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Sample records for postnatal mouse olfactory

  1. RhoE deficiency alters postnatal subventricular zone development and the number of calbindin-expressing neurons in the olfactory bulb of mouse.

    PubMed

    Ballester-Lurbe, Begoña; González-Granero, Susana; Mocholí, Enric; Poch, Enric; García-Manzanares, María; Dierssen, Mara; Pérez-Roger, Ignacio; García-Verdugo, José M; Guasch, Rosa M; Terrado, José

    2015-11-01

    The subventricular zone represents an important reservoir of progenitor cells in the adult brain. Cells from the subventricular zone migrate along the rostral migratory stream and reach the olfactory bulb, where they originate different types of interneurons. In this work, we have analyzed the role of the small GTPase RhoE/Rnd3 in subventricular zone cell development using mice-lacking RhoE expression. Our results show that RhoE null mice display a remarkable postnatal broadening of the subventricular zone and caudal rostral migratory stream. This broadening was caused by an increase in progenitor proliferation, observed in the second postnatal week but not before, and by an altered migration of the cells, which appeared in disorganized cell arrangements that impaired the appropriate contact between cells in the rostral migratory stream. In addition, the thickness of the granule cell layer in the olfactory bulb was reduced, although the density of granule cells did not differ between wild-type and RhoE null mice. Finally, the lack of RhoE expression affected the olfactory glomeruli inducing a severe reduction of calbindin-expressing interneurons in the periglomerular layer. This was already evident in the newborns and even more pronounced 15 days later when RhoE null mice displayed 89% less cells than control mice. Our results indicate that RhoE has pleiotropic functions on subventricular cells because of its role in proliferation and tangential migration, affecting mainly the development of calbindin-expressing cells in the olfactory bulb.

  2. The olfactory conditioning in the early postnatal period stimulated neural stem/progenitor cells in the subventricular zone and increased neurogenesis in the olfactory bulb of rats.

    PubMed

    So, K; Moriya, T; Nishitani, S; Takahashi, H; Shinohara, K

    2008-01-01

    The olfactory memory acquired during the early postnatal period is known to be maintained for a long period, however, its neural mechanism remains to be clarified. In the present study, we examined the effect of olfactory conditioning during the early postnatal period on neurogenesis in the olfactory bulb of rats. Using the bromodeoxyuridine-pulse chase method, we found that the olfactory conditioning, which was a paired presentation of citral odor (conditioned stimulus) and foot shock (unconditioned stimulus) in rat pups on postnatal day 11, stimulated the proliferation of neural stem/progenitor cells in the anterior subventricular zone (aSVZ), but not in the olfactory bulb, at 24 h after the conditioning. However, the number of newborn cells in the olfactory bulb was increased at 2 weeks, but not 8 weeks, after such conditioning. Neither the exposure of a citral odor alone nor foot shock alone affected the proliferation of neural stem/progenitor cells in the aSVZ at 24 h after and the number of newborn cells in the olfactory bulb at 2 weeks after. The majority of newborn cells in the olfactory bulb of either the conditioned rats or the unconditioned rats expressed the neural marker NeuN, thus indicating that the olfactory conditioning stimulated neurogenesis in the olfactory bulb. These results suggest that olfactory conditioning during the early postnatal period temporally stimulates neurogenesis in the olfactory bulb of rats.

  3. Adult Olfactory Bulb Interneuron Phenotypes Identified by Targeting Embryonic and Postnatal Neural Progenitors

    PubMed Central

    Figueres-Oñate, Maria; López-Mascaraque, Laura

    2016-01-01

    Neurons are generated during embryonic development and in adulthood, although adult neurogenesis is restricted to two main brain regions, the hippocampus and olfactory bulb. The subventricular zone (SVZ) of the lateral ventricles generates neural stem/progenitor cells that continually provide the olfactory bulb (OB) with new granule or periglomerular neurons, cells that arrive from the SVZ via the rostral migratory stream. The continued neurogenesis and the adequate integration of these newly generated interneurons is essential to maintain homeostasis in the olfactory bulb, where the differentiation of these cells into specific neural cell types is strongly influenced by temporal cues. Therefore, identifying the critical features that control the generation of adult OB interneurons at either pre- or post-natal stages is important to understand the dynamic contribution of neural stem cells. Here, we used in utero and neonatal SVZ electroporation along with a transposase-mediated stable integration plasmid, in order to track interneurons and glial lineages in the OB. These plasmids are valuable tools to study the development of OB interneurons from embryonic and post-natal SVZ progenitors. Accordingly, we examined the location and identity of the adult progeny of embryonic and post-natally transfected progenitors by examining neurochemical markers in the adult OB. These data reveal the different cell types in the olfactory bulb that are generated in function of age and different electroporation conditions. PMID:27242400

  4. Postnatal odorant exposure induces peripheral olfactory plasticity at the cellular level.

    PubMed

    Cadiou, Hervé; Aoudé, Imad; Tazir, Bassim; Molinas, Adrien; Fenech, Claire; Meunier, Nicolas; Grosmaitre, Xavier

    2014-04-01

    Mammalian olfactory sensory neurons (OSNs) form the primary elements of the olfactory system. Inserted in the olfactory mucosa lining of the nasal cavity, they are exposed to the environment and their lifespan is brief. Several reports say that OSNs are regularly regenerated during the entire life and that odorant environment affects the olfactory epithelium. However, little is known about the impact of the odorant environment on OSNs at the cellular level and more precisely in the context of early postnatal olfactory exposure. Here we exposed MOR23-green fluorescent protein (GFP) and M71-GFP mice to lyral or acetophenone, ligands for MOR23 or M71, respectively. Daily postnatal exposure to lyral induces plasticity in the population of OSNs expressing MOR23. Their density decreases after odorant exposure, whereas the amount of MOR23 mRNA and protein remain stable in the whole epithelium. Meanwhile, quantitative PCR indicates that each MOR23 neuron has higher levels of olfactory receptor transcripts and also expresses more CNGA2 and phosphodiesterase 1C, fundamental olfactory transduction pathway proteins. Transcript levels return to baseline after 4 weeks recovery. Patch-clamp recordings reveal that exposed MOR23 neurons respond to lyral with higher sensitivity and broader dynamic range while the responses' kinetics were faster. These effects are specific to the odorant-receptor pair lyral-MOR23: there was no effect of acetophenone on MOR23 neurons and no effect of acetophenone and lyral on the M71 population. Together, our results clearly demonstrate that OSNs undergo specific anatomical, molecular, and functional adaptation when chronically exposed to odorants in the early stage of life.

  5. Inhibition of Inflammation-Associated Olfactory Loss by Etanercept in an Inducible Olfactory Inflammation Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Yong Gi; Lane, Andrew P.

    2016-01-01

    Objective To determine the effect of a soluble human tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) receptor blocker (Etanercept) on an inducible olfactory inflammation (IOI) mouse model Study Design An in vivo study using a transgenic mouse model Setting Research laboratory Subjects and Methods To study the impact of chronic inflammation on the olfactory system, a transgenic mouse model of chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS)-associated olfactory loss was utilized (IOI mouse), expressing TNF-α in a temporally-controlled fashion specifically within the olfactory epithelium. In one group of mice (n=4), Etanercept was injected intraperitoneally (100 µg/dose, 3 times/week) concurrent with a 2-week period of TNF-α expression. A second group of mice (n=2) underwent induction of TNF-α expression for 8 weeks, with Etanercept treatment administered during the final 2 weeks of inflammation. Olfactory function was assayed by elecro-olfactogram (EOG), and olfactory tissue was processed for histology and immunohistochemical staining. Each group was compared with equal number of control group. Results Compared to non-treated IOI mice, Etanercept -treated IOI mice showed significantly improved EOG responses after 2 weeks (p<0.001). After 8 weeks of induced inflammation, there was massive loss of olfactory epithelium and no EOG response in non-treated IOI mice. However, in Etanercept - treated mice, regeneration of olfactory epithelium was observed. Conclusion Concomitant administration of Etanercept in IOI mice results in interruption of TNF-α-induced olfactory loss and induction of neuroepithelial regeneration. This demonstrates that Etanercept has potential utility as a tool for elucidating the role of TNF-α in other olfactory inflammation models. PMID:26932943

  6. Participation of the Olfactory Bulb in Circadian Organization during Early Postnatal Life in Rabbits

    PubMed Central

    Navarrete, Erika; Ortega-Bernal, Juan Roberto; Trejo-Muñoz, Lucero; Díaz, Georgina; Montúfar-Chaveznava, Rodrigo; Caldelas, Ivette

    2016-01-01

    Experimental evidence indicates that during pre-visual stages of development in mammals, circadian regulation is still not under the control of the light-entrainable hypothalamic pacemaker, raising the possibility that the circadian rhythmicity that occurs during postnatal development is under the control of peripheral oscillators, such as the main olfactory bulb (MOB). We evaluated the outcome of olfactory bulbectomy on the temporal pattern of core body temperature and gross locomotor activity in newborn rabbits. From postnatal day 1 (P1), pups were randomly assigned to one of the following conditions: intact pups (INT), intact pups fed by enteral gavage (INT+ENT), sham operated pups (SHAM), pups with unilateral lesions of the olfactory bulb (OBx-UNI), and pups with bilateral lesions of the olfactory bulb (OBx-BI). At the beginning of the experiment, from P1-8, the animals in all groups were fed at 11:00, from P9-13 the feeding schedule was delayed 6 h (17:00), and finally, from P14-15 the animals were subjected to fasting conditions. The rabbit pups of the INT, INT+ENT, SHAM and OBx-UNI groups exhibited a clear circadian rhythmicity in body temperature and locomotor activity, with a conspicuous anticipatory rise hours prior to the nursing or feeding schedule, which persisted even during fasting conditions. In addition, phase delays in the nursing or feeding schedule induced a clear phase shift in both parameters. In contrast, the OBx-BI group exhibited atypical rhythmicity in both parameters under entrained conditions that altered the anticipatory component, as well as deficient phase control of both rhythms. The present results demonstrate that the expression of circadian rhythmicity at behavioral and physiological levels during early stages of rabbit development largely depends on the integrity of the main olfactory bulb. PMID:27305041

  7. Participation of the Olfactory Bulb in Circadian Organization during Early Postnatal Life in Rabbits.

    PubMed

    Navarrete, Erika; Ortega-Bernal, Juan Roberto; Trejo-Muñoz, Lucero; Díaz, Georgina; Montúfar-Chaveznava, Rodrigo; Caldelas, Ivette

    2016-01-01

    Experimental evidence indicates that during pre-visual stages of development in mammals, circadian regulation is still not under the control of the light-entrainable hypothalamic pacemaker, raising the possibility that the circadian rhythmicity that occurs during postnatal development is under the control of peripheral oscillators, such as the main olfactory bulb (MOB). We evaluated the outcome of olfactory bulbectomy on the temporal pattern of core body temperature and gross locomotor activity in newborn rabbits. From postnatal day 1 (P1), pups were randomly assigned to one of the following conditions: intact pups (INT), intact pups fed by enteral gavage (INT+ENT), sham operated pups (SHAM), pups with unilateral lesions of the olfactory bulb (OBx-UNI), and pups with bilateral lesions of the olfactory bulb (OBx-BI). At the beginning of the experiment, from P1-8, the animals in all groups were fed at 11:00, from P9-13 the feeding schedule was delayed 6 h (17:00), and finally, from P14-15 the animals were subjected to fasting conditions. The rabbit pups of the INT, INT+ENT, SHAM and OBx-UNI groups exhibited a clear circadian rhythmicity in body temperature and locomotor activity, with a conspicuous anticipatory rise hours prior to the nursing or feeding schedule, which persisted even during fasting conditions. In addition, phase delays in the nursing or feeding schedule induced a clear phase shift in both parameters. In contrast, the OBx-BI group exhibited atypical rhythmicity in both parameters under entrained conditions that altered the anticipatory component, as well as deficient phase control of both rhythms. The present results demonstrate that the expression of circadian rhythmicity at behavioral and physiological levels during early stages of rabbit development largely depends on the integrity of the main olfactory bulb. PMID:27305041

  8. Centrin 2 Is Required for Mouse Olfactory Ciliary Trafficking and Development of Ependymal Cilia Planar Polarity

    PubMed Central

    Avasthi, Prachee; Irwin, Mavis; Gerstner, Cecilia D.; Frederick, Jeanne M.; Lucero, Mary T.

    2014-01-01

    Centrins are ancient calmodulin-related Ca2+-binding proteins associated with basal bodies. In lower eukaryotes, Centrin2 (CETN2) is required for basal body replication and positioning, although its function in mammals is undefined. We generated a germline CETN2 knock-out (KO) mouse presenting with syndromic ciliopathy including dysosmia and hydrocephalus. Absence of CETN2 leads to olfactory cilia loss, impaired ciliary trafficking of olfactory signaling proteins, adenylate cyclase III (ACIII), and cyclic nucleotide-gated (CNG) channel, as well as disrupted basal body apical migration in postnatal olfactory sensory neurons (OSNs). In mutant OSNs, cilia base-anchoring of intraflagellar transport components IFT88, the kinesin-II subunit KIF3A, and cytoplasmic dynein 2 appeared compromised. Although the densities of mutant ependymal and respiratory cilia were largely normal, the planar polarity of mutant ependymal cilia was disrupted, resulting in uncoordinated flow of CSF. Transgenic expression of GFP-CETN2 rescued the Cetn2-deficiency phenotype. These results indicate that mammalian basal body replication and ciliogenesis occur independently of CETN2; however, mouse CETN2 regulates protein trafficking of olfactory cilia and participates in specifying planar polarity of ependymal cilia. PMID:24790208

  9. Postnatal histomorphogenesis of the mandible in the house mouse

    PubMed Central

    Martinez-Maza, Cayetana; Montes, Laëtitia; Lamrous, Hayat; Ventura, Jacint; Cubo, Jorge

    2012-01-01

    The mandible of the house mouse, Mus musculus, is a model structure for the study of the development and evolution of complex morphological systems. This research describes the histomorphogenesis of the house mouse mandible and analyses its biological significance from the first to the eighth postnatal weeks. Histological data allowed us to test a hypothesis concerning modularity in this structure. We measured the bone growth rates by fluorescent labelling and identified the bone tissue types through microscopic analysis of histological cross-sections of the mandible during its postnatal development. The results provide evidence for a modular structure of the mouse mandible, as the alveolar region and the ascending ramus show histological differences throughout ontogeny. The alveolar region increases in length during the first two postnatal weeks by bone growth in the posterior region, while horizontally positioned incisors preclude bone growth in the anterior region. In the fourth postnatal week, growth dynamics shows a critical change. The alveolar region drifts laterally and the ramus becomes more vertical due to the medial growth direction of the coronoid region and the lateral growth of the ventral region of the ramus. Diet changes after weaning are probably involved in these morphological changes. In this way, the development of the masticatory muscles that insert on the ascending ramus may be particularly related to this shape modeling of the house mouse mandible. PMID:22372819

  10. Postnatal ontogenesis of molecular clock in mouse striatum.

    PubMed

    Cai, Yanning; Liu, Shu; Li, Ning; Xu, Shengli; Zhang, Yanli; Chan, Piu

    2009-04-01

    Striatum is an important brain area whose function is related to motor, emotion and motivation. Interestingly, biological and physiological circadian rhythms have been found in the striatum extensively, suggesting molecular clock machinery works efficiently therein. However, the striatal expression profiles of clock genes have not been characterized systematically. In addition, little is known about when the expression rhythms start during postnatal ontogenesis. In the present study, 24 h mRNA oscillations of 6 principle clock genes (Bmal1, Clock, Npas2, Cry1, Per1 and Rev-erb alpha) were examined in mouse striatum, at early postnatal stage (postnatal day 3), pre-weaning stage (postnatal day 14) and in adult (postnatal day 60). At P3, no daily oscillation was found for all clock genes. At P14, a significant time effect was identified only for Rev-erb alpha and Npas2. At P60, the daily oscillations of these clock genes were at least borderline significant, with peak time at Circadian time (CT) 01 for Bmal1, Clock, Npas2 and Cry1; at CT 13 for Per1; and at CT 07 for Rev-erb alpha. In addition, the overall mean mRNA levels of these clock genes also underwent a dynamic change postnatally. For Bmal1, Clock, Npas2, Per1 and Rev-erb alpha, the expression level increased throughout the postnatal ontogenesis from P3, P14 to P60. For Cry1, however, the abundance at P3 and P60 were similar while that at P14 was much lower. In conclusion, the striatal molecular clock machinery, although works efficiently in adult, develops gradually after birth in mice.

  11. Protein Expression Dynamics During Postnatal Mouse Brain Development

    PubMed Central

    Laeremans, Annelies; Van de Plas, Babs; Clerens, Stefan; Van den Bergh, Gert; Arckens, Lutgarde; Hu, Tjing-Tjing

    2013-01-01

    We explored differential protein expression profiles in the mouse forebrain at different stages of postnatal development, including 10-day (P10), 30-day (P30), and adult (Ad) mice, by large-scale screening of proteome maps using two-dimensional difference gel electrophoresis. Mass spectrometry analysis resulted in the identification of 251 differentially expressed proteins. Most molecular changes were observed between P10 compared to both P30 and Ad. Computational ingenuity pathway analysis (IPA) confirmed these proteins as crucial molecules in the biological function of nervous system development. Moreover, IPA revealed Semaphorin signaling in neurons and the protein ubiquitination pathway as essential canonical pathways in the mouse forebrain during postnatal development. For these main biological pathways, the transcriptional regulation of the age-dependent expression of selected proteins was validated by means of in situ hybridization. In conclusion, we suggest that proteolysis and neurite outgrowth guidance are key biological processes, particularly during early brain maturation. PMID:25157209

  12. Expression of Npas4 mRNA in Telencephalic Areas of Adult and Postnatal Mouse Brain

    PubMed Central

    Damborsky, Joanne C.; Slaton, G. Simona; Winzer-Serhan, Ursula H.

    2015-01-01

    The transcription factor neuronal PAS domain-containing protein 4 (Npas4) is an inducible immediate early gene which regulates the formation of inhibitory synapses, and could have a significant regulatory role during cortical circuit formation. However, little is known about basal Npas4 mRNA expression during postnatal development. Here, postnatal and adult mouse brain sections were processed for isotopic in situ hybridization using an Npas4 specific cRNA antisense probe. In adults, Npas4 mRNA was found in the telencephalon with very restricted or no expression in diencephalon or mesencephalon. In most telencephalic areas, including the anterior olfactory nucleus (AON), piriform cortex, neocortex, hippocampus, dorsal caudate putamen (CPu), septum and basolateral amygdala nucleus (BLA), basal Npas4 expression was detected in scattered cells which exhibited strong hybridization signal. In embryonic and neonatal brain sections, Npas4 mRNA expression signals were very low. Starting at postnatal day 5 (P5), transcripts for Npas4 were detected in the AON, CPu and piriform cortex. At P8, additional Npas4 hybridization was found in CA1 and CA3 pyramidal layer, and in primary motor cortex. By P13, robust mRNA expression was located in layers IV and VI of all sensory cortices, frontal cortex and cingulate cortex. After onset of expression, postnatal spatial mRNA distribution was similar to that in adults, with the exception of the CPu, where Npas4 transcripts became gradually restricted to the most dorsal part. In conclusion, the spatial distribution of Npas4 mRNA is mostly restricted to telencephalic areas, and the temporal expression increases with developmental age during postnatal development, which seem to correlate with the onset of activity-driven excitatory transmission. PMID:26633966

  13. Serotonin modulates outward potassium currents in mouse olfactory receptor neurons.

    PubMed

    Gao, S; Guo, X; Liu, T; Liu, J; Chen, W; Xia, Q; Chen, Y; Tang, Y

    2013-01-01

    Monoaminergic neurotransmitter 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT), also known as serotonin, plays important roles in modulating the function of the olfactory system. However, thus far, the knowledge about 5-HT and its receptors in olfactory receptor neurons (ORNs) and their physiological role have not been fully characterized. In the present study, reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) analysis revealed the presence of 5-HT(1A) and 5-HT(1B) receptor subtypes in mouse olfactory epithelium at the mRNA level. With subtype selective antibodies and standard immunohistochemical techniques, both receptor subtypes were found to be positively labeled. To further elucidate the molecular mechanisms of 5-HT act on the peripheral olfactory transduction, the whole-cell patch clamp techniques were used on freshly isolated ORNs. We found that 5-HT decreased the magnitude of outward K(+) current in a dose-dependent manner and these inhibitory effects were markedly attenuated by the 5-HT(1A) receptor blocker WAY-100635 and the 5-HT(1B) receptor antagonist GR55562. These data suggested that 5-HT may play a role in the modulation of peripheral olfactory signals by regulating outward potassium currents, both 5-HT(1A) and 5-HT(1B) receptors were involved in this regulation.

  14. Mechanisms of neuronal chloride accumulation in intact mouse olfactory epithelium.

    PubMed

    Nickell, William T; Kleene, Nancy K; Kleene, Steven J

    2007-09-15

    When olfactory receptor neurons respond to odours, a depolarizing Cl(-) efflux is a substantial part of the response. This requires that the resting neuron accumulate Cl(-) against an electrochemical gradient. In isolated olfactory receptor neurons, the Na(+)-K(+)-2Cl(-) cotransporter NKCC1 is essential for Cl(-) accumulation. However, in intact epithelium, a robust electrical olfactory response persists in mice lacking NKCC1. This response is largely due to a neuronal Cl(-) efflux. It thus appears that NKCC1 is an important part of a more complex system of Cl(-) accumulation. To identify the remaining transport proteins, we first screened by RT-PCR for 21 Cl(-) transporters in mouse nasal tissue containing olfactory mucosa. For most of the Cl(-) transporters, the presence of mRNA was demonstrated. We also investigated the effects of pharmacological block or genetic ablation of Cl(-) transporters on the olfactory field potential, the electroolfactogram (EOG). Mice lacking the common Cl(-)/HCO(3)(-) exchanger AE2 had normal EOGs. Block of NKCC cotransport with bumetanide reduced the EOG in epithelia from wild-type mice but had no effect in mice lacking NKCC1. Hydrochlorothiazide, a blocker of the Na(+)-Cl(-) cotransporter, had only a small effect. DIDS, a blocker of some KCC cotransporters and Cl(-)/HCO(3)(-) exchangers, reduced the EOG in epithelia from both wild-type and NKCC1 knockout mice. A combination of bumetanide and DIDS decreased the response more than either drug alone. However, no combination of drugs completely abolished the Cl(-) component of the response. These results support the involvement of both NKCC1 and one or more DIDS-sensitive transporters in Cl(-) accumulation in olfactory receptor neurons.

  15. Mechanisms of neuronal chloride accumulation in intact mouse olfactory epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Nickell, William T; Kleene, Nancy K; Kleene, Steven J

    2007-01-01

    When olfactory receptor neurons respond to odours, a depolarizing Cl− efflux is a substantial part of the response. This requires that the resting neuron accumulate Cl− against an electrochemical gradient. In isolated olfactory receptor neurons, the Na+–K+–2Cl− cotransporter NKCC1 is essential for Cl− accumulation. However, in intact epithelium, a robust electrical olfactory response persists in mice lacking NKCC1. This response is largely due to a neuronal Cl− efflux. It thus appears that NKCC1 is an important part of a more complex system of Cl− accumulation. To identify the remaining transport proteins, we first screened by RT-PCR for 21 Cl− transporters in mouse nasal tissue containing olfactory mucosa. For most of the Cl− transporters, the presence of mRNA was demonstrated. We also investigated the effects of pharmacological block or genetic ablation of Cl− transporters on the olfactory field potential, the electroolfactogram (EOG). Mice lacking the common Cl−/HCO3− exchanger AE2 had normal EOGs. Block of NKCC cotransport with bumetanide reduced the EOG in epithelia from wild-type mice but had no effect in mice lacking NKCC1. Hydrochlorothiazide, a blocker of the Na+–Cl− cotransporter, had only a small effect. DIDS, a blocker of some KCC cotransporters and Cl−/HCO3− exchangers, reduced the EOG in epithelia from both wild-type and NKCC1 knockout mice. A combination of bumetanide and DIDS decreased the response more than either drug alone. However, no combination of drugs completely abolished the Cl− component of the response. These results support the involvement of both NKCC1 and one or more DIDS-sensitive transporters in Cl− accumulation in olfactory receptor neurons. PMID:17656441

  16. Postnatal Development of the Mouse Enteric Nervous System.

    PubMed

    Foong, Jaime Pei Pei

    2016-01-01

    Owing to over three decades of research, we now have a good understanding of the genetic and molecular control of enteric nervous system (ENS) development during embryonic and prenatal stages. On the other hand, it has only just become clear that a substantial process of ENS maturation occurs after birth (Hao et al. 2013a). During postnatal stages, in addition to genetic influences, ENS development is also potentially affected by the external environment. Thus it is possible that manipulating certain environmental factors could help prevent or reduce motility disorders. However the genetic and environmental factors that regulate postnatal ENS development remain unknown. Researchers have used a variety of animal models that are easy to manipulate genetically or experimentally, and have short gestational periods, to understand the development of the ENS. Notably, due to the availability of mouse models for several human enteric neuropathies, many studies have used the mature and developing murine ENS as a model. Here, I will discuss recent advances in knowledge about postnatal development of the murine ENS, and highlight future directions for this emerging research field. PMID:27379641

  17. Notch2 is required for maintaining sustentacular cell function in the adult mouse main olfactory epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez, Steve; Sickles, Heather M.; DeLeonardis, Chris; Alcaraz, Ana; Gridley, Thomas; Lin, David M.

    2008-01-01

    Notch receptors are expressed in neurons and glia in the adult nervous system, but why this expression persists is not well-understood. Here we examine the role of the Notch pathway in the postnatal mouse main olfactory system, and show evidence consistent with a model where Notch2 is required for maintaining sustentacular cell function. In the absence of Notch2, the laminar nature of these glial-like cells is disrupted. Hes1, Hey1, and Six1, which are downstream effectors of the Notch pathway, are down-regulated, and cytochrome P450 and Glutathione S-transferase (GST) expression by sustentacular cells is reduced. Functional levels of GST activity are also reduced. These disruptions are associated with increased olfactory sensory neuron degeneration. Surprisingly, expression of Notch3 is also down-regulated. This suggests the existence of a feedback loop where expression of Notch3 is initially independent of Notch2, but requires Notch2 for maintained expression. While the Notch pathway has previously been shown to be important for promoting gliogenesis during development, this is the first demonstration that the persistent expression of Notch receptors is required for maintaining glial function in adult. PMID:18155189

  18. Integrative Analysis of the Developing Postnatal Mouse Heart Transcriptome

    PubMed Central

    Gan, Jingyi; Sonntag, Hans-Joachim; Tang, Mei kuen; Cai, Dongqing; Lee, Kenneth Ka Ho

    2015-01-01

    In mammals, cardiomyocytes rapidly proliferate in the fetus and continue to do so for a few more days after birth. These cardiomyocytes then enter into growth arrest but the detailed molecular mechanisms involved have not been fully elucidated. We have addressed this issue by comparing the transcriptomes of 2-day-old (containing dividing cardiomyocytes) with 13-day-old (containing growth arrested cardiomyocytes) postnatal mouse hearts. We performed comparative microarray analysis on the heart tissues and then conducted Functional annotation, Gene ontology, KEGG pathway and Gene Set enrichment analyses on the differentially expressed genes. The bioinformatics analysis revealed that gene ontology categories associated with the “cell cycle”, “DNA replication”, “chromosome segregation” and “microtubule cytoskeleton” were down-regulated. Inversely, “immune response”, “extracellular matrix”, “cell differentiation” and “cell membrane” were up-regulated. Ingenuity Pathways Analysis (IPA) has revealed that GATA4, MYH7 and IGF1R were the key drivers of the gene interaction networks. In addition, Regulator Effects network analysis suggested that TASP1, TOB1, C1orf61, AIF1, ROCK1, TFF2 and miR503-5p may be acting on the cardiomyocytes in 13-day-old mouse hearts to inhibit cardiomyocyte proliferation and G1/S phase transition. RT-qPCR was used to validate genes which were differentially expressed and genes that play a prominent role in the pathways and interaction networks that we identified. In sum, our integrative analysis has provided more insights into the transcriptional regulation of cardiomyocyte exit from the cell cycle during postnatal heart development. The results also pinpoint potential regulators that could be used to induce growth arrested cardiomyocytes to proliferate in the infarcted heart. PMID:26200114

  19. Linear correlation between the number of olfactory sensory neurons expressing a given mouse odorant receptor gene and the total volume of the corresponding glomeruli in the olfactory bulb

    PubMed Central

    Bressel, Olaf Christian; Khan, Mona

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Chemosensory specificity in the main olfactory system of the mouse relies on the expression of ∼1,100 odorant receptor (OR) genes across millions of olfactory sensory neurons (OSNs) in the main olfactory epithelium (MOE), and on the coalescence of OSN axons into ∼3,600 glomeruli in the olfactory bulb. A traditional approach for visualizing OSNs and their axons consists of tagging an OR gene genetically with an axonal marker that is cotranslated with the OR by virtue of an internal ribosome entry site (IRES). Here we report full cell counts for 15 gene‐targeted strains of the OR‐IRES‐marker design coexpressing a fluorescent protein. These strains represent 11 targeted OR genes, a 1% sample of the OR gene repertoire. We took an empirical, “count every cell” strategy: we counted all fluorescent cell profiles with a nuclear profile within the cytoplasm, on all serial coronal sections under a confocal microscope, a total of 685,673 cells in 56 mice at postnatal day 21. We then applied a strain‐specific Abercrombie correction to these OSN counts in order to obtain a closer approximation of the true OSN numbers. We found a 17‐fold range in the average (corrected) OSN number across these 11 OR genes. In the same series of coronal sections, we then determined the total volume of the glomeruli (TGV) formed by coalescence of the fluorescent axons. We found a strong linear correlation between OSN number and TGV, suggesting that TGV can be used as a surrogate measurement for estimating OSN numbers in these gene‐targeted strains. J. Comp. Neurol. 524:199–209, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26100963

  20. Functional properties of dopaminergic neurones in the mouse olfactory bulb

    PubMed Central

    Pignatelli, Angela; Kobayashi, Kazuto; Okano, Hideyuki; Belluzzi, Ottorino

    2005-01-01

    The olfactory bulb of mammals contains a large population of dopaminergic interneurones within the glomerular layer. Dopamine has been shown both in vivo and in vitro to modulate several aspects of olfactory information processing, but the functional properties of dopaminergic neurones have never been described due to the inability to recognize these cells in living preparations. To overcome this difficulty, we used a transgenic mouse strain harbouring an eGFP (enhanced green fluorescent protein) reporter construct under the promoter of tyrosine hydroxylase, the rate-limiting enzyme for cathecolamine synthesis. As a result, we were able to identify dopaminergic neurones (TH-GFP cells) in living preparations and, for the first time, we could study the functional properties of such neurones in the olfactory bulb, in both slices and dissociated cells. The most prominent feature of these cells was the autorhythmicity. In these cells we identified five main voltage-dependent conductances: the two having largest amplitude were a fast transient Na+ current and a delayed rectifier K+ current. In addition, we observed three smaller inward currents, sustained by Na+ ions (persistent type) and by Ca2+ ions (LVA and HVA). Using pharmacological tools and ion substitution methods we showed that the pacemaking process is supported by the interplay of the persistent Na+ current and of a T-type Ca2+ current. We carried out a complete kinetical analysis of the five conductances present in these cells, and developed a Hodgkin-Huxley model of TH-GFP cells, capable of reproducing accurately the properties of living cells, including autorhytmicity, and allowing a precise understanding of the process. PMID:15731185

  1. Structure and function of long-lived olfactory organotypic cultures from postnatal mice.

    PubMed

    Josephson, E M; Yilma, S; Vodyanoy, V; Morrison, E E

    2004-03-01

    The first synapse in the olfactory pathway mediates a significant transfer of information given the restricted association of specific olfactory receptor neurons with specific glomeruli in the olfactory bulb. To understand better how this connection is made and what the functional capacities of the participating cells are, we created a long-lived culture system composed of olfactory epithelium and olfactory bulb tissues. Using the roller tube method of culturing, we grew epithelium-bulb cocultures, explanted from 1-4-day-old Swiss Webster mice, on Aclar for periods ranging from 18 hr to 68 days. The explants flattened so that in some areas the culture was only a few cells thick, making individual cells distinguishable. From 107 cultures studied, we identified the following cell types by expression of specific markers (oldest culture expressing marker, days in vitro, DIV): olfactory receptor neurons (neural cell adhesion molecule, 42 DIV); mature receptor neurons (olfactory marker protein, 28 DIV); postmitotic olfactory receptor neurons and olfactory bulb neurons (beta-tubulin, 68 DIV); astrocytes (glial fibrillary acidic protein, glutamate/aspartate transporter, 68 DIV); olfactory horizontal basal cells (cytokeratin, 22 DIV). Neuronal processes formed glomeruli in 2-4-week-old cultures. We also recorded electro-olfactography responses to puffs of vapor collected over an odorant mixture containing ethyl butyrate, eugenol, (+) carvone, and (-) carvone from cultures as old as 21 DIV. These features of our olfactory culture system make this model useful for studying properties of immature and mature olfactory receptor neurons, pathfinding strategies of receptor axons, and mechanisms of information transfer in the olfactory glomerulus.

  2. Functional transformations of odor inputs in the mouse olfactory bulb.

    PubMed

    Adam, Yoav; Livneh, Yoav; Miyamichi, Kazunari; Groysman, Maya; Luo, Liqun; Mizrahi, Adi

    2014-01-01

    Sensory inputs from the nasal epithelium to the olfactory bulb (OB) are organized as a discrete map in the glomerular layer (GL). This map is then modulated by distinct types of local neurons and transmitted to higher brain areas via mitral and tufted cells. Little is known about the functional organization of the circuits downstream of glomeruli. We used in vivo two-photon calcium imaging for large scale functional mapping of distinct neuronal populations in the mouse OB, at single cell resolution. Specifically, we imaged odor responses of mitral cells (MCs), tufted cells (TCs) and glomerular interneurons (GL-INs). Mitral cells population activity was heterogeneous and only mildly correlated with the olfactory receptor neuron (ORN) inputs, supporting the view that discrete input maps undergo significant transformations at the output level of the OB. In contrast, population activity profiles of TCs were dense, and highly correlated with the odor inputs in both space and time. Glomerular interneurons were also highly correlated with the ORN inputs, but showed higher activation thresholds suggesting that these neurons are driven by strongly activated glomeruli. Temporally, upon persistent odor exposure, TCs quickly adapted. In contrast, both MCs and GL-INs showed diverse temporal response patterns, suggesting that GL-INs could contribute to the transformations MCs undergo at slow time scales. Our data suggest that sensory odor maps are transformed by TCs and MCs in different ways forming two distinct and parallel information streams.

  3. Galantamine improves olfactory learning in the Ts65Dn mouse model of Down syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Simoes de Souza, Fabio M.; Busquet, Nicolas; Blatner, Megan; Maclean, Kenneth N.; Restrepo, Diego

    2011-01-01

    Down syndrome (DS) is the most common form of congenital intellectual disability. Although DS involves multiple disturbances in various tissues, there is little doubt that in terms of quality of life cognitive impairment is the most serious facet and there is no effective treatment for this aspect of the syndrome. The Ts65Dn mouse model of DS recapitulates multiple aspects of DS including cognitive impairment. Here the Ts65Dn mouse model of DS was evaluated in an associative learning paradigm based on olfactory cues. In contrast to disomic controls, trisomic mice exhibited significant deficits in olfactory learning. Treatment of trisomic mice with the acetylcholinesterase inhibitor galantamine resulted in a significant improvement in olfactory learning. Collectively, our study indicates that olfactory learning can be a sensitive tool for evaluating deficits in associative learning in mouse models of DS and that galantamine has therapeutic potential for improving cognitive abilities. PMID:22355654

  4. Functional promiscuity in a mammalian chemosensory system: extensive expression of vomeronasal receptors in the main olfactory epithelium of mouse lemurs

    PubMed Central

    Hohenbrink, Philipp; Dempewolf, Silke; Zimmermann, Elke; Mundy, Nicholas I.; Radespiel, Ute

    2014-01-01

    The vomeronasal organ (VNO) is functional in most terrestrial mammals, though progressively reduced in the primate lineage, and is used for intraspecific communication and predator recognition. Vomeronasal receptor (VR) genes comprise two families of chemosensory genes (V1R and V2R) that have been considered to be specific for the VNO. However, recently a large number of VRs were reported to be expressed in the main olfactory epithelium (MOE) of mice, but there is little knowledge of the expression of these genes outside of rodents. To explore the function of VR genes in mammalian evolution, we analyzed and compared the expression of 64 V1R and 2 V2R genes in the VNO and the MOE of the gray mouse lemur (Microcebus murinus), the primate with the largest known VR repertoire. We furthermore compared expression patterns in adults of both sexes and seasons, and in an infant. A large proportion (83–97%) of the VR loci was expressed in the VNO of all individuals. The repertoire in the infant was as rich as in adults, indicating reliance on olfactory communication from early postnatal development onwards. In concordance with mice, we also detected extensive expression of VRs in the MOE, with proportions of expressed loci in individuals ranging from 29 to 45%. TRPC2, which encodes a channel protein crucial for signal transduction via VRs, was co-expressed in the MOE in all individuals indicating likely functionality of expressed VR genes in the MOE. In summary, the large VR repertoire in mouse lemurs seems to be highly functional. Given the differences in the neural pathways of MOE and VNO signals, which project to higher cortical brain centers or the limbic system, respectively, this raises the intriguing possibility that the evolution of MOE-expression of VRs enabled mouse lemurs to adaptively diversify the processing of VR-encoded olfactory information. PMID:25309343

  5. Molecular and neuronal homology between the olfactory systems of zebrafish and mouse

    PubMed Central

    Saraiva, Luis R.; Ahuja, Gaurav; Ivandic, Ivan; Syed, Adnan S.; Marioni, John C.; Korsching, Sigrun I.; Logan, Darren W.

    2015-01-01

    Studies of the two major olfactory organs of rodents, the olfactory mucosa (OM) and the vomeronasal organ (VNO), unraveled the molecular basis of smell in vertebrates. However, some vertebrates lack a VNO. Here we generated and analyzed the olfactory transcriptome of the zebrafish and compared it to the olfactory transcriptomes of mouse to investigate the evolutionary and molecular relationship between single and dual olfactory systems. Our analyses revealed a high degree of molecular conservation, with orthologs of mouse olfactory cell-specific markers and all but one of their chemosensory receptor classes expressed in the single zebrafish olfactory organ. Zebrafish chemosensory receptor genes are expressed across a large dynamic range and their RNA abundance correlates positively with the number of neurons expressing that RNA. Thus we estimate the relative proportions of neuronal sub-types expressing different chemosensory receptors. Receptor repertoire size drives the absolute abundance of different classes of neurons, but we find similar underlying patterns in both species. Finally, we identified novel marker genes that characterize rare neuronal populations in both mouse and zebrafish. In sum, we find that the molecular and cellular mechanisms underpinning olfaction in teleosts and mammals are similar despite 430 million years of evolutionary divergence. PMID:26108469

  6. An endocannabinoid system is present in the mouse olfactory epithelium but does not modulate olfaction.

    PubMed

    Hutch, C R; Hillard, C J; Jia, C; Hegg, C C

    2015-08-01

    Endocannabinoids modulate a diverse array of functions including progenitor cell proliferation in the central nervous system, and odorant detection and food intake in the mammalian central olfactory system and larval Xenopus laevis peripheral olfactory system. However, the presence and role of endocannabinoids in the peripheral olfactory epithelium have not been examined in mammals. We found the presence of cannabinoid type 1 (CB1) and cannabinoid type 2 (CB2) receptor protein and mRNA in the olfactory epithelium. Using either immunohistochemistry or calcium imaging we localized CB1 receptors on neurons, glia-like sustentacular cells, microvillous cells and progenitor-like basal cells. To examine the role of endocannabinoids, CB1- and CB2- receptor-deficient (CB1(-/-)/CB2(-/-)) mice were used. The endocannabinoid 2-arachidonylglycerol (2-AG) was present at high levels in both C57BL/6 wildtype and CB1(-/-)/CB2(-/-) mice. 2-AG synthetic and degradative enzymes are expressed in wildtype mice. A small but significant decrease in basal cell and olfactory sensory neuron numbers was observed in CB1(-/-)/CB2(-/-) mice compared to wildtype mice. The decrease in olfactory sensory neurons did not translate to impairment in olfactory-mediated behaviors assessed by the buried food test and habituation/dishabituation test. Collectively, these data indicate the presence of an endocannabinoid system in the mouse olfactory epithelium. However, unlike in tadpoles, endocannabinoids do not modulate olfaction. Further investigation on the role of endocannabinoids in progenitor cell function in the olfactory epithelium is warranted. PMID:26037800

  7. An endocannabinoid system is present in the mouse olfactory epithelium but does not modulate olfaction.

    PubMed

    Hutch, C R; Hillard, C J; Jia, C; Hegg, C C

    2015-08-01

    Endocannabinoids modulate a diverse array of functions including progenitor cell proliferation in the central nervous system, and odorant detection and food intake in the mammalian central olfactory system and larval Xenopus laevis peripheral olfactory system. However, the presence and role of endocannabinoids in the peripheral olfactory epithelium have not been examined in mammals. We found the presence of cannabinoid type 1 (CB1) and cannabinoid type 2 (CB2) receptor protein and mRNA in the olfactory epithelium. Using either immunohistochemistry or calcium imaging we localized CB1 receptors on neurons, glia-like sustentacular cells, microvillous cells and progenitor-like basal cells. To examine the role of endocannabinoids, CB1- and CB2- receptor-deficient (CB1(-/-)/CB2(-/-)) mice were used. The endocannabinoid 2-arachidonylglycerol (2-AG) was present at high levels in both C57BL/6 wildtype and CB1(-/-)/CB2(-/-) mice. 2-AG synthetic and degradative enzymes are expressed in wildtype mice. A small but significant decrease in basal cell and olfactory sensory neuron numbers was observed in CB1(-/-)/CB2(-/-) mice compared to wildtype mice. The decrease in olfactory sensory neurons did not translate to impairment in olfactory-mediated behaviors assessed by the buried food test and habituation/dishabituation test. Collectively, these data indicate the presence of an endocannabinoid system in the mouse olfactory epithelium. However, unlike in tadpoles, endocannabinoids do not modulate olfaction. Further investigation on the role of endocannabinoids in progenitor cell function in the olfactory epithelium is warranted.

  8. Postnatal administration of dihydrotestosterone to the male rat abolishes sexual dimorphism in the accessory olfactory bulb: a volumetric study.

    PubMed

    Valencia, A; Collado, P; Calés, J M; Segovia, S; Pérez Laso, C; Rodríguez Zafra, M; Guillamón, A

    1992-07-24

    The regulatory action of the non-aromatizable androgen dihydrotestosterone (DHT) on sexual differentiation of the volume of the rat accessory olfactory bulb (AOB) was studied. Postnatal treatment with DHT (180 micrograms/day) carried out daily between days 6 and 20 produced a drastic reduction in overall AOB size and that of its constituent neural layers in genetic males with respect to intact and control males. The volumetric measures found in DHT-treated males did not differ from those shown by the intact females. These results, which indicate a demasculinization and a feminization of the AOB volume in gonadally intact male rats induced by DHT, are discussed in relation to the presumably regulatory role of DHT on neuron populations during the sexual organizational process of the brain.

  9. Postnatal neurogenesis in the olfactory bulbs of a lizard. A tritiated thymidine autoradiographic study.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Verdugo, J M; Llahi, S; Ferrer, I; Lopez-Garcia, C

    1989-04-10

    Autoradiographically labelled cells were observed in the olfactory bulbs of perinatal, young and adult specimens of the lizard Podarcis hispanica following intraperitoneal injection of tritiated thymidine (5 muCi/g b.wt). After survival times of 7, 18 and 28 days labelled cells were found in the granular layer of both main and accessory bulbs. A few labelled cells were observed in the ependyma, mitral and glomerular layer. In the main olfactory bulb, one week of survival time resulted in labelling of cells in the innermost part of the granular layer. Longer survival times (up to 4 weeks), resulted in labelling of cells mainly in the outermost part of the granular layer. This spatio-temporal gradient was not observed in the accessory bulb. Nevertheless, longer survival times resulted in greater number of labelled cells located in the dorsal and ventral parts of the granular layer of the accessory bulb.

  10. Exposure to perfluorooctane sulfonate during pregnancy in rat and mouse. II: postnatal evaluation

    EPA Science Inventory

    The postnatal effects of in utero exposure to perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS, C8F17SO3-) were evaluated in the rat and mouse. Pregnant Sprague-Dawley rats were given 1, 2, 3, 5, or 10 mg/kg PFOS daily by gavage from gestation day (GD) 2 to GD 21; pregnant CD-1 mice were treated ...

  11. An endocannabinoid system is present in the mouse olfactory epithelium but does not modulate olfaction

    PubMed Central

    Hutch, Chelsea; Hillard, Cecilia J.; Jia, Cuihong; Hegg, Colleen C.

    2015-01-01

    Endocannabinoids modulate a diverse array of functions including progenitor cell proliferation in the central nervous system, and odorant detection and food intake in the mammalian central olfactory system and larval Xenopus laevis peripheral olfactory system. However, the presence and role of endocannabinoids in the peripheral olfactory epithelium has not been examined in mammals. We found the presence of cannabinoid type 1 (CB1) and cannabinoid type 2 (CB2) receptor protein and mRNA in the olfactory epithelium. Using either immunohistochemistry or calcium imaging we localized CB1 receptors on neurons, glia like sustentacular cells, microvillous cells and progenitor-like basal cells. To examine the role of endocannabinoids, CB1 and CB2 receptor deficient (CB1−/−/CB2−/−) mice were used. The endocannabinoid 2-arachidonylglycerol (2-AG) was present at high levels in both C57BL/6 wildtype and CB1−/−/CB2−/− mice. 2-AG synthetic and degradative enzymes are expressed in wildtype mice. A small but significant decrease in basal cell and olfactory sensory neuron numbers was observed in CB1−/−/CB2−/− mice compared to wildtype mice. The decrease in olfactory sensory neurons did not translate to impairment in olfactory-mediated behaviors assessed by the buried food test and habituation/dishabituation test. Collectively, these data indicate the presence of an endocannabinoid system in the mouse olfactory epithelium. However, unlike in tadpoles, endocannabinoids do not modulate olfaction. Further investigation on the role of endocannabinoids in progenitor cell function in the olfactory epithelium is warranted. PMID:26037800

  12. Faecal bile acids are natural ligands of the mouse accessory olfactory system.

    PubMed

    Doyle, Wayne I; Dinser, Jordan A; Cansler, Hillary L; Zhang, Xingjian; Dinh, Daniel D; Browder, Natasha S; Riddington, Ian M; Meeks, Julian P

    2016-01-01

    The accessory olfactory system (AOS) guides behaviours that are important for survival and reproduction, but understanding of AOS function is limited by a lack of identified natural ligands. Here we report that mouse faeces are a robust source of AOS chemosignals and identify bile acids as a class of natural AOS ligands. Single-unit electrophysiological recordings from accessory olfactory bulb neurons in ex vivo preparations show that AOS neurons are strongly and selectively activated by peripheral stimulation with mouse faecal extracts. Faecal extracts contain several unconjugated bile acids that cause concentration-dependent neuronal activity in the AOS. Many AOS neurons respond selectively to bile acids that are variably excreted in male and female mouse faeces, and others respond to bile acids absent in mouse faeces. These results identify faeces as a natural source of AOS information, and suggest that bile acids may be mammalian pheromones and kairomones. PMID:27324439

  13. Faecal bile acids are natural ligands of the mouse accessory olfactory system

    PubMed Central

    Doyle, Wayne I.; Dinser, Jordan A.; Cansler, Hillary L.; Zhang, Xingjian; Dinh, Daniel D.; Browder, Natasha S.; Riddington, Ian M.; Meeks, Julian P.

    2016-01-01

    The accessory olfactory system (AOS) guides behaviours that are important for survival and reproduction, but understanding of AOS function is limited by a lack of identified natural ligands. Here we report that mouse faeces are a robust source of AOS chemosignals and identify bile acids as a class of natural AOS ligands. Single-unit electrophysiological recordings from accessory olfactory bulb neurons in ex vivo preparations show that AOS neurons are strongly and selectively activated by peripheral stimulation with mouse faecal extracts. Faecal extracts contain several unconjugated bile acids that cause concentration-dependent neuronal activity in the AOS. Many AOS neurons respond selectively to bile acids that are variably excreted in male and female mouse faeces, and others respond to bile acids absent in mouse faeces. These results identify faeces as a natural source of AOS information, and suggest that bile acids may be mammalian pheromones and kairomones. PMID:27324439

  14. Comprehensive connectivity of the mouse main olfactory bulb: analysis and online digital atlas

    PubMed Central

    Hintiryan, Houri; Gou, Lin; Zingg, Brian; Yamashita, Seita; Lyden, Hannah M.; Song, Monica Y.; Grewal, Arleen K.; Zhang, Xinhai; Toga, Arthur W.; Dong, Hong-Wei

    2012-01-01

    We introduce the first open resource for mouse olfactory connectivity data produced as part of the Mouse Connectome Project (MCP) at UCLA. The MCP aims to assemble a whole-brain connectivity atlas for the C57Bl/6J mouse using a double coinjection tracing method. Each coinjection consists of one anterograde and one retrograde tracer, which affords the advantage of simultaneously identifying efferent and afferent pathways and directly identifying reciprocal connectivity of injection sites. The systematic application of double coinjections potentially reveals interaction stations between injections and allows for the study of connectivity at the network level. To facilitate use of the data, raw images are made publicly accessible through our online interactive visualization tool, the iConnectome, where users can view and annotate the high-resolution, multi-fluorescent connectivity data (www.MouseConnectome.org). Systematic double coinjections were made into different regions of the main olfactory bulb (MOB) and data from 18 MOB cases (~72 pathways; 36 efferent/36 afferent) currently are available to view in iConnectome within their corresponding atlas level and their own bright-field cytoarchitectural background. Additional MOB injections and injections of the accessory olfactory bulb (AOB), anterior olfactory nucleus (AON), and other olfactory cortical areas gradually will be made available. Analysis of connections from different regions of the MOB revealed a novel, topographically arranged MOB projection roadmap, demonstrated disparate MOB connectivity with anterior versus posterior piriform cortical area (PIR), and exposed some novel aspects of well-established cortical olfactory projections. PMID:22891053

  15. Noradrenergic Control of Odor Recognition in a Nonassociative Olfactory Learning Task in the Mouse

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Veyrac, Alexandra; Nguyen, Veronique; Marien, Marc; Didier, Anne; Jourdan, Francois

    2007-01-01

    The present study examined the influence of pharmacological modulations of the locus coeruleus noradrenergic system on odor recognition in the mouse. Mice exposed to a nonrewarded olfactory stimulation (training) were able to memorize this odor and to discriminate it from a new odor in a recall test performed 15 min later. At longer delays (30 or…

  16. Deletion of neurturin impairs development of cholinergic nerves and heart rate control in postnatal mouse hearts.

    PubMed

    Downs, Anthony M; Jalloh, Hawa B; Prater, Kayla J; Fregoso, Santiago P; Bond, Cherie E; Hampton, Thomas G; Hoover, Donald B

    2016-05-01

    The neurotrophic factor neurturin is required for normal cholinergic innervation of adult mouse heart and bradycardic responses to vagal stimulation. Our goals were to determine effects of neurturin deletion on development of cardiac chronotropic and dromotropic functions, vagal baroreflex response, and cholinergic nerve density in nodal regions of postnatal mice. Experiments were performed on postnatal C57BL/6 wild-type (WT) and neurturin knockout (KO) mice. Serial electrocardiograms were recorded noninvasively from conscious pups using an ECGenie apparatus. Mice were treated with atenolol to evaluate and block sympathetic effects on heart rate (HR) and phenylephrine (PE) to stimulate the baroreflex. Immunohistochemistry was used to label cholinergic nerves in paraffin sections. WT and KO mice showed similar age-dependent increases in HR and decreases in PR interval between postnatal days (P) 2.5 and 21. Treatment with atenolol reduced HR significantly in WT and KO pups at P7.5. PE caused a reflex bradycardia that was significantly smaller in KO pups. Cholinergic nerve density was significantly less in nodal regions of P7.5 KO mice. We conclude that cholinergic nerves have minimal influence on developmental changes in HR and PR, QRS, and QTc intervals in mouse pups. However, cholinergic nerves mediate reflex bradycardia by 1 week postnatally. Deletion of neurturin impairs cholinergic innervation of the heart and the vagal efferent component of the baroreflex early during postnatal development.

  17. [Novel calretinin-positive cells with polymorphous spines in the mouse forebrain during early postnatal ontogenesis].

    PubMed

    Revishchin, A V; Okhotin, V E; Pavlova, G V

    2009-01-01

    Using an immunocytochemical method for calretinin (CR) detection, we have earlier described (Morfologiya, 2009 v. 135. No. 3, p. 7-19) the population of previously unknown mono- and bipolar cells with polymorphous spines (PS) covering their cell bodies and processes, in adult mice forebrain structures adjacent to anterior horn of lateral ventricle. CR-positive spiny (CR+PS) cells were negative to GAD67 and were detected in the white matter and in layers V and VI of frontal area of dorsomedial cortex close to the cingulum, in in rostro-dorsal part of the caudate nucleus-putamen complex, anterior olfactory nucleus and in subependymal layer of the dorso-lateral angle of the lateral ventricle. In this work, the distribution of these cells in 7-day-old mice was studied. Comparative topographical analysis of definitive and early CR+PS cells demonstrated that in 7-day-old mice CR+PS cells were absent from the areas of their localization in adult animals - anterior olfactory nucleus, cortical plate and inner portion of neostriatum. Meanwhile, some CR+PS-like cells were detected in 7-day-old mice inside the rostral migratory route, close to neostriatum anterior boundary, along the dorsal border between neostriatum and corpus callosum, subependymal layer of lateral wall of the lateral ventricle, and in the cingulum area. These findings are indicative of the possible postnatal appearance of CR+PS cells. To test this hypothesis, the experiments were conducted in which bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) was administered to the mice on their postnatal days 2-4 with the subsequent study of the brain sections of these animals sacrificed on their postnatal day 20. Double immunolabeling of these sections for CR and BrdU has detected the presence of CR+PS cells that contained postnatally administered BrdU. These results strongly suggest that, at least, some portion of CR+PS cells have their mitosis postnatally. It may be assumed, that CR+PS cells migrate to the sites of their distribution in

  18. Tonic and stimulus-evoked nitric oxide production in the mouse olfactory bulb

    PubMed Central

    Lowe, Graeme; Buerk, Donald G.; Ma, Jie; Gelperin, Alan

    2008-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) has been long assumed to play a key role in mammalian olfaction. This was based largely on circumstantial evidence, i.e. prominent staining for nitric oxide synthase (NOS) and cyclic GMP or soluble guanylyl cyclase, an effector enzyme activated by NO, in local interneurons of the olfactory bulb. Here we employ innovative custom-fabricated NO micro-sensors to obtain the first direct, time-resolved measurements of NO signaling in the olfactory bulb. In 400 μm thick mouse olfactory bulb slices, we detected a steady average basal level of 87 nM NO in the extracellular space of mitral or granule cell layers. This NO ‘tone’ was sensitive to NOS substrate manipulation (200 μM L-arginine, 2 mM L-NAME) and Mg2+ modulation of NMDA receptor conductance. Electrical stimulation of olfactory nerve fibers evoked transient (peak at 10 s) increments in NO levels 90 – 100 nM above baseline. In the anesthetized mouse, NO micro-sensors inserted into the granule cell layer detected NO transients averaging 55 nM in amplitude and peaking at 3.4 sec after onset of a 5 sec odorant stimulation. These findings suggest dual roles for NO signaling in the olfactory bulb – tonic inhibitory control of principal neurons, and regulation of circuit dynamics during odor information processing. PMID:18407420

  19. Dog and mouse: toward a balanced view of the mammalian olfactory system

    PubMed Central

    Barrios, Arthur W.; Sánchez-Quinteiro, Pablo; Salazar, Ignacio

    2014-01-01

    Although the most intensively studied mammalian olfactory system is that of the mouse, in which olfactory chemical cues of one kind or another are detected in four different nasal areas [the main olfactory epithelium (MOE), the septal organ (SO), Grüneberg's ganglion, and the sensory epithelium of the vomeronasal organ (VNO)], the extraordinarily sensitive olfactory system of the dog is also an important model that is increasingly used, for example in genomic studies of species evolution. Here we describe the topography and extent of the main olfactory and vomeronasal sensory epithelia of the dog, and we report finding no structures equivalent to the Grüneberg ganglion and SO of the mouse. Since we examined adults, newborns, and fetuses we conclude that these latter structures are absent in dogs, possibly as the result of regression or involution. The absence of a vomeronasal component based on VR2 receptors suggests that the VNO may be undergoing a similar involutionary process. PMID:25309347

  20. Specification of a Foxj1-dependent lineage in the forebrain is required for embryonic-to-postnatal transition of neurogenesis in the olfactory bulb.

    PubMed

    Jacquet, Benoit V; Muthusamy, Nagendran; Sommerville, Laura J; Xiao, Guanxi; Liang, Huixuan; Zhang, Yong; Holtzman, Michael J; Ghashghaei, H Troy

    2011-06-22

    Establishment of a neural stem cell niche in the postnatal subependymal zone (SEZ) and the rostral migratory stream (RMS) is required for postnatal and adult neurogenesis in the olfactory bulbs (OB). We report the discovery of a cellular lineage in the SEZ-RMS-OB continuum, the specification of which is dependent on the expression of the forkhead transcription factor Foxj1 in mice. Spatially and temporally restricted Foxj1+ neuronal progenitors emerge during embryonic periods, surge during perinatal development, and are active only for the first few postnatal weeks. We show that the development of the unique Foxj1-derived lineage is dependent on Foxj1 expression and is required for overall postnatal neurogenesis in the OB. Strikingly, the production of neurons from Foxj1+ progenitors significantly declines after the early postnatal weeks, but Foxj1-derived neurons in the OB persist during adult periods. For the first time, our study identifies the time- and region-specific activity of a perinatal progenitor domain that is required for transition and progression of OB neurogenesis from the embryonic-to-postnatal periods.

  1. Specification of a Foxj1-dependent lineage in the forebrain is required for embryonic-to-postnatal transition of neurogenesis in the olfactory bulb

    PubMed Central

    Jacquet, Benoit V.; Muthusamy, Nagendran; Sommerville, Laura J.; Xiao, Guanxi; Liang, Huixuan; Zhang, Yong; Holtzman, Michael; Ghashghaei, H. Troy

    2011-01-01

    Establishment of a neural stem cell niche in the postnatal subependymal zone (SEZ) and the rostral migratory stream (RMS) is required for postnatal and adult neurogenesis in the olfactory bulbs (OB). We report the discovery of a cellular lineage in the SEZ-RMS-OB continuum, the specification of which is dependent on the expression of the forkhead transcription factor Foxj1 in mice. Spatially- and temporally- restricted Foxj1+ neuronal progenitors emerge during embryonic periods, surge during perinatal development, and are active only for the first few postnatal weeks. We show that the development of the unique Foxj1-derived lineage is dependent on Foxj1 expression, and is required for overall postnatal neurogenesis in the OB. Strikingly, the production of neurons from Foxj1+ progenitors significantly declines after the early postnatal weeks, but Foxj1-derived neurons in the OB persist during adult periods. Our study for the first time identifies the time-and region-specific activity of a perinatal progenitor domain that is required for transition and progression of OB neurogenesis from the embryonic-to-postnatal periods. PMID:21697387

  2. Maternal Forced Swimming Reduces Cell Proliferation in the Postnatal Dentate Gyrus of Mouse Offspring

    PubMed Central

    Wasinski, Frederick; Estrela, Gabriel R.; Arakaki, Aline M.; Bader, Michael; Alenina, Natalia; Klempin, Friederike; Araújo, Ronaldo C.

    2016-01-01

    Physical exercise positively affects the metabolism and induces proliferation of precursor cells in the adult brain. Maternal exercise likewise provokes adaptations early in the offspring. Using a high-intensity swimming protocol that comprises forced swim training before and during pregnancy, we determined the effect of maternal swimming on the mouse offspring's neurogenesis. Our data demonstrate decreased proliferation in sublayers of the postnatal dentate gyrus in offspring of swimming mother at postnatal day (P) 8 accompanied with decreased survival of newly generated cells 4 weeks later. The reduction in cell numbers was predominantly seen in the hilus and molecular layer. At P35, the reduced amount of cells was also reflected by a decrease in the population of newly generated immature and mature neurons of the granule cell layer. Our data suggest that forced maternal swimming at high-intensity has a negative effect on the neurogenic niche development in postnatal offspring.

  3. Maternal Forced Swimming Reduces Cell Proliferation in the Postnatal Dentate Gyrus of Mouse Offspring

    PubMed Central

    Wasinski, Frederick; Estrela, Gabriel R.; Arakaki, Aline M.; Bader, Michael; Alenina, Natalia; Klempin, Friederike; Araújo, Ronaldo C.

    2016-01-01

    Physical exercise positively affects the metabolism and induces proliferation of precursor cells in the adult brain. Maternal exercise likewise provokes adaptations early in the offspring. Using a high-intensity swimming protocol that comprises forced swim training before and during pregnancy, we determined the effect of maternal swimming on the mouse offspring's neurogenesis. Our data demonstrate decreased proliferation in sublayers of the postnatal dentate gyrus in offspring of swimming mother at postnatal day (P) 8 accompanied with decreased survival of newly generated cells 4 weeks later. The reduction in cell numbers was predominantly seen in the hilus and molecular layer. At P35, the reduced amount of cells was also reflected by a decrease in the population of newly generated immature and mature neurons of the granule cell layer. Our data suggest that forced maternal swimming at high-intensity has a negative effect on the neurogenic niche development in postnatal offspring. PMID:27621701

  4. Maternal Forced Swimming Reduces Cell Proliferation in the Postnatal Dentate Gyrus of Mouse Offspring.

    PubMed

    Wasinski, Frederick; Estrela, Gabriel R; Arakaki, Aline M; Bader, Michael; Alenina, Natalia; Klempin, Friederike; Araújo, Ronaldo C

    2016-01-01

    Physical exercise positively affects the metabolism and induces proliferation of precursor cells in the adult brain. Maternal exercise likewise provokes adaptations early in the offspring. Using a high-intensity swimming protocol that comprises forced swim training before and during pregnancy, we determined the effect of maternal swimming on the mouse offspring's neurogenesis. Our data demonstrate decreased proliferation in sublayers of the postnatal dentate gyrus in offspring of swimming mother at postnatal day (P) 8 accompanied with decreased survival of newly generated cells 4 weeks later. The reduction in cell numbers was predominantly seen in the hilus and molecular layer. At P35, the reduced amount of cells was also reflected by a decrease in the population of newly generated immature and mature neurons of the granule cell layer. Our data suggest that forced maternal swimming at high-intensity has a negative effect on the neurogenic niche development in postnatal offspring. PMID:27621701

  5. New calretinin-positive cells with polymorphous spines in the mouse forebrain during early postnatal ontogeny.

    PubMed

    Revishchin, A V; Okhotin, V E; Pavlova, G V

    2010-10-01

    Immunohistochemical studies of calretinin (CR) in forebrain structures adjacent to the anterior horn of the lateral ventricle in adult mice allowed us to detect a population of previously unknown mono- and bipolar cells whose bodies and processes were coated with polymorphous spines (PS) (Morfologiya, 135, No. 3, 7-19 (2009)). CR-positive spiny (CR(+)PS) cells did not contain GAD67 and were located in the white matter and layers V-VI of the frontal area of the dorsomedial cortex close to the cingulum, the rostrodorsal part of the caudate-putamen, the anterior olfactory nucleus, and the subependyma of the dorsolateral angle of the lateral ventricle. We report here studies of the distribution of these cells in seven-day-old mice. Comparative topographic analysis of definitive and early CR(+)PS cells showed that in seven-day-old mice, CR(+)PS cells were absent from the sites at which they were seen in adults, i.e., the anterior olfactory cortex, the cortical plate, and the inner part of the neostriatum. In addition, small numbers of CR(+)PS-like cells were seen at this age within the dorsal migration pathway, at the anterior margin of the neostriatum, along the dorsal border of the neostriatum with the corpus callosum, in the subependymal layer of the lateral wall of the lateral ventricle, and in the cingulum area. These data demonstrate that CR(+)PS cells may have a postnatal origin. Experiments to verify this hypothesis were performed using postnatal administration of bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) to mice aged 2-4 days, followed by assessment of brain sections fixed at age 20 days. Double immunolabeling of sections for CR and BrdU demonstrated the presence of CR(+)PS cells containing postnatally supplied BrdU. These data provide evidence that at least some CR(+)PS cells undergo mitosis at postnatal age. In all probability, during the period from 7 to 20 days of postnatal development, CR(+)PS cells migrate to the sites that they occupy in adult animals. PMID:20721693

  6. Quantitative assessment of angiogenesis, perfused blood vessels and endothelial tip cells in the postnatal mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Wälchli, Thomas; Mateos, José María; Weinman, Oliver; Babic, Daniela; Regli, Luca; Hoerstrup, Simon P; Gerhardt, Holger; Schwab, Martin E; Vogel, Johannes

    2015-01-01

    During development and in various diseases of the CNS, new blood vessel formation starts with endothelial tip cell selection and vascular sprout migration, followed by the establishment of functional, perfused blood vessels. Here we describe a method that allows the assessment of these distinct angiogenic steps together with antibody-based protein detection in the postnatal mouse brain. Intravascular and perivascular markers such as Evans blue (EB), isolectin B4 (IB4) or laminin (LN) are used alongside simultaneous immunofluorescence on the same sections. By using confocal laser-scanning microscopy and stereological methods for analysis, detailed quantification of the 3D postnatal brain vasculature for perfused and nonperfused vessels (e.g., vascular volume fraction, vessel length and number, number of branch points and perfusion status of the newly formed vessels) and characterization of sprouting activity (e.g., endothelial tip cell density, filopodia number) can be obtained. The entire protocol, from mouse perfusion to vessel analysis, takes ∼10 d.

  7. Characterization of piRNAs across postnatal development in mouse brain

    PubMed Central

    Ghosheh, Yanal; Seridi, Loqmane; Ryu, Taewoo; Takahashi, Hazuki; Orlando, Valerio; Carninci, Piero; Ravasi, Timothy

    2016-01-01

    PIWI-interacting RNAs (piRNAs) are responsible for maintaining the genome stability by silencing retrotransposons in germline tissues– where piRNAs were first discovered and thought to be restricted. Recently, novel functions were reported for piRNAs in germline and somatic cells. Using deep sequencing of small RNAs and CAGE of postnatal development of mouse brain, we identified piRNAs only in adult mouse brain. These piRNAs have similar sequence length as those of MILI-bound piRNAs. In addition, we predicted novel candidate regulators and putative targets of adult brain piRNAs. PMID:27112104

  8. Live imaging and analysis of postnatal mouse retinal development

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The explanted, developing rodent retina provides an efficient and accessible preparation for use in gene transfer and pharmacological experimentation. Many of the features of normal development are retained in the explanted retina, including retinal progenitor cell proliferation, heterochronic cell production, interkinetic nuclear migration, and connectivity. To date, live imaging in the developing retina has been reported in non-mammalian and mammalian whole-mount samples. An integrated approach to rodent retinal culture/transfection, live imaging, cell tracking, and analysis in structurally intact explants greatly improves our ability to assess the kinetics of cell production. Results In this report, we describe the assembly and maintenance of an in vitro, CO2-independent, live mouse retinal preparation that is accessible by both upright and inverted, 2-photon or confocal microscopes. The optics of this preparation permit high-quality and multi-channel imaging of retinal cells expressing fluorescent reporters for up to 48h. Tracking of interkinetic nuclear migration within individual cells, and changes in retinal progenitor cell morphology are described. Follow-up, hierarchical cluster screening revealed that several different dependent variable measures can be used to identify and group movement kinetics in experimental and control samples. Conclusions Collectively, these methods provide a robust approach to assay multiple features of rodent retinal development using live imaging. PMID:23758927

  9. Transcriptomes of mouse olfactory epithelium reveal sexual differences in odorant detection.

    PubMed

    Shiao, Meng-Shin; Chang, Andrew Ying-Fei; Liao, Ben-Yang; Ching, Yung-Hao; Lu, Mei-Yeh Jade; Chen, Stella Maris; Li, Wen-Hsiung

    2012-01-01

    To sense numerous odorants and chemicals, animals have evolved a large number of olfactory receptor genes (Olfrs) in their genome. In particular, the house mouse has ~1,100 genes in the Olfr gene family. This makes the mouse a good model organism to study Olfr genes and olfaction-related genes. To date, whether male and female mice possess the same ability in detecting environmental odorants is still unknown. Using the next generation sequencing technology (paired-end mRNA-seq), we detected 1,088 expressed Olfr genes in both male and female olfactory epithelium. We found that not only Olfr genes but also odorant-binding protein (Obp) genes have evolved rapidly in the mouse lineage. Interestingly, Olfr genes tend to express at a higher level in males than in females, whereas the Obp genes clustered on the X chromosome show the opposite trend. These observations may imply a more efficient odorant-transporting system in females, whereas a more active Olfr gene expressing system in males. In addition, we detected the expression of two genes encoding major urinary proteins, which have been proposed to bind and transport pheromones or act as pheromones in mouse urine. This observation suggests a role of main olfactory system (MOS) in pheromone detection, contrary to the view that only accessory olfactory system (AOS) is involved in pheromone detection. This study suggests the sexual differences in detecting environmental odorants in MOS and demonstrates that mRNA-seq provides a powerful tool for detecting genes with low expression levels and with high sequence similarities.

  10. Developmental Profile, Morphology, and Synaptic Connectivity of Cajal-Retzius Cells in the Postnatal Mouse Hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Anstötz, Max; Huang, Hao; Marchionni, Ivan; Haumann, Iris; Maccaferri, Gianmaria; Lübke, Joachim H R

    2016-02-01

    Cajal-Retzius (CR) cells are early generated neurons, involved in the assembly of developing neocortical and hippocampal circuits. However, their roles in networks of the postnatal brain remain poorly understood. In order to get insights into these latter functions, we have studied their morphological and synaptic properties in the postnatal hippocampus of the CXCR4-EGFP mouse, where CR cells are easily identifiable. Our data indicate that CR cells are nonuniformly distributed along different subfields of the hippocampal formation, and that their postnatal decline is regulated in a region-specific manner. In fact, CR cells persist in distinct areas of fully mature animals. Subclasses of CR cells project and target either local (molecular layers) or distant regions [subicular complex and entorhinal cortex (EC)] of the hippocampal formation, but have similar firing patterns. Lastly, CR cells are biased toward targeting dendritic shafts compared with spines, and produce large-amplitude glutamatergic unitary postsynaptic potentials on γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) containing interneurons. Taken together, our results suggest that CR cells are involved in a novel excitatory loop of the postnatal hippocampal formation, which potentially contributes to shaping the flow of information between the hippocampus, parahippocampal regions and entorhinal cortex, and to the low seizure threshold of these brain areas.

  11. Postnatal developmental changes in the responses of mouse primary vestibular neurons to externally applied galvanic currents.

    PubMed

    Desmadryl, G

    1991-12-17

    The ontogenesis of vestibular primary neuron sensitivity to depolarisation produced by galvanic current stimulations was studied in mouse inner ear explants maintained in vitro. Cathodal galvanic stimulations, which elicit an increase of the discharge frequencies, are assumed to act on the spike initiation site by depolarizing the neuron. The responses of neurons to galvanic currents at various developmental stages were recorded. The pattern of responses reflected the sensitivities of the neurons to depolarization. At birth, about 75% of the vestibular neurons responded weakly to high intensity galvanic currents thus indicating that they were able to generate action potentials. However, the very low gain of the response to the stimulation revealed the immaturity of the neurons at the spike generation site. Between the day of birth and the ninth postnatal day, an increase in the gain of the responses was observed, indicating the enhancement of the sensitivity of the vestibular neurons to the galvanic currents. This increase in sensitivity was more pronounced from the fourth postnatal day. The response of the neurons to galvanic stimulation increased gradually during postnatal development without reaching a plateau at postnatal day 9 indicating that a further physiological maturation occurs after this stage. These results are consistent with the morphological maturation of the vestibular primary afferents and with previous studies showing that the physiological maturation parallels myelination of the afferent fibers.

  12. Encoding and representation of intranasal CO2 in the mouse olfactory cortex.

    PubMed

    Carlson, Kaitlin S; Xia, Christina Z; Wesson, Daniel W

    2013-08-21

    Intranasal trigeminal sensory input, often perceived as a burning, tingling, or stinging sensation, is well known to affect odor perception. While both anatomical and functional imaging data suggest that the influence of trigeminal stimuli on odor information processing may occur within the olfactory cortex, direct electrophysiological evidence for the encoding of trigeminal information at this level of processing is unavailable. Here, in agreement with human functional imaging studies, we found that 26% of neurons in the mouse piriform cortex (PCX) display modulation in firing to carbon dioxide (CO2), an odorless stimulant with known trigeminal capacity. Interestingly, CO2 was represented within the PCX by distinct temporal dynamics, differing from those evoked by odor. Experiments with ascending concentrations of isopentyl acetate, an odorant known to elicit both olfactory and trigeminal sensations, resulted in morphing of the temporal dynamics of stimulus-evoked responses. Whereas low concentrations of odorant evoked responses upon stimulus onset, high concentrations of odorant and/or CO2 often evoked responses structured to stimulus offset. These physiological experiments in mice suggest that PCX neurons possess the capacity to encode for stimulus modality (olfactory vs trigeminal) by differential patterns of firing. These data provide mechanistic insights into the influences of trigeminal information on odor processing and place constraints on models of olfactory-trigeminal sensory integration. PMID:23966706

  13. [Autoradiographic investigations on postnatal proliferative activity of the telencephalic and diencephalic matrix-zones in the axolotl (Ambystoma mexicanum), with special references to the olfactory organ (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Richter, W; Kranz, D

    1981-01-01

    The localization and proliferative activity of the matrix-zones has been investigated in the telencephalon and in the diencephalon of 21 axolotls (Ambystoma mexicanum) by means of autoradiographs, after injection of tritiated thymidine at different stages of the postnatal life. There are no previous detailed autoradiographical reports on postnatal brain development in the axolotl. Matrix-zones (i.e. ventricular and subventricular zone) exist in the dorsal part and in the ventral part of the telencephalon, we have found these also in the diencephalon in the wall of the preoptic recessus and ventrally of the habenula. The quantitative part of this study indicates high values of the labeling-index in the early postnatal stages. Then, the labeling-index decreases, but also in 3 years old specimens labeled cells were observed in the matrix-zones of the telencephalon; therefore a few of proliferative capacity remains in the central nervous system of adult axolotls. Labeled cells were also found in the olfactory organ of early postnatal and adult axolotls; these are neuroblasts which have relevance for the regeneration of the forebrain.

  14. Developmental changes and regional localization of Dspp, Mepe, Mimecan and Versican in postnatal developing mouse teeth.

    PubMed

    Hou, C; Liu, Z X; Tang, K L; Wang, M G; Sun, J; Wang, J; Li, S

    2012-02-01

    It has been implicated noncollagenous proteins act as important regulators during odontogenesis. To test the hypothesis that the roles of Dspp, Mepe, Versican and Mimecan in the regulation of odontogenesis may be complementary, comparative investigations on the localization of four proteins were performed by immunohistochemical staining using mouse first molar at different developmental stages as a model. In postnatal 1- day-old mice, all the proteins, excluding Mepe, showed co-expression in young odontoblasts. At postnatal 3, strong immunoreactions for all proteins were detected in odontoblasts. Interestingly, Mepe was present within both cytoplasm and nucleus in odontoblasts. In mice older than 5 days, the expression of Dspp, Mimecan and Versican accumulated in subodontoblastic layer of the coronal pulp at high levels while the co-expression of Mepe and Mimecan significantly existed in predentin. The temporal-spatial specific pattern and unique co-localization of Dspp, Mepe, Mimecan and Versican suggest they play complementary roles during odontogenesis.

  15. Transient expression of neuropeptide W in postnatal mouse hypothalamus--a putative regulator of energy homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Motoike, T; Skach, A G; Godwin, J K; Sinton, C M; Yamazaki, M; Abe, M; Natsume, R; Sakimura, K; Yanagisawa, M

    2015-08-20

    Neuropeptide B and W (NPB and NPW) are cognate peptide ligands for NPBWR1 (GPR7), a G protein-coupled receptor. In rodents, they have been implicated in the regulation of energy homeostasis, neuroendocrine/autonomic responses, and social interactions. Although localization of these peptides and their receptors in adult rodent brain has been well documented, their expression in mouse brain during development is unknown. Here we demonstrate the transient expression of NPW mRNA in the dorsomedial hypothalamus (DMH) of postnatal mouse brain and its co-localization with neuropeptide Y (NPY) mRNA. Neurons expressing both NPW and NPY mRNAs begin to emerge in the DMH at about postnatal day 0 (P-0) through P-3. Their expression is highest around P-14, declines after P-21, and by P-28 only a faint expression of NPW and NPY mRNA remains. In P-18 brains, we detected NPW neurons in the region spanning the subincertal nucleus (SubI), the lateral hypothalamic (LH) perifornical (PF) areas, and the DMH, where the highest expression of NPW mRNA was observed. The majority of these postnatal hypothalamic NPW neurons co-express NPY mRNA. A cross of NPW-iCre knock-in mice with a Cre-dependent tdTomato reporter line revealed that more than half of the reporter-positive neurons in the adult DMH, which mature from the transiently NPW-expressing neurons, are sensitive to peripherally administrated leptin. These data suggest that the DMH neurons that transiently co-express NPW and NPY in the peri-weaning period might play a role in regulating energy homeostasis during postnatal development.

