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Sample records for postoperative infectious complications

  1. [Postoperative infectious-inflammatory complications of endoscopic surgery for urolithiasis].

    PubMed

    Akilov, F A; Mukhtarov, Sh T; Giiasov, Sh I; Mirkhamidov, D Kh; Nasirov, F R; Muratova, N B

    2013-01-01

    Retrospective analysis of 1027 percutaneous radioendoscopic surgeries for upper urinary tract stones was performed. Postoperative acute pyelonephritis was the most common complication (11.2%), the frequency of which was significantly dependent on the presence of source of infection in the urinary tract, and the frequency of intra- and postoperative complications. When performing PPN, patients with urolithiasis and with the presence of the initial infection in the urinary tract, intra- and postoperative complications should be referred to the group of patients with a high risk of postoperative infectious and inflammatory complications. The analysis showed that the development of acute pyelonephritis after PPN increases the cost of treatment by 25%.

  2. The Evaluation of Risk Factors for Postoperative Infectious Complications after Percutaneous Nephrolithotomy

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Tian; Liu, Shenghua; Wang, Lujia

    2017-01-01

    This study was to evaluate the risk factors of infectious complications after percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PCNL) and build a prediction tool for postoperative complications based on the risk factors. A total of 110 male (67.1%) and 54 female (32.9%) patients who underwent PCNL for renal stones between 2010 and 2014 in our institute were included. A detailed clinical information and laboratory results were obtained from patients. Systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) and postoperative fever were recorded after PCNL surgery. In all, 45 cases (27.4%) developed SIRS and fever was observed in 20 cases (12.2%). In multivariate analysis, stone size (odds ratio, OR = 1.471, p = 0.009) and urine white blood cell (WBC) (OR = 1.001, p = 0.007) were related to the development of SIRS. Stone size (OR = 1.644, p = 0.024), urine WBC (OR = 1.001, p = 0.002) and serum albumin (OR = 0.807, p = 0.021) were associated with postoperative fever. We concluded that patients with larger stone size and preoperative urinary tract infection might have a higher risk of developing SIRS and fever after operation, while a high-normal level of serum albumin might be the protective factor for postoperative fever. PMID:28261611

  3. Elevated serum lactoferrin and neopterin are associated with postoperative infectious complications in patients with acute traumatic spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Du, Gang; Wei, Chengshou; Gu, Song; Tang, Jun

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Several studies have shown that lactoferrin (LF) and neopterin (NT) are correlated with infection. The aim of this study is to determine whether serum levels of LF and NT are associated with postoperative infectious complications in patients with acute traumatic spinal cord injury. Material and methods A total of 268 patients with acute traumatic spinal cord injury who underwent spinal surgery were enrolled in this study. Serum levels of LF, NT, and C-reactive protein (CRP), in addition to white blood cell count (WBC) and erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), were measured preoperatively and 24 h postoperatively. Results In total, 22 of 268 patients (8.2%) developed postoperative infectious complications. The levels of serum LF, NT, and CRP were significantly higher in the infected patients than in the non-infected patients. No significant differences were observed in postoperative WBC count and ESR between the two groups. Multivariate logistic regression revealed that LF (OR: 1.004 (1.002–1.007)), NT (OR: 1.137 (1.054–1.227)), and CRP (OR: 1.023 (1.002–1.044)) were significantly associated with the presence of postoperative infectious complications. The area under receiver operating characteristic curves for LF, NT, and CRP was 0.709, 0.779, and 0.629, respectively. Conclusions Elevated serum concentrations of LF and NT are associated with early infection after surgery. Compared to CRP, elevated levels of LF and NT are better indicators for predicting postoperative infectious complications in patients with acute traumatic spinal cord injury. PMID:24273571

  4. Postoperative complications of spine surgery.

    PubMed

    Swann, Matthew C; Hoes, Kathryn S; Aoun, Salah G; McDonagh, David L

    2016-03-01

    A variety of surgical approaches are available for the treatment of spine diseases. Complications can arise intraoperatively, in the immediate postoperative period, or in a delayed fashion. These complications may lead to severe or even permanent morbidity if left unrecognized and untreated [1-4]. Here we review a range of complications in the early postoperative period from more benign complications such as postoperative nausea and vomiting (PONV) to more feared complications leading to permanent loss of neurological function or death [5]. Perioperative pain management is covered in a separate review (Chapter 8).

  5. [Infectious complications of biological therapy].

    PubMed

    Holub, M; Rozsypal, H; Chalupa, P

    2011-02-01

    Biological treatment represents a significant progress in the therapy of many serious diseases. Together with the growing knowledge of pathophysiology and subsequent development of new therapeutic agents, this progress will definitely lead to further expansion of biologics. Since biologics interfere with many mechanisms of host defence, which may sometimes be compromised by them, increased risk of infectious complications must be taken into account. Patients treated with biologics are prone to classical virulent infections (e.g. listeriosis, legionellosis and tuberculosis) and opportunistic infections such as progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy. Furthermore, suppression of the immune response that is caused by biologics may lead to reactivation of latent infections such as tuberculosis or viral hepatitis B. Therefore, the knowledge of basic mechanisms by which biologics modify the immune response is important for a rapid clinical diagnosis of possible aetiology of infectious complications.

  6. [Postoperative complications in plastic surgery].

    PubMed

    Vogt, P M

    2009-09-01

    aspects of postoperative complication management in plastic surgery.

  7. Management of infectious complications in percutaneous nephrolithotomy.

    PubMed

    Negrete-Pulido, Oscar; Gutierrez-Aceves, Jorge

    2009-10-01

    Infectious complications are one of the most frequent and feared adverse medical events in percutaneous nephrolithotomy. They represent a dangerous and life-threatening condition, especially when postoperative septicemia or severe sepsis develops. In order to limit morbidity and mortality it is crucial to recognize preoperative and intraoperative risk factors that could be clear contributors to an adverse infectious event; those factors are mainly immunosuppression caused by some comorbidities, presence of urinary infection or colonization, stone characteristics, obstruction, long-lasting operation, and high intrapelvic pressure during nephrolithotomy. Close observation during the immediate and early postoperative period must be established and a high index of suspicion must be maintained to identify a major complication. The early recognition and prompt multidisciplinary management of sepsis is mandatory to optimize the final outcome. Appropriate therapy is a continuum of management of infection, ranging from adequate drainage and broad-spectrum antibiotics to aggressive fluid resuscitation and invasive monitoring with medical management in the intensive care setting until the causative agent is found and eradicated.

  8. Postoperative surgical complications of lymphadenohysterocolpectomy

    PubMed Central

    Marin, F; Pleşca, M; Bordea, CI; Voinea, SC; Burlănescu, I; Ichim, E; Jianu, CG; Nicolăescu, RR; Teodosie, MP; Maher, K; Blidaru, A

    2014-01-01

    Rationale The current standard surgical treatment for the cervix and uterine cancer is the radical hysterectomy (lymphadenohysterocolpectomy). This has the risk of intraoperative accidents and postoperative associated morbidity. Objective The purpose of this article is the evaluation and quantification of the associated complications in comparison to the postoperative morbidity which resulted after different types of radical hysterectomy. Methods and results Patients were divided according to the type of surgery performed as follows: for cervical cancer – group A- 37 classic radical hysterectomies Class III Piver - Rutledge -Smith ( PRS ), group B -208 modified radical hysterectomies Class II PRS and for uterine cancer- group C -79 extended hysterectomies with pelvic lymphadenectomy from which 17 patients with paraaortic lymphnode biopsy . All patients performed preoperative radiotherapy and 88 of them associated radiosensitization. Discussion Early complications were intra-abdominal bleeding ( 2.7% Class III PRS vs 0.48% Class II PRS), supra-aponeurotic hematoma ( 5.4% III vs 2.4% II) , dynamic ileus (2.7% III vs 0.96% II) and uro - genital fistulas (5.4% III vs 0.96% II).The late complications were the bladder dysfunction (21.6% III vs 16.35% II) , lower limb lymphedema (13.5% III vs 11.5% II), urethral strictures (10.8% III vs 4.8% II) , incisional hernias ( 8.1% III vs 7.2% II), persistent pelvic pain (18.91% III vs 7.7% II), bowel obstruction (5.4% III vs 1.4% II) and deterioration of sexual function (83.3% III vs 53.8% II). PRS class II radical hysterectomy is associated with fewer complications than PRS class III radical hysterectomy , except for the complications of lymphadenectomy . A new method that might reduce these complications is a selective lymphadenectomy represented by sentinel node biopsy . In conclusion PRS class II radical hysterectomy associated with neoadjuvant radiotherapy is a therapeutic option for the incipient stages of cervical cancer

  9. Infectious complications of regional anesthesia.

    PubMed

    Horlocker, Terese T; Wedel, Denise J

    2008-09-01

    Although individual cases have been reported in the literature, serious infections of the central nervous system (CNS) such as arachnoiditis, meningitis, and abscess following spinal or epidural anesthesia are rare. However, recent epidemiologic series from Europe suggest that the frequency of infectious complications associated with neuraxial techniques may be increasing. Importantly, while meningitis and epidural abscess are both complications of neuraxial block, the risk factors and causative organisms are disparate. For example, staphylococcus is the organism most commonly associated epidural abscess; often these infections occurred in patients with impaired immunity. Conversely, meningitis follows dural puncture, and is typically caused by alpha-hemolytic streptococci, with the source of the organism the nasopharynx of the proceduralist. In order to reduce the risk of serious infection following neuraxial blockade, the clinician must be knowledgeable in the pathogenesis of CNS infections, patient selection, and use of meticulous aseptic technique. Finally, since delay in the diagnosis may result in morbidity and even death, it is crucial to be aware of the presenting signs and symptoms of meningitis and epidural abscess.

  10. Post-operative pulmonary complications after thoracotomy

    PubMed Central

    Sengupta, Saikat

    2015-01-01

    Pulmonary complications are a major cause of morbidity and mortality in the post-operative period after thoracotomy. The type of complications and the severity of complications depend on the type of thoracic surgery that has been performed as well as on the patient's pre-operative medical status. Risk stratification can help in predicting the possibility of the post-operative complications. Certain airway complications are more prone to develop with thoracic surgery. Vocal cord injuries, bronchopleural fistulae, pulmonary emboli and post-thoracic surgery non-cardiogenic pulmonary oedema are some of the unique complications that occur in this subset of patients. The major pulmonary complications such as atelectasis, bronchospasm and pneumonia can lead to respiratory failure. This review was compiled after a search for search terms within ‘post-operative pulmonary complications after thoracic surgery and thoracotomy’ on search engines including PubMed and standard text references on the subject from 2000 to 2015. PMID:26556921

  11. Modeling the Temporal Evolution of Postoperative Complications

    PubMed Central

    Feld, Shara I.; Cobian, Alexander G.; Tevis, Sarah E.; Kennedy, Gregory D.; Craven, Mark W.

    2016-01-01

    Post-operative complications have a significant impact on patient morbidity and mortality; these impacts are exacerbated when patients experience multiple complications. However, the task of modeling the temporal sequencing of complications has not been previously addressed. We present an approach based on Markov chain models for characterizing the temporal evolution of post-operative complications represented in the American College of Surgeons National Surgery Quality Improvement Program database. Our work demonstrates that the models have significant predictive value. In particular, an inhomogenous Markov chain model effectively predicts the development of serious complications (coma longer than a day, cardiac arrest, myocardial infarction, septic shock, renal failure, pneumonia) and interventional complications (unplanned re-intubation, longer than 2 days on a ventilator and bleeding transfusion). PMID:28269851

  12. Management of postoperative complications: general approach.

    PubMed

    Sanguineti, V Ana; Wild, Jason R; Fain, Mindy J

    2014-05-01

    The goal of postoperative management is to promote early mobility and avoid postoperative complications, recognizing the potentially devastating impact of complications on elderly patients with hip fracture. The recommended approach involves early mobilization; freedom from tethers (indwelling urinary catheters and other devices); effective pain control; treating malnutrition; preventing pressure ulcers; reducing risk for pulmonary, urinary, and wound infections; and managing cognition. This carefully structured and patient-centered management provides older, vulnerable patients their best chance of returning to their previous level of functioning as quickly and safety as possible.

  13. Infectious Complications After Liver Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Hernandez, Maria Del Pilar; Martin, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT) is the standard of care for patients with decompensated cirrhosis and for patients with hepatocellular carcinoma. More than 6000 liver transplants are performed annually in the United States. High patient and graft survival rates have been achieved in great part due to the availability of potent immunosuppressive agents. Systemic immunosuppression has rendered the liver recipient susceptible to de novo infections as well as reactivation of preexisting latent infections. Infections occurring during the first month post-OLT are usually nosocomial, donor-derived, or the result of a perioperative complication. The development of opportunistic infections (OIs) such as Aspergillus and the reactivation of latent infections such as Mycobacterium tuberculosis are more frequent 1 to 6 months posttransplant, when the net state of immunosuppression is the highest. Immunosuppressive therapy is tapered 6 to 12 months post-OLT; therefore, infections occurring during that time period and afterward generally resemble those of the general population. Screening strategies applied to determine the risk of an infection after transplantation and the use of prophylactic antimicrobial therapy have reduced the incidence of OIs after OLT. This article will review the various causes of infection post-OLT and the therapies used to manage complications. PMID:27134589

  14. Factors predicting infectious complications following percutaneous nephrolithotomy

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Kuldeep; Sankhwar, Satya Narayan; Goel, Apul; Singh, Vishwajeet; Sharma, Pradeep; Garg, Yogesh

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To determine the predictors of infectious complications following percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PCNL) in a prospective study. Materials and Methods: A total of 332 patients with renal or upper ureteric calculi who underwent PCNL between January 2013 and June 2014 were included in the study. Infectious complications included febrile urinary tract infection and septicemia. The patients were divided into Group A and B depending on whether they developed or did not develop infectious complications. Patient, stone, renal, and procedure-related factors were compared between the two groups. Results: There was no significant (P > 0.05) correlation among age (37.03 ± 16.24 vs. 36.72 ± 14.88), sex, and body mass index (21.00 ± 1.77 vs. 21.03 ± 2.25) between Group A and B. The patients in Group A were found to have significantly higher incidence of renal failure (39.5% vs. 9.2%,P= 0.0001), diabetes mellitus (12 [31.5%] vs. 33 [11.2%],P= 0.0001), previous percutaneous nephrostomy (PCN) tube placement (11 [28%] vs. 21 [7.1%]P= 0.0001), moderate to severe hydronephrosis (HDN), larger stone surface area (812.68 ± 402.07 vs. 564.92 ± 361.32,P= 0.0001), mean number of punctures (1.57 ± 0.50 vs. 1.20 ± 0.47,P= 0.002), and mean duration of surgery (94.28 ± 18.23 vs. 69.12 ± 21.23,P= 0.0001) than Group B. Conclusion: Post-PCNL infectious complications were found to be more common in patients with renal failure, diabetes mellitus, preoperative PCN placement, staghorn calculi, severe HDN, multiple punctures, and prolonged duration of surgery. PMID:28057987

  15. Management of postoperative complications of lymphadenectomy

    PubMed Central

    Charruf, Amir Zeide; de Oliveira, Rodrigo José; Jacob, Carlos Eduardo; Cecconello, Ivan; Zilberstein, Bruno

    2016-01-01

    Gastric cancer remains a disease with poor prognosis, mainly due to its late diagnosis. Surgery remains as the only treatment with curative intent, where the goal is radical resection with free-margin gastrectomy and extended lymphadenectomy. Over the last two decades there has been an improvement on postoperative outcomes. However, complications rate is still not negligible even in high volume specialized centers and are directly related mainly to the type of gastric resection: total or subtotal, combined with adjacent organs resection and the extension of lymphadenectomy (D1, D2 and D3). The aim of this study is to analyze the complications specific-related to lymphadenectomy in gastric cancer surgery. PMID:28138657

  16. [Immunity status in early postoperative complications in children with anomalies of kidneys and upper urinary tract].

    PubMed

    Panikratov, K D; Polozov, V V; Strel'nikov, A I; Sotnikova, N Iu

    2001-01-01

    31 children aged 1 to 9 years with malformations of the kidneys and upper urinary tracts were preoperatively examined for immune status. After plastic operation 14 children developed early postoperative infectious-inflammatory complications. It is suggested that early postoperative complications in some children with renal and upper urinary tract maldevelopments may arise because of weak compensatory abilities and immunodeficiency resultant from the operative stress. These created favourable conditions for activation of latent infection. Immunological assessment of the patient prior to surgery predicts early postoperative complications and thus enables proper preventive measures.

  17. Body Fat Composition Assessment Using Analytic Morphomics Predicts Infectious Complications After Bowel Resection in Crohn's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Waljee, Akbar K.; Day, Nicholas M.; Bergmans, Carrie L.; Zahn, Katelin M.; Higgins, Peter D. R.; Wang, Stewart C.; Su, Grace L.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Decisions between medical and surgical management of Crohn's disease (CD) incorporate risk assessments for potential complications of each therapy. Analytic morphomics is a novel method of image analysis providing quantifiable measurements of body tissue composition, characterizing body fat more comprehensively than body mass index alone. The aim of this study was to determine the risk factors associated with postoperative complications in CD, incorporating fat composition analysis using analytic morphomics. Methods: We performed a retrospective review of adults undergoing bowel resection for CD between 2004 and 2011 at a single center. Computed tomography obtained within 30 days prior to surgery underwent morphomic analysis for fat characterization. Postoperative infectious complications were defined as the need for a postoperative abdominal drain, intravenous antibiotics, or reoperation within 30 days. Bivariate and multivariate analyses using logistic regression were used to generate a prediction model of infectious complications. Results: A total of 269 subjects met selection criteria; 27% incurred postoperative infectious complications. Bivariate analysis showed hemoglobin, albumin, surgical urgency, high-dose prednisone use, and subcutaneous-to-visceral fat volume distribution as predictors of complications. Body mass index, anti-tumor necrosis factor alpha therapies, and immunomodulator use were not predictors of complication. Multivariate modeling demonstrated a c-statistic of 0.77 and a negative predictive value of 81.1% with surgical urgency (odds ratio = 2.78; 95% confidence interval, 1.46–6.02; P = 0.004), subcutaneous-to-visceral fat distribution (odds ratio = 2.01; 95% confidence interval, 1.20–3.19; P = 0.006), and hemoglobin (odds ratio = 0.69; 95% confidence interval, 0.55–0.85; P = 0.001) as predictors of infectious complication. Conclusions: Fat subtype and distribution are predictive of postoperative infectious complications

  18. Postoperative complications after thoracic surgery for lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Maugeri, Laura; Corbo, Giuseppe Maria; Valente, Salvatore

    2004-01-01

    Postoperative complications and related risk factors after lung reduction surgery are analyzed based on a review of the literature. In particular the pathogenesis of some of postoperative respiratory disorders is carefully assessed. Most commonly cardiac arrhythmias, respiratory failure, bronchopleural fistula are observed. Main risk factors for postoperative complications are old age, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, coronary disease, poor nutritional state, neoadjuvant therapy. Attention should be paid to all these factors, both in preoperative assessment and postoperative care, to prevent and promptly treat postoperative complications.

  19. Increased CD64 expression on polymorphonuclear neutrophils indicates infectious complications following solid organ transplantation.

    PubMed

    Grey, Daniel; Sack, Ulrich; Scholz, Markus; Knaack, Heike; Fricke, Stephan; Oppel, Christoph; Luderer, Daniel; Fangmann, Josef; Emmrich, Frank; Kamprad, Manja

    2011-06-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the diagnostic value of monitoring CD64 antigen upregulation on polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMN) for the identification of infectious complications in the postoperative course of solid organ transplanted patients. Twenty-five kidney, 13 liver, and four pancreas-kidney transplanted patients were included. Beginning with preoperative values up to postoperative values after 3 months for each patient, the PMN CD64 Index, HLA-DR on monocytes, NKp44+ NK and NK/T cells, CXCR3+ NK cells, CXCR3+ T helper cells, CXCR3+ NK/T cells, and CD4/CD8 ratio were measured by flow cytometry. Subsequently they were correlated with confirmed postoperative complications. Measuring the PMN CD64 Index reached a sensitivity of 89% and a specificity of 65% in the detection of infectious complications. Concerning this matter, it was a significantly better marker than all other included parameters except CXCR3+ NK/T cells. In contrast, according to our results the PMN CD64 Index has no diagnostic relevance in detection of rejections. The combination of included parameters showed no improved diagnostic value. Due to its high sensitivity and specificity for infectious complications CD64 on PMN could be proven a very good indicator in evaluating suspected infectious complications in the postoperative course of transplanted patients.

  20. Immediate postoperative complications in transsphenoidal pituitary surgery: A prospective study

    PubMed Central

    Chowdhury, Tumul; Prabhakar, Hemanshu; Bithal, Parmod K.; Schaller, Bernhard; Dash, Hari Hara

    2014-01-01

    Background: Considering the important role of pituitary gland in regulating various endocrine axes and its unique anatomical location, various postoperative complications can be anticipated resulting from surgery on pituitary tumors. We examined and categorized the immediate postoperative complications according to various tumor pathologies. Materials and Methods: We carried out a prospective study in 152 consecutive patients and noted various postoperative complications during neurosurgical intensive care unit stay (within 48 hrs of hospital stay) in patients undergoing transsphenoidal removal of pituitary tumors. Results: In our series, various groups showed different postoperative complications out of which, cerebrospinal fluid leak was the commonest followed by diabetes insipidus, postoperative nausea and vomiting, and hematoma at operation site. Conclusion: Various immediate postoperative complications can be anticipated in transsphenoidal pituitary surgery even though, it is considered to be relatively safe. PMID:25191182

  1. Preoperative Nutritional Status and Clinical Complications in the Postoperative Period of Cardiac Surgeries

    PubMed Central

    Gonçalves, Luciana de Brito; de Jesus, Natanael Moura Teixeira; Gonçalves, Maiara de Brito; Dias, Lidiane Cristina Gomes; Deiró, Tereza Cristina Bomfim de Jesus

    2016-01-01

    Objective This study aims to assess the preoperative nutritional status of patients and the role it plays in the occurrence of clinical complications in the postoperative period of major elective cardiac surgeries. Methods Cross-sectional study comprising 72 patients aged 20 years or older, who underwent elective cardiac surgery. The preoperative nutritional assessment consisted of nutritional screening, anthropometry (including the measurement of the adductor pollicis muscle thickness) and biochemical tests. The patients were monitored for up to 10 days after the surgery in order to control the occurrence of postoperative complications. The R software, version 3.0.2, was used to statistically analyze the data. Results Clinical complications were found in 62.5% (n=42) of the studied samples and complications of non-infectious nature were most often found. Serum albumin appeared to be associated with renal complications (P=0.026) in the nutritional status indicators analyzed herein. The adductor pollicis muscle thickness was associated with infectious complications and presented mean of 9.39±2.32 mm in the non-dominant hand (P=0.030). No significant correlation was found between the other indicators and the clinical complications. Conclusion The adductor pollicis muscle thickness and the serum albumin seemed be associated with clinical complications in the postoperative period of cardiac surgeries. PMID:27982346

  2. Infection control practices and infectious complications in dermatological surgery.

    PubMed

    Rogues, A M; Lasheras, A; Amici, J M; Guillot, P; Beylot, C; Taïeb, A; Gachie, J P

    2007-03-01

    The aim of this study was to assess infection control practices and their impact upon infectious complications in skin surgery conducted by private dermatologists. A prospective study was carried out by 73 volunteers belonging to the Surgical Group of the Société Française de Dermatologie over a period of three months. Data were collected for surgical procedures performed during this period, including the excision of all benign or malignant tumours, but excluding sebaceous cysts and pyodermas. A total of 3491 dermatological surgical procedures were included in the survey. Post-operative infections occurred in 67 patients (1.9%), with superficial suppuration accounting for 92.5% of surgical site infections. The incidence was higher in the excision group with a reconstructive procedure (4.3%) than in excisions alone (1.6%). Infection control precautions varied according to the site of procedure; multivariate analysis showed that haemorrhagic complications were an independent factor for infection in both types of surgical procedure. The male gender, immunosuppressive therapy and not wearing sterile gloves were independent factors for infections occurring following excisions with reconstruction. Not all of the procedures needed the use of a hospital theatre. It is clear that for excisions with a reconstructive procedure or for certain anatomical sites, such as the nose, there should be more emphasis upon infection control precautions. Further studies are needed to establish optimal guidelines for this kind of surgery.

  3. [Postoperative complications in patients with cervicothoracic injuries].

    PubMed

    Tatarinova, E V; Pogodina, A N; Korovkina, E N

    2014-01-01

    The results of the diagnosis and treatment of 117 patients with cervicothoracic injuries were analyzed. Different complications were observed in 51 (43.6%) cases. The main reasons contributing to the development of complications included late diagnosis of lesions of trachea and esophagus, acute blood loss, inadequate hemostasis during surgery.

  4. Prevention and Management of Infectious Complications of Percutaneous Interventions

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Steven Y.; Philip, Asher; Richter, Michael D.; Gupta, Sanjay; Lessne, Mark L.; Kim, Charles Y.

    2015-01-01

    Infectious complications following interventional radiology (IR) procedures can cause significant patient morbidity and, potentially, mortality. As the number and breadth of IR procedures grow, it becomes increasingly evident that interventional radiologists must possess a thorough understanding of these potential infectious complications. Furthermore, given the increasing incidence of antibiotic-resistant bacteria, emphasis on cost containment, and attention to quality of care, it is critical to have infection control strategies to maximize patient safety. This article reviews infectious complications associated with percutaneous ablation of liver tumors, transarterial embolization of liver tumors, uterine fibroid embolization, percutaneous nephrostomy, percutaneous biliary interventions, central venous catheters, and intravascular stents. Emphasis is placed on incidence, risk factors, prevention, and management. With the use of these strategies, IR procedures can be performed with reduced risk of infectious complications. PMID:26038616

  5. Postoperative pyoderma gangrenosum: a rare complication after appendectomy.

    PubMed

    Faghihi, G; Abtahi-Naeini, B; Nikyar, Z; Jamshidi, K; Bahrami, A

    2015-01-01

    Pyoderma gangrenosum (PG) is an uncommon inflammatory ulcerative skin disease. It is characterized by painful progressive necrosis of the wound margins. Rarely, postoperative pyoderma gangrenosum (PPG) manifests as a severe disturbance of wound healing following surgical interventions. Only rare cases of this complication have been reported after appendectomy. We report a case of PPG in a 29-year-old female after appendectomy. She was successfully treated with oral prednisolone. Postoperative pyoderma gangrenosum should be kept in mind in the differential diagnosis of any postoperative delayed wound healing, because this disease is simply distinguished from a postoperative wound.

  6. Rectal Culture-Guided Targeted Antimicrobial Prophylaxis Reduces the Incidence of Post-Operative Infectious Complications in Men at High Risk for Infections Submitted to Transrectal Ultrasound Prostate Biopsy – Results of a Cross-Sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Boeri, Luca; Fontana, Matteo; Gallioli, Andrea; Zanetti, Stefano Paolo; Catellani, Michele; Longo, Fabrizio; Mangiarotti, Barbara; Montanari, Emanuele

    2017-01-01

    The role of rectal culture-guided antimicrobial prophylaxis (TAP) in reducing infectious complications (IC) after transrectal-ultrasound prostate biopsy (TRUSPBx) is conflicting. We assessed the prevalence of IC in a cohort of men at high risk for IC submitted to TRUSPBx and treated with either TAP or empirical prophylaxis (EAP). Data from 53 patients at high risk for IC undergoing TRUSPBx were collected. Patients who did not receive a rectal swab (RS) were treated with EAP with fluoroquinolones (FQs). Of those who received the RS, patients with FQ-susceptible organisms received ciprofloxacin while those with FQ-resistant organisms received TAP. Office visits were scheduled to investigate the rate of complication at day 7 and 30 after TRUSPBx. Comorbidities were scored with the Charlson Comorbidity Index (CCI). Descriptive statistics and logistic regression models detailed the association between clinical parameters and IC rate. Out of 53 men, 17 (32.1%) had RS while 36 (67.9%) did not. All RS cultures were positive for E. Coli and 4 (23.5%) reported FQ-resistant pathogens. Considering risk factors for IC, no difference was found in terms of CCI, rate of diabetes, UTIs or recent antibiotic utilization between groups. Overall, 12 (22.6%) men reported IC, with a greater proportion of them belonging to the group treated with EAP (30.6% vs 5.9%; p = 0.045). Of these, 9 (25.0%) patients, all treated with EAP, developed post biopsy UTIs. E. Coli sustained all UTIs and 7 (77.7%) were FQ resistant. At multivariable analysis, CCI≥1, a history of UTIs/prostatitis and recent antibiotic utilization (all p<0.04) were the most powerful predictors for ICs. In conclusion, we found that compared to EAP, TAP significantly reduces ICs, in men at high risk for post TRUSPBx IC. Patients at risk for IC, especially those with recent antibiotic utilization, CCI≥1 and a history of UTIs/prostatitis before biopsy, could benefit from TAP. PMID:28122053

  7. Rectal Culture-Guided Targeted Antimicrobial Prophylaxis Reduces the Incidence of Post-Operative Infectious Complications in Men at High Risk for Infections Submitted to Transrectal Ultrasound Prostate Biopsy - Results of a Cross-Sectional Study.

    PubMed

    Boeri, Luca; Fontana, Matteo; Gallioli, Andrea; Zanetti, Stefano Paolo; Catellani, Michele; Longo, Fabrizio; Mangiarotti, Barbara; Montanari, Emanuele

    2017-01-01

    The role of rectal culture-guided antimicrobial prophylaxis (TAP) in reducing infectious complications (IC) after transrectal-ultrasound prostate biopsy (TRUSPBx) is conflicting. We assessed the prevalence of IC in a cohort of men at high risk for IC submitted to TRUSPBx and treated with either TAP or empirical prophylaxis (EAP). Data from 53 patients at high risk for IC undergoing TRUSPBx were collected. Patients who did not receive a rectal swab (RS) were treated with EAP with fluoroquinolones (FQs). Of those who received the RS, patients with FQ-susceptible organisms received ciprofloxacin while those with FQ-resistant organisms received TAP. Office visits were scheduled to investigate the rate of complication at day 7 and 30 after TRUSPBx. Comorbidities were scored with the Charlson Comorbidity Index (CCI). Descriptive statistics and logistic regression models detailed the association between clinical parameters and IC rate. Out of 53 men, 17 (32.1%) had RS while 36 (67.9%) did not. All RS cultures were positive for E. Coli and 4 (23.5%) reported FQ-resistant pathogens. Considering risk factors for IC, no difference was found in terms of CCI, rate of diabetes, UTIs or recent antibiotic utilization between groups. Overall, 12 (22.6%) men reported IC, with a greater proportion of them belonging to the group treated with EAP (30.6% vs 5.9%; p = 0.045). Of these, 9 (25.0%) patients, all treated with EAP, developed post biopsy UTIs. E. Coli sustained all UTIs and 7 (77.7%) were FQ resistant. At multivariable analysis, CCI≥1, a history of UTIs/prostatitis and recent antibiotic utilization (all p<0.04) were the most powerful predictors for ICs. In conclusion, we found that compared to EAP, TAP significantly reduces ICs, in men at high risk for post TRUSPBx IC. Patients at risk for IC, especially those with recent antibiotic utilization, CCI≥1 and a history of UTIs/prostatitis before biopsy, could benefit from TAP.

  8. Infectious complications after mass disasters: the Marmara earthquake experience.

    PubMed

    Keven, Kenan; Ates, Kenan; Sever, Mehmet Sukru; Yenicesu, Mujdat; Canbakan, Basol; Arinsoy, Turgay; Ozdemir, Nurhan; Duranay, Murat; Altun, Bulent; Erek, Ekrem

    2003-01-01

    The Marmara earthquake occurred on 17 August 1999. There were 639 renal victims, of whom 477 needed some form of renal replacement therapy. Although several medical complications have been reported in the literature, there has been no detailed description of infectious complications in patients with crush syndrome after earthquakes. Data from 35 hospitals considering clinical and laboratory findings, as well as infectious complications and the results of microbiological examinations, were analysed. 223 out of 639 (34.9%) patients had infectious complications, which comprised the most frequent medical problem in the renal victims. The patients who suffered from infections had a higher mortality rate than those who did not (p = 0.03). Sepsis and wound infection were the main presentation of the infectious complications. 121 (18.9%) patients suffered from sepsis; the mortality rate was higher in these patients (27.3%) than in victims who did not suffer from sepsis (12.4%, p < 0.0001). In a multivariate model, sepsis was associated with increased mortality (p = 0.0002, odds ratio 2.45, 95% confidence interval 1.52-3.96). 53 (8.2%) and 41 (6.4%) patients had wound and pulmonary infections, respectively. Most of the infections were nosocomial in origin and caused by Gram-negative aerobic bacteria and Staphylococcus spp. Infectious complications are common in renal victims of catastrophic earthquakes and are associated with increased mortality when complicated by sepsis.

  9. Thyroidectomy: post-operative care and common complications.

    PubMed

    Furtado, L

    Any surgical procedure involves risks. Thyroid surgery can cause potentially fatal complications during the early post-operative phase. It is essential that nurses have the knowledge and skills to detect early signs and symptoms of potential complications and take appropriate action. Early detection and rapid response are key to maintaining patient safety and minimising harm.

  10. [The neurological complications of infectious endocarditis].

    PubMed

    Arauz-Góngora, A A; Souta-Meiriño, C A; Cotter-Lemus, L E; Guzmán-Rodríguez, C; Méndez-Domínguez, A

    1998-01-01

    We review the neurologic complications of 131 episodes of infective endocarditis, and the influences of some factors that are considered risk factors at its presentation, like the presence of vegetations detected by echocardiography, type and location of involved valve, or bacterial culture. Neurologic complications occurred in 28 patients (21.4%), 4 of them were excluded because of the absence of neuroimaging studies. In 21 patients the underlying cardiac pathology was valve disease and in the remaining 3 patients was congenital heart disease. 11 patients had native valve endocarditis and 10 prosthetic valve endocarditis. The cultured bacteria were Streptococcus viridans in 8 cases and Staphylococcus aureus in 7. The most frequent complication was cerebrovascular with incidence of cerebral embolism, and intracerebral hemorrhage of 62.5% and 8.3% respectively. Echocardiographic evidence of vegetation was seen in 18 patients, and cerebral embolism were noted in 12. Death occurred in 29% of patients with neurologic complications and 27% without. Two of nine patients who underwent open-heat surgery died. We conclude that there is no difference in the incidence of neurologic complications between mitral and aortic valve groups, neither when comparing native and prosthetic valve groups. Open-heart surgery does not increase mortality in this group of patients.

  11. Predictors of Postoperative Complications After Trimodality Therapy for Esophageal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Jingya; Wei, Caimiao; Tucker, Susan L.; Myles, Bevan; Palmer, Matthew; Hofstetter, Wayne L.; Swisher, Stephen G.; Ajani, Jaffer A.; Cox, James D.; Komaki, Ritsuko; Liao, Zhongxing; Lin, Steven H.

    2013-08-01

    Purpose: While trimodality therapy for esophageal cancer has improved patient outcomes, surgical complication rates remain high. The goal of this study was to identify modifiable factors associated with postoperative complications after neoadjuvant chemoradiation. Methods and Materials: From 1998 to 2011, 444 patients were treated at our institution with surgical resection after chemoradiation. Postoperative (pulmonary, gastrointestinal [GI], cardiac, wound healing) complications were recorded up to 30 days postoperatively. Kruskal-Wallis tests and χ{sup 2} or Fisher exact tests were used to assess associations between continuous and categorical variables. Multivariate logistic regression tested the association between perioperative complications and patient or treatment factors that were significant on univariate analysis. Results: The most frequent postoperative complications after trimodality therapy were pulmonary (25%) and GI (23%). Lung capacity and the type of radiation modality used were independent predictors of pulmonary and GI complications. After adjusting for confounding factors, pulmonary and GI complications were increased in patients treated with 3-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT) versus intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT; odds ratio [OR], 2.018; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.104-3.688; OR, 1.704; 95% CI, 1.03-2.82, respectively) and for patients treated with 3D-CRT versus proton beam therapy (PBT; OR, 3.154; 95% CI, 1.365-7.289; OR, 1.55; 95% CI, 0.78-3.08, respectively). Mean lung radiation dose (MLD) was strongly associated with pulmonary complications, and the differences in toxicities seen for the radiation modalities could be fully accounted for by the MLD delivered by each of the modalities. Conclusions: The radiation modality used can be a strong mitigating factor of postoperative complications after neoadjuvant chemoradiation.

  12. Risk factors for postoperative complications in robotic general surgery.

    PubMed

    Fantola, Giovanni; Brunaud, Laurent; Nguyen-Thi, Phi-Linh; Germain, Adeline; Ayav, Ahmet; Bresler, Laurent

    2017-03-01

    The feasibility and safety of robotically assisted procedures in general surgery have been reported from various groups worldwide. Because postoperative complications may lead to longer hospital stays and higher costs overall, analysis of risk factors for postoperative surgical complications in this subset of patients is clinically relevant. The goal of this study was to identify risk factors for postoperative morbidity after robotic surgical procedures in general surgery. We performed an observational monocentric retrospective study. All consecutive robotic surgical procedures from November 2001 to December 2013 were included. One thousand consecutive general surgery patients met the inclusion criteria. The mean overall postoperative morbidity and major postoperative morbidity (Clavien >III) rates were 20.4 and 6 %, respectively. This included a conversion rate of 4.4 %, reoperation rate of 4.5 %, and mortality rate of 0.2 %. Multivariate analysis showed that ASA score >3 [OR 1.7; 95 % CI (1.2-2.4)], hematocrit value <38 [OR 1.6; 95 % CI (1.1-2.2)], previous abdominal surgery [OR 1.5; 95 % CI (1-2)], advanced dissection [OR 5.8; 95 % CI (3.1-10.6)], and multiquadrant surgery [OR 2.5; 95 % CI (1.7-3.8)] remained independent risk factors for overall postoperative morbidity. It also showed that advanced dissection [OR 4.4; 95 % CI (1.9-9.6)] and multiquadrant surgery [OR 4.4; 95 % CI (2.3-8.5)] remained independent risk factors for major postoperative morbidity (Clavien >III). This study identifies independent risk factors for postoperative overall and major morbidity in robotic general surgery. Because these factors independently impacted postoperative complications, we believe they could be taken into account in future studies comparing conventional versus robot-assisted laparoscopic procedures in general surgery.

  13. Imaging panorama in postoperative complications after liver transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Sureka, Binit; Bansal, Kalpana; Rajesh, S; Mukund, Amar; Pamecha, Viniyendra; Arora, Ankur

    2016-01-01

    The liver is the second most-often transplanted solid organ after the kidney, so it is clear that liver disease is a common and serious problem around the globe. With the advancements in surgical, oncological and imaging techniques, orthotopic liver transplantation has become the first-line treatment for many patients with end-stage liver disease. Ultrasound, and Doppler are the most economical and cost-effective imaging modalities for evaluating postoperative fluid collections and vascular complications. Computed tomography (CT) is used to confirm the findings of ultrasound and look for pulmonary complications. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is used for the diagnosis of biliary complications, bile leaks and neurological complications. This article illustrates the imaging options for diagnosing the various complications that can be encountered in the postoperative period after liver transplantation. PMID:26534929

  14. [Postoperative complications after larynx resection: assessment with video-cinematography].

    PubMed

    Kreuzer, S; Schima, W; Schober, E; Strasser, G; Denk, D M; Swoboda, H

    1998-02-01

    In past decades, the surgical techniques for treating laryngeal carcinoma have been vastly improved. For circumscribed tumors, voice-conserving resections are possible and for extensive neoplasms, radical laryngectomy, sometimes combined with chemoradiation, has been developed. Postoperative complications regarding swallowing function are not uncommon. Radiologic examinations, especially pharyngography and videofluoroscopy, are most often used to evaluate patients with complications after laryngeal surgery. An optimized videofluoroscopic technique for evaluation of complications is described. The radiologic appearance of early and late complications, such as fistulas, hematomas, aspiration, strictures, dysfunction of the pharyngoesophageal sphincter, tumor recurrence, and metachronous tumors is demonstrated.

  15. Risk factors for postoperative complications following oral surgery

    PubMed Central

    SHIGEISHI, Hideo; OHTA, Kouji; TAKECHI, Masaaki

    2015-01-01

    Objective The objective of this study was to clarify significant risk factors for postoperative complications in the oral cavity in patients who underwent oral surgery, excluding those with oral cancer. Material and Methods This study reviewed the records of 324 patients who underwent mildly to moderately invasive oral surgery (e.g., impacted tooth extraction, cyst excision, fixation of mandibular and maxillary fractures, osteotomy, resection of a benign tumor, sinus lifting, bone grafting, removal of a sialolith, among others) under general anesthesia or intravenous sedation from 2012 to 2014 at the Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Reconstructive Surgery, Hiroshima University Hospital. Results Univariate analysis showed a statistical relationship between postoperative complications (i.e., surgical site infection, anastomotic leak) and diabetes (p=0.033), preoperative serum albumin level (p=0.009), and operation duration (p=0.0093). Furthermore, preoperative serum albumin level (<4.0 g/dL) and operation time (≥120 minutes) were found to be independent factors affecting postoperative complications in multiple logistic regression analysis results (odds ratio 3.82, p=0.0074; odds ratio 2.83, p=0.0086, respectively). Conclusion Our results indicate that a low level of albumin in serum and prolonged operation duration are important risk factors for postoperative complications occurring in the oral cavity following oral surgery. PMID:26398515

  16. Reducing the Risk of Postoperative Genital Complications in Male Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dossanova, ?ssem; Lozovoy, Vasiliy; Wood, Dan; ??nekenova, ?enzhekyz; Botabayeva, ?igul; Dossanov, Bolatbek; Lozovaya, Yelena; ?marov, ?algat

    2016-01-01

    The reproductive system of adolescents is exposed to a high risk of anomalies. In spite of the successes of surgical correction, the percentage of postoperative complications remains high. Special attention should be paid to circumcision, which is regarded as a religious tradition in many countries and carried out with sanitary violations. This…

  17. The Effect of Immunonutrition on the Postoperative Complications in Thymoma with Myasthenia Gravis

    PubMed Central

    Xin, Yanzhong; Cai, Hongfei; Wu, Lihui

    2016-01-01

    Object. To test whether preoperative immunonutrition is efficacious in reducing postoperative complications in patients of thymoma with myasthenia gravis (MG). Material and Methods. A total of 244 patients operated on for thymoma with myasthenia gravis were prospectively assigned to two groups, each receiving seven-day preoperative and seven-day postoperative nutrition. The patients in immunonutrition group were given oral immunonutrition (IN). The patients in control group received oral standard nutrition. Immunonutritional and inflammatory biomarkers (IgA, IgG, IgM, CD3t, CD4t, CD8t, CD4t/CD8t ratio, NK-cell, prealbumin, albumin, white blood cells counts, and C-reactive protein) and clinical variables (age, gender, BMI, performance status, type of thymoma, type of MG, operative time, pathology, operative approach, postoperative complications, quantity of drainage, hospital stays) were examined. Results. A significant reduction in the length of hospital stay, quantity of drainage, and postoperative complications was observed in the IN group (p < 0.05). An increase in the level of IgA, IgG, IgM, CD3+T, CD4+T, CD4+T/CD8+T, WBC, CRP, and NK-cell in the IN group was observed after thymectomy, while a decrease was seen with regard to prealbumin and albumin (p < 0.05). Conclusion. Preoperative immunonutrition support is effective in reducing postoperative complications in patients of thymoma with MG. It helps to lower the risk of postoperative infectious complications and hospital stays. PMID:27956763

  18. Impact of hypertonic saline on postoperative complications for patients undergoing upper gastrointestinal surgery

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Siqi; Shang, Qingjuan; Geng, Qiankun; Yang, Yang; Wang, Yan; Guo, Chunbao

    2017-01-01

    Abstract The aim of this study was to explore the impact of 3% hypertonic saline (HS) intragastric administration for patients who underwent upper gastrointestinal surgery. During the postoperative period, 3% HS has been suggested as a means to improve the intestinal edema and reduce gastrointestinal complications. The medical records of 111 patients with HS intragastric administration following upper gastrointestinal surgery and 268 patients, served as control, were reviewed retrospectively. Propensity score matching was performed to adjust for selected baseline variables. Clinical outcomes, including early gastrointestinal function recovery, postoperative complications, and length of hospital stay, were compared according to the HS intragastric administration or not. HS intragastric administration was associated with prompt postoperative gastrointestinal function recovery, including first flatus (risk ratio [RR], 1.32; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.89–1.65; P = 0.048) and feeding within 3 postoperative days (RR (95% CI), 0.57 (0.49–0.77); P = 0.036). Early ileus occurred in 25 of 108 patients with HS treatment versus 36 of 108 patients without HS treatment (RR (95% CI), 1.43 (0.63–2.15); P = 0.065). The patients with HS experienced a lower overall postoperative complication (odds ratio [OD] 0.57; 95% CI, 0.33–1.09; P = 0.063), including trend toward a decrease for infectious complications (15[13.9] vs 23[21.3]; P = 0.11; OD, 0.59; 95% CI, 0.29–1.22). There was a decreased incidence of anastomotic leakage (1[0.9] vs 7[6.5]; P = 0.033) and postoperative ileuas (5[4.6%] vs 11[10.2%]; P = 0.096) in the HS administration patients. Our study demonstrated beneficial postoperative clinical effects of HS intragastric administration in patients who had undergone upper gastrointestinal surgery, such as prompt postoperative gastrointestinal function recovery and reduced overall postoperative complications, which may be attributed to a

  19. Preoperative oral health care reduces postoperative inflammation and complications in oral cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Shigeishi, Hideo; Ohta, Kouji; Fujimoto, Shinichi; Nakagawa, Takayuki; Mizuta, Kuniko; Ono, Shigehiro; Shimasue, Hiroshi; Ninomiya, Yoshiaki; Higashikawa, Koichiro; Tada, Misato; Ishida, Fumi; Okui, Gaku; Okumura, Toshiya; Fukui, Akiko; Kubozono, Kazumi; Yamamoto, Kazuhiro; Ishida, Yoko; Seino, Sayaka; Hashikata, Miho; Sasaki, Kazuki; Naruse, Takako; Rahman, Mohammad Zeshaan; Uetsuki, Ryo; Nimiya, Akiko; Takamoto, Megumi; Dainobu, Kana; Tokikazu, Tomoko; Nishi, Hiromi; Sugiyama, Masaru; Takechi, Masaaki

    2016-01-01

    The records of 70 patients with oral cancer who were treated at a single institution between 2008 and 2014 were reviewed. The body temperature, white blood cell count, and C-reactive protein (CRP) levels were compared between those who had received preoperative oral care (oral care group) and those who had not received any (non-oral care group). When the patients were divided into those who underwent minimally invasive surgery and those who underwent severely invasive surgery, the mean CRP level in the early postoperative period was lower in the oral care group as compared with the non-oral care group in those who underwent minimally invasive surgery as well as those who underwent severely invasive surgery. However, the mean CRP level was most evidently reduced in the severely invasive group on days 1 and 3–5. However, no significant differences were observed with regard to the percentage of postoperative infectious complications (for example, surgical site infection, anastomotic leak and pneumonia) between the oral care (13.6%) and non-oral care (20.8%) groups, though a reduced prevalence of postoperative complications following preoperative oral care was noted. The results of the present study suggest that preoperative oral care can decrease inflammation during the early postoperative stage in patients with oral cancer who undergo severely invasive surgery. PMID:27588111

  20. Convergent Validity of Three Methods for Measuring Postoperative Complications

    PubMed Central

    Fritz, Bradley A.; Escallier, Krisztina E.; Abdallah, Arbi Ben; Oberhaus, Jordan; Becker, Jennifer; Geczi, Kristin; McKinnon, Sherry; Helsten, Dan L.; Sharma, Anshuman; Wildes, Troy S.; Avidan, Michael S.

    2016-01-01

    Background Anesthesiologists need tools to accurately track postoperative outcomes. The accuracy of patient report in identifying a wide variety of postoperative complications after diverse surgical procedures has not previously been investigated. Methods In this cohort study, 1,578 adult surgical patients completed a survey at least 30 days after their procedure asking if they had experienced any of 18 complications while in the hospital after surgery. Patient responses were compared to the results of an automated electronic chart review and (for a random subset of 750 patients) to a manual chart review. Results from automated chart review were also compared to those from manual chart review. Forty-two randomly selected patients were contacted by telephone to explore reasons for discrepancies between patient report and manual chart review. Results Comparisons between patient report, automated chart review, and manual chart review demonstrated poor-to-moderate positive agreement (range, 0 to 58%) and excellent negative agreement (range, 82 to 100%). Discordance between patient report and manual chart review was frequently explicable by patients reporting events that happened outside the time period of interest. Conclusions Patient report can provide information about subjective experiences or events that happen after hospital discharge, but often yields different results from chart review for specific in-hospital complications. Effective in-hospital communication with patients and thoughtful survey design may increase the quality of patient-reported complication data. PMID:27028469

  1. Risk factors for postoperative complications in total thyroidectomy

    PubMed Central

    Caulley, Lisa; Johnson-Obaseki, Stephanie; Luo, Lindy; Javidnia, Hedyeh

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Thyroid cancer incidence is increasing, and with it, an increase in total thyroidectomy. There are limited studies comparing outcomes in total thyroidectomy performed in the inpatient versus outpatient setting. The objective of this study was to perform a comparative analysis of risk factors and outcomes of postoperative morbidity and mortality in total thyroidectomy performed as an inpatient versus outpatient surgery. Retrospective cohort study of data from the 2005 to 2014 multi-institutional, risk-adjusted American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program (ACS-NSQIP) database. A multivariate regression model with corresponding odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals was used to determine 30-day morbidity and mortality after total thyroidectomies, and also risk factors of postoperative outcomes. From 2005 to 2014, 40,025 total thyroidectomies were performed (48.5% inpatient, 51.5% outpatient). The 30-day complication rate for all total thyroidectomies was 7.74%. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was performed to control for potential confounding variables. Preoperative factors that affected complications rates for inpatient thyroidectomies included: age ≥70, non-Caucasian race, dependent functional status, history of congestive heart failure, smoking history, bleeding disorder, wound infection, and preoperative sepsis (P < 0.05). In addition, preoperative factors affecting complications in thyroidectomy performed as an outpatient surgery included malignant thyroid pathology (P  0.05). We identified a subset of preoperative conditions that affect risk of complications after total thyroidectomy. Recommendations for patient selection for outpatient total thyroidectomies should be modified to account for pre-existing conditions that increase the risk of postoperative morbidity. PMID:28151852

  2. Hyperprolactinaemia: a cause of severe postoperative complication after reduction mammaplasty.

    PubMed

    Mestak, Ondrej; Mestak, Jan; Borsky, Jiri

    2014-12-01

    Galactorrhoea is a rare complication of wound healing after breast reduction and its association with necrosis of the areolar skin in women with no recent history of breast feeding has to our knowledge never been described. Galactorrhoea is common and there are many differential diagnoses. We report a case of a 46-year-old woman who had bilateral reductions of the breast and developed hyperprolactinaemia and galactorrhoea six weeks postoperatively. Subsequently she developed dry necrosis of both areolas. All radiographic and laboratory findings were within the reference ranges except for of prolactin.

