of scars on cardiac MRI. This may be of value in clinical practice by permitting routine reporting of scar quantification.

  3. [Study on the progress of the mechanism of TGF-beta in the scarring and the effect of TCM].

    PubMed

    Wang, Rong-Guo; Zhou, Wei; Zhang, Yong-Dong

    2008-02-01

    Transforming growth factor (TGF-beta) plays a central role in wound healing and scarring. TGF-beta is a member of cytokine family, involving cell proliferation, migration, differentiation and apoptosis, which subsequently trigger extracellular matrix (ECM) deposite and collagen overproduction. A number of regulators of TGF-beta expression bave been identified, including Decorin CTGF, etc. TCM can reduced later scarring, and it accelerates wound healing. TCM can reduce the expression of TGF-beta, resistance of fibrosis, so that lighten the development of scar. This article reviewed the mechanism of TGF-beta in the scarring and TCM can decrease the development of scar effected by TGF-beta.

  4. Monitoring the influence of compression therapy on pathophysiology and structure of a swine scar model using multispectral imaging system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghassemi, Pejhman; Travis, Taryn E.; Shuppa, Jeffrey W.; Moffatt, Lauren T.; Ramella-Romana, Jessica C.

    2014-03-01

    Scar contractures can lead to significant reduction in function and inhibit patients from returning to work, participating in leisure activities and even render them unable to provide care for themselves. Compression therapy has long been a standard treatment for scar prevention but due to the lack of quantifiable metrics of scar formation scant evidence exists of its efficacy. We have recently introduced a multispectral imaging system to quantify pathophysiology (hemoglobin, blood oxygenation, melanin, etc) and structural features (roughness and collagen matrix) of scar. In this study, hypertrophic scars are monitored in-vivo in a porcine model using the imaging system to investigate influence of compression therapy on its quality.

  5. Quantitative differentiation of normal and scarred tissues using second-harmonic generation microscopy.

    PubMed

    Yildirim, Murat; Quinn, Kyle P; Kobler, James B; Zeitels, Steven M; Georgakoudi, Irene; Ben-Yakar, Adela

    2016-11-01

    The aim of this study was to differentiate normal and scarred hamster cheek pouch samples by applying a quantitative image analysis technique for determining collagen fiber direction and density in second-harmonic generation microscopy images. This paper presents a collagen tissue analysis of scarred cheek pouches of four adult male Golden Syrian hamsters as an animal model for vocal fold scarring. One cheek pouch was scarred using an electrocautery unit and the other cheek was used as a control for each hamster. A home-built upright microscope and a compact ultrafast fiber laser were used to acquire depth resolved epi-collected second-harmonic generation images of collagen fibers. To quantify the average fiber direction and fiber density in each image, we applied two-dimensional Fourier analysis and intensity thresholding at five different locations for each control and scarred tissue sample, respectively. The resultant depth-resolved average fiber direction variance for scarred hamster cheek pouches (0.61 ± 0.03) was significantly lower (p < 0.05) than control tissue (0.73 ± 0.04), indicating increased fiber alignment within the scar. Depth-resolved average voxel density measurements indicated scarred tissues contained greater (p < 0.005) fiber density (0.72 ± 0.09) compared to controls (0.18 ± 0.03). In the present study, image analysis of both fiber alignment and density from depth-resolved second-harmonic generation images in epi-detection mode enabled the quantification of the increased collagen fiber deposition and alignment typically observed in fibrosis. The epi-detection geometry is the only viable method for in vivo imaging as well as imaging thick turbid tissues. These quantitative endpoints, clearly differentiating between control and scarred hamster cheek pouches, provide an objective means to characterize the extent of vocal fold scarring in vivo in preclinical and clinical research. In particular, this non-invasive method

  6. Depressed scar after filler injection successfully treated with pneumatic needleless injector and radiofrequency device.

    PubMed

    Seok, Joon; Choi, Sun Young; Park, Kui Young; Jang, Ji Hye; Bae, Joon Ho; Kim, Beom Joon; Kim, Myeung Nam; Hong, Chang Kwon

    2016-01-01

    Fillers are known to be associated with a number of side effects, one of the most severe being skin necrosis. The most vulnerable areas are those that are supplied by a single arterial branch; for example, the glabellar and nasolabial folds are susceptible. In this study, we report good cosmetic outcomes were produced by utilizing the pneumatic needleless injector and radiofrequency device to treat depressed scars that occurred after necrosis following filler injection. Initially, applying light-emitting diode treatment and following through with the two devices appears to have synergistic effects for scar remodeling when dealing with treatment of depressed scars with irregular borders.

  7. Relationship Between Scarring and Dog Aggression in Pit Bull-Type Dogs Involved in Organized Dogfighting

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Katherine A.; Touroo, Rachel; Spain, C. Victor; Jones, Kelly; Reid, Pamela; Lockwood, Randall

    2016-01-01

    Simple Summary Organizations responsible for placing dogs seized from dogfighting investigations often must determine if a particular dog should be euthanized because it is too dangerous or if it is safe to place the dog in an adoptive home. In this study, we examine whether the extent of scarring from dog fighting is a reliable predictor of aggression towards other dogs and therefore could be used to help make that decision. We found that dogs with 10 or more scars in the three body zones where dogfighting injuries tend to be concentrated were more likely, on average, to show aggression to other dogs. The relationship is imperfect, however. Many unscarred dogs were dog aggressive while some highly scarred dogs were not. Therefore, we recommend also assessing a dog’s behavior before making decisions about its disposition. Abstract When pit bull-type dogs are seized in an investigation of organized dogfighting, heavily scarred dogs are often assumed to be highly dog aggressive due to a history of fighting. These dogs may be deemed dangerous and euthanized based on scarring alone. We analyzed our existing data on dogs seized from four dogfighting investigations, examining the relationship between the dogs’ scars with aggression towards other dogs. Scar and wound data were tallied in three body zones where dogfighting injuries tend to be concentrated. Dog aggression was assessed using a model dog and a friendly stimulus dog in a standardized behavior evaluation. Scarring and dog aggression were significantly related, more strongly among male (Fisher’s Exact p < 0.001) than female dogs (Fisher’s Exact p = 0.05). Ten or more scars in the three body zones was a reasonable threshold with which to classify a dog as high risk for dog aggression: 82% of males and 60% of females with such scarring displayed dog aggression. However, because many unscarred dogs were dog aggressive while some highly scarred dogs were not, we recommend collecting behavioral information to

  8. High-frequency electromagnetic scarring in three-dimensional axisymmetric convex cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Warne, Larry K.; Jorgenson, Roy E.

    2016-04-13

    Here, this article examines the localization of high-frequency electromagnetic fields in three-dimensional axisymmetric cavities along periodic paths between opposing sides of the cavity. When these orbits lead to unstable localized modes, they are known as scars. This article treats the case where the opposing sides, or mirrors, are convex. Particular attention is focused on the normalization through the electromagnetic energy theorem. Both projections of the field along the scarred orbit as well as field point statistics are examined. Statistical comparisons are made with a numerical calculation of the scars run with an axisymmetric simulation.

  9. Comparison of the effectiveness of nonablative fractional laser versus ablative fractional laser in thyroidectomy scar prevention: A pilot study.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hei Sung; Lee, Ji Hae; Park, Young Min; Lee, Jun Young

    2012-04-01

    A scar is a mark that remains after the healing of a wound or other morbid processes. In the past, treatment was mainly focused on severe scarring, such as the hypertrophic and burn scars. However, scars from relatively minor wounds can also be stressful. The site of an open thyroidectomy is the anterior neck, a prominently exposed part of the body, where postoperative scarring can cause patients distress. The cosmetic outcome of the scar after thyroidectomy is of particular importance to women, who constitute the majority of patients with thyroid disease. Active prevention is more likely to yield better cosmetic results and would require fewer treatment sessions and less expense than scar revision procedures. Many interventions have been proposed, but there is yet no universal consensus on optimal treatment. Recently, focus has been made on 'laser scar prevention', where various types of lasers have been used to improve the appearance of scars. The purpose of this study was to improve the appearance of scars, by laser intervention of the wound healing process. In this pilot study, we comparatively examined the effect of non-ablative 1550-nm fractional Er: glass laser and ablative 2940-nm fractional Er: YAG laser on fresh surgical scars of patients with Fitzpatrick skin type III-IV.

  10. Intravenous contrast-enhanced CT of the postoperative lumbar spine: improved identification of recurrent disk herniation, scar, arachnoiditis, and diskitis

    SciTech Connect

    Teplick, J.G.; Haskin, M.E.

    1984-10-01

    Unsuccessful relief of symptoms after back surgery is usually attributable to hypertrophic extradural scar or recurrent herniated disk. Their clinical and myelographic differentiation is difficult, yet important because reoperation is not always beneficial for scar removal. This article examines the usefulness of intravenous contrast-enhanced computed tomography for this problem. Forty-five postsurgical patients were studied; eight had subsequent surgery. In the four with hypertrophic scars, intravenous contrast enhancement of the scar allowed its recognition in each case; in the four with hypertrophic scars, intravenous contrast enhancement of the scar allowed its recognition in each case; in the four with recurrent disk herniation, nonenhancement of the extruded disk allowed its recognition in three. In the other 37 patients who were not reoperated, 33 were believed to have scar on the basis of contrast enhancement. The method seems promising for more accurate evaluation of failed back surgery, including the recognition of diskitis.

  11. Linear skin atrophy, scarring alopecia, anonychia, and tongue lesion: a "new" syndrome?

    PubMed

    Sequeiros, J; Sack, G H

    1985-08-01

    One of a pair of female monozygotic twins showed skin atrophy with linear alternation of depressed scarlike areas and intervening ridges of normal or nearly normal skin. She was born with friable skin and a vesicular-bullous eruption which was followed by gradual scabbing. Hypohidrosis in the affected areas, heat intolerance, and febrile convulsions were noted in infancy and childhood. No new skin lesions developed, and the existing ones, the sweating disturbance, and the heat intolerance gradually improved with time. Scarring alopecia, congenital absence of three toenails, and a scarlike lesion of the tongue were also present. Their absence in the other twin supports the view that 1) these manifestations all are part of the same syndrome, and 2) this syndrome is nongenetic. Histologically, there were no diagnostic or consistent findings, but the number of skin appendages was diminished, and the elastic fibers were reduced in number and size in one biopsy. The calculated probability for the twins being monozygotic was 0.9998. This family was also remarkable for the presence of alopecia areata in three successive generations with only one instance of apparent nonpenetrance. We conclude that this may represent a previously undescribed syndrome of congenital fragility of connective tissue which predisposed to damage of the elastica, possibly caused by an early inflammatory phase.

  12. An optimized algorithm of image stitching in the case of a multi-modal probe for monitoring the evolution of scars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kassab, R.; Treuillet, S.; Marzani, F.; Pieralli, C.; Lapayre, J. C.

    2013-03-01

    We propose a new system that makes possible to monitor the evolution of scars after the excision of a tumorous dermatosis. The hardware part of this system is composed of a new optical innovative probe with which two types of images can be acquired simultaneously: an anatomic image acquired under a white light and a functional one based on autofluorescence from the protoporphyrin within the cancer cells. For technical reasons related to the maximum size of the area covered by the probe, acquired images are too small to cover the whole scar. That is why a sequence of overlapping images is taken in order to cover the required area. The main goal of this paper is to describe the creation of two panoramic images (anatomic and functional). Fluorescence images do not have enough salient information for matching the images; stitching algorithms are applied over each couple of successive white light images to produce an anatomic panorama of the entire scar. The same transformations obtained from this step are used to register and stitch the functional images. Several experiments have been implemented using different stitching algorithms (SIFT, ASIFT and SURF), with various transformation parameters (angles of rotation, projection, scaling, etc…) and different types of skin images. We present the results of these experiments that propose the best solution. Thus, clinician has two panoramic images superimposed and usable for diagnostic support. A collaborative layer is added to the system to allow sharing panoramas among several practitioners over different places.

  13. The soft mechanical signature of glial scars in the central nervous system

    PubMed Central

    Moeendarbary, Emad; Weber, Isabell P.; Sheridan, Graham K.; Koser, David E.; Soleman, Sara; Haenzi, Barbara; Bradbury, Elizabeth J.; Fawcett, James; Franze, Kristian

    2017-01-01

    Injury to the central nervous system (CNS) alters the molecular and cellular composition of neural tissue and leads to glial scarring, which inhibits the regrowth of damaged axons. Mammalian glial scars supposedly form a chemical and mechanical barrier to neuronal regeneration. While tremendous effort has been devoted to identifying molecular characteristics of the scar, very little is known about its mechanical properties. Here we characterize spatiotemporal changes of the elastic stiffness of the injured rat neocortex and spinal cord at 1.5 and three weeks post-injury using atomic force microscopy. In contrast to scars in other mammalian tissues, CNS tissue significantly softens after injury. Expression levels of glial intermediate filaments (GFAP, vimentin) and extracellular matrix components (laminin, collagen IV) correlate with tissue softening. As tissue stiffness is a regulator of neuronal growth, our results may help to understand why mammalian neurons do not regenerate after injury. PMID:28317912

  14. An automated image processing method to quantify collagen fibre organization within cutaneous scar tissue.

    PubMed

    Quinn, Kyle P; Golberg, Alexander; Broelsch, G Felix; Khan, Saiqa; Villiger, Martin; Bouma, Brett; Austen, William G; Sheridan, Robert L; Mihm, Martin C; Yarmush, Martin L; Georgakoudi, Irene

    2015-01-01

    Standard approaches to evaluate scar formation within histological sections rely on qualitative evaluations and scoring, which limits our understanding of the remodelling process. We have recently developed an image analysis technique for the rapid quantification of fibre alignment at each pixel location. The goal of this study was to evaluate its application for quantitatively mapping scar formation in histological sections of cutaneous burns. To this end, we utilized directional statistics to define maps of fibre density and directional variance from Masson's trichrome-stained sections for quantifying changes in collagen organization during scar remodelling. Significant increases in collagen fibre density are detectable soon after burn injury in a rat model. Decreased fibre directional variance in the scar was also detectable between 3 weeks and 6 months after injury, indicating increasing fibre alignment. This automated analysis of fibre organization can provide objective surrogate endpoints for evaluating cutaneous wound repair and regeneration.

  15. The soft mechanical signature of glial scars in the central nervous system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moeendarbary, Emad; Weber, Isabell P.; Sheridan, Graham K.; Koser, David E.; Soleman, Sara; Haenzi, Barbara; Bradbury, Elizabeth J.; Fawcett, James; Franze, Kristian

    2017-03-01

    Injury to the central nervous system (CNS) alters the molecular and cellular composition of neural tissue and leads to glial scarring, which inhibits the regrowth of damaged axons. Mammalian glial scars supposedly form a chemical and mechanical barrier to neuronal regeneration. While tremendous effort has been devoted to identifying molecular characteristics of the scar, very little is known about its mechanical properties. Here we characterize spatiotemporal changes of the elastic stiffness of the injured rat neocortex and spinal cord at 1.5 and three weeks post-injury using atomic force microscopy. In contrast to scars in other mammalian tissues, CNS tissue significantly softens after injury. Expression levels of glial intermediate filaments (GFAP, vimentin) and extracellular matrix components (laminin, collagen IV) correlate with tissue softening. As tissue stiffness is a regulator of neuronal growth, our results may help to understand why mammalian neurons do not regenerate after injury.

  16. An automated image processing method to quantify collagen fiber organization within cutaneous scar tissue

    PubMed Central

    Quinn, Kyle P.; Golberg, Alexander; Broelsch, G. Felix; Khan, Saiqa; Villiger, Martin; Bouma, Brett; Austen, William G.; Sheridan, Robert L.; Mihm, Martin C.; Yarmush, Martin L.; Georgakoudi, Irene

    2014-01-01

    Standard approaches to evaluate scar formation within histological sections rely on qualitative evaluations and scoring, which limits our understanding of the remodeling process. We have recently developed an image analysis technique for the rapid quantification of fiber alignment at each pixel location. The goal of this study was to evaluate its application for quantitatively mapping scar formation in histological sections of cutaneous burns. To this end, we utilized directional statistics to define maps of fiber density and directional variance from Masson’s Trichrome stained sections for quantifying changes in collagen organization during scar remodeling. Significant increases in collagen fiber density are detectable soon after burn injury in a rat model. Decreased fiber directional variance in the scar was also detectable between 3 weeks and 6 months after injury, indicating increasing fiber alignment. This automated analysis of fiber organization can provide objective surrogate endpoints for evaluating cutaneous wound repair and regeneration. PMID:25256009

  17. Crmp4 deletion promotes recovery from spinal cord injury by neuroprotection and limited scar formation

    PubMed Central

    Nagai, Jun; Kitamura, Yoshiteru; Owada, Kazuki; Yamashita, Naoya; Takei, Kohtaro; Goshima, Yoshio; Ohshima, Toshio

    2015-01-01

    Axonal outgrowth inhibitors and scar formation are two major obstacles to central nervous system (CNS) repair. No target molecule that regulates both axonal growth and scarring has been identified. Here we identified collapsin response mediator protein 4 (CRMP4), a common mediator of inhibitory signals after neural injury, as a crucial factor that contributes to both axonal growth inhibition and scarring after spinal cord injury (SCI). We found increases in the inhibitory and toxic forms of CRMP4 in injured spinal cord. Notably, CRMP4 expression was evident in inflammatory cells as well as in neurons after spinal cord transection. Crmp4−/− mice displayed neuroprotection against SCI and reductions in inflammatory response and scar formation. This permissive environment for axonal growth due to CRMP4 deletion restored locomotor activity at an unusually early phase of healing. These results suggest that deletion of CRMP4 is a unique therapeutic strategy that overcomes two obstacles to CNS repair after SCI. PMID:25652774

  18. A rare case of gallbladder fistulation with a 60-year-old appendicectomy scar.

    PubMed

    Thiruchandran, Gajendiran; Joyce, Megan; Baggott, Paul James

    2016-04-12

    We present an extremely unusual case of an external biliary fistula in an 87-year-old woman who presented with a 1-day history of spontaneous green discharge from a 60-year-old appendicectomy scar. Examination revealed a sinus in the right iliac fossa overlying her appendicectomy scar, with a raised white cell count and C reactive protein. A CT scan revealed a complex fistula connecting the gallbladder to the subcutaneous tissue in the right flank, which further connected inferiorly with a fistula to the previous appendicectomy scar and a small iliopsoas collection. Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography revealed several stones in the common bile duct, which were removed using a balloon catheter. The patient was further managed with a long course of antibiotics and discharged with a long-term drainage bag. A literature search revealed no previously reported cases of an external biliary fistula communicating with an appendicectomy scar.

  19. Scars in Dirac fermion systems: the influence of an Aharonov-Bohm flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Cheng-Zhen; Huang, Liang; Chang, Kai

    2017-01-01

    Time-reversal ({ T }-) symmetry is fundamental to many physical processes. Typically, { T }-breaking for microscopic processes requires the presence of magnetic field. However, for 2D massless Dirac billiards, { T }-symmetry is broken automatically by the mass confinement, leading to chiral quantum scars. In this paper, we investigate the mechanism of { T }-breaking by analyzing the local current of the scarring eigenstates and their magnetic response to an Aharonov-Bohm flux. Our results unveil the complete understanding of the subtle { T }-breaking phenomena from both the semiclassical formula of chiral scars and the microscopic current and spin reflection at the boundaries, leading to a controlling scheme to change the chirality of the relativistic quantum scars. Our findings not only have significant implications on the transport behavior and spin textures of the relativistic pseudoparticles, but also add basic knowledge to relativistic quantum chaos.

  20. Screening of differentially expressed genes in pathological scar tissues using expression microarray.

    PubMed

    Huang, L P; Mao, Z; Zhang, L; Liu, X X; Huang, C; Jia, Z S

    2015-09-09

    Pathological scar tissues and normal skin tissues were differentiated by screening for differentially expressed genes in pathologic scar tissues via gene expression microarray. The differentially expressed gene data was analyzed by gene ontology and pathway analyses. There were 5001 up- or down-regulated genes in 2-fold differentially expressed genes, 956 up- or down-regulated genes in 5-fold differentially expressed genes, and 114 up- or down-regulated genes in 20-fold differentially expressed genes. Therefore, significant differences were observed in the gene expression in pathological scar tissues and normal foreskin tissues. The development of pathological scar tissues has been correlated to changes in multiple genes and pathways, which are believed to form a dynamic network connection.

  1. Extracellular matrix considerations for scar-free repair and regeneration: insights from regenerative diversity among vertebrates.

    PubMed

    Godwin, James; Kuraitis, Drew; Rosenthal, Nadia

    2014-11-01

    The extracellular matrix (ECM) is an essential feature of development, tissue homeostasis and recovery from injury. How the ECM responds dynamically to cellular and soluble components to support the faithful repair of damaged tissues in some animals but leads to the formation of acellular fibrotic scar tissue in others has important clinical implications. Studies in highly regenerative organisms such as the zebrafish and the salamander have revealed a specialist formulation of ECM components that support repair and regeneration, while avoiding scar tissue formation. By comparing a range of different contexts that feature scar-less healing and full regeneration vs. scarring through fibrotic repair, regenerative therapies that incorporate ECM components could be significantly enhanced to improve both regenerative potential and functional outcomes. This article is part of a directed issue entitled: Regenerative Medicine: the challenge of translation.

  2. Aldehyde dehydrogenase inhibition blocks mucosal fibrosis in human and mouse ocular scarring

    PubMed Central

    Ahadome, Sarah D.; Abraham, David J.; Rayapureddi, Suryanarayana; Saw, Valerie P.; Saban, Daniel R.; Calder, Virginia L.; Norman, Jill T.; Ponticos, Markella; Daniels, Julie T.; Dart, John K.

    2016-01-01

    Mucous membrane pemphigoid (MMP) is a systemic mucosal scarring disease, commonly causing blindness, for which there is no antifibrotic therapy. Aldehyde dehydrogenase family 1 (ALDH1) is upregulated in both ocular MMP (OMMP) conjunctiva and cultured fibroblasts. Application of the ALDH metabolite, retinoic acid (RA), to normal human conjunctival fibroblasts in vitro induced a diseased phenotype. Conversely, application of ALDH inhibitors, including disulfiram, to OMMP fibroblasts in vitro restored their functionality to that of normal controls. ALDH1 is also upregulated in the mucosa of the mouse model of scarring allergic eye disease (AED), used here as a surrogate for OMMP, in which topical application of disulfiram decreased fibrosis in vivo. These data suggest that progressive scarring in OMMP results from ALDH/RA fibroblast autoregulation, that the ALDH1 subfamily has a central role in immune-mediated ocular mucosal scarring, and that ALDH inhibition with disulfiram is a potential and readily translatable antifibrotic therapy. PMID:27699226

  3. “Cat FACE” SCAR ON LONGLEAF PINE TREE, OVERHILLS HISTORIC ENTRANCE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    “Cat FACE” SCAR ON LONGLEAF PINE TREE, OVERHILLS HISTORIC ENTRANCE ROAD, FACING NORTHEAST - Overhills, Fort Bragg Military Reservation, Approximately 15 miles NW of Fayetteville, Overhills, Harnett County, NC

  4. Herpes zoster developing within recent subciliary incision scar.

    PubMed

    Choi, Hwan Jun; Kim, Jun Hyuk; Lee, Young Man

    2012-05-01

    Herpes zoster is a common dermatologic disease characterized by unilateral pain and vesicular lesions over the unilateral sensory dermatomes being caused by the reactivation of varicella zoster virus, and its incidence seems to be increasing recently. In case of involving the ganglion of the fifth cranial nerve (trigeminal nerve), it can descend down the affected nerve into the skin, then producing an eruption in the dermatome. Among the patients with this disease, about 40% to 50% had associated conditions such as diabetes mellitus, hypertension, pulmonary tuberculosis, liver diseases, peptic ulcer, hypothyroidism, or pharyngitis but rarely facial trauma. Generally, herpes zoster was commonly associated with systemic disorders, and the treatment duration was prolonged in associated diseases. However, herpes zoster occurring specifically at the site of previously traumatized facial bone has not yet been reported. Retrospective study of 1 case of herpes zoster with blow-out fracture, which had been treated with acyclovir and steroid, was done. Follow-up length was about 3 months. After treatment, the patient became stable, and there was no complication. We treated herpes zoster developing within a recent operative subciliary scar, and the case is presented with the review of literature. Finally, facial trauma or reconstruction of the orbital floor with alloplastic implant might be a risk factor for herpes zoster in traumatized patient.

  5. Transforming the radiological interpretation process: the SCAR TRIP initiative

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andriole, Katherine P.; Morin, Richard L.; Arenson, Ronald L.; Carrino, John A.; Erickson, Bradley J.; Horii, Steven C.; Piraino, David W.; Reiner, Bruce I.; Seibert, James A.; Siegel, Eliot L.

    2004-04-01

    The Society for Computer Applications in Radiology (SCAR) Transforming the Radiological Interpretation Process (TRIP) Initiative aims to spearhead research, education, and discovery of innovative solutions to address the problem of information and image data overload. The initiative will foster inter-disciplinary research on technological, environmental and human factors to better manage and exploit the massive amounts of data. TRIP will focus on the following basic objectives: improving the efficiency of interpretation of large data sets, improving the timeliness and effectiveness of communication, and decreasing medical errors. The ultimate goal of the initiative is to improve the quality and safety of patient care. Interdisciplinary research into several broad areas will be necessary to make progress in managing the ever-increasing volume of data. The six concepts involved include: human perception, image processing and computer-aided detection (CAD), visualization, navigation and usability, databases and integration, and evaluation and validation of methods and performance. The result of this transformation will affect several key processes in radiology, including image interpretation; communication of imaging results; workflow and efficiency within the health care enterprise; diagnostic accuracy and a reduction in medical errors; and, ultimately, the overall quality of care.