  16. Cannabinoid receptor signaling induces proliferation but not neurogenesis in the mouse olfactory epithelium.

    PubMed

    Hutch, Chelsea R; Hegg, Colleen C

    2016-01-01

    The olfactory epithelium actively generates neurons through adulthood, and this neurogenesis is tightly regulated by multiple factors that are not fully defined. Here, we examined the role of cannabinoids in the regulation of neurogenesis in the mouse olfactory epithelium. In vivo proliferation and cell lineage studies were performed in mice (C57BL/6 and cannabinoid type 1 and 2 receptor deficient strains) treated with cannabinoids directly (WIN 55,212-2 or 2-arachidonylglycerol ether) or indirectly via inhibition of cannabinoid hydrolytic enzymes. Cannabinoids increased proliferation in neonatal and adult mice, and had no effect on proliferation in cannabinoid type 1 and 2 receptor deficient adult mice. Pretreatment with the cannabinoid type1 receptor antagonist AM251 decreased cannabinoid-induced proliferation in adult mice. Despite a cannabinoid-induced increase in proliferation, there was no change in newly generated neurons or non-neuronal cells 16 d post-treatment. However, cannabinoid administration increased apoptotic cell death at 72 hours post-treatment and by 16 d the level of apoptosis dropped to control levels. Thus, cannabinoids induce proliferation, but do not induce neurogenesis nor non-neuronal cell generation. Cannabinoid receptor signaling may regulate the balance of progenitor cell survival and proliferation in adult mouse olfactory epithelium. PMID:27606334

  17. Adolescent mouse takes on an active transcriptomic expression during postnatal cerebral development.

    PubMed

    Xu, Wei; Xin, Chengqi; Lin, Qiang; Ding, Feng; Gong, Wei; Zhou, Yuanyuan; Yu, Jun; Cui, Peng; Hu, Songnian

    2014-06-01

    Postnatal cerebral development is a complicated biological process precisely controlled by multiple genes. To understand the molecular mechanism of cerebral development, we compared dynamics of mouse cerebrum transcriptome through three developmental stages using high-throughput RNA-seq technique. Three libraries were generated from the mouse cerebrum at infancy, adolescence and adulthood, respectively. Consequently, 44,557,729 (infancy), 59,257,530 (adolescence) and 72,729,636 (adulthood) reads were produced, which were assembled into 15,344, 16,048 and 15,775 genes, respectively. We found that the overall gene expression level increased from infancy to adolescence and decreased later on upon reaching adulthood. The adolescence cerebrum has the most active gene expression, with expression of a large number of regulatory genes up-regulated and some crucial pathways activated. Transcription factor (TF) analysis suggested the similar dynamics as expression profiling, especially those TFs functioning in neurogenesis differentiation, oligodendrocyte lineage determination and circadian rhythm regulation. Moreover, our data revealed a drastic increase in myelin basic protein (MBP)-coding gene expression in adolescence and adulthood, suggesting that the brain myelin may be generated since mouse adolescence. In addition, differential gene expression analysis indicated the activation of rhythmic pathway, suggesting the function of rhythmic movement since adolescence; Furthermore, during infancy and adolescence periods, gene expression related to axonrepulsion and attraction showed the opposite trends, indicating that axon repulsion was activated after birth, while axon attraction might be activated at the embryonic stage and declined during the postnatal development. Our results from the present study may shed light on the molecular mechanism underlying the postnatal development of the mammalian cerebrum.

  18. Olfactory classical conditioning in neonatal mouse pups using thermal stimuli.

    PubMed

    Bollen, Bieke; Matrot, Boris; Ramanantsoa, Nelina; Van den Bergh, Omer; D'Hooge, Rudi; Gallego, Jorge

    2012-04-01

    Mouse models are increasingly used to investigate genetic contributions to developmental disorders in children, especially newborns. In particular, early cognitive assessment in newborn mice is critical to evaluate pediatric drug efficacy and toxicity. Unfortunately, methods for behavioral tests in newborn mice are scarce. Therefore, developing such tests for newborn mice is a priority challenge for neurogenetics and pharmacological research. The aim of the present study was to develop a conditioning method well suited to high-throughput cognitive screening in newborn mice. To this end, we developed an odor-preference conditioning test using ambient temperature as an unconditioned stimulus (US) and artificial odors as conditioned stimuli (CS). First, we showed that mouse pups move toward the thermoneutral temperature when offered a choice between a thermoneutral and cold environment, thus showing thermotaxis. Second, we conducted a classical conditioning paradigm in pups aged six to ten days. In terms of central nervous system development, this period corresponds to extreme prematurity to early post-term period in humans. During acquisition, the pups were alternatively exposed to odor CS paired with either cold or warm temperatures. Immediately after acquisition, the pups underwent a two-odor choice test, which showed preference for the odor previously paired with the warm temperature, thus showing conditioning. The proposed paradigm is easy to conduct, and requires modest experimenter interference. The method is well suited for high-throughput screening of early associative disorders in newborn mice.

  19. Postnatal brain and skull growth in an Apert syndrome mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Hill, Cheryl A.; Martínez-Abadías, Neus; Motch, Susan M.; Austin, Jordan R.; Wang, Yingli; Jabs, Ethylin Wang; Richtsmeier, Joan T.; Aldridge, Kristina

    2012-01-01

    Craniofacial and neural tissues develop in concert throughout pre- and postnatal growth. FGFR-related craniosynostosis syndromes, such as Apert syndrome (AS), are associated with specific phenotypes involving both the skull and the brain. We analyzed the effects of the FGFR P253R mutation for Apert syndrome using the Fgfr2+/P253R mouse to evaluate the effects of this mutation on these two tissues over the course of development from day of birth (P0) to postnatal day 2 (P2). Three-dimensional magnetic resonance microscopy and computed tomography images were acquired from Fgfr2+/P253R mice and unaffected littermates at P0 (N=28) and P2 (N=23). 3D coordinate data for 23 skull and 15 brain landmarks were statistically compared between groups. Results demonstrate that the Fgfr2+/P253R mice show reduced growth in the facial skeleton and the cerebrum, while the height and width of the neurocranium and caudal regions of the brain show increased growth relative to unaffected littermates. This localized correspondence of differential growth patterns in skull and brain point to their continued interaction through development and suggest that both tissues display divergent postnatal growth patterns relative to unaffected littermates. However, the change in the skull-brain relationship from P0 to P2 implies that each tissue affected by the mutation retains a degree of independence, rather than one tissue directing the development of the other. PMID:23495236

  20. The β2-adrenergic receptor as a surrogate odorant receptor in mouse olfactory sensory neurons

    PubMed Central

    Omura, Masayo; Grosmaitre, Xavier; Ma, Minghong; Mombaerts, Peter

    2015-01-01

    In the mouse, mature olfactory sensory neurons (OSNs) express one allele of one of the ~1200 odorant receptor (OR) genes, which encode G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs). Axons of OSNs that express the same OR coalesce into homogeneous glomeruli at conserved positions in the olfactory bulb. ORs are involved in OR gene choice and OSN axonal wiring, but the mechanisms remain poorly understood. One approach is to substitute an OR genetically with another GPCR, and to determine in which aspects this GPCR can serve as a surrogate OR under experimental conditions. Here, we characterize a novel gene-targeted mouse strain in which the mouse β2-adrenergic receptor (β2AR) is coexpressed with tauGFP in OSNs that choose the OR locus M71 for expression (β2AR→M71-GFP). By crossing these mice with β2AR→M71-lacZ gene-targeted mice, we find that differentially tagged β2AR→M71 alleles are expressed monoallelically. The OR coding sequence is thus not required for monoallelic expression — the expression of one of the two alleles of a given OR gene in an OSN. We detect strong β2AR immunoreactivity in dendritic cilia of β2AR→M71-GFP OSNs. These OSNs respond to the β2AR agonist isoproterenol in a dose-dependent manner. Axons of β2AR→M71-GFP OSNs coalesce into homogeneous glomeruli, and β2AR immunoreactivity is detectable within these glomeruli. We do not find evidence for expression of endogenous β2AR in OSNs of wild-type mice, also not in M71-expressing OSNs, and we do not observe overt differences in the olfactory system of β2AR and β1AR knockout mice. Our findings corroborate the experimental value of the β2AR as a surrogate OR, including for the study of the mechanisms of monoallelic expression. PMID:24211702

  1. Differential expression of axon-sorting molecules in mouse olfactory sensory neurons.

    PubMed

    Ihara, Naoki; Nakashima, Ai; Hoshina, Naosuke; Ikegaya, Yuji; Takeuchi, Haruki

    2016-08-01

    In the mouse olfactory system, the axons of olfactory sensory neurons that express the same type of odorant receptor (OR) converge to a specific set of glomeruli in the olfactory bulb (OB). It is widely accepted that expressed OR molecules instruct glomerular segregation by regulating the expression of axon-sorting molecules. Although the relationship between the expression of axon-sorting molecules and OR types has been analyzed in detail, those between the expressions of axon-sorting molecules remain to be elucidated. Here we collected the expression profiles of four axon-sorting molecules from a large number of glomeruli in the OB. These molecules demonstrated position-independent mosaic expressions, but their patterns were not identical in the OB. Comparing their expressions identified positive and negative correlations between several pairs of genes even though they showed various expressions. Furthermore, the principal component analysis revealed that the factor loadings in the principal component 1, which explain the largest amount of variation, were most likely to reflect the degree of the cyclic nucleotide-gated (CNG) channel dependence on the expression of axon-sorting molecules. Thus, neural activity generated through the CNG channel is a major component in the generation of a wide variety of expressions of axon-sorting molecules in glomerular segregation.

  2. Exposure to perfluorooctane sulfonate during pregnancy in rat and mouse. II: postnatal evaluation.

    PubMed

    Lau, Christopher; Thibodeaux, Julie R; Hanson, Roger G; Rogers, John M; Grey, Brian E; Stanton, Mark E; Butenhoff, John L; Stevenson, Lisa A

    2003-08-01

    The postnatal effects of in utero exposure to perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS, C8F17SO3-) were evaluated in the rat and mouse. Pregnant Sprague-Dawley rats were given 1, 2, 3, 5, or 10 mg/kg PFOS daily by gavage from gestation day (GD) 2 to GD 21; pregnant CD-1 mice were treated with 1, 5, 10, 15, and 20 mg/kg PFOS from GD 1 to GD 18. Controls received 0.5% Tween-20 vehicle (1 ml/kg for rats and 10 ml/kg for mice). At parturition, newborns were observed for clinical signs and survival. All animals were born alive and initially appeared to be active. In the highest dosage groups (10 mg/kg for rat and 20 mg/kg for mouse), the neonates became pale, inactive, and moribund within 30-60 min, and all died soon afterward. In the 5 mg/kg (rat) and 15 mg/kg (mouse) dosage groups, the neonates also became moribund but survived for a longer period of time (8-12 h). Over 95% of these animals died within 24 h. Approximately 50% of offspring died at 3 mg/kg for rat and 10 mg/kg for mouse. Cross-fostering the PFOS-exposed rat neonates (5 mg/kg) to control nursing dams failed to improve survival. Serum concentrations of PFOS in newborn rats mirrored the maternal administered dosage and were similar to those in the maternal circulation at GD 21; PFOS levels in the surviving neonates declined in the ensuing days. Small but significant and persistent growth lags were detected in surviving rat and mouse pups exposed to PFOS prenatally, and slight delays in eye opening were noted. Significant increases in liver weight were observed in the PFOS-exposed mouse pups. Serum thyroxine levels were suppressed in the PFOS-treated rat pups, although triiodothyronine and thyroid-stimulating hormone [TSH] levels were not altered. Choline acetyltransferase activity (an enzyme that is sensitive to thyroid status) in the prefrontal cortex of rat pups exposed to PFOS prenatally was slightly reduced, but activity in the hippocampus was not affected. Development of learning, determined by T-maze delayed

  3. Prolactin administration during early postnatal life decreases hippocampal and olfactory bulb neurogenesis and results in depressive-like behavior in adulthood.

    PubMed

    Lajud, Naima; Gonzalez-Zapien, Rubén; Roque, Angélica; Tinajero, Eréndira; Valdez, Juan José; Clapp, Carmen; Torner, Luz

    2013-11-01

    Tight regulation of hormone and neurochemical milieu during developmental periods is critical for adequate physiological functions. For instance, activation of peptide systems during early life stress induces morphological changes in the brain resulting in depression and anxiety disorders. Prolactin (PRL) exerts different actions within the brain; it regulates neurogenesis and modulates neuroendocrine functions in the adult. However, PRL effects during early postnatal life are hardly known. Therefore, we examined whether neonatal administration of PRL influences cell survival in the hippocampal dentate gyrus (DG) and in the olfactory bulb (OB) and whether such influence results in behavioral consequences in adulthood. PRL-treated rat pups (13 mg/kg; PND1 to PND14), injected with BrdU at postnatal day 5 (PND5), showed a decrease in the density of DG BrdU/DCX and BrdU/NeuN-positive cells that survive at PND15. Similarly, PRL treatment decreased the density of BrdU+ cells in the OB compared with VEH. Fluorojade B analysis showed no significant changes in the amount of cell death in the DG between the groups. Postnatal PRL administration induced a passive coping strategy in the forced swimming test in male and female adult rats when compared with control and vehicle groups. Corticosterone endogenous levels at PND12 were not affected by PRL or VEH treatment. Altogether, these results suggest that opposed to its effects in the adult, postnatal PRL treatment affects neurogenesis and results in psychopathology later in life. High PRL levels, as observed in neonates under several pathological states, might contribute to detrimental effects on the developing brain.

  4. Olfactory delayed matching to sample performance in mice: sex differences in the 5XFAD mouse model of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Roddick, Kyle M; Schellinck, Heather M; Brown, Richard E

    2014-08-15

    While olfactory delayed matching-to-sample tasks have been used to assess working memory in rats, no such tasks have been tested in mice. Olfactory delayed matching-to-sample learning was assessed in male and female 5XFAD mice, a model of Alzheimer's disease, and their wildtype (B6SJL F1) littermates at 6-7 months of age using an operant olfactometer. All 5XFAD and wildtype mice were able to learn the delayed olfactory matching-to-sample task at 2 and 5s delays. Fewer mice learned with a 10s delay and only one mouse learned with a 30s delay. Female mice showed higher levels of performance on the delayed matching-to-sample task than males, indicative of better working memory. These results demonstrate for the first time that mice are able to learn an olfactory delayed matching to sample task.

  5. Postnatal growth restriction and gene expression changes in a mouse model of fetal alcohol syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kaminen-Ahola, Nina; Ahola, Arttu; Flatscher-Bader, Traute; Wilkins, Sarah J; Anderson, Greg J; Whitelaw, Emma; Chong, Suyinn

    2010-10-01

    Growth restriction, craniofacial dysmorphology, and central nervous system defects are the main diagnostic features of fetal alcohol syndrome. Studies in humans and mice have reported that the growth restriction can be prenatal or postnatal, but the underlying mechanisms remain unknown.We recently described a mouse model of moderate gestational ethanol exposure that produces measurable phenotypes in line with fetal alcohol syndrome (e.g., craniofacial changes and growth restriction in adolescent mice). In this study, we characterize in detail the growth restriction phenotype by measuring body weight at gestational day 16.5, cross-fostering from birth to weaning, and by extending our observations into adulthood. Furthermore, in an attempt to unravel the molecular events contributing to the growth phenotype, we have compared gene expression patterns in the liver and kidney of nonfostered, ethanol-exposed and control mice at postnatal day 28.We find that the ethanol-induced growth phenotype is not detectable prior to birth, but is present at weaning, even in mice that have been cross-fostered to unexposed dams. This finding suggests a postnatal growth restriction phenotype that is not due to deficient postpartum care by dams that drank ethanol, but rather a physiologic result of ethanol exposure in utero. We also find that, despite some catch-up growth after 5 weeks of age, the effect extends into adulthood, which is consistent with longitudinal studies in humans.Genome-wide gene expression analysis revealed interesting ethanol-induced changes in the liver, including genes involved in the metabolism of exogenous and endogenous compounds, iron homeostasis, and lipid metabolism.

  6. Mapping of Learned Odor-Induced Motivated Behaviors in the Mouse Olfactory Tubercle.

    PubMed

    Murata, Koshi; Kanno, Michiko; Ieki, Nao; Mori, Kensaku; Yamaguchi, Masahiro

    2015-07-22

    An odor induces food-seeking behaviors when humans and animals learned to associate the odor with food, whereas the same odor elicits aversive behaviors following odor-danger association learning. It is poorly understood how central olfactory circuits transform the learned odor cue information into appropriate motivated behaviors. The olfactory tubercle (OT) is an intriguing area of the olfactory cortex in that it contains medium spiny neurons as principal neurons and constitutes a part of the ventral striatum. The OT is therefore a candidate area for participation in odor-induced motivated behaviors. Here we mapped c-Fos activation of medium spiny neurons in different domains of the mouse OT following exposure to learned odor cues. Mice were trained to associate odor cues to a sugar reward or foot shock punishment to induce odor-guided approach behaviors or aversive behaviors. Regardless of odorant types, the anteromedial domain of the OT was activated by learned odor cues that induced approach behaviors, whereas the lateral domain was activated by learned odor cues that induced aversive behaviors. In each domain, a larger number of dopamine receptor D1 type neurons were activated than D2 type neurons. These results indicate that specific domains of the OT represent odor-induced distinct motivated behaviors rather than odor stimuli, and raise the possibility that neuronal type-specific activation in individual domains of the OT plays crucial roles in mediating the appropriate learned odor-induced motivated behaviors. Significance statement: Although animals learn to associate odor cues with various motivated behaviors, the underlying circuit mechanisms are poorly understood. The olfactory tubercle (OT), a subarea of the olfactory cortex, also constitutes the ventral striatum. Here, we trained mice to associate odors with either reward or punishment and mapped odor-induced c-Fos activation in the OT. Regardless of odorant types, the anteromedial domain was

  7. Mapping of Learned Odor-Induced Motivated Behaviors in the Mouse Olfactory Tubercle.

    PubMed

    Murata, Koshi; Kanno, Michiko; Ieki, Nao; Mori, Kensaku; Yamaguchi, Masahiro

    2015-07-22

    An odor induces food-seeking behaviors when humans and animals learned to associate the odor with food, whereas the same odor elicits aversive behaviors following odor-danger association learning. It is poorly understood how central olfactory circuits transform the learned odor cue information into appropriate motivated behaviors. The olfactory tubercle (OT) is an intriguing area of the olfactory cortex in that it contains medium spiny neurons as principal neurons and constitutes a part of the ventral striatum. The OT is therefore a candidate area for participation in odor-induced motivated behaviors. Here we mapped c-Fos activation of medium spiny neurons in different domains of the mouse OT following exposure to learned odor cues. Mice were trained to associate odor cues to a sugar reward or foot shock punishment to induce odor-guided approach behaviors or aversive behaviors. Regardless of odorant types, the anteromedial domain of the OT was activated by learned odor cues that induced approach behaviors, whereas the lateral domain was activated by learned odor cues that induced aversive behaviors. In each domain, a larger number of dopamine receptor D1 type neurons were activated than D2 type neurons. These results indicate that specific domains of the OT represent odor-induced distinct motivated behaviors rather than odor stimuli, and raise the possibility that neuronal type-specific activation in individual domains of the OT plays crucial roles in mediating the appropriate learned odor-induced motivated behaviors. Significance statement: Although animals learn to associate odor cues with various motivated behaviors, the underlying circuit mechanisms are poorly understood. The olfactory tubercle (OT), a subarea of the olfactory cortex, also constitutes the ventral striatum. Here, we trained mice to associate odors with either reward or punishment and mapped odor-induced c-Fos activation in the OT. Regardless of odorant types, the anteromedial domain was

  8. Transplantation of Neuro2a Cells into the Developing Postnatal Mouse Eye

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Eun-Shil; Jeong, Se-Jin; Kim, Yeoun-Hee; Jeon, Chang-Jin

    2015-01-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the influence of the host retinal microenvironment on cell migration and differentiation using Neuro2a (N2a) cells transduced with green fluorescent protein. N2a cells were transplanted into the vitreous cavities of developing mouse eyes (C57BL/6) on postnatal days 1, 5, and 10 (P1, 5, and 10). To analyze the effects of the host microenvironment on neural differentiation of N2a cells in vitro, cells were treated with a conditioned medium (CM) collected from retinal cells cultured at each developmental stage. We observed that numerous cells transplanted into P5 mice eyes migrated into all layers of the host retina, and the presence of processes indicated morphological differentiation. Some transplanted N2a cells expressed several neural markers. However, cells transplanted into the P1 and 10 mice eyes only proliferated within the vitreous cavity. Neurite length increased in N2a cells treated with CM collected from the cultured retinal cells from P5 and 10 mice, while western blotting revealed that the levels of proteins related to neural differentiation were not significantly altered in N2a cells treated with CM. We show that the migration and differentiation capacities of transplanted cells were differentially influenced by the microenvironment of the retinal postnatal ontogeny. PMID:26855453

  9. Phosphorylated SAP155, the spliceosomal component, is localized to chromatin in postnatal mouse testes

    SciTech Connect

    Eto, Ko; Sonoda, Yoshiyuki; Jin, Yuji; Abe, Shin-ichi

    2010-03-19

    SAP155 is an essential component of the spliceosome and its phosphorylation is required for splicing catalysis, but little is known concerning its expression and regulation during spermatogenesis in postnatal mouse testes. We report that SAP155 is ubiquitously expressed in nuclei of germ and Sertoli cells within the seminiferous tubules of 6- and 35-day postpartum (dpp) testes. Analyses by fractionation of testes revealed that (1) phosphorylated SAP155 was found in the fraction containing nuclear structures at 6 dpp in amounts much larger than that at other ages; (2) non-phosphorylated SAP155 was detected in the fraction containing nucleoplasm; and (3) phosphorylated SAP155 was preferentially associated with chromatin. Our findings suggest that the active spliceosome, containing phosphorylated SAP155, performs pre-mRNA splicing on chromatin concomitant with transcription during testicular development.

  10. Serine/threonine-protein phosphatase 1 α levels are paralleling olfactory memory formation in the CD1 mouse.

    PubMed

    Winding, Christiana; Sun, Yanwei; Höger, Harald; Bubna-Littitz, Hermann; Pollak, Arnold; Schmidt, Peter; Lubec, Gert

    2011-06-01

    Although olfactory discrimination has already been studied in several mouse strains, data on protein levels linked to olfactory memory are limited. Wild mouse strains Mus musculus musculus, Mus musculus domesticus and CD1 laboratory outbred mice were tested in a conditioned odor preference task and trained to discriminate between two odors, Rose and Lemon, by pairing one odor with a sugar reward. Six hours following the final test, mice were sacrificed and olfactory bulbs (OB) were taken for gel-based proteomics analyses and immunoblotting. OB proteins were extracted, separated by 2-DE and quantified using specific software (Proteomweaver). Odor-trained mice showed a preference for the previously rewarded odor suggesting that conditioned odor preference occurred. In CD1 mice levels, one out of 482 protein spots was significantly increased in odor-trained mice as compared with the control group; it was in-gel digested by trypsin and chymotrypsin and analyzed by tandem mass spectrometry (nano-ESI-LC-MS/MS). The spot was unambiguously identified as serine/threonine-protein phosphatase PP1-α catalytic subunit (PP-1A) and differential levels observed in gel-based proteomic studies were verified by immunoblotting. PP-1A is a key signalling element in synaptic plasticity and memory processes and is herein shown to be paralleling olfactory discrimination representing olfactory memory.

  11. Reduced nasal transport of insulin-like growth factor-1 to the mouse cerebrum with olfactory bulb resection.

    PubMed

    Shiga, Hideaki; Nagaoka, Mikiya; Washiyama, Kohshin; Yamamoto, Junpei; Yamada, Kentaro; Noda, Takuya; Harita, Masayuki; Amano, Ryohei; Miwa, Takaki

    2014-09-01

    Although the olfactory nerve is involved in nasal transport of insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) to the brain, to our knowledge there have been no direct assessments of the effects of olfactory nerve damage on this transport. To determine whether olfactory bulb resection resulted in reduced transport of nasally administered human recombinant IGF-1 (hIGF-1) to the cerebrum, we measured the uptake of nasally administered iodine-125 hIGF-1 ((125)I-hIGF-1) in the cerebrum as a percentage of that in the blood in male ICR mice subjected to left olfactory bulb resection (model mice) and in sham-operated male ICR mice (control mice). Phosphorylated extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) 1/2 (Thr202/Tyr204)/(Thr185/Tyr187) as a percentage of total ERK 1/2 in the left cerebrum was also assessed by using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay after nasal administration of hIGF-1. Uptake of nasally administered (125)I-hIGF-1 in the cerebrum as a percentage of that in the blood was significantly lower in the model group than in the control group 30min after nasal administration of hIGF-1. Unilateral olfactory bulb resection prevented nasally administered hIGF-1 from increasing the phosphorylation of ERK 1/2 in the mouse cerebrum in vivo. These findings suggest that olfactory bulb damage reduces nasal transport of hIGF-1 to the brain in vivo.

  12. Olfactory regulation of the sexual behavior and reproductive physiology of the laboratory mouse: effects and neural mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Kelliher, Kevin R; Wersinger, Scott R

    2009-01-01

    In many species, chemical compounds emitted by conspecifics exert profound effects on reproductive physiology and sexual behavior. This is particularly true in the mouse, where such cues advance and delay puberty, suppress and facilitate estrous cycles, and cause the early termination of pregnancy. They also facilitate sexual behavior and inform mate selection. The mouse has a rich and complex repertoire of social behaviors. The technologies of molecular genetics are well developed in the mouse. Gene expression can be experimentally manipulated in the mouse relatively easily and in a time- and tissue-specific manner. Thus, the mouse is an excellent model in which to investigate the genetic, neural, and hormonal bases by which chemical compounds released by other mice affect physiology and behavior. These chemical cues are detected and processed by the olfactory system and other specialized but less well characterized sensory organs. The sensory information reaches brain regions that regulate hormone levels as well as those that are involved in behavior and alters the function of these brain regions. The effects of these chemical compounds have important implications for the laboratory animal facility as well as for researchers. We begin with an overview of the basic structure and function of the olfactory system and of the connections among brain regions that receive olfactory stimuli. We discuss the effects of chemosensory cues on the behavior and physiology of the organism along with what is known about the neural and hormonal mechanisms underlying these effects. We also describe some of the implications for the laboratory animal facility.

  13. Effects of Low-Dose Drinking Water Arsenic on Mouse Fetal and Postnatal Growth and Development

    PubMed Central

    Kozul-Horvath, Courtney D.; Zandbergen, Fokko; Jackson, Brian P.; Enelow, Richard I.; Hamilton, Joshua W.

    2012-01-01

    Background Arsenic (As) exposure is a significant worldwide environmental health concern. Chronic exposure via contaminated drinking water has been associated with an increased incidence of a number of diseases, including reproductive and developmental effects. The goal of this study was to identify adverse outcomes in a mouse model of early life exposure to low-dose drinking water As (10 ppb, current U.S. EPA Maximum Contaminant Level). Methodology and Findings C57B6/J pups were exposed to 10 ppb As, via the dam in her drinking water, either in utero and/or during the postnatal period. Birth outcomes, the growth of the F1 offspring, and health of the dams were assessed by a variety of measurements. Birth outcomes including litter weight, number of pups, and gestational length were unaffected. However, exposure during the in utero and postnatal period resulted in significant growth deficits in the offspring after birth, which was principally a result of decreased nutrients in the dam's breast milk. Cross-fostering of the pups reversed the growth deficit. Arsenic exposed dams displayed altered liver and breast milk triglyceride levels and serum profiles during pregnancy and lactation. The growth deficits in the F1 offspring resolved following separation from the dam and cessation of exposure in male mice, but did not resolve in female mice up to six weeks of age. Conclusions/Significance Exposure to As at the current U.S. drinking water standard during critical windows of development induces a number of adverse health outcomes for both the dam and offspring. Such effects may contribute to the increased disease risks observed in human populations. PMID:22693606

  14. Dynamics of the mouse brain cortical synaptic proteome during postnatal brain development

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez-Lozano, Miguel A.; Klemmer, Patricia; Gebuis, Titia; Hassan, Chopie; van Nierop, Pim; van Kesteren, Ronald E.; Smit, August B.; Li, Ka Wan

    2016-01-01

    Development of the brain involves the formation and maturation of numerous synapses. This process requires prominent changes of the synaptic proteome and potentially involves thousands of different proteins at every synapse. To date the proteome analysis of synapse development has been studied sparsely. Here, we analyzed the cortical synaptic membrane proteome of juvenile postnatal days 9 (P9), P15, P21, P27, adolescent (P35) and different adult ages P70, P140 and P280 of C57Bl6/J mice. Using a quantitative proteomics workflow we quantified 1560 proteins of which 696 showed statistically significant differences over time. Synaptic proteins generally showed increased levels during maturation, whereas proteins involved in protein synthesis generally decreased in abundance. In several cases, proteins from a single functional molecular entity, e.g., subunits of the NMDA receptor, showed differences in their temporal regulation, which may reflect specific synaptic development features of connectivity, strength and plasticity. SNARE proteins, Snap 29/47 and Stx 7/8/12, showed higher expression in immature animals. Finally, we evaluated the function of Cxadr that showed high expression levels at P9 and a fast decline in expression during neuronal development. Knock down of the expression of Cxadr in cultured primary mouse neurons revealed a significant decrease in synapse density. PMID:27748445

  15. Cell death atlas of the postnatal mouse ventral forebrain and hypothalamus: effects of age and sex.

    PubMed

    Ahern, Todd H; Krug, Stefanie; Carr, Audrey V; Murray, Elaine K; Fitzpatrick, Emmett; Bengston, Lynn; McCutcheon, Jill; De Vries, Geert J; Forger, Nancy G

    2013-08-01

    Naturally occurring cell death is essential to the development of the mammalian nervous system. Although the importance of developmental cell death has been appreciated for decades, there is no comprehensive account of cell death across brain areas in the mouse. Moreover, several regional sex differences in cell death have been described for the ventral forebrain and hypothalamus, but it is not known how widespread the phenomenon is. We used immunohistochemical detection of activated caspase-3 to identify dying cells in the brains of male and female mice from postnatal day (P) 1 to P11. Cell death density, total number of dying cells, and regional volume were determined in 16 regions of the hypothalamus and ventral forebrain (the anterior hypothalamus, arcuate nucleus, anteroventral periventricular nucleus, medial preoptic nucleus, paraventricular nucleus, suprachiasmatic nucleus, and ventromedial nucleus of the hypothalamus; the basolateral, central, and medial amygdala; the lateral and principal nuclei of the bed nuclei of the stria terminalis; the caudate-putamen; the globus pallidus; the lateral septum; and the islands of Calleja). All regions showed a significant effect of age on cell death. The timing of peak cell death varied between P1 to P7, and the average rate of cell death varied tenfold among regions. Several significant sex differences in cell death and/or regional volume were detected. These data address large gaps in the developmental literature and suggest interesting region-specific differences in the prevalence and timing of cell death in the hypothalamus and ventral forebrain.

  16. Maternal stress affects postnatal growth and the pituitary expression of prolactin in mouse offspring.

    PubMed

    Gao, Pengfei; Ishige, Atsushi; Murakami, Yu; Nakata, Hideyuki; Oka, Jun-Ichiro; Munakata, Kaori; Yamamoto, Masahiro; Nishimura, Ko; Watanabe, Kenji

    2011-03-01

    Maternal stress exerts long-lasting psychiatric and somatic on offspring, which persist into adulthood. However, the effect of maternal stress on the postnatal growth of pups has not been widely reported. In this study, we found that maternal immobilization stress (IS) during lactation resulted in low body weight of male mouse offspring, which persisted after weaning. Despite free access to chow, IS induced maternal malnutrition and decreased the serum insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) levels in the mothers and in the pups. mRNA expression analysis of anterior pituitary hormones in the pups revealed that growth hormone (GH) and prolactin (PRL), but no other hormones, were decreased by IS. Expression of the pituitary transcription factor PIT1 and isoforms of PITX2, which are essential for the development and function of GH-producing somatotropes and PRL-producing lactotropes, was decreased, whereas that of PROP1, which is critical for the earlier stages of pituitary development, was unchanged. Immunohistochemistry also showed a decrease in pituitary PRL protein expression. These results suggest that stress in a postpartum mother has persistent effects on the body weight of the offspring. Reduced PRL expression in the offspring's pituitary gland may play a role in these effects.

  17. Prenatal and Postnatal Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon Exposure, Airway Hyperreactivity, and Beta-2 Adrenergic Receptor Function in Sensitized Mouse Offspring

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hanjie; Maher, Christina; McDonald, Jacob D.; Zhang, Xiang; Ho, Shuk-Mei; Yan, Beizhan; Chillrud, Steven; Perera, Frederica; Factor, Phillip; Miller, Rachel L.

    2013-01-01

    Despite data associating exposure to traffic-related polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) in asthma, mechanistic support has been limited. We hypothesized that both prenatal and early postnatal exposure to PAH would increase airway hyperreactivity (AHR) and that the resulting AHR may be insensitive to treatment with a β2AR agonist drug, procaterol. Further, we hypothesized that these exposures would be associated with altered β2AR gene expression and DNA methylation in mouse lungs. Mice were exposed prenatally or postnatally to a nebulized PAH mixture versus negative control aerosol 5 days a week. Double knockout β2AR mice were exposed postnatally only. Prenatal exposure to PAH was associated with reduced β2AR gene expression among nonsensitized mice offspring, but not increases in DNA methylation or AHR. Postnatal exposure to PAH was borderline associated with increased AHR among sensitized wildtype, but not knockout mice. In the first study that delivers PAH aerosols to mice in a relatively physiological manner, small effects on AHR and β2AR gene expression, but not β2AR agonist drug activity, were observed. If confirmed, the results may suggest that exposure to PAH, common ambient urban pollutants, affects β2AR function, although the impact on the efficacy of β2AR agonist drugs used in treating asthma remains uncertain. PMID:24454363

  18. Tympanic border cells are Wnt-responsive and can act as progenitors for postnatal mouse cochlear cells

    PubMed Central

    Jan, Taha Adnan; Chai, Renjie; Sayyid, Zahra Nabi; van Amerongen, Renée; Xia, Anping; Wang, Tian; Sinkkonen, Saku Tapani; Zeng, Yi Arial; Levin, Jared Ruben; Heller, Stefan; Nusse, Roel; Cheng, Alan Gi-Lun

    2013-01-01

    Permanent hearing loss is caused by the irreversible damage of cochlear sensory hair cells and nonsensory supporting cells. In the postnatal cochlea, the sensory epithelium is terminally differentiated, whereas tympanic border cells (TBCs) beneath the sensory epithelium are proliferative. The functions of TBCs are poorly characterized. Using an Axin2lacZ Wnt reporter mouse, we found transient but robust Wnt signaling and proliferation in TBCs during the first 3 postnatal weeks, when the number of TBCs decreases. In vivo lineage tracing shows that a subset of hair cells and supporting cells is derived postnatally from Axin2-expressing TBCs. In cochlear explants, Wnt agonists stimulated the proliferation of TBCs, whereas Wnt inhibitors suppressed it. In addition, purified Axin2lacZ cells were clonogenic and self-renewing in culture in a Wnt-dependent manner, and were able to differentiate into hair cell-like and supporting cell-like cells. Taken together, our data indicate that Axin2-positive TBCs are Wnt responsive and can act as precursors to sensory epithelial cells in the postnatal cochlea. PMID:23444352

  19. Chronic maternal morphine alters calbindin D-28k expression pattern in postnatal mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Mithbaokar, Pratibha; Fiorito, Filomena; Della Morte, Rossella; Maharajan, Veeramani; Costagliola, Anna

    2016-01-01

    The distribution pattern of calbindin (CB)-D28k-expressing neurons results to be altered in several brain regions of chronic morphine exposed adult mice. In this study, the influence of chronic maternal exposure to morphine on the distribution pattern of CB-D28k-expressing neurons in the brain of mouse offspring was investigated. Females of CD-1 mice were daily administered with saline or morphine for 7 days before mating, during the whole gestation period, and until 21 day post-partum. Their offspring were sacrificed on postnatal day 18, and the brains were examined by histology using cresyl violet and by immunohistochemistry using a rabbit polyclonal anti-CB-D28k antibody. Histology revealed no significant differences in the distribution pattern and the number of neurons between the offspring forebrain of the control group of mice and the two groups of mice treated with different doses of morphine. However, immunohistochemical analysis revealed that the number of CB-D28k-immunoreactive neurons remarkably decreased in the cingulate cortex, in the layers II-IV of the parietal cortex and in all regions of the hippocampus, while it increased in the layers V-VI of the parietal cortex and in the subicular region of the offspring brain of morphine treated mice. Overall, our findings demonstrate that maternal exposure to morphine alters the pattern of CB-D28k-expressing neuron pattern in specific regions of murine developing brain, in a layer- and dose-dependent way, thus suggesting that these alterations might represent a mechanism by which morphine modifies the functional aspects of developing brain.

  20. Gonadotropin treatment augments postnatal oogenesis and primordial follicle assembly in adult mouse ovaries?

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Follicle stimulating hormone (FSH) exerts action on both germline and somatic compartment in both ovary and testis although FSH receptors (FSHR) are localized only on the somatic cells namely granulosa cells of growing follicles and Sertoli cells in the seminiferous tubules. High levels of FSH in females are associated with poor ovarian reserve, ovarian hyper stimulation syndrome etc. and at the same time FSH acts as a survival factor during in vitro organotypic culture of ovarian cortical strips. Thus a further understanding of FSH action on the ovary is essential. We have earlier reported presence of pluripotent very small embryonic-like stem cells (VSELs express Oct-4A in addition to other pluripotent markers) and their immediate descendants ‘progenitors’ ovarian germ stem cells (OGSCs express Oct-4B in addition to other germ cell markers) in ovarian surface epithelium (OSE) in various mammalian species including mice, rabbit, monkey, sheep and human. Present study was undertaken to investigate the effect of pregnant mare serum gonadotropin (PMSG) on adult mice ovaries with a focus on VSELs, OGSCs, postnatal oogenesis and primordial follicle assembly. Methods Ovaries were collected from adult mice during different stages of estrus cycle and after 2 and 7 days of PMSG (5 IU) treatment to study histo-architecture and expression for FSHR, pluripotent stem cells , meiosis and germ cell specific markers. Results PMSG treatment resulted in increased FSHR and proliferation as indicated by increased FSHR and PCNA immunostaining in OSE and oocytes of primordial follicles (PF) besides the granulosa cells of large antral follicles. Small 1–2 regions of multilayered OSE invariably associated with a cohort of PF during estrus stage in control ovary were increased to 5–8 regions after PMSG treatment. This was associated with an increase in pluripotent transcripts (Oct-4A, Nanog), meiosis (Scp-3) and germ cells (Oct-4B, Mvh) specific markers. MVH showed

  1. Changes in the Chondrocyte and Extracellular Matrix Proteome during Post-natal Mouse Cartilage Development*

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Richard; Norris, Emma L.; Brachvogel, Bent; Angelucci, Constanza; Zivkovic, Snezana; Gordon, Lavinia; Bernardo, Bianca C.; Stermann, Jacek; Sekiguchi, Kiyotoshi; Gorman, Jeffrey J.; Bateman, John F.

    2012-01-01

    Skeletal growth by endochondral ossification involves tightly coordinated chondrocyte differentiation that creates reserve, proliferating, prehypertrophic, and hypertrophic cartilage zones in the growth plate. Many human skeletal disorders result from mutations in cartilage extracellular matrix (ECM) components that compromise both ECM architecture and chondrocyte function. Understanding normal cartilage development, composition, and structure is therefore vital to unravel these disease mechanisms. To study this intricate process in vivo by proteomics, we analyzed mouse femoral head cartilage at developmental stages enriched in either immature chondrocytes or maturing/hypertrophic chondrocytes (post-natal days 3 and 21, respectively). Using LTQ-Orbitrap tandem mass spectrometry, we identified 703 cartilage proteins. Differentially abundant proteins (q < 0.01) included prototypic markers for both early and late chondrocyte differentiation (epiphycan and collagen X, respectively) and novel ECM and cell adhesion proteins with no previously described roles in cartilage development (tenascin X, vitrin, Urb, emilin-1, and the sushi repeat-containing proteins SRPX and SRPX2). Meta-analysis of cartilage development in vivo and an in vitro chondrocyte culture model (Wilson, R., Diseberg, A. F., Gordon, L., Zivkovic, S., Tatarczuch, L., Mackie, E. J., Gorman, J. J., and Bateman, J. F. (2010) Comprehensive profiling of cartilage extracellular matrix formation and maturation using sequential extraction and label-free quantitative proteomics. Mol. Cell. Proteomics 9, 1296–1313) identified components involved in both systems, such as Urb, and components with specific roles in vivo, including vitrin and CILP-2 (cartilage intermediate layer protein-2). Immunolocalization of Urb, vitrin, and CILP-2 indicated specific roles at different maturation stages. In addition to ECM-related changes, we provide the first biochemical evidence of changing endoplasmic reticulum function during

  2. Potential role of transient receptor potential channel M5 in sensing putative pheromones in mouse olfactory sensory neurons.

    PubMed

    Oshimoto, Arisa; Wakabayashi, Yoshihiro; Garske, Anna; Lopez, Roberto; Rolen, Shane; Flowers, Michael; Arevalo, Nicole; Restrepo, Diego

    2013-01-01

    Based on pharmacological studies of chemosensory transduction in transient receptor potential channel M5 (TRPM5) knockout mice it was hypothesized that this channel is involved in transduction for a subset of putative pheromones in mouse olfactory sensory neurons (OSNs). Yet, in the same study an electroolfactogram (EOG) in the mouse olfactory epithelium showed no significant difference in the responses to pheromones (and odors) between wild type and TRPM5 knockout mice. Here we show that the number of OSNs expressing TRPM5 is increased by unilateral naris occlusion. Importantly, EOG experiments show that mice lacking TRPM5 show a decreased response in the occluded epithelia to putative pheromones as opposed to wild type mice that show no change upon unilateral naris occlusion. This evidence indicates that under decreased olfactory sensory input TRPM5 plays a role in mediating putative pheromone transduction. Furthermore, we demonstrate that cyclic nucleotide gated channel A2 knockout (CNGA2-KO) mice that show substantially decreased or absent responses to odors and pheromones also have elevated levels of TRPM5 compared to wild type mice. Taken together, our evidence suggests that TRPM5 plays a role in mediating transduction for putative pheromones under conditions of reduced chemosensory input.

  3. Postnatal genome editing partially restores dystrophin expression in a mouse model of muscular dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Long, Chengzu; Amoasii, Leonela; Mireault, Alex A.; McAnally, John R.; Li, Hui; Sanchez-Ortiz, Efrain; Bhattacharyya, Samadrita; Shelton, John M.; Bassel-Duby, Rhonda; Olson, Eric N.

    2016-01-01

    CRISPR/Cas9-mediated genome editing holds clinical potential for treating genetic diseases, such as Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), which is caused by mutations in the dystrophin gene. To correct DMD by skipping mutant dystrophin exons in postnatal muscle tissue in vivo, we used adeno-associated virus–9 (AAV9) to deliver gene-editing components to postnatal mdx mice, a model of DMD. Different modes of AAV9 delivery were systematically tested, including intraperitoneal at postnatal day 1 (P1), intramuscular at P12, and retro-orbital at P18. Each of these methods restored dystrophin protein expression in cardiac and skeletal muscle to varying degrees, and expression increased from 3 to 12 weeks after injection. Postnatal gene editing also enhanced skeletal muscle function, as measured by grip strength tests 4 weeks after injection. This method provides a potential means of correcting mutations responsible for DMD and other monogenic disorders after birth. PMID:26721683

  4. Olfactory Perceptual Learning Requires Action of Noradrenaline in the Olfactory Bulb: Comparison with Olfactory Associative Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vinera, Jennifer; Kermen, Florence; Sacquet, Joëlle; Didier, Anne; Mandairon, Nathalie; Richard, Marion

    2015-01-01

    Noradrenaline contributes to olfactory-guided behaviors but its role in olfactory learning during adulthood is poorly documented. We investigated its implication in olfactory associative and perceptual learning using local infusion of mixed a1-ß adrenergic receptor antagonist (labetalol) in the adult mouse olfactory bulb. We reported that…

  5. Calcium store-mediated signaling in sustentacular cells of the mouse olfactory epithelium.

    PubMed

    Hegg, Colleen Cosgrove; Irwin, Mavis; Lucero, Mary T

    2009-04-15

    Sustentacular cells have structural features that allude to functions of secretion, absorption, phagocytosis, maintenance of extracellular ionic gradients, metabolism of noxious chemicals, and regulation of cell turnover. We present data detailing their dynamic activity. We show, using a mouse olfactory epithelium slice model, that sustentacular cells are capable of generating two types of calcium signals: intercellular calcium waves where elevations in intracellular calcium propagate between neighboring cells, and intracellular calcium oscillations consisting of repetitive elevations in intracellular calcium confined to single cells. Sustentacular cells exhibited rapid, robust increases in intracellular calcium in response to G-protein coupled muscarinic and purinergic receptor stimulation. In a subpopulation of sustentacular cells, oscillatory calcium transients were evoked. We pharmacologically characterized the properties of purinergic-evoked increases in intracellular calcium. Calcium transients were elicited by release from intracellular stores and were not dependent on extracellular calcium. BAPTA-AM, a cytosolic calcium chelator, and cyclopiazonic acid, an endoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+)-ATPase inhibitor irreversibly blocked the purinergic-induced calcium transient. Phospholipase C antagonist U73122 inhibited the purinergic-evoked calcium transient. 2-Aminoethoxydiphenyl borate, an inositol-1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP(3)) receptor antagonist, and the ryanodine receptor (RyR) antagonists tetracaine and ryanodine, inhibited the UTP-induced calcium transients. Collectively, these data suggest that activation of the phospholipase C pathway, IP(3)-mediated calcium release, and subsequent calcium-induced-calcium release is involved in ATP-elicited increases in intracellular calcium. Our findings indicate that sustentacular cells are not static support cells, and, like glia in the central nervous system, have complex calcium signaling.

  6. AhR signaling activation disrupts migration and dendritic growth of olfactory interneurons in the developing mouse

    PubMed Central

    Kimura, Eiki; Ding, Yunjie; Tohyama, Chiharu

    2016-01-01

    Perinatal exposure to a low level of dioxin, a ubiquitous environmental pollutant, has been shown to induce abnormalities in learning and memory, emotion, and sociality in laboratory animals later in adulthood. However, how aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) signaling activation disrupts the higher brain function remains unclear. Therefore, we studied the possible effects of excessive activation of AhR signaling on neurodevelopmental processes, such as cellular migration and neurite growth, in mice. To this end, we transfected a constitutively active-AhR plasmid into stem cells in the lateral ventricle by in vivo electroporation on postnatal day 1. Transfection was found to induce tangential migration delay and morphological abnormalities in neuronal precursors in the rostral migratory stream at 6 days post-electroporation (dpe) as well as disrupt radial migration in the olfactory bulb and apical and basal dendritic growth of the olfactory interneurons in the granule cell layer at 13 and 20 dpe. These results suggest that the retarded development of interneurons by the excessive AhR signaling may at least in part explain the dioxin-induced abnormal behavioral alterations previously reported in laboratory animals. PMID:27197834

  7. A combined approach identifies a limited number of new thyroid hormone target genes in post-natal mouse cerebellum.

    PubMed

    Quignodon, Laure; Grijota-Martinez, Carmen; Compe, Emmanuel; Guyot, Romain; Allioli, Nathalie; Laperrière, David; Walker, Robert; Meltzer, Paul; Mader, Sylvie; Samarut, Jacques; Flamant, Frédéric

    2007-07-01

    Thyroid hormones act directly on gene transcription in the post-natal developing cerebellum, controlling neuronal, and glial cell differentiation. We have combined three experimental approaches to identify the target genes that are underlying this phenomenon: 1) a microarray analysis of gene expression to identify hormone responsive genes in the cerebellum of Pax8-/- mice, a transgenic mouse model of congenital hypothyroidism; 2) a similar microarray analysis on primary culture of cerebellum neurons; and 3) a bioinformatics screen of conserved putative-binding sites in the mouse genome. This identifies surprisingly a small set of target genes, which, for some of them, might be key regulators of cerebellum development and neuronal differentiation. PMID:17601882

  8. CD90 and CD105 expression in the mouse ovary and testis at different stages of postnatal development.

    PubMed

    Tepekoy, Filiz; Ozturk, Saffet; Sozen, Berna; Ozay, Recep S; Akkoyunlu, Gokhan; Demir, Necdet

    2015-12-01

    CD90 (i.e., THY1) and CD105 (i.e., endoglin) are glycoproteins known as mesenchymal stem cell markers that are expressed in various cell types including male and female gonadal cells. We aimed to determine ovarian and testicular expression of CD90 and CD105 in various cell types during postnatal development in mice. The present study was carried out on male (C57BL/6) and female (Balb/C) mice during critical stages of gonadal development. Immunohistochemical localization of CD90 and CD105 was determined in the ovaries obtained at postnatal days (PND) -1, -7, -21 and -60 and in the testes obtained at PND6, -8, -16, -20, -29, -32 and -88. The relative expression of CD90 and CD105 was evaluated by ImageJ software and data were analyzed by analysis of variance. The relative expression of CD90 and CD105 varied during postnatal development and increased significantly in the adult ovary (PND60) and testis (PND88) compared to the early postnatal gonads. In the ovaries, the expression of CD90 was significantly higher in somatic cells in comparison to germ cell compartments. In the testis, CD90 expression was greater in germ cells and Sertoli cells compared to other cell types. Expression of CD105 was higher in germ cells than somatic cells of both the ovary and testis. In addition to different expression of CD90 and CD105 during various developmental stages, also their altered expression in particular cell types suggests specific roles of these glycoproteins in physiological processes of mouse gonads.

  9. Hierarchical deconstruction of mouse olfactory sensory neurons: from whole mucosa to single-cell RNA-seq

    PubMed Central

    Saraiva, Luis R.; Ibarra-Soria, Ximena; Khan, Mona; Omura, Masayo; Scialdone, Antonio; Mombaerts, Peter; Marioni, John C.; Logan, Darren W.

    2015-01-01

    The mouse olfactory mucosa is a complex chemosensory tissue composed of multiple cell types, neuronal and non-neuronal. We have here applied RNA-seq hierarchically, in three steps of decreasing cellular heterogeneity: starting with crude tissue samples dissected from the nose, proceeding to flow-cytometrically sorted pools of mature olfactory sensory neurons (OSNs), and finally arriving at single mature OSNs. We show that 98.9% of intact olfactory receptor (OR) genes are expressed in mature OSNs. We uncover a hitherto unknown bipartition among mature OSNs. We find that 19 of 21 single mature OSNs each express a single intact OR gene abundantly, consistent with the one neuron-one receptor rule. For the 9 single OSNs where the two alleles of the abundantly expressed OR gene exhibit single-nucleotide polymorphisms, we demonstrate that monoallelic expression of the abundantly expressed OR gene is extremely tight. The remaining two single mature OSNs lack OR gene expression but express Trpc2 and Gucy1b2. We establish these two cells as a neuronal cell type that is fundamentally distinct from canonical, OR-expressing OSNs and that is defined by the differential, higher expression of 55 genes. We propose this tiered experimental approach as a paradigm to unravel gene expression in other cellularly heterogeneous systems. PMID:26670777

  10. Lin41/Trim71 is essential for mouse development and specifically expressed in postnatal ependymal cells of the brain

    PubMed Central

    Cuevas, Elisa; Rybak-Wolf, Agnieszka; Rohde, Anna M.; Nguyen, Duong T. T.; Wulczyn, F. Gregory

    2015-01-01

    Lin41/Trim71 is a heterochronic gene encoding a member of the Trim-NHL protein family, and is the original, genetically defined target of the microRNA let-7 in C. elegans. Both the LIN41 protein and multiple regulatory microRNA binding sites in the 3′ UTR of the mRNA are highly conserved from nematodes to humans. Functional studies have described essential roles for mouse LIN41 in embryonic stem cells, cellular reprogramming and the timing of embryonic neurogenesis. We have used a new gene trap mouse line deficient in Lin41 to characterize Lin41 expression during embryonic development and in the postnatal central nervous system (CNS). In the embryo, Lin41 is required for embryonic viability and neural tube closure. Nevertheless, neurosphere assays suggest that Lin41 is not required for adult neurogenesis. Instead, we show that Lin41 promoter activity and protein expression in the postnatal CNS is restricted to ependymal cells lining the walls of the four ventricles. We use ependymal cell culture to confirm reestablishment of Lin41 expression during differentiation of ependymal progenitors to post-mitotic cells possessing motile cilia. Our results reveal that terminally differentiated ependymal cells express Lin41, a gene to date associated with self-renewing stem cells. PMID:25883935

  11. Laminar Specific Detection of APP induced Neurodegeneration and Recovery using MEMRI in an Olfactory based Alzheimer’s Disease Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Saar, Galit; Cheng, Ning; Belluscio, Leonardo; Koretsky, Alan P.

    2015-01-01

    Manganese Enhanced MRI (MEMRI) was used to detect specific laminar changes in the olfactory bulb (OB) to follow the progression of amyloid precursor protein (APP)-induced neuronal pathology and its recovery in a reversible olfactory based Alzheimer’s disease (AD) mouse model. Olfactory dysfunction is an early symptom of AD, which suggests that olfactory sensory neurons (OSNs) may be more sensitive to AD related factors than neurons in other brain areas. Previously a transgenic mouse model was established that causes degeneration of OSNs by overexpressing humanized APP (hAPP), which results in a disruption of olfactory circuitry with changes in glomerular structure. In the present work, OB volume and manganese enhancement of the glomerular layer in OB were decreased in mutant mice. Turning off APP overexpression with doxycycline produced a significant increase in manganese enhancement of the glomerular layer after only 1 week, and further recovery after 3 weeks, while treatment with Aβ antibody produced modest improvement with MRI measurements. Thus, MEMRI enables a direct tracking of laminar specific neurodegeneration through a non-invasive in vivo measurement. The use of MRI will enable assessment of the ability of different pharmacological reagents to block olfactory neuronal loss and can serve as a unique in vivo screening tool to both identify potential therapeutics and test their efficacy. PMID:26021215

  12. NanoCAGE analysis of the mouse olfactory epithelium identifies the expression of vomeronasal receptors and of proximal LINE elements

    PubMed Central

    Pascarella, Giovanni; Lazarevic, Dejan; Plessy, Charles; Bertin, Nicolas; Akalin, Altuna; Vlachouli, Christina; Simone, Roberto; Faulkner, Geoffrey J.; Zucchelli, Silvia; Kawai, Jun; Daub, Carsten O.; Hayashizaki, Yoshihide; Lenhard, Boris; Carninci, Piero; Gustincich, Stefano

    2013-01-01

    By coupling laser capture microdissection to nanoCAGE technology and next-generation sequencing we have identified the genome-wide collection of active promoters in the mouse Main Olfactory Epithelium (MOE). Transcription start sites (TSSs) for the large majority of Olfactory Receptors (ORs) have been previously mapped increasing our understanding of their promoter architecture. Here we show that in our nanoCAGE libraries of the mouse MOE we detect a large number of tags mapped in loci hosting Type-1 and Type-2 Vomeronasal Receptors genes (V1Rs and V2Rs). These loci also show a massive expression of Long Interspersed Nuclear Elements (LINEs). We have validated the expression of selected receptors detected by nanoCAGE with in situ hybridization, RT-PCR and qRT-PCR. This work extends the repertory of receptors capable of sensing chemical signals in the MOE, suggesting intriguing interplays between MOE and VNO for pheromone processing and positioning transcribed LINEs as candidate regulatory RNAs for VRs expression. PMID:24600346

  13. The heterogeneity of hepatocytes during the postnatal development of the mouse.

    PubMed

    Kanamura, S; Asada-Kubota, M

    1980-01-01

    Development of the hepatocyte heterogeneity was studied histochemically during the postnatal period. At birth ornithine carbamoyltransferase (OCT). succinate dehydrogenase (SDH) and NADH dehydrogenase (NADHDH) activities were evenly distributed throughout the liver acinus. Slightly uneven distribution within the acinus appeared at 3 days after birth in SDH and at 4 days after birth in OCT and NADHDH, changing to that of adult type at 10 or 12 days after birth which is characterized by a marked difference in the activities between zone 1 and 3. However, in animals of all age groups studied, glycogen was decreased mainly in zone 1 and 2 after 6 or 10 h of fasting and glucose 6-phosphatase activity was markedly reduced or disappeared in zone 3 and often in zone 2 after carbon tetrachloride administration. The results show that so-called "functional and structural heterogeneity among hepatocytes" consists of at least two different components, that formed gradually during the postnatal development and that existing already at birth.

  14. Differential Expression of Melanopsin Isoforms Opn4L and Opn4S during Postnatal Development of the Mouse Retina

    PubMed Central

    Hughes, Steven; Welsh, Laura; Katti, Christiana; González-Menéndez, Irene; Turton, Michael; Halford, Stephanie; Sekaran, Sumathi; Peirson, Stuart N.; Hankins, Mark W.; Foster, Russell G.

    2012-01-01

    Photosensitive retinal ganglion cells (pRGCs) respond to light from birth and represent the earliest known light detection system to develop in the mouse retina. A number of morphologically and functionally distinct subtypes of pRGCs have been described in the adult retina, and have been linked to different physiological roles. We have previously identified two distinct isoforms of mouse melanopsin, Opn4L and Opn4S, which are generated by alternate splicing of the Opn4 locus. These isoforms are differentially expressed in pRGC subtypes of the adult mouse retina, with both Opn4L and Opn4S detected in M1 type pRGCs, and only Opn4L detected in M2 type pRGCs. Here we investigate the developmental expression of Opn4L and Opn4S and show a differential profile of expression during postnatal development. Opn4S mRNA is detected at relatively constant levels throughout postnatal development, with levels of Opn4S protein showing a marked increase between P0 and P3, and then increasing progressively over time until adult levels are reached by P10. By contrast, levels of Opn4L mRNA and protein are low at birth and show a marked increase at P14 and P30 compared to earlier time points. We suggest that these differing profiles of expression are associated with the functional maturation of M1 and M2 subtypes of pRGCs. Based upon our data, Opn4S expressing M1 type pRGCs mature first and are the dominant pRGC subtype in the neonate retina, whereas increased expression of Opn4L and the maturation of M2 type pRGCs occurs later, between P10 and P14, at a similar time to the maturation of rod and cone photoreceptors. We suggest that the distinct functions associated with these cell types will develop at different times during postnatal development. PMID:22496826

  15. Postnatal changes in Rho and Rho-related proteins in the mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Komagome, R; Kimura, K; Saito, M

    2000-02-01

    To provide information on the role of Rho, a GTP-binding protein, in postnatal development of the brain cells, the change in the levels of Rho protein and Rho-related proteins was examined in the brain of mice for two weeks after birth, in parallel with the changes in the activity of marker enzymes for neuronal and glial cells. The activities of acetylcholine esterase and choline acetyltransferase of whole brain homogenate, both of which are neuronal marker enzymes, were progressively increased in an age-dependent manner. The activity of 2',3'-cyclic nucleotide 3'-phosphohydrolase, a glial marker enzyme, increased markedly between one and two weeks after birth. In contrast, the levels of RhoA and RhoB in the membrane fraction were decreased during the postnatal period. The amount of Rho GDP dissociation inhibitor, a regulatory protein for Rho, was unchanged, while those of Rho target proteins, Rock-2 and citron, were gradually increased. Since the inactivation of Rho is known to induce neurite extension and neuronal and glial differentiation in vitro, our results suggest that the Rho signalling pathway plays a regulatory role in the postnatal differentiation of neuronal and glial cells in vivo.

  16. Glucose sensitivity of mouse olfactory bulb neurons is conveyed by a voltage-gated potassium channel

    PubMed Central

    Tucker, Kristal; Cho, Sukhee; Thiebaud, Nicolas; Henderson, Michael X; Fadool, Debra Ann

    2013-01-01

    The olfactory bulb has recently been proposed to serve as a metabolic sensor of internal chemistry, particularly that modified by metabolism. Because the voltage-dependent potassium channel Kv1.3 regulates a large proportion of the outward current in olfactory bulb neurons and gene-targeted deletion of the protein produces a phenotype of resistance to diet-induced obesity in mice, we hypothesized that this channel may play a role in translating energy availability into a metabolic signal. Here we explored the ability of extracellular glucose concentration to modify evoked excitability of the mitral neurons that principally regulate olfactory coding and processing of olfactory information. Using voltage-clamp electrophysiology of heterologously expressed Kv1.3 channels in HEK 293 cells, we found that Kv1.3 macroscopic currents responded to metabolically active (d-) rather than inactive (l-) glucose with a response profile that followed a bell-shaped curve. Olfactory bulb slices stimulated with varying glucose concentrations showed glucose-dependent mitral cell excitability as evaluated by current-clamp electrophysiology. While glucose could be either excitatory or inhibitory, the majority of the sampled neurons displayed a decreased firing frequency in response to elevated glucose concentration that was linked to increased latency to first spike and decreased action potential cluster length. Unlike modulation attributed to phosphorylation, glucose modulation of mitral cells was rapid, less than one minute, and was reversible within the time course of a patch recording. Moreover, we report that modulation targets properties of spike firing rather than action potential shape, involves synaptic activity of glutamate or GABA signalling circuits, and is dependent upon Kv1.3 expression. Given the rising incidence of metabolic disorders attributed to weight gain, changes in neuronal excitability in brain regions regulating sensory perception of food are of consequence

  17. ATP Mediates Neuroprotective and Neuroproliferative Effects in Mouse Olfactory Epithelium following Exposure to Satratoxin G In Vitro and In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Cuihong; Sangsiri, Sutheera; Belock, Bethany; Iqbal, Tania R.; Pestka, James J.; Hegg, Colleen C.

    2011-01-01

    Intranasal aspiration of satratoxin G (SG), a mycotoxin produced by the black mold Stachybotrys chartarum, selectively induces apoptosis in olfactory sensory neurons (OSNs) in mouse olfactory epithelium (OE) through unknown mechanisms. Here, we show a dose-dependent induction of apoptosis 24 h post-SG exposure in vitro as measured by increased activated caspases in the OP6 olfactory placodal cell line and increased propidium iodide staining in primary OE cell cultures. Intranasal aspiration of SG increased TUNEL (Terminal dUTP Nick End Labeling) staining in the neuronal layer of the OE and significantly increased the latency to find a buried food pellet, confirming that SG selectively induces neuronal apoptosis and demonstrating that SG impairs the sense of smell. Next, we investigated whether ATP can prevent SG-induced OE toxicity. ATP did not decrease apoptosis under physiological conditions but significantly reduced SG-induced OSN apoptosis in vivo and in vitro. Furthermore, purinergic receptor inhibition significantly increased apoptosis in OE primary cell culture and in vivo. These data indicate that ATP is neuroprotective against SG-induced OE toxicity. The number of cells that incorporated 5′-bromodeoxyuridine, a measure of proliferation, was significantly increased 3 and 6 days post-SG aspiration. Treatment with purinergic receptor antagonists significantly reduced SG-induced cell proliferation, whereas post-treatment with ATP significantly potentiated SG-induced cell proliferation. These data indicate that ATP is released and promotes cell proliferation via activation of purinergic receptors in SG-induced OE injury. Thus, the purinergic system is a therapeutic target to alleviate or restore the loss of OSNs. PMID:21865290

  18. ATP mediates neuroprotective and neuroproliferative effects in mouse olfactory epithelium following exposure to satratoxin G in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Jia, Cuihong; Sangsiri, Sutheera; Belock, Bethany; Iqbal, Tania R; Pestka, James J; Hegg, Colleen C

    2011-11-01

    Intranasal aspiration of satratoxin G (SG), a mycotoxin produced by the black mold Stachybotrys chartarum, selectively induces apoptosis in olfactory sensory neurons (OSNs) in mouse olfactory epithelium (OE) through unknown mechanisms. Here, we show a dose-dependent induction of apoptosis 24 h post-SG exposure in vitro as measured by increased activated caspases in the OP6 olfactory placodal cell line and increased propidium iodide staining in primary OE cell cultures. Intranasal aspiration of SG increased TUNEL (Terminal dUTP Nick End Labeling) staining in the neuronal layer of the OE and significantly increased the latency to find a buried food pellet, confirming that SG selectively induces neuronal apoptosis and demonstrating that SG impairs the sense of smell. Next, we investigated whether ATP can prevent SG-induced OE toxicity. ATP did not decrease apoptosis under physiological conditions but significantly reduced SG-induced OSN apoptosis in vivo and in vitro. Furthermore, purinergic receptor inhibition significantly increased apoptosis in OE primary cell culture and in vivo. These data indicate that ATP is neuroprotective against SG-induced OE toxicity. The number of cells that incorporated 5'-bromodeoxyuridine, a measure of proliferation, was significantly increased 3 and 6 days post-SG aspiration. Treatment with purinergic receptor antagonists significantly reduced SG-induced cell proliferation, whereas post-treatment with ATP significantly potentiated SG-induced cell proliferation. These data indicate that ATP is released and promotes cell proliferation via activation of purinergic receptors in SG-induced OE injury. Thus, the purinergic system is a therapeutic target to alleviate or restore the loss of OSNs.

  19. Irx3 is required for postnatal maturation of the mouse ventricular conduction system

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kyoung-Han; Rosen, Anna; Hussein, Samer M. I.; Puviindran, Vijitha; Korogyi, Adam S.; Chiarello, Carmelina; Nagy, Andras; Hui, Chi-chung; Backx, Peter H.

    2016-01-01

    The ventricular conduction system (VCS) orchestrates the harmonious contraction in every heartbeat. Defects in the VCS are often associated with life-threatening arrhythmias and also promote adverse remodeling in heart disease. We have previously established that the Irx3 homeobox gene regulates rapid electrical propagation in the VCS by modulating the transcription of gap junction proteins Cx40 and Cx43. However, it is unknown whether other factors contribute to the conduction defects observed in Irx3 knockout (Irx3−/−) mice. In this study, we show that during the early postnatal period, Irx3−/− mice develop morphological defects in the VCS which are temporally dissociated from changes in gap junction expression. These morphological defects were accompanied with progressive changes in the cardiac electrocardiogram including right bundle branch block. Hypoplastic VCS was not associated with increased apoptosis of VCS cardiomyocytes but with a lack of recruitment and maturation of ventricular cardiomyocytes into the VCS. Computational analysis followed by functional verification revealed that Irx3 promotes VCS-enriched transcripts targeted by Nkx2.5 and/or Tbx5. Altogether, these results indicate that, in addition to ensuring the appropriate expression of gap junctional channels in the VCS, Irx3 is necessary for the postnatal maturation of the VCS, possibly via its interactions with Tbx5 and Nkx2.5. PMID:26786475

  20. Selenomethionine Ameliorates Neuropathology in the Olfactory Bulb of a Triple Transgenic Mouse Model of Alzheimer’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhong-Hao; Chen, Chen; Wu, Qiu-Yan; Zheng, Rui; Chen, Yao; Liu, Qiong; Ni, Jia-Zuan; Song, Guo-Li

    2016-01-01

    Olfactory dysfunction is an early and common symptom in Alzheimer′s disease (AD) and is reported to be related to several pathologic changes, including the deposition of Aβ and hyperphosphorylated tau protein as well as synaptic impairment. Selenomethionine (Se-Met), the major form of selenium in animals and humans, may be a promising therapeutic option for AD as it decreases the deposition of Aβ and tau hyperphosphorylation in a triple transgenic mouse model of AD (3× Tg-AD). In this study, 4-month-old AD mice were treated with 6 µg/mL Se-Met in drinking water for 12 weeks and the effect of Se-Met on neuropathological deficits in olfactory bulb (OB) of 3× Tg-AD mice was investigated. The administration of Se-Met effectively decreased the production and deposition of Aβ by inhibiting β-site amyloid precursor protein cleaving enzyme 1 (BACE1)-regulated amyloid precursor protein (APP) processing and reduced the level of total tau and phosphorylated tau, which depended on depressing the activity and expression of glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK-3β) and cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (CDK5). Meanwhile, Se-Met reduced glial activation, relieved neuroinflammation and attenuated neuronal cell death in the OB of AD mice. So Se-Met could improve pathologic changes of AD in the OB, which further demonstrated the potential therapeutic effect of Se-Met in AD. PMID:27689994

  1. Exchanging ligand-binding specificity between a pair of mouse olfactory receptor paralogs reveals odorant recognition principles.

    PubMed

    Baud, Olivia; Yuan, Shuguang; Veya, Luc; Filipek, Slawomir; Vogel, Horst; Pick, Horst

    2015-01-01

    A multi-gene family of ~1000 G protein-coupled olfactory receptors (ORs) constitutes the molecular basis of mammalian olfaction. Due to the lack of structural data its remarkable capacity to detect and discriminate thousands of odorants remains poorly understood on the structural level of the receptor. Using site-directed mutagenesis we transferred ligand specificity between two functionally related ORs and thereby revealed amino acid residues of central importance for odorant recognition and discrimination of the two receptors. By exchanging two of three residues, differing at equivalent positions of the putative odorant binding site between the mouse OR paralogs Olfr73 (mOR-EG) and Olfr74 (mOR-EV), we selectively changed ligand preference but remarkably also signaling activation strength in both ORs. Computer modeling proposed structural details at atomic resolution how the very same odorant molecule might interact with different contact residues to induce different functional responses in two related receptors. Our findings provide a mechanistic explanation of how the olfactory system distinguishes different molecular aspects of a given odorant molecule, and unravel important molecular details of the combinatorial encoding of odorant identity at the OR level.

  2. Exchanging ligand-binding specificity between a pair of mouse olfactory receptor paralogs reveals odorant recognition principles.

    PubMed

    Baud, Olivia; Yuan, Shuguang; Veya, Luc; Filipek, Slawomir; Vogel, Horst; Pick, Horst

    2015-01-01

    A multi-gene family of ~1000 G protein-coupled olfactory receptors (ORs) constitutes the molecular basis of mammalian olfaction. Due to the lack of structural data its remarkable capacity to detect and discriminate thousands of odorants remains poorly understood on the structural level of the receptor. Using site-directed mutagenesis we transferred ligand specificity between two functionally related ORs and thereby revealed amino acid residues of central importance for odorant recognition and discrimination of the two receptors. By exchanging two of three residues, differing at equivalent positions of the putative odorant binding site between the mouse OR paralogs Olfr73 (mOR-EG) and Olfr74 (mOR-EV), we selectively changed ligand preference but remarkably also signaling activation strength in both ORs. Computer modeling proposed structural details at atomic resolution how the very same odorant molecule might interact with different contact residues to induce different functional responses in two related receptors. Our findings provide a mechanistic explanation of how the olfactory system distinguishes different molecular aspects of a given odorant molecule, and unravel important molecular details of the combinatorial encoding of odorant identity at the OR level. PMID:26449412

  3. Exchanging ligand-binding specificity between a pair of mouse olfactory receptor paralogs reveals odorant recognition principles

    PubMed Central

    Baud, Olivia; Yuan, Shuguang; Veya, Luc; Filipek, Slawomir; Vogel, Horst; Pick, Horst

    2015-01-01

    A multi-gene family of ~1000 G protein-coupled olfactory receptors (ORs) constitutes the molecular basis of mammalian olfaction. Due to the lack of structural data its remarkable capacity to detect and discriminate thousands of odorants remains poorly understood on the structural level of the receptor. Using site-directed mutagenesis we transferred ligand specificity between two functionally related ORs and thereby revealed amino acid residues of central importance for odorant recognition and discrimination of the two receptors. By exchanging two of three residues, differing at equivalent positions of the putative odorant binding site between the mouse OR paralogs Olfr73 (mOR-EG) and Olfr74 (mOR-EV), we selectively changed ligand preference but remarkably also signaling activation strength in both ORs. Computer modeling proposed structural details at atomic resolution how the very same odorant molecule might interact with different contact residues to induce different functional responses in two related receptors. Our findings provide a mechanistic explanation of how the olfactory system distinguishes different molecular aspects of a given odorant molecule, and unravel important molecular details of the combinatorial encoding of odorant identity at the OR level. PMID:26449412

  4. Novel Behavioral Paradigm Reveals Lower Temporal Limits on Mouse Olfactory Decisions

    PubMed Central

    Resulaj, Arbora

    2015-01-01

    Temporal limits on perceptual decisions set strict boundaries on the possible underlying neural computations. How odor information is encoded in the olfactory system is still poorly understood. Here, we sought to define the limit on the speed of olfactory processing. To achieve this, we trained mice to discriminate different odor concentrations in a novel behavioral setup with precise odor delivery synchronized to the sniffing cycle. Mice reported their choice by moving a horizontal treadmill with their front limbs. We found that mice reported discriminations of 75% accuracy in 70–90 ms after odor inhalation. For a low concentration and nontrigeminal odorant, this time was 90–140 ms, showing that mice process odor information rapidly even in the absence of trigeminal stimulation. These response times establish, after accounting for odor transduction and motor delays, that olfactory processing can take tens of milliseconds. This study puts a strong limit on the underlying neural computations and suggests that the action potentials forming the neural basis for these decisions are fired in a few tens of milliseconds. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Understanding how sensory information is processed requires different approaches that span multiple levels of investigation from genes to neurons to behavior. Limits on behavioral performance constrain the possible neural mechanisms responsible for specific computations. Using a novel behavioral paradigm, we established that mice can make decisions about odor intensity surprisingly fast. After accounting for sensory and motor delays, the limit on some olfactory neural computations can be as low as a few tens of milliseconds, which suggests that only the first action potentials across a population of neurons contribute to these computations. PMID:26290243

  5. A generational study of glyphosate-tolerant soybeans on mouse fetal, postnatal, pubertal and adult testicular development.

    PubMed

    Brake, Denise G; Evenson, Donald P

    2004-01-01

    The health safety of transgenic soybeans (glyphosate-tolerant or Roundup Ready) was studied using the mammalian testis (mouse model) as a sensitive biomonitor of potential toxic effects. Pregnant mice were fed a transgenic soybean or a non-transgenic (conventional) diet through gestation and lactation. After weaning, the young male mice were maintained on the respective diets. At 8, 16, 26, 32, 63 and 87 days after birth, three male mice and an adult reference mouse were killed, the testes surgically removed, and the cell populations measured by flow cytometry. Multi-generational studies were conducted in the same manner. The results showed that the transgenic foodstuffs had no effect on macromolecular synthesis or cell growth and differentiation as evidenced by no differences in the percentages of testicular cell populations (haploid, diploid, and tetraploid) between the transgenic soybean-fed mice and those fed the conventional diet. Additionally, there were no differences in litter sizes and body weights of the two groups. It was concluded that the transgenic soybean diet had no negative effect on fetal, postnatal, pubertal or adult testicular development.

  6. Stem and progenitor cell division kinetics during postnatal mouse mammary gland development.

    PubMed

    Giraddi, Rajshekhar R; Shehata, Mona; Gallardo, Mercedes; Blasco, Maria A; Simons, Benjamin D; Stingl, John

    2015-01-01

    The cycling properties of mammary stem and progenitor cells is not well understood. To determine the division properties of these cells, we administered synthetic nucleosides for varying periods of time to mice at different stages of postnatal development and monitored the rate of uptake of these nucleosides in the different mammary cell compartments. Here we show that most cell division in the adult virgin gland is restricted to the oestrogen receptor-expressing luminal cell lineage. Our data also demonstrate that the oestrogen receptor-expressing, milk and basal cell subpopulations have telomere lengths and cell division kinetics that are not compatible with these cells being hierarchically organized; instead, our data indicate that in the adult homeostatic gland, each cell type is largely maintained by its own restricted progenitors. We also observe that transplantable stem cells are largely quiescent during oestrus, but are cycling during dioestrus when progesterone levels are high.

  7. Differential neuronal plasticity in mouse hippocampus associated with various periods of enriched environment during postnatal development.

    PubMed

    Hosseiny, Salma; Pietri, Mariel; Petit-Paitel, Agnès; Zarif, Hadi; Heurteaux, Catherine; Chabry, Joëlle; Guyon, Alice

    2015-11-01

    Enriched environment (EE) is characterized by improved conditions for enhanced exploration, cognitive activity, social interaction and physical exercise. It has been shown that EE positively regulates the remodeling of neural circuits, memory consolidation, long-term changes in synaptic strength and neurogenesis. However, the fine mechanisms by which environment shapes the brain at different postnatal developmental stages and the duration required to induce such changes are still a matter of debate. In EE, large groups of mice were housed in bigger cages and were given toys, nesting materials and other equipment that promote physical activity to provide a stimulating environment. Weaned mice were housed in EE for 4, 6 or 8 weeks and compared with matched control mice that were raised in a standard environment. To investigate the differential effects of EE on immature and mature brains, we also housed young adult mice (8 weeks old) for 4 weeks in EE. We studied the influence of onset and duration of EE housing on the structure and function of hippocampal neurons. We found that: (1) EE enhances neurogenesis in juvenile, but not young adult mice; (2) EE increases the number of synaptic contacts at every stage; (3) long-term potentiation (LTP) and spontaneous and miniature activity at the glutamatergic synapses are affected differently by EE depending on its onset and duration. Our study provides an integrative view of the role of EE during postnatal development in various mechanisms of plasticity in the hippocampus including neurogenesis, synaptic morphology and electrophysiological parameters of synaptic connectivity. This work provides an explanation for discrepancies found in the literature about the effects of EE on LTP and emphasizes the importance of environment on hippocampal plasticity.

  8. Differential neuronal plasticity in mouse hippocampus associated with various periods of enriched environment during postnatal development.

    PubMed

    Hosseiny, Salma; Pietri, Mariel; Petit-Paitel, Agnès; Zarif, Hadi; Heurteaux, Catherine; Chabry, Joëlle; Guyon, Alice

    2015-11-01

    Enriched environment (EE) is characterized by improved conditions for enhanced exploration, cognitive activity, social interaction and physical exercise. It has been shown that EE positively regulates the remodeling of neural circuits, memory consolidation, long-term changes in synaptic strength and neurogenesis. However, the fine mechanisms by which environment shapes the brain at different postnatal developmental stages and the duration required to induce such changes are still a matter of debate. In EE, large groups of mice were housed in bigger cages and were given toys, nesting materials and other equipment that promote physical activity to provide a stimulating environment. Weaned mice were housed in EE for 4, 6 or 8 weeks and compared with matched control mice that were raised in a standard environment. To investigate the differential effects of EE on immature and mature brains, we also housed young adult mice (8 weeks old) for 4 weeks in EE. We studied the influence of onset and duration of EE housing on the structure and function of hippocampal neurons. We found that: (1) EE enhances neurogenesis in juvenile, but not young adult mice; (2) EE increases the number of synaptic contacts at every stage; (3) long-term potentiation (LTP) and spontaneous and miniature activity at the glutamatergic synapses are affected differently by EE depending on its onset and duration. Our study provides an integrative view of the role of EE during postnatal development in various mechanisms of plasticity in the hippocampus including neurogenesis, synaptic morphology and electrophysiological parameters of synaptic connectivity. This work provides an explanation for discrepancies found in the literature about the effects of EE on LTP and emphasizes the importance of environment on hippocampal plasticity. PMID:25096287

  9. During postnatal development endogenous neurosteroids influence GABA-ergic neurotransmission of mouse cortical neurons

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Adam R.; Mitchell, Scott J.; Peden, Dianne R.; Herd, Murray B.; Seifi, Mohsen; Swinny, Jerome D.; Belelli, Delia; Lambert, Jeremy J.