  3. EARLY POSTOPERATIVE COMPLICATIONS IN ROUX-EN-Y GASTRIC BYPASS

    PubMed Central

    STOLL, Aluisio; ROSIN, Leandro; DIAS, Mariana Fernandes; MARQUIOTTI, Bruna; GUGELMIN, Giovana; STOLL, Gabriela Fanezzi

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background: Roux-en-Y gastric bypass is one of the most common bariatric surgery and leads to considerable weight loss in the first months. Aim: To quantify the main early postoperative complications in patients submitted to the gastric bypass. Method: Observational retrospective cohort. Data of 1051 patients with class II obesity associated with comorbidities or class III obesity submitted to the gastric bypass with 30 days of follow-up starting from the date of the surgery. Results: The age average was 36 years with a predominance of females (81.1%). The mean preoperative body mass index was 43 kg/m². The major complication was fistula (2.3%), followed by intestinal obstruction (0.5%) and pulmonary embolism (0.5%). Death occurred in 0.6% of the cases. Conclusion: In the period of 30 days after surgery the overall complication rate was 3.8%; reoperation was necessary in 2.6% and death occurred in 0.6%. Fistula was the main complication and the leading cause of hospitalization in intensive care unit, reoperation and death. PMID:27683781

  4. Infectious Complications and Morbidities After Neonatal Bloodstream Infections

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Ming-Horng; Lee, Chiang-Wen; Chu, Shih-Ming; Lee, I-Ta; Lien, Reyin; Huang, Hsuan-Rong; Chiang, Ming-Chou; Fu, Ren-Huei; Hsu, Jen-Fu; Huang, Yhu-Chering

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Few data are available on the clinical characteristics of complications and morbidities after neonatal bloodstream infections (BSIs), understood as any newly infectious focus or organ dysfunction directly related to BSIs but not occur concurrently. However, these bloodstream-associated infectious complications (BSICs) contribute significantly to increased hospital stay, cost, and final mortality. We performed an observational cohort study of unselected neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) patients based on records in a large clinical database. All neonates hospitalized in our NICU with BSI between 2006 and 2013 were reviewed, and those who developed BSICs were analyzed to identify the clinical characteristics and outcomes. Multivariate logistic regression was used to identify independent risk factors for BSICs. Of 975 episodes of neonatal BSI, 101 (10.4%) BSICs occurred in 93 neonates with a median interval of 3 days (range, 0–17 days) after onset of BSI and included newly infectious focuses in 40 episodes (39.6%), major organ dysfunctions after septic shock in 36 episodes (35.6%), and neurological complications after meningitis or septic shock in 34 episodes (33.7%). All patients with BSICs encountered various morbidities, which subsequently resulted in in-hospital death in 30 (32.3%) neonates, critical discharge in 4 (4.3%), and persistent sequelae in 17 (18.3%). After multivariate logistic regression analysis, independent risk factors for BSICs included initial inappropriate antibiotics (odds ratio [OR], 5.54; 95% confidence interval [CI], 3.40–9.01), BSI with septic shock (OR, 5.75; 95% CI, 3.51–9.40), and BSI concurrent with meningitis (OR, 9.20; 95% CI, 4.33–19.56). It is worth noting that a percentage of neonates with BSI encountered subsequent sequelae or died of infections complications, which were significantly associated with initial inappropriate antibiotic therapy, septic shock, and the occurrence of meningitis. Further investigation is

  5. [Postoperative necrotizing fasciitis: a rare and fatal complication].

    PubMed

    Ghezala, Hassen Ben; Feriani, Najla

    2016-01-01

    Postoperative parietal complications can be exceptionally severe and serious threatening vital prognosis. Necrotizing fasciitis is a rare infection of the skin and deep subcutaneous tissues, spreading along fascia and adipose tissue. It is mainly caused by group A streptococcus (streptococcus pyogenes) but also by other bacteria such as Vibrio vulnificus, Clostridium perfringens or Bacteroides fragilis. Necrotizing fasciitis is a real surgical and medical emergency. We report, in this study, a very rare case of abdominal parietal gangrene occurring in a 75-year-old woman on the fifth day after surgery for an ovarian cyst. Evolution was marked by occurrence of a refractory septic shock with a rapidly fatal course on the third day of management.

  6. Infectious anastomotic pseudoaneurysm complicating renal allograft: case report and review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Marvin MT; Chan, Yiu Che; Law, Yuk; Cheng, Stephen WK

    2017-01-01

    Infectious anastomotic pseudoaneurysm complicating renal transplant is rare, but probably under-reported with <30 cases worldwide. We report a 45-year-old man with hypertension, diabetes mellitus and end stage renal failure, who had a renal transplant anastomosed to the right external iliac artery and vein. Postoperatively, he made a slow recovery with malaise and persistent vague right iliac fossa discomfort. Ultrasound scan 1 month postoperatively showed perinephric collection, and fluid culture grew Enterococcus faecium and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. He was started on vancomycin, daptomycin and colistin. MAG-3 scan also showed suboptimal function in the renal allograft. His symptoms persisted with fever, and blood culture yielded P. aeruginosa. Repeated ultrasound scan, and subsequent computed tomography scan a few weeks later, showed perinephric collection and a large, 3.8×3.5 cm pseudoaneurysm posteromedial to the graft kidney. He underwent emergency graft excision, together with resection of the pseudoaneurysm with in situ reversed great saphenous vein interposition graft, and made a good recovery on hemodialysis. The aneurysm wall grew P. aeruginosa, and he was put on imipenem and cilastatin (tienam), colistin, ciprofloxacin and daptomycin. To our knowledge, this is one of very few cases in the world’s literature in which a P. aeruginosa infectious anastomotic pseudoaneurysm developed after a renal allograft. PMID:28260939

  7. Treatment of infectious complications of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome.

    PubMed

    Furio, M M; Wordell, C J

    1985-01-01

    The infectious complications of the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) are discussed, and the conventional and nonconventional therapies used for these infections are reviewed. The infections most commonly encountered in patients with AIDS are Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia (58%), Candida esophagitis (31%), toxoplasmosis (21%), cytomegalovirus infections (15%), and herpes-simplex virus infections (12%). Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia is the most common life-threatening process in these patients. Trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (TMP-SMZ) is considered the drug of choice for its treatment. Oral candidiasis often indicates the progression to AIDS in the high-risk populations of homosexual or bisexual men, intravenous drug abusers, and individuals with hemophilia. Nystatin suspension is commonly used to treat oral candidiasis, while Candida esophagitis demands systemic therapy with ketoconazole. Toxoplasmosis most commonly manifests itself in patients with AIDS as a cerebral mass lesion. The recommended therapy includes sulfadiazine and pyrimethamine. AIDS patients frequently experience protozoal invasion of the intestinal tract with Giardia lamblia, Isospora belli, and Cryptosporidium muris. Various drugs have been tried for these infections, including quinacrine hydrochloride, metronidazole, TMP-SMZ, and spiramycin. Cytomegalovirus (CMV) infections commonly involve the lungs, gastrointestinal tract, eyes, brain, and nervous system. Attempts to treat these disseminated CMV infections with antiviral agents, including acyclovir, have not been successful. However, acyclovir has been found beneficial in the treatment of herpes-simplex virus infections. Multiple infectious complications may occur in patients with AIDS as a result of the cellular-immune deficiency associated with this disease. Until more research is done with AIDS patients, therapy must be based on the data available from the treatment of these infections in immunosuppressed patients without AIDS.

  8. Infectious complications of antilymphocyte therapies in solid organ transplantation.

    PubMed

    Issa, Nicolas C; Fishman, Jay A

    2009-03-15

    Antilymphocyte therapies are widely used for immunosuppression in solid organ transplantation. These agents have varied mechanisms of action, with resulting differences in the intensity and duration of immunosuppression and in associated infectious complications. Induction therapy with antithymocyte globulins is associated with a greater incidence of cytomegalovirus, Epstein-Barr virus, and BK polyomavirus infections, compared with therapy with interleukin (IL)-2a receptor antagonists. However, long-term experience with the IL-2a receptor antagonists is lacking. By contrast, the treatment of graft rejection with T cell-depleting antibodies is associated with an increased risk of opportunistic infections. This is likely a reflection of the intensification of immunosuppression in the treatment of graft rejection and, often, a failure to link the use of antilymphocyte agents to prophylaxis for infection. The use of T cell-depleting agents, especially in the treatment of acute graft rejection, must be linked to monitoring and risk-adjusted prophylaxis for Pneumocystis, other fungi, Epstein-Barr virus, BK polyomavirus, and cytomegalovirus infection.

  9. [Infectious complications of long term intravenous devices: incidence, risk factors, diagnostic tools].

    PubMed

    Douard, M C; Ardoin, C; Payri, L; Tarot, J P

    1999-03-01

    Implantable venous ports and Hickman central venous catheters are widely used in patients with cancer, blood disorders, or HIV infection, both for in-hospital care and at home. Infectious complications are among the common causes for readmission in these patients. The present review discusses the incidence, risk factors, and diagnostic tools for infectious complications associated with long-term venous access devices.

  10. Postoperative discal cyst: An unusual complication after microendoscopic discectomy in teenagers.

    PubMed

    Jha, Subash C; Tonogai, Ichiro; Higashino, Kosaku; Sakai, Toshinori; Takata, Yoichiro; Goda, Yuichiro; Abe, Mitsunobu; Nagamachi, Akihiro; Fukuta, Shoji; Sairyo, Koichi

    2016-02-01

    Various complications after microendoscopic discectomy (MED) are well known, but postoperative discal cyst is a unique and relatively unknown complication. Here, we report on two teenage patients who presented with postoperative discal cyst after MED for herniated nucleus pulposus (HNP), which resolved after conservative treatment. The patients were diagnosed with HNP at L4-5 and L5-S1 based on MRI and then treated by MED. Postoperative discal cyst was diagnosed on MRI after recurrence of symptoms. Both patients were managed conservatively. T2-weighted MRI demonstrated hyperintense collections adjacent to the operated intervertebral disc level, which were communicating with the corresponding disc annulus. Because the clinical symptoms were relatively mild, the patients were managed conservatively; both made a complete clinical recovery with radiological evidence of improvement. Postoperative discal cyst is a relatively unknown complication after MED for HNP. Surgeons should be aware of this postoperative complication when operating on young individuals with HNP.

  11. Simplified cesarean section: a strategic surgical approach to minimize postoperative infectious morbidity.

    PubMed

    Pelosi

    1998-07-01

    Objective: A simplified method of cesarean delivery aimed at minimizing postoperative morbidity is illustrated.Methods: Two hundred consecutive cesarean deliveries were performed by the authors' simplified cesarean technique. Mean patient age was 27 years (range 17-46), and mean weight was 169 pounds (range 112-414). Indications for cesarean delivery included dystocia or failure to progress in labor (38%), repeat cesarean (32%), malpresentation (11.5%), fetal distress (9.5%), and other (9%).Results: Simplified cesarean delivery was successfully completed in all cases. Mean operating time was 16 minutes (range 9-33), mean blood loss was 460 mL (range 100-1150), and mean postsurgical hospitalization time was 72 hours (range 36-120). No bowel, bladder, or vascular injuries occurred. Postoperative febrile morbidity occurred in one patient (0.5%), ileus occurred in one patient (0.5%), and blood transfusion was administered to one patient (0.5%). No cases of wound infection, wound dehiscence, hematoma, or incisional hernia occurred. All patients were ambulatory on the first postoperative day. All but one patient (99.5%) tolerated a regular diet on the first postoperative day.Conclusions: The authors' technique of cesarean section appears to be a safe and efficient method for cesarean delivery associated with minimal postoperative infectious morbidity and rapid resumption of bowel and ambulatory function.

  12. Infectious complications after surgical splenectomy in children with sickle cell disease

    PubMed Central

    Monaco, Cypriano Petrus; Fonseca, Patricia Belintani Blum; Braga, Josefina Aparecida Pellegrini

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the frequency of infectious complications in children with sickle cell disease (SCD) after surgical splenectomy for acute splenic sequestration crisis. METHODS: Retrospective cohort of children with SCD who were born after 2002 and were regularly monitored until July 2013. Patients were divided into two groups: cases (children with SCD who underwent surgical splenectomy after an episode of splenic sequestration) and controls (children with SCD who did not have splenic sequestration and surgical procedures), in order to compare the frequency of invasive infections (sepsis, meningitis, bacteremia with positive blood cultures, acute chest syndrome and/or pneumonia) by data collected from medical records. Data were analyzed by descriptive statistical analysis. RESULTS: 44 patients were included in the case group. The mean age at the time of splenectomy was 2.6 years (1-6.9 years) and the mean postoperative length of follow-up was 6.1 years (3.8-9.9 years). The control group consisted of 69 patients with a mean age at the initial follow-up visit of 5.6 months (1-49 months) and a mean length of follow-up of 7.2 years (4-10.3 years).All children received pneumococcal conjugate vaccine. No significant difference was observed between groups in relation to infections during the follow-up. CONCLUSIONS: Surgical splenectomy in children with sickle cell disease that had splenic sequestration did not affect the frequency of infectious complications during 6 years of clinical follow-up. PMID:25913493

  13. [Relaparotomy and programmed sanation of the abdominal cavity in treatment of early postoperative complications].

    PubMed

    Trofymov, P S; Shestopalov, D V; Karakursakov, N E; Kysliakov, V V; Tatarchuk, P O

    2014-08-01

    The structure and causes of postoperative complications occurrence, necessitating early relaparotomy conduction through last 5 yrs and 30 yrs ago, were analyzed. The complications rate almost did not change, but their structure--essentially. The occurrence rate for eventration, adhesive ileus, relaparotomy performance for abdominal cavity abscess have had lowered significantly due to introduction of a new operative technologies and prophylactic measures. The lowering of lethality after relaparotomy is caused by improvement of the complications diagnosis, timely performance of reoperations, application of laparostomy in the treatment of postoperative peritonitis, what have permitted to govern a postoperative period course.

  14. [A simple point score for definition of the risk of postoperative complications].

    PubMed

    Grundmann, R; Papoulis, C

    1989-01-01

    During a 5-year-period we recorded prospectively 5,823 patients who had undergone general surgery and documented the postoperative complications as wound infection, pneumonia, reoperations and death. A score including all these complications was developed to evaluate the risk of an operation more exactly than using the wound infection rate alone. This method seems to provide a continuous monitoring and the comparison of the complication risks of certain operations within a quality assurance program. For gastric and colon surgery we found a correlation between postoperative antibiotic use and score, but not between score and postoperative hospitalization time.

  15. [Fibrin glue injection therapy with diluted thrombin for complicated postoperative fistulas following digestive surgery].

    PubMed

    Tono, Takeshi; Murakami, Masahiro; Ohtsuru, Minoru; Monden, Takushi

    2014-11-01

    Fibrin glue injection is used for treating postoperative digestive fistulas; however, this method is not always successful, especially in cases of complicated fistulas. Generally, the fibrin glue coagulates immediately after application before it reaches the end of the fistulas. Based on the results of an in vitro study of tensile strength and coagulation time, we utilized fibrin glue injection therapy with diluted thrombin solution (× 30) for treating refractory postoperative complicated fistulas in 23 cancer patients. In 20 of these patients, the fistulas were successfully closed after an average of 2.0 treatment cycles. This simple method of fibrin glue injection with diluted thrombin is useful for treating complicated postoperative digestive fistulas.

  16. Infectious Complications of Noncombat Trauma Patients Provided Care at a Military Trauma Center

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-05-01

    were admitted to the lCU for at lea-.t one day. The mo<.,t common infectious complications captured in the data- base were pneumonia, urinary tract infection , and... urinary tract infection were not asso- ciated with chest and abdominal injury. DISCUSSION These data present the first systematic overview of infectious

  17. [Clinical application of the plasma substitutes in patients with postoperative complications after surgeries for brain meningioma].

    PubMed

    Kvasha, M S; Iarotskiĭ, R Iu; Ivashenko, V I; Gavrish, R V; Dmitrieva, N Iu; Ivanovich, I N; Pushkareva, T M

    2011-04-01

    The issues on optimization of the restoration treatment of patients, suffering the brain meningioma, were discussed, basing on analysis of 498 observations. Tactics of the patients management in noncomplicated, complicated and severe course of postoperative period is adduced. The indices of survival and lethality, peculiarities of the infusion therapy were analyzed. The role of plasm-restituting preparations was demonstrated in complicated course of postoperative period. Rational complex approach to the restoration measures and intensive therapy conduction promotes the treatment efficacy raising, the patients fair quality of life securing in the brain meningioma in postoperative period.

  18. Randomized Clinical Trial for Early Postoperative Complications of Ex-PRESS Implantation versus Trabeculectomy: Complications Postoperatively of Ex-PRESS versus Trabeculectomy Study (CPETS).

    PubMed

    Arimura, Shogo; Takihara, Yuji; Miyake, Seiji; Iwasaki, Kentaro; Gozawa, Makoto; Matsumura, Takehiro; Tomomatsu, Takeshi; Takamura, Yoshihiro; Inatani, Masaru

    2016-05-17

    We compared early postoperative complications between trabeculectomy and Ex-PRESS implantation. Enrolled patients with 39 primary open-angle or 25 exfoliative glaucoma were randomly assigned to receive trabeculectomy (trabeculectomy group) or Ex-PRESS implantation (Ex-PRESS group). Primary outcomes were early postoperative complications, including postoperative anterior chamber inflammation, frequencies of hyphema, flat anterior chamber, choroidal detachment, hypotonic maculopathy, and the change of visual acuity. The postoperative flare values in trabeculectomy group were higher than those in the Ex-PRESS group (overall, P = 0.004; and 10 days, P = 0.02). Hyphema occurred significantly more frequently in the trabeculectomy group (P = 0.0025). There were no significant differences of the other primary outcomes between the two groups. Additionally, duration of anterior chamber opening was significantly shorter in the Ex-PRESS group (P = 0.0002) and the eyes that had iris contact with Ex-PRESS tube had significantly shallower anterior chambers than did the eyes without the iris contact (P = 0.013). The Ex-PRESS implantation prevented early postoperative inflammation and hyphema in the anterior chamber and shortened the duration of anterior chamber opening. Iris contact with the Ex-PRESS tube occurred more frequently in eyes with open-angle glaucoma and shallow anterior chambers.

  19. Omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids in the prevention of postoperative complications in colorectal cancer: a meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Hai; Chang, Yan-na

    2016-01-01

    Objective To evaluate systematically the clinical efficacy of omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) in the prevention of postoperative complications in colorectal cancer (CRC) patients. Materials and methods Published articles were identified by using search terms in online databases – PubMed, Embase, and the Cochrane Library – up to March 2016. Only randomized controlled trials investigating the efficacy of omega-3 PUFAs in CRC were selected and analyzed through a meta-analysis. Subgroup, sensitivity, and inverted funnel-plot analyses were also conducted. Results Eleven articles with 694 CRC patients were finally included. Compared with control, omega-3 PUFA-enriched enteral or parenteral nutrition during the perioperative period reduced infectious complications (risk ratio [RR] 0.63, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.47–0.86; P=0.004), tumor necrosis factor alpha (standard mean difference [SMD] −0.37, 95% CI −0.66 to −0.07; P=0.01), interleukin-6 (SMD −0.36, 95% CI −0.66 to −0.07; P=0.02), and hospital stay (MD −2.09, 95% CI −3.71 to −0.48; P=0.01). No significant difference was found in total complications, surgical site infection, or CD4+:CD8+ cell ratio. Conclusion Short-term omega-3 PUFA administration was associated with reduced postoperative infectious complications, inflammatory cytokines, and hospital stay after CRC surgery. Due to heterogeneity and relatively small sample size, the optimal timing and route of administration deserve further study. PMID:28003759

  20. Association of pre and intraoperative variables with postoperative complications in coronary artery bypass graft surgery

    PubMed Central

    Gimenes, Camila; Barrile, Silvia Regina; Martinelli, Bruno; Ronchi, Carlos Fernando; Arca, Eduardo Aguilar; Gimenes, Rodrigo; Okoshi, Marina Politi; Okoshi, Katashi

    2013-01-01

    Objective To associate the pre- and intraoperative variables with postoperative complications of patients undergoing coronary artery bypass graft surgery. Methods The pre- and intraoperative risk factors of individuals of both genders with diagnosis of coronary insufficiency undergoing coronary artery bypass graft have been studied. Results Fifty-eight individuals with median age 62 ± 10 year-old were included in the study, 67% of whom were male. Fourteen (24.1%) patients were smokers, 39 (67.2%) had previous myocardial infarction history, 11 (19%) had undergone coronary angioplasty, 74% had hypertension, 27% had diabetes mellitus, 64% had dyslipidemia and 15.5% had chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Eighteen (31%) patients presented postoperative complications, most frequent being: infection in surgical incision, difficulties in deambulation, dyspnea, urinary infection and generalized weakness. Male patients had fewer complications than females (P=0.005). Patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease remained hospitalized for longer time periods (P=0.019). Postoperative complications occurred in 50% of the patients with creatinine increased, while only 27.1% of the patients with normal value of creatinine had complications (P=0.049). In addition, complications occurred in 50% of the patients with diabetes mellitus, while only 23.8% of patients without diabetes mellitus had complications (P=0.032). The intraoperative factors showed no statistically significant differences. Conclusion The preoperative factors are associated with postoperative complications in patients undergoing coronary artery bypass graft surgery. PMID:24598958

  1. Effect of Pre-Designed Instructions for Mothers of Children with Hypospadias on Reducing Postoperative Complications

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mohamed, Sanaa A.

    2015-01-01

    Hypospadias is a common congenital anomaly with a prevalence estimated to be as high as 1 in 125 live male births. Complications after surgical procedures are possible. The incidence of complications can be reduced by meticulous preoperative planning, and judicious postoperative care. So the aim of the study was to investigate the effect of…

  2. Postoperative visual loss following dorsal root entry zone rhizotomy: A dreaded complication after a benign procedure

    PubMed Central

    Mishra, RK; Mahajan, C; Bindra, A; Goyal, K

    2016-01-01

    Postoperative visual loss (POVL) is a rare but grave postoperative complication. It has been mainly reported in patients undergoing cardiac and spinal surgeries. Dorsal root entry zone (DREZ) is pain relieving procedure performed in patients with refractory neuropathic pain with minimal complication rate. We present a case of unilateral POVL following DREZ rhizotomy in prone position in a patient having brachial plexus neuropathy. Exact etiology of vision loss was though not clear; hypotension, use of vasopressors and hemodilution may have led to vision loss in this patient. This case report highlights the associated risk factors for development of this hazardous complication. PMID:27833493

  3. [Septic ascites: a rare post-operative complication].

    PubMed

    La Torre, F; Taglienti, D; de Anna, L; Masoni, L; Gasparrini, M; Viola, M; Nicolai, A P; Lucidi, V; Montori, A

    1995-01-01

    Spontaneous bacterial peritonitis in patients with chronic hepatitis represents a very controversial matter in terms of frequency, pathology and treatment. This unusual complication mainly due to decreased immunological defences and ascitic fluid opsonic activity is not accepted by all the Authors as a rare event. However, there is agreement as far as management is concerned: cultural examination of the ascitic fluid and the relative antibiogram are the best tools in guiding the approach to an adequate antibiotic therapy.

  4. The predictive role of delayed cutaneous hypersensitivity testing in postoperative complications.

    PubMed

    Schackert, H K; Betzler, M; Zimmermann, G F; Decker, R; Geelhaar, G H; Edler, L; Hess, C; Herfarth, C

    1986-06-01

    Ten parameters, including delayed cutaneous hypersensitivity testing (DCH), were evaluated with regard to their predictive value in instances of postoperative septic complications. In 302 patients undergoing surgical treatment, 45 complications, including wound infection, abscess, pneumonia and sepsis, were seen postoperatively in 42 patients. When these patients were compared with 260 patients without complications, hemoglobin, leukocyte count, serum albumin, total protein, blood sedimentation rate, age and sex were found not to contribute to the prediction of postoperative complications. In DCH testing, the complication rate increased from 7.5 per cent in normergic patients to 20.6 per cent in anergic patients. With increasing length and severity of operation, the complication rate increased from 6.5 to 26.4 per cent and from 6.5 to 31.8 per cent, respectively. Only in severe, long lasting operations could DCH testing differentiate the complication risk. Normergic patients had a 8.6 per cent complication rate; hypoergic patients, 36.6 per cent, and anergic patients, 37.5 per cent. The results of DCH testing did not correlate with the complication rate in any of the other operative groups. In conclusion, the predictive value of DCH testing is clearly greater in groups of patients highly affected by the operative trauma. The results of this study show that it is important to consider both host defense mechanisms and environmental factors in the assessment of operative risks.

  5. Risk of Infectious Complications in Hemato-Oncological Patients Treated with Kinase Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Reinwald, Mark; Boch, Tobias; Hofmann, Wolf-Karsten; Buchheidt, Dieter

    2015-01-01

    Infectious complications are a major cause of morbidity and mortality in patients with hemato-oncological diseases. Although disease-related immunosuppression represents one factor, aggressive treatment regimens, such as chemotherapy, stem cell transplantation, or antibody treatment, account for a large proportion of infectious side effects. With the advent of targeted therapies affecting specific kinases in malignant diseases, the outcome of patients has further improved. Nonetheless, dependent on the specific pathway targeted or off-target activity of the kinase inhibitor, therapy-associated infectious complications may occur. We review the most common and approved kinase inhibitors targeting a variety of hemato-oncological malignancies for their immunosuppressive potential and evaluate their risk of infectious side effects based on preclinical evidence and clinical data in order to raise awareness of the potential risks involved. PMID:27127405

  6. [Significance and prevention of post-operative wound complications].

    PubMed

    Napp, M; Gümbel, D; Lange, J; Hinz, P; Daeschlein, G; Ekkernkamp, A

    2014-01-01

    Although surgical site infections (SSI) in dermatologic operative procedures are extremely rare, it is important to understand risks and etiological factors to initiate risk assessment and specific preventive measures. SSI commonly are associated with a complicated, long-term and expensive outcome. Typical wound pathogens of these infections include a variety of multiresistant organisms along with Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus epidermidis, hemolytic streptococci and the gram-negative bacilli Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Effective hygienic measures as part of an adequate quality management system should consider the critical points in the development of SSI, particularly in the setting of an outpatient dermatologic unit, such as preparation of the operative area, preoperative skin antisepsis, hand hygiene, safe and skilled technique by surgeons, and barrier nursing to prevent spread of pathogens. The baseline infection incidence in dermatologic surgery inherently is low; nevertheless significant improvements can be achieved by implementation of risk-adapted infection control measures.

  7. Impact of postoperative complications on clinical and economic consequences in pancreatic surgery

    PubMed Central

    Jon, Bohumil; Čermáková, Eva; Šubrt, Zdeněk; Ferko, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Patients who develop complications consume a disproportionately large share of available resources in surgery; therefore the attention of healthcare funders focuses on the economic impact of complications. The main objective of this work was to assess the clinical and economic impact of postoperative complications in pancreatic surgery, and furthermore to assess risk factors for increased costs. Methods In all, 161 consecutive patients underwent pancreatic resection. The costs of the treatment were determined and analyzed. Results The overall morbidity rate was 53.4%, and the in-hospital mortality rate was 3.7%. The median of costs for all patients without complication was 3,963 Euro, whereas the median of costs for patients with at least one complication was significantly increased at 10,670 Euro (P < 0.001). In multivariate analysis American Society of Anesthesiologists ≥ 3 (P = 0.006), multivisceral resection (P < 0.001) and any complication (P < 0.001) were independently associated with increased costs. Conclusion Postoperative complications are associated with an increase in mortality, length of hospital stay, and hospital costs. The treatment costs increase with the severity of the postoperative complications. Those factors that are known to increase the treatment costs in pancreatic resection should be considered when planning patients for surgery. PMID:26793689

  8. Postoperative complications and overall survival after pancreaticoduodenectomy for pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Pugalenthi, Amudhan; Protic, Mladjan; Gonen, Mithat; Kingham, T. Peter; D’ Angelica, Michael I.; Dematteo, Ronald P.; Fong, Yuman; Jarnagin, William R.; Allen, Peter J.

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Pancreaticoduodenectomy (PD) performed for pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDA) has a postoperative morbidity of 40–50%. In this study, we analyzed the impact of high grade complications after PD for PDA on overall survival. METHODS 596 patients that underwent PD for PDA between 2001–2009 were identified from a prospective database. Complications were defined and graded (1–5) as per our Institutional Surgical Secondary Events Program. High grade complications were defined as ≥ grade 3. Postoperative mortality (≤ 90 days) was excluded. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed to identify factors associated with overall survival. RESULTS Median survival was 24 months. Overall complication rate was 51% (301/596). Low grade complications were recorded in 266 patients (45%) and high grade complications in 22% (n= 129). Our 90 day mortality was 3.7% (n= 22). Anastomotic fistula/ leak/abscess rate was 14% (n= 82). Multivariate Cox-Regression analysis identified node positivity, estimated blood loss (EBL) > 600 ml, length of stay (LOS) > 10 days, margin positivity and vascular procedures as predictors of decreased overall survival (p < 0.05). High grade complications were not associated with overall survival (p = 0.948). CONCLUSION In this study, the occurrence of high grade postoperative complications was not associated with overall survival. PMID:26678349

  9. Imaging of the postoperative liver: review of normal appearances and common complications.

    PubMed

    Mulé, S; Colosio, A; Cazejust, J; Kianmanesh, R; Soyer, P; Hoeffel, C

    2015-10-01

    Several benign and malignant liver diseases may require surgical treatment for cure, including anatomical resections based on the segmental anatomy of the liver, non-anatomical (wedge) resections, and surgical management of biliary cysts. The type of surgery depends not only on the location and the nature of the disease, but also on the expertise of the surgeon. Whereas ultrasonography is often the first-line imaging examination in case of suspected postoperative complication, multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) is of greater value for identifying normal findings after surgery, early postoperative pathologic fluid collections and vascular thromboses, and tumor recurrence in patients who have undergone hepatic surgery. Magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography (MRCP) is the imaging modality of choice for depicting early postoperative bile duct injuries and ischemic cholangitis that may occur in the late postoperative phase. Both MDCT and MRCP can accurately depict tumor recurrence. Radiologists should become familiar with these surgical procedures to better understand postoperative changes, and with the normal imaging appearances of various postoperative complications to better differentiate between complications and normal findings.

  10. [Infectious complications in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease].

    PubMed

    Pirson, Yves; Kanaan, Nada

    2015-04-01

    Despite advances in the management of autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease over the past two decades, infection of liver and kidney cysts remains a serious and potentially threatening complication. Kidney cyst infection is the most frequent complication. It is differentiated from hemorrhage by the clinical presentation (mainly the severity and duration of fever), C-reactive protein (CRP) and white blood cells levels, and the density of the suspected cyst on computed tomography. Liver cyst infection occurs more frequently in patients with large cysts volumes. It can be life threatening and has a tendency to recur. In both infections, the best radiological imaging technique is positron emission tomography after intravenous injection of [18F]-fluorodeoxyglucose combined with computed tomography. Treatment with a fluoroquinolone should be continued for 6 weeks. Cyst aspiration is necessary only when cysts are very large and/or when infection is resistant to antibiotic treatment. In patients who are candidates to kidney transplantation, a history of recurrent kidney cyst infection justifies pre-transplant nephrectomy, while a past history of recurrent liver cyst infection or angiocholitis leads to consider liver transplantation. Among extrarenal and extrahepatic complications of polycystic disease, colic diverticulosis is reported to be associated with increased risk of infection in patients on hemodialysis and after kidney transplantation. However, this observation needs to be confirmed.

  11. [Laparoscopic gastric bypass: computed tomography appearance of common postoperative changes and complications].

    PubMed

    Caracela Zeballos, C R; Diéguez Tapias, S; Cereceda Pérez, C N; Pinto Varela, J M

    2014-01-01

    Laparoscopic Roux-en-Y bypass is being increasingly used for weight reduction in patients with morbid obesity. Unfortunately, some complications can occur after this procedure, the most frequent being intestinal obstruction (due to stenosis of the anastomosis at the distal end of the loop, internal hernias, bands, and adhesions), anastomotic leaks, and bleeding. This article provides basic knowledge about the surgical technique and its correlation with the common postoperative changes with the aim of facilitating the interpretation of CT findings and the identification of postoperative complications in these patients.

  12. Renal, hematologic and infectious complications in multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Bladé, Joan; Rosiñol, Laura

    2005-01-01

    Renal failure is a common complication in patients with multiple myeloma. It is generally due to tubular light-chain damage, and it is reversible in about 50% of patients. The reversibility rate depends on the degree of light-chain nephropathy. The initial therapy should consist of dexamethasone- or cyclophosphamide-based regimens. High-dose therapy/autologous transplant may be of benefit in selected patients. Early plasma exchange may be useful in patients who have severe renal failure but do not yet require dialysis. Renal replacement with dialysis is a worthwhile measure in patients with end-stage renal failure. Anemia is the most common hematologic complication. About 70% of anemic patients respond to recombinant human erythropoietin (rHuEPO), resulting not only in an increase in the hemoglobin level but also in an improvement in the quality of life. The hemoglobin level should ideally be maintained at around 12 g/dL. Infection is the main cause of morbidity and mortality in patients with myeloma. The highest risk of infection is within the first 2 months of initiation of therapy as well as in patients with renal failure and in those with relapsed and refractory disease.

  13. Comparison of intraoperative and postoperative complications based on ASA risks in patients who underwent percutaneous nephrolithotomy

    PubMed Central

    Karakaş, Hüseyin Buğra; Çiçekbilek, İzzet; Tok, Adem; Alışkan, Tamer; Akduman, Bülent

    2016-01-01

    Objective In this study we aimed to evaluate intraoperative and postoperative complications which developed according to pre-operative American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) risk criteria in patients who had undergone percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PNL). Material and methods Five hundred and sixty patients who had undergone PNL between 2002 and 2014 were included in the study. Patients operated on the ipsilateral kidney, those with solitary kidney or the cases who had previously undergone more than one access were excluded from this study. Preoperative anesthesia risks were determined according to preoperative classification developed by ASA. Postoperative complications were evaluated using Clavien Complication Grading Scale. Results The mean age of the cases was 47±14 years. The 57% (n=319) of the cases were male, 241 (43%) of them were female. The average indwell time of nephrostomy catheter was 2.88±1.00 (1–8), and length of hospital stay was 4.91±1.54 (2–17) days. When the cases were assessed according to ASA risk groups, intraoperative complications were observed in 9 (5.5%) ASA I, 27 (8.6%) ASA II, and 18 (22%) ASA III patients and and distribution of the patients was statistically significant (p<0.001). When intraoperative complications were evaluated one by one, intraoperative hypotension developed in ASA I (n=3; 1.8%), ASA II (n=20; 6.4%) and ASA III (n=11; 13.4%) risk groups and this distribution (p=0.002) of patients was statistically significant. When assessed according to Clavien Postoperative Scale, postoperative complications developed (p=0.053) in ASAI (n=24; 14.7%), ASA II (n=27, 8.6%) and ASA III (n=13; 15.9%) risk groups, and this distribution of the patients was not statistically significant. In postoperative complications, Grade 3a complications developed in ASA I (n=12; 7.4%), ASA II (n=19; 6%) and ASA III (n=8; 9.8%) risk groups and this distribution was not seen to be statistically significant (p=0.485). Conclusion A statistically

  14. Perioperative lung-protective ventilation strategy reduces postoperative pulmonary complications in patients undergoing thoracic and major abdominal surgery

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The occurrence of postoperative pulmonary complications is strongly associated with increased hospital mortality and prolonged postoperative hospital stays. Although protective lung ventilation is commonly used in the intensive care unit, low tidal volume ventilation in the operating room is not a routine strategy. Low tidal volume ventilation, moderate positive end-expiratory pressure, and repeated recruitment maneuvers, particularly for high-risk patients undergoing major abdominal surgery, can reduce postoperative pulmonary complications. Facilitating perioperative bundle care by combining prophylactic and postoperative positive-pressure ventilation with intraoperative lung-protective ventilation may be helpful to reduce postoperative pulmonary complications. PMID:26885294

  15. Surgical Treatment of Orbital Blowout Fractures: Complications and Postoperative Care Patterns.

    PubMed

    Shew, Matthew; Carlisle, Michael P; Lu, Guanning Nina; Humphrey, Clinton; Kriet, J David

    2016-11-01

    Orbital fractures are a common result of facial trauma. Sequelae and indications for repair include enophthalmos and/or diplopia from extraocular muscle entrapment. Alloplastic implant placement with careful release of periorbital fat and extraocular muscles can effectively restore extraocular movements, orbital integrity, and anatomic volume. However, rare but devastating complications such as retrobulbar hematoma (RBH) can occur after repair, which pose a risk of permanent vision loss if not addressed emergently. For this reason, some surgeons take the precaution of admitting patients for 24-hour postoperative vision checks, while others do not. The incidence of postoperative RBH has not been previously reported and existing data are limited to case reports. Our aim was to examine national trends in postoperative management and to report the incidence of immediate postoperative complications at our institution following orbital repair. A retrospective assessment of orbital blowout fractures was undertaken to assess immediate postoperative complications including RBH. Only patients treated by a senior surgeon in the Department of Otolaryngology were included in the review. In addition, we surveyed AO North America (AONA) Craniomaxillofacial faculty to assess current trends in postoperative management. There were 80 patients treated surgically for orbital blowout fractures over a 9.5-year period. Nearly all patients were observed overnight (74%) or longer (25%) due to other trauma. Average length of stay was 17 hours for those observed overnight. There was one (1.3%) patient with RBH, who was treated and recovered without sequelae. Results of the survey indicated that a majority (64%) of responders observe postoperative patients overnight. Twenty-nine percent of responders indicated that they send patients home the same day of surgery. Performance of more than 20 orbital repairs annually significantly increased the likelihood that faculty would manage patients on

  16. Doppler ultrasonography in living donor liver transplantation recipients: Intra- and post-operative vascular complications

    PubMed Central

    Abdelaziz, Omar; Attia, Hussein

    2016-01-01

    Living-donor liver transplantation has provided a solution to the severe lack of cadaver grafts for the replacement of liver afflicted with end-stage cirrhosis, fulminant disease, or inborn errors of metabolism. Vascular complications remain the most serious complications and a common cause for graft failure after hepatic transplantation. Doppler ultrasound remains the primary radiological imaging modality for the diagnosis of such complications. This article presents a brief review of intra- and post-operative living donor liver transplantation anatomy and a synopsis of the role of ultrasonography and color Doppler in evaluating the graft vascular haemodynamics both during surgery and post-operatively in accurately defining the early vascular complications. Intra-operative ultrasonography of the liver graft provides the surgeon with useful real-time diagnostic and staging information that may result in an alteration in the planned surgical approach and corrections of surgical complications during the procedure of vascular anastomoses. The relevant intra-operative anatomy and the spectrum of normal and abnormal findings are described. Ultrasonography and color Doppler also provides the clinicians and surgeons early post-operative potential developmental complications that may occur during hospital stay. Early detection and thus early problem solving can make the difference between graft survival and failure. PMID:27468207

  17. Impact of Nursing Educational Program on Reducing or Preventing Postoperative Complications for Patients after Intracranial Surgery

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elmowla, Rasha Ali Ahmed Abd; El-Lateef, Zienab Abd; El-khayat, Roshdy

    2015-01-01

    Intracranial surgery means any surgery performed inside the skull to treat problems in the brain and surrounding structures. Aim: Evaluate the impact of nursing educational program on reducing or preventing postoperative complications for patients after intracranial surgery. Subjects and methods: Sixty adult patients had intracranial surgery (burr…

  18. Survival outcomes of hepatocellular carcinoma resection with postoperative complications – a propensity-score-matched analysis

    PubMed Central

    Chok, Kenneth S.H.; Chan, Millies M.Y.; Dai, Wing Chiu; Chan, Albert C.Y.; Cheung, Tan To; Wong, Tiffany C.L.; She, Wong Hoi; Lo, Chung Mau

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Curative resection remains the only hope of cure for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), but postoperative complications can have a significant impact on long-term survival. However, only scarce data on such impact can be found in the literature. This retrospective study reviewed the prospectively collected data of patients who underwent primary liver resection for HCC at our hospital during the period from December 1989 to December 2014. Patients with and without postoperative complications were compared. A 1:1 propensity score matching was adopted by matching age, comorbidity, Model of End-stage Liver Disease score, tumor stage, and extent of resection. Totally 1710 patients were eligible for the study. Four hundred and sixty-one (27.0%) of them developed postoperative complications while 1249 (73.0%) did not. After propensity score matching, 922 patients were compared in a 1:1 ratio (461 with postoperative complications and 461 without). Patients who developed postoperative complications were demographically similar to patients who did not, but had more intraoperative blood loss and transfusion (both P < 0.001), longer hospital stay (17 vs 9 days; P < 0.001), worse hospital mortality (12.1% vs 0%; P < 0.001), and shorter overall survival (P < 0.001). On multivariate analysis, factors that might have affected overall survival were cancer stage (HR 1.22, P < 0.001), tumor size (HR 1.02, P = 0.005), tumor number (HR 1.08, P < 0.001), venous invasion (HR 1.38, P = 0.003), extent of resection (HR 1.19, P = 0.045), intraoperative blood loss (HR 1.11, P < 0.001), postoperative complication (HR 1.37, P < 0.001), and era effect (HR 1.27, P = 0.01). Patients should be monitored closely after HCC resection. Prompt treatment of postoperative complications may be salvational. PMID:28328851

  19. Post-Operative Complications in Living Liver Donors: A Single-Center Experience in China

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Songfeng; Chen, Jihao; Wang, Jingqiao; Yang, Cheng; Jin, Mengmeng; Yan, Sheng; Zhang, Mangli; Zhang, Min; Zheng, Shusen

    2015-01-01

    The gap between the growing demand for available organs and the cadaveric organs facilitates the adoption of living donor liver transplantation. We retrospectively identified and evaluated the post-operative complications as per the modified Clavien classification system in 152 living liver donors at at the First Affiliated Hospital, College of Medicine, Zhejiang University between December, 2006 and June, 2014. Post-operative complications were observed in 61 patients (40.1%) in the present study, but no mortality was reported. Complications developed in 58 (40.0%) right, 1 (33.3%) left, and 2 (66.7%) lateral left hepatectomy donors. The prevalence of re-operation was 1.3%. Grade I and II complications were observed in 38 (25.0%) and 11 (7.2%) donors, respectively. Grade IIIa complications developed in 9 (5.9%) donors and only 3 (2.0%) patients reported grade IIIb complications. The most common complication was pleural effusion that occurred in 31 (20.4%) donors. No significant prognostic baseline factor was identified in this study. In conclusion, living donors experienced various complications, which were usually mild and had a good prognosis. PMID:26270475

  20. Patient Risk Factors for Mechanical Wound Complications and Postoperative Infections after Elective Open Intestinal Resection

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Wei Chao; Turner, Akiva; Imon, Michael; Dyda, Anthony

    2016-01-01

    Background Few studies focused on the construction of preoperative patient surgical risk profile using only patients’ personal, social history, and comorbidity profiles. Objective To identify risk factors for mechanical wound complications and postoperative infections in patients’ preoperative profiles. Design Quantitative retrospective cohort study using 2009–2011 Health Care Utilization Project (HCUP) Nationwide Inpatient Sample (NIS) databases. Patients 56,853 patients who underwent elective open intestinal resection. Measurements Predictors of mechanical wound complications and postoperative infections in patients’ personal, social history, and comorbidity profiles. Results Patients age 18–39 were more likely to suffer mechanical wound complications compared to patients age 65–79 (OR = 1.9, 95% CI [1.5, 2.4], p < .01) and to patients age 80 and over (OR = 2.9, 95% CI [2.2, 3.8], p < .01). Patients age 18–39 were also more likely to suffer postoperative infections compared to patients age 65–79 (OR = 1.4, 95% CI [1.1, 1.6], p < .01) and to patients age 80 and over (OR = 2.0, 95% CI [1.6, 2.6], p < .01). Other most significant predictors included male gender, fluid and electrolyte disorders, pulmonary circulation disorders, and weight loss, as well as patients with comorbidities. All statistically significant predictors with positive estimates for postoperative infections were also statistically significant predictors of mechanical wound complications. Conclusions Individual patient risk profile can be constructed using preoperative patient profiles for improving perioperative care coordination and patient care quality. Postoperative infections were associated with mechanical wound complications in patients undergoing elective open intestinal resection. PMID:27833511

  1. Preoperative Acute Inflammatory Markers as Predictors for Postoperative Complications in Primary Total Knee Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Godoy, Gustavo; Sumarriva, Gonzalo; Ochsner, J. Lockwood; Chimento, George; Schmucker, Dana; Dasa, Vinod; Meyer, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Background: C-reactive protein (CRP) has been suggested as an independent risk factor for cardiovascular pathology in the nonsurgical setting. While postoperative CRP and erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) have an established role in aiding the diagnosis of periprosthetic joint infections, some authors suggest a link between preoperative CRP and postoperative complications in patients undergoing total joint arthroplasty. Methods: We conducted a retrospective cohort study of 351 patients who underwent unilateral primary total knee arthroplasty by a single surgeon during a 28-month period (January 2013 through April 2015). Patient medical records were reviewed for the following complications occurring within 90 days postoperatively: myocardial infarction, arrhythmia, pulmonary embolism, wound infection, acute renal failure, and reoperation. Results: We found no statistically significant link between postoperative complications and preoperative CRP levels (P=0.5005) or ESR levels (P=0.1610). Conclusion: The results of this study do not support the routine inclusion of CRP and ESR analysis as part of the preoperative evaluation for elective total knee arthroplasty. PMID:27999506

  2. Evaluation of postoperative complications according to treatment of third molars in mandibular angle fracture

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this study was to evaluate the implication of third molars in postoperative complications of mandibular angle fracture with open reduction and internal fixation (ORIF). Materials and Methods Data were collected on patients who presented with mandibular angle fracture at our Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery between January 2011 and December 2015. Of the 63 total patients who underwent ORIF and perioperative intermaxillary fixation (IMF) with an arch bar, 49 patients were identified as having third molars in the fracture line and were followed up with until plate removal. The complications of postoperative infection, postoperative nerve injury, bone healing, and changes in occlusion and temporomandibular joint were evaluated and analyzed using statistical methods. Results In total, 49 patients had third molars in the fracture line and underwent ORIF surgery and perioperative IMF with an arch bar. The third molar in the fracture line was retained during ORIF in 39 patients. Several patients complained of nerve injury, temporomandibular disorder (TMD), change of occlusion, and postoperative infection around the retained third molar. The third molars were removed during ORIF surgery in 10 patients. Some of these patients complained of nerve injury, but no other complications, such as TMD, change in occlusion, or postoperative infection, were observed. There was no delayed union or nonunion in either of the groups. No statistically significant difference was found between the non-extraction group and the retained teeth group regarding complications after ORIF. Conclusion If the third molar is partially impacted or completely nonfunctional, likely to be involved in pathologic conditions later in life, or possible to remove with the plate simultaneously, extraction of the third molar in the fracture line should be considered during ORIF surgery of the mandible angle fracture. PMID:28280708

  3. Postoperative complications following TECA-LBO in the dog and cat.

    PubMed

    Spivack, Rebecca E; Elkins, A Derrell; Moore, George E; Lantz, Gary C

    2013-01-01

    The medical records for 133 total ear canal ablations combined with lateral bulla osteotomies (TECA-LBOs) performed on 82 dogs (121 ears) and 11 cats (12 ears) between 2004 and 2010 were reviewed to determine if the duration of preoperative clinical signs was associated with the incidence of postoperative facial nerve injury and Horner's syndrome. Other perioperative complications, such as a head tilt, nystagmus, incisional drainage, draining tracts, hearing loss, as well as bacterial culture results, were noted. Postoperative facial nerve paresis occurred in 36 of 133 ears (27.1%), and paralysis occurred in 29 of 133 ears (21.8%), with no significant difference between species. Thus, postoperative facial nerve deficits occurred in 48.9% of ears. The median duration of clinically evident temporary facial nerve deficits was 2 wk for dogs and 4 wk for cats. Dogs had a significantly longer duration of preoperative clinical signs and were less likely than cats to have a mass in the ear canal. Dogs were less likely to have residual (> 1 yr) postoperative facial nerve deficits. The incidence of postoperative Horner's syndrome was significantly higher in cats than dogs. The duration of preoperative clinical signs of ear disease was not associated with postoperative facial nerve deficits.

  4. Impact of NOD2 polymorphisms on infectious complications following chemotherapy in patients with acute myeloid leukaemia.

    PubMed

    Yomade, Olaposi; Spies-Weisshart, Bärbel; Glaser, Anita; Schnetzke, Ulf; Hochhaus, Andreas; Scholl, Sebastian

    2013-08-01

    We sought to investigate the relationship between polymorphisms of the NOD2 gene and infectious complications following intensive induction chemotherapy in patients with acute myeloid leukaemia (AML). We hypothesised that single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of the NOD2 gene are associated with a higher rate of infections during the phase of severe neutropenia. In 131 AML patients receiving induction therapy, the presence of the three most frequent polymorphisms of NOD2 (Arg702Trp, Gly908Arg, Leu1007fsinsC) was analysed. SNP analyses by means of genomic PCR incorporating fluorescence-labelled probes with characteristic melting curves were performed using the LightCycler platform. Our data suggest a significantly lower probability of mucositis or enteritis in AML patients lacking any of the three evaluated NOD2 polymorphisms. Furthermore, bloodstream cultures of AML patients carrying either a missense or a frameshift mutation of NOD2 were significantly more frequently tested positive concerning Streptococcus spp. In contrast, the presence of NOD2 polymorphisms had no impact on such important infectious complications as systemic inflammatory response syndrome or sepsis, the rate of central venous catheter infections or the incidence of pneumonia including fungal infections. Our data represent one of the first reports investigating the impact of polymorphisms of the innate immune system on infectious complications in patients with neutropenia following chemotherapy. A correlation between NOD2 polymorphisms and infectious events in AML patients is demonstrated.

  5. Increased postoperative complications after protective ileostomy closure delay: An institutional study

    PubMed Central

    Rubio-Perez, Ines; Leon, Miguel; Pastor, Daniel; Diaz Dominguez, Joaquin; Cantero, Ramon

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To study the morbidity and complications associated to ileostomy reversal in colorectal surgery patients, and if these are related to the time of closure. METHODS: A retrospective analysis of 93 patients, who had undergone elective ileostomy closure between 2009 and 2013 was performed. Demographic, clinical and surgical variables were reviewed for analysis. All complications were recorded, and classified according to the Clavien-Dindo Classification. Statistical univariate and multivariate analysis was performed, setting a P value of 0.05 for significance. RESULTS: The patients had a mean age of 60.3 years, 58% male. The main procedure for ileostomy creation was rectal cancer (56%), and 37% had received preoperative chemo-radiotherapy. The average delay from creation to closure of the ileostomy was 10.3 mo. Postoperative complications occurred in 40% of the patients, with 1% mortality. The most frequent were ileus (13%) and wound infection (13%). Pseudomembranous colitis appeared in 4%. Increased postoperative complications were associated with delay in ileostomy closure (P = 0.041). Male patients had more complications (P = 0.042), mainly wound infections (P = 0.007). Pseudomembranous colitis was also associated with the delay in ileostomy closure (P = 0.003). End-to-end intestinal anastomosis without resection was significantly associated with postoperative ileus (P = 0.037). CONCLUSION: Although closure of a protective ileostomy is a fairly common surgical procedure, it has a high rate of complications, and this must be taken into account when the indication is made. The delay in stoma closure can increase the rate of complications in general, and specifically wound infections and colitis. PMID:25276286

  6. Can Screening Tools for Obstructive Sleep Apnea Predict Postoperative Complications? A Systematic Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Dimitrov, Lilia; Macavei, Vladimir

    2016-01-01

    Study Objectives: Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a common, underdiagnosed condition that is associated with significant morbidity and mortality in the perioperative setting. Increasing evidence suggests that the utility of preoperative screening tools may go beyond identification of OSA, to the prediction of perioperative complications. The primary objective of this study was to systematically review the literature on all studies assessing whether high risk scores on the STOP-Bang questionnaire, American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) checklist, and the Berlin Questionnaire (BQ) are associated with higher rates of postoperative complications. Methods: A systematic review of English language records was performed using Medline, EMBASE, and PsychInfo with additional studies identified by manual search through reference lists. Only studies that evaluated the ability of the STOP-Bang, the BQ, and ASA checklist to predict postoperative complications in adults were included. Results: Twelve studies were included in the final review. Eight studies looked at STOP-Bang, 3 at the Berlin Questionnaire, and 2 at the ASA Checklist. Significant differences across study characteristics prevented a meta-analysis and the studies were evaluated qualitatively. Conclusions: The ASA checklist, Berlin Questionnaire, and STOP-Bang questionnaire may be able to risk stratify patients for perioperative and postoperative complications. Further research is required, with a particular focus on specific surgery types and adjustment of potentially confounding factors in the analysis. Citation: Dimitrov L, Macavei V. Can screening tools for obstructive sleep apnea predict postoperative complications? A systematic review of the literature. J Clin Sleep Med 2016;12(9):1293–1300. PMID:27448417

  7. Correlation of antibiotic prophylaxis and difficulty of extraction with postoperative inflammatory complications in the lower third molar surgery.

    PubMed

    Lee, J Y; Do, H S; Lim, J H; Jang, H S; Rim, J S; Kwon, J J; Lee, E S

    2014-01-01

    Our aim was to investigate the correlation among antibiotic prophylaxis, difficulty of extraction, and postoperative complications in the removal of lower 3rd molars. A total of 1222 such extractions in 890 patients between January 2010 and January 2012 were analysed retrospectively. The difficulty of extraction measured by Pederson's index, antibiotic prophylaxis with cefditoren, and postoperative complications were recorded. The difficulty of extraction was significantly associated with postoperative complications (p=0.03). There were no significant associations between antibiotic prophylaxis and postoperative complications in groups of equal difficulty ("easy" group (class I) p=1.00; "moderate" group (class II) p=1.00; and "difficult" group (class III) p=0.65). There was a small but insignificant increase in the number of dry sockets and infections in class III cases. In conclusion, this study provides further evidence that antibiotic prophylaxis for the prevention of postoperative inflammatory complications is unnecessary for extraction of 3rd molars.