  6. Interplay between transglutaminases and heparan sulphate in progressive renal scarring

    PubMed Central

    Burhan, Izhar; Furini, Giulia; Lortat-Jacob, Hugues; Atobatele, Adeola G.; Scarpellini, Alessandra; Schroeder, Nina; Atkinson, John; Maamra, Mabrouka; Nutter, Faith H.; Watson, Philip; Vinciguerra, Manlio; Johnson, Timothy S.; Verderio, Elisabetta A. M.

    2016-01-01

    Transglutaminase-2 (TG2) is a new anti-fibrotic target for chronic kidney disease, for its role in altering the extracellular homeostatic balance leading to excessive build-up of matrix in kidney. However, there is no confirmation that TG2 is the only transglutaminase involved, neither there are strategies to control its action specifically over that of the conserved family-members. In this study, we have profiled transglutaminase isozymes in the rat subtotal nephrectomy (SNx) model of progressive renal scarring. All transglutaminases increased post-SNx peaking at loss of renal function but TG2 was the predominant enzyme. Upon SNx, extracellular TG2 deposited in the tubulointerstitium and peri-glomerulus via binding to heparan sulphate (HS) chains of proteoglycans and co-associated with syndecan-4. Extracellular TG2 was sufficient to activate transforming growth factor-β1 in tubular epithelial cells, and this process occurred in a HS-dependent way, in keeping with TG2-affinity for HS. Analysis of heparin binding of the main transglutaminases revealed that although the interaction between TG1 and HS is strong, the conformational heparin binding site of TG2 is not conserved, suggesting that TG2 has a unique interaction with HS within the family. Our data provides a rationale for a novel anti-fibrotic strategy specifically targeting the conformation-dependent TG2-epitope interacting with HS. PMID:27694984

  7. Successful Treatment of Caesarean Scar Pregnancies by Local Treatment Only

    PubMed Central

    Nagata, Chie; Ueno, Kazunori; Ozawa, Nobuaki; Nagaoka, Shinichi; Tanaka, Kei; Sago, Haruhiko; Iwashita, Mitsutoshi

    2017-01-01

    Background. Caesarean scar pregnancy (CSP) is a rare ectopic pregnancy associated with life-threatening complications. To date, no therapeutic protocols have been established. Sono-guided local methotrexate (MTX) injection is a relatively easy and low-invasive treatment. Additional systemic MTX is sometimes needed for CSP cases, especially when β-subunit human chorionic gonadotropin (β-hCG) levels are >20,000 mIU/ml at diagnosis. We report on six cases of CSP treated with local MTX injection, five of which received combined local treatment. Methods. Under intravenous anesthesia, six CSPs including a case with β-hCG levels >20,000 mIU/ml received MTX injection to the gestational sac. Five cases received gestational sac aspiration. Three cases had additional local potassium chloride injection and one case had a saline injection aiming at the fetal heart beat concurrent with MTX injection. MTX was administered weekly if β-hCG levels stayed beyond the expected values. Outcomes. All cases achieved β-hCG normalization without additional systemic MTX, with one case having a successful pregnancy after treatment. Conclusion. Sono-guided local MTX injection with concurrent local treatment might be a potentially effective approach for CSP cases. The accumulation of further cases is necessary to confirm this.

  8. A new CO2 laser technique for the treatment of pediatric hypertrophic burn scars

    PubMed Central

    Żądkowski, Tomasz; Nachulewicz, Paweł; Mazgaj, Maciej; Woźniak, Magdalena; Cielecki, Czesław; Wieczorek, Andrzej Paweł; Beń-Skowronek, Iwona

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Treatment of hypertrophic scars arising as a result of thermal burns in children is still a big problem. The results of the treatment are not satisfactory for patients and parents, and new methods of treatment are still investigated. We present the use of one of the most modern carbon dioxide (CO2) lasers (Lumenis Encore laser equipped with a Synergistic Coagulation and Ablation for Advanced Resurfacing module) in the treatment of hypertrophic scars in children after burns. From March to April of 2013, a group of 47 patients aged 6 to 16 years underwent 57 laser surgery treatments. The average time from accident was 7.5 years. The results of treatment were investigated in 114 areas. The assessed areas were divided into 2 groups: 9-cm2 area 1, where the thickness of the scar measured by physician was the lowest and 9-cm2 area 2, where the thickness of the scar was the biggest. The results were considered on the Vancouver Scar Scale (VSS) independently by the surgeon and by parents 1, 4, and 8 months after the procedure. In addition, ultrasound evaluation of the scar thickness before and after laser procedure was made. VSS total score improved in all areas assessed by both the physician and parents. The biggest change in total VSS score in area 1 in the evaluation of the investigator was obtained at follow-up after the 1st month of treatment (average 7.23 points before and 5.18 points after the 1st month after surgery—a difference of 2.05 points). Scar ratings by parents and the physician did not differ statistically (P < 0.05). In the ultrasound assessment, the improvement was statistically significant, more frequently for both minimum and maximum thickness of the scars (B-mode measures) (P < 0.05). The use of a CO2 laser in the treatment of hypertrophic scars in children is an effective and safe method. The use of a CO2 laser improves the appearance and morphology of scarring assessed using the VSS by both the parents and the physician. The

  9. A New Proprietary Onion Extract Gel Improves the Appearance of New Scars

    PubMed Central

    Draelos, Zoe D.; Baumann, Leslie; Fleischer, Alan B.; Plaum, Stefan; Hardas, Bhushan

    2012-01-01

    Objective: This randomized, controlled, single-blind study evaluated the appearance of new dermal scars after eight weeks of once-daily application of a nonprescription proprietary onion extract gel formulation compared to control (no application scars) in a dermatological surgical setting. Methods: At Visit 1, 44 healthy male and female subjects aged 18 to 70 years gave informed consent, were screened, and enrolled in the study. Two bilateral, 8mm seborrheic keratoses, one on the right and one on the left chest, were surgically removed from each subject. The wounds were photographed at all visits. Two weeks later (Visit 2), each subject was randomly assigned to apply onion extract gel to either the right or left side wound site once daily for eight weeks and no treatment on the opposite wound. The investigator was blinded to which wound was treated. At two, four, and eight weeks after gel application, right and left scars were graded by the investigator and subjects for improvement from baseline in overall appearance, texture, redness, and softness using 4-point ordinal scales (0=no improvement, 1=mild improvement; 2= moderate improvement; 3=significant improvement). Safety was evaluated by adverse events. Results: Six subjects (13.6%) experienced mild stinging that resolved spontaneously. At two weeks, the subjects rated gel-applied scars to be significantly softer than control scars (p=0.014). After four and eight weeks of application, the investigator and subjects rated all appearance variables of the gel-applied scars to be significantly more improved from baseline than control scars (p=0.017 to p<0.01). Conclusion: The new proprietary onion extract gel is safe and significantly improves scar appearance after four weeks of once-daily application. PMID:22768353

  10. Bibliography of Supersonic Cruise Aircraft Research (SCAR) Program from 1972 to Mid-1977

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffman, S.

    1977-01-01

    This bibliography documents publications of the supersonic cruise aircraft research (SCAR) program that were generated during the first 5 years of effort. The reports are arranged according to systems studies and five SCAR disciplines: propulsion, stratospheric emissions impact, structures and materials, aerodynamic performance, and stability and control. The specific objectives of each discipline are summarized. Annotation is included for all NASA inhouse and low-number contractor reports. There are 444 papers and articles included.

  11. Is manual palpation of the uterine scar following vaginal birth after cesarean section (VBAC) helpful?

    PubMed

    Dinglas, C; Rafael, T J; Vintzileos, A

    2015-05-01

    Risk of uterine rupture with trial of labor after cesarean (TOLAC) is less than one percent. Discovery of uterine rupture often occurs during labor. In our case, the uterine scar is discovered to be ruptured during the postpartum period. The exact cause and time of uterine rupture is difficult to ascertain in this case, yet manual palpation of the uterine scar did not aid in the eventual diagnosis.

  12. Linear Non Scarring Alopecia of the Scalp: A Rare Manifestation of Lupus Panniculitis

    PubMed Central

    Kshetrimayum, Sandhyarani; Thokchom, Nandakishore; Hmar, Vanlalhriatpuii

    2016-01-01

    Alopecia in a linear pattern is very rare with only a few cases reported in the medical literature. We report a case of linear non scarring alopecia involving the scalp in a 17-year-old boy with a histological diagnosis of lupus panniculitis. We report this case because of its rarity and also the inclusion of this entity as one of the rare differential of non scarring alopecia. PMID:27688465

  13. Immunohistochemical evaluation of COX-1 and COX-2 expression in keloid and hypertrophic scar.

    PubMed

    Abdou, Asmaa G; Maraee, Alaa H; Saif, Hala F Abd-Elsattar

    2014-04-01

    Both keloids (KLs) and hypertrophic scars (HSs) are considered as dermal fibroproliferative diseases that differ clinically and histopathologically. Although several factors have been postulated in the etiopathogenesis of these conditions, there has been growing evidence to suggest the role of COXs in the pathogenesis of abnormal wound healing because of the reduction of formation of KL and HS in patients using nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and a COX-2 inhibitor. The aim of the present work is to evaluate the pattern and localization of COX-1 and COX-2 expression in KL and HS compared with surgical scars. COX-1 and COX-2 were analyzed on skin biopsies of 30 patients who presented with KL (15) and HS (15) and 10 normal surgical scars (controls). Both COX-1 and COX-2 were expressed not only in dermal components (fibroblasts, inflammatory cells, and endothelial cells) but also in keratinocytes of the overlying epidermis in the different studied scar lesions. The percentage of COX-1 expression increased progressively from surgical scar (40%) to HS (53.3%) to KL (100%) with a statistically significant difference (P = 0.002). COX-2 was expressed in 100% of surgical scars, 73.3% of HS and 86.7% of KL with the absence of significant differences (P > 0.05). The significant difference in COX-1 expression between HS and KL may refer to the presence of different pathways for the emergence of these diseases. The expression of COX-2 in all scars (normal or abnormal) indicates its active role as an inflammatory mediator. Keratinocytes play an active role in induction of scarring by up-regulation of inflammatory mediators, such as COX-1 and COX-2.

  14. The use of moxibustion scars in the identification of individuals in forensic medicine.

    PubMed

    Sakabe, Masaaki; Miyamori, Daisuke; Mclean, Stuart; Shinmen, Natsuko; Kato, Hideaki; Yoshimoto, Kanji; Ikegaya, Hiroshi

    2012-06-10

    The use of moxibustion today does not only take place in Eastern Asia, but recently also in Europe and the United States. Moxibustion scars are often seen in autopsy cases in Japan. However, no reports of the use of moxibustion in autopsy cases have been reported. This paper reports on an autopsy case in which moxibustion scars were used to extrapolate on the past symptoms of the deceased, date of therapy and the location of the moxibustion clinic which administered the moxibustion.

  15. Pressure therapy in treatment of hypertrophic scar, burn contracture and keloid: the Kenyan experience.

    PubMed

    Haq, M A; Haq, A

    1990-11-01

    A preliminary report of the results of pressure therapy for hypertrophic scar, burn contracture and keloid is presented. Thirty four patients over a four year period were treated with four types of pressure therapy. Results showed over 50% improvement in 21 (61.8%) cases. This method obviated the need for repetitive surgery and no recurrence was noted. Pressure therapy is advocated as an adjunct measure for all cases of hypertrophic scarring, burn contracture and keloid.

  16. Seepage of methane at Jaco Scar, a slide caused by seamount subduction offshore Costa Rica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mau, Susan; Rehder, Gregor; Sahling, Heiko; Schleicher, Tina; Linke, Peter

    2014-10-01

    Methane (CH4) concentrations and CH4 stable carbon isotopic composition () were investigated in the water column within Jaco Scar. It is one of several scars formed by massive slides resulting from the subduction of seamounts offshore Costa Rica, a process that can open up structural and stratigraphical pathways for migrating CH4. The release of large amounts of CH4 into the adjacent water column was discovered at the outcropping lowermost sedimentary sequence of the hanging wall in the northwest corner of Jaco Scar, where concentrations reached up to 1,500 nmol L-1. There CH4-rich fluids seeping from the sedimentary sequence stimulate both growth and activity of a dense chemosynthetic community. Additional point sources supplying CH4 at lower concentrations were identified in density layers above and below the main plume from light carbon isotope ratios. The injected CH4 is most likely a mixture of microbial and thermogenic CH4 as suggested by values between -50 and -62 ‰ Vienna Pee Dee Belemnite. This CH4 spreads along isopycnal surfaces throughout the whole area of the scar, and the concentrations decrease due to mixing with ocean water and microbial oxidation. The supply of CH4 appears to be persistent as repeatedly high CH4 concentrations were found within the scar over 6 years. The maximum CH4 concentration and average excess CH4 concentration at Jaco Scar indicate that CH4 seepage from scars might be as significant as seepage from other tectonic structures in the marine realm. Hence, taking into account the global abundance of scars, such structures might constitute a substantial, hitherto unconsidered contribution to natural CH4 sources at the seafloor.

  17. Periodic scarred States in open quantum dots as evidence of quantum Darwinism.

    PubMed

    Burke, A M; Akis, R; Day, T E; Speyer, Gil; Ferry, D K; Bennett, B R

    2010-04-30

    Scanning gate microscopy (SGM) is used to image scar structures in an open quantum dot, which is created in an InAs quantum well by electron-beam lithography and wet etching. The scanned images demonstrate periodicities in magnetic field that correlate to those found in the conductance fluctuations. Simulations have shown that these magnetic transform images bear a strong resemblance to actual scars found in the dot that replicate through the modes in direct agreement with quantum Darwinism.

  18. Periodic Scarred States in Open Quantum Dots as Evidence of Quantum Darwinism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burke, A. M.; Akis, R.; Day, T. E.; Speyer, Gil; Ferry, D. K.; Bennett, B. R.

    2010-04-01

    Scanning gate microscopy (SGM) is used to image scar structures in an open quantum dot, which is created in an InAs quantum well by electron-beam lithography and wet etching. The scanned images demonstrate periodicities in magnetic field that correlate to those found in the conductance fluctuations. Simulations have shown that these magnetic transform images bear a strong resemblance to actual scars found in the dot that replicate through the modes in direct agreement with quantum Darwinism.

  19. Digital representation of oil and natural gas well pad scars in southwest Wyoming

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Garman, Steven L.; McBeth, Jamie L.

    2014-01-01

    The recent proliferation of oil and natural gas energy development in southwest Wyoming has stimulated the need to understand wildlife responses to this development. Central to many wildlife assessments is the use of geospatial methods that rely on digital representation of energy infrastructure. Surface disturbance of the well pad scars associated with oil and natural gas extraction has been an important but unavailable infrastructure layer. To provide a digital baseline of this surface disturbance, we extracted visible oil and gas well pad scars from 1-meter National Agriculture Imagery Program imagery (NAIP) acquired in 2009 for a 7.7 million-hectare region of southwest Wyoming. Scars include the pad area where wellheads, pumps, and storage facilities reside, and the surrounding area that was scraped and denuded of vegetation during the establishment of the pad. Scars containing tanks, compressors, and the storage of oil and gas related equipment, and produced-water ponds were also collected on occasion. Our extraction method was a two-step process starting with automated extraction followed by manual inspection and clean up. We used available well-point information to guide manual clean up and to derive estimates of year of origin and duration of activity on a pad scar. We also derived estimates of the proportion of non-vegetated area on a scar using a Normalized Difference Vegetation Index derived using 1-meter NAIP imagery. We extracted 16,973 pad scars of which 15,318 were oil and gas well pads. Digital representation of pad scars along with time-stamps of activity and estimates of non-vegetated area provides important baseline (circa 2009) data for assessments of wildlife responses, land-use trends, and disturbance-mediated pattern assessments.

  20. Risk factors for renal scarring in children and adolescents with lower urinary tract dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Leonardo, Cristiane R; Filgueiras, Maria Francisca T; Vasconcelos, Mônica M; Vasconcelos, Roberta; Marino, Viviane P; Pires, Cleidismar; Pereira, Ana Cristina; Reis, Fernanda; Oliveira, Eduardo A; Lima, Eleonora M

    2007-11-01

    Risk factors for renal scarring in children with lower urinary tract dysfunction (LUTD) were evaluated. The medical records of 120 patients were assessed concerning gender, presence of vesicoureteric reflux (VUR), bladder capacity, detrusor overactivity, residual urine, febrile urinary tract infection (UTI), bacteriuria, constipation, detrusor sphincter incoordination (DSI), high detrusor pressure at maximal cystometric capacity (PMCC), low compliance, and thickness and trabeculation of the bladder wall. Renal scarring was diagnosed by (99m)technetium-dimercaptosuccinic acid renal scan (DMSA). Renal scarring was detected in 38 patients (31%). VUR, UTI, decreased bladder capacity, urinary residue, and trabeculated and thick bladder wall were associated with scarring at univariate analysis. Multivariate analysis showed VUR (P < 0.0001) as the independent risk factor for renal scarring. Thickness of the bladder wall was a marginal risk factor (P = 0.07). Although UTI was not a risk factor, it was associated with VUR (P = 0.03). In our analysis, VUR was the main risk factor; however, renal scarring was probably due to multifactorial causes, as VUR was associated with UTI.

  1. Risk factors for renal scarring in children with primary vesicoureteral reflux disease.

    PubMed

    Mir, Sevgi; Ertan, Pelin; Ozkayin, Nese

    2013-01-01

    To determine the incidence of renal scarring among patients with primary vesicoureteral reflux (VUR) and the possible risk factor(s), we studied 90 children (60 girls and 30 boys) with VUR followed in the Pediatric Nephrology Unit at the Ege University Hospital from 1998 to 2003. All the patients were assessed for VUR grade by voiding cystoureterography and for presence of renal scarring by (99 m) technetium dimercapto-succinic acid scintigraphy. All infants with VUR were given low-dose prophylactic antibiotics and followed-up until resolution of the reflux. Grade of reflux and number of urinary tract infection (UTI) episodes (≥3) were found to be statistically significant risk factors for renal scarring (P <0.05). However, gender, familial history and laterality of the disease were not found to be statistically significant risk factors (P >0.05). Similarly, there was no statistically significant difference of frequency of renal scarring among the different age groups (P >0.05). We conclude that recurrences of UTI and VUR severity are significant risk factors for renal scarring in children with VUR. Therefore, identification of VUR at an early age may offer the opportunity to prevent episodes of UTI and possible formation of renal scars that may result in end-stage renal failure.

  2. Ultrasonography in the evaluation of renal scarring using DMSA scan as the gold standard.

    PubMed

    Moorthy, Ima; Wheat, Deirdre; Gordon, Isky

    2004-02-01

    Dimercaptosuccinic acid (DMSA) renal scan is presently the technique of choice for assessing renal scars. Recent advances suggest that ultrasonography could replace DMSA scan for this purpose. This paper describes the experience of a tertiary pediatric referral hospital performing ultrasonography and DMSA scans in the assessment of renal scarring. Investigations were conducted 3-6 months after patients presented with urinary tract infection (UTI). Results were extracted from the radiology information system and recorded for analysis. All children with a UTI who had undergone DMSA and ultrasound examination on the same day between January 1995 and December 1999 were included; 930 kidneys were compared. DMSA scan was utilized as the reference method. When used to detect focal renal scarring, ultrasonography had a sensitivity of 5.2%, specificity of 98.3%, a positive predictive value (PPV) of 50% and a negative predictive value (NPV) of 75.8%. When used to detect diffuse renal scarring, ultrasonography had a sensitivity of 47.2%, specificity of 91.8%, PPV of 60.8% and NPV of 86.6%. Our results demonstrate that although ultrasonography has a good specificity for the detection of renal scarring compared with DMSA, it has low sensitivity, PPV and NPV. Ultrasonography cannot be substituted for DMSA scan in the evaluation of focal renal scarring.

  3. Scar sarcoidosis on a finger mimicking a rapidly growing soft tissue tumour: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Scar sarcoidosis is a rare and uncommon but specific cutaneous manifestation of sarcoidosis. In general it arises in pre-existing scars deriving from mechanical traumas. As most surgeons dealing with scars might not be aware of cutaneous sarcoidosis and its different types of appearance the appropriate staging and treatment might be missed or at least delayed. To our knowledge this is the first case in literature of scar sarcoidosis on a finger. Case presentation We present a case of a 33-year-old carpenter who developed scar sarcoidosis on his right index finger 4 years after the tendon of the long digital flexor got accidentally cut by an angle grinder. He was referred due to a swelling of the finger suspected to be a malignant soft tissue tumour. The circumference of the affected finger had almost doubled, adding up to 94 mm. Incision biopsy revealed typical noncaseating granulomas. Further investigation showed a systemic extent of the disease with involvement of the lung. A systemic treatment with oral steroids led to an almost full regression of the swelling with restoration of function and resolution of lung infiltrates. Conclusion In case of a suspicious and/or progressive swelling a definite diagnosis should be achieved by biopsy within a short time to enable a proper treatment. If scar sarcoidosis is proven further investigation is necessary to exclude a systemical involvement. A surgical treatment of the swelling is not indicated. PMID:23031186

  4. Opuntia Extract Reduces Scar Formation in Rabbit Ear Model: A Randomized Controlled Study.

    PubMed

    Fang, Quan; Huang, Chunlan; You, Chuangang; Ma, Shaolin

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of this article is to investigate the effect of Opuntia stricta H (Cactaceae) extract on suppression of hypertrophic scar on ventral surface wounds of rabbit ears. Full thickness skin defection was established in a rabbit ear to simulate hypertrophic scar. Opuntia extract was sprayed on the wounds in the experimental group, and normal saline was used in the control group. After the wounds healed with scar formation, the hypertrophic scar tissue was harvested on days 22, 39, and 54 for histological analysis. The expression of type I and type III collagen and matrix metalloproteinase-1 (MMP-1) were evaluated by immunohistochemistry and real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction. The results indicated that the scar of the control group is more prominent compared with the opuntia extract group. The expression of type I collagen in the opuntia extract group was lower than the control group, while type III collagen in opuntia extract group gradually increased and exceeded control group. The expression of MMP-1 decreased in the opuntia extract group, while the control group increased over time, but the amount of MMP-1 was much higher than that in the control group on day 22. In conclusion, opuntia extract reduces hypertrophic scar formation by means of type I collagen inhibition, and increasing type III collagen and MMP-1.T he novel application of opuntia extract may lead to innovative and effective antiscarring therapies.

  5. AKAP12 Mediates Barrier Functions of Fibrotic Scars during CNS Repair

    PubMed Central

    Cha, Jong-Ho; Wee, Hee-Jun; Seo, Ji Hae; Ahn, Bum Ju; Park, Ji-Hyeon; Yang, Jun-Mo; Lee, Sae-Won; Kim, Eun Hee; Lee, Ok-Hee; Heo, Ji Hoe; Lee, Hyo-Jong; Gelman, Irwin H.; Arai, Ken; Lo, Eng H.; Kim, Kyu-Won

    2014-01-01

    The repair process after CNS injury shows a well-organized cascade of three distinct stages: inflammation, new tissue formation, and remodeling. In the new tissue formation stage, various cells migrate and form the fibrotic scar surrounding the lesion site. The fibrotic scar is known as an obstacle for axonal regeneration in the remodeling stage. However, the role of the fibrotic scar in the new tissue formation stage remains largely unknown. We found that the number of A-kinase anchoring protein 12 (AKAP12)-positive cells in the fibrotic scar was increased over time, and the cells formed a structure which traps various immune cells. Furthermore, the AKAP12-positive cells strongly express junction proteins which enable the structure to function as a physical barrier. In in vivo validation, AKAP12 knock-out (KO) mice showed leakage from a lesion, resulting from an impaired structure with the loss of the junction complex. Consistently, focal brain injury in the AKAP12 KO mice led to extended inflammation and more severe tissue damage compared to the wild type (WT) mice. Accordingly, our results suggest that AKAP12-positive cells in the fibrotic scar may restrict excessive inflammation, demonstrating certain mechanisms that could underlie the beneficial actions of the fibrotic scar in the new tissue formation stage during the CNS repair process. PMID:24760034

  6. Hematogenous macrophage depletion reduces the fibrotic scar and increases axonal growth after spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Y; Soderblom, C; Krishnan, V; Ashbaugh, J; Bethea, J R; Lee, J K

    2015-02-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) leads to formation of a fibrotic scar that is inhibitory to axon regeneration. Recent evidence indicates that the fibrotic scar is formed by perivascular fibroblasts, but the mechanism by which they are recruited to the injury site is unknown. Using bone marrow transplantation in mouse model of spinal cord injury, we show that fibroblasts in the fibrotic scar are associated with hematogenous macrophages rather than microglia, which are limited to the surrounding astroglial scar. Depletion of hematogenous macrophages results in reduced fibroblast density and basal lamina formation that is associated with increased axonal growth in the fibrotic scar. Cytokine gene expression analysis after macrophage depletion indicates that decreased Tnfsf8, Tnfsf13 (tumor necrosis factor superfamily members) and increased BMP1-7 (bone morphogenetic proteins) expression may serve as anti-fibrotic mechanisms. Our study demonstrates that hematogenous macrophages are necessary for fibrotic scar formation and macrophage depletion results in changes in multiple cytokines that make the injury site less fibrotic and more conducive to axonal growth.

  7. Chitooligosaccharide Inhibits Scar Formation and Enhances Functional Recovery in a Mouse Model of Sciatic Nerve Injury.

    PubMed

    Hou, Hongping; Zhang, Lihai; Ye, Zuguang; Li, Jianrong; Lian, Zijian; Chen, Chao; He, Rong; Peng, Bo; Xu, Qihua; Zhang, Guangping; Gan, Wenbiao; Tang, Peifu

    2016-05-01

    Chitooligosaccharide (COS) has been shown to induce fibroblast apoptosis, indicating that it could be used as a material to inhibit scar formation. In the present study, we used a mouse model of sciatic nerve injury (SNI) to determine the role of COS in scar inhibition and functional recovery. The animals were divided into three groups: SNI, SNI + vehicle, and SNI + COS group. We performed a series of functional and histological examinations at ctrl, 0 min, 14 days, and 42 days, including behavioral recovery, percentage of regenerating axons, degree of scar formation, vascular changes, type I and type III collagen ratio, and percentage of demyelinated axons. The SNI + COS group exhibited better recovery of sensory and motor function and less scar formation. Two-photon microscopy showed that the percentage of regenerating axons was highest in the SNI + COS group at 14 and 42 days. Our results suggested that COS can inhibit scar formation and enhance functional recovery by inducing fibroblast death, altering the proportion of different vascular diameters, changing the ratio of type I/type III collagen, and reducing the percentage of demyelinated axons. COS might be a useful drug in the treatment of SNI to reduce scar formation, but additional research is required to clarify the relevant molecular pathways.