    2016-01-01

    As neuronal development progresses, GABAergic synaptic transmission undergoes a defined program of reconfiguration. For example, GABAA receptor (GABAAR)-mediated synaptic currents, (miniature inhibitory postsynaptic currents; mIPSCs), which initially exhibit a relatively slow decay phase, become progressively reduced in duration, thereby supporting the temporal resolution required for mature network activity. Here we report that during postnatal development of cortical layer 2/3 pyramidal neurons, GABAAR-mediated phasic inhibition is influenced by a resident neurosteroid tone, which wanes in the second postnatal week, resulting in the brief phasic events characteristic of mature neuronal signalling. Treatment of cortical slices with the immediate precursor of 5α-pregnan-3α-ol-20-one (5α3α), the GABAAR-inactive 5α-dihydroprogesterone, (5α-DHP), greatly prolonged the mIPSCs of P20 pyramidal neurons, demonstrating these more mature neurons retain the capacity to synthesize GABAAR-active neurosteroids, but now lack the endogenous steroid substrate. Previously, such developmental plasticity of phasic inhibition was ascribed to the expression of synaptic GABAARs incorporating the α1 subunit. However, the duration of mIPSCs recorded from L2/3 cortical neurons derived from α1 subunit deleted mice, were similarly under the developmental influence of a neurosteroid tone. In addition to principal cells, synaptic GABAARs of L2/3 interneurons were modulated by native neurosteroids in a development-dependent manner. In summary, local neurosteroids influence synaptic transmission during a crucial period of cortical neurodevelopment, findings which may be of importance for establishing normal network connectivity. PMID:26626485

  10. SOHLH2 is essential for synaptonemal complex formation during spermatogenesis in early postnatal mouse testes

    PubMed Central

    Park, Miree; Lee, Youngeun; Jang, Hoon; Lee, Ok-Hee; Park, Sung-Won; Kim, Jae-Hwan; Hong, Kwonho; Song, Hyuk; Park, Se-Pill; Park, Yun-Yong; Ko, Jung Jae; Choi, Youngsok

    2016-01-01

    Spermatogenesis- and oogenesis-specific helix-loop-helix transcription factor 2 (SOHLH2) is exclusively expressed in germ cells of the gonads. Previous studies show that SOHLH2 is critical for spermatogenesis in mouse. However, the regulatory mechanism of SOHLH2 during early spermatogenesis is poorly understood. In the present study, we analyzed the gene expression profile of the Sohlh2-deficient testis and examined the role of SOHLH2 during spermatogenesis. We found 513 genes increased in abundance, while 492 genes decreased in abundance in 14-day-old Sohlh2-deficient mouse testes compared to wildtype mice. Gene ontology analysis revealed that Sohlh2 disruption effects the relative abundance of various meiotic genes during early spermatogenesis, including Spo11, Dmc1, Msh4, Prdm9, Sycp1, Sycp2, Sycp3, Hormad1, and Hormad2. Western blot analysis and immunostaining showed that SYCP3, a component of synaptonemal complex, was significantly less abundant in Sohlh2-deficient spermatocytes. We observed a lack of synaptonemal complex formation during meiosis in Sohlh2-deficient spermatocytes. Furthermore, we found that SOHLH2 interacted with two E-boxes on the mouse Sycp1 promoter and Sycp1 promoter activity increased with ectopically expressed SOHLH2. Taken together, our data suggest that SOHLH2 is critical for the formation of synaptonemal complexes via its regulation of Sycp1 expression during mouse spermatogonial differentiation. PMID:26869299

  11. Hypoxia-Induced Developmental Delays of Inhibitory Interneurons Are Reversed by Environmental Enrichment in the Postnatal Mouse Forebrain

    PubMed Central

    Komitova, Mila; Xenos, Dionysios; Salmaso, Natalina; May Tran, Kathy; Brand, Theresa; Schwartz, Michael L.; Ment, Laura

    2013-01-01

    Infants born premature experience hypoxic episodes due to immaturity of their respiratory and central nervous systems. This profoundly affects brain development and results in cognitive impairments. We used a mouse model to examine the impact of hypoxic rearing (9.5–10.5% O2) from postnatal day 3 to 11 (P3–P11) on GABAergic interneurons and the potential for environmental enrichment to ameliorate these developmental abnormalities. At P15 the numbers of cortical interneurons expressing immunohistochemically detectable levels of parvalbumin (PV), somatostatin (SST), and vasoactive intestinal peptide were decreased in hypoxic-reared mice by 59%, 32%, and 38%, respectively, compared with normoxic controls. Hypoxia also decreased total GABA content in frontal neocortex by 31%. However, GAD67-EGFP knock-in mice reared under hypoxic conditions showed no changes in total number of GAD67-EGFP+ cells and no evidence of increased interneuron death, suggesting that the total number of interneurons was not decreased, but rather, that hypoxic-rearing decreased interneuron marker expression in these cells. In adulthood, PV and SST expression levels were decreased in hypoxic-reared mice. In contrast, intensity of reelin (RLN) expression was significantly increased in adult hypoxic-reared mice compared with normoxic controls. Housing mice in an enriched environment from P21 until adulthood normalized phenotypic interneuron marker expression without affecting total interneuron numbers or leading to increased neurogenesis. Our data show that (1) hypoxia decreases PV and SST and increases RLN expression in cortical interneurons during postnatal cortical development and (2) enriched environment has the capacity to normalize the interneuron abnormalities in cortex. PMID:23946395

  12. Postnatal exposure to trichloroethylene alters glutathione redox homeostasis, methylation potential, and neurotrophin expression in the mouse hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Blossom, Sarah J; Melnyk, Stepan; Cooney, Craig A; Gilbert, Kathleen M; James, S Jill

    2012-12-01

    Previous studies have shown that continuous exposure throughout gestation until the juvenile period to environmentally relevant doses of trichloroethylene (TCE) in the drinking water of MRL+/+ mice promoted adverse behavior associated with glutathione depletion in the cerebellum indicating increased sensitivity to oxidative stress. The purpose of this study was to extend our findings and further characterize the impact of TCE exposure on redox homeostasis and biomarkers of oxidative stress in the hippocampus, a brain region prone to oxidative stress. Instead of a continuous exposure, the mice were exposed to water only or two environmentally relevant doses of TCE in the drinking water postnatally from birth until 6 weeks of age. Biomarkers of plasma metabolites in the transsulfuration pathway and the transmethylation pathway of the methionine cycle were also examined. Gene expression of neurotrophins was examined to investigate a possible relationship between oxidative stress, redox imbalance and neurotrophic factor expression with TCE exposure. Our results show that hippocampi isolated from male mice exposed to TCE showed altered glutathione redox homeostasis indicating a more oxidized state. Also observed was a significant, dose dependent increase in glutathione precursors. Plasma from the TCE treated mice showed alterations in metabolites in the transsulfuration and transmethylation pathways indicating redox imbalance and altered methylation capacity. 3-Nitrotyrosine, a biomarker of protein oxidative stress, was also significantly higher in plasma and hippocampus of TCE-exposed mice compared to controls. In contrast, expression of key neurotrophic factors in the hippocampus (BDNF, NGF, and NT-3) was significantly reduced compared to controls. Our results demonstrate that low-level postnatal and early life TCE exposure modulates neurotrophin gene expression in the mouse hippocampus and may provide a mechanism for TCE-mediated neurotoxicity.

  13. Molecular clock regulates daily α1-2-fucosylation of the neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM) within mouse secondary olfactory neurons.

    PubMed

    Kondoh, Daisuke; Tateno, Hiroaki; Hirabayashi, Jun; Yasumoto, Yuki; Nakao, Reiko; Oishi, Katsutaka

    2014-12-26

    The circadian clock regulates various behavioral and physiological rhythms in mammals. Circadian changes in olfactory functions such as neuronal firing in the olfactory bulb (OB) and olfactory sensitivity have recently been identified, although the underlying molecular mechanisms remain unknown. We analyzed the temporal profiles of glycan structures in the mouse OB using a high-density microarray that includes 96 lectins, because glycoconjugates play important roles in the nervous system such as neurite outgrowth and synaptogenesis. Sixteen lectin signals significantly fluctuated in the OB, and the intensity of all three that had high affinity for α1-2-fucose (α1-2Fuc) glycan in the microarray was higher during the nighttime. Histochemical analysis revealed that α1-2Fuc glycan is located in a diurnal manner in the lateral olfactory tract that comprises axon bundles of secondary olfactory neurons. The amount of α1-2Fuc glycan associated with the major target glycoprotein neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM) varied in a diurnal fashion, although the mRNA and protein expression of Ncam1 did not. The mRNA and protein expression of Fut1, a α1-2-specific fucosyltransferase gene, was diurnal in the OB. Daily fluctuation of the α1-2Fuc glycan was obviously damped in homozygous Clock mutant mice with disrupted diurnal Fut1 expression, suggesting that the molecular clock governs rhythmic α1-2-fucosylation in secondary olfactory neurons. These findings suggest the possibility that the molecular clock is involved in the diurnal regulation of olfaction via α1-2-fucosylation in the olfactory system.

  14. Mouse embryos and chimera cloned from neural cells in the postnatal cerebral cortex.

    PubMed

    Makino, Hatsune; Yamazaki, Yukiko; Hirabayashi, Takahiro; Kaneko, Ryosuke; Hamada, Shun; Kawamura, Yoshimi; Osada, Tomoharu; Yanagimachi, Ryuzo; Yagi, Takeshi

    2005-01-01

    Cloning of mice has been achieved by transferring nuclei of various types of somatic cell nuclei into enucleated oocytes. However, all attempts to produce live cloned offspring using the nuclei of neurons from adult cerebral cortex have failed. Previously we obtained cloned mice using the nuclei of neural cells collected from fetal cerebral cortex. Here, we attempted to generate cloned mice using differentiated neurons from the cerebral cortex of postnatal (day 0-4) mice. Although we were unable to obtain live cloned pups, many fetuses reached day 10.5 days of development. These fetuses showed various abnormalities such as spherical omission of the neuroepithelium, collapsed lumen of neural tube, and aberrant expressions of marker proteins of neurons. We produced chimeric mice in which some hair cells and kidney cells were originated from differentiated neurons. In chimeric fetuses, LacZ-positive donor cells were in all three germ cell layers. However, chimeras with large contribution of donor-derived cells were not obtained. These results indicate that nuclei of differentiated neurons have lost their developmental totipotency. In other words, the conventional nuclear transfer technique does not allow nuclei of differentiated neurons to undergo complete genomic reprogramming required for normal embryonic development.

  15. Ectopic Atoh1 expression drives Merkel cell production in embryonic, postnatal and adult mouse epidermis.

    PubMed

    Ostrowski, Stephen M; Wright, Margaret C; Bolock, Alexa M; Geng, Xuehui; Maricich, Stephen M

    2015-07-15

    Merkel cells are mechanosensitive skin cells whose production requires the basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor Atoh1. We induced ectopic Atoh1 expression in the skin of transgenic mice to determine whether Atoh1 was sufficient to create additional Merkel cells. In embryos, ectopic Atoh1 expression drove ectopic expression of the Merkel cell marker keratin 8 (K8) throughout the epidermis. Epidermal Atoh1 induction in adolescent mice similarly drove widespread K8 expression in glabrous skin of the paws, but in the whisker pads and body skin ectopic K8+ cells were confined to hair follicles and absent from interfollicular regions. Ectopic K8+ cells acquired several characteristics of mature Merkel cells in a time frame similar to that seen during postnatal development of normal Merkel cells. Although ectopic K8+ cell numbers decreased over time, small numbers of these cells remained in deep regions of body skin hair follicles at 3 months post-induction. In adult mice, greater numbers of ectopic K8+ cells were created by Atoh1 induction during anagen versus telogen and following disruption of Notch signaling by conditional deletion of Rbpj in the epidermis. Our data demonstrate that Atoh1 expression is sufficient to produce new Merkel cells in the epidermis, that epidermal cell competency to respond to Atoh1 varies by skin location, developmental age and hair cycle stage, and that the Notch pathway plays a key role in limiting epidermal cell competency to respond to Atoh1 expression.

  16. Subchronic inhalation exposure to 2-ethyl-1-hexanol impairs the mouse olfactory bulb via injury and subsequent repair of the nasal olfactory epithelium.

    PubMed

    Miyake, Mio; Ito, Yuki; Sawada, Masato; Sakai, Kiyoshi; Suzuki, Himiko; Sakamoto, Tatsuo; Sawamoto, Kazunobu; Kamijima, Michihiro

    2016-08-01

    The olfactory system can be a toxicological target of volatile organic compounds present in indoor air. Recently, 2-ethyl-1-hexanol (2E1H) emitted from adhesives and carpeting materials has been postulated to cause "sick building syndrome." Patients' symptoms are associated with an increased sense of smell. This investigation aimed to characterize the histopathological changes of the olfactory epithelium (OE) of the nasal cavity and the olfactory bulb (OB) in the brain, due to subchronic exposure to 2E1H. Male ICR mice were exposed to 0, 20, 60, or 150 ppm 2E1H for 8 h every day for 1 week, or 5 days per week for 1 or 3 months. After a 1-week exposure, the OE showed inflammation and degeneration, with a significant concentration-dependent reduction in the staining of olfactory receptor neurons and in the numbers of globose basal cells at ≥20 ppm. Regeneration occurred at 1 month along with an increase in the basal cells, but lymphocytic infiltration, expanded Bowman's glands, and a decrease in the olfactory receptor neurons were observed at 3 months. Intriguingly, the OB at 3 months showed a reduction in the diameters of the glomeruli and in the number of olfactory nerves and tyrosine hydroxylase-positive neurons, but an increased number of ionized calcium-binding adaptor molecule 1-positive microglia in glomeruli. Accordingly, 2E1H inhalation induced degeneration of the OE with the lowest-observed-adverse-effect level of 20 ppm. The altered number of functional cell components in the OB suggests that effects on olfactory sensation persist after subchronic exposure to 2E1H. PMID:27055686

  17. Olfactory ability and object memory in three mouse models of varying body weight, metabolic hormones, and adiposity.

    PubMed

    Tucker, Kristal R; Godbey, Steven J; Thiebaud, Nicolas; Fadool, Debra Ann

    2012-10-10

    Physiological and nutritional state can modify sensory ability and perception through hormone signaling. Obesity and related metabolic disorders present a chronic imbalance in hormonal signaling that could impact sensory systems. In the olfactory system, external chemical cues are transduced into electrical signals to encode information. It is becoming evident that this system can also detect internal chemical cues in the form of molecules of energy homeostasis and endocrine hormones, whereby neurons of the olfactory system are modulated to change animal behavior towards olfactory cues. We hypothesized that chronic imbalance in hormonal signaling and energy homeostasis due to obesity would thereby disrupt olfactory behaviors in mice. To test this idea, we utilized three mouse models of varying body weight, metabolic hormones, and visceral adiposity - 1) C57BL6/J mice maintained on a condensed-milk based, moderately high-fat diet (MHF) of 32% fat for 6 months as the diet-induced obesity model, 2) an obesity-resistant, lean line of mice due to a gene-targeted deletion of a voltage-dependent potassium channel (Kv 1.3-null), and 3) a genetic model of obesity as a result of a gene-targeted deletion of the melanocortin 4 receptor (MC4R-null). Diet-induced obese (DIO) mice failed to find a fatty-scented hidden peanut butter cracker, based solely on olfactory cues, any faster than an unscented hidden marble, initially suggesting general anosmia. However, when these DIO mice were challenged to find a sweet-scented hidden chocolate candy, they had no difficulty. Furthermore, DIO mice were able to discriminate between fatty acids that differ by a single double bond and are components of the MHF diet (linoleic and oleic acid) in a habituation-dishabituation paradigm. Obesity-resistant, Kv1.3-null mice exhibited no change in scented object retrieval when placed on the MHF-diet, nor did they perform differently than wild-type mice in parallel habituation-dishabituation paradigms

  18. Impact of apoE deficiency during synaptic remodeling in the mouse olfactory bulb

    PubMed Central

    Nwosu, Ikemefuna; Gairhe, Salina; Struble, Robert G.; Nathan, Britto P.

    2008-01-01

    In this study we examined the role of apoE on the rate of synaptic recovery in the olfactory bulb (OB) following olfactory epithelium (OE) lesioning in mice. We used both immunoblotting and immunohistochemical techniques to compare the density of OB synaptophysin (Syn, a synaptic marker) in apoE-gene deficient/knockout (KO) mice and wild-type (WT) mice following OE lesion. We found that the whole bulb concentrations of Syn, measured by immunoblotting, declined sharply following injury in both WT and KO mice during the degenerative phase (3–7 days). After this initial decline, the Syn concentration gradually increased to normal levels by 56 days in WT mice. In contrast, Syn concentration in KO mice did not recover by day 56 when Syn density in WT was essentially normal. Glomerular Syn density, measured by immunohistochemistry, found a lower density in KO mice at all time points post lesion. This lower concentration of whole bulb Syn parallels the slower recovery of glomerular area in KO mice. The data indicate that apoE deficiency in KO mice is associated with a delayed recovery of the glomerular area and a slower recovery in Syn concentration in the OB. PMID:18621483

  19. Progressive impairment in olfactory working memory in a mouse model of Mild Cognitive Impairment.

    PubMed

    Young, Jared W; Sharkey, John; Finlayson, Keith

    2009-09-01

    Patients with Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI), exhibiting both working memory and olfactory deficits are likely to progress to Alzheimer's disease (AD). Targeting this pre-clinical AD population with disease modifying agents or cognitive enhancers represents the best strategy for halting or delaying the impact of this pernicious disease. However, there is a paucity of animal models of MCI with which to assess putative therapeutic strategies. We describe an odour span task which assesses the ability of mice to remember lists of odours, and report subtle cognitive deficits in human amyloid over-expressing (Tg2576) mice, at an age prior to plaque deposition. Four-month-old Tg2576 mice exhibited normal acquisition and performance in the standard 12-span task, but were significantly impaired when memory load was increased to 22 odours. By 8-months, a performance deficit was apparent in the 12-span task and by 1-year mice also exhibited significant acquisition deficits. Thus, by assessing olfactory working memory in Tg2576 mice we can model aspects of MCI in rodents and aid development of future therapeutic strategies for AD.

  20. Distinct spatiotemporal activity in principal neurons of the mouse olfactory bulb in anesthetized and awake states

    PubMed Central

    Blauvelt, David G.; Sato, Tomokazu F.; Wienisch, Martin; Murthy, Venkatesh N.

    2013-01-01

    The acquisition of olfactory information and its early processing in mammals are modulated by brain states through sniffing behavior and neural feedback. We imaged the spatiotemporal pattern of odor-evoked activity in a population of output neurons (mitral/tufted cells, MTCs) in the olfactory bulb (OB) of head-restrained mice expressing a genetically-encoded calcium indicator. The temporal dynamics of MTC population activity were relatively simple in anesthetized animals, but were highly variable in awake animals. However, the apparently irregular activity in awake animals could be predicted well using sniff timing measured externally, or inferred through fluctuations in the global responses of MTC population even without explicit knowledge of sniff times. The overall spatial pattern of activity was conserved across states, but odor responses had a diffuse spatial component in anesthetized mice that was less prominent during wakefulness. Multi-photon microscopy indicated that MTC lateral dendrites were the likely source of spatially disperse responses in the anesthetized animal. Our data demonstrate that the temporal and spatial dynamics of MTCs can be significantly modulated by behavioral state, and that the ensemble activity of MTCs can provide information about sniff timing to downstream circuits to help decode odor responses. PMID:23543674

  1. Quantitative analysis of crypt cell population during postnatal development of the olfactory organ of the guppy, Poecilia reticulata (Teleostei, Poecilidae), from birth to sexual maturity.

    PubMed

    Bettini, Simone; Lazzari, Maurizio; Franceschini, Valeria

    2012-08-01

    Crypt cells are one of three types of olfactory sensory neuron, differing from ciliated and microvillar cells in shape, localization and number, and found only in fish. Although crypt cells are morphologically well characterized, their function remains unclear. They were hypothesized to be involved in reproductive behaviours by detecting sex pheromones, but electrophysiological investigations revealed sensitivity to only amino acids. However, the number of crypt cells in adult guppies is not the same in the two sexes. In this study, we compared the size of the crypt cell population in juvenile guppies during the first 90 days after birth. The purpose of our study was to clarify whether a correlation exists between sex and the number of these olfactory neurons. The data show that guppies reach adult crypt cell density when they become sexually mature. Despite a constant increment in volume during development of the olfactory organ, the minimum density of crypt neurons occurs at ~45 days. Moreover, in the early weeks, the density of crypt neurons is greater in males than in females because in females the total number of cells decreases significantly after just 7 days. In adults, however, crypt neurons are found in higher density in females than in males. These findings suggest that the number of crypt cells is sex specific, with independent developmental dynamics between males and females. A role in pheromone detection could explain such a difference, but the early appearance of crypt cells in the first days of life is suggestive of other, not sexually related, functions.

  2. Quantitative analysis of crypt cell population during postnatal development of the olfactory organ of the guppy, Poecilia reticulata (Teleostei, Poecilidae), from birth to sexual maturity.

    PubMed

    Bettini, Simone; Lazzari, Maurizio; Franceschini, Valeria

    2012-08-01

    Crypt cells are one of three types of olfactory sensory neuron, differing from ciliated and microvillar cells in shape, localization and number, and found only in fish. Although crypt cells are morphologically well characterized, their function remains unclear. They were hypothesized to be involved in reproductive behaviours by detecting sex pheromones, but electrophysiological investigations revealed sensitivity to only amino acids. However, the number of crypt cells in adult guppies is not the same in the two sexes. In this study, we compared the size of the crypt cell population in juvenile guppies during the first 90 days after birth. The purpose of our study was to clarify whether a correlation exists between sex and the number of these olfactory neurons. The data show that guppies reach adult crypt cell density when they become sexually mature. Despite a constant increment in volume during development of the olfactory organ, the minimum density of crypt neurons occurs at ~45 days. Moreover, in the early weeks, the density of crypt neurons is greater in males than in females because in females the total number of cells decreases significantly after just 7 days. In adults, however, crypt neurons are found in higher density in females than in males. These findings suggest that the number of crypt cells is sex specific, with independent developmental dynamics between males and females. A role in pheromone detection could explain such a difference, but the early appearance of crypt cells in the first days of life is suggestive of other, not sexually related, functions. PMID:22786649

  3. An interglomerular circuit gates glomerular output and implements gain control in the mouse olfactory bulb

    PubMed Central

    Banerjee, Arkarup; Marbach, Fred; Anselmi, Francesca; Koh, Matthew S.; Davis, Martin B.; da Silva, Pedro Garcia; Delevich, Kristen; Oyibo, Hassana K.; Gupta, Priyanka; Li, Bo; Albeanu, Dinu F.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Odors elicit distributed activation of glomeruli in the olfactory bulb (OB). Crosstalk between co-active glomeruli has been proposed to perform a variety of computations, facilitating efficient extraction of sensory information by the cortex. Dopaminergic/GABAergic cells in the OB, which can be identified by their expression of the dopamine transporter (DAT), provide the earliest opportunity for such crosstalk. Here we show in mice that DAT+ cells carry concentration dependent odor signals and broadcast focal glomerular inputs throughout the OB to cause suppression of mitral/tufted (M/T) cell firing, an effect that is mediated by the external tufted (ET) cells coupled to DAT+ cells via chemical and electrical synapses. We find that DAT+ cells implement gain control and decorrelate odor representations in the M/T cell population. Our results further indicate that ET cells are gatekeepers of glomerular output and prime determinants of M/T responsiveness. PMID:26139373

  4. Odour enrichment increases adult-born dopaminergic neurons in the mouse olfactory bulb.

    PubMed

    Bonzano, Sara; Bovetti, Serena; Fasolo, Aldo; Peretto, Paolo; De Marchis, Silvia

    2014-11-01

    The olfactory bulb (OB) is the first brain region involved in the processing of olfactory information. In adult mice, the OB is highly plastic, undergoing cellular/molecular dynamic changes that are modulated by sensory experience. Odour deprivation induces down-regulation of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) expression in OB dopaminergic interneurons located in the glomerular layer (GL), resulting in decreased dopamine in the OB. Although the effect of sensory deprivation is well established, little is known about the influence of odour enrichment on dopaminergic cells. Here we report that prolonged odour enrichment on C57BL/6J strain mice selectively increases TH-immunopositive cells in the GL by nearly 20%. Following odour enrichment on TH-green fluorescent protein (GFP) transgenic mice, in which GFP identified both mature TH-positive cells and putative immature dopaminergic cells expressing TH mRNA but not TH protein, we found a similar 20% increase in GFP-expressing cells, with no changes in the ratio between TH-positive and TH-negative cells. These data suggest that enriched conditions induce an expansion in the whole dopaminergic lineage. Accordingly, by using 5-bromo-2-deoxyuridine injections to label adult-generated cells in the GL of TH-GFP mice, we found an increase in the percentage of 5-bromo-2-deoxyuridine-positive dopaminergic cells in enriched compared with control conditions, whereas no differences were found for calretinin- and calbindin-positive subtypes. Strikingly, the fraction of newborn cells among the dopaminergic population doubled in enriched conditions. On the whole, our results demonstrate that odour enrichment drives increased integration of adult-generated dopaminergic cells that could be critical to adapt the OB circuits to the environmental incoming information.

  5. Trpc2-expressing sensory neurons in the mouse main olfactory epithelium of type B express the soluble guanylate cyclase Gucy1b2

    PubMed Central

    Omura, Masayo; Mombaerts, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Chemoreception in the mouse olfactory system occurs primarily at two chemosensory epithelia in the nasal cavity: the main olfactory epithelium (MOE) and the vomeronasal epithelium. The canonical chemosensory neurons in the MOE, the olfactory sensory neurons (OSNs), express the odorant receptor (OR) gene repertoire, and depend on Adcy3 and Cnga2 for chemosensory signal transduction. The canonical chemosensory neurons in the vomeronasal epithelium, the vomeronasal sensory neurons (VSNs), express two unrelated vomeronasal receptor (VR) gene repertoires, and involve Trpc2 for chemosensory signal transduction. Recently we reported the discovery of two types of neurons in the mouse MOE that express Trcp2 in addition to Cnga2. These cell types can be distinguished at the single-cell level by expression of Adcy3: positive, type A and negative, type B. Some type A cells express OR genes. Thus far there is no specific gene or marker for type B cells, hampering further analyses such as physiological recordings. Here, we show that among MOE cells, type B cells are unique in their expression of the soluble guanylate cyclase Gucy1b2. We came across Gucy1b2 in an explorative approach based on Long Serial Analysis of Gene Expression (LongSAGE) that we applied to single red-fluorescent cells isolated from whole olfactory mucosa and vomeronasal organ of mice of a novel Trcp2-IRES-taumCherry gene-targeted strain. The generation of a novel Gucy1b2-IRES-tauGFP gene-targeted strain enabled us to visualize coalescence of axons of type B cells into glomeruli in the main olfactory bulb. Our molecular and anatomical analyses define Gucy1b2 as a marker for type B cells within the MOE. The Gucy1b2-IRES-tauGFP strain will be useful for physiological, molecular, cellular, and anatomical studies of this newly described chemosensory subsystem. PMID:25701815

  6. Spatio-Temporal Characteristics of Inhibition Mapped by Optical Stimulation in Mouse Olfactory Bulb

    PubMed Central

    Lehmann, Alexander; D’Errico, Anna; Vogel, Martin; Spors, Hartwig

    2016-01-01

    Mitral and tufted cells (MTCs) of the mammalian olfactory bulb are connected via dendrodendritic synapses with inhibitory interneurons in the external plexiform layer. The range, spatial layout, and temporal properties of inhibitory interactions between MTCs mediated by inhibitory interneurons remain unclear. Therefore, we tested for inhibitory interactions using an optogenetic approach. We optically stimulated MTCs expressing channelrhodopsin-2 in transgenic mice, while recording from individual MTCs in juxtacellular or whole-cell configuration in vivo. We used a spatial noise stimulus for mapping interactions between MTCs belonging to different glomeruli in the dorsal bulb. Analyzing firing responses of MTCs to the stimulus, we did not find robust lateral inhibitory effects that were spatially specific. However, analysis of sub-threshold changes in the membrane potential revealed evidence for inhibitory interactions between MTCs that belong to different glomerular units. These lateral inhibitory effects were short-lived and spatially specific. MTC response maps showed hyperpolarizing effects radially extending over more than five glomerular diameters. The inhibitory maps exhibited non-symmetrical yet distance-dependent characteristics. PMID:27047340

  7. Morphological analysis of activity-reduced adult-born neurons in the mouse olfactory bulb.

    PubMed

    Dahlen, Jeffrey E; Jimenez, Daniel A; Gerkin, Richard C; Urban, Nathan N

    2011-01-01

    Adult-born neurons (ABNs) are added to the olfactory bulb (OB) throughout life in rodents. While many factors have been identified as regulating the survival and integration of ABNs into existing circuitry, the understanding of how these factors affect ABN morphology and connectivity is limited. Here we compare how cell intrinsic [small interfering RNA (siRNA) knock-down of voltage gated sodium channels Na(V)1.1-1.3] and circuit level (naris occlusion) reductions in activity affect ABN morphology during integration into the OB. We found that both manipulations reduce the number of dendritic spines (and thus likely the number of reciprocal synaptic connections) formed with the surrounding circuitry and inhibited dendritic ramification of ABNs. Further, we identified regions of ABN apical dendrites where the largest and most significant decreases occur following siRNA knock-down or naris occlusion. In siRNA knock-down cells, reduction of spines is observed in proximal regions of the apical dendrite. This suggests that distal regions of the dendrite may remain active independent of Na(V)1.1-1.3 channel expression, perhaps facilitated by activation of T-type calcium channels and NMDA receptors. By contrast, circuit level reduction of activity by naris occlusion resulted in a global depression of spine number. Together, these results indicate that ABNs retain the ability to develop their typical overall morphological features regardless of experienced activity, and activity modulates the number and location of formed connections.

  8. Contribution of maternal oxygenic state to the effects of chronic postnatal hypoxia on mouse body and brain development.

    PubMed

    Salmaso, Natalina; Dominguez, Moises; Kravitz, Jacob; Komitova, Mila; Vaccarino, Flora M; Schwartz, Michael L

    2015-09-14

    1-2% of live births are to very low birth weight, premature infants that often show a developmental trajectory plagued with neurological sequelae including ventriculomegaly and significant decreases in cortical volume. We are able to recapitulate these sequelae using a mouse model of hypoxia where early postnatal pups are exposed to chronic hypoxia for one week. However, because the timing of hypoxic exposure occurs so early in development, dams and pups are housed together in the hypoxic chamber, and therefore, dams are also subjected to the same hypoxic conditions as the pups. To understand the relative contribution of hypoxia directly on the pups as opposed to the indirect contribution mediated by the effects of hypoxia and potential alterations in the dam's care of the pups, we examined whether reducing the dams exposure to hypoxia may significantly increase pup outcomes on measures that we have found consistently changed immediately following chronic hypoxia exposure. To achieve this, we rotated dams between normoxic and hypoxic conditions, leaving the litters untouched in their respective conditions and compared gross anatomical measures of normoxic and hypoxic pups with non-rotating or rotating mothers. As we expected, hypoxic-rearing decreased pup body weight, brain weight and cortical volume. Reducing the dam's exposure to hypoxic conditions actually amplified the effects of hypoxia on body weight, such that hypoxic pups with rotating mothers showed significantly less growth. Interestingly, rotation of hypoxic mothers did not have the same deleterious effect on brain weight, suggesting the presence of compensatory mechanisms conserving brain weight and development even under extremely low body weight conditions. The factors that potentially contribute to these compensatory changes remain to be determined, however, nutrition, pup feeding/metabolism, or changes in maternal care are important candidates, acting either together or independently to change pup

  9. High-throughput mapping of the promoters of the mouse olfactory receptor genes reveals a new type of mammalian promoter and provides insight into olfactory receptor gene regulation

    PubMed Central

    Clowney, E. Josephine; Magklara, Angeliki; Colquitt, Bradley M.; Pathak, Nidhi; Lane, Robert P.; Lomvardas, Stavros

    2011-01-01

    The olfactory receptor (OR) genes are the largest mammalian gene family and are expressed in a monogenic and monoallelic fashion in olfactory neurons. Using a high-throughput approach, we mapped the transcription start sites of 1085 of the 1400 murine OR genes and performed computational analysis that revealed potential transcription factor binding sites shared by the majority of these promoters. Our analysis produced a hierarchical model for OR promoter recognition in which unusually high AT content, a unique epigenetic signature, and a stereotypically positioned O/E site distinguish OR promoters from the rest of the murine promoters. Our computations revealed an intriguing correlation between promoter AT content and evolutionary plasticity, as the most AT-rich promoters regulate rapidly evolving gene families. Within the AT-rich promoter category the position of the TATA-box does not correlate with the transcription start site. Instead, a spike in GC composition might define the exact location of the TSS, introducing the concept of “genomic contrast” in transcriptional regulation. Finally, our experiments show that genomic neighborhood rather than promoter sequence correlates with the probability of different OR genes to be expressed in the same olfactory cell. PMID:21705439

  10. Rapid and continuous activity-dependent plasticity of olfactory sensory input

    PubMed Central

    Cheetham, Claire E. J.; Park, Una; Belluscio, Leonardo

    2016-01-01

    Incorporation of new neurons enables plasticity and repair of circuits in the adult brain. Adult neurogenesis is a key feature of the mammalian olfactory system, with new olfactory sensory neurons (OSNs) wiring into highly organized olfactory bulb (OB) circuits throughout life. However, neither when new postnatally generated OSNs first form synapses nor whether OSNs retain the capacity for synaptogenesis once mature, is known. Therefore, how integration of adult-born OSNs may contribute to lifelong OB plasticity is unclear. Here, we use a combination of electron microscopy, optogenetic activation and in vivo time-lapse imaging to show that newly generated OSNs form highly dynamic synapses and are capable of eliciting robust stimulus-locked firing of neurons in the mouse OB. Furthermore, we demonstrate that mature OSN axons undergo continuous activity-dependent synaptic remodelling that persists into adulthood. OSN synaptogenesis, therefore, provides a sustained potential for OB plasticity and repair that is much faster than OSN replacement alone. PMID:26898529

  11. Y1 receptors are critical for the proliferation of adult mouse precursor cells in the olfactory neuroepithelium.

    PubMed

    Doyle, Kharen L; Karl, Tim; Hort, Yvonne; Duffy, Liesl; Shine, John; Herzog, Herbert

    2008-05-01

    While the regenerative capacity of the olfactory neuroepithelium has been well studied less is known about the molecular events controlling precursor cell activity. Neuropeptide Y (NPY) is expressed at high levels in the olfactory system, and NPY has been shown to play a role in neuroregeneration of the brain. In this study, we show that the numbers of olfactory neurospheres derived from NPY, NPY/peptide YY, and Y1 receptor knockout mice are decreased compared with wild type (WT) controls. Furthermore, flow cytometric analysis of isolated horizontal basal cells, globose basal cells, and glandular cells showed that only glandular cells derived from WT mice, but not from NPY and Y1 receptor knockout mice, formed secondary neurospheres suggesting a critical role for NPY signaling in this process. Interestingly, olfactory function tests revealed that olfaction in Y1 knockout mice is impaired compared with those of WT mice, probably because of the reduced number of olfactory neurons formed. Together these results indicate that NPY and the Y1 receptor are required for the normal proliferation of adult olfactory precursors and olfactory function.

  12. New ependymal cells are born postnatally in two discrete regions of the mouse brain and support ventricular enlargement in hydrocephalus.

    PubMed

    Bátiz, Luis Federico; Jiménez, Antonio J; Guerra, Montserrat; Rodríguez-Pérez, Luis Manuel; Toledo, César D; Vio, Karin; Páez, Patricia; Pérez-Fígares, José Manuel; Rodríguez, Esteban M

    2011-06-01

    A heterogeneous population of ependymal cells lines the brain ventricles. The evidence about the origin and birth dates of these cell populations is scarce. Furthermore, the possibility that mature ependymal cells are born (ependymogenesis) or self-renewed (ependymal proliferation) postnatally is controversial. The present study was designed to investigate both phenomena in wild-type (wt) and hydrocephalic α-SNAP mutant (hyh) mice at different postnatal stages. In wt mice, proliferating cells in the ventricular zone (VZ) were only found in two distinct regions: the dorsal walls of the third ventricle and Sylvian aqueduct (SA). Most proliferating cells were monociliated and nestin+, likely corresponding to radial glial cells. Postnatal cumulative BrdU-labeling showed that most daughter cells remained in the VZ of both regions and they lost nestin-immunoreactivity. Furthermore, some labeled cells became multiciliated and GLUT-1+, indicating they were ependymal cells born postnatally. Postnatal pulse BrdU-labeling and Ki-67 immunostaining further demonstrated the presence of cycling multiciliated ependymal cells. In hydrocephalic mutants, the dorsal walls of the third ventricle and SA expanded enormously and showed neither ependymal disruption nor ventriculostomies. This phenomenon was sustained by an increased ependymogenesis. Consequently, in addition to the physical and geometrical mechanisms traditionally explaining ventricular enlargement in fetal-onset hydrocephalus, we propose that postnatal ependymogenesis could also play a role. Furthermore, as generation of new ependymal cells during postnatal stages was observed in distinct regions of the ventricular walls, such as the roof of the third ventricle, it may be a key mechanism involved in the development of human type 1 interhemispheric cysts.

  13. Functional coupling of transcription factor HiNF-P and histone H4 gene expression during pre- and post-natal mouse development.

    PubMed

    Liu, Li-Jun; Xie, Ronglin; Hussain, Sadiq; Lian, Jane B; Rivera-Perez, Jaime; Jones, Stephen N; Stein, Janet L; Stein, Gary S; van Wijnen, Andre J

    2011-09-01

    Transcription factor Histone Nuclear Factor P (HiNF-P; gene symbol Hinfp) mediates cell cycle control of histone H4 gene expression to support the packaging of newly replicated DNA as chromatin. The HiNF-P/p220(NPAT) complex controls multiple H4 genes in established human cell lines and is critical for cell proliferation. The mouse Hinfp(LacZ) null allele causes early embryonic lethality due to a blastocyst defect. However, neither Hinfp function nor its temporal expression relative to histone H4 genes during fetal development has been explored. Here, we establish that expression of Hinfp is biologically coupled with expression of twelve functional mouse H4 genes during pre- and post-natal tissue-development. Both Hinfp and H4 genes are robustly expressed at multiple embryonic (E) days (from E5.5 to E15.5), coincident with ubiquitous LacZ staining driven by the Hinfp promoter. Five highly expressed mouse H4 genes (Hist1h4d, Histh4f, Hist1h4m and Hist2h4) account for >90% of total histone H4 mRNA throughout development. Post-natal expression of H4 genes in mice is most evident in lung, spleen, thymus and intestine, and with few exceptions (e.g., adult liver) correlates with Hinfp gene expression. Histone H4 gene expression decreases butHinfp levels remain constitutive upon cell growth inhibition in culture. The in vivo co-expression of Hinfp and histone H4 genes is consistent with the biological function of Hinfp as a principal transcriptional regulator of histone H4 gene expression during mouse development.

  14. Alteration of Scn3a expression is mediated via CpG methylation and MBD2 in mouse hippocampus during postnatal development and seizure condition.

    PubMed

    Li, Hai-Jun; Wan, Rui-Ping; Tang, Ling-Jia; Liu, Shu-Jing; Zhao, Qi-Hua; Gao, Mei-Mei; Yi, Yong-Hong; Liao, Wei-Ping; Sun, Xiao-Fang; Long, Yue-Sheng

    2015-01-01

    Increased expression of sodium channel SCN3A, an embryonic-expressed gene, has been identified in epileptic tissues, which is believed to contribute to the development of epilepsy. However, the regulatory mechanism of SCN3A expression under epileptic condition is still unknown. Here we showed a high level of Scn3a mRNA expression in mouse embryonic hippocampus with gradually decreasing to a low level during the postnatal development and a methylation of a specific CpG site (-39C) in the Scn3a promoter was increased in hippocampus during postnatal development, corresponding to the downregulation of Scn3a expression. Furthermore, in vitro methylation and -39C>T mutation of the Scn3a promoter decreased the reporter gene expression, suggesting an important role of the -39C site in regulating gene expression. We then demonstrated that the sequence containing -39C was a MBD2-binding motif and the CpG methylation of the promoter region increased the capability of MBD2's binding to the motif. Knockdown of MBD2 in mouse N1E-115 cells led to the -39C methylation and the downregulation of Scn3a transcription by decreasing the Scn3a promoter activity. In the hippocampus of seizure mice, the expressions of Scn3a and Mbd2 were upregulated after 10-day KA treatment. At the same time point, the -39C site was demethylated and the capability of MBD2's binding to the Scn3a promoter motif was decreased. Taken together, these findings suggest that CpG methylation and MBD2 are involved in altering Scn3a expression during postnatal development and seizure condition.

  15. Nectin-1 spots as a novel adhesion apparatus that tethers mitral cell lateral dendrites in a dendritic meshwork structure of the developing mouse olfactory bulb.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Takahito; Fujiwara, Takeshi; Rikitake, Yoshiyuki; Maruo, Tomohiko; Mandai, Kenji; Kimura, Kazushi; Kayahara, Tetsuro; Wang, Shujie; Itoh, Yu; Sai, Kousyoku; Mori, Masahiro; Mori, Kensaku; Mizoguchi, Akira; Takai, Yoshimi

    2015-08-15

    Mitral cells project lateral dendrites that contact the lateral and primary dendrites of other mitral cells and granule cell dendrites in the external plexiform layer (EPL) of the olfactory bulb. These dendritic structures are critical for odor information processing, but it remains unknown how they are formed. In immunofluorescence microscopy, the immunofluorescence signal for the cell adhesion molecule nectin-1 was concentrated on mitral cell lateral dendrites in the EPL of the developing mouse olfactory bulb. In electron microscopy, the immunogold particles for nectin-1 were symmetrically localized on the plasma membranes at the contacts between mitral cell lateral dendrites, which showed bilateral darkening without dense cytoskeletal undercoats characteristic of puncta adherentia junctions. We named the contacts where the immunogold particles for nectin-1 were symmetrically accumulated "nectin-1 spots." The nectin-1 spots were 0.21 μm in length on average and the distance between the plasma membranes was 20.8 nm on average. In 3D reconstruction of serial sections, clusters of the nectin-1 spots formed a disc-like structure. In the mitral cell lateral dendrites of nectin-1-knockout mice, the immunogold particles for nectin-1 were undetectable and the plasma membrane darkening was electron-microscopically normalized, but the plasma membranes were partly separated from each other. The nectin-1 spots were further identified between mitral cell lateral and primary dendrites and between mitral cell lateral dendrites and granule cell dendritic spine necks. These results indicate that the nectin-1 spots constitute a novel adhesion apparatus that tethers mitral cell dendrites in a dendritic meshwork structure of the developing mouse olfactory bulb.

  16. Lack of evidence for intergenerational reproductive effects due to prenatal and postnatal undernutrition in the female CD-1 mouse

    EPA Science Inventory

    The impacts of adverse environments during the prenatal and/or early postnatal periods may be manifested as functional deficits that occur later in life. Epidemiological studies have shown an association of sub-optimal pregnancy outcomes in one generation with similar events in t...

  17. Early postnatal GABAA receptor modulation reverses deficits in neuronal maturation in a conditional neurodevelopmental mouse model of DISC1

    PubMed Central

    Saito, Atsushi; Taniguchi, Yu; Rannals, Matthew D.; Merfeld, Emily B.; Ballinger, Michael D.; Koga, Minori; Ohtani, Yoshikazu; Gurley, David A.; Sedlak, Thomas W.; Cross, Alan; Moss, Stephen J.; Brandon, Nicholas J.; Maher, Brady J.; Kamiya, Atsushi

    2015-01-01

    Exploring drug targets based on disease-associated molecular mechanisms during development is crucial for the generation of novel prevention and treatment strategies for neurodevelopmental psychiatric conditions. We report that prefrontal cortex-specific postnatal knockdown of DISC1 via in utero electroporation combined with an inducible knockdown expression system drives deficits in synaptic GABAA function and dendritic development in pyramidal neurons, as well as abnormalities in sensorimotor gating, albeit without profound memory deficits. We show for the first time that DISC1 is specifically involved in regulating cell surface expression of α2 subunit-containing GABAA receptors in immature developing neurons, but not after full maturation. Notably, pharmacological intervention with α2/3 subtype-selective GABAA receptor positive allosteric modulators during the early postnatal period ameliorates dendritic deficits and behavioral abnormalities induced by knockdown of DISC1. These findings highlight a critical role of DISC1-mediated disruption of postnatal GABA signaling in aberrant prefrontal cortex maturation and function. PMID:26728564

  18. MeCP2 is required for activity-dependent refinement of olfactory circuits

    PubMed Central

    Degano, Alicia L.; Park, Min Jung; Penati, Judy; Li, Qun; Ronnett, Gabriele V.

    2014-01-01

    Methyl CpG binding protein 2 (MeCP2) is a structural chromosomal protein involved in the regulation of gene expression. Alterations in the levels of MeCP2 have been related to neurodevelopmental disorders. Studies in mouse models of MeCP2 deficiency have demonstrated that this protein is important for neuronal maturation, neurite complexity, synaptogenesis, and synaptic plasticity. However, the mechanisms by which MeCP2 dysfunction leads to neurodevelopmental defects, and the role of activity, remain unclear, as most studies examine the adult nervous system, which may obfuscate the primary consequences of MeCP2 mutation. We hypothesize that MeCP2 plays a role during the formation and activity-driven maturation of neural circuits at early postnatal stages. To test this hypothesis, we use the olfactory system as a neurodevelopmental model. This system undergoes postnatal neurogenesis; axons from olfactory neurons form highly stereotyped projections to higher-order neurons, facilitating the detection of possible defects in the establishment of connectivity. In vivo olfactory stimulation paradigms were used to produce physiological synaptic activity in gene-targeted mice in which specific olfactory circuits are visualized. Our results reveal defective postnatal refinement of olfactory circuits in Mecp2 knock out (KO) mice after sensory (odorant) stimulation. This failure in refinement was associated with deficits in the normal responses to odorants, including brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) production, as well as changes in adhesion molecules known to regulate axonal convergence. The defective refinement observed in Mecp2 KO mice was prevented by daily treatment with ampakine beginning after the first postnatal week. These observations indicate that increasing synaptic activity at early postnatal stage might circumvent the detrimental effect of MeCP2 deficiency on circuitry maturation. The present results provide in vivo evidence in real time for the role of

  19. Inflammation-induced subventricular zone dysfunction leads to olfactory deficits in a targeted mouse model of multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Tepavčević, Vanja; Lazarini, Françoise; Alfaro-Cervello, Clara; Kerninon, Christophe; Yoshikawa, Kazuaki; Garcia-Verdugo, José Manuel; Lledo, Pierre-Marie; Nait-Oumesmar, Brahim; Baron-Van Evercooren, Anne

    2011-01-01

    Neural stem cells (NSCs) persist in defined brain niches, including the subventricular zone (SVZ), throughout adulthood and generate new neurons destined to support specific neurological functions. Whether brain diseases such as multiple sclerosis (MS) are associated with changes in adult NSCs and whether this might contribute to the development and/or persistence of neurological deficits remains poorly investigated. We examined SVZ function in mice in which we targeted an MS-like pathology to the forebrain. In these mice, which we refer to herein as targeted EAE (tEAE) mice, there was a reduction in the number of neuroblasts compared with control mice. Altered expression of the transcription factors Olig2 and Dlx2 in the tEAE SVZ niche was associated with amplification of pro-oligodendrogenic transit-amplifying cells and decreased neuroblast generation, which resulted in persistent reduction in olfactory bulb neurogenesis. Altered SVZ neurogenesis led to impaired long-term olfactory memory, mimicking the olfactory dysfunction observed in MS patients. Importantly, we also found that neurogenesis was reduced in the SVZ of MS patients compared with controls. Thus, our findings suggest that neuroinflammation induces functional alteration of adult NSCs that may contribute to olfactory dysfunction in MS patients. PMID:22056384

  20. Histology Atlas of the Developing Mouse Hepatobiliary Hemolymphatic Vascular System with Emphasis on Embryonic Days 11.5-18.5 and Early Postnatal Development.

    PubMed

    Swartley, Olivia M; Foley, Julie F; Livingston, David P; Cullen, John M; Elmore, Susan A

    2016-07-01

    A critical event in embryo development is the proper formation of the vascular system, of which the hepatobiliary system plays a pivotal role. This has led researchers to use transgenic mice to identify the critical steps involved in developmental disorders associated with the hepatobiliary vascular system. Vascular development is dependent upon normal vasculogenesis, angiogenesis, and the transformation of vessels into their adult counterparts. Any alteration in vascular development has the potential to cause deformities or embryonic death. Numerous publications describe specific stages of vascular development relating to various organs, but a single resource detailing the stage-by-stage development of the vasculature pertaining to the hepatobiliary system has not been available. This comprehensive histology atlas provides hematoxylin & eosin and immunohistochemical-stained sections of the developing mouse blood and lymphatic vasculature with emphasis on the hepatobiliary system between embryonic days (E) 11.5-18.5 and the early postnatal period. Additionally, this atlas includes a 3-dimensional video representation of the E18.5 mouse venous vasculature. One of the most noteworthy findings of this atlas is the identification of the portal sinus within the mouse, which has been erroneously misinterpreted as the ductus venosus in previous publications. Although the primary purpose of this atlas is to identify normal hepatobiliary vascular development, potential embryonic abnormalities are also described.

  1. Gene signatures associated with mouse postnatal hindbrain neural stem cells and medulloblastoma cancer stem cells identify novel molecular mediators and predict human medulloblastoma molecular classification.

    PubMed

    Corno, Daniela; Daniela, Corno; Pala, Mauro; Cominelli, Manuela; Cipelletti, Barbara; Leto, Ketty; Croci, Laura; Barili, Valeria; Brandalise, Federico; Melzi, Raffaella; Di Gregorio, Alessandra; Sergi, Lucia Sergi; Politi, Letterio Salvatore; Piemonti, Lorenzo; Bulfone, Alessandro; Rossi, Paola; Rossi, Ferdinando; Consalez, Gian Giacomo; Poliani, Pietro Luigi; Galli, Rossella

    2012-06-01

    Medulloblastoma arises from mutations occurring in stem/progenitor cells located in restricted hindbrain territories. Here we report that the mouse postnatal ventricular zone lining the IV ventricle also harbors bona fide stem cells that, remarkably, share the same molecular profile with cerebellar white matter-derived neural stem cells (NSC). To identify novel molecular mediators involved in medulloblastomagenesis, we compared these distinct postnatal hindbrain-derived NSC populations, which are potentially tumor initiating, with murine compound Ptch/p53 mutant medulloblastoma cancer stem cells (CSC) that faithfully phenocopy the different variants of human medulloblastoma in vivo. Transcriptome analysis of both hindbrain NSCs and medulloblastoma CSCs resulted in the generation of well-defined gene signatures, each reminiscent of a specific human medulloblastoma molecular subclass. Most interestingly, medulloblastoma CSCs upregulated developmentally related genes, such as Ebfs, that were shown to be highly expressed in human medulloblastomas and play a pivotal role in experimental medullo-blastomagenesis. These data indicate that gene expression analysis of medulloblastoma CSCs holds great promise not only for understanding functional differences between distinct CSC populations but also for identifying meaningful signatures that might stratify medulloblastoma patients beyond histopathologic staging.

  2. Expression of transient receptor potential channel vanilloid (TRPV) 1–4, melastin (TRPM) 5 and 8, and ankyrin (TRPA1) in the normal and methimazole-treated mouse olfactory epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Nakashimo, Yousuke; Takumida, Masaya; Fukuiri, Takashi; Anniko, Matti; Hirakawa, Katsuhiro

    2010-01-01

    Conclusion: It is suggested that TRPV1, 2, 3, and 4, TRPM5 and 8, and TRPA1 may play several roles in the olfactory epithelium (OE), contributing to olfactory chemosensation, olfactory adaptation, olfactory-trigeminal interaction, and OE fluid homeostasis. In patients with olfactory disturbance, TRPV1 and TRPM8 may be closely related to a high rate of recognition of curry and menthol odors, while TRPV2 may also play a crucial role in the regeneration of olfactory receptor neurons. Objective: Expression of TRPV1–4, TRPM5 and 8, and TRPA1 in the normal and methimazole-treated mouse OE was analyzed. Methods: The localization of TRPV1–4, TRPM5 and 8, and TRPA1 in the OE of normal and methimazole-treated CBA/J mice was investigated by immunohistochemistry. Results: Normal OE showed a positive immunofluorescent reaction to TRPV1–4, TRPM5 and 8, and TRPA1. In lamina propria, the nerve fibers displayed TRPV 1, 2, and 3, TRPM8 and TRPA1. In the pathological condition, the expression of TRPV3, TRPV4, TRPM5, and TRPA1 was markedly reduced and took a long time to recover. In contrast, expression of TRPM8 was scarcely affected, even in the pathological condition, while TRPV1 and TRPV2 showed early recovery following methimazole treatment. PMID:20586674

  3. Regional Myelin and Axon Damage and Neuroinflammation in the Adult Mouse Brain After Long-Term Postnatal Vanadium Exposure.

    PubMed

    Azeez, Idris A; Olopade, Funmilayo; Laperchia, Claudia; Andrioli, Anna; Scambi, Ilaria; Onwuka, Silas K; Bentivoglio, Marina; Olopade, James O

    2016-09-01

    Environmental exposure to vanadium occurs in areas of persistent burning of fossil fuels; this metal is known to induce oxidative stress and oligodendrocyte damage. Here, we determined whether vanadium exposure (3 mg/kg) in mice during the first 3 postnatal months leads to a sustained neuroinflammatory response. Body weight monitoring, and muscle strength and open field tests showed reduction of body weight gain and locomotor impairment in vanadium-exposed mice. Myelin histochemistry and immunohistochemistry for astrocytes, microglia, and nonphosphorylated neurofilaments revealed striking regional heterogeneity. Myelin damage involved the midline corpus callosum and fibers in cortical gray matter, hippocampus, and diencephalon that were associated with axonal damage. Astrocyte and microglial activation was identified in the same regions and in the internal capsule; however, no overt myelin and axon damage was observed in the latter. Double immunofluorescence revealed induction of high tumor necrosis factor (TNF) immunoreactivity in reactive astrocytes. Western blotting analysis showed significant induction of TNF and interleukin-1β expression. Together these findings show that chronic postnatal vanadium exposure leads to functional deficit and region-dependent myelin damage that does not spare axons. This injury is associated with glial cell activation and proinflammatory cytokine induction, which may reflect both neurotoxic and neuroprotective responses. PMID:27390101

  4. Reelin is a detachment signal in tangential chain-migration during postnatal neurogenesis.

    PubMed

    Hack, Iris; Bancila, Mircea; Loulier, Karine; Carroll, Patrick; Cremer, Harold

    2002-10-01

    During development, Reelin acts on migrating neuronal precursors and controls correct cell positioning in the cortex and other brain structures by a hitherto unidentified mechanism. Here we show that in the postnatal mouse brain, Reelin acts as a detachment signal for chain-migrating interneuron precursors in the olfactory bulb. Neuronal precursors cultured in Matrigel detached from chains and migrated individually in the presence of exogenously added Reelin protein or Reelin-expressing brain tissues. Furthermore, we found that in reeler mutant mice, neuronal precursors accumulated in the olfactory bulb and remained in clusters, indicating that they did not change from tangential chain-migration to radial individual migration. Our data provide direct evidence that Reelin acts as a detachment signal, but not a stop or guidance cue. We propose that Reelin may have comparable functions during development.

  5. Multiplex assessment of the positions of odorant receptor-specific glomeruli in the mouse olfactory bulb by serial two-photon tomography.

    PubMed

    Zapiec, Bolek; Mombaerts, Peter

    2015-10-27

    In the mouse, axons of olfactory sensory neurons (OSNs) that express the same odorant receptor (OR) gene coalesce into one or a few glomeruli in the olfactory bulb. The positions of OR-specific glomeruli are traditionally described as stereotyped. Here, we have assessed quantitatively the positions of OR-specific glomeruli using serial two-photon tomography, an automated method for whole-organ fluorescence imaging that integrates two-photon microscopy with serial microtome sectioning. Our strategy is multiplexed. By repeated crossing, we generated two strains of mice with gene-targeted mutations at four or five OR loci for a total of six ORs: MOR23 (Olfr16), mOR37A (Olfr155), M72 (Olfr160), P2 (Olfr17), MOR256-17 (Olfr15), and MOR28 (Olfr1507). Glomerular imaging relied on intrinsic fluorescence of GFP or DsRed, or on whole-mount immunofluorescence with antibodies against GFP, DsRed, or β-gal using the method of immunolabeling-enabled three-dimensional imaging of solvent-cleared organs (iDISCO). The high-resolution 3D-reconstructed datasets were segmented to identify the labeled glomeruli and to assess glomerular positional variability between the bulbs of one mouse (intraindividual) and among the bulbs of different mice (interindividual). In 26 mice aged 21 or 50 d or 10 wk, we made measurements of the positions of 352 glomeruli. We find that positional variability of glomeruli correlates with the OR: For instance, the medial MOR28 glomerular domain occupies a surface area that is an order of magnitude larger than the surface area of the medial MOR23 glomerular domain. Our results quantify the level of precision that is delivered by the mechanisms of OSN axon wiring, differentially for the various OSN populations expressing distinct OR genes. PMID:26450880

  6. Evidence for the spontaneous production but massive programmed cell death of new neurons in the subcallosal zone of the postnatal mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Kim, Woon Ryoung; Chun, Sung Kun; Kim, Tae Woo; Kim, Hyun; Ono, Katsuhiko; Takebayashi, Hirohide; Ikenaka, Kazuhiro; Oppenheim, Ronald W; Sun, Woong

    2011-02-01

    In the last 10 years, many studies have reported that neural stem/progenitor cells spontaneously produce new neurons in a subset of adult brain regions, including the hippocampus, olfactory bulb (OB), cerebral cortex, substantia nigra, hypothalamus, white matter and amygdala in several mammalian species. Although adult neurogenesis in the hippocampus and OB has been clearly documented, its occurrence in other brain regions is controversial. In the present study, we identified a marked accumulation of new neurons in the subcallosal zone (SCZ) of Bax-knockout mice in which programmed cell death (PCD) of adult-generated hippocampal and OB neurons has been shown to be completely prevented. By contrast, in the SCZ of wild-type (WT) mice, only a few immature (but no mature) newly generated neurons were observed, suggesting that virtually all postnatally generated immature neurons in the SCZ were eliminated by Bax-dependent PCD. Treatment of 2-month-old WT mice with a caspase inhibitor, or with the neurotrophic factor brain-derived neurotrophic factor, promoted the survival of adult-generated neurons, suggesting that it is the absence of sufficient neurotrophic signaling in WT SCZ that triggers the Bax-dependent, apoptotic PCD of newly generated SCZ neurons. Furthermore, following focal traumatic brain injury to the posterior brain, SCZ neurogenesis in WT mice was increased, and a subset of these newly generated neurons migrated toward the injury site. These data indicate that the adult SCZ maintains a neurogenic potential that could contribute to recovery in the brain in response to the injury-induced upregulation of neurotrophic signaling.

  7. Roles of the lactogens and somatogens in perinatal and postnatal metabolism and growth: studies of a novel mouse model combining lactogen resistance and growth hormone deficiency.

    PubMed

    Fleenor, Donald; Oden, Jon; Kelly, Paul A; Mohan, Subburaman; Alliouachene, Samira; Pende, Mario; Wentz, Sabrina; Kerr, Jennifer; Freemark, Michael

    2005-01-01

    To delineate the roles of the lactogens and GH in the control of perinatal and postnatal growth, fat deposition, insulin production, and insulin action, we generated a novel mouse model that combines resistance to all lactogenic hormones with a severe deficiency of pituitary GH. The model was created by breeding PRL receptor (PRLR)-deficient (knockout) males with GH-deficient (little) females. In contrast to mice with isolated GH or PRLR deficiencies, double-mutant (lactogen-resistant and GH-deficient) mice on d 7 of life had growth failure and hypoglycemia. These findings suggest that lactogens and GH act in concert to facilitate weight gain and glucose homeostasis during the perinatal period. Plasma insulin and IGF-I and IGF-II concentrations were decreased in both GH-deficient and double-mutant neonates but were normal in PRLR-deficient mice. Body weights of the double mutants were reduced markedly during the first 3-4 months of age, and adults had striking reductions in femur length, plasma IGF-I and IGF binding protein-3 concentrations, and femoral bone mineral density. By age 6-12 months, however, the double-mutant mice developed obesity, hyperleptinemia, fasting hyperglycemia, relative hypoinsulinemia, insulin resistance, and glucose intolerance; males were affected to a greater degree than females. The combination of perinatal growth failure and late-onset obesity and insulin resistance suggests that the lactogen-resistant/GH-deficient mouse may serve as a model for the development of the metabolic syndrome.

  8. Neuropeptide Y and extracellular signal-regulated kinase mediate injury-induced neuroregeneration in mouse olfactory epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Cuihong; Hegg, Colleen Cosgrove

    2011-01-01

    In the olfactory epithelium (OE), injury induces ATP release, and subsequent activation of P2 purinergic receptors by ATP promotes neuroregeneration by increasing basal progenitor cell proliferation. The molecular mechanisms underlying ATP-induced increases in OE neuroregeneration have not been established. In the present study, the roles of neuroproliferative factors neuropeptide Y (NPY) and fibroblast growth factor2 (FGF2), and p44/42 extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) on ATP-mediated increases of neuroregeneration in the OE were investigated. ATP increased basal progenitor cell proliferation in the OE via activation of P2 purinergic receptors in vitro and in vivo as monitored by incorporation of 5′-ethynyl-2′-deoxyuridine, a thymidine analog, into DNA, and proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) protein levels. ATP induced p44/42 ERK activation in globose basal cells (GBC) but not horizontal basal cells (HBC). ATP differentially regulated p44/42 ERK over time in the OE both in vitro and in vivo with transient inhibition (5–15 min) followed by activation (30 min – 1 hr) of p44/42 ERK. In addition, ATP indirectly activated p44/42 ERK in the OE via ATP-induced NPY release and subsequent activation of NPY Y1 receptors in the basal cells. There were no synergistic effects of ATP and NPY or FGF2 on OE neuroregeneration. These data clearly have implications for the pharmacological modulation of neuroregeneration in the olfactory epithelium. PMID:22154958

  9. Notch1 activity in the olfactory bulb is odour-dependent and contributes to olfactory behaviour.

    PubMed

    Brai, Emanuele; Marathe, Swananda; Zentilin, Lorena; Giacca, Mauro; Nimpf, Johannes; Kretz, Robert; Scotti, Alessandra; Alberi, Lavinia

    2014-11-01

    Notch signalling plays an important role in synaptic plasticity, learning and memory functions in both Drosophila and rodents. In this paper, we report that this feature is not restricted to hippocampal networks but also involves the olfactory bulb (OB). Odour discrimination and olfactory learning in rodents are essential for survival. Notch1 expression is enriched in mitral cells of the mouse OB. These principal neurons are responsive to specific input odorants and relay the signal to the olfactory cortex. Olfactory stimulation activates a subset of mitral cells, which show an increase in Notch activity. In Notch1cKOKln mice, the loss of Notch1 in mitral cells affects the magnitude of the neuronal response to olfactory stimuli. In addition, Notch1cKOKln mice display reduced olfactory aversion to propionic acid as compared to wildtype controls. This indicates, for the first time, that Notch1 is involved in olfactory processing and may contribute to olfactory behaviour.

  10. Perinatal exposure to diethylstilbestrol improves olfactory discrimination learning in male and female Swiss-Webster mice.

    PubMed

    Mihalick, Sheila M

    2003-07-01

    During late prenatal and early postnatal brain development, estrogen induces structural sex differences that correspond to behavioral differences in certain domains such as learning and memory. The typically superior performance of males is attributed to the action of elevated concentrations of estrogen, derived inside neurons from the aromatization of testosterone. In contrast, female performance appears dependent on minimal estrogenic activity. Rat models of the relationship between hormones and cognitive behavior predominate the field, but the advent of genetically modified mice as research tools necessitates development of analogous mouse models. This study examined how early postnatal exposure to the synthetic estrogen diethylstilbestrol (DES) affected the ability of male and female Swiss-Webster mice to learn a two-choice olfactory discrimination and three repeated reversals. Mice treated with subcutaneous injections of DES from postnatal days 1-10 learned reversals more readily than oil-treated controls, a difference that became evident after repeated testing. DES-exposed males and females learned reversals at a comparable rate, suggesting that early postnatal estrogen exposure does not influence this mode of learning through a sexually differentiated mechanism in mice. An analysis of response patterns during qualitatively different phases of reversal learning revealed that DES-induced improvements probably were not due to greater inhibitory control. Instead, DES appeared to enhance associative ability. Early postnatal estrogen exposure may have the potential to preserve certain cognitive skills in adulthood.

  11. Effect of dietary lipid structure in early postnatal life on mouse adipose tissue development and function in adulthood.

    PubMed

    Oosting, Annemarie; van Vlies, Naomi; Kegler, Diane; Schipper, Lidewij; Abrahamse-Berkeveld, Marieke; Ringler, Silvia; Verkade, Henkjan J; van der Beek, Eline M

    2014-01-28

    Obese individuals have more (hyperplastic) and larger (hypertrophic) adipocytes in their white adipose tissue (WAT) than normal-weight individuals. The difference in cell number emerges early in childhood, suggesting that this is a critical period for being susceptible to obesity. Breast-feeding has been shown to be protective against obesity, and we have previously shown in mice that the physical structure of lipids in human milk may contribute to this protective effect. In the present study, we investigated how differences in the physical structure of lipids in the early diet may modulate adipose tissue development. Male mice were fed a diet containing control infant milk formula (Control IMF; Danone Research) or Nuturis® (Concept IMF with large phospholipid-coated lipid droplets; Danone Research) from postnatal day (PN)16 to 42. Subsequently, mice were challenged with a moderate Western-style diet (WSD) until PN98, and body composition was monitored by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. Epididymal WAT was analysed for adipocyte size, number and gene expression of metabolic transcription factors. Early Concept IMF exposure reduced fat accumulation during the WSD challenge by 30 % compared with the Control IMF. It reduced adipocyte size without affecting adipocyte number in adult mice. The Concept IMF decreased the expression of PPARγ, CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein and retinoid X receptor α in WAT in adulthood, key regulators of metabolic activity. In conclusion, Concept IMF exposure in early life reduced susceptibility to obesity in adult life, by preventing adipocyte hypertrophia upon adult dietary challenge without affecting adipogenesis. These data emphasise the importance of the physical properties of dietary lipids in early life in obesity risk later in life.

  12. Dynamic integration of subplate neurons into the cortical barrel field circuitry during postnatal development in the Golli-tau-eGFP (GTE) mouse

    PubMed Central

    Piñon, Maria Carmen; Jethwa, Ankeet; Jacobs, Erin; Campagnoni, Anthony; Molnár, Zoltán

    2009-01-01

    In the Golli-tau-eGFP (GTE) transgenic mouse the reporter gene expression is largely confined to the layer of subplate neurons (SPn), providing an opportunity to study their intracortical and extracortical projections. In this study, we examined the thalamic afferents and layer IV neuron patterning in relation to the SPn neurites in the developing barrel cortex in GTE mouse at ages embryonic day 17 (E17) to postnatal day 14 (P14). Serotonin transporter immunohistochemistry or cytochrome oxydase histochemistry was used to reveal thalamic afferent patterning. Bizbenzimide staining identified the developing cytoarchitecture in coronal and tangential sections of GTE brains. Enhanced green fluorescent protein (GFP)-labelled neurites and thalamic afferents were both initially diffusely present in layer IV but by P4–P6 both assumed the characteristic periphery-related pattern and became restricted to the barrel hollows. This pattern gradually changed and by P10 the GFP-labelled neurites largely accumulated at the layer IV–V boundary within the barrel septa whereas thalamic afferents remained in the hollows. To investigate whether this reorganisation is dependent on sensory input, the whiskers of row ‘a’ or ‘c’ were removed at P0 or P5 and the organisation of GFP-labelled neurites in the barrel cortex was examined at P6 or P10. In the contralateral region corresponding to row ‘a’ or ‘c’ the lack of hollow to septa rearrangement of the GFP-labelled neurites was observed after P0 row removal at P10 but not at P6. Our findings suggest a dynamic, sensory periphery-dependent integration of SPn neurites into the primary somatosensory cortex during the period of barrel formation. PMID:19289548

  13. Effect of olfactory manganese exposure on anxiety-related behavior in a mouse model of iron overload hemochromatosis.

    PubMed

    Ye, Qi; Kim, Jonghan

    2015-07-01

    Manganese in excess promotes unstable emotional behavior. Our previous study showed that olfactory manganese uptake into the brain is altered in Hfe(-/-) mice, a model of iron overload hemochromatosis, suggesting that Hfe deficiency could modify the neurotoxicity of airborne manganese. We determined anxiety-related behavior and monoaminergic protein expression after repeated intranasal instillation of MnCl2 to Hfe(-/-) mice. Compared with manganese-instilled wild-type mice, Hfe(-/-) mice showed decreased manganese accumulation in the cerebellum. Hfe(-/-) mice also exhibited increased anxiety with decreased exploratory activity and elevated dopamine D1 receptor and norepinephrine transporter in the striatum. Moreover, Hfe deficiency attenuated manganese-associated impulsivity and modified the effect of manganese on the expression of tyrosine hydroxylase, vesicular monoamine transporter and serotonin transporter. Together, our data indicate that loss of HFE function alters manganese-associated emotional behavior and further suggest that HFE could be a potential molecular target to alleviate affective disorders induced by manganese inhalation.

  14. Wnt Signaling Activates Shh Signaling in Early Postnatal Intervertebral Discs, and Re-Activates Shh Signaling in Old Discs in the Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Sinner, Debora; Wylie, Christopher C.; Dahia, Chitra Lekha

    2014-01-01

    Intervertebral discs (IVDs) are strong fibrocartilaginous joints that connect adjacent vertebrae of the spine. As discs age they become prone to failure, with neurological consequences that are often severe. Surgical repair of discs treats the result of the disease, which affects as many as one in seven people, rather than its cause. An ideal solution would be to repair degenerating discs using the mechanisms of their normal differentiation. However, these mechanisms are poorly understood. Using the mouse as a model, we previously showed that Shh signaling produced by nucleus pulposus cells activates the expression of differentiation markers, and cell proliferation, in the postnatal IVD. In the present study, we show that canonical Wnt signaling is required for the expression of Shh signaling targets in the IVD. We also show that Shh and canonical Wnt signaling pathways are down-regulated in adult IVDs. Furthermore, this down-regulation is reversible, since re-activation of the Wnt or Shh pathways in older discs can re-activate molecular markers of the IVD that are lost with age. These data suggest that biological treatments targeting Wnt and Shh signaling pathways may be feasible as a therapeutic for degenerative disc disease. PMID:24892825

  15. Effect of olfactory manganese exposure on anxiety-related behavior in a mouse model of iron overload hemochromatosis

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Qi; Kim, Jonghan

    2015-01-01

    Manganese in excess promotes unstable emotional behavior. Our previous study showed that olfactory manganese uptake into the brain is altered in Hfe−/− mice, a model of iron overload hemochromatosis, suggesting that Hfe deficiency could modify the neurotoxicity of airborne manganese. We determined anxiety-related behavior and monoaminergic protein expression after repeated intranasal instillation of MnCl2 to Hfe−/− mice. Compared with manganese-instilled wild-type mice, Hfe−/− mice showed decreased manganese accumulation in the cerebellum. Hfe−/− mice also exhibited increased anxiety with decreased exploratory activity and elevated dopamine D1 receptor and norepinephrine transporter in the striatum. Moreover, Hfe deficiency attenuated manganese-associated impulsivity and modified the effect of manganese on the expression of tyrosine hydroxylase, vesicular monoamine transporter and serotonin transporter. Together, our data indicate that loss of HFE function alters manganese-associated emotional behavior and further suggest that HFE could be a potential molecular target to alleviate affective disorders induced by manganese inhalation. PMID:26189056

  16. The effect of spaceflight on mouse olfactory bulb volume, neurogenesis, and cell death indicates the protective effect of novel environment.

    PubMed

    Latchney, Sarah E; Rivera, Phillip D; Mao, Xiao W; Ferguson, Virginia L; Bateman, Ted A; Stodieck, Louis S; Nelson, Gregory A; Eisch, Amelia J

    2014-06-15

    Space missions necessitate physiological and psychological adaptations to environmental factors not present on Earth, some of which present significant risks for the central nervous system (CNS) of crewmembers. One CNS region of interest is the adult olfactory bulb (OB), as OB structure and function are sensitive to environmental- and experience-induced regulation. It is currently unknown how the OB is altered by spaceflight. In this study, we evaluated OB volume and neurogenesis in mice shortly after a 13-day flight on Space Shuttle Atlantis [Space Transport System (STS)-135] relative to two groups of control mice maintained on Earth. Mice housed on Earth in animal enclosure modules that mimicked the conditions onboard STS-135 (AEM-Ground mice) had greater OB volume relative to mice maintained in standard housing on Earth (Vivarium mice), particularly in the granule (GCL) and glomerular (GL) cell layers. AEM-Ground mice also had more OB neuroblasts and fewer apoptotic cells relative to Vivarium mice. However, the AEM-induced increase in OB volume and neurogenesis was not seen in STS-135 mice (AEM-Flight mice), suggesting that spaceflight may have negated the positive effects of the AEM. In fact, when OB volume of AEM-Flight mice was considered, there was a greater density of apoptotic cells relative to AEM-Ground mice. Our findings suggest that factors present during spaceflight have opposing effects on OB size and neurogenesis, and provide insight into potential strategies to preserve OB structure and function during future space missions. PMID:24744382

  17. The effect of spaceflight on mouse olfactory bulb volume, neurogenesis, and cell death indicates the protective effect of novel environment

    PubMed Central

    Latchney, Sarah E.; Rivera, Phillip D.; Mao, Xiao W.; Ferguson, Virginia L.; Bateman, Ted A.; Stodieck, Louis S.; Nelson, Gregory A.

    2014-01-01

    Space missions necessitate physiological and psychological adaptations to environmental factors not present on Earth, some of which present significant risks for the central nervous system (CNS) of crewmembers. One CNS region of interest is the adult olfactory bulb (OB), as OB structure and function are sensitive to environmental- and experience-induced regulation. It is currently unknown how the OB is altered by spaceflight. In this study, we evaluated OB volume and neurogenesis in mice shortly after a 13-day flight on Space Shuttle Atlantis [Space Transport System (STS)-135] relative to two groups of control mice maintained on Earth. Mice housed on Earth in animal enclosure modules that mimicked the conditions onboard STS-135 (AEM-Ground mice) had greater OB volume relative to mice maintained in standard housing on Earth (Vivarium mice), particularly in the granule (GCL) and glomerular (GL) cell layers. AEM-Ground mice also had more OB neuroblasts and fewer apoptotic cells relative to Vivarium mice. However, the AEM-induced increase in OB volume and neurogenesis was not seen in STS-135 mice (AEM-Flight mice), suggesting that spaceflight may have negated the positive effects of the AEM. In fact, when OB volume of AEM-Flight mice was considered, there was a greater density of apoptotic cells relative to AEM-Ground mice. Our findings suggest that factors present during spaceflight have opposing effects on OB size and neurogenesis, and provide insight into potential strategies to preserve OB structure and function during future space missions. PMID:24744382

  18. The effect of spaceflight on mouse olfactory bulb volume, neurogenesis, and cell death indicates the protective effect of novel environment.

    PubMed

    Latchney, Sarah E; Rivera, Phillip D; Mao, Xiao W; Ferguson, Virginia L; Bateman, Ted A; Stodieck, Louis S; Nelson, Gregory A; Eisch, Amelia J

    2014-06-15

    Space missions necessitate physiological and psychological adaptations to environmental factors not present on Earth, some of which present significant risks for the central nervous system (CNS) of crewmembers. One CNS region of interest is the adult olfactory bulb (OB), as OB structure and function are sensitive to environmental- and experience-induced regulation. It is currently unknown how the OB is altered by spaceflight. In this study, we evaluated OB volume and neurogenesis in mice shortly after a 13-day flight on Space Shuttle Atlantis [Space Transport System (STS)-135] relative to two groups of control mice maintained on Earth. Mice housed on Earth in animal enclosure modules that mimicked the conditions onboard STS-135 (AEM-Ground mice) had greater OB volume relative to mice maintained in standard housing on Earth (Vivarium mice), particularly in the granule (GCL) and glomerular (GL) cell layers. AEM-Ground mice also had more OB neuroblasts and fewer apoptotic cells relative to Vivarium mice. However, the AEM-induced increase in OB volume and neurogenesis was not seen in STS-135 mice (AEM-Flight mice), suggesting that spaceflight may have negated the positive effects of the AEM. In fact, when OB volume of AEM-Flight mice was considered, there was a greater density of apoptotic cells relative to AEM-Ground mice. Our findings suggest that factors present during spaceflight have opposing effects on OB size and neurogenesis, and provide insight into potential strategies to preserve OB structure and function during future space missions.

  19. Pre- and postnatal dietary protein deficiency influences anxiety, memory and social behaviour in the African striped mouse Rhabdomys dilectus chakae.

    PubMed

    Pillay, Neville; Rimbach, Rebecca; Rymer, Tasmin

    2016-07-01

    Dietary protein deficiency influences the behavioural phenotypes of mammals. We studied whether protein deficiency during gestation and/or post-weaning heightened anxiety, reduced memory recall and influenced competitive ability in the African striped mouse Rhabdomys dilectus chakae. Mice were subjected to five protein diet treatments, which they received continuously, or were raised on one diet to weaning and switched to an alternate diet post-weaning (Day 16): 1) HP-HP: high protein (24%); first letter pair indicates maternal diet and the second pair indicates offspring diet post-weaning; 2) BP-BP: baseline protein (19%); 3) LP-LP: low protein (10%); 4) HP-LP: switched from high to low protein diet; and 5) LP-HP: switched from low protein to high protein diet. From Day 70, when mice were sexually mature, 20 individuals (10 males, 10 females) per treatment were subjected to three successive experiments, in which we tested their anxiety responses in: 1) an open field arena (time spent in the centre of the open field); 2) novel object recognition (time spent exploring a novel object); and 3) social interactions (excluding BP-BP) in age-matched same-sex dyadic encounters (aggressive, amicable and avoidance behaviours). LP-LP and LP-HP treatment mice spent the least amount of time in the centre of the open field, did not demonstrate object preference compared to the other treatments, and were the most aggressive in dyadic encounters. Our study shows that the systemic effects of protein-deficient diets during early life shapes the behavioural phenotype in R. d. chakae, possibly through early organisation of neuro-biological pathways or competition among littermates. PMID:27080079

  20. Transplacental arsenic plus postnatal 12-O-teradecanoyl phorbol-13-acetate exposures associated with hepatocarcinogenesis induce similar aberrant gene expression patterns in male and female mouse liver

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Jie . E-mail: Liu6@niehs.nih.gov; Xie Yaxiong; Merrick, B. Alex; Shen Jun; Ducharme, Danica M.K.; Collins, Jennifer; Diwan, Bhalchandra A.; Logsdon, Daniel; Waalkes, Michael P.

    2006-06-15

    Our prior work shows that in utero arsenic exposure alone is a complete transplacental carcinogen, producing hepatocellular carcinoma in adult male offspring but not in females. In a follow-up study to potentially promote arsenic-initiated tumors, mice were exposed to arsenic (85 ppm) from gestation day 8 to 18 and then exposed to 12-O-teradecanoyl phorbol-13-acetate (TPA), a well-known tumor promoter after weaning. The dermal application of TPA (2 {mu}g/0.1 ml acetone, twice/week for 21 weeks) after transplacental arsenic did not further increase arsenic-induced liver tumor formation in adult males but significantly increased liver tumor formation in adult females. Thus, for comparison, liver tumors and normal liver samples taken from adult male and female mice at necropsy were analyzed for aberrant gene/protein expression by microarray, real-time RT-PCR and Western blot analysis. Arsenic/TPA treatment resulted in increased expression of {alpha}-fetoprotein, k-ras, c-myc, estrogen receptor-{alpha}, cyclin D1, cdk2na, plasminogen activator inhibitor-1, cytokeratin-8, cytokeratin-18, glutathione S-transferases and insulin-like growth factor binding proteins in liver and liver tumors from both male and female mice. Arsenic/TPA also decreased the expression of BRCA1, betaine-homocysteine methyltransferase, CYP7B1, CYP2F2 and insulin-like growth factor-1 in normal and cancerous livers. Alterations in these gene products were associated with arsenic/TPA-induced liver tumors, regardless of sex. Thus, transplacental arsenic plus postnatal TPA exposure induced similar aberrant gene expression patterns in male and female mouse liver, which are persistent and potentially important to the mechanism of arsenic initiation of hepatocarcinogenesis.