  8. Evaluation of Early Postoperative Neurological Complications Following Living Donor Liver Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    OTAN, Emrah; AYDIN, Cemalettin; YÖNDER, Hüseyin; KAYAALP, Cüneyt; KAPLAN, Yüksel; YILMAZ, Sezai

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Liver transplantation is one of the best treatment options for end-stage liver disease. In Turkey, living donor liver transplantation (LDLT) is performed more frequently than cadaveric transplantation, because organ donation is unpopular in our country. Neurological complications contribute to poor postoperative outcomes after liver transplantation. In the present study, we aimed to evaluate the outcomes of LDLT patients in whom such complications developed early during postoperative follow-up in the intensive care unit. Methods Of 217 LDLTs performed between August 2011 and August 2012, neurology consultations were arranged for 29 patients (13.36%) because of development of new-onset neurological symptoms and/or findings in patients with neurologically uneventful preoperative histories. We retrospectively collected data on age, gender, primary disease, Model for End-Stage Liver Disease (MELD) score, and postoperative hospitalization duration of those who survived. The indications for neurological consultation and diagnoses were categorized into acute confusion/encephalopathy, epileptic seizures, leukoencephalopathy, and focal neurological deficits. The immunosuppressive treatment regimens prescribed were also considered. The outcomes of the 2 groups (with and without neurological complications) were compared. Results The mean patient age was 44.52±16.24 years, and males predominated (65.5%, n=19). Acute confusion/encephalopathy was the most frequent complication (62.1%, n=18), followed by epileptic seizures (27.6%, n=8), cerebrovascular disease (6.9%, n=2), and leukoencephalopathy (3.4%, n=1). Statistically significant between-group differences in age (44.5±16.2 vs. 34.33±20.98 years; p<0.001), and proportions of patients with a disease of viral etiology (55.17% vs. 35.63%, p<0.05), were evident. Mortality was significantly higher in the group with neurological complications (65.5% vs. 37.32%, p<0.05). The duration of postoperative hospitalization

  9. The Effect of Prophylactic Antibiotics on Post Laparoscopic Cholecystectomy Infectious Complications: A Double-Blinded Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Darzi, Ali Asghar; Nikmanesh, Alieh; Bagherian, Farhad

    2016-01-01

    Background Laparoscopic cholecystectomy (LC) is one of the most common surgeries in laparoscopic surgery. Although, it is believed that LC has low-risk for post-operative infectious complications, the use of a prophylactic antibiotic is still controversial in elective LC. Objective To determine the impact of prophylactic antibiotics on postoperative infection complications in elective laparoscopic cholecystectomy. Methods In this double-blind, placebo-controlled, randomized, clinical trial, patients who were candidates for elective LC, from March 2012 to 2015, in four hospitals in Babol, Iran, were studied. Patients were allocated randomly to two groups, i.e., group C: Cefazolin (n = 182) and group P: placebo (n = 247). Group C received 1 g of Cefazolin 30 minutes before anesthesia and and then, six and 12 hours after anesthesia. Group P patients received 10 ml of isotonic sodium chloride solution. Age, gender, type of gallbladder diseases (stone, polyp, or hydrops), the length of post-operative hospitalization, frequency of gallbladder rupture, the duration of surgery, and the kinds of complications associated with infections were collected for each patient in the two groups. The data were analyzed by IBM-SPSS version 20, using the t-test and the chi-squared test, and a p-value < 0.05 was considered as significant. Results There were no significant differences between the two groups in terms of gender (C versus P: 18 (9.9%) male versus 22 (9%); p = 0.74), age (C versus P: 43.75 + 13.30 years versus 40.91 + 13.05; p = 0.20), and duration of surgery (C versus P: 34.97 ± 8.25 min versus 34.11 ± 8.39; p = 0.71). There were no significant differences between the two groups in the incidences of post-operative infection (C versus P: 3 (1.7%) versus 5 (2%); p = 0.99) and rupture of the gallbladder (C versus P: 14 (7.8%) versus 17 (6.8%); p = 0.85). No other post-operative systemic infectious complications (e.g., sepsis, pneumonia, or urinary tract infection) were found

  10. Accelerating Chart Review Using Automated Methods on Electronic Health Record Data for Postoperative Complications

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Zhen; Melton, Genevieve B.; Moeller, Nathan D.; Arsoniadis, Elliot G.; Wang, Yan; Kwaan, Mary R.; Jensen, Eric H.; Simon, Gyorgy J.

    2016-01-01

    Manual Chart Review (MCR) is an important but labor-intensive task for clinical research and quality improvement. In this study, aiming to accelerate the process of extracting postoperative outcomes from medical charts, we developed an automated postoperative complications detection application by using structured electronic health record (EHR) data. We applied several machine learning methods to the detection of commonly occurring complications, including three subtypes of surgical site infection, pneumonia, urinary tract infection, sepsis, and septic shock. Particularly, we applied one single-task and five multi-task learning methods and compared their detection performance. The models demonstrated high detection performance, which ensures the feasibility of accelerating MCR. Specifically, one of the multi-task learning methods, propensity weighted observations (PWO) demonstrated the highest detection performance, with single-task learning being a close second. PMID:28269941

  11. [THE RISK FACTORS OF LETHAL COMPLICATIONS IN EARLY POSTOPERATIVE PERIOD IN PATIENTS, SUFFERING GASTROESOPHAGEAL ZONE MALIGNANCIES].

    PubMed

    Dumanskiy, Yu V; Stepko, V A; Sinyachenko, O V

    2016-02-01

    Abstract The factors, determining possibility of early postoperative morbidity occurrence in patients, suffering gastro-esophageal zone cancer, were analyzed. After radical operation performance (gastrectomy, gastric and esophageal resection) 5.7% patients died. Insufficience of the anastomosis sutures with peritonitis occurrence, an acute hepato-renal insufficience, an acute coronary syndrome, pulmonary thromboembolism, pneumonia, the brain insult, pancreonecrosis and mesenterial thrombosis constituted the main morbidities. The complications occurrence depends upon the tumoral process course severity, morphological variant of cancer, presence of concomitant diaphragmatic hernia and the blood rheological properties. Initially high indices of the blood sera present a rheological properties of blood serum may serve as a prognostic criterion of the postoperative complications occurrence in the patients.

  12. Invasive aspergillosis associated with systemic lupus erythematosus and cardiac postoperative complication

    PubMed Central

    Macêdo, Danielle Patrícia Cerqueira; Silva-Júnior, Heraldo Maia; de Souza-Motta, Cristina Maria; Milan, Eveline Pípolo; Neves, Rejane Pereira

    2009-01-01

    Aspergillus is a ubiquitous fungus which can cause a variety of clinical syndromes. This fungus has emerged as agent of systemic infections and has therefore gained considerable public health importance. This paper describes two cases of invasive aspergillosis caused by A. fumigatus in immuno-suppressed patients and underscores the importance of early identification of Aspergillus infection associated with systemic lupus erythematosus and cardiac postoperative complications. PMID:24031340

  13. Infectious Complications after Umbilical Cord-Blood Transplantation from Unrelated Donors

    PubMed Central

    Montoro, Juan; Piñana, José Luis; Moscardó, Federico; Sanz, Jaime

    2016-01-01

    Umbilical cord-blood (UCB) is a well-recognized alternative source of stem cells for unrelated donor hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). As compared with other stem cell sources from adult donors, it has the advantages of immediate availability of cells, absence of risk to the donor and reduced risk of graft-versus-host disease despite donor-recipient HLA disparity. However, the use of UCB is limited by the delayed post-transplant hematologic recovery due, at least in part, to the reduced number of hematopoietic cells in the graft and the delayed or incomplete immune reconstitution. As a result, severe infectious complications continue to be a leading cause of morbidity and mortality following UCB transplantation (UCBT). We will address the complex differences in the immune properties of UCB and review the incidence, characteristics, risk factors, and severity of bacterial, fungal and viral infectious complications in patients undergoing UCBT. PMID:27872731

  14. Fatal infectious mononucleosis: a severe complication in the treatment of Crohn's disease with azathioprine.

    PubMed Central

    Posthuma, E F; Westendorp, R G; van der Sluys Veer, A; Kluin-Nelemans, J C; Kluin, P M; Lamers, C B

    1995-01-01

    A 19 year old man with a history of Crohn's disease treated with azathioprine and prednisone, died after a primary infection with Epstein-Barr virus. He had the characteristics of the virus associated haemophagocytic syndrome, a rare complication of viral infections, which consists of fever, constitutional symptoms, hepatosplenomegaly, liver function and coagulation abnormalities, and hypertriglyceridaemia. Additionally, there was pain, cytopenia, and histiocytic hyperplasia in the bone marrow, spleen, or lymph nodes. This severe complication has been reported previously in renal transplant patients, but not in those with inflammatory bowel disease taking azathioprine. The immunosuppressive therapy may have contributed to this fatal complication of infectious mononucleosis, and this complication should be considered when treating a patient with inflammatory bowel disease with azathioprine. Images p312-a PMID:7883236

  15. Analysis of Intraoperative and Postoperative Complications in Pseudoexfoliation Eyes Undergoing Cataract Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Shetty, Sathyendranath B

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Pseudoexfoliation (PXE) is a genetically inherited condition affecting usually seen in those aged over 50 years. Surgical management of cataract in patients with PXE pose a challenge due to associated changes in ocular structures. Aim To study the challenges in the management of cataract in patients with PXE. Materials and Methods This was an interventional study conducted in the Ophthalmology Department of MS Ramaiah Medical College and Memorial Hospital, Bangalore from June 2012 to September 2014. All patients admitted for cataract surgery during this period who were diagnosed as cataract associated with PXE above 50 years of age belonging to either sex were included in the study. All patients underwent cataract surgery with intraocular lens implantation. Depending on type of cataract both small incision and phacoemulsification operations were conducted. Intraoperative and postoperative complications were studied. The patients were reviewed up to 6 weeks postoperatively. Results A total of 50 eyes of 50 patients diagnosed as cataract with PXE underwent cataract surgery. Of which 40 eyes (80%) underwent small incision cataract surgery whereas, 10 (20%) underwent phacoemusification. Corneal thinning (<535 microns) was noted in majority of the cases (41 cases). Preoperatively there were 3 cases of zonular weakness. Pseudo exfoliation with glaucoma was seen in 5 cases. Intraoperative complications encountered during surgery were; zonular dialysis in 3 cases, posterior capsular tear in 2 cases, out of these 5 cases vitreous loss was seen in 3 cases. Postoperative complications were corneal odema in 17 cases, of which endothelium de-compensated in one case, while early posterior capsular opacification was seen in 6 cases. Final best corrected visual acuity was between 6/6-6/12 in 39(78%) eyes, 6/18 -6/36 in 6(12%) cases; 6/60 to less in 5(10%) cases. Conclusion Cataract surgery in eyes with PXE has higher incidence of intraoperative and postoperative

  16. Relationship between BMI and Postoperative Complications with Free Flap in Anterolateral Craniofacial Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Yagi, Shunjiro; Toriyama, Kazuhiro; Takanari, Keisuke; Fujimoto, Yasushi; Nishio, Naoki; Fujii, Masazumi; Saito, Kiyoshi; Takahashi, Masakatsu; Kamei, Yuzuru

    2016-01-01

    Background: Although we have seen tremendous advancement in microsurgery over the last 2 decades and free tissue transfer has become standard for head and neck reconstruction, surgeons still struggle to prevent postoperative complications. We examined the relationship between body mass index (BMI) and postoperative complications in patients undergoing rectus abdominis free flap transfer after anterolateral craniofacial resection. Methods: This was a retrospective review of reconstructive surgery using rectus abdominis musculocutaneous free flap in patients with locally advanced maxillary sinus carcinoma from 2003 to 2014 (n = 35, 27 men and 8 women; average age, 60.9 ± 7.8 years). All patients underwent craniofacial reconstruction after anterior and middle cranial fossa skull base resection and maxillectomy (class IV, subtype a) with palatal resection. Patients were categorized based on sex, BMI, and other parameters. Results: Recipient-site infection occurred in 11 patients (31.4%), cerebrospinal fluid leakage in 6 (17.1%), partial flap necrosis in 2 (5.7%), total flap necrosis in 1 (2.9%), and facial fistula in 4 (11.4%). Women showed partial flap necrosis significantly more frequently (P = 0.047), probably owing to poor vascular supply of the subcutaneous fat layer. Patients with low BMI (<20 kg/m2) showed recipient-site infection (P = 0.02) and facial fistula (P = 0.01) significantly more frequently owing to insufficient tissue volume and poor vascular supply. Conclusion: Postoperative recipient-site infection and facial fistula occurred mainly in low-BMI patients. Surgeons should take care to achieve sufficient donor tissue on low-BMI patients. Using a prosthetic obturator in low-BMI patients for craniofacial reconstruction can be a good alternative option to reduce postoperative complications due to insufficient donor tissue volume. PMID:27257566

  17. Exploring the Frontier of Electronic Health Record Surveillance: The Case of Post-Operative Complications

    PubMed Central

    FitzHenry, Fern; Murff, Harvey J.; Matheny, Michael E.; Gentry, Nancy; Fielstein, Elliot M.; Brown, Steven H; Reeves, Ruth M; Aronsky, Dominik; Elkin, Peter L.; Messina, Vincent P.; Speroff, Theodore

    2013-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to build electronic algorithms using a combination of structured data and natural language processing (NLP) of text notes for potential safety surveillance of nine post-operative complications. Methods Post-operative complications from six medical centers in the Southeastern United States were obtained from the Veterans Affairs Surgical Quality Improvement Program (VASQIP) registry. Development and test datasets were constructed using stratification by facility and date of procedure for patients with and without complication. Algorithms were developed from VASQIP outcome definitions using NLP coded concepts, regular expressions, and structured data. The VASQIP nurse reviewer served as the reference standard for evaluating sensitivity and specificity. The algorithms were designed in the development and evaluated in the test dataset. Results Sensitivity and specificity in the test set were 85% and 92% for acute renal failure, 80% and 93% for sepsis, 56% and 94% for deep vein thrombosis, 80% and 97% for pulmonary embolism, 88% and 89% for acute myocardial infarction, 88% and 92% for cardiac arrest, 80% and 90% for pneumonia, 95% and 80% for urinary tract infection, and 80% and 93% for wound infection, respectively. A third of the complications occurred outside of the hospital setting. Conclusions Computer algorithms on data extracted from the electronic health record produced respectable sensitivity and specificity across a large sample of patients seen in six different medical centers. This study demonstrates the utility of combining natural language processing with structured data for mining the information contained within the electronic health record. PMID:23673394

  18. How to lower postoperative complications after radical cystectomy – a review

    PubMed Central

    Zdrojowy, Romuald; Tupikowski, Krzysztof; Małkiewicz, Bartosz; Kołodziej, Anna

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Lowering morbidity and mortality after RC is subject of considerable interest. Lately, many evidence-based data on improvements in operative technique, anesthetic management, and patient care have been published. In this article, we present a review of literature on how to lower postoperative complications after RC. Material and methods The Medline, and Web of Science databases were searched without a time limit on February 2016 using the terms ‘cystectomy’ in conjunction with ‘radical’, ‘bladder cancer’, ‘complications’ or ‘management’. Boolean operators (NOT, AND, OR) were also used in succession to narrow and broaden the search. The search was limited to the English, Polish and Spanish literature. Results Many complications may be avoided by appropriate patient selection and meticulous introduction of care protocols. Conclusions RC as treatment free of complications, even in the hands of an experienced urologist, does not exist. A large number of complications are acceptable in the name of good long-term results. Optimum results are possible with proper surgical technique, good patients and urinary diversion selection and proper patient management in the pre-, peri, and postoperative period. PMID:28127453

  19. Enterocutaneous fistula as a postoperative complication of laparoscopic inguinal hernia repair.

    PubMed

    Klein, A M; Banever, T C

    1999-01-01

    Trocar injuries to the small bowel during laparoscopic hernia repair are a rare complication, the most common complications being postoperative neuralgias, scrotal swelling, scrotal ecchymosis, and hematoma. A 15-year-old boy was admitted 5 days status-post transabdominal laparoscopic inguinal hernia repair of a symptomatic right pantaloon hernia, with signs and symptoms of a retrocecal abscess. Despite laparotic intervention and appendectomy, the next 2 years passed with almost daily, purulent, right lower quadrant wound drainage, in an otherwise asymptomatic patient. Superficial wound exploration and sinogram in 1996 revealed a sinus tract in direct communication with the small bowel. Elective laparotomy in December 1997 involved a successful resection of a 2.5-cm fistula with involved mesh, and the communicating small bowel through a midline incision, followed by a primary closure of the small-bowel opening. The patient has recovered without complications.

  20. Total mechanical stapled oesophagogastric anastomosis on the neck in oesophageal cancer - prevention of postoperative mediastinal complications.

    PubMed

    Zieliński, Jacek; Jaworski, Radosław; Irga-Jaworska, Ninela; Haponiuk, Ireneusz; Jaśkiewicz, Janusz

    2015-12-01

    Oesophagogastric anastomosis after oesophagus resection is commonly performed on the neck. Even though a few different techniques of oesophagogastric anastomosis have been previously detailed, both manual and mechanical procedures have been burdened with leakages and strictures. Our simple technique of oesophagogastric anastomosis is a modification of mechanical anastomosis with the use of a circular stapler in order to prevent postoperative leak and concomitant mediastinal complications. Since 2008, we have performed nine oesophagogastric anastomoses following oesophagus resection. The mean age of the operated patients was 54 years. There was no mortality among the operated patients in the early post-operative period. The mean follow-up period for the patients operated on in our department was 17 months until the time of the analysis. None of the patients showed any leakage or stricture, and no mediastinal complications were reported in the group. Following our own experience, mechanical anastomosis with the use of a circular stapler seems to decrease the time of the operation as well as significantly reducing the incidence of leakages from the anastomosis. This type of anastomosis may decrease the number of postoperative strictures and the most dangerous mediastinal infections.

  1. Obesity and post-operative complications in patients undergoing non-bariatric surgery.

    PubMed

    Doyle, S L; Lysaght, J; Reynolds, J V

    2010-12-01

    As the prevalence of obesity continues to rise in society, an increasing number of patients undergoing non-bariatric surgery will be obese. Obesity is known to increase morbidity and mortality in the general population and thus is perceived as a risk factor for adverse post-surgical outcomes. This association is not clear-cut, however, and there is a lack of consensus in the literature on the risk between obesity and specific complications, in particular relating to infection, wound healing, respiratory and venous thromboembolism. The paucity of studies, as well as a lack of consistency of definition of obesity, with an over-reliance on body mass index rather than body composition analysis, may underlie this confusion. Emerging concepts position central/visceral adipose tissue as potentially key to the pathogenesis of the comorbidities associated with obesity, thus this article reviews emerging research investigating the association between visceral obesity, the metabolic syndrome and resulting post-operative complications. It is hypothesized that the state of chronic inflammation and dysmetabolism observed in visceral obese patients negatively influences post-operative outcomes and represents a potential target for pharmaconutrition. The need for further research investigating the influence of visceral adiposity on immune function post surgery and its impact on post-operative morbidity and mortality is highlighted.

  2. Stair-Climbing Test Predicts Postoperative Cardiopulmonary Complications and Hospital Stay in Patients with Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Jingsi; Mao, Yousheng; Li, Jiagen; He, Jie

    2017-01-01

    Background There is currently no reliable method to predict major postoperative cardiopulmonary complications for patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). In this study, we hypothesized that exercise oxygen desaturation (EOD) and heart rate change results in a stair-climbing test (SCT) would predict postoperative cardiopulmonary complications for patients with NSCLC. Material/Methods We examined 171 patients (41 females and 130 males) with NSCLC by preoperative SCT from January 2010 to July 2015. Among them, 27 underwent wedge resection, 122 underwent lobectomy, and 22 underwent pneumonectomy. The correlation between postoperative cardiopulmonary complications and parameters of SCT and pulmonary function test (PFT) parameters were analyzed retrospectively. Results The overall 30-day postoperative morbidity of the patients was 46/171 (26.9%), with death occurring in 3/171(1.8%). The age, FEV1%, MVV, height of climbing, EOD, and heart rate change were found to be significantly different between the group with postoperative cardiopulmonary complications and those without. Binary logistic regression analysis showed that EOD and heart rate change were independently correlated with postoperative cardiopulmonary complications. In addition, a model predicting the probability of postoperative cardiopulmonary complication based on logistic regression for multivariable analysis was used to confirm our findings. Conclusions A symptom-limited SCT with oxygen saturation monitoring is a safe, simple, and low-cost method to evaluate cardiopulmonary function preoperatively. PMID:28336909

  3. Stair-Climbing Test Predicts Postoperative Cardiopulmonary Complications and Hospital Stay in Patients with Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer.

    PubMed

    Dong, Jingsi; Mao, Yousheng; Li, Jiagen; He, Jie

    2017-03-24

    BACKGROUND There is currently no reliable method to predict major postoperative cardiopulmonary complications for patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). In this study, we hypothesized that exercise oxygen desaturation (EOD) and heart rate change results in a stair-climbing test (SCT) would predict postoperative cardiopulmonary complications for patients with NSCLC. MATERIAL AND METHODS We examined 171 patients (41 females and 130 males) with NSCLC by preoperative SCT from January 2010 to July 2015. Among them, 27 underwent wedge resection, 122 underwent lobectomy, and 22 underwent pneumonectomy. The correlation between postoperative cardiopulmonary complications and parameters of SCT and pulmonary function test (PFT) parameters were analyzed retrospectively. RESULTS The overall 30-day postoperative morbidity of the patients was 46/171 (26.9%), with death occurring in 3/171(1.8%). The age, FEV1%, MVV, height of climbing, EOD, and heart rate change were found to be significantly different between the group with postoperative cardiopulmonary complications and those without. Binary logistic regression analysis showed that EOD and heart rate change were independently correlated with postoperative cardiopulmonary complications. In addition, a model predicting the probability of postoperative cardiopulmonary complication based on logistic regression for multivariable analysis was used to confirm our findings. CONCLUSIONS A symptom-limited SCT with oxygen saturation monitoring is a safe, simple, and low-cost method to evaluate cardiopulmonary function preoperatively.

  4. The contribution of opiate analgesics to the development of infectious complications in trauma patients

    PubMed Central

    Oppeltz, Richard F; Holloway, Travis L; Covington, Cody J; Schwacha, Martin G

    2015-01-01

    Trauma-related pain is a natural consequence of injury and its surgical management; however, the relationship between opiates and complications in trauma patients is unknown. To study this a retrospective chart review of selected subjects following traumatic injury with admission to the SICU for > 3 days was performed, and opiate administration data was collected for the first 3 days of admission. Associated data from each subject’s chart was also collected. Analysis of the data revealed that increased opiate intake after admission to the SICU was associated with significantly increased SICU and hospital LOS independent of injury severity. This increase in LOS was independent of mechanical ventilation in the moderate ISS group. Infectious complications were also more prevalent in the moderate ISS group with higher opiate use. These findings suggest that increased doses of opiate analgesics in trauma patients may contribute to an increased overall LOS and associated infectious complications. Analgesic regimes that minimize opiate intake, while still providing adequate pain relief, may be advantageous in reducing LOS, complications and reduce hospitalization costs. PMID:26309777

  5. Addition of Ceftriaxone and Amikacin to a Ciprofloxacin plus Metronidazole Regimen for Preventing Infectious Complications of Transrectal Ultrasound-Guided Prostate Biopsy: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Izadpanahi, Mohammad-Hossein; Majidi, Seyed Mahmood; Khorrami, Mohammad-Hatef; Mohammadi-Sichani, Mehrdad

    2017-01-01

    Background. The objective of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of adding single doses of ceftriaxone and amikacin to a ciprofloxacin plus metronidazole regimen on the reduction of infectious complications following transrectal ultrasound-guided prostate biopsy (TRUS Bx). Materials and Methods. Four hundred and fifty patients who were candidates for TRUS Bx were divided into two groups of 225 each. The control group received ciprofloxacin 500 mg orally every 12 hours together with metronidazole 500 mg orally every 8 hours from the day prior to the procedure until the fifth postoperative day. In the second group, single doses of ceftriaxone 1 g by intravenous infusion and amikacin 5 mg/kg intramuscularly were administered 30–60 minutes before TRUS Bx in addition to the oral antimicrobials described for group 1. The incidence of infection was compared between the groups. Results. The incidence of infectious complications in the intervention group was significantly lower than that in the control group (4.6% versus 0.9%, p = 0.017). Conclusion. The addition of single doses of intramuscular amikacin and intravenously infused ceftriaxone to our prophylactic regimen of ciprofloxacin plus metronidazole resulted in a statistically significant reduction of infectious complications following TRUS Bx. PMID:28167960

  6. Use of indocyanine green videoangiography during intracranial aneurysm surgery reduces the incidence of postoperative ischaemic complications.

    PubMed

    Lai, Leon Tat; Morgan, Michael Kerin

    2014-01-01

    Microscope-integrated near-infrared indocyanine green videoangiography (ICGVA) has been shown to be a useful adjunct for intracranial aneurysm surgery. That the routine application of this technique reduces the risk of postoperative ischaemic complication, however, has not been reported. We present a retrospective matched-pair comparison of ICGVA guided aneurysm surgery versus historic control surgical cohort treated by the same author. Index patients and controls were matched for aneurysm size, location, patient demographics, risk factors, comorbidities, and surgical treatments. Ninety-one eligible patients with 100 intracranial aneurysms were treated using ICGVA assistance. There were no statistically significant differences between the two groups in terms of patient age, sex, risk factors, comorbidities and aneurysm characteristics. Of the 100 aneurysms in the ICGVA group, 107 investigations of ICGVA were performed. In 79 aneurysms (79.0%), ICGVA was considered useful but did not affect surgical management. In six patients (6.0%), ICGVA led to a crucial change of intraoperative strategies. In nine patients (9.0%), it was considered critical in assuring patency of small perforators. ICGVA was of no benefit in four patients (4.0%) and was misleading in two (2.0%). Postoperative ischaemic complications occurred in three patients (3.3%) in the ICGVA group compared with seven patients (7.7%) in the control group (p<0.001). Our study supports the use of ICGVA in aneurysm surgery as a safe and effective modality of intraoperative blood flow assessment. With all limitations of a retrospective matched-pair comparison, the use of ICGVA during routine aneurysm surgery reduces the incidence of postoperative ischaemic complications.

  7. Postoperative Complications in the Ahmed Baerveldt Comparison Study during Five Years of Follow-up

    PubMed Central

    Budenz, Donald L.; Feuer, William J.; Barton, Keith; Schiffman, Joyce; Costa, Vital P.; Godfrey, David G.; Buys, Yvonne M.

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE To compare the late complications in the Ahmed Baerveldt Comparison Study during 5 years of follow-up. DESIGN Multicenter, prospective, randomized clinical trial. METHODS SETTINGS Sixteen international clinical centers. STUDY POPULATION Two hundred seventy six subjects aged 18 to 85 years with previous intraocular surgery or refractory glaucoma with intraocular pressure of > 18 mmHg. INTERVENTIONS Ahmed Glaucoma Valve FP7 or Baerveldt Glaucoma Implant BG 101-350. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES Late postoperative complications (beyond 3 months), reoperations for complications, and decreased vision from complications. RESULTS Late complications developed in 56 subjects (46.8 ± 4.8 5 year cumulative % ± SE) in the Ahmed Glaucoma Valve group and 67 (56.3 ± 4.7 5 year cumulative % ± SE) in the Baerveldt Glaucoma Implant group (P = 0.082). The cumulative rates of serious complications were 15.9% and 24.7% in the Ahmed Glaucoma Valve and Baerveldt Glaucoma Implant groups respectively (P = 0.034) although this was largely driven by subjects who had tube occlusions in the two groups (0.8% in the Ahmed Glaucoma Valve group and 5.7% in the Baerveldt Glaucoma Implant group, P = 0.037). Both groups had a relatively high incidence of persistent diplopia (12%) and corneal edema (20%), although half of the corneal edema cases were likely due to pre-existing causes other than the aqueous shunt. The incidence of tube erosion was 1% and 3% in the Ahmed Glaucoma Valve and Baerveldt Glaucoma Implant groups, respectively (P = 0.04). CONCLUSIONS Long term rates of vision threatening complications and complications resulting in reoperation were higher in the Baerveldt Glaucoma Implant than the Ahmed Glaucoma Valve group over 5 years of follow-up. PMID:26596400

  8. Intraoperative and Postoperative Complications of Laser in situ Keratomileusis Flap Creation Using IntraLase Femtosecond Laser and Mechanical Microkeratomes

    PubMed Central

    Espandar, Ladan; Meyer, Jay

    2010-01-01

    An essential step of laser in situ keratomileusis surgery is corneal flap creation, Femtosecond (FS)-assisted or mechanical microkeratome. Each type has rare intraoperative and postoperative complication rates. Several recent studies have identified risk factors and guidelines to help manage these complications. Fortunately, studies have shown no loss of best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA) after the management of intraoperative and postoperative complications in IntraLase FS and mechanical microkeratome. Refractive surgeons need to be aware of the types of complications that can occur, how to avoid them and how to manage them to ensure the best possible outcomes. PMID:20543937

  9. Intraoperative and Postoperative Complications of Laser in situ Keratomileusis Flap Creation Using IntraLase Femtosecond Laser and Mechanical Microkeratomes.

    PubMed

    Espandar, Ladan; Meyer, Jay

    2010-01-01

    An essential step of laser in situ keratomileusis surgery is corneal flap creation, Femtosecond (FS)-assisted or mechanical microkeratome. Each type has rare intraoperative and postoperative complication rates. Several recent studies have identified risk factors and guidelines to help manage these complications. Fortunately, studies have shown no loss of best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA) after the management of intraoperative and postoperative complications in IntraLase FS and mechanical microkeratome. Refractive surgeons need to be aware of the types of complications that can occur, how to avoid them and how to manage them to ensure the best possible outcomes.

  10. Postoperative Ascites of Unknown Origin following Laparoscopic Appendicectomy: An Unusual Complication of Laparoscopic Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Feretis, M.; Boyd-Carson, H.; Karim, A.

    2014-01-01

    Postoperative ascites is a very rare complication of laparoscopic surgery. Significant iatrogenic injuries to the bowel, the urinary tract, and the lymphatic system should be excluded promptly to avoid devastating results for the patient. In some cases, in spite of investigating patients extensively, no definitive causative factor for the accumulation of fluid can be identified. In such cases, idiopathic allergic or inflammatory reaction of the peritoneum may be responsible for the development of ascites. We present a case of ascites of an unknown origin in a young female patient following a laparoscopic appendicectomy. PMID:24822146

  11. Cerebral salt wasting syndrome: postoperative complication in tumours of the cerebellopontine angle.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Juretschke, Fernando; Arístegui, Miguel; García-Leal, Roberto; Fernández-Carballal, Carlos; Lowy, Alejandro; Martin-Oviedo, Carlos; Panadero, Teresa

    2012-02-01

    Cerebral salt wasting (CSW) is a rare complication in posterior fossa tumour surgery. We present two patients with cerebellopontine angle (CPA) tumours who developed cerebral salt wasting postoperatively. Both patients deteriorated in spite of intensive fluid and salt replacement. On CT scan the patients presented mild to moderate ventricular dilation, which was treated with an external ventricular drainage. After the resolution of hydrocephalus, fluid balance rapidly returned to normal in both patients and the clinical status improved. Identification and treatment of secondary obstructive hydrocephalus may contribute to the management of CSW associated to posterior fossa tumour surgery.

  12. Self-powered instrumented knee implant for early detection of postoperative complications.

    PubMed

    Almouahed, Shaban; Gouriou, Manuel; Hamitouche, Chafiaa; Stindel, Eric; Roux, Christian

    2010-01-01

    In-vivo measurement of tibiofemoral forces transmitted through Total Knee Replacement (TKR) during normal walking allows the early detection of postoperative complications such as the tibiofemoral misalignment and soft-tissue imbalance. In addition, the in-vivo data can help to improve the design of TKR in order to reduce polyethylene wear and consequently to increase the lifespan of knee implant. A self-powered custom-designed tibial implant instrumented with four piezoceramics has been developed in order to detect the aforementioned complications by measuring the relative change in pressure center (COP) position for different levels of eccentric compressive loading. Moreover, the energy harvested by the piezoceramics can be used to power a transmission system located at the stem of knee implant to wirelessly transmit the in-vivo data outside the implant for further processing and display.

  13. [Assessment of the predisposing risk factors of the complicated postoperative course after combined operations].

    PubMed

    Federov, A V; Kolygin, A V; Berelavichus, S V; Kriger, A G; Chernova, T G; Goncharova, N N; Solodkiĭ, A V

    2013-01-01

    Results of 335 combined operations were analyzed. Men were 89 (27%), women - 246 (73%), the majority of patients were of middle age. 285 (85%) operations included cholecystectomy. 195 (58%) patients had hernioplasty. The third place belonged to vascular operations - 76 (23%). Certain predisposing factors, correlating with the risk of the complicated postoperative course, were marked out. Indications and contraindications to the combined operation were assigned, based on the number of predisposing factors in a patient. Considering the increased risk of intraoperative complications during the combined operation (increased duration, blood loss), participation of highly experienced surgeons and use of modern high-tech equipment seem to be reasonable. The general results of the analysis prove that combined operations are effective, safe and economically beneficial.

  14. Factors associated with major complications in the short-term postoperative period in dogs undergoing surgery for brachycephalic airway syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Ree, Jennifer J.; Milovancev, Milan; MacIntyre, Laura A.; Townsend, Katy L.

    2016-01-01

    Surgical correction of brachycephalic airway syndrome (BAS) in dogs has been reported to result in low complication rates and good long-term outcomes. Previous reports have not identified risk factors for the development of complications following BAS surgery. This retrospective study evaluated a wide variety of patient- and procedure-related, pre-operative, intra-operative, and post-operative factors for an association with the development of major postoperative complications in the short-term period following BAS surgery. The overall major complication rate, including death or euthanasia, was 4/55 (7%) dogs. Temporary tracheostomy was the only major surgical complication identified (n = 3). Multiple logistic regression identified postoperative radiographic evidence of pneumonia as associated with the development of any major complication overall, requirement of a temporary tracheostomy postoperatively, and death or euthanasia, within the short-term postoperative period. Future prospective studies should evaluate specific risk factors for an association with major complications following BAS surgery in dogs to improve patient outcomes. PMID:27587891

  15. Factors associated with major complications in the short-term postoperative period in dogs undergoing surgery for brachycephalic airway syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ree, Jennifer J; Milovancev, Milan; MacIntyre, Laura A; Townsend, Katy L

    2016-09-01

    Surgical correction of brachycephalic airway syndrome (BAS) in dogs has been reported to result in low complication rates and good long-term outcomes. Previous reports have not identified risk factors for the development of complications following BAS surgery. This retrospective study evaluated a wide variety of patient- and procedure-related, pre-operative, intra-operative, and post-operative factors for an association with the development of major postoperative complications in the short-term period following BAS surgery. The overall major complication rate, including death or euthanasia, was 4/55 (7%) dogs. Temporary tracheostomy was the only major surgical complication identified (n = 3). Multiple logistic regression identified postoperative radiographic evidence of pneumonia as associated with the development of any major complication overall, requirement of a temporary tracheostomy postoperatively, and death or euthanasia, within the short-term postoperative period. Future prospective studies should evaluate specific risk factors for an association with major complications following BAS surgery in dogs to improve patient outcomes.

  16. Determinants of Malnutrition and Post-operative Complications in Hospitalized Surgical Patients

    PubMed Central

    de Aquino, José Luiz Braga

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT The study aimed to determine the nutritional status (NS) of hospitalized surgical patients and investigate a possible association between NS and type of disease, type of surgery and post-operative complications. The gender, age, disease, surgery, complications, length of hospital stay, number of medications, laboratory test results, and energy intake of 388 hospitalized surgical patients were recorded. NS was determined by classical anthropometry. The inclusion criteria were: nutritional status assessment done within the first 24 hours of admission, age ≥20 years, and complete medical history. Univariate and multiple Cox's regression analyses were employed to determine which variables were possible risk factors of malnutrition and complications. Malnutrition was more common in males (p=0.017), individuals aged 70 to 79 years (p=0.000), and individuals with neoplasms and digestive tract diseases (p=0.000). Malnourished individuals had longer hospital stays (p=0.013) and required more medications (p=0.001). The risk of malnutrition was associated with age and disease. Individuals aged 70 years or more had a two-fold increased risk of malnutrition (p=0.014; RR=2.207; 95% CI 1.169-4.165); those with neoplasms (p=0.008; RR=14.950; 95% CI 2.011-111.151) and those having digestive tract diseases (p=0.009; RR=14.826; 95% CI 1.939-113.362) had a 14-fold increased risk of malnutrition. Complications prevailed in older individuals (p=0.016), individuals with longer hospital stays (p=0.007), and individuals who died (p=0.002). The risk of complications was associated with age and BMI. In the present study, the risk of malnutrition was associated with age and type of disease; old age and low BMI may increase complications. PMID:25395903

  17. Examination of a CRP first approach for the detection of postoperative complications in patients undergoing surgery for colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    McSorley, Stephen T.; Khor, Bo Y.; MacKay, Graham J.; Horgan, Paul G.; McMillan, Donald C.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract The aim of the present study was to examine whether a C-reactive protein (CRP) first approach would improve the detection rate of postoperative complications by CT. CRP is a useful biomarker to identify major complications following surgery for colorectal cancer. Patients with histologically confirmed colorectal cancer, who underwent elective surgery between 2008 and 2015 at a single centre were included. Exceeding the established CRP threshold of 150 mg/L on postoperative day (POD) 4 was recorded. Results of CT performed between postoperative days 4 and 14 were recorded. Four hundred ninety-five patients were included. The majority were male (58%), over 65 (68%), with node-negative disease (66%) and underwent open surgery (70%). Those patients who underwent a CT scan (n = 93), versus those who did not (n = 402), were more likely to have a postoperative complication (84% vs 35%, P < 0.001), infective complication (67% vs 21%, P < 0.001), and anastomotic leak (17% vs 2%, P < 0.001). In patients who did not undergo a CT scan (n = 402) exceeding the CRP threshold (n = 117) on POD 4 was associated with a higher rate of postoperative complication (50% vs 29%, P < 0.001), infective complications (36% vs 15%, P < 0.001), and anastomotic leak (4% vs 0.5%, P = 0.009). In patients who did undergo a CT scan (n = 93) exceeding the CRP threshold (n = 53) on POD 4 was associated with earlier CT (median POD 6 vs 8, P = 0.001) but not postoperative complications. A CRP first approach resulted in earlier and improved detection of complications by CT following surgery for colorectal cancer. PMID:28207541

  18. Resection of complex pancreatic injuries: Benchmarking postoperative complications using the Accordion classification

    PubMed Central

    Krige, Jake E; Jonas, Eduard; Thomson, Sandie R; Kotze, Urda K; Setshedi, Mashiko; Navsaria, Pradeep H; Nicol, Andrew J

    2017-01-01

    AIM To benchmark severity of complications using the Accordion Severity Grading System (ASGS) in patients undergoing operation for severe pancreatic injuries. METHODS A prospective institutional database of 461 patients with pancreatic injuries treated from 1990 to 2015 was reviewed. One hundred and thirty patients with AAST grade 3, 4 or 5 pancreatic injuries underwent resection (pancreatoduodenectomy, n = 20, distal pancreatectomy, n = 110), including 30 who had an initial damage control laparotomy (DCL) and later definitive surgery. AAST injury grades, type of pancreatic resection, need for DCL and incidence and ASGS severity of complications were assessed. Uni- and multivariate logistic regression analysis was applied. RESULTS Overall 238 complications occurred in 95 (73%) patients of which 73% were ASGS grades 3-6. Nineteen patients (14.6%) died. Patients more likely to have complications after pancreatic resection were older, had a revised trauma score (RTS) < 7.8, were shocked on admission, had grade 5 injuries of the head and neck of the pancreas with associated vascular and duodenal injuries, required a DCL, received a larger blood transfusion, had a pancreatoduodenectomy (PD) and repeat laparotomies. Applying univariate logistic regression analysis, mechanism of injury, RTS < 7.8, shock on admission, DCL, increasing AAST grade and type of pancreatic resection were significant variables for complications. Multivariate logistic regression analysis however showed that only age and type of pancreatic resection (PD) were significant. CONCLUSION This ASGS-based study benchmarked postoperative morbidity after pancreatic resection for trauma. The detailed outcome analysis provided may serve as a reference for future institutional comparisons.

  19. Comparison of perioperative and short-term postoperative complications of gastrointestinal biopsies via laparoscopic-assisted technique versus laparotomy

    PubMed Central

    Mitterman, Laura; Bonczynski, Jennifer; Hearon, Kendra; Selmic, Laura E.

    2016-01-01

    This retrospective report describes perioperative and short-term postoperative complications of gastrointestinal biopsies obtained via a laparoscopic-assisted technique compared with laparotomy in a population of 60 client-owned dogs and cats with naturally occurring gastrointestinal disease. The medical records were examined for patients that underwent surgery for diagnostic gastrointestinal biopsies. Data were collected regarding perioperative complications such as hypotension, hypercarbia, and hypoxemia, and short-term postoperative complications including seroma and incisional infection/inflammation. The perioperative complication rate was 17.6% for the laparoscopically assisted group and 16.6% for the control group. The short-term postoperative complication rate was 5.9% for the laparoscopically assisted group and 0% for the control group. There was a 0% rate of intestinal dehiscence. There were no statistically significant differences in complication rates between the 2 groups, showing that laparoscopic-assisted gastrointestinal biopsies can be performed with acceptable perioperative and short-term postoperative complication rates. PMID:27041757

  20. [Logistic, technic and postoperative complications of lung and heart-lung transplantations].

    PubMed

    Bonnette, P

    2010-02-01

    In France, the "Agence de la biomédecine" distributes lung grafts. "Ideal" criteria for lung donor selection are not always respected, driven by the scarcity of suitable donor lungs (10% deaths while waiting). In single lung transplantation, three anastomoses are performed (bronchus near the lobar carina, pulmonary artery, left atrium). For double lung transplantation (twice as frequent around the world), two single lung transplantations are successively performed through two separate anterolateral thoracotomies, often without cardiopulmonary bypass. Heart lung transplantations are now rare (2% around the world). Postoperative mortality has improved (between 10 and 15%): less severe primary graft dysfunctions, treatable with ECMO, fewer bronchial complications, improvement in the diagnosis of hyperacute humoral rejection, improvement in antiviral prophylaxis.

  1. [Basilar impression and malformation of Arnold-Chiari. Postoperative complications in 126 cases (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Gonçalves da Silva, J A; Gonçalves da Silva, C E

    1981-09-01

    Within a period of ten years we operated on 126 cases of basilar impression and/or Arnold-Chiari malformation. Two surgical techniques were employed for decompression of the posterior fossa. In the group I (64 cases) the operation consisted of craniectomy and the dura mater was left open and was fixed to the lateral musculature. The technique of the group II (62 cases) consisted in endotracheal intubation without flexion of the head, position of the head without anterior flexion during the operation and plastic closure of the dura. The dural graft was employed to create more space at the craniocervical joint, to avoid cerebrospinal fluid fistula and to restore the integrity of the dura as a protection for the nervous structures of the posterior fossa. The frequency of postoperative complications and mortality observed in group II was definitely less than in the group I.

  2. Infectious complications in children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia treated in low-middle-income countries.

    PubMed

    Caniza, Miguela A; Odio, Carla; Mukkada, Sheena; Gonzalez, Miriam; Ceppi, Francesco; Chaisavaneeyakorn, Sujittra; Apiwattanakul, Nopporn; Howard, Scott C; Conter, Valentino; Bonilla, Miguel

    2015-10-01

    Infections are the most important cause of morbidity and mortality in children treated for acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). The rates of infection-associated mortality are up to 10-times higher in low- and middle-income countries (LMIC) than in high-income countries. The prevention, early recognition and management of infectious complications is especially challenging in LMIC because of disease and poverty-related factors, as well as the shortage of trained personnel, supplies, diagnostic tools and adequate organizational infrastructure. Children in LMIC with ALL, who are frequently underweight, are at increased risk of community-acquired pathogens, nosocomial multidrug-resistant pathogens and opportunistic microorganisms. This review summarizes the challenges of managing the major categories of infections in children receiving treatment for ALL and provides updated practical recommendations for preventing and managing these infections in LMIC.

  3. Correlations between anatomic variations of maxillary sinus ostium and postoperative complication after sinus lifting

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Objectives The maxillary sinus mucosa is reported to recover to preoperative sterility after sinus floor elevation. However, when drainage of maxillary sinus is impaired, recovery can be delayed and maxillary sinusitis can occur. Therefore, in this study, we investigated the correlations between anatomic variants that can interrupt the ostium of the maxillary sinus and incidence of complication after sinus lifting. Materials and Methods The subjects are 81 patients who underwent sinus lifting in Wonkwang University Dental Hospital (Iksan, Korea). Computed tomography (CT) images of the subjects were reviewed for presence of nasal septum deviation, anatomic variants of the middle turbinate, and Haller cells. Correlations between anatomic variations and occurrence of maxillary sinusitis were statistically analyzed. Results Patients with anatomic variants of ostio-meatal units, such as deviated nasal septum, concha bullosa or paradoxical curvature of the middle turbinate, or Haller cells, showed a higher rate of complication. However, only presence of Haller cell showed statistically significant. Conclusion Before sinus lifting, CT images are recommended to detect anatomic variants of the ostio-meatal complex. If disadvantageous anatomic variants are detected, the use of nasal decongestants should be considered to reduce the risk of postoperative sinusitis. PMID:27847736

  4. Insulin Infusion on Postoperative Complications of Coronary Artery Bypass Graft in Patients With Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Masoumi, Gholamreza; Frasatkhish, Rasoul; Bigdelian, Hamid; Ziyaefard, Mohsen; Sadeghpour-Tabae, Ali; Mansouri, Mojtaba; Jalali, Alireza

    2014-01-01

    Background: Cardiovascular events are common in patients with diabetes mellitus (DM), which make coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) a highly demanded surgery in this population. Tight control of blood glucose in patients with DM is beneficial in reducing postoperative complications; however, the adequate range has not been determined yet. Objectives: This study aimed to investigate the effect of semi-tight (moderate) control of DM on complications and serum glucose levels during and after CABG. Patients and Methods: In this prospective clinical trial, 18 and 31 patients with and without DM, respectively, who were referred to Shahid Chamran Hospital, Isfahan, Iran, for elective CABG surgery, were enrolled. For DM group, patients with controlled DM (i.e. glycosylated hemoglobin levels [HgA1C] ≤ 7%) were recruited. Blood glucose level (blood sugar, BS) was measured after anesthesia, during pumping, warming, off pumping, six and 12 hours after Intensive Care Unit (ICU) admission, and at discharging from the hospital. The hemodynamic state of the patients, bleeding, need of blood transfusion, infection, and duration of hospitalization were also monitored and recorded. Results: None of the BS measurements (FBS, after anesthesia, on-pump, warming, off pump, six and 12 hours after ICU admission, and at discharge) were significantly different between study groups (P > 0.05). Frequency of surgery site bleeding and blood transfusion need were not significantly different between these groups (P > 0.05). Conclusions: Semi-tight control of DM with insulin infusion during operation did not led to any difference in the type and rate of CABG complications between patients with well-controlled and those without DM; however, BS levels in patients with well-controlled DM could be more easily controlled. PMID:25478540

  5. Postoperative complications necessitating right lower lobectomy in a heart-lung transplant recipient with previous sternotomy.

    PubMed

    Diethrich, E B; Bahadir, I; Gordon, M; Maki, P; Warner, M G; Clark, R; Siever, J; Silverthorn, A

    1987-09-01

    Heart-lung transplantation for treatment of end-stage cardiopulmonary disease continues to be plagued by many problems. Three primary ones are the technical difficulties that can be encountered, particularly in those patients who have undergone previous cardiac operations, the additional restriction on donor availability imposed by the lack of satisfactory preservation techniques, and the need for lung size compatibility. Two of these difficulties and others surfaced postoperatively in a heart-lung transplant recipient who presented a series of unique operative and therapeutic challenges. A 42-year-old woman with chronic pulmonary hypertension and previous atrial septal defect repair underwent a heart-lung transplantation in August 1985. The operative procedure was expectedly complicated by bleeding from extensive mediastinal adhesions from the previous sternotomy and bronchial collateralization. Excessive chest tube drainage postoperatively necessitated reoperation to control bleeding from a right bronchial artery tributary. Phrenic nerve paresis, hepatomegaly, and marked abdominal distention caused persistent atelectasis and eventual right lower lobe collapse. Arteriovenous shunting and low oxygen saturation necessitated right lower lobectomy 15 days after transplantation, believed to be the first use of this procedure in a heart-lung graft recipient. Although oxygenation improved dramatically, continued ventilatory support led to tracheostomy. An intensive, psychologically oriented physical therapy program was initiated to access and retrain intercostal and accessory muscles. The tracheostomy cannula was removed after 43 days and gradual weaning from supplemental oxygen was accomplished. During this protracted recovery period, an episode of rejection was also encountered and successfully managed with steroid therapy. The patient continued to progress satisfactorily and was discharged 83 days after transplantation. She is well and active 20 months after discharge.

  6. Factors Associated with Complications and Postoperative Visual Outcomes of Cataract Surgery; a Study of 1,632 Cases

    PubMed Central

    Thanigasalam, Thevi; Reddy, Sagili Chandrashekara; Zaki, Rafdzah Ahmad

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Cataract surgery is the most common intraocular surgery performed all over the world and has advanced technically in recent years. As in all surgeries, complications are unavoidable. Herein we report factors associated with complications and visual outcomes of cataract surgery. Methods: This retrospective cohort study included data of 1,632 cataract surgeries performed from 2007 to 2010 which was obtained from the cataract registry of the Malaysian National Eye Database. Demographic features, ocular and systemic comorbidites, grade of surgeon expertise and duration of surgery, type of anesthesia, intraoperative and postoperative complications, and the type of intraocular lens were recorded. Best corrected visual acuities were compared before and after the operation. Results: Mean patient age was 66.9 years with equal gender distribution. The majority of subjects had age related cataracts. Phacoemulsification was done faster than other surgeries, especially by specialist surgeons. History of prior ocular surgery and operations performed under general anesthesia were associated with greater complications. Phacoemulsification was associated with less complications and better visual outcomes. The age and etiology of cataract did not affect complications. Malays, absence of ocular comorbidities, left eyes and eyes operated under local anesthesia were more likely to experience more visual improvement. Gender, age, cause of cataract, systemic comorbidities and surgeon expertise as well as intra-and postoperative complications did not affect the visual outcomes. Conclusion: Phacoemulsification had good visual outcomes in cataract surgery. Duration of surgery, expertise of the surgeon and complications did not affect the visual outcomes. PMID:27051481

  7. A case-control study of postoperative pulmonary complications after laparoscopic and open cholecystectomy.

    PubMed

    Hall, J C; Tarala, R A; Hall, J L

    1996-04-01

    Postoperative pulmonary complications (PPC) are common after upper abdominal surgery. The objective of this case-control study was to compare the incidence of PPC after laparoscopic cholecystectomy (LC) and open cholecystectomy (OC) within a tertiary care center. Patients were accrued from two sequential clinical trials that evaluated the role of incentive spirometry in the prevention of PPC after abdominal surgery. Included for study were patients with gallstones undergoing elective surgery who had an American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) classification < 3. All patients included in the study were encouraged to use an incentive spirometer at least 10 times each hour while awake. Patients with chronic bronchitis were excluded from study, as were patients who received other forms of physical therapy. OC was performed through either a transverse or an oblique incision. There was an equitable dispersion of putative risk factors for PPC between the groups at baseline. PPC were defined as clinical features consistent with collapse/consolidation, an otherwise unexplained temperature above 38 degrees C, plus either confirmatory chest radiology or positive sputum microbiology. The incidence of PPC was 2.7% (1/37) after LC and 17.2% (10/58) after OC (p < 0.05). It is concluded that PPC are less common after laparoscopic cholecystectomy than after open cholecystectomy.