  8. Histological Effect of Basic Fibroblast Growth Factor on Chronic Vocal Fold Scarring in a Rat Model

    PubMed Central

    Tateya, Ichiro; Tateya, Tomoko; Sohn, Jin-Ho; Bless, Diane M.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Vocal fold scarring is one of the most challenging laryngeal disorders to treat and there are currently no consistently effective treatments available. Our previous studies have shown the therapeutic potential of basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) for vocal fold scarring. However, the histological effects of bFGF on scarred vocal fold have not been elucidated. The aim of this study was to examine the histological effects of bFGF on chronic vocal fold scarring. Methods Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into phosphate buffered saline (sham) and bFGF groups. Unilateral vocal fold stripping was performed and the drug was injected into the scarred vocal fold for each group 2 months postoperatively. Injections were performed weekly for 4 weeks. Two months after the last injection, larynges were harvested and histologically analyzed. Results A significant increase of hyaluronic acid was observed in the vocal fold of the bFGF group compared with that of the sham group. However, there was no remarkable change in collagen expression nor in vocal fold contraction. Conclusion Significant increase of hyaluronic acid by local bFGF injection was thought to contribute to the therapeutic effects on chronic vocal fold scarring. PMID:26976028

  9. Co-localization of LTBP-2 with FGF-2 in fibrotic human keloid and hypertrophic scar.

    PubMed

    Sideek, Mohamed A; Teia, Abdulrahman; Kopecki, Zlatko; Cowin, Allison J; Gibson, Mark A

    2016-02-01

    We have recently shown that Latent transforming growth factor-beta-1 binding protein-2 (LTBP-2) has a single high-affinity binding site for fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF-2) and that LTBP-2 blocks FGF-2 induced cell proliferation. Both proteins showed strong co-localisation within keloid skin from a single patient. In the current study, using confocal microscopy, we have investigated the distribution of the two proteins in normal and fibrotic skin samples including normal scar tissue, hypertrophic scars and keloids from multiple patients. Consistently, little staining for either protein was detected in normal adult skin and normal scar samples but extensive co-localisation of the two proteins was observed in multiple examples of hypertrophic scars and keloids. LTBP-2 and FGF-2 were co-localised to fine fibrous elements within the extracellular matrix identified as elastic fibres by immunostaining with anti-fibrillin-1 and anti-elastin antibodies. Furthermore, qPCR analysis of RNA samples from multiple patients confirmed dramatically increased expression of LTBP-2 and FGF-2, similar TGF-beta 1, in hypertrophic scar compared to normal skin and scar tissue. Overall the results suggest that elevated LTBP-2 may bind and sequester FGF-2 on elastic fibres in fibrotic tissues and modulate FGF-2's influence on the repair and healing processes.

  10. Study of burn scar extraction automatically based on level set method using remote sensing data.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yang; Dai, Qin; Liu, Jianbo; Liu, ShiBin; Yang, Jin

    2014-01-01

    Burn scar extraction using remote sensing data is an efficient way to precisely evaluate burn area and measure vegetation recovery. Traditional burn scar extraction methodologies have no well effect on burn scar image with blurred and irregular edges. To address these issues, this paper proposes an automatic method to extract burn scar based on Level Set Method (LSM). This method utilizes the advantages of the different features in remote sensing images, as well as considers the practical needs of extracting the burn scar rapidly and automatically. This approach integrates Change Vector Analysis (CVA), Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) and the Normalized Burn Ratio (NBR) to obtain difference image and modifies conventional Level Set Method Chan-Vese (C-V) model with a new initial curve which results from a binary image applying K-means method on fitting errors of two near-infrared band images. Landsat 5 TM and Landsat 8 OLI data sets are used to validate the proposed method. Comparison with conventional C-V model, OSTU algorithm, Fuzzy C-mean (FCM) algorithm are made to show that the proposed approach can extract the outline curve of fire burn scar effectively and exactly. The method has higher extraction accuracy and less algorithm complexity than that of the conventional C-V model.

  11. CD34-positive dendritic cells disappear from scars but are increased in pericicatricial tissue.

    PubMed

    Erdag, Gulsun; Qureshi, Hina S; Patterson, James W; Wick, Mark R

    2008-08-01

    CD34-positive stromal cells (CD34SC) are distributed throughout the body, including the dermis. They are thought to play a role in maturation and proliferation of adjacent mesenchymal and epithelial stem cells and in immune responses. To investigate the role of such cells in wound healing after excision of cutaneous lesions, we examined the distribution and quantity of CD34SC in scars from the sites of removal of malignant skin tumors and from reconstructive surgery, as well as in samples of normal skin. In normal skin, CD34 staining was confined to dendritic cells in the dermis, endothelial cells, perifollicular cells and eccrine glands. In cutaneous scars, the cicatricial tissue was totally devoid of CD34SC. However, the dermis adjacent to scar showed increased numbers of CD34SC as compared with normal skin [41.5 cells/mm(2) vs. 24.5 cells/mm(2) (p < 0.001)]. We conclude that CD34SC disappears from scars but are induced to proliferate in pericicatricial tissue. The cells in question may play a role in remodeling of scarred skin. One should be aware that augmented labeling for CD34SC around scars is common; it should not be interpreted as evidence for the persistence or recurrence of tumors that may also express CD34.

  12. Identifying a Physical Indicator of Suicide Risk: Non-Suicidal Self-Injury Scars Predict Suicidal Ideation and Suicide Attempts

    PubMed Central

    Burke, Taylor A.; Hamilton, Jessica L.; Cohen, Jonah N.; Stange, Jonathan P.; Alloy, Lauren B.

    2015-01-01

    Background Suicide risk is challenging to quantify due to reliance on self-report, which is limited by individuals’ lack of insight and the desire to conceal such intentions. Non-suicidal self-injury (NSSI) is one of the most robust predictors of suicidal ideation (SI) and suicide attempts (SA). Although NSSI often leads to permanent scarring, which can be assessed by objective physical examination, no research has examined whether scarring denotes tangible risk for SI and SA. The present study examined whether NSSI scar presence and number predict current SI and SA history. Further, we examined whether brooding would exacerbate the effects of NSSI scarring on SI or SA. Methods Young adults (N = 231; M = 21.24 years; 78% female) completed self-report questionnaires assessing SA history, frequency of NSSI, presence/number of NSSI scars, brooding, current depressive symptoms, and SI. Results NSSI scar presence and number predicted current SI and SA history after controlling for current depressive symptoms. Moreover, scar presence and number predicted current SI over and above the effects of SA history and NSSI frequency, method, and medical severity. Further, NSSI scar presence and number predicted SI more strongly among individuals with greater levels of brooding than among individuals with lower levels of brooding. Conclusions The presence and number of NSSI scars are objective physical indicators of risk for SI and SAs. Brooding may further heighten the risk of SI for individuals bearing NSSI scars. PMID:26773994

  13. Laparoscopic repair of the uterine scar defect – successful treatment of secondary infertility: a case report and literature review

    PubMed Central

    Greta, Bakavičiūtė; Sabina, Špiliauskaitė; Audronė, Meškauskienė; Diana, Ramašauskaitė

    2016-01-01

    Background. The aim of this paper is to present a clinical case of laparoscopic repair of a uterine scar defect, to assess the effectiveness of treatment reviewing the latest literature sources, and to provide recommendations of uterine scar defect management. Materials and methods. We report the case of a 33-year-old woman with an insufficient uterine scar and one-year history of secondary infertility. Following this, she underwent corrective laparoscopic repair, successfully got pregnant two months later and carried pregnancy to full term. We discuss the prevalence of caesarean scar defects, their clinical symptoms, diagnostic methods, various treatment techniques, and their outcomes. Results and conclusion. Caesarean scar defects, insufficient uterine scars, isthmocele or scar dehiscence following a caesarean section involve myometrial discontinuity at the site of a scar previous caesarean section. These anatomical defects associated with prolonged menstrual bleeding, chronic pelvic pain, dysmenorrhea, dyspareunia and secondary infertility. Laparoscopic repair of the uterine scar defect is an effective method of treatment of secondary infertility. Patients with a previous history of caesarean section who present complaints of secondary infertility, need a detailed evaluation of the uterine scar before planning future pregnancies PMID:28356813

  14. The role of DMSA scans in evaluation of the correlation between urinary tract infection, vesicoureteric reflux, and renal scarring.

    PubMed

    Bhatnagar, V; Mitra, D K; Agarwala, S; Kumar, R; Patel, C; Malhotra, A K; Gupta, A K

    2002-03-01

    The correlation between urinary tract infection (UTI), vesicoureteric reflux (VUR) and renal scarring was studied in 89 patients (177 renal units; 1 solitary kidney) during the period 1997-2000. There were 63 males and 26 females; ages ranged from neonates to 14 years. UTI was diagnosed on the basis of a positive urine culture, VUR was diagnosed and graded by micturating cystourethrogram (MCU), and renal scarring was assessed by technetium 99 m Tc-dimercaptosuccinic acid (DMSA) scan. Ultrasonography (US) was done to evaluate renal tract dilatation and other structural abnormalities. A follow up DMSA scan was performed approximately 6 months after the initial scan. VUR was present in 106 of the 171 renal units in which it was studied and absent in 65 units. The majority of the VUR was grade V. Renal scars were seen in 90 of 177 renal units at presentation and in 72 of the 163 renal units studied at follow-up. Some information was lacking in 31 patients; hence, the correlation between UTI, VUR, and renal scarring was done in 58 patients. The majority of the suspected scars at presentation were not seen at follow-up, but most of the established scars persisted. Only 2 renal units showed scars for the first time on follow-up. On US, approximately 50% of normal kidneys showed either suspicious or established scars on DMSA scan, and patients with bilateral abnormality on US showed renal scars. Renal scars were seen in 15 of 23 children without VUR, 17 of 18 with unilateral VUR, and 16 of 17 with bilateral VUR. Thus, there is a cause-and-effect relationship between UTI and renal scarring that is made worse by VUR. DMSA scans have been shown to be the most reliable method of assessing renal scarring, and an abnormal US scan showing upper-tract dilatation or a structural abnormality may have a predictive value in the detection of renal scarring.

  15. Renal Scarring in the Randomized Intervention for Children with Vesicoureteral Reflux (RIVUR) Trial

    PubMed Central

    Chesney, Russell W.; Greenfield, Saul P.; Hoberman, Alejandro; Keren, Ron; Mathews, Ranjiv; Gravens-Mueller, Lisa; Ivanova, Anastasia; Carpenter, Myra A.; Moxey-Mims, Marva; Majd, Massoud; Ziessman, Harvey A.

    2016-01-01

    Background and objectives The main objectives of the Randomized Intervention for Children with Vesicoureteral Reflux (RIVUR) trial were to evaluate the role of antimicrobial prophylaxis in the prevention of recurrent urinary tract infection (UTI) and renal scarring in children with vesicoureteral reflux (VUR). We present a comprehensive evaluation of renal scarring outcomes in RIVUR trial participants. Design, setting, participants, & measurements This multicenter, randomized, placebo-controlled trial enrolled 607 children aged 2–71 months with grade 1–4 VUR diagnosed after a first or second febrile or symptomatic UTI. Study participants received trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole or placebo and were followed for 2 years. Renal scarring was evaluated by baseline and follow-up 99mtechnetium dimercaptosuccinic acid (DMSA) renal scans that were reviewed independently by two blinded reference radiologists. Results At the end of the study, 58 (10%) of 599 children and 63 (5%) of 1197 renal units had renal scarring. New renal scarring did not differ between the prophylaxis and placebo groups (6% versus 7%, respectively). Children with renal scarring were significantly older (median age, 26 versus 11 months; P=0.01), had a second UTI before enrollment (odds ratio [OR], 2.85; 95% confidence interval [95% CI], 1.38 to 5.92), were more likely to be Hispanic (OR, 2.22; 95% CI, 1.13 to 4.34), and had higher grades of VUR (OR, 2.79; 95% CI, 1.56 to 5.0). The proportion of new scars in renal units with grade 4 VUR was significantly higher than in units with no VUR (OR, 24.2; 95% CI, 6.4 to 91.2). Conclusions Significantly more renal scarring was seen in relatively older children and in those with a second episode of febrile or symptomatic UTI before randomization. Preexisting and new renal scars occurred significantly more in renal units with grade 4 VUR than in those with low-grade or no VUR. Antimicrobial prophylaxis did not decrease the risk of renal scarring. PMID:26555605

  16. Keloid and Hypertrophic Scars Are the Result of Chronic Inflammation in the Reticular Dermis

    PubMed Central

    Ogawa, Rei

    2017-01-01

    Keloids and hypertrophic scars are caused by cutaneous injury and irritation, including trauma, insect bite, burn, surgery, vaccination, skin piercing, acne, folliculitis, chicken pox, and herpes zoster infection. Notably, superficial injuries that do not reach the reticular dermis never cause keloidal and hypertrophic scarring. This suggests that these pathological scars are due to injury to this skin layer and the subsequent aberrant wound healing therein. The latter is characterized by continuous and histologically localized inflammation. As a result, the reticular layer of keloids and hypertrophic scars contains inflammatory cells, increased numbers of fibroblasts, newly formed blood vessels, and collagen deposits. Moreover, proinflammatory factors, such as interleukin (IL)-1α, IL-1β, IL-6, and tumor necrosis factor-α are upregulated in keloid tissues, which suggests that, in patients with keloids, proinflammatory genes in the skin are sensitive to trauma. This may promote chronic inflammation, which in turn may cause the invasive growth of keloids. In addition, the upregulation of proinflammatory factors in pathological scars suggests that, rather than being skin tumors, keloids and hypertrophic scars are inflammatory disorders of skin, specifically inflammatory disorders of the reticular dermis. Various external and internal post-wounding stimuli may promote reticular inflammation. The nature of these stimuli most likely shapes the characteristics, quantity, and course of keloids and hypertrophic scars. Specifically, it is likely that the intensity, frequency, and duration of these stimuli determine how quickly the scars appear, the direction and speed of growth, and the intensity of symptoms. These proinflammatory stimuli include a variety of local, systemic, and genetic factors. These observations together suggest that the clinical differences between keloids and hypertrophic scars merely reflect differences in the intensity, frequency, and duration of

  17. Digital representation of oil and natural gas well pad scars in southwest Wyoming: 2012 update

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Garman, Steven L.; McBeth, Jamie L.

    2015-01-01

    The recent proliferation of oil and natural gas energy development in the Greater Green River Basin of southwest Wyoming has accentuated the need to understand wildlife responses to this development. The location and extent of surface disturbance that is created by oil and natural gas well pad scars are key pieces of information used to assess the effects of energy infrastructure on wildlife populations and habitat. A digital database of oil and natural gas pad scars had previously been generated from 1-meter (m) National Agriculture Imagery Program imagery (NAIP) acquired in 2009 for a 7.7-million hectare (ha) (19,026,700 acres) region of southwest Wyoming. Scars included the pad area where wellheads, pumps, and storage facilities reside and the surrounding area that was scraped and denuded of vegetation during the establishment of the pad. Scars containing tanks, compressors, the storage of oil and gas related equipment, and produced-water ponds were also collected on occasion. This report updates the digital database for the five counties of southwest Wyoming (Carbon, Lincoln, Sublette, Sweetwater, Uinta) within the Wyoming Landscape Conservation Initiative (WLCI) study area and for a limited portion of Fremont, Natrona, and Albany Counties using 2012 1-m NAIP imagery and 2012 oil and natural gas well permit information. This report adds pad scars created since 2009, and updates attributes of all pad scars using the 2012 well permit information. These attributes include the origination year of the pad scar, the number of active and inactive wells on or near each pad scar in 2012, and the overall status of the pad scar (active or inactive). The new 2012 database contains 17,404 pad scars of which 15,532 are attributed as oil and natural gas well pads. Digital data are stored as shapefiles projected to the Universal Transverse Mercator (zones 12 and 13) coordinate system. These data are available from the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) at http://dx.doi.org/10

  18. [Methotrexate to treat SAPHO syndrome with keloidal scars].

    PubMed

    Azevedo, V F; Dal Pizzol, V I; Lopes, H; Coelho, S P; Czeczko, L E A

    2011-01-01

    SAPHO syndrome is an uncommon clinical entity, recently described in literature, which usually affects children, young adults and middle-aged people. It is defined by the association of skin lesions (severe acne, palmo-plantar pustulosis, supurative hidradenitis), synovitis, hiperosthosis and osteitis; however, not all manifestations are required for correct diagnosis. We report a currently forty-two year-old man who initiated follow-up in 1992 for severe acne. His diagnosis changed along the years and has been treated with antibiotics many times to control pustule formation and hidrosadenitis, which evolved to keloidal scars, requiring neck zethaplasty due to limitation of mobility. In 1996 isotretinoin was started, with good response to treatment but recurrence after its completion. Ten years later, isotretinoin was being used again due to worsening clinical picture when the patient developed polyarthritis, lost 11kg in 3 months and was found to have an elevated erythrocyte sedimentation rate. SAPHO syndrome was then diagnosed by the Rheumatology clinic, which started methotrexate at 10mg per week to a good clinical response. Several cutaneous and articular flares have occurred since, however he is now clinically stable with methotrexate 20mg per week and finasteride 5mg per day. SAPHO syndrome is a rare disease and its diagnosis is often late and difficult. In this case, skin lesions preceded arthritis in several years and have been resistant to other common treatments. The patient had a better improve after initiation of methotrexate. Although the skin disease has evolved to keloids, the patient has had excellent treatment response.

  19. Imaging of skin birefringence for human scar assessment using polarization-sensitive optical coherence tomography aided by vascular masking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Peijun; Chin, Lixin; Es'haghian, Shaghayegh; Liew, Yih Miin; Wood, Fiona M.; Sampson, David D.; McLaughlin, Robert A.

    2014-12-01

    We demonstrate the in vivo assessment of human scars by parametric imaging of birefringence using polarization-sensitive optical coherence tomography (PS-OCT). Such in vivo assessment is subject to artifacts in the detected birefringence caused by scattering from blood vessels. To reduce these artifacts, we preprocessed the PS-OCT data using a vascular masking technique. The birefringence of the remaining tissue regions was then automatically quantified. Results from the scars and contralateral or adjacent normal skin of 13 patients show a correspondence of birefringence with scar type: the ratio of birefringence of hypertrophic scars to corresponding normal skin is 2.2±0.2 (mean±standard deviation), while the ratio of birefringence of normotrophic scars to normal skin is 1.1±0.4. This method represents a new clinically applicable means for objective, quantitative human scar assessment.

  20. Treatment of Burn and Surgical Wounds With Recombinant Human Tropoelastin Produces New Elastin Fibers in Scars.

    PubMed

    Xie, Hua; Lucchesi, Lisa; Zheng, Bo; Ladich, Elena; Pineda, Teresa; Merten, Rose; Gregory, Cynthia; Rutten, Michael; Gregory, Kenton

    2017-02-15

    Tropoelastin (TE), the soluble precursor of insoluble elastin fibers, is produced in minimal amounts in adults. Burn injuries result in inflexible collagen-rich scars because of lack of elastin fiber formation. We studied the feasibility of using recombinant human tropoelastin to enable elastin fiber production in burn and surgical scars to improve skin flexibility. In a swine hypertrophic burn scar model, normal skin and 3 × 3-cm partial thickness thermal burns underwent dermatome resection at 1 week post burn and randomized to four subcutaneous injections of saline or TE (either 0.5, 5, or 10 mg/ml) spaced 3 days apart. Two burn sites received TE injections after wound closure (0.5 or 10 mg/ml). At 90 days, skin hardness, flexibility, and histology were evaluated. All injury sites developed hypertrophic scars. New elastin fibers were found in burn scars in all injuries injected after skin closure with low (5/5) and high (6/6) TE doses (P < .05). No elastin fibers were observed without TE treatment. No significant differences in skin hardness, flexibility, or inflammation were observed. This is the first report demonstrating that subcutaneous injections of TE into surgical and burn injuries can safely produce new elastin fibers in scars. Despite the development of new elastin fibers, skin flexibility was not improved, possibly because of insufficient elastin fiber maturation or the hypertrophic model used. The ability to restore elastin fiber formation in adult skin after burns, trauma, and surgery may improve skin regeneration and reduce disabling complications of scar formation.

  1. Clinical Evaluation of Hyaluronic Acid Sponge with Zinc versus Placebo for Scar Reduction after Breast Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Mahedia, Monali; Shah, Nilay

    2016-01-01

    Background: Scar formation is a major source of dissatisfaction among patients and surgeons. Individually, hyaluronan, or hyaluronic acid (HA), and zinc have been shown to reduce scarring. The authors evaluated the safety and efficacy of an HA sponge with zinc compared with placebo when applied to bilateral breast surgery scars; specifically, they evaluated whether the use of this product modulates inflammation and immediate scarring in treated patients after bilateral breast surgery. Methods: This double-blind, randomized, prospective study was approved by the local institutional review board. Bilateral breast surgery patients with right and left incision lines were randomly assigned to receive HA sponge with zinc or placebo within 2 to 4 days after their procedure. Participants were followed up at 6 weeks, 12 weeks, and 1 year and evaluated at 12 weeks. Three blinded evaluators reviewed photographs of the incision lines and assessed the scars using a visual analog scale, new scale, and a patient satisfaction survey. Results: Nineteen bilateral breast surgery patients were enrolled in the study. Statistical analysis was performed on 14 patients who completed the follow-up. The mean visual analog scale score was lower for the side receiving the HA sponge with zinc (2.6) than for the side receiving placebo (3.0), indicating a better outcome (t test; P = 0.08). The HA sponge with zinc was found to have significant positive findings on a patient satisfaction survey (P = 0.01). Conclusions: This is a preliminary study that shows zinc hyaluronan was associated with high patient satisfaction in achieving a better scar after bilateral breast surgery, irrespective of skin color. It seems to be safe and effective for early scars. PMID:27536470

  2. The dose-dependence biological effect of laser fluence on rabbit fibroblasts derived from urethral scar.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yong; Yu, Bo; Sun, Dongchong; Wu, Yuanyi; Xiao, Yi

    2015-04-01

    Two-micrometer laser vaporization resection has been used in clinic for years, but some patients received the treatment are still faced with excessive and abnormal wound repair which leads to the recurrent of urethral stricture eventually. Fibroblasts play a key role in the processes of "narrow-expansion/operation-restenosis" recurring problems. Here, we investigated the effect of laser fluence biomodulation on urethral scar fibroblasts as well as the underlying mechanism. Urethral scar fibroblasts were isolated and cultured, and laser irradiation (2 μm) was applied at different laser fluence or doses (0, 0.125, 0.5, 2, 8, 32 J/cm(2)) with a single exposure in 1 day. The effect of 2-μm laser irradiation on cell proliferation, viability, and expression of scar formation related genes were investigated. Two-micrometer laser irradiation with intermediate dose (8 J/cm(2)) promoted scar fibroblasts proliferation and reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, while higher doses of 32 J/cm(2) are suppressive as it decreased the survival rate, viability, and proliferation of fibroblasts. In addition, qRT-PCR and Western blotting results both proven that collagen type I, collagen IV, MMP9, and CTGF display significant increase, yet the TGF-β1 expression was severely reduced at intermediate dose (8 J/cm(2)) group when compared with the others groups. Our findings suggest the scar formation-related genes are sensitive to intermediate laser irradiation dose, the most in scar fibroblasts. We revealed the bioeffect and molecular mechanism of 2-μm laser irradiation on rabbit urethral scar fibroblasts. Our study provides new insights into the mechanisms which involved in the excessive and abnormal wound repair of 2-μm laser vaporization resection. These results could potentially contribute to further study on biological effects and application of 2-μm laser irradiation in urethral stricture therapy.

  3. Perforator-based flaps for the treatment of burn scar contractures: a review.

    PubMed

    Stekelenburg, C M; Marck, R E; Verhaegen, P D H M; Marck, K W; van Zuijlen, P P M

    2017-01-01

    Patients with burn scars often experience functional problems because of scar contractures. Surgical treatment may be indicated for those burn scar contractures. If the contractures are small and linear, the contraction bands can be treated with local transposition flaps like the Z-plasty. Broader, diffuse contractures are more challenging and require a different surgical approach, such as the use of local tissue. The use of perforator-based flaps is promising; however, their true clinical significance for this type of burn reconstructions still needs to be determined. Therefore, we performed a review to evaluate the role of perforator-based flaps for burn scar contracture treatment. Electronic databases were searched using a predefined search strategy. Studies evaluating the long-term outcome of perforator-based flaps for the treatment of burn scar contractures were included. The methodological quality was tested and data was summarized. Five hundred and ten papers were identified of which eleven met the inclusion criteria. One study was a randomized controlled trial; ten were cohort studies of a pre-postoperative design. The papers described outcomes of free flaps and local flaps. Most studies had methodological shortcomings and used inappropriate statistical methods. Perforator-based interposition flaps appear to be highly relevant for burn scar contracture treatment. However, due to the paucity and low quality of the studies that were assessed, no definitive conclusions about the true clinical significance could be reached. And therefore, only recommendations could be given for improvement of the quality of further primary research on the effectiveness of perforator-based flaps for burn scar contracture release.