  1. "Small axonless neurons": postnatally generated neocortical interneurons with delayed functional maturation.

    PubMed

    Le Magueresse, Corentin; Alfonso, Julieta; Khodosevich, Konstantin; Arroyo Martín, Angel A; Bark, Christine; Monyer, Hannah

    2011-11-16

    GABAergic interneurons of the mouse cortex are generated embryonically in the ventral telencephalon. Recent evidence, however, indicated that a subset of cortical cells expressing interneuronal markers originate in the neonatal subventricular zone. This has raised interest in the functional development and incorporation of these postnatally generated cells into cortical circuits. Here we demonstrate that these cells integrate in the cortex, and that they constitute two distinct GABAergic interneuronal classes. Whereas one class reflects the tail end of embryonic interneuron genesis, the other class comprises interneurons that are exclusively generated perinatally and postnatally. The latter constitute a novel subclass of interneurons. They are preferentially located in the deeper layers of the olfactory and orbital cortices, exhibit a unique firing pattern and slow functional maturation. Based on their distinct morphology we termed them "small axonless neurons" and indeed, unlike other cortical neurons, they communicate with their neuronal partners via dendrodendritic synapses. Finally, we provide evidence that the number of small axonless neurons is enhanced by odor enrichment, a further indication that they integrate into neural circuits and participate to olfactory processing.

  2. Methods to measure olfactory behavior in mice.

    PubMed

    Zou, Junhui; Wang, Wenbin; Pan, Yung-Wei; Lu, Song; Xia, Zhengui

    2015-02-02

    Mice rely on the sense of olfaction to detect food sources, recognize social and mating partners, and avoid predators. Many behaviors of mice, including learning and memory, social interaction, fear, and anxiety are closely associated with their function of olfaction, and behavior tasks designed to evaluate those brain functions may use odors as cues. Accurate assessment of olfaction is not only essential for the study of olfactory system but also critical for proper interpretation of various mouse behaviors, especially learning and memory, emotionality and affect, and sociality. Here we describe a series of behavior experiments that offer multidimensional and quantitative assessments for mouse olfactory function, including olfactory habituation, discrimination, odor preference, odor detection sensitivity, and olfactory memory, with respect to both social and nonsocial odors.

  3. The effects of pre- and post-natal nicotine exposure and genetic background on the striatum and behavioral phenotypes in the mouse.

    PubMed

    Balsevich, Georgia; Poon, Anna; Goldowitz, Dan; Wilking, Jennifer A

    2014-06-01

    Maternal tobacco use increases the risk of complications in pregnancy and also the risk of adverse fetal outcomes. Studies have established nicotine as the principal component of tobacco smoke that leads to the majority of negative reproductive outcomes associated with maternal tobacco use. It appears the neuroteratogenicity of nicotine is mediated by complex gene-environment interactions. Genetic background contributes to individual differences in nicotine-related phenotypes. The aim of the current study was to investigate the interaction between pre- and post-natal nicotine exposure and genetic background on the histology of the striatum and behavioral measures using DBA/2J (D2) and C57BL/6J (B6) inbred mice. Alterations in neuronal cell populations, striatal brain volume, and behavior - open field (OF) activity, novel object recognition (NOR), elevated plus maze (EPM), and passive avoidance (PA) - were evaluated on post-natal day (PN) 24 and PN75. Histological data showed that pre- and post-natal nicotine exposure resulted in decreased striatal volume among preadolescent B6 and reduced neuronal number within the striatum of preadolescent B6 mice. Behavioral data showed that pre- and post-natal nicotine exposure promoted hyperactivity in D2 female mice and disrupted NOR and PA memory. Specifically, NOR deficits were significant amongst adult male mice whereas PA deficits were seen across genetic background and sex. These data suggest that nicotine treatment, genetic background, developmental stage, and sex effect striatal morphology can lead to neurobehavioral alterations.

  4. Establishment of an in vivo electroporation method into postnatal newborn neurons in the dentate gyrus.

    PubMed

    Ito, Hidenori; Morishita, Rika; Iwamoto, Ikuko; Nagata, Koh-ichi

    2014-12-01

    Electroporation-mediated gene transfer has been developed for the analysis of mammalian brain development in vivo. Indeed, in utero electroporation method is widely used for the investigation of the mouse embryonic cortical development while in vivo electroporation using neonatal mouse brain is employed for the analysis of the rostral migratory stream (RMS) and postnatal olfactory neurogenesis. In the present study, we established a stable gene-transfer method to dentate gyrus (DG) neurons by carefully determining the in vivo electroporation conditions, such as position and direction of electrode, voltage for electric pulses, and interval between electroporation and sample preparation. Consequently, GFP-positive cells in DG were observed to extend branched dendrites and long axons into the molecular layer and the hilus, respectively, 21 days after electrporation. They were morphologically identified as dentate granule neurons with many protrusions on dendrites, and some of them had wide head and thin neck that resembled matured mushroom spines. Expression of GFP in dentate neurons sustained for at least 9 months after electroporation under our experimental conditions. Taken together, the method developed here could be a powerful new tool for the analysis of the postnatal DG development.

  5. The differential effects of prenatal and/or postnatal rapamycin on neurodevelopmental defects and cognition in a neuroglial mouse model of tuberous sclerosis complex

    PubMed Central

    Way, Sharon W.; Rozas, Natalia S.; Wu, Henry C.; McKenna, James; Reith, R. Michelle; Hashmi, S. Shahrukh; Dash, Pramod K.; Gambello, Michael J.

    2012-01-01

    Tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC) is caused by heterozygous mutations in either the TSC1 (hamartin) or the TSC2 (tuberin) gene. Among the multisystemic manifestations of TSC, the neurodevelopmental features cause the most morbidity and mortality, presenting a considerable clinical challenge. Hamartin and tuberin form a heterodimer that inhibits the mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) kinase, a major cellular regulator of protein translation, cell growth and proliferation. Hyperactivated mTORC1 signaling, an important feature of TSC, has prompted a number of preclinical and clinical studies with the mTORC1 inhibitor rapamycin. Equally exciting is the prospect of treating TSC in the perinatal period to block the progression of brain pathologies and allow normal brain development to proceed. We hypothesized that low-dose rapamycin given prenatally and/or postnatally in a well-established neuroglial (Tsc2-hGFAP) model of TSC would rescue brain developmental defects. We developed three treatment regimens with low-dose intraperitoneal rapamycin (0.1 mg/kg): prenatal, postnatal and pre/postnatal (combined). Combined rapamycin treatment resulted in almost complete histologic rescue, with a well-organized cortex and hippocampus almost identical to control animals. Other treatment regimens yielded less complete, but significant improvements in brain histology. To assess how treatment regimens affected cognitive function, we continued rapamycin treatment after weaning and performed behavioral testing. Surprisingly, the animals treated with the combined therapy did not perform as well as postnatally-treated animals in learning and memory tasks. These results have important translational implications in the optimization of the timing and dosage of rapamycin treatment in TSC affected children. PMID:22532572

  6. The septal organ of the rat during postnatal development.

    PubMed

    Weiler, Elke; Farbman, Albert I

    2003-09-01

    The septal organ of Masera (SO) is a small, isolated patch of olfactory epithelium, located in the ventral part of the nasal septum. We investigated in this systematic study the postnatal development of the SO in histological sections of rats at various ages from the day of birth (P1) to P666. The SO-area increases to a maximum at P66-P105, just as the animals reach sexual maturity, and decreases thereafter, significantly however only in males, indicating a limited neurogenetic capacity for regeneration. In contrast, the main olfactory epithelium area continues to expand beyond P300. The modified respiratory epithelium ('zwischen epithelium') separating the SO and the main olfactory epithelium contains a few olfactory neurons up to age P66. Its length increases postnatally so that the SO becomes more ventral to the OE. Although the position of the SO relative to other anatomical landmarks changes with development it is consistently located just posterior to the opening of the nasopalatine duct (NPAL). Thus, a possible function of the SO is in sensing chemicals in fluids entering the mouth by licking and then delivered to the nasal cavity via the NPAL; therefore the SO may be involved in social/sexual behavior as is the vomeronasal organ (VNO). We suggest that the SO is a separate accessory olfactory organ with properties somewhat different from both OE and VNO and may exist only in species where the NPAL does not open into the VNO. PMID:14578120

  7. Mitochondrial impairment induced by postnatal ActRIIB blockade does not alter function and energy status in exercising mouse glycolytic muscle in vivo.

    PubMed

    Béchir, Nelly; Pecchi, Émilie; Relizani, Karima; Vilmen, Christophe; Le Fur, Yann; Bernard, Monique; Amthor, Helge; Bendahan, David; Giannesini, Benoît

    2016-04-01

    Because it leads to a rapid and massive muscle hypertrophy, postnatal blockade of the activin type IIB receptor (ActRIIB) is a promising therapeutic strategy for counteracting muscle wasting. However, the functional consequences remain very poorly documented in vivo. Here, we have investigated the impact of 8-wk ActRIIB blockade with soluble receptor (sActRIIB-Fc) on gastrocnemius muscle anatomy, energy metabolism, and force-generating capacity in wild-type mice, using totally noninvasive magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and dynamic(31)P-MRS. Compared with vehicle (PBS) control, sActRIIB-Fc treatment resulted in a dramatic increase in body weight (+29%) and muscle volume (+58%) calculated from hindlimb MR imaging, but did not alter fiber type distribution determined via myosin heavy chain isoform analysis. In resting muscle, sActRIIB-Fc treatment induced acidosis and PCr depletion, thereby suggesting reduced tissue oxygenation. During an in vivo fatiguing exercise (6-min repeated maximal isometric contraction electrically induced at 1.7 Hz), maximal and total absolute forces were larger in sActRIIB-Fc treated animals (+26 and +12%, respectively), whereas specific force and fatigue resistance were lower (-30 and -37%, respectively). Treatment with sActRIIB-Fc further decreased the maximal rate of oxidative ATP synthesis (-42%) and the oxidative capacity (-34%), but did not alter the bioenergetics status in contracting muscle. Our findings demonstrate in vivo that sActRIIB-Fc treatment increases absolute force-generating capacity and reduces mitochondrial function in glycolytic gastrocnemius muscle, but this reduction does not compromise energy status during sustained activity. Overall, these data support the clinical interest of postnatal ActRIIB blockade.

  8. An IP3R3- and NPY-Expressing Microvillous Cell Mediates Tissue Homeostasis and Regeneration in the Mouse Olfactory Epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Cuihong; Hayoz, Sebastien; Hutch, Chelsea R.; Iqbal, Tania R.; Pooley, Apryl E.; Hegg, Colleen C.

    2013-01-01

    Calcium-dependent release of neurotrophic factors plays an important role in the maintenance of neurons, yet the release mechanisms are understudied. The inositol triphosphate (IP3) receptor is a calcium release channel that has a physiological role in cell growth, development, sensory perception, neuronal signaling and secretion. In the olfactory system, the IP3 receptor subtype 3 (IP3R3) is expressed exclusively in a microvillous cell subtype that is the predominant cell expressing neurotrophic factor neuropeptide Y (NPY). We hypothesized that IP3R3-expressing microvillous cells secrete sufficient NPY needed for both the continual maintenance of the neuronal population and for neuroregeneration following injury. We addressed this question by assessing the release of NPY and the regenerative capabilities of wild type, IP3R3+/−, and IP3R3−/− mice. Injury, simulated using extracellular ATP, induced IP3 receptor-mediated NPY release in wild-type mice. ATP-evoked NPY release was impaired in IP3R3−/− mice, suggesting that IP3R3 contributes to NPY release following injury. Under normal physiological conditions, both IP3R3−/− mice and explants from these mice had fewer progenitor cells that proliferate and differentiate into immature neurons. Although the number of mature neurons and the in vivo rate of proliferation were not altered, the proliferative response to the olfactotoxicant satratoxin G and olfactory bulb ablation injury was compromised in the olfactory epithelium of IP3R3−/− mice. The reductions in both NPY release and number of progenitor cells in IP3R3−/− mice point to a role of the IP3R3 in tissue homeostasis and neuroregeneration. Collectively, these data suggest that IP3R3 expressing microvillous cells are actively responsive to injury and promote recovery. PMID:23516531

  9. An IP3R3- and NPY-expressing microvillous cell mediates tissue homeostasis and regeneration in the mouse olfactory epithelium.

    PubMed

    Jia, Cuihong; Hayoz, Sebastien; Hutch, Chelsea R; Iqbal, Tania R; Pooley, Apryl E; Hegg, Colleen C

    2013-01-01

    Calcium-dependent release of neurotrophic factors plays an important role in the maintenance of neurons, yet the release mechanisms are understudied. The inositol triphosphate (IP3) receptor is a calcium release channel that has a physiological role in cell growth, development, sensory perception, neuronal signaling and secretion. In the olfactory system, the IP3 receptor subtype 3 (IP3R3) is expressed exclusively in a microvillous cell subtype that is the predominant cell expressing neurotrophic factor neuropeptide Y (NPY). We hypothesized that IP3R3-expressing microvillous cells secrete sufficient NPY needed for both the continual maintenance of the neuronal population and for neuroregeneration following injury. We addressed this question by assessing the release of NPY and the regenerative capabilities of wild type, IP3R3(+/-), and IP3R3(-/-) mice. Injury, simulated using extracellular ATP, induced IP3 receptor-mediated NPY release in wild-type mice. ATP-evoked NPY release was impaired in IP3R3(-/-) mice, suggesting that IP3R3 contributes to NPY release following injury. Under normal physiological conditions, both IP3R3(-/-) mice and explants from these mice had fewer progenitor cells that proliferate and differentiate into immature neurons. Although the number of mature neurons and the in vivo rate of proliferation were not altered, the proliferative response to the olfactotoxicant satratoxin G and olfactory bulb ablation injury was compromised in the olfactory epithelium of IP3R3(-/-) mice. The reductions in both NPY release and number of progenitor cells in IP3R3(-/-) mice point to a role of the IP3R3 in tissue homeostasis and neuroregeneration. Collectively, these data suggest that IP3R3 expressing microvillous cells are actively responsive to injury and promote recovery.

  10. The expression pattern and inhibitory influence of Tenascin-C on the growth of spiral ganglion neurons suggest a regulatory role as boundary formation molecule in the postnatal mouse inner ear.

    PubMed

    Kwiatkowska, M; Reinhard, J; Roll, L; Kraft, N; Dazert, S; Faissner, A; Volkenstein, S

    2016-04-01

    Sensorineural hearing loss, as a consequence of acoustic trauma, aging, genetic defects or ototoxic drugs, is highly associated with irreversible damage of cochlear hair cells (HCs) and secondary degeneration of spiral ganglion (SG) cells. Cochlear implants (CIs), which bypass the lost HC function by direct electrical stimulation of the remaining auditory neurons, offer an effective therapy option. Several studies imply that components of the extracellular matrix (ECM) have a great impact on the adhesion and growth of spiral ganglion neurons (SGNs) during development. Based on these findings, ECM proteins might act as bioactive CI substrates to optimize the electrode-nerve interface and to improve efficacy of these implants. In the present study, we focused on the ECM glycoproteins Tenascin-C (TN-C), Laminin (LN), and Fibronectin (FN), which show a prominent expression along the growth route of SGNs and the niche around HCs during murine postnatal development in vivo. We compared their influence on adhesion, neurite length, and neurite number of SGNs in vitro. Moreover, we studied the expression of the chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan (CSPG) dermatan sulfate-dependent proteoglycan-1 (DSD-1-PG), an interaction partner of TN-C. In sum, our in vitro data suggest that TN-C acts as an anti-adhesive and inhibitory factor for the growth of SGNs. The DSD-1 carbohydrate epitope is specifically localized to HC stereocilia and SG fibers. Interestingly, TN-C and the DSD-1-PG exhibit a mutually exclusive expression pattern, with the exception of a very restricted region beneath the habenula perforata, where SG neurites grow through the basilar membrane (BM) toward the HCs. The complementary expression of TN-C, LN, FN, and the DSD-1 epitope suggests that TN-C may act as an important boundary formation molecule in the developing postnatal mouse inner ear, which makes it a promising candidate to regulate neurite outgrowth in the light of CIs.

  11. Olfactory system and demyelination.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Gonzalez, D; Murcia-Belmonte, V; Clemente, D; De Castro, F

    2013-09-01

    Within the central nervous system, the olfactory system represents one of the most exciting scenarios since it presents relevant examples of long-life sustained neurogenesis and continuous axonal outgrowth from the olfactory epithelium with the subsequent plasticity phenomena in the olfactory bulb. The olfactory nerve is composed of nonmyelinated axons with interesting ontogenetic interpretations. However, the centripetal projections from the olfactory bulb are myelinated axons which project to more caudal areas along the lateral olfactory tract. In consequence, demyelination has not been considered as a possible cause of the olfactory symptoms in those diseases in which this sense is impaired. One prototypical example of an olfactory disease is Kallmann syndrome, in which different mutations give rise to combined anosmia and hypogonadotropic hypogonadism, together with different satellite symptoms. Anosmin-1 is the extracellular matrix glycoprotein altered in the X-linked form of this disease, which participates in cell adhesion and migration, and axonal outgrowth in the olfactory system and in other regions of the central nervous system. Recently, we have described a new patho-physiological role of this protein in the absence of spontaneous remyelination in multiple sclerosis. In the present review, we hypothesize about how both main and satellite neurological symptoms of Kallmann syndrome may be explained by alterations in the myelination. We revisit the relationship between the olfactory system and myelin highlighting that minor histological changes should not be forgotten as putative causes of olfactory malfunction.

  12. Postnatal day 7 ethanol treatment causes persistent reductions in adult mouse brain volume and cortical neurons with sex specific effects on neurogenesis.

    PubMed

    Coleman, Leon G; Oguz, Ipek; Lee, Joohwi; Styner, Martin; Crews, Fulton T

    2012-09-01

    Ethanol treatment on postnatal day seven (P7) causes robust brain cell death and is a model of late gestational alcohol exposure (Ikonomidou et al., 2000). To investigate the long-term effects of P7 ethanol treatment on adult brain, mice received either two doses of saline or ethanol on P7 (2.5 g/kg, s.c., 2 h apart) and were assessed as adults (P82) for brain volume (using postmortem MRI) and cellular architecture (using immunohistochemistry). Adult mice that received P7 ethanol had reduced MRI total brain volume (4%) with multiple brain regions being reduced in both males and females. Immunohistochemistry indicated reduced frontal cortical parvalbumin immunoreactive (PV + IR) interneurons (18-33%) and reduced Cux1+IR layer II pyramidal neurons (15%) in both sexes. Interestingly, markers of adult hippocampal neurogenesis differed between sexes, with only ethanol treated males showing increased doublecortin and Ki67 expression (52 and 57% respectively) in the dentate gyrus, consistent with increased neurogenesis compared to controls. These findings suggest that P7 ethanol treatment causes persistent reductions in adult brain volume and frontal cortical neurons in both males and females. Increased adult neurogenesis in males, but not females, is consistent with differential adaptive responses to P7 ethanol toxicity between the sexes. One day of ethanol exposure, e.g. P7, causes persistent adult brain dysmorphology.

  13. Altered postnatal cell proliferation in brains of mouse pups prenatally exposed to IgG from mothers of children with autistic disorder.

    PubMed

    Kadam, Shilpa D; French, Beth M; Kim, S-T; Morris-Berry, Christy M; Zimmerman, Andrew W; Blue, Mary E; Singer, Harvey S

    2013-01-01

    Auto antibodies found in the mothers of children with autistic disorder (MCAD) when passively transferred to pregnant mice cause behavioral alterations in juvenile and adult offspring. The goal of this study was to identify whether intraperitoneal injection of MCAD-IgG during gestation affected postnatal cell proliferation and survival in P7 offspring. Pooled MCAD-IgG or IgG from mothers of unaffected children (MUC) or phosphate-buffered saline was injected daily into C57BL/J6 pregnant dams (gestational days E13-E18). MCAD-IgG exposure significantly increased cell proliferation in the subventricular and subgranular zones. In contrast, BrdU-labeled cells on P1 and surviving until P7 (P1-generated cells) showed reduced cell densities in layers 2-4 of frontal and parietal cortices of MCAD mice compared to those in MUC and PBS-injected mice. In conclusion, significant increases in cell proliferation at P7 and reduced densities of P1-generated cells distinguish in utero exposure to MCAD compared to MUC and PBS.

  14. Use of DEAD-box polypeptide-4 (Ddx4) gene promoter-driven fluorescent reporter mice to identify mitotically active germ cells in post-natal mouse ovaries.

    PubMed

    Park, Eun-Sil; Tilly, Jonathan L

    2015-01-01

    Several laboratories have independently isolated mitotically active germ cells, termed female germline stem cells or oogonial stem cells (OSCs), from adult mouse ovaries. However, a recent study using Ddx4-Cre;Rosa26 reporter mice concluded that such germ cells do not exist. Given the disparity in conclusions drawn in this study compared with others, we felt it was important to re-assess the utility of Ddx4-Cre;Rosa26 reporter mice for identification of OSCs in adult mouse ovaries. Transgenic Ddx4-Cre mice were crossed with Rosa26(tdTm/tdTm) mice to drive restricted tomato red (tdTm) gene expression in cells in which the Ddx4 gene promoter has been activated. Crude dispersion of ovaries from recombined offspring generated cell fractions containing tdTm-positive immature oocytes, which are incapable of proliferation and thus probably represent the uncharacterized reporter-positive ovarian cells identified in the paper Zhang et al. (2012) as being mitotically inactive. Dispersed ovaries further subjected to fluorescence-activated cell sorting yielded a large population of non-germline tdTm-positive cells, indicative of promoter 'leakiness' in the Ddx4-Cre mouse line. Nonetheless, a small percentage of these tdTm-positive cells exhibited externalized (extracellular, ec) expression of Ddx4 protein (ecDdx4-positive), expressed markers of primitive germ cells but not of oocytes, and actively proliferated in culture, all of which are characteristic features of OSCs. Thus, crude dispersion of ovaries collected from Ddx4 gene promoter-driven reporter mice is not, by itself, a reliable approach to identify OSCs, whereas the same ovarian dispersates further subjected to cell sorting strategies yield purified OSCs that can be expanded in culture.

  15. Use of DEAD-box polypeptide-4 (Ddx4) gene promoter-driven fluorescent reporter mice to identify mitotically active germ cells in post-natal mouse ovaries.

    PubMed

    Park, Eun-Sil; Tilly, Jonathan L

    2015-01-01

    Several laboratories have independently isolated mitotically active germ cells, termed female germline stem cells or oogonial stem cells (OSCs), from adult mouse ovaries. However, a recent study using Ddx4-Cre;Rosa26 reporter mice concluded that such germ cells do not exist. Given the disparity in conclusions drawn in this study compared with others, we felt it was important to re-assess the utility of Ddx4-Cre;Rosa26 reporter mice for identification of OSCs in adult mouse ovaries. Transgenic Ddx4-Cre mice were crossed with Rosa26(tdTm/tdTm) mice to drive restricted tomato red (tdTm) gene expression in cells in which the Ddx4 gene promoter has been activated. Crude dispersion of ovaries from recombined offspring generated cell fractions containing tdTm-positive immature oocytes, which are incapable of proliferation and thus probably represent the uncharacterized reporter-positive ovarian cells identified in the paper Zhang et al. (2012) as being mitotically inactive. Dispersed ovaries further subjected to fluorescence-activated cell sorting yielded a large population of non-germline tdTm-positive cells, indicative of promoter 'leakiness' in the Ddx4-Cre mouse line. Nonetheless, a small percentage of these tdTm-positive cells exhibited externalized (extracellular, ec) expression of Ddx4 protein (ecDdx4-positive), expressed markers of primitive germ cells but not of oocytes, and actively proliferated in culture, all of which are characteristic features of OSCs. Thus, crude dispersion of ovaries collected from Ddx4 gene promoter-driven reporter mice is not, by itself, a reliable approach to identify OSCs, whereas the same ovarian dispersates further subjected to cell sorting strategies yield purified OSCs that can be expanded in culture. PMID:25147160

  16. The effects of postnatal exposure to low-dose bisphenol-A on activity-dependent plasticity in the mouse sensory cortex.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Emily A; Opanashuk, Lisa A; Majewska, Ania K

    2014-01-01

    Bisphenol-A (BPA) is a monomer used in the production of polycarbonate plastics, epoxies and resins and is present in many common household objects ranging from water bottles, can linings, baby bottles, and dental resins. BPA exposure has been linked to numerous negative health effects throughout the body, although the mechanisms of BPA action on the developing brain are still poorly understood. In this study, we sought to investigate whether low dose BPA exposure during a developmental phase when brain connectivity is being organized can cause long-term deleterious effects on brain function and plasticity that outlast the BPA exposure. Lactating dams were orally exposed to 25 μg/kg/day of BPA (one half the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's 50 μg/kg/day rodent dose reference) or vehicle alone from postnatal day (P)5 to P21. Pups exposed to BPA in their mother's milk exhibited deficits in activity-dependent plasticity in the visual cortex during the visual critical period (P28). To determine the possible mechanisms underlying BPA action, we used immunohistochemistry to examine histological markers known to impact cortical maturity and developmental plasticity and quantified cortical dendritic spine density, morphology, and dynamics. While we saw no changes in parvalbumin neuron density, myelin basic protein expression or microglial density in BPA-exposed animals, we observed increases in spine density on apical dendrites in cortical layer five neurons but no significant alterations in other morphological parameters. Taken together our results suggest that exposure to very low levels of BPA during a critical period of brain development can have profound consequences for the normal wiring of sensory circuits and their plasticity later in life. PMID:25374513

  17. The effects of postnatal exposure to low-dose bisphenol-A on activity-dependent plasticity in the mouse sensory cortex

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, Emily A.; Opanashuk, Lisa A.; Majewska, Ania K.

    2014-01-01

    Bisphenol-A (BPA) is a monomer used in the production of polycarbonate plastics, epoxies and resins and is present in many common household objects ranging from water bottles, can linings, baby bottles, and dental resins. BPA exposure has been linked to numerous negative health effects throughout the body, although the mechanisms of BPA action on the developing brain are still poorly understood. In this study, we sought to investigate whether low dose BPA exposure during a developmental phase when brain connectivity is being organized can cause long-term deleterious effects on brain function and plasticity that outlast the BPA exposure. Lactating dams were orally exposed to 25 μg/kg/day of BPA (one half the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s 50 μg/kg/day rodent dose reference) or vehicle alone from postnatal day (P)5 to P21. Pups exposed to BPA in their mother’s milk exhibited deficits in activity-dependent plasticity in the visual cortex during the visual critical period (P28). To determine the possible mechanisms underlying BPA action, we used immunohistochemistry to examine histological markers known to impact cortical maturity and developmental plasticity and quantified cortical dendritic spine density, morphology, and dynamics. While we saw no changes in parvalbumin neuron density, myelin basic protein expression or microglial density in BPA-exposed animals, we observed increases in spine density on apical dendrites in cortical layer five neurons but no significant alterations in other morphological parameters. Taken together our results suggest that exposure to very low levels of BPA during a critical period of brain development can have profound consequences for the normal wiring of sensory circuits and their plasticity later in life. PMID:25374513

  18. Electrophysiological differentiation of new neurons in the olfactory bulb.

    PubMed

    Belluzzi, Ottorino; Benedusi, Mascia; Ackman, James; LoTurco, Joseph J

    2003-11-12

    The subventricular zone produces neuroblasts that migrate to the olfactory bulb (OB) and differentiate into interneurons throughout postnatal life (Altman and Das, 1966; Hinds, 1968; Altman, 1969; Kishi et al., 1990; Luskin, 1993; Lois and Alvarez-Buylla, 1994). Although such postnatally generated interneurons have been characterized morphologically, their physiological differentiation has not been thoroughly described. Combining retroviral-mediated labeling of newly generated neurons with patch-clamp electrophysiology, we demonstrated that soon after new cells enter the layers of the olfactory bulb, they display voltage-dependent currents typical of more mature neurons. We also show that these "newcomers" express functional GABA and glutamate receptor channels, respond synaptically to stimulation of the olfactory nerve, and may establish both axodendritic and dendrodendritic synaptic contacts within the olfactory bulb. These data provide a basic description of the physiology of newly generated cells in the OB and show that such new cells are functional neurons that synaptically integrate into olfactory bulb circuitry soon after their arrival.

  19. Centrifugal telencephalic afferent connections to the main and accessory olfactory bulbs.

    PubMed

    Mohedano-Moriano, Alicia; de la Rosa-Prieto, Carlos; Saiz-Sanchez, Daniel; Ubeda-Bañon, Isabel; Pro-Sistiaga, Palma; de Moya-Pinilla, Miguel; Martinez-Marcos, Alino

    2012-01-01

    Parallel to the olfactory system, most mammals possess an accessory olfactory or vomeronasal system. The olfactory and vomeronasal epithelia project to the main and accessory olfactory bulbs, which in turn project to adjacent areas of the telencephalon, respectively. New data indicate that projections arising from the main and accessory olfactory bulbs partially converge in the rostral telencephalon and are non-overlapping at caudal telencephalic levels. Therefore, the basal telencephalon should be reclassified in olfactory, vomeronasal, and mixed areas. On the other hand, it has been demonstrated that virtually all olfactory- and vomeronasal-recipient structures send reciprocal projections to the main and accessory olfactory bulbs, respectively. Further, non-chemosensory recipient structures also projects centrifugally to the olfactory bulbs. These feed-back projections appear to be essential modulating processing of chemosensory information. The present work aims at characterizing centrifugal projections to the main and accessory olfactory bulbs arising from olfactory, vomeronasal, mixed, and non-chemosensory recipient telencephalic areas. This issue has been addressed by using tracer injections in the rat and mouse brain. Tracer injections were delivered into the main and accessory olfactory bulbs as well as in olfactory, vomeronasal, mixed, and non-chemosensory recipient telencephalic structures. The results confirm that olfactory- and vomeronasal-recipient structures project to the main and accessory olfactory bulbs, respectively. Interestingly, olfactory (e.g., piriform cortex), vomeronasal (e.g., posteromedial cortical amygdala), mixed (e.g., the anterior medial amygdaloid nucleus), and non-chemosensory-recipient (e.g., the nucleus of the diagonal band) structures project to the main and to the accessory olfactory bulbs thus providing the possibility of simultaneous modulation and interaction of both systems at different stages of chemosensory processing.

  20. Centrifugal telencephalic afferent connections to the main and accessory olfactory bulbs

    PubMed Central

    Mohedano-Moriano, Alicia; de la Rosa-Prieto, Carlos; Saiz-Sanchez, Daniel; Ubeda-Bañon, Isabel; Pro-Sistiaga, Palma; de Moya-Pinilla, Miguel; Martinez-Marcos, Alino

    2012-01-01

    Parallel to the olfactory system, most mammals possess an accessory olfactory or vomeronasal system. The olfactory and vomeronasal epithelia project to the main and accessory olfactory bulbs, which in turn project to adjacent areas of the telencephalon, respectively. New data indicate that projections arising from the main and accessory olfactory bulbs partially converge in the rostral telencephalon and are non-overlapping at caudal telencephalic levels. Therefore, the basal telencephalon should be reclassified in olfactory, vomeronasal, and mixed areas. On the other hand, it has been demonstrated that virtually all olfactory- and vomeronasal-recipient structures send reciprocal projections to the main and accessory olfactory bulbs, respectively. Further, non-chemosensory recipient structures also projects centrifugally to the olfactory bulbs. These feed-back projections appear to be essential modulating processing of chemosensory information. The present work aims at characterizing centrifugal projections to the main and accessory olfactory bulbs arising from olfactory, vomeronasal, mixed, and non-chemosensory recipient telencephalic areas. This issue has been addressed by using tracer injections in the rat and mouse brain. Tracer injections were delivered into the main and accessory olfactory bulbs as well as in olfactory, vomeronasal, mixed, and non-chemosensory recipient telencephalic structures. The results confirm that olfactory- and vomeronasal-recipient structures project to the main and accessory olfactory bulbs, respectively. Interestingly, olfactory (e.g., piriform cortex), vomeronasal (e.g., posteromedial cortical amygdala), mixed (e.g., the anterior medial amygdaloid nucleus), and non-chemosensory-recipient (e.g., the nucleus of the diagonal band) structures project to the main and to the accessory olfactory bulbs thus providing the possibility of simultaneous modulation and interaction of both systems at different stages of chemosensory processing

  1. Neurogenesis, Neurodegeneration, Interneuron Vulnerability, and Amyloid-β in the Olfactory Bulb of APP/PS1 Mouse Model of Alzheimer's Disease

    PubMed Central

    De la Rosa-Prieto, Carlos; Saiz-Sanchez, Daniel; Ubeda-Banon, Isabel; Flores-Cuadrado, Alicia; Martinez-Marcos, Alino

    2016-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most prevalent neurodegenerative disease, mostly idiopathic and with palliative treatment. Neuropathologically, it is characterized by intracellular neurofibrillary tangles of tau protein and extracellular plaques of amyloid β peptides. The relationship between AD and neurogenesis is unknown, but two facts are particularly relevant. First, early aggregation sites of both proteinopathies include the hippocampal formation and the olfactory bulb (OB), which have been correlated to memory and olfactory deficits, respectively. These areas are well-recognized integration zones of newly-born neurons in the adult brain. Second, molecules, such as amyloid precursor protein (APP) and presenilin-1 are common to both AD etiology and neurogenic development. Adult neurogenesis in AD models has been studied in the hippocampus, but only occasionally addressed in the OB and results are contradictory. To gain insight on the relationship between adult neurogenesis and AD, this work analyzes neurogenesis, neurodegeneration, interneuron vulnerability, and amyloid-β involvement in the OB of an AD model. Control and double-transgenic mice carrying the APP and the presenilin-1 genes, which give rise amyloid β plaques have been used. BrdU-treated animals have been studied at 16, 30, 43, and 56 weeks of age. New-born cell survival (BrdU), neuronal loss (using neuronal markers NeuN and PGP9.5), differential interneuron (calbindin-, parvalbumin-, calretinin- and somatostatin-expressing populations) vulnerability, and involvement by amyloid β have been analyzed. Neurogenesis increases with aging in the granule cell layer of control animals from 16 to 43 weeks. No neuronal loss has been observed after quantifying NeuN or PGP9.5. Regarding interneuron population vulnerability: calbindin-expressing neurons remains unchanged; parvalbumin-expressing neurons trend to increase with aging in transgenic animals; calretinin-expressing neurons increase with aging in

  2. Olfactory Receptor Patterning in a Higher Primate

    PubMed Central

    Horowitz, Lisa F.; Saraiva, Luis R.; Kuang, Donghui; Yoon, Kyoung-hye

    2014-01-01

    The mammalian olfactory system detects a plethora of environmental chemicals that are perceived as odors or stimulate instinctive behaviors. Studies using odorant receptor (OR) genes have provided insight into the molecular and organizational strategies underlying olfaction in mice. One important unanswered question, however, is whether these strategies are conserved in primates. To explore this question, we examined the macaque, a higher primate phylogenetically close to humans. Here we report that the organization of sensory inputs in the macaque nose resembles that in mouse in some respects, but not others. As in mouse, neurons with different ORs are interspersed in the macaque nose, and there are spatial zones that differ in their complement of ORs and extend axons to different domains in the olfactory bulb of the brain. However, whereas the mouse has multiple discrete band-like zones, the macaque appears to have only two broad zones. It is unclear whether the organization of OR inputs in a rodent/primate common ancestor degenerated in primates or, alternatively became more sophisticated in rodents. The mouse nose has an additional small family of chemosensory receptors, called trace amine-associated receptors (TAARs), which may detect social cues. Here we find that TAARs are also expressed in the macaque nose, suggesting that TAARs may also play a role in human olfactory perception. We further find that one human TAAR responds to rotten fish, suggesting a possible role as a sentinel to discourage ingestion of food harboring pathogenic microorganisms. PMID:25209267

  3. High-Field MRI Reveals a Drastic Increase of Hypoxia-Induced Microhemorrhages upon Tissue Reoxygenation in the Mouse Brain with Strong Predominance in the Olfactory Bulb

    PubMed Central

    Helluy, Xavier; Milford, David; Heiland, Sabine; Bendszus, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Human pathophysiology of high altitude hypoxic brain injury is not well understood and research on the underlying mechanisms is hampered by the lack of well-characterized animal models. In this study, we explored the evolution of brain injury by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and histological methods in mice exposed to normobaric hypoxia at 8% oxygen for 48 hours followed by rapid reoxygenation and incubation for further 24 h under normoxic conditions. T2*-, diffusion-weighted and T2-relaxometry MRI was performed before exposure, immediately after 48 hours of hypoxia and 24 hours after reoxygenation. Cerebral microhemorrhages, previously described in humans suffering from severe high altitude cerebral edema, were also detected in mice upon hypoxia-reoxygenation with a strong region-specific clustering in the olfactory bulb, and to a lesser extent, in the basal ganglia and cerebral white matter. The number of microhemorrhages determined immediately after hypoxia was low, but strongly increased 24 hours upon onset of reoxygenation. Histologically verified microhemorrhages were exclusively located around cerebral microvessels with disrupted interendothelial tight junction protein ZO-1. In contrast, quantitative T2 and apparent-diffusion-coefficient values immediately after hypoxia and after 24 hours of reoxygenation did not show any region-specific alteration, consistent with subtle multifocal but not with regional or global brain edema. PMID:26863147

  4. Long-term in vivo single-cell tracking reveals the switch of migration patterns in adult-born juxtaglomerular cells of the mouse olfactory bulb.

    PubMed

    Liang, Yajie; Li, Kaizhen; Riecken, Kristoffer; Maslyukov, Anatoliy; Gomez-Nicola, Diego; Kovalchuk, Yury; Fehse, Boris; Garaschuk, Olga

    2016-07-01

    The behavior of adult-born cells can be easily monitored in cell culture or in lower model organisms, but longitudinal observation of individual mammalian adult-born cells in their native microenvironment still proves to be a challenge. Here we have established an approach named optical cell positioning system for long-term in vivo single-cell tracking, which integrates red-green-blue cell labeling with repeated angiography. By combining this approach with in vivo two-photon imaging technique, we characterized the in vivo migration patterns of adult-born neurons in the olfactory bulb. In contrast to the traditional view of mere radial migration of adult-born cells within the bulb, we found that juxtaglomerular cells switch from radial migration to long distance lateral migration upon arrival in their destination layer. This unique long-distance lateral migration has characteristic temporal (stop-and-go) and spatial (migratory, unidirectional or multidirectional) patterns, with a clear cell age-dependent decrease in the migration speed. The active migration of adult-born cells coincides with the time period of initial fate determination and is likely to impact on the integration sites of adult-born cells, their odor responsiveness, as well as their survival rate.

  5. High-Field MRI Reveals a Drastic Increase of Hypoxia-Induced Microhemorrhages upon Tissue Reoxygenation in the Mouse Brain with Strong Predominance in the Olfactory Bulb.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, Angelika; Kunze, Reiner; Helluy, Xavier; Milford, David; Heiland, Sabine; Bendszus, Martin; Pham, Mirko; Marti, Hugo H

    2016-01-01

    Human pathophysiology of high altitude hypoxic brain injury is not well understood and research on the underlying mechanisms is hampered by the lack of well-characterized animal models. In this study, we explored the evolution of brain injury by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and histological methods in mice exposed to normobaric hypoxia at 8% oxygen for 48 hours followed by rapid reoxygenation and incubation for further 24 h under normoxic conditions. T2*-, diffusion-weighted and T2-relaxometry MRI was performed before exposure, immediately after 48 hours of hypoxia and 24 hours after reoxygenation. Cerebral microhemorrhages, previously described in humans suffering from severe high altitude cerebral edema, were also detected in mice upon hypoxia-reoxygenation with a strong region-specific clustering in the olfactory bulb, and to a lesser extent, in the basal ganglia and cerebral white matter. The number of microhemorrhages determined immediately after hypoxia was low, but strongly increased 24 hours upon onset of reoxygenation. Histologically verified microhemorrhages were exclusively located around cerebral microvessels with disrupted interendothelial tight junction protein ZO-1. In contrast, quantitative T2 and apparent-diffusion-coefficient values immediately after hypoxia and after 24 hours of reoxygenation did not show any region-specific alteration, consistent with subtle multifocal but not with regional or global brain edema. PMID:26863147

  6. Expression of the CTCFL Gene during Mouse Embryogenesis Causes Growth Retardation, Postnatal Lethality, and Dysregulation of the Transforming Growth Factor β Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Sati, Leyla; Zeiss, Caroline; Yekkala, Krishna; Demir, Ramazan

    2015-01-01

    CTCFL, a paralog of CTCF, also known as BORIS (brother of regulator of imprinted sites), is a testis-expressed gene whose function is largely unknown. Its product is a cancer testis antigen (CTA), and it is often expressed in tumor cells and also seen in two benign human vascular malformations, juvenile angiofibromas and infantile hemangiomas. To understand the function of Ctcfl, we created tetracycline-inducible Ctcfl transgenic mice. We show that Ctcfl expression during embryogenesis results in growth retardation, eye malformations, multiorgan pathologies, vascular defects, and neonatal death. This phenotype resembles prior mouse models that perturb the transforming growth factor β (TGFB) pathway. Embryonic stem (ES) cells with the Ctcfl transgene reproduce the phenotype in ES cell-tetraploid chimeras. Transcriptome sequencing of the Ctcfl ES cells revealed 14 genes deregulated by Ctcfl expression. Bioinformatic analysis revealed the TGFB pathway as most affected by embryonic Ctcfl expression. Understanding the consequence of Ctcfl expression in nontesticular cells and elucidating downstream targets of Ctcfl could explain the role of its product as a CTA and its involvement in two, if not more, human vascular malformations. PMID:26169830

  7. Immunoelectron microscopic localization of the neural cell adhesion molecules L1 and N-CAM during postnatal development of the mouse cerebellum

    PubMed Central

    1987-01-01

    The cellular and subcellular localization of the neural cell adhesion molecules L1 and N-CAM was studied by pre- and postembedding immunoelectron microscopic labeling procedures in the developing mouse cerebellar cortex. The salient features of the study are: L1 displays a previously unrecognized restricted expression by particular neuronal cell types (i.e., it is expressed by granule cells but not by stellate and basket cells) and by particular subcellular compartments (i.e., it is expressed on axons but not on dendrites or cell bodies of Purkinje cells). L1 is always expressed on fasciculating axons and on postmitotic, premigratory, and migrating granule cells at sites of neuron-neuron contact, but never at contact sites between neuron and glia, thus strengthening the view that L1 is not involved in granule cell migration as a neuron-glia adhesion molecule. While N-CAM antibodies reacting with the three major components of N-CAM (180, 140, and 120 kD) show a rather uniform labeling of all cell types, antibodies to the 180-kD component (N-CAM180) stain only the postmigratory granule cell bodies supporting the notion that N-CAM180, the N-CAM component with the longest cytoplasmic domain, is not expressed before stable cell contacts are formed. Furthermore, N-CAM180 is only transiently expressed on Purkinje cell dendrites. N-CAM is present in synapses on both pre- and post-synaptic membranes. L1 is expressed only preterminally and not in the subsynaptic membranes. These observations indicate an exquisite degree of fine tuning in adhesion molecule expression during neural development and suggest a rich combinatorial repertoire in the specification of cell surface contacts. PMID:3301870

  8. ANO2 is the cilial calcium-activated chloride channel that may mediate olfactory amplification

    PubMed Central

    Stephan, Aaron B.; Shum, Eleen Y.; Hirsh, Sarah; Cygnar, Katherine D.; Reisert, Johannes; Zhao, Haiqing

    2009-01-01

    For vertebrate olfactory signal transduction, a calcium-activated chloride conductance serves as a major amplification step. However, the molecular identity of the olfactory calcium-activated chloride channel (CaCC) is unknown. Here we report a proteomic screen for cilial membrane proteins of mouse olfactory sensory neurons (OSNs) that identified all the known olfactory transduction components as well as Anoctamin 2 (ANO2). Ano2 transcripts were expressed specifically in OSNs in the olfactory epithelium, and ANO2::EGFP fusion protein localized to the OSN cilia when expressed in vivo using an adenoviral vector. Patch-clamp analysis revealed that ANO2, when expressed in HEK-293 cells, forms a CaCC and exhibits channel properties closely resembling the native olfactory CaCC. Considering these findings together, we propose that ANO2 constitutes the olfactory calcium-activated chloride channel. PMID:19561302

  9. Inducible activation of ERK5 MAP kinase enhances adult neurogenesis in the olfactory bulb and improves olfactory function.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wenbin; Lu, Song; Li, Tan; Pan, Yung-Wei; Zou, Junhui; Abel, Glen M; Xu, Lihong; Storm, Daniel R; Xia, Zhengui

    2015-05-20

    Recent discoveries have suggested that adult neurogenesis in the subventricular zone (SVZ) and olfactory bulb (OB) may be required for at least some forms of olfactory behavior in mice. However, it is unclear whether conditional and selective enhancement of adult neurogenesis by genetic approaches is sufficient to improve olfactory function under physiological conditions or after injury. Furthermore, specific signaling mechanisms regulating adult neurogenesis in the SVZ/OB are not fully defined. We previously reported that ERK5, a MAP kinase selectively expressed in the neurogenic regions of the adult brain, plays a critical role in adult neurogenesis in the SVZ/OB. Using a site-specific knock-in mouse model, we report here that inducible and targeted activation of the endogenous ERK5 in adult neural stem/progenitor cells enhances adult neurogenesis in the OB by increasing cell survival and neuronal differentiation. This conditional ERK5 activation also improves short-term olfactory memory and odor-cued associative olfactory learning under normal physiological conditions. Furthermore, these mice show enhanced recovery of olfactory function and have more adult-born neurons after a zinc sulfate-induced lesion of the main olfactory epithelium. We conclude that ERK5 MAP kinase is an important endogenous signaling pathway regulating adult neurogenesis in the SVZ/OB, and that conditional activation of endogenous ERK5 is sufficient to enhance adult neurogenesis in the OB thereby improving olfactory function both under normal conditions and after injury.

  10. Inducible Activation of ERK5 MAP Kinase Enhances Adult Neurogenesis in the Olfactory Bulb and Improves Olfactory Function

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wenbin; Lu, Song; Li, Tan; Pan, Yung-Wei; Zou, Junhui; Abel, Glen M.; Xu, Lihong; Storm, Daniel R.

    2015-01-01

    Recent discoveries have suggested that adult neurogenesis in the subventricular zone (SVZ) and olfactory bulb (OB) may be required for at least some forms of olfactory behavior in mice. However, it is unclear whether conditional and selective enhancement of adult neurogenesis by genetic approaches is sufficient to improve olfactory function under physiological conditions or after injury. Furthermore, specific signaling mechanisms regulating adult neurogenesis in the SVZ/OB are not fully defined. We previously reported that ERK5, a MAP kinase selectively expressed in the neurogenic regions of the adult brain, plays a critical role in adult neurogenesis in the SVZ/OB. Using a site-specific knock-in mouse model, we report here that inducible and targeted activation of the endogenous ERK5 in adult neural stem/progenitor cells enhances adult neurogenesis in the OB by increasing cell survival and neuronal differentiation. This conditional ERK5 activation also improves short-term olfactory memory and odor-cued associative olfactory learning under normal physiological conditions. Furthermore, these mice show enhanced recovery of olfactory function and have more adult-born neurons after a zinc sulfate-induced lesion of the main olfactory epithelium. We conclude that ERK5 MAP kinase is an important endogenous signaling pathway regulating adult neurogenesis in the SVZ/OB, and that conditional activation of endogenous ERK5 is sufficient to enhance adult neurogenesis in the OB thereby improving olfactory function both under normal conditions and after injury. PMID:25995470

  11. Practical postnatal care.

    PubMed

    Smibert, J

    1989-05-01

    This second paper by the author presents an experienced obstetrician's viewpoint of a very practical and perhaps provocative approach to postnatal care, especially considering the rights and emotional factors of the new parents.

  12. Expression of Olfactory Signaling Genes in the Eye

    PubMed Central

    Velmeshev, Dmitry; Faghihi, Mohammad; Shestopalov, Valery I.; Slepak, Vladlen Z.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To advance our understanding how the outer eye interacts with its environment, we asked which cellular receptors are expressed in the cornea, focusing on G protein-coupled receptors. Methods Total RNA from the mouse cornea was subjected to next-generation sequencing using the Illumina platform. The data was analyzed with TopHat and CuffLinks software packages. Expression of a representative group of genes detected by RNA-seq was further analyzed by RT-PCR and in situ hybridization using RNAscope technology and fluorescent microscopy. Results We generated more than 46 million pair-end reads from mouse corneal RNA. Bioinformatics analysis revealed that the mouse corneal transcriptome reconstructed from these reads represents over 10,000 gene transcripts. We identified 194 GPCR transcripts, of which 96 were putative olfactory receptors. RT-PCR analysis confirmed the presence of several olfactory receptors and related genes, including olfactory marker protein and the G protein associated with olfaction, Gαolf. In situ hybridization showed that mRNA for olfactory marker protein, Gαolf and possibly some olfactory receptors were found in the corneal epithelial cells. In addition to the corneal epithelium, Gαolf was present in the ganglionic and inner nuclear layers of the retina. One of the olfactory receptors, Olfr558, was present primarily in vessels of the eye co-stained with antibodies against alpha-smooth muscle actin, indicating expression in arterioles. Conclusions Several species of mRNA encoding putative olfactory receptors and related genes are expressed in the mouse cornea and other parts of the eye indicating they may play a role in sensing chemicals in the ocular environment. PMID:24789354

  13. Multimodal imaging of subventricular zone neural stem/progenitor cells in the cuprizone mouse model reveals increased neurogenic potential for the olfactory bulb pathway, but no contribution to remyelination of the corpus callosum.

    PubMed

    Guglielmetti, Caroline; Praet, Jelle; Rangarajan, Janaki Raman; Vreys, Ruth; De Vocht, Nathalie; Maes, Frederik; Verhoye, Marleen; Ponsaerts, Peter; Van der Linden, Annemie

    2014-02-01

    Multiple sclerosis is a devastating demyelinating disease of the central nervous system (CNS) in which endogenous remyelination, and thus recovery, often fails. Although the cuprizone mouse model allowed elucidation of many molecular factors governing remyelination, currently very little is known about the spatial origin of the oligodendrocyte progenitor cells that initiate remyelination in this model. Therefore, we here investigated in this model whether subventricular zone (SVZ) neural stem/progenitor cells (NSPCs) contribute to remyelination of the splenium following cuprizone-induced demyelination. Experimentally, from the day of in situ NSPC labeling, C57BL/6J mice were fed a 0.2% cuprizone diet during a 4-week period and then left to recover on a normal diet for 8weeks. Two in situ labeling strategies were employed: (i) NSPCs were labeled by intraventricular injection of micron-sized iron oxide particles and then followed up longitudinally by means of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and (ii) SVZ NSPCs were transduced with a lentiviral vector encoding the eGFP and Luciferase reporter proteins for longitudinal monitoring by means of in vivo bioluminescence imaging (BLI). In contrast to preceding suggestions, no migration of SVZ NSPC towards the demyelinated splenium was observed using both MRI and BLI, and further validated by histological analysis, thereby demonstrating that SVZ NSPCs are unable to contribute directly to remyelination of the splenium in the cuprizone model. Interestingly, using longitudinal BLI analysis and confirmed by histological analysis, an increased migration of SVZ NSPC-derived neuroblasts towards the olfactory bulb was observed following cuprizone treatment, indicative for a potential link between CNS inflammation and increased neurogenesis.

  14. Mainstream cigarette smoke exposure alters cytochrome P4502G1 expression in F344 rat olfactory mucosa

    SciTech Connect

    Hotchkiss, J.A.; Nikula, K.J.; Lewis, J.L.; Finch, G.L.; Belinsky, S.A.; Dahl, A.R.

    1994-11-01

    Inhalation of mainstream cigarette smoke (MCS) by rats results in multifocal rhinitis, mucous hypersecretion, nasal epithelial hyperplasia and metaplasia, and focal olfactory mucosal atrophy. In humans, cigarette smoking causes long-term, dose-related alterations in olfactory function in both current and former smokers. An olfactory-specific cytochrome P450 has been identified in rabbits and rats. The presence of olfactory-specific P450s, as well as relatively high levels of other biotransformation enzymes, such as NADPH-cytochrome P450 reductase and UDP-glucuronosyl transferase, in the olfactory neuroepithelium suggest that these enzyme systems may play a role in olfaction. This hypothesis is strengthened by the observation that, in rats, the temporal gene activation of P4502G1 coincides with the postnatal increase in the sensitivity of olfactory response to odorants. The purpose of this investigation was to examine the effect of MCS exposure on P4502G1 protein expression.

  15. Persistent Wnt/β-catenin signaling determines dorsalization of the postnatal subventricular zone and neural stem cell specification into oligodendrocytes and glutamatergic neurons.

    PubMed

    Azim, Kasum; Fischer, Bruno; Hurtado-Chong, Anahi; Draganova, Kalina; Cantù, Claudio; Zemke, Martina; Sommer, Lukas; Butt, Arthur; Raineteau, Olivier

    2014-05-01

    In the postnatal and adult central nervous system (CNS), the subventricular zone (SVZ) of the forebrain is the main source of neural stem cells (NSCs) that generate olfactory neurons and oligodendrocytes (OLs), the myelinating cells of the CNS. Here, we provide evidence of a primary role for canonical Wnt/β-catenin signaling in regulating NSC fate along neuronal and oligodendroglial lineages in the postnatal SVZ. Our findings demonstrate that glutamatergic neuronal precursors (NPs) and oligodendrocyte precursors (OPs) are derived strictly from the dorsal SVZ (dSVZ) microdomain under the control of Wnt/β-catenin, whereas GABAergic NPs are derived mainly from the lateral SVZ (lSVZ) microdomain independent of Wnt/β-catenin. Transcript analysis of microdissected SVZ microdomains revealed that canonical Wnt/β-catenin signaling was more pronounced in the dSVZ microdomain. This was confirmed using the β-catenin-activated Wnt-reporter mouse and by pharmacological stimulation of Wnt/β-catenin by infusion of the specific glycogen synthase kinase 3β inhibitor, AR-A014418, which profoundly increased the generation of cycling cells. In vivo genetic/pharmacological stimulation or inhibition of Wnt/β-catenin, respectively, increased and decreased the differentiation of dSVZ-NSCs into glutamatergic NPs, and had a converse effect on GABAergic NPs. Activation of Wnt/β-catenin dramatically stimulated the generation of OPs, but its inhibition had no effect, indicating other factors act in concert with Wnt/β-catenin to fine tune oligodendrogliogenesis in the postnatal dSVZ. These results demonstrate a role for Wnt/β-catenin signaling within the dorsal microdomain of the postnatal SVZ, in regulating the genesis of glutamatergic neurons and OLs.

  16. Ionotropic Crustacean Olfactory Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Corey, Elizabeth A.; Bobkov, Yuriy; Ukhanov, Kirill; Ache, Barry W.

    2013-01-01

    The nature of the olfactory receptor in crustaceans, a major group of arthropods, has remained elusive. We report that spiny lobsters, Panulirus argus, express ionotropic receptors (IRs), the insect chemosensory variants of ionotropic glutamate receptors. Unlike insects IRs, which are expressed in a specific subset of olfactory cells, two lobster IR subunits are expressed in most, if not all, lobster olfactory receptor neurons (ORNs), as confirmed by antibody labeling and in situ hybridization. Ligand-specific ORN responses visualized by calcium imaging are consistent with a restricted expression pattern found for other potential subunits, suggesting that cell-specific expression of uncommon IR subunits determines the ligand sensitivity of individual cells. IRs are the only type of olfactory receptor that we have detected in spiny lobster olfactory tissue, suggesting that they likely mediate olfactory signaling. Given long-standing evidence for G protein-mediated signaling in activation of lobster ORNs, this finding raises the interesting specter that IRs act in concert with second messenger-mediated signaling. PMID:23573266

  17. Dendritic Organization of Olfactory Inputs to Medial Amygdala Neurons.

    PubMed

    Keshavarzi, Sepideh; Power, John M; Albers, Eva H H; Sullivan, Robert K S; Sah, Pankaj

    2015-09-23

    The medial amygdala (MeA) is a central hub in the olfactory neural network. It receives vomeronasal information directly from the accessory olfactory bulb (AOB) and main olfactory information largely via odor-processing regions such as the olfactory cortical amygdala (CoA). How these inputs are processed by MeA neurons is poorly understood. Using the GAD67-GFP mouse, we show that MeA principal neurons receive convergent AOB and CoA inputs. Somatically recorded AOB synaptic inputs had slower kinetics than CoA inputs, suggesting that they are electrotonically more distant. Field potential recording, pharmacological manipulation, and Ca(2+) imaging revealed that AOB synapses are confined to distal dendrites and segregated from the proximally located CoA synapses. Moreover, unsynchronized AOB inputs had significantly broader temporal summation that was dependent on the activation of NMDA receptors. These findings show that MeA principal neurons process main and accessory olfactory inputs differentially in distinct dendritic compartments. Significance statement: In most vertebrates, olfactory cues are processed by two largely segregated neural pathways, the main and accessory olfactory systems, which are specialized to detect odors and nonvolatile chemosignals, respectively. Information from these two pathways ultimately converges at higher brain regions, one of the major hubs being the medial amygdala. Little is known about how olfactory inputs are processed by medial amygdala neurons. This study shows that individual principal neurons in this region receive input from both pathways and that these synapses are spatially segregated on their dendritic tree. We provide evidence suggesting that this dendritic segregation leads to distinct input integration and impact on neuronal output; hence, dendritic mechanisms control olfactory processing in the amygdala. PMID:26400933

  18. Functional Evidence of Multidrug Resistance Transporters (MDR) in Rodent Olfactory Epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Molinas, Adrien; Sicard, Gilles; Jakob, Ingrid

    2012-01-01

    Background P-glycoprotein (Pgp) and multidrug resistance-associated protein (MRP1) are membrane transporter proteins which function as efflux pumps at cell membranes and are considered to exert a protective function against the entry of xenobiotics. While evidence for Pgp and MRP transporter activity is reported for olfactory tissue, their possible interaction and participation in the olfactory response has not been investigated. Principal Findings Functional activity of putative MDR transporters was assessed by means of the fluorometric calcein acetoxymethyl ester (calcein-AM) accumulation assay on acute rat and mouse olfactory tissue slices. Calcein-AM uptake was measured as fluorescence intensity changes in the presence of Pgp or MRP specific inhibitors. Epifluorescence microscopy measured time course analysis in the olfactory epithelium revealed significant inhibitor-dependent calcein uptake in the presence of each of the selected inhibitors. Furthermore, intracellular calcein accumulation in olfactory receptor neurons was also significantly increased in the presence of either one of the Pgp or MRP inhibitors. The presence of Pgp or MRP1 encoding genes in the olfactory mucosa of rat and mouse was confirmed by RT-PCR with appropriate pairs of species-specific primers. Both transporters were expressed in both newborn and adult olfactory mucosa of both species. To assess a possible involvement of MDR transporters in the olfactory response, we examined the electrophysiological response to odorants in the presence of the selected MDR inhibitors by recording electroolfactograms (EOG). In both animal species, MRPs inhibitors induced a marked reduction of the EOG magnitude, while Pgp inhibitors had only a minor or no measurable effect. Conclusions The findings suggest that both Pgp and MRP transporters are functional in the olfactory mucosa and in olfactory receptor neurons. Pgp and MRPs may be cellular constituents of olfactory receptor neurons and represent potential

  19. Olfactory Learning in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Busto, Germain U.; Cervantes-Sandoval, Isaac; Davis, Ronald L.

    2012-01-01

    Studies of olfactory learning in Drosophila have provided key insights into the brain mechanisms underlying learning and memory. One type of olfactory learning, olfactory classical conditioning, consists of learning the contingency between an odor with an aversive or appetitive stimulus. This conditioning requires the activity of molecules that can integrate the two types of sensory information, the odorant as the conditioned stimulus and the aversive or appetitive stimulus as the unconditioned stimulus, in brain regions where the neural pathways for the two stimuli intersect. Compelling data indicate that a particular form of adenylyl cyclase functions as a molecular integrator of the sensory information in the mushroom body neurons. The neuronal pathway carrying the olfactory information from the antennal lobes to the mushroom body is well described. Accumulating data now show that some dopaminergic neurons provide information about aversive stimuli and octopaminergic neurons about appetitive stimuli to the mushroom body neurons. Inhibitory inputs from the GABAergic system appear to gate olfactory information to the mushroom bodies and thus control the ability to learn about odors. Emerging data obtained by functional imaging procedures indicate that distinct memory traces form in different brain regions and correlate with different phases of memory. The results from these and other experiments also indicate that cross talk between mushroom bodies and several other brain regions is critical for memory formation. PMID:21186278

  20. Acetylcholine and Olfactory Perceptual Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Donald A.; Fletcher, Max L.; Sullivan, Regina M.

    2004-01-01

    Olfactory perceptual learning is a relatively long-term, learned increase in perceptual acuity, and has been described in both humans and animals. Data from recent electrophysiological studies have indicated that olfactory perceptual learning may be correlated with changes in odorant receptive fields of neurons in the olfactory bulb and piriform…

  1. Olfactory dysfunction in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Zou, Yong-Ming; Lu, Da; Liu, Li-Ping; Zhang, Hui-Hong; Zhou, Yu-Ying

    2016-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a common neurodegenerative disorder with the earliest clinical symptom of olfactory dysfunction, which is a potential clinical marker for AD severity and progression. However, many questions remain unanswered. This article reviews relevant research on olfactory dysfunction in AD and evaluates the predictive value of olfactory dysfunction for the epidemiological, pathophysiological, and clinical features of AD, as well as for the conversion of cognitive impairment to AD. We summarize problems of existing studies and provide a useful reference for further studies in AD olfactory dysfunction and for clinical applications of olfactory testing. PMID:27143888

  2. Inhibition of Olfactory Receptor Neuron Input to Olfactory Bulb Glomeruli Mediated by Suppression of Presynaptic Calcium Influx

    PubMed Central

    Wachowiak, Matt; McGann, John P.; Heyward, Philip M.; Shao, Zuoyi; Puche, Adam C.; Shipley, Michael T.

    2005-01-01

    We investigated the cellular mechanism underlying presynaptic regulation of olfactory receptor neuron (ORN) input to the mouse olfactory bulb using optical-imaging techniques that selectively report activity in the ORN pre-synaptic terminal. First, we loaded ORNs with calcium-sensitive dye and imaged stimulus-evoked calcium influx in a slice preparation. Single olfactory nerve shocks evoked rapid fluorescence increases that were largely blocked by the N-type calcium channel blocker ω-conotoxin GVIA. Paired shocks revealed a long-lasting suppression of calcium influx with ~40% suppression at 400-ms interstimulus intervals and a recovery time constant of ~450 ms. Blocking activation of postsynaptic olfactory bulb neurons with APV/CNQX reduced this suppression. The GABAB receptor agonist baclofen inhibited calcium influx, whereas GABAB antagonists reduced paired-pulse suppression without affecting the response to the conditioning pulse. We also imaged transmitter release directly using a mouse line that expresses synaptopHluorin selectively in ORNs. We found that the relationship between calcium influx and transmitter release was superlinear and that paired-pulse suppression of transmitter release was reduced, but not eliminated, by APV/CNQX and GABAB antagonists. These results demonstrate that primary olfactory input to the CNS can be presynaptically regulated by GABAergic interneurons and show that one major intracellular pathway for this regulation is via the suppression of calcium influx through N-type calcium channels in the pre-synaptic terminal. This mechanism is unique among primary sensory afferents. PMID:15917320

  3. Olfactory sensitivity in mammalian species.

    PubMed

    Wackermannová, M; Pinc, L; Jebavý, L

    2016-07-18

    Olfaction enables most mammalian species to detect and discriminate vast numbers of chemical structures called odorants and pheromones. The perception of such chemical compounds is mediated via two major olfactory systems, the main olfactory system and the vomeronasal system, as well as minor systems, such as the septal organ and the Grueneberg ganglion. Distinct differences exist not only among species but also among individuals in terms of their olfactory sensitivity; however, little is known about the mechanisms that determine these differences. In research on the olfactory sensitivity of mammals, scientists thus depend in most cases on behavioral testing. In this article, we reviewed scientific studies performed on various mammalian species using different methodologies and target chemical substances. Human and non-human primates as well as rodents and dogs are the most frequently studied species. Olfactory threshold studies on other species do not exist with the exception of domestic pigs. Olfactory testing performed on seals, elephants, and bats focused more on discriminative abilities than on sensitivity. An overview of olfactory sensitivity studies as well as olfactory detection ability in most studied mammalian species is presented here, focusing on comparable olfactory detection thresholds. The basics of olfactory perception and olfactory sensitivity factors are also described. PMID:27070753

  4. Diverse Representations of Olfactory Information in Centrifugal Feedback Projections

    PubMed Central

    Osakada, Fumitaka; Tarabrina, Anna; Kizer, Erin; Callaway, Edward M.; Gage, Fred H.; Sejnowski, Terrence J.

    2016-01-01

    Although feedback or centrifugal projections from higher processing centers of the brain to peripheral regions have long been known to play essential functional roles, the anatomical organization of these connections remains largely unknown. Using a virus-based retrograde labeling strategy and 3D whole-brain reconstruction methods, we mapped the spatial organization of centrifugal projections from two olfactory cortical areas, the anterior olfactory nucleus (AON) and the piriform cortex, to the granule cell layer of the main olfactory bulb in the mouse. Both regions are major recipients of information from the bulb and are the largest sources of feedback to the bulb, collectively constituting circuits essential for olfactory coding and olfactory behavior. We found that, although ipsilateral inputs from the AON were uniformly distributed, feedback from the contralateral AON had a strong ventral bias. In addition, we observed that centrifugally projecting neurons were spatially clustered in the piriform cortex, in contrast to the distributed feedforward axonal inputs that these cells receive from the principal neurons of the bulb. Therefore, information carried from the bulb to higher processing structures by anatomically stereotypic projections is likely relayed back to the bulb by organizationally distinct feedback projections that may reflect different coding strategies and therefore different functional roles. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Principles of anatomical organization, sometimes instantiated as “maps” in the mammalian brain, have provided key insights into the structure and function of circuits in sensory systems. Generally, these characterizations focus on projections from early sensory processing areas to higher processing structures despite considerable evidence that feedback or centrifugal projections often constitute major conduits of information flow. Our results identify structure in the organization of centrifugal feedback projections to the

  5. Post-natal myogenic and adipogenic developmental

    PubMed Central

    Konings, Gonda; van Weeghel, Michel; van den Hoogenhof, Maarten MG; Gijbels, Marion; van Erk, Arie; Schoonderwoerd, Kees; van den Bosch, Bianca; Dahlmans, Vivian; Calis, Chantal; Houten, Sander M; Misteli, Tom

    2011-01-01

    A-type lamins are a major component of the nuclear lamina. Mutations in the LMNA gene, which encodes the A-type lamins A and C, cause a set of phenotypically diverse diseases collectively called laminopathies. While adult LMNA null mice show various symptoms typically associated with laminopathies, the effect of loss of lamin A/C on early post-natal development is poorly understood. Here we developed a novel LMNA null mouse (LMNAGT−/−) based on genetrap technology and analyzed its early post-natal development. We detect LMNA transcripts in heart, the outflow tract, dorsal aorta, liver and somites during early embryonic development. Loss of A-type lamins results in severe growth retardation and developmental defects of the heart, including impaired myocyte hypertrophy, skeletal muscle hypotrophy, decreased amounts of subcutaneous adipose tissue and impaired ex vivo adipogenic differentiation. These defects cause death at 2 to 3 weeks post partum associated with muscle weakness and metabolic complications, but without the occurrence of dilated cardiomyopathy or an obvious progeroid phenotype. Our results indicate that defective early post-natal development critically contributes to the disease phenotypes in adult laminopathies. PMID:21818413

  6. Aggressive behaviour and physiological responses to pheromones are strongly impaired in mice deficient for the olfactory G-protein -subunit G8.

    PubMed

    Montani, Giorgia; Tonelli, Simone; Sanghez, Valentina; Ferrari, Pier Francesco; Palanza, Paola; Zimmer, Andreas; Tirindelli, Roberto

    2013-08-15

    Heterotrimeric G-proteins are critical players in the transduction mechanisms underlying odorant and pheromonal signalling. In the vomeronasal organ (VNO) of the adult mouse, two different G-protein complexes have been identified. Gαoβ2γ8 is preferentially expressed in the basal neurons and coexpresses with type-2 vomeronasal pheromone receptors (V2Rs) whereas Gαi2β2γ2 is found in the apical neurons and coexpresses with type-1 vomeronasal pheromone receptors (V1Rs). V2R-expressing neurons project to the posterior accessory olfactory bulb (AOB) whereas neurons expressing V1Rs send their axon to the anterior AOB. Gγ8 is also expressed in developing olfactory neurons where this protein is probably associated with Go. Here, we generated mice with a targeted deletion of the Gγ8 gene and investigated the behavioural effects and the physiological consequences of this mutation. Gγ8(-/-) mice show a normal development of the main olfactory epithelium; moreover, they do not display major deficits in odour perception. In contrast, the VNO undergoes a slow but remarkable loss of basal neurons starting from the fourth postnatal week, with a 40% reduction of cells at 2 months and 70% at 1 year. This loss is associated with a reduced early-gene expression in the posterior AOB of mice stimulated with pheromones. More interestingly, the Gγ8 deletion specifically leads to a reduced pheromone-mediated aggressiveness in both males and females, all other socio-sexual behaviours remaining unaltered. This study defines a specific role for Gγ8 in maintenance of the neuronal population of the VNO and in the mechanisms of pheromonal signalling that involve the aggressive behaviour towards conspecifics.

  7. Mitochondrial Ca(2+) mobilization is a key element in olfactory signaling.

    PubMed

    Fluegge, Daniela; Moeller, Lisa M; Cichy, Annika; Gorin, Monika; Weth, Agnes; Veitinger, Sophie; Cainarca, Silvia; Lohmer, Stefan; Corazza, Sabrina; Neuhaus, Eva M; Baumgartner, Werner; Spehr, Jennifer; Spehr, Marc

    2012-05-01

    In olfactory sensory neurons (OSNs), cytosolic Ca(2+) controls the gain and sensitivity of olfactory signaling. Important components of the molecular machinery that orchestrates OSN Ca(2+) dynamics have been described, but key details are still missing. Here, we demonstrate a critical physiological role of mitochondrial Ca(2+) mobilization in mouse OSNs. Combining a new mitochondrial Ca(2+) imaging approach with patch-clamp recordings, organelle mobility assays and ultrastructural analyses, our study identifies mitochondria as key determinants of olfactory signaling. We show that mitochondrial Ca(2+) mobilization during sensory stimulation shapes the cytosolic Ca(2+) response profile in OSNs, ensures a broad dynamic response range and maintains sensitivity of the spike generation machinery. When mitochondrial function is impaired, olfactory neurons function as simple stimulus detectors rather than as intensity encoders. Moreover, we describe activity-dependent recruitment of mitochondria to olfactory knobs, a mechanism that provides a context-dependent tool for OSNs to maintain cellular homeostasis and signaling integrity. PMID:22446879

  8. Attention and Olfactory Consciousness

    PubMed Central

    Keller, Andreas

    2011-01-01

    Understanding the relation between attention and consciousness is an important part of our understanding of consciousness. Attention, unlike consciousness, can be systematically manipulated in psychophysical experiments and a law-like relation between attention and consciousness is waiting to be discovered. Most attempts to discover the nature of this relation are focused on a special type of attention: spatial visual attention. In this review I want to introduce another type of attention to the discussion: attention to the olfactory modality. I will first clarify the position of attention to smells in a general taxonomy of attention. I will then review the mechanisms and neuroanatomy of attention and consciousness in the olfactory system before using the newly introduced system to provide evidence that attention is necessary for consciousness. PMID:22203813

  9. Recent Trend in Development of Olfactory Displays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yanagida, Yasuyuki

    An olfactory display is a device that generates scented air with desired concentration of aroma, and delivers it to the user's olfactory organ. In this article, the nature of olfaction is briefly described from the view point of how to configure olfactory displays. Next, component technologies to compose olfactory displays, i.e., making scents and delivering scents, are categorized. Several existing olfactory display systems are introduced to show the current status of research and development of olfactory displays.

  10. Fragile X Mental Retardation Protein Regulates Olfactory Sensitivity But Not Odorant Discrimination

    PubMed Central

    Schilit Nitenson, Arielle; Stackpole, Emily E.; Truszkowski, Torrey L.S.; Midroit, Maellie; Fallon, Justin R.

    2015-01-01

    Fragile X syndrome (FXS) is the most common cause of inherited intellectual disability and is characterized by cognitive impairments and altered sensory function. It is caused by absence of fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP), an RNA-binding protein essential for normal synaptic plasticity and function. Animal models have provided important insights into mechanisms through which loss of FMRP impacts cognitive and sensory development and function. While FMRP is highly enriched in the developing and adult olfactory bulb (OB), its role in olfactory sensory function remains poorly understood. Here, we used a mouse model of FXS, the fmr1 −/y mouse, to test whether loss of FMRP impacts olfactory discrimination, habituation, or sensitivity using a spontaneous olfactory cross-habituation task at a range of odorant concentrations. We demonstrated that fmr1 −/y mice have a significant decrease in olfactory sensitivity compared with wild type controls. When we controlled for differences in sensitivity, we found no effect of loss of FMRP on the ability to habituate to or spontaneously discriminate between odorants. These data indicate that loss of FMRP significantly alters olfactory sensitivity, but not other facets of basal olfactory function. These findings have important implications for future studies aimed at understanding the role of FMRP on sensory functioning. PMID:25917509

  11. PACAP protects against TNFα-induced cell death in olfactory epithelium and olfactory placodal cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Kanekar, Shami; Gandham, Mahendra; Lucero, Mary T

    2010-01-01

    In mouse olfactory epithelium (OE), pituitary adenylate cyclase activating peptide (PACAP) protects against axotomy-induced apoptosis. We used mouse OE to determine whether PACAP protects neurons during exposure to the inflammatory cytokine TNFα. Live slices of neonatal mouse OE were treated with 40 ng/ml TNFα ± 40 nM PACAP for 6 hours and dying cells were live-labeled with 0.5% propidium iodide. TNFα significantly increased the percentage of dying cells while co-incubation with PACAP prevented cell death. PACAP also prevented TNFα-mediated cell death in the olfactory placodal (OP) cell lines, OP6 and OP27. Although OP cell lines express all three PACAP receptors (PAC1, VPAC1,VPAC2), PACAP’s protection of these cells from TNFα was mimicked by the specific PAC1 receptor agonist maxadilan and abolished by the PAC1 antagonist PACAP6–38. Treatment of OP cell lines with blockers or activators of the PLC and AC/MAPKK pathways revealed that PACAP-mediated protection from TNFα involved both pathways. PACAP may therefore function through PAC1 receptors to protect neurons from cell death during inflammatory cytokine release in vivo as would occur upon viral infection or allergic rhinitis-associated injury. PMID:20654718

  12. Functional Rehabilitation of Cadmium-Induced Neurotoxicity Despite Persistent Peripheral Pathophysiology in the Olfactory System

    PubMed Central

    Czarnecki, Lindsey A.; Moberly, Andrew H.; Turkel, Daniel J.; Rubinstein, Tom; Pottackal, Joseph; Rosenthal, Michelle C.; McCandlish, Elizabeth F. K.; Buckley, Brian; McGann, John P.

    2012-01-01

    Intranasal exposure to the heavy metal cadmium has been linked to olfactory dysfunction and neurotoxicity. Here, we combine optical imaging of in vivo neurophysiology, genetically defined anatomical tract tracing, mass spectrometry, and behavioral psychophysical methods to evaluate the persistent harmful effects of acute intranasal exposure to cadmium in a mouse model and to investigate the functional consequences of sensory rehabilitation training. We find that an acute intranasal instillation of cadmium chloride leads to an accumulation of cadmium in the brain's olfactory bulb that persists for at least 4 weeks. This is accompanied by persistent severe pathophysiology of the olfactory nerve, a gradual reduction in axonal projections from the olfactory epithelium, and complete impairment on an olfactory detection task. Remarkably, 2 weeks of odorant-guided operant conditioning training proved sufficient to restore olfactory detection performance to control levels in cadmium-exposed mice. Optical imaging from rehabilitated mice showed that this training did not cause any detectable restoration of olfactory nerve function, suggesting that the recovery of function was mediated by central neuroplasticity in which the brain learned to interpret the degraded sensory input. These data demonstrate that sensory learning can mask even severe damage from neurotoxicants and suggest that explicit sensory training may be useful in rehabilitation of olfactory dysfunction. PMID:22287023

  13. The olfactory nerve: a shortcut for influenza and other viral diseases into the central nervous system.

    PubMed

    van Riel, Debby; Verdijk, Rob; Kuiken, Thijs

    2015-01-01

    The olfactory nerve consists mainly of olfactory receptor neurons and directly connects the nasal cavity with the central nervous system (CNS). Each olfactory receptor neuron projects a dendrite into the nasal cavity on the apical side, and on the basal side extends its axon through the cribriform plate into the olfactory bulb of the brain. Viruses that can use the olfactory nerve as a shortcut into the CNS include influenza A virus, herpesviruses, poliovirus, paramyxoviruses, vesicular stomatitis virus, rabies virus, parainfluenza virus, adenoviruses, Japanese encephalitis virus, West Nile virus, chikungunya virus, La Crosse virus, mouse hepatitis virus, and bunyaviruses. However, mechanisms of transport via the olfactory nerve and subsequent spread through the CNS are poorly understood. Proposed mechanisms are either infection of olfactory receptor neurons themselves or diffusion through channels formed by olfactory ensheathing cells. Subsequent virus spread through the CNS could occur by multiple mechanisms, including trans-synaptic transport and microfusion. Viral infection of the CNS can lead to damage from infection of nerve cells per se, from the immune response, or from a combination of both. Clinical consequences range from nervous dysfunction in the absence of histopathological changes to severe meningoencephalitis and neurodegenerative disease.

  14. Endocrine Modulation of Olfactory Responsiveness: Effects of the Orexigenic Hormone Ghrelin.

    PubMed

    Loch, Diana; Breer, Heinz; Strotmann, Jörg

    2015-09-01

    Finding food sources is a prerequisite for an acute food intake. This process is initiated by ghrelin released from X/A-like cells of the gastrointestinal tract. Because food finding often depends on olfaction, the question arises whether ghrelin may affect the responsiveness of the olfactory system. Monitoring odor-induced activation of the mouse olfactory epithelium via Egr1 expression revealed that after a nasal application of ghrelin, more sensory neurons responded upon odor exposure indicating an increased responsiveness. The higher reactivity of olfactory neurons was accompanied with an increased activity of receptor-specific glomeruli. In search for mechanisms underlying the ghrelin-mediated sensitization of olfactory neurons, it was shown that Ghsr1a, the ghrelin receptor gene, but not the hormone itself was expressed in the olfactory epithelium. Further analysis of isolated cells revealed that the receptor was in fact expressed in mature olfactory sensory neurons. Treatment with a ghrelin receptor antagonist abolished the ghrelin effect, strengthening the notion that ghrelin and its receptor are responsible for the enhanced neuronal responsiveness. In contrast to the effects of the "hunger" hormone ghrelin, the short-term "satiety" hormone PYY3-36 did not affect olfactory responsiveness. The results demonstrate that ghrelin, which signals acute hunger, renders the olfactory system more responsive to odors.