  8. Infectious Complications and Immune/Inflammatory Response in Cardiogenic Shock Patients: A Prospective Observational Study

    PubMed Central

    Parenica, Jiri; Jarkovsky, Jiri; Malaska, Jan; Mebazaa, Alexandre; Gottwaldova, Jana; Helanova, Katerina; Litzman, Jiri; Dastych, Milan; Tomandl, Josef; Spinar, Jindrich; Dostalova, Ludmila; Lokaj, Petr; Tomandlova, Marie; Pavkova, Monika Goldergova; Sevcik, Pavel; Legrand, Matthieu

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Introduction: Patients with cardiogenic shock (CS) are at a high risk of developing infectious complications; however, their early detection is difficult, mainly due to a frequently occurring noninfectious inflammatory response, which accompanies an extensive myocardial infarction (MI) or a postcardiac arrest syndrome. The goal of our prospective study was to describe infectious complications in CS and the immune/inflammatory response based on a serial measurement of several blood-based inflammatory biomarkers. Methods: Eighty patients with CS were evaluated and their infections were monitored. Inflammatory markers (C-reactive protein, procalcitonin, pentraxin 3, presepsin) were measured seven times per week. The control groups consisted of 11 patients with ST segment elevation myocardial infarction without CS and without infection, and 22 patients in septic shock. Results: Infection was diagnosed in 46.3% of patients with CS; 16 patients developed an infection within 48 h. Respiratory infection was most common, occurring in 33 out of 37 patients. Infection was a significant or even the main reason of death only in 3.8% of all patients with CS, and we did not find statistically significant difference in 3-month mortality between group of patients with CS with and without infection. There was no statistically significant prolongation of the duration of mechanical ventilation associated with infection. Strong inflammatory response is often in patients with CS due to MI, but we found no significant difference in the course of the inflammatory response expressed by evaluated biomarkers in patients with CS with and without infection. We found a strong relationship between the elevated inflammatory markers (sampled at 12 h) and the 3-month mortality: the area under the curve of receiver operating characteristic ranged between 0.683 and 0.875. Conclusion: The prevalence of infection in patients with CS was 46.3%, and respiratory tract infections were the most

  9. The Role of Computed Tomography in Predicting Left Ventricular Assist Device Infectious Complications

    PubMed Central

    Gomez, Carrie K; Schiffman, Scott R; Hobbs, Susan K

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study is to identify early computed tomography findings around the driveline which would predict mediastinal or left ventricular assist device (LVAD) pocket abscess formation. Materials and Methods: A retrospective analysis was performed on 128 LVAD recipients between January 2007 and December 2011. Infectious complications were subdivided into those affecting the driveline and those resulting in abscess formation either around the LVAD pump or mediastinum. The size and location of infiltrative changes surrounding the driveline were used to predict infection propagation resulting in abscess. Results: Of the 128 patients, 49 (38.3%) patients developed driveline infections and 24 (18.8%) patients developed abscess. 87.5% patients who developed abscess had a preceding driveline infection. The mean time from driveline infection to the development of pump pocket abscess was approximately 7 months. In addition, patients with abscess in the pump pocket or mediastinum had preceding infiltrative changes surrounding the driveline ≥14 mm (P = 0.0001). A preperitoneal location and size of infiltrative changes ≥14 mm were correlated with a higher likelihood of abscess formation (P = 0.0002). Conclusion: Our study demonstrates the predictive value of infection/infiltrative changes around the driveline, which increases the risk for abscess formation in the LVAD pump pocket and/or in the mediastinum. PMID:27833783

  10. Potential Peripartum Markers of Infectious-Inflammatory Complications in Spontaneous Preterm Birth

    PubMed Central

    Tambor, Vojtech; Vajrychova, Marie; Kacerovsky, Marian; Link, Marek; Domasinska, Petra; Menon, Ramkumar; Lenco, Juraj

    2015-01-01

    Spontaneous preterm birth significantly contributes to the overall neonatal morbidity associated with preterm deliveries. Nearly 50% of cases are associated with microbial invasion of the amniotic cavity followed by an inflammatory response. Robust diagnostic tools for neonates jeopardized by infection and inflammation may thus decrease the overall neonatal morbidity substantially. Amniotic fluid retrieved during labor retains fetal and pregnancy-related protein fingerprint and its sampling does not place any unwanted stress on women. Using exploratory and targeted methods we analyzed proteomes of amniotic fluid sampled at the end of spontaneous preterm labor prior to delivery from women with and without infection and inflammation. Exploratory data indicated several amniotic fluid proteins to be associated with infectious-inflammatory complications in spontaneous preterm birth. LC-SRM analysis subsequently verified statistically significant changes in lipocalin-1 (P = 0.047 and AUC = 0.67, P = 0.046), glycodelin (P = 0.013 and AUC = 0.73, P = 0.013), and nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (P = 0.018 and AUC = 0.71, P = 0.01). PMID:26120581

  11. Keratitis, ichthyosis, and deafness syndrome: a review of infectious and neoplastic complications.

    PubMed

    Coggshall, Kathleen; Farsani, Taraneh; Ruben, Beth; McCalmont, Timothy H; Berger, Timothy G; Fox, Lindy P; Shinkai, Kanade

    2013-07-01

    Keratitis, ichthyosis, and deafness (KID) syndrome is a rare genodermatosis associated with mutations in the connexin 26 gene. Although characterized by this clinical triad, KID syndrome predisposes to a heterogeneous spectrum of cutaneous manifestations and complications, both infectious and neoplastic in nature. Chronic mucocutaneous candidiasis and/or superinfection of skin lesions commonly occur and warrant aggressive therapeutic intervention. Benign neoplasms, namely trichilemmal tumors, have also been reported and can herald malignant growth and invasive disease. Squamous cell carcinoma of both mucosa and skin, especially acral sites, occurs in approximately 15% of patients. The pathogenesis of KID syndrome can be at least partially explained by the role of connexin 26 in intercellular communication and carcinogenesis, but the precise mechanism of disease remains unclear. Treatment strategies, which have ranged from antifungals and antibiotics to systemic retinoids, pose an ongoing challenge given the spectrum of disease. A review of the literature, with a particular focus on infection and malignancy associated with KID syndrome, and updates on the pathogenesis of disease, is discussed.

  12. Surgical anatomy, transperitoneal approach, and early postoperative complications of a ventral lumbar spine surgical model in Lewis rats.

    PubMed

    Damle, Sheela R; Krzyzanowska, Agata; Frawley, Robert J; Cunningham, Matthew E

    2013-10-01

    Surgical models in animals are used extensively to study small molecules and devices for lumbar intervertebral disc repair, replacement, and fusion. Although the ventral lumbar animal models themselves are well described, critical assessment of morbidity and mortality avoidance when using the models have not been reported. Hypothesizing that technique modifications and the relative prevalence and severity of complications would be correlated, we collected and examined peri- and postoperative data stratified by surgical technique. We here report complications associated with the transperitoneal approach to the lumbar spine in 268 Lewis rats and offer data-driven suggestions regarding complication avoidance through technique modification. Compared with wider exposure, limiting the width of exposure to a maximum of 3 mm resulted in fewer neurologic complications in the lower limbs. In addition, avoiding extracorporeal reflection of the small intestine during the exposure was associated with lower incidence of postoperative gastrointestinal distress and fewer situations requiring euthanasia. These findings underscore the importance of detailed approaches in minimizing postoperative morbidity and attrition in surgical models.

  13. Factors associated with postoperative complications and 1-year mortality after surgery for colorectal cancer in octogenarians and nonagenarians

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Young Wan; Kim, Ik Yong

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To identify the factors affecting 30-day postoperative complications and 1-year mortality after surgery for colorectal cancer in octogenarians and nonagenarians. Methods Between 2005 and 2014, a total of 204 consecutive patients aged ≥80 years who underwent major colorectal surgery were included. Results One hundred patients were male (49%) and 52 patients had American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) score ≥3 (25%). Combined surgery was performed in 32 patients (16%). Postoperative complications within 30 days after surgery occurred in 54 patients (26%) and 30-day mortality occurred in five patients (2%). Independent risk factors affecting 30-day postoperative complications were older age (≥90 years, hazard ratio [HR] with 95% confidence interval [CI] =4.95 [1.69−14.47], P=0.004), an ASA score ≥3 (HR with 95% CI =4.19 [1.8−9.74], P=0.001), performance of combined surgery (HR with 95% CI =3.1 [1.13−8.46], P=0.028), lower hemoglobin level (<10 g/dL, HR with 95% CI =7.56 [3.07−18.63], P<0.001), and lower albumin level (<3.4 g/dL, HR with 95% CI =3.72 [1.43−9.69], P=0.007). An ASA score ≥3 (HR with 95% CI =2.72 [1.15−6.46], P=0.023), tumor-node-metastasis (TNM) stage IV (HR with 95% CI =3.47 [1.44−8.39], P=0.006), and occurrence of postoperative complications (HR with 95% CI =4.42 [1.39−14.09], P=0.012) were significant prognostic factors for 1-year mortality. Conclusion Patient-related factors (older age, higher ASA score, presence of anemia, and lower serum albumin) and procedure-related factors (performance of combined surgical procedure) increased postoperative complications. Avoidance of 30-day postoperative complications may decrease 1-year mortality. PMID:27279741

  14. Tranexamic acid in life-threatening military injury and the associated risk for infectious complications

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, C. J.; Li, P.; Stewart, L.; Weintrob, A. C.; Carson, M. L.; Murray, C. K.; Tribble, D. R.; Ross, J. D.

    2015-01-01

    Background Tranexamic acid (TXA) has been shown to reduce mortality from severe hemorrhage. Although recent data suggest that TXA has anti-inflammatory properties, few analyses have investigated the impact of TXA on infectious complications in trauma patients. We examined the association between TXA administration and infection risk among injured military personnel. Methods Patients administered TXA were matched by injury severity score to patients who did not receive TXA. Conditional logistic regression was used to examine risk factors associated with infections within 30 days. A Cox proportional analysis evaluated risk factors in a time-to-first infection model. Results A total of 335 TXA recipients were matched to 626 patients not administered TXA. A greater proportion of TXA recipients had an infection compared to the comparative group (P <0.001). The univariate analysis estimated an unadjusted odds ratio (OR) of 2.5 (95 per cent confidence interval [CI]: 1.8–3.4) for the association of TXA with infection risk; however, upon multivariable analysis, TXA administration was not significant (OR: 1.3; CI: 0.8–1.9). Blast injuries, intensive care unit (ICU) admission, and receipt of ≥10 units of blood within 24 hours post-injury were independently associated with infection risk. The Cox proportional model confirmed association with ICU admission and blood transfusions. Moreover, traumatic amputations were also significantly associated with a reduced time-to-first infection. Conclusion In life-threatening military injuries matched for injury severity, TXA recipients did not have a higher risk for infections nor was time to developed infections shorter than in non-recipients. Extent of blood loss, blast injuries, extremity amputations, and intensive care stay were associated with infections. PMID:26791625

  15. Radiological contribution to the diagnosis of early postoperative complications after lung resection for primary tumor: a revisional study

    PubMed Central

    Priola, Adriano Massimiliano; Priola, Sandro Massimo; Boccuzzi, Francesco; Dervishi, Najada; Lisi, Elena; Veltri, Andrea; Ardissone, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    In the post-operative course of the interventions of lung resection for primary tumor, complications of different nature and severity can arise, recognizing different pathogenetic mechanisms and differing according to the type of resection performed and to the time elapsed after surgery. The low diagnostic accuracy of chest radiography requires a thorough knowledge of the radiologist about all radiographic findings, both normal and pathological, which can be found in the immediate post-operative period (within 30 days after surgery). This article aims to describe the incidence, the clinical features and the radiological aspects of immediate complications following pulmonary resections, with specific reference to those in which the diagnostic imaging provides a fundamental contribution. PMID:27621893

  16. [Late paraparesis as a postoperative complication in a patient undergoing the repair of a double aortic aneurysm].

    PubMed

    Bonome González, C; Alvarez Refojo, F; Fernández Carballal, F; Rodríguez Alvarez, R

    1993-01-01

    We report a case of a fifty-seven (57)-years old man undergoing elective surgery of a thoracoabdominal and aortoiliac aneurysm in a single surgical time. The patients is operated undergoing general anesthetic combined with thoracic epidural blockade, and it was done two aortic cross-clamping: one to five cm of the aortic arch and the other to the infrarenal level. The most important intraoperative complications were during the thoracic aortic cross-clamping and the most important postoperative complication was related 48 hours later, to paraparesis after a hypotension episode what improved with rehabilitation treatment.

  17. Sarcopenia is an Independent Predictor of Severe Postoperative Complications and Long-Term Survival After Radical Gastrectomy for Gastric Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhuang, Cheng-Le; Huang, Dong-Dong; Pang, Wen-Yang; Zhou, Chong-Jun; Wang, Su-Lin; Lou, Neng; Ma, Liang-Liang; Yu, Zhen; Shen, Xian

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Currently, the association between sarcopenia and long-term prognosis after gastric cancer surgery has not been investigated. Moreover, the association between sarcopenia and postoperative complications remains controversial. This large-scale retrospective study aims to ascertain the prevalence of sarcopenia and assess its impact on postoperative complications and long-term survival in patients undergoing radical gastrectomy for gastric cancer. From December 2008 to April 2013, the clinical data of all patients who underwent elective radical gastrectomy for gastric cancer were collected prospectively. Only patients with available preoperative abdominal CT scan within 30 days of surgery were considered for analysis. Skeletal muscle mass was determined by abdominal (computed tomography) CT scan, and sarcopenia was diagnosed by the cut-off values obtained by means of optimum stratification. Univariate and multivariate analyses evaluating risk factors of postoperative complications and long-term survival were performed. A total of 937 patients were included in this study, and 389 (41.5%) patients were sarcopenic based on the diagnostic cut-off values (34.9 cm2/m2 for women and 40.8 cm2/m2 for men). Sarcopenia was an independent risk factor for severe postoperative complications (OR = 3.010, P < 0.001), but not for total complications. However, sarcopenia did not show significant association with operative mortality. Moreover, sarcopenia was an independent predictor for poorer overall survival (HR = 1.653, P < 0.001) and disease-free survival (HR = 1.620, P < 0.001). Under the adjusted tumor-node-metastasis (TNM) stage, sarcopenia remained an independent risk factor for overall survival and disease-free survival in patients with TNM stage II and III, but not in patients with TNM stage I. Sarcopenia is an independent predictive factor of severe postoperative complications after radical gastrectomy for gastric cancer. Moreover

  18. A Comparative Study of Postoperative Pulmonary Complications Using Fast Track Regimen and Conservative Analgesic Treatment: A Randomized Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Aghdam, Babak Abri; Golzari, Samad Eslam Jamal; Moghadaszadeh, Majid

    2011-01-01

    Background Postoperative pulmonary complications and pain are important causes of postoperative morbidity following thoracotomy. This study aimed to compare the effects of fast track and conservative treatment regimens on patients undergoing thoracotomy. Materials and Methods In this randomized controlled clinical trial, we recruited 60 patients admitted to the thoracic ICU of Imam Reza Hospital in two matched groups of 30 patients each. Group 1 patients received fast track regimen randomly; whereas, group 2 cases randomly received conservative analgesic regimen after thoracotomy and pulmonary resection. The outcome was determined based on the incidence of pulmonary complications and reduction of post-thoracotomy pain in all patients with forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1) <75% predicted value which was measured while the patients were in ICU. The length of ICU stay, thoracotomy pain, morbidity, pulmonary complications and mortality were compared in two groups. Results A total of 60 patients, 45 (75%) males and 15(25%) females with ASA class I-III were recruited in this study. Postoperative pulmonary complications were observed in 5 (16.7%) patients in group 1 versus 17 (56.7%) patients in group 2. There were statistically significant differences in development of postoperative pulmonary complications such as atelectasis and prolonged air leak between both groups (P< 0.001 and P = 0.003). There was also a statistically significant difference in the rate of preoperative FEV1 (p = 0.001) and ASA scoring (p = 0.01) and value of FEV1 < 75% predicted in the two groups. The difference in length of ICU stay in two groups was statistically significant (P= 0.003 and P = 0.017 in FEV1 < 75% group). Four patients in group 1 and 9 patients in group 2 had FEV1reduced to less than 75% of predicted value (p = 0.03). Conclusion Using fast track regimen reduced postoperative pain and incidence of some pulmonary complications significantly when compared to the

  19. The comparative risk of developing postoperative complications in patients with distal radius fractures following different treatment modalities

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Wen-Jun; Li, Yi-Fan; Ji, Yun-Han; Xu, Wei; Zhu, Xiao-Dong; Tang, Xian-Zhong; Zhao, Huan-Li; Wang, Gui-Bin; Jia, Yue-Qing; Zhu, Shi-Cai; Zhang, Feng-Fang; Liu, Hong-Mei

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we performed a network meta-analysis to compare the outcomes of seven most common surgical procedures to fix DRF, including bridging external fixation, non-bridging external fixation, K-wire fixation, plaster fixation, dorsal plating, volar plating, and dorsal and volar plating. Published studies were retrieved through PubMed, Embase and Cochrane Library databases. The database search terms used were the following keywords and MeSH terms: DRF, bridging external fixation, non-bridging external fixation, K-wire fixation, plaster fixation, dorsal plating, volar plating, and dorsal and volar plating. The network meta-analysis was performed to rank the probabilities of postoperative complication risks for the seven surgical modalities in DRF patients. This network meta-analysis included data obtained from a total of 19 RCTs. Our results revealed that compared to DRF patients treated with bridging external fixation, marked differences in pin-track infection (PTI) rate were found in patients treated with plaster fixation, volar plating, and dorsal and volar plating. Cluster analysis showed that plaster fixation is associated with the lowest probability of postoperative complication in DRF patients. Plaster fixation is associated with the lowest risk for postoperative complications in DRF patients, when compared to six other common DRF surgical methods examined. PMID:26549312

  20. Postoperative Cervical Haematoma Complicated by Ipsilateral Carotid Thrombosis and Aphasia after Anterior Cervical Fusion: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Chin, Kingsley R.; Seale, Jason; Butron, Veronica

    2013-01-01

    Hematoma alone is the most common vascular complication reported after anterior cervical decompression and fusion (ACDF). We present this case to report the occurrence of postoperative cervical hematoma complicated by ipsilateral carotid thrombosis and aphasia after an uncomplicated C4–6 ACDF. This is a case of a 65-year-old woman who underwent revision fusions of the C4-5 and C6-7 levels complicated by postoperative cervical hematoma and carotid thrombosis. The patient's history, clinical examination, imaging findings, and treatment are reported. The revision fusions were performed and deemed routine. Approximately eight hours later 200 mL of blood was evacuated from a postoperative cervical hematoma. The patient became unresponsive and disoriented a few hours after evacuating the hematoma. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging of the brain were normal, but magnetic resonance angiography demonstrated total occlusion of the left carotid artery. Thrombectomy was performed and the patient was discharged without residual deficits. At the latest followup she is fully functional and asymptomatic in her neck. We suggest, after evacuating a cervical hematoma, an evaluation of the carotids be made with MRA or cerebral angiography, as this may demonstrate a clot before the patient develops symptoms. PMID:23533432

  1. Factors predicting early postoperative liver cirrhosis-related complications after lung cancer surgery in patients with liver cirrhosis.

    PubMed

    Iwata, Takashi; Inoue, Kiyotoshi; Nishiyama, Noritoshi; Nagano, Koshi; Izumi, Nobuhiro; Tsukioka, Takuma; Hanada, Shoji; Suehiro, Shigefumi

    2007-12-01

    We aimed to determine the factors predicting liver cirrhosis-related complications in the early postoperative period after lung cancer surgery in patients with liver cirrhosis. We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of patients who underwent curative surgery for primary lung cancer in our institute from January 1990 to March 2007, finding 37 cases with comorbid liver cirrhosis. These patients were divided into two groups, according to whether liver failure, bleeding, and critical infection had occurred postoperatively. Various clinical parameters were analyzed statistically between the bigeminal groups. Liver cirrhosis-related complications occurred in seven of the 37 patients (18.9%). Transient liver failure occurred in two patients (5.4%) after pulmonary resection. Acute intrathoracic bleeding occurred in four cases (10.8%). Two patients died (5.4%) in both cases due to sepsis. Preoperative total bilirubin (P<0.05), and indocyanine green retention rate at 15 min (P<0.05) were significantly higher in patients with liver failure. Only serum value of total bilirubin was an independent risk factor (P<0.05) by multivariate analysis. In predicting death from infection, only preoperative nutritional status was a significant risk factor (P<0.05). To avoid postoperative cirrhosis-related complications, preoperative preparation to improve their liver function and nutrition status is essential.

  2. A retrospective analysis of massive blood transfusion and post-operative complications in patients undergoing supra-major orthopaedic oncosurgeries

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Ankit; Kulkarni, Atul

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims: Anaesthetic management of patients undergoing supra-major orthopaedic oncosurgeries is challenging. We wanted to evaluate the effects of pre-operative co-morbid conditions, intraoperative blood loss and transfusion, haemodynamic instability on post-operative complications and hospital outcomes in patients after such surgeries. Methods: We collected data from the patient files, anaesthesia records and the electronic medical records about pre-operative morbidities, intraoperative management, complications, blood loss, fluid therapy and blood products transfused. We also collected data on post-operative complications, intensive care unit (ICU) and hospital length of stay (LOS) and status at discharge. Data were summarised using percentages for categorical data and mean and median for continuous data. Results: The mean blood loss was 4567.44 ml (range 1200–16,000 ml); 95% of all patients received blood transfusion. Twenty patients needed massive blood transfusion. Fresh frozen plasma was needed in 17 patients while 1 patient needed single donor platelets. Haemodynamic instability was present in 38 patients, of which 8 needed continuous vasopressor infusion. Nineteen patients were ventilated post-operatively. Coagulopathy occurred in 22 patients while thrombocytopaenia was seen in 6 patients. The median ICU LOS was 3 (1–6) days, and median hospital stay was 17 (6–53) days. All patients were discharged alive. Conclusion: Supra-major orthopaedic oncosurgeries are associated with massive intraoperative blood loss and transfusion. Common complications include anaemia, coagulopathy and hyperbilirubinaemia and prolonged ICU stay. Meticulous care, anticipating the complications with timely treatment can lead to excellent outcomes. PMID:27141111

  3. Intermediate acting non-depolarizing neuromuscular blocking agents and risk of postoperative respiratory complications: prospective propensity score matched cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Grosse-Sundrup, Martina; Henneman, Justin P; Sandberg, Warren S; Bateman, Brian T; Uribe, Jose Villa; Nguyen, Nicole Thuy; Ehrenfeld, Jesse M; Martinez, Elizabeth A; Kurth, Tobias

    2012-01-01

    Objective To determine whether use of intermediate acting neuromuscular blocking agents during general anesthesia increases the incidence of postoperative respiratory complications. Design Prospective, propensity score matched cohort study. Setting General teaching hospital in Boston, Massachusetts, United States, 2006-10. Participants 18 579 surgical patients who received intermediate acting neuromuscular blocking agents during surgery were matched by propensity score to 18 579 reference patients who did not receive such agents. Main outcome measures The main outcome measures were oxygen desaturation after extubation (hemoglobin oxygen saturation <90% with a decrease in oxygen saturation after extubation of >3%) and reintubations requiring unplanned admission to an intensive care unit within seven days of surgery. We also evaluated effects on these outcome variables of qualitative monitoring of neuromuscular transmission (train-of-four ratio) and reversal of neuromuscular blockade with neostigmine to prevent residual postoperative neuromuscular blockade. Results The use of intermediate acting neuromuscular blocking agents was associated with an increased risk of postoperative desaturation less than 90% after extubation (odds ratio 1.36, 95% confidence interval 1.23 to 1.51) and reintubation requiring unplanned admission to an intensive care unit (1.40, 1.09 to 1.80). Qualitative monitoring of neuromuscular transmission did not decrease this risk and neostigmine reversal increased the risk of postoperative desaturation to values less than 90% (1.32, 1.20 to 1.46) and reintubation (1.76, 1.38 to 2.26). Conclusion The use of intermediate acting neuromuscular blocking agents during anesthesia was associated with an increased risk of clinically meaningful respiratory complications. Our data suggest that the strategies used in our trial to prevent residual postoperative neuromuscular blockade should be revisited. PMID:23077290

  4. Risk of perioperative blood transfusions and postoperative complications associated with serotonergic antidepressants in older adults undergoing hip fracture surgery.

    PubMed

    Seitz, Dallas P; Bell, Chaim M; Gill, Sudeep S; Reimer, Cara L; Herrmann, Nathan; Anderson, Geoffrey M; Newman, Alice; Rochon, Paula A

    2013-12-01

    Serotonergic antidepressants (SAds) are associated with bleeding-related adverse events. An increased risk of bleeding with SAds may have important implications in surgical settings. Our study evaluates the risk of red blood cell (RBC) transfusions and postoperative complications associated with SAds among older adults undergoing hip fracture surgery. We conducted a retrospective cohort study of individuals 66 years or older who underwent hip fracture surgery in Ontario, Canada. The risk of RBC transfusion among current users of SAds and nonserotonergic antidepressants (NSAds) was compared with recent former SAd users. Secondary outcomes included measures of postoperative morbidity and mortality. Subgroup analyses were undertaken in groups who were coprescribed other medications known to effect bleeding. Multivariable logistic regression was utilized to determine the odds ratios (ORs) for antidepressants and postoperative outcomes. A total 11,384 individuals were included in the study sample. Current SAd users had an increased risk of RBC transfusion compared with recent former users of SAds (OR, 1.28; 95% confidence interval, 1.14-1.43) as did current NSAd users (OR, 1.17; 95% confidence interval, 1.03-1.33). The risk of RBC transfusion with SAds or NSAds was further increased among individuals receiving antiplatelet agents. However, postoperative morbidity and mortality were not increased among either group of antidepressant users. In conclusion, SAds are associated with an increased risk of RBC transfusions, although this does not appear to result in major postoperative complications. Clinicians should be aware of this increased risk, although routine discontinuation of antidepressants before surgery is likely unwarranted in most cases.

  5. Intensive Insulin Therapy is Associated with Reduced Infectious Complications in Burn Patients

    PubMed Central

    Hemmila, Mark R.; Taddonio, Michael A.; Arbabi, Saman; Maggio, Paul M.; Wahl, Wendy L.

    2013-01-01

    Background Intensive insulin therapy to control blood glucose levels has reduced mortality in surgical, but not medical intensive care unit (ICU) patients. Control of blood glucose levels has also been shown to reduce morbidity in surgical ICU patients. There is very little data for use of intensive insulin therapy in the burn patient population. We sought to evaluate our experience with intensive insulin therapy in burn injured ICU patients with regard to mortality, morbidity, and use of hospital resources. Study Design Burn patients admitted to our American College of Surgeons Level 1 verified Burn Center ICU from 7/1/2004 to 6/30/2006 were studied. An intensive insulin therapy protocol was initiated for ICU patients admitted starting 7/1/2005 with a blood glucose target of 100–140 mg/dL. The two groups of patients studied were control (7/1/2004 to 6/30/2005) and intensive insulin therapy (7/1/2005 to 6/30/2006). All glucose values for the hospitalization were analyzed. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed. Results 152 ICU patients admitted with burn injury were available for study. No difference in mortality was evident between the control and intensive insulin therapy groups. After adjusting for patient risk, the intensive insulin therapy group was found to have a decreased rate of pneumonia, ventilator-associated pneumonia, and urinary tract infection. In patients with a maximum glucose value > 140 mg/dL, the risk for an infection was significantly increased (OR 11.3, 95% CI 4–32, p-value <0.001). Presence of a maximum glucose value > 140 mg/dL was associated with a sensitivity of 91% and specificity of 62% for an infectious complication. Conclusion Intensive insulin therapy for burn injured patients admitted to the ICU was associated with a reduced incidence of pneumonia, ventilator associated pneumonia, and urinary tract infection. Intensive insulin therapy did not result in a change in mortality or length of stay when adjusting for

  6. Open and closed models of intensive care unit have different influences on infectious complications in a tertiary care center: A retrospective data analysis.

    PubMed

    El-Kersh, Karim; Guardiola, Juan; Cavallazzi, Rodrigo; Wiemken, Timothy L; Roman, Jesse; Saad, Mohamed

    2016-12-01

    Infectious complications in the intensive care unit (ICU) are associated with higher morbidity, mortality, and increased health care use. Here, we report the results of implementing 2 different models (open vs closed) on infectious complications in the ICU. The closed ICU model was associated with 52% reduction in ventilator-associated pneumonia rate (P = .038) and 25% reduction in central line-associated bloodstream infection rate (P = .631). We speculate that a closed ICU model allows clinical leadership centralization that further facilitates standardized care delivery that translates into fewer infectious complications.

  7. [Transrectal magnetotherapy of the prostate from Intramag device in prophylaxis of postoperative complications of transurethral resection of prostatic adenoma].

    PubMed

    Neĭmark, A I; Snegirev, I V; Neĭmark, B A

    2006-01-01

    The authors analyse preoperative preparation of 91 patients with benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH). Two groups of patients received conventional preparation (group 1) and magnetotherapy (group 2) before TUR of the prostate. The examination covered immune system, bacteriological indices of urine and prostatic tissue. Infection of the urinary tract is a main risk factor of complications after TUR. Conventional preoperative preparation fails to correct immunity, to change bacterial urine flora, to improve hemodynamics in the prostate. Transrectal magnetotherapy with running magnetic field eliminates deficiency of T- and B-cell immunity, raises functional activity of B-lymphocytes and phagocytic ability of neutrophils, reduces endogenic intoxication, tissue edema, bacterial contamination, number of thrombohemorrhagic complications. This leads to a decrease in the number of postoperative complications.

  8. Evaluation of the role of antibiotics in preventing postoperative complication after routine periodontal surgery: A comparative clinical study

    PubMed Central

    Mohan, Rosh Radhika; Doraswamy, Dwarakanath Chinni; Hussain, Ahad M.; Gundannavar, Gayatri; Subbaiah, Shobha Krishna; Jayaprakash, Deepika

    2014-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Aim of this randomly controlled clinical study was to evaluate the role of antibiotics to prevent postoperative complications after routine periodontal surgery and also to determine whether their administration improved the surgical outcome. Materials and Methods: Forty-five systemically healthy patients with moderate to severe chronic periodontitis requiring flap surgery were enrolled in the study. They were randomly allocated to Amoxicillin, Doxycycline, and control groups. Surgical procedures were carried out with complete asepsis as per the protocol. Postoperative assessment of patient variables like swelling, pain, temperature, infection, ulceration, necrosis, and trismus was performed at intervals of 24 h, 48 h, 1 week, and 3 months. Changes in clinical parameters such as gingival index, plaque index, probing pocket depth, and clinical attachment level were also recorded. Results: There was no incidence of postoperative infection in any of the patients. Patient variables were comparable in all the three groups. Though there was significant improvement in the periodontal parameters in all the groups, no statistically significant result was observed for any group over the others. Conclusion: Results of this study showed that when periodontal surgical procedures were performed following strict asepsis, the incidence of clinical infection was not significant among all the three groups, and also that antibiotic administration did not influence the outcome of surgery. Therefore, prophylactic antibiotics for patients who are otherwise healthy administered following routine periodontal surgery to prevent postoperative infection are unnecessary and have no demonstrable additional benefits. PMID:24872630

  9. Value of a step-up diagnosis plan: CRP and CT-scan to diagnose and manage postoperative complications after major abdominal surgery.

    PubMed

    Straatman, Jennifer; Cuesta, Miguel A; Gisbertz, Suzanne S; Van der Peet, Donald L

    2014-12-01

    Postoperative complications frequently follow major abdominal surgery and are associated with increased morbidity and mortality. Early diagnosis and treatment of complications is associated with improved patient outcome. In this study we assessed the value of a step-up diagnosis plan by C-reactive protein and CT-scan (computed tomography-scan) imaging for detection of postoperative complications following major abdominal surgery.An observational cohort study was conducted of 399 consecutivepatients undergoing major abdominal surgery between January 2009 and January 2011. Indication for operation, type of surgery, postoperative morbidity, complications according to the Clavien-Dindo classification and mortality were recorded. Clinical parameters were recorded until 14 days postoperatively or until discharge. Regular C-reactive protein (CPR) measurements in peripheral blood and on indication -enhanced CT-scans were performed.Eighty-three out of 399 (20.6 %) patients developed a major complication in the postoperative course after a median of seven days (IQR 4-9 days). One hundred and thirty two patients received additional examination consisting of enhanced CT-scan imaging, and treatment by surgical reintervention or intensive care observation. CRP levels were significantly higher in patients with postoperative complications. On the second postoperative dayCRP levels were on average 197.4 mg/L in the uncomplicated group, 220.9 mg/L in patients with a minor complication and 280.1 mg/L in patients with major complications (p < 0,001).CT-scan imaging showed a sensitivity of 91.7 % and specificity of 100 % in diagnosis of major complications. Based on clinical deterioration and the increase of CRP, an additional enhanced CT-scan offered clear discrimination between patients with major abdominal complications and uncomplicated patients. Adequate treatment could then be accomplished.

  10. Prediction of Mortality and Postoperative Complications using the Hip-Multidimensional Frailty Score in Elderly Patients with Hip Fracture

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Jung-Yeon; Cho, Kwan-Jae; Kim, Sun-wook; Yoon, Sol-Ji; Kang, Min-gu; Kim, Kwang-il; Lee, Young-Kyun; Koo, Kyung-Hoi; Kim, Cheol-Ho

    2017-01-01

    High mortality and dependent living after hip fracture pose a significant public health concern. Retrospective study was conducted with 481 hip fracture patients (≥65 years of age) undergoing surgery from March 2009 to May 2014. The Hip-MFS was calculated by Comprehensive Geriatric Assessment (CGA). The primary outcome was the 6-month all-cause mortality rate. The secondary outcomes were 1-year all-cause mortality, postoperative complications and prolonged hospital stay, and institutionalization. Thirty-five patients (7.3%) died within 6 months after surgery (median [interquartile range], 2.9 [1.4–3.9] months). The fully adjusted hazard ratio per 1 point increase in Hip-MFS was 1.458 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.210–1.758) for 6-months mortality and odds ratio were 1.239 (95% CI: 1.115–1.377), 1.156 (95% CI: 1.031–1.296) for postoperative complications and prolonged total hospital stay, respectively. High-risk patients (Hip-MFS > 8) showed higher risk of 6-month mortality (hazard ratio: 3.545, 95% CI: 1.466–8.572) than low-risk patients after adjustment. Hip-MFS successfully predict 6-month mortality, postoperative complications and prolonged hospital stay in elderly hip fracture patients after surgery. Hip-MFS more precisely predict 6-month mortality than age or existing tools (P values of comparison of ROC curve: 0.002, 0.004, and 0.044 for the ASA classification, age and NHFS, respectively). PMID:28233870

  11. Staphylococcal Scalded-Skin Syndrome Complicating Wound Infection in a Preterm Infant with Postoperative Chylothorax

    PubMed Central

    Peters, Bjoern; Hentschel, Juliane; Mau, Harald; Halle, Elke; Witte, Wolfgang; Obladen, Michael

    1998-01-01

    The course of infection in a 3-week-old premature newborn suffering from extensive dermatitis with flaccid blisters is described. Staphylococcus aureus was recovered from a local wound infection around a chest tube inserted to drain a postoperative chylothorax. The strain isolated tested positive for the eta gene for exfoliative toxin A, the causative agent of staphylococcal scalded-skin syndrome (SSSS). In this case, prematurity and loss of chylus with consecutive lymphopenia may have contributed to development of SSSS. PMID:9738069

  12. Complications related to the use of spinal cord stimulation for managing persistent postoperative neuropathic pain after lumbar spinal surgery.

    PubMed

    Shamji, Mohammed F; Westwick, Harrison J; Heary, Robert F

    2015-10-01

    OBJECT Structural spinal surgery yields improvement in pain and disability for selected patients with spinal stenosis, spondylolisthesis, or a herniated intervertebral disc. A significant fraction of patients exhibit persistent postoperative neuropathic pain (PPNP) despite technically appropriate intervention, and such patients can benefit from spinal cord stimulation (SCS) to alleviate suffering. The complication profile of this therapy has not been systematically assessed and, thus, was the goal of this review. METHODS A comprehensive literature search was performed to identify prospective cohorts of patients who had PPNP following structurally corrective lumbar spinal surgery and who underwent SCS device implantation. Data about study design, technique of SCS lead introduction, and complications encountered were collected and analyzed. Comparisons of complication incidence were performed between percutaneously and surgically implanted systems, with the level of significance set at 0.05. RESULTS Review of 11 studies involving 542 patients formed the basis of this work: 2 randomized controlled trials and 9 prospective cohorts. Percutaneous implants were used in 4 studies and surgical implants were used in 4 studies; in the remainder, the types were undefined. Lead migration occurred in 12% of cases, pain at the site of the implantable pulse generator occurred in 9% of cases, and wound-related complications occurred in 5% of cases; the latter 2 occurred more frequently among surgically implanted devices. CONCLUSIONS Spinal cord stimulation can provide for improved pain and suffering and for decreased narcotic medication use among patients with PPNP after lumbar spinal surgery. This study reviewed the prospective studies forming the evidence base for this therapy, to summarize the complications encountered and, thus, best inform patients and clinicians considering its use. There is a significant rate of minor complications, many of which require further surgical

  13. Performance in the 6-minute walk test and postoperative pulmonary complications in pulmonary surgery: an observational study

    PubMed Central

    Santos, Bruna F. A.; Souza, Hugo C. D.; Miranda, Aline P. B.; Cipriano, Federico G.; Gastaldi, Ada C.

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To assess functional capacity in the preoperative phase of pulmonary surgery by comparing predicted and obtained values for the six-minute walk test (6MWT) in patients with and without postoperative pulmonary complication (PPC) METHOD: Twenty-one patients in the preoperative phase of open thoracotomy were evaluated using the 6MWT, followed by monitoring of the postoperative evolution of each participant who underwent the routine treatment. Participants were then divided into two groups: the group with PPC and the group without PPC. The results were also compared with the predicted values using reference equations for the 6MWT RESULTS: Over half (57.14%) of patients developed PPC. The 6MWT was associated with the odds for PPC (odds ratio=22, p=0.01); the group without PPC in the postoperative period walked 422.38 (SD=72.18) meters during the 6MWT, while the group with PPC walked an average of 340.89 (SD=100.93) meters (p=0.02). The distance traveled by the group without PPC was 80% of the predicted value, whereas the group with PPC averaged less than 70% (p=0.03), with more appropriate predicted values for the reference equations CONCLUSIONS: The 6MWT is an easy, safe, and feasible test for routine preoperative evaluation in pulmonary surgery and may indicate patients with a higher chance of developing PPC. PMID:26786074

  14. Application of Machine Learning Techniques to High-Dimensional Clinical Data to Forecast Postoperative Complications

    PubMed Central

    Thottakkara, Paul; Ozrazgat-Baslanti, Tezcan; Hupf, Bradley B.; Rashidi, Parisa; Pardalos, Panos; Momcilovic, Petar

    2016-01-01

    Objective To compare performance of risk prediction models for forecasting postoperative sepsis and acute kidney injury. Design Retrospective single center cohort study of adult surgical patients admitted between 2000 and 2010. Patients 50,318 adult patients undergoing major surgery. Measurements We evaluated the performance of logistic regression, generalized additive models, naïve Bayes and support vector machines for forecasting postoperative sepsis and acute kidney injury. We assessed the impact of feature reduction techniques on predictive performance. Model performance was determined using the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve, accuracy, and positive predicted value. The results were reported based on a 70/30 cross validation procedure where the data were randomly split into 70% used for training the model and the 30% for validation. Main Results The areas under the receiver operating characteristic curve for different models ranged between 0.797 and 0.858 for acute kidney injury and between 0.757 and 0.909 for severe sepsis. Logistic regression, generalized additive model, and support vector machines had better performance compared to Naïve Bayes model. Generalized additive models additionally accounted for non-linearity of continuous clinical variables as depicted in their risk patterns plots. Reducing the input feature space with LASSO had minimal effect on prediction performance, while feature extraction using principal component analysis improved performance of the models. Conclusions Generalized additive models and support vector machines had good performance as risk prediction model for postoperative sepsis and AKI. Feature extraction using principal component analysis improved the predictive performance of all models. PMID:27232332

  15. Application of subcutaneous talc in hernia repair and wide subcutaneous dissection dramatically reduces seroma formation and postoperative wound complications.

    PubMed

    Klima, David A; Brintzenhoff, Rita A; Tsirline, Victor B; Belyansky, Igor; Lincourt, Amy E; Getz, Stanley; Heniford, B Todd

    2011-07-01

    Wound complications after large ventral hernia repairs when combined with wide subcutaneous dissection (OVHR/WSD) are common (33 to 66%). We evaluate a novel technique of applying talc to wound subcutaneous tissues to decrease wound complications. We accessed our prospectively collected surgical outcomes database for OVHR/WSD procedures performed. Patients were divided into those that did and did not receive subcutaneous talc (TALC vs NOTALC). Demographics intraoperative and outcomes data were collected and analyzed. The study included 180 patients (n = 74 TALC, n = 106 NOTALC). Demographics were all similar, but hernias were larger in the TALC group. TALC patients had their drains removed earlier (14.6 vs 25.6 days; P < 0.001) with dramatic reduction in postoperative seromas requiring intervention (20.8 to 2.7%; P < 0.001) and cellulitis (39.0 to 20.6%; P = 0.007). Short-term follow-up demonstrates significantly higher recurrence rates in the NOTALC group with each recurrence related to infection. The use of talc in the subcutaneous space of OVHR/WSD results in significantly earlier removal of subcutaneous drains, fewer wound complications, and a decrease in early hernia recurrence. Use of talc in the subcutaneous space at the time of wound closure is an excellent technique to decrease wound complications in large subcutaneous dissections.

  16. Early enteral feeding, compared with parenteral, reduces postoperative septic complications. The results of a meta-analysis.

    PubMed Central

    Moore, F A; Feliciano, D V; Andrassy, R J; McArdle, A H; Booth, F V; Morgenstein-Wagner, T B; Kellum, J M; Welling, R E; Moore, E E

    1992-01-01

    This two-part meta-analysis combined data from eight prospective randomized trials designed to compare the nutritional efficacy of early enteral (TEN) and parenteral (TPN) nutrition in high-risk surgical patients. The combined data gave sufficient patient numbers (TEN, n = 118; TPN, n = 112) to adequately address whether route of substrate delivery affected septic complication incidence. Phase I (dropouts excluded) meta-analysis confirmed data homogeneity across study sites, that TEN and TPN groups were comparable, and that significantly fewer TEN patients experienced septic complications (TEN, 18%; TPN, 35%; p = 0.01). Phase II meta-analysis, an intent-to-treat analysis (dropouts included), confirmed that fewer TEN patients developed septic complications. Further breakdown by patient type showed that all trauma and blunt trauma subgroups had the most significant reduction in septic complications when fed enterally. In conclusion, this meta-analysis attests to the feasibility of early postoperative TEN in high-risk surgical patients and that these patients have reduced septic morbidity rates compared with those administered TPN. PMID:1386982

  17. Post-operative avascular necrosis of the maxilla: a rare complication following orthognathic surgery

    PubMed Central

    Teemul, Trevor A.; Perfettini, Jean; Morris, David O.; Russell, John L.

    2017-01-01

    We present a patient with sickle cell trait who suffered avascular necrosis of the maxilla as a complication of maxillary osteotomy. Understanding the blood supply of the maxilla and how possible patient related, anaesthetic and operative factors affect it, is important in understanding how the vascularity of the maxilla can become compromised in a surgical procedure. The perioperative parameters were analysed to identify any prognostic elements. Avascular necrosis of the maxilla is a rare complication of orthognathic surgery with few cases reported in the literature. There are identifiable risk factors that can influence the blood supply of the maxilla. Careful preoperative assessment is required to exclude patient factors that have the potential to affect tissue vascularity. This in conjunction with sound anaesthetic and surgical technique should all minimize the risk of avascular necrosis. Even so it is still possible for this rare complication to occur. PMID:28122898

  18. Vitamin a deficiency after gastric bypass surgery: an underreported postoperative complication.

    PubMed

    Zalesin, Kerstyn C; Miller, Wendy M; Franklin, Barry; Mudugal, Dharani; Rao Buragadda, Avdesh; Boura, Judith; Nori-Janosz, Katherine; Chengelis, David L; Krause, Kevin R; McCullough, Peter A

    2011-01-01

    Introduction. Few data are available on vitamin A deficiency in the gastric bypass population. Methods. We performed a retrospective chart review of gastric bypass patients (n = 69, 74% female). The relationship between serum vitamin A concentration and markers of protein metabolism at 6-weeks and 1-year post-operative were assessed. Results. The average weight loss at 6-weeks and 1-year following surgery was 20.1 ± 9.1 kg and 44.1 ± 17.1 kg, respectively. At 6 weeks and 1 year after surgery, 35% and 18% of patients were vitamin A deficient, (<325 mcg/L). Similarly, 34% and 19% had low pre-albumin levels (<18 mg/dL), at these time intervals. Vitamin A directly correlated with pre-albumin levels at 6 weeks (r = 0.67, P < 0.001) and 1-year (r = 0.67,  P < 0.0001). There was no correlation between the roux limb length measurement and pre-albumin or vitamin A serum concentrations at these post-operative follow-ups. Vitamin A levels and markers of liver function testing were also unrelated. Conclusion. Vitamin A deficiency is common after bariatric surgery and is associated with a low serum concentration of pre-albumin. This fat-soluble vitamin should be measured in patients who have undergone gastric bypass surgery and deficiency should be suspected in those with evidence of protein-calorie malnutrition.

  19. Anterograde amnesia as a possible postoperative complication of Midazolam as an agent for intravenous conscious sedation.

    PubMed

    Malamed, S F; Nikchevich, D; Block, J

    1988-01-01

    Anterograde amnesia is often considered to be a beneficial effect of intravenous conscious sedation. The recently introduced benzodiazepine, midazolam, has associated with its administration a significant anterograde amnesic period. In the case presented here, a healthy young female presented for third molar extraction under midazolam conscious sedation and local anesthesia. After uncomplicated removal of the teeth and clinically adequate recovery from sedation, it was noted that the patient had swallowed the postsurgical gauze packs. Efforts at recovery of the gauze packs were futile. Follow-up discussion with the patient revealed a complete lack of recall of all events occurring for up to an hour or more after the administration of intravenous midazolam. The need for written and oral postoperative instructions to both the patient and his/her escort is emphasized.

  20. Anterograde Amnesia as a Possible Postoperative Complication of Midazolam as an Agent for Intravenous Conscious Sedation

    PubMed Central

    Malamed, Stanley F.; Nikchevich, Donald; Block, James

    1988-01-01

    Anterograde amnesia is often considered to be a beneficial effect of intravenous conscious sedation. The recently introduced benzodiazepine, midazolam, has associated with its administration a significant anterograde amnesic period. In the case presented here, a healthy young female presented for third molar extraction under midazolam conscious sedation and local anesthesia. After uncomplicated removal of the teeth and clinically adequate recovery from sedation, it was noted that the patient had swallowed the postsurgical gauze packs. Efforts at recovery of the gauze packs were futile. Follow-up discussion with the patient revealed a complete lack of recall of all events occurring for up to an hour or more after the administration of intravenous midazolam. The need for written and oral postoperative instructions to both the patient and his/her escort is emphasized. PMID:3166354

  1. Incidence of infectious complications following transrectal ultrasound-guided prostate biopsy in Calgary, Alberta, Canada: A retrospective population-based analysis

    PubMed Central

    Rudzinski, Jan Krzysztof; Kawakami, Jun

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: We have seen an increased risk of infectious complications following transrectal ultrasound-guided prostate biopsy (TRUS-PB). Fluoroquinolone (FQ) antibiotics are common for prophylaxis prior to TRUS-PB. We evaluate whether increasing FQ resistance correlates with increased incidence of post-biopsy infectious complications at our institution. Methods: We conducted a retrospective chart and electronic health record review on 927 patients who underwent TRUS-PB between January and July of 2012 in Calgary, Alberta, Canada. We prospectively collected the following variables: age, pre-biopsy prostate-specific antigen, and date of biopsy. We documented presentation to an emergency department within 30 days of TRUS-PB for infectious and non-infectious complications. Results: Of the 927 patients, 58 patients (6.3%) were admitted to the emergency department due to post-TRUS-PB complications within 30 days post-biopsy. The most common infectious complications were sepsis in 21 patients (2.2%), followed by urinary tract infection (UTI) in 9 (0.9%), and prostatitis in 4 (0.4%). We found that 83% of the septic episodes and 66.6% of the UTIs were attributed to ciprofloxacin resistant Escherichia coli (E. coli). The incidence of non-infectious complications was as follows: urinary retention in 12 (1.2%), hematuria in 9 (0.9%), and rectal bleeding in 8 (0.8%). Conclusion: Our results suggest an increased incidence of infectious complications caused by FQ resistant organisms following TRUS-PB. This finding could be attributed to increasing community resistance to ciprofloxacin. The current antimicrobial prophylactic regimen needs to be re-evaluated, and a novel approach may need to be considered. PMID:24940454

  2. Long-term infectious complications of using porous polyethylene mesh for orbital fracture reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Song, Xuefei; Li, Lunhao; Sun, Yiyuan; Fan, Xianqun; Li, Zhengkang

    2016-06-01

    Porous polyethylene is a widely used implants in orbital reconstruction, on which comprehensive clinical analysis, various treatments, and different prognosis according to specific classification principles on long-term complications have not been reported.To investigate the new clinical symptoms, intraoperative findings, treatments, and outcomes of complications long period after previous surgery, resulting from the use of porous polyethylene mesh for orbital fracture reconstruction.A retrospective study was conducted on 21 patients at the Department of Ophthalmology, Shanghai Ninth People's Hospital with orbital complications after orbital fracture reconstruction with porous polyethylene mesh for 4 ± 2.2 years from 2011 to 2013. These data included new clinical symptoms after previous surgery, computerized tomography data, intraoperative findings, treatments, and outcomes.Data from 21 patients were analyzed in this study. Two patients received conservative treatment, while the other 19 patients underwent surgical approaches. Classification principles for orbital complications after orbital wall defect reconstruction with porous polyethylene mesh were formulated according to patients' new clinical symptoms, computed tomography (CT), and intraoperative findings after previous surgery. In the last follow-up, 19 patients (90.5%) were cured or improved according to our assessment principle. The follow-up ranged from 3 to 45 months (35 months in average).According to specific classification for orbital complications resulting from the use of porous polyethylene mesh for orbital fracture reconstruction, various medical treatments should be carried out, and the prognosis may be different.

  3. Long-term infectious complications of using porous polyethylene mesh for orbital fracture reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Song, Xuefei; Li, Lunhao; Sun, Yiyuan; Fan, Xianqun; Li, Zhengkang

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Porous polyethylene is a widely used implants in orbital reconstruction, on which comprehensive clinical analysis, various treatments, and different prognosis according to specific classification principles on long-term complications have not been reported. To investigate the new clinical symptoms, intraoperative findings, treatments, and outcomes of complications long period after previous surgery, resulting from the use of porous polyethylene mesh for orbital fracture reconstruction. A retrospective study was conducted on 21 patients at the Department of Ophthalmology, Shanghai Ninth People's Hospital with orbital complications after orbital fracture reconstruction with porous polyethylene mesh for 4 ± 2.2 years from 2011 to 2013. These data included new clinical symptoms after previous surgery, computerized tomography data, intraoperative findings, treatments, and outcomes. Data from 21 patients were analyzed in this study. Two patients received conservative treatment, while the other 19 patients underwent surgical approaches. Classification principles for orbital complications after orbital wall defect reconstruction with porous polyethylene mesh were formulated according to patients’ new clinical symptoms, computed tomography (CT), and intraoperative findings after previous surgery. In the last follow-up, 19 patients (90.5%) were cured or improved according to our assessment principle. The follow-up ranged from 3 to 45 months (35 months in average). According to specific classification for orbital complications resulting from the use of porous polyethylene mesh for orbital fracture reconstruction, various medical treatments should be carried out, and the prognosis may be different. PMID:27336867

  4. Citicoline (CDP-choline): What role in the treatment of complications of infectious diseases.

    PubMed

    Jambou, Ronan; El-Assaad, Fatima; Combes, Valery; Grau, Georges Emile

    2009-07-01

    A dysregulated host immune response, as opposed to the intrinsic virulence of a microbial pathogen induces a large part of the pathology seen in infectious diseases. However, current therapies are designed to target the pathogen rather than the underlying pathogenic mechanisms responsible for the manifestation of the pathology. Recent studies have highlighted the role of endothelial cell alteration in the pathology induced in sepsis and cerebral malaria. The endothelial onslaught described, is similar to that seen during ischemia reperfusion in stroke. Protecting endothelial cell membranes during sepsis and cerebral malaria, using citicoline in the same way as in stroke, has thus emerged as a new strategy that needs to be evaluated urgently. Citicoline is a natural compound that is registered for use in ischemic stroke, head trauma and neurological disorders. It enters the phosphatidylcholine synthesis pathway as a rate-limiting step and is involved in the modulation of a large number of metabolic pathways and neurotransmitter levels, and also in the biosynthesis of phospholipids in neuronal membranes. This short review highlights the potential role of citicoline as part of adjunct therapy in the treatment of infectious diseases.

  5. [Postoperative complications in 139 cases of basilar impression and/or Arnold-Chiari deformity].