  4. Class Size.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Underwood, Siobhan; Lumsden, Linda S.

    1994-01-01

    The items featured in this annotated bibliography touch on several aspects of the multifaceted class-size debate. Allen Odden reviews the literature and contends that class-size reduction should be used "sparingly and strategically." C. M. Achilles and colleagues examines two different class-size situations and find student test…

  5. Comparison of the Effectiveness of Ablative and Non-Ablative Fractional Laser Treatments for Early Stage Thyroidectomy Scars

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Jin-Uk; Kim, Soo-Young; Kim, Woo-Kyung; Park, Seung-Ha; Lee, Byung-Il; Kim, Deok-Woo

    2016-01-01

    Background Open thyroidectomy is conventionally performed at the anterior side of neck, which is a body part with a comparatively great degree of open exposure; due to this, postoperative scarring may cause distress in patients. We aimed to compare the effects of ablative and nonablative fractional laser treatments on thyroidectomy scars. We examined medical records in a retrospective manner and analyzed scars based on their digital images by using the modified Manchester Scar Scale (mMSS). Methods Between February 2012 and May 2013, 55 patients with thyroidectomy scars were treated with ablative (34 patients) or nonablative (21 patients) fractional laser. Each patient underwent 4 laser treatment sessions in 3–4 week intervals, 1–2 months postoperatively. Scar improvement was assessed using patient images and the mMSS scale. Results The mean decrease in scar score was 3.91 and 3.47 in the ablative and nonablative groups, respectively; the reduction between 2 groups did not exhibit any significant difference (P=0.16). We used the scale once again to individually evaluate scar attributes. The nonablative group accounted for a considerably higher color score value (P=0.03); the ablative group accounted for a considerably higher contour score value (P<0.01). Patient satisfaction was high and no complications occurred. Conclusions Both types of fractional laser treatments can be used successfully for thyroidectomy scar treatment with minimal complications; however, results indicate that higher effectiveness may be obtained from the use of ablative and nonablative lasers for hypertrophic scars and early erythematous scars, respectively. Therefore, the appropriate laser for scar treatment should be selected according to its specific characteristics. PMID:27896191

  6. Subcellular Size

    PubMed Central

    Marshall, Wallace F.

    2016-01-01

    All of the same conceptual questions about size in organisms apply equally at the level of single cells. What determines the size, not only of the whole cell, but of all its parts? What ensures that subcellular components are properly proportioned relative to the whole cell? How does alteration in organelle size affect biochemical function? Answering such fundamental questions requires us to understand how the size of individual organelles and other cellular structures is determined. Knowledge of organelle biogenesis and dynamics has advanced rapidly in recent years. Does this knowledge give us enough information to formulate reasonable models for organelle size control, or are we still missing something? PMID:25957302

  7. Substrate Ablation of Ventricular Tachycardia: Late Potentials, Scar Dechanneling, Local Abnormal Ventricular Activities, Core Isolation, and Homogenization.

    PubMed

    Briceño, David F; Romero, Jorge; Gianni, Carola; Mohanty, Sanghamitra; Villablanca, Pedro A; Natale, Andrea; Di Biase, Luigi

    2017-03-01

    Ventricular arrhythmias are a frequent cause of mortality in patients with ischemic cardiomyopathy and nonischemic cardiomyopathy. Scar-related reentry represents the most common arrhythmia substrate in patients with recurrent episodes of sustained ventricular tachycardia (VT). Initial mapping of scar-related VT circuits is focused on identifying arrhythmogenic tissue. The substrate-based strategies include targeting late potentials, scar dechanneling, local abnormal ventricular activities, core isolation, and homogenization of the scar. Even though substrate-based strategies for VT ablation have shown promising outcomes for patients with structural heart disease related to ischemic cardiomyopathy, the data are scarce for patients with nonischemic substrates.

  8. In vitro study of ethosome penetration in human skin and hypertrophic scar tissue.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhen; Wo, Yan; Zhang, Yixin; Wang, Danru; He, Rong; Chen, Huijin; Cui, Daxiang

    2012-08-01

    The purpose of this study is to characterize a novel transdermal delivery carrier, ethosomes containing 5-fluorouracil. The delivery of drugs from ethosomes in human hypertrophic scar (HS) and the mechanisms of action of ethosomes in human HS were investigated. Percutaneous ethosome permeation was evaluated in vitro in human HS and skin using a Franz's cell. The amount of 5-fluorouracil that permeated HS and skin after 24 hours was most abundant in ethosomes via HS (E-Scar), followed by hydroethanolic solution via HS (H-Scar), ethosomes via skin (E-Skin), and hydroethanolic solution via skin (H-Skin). The penetration of ethosomes in HS and skin was analyzed by ethosomes fluorescently labeled with rhodamine 6GO using confocal laser scanning microscopy. The fluorescence intensity after application for 24 hours was highest in E-Scar, followed by E-Skin, H-Scar, and H-Skin, which indicates the penetration of ethosomes in HS was greatest. In conclusion, we consider that ethosomes are a highly efficient carrier in HS.

  9. Second harmonic generation imaging of skin wound healing and scarring in a rabbit ear model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Yiyan; Zhu, Xiaoqin; Xiong, Shuyuan; Chen, Jianxin

    2012-12-01

    Skin wound healing and scarring in rabbit ears was examined by second harmonic generation (SHG) microscopy. Rabbit ear wound model was created by punching from the ventral surface with removal of epidermis, dermis and perichondrium. The samples were collected weekly, and cut into 100 μm thickness sections for SHG imaging. SHG imaging system was operated at 810 nm, producing SHG signals at half the excitation wavelength 405 nm. A Plan-Neofluar objective (x40 and NA=0.75) was employed for focusing the excitation beam into tissue samples and was also used to collect the backscattered intrinsic SHG signals. Our results showed apparent difference in collagen content and microstructure at various wound healing and scarring time points. It suggested that SHG signals from collagen can serve as a good indicator for characterization of wound status. With the advancement on miniaturization, microscopy based on SHG will become a valuable tool for monitoring the wound healing and scarring in vivo, and help to guide the improvement of scar appearance with appropriate and subtle modulation during wound healing based on better understanding of scarring response mechanism.

  10. Predisposing factors for renal scarring in children with urinary tract infection.

    PubMed

    Beiraghdar, Fatemeh; Panahi, Yunes; Einollahi, Behzad; Moharamzad, Yashar; Nemati, Eghlim; Amirsalari, Susan

    2012-05-01

    This study was undertaken to determine the predisposing factors for renal scarring in children with urinary tract infection. In this prospective cohort study, 176 children with documented urinary tract infection were categorized into four groups: ≤1 year old, 1-2 years old, 2-7 years and 7-14 years old. Ultrasonography and Technetium-99 m-DMSA scan were used to detect the possible abnormalities. Infants under 12 months old presented as the most common group for renal scarring (27 cases, 52.9%), and vesicoureteral reflux (VUR) was diagnosed in 29 cases (56.8%). Fifteen (41.67%) children between the ages of one and two years had renal scar, and VUR was detected in half of the patients. In the third group, 36.3%, and in fourth group, 41.6% of the patients had renal scar. Also, 38.6% in group three and 50% in the final group had VUR. A co-incidental finding that was observed in this study was the high incidence of pseudohypoaldesteronism (PHA) in our patients: in 39.2% of the children in group one, 22.2% in group two and 4% in group three. In group four however, none of the patients had PHA. Risk of scar formation with urinary tract infection (UTI) was higher in the younger age group and in those with recurrent UTIs.

  11. A portable automatic pressure delivery system for scar compression therapy in large animals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghassemi, Pejhman; Shupp, Jeffrey W.; Travis, Taryn E.; Gravunder, Andrew J.; Moffatt, Lauren T.; Ramella-Roman, Jessica C.

    2015-01-01

    Compression therapy has long been a standard treatment for hypertrophic scar prevention. However, due to the lack of objective, quantitative assessments, and measurements of scar severity, as well as the lack of a self-operated, controllable, and precise pressure delivery technique, limited concrete evidence exists, demonstrating compression therapy's efficacy. We have designed and built an automatic pressure delivery system to apply and maintain constant pressure on scar tissue in an animal model. A force sensor positioned on a compression plate reads the imposed force in real-time and sends the information to a feedback system controlling two position actuators. The actuators move accordingly to maintain a preset value of pressure onto the skin. The system was used in an in vivo model of compression therapy on hypertrophic scars. It was shown that the system was capable of delivering a constant pressure of 30 mmHg on scar wounds for a period of two weeks, and that phenotypic changes were seen in the wounds.

  12. The effects of conservative treatments on burn scars: A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Anthonissen, Mieke; Daly, Daniel; Janssens, Thaïs; Van den Kerckhove, Eric

    2016-05-01

    A variety of conservative treatments for burn scars are available, but there is no clear consensus on the evidence. The purpose of this study was to summarize the available literature on the effects of conservative treatments of burn scars in adults. RCTs and CCTs were sought in three databases, reference lists of retrieved articles and relevant reviews. The Scottish Intercollegiate Guidelines Network scoring system was used to assess the quality of the selected studies. Information on the study characteristics, results and interventions was extracted. Twenty-two articles were included into the review and categorized in six topics: 5 on massage therapy, 4 on pressure therapy, 6 on silicone gel application, 3 on combined therapy of pressure and silicone, 3 on hydration and 1 on ultrasound. Pressure and silicone therapy are evidence-based conservative treatments of hypertrophic scar formation after a burn producing clinically relevant improvement of scar thickness, redness and pliability. Massage therapy could have a positive result on scar pliability, pain and pruritus, but with less supporting evidence. The use of moisturizers and lotions could have an effect on itching, but the findings are contradictory. Of all other non-invasive treatments such as splinting, casting, physical activity, exercise and mobilizations no RCTs or CCTs were found.

  13. Inactivation of salmonella on tomato stem scars by edible chitosan and organic Acid coatings.

    PubMed

    Jin, T; Gurtler, J B

    2012-08-01

    This study was conducted to investigate the efficacy of antimicrobial coatings for inactivation of Salmonella on the surface of tomato stem scars. Scars were inoculated with a four-strain cocktail of Salmonella (serovars Montevideo, Newport, Saintpaul, and Typhimurium) and coated with acid-chitosan solutions. The chitosan coating with three acids (3A plus chitosan), the chitosan coating with one acid, and the three-acid solution without chitosan reduced the populations of Salmonella by 6.0, 3.6, and 5.3 log CFU per stem scar, respectively. Addition of allyl isothiocyanate (10 μl/ml) to the 3A plus chitosan coating did not significantly increase (P > 0.05) the antimicrobial efficacy. Although the populations of Salmonella in the controls (ca. 7.5 log CFU per stem scar) did not change significantly throughout the 14-day storage period at 10° C, Salmonella cells were reduced to undetectable levels (< 0.7 log CFU per stem scar) in the samples treated with 3A plus chitosan coating after two days of storage, and no growth was observed for the remaining storage period. Results from this study demonstrate that coatings of acid plus chitosan provide an alternative antimicrobial intervention for decontamination of tomatoes.

  14. Signaling molecules regulating phenotypic conversions of astrocytes and glial scar formation in damaged nerve tissues.

    PubMed

    Koyama, Yutaka

    2014-12-01

    Phenotypic conversion of astrocytes from resting to reactive (i.e., astrocytic activation) occurs in numerous brain disorders. Astrocytic activation in severely damaged brain regions often leads to glial scar formation. Because astrocytic activation and glial scar largely affect the vulnerability and tissue repair of damaged brain, numerous studies have been made to clarify mechanisms regulating the astrocytic phenotype. The phenotypic conversion is accompanied by the increased expression of intermediate filament proteins and the induction of hypertrophy in reactive astrocytes. Severe brain damage results in proliferation and migration of reactive astrocytes, which lead to glial scar formations at the injured areas. Gliogenesis from neural progenitors in the adult brain is also involved in astrocytic activation and glial scar formation. Recent studies have shown that increased expression of connexin 43, aquaporin 4, matrix metalloproteinase 9, and integrins alter the function of astrocytes. The transcription factors: STAT3, OLIG2, SMAD, NF-κB, and Sp1 have been suggested to play regulatory roles in astrocytic activation and glial scar formation. In this review, I discuss the roles of these key molecules regulating the pathophysiological functions of reactive astrocytes.

  15. A portable automatic pressure delivery system for scar compression therapy in large animals

    PubMed Central

    Shupp, Jeffrey W.; Travis, Taryn E.; Gravunder, Andrew J.; Moffatt, Lauren T.; Ramella-Roman, Jessica C.

    2015-01-01

    Compression therapy has long been a standard treatment for hypertrophic scar prevention. However, due to the lack of objective, quantitative assessments, and measurements of scar severity, as well as the lack of a self-operated, controllable, and precise pressure delivery technique, limited concrete evidence exists, demonstrating compression therapy’s efficacy. We have designed and built an automatic pressure delivery system to apply and maintain constant pressure on scar tissue in an animal model. A force sensor positioned on a compression plate reads the imposed force in real-time and sends the information to a feedback system controlling two position actuators. The actuators move accordingly to maintain a preset value of pressure onto the skin. The system was used in an in vivo model of compression therapy on hypertrophic scars. It was shown that the system was capable of delivering a constant pressure of 30 mmHg on scar wounds for a period of two weeks, and that phenotypic changes were seen in the wounds. PMID:25638116

  16. A systematic review on burn scar contracture treatment: searching for evidence.

    PubMed

    Stekelenburg, Carlijn M; Marck, Roos E; Tuinebreijer, Wim E; de Vet, Henrica C W; Ogawa, Rei; van Zuijlen, Paul P M

    2015-01-01

    Treating burn scar contracture remains a challenging problem for reconstructive surgeons. At present, no consensus exists on when to use what kind of technique. Therefore, a systematic review was performed on the effectiveness of the different surgical techniques after burn scar contracture release. Electronic databases were searched using a predefined search strategy. Studies evaluating the outcome of surgical techniques for the treatment of burn scar contractures were included. The methodological quality was tested and the data were summarized. One thousand six hundred fourty-nine papers were identified of which 17 met the inclusion criteria. Three papers reported on a controlled trial, 14 were cohort studies, including 10 of a pre-post operative design and 4 of a comparative design. The papers described outcomes of grafts, flaps with random or defined vascularization, and dermal substitutes. All studies had methodological shortcomings and most used inappropriate statistical methods. The current evidence on the effectiveness of reconstruction techniques for burn scar contractures was summarized. Due to the scarcity and low quality of the included studies, no definitive conclusions could be reached about the effectiveness of different techniques. Therefore, no direct implications for daily practice could be made. However, recommendations could be given for improvement of the quality of further primary research on the effectiveness of surgical treatment strategies for burn scar contracture release.

  17. Towards on line monitoring the evolution of the myocardium infarction scar with an implantable electrical impedance spectrum monitoring system.

    PubMed

    Sanchez, B; Guasch, A; Bogonez, P; Galvez, C; Puig, V; Prat, C; Semino, C E; Bayes-Genis, A; Bragos, R

    2012-01-01

    The human heart tissue has a limited capacity for regeneration. Tissue and cellular therapies based on the use of stem cells may be useful alternatives to limit the size of myocardial infarction. In this paper, the preliminary results from an experimental campaign for on-line monitoring of myocardium scar infarction are presented. This study has been carried out under a research project that has as main objective the development and application of a bioactive patch implant for regeneration of myocardial infarction. Electrical Impedance Spectroscopy (EIS) has been chosen as a tissue state monitoring technique. What is presented in this communication is the first results of an implantable EIS measurement system which has been implanted in a subset of the animals corresponding to the control group, along one month. In all the animals, the myocardial infarction was induced by the ligation of the first circumflex marginal artery. In the animal group presented, the bioactive patch scaffold and the electrodes were implanted without the stem cells load. The scaffold is a piece of decellularized human pericardium, lyophilized and rehydrated with hydrogel RAD16-I. Nanogold particles were also placed near the electrodes to improve the electrode area conductivity. The results presented correspond to the subset of animals (n = 5), which had implanted the bioimpedance system monitoring the electrical impedance spectrum in vivo during 1 month. Two electrodes were connected to the bioactive patch implant. A total of 14 logarithmically spaced frequencies were measured every 5 minutes, from 100 Hz to 200 kHz. Results show a convergence of low-frequency and high frequency impedance magnitudes along the measurement period, which is coherent with the scar formation.

  18. Uterine Rupture with Cesarean Scar Heterotopic Pregnancy with Survival of the Intrauterine Twin

    PubMed Central

    Behrman, Eric R.; Bembry, James S.; Kovac, Christine M.

    2016-01-01

    Background. Heterotopic pregnancy is a multiple gestation with both intrauterine and ectopic fetuses. A cesarean scar ectopic pregnancy is when the fetus has implanted over the previous hysterotomy site. A known complication of cesarean scar ectopic pregnancy is uterine rupture, which can cause great morbidity and mortality. Case. 28-year-old G5P3105 at 10 weeks with a dichorionic diamniotic gestation was found to have a ruptured uterus with expulsion of a cesarean scar ectopic pregnancy and retention of the intrauterine fetus. After uterine repair, the singleton gestation reached viability was delivered by emergent cesarean section for placental abruption. Conclusion. Safe management of cesarean ectopic pregnancy requires early diagnosis by ultrasonography. With early detection, management can focus on preventing maternal morbidity of uterine rupture and life-threatening hemorrhage. PMID:28116191

  19. Endometriosis in a post-laparoscopic scar--case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Chmaj-Wierzchowska, Karolina; Pieta, Beata; Czerniak, Tomasz; Opala, Tomasz

    2014-05-01

    Endometriosis is an estrogen-dependent, chronic disease consisting in implantation and hyperplasia of the endometrium outside of the uterine cavity Endometriosis in post-laparoscopic scars applies to approx. 0.5-7% of the extraorganic locations of the disease. The purpose of the paper was to describe medical management and literature review for endometriosis in a post-laparoscopic scar. Two lesions located near the insertion site for the lower trocars were removed along with the border of healthy tissue. At the time of publication of this paper the patient did not report any complaints. In conclusion, each limited lesion in the subcutaneous tissue, with pain intensifying during menstruation, should suggest an initial diagnosis of scar endometriosis, regardless of patient age and type of surgery

  20. Up-to-date approach to manage keloids and hypertrophic scars: A useful guide

    PubMed Central

    Arno, Anna I.; Gauglitz, Gerd G.; Barret, Juan P.; Jeschke, Marc G.

    2014-01-01

    Keloids and hypertrophic scars occur anywhere from 30 to 90% of patients, and are characterized by pathologically excessive dermal fibrosis and aberrant wound healing. Both entities have different clinical and histochemical characteristics, and unfortunately still represent a great challenge for clinicians due to lack of efficacious treatments. Current advances in molecular biology and genetics reveal new preventive and therapeutical options which represent a hope to manage this highly prevalent, chronic and disabling problem, with long-term beneficial outcomes and improvement of quality of life. While we wait for these translational clinical products to be marketed, however, it is imperative to know the basics of the currently existing wide array of strategies to deal with excessive scars: from the classical corticotherapy, to the most recent botulinum toxin and lasers. The main aim of this review paper is to offer a useful up-to-date guideline to prevent and treat keloids and hypertrophic scars. PMID:24767715

  1. Common threads in cardiac fibrosis, infarct scar formation, and wound healing

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Wound healing, cardiac fibrosis, and infarct scar development, while possessing distinct features, share a number of key functional similarities, including extracellular matrix synthesis and remodeling by fibroblasts and myofibroblasts. Understanding the underlying mechanisms that are common to these processes may suggest novel therapeutic approaches for pathologic situations such as fibrosis, or defective wound healing such as hypertrophic scarring or keloid formation. This manuscript will briefly review the major steps of wound healing, and will contrast this process with how cardiac infarct scar formation or interstitial fibrosis occurs. The feasibility of targeting common pro-fibrotic growth factor signaling pathways will be discussed. Finally, the potential exploitation of novel regulators of wound healing and fibrosis (ski and scleraxis), will be examined. PMID:23114500

  2. Up-to-date approach to manage keloids and hypertrophic scars: a useful guide.

    PubMed

    Arno, Anna I; Gauglitz, Gerd G; Barret, Juan P; Jeschke, Marc G

    2014-11-01

    Keloids and hypertrophic scars occur anywhere from 30 to 90% of patients, and are characterized by pathologically excessive dermal fibrosis and aberrant wound healing. Both entities have different clinical and histochemical characteristics, and unfortunately still represent a great challenge for clinicians due to lack of efficacious treatments. Current advances in molecular biology and genetics reveal new preventive and therapeutical options which represent a hope to manage this highly prevalent, chronic and disabling problem, with long-term beneficial outcomes and improvement of quality of life. While we wait for these translational clinical products to be marketed, however, it is imperative to know the basics of the currently existing wide array of strategies to deal with excessive scars: from the classical corticotherapy, to the most recent botulinum toxin and lasers. The main aim of this review paper is to offer a useful up-to-date guideline to prevent and treat keloids and hypertrophic scars.

  3. A Clinical Evaluation of Efficacy and Safety of Hyaluronan Sponge with Vitamin C Versus Placebo for Scar Reduction

    PubMed Central

    Mahedia, Monali; Shah, Nilay

    2016-01-01

    Background: Scar formation after injury or surgery is a major clinical problem. Individually, hyaluronan, or hyaluronic acid (HA), and vitamin C have been shown to reduce scarring by means of different mechanisms. The authors evaluated the efficacy and safety of an HA sponge system containing an active derivative of vitamin C to determine whether the use of this product promotes healing and reduces inflammation and scarring after surgery. Methods: This double-blind, randomized, prospective study was approved by the local institutional review board. Participants who had unilateral or bilateral surgical scars more than 1 month but less than 18 months old were enrolled. Surgical scars were randomly assigned to receive placebo or HA sponge with vitamin C. Three blinded evaluators reviewed photographs of the incision lines and assessed the scars using a visual analog scale. A patient satisfaction survey was also administered. Participants were followed up at 4 weeks, 12 weeks, and 1 year. Results: Twenty-three patients were enrolled in the study. Six patients dropped out of the study, for a total of 17 patients included in final analysis. Mean (range) age of patient was 43.5 (25–67) years. Mean (range) body mass index was 27.4 (18–36.9) kg/m2. The mean visual analog scale score for scars receiving HA sponge with vitamin C was slightly lower than the scars receiving placebo, but the difference was not statistically significant (t test; P = 0.9). The HA sponge with vitamin C was found to have significant positive findings on a patient satisfaction survey. Conclusions: The HA sponge system with vitamin C is safe to use in any scars older than 4 weeks. It has high patient satisfaction in achieving a better scar after surgery. The micro-roller used to apply the product was easy to use to potentially increase the spread of the medication in older scars. PMID:27536471

  4. Functional measurements based on feature tracking of cine magnetic resonance images identify left ventricular segments with myocardial scar

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background The aim of the study was to perform a feature tracking analysis on cine magnetic resonance (MR) images to elucidate if functional measurements of the motion of the left ventricular wall may detect scar defined with gadolinium enhanced MR. Myocardial contraction can be measured in terms of the velocity, displacement and local deformation (strain) of a particular myocardial segment. Contraction of the myocardial wall will be reduced in the presence of scar and as a consequence of reduced myocardial blood flow. Methods Thirty patients (3 women and 27 men) were selected based on the presence or absence of extensive scar in the anteroseptal area of the left ventricle. The patients were investigated in stable clinical condition, 4-8 weeks post ST-elevation myocardial infarction treated with percutaneous coronary intervention. Seventeen had a scar area >75% in at least one anteroseptal segment (scar) and thirteen had scar area <1% (non-scar). Velocity, displacement and strain were calculated in the longitudinal direction, tangential to the endocardial outline, and in the radial direction, perpendicular to the tangent. Results In the scar patients, segments with scar showed lower functional measurements than remote segments. Radial measurements of velocity, displacement and strain performed better in terms of receiver-operator-characteristic curves (ROC) than the corresponding longitudinal measurements. The best area-under-curve was for radial strain, 0.89, where a cut-off value of 38.8% had 80% sensitivity and 86% specificity for the detection of a segment with scar area >50%. As a percentage of the mean, intraobserver variability was 16-14-26% for radial measurements of displacement-velocity-strain and corresponding interobserver variability was 13-12-18%. Conclusion Feature tracking analysis of cine-MR displays velocity, displacement and strain in the radial and longitudinal direction and may be used for the detection of transmural scar. The accuracy and

  5. Procalcitonin as a predictor of renal scarring in infants and young children.

    PubMed

    Bressan, Silvia; Andreola, Barbara; Zucchetta, Pietro; Montini, Giovanni; Burei, Marta; Perilongo, Giorgio; Da Dalt, Liviana

    2009-06-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the usefulness of procalcitonin (PCT) as a marker of renal scars in infants and young children with a first episode of acute pyelonephritis. Children aged 7 days to 36 months admitted for first febrile urinary tract infection (UTI) to a pediatric emergency department were prospectively enrolled. The PCT concentration was determined at admission. Acute (99m)Tc-dimercaptosuccinic acid (DMSA) scintigraphy was performed within 7 days of admission and repeated 12 months later when abnormal findings were obtained on the first scan. Of the 72 children enrolled in the study, 52 showed signs of acute pyelonephritis (APN) on the first DMSA scan. A follow-up scintigraphy at the 12-month follow-up performed on 41 patients revealed that 14 (34%) patients had developed renal scars; these patients also presented significantly higher PCT values than those without permanent renal lesions [2.3 (interquartile range 1-11.6) vs. 0.5 (0.2-1.4) ng/mL; p = 0.007]. A comparison of the PCT concentration in patients with febrile UTI without renal involvement, with APN without scar development and with APN with subsequent renal scarring revealed a significant increasing trend (p = 0.006, Kruskal-Wallis test). The area under the ROC curve for scar prediction was 0.74 (95% confidence interval 0.61-0.85), with an optimum statistical cut-off value of 1 ng/mL (sensitivity 78.6%; specificity 63.8%). Based on these results, we suggest that serum PCT concentration at admission is a useful predictive tool of renal scarring in infants and young children with acute pyelonephritis.