  15. Computational Biology of Olfactory Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Crasto, Chiquito J.

    2011-01-01

    Olfactory receptors, in addition to being involved in first step of the physiological processes that leads to olfaction, occupy an important place in mammalian genomes. ORs constitute super families in these genomes. Elucidating ol-factory receptor function at a molecular level can be aided by a computationally derived structure and an understanding of its interactions with odor molecules. Experimental functional analyses of olfactory receptors in conjunction with computational studies serve to validate findings and generate hypotheses. We present here a review of the research efforts in: creating computational models of olfactory receptors, identifying binding strategies for these receptors with odorant molecules, performing medium to long range simulation studies of odor ligands in the receptor binding region, and identifying amino acid positions within the receptor that are responsible for ligand-binding and olfactory receptor activation. Written as a primer and a teaching tool, this review will help researchers extend the methodologies described herein to other GPCRs. PMID:21984880

  16. Olfactory system oscillations across phyla

    PubMed Central

    Kay, Leslie M.

    2014-01-01

    Neural oscillations are ubiquitous in olfactory systems of mammals, insects and molluscs. Neurophysiological and computational investigations point to common mechanisms for gamma or odor associated oscillations across phyla (40–100 Hz in mammals, 20–30 Hz in insects, 0.5–1.5 Hz in molluscs), engaging the reciprocal dendrodendritic synapse between excitatory principle neurons and inhibitory interneurons in the olfactory bulb, antennal lobe, or procerebrum. Recent studies suggest important mechanisms that may modulate gamma oscillations, including neuromodulators and centrifugal input to the olfactory bulb and antennal lobe. Beta (20 Hz) and theta (2–12 Hz) oscillations coordinate activity within and across brain regions. Olfactory beta oscillations are associated with odor learning and depend on centrifugal olfactory bulb input, while theta oscillations are strongly associated with respiration. PMID:25460070

  17. Olfactory Sensory Activity Modulates Microglial-Neuronal Interactions during Dopaminergic Cell Loss in the Olfactory Bulb

    PubMed Central

    Grier, Bryce D.; Belluscio, Leonardo; Cheetham, Claire E. J.

    2016-01-01

    The mammalian olfactory bulb (OB) displays robust activity-dependent plasticity throughout life. Dopaminergic (DA) neurons in the glomerular layer (GL) of the OB are particularly plastic, with loss of sensory input rapidly reducing tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) expression and dopamine production, followed by a substantial reduction in DA neuron number. Here, we asked whether microglia participate in activity-dependent elimination of DA neurons in the mouse OB. Interestingly, we found a significant reduction in the number of both DA neurons and their synapses in the OB ipsilateral to the occluded naris (occluded OB) within just 7 days of sensory deprivation. Concomitantly, the volume of the occluded OB decreased, resulting in an increase in microglial density. Microglia in the occluded OB also adopted morphologies consistent with activation. Using in vivo 2-photon imaging and histological analysis we then showed that loss of olfactory input markedly altered microglial-neuronal interactions during the time that DA neurons are being eliminated: both microglial process motility and the frequency of wrapping of DA neuron somata by activated microglia increased significantly in the occluded OB. Furthermore, we found microglia in the occluded OB that had completely engulfed components of DA neurons. Together, our data provide evidence that loss of olfactory input modulates microglial-DA neuron interactions in the OB, thereby suggesting an important role for microglia in the activity-dependent elimination of DA neurons and their synapses. PMID:27471450

  18. Olfactory Sensory Activity Modulates Microglial-Neuronal Interactions during Dopaminergic Cell Loss in the Olfactory Bulb.

    PubMed

    Grier, Bryce D; Belluscio, Leonardo; Cheetham, Claire E J

    2016-01-01

    The mammalian olfactory bulb (OB) displays robust activity-dependent plasticity throughout life. Dopaminergic (DA) neurons in the glomerular layer (GL) of the OB are particularly plastic, with loss of sensory input rapidly reducing tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) expression and dopamine production, followed by a substantial reduction in DA neuron number. Here, we asked whether microglia participate in activity-dependent elimination of DA neurons in the mouse OB. Interestingly, we found a significant reduction in the number of both DA neurons and their synapses in the OB ipsilateral to the occluded naris (occluded OB) within just 7 days of sensory deprivation. Concomitantly, the volume of the occluded OB decreased, resulting in an increase in microglial density. Microglia in the occluded OB also adopted morphologies consistent with activation. Using in vivo 2-photon imaging and histological analysis we then showed that loss of olfactory input markedly altered microglial-neuronal interactions during the time that DA neurons are being eliminated: both microglial process motility and the frequency of wrapping of DA neuron somata by activated microglia increased significantly in the occluded OB. Furthermore, we found microglia in the occluded OB that had completely engulfed components of DA neurons. Together, our data provide evidence that loss of olfactory input modulates microglial-DA neuron interactions in the OB, thereby suggesting an important role for microglia in the activity-dependent elimination of DA neurons and their synapses. PMID:27471450

  19. Olfactory function in patients with olfactory groove meningioma

    PubMed Central

    Welge-Luessen, A; Temmel, A; Quint, C; Moll, B; Wolf, S; Hummel, T

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVES—Olfactory meningiomas are rare benign tumours and represent about 12% of all basal meningiomas. Anosmia is thought to be among the first symptoms, even though patients often present with headaches or visual problems. However, so far no detailed physophysical tests of olfactory function have been performed in a large number of those patients.
METHODS—Twelve patients (five men, seven women; mean age 52 years) with olfactory meningiomas were examined. In all patients extensive preoperative and postoperative lateralised olfactory testing was performed using the "Sniffin' Sticks" test battery, a psychometric testing tool. In eight cases the meningioma was lateralised (five left, three right), in four patients a bilateral meningioma was found. In addition to a detailed ear, nose, and throat examination MRI was performed in all patients.
RESULTS—In preoperative testing six patients were found to be anosmic on the side of the tumour, two were hyposmic. Four patients were normosmic. Postoperative investigations showed lateralised anosmia in four patients on the operated side, three were normosmic on the contralateral side and one hyposmic. The remaining eight patients were completely anosmic postoperatively.
CONCLUSIONS—(1) Contrary to expectations, olfactory testing seems to be of little help in detecting olfactory meningiomas. (2) The likelihood of normal postoperative olfactory function contralateral to the tumour was high when the tumour was less than 3 cm in diameter and preoperative normosmia had been established. (3) Preservation of olfactory function ipsilateral to the tumour seems to be extremely difficult, irrespective of tumour size or surgical approach.

 PMID:11160471

  20. Olfactory receptor signaling.

    PubMed

    Antunes, Gabriela; Simoes de Souza, Fabio Marques

    2016-01-01

    The guanine nucleotide protein (G protein)-coupled receptors (GPCRs) superfamily represents the largest class of membrane protein in the human genome. More than a half of all GPCRs are dedicated to interact with odorants and are termed odorant-receptors (ORs). Linda Buck and Richard Axel, the Nobel Prize laureates in physiology or medicine in 2004, first cloned and characterized the gene family that encode ORs, establishing the foundations to the understanding of the molecular basis for odor recognition. In the last decades, a lot of progress has been done to unravel the functioning of the sense of smell. This chapter gives a general overview of the topic of olfactory receptor signaling and reviews recent advances in this field. PMID:26928542

  1. Perinatal administration of diazepam alters sexual dimorphism in the rat accessory olfactory bulb.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Laso, C; Valencia, A; Rodríguez-Zafra, M; Calés, J M; Guillamón, A; Segovia, S

    1994-01-14

    The present study examines the effects of pre and/or early postnatal administration of diazepam on the mitral cell and on the light and dark granule cell populations in the sexually dimorphic accessory olfactory bulb of the rat. Quantitative differences related to sex were observed in the numbers of the three types of neurons, with vehicle males showing greater numbers of cells than vehicle females. The number of mitral cells in males decreased to the levels shown by female rats following prenatal and pre-postnatal diazepam treatments, whereas the DZ treatments did not affect the females. In addition, the diazepam administration during the prenatal, postnatal and pre-postnatal periods decreased the numbers of both light and dark granule cells in males, while these two granule cell subpopulations were not affected in diazepam treated females. These results indicate that perinatal administration of diazepam can alter the sexual dimorphism in the accessory olfactory bulb and that the GABAA/benzodiazepine receptor complex is involved in the sexual differentiation this part of the brain.

  2. Transcriptional changes during neuronal death and replacement in the olfactory epithelium.

    PubMed

    Shetty, Ranjit S; Bose, Soma C; Nickell, Melissa D; McIntyre, Jeremy C; Hardin, Debra H; Harris, Andrew M; McClintock, Timothy S

    2005-12-01

    The olfactory epithelium has the unusual ability to replace its neurons.We forced replacement of mouse olfactory sensory neurons by bulbectomy. Microarray, bioinformatics, and in situ hybridization techniques detected a rapid shift in favor of pro-apoptotic proteins, a progressive immune response by macrophages and dendritic cells, and identified or predicted 439 mRNAs enriched in olfactory sensory neurons, including gene silencing factors and sperm flagellar proteins. Transcripts encoding cell cycle regulators, axonogenesis proteins, and transcription factors and signaling proteins that promote proliferation and differentiation were increased at 5-7 days after bulbectomy and were expressed by basal progenitor cells or immature neurons. The transcription factors included Nhlhl, Hes6, Lmycl, c-Myc, Mxd4, Idl,Nmycl, Cited2, c-Myb, Mybll, Tead2, Dpl, Gata2, Lmol, and Soxll. The data reveal significant similarities with embryonic neurogenesis and make several mechanistic predictions, including the roles of the transcription factors in the olfactory sensory neuron lineage.

  3. The scaffold protein MUPP1 regulates odorant-mediated signaling in olfactory sensory neurons.

    PubMed

    Baumgart, Sabrina; Jansen, Fabian; Bintig, Willem; Kalbe, Benjamin; Herrmann, Christian; Klumpers, Fabian; Köster, S David; Scholz, Paul; Rasche, Sebastian; Dooley, Ruth; Metzler-Nolte, Nils; Spehr, Marc; Hatt, Hanns; Neuhaus, Eva M

    2014-06-01

    The olfactory signal transduction cascade transforms odor information into electrical signals by a cAMP-based amplification mechanism. The mechanisms underlying the very precise temporal and spatial organization of the relevant signaling components remains poorly understood. Here, we identify, using co-immunoprecipitation experiments, a macromolecular assembly of signal transduction components in mouse olfactory neurons, organized through MUPP1. Disruption of the PDZ signaling complex, through use of an inhibitory peptide, strongly impaired odor responses and changed the activation kinetics of olfactory sensory neurons. In addition, our experiments demonstrate that termination of the response is dependent on PDZ-based scaffolding. These findings provide new insights into the functional organization, and regulation, of olfactory signal transduction. PMID:24652834

  4. Evidence for a Notch1-mediated transition during olfactory ensheathing cell development.

    PubMed

    Miller, Sophie R; Perera, Surangi N; Benito, Cristina; Stott, Simon R W; Baker, Clare V H

    2016-09-01

    Olfactory ensheathing cells (OECs) are a unique glial population found in both the peripheral and central nervous system: they ensheath bundles of unmyelinated olfactory axons from their peripheral origin in the olfactory epithelium to their central synaptic targets in the glomerular layer of the olfactory bulb. Like all other peripheral glia (Schwann cells, satellite glia, enteric glia), OECs are derived from the embryonic neural crest. However, in contrast to Schwann cells, whose development has been extensively characterised, relatively little is known about their normal development in vivo. In the Schwann cell lineage, the transition from multipotent Schwann cell precursor to immature Schwann cell is promoted by canonical Notch signalling. Here, in situ hybridisation and immunohistochemistry data from chicken, mouse and human embryos are presented that suggest a canonical Notch-mediated transition also occurs during OEC development. PMID:27271278

  5. Olfactory receptor and neural pathway responsible for highly selective sensing of musk odors.

    PubMed

    Shirasu, Mika; Yoshikawa, Keiichi; Takai, Yoshiki; Nakashima, Ai; Takeuchi, Haruki; Sakano, Hitoshi; Touhara, Kazushige

    2014-01-01

    Musk odorants are used widely in cosmetic industries because of their fascinating animalic scent. However, how this aroma is perceived in the mammalian olfactory system remains a great mystery. Here, we show that muscone, one musk odor secreted by various animals from stink glands, activates a few glomeruli clustered in a neuroanatomically unique anteromedial olfactory bulb. The muscone-responsive glomeruli are highly specific to macrocyclic ketones; interestingly, other synthetic musk odorants with nitro or polycyclic moieties or ester bonds activate distinct but nearby glomeruli. Anterodorsal bulbar lesions cause muscone anosmia, suggesting that this region is involved in muscone perception. Finally, we identified the mouse olfactory receptor, MOR215-1, that was a specific muscone receptor expressed by neurons innervating the muscone-responsive anteromedial glomeruli and also the human muscone receptor, OR5AN1. The current study documents the olfactory neural pathway in mice that senses and transmits musk signals from receptor to brain.

  6. Postnatal growth defects in mice with constitutive depletion of central serotonin.

    PubMed

    Narboux-Nême, Nicolas; Angenard, Gaelle; Mosienko, Valentina; Klempin, Friederike; Pitychoutis, Pothitos M; Deneris, Evan; Bader, Michael; Giros, Bruno; Alenina, Natalia; Gaspar, Patricia

    2013-01-16

    Although the trophic actions of serotonin (5-HT) are well established, only few developmental defects have been reported in mouse strains with constitutive hyposerotonergia. We analyzed postnatal growth and cortical development in three different mutant mouse strains with constitutive reductions in central 5-HT levels. We compared two previously published mouse strains with severe (-95%) depletions of 5-HT, the tryptophan hydroxylase (Tph) 2(-/-) mouse line and VMAT2(sert-cre) mice, with a new strain, in which VMAT2 deletion is driven by Pet1 (VMAT2(pet1-cre)) in 5-HT raphe neurons leading to partial (-75%) reduction in brain 5-HT levels. We find that normal embryonic growth and postnatal growth retardation are common features of all these mouse strains. Postnatal growth retardation varied from mild to severe according to the extent of the brain 5-HT reduction and gender. Normal growth was reinstated in VMAT2(sert-cre) mice by reconstituting central 5-HT stores. Growth abnormalities could not be linked to altered food intake or temperature control. Morphological study of the cerebral cortex over postnatal development showed a delayed maturation of the upper cortical layers in the VMAT2(sert-cre) and Tph2(-/-) mice, but not in the VMAT2(pet1-cre) mice. No changes in layer-specific gene expression or morphological alterations of barrel cortex development were found. Overall, these observations sustain the notion that central 5-HT signaling is required for the preweaning growth spurt of mouse pups. Brain development appeared to be immune to severe central 5-HT depletion for its overall growth during prenatal life, whereas reduced brain growth and delayed cortical maturation development occurred during postnatal life. Reduced developmental 5-HT signaling during postnatal development might modulate the function and fine structure of neural circuits in ways that affect adult behavior. PMID:23336056

  7. Orientation in birds. Olfactory navigation.

    PubMed

    Papi, F

    1991-01-01

    Research work on the olfactory navigation of birds, which has only recently attracted attention, has shown that many wild species rely on an osmotactic mechanism to find food sources, even at a considerable distance. The homing pigeon, the only bird to have been thoroughly investigated with respect to olfactory navigation, has been found to rely on local odours for homeward orientation, and to integrate olfactory cues perceived during passive transportation with those picked up at the release site. It is possible to design experiments in which birds are given false olfactory information, and predictions about the effects of this can be made and tested. Pigeons are able to home from unfamiliar sites because they acquire an olfactory map extending beyond the area they have flown over. The olfactory map is built up by associating wind-borne odours with the direction from which they come; this was shown by experiments which aimed to prevent, limit or alter this association. One aim of the research work has been to test whether pigeons flying over unfamiliar areas also rely or can learn to rely on non-olfactory cues, depending on their local availability, and/or on the methods of rearing and training applied to them. Various evaluations have been made of the results; the most recent experiments, however, confirm that pigeons do derive directional information from atmospheric odours. A neurobiological approach is also in progress; its results show that some telencephalic areas are involved in orientation and olfactory navigation. The lack of any knowledge about the distribution and chemical nature of the odorants which allow pigeons to navigate hinders progress in this area of research.

  8. [Occupational olfactory changes: diagnostic trends].

    PubMed

    Chiappino, G; Broich, G; Mascagni, P; Picchi, O

    1998-01-01

    Olfactory testing has been of minor interest in Occupational Health due to the lack of testing methods able to detect malingering. On the other hand there is evidence that occupational exposure to several, mainly neurotoxic, substances may result in olfactory damage. We have combined three different testing methods in one package in order to assure a forensic-degree level of results. The package consists of: 1. primary neuron functionality testing with a single olfactory stimulant; 2. olfactory-trigeminal discrimination testing with regular sniff-test; 3. odor identification score by Doty's UPSIT test. Final judgement of a link between olfactory system impairment and occupational exposure to chemicals requires a good knowledge of the present and past occupational exposure and of the general conditions of the patient. It requires collaboration between the Occupational Health specialist and the expert in Olfactology and may be completed with endoscopy, radiography and other specific controls. We suggest that a more extensive use of appropriate olfactory testing should be established at least for special risk groups of workers. This will not only detect occupational health damage that would otherwise have remained unknown, but can also furnish new information on the neurotoxic effects of many inhalable chemicals. PMID:9847530

  9. Overexpression of Dlx2 leads to postnatal condyle degradation

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Jiewen; Si, Jiawen; Zhu, Xiaofang; Zhang, Lei; Wu, Dandan; Lu, Jingting; Ouyang, Ningjuan; Wang, Xudong; Shen, Guofang

    2016-01-01

    Distal-less homeobox 2 (Dlx2), a member of the Dlx family of transcription factors, is important for the development of craniofacial tissues. Previous studies based on knock-out mutant mice revealed that Dlx2 primarily disturbed the development of tissues from maxillary arch. The present study used a transgenic mouse model to specifically overexpress Dlx2 in neural crest cells in order to investigate the role of Dlx2 overexpression in post-natal condyle in mice. The model was constructed and the phenotype observed using gross observation, micro-CT scan and histological examination. The model determined that overexpression of Dlx2 may lead to postnatal condyle malformation, subchondral bone degradation and irregular histological structure of the condylar cartilage. In addition, the expression of osteocalcin in the condyle region was markedly downregulated, whereas expression of msh homeobox 2 was upregulated. The results of the present study suggest that Dlx2 overexpression in cranial neural crest cells would disrupt the development of post-natal condyle, which demonstrates that the expression level and the spatiotemporal expression patterns of Dlx2 may be important in regulating the development of post-natal condyle in mice, and also offered a possible temporal-mandibular joint osteoarthritis model animal for future studies. PMID:27315306

  10. Olfactory Ensheathing Cells Express α7 Integrin to Mediate Their Migration on Laminin

    PubMed Central

    Ingram, Norianne T.; Khankan, Rana R.; Phelps, Patricia E.

    2016-01-01

    The unique glia located in the olfactory system, called olfactory ensheathing cells (OECs), are implicated as an attractive choice for transplantation therapy following spinal cord injury because of their pro-regenerative characteristics. Adult OECs are thought to improve functional recovery and regeneration after injury by secreting neurotrophic factors and making cell-to-cell contacts with regenerating processes, but the mechanisms are not well understood. We show first that α7 integrin, a laminin receptor, is highly expressed at the protein level by OECs throughout the olfactory system, i.e., in the olfactory mucosa, olfactory nerve, and olfactory nerve layer of the olfactory bulb. Then we asked if OECs use the α7 integrin receptor directly to promote neurite outgrowth on permissive and neutral substrates, in vitro. We co-cultured α7+/+ and α7lacZ/lacZ postnatal cerebral cortical neurons with α7+/+ or α7lacZ/lacZ OECs and found that genotype did not effect the ability of OECs to enhance neurite outgrowth by direct contact. Loss of α7 integrin did however significantly decrease the motility of adult OECs in transwell experiments. Twice as many α7+/+ OECs migrated through laminin-coated transwells compared to α7+/+ OECs on poly-L-lysine (PLL). This is in contrast to α7lacZ/lacZ OECs, which showed no migratory preference for laminin substrate over PLL. These results demonstrate that OECs express α7 integrin, and that laminin and its α7 integrin receptor contribute to adult OEC migration in vitro and perhaps also in vivo. PMID:27078717

  11. [Olfactory sensory perception].

    PubMed

    Fuentes, Aler; Fresno, María Javiera; Santander, Hugo; Valenzuela, Saúl; Gutiérrez, Mario Felipe; Miralles, Rodolfo

    2011-03-01

    The five senses have had a fundamental importance for survival and socialization of human beings. From an evolutionary point of view the sense of smell is the oldest. This sense has a strong representation within the genome, allowing the existence of many types of receptors that allow us to capture multiple volatile odor producing molecules, sending electrical signals to higher centers to report the outside world. Several cortical areas are activated in the brain, which are interconnected to form an extensive and complex neural network, linking for example, areas involved with memory and emotions, thus giving this sense of perceptual richness. While the concept of flavor is largely related to the sense of taste, smell provides the necessary integration with the rest of the senses and higher functions. Fully understanding the sense of smell is relevant to health professionals. Knowing the characteristics of the receptors, the transduction processes and convergence of information in the higher centers involved, we can properly detect olfactory disorders in our patients. PMID:21879170

  12. Olfactory signaling in insects.

    PubMed

    Wicher, Dieter

    2015-01-01

    The detection of volatile chemical information in insects is performed by three types of olfactory receptors, odorant receptors (ORs), specific gustatory receptor (GR) proteins for carbon dioxide perception, and ionotropic receptors (IRs) which are related to ionotropic glutamate receptors. All receptors form heteromeric assemblies; an OR complex is composed of an odor-specific OrX protein and a coreceptor (Orco). ORs and GRs have a 7-transmembrane topology as for G protein-coupled receptors, but they are inversely inserted into the membrane. Ligand-gated ion channels (ionotropic receptors) and ORs operate as IRs activated by volatile chemical cues. ORs are evolutionarily young receptors, and they first appear in winged insects and seem to be evolved to allow an insect to follow sparse odor tracks during flight. In contrast to IRs, the ORs can be sensitized by repeated subthreshold odor stimulation. This process involves metabotropic signaling. Pheromone receptors are especially sensitive and require an accessory protein to detect the lipid-derived pheromone molecules. Signaling cascades involved in pheromone detection depend on intensity and duration of stimuli and underlie a circadian control. Taken together, detection and processing of volatile information in insects involve ionotropic as well as metabotropic mechanisms. Here, I review the cellular signaling events associated with detection of cognate ligands by the different types of odorant receptors.

  13. [Olfactory sensory perception].

    PubMed

    Fuentes, Aler; Fresno, María Javiera; Santander, Hugo; Valenzuela, Saúl; Gutiérrez, Mario Felipe; Miralles, Rodolfo

    2011-03-01

    The five senses have had a fundamental importance for survival and socialization of human beings. From an evolutionary point of view the sense of smell is the oldest. This sense has a strong representation within the genome, allowing the existence of many types of receptors that allow us to capture multiple volatile odor producing molecules, sending electrical signals to higher centers to report the outside world. Several cortical areas are activated in the brain, which are interconnected to form an extensive and complex neural network, linking for example, areas involved with memory and emotions, thus giving this sense of perceptual richness. While the concept of flavor is largely related to the sense of taste, smell provides the necessary integration with the rest of the senses and higher functions. Fully understanding the sense of smell is relevant to health professionals. Knowing the characteristics of the receptors, the transduction processes and convergence of information in the higher centers involved, we can properly detect olfactory disorders in our patients.

  14. Which solvent for olfactory testing?

    PubMed

    Philpott, C M; Goodenough, P C; Wolstenholme, C R; Murty, G E

    2004-12-01

    The physical properties of any carrier can deteriorate over time and thus alter the results in any olfactory test. The aim of this study was to evaluate clinically potential solvents as a clean odourless carrier for olfactory testing. Sweet almond oil, pure coconut oil, pure peach kernel oil, dipropylene glycol, monopropylene glycol, mineral oil and silicone oil were studied. The experimentation was conducted in two parts. First, an olfactory device was used to conduct air through the solvents on a weekly basis using a cohort of six volunteers to assess the perceived odour of each solvent at weekly intervals. Secondly a cross-reference test was performed using small bottled solutions of phenylethyl-alcohol and 1-butanol in 10-fold dilutions to compare any perceived difference in concentrations over a period of 8 weeks. We concluded that mineral oil is the most suitable carrier for the purpose of olfactory testing, possessing many desirable characteristics of an olfactory solvent, and that silicone oil may provide a suitable alternative for odorants with which it is miscible.

  15. Evolution of insect olfactory receptors

    PubMed Central

    Missbach, Christine; Dweck, Hany KM; Vogel, Heiko; Vilcinskas, Andreas; Stensmyr, Marcus C; Hansson, Bill S; Grosse-Wilde, Ewald

    2014-01-01

    The olfactory sense detects a plethora of behaviorally relevant odor molecules; gene families involved in olfaction exhibit high diversity in different animal phyla. Insects detect volatile molecules using olfactory (OR) or ionotropic receptors (IR) and in some cases gustatory receptors (GRs). While IRs are expressed in olfactory organs across Protostomia, ORs have been hypothesized to be an adaptation to a terrestrial insect lifestyle. We investigated the olfactory system of the primary wingless bristletail Lepismachilis y-signata (Archaeognatha), the firebrat Thermobia domestica (Zygentoma) and the neopteran leaf insect Phyllium siccifolium (Phasmatodea). ORs and the olfactory coreceptor (Orco) are with very high probability lacking in Lepismachilis; in Thermobia we have identified three Orco candidates, and in Phyllium a fully developed OR/Orco-based system. We suggest that ORs did not arise as an adaptation to a terrestrial lifestyle, but evolved later in insect evolution, with Orco being present before the appearance of ORs. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.02115.001 PMID:24670956

  16. Olfactory dysfunction in patients with multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Li, Li-Min; Yang, Li-Na; Zhang, Lin-Jie; Fu, Ying; Li, Ting; Qi, Yuan; Wang, Jing; Zhang, Da-Qi; Zhang, Ningnannan; Liu, Jingchun; Yang, Li

    2016-06-15

    Association of changes in olfactory-related structures with olfactory function in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) is not well understood. We used a T&T olfactometer test kit to evaluate olfactory function in 26 patients with MS and 26 age- and sex-matched healthy controls (HC). Then, Brain MRI were performed and olfactory-related structures were analyzed in these subjects. Olfactory detection and recognition threshold were significantly higher in the MS group, interestingly olfactory recognition threshold positively correlated with expanded disability status scale scores in these patients. Olfactory bulb (OB) volume reduced in patients with olfactory dysfunction (ODF). At the same time, reductions in gray matter (GM) volume were observed in the parahippocampal gyrus (PCG), amygdala, piriform cortex, and inferior frontal gyrus in patients with MS compared to HC. Atrophy of the PCG was more obvious in patients with ODF than patients without ODF and the PCG volume correlated with the olfactory recognition threshold, while no difference was found in fractional anisotropy values of tract-based spatial statistics analysis in the two groups. Olfactory function in patients with MS tends to become gradually more impaired with disability aggravation. Decreases in the volume of the OB and olfactory-related GM might provide valuable information about disease status in patients with MS with olfactory impairment. PMID:27206870

  17. Hebbian learning for olfactory sequences.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Andrew J; Cauchi, Laura; Miles, Christopher

    2013-06-01

    The present paper explores the generality of the Hebb repetition effect to the learning of olfactory sequences in order to assess commonality of memory functioning across sensory modalities. Participants completed a serial-order reconstruction task comprising sequences of four olfactory stimuli. Following presentation of each sequence, participants were re-presented with the odours and were required to reconstruct their order of presentation. Surreptitious re-presentation of the repeated sequence occurred on every third trial. This order reconstruction task produced a serial-position function comprising recency only for both the non-repeated and the repeated sequences. Importantly, serial-order reconstruction for the repeated odour sequence produced improved performance for that sequence compared to the non-repeated sequences. This observation of a Hebb repetition effect for olfactory sequences further supports the proposition that sequential learning can operate amodally.

  18. Monoallelic Expression of Olfactory Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Monahan, Kevin; Lomvardas, Stavros

    2016-01-01

    The sense of smell collects vital information about the environment by detecting a multitude of chemical odorants. Breadth and sensitivity are provided by a huge number of chemosensory receptor proteins, including more than 1,400 olfactory receptors (ORs). Organizing the sensory information generated by these receptors so that it can be processed and evaluated by the central nervous system is a major challenge. This challenge is overcome by monogenic and monoallelic expression of OR genes. The single OR expressed by each olfactory sensory neuron determines the neuron’s odor sensitivity and the axonal connections it will make to downstream neurons in the olfactory bulb. The expression of a single OR per neuron is accomplished by coupling a slow chromatin-mediated activation process to a fast negative-feedback signal that prevents activation of additional ORs. Singular OR activation is likely orchestrated by a network of interchromosomal enhancer interactions and large-scale changes in nuclear architecture. PMID:26359778

  19. Olfactory dysfunction in Down's Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Murphy, C; Jinich, S

    1996-01-01

    Down's Syndrome subjects over 40 years old show neuropathology similar to that of Alzheimer's disease. The olfactory system is particularly vulnerable in Alzheimer's disease, both anatomically and functionally. Several measures of sensory and cognitive functioning were studied in the older Down's Syndrome patient, with the hypothesis of significant olfactory dysfunction. Participants were 23 Down's subjects, and 23 controls. The Dementia Rating Scale showed mean scores of 103 for Down's subjects and 141 for controls. Down's subjects showed significant deficits in odor detection threshold, odor identification, and odor recognition memory. Normal performance in a taste threshold task, similar to the olfactory threshold task in subject demands, suggested that the Down's syndrome subjects' poor performance was not due to task demands. Deficits in olfaction may provide a sensitive and early indicator of the deterioration and progression of the brain in older subjects with Down's Syndrome.

  20. Aging in the olfactory system.

    PubMed

    Mobley, Arie S; Rodriguez-Gil, Diego J; Imamura, Fumiaki; Greer, Charles A

    2014-02-01

    With advancing age, the ability of humans to detect and discriminate odors declines. In light of the rapid progress in analyzing molecular and structural correlates of developing and adult olfactory systems, the paucity of information available on the aged olfactory system is startling. A rich literature documents the decline of olfactory acuity in aged humans, but the underlying cellular and molecular mechanisms are largely unknown. Using animal models, preliminary work is beginning to uncover differences between young and aged rodents that may help address the deficits seen in humans, but many questions remain unanswered. Recent studies of odorant receptor (OR) expression, synaptic organization, adult neurogenesis, and the contribution of cortical representation during aging suggest possible underlying mechanisms and new research directions.

  1. Olfactory system oscillations across phyla.

    PubMed

    Kay, Leslie M

    2015-04-01

    Neural oscillations are ubiquitous in olfactory systems of mammals, insects and molluscs. Neurophysiological and computational investigations point to common mechanisms for gamma or odor associated oscillations across phyla (40-100Hz in mammals, 20-30Hz in insects, 0.5-1.5Hz in molluscs), engaging the reciprocal dendrodendritic synapse between excitatory principle neurons and inhibitory interneurons in the olfactory bulb (OB), antennal lobe (AL), or procerebrum (PrC). Recent studies suggest important mechanisms that may modulate gamma oscillations, including neuromodulators and centrifugal input to the OB and AL. Beta (20Hz) and theta (2-12Hz) oscillations coordinate activity within and across brain regions. Olfactory beta oscillations are associated with odor learning and depend on centrifugal OB input, while theta oscillations are strongly associated with respiration.

  2. Olfactory nerve--a novel invasion route of Neisseria meningitidis to reach the meninges.

    PubMed

    Sjölinder, Hong; Jonsson, Ann-Beth

    2010-11-18

    Neisseria meningitidis is a human-specific pathogen with capacity to cause septic shock and meningitis. It has been hypothesized that invasion of the central nervous system (CNS) is a complication of a bacteremic condition. In this study, we aimed to characterize the invasion route of N. meningitidis to the CNS. Using an intranasally challenged mouse disease model, we found that twenty percent of the mice developed lethal meningitis even though no bacteria could be detected in blood. Upon bacterial infection, epithelial lesions and redistribution of intracellular junction protein N-cadherin were observed at the nasal epithelial mucosa, especially at the olfactory epithelium, which is functionally and anatomically connected to the CNS. Bacteria were detected in the submucosa of the olfactory epithelium, along olfactory nerves in the cribriform plate, at the olfactory bulb and subsequently at the meninges and subarachnoid space. Furthermore, our data suggest that a threshold level of bacteremia is required for the development of meningococcal sepsis. Taken together, N. meningitidis is able to pass directly from nasopharynx to meninges through the olfactory nerve system. This study enhances our understanding how N. meningitidis invades the meninges. The nasal olfactory nerve system may be a novel target for disease prevention that can improve outcome and survival.

  3. Inhibition by Somatostatin Interneurons in Olfactory Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Large, Adam M.; Kunz, Nicholas A.; Mielo, Samantha L.; Oswald, Anne-Marie M.

    2016-01-01

    Inhibitory circuitry plays an integral role in cortical network activity. The development of transgenic mouse lines targeting unique interneuron classes has significantly advanced our understanding of the functional roles of specific inhibitory circuits in neocortical sensory processing. In contrast, considerably less is known about the circuitry and function of interneuron classes in piriform cortex, a paleocortex responsible for olfactory processing. In this study, we sought to utilize transgenic technology to investigate inhibition mediated by somatostatin (SST) interneurons onto pyramidal cells (PCs), parvalbumin (PV) interneurons, and other interneuron classes. As a first step, we characterized the anatomical distributions and intrinsic properties of SST and PV interneurons in four transgenic lines (SST-cre, GIN, PV-cre, and G42) that are commonly interbred to investigate inhibitory connectivity. Surprisingly, the distributions SST and PV cell subtypes targeted in the GIN and G42 lines were sparse in piriform cortex compared to neocortex. Moreover, two-thirds of interneurons recorded in the SST-cre line had electrophysiological properties similar to fast spiking (FS) interneurons rather than regular (RS) or low threshold spiking (LTS) phenotypes. Nonetheless, like neocortex, we find that SST-cells broadly inhibit a number of unidentified interneuron classes including putatively identified PV cells and surprisingly, other SST cells. We also confirm that SST-cells inhibit pyramidal cell dendrites and thus, influence dendritic integration of afferent and recurrent inputs to the piriform cortex. Altogether, our findings suggest that SST interneurons play an important role in regulating both excitation and the global inhibitory network during olfactory processing. PMID:27582691

  4. Inhibition by Somatostatin Interneurons in Olfactory Cortex.

    PubMed

    Large, Adam M; Kunz, Nicholas A; Mielo, Samantha L; Oswald, Anne-Marie M

    2016-01-01

    Inhibitory circuitry plays an integral role in cortical network activity. The development of transgenic mouse lines targeting unique interneuron classes has significantly advanced our understanding of the functional roles of specific inhibitory circuits in neocortical sensory processing. In contrast, considerably less is known about the circuitry and function of interneuron classes in piriform cortex, a paleocortex responsible for olfactory processing. In this study, we sought to utilize transgenic technology to investigate inhibition mediated by somatostatin (SST) interneurons onto pyramidal cells (PCs), parvalbumin (PV) interneurons, and other interneuron classes. As a first step, we characterized the anatomical distributions and intrinsic properties of SST and PV interneurons in four transgenic lines (SST-cre, GIN, PV-cre, and G42) that are commonly interbred to investigate inhibitory connectivity. Surprisingly, the distributions SST and PV cell subtypes targeted in the GIN and G42 lines were sparse in piriform cortex compared to neocortex. Moreover, two-thirds of interneurons recorded in the SST-cre line had electrophysiological properties similar to fast spiking (FS) interneurons rather than regular (RS) or low threshold spiking (LTS) phenotypes. Nonetheless, like neocortex, we find that SST-cells broadly inhibit a number of unidentified interneuron classes including putatively identified PV cells and surprisingly, other SST cells. We also confirm that SST-cells inhibit pyramidal cell dendrites and thus, influence dendritic integration of afferent and recurrent inputs to the piriform cortex. Altogether, our findings suggest that SST interneurons play an important role in regulating both excitation and the global inhibitory network during olfactory processing. PMID:27582691

  5. Progressive effects of N-myc deficiency on proliferation, neurogenesis, and morphogenesis in the olfactory epithelium.

    PubMed

    Wittmann, Walter; Schimmang, Thomas; Gunhaga, Lena

    2014-06-01

    N-myc belongs to the myc proto-oncogene family, which is involved in numerous cellular processes such as proliferation, growth, apoptosis, and differentiation. Conditional deletion of N-myc in the mouse nervous system disrupted brain development, indicating that N-myc plays an essential role during neural development. How the development of the olfactory epithelium and neurogenesis within are affected by the loss of N-myc has, however, not been determined. To address these issues, we examined an N-myc(Foxg1Cre) conditional mouse line, in which N-myc is depleted in the olfactory epithelium. First changes in N-myc mutants were detected at E11.5, with reduced proliferation and neurogenesis in a slightly smaller olfactory epithelium. The phenotype was more pronounced at E13.5, with a complete lack of Hes5-positive progenitor cells, decreased proliferation, and neurogenesis. In addition, stereological analyses revealed reduced cell size of post-mitotic neurons in the olfactory epithelium, which contributed to a smaller olfactory pit. Furthermore, we observed diminished proliferation and neurogenesis also in the vomeronasal organ, which likewise was reduced in size. In addition, the generation of gonadotropin-releasing hormone neurons was severely reduced in N-myc mutants. Thus, diminished neurogenesis and proliferation in combination with smaller neurons might explain the morphological defects in the N-myc depleted olfactory structures. Moreover, our results suggest an important role for N-myc in regulating ongoing neurogenesis, in part by maintaining the Hes5-positive progenitor pool. In summary, our results provide evidence that N-myc deficiency in the olfactory epithelium progressively diminishes proliferation and neurogenesis with negative consequences at structural and cellular levels.

  6. Olfactory dysfunction in Alzheimer’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Zou, Yong-ming; Lu, Da; Liu, Li-ping; Zhang, Hui-hong; Zhou, Yu-ying

    2016-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is a common neurodegenerative disorder with the earliest clinical symptom of olfactory dysfunction, which is a potential clinical marker for AD severity and progression. However, many questions remain unanswered. This article reviews relevant research on olfactory dysfunction in AD and evaluates the predictive value of olfactory dysfunction for the epidemiological, pathophysiological, and clinical features of AD, as well as for the conversion of cognitive impairment to AD. We summarize problems of existing studies and provide a useful reference for further studies in AD olfactory dysfunction and for clinical applications of olfactory testing. PMID:27143888

  7. Gene Expression Profiles of Main Olfactory Epithelium in Adenylyl Cyclase 3 Knockout Mice

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhenshan; Zhou, Yanfen; Luo, Yingtao; Zhang, Jing; Zhai, Yunpeng; Yang, Dong; Zhang, Zhe; Li, Yongchao; Storm, Daniel R.; Ma, Runlin Z.

    2015-01-01

    Adenylyl Cyclase 3 (AC3) plays an important role in the olfactory sensation-signaling pathway in mice. AC3 deficiency leads to defects in olfaction. However, it is still unknown whether AC3 deficiency affects gene expression or olfactory signal transduction pathways within the main olfactory epithelium (MOE). In this study, gene microarrays were used to screen differentially expressed genes in MOE from AC3 knockout (AC3−/−) and wild-type (AC3+/+) mice. The differentially expressed genes identified were subjected to bioinformatic analysis and verified by qRT-PCR. Gene expression in the MOE from AC3−/− mice was significantly altered, compared to AC3+/+ mice. Of the 41266 gene probes, 3379 had greater than 2-fold fold change in expression levels between AC3−/− and AC3+/+ mice, accounting for 8% of the total gene probes. Of these genes, 1391 were up regulated, and 1988 were down regulated, including 425 olfactory receptor genes, 99 genes that are specifically expressed in the immature olfactory neurons, 305 genes that are specifically expressed in the mature olfactory neurons, and 155 genes that are involved in epigenetic regulation. Quantitative RT-PCR verification of the differentially expressed epigenetic regulation related genes, olfactory receptors, ion transporter related genes, neuron development and differentiation related genes, lipid metabolism and membrane protein transport etc. related genes showed that P75NTR, Hinfp, Gadd45b, and Tet3 were significantly up-regulated, while Olfr370, Olfr1414, Olfr1208, Golf, Faim2, Tsg101, Mapk10, Actl6b, H2BE, ATF5, Kirrrel2, OMP, Drd2 etc. were significantly down-regulated. In summary, AC3 may play a role in proximal olfactory signaling and play a role in the regulation of differentially expressed genes in mouse MOE. PMID:26633363

  8. Gene Expression Profiles of Main Olfactory Epithelium in Adenylyl Cyclase 3 Knockout Mice.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhenshan; Zhou, Yanfen; Luo, Yingtao; Zhang, Jing; Zhai, Yunpeng; Yang, Dong; Zhang, Zhe; Li, Yongchao; Storm, Daniel R; Ma, Runlin Z

    2015-11-30

    Adenylyl Cyclase 3 (AC3) plays an important role in the olfactory sensation-signaling pathway in mice. AC3 deficiency leads to defects in olfaction. However, it is still unknown whether AC3 deficiency affects gene expression or olfactory signal transduction pathways within the main olfactory epithelium (MOE). In this study, gene microarrays were used to screen differentially expressed genes in MOE from AC3 knockout (AC3(-/-)) and wild-type (AC3(+/+)) mice. The differentially expressed genes identified were subjected to bioinformatic analysis and verified by qRT-PCR. Gene expression in the MOE from AC3(-/-) mice was significantly altered, compared to AC3(+/+) mice. Of the 41266 gene probes, 3379 had greater than 2-fold fold change in expression levels between AC3(-/-) and AC3(+/+) mice, accounting for 8% of the total gene probes. Of these genes, 1391 were up regulated, and 1988 were down regulated, including 425 olfactory receptor genes, 99 genes that are specifically expressed in the immature olfactory neurons, 305 genes that are specifically expressed in the mature olfactory neurons, and 155 genes that are involved in epigenetic regulation. Quantitative RT-PCR verification of the differentially expressed epigenetic regulation related genes, olfactory receptors, ion transporter related genes, neuron development and differentiation related genes, lipid metabolism and membrane protein transport etc. related genes showed that P75NTR, Hinfp, Gadd45b, and Tet3 were significantly up-regulated, while Olfr370, Olfr1414, Olfr1208, Golf, Faim2, Tsg101, Mapk10, Actl6b, H2BE, ATF5, Kirrrel2, OMP, Drd2 etc. were significantly down-regulated. In summary, AC3 may play a role in proximal olfactory signaling and play a role in the regulation of differentially expressed genes in mouse MOE.

  9. Critical role of GFRα1 in the development and function of the main olfactory system.

    PubMed

    Marks, Carolyn; Belluscio, Leonardo; Ibáñez, Carlos F

    2012-11-28

    Glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) and its receptor GFRα1 are prominently expressed in the olfactory epithelium (OE) and olfactory bulb (OB), but their importance for olfactory system development is completely unknown. We have investigated the consequences of GFRα1 deficiency for mouse olfactory system development and function. In the OE, GFRα1 was expressed in basal precursors, immature olfactory sensory neurons (OSNs), and olfactory ensheathing cells (OECs), but was excluded from mature OSNs. The OE of newborn Gfra1 knock-out mice was thinner and contained fewer OSNs, but more dividing precursors, suggesting deficient neurogenesis. Immature OSN axon bundles were enlarged and associated OECs increased, indicating impaired migration of OECs and OSN axons. In the OB, GFRα1 was expressed in immature OSN axons and OECs of the nerve layer, as well as mitral and tufted cells, but was excluded from GABAergic interneurons. In newborn knock-outs, the nerve layer was dramatically reduced, exhibiting fewer axons and OECs. Bulbs were smaller and presented fewer and disorganized glomeruli and a significant reduction in mitral cells. Numbers of tyrosine hydroxylase-, calbindin-, and calretinin-expressing interneurons were also reduced in newborn mice lacking Gfra1. At birth, the OE and OB of Gdnf knock-out mice displayed comparable phenotypes. Similar deficits were also found in adult heterozygous Gfra1(+/-) mutants, which in addition displayed diminished responses in behavioral tests of olfactory function. We conclude that GFRα1 is critical for the development and function of the main olfactory system, contributing to the development and allocation of all major classes of neurons and glial cells.

  10. Olfactory receptor neuron profiling using sandalwood odorants.

    PubMed

    Bieri, Stephan; Monastyrskaia, Katherine; Schilling, Boris

    2004-07-01

    The mammalian olfactory system can discriminate between volatile molecules with subtle differences in their molecular structures. Efforts in synthetic chemistry have delivered a myriad of smelling compounds of different qualities as well as many molecules with very similar olfactive properties. One important class of molecules in the fragrance industry are sandalwood odorants. Sandalwood oil and four synthetic sandalwood molecules were selected to study the activation profile of endogenous olfactory receptors when exposed to compounds from the same odorant family. Dissociated rat olfactory receptor neurons were exposed to the sandalwood molecules and the receptor activation studied by monitoring fluxes in the internal calcium concentration. Olfactory receptor neurons were identified that were specifically stimulated by sandalwood compounds. These neurons expressed olfactory receptors that can discriminate between sandalwood odorants with slight differences in their molecular structures. This is the first study in which an important class of perfume compounds was analyzed for its ability to activate endogenous olfactory receptors in olfactory receptor neurons.

  11. Continuous Neural Plasticity in the Olfactory Intrabulbar Circuitry

    PubMed Central

    Cummings, Diana M.; Belluscio, Leonardo

    2012-01-01

    In the mammalian brain each olfactory bulb contains two mirror-symmetric glomerular maps linked through a set of reciprocal intrabulbar projections. These projections connect isofunctional odor columns through synapses in the internal plexiform layer (IPL) to produce an intrabulbar map. Developmental studies show that initially intrabulbar projections broadly target the IPL on the opposite side of the bulb and refine postnatally to their adult precision by 7 weeks of age in an activity-dependent manner (Marks et al., 2006). In this study, we sought to determine the capacity of intrabulbar map to recover its precision after disruption. Using reversible naris closure in both juvenile and adult mice, we distorted the intrabulbar map and then removed the blocks for varying survival periods. Our results reveal that returning normal olfactory experience can indeed drive the re-refinement of intrabulbar projections but requires 9 weeks. Since activity also affects olfactory sensory neurons (OSNs) (Suh et al., 2006), we further examined the consequence of activity deprivation on P2-expressing OSNs and their associated glomeruli. Our findings indicate that while naris closure caused a marked decrease in P2-OSN number and P2-glomerular volume, axonal convergence was not lost and both were quickly restored within 3 weeks. By contrast, synaptic contacts within the IPL also decreased with sensory deprivation but required at least 6 weeks to recover. Thus, we conclude that recovery of the glomerular map precedes and likely drives the refinement of the intrabulbar map while IPL contacts recover gradually, possibly setting the pace for intrabulbar circuit restoration. PMID:20610751

  12. Hypothyroidism Affects Olfactory Evoked Potentials

    PubMed Central

    Świdziński, Teodor; Czerniejewska-Wolska, Hanna; Wiskirska-Woźnica, Bożena; Owecki, Maciej; Głowacka, Maria Danuta; Frankowska, Anna; Łącka, Katarzyna; Glapiński, Mariusz; Maciejewska-Szaniec, Zofia; Świdziński, Piotr

    2016-01-01

    Background. Objective electrophysiological methods for investigations of the organ of smell consist in recordings of olfactory cortex responses to specific, time restricted odor stimuli. In hypothyroidism have impaired sense of smell. Material and Methods. Two groups: control of 31 healthy subjects and study group of 21 with hypothyroidism. The inclusion criterion for the study group was the TSH range from 3.54 to 110 μIU/mL. Aim. Assessment of the latency time of evoked responses from the olfactory nerve N1 and the trigeminal nerve N5 using two smells of mint and anise in hypothyroidism. Results. The smell perception in subjective olfactory tests was normal in 85% of the hypothyroid group. Differences were noticed in the objective tests. The detailed intergroup analysis of latency times of recorded cortical responses PN5 and PN1 performed by means between the groups of patients with overt clinical hypothyroidism versus subclinical hypothyroidism demonstrated a significant difference (p < 0.05) whereas no such differences were found between the control group versus subclinical hypothyroidism group (p > 0.05). Conclusion. We can conclude that registration of cortex potentials at irritation of olfactory and trigeminal nerves offers possibilities for using this method as an objective indicator of hypothyroidism severity and prognostic process factor. PMID:27656655

  13. Hypothyroidism Affects Olfactory Evoked Potentials

    PubMed Central

    Świdziński, Teodor; Czerniejewska-Wolska, Hanna; Wiskirska-Woźnica, Bożena; Owecki, Maciej; Głowacka, Maria Danuta; Frankowska, Anna; Łącka, Katarzyna; Glapiński, Mariusz; Maciejewska-Szaniec, Zofia; Świdziński, Piotr

    2016-01-01

    Background. Objective electrophysiological methods for investigations of the organ of smell consist in recordings of olfactory cortex responses to specific, time restricted odor stimuli. In hypothyroidism have impaired sense of smell. Material and Methods. Two groups: control of 31 healthy subjects and study group of 21 with hypothyroidism. The inclusion criterion for the study group was the TSH range from 3.54 to 110 μIU/mL. Aim. Assessment of the latency time of evoked responses from the olfactory nerve N1 and the trigeminal nerve N5 using two smells of mint and anise in hypothyroidism. Results. The smell perception in subjective olfactory tests was normal in 85% of the hypothyroid group. Differences were noticed in the objective tests. The detailed intergroup analysis of latency times of recorded cortical responses PN5 and PN1 performed by means between the groups of patients with overt clinical hypothyroidism versus subclinical hypothyroidism demonstrated a significant difference (p < 0.05) whereas no such differences were found between the control group versus subclinical hypothyroidism group (p > 0.05). Conclusion. We can conclude that registration of cortex potentials at irritation of olfactory and trigeminal nerves offers possibilities for using this method as an objective indicator of hypothyroidism severity and prognostic process factor.

  14. Olfactory dysfunction in degenerative ataxias.

    PubMed

    Connelly, T; Farmer, J M; Lynch, D R; Doty, R L

    2003-10-01

    Several lines of evidence suggest that the cerebellum may play a role in higher-order olfactory processing. In this study, we administered the University of Pennsylvania Smell Identification Test (UPSIT), a standardised test of olfactory function, to patients with ataxias primarily due to cerebellar pathology (spinocerebellar ataxias and related disorders) and to patients with Friedreich ataxia, an ataxia associated mainly with loss of afferent cerebellar pathways. UPSIT scores were slightly lower in both patient groups than in the control subjects, but no differences were noted between the scores of the Friedreich and the other ataxia patients. Within the Friedreich ataxia group, the smell test scores did not correlate with the number of pathologic GAA repeats (a marker of genetic severity), disease duration, or categorical ambulatory ability. UPSIT scores did not correlate with disease duration, although they correlated marginally with ambulatory status in the patients with cerebellar pathology. This study suggests that olfactory dysfunction may be a subtle clinical component of degenerative ataxias, in concordance with the hypothesis that the cerebellum or its afferents plays some role in central olfactory processing.

  15. Attractive action of FGF-signaling contributes to the postnatal developing hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Cuccioli, V; Bueno, C; Belvindrah, R; Lledo, P-M; Martinez, S

    2015-04-01

    During brain development neural cell migration is a crucial, well-orchestrated, process, which leads to the proper whole brain structural organization. As development proceeds, new neurons are continuously produced, and this protracted neurogenesis is maintained throughout life in specialized germinative areas inside the telencephalon: the subventricular zone (SVZ) and the dentate gyrus (DG) of the hippocampus. In the anterior SVZ, newly generated neurons migrate through long distances, along the rostral migratory stream (RMS), before reaching their final destinations in the olfactory bulb (OB). Intriguingly, recent observations pointed out the existence of other postnatal tangential routes of migration alternative to the RMS but still starting from the SVZ. The presence of such dynamic and heterogeneous cell movements contributes to important features in the postnatal brain such as neural cell replacement and plasticity in cortical regions. In this work, we asked whether a caudal migratory pathway starting from the caudal SVZ continues through life. Strikingly, in vivo analysis of this caudal migration revealed the presence of a postnatal contribution of SVZ to the hippocampus. In vitro studies of the caudal migratory stream revealed the role of FGF signaling in attracting caudally the migrating neuroblasts during postnatal stages. Our findings demonstrate a postnatal neuronal contribution from the caudal ganglionic eminence (CGE) CGE-SVZ to the hippocampus through an FGF-dependent migrating mechanism. All together our data emphasizes the emerging idea that a developmental program is still operating in discrete domains of the postnatal brain and may contribute to the regulation of neural cell replacement processes in physiological plasticity and/or pathological circumstances.

  16. Subtype-specific reduction of olfactory bulb interneurons in Pax6 heterozygous mutant mice.

    PubMed

    Haba, Hasumi; Nomura, Tadashi; Suto, Fumikazu; Osumi, Noriko

    2009-09-01

    Interneurons in the olfactory bulb (OB) play essential roles in the processing of olfactory information. They are classified into several subpopulations by the expression of different neurochemical markers. Here we focused on a transcription factor Pax6, and examined its expression and function in distinct subtypes of OB interneurons. We identified Pax6 expression in specific subtypes of interneurons in the external plexiform layer (EPL). The number of these interneuron subtypes was dramatically decreased in Pax6 heterozygous mutant mice. These results indicate that Pax6 is required for differentiation and/or maintenance of EPL interneurons in the adult mouse OB.

  17. Reading Out Olfactory Receptors: Feedforward Circuits Detect Odors in Mixtures without Demixing.

    PubMed

    Mathis, Alexander; Rokni, Dan; Kapoor, Vikrant; Bethge, Matthias; Murthy, Venkatesh N

    2016-09-01

    The olfactory system, like other sensory systems, can detect specific stimuli of interest amidst complex, varying backgrounds. To gain insight into the neural mechanisms underlying this ability, we imaged responses of mouse olfactory bulb glomeruli to mixtures. We used this data to build a model of mixture responses that incorporated nonlinear interactions and trial-to-trial variability and explored potential decoding mechanisms that can mimic mouse performance when given glomerular responses as input. We find that a linear decoder with sparse weights could match mouse performance using just a small subset of the glomeruli (∼15). However, when such a decoder is trained only with single odors, it generalizes poorly to mixture stimuli due to nonlinear mixture responses. We show that mice similarly fail to generalize, suggesting that they learn this segregation task discriminatively by adjusting task-specific decision boundaries without taking advantage of a demixed representation of odors. PMID:27593177

  18. Gestational methyl donor deficiency alters key proteins involved in neurosteroidogenesis in the olfactory bulbs of newborn female rats and is associated with impaired olfactory performance.

    PubMed

    El Hajj Chehadeh, Sarah; Pourié, Grégory; Martin, Nicolas; Alberto, Jean-Marc; Daval, Jean-Luc; Guéant, Jean-Louis; Leininger-Muller, Brigitte

    2014-03-28

    Gestational methyl donor deficiency (MDD) leads to growth retardation as well as to cognitive and motor disorders in 21-d-old rat pups. These disorders are related to impaired neurogenesis in the cerebral neurogenic areas. Olfactory bulbs (OB), the main target of neuronal progenitors originating from the subventricular zone, play a critical role during the postnatal period by allowing the pups to identify maternal odour. We hypothesised that growth retardation could result from impaired suckling due to impaired olfactory discrimination through imbalanced apoptosis/neurogenesis in the OB. Since neurosteroidogenesis modulates neurogenesis in OB, in the present study, we investigated whether altered neurosteroidogenesis could explain some these effects. Pups born to dams fed a normal diet (n 24) and a MDD diet (n 27) were subjected to olfactory tests during the lactation and weaning periods (n 24 and 20, respectively). We studied the markers of apoptosis/neurogenesis and the expression levels of the key neurosteroidogenic enzyme aromatase, the cholesterol-transfer protein StAR (steroidogenic acute regulatory protein) and the ERα oestrogen receptor and the content of oestradiol in OB. The 21-d-old MDD female pups displayed lower body weight and impaired olfactory discrimination when compared with the control pups. MDD led to greater homocysteine accumulation and more pronounced apoptosis, along with impaired cell proliferation in the OB of female pups. The expression levels of aromatase, StAR and ERα as well as the content of oestradiol were lower in the OB of the MDD female pups than in those of the control female pups. In conclusion, gestational MDD may alter olfactory discrimination performances by affecting neurogenesis, apoptosis and neurosteroidogenesis in OB in a sex-dependent manner. It may be involved in growth retardation through impaired suckling.

  19. Programming of Mice Circadian Photic Responses by Postnatal Light Environment

    PubMed Central

    Brooks, Elisabeth; Patel, Dhruval; Canal, Maria Mercè

    2014-01-01

    Early life programming has important consequences for future health and wellbeing. A key new aspect is the impact of perinatal light on the circadian system. Postnatal light environment will program circadian behavior, together with cell morphology and clock gene function within the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) of the hypothalamus, the principal circadian clock in mammals. Nevertheless, it is still not clear whether the observed changes reflect a processing of an altered photic input from the retina, rather than an imprinting of the intrinsic molecular clock mechanisms. Here, we addressed the issue by systematically probing the mouse circadian system at various levels. Firstly, we used electroretinography, pupillometry and histology protocols to show that gross retinal function and morphology in the adult are largely independent of postnatal light experiences that modulate circadian photosensitivity. Secondly, we used circadian activity protocols to show that only the animal's behavioral responses to chronic light exposure, but not to constant darkness or the acute responses to a light stimulus depend on postnatal light experience. Thirdly, we used real-time PER2::LUC rhythm recording to show long-term changes in clock gene expression in the SCN, but also heart, lung and spleen. The data showed that perinatal light mainly targets the long-term adaptive responses of the circadian clock to environmental light, rather than the retina or intrinsic clock mechanisms. Finally, we found long-term effects on circadian peripheral clocks, suggesting far-reaching consequences for the animal's overall physiology. PMID:24842115

  20. Centrifugal innervation of the mammalian olfactory bulb.

    PubMed

    Matsutani, Shinji; Yamamoto, Noboru

    2008-12-01

    Although it has been known for decades that the mammalian olfactory bulb receives a substantial number of centrifugal inputs from other regions of the brain, relatively few data have been available on the function of the centrifugal olfactory system. Knowing the role of the centrifugal projection and how it works is of critical importance to fully understanding olfaction. The centrifugal fibers can be classified into two groups, a group that release neuromodulators, such as noradrenaline, serotonin, or acetylcholine, and a group originating in the olfactory cortex. Accumulating evidence suggests that centrifugal neuromodulatory inputs are associated with acquisition of odor memory. Because the distribution of the terminals on these fibers is diffuse and widespread, the neuromodulatory inputs must affect diverse subsets of bulbar neurons at the same time. In contrast, knowledge of the role of centrifugal fibers from the olfactory cortical areas is limited. Judging from recent morphological evidence, these fibers may modify the activity of neurons located in sparse and discrete loci in the olfactory bulb. Given the modular organization of the olfactory bulb, centrifugal fibers from the olfactory cortex may help coordinate the activities of restricted subsets of neurons belonging to distinct functional modules in an odor-specific manner. Because the olfactory cortex receives inputs from limbic and neocortical areas in addition to inputs from the bulb, the centrifugal inputs from the cortex can modulate odor processing in the bulb in response to non-olfactory as well as olfactory cues.

  1. Olfactory dysfunction, olfactory bulb pathology and urban air pollution

    PubMed Central

    Calderón-Garcidueñas, Lilian; Franco-Lira, Maricela; Henríquez-Roldán, Carlos; Osnaya, Norma; González-Maciel, Angelica; Reynoso-Robles, Rafael; Villarreal-Calderon, Rafael; Herritt, Lou; Brooks, Diane; Keefe, Sheyla; Palacios-Moreno, Juan; Villarreal-Calderon, Rodolfo; Torres-Jardón, Ricardo; Medina-Cortina, Humberto; Delgado-Chávez, Ricardo; Aiello-Mora, Mario; Maronpot, Robert R.; Doty, Richard L

    2010-01-01

    Mexico City (MC) residents are exposed to severe air pollution and exhibit olfactory bulb inflammation. We compared the olfactory function of individuals living under conditions of extreme air pollution to that of controls from a relatively clean environment and explore associations between olfaction scores, apolipoprotein E (APOE) status, and pollution exposure. The olfactory bulbs (OBs) of 35 MC and 9 controls 20.8 ± 8.5 y were assessed by light and electron microscopy. The University of Pennsylvania Smell Identification Test (UPSIT) was administered to 62 MC / 25 controls 21.2 ±2.7 y. MC subjects had significantly lower UPSIT scores: 34.24 ± 0.42 versus controls 35.76 ± 0.40, p=0.03. Olfaction deficits were present in 35.5% MC and 12% of controls. MC APOE ε 4 carriers failed 2.4 ± 0.54 items in the 10-item smell identification scale from the UPSIT related to Alzheimer's disease, while APOE 2/3 and 3/3 subjects failed 1.36 ± 0.16 items, p = 0.01. MC residents exhibited OB endothelial hyperplasia, neuronal accumulation of particles (2/35), and immunoreactivity to beta amyloid βA42 (29/35) and/or α-synuclein (4/35) in neurons, glial cells and/or blood vessels. Ultrafine particles were present in OBs endothelial cytoplasm and basement membranes. Control OBs were unremarkable. Air pollution exposure is associated with olfactory dysfunction and OB pathology, APOE 4 may confer greater susceptibility to such abnormalities, and ultrafine particles could play a key role in the OB pathology. This study contributes to our understanding of the influences of air pollution on olfaction and its potential contribution to neurodegeneration. PMID:19297138

  2. Postnatal Hematopoiesis and Gut Microbiota in NOD Mice Deviate from C57BL/6 Mice

    PubMed Central

    Damlund, Dina Silke Malling; Metzdorff, Stine Broeng; Hasselby, Jane Preuss; Wiese, Maria; Lundsager, Mia; Buschard, Karsten Stig; Hansen, Axel Kornerup; Frøkiær, Hanne

    2016-01-01

    Neonatal studies in different mouse strains reveal that early life colonization affects the development of adaptive immunity in mice. The nonobese diabetic (NOD) mouse spontaneously develops autoimmune diabetes, but neonatal studies of NOD mice are lacking. We hypothesized that NOD mice deviate from another much used mouse strain, C57BL/6, with respect to postnatal microbiota and/or hematopoiesis and compared this in newborn mice of dams housed under the same conditions. A distinct bacteria profile rich in staphylococci was found at postnatal days (PND) 1–4 in NOD mice. Furthermore, a distinct splenic cell profile high in a granulocytic phenotype was evident in the neonatal NOD mice whereas neonatal C57BL/6 mice showed a profile rich in monocytes. Neonatal expression of Reg3g and Muc2 in the gut was deviating in NOD mice and coincided with fewer bacteria attaching to the Mucosal surface in NOD compared to C57BL/6 mice. PMID:26783537

  3. Midwives benefit from good postnatal care, too.

    PubMed

    Cameron, Helen

    2014-01-01

    Appropriate, timely and responsive postnatal care can help women and families negotiate the major life transition that childbirth brings. However, women's experiences of postnatal care are often negative and our increasingly biomedical approach to birth means that greater emphasis is placed on antenatal and intrapartum care at the expense of postnatal care. Good postnatal care is essential not only for women, but for midwives too, and our failure to acknowledge the significance of birth, and our contribution to that event can diminish us as people and midwives.

  4. Sexual dimorphism in the bed nucleus of the accessory olfactory tract in the rat.

    PubMed

    Collado, P; Guillamón, A; Valencia, A; Segovia, S

    1990-11-01

    This work investigates the existence of sex differences in the volume and number of neurons and glial cells in the bed nucleus of the accessory olfactory tract (BAOT). Males showed larger volume and number of cells than female rats. Early postnatal (day 1 after birth) orchidectomy in males, and androgenization in females, reversed these differences. No sex differences were found in BAOT glial cells. The sexual dimorphism found in the neuron/glial cell ratio reflects sex differences in neuron number. The existence of sexual dimorphism in the BAOT supports our earlier hypothesis which states that the vomeronasal system (VNS) is sexually dimorphic.

  5. Neuronal pattern separation in the olfactory bulb improves odor discrimination learning

    PubMed Central

    Lagier, Samuel; Begnaud, Frédéric; Rodriguez, Ivan; Carleton, Alan

    2015-01-01

    Neuronal pattern separation is thought to enable the brain to disambiguate sensory stimuli with overlapping features thereby extracting valuable information. In the olfactory system, it remains unknown whether pattern separation acts as a driving force for sensory discrimination and the learning thereof. Here we show that overlapping odor-evoked input patterns to the mouse olfactory bulb (OB) are dynamically reformatted in the network at the timescale of a single breath, giving rise to separated patterns of activity in ensemble of output neurons (mitral/tufted cells; M/T). Strikingly, the extent of pattern separation in M/T assemblies predicts behavioral discrimination performance during the learning phase. Furthermore, exciting or inhibiting GABAergic OB interneurons, using optogenetics or pharmacogenetics, altered pattern separation and thereby odor discrimination learning in a bidirectional way. In conclusion, we propose that the OB network can act as a pattern separator facilitating olfactory stimuli distinction, a process that is sculpted by synaptic inhibition. PMID:26301325

  6. Exotic models may offer unique opportunities to decipher specific scientific question: the case of Xenopus olfactory system.

    PubMed

    Gascuel, Jean; Amano, Tosikazu

    2013-09-01

    The fact that olfactory systems are highly conserved in all animal species from insects to mammals allow the generalization of findings from one species to another. Most of our knowledge about the anatomy and physiology of the olfactory system comes from data obtained in a very limited number of biological models such as rodents, Zebrafish, Drosophila, and a worm, Caenorhabditis elegans. These models have proved useful to answer most questions in the field of olfaction, and thus concentrating on these few models appear to be a pragmatic strategy. However, the diversity of the organization and physiology of the olfactory system amongst phyla appear to be greater than generally assumed and the four models alone may not be sufficient to address all the questions arising from the study of olfaction. In this article, we will illustrate the idea that we should take advantage of biological diversity to address specific scientific questions and will show that the Xenopus olfactory system is a very good model to investigate: first, olfaction in aerial versus aquatic conditions and second, mechanisms underlying postnatal reorganization of the olfactory system especially those controlled by tyroxine hormone.

  7. Olfactory neuroblastoma: A case report

    PubMed Central

    USLU, GONCA HANEDAN; CANYILMAZ, EMINE; ZENGIN, AHMET YASAR; MUNGAN, SEVDEGUL; YONEY, ADNAN; BAHADIR, OSMAN; GOCMEZ, HUSEYIN

    2015-01-01

    Olfactory neuroblastoma (ON) is a rare type of malignant neoplasm originating from the olfactory neuroepithelial cells of the nasal cavity. ON is also known as esthesioneuroblastoma or neuroendocrine carcinoma. The malignancy accounts for <3% of tumors originating in the nasal cavity. Through the nasal cavity, ON may infiltrate the sinuses, the orbit and the cranium. The tumor is characterized by a pattern of slow growth and local recurrences. Treatment options are surgical excision or surgery combined with a radiotherapy (RT) and/or chemotherapy combination treatment. The present study reports the case of a 69-year-old patient with a mass in the nasal cavity who was treated by combined surgical excision and RT. The literature for ON and the treatment of the tumor are also discussed. PMID:26788185

  8. Role of Centrifugal Projections to the Olfactory Bulb in Olfactory Processing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kiselycznyk, Carly L.; Zhang, Steven; Linster, Christine

    2006-01-01

    While there is evidence that feedback projections from cortical and neuromodulatory structures to the olfactory bulb are crucial for maintaining the oscillatory dynamics of olfactory bulb processing, it is not clear how changes in dynamics are related to odor perception. Using electrical lesions of the olfactory peduncle, sparing output from the…

  9. Cux2 acts as a critical regulator for neurogenesis in the olfactory epithelium of vertebrates.

    PubMed

    Wittmann, Walter; Iulianella, Angelo; Gunhaga, Lena

    2014-04-01

    Signaling pathways and transcription factors are crucial regulators of vertebrate neurogenesis, exerting their function in a spatial and temporal manner. Despite recent advances in our understanding of the molecular regulation of embryonic neurogenesis, little is known regarding how different signaling pathways interact to tightly regulate this process during the development of neuroepithelia. To address this, we have investigated the events lying upstream and downstream of a key neurogenic factor, the Cut-like homeodomain transcription factor-2 (Cux2), during embryonic neurogenesis in chick and mouse. By using the olfactory epithelium as a model for neurogenesis we have analyzed mouse embryos deficient in Cux2, as well as chick embryos exposed to Cux2 silencing (si) RNA or a Cux2 over-expression construct. We provide evidence that enhanced BMP activity increases Cux2 expression and suppresses olfactory neurogenesis in the chick olfactory epithelium. In addition, our results show that up-regulation of Cux2, either BMP-induced or ectopically over-expressed, reduce Delta1 expression and suppress proliferation. Interestingly, the loss of Cux2 activity, using mutant mice or siRNA in chick, also diminishes neurogenesis, Notch activity and cell proliferation in the olfactory epithelium. Our results suggest that controlled low levels of Cux2 activity are necessary for proper Notch signaling, maintenance of the proliferative pool and ongoing neurogenesis in the olfactory epithelium. Thus, we demonstrate a novel conserved mechanism in vertebrates in which levels of Cux2 activity play an important role for ongoing neurogenesis in the olfactory epithelium.

  10. The complete human olfactory subgenome.

    PubMed

    Glusman, G; Yanai, I; Rubin, I; Lancet, D

    2001-05-01

    Olfactory receptors likely constitute the largest gene superfamily in the vertebrate genome. Here we present the nearly complete human olfactory subgenome elucidated by mining the genome draft with gene discovery algorithms. Over 900 olfactory receptor genes and pseudogenes (ORs) were identified, two-thirds of which were not annotated previously. The number of extrapolated ORs is in good agreement with previous theoretical predictions. The sequence of at least 63% of the ORs is disrupted by what appears to be a random process of pseudogene formation. ORs constitute 17 gene families, 4 of which contain more than 100 members each. "Fish-like" Class I ORs, previously considered a relic in higher tetrapods, constitute as much as 10% of the human repertoire, all in one large cluster on chromosome 11. Their lower pseudogene fraction suggests a functional significance. ORs are disposed on all human chromosomes except 20 and Y, and nearly 80% are found in clusters of 6-138 genes. A novel comparative cluster analysis was used to trace the evolutionary path that may have led to OR proliferation and diversification throughout the genome. The results of this analysis suggest the following genome expansion history: first, the generation of a "tetrapod-specific" Class II OR cluster on chromosome 11 by local duplication, then a single-step duplication of this cluster to chromosome 1, and finally an avalanche of duplication events out of chromosome 1 to most other chromosomes. The results of the data mining and characterization of ORs can be accessed at the Human Olfactory Receptor Data Exploratorium Web site (http://bioinfo.weizmann.ac.il/HORDE). PMID:11337468

  11. The complete human olfactory subgenome.

    PubMed

    Glusman, G; Yanai, I; Rubin, I; Lancet, D

    2001-05-01

    Olfactory receptors likely constitute the largest gene superfamily in the vertebrate genome. Here we present the nearly complete human olfactory subgenome elucidated by mining the genome draft with gene discovery algorithms. Over 900 olfactory receptor genes and pseudogenes (ORs) were identified, two-thirds of which were not annotated previously. The number of extrapolated ORs is in good agreement with previous theoretical predictions. The sequence of at least 63% of the ORs is disrupted by what appears to be a random process of pseudogene formation. ORs constitute 17 gene families, 4 of which contain more than 100 members each. "Fish-like" Class I ORs, previously considered a relic in higher tetrapods, constitute as much as 10% of the human repertoire, all in one large cluster on chromosome 11. Their lower pseudogene fraction suggests a functional significance. ORs are disposed on all human chromosomes except 20 and Y, and nearly 80% are found in clusters of 6-138 genes. A novel comparative cluster analysis was used to trace the evolutionary path that may have led to OR proliferation and diversification throughout the genome. The results of this analysis suggest the following genome expansion history: first, the generation of a "tetrapod-specific" Class II OR cluster on chromosome 11 by local duplication, then a single-step duplication of this cluster to chromosome 1, and finally an avalanche of duplication events out of chromosome 1 to most other chromosomes. The results of the data mining and characterization of ORs can be accessed at the Human Olfactory Receptor Data Exploratorium Web site (http://bioinfo.weizmann.ac.il/HORDE).

  12. Sleep and olfactory cortical plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Barnes, Dylan C.; Wilson, Donald A.

    2014-01-01

    In many systems, sleep plays a vital role in memory consolidation and synaptic homeostasis. These processes together help store information of biological significance and reset synaptic circuits to facilitate acquisition of information in the future. In this review, we describe recent evidence of sleep-dependent changes in olfactory system structure and function which contribute to odor memory and perception. During slow-wave sleep, the piriform cortex becomes hypo-responsive to odor stimulation and instead displays sharp-wave activity similar to that observed within the hippocampal formation. Furthermore, the functional connectivity between the piriform cortex and other cortical and limbic regions is enhanced during slow-wave sleep compared to waking. This combination of conditions may allow odor memory consolidation to occur during a state of reduced external interference and facilitate association of odor memories with stored hedonic and contextual cues. Evidence consistent with sleep-dependent odor replay within olfactory cortical circuits is presented. These data suggest that both the strength and precision of odor memories is sleep-dependent. The work further emphasizes the critical role of synaptic plasticity and memory in not only odor memory but also basic odor perception. The work also suggests a possible link between sleep disturbances that are frequently co-morbid with a wide range of pathologies including Alzheimer’s disease, schizophrenia and depression and the known olfactory impairments associated with those disorders. PMID:24795585

  13. Cytokines and olfactory bulb microglia in response to bacterial challenge in the compromised primary olfactory pathway

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The primary olfactory pathway is a potential route through which microorganisms from the periphery could potentially access the central nervous system. Our previous studies demonstrated that if the olfactory epithelium was damaged, bacteria administered into the nasal cavity induced nitric oxide production in olfactory ensheathing cells. This study investigates the cytokine profile of olfactory tissues as a consequence of bacterial challenge and establishes whether or not the bacteria are able to reach the olfactory bulb in the central nervous system. Methods The olfactory epithelium of C57BL/6 mice was damaged by unilateral Triton X-100 nasal washing, and Staphylococcus aureus was administered ipsilaterally 4 days later. Olfactory mucosa and bulb were harvested 6 h, 24 h and 5 days after inoculation and their cytokine profile compared to control tissues. The fate of S. aureus and the response of bulbar microglia were examined using fluorescence microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. Results In the olfactory mucosa, administered S. aureus was present in supporting cells of the olfactory epithelium, and macrophages and olfactory nerve bundles in the lamina propria. Fluorescein isothiocyanate-conjugated S. aureus was observed within the olfactory mucosa and bulb 6 h after inoculation, but remained restricted to the peripheral layers up to 5 days later. At the 24-h time point, the level of interleukin-6 (IL-6) and tumour necrosis factor-α in the compromised olfactory tissues challenged with bacteria (12,466 ± 956 pg/ml and 552 ± 193 pg/ml, respectively) was significantly higher than that in compromised olfactory tissues alone (6,092 ± 1,403 pg/ml and 80 ± 2 pg/ml, respectively). Immunohistochemistry confirmed that IL-6 was present in several cell types including olfactory ensheathing cells and mitral cells of the olfactory bulb. Concurrently, there was a 4.4-, 4.5- and 2.8-fold increase in the density of i

  14. Roles of olfactory system dysfunction in depression.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Ti-Fei; Slotnick, Burton M

    2014-10-01

    The olfactory system is involved in sensory functions, emotional regulation and memory formation. Olfactory bulbectomy in rat has been employed as an animal model of depression for antidepressant discovery studies for many years. Olfaction is impaired in animals suffering from chronic stress, and patients with clinical depression were reported to have decreased olfactory function. It is believed that the neurobiological bases of depression might include dysfunction in the olfactory system. Further, brain stimulation, including nasal based drug delivery could provide novel therapies for management of depression.

  15. Computational Approaches for Decoding Select Odorant-Olfactory Receptor Interactions Using Mini-Virtual Screening.

    PubMed

    Harini, K; Sowdhamini, Ramanathan

    2015-01-01

    Olfactory receptors (ORs) belong to the class A G-Protein Coupled Receptor superfamily of proteins. Unlike G-Protein Coupled Receptors, ORs exhibit a combinatorial response to odors/ligands. ORs display an affinity towards a range of odor molecules rather than binding to a specific set of ligands and conversely a single odorant molecule may bind to a number of olfactory receptors with varying affinities. The diversity in odor recognition is linked to the highly variable transmembrane domains of these receptors. The purpose of this study is to decode the odor-olfactory receptor interactions using in silico docking studies. In this study, a ligand (odor molecules) dataset of 125 molecules was used to carry out in silico docking using the GLIDE docking tool (SCHRODINGER Inc Pvt LTD). Previous studies, with smaller datasets of ligands, have shown that orthologous olfactory receptors respond to similarly-tuned ligands, but are dramatically different in their efficacy and potency. Ligand docking results were applied on homologous pairs (with varying sequence identity) of ORs from human and mouse genomes and ligand binding residues and the ligand profile differed among such related olfactory receptor sequences. This study revealed that homologous sequences with high sequence identity need not bind to the same/ similar ligand with a given affinity. A ligand profile has been obtained for each of the 20 receptors in this analysis which will be useful for expression and mutation studies on these receptors.

  16. Computational Approaches for Decoding Select Odorant-Olfactory Receptor Interactions Using Mini-Virtual Screening

    PubMed Central

    Harini, K.; Sowdhamini, Ramanathan

    2015-01-01

    Olfactory receptors (ORs) belong to the class A G-Protein Coupled Receptor superfamily of proteins. Unlike G-Protein Coupled Receptors, ORs exhibit a combinatorial response to odors/ligands. ORs display an affinity towards a range of odor molecules rather than binding to a specific set of ligands and conversely a single odorant molecule may bind to a number of olfactory receptors with varying affinities. The diversity in odor recognition is linked to the highly variable transmembrane domains of these receptors. The purpose of this study is to decode the odor-olfactory receptor interactions using in silico docking studies. In this study, a ligand (odor molecules) dataset of 125 molecules was used to carry out in silico docking using the GLIDE docking tool (SCHRODINGER Inc Pvt LTD). Previous studies, with smaller datasets of ligands, have shown that orthologous olfactory receptors respond to similarly-tuned ligands, but are dramatically different in their efficacy and potency. Ligand docking results were applied on homologous pairs (with varying sequence identity) of ORs from human and mouse genomes and ligand binding residues and the ligand profile differed among such related olfactory receptor sequences. This study revealed that homologous sequences with high sequence identity need not bind to the same/ similar ligand with a given affinity. A ligand profile has been obtained for each of the 20 receptors in this analysis which will be useful for expression and mutation studies on these receptors. PMID:26221959

  17. An Olfactory Cilia Pattern in the Mammalian Nose Ensures High Sensitivity to Odors.

    PubMed

    Challis, Rosemary C; Tian, Huikai; Wang, Jue; He, Jiwei; Jiang, Jianbo; Chen, Xuanmao; Yin, Wenbin; Connelly, Timothy; Ma, Limei; Yu, C Ron; Pluznick, Jennifer L; Storm, Daniel R; Huang, Liquan; Zhao, Kai; Ma, Minghong

    2015-10-01

    In many sensory organs, specialized receptors are strategically arranged to enhance detection sensitivity and acuity. It is unclear whether the olfactory system utilizes a similar organizational scheme to facilitate odor detection. Curiously, olfactory sensory neurons (OSNs) in the mouse nose are differentially stimulated depending on the cell location. We therefore asked whether OSNs in different locations evolve unique structural and/or functional features to optimize odor detection and discrimination. Using immunohistochemistry, computational fluid dynamics modeling, and patch clamp recording, we discovered that OSNs situated in highly stimulated regions have much longer cilia and are more sensitive to odorants than those in weakly stimulated regions. Surprisingly, reduction in neuronal excitability or ablation of the olfactory G protein in OSNs does not alter the cilia length pattern, indicating that neither spontaneous nor odor-evoked activity is required for its establishment. Furthermore, the pattern is evident at birth, maintained into adulthood, and restored following pharmacologically induced degeneration of the olfactory epithelium, suggesting that it is intrinsically programmed. Intriguingly, type III adenylyl cyclase (ACIII), a key protein in olfactory signal transduction and ubiquitous marker for primary cilia, exhibits location-dependent gene expression levels, and genetic ablation of ACIII dramatically alters the cilia pattern. These findings reveal an intrinsically programmed configuration in the nose to ensure high sensitivity to odors.