    PubMed

    Gonçalves da Silva, J A; Gonçalves da Silva, C E

    1981-09-01

    The many kinds of complication that have been observed following operations of basilar impression and/or malformation of Arnold-Chiari are analysed. Two surgical techniques were adopted in the treatment of the patients. In the first 64 cases, the operation consisted in the craniectomy of the posterior fossa and high cervical laminectomy, while the dura-mater remained opened and saturated to the lateral musculature. Concerning the other 75 cases, it was made a plastic of the dura-mater of the posterior fossa and, in most of the cases, the patients were intubated with no retroflexion of the head and operated in sitting position without anterior flexion of the head. In the second group of patients, it was observed lesser occurrence of complications and death.

  6. Post-operative Streptococcus pneumoniae meningoencephalitis complicating surgery for acromegaly in an identical twin.

    PubMed

    Cote, David J; Iuliano, Sherry L; Smith, Timothy R; Laws, Edward R

    2015-06-01

    This case report provides provocative and useful data regarding two aspects of acromegaly and its management. The patient, who is one of a pair of identical twins, has no known hereditary, genetic or otherwise potentially etiologic factors as compared to her unaffected sister. Secondly, transsphenoidal surgery, which was ultimately successful, was complicated by pneumococcal meningitis, an unusual event with only four previously reported patients, three of whom ended in death or major neurologic deficits. In this case, a 57-year-old woman gradually developed classical signs and symptoms of acromegaly while her identical twin sister remained normal with no evidence of endocrine disease. Endoscopic transsphenoidal surgery was complicated by the development of meningitis 25 days after surgery. This was controlled following a difficult hospital course. Streptococcus pneumoniae meningoencephalitis is a rare but life-threatening complication of transsphenoidal surgery. A high index of suspicion for incipient meningitis should be maintained when patients present with severe headache and increased intracranial pressure, even if they initially lack the typical symptoms and signs. Immediate and aggressive treatment is necessary to avoid significant neurologic deficit.

  7. Infectious Complications and Soft Tissue Injury Contribute to Late Amputation After Severe Lower Extremity Trauma

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-07-01

    9.0% (1) 1 GSW, gunshot wound. TABLE 2. Distribution of Injury Characteristics Group I, Limb Salvage (N 166) Group II, Early Amputees (N 36) Group...with primary amputation and limb salvage, including most commonly wound infection (68%), osteomyelitis (40%), and residual limb complications (24%).3

  8. Gallbladder perforation: a rare complication of postoperative chemotherapy of gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yanlai; Song, Wentao; Hou, Qingsheng; Li, Jianning; Guo, Hongliang

    2015-08-15

    A middle-aged man presented 1 day after being discharged from hospital with completing the first course of postoperative chemotherapy. He suffered a sudden persistent high fever and chills. It was noted that he had a history of a total gastrectomy (with D2 lymphadenectomy) 1 month ago. His admission bloods revealed total bilirubin was 142.2 umol/L, indirect bilirubin of 107.6 umol/L and white cell count of 20.05×10(9)/L. A color doppler ultrasound scan confirmed fluid and gas around liver and hilus lienis while the gallbladder cannot be detected. During Computed Tomography (CT) guided puncture positioning technology and setting a three-channel tube, about 400 ml of foul smell hazel turbid liquid was drained out. He was diagnosed as gallbladder perforation and he was underwent conservative treatment consist of drainage, banning diet, total parenteral nutrition and intravenous antibiotics. Then he recovered well within the subsequent 10 days and was discharged.

  9. Post-operative stress fractures complicating surgery for painful forefoot conditions.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Max R; Jack, Christopher; Jones, Gareth G; Singh, Samrendu K

    2010-01-01

    A stress fracture is caused by repetitive or unusual loading of a bone leading to mechanical failure. Fatigue type stress fractures occur in normal bone exposed to abnormally high repetitive loads, whereas insufficiency type stress fractures occur in abnormal bone exposed to normal loads. We describe three cases of insufficiency stress fractures that have complicated surgery for painful forefoot conditions. The diagnosis and management of these cases are discussed. Stress fractures should be included in the differential diagnosis of any patient who continues or develops pain after surgery to the forefoot.

  10. Infectious Complications during Tandem High-Dose Chemotherapy and Autologous Stem Cell Transplantation for Children with High-Risk or Recurrent Solid Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Ji-Man; Lee, Ji Won; Yoo, Keon Hee; Kim, Yae-Jean; Sung, Ki Woong; Koo, Hong Hoe

    2016-01-01

    We retrospectively analyzed infectious complications during tandem high-dose chemotherapy and autologous stem cell transplantation (HDCT/auto-SCT) in children and adolescents with high-risk or recurrent solid tumors. A total of 324 patients underwent their first HDCT/auto-SCT between October 2004 and September 2014, and 283 of them proceeded to their second HDCT/auto-SCT (a total of 607 HDCT/auto-SCTs). During the early transplant period of 607 HDCT/auto-SCTs (from the beginning of HDCT to day 30 post-transplant), bacteremia, urinary tract infection (UTI), respiratory virus infection, and varicella zoster virus (VZV) reactivation occurred in 7.1%, 2.3%, 13.0%, and 2.5% of HDCT/auto-SCTs, respectively. The early transplant period of the second HDCT/auto-SCT had infectious complications similar to the first HDCT/auto-SCT. During the late transplant period of HDCT/auto-SCT (from day 31 to 1 year post-transplant), bacteremia, UTI, and VZV reactivation occurred in 7.5%, 2.5%, and 3.9% of patients, respectively. Most infectious complications in the late transplant period occurred during the first 6 months post-transplant. There were no invasive fungal infections during the study period. Six patients died from infectious complications (4 from bacterial sepsis and 2 from respiratory virus infection). Our study suggests that infectious complications are similar following second and first HDCT/auto-SCT in children. PMID:27627440

  11. [Pre- and postoperative radiotherapy of oral carcinoma of a locally advanced stage. An analysis of the results and complications].

    PubMed

    Zini, G; Barbieri, E; Campobassi, A; Dallera, P; Emiliani, E; Frezza, G; Marchetti, C; Neri, S; Romagnoli, D; Silvano, M

    1989-01-01

    The combination of radiotherapy and surgery in the treatment of advanced oral carcinoma (T3 and T4 lesions) yields good possibilities of recovery; whether radiotherapy should be given before or after surgery is still debated. Fifty patients with advanced oral carcinomas were analyzed: 24 of them were irradiated before and 26 after surgery; doses ranged from 40 to 56 Gy for the first group of patients, and from 50 to 68 Gy for the second one. The disease-free survival 48 months after the diagnosis was 36% in patients who received preoperative irradiation, and 53.6% in patients who received postoperative radiotherapy; the latter allowed local control of the disease to be significantly improved (chi 2 3.99, 0.01 less than p less than 0.05). The quality of survival was worse in the group receiving preoperative irradiation, because of radiation-induced surgical complications, which were especially observed in patients with diffuse disease. Our findings suggest that postoperative radiotherapy may be advisable if the tumor is resectable, since tolerance and local control rate were acceptable. On the contrary, nearly inoperable masses and massive neck diseases often require preoperative irradiation.

  12. Analysis of Flap Weight and Postoperative Complications Based on Flap Weight in Patients Undergoing Microsurgical Breast Reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Lam, Gretl; Weichman, Katie E; Reavey, Patrick L; Wilson, Stelios C; Levine, Jamie P; Saadeh, Pierre B; Allen, Robert J; Choi, Mihye; Karp, Nolan S; Thanik, Vishal D

    2017-03-01

    Background Higher body mass index (BMI) has been shown to increase postoperative complications in autologous breast reconstruction. However, the correlation with flap weight is unknown. Here, we explore the relationship of flap weights and complication rates in patients undergoing microvascular breast reconstruction. Methods Retrospective chart review identified all patients undergoing microvascular breast reconstruction with abdominally based flaps at a single institution between November 2007 and April 2013. Breasts with documented flap weight and 1-year follow-up were included. Patients undergoing stacked deep inferior epigastric perforator flaps were excluded. Breasts were divided into quartiles based on flap weight and examined by demographics, surgical characteristics, complications, and revisions. Results A total of 130 patients undergoing 225 flaps were identified. Patients had a mean age of 50.4 years, mean BMI of 27.1 kg/m(2), and mean flap weight of 638.4 g (range: 70-1640 g). Flap weight and BMI were directly correlated. Flaps were divided into weight-based quartiles: first (70-396 g), second (397-615 g), third (616-870 g), and fourth (871-1640 g). There were no associations between flap weight and incidences of venous thrombosis, arterial thrombosis, hematoma, flap loss, fat necrosis, or donor site hernia. However, increased flap weight was associated with increased rate of donor site wound healing problems in both univariate and multivariate analysis. Conclusions Increased flap weight is not associated with added flap complications among patients undergoing microvascular breast reconstruction, however, patients with flaps of 667.5 g or more are more likely to have donor site healing problems. The success and evidence contrary to previous studies may be attributed to surgeon intraoperative flap choice.

  13. Aorta-Left Renal Vein Fistula Complicating an Aortic Aneurysm: Preoperative and Postoperative Multislice CT Findings

    SciTech Connect

    Barrier, Pierre Otal, Philippe; Garcia, Olivier; Vahdat, Olivier; Domenech, Brice; Lannareix, Valerie; Joffre, Francis; Rousseau, Herve

    2007-06-15

    Fistulas complicating an abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) are rare, and fistulas involving the left renal vein are particularly uncommon. We highlight here a fistula between an infrarenal aortic aneurysm and a retroaortic left renal vein, revealed by left flank pain associated with hematuria and acute renal failure. The multislice CT angiography performed in this 68-year-old patient revealed communication and equal enhancement between the aorta and the left gonadic vein, suggesting the presence of a fistula. The three-dimensional VRT reconstructions presented in this case were of great value in the preoperative planning, enabling immediate visualization of this unusual feature. Alternative diagnoses to consider when encountering this clinical presentation are reviewed.

  14. Ruptured Sinus of Valsalva with Infective Endocarditis Complicated with Post-Infectious Acute Glomerulonephritis: A Rare Case Presentation

    PubMed Central

    Daga, Mradul Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Ruptured Sinus of Valsalva (RSOV) is a rarely seen disease condition. RSOV can have varied presentations from being asymptomatic with just a cardiac murmur to profound hypotension. There has been simultaneous occurrence of RSOV with Infective Endocarditis (IE) in literature. Glomerulonephritis has also been reported in approximately 20% patients with IE. Large amount of proteinuria or decline in kidney functions is rarely encountered and mostly this finding has been incidental on routine evaluation. The co-existence of all the three conditions in a single patient is rare. This case was diagnosed to have RSOV with IE and was also diagnosed with post-infectious glomerulonephritis on renal biopsy. Patient was advised corrective cardiac surgery, but due to financial constraints, patient could not be operated and he died. Here, we report for the first time an unusual presence of both RSOV and sub-aortic membrane with IE complicated by glomerulonephritis. PMID:27891383

  15. Contrast-enhanced ultrasound with SonoVue in the evaluation of postoperative complications in pediatric liver transplant recipients

    PubMed Central

    Bonini, G.; Pezzotta, G.; Morzenti, C.; Agazzi, R.; Nani, R.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the utility of contrast-enhanced sonography in the study of pediatric liver transplant recipients and its potential impact in reducing the need for invasive diagnostic procedures. Materials and methods From October 2002 to December 2003 we performed routine color Doppler ultrasound and contrast-enhanced ultrasound studies on 30 pediatric patients who had undergone liver transplantation. Findings indicative of complications were confirmed with invasive studies (angiography, computed tomography, and PTC). Results Contrast-enhanced sonography correctly identified four of the five cases of hepatic artery thrombosis and all those involving the portal (n = 6) and hepatic vein (n = 3) thrombosis. It failed to identify one case of hepatic artery thrombosis characterized by collateral circulation arising from the phrenic artery and the single case of hepatic artery stenosis. The latter was more evident on color Doppler, which revealed a typical tardus parvus waveform. The use of contrast offered no significant advantages in the study of biliary complications although it did provide better visualization of bile leaks. Conclusions Contrast-enhanced sonography improves diagnostic confidence and reduces the need for more invasive imaging studies in the postoperative follow-up of pediatric liver transplant recipients. PMID:23396596

  16. Predicting infectious complications in neutropenic children and young people with cancer (IPD protocol)

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background A common and potentially life-threatening complication of the treatment of childhood cancer is infection, which frequently presents as fever with neutropenia. The standard management of such episodes is the extensive use of intravenous antibiotics, and though it produces excellent survival rates of over 95%, it greatly inconveniences the three-fourths of patients who do not require such aggressive treatment. There have been a number of studies which have aimed to develop risk prediction models to stratify treatment. Individual participant data (IPD) meta-analysis in therapeutic studies has been developed to improve the precision and reliability of answers to questions of treatment effect and recently have been suggested to be used to answer questions regarding prognosis and diagnosis to gain greater power from the frequently small individual studies. Design In the IPD protocol, we will collect and synthesise IPD from multiple studies and examine the outcomes of episodes of febrile neutropenia as a consequence of their treatment for malignant disease. We will develop and evaluate a risk stratification model using hierarchical regression models to stratify patients by their risk of experiencing adverse outcomes during an episode. We will also explore specific practical and methodological issues regarding adaptation of established techniques of IPD meta-analysis of interventions for use in synthesising evidence derived from IPD from multiple studies for use in predictive modelling contexts. Discussion Our aim in using this model is to define a group of individuals at low risk for febrile neutropenia who might be treated with reduced intensity or duration of antibiotic therapy and so reduce the inconvenience and cost of these episodes, as well as to define a group of patients at very high risk of complications who could be subject to more intensive therapies. The project will also help develop methods of IPD predictive modelling for use in future studies of

  17. Investigation of clinical and dosimetric factors associated with postoperative pulmonary complications in esophageal cancer patients treated with concurrent chemoradiotherapy followed by surgery

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Shulian; Liao Zhongxing . E-mail: zliao@mdanderson.org; Vaporciyan, Ara A.; Tucker, Susan L.; Liu, Helen; Wei Xiong; Swisher, Stephen; Ajani, Jaffer A.; Cox, James D.; Komaki, Ritsuko

    2006-03-01

    Purpose: To assess the association of clinical and especially dosimetric factors with the incidence of postoperative pulmonary complications among esophageal cancer patients treated with concurrent chemoradiation therapy followed by surgery. Method and Materials: Data from 110 esophageal cancer patients treated between January 1998 and December 2003 were analyzed retrospectively. All patients received concurrent chemoradiotherapy followed by surgery; 72 patients also received irinotecan-based induction chemotherapy. Concurrent chemotherapy was 5-fluorouracil-based and in 97 cases included taxanes. Radiotherapy was delivered to a total dose of 41.4-50.4 Gy at 1.8-2.0 Gy per fraction with a three-dimensional conformal technique. Surgery (three-field, Ivor-Lewis, or transhiatal esophagectomy) was performed 27-123 days (median, 45 days) after completion of radiotherapy. The following dosimetric parameters were generated from the dose-volume histogram (DVH) for total lung: lung volume, mean dose to lung, relative and absolute volumes of lung receiving more than a threshold dose (relative V{sub dose} and absolute V{sub dose}), and absolute volume of lung receiving less than a threshold dose (volume spared, or VS{sub dose}). Occurrence of postoperative pulmonary complications, defined as pneumonia or acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) within 30 days after surgery, was the endpoint for all analyses. Fisher's exact test was used to investigate the relationship between categorical factors and incidence of postoperative pulmonary complications. Logistic analysis was used to analyze the relationship between continuous factors (e.g., V{sub dose} or VS{sub dose}) and complication rate. Logistic regression with forward stepwise inclusion of factors was used to perform multivariate analysis of those factors having univariate significance (p < 0.05). The Mann-Whitney test was used to compare length of hospital stay in patients with and without lung complications and to

  18. [Infectious complications with herpes virus after ritual Jewish circumcision: a historical and cultural analysis].

    PubMed

    Gesundheit, Benjamin; Greenberg, David; Walfish, Shlomo; Dagan, Ron; Koren, Gideon; Malkin, David; Tendeler, Moshe David

    2005-02-01

    Ritual circumcision performed on eight-day-old male infants is rooted in the Bible and is discussed in the earliest Jewish sources. The practice has been observed across the generations in every Jewish community in Israel and the Diaspora. According to Jewish ritual, the mohel--the ritual circumcisor--amputates the foreskin and then folds back the membrane that lies beneath it. This is followed by metzitza--"suction"--a practice performed throughout the ages by mouth. Halakhic literature sets down strict rules regarding this surgical intervention in order to prevent medical complications for the newborn. Metzitza by mouth has been recognized as a risk factor in the transfer of infection from the mohel to the newborn. A recent study relates to eight infants who became infected with herpes virus as a result of the procedure. We shall review the halakhic literature in order to clarify the custom of metzitza by mouth and understand the principles underlying the controversy that surrounds it. The custom of metzitza by mouth has been the subject of extensive rabbinic discussion since the middle of the nineteenth century. A better understanding of the historical, social and cultural background of the issue might allow us to formulate alternatives to the practice. The metzitza controversy gave rise to a stimulating discussion in the rabbinic literature with diverse and conflicting opinions. We shall undertake a precise analysis of the rabbinic discussion and its historical and social background, and attempt to identify the ideological underpinnings of the various positions. Rabbinic literature is replete with cautionary measures to be observed when circumcising a newborn child. The halakhic disputes beginning in the middle of the nineteenth century reflect ideological considerations and objectives. Metzitza was performed throughout the generations by mouth because that was the recognized method of disinfection at the time. Beginning in the nineteenth century, medical and

  19. Dose-Volume Histogram Predictors of Chronic Gastrointestinal Complications After Radical Hysterectomy and Postoperative Concurrent Nedaplatin-Based Chemoradiation Therapy for Early-Stage Cervical Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Isohashi, Fumiaki; Yoshioka, Yasuo; Mabuchi, Seiji; Konishi, Koji; Koizumi, Masahiko; Takahashi, Yutaka; Ogata, Toshiyuki; Maruoka, Shintaroh; Kimura, Tadashi; Ogawa, Kazuhiko

    2013-03-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to evaluate dose-volume histogram (DVH) predictors for the development of chronic gastrointestinal (GI) complications in cervical cancer patients who underwent radical hysterectomy and postoperative concurrent nedaplatin-based chemoradiation therapy. Methods and Materials: This study analyzed 97 patients who underwent postoperative concurrent chemoradiation therapy. The organs at risk that were contoured were the small bowel loops, large bowel loop, and peritoneal cavity. DVH parameters subjected to analysis included the volumes of these organs receiving more than 15, 30, 40, and 45 Gy (V15-V45) and their mean dose. Associations between DVH parameters or clinical factors and the incidence of grade 2 or higher chronic GI complications were evaluated. Results: Of the clinical factors, smoking and low body mass index (BMI) (<22) were significantly associated with grade 2 or higher chronic GI complications. Also, patients with chronic GI complications had significantly greater V15-V45 volumes and higher mean dose of the small bowel loops compared with those without GI complications. In contrast, no parameters for the large bowel loop or peritoneal cavity were significantly associated with GI complications. Results of the receiver operating characteristics (ROC) curve analysis led to the conclusion that V15-V45 of the small bowel loops has high accuracy for prediction of GI complications. Among these parameters, V40 gave the highest area under the ROC curve. Finally, multivariate analysis was performed with V40 of the small bowel loops and 2 other clinical parameters that were judged to be potential risk factors for chronic GI complications: BMI and smoking. Of these 3 parameters, V40 of the small bowel loops and smoking emerged as independent predictors of chronic GI complications. Conclusions: DVH parameters of the small bowel loops may serve as predictors of grade 2 or higher chronic GI complications after postoperative

  20. Early-onset Infectious Complications among Penetrating and Severe Closed Traumatic Brain Injury in Active Duty Deployed during OIF and OEF, 2008-2013

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-02-01

    Military traumatic brain injury and spinal column injury: 5-year study of the impact of blast and other military grade weaponry on the central...seizures, hydrocephalus, cerebral spinal fluid (CSF) leaks, infections inside the skull, vascular injuries, and cranial nerve injuries. 9-11 The...Infectious complications were a subset of medical complications grouped by type of infection (systemic, cerebral spinal fluid, pneumonia, fungal, and other

  1. [Preoperative magnetic resonance angiography findings and postoperative neurological complications in 93 cases of CABG with cardiopulmonary bypass].

    PubMed

    Koyama, T; Mochizuki, T; Mitsui, N; Marui, A

    1998-12-01

    Between February 1994 and January 1997, 102 of the 146 patients treated by coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) had undergone magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) of the brain and neck before the operation, and arterial stenosis or occlusion had been detected in 38 (36.9%) of them. Two of these patients had complicating severe calcification of the ascending aorta, and CABG was performed without cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB). Seven patients without stenotic lesions on MRA were also treated by CABG without CPB for other complications. In addition to the 102 patients one patient had been found to have occlusion of the left common carotid artery and poor enhancement of the distal portion, and as a result we switched from CABG to percutaneous transluminal angioplasty (PTCA). We enrolled 93 patients in this study excluding these 10 patients. The patients were distributed into the three groups according to the MRA findings. Group C = no stenotic lesions (58 patients). Group S = stenosis of < 70% (26 patients), Group SS = stenosis of > or = 70% (9 patients). Enhancement distal to the stenotic or occlusive lesions was good in all patients in group S and SS. We then examined them for the incidence of postoperative neurological complications. There were no significant differences among the three groups in regard to age, male/female ratio, or incidence of hypertension and hyperlipidemia. In Group S, the incidence of diabetes was significantly higher than in the other Groups. The incidence of prior stroke was significantly higher and the number of coronary arteries affected was significantly larger in group SS than the other groups. There were no significant differences among the three groups with regard to intraoperative variables. The lowest mean arterial pressure on CPB was 44.3 +/- 7.4 mmHg, 48.0 +/- 8.8 mmHg, 46.3 +/- 7.8 mmHg in Group C, S, and SS, respectively, In all groups the lowest mean arterial pressure on CPB was below 50 mmHg. There were no significant

  2. Intraoperative ventilation strategies to prevent postoperative pulmonary complications: Systematic review, meta-analysis, and trial sequential analysis.

    PubMed

    Serpa Neto, Ary; Schultz, Marcus J; Gama de Abreu, Marcelo

    2015-09-01

    For many years, mechanical ventilation with high tidal volumes (V(T)) was common practice in operating theaters because this strategy recruits collapsed lung tissue, improves ventilation-perfusion mismatch, and thus decreases the need for high oxygen fractions. Positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) was seldom used because it could cause cardiac compromise. Increasing advances in the understanding of the mechanisms of ventilator-induced lung injury from animal studies and randomized controlled trials in patients with uninjured lungs in intensive care unit and operation room have pushed anesthesiologists to consider lung-protective strategies during intraoperative ventilation. These strategies at least include the use of low V(T), and perhaps also the use of PEEP, which when compared to high V(T) with low PEEP may prevent the occurrence of postoperative pulmonary complications (PPCs). Such protective effects, however, are likely ascribed to low V(T) rather than to PEEP. In fact, at least in nonobese patients undergoing open abdominal surgery, high PEEP does not protect against PPCs, and it can impair the hemodynamics. Further studies shall determine whether a strategy consisting of low V(T) combined with PEEP and recruitment maneuvers reduces PPCs in obese patients and other types of surgery (e.g., laparoscopic and thoracic), compared to low V(T) with low PEEP. Furthermore, the role of driving pressure for titrating ventilation settings in patients with uninjured lungs shall be investigated.

  3. Dose–volume analysis of predictors for chronic gastrointestinal complications in patients with cervical cancer treated with postoperative concurrent chemotherapy and whole-pelvic radiation therapy

    PubMed Central

    Isohashi, Fumiaki; Mabuchi, Seiji; Akino, Yuichi; Yoshioka, Yasuo; Seo, Yuji; Suzuki, Osamu; Tamari, Keisuke; Yoshino, Kiyoshi; Sawada, Kenjiro; Ueda, Yutaka; Kobayashi, Eiji; Sumida, Iori; Mizuno, Hirokazu; Okubo, Hirofumi; Kimura, Tadashi; Ogawa, Kazuhiko

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate dose–volume histogram (DVH) predictors for the development of chronic gastrointestinal (GI) complications in patients with cervical cancer who have undergone postoperative concurrent chemotherapy and whole-pelvic radiation therapy (WPRT). The subjects were 135 patients who had undergone postoperative WPRT with concurrent nedaplatin-based chemotherapy between 2000 and 2014. Associations between selected DVH parameters and the incidence of chronic GI complications of G3 or higher were evaluated. Chronic GI complications of severity G3 occurred in 18 (13%) patients. Patients with GI complications had significantly greater V5–V45, mean dose and the generalized equivalent uniform dose (gEUD) of the small bowel loops, compared with those without GI complications. V30–V45, mean dose and gEUD of the bowel bag also showed significant differences between patients with and without GI complications. In contrast, no parameter for the large bowel loop was correlated with GI complications. Receiver operating characteristics curve analysis indicated that V30–V45 of the small bowel loops were better predictors than these respective parameters for the bowel bag. Next, patients were divided into four groups based on the median V15 and V40 of the small bowel loops. The group with both a high V15 and a high V40 showed a significantly higher probability of chronic GI complications. In conclusion, the small bowel loops are better predictors of chronic GI complications compared with the bowel bag, and a relatively high-dose volume (e.g. V40) of the small bowel loops is a useful predictor of chronic GI complications. PMID:27342839

  4. Effects of obstructive sleep apnoea risk on postoperative respiratory complications: protocol for a hospital-based registry study

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Christina H; Zaremba, Sebastian; Devine, Scott; Nikolov, Milcho; Kurth, Tobias; Eikermann, Matthias

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA), the most common type of sleep-disordered breathing, is associated with significant immediate and long-term morbidity, including fragmented sleep and impaired daytime functioning, as well as more severe consequences, such as hypertension, impaired cognitive function and reduced quality of life. Perioperatively, OSA occurs frequently as a consequence of pre-existing vulnerability, surgery and drug effects. The impact of OSA on postoperative respiratory complications (PRCs) needs to be better characterised. As OSA is associated with significant comorbidities, such as obesity, pulmonary hypertension, myocardial infarction and stroke, it is unclear whether OSA or its comorbidities are the mechanism of PRCs. This project aims to (1) develop a novel prediction score identifying surgical patients at high risk of OSA, (2) evaluate the association of OSA risk on PRCs and (3) evaluate if pharmacological agents used during surgery modify this association. Methods Retrospective cohort study using hospital-based electronic patient data and perioperative data on medications administered and vital signs. We will use data from Partners Healthcare clinical databases, Boston, Massachusetts. First, a prediction model for OSA will be developed using OSA diagnostic codes and polysomnography procedural codes as the reference standard, and will be validated by medical record review. Results of the prediction model will be used to classify patients in the database as high, medium or low risk of OSA, and we will investigate the effect of OSA on risk of PRCs. Finally, we will test whether the effect of OSA on PRCs is modified by the use of intraoperative pharmacological agents known to increase upper airway instability, including neuromuscular blockade, neostigmine, opioids, anaesthetics and sedatives. Ethics and dissemination The Partners Human Research Committee approved this study (protocol number: 2014P000218). Study results will be made

  5. Clinical Outcomes of Wulingsan Subtraction Decoction Treatment of Postoperative Brain Edema and Fever as a Complication of Glioma Neurosurgery

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Wei-rong; Zhang, Feng-e; Diao, Bao-zhong; Zhang, Yue-ying

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To evaluate the efficacy of Wulingsan subtraction (五苓散加减 WLSS) decoction in the treatment of postoperative brain edema and fever as a complication of glioma neurosurgery. Methods. This retrospective study was conducted at the Department of Neurosurgery of Liaocheng People's Hospital. Patients hospitalized between March 2011 and December 2014 were divided into three groups: Group A received WLSS oral liquid (50 mL), twice a day; Group B received an intravenous infusion of mannitol; and Group C received WLSS combined with mannitol (n = 30 patients per group). All patients were treated for 10 days continuously. Therapeutic efficacy was evaluated by measuring body temperature and indicators of renal function before and 3, 5, and 10 days after treatment. Results. Compared to the other two groups, significantly greater clinical efficacy was observed in the patients treated with mannitol (Group B; P < 0.05), although marked clinical efficacy was also observed over time in patients treated with WLSS (Group A). After 5 days, the quantifiable effects of the WLSS and mannitol combination group (Group C) were substantial (P < 0.05). The renal damage in Group B was more obvious after 5 days and 10 days. Conclusion. Compared with mannitol treatment alone, WLSS combined with mannitol induced a more rapid reduction in body temperature. Our findings suggest that patients should be started on mannitol for 3 days and then switched to WLSS to achieve obvious antipyretic effects and protect renal function. This method of treatment should be considered for clinical applications. PMID:27019661

  6. Impact of Lifestyle Diseases on Postoperative Complications and Survival in Elderly Patients with Stage I Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Sang Seok; Choi, Pil Jo; Yi, Jung Hoon; Yoon, Sung Sil

    2017-01-01

    Background The influence of lifestyle diseases on postoperative complications and long-term survival in patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is unclear. The aim of this study was to determine whether lifestyle diseases were significant risk factors of perioperative and long-term surgical outcomes in elderly patients with stage I NSCLC. Methods Between December 1995 and November 2013, 110 patients aged 65 years or older who underwent surgical resection of stage I NSCLC at Dong-A University Hospital were retrospectively studied. We assessed the presence of the following lifestyle diseases as risk factors for postoperative complications and long-term mortality: diabetes, hypertension, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, stroke, and ischemic heart disease. Results The mean age of the patients was 71 years (range, 65 to 82 years). Forty-six patients (41.8%) had hypertension, making it the most common lifestyle disease, followed by diabetes (n=23, 20.9%). The in-hospital mortality rate was 0.9% (n=1). The 3-year and 5-year survival rates were 78% and 64%, respectively. Postoperative complications developed in 32 patients (29.1%), including 7 (6.4%) with prolonged air leakage, 6 (5.5%) with atrial fibrillation, 5 (4.5%) with delirium and atelectasis, and 3 (2.7%) with acute kidney injury and pneumonia. Univariate and multivariate analyses showed that the presence of a lifestyle disease was the only independent risk factor for postoperative complications. In survival analysis, univariate analysis showed that age, smoking, body mass index, extent of resection, and pathologic stage were associated with impaired survival. Multivariate analysis revealed that resection type (hazard ratio [HR], 2.20; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.08 to 4.49; p=0.030) and pathologic stage (HR, 1.89; 95% CI, 1.02 to 3.49; p=0.043) had independent adverse impacts on survival. Conclusion This study demonstrated that the presence of a lifestyle disease was a significant prognostic

  7. Postoperative Complications of Laparoscopic Total Gastrectomy versus Open Total Gastrectomy for Gastric Cancer in a Meta-Analysis of High-Quality Case-Controlled Studies

    PubMed Central

    Otsuki, Sho; Ogawa, Norihito; Tanioka, Toshiro; Okuno, Keisuke; Gokita, Kentaro; Kawano, Tatsuyuki

    2016-01-01

    Background. Some meta-analyses of case-controlled studies (CCSs) have shown that laparoscopic or laparoscopy-assisted total gastrectomy (LTG) had some short-term advantages over open total gastrectomy (OTG). However, postoperative complications differed somewhat among the meta-analyses, and some CCSs included in the meta-analyses had mismatched factors between LTG and OTG. Methods. CCSs comparing postoperative complications between LTG and OTG were identified in PubMed and Embase. Studies matched for patients' status, tumor stage, and the extents of lymph-node dissection were included. Outcomes of interest, such as anastomotic, other intra-abdominal, wound, and pulmonary complications, were evaluated in a meta-analysis performed using Review Manager version 5.3 software. Result. This meta-analysis included a total of 2,560 patients (LTG, 1,073 patients; OTG, 1,487 patients) from 15 CCSs. Wound complications were significantly less frequent in LTG than in OTG (n = 2,430; odds ratio [OR] 0.30, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.29–0.85, P = 0.01, I2 = 0%, and OR 0.46, 95% CI 0.17–0.52, P < 0.0001, I2 = 0%). However, the incidence of anastomotic complications was slightly but not significantly higher in LTG than in OTG (n = 2,560; OR 1.44, 95% CI 0.96–2.16, P = 0.08, I2 = 0%). Conclusion. LTG was associated with a lower incidence of wound-related postoperative complications than was OTG in this meta-analysis of CCSs; however, some concern remains about anastomotic problems associated with LTG. PMID:28042292

  8. Sarcopenia is an Independent Predictor of Severe Postoperative Complications and Long-Term Survival After Radical Gastrectomy for Gastric Cancer: Analysis from a Large-Scale Cohort.

    PubMed

    Zhuang, Cheng-Le; Huang, Dong-Dong; Pang, Wen-Yang; Zhou, Chong-Jun; Wang, Su-Lin; Lou, Neng; Ma, Liang-Liang; Yu, Zhen; Shen, Xian

    2016-03-01

    Currently, the association between sarcopenia and long-term prognosis after gastric cancer surgery has not been investigated. Moreover, the association between sarcopenia and postoperative complications remains controversial. This large-scale retrospective study aims to ascertain the prevalence of sarcopenia and assess its impact on postoperative complications and long-term survival in patients undergoing radical gastrectomy for gastric cancer. From December 2008 to April 2013, the clinical data of all patients who underwent elective radical gastrectomy for gastric cancer were collected prospectively. Only patients with available preoperative abdominal CT scan within 30 days of surgery were considered for analysis. Skeletal muscle mass was determined by abdominal (computed tomography) CT scan, and sarcopenia was diagnosed by the cut-off values obtained by means of optimum stratification. Univariate and multivariate analyses evaluating risk factors of postoperative complications and long-term survival were performed. A total of 937 patients were included in this study, and 389 (41.5%) patients were sarcopenic based on the diagnostic cut-off values (34.9 cm²/m² for women and 40.8 cm²/m² for men). Sarcopenia was an independent risk factor for severe postoperative complications (OR = 3.010, P < 0.001), but not for total complications. However, sarcopenia did not show significant association with operative mortality. Moreover, sarcopenia was an independent predictor for poorer overall survival (HR = 1.653, P < 0.001) and disease-free survival (HR = 1.620, P < 0.001). Under the adjusted tumor-node-metastasis (TNM) stage, sarcopenia remained an independent risk factor for overall survival and disease-free survival in patients with TNM stage II and III, but not in patients with TNM stage I. Sarcopenia is an independent predictive factor of severe postoperative complications after radical gastrectomy for gastric cancer. Moreover, sarcopenia

  9. Influence of two different surgical techniques on the difficulty of impacted lower third molar extraction and their post-operative complications

    PubMed Central

    Ohanyan, Ani; Kechagias, Nikos; Tsekos, Antonis; Vahtsevanos, Konstantinos

    2015-01-01

    Background Post-operative complications of various degrees of severity are commonly observed in third molar impaction surgery. For this reason, a surgical procedure that decreases the trauma of bone and soft tissues should be a priority for surgeons. In the present study, we compare the efficacy and the post-operative complications of patients to whom two different surgical techniques were applied for impacted lower third molar extraction. Material and Methods Patients of the first group underwent the classical bur technique, while patients of the second group underwent another technique, in which an elevator was placed on the buccal surface of the impacted molar in order to luxate the alveolar socket more easily. Results Comparing the two techniques, we observed a statistically significant decrease in the duration of the procedure and in the need for tooth sectioning when applying the second surgical technique, while the post-operative complications were similar in the two groups. We also found a statistically significant lower incidence of lingual nerve lesions and only a slightly higher frequency of sharp mandibular bone irregularities in the second group, which however was not statistically significant. Conclusions The results of our study indicate that the surgical technique using an elevator on the buccal surface of the tooth seems to be a reliable method to extract impacted third molars safely, easily, quickly and with the minimum trauma to the surrounding tissues. Key words:Mandibular third molar, impacted, surgical technique, extraction, elevator. PMID:26116843

  10. Associated thyreoiditis, myasthenia gravis, thymectomy, Chron's disease, and erythema nodosum: pathogenetic and clinical correlations, immune system involvement, and systemic infectious complications.

    PubMed

    Manfredi, Roberto; Fasulo, Giovanni; Fulgaro, Ciro; Sabbatani, Sergio

    2008-09-01

    The case of a young woman suffering from multiple autoimmune-dysreactive disorders (including thyreoiditis, myasthenia gravis, thymectomy, Crohn's disease, and erythema nodosum), while undergoing steroideal therapy, was complicated by a severe infectious disorder (severe upper urinary tract infection). While the pathogenetic and clinical relationship between the different autoimmune-dysreactive complications is still unclear, and the supporting role of the frequent immunosuppressive treatment may add significantly to these risk factors, clinicians who are engaged in the management of these patients should be aware that multiple, concurrent or subsequent disorders might occur in these subjects, and also that severe infections might be of relevant concern.

  11. Postoperative survival for patients with thymoma complicating myasthenia gravis—preliminary retrospective results of the ChART database

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Fangrui; Fu, Jianhua; Shen, Yi; Wei, Yucheng; Tan, Lijie; Zhang, Peng; Han, Yongtao; Chen, Chun; Zhang, Renquan; Li, Yin; Chen, Keneng; Chen, Hezhong; Liu, Yongyu; Cui, Youbing; Wang, Yun; Yu, Zhentao; Zhou, Xinming; Liu, Yangchun; Liu, Yuan; Gu, Zhitao

    2016-01-01

    Background It is so far not clear that how myasthenia gravis (MG) affected the prognosis of thymoma patients. The aim of this assay is to compare the postoperative survival between patients with thymoma only and those with both thymoma and MG. Methods The Chinese Alliance for Research in Thymomas (ChART) registry recruited patients with thymoma from 18 centers over the country on an intention to treat basis from 1992 to 2012. Two groups were formed according to whether the patient complicated MG. Demographic and clinical data were reviewed, patients were followed and their survival status were analyzed. Results There were 1,850 patients included in this study, including 421 with and 1,429 without MG. Complete thymectomy were done in 91.2% patients in MG group and 71.0% in non-MG group (P<0.05). There were more percentage of patients with the histology of thymoma AB, B1, or B2 (P<0.05) in MG group, and more percentage of patients with MG were in Masaoka stage I and II. The 5- and 10-year overall survival (OS) rates were both higher in MG group (93% vs. 88%; 83% vs. 81%, P=0.034) respectively. The survival rate was significantly higher in patients with MG when the Masaoka staging was 3/4 (P=0.003). Among patients with advanced stage thymoma (stage 3, 4a, 4b), the constituent ratios of 3, 4a, 4b were similar between MG and non-MG group. Histologically, however, there were significantly more proportion of AB/B1/B2/B3 in the MG group while there were more C in the non-MG group (P=0.000). Univariate analyses for all patients showed that MG, WHO classification, Masaoka stage, surgical approach, chemotherapy and radiotherapy and resectability were significant factors, and multivariate analysis showed WHO classification, Masaoka stage, and resectability were strong independent prognostic indicators. Conclusions Although MG is not an independent prognostic factor, the survival of patients with thymoma was superior when MG was present, especially in late Masaoka stage

  12. Dose-volume modeling of the risk of postoperative pulmonary complications among esophageal cancer patients treated with concurrent chemoradiotherapy followed by surgery

    SciTech Connect

    Tucker, Susan L. . E-mail: sltucker@mdanderson.org; Liu, H. Helen; Wang, Shulian; Wei Xiong; Liao Zhongxing; Komaki, Ritsuko; Cox, James D.; Mohan, Radhe

    2006-11-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of radiation dose distribution in the lung on the risk of postoperative pulmonary complications among esophageal cancer patients. Methods and Materials: We analyzed data from 110 patients with esophageal cancer treated with concurrent chemoradiotherapy followed by surgery at our institution from 1998 to 2003. The endpoint for analysis was postsurgical pneumonia or acute respiratory distress syndrome. Dose-volume histograms (DVHs) and dose-mass histograms (DMHs) for the whole lung were used to fit normal-tissue complication probability (NTCP) models, and the quality of fits were compared using bootstrap analysis. Results: Normal-tissue complication probability modeling identified that the risk of postoperative pulmonary complications was most significantly associated with small absolute volumes of lung spared from doses {>=}5 Gy (VS5), that is, exposed to doses <5 Gy. However, bootstrap analysis found no significant difference between the quality of this model and fits based on other dosimetric parameters, including mean lung dose, effective dose, and relative volume of lung receiving {>=}5 Gy, probably because of correlations among these factors. The choice of DVH vs. DMH or the use of fractionation correction did not significantly affect the results of the NTCP modeling. The parameter values estimated for the Lyman NTCP model were as follows (with 95% confidence intervals in parentheses): n = 1.85 (0.04, {infinity}), m = 0.55 (0.22, 1.02), and D {sub 5} = 17.5 Gy (9.4 Gy, 102 Gy). Conclusions: In this cohort of esophageal cancer patients, several dosimetric parameters including mean lung dose, effective dose, and absolute volume of lung receiving <5 Gy provided similar descriptions of the risk of postoperative pulmonary complications as a function of Radiation dose distribution in the lung.

  13. Single-dose and multi-dose clindamycin therapy fails to demonstrate efficacy in preventing infectious and inflammatory complications in third molar surgery.

    PubMed

    Kaczmarzyk, T; Wichlinski, J; Stypulkowska, J; Zaleska, M; Panas, M; Woron, J

    2007-05-01

    The goal of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of single- and multi-dose (5-day) clindamycin therapy for the prevention of inflammatory complications in patients undergoing lower third molar surgical extraction with bone removal. Patients who qualified for the prospective, randomized, double-masked, placebo-controlled trial were randomly divided into three groups: (1) single dose of oral clindamycin administered preoperatively (single-dose group); (2) clindamycin administered preoperatively with continued therapy for 5 days (5-day group); and (3) a placebo group. The following parameters were evaluated on the first, second and seventh days postsurgery: trismus, facial swelling, body temperature, lymphadenopathy, alveolar osteitis and subjective pain sensations. There were 86 patients (31 in the single-dose group, 28 in the 5-day group and 27 in the placebo group) enrolled in the study. There were no statistically significant differences in postoperative inflammatory complications in patients during the first and second days postsurgery. A statistically significant variation in body temperature was reported on the seventh day. Analysis of the postoperative analgesic intake did not show statistically significant differences between examined groups. Clindamycin applied in a single preoperative dose of 600 mg with or without subsequent 5-day therapy does not demonstrate efficacy in prophylaxis for postoperative inflammatory complications after third molar surgery.

  14. Effect of azidocillin, erythromycin, clindamycin and doxycycline on postoperative complications after surgical removal of impacted mandibular third molars.

    PubMed

    Bystedt, H; Nord, C E; Nordenram, A

    1980-06-01

    Treatment of osteitis after surgical removal of the third molar of the mandible is still a clinical problem. A total of 140 patients undergoing operations for removal of an impacted third molar of the mandible, were included in a double-blind study. Placebo or antibiotics - azidocillin, erythromycin, clindamycin and doxycycline - were given to the patients preoperatively and for the following 7 days. The concentrations in serum, alveolar serum and mandibular bone were measured and the postoperative courses - pain, trismus, swelling and wound-healing - were recorded. No correlation was obtained between the antibiotic concentration and the postoperative complaints, except in the azidocillin group on day 2, in which fewer complaints were noticed in patients with high concentrations of the drug at the time of operations. The 80 patients in the antibiotic groups responded significantly better with respect to wound-healing than the 60 patients in the placebo groups. Only 15 operations lasted more than 15 min and the three of them which subsequently resulted in alveolitis were in the placebo groups. Antibiotics significantly reduced pain on day 7 postoperatively. In general, no statistically significant differences in trismus and swelling could be demonstrated between the patient groups. However, there was a significant difference between the placebo and doxycycline groups with respect to swelling (day 2 postoperative, P < 0.01; day 5 postoperative, P < 0.05). Thus systemically administered antibiotics offered only slight advantages in routine operations of impacted third mandibular molars, but could decrease the rate of infections after traumatic operations.

  15. [The evaluation of sensitivity and specificity of technique of detection of C-reactive protein under diagnostic of infectious complications in patients with acute lymphoblastic leucosis receiving chemotherapy].

    PubMed

    Vladimirova, S G; Tarasova, L N; Dokshina, I A; Cherepanova, V A

    2014-11-01

    The C-reactive protein is a generally recognized marker of inflammation and bacterial infection. However, issue of diagnostic effectiveness of this indicator is still open-ended in case of patients with oncologic hematological diseases. The level of C-reactive protein can increase under neoplastic processes. On the contrary, the inhibition of immune response observed under cytoplastic therapy can decrease synthesis of this protein. The study was organized to establish levels of C-reactive protein as markers of infection in adult patients with acute lymphoblastic leucosis under application of chemotherapy and to evaluate their diagnostic effectiveness. The sampling included 34 patients with acute lymphoblastic leucosis all patients had infectious complications at various stages of treatment. The levels of C-reactive protein in groups of patients with localized infections (mucositis, abscess, pneumonia, etc.) or fever of unknown genesis had no statistical differences but were reliably higher in patients without infectious complications. The concentrations of C-reactive protein in patients with syndrome of systemic inflammatory response and sepsis had no differences. At the same time, level of C-reactive protein under systemic infection (syndrome of systemic inflammatory response, sepsis) was reliably higher than in case of localized infection. The diagnostically reliable levels of C-reactive protein were established as follows: lower than 11 mg/l--infectious complications are lacking; higher than 11 mg/l--availability of infectious process; higher than 82 mg/l--generalization of infection. The given levels are characterized by high diagnostic sensitivity (92% and 97% correspondingly) and specificity (97% and 97%) when patients receive therapy without application of L-asparaginase. At the stages of introduction of this preparation effecting protein synthesizing function of liver sensitivity of proposed criteria are decreased (69% and 55% correspondingly). However; due

  16. Influence of prior radiotherapy on the development of postoperative complications and success of free tissue transfers in head and neck cancer reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Bengtson, B P; Schusterman, M A; Baldwin, B J; Miller, M J; Reece, G P; Kroll, S S; Robb, G L; Goepfert, H

    1993-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether prior radiotherapy had any effect on the development of postoperative complications in patients undergoing microvascular tissue transfers for reconstruction of head and neck cancer. A prospective database was used to review 354 consecutive patients who had a total of 368 free tissue transfers limited to the head and neck during the 4-year period from July 1988 to June 1992. Postoperative complications in 167 patients who received preoperative radiotherapy (XRT) were compared with those of 187 patients who did not undergo radiotherapy preoperatively (NR). No statistical differences in complications or flap loss between the two groups were noted using the chi 2 test or Fisher's exact test (p > 0.2). Total flap loss occurred in 5.3% of the XRT group (9 of 169) and 5.0% of the NR patient group (10 of 199), and partial flap loss occurred in 4.1% of the irradiated patients and 2.5% of the nonirradiated patients. Major wound complications requiring additional surgery occurred in 16% of the XRT group and 11% of the NR group. Minor wound complications that did not require further surgery occurred in 21% of the irradiated patients and 18% of the nonirradiated patients. No significant difference in the timing or dose of preoperative radiation, previous neck dissection, or anastomotic type could be documented in failed versus successful flaps (two-tailed t-test, p > 0.80, and chi 2, p > 0.2). Our results show that, in a large group of cancer patients undergoing free tissue transfers to the head and neck, prior radiotherapy or surgery did not predispose them to a higher rate of acute flap loss or wound complications than their nonirradiated cohorts.

  17. Prediction of early postoperative infections in pediatric liver transplantation by logistic regression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uzunova, Yordanka; Prodanova, Krasimira; Spassov, Lubomir

    2016-12-01

    Orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT) is the only curative treatment for end-stage liver disease. Early diagnosis and treatment of infections after OLT are usually associated with improved outcomes. This study's objective is to identify reliable factors that can predict postoperative infectious morbidity. 27 children were included in the analysis. They underwent liver transplantation in our department. The correlation between two parameters (the level of blood glucose at 5th postoperative day and the duration of the anhepatic phase) and postoperative infections was analyzed, using univariate analysis. In this analysis, an independent predictive factor was derived which adequately identifies patients at risk of infectious complications after a liver transplantation.

  18. Prospective multicenter assessment of perioperative and minimum 2-year postoperative complication rates associated with adult spinal deformity surgery.

    PubMed

    Smith, Justin S; Klineberg, Eric; Lafage, Virginie; Shaffrey, Christopher I; Schwab, Frank; Lafage, Renaud; Hostin, Richard; Mundis, Gregory M; Errico, Thomas J; Kim, Han Jo; Protopsaltis, Themistocles S; Hamilton, D Kojo; Scheer, Justin K; Soroceanu, Alex; Kelly, Michael P; Line, Breton; Gupta, Munish; Deviren, Vedat; Hart, Robert; Burton, Douglas C; Bess, Shay; Ames, Christopher P

    2016-07-01

    OBJECTIVE Although multiple reports have documented significant benefit from surgical treatment of adult spinal deformity (ASD), these procedures can have high complication rates. Previously reported complications rates associated with ASD surgery are limited by retrospective design, single-surgeon or single-center cohorts, lack of rigorous data on complications, and/or limited follow-up. Accurate definition of complications associated with ASD surgery is important and may serve as a resource for patient counseling and efforts to improve the safety of patient care. The authors conducted a study to prospectively assess the rates of complications associated with ASD surgery with a minimum 2-year follow-up based on a multicenter study design that incorporated standardized data-collection forms, on-site study coordinators, and regular auditing of data to help ensure complete and accurate reporting of complications. In addition, they report age stratification of complication rates and provide a general assessment of factors that may be associated with the occurrence of complications. METHODS As part of a prospective, multicenter ASD database, standardized forms were used to collect data on surgery-related complications. On-site coordinators and central auditing helped ensure complete capture of complication data. Inclusion criteria were age older than 18 years, ASD, and plan for operative treatment. Complications were classified as perioperative (within 6 weeks of surgery) or delayed (between 6 weeks after surgery and time of last follow-up), and as minor or major. The primary focus for analyses was on patients who reached a minimum follow-up of 2 years. RESULTS Of 346 patients who met the inclusion criteria, 291 (84%) had a minimum 2-year follow-up (mean 2.1 years); their mean age was 56.2 years. The vast majority (99%) had treatment including a posterior procedure, 25% had an anterior procedure, and 19% had a 3-column osteotomy. At least 1 revision was required in 82

  19. Most women recover from psychological distress after postoperative complications following implant or DIEP flap breast reconstruction: A prospective long-term follow-up study

    PubMed Central

    Gopie, Jessica P.; Brinkman, J. Nick; Kleijne, Annelies; Seynaeve, Caroline; Menke-Pluymers, Marian B. E.; ter Kuile, Moniek M.; Tibben, Aad; Mureau, Marc A. M.

    2017-01-01

    Background Substantial complication rates after postmastectomy breast reconstruction (BR) in breast cancer patients have been reported. Few studies have reported on the resulting psychological distress (PD) and satisfaction with the aesthetic result in relation to postoperative complications after completion of implant or DIEP flap BR. The present study investigated whether women were able to recover from complication related distress in the long term. Methods PD was prospectively measured using questionnaires regarding anxiety, depression and cancer distress. Eligible patients completed questionnaires before BR (T0, n = 144), after one month (T1, n = 139) and after completion of BR, approximately 21 months after initial reconstructive surgery (T2, n = 119). Satisfaction with the aesthetic result was assessed 21 months after BR. Data concerning complications, subsequent additional surgery and total reconstruction failure up to T2 were collected from the medical records. Analyses were performed using multi-level regression analyses correcting for age. Results One or more complications occurred in 61 patients (42%) and 50 women required subsequent surgery (35%). In time, mean PD significantly declined towards baseline scores independent of complications. However, a total reconstruction failure (n = 10) was significantly associated with a large temporary increase in depression scores. After additional surgery due to complications patients were less satisfied with aesthetic outcome, although patient satisfaction was independent of PD. Conclusions PD outcomes generally declined to normal levels after completion of the entire BR course. Patients experiencing a total reconstruction failure reported more depression after this loss, but in the long term recovered to the same level as women without complications. These findings indicate that women generally can cope efficiently with these serious adverse events, even if they were less satisfied with the aesthetic result

  20. Post-operative complications associated with the Arthrex Canine Cranial Cruciate Ligament Repair Anchor System in small- to medium-sized dogs: A retrospective analysis (2009–2012)

    PubMed Central

    Rappa, Nick S.; Radasch, Robert M.

    2016-01-01

    This study classified and determined the post-operative complication rate associated with stabilization of cranial (CCL) ligament deficient stifles in small- to medium-sized dogs with the Arthrex Canine Cranial Cruciate Ligament Repair Anchor System (CCLRAS). Eighty-five medical records from 2009 to 2012 from 1 institution were evaluated. Complications were classified according to previously proposed definitions for orthopedic studies in veterinary medicine. Fifty-two owners were contacted by telephone at least 6 months after surgery and given a questionnaire to classify complications related to the implant. A visual analog scale was used to assess functionality and degree of pain. The overall complication rate was 30.3% with an inflammation-infection rate of 5.4% and a documented infection rate requiring implant removal of 1.8%. Owners reported full or acceptable function in 96% of cases with an average functional score of 86.5. Stabilization of CCL-deficient stifles in small- to medium-sized dogs with the Arthrex Canine CCLRAS is reliable with acceptable complication rates. PMID:27493284

  1. Association of Preoperative Biliary Drainage With Postoperative Outcome Following Pancreaticoduodenectomy

    PubMed Central

    Povoski, Stephen P.; Karpeh, Martin S.; Conlon, Kevin C.; Blumgart, Leslie H.; Brennan, Murray F.