  6. Could Pyelonephritic Scarring Be Prevented by Anti-Inflammatory Treatment? An Experimental Model of Acute Pyelonephritis

    PubMed Central

    Bahat Özdoğan, Elif; Özdemir, Tuğba; Arslansoyu Çamlar, Seçil; İmamoğlu, Mustafa; Çobanoğlu, Ümit; Sönmez, Bircan; Tosun, İlknur; Doğan, İsmail

    2014-01-01

    Objectives. This study aimed to demonstrate if the addition of anti-inflammatory treatment to antibiotic therapy shows any superiority to the treatment with antibiotic only. Methods. Forty-nine Wistar rats were divided into 7 groups. Pyelonephritis was performed by E. coli injection to upper pole of kidneys except control group. Group 2 was not treated. Ceftriaxone, ketoprofen, “ceftriaxone + ketoprofen,” methylprednisolone, and “ceftriaxone + methylprednisolone” were given in the groups. The technetium-99m-dimercaptosuccinic acid scintigraphies were performed in 3rd day to detect pyelonephritis and 10th week to detect renal scarring. All kidneys were also histopathologically evaluated. Results. When 3rd day and 10th week scintigraphies were compared, initial 2.00 ± 0.30 point pyelonephritis score resulted in 0.71 ± 0.36 renal scar score in “ceftriaxone + ketoprofen” group (P = 0.039). Initial 2.00 ± 0.43 point pyelonephritis score resulted in 0.86 ± 0.26 renal scar score in “ceftriaxone + methylprednisolone” group (P = 0.041). Renal scar score was declined in “ceftriaxone + ketoprofen” group and “ceftriaxone + methylprednisolone” group compared with no-treatment group on 10th week of the study (P = 0.026, P = 0.044). On histopathological evaluation, it was seen that renal scar prevalence and expansion declined significantly in “ceftriaxone + ketoprofen and ceftriaxone + methylprednisolone” (P = 0.011, P = 0.023). Conclusion. It was evidenced that ceftriaxone treatment in combination with ketoprofen or methylprednisolone declined scar formation in scintigraphic and histopathologic examinations of the kidneys. PMID:25105116

  7. Type 1 procollagen as a marker of severity of scarring after sternotomy: effects of topical corticosteroids.

    PubMed Central

    Riaz, Y; Cook, H T; Wangoo, A; Glenville, B; Shaw, R J

    1994-01-01

    AIMS--To determine whether the abundance of newly formed collagen in healing surgical wounds correlated with scar severity, and whether topical application of steroid cream reduced new collagen formation in patients who have undergone median sternotomy. METHODS--Thirty three patients six weeks after sternotomy, and 12 controls were studied. Scars were photographed, and biopsy specimens from scars at sites treated or untreated with topical corticosteroids (clobetasol proprionate 0.5%) were examined using immunohistochemical staining for type 1 procollagen (PCP 1) and transforming growth factor beta (TGF-beta), and in situ hybridisation for type 1 procollagen messenger RNA (mRNA). RESULTS--The degree of hypertrophy of the scar and the abundance of PCP 1 immunostaining were ranked independently, blind, and a correlation between these two variables was observed (r = 0.604, p < 0.001). The PCP 1 immunostaining was accompanied by a great abundance of PCP 1 mRNA and only a slight increase in TGF-beta immunostaining, when compared with normal skin or mature scars. Following the application of topical corticosteroids, for either 48 hours or twice daily for seven days, there was no reduction in PCP 1 immunostaining nor the abundance of PCP 1 mRNA. CONCLUSIONS--These data suggest that the extent of new collagen formation as assessed by PCP 1 immunohistochemistry may be a useful marker of the exuberance of the scarring process following sternotomy, and that topical corticosteroids are ineffective in reducing this component of the fibrotic response. Images PMID:7962602

  8. Evidence of invasive and noninvasive treatment modalities for hypertrophic scars: A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Kafka, Mona; Collins, Vanessa; Kamolz, Lars-Peter; Rappl, Thomas; Branski, Ludwik K; Wurzer, Paul

    2017-01-01

    Currently, there are various therapeutic approaches to reduce hypertrophic scarring; however, there is no standard evidence-based treatment protocol. Hence, a systematic review was performed to obtain a summary of the latest clinical trials to evaluate evidence for the treatment of hypertrophic scars. The review protocol was registered and approved by PROSPERO (CRD42015027040). PubMed and Web of Science were searched using predefined MeSH-Terms to identify studies published within the last 10 years regarding treatment for hypertrophic scars. Exclusion criteria included a level of evidence (LoE) lower than I, nonhuman in vivo studies, in vitro studies, studies on keloids, literature reviews, and non-English articles. The literature search identified 1,029 unique articles, whereas 6 articles were prospective, randomized, blinded, controlled clinical trials with a LoE I, and were thus included in the systematic analysis. Three clinical trials evaluated silicone products and pressure garments, and the other three studies investigated the efficacy of intralesional injections of triamcinolone (TAC), 5-Fluorouracil (5-FU) combined with TAC as well as the additional irradiation with a 585 nm pulsed-dye laser (PDL). Intralesional injections revealed significant improvements of the scar quality in terms of height, thickness, erythema, and pigmentation. Pressure garments showed favorable results but there was no evidence that silicone products were able to improve the scar quality. The systematic review demonstrated that there are just a few clinical trials with a LoE of I. Consequently, evidence is still lacking especially for noninvasive treatment regimens for hypertrophic scars. Intralesional injections of 5-FU mixed with a low dose of TAC can be seen as most appropriate treatment modality. Prospective clinical trials to determine the efficiency of silicone products are warranted.

  9. Abdominal scar characteristics as a predictor of cervical stenosis after abdominal radical trachelectomy

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiaoqi; Li, Jin; Ju, Xingzhu; Chen, Xiaojun; Wu, Xiaohua

    2016-01-01

    To investigate whether abdominal scar characteristics could predict the occurrence of cervical stenosis after abdominal radical trachelectomy (ART), we conducted a retrospective study and investigated the relationship between abdominal scar characteristics and the occurrence of cervical stenosis in patients one year after undergoing ART. The abdominal scars were evaluated using the Vancouver Scar Scale (VSS). Seventy-two participants were enrolled in the study, including 15 (20.8%) women with cervical stenosis, and 57 (79.2%) without stenosis. Results showed that the mean abdominal scar score assessed by VSS was higher in patients with cervical stenosis (7, range: 1–10) compared to those without stenosis (4, range: 0–9) (P = 0.001). Incidence rates of cervical stenosis increased with the VSS score. For women with VSS scores of 0 to 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9 and 10, respectively, the occurrences of cervical stenosis were 6.1%, 16.7%, 16.7%, 27.3%, 37.5%, 50% and 100%. The cutoff point of VSS score was 7 according to the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve. Fourteen of the 15 stenosis happened either in patients without anti-stenosis tools (Foley catheters or tailed intrauterine devices) placed during the surgery or after the devices were removed. Our results demonstrated that VSS is an effective approach to assess the presence of cervical stenosis after ART. Women who have an abdominal scar with a VSS score > 7 have a high risk of developing isthmic stenosis without anti-stenosis tools in place. PMID:27191256

  10. Comparative effect and safety of verapamil in keloid and hypertrophic scar treatment: a meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhouna; Jin, Zhehu

    2016-01-01

    Background Keloids and hypertrophic scars are the most common types of pathological scarring. Traditionally, keloids have been considered as a result of aberrant wound healing, involving excessive fibroblast participation that is characterized by hyalinized collagen bundles. However, the usefulness of this characterization has been questioned. In recent years, studies have reported the appropriate use of verapamil for keloids and hypertrophic scars. Methods Searches were conducted on the databases Medline, Embase, Cochrane, PubMed, and China National Knowledge Infrastructure from 2006 to July 2016. State12.0 was used for literature review, data extraction, and meta-analysis. Treatment groups were divided into verapamil and nonverapamil group. Nonverapamil group includes steroids and intense pulsed light (IPL) therapy. Total effective rates include cure rate and effective rate. Cure: skin lesions were completely flattened, became soft and symptoms disappeared. Efficacy: skin lesions subsided, patient significantly reduced symptoms. Inefficient definition of skin was progression free or became worse. Random-effects model was used for the meta-analysis. Results Six studies that included 331 patients with keloids and hypertrophic scars were analyzed. Analysis of the total effective rate of skin healing was performed. The total effective rates in the two groups were 54.07% (verapamil) and 53.18% (nonverapamil), respectively. The meta-analysis showed that there was no difference between the two groups. We also compared the adverse reactions between the verapamil treatment group and the steroids treatment group in two studies, and the result indicated that the verapamil group showed less adverse reactions. Conclusion There were no differences between the application of verapamil and nonverapamil group in keloids and hypertrophic scars treatment. Verapamil could act as an effective alternative modality in the prevention and treatment of keloid and hypertrophic scars. A

  11. Large arcuate scars: A geological legacy of the Earth's accretionary past

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saul, J. M.

    1985-01-01

    Immediately following accretion, the surface of the Earth was densely patterned with circular scars which were the surface expressions of 3-D craterform structures. In the course of geological time these structures would have become less and less visible due to the workings of the Earth's atmosphere, surface waters, and plate tectonics regime but there is no compelling reason to assume that they have been entirely eradicated. Furthermore, a very imperfect analogy with the other inner planets suggests that geological processes may not in fact be capable of totally erasing such deep features. Some illustrative examples of arcuate scars are discussed.

  12. Lichen Planus Pemphigoides Presenting Preferentially Over Preexisting Scars: A Rare Instance of Isotopic Phenomenon.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Piyush; Savant, Sushil S; Das, Anupam; Hassan, Shahid; Barman, Panchami Deb

    2015-01-01

    An 18-year-old girl presented with multiple itchy hyperpigmented papules and plaques, along with tense blisters over the lower limbs and buttocks for last 3 months. These papules, plaques, and bullae were mostly localized to preexisting scars. The histopathological findings from papule and bulla were consistent with lichen planus (LP) and bullous pemphigoid, respectively. Direct immunofluorescence (DIF) of perilesional skin around bulla showed linear deposition of IgG and C3. Considering clinical, histopathological and DIF findings, diagnosis of LP pemphigoides (LPP) was made. The preferential localization of LPP lesions over preexisting scars was a very interesting finding in our case an extremely rare instance of the isotopic phenomenon.

  13. Laser and light-based treatments of acne and acne scarring.

    PubMed

    Alexiades, Macrene

    The treatment of acne and acne scarring with lasers and light-based and energy-based technologies has become an integral component of our therapeutic arsenal. Lasers including infrared wavelengths and pulsed dye lasers; light devices including blue light, red light, and broadband light; and photodynamic therapy with aminolevulinic acid and methylaminolevulinic acid have been shown to be effective in the treatment of acne vulgaris. The optimal outcomes are achieved with photodynamic therapy combined with medical therapy. Acne scarring has been best treated with lasers, including nonablative infrared lasers, fractional nonablative and ablative laser resurfacing, and most recently needle-based radiofrequency devices.

  14. Cesarean Scar Endometriosis: An Uncommon Surgical Complication on the Rise? Case Report and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Filali Adib, Abdelhai; Bezad, Rachid

    2017-01-01

    Endometriosis is defined by the presence and growth of ectopic functional endometrial tissue outside the uterus. Scar endometriosis has been described following obstetrical and gynecological surgery. It is a rare condition, though probably on the rise, due to the considerable increase of cesarean sections performed worldwide. Its physiopathology is complex; its symptomatology is rich and diverse but thorough clinical examination along with ultrasound imaging and potentially pretherapeutic cytologic evaluation are usually efficient in diagnosing the condition. Treatment is mostly surgical. We report the case of a cesarean section scar endometriosis, managed at a tertiary level center and emphasize the diagnosis and treatment options. PMID:28326210

  15. Microvascular changes during acne lesion initiation and scarring is revealed in vivo using optical microangiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baran, Utku; Li, Yuandong; Choi, Woo J.; Wang, Ruikang K.

    2015-02-01

    Acne is a common skin disease in society and often leads to scarring. In this paper, we demonstrate the capabilities of swept-source optical coherence tomography (SS-OCT) in detecting specific features of acne lesion initiation and scarring on human facial skin in vivo over 30 days. Optical microangiography (OMAG) technique made it possible to image 3D tissue microvasculature changes up to 1 mm depth in vivo without the need of exogenous contrast agents in ~10 seconds. The presented results show promise to facilitate clinical trials of treatment and prognosis of acne vulgaris by detecting cutaneous microvasculature and structural changes within human skin in vivo.

  16. “Meniscal” scar as a landmark for the joint line in revision total knee replacement

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Wasim Sardar; Bhamra, Jagmeet; Williams, Rhodri; Morgan-Jones, Rhidian

    2017-01-01

    AIM To determine whether tissue identified at the joint line was actually remnant “meniscal” scar tissue or not. METHODS Nine patients undergoing revision knee surgery following informed consent had meniscal scar tissue sent to the histology department for analyses. All revisions were performed where joint line had been raised or lowered at earlier surgery. Although preoperative radiographic evaluations suggested that the joint line had been altered, intraoperatively there was scar tissue at the level of the recreated joint line. This scar tissue has traditionally been described as meniscal scar, and to identify the origins of this tissue, samples were sent for histological analyses. The tissue samples were stored in formalin, and embedded and sectioned before undergoing histochemical staining. All samples underwent macroscopic and microscopic examination by a histopathologist who was blind to the study aims. The specific features that were examined included tissue organisation, surface and central composition, cellular distribution including histiocytes, nuclear ratio and vasculature. Atypical and malignant features, inflammation and degeneration were specifically looked for. A statistical review of the study was performed by a biomedical statistician. RESULTS The histological findings for the nine patients showing the macroscopic and microscopic findings, and the conclusion are outlined in a Table. The histological analyses were reviewed to determine whether the tissue samples were likely to be meniscal scar tissue. The response was yes (2, 22%), no (6, 67%) and maybe (1, 11%) based on the conclusions. The results were “yes” when on macroscopy, firm cream tissue was identified. In these two “yes” samples, microscopic analyses showed organised fibrous tissue with focal degenerative areas with laminated pattern associated with histiocytes peripherally but no inflammation. The “no” samples were assessed macroscopically and microscopically and were

  17. Maternal BCG scar is associated with increased infant proinflammatory immune responses

    PubMed Central

    Mawa, Patrice Akusa; Webb, Emily L.; Filali-Mouhim, Abdelali; Nkurunungi, Gyaviira; Sekaly, Rafick-Pierre; Lule, Swaib Abubaker; Prentice, Sarah; Nash, Stephen; Dockrell, Hazel M.; Elliott, Alison M.; Cose, Stephen

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Prenatal exposures such as infections and immunisation may influence infant responses. We had an opportunity to undertake an analysis of innate responses in infants within the context of a study investigating the effects of maternal mycobacterial exposures and infection on BCG vaccine-induced responses in Ugandan infants. Material and methods Maternal and cord blood samples from 29 mother-infant pairs were stimulated with innate stimuli for 24 h and cytokines and chemokines in supernatants were measured using the Luminex® assay. The associations between maternal latent Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection (LTBI), maternal BCG scar (adjusted for each other’s effect) and infant responses were examined using linear regression. Principal Component Analysis (PCA) was used to assess patterns of cytokine and chemokine responses. Gene expression profiles for pathways associated with maternal LTBI and with maternal BCG scar were examined using samples collected at one (n = 42) and six (n = 51) weeks after BCG immunisation using microarray. Results Maternal LTBI was positively associated with infant IP-10 responses with an adjusted geometric mean ratio (aGMR) [95% confidence interval (CI)] of 5.10 [1.21, 21.48]. Maternal BCG scar showed strong and consistent associations with IFN-γ (aGMR 2.69 [1.15, 6.17]), IL-12p70 (1.95 [1.10, 3.55]), IL-10 (1.82 [1.07, 3.09]), VEGF (3.55 [1.07, 11.48]) and IP-10 (6.76 [1.17, 38.02]). Further assessment of the associations using PCA showed no differences for maternal LTBI, but maternal BCG scar was associated with higher scores for principal component (PC) 1 (median level of scores: 1.44 in scar-positive versus −0.94 in scar-negative, p = 0.020) in the infants. PC1 represented a controlled proinflammatory response. Interferon and inflammation response pathways were up-regulated in infants of mothers with LTBI at six weeks, and in infants of mothers with a BCG scar at one and six weeks after BCG immunisation. Conclusions

  18. 99mTc-DMSA scanning to diagnose pyelonephritic scarring in children

    SciTech Connect

    Kogan, B.A.; Kay, R.; Wasnick, R.J.; Carty, H.

    1983-06-01

    99mTechnetium-labeled dimercaptosuccinic acid (99mTc-DMSA) scanning provides superior quality images of renal parenchymal detail, which makes it highly sensitive for the diagnosis of pyelonephritic scarring. Unlike most other imaging techniques, radionuclide scanning is not affected by bowel gas or bony structures overlying the kidneys. This makes it particularly useful in children. Furthermore, renal scarring can be demonstrated by 99mTc-DMSA even before the classic gross anatomic and radiologic changes are present. The use of 99mTc-DMSA scanning in over 300 children has demonstrated its benefits and advantages over standard radiographic techniques.

  19. Development and application of RAPD-SCAR marker for identification of Phyllanthus emblica LINN.

    PubMed

    Dnyaneshwar, Warude; Preeti, Chavan; Kalpana, Joshi; Bhushan, Patwardhan

    2006-11-01

    Correct genotype identification of medicinal plant material remains important for botanical drug industry. Limitations of chemical and morphological approaches for authentication have generated need for newer methods in quality control of botanicals. The present study was carried out to develop DNA based marker for identification of Phyllanthus emblica LINN. A putative marker (1.1 kb) specific for P. emblica was identified by Random Amplified Polymorphic DNA (RAPD) technique. Sequence Characterized Amplified Region (SCAR) marker was developed from the RAPD amplicon. The SCAR marker was found useful for identification of P. emblica in its commercial samples and Triphalachurna, a multi-component Ayurvedic formulation.

  20. What score on the Vancouver Scar Scale constitutes a hypertrophic scar? Results from a survey of North American burn-care providers

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Callie M.; Sood, Ravi F.; Honari, Shari; Carrougher, Gretchen J.; Gibran, Nicole S.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Reliable characterization of a hypertrophic scar (HTS) is integral to epidemiologic studies designed to identify clinical and genetic risk factors for HTS. The Vancouver Scar Scale (VSS) has been widely used for this purpose; however, no publication has defined what score on this scale corresponds to a clinical diagnosis of HTS. Methods In a survey of 1000 burn care providers, we asked respondents what VSS score indicates a HTS and asked them to score scar photos using the VSS. We used receiver-operating-characteristic (ROC) curves to evaluate VSS subscores and their combinations in diagnosis of HTS. Results Of 130 responses (13.5%), most were physicians (43.9%) who had worked in burn care for over 10 years (63.1%) and did not use the VSS in clinical practice (58.5%). There was no consensus as to what VSS score indicates a diagnosis of HTS. VSS height score (0–3) performed best for diagnosis of HTS; using a cut-off of ≥1, height score was 99.5% sensitive and 85.9% specific for HTS. Conclusions Burn clinicians do not routinely use the VSS and perceptions vary widely regarding what constitutes a HTS. When a dichotomous variable is needed, the VSS height score with a cut-off of ≥1 may be optimal. Our findings underscore the need for an objective tool to reproducibly characterize HTS across burn centers. PMID:26141527

  1. Unemployment scarring by gender: Human capital depreciation or stigmatization? Longitudinal evidence from the Netherlands, 1980-2000.

    PubMed

    Mooi-Reci, Irma; Ganzeboom, Harry B

    2015-07-01

    Using longitudinal data from the Dutch Labor Force Supply Panel (OSA), this article examines how unemployment scarring (i.e., wage setbacks following unemployment) and its underlying mechanisms operate across gender in the Netherlands over the period 1985-2000. A series of fixed effect panel models that correct for unobserved heterogeneity, reveal a notable disparity in unemployment scarring by gender. Interestingly, while unemployment scarring is short-lived and partly conditional upon human capital differences among women, it is strongly persistent among men and contingent upon old age, ethnicity, and tight economic conditions. Our findings provide new evidence regarding unemployment scarring by gender while they support the hypothesis that among women the effects of unemployment scarring are predominantly driven by human capital depreciation, while among men stigma effects dominate.

  2. Boron/aluminum fan blades for SCAR engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stabrylla, R. G.; Carlson, R. G.

    1977-01-01

    Processing procedures were developed to enhance boron/aluminum bond behavior and foreign object damage (FOD) tolerance. Design and analysis indicated that the J101 Stage 1 fan blade meets the required frequencies without a midspan shroud. The fabricability of full size J101 blades was assessed, while six blades were fabricated and finished machined.

  3. Size distribution of submarine landslides along the U.S. Atlantic margin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chaytor, J.D.; ten Brink, U.S.; Solow, A.R.; Andrews, B.D.

    2009-01-01

    Assessment of the probability for destructive landslide-generated tsunamis depends on the knowledge of the number, size, and frequency of large submarine landslides. This paper investigates the size distribution of submarine landslides along the U.S. Atlantic continental slope and rise using the size of the landslide source regions (landslide failure scars). Landslide scars along the margin identified in a detailed bathymetric Digital Elevation Model (DEM) have areas that range between 0.89??km2 and 2410??km2 and volumes between 0.002??km3 and 179??km3. The area to volume relationship of these failure scars is almost linear (inverse power-law exponent close to 1), suggesting a fairly uniform failure thickness of a few 10s of meters in each event, with only rare, deep excavating landslides. The cumulative volume distribution of the failure scars is very well described by a log-normal distribution rather than by an inverse power-law, the most commonly used distribution for both subaerial and submarine landslides. A log-normal distribution centered on a volume of 0.86??km3 may indicate that landslides preferentially mobilize a moderate amount of material (on the order of 1??km3), rather than large landslides or very small ones. Alternatively, the log-normal distribution may reflect an inverse power law distribution modified by a size-dependent probability of observing landslide scars in the bathymetry data. If the latter is the case, an inverse power-law distribution with an exponent of 1.3 ?? 0.3, modified by a size-dependent conditional probability of identifying more failure scars with increasing landslide size, fits the observed size distribution. This exponent value is similar to the predicted exponent of 1.2 ?? 0.3 for subaerial landslides in unconsolidated material. Both the log-normal and modified inverse power-law distributions of the observed failure scar volumes suggest that large landslides, which have the greatest potential to generate damaging tsunamis

  4. Bone marrow stromal cell sheets may promote axonal regeneration and functional recovery with suppression of glial scar formation after spinal cord transection injury in rats.

    PubMed

    Okuda, Akinori; Horii-Hayashi, Noriko; Sasagawa, Takayo; Shimizu, Takamasa; Shigematsu, Hideki; Iwata, Eiichiro; Morimoto, Yasuhiko; Masuda, Keisuke; Koizumi, Munehisa; Akahane, Manabu; Nishi, Mayumi; Tanaka, Yasuhito

    2017-03-01

    OBJECTIVE Transplantation of bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) is a theoretical potential as a therapeutic strategy in the treatment of spinal cord injury (SCI). Although a scaffold is sometimes used for retaining transplanted cells in damaged tissue, it is also known to induce redundant immunoreactions during the degradation processes. In this study, the authors prepared cell sheets made of BMSCs, which are transplantable without a scaffold, and investigated their effects on axonal regeneration, glial scar formation, and functional recovery in a completely transected SCI model in rats. METHODS BMSC sheets were prepared from the bone marrow of female Fischer 344 rats using ascorbic acid and were cryopreserved until the day of transplantation. A gelatin sponge (GS), as a control, or BMSC sheet was transplanted into a 2-mm-sized defect of the spinal cord at the T-8 level. Axonal regeneration and glial scar formation were assessed 2 and 8 weeks after transplantation by immunohistochemical analyses using anti-Tuj1 and glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) antibodies, respectively. Locomotor function was evaluated using the Basso, Beattie, and Bresnahan scale. RESULTS The BMSC sheets promoted axonal regeneration at 2 weeks after transplantation, but there was no significant difference in the number of Tuj1-positive axons between the sheet- and GS-transplanted groups. At 8 weeks after transplantation, Tuj1-positive axons elongated across the sheet, and their numbers were significantly greater in the sheet group than in the GS group. The areas of GFAP-positive glial scars in the sheet group were significantly reduced compared with those of the GS group at both time points. Finally, hindlimb locomotor function was ameliorated in the sheet group at 4 and 8 weeks after transplantation. CONCLUSIONS The results of the present study indicate that an ascorbic acid-induced BMSC sheet is effective in the treatment of SCI and enables autologous transplantation without requiring a

  5. A comprehensive evidence-based review on the role of topicals and dressings in the management of skin scarring.

    PubMed

    Sidgwick, G P; McGeorge, D; Bayat, A

    2015-08-01

    Wound healing after dermal injury is an imperfect process, inevitably leading to scar formation as the skin re-establishes its integrity. The resulting scars have different characteristics to normal skin, ranging from fine-line asymptomatic scars to problematic scarring including hypertrophic and keloid scars. Scars appear as a different colour to the surrounding skin and can be flat, stretched, depressed or raised, manifesting a range of symptoms including inflammation, erythema, dryness and pruritus, which can result in significant psychosocial impact on patients and their quality of life. In this paper, a comprehensive literature review coupled with an analysis of levels of evidence (LOE) for each published treatment type was conducted. Topical treatments identified include imiquimod, mitomycin C and plant extracts such as onion extract, green tea, Aloe vera, vitamin E and D, applied to healing wounds, mature scar tissue or fibrotic scars following revision surgery, or in combination with other more established treatments such as steroid injections and silicone. In total, 39 articles were included, involving 1703 patients. There was limited clinical evidence to support their efficacy; the majority of articles (n = 23) were ranked as category 4 LOE, being of limited quality with individual flaws, including low patient numbers, poor randomisation, blinding, and short follow-up periods. As trials were performed in different settings, they were difficult to compare. In conclusion, there is an unmet clinical need for effective solutions to skin scarring, more robust long-term randomised trials and a consensus on a standardised treatment regime to address all aspects of scarring.