  18. An Olfactory Cilia Pattern in the Mammalian Nose Ensures High Sensitivity to Odors.

    PubMed

    Challis, Rosemary C; Tian, Huikai; Wang, Jue; He, Jiwei; Jiang, Jianbo; Chen, Xuanmao; Yin, Wenbin; Connelly, Timothy; Ma, Limei; Yu, C Ron; Pluznick, Jennifer L; Storm, Daniel R; Huang, Liquan; Zhao, Kai; Ma, Minghong

    2015-10-01

    In many sensory organs, specialized receptors are strategically arranged to enhance detection sensitivity and acuity. It is unclear whether the olfactory system utilizes a similar organizational scheme to facilitate odor detection. Curiously, olfactory sensory neurons (OSNs) in the mouse nose are differentially stimulated depending on the cell location. We therefore asked whether OSNs in different locations evolve unique structural and/or functional features to optimize odor detection and discrimination. Using immunohistochemistry, computational fluid dynamics modeling, and patch clamp recording, we discovered that OSNs situated in highly stimulated regions have much longer cilia and are more sensitive to odorants than those in weakly stimulated regions. Surprisingly, reduction in neuronal excitability or ablation of the olfactory G protein in OSNs does not alter the cilia length pattern, indicating that neither spontaneous nor odor-evoked activity is required for its establishment. Furthermore, the pattern is evident at birth, maintained into adulthood, and restored following pharmacologically induced degeneration of the olfactory epithelium, suggesting that it is intrinsically programmed. Intriguingly, type III adenylyl cyclase (ACIII), a key protein in olfactory signal transduction and ubiquitous marker for primary cilia, exhibits location-dependent gene expression levels, and genetic ablation of ACIII dramatically alters the cilia pattern. These findings reveal an intrinsically programmed configuration in the nose to ensure high sensitivity to odors. PMID:26365258

  19. Identification and molecular regulation of neural stem cells in the olfactory epithelium

    SciTech Connect

    Beites, Crestina L.; Kawauchi, Shimako; Crocker, Candice E.; Calof, Anne L. . E-mail: alcalof@uci.edu

    2005-06-10

    The sensory neurons that subserve olfaction, olfactory receptor neurons (ORNs), are regenerated throughout life, making the neuroepithelium in which they reside [the olfactory epithelium (OE)] an excellent model for studying how intrinsic and extrinsic factors regulate stem cell dynamics and neurogenesis during development and regeneration. Numerous studies indicate that transcription factors and signaling molecules together regulate generation of ORNs from stem and progenitor cells during development, and work on regenerative neurogenesis indicates that these same factors may operate at postnatal ages as well. This review describes our current knowledge of the identity of the OE neural stem cell; the different cell types that are thought to be the progeny (directly or indirectly) of this stem cell; and the factors that influence cell differentiation in the OE neuronal lineage. We review data suggesting that (1) the ORN lineage contains three distinct proliferating cell types-a stem cell and two populations of transit amplifying cells; (2) in established OE, these three cell types are present within the basal cell compartment of the epithelium; and (3) the stem cell that gives rise ultimately to ORNs may also generate two glial cell types of the primary olfactory pathway: sustentacular cells (SUS), which lie within OE proper; and olfactory ensheathing cells (OEC), which envelope the olfactory nerve. In addition, we describe factors that are both made by and found within the microenvironment of OE stem and progenitor cells, and which exert crucial growth regulatory effects on these cells. Thus, as with other regenerating tissues, the basis of regeneration in the OE appears be a population of stem cells, which resides within a microenvironment (niche) consisting of factors crucial for maintenance of its capacity for proliferation and differentiation.

  20. Postnatal Exposure History and Airways

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, Shannon R.; Schelegle, Edward S.; Edwards, Patricia C.; Miller, Lisa A.; Hyde, Dallas M.

    2012-01-01

    Postnatally, the lung continues to grow and differentiate while interacting with the environment. Exposure to ozone (O3) and allergens during postnatal lung development alters structural elements of conducting airways, including innervation and neurokinin abundance. These changes have been linked with development of asthma in a rhesus monkey model. We hypothesized that O3 exposure resets the ability of the airways to respond to oxidant stress and that this is mediated by changes in the neurokinin-1 receptor (NK-1R). Infant rhesus monkeys received episodic exposure to O3 biweekly with or without house dust mite antigen (HDMA) from 6 to 12 months of age. Age-matched monkeys were exposed to filtered air (FA). Microdissected airway explants from midlevel airways (intrapulmonary generations 5–8) for four to six animals in each of four groups (FA, O3, HDMA, and HDMA+O3) were tested for NK-1R gene responses to acute oxidant stress using exposure to hydrogen peroxide (1.2 mM), a lipid ozonide (10 μM), or sham treatment for 4 hours in vitro. Airway responses were measured using real-time quantitative RT-PCR of NK-1R and IL-8 gene expression. Basal NK-1R gene expression levels were not different between the exposure groups. Treatment with ozonide or hydrogen peroxide did not change NK-1R gene expression in animals exposed to FA, HDMA, or HDMA+O3. However, treatment in vitro with lipid ozonide significantly increased NK-1R gene expression in explants from O3–exposed animals. We conclude that a history of prior O3 exposure resets the steady state of the airways to increase the NK-1R response to subsequent acute oxidant stresses. PMID:22962062

  1. Either main or accessory olfactory system signaling can mediate the rewarding effects of estrous female chemosignals in sexually naive male mice.

    PubMed

    Korzan, Wayne J; Freamat, Mihael; Johnson, Adam G; Cherry, James A; Baum, Michael J

    2013-10-01

    A long-held view has been that interest of male mice in female body odors reflects an activation of reward circuits in the male brain following their detection by the vomeronasal organ (VNO) and processing via the accessory olfactory system. We found that adult, sexually naive male mice acquired a conditioned place preference (CPP) after repeatedly receiving estrous female urine on the nose and being placed in an initially nonpreferred chamber with soiled estrous bedding on the floor. CPP was not acquired in control mice that received saline on the nose before being placed in a nonpreferred chamber with clean bedding. Robust acquisition of a CPP using estrous female odors as the reward persisted in separate groups of mice in which VNO-accessory olfactory function was disrupted by bilateral lesioning of the accessory olfactory bulb (AOB) or in which main olfactory function was disrupted by zinc sulfate lesions of the main olfactory epithelium (MOE). By contrast, no CPP was acquired for estrous odors in males that received combined AOB and MOE lesions. Either the main or the accessory olfactory system suffices to mediate the rewarding effects of estrous female odors in the male mouse, even in the absence of prior mating experience. The main olfactory system is part of the circuitry that responds to chemosignals involved in motivated behavior, a role that may be particularly important for humans who lack a functional accessory olfactory system.

  2. Prenatal imprinting of postnatal specific appetites and feeding behavior.

    PubMed

    Nicolaïdis, Stylianos

    2008-10-01

    Epigenetic influences on the fetus's genotype have been shown to occur during intrauterine life. Experimentally imposed extracellular dehydration in pregnant rats (a model for human hyponatremia caused by gravidic vomiting) brings about a dramatic enhancement of salt appetite not only in the dam, but also in offspring when they reach adulthood. This phenomenon has been verified in human newborn infants and adults whose mothers experienced nausea and/or vomiting during pregnancy. Alcohol consumption during pregnancy enhances its palatability for the offspring. Ingestion of olfactory test substances like anise or carrot by the mother during pregnancy gives rise to a preference for the same testants in the offspring. Under- or overnutrition in the pregnant mother appears to play a role in reprogramming the postnatal regulation of both feeding and fat reserves in offspring. Both maternal under- and overnutrition during pregnancy predispose the offspring to later development of obesity and type 2 diabetes mellitus. A careful examination of the systems concerned with the regulation of food intake, and the neurosubstances involved in such regulation, reveals some of the mechanisms by which maternal nutritional status can affect the offspring and their food-related behaviors.

  3. Postnatal choline supplementation in preweanling mice: sexually dimorphic behavioral and neurochemical effects.

    PubMed

    Ricceri, L; Berger-Sweeney, J

    1998-12-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of postnatal choline supplementation on neurochemical and behavioral parameters in preweanling BALB/cByJ mice. Mouse pups were injected daily subcutaneously with choline chloride (0.85 mM/g body weight) from Postnatal Day (PND) 1 to PND 16. Pups performed a passive avoidance (PA) learning task on PND 17-18 and a 30-min locomotor activity test on PND 19. The choline treatment affected retention of the PA task on PND 18. The treatment also increased locomotor activity in females, but not in males, on PND 19. Choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) enzymatic activity was measured on PND 20 and revealed that choline administration in the first 2 weeks of postnatal life selectively affects male pups. Choline's effect, as seen in previous rat experiments, was to decrease ChAT activity in the hippocampal region.

  4. Postnatal Development of the Craniofacial Skeleton in Male C57BL/6J Mice

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    C57BL/6J is one of the most commonly used inbred mouse strains in biomedical research, including studies of craniofacial development and teratogenic studies of craniofacial malformation. The current study quantitatively assessed the development of the skull in male C57BL/6J mice by using high-resolution 3D imaging of 55 landmarks from 48 male mice over 10 developmental time points from postnatal day 0 to 90. The growth of the skull plateaued at approximately postnatal day 60, and the shape of the skull did not change markedly thereafter. The amount of asymmetry in the craniofacial skeleton seemed to peak at birth, but considerable variation persisted in all age groups. For C57BL/6J male mice, postnatal day 60 is the earliest time point at which the skull achieves its adult shape and proportions. In addition, C57BL/6J male mice appear to have an inherent susceptibility to craniofacial malformation. PMID:27025802

  5. Olfactory epithelium changes in germfree mice

    PubMed Central

    François, Adrien; Grebert, Denise; Rhimi, Moez; Mariadassou, Mahendra; Naudon, Laurent; Rabot, Sylvie; Meunier, Nicolas

    2016-01-01

    Intestinal epithelium development is dramatically impaired in germfree rodents, but the consequences of the absence of microbiota have been overlooked in other epithelia. In the present study, we present the first description of the bacterial communities associated with the olfactory epithelium and explored differences in olfactory epithelium characteristics between germfree and conventional, specific pathogen-free, mice. While the anatomy of the olfactory epithelium was not significantly different, we observed a thinner olfactory cilia layer along with a decreased cellular turn-over in germfree mice. Using electro-olfactogram, we recorded the responses of olfactory sensitive neuronal populations to various odorant stimulations. We observed a global increase in the amplitude of responses to odorants in germfree mice as well as altered responses kinetics. These changes were associated with a decreased transcription of most olfactory transduction actors and of olfactory xenobiotic metabolising enzymes. Overall, we present here the first evidence that the microbiota modulates the physiology of olfactory epithelium. As olfaction is a major sensory modality for most animal species, the microbiota may have an important impact on animal physiology and behaviour through olfaction alteration. PMID:27089944

  6. Sensory-Evoked Intrinsic Imaging Signals in the Olfactory Bulb Are Independent of Neurovascular Coupling

    PubMed Central

    Vincis, Roberto; Lagier, Samuel; Van De Ville, Dimitri; Rodriguez, Ivan; Carleton, Alan

    2016-01-01

    Summary Functional brain-imaging techniques used in humans and animals, such as functional MRI and intrinsic optical signal (IOS) imaging, are thought to largely rely on neurovascular coupling and hemodynamic responses. Here, taking advantage of the well-described micro-architecture of the mouse olfactory bulb, we dissected the nature of odor-evoked IOSs. Using in vivo pharmacology in transgenic mouse lines reporting activity in different cell types, we show that parenchymal IOSs are largely independent of neurotransmitter release and neurovascular coupling. Furthermore, our results suggest that odor-evoked parenchymal IOSs originate from changes in light scattering of olfactory sensory neuron axons, mostly due to water movement following action potential propagation. Our study sheds light on a direct correlate of neuronal activity, which may be used for large-scale functional brain imaging. PMID:26146075

  7. Spatial-Temporal Expression of Non-classical MHC Class I Molecules in the C57 Mouse Brain.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jiane; Shen, Yuqing; Li, Mingli; Lv, Dan; Zhang, Aifeng; Peng, Yaqin; Miao, Fengqin; Zhang, Jianqiong

    2015-07-01

    Recent studies clearly demonstrate major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I expression in the brain plays an important functional role in neural development and plasticity. A previous study from our laboratory demonstrated the temporal and spatial expression patterns of classical MHC class I molecules in the brain of C57 mice. Studies regarding non-classical MHC class I molecules remain limited. Here we examine the expression of non-classical MHC class I molecules in mouse central nervous system (CNS) during embryonic and postnatal developmental stages using in situ hybridization and immunofluorescence. We find non-classical MHC class I molecules, M3/T22/Q1, are expressed in the cerebral cortex, neuroepithelium of the lateral ventricle, neuroepithelium of aquaeductus and developing cerebellum during embryonic developmental stages. During the postnatal period from P0 to adult, non-classical MHC class I mRNAs are detected in olfactory bulb, hippocampus, cerebellum and some nerve nuclei. Overall, the expression patterns of non-classical MHC class I molecules are similar to those of classical MHC class I molecules in the developing mouse brain. In addition, non-classical MHC class I molecules are present in the H2-K(b) and H2-D(b) double knock-out mice where their expression levels are greatly increased within the same locations as compared to wild type mice. The elucidation and discovery of the expression profile of MHC class I molecules during development is important for supporting an enhanced understanding of their physiological and potential pathological roles within the CNS.

  8. Pre- and Postnatal Exposure to Low Dose Glufosinate Ammonium Induces Autism-Like Phenotypes in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Laugeray, Anthony; Herzine, Ameziane; Perche, Olivier; Hébert, Betty; Aguillon-Naury, Marine; Richard, Olivier; Menuet, Arnaud; Mazaud-Guittot, Séverine; Lesné, Laurianne; Briault, Sylvain; Jegou, Bernard; Pichon, Jacques; Montécot-Dubourg, Céline; Mortaud, Stéphane

    2014-01-01

    Glufosinate ammonium (GLA) is one of the most widely used herbicides in agriculture. As is the case for most pesticides, potential adverse effects of GLA have not been studied from the perspective of developmental neurotoxicity. Early pesticides exposure may weaken the basic structure of the developing brain and cause permanent changes leading to a wide range of lifelong effects on health and/or behavior. Here, we addressed the developmental impact of GLA by exposing female mice to low dose GLA during both pre- and postnatal periods and analyzed potential developmental and behavioral changes of the offspring during infancy and adulthood. A neurobehavioral test battery revealed significant effects of GLA maternal exposure on early reflex development, pup communication, affiliative behaviors, and preference for social olfactory cues, but emotional reactivity and emotional memory remained unaltered. These behavioral alterations showed a striking resemblance to changes seen in animal models of Autistic Spectrum Disorders. At the brain level, GLA maternal exposure caused some increase in relative brain weight of the offspring. In addition, reduced expression of Pten and Peg3 – two genes implicated in autism-like deficits – was observed in the brain of GLA-exposed pups at postnatal day 15. Our work thus provides new data on the link between pre- and postnatal exposure to the herbicide GLA and the onset of autism-like symptoms later in life. It also raises fundamental concerns about the ability of current safety testing to assess risks of pesticide exposure during critical developmental periods. PMID:25477793

  9. Initial stages of radial glia astrocytic transformation in the early postnatal anterior subventricular zone.

    PubMed

    Alves, José A J; Barone, Patrick; Engelender, Simone; Fróes, Maira M; Menezes, João R L

    2002-09-01

    In the early postnatal subventricular zone (SVZ), two seemingly unrelated events occur simultaneously: a massive tangential migration of neuroblasts towards the olfactory bulb, known as the rostral migratory stream (RMS), and the outward movement of radial glia (RG) undergoing astrocytic transformation. Because of the orthogonal arrangement between these two sets of cells, little, if any, relevance has been ascribed for their possible interactions. By depositing DiI at the pial surface we have studied RG transformation within the SVZ/RMS, from birth up to the end of the first postnatal week. While still within the SVZ/RMS, RG morphology changed from simple bipolar to highly complex branched profiles, attaining their highest degree of complexity at the interface of the SVZ with the overlying white matter. At this interface cell bodies of radial glia accumulate and their processes run tangentially, surrounding the SVZ/RMS. Processes of RG surrounding the SVZ/RMS could also be observed by immunostaining for vimentin, GFAP, and nestin. In contrast, in the white matter all DiI-labeled RG presented a simple bipolar profile. These results indicate that the outward radial migration of the transforming RG does not occur uniformly. Instead, the different morphologies and cell densities that RG assume when they cross the SVZ/RMS and overlying white matter imply different migratory behaviors. Finally, our data suggest that RG provide a cellular scaffold to the early postnatal SVZ/RMS, much in the same way as astrocytes in the adult RMS.

  10. Detection of explosives by olfactory sensory neurons.

    PubMed

    Corcelli, Angela; Lobasso, Simona; Lopalco, Patrizia; Dibattista, Michele; Araneda, Ricardo; Peterlin, Zita; Firestein, Stuart

    2010-03-15

    The response of olfactory sensory neurons to TNT and RDX as well as to some volatile organic compounds present in the vapors of antipersonnel landmines has been studied both in the pig and in the rat. GC/MS analyses of different plastic components of six different kinds of landmines were performed in order to identify the components of the "perfume" of mines. Studies on rat olfactory mucosa were carried out with electro-olfactogram and calcium imaging techniques, while changes in the cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) levels following exposure to odorants and explosives were used as a criterion to evaluate the interaction of TNT and RDX with olfactory receptors in a preparation of isolated pig olfactory cilia. These studies indicate that chemical compounds associated with explosives and explosive devices can activate mammalian olfactory receptors.

  11. [Examination of the olfactory analyzer].

    PubMed

    Domrachev, A A; Afon'kin, V Iu

    2002-01-01

    A method of threshold olfactometry is proposed consisting in the use of three olfactive substances (tincture of valerian, acetic acid, liquid ammonia) in selected concentrations. This allows to investigate the thresholds of certain modality. Each concentration of the olfactive substance is placed into a glass bottle (100 ml) and stored at the temperature 18-20 degrees C. The examination of the state of the olfactory analyzer within a 24-h working day showed stability of threshold olfactometry when the organism is tired. Utilization of threshold olfactometry in some diagnostic areas is shown. PMID:12056163

  12. Calcium signals in olfactory neurons.

    PubMed

    Tareilus, E; Noé, J; Breer, H

    1995-11-01

    Laser scanning confocal microscopy in combination with the fluorescent calcium indicators Fluo-3 and Fura-Red was employed to estimate the intracellular concentration of free calcium ions in individual olfactory receptor neurons and to monitor temporal and spatial changes in the Ca(2+)-level upon stimulation. The chemosensory cells responded to odorants with a significant increase in the calcium concentration, preferentially in the dendritic knob. Applying various stimulation paradigma, it was found that in a population of isolated cells, subsets of receptor neurons display distinct patterns of responsiveness. PMID:7488645

  13. Calcium signals in olfactory neurons.

    PubMed

    Tareilus, E; Noé, J; Breer, H

    1995-11-01

    Laser scanning confocal microscopy in combination with the fluorescent calcium indicators Fluo-3 and Fura-Red was employed to estimate the intracellular concentration of free calcium ions in individual olfactory receptor neurons and to monitor temporal and spatial changes in the Ca(2+)-level upon stimulation. The chemosensory cells responded to odorants with a significant increase in the calcium concentration, preferentially in the dendritic knob. Applying various stimulation paradigma, it was found that in a population of isolated cells, subsets of receptor neurons display distinct patterns of responsiveness.

  14. Morphological, olfactory, and vocal development in big brown bats.

    PubMed

    Mayberry, Heather W; Faure, Paul A

    2014-12-12

    Using a within subjects design, we documented morphological, bioacoustical and behavioral developmental changes in big brown bats. Eptesicus fuscus pups are born naked and blind but assume an adult-like appearance by post-natal day (PND) 45 and flight by PND 30. Adult females use spatial memory, acoustic and olfactory cues to reunite with offspring, but it is unclear if pups can recognize maternal scents. We tested the olfactory discrimination abilities of young E. fuscus pups and found they exhibited no odor preferences. Pups also emit distinct vocalizations called isolation calls (i-calls) that facilitate mother-offspring reunions, but how pups shift their vocalizations from i-calls to downward frequency modulated (FM) sweeps used in echolocation remains unclear. Between PND 0-9, pups emitted mainly long duration, tonal i-calls rich in harmonics, but after they switched to short duration, downward FM sweeps with fewer harmonics. Call maximum frequency and repetition rate showed minor changes across development. Signal duration, bandwidth, and number of harmonics decreased, whereas the maximum, minimum and bandwidth of the fundamental, and peak spectral frequency all increased. We recorded vocalizations during prolonged maternal separation and found that isolated pups called longer and at a faster rate, presumably to signal for maternal assistance. To assess how PND 13 pups alter their signals during interactions with humans we compared spontaneous and provoked vocalizations and found that provoked calls were spectrally and temporally more similar to those of younger bats suggesting that pups in distress emit signals that sound like younger bats to promote maternal assistance.

  15. Morphological, olfactory, and vocal development in big brown bats

    PubMed Central

    Mayberry, Heather W.; Faure, Paul A.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Using a within subjects design, we documented morphological, bioacoustical and behavioral developmental changes in big brown bats. Eptesicus fuscus pups are born naked and blind but assume an adult-like appearance by post-natal day (PND) 45 and flight by PND 30. Adult females use spatial memory, acoustic and olfactory cues to reunite with offspring, but it is unclear if pups can recognize maternal scents. We tested the olfactory discrimination abilities of young E. fuscus pups and found they exhibited no odor preferences. Pups also emit distinct vocalizations called isolation calls (i-calls) that facilitate mother-offspring reunions, but how pups shift their vocalizations from i-calls to downward frequency modulated (FM) sweeps used in echolocation remains unclear. Between PND 0–9, pups emitted mainly long duration, tonal i-calls rich in harmonics, but after they switched to short duration, downward FM sweeps with fewer harmonics. Call maximum frequency and repetition rate showed minor changes across development. Signal duration, bandwidth, and number of harmonics decreased, whereas the maximum, minimum and bandwidth of the fundamental, and peak spectral frequency all increased. We recorded vocalizations during prolonged maternal separation and found that isolated pups called longer and at a faster rate, presumably to signal for maternal assistance. To assess how PND 13 pups alter their signals during interactions with humans we compared spontaneous and provoked vocalizations and found that provoked calls were spectrally and temporally more similar to those of younger bats suggesting that pups in distress emit signals that sound like younger bats to promote maternal assistance. PMID:25505151

  16. The Membrane Proteome of Sensory Cilia to the Depth of Olfactory Receptors*

    PubMed Central

    Kuhlmann, Katja; Tschapek, Astrid; Wiese, Heike; Eisenacher, Martin; Meyer, Helmut E.; Hatt, Hanns H.; Oeljeklaus, Silke; Warscheid, Bettina

    2014-01-01

    In the nasal cavity, the nonmotile cilium of olfactory sensory neurons (OSNs) constitutes the chemosensory interface between the ambient environment and the brain. The unique sensory organelle facilitates odor detection for which it includes all necessary components of initial and downstream olfactory signal transduction. In addition to its function in olfaction, a more universal role in modulating different signaling pathways is implicated, for example, in neurogenesis, apoptosis, and neural regeneration. To further extend our knowledge about this multifunctional signaling organelle, it is of high importance to establish a most detailed proteome map of the ciliary membrane compartment down to the level of transmembrane receptors. We detached cilia from mouse olfactory epithelia via Ca2+/K+ shock followed by the enrichment of ciliary membrane proteins at alkaline pH, and we identified a total of 4,403 proteins by gel-based and gel-free methods in conjunction with high resolution LC/MS. This study is the first to report the detection of 62 native olfactory receptor proteins and to provide evidence for their heterogeneous expression at the protein level. Quantitative data evaluation revealed four ciliary membrane-associated candidate proteins (the annexins ANXA1, ANXA2, ANXA5, and S100A5) with a suggested function in the regulation of olfactory signal transduction, and their presence in ciliary structures was confirmed by immunohistochemistry. Moreover, we corroborated the ciliary localization of the potassium-dependent Na+/Ca2+ exchanger (NCKX) 4 and the plasma membrane Ca2+-ATPase 1 (PMCA1) involved in olfactory signal termination, and we detected for the first time NCKX2 in olfactory cilia. Through comparison with transcriptome data specific for mature, ciliated OSNs, we finally delineated the membrane ciliome of OSNs. The membrane proteome of olfactory cilia established here is the most complete today, thus allowing us to pave new avenues for the study of diverse

  17. A Closer Look at Acid-Base Olfactory Titrations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neppel, Kerry; Oliver-Hoyo, Maria T.; Queen, Connie; Reed, Nicole

    2005-01-01

    Olfactory titrations using raw onions and eugenol as acid-base indicators are reported. An in-depth investigation on olfactory titrations is presented to include requirements for potential olfactory indicators and protocols for using garlic, onions, and vanillin as acid-base olfactory indicators are tested.

  18. 21 CFR 874.1600 - Olfactory test device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...) MEDICAL DEVICES EAR, NOSE, AND THROAT DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 874.1600 Olfactory test device. (a) Identification. An olfactory test device is used to determine whether an olfactory loss is present. The device... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Olfactory test device. 874.1600 Section...

  19. 21 CFR 874.1600 - Olfactory test device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...) MEDICAL DEVICES EAR, NOSE, AND THROAT DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 874.1600 Olfactory test device. (a) Identification. An olfactory test device is used to determine whether an olfactory loss is present. The device... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Olfactory test device. 874.1600 Section...

  20. Preliminary Modeling and Simulation Study on Olfactory Cell Sensation

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou Jun; Chen Peihua; Liu Qingjun; Wang Ping; Yang Wei

    2009-05-23

    This paper introduced olfactory sensory neuron's whole-cell model with a concrete voltage-gated ionic channels and simulation. Though there are many models in olfactory sensory neuron and olfactory bulb, it remains uncertain how they express the logic of olfactory information processing. In this article, the olfactory neural network model is also introduced. This model specifies the connections among neural ensembles of the olfactory system. The simulation results of the neural network model are consistent with the observed olfactory biological characteristics such as 1/f-type power spectrum and oscillations.

  1. Preliminary Modeling and Simulation Study on Olfactory Cell Sensation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Jun; Yang, Wei; Chen, Peihua; Liu, Qingjun; Wang, Ping

    2009-05-01

    This paper introduced olfactory sensory neuron's whole-cell model with a concrete voltage-gated ionic channels and simulation. Though there are many models in olfactory sensory neuron and olfactory bulb, it remains uncertain how they express the logic of olfactory information processing. In this article, the olfactory neural network model is also introduced. This model specifies the connections among neural ensembles of the olfactory system. The simulation results of the neural network model are consistent with the observed olfactory biological characteristics such as 1/f-type power spectrum and oscillations.

  2. The human olfactory receptor repertoire

    PubMed Central

    Zozulya, Sergey; Echeverri, Fernando; Nguyen, Trieu

    2001-01-01

    Background The mammalian olfactory apparatus is able to recognize and distinguish thousands of structurally diverse volatile chemicals. This chemosensory function is mediated by a very large family of seven-transmembrane olfactory (odorant) receptors encoded by approximately 1,000 genes, the majority of which are believed to be pseudogenes in humans. Results The strategy of our sequence database mining for full-length, functional candidate odorant receptor genes was based on the high overall sequence similarity and presence of a number of conserved sequence motifs in all known mammalian odorant receptors as well as the absence of introns in their coding sequences. We report here the identification and physical cloning of 347 putative human full-length odorant receptor genes. Comparative sequence analysis of the predicted gene products allowed us to identify and define a number of consensus sequence motifs and structural features of this vast family of receptors. A new nomenclature for human odorant receptors based on their chromosomal localization and phylogenetic analysis is proposed. We believe that these sequences represent the essentially complete repertoire of functional human odorant receptors. Conclusions The identification and cloning of all functional human odorant receptor genes is an important initial step in understanding receptor-ligand specificity and combinatorial encoding of odorant stimuli in human olfaction. PMID:11423007

  3. Revealing tact within postnatal care.

    PubMed

    Smythe, Elizabeth; Payne, Deborah; Wilson, Sally; Paddy, Ann; Heard, Kate

    2014-02-01

    In this article, we explore the nature of good postnatal care through a hermeneutic unpacking of the notion of tact, drawing on the philosophical writings of Heidegger, Gadamer, and van Manen. The tactful encounters considered were from a hermeneutic research study within a small, rural birthing center in New Zealand. Insights drawn from the analysis were as follows: the openness of listening, watching and being attuned that builds a positive mode of engagement, recognizing that the distance the woman needs from her nurse/midwife is a call of tact, that tact is underpinned by a spirit of care, within tact there are moods and tact might require firmness, and that all of these factors come together to build trust. We conclude that the attunement of tact requires that the staff member has time to spend with a woman, enough energy to engage, and a spirit of care. Women know that tactful practice builds their confidence and affects their mothering experience. Tact cannot be assumed; it needs to be nurtured and sheltered.

  4. Olfactory and Visuospatial Learning and Memory Performance in Two Strains of Alzheimer's Disease Model Mice—A Longitudinal Study

    PubMed Central

    Österman, Hanna; Willhite, David; Laska, Matthias

    2011-01-01

    Using a longitudinal study design, two strains of Alzheimer's disease (AD) model mice, one expressing β-amyloid plaques and one expressing Tau protein-associated neurofibrillary tangles were assessed for olfactory and visuospatial learning and memory and their performance compared to that of age-matched controls. No significant difference between AD and control mice was found in the initial set of olfactory tasks performed at 6 months of age whereas both strains of AD mice performed significantly poorer than the controls in visuospatial learning at this age. Subsequent tests performed on the same individual animals at 7, 8, 9, 11, 13, 15, and 18 months of age also failed to find systematic differences in olfactory performance between AD and control mice. In contrast, the AD mice performed consistently poorer than the controls in visuospatial re-learning tests performed at these ages. With most olfactory tasks, both AD and control mice displayed a marked decrease in performance between testing at 15 and 18 months of age. These results show that the two strains of AD model mice do not display an olfactory impairment in a time course consistent with human AD, but are impaired in visuospatial capabilities. The marked age-related changes observed with the olfactory tasks in both AD and control mice suggest that the observed lack of an AD-related olfactory impairment is not due to an insensitivity of the tests employed. Rather, they suggest that the olfactory system of the two AD mouse model strains may be surprisingly robust against AD-typical neuropathologies. PMID:21573167

  5. Exposure to Sevoflurane Affects the Development of Parvalbumin Interneurons in the Main Olfactory Bulb in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jing; Chen, Jing; Cai, Guohong; Lu, Rui; Sun, Tingting; Luo, Tingting; Wu, Shengxi; Ling, Shucai

    2016-01-01

    Sevoflurane is widely used in adult and pediatric patients during clinical surgeries. Although studies have shown that exposure to sevoflurane impairs solfactory memory after an operation, the neuropathological changes underlying this effect are not clear. This study detected the effect of sevoflurane exposure on the development of calcium-binding proteins-expressing interneurons in the main olfactory bulb (MOB). We exposed neonatal mice to 2% sevoflurane at two different developmental time points and found that exposing mice to sevoflurane at postnatal day (PD) 7 significantly decreased the expression of GAD67 and parvalbumin (PV) in the olfactory bulb (OB) but did not alter the expression of calretinin (CR) or calbindin D28k (CB). The number and dendritic morphology of PV-expressing interneurons in the MOB were impaired by exposure to sevoflurane at PD7. However, exposure to sevoflurane at PD10 had no effect on calcium-binding protein expression or the number and dendritic morphology of PV-expressing interneurons in the MOB. These results suggest that exposing neonatal mice to sevoflurane during a critical period of olfactory development affects the development of PV-expressing interneurons in the MOB. PMID:27445710

  6. Olfactory learning in the rat immediately after birth: unique salience of first odors

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Stacie S.; Spear, Norman E.

    2011-01-01

    An infant rat’s chance of survival is increased when it remains close to the nest. Early olfactory learning supports such adaptive behavior. Previous experiments indicated that non-associative odor exposure immediately after birth promoted later attachment to a similarly scented artificial nipple. The goal of the current experiments was to extend these findings on olfactory learning in the hours after birth by: exposing pups to more than one odor exposure (Exp. 1), dissecting the role of timing versus order of odor exposure (Exp. 2), testing the odor specificity of these effects (Exp. 3 and 4), and evaluating associative odor conditioning soon after birth (Exp. 5). Without explicit prior odor experience, pups only hours old do not respond much to a novel odor. Prior non-associative odor experience increases later motor activity to that same odor and to novel odors. Furthermore, these findings may be specific to certain amodal dimensions of the (in our case) lemon odor exposure. Single odor non-associative and associative conditioning was equally effective immediately after birth and during the third postnatal hour. Nevertheless, pups given two mere odor exposures responded to the first one more than the second at test, regardless of whether the exposures began immediately or two hours after birth. Possible mechanisms for these findings concerning early olfactory learning are discussed. PMID:19582793

  7. MeCP2 regulates activity-dependent transcriptional responses in olfactory sensory neurons.

    PubMed

    Lee, Wooje; Yun, Jung-Mi; Woods, Rima; Dunaway, Keith; Yasui, Dag H; Lasalle, Janine M; Gong, Qizhi

    2014-12-01

    During postnatal development, neuronal activity controls the remodeling of initially imprecise neuronal connections through the regulation of gene expression. MeCP2 binds to methylated DNA and modulates gene expression during neuronal development and MECP2 mutation causes the autistic disorder Rett syndrome. To investigate a role for MeCP2 in neuronal circuit refinement and to identify activity-dependent MeCP2 transcription regulations, we leveraged the precise organization and accessibility of olfactory sensory axons to manipulation of neuronal activity through odorant exposure in vivo. We demonstrate that olfactory sensory axons failed to develop complete convergence when Mecp2 is deficient in olfactory sensory neurons (OSNs) in an otherwise wild-type animal. Furthermore, we demonstrate that expression of selected adhesion genes was elevated in Mecp2-deficient glomeruli, while acute odor stimulation in control mice resulted in significantly reduced MeCP2 binding to these gene loci, correlating with increased expression. Thus, MeCP2 is required for both circuitry refinement and activity-dependent transcriptional responses in OSNs.

  8. Information processing in the mammalian olfactory system.

    PubMed

    Lledo, Pierre-Marie; Gheusi, Gilles; Vincent, Jean-Didier

    2005-01-01

    Recently, modern neuroscience has made considerable progress in understanding how the brain perceives, discriminates, and recognizes odorant molecules. This growing knowledge took over when the sense of smell was no longer considered only as a matter for poetry or the perfume industry. Over the last decades, chemical senses captured the attention of scientists who started to investigate the different stages of olfactory pathways. Distinct fields such as genetic, biochemistry, cellular biology, neurophysiology, and behavior have contributed to provide a picture of how odor information is processed in the olfactory system as it moves from the periphery to higher areas of the brain. So far, the combination of these approaches has been most effective at the cellular level, but there are already signs, and even greater hope, that the same is gradually happening at the systems level. This review summarizes the current ideas concerning the cellular mechanisms and organizational strategies used by the olfactory system to process olfactory information. We present findings that exemplified the high degree of olfactory plasticity, with special emphasis on the first central relay of the olfactory system. Recent observations supporting the necessity of such plasticity for adult brain functions are also discussed. Due to space constraints, this review focuses mainly on the olfactory systems of vertebrates, and primarily those of mammals.

  9. [Odor sensing system and olfactory display].

    PubMed

    Nakamoto, Takamichi

    2014-01-01

    In this review, an odor sensing system and an olfactory display are introduced into people in pharmacy. An odor sensing system consists of an array of sensors with partially overlapping specificities and pattern recognition technique. One of examples of odor sensing systems is a halitosis sensor which quantifies the mixture composition of three volatile sulfide compounds. A halitosis sensor was realized using a preconcentrator to raise sensitivity and an electrochemical sensor array to suppress the influence of humidity. Partial least squares (PLS) method was used to quantify the mixture composition. The experiment reveals that the sufficient accuracy was obtained. Moreover, the olfactory display, which present scents to human noses, is explained. A multi-component olfactory display enables the presentation of a variety of smells. The two types of multi-component olfactory display are described. The first one uses many solenoid valves with high speed switching. The valve ON frequency determines the concentration of the corresponding odor component. The latter one consists of miniaturized liquid pumps and a surface acoustic wave (SAW) atomizer. It enables the wearable olfactory display without smell persistence. Finally, the application of the olfactory display is demonstrated. Virtual ice cream shop with scents was made as a content of interactive art. People can enjoy harmony among vision, audition and olfaction. In conclusion, both odor sensing system and olfactory display can contribute to the field of human health care.

  10. Browning attenuates murine white adipose tissue expansion during postnatal development.

    PubMed

    Lasar, D; Julius, A; Fromme, T; Klingenspor, M

    2013-05-01

    During postnatal development of mice distinct white adipose tissue depots display a transient appearance of brown-like adipocytes. These brite (brown in white) adipocytes share characteristics with classical brown adipocytes including a multilocular appearance and the expression of the thermogenic protein uncoupling protein 1. In this study, we compared two inbred mouse strains 129S6sv/ev and C57BL6/N known for their different propensity to diet-induced obesity. We observed transient browning in retroperitoneal and inguinal adipose tissue depots of these two strains. From postnatal day 10 to 20 the increase in the abundance of multilocular adipocytes and uncoupling protein 1 expression was higher in 129S6sv/ev than in C57BL6/N pups. The parallel increase in the mass of the two fat depots was attenuated during this browning period. Conversely, epididymal white and interscapular brown adipose tissue displayed a steady increase in mass during the first 30 days of life. In this period, 129S6sv/ev mice developed a significantly higher total body fat mass than C57BL6/N. Thus, while on a local depot level a high number of brite cells is associated with the attenuation of adipose tissue expansion the strain comparison reveals no support for a systemic impact on energy balance. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Brown and White Fat: From Signaling to Disease.

  11. Olfactory deposition of inhaled nanoparticles in humans

    PubMed Central

    Garcia, Guilherme J. M.; Schroeter, Jeffry D.; Kimbell, Julia S.

    2016-01-01

    Context Inhaled nanoparticles can migrate to the brain via the olfactory bulb, as demonstrated in experiments in several animal species. This route of exposure may be the mechanism behind the correlation between air pollution and human neurodegenerative diseases, including Alzheimer’s disease and Parkinson’s disease. Objectives This manuscript aims to (1) estimate the dose of inhaled nanoparticles that deposit in the human olfactory epithelium during nasal breathing at rest and (2) compare the olfactory dose in humans with our earlier dose estimates for rats. Materials and methods An anatomically-accurate model of the human nasal cavity was developed based on computed tomography scans. The deposition of 1–100 nm particles in the whole nasal cavity and its olfactory region were estimated via computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations. Our CFD methods were validated by comparing our numerical predictions for whole-nose deposition with experimental data and previous CFD studies in the literature. Results In humans, olfactory dose of inhaled nanoparticles is highest for 1–2 nm particles with approximately 1% of inhaled particles depositing in the olfactory region. As particle size grows to 100 nm, olfactory deposition decreases to 0.01% of inhaled particles. Discussion and conclusion Our results suggest that the percentage of inhaled particles that deposit in the olfactory region is lower in humans than in rats. However, olfactory dose per unit surface area is estimated to be higher in humans due to their larger minute volume. These dose estimates are important for risk assessment and dose-response studies investigating the neurotoxicity of inhaled nanoparticles. PMID:26194036

  12. Utilization of postnatal care among Nepalese women.

    PubMed

    Neupane, Subas; Doku, David

    2013-12-01

    This study investigated risk factors associated with the type of birth attendants and timing of postnatal care among a nationally representative sample of Nepalese women. The 2006 Nepalese Demographic and Health Survey on women age 15-49 years old who had delivered within 3 years prior to the survey (N = 4,136) was used. Multivariate logistic regression was employed to study the association between socio-demographic variables and type of birth attendants and timing of postnatal care. Only 23 % deliveries were assisted by skilled attendants. A majority of Nepalese women did not have postnatal check-ups. Education (OR = 1.46, 95 % CI = 1.11-1.92), wealth (OR = 2.57, 95 % CI = 1.59-4.15) and sufficiency of advice during pregnancy (OR = 3.09, 95 % CI = 2.16-4.41), were all independently associated with having postnatal check-ups. Similarly, maternal age, education, parity, wealth, sufficiency of advice and place of delivery were associated with having delivery assisted by a skilled attendant. The utilization of postnatal services is still very low in Nepal. Public health interventions are needed to increase the utilization of postnatal care as well as delivery assisted by skilled attendants. Such interventions should target poor women, the less educated and those in rural areas in Nepal.

  13. [Graphic method of recording olfactory disorders].

    PubMed

    Bariliak, R A; Kitsera, A E

    1976-01-01

    The authors present a method of recording results of threshold olfactometry for substances of different neuroreceptive response (olfactory, olfactive-trigeminal and olfactive-glossopharyngeal) in the form of olfactograms. The use of a unit for comparative evaluation of the olfactory function (deciodor) made it possible to get a unit horizontal zero line on the olfactogram. The authors demonstrate olfactograms of patients with various olfactory disorders. They consider that the method of graphic recording results of comparative threshold olfactometry is a valuable differential-diagnostic test.

  14. Unraveling Cajal's view of the olfactory system

    PubMed Central

    Figueres-Oñate, María; Gutiérrez, Yolanda; López-Mascaraque, Laura

    2014-01-01

    The olfactory system has a highly regular organization of interconnected synaptic circuits from the periphery. It is therefore an excellent model for understanding general principles about how the brain processes information. Cajal revealed the basic cell types and their interconnections at the end of the XIX century. Since his original descriptions, the observation and analysis of the olfactory system and its components represents a major topic in neuroscience studies, providing important insights into the neural mechanisms. In this review, we will highlight the importance of Cajal contributions and his legacy to the actual knowledge of the olfactory system. PMID:25071462

  15. Compensatory plasticity in the olfactory epithelium: age, timing, and reversibility

    PubMed Central

    Barber, Casey N.

    2015-01-01

    Like other biological systems, olfaction responds “homeostatically” to enduring change in the stimulus environment. This adaptive mechanism, referred to as compensatory plasticity, has been studied almost exclusively in developing animals. Thus it is unknown if this phenomenon is limited to ontogenesis and irreversible, characteristics common to some other forms of plasticity. Here we explore the effects of odor deprivation on the adult mouse olfactory epithelium (OE) using nasal plugs to eliminate nasal airflow unilaterally. Plugs were in place for 2–6 wk after which electroolfactograms (EOGs) were recorded from the occluded and open sides of the nasal cavity. Mean EOG amplitudes were significantly greater on the occluded than on the open side. The duration of plugging did not affect the results, suggesting that maximal compensation occurs within 2 wk or less. The magnitude of the EOG difference between the open and occluded side in plugged mice was comparable to adults that had undergone surgical naris occlusion as neonates. When plugs were removed after 4 wk followed by 2 wk of recovery, mean EOG amplitudes were not significantly different between the always-open and previously plugged sides of the nasal cavity suggesting that this form of plasticity is reversible. Taken together, these results suggest that compensatory plasticity is a constitutive mechanism of olfactory receptor neurons that allows these cells to recalibrate their stimulus-response relationship to fit the statistics of their current odor environment. PMID:26269548

  16. In vivo Growth and Differentiation of Canine Olfactory Bulb-Derived Neural Progenitor Cells under Variable Culture Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Walton, Raquel M.; Wolfe, John H.

    2008-01-01

    The dog serves as a large animal model for multiple neurologic diseases that may potentially benefit from neural progenitor cell (NPC) transplantation. In the adult brain, multipotent NPCs reside in the subventricular zone and its rostral and caudal extensions into the olfactory bulb and hippocampus. The olfactory bulb represents a surgically accessible site for obtaining cells for autologous NPC transplantation. To model conditions that would occur for ex vivo gene therapy in the postnatal brain, NPCs were isolated from the canine olfactory bulb, expanded ex vivo under different culture conditions, and compared quantitatively for growth and immunophenotype. Under standard growth conditions, canine olfactory bulb-derived NPCs (OB-cNPCs) could be expanded nearly 500-fold in the time evaluated. Canine OB-cNPCs grown on poly-D-lysine (PDL) or on PDL-fibronectin had similar growth rates, whereas supplementation with leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF) resulted in significantly slower growth. However, when OB-cNPC cultures were grown on PDL-fibronectin or PDL supplemented with LIF, a greater proportion of cells with neuronal markers were generated upon differentiation. PMID:18261803

  17. The Role of Astrocytes in the Generation, Migration, and Integration of New Neurons in the Adult Olfactory Bulb

    PubMed Central

    Gengatharan, Archana; Bammann, Rodrigo R.; Saghatelyan, Armen

    2016-01-01

    In mammals, new neurons in the adult olfactory bulb originate from a pool of neural stem cells in the subventricular zone of the lateral ventricles. Adult-born cells play an important role in odor information processing by adjusting the neuronal network to changing environmental conditions. Olfactory bulb neurogenesis is supported by several non-neuronal cells. In this review, we focus on the role of astroglial cells in the generation, migration, integration, and survival of new neurons in the adult forebrain. In the subventricular zone, neural stem cells with astrocytic properties display regional and temporal specificity when generating different neuronal subtypes. Non-neurogenic astrocytes contribute to the establishment and maintenance of the neurogenic niche. Neuroblast chains migrate through the rostral migratory stream ensheathed by astrocytic processes. Astrocytes play an important regulatory role in neuroblast migration and also assist in the development of a vasculature scaffold in the migratory stream that is essential for neuroblast migration in the postnatal brain. In the olfactory bulb, astrocytes help to modulate the network through a complex release of cytokines, regulate blood flow, and provide metabolic support, which may promote the integration and survival of new neurons. Astrocytes thus play a pivotal role in various processes of adult olfactory bulb neurogenesis, and it is likely that many other functions of these glial cells will emerge in the near future. PMID:27092050

  18. Neurobiology of secure infant attachment and attachment despite adversity: a mouse model.

    PubMed

    Roth, T L; Raineki, C; Salstein, L; Perry, R; Sullivan-Wilson, T A; Sloan, A; Lalji, B; Hammock, E; Wilson, D A; Levitt, P; Okutani, F; Kaba, H; Sullivan, R M

    2013-10-01

    Attachment to an abusive caregiver has wide phylogenetic representation, suggesting that animal models are useful in understanding the neural basis underlying this phenomenon and subsequent behavioral outcomes. We previously developed a rat model, in which we use classical conditioning to parallel learning processes evoked during secure attachment (odor-stroke, with stroke mimicking tactile stimulation from the caregiver) or attachment despite adversity (odor-shock, with shock mimicking maltreatment). Here we extend this model to mice. We conditioned infant mice (postnatal day (PN) 7-9 or 13-14) with presentations of peppermint odor and either stroking or shock. We used (14) C 2-deoxyglucose (2-DG) to assess olfactory bulb and amygdala metabolic changes following learning. PN7-9 mice learned to prefer an odor following either odor-stroke or shock conditioning, whereas odor-shock conditioning at PN13-14 resulted in aversion/fear learning. 2-DG data indicated enhanced bulbar activity in PN7-9 preference learning, whereas significant amygdala activity was present following aversion learning at PN13-14. Overall, the mouse results parallel behavioral and neural results in the rat model of attachment, and provide the foundation for the use of transgenic and knockout models to assess the impact of both genetic (biological vulnerabilities) and environmental factors (abusive) on attachment-related behaviors and behavioral development. PMID:23927771

  19. Neurobiology of secure infant attachment and attachment despite adversity: a mouse model.

    PubMed

    Roth, T L; Raineki, C; Salstein, L; Perry, R; Sullivan-Wilson, T A; Sloan, A; Lalji, B; Hammock, E; Wilson, D A; Levitt, P; Okutani, F; Kaba, H; Sullivan, R M

    2013-10-01

    Attachment to an abusive caregiver has wide phylogenetic representation, suggesting that animal models are useful in understanding the neural basis underlying this phenomenon and subsequent behavioral outcomes. We previously developed a rat model, in which we use classical conditioning to parallel learning processes evoked during secure attachment (odor-stroke, with stroke mimicking tactile stimulation from the caregiver) or attachment despite adversity (odor-shock, with shock mimicking maltreatment). Here we extend this model to mice. We conditioned infant mice (postnatal day (PN) 7-9 or 13-14) with presentations of peppermint odor and either stroking or shock. We used (14) C 2-deoxyglucose (2-DG) to assess olfactory bulb and amygdala metabolic changes following learning. PN7-9 mice learned to prefer an odor following either odor-stroke or shock conditioning, whereas odor-shock conditioning at PN13-14 resulted in aversion/fear learning. 2-DG data indicated enhanced bulbar activity in PN7-9 preference learning, whereas significant amygdala activity was present following aversion learning at PN13-14. Overall, the mouse results parallel behavioral and neural results in the rat model of attachment, and provide the foundation for the use of transgenic and knockout models to assess the impact of both genetic (biological vulnerabilities) and environmental factors (abusive) on attachment-related behaviors and behavioral development.

  20. Olfactory loss in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Zivadinov, R; Zorzon, M; Monti Bragadin, L; Pagliaro, G; Cazzato, G

    1999-10-15

    The objectives of the present study were to test odor identification ability in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) and to examine possible correlations between smell identification test scores and various clinical variables. We performed a case-control study comparing the Cross Cultural Smell Identification Test scores of 40 patients with definite multiple sclerosis with those obtained in 40 age-, sex- and smoking-habit-matched healthy controls. The neurological impairment, the disability, the cognitive performances and the psychological functioning were also assessed. Patients with multiple sclerosis scored significantly poorer than controls on the Cross-Cultural Smell Identification Test (P<0.001). Olfactory function was borderline normal in four (10%) and abnormal in five (12.5%) MS patients, whereas it was normal in all controls (P<0.02). Significant correlations between the smell identification score and symptoms of anxiety (r=-0.43, P=0.006), depression (r=-0.42, P=0. 008) and severity of neurological impairment (r=-0.32, P=0.05) were found. Only two (5%) patients with multiple sclerosis reported having episodes of smell loss, suggesting a low level of awareness of this problem. Although smell changes are rarely reported, olfactory function is impaired in a considerable number of patients with MS. The observed association between decreased odor identification ability and symptoms of anxiety and depression in our patients suggests that mood and anxiety disorders have to be considered in assessing olfaction in MS patients. Clearly, smell disturbances deserve greater attention from health professionals and caregivers dealing with such patients.

  1. The Pig Olfactory Brain: A Primer

    PubMed Central

    Feldman, Sanford; Osterberg, Stephen K.

    2016-01-01

    Despite the fact that pigs are reputed to have excellent olfactory abilities, few studies have examined regions of the pig brain involved in the sense of smell. The present study provides an overview of the olfactory bulb, anterior olfactory nucleus, and piriform cortex of adult pigs using several approaches. Nissl, myelin, and Golgi stains were used to produce a general overview of the organization of the regions and confocal microscopy was employed to examine 1) projection neurons, 2) GABAergic local circuit neurons that express somatostatin, parvalbumin, vasoactive intestinal polypeptide, or calretinin, 3) neuromodulatory fibers (cholinergic and serotonergic), and 4) glia (astrocytes and microglia). The findings revealed that pig olfactory structures are quite large, highly organized and follow the general patterns observed in mammals. PMID:26936231

  2. The Pig Olfactory Brain: A Primer.

    PubMed

    Brunjes, Peter C; Feldman, Sanford; Osterberg, Stephen K

    2016-06-01

    Despite the fact that pigs are reputed to have excellent olfactory abilities, few studies have examined regions of the pig brain involved in the sense of smell. The present study provides an overview of the olfactory bulb, anterior olfactory nucleus, and piriform cortex of adult pigs using several approaches. Nissl, myelin, and Golgi stains were used to produce a general overview of the organization of the regions and confocal microscopy was employed to examine 1) projection neurons, 2) GABAergic local circuit neurons that express somatostatin, parvalbumin, vasoactive intestinal polypeptide, or calretinin, 3) neuromodulatory fibers (cholinergic and serotonergic), and 4) glia (astrocytes and microglia). The findings revealed that pig olfactory structures are quite large, highly organized and follow the general patterns observed in mammals. PMID:26936231

  3. A multisensory network for olfactory processing

    PubMed Central

    Maier, Joost X.; Blankenship, Meredith L.; Li, Jennifer X.; Katz, Donald B.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Primary gustatory cortex (GC) is connected (both mono- and poly-synaptically) to primary olfactory (piriform) cortex (PC)—connections that might be hypothesized to underlie the construction of a “flavor” percept when both gustatory and olfactory stimuli are present. Here, we use multi-site electrophysiology and optical inhibition of GC neurons (GCx, produced via infection with ArchT) to demonstrate that, indeed, during gustatory stimulation, taste-selective information is transmitted from GC to PC. We go on to show that these connections impact olfactory processing even in the absence of gustatory stimulation: GCx alters PC responses to olfactory stimuli presented alone, enhancing some and eliminating others, despite leaving the path from nasal epithelium to PC intact. Finally, we show the functional importance of this latter phenomenon, demonstrating that GCx renders rats unable to properly recognize odor stimuli. This sequence of findings suggests that sensory processing may be more intrinsically integrative than previously thought. PMID:26441351

  4. Transcriptional changes during neuronal death and replacement in the olfactory epithelium.

    PubMed

    Shetty, Ranjit S; Bose, Soma C; Nickell, Melissa D; McIntyre, Jeremy C; Hardin, Debra H; Harris, Andrew M; McClintock, Timothy S

    2005-09-01

    The olfactory epithelium has the unusual ability to replace its neurons. We forced replacement of mouse olfactory sensory neurons by bulbectomy. Microarray, bioinformatics, and in situ hybridization techniques detected a rapid shift in favor of pro-apoptotic proteins, a progressive immune response by macrophages and dendritic cells, and identified or predicted 439 mRNAs enriched in olfactory sensory neurons, including gene silencing factors and sperm flagellar proteins. Transcripts encoding cell cycle regulators, axonogenesis proteins, and transcription factors and signaling proteins that promote proliferation and differentiation were increased at 5--7 days after bulbectomy and were expressed by basal progenitor cells or immature neurons. The transcription factors included Nhlh 1, Hes 6, Lmyc 1, c-Myc, Mxd 4, Id 1, Nmyc 1, Cited 2, c-Myb, Mybl 1, Tead 2, Dp 1, Gata 2, Lmo 1, and Sox1 1. The data reveal significant similarities with embryonic neurogenesis and make several mechanistic predictions, including the roles of the transcription factors in the olfactory sensory neuron lineage.

  5. Hierarchical organization of long-range circuits in the olfactory cortices

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Weiguo; Sun, Qian-Quan

    2015-01-01

    How sensory information is processed within olfactory cortices is unclear. Here, we examined long-range circuit wiring between different olfactory cortical regions of acute mouse brain slices using a channelrhodopsin-2 (ChR2)-based neuronal targeting approach. Our results provide detailed information regarding the synaptic properties of the reciprocal long-range monosynaptic glutamatergic projections (LRMGP) between and within anterior piriform cortex (aPC), posterior piriform cortex (pPC), and lateral entorhinal cortex (LEC), thereby creating a long-range inter- and intracortical circuit diagrams at the level of synapses and single cortical neurons. Our results reveal the following information regarding hierarchical intra- and intercortical organizations: (i) there is massive bottom-up (i.e., rostral–caudal) excitation within the LRMGP accompanied with strong feedforward (FF) inhibition; (ii) there are convergent FF connections onto LEC from both aPC and pPC; (iii) feedback (FB) intercortical connections are weak with a significant fraction of presumptive silent synapses; and (iv) intra and intercortical long-range connections lack layer specificity and their innervation of interneurons are stronger than neighboring pyramidal neurons. The elucidation of the distinct hierarchical organization of long-range olfactory cortical circuits paves the way for further understanding of higher order cortical processing within the olfactory system. PMID:26416972

  6. Odor Information Processing by the Olfactory Bulb Analyzed in Gene-Targeted Mice

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Jie; Savigner, Agnès; Ma, Minghong; Luo, Minmin

    2010-01-01

    SUMMARY In mammals, olfactory sensory neurons (OSNs) expressing a specific odorant receptor (OR) gene project with precise stereotypy onto mitral/tufted (M/T) cells in the main olfactory bulb (MOB). It remains challenging to understand how incoming olfactory signals are transformed into outputs of M/T cells. By recording from OSNs expressing mouse I7 receptor and their postsynaptic neurons in the bulb, we found that I7 OSNs and their corresponding M/T cells exhibit similarly selective tuning profiles at low concentrations. Increasing the concentration significantly reduces response selectivity for both OSNs and M/T cells, although the tuning curve of M/T cells remains comparatively narrow. By contrast, interneurons in the MOB are broadly tuned, and blocking GABAergic neurotransmission reduces selectivity of M/T cells at high odorant concentrations. Our results indicate that olfactory information carried by an OR is channeled to its corresponding M/T cells and support the role of lateral inhibition via interneurons in sharpening the tuning of M/T cells. PMID:20346765

  7. The type 3 adenylyl cyclase is required for the survival and maturation of newly generated granule cells in the olfactory bulb.

    PubMed

    Luo, Jie; Chen, Xuanmao; Pan, Yung-Wei; Lu, Song; Xia, Zhengui; Storm, Daniel R

    2015-01-01

    The type 3 adenylyl cyclase (AC3) is localized to olfactory cilia in the main olfactory epithelium (MOE) and primary cilia in the adult mouse brain. Although AC3 has been strongly implicated in odor perception and olfactory sensory neuron (OSN) targeting, its role in granule cells (GCs), the most abundant interneurons in the main olfactory bulb (MOB), remains largely unknown. Here, we report that the deletion of AC3 leads to a significant reduction in the size of the MOB as well as the level of adult neurogenesis. The cell proliferation and cell cycle in the subventricular zone (SVZ), however, are not suppressed in AC3-/- mice. Furthermore, AC3 deletion elevates the apoptosis of GCs and disrupts the maturation of newly formed GCs. Collectively, our results identify a fundamental role for AC3 in the development of adult-born GCs in the MOB.

  8. Sendai Virus Induces Persistent Olfactory Dysfunction in a Murine Model of PVOD via Effects on Apoptosis, Cell Proliferation, and Response to Odorants

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Jun; Pinto, Jayant M.; Cui, Xiaolan; Zhang, Henghui; Li, Li; Liu, Yulong; Wu, Chan; Wei, Yongxiang

    2016-01-01

    Background Viral infection is a common cause of olfactory dysfunction. The complexities of studying post-viral olfactory loss in humans have impaired further progress in understanding the underlying mechanism. Recently, evidence from clinical studies has implicated Parainfluenza virus 3 as a causal agent. An animal model of post viral olfactory disorders (PVOD) would allow better understanding of disease pathogenesis and represent a major advance in the field. Objective To develop a mouse model of PVOD by evaluating the effects of Sendai virus (SeV), the murine counterpart of Parainfluenza virus, on olfactory function and regenerative ability of the olfactory epithelium. Methods C57BL/6 mice (6–8 months old) were inoculated intranasally with SeV or ultraviolet (UV)-inactivated virus (UV-SeV). On days 3, 10, 15, 30 and 60 post-infection, olfactory epithelium was harvested and analyzed by histopathology and immunohistochemical detection of S-phase nuclei. We also measured apoptosis by TUNEL assay and viral load by real-time PCR. The buried food test (BFT) was used to measure olfactory function of mice at day 60. In parallel, cultured murine olfactory sensory neurons (OSNs) infected with SeV or UV-SeV were tested for odorant-mixture response by measuring changes in intracellular calcium concentrations indicated by fura-4 AM assay. Results Mice infected with SeV suffered from olfactory dysfunction, peaking on day 15, with no loss observed with UV-SeV. At 60 days, four out of 12 mice infected with SeV still had not recovered, with continued normal function in controls. Viral copies of SeV persisted in both the olfactory epithelium (OE) and the olfactory bulb (OB) for at least 60 days. At day 10 and after, both unit length labeling index (ULLI) of apoptosis and ULLI of proliferation in the SeV group was markedly less than the UV-SeV group. In primary cultured OSNs infected by SeV, the percentage of cells responding to mixed odors was markedly lower in the SeV group

  9. Dimorphic Olfactory Lobes in the Arthropoda

    PubMed Central

    Strausfeld, Nicholas; Reisenman, Carolina E.

    2009-01-01

    Specialized olfactory lobe glomeruli relating to sexual or caste differences have been observed in at least five orders of insects, suggesting an early appearance of this trait in insect evolution. Dimorphism is not limited to nocturnal species, but occurs even in insects that are known to use vision for courtship. Other than a single description there is no evidence for similar structures occuring in the Crustacea, suggesting that the evolution of dimorphic olfactory systems may typify terrestrial arthropods. PMID:19686183

  10. Cladistic Analysis of Olfactory and Vomeronasal Systems

    PubMed Central

    Ubeda-Bañon, Isabel; Pro-Sistiaga, Palma; Mohedano-Moriano, Alicia; Saiz-Sanchez, Daniel; de la Rosa-Prieto, Carlos; Gutierrez-Castellanos, Nicolás; Lanuza, Enrique; Martinez-Garcia, Fernando; Martinez-Marcos, Alino

    2010-01-01

    Most tetrapods possess two nasal organs for detecting chemicals in their environment, which are the sensory detectors of the olfactory and vomeronasal systems. The seventies’ view that the olfactory system was only devoted to sense volatiles, whereas the vomeronasal system was exclusively specialized for pheromone detection was challenged by accumulating data showing deep anatomical and functional interrelationships between both systems. In addition, the assumption that the vomeronasal system appeared as an adaptation to terrestrial life is being questioned as well. The aim of the present work is to use a comparative strategy to gain insight in our understanding of the evolution of chemical “cortex.” We have analyzed the organization of the olfactory and vomeronasal cortices of reptiles, marsupials, and placental mammals and we have compared our findings with data from other taxa in order to better understand the evolutionary history of the nasal sensory systems in vertebrates. The olfactory and vomeronsasal cortices have been re-investigated in garter snakes (Thamnophis sirtalis), short-tailed opossums (Monodelphis domestica), and rats (Rattus norvegicus) by tracing the efferents of the main and accessory olfactory bulbs using injections of neuroanatomical anterograde tracers (dextran-amines). In snakes, the medial olfactory tract is quite evident, whereas the main vomeronasal-recipient structure, the nucleus sphaericus is a folded cortical-like structure, located at the caudal edge of the amygdala. In marsupials, which are acallosal mammals, the rhinal fissure is relatively dorsal and the olfactory and vomeronasal cortices relatively expanded. Placental mammals, like marsupials, show partially overlapping olfactory and vomeronasal projections in the rostral basal telencephalon. These data raise the interesting question of how the telencephalon has been re-organized in different groups according to the biological relevance of chemical senses. PMID:21290004

  11. Dimorphic olfactory lobes in the arthropoda.

    PubMed

    Strausfeld, Nicholas; Reisenman, Carolina E

    2009-07-01

    Specialized olfactory lobe glomeruli relating to sexual or caste differences have been observed in at least five orders of insects, suggesting an early appearance of this trait in insect evolution. Dimorphism is not limited to nocturnal species, but occurs even in insects that are known to use vision for courtship. Other than a single description, there is no evidence for similar structures occurring in the Crustacea, suggesting that the evolution of dimorphic olfactory systems may typify terrestrial arthropods.

  12. Protein kinase C sensitizes olfactory adenylate cyclase

    PubMed Central

    1993-01-01

    Effects of neurotransmitters on cAMP-mediated signal transduction in frog olfactory receptor cells (ORCs) were studied using in situ spike recordings and radioimmunoassays. Carbachol, applied to the mucosal side of olfactory epithelium, amplified the electrical response of ORCs to cAMP-generating odorants, but did not affect unstimulated cells. A similar augmentation of odorant response was observed in the presence of phorbol dibutyrate (PDBu), an activator of protein kinase C (PKC). The electrical response to forskolin, an activator of adenylate cyclase (AC), was also enhanced by PDBu, and it was attenuated by the PKC inhibitor Goe 6983. Forskolin-induced accumulation of cAMP in olfactory tissue was potentiated by carbachol, serotonin, and PDBu to a similar extent. Potentiation was completely suppressed by the PKC inhibitors Goe 6983, staurosporine, and polymyxin B, suggesting that the sensitivity of olfactory AC to stimulation by odorants and forskolin was increased by PKC. Experiments with deciliated olfactory tissue indicated that sensitization of AC was restricted to sensory cilia of ORCs. To study the effects of cell Ca2+ on these mechanisms, the intracellular Ca2+ concentration of olfactory tissue was either increased by ionomycin or decreased by BAPTA/AM. Increasing cell Ca2+ had two effects on cAMP production: (a) the basal cAMP production was enhanced by a mechanism sensitive to inhibitors of calmodulin; and (b) similar to phorbol ester, cell Ca2+ caused sensitization of AC to stimulation by forskolin, an effect sensitive to Goe 6983. Decreasing cell Ca2+ below basal levels rendered AC unresponsive to stimulation by forskolin. These data suggest that a crosstalk mechanism is functional in frog ORCs, linking the sensitivity of AC to the activity of PKC. At increased activity of PKC, olfactory AC becomes more responsive to stimulation by odorants, forskolin, and cell Ca2+. Neurotransmitters appear to use this crosstalk mechanism to regulate olfactory

  13. Olfactory bulb encoding during learning under anesthesia

    PubMed Central

    Nicol, Alister U.; Sanchez-Andrade, Gabriela; Collado, Paloma; Segonds-Pichon, Anne; Kendrick, Keith M.

    2014-01-01

    Neural plasticity changes within the olfactory bulb are important for olfactory learning, although how neural encoding changes support new associations with specific odors and whether they can be investigated under anesthesia, remain unclear. Using the social transmission of food preference olfactory learning paradigm in mice in conjunction with in vivo microdialysis sampling we have shown firstly that a learned preference for a scented food odor smelled on the breath of a demonstrator animal occurs under isofluorane anesthesia. Furthermore, subsequent exposure to this cued odor under anesthesia promotes the same pattern of increased release of glutamate and gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) in the olfactory bulb as previously found in conscious animals following olfactory learning, and evoked GABA release was positively correlated with the amount of scented food eaten. In a second experiment, multiarray (24 electrodes) electrophysiological recordings were made from olfactory bulb mitral cells under isofluorane anesthesia before, during and after a novel scented food odor was paired with carbon disulfide. Results showed significant increases in overall firing frequency to the cued-odor during and after learning and decreases in response to an uncued odor. Analysis of patterns of changes in individual neurons revealed that a substantial proportion (>50%) of them significantly changed their response profiles during and after learning with most of those previously inhibited becoming excited. A large number of cells exhibiting no response to the odors prior to learning were either excited or inhibited afterwards. With the uncued odor many previously responsive cells became unresponsive or inhibited. Learning associated changes only occurred in the posterior part of the olfactory bulb. Thus olfactory learning under anesthesia promotes extensive, but spatially distinct, changes in mitral cell networks to both cued and uncued odors as well as in evoked glutamate and GABA

  14. Cladistic analysis of olfactory and vomeronasal systems.

    PubMed

    Ubeda-Bañon, Isabel; Pro-Sistiaga, Palma; Mohedano-Moriano, Alicia; Saiz-Sanchez, Daniel; de la Rosa-Prieto, Carlos; Gutierrez-Castellanos, Nicolás; Lanuza, Enrique; Martinez-Garcia, Fernando; Martinez-Marcos, Alino

    2011-01-01

    Most tetrapods possess two nasal organs for detecting chemicals in their environment, which are the sensory detectors of the olfactory and vomeronasal systems. The seventies' view that the olfactory system was only devoted to sense volatiles, whereas the vomeronasal system was exclusively specialized for pheromone detection was challenged by accumulating data showing deep anatomical and functional interrelationships between both systems. In addition, the assumption that the vomeronasal system appeared as an adaptation to terrestrial life is being questioned as well. The aim of the present work is to use a comparative strategy to gain insight in our understanding of the evolution of chemical "cortex." We have analyzed the organization of the olfactory and vomeronasal cortices of reptiles, marsupials, and placental mammals and we have compared our findings with data from other taxa in order to better understand the evolutionary history of the nasal sensory systems in vertebrates. The olfactory and vomeronsasal cortices have been re-investigated in garter snakes (Thamnophis sirtalis), short-tailed opossums (Monodelphis domestica), and rats (Rattus norvegicus) by tracing the efferents of the main and accessory olfactory bulbs using injections of neuroanatomical anterograde tracers (dextran-amines). In snakes, the medial olfactory tract is quite evident, whereas the main vomeronasal-recipient structure, the nucleus sphaericus is a folded cortical-like structure, located at the caudal edge of the amygdala. In marsupials, which are acallosal mammals, the rhinal fissure is relatively dorsal and the olfactory and vomeronasal cortices relatively expanded. Placental mammals, like marsupials, show partially overlapping olfactory and vomeronasal projections in the rostral basal telencephalon. These data raise the interesting question of how the telencephalon has been re-organized in different groups according to the biological relevance of chemical senses.

  15. The sense of smell: multiple olfactory subsystems.

    PubMed

    Breer, H; Fleischer, J; Strotmann, J

    2006-07-01

    The mammalian olfactory system is not uniformly organized but consists of several subsystems each of which probably serves distinct functions. Not only are the two major nasal chemosensory systems, the vomeronasal organ and the main olfactory epithelium, structurally and functionally separate entities, but the latter is further subcompartimentalized into overlapping expression zones and projection-related subzones. Moreover, the populations of 'OR37' neurons not only express a unique type of olfactory receptors but also are segregated in a cluster-like manner and generally project to only one receptor-specific glomerulus. The septal organ is an island of sensory epithelium on the nasal septum positioned at the nasoplatine duct; it is considered as a 'mini-nose' with dual function. A specific chemosensory function of the most recently discovered subsystem, the so-called Grueneberg ganglion, is based on the expression of olfactory marker protein and the axonal projections to defined glomeruli within the olfactory bulb. This complexity of distinct olfactory subsystems may be one of the features determining the enormous chemosensory capacity of the sense of smell.

  16. Olfactory Fear Conditioning Induces Field Potential Potentiation in Rat Olfactory Cortex and Amygdala

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Messaoudi, Belkacem; Granjon, Lionel; Mouly, Anne-Marie; Sevelinges, Yannick; Gervais, Remi

    2004-01-01

    The widely used Pavlovian fear-conditioning paradigms used for studying the neurobiology of learning and memory have mainly used auditory cues as conditioned stimuli (CS). The present work assessed the neural network involved in olfactory fear conditioning, using olfactory bulb stimulation-induced field potential signal (EFP) as a marker of…

  17. Relation of the volume of the olfactory bulb to psychophysical measures of olfactory function.

    PubMed

    Mazal, Patricia Portillo; Haehner, Antje; Hummel, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this review is to investigate whether changes in olfactory bulb volume relate to changes in specific olfactory functions. We studied currently available peer-reviewed articles on the volume of the human olfactory bulb that also included a psychophysical measure of olfactory function. In the present review, we observed a very clear and consistent correlation between general olfactory function and olfactory bulb (OB) volume. We were not able to find a clear relationship between a specific smell component and OB volume, even when analyzing pathologic conditions separately. In some cases, changes were observed for different subtests, but these changes did not significantly correlate with OB volume or had only a borderline correlation. In other cases, we found contradictory data. Several factors may contribute to the difficulties in finding correlations with the different components of smell: (1) the OB volume may be influenced by information from olfactory receptor neurons (bottom-up effect), information from central nervous system (top-down effect) and by direct damage; (2) most pathologic conditions affect more than one area of the olfactory pathway; (3) small sample sizes of hyposmic subjects were used. We believe that it is necessary to do further studies with larger numbers of subjects to answer the currently investigated question.

  18. Ion Transporter NKCC1, Modulator of Neurogenesis in Murine Olfactory Neurons*

    PubMed Central

    Haering, Claudia; Kanageswaran, Ninthujah; Bouvain, Pascal; Scholz, Paul; Altmüller, Janine; Becker, Christian; Gisselmann, Günter; Wäring-Bischof, Janine; Hatt, Hanns

    2015-01-01

    Olfaction is one of the most crucial senses for vertebrates regarding foraging and social behavior. Therefore, it is of particular interest to investigate the sense of smell, its function on a molecular level, the signaling proteins involved in the process and the mechanism of required ion transport. In recent years, the precise role of the ion transporter NKCC1 in olfactory sensory neuron (OSN) chloride accumulation has been a controversial subject. NKCC1 is expressed in OSNs and is involved in chloride accumulation of dissociated neurons, but it had not been shown to play a role in mouse odorant sensation. Here, we present electro-olfactogram recordings (EOG) demonstrating that NKCC1-deficient mice exhibit significant defects in perception of a complex odorant mixture (Henkel100) in both air-phase and submerged approaches. Using next generation sequencing (NGS) and RT-PCR experiments of NKCC1-deficient and wild type mouse transcriptomes, we confirmed the absence of a highly expressed ion transporter that could compensate for NKCC1. Additional histological investigations demonstrated a reduced number of cells in the olfactory epithelium (OE), resulting in a thinner neuronal layer. Therefore, we conclude that NKCC1 is an important transporter involved in chloride ion accumulation in the olfactory epithelium, but it is also involved in OSN neurogenesis. PMID:25713142

  19. Effects of handedness on olfactory event-related potentials in a simple olfactory task.

    PubMed

    Gottschlich, Marie; Hummel, Thomas

    2015-06-01

    The purpose of the present study was to re-investigate the influence of handedness on simple olfactory tasks to further clarify the role of handedness in chemical senses. Similar to language and other sensory systems, effects of handedness should be expected. Young, healthy subjects participated in this study, including 24 left-handers and 24 right-handers, with no indication of any major nasal or health problems. The two groups did not differ in terms of sex and age (14 women and 10 men in each group). They had a mean age of 24.0 years. Olfactory event-related potentials were recorded after left or right olfactory stimulation with the rose-like odor phenyl ethyl alcohol (PEA) or the smell of rotten eggs (hydrogen sulfide, H2S). Results suggested that handedness has no major influence on amplitude or latency of olfactory event-related potentials when it comes to simple olfactory tasks.

  20. Congenital lung lesions: Postnatal management and outcome.

    PubMed

    Parikh, Dakshesh H; Rasiah, Shree Vishna

    2015-08-01

    Antenatal diagnosis of lung lesion has become more accurate resulting in dilemma and controversies of its antenatal and postnatal management. Majority of antenatally diagnosed congenital lung lesions are asymptomatic in the neonatal age group. Large lung lesions cause respiratory compromise and inevitably require urgent investigations and surgery. The congenital lung lesion presenting with hydrops requires careful postnatal management of lung hypoplasia and persistent pulmonary hypertension. Preoperative stabilization with gentle ventilation with permissive hypercapnia and delayed surgery similar to congenital diaphragmatic hernia management has been shown to result in good outcome. The diagnostic investigations and surgical management of the asymptomatic lung lesions remain controversial. Postnatal management and outcome of congenital cystic lung lesions are discussed. PMID:26051048

  1. Postnatal care from an international perspective.

    PubMed

    Steinhauer, Suyai

    2016-01-01

    The postnatal period, defined as beginning with birth and ending after six weeks, is a time of major adaptation at all levels physically, emotionally, socially and psychologically. In the United Kingdom (UK), we put a lot of emphasis on birth preparation and how to look after yourself optimally before the birth, but once the new baby has arrived there is little support or emphasis on self-care. The focus after childbirth is primarily on the baby, with not much thought given to the mother, who is usually discharged from midwifery care on day 10, and whose partner is often back at work after a week or two. In other cultures there is much more emphasis on caring for new mothers, and this article will explore some of the different attitudes and approaches to postnatal care around the world, exploring the postnatal period from an international perspective.

  2. Postnatal care from an international perspective.

    PubMed

    Steinhauer, Suyai

    2016-01-01

    The postnatal period, defined as beginning with birth and ending after six weeks, is a time of major adaptation at all levels physically, emotionally, socially and psychologically. In the United Kingdom (UK), we put a lot of emphasis on birth preparation and how to look after yourself optimally before the birth, but once the new baby has arrived there is little support or emphasis on self-care. The focus after childbirth is primarily on the baby, with not much thought given to the mother, who is usually discharged from midwifery care on day 10, and whose partner is often back at work after a week or two. In other cultures there is much more emphasis on caring for new mothers, and this article will explore some of the different attitudes and approaches to postnatal care around the world, exploring the postnatal period from an international perspective. PMID:27652442

  3. Olfactory Sensitivity for Six Predator Odorants in CD-1 Mice, Human Subjects, and Spider Monkeys

    PubMed Central

    Sarrafchi, Amir; Odhammer, Anna M. E.; Hernandez Salazar, Laura Teresa; Laska, Matthias

    2013-01-01

    Using a conditioning paradigm, we assessed the olfactory sensitivity of six CD-1 mice (Mus musculus) for six sulfur-containing odorants known to be components of the odors of natural predators of the mouse. With all six odorants, the mice discriminated concentrations <0.1 ppm (parts per million) from the solvent, and with five of the six odorants the best-scoring animals were even able to detect concentrations <1 ppt (parts per trillion). Four female spider monkeys (Ateles geoffroyi) and twelve human subjects (Homo sapiens) tested in parallel were found to detect the same six odorants at concentrations <0.01 ppm, and with four of the six odorants the best-scoring animals and subjects even detected concentrations <10 ppt. With all three species, the threshold values obtained here are generally lower than (or in the lower range of) those reported for other chemical classes tested previously, suggesting that sulfur-containing odorants may play a special role in olfaction. Across-species comparisons showed that the mice were significantly more sensitive than the human subjects and the spider monkeys with four of the six predator odorants. However, the human subjects were significantly more sensitive than the mice with the remaining two odorants. Human subjects and spider monkeys significantly differed in their sensitivity with only two of the six odorants. These comparisons lend further support to the notion that the number of functional olfactory receptor genes or the relative or absolute size of the olfactory bulbs are poor predictors of a species’ olfactory sensitivity. Analysis of odor structure–activity relationships showed that in both mice and human subjects the type of alkyl rest attached to a thietane and the type of oxygen moiety attached to a thiol significantly affected olfactory sensitivity. PMID:24278296

  4. Peripheral olfactory signaling in insects

    PubMed Central

    Suh, Eunho; Bohbot, Jonathan; Zwiebel, Laurence J.