    1999-01-01

    Objective To determine whether preoperative biliary instrumentation and preoperative biliary drainage are associated with increased morbidity and mortality rates after pancreaticoduodenectomy. Summary Background Data Pancreaticoduodenectomy is accompanied by a considerable rate of postoperative complications and potential death. Controversy exists regarding the impact of preoperative biliary instrumentation and preoperative biliary drainage on morbidity and mortality rates after pancreaticoduodenectomy. Methods Two hundred forty consecutive cases of pancreaticoduodenectomy performed between January 1994 and January 1997 were analyzed. Multiple preoperative, intraoperative, and postoperative variables were examined. Pearson chi square analysis or Fisher’s exact test, when appropriate, was used for univariate comparison of all variables. Logistic regression was used for multivariate analysis. Results One hundred seventy-five patients (73%) underwent preoperative biliary instrumentation (endoscopic, percutaneous, or surgical instrumentation). One hundred twenty-six patients (53%) underwent preoperative biliary drainage (endoscopic stents, percutaneous drains/stents, or surgical drainage). The overall postoperative morbidity rate after pancreaticoduodenectomy was 48% (114/240). Infectious complications occurred in 34% (81/240) of patients. Intraabdominal abscess occurred in 14% (33/240) of patients. The postoperative mortality rate was 5% (12/240). Preoperative biliary drainage was determined to be the only statistically significant variable associated with complications (p = 0.025), infectious complications (p = 0.014), intraabdominal abscess (p = 0.022), and postoperative death (p = 0.037). Preoperative biliary instrumentation alone was not associated with complications, infectious complications, intraabdominal abscess, or postoperative death. Conclusions Preoperative biliary drainage, but not preoperative biliary instrumentation alone, is associated with increased

  2. Prospective Study of Postoperative Complications After Total Thyroidectomy for Multinodular Goiters by Surgeons With Experience in Endocrine Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Zambudio, Antonio Ríos; Rodríguez, José; Riquelme, Juan; Soria, Teresa; Canteras, Manuel; Parrilla, Pascual

    2004-01-01

    Objetives: (1) To show that total thyroidectomy (TT) can be performed in multinodular goiter (MG) by surgeons with experience in endocrine surgery with a definitive complication rate of 1% or less; and (2) to analyze the risk factors for complications in these patients. Summary Background Data: There is current controversy over the role of TT in the treatment of MG; although there are potential benefits, high rates of complications are not acceptable in surgery for a benign pathology. Patients and Method: A prospective study was conducted on 301 MGs meeting the following criteria: (1) bilateral MG; (2) no prior cervical surgery; (3) operation by surgeons with experience in endocrine surgery; (4) no associated parathyroid pathology; (5) no initial thoracic approach; and (6) minimum follow-up of 1 year. Age, sex, time of evolution, symptoms, cervical goiter grade, intrathoracic component, thyroid weight, and presence of associated carcinoma were analyzed as risk factors for complications. The χ2 test and a logistic regression analysis were applied. Results: Complications were presented by 62 patients (21%), corresponding to 29 hypoparathyroidisms, 26 recurrent laryngeal nerve injuries, 4 lesions of the superior laryngeal nerve, 3 cervical hematomas, and 1 infection of the cervicotomy. The variables associated with the presence of these complications were hyperthyroidism (P = 0.0033), compressive symptoms (P = 0.0455), intrathoracic component (P = 0.0366), goiter grade (P = 0.0195), and weight of excised specimen (P = 0.0302); hyperthyroidism (relative risk [RR] 2.5) and intrathoracic component (RR 1.5) persisted as independent risk factors. Definitive complications appeared in 3 patients (1%), corresponding to 2 hypoparathyroidisms and 1 recurrent laryngeal nerve injury. Two cases corresponded to a toxic goiter, and the third to an intrathoracic goiter with compressive symptoms. Conclusion: In endocrine surgery units, TT can be performed for MG with a definitive

  3. [The function of the coagulation hemostatic and fibrinolytic processes in the postoperative period in patients with complicated chronic pancreatitis].

    PubMed

    Shishlov, V I

    1999-01-01

    Intravenous infusion of modified amino acid cocktail (AC), based of the "Aminosyn PF" composition with addition of glutamine, methyonine and selenium was applied in the complex of treatment of patients with complicated chronic pancreatitis. After AC infusion during 3 days after the operation the coagulation indexes restoration was noted while after conventional treatment in these terms the signs of thrombohemorrhagic syndrome were registered.

  4. Early respiratory complications after liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Feltracco, Paolo; Carollo, Cristiana; Barbieri, Stefania; Pettenuzzo, Tommaso; Ori, Carlo

    2013-12-28

    The poor clinical conditions associated with end-stage cirrhosis, pre-existing pulmonary abnormalities, and high comorbidity rates in patients with high Model for End-Stage Liver Disease scores are all well-recognized factors that increase the risk of pulmonary complications after orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT) surgery. Many intraoperative and postoperative events, such as fluid overload, massive transfusion of blood products, hemodynamic instability, unexpected coagulation abnormalities, renal dysfunction, and serious adverse effects of reperfusion syndrome, are other factors that predispose an individual to postoperative respiratory disorders. Despite advances in surgical techniques and anesthesiological management, the lung may still suffer throughout the perioperative period from various types of injury and ventilatory impairment, with different clinical outcomes. Pulmonary complications after OLT can be classified as infectious or non-infectious. Pleural effusion, atelectasis, pulmonary edema, respiratory distress syndrome, and pneumonia may contribute considerably to early morbidity and mortality in liver transplant patients. It is of paramount importance to accurately identify lung disorders because infectious pulmonary complications warrant speedy and aggressive treatment to prevent diffuse lung injury and the risk of evolution into multisystem organ failure. This review discusses the most common perioperative factors that predispose an individual to postoperative pulmonary complications and these complications' early clinical manifestations after OLT and influence on patient outcome.

  5. Procalcitonin as the biomarker of inflammation in diagnostics of pediatric appendicular peritonitis and for the prognosis of early postoperative complications.

    PubMed

    Chakhunashvili, L; Inasaridze, A; Svanidze, S; Samkharadze, J; Chkhaidze, I

    2005-12-01

    A total of 43 patients up to 15 years, who underwent appendectomy with preliminary diagnosis of acute appendicitis have been studied at M. Guramishvili Pediatric Clinic in 2004-2005 years. Procalcitonin concentration has been defined in patients' blood sera using the immunoluminometric method (LUMITest PCT, BRAHMS Diagnostika, Berlin, Germany). Analysis of procalcitonin in different groups of patients has shown that increase in procalcitonin correlates with disease severity, and maximally increases in case of peritonitis due to acute destructive appendicitis. The procalcitonin level can be used to confirm the diagnosis of acute appendicitis. It has been suggested that procalcitonin can be used not only as diagnostic marker for acute appendicitis but also as a prognostic marker of it's complications. Using of procalcitonin in case of acute appendicitis would help to carry out timely surgical interventions and predict disease complications.

  6. Postoperative vascular complications in unrecognised Obstructive Sleep apnoea (POSA) study protocol: an observational cohort study in moderate-to-high risk patients undergoing non-cardiac surgery

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Matthew T V; Wang, Chew-Yin; Seet, Edwin; Tam, Stanley; Lai, Hou-Yee; Walker, Stuart; Short, Timothy G; Halliwell, Richard; Chung, Frances

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Emerging epidemiological data suggest that obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) is common in the general surgical population. Unfortunately, the majority of these patients are unrecognised and untreated at the time of surgery. There is substantial biological rationale to indicate that patients with unrecognised OSA are at a higher risk of postoperative vascular events. However, the extent of this morbidity is currently unknown. We have initated the postoperative vascular complications in the unrecognised obstructive sleep apnoea (POSA) study to determine the associations between OSA, nocturnal hypoxia and major postoperative vascular events in 1200 moderate-to-high risk patients undergoing major non-cardiac surgery. Methods and analysis The POSA study is an international prospective observational cohort study. Using a type 3 portable sleep monitoring device and ambulatory oximetry, we will quantify the severity of OSA. The primary outcome is a composite of vascular death, myocardial infarction; non-fatal cardiac arrest; stroke; pulmonary embolism; congestive heart failure and new arrhythmia within 30 days of surgery. As of November 2013, we have recruited over 700 patients from nine centres in six countries. The mean age is 68 years, the mean body mass index is 27 kg/m2 and 55% of patients are men. 27.9% of patients have known coronary artery disease, over 76% have diabetes. The majority of patients underwent orthopaedic surgery (28%) and colorectal resection (18.5%). Ethics and dissemination The POSA study has received ethics approval from all study sites before patient recruitment. Informed consent will be obtained from all patients. The POSA study will determine the risk of unrecognised OSA in major non-cardiac surgery. We will publish these findings in peer-reviewed journals. Trial Registration: ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT01494181 PMID:24413351

  7. Risk factors of postoperative pulmonary complications following elective craniotomy for patients with tumors of the brainstem or adjacent to the brainstem

    PubMed Central

    CHU, HUI; DANG, BIN-WEN

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to analyze the risk factors of postoperative pulmonary complications (PPCs) of elective craniotomy for patients presenting with brainstem tumors or tumors adjacent to the brainstem. A total of 162 consecutive patients with a brainstem tumor or adjacent brainstem tumor undergoing elective craniotomy were included and monitored. Potential risk factors were identified by data collection and monitoring of the PPCs, as well as the performance of single factor analysis (using the χ2 test). In addition, the independent risk factors of PPCs were screened by logistic analysis. A total of 39 cases of PPC were included in the current study, with an incidence rate of 23.9%. The analysis indicated that smoking history, previous pulmonary diseases, an American Society of Anesthesiologists classification >II and partial tumor resection were risk factors of PPC following an elective craniotomy. Smoking history and partial tumor resection were identified to be independent risk factors of PPCs. PMID:25202352

  8. Expansion of polymorphonuclear myeloid-derived suppressor cells in patients with end-stage renal disease may lead to infectious complications.

    PubMed

    Xing, Yan-Fang; Cai, Rui-Ming; Lin, Qu; Ye, Qing-Jian; Ren, Jian-Hua; Yin, Liang-Hong; Li, Xing

    2017-02-16

    Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) are recently identified immune suppressive cells in multiple chronic inflammations. Here, we investigated MDSCs in patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) and their clinical significance in these patients and healthy individuals (49 each). Polymorphonuclear and mononuclear MDSCs were investigated by flow cytometry. Patients with ESRD before hemodialysis presented a significantly higher level of polymorphonuclear MDSCs. Depletion of polymorphonuclear-MDSCs resolved T cell IFN-γ responses. By co-culture, T cell proliferation and the production of IFN-γ were abrogated by the addition of polymorphonuclear MDSCs in a dose-dependent manner. Both of these effects were reversed by a reactive oxygen species inhibitor. The levels of reactive oxygen species were higher in polymorphonuclear MDSCs derived from patients with ESRD than from normal individuals. The mRNA level of NOX2, the key protein complex responsible for reactive oxygen species production, was higher in ESRD-related polymorphonuclear MDSCs. The phospho-STAT3 level, a key activator of MDSCs, was higher in ESRD-related polymorphonuclear MDSCs. Finally, the polymorphonuclear MDSC level before and after hemodialysis was positively related to infectious diseases. Patients with ESRD were dichotomized into 2 groups by the amount of polymorphonuclear MDSCs. Patients with high levels of polymorphonuclear MDSCs presented with a higher incidence of infectious events. Thus, polymorphonuclear MDSCs were elevated in ESRD patients with strong immune-suppressive capability through a phospho-STAT3/reactive oxygen species pathway. Hence, polymorphonuclear MDSCs might increase the risk of infectious complications.

  9. Infective endocarditis due to Abiotrophia defectiva and Granulicatella spp. complicated by infectious intracranial cerebral aneurysms: a report of three cases and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Rhodes, Heather M; Hirigoyen, Diane; Shabnam, Lubna; Williams, David N; Hansen, Glen T

    2016-06-01

    Nutritionally variant streptococci, now classified as Abiotrophia defectivaor Granulicatella spp., are thought to account for 2 % of all infective endocarditis cases but estimates of their frequency are complicated by changes in nomenclature and difficulties in obtaining positive microbiology cultures. Their growth characteristics and difficulty undertaking antibiotic susceptibility testing may impede optimal antibiotic treatment decisions. We describe three patients with definite infective endocarditis due to these organisms seen at our hospital between 2005 and 2010, all of whom presented with neurological symptoms due to infectious intracranial cerebral aneurysms. We recommend that, for patients with left-sided infective endocarditis due to A. defictiva and Granulicatella spp., clinicians should consider imaging the central nervous system.

  10. Dosimetric planning study for the prevention of anal complications after post-operative whole pelvic radiotherapy in cervical cancer patients with hemorrhoids

    PubMed Central

    Baek, J G; Kim, E C; Kim, S K

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Radiation-induced anal toxicity can be induced by low radiation doses in patients with haemorrhoids. The object of this study was to determine the dosimetric benefits of different whole pelvic radiotherapy (WPRT) techniques in terms of dose delivered to the anal canal in post-operative patients with cervical cancer. Methods: The planning CT images of 10 patients with cervical cancer undergoing postoperative radiotherapy were used for comparison of three different plans. All patients had been treated using the conventional box technique WPRT (CV-WPRT), and we tried low-margin-modified WPRT (LM-WPRT), three-dimensional conformal techniques WPRT (CF-WPRT) and intensity-modulated WPRT (IM-WPRT) planning for dosimetric comparison of the anal canal, retrospectively. Results: Mean anal canal doses of the IM-WPRT were significantly lower (p < 0.05) than those of CV-WPRT, LM-WPRT and CF-WPRT, and V10, V20, V30 and V40 to the anal canal were also significantly lower for IM-WPRT (p < 0.05). The proportion of planning target volumes (PTVs) that received ≥98% of the prescribed dose for all plans was >99%, and the proportion that received ≥108% of the prescribed dose for IM-WPRT was <2%. Volumes of bladders and rectums that received ≥30 or ≥40 Gy were significantly lower for IM-WPRT than for three of the four-field WPRT plans (p = 0.000). Conclusion: IM-WPRT can significantly reduce radiation dose delivered to the anal canal and does not compromise PTV coverage. In patients with haemorrhoids, IM-WPRT may be of value for the prevention of anal complications. Advances in knowledge: Although tolerance of the anal canal tends to be ignored in patients undergoing post-operative WPRT, patients with haemorrhoids may suffer complications at low radiation doses. The present study shows IM-WPRT can be meaningful in these patients. PMID:26395671

  11. [Infectious cellulitis of the face complicating injection for esthetic nasolabial sulcus by hyaluronic acid: report of seven cases].

    PubMed

    Chader, H; Bosc, R; Hersant, B; Lange, F; Hermeziu, O; Zehou, O; Chosidow, O; Meningaud, J-P

    2013-12-01

    We report a case series of seven patients with bacterial cellulitis of the face complicating a filler injection for cosmetic reason, treated in a university hospital from 2005 to 2012. There were seven women aged 34 to 57 years. Two patients had a deep collection requiring surgical excision combined with antibiotics. Five patients were treated with antibiotics only. In two cases the bacteria was found streptococcus A and in one case Staphylococcus aureus. One patient required hospitalization in an intensive care unit. Only patients who needed surgical treatment showed moderate aesthetic sequelae.

  12. Comparison of Treatment Outcomes of Surgical Repair in Inguinal Hernia with Classic versus Preperitoneal Methods on Reduction of Postoperative Complications

    PubMed Central

    Mahmoudvand, Hormoz; Forutani, Shahab

    2017-01-01

    Background. This study aims to evaluate and compare the results of inguinal herniorrhaphy with mesh in classic and preperitoneal method. Methods. Our study community includes 150 candidate patients for inguinal herniorrhaphy with mesh. Totally, 150 candidate patients for inguinal herniorrhaphy were randomly divided into two groups: (1) classic group in which the floor of the canal was repaired and the mesh was located on the floor of the canal and (2) preperitoneal group in which the mesh was installed under the canal and then the floor was repaired. Results. The frequency of recurrence was 10 (13.3%) and 2 (2.66%) in the classic and preperitoneal group, respectively. The frequency of postsurgical pain was 21 (28%) in the classic group and 9 (12%) in the preperitoneal group. The postsurgical hematoma was observed in 7 (9.3%) and 9 (12%) in the classic and preperitoneal group, respectively. Also, the frequency of postsurgical seroma was 8 (10.7%) and 1 (1.3%) in the patients treated with the classic and preperitoneal method, respectively. Conclusion. The findings of the present study demonstrated that the preperitoneal method is a more suitable method for inguinal herniorrhaphy than the classic one because of fewer complications, according to the findings of this study. PMID:28232939

  13. The impact of nutritional status and appetite on the hospital length of stay and postoperative complications in elderly patients with severe aortic stenosis before aortic valve replacement

    PubMed Central

    Jagielak, Dariusz; Wernio, Edyta; Bramlage, Peter; Gruchała-Niedoszytko, Marta; Rogowski, Jan; Małgorzewicz, Sylwia

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Severe aortic stenosis (AS) is associated with the reduction of physical activity and muscle mass and may be associated with decreased appetite. Aim To assess the nutritional status and the impact of nutritional status and appetite on the hospital length of stay and postoperative complications in elderly patients with severe AS before aortic valve replacement. Material and methods Ninety-nine patients (55 male, 44 female; 74.3 ±5.2 years old) with severe AS and an indication for aortic valve replacement (AVR) were included. The nutritional status was assessed by different questionnaires (7-point Subjective Global Assessment Score – 7-SGA, full-Mini Nutritional Assessment – full-MNA) and anthropometric measurements (body mass index (BMI) kg/m2). Body composition was estimated using multi-frequency bioelectrical impedance analysis. Appetite was assessed by the Simplified Nutrition Assessment Questionnaire (SNAQ). Results The average BMI of patients was 28.8 ±5.8 kg/m2. Results of the 7-SGA and f-MNA questionnaires revealed that 39 patients (39.4%) were at risk of malnutrition. The mean SNAQ score was 15.8 ±1.8. The average length of hospital stay was 10 ±5.8 days. There was a positive correlation of LOS with age (r = 0.26, p = 0.03) and a negative correlation with fat mass (kg) (r = –0.28, p = 0.04) and BMI (r = –0.22, p = 0.03). Postoperative complications were observed in 37 patients (37.4%). Patients who developed complications were older and had poorer nutritional status according to the results of the 7-SGA. Conclusions Despite many patients undergoing AVR being overweight and obese, a considerable proportion displayed clinical signs of malnutrition. The results suggest that an assessment of nutritional status and appetite in this group of patients should be conducted regularly and that the 7-SGA scale could represent a reliable tool to assess malnutrition. PMID:27516781

  14. Comparison Study between Conventional Sequence and Slice-Encoding Metal Artifact Correction (SEMAC) in the Diagnosis of Postoperative Complications in Patients Receiving Lumbar Inter-Body Fusion and Pedicle Screw Fixation Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Han, Sol Bee; Kwon, Jong Won

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose Slice-Encoding Metal Artifact Correction (SEMAC) sequence is one of the metal artifact reduction techniques of anatomical structure, but there has been no report about evaluation of post-operative complications. The purpose of this article is to compare the anatomical visibility between fast spin echo (FSE) and FSE-SEMAC and to evaluate the additional value of FSE-SEMAC in diagnostic confidence of the complications. Materials and Methods We conducted a retrospective study with 54 patients who received lumbar spinal surgery and MR images including FSE-SEMAC. For the semi-quantitative evaluation, the visibility of anatomical structures (neural foramen, bone-inter-body cage interface, central canal, nerve root in epidural space, back muscle, and bone-pedicle screw interface) was evaluated. For qualitative evaluation, we evaluated FSE and FSE with FSE-SEMAC independently, and recorded the diagnostic confidence level of post-operative complications. Generalized estimating equation regression analysis was used for statistical analysis, and a weighted kappa was used for inter-observer agreement. Results Scores of 6 imaging findings with FSE-SEMAC were significantly higher than that of FSE (P-value < .0001). Inter-observer agreements show good reliability (weighted kappa = 0.45–0.75). Both reviewers deemed 37 (reviewer 1) or 19 more (reviewer 2) post-operative complications with FSE plus FSE-SEMAC, compared to FSE only. Except for central canal stenosis (P-value = .2408), diagnostic confidence level for other post-operative complications were significantly higher with FSE plus FSE-SEMAC (P-value = .0000) than FSE. Conclusions FSE-SEMAC significantly reduces image distortion, compared to FSE sequence in 3.0-T MR. Also, diagnostic confidence for post-operative complications was higher when FSE with additional FSE-SEMAC compared to FSE only. PMID:27711137

  15. Incidence, Predictors, and Postoperative Complications of Blood Transfusion in Thoracic and Lumbar Fusion Surgery: An Analysis of 13,695 Patients from the American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program Database.

    PubMed

    Aoude, Ahmed; Nooh, Anas; Fortin, Maryse; Aldebeyan, Sultan; Jarzem, Peter; Ouellet, Jean; Weber, Michael H

    2016-12-01

    Study Design Retrospective cohort study. Objective To identify predictive factors for blood transfusion and associated complications in lumbar and thoracic fusion surgeries. Methods The American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program (ACS-NSQIP) database was used to identify patients who underwent lumbar or thoracic fusion from 2010 to 2013. Multivariate analysis was used to determine predictive factors and postoperative complications associated with transfusion. Results Out of 13,695 patients, 13,170 had lumbar fusion and 525 had thoracic fusion. The prevalence of transfusion was 31.8% for thoracic and 17.0% for lumbar fusion. The multivariate analysis showed that age between 50 and 60, age between 61 and 70, age > 70, dyspnea, American Society of Anesthesiologists class 3, bleeding disease, multilevel surgery, extended surgical time, return to operation room, and higher preoperative blood urea nitrogen (BUN) were predictors of blood transfusion for lumbar fusion. Multilevel surgery, preoperative BUN, and extended surgical time were predictors of transfusion for thoracic fusion. Patients receiving transfusions who underwent lumbar fusion were more likely to develop wound infection, venous thromboembolism, pulmonary embolism, and myocardial infarction and had longer hospital stay. Patients receiving transfusions who underwent thoracic fusion were more likely to have extended hospital stay. Conclusion This study characterizes incidence, predictors, and postoperative complications associated with blood transfusion in thoracic and lumbar fusion. Pre- and postoperative planning for patients deemed to be at high risk of requiring blood transfusion might reduce postoperative complications in this population.

  16. A Single Dose of Amoxicillin and Dexamethasone for Prevention of Postoperative Complications in Third Molar Surgery: A Randomized, Double-Blind, Placebo Controlled Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Bortoluzzi, Marcelo Carlos; Capella, Diogo Lenzi; Barbieri, Tharzon; Pagliarini, Micheli; Cavalieri, Talita; Manfro, Rafael

    2013-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to assess the efficacy of a single prophylactic dose of amoxicillin and/or dexamethasone in preventing postoperative complications (PC) after a surgical removal of a single mandibular third molar (M3). Methods This study is a randomized, placebo controlled clinical trial. Four groups were included: Group 1 (G1) included a prophylactic dose of 2 g of amoxicillin and 8 mg of dexamethasone; Group 2 (G2) included a prophylactic dose of 2 g of amoxicillin and 8 mg of placebo; Group 3 (G3) included a prophylactic dose of 8 mg of dexamethasone and 2 g of placebo and; Group 4 (G4) placebo. Results Fifty patients were included. It was observed one case of alveolar infection (2%) and two of alveolar osteitis (4%) resulting in three PC (6%). No statistical differences were observed between therapeutic groups for development of PC, trismus, pain and edema. The use of antibiotics showed an absolute risk reduction (ARR) for PC development of 3.52% and the number needed to treat (NNT) was 29. Conclusion Prophylactic antibiotics and corticoid in a single dose regimen did not bring any benefit on M3 surgeries. PMID:23390473

  17. Infectious Uveitis

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Infectious uveitis is one of the most common and visually devastating causes of uveitis in the US and worldwide. This review provides a summary of the identification, treatment, and complications associated with certain forms of viral, bacterial, fungal, helminthic, and parasitic uveitis. In particular, this article reviews the literature on identification and treatment of acute retinal necrosis due to herpes simplex virus, varicella virus, and cytomegalovirus. While no agreed-upon treatment has been identified, the characteristics of Ebola virus panuveitis is also reviewed. In addition, forms of parasitic infection such as Toxoplasmosis and Toxocariasis are summarized, as well as spirochetal uveitis. Syphilitic retinitis is reviewed given its increase in prevalence over the last decade. The importance of early identification and treatment of infectious uveitis is emphasized. Early identification can be achieved with a combination of maintaining a high suspicion, recognizing certain clinical features, utilizing multi-modal imaging, and obtaining specimens for molecular diagnostic testing. PMID:26618074

  18. Immunreconstitution and Infectious Complications After Rituximab Treatment in Children and Adolescents: What Do We Know and What Can We Learn from Adults?

    PubMed Central

    Worch, Jennifer; Makarova, Olga; Burkhardt, Birgit

    2015-01-01

    Rituximab, an anti CD20 monoclonal antibody, is widely used in the treatment of B-cell malignancies in adults and increasingly in pediatric patients. By depleting B-cells, rituximab interferes with humoral immunity. This review provides a comprehensive overview of immune reconstitution and infectious complications after rituximab treatment in children and adolescents. Immune reconstitution starts usually after six months with recovery to normal between nine to twelve months. Extended rituximab treatment results in a prolonged recovery of B-cells without an increase of clinically relevant infections. The kinetic of B-cell recovery is influenced by the concomitant chemotherapy and the underlying disease. Intensive B-NHL treatment such as high-dose chemotherapy followed by rituximab bears a risk for prolonged hypogammaglobulinemia. Overall transient alteration of immune reconstitution and infections after rituximab treatment are acceptable for children and adolescent without significant differences compared to adults. However, age related disparities in the kinetic of immune reconstitution and the definitive role of rituximab in the treatment for children and adolescents with B-cell malignancies need to be evaluated in prospective controlled clinical trials. PMID:25643241

  19. Infectious Complications After Burn Injury,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-01-01

    and burn wound Epidemiology of infection sepsis’ through the use of effective topical antimicrobial agents and timely excision and grafting have...and early closure of the burn woundthe epidemiology of infection have occurred, resulting in have become standard practice; at the same time, the a...airway and gastrointestinal tract. vasive wound infection , endocarditis , or suppurative Perioperative antibiotic use. thrombophlebitis are common causes

  20. Piezoelectric compared with conventional rotary osteotomy for the prevention of postoperative sequelae and complications after surgical extraction of mandibular third molars: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Badenoch-Jones, E K; David, M; Lincoln, T

    2016-12-01

    The purpose of this review was to determine if postoperative sequelae (facial swelling, trismus, pain) and neurological complications are reduced when mandibular third molars are surgically extracted using a piezoelectric device for osteotomy compared with conventional rotary burs, and to determine if there is a difference in operating time between the two techniques. Clinical trials were identified through a search (April 2015) on the PubMed, EMBASE, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) and Google Scholar databases. Studies were assessed by study type, characteristics of participants, sample size, surgical technique, cointerventions, outcomes, risk of bias, and findings. We calculated a Grading of Recommendations, Assessment, Development, and Evaluation (GRADE) rating of confidence in the effect estimates. We identified 2515 citations and found 15 eligible clinical trials. Patients who had osteotomies with the piezoelectric device had less facial swelling (standard mean difference -1.15; 95% CI -2.02 to -0.27; p<0.0001), trismus (greater maximum mouth opening, standard mean difference 0.78; 95% CI 0.56 to 1.00; p=0.33) and pain (standard mean difference -0.84; 95% CI -1.55 to -0.13; p<0.0001) at day 1, less facial swelling at day 7 (standard mean difference -0.98; 95% CI -1.52 to -0.44; p=0.05), and a reduced risk of neurological complications (odds ratio (OR) 0.28; 95% CI 0.09 to 0.89; p=0.79). Trismus at day 7 and pain at day 5 did not differ significantly between the two methods. Operating time was longer with the piezoelectric device (standard mean difference 0.83; 95% CI 0.57 to 1.09; p=0.001). The confidence in the effect estimates was low or very low across all outcomes. The findings raise the possibility of an improved clinical healing response to osteotomy with the piezoelectric device compared with one done with conventional rotary burs for surgical extractions of mandibular third molars.

  1. [Effects of a Kampo medicine on postoperative infection].

    PubMed

    Iwagaki, Hiromi; Saito, Shinya

    2013-09-01

    We studied the effects of preoperative administration of Hochuekkito (TJ-41) on the host response of patients undergoing gastrectomy or colectomy in a prospective, randomized, multicenter clinical trial. Forty-eight patients were randomized into two groups: one received 7.5 g/day of TJ-41 for 7 days before surgery (n = 22); and the other served as the control group (n = 26). The body temperature and pulse rate in patients in the TJ41 group were significantly better controlled during the study compared with those in the control group. The concentration of serum cortisol on the first postoperative day in the TJ-41 group was also significantly lower compared with that in the control group. These results clearly indicate that the preoperative administration of TJ-41 may ameliorate an excessive postoperative inflammatory response and prolonged immunosuppressed state, resulting in fewer postoperative infectious complications.

  2. Total Psoas Area Predicts Complications following Radical Cystectomy

    PubMed Central

    Lyon, Timothy D.; Farber, Nicholas J.; Chen, Leo C.; Fuller, Thomas W.; Davies, Benjamin J.; Gingrich, Jeffrey R.; Hrebinko, Ronald L.; Maranchie, Jodi K.; Taylor, Jennifer M.; Tarin, Tatum V.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. To determine whether total psoas area (TPA), a simple estimate of muscle mass, is associated with complications after radical cystectomy. Materials and Methods. Patients who underwent radical cystectomy at our institution from 2011 to 2012 were retrospectively identified. Total psoas area was measured on preoperative CT scans and normalized for patient height. Multivariable logistic regression was used to determine whether TPA was a predictor of 90-day postoperative complications. Overall survival was compared between TPA quartiles. Results. 135 patients were identified for analysis. Median follow-up was 24 months (IQR: 6–37 months). Overall 90-day complication rate was 56% (75/135). TPA was significantly lower for patients who experienced any complication (7.8 cm2/m2 versus 8.8 cm2/m2, P = 0.023) and an infectious complication (7.0 cm2/m2 versus 8.7 cm2/m2, P = 0.032) than those who did not. On multivariable analysis, TPA (adjusted OR 0.70 (95% CI 0.56–0.89), P = 0.003) and Charlson comorbidity index (adjusted OR 1.34 (95% CI 1.01–1.79), P = 0.045) were independently associated with 90-day complications. TPA was not a predictor of overall survival. Conclusions. Low TPA is associated with infectious complications and is an independent predictor of experiencing a postoperative complication following radical cystectomy. PMID:26798336

  3. Postoperative permanent pressure alopecia.

    PubMed

    Chang, Zi Yun; Ngian, Jan; Chong, Claudia; Chong, Chin Ted; Liew, Qui Yin

    2016-04-01

    A 49-year-old Chinese female underwent elective laparoscopic assisted Whipple's surgery lasting 12 h. This was complicated by postoperative pressure alopecia at the occipital area of the scalp. Pressure-induced hair loss after general anaesthesia is uncommon and typically temporary, but may be disconcerting to the patient. We report this case of postoperative permanent pressure alopecia due to its rarity in the anaesthesia/local literature, and review the risk factors for its development.

  4. [Characteristics of postoperative peritonitis].

    PubMed

    Lock, J F; Eckmann, C; Germer, C-T

    2016-01-01

    Postoperative peritonitis is still a life-threatening complication after abdominal surgery and approximately 10,000 patients annually develop postoperative peritonitis in Germany. Early recognition and diagnosis before the onset of sepsis has remained a clinical challenge as no single specific screening test is available. The aim of therapy is a rapid and effective control of the source of infection and antimicrobial therapy. After diagnosis of diffuse postoperative peritonitis surgical revision is usually inevitable after intestinal interventions. Peritonitis after liver, biliary or pancreatic surgery is managed as a rule by means of differentiated therapy approaches depending on the severity.

  5. [Non-invasive mechanical ventilation in postoperative patients. A clinical review].

    PubMed

    Esquinas, A M; Jover, J L; Úbeda, A; Belda, F J

    2015-11-01

    Non-invasive ventilation (NIV) is a method of ventilatory support that is increasing in importance day by day in the management of postoperative respiratory failure. Its role in the prevention and treatment of atelectasis is particularly important in the in the period after thoracic and abdominal surgeries. Similarly, in the transplanted patient, NIV can shorten the time of invasive mechanical ventilation, reducing the risk of infectious complications in these high-risk patients. It has been performed A systematic review of the literature has been performed, including examining the technical, clinical experiences and recommendations concerning the application of NIV in the postoperative period.

  6. [Management of postoperative pancreatic fistula].

    PubMed

    Hackert, T; Büchler, M W

    2015-06-01

    The occurrence of a postoperative pancreatic fistula is one of the most important complications following pancreatic resections. The frequency of this complication varies between 3 % after pancreatic head resection and up to 35 % following distal pancreatectomy. In 2005, the international definition of postoperative pancreatic fistula was standardized according to the approach of the International Study Group of Pancreatic Surgery (ISGPS) including an A-C grading system of the severity. Consequently, results from different studies have become comparable and the historically reported fistula rates can be evaluated more critically. The present review summarises the currently available data on incidence, risk factors, fistula-associated complications and management of postoperative pancreatic fistula.

  7. Postoperative continuous wound infusion of ropivacaine has comparable analgesic effects and fewer complications as compared to traditional patient-controlled analgesia with sufentanil in patients undergoing non-cardiac thoracotomy

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Fang-Fang; Liu, Xiao-Ming; Liu, Xiao-Yu; Tang, Jun; Jin, Li; Li, Wei-Yan; Zhang, Li-Dong

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To compare the postoperative analgesic effects of continuous wound infusion of ropivacaine with traditional patient-controlled analgesia (PCA) with sufentanil after non-cardiac thoracotomy. Methods: One hundred and twenty adult patients undergoing open thoracotomy were recruited into this assessor-blinded, randomized study. Patients were randomly assigned to receive analgesia through a wound catheter placed below the fascia and connected to a 2 ml/h ropivacaine 0.5% (RWI group) or sufentanil PCA (SPCA group). Analgesia continued for 48 h. Visual analogue scores (VAS) at rest and movement, Ramsay scores and adverse effects were recorded at 2, 8, 12, 24, 36 and 48 h after surgery. Three months after discharge, patient’s satisfaction, residual pain and surgical wound complications were assessed. Results: General characteristics of patients were comparable between two groups. There were no statistical differences in the VAS scores and postoperative pethidine consumption between two groups (P > 0.05). However, when compared with SPCA group, the incidences of drowsiness, dizziness and respiratory depression, ICU stay and hospital expenditure reduced significantly in RWI group (P < 0.05). Patients’ satisfaction with pain management was also improved markedly in RWI group (P < 0.05). Conclusion: Continuous wound infusion with ropivacaine is effective for postoperative analgesia and has comparable effects to traditional PCA with sufentanil. Furthermore, this therapy may also reduce the incidences of drowsiness, dizziness, respiratory depression and decrease the ICU stay and hospital expenditure. PMID:26131121

  8. [Community acquired pneumonia in children: Treatment of complicated cases and risk patients. Consensus statement by the Spanish Society of Paediatric Infectious Diseases (SEIP) and the Spanish Society of Paediatric Chest Diseases (SENP)].

    PubMed

    Moreno-Pérez, D; Andrés Martín, A; Tagarro García, A; Escribano Montaner, A; Figuerola Mulet, J; García García, J J; Moreno-Galdó, A; Rodrigo Gonzalo de Lliria, C; Saavedra Lozano, J

    2015-09-01

    The incidence of community-acquired pneumonia complications has increased during the last decade. According to the records from several countries, empyema and necrotizing pneumonia became more frequent during the last few years. The optimal therapeutic approach for such conditions is still controversial. Both pharmacological management (antimicrobials and fibrinolysis), and surgical management (pleural drainage and video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery), are the subject of continuous assessment. In this paper, the Spanish Society of Paediatric Infectious Diseases and the Spanish Society of Paediatric Chest Diseases have reviewed the available evidence. Consensus treatment guidelines are proposed for complications of community-acquired pneumonia in children, focusing on parapneumonic pleural effusion. Recommendations are also provided for the increasing population of patients with underlying diseases and immunosuppression.

  9. Postpancreatectomy Complications and Management.

    PubMed

    Malleo, Giuseppe; Vollmer, Charles M

    2016-12-01

    Although mortality rates after pancreatectomy have decreased, the incidence of postoperative morbidity remains high. The major procedure-related complications are pancreatic fistula, delayed gastric emptying, and postpancreatectomy hemorrhage. The International Study Group of Pancreatic Surgery defined leading complications in a standardized fashion, allowing unbiased comparison of operative results and management strategies. Risk factors for postoperative complications have been investigated and quantitative scoring systems established to estimate patient-specific risks. Management of postpancreatectomy complications has shifted from an operative to a conservative approach. Nevertheless, postoperative morbidities may have a profound impact on patient recovery and length of hospital stay and are associated with increased hospital costs.

  10. [Postoperative hypothyroidism].

    PubMed

    Olifirova, O S; Trynov, N N

    2015-01-01

    There is a number of factors such as the thyroidectomy and limiting subtotal thyroid resection against the background of euthyroidism and initial hypothyroidism (in any extent of operation) which leads to the prediction of early postoperative hypothyroidism origin during 10 days of the postoperative peri- od. The early postoperative hypothyroidism is accompanied by activation processes of lipid peroxide oxidation and at the same time by reduction of antioxidant protection.

  11. Management of postoperative spinal infections

    PubMed Central

    Hegde, Vishal; Meredith, Dennis S; Kepler, Christopher K; Huang, Russel C

    2012-01-01

    Postoperative surgical site infection (SSI) is a common complication after posterior lumbar spine surgery. This review details an approach to the prevention, diagnosis and treatment of SSIs. Factors contributing to the development of a SSI can be split into three categories: (1) microbiological factors; (2) factors related to the patient and their spinal pathology; and (3) factors relating to the surgical procedure. SSI is most commonly caused by Staphylococcus aureus. The virulence of the organism causing the SSI can affect its presentation. SSI can be prevented by careful adherence to aseptic technique, prophylactic antibiotics, avoiding myonecrosis by frequently releasing retractors and preoperatively optimizing modifiable patient factors. Increasing pain is commonly the only symptom of a SSI and can lead to a delay in diagnosis. C-reactive protein and magnetic resonance imaging can help establish the diagnosis. Treatment requires acquiring intra-operative cultures to guide future antibiotic therapy and surgical debridement of all necrotic tissue. A SSI can usually be adequately treated without removing spinal instrumentation. A multidisciplinary approach to SSIs is important. It is useful to involve an infectious disease specialist and use minimum serial bactericidal titers to enhance the effectiveness of antibiotic therapy. A plastic surgeon should also be involved in those cases of severe infection that require repeat debridement and delayed closure. PMID:23330073

  12. Infectious disease

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pierson, Duane L.

    1990-01-01

    This is a collection of viewgraphs on the Johnson Space Center's work on infectious disease. It addresses their major concern over outbreaks of infectious disease that could jeopardize the health, safety and/or performance of crew members engaged in long duration space missions. The Antarctic environment is seen as an analogous location on Earth and a good place to carry out such infectious disease studies and methods for proposed studies as suggested.

  13. Effect of low-dose dexketoprofen trometamol and paracetamol on postoperative complications after impacted third molar surgery on healthy volunteers: A pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Durmus, Ercan; Kiresi, Demet

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of the present study was to investigate the analgesic and anti-inflammatory effects of dexketoprofen trometamol (DT) and paracetamol on deep acute somatic pain and inflammation in patients undergoing impacted third molar surgery. This study was planned to present benefits that we could obtain with low burden of drug. Study Design: Effects of drugs, which were administered preemptively before the procedure, on pain, mouth-opening limitation, and swelling were assessed by visual analogue scale (VAS), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and mouth-opening measurement. Following surgery, time intervals when the patients first need to receive the drug were measured. Results: The VAS scores of the patients were lower in the side treated with DT than that in the paracetamol treated side. There was no significant difference between the groups in terms of mouth-opening limitation. MRI recordings revealed that swelling was lower in the side treated with paracetamol than DT treated side. Conclusions: Administration of the drugs before surgery contributed to the postoperative patient comfort. The analgesic activity of 12.5 mg dose of DT was similar to, even better than, the analgesic activity of 500 mg dose of paracetamol; however, DT had insufficient anti-inflammatory efficacy. Key words:Dexketoprofen trometamol, paracetamol, magnetic resonance imaging. PMID:25129247

  14. Effects of Dietary Honey andArdehCombination on Chemotherapy- Induced Gastrointestinal and Infectious Complications in Patients with Acute Myeloid Leukemia: A Double-Blind Randomized Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Ebrahimi, Mahmoud; Allahyari, Abolghasem; Ebrahimi, Mohsen; Hesam, Hesam; Hosseini, Golkoo; Karimi, Mohammad; Rezaiean, Amin; Kazemi, Mohammad Reza

    2016-01-01

    We aimed to investigate the effects of dietary combination of honey and Ardeh on chemotherapy-induced complications in patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML). A total of 107 AML patients who underwent chemotherapy for at least 30 consecutive dayswere recruited to this double-blind randomized placebo-controlled clinical-trial which was conducted in the Imam Reza and Ghaem teaching hospitals (Mashhad, Iran). They weredivided into two age and sex-matched groups: 58 treated and 49 untreated patients. A combination of 50 grams of honey and 150 grams of Ardehwas added to the treated group’s diet for 30consecutive days, three times each day; while the untreated group received their regular diet.Both groups received their standard medication for AML as well. After one month, they were all examined and lab tests were done on them by an internist and laboratory technicians who were blinded to the subject allocations. Mean value of WBC count in treated group was significantly lower than that of untreated group. Duration of fever and admission in the hospital due to fever were both significantly lower in the treated group (P=0.014, P=0.032 respectively). Total gastrointestinal complications were significantly less in the treated group one month after therapy with the special honey and Ardeh compound.No unusual or unexpected side effects were observed. Honey and Ardehare easily accessible materials that can be helpfully administered in AML patientsreceiving chemotherapy, since their useful effects in ameliorating gastrointestinal complications and reducingfever and neutropenia in AML patients have been shown. PMID:27642340

  15. Intra-Abdominal Complications after Curative Gastrectomies Worsen Prognoses of Patients with Stage II–III Gastric Cancer

    PubMed Central

    A.T.M. Abdul, Kader; Murakami, Yuki; Yoshimoto, Miwa; Onishi, Kazunari; Kuroda, Hirohiko; Matsunaga, Tomoyuki; Fukumoto, Yoji; Takano, Shuichi; Tokuyasu, Naruo; Osaki, Tomohiro; Saito, Hiroaki; Ikeguchi, Masahide

    2016-01-01

    Background Postoperative complications have been shown to worsen prognoses of various cancer types. Methods We retrospectively analyzed 265 patients with stage II-III gastric cancer who underwent curative gastrectomies between 1991 and 2010 at Tottori University Hospital to determine the effect of postoperative intra-abdominal complication (IAC) on prognosis. Results Of the 265 patients, 38 (14.3%) developed postoperative IACs of grade ≥ 2, of whom significantly more patients were male. Patients in the IAC group were significantly older than patients in the non-complication (NC) group. The NC group had significantly better survival than did the IAC group (P < 0.0001). Within the IAC group, 5-year survival rates did not significantly differ between patients with infectious complication subgroup (24.6%) and the non-infectious subgroup (46.2%). Grade of complication was not related to prognosis. Lengths of time before starting adjuvant chemotherapy (AC) after surgery were significantly longer for the IAC group (55.3 ± 34.7 days) than for the NC group: (26.6 ± 11.9 days; P = 0.0023). Prognosis of patients who took AC within 6 weeks after surgery tended to be better than that of patients who took AC > 6 weeks after surgery (P = 0.071). In multivariate analysis, IAC was an independent predictor of prognosis, as were age, invasion depth, and lymph node metastasis. Conclusion Postoperative IACs were related to poorer survival for patients with stage II–III gastric cancer. PMID:27708536

  16. Infectious Arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... something that has bacteria on it. To diagnose infectious arthritis, your health care provider may do tests of your blood, urine, and joint fluid. Treatment includes medicines and sometimes surgery.

  17. Postoperative patient-controlled epidural analgesia in patients with spondylodiscitis and posterior spinal fusion surgery.

    PubMed

    Gessler, Florian; Mutlak, Haitham; Tizi, Karima; Senft, Christian; Setzer, Matthias; Seifert, Volker; Weise, Lutz

    2016-06-01

    OBJECTIVE The value of postoperative epidural analgesia after major spinal surgery is well established. Thus far, the use of patient-controlled epidural analgesia (PCEA) has been denied to patients undergoing debridement and instrumentation in spondylodiscitis, with the risk of increased postoperative pain resulting in prolonged recovery. The value of PCEA with special regard to infectious complications remains to be clarified. The present study examined the value of postoperative PCEA in comparison with intravenous analgesia in patients with spondylodiscitis undergoing posterior spinal surgery. METHODS Thirty-two patients treated surgically for spondylodiscitis of the thoracic and lumbar spine were prospectively included in a database and retrospectively reviewed for this study. Postoperative antibiotic treatment, functional capacity, pain levels, side effects, and complications were documented. Sixteen patients were given patient-demanded intravenous analgesia (PIA) followed by 16 patients assigned to PCEA. If PCEA was applied, the insertion of an epidural catheter was performed under the direct visual guidance of the surgeon at the end of the surgery. RESULTS Three patients intended for PCEA treatment were excluded due to predefined exclusion criteria. Postoperative pain was significantly lower in the PCEA group during the first 48 hours after surgery (p = 0.03). As determined by the trunk control test conducted at 8 (p < 0.001), 24 (p = 0.004), 48 (p = 0.015), 72 (p = 0.0031), and 96 hours (p < 0.001), patients in the PCEA treatment group displayed significantly increased mobilization capacity compared with those of the PIA group. Time until normal accomplishment of all mobilization maneuvers was reduced in the PCEA group compared with that in the PIA group (p = 0.04). No differences in complication rates were observed between the 2 groups (p = 0.52). CONCLUSIONS PCEA may reduce postoperative pain and lead to earlier achievement of functional capacity at a low

  18. Imaging of the Postoperative Orbit.

    PubMed

    Learned, Kim O; Nasseri, Farbod; Mohan, Suyash

    2015-08-01

    Imaging evaluation of the postoperative orbit remains challenging even for the expert neuroradiologist. This article provides a simplified framework for understanding the complex postoperative appearances of the orbit, in an attempt to enhance the diagnostic accuracy of postoperative computed tomography and MR imaging of the orbit. Readers are familiarized with the normal appearances of common eye procedures and orbit reconstructions to help avoid interpretative pitfalls. Also reviewed are imaging features of common surgical complications, and evaluation of residual/recurrent neoplasm in the setting of oncologic imaging surveillance.

  19. [Postoperative imaging of the shoulder].

    PubMed

    Wörtler, K; Rummeny, E J

    2004-06-01

    Correct interpretation of imaging findings in the postoperative shoulder is impaired by surgical distortion of normal anatomy and possible artifacts. Advanced postoperative imaging of the shoulder in addition to the selection of the best suited modality necessitates familiarity with the surgical procedure that has been performed and its consecutive morphological changes. This article reviews the most common arthroscopic and open techniques used for treatment of shoulder instability, lesions of the superior labral-bicipital complex, primary impingement, and rotator cuff tears, their typical postoperative imaging findings, as well as the diagnostic performance of cross sectional imaging techniques in the detection of recurrent lesions and complications.

  20. Postoperative Complications Leading to Death after Coagulum Pyelolithotomy in a Tetraplegic Patient: Can We Prevent Prolonged Ileus, Recurrent Intestinal Obstruction due to Adhesions Requiring Laparotomies, Chest Infection Warranting Tracheostomy, and Mechanical Ventilation?

    PubMed Central

    Vaidyanathan, Subramanian; Soni, Bakul; Singh, Gurpreet; Hughes, Peter

    2013-01-01

    A 22-year-old male sustained C-6 tetraplegia in 1992. In 1993, intravenous pyelography revealed normal kidneys. Suprapubic cystostomy was performed. He underwent open cystolithotomy in 2004 and 2008. In 2009, computed tomography revealed bilateral renal calculi. Coagulum pyelolithotomy of left kidney was performed. Pleura and peritoneum were opened. Peritoneum could not be closed. Following surgery, he developed pulmonary atelectasis; he required tracheostomy and mechanical ventilation. He did not tolerate nasogastric feeding. CT of abdomen revealed bilateral renal calculi and features of proximal small bowel obstruction. Laparotomy revealed small bowel obstruction due to dense inflammatory adhesions involving multiple small bowel loops which protruded through the defect in sigmoid mesocolon and fixed posteriorly over the area of previous intervention. All adhesions were divided. The wide defect in mesocolon was not closed. In 2010, this patient again developed vomiting and distension of abdomen. Laparotomy revealed multiple adhesions. He developed chest infection and required ventilatory support again. He developed pressure sores and depression. Later abdominal symptoms recurred. This patient's general condition deteriorated and he expired in 2011. Conclusion. Risk of postoperative complications could have been reduced if minimally invasive surgery had been performed instead of open surgery to remove stones from left kidney. Suprapubic cystostomy predisposed to repeated occurrence of stones in urinary bladder and kidneys. Spinal cord physicians should try to establish intermittent catheterisation regime in tetraplegic patients. PMID:23533931

  1. Postoperative astigmatism.

    PubMed

    Swinger, C A

    1987-01-01

    With the numerous significant advances in surgical methodology--e.g., microinstrumentation, the operating microscope, the surgical keratometer, and intraocular lenses--that have been developed over the past two decades, both surgeons and patients have become increasingly aware of the final optic result of any surgical intervention. This is especially so since the development of refractive surgery, where good uncorrected vision is frequently the final arbiter of success. We have progressed to the stage where the optic manipulation of the cornea, whether intentional or otherwise, can be understood in terms of a number of variables. These include the preparation and closure of the surgical wound, the choice of suture material, and both intraoperative and postoperative manipulations. Where these have failed and postoperative astigmatism still occurs, a number of surgical procedures are available to reduce the astigmatic error to an acceptable level.

  2. Infectious Diseases

    MedlinePlus

    ... that contain genetic material, and use your own cells to multiply Fungi - primitive plants, like mushrooms or mildew Protozoa - one-celled animals that use other living things for food and a place to live NIH: National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

  3. Incidence of Perioperative Complications Following Resection of Adrenocortical Carcinoma and Its Association with Long-Term Survival

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yuhree; Tran, Thuy B.; Postlewait, Lauren M.; Maithel, Shishir K.; Wang, Tracy S.; Evans, Douglas B.; Hatzaras, Ioannis; Shenoy, Rivfka; Phay, John E.; Keplinger, Kara; Fields, Ryan C.; Moses, Lindsey E.; Weber, Sharon M.; Salem, Ahmed; Sicklick, Jason K.; Gad, Shady; Yopp, Adam C.; Mansour, John C.; Duh, Quan-Yang; Seiser, Natalie; Solorzano, Carmen C.; Kiernan, Colleen M.; Votanopoulos, Konstantinos I.; Levine, Edward A.; Poultsides, George A.; Pawlik, Timothy M.

    2016-01-01

    Background The association of postoperative complications with long-term oncologic outcomes remains unclear. We sought to determine the incidence of complications among patients who underwent surgery for adrenocortical carcinoma (ACC) and define the relationship of morbidity with long-term survival. Methods Patients who underwent surgery for ACC between 1993 and 2014 were identified from 13 academic institutions participating in the US ACC group study. The incidence and type of the postoperative complications, the factors associated with them as well their association with long-term survival were analyzed. Results A total of 265 patients with median age of 52 years (IQR 44–63) were identified; at surgery, the majority of patients underwent an open abdominal procedure (n = 169, 66.8 %). A postoperative complication occurred in 99 patients for a morbidity of 37.4 %; five patients (1.9 %) died in hospital. Factors associated with morbidity included a thoraco-abdominal operative approach (reference: open abdominal; OR 2.85, 95 % CI 1.00–8.18), and a hormonally functional tumor (OR 3.56, 95 % CI 1.65–7.69) (all P < 0.05). Presence of any complication was associated with a worse long-term outcome (median survival: no complication, 58.9 months vs. any complication, 25.1 months; P = 0.009). In multivariate analysis, after adjusting for patient- and disease-related factors postoperative infectious complications independently predicted shorter overall survival (hazard ratio (HR) 5.56, 95 % CI 2.24–13.80; P < 0.001). Conclusion Postoperative complications were independently associated with decreased long-term survival after resection for ACC. The prevention of complications may be important from an oncologic perspective. PMID:26546184

  4. Infectious Achilles Tendinitis After Local Injection of Human Placental Extracts: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yoon-Chung; Ahn, Jae Hoon; Kim, Man-Soo

    2015-01-01

    Local injections of corticosteroids or human placental extracts are sometimes used for the treatment of resistant tendinitis or fasciitis. We report a case of infectious Achilles tendinitis complicated by calcaneal osteomyelitis after injection of human placental extracts for the Achilles tendinitis. She was treated with excision of the infected bone and tendon, followed by V-Y lengthening of the proximal portion of the Achilles tendon in a single stage. At 2 years postoperative, she remained symptom free without any signs of recurrence, and the follow-up magnetic resonance imaging scan demonstrated a well-maintained Achilles tendon with normal signal intensity.