  6. Acne scars in 18-year-old male adolescents: a population-based study of prevalence and associated factors*

    PubMed Central

    Lauermann, Fernanda Tcatch; de Almeida Jr., Hiram Larangeira; Duquia, Rodrigo Pereira; de Souza, Paulo Ricardo Martins; Breunig, Juliano de Avelar

    2016-01-01

    Background Acne vulgaris is a pilosebaceous follicle disorder affecting over 85% of adolescents to some degree. It frequently causes psychological distress that may persist into adulthood due to scarring. Little information about post-acne scarring epidemiology is available. Objectives To describe prevalence, distribution patterns and associated factors of acne scarring in young males, drawing on a representative population sample from a southern Brazilian city. Methods A cross-sectional study was undertaken during presentation for military service, which is compulsory for all 18-year-old males. A questionnaire was applied, covering topics like diet, smoking habits, ethnicity, family structure, socio-economic level, as well as specific questions about active acne and resulting scars. Dermatologists conducted the clinical examination. Results A total of 2,201 male adolescents were interviewed and examined. The overall prevalence of acne scarring was 22%. The malar region was the most frequently involved, present in 80% of affected individuals, followed by the frontal region (31.5%), back (17%), anterior chest (8.2%) and mentonian region (6.4%). Correlation between the intensity of clinical acne and the presence of scars was found, but no association was observed with educational level, smoking, ethnicity, obesity or socio-economic status. Conclusions There is a high prevalence of acne scars among this population. This is the first study to ascertain a correlation between acne scarring and factors such as socio-economic status and educational level. The direct relation between acne severity and scarring indicates that prompt and effective treatment is the best way to reduce scarring. PMID:27438194

  7. Low-Dose Enalapril in the Treatment of Surgical Cutaneous Hypertrophic Scar and Keloid - Two Case Reports and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Iannello, Silvia; Milazzo, Paolina; Bordonaro, Fabio; Belfiore, Francesco

    2006-01-01

    Hypertrophic scars and keloids are 2 forms of excessive cutaneous scarring that occur in predisposed individuals. The healing process varies greatly among patients, and the risk of a bad scar evolution is unpredictable. Keloids create disfiguring scars with associated erythema and pain or pruritus or restricted range of motion, and are a major cause of morbidity. A fortuitous observation was made by the first author of this study who, at age 54, developed an erythematous and painful postsurgical abdominal keloid scar after undergoing left colectomy for colon adenocarcinoma. Four months later, after treatment with low-dose enalapril (10 mg, once a day) for mild arterial hypertension, her keloid scar rapidly improved and she eventually made a complete recovery. A second case involved a 70-year-old female with diabetes who was affected by a long-standing postsurgical abdominal keloid scar of 2 years' duration. She was intentionally treated with the same low dose of enalapril, and, after 6 months of therapy, the bad scar showed marked improvement. We conducted an exhaustive search of the literature pertaining to the wound healing process, specifically to determine whether angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors have a healing effect on wounds. ACE inhibitors are known to induce reduction of left ventricular collagen content and to attenuate remodeling during the postinfarctual period (thus improving ventricular function), and they have been shown to exert a pulmonary antifibrotic effect. After conducting this literature search, it became apparent that no data on cutaneous scars and ACE inhibitors are available. During the posttraumatic or postoperative stage, it is useful to achieve the best possible aesthetic results and to decrease the risk of a disfiguring keloid scar, thereby avoiding revision surgery; to this purpose, an early treatment with a low dose of enalapril is a possible solution, even if further confirmatory observations are needed. PMID:17415337

  8. Spacial and Temporal Patterns of Gene Expression After Cardiac MEK1 Gene Transfer Improve Post-Infarction Remodeling Without Inducing Global Hypertrophy.

    PubMed

    Fan, Yanying; Yang, Yi-Lin; Yeh, Che-Chung; Mann, Michael J

    2017-04-01

    Alteration of mitogen activated protein (MAP) kinase signaling in transgenic mice can ameliorate post-myocardial infarction (MI) remodeling. However, pre-existing changes in transgenic hearts and clinically unrealistic transgene expression likely affect the response to injury; it is unknown whether clinically relevant induction of transgene expression in an otherwise normal heart can yield similar benefits. Constitutively active MEK1 (aMEK1) or LacZ adeno-associated virus 9 (AAV9) vectors were injected into the left ventricular (LV) chambers of mice either just before or after coronary ligation. Hearts were evaluated via Western blot, quantitative polymerase chain reaction, histology, and echocardiography. AAV9-mediated aMEK1 delivery altered ERK1/2 expression/activation as in transgenic mice. Transgene expression was not immediately detectable but plateaued at 17 days, and therefore did not likely impact acute ischemia as it would in transgenics. With AAV9-aMEK1 injection just prior to MI, robust expression in the infarct border zone during post-MI remodeling increased border zone wall thickness and reduced infarct size versus controls at 4 weeks, but did not induce global hypertrophy. Significant improvements in local and global LV function were observed, as were trends toward a preservation of LV volume. Delivery after ligation significantly lowered transgene expression in the infarct border zone and did not yield structural or functional benefits. The primary benefits observed in transgenic mice, ameliorated remodeling, and reduced chronic infarct size, were achievable via clinically relevant gene transfer of aMEK1, supporting ongoing translational efforts. Important differences, however, were observed, and consideration must be given to the timing and distribution of transgene delivery and expression. J. Cell. Biochem. 118: 775-784, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Secondary Cleft Lip Reconstruction and the Use of Pedicled, Deepithelialized Scar Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Nadjmi, Nasser; Amadori, Sara; Van de Casteele, Elke

    2016-01-01

    Background: The optimal time to create symmetry in a cleft lip is during primary repair; a secondary effort later is more difficult due to potential scarring and possible tissue deficiency of the repaired cleft lip. A plethora of methods for secondary correction have been described that have the goal of constructing the philtral column, ameliorating bad scar results, and augmenting lip volume, for example. Nevertheless, there is no single procedure that yields completely satisfactory results. In addition, the appropriate timing for secondary surgical corrections of the cleft lip is still under debate. Methods: We present a new technique for secondary lip reconstruction of unilateral and bilateral cleft patients using pedicled, de-epithelialized cleft scar tissue as an autologous graft to obtain sustainable lip volume. Our results were evaluated by physicians and patient-parent satisfaction surveys. Results: The esthetic outcomes of 29 patients were assessed using a patient satisfaction questionnaire and a physician survey based on the preoperative and postoperative clinical images. The success of the procedure was evaluated using a 5-point scale. The total scores of both the physician and patient assessments were high, although no correlation was found between the scores. Conclusions: Cleft lip reconstruction using pedicled, deepithelialized scar tissue leads to excellent physician and patient satisfaction scores; this technique can be executed at any patient age and as a secondary repair for any given primary type of cleft disorder. PMID:27826467

  10. Role of rat autologous skin fibroblasts and mechanism underlying the repair of depressed scars

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Juan; Liu, Yan-Chun; Shi, Yan-Hua; Xie, Ya-Qin; Cui, Hai-Peng; Li, Ying; Li, Xiang-Jun; Ren, Li-Qun

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to provide reliable experimental evidence for the application of autologous skin fibroblasts (asFbs) in the repair of depressed scars. In the experiments, depressed trauma was induced in male Wistar rats, and fibroblasts were separated from the removed skin tissues to culture in medium. In vitro cultured asFbs were injected into the depressed scar sites of rats, and the repair function of asFbs in the depressed scars was then examined at the cellular and whole-animal levels. The expression levels of type I and type III collagen in the dermal layer of the skin injected with asFb cells were significantly higher, as compared with those of the control, and type I collagen expression was significantly higher compared with Type III. Re-injection of asFbs into the dermal layer of depressed scars can markedly improve their repair. These results may prove useful for skin repair in clinical settings. PMID:27446300

  11. Wound healing in a fetal, adult, and scar tissue model: a comparative study.

    PubMed

    Coolen, Neeltje A; Schouten, Kelly C W M; Boekema, Bouke K H L; Middelkoop, Esther; Ulrich, Magda M W

    2010-01-01

    Early gestation fetal wounds heal without scar formation. Understanding the mechanism of this scarless healing may lead to new therapeutic strategies for improving adult wound healing. The aims of this study were to develop a human fetal wound model in which fetal healing can be studied and to compare this model with a human adult and scar tissue model. A burn wound (10 x 2 mm) was made in human ex vivo fetal, adult, and scar tissue under controlled and standardized conditions. Subsequently, the skin samples were cultured for 7, 14, and 21 days. Cells in the skin samples maintained their viability during the 21-day culture period. Already after 7 days, a significantly higher median percentage of wound closure was achieved in the fetal skin model vs. the adult and scar tissue model (74% vs. 28 and 29%, respectively, p<0.05). After 21 days of culture, only fetal wounds were completely reepithelialized. Fibroblasts migrated into the wounded dermis of all three wound models during culture, but more fibroblasts were present earlier in the wound area of the fetal skin model. The fast reepithelialization and prompt presence of many fibroblasts in the fetal model suggest that rapid healing might play a role in scarless healing.

  12. Persistent scarring, atrophy, and dyspigmentation in a preteen girl with neonatal lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    High, Whitney A; Costner, Melissa I

    2003-04-01

    Neonatal lupus erythematosus is an uncommon autoimmune disease with distinctive cutaneous findings. Descriptions of chronic cutaneous sequelae are rare. We describe a 12-year-old girl with persistent dyspigmentation, scarring, and atrophy as a result of neonatal lupus occurring during infancy.

  13. HOXA9 regulates angiogenesis in human hypertrophic scars: induction of VEGF secretion by epidermal stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Peng-Fei; Xu, Ying-Bin; Tang, Jin-Ming; Yang, Rong-Hua; Liu, Xu-Sheng

    2014-01-01

    Hypertrophic scars are fibroproliferative disorders of excessive wound healing after skin injury. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-induced angiogenesis plays a major role in fibrogenesis and hypertrophic scar formation. Over recent years, there has been a major interest in homeobox gene regulation of VEGF-VEGFR mediated angiogenesis in dermal tissue. In the current study, we investigated the role of homeobox genes in the epidermis, for their role in angiogenesis, with a focus on epidermal-mesenchymal interactions. As epidermal stem cells (ESCs) have a central role in epidermal homeostasis, we tested the hypothesis that these cells play a key role in the pathogenesis of hypertrophic scars through the HOXA9-VEGF/VEGFR signaling pathways. We found significant differences in the expression of homeobox A9 in hyperplastic scar tissue during different phases of development. These differences coincided with similar regulations in VEGF expression and with the distribution of ESCs. HOXA9 is expressed in cultured human ESCs in vitro. Antisense suppression of HOXA9 expression was found to suppress VEGF levels in ESCs. Together these findings indicate that homeobox A9 regulates the expression of VEGF in ESCs. PMID:25031718

  14. Resolution Mediator Chemerin15 Reprograms the Wound Microenvironment to Promote Repair and Reduce Scarring

    PubMed Central

    Cash, Jenna L.; Bass, Mark D.; Campbell, Jessica; Barnes, Matthew; Kubes, Paul; Martin, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Summary Disorders of cutaneous repair can cause disability or death given that skin functions as a protective barrier against the external environment. The inflammatory response triggered by tissue damage is thought to play both positive (e.g., pathogen-killing) and negative (e.g., scarring) roles in repair [1–3]. Inflammatory resolution mediators such as chemerin15 (C15) control the magnitude and duration of the inflammatory response; however, their role in wound repair and scarring is unknown [4–8]. Here, we show that the C15 precursor, chemerin, and its receptor, ChemR23, are both upregulated after skin damage and that the receptor is expressed by macrophages, neutrophils, and keratinocytes. Dynamic live-imaging studies of murine cutaneous wounds demonstrate that C15 delivery dampens the immediate intravascular inflammatory events, including platelet adhesion to neutrophils, an important event in driving leukocyte recruitment. C15 administration indirectly accelerates wound closure while altering fibroblast-mediated collagen deposition and alignment to reduce scarring. Macrophage recruitment is restricted to the immediate wound site rather than spilling extensively into the adjacent tissue as in control wounds, and macrophage phenotype in C15-treated wounds is skewed toward a less inflammatory phenotype with reduced iNOS, increased Arginase-1, and lower wound tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α) expression. Modulation of inflammatory resolution pathways in acute and chronic wounds may therefore provide a novel therapeutic avenue to improve repair and reduce scarring. PMID:24881877

  15. Control of Scar Tissue Formation in the Cornea: Strategies in Clinical and Corneal Tissue Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Samantha L.; El Haj, Alicia J.; Yang, Ying

    2012-01-01

    Corneal structure is highly organized and unified in architecture with structural and functional integration which mediates transparency and vision. Disease and injury are the second most common cause of blindness affecting over 10 million people worldwide. Ninety percent of blindness is permanent due to scarring and vascularization. Scarring caused via fibrotic cellular responses, heals the tissue, but fails to restore transparency. Controlling keratocyte activation and differentiation are key for the inhibition and prevention of fibrosis. Ophthalmic surgery techniques are continually developing to preserve and restore vision but corneal regression and scarring are often detrimental side effects and long term continuous follow up studies are lacking or discouraging. Appropriate corneal models may lead to a reduced need for corneal transplantation as presently there are insufficient numbers or suitable tissue to meet demand. Synthetic optical materials are under development for keratoprothesis although clinical use is limited due to implantation complications and high rejection rates. Tissue engineered corneas offer an alternative which more closely mimic the morphological, physiological and biomechanical properties of native corneas. However, replication of the native collagen fiber organization and retaining the phenotype of stromal cells which prevent scar-like tissue formation remains a challenge. Careful manipulation of culture environments are under investigation to determine a suitable environment that simulates native ECM organization and stimulates keratocyte migration and generation. PMID:24955637

  16. Reconstructive Surgery of Extensive Face and Neck Burn Scars Using Tissue Expanders

    PubMed Central

    Ashab Yamin, Mohammad Reza; Mozafari, Naser; Mozafari, Mohadase; Razi, Zahra

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Neck reconstruction is considered as one of the most important surgeries in cosmetic and reconstructive surgery. The present study aimed to assess the results of reconstructive surgery of extensive face and neck burning scars using tissue expanders. METHODS This descriptive prospective study was conducted on 36 patients with extensive burning scars on the neck and face. Operation for tissue expander insertion was performed and tissue distension started two or three weeks later, depending on the patients’ incisions. After sufficient time for tissue expansion, while removing the expander and excision of the lesion, the expanded flap was used to cover the lesion. Overall, 43 cosmetic surgeries were done. RESULTS Rectangular expanders were employed in most patients (73.81%) and were located in the neck in most of them (60.78%). Complications were detected in five patients (13.89%), with exposure of the prosthesis being the most common one. Scar tissues at the reconstruction site and the flap donor site were acceptable in 94.44% and 98.18% of the cases, respectively. Overall, most of the patients (77.78%) were satisfied with the operation results.  CONCLUSION Using tissue expanders in tissue reconstruction of extensive neck and facial burning scars results in highly desirable outcomes. PMID:25606476

  17. A novel approach to ablative fractional treatment of mature thermal burn scars.

    PubMed

    Bowen, Robert E

    2010-04-01

    This report details the use of a fractionated ablative Er:YAG laser in treating two cases of thermal burn injuries using a novel approach which matches the energy required to the depth of the burn scar. This method is termed "selective objective fractional technique (SOFT)".

  18. Comparative assessment of iridium oxide and platinum alloy wires using an in vitro glial scar assay.

    PubMed

    Ereifej, Evon S; Khan, Saida; Newaz, Golam; Zhang, Jinsheng; Auner, Gregory W; VandeVord, Pamela J

    2013-12-01

    The long-term effect of chronically implanted electrodes is the formation of a glial scar. Therefore, it is imperative to assess the biocompatibility of materials before employing them in neural electrode fabrication. Platinum alloy and iridium oxide have been identified as good candidates as neural electrode biomaterials due to their mechanical and electrical properties, however, effect of glial scar formation for these two materials is lacking. In this study, we applied a glial scarring assay to observe the cellular reactivity to platinum alloy and iridium oxide wires in order to assess the biocompatibility based on previously defined characteristics. Through real-time PCR, immunostaining and imaging techniques, we will advance the understanding of the biocompatibility of these materials. Results of this study demonstrate iridium oxide wires exhibited a more significant reactive response as compared to platinum alloy wires. Cells cultured with platinum alloy wires had less GFAP gene expression, lower average GFAP intensity, and smaller glial scar thickness. Collectively, these results indicated that platinum alloy wires were more biocompatible than the iridium oxide wires.

  19. Burn Patient Acuity Demographics, Scar Contractures, and Rehabilitation Treatment Time Related to Patient Outcomes (ACT)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-01

    Scar Contractures, and Rehabilitation Treatment Time Related to Patient Outcomes, conveniently referred to as the ACT for representing Acuity...acute and intermediate phases of burn rehabilitation through the collection of daily treatment information for analysis. In particular, the ACT is...primarily interested in investigating the influence that time spent receiving rehabilitation treatments has on patient outcomes as a reflection of

  20. Collagen-Binding Peptidoglycans Inhibit MMP Mediated Collagen Degradation and Reduce Dermal Scarring

    PubMed Central

    Snyder, Paul W.; Freeman, Lynetta; Panitch, Alyssa

    2011-01-01

    Scarring of the skin is a large unmet clinical problem that is of high patient concern and impact. Wound healing is complex and involves numerous pathways that are highly orchestrated, leaving the skin sealed, but with abnormal organization and composition of tissue components, namely collagen and proteoglycans, that are then remodeled over time. To improve healing and reduce or eliminate scarring, more rapid restoration of healthy tissue composition and organization offers a unique approach for development of new therapeutics. A synthetic collagen-binding peptidoglycan has been developed that inhibits matrix metalloproteinase-1 and 13 (MMP-1 and MMP-13) mediated collagen degradation. We investigated the synthetic peptidoglycan in a rat incisional model in which a single dose was delivered in a hyaluronic acid (HA) vehicle at the time of surgery prior to wound closure. The peptidoglycan treatment resulted in a significant reduction in scar tissue at 21 days as measured by histology and visual analysis. Improved collagen architecture of the treated wounds was demonstrated by increased tensile strength and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analysis of collagen fibril diameters compared to untreated and HA controls. The peptidoglycan's mechanism of action includes masking existing collagen and inhibiting MMP-mediated collagen degradation while modulating collagen organization. The peptidoglycan can be synthesized at low cost with unique design control, and together with demonstrated preclinical efficacy in reducing scarring, warrants further investigation for dermal wound healing. PMID:21779387

  1. Galangin inhibits hypertrophic scar formation via ALK5/Smad2/3 signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yifan; Shan, Shengzhou; Wang, Jing; Cheng, Xinyu; Yi, Bo; Zhou, Jia; Li, Qingfeng

    2016-02-01

    Hypertrophic scar (HS) is characterized by excessive fibrosis associated with aberrant function of fibroblasts. Currently, no satisfactory drug has been developed to treat the disease. Here we found that a flavonoid natural product, galangin, could significantly attenuate hypertrophic scar formation in a mechanical load-induced mouse model. Both in vivo and in vitro studies demonstrated that galangin remarkably inhibited collagen production, proliferation, and activation of fibroblasts. Besides, galangin suppressed the contractile ability of hypertrophic scar fibroblasts. Further Western blot analysis revealed that galangin dose-dependently down-regulated Smad2 and Smad3 phosphorylation. Such bioactivity of galangin resulted from its selective targeting to the activin receptor-like kinase 5 (ALK5) was demonstrated by ALK5 knockdown and over-expression experiments. Taken together, this compound could simultaneously inhibit both the accumulation of collagen and abnormal activation/proliferation of fibroblasts, which were the two pivotal factors for hypertrophic scar formation, thus suggesting that galangin serves as a potential agent for treatment of HS or other fibroproliferative disorders.

  2. Spontaneous tooth exfoliation, maxillary osteomyelitis and facial scarring following trigeminal herpes zoster infection.

    PubMed

    Pillai, Kamala G; Nayar, Kavitha; Rawal, Yeshwant B

    2006-07-01

    A case of trigeminal herpes zoster (HZ) infection affecting the left maxillary and ophthalmic divisions of the fifth cranial nerve in an immuno-competent patient is presented. Extremely rare complications such as osteonecrosis, spontaneous tooth exfoliation, secondary osteomyelitis and facial scarring were observed. Sequestrectomy, aciclovir and erythromycin stearate were effectively used in managing the case.

  3. Inactivation of Salmonella on tomato stem scars by edible chitosan and organic acid coatings

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study investigated the efficacy of antimicrobial coatings on inactivation of Salmonella on the surface of tomato stem scars, which was inoculated with a four-strain cocktail of Salmonella (S. Montevideo. S. Newport. S. Saintpaul, and S. Typhimurium) and coated with acid-chitosan solutions. The ...

  4. Magnetic Resonance Imaging as an Adjunct to Ultrasound in Evaluating Cesarean Scar Ectopic Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Rebecca; Klein, Michelle A.; Mahboob, Sabrina; Gupta, Mala; Katz, Douglas S.

    2013-01-01

    Cesarean scar pregnancies (CSPs) are a relatively rare form of ectopic pregnancy in which the embryo is implanted within the fibrous scar of a previous cesarean section. A greater number of cases of CSPs are currently being reported as the rates of cesarean section are increasing globally and as detection of scar pregnancy has improved with use of transvaginal ultrasound (TVUS) with color Doppler imaging. Delayed diagnosis and management of this potentially life-threatening condition may result in complications, predominantly uterine rupture and hemorrhage with significant potential maternal morbidity. Diagnosis of a cesarean scar pregnancy (CSP) requires a high index of clinical suspicion, as up to 40% of patients may be asymptomatic. TVUS has a reported sensitivity of 84.6% and has become the imaging examination of choice for diagnosis of a CSP. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has been used in a small number of patients as an adjunct to TVUS. In the present report, MRI is highlighted as a problem-solving tool capable of more precisely identifying the relationship of a CSP to adjacent structures, thereby providing additional information critical to directing appropriate patient management and therapy. PMID:23814688

  5. Oligodendrogliomas arising in the scar of a brain contusion. Report of two surgically verified cases.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Díaz, C; Cabello, A; Lobato, R D; Rivas, J J; Cabrera, A

    1985-11-01

    Several years after sustaining head injuries, two patients developed oligodendrogliomas in the scar of brain contusions. Both cases seem to fulfill the criteria currently established for accepting the traumatic origin of a brain tumor. The literature concerning the relationship between head injury and intracranial tumor is reviewed.

  6. Association of AFLP and SCAR markers with common leafspot resistance in autotetraploid alfalfa (Medicago sativa).

    PubMed

    Wang, Y; Bi, B; Yuan, Q H; Li, X L; Gao, J M

    2012-03-14

    To identify amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) markers associated with resistance or susceptibility of alfalfa to common leafspot (CLS) caused by the fungus Pseudopeziza medicaginis (Dermateaceae), bulked segregant analysis was conducted based on an F(1(M × M)) population of 93 plants and a BC(1)S population of 91 plants. Three AFLP markers, ACTCAA(R206), TAGCAC(R185), and GGACTA(S264), were found to be associated with CLS resistance or susceptibility. All three markers were found at significantly different frequencies (71.9, 80.3 and 91.8%) compared to resistant or susceptible plants in the original population. Subsequently, these three AFLP markers were converted into three SCAR markers, ACTCAA(R136), TAGCAC(R128) and GGACTA(S254), which are easier to employ in breeding programs. The three SCAR markers were used in a randomly selected population with 50% resistance; the probability of finding one resistant plant was increased to 67.3, 66.7 and 90.0% with markers ACTCAA(R136), TAGCAC(R128) and GGACTA(S254), independently. If two of the SCAR markers were used simultaneously, the probability would be higher than 89%. The three SCAR markers identified in this study would be applicable for selection for CLS resistance in alfalfa breeding programs. Moreover, the genetic analysis indicated that CLS resistance in alfalfa is conferred by a single dominant gene.

  7. Control of scar tissue formation in the cornea: strategies in clinical and corneal tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Samantha L; El Haj, Alicia J; Yang, Ying

    2012-09-18

    Corneal structure is highly organized and unified in architecture with structural and functional integration which mediates transparency and vision. Disease and injury are the second most common cause of blindness affecting over 10 million people worldwide. Ninety percent of blindness is permanent due to scarring and vascularization. Scarring caused via fibrotic cellular responses, heals the tissue, but fails to restore transparency. Controlling keratocyte activation and differentiation are key for the inhibition and prevention of fibrosis. Ophthalmic surgery techniques are continually developing to preserve and restore vision but corneal regression and scarring are often detrimental side effects and long term continuous follow up studies are lacking or discouraging. Appropriate corneal models may lead to a reduced need for corneal transplantation as presently there are insufficient numbers or suitable tissue to meet demand. Synthetic optical materials are under development for keratoprothesis although clinical use is limited due to implantation complications and high rejection rates. Tissue engineered corneas offer an alternative which more closely mimic the morphological, physiological and biomechanical properties of native corneas. However, replication of the native collagen fiber organization and retaining the phenotype of stromal cells which prevent scar-like tissue formation remains a challenge. Careful manipulation of culture environments are under investigation to determine a suitable environment that simulates native ECM organization and stimulates keratocyte migration and generation.