    2014-01-01

    Olfactory signaling is a crucial component in the life history of insects. The development of precise and parallel mechanisms to analyze the tremendous amount of chemical information from the environment and other sources has been essential to their evolutionary success. Considerable progress has been made in the study of insect olfaction fueled by bioinformatics- based utilization of genomics along with rapid advances in functional analyses. Here we review recent progress in our rapidly emerging understanding of insect peripheral sensory reception and signal transduction. These studies reveal that the nearly unlimited chemical space insects encounter is covered by distinct chemosensory receptor repertoires that are generally derived by species-specific, rapid gene gain and loss, reflecting the evolutionary consequences of adaptation to meet their specific biological needs. While diverse molecular mechanisms have been put forth, often in the context of controversial models, the characterization of the ubiquitous, highly conserved and insect-specific Orco odorant receptor co-receptor has opened the door to the design and development of novel insect control methods to target agricultural pests, disease vectors and even nuisance insects. PMID:25584200

  5. Involvement of TRPV1 in the Olfactory Bulb in Rimonabant-Induced Olfactory Discrimination Deficit.

    PubMed

    Hu, Sherry Shu-Jung

    2016-02-29

    Rimonabant is well recognized as a cannabinoid CB₁ receptor antagonist/inverse agonist. Rimonabant not only antagonizes the effects induced by exogenous cannabinoids and endocannabinoids at CB₁ receptors, it also exerts several pharmacological and behavioral effects independent of CB₁ receptor inactivation. For example, rimonabant can function as a low-potency mixed agonist/antagonist of the transient receptor potential vanilloid receptor 1 (TRPV1). Hence, it is important to explain the underlying mechanisms of the diverse physiological effects induced by rimonabant with caution. Interestingly, CB₁ receptor has recently been suggested to play a role in olfactory functions. Olfaction not only is involved in food intake, visual perception and social interaction, but also is proposed as a putative marker for schizophrenia and autism. Therefore, the present study aimed to investigate whether CB₁ receptor and TRPV1 played a role in olfactory functions. We first used the genetic disruption approach to examine the role of CB₁ receptor in olfactory functions and found that CB₁ knockout mice exhibited olfactory discrimination deficit. However, it is important to point out that these CB₁ knockout mice, despite their normal locomotivity, displayed deficiencies in the olfactory foraging and novel object exploration tasks. These results imply that general exploratory behaviors toward odorant and odorless objects are compromised in CB₁ knockout mice. We next turned to the pharmacological approach to examine the role of CB₁ receptor and TRPV1 in olfactory functions. We found that the short-term administration of rimonabant, injected systemically or directly into the olfactory bulb (OB), impaired olfactory discrimination that was rescued by the TRPV1 antagonist capsazepine (CPZ), via the same route of rimonabant, in wild-type mice. These results suggest that TRPV1 in the OB is involved in rimonabant-induced olfactory discrimination deficit. However, the

  6. An Olfactory Indicator for Acid-Base Titrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flair, Mark N.; Setzer, William N.

    1990-01-01

    The use of an olfactory acid-base indicator in titrations for visually impaired students is discussed. Potential olfactory indicators include eugenol, thymol, vanillin, and thiophenol. Titrations performed with each indicator with eugenol proved to be successful. (KR)

  7. Transcription and imprinting dynamics in developing postnatal male germline stem cells.

    PubMed

    Hammoud, Saher Sue; Low, Diana H P; Yi, Chongil; Lee, Chee Leng; Oatley, Jon M; Payne, Christopher J; Carrell, Douglas T; Guccione, Ernesto; Cairns, Bradley R

    2015-11-01

    Postnatal spermatogonial stem cells (SSCs) progress through proliferative and developmental stages to populate the testicular niche prior to productive spermatogenesis. To better understand, we conducted extensive genomic profiling at multiple postnatal stages on subpopulations enriched for particular markers (THY1, KIT, OCT4, ID4, or GFRa1). Overall, our profiles suggest three broad populations of spermatogonia in juveniles: (1) epithelial-like spermatogonia (THY1(+); high OCT4, ID4, and GFRa1), (2) more abundant mesenchymal-like spermatogonia (THY1(+); moderate OCT4 and ID4; high mesenchymal markers), and (3) (in older juveniles) abundant spermatogonia committing to gametogenesis (high KIT(+)). Epithelial-like spermatogonia displayed the expected imprinting patterns, but, surprisingly, mesenchymal-like spermatogonia lacked imprinting specifically at paternally imprinted loci but fully restored imprinting prior to puberty. Furthermore, mesenchymal-like spermatogonia also displayed developmentally linked DNA demethylation at meiotic genes and also at certain monoallelic neural genes (e.g., protocadherins and olfactory receptors). We also reveal novel candidate receptor-ligand networks involving SSCs and the developing niche. Taken together, neonates/juveniles contain heterogeneous epithelial-like or mesenchymal-like spermatogonial populations, with the latter displaying extensive DNA methylation/chromatin dynamics. We speculate that this plasticity helps SSCs proliferate and migrate within the developing seminiferous tubule, with proper niche interaction and membrane attachment reverting mesenchymal-like spermatogonial subtype cells back to an epithelial-like state with normal imprinting profiles. PMID:26545815

  8. Transcription and imprinting dynamics in developing postnatal male germline stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Hammoud, Saher Sue; Low, Diana H.P.; Yi, Chongil; Lee, Chee Leng; Oatley, Jon M.; Payne, Christopher J.; Carrell, Douglas T.; Guccione, Ernesto; Cairns, Bradley R.

    2015-01-01

    Postnatal spermatogonial stem cells (SSCs) progress through proliferative and developmental stages to populate the testicular niche prior to productive spermatogenesis. To better understand, we conducted extensive genomic profiling at multiple postnatal stages on subpopulations enriched for particular markers (THY1, KIT, OCT4, ID4, or GFRa1). Overall, our profiles suggest three broad populations of spermatogonia in juveniles: (1) epithelial-like spermatogonia (THY1+; high OCT4, ID4, and GFRa1), (2) more abundant mesenchymal-like spermatogonia (THY1+; moderate OCT4 and ID4; high mesenchymal markers), and (3) (in older juveniles) abundant spermatogonia committing to gametogenesis (high KIT+). Epithelial-like spermatogonia displayed the expected imprinting patterns, but, surprisingly, mesenchymal-like spermatogonia lacked imprinting specifically at paternally imprinted loci but fully restored imprinting prior to puberty. Furthermore, mesenchymal-like spermatogonia also displayed developmentally linked DNA demethylation at meiotic genes and also at certain monoallelic neural genes (e.g., protocadherins and olfactory receptors). We also reveal novel candidate receptor–ligand networks involving SSCs and the developing niche. Taken together, neonates/juveniles contain heterogeneous epithelial-like or mesenchymal-like spermatogonial populations, with the latter displaying extensive DNA methylation/chromatin dynamics. We speculate that this plasticity helps SSCs proliferate and migrate within the developing seminiferous tubule, with proper niche interaction and membrane attachment reverting mesenchymal-like spermatogonial subtype cells back to an epithelial-like state with normal imprinting profiles. PMID:26545815

  9. miR-200 family controls late steps of postnatal forebrain neurogenesis via Zeb2 inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Beclin, Christophe; Follert, Philipp; Stappers, Elke; Barral, Serena; Nathalie, Coré; de Chevigny, Antoine; Magnone, Virginie; Lebrigand, Kévin; Bissels, Ute; Huylebroeck, Danny; Bosio, Andreas; Barbry, Pascal; Seuntjens, Eve; Cremer, Harold

    2016-01-01

    During neurogenesis, generation, migration and integration of the correct numbers of each neuron sub-type depends on complex molecular interactions in space and time. MicroRNAs represent a key control level allowing the flexibility and stability needed for this process. Insight into the role of this regulatory pathway in the brain is still limited. We performed a sequential experimental approach using postnatal olfactory bulb neurogenesis in mice, starting from global expression analyses to the investigation of functional interactions between defined microRNAs and their targets. Deep sequencing of small RNAs extracted from defined compartments of the postnatal neurogenic system demonstrated that the miR-200 family is specifically induced during late neuronal differentiation stages. Using in vivo strategies we interfered with the entire miR-200 family in loss- and gain-of-function settings, showing a role of miR-200 in neuronal maturation. This function is mediated by targeting the transcription factor Zeb2. Interestingly, so far functional interaction between miR-200 and Zeb2 has been exclusively reported in cancer or cultured stem cells. Our data demonstrate that this regulatory interaction is also active during normal neurogenesis. PMID:27767083

  10. Forty years of olfactory navigation in birds.

    PubMed

    Gagliardo, Anna

    2013-06-15

    Forty years ago, Papi and colleagues discovered that anosmic pigeons cannot find their way home when released at unfamiliar locations. They explained this phenomenon by developing the olfactory navigation hypothesis: pigeons at the home loft learn the odours carried by the winds in association with wind direction; once at the release site, they determine the direction of displacement on the basis of the odours perceived locally and orient homeward. In addition to the old classical experiments, new GPS tracking data and observations on the activation of the olfactory system in displaced pigeons have provided further evidence for the specific role of olfactory cues in pigeon navigation. Although it is not known which odours the birds might rely on for navigation, it has been shown that volatile organic compounds in the atmosphere are distributed as fairly stable gradients to allow environmental odour-based navigation. The investigation of the potential role of olfactory cues for navigation in wild birds is still at an early stage; however, the evidence collected so far suggests that olfactory navigation might be a widespread mechanism in avian species.

  11. Olfactory phenotypic expression unveils human aging.

    PubMed

    Mazzatenta, Andrea; Cellerino, Alessandro; Origlia, Nicola; Barloscio, Davide; Sartucci, Ferdinando; Di Giulio, Camillo; Domenici, Luciano

    2016-04-12

    The mechanism of the natural aging of olfaction and its declinein the absence of any overt disease conditions remains unclear. Here, we investigated this mechanism through measurement of one of the parameters of olfactory function, the absolute threshold, in a healthy population from childhood to old age. The absolute olfactory threshold data were collected from an Italian observational study with 622 participants aged 5-105 years. A subjective testing procedure of constant stimuli was used, which was also compared to the 'staircase' method, with the calculation of the reliability. The n-butanol stimulus was used as an ascending series of nine molar concentrations that were monitored using an electronic nose. The data were analyzed using nonparametric statistics because of the multimodal distribution. We show that the age-related variations in the absolute olfactory threshold are not continuous; instead, there are multiple olfactory phenotypes. Three distinct age-related phenotypes were defined, termed as 'juvenile', 'mature' and 'elder'. The frequency of these three phenotypes depends on age. Our data suggest that the sense of smell does not decrease linearly with aging. Our findings provide the basis for further understanding of olfactory loss as an anticipatory sign of aging and neurodegenerative processes. PMID:27027240

  12. Perceptual and Neural Olfactory Similarity in Honeybees

    PubMed Central

    2005-01-01

    The question of whether or not neural activity patterns recorded in the olfactory centres of the brain correspond to olfactory perceptual measures remains unanswered. To address this question, we studied olfaction in honeybees Apis mellifera using the olfactory conditioning of the proboscis extension response. We conditioned bees to odours and tested generalisation responses to different odours. Sixteen odours were used, which varied both in their functional group (primary and secondary alcohols, aldehydes and ketones) and in their carbon-chain length (from six to nine carbons).The results obtained by presentation of a total of 16 × 16 odour pairs show that (i) all odorants presented could be learned, although acquisition was lower for short-chain ketones; (ii) generalisation varied depending both on the functional group and the carbon-chain length of odours trained; higher generalisation was found between long-chain than between short-chain molecules and between groups such as primary and secondary alcohols; (iii) for some odour pairs, cross-generalisation between odorants was asymmetric; (iv) a putative olfactory space could be defined for the honeybee with functional group and carbon-chain length as inner dimensions; (v) perceptual distances in such a space correlate well with physiological distances determined from optophysiological recordings of antennal lobe activity. We conclude that functional group and carbon-chain length are inner dimensions of the honeybee olfactory space and that neural activity in the antennal lobe reflects the perceptual quality of odours. PMID:15736975

  13. Olfactory phenotypic expression unveils human aging

    PubMed Central

    Mazzatenta, Andrea; Cellerino, Alessandro; Origlia, Nicola; Barloscio, Davide; Sartucci, Ferdinando; Giulio, Camillo Di; Domenici, Luciano

    2016-01-01

    The mechanism of the natural aging of olfaction and its declinein the absence of any overt disease conditions remains unclear. Here, we investigated this mechanism through measurement of one of the parameters of olfactory function, the absolute threshold, in a healthy population from childhood to old age. The absolute olfactory threshold data were collected from an Italian observational study with 622 participants aged 5-105 years. A subjective testing procedure of constant stimuli was used, which was also compared to the ‘staircase’ method, with the calculation of the reliability. The n-butanol stimulus was used as an ascending series of nine molar concentrations that were monitored using an electronic nose. The data were analyzed using nonparametric statistics because of the multimodal distribution. We show that the age-related variations in the absolute olfactory threshold are not continuous; instead, there are multiple olfactory phenotypes. Three distinct age-related phenotypes were defined, termed as ‘juvenile’, ‘mature’ and ‘elder’. The frequency of these three phenotypes depends on age. Our data suggest that the sense of smell does not decrease linearly with aging. Our findings provide the basis for further understanding of olfactory loss as an anticipatory sign of aging and neurodegenerative processes. PMID:27027240

  14. Chemical olfactory signals and parenthood in mammals.

    PubMed

    Corona, Rebeca; Lévy, Frédéric

    2015-02-01

    This article is part of a Special Issue "Chemosignals and Reproduction". In mammalian species, odor cues emitted by the newborn are essential to establish maternal behavior at parturition and coordinate early mother-infant interactions. Offspring odors become potent attractive stimuli at parturition promoting the contact with the young to ensure that normal maternal care develops. In some species odors provide a basis for individual recognition of the offspring and highly specialized neural mechanisms for learning the infant signals have evolved. Both the main and the accessory olfactory systems are involved in the onset of maternal care, but only the former contributes to individual odor discrimination of the young. Electrophysiological and neurochemical changes occur in the main olfactory bulb leading to a coding of the olfactory signature of the familiar young. Olfactory neurogenesis could also contribute to motherhood and associated learning. Parturition and interactions with the young influence neurogenesis and some evidence indicates a functional link between olfactory neurogenesis and maternal behavior. Although a simple compound has been found which regulates anogenital licking in the rat, studies identifying the chemical nature of these odors are lacking. Neonatal body odors seem to be particularly salient to human mothers who are able to identify their infant's odors. Recent studies have revealed some neural processing of these cues confirming the importance of mother-young chemical communication in our own species.

  15. Odorant concentration differentiator for intermittent olfactory signals.

    PubMed

    Fujiwara, Terufumi; Kazawa, Tomoki; Sakurai, Takeshi; Fukushima, Ryota; Uchino, Keiro; Yamagata, Tomoko; Namiki, Shigehiro; Haupt, Stephan Shuichi; Kanzaki, Ryohei

    2014-12-10

    Animals need to discriminate differences in spatiotemporally distributed sensory signals in terms of quality as well as quantity for generating adaptive behavior. Olfactory signals characterized by odor identity and concentration are intermittently distributed in the environment. From these intervals of stimulation, animals process odorant concentration to localize partners or food sources. Although concentration-response characteristics in olfactory neurons have traditionally been investigated using single stimulus pulses, their behavior under intermittent stimulus regimens remains largely elusive. Using the silkmoth (Bombyx mori) pheromone processing system, a simple and behaviorally well-defined model for olfaction, we investigated the neuronal representation of odorant concentration upon intermittent stimulation in the naturally occurring range. To the first stimulus in a series, the responses of antennal lobe (AL) projection neurons (PNs) showed a concentration dependence as previously shown in many olfactory systems. However, PN response amplitudes dynamically changed upon exposure to intermittent stimuli of the same odorant concentration and settled to a constant, largely concentration-independent level. As a result, PN responses emphasized odorant concentration changes rather than encoding absolute concentration in pulse trains of stimuli. Olfactory receptor neurons did not contribute to this response transformation which was due to long-lasting inhibition affecting PNs in the AL. Simulations confirmed that inhibition also provides advantages when stimuli have naturalistic properties. The primary olfactory center thus functions as an odorant concentration differentiator to efficiently detect concentration changes, thereby improving odorant source orientation over a wide concentration range.

  16. Olfactory region schwannoma: Excision with preservation of olfaction.

    PubMed

    Salunke, Pravin; Patra, Devi Prasad; Futane, Sameer; Nada, Ritambhara

    2014-07-01

    Olfactory region schwannomas are rare, but when they occur, they commonly arise from the meningeal branches of the trigeminal nerve and may present without involvement of the olfaction. A 24 year old lady presented with hemifacial paraesthesias. Radiology revealed a large olfactory region enhancing lesion. She was operated through a transbasal with olfactory preserving approach. This manuscript highlights the importance of olfactory preservation in such lesions.

  17. Coadaptation of prenatal and postnatal maternal effects.

    PubMed

    Lock, Judith E; Smiseth, Per T; Moore, Patricia J; Moore, Allen J

    2007-11-01

    In a wide variety of species, a female's age of first reproduction influences offspring size and survival, suggesting that there exists an optimal timing of reproduction. Mothers in many species also influence offspring size and survival after birth through variation in parental care. We experimentally separated these effects in the burying beetle Nicrophorus vespilloides to test for coadaptation between prenatal and postnatal maternal effects associated with age at first reproduction. Females that reproduced early produced offspring with lower birth weight. The amount of parental care depended on the age of first reproduction of the caretaker, as did the extent of offspring begging. As predicted for a coadaptation of maternal effects, prenatal and postnatal effects were opposite for different-aged mothers, and larval weight gain and survival was greatest when the age of the caretaker and birth mother matched. Thus, prenatal effects intrinsically associated with age of first reproduction can be ameliorated by innate plasticity in postnatal care. A coadaptation of prenatal and postnatal maternal effects may evolve to allow variable timing of the first reproductive attempt. Such a coadaptation might be particularly valuable when females are constrained from reproducing at an optimal age, as, for example, in species that breed on scarce and unpredictable resources.

  18. Postnatal Testosterone Concentrations and Male Social Development

    PubMed Central

    Alexander, Gerianne M.

    2014-01-01

    Converging evidence from over 40 years of behavioral research indicates that higher testicular androgens in prenatal life and at puberty contribute to the masculinization of human behavior. However, the behavioral significance of the transient activation of the hypothalamic–pituitary–gonadal (HPG) axis in early postnatal life remains largely unknown. Although early research on non-human primates indicated that suppression of the postnatal surge in testicular androgens had no measurable effects on the later expression of the male behavioral phenotype, recent research from our laboratory suggests that postnatal testosterone concentrations influence male infant preferences for larger social groups and temperament characteristics associated with the later development of aggression. In later assessment of gender-linked behavior in the second year of life, concentrations of testosterone at 3–4 months of age were unrelated to toy choices and activity levels during toy play. However, higher concentrations of testosterone predicted less vocalization in toddlers and higher parental ratings on an established screening measure for autism spectrum disorder. These findings suggest a role of the transient activation of the HPG axis in the development of typical and atypical male social relations and suggest that it may be useful in future research on the exaggerated rise in testosterone secretion in preterm infants or exposure to hormone disruptors in early postnatal life to include assessment of gender-relevant behavioral outcomes, including childhood disorders with sex-biased prevalence rates. PMID:24600437

  19. Post-natal imprinting: evidence from marsupials

    PubMed Central

    Stringer, J M; Pask, A J; Shaw, G; Renfree, M B

    2014-01-01

    Genomic imprinting has been identified in therian (eutherian and marsupial) mammals but not in prototherian (monotreme) mammals. Imprinting has an important role in optimising pre-natal nutrition and growth, and most imprinted genes are expressed and imprinted in the placenta and developing fetus. In marsupials, however, the placental attachment is short-lived, and most growth and development occurs post-natally, supported by a changing milk composition tailor-made for each stage of development. Therefore there is a much greater demand on marsupial females during post-natal lactation than during pre-natal placentation, so there may be greater selection for genomic imprinting in the mammary gland than in the short-lived placenta. Recent studies in the tammar wallaby confirm the presence of genomic imprinting in nutrient-regulatory genes in the adult mammary gland. This suggests that imprinting may influence infant post-natal growth via the mammary gland as it does pre-natally via the placenta. Similarly, an increasing number of imprinted genes have been implicated in regulating feeding and nurturing behaviour in both the adult and the developing neonate/offspring in mice. Together these studies provide evidence that genomic imprinting is critical for regulating growth and subsequently the survival of offspring not only pre-natally but also post-natally. PMID:24595366

  20. Postnatal testosterone concentrations and male social development.

    PubMed

    Alexander, Gerianne M

    2014-01-01

    Converging evidence from over 40 years of behavioral research indicates that higher testicular androgens in prenatal life and at puberty contribute to the masculinization of human behavior. However, the behavioral significance of the transient activation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis in early postnatal life remains largely unknown. Although early research on non-human primates indicated that suppression of the postnatal surge in testicular androgens had no measurable effects on the later expression of the male behavioral phenotype, recent research from our laboratory suggests that postnatal testosterone concentrations influence male infant preferences for larger social groups and temperament characteristics associated with the later development of aggression. In later assessment of gender-linked behavior in the second year of life, concentrations of testosterone at 3-4 months of age were unrelated to toy choices and activity levels during toy play. However, higher concentrations of testosterone predicted less vocalization in toddlers and higher parental ratings on an established screening measure for autism spectrum disorder. These findings suggest a role of the transient activation of the HPG axis in the development of typical and atypical male social relations and suggest that it may be useful in future research on the exaggerated rise in testosterone secretion in preterm infants or exposure to hormone disruptors in early postnatal life to include assessment of gender-relevant behavioral outcomes, including childhood disorders with sex-biased prevalence rates.

  1. Radiology of postnatal skeletal development. Pt. 7

    SciTech Connect

    Ogden, J.A.; Phillips, S.B.

    1983-02-01

    Twenty-four pairs of scapulae from fetal specimens and 35 pairs of scapulae from postnatal cadavers ranging in age from full-term neonates to 14 years, were studied morphologically and roentgenographically. Air-cartilage interfacing was used to demonstrate both the osseous and cartilaginous contours. When the entire chondro-osseous dimensions, rather than just the osseous dimensions, were measured, the scapula had a height-width ratio ranging from 1.36 to 1.52 (average 1.44) during most of fetal development. The exceptions were three stillborns with camptomelic, thanatophoric, and achondrogenic dwarfism in which the ratio averaged 0.6. At no time during fetal development was the glenoid cavity convex; it always had a concave articular surface. However, the osseous subchrondral countour was often flat or slightly convex. In the postnatal period the height-width ratio averaged 1.49. The ratio remained virtually unchanged throughout skeletal growth and maturation. In a patient with unilateral Sprengel's deformity the ratio for the normal side was 1.5, while the abnormal was 1.0. The cartilaginous glenoid cavity was always concave during postnatal development, even in the specimens with major structural deformities, although the subchondral osseous contour was usually flat or convex during the first few years of postnatal development. Ossification of the coracoid process began with the development of a primary center at three to four months. A bipolar physis was present between the primary coracoid center and the primary scapular center until late adolescence.

  2. Individual olfactory perception reveals meaningful nonolfactory genetic information.

    PubMed

    Secundo, Lavi; Snitz, Kobi; Weissler, Kineret; Pinchover, Liron; Shoenfeld, Yehuda; Loewenthal, Ron; Agmon-Levin, Nancy; Frumin, Idan; Bar-Zvi, Dana; Shushan, Sagit; Sobel, Noam

    2015-07-14

    Each person expresses a potentially unique subset of ∼ 400 different olfactory receptor subtypes. Given that the receptors we express partially determine the odors we smell, it follows that each person may have a unique nose; to capture this, we devised a sensitive test of olfactory perception we termed the "olfactory fingerprint." Olfactory fingerprints relied on matrices of perceived odorant similarity derived from descriptors applied to the odorants. We initially fingerprinted 89 individuals using 28 odors and 54 descriptors. We found that each person had a unique olfactory fingerprint (P < 10(-10)), which was odor specific but descriptor independent. We could identify individuals from this pool using randomly selected sets of 7 odors and 11 descriptors alone. Extrapolating from this data, we determined that using 34 odors and 35 descriptors we could individually identify each of the 7 billion people on earth. Olfactory perception, however, fluctuates over time, calling into question our proposed perceptual readout of presumably stable genetic makeup. To test whether fingerprints remain informative despite this temporal fluctuation, building on the linkage between olfactory receptors and HLA, we hypothesized that olfactory perception may relate to HLA. We obtained olfactory fingerprints and HLA typing for 130 individuals, and found that olfactory fingerprint matching using only four odorants was significantly related to HLA matching (P < 10(-4)), such that olfactory fingerprints can save 32% of HLA tests in a population screen (P < 10(-6)). In conclusion, a precise measure of olfactory perception reveals meaningful nonolfactory genetic information.

  3. Neural Correlates of Olfactory Learning: Critical Role of Centrifugal Neuromodulation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fletcher, Max L.; Chen, Wei R.

    2010-01-01

    The mammalian olfactory system is well established for its remarkable capability of undergoing experience-dependent plasticity. Although this process involves changes at multiple stages throughout the central olfactory pathway, even the early stages of processing, such as the olfactory bulb and piriform cortex, can display a high degree of…

  4. Evolving olfactory systems on the fly.

    PubMed

    Ramdya, Pavan; Benton, Richard

    2010-07-01

    The detection of odour stimuli in the environment is universally important for primal behaviours such as feeding, mating, kin interactions and escape responses. Given the ubiquity of many airborne chemical signals and the similar organisation of animal olfactory circuits, a fundamental question in our understanding of the sense of smell is how species-specific behavioural responses to odorants can evolve. Recent comparative genomic, developmental and physiological studies are shedding light on this problem by providing insights into the genetic mechanisms that underlie anatomical and functional evolution of the olfactory system. Here we synthesise these data, with a particular focus on insect olfaction, to address how new olfactory receptors and circuits might arise and diverge, offering glimpses into how odour-evoked behaviours could adapt to an ever-changing chemosensory world.

  5. Postnatal NMDA receptor ablation in corticolimbic interneurons confers schizophrenia-like phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Belforte, Juan E; Zsiros, Veronika; Sklar, Elyse R; Jiang, Zhihong; Yu, Gu; Li, Yuqing; Quinlan, Elizabeth M; Nakazawa, Kazu

    2010-01-01

    Cortical GABAergic dysfunction may underlie the pathophysiology of psychiatric disorders, including schizophrenia. Here, we characterized a mouse strain in which the essential NR1 subunit of the NMDA receptor (NMDAR) was selectively eliminated in 40-50% of cortical and hippocampal interneurons in early postnatal development. Consistent with the NMDAR hypofunction theory of schizophrenia, distinct schizophrenia-related symptoms emerged after adolescence, including novelty-induced hyperlocomotion, mating and nest-building deficits, as well as anhedonia-like and anxiety-like behaviors. Many of these behaviors were exacerbated by social isolation stress. Social memory, spatial working memory and prepulse inhibition were also impaired. Reduced expression of glutamic acid decarboxylase 67 and parvalbumin was accompanied by disinhibition of cortical excitatory neurons and reduced neuronal synchrony. Postadolescent deletion of NR1 did not result in such abnormalities. These findings suggest that early postnatal inhibition of NMDAR activity in corticolimbic GABAergic interneurons contributes to the pathophysiology of schizophrenia-related disorders.

  6. Expressions of Sox9, Sox5, and Sox13 transcription factors in mice testis during postnatal development.

    PubMed

    Daigle, Mikella; Roumaud, Pauline; Martin, Luc J

    2015-09-01

    SRY-related box (Sox) transcription factors are conserved among vertebrate species. These proteins regulate multiple processes including sex determination and testis differentiation of the male embryo. Although members of the Sox family have been identified in pre- and postnatal Sertoli cells, they have never been characterized in adult Leydig cells. The objectives of this research were to identify expressions of Sox9, Sox5, and Sox13 in mice Leydig cell cultures and to establish their expression profiles in postnatal mice testes at different developmental stages. Methods used include Western blots and qPCR of stimulated MA-10 cell cultures and whole mice testes. Sox9, Sox5, and Sox13 proteins were detected in MA-10 cells as well as whole mouse testis. Although Sox9, Sox5, and Sox13 mRNA levels from whole mice testes tended to increase according to postnatal development, these results were not significant. Sox members were also detected in whole mice testis by Western Blot. However, Sox9, Sox5, and Sox13 protein expressions remained relatively constant during postnatal development from postnatal (P) day 60 to P365. Being newly characterized in the mouse testis, Sox13 was mainly localized by immunofluorescence within the nuclei of cells from seminiferous tubules, possibly spermatocytes and Sertoli cells. In addition, Sox9, Sox5, and Sox13 proteins were characterized in the nuclei of MA-10 Leydig cell cultures. Their expressions and transcriptional activities remained unaffected by activators of the cAMP/PKA pathway. Thus, Sox9, Sox5, and Sox13 transcription factors are expressed in postnatal testis and may regulate multiple functions such as steroidogenesis and spermatogenesis.

  7. Ontogeny of CX3CR1-EGFP expressing cells unveil microglia as an integral component of the postnatal subventricular zone.

    PubMed

    Xavier, Anna L; Lima, Flavia R S; Nedergaard, Maiken; Menezes, João R L

    2015-01-01

    The full spectrum of cellular interactions within CNS neurogenic niches is still poorly understood. Only recently has the monocyte counterpart of the nervous system, the microglial cells, been described as an integral cellular component of neurogenic niches. The present study sought to characterize the microglia population in the early postnatal subventricular zone (SVZ), the major site of postnatal neurogenesis, as well as in its anterior extension, the rostral migratory stream (RMS), a pathway for neuroblasts during their transit toward the olfactory bulb (OB) layers. Here we show that microglia within the SVZ/RMS pathway are not revealed by phenotypic markers that characterize microglia in other regions. Analysis of the transgenic mice strain that has one locus of the constitutively expressed fractalkine CX3CR1 receptor replaced by the gene encoding the enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) circumvented the antigenic plasticity of the microglia, thus allowing us to depict microglia within the SVZ/RMS pathway during early development. Notably, microglia within the early SVZ/RMS are not proliferative and display a protracted development, retaining a more immature morphology than their counterparts outside germinal layers. Furthermore, microglia contact and phagocyte radial glia cells (RG) processes, thereby playing a role on the astroglial transformation that putative stem cells within the SVZ niche undergo during the first postnatal days.

  8. Ontogeny of CX3CR1-EGFP expressing cells unveil microglia as an integral component of the postnatal subventricular zone

    PubMed Central

    Xavier, Anna L.; Lima, Flavia R. S.; Nedergaard, Maiken; Menezes, João R. L.

    2015-01-01

    The full spectrum of cellular interactions within CNS neurogenic niches is still poorly understood. Only recently has the monocyte counterpart of the nervous system, the microglial cells, been described as an integral cellular component of neurogenic niches. The present study sought to characterize the microglia population in the early postnatal subventricular zone (SVZ), the major site of postnatal neurogenesis, as well as in its anterior extension, the rostral migratory stream (RMS), a pathway for neuroblasts during their transit toward the olfactory bulb (OB) layers. Here we show that microglia within the SVZ/RMS pathway are not revealed by phenotypic markers that characterize microglia in other regions. Analysis of the transgenic mice strain that has one locus of the constitutively expressed fractalkine CX3CR1 receptor replaced by the gene encoding the enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) circumvented the antigenic plasticity of the microglia, thus allowing us to depict microglia within the SVZ/RMS pathway during early development. Notably, microglia within the early SVZ/RMS are not proliferative and display a protracted development, retaining a more immature morphology than their counterparts outside germinal layers. Furthermore, microglia contact and phagocyte radial glia cells (RG) processes, thereby playing a role on the astroglial transformation that putative stem cells within the SVZ niche undergo during the first postnatal days. PMID:25741237

  9. Olfactory regulation of mosquito–host interactions

    PubMed Central

    Zwiebel, L.J.; Takken, W.

    2011-01-01

    Mosquitoes that act as disease vectors rely upon olfactory cues to direct several important behaviors that are fundamentally involved in establishing their overall vectorial capacity. Of these, the propensity to select humans for blood feeding is arguably the most important of these olfactory driven behaviors in so far as it significantly contributes to the ability of these mosquitoes to transmit pathogens that cause diseases such as dengue, yellow fever and most significantly human malaria. Here, we review significant advances in behavioral, physiological and molecular investigations into mosquito host preference, with a particular emphasis on studies that have emerged in the post-genomic era that seek to combine these approaches. PMID:15242705

  10. Olfactory regulation of mosquito-host interactions.

    PubMed

    Zwiebel, L J; Takken, W

    2004-07-01

    Mosquitoes that act as disease vectors rely upon olfactory cues to direct several important behaviors that are fundamentally involved in establishing their overall vectorial capacity. Of these, the propensity to select humans for blood feeding is arguably the most important of these olfactory driven behaviors in so far as it significantly contributes to the ability of these mosquitoes to transmit pathogens that cause diseases such as dengue, yellow fever and most significantly human malaria. Here, we review significant advances in behavioral, physiological and molecular investigations into mosquito host preference, with a particular emphasis on studies that have emerged in the post-genomic era that seek to combine these approaches.

  11. Genomics of mature and immature olfactory sensory neurons.

    PubMed

    Nickell, Melissa D; Breheny, Patrick; Stromberg, Arnold J; McClintock, Timothy S

    2012-08-15

    The continuous replacement of neurons in the olfactory epithelium provides an advantageous model for investigating neuronal differentiation and maturation. By calculating the relative enrichment of every mRNA detected in samples of mature mouse olfactory sensory neurons (OSNs), immature OSNs, and the residual population of neighboring cell types, and then comparing these ratios against the known expression patterns of >300 genes, enrichment criteria that accurately predicted the OSN expression patterns of nearly all genes were determined. We identified 847 immature OSN-specific and 691 mature OSN-specific genes. The control of gene expression by chromatin modification and transcription factors, and neurite growth, protein transport, RNA processing, cholesterol biosynthesis, and apoptosis via death domain receptors, were overrepresented biological processes in immature OSNs. Ion transport (ion channels), presynaptic functions, and cilia-specific processes were overrepresented in mature OSNs. Processes overrepresented among the genes expressed by all OSNs were protein and ion transport, ER overload response, protein catabolism, and the electron transport chain. To more accurately represent gradations in mRNA abundance and identify all genes expressed in each cell type, classification methods were used to produce probabilities of expression in each cell type for every gene. These probabilities, which identified 9,300 genes expressed in OSNs, were 96% accurate at identifying genes expressed in OSNs and 86% accurate at discriminating genes specific to mature and immature OSNs. This OSN gene database not only predicts the genes responsible for the major biological processes active in OSNs, but also identifies thousands of never before studied genes that support OSN phenotypes.

  12. Genomics of Mature and Immature Olfactory Sensory Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Nickell, Melissa D.; Breheny, Patrick; Stromberg, Arnold J.; McClintock, Timothy S.

    2014-01-01

    The continuous replacement of neurons in the olfactory epithelium provides an advantageous model for investigating neuronal differentiation and maturation. By calculating the relative enrichment of every mRNA detected in samples of mature mouse olfactory sensory neurons (OSNs), immature OSNs, and the residual population of neighboring cell types, and then comparing these ratios against the known expression patterns of >300 genes, enrichment criteria that accurately predicted the OSN expression patterns of nearly all genes were determined. We identified 847 immature OSN-specific and 691 mature OSN-specific genes. The control of gene expression by chromatin modification and transcription factors, and neurite growth, protein transport, RNA processing, cholesterol biosynthesis, and apoptosis via death domain receptors, were overrepresented biological processes in immature OSNs. Ion transport (ion channels), presynaptic functions, and cilia-specific processes were overrepresented in mature OSNs. Processes overrepresented among the genes expressed by all OSNs were protein and ion transport, ER overload response, protein catabolism, and the electron transport chain. To more accurately represent gradations in mRNA abundance and identify all genes expressed in each cell type, classification methods were used to produce probabilities of expression in each cell type for every gene. These probabilities, which identified 9,300 genes expressed in OSNs, were 96% accurate at identifying genes expressed in OSNs and 86% accurate at discriminating genes specific to mature and immature OSNs. This OSN gene database not only predicts the genes responsible for the major biological processes active in OSNs, but also identifies thousands of never before studied genes that support OSN phenotypes. PMID:22252456

  13. Same same but different: the case of olfactory imagery

    PubMed Central

    Arshamian, Artin; Larsson, Maria

    2014-01-01

    In the present work we present an overview of experimental findings corroborating olfactory imagery observations with the visual and auditory modalities. Overall, the results indicate that imagery of olfactory information share many features with those observed in the primary senses although some major differences are evident. One such difference pertains to the considerable individual differences observed, with the majority being unable to reproduce olfactory information in their mind. Here, we highlight factors that are positively related to an olfactory imagery capacity, such as semantic knowledge, perceptual experience, and olfactory interest that may serve as potential moderators of the large individual variation. PMID:24550862

  14. Interneurons in the human olfactory system in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Saiz-Sanchez, Daniel; Flores-Cuadrado, Alicia; Ubeda-Bañon, Isabel; de la Rosa-Prieto, Carlos; Martinez-Marcos, Alino

    2016-02-01

    The principal olfactory structures display Alzheimer's disease (AD) related pathology at early stages of the disease. Consequently, olfactory deficits are among the earliest symptoms. Reliable olfactory tests for accurate clinical diagnosis are rarely made. In addition, neuropathological analysis postmortem of olfactory structures is often not made. Therefore, the relationship between the clinical features and the underlying pathology is poorly defined. Traditionally, research into Alzheimer's disease has focused on the degeneration of cortical temporal projection neurons and cholinergic neurons. Recent evidence has demonstrated the neurodegeneration of interneuron populations in AD. This review provides an updated overview of the pathological involvement of interneuron populations in the human olfactory system in Alzheimer's disease.

  15. Development of olfactory projection neuron dendrites that contribute to wiring specificity of the Drosophila olfactory circuit.

    PubMed

    Sakuma, Chisako; Anzo, Marie; Miura, Masayuki; Chihara, Takahiro

    2014-01-01

    The antennal lobe (AL) of Drosophila is the first olfactory processing center in which olfactory input and output are spatially organized into distinct channels via glomeruli to form a discrete neural map. In each glomerulus, the axons of a single type of olfactory receptor neurons (ORNs) synapse with the dendrites of a single type of projection neurons (PNs). The AL is an ideal place to study how the wiring specificity between specific types of ORNs and PNs is established during development. During the past two decades, the involvement of diverse molecules in the specification and patterning of ORNs and PNs has been reported. Furthermore, local interneurons-another component of glomeruli-have been recently catalogued and their functions have been gradually dissected. Although there is accumulating knowledge about the involvement of these three cell types in the wiring specificity of the olfactory system, in this review, we focus especially on the development of PN dendrites.

  16. Disruption of centrifugal inhibition to olfactory bulb granule cells impairs olfactory discrimination

    PubMed Central

    Nunez-Parra, Alexia; Maurer, Robert K.; Krahe, Krista; Smith, Richard S.; Araneda, Ricardo C.

    2013-01-01

    Granule cells (GCs) are the most abundant inhibitory neuronal type in the olfactory bulb and play a critical role in olfactory processing. GCs regulate the activity of principal neurons, the mitral cells, through dendrodendritic synapses, shaping the olfactory bulb output to other brain regions. GC excitability is regulated precisely by intrinsic and extrinsic inputs, and this regulation is fundamental for odor discrimination. Here, we used channelrhodopsin to stimulate GABAergic axons from the basal forebrain selectively and show that this stimulation generates reliable inhibitory responses in GCs. Furthermore, selective in vivo inhibition of GABAergic neurons in the basal forebrain by targeted expression of designer receptors exclusively activated by designer drugs produced a reversible impairment in the discrimination of structurally similar odors, indicating an important role of these inhibitory afferents in olfactory processing. PMID:23959889

  17. Olfactory sensations produced by high-energy photon irradiation of the olfactory receptor mucosa in humans

    SciTech Connect

    Sagar, S.M.; Thomas, R.J.; Loverock, L.T.; Spittle, M.F. )

    1991-04-01

    During irradiation of volumes that incorporate the olfactory system, a proportion of patients have complained of a pungent smell. A retrospective study was carried out to determine the prevalence of this side-effect. A questionnaire was sent to 40 patients whose treatment volumes included the olfactory region and also to a control group treated away from this region. The irradiated tumor volumes included the frontal lobe, whole brain, nasopharynx, pituitary fossa, and maxillary antrum. Of the 25 patients who replied, 60% experienced odorous symptoms during irradiation. They described the odor as unpleasant and consistent with ozone. Stimulation of olfactory receptors is considered to be caused by the radiochemical formation of ozone and free radicals in the mucus overlying the olfactory mucosa.

  18. On the organization of olfactory and vomeronasal cortices.

    PubMed

    Martinez-Marcos, Alino

    2009-01-12

    Classically, the olfactory and vomeronasal pathways are thought to run in parallel non-overlapping axes in the forebrain subserving different functions. The olfactory and vomeronasal epithelia project to the main and accessory olfactory bulbs (primary projections), which in turn project to different areas of the telencephalon in a non-topographic fashion (secondary projections) and so on (tertiary projections). New data indicate that projections arising from the main and accessory olfactory bulbs converge widely in the rostral basal telencephalon. In contrast, in the vomeronasal system, cloning two classes of vomeronasal receptors (V1R and V2R) has led to the distinction of two anatomically and functionally independent pathways that reach some common, but also some different, targets in the amygdala. Tertiary projections from the olfactory and vomeronasal amygdalae are directed to the ventral striatum, which thus becomes a site for processing and potential convergence of chemosensory stimuli. Functional data indicate that the olfactory and vomeronasal systems are able to detect and process volatiles (presumptive olfactory cues) as well as pheromones in both epithelia and bulbs. Collectively, these data indicate that the anatomical and functional distinction between the olfactory and vomeronasal systems should be re-evaluated. Specifically, the recipient cortex should be reorganized to include olfactory, vomeronasal (convergent and V1R and V2R specific areas) and mixed (olfactory and vomeronasal) chemosensory cortices. This new perspective could help to unravel olfactory and vomeronasal interactions in behavioral paradigms.

  19. Subjective and objective olfactory abnormalities in Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Marie; Zopf, Yurdagül; Elm, Cornelia; Pechmann, Georg; Hahn, Eckhart G; Schwab, Dieter; Kornhuber, Johannes; Thuerauf, Norbert Joachim

    2014-07-01

    The pathogenesis of Crohn's disease (CD) is still unknown, but the involvement of the olfactory system in CD appears possible. No study to date has systematically assessed the olfactory function in CD patients. We investigated the olfactory function in CD patients in active (n = 31) and inactive disease (n = 27) and in a control group of age- and sex-matched healthy subjects (n = 35). Subjective olfactory testing was applied using the Sniffin' Sticks test. For olfactory testing, olfactory event-related potentials (OERPs) were obtained with a 4-channel olfactometer using phenyl ethyl alcohol (PEA) and hydrogen sulfide (H(2)S). Carbon dioxide (CO(2)) was employed as control stimulus, and chemosomatosensory event-related potentials (CSSERPs) were registered. Results of the Sniffin' Sticks test revealed significantly different olfactory hedonic judgment with increased olfactory hedonic estimates for pleasant odorants in CD patients in active disease compared with healthy subjects. A statistical trend was found toward lower olfactory thresholds in CD patients. In objective olfactory testing, CD patients showed lower amplitudes of OERPs and CSSERPs. Additionally, OERPs showed significantly shorter N1- and P2 latencies following stimulation of the right nostril with H(2)S in CD patients in inactive disease compared with controls. Our study demonstrates specific abnormalities of olfactory perception in CD patients.

  20. Odorant metabolism catalyzed by olfactory mucosal enzymes influences peripheral olfactory responses in rats.

    PubMed

    Thiebaud, Nicolas; Veloso Da Silva, Stéphanie; Jakob, Ingrid; Sicard, Gilles; Chevalier, Joëlle; Ménétrier, Franck; Berdeaux, Olivier; Artur, Yves; Heydel, Jean-Marie; Le Bon, Anne-Marie

    2013-01-01

    A large set of xenobiotic-metabolizing enzymes (XMEs), such as the cytochrome P450 monooxygenases (CYPs), esterases and transferases, are highly expressed in mammalian olfactory mucosa (OM). These enzymes are known to catalyze the biotransformation of exogenous compounds to facilitate elimination. However, the functions of these enzymes in the olfactory epithelium are not clearly understood. In addition to protecting against inhaled toxic compounds, these enzymes could also metabolize odorant molecules, and thus modify their stimulating properties or inactivate them. In the present study, we investigated the in vitro biotransformation of odorant molecules in the rat OM and assessed the impact of this metabolism on peripheral olfactory responses. Rat OM was found to efficiently metabolize quinoline, coumarin and isoamyl acetate. Quinoline and coumarin are metabolized by CYPs whereas isoamyl acetate is hydrolyzed by carboxylesterases. Electro-olfactogram (EOG) recordings revealed that the hydroxylated metabolites derived from these odorants elicited lower olfactory response amplitudes than the parent molecules. We also observed that glucurono-conjugated derivatives induced no olfactory signal. Furthermore, we demonstrated that the local application of a CYP inhibitor on rat olfactory epithelium increased EOG responses elicited by quinoline and coumarin. Similarly, the application of a carboxylesterase inhibitor increased the EOG response elicited by isoamyl acetate. This increase in EOG amplitude provoked by XME inhibitors is likely due to enhanced olfactory sensory neuron activation in response to odorant accumulation. Taken together, these findings strongly suggest that biotransformation of odorant molecules by enzymes localized to the olfactory mucosa may change the odorant's stimulating properties and may facilitate the clearance of odorants to avoid receptor saturation. PMID:23555703

  1. Somatostatin-expressing interneurons provide subtractive inhibition and regulate sensory response fidelity in olfactory cortex

    PubMed Central

    Sturgill, James F.; Isaacson, Jeffry S.

    2015-01-01

    Diverse types of local GABAergic interneurons shape the cortical representation of sensory information. Here we show how somatostatin-expressing interneurons (SOM cells) contribute to odor coding in mouse olfactory cortex. We find that odor-tuned SOM cells regulate principal cells through a purely subtractive operation that is independent of odor identity or intensity. This operation enhances the salience of odor-evoked activity without changing cortical odor tuning. SOM cells inhibit both principal cells and fast-spiking interneurons, indicating that subtractive inhibition reflects the interplay of multiple classes of interneurons. PMID:25751531

  2. Postnatal Treatment in Antenatally Diagnosed Meconium Peritonitis.

    PubMed

    Ionescu, S; Andrei, B; Oancea, M; Licsandru, E; Ivanov, M; Marcu, V; Popa-Stanila, R; Mocanu, M

    2015-01-01

    Meconium peritonitis is a rare prenatal disease with an increased rate of morbidity and mortality in the neonatal period. Distinctive features revealed by prenatal and postnatal ultrasoundmay be present: abdominal calcifications, ascites, polyhydramnios, meconium pseudocyst, echogenic mass and dilated bowel or intestinal obstruction. Establishing clear postnatal treatment and prognosis is difficult because of the heterogeneity of the results obtained by ultrasound. The aim of the study is to determine how prenatal diagnosis of meconium peritonitis is associated with perinatal management and further evolution. Clinical results are different depending on the presence of antenatal diagnosis of meconium peritonitis and its form, which can be mild or severe. Surgical treatment and management of meconium peritonitis depend on the clinical presentation of the newborn. Meconium peritonitis diagnosed prenatally differs from that of the newborn, not only concerning the mortality rates but also through reduced morbidity and overall better prognosis.

  3. Harmful effects of cadmium on olfactory system in mice.

    PubMed

    Bondier, Jean-Robert; Michel, Germaine; Propper, Alain; Badot, Pierre-Marie

    2008-10-01

    The inhalation of certain metals can result in olfactory epithelial injury, an altered sense of smell, and direct delivery of the metal from the olfactory epithelium to the olfactory bulbs and other parts of the central nervous system. The purpose of this study was to examine whether mice given an intranasal instillation of cadmium would develop altered olfactory function and to assess whether cadmium may be transported directly from the olfactory epithelium to the central nervous system. To evaluate cadmium's ability to induce anosmia and on the basis of olfactory epithelium sensitivity to metals, the aim of this study was first to study cadmium effects on the olfactory function and secondly to check whether cadmium may be transported from the nasal area to the central nervous system. After an intranasal instillation of a solution containing CdCl2 at 136 mM, we observed in treated mice: (1) a partial destruction of the olfactory epithelium, which is reduced to three or four basal cell layers followed by a progressive regeneration; (2) a loss of odor discrimination with a subsequent recovery; and (3) a cadmium uptake by olfactory bulbs demonstrated using atomic absorption spectrophotometry, but not by other parts of the central nervous system. Cadmium was delivered to the olfactory bulbs, most likely along the olfactory nerve, thereby bypassing the intact blood-brain barrier. We consider that cadmium can penetrate olfactory epithelium and hence be transported to olfactory bulbs. The olfactory route could therefore be a likely way to reach the brain and should be taken into account for occupational risk assessments for this metal.

  4. Functional Neuroanatomy of "Drosophila" Olfactory Memory Formation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guven-Ozkan, Tugba; Davis, Ronald L.

    2014-01-01

    New approaches, techniques and tools invented over the last decade and a half have revolutionized the functional dissection of neural circuitry underlying "Drosophila" learning. The new methodologies have been used aggressively by researchers attempting to answer three critical questions about olfactory memories formed with appetitive…

  5. Adult Neurogenesis and the Olfactory System

    PubMed Central

    Whitman, Mary C.; Greer, Charles A.

    2009-01-01

    Though initially described in the early 1960s, it is only within the past decade that the concept of continuing adult neurogenesis has gained widespread acceptance. Neuroblasts from the subventricular zone (SVZ) migrate along the rostral migratory stream (RMS) into the olfactory bulb, where they differentiate into interneurons. Neuroblasts from the subgranular zone (SGZ) of the hippocampal formation show relatively little migratory behavior, and differentiate into dentate gyrus granule cells. In sharp contrast to embryonic and perinatal development, these newly differentiated neurons must integrate into a fully functional circuit, without disrupting ongoing performance. Here, after a brief historical overview and introduction to olfactory circuitry, we review recent advances in the biology of neural stem cells, mechanisms of migration in the RMS and olfactory bulb, differentiation and survival of new neurons, and finally mechanisms of synaptic integration. Our primary focus is on the olfactory system, but we also contrast the events occurring there with those in the hippocampal formation. Although both SVZ and SGZ neurogenesis are involved in some types of learning, their full functional significance remains unclear. Since both systems offer models of integration of new neuroblasts, there is immense interest in using neural stem cells to replace neurons lost in injury or disease. Though many questions remain unanswered, new insights appear daily about adult neurogenesis, regulatory mechanisms, and the fates of the progeny. We discuss here some of the central features of these advances, as well as speculate on future research directions. PMID:19615423

  6. The Olfactory Factor in Nonverbal Communication.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Riley, Jobie E.

    This paper on the subject of smell in communication provides a brief survey of the subject, pulling together a wide variety of disparate ideas across many disciplines. The paper is comprised of a general introductory section and separate sections on the olfactory nonverbal communication of animals and human beings. The uses to which animals put…

  7. Olfactory Environment Design for Human Spaceflight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welch, C. S.; Holland, F. J.

    2002-01-01

    Smell is usually deemed the least important of the five senses. To contradict this assertion, however, there is no shortage of scientific literature which concludes that olfaction is of very great significance to humans. Odours have been shown to have a variety of effects on humans, and are capable of changing both behaviour and cognitive processing in ways that we are frequently completely unconscious of. Examples of this include alertness, alteration of mood, capacity for ideation and intellectual performance. To date, the design of human spacecraft has concentrated on making their olfactory environments, where possible, `odour neutral' - that is ensuring that all unpleasant and/or offensive odours are removed. Here it suggested that spacecraft (and other extraterrestrial facilities for human inhabitation) might benefit from having their olfactory environments designed to be `odour positive', that is to use odours and olfaction for the positive benefit of their residents. This paper presents a summary of current olfactory research and considers both its positive and negative implications for humans in space. It then discusses `odour positive' design of spacecraft olfactory environments and the possible benefits accruing from this approach before examining its implications for the architecture of spacecraft environmental control systems.

  8. The olfactory experience: constants and cultural variables.

    PubMed

    Candau, J

    2004-01-01

    Odor and olfaction anthropology explores four lines of research which, in many cases, may overlap: the variability of the olfactory perception, olfactory skills and know-how, odor use, and odor representations. My proposal here is to deal with the first one, trying to answer the following question: is olfactory perception a phenomenon resulting solely from the biological organization of the human being, in such a way that it does not know other variations than the ones due to nature? Or, on the contrary, can we show different kinds of olfaction culturally determined or, at least, environmental influences resulting in significant perceptual differences among groups, societies, cultures, etc.? In the first part of the text, I will deal with the invariants (or universals). In the second, I will insist on the cultural types of olfaction. In the third and last part, I will advance the following proposal: beyond the discussion on the roles that nature and culture play in human olfaction, we can sustain that naturally and culturally, there is a way of smelling characteristic of our species. Finally, I will conclude with two examples of the symbolic treatment characteristic of the olfactory human experience.

  9. Nitric oxide synthesis in locust olfactory interneurones

    PubMed

    Elphick; Rayne; Riveros-Moreno; Moncada; Shea

    1995-01-01

    The brain of the locust Schistocerca gregaria contains a nitric oxide synthase (NOS) that has similar properties to mammalian neuronal NOS. It catalyses the production of equimolar quantities of nitric oxide (NO) and citrulline from l-arginine in a Ca2+/calmodulin- and NADPH-dependent manner and is inhibited by the Nomega-nitro and Nomega-monomethyl analogues of l-arginine. In Western blots, an antiserum to the 160 kDa rat cerebellar NOS subunit recognises a locust brain protein with a molecular mass of approximately 135 kDa. NOS is located in several parts of the locust brain, including the mushroom bodies, but it is particularly abundant in the olfactory processing centres, the antennal lobes. Here it is present in two groups of local interneurones (a pair and a cluster of about 50) that project into the neuropile of the antennal lobes. The processes of these neurones terminate in numerous glomerulus-like structures where the synapses between primary olfactory receptor neurones and central interneurones are formed. NOS-containing local interneurones have also been identified in the mammalian olfactory bulb, suggesting that NO performs analogous functions in locust and mammalian olfactory systems. As yet, nothing is known about the role of NO in olfaction, but it seems likely that it is involved in the processing of chemosensory input to the brain. The locust antennal lobe may be an ideal 'simple' system in which this aspect of NO function can be examined.

  10. Resistance to Interference of Olfactory Perceptual Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stevenson, Richard J.; Case, Trevor I.; Tomiczek, Caroline

    2007-01-01

    Olfactory memory is especially persistent. The current study explored whether this applies to a form of perceptual learning, in which experience of an odor mixture results in greater judged similarity between its elements. Experiment 1A contrasted 2 forms of interference procedure, "compound" (mixture AW, followed by presentation of new mixtures…

  11. Olfactory processing: detection of rapid changes.

    PubMed

    Croy, Ilona; Krone, Franziska; Walker, Susannah; Hummel, Thomas

    2015-06-01

    Changes in the olfactory environment have a rather poor chance of being detected. Aim of the present study was to determine, whether the same (cued) or different (uncued) odors can generally be detected at short inter stimulus intervals (ISI) below 2.5 s. Furthermore we investigated, whether inhibition of return, an attentional phenomenon facilitating the detection of new stimuli at longer ISI, is present in the domain of olfaction. Thirteen normosmic people (3 men, 10 women; age range 19-27 years; mean age 23 years) participated. Stimulation was performed using air-dilution olfactometry with 2 odors: phenylethylalcohol and hydrogen disulfide. Reaction time to target stimuli was assessed in cued and uncued conditions at ISIs of 1, 1.5, 2, and 2.5 s. There was a significant main effect of ISI, indicating that odors presented only 1 s apart are missed frequently. Uncued presentation facilitated detection at short ISIs, implying that changes of the olfactory environment are detected better than presentation of the same odor again. Effects in relation to "olfactory inhibition of return," on the other hand, are not supported by our results. This suggests that attention works different for the olfactory system compared with the visual and auditory systems.

  12. Acid sensing by the Drosophila olfactory system.

    PubMed

    Ai, Minrong; Min, Soohong; Grosjean, Yael; Leblanc, Charlotte; Bell, Rati; Benton, Richard; Suh, Greg S B

    2010-12-01

    The odour of acids has a distinct quality that is perceived as sharp, pungent and often irritating. How acidity is sensed and translated into an appropriate behavioural response is poorly understood. Here we describe a functionally segregated population of olfactory sensory neurons in the fruitfly, Drosophila melanogaster, that are highly selective for acidity. These olfactory sensory neurons express IR64a, a member of the recently identified ionotropic receptor (IR) family of putative olfactory receptors. In vivo calcium imaging showed that IR64a+ neurons projecting to the DC4 glomerulus in the antennal lobe are specifically activated by acids. Flies in which the function of IR64a+ neurons or the IR64a gene is disrupted had defects in acid-evoked physiological and behavioural responses, but their responses to non-acidic odorants remained unaffected. Furthermore, artificial stimulation of IR64a+ neurons elicited avoidance responses. Taken together, these results identify cellular and molecular substrates for acid detection in the Drosophila olfactory system and support a labelled-line mode of acidity coding at the periphery. PMID:21085119

  13. Metabolic programming in the immediate postnatal life.

    PubMed

    Patel, Mulchand S; Srinivasan, Malathi

    2011-01-01

    The metabolic programming effects of nutritional modifications in the immediate postnatal life are increasingly recognized to independently contribute to the development of metabolic syndrome in later life. Adjustment of litter size in rodents has been used to induce either under- or overnourishment in the immediate postnatal life of the offspring. While undernourishment led to growth retardation in the offspring, overnourishment produced increased body weight gains, hyperinsulinemia and hyperleptinemia. Overnourishment during the suckling period induced several adaptations in the energy circuitry in the hypothalamus of the offspring predisposing them for the onset of obesity later in life. Another approach for a nutritional modification in the immediate postnatal period is the artificial rearing of newborn rat pups on a high-carbohydrate (HC) milk formula without changes in the total calorie availability. Hyperinsulinemia, immediately evident in the HC pups, persisted in the post-weaning period even after withdrawal of the HC milk. Significant alterations in pancreatic islets supported chronic hyperinsulinemia in the HC rats. Alterations in the gene expression of hypothalamic neuropeptides predisposing to hyperphagia were evident during the period of the HC dietary modification. The persistence of these hypothalamic adaptations supported the obese phenotype in adult HC rats. A transgenerational effect gave rise to the development of chronic hyperinsulinemia and adult-onset obesity in the offspring of the HC female rats. Other studies have shown that lactation by a diabetic, obese or malnourished mother resulted in predisposition for the onset of metabolic disorders in the offspring. These observations from animal studies on the metabolic programming effects due to altered nutritional experiences in the immediate postnatal life strongly suggest that altered feeding practices for infants (formula feeding and early introduction of infant foods) could contribute to

  14. Genetic disorders associated with postnatal microcephaly.

    PubMed

    Seltzer, Laurie E; Paciorkowski, Alex R

    2014-06-01

    Several genetic disorders are characterized by normal head size at birth, followed by deceleration in head growth resulting in postnatal microcephaly. Among these are classic disorders such as Angelman syndrome and MECP2-related disorder (formerly Rett syndrome), as well as more recently described clinical entities associated with mutations in CASK, CDKL5, CREBBP, and EP300 (Rubinstein-Taybi syndrome), FOXG1, SLC9A6 (Christianson syndrome), and TCF4 (Pitt-Hopkins syndrome). These disorders can be identified clinically by phenotyping across multiple neurodevelopmental and neurobehavioral realms, and enough data are available to recognize these postnatal microcephaly disorders as separate diagnostic entities in their own right. A second diagnostic grouping, comprised of Warburg MICRO syndrome, Cockayne syndrome, and Cerebral-oculo-facial skeletal syndrome, share similar features of somatic growth failure, ophthalmologic, and dysmorphologic features. Many postnatal microcephaly syndromes are caused by mutations in genes important in the regulation of gene expression in the developing forebrain and hindbrain, although important synaptic structural genes also play a role. This is an emerging group of disorders with a fascinating combination of brain malformations, specific epilepsies, movement disorders, and other complex neurobehavioral abnormalities. PMID:24839169

  15. Imprinted Rasgrf1 expression in neonatal mice affects olfactory learning and memory

    PubMed Central

    Drake, Nadia M; DeVito, Loren M; Cleland, Thomas A; Soloway, Paul D

    2011-01-01

    Rasgrf1 is genomically imprinted; only the paternally-inherited allele is expressed in the neonatal mouse brain until weaning, at which time expression becomes biallelic. Whereas Rasgrf1 has been implicated in learning and memory via knockout studies in adult mice, the effect of its normal imprinted expression on these phenotypes has not yet been examined. Neonatal mice with experimentally manipulated patterns of imprinted Rasgrf1 expression were assessed on an associative olfactory task. Neonates lacking the normally-expressed wildtype paternal allele exhibited significant impairment in olfactory associative memory. Adult animals in which neonatal imprinting had been manipulated were also behaviorally assessed; while neonatal imprinting significantly affects body weight even into adulthood, no learning and memory phenotype attributable to imprinting was observed in adults. Additional analyses of neonates revealed imprinted Rasgrf1 transcript selective to olfactory bulb even in mice that were null for Rasgrf1 in the rest of the brain, and showed that Rasgrf1 affects Ras and Rac activation in the brain. Taken together, these results indicate that Rasgrf1 expression from the wildtype paternal allele contributes to learning and memory in neonatal mice. PMID:21251221

  16. Neuronal chloride accumulation in olfactory epithelium of mice lacking NKCC1

    PubMed Central

    Nickell, William T.; Kleene, Nancy K.; Gesteland, Robert C.; Kleene, Steven J.

    2005-01-01

    When stimulated with odorants, olfactory receptor neurons (ORNs) produce a depolarizing receptor current. In isolated ORNs, much of this current is due to an efflux of Cl−. This implies that the neurons have one or more mechanisms for accumulating cytoplasmic Cl− at rest. Whether odors activate an efflux of Cl− in intact olfactory epithelium, where the ionic environment is poorly characterized, has not been previously determined. In mouse olfactory epithelium, we find that >80% of the summated electrical response to odors is blocked by niflumic acid or flufenamic acid, each of which inhibits Ca2+-activated Cl− channels in ORNs. This indicates that ORNs accumulate Cl− in situ. Recent evidence has shown that NKCC1, a Na+-K+-2Cl− cotransporter, contributes to Cl− accumulation in mammalian ORNs. However, we find that the epithelial response to odors is only reduced by 39% in mice carrying a null mutation in Nkcc1. As in the wild type, most of the response is blocked by niflumic acid or flufenamic acid, indicating that the underlying current is carried by Cl−. We conclude that ORNs effectively accumulate Cl− in situ even in the absence of NKCC1. The Cl−-transport mechanism underlying this accumulation has not yet been identified. PMID:16319203

  17. Neuronal chloride accumulation in olfactory epithelium of mice lacking NKCC1.

    PubMed

    Nickell, William T; Kleene, Nancy K; Gesteland, Robert C; Kleene, Steven J

    2006-03-01

    When stimulated with odorants, olfactory receptor neurons (ORNs) produce a depolarizing receptor current. In isolated ORNs, much of this current is caused by an efflux of Cl-. This implies that the neurons have one or more mechanisms for accumulating cytoplasmic Cl- at rest. Whether odors activate an efflux of Cl- in intact olfactory epithelium, where the ionic environment is poorly characterized, has not been previously determined. In mouse olfactory epithelium, we found that >80% of the summated electrical response to odors is blocked by niflumic acid or flufenamic acid, each of which inhibits Ca2+-activated Cl- channels in ORNs. This indicates that ORNs accumulate Cl- in situ. Recent evidence has shown that NKCC1, a Na+-K+-2Cl- cotransporter, contributes to Cl- accumulation in mammalian ORNs. However, we find that the epithelial response to odors is only reduced by 39% in mice carrying a null mutation in Nkcc1. As in the wild-type, most of the response is blocked by niflumic acid or flufenamic acid, indicating that the underlying current is carried by Cl-. We conclude that ORNs effectively accumulate Cl- in situ even in the absence of NKCC1. The Cl- -transport mechanism underlying this accumulation has not yet been identified.

  18. Loss of olfactory receptor genes coincides with the acquisition of full trichromatic vision in primates.

    PubMed

    Gilad, Yoav; Wiebe, Victor; Przeworski, Molly; Lancet, Doron; Pääbo, Svante

    2004-01-01

    Olfactory receptor (OR) genes constitute the molecular basis for the sense of smell and are encoded by the largest gene family in mammalian genomes. Previous studies suggested that the proportion of pseudogenes in the OR gene family is significantly larger in humans than in other apes and significantly larger in apes than in the mouse. To investigate the process of degeneration of the olfactory repertoire in primates, we estimated the proportion of OR pseudogenes in 19 primate species by surveying randomly chosen subsets of 100 OR genes from each species. We find that apes, Old World monkeys and one New World monkey, the howler monkey, have a significantly higher proportion of OR pseudogenes than do other New World monkeys or the lemur (a prosimian). Strikingly, the howler monkey is also the only New World monkey to possess full trichromatic vision, along with Old World monkeys and apes. Our findings suggest that the deterioration of the olfactory repertoire occurred concomitant with the acquisition of full trichromatic color vision in primates. PMID:14737185

  19. Proliferative and transcriptional identity of distinct classes of neural precursors in the mammalian olfactory epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Tucker, Eric S.; Lehtinen, Maria K.; Maynard, Tom; Zirlinger, Mariela; Dulac, Catherine; Rawson, Nancy; Pevny, Larysa; LaMantia, Anthony-Samuel

    2010-01-01

    Neural precursors in the developing olfactory epithelium (OE) give rise to three major neuronal classes – olfactory receptor (ORNs), vomeronasal (VRNs) and gonadotropin releasing hormone (GnRH) neurons. Nevertheless, the molecular and proliferative identities of these precursors are largely unknown. We characterized two precursor classes in the olfactory epithelium (OE) shortly after it becomes a distinct tissue at midgestation in the mouse: slowly dividing self-renewing precursors that express Meis1/2 at high levels, and rapidly dividing neurogenic precursors that express high levels of Sox2 and Ascl1. Precursors expressing high levels of Meis genes primarily reside in the lateral OE, whereas precursors expressing high levels of Sox2 and Ascl1 primarily reside in the medial OE. Fgf8 maintains these expression signatures and proliferative identities. Using electroporation in the wild-type embryonic OE in vitro as well as Fgf8, Sox2 and Ascl1 mutant mice in vivo, we found that Sox2 dose and Meis1 – independent of Pbx co-factors – regulate Ascl1 expression and the transition from lateral to medial precursor state. Thus, we have identified proliferative characteristics and a dose-dependent transcriptional network that define distinct OE precursors: medial precursors that are most probably transit amplifying neurogenic progenitors for ORNs, VRNs and GnRH neurons, and lateral precursors that include multi-potent self-renewing OE neural stem cells. PMID:20573694

  20. Distorted Coarse Axon Targeting and Reduced Dendrite Connectivity Underlie Dysosmia after Olfactory Axon Injury

    PubMed Central

    Iwata, Ryo; Fujimoto, Satoshi; Aihara, Shuhei

    2016-01-01

    The glomerular map in the olfactory bulb (OB) is the basis for odor recognition. Once established during development, the glomerular map is stably maintained throughout the life of an animal despite the continuous turnover of olfactory sensory neurons (OSNs). However, traumatic damage to OSN axons in the adult often leads to dysosmia, a qualitative and quantitative change in olfaction in humans. A mouse model of dysosmia has previously indicated that there is an altered glomerular map in the OB after the OSN axon injury; however, the underlying mechanisms that cause the map distortion remain unknown. In this study, we examined how the glomerular map is disturbed and how the odor information processing in the OB is affected in the dysosmia model mice. We found that the anterior–posterior coarse targeting of OSN axons is disrupted after OSN axon injury, while the local axon sorting mechanisms remained. We also found that the connectivity of mitral/tufted cell dendrites is reduced after injury, leading to attenuated odor responses in mitral/tufted cells. These results suggest that existing OSN axons are an essential scaffold for maintaining the integrity of the olfactory circuit, both OSN axons and mitral/tufted cell dendrites, in the adult. PMID:27785463

  1. Olfactory discrimination ability of CD-1 mice for a large array of enantiomers

    PubMed Central

    Laska, Matthias; Shepherd, Gordon M.

    2006-01-01

    With use of a conditioning paradigm, the ability of eight CD-1 mice to distinguish between 15 enantiomeric odor pairs was investigated. The results demonstrate a) that CD-1 mice are capable of discriminating between all odor pairs tested, b) that the enantiomeric odor pairs clearly differed in their degree of discriminability and thus in their perceptual similarity, and c) that pre-training with the rewarded stimuli led to improved initial but not terminal or overall performance. A comparison between the proportion of discriminated enantiomeric odor pairs of the CD-1 mice and those of other species tested in earlier studies on the same discrimination tasks (or on subsets thereof) shows a significant positive correlation between discrimination performance and the number of functional olfactory receptor genes. These findings provide the first evidence of a highly developed ability of CD-1 mice to discriminate between an array of non-pheromonal chiral odorants. Further, they suggest that a species′ olfactory discrimination capabilities for these odorants may be correlated with its number of functional olfactory receptor genes. The data presented here may provide useful information for the interpretation of findings from electrophysiological or imaging studies in the mouse and the elucidation of odor structure-activity relationships. PMID:17045753

  2. Genetic dissection of pheromone processing reveals main olfactory system-mediated social behaviors in mice.

    PubMed

    Matsuo, Tomohiko; Hattori, Tatsuya; Asaba, Akari; Inoue, Naokazu; Kanomata, Nobuhiro; Kikusui, Takefumi; Kobayakawa, Reiko; Kobayakawa, Ko

    2015-01-20

    Most mammals have two major olfactory subsystems: the main olfactory system (MOS) and vomeronasal system (VNS). It is now widely accepted that the range of pheromones that control social behaviors are processed by both the VNS and the MOS. However, the functional contributions of each subsystem in social behavior remain unclear. To genetically dissociate the MOS and VNS functions, we established two conditional knockout mouse lines that led to either loss-of-function in the entire MOS or in the dorsal MOS. Mice with whole-MOS loss-of-function displayed severe defects in active sniffing and poor survival through the neonatal period. In contrast, when loss-of-function was confined to the dorsal MOB, sniffing behavior, pheromone recognition, and VNS activity were maintained. However, defects in a wide spectrum of social behaviors were observed: attraction to female urine and the accompanying ultrasonic vocalizations, chemoinvestigatory preference, aggression, maternal behaviors, and risk-assessment behaviors in response to an alarm pheromone. Functional dissociation of pheromone detection and pheromonal induction of behaviors showed the anterior olfactory nucleus (AON)-regulated social behaviors downstream from the MOS. Lesion analysis and neural activation mapping showed pheromonal activation in multiple amygdaloid and hypothalamic nuclei, important regions for the expression of social behavior, was dependent on MOS and AON functions. Identification of the MOS-AON-mediated pheromone pathway may provide insights into pheromone signaling in animals that do not possess a functional VNS, including humans.

  3. Neuronal chloride accumulation in olfactory epithelium of mice lacking NKCC1.

    PubMed

    Nickell, William T; Kleene, Nancy K; Gesteland, Robert C; Kleene, Steven J

    2006-03-01

    When stimulated with odorants, olfactory receptor neurons (ORNs) produce a depolarizing receptor current. In isolated ORNs, much of this current is caused by an efflux of Cl-. This implies that the neurons have one or more mechanisms for accumulating cytoplasmic Cl- at rest. Whether odors activate an efflux of Cl- in intact olfactory epithelium, where the ionic environment is poorly characterized, has not been previously determined. In mouse olfactory epithelium, we found that >80% of the summated electrical response to odors is blocked by niflumic acid or flufenamic acid, each of which inhibits Ca2+-activated Cl- channels in ORNs. This indicates that ORNs accumulate Cl- in situ. Recent evidence has shown that NKCC1, a Na+-K+-2Cl- cotransporter, contributes to Cl- accumulation in mammalian ORNs. However, we find that the epithelial response to odors is only reduced by 39% in mice carrying a null mutation in Nkcc1. As in the wild-type, most of the response is blocked by niflumic acid or flufenamic acid, indicating that the underlying current is carried by Cl-. We conclude that ORNs effectively accumulate Cl- in situ even in the absence of NKCC1. The Cl- -transport mechanism underlying this accumulation has not yet been identified. PMID:16319203

  4. Olfactory dysfunction in head injured workers.

    PubMed

    Ogawa, T; Rutka, J

    1999-01-01

    Olfactory dysfunction following trauma has been widely reported and is currently compensable according to existing American Medical Association guidelines when it occurs in the occupational setting. Its presence and the risk factors for its development, however, have not been clearly delineated in occupationally head injured workers. In order to assess this phenomenon, a series of 365 consecutive head injured workers from 1993-1997 was assessed in order to determine the incidence of post-traumatic olfactory dysfunction and its association with the severity of the head injury, the mechanism of injury and other neurotological abnormalities in the same cohort group. Olfactory dysfunction was identified in 13.7% (9.3% with anosmia, 4.4% with hyposmia/dysosmia). It was more likely where the loss of consciousness > 1 h (p < 0.002), in more severe head injuries (grades II-V) (p < 0.001) and when skull fracture (p < 0.001) occurred. The direction of the blow applied to the skull did not influence its presence, although radiologically confirmed skull fractures in the frontal, occipital, skull base and midface were twice as likely as temporal and parietal fractures to result in an olfactory change. From a neurotologic perspective, approximately 21.9% of head injured workers were determined to have recognizable evidence of cochleovestibular dysfunction. Olfactory dysfunction as a physical finding post-head injury compares favourably with the presence of post-traumatic benign positional paroxysmal vertigo (BPPV) and its atypical variants in 11.2% of head injured workers. PMID:10445080

  5. The Adult Ventricular-Subventricular Zone (V-SVZ) and Olfactory Bulb (OB) Neurogenesis.

    PubMed

    Lim, Daniel A; Alvarez-Buylla, Arturo

    2016-05-02

    A large population of neural stem/precursor cells (NSCs) persists in the ventricular-subventricular zone (V-SVZ) located in the walls of the lateral brain ventricles. V-SVZ NSCs produce large numbers of neuroblasts that migrate a long distance into the olfactory bulb (OB) where they differentiate into local circuit interneurons. Here, we review a broad range of discoveries that have emerged from studies of postnatal V-SVZ neurogenesis: the identification of NSCs as a subpopulation of astroglial cells, the neurogenic lineage, new mechanisms of neuronal migration, and molecular regulators of precursor cell proliferation and migration. It has also become evident that V-SVZ NSCs are regionally heterogeneous, with NSCs located in different regions of the ventricle wall generating distinct OB interneuron subtypes. Insights into the developmental origins and molecular mechanisms that underlie the regional specification of V-SVZ NSCs have also begun to emerge. Other recent studies have revealed new cell-intrinsic molecular mechanisms that enable lifelong neurogenesis in the V-SVZ. Finally, we discuss intriguing differences between the rodent V-SVZ and the corresponding human brain region. The rapidly expanding cellular and molecular knowledge of V-SVZ NSC biology provides key insights into postnatal neural development, the origin of brain tumors, and may inform the development regenerative therapies from cultured and endogenous human neural precursors.

  6. Cell migration in the normal and pathological postnatal mammalian brain

    PubMed Central

    Canoll, Peter; Goldman, James E.

    2009-01-01

    In the developing brain, cell migration is a crucial process for structural organization, and is therefore highly regulated to allow the correct formation of complex networks, wiring neurons, and glia. In the early postnatal brain, late developmental processes such as the production and migration of astrocyte and oligodendrocyte progenitors still occur. Although the brain is completely formed and structured few weeks after birth, it maintains a degree of plasticity throughout life, including axonal remodeling, synaptogenesis, but also neural cell birth, migration and integration. The subventricular zone (SVZ) and the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus (DG) are the two main neurogenic niches in the adult brain. Neural stem cells reside in these structures and produce progenitors that migrate toward their ultimate location: the olfactory bulb and granular cell layer of the DG respectively. The aim of this review is to synthesize the increasing information concerning the organization, regulation and function of cell migration in a mature brain. In a normal brain, protein involved in cell-cell or cell-matrix interactions together with secreted proteins acting as chemoattractant or chemorepellant play key roles in the regulation of neural progenitor cell migration. In addition, recent data suggest that gliomas arise from the transformation of neural stem cells or progenitor cells and that glioma cell infiltration recapitulates key aspects of glial progenitor migration. Thus, we will consider glioma migration in the context of progenitor migration. Finally, many observations show that brain lesions and neurological diseases trigger neural stem/progenitor cell activation and migration towards altered structures. The factors involved in such cell migration/recruitment are just beginning to be understood. Inflammation which has long been considered as thoroughly disastrous for brain repair is now known to produce some positive effects on stem/progenitor cell recruitment via

  7. Odorant-induced Responses Recorded from Olfactory Receptor Neurons using the Suction Pipette Technique

    PubMed Central

    Matthews, Hugh R.; Reisert, Johannes

    2012-01-01

    Animals sample the odorous environment around them through the chemosensory systems located in the nasal cavity. Chemosensory signals affect complex behaviors such as food choice, predator, conspecific and mate recognition and other socially relevant cues. Olfactory receptor neurons (ORNs) are located in the dorsal part of the nasal cavity embedded in the olfactory epithelium. These bipolar neurons send an axon to the olfactory bulb (see Fig. 1, Reisert & Zhao1, originally published in the Journal of General Physiology) and extend a single dendrite to the epithelial border from where cilia radiate into the mucus that covers the olfactory epithelium. The cilia contain the signal transduction machinery that ultimately leads to excitatory current influx through the ciliary transduction channels, a cyclic nucleotide-gated (CNG) channel and a Ca2+-activated Cl- channel (Fig. 1). The ensuing depolarization triggers action potential generation at the cell body2-4. In this video we describe the use of the "suction pipette technique" to record odorant-induced responses from ORNs. This method was originally developed to record from rod photoreceptors5 and a variant of this method can be found at jove.com modified to record from mouse cone photoreceptors6. The suction pipette technique was later adapted to also record from ORNs7,8. Briefly, following dissociation of the olfactory epithelium and cell isolation, the entire cell body of an ORN is sucked into the tip of a recording pipette. The dendrite and the cilia remain exposed to the bath solution and thus accessible to solution changes to enable e.g. odorant or pharmacological blocker application. In this configuration, no access to the intracellular environment is gained (no whole-cell voltage clamp) and the intracellular voltage remains free to vary. This allows the simultaneous recording of the slow receptor current that originates at the cilia and fast action potentials fired by the cell body9. The difference in

  8. Rapid Feedforward Inhibition and Asynchronous Excitation Regulate Granule Cell Activity in the Mammalian Main Olfactory Bulb

    PubMed Central

    Burton, Shawn D.