  5. Epidural Analgesia in the Postoperative Period

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-10-01

    violations. VI ABSTRACT Postoperative pain is an unwanted side effect of surgery, and is associated with many postoperative complications...This descriptive study was conducted to determine which surgical patients experienced the most analgesia with the fewest side effects when...epidural medication, side effects , incidence of breakthrough pain, and treatments were recorded and cross-tabulated. The following surgical categories

  6. Infectious Mononucleosis: Recognition and Management in Athletes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eichner, Edward R.

    1987-01-01

    Infectious mononucleosis strikes many young athletes. Considered here are its epidemiology, pathophysiology, diagnosis, natural course, complications, and management. The focus is on concerns of athletes with a perspective on personality, convalescence, and chronic fatigue. (Author/MT)

  7. The postanesthetic period. Complications.

    PubMed

    Malamed, S F

    1987-01-01

    Postanesthetic complications can occur even in the best of circumstances. Proper preparation of the staff, aggressive monitoring of the recovering patient, and early recognition and management of the complications are essential if the outcome is to be successful. In reviewing postanesthetic complications, two factors are present in the overwhelming majority of situations--hypoxia and hypercarbia--often the direct result of inadequate monitoring during the postanesthetic period. The anesthetic procedure is not over once the anesthetic agents are discontinued. The skillful anesthetist is aware of the possibilities of postoperative complications and prevents problems by employing enhanced monitoring techniques during the recovery phase.

  8. Complications of prostate biopsy.

    PubMed

    Anastasiadis, Anastasios; Zapała, Lukasz; Cordeiro, Ernesto; Antoniewicz, Artur; Dimitriadis, Georgios; De Reijke, Theo

    2013-07-01

    Biopsy of the prostate is a common procedure with minor complications that are usually self-limited. However, if one considers that millions of men undergo biopsy worldwide, one realizes that although complication rate is low, the number of patients suffering from biopsy complications should not be underestimated and can be a clinically relevant problem for healthcare professionals. In this review, the authors present diagnosis and management of postbiopsy of prostate complications. Bleeding is the most common complication observed after prostate biopsy, but the use of aspirin or nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs is not an absolute contraindication to prostate biopsy. Emerging resistance to ciprofloxacin is the most probable cause of the increasing risk of infectious complications after prostate biopsy. Even though extremely rare, fatal complications are possible and were described in case reports.

  9. Postoperative hyperkalemia.

    PubMed

    Ayach, Taha; Nappo, Robert W; Paugh-Miller, Jennifer L; Ross, Edward A

    2015-03-01

    Hyperkalemia occurs frequently in hospitalized patients and is of particular concern for those who have undergone surgery, with postoperative care provided by clinicians of many disciplines. This review describes the normal physiology and how multiple perioperative factors can disrupt potassium homeostasis and lead to severe elevations in plasma potassium concentration. The pathophysiologic basis of diverse causes of hyperkalemia was used to broadly classify etiologies into those with altered potassium distribution (e.g. increased potassium release from cells or other transcellular shifts), reduced urinary excretion (e.g. reduced sodium delivery, volume depletion, and hypoaldosteronism), or an exogenous potassium load (e.g. blood transfusions). Surgical conditions of particular concern involve: rhabdomyolysis from malpositioning, trauma or medications; bariatric surgery; vascular procedures with tissue ischemia; acidosis; hypovolemia; and volume or blood product resuscitation. Certain acute conditions and chronic co-morbidities present particular risk. These include chronic kidney disease, diabetes mellitus, many outpatient preoperative medications (e.g. beta blockers, salt substitutes), and inpatient agents (e.g. succinylcholine, hyperosmolar volume expanders). Clinicians need to be aware of these pathophysiologic mechanisms for developing perioperative hyperkalemia as many of the risks can be minimized or avoided.

  10. Postoperative Necrotizing Scleritis: A Report of Four Cases

    PubMed Central

    Das, Sudipta; Saurabh, Kumar; Biswas, Jyotrimay

    2014-01-01

    Postoperative necrotizing scleritis should be considered in cases of persistent localized postoperative inflammation following all forms of surgical trauma. We present the history, clinical findings, and follow-up data of four patients with postoperative necrotizing scleritis. The clinical records of four patients who developed scleritis following ocular surgery were retrospectively reviewed. The first step in managing necrotizing scleritis is to rule out infectious etiology. Surgically induced necrotizing scleritis is an immune-mediated condition that can coexist with concomitant infectious condition, i.e. endophthalmitis, but response to immunosuppression leads to resolution of the disease and verifies the diagnosis. PMID:25371644

  11. Post-operative urinary retention.

    PubMed

    Steggall, Martin; Treacy, Colm; Jones, Mark

    Urinary retention is a common complication of surgery and anaesthesia. The risk of post-operative urinary retention is increased following certain surgical procedures and anaesthetic modalities, and with patients' advancing age. Patients at increased risk of post-operative urinary retention should be identified before surgery or the condition should be identified and treated in a timely manner following surgery. If conservative measures do not help the patient to pass urine, the bladder will need to be drained using either an intermittent catheter or an indwelling urethral catheter, which can result in catheter-associated urinary tract infections. This article provides an overview of normal bladder function, risk factors for developing post-operative urinary retention, and treatment options. Guidance drawn from the literature aims to assist nurses in identifying at-risk patients and inform patient care.

  12. Postoperative fluid management

    PubMed Central

    Kayilioglu, Selami Ilgaz; Dinc, Tolga; Sozen, Isa; Bostanoglu, Akin; Cete, Mukerrem; Coskun, Faruk

    2015-01-01

    Postoperative care units are run by an anesthesiologist or a surgeon, or a team formed of both. Management of postoperative fluid therapy should be done considering both patients’ status and intraoperative events. Types of the fluids, amount of the fluid given and timing of the administration are the main topics that determine the fluid management strategy. The main goal of fluid resuscitation is to provide adequate tissue perfusion without harming the patient. The endothelial glycocalyx dysfunction and fluid shift to extracellular compartment should be considered wisely. Fluid management must be done based on patient’s body fluid status. Patients who are responsive to fluids can benefit from fluid resuscitation, whereas patients who are not fluid responsive are more likely to suffer complications of over-hydration. Therefore, common use of central venous pressure measurement, which is proved to be inefficient to predict fluid responsiveness, should be avoided. Goal directed strategy is the most rational approach to assess the patient and maintain optimum fluid balance. However, accessible and applicable monitoring tools for determining patient’s actual fluid need should be further studied and universalized. The debate around colloids and crystalloids should also be considered with goal directed therapies. Advantages and disadvantages of each solution must be evaluated with the patient’s specific condition. PMID:26261771

  13. [Loperamide for acute infectious diarrhoea].

    PubMed

    Douma, Joeri A J; Smulders, Yvo M

    2015-01-01

    Many physicians are resistant to the idea of prescribing loperamide for acute infectious traveller's diarrhoea and community-acquired diarrhoea because of the fear of possible adverse effects. Large randomized trials with loperamide, either alone or as an adjunct to antibiotic treatment, have in fact revealed positive rather than negative effects. International guidelines now often support the use of loperamide for the treatment of infectious diarrhoea without dysentery. There seems to be no reason to systematically avoid loperamide in patients with dysentery, but caution is advised. Loperamide can be used as monotherapy or as an adjunct to antibiotic treatment in immunocompetent adults with acute infectious traveller's diarrhoea or community-acquired diarrhoea without severe comorbidities. This can reduce both the frequency of diarrhoea and the time until the diarrhoea stops without the risk of severe complications.

  14. Complications following hepatectomy.

    PubMed

    Russell, Maria C

    2015-01-01

    As the number of liver resections in the United States has increased, operations are more commonly performed on older patients with multiple comorbidities. The advent of effective chemotherapy and techniques such as portal vein embolization, have compounded the number of increasingly complex resections taking up to 75% of healthy livers. Four potentially devastating complications of liver resection include postoperative hemorrhage, venous thromboembolism, bile leak, and post-hepatectomy liver failure. The risk factors and management of these complications are herein explored, stressing the importance of identifying preoperative factors that can decrease the risk for these potentially fatal complications.

  15. Complications associated with orthognathic surgery

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    While most patients undergo orthognathic surgery for aesthetic purposes, aesthetic improvements are most often followed by postoperative functional complications. Therefore, patients must carefully decide whether their purpose of undergoing orthognathic surgery lies on the aesthetic side or the functional side. There is a wide variety of complications associated with orthognathic surgery. There should be a clear distinction between malpractice and complications. Complications can be resolved without any serious problems if the cause is detected early and adequate treatment provided. Oral and maxillofacial surgeons must have a full understanding of the types, causes, and treatment of complications, and should deliver this information to patients who develop these complications. PMID:28280704

  16. Perioperative supplementation with bifidobacteria improves postoperative nutritional recovery, inflammatory response, and fecal microbiota in patients undergoing colorectal surgery: a prospective, randomized clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    MIZUTA, Minoru; ENDO, Izuru; YAMAMOTO, Sumiharu; INOKAWA, Hidetoshi; KUBO, Masatoshi; UDAKA, Tetsunobu; SOGABE, Osanori; MAEDA, Hiroya; SHIRAKAWA, Kazutoyo; OKAZAKI, Eriko; ODAMAKI, Toshitaka; ABE, Fumiaki; XIAO, Jin-zhong

    2015-01-01

    The use of probiotics has been widely documented to benefit human health, but their clinical value in surgical patients remains unclear. The present study investigated the effect of perioperative oral administration of probiotic bifidobacteria to patients undergoing colorectal surgery. Sixty patients undergoing colorectal resection were randomized to two groups prior to resection. One group (n=31) received a probiotic supplement, Bifidobacterium longum BB536, preoperatively for 7–14 days and postoperatively for 14 days, while the other group (n=29) received no intervention as a control. The occurrences of postoperative infectious complications were recorded. Blood and fecal samples were collected before and after surgery. No significant difference was found in the incidence of postoperative infectious complications and duration of hospital stay between the two groups. In comparison to the control group, the probiotic group tended to have higher postoperative levels of erythrocytes, hemoglobin, lymphocytes, total protein, and albumin and lower levels of high sensitive C-reactive proteins. Postoperatively, the proportions of fecal bacteria changed significantly; Actinobacteria increased in the probiotic group, Bacteroidetes and Proteobacteria increased in the control group, and Firmicutes decreased in both groups. Significant correlations were found between the proportions of fecal bacteria and blood parameters; Actinobacteria correlated negatively with blood inflammatory parameters, while Bacteroidetes and Proteobacteria correlated positively with blood inflammatory parameters. In the subgroup of patients who received preoperative chemoradiotherapy treatment, the duration of hospital stay was significantly shortened upon probiotic intervention. These results suggest that perioperative oral administration of bifidobacteria may contribute to a balanced intestinal microbiota and attenuated postoperative inflammatory responses, which may subsequently promote a healthy

  17. Sports: The Infectious Hazards.

    PubMed

    Minooee, Arezou; Wang, Jeff; Gupta, Geeta K

    2015-10-01

    Although the medical complications of sports are usually traumatic in nature, infectious hazards also arise. While blood-borne pathogens such as HIV, hepatitis B, and hepatitis C, cause significant illness, the risk of acquiring these agents during sporting activities is minimal. Skin infections are more commonplace, arising from a variety of microbial agents including bacterial, fungal, and viral pathogens. Sports involving water contact can lead to enteric infections, eye infections, or disseminated infections such as leptospirosis. Mumps, measles, and influenza are vaccine-preventable diseases that have been transmitted during sporting events, both in players and in spectators. Prevention is the key to many of these infections. Players should be vaccinated and should not participate in sports if their infection can be spread by contact, airborne, or droplet transmission.

  18. Postoperative Delirium in the Geriatric Patient

    PubMed Central

    Schenning, Katie J.; Deiner, Stacie G.

    2015-01-01

    SYNOPSIS Postoperative delirium, a common complication in older surgical patients, is independently associated with increased morbidity and mortality. Patients over the age of 65 years receive greater than 1/3 of the over 40 million anesthetics delivered yearly in the United States. This number is expected to increase with the aging of the population. Thus, it is increasingly important that perioperative clinicians who care for geriatric patients have an understanding of the complex syndrome of postoperative delirium. PMID:26315635

  19. Epidural Analgesia in the Postoperative Period

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-10-01

    an unwanted side effect of surgery, and is associated with many postoperative complications. This descriptive study was conducted to determine which...surgical patients experienced the most analgesia with the fewest side effects when receiving epidural analgesia in the postoperative period. A...hospital. A description of the patients age, gender, type of surgery, type of epidural medication, side effects , incidence of breakthrough pain, and

  20. Neurologic complications of vaccinations.

    PubMed

    Miravalle, Augusto A; Schreiner, Teri

    2014-01-01

    This chapter reviews the most common neurologic disorders associated with common vaccines, evaluates the data linking the disorder with the vaccine, and discusses the potential mechanism of disease. A literature search was conducted in PubMed using a combination of the following terms: vaccines, vaccination, immunization, and neurologic complications. Data were also gathered from publications of the American Academy of Pediatrics Committee on Infectious Diseases, the World Health Organization, the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and the Vaccine Adverse Event Reporting System. Neurologic complications of vaccination are rare. Many associations have been asserted without objective data to support a causal relationship. Rarely, patients with a neurologic complication will have a poor outcome. However, most patients recover fully from the neurologic complication. Vaccinations have altered the landscape of infectious disease. However, perception of risk associated with vaccinations has limited the success of disease eradication measures. Neurologic complications can be severe, and can provoke fear in potential vaccines. Evaluating whether there is causal link between neurologic disorders and vaccinations, not just temporal association, is critical to addressing public misperception of risk of vaccination. Among the vaccines available today, the cost-benefit analysis of vaccinations and complications strongly argues in favor of vaccination.

  1. COMPLICATIONS REQUIRING HOSPITAL MANAGEMENT AFTER BARIATRIC SURGERY

    PubMed Central

    WRZESINSKI, Aline; CORRÊA, Jéssica Moraes; FERNANDES, Tainiely Müller Barbosa; MONTEIRO, Letícia Fernandes; TREVISOL, Fabiana Schuelter; do NASCIMENTO, Ricardo Reis

    2015-01-01

    Background: The actual gold standard technique for obesity treatment is the Roux-en-Y gastric bypass. However, complications may occur and the surgeon must be prepared for them. Aim: To evaluate retrospectively the complications occurrence and associated factors in patients who underwent bariatric surgery. Methods: In this study, 469 medical charts were considered, from patients and from data collected during outpatient consultations. The variables considered were gender, age, height, pre-operatory BMI, pre-operatory weight, pre-operatory comorbidities, time of hospital stay, postoperative complications that demanded re-admission to the hospital and the time elapsed between the procedure and the complication. The patients' follow up was, at least, one year. Results: The incidence of postoperative complications that demanded a hospital care was 24,09%. The main comorbidity presented in this sample was hepatic steatosis. The comorbidity that was associated with the postoperative period was type 2 diabetes. There was a tendency for the female gender be related to the complications. The cholecystectomy was the most frequent complication. Complications occurred during the first year in 57,35%. Conclusion: The most frequent complication was the need to perform a cholecystectomy, where the most frequent comorbidity was hepatic steatosis. Over half the complications occurred during the first year postoperatively. Type 2 diabetes was associated with the occurrence of postoperative complications; women had the highest incidence; body mass index was not associated with the occurrence of complications. PMID:26537263

  2. Rare complication of ventriculoperitoneal shunt: Catheter protrusion to subcutaneous tissue – Case report

    PubMed Central

    Gatto, Luana Antunes Maranha; Mathias, Roger; Tuma, Rogério; Abdalla, Ricardo; de Aguiar, Paulo Henrique Pires

    2016-01-01

    Background: Ventriculoperitoneal (VP) shunt is a day-to-day procedure performed by a neurosurgeon. The most frequent associated complications are obstructive and infectious. Although rare, there are well-reported complications related to the poor positioning of the distal catheter, with perforation of organs and tissues. Still rarer are the complications related to the migration of this catheter. Case Description: We describe an atypical case of VP shunt postoperative by normal pressure hydrocephalus. After well-documented proper positioning of the distal catheter into the intraperitoneal cavity, it protruded into the subcutaneous space. Even on a new documented satisfactory abdominal tomography, this catheter migrated back again to the subcutaneous tissue. Conclusion: We did not find plausible explanation for this rare event. PMID:28194301

  3. Urethral protrusion of the abdominal catheter of ventriculoperitoneal shunt: Case report of extremely rare complication.

    PubMed

    Yazar, Ugur; Kanat, Ayhan; Akca, Nezih; Gazioglu, Gurkan; Arda, Irfan S; Kazdal, Hizir

    2012-05-01

    Hydrocephalus in its various forms constitutes one of the major problems in pediatric neurosurgical practice. The placement of a ventriculoperitoneal (VP) shunt is the most common form of treatment for hydrocephalus, so that all neurosurgeons struggle with shunt malfunctions and their complications. Well-known complications are connected with the use of the valve systems (malfunction, infectious, overdrainage, secondary craniosynostosis, etc.). We report an unusual case of protruding abdominal catheter from the urethra. This girl had received a VP shunt for hydrocephalus following surgery of posterior fossa medulloblastoma 4 years ago. After admission, the entire system was removed, antibiotic treatment was administered for 2 weeks, and a new VP shunt was placed. The postoperative course was uneventful. This complication is extremely rare.

  4. A Four-Year Monocentric Study of the Complications of Third Molars Extractions under General Anesthesia: About 2112 Patients

    PubMed Central

    Guerrouani, A.; Zeinoun, T.; Vervaet, C.; Legrand, W.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction. The aim of this study was to assess the complications resulting from third molar extraction under general anesthesia. Material and Methods. The retrospective study included all patients who underwent impacted third molars extraction from January 2008 until December 2011. 7659 third molars were extracted for 2112 patients. Postoperative complications were retrieved from medical files. Results. No complications were related to general anesthesia. The most frequent postoperative complication was infection (7.15%). Lingual nerve injuries affected 1.8% of the patients. All of them were transient and were not related to tooth section. Inferior alveolar nerve injuries were reported in 0.4% of the cases. 95.8% of these patients were admitted for one-day ambulatory care, and only two patients were readmitted after discharge from hospital. Discussion. This surgical technique offers comfort for both surgeons and patients. Risks are only linked to the surgical procedure as we observed no complication resulting from general anesthesia. One-day hospitalization offers a good balance between comfort, security, and cost. The incidence of complications is in agreement with the literature data, especially regarding pain, edema, and infectious and nervous complications. It is of utmost importance to discuss indications with patients, and to provide them with clear information. PMID:24101928

  5. Postoperative (pressure) alopecia following sacrocolpopexy.

    PubMed

    Bagaria, Madhu; Luck, Ali Maria

    2015-06-01

    Postoperative alopecia is a rare occurrence seen after a variety of surgical procedures performed under general anesthesia. The speculated cause is pressure-induced ischemia due to prolonged head immobilization. This case describes a patient who developed this complication after undergoing sacrocolpopexy. A 57-year-old postmenopausal Caucasian female was consented to undergo a robotic-assisted sacrocolpopexy, perineoplasty, and midurethral sling with possible conversion to an open procedure. The indication was symptomatic proximal and distal rectocele with foreshortened vagina. It was converted to laparotomy due to difficult presacral dissection. Her total operative time was 540 with 240 min in the Trendelenburg position. No intraoperative hypotension or excessive blood loss was noted. She started complaining of scalp pain in the postoperative recovery area. She developed soreness, crusting, and later alopecia in the same area. It was noted at her 3-week office visit. Referral was made for dermatology and anesthesiology evaluation. There was spontaneous full recovery by the 5th month. Postoperative alopecia is a rare condition mimicking alopecia areata but it is preceded by inciting events. There is some evidence to suggest that it is a preventable condition by frequent head repositioning during surgery. This case report is intended to increase the surgeon's awareness about this rare complication as its occurrence can be distressing for the patient.

  6. Postoperative singultus: an osteopathic approach.

    PubMed

    Petree, Kristie; Bruner, Jonathan

    2015-03-01

    Singultus, or hiccups, is a common medical condition. Despite exponential leaps in medicine, the pathophysiologic cause remains poorly defined. Persistent singultus has been associated with conditions such as pulmonary embolism and myocardial infarction. Singultus is also a well-known postoperative complication. The criterion standard of care for patients with singultus involves ruling out lethal pathologic causes, attempting physical stimulation with Valsava maneuvers or drinking water, and, if no relief has been achieved, administering drugs to ease the symptoms. The authors report a case of a man whose postoperative singultus was successfully managed with osteopathic manipulative treatment. This approach addresses many of the possible underlying neuromechanical causes of the aberrant reflex with minimal potential for adverse effects. Physicians should consider osteopathic manipulative treatment in the care of patients with singultus.

  7. Arteriovenous Access: Infection, Neuropathy, and Other Complications.

    PubMed

    MacRae, Jennifer M; Dipchand, Christine; Oliver, Matthew; Moist, Louise; Yilmaz, Serdar; Lok, Charmaine; Leung, Kelvin; Clark, Edward; Hiremath, Swapnil; Kappel, Joanne; Kiaii, Mercedeh; Luscombe, Rick; Miller, Lisa M

    2016-01-01

    Complications of vascular access lead to morbidity and may reduce quality of life. In this module, we review both infectious and noninfectious arteriovenous access complications including neuropathy, aneurysm, and high-output access. For the challenging patients who have developed many complications and are now nearing their last vascular access, we highlight some potentially novel approaches.

  8. Hemorrhagic complications in dermatologic surgery

    PubMed Central

    Bunick, Christopher G.; Aasi, Sumaira Z.

    2014-01-01

    The ability to recognize, manage, and, most importantly, prevent hemorrhagic complications is critical to performing dermatologic procedures that have safe and high quality outcomes. This article reviews the preoperative, intraoperative, and postoperative factors and patient dynamics that are central to preventing such an adverse outcome. Specifically, the role that anticoagulants and antiplatelet agents, hypertension, and other medical conditions play in the development of postoperative hemorrhage are discussed. In addition, this article provides practical guidelines on managing bleeding during and after surgery. PMID:22515669

  9. Infectious mononucleosis #3 (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Infectious mononucleosis is caused by the Epstein-Barr virus. It is a viral infection causing high temperature, sore throat, and swollen lymph glands. Infectious mononucleosis can be contagious if the infected ...

  10. Neurological Complications of Bariatric Surgery.

    PubMed

    Goodman, Jerry Clay

    2015-12-01

    Obesity has attained pandemic proportions, and bariatric surgery is increasingly being employed resulting in turn to more neurological complications which must be recognized and managed. Neurological complications may result from mechanical or inflammatory mechanisms but primarily result from micro-nutritional deficiencies. Vitamin B12, thiamine, and copper constitute the most frequent deficiencies. Neurological complications may occur at reasonably predictable times after bariatric surgery and are associated with the type of surgery used. During the early post-operative period, compressive or stretch peripheral nerve injury, rhabdomyolysis, Wernicke's encephalopathy, and inflammatory polyradiculoneuropathy may occur. Late complications ensue after months to years and include combined system degeneration (vitamin B12 deficiency) and hypocupric myelopathy. Bariatric surgery patients require careful nutritional follow-up with routine monitoring of micronutrients at 6 weeks and 3, 6, and 12 months post-operatively and then annually after surgery and multivitamin supplementation for life. Sustained vigilance for common and rare neurological complications is essential.

  11. [Clinical and functional considerations in some cases of postoperative endophthalmitis].

    PubMed

    Muşat, O; Toma, Oana; Cristescu, R; Coman, Corina; Asandi, R; Burcea, M

    2013-01-01

    We present 3 cases of postsurgery endophthalmitis, with good initial operatory technique, which were admitted in our hospital within variable time, to which a second surgery was performed, with good postoperative evolution, without any inflammatory signs and preserving the eye. We analyse the pre and post-operative treatment of endophthalmitis, but also the ways to prevent the appearance of this post-operative complication.

  12. Infectious keratitis in a paracentesis tract.

    PubMed

    Azuara-Blanco, A; Katz, L J

    1997-04-01

    A paracentesis is performed in glaucoma procedures as a flat, beveled tract to allow access into the anterior chamber after the filtration fistula is made. Complications related to the paracentesis are infrequent because it is a self-sealing wound. The authors report a case of infectious keratitis that developed in a paracentesis tract.

  13. Effect of day-case unilateral cochlear implantation in adults on general and disease-specific quality of life, postoperative complications and hearing results, tinnitus, vertigo and cost-effectiveness: protocol for a randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Derks, Laura S M; Wegner, Inge; Smit, Adriana L; Thomeer, Hans G X M; Topsakal, Vedat; Grolman, Wilko

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Cochlear implantation is an increasingly common procedure in the treatment of severe to profound sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL) in children and adults. It is often performed as a day-case procedure. The major drive towards day-case surgery has been from a logistical, economical and societal perspective, but we also speculate that the patient's quality of life (QoL) is at least equal to inpatient surgery if not increased as a result of rapid discharge and rehabilitation. Even though cochlear implantation seems well suited to a day-case approach and this even seems to be common practice in some countries, evidence is scarce and of low quality to guide us towards the preferred treatment option. Methods and analysis A single-centre, non-blinded, randomised, controlled trial was designed to (primarily) investigate the effect on general QoL of day-case cochlear implantation compared to inpatient cochlear implantation and (secondarily) the effect of both methods on (subjective) hearing improvement, disease-specific QoL, tinnitus, vertigo and cost-effectiveness. 30 adult patients with severe to profound bilateral postlingual SNHL who are eligible for unilateral cochlear implantation will be randomly assigned to either the day-case or inpatient treatment group. The outcome measures will be assessed using auditory evaluations, questionnaires (preoperatively, at 1-week, 3-week, 3-month and 1-year follow-up) and costs diaries (weekly during the first month postoperatively, after which once in a month until 1-year follow-up). Preoperative and postoperative outcomes will be compared. The difference in costs and benefit will be represented using the incremental cost utility/effectiveness ratio. The analyses will be carried out on an intention-to-treat basis. Ethics and dissemination This research protocol was approved by the Institutional Review Board of the UMC Utrecht (NL45590.041.13; V.5, November 2015). The trial results will be disseminated through peer

  14. [Complications of tubal sterilization].

    PubMed

    Schreiner, W E

    1986-05-01

    In Europe and the US, tubal sterilization by laparoscopy has become the most widely used technique for female sterilization. The overall rate of intra- and postoperative complications differs between 0.145% and 0.85% in the numerous studies which have been done. This means 1 severe complication in 120-700 laparoscopic sterilizations. The lethality of tubal sterilization by laparoscopy lies between 3-10 deaths/100,000 interventions. The so-called "post-tubal ligation syndrome" is a rare complication. The overall pregnancy rate after tubal sterilization is 3-10/1000 women. The rate of ectopic pregnancy is very high and varies between 13.6% and 90%. Only 5% of the sterilized women show dissatisfaction. Several factors are relevant with regard to psychological sequelae and must be considered before tubal sterilization can be performed. 1 of the most important is the individual comprehensive counselling of the female or the couple prior to the sterilization.

  15. Postoperative pelvic pain: An imaging approach.

    PubMed

    Farah, H; Laurent, N; Phalippou, J; Bazot, M; Giraudet, G; Serb, T; Poncelet, E

    2015-10-01

    Postoperative pelvic pain after gynecological surgery is a readily detected but unspecific sign of complication. Imaging as a complement to physical examination helps establish the etiological diagnosis. In the context of emergency surgery, vascular, urinary and digestive injuries constitute the most frequent intraoperative complications. During the follow-up of patients who had undergone pelvic surgery, imaging should be performed to detect recurrent disease, postoperative fibrosis, adhesions and more specific complications related to prosthetic material. Current guidelines recommend using pelvic ultrasonography as the first line imaging modality whereas the use of pelvic computed tomography and/or magnetic resonance imaging should be restricted to specific situations, depending on local availability of equipment and suspected disease.

  16. Video-assisted thoracic surgery complications

    PubMed Central

    Kozak, Józef

    2014-01-01

    Video-assisted thoracic surgery (VATS) is a miniinvasive technique commonly applied worldwide. Indications for VATS are very broad and include the diagnosis of mediastinal, lung and pleural diseases, as well as large resection procedures such as pneumonectomy. The most frequent complication is prolonged postoperative air leak. The other significant complications are bleeding, infections, postoperative pain and recurrence at the port site. Different complications of VATS procedures can occur with variable frequency in various diseases. Despite the large number of their types, such complications are rare and can be avoided through the proper selection of patients and an appropriate surgical technique. PMID:25561984

  17. Treatment of complications of parotid gland surgery

    PubMed Central

    Marchese-Ragona, R; De Filippis, C; Marioni, G; Staffieri, A

    2005-01-01

    Summary Although several reports in the literature have documented the surgical technique, and the oncological outcome achieved with parotidectomy, only a few articles have described the complications of parotid gland surgery and their management. Several complications have been reported in parotid surgery. We re-classified the complications of parotidectomy in intra-operative and post-operative (early and late). The commonest complications after parotidectomy are temporary or permanent facial palsy and Frey’s syndrome. PMID:16450773

  18. Pregnancy Complications

    MedlinePlus

    ... To receive Pregnancy email updates Enter email Submit Pregnancy complications Complications of pregnancy are health problems that ... pregnancy. Expand all | Collapse all Health problems before pregnancy Before pregnancy, make sure to talk to your ...

  19. [Postoperative pain in craniotomy].

    PubMed

    Peón, Andréa Ungaro; Diccini, Solange

    2005-01-01

    In the postoperative period, 47% to 75% of the patients report some degree of pain. This study aimed to evaluate pain in the pre and postoperative period of patients submitted to craniotomy. This prospective research was carried out at the neurosurgery unit of a large Brazilian hospital. For a quantitative evaluation of pain, the verbal numeric 0-10 rating scale was used. Forty patients with a mean age of 36 years were evaluated. In the preoperative period, 34 (85%) patients indicated headache as the main cause of pain. In the postoperative period, 37 (93%) patients complained of pain while three (7%) reported absence of pain. Pain peaks were observed on the 2nd postoperative day, when 12 (32%) of the patients reported severe pain and 10 (27%) moderate pain. Absence of severe pain occurred after the 8th postoperative day. It was concluded that protocols of analgesia in craniotomy are needed, such as training nurses to better evaluate and handle pain.

  20. Keratomycosis complicating pterygium excision.

    PubMed

    Merle, Harold; Guyomarch, Jérôme; Joyaux, Jean-Christophe; Dueymes, Maryvonne; Donnio, Angélique; Desbois, Nicole

    2011-01-01

    The authors describe a case of keratomycosis that appeared after the exeresis of a pterygium. A 48-year-old patient had been referred with a red right eye associated with an abscess of the cornea along the ablation zone of the pterygium. The surgery had been performed a month beforehand. The abscess was 6 mm high and 4 mm wide. The authors instigated a treatment that included amphotericin B (0.25%) after noticing a clinical aspect evoking a fungal keratitis and finding several septate filaments on direct examination. On day 10, a Fusarium dimerum was isolated on Sabouraud agar. After 15 days of treatment, the result was favorable and the size of the ulceration as well as the size of the abscess had progressively decreased. The antifungal treatment was definitively stopped at 14 weeks. Infectious-related complications of the pterygium surgery are rare and are essentially caused by bacterial agents. Secondary infections by fungus are rare. There have been two previous cases reported: one that appeared 15 years after radiotherapy and another that appeared at 3 weeks post surgery, consecutive to the use of mitomycin C. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first case of a keratomycosis due to F. dimerum reported that complicated the exeresis of a pterygium without the use of an adjuvant antihealing treatment. Pterygium surgery is a common procedure; nevertheless, ophthalmologists need to be aware of the existence of potential infectious complications.

  1. Gastrointestinal complications postthoracotomy and postvagotomy.

    PubMed

    Kokoska, E R; Naunheim, K S

    1998-08-01

    Postthoracotomy gastrointestinal complications, although relatively uncommon, can be associated with significant morbidity and mortality. It is necessary to identify patients who are at high risk for gastrointestinal complications during the preoperative evaluation. Appropriate stress ulcer prophylaxis should be provided to high-risk patients, and enteral feeds should be initiated as early in the postoperative course as possible. Postoperative hypotension and massive blood transfusions can be avoided with early reexploration in the case of postoperative hemorrhage. Finally, unexplained abdominal pain must not be ignored; a high index of suspicion should be maintained, with early and liberal use of diagnostic tools such as standard radiography, CT, endoscopy, and angiography. Consultation should be requested from a surgeon experienced in abdominal catastrophes. Early laparotomy with aggressive operative management can be lifesaving therapy but must be not applied in a cavalier fashion, as many of these disorders can and should be managed conservatively.

  2. A Rare Complication of Septorhinoplasty

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Summary: Septoplasty and septorhinoplasty are common procedures. A 28-year-old woman underwent the procedure and presented postoperatively with headache and vomiting and had developed a large pneumocephalus. We describe the case in detail and analyze the possible causes and ways to prevent such a complication. PMID:25587507

  3. Promoting safety of postoperative orthopaedic patients with obstructive sleep apnea.

    PubMed

    Veney, Amy J

    2013-01-01

    Orthopaedic patients with obstructive sleep apnea are at risk for postoperative complications related to administration of pain medications, anxiolytics, and antiemetics. They are more likely to experience respiratory and cardiac complications, be transferred to an intensive care unit, or have an increased length of stay in the hospital. This informational article is for nurses who care for postoperative orthopaedic patients with obstructive sleep apnea. The focus is on promoting patient safety through communication, vigilant postoperative sedation assessment, and nursing interventions that include appropriate patient positioning, patient education, and involving patients and their families in care.

  4. Remote Postoperative Epidural Hematoma after Brain Tumor Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Ho-Jung; Park, Jae-Sung; Jeun, Sin-Soo

    2015-01-01

    A postoperative epidural hematoma (EDH) is a serious and embarrassing complication, which usually occurs at the site of operation after intracranial surgery. However, remote EDH is relatively rare. We report three cases of remote EDH after brain tumor surgery. All three cases seemed to have different causes of remote postoperative EDH; however, all patients were managed promptly and showed excellent outcomes. Although the exact mechanism of remote postoperative EDH is unknown, surgeons should be cautious of the speed of lowering intracranial pressure and implement basic procedures to prevent this hazardous complication of brain tumor surgery. PMID:26605271

  5. Ability of Serum C-Reactive Protein Concentrations to Predict Complications After Laparoscopy-Assisted Gastrectomy

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Kecheng; Xi, Hongqing; Wu, Xiaosong; Cui, Jianxin; Bian, Shibo; Ma, Liangang; Li, Jiyang; Wang, Ning; Wei, Bo; Chen, Lin

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Inflammatory markers, including C-reactive protein (CRP) and white blood cell (WBC), are widely available in clinical practice. However, their predictive roles for infectious complications following laparoscopy-assisted gastrectomy (LAG) have not been investigated. Our aim was to investigate the diagnostic accuracy of CRP concentrations and WBC counts for early detection of infectious complications following LAG and to construct a nomogram for clinical decision-making. The clinical data of consecutive patients who underwent LAG with curative intent between December 2013 and March 2015 were prospectively collected. Postoperative complications were recorded according to the Clavien–Dindo classification. The diagnostic value of CRP concentrations and WBC counts was evaluated by area under the curve of receiver-operating characteristic curves. Optimal cutoff values were determined by Youden index. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses were performed to identify risk factors for complications, after which a nomogram was constructed. Twenty-nine of 278 patients (10.4%) who successfully underwent LAG developed major complications (grade ≥III). CRP concentration on postoperative day 3 (POD 3) and WBC count on POD 7 had the highest diagnostic accuracy for major complications with an area under the curve value of 0.86 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.79–0.92] and 0.68 (95% CI, 0.56–0.79) respectively. An optimal cutoff value of 172.0 mg/L was identified for CRP, yielding a sensitivity of 0.79 (95% CI, 0.60–0.92) and specificity 0.74 (95% CI, 0.68–0.80). Multivariate analysis identified POD3 CRP concentrations ≥172.0 mg/L, Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group Performance Status ≥1, presence of preoperative comorbidity, and operation time ≥240 min as risk factors for major complications after LAG. The optimal cut-off value of CRP on POD3 to predict complications following LAG was 172.0 mg/L and a CRP-based nomogram may

  6. Risks and complications in rhinoplasty

    PubMed Central

    Rettinger, Gerhard

    2008-01-01

    Rhinoplasty is regarded to be associated with many risks as the expectations of patient and physician are not always corresponding. Besides of postoperative deformities many other risks and complications have to be considered. Reduction-rhinoplasty e.g. can cause breathing disturbances which are reported in 70% of all revision-rhinoplasty-patients. One has to be aware however that scars and loss of mucosal-sensation can also give the feeling of a “blocked nose”. The main risks of autogenous transplants are dislocation and resorption, while alloplasts can cause infection and extrusion. In this respect silicone implants can have a complication rate between 5-20%. Less complications are reported with other materials like Gore-Tex. Complications of skin and soft tissues can be atrophy, fibrosis, numbness, cysts originating from displaced mucosa or subcutaneous granulomas caused by ointment material. Postoperative swelling depends mainly on the osteotomy technique. Percutaneous osteotomies cause less trauma, but may result in visible scars. Infections are rare but sometimes life-threatening (toxic-shock-syndrome). The risk is higher, when sinus surgery and rhinoplasty are combined. Osteotomies can also cause injuries of the orbital region. Necrosis of eye-lids by infections and blindness by central artery occlusion are known. There are reports on various other risks like rhinoliquorrhea, brain damage, fistulas between sinus-cavernosus and carotid artery, aneurysms and thrombosis of the cavernous sinus. Discoloration of incisors are possible by damage of vessels and nerves. Rhinoplasty can also become a court-case in dissatisfied patients, a situation that may be called a “typical complication of rhinoplasty”. It can be avoided by proper patient selection and consideration of psychological disturbances. Postoperative deformities are considered as main risks of rhinoplasty, causing revision surgery in 5% to 15% of the cases. The analysis of postoperative

  7. Complications of decorative tattoo.

    PubMed

    Shinohara, Michi M

    2016-01-01

    Decorative tattoo is a popular practice that is generally safe when performed in the professional setting but can be associated with a variety of inflammatory, infectious, and neoplastic complications, risks that may be increased with current trends in home tattooing. Modern tattoo inks contain azo dyes and are often of unknown composition and not currently regulated for content or purity. Biopsy of most (if not all) tattoo reactions presenting to the dermatologist is recommended, given recent clusters of nontuberculous mycobacterial infections occurring within tattoo, as well as associations between tattoo reactions and systemic diseases such as sarcoidosis.

  8. Understanding postoperative fatigue.

    PubMed

    Rose, E A; King, T C

    1978-07-01

    Performance characteristics of the central nervous, cardiovascular, respiratory and muscular systems in man postoperatively have received little investigative attention, despite the well known syndrome of postoperative fatigue. The impairmen in perception and psychomotor skills that has been shown to result from caloric restriction, bedrest, sedation and sleep deprivation suggests that a similar deficit may occur after surgical procedures. After a simple elective surgical procedure, maximal oxygen uptake decreases and the adaptability of heart rate to submaximal workloads is impaired. Similar deleterious effects on cardiorespiratory performance have been documented with starvation and bedrest; an understanding of cardiorespiratory performance postoperatively awaits further investigation. Maximal muscular force of contraction is also impaired by caloric restriction and bedrest, suggesting that similar effects may be seen in the postoperative state, although this has not been studied. A better understanding of the syndrome of postoperative fatigue could be achieved by a descriptive analysis of physiologic performance postoperatively. Such descriptive data could form the basis for objective evaluation of therapeutic measures intended to improve performance, such as nutritional supplementation and pharmacologic intervention. The observation that exercise with the patient in the supine position may decrease the impairment in maximal aerobic power otherwise expected in immobilized patients suggests that controlled exercise therapy may be of value in reducing physiologic impairment postoperatively.

  9. About Infectious Mononucleosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Search The CDC Cancel Submit Search The CDC Epstein-Barr Virus and Infectious Mononucleosis Note: Javascript is disabled or ... About CDC.gov . EBV and Mono Home About Epstein-Barr Virus About Infectious Mononucleosis For Healthcare Providers Laboratory Testing ...

  10. [Infectious diseases research].

    PubMed

    Carratalà, Jordi; Alcamí, José; Cordero, Elisa; Miró, José M; Ramos, José Manuel

    2008-12-01

    There has been a significant increase in research activity into infectious diseases in Spain in the last few years. The Spanish Society of Infectious Diseases and Clinical Microbiology (SEIMC) currently has ten study groups, with the cooperation of infectious diseases specialists and microbiologists from different centres, with significant research activity. The program of Redes Temáticas de Investigación Cooperativa en Salud (Special Topics Cooperative Health Research Networks) is an appropriate framework for the strategic coordination of research groups from the Spanish autonomous communities. The Spanish Network for Research in Infectious Diseases (REIPI) and the Network for Research in AIDS (RIS) integrate investigators in Infectious Diseases from multiple groups, which continuously perform important research projects. Research using different experimental models in infectious diseases, in numerous institutions, is an important activity in our country. The analysis of the recent scientific production in Infectious Diseases shows that Spain has a good position in the context of the European Union. The research activity in Infectious Diseases carried out in our country is a great opportunity for the training of specialists in this area of knowledge.

  11. Endoscopic management of post-bariatric surgery complications

    PubMed Central

    Boules, Mena; Chang, Julietta; Haskins, Ivy N; Sharma, Gautam; Froylich, Dvir; El-Hayek, Kevin; Rodriguez, John; Kroh, Matthew

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the technical constructs of bariatric surgery is important to the treating endoscopist to maximize effective endoluminal therapy. Post-operative complication rates vary widely based on the complication of interest, and have been reported to be as high as 68% following adjustable gastric banding. Similarly, there is a wide range of presenting symptoms for post-operative bariatric complications, including abdominal pain, nausea and vomiting, dysphagia, gastrointestinal hemorrhage, and weight regain, all of which may provoke an endoscopic assessment. Bleeding and anastomotic leak are considered to be early (< 30 d) complications, whereas strictures, marginal ulcers, band erosions, and weight loss failure or weight recidivism are typically considered late (> 30 d) complications. Treatment of complications in the immediate post-operative period may require unique considerations. Endoluminal therapies serve as adjuncts to surgical and radiographic procedures. This review aims to summarize the spectrum and efficacy of endoscopic management of post-operative bariatric complications. PMID:27668069

  12. Endoscopic management of post-bariatric surgery complications.

    PubMed

    Boules, Mena; Chang, Julietta; Haskins, Ivy N; Sharma, Gautam; Froylich, Dvir; El-Hayek, Kevin; Rodriguez, John; Kroh, Matthew

    2016-09-16

    Understanding the technical constructs of bariatric surgery is important to the treating endoscopist to maximize effective endoluminal therapy. Post-operative complication rates vary widely based on the complication of interest, and have been reported to be as high as 68% following adjustable gastric banding. Similarly, there is a wide range of presenting symptoms for post-operative bariatric complications, including abdominal pain, nausea and vomiting, dysphagia, gastrointestinal hemorrhage, and weight regain, all of which may provoke an endoscopic assessment. Bleeding and anastomotic leak are considered to be early (< 30 d) complications, whereas strictures, marginal ulcers, band erosions, and weight loss failure or weight recidivism are typically considered late (> 30 d) complications. Treatment of complications in the immediate post-operative period may require unique considerations. Endoluminal therapies serve as adjuncts to surgical and radiographic procedures. This review aims to summarize the spectrum and efficacy of endoscopic management of post-operative bariatric complications.

  13. [Chronic postoperative pain].

    PubMed

    Cachemaille, Matthieu; Blanc, Catherine

    2016-06-22

    Chronic postoperative pain remains a frequent pathology whose global impact approximates 20 and 30% and accounts for 20% of the consultations in a pain center. Risk factors consider firstly each patient's feature and comorbidity and also different surgical procedures with their technical approach. Neuropathic pain compared to nociceptive pain is a great component in the postoperative period and needs to be recognized by specific tests (DN4). Pain prevention involves risk factors' detection, appropriate anesthetic support and effective postoperative pain management. Treatment is based on the type of pain and includes a multimodal analgesia with interventional pain therapy.

  14. Management and complications of stomas.

    PubMed

    Bafford, Andrea C; Irani, Jennifer L

    2013-02-01

    Stomas are created for a wide range of indications such as temporary protection of a high-risk anastomosis, diversion of sepsis, or permanent relief of obstructed defecation or incontinence. Yet this seemingly benign procedure is associated with an overall complication rate of up to 70%. Therefore, surgeons caring for patients with gastrointestinal diseases must be proficient not only with stoma creation but also with managing postoperative stoma-related complications. This article reviews the common complications associated with ostomy creation and strategies for their management.

  15. Postoperative radicular neuroma. Case report.

    PubMed

    Erman, T; Tuna, M; Göçer, A I; Idan, F; Akgül, E; Zorludemir, S

    2001-11-15

    Lumbar discectomy is the most common surgical procedure performed in neurosurgery clinics. Such a large number of procedures underscore not only the prevalence of conditions such as intervertebral disc herniation, but also the strong belief of surgeons that the operation does provide benefits to patients suffering from sciatica. In spite of this belief, sciatic pain may continue after the surgery. The recurrence of sciatic and/or back pain after primary discectomy is called the "failed back surgery syndrome." The rate of the complications involved in standard lumbar discectomy ranges from 5.4 to 14%. One of the complications of the lumbar disc surgery is nerve root injury. The complication rate of this injury ranges from 0.7 to 2.2%. Postoperative radicular neuroma must be considered in differential diagnosis for the patient who has failed back surgery syndrome. In this study the authors evaluate a patient who had undergone surgery for lumbar disc herniation and suffered intractable pain. A traumatic radicular neuroma is demonstrated and the pertinent literature is presented.

  16. Complications of open reduction and internal fixation of ankle fractures.

    PubMed

    Leyes, Manuel; Torres, Raúl; Guillén, Pedro

    2003-03-01

    This article discusses the complications after open reduction and internal fixation of ankle fractures. Complications are classified as perioperative (malreduction, inadequate fixation, and intra-articular penetration of hardware), early postoperative (wound edge dehiscence, necrosis, infection and compartment syndrome), and late (stiffness, distal tibiofibular synostosis, degenerative osteoarthritis, and hardware related complications). Emphasis is placed on preventive measures to avoid such complications.

  17. Endoscopic management of acute colorectal anastomotic complications with temporary stent.

    PubMed

    Abbas, Maher A

    2009-01-01

    Acute postoperative anastomotic complications following colorectal resection include leak and obstruction. Often an operation is necessary to treat these complications. The role of endoluminal procedures to treat these complications has been limited. This article illustrates that such an approach is technically feasible and can be used to treat some colorectal anastomotic complications.

  18. Complications of third molar surgery.

    PubMed

    Bouloux, Gary F; Steed, Martin B; Perciaccante, Vincent J

    2007-02-01

    This article addresses the incidence of specific complications and, where possible, offers a preventive or management strategy. Injuries of the inferior alveolar and lingual nerves are significant issues that are discussed separately in this text. Surgical removal of third molars is often associated with postoperative pain, swelling, and trismus. Factors thought to influence the incidence of complications after third molar removal include age, gender, medical history, oral contraceptives, presence of pericoronitis, poor oral hygiene, smoking, type of impaction, relationship of third molar to the inferior alveolar nerve, surgical time, surgical technique, surgeon experience, use of perioperative antibiotics, use of topical antiseptics, use of intra-socket medications, and anesthetic technique. Complications that are discussed further include alveolar osteitis, postoperative infection, hemorrhage, oro-antral communication, damage to adjacent teeth, displaced teeth, and fractures.

  19. Air leakage on the postoperative day: powerful factor of postoperative recurrence after thoracoscopic bullectomy

    PubMed Central

    Jeon, Hyun Woo; Kye, Yeo Kon; Kim, Kyung Soo

    2016-01-01

    Background Primary spontaneous pneumothorax (PSP) is a relatively common disorder in young patients. Although various surgical techniques have been introduced, recurrence after video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery (VATS) remains high. The aim of study was to identify the risk factors for postoperative recurrence after thoracoscopic bullectomy in the spontaneous pneumothorax. Methods From January 2011 through March 2013, two hundreds and thirty two patients underwent surgery because of pneumothorax. Patients with a secondary pneumothorax, as well as cases of single port surgery, an open procedure, additional pleural procedure (pleurectomy, pleural abrasion) or lack of medical records were excluded. The records of 147 patients with PSP undergoing 3-port video-assisted thoracoscopic bullectomy with staple line coverage using an absorbable polyglycolic acid (PGA) sheet were retrospectively reviewed. Results The median age was 19 years (range, 11−34 years) with male predominance (87.8%). Median postoperative hospital stay was 3 days (range, 1−10 days) without mortality. Complications were developed in five patients. A total of 24 patients showed postoperative recurrence (16.3%). Younger age less than 17 years old and immediate postoperative air leakage were risk factors for postoperative recurrence after thoracoscopic bullectomy by multivariate analysis. Conclusions Immediate postoperative air leakage was the risk factor for postoperative recurrence. However, further study will be required for the correlation of air leakage with recurrence. PMID:26904217

  20. Normal Postoperative Computed Tomography Findings after a Variety of Pancreatic Surgeries

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Ji Won; Hwang, Ho Kyoung; Lee, Minwook; Kim, Ki Whang; Kang, Chang Moo; Kim, Myeong-Jin

    2017-01-01

    Pancreatic surgery remains the only curative treatment for pancreatic neoplasms, and plays an important role in the management of medically intractable diseases. Since the original Whipple operation in the 20th century, surgical techniques have advanced, resulting in decreased postoperative complications and better clinical outcomes. Normal postoperative imaging findings vary greatly depending on the surgical technique used. Radiologists are required to be familiar with the normal postoperative imaging findings, in order to distinguish from postoperative complications or tumor recurrence. In this study, we briefly review a variety of surgical techniques for the pancreas, and present the normal postoperative computed tomography findings. PMID:28246510

  1. Infectious and Non-infectious Etiologies of Cardiovascular Disease in Human Immunodeficiency Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Chastain, Daniel B.; King, Travis S.; Stover, Kayla R.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Increasing rates of HIV have been observed in women, African Americans, and Hispanics, particularly those residing in rural areas of the United States. Although cardiovascular (CV) complications in patients infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) have significantly decreased following the introduction of antiretroviral therapy on a global scale, in many rural areas, residents face geographic, social, and cultural barriers that result in decreased access to care. Despite the advancements to combat the disease, many patients in these medically underserved areas are not linked to care, and fewer than half achieve viral suppression. Methods: Databases were systematically searched for peer-reviewed publications reporting infectious and non-infectious etiologies of cardiovascular disease in HIV-infected patients. Relevant articles cited in the retrieved publications were also reviewed for inclusion. Results: A variety of outcomes studies and literature reviews were included in the analysis. Relevant literature discussed the manifestations, diagnosis, treatment, and outcomes of infectious and non-infectious etiologies of cardiovascular disease in HIV-infected patients. Conclusion: In these medically underserved areas, it is vital that clinicians are knowledgeable in the manifestations, diagnosis, and treatment of CV complications in patients with untreated HIV. This review summarizes the epidemiology and causes of CV complications associated with untreated HIV and provide recommendations for management of these complications. PMID:27583063

  2. VLAP: results immediately post-op

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cowles, Robert S.

    1996-05-01

    Visual laser ablation of the prostate (VLAP) has been shown to be as effective with fewer complications than TURP in the treatment of bladder outlet obstruction secondary to benign prostatic hyperplasia. Questions have been raised about VLAP regarding prolonged irritative and obstructive voiding symptoms postoperatively. It is postulated that these symptoms are due to the slow slough of necrotic debris following VLAP. In an effort to improve upon the technique of VLAP, patients underwent lasing of the prostate in the routine manner (2, 4, 8, and 10 o'clock positions with sixty watts for sixty seconds) using Nd:YAG free beam energy. A bladder neck incision was then performed using a contact laser fiber. International prostate symptom score assessments were done preoperatively; one week and six weeks postoperatively. Post void residual urine volumes and prostate size were also evaluated. The findings indicate that symptom scores and post void residual urine volumes have significantly improved within ten days postoperatively using this technique.