  8. Inactivation of Salmonella enterica on tomato stem scars by antimicrobial solutions and vacuum perfusion.

    PubMed

    Gurtler, Joshua B; Smelser, Amanda M; Niemira, Brendan A; Jin, Tony Z; Yan, Xianghe; Geveke, David J

    2012-10-01

    A study was conducted to identify sanitizing solutions effective at inactivating ca. 5logCFU of Salmonella enterica inoculated onto the stem scar of red round tomatoes during two-minute immersion treatments. Sixty-three antimicrobial combinations were tested. Vacuum perfusion was applied to tomatoes during selected treatments to promote infiltration of sanitizer into porous tomato stem scar tissue. Red round tomatoes were inoculated to ca. 6.9logCFU/stem scar with a four-serovar composite of Salmonella enterica, air dried, and tomatoes were immersed in circulating sanitizing solutions for 120s at ca. 22°C. Stem scars were aseptically excised, macerated in DE neutralizing broth, and the homogenate was spiral plated. Twenty-four washes inactivated ≥3.0logCFU/stem scar. Seven treatments reduced ≥4.8 log (viz., 40% EtOH, sulfuric acid, and organic acid combinations). LogCFU/stem scar reductions for various sanitizers are listed in parenthesis, as follows: 90ppm peroxyacetic acid (1.31), 200ppm chlorine (1.53), 190ppm chlorine+15″ Hg vacuum perfusion (2.23), 0.2N sodium hydroxide (NaOH) (3.78), 2% total of lactic+acetic acid (4.35), 3% total of phosphoric+lactic acids (4.51), and 40% ethanol (4.81). Solutions that achieved ≥4.95 log reductions were 5.1% total of lactic+acetic+levulinic acids, 49% ethanol, 6% total of lactic+acetic acids, and a 0.2M H(2)SO(4) (sulfuric acid) solution. The use of vacuum perfusion with 200ppm chlorine increased inactivation by 0.7logCFU over chlorine alone, however, P>0.05. Results from this study provide tomato processers with some sanitization options effective at inactivating Salmonella from the stem scars of tomatoes. These results may also help processors and scientists design future decontamination studies by incorporating combinations of these chemical treatments.

  9. Assessment of propeller and off-road vehicle scarring in seagrass beds and wind-tidal flats of the southwestern Gulf of Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Martin, S.R.; Onuf, C.P.; Dunton, K.H.

    2008-01-01

    We used aerial photography and GIS to establish a quantitative baseline of propeller and off-road vehicle (ORV) scarring in seagrass and wind-tidal flats of the upper Laguna Madre in the Padre Island National Seashore (Texas, USA). We also examined scar recovery through comparison of recent (2002, 2005) and historical (1967) aerial photographs of the study area. Scarring intensity was calculated using two different methods. In the first, polygons were visually drawn around groups of scars on digital images. Scarring intensity was estimated as light (20%), based on the total coverage of scars within each polygon (taking into account the length, width, and density of scars). We developed a more objective method that employed creation of vector grid cells and buffers that incorporated the localized ecological impact of scars. Results of spatial and temporal analysis revealed that the polygon approach greatly underestimated the magnitude of scarring. For example, in a single photograph, 7% of seagrass area was lightly scarred according to the polygon method; but light scarring increased to 51% according to grid analysis of the same image. Our results also indicated that propeller scars in Halodule wrightii beds appear to recover in less than three years and ORV tracks have persisted in the wind-tidal flats for at least 38 years. Our approach provides resource managers with procedures for a more objective and efficient assessment of physical disturbances to seagrass and wind-tidal flats caused by boats and ORVs. ?? 2008 by Walter de Gruyter.

  10. Effects of the Combined PDL/Nd:YAG Laser on Surgical Scars: Vascularity and Collagen Changes Evaluated by In Vivo Confocal Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Vas, Krisztina; Gaál, Magdolna; Varga, Erika; Kovács, Réka; Bende, Balázs; Kocsis, Ádám; Kemény, Lajos

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the efficacy of the sequential combined 585 nm PDL and the 1064 nm neodymium:yttrium-aluminium-garnet laser (PDL/Nd:YAG) in the treatment of surgical scars and to evaluate the short-term effects by in vivo confocal microscopy (RCM) and the long-term effects by clinical assessment of the scars. Twenty-five patients were enrolled with 39 postoperative linear scars; each scar was divided into two fields. One half was treated with the combined PDL/Nd:YAG laser, whereas the other half remained untreated. Each scar was treated three times at monthly intervals. Scars were evaluated by an independent examiner, using the Vancouver Scar Scale. The combined PDL/Nd:YAG laser significantly improved the appearance of the scars. In order to study the short-term effects of combined laser treatment, six additional patients were enrolled with 7 postoperative linear scars. One half of scars was treated once with the combined PDL/Nd:YAG laser. One week after this laser treatment, both the treated and the nontreated parts of the scars were examined by dermoscopy and RCM. The dermoscopic pictures revealed improvements even in treated areas. In conclusion, the combined PDL/Nd:YAG laser was found to be effective in improving the quality and appearance of the surgical scars. PMID:25276770

  11. Spatial and temporal corroboration of a fire-scar-based fire history in a frequently burned ponderosa pine forest.

    PubMed

    Farris, Calvin A; Baisan, Christopher H; Falk, Donald A; Yool, Stephen R; Swetnam, Thomas W

    2010-09-01

    Fire scars are used widely to reconstruct historical fire regime parameters in forests around the world. Because fire scars provide incomplete records of past fire occurrence at discrete points in space, inferences must be made to reconstruct fire frequency and extent across landscapes using spatial networks of fire-scar samples. Assessing the relative accuracy of fire-scar fire history reconstructions has been hampered due to a lack of empirical comparisons with independent fire history data sources. We carried out such a comparison in a 2780-ha ponderosa pine forest on Mica Mountain in southern Arizona (USA) for the time period 1937-2000. Using documentary records of fire perimeter maps and ignition locations, we compared reconstructions of key spatial and temporal fire regime parameters developed from documentary fire maps and independently collected fire-scar data (n = 60 plots). We found that fire-scar data provided spatially representative and complete inventories of all major fire years (> 100 ha) in the study area but failed to detect most small fires. There was a strong linear relationship between the percentage of samples recording fire scars in a given year (i.e., fire-scar synchrony) and total area burned for that year (y = 0.0003x + 0.0087, r2 = 0.96). There was also strong spatial coherence between cumulative fire frequency maps interpolated from fire-scar data and ground-mapped fire perimeters. Widely reported fire frequency summary statistics varied little between fire history data sets: fire-scar natural fire rotations (NFR) differed by < 3 yr from documentary records (29.6 yr); mean fire return intervals (MFI) for large-fire years (i.e., > or = 25% of study area burned) were identical between data sets (25.5 yr); fire-scar MFIs for all fire years differed by 1.2 yr from documentary records. The known seasonal timing of past fires based on documentary records was furthermore reconstructed accurately by observing intra-annual ring position of fire

  12. Correlation of Scar in Cardiac MRI and High‐Resolution Contact Mapping of Left Ventricle in a Chronic Infarct Model

    PubMed Central

    THAJUDEEN, ANEES; STEWART, BRIAN; COKIC, IVAN; NAKAGAWA, HIROSHI; SHEHATA, MICHAEL; AMORN, ALLEN M.; KALI, AVINASH; LIU, EZH; HARLEV, DORON; BENNETT, NATHAN; DHARMAKUMAR, ROHAN; CHUGH, SUMEET S.; WANG, XUNZHANG

    2015-01-01

    Background Endocardial mapping for scars and abnormal electrograms forms the most essential component of ventricular tachycardia ablation. The utility of ultra‐high resolution mapping of ventricular scar was assessed using a multielectrode contact mapping system in a chronic canine infarct model. Methods Chronic infarcts were created in five anesthetized dogs by ligating the left anterior descending coronary artery. Late gadolinium‐enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (LGE MRI) was obtained 4.9 ± 0.9 months after infarction, with three‐dimensional (3D) gadolinium enhancement signal intensity maps at 1‐mm and 5‐mm depths from the endocardium. Ultra‐high resolution electroanatomical maps were created using a novel mapping system (Rhythmia Mapping System, Rhythmia Medical/Boston Scientific, Marlborough, MA, USA) Rhythmia Medical, Boston Scientific, Marlborough, MA, USA with an 8.5F catheter with mini‐basket electrode array (64 tiny electrodes, 2.5‐mm spacing, center‐to‐center). Results The maps contained 7,754 ± 1,960 electrograms per animal with a mean resolution of 2.8 ± 0.6 mm. Low bipolar voltage (<2 mV) correlated closely with scar on the LGE MRI and the 3D signal intensity map (1‐mm depth). The scar areas between the MRI signal intensity map and electroanatomic map matched at 87.7% of sites. Bipolar and unipolar voltages, compared in 592 electrograms from four MRI‐defined scar types (endocardial scar, epicardial scar, mottled transmural scar, and dense transmural scar) as well as normal tissue, were significantly different. A unipolar voltage of <13 mV correlated with transmural extension of scar in MRI. Electrograms exhibiting isolated late potentials (ILPs) were manually annotated and ILP maps were created showing ILP location and timing. ILPs were identified in 203 ± 159 electrograms per dog (within low‐voltage areas) and ILP maps showed gradation in timing of ILPs at different locations in the scar. Conclusions Ultra

  13. Assessment of Anti-Scarring Therapies in Ex Vivo Organ Cultured Rabbit Corneas

    PubMed Central

    Sriram, Sriniwas; Gibson, Daniel; Robinson, Paulette; Pi, Liya; Tuli, Sonal; Lewin, Alfred S.; Schultz, Gregory

    2014-01-01

    The effects of a triple combination of siRNAs targeting key scarring genes was assessed using an ex vivo organ culture model of excimer ablated rabbit corneas. The central 6 mm diameter region of fresh rabbit globes was ablated to a depth of 155 microns with an excimer laser. Corneas were excised, cultured at the air-liquid interface in defined culture medium supplemented with transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGFB1), and treated with either 1% prednisolone acetate or with 22.5 μM cationic nanoparticles complexed with a triple combination of siRNAs (NP-siRNA) targeting TGFB1, TGFB Receptor (TGFBR2) and connective tissue growth factor (CTGF). Scar formation was measured using image analysis of digital images and levels of smooth muscle actin (SMA) were assessed in ablated region of corneas using qRT-PCR and immunostaining. Ex vivo cultured corneas developed intense haze-like scar in the wounded areas and levels of mRNAs for pro-fibrotic genes were significantly elevated 3 to 8 fold in wounded tissue compared to unablated corneas. Treatment with NP-siRNA or steroid significantly reduced quantitative haze levels by 55% and 68%, respectively, and reduced SMA mRNA and immunohistostaining. This ex vivo corneal culture system reproduced key molecular patterns of corneal scarring and haze formation generated in rabbits. Treatment with NP-siRNAs targeting key scarring genes or an anti-inflammatory steroid reduced corneal haze and SMA mRNA and protein. PMID:24971495

  14. Structural Composition of Myocardial Infarction Scar in Middle-aged Male and Female Rats

    PubMed Central

    Bogatyryov, Yevgen; Tomanek, Robert J.

    2013-01-01

    The present study was designed to determine whether the structural composition of the scar in middle-aged post–myocardial infraction (MI) rats is affected by the biological sex of the animals. A large MI was induced in 12-month-old male (M-MI) and female (F-MI) Sprague-Dawley rats by ligation of the left coronary artery. Four weeks after the MI, rats with transmural infarctions, greater than 50% of the left ventricular (LV) free wall, were evaluated. The extent of LV remodeling and fractional volumes of fibrillar collagen (FC), myofibroblasts, vascular smooth muscle (SM) cells, and surviving cardiac myocytes (CM) in the scars were compared between the two sexes. The left ventricle of post-MI male and female rats underwent a similar degree of remodeling as evidenced by the analogous scar thinning ratio (0.46 ± 0.02 vs. 0.42 ± 0.05) and infarct expansion index (1.06 ± 0.07 vs. 1.12 ± 0.08), respectively. Most important, the contents of major structural components of the scar revealed no evident difference between M-MI and F-MI rats (interstitial FC, 80.74 ± 2.08 vs. 82.57 ± 4.53; myofibroblasts, 9.59 ± 1.68 vs.9.56 ± 1.15; vascular SM cells, 2.27 ± 0.51 vs. 3.38 ± 0.47; and surviving CM, 3.26 ± 0.39 vs. 3.05 ± 0.38, respectively). Our data are the first to demonstrate that biological sex does not influence the structural composition of a mature scar in middle-aged post-MI rats. PMID:23867842

  15. The immediate use of a silicone sheet wound closure device in scar reduction and prevention.

    PubMed

    Parry, James R; Stupak, Howard D; Johnson, Calvin M

    2016-02-01

    Silicone has been used successfully postoperatively in the prevention of hypertrophic and other types of adverse scars. The Silicone Suture Plate (SSP) is a new, minimally invasive, sterile wound closure device that is applied intraoperatively to prevent adverse scarring. The SSP device permits immediate application of silicone while concurrently allowing for wound-edge tension redistribution. In this prospective, controlled, single-blinded clinical study, 8 consecutive patients undergoing deep-plane rhytidectomy were selected. SSP devices were placed on the patients' posterior rhytidectomy hairline incision; the mirror-image control site underwent standard suturing techniques. Three blinded, independent raters assessed the treatment and control sides at 6-week and 4-month follow-up visits, using the Objective Scar Assessment Scale (OSAS), a validated scar assessment tool. The 6-week OSAS scores revealed an 18.4% improvement on the side with the SSP device (13.3) when compared to the control side (16.3). The 4-month OSAS scores showed a 27.3% improvement on the treatment side from 12.7 (control) to 9.2 (SSP). These OSAS results were found to be statistically significant when taken as an aggregate of the observers' scores, but not when observers' scores were measured individually (p < 0.05). In our series of patients, we showed promising results with the use of the SSP device. Early silicone application and tissue tension distribution contributed to an overall more aesthetically pleasing scar compared to those seen with standard suturing techniques, although more testing is required.

  16. High molecular weight hyaluronic acid limits astrocyte activation and scar formation after spinal cord injury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khaing, Zin Z.; Milman, Brian D.; Vanscoy, Jennifer E.; Seidlits, Stephanie K.; Grill, Raymond J.; Schmidt, Christine E.

    2011-08-01

    A major hurdle for regeneration after spinal cord injury (SCI) is the ability of axons to penetrate and grow through the scar tissue. After SCI, inflammatory cells, astrocytes and meningeal cells all play a role in developing the glial scar. In addition, degradation of native high molecular weight (MW) hyaluronic acid (HA), a component of the extracellular matrix, has been shown to induce activation and proliferation of astrocytes. However, it is not known if the degradation of native HA actually enhances glial scar formation. We hypothesize that the presence of high MW HA (HA with limited degradation) after SCI will decrease glial scarring. Here, we demonstrate that high MW HA decreases cell proliferation and reduces chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan (CSPG) production in cultured neonatal and adult astrocytes. In addition, stiffness-matched high MW HA hydrogels crosslinked to resist degradation were implanted in a rat model of spinal dorsal hemisection injury. The numbers of immune cells (macrophages and microglia) detected at the lesion site in animals with HA hydrogel implants were significantly reduced at acute time points (one, three and ten days post-injury). Lesioned animals with HA implants also exhibited significantly lower CSPG expression at ten days post-injury. At nine weeks post-injury, animals with HA hydrogel implants exhibited a significantly decreased astrocytic response, but did not have significantly altered CSPG expression. Combined, these data suggest that high MW HA, when stabilized against degradation, mitigates astrocyte activation in vitro and in vivo. The presence of HA implants was also associated with a significant decrease in CSPG deposition at ten days after SCI. Therefore, HA-based hydrogel systems hold great potential for minimizing undesired scarring as part of future repair strategies after SCI.

  17. A Novel Nude Mouse Model of Hypertrophic Scarring Using Scratched Full Thickness Human Skin Grafts

    PubMed Central

    Alrobaiea, Saad M.; Ding, Jie; Ma, Zengshuan; Tredget, Edward E.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Hypertrophic scar (HTS) is a dermal form of fibroproliferative disorder that develops following deep skin injury. HTS can cause deformities, functional disabilities, and aesthetic disfigurements. The pathophysiology of HTS is not understood due to, in part, the lack of an ideal animal model. We hypothesize that human skin with deep dermal wounds grafted onto athymic nude mice will develop a scar similar to HTS. Our aim is to develop a representative animal model of human HTS. Approach: Thirty-six nude mice were grafted with full thickness human skin with deep dermal scratch wound before or 2 weeks after grafting or without scratch. The scratch on the human skin grafts was made using a specially designed jig that creates a wound >0.6 mm in depth. The xenografts were morphologically analyzed by digital photography. Mice were euthanized at 1, 2, and 3 months postoperatively for histology and immunohistochemistry analysis. Results: The mice developed raised and firm scars in the scratched xenografts with more contraction, increased infiltration of macrophage, and myofibroblasts compared to the xenografts without deep dermal scratch wound. Scar thickness and collagen bundle orientation and morphology resembled HTS. The fibrotic scars in the wounded human skin were morphologically and histologically similar to HTS, and human skin epithelial cells persisted in the remodeling tissues for 1 year postengraftment. Innovation and Conclusions: Deep dermal injury in human skin retains its profibrotic nature after transplantation, affording a novel model for the assessment of therapies for the treatment of human fibroproliferative disorders of the skin. PMID:27366591

  18. Surgeon interrater reliability in the endoscopic assessment of cistern scarring and aqueduct patency.

    PubMed

    He, Lucy; Gannon, Stephen; Shannon, Chevis N; Rocque, Brandon G; Riva-Cambrin, Jay; Naftel, Robert P

    2016-09-01

    OBJECTIVE The success of endoscopic third ventriculostomy with choroid plexus cauterization may have associations with age, etiology of hydrocephalus, previous shunting, cisternal scarring, and possibly aqueduct patency. This study aimed to measure interrater reliability among surgeons in identifying cisternal scarring and aqueduct patency. METHODS Using published definitions of cistern scarring and aqueduct patency, 7 neuroendoscopists with training from Dr. Warf in Uganda and 7 neuroendoscopists who were not trained by Dr. Warf rated cistern status from 30 operative videos and aqueduct patency from 26 operative videos. Interrater agreement was calculated using Fleiss' kappa coefficient (κ). Fisher's 2-tailed exact test was used to identify differences in the rates of agreement between the Warf-trained and nontrained groups compared with Dr. Warf's reference answer. RESULTS Aqueduct status, among all raters, showed substantial agreement with κ = 0.663 (confidence interval [CI] 0.626-0.701); within the trained group and nontrained groups, there was substantial agreement with κ = 0.677 (CI 0.593-0.761) and κ = 0.631 (CI 0.547-0.715), respectively. The identification of cistern scarring was less reliable, with moderate agreement among all raters with κ = 0.536 (CI 0.501-0.571); within the trained group and nontrained groups, there was moderate agreement with κ = 0.555 (CI 0.477-0.633) and κ = 0.542 (CI 0.464-0.620), respectively. There was no statistically significant difference in the amount of agreement between groups compared with Dr. Warf's reference. CONCLUSIONS Regardless of training with Dr. Warf, all neuroendoscopists could identify scarred cisterns and aqueduct patency with similar reliability, emphasizing the strength of the published definitions. This makes the identification of this risk factor for failure generalizable for surgical decision making and research studies.

  19. Identification of cutaneous functional units related to burn scar contracture development.

    PubMed

    Richard, Reginald L; Lester, Mark E; Miller, Sidney F; Bailey, J Kevin; Hedman, Travis L; Dewey, William S; Greer, Michelle; Renz, Evan M; Wolf, Steven E; Blackbourne, Lorne H

    2009-01-01

    The development of burn scar contractures is due in part to the replacement of naturally pliable skin with an inadequate quantity and quality of extensible scar tissue. Predilected skin surface areas associated with limb range of motion (ROM) have a tendency to develop burn scar contractures that prevent full joint ROM leading to deformity, impairment, and disability. Previous study has documented forearm skin movement associated with wrist extension. The purpose of this study was to expand the identification of skin movement associated with ROM to all joint surface areas that have a tendency to develop burn scar contractures. Twenty male subjects without burns had anthropometric measurements recorded and skin marks placed on their torsos and dominant extremities. Each subject performed ranges of motion of nine common burn scar contracture sites with the markers photographed at the beginning and end of motion. The area of skin movement associated with joint ROM was recorded, normalized, and quantified as a percentage of total area. On average, subjects recruited 83% of available skin from a prescribed area to complete movement across all joints of interest (range, 18-100%). Recruitment of skin during wrist flexion demonstrated the greatest amount of variability between subjects, whereas recruitment of skin during knee extension demonstrated the most consistency. No association of skin movement was found related to percent body fat or body mass index. Skin recruitment was positively correlated with joint ROM. Fields of skin associated with normal ROM were identified and subsequently labeled as cutaneous functional units. The amount of skin involved in joint movement extended far beyond the immediate proximity of the joint skin creases themselves. This information may impact the design of rehabilitation programs for patients with severe burns.

  20. Counting scars on tree stems to assess rockfall hazards: A low effort approach, but how reliable?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trappmann, Daniel; Stoffel, Markus

    2013-01-01

    Rockfall is a widespread and hazardous process in mountain environments, but data on past events are only rarely available. Growth-ring series from trees impacted by rockfall were successfully used in the past to overcome the lack of archival records. Dendrogeomorphic techniques have been demonstrated to allow very accurate dating and reconstruction of spatial and temporal rockfall activity, but the approach has been cited to be labor intensive and time consuming. In this study, we present a simplified method to quantify rockfall processes on forested slopes requiring less time and efforts. The approach is based on a counting of visible scars on the stem surface of Common beech (Fagus sylvatica L.). Data are presented from a site in the Inn valley (Austria), where rocks are frequently detached from an ~ 200-m-high, south-facing limestone cliff. We compare results obtained from (i) the "classical" analysis of growth disturbances in the tree-ring series of 33 Norway spruces (Picea abies (L.) Karst.) and (ii) data obtained with a scar count on the stem surface of 50 F. sylvatica trees. A total of 277 rockfall events since A.D. 1819 could be reconstructed from tree-ring records of P. abies, whereas 1140 scars were observed on the stem surface of F. sylvatica. Absolute numbers of rockfalls (and hence return intervals) vary significantly between the approaches, and the mean number of rockfalls observed on the stem surface of F. sylvatica exceeds that of P. abies by a factor of 2.7. On the other hand, both methods yield comparable data on the spatial distribution of relative rockfall activity. Differences may be explained by a great portion of masked scars in P. abies and the conservation of signs of impacts on the stem of F. sylvatica. Besides, data indicate that several scars on the bark of F. sylvatica may stem from the same impact and thus lead to an overestimation of rockfall activity.

  1. Exploring Size.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brand, Judith, Ed.

    1995-01-01

    "Exploring" is a magazine of science, art, and human perception that communicates ideas museum exhibits cannot demonstrate easily by using experiments and activities for the classroom. This issue concentrates on size, examining it from a variety of viewpoints. The focus allows students to investigate and discuss interconnections among…

  2. Adipose-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells in the Regeneration of Vocal Folds: A Study on a Chronic Vocal Fold Scar

    PubMed Central

    Vassiliki, Kalodimou; Irini, Messini; Nikolaos, Psychalakis; Karampela, Eleftheria; Apostolos, Papalois

    2016-01-01

    Background. The aim of the study was to assess the histological effects of autologous infusion of adipose-derived stem cells (ADSC) on a chronic vocal fold scar in a rabbit model as compared to an untreated scar as well as in injection of hyaluronic acid. Study Design. Animal experiment. Method. We used 74 New Zealand rabbits. Sixteen of them were used as control/normal group. We created a bilateral vocal fold wound in the remaining 58 rabbits. After 18 months we separated our population into three groups. The first group served as control/scarred group. The second one was injected with hyaluronic acid in the vocal folds, and the third received an autologous adipose-derived stem cell infusion in the scarred vocal folds (ADSC group). We measured the variation of thickness of the lamina propria of the vocal folds and analyzed histopathologic changes in each group after three months. Results. The thickness of the lamina propria was significantly reduced in the group that received the ADSC injection, as compared to the normal/scarred group. The collagen deposition, the hyaluronic acid, the elastin levels, and the organization of elastic fibers tend to return to normal after the injection of ADSC. Conclusions. Autologous injection of adipose-derived stem cells on a vocal fold chronic scar enhanced the healing of the vocal folds and the reduction of the scar tissue, even when compared to other treatments. PMID:26933440

  3. MicroRNA 181b regulates decorin production by dermal fibroblasts and may be a potential therapy for hypertrophic scar.

    PubMed

    Kwan, Peter; Ding, Jie; Tredget, Edward E

    2015-01-01

    Hypertrophic scarring is a frequent fibroproliferative complication following deep dermal burns leading to impaired function and lifelong disfigurement. Decorin reduces fibrosis and induces regeneration in many tissues, and is significantly downregulated in hypertrophic scar and normal deep dermal fibroblasts. It was hypothesized that microRNAs in these fibroblasts downregulate decorin and blocking them would increase decorin and may prevent hypertrophic scarring. Lower decorin levels were found in hypertrophic scar as compared to normal skin, and in deep as compared to superficial dermis. A decorin 3' un-translated region reporter assay demonstrated microRNA decreased decorin in deep dermal fibroblasts, and microRNA screening predicted miR- 24, 181b, 421, 526b, or 543 as candidates. After finding increased levels of mir-181b in deep dermal fibroblasts, it was demonstrated that TGF-β1 stimulation decreased miR-24 but increased miR-181b and that hypertrophic scar and deep dermis contained increased levels of miR-181b. By blocking miR-181b with an antagomiR, it was possible to increase decorin protein expression in dermal fibroblasts. This suggests miR-181b is involved in the differential expression of decorin in skin and wound healing. Furthermore, blocking miR-181b reversed TGF-β1 induced decorin downregulation and myofibroblast differentiation in hypertrophic scar fibroblasts, suggesting a potential therapy for hypertrophic scar.