    2015-01-01

    Granule cell-mediated inhibition is critical to patterning principal neuron activity in the olfactory bulb, and perturbation of synaptic input to granule cells significantly alters olfactory-guided behavior. Despite the critical role of granule cells in olfaction, little is known about how sensory input recruits granule cells. Here, we combined whole-cell patch-clamp electrophysiology in acute mouse olfactory bulb slices with biophysical multicompartmental modeling to investigate the synaptic basis of granule cell recruitment. Physiological activation of sensory afferents within single glomeruli evoked diverse modes of granule cell activity, including subthreshold depolarization, spikelets, and suprathreshold responses with widely distributed spike latencies. The generation of these diverse activity modes depended, in part, on the asynchronous time course of synaptic excitation onto granule cells, which lasted several hundred milliseconds. In addition to asynchronous excitation, each granule cell also received synchronous feedforward inhibition. This inhibition targeted both proximal somatodendritic and distal apical dendritic domains of granule cells, was reliably recruited across sniff rhythms, and scaled in strength with excitation as more glomeruli were activated. Feedforward inhibition onto granule cells originated from deep short-axon cells, which responded to glomerular activation with highly reliable, short-latency firing consistent with tufted cell-mediated excitation. Simulations showed that feedforward inhibition interacts with asynchronous excitation to broaden granule cell spike latency distributions and significantly attenuates granule cell depolarization within local subcellular compartments. Collectively, our results thus identify feedforward inhibition onto granule cells as a core feature of olfactory bulb circuitry and establish asynchronous excitation and feedforward inhibition as critical regulators of granule cell activity. SIGNIFICANCE

  9. Anatomical specializations for enhanced olfactory sensitivity in kiwi, Apteryx mantelli.

    PubMed

    Corfield, Jeremy R; Eisthen, Heather L; Iwaniuk, Andrew N; Parsons, Stuart

    2014-01-01

    The ability to function in a nocturnal and ground-dwelling niche requires a unique set of sensory specializations. The New Zealand kiwi has shifted away from vision, instead relying on auditory and tactile stimuli to function in its environment and locate prey. Behavioral evidence suggests that kiwi also rely on their sense of smell, using olfactory cues in foraging and possibly also in communication and social interactions. Anatomical studies appear to support these observations: the olfactory bulbs and tubercles have been suggested to be large in the kiwi relative to other birds, although the extent of this enlargement is poorly understood. In this study, we examine the size of the olfactory bulbs in kiwi and compare them with 55 other bird species, including emus, ostriches, rheas, tinamous, and 2 extinct species of moa (Dinornithiformes). We also examine the cytoarchitecture of the olfactory bulbs and olfactory epithelium to determine if any neural specializations beyond size are present that would increase olfactory acuity. Kiwi were a clear outlier in our analysis, with olfactory bulbs that are proportionately larger than those of any other bird in this study. Emus, close relatives of the kiwi, also had a relative enlargement of the olfactory bulbs, possibly supporting a phylogenetic link to well-developed olfaction. The olfactory bulbs in kiwi are almost in direct contact with the olfactory epithelium, which is indeed well developed and complex, with olfactory receptor cells occupying a large percentage of the epithelium. The anatomy of the kiwi olfactory system supports an enhancement for olfactory sensitivities, which is undoubtedly associated with their unique nocturnal niche. PMID:25376305

  10. Anatomical specializations for enhanced olfactory sensitivity in kiwi, Apteryx mantelli.

    PubMed

    Corfield, Jeremy R; Eisthen, Heather L; Iwaniuk, Andrew N; Parsons, Stuart

    2014-01-01

    The ability to function in a nocturnal and ground-dwelling niche requires a unique set of sensory specializations. The New Zealand kiwi has shifted away from vision, instead relying on auditory and tactile stimuli to function in its environment and locate prey. Behavioral evidence suggests that kiwi also rely on their sense of smell, using olfactory cues in foraging and possibly also in communication and social interactions. Anatomical studies appear to support these observations: the olfactory bulbs and tubercles have been suggested to be large in the kiwi relative to other birds, although the extent of this enlargement is poorly understood. In this study, we examine the size of the olfactory bulbs in kiwi and compare them with 55 other bird species, including emus, ostriches, rheas, tinamous, and 2 extinct species of moa (Dinornithiformes). We also examine the cytoarchitecture of the olfactory bulbs and olfactory epithelium to determine if any neural specializations beyond size are present that would increase olfactory acuity. Kiwi were a clear outlier in our analysis, with olfactory bulbs that are proportionately larger than those of any other bird in this study. Emus, close relatives of the kiwi, also had a relative enlargement of the olfactory bulbs, possibly supporting a phylogenetic link to well-developed olfaction. The olfactory bulbs in kiwi are almost in direct contact with the olfactory epithelium, which is indeed well developed and complex, with olfactory receptor cells occupying a large percentage of the epithelium. The anatomy of the kiwi olfactory system supports an enhancement for olfactory sensitivities, which is undoubtedly associated with their unique nocturnal niche.

  11. Cell migration in the postnatal subventricular zone.

    PubMed

    Menezes, J R L; Marins, M; Alves, J A J; Froes, M M; Hedin-Pereira, C

    2002-12-01

    New neurons are constantly added to the olfactory bulb of rodents from birth to adulthood. This accretion is not only dependent on sustained neurogenesis, but also on the migration of neuroblasts and immature neurons from the cortical and striatal subventricular zone (SVZ) to the olfactory bulb. Migration along this long tangential pathway, known as the rostral migratory stream (RMS), is in many ways opposite to the classical radial migration of immature neurons: it is faster, spans a longer distance, does not require radial glial guidance, and is not limited to postmitotic neurons. In recent years many molecules have been found to be expressed specifically in this pathway and to directly affect this migration. Soluble factors with inhibitory, attractive and inductive roles in migration have been described, as well as molecules mediating cell-to-cell and cell-substrate interactions. However, it is still unclear how the various molecules and cells interact to account for the special migratory behavior in the RMS. Here we will propose some candidate mechanisms for roles in initiating and stopping SVZ/RMS migration.

  12. Primary Cilia on Horizontal Basal Cells Regulate Regeneration of the Olfactory Epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Joiner, Ariell M.; Green, Warren W.; McIntyre, Jeremy C.; Allen, Benjamin L.; Schwob, James E.

    2015-01-01

    The olfactory epithelium (OE) is one of the few tissues to undergo constitutive neurogenesis throughout the mammalian lifespan. It is composed of multiple cell types including olfactory sensory neurons (OSNs) that are readily replaced by two populations of basal stem cells, frequently dividing globose basal cells and quiescent horizontal basal cells (HBCs). However, the precise mechanisms by which these cells mediate OE regeneration are unclear. Here, we show for the first time that the HBC subpopulation of basal stem cells uniquely possesses primary cilia that are aligned in an apical orientation in direct apposition to sustentacular cell end feet. The positioning of these cilia suggests that they function in the detection of growth signals and/or differentiation cues. To test this idea, we generated an inducible, cell type-specific Ift88 knock-out mouse line (K5rtTA;tetOCre;Ift88fl/fl) to disrupt cilia formation and maintenance specifically in HBCs. Surprisingly, the loss of HBC cilia did not affect the maintenance of the adult OE but dramatically impaired the regeneration of OSNs following lesion. Furthermore, the loss of cilia during development resulted in a region-specific decrease in neurogenesis, implicating HBCs in the establishment of the OE. Together, these results suggest a novel role for primary cilia in HBC activation, proliferation, and differentiation. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT We show for the first time the presence of primary cilia on a quiescent population of basal stem cells, the horizontal basal cells (HBCs), in the olfactory epithelium (OE). Importantly, our data demonstrate that cilia on HBCs are necessary for regeneration of the OE following injury. Moreover, the disruption of HBC cilia alters neurogenesis during the development of the OE, providing evidence that HBCs participate in the establishment of this tissue. These data suggest that the mechanisms of penetrance for ciliopathies in the OE extend beyond that of defects in olfactory sensory

  13. Burkholderia pseudomallei penetrates the brain via destruction of the olfactory and trigeminal nerves: implications for the pathogenesis of neurological melioidosis.

    PubMed

    St John, James A; Ekberg, Jenny A K; Dando, Samantha J; Meedeniya, Adrian C B; Horton, Rachel E; Batzloff, Michael; Owen, Suzzanne J; Holt, Stephanie; Peak, Ian R; Ulett, Glen C; Mackay-Sim, Alan; Beacham, Ifor R

    2014-04-15

    we have investigated the ability of the bacteria to migrate along nerves that innervate the nasal cavity and enter the frontal region of the brain by using a mouse model of infection. By generating a mutant strain of B. pseudomallei which is unable to survive in the blood, we show that the bacteria rapidly penetrate the cranial cavity using the olfactory (smell) nerve and the trigeminal (sensory) nerve that line the nasal cavity.

  14. Spatial and Age-Dependent Hair Cell Generation in the Postnatal Mammalian Utricle.

    PubMed

    Gao, Zhen; Kelly, Michael C; Yu, Dehong; Wu, Hao; Lin, Xi; Chi, Fang-lu; Chen, Ping

    2016-04-01

    Loss of vestibular hair cells is a common cause of balance disorders. Current treatment options for bilateral vestibular dysfunction are limited. During development, atonal homolog 1 (Atoh1) is sufficient and necessary for the formation of hair cells and provides a promising gene target to induce hair cell generation in the mammals. In this study, we used a transgenic mouse line to test the age and cell type specificity of hair cell induction in the postnatal utricle in mice. We found that forced Atoh1 expression in vivo can induce hair cell formation in the utricle from postnatal days 1 to 21, while the efficacy of hair cell induction is progressively reduced as the animals become older. In the utricle, the induction of hair cells occurs both within the sensory region and in cells in the transitional epithelium next to the sensory region. Within the sensory epithelium, the central region, known as the striola, is most subjective to the induction of hair cell formation. Furthermore, forced Atoh1 expression can promote proliferation in an age-dependent manner that mirrors the progressively reduced efficacy of hair cell induction in the postnatal utricle. These results suggest that targeting both cell proliferation and Atoh1 in the utricle striolar region may be explored to induce hair cell regeneration in mammals. The study also demonstrates the usefulness of the animal model that provides an in vivo Atoh1 induction model for vestibular regeneration studies.

  15. Pericytes in the myovascular niche promote post-natal myofiber growth and satellite cell quiescence.

    PubMed

    Kostallari, Enis; Baba-Amer, Yasmine; Alonso-Martin, Sonia; Ngoh, Pamela; Relaix, Frederic; Lafuste, Peggy; Gherardi, Romain K

    2015-04-01

    The satellite cells, which serve as adult muscle stem cells, are both located beneath myofiber basement membranes and closely associated with capillary endothelial cells. We observed that 90% of capillaries were associated with pericytes in adult mouse and human muscle. During post-natal growth, newly formed vessels with their neuroglial 2 proteoglycan (NG2)-positive pericytes became progressively associated with the post-natal muscle stem cells, as myofibers increased in size and satellite cells entered into quiescence. In vitro, human muscle-derived pericytes promoted myogenic cell differentiation through insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF1) and myogenic cell quiescence through angiopoietin 1 (ANGPT1). Diphtheria toxin-induced ablation of muscle pericytes in growing mice led both to myofiber hypotrophy and to impaired establishment of stem cells quiescence. Similar effects were observed following conditional in vivo deletion of pericyte Igf1 and Angpt1 genes, respectively. Our data therefore demonstrate that, by promoting post-natal myogenesis and stem cell quiescence, pericytes play a key role in the microvascular niche of satellite cells.

  16. Disentangling prenatal and postnatal maternal genetic effects reveals persistent prenatal effects on offspring growth in mice.

    PubMed

    Wolf, Jason B; Leamy, Larry J; Roseman, Charles C; Cheverud, James M

    2011-11-01

    Mothers are often the most important determinant of traits expressed by their offspring. These "maternal effects" (MEs) are especially crucial in early development, but can also persist into adulthood. They have been shown to play a role in a diversity of evolutionary and ecological processes, especially when genetically based. Although the importance of MEs is becoming widely appreciated, we know little about their underlying genetic basis. We address the dearth of genetic data by providing a simple approach, using combined genotype information from parents and offspring, to identify "maternal genetic effects" (MGEs) contributing to natural variation in complex traits. Combined with experimental cross-fostering, our approach also allows for the separation of pre- and postnatal MGEs, providing rare insights into prenatal effects. Applying this approach to an experimental mouse population, we identified 13 ME loci affecting body weight, most of which (12/13) exhibited prenatal effects, and nearly half (6/13) exhibiting postnatal effects. MGEs contributed more to variation in body weight than the direct effects of the offsprings' own genotypes until mice reached adulthood, but continued to represent a major component of variation through adulthood. Prenatal effects always contributed more variation than postnatal effects, especially for those effects that persisted into adulthood. These results suggest that MGEs may be an important component of genetic architecture that is generally overlooked in studies focused on direct mapping from genotype to phenotype. Our approach can be used in both experimental and natural populations, providing a widely practicable means of expanding our understanding of MGEs.

  17. Postnatal behavioral and inflammatory alterations in female pups prenatally exposed to valproic acid.

    PubMed

    Kazlauskas, Nadia; Campolongo, Marcos; Lucchina, Luciana; Zappala, Cecilia; Depino, Amaicha Mara

    2016-10-01

    In Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD), a bias to a higher incidence in boys than in girls has been reported. With the aim to identify biological mechanisms acting in female animals that could underlie this bias, we used an extensively validated mouse model of ASD: the prenatal exposure to valproic acid (VPA). We found postnatal behavioral alterations in female VPA pups: a longer latency in righting reflex at postnatal day (P) 3, and a delay in the acquisition of the acoustic startle response. We also analyzed the density of glial cells in the prefrontal cortex, hippocampus and cerebellum, in VPA and control animals. Female VPA pups showed alterations in the density of astrocytes and microglial cells between P21 and P42, with specific dynamics in each brain region. We also found a decrease in histone 3 acetylation in the cerebellum of female VPA pups at P14, suggesting that the changes in glial cell density could be due to alterations in the epigenetic developmental program. Finally, no differences in maternal behavior were found. Our results show that female VPA pups exhibit behavioral and inflammatory alterations postnatally, although they have been reported to have normal levels of sociability in adulthood. With our work, we contribute to the understanding of biological mechanisms underlying different effects of VPA on male and female rodents, and we hope to help elucidate whether there are factors increasing susceptibility to ASD in boys and/or resilience in girls.

  18. Differential Muscarinic Modulation in the Olfactory Bulb

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Richard S.; Hu, Ruilong; DeSouza, Andre; Eberly, Christian L.; Krahe, Krista; Chan, Wilson

    2015-01-01

    Neuromodulation of olfactory circuits by acetylcholine (ACh) plays an important role in odor discrimination and learning. Early processing of chemosensory signals occurs in two functionally and anatomically distinct regions, the main and accessory olfactory bulbs (MOB and AOB), which receive extensive cholinergic input from the basal forebrain. Here, we explore the regulation of AOB and MOB circuits by ACh, and how cholinergic modulation influences olfactory-mediated behaviors in mice. Surprisingly, despite the presence of a conserved circuit, activation of muscarinic ACh receptors revealed marked differences in cholinergic modulation of output neurons: excitation in the AOB and inhibition in the MOB. Granule cells (GCs), the most abundant intrinsic neuron in the OB, also exhibited a complex muscarinic response. While GCs in the AOB were excited, MOB GCs exhibited a dual muscarinic action in the form of a hyperpolarization and an increase in excitability uncovered by cell depolarization. Furthermore, ACh influenced the input–output relationship of mitral cells in the AOB and MOB differently showing a net effect on gain in mitral cells of the MOB, but not in the AOB. Interestingly, despite the striking differences in neuromodulatory actions on output neurons, chemogenetic inhibition of cholinergic neurons produced similar perturbations in olfactory behaviors mediated by these two regions. Decreasing ACh in the OB disrupted the natural discrimination of molecularly related odors and the natural investigation of odors associated with social behaviors. Thus, the distinct neuromodulation by ACh in these circuits could underlie different solutions to the processing of general odors and semiochemicals, and the diverse olfactory behaviors they trigger. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT State-dependent cholinergic modulation of brain circuits is critical for several high-level cognitive functions, including attention and memory. Here, we provide new evidence that cholinergic

  19. Response Patterns of Single Neurons in the Tortoise Olfactory Epithelium and Olfactory Bulb

    PubMed Central

    Mathews, Donald F.

    1972-01-01

    The responses to odor stimulation of 40 single units in the olfactory mucosa and of 18 units in the olfactory bulb of the tortoise (Gopherus polyphemus) were recorded with indium-filled, Pt-black-tipped microelectrodes. The test battery consisted of 27 odorants which were proved effective by recording from small bundles of olfactory nerve. Two concentrations of each odorant were employed. These values were adjusted for response magnitudes equal to those for amyl acetate at –2.5 and –3.5 log concentration in olfactory twig recording. Varying concentrations were generated by an injection-type olfactometer. The mucosal responses were exclusively facilitory with a peak frequency of 16 impulses/sec. 19 mucosal units responded to at least one odorant and each unit was sensitive to a limited number of odorants (1–15). The sensitivity pattern of each unit was highly individual, with no clear-cut types, either chemical or qualitative, emerging. Of the 18 olfactory bulb units sampled, all responded to at least one odorant. The maximum frequency observed during a response was 39 impulses/sec. The bulbar neurons can be classified into two types. There are neurons that respond exclusively with facilitation and others that respond with facilitation to some odorants and with inhibition to others. Qualitatively or chemically similar odorants did not generate similar patterns across bulbar units. PMID:5049077

  20. Neural correlates of taste perception in congenital olfactory impairment.

    PubMed

    Gagnon, Léa; Vestergaard, Martin; Madsen, Kristoffer; Karstensen, Helena G; Siebner, Hartwig; Tommerup, Niels; Kupers, Ron; Ptito, Maurice

    2014-09-01

    Olfaction and gustation contribute both to the appreciation of food flavours. Although acquired loss of smell has profound consequences on the pleasure of eating, food habits and body weight, less is known about the impact of congenital olfactory impairment on gustatory processing. Here we examined taste identification accuracy and its neural correlates using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) in 12 congenitally olfactory impaired individuals and 8 normosmic controls. Results showed that taste identification was worse in congenitally olfactory impaired compared to control subjects. The fMRI results demonstrated that olfactory impaired individuals had reduced activation in medial orbitofrontal cortex (mOFC) relative to normosmic subjects while tasting. In addition, olfactory performance as measured with the Sniffin' Sticks correlated positively with taste-induced blood-oxygen-level dependent (BOLD) signal increases in bilateral mOFC and anterior insula. Our data provide a neurological underpinning for the reduced taste perception in congenitally olfactory impaired individuals.

  1. Prenatal immunotoxicant exposure and postnatal autoimmune disease.

    PubMed Central

    Holladay, S D

    1999-01-01

    Reports in humans and rodents indicate that immune development may be altered following perinatal exposure to immunotoxic compounds, including chemotherapeutics, corticosteroids, polycyclic hydrocarbons, and polyhalogenated hydrocarbons. Effects from such exposure may be more dramatic or persistent than following exposure during adult life. For example, prenatal exposure to the insecticide chlordane or to the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon benzo[(italic)a(/italic)]pyrene produces what appears to be lifelong immunosuppression in mice. Whether prenatal immunotoxicant exposure may predispose the organism to postnatal autoimmune disease remains largely unknown. In this regard, the therapeutic immunosuppressant cyclosporin A (CsA) crosses the placenta poorly. However, lethally irradiated rodents exposed to CsA postsyngeneic bone marrow transplant (i.e., during re-establishment of the immune system) develop T-cell-mediated autoimmune disease, suggesting this drug may produce a fundamental disruption in development of self-tolerance by T cells. The environmental contaminant 2,3,7, 8-tetrachlorodibenzo-(italic)p(/italic)-dioxin (TCDD) crosses the placenta and produces fetal thymic effects (italic)in vivo(/italic) similar to effects of CsA in fetal thymic organ culture, including inhibited thymocyte maturation and reduced expression of thymic major histocompatability complex class II molecules. These observations led to the suggestion that gestational exposure to TCDD may interfere with normal development of self-tolerance. Possibly supporting this hypothesis, when mice predisposed to development of autoimmune disease were treated with TCDD during gestation, postnatal autoimmunity was exacerbated. Similar results have been reported for mice exposed to diethylstilbestrol during development. These reports suggest that prenatal exposure to certain immunotoxicants may play a role in postnatal expression of autoimmunity. PMID:10502532

  2. Postnatal Evaluation and Outcome of Prenatal Hydronephrosis

    PubMed Central

    Sadeghi-Bojd, Simin; Kajbafzadeh, Abdol-Mohammad; Ansari-Moghadam, Alireza; Rashidi, Somaye

    2016-01-01

    Background: Prenatal hydronephrosis (PNH) is dilation in urinary collecting system and is the most frequent neonatal urinary tract abnormality with an incidence of 1% to 5% of all pregnancies. PNH is defined as anteroposterior diameter (APD) of renal pelvis ≥ 4 mm at gestational age (GA) of < 33 weeks and APD ≥ 7 mm at GA of ≥ 33 weeks to 2 months after birth. All patients need to be evaluated after birth by postnatal renal ultrasonography (US). In the vast majority of cases, watchful waiting is the only thing to do; others need medical or surgical therapy. Objectives: There is a direct relationship between APD of renal pelvis and outcome of PNH. Therefore we were to find the best cutoff point APD of renal pelvis which leads to surgical outcome. Patients and Methods: In this retrospective cohort study we followed 200 patients 1 to 60 days old with diagnosis of PNH based on before or after birth ultrasonography; as a prenatal or postnatal detected, respectively. These patients were referred to the nephrology clinic in Zahedan Iran during 2011 to 2013. The first step of investigation was a postnatal renal US, by the same expert radiologist and classifying the patients into 3 groups; normal, mild/moderate and severe. The second step was to perform voiding cystourethrogram (VCUG) for mild/moderate to severe cases at 4 - 6 weeks of life. Tc-diethylene triamine-pentaacetic acid (DTPA) was the last step and for those with normal VCUG who did not show improvement in follow-up examination, US to evaluate obstruction and renal function. Finally all patients with mild/moderate to severe PNH received conservative therapy and surgery was preserved only for progressive cases, obstruction or renal function ≤35%. All patients’ data and radiologic information was recorded in separate data forms, and then analyzed by SPSS (version 22). Results: 200 screened PNH patients with male to female ratio 3.5:1 underwent first postnatal control US, of whom 65% had normal, 18% mild

  3. Innovation:CBT-based support groups for postnatal depression.

    PubMed

    Alexander, Pat

    Postnatal depression can have serious implications for mother/child bonding and damage relationships between parents. Approaches to treat it need to overcome barriers that have led to high attrition in some group or clinic-based postnatal depression treatment studies. This retrospective evaluation explored the benefits of offering postnatally depressed mothers group support based on cognitive behavioural therapy. It helped to improve women's self-esteem and self-worth and to make them feel safe and supported.

  4. Mirror sniffing: humans mimic olfactory sampling behavior.

    PubMed

    Arzi, Anat; Shedlesky, Limor; Secundo, Lavi; Sobel, Noam

    2014-05-01

    Ample evidence suggests that social chemosignaling plays a significant role in human behavior. Processing of odors and chemosignals depends on sniffing. Given this, we hypothesized that humans may have evolved an automatic mechanism driving sniffs in response to conspecific sniffing. To test this, we measured sniffing behavior of human subjects watching the movie Perfume, which contains many olfactory sniffing events. Despite the total absence of odor, observers sniffed when characters in the movie sniffed. Moreover, this effect was most pronounced in scenes where subjects heard the sniff but did not see the sniffed-at object. We liken this response to the orienting towards conspecific gaze in vision and argue that its robustness further highlights the significance of olfactory information processing in human behavior.

  5. Mirror sniffing: humans mimic olfactory sampling behavior.

    PubMed

    Arzi, Anat; Shedlesky, Limor; Secundo, Lavi; Sobel, Noam

    2014-05-01

    Ample evidence suggests that social chemosignaling plays a significant role in human behavior. Processing of odors and chemosignals depends on sniffing. Given this, we hypothesized that humans may have evolved an automatic mechanism driving sniffs in response to conspecific sniffing. To test this, we measured sniffing behavior of human subjects watching the movie Perfume, which contains many olfactory sniffing events. Despite the total absence of odor, observers sniffed when characters in the movie sniffed. Moreover, this effect was most pronounced in scenes where subjects heard the sniff but did not see the sniffed-at object. We liken this response to the orienting towards conspecific gaze in vision and argue that its robustness further highlights the significance of olfactory information processing in human behavior. PMID:24457159

  6. Olfactory Orientation and Navigation in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Jacobs, Lucia F.; Arter, Jennifer; Cook, Amy; Sulloway, Frank J.

    2015-01-01

    Although predicted by theory, there is no direct evidence that an animal can define an arbitrary location in space as a coordinate location on an odor grid. Here we show that humans can do so. Using a spatial match-to-sample procedure, humans were led to a random location within a room diffused with two odors. After brief sampling and spatial disorientation, they had to return to this location. Over three conditions, participants had access to different sensory stimuli: olfactory only, visual only, and a final control condition with no olfactory, visual, or auditory stimuli. Humans located the target with higher accuracy in the olfaction-only condition than in the control condition and showed higher accuracy than chance. Thus a mechanism long proposed for the homing pigeon, the ability to define a location on a map constructed from chemical stimuli, may also be a navigational mechanism used by humans. PMID:26083337

  7. Olfactory signal coding in an odor background.

    PubMed

    Renou, Michel; Party, Virginie; Rouyar, Angéla; Anton, Sylvia

    2015-10-01

    Insects communicating with pheromones are confronted with an olfactory environment featuring a diversity of volatile organic compounds from plant origin. These volatiles constitute a rich and fluctuant background from which the information carried by the pheromone signal must be extracted. Thus, the pheromone receptor neurons must encode into spike trains the quality, intensity and temporal characteristics of the signal that are determinant to the recognition and localization of a conspecific female. We recorded and analyzed the responses of the pheromone olfactory receptor neurons of male moths to sex pheromone in different odor background conditions. We show that in spite of the narrow chemical tuning of the pheromone receptor neurons, the sensory input can be altered by odorant background. PMID:26116090

  8. Odors Discrimination by Olfactory Epithelium Biosensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Qingjun; Hu, Ning; Ye, Weiwei; Zhang, Fenni; Wang, Hua; Wang, Ping

    2011-09-01

    Humans are exploring the bionic biological olfaction to sense the various trace components of gas or liquid in many fields. For achieving the goal, we endeavor to establish a bioelectronic nose system for odor detection by combining intact bioactive function units with sensors. The bioelectronic nose is based on the olfactory epithelium of rat and microelectrode array (MEA). The olfactory epithelium biosensor generates extracellular potentials in presence of odor, and presents obvious specificity under different odors condition. The odor response signals can be distinguished with each other effectively by signal sorting. On basis of bioactive MEA hybrid system and the improved signal processing analysis, the bioelectronic nose will realize odor discrimination by the specific feature of signals response to various odors.

  9. Topographical representation of odor hedonics in the olfactory bulb.

    PubMed

    Kermen, Florence; Midroit, Maëllie; Kuczewski, Nicola; Forest, Jérémy; Thévenet, Marc; Sacquet, Joëlle; Benetollo, Claire; Richard, Marion; Didier, Anne; Mandairon, Nathalie

    2016-07-01

    Hedonic value is a dominant aspect of olfactory perception. Using optogenetic manipulation in freely behaving mice paired with immediate early gene mapping, we demonstrate that hedonic information is represented along the antero-posterior axis of the ventral olfactory bulb. Using this representation, we show that the degree of attractiveness of odors can be bidirectionally modulated by local manipulation of the olfactory bulb's neural networks in freely behaving mice. PMID:27273767

  10. Ex vivo preparations of the intact vomeronasal organ and accessory olfactory bulb.

    PubMed

    Doyle, Wayne I; Hammen, Gary F; Meeks, Julian P

    2014-01-01

    The mouse accessory olfactory system (AOS) is a specialized sensory pathway for detecting nonvolatile social odors, pheromones, and kairomones. The first neural circuit in the AOS pathway, called the accessory olfactory bulb (AOB), plays an important role in establishing sex-typical behaviors such as territorial aggression and mating. This small (<1 mm(3)) circuit possesses the capacity to distinguish unique behavioral states, such as sex, strain, and stress from chemosensory cues in the secretions and excretions of conspecifics. While the compact organization of this system presents unique opportunities for recording from large portions of the circuit simultaneously, investigation of sensory processing in the AOB remains challenging, largely due to its experimentally disadvantageous location in the brain. Here, we demonstrate a multi-stage dissection that removes the intact AOB inside a single hemisphere of the anterior mouse skull, leaving connections to both the peripheral vomeronasal sensory neurons (VSNs) and local neuronal circuitry intact. The procedure exposes the AOB surface to direct visual inspection, facilitating electrophysiological and optical recordings from AOB circuit elements in the absence of anesthetics. Upon inserting a thin cannula into the vomeronasal organ (VNO), which houses the VSNs, one can directly expose the periphery to social odors and pheromones while recording downstream activity in the AOB. This procedure enables controlled inquiries into AOS information processing, which can shed light on mechanisms linking pheromone exposure to changes in behavior.

  11. Viral infection and dissemination through the olfactory pathway and the limbic system by Theiler's virus.

    PubMed

    Wada, Y; Fujinami, R S

    1993-07-01

    Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus (TMEV) infection of mice can produce a biphasic disease of the central nervous system (CNS). Most susceptible strains of mice survive the acute infection and develop a chronic demyelinating disease. In this report, we analyzed the routes of spread of TMEV within the CNS of nude mice and target sites eventually infected in the CNS. Compared to the immunocompetent mouse, in which an antiviral immune response is mounted but virus persists, the nude mouse develops a severe encephalomyelitis due to the lack of functional T lymphocytes and provides a useful model for the study of viral dissemination. We demonstrated, by immunohistochemistry, the presence of viral antigen in defined regions of the CNS, corresponding to various structures of the limbic system. In addition, we found a different time course for viral spread using two different sites of intracerebral inoculation, ie, via the olfactory bulb or the cortex. Limbic structures were rapidly infected following olfactory bulb infection and then showed a decrease in viral load, presumably due to loss of target neurons. Using either route of infection, the virus was able to disseminate to similar regions. These results indicate that limbic structures and their connections are very important for the spread of TMEV in the brain. In the spinal cord, not only neuronal but hematogenous pathways were suspected to be involved in the dissemination of Theiler's virus.

  12. Viral infection and dissemination through the olfactory pathway and the limbic system by Theiler's virus.

    PubMed Central

    Wada, Y.; Fujinami, R. S.

    1993-01-01

    Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus (TMEV) infection of mice can produce a biphasic disease of the central nervous system (CNS). Most susceptible strains of mice survive the acute infection and develop a chronic demyelinating disease. In this report, we analyzed the routes of spread of TMEV within the CNS of nude mice and target sites eventually infected in the CNS. Compared to the immunocompetent mouse, in which an antiviral immune response is mounted but virus persists, the nude mouse develops a severe encephalomyelitis due to the lack of functional T lymphocytes and provides a useful model for the study of viral dissemination. We demonstrated, by immunohistochemistry, the presence of viral antigen in defined regions of the CNS, corresponding to various structures of the limbic system. In addition, we found a different time course for viral spread using two different sites of intracerebral inoculation, ie, via the olfactory bulb or the cortex. Limbic structures were rapidly infected following olfactory bulb infection and then showed a decrease in viral load, presumably due to loss of target neurons. Using either route of infection, the virus was able to disseminate to similar regions. These results indicate that limbic structures and their connections are very important for the spread of TMEV in the brain. In the spinal cord, not only neuronal but hematogenous pathways were suspected to be involved in the dissemination of Theiler's virus. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:8317548

  13. Ex vivo preparations of the intact vomeronasal organ and accessory olfactory bulb.

    PubMed

    Doyle, Wayne I; Hammen, Gary F; Meeks, Julian P

    2014-01-01

    The mouse accessory olfactory system (AOS) is a specialized sensory pathway for detecting nonvolatile social odors, pheromones, and kairomones. The first neural circuit in the AOS pathway, called the accessory olfactory bulb (AOB), plays an important role in establishing sex-typical behaviors such as territorial aggression and mating. This small (<1 mm(3)) circuit possesses the capacity to distinguish unique behavioral states, such as sex, strain, and stress from chemosensory cues in the secretions and excretions of conspecifics. While the compact organization of this system presents unique opportunities for recording from large portions of the circuit simultaneously, investigation of sensory processing in the AOB remains challenging, largely due to its experimentally disadvantageous location in the brain. Here, we demonstrate a multi-stage dissection that removes the intact AOB inside a single hemisphere of the anterior mouse skull, leaving connections to both the peripheral vomeronasal sensory neurons (VSNs) and local neuronal circuitry intact. The procedure exposes the AOB surface to direct visual inspection, facilitating electrophysiological and optical recordings from AOB circuit elements in the absence of anesthetics. Upon inserting a thin cannula into the vomeronasal organ (VNO), which houses the VSNs, one can directly expose the periphery to social odors and pheromones while recording downstream activity in the AOB. This procedure enables controlled inquiries into AOS information processing, which can shed light on mechanisms linking pheromone exposure to changes in behavior. PMID:25145699

  14. Ex Vivo Preparations of the Intact Vomeronasal Organ and Accessory Olfactory Bulb

    PubMed Central

    Doyle, Wayne I.; Hammen, Gary F.; Meeks, Julian P.

    2014-01-01

    The mouse accessory olfactory system (AOS) is a specialized sensory pathway for detecting nonvolatile social odors, pheromones, and kairomones. The first neural circuit in the AOS pathway, called the accessory olfactory bulb (AOB), plays an important role in establishing sex-typical behaviors such as territorial aggression and mating. This small (<1 mm3) circuit possesses the capacity to distinguish unique behavioral states, such as sex, strain, and stress from chemosensory cues in the secretions and excretions of conspecifics. While the compact organization of this system presents unique opportunities for recording from large portions of the circuit simultaneously, investigation of sensory processing in the AOB remains challenging, largely due to its experimentally disadvantageous location in the brain. Here, we demonstrate a multi-stage dissection that removes the intact AOB inside a single hemisphere of the anterior mouse skull, leaving connections to both the peripheral vomeronasal sensory neurons (VSNs) and local neuronal circuitry intact. The procedure exposes the AOB surface to direct visual inspection, facilitating electrophysiological and optical recordings from AOB circuit elements in the absence of anesthetics. Upon inserting a thin cannula into the vomeronasal organ (VNO), which houses the VSNs, one can directly expose the periphery to social odors and pheromones while recording downstream activity in the AOB. This procedure enables controlled inquiries into AOS information processing, which can shed light on mechanisms linking pheromone exposure to changes in behavior. PMID:25145699

  15. Olfactory Stimuli Increase Presence in Virtual Environments

    PubMed Central

    Munyan, Benson G.; Neer, Sandra M.; Beidel, Deborah C.; Jentsch, Florian

    2016-01-01

    Background Exposure therapy (EXP) is the most empirically supported treatment for anxiety and trauma-related disorders. EXP consists of repeated exposure to a feared object or situation in the absence of the feared outcome in order to extinguish associated anxiety. Key to the success of EXP is the need to present the feared object/event/situation in as much detail and utilizing as many sensory modalities as possible, in order to augment the sense of presence during exposure sessions. Various technologies used to augment the exposure therapy process by presenting multi-sensory cues (e.g., sights, smells, sounds). Studies have shown that scents can elicit emotionally charged memories, but no prior research has examined the effect of olfactory stimuli upon the patient’s sense of presence during simulated exposure tasks. Methods 60 adult participants navigated a mildly anxiety-producing virtual environment (VE) similar to those used in the treatment of anxiety disorders. Participants had no autobiographical memory associated with the VE. State anxiety, Presence ratings, and electrodermal (EDA) activity were collected throughout the experiment. Results Utilizing a Bonferroni corrected Linear Mixed Model, our results showed statistically significant relationships between olfactory stimuli and presence as assessed by both the Igroup Presence Questionnaire (IPQ: R2 = 0.85, (F(3,52) = 6.625, p = 0.0007) and a single item visual-analogue scale (R2 = 0.85, (F(3,52) = 5.382, p = 0.0027). State anxiety was unaffected by the presence or absence of olfactory cues. EDA was unaffected by experimental condition. Conclusion Olfactory stimuli increase presence in virtual environments that approximate those typical in exposure therapy, but did not increase EDA. Additionally, once administered, the removal of scents resulted in a disproportionate decrease in presence. Implications for incorporating the use of scents to increase the efficacy of exposure therapy is discussed. PMID

  16. Epileptic activity during early postnatal life in the AY-9944 model of atypical absence epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Jung, Seungmoon; Jeong, Yong; Jeon, Daejong

    2015-05-01

    Atypical absence epilepsy (AAE) is an intractable disorder characterized by slow spike-and-wave discharges in electroencephalograms (EEGs) and accompanied by severe cognitive dysfunction and neurodevelopmental or neurological deficits in humans. Administration of the cholesterol biosynthesis inhibitor AY-9944 (AY) during the postnatal developmental period induces AAE in animals; however, the neural mechanism of seizure development remains largely unknown. In this study, we characterized the cellular manifestations of AY-induced AAE in the mouse. Treatment of brain slices with AY increased membrane excitability of hippocampal CA1 neurons. AY treatment also increased input resistance of CA1 neurons during early postnatal days (PND) 5-10. However, these effects were not observed during late PND (14-21) or in adulthood (7-10 weeks). Notably, AY treatment elicited paroxysmal depolarizing shift (PDS)-like epileptiform discharges during the early postnatal period, but not during late PND or in adults. The PDS-like events were not compromised by application of glutamate or GABA receptor antagonists. However, the PDS-like events were abolished by blockage of voltage-gated Na(+) channels. Hippocampal neurons isolated from an in vivo AY model of AAE showed similar PDS-like epileptiform discharges. Further, AY-treated neurons from T-type Ca(2+) channel α1G knockout (Cav3.1(-/-)) mice, which do not exhibit typical absence seizures, showed similar PDS-like epileptiform discharges. These results demonstrate that PDS-like epileptiform discharges during the early postnatal period are dependent upon Na(+) channels and are involved in the generation of AY-induced AAE, which is distinct from typical absence epilepsy. Our findings may aid our understanding of the pathophysiological mechanisms of clinical AAE in individuals, such as those with Lennox-Gastaut syndrome. PMID:25890840

  17. Neurally Encoding Time for Olfactory Navigation

    PubMed Central

    Park, In Jun; Hein, Andrew M.; Bobkov, Yuriy V.; Reidenbach, Matthew A.; Ache, Barry W.; Principe, Jose C.

    2016-01-01

    Accurately encoding time is one of the fundamental challenges faced by the nervous system in mediating behavior. We recently reported that some animals have a specialized population of rhythmically active neurons in their olfactory organs with the potential to peripherally encode temporal information about odor encounters. If these neurons do indeed encode the timing of odor arrivals, it should be possible to demonstrate that this capacity has some functional significance. Here we show how this sensory input can profoundly influence an animal’s ability to locate the source of odor cues in realistic turbulent environments—a common task faced by species that rely on olfactory cues for navigation. Using detailed data from a turbulent plume created in the laboratory, we reconstruct the spatiotemporal behavior of a real odor field. We use recurrence theory to show that information about position relative to the source of the odor plume is embedded in the timing between odor pulses. Then, using a parameterized computational model, we show how an animal can use populations of rhythmically active neurons to capture and encode this temporal information in real time, and use it to efficiently navigate to an odor source. Our results demonstrate that the capacity to accurately encode temporal information about sensory cues may be crucial for efficient olfactory navigation. More generally, our results suggest a mechanism for extracting and encoding temporal information from the sensory environment that could have broad utility for neural information processing. PMID:26730727

  18. Functional neuroanatomy of Drosophila olfactory memory formation

    PubMed Central

    Guven-Ozkan, Tugba

    2014-01-01

    New approaches, techniques and tools invented over the last decade and a half have revolutionized the functional dissection of neural circuitry underlying Drosophila learning. The new methodologies have been used aggressively by researchers attempting to answer three critical questions about olfactory memories formed with appetitive and aversive reinforcers: (1) Which neurons within the olfactory nervous system mediate the acquisition of memory? (2) What is the complete neural circuitry extending from the site(s) of acquisition to the site(s) controlling memory expression? (3) How is information processed across this circuit to consolidate early-forming, disruptable memories to stable, late memories? Much progress has been made and a few strong conclusions have emerged: (1) Acquisition occurs at multiple sites within the olfactory nervous system but is mediated predominantly by the γ mushroom body neurons. (2) The expression of long-term memory is completely dependent on the synaptic output of α/β mushroom body neurons. (3) Consolidation occurs, in part, through circuit interactions between mushroom body and dorsal paired medial neurons. Despite this progress, a complete and unified model that details the pathway from acquisition to memory expression remains elusive. PMID:25225297

  19. Neurally Encoding Time for Olfactory Navigation.

    PubMed

    Park, In Jun; Hein, Andrew M; Bobkov, Yuriy V; Reidenbach, Matthew A; Ache, Barry W; Principe, Jose C

    2016-01-01

    Accurately encoding time is one of the fundamental challenges faced by the nervous system in mediating behavior. We recently reported that some animals have a specialized population of rhythmically active neurons in their olfactory organs with the potential to peripherally encode temporal information about odor encounters. If these neurons do indeed encode the timing of odor arrivals, it should be possible to demonstrate that this capacity has some functional significance. Here we show how this sensory input can profoundly influence an animal's ability to locate the source of odor cues in realistic turbulent environments-a common task faced by species that rely on olfactory cues for navigation. Using detailed data from a turbulent plume created in the laboratory, we reconstruct the spatiotemporal behavior of a real odor field. We use recurrence theory to show that information about position relative to the source of the odor plume is embedded in the timing between odor pulses. Then, using a parameterized computational model, we show how an animal can use populations of rhythmically active neurons to capture and encode this temporal information in real time, and use it to efficiently navigate to an odor source. Our results demonstrate that the capacity to accurately encode temporal information about sensory cues may be crucial for efficient olfactory navigation. More generally, our results suggest a mechanism for extracting and encoding temporal information from the sensory environment that could have broad utility for neural information processing. PMID:26730727

  20. Anatomy, histochemistry, and immunohistochemistry of the olfactory subsystems in mice

    PubMed Central

    Barrios, Arthur W.; Núñez, Gonzalo; Sánchez Quinteiro, Pablo; Salazar, Ignacio

    2014-01-01

    The four regions of the murine nasal cavity featuring olfactory neurons were studied anatomically and by labeling with lectins and relevant antibodies with a view to establishing criteria for the identification of olfactory subsystems that are readily applicable to other mammals. In the main olfactory epithelium and the septal organ the olfactory sensory neurons (OSNs) are embedded in quasi-stratified columnar epithelium; vomeronasal OSNs are embedded in epithelium lining the medial interior wall of the vomeronasal duct and do not make contact with the mucosa of the main nasal cavity; and in Grüneberg's ganglion a small isolated population of OSNs lies adjacent to, but not within, the epithelium. With the exception of Grüneberg's ganglion, all the tissues expressing olfactory marker protein (OMP) (the above four nasal territories, the vomeronasal and main olfactory nerves, and the main and accessory olfactory bulbs) are also labeled by Lycopersicum esculentum agglutinin, while Ulex europaeus agglutinin I labels all and only tissues expressing Gαi2 (the apical sensory neurons of the vomeronasal organ, their axons, and their glomerular destinations in the anterior accessory olfactory bulb). These staining patterns of UEA-I and LEA may facilitate the characterization of olfactory anatomy in other species. A 710-section atlas of the anatomy of the murine nasal cavity has been made available on line. PMID:25071468

  1. [Hypothesis on the function of olfactory receptor cells].

    PubMed

    Smirnov, A A

    1995-01-01

    The scientific studies of sensory systems (including olfactory organs) are carried out during a century. Usually a preliminary theory of object is suggested and detailed in accordance with the new data. However only the strong criticized theories of smell reception more than thirty) are now in the theoretical part of the olfactory organ physiology. The theory is necessary for planning the further investigations of olfactory organ; revealing the mystery of the biological sensors to improve the artificial ones; the improvement of the methods to obtain new biological active substances (perfume, drugs, insecticides). These circumstances justify the attempt to suggest the theory of the olfactory receptor cell functioning.

  2. Mechanisms of Regulation of Olfactory Transduction and Adaptation in the Olfactory Cilium

    PubMed Central

    Antunes, Gabriela; Sebastião, Ana Maria; Simoes de Souza, Fabio Marques

    2014-01-01

    Olfactory adaptation is a fundamental process for the functioning of the olfactory system, but the underlying mechanisms regulating its occurrence in intact olfactory sensory neurons (OSNs) are not fully understood. In this work, we have combined stochastic computational modeling and a systematic pharmacological study of different signaling pathways to investigate their impact during short-term adaptation (STA). We used odorant stimulation and electroolfactogram (EOG) recordings of the olfactory epithelium treated with pharmacological blockers to study the molecular mechanisms regulating the occurrence of adaptation in OSNs. EOG responses to paired-pulses of odorants showed that inhibition of phosphodiesterases (PDEs) and phosphatases enhanced the levels of STA in the olfactory epithelium, and this effect was mimicked by blocking vesicle exocytosis and reduced by blocking cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP)-dependent protein kinase (PKA) and vesicle endocytosis. These results suggest that G-coupled receptors (GPCRs) cycling is involved with the occurrence of STA. To gain insights on the dynamical aspects of this process, we developed a stochastic computational model. The model consists of the olfactory transduction currents mediated by the cyclic nucleotide gated (CNG) channels and calcium ion (Ca2+)-activated chloride (CAC) channels, and the dynamics of their respective ligands, cAMP and Ca2+, and it simulates the EOG results obtained under different experimental conditions through changes in the amplitude and duration of cAMP and Ca2+ response, two second messengers implicated with STA occurrence. The model reproduced the experimental data for each pharmacological treatment and provided a mechanistic explanation for the action of GPCR cycling in the levels of second messengers modulating the levels of STA. All together, these experimental and theoretical results indicate the existence of a mechanism of regulation of STA by signaling pathways that control GPCR

  3. Control of postnatal apoptosis in the neocortex by RhoA-subfamily GTPases determines neuronal density.

    PubMed

    Sanno, Hitomi; Shen, Xiao; Kuru, Nilgün; Bormuth, Ingo; Bobsin, Kristin; Gardner, Humphrey A R; Komljenovic, Dorde; Tarabykin, Victor; Erzurumlu, Reha S; Tucker, Kerry L

    2010-03-24

    Apoptosis of neurons in the maturing neocortex has been recorded in a wide variety of mammals, but very little is known about its effects on cortical differentiation. Recent research has implicated the RhoA GTPase subfamily in the control of apoptosis in the developing nervous system and in other tissue types. Rho GTPases are important components of the signaling pathways linking extracellular signals to the cytoskeleton. To investigate the role of the RhoA GTPase subfamily in neocortical apoptosis and differentiation, we have engineered a mouse line in which a dominant-negative RhoA mutant (N19-RhoA) is expressed from the Mapt locus, such that all neurons of the developing nervous system are expressing the N19-RhoA inhibitor. Postnatal expression of N19-RhoA led to no major changes in neocortical anatomy. Six layers of the neocortex developed and barrels (whisker-related neural modules) formed in layer IV. However, the density and absolute number of neurons in the somatosensory cortex increased by 12-26% compared with wild-type littermates. This was not explained by a change in the migration of neurons during the formation of cortical layers but rather by a large decrease in the amount of neuronal apoptosis at postnatal day 5, the developmental maximum of cortical apoptosis. In addition, overexpression of RhoA in cortical neurons was seen to cause high levels of apoptosis. These results demonstrate that RhoA-subfamily members play a major role in developmental apoptosis in postnatal neocortex of the mouse but that decreased apoptosis does not alter cortical cytoarchitecture and patterning. PMID:20335457

  4. Small particles disrupt postnatal airway development

    PubMed Central

    Lee, DongYoub; Wallis, Chris; Schelegle, Edward S.; Van Winkle, Laura S.; Plopper, Charles G.; Fanucchi, Michelle V.; Kumfer, Ben; Kennedy, Ian M.; Chan, Jackie K. W.

    2010-01-01

    Increasing numbers of epidemiologic studies associate air pollution exposure in children with decreased lung function development. The objective of this study was to examine the effects of exposure to combustion-generated fine [230 and 212 nm number mean aerodynamic particle diameter (NMAD)] to ultrafine (73 nm NMAD) particles differing in elemental (EC) and organic (OC) carbon content on postnatal airway development in rats. Neonatal Sprague-Dawley rats were exposed from postnatal day 7 through 25, and lung function and airway architecture were evaluated 81 days of age. In a separate group of rats, cell proliferation was examined after a single particle exposure at 7 days of age. Early life exposure to 73 nm high OC/EC particles altered distal airway architecture and resulted in subtle changes in lung mechanics. Early life exposure to 212 nm high OC/EC particles did not alter lung architecture but did alter lung mechanics in a manner suggestive of central airway changes. In contrast, early life exposure to 230 nm low OC/EC particles did not alter lung architecture or mechanics. A single 6-h exposure to 73 nm high OC/EC particle decreased airway cell proliferation, whereas 212 nm high OC/EC particles increased it and 230 nm low OC/EC particles did not. The early life exposure to ultrafine, high OC/EC particles results in persistent alterations in distal airway architecture that is characterized by an initial decrease in airway cell proliferation. PMID:20634362

  5. Fetal and postnatal ovine mesenteric vascular reactivity

    PubMed Central

    Nair, Jayasree; Gugino, Sylvia F.; Nielsen, Lori C.; Caty, Michael G.; Lakshminrusimha, Satyan

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Intestinal circulation and mesenteric arterial (MA) reactivity may play a role in preparing the fetus for enteral nutrition. We hypothesized that MA vasoreactivity changes with gestation and vasodilator pathways predominate in the postnatal period. METHODS Small distal MA rings (0.5-mm diameter) were isolated from fetal (116-d, 128-d, 134-d, and 141-d gestation, term ~ 147 d) and postnatal lambs. Vasoreactivity was evaluated using vasoconstrictors (norepinephrine (NE) after pretreatment with propranolol and endothelin-1(ET-1)) and vasodilators (NO donors A23187 and s-nitrosopenicillamine (SNAP)). Protein and mRNA assays for receptors and enzymes (endothelin receptor A, alpha-adrenergic receptor 1A (ADRA1A), endothelial NO synthase (eNOS), soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC), and phosphodiesterase5 (PDE5)) were performed in mesenteric arteries. RESULTS MA constriction to NE and ET-1 peaked at 134 d. Relaxation to A23187 and SNAP was maximal after birth. Basal eNOS activity was low at 134 d. ADRA1A mRNA and protein increasedsignificantlyat134danddecreasedpostnatally.sGC and PDE5 protein increased from 134 to 141 d. CONCLUSION Mesenteric vasoconstriction predominates in late-preterm gestation (134 d; the postconceptional age with the highest incidence of necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC)) followed by a conversion to vasodilatory influences near the time of full-term birth. Perturbations in this ontogenic mechanism, including preterm birth, may be a risk factor for NEC. PMID:26672733

  6. Parvovirus minute virus of mice strain i multiplication and pathogenesis in the newborn mouse brain are restricted to proliferative areas and to migratory cerebellar young neurons.

    PubMed Central

    Ramírez, J C; Fairén, A; Almendral, J M

    1996-01-01

    Newborn BALB/c mice intranasally inoculated at birth with a lethal dose of the immunosuppressive strain of the parvovirus minute virus of mice (MVMi) developed motor disabilities and intention tremors with a high incidence by the day 6 postinfection (dpi). These neurological syndromes paralleled the synthesis of virus intermediate DNA replicative forms and yield of infectious particles in the brain, with kinetics that peaked by this time. The preferred virus replicative sites in the brain were established early in the infection (2 dpi) and at the onset of clinical symptoms (6 dpi) and were compared with major regions of cellular proliferative activity found after intraperitoneal injection of bromodeoxyuridine 24 h before encephalons were subjected to immunohistochemistry detection. At 2 dpi, viral capsid antigen was located in the laterodorsal thalamic and the pontine nuclei but not in the extensive proliferative regions of the mouse brain at this postnatal day. At 6 dpi, however, the neurotropism of the MVMi was highlighted by its ability to target the subventricular zone of the ventricles, the subependymal zone of the olfactory bulb, and the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus, which are the three main germinal centers of the cerebrum in mouse postbirth neurogenesis. Unexpectedly, in the cerebellum, the MVMi capsid antigen was confined exclusively to cells that have undergone mitosis and have migrated to the internal granular layer (IGL) and not to the proliferative external granular layer (EGL), which was stained with antiproliferative cell nuclear antigen antibody and is the main target in other parvovirus infections. This result implies temporal or differentiation coupling between MVMi cycle and neuroblast morphogenesis, since proliferative granules of the EGL should primarily be infected but must migrate in a virus carrier state into the IGL in order to express the capsid proteins. During migration, many cells undergo destruction, accounting for the marked

  7. The olfactory apparatus of the bandicoot (Isoodon macrourus): fine structure and presence of a septal olfactory organ.

    PubMed Central

    Kratzing, J E

    1978-01-01

    The structure and extent of olfactory epithelium in the bandicoot (Isoodon macrourus) were examined by light and electron microscopy. Sensory epithelium covers most of the dorsal conchae, though non-sensory epithelium lines ventrally facing scrolls. The middle conchae are partly covered by olfactory epithelium, the proportion of olfactory to ciliated respiratory epithelium increasing caudally. Ventral conchae are lined by non-sensory ciliated epithelium. The nasal septum ends short of the floor of the nasal cavity in its caudal two thirds. It is covered dorsally by olfactory epithelium. The ventral margin has rounded lateral extensions which carry the isolated strips of olfactory epithelium which form the septal olfactory organ. The fine structure of the olfactory epithelium is the same in all areas. Cell types include olfactory receptors, supporting cells, two types of basal cell and rarer pale and brush cells. There is considerable morphological variation in olfactory cells, and evidence suggestive of continuing turnover in the receptor cell population. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 Fig. 7 Fig. 8 Fig. 9 PMID:640961

  8. Photoperiod mediated changes in olfactory bulb neurogenesis and olfactory behavior in male white-footed mice (Peromyscus leucopus).

    PubMed

    Walton, James C; Pyter, Leah M; Weil, Zachary M; Nelson, Randy J

    2012-01-01

    Brain plasticity, in relation to new adult mammalian neurons generated in the subgranular zone of the hippocampus, has been well described. However, the functional outcome of new adult olfactory neurons born in the subventricular zone of the lateral ventricles is not clearly defined, as manipulating neurogenesis through various methods has given inconsistent and conflicting results in lab mice. Several small rodent species, including Peromyscus leucopus, display seasonal (photoperiodic) brain plasticity in brain volume, hippocampal function, and hippocampus-dependent behaviors; plasticity in the olfactory system of photoperiodic rodents remains largely uninvestigated. We exposed adult male P. leucopus to long day lengths (LD) and short day lengths (SD) for 10 to 15 weeks and then examined olfactory bulb cell proliferation and survival using the thymidine analog BrdU, olfactory bulb granule cell morphology using Golgi-Cox staining, and behavioral investigation of same-sex conspecific urine. SD mice did not differ from LD counterparts in granular cell morphology of the dendrites or in dendritic spine density. Although there were no differences due to photoperiod in habituation to water odor, SD mice rapidly habituated to male urine, whereas LD mice did not. In addition, short day induced changes in olfactory behavior were associated with increased neurogenesis in the caudal plexiform and granule cell layers of the olfactory bulb, an area known to preferentially respond to water-soluble odorants. Taken together, these data demonstrate that photoperiod, without altering olfactory bulb neuronal morphology, alters olfactory bulb neurogenesis and olfactory behavior in Peromyscus leucopus. PMID:22912730

  9. Photoperiod mediated changes in olfactory bulb neurogenesis and olfactory behavior in male white-footed mice (Peromyscus leucopus).

    PubMed

    Walton, James C; Pyter, Leah M; Weil, Zachary M; Nelson, Randy J

    2012-01-01

    Brain plasticity, in relation to new adult mammalian neurons generated in the subgranular zone of the hippocampus, has been well described. However, the functional outcome of new adult olfactory neurons born in the subventricular zone of the lateral ventricles is not clearly defined, as manipulating neurogenesis through various methods has given inconsistent and conflicting results in lab mice. Several small rodent species, including Peromyscus leucopus, display seasonal (photoperiodic) brain plasticity in brain volume, hippocampal function, and hippocampus-dependent behaviors; plasticity in the olfactory system of photoperiodic rodents remains largely uninvestigated. We exposed adult male P. leucopus to long day lengths (LD) and short day lengths (SD) for 10 to 15 weeks and then examined olfactory bulb cell proliferation and survival using the thymidine analog BrdU, olfactory bulb granule cell morphology using Golgi-Cox staining, and behavioral investigation of same-sex conspecific urine. SD mice did not differ from LD counterparts in granular cell morphology of the dendrites or in dendritic spine density. Although there were no differences due to photoperiod in habituation to water odor, SD mice rapidly habituated to male urine, whereas LD mice did not. In addition, short day induced changes in olfactory behavior were associated with increased neurogenesis in the caudal plexiform and granule cell layers of the olfactory bulb, an area known to preferentially respond to water-soluble odorants. Taken together, these data demonstrate that photoperiod, without altering olfactory bulb neuronal morphology, alters olfactory bulb neurogenesis and olfactory behavior in Peromyscus leucopus.

  10. Photoperiod Mediated Changes in Olfactory Bulb Neurogenesis and Olfactory Behavior in Male White-Footed Mice (Peromyscus leucopus)

    PubMed Central

    Weil, Zachary M.; Nelson, Randy J.

    2012-01-01

    Brain plasticity, in relation to new adult mammalian neurons generated in the subgranular zone of the hippocampus, has been well described. However, the functional outcome of new adult olfactory neurons born in the subventricular zone of the lateral ventricles is not clearly defined, as manipulating neurogenesis through various methods has given inconsistent and conflicting results in lab mice. Several small rodent species, including Peromyscus leucopus, display seasonal (photoperiodic) brain plasticity in brain volume, hippocampal function, and hippocampus-dependent behaviors; plasticity in the olfactory system of photoperiodic rodents remains largely uninvestigated. We exposed adult male P. leucopus to long day lengths (LD) and short day lengths (SD) for 10 to 15 weeks and then examined olfactory bulb cell proliferation and survival using the thymidine analog BrdU, olfactory bulb granule cell morphology using Golgi-Cox staining, and behavioral investigation of same-sex conspecific urine. SD mice did not differ from LD counterparts in granular cell morphology of the dendrites or in dendritic spine density. Although there were no differences due to photoperiod in habituation to water odor, SD mice rapidly habituated to male urine, whereas LD mice did not. In addition, short day induced changes in olfactory behavior were associated with increased neurogenesis in the caudal plexiform and granule cell layers of the olfactory bulb, an area known to preferentially respond to water-soluble odorants. Taken together, these data demonstrate that photoperiod, without altering olfactory bulb neuronal morphology, alters olfactory bulb neurogenesis and olfactory behavior in Peromyscus leucopus. PMID:22912730

  11. [Effect of ladasten on antenatal and postnatal development].

    PubMed

    Bugaeva, L I; Denisova, T D; Spasov, A A

    2012-01-01

    Positive effects of ladasten on both antenatal and postnatal development have been established in experiments on pregnant female rats. Under the action of this drug, the number of resorption events decreases and process of antenatal development of fetuses is activated. In the postnatal period, increased weight gain and accelerated physical development has been observed in the progeny of rats treated with ladasten. PMID:22702107

  12. Postnatal Depression. A Review. EUR/HFA Target 8.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    World Health Organization, Copenhagen (Denmark). Regional Office for Europe.

    This document contains three reports on postnatal depression. The first, "The Maternity Blues," by Flemming Warborg Larsen, presents a literature review on the topic. It concludes that most women look back at the "blues" as an episode that was brief, unpleasant, and difficult to explain. The second report, "Postnatal Depressions," by Lene Lier,…

  13. Changes in neurotransmitter levels and proinflammatory cytokine mRNA expressions in the mice olfactory bulb following nanoparticle exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Tin-Tin-Win-Shwe Mitsushima, Dai; Yamamoto, Shoji; Fukushima, Atsushi; Funabashi, Toshiya; Kobayashi, Takahiro; Fujimaki, Hidekazu

    2008-01-15

    Recently, there have been increasing reports that nano-sized component of particulate matter can reach the brain and may be associated with neurodegenerative diseases. Previously, our laboratory has studied the effect of intranasal instillation of nano-sized carbon black (CB) (14 nm and 95 nm) on brain cytokine and chemokine mRNA expressions and found that 14-nm CB increased IL-1{beta}, TNF-{alpha}, CCL2 and CCL3 mRNA expressions in the olfactory bulb, not in the hippocampus of mice. To investigate the effect of a single administration of nanoparticles on neurotransmitters and proinflammatory cytokines in a mouse olfactory bulb, we performed in vivo microdialysis and real-time PCR methods. Ten-week-old male BALB/c mice were implanted with guide cannula in the right olfactory bulb and, 1 week later, were instilled vehicle or CB (14 nm, 250 {mu}g) intranasally. Six hours after the nanoparticle instillation, the mice were intraperitoneally injected with normal saline or 50 {mu}g of bacteria cell wall component lipoteichoic acid (LTA), which may potentiate CB-induced neurologic effect. Extracellular glutamate and glycine levels were significantly increased in the olfactory bulb of CB-instilled mice when compared with vehicle-instilled control mice. Moreover, we found that LTA further increased glutamate and glycine levels. However, no alteration of taurine and GABA levels was observed in the olfactory bulb of the same mice. We also detected immunological changes in the olfactory bulb 11 h after vehicle or CB instillation and found that IL-1{beta} mRNA expression was significantly increased in CB- and LTA-treated mice when compared with control group. However, TNF-{alpha} mRNA expression was increased significantly in CB- and saline-treated mice when compared with control group. These findings suggest that nanoparticle CB may modulate the extracellular amino acid neurotransmitter levels and proinflammatory cytokine IL-1 {beta} mRNA expressions synergistically with LTA

  14. Neuropeptide S facilitates mice olfactory function through activation of cognate receptor-expressing neurons in the olfactory cortex.

    PubMed

    Shao, Yu-Feng; Zhao, Peng; Dong, Chao-Yu; Li, Jing; Kong, Xiang-Pan; Wang, Hai-Liang; Dai, Li-Rong; Hou, Yi-Ping

    2013-01-01

    Neuropeptide S (NPS) is a newly identified neuromodulator located in the brainstem and regulates various biological functions by selectively activating the NPS receptors (NPSR). High level expression of NPSR mRNA in the olfactory cortex suggests that NPS-NPSR system might be involved in the regulation of olfactory function. The present study was undertaken to investigate the effects of intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) injection of NPS or co-injection of NPSR antagonist on the olfactory behaviors, food intake, and c-Fos expression in olfactory cortex in mice. In addition, dual-immunofluorescence was employed to identify NPS-induced Fos immunereactive (-ir) neurons that also bear NPSR. NPS (0.1-1 nmol) i.c.v. injection significantly reduced the latency to find the buried food, and increased olfactory differentiation of different odors and the total sniffing time spent in olfactory habituation/dishabituation tasks. NPS facilitated olfactory ability most at the dose of 0.5 nmol, which could be blocked by co-injection of 40 nmol NPSR antagonist [D-Val(5)]NPS. NPS administration dose-dependently inhibited food intake in fasted mice. Ex-vivo c-Fos and NPSR immunohistochemistry in the olfactory cortex revealed that, as compared with vehicle-treated mice, NPS markedly enhanced c-Fos expression in the anterior olfactory nucleus (AON), piriform cortex (Pir), ventral tenia tecta (VTT), the anterior cortical amygdaloid nucleus (ACo) and lateral entorhinal cortex (LEnt). The percentage of Fos-ir neurons that also express NPSR were 88.5% and 98.1% in the AON and Pir, respectively. The present findings demonstrated that NPS, via selective activation of the neurons bearing NPSR in the olfactory cortex, facilitates olfactory function in mice.

  15. A Screen for Genes Expressed in the Olfactory Organs of Drosophila melanogaster Identifies Genes Involved in Olfactory Behaviour

    PubMed Central

    Tunstall, Narelle E.; Herr, Anabel; de Bruyne, Marien; Warr, Coral G.

    2012-01-01

    Background For insects the sense of smell and associated olfactory-driven behaviours are essential for survival. Insects detect odorants with families of olfactory receptor proteins that are very different to those of mammals, and there are likely to be other unique genes and genetic pathways involved in the function and development of the insect olfactory system. Methodology/Principal Findings We have performed a genetic screen of a set of 505 Drosophila melanogaster gene trap insertion lines to identify novel genes expressed in the adult olfactory organs. We identified 16 lines with expression in the olfactory organs, many of which exhibited expression of the trapped genes in olfactory receptor neurons. Phenotypic analysis showed that six of the lines have decreased olfactory responses in a behavioural assay, and for one of these we showed that precise excision of the P element reverts the phenotype to wild type, confirming a role for the trapped gene in olfaction. To confirm the identity of the genes trapped in the lines we performed molecular analysis of some of the insertion sites. While for many lines the reported insertion sites were correct, we also demonstrated that for a number of lines the reported location of the element was incorrect, and in three lines there were in fact two pGT element insertions. Conclusions/Significance We identified 16 new genes expressed in the Drosophila olfactory organs, the majority in neurons, and for several of the gene trap lines demonstrated a defect in olfactory-driven behaviour. Further characterisation of these genes and their roles in olfactory system function and development will increase our understanding of how the insect olfactory system has evolved to perform the same essential function to that of mammals, but using very different molecular genetic mechanisms. PMID:22530061

  16. Olfactory lateralization in homing pigeons: a GPS study on birds released with unilateral olfactory inputs.

    PubMed

    Gagliardo, Anna; Filannino, Caterina; Ioalè, Paolo; Pecchia, Tommaso; Wikelski, Martin; Vallortigara, Giorgio

    2011-02-15

    A large body of evidence has shown that pigeons rely on an olfactory-based navigational map when homing from unfamiliar locations. Previous studies on pigeons released with one nostril occluded highlighted an asymmetry in favour of the right nostril, particularly concerning the initial orientation performance of naïve birds. Nevertheless, all pigeons experiencing only unilateral olfactory input showed impaired homing, regardless of the side of the occluded nostril. So far this phenomenon has been documented only by observing the birds' vanishing bearings. In the present work we recorded the flight tracks of pigeons with previous homing experience equipped with a GPS data logger and released from an unfamiliar location with the right or the left nostril occluded. The analysis of the tracks revealed that the flight path of the birds with the right nostril occluded was more tortuous than that of unmanipulated controls. Moreover, the pigeons smelling with the left nostril interrupted their journey significantly more frequently and displayed more exploratory activity than the control birds, e.g. during flights around a stopover site. These data suggest a more important involvement of the right olfactory system in processing the olfactory information needed for the operation of the navigational map.

  17. Recovery of Olfactory Function in Postviral Olfactory Dysfunction Patients after Acupuncture Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Qi; Pang, Zhihui; Yu, Hongmeng

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. The aims of this study were to assess the impact of traditional Chinese acupuncture (TCA) in postviral olfactory dysfunction (PVOD) patients who were refractory to standardized treatment and to compare the results with the impact observed in an observation group. Methods. Fifty patients who presented to the outpatient clinic with PVOD and were refractory to standardized treatment were included: 25 were treated with TCA and 25 patients were simply observed. A subjective olfactory test was performed using the University of Pennsylvania Smell Identification Test (UPSIT). The effects of TCA were compared with the results obtained in the observation group. Results. Improved olfactory function was observed in eleven patients treated with TCA compared with four patients in the observation group. This study revealed significantly improved olfactory function outcomes in patients who underwent acupuncture compared with the observation group. No significant differences in olfaction recovery were found according to age, gender, or duration of disease between the two groups; however, hyposmic patients recovered at a higher rate than anosmic patients. Conclusion. TCA may aid the treatment of PVOD patients who are refractory to drugs or other therapies. PMID:27034689

  18. Dietary sodium protects fish against copper-induced olfactory impairment.

    PubMed

    Azizishirazi, Ali; Dew, William A; Bougas, Berenice; Bernatchez, Louis; Pyle, Greg G

    2015-04-01

    Exposure to low concentrations of copper impairs olfaction in fish. To determine the transcriptional changes in the olfactory epithelium induced by copper exposure, wild yellow perch (Perca flavescens) were exposed to 20 μg/L of copper for 3 and 24h. A novel yellow perch microarray with 1000 candidate genes was used to measure differential gene transcription in the olfactory epithelium. While three hours of exposure to copper changed the transcription of only one gene, the transcriptions of 70 genes were changed after 24h of exposure to copper. Real-time PCR was utilized to determine the effect of exposure duration on two specific genes of interest, two sub-units of Na/K-ATPase. At 24 and 48 h, Na/K-ATPase transcription was down-regulated by copper at olfactory rosettes. As copper-induced impairment of Na/K-ATPase activity in gills can be ameliorated by increased dietary sodium, rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) were used to determine if elevated dietary sodium was also protective against copper-induced olfactory impairment. Measurement of the olfactory response of rainbow trout using electro-olfactography demonstrated that sodium was protective of copper-induced olfactory dysfunction. This work demonstrates that the transcriptions of both subunits of Na/K-ATPase in the olfactory epithelium of fish are affected by Cu exposure, and that dietary Na protects against Cu-induced olfactory dysfunction.

  19. Voltage-Dependent Intrinsic Bursting in Olfactory Bulb Golgi Cells

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pressler, R. Todd; Rozman, Peter A.; Strowbridge, Ben W.

    2013-01-01

    In the mammalian olfactory bulb (OB), local synaptic circuits modulate the evolving pattern of activity in mitral and tufted cells following olfactory sensory stimulation. GABAergic granule cells, the most numerous interneuron subtype in this brain region, have been extensively studied. However, classic studies using Golgi staining methods…

  20. 21 CFR 874.1600 - Olfactory test device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Olfactory test device. 874.1600 Section 874.1600 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES EAR, NOSE, AND THROAT DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 874.1600 Olfactory test device....

  1. 21 CFR 874.1600 - Olfactory test device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Olfactory test device. 874.1600 Section 874.1600 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES EAR, NOSE, AND THROAT DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 874.1600 Olfactory test device....

  2. 21 CFR 874.1600 - Olfactory test device.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Olfactory test device. 874.1600 Section 874.1600 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES EAR, NOSE, AND THROAT DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 874.1600 Olfactory test device....

  3. Construction of odor representations by olfactory bulb microcircuits.

    PubMed

    Cleland, Thomas A

    2014-01-01

    Like other sensory systems, the olfactory system transduces specific features of the external environment and must construct an organized sensory representation from these highly fragmented inputs. As with these other systems, this representation is not accurate per se, but is constructed for utility, and emphasizes certain, presumably useful, features over others. I here describe the cellular and circuit mechanisms of the peripheral olfactory system that underlie this process of sensory construction, emphasizing the distinct architectures and properties of the two prominent computational layers in the olfactory bulb. Notably, while the olfactory system solves essentially similar conceptual problems to other sensory systems, such as contrast enhancement, activity normalization, and extending dynamic range, its peculiarities often require qualitatively different computational algorithms than are deployed in other sensory modalities. In particular, the olfactory modality is intrinsically high dimensional, and lacks a simple, externally defined basis analogous to wavelength or pitch on which elemental odor stimuli can be quantitatively compared. Accordingly, the quantitative similarities of the receptive fields of different odorant receptors (ORs) vary according to the statistics of the odor environment. To resolve these unusual challenges, the olfactory bulb appears to utilize unique nontopographical computations and intrinsic learning mechanisms to perform the necessary high-dimensional, similarity-dependent computations. In sum, the early olfactory system implements a coordinated set of early sensory transformations directly analogous to those in other sensory systems, but accomplishes these with unique circuit architectures adapted to the properties of the olfactory modality.

  4. Kappe neurons, a novel population of olfactory sensory neurons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahuja, Gaurav; Nia, Shahrzad Bozorg; Zapilko, Veronika; Shiriagin, Vladimir; Kowatschew, Daniel; Oka, Yuichiro; Korsching, Sigrun I.

    2014-02-01

    Perception of olfactory stimuli is mediated by distinct populations of olfactory sensory neurons, each with a characteristic set of morphological as well as functional parameters. Beyond two large populations of ciliated and microvillous neurons, a third population, crypt neurons, has been identified in teleost and cartilaginous fishes. We report here a novel, fourth olfactory sensory neuron population in zebrafish, which we named kappe neurons for their characteristic shape. Kappe neurons are identified by their Go-like immunoreactivity, and show a distinct spatial distribution within the olfactory epithelium, similar to, but significantly different from that of crypt neurons. Furthermore, kappe neurons project to a single identified target glomerulus within the olfactory bulb, mdg5 of the mediodorsal cluster, whereas crypt neurons are known to project exclusively to the mdg2 glomerulus. Kappe neurons are negative for established markers of ciliated, microvillous and crypt neurons, but appear to have microvilli. Kappe neurons constitute the fourth type of olfactory sensory neurons reported in teleost fishes and their existence suggests that encoding of olfactory stimuli may require a higher complexity than hitherto assumed already in the peripheral olfactory system.

  5. Integrating temperature with odor processing in the olfactory bulb.

    PubMed

    Kludt, Eugen; Okom, Camille; Brinkmann, Alexander; Schild, Detlev

    2015-05-20

    Temperature perception has long been classified as a somesthetic function solely. However, in recent years several studies brought evidence that temperature perception also takes place in the olfactory system of rodents. Temperature has been described as an effective stimulus for sensory neurons of the Grueneberg ganglion located at the entrance of the nose. Here, we investigate whether a neuronal trace of temperature stimulation can be observed in the glomeruli and mitral cells of the olfactory bulb, using calcium imaging and fast line-scanning microscopy. We show in the Xenopus tadpole system that the γ-glomerulus, which receives input from olfactory neurons, is highly sensitive to temperature drops at the olfactory epithelium. We observed that thermo-induced activity in the γ-glomerulus is conveyed to the mitral cells innervating this specific neuropil. Surprisingly, a substantial number of thermosensitive mitral cells were also chemosensitive. Moreover, we report another unique feature of the γ-glomerulus: it receives ipsilateral and contralateral afferents. The latter fibers pass through the contralateral bulb, cross the anterior commissure, and then run to the ipsilateral olfactory bulb, where they target the γ-glomerulus. Temperature drops at the contralateral olfactory epithelium also induced responses in the γ-glomerulus and in mitral cells. Temperature thus appears to be a relevant physiological input to the Xenopus olfactory system. Each olfactory bulb integrates and codes temperature signals originating from receptor neurons of the ipsilateral and contralateral nasal cavities. Finally, temperature and chemical information is processed in shared cellular networks.

  6. Early influences of nutrition on postnatal growth.

    PubMed

    Koletzko, Berthold; Beyer, Jeanette; Brands, Brigitte; Demmelmair, Hans; Grote, Veit; Haile, Gudrun; Gruszfeld, Dariusz; Rzehak, Peter; Socha, Piotr; Weber, Martina

    2013-01-01

    Health and nutrition modulate postnatal growth. The availability of amino acids and energy, and insulin and insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) regulates early growth through the mTOR pathway. Amino acids and glucose also stimulate the secretion of IGF-I and insulin. Postnatal growth induces lasting, programming effects on later body size and adiposity in animals and in human observational studies. Rapid weight gain in infancy and the first 2 years was shown to predict increased obesity risk in childhood and adulthood. Breastfeeding leads to lesser high weight gain in infancy and reduces obesity risk in later life by about 20%, presumably partly due to the lower protein supply with human milk than conventional infant formula. In a large randomized clinical trial, we tested the hypothesis that reduced infant formula protein contents lower insulin-releasing amino acid concentrations and thereby decrease circulating insulin and IGF-I levels, resulting in lesser early weight gain and reduced later obesity risk (the 'Early Protein Hypothesis'). The results demonstrate that lowered protein in infant formula induces similar - but not equal - metabolic and endocrine responses and normalizes weight and BMI relative to breastfed controls at the age of 2 years. The results available should lead to enhanced efforts to actively promote, protect and support breastfeeding. For infants that are not breastfed or not fully breastfed, the use of infant formulas with lower protein contents but high protein quality appears preferable. Cows' milk as a drink provides high protein intake and should be avoided in infancy.

  7. Early influences of nutrition on postnatal growth.

    PubMed

    Koletzko, Berthold; Beyer, Jeanette; Brands, Brigitte; Demmelmair, Hans; Grote, Veit; Haile, Gudrun; Gruszfeld, Dariusz; Rzehak, Peter; Socha, Piotr; Weber, Martina

    2013-01-01

    Health and nutrition modulate postnatal growth. The availability of amino acids and energy, and insulin and insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) regulates early growth through the mTOR pathway. Amino acids and glucose also stimulate the secretion of IGF-I and insulin. Postnatal growth induces lasting, programming effects on later body size and adiposity in animals and in human observational studies. Rapid weight gain in infancy and the first 2 years was shown to predict increased obesity risk in childhood and adulthood. Breastfeeding leads to lesser high weight gain in infancy and reduces obesity risk in later life by about 20%, presumably partly due to the lower protein supply with human milk than conventional infant formula. In a large randomized clinical trial, we tested the hypothesis that reduced infant formula protein contents lower insulin-releasing amino acid concentrations and thereby decrease circulating insulin and IGF-I levels, resulting in lesser early weight gain and reduced later obesity risk (the 'Early Protein Hypothesis'). The results demonstrate that lowered protein in infant formula induces similar - but not equal - metabolic and endocrine responses and normalizes weight and BMI relative to breastfed controls at the age of 2 years. The results available should lead to enhanced efforts to actively promote, protect and support breastfeeding. For infants that are not breastfed or not fully breastfed, the use of infant formulas with lower protein contents but high protein quality appears preferable. Cows' milk as a drink provides high protein intake and should be avoided in infancy. PMID:23502135

  8. Odors from proximal species reverse the stress-decreased neurogenesis via main olfactory processing.

    PubMed

    Cherng, Chian-Fang G; Chang, Chun Pi; Su, Chien-Chou; Tzeng, Wen-Yu; Chuang, Jia-Ying; Chen, Li-Hsien; Lin, Kuei-Ying; Yu, Lung

    2012-04-01

    Unconditioned foot shock followed by restraint in water was used as a stress regimen to induce decreases in neurogenesis in mouse dentate gyrus (DG). Presence of conspecific odors has been known to reverse the stress-induced decrease in DG neurogenesis. In this study, we found that the conspecific odors did not produce these protective effects in mice whose MOE was impaired by nasal zinc sulfate lavage. Moreover, we observed that the presence of odors from rats, hamsters, and guinea pigs throughout the stress procedure reversed the stress-induced decrease in cell proliferation and neurogenesis in mouse dentate gyrus, while these odors alone did not affect mouse dentate cell proliferation or neurogenesis. In contrast, the presence of rabbit, sugar glider, hedgehog, beetle odors did not affect cell proliferation, neurogenesis, the stress-decreased cell proliferation or neurogenesis in DG. Finally, the presence of fox urine odors decreased mouse dentate cell proliferation and neurogenesis but did not affect the stress-induced decrease in cell proliferation or neurogenesis. Taken together, we conclude that olfactory processing via activation of sensory neurons in MOE is responsible for the conspecific odor-produced protective effect against the stress-decreased cell proliferation and neurogenesis. Phylogenetic distances of the odor-generating species and mice might contribute to the odors' protective effects against the stress-induced decreases in cell proliferation and neurogenesis. PMID:22200498

  9. Hidden consequences of olfactory dysfunction: a patient report series

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The negative consequences of olfactory dysfunction for the quality of life are not widely appreciated and the condition is therefore often ignored or trivialized. Methods 1,000 patients with olfactory dysfunction participated in an online study by submitting accounts of their subjective experiences of how they have been affected by their condition. In addition, they were given the chance to answer 43 specific questions about the consequences of their olfactory dysfunction. Results Although there are less practical problems associated with impaired or distorted odor perception than with impairments in visual or auditory perception, many affected individuals report experiencing olfactory dysfunction as a debilitating condition. Smell loss-induced social isolation and smell loss-induced anhedonia can severely