  4. Breast reconstruction with single-pedicle TRAM flap in breast cancer patients with low midline abdominal scar

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Jun-Dong; Huang, Wen-He; Qiu, Si-Qi; He, Li-Fang; Guo, Cui-Ping; Zhang, Yong-Qu; Zhang, Fan; Zhang, Guo-Jun

    2016-01-01

    Breast reconstruction with transverse rectus abdominis myocutaneous (TRAM) flap is challenging in patients with low midline abdominal scar. In this study, we aimed to investigate the clinical feasibility of immediate breast reconstruction using single-pedicle TRAM (SP-TRAM) flaps in patients with low midline abdominal scar. There were 4 strict selection criteria: 1) presence at least 3 perforators on the pedicle side; 2) perforators with regional average flow velocity of >20 cm/s; 3) upper edge of the abdominal scar at least 4 cm from the umbilicus; and 4) scar age >1 year. Eight breast cancer patients with low midline abdominal scar (scar group) and 20 without (control group) underwent immediate breast reconstruction with SP-TRAM flaps consisting of zone I and III and zone II tissues. Flap complications, donor-site complications, and cosmetic results were compared between the two groups. All flaps survived and both groups presented similar flap and donor site complications, including fat necrosis, seroma, hematoma, infection, delayed wound healing, and abdominal hernia, and patients in both groups had similar aesthetic results (p > 0.05). Thus, the study demonstrated that breast reconstruction using SP-TRAM flap was a safe approach in carefully selected patients with low midline abdominal scar. PMID:27406872

  5. 99mtechnetium-dimercapto-succinic acid renal scanning and excretory urography in diagnosis of renal scars in children

    SciTech Connect

    McLorie, G.A.; Aliabadi, H.; Churchill, B.M.; Ash, J.M.; Gilday, D.L. )

    1989-09-01

    We compared the ability of excretory urography (without tomography) and 99mtechnetium-dimercapto-succinic acid renal scanning to detect renal scars in 32 children with primary vesicoureteral reflux. These children did not have hydronephrosis, renal failure or urinary tract obstruction. In all cases both studies were conducted within a 10-month period. The findings from both modalities were in agreement for 51 of the 64 renal units evaluated (80%). Evaluation of the excretory urogram indicated 6 cases of diffuse and 2 of focal scarring that were not detected by evaluation of the renal scan. The sensitivity of excretory urography to detect renal scars was 84% and the specificity was 83%. The 99mtechnetium-dimercapto-succinic acid renal scan showed 5 cases of focal renal scarring not detected by excretory urography. The sensitivity of the renal scan to detect renal scars was 77% and the specificity was 75%. We conclude that neither study alone could effectively replace the other for the detection of renal scars, and recommend that both be included in the initial evaluation and followup of patients with renal scars.

  6. DNA-SCARS: distinct nuclear structures that sustain damage-induced senescence growth arrest and inflammatory cytokine secretion

    PubMed Central

    Rodier, Francis; Muñoz, Denise P.; Teachenor, Robert; Chu, Victoria; Le, Oanh; Bhaumik, Dipa; Coppé, Jean-Philippe; Campeau, Eric; Beauséjour, Christian M.; Kim, Sahn-Ho; Davalos, Albert R.; Campisi, Judith

    2011-01-01

    DNA damage can induce a tumor suppressive response termed cellular senescence. Damaged senescent cells permanently arrest growth, secrete inflammatory cytokines and other proteins and harbor persistent nuclear foci that contain DNA damage response (DDR) proteins. To understand how persistent damage foci differ from transient foci that mark repairable DNA lesions, we identify sequential events that differentiate transient foci from persistent foci, which we term ‘DNA segments with chromatin alterations reinforcing senescence’ (DNA-SCARS). Unlike transient foci, DNA-SCARS associate with PML nuclear bodies, lack the DNA repair proteins RPA and RAD51, lack single-stranded DNA and DNA synthesis and accumulate activated forms of the DDR mediators CHK2 and p53. DNA-SCARS form independently of p53, pRB and several other checkpoint and repair proteins but require p53 and pRb to trigger the senescence growth arrest. Importantly, depletion of the DNA-SCARS-stabilizing component histone H2AX did not deplete 53BP1 from DNA-SCARS but diminished the presence of MDC1 and activated CHK2. Furthermore, depletion of H2AX reduced both the p53-dependent senescence growth arrest and p53-independent cytokine secretion. DNA-SCARS were also observed following severe damage to multiple human cell types and mouse tissues, suggesting that they can be used in combination with other markers to identify senescent cells. Thus, DNA-SCARS are dynamically formed distinct structures that functionally regulate multiple aspects of the senescent phenotype. PMID:21118958

  7. Evaluation of left ventricular scar identification from contrast enhanced magnetic resonance imaging for guidance of ventricular catheter ablation therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rettmann, M. E.; Lehmann, H. I.; Johnson, S. B.; Packer, D. L.

    2016-03-01

    Patients with ventricular arrhythmias typically exhibit myocardial scarring, which is believed to be an important anatomic substrate for reentrant circuits, thereby making these regions a key target in catheter ablation therapy. In ablation therapy, a catheter is guided into the left ventricle and radiofrequency energy is delivered into the tissue to interrupt arrhythmic electrical pathways. Low bipolar voltage regions are typically localized during the procedure through point-by-point construction of an electroanatomic map by sampling the endocardial surface with the ablation catheter and are used as a surrogate for myocardial scar. This process is time consuming, requires significant skill, and has the potential to miss low voltage sites. This has led to efforts to quantify myocardial scar preoperatively using delayed, contrast-enhanced MRI. In this paper, we evaluate the utility of left ventricular scar identification from delayed contrast enhanced magnetic resonance imaging for guidance of catheter ablation of ventricular arrhythmias. Myocardial infarcts were created in three canines followed by a delayed, contrast enhanced MRI scan and electroanatomic mapping. The left ventricle and myocardial scar is segmented from preoperative MRI images and sampled points from the procedural electroanatomical map are registered to the segmented endocardial surface. Sampled points with low bipolar voltage points visually align with the segmented scar regions. This work demonstrates the potential utility of using preoperative delayed, enhanced MRI to identify myocardial scarring for guidance of ventricular catheter ablation therapy.

  8. The WAVE/SCAR complex promotes polarized cell movements and actin enrichment in epithelia during C. elegans embryogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Falshruti B.; Bernadskaya, Yelena Y.; Chen, Esteban; Jobanputra, Aesha; Pooladi, Zahra; Freeman, Kristy L.; Gally, Christelle; Mohler, William A.; Soto, Martha C.

    2009-01-01

    The WAVE/SCAR complex promotes actin nucleation through the Arp2/3 complex, in response to Rac signaling. We show that loss of WVE-1/GEX-1, the only C. elegans WAVE/SCAR homolog, by genetic mutation or by RNAi, has the same phenotype as loss of GEX-2/Sra1/p140/PIR121, GEX-3/NAP1/HEM2/KETTE, or ABI-1/ABI, the three other components of the C. elegans WAVE/SCAR complex. We find that the entire WAVE/SCAR complex promotes actin-dependent events at different times and in different tissues during development. During C. elegans embryogenesis loss of CED-10/Rac1, WAVE/SCAR complex components, or Arp2/3 blocks epidermal cell migrations despite correct epidermal cell differentiation. 4D movies show that this failure occurs due to decreased membrane dynamics in specific epidermal cells. Unlike myoblasts in Drosophila, epidermal cell fusions in C. elegans can occur in the absence of WAVE/SCAR or Arp2/3. Instead we find that subcellular enrichment of F-actin in epithelial tissues requires the Rac-WAVE/SCAR- Arp2/3 pathway. Intriguingly, we find that at the same stage of development both F-actin and WAVE/SCAR proteins are enriched apically in one epithelial tissue and basolaterally in another. We propose that temporally and spatially regulated actin nucleation by the Rac-WAVE/SCAR- Arp2/3 pathway is required for epithelial cell organization and movements during morphogenesis. PMID:18938151

  9. Pingo scars in the Mission Valley, northwest Montana -- Implications for paleoclimate and the Flathead lobe of the Cordilleran ice sheet

    SciTech Connect

    Levish, D.R.; Klinger, R.E.; Ostenaa, D.A. )

    1993-04-01

    More than 2,000 closed depressions on the floor of the Mission Valley have previously been interpreted as kettles from a late Wisconsin advance of the Flathead lobe of the Cordilleran ice sheet. However, these depressions are encircled by low ridges or ramparts, a distinguishing characteristic of collapsed pingos and pingo scars in areas of active and former permafrost. The morphology of these ramparts, their internal structure, and the complex crosscutting patterns of depressions and ramparts, demonstrate that these closed depressions in the Mission Valley are pingo scars. The pingo scars commonly occur in clusters. Often annular ramparts are truncated by other ramparts and smaller pingo scars are superimposed on larger ones. The scars range in diameter from 20 to 400 m; have circular, oval, and composite shapes; and have ramparts that range in height from 1 to 10 m. South of Ronan, Montana, the density of pingo scars is as high as 50--60/km[sup 2], and pingo scars are associated with relic frost mounds and thermokarst features. A 30-m-long trench excavated across the rampart of a pingo scar exposed laminated silt and clay of glacial Lake Missoula. Upturned beds, recumbent folds, and minor thrust faults record the outward displacement of material during pingo growth. Normal faults cut these compressional features and indicate extension during later pingo collapse. The pingo scars formed in glacial Lake Missoula sediment of the Mission Valley constrain the southern extent of the late Wisconsin advance of the Flathead lobe and document the existence of permafrost following the most recent draining of glacial lake Missoula.

  10. Cutaneous scar at anterior hair line in mother and child with associated frontal bone defect in child.

    PubMed

    Stratis, J P; Ramer, J C; Manders, E K; Lehman, R A; Ladda, R L

    1992-09-15

    A large frontal bone defect underlying a "V" shaped scar was noted in a newborn male whose mother had an identical "V" shaped scar at the same location in the anterior hairline. Both had hypertelorism and short palpebral fissures. The mother had no radiographic evidence of skull defect and neither mother nor child had other cutaneous or skeletal anomalies. Cranioplasty was performed on the child using the remaining frontal bones with an excellent cosmetic result. Biopsy performed at operation documented scar tissue extending through the dermis and underlain by thickened dura. Mother and child appear to have a variant form of aplasia cutis congenita, an autosomal dominant trait with wide variation in expression.

  11. The Use of Silgel STC-SE, a Topical Silicone Gel for the Treatment and Reduction of Hypertrophic and Keloid Scars

    PubMed Central

    Dougall, Greig M. G.; Tafuro, Erica M.

    2016-01-01

    Background: A single-center study assessing the efficacy of Nagor’s Silgel STC-SE silicone gel to reduce the appearance of hypertrophic and keloid scars. Methods: A 16-week controlled study of 36 patients with hypertrophic or keloid scars. The subjects were divided between 2 cohorts: one assessing recently healed scars (<6 mo) and other assessing older scars (6 mo to 2 y). The efficacy of Silgel STC-SE on the scar was evaluated by skin hydration, skin moisture evaporation, skin elasticity, basic scar measurements, subjective patient questionnaire data, and image analysis. All subjects had data collected at baseline and weeks 1, 4, 8, 12, and 16. Photographs were taken for image analysis at baseline, week 8, and week 16. Statistical analysis was conducted on all data. Results: Twenty-nine patients completed the study (27 presented with hypertrophic scars and 2 with keloid scars), and 90% reported a marked improvement in their scar appearance. Patient questionnaire data showed great satisfaction with the product. Image analysis showed visual improvement with a statistically significant reduction of the “red” color of scars. Overall, scar dimensions were significantly reduced. There was a significant decrease from baseline levels in average scar length. Skin elasticity, skin hydration, and skin moisture evaporation did not change significantly from baseline. Conclusions: The results of this study indicate that Silgel STC-SE is an effective treatment in reducing the appearance and red color of hypertrophic scars up to 2 years old. Further study is required to draw significant conclusion in regard to the treatment of keloid scars. PMID:28293527

  12. Splenic release of platelets contributes to increased circulating platelet size and inflammation after myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Gao, Xiao-Ming; Moore, Xiao-Lei; Liu, Yang; Wang, Xin-Yu; Han, Li-Ping; Su, Yidan; Tsai, Alan; Xu, Qi; Zhang, Ming; Lambert, Gavin W; Kiriazis, Helen; Gao, Wei; Dart, Anthony M; Du, Xiao-Jun

    2016-07-01

    Acute myocardial infarction (AMI) is characterized by a rapid increase in circulating platelet size but the mechanism for this is unclear. Large platelets are hyperactive and associated with adverse clinical outcomes. We determined mean platelet volume (MPV) and platelet-monocyte conjugation (PMC) using blood samples from patients, and blood and the spleen from mice with AMI. We further measured changes in platelet size, PMC, cardiac and splenic contents of platelets and leucocyte infiltration into the mouse heart. In AMI patients, circulating MPV and PMC increased at 1-3 h post-MI and MPV returned to reference levels within 24 h after admission. In mice with MI, increases in platelet size and PMC became evident within 12 h and were sustained up to 72 h. Splenic platelets are bigger than circulating platelets in normal or infarct mice. At 24 h post-MI, splenic platelet storage was halved whereas cardiac platelets increased by 4-fold. Splenectomy attenuated all changes observed in the blood, reduced leucocyte and platelet accumulation in the infarct myocardium, limited infarct size and alleviated cardiac dilatation and dysfunction. AMI-induced elevated circulating levels of adenosine diphosphate and catecholamines in both human and the mouse, which may trigger splenic platelet release. Pharmacological inhibition of angiotensin-converting enzyme, β1-adrenergic receptor or platelet P2Y12 receptor reduced platelet abundance in the murine infarct myocardium albeit having diverse effects on platelet size and PMC. In conclusion, AMI evokes release of splenic platelets, which contributes to the increase in platelet size and PMC and facilitates myocardial accumulation of platelets and leucocytes, thereby promoting post-infarct inflammation.

  13. Size Matters

    PubMed Central

    Long, Kimberly; Abuelenen, Toaa; Pava, Libia; Bastille, Maya

    2011-01-01

    We tallied the number of possible mutant amino acids in proteins thought to be inactivated early in tumorigenesis and in proteins thought to be inactivated late in tumorigenesis, respectively. Proteins thought to be inactivated early in tumorigenesis, on average, have a greater number of alternative, mutant possibilities, which raises the possibility that the sequential order of mutations associated with cancer development reflects the random chance, throughout life, of a mutagen inactivating a larger versus a smaller target. The hypothesis that the temporal order of genetic changes in cancer reflects mutagen target sizes leads to novel considerations of 1) the mechanisms of the acquisition of cancer hallmarks and 2) cancer screening strategies. PMID:22701759

  14. Suction Evacuation with Methotrexate as a Successful Treatment Modality for Caesarean Scar Pregnancies

    PubMed Central

    Datta, Sumita; Jha, Chitra

    2015-01-01

    Pregnancy resulting from the implantation of an embryo within a scar of a previous Caesarean section is extremely rare. The diagnosis and treatment of Caesarean scar pregnancies (CSPs) are challenging and the optimal course of treatment is still to be determined. We report a case series of six patients with CSPs who presented to the Royal Hospital in Muscat, Oman, between October 2012 and April 2014. All of the patients were successfully treated with systemic methotrexate and five patients underwent suction evacuation either before or after the methotrexate administration. The patients were followed up for a period of 6–9 weeks after treatment and recovered completely without any significant complications. Suction evacuation with methotrexate can therefore be considered an effective treatment option with good maternal outcomes. PMID:26629384

  15. Ground-state degeneracies leave recognizable topological scars in the electronic density.

    PubMed

    Baer, Roi

    2010-02-19

    In Kohn-Sham density functional theory (KS DFT) a fictitious system of noninteracting particles is constructed having the same ground-state (GS) density as the physical system of interest. A fundamental open question in DFT concerns the ability of an exact KS calculation to spot and characterize the GS degeneracies in the physical system. In this Letter we provide theoretical evidence suggesting that the GS density, as a function of position on a 2D manifold of parameters affecting the external potential, is "topologically scarred" in a distinct way by degeneracies. These scars are sufficiently detailed to enable determination of the positions of degeneracies and even the associated Berry phases. We conclude that an exact KS calculation can spot and characterize the degeneracies of the physical system.

  16. Preceding bronchial cutting for exposure of the pulmonary artery buried in scar tissue after chemoradiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Nomori, Hiroaki; Cong, Yue; Sugimura, Hiroshi

    2017-01-01

    It is often difficult to expose the pulmonary artery buried in a scar tissue, especially in lung cancer patients that responded well to neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy. Difficulty to access pulmonary artery branches may lead to potentially unnecessary pneumonectomy. To complete lobectomy in such cases, a technique with preceding bronchial cutting for exposure of the pulmonary artery is presented. After dissecting the pulmonary vein, the lobar bronchus is cut from the opposite side of the pulmonary artery with scissors. The back wall of the lobar bronchus is cut using a surgical knife from the luminal face, which can expose the pulmonary artery behind the bronchial stump and then complete lobectomy. Fourteen patients have been treated using the present technique, enabling complete resection by lobectomy (including sleeve lobectomy in 3 patients) without major bleeding. The present procedure can expose pulmonary artery buried in scar tissue, resulting in making the lobectomy safer.

  17. [RAPD and SCAR molecular markers linked to the sexuality of cycads (Cycas tanqingii D. Y. Wang)].

    PubMed

    Jing, Jian-Zhou; Jin, Hong; Li, Dong-Liang; Chen, Xiao-Ke; Zhang, Yong

    2007-11-01

    The random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) technique was used to amplify DNA fragment, aiming at finding markers linked to the sex trait in Cycas tanqingii D. Y. Wang. A total number of 160 random primers were screened in the RAPD-PCR and more than 2500 RAPD fragments were generated from the male or the female plants. One fragment of about 500 bp was amplified steadily and repeatedly by the S0465 (CCCCGGTAAC) primer only from female plants but not male plants. The RAPD marker was then converted into female-linked dominant SCAR (Sequence Characterized Amplified Regions) marker named STQC-S465-483. The development of this sex-linked SCAR marker provides a possibility of identifying the sex of Cycas tanqingii before sexual maturation, which is very important to in situ or ex situ conservation.

  18. Lichen Planus Pemphigoides Presenting Preferentially Over Preexisting Scars: A Rare Instance of Isotopic Phenomenon

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Piyush; Savant, Sushil S; Das, Anupam; Hassan, Shahid; Barman, Panchami Deb

    2015-01-01

    An 18-year-old girl presented with multiple itchy hyperpigmented papules and plaques, along with tense blisters over the lower limbs and buttocks for last 3 months. These papules, plaques, and bullae were mostly localized to preexisting scars. The histopathological findings from papule and bulla were consistent with lichen planus (LP) and bullous pemphigoid, respectively. Direct immunofluorescence (DIF) of perilesional skin around bulla showed linear deposition of IgG and C3. Considering clinical, histopathological and DIF findings, diagnosis of LP pemphigoides (LPP) was made. The preferential localization of LPP lesions over preexisting scars was a very interesting finding in our case an extremely rare instance of the isotopic phenomenon. PMID:26677275

  19. Fitting of aspheric high gas-permeable rigid contact lenses to scarred corneas.

    PubMed

    Kok, J H; Smulders, F; van Mil, C

    1991-08-15

    Scarring of the cornea often results in an irregular corneal surface, which causes scattering in light perception. Therefore, the impaired visual acuity cannot be adequately corrected by spectacles in most cases. In this study, high oxygen-transmissible aspheric rigid lenses were fitted, with computer assistance, in 26 scarred eyes of 23 consecutive patients. In 15 of 26 eyes (57.7%), a successful fitting with good vision, no complications, and a sufficiently long wearing time was accomplished. The main lens-related complications included fluorescein-staining epithelial defects in five of 26 eyes (19.2%) and epithelial edema in two of 26 eyes (7.7%). Computer-aided fitting was of limited value because keratometer readings were not measurable in 50% of the cases. The results of this study indicate that the application of high oxygen-transmissible aspheric rigid contact lenses may obviate corneal surgery.

  20. Perio-esthetic surgery: Using LPF with frenectomy for prevention of scar.

    PubMed

    Chaubey, K Krishna; Arora, Vipin K; Thakur, Rajesh; Narula, Inderpreet S

    2011-07-01

    An aberrant frenum is postulated to create functional and aesthetic problems. Archer's 'classical frenectomy' is an extensive procedure including the excision of fibers, interdental papilla, and exposure of alveolar bone up to the palatine papilla. The resultant delayed healing, loss of interdental papilla, and abnormal scar led towards the conservative approaches like Edward's frenectomy, frenum relocation by Z-plasty and free gingival graft; with their technical and aesthetic limitations. A better approach to make a primary closure in midline and to avoid anesthetic scar by creating a zone of attached gingiva, frenectomy is assisted with lateral pedicle graft. The interdental papilla is left surgically undisturbed and healing takes place by primary intention. Miller, in his study on 27 subjects, suggested that the newly created zone of attached gingiva might have bracing effect inhibiting reopening of diastema. A case series of this technique with its distinct advantages is presented.

  1. Autologous Fat Grafting in the Treatment of Painful Postsurgical Scar of the Oral Mucosa.

    PubMed

    Lisa, Andrea; Summo, Valeria; Bandi, Valeria; Maione, Luca; Murolo, Matteo; Klinger, Francesco; Klinger, Marco

    2015-01-01

    Background. Persistent pain as a consequence of surgical treatment has been reported for several common surgical procedures and represents a clinical problem of great magnitude. Material and Methods. We describe the case of a 47-year-old female who presented a retractile scar that adhered to deep planes at the upper right of the vestibule due to surgical removal of maxillary exostosis, which determined important pain symptoms extending till the right shoulder during both chewing and rest. We subsequently treated her with autologous fat grafting according to Coleman's technique. Results. Clinical assessments were performed at 5 and 14 days, 1, 3, and 6 months, and 1 year after surgical procedure. We observed a progressive release of scar retraction together with an important improvement of pain symptoms. Conclusion. The case described widens the possible application of autologous fat grafting on a new anatomical site as buccal vestibule and in one specific clinical setting confirming its promising biological effects.

  2. The evidence for the role of transforming growth factor-beta in the formation of abnormal scarring.

    PubMed

    Chalmers, Richard L

    2011-06-01

    The complex biological and physiological mechanisms that result in poor quality scarring are still not fully understood. This review looks at current evidence of the role of transforming growth factor-beta (TGFβ) in this pathological process.

  3. Arthroscopic Scar Resection for the Treatment of Anteromedial Knee Pain after Oxford Unicompartmental Knee Arthroplasty: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Kawaguchi, Kohei; Michishita, Kazuhiko; Manabe, Takeshi; Akasaka, Yoshiyuki; Kaminaga, Naoto

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: It has been reported that the unicompartmental knee arthroplasty has good long-term outcomes for Western and Japanese patients. Alternatively, several reports have described reoperations after unicompartmental knee arthroplasty because of post-operative knee pain and sometimes it is difficult to diagnose the cause of pain. Case Report: We treated a patient with anteromedial knee pain caused by intra-articular scar tissue that contained residual cement fragments on the anterior surface of a femoral implant following Oxford unicompartmental knee arthroplasty. After arthroscopic resection of the scar tissue and removal of the 3 mm residual cement covered with the scar tissue, the patient’s post-operative symptoms were considerably alleviated. Conclusion: This is the first report describing a case of painful intra-articular scar tissue following unicompartmental knee arthroplasty. PMID:28164064

  4. 76 FR 6650 - Culturally Significant Objects Imported for Exhibition Determinations: “Splendors of Faith/Scars...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-07

    ...: The Arts of the Missions of Northern New Spain, 1600-1821'' SUMMARY: Notice is hereby given of the... exhibition ``Splendors of Faith/Scars of Conquest: The Arts of the Missions of Northern New Spain,...

  5. The combined use of cryosurgery and intralesional injections of suspensions of fluorinated adrenocorticosteroids for reducing keloids and hypertrophic scars.

    PubMed

    Ceilley, R I; Babin, R W

    1979-01-01

    Freezing with liquid nitrogen in the conventional manner of cryosurgery followed immediately by injection of a suspension of a fluorinated adrenocorticosteroid is an effective way of treating keloids and hypertrophic scars. Details of the method are given.

  6. Primary Cutaneous Actinomycosis along with the Surgical Scar on the Hand

    PubMed Central

    Niknezhad, Nasim; Bidari-Zerehpoush, Farahnaz; Niknezhad, Nakisa

    2016-01-01

    Primary cutaneous actinomycosis is a rare clinical form with variable presentation. The tumoral presentation of actinomycosis as pseudocarcinomatous or sarcomatous masses is completely rare. The management of cutaneous actinomycosis needs proper antibiotic treatment and surgical resection would not be adequate alone. Herein, we report a case of primary cutaneous actinomycosis on the dorsal surface of the hand as draining and infiltrated lesions along with the scar of previous tumor excision that had not received proper antibiotics after the surgery. PMID:27957360

  7. Exposure to Varying Strain Magnitudes Influences the Conversion of Normal Skin Fibroblasts Into Hypertrophic Scar Cells.

    PubMed

    Kuang, Ruixia; Wang, Zhiguo; Xu, Quanchen; Cai, Xia; Liu, Tao

    2016-04-01

    Mechanical strain is a key contributor in the pathogenesis of hypertrophic scarring, whose optimal stretch magnitudes to initiate the differentiation of normal skin fibroblasts into aberrant fibroblasts phenotype remains largely unresolved. Influence of varying cyclic strain magnitudes on cultured human normal skin fibroblasts and its transformation into hypertrophic scar fibroblast-like phenotype is investigated in this study. Cultured fibroblasts isolated from hypertrophic scar and normal skin tissue were subjected to cyclic mechanical stretching under individual 10%, 15%, and 20% strain magnitudes at a frequency of 0.1 Hz for 24 hours. Stretched normal skin fibroblasts demonstrated significantly increased rates of cell proliferation, and also apparently oriented away nearly perpendicular to the applied stretching direction. Interestingly, the applied 10% strains magnitude resulted in a markedly enhanced cell proliferative ability compared with that of 20% strain magnitude. Parameters involving the mechanotransduction signaling, such as integrin β1 and P130Cas, were significantly improved at both mRNA and protein levels in the stretched normal skin fibroblasts, which was demonstrated in a negative magnitude-dependent manner. In addition, 10% strains magnitude triggered the highest expression levels of growth factor TGF-β1 and collagen matrix in stretched normal skin fibroblasts. Collectively, these results indicate that the 10% stretching magnitude, of the 3 strain magnitudes studied, is most effective for triggering the optimal mechanotransduction effects and biological responses inside cultured skin fibroblasts. The demonstrable conversion of normal skin fibroblasts into hypertrophic scar fibroblasts was also observed when 10% stretching magnitude was applied to cultured fibroblasts in vitro.