  3. Infectious Discitis and Spondylodiscitis in Children

    PubMed Central

    Principi, Nicola; Esposito, Susanna

    2016-01-01

    In children, infectious discitis (D) and infectious spondylodiscitis (SD) are rare diseases that can cause significant clinical problems, including spinal deformities and segmental instabilities. Moreover, when the infection spreads into the spinal channel, D and SD can cause devastating neurologic complications. Early diagnosis and treatment may reduce these risks. The main aim of this paper is to discuss recent concepts regarding the epidemiology, microbiology, clinical presentation, diagnosis, and treatment of pediatric D and SD. It is highlighted that particular attention must be paid to the identification of the causative infectious agent and its sensitivity to antibiotics, remembering that traditional culture frequently leads to negative results and modern molecular methods can significantly increase the detection rate. Several different bacterial pathogens can cause D and SD, and, in some cases, particularly those due to Staphylococcus aureus, Kingella kingae, Mycobacterium tuberculosis, Brucella spp., the appropriate choice of drug is critical to achieve cure. PMID:27070599

  4. [Neurologic manifestations of infectious endocarditis].

    PubMed

    Hannachi, N; Béard, T; Ben Ismail, M

    1991-01-01

    Thirty out of 287 patients (10.4%) admitted to hospital for infective endocarditis between December 1970 and January 1990 had neurological complications. Twenty-three patients had native valve infectious endocarditis and 7 had prosthetic valve endocarditis. The clinical features were characterized by the frequency of aortic valve involvement (23 out of 30) and other complications, especially cardiac failure (16 cases) and peripheral vascular manifestations (7 cases). The commonest organism was the staphylococcus (53% of identified organisms) but the number of negative blood cultures was high (50% of cases). The neurological complication was often the presenting symptom of the endocarditis (19 cases) but it occurred after bacteriological cure in 4 cases. The complications observed were cerebral ischemia (16 cases), cerebral haemorrhage (11 cases), coma (2 cases), and one peripheral neuropathy causing a Claude Bernard Horner syndrome. These complications presented with hemiplegia in 17 cases, a meningeal syndrome in 8 cases, a convulsion in 1 case, a Von Wallenberg syndrome in 1 case, and a Claude Bernard Horner syndrome in 1 case. Twelve patients had a transient or permanent neurological coma. Cerebral CT scan showed ischemic lesions in 7 cases and haemorrhagic lesions in 10 cases. Carotid angiography demonstrated mycotic aneurysms in 6 patients. Twelve patients died: the cause of death was neurological coma (7 cases), low cardiac output (4 cases) and haemorrhagic shock (1 case). Four patients underwent neurosurgery: 3 for clipping a mycotic aneurysm and 1 for drainage of an intracerebral haematoma. Poor prognostic factors were: coma, cardiac failure, cardiac valve prosthesis and, above all, the extent and multiplicity of the neurological lesions. The authors propose the following measures to improve the prognosis: early surgery in cases of large and/or mobile vegetations especially when the infecting organism is a staphylococcus and when a systemic embolism has

  5. Reducing Non-Infectious Risks of Blood Transfusion

    PubMed Central

    Gilliss, Brian M.; Looney, Mark R.; Gropper, Michael A.

    2011-01-01

    Summary As screening for transfusion-associated infections has improved, non-infectious complications of transfusion now cause the majority of morbidity and mortality associated with transfusion in the United States. For example, transfusion-related acute lung injury, transfusion-associated circulatory overload, and hemolytic transfusion-reactions are the first, second, and third leading causes of death from transfusion respectively. These complications and others are reviewed here and several controversial methods for prevention of non-infectious complications of transfusion are discussed; universal leukoreduction of red cell units, use of male-only plasma, and restriction of red cell storage age. PMID:21792054

  6. A Minimally Invasive Endoscopic Surgery for Infectious Spondylodiscitis of the Thoracic and Upper Lumbar Spine in Immunocompromised Patients.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hsin-Chuan; Huang, Teng-Le; Chen, Yen-Jen; Tsou, Hsi-Kai; Lin, Wei-Ching; Hung, Chih-Hung; Tsai, Chun-Hao; Hsu, Horng-Chaung; Chen, Hsien-Te

    2015-01-01

    This study evaluates the safety and effectiveness of computed tomography- (CT-) assisted endoscopic surgery in the treatment of infectious spondylodiscitis of the thoracic and upper lumbar spine in immunocompromised patients. From October 2006 to March 2014, a total of 41 patients with infectious spondylodiscitis underwent percutaneous endoscopic surgery under local anesthesia, and 13 lesions from 13 patients on the thoracic or upper lumbar spine were selected for evaluation. A CT-guided catheter was placed before percutaneous endoscopic surgery as a guide to avoid injury to visceral organs, major vessels, and the spinal cord. All 13 patients had quick pain relief after endoscopic surgery without complications. The bacterial culture rate was 77%. Inflammatory parameters returned to normal after adequate antibiotic treatment. Postoperative radiographs showed no significant kyphotic deformity when compared with preoperative films. As of the last follow-up visit, no recurrent infections were noted. Traditional transthoracic or diaphragmatic surgery with or without posterior instrumentation is associated with high rates of morbidity and mortality, especially in elderly patients, patients with multiple comorbidities, or immunocompromised patients. Percutaneous endoscopic surgery assisted by a CT-guided catheter provides a safe and effective alternative treatment for infectious spondylodiscitis of the thoracic and upper lumbar spine.

  7. A Case Report on the Successful Treatment of Streptococcus pneumoniae-Induced Infectious Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Initially Presenting with Meningitis

    PubMed Central

    Kawatani, Yohei; Nakamura, Yoshitsugu; Hayashi, Yujiro; Taneichi, Tetsuyoshi; Ito, Yujiro; Kurobe, Hirotsugu; Suda, Yuji; Hori, Takaki

    2015-01-01

    Infectious abdominal aortic aneurysms often present with abdominal and lower back pain, but prolonged fever may be the only symptom. Infectious abdominal aortic aneurysms initially presenting with meningitis are extremely rare; there are no reports of their successful treatment. Cases with Streptococcus pneumoniae as the causative bacteria are even rarer with a higher mortality rate than those caused by other bacteria. We present the case of a 65-year-old man with lower limb weakness and back pain. Examination revealed fever and neck stiffness. Cerebrospinal fluid showed leukocytosis and low glucose levels. The patient was diagnosed with meningitis and bacteremia caused by Streptococcus pneumoniae and treated with antibiotics. Fever, inflammatory response, and neurologic findings showed improvement. However, abdominal computed tomography revealed an aneurysm not present on admission. Antibiotics were continued, and a rifampicin soaked artificial vascular graft was implanted. Tissue cultures showed no bacteria, and histological findings indicated inflammation with high leukocyte levels. There were no postoperative complications or neurologic abnormalities. Physical examination, blood tests, and computed tomography confirmed there was no relapse over the following 13 months. This is the first reported case of survival of a patient with an infectious abdominal aortic aneurysm initially presenting with meningitis caused by Streptococcus pneumoniae. PMID:26779361

  8. [Prevention of post-operative infection in heart surgery with extracorporeal circulation (apropos of 295 cases)].

    PubMed

    Hubscher, C; Coulombe, G; Oksenhendler, G; Laborde, F; Soyer, R; Winckler, C

    1979-01-01

    From April 1977 to November 1978, 295 patients were operated on using artificial circulation. 31 p. 100 of these developed a post-operative infectious complication, 7.3 p. 100 being of a serious nature (3.3 p. 100 suffered from mediastinitis, and 4 p. 100 from septicaemia). The organisms responsible are, in the case of the mediastinal infections the staphylococcus Citreus, and Gram negative bacilli in the case of the septicaemias. A retrospective analysis shows that there are two successive periods and that in the course of the second there is a decrease in the occurence of all of the infections and particularly in the cases of mediastinitis. This improvment would seem on superficial analysis to correspond with a change in the preventive antibiotic treatment, the cephradine--gentamicin combination having replaced penicillin G. However, the statistical study shows that other factors were altered between the two periods (type of antiseptic, duration of treatments, time of postoperative intubation) and that these equally contributed to the fall in the incidence of infection. In the light of this study, it would seem that if prophylactic antibiotic treatment essentially directed against staphylococci has a place in cardiac surgery with artificial circulation, it can only be regarded as one of several preventive factors. The statistical data gathered so far is not sufficient to prove the efficacy of this treatment.

  9. Immunologic and Infectious Diseases in Pediatric Cardiac Critical Care: Proceedings of the 10th International Pediatric Cardiac Intensive Care Society Conference.

    PubMed

    Axelrod, David M; Alten, Jeffrey A; Berger, John T; Hall, Mark W; Thiagarajan, Ravi; Bronicki, Ronald A

    2015-10-01

    Since the inception of the Pediatric Cardiac Intensive Care Society (PCICS) in 2003, remarkable advances in the care of children with critical cardiac disease have been developed. Specialized surgical approaches, anesthesiology practices, and intensive care management have all contributed to improved outcomes. However, significant morbidity often results from immunologic or infectious disease in the perioperative period or during a medical intensive care unit admission. The immunologic or infectious illness may lead to fever, which requires the attention and resources of the cardiac intensivist. Frequently, cardiopulmonary bypass leads to an inflammatory state that may present hemodynamic challenges or complicate postoperative care. However, inflammation unchecked by a compensatory anti-inflammatory response may also contribute to the development of capillary leak and lead to a complicated intensive care unit course. Any patient admitted to the intensive care unit is at risk for a hospital acquired infection, and no patients are at greater risk than the child treated with mechanical circulatory support. In summary, the prevention, diagnosis, and management of immunologic and infectious diseases in the pediatric cardiac intensive care unit is of paramount importance for the clinician. This review from the tenth PCICS International Conference will summarize the current knowledge in this important aspect of our field.

  10. Overview of Infectious Diseases

    MedlinePlus

    ... Pediatrician Health Issues Conditions Abdominal ADHD Allergies & Asthma Autism Cancer Chest & Lungs Chronic Conditions Cleft & Craniofacial Developmental ... to worms Last Updated 11/21/2015 Source Immunizations & Infectious Diseases: An Informed Parent's Guide (Copyright © 2006 ...

  11. Modeling Infectious Diseases

    MedlinePlus

    ... MIDAS models require a breadth of knowledge, the network draws together an interdisciplinary team of researchers with expertise in epidemiology, infectious diseases, computational biology, statistics, social sciences, physics, computer sciences and informatics. ...

  12. Non-Infectious Meningitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Resources for Healthcare Professionals Related Links Vaccine Schedules Preteen & Teen Vaccines Meningococcal Disease Sepsis Non-Infectious Meningitis ... confusion) Top of Page Related Links Vaccine Schedules Preteen & Teen Vaccines Meningococcal Disease Sepsis File Formats Help: ...

  13. Predictive Factors of Postoperative Pain and Postoperative Anxiety in Children Undergoing Elective Circumcision: A Prospective Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Tsamoudaki, Stella; Ntomi, Vasileia; Yiannopoulos, Ioannis; Christianakis, Efstratios; Pikoulis, Emmanuel

    2015-01-01

    Background Although circumcision for phimosis in children is a minor surgical procedure, it is followed by pain and carries the risk of increased postoperative anxiety. This study examined predictive factors of postoperative pain and anxiety in children undergoing circumcision. Methods We conducted a prospective cohort study of children scheduled for elective circumcision. Circumcision was performed applying one of the following surgical techniques: sutureless prepuceplasty (SP), preputial plasty technique (PP), and conventional circumcision (CC). Demographics and base-line clinical characteristics were collected, and assessment of the level of preoperative anxiety was performed. Subsequently, a statistical model was designed in order to examine predictive factors of postoperative pain and postoperative anxiety. Assessment of postoperative pain was performed using the Faces Pain Scale (FPS). The Post Hospitalization Behavior Questionnaire study was used to assess negative behavioral manifestations. Results A total of 301 children with a mean age of 7.56 ± 2.61 years were included in the study. Predictive factors of postoperative pain measured with the FPS included a) the type of surgical technique, b) the absence of siblings, and c) the presence of postoperative complications. Predictive factors of postoperative anxiety included a) the type of surgical technique, b) the level of education of mothers, c) the presence of preoperative anxiety, and d) a history of previous surgery. Conclusions Although our study was not without its limitations, it expands current knowledge by adding new predictive factors of postoperative pain and postoperative anxiety. Clearly, further randomized controlled studies are needed to confirm its results. PMID:26495079

  14. [Proteomics in infectious diseases].

    PubMed

    Quero, Sara; Párraga-Niño, Noemí; García-Núñez, Marian; Sabrià, Miquel

    2016-04-01

    Infectious diseases have a high incidence in the population, causing a major impact on global health. In vitro culture of microorganisms is the first technique applied for infection diagnosis which is laborious and time consuming. In recent decades, efforts have been focused on the applicability of "Omics" sciences, highlighting the progress provided by proteomic techniques in the field of infectious diseases. This review describes the management, processing and analysis of biological samples for proteomic research.

  15. Ethics and infectious disease.

    PubMed

    Selgelid, Michael J

    2005-06-01

    Bioethics apparently suffers from a misdistribution of research resources analogous to the '10/90' divide in medical research. Though infectious disease should be recognized as a topic of primary importance for bioethics, the general topic of infectious disease has received relatively little attention from the discipline of bioethics in comparison with things like abortion, euthanasia, genetics, cloning, stem cell research, and so on. The fact that the historical and potential future consequences of infectious diseases are almost unrivalled is one reason that the topic of infectious disease warrants more attention from bioethicists. The 'Black Death' eliminated one third of the European population during the 14th Century; the 1989 flu killed between 20 and 100 million people; and, in the 20th Century smallpox killed perhaps three times more people than all the wars of that period. In the contemporary world, epidemics (AIDS, multi-drug resistant turberculosis, and newly emerging infectious diseases such as SARS) continue to have dramatic consequences. A second reason why the topic of infectious disease deserves further attention is that it raises difficult ethical questions of its own. While infected individuals can threaten the health of other individuals and society as a whole, for example, public health care measures such as surveillance, isolation, and quarantine can require the infringement of widely accepted basic human rights and liberties. An important and difficult ethical question asks how to strike a balance between the utilitarian aim of promoting public health, on the one hand, and libertarian aims of protecting privacy and freedom of movement, on the other, in contexts involving diseases that are--to varying degrees--contagious, deadly, or otherwise dangerous. Third, since their burden is most heavily shouldered by the poor (in developing countries), infectious diseases involve issues of justice--which should be a central concern of ethics. I conclude

  16. Intraoperative laparoscopic complications for urological cancer procedures

    PubMed Central

    Montes, Sergio Fernández-Pello; Rodríguez, Ivan Gonzalez; Ugarteburu, Rodrigo Gil; Villamil, Luis Rodríguez; Mendez, Begoña Diaz; Gil, Patricio Suarez; Madera, Javier Mosquera

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To structure the rate of intraoperative complications that requires an intraoperative or perioperative resolution. METHODS: We perform a literature review of Medline database. The research was focused on intraoperative laparoscopic procedures inside the field of urological oncology. General rate of perioperative complications in laparoscopic urologic surgery is described to be around 12.4%. Most of the manuscripts published do not make differences between pure intraoperative, intraoperative with postoperative consequences and postoperative complications. RESULTS: We expose a narrative statement of complications, possible solutions and possible preventions for most frequent retroperitoneal and pelvic laparoscopic surgery. We expose the results with the following order: retroperitoneal laparoscopic surgery (radical nephrectomy, partial nephrectomy, nephroureterectomy and adrenalectomy) and pelvic laparoscopic surgery (radical prostatectomy and radical cystectomy). CONCLUSION: Intraoperative complications vary from different series. More scheduled reports should be done in order to better understand the real rates of complications. PMID:25984519

  17. Early reoperation performed for the management of complications in patients undergoing general thoracic surgical procedures

    PubMed Central

    Foroulis, Christophoros N.; Kleontas, Athanasios; Karatzopoulos, Avgerinos; Nana, Chryssoula; Tagarakis, George; Tossios, Paschalis; Anastasiadis, Kyriakos

    2014-01-01

    Objective To detect the rate and predisposing factors for the development of postoperative complications requiring re-operation for their control in the immediate postoperative period. Methods During the time period 2009-2012, 719 patients (male: 71.62%, mean age: 54±19 years) who underwent a wide range of general thoracic surgery procedures, were retrospectively collected. Data of patients who underwent early re-operation for the management of postoperative complications were assessed for identification of the responsible causative factors. Results Overall, 33/719 patients (4.6%) underwent early re-operation to control postoperative complications. Early re-operation was obviated by the need to control bleeding or to drain clotted hemothoraces in nine cases (27.3%), to manage a prolonged air leak in six cases (18.2%), to drain a post-thoracotomy empyema in five cases (15.2%), to revise the thoracotomy incision or an ischemic musculocutaneous flap in five cases (15.2%), to manage a bronchopleural fistula in four cases (12.1%), to manage persistent atelectasis of the remaining lung in two cases (6.1%), to cease a chyle leak in one case (3%) and to plicate the right hemidiaphragm in another one case (3%). The factors responsible for the development of complications requiring reopening of the chest for their management were technical in 17 cases (51.5%), initial surgery for lung or pleural infections in 9 (27.3%), the recent antiplatelet drug administration in 4 (12.1%) and advanced lung emphysema in 3 (9.1%). Mortality of re-operations was 6.1% (2/33) and it was associated with the need to proceed with completion pneumonectomy in the two cases with persistent atelectasis of the remaining lung and permanent parenchymal damage. The majority of complications requiring reoperation were observed after lung parenchyma resection (17 out of the 228 procedures/7.4%) or pleurectomy (7 out of the 106 procedures/6.5%). Reoperations after video-assisted thoracic surgery (VATS

  18. Infectious diarrhea: an overview.

    PubMed

    Dickinson, Brandon; Surawicz, Christina M

    2014-08-01

    Diarrheal disease, which is most often caused by infectious pathogens, is a significant cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide, especially in children. This is particularly true in developing countries. Recent outbreaks of infectious diarrhea in developed countries, including the USA, are often attributed to food handling and distribution practices and highlight the need for continued vigilance in this area. Another common cause of infectious diarrhea, Clostridium difficile infection (CDI), has historically been associated with the use of antibiotics and exposure to a health-care setting but is now increasingly common in the community in persons who lack the typical risk factors. Recent scientific advances have also led to new and proposed new therapies for infectious diarrhea, including fecal microbiota transplant (FMT) for recurrent C. difficile infection (RCDI), probiotics for prevention of antibiotic-associated diarrhea (AAD) and CDI, and the use of zinc supplementation in the treatment of acute diarrhea in children. Other therapies that have been in use for decades, such as the oral rehydration solution (ORS), continue to be the targets of scientific advancement in an effort to improve delivery and efficacy. Finally, post-infectious irritable bowel syndrome (PI-IBS) is an increasingly recognized occurrence. Attempts to understand the mechanism behind this phenomenon are underway and may provide insight into potential treatment options.

  19. Emergent Infectious Uveitis

    PubMed Central

    Khairallah, Moncef; Jelliti, Bechir; Jenzeri, Salah

    2009-01-01

    Infectious causes should always be considered in all patients with uveitis and it should be ruled out first. The differential diagnosis includes multiple well-known diseases including herpes, syphilis, toxoplasmosis, tuberculosis, bartonellosis, Lyme disease, and others. However, clinicians should be aware of emerging infectious agents as potential causes of systemic illness and also intraocular inflammation. Air travel, immigration, and globalization of business have overturned traditional pattern of geographic distribution of infectious diseases, and therefore one should work locally but think globally, though it is not possible always. This review recapitulates the systemic and ocular mainfestations of several emergent infectious diseases relevant to the ophthalmologist including Rickettsioses, West Nile virus infection, Rift valley fever, dengue fever, and chikungunya. Retinitis, chorioretinitis, retinal vasculitis, and optic nerve involvement have been associated with these emergent infectious diseases. The diagnosis of any of these infections is usually based on pattern of uveitis, systemic symptoms and signs, and specific epidemiological data and confirmed by detection of specific antibody in serum. A systematic ocular examination, showing fairly typical fundus findings, may help in establishing an early clinical diagnosis, which allows prompt, appropriate management. PMID:20404989

  20. Infectious Disease Transmission during Organ and Tissue Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Kuehnert, Matthew J.; Fishman, Jay A.

    2012-01-01

    Infectious disease transmission through organ and tissue transplantation has been associated with severe complications in recipients. Determination of donor-derived infectious risk associated with organ and tissue transplantation is challenging and limited by availability and performance characteristics of current donor epidemiologic screening (e.g., questionnaire) and laboratory testing tools. Common methods and standards for evaluating potential donors of organs and tissues are needed to facilitate effective data collection for assessing the risk for infectious disease transmission. Research programs can use advanced microbiological technologies to define infectious risks posed by pathogens that are known to be transplant transmissible and provide insights into transmission potential of emerging infectious diseases for which transmission characteristics are unknown. Key research needs are explored. Stakeholder collaboration for surveillance and research infrastructure is required to enhance transplant safety. PMID:22840823

  1. Postoperative intravenous morphine titration.

    PubMed

    Aubrun, F; Mazoit, J-X; Riou, B

    2012-02-01

    Relief of acute pain during the immediate postoperative period is an important task for anaesthetists. Morphine is widely used to control moderate-to-severe postoperative pain and the use of small i.v. boluses of morphine in the post-anaesthesia care unit allows a rapid titration of the dose needed for adequate pain relief. The essential principle of a titration regimen must be to adapt the morphine dose to the pain level. Although morphine would not appear to be the most appropriate choice for achieving rapid pain relief, this is the sole opioid assessed in many studies of immediate postoperative pain management using titration. More than 90% of the patients have pain relief using a protocol of morphine titration and the mean dose required to obtain pain relief is 12 (7) mg, after a median of four boluses. Sedation is frequent during i.v. morphine titration and should be considered as a morphine-related adverse event and not evidence of pain relief. The incidence of ventilatory depression is very low when the criteria to limit the dose of i.v. morphine are enforced. Morphine titration can be used with caution in elderly patients, in children, or in obese patients. In practice, i.v. morphine titration allows the physician to meet the needs of individual patients rapidly and limits the risk of overdose making this method the first step in postoperative pain management.

  2. [Postoperative complications of cochlear implant: eight years of experience].

    PubMed

    Yépez-Pabón, Daniela; Guevara-Sánchez, Marco

    2015-01-01

    Introducción: el implante coclear es una cirugía con poca morbimortalidad. Las complicaciones posquirúrgicas pueden ser menores y mayores. Las menores requieren manejo conservador; las mayores, reintervención o retiro del implante. El objetivo de este trabajo es determinar nuestras complicaciones y cotejarlas con series internacionales y latinoamericanas. Métodos: se analizan retrospectivamente 275 casos intervenidos entre diciembre 2005 y diciembre 2013. Se incluyen niños y adultos entre 11 meses hasta 82 años de edad. Se evalúan datos demográficos, colocación uni o bilateral, tipo de cirugía y las complicaciones posquirúrgicas. El seguimiento fue por 20 meses. Resultados: el 57.46 % son niños y adolescentes; el 33.81 % jóvenes y adultos, y el 8.73 % adultos mayores. El índice de complicaciones es del 12 % (n = 33), 6.91 % en mujeres y 5.09 % en hombres. Entre los 19 a 60 años hay más complicaciones. Las complicaciones menores representan el 7.64 %: infección local (n = 9), parálisis facial transitoria tardía (n = 7), vértigo (n = 3) y tinnitus (n = 2). Prevalecen en niños y adultos. Las complicaciones mayores son el 4.36 %: hematomas postquirúrgicos (n = 8), extrusiones (n = 2) e inadecuada colocación de electrodos (n = 2). Predominan en los adultos entre 19 a 60 años. No se presentan casos de meningitis ni decesos. Conclusiones: la implantación coclear tiene baja incidencia de complicaciones. Nuestros resultados, los únicos reportados a nivel nacional, son similares a los que menciona la literatura.

  3. Postoperative incentive spirometry use.

    PubMed

    Hassanzadeh, Hamid; Jain, Amit; Tan, Eric W; Stein, Benjamin E; Van Hoy, Megan L; Stewart, Nadine N; Lemma, Mesfin A

    2012-06-01

    The authors hypothesized that the use of incentive spirometry by orthopedic patients is less than the recommended level and is affected by patient-related factors and type of surgery. To determine its postoperative use, the authors prospectively surveyed all patients in their institution's general orthopedic ward who had undergone elective spine surgery or total knee or hip arthroplasty during a consecutive 3-month period in 2010, excluding patients with postoperative delirium or requiring a monitored bed. All 182 patients (74 men, 108 women; average age, 64.5 years; range, 32-88 years; spine group, n=55; arthroplasty group, n=127), per protocol, received preoperative spirometry education by a licensed respiratory therapist (recommended use, 10 times hourly) and reinforcement education by nurses. Patients were asked twice daily (morning and evening) regarding their spirometry use during the previous 1-hour period by a registered nurse on postoperative days 1 through 3. All data were collected by the same 2 nurses using the same standardized questionnaire. Spirometry use was correlated with surgery type, postoperative day/time, and patient's age and sex. Student's t test, Spearman test, and one-way analysis of variance were used to compare differences (P<.05). Spirometry use averaged 4.1 times per hour (range, 0-10 times). No statistical correlations were found between spirometry use and age. Sex did not influence spirometry use. The arthroplasty group reported significantly higher use than did the spine group: 4.3 and 3.5 times per hour, respectively. Mean use increased significantly between postoperative days 1, 2, and 3.

  4. Forecasting Infectious Disease Outbreaks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaman, J. L.

    2015-12-01

    Dynamic models of infectious disease systems abound and are used to study the epidemiological characteristics of disease outbreaks, the ecological mechanisms affecting transmission, and the suitability of various control and intervention strategies. The dynamics of disease transmission are non-linear and consequently difficult to forecast. Here, we describe combined model-inference frameworks developed for the prediction of infectious diseases. We show that accurate and reliable predictions of seasonal influenza outbreaks can be made using a mathematical model representing population-level influenza transmission dynamics that has been recursively optimized using ensemble data assimilation techniques and real-time estimates of influenza incidence. Operational real-time forecasts of influenza and other infectious diseases have been and are currently being generated.

  5. Sigmoid Volvulus Complicating Postpartum Period

    PubMed Central

    Blake, Erin; Gonzalez, Eduardo; Pieracci, Frederic

    2017-01-01

    Background. Sigmoid volvulus is a rare complication of pregnancy and the puerperium. Case. A 19-year-old patient, gravida 1 para 0 at 41 0/7 weeks of gestation, admitted for late-term induction of labor underwent an uncomplicated primary low transverse cesarean delivery for arrest of descent. Her postoperative period was complicated by sudden onset of abdominal pain and the ultimate diagnosis of sigmoid volvulus. Conclusion. Prompt surgical evaluation of an acute abdomen in the postpartum period is essential; delayed diagnosis and treatment can lead to significant maternal morbidity and mortality. PMID:28251004

  6. Infectious waste feed system

    DOEpatents

    Coulthard, E. James

    1994-01-01

    An infectious waste feed system for comminuting infectious waste and feeding the comminuted waste to a combustor automatically without the need for human intervention. The system includes a receptacle for accepting waste materials. Preferably, the receptacle includes a first and second compartment and a means for sealing the first and second compartments from the atmosphere. A shredder is disposed to comminute waste materials accepted in the receptacle to a predetermined size. A trough is disposed to receive the comminuted waste materials from the shredder. A feeding means is disposed within the trough and is movable in a first and second direction for feeding the comminuted waste materials to a combustor.

  7. Pulmonary complications of general surgery.

    PubMed

    Pierce, A K; Robertson, J

    1977-01-01

    1. Patients should be divided preoperatively into low- or high-risk categories, depending on their probability of developing postoperative pulmonary complications. The evaluation should include spirometry as well as an assessment of the previously defined risk factors. 2. Patients in a low-risk category need only instruction in deep breathing pre- and postoperatively. Routine use of supplemented oxygen postoperatively is reasonable until it can be demonstrated whether such is necessary. 3. High-risk patients should be as free as possible of respiratory secretions at the time of surgery. A regimen for this purpose includes cessation of smoking, and administration of inhaled bronchodilators followed by chest percussion and postural drainage. 4. High-risk patients should be carefully instructed in deep breathing and coughing preoperatively. A mechanical device such as an incentive spirometer may be beneficial in this regard. If it is not possible to achieve spontaneous deep breathing, an attempt to accomplish this by IPPB may be undertaken. The tidal volume desired should be ordered. If IPPB does not result in large tidal volumes, it should be discontinued. 5. The deep breathing procedure found to be most successful preoperativelly should be continued postoperatively. 6. The patient should be as mobile as possible while in bed and ambulated as soon as is feasible. 7. Patients with preoperative expiratory flows of less than 20% of predicted values or with chronic hypercapnia should be carefully observed for postoperative ventilatory failure.

  8. Management of complications with flap procedures and replantation.

    PubMed

    Sammer, Douglas M

    2015-05-01

    Replantation and flap procedures employ microvascular techniques to salvage or reconstruct a severely damaged limb or digit. The most devastating complications include complete or partial flap loss, or replantation failure due to vascular complications. Often, these complications can be prevented by appropriate patient selection, careful surgical planning, meticulous technique, and proper postoperative management. This article discusses complications related to replantation and flap procedures in the upper limb, focusing on preventing and managing these complications.

  9. Vaginal Evisceration: An Unexpected Complication of Conization

    PubMed Central

    Ghassani, Ali; Andre, Benoit; Simon-Toulza, Caroline; Tanguy le Gac, Yann; Martinez, Alejandra; Vidal, Fabien

    2014-01-01

    Background. Large loop excision of the transformation zone (LLETZ) is routinely performed for the management of high grade intracervical neoplasia (CIN). Several uncommon complications have been described, including postoperative peritonitis, pseudoaneurysm of uterine artery, and bowel fistula. We report a unique case of postoperative vaginal evisceration and the subsequent management. Case. A 73-years-old woman underwent LLETZ for high grade CIN. On postoperative day 3, she was admitted for small bowel evisceration through the vagina. Surgical management was based on combined laparoscopic and transvaginal approach and consisted in bowel inspection and reinstatement, peritoneal washing, and dehiscence repair. Conclusions. Vaginal evisceration is a rare but potentially serious complication of pelvic surgery. This case report is to make clinicians aware of such complication following LLETZ and its management. PMID:25506010

  10. Preoperative anemia and postoperative outcomes after hepatectomy

    PubMed Central

    Tohme, Samer; Varley, Patrick R.; Landsittel, Douglas P.; Chidi, Alexis P.; Tsung, Allan

    2015-01-01

    Background Preoperative anaemia is associated with adverse outcomes after surgery but outcomes after liver surgery specifically are not well established. We aimed to analyze the incidence of and effects of preoperative anemia on morbidity and mortality in patients undergoing liver resection. Methods All elective hepatectomies performed for the period 2005–2012 recorded in the American College of Surgeons' National Surgical Quality Improvement Program (ACS-NSQIP) database were evaluated. We obtained anonymized data for 30-day mortality and major morbidity (one or more major complication), demographics, and preoperative and perioperative risk factors. We used multivariable logistic regression models to assess the adjusted effect of anemia, which was defined as (hematocrit <39% in men, <36% in women), on postoperative outcomes. Results We obtained data for 12,987 patients, of whom 4260 (32.8%) had preoperative anemia. Patients with preoperative anemia experienced higher postoperative major morbidity and mortality rates compared to those without anemia. After adjustment for predefined variables, preoperative anemia was an independent risk factor for postoperative major morbidity (adjusted OR 1.21, 1.09–1.33). After adjustment, there was no significant difference in postoperative mortality for patients with or without preoperative anemia (adjusted OR 0.88, 0.66–1.16). Conclusion Preoperative anemia is independently associated with an increased risk of major morbidity in patients undergoing hepatectomy. Therefore, it is crucial to readdress preoperative blood management in anemic patients prior to hepatectomy. PMID:27017165

  11. Infectious complication or exacerbation of granulomatosis with polyangiitis?

    PubMed

    Masiak, Anna; Struk-Panfill, Małgorzata; Zdrojewski, Zbigniew

    2015-01-01

    Granulomatosis with polyangiitis (GPA) is a primary, systemic small vessel vasculitis. The respiratory tract is typically involved in the course of the disease. Abnormalities on the chest radiograph are noted in more than 70% patients at some point during their disease history. In some clinical situations it is difficult to distinguish whether symptoms result from the underlying disease or are a symptom of infection. In these clinical situations, chest computed tomography (CT) can be very useful. We present a patient with GPA localized mainly in the respiratory tract with sudden deterioration of the general state and new abnormalities revealed in the CT of the chest.

  12. Eosinophilia in Infectious Diseases

    PubMed Central

    O'Connell, Elise M.; Nutman, Thomas B.

    2015-01-01

    In determining the etiology of eosinophilia, it is necessary to consider the type of patient, including previous travel and exposure history, comorbidities, and symptoms. In this review, we discuss the approach to the patient with eosinophilia from an infectious diseases perspective based on symptom complexes. PMID:26209897

  13. [Antibiotherapy of infectious endocarditis].

    PubMed

    Meyssonnier, Vanina; Bricaire, François

    2012-04-01

    Antibiotherapy is the pillar of the infectious endocarditis treatment. Bactericidal drugs must be used and their choice has to be adapted to bacterial sensitivity. The duration of treatment, traditionaly lengthy, especially in prosthetic valve endocarditis, depends on bacteria and has been shortened in some guidelines because of the combination of aminoglycoside.

  14. Dynamics of infectious diseases.

    PubMed

    Rock, Kat; Brand, Sam; Moir, Jo; Keeling, Matt J

    2014-01-01

    Modern infectious disease epidemiology has a strong history of using mathematics both for prediction and to gain a deeper understanding. However the study of infectious diseases is a highly interdisciplinary subject requiring insights from multiple disciplines, in particular a biological knowledge of the pathogen, a statistical description of the available data and a mathematical framework for prediction. Here we begin with the basic building blocks of infectious disease epidemiology--the SIS and SIR type models--before considering the progress that has been made over the recent decades and the challenges that lie ahead. Throughout we focus on the understanding that can be developed from relatively simple models, although accurate prediction will inevitably require far greater complexity beyond the scope of this review. In particular, we focus on three critical aspects of infectious disease models that we feel fundamentally shape their dynamics: heterogeneously structured populations, stochasticity and spatial structure. Throughout we relate the mathematical models and their results to a variety of real-world problems.

  15. Streptococcus Pneumoniae Intracranial Abscess and Post-Infectious Vasculitis

    PubMed Central

    Lucas, Alexandra; Maung, Ko Ko; Ratts, Ryan

    2016-01-01

    Intracranial abscesses are rare complications of Streptococcus pneumoniae infections, and to our knowledge, there have been no case reports of post-infectious vasculitis developing in such patients. Here we describe the case of a 48-year-old post-splenectomy male who developed post-infectious vasculitis following S. pneumoniae otitis media complicated by mastoiditis, osteomyelitis, meningitis, and intracranial abscess. Clinicians ought to be aware of the possible adverse outcomes of invasive S. pneumoniae and the limitations of current treatment options. PMID:28191299

  16. Central nervous system complications after liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jeong-Min; Jung, Keun-Hwa; Lee, Soon-Tae; Chu, Kon; Roh, Jae-Kyu

    2015-08-01

    We investigated the diversity of central nervous system complications after liver transplantation in terms of clinical manifestations and temporal course. Liver transplantation is a lifesaving option for end stage liver disease patients but post-transplantation neurologic complications can hamper recovery. Between 1 January 2001 and 31 December 2010, patients who had undergone liver transplantation at a single tertiary university hospital were included. We reviewed their medical records and brain imaging data and classified central nervous system complications into four categories including vascular, metabolic, infectious and neoplastic. The onset of central nervous system complications was grouped into five post-transplantation intervals including acute (within 1 month), early subacute (1-3 months), late subacute (3-12 months), chronic (1-3 years), and long-term (after 3 years). During follow-up, 65 of 791 patients (8.2%) experienced central nervous system complications, with 30 occurring within 1 month after transplantation. Vascular etiology was the most common (27 patients; 41.5%), followed by metabolic (23; 35.4%), infectious (nine patients; 13.8%), and neoplastic (six patients). Metabolic encephalopathy with altered consciousness was the most common etiology during the acute period, followed by vascular disorders. An initial focal neurologic deficit was detected in vascular and neoplastic complications, whereas metabolic and infectious etiologies presented with non-focal symptoms. Our study shows that the etiology of central nervous system complications after liver transplantation changes over time, and initial symptoms can help to predict etiology.

  17. Keratophakia--postoperative astigmatism.

    PubMed

    Swinger, C A; Troutman, R C; Forman, J S

    1987-01-01

    Forty-nine cases of primary keratophakia and 13 cases of secondary keratophakia were analyzed for postoperative astigmatism. For primary cases, the surgically induced astigmatism was 1.55 D, whereas for secondary cases it was 0.19 D (insignificant). There was a tendency for both procedures to induce against-the-rule astigmatism, and both procedures were found capable of producing irregular astigmatism.

  18. Infectious Diseases Physician Compensation: An Improved Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Ritter, Jethro Trees; Lynch, John B.; MacIntyre, Ann T.; Trotman, Robin

    2016-01-01

    Negotiating physician compensation can be complicated because many factors now influence the ways in which physicians can be compensated. Infectious diseases (ID) specialists typically provide a wide array of services, ranging from patient care to administrative leadership. Compensation surveys from national organizations have produced results based on small samples and often are not congruent with ID physicians’ perceptions. In July of 2015, the Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA) conducted a compensation survey to assess current compensation earned by the diverse ID specialists within its membership. Members of IDSA's Clinical Affairs Committee report the results from the 2015 IDSA Physician Compensation survey, with a particular focus on the findings from respondents who indicate “patient care” as their primary responsibility and present a discussion that compares and contrasts results against other survey data. PMID:27419159

  19. Anaesthetic complications in plastic surgery.

    PubMed

    Nath, Soumya Sankar; Roy, Debashis; Ansari, Farrukh; Pawar, Sundeep T

    2013-05-01

    Anaesthesia related complications in plastic surgeries are fortunately rare, but potentially catastrophic. Maintaining patient safety in the operating room is a major concern of anaesthesiologists, surgeons, hospitals and surgical facilities. Circumventing preventable complications is essential and pressure to avoid these complications in cosmetic surgery is increasing. Key aspects of patient safety in the operating room are outlined, including patient positioning, airway management and issues related to some specific conditions, essential for minimizing post-operative morbidity. Risks associated with extremes of age in the plastic surgery population, may be minimised by a better understanding of the physiologic changes as well as the pre-operative and post-operative considerations in caring for this special group of patients. An understanding of the anaesthesiologist's concerns during paediatric plastic surgical procedures can facilitate the coordination of efforts between the multiple services involved in the care of these children. Finally, the reader will have a better understanding of the perioperative care of unique populations including the morbidly obese and the elderly. Attention to detail in these aspects of patient safety can help avoid unnecessary complication and significantly improve the patients' experience and surgical outcome.

  20. Anaesthetic complications in plastic surgery

    PubMed Central

    Nath, Soumya Sankar; Roy, Debashis; Ansari, Farrukh; Pawar, Sundeep T.

    2013-01-01

    Anaesthesia related complications in plastic surgeries are fortunately rare, but potentially catastrophic. Maintaining patient safety in the operating room is a major concern of anaesthesiologists, surgeons, hospitals and surgical facilities. Circumventing preventable complications is essential and pressure to avoid these complications in cosmetic surgery is increasing. Key aspects of patient safety in the operating room are outlined, including patient positioning, airway management and issues related to some specific conditions, essential for minimizing post-operative morbidity. Risks associated with extremes of age in the plastic surgery population, may be minimised by a better understanding of the physiologic changes as well as the pre-operative and post-operative considerations in caring for this special group of patients. An understanding of the anaesthesiologist's concerns during paediatric plastic surgical procedures can facilitate the coordination of efforts between the multiple services involved in the care of these children. Finally, the reader will have a better understanding of the perioperative care of unique populations including the morbidly obese and the elderly. Attention to detail in these aspects of patient safety can help avoid unnecessary complication and significantly improve the patients’ experience and surgical outcome. PMID:24501480

  1. [Liver diseases of infectious aetiology].

    PubMed

    Chalupa, P

    2007-01-01

    Review article is dealing with the problems of infectious diseases of the liver. Attention is paid to the basic infectious agents, jaundice accompanying infectious diseases and focal infections of the liver. Specific infections of the liver are supplemented by brief pathological and anatomical characteristics.

  2. Bedbugs and infectious diseases.

    PubMed

    Delaunay, Pascal; Blanc, Véronique; Del Giudice, Pascal; Levy-Bencheton, Anna; Chosidow, Olivier; Marty, Pierre; Brouqui, Philippe

    2011-01-15

    Bedbugs are brown and flat hematophagous insects. The 2 cosmopolite species, Cimex lectularius and Cimex hemipterus, feed on humans and/or domestic animals, and recent outbreaks have been reported in occidental countries. Site assessment for bedbug eradication is complex but can be assured, despite emerging insecticide resistance, by hiring a pest-control manager. The common dermatological presentation of bites is an itchy maculopapular wheal. Urticarial reactions and anaphylaxis can also occur. Bedbugs are suspected of transmitting infectious agents, but no report has yet demonstrated that they are infectious disease vectors. We describe 45 candidate pathogens potentially transmitted by bedbugs, according to their vectorial capacity, in the wild, and vectorial competence, in the laboratory. Because of increasing demands for information about effective control tactics and public health risks of bedbugs, continued research is needed to identify new pathogens in wild Cimex species (spp) and insecticide resistance.

  3. Bedbugs and Infectious Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Blanc, Véronique; Del Giudice, Pascal; Levy-Bencheton, Anna; Chosidow, Olivier; Marty, Pierre; Brouqui, Philippe

    2011-01-01

    Bedbugs are brown and flat hematophagous insects. The 2 cosmopolite species, Cimex lectularius and Cimex hemipterus, feed on humans and/or domestic animals, and recent outbreaks have been reported in occidental countries. Site assessment for bedbug eradication is complex but can be assured, despite emerging insecticide resistance, by hiring a pest-control manager. The common dermatological presentation of bites is an itchy maculopapular wheal. Urticarial reactions and anaphylaxis can also occur. Bedbugs are suspected of transmitting infectious agents, but no report has yet demonstrated that they are infectious disease vectors. We describe 45 candidate pathogens potentially transmitted by bedbugs, according to their vectorial capacity, in the wild, and vectorial competence, in the laboratory. Because of increasing demands for information about effective control tactics and public health risks of bedbugs, continued research is needed to identify new pathogens in wild Cimex species (spp) and insecticide resistance. PMID:21288844

  4. Complications of thyroidectomy for large goiter

    PubMed Central

    Berri, Toufik; Houari, Rachida

    2013-01-01

    Thyroidectomy is a routinely common practiced surgery. Morbidity and mortality from thyroid surgery are disregarded nowadays and undervalued in the literature. Perioperative risks and complications still exist for large goiters and can be life-threatening. These complications may occur during the anesthesia and intubation, intra-, or postoperatively. We set out through a case of a large cervical multinodular goiter (MNG) and a review of literature the perioperative complications and how to avoid them. During the total thyroidectomy operation, an accidental devascularisation of a parathyroid gland, a cervical hematoma which was evacuated by surgical reoperation, hemodynamic disorder and a transitory hypoparathyroidism were the postoperative complications that occurred. Surgery for large goiters remains difficult; so adequate preoperative assessment, particular attention and careful operative procedure should be followed to obtain better surgical outcomes. PMID:24847400

  5. Pre- and Postoperative Imaging of the Aortic Root

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Frandics P.; Mitchell, R. Scott; Miller, D. Craig; Fleischmann, Dominik

    2016-01-01

    Three-dimensional datasets acquired using computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging are ideally suited for characterization of the aortic root. These modalities offer different advantages and limitations, which must be weighed according to the clinical context. This article provides an overview of current aortic root imaging, highlighting normal anatomy, pathologic conditions, imaging techniques, measurement thresholds, relevant surgical procedures, postoperative complications and potential imaging pitfalls. Patients with a range of clinical conditions are predisposed to aortic root disease, including Marfan syndrome, bicuspid aortic valve, vascular Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, and Loeys-Dietz syndrome. Various surgical techniques may be used to repair the aortic root, including placement of a composite valve graft, such as the Bentall and Cabrol procedures; placement of an aortic root graft with preservation of the native valve, such as the Yacoub and David techniques; and implantation of a biologic graft, such as a homograft, autograft, or xenograft. Potential imaging pitfalls in the postoperative period include mimickers of pathologic processes such as felt pledgets, graft folds, and nonabsorbable hemostatic agents. Postoperative complications that may be encountered include pseudoaneurysms, infection, and dehiscence. Radiologists should be familiar with normal aortic root anatomy, surgical procedures, and postoperative complications, to accurately interpret pre- and postoperative imaging performed for evaluation of the aortic root. Online supplemental material is available for this article. ©RSNA, 2015 PMID:26761529

  6. INFECTIOUS PAPILLOMATOSIS OF RABBITS

    PubMed Central

    Shope, Richard E.; Hurst, E. Weston

    1933-01-01

    A papilloma has been observed in wild cottontail rabbits and has been found to be transmissible to both wild and domestic rabbits. The clinical and pathological pictures of the condition have been described. It has been found that the causative agent is readily filtrable through Berkefeld but not regularly through Seitz filters, that it stores well in glycerol, that it is still active after heating to 67°C. for 30 minutes, but not after heating to 70°C., and that it exhibits a marked tropism for cutaneous epithelium. The activities and properties of the papilloma-producing agent warrant its classification as a filtrable virus. Rabbits carrying experimentally produced papillomata are partially or completely immune to reinfection and, furthermore, their sera partially or completely neutralize the causative virus. The disease is transmissible in series through wild rabbits and virus of wild rabbit origin is readily transmissible to domestic rabbits, producing in this species papillomata identical in appearance with those found in wild rabbits. However, the condition is not transmissible in series through domestic rabbits. The possible significance of this observation has been discussed. The virus of infectious papillomatosis is not related immunologically to either the virus of infectious fibroma or to that of infectious myxoma of rabbits. PMID:19870219

  7. Immunoserology of infectious diseases.

    PubMed Central

    James, K

    1990-01-01

    The immune response to microorganisms not only participates in the elimination of unwanted organisms from the body, but also assists in diagnosis of infectious diseases. The nonspecific immune response is the first line of defense, assisting the body until the specific immune response can be mobilized to provide protective mechanisms. The specific immune response involves humoral or cell-mediated immunity or both, dependent on the nature of the organism and its site of sequestration. A variety of test systems have been developed to identify the causative organisms of infectious diseases. Test systems used in immunoserology have classically included methods of detecting antigen-antibody reactions which range from complement fixation to immunoassay methods. Relevant test systems for detecting antigens and antibodies are described. With numerous test systems available to detect antigens and antibodies, there can be confusion regarding selection of the appropriate system for each application. Methods for detecting antibody to verify immunity differ from immunologic methods to diagnose disease. Techniques to detect soluble antigens present in active infectious states may appear similar to those used to detect antibody, but their differences should be appreciated. PMID:2187592

  8. [Renaissance of infectious diseases].

    PubMed

    Gładysz, Andrzej; Fleischer-Stepniewska, Katarzyna

    2011-05-01

    According to the report of the National Institutes of Health (NIH) in Bethesda, Maryland, USA, infectious diseases are one of the eight most common causes of illness since 1990. Due to breaking down barriers of interspecies, the state of immunosuppression, widespread use of antibiotics, there are still new threats, and earlier known to cause disease of a different course, resistant to previously effective therapies. The evolution of infectious diseases directs our attention primarily on the validity of the principles of rational antibiotic use to the increasing resistance of microorganisms. The movements of the opponents of vaccination appear to be more effective than the planned education of doctors and their patients, and the absence of sufficient administrative control performance of vaccination, raises a serious problem in contemporary clinical researcher. Infectious diseases will continue to exist as long as host organisms. It is important to the fight against them, making the best use of expertise and funds. In such a situation, the balance may move to benefit us--humans.

  9. Postoperative conversion disorder.

    PubMed

    Afolabi, Kola; Ali, Sameer; Gahtan, Vivian; Gorji, Reza; Li, Fenghua; Nussmeier, Nancy A

    2016-05-01

    Conversion disorder is a psychiatric disorder in which psychological stress causes neurologic deficits. A 28-year-old female surgical patient had uneventful general anesthesia and emergence but developed conversion disorder 1 hour postoperatively. She reported difficulty speaking, right-hand numbness and weakness, and right-leg paralysis. Neurologic examination and imaging revealed no neuronal damage, herniation, hemorrhage, or stroke. The patient mentioned failing examinations the day before surgery and discontinuing her prescribed antidepressant medication, leading us to diagnose conversion disorder, with eventual confirmation by neuroimaging and follow-up examinations.

  10. Predictors of complications in gynaecological oncological surgery: a prospective multicentre study (UKGOSOC—UK gynaecological oncology surgical outcomes and complications)

    PubMed Central

    Iyer, R; Gentry-Maharaj, A; Nordin, A; Burnell, M; Liston, R; Manchanda, R; Das, N; Desai, R; Gornall, R; Beardmore-Gray, A; Nevin, J; Hillaby, K; Leeson, S; Linder, A; Lopes, A; Meechan, D; Mould, T; Varkey, S; Olaitan, A; Rufford, B; Ryan, A; Shanbhag, S; Thackeray, A; Wood, N; Reynolds, K; Menon, U

    2015-01-01

    Background: There are limited data on surgical outcomes in gynaecological oncology. We report on predictors of complications in a multicentre prospective study. Methods: Data on surgical procedures and resulting complications were contemporaneously recorded on consented patients in 10 participating UK gynaecological cancer centres. Patients were sent follow-up letters to capture any further complications. Post-operative (Post-op) complications were graded (I–V) in increasing severity using the Clavien-Dindo system. Grade I complications were excluded from the analysis. Univariable and multivariable regression was used to identify predictors of complications using all surgery for intra-operative (Intra-op) and only those with both hospital and patient-reported data for Post-op complications. Results: Prospective data were available on 2948 major operations undertaken between April 2010 and February 2012. Median age was 62 years, with 35% obese and 20.4% ASA grade ⩾3. Consultant gynaecological oncologists performed 74.3% of operations. Intra-op complications were reported in 139 of 2948 and Grade II–V Post-op complications in 379 of 1462 surgeries. The predictors of risk were different for Intra-op and Post-op complications. For Intra-op complications, previous abdominal surgery, metabolic/endocrine disorders (excluding diabetes), surgical complexity and final diagnosis were significant in univariable and multivariable regression (P<0.05), with diabetes only in multivariable regression (P=0.006). For Post-op complications, age, comorbidity status, diabetes, surgical approach, duration of surgery, and final diagnosis were significant in both univariable and multivariable regression (P<0.05). Conclusions: This multicentre prospective audit benchmarks the considerable morbidity associated with gynaecological oncology surgery. There are significant patient and surgical factors that influence this risk. PMID:25535730

  11. [Multiple complications after renal transplantation].

    PubMed

    Manrique, J; Rossich, E; Hernández Sierra, A

    2004-01-01

    This is the case of a 32-year-old male patient, diagnosed with end stage renal disease secondary to a focal and segmental glomerulonephritis. After four years of haemodialysis, he received a renal graft from a cadaveric donor. During the following sixteen years, he developped many different complications. In the early post-transplant period, he developed a severe acute tubular necrosis and two episodes of acute rejection took place, both of them with later recovery. Among the outstanding infectious complications were a virus herpes zoster dorsal infection and a Pseudomonas aeruginosa nosocomial pneumonia. Twelve months later, a series of severe digestive complications took place: cholecystitis that required cholecystectomy, pancreatic pseudocyst which required laparotomy because of an abdominal complication, two separate episodes of upper digestive bleeding that finally required gastric surgery, and an hemorrhagic subphrenic abscess that required a second laparotomy. Currently he has developed a calcified chronic pancreatitis. Moreover, metabolic complications must be mentioned carbohydrate intolerance, cataracts and an avascular bone necrosis, all of them closely related to the immunosuppressive therapy. In spite of these multiple complications, he mantains a good renal function and his quality of life is acceptable.

  12. Infectious intracranial aneurysms: triage and management.

    PubMed

    Gulek, Bernice G; Rapport, Richard

    2011-02-01

    Infectious intracranial aneurysms are a rare but serious potential complication of subacute endocarditis. Early diagnosis and treatment is essential to prevent devastating neurological deficits and mortality. Because nurse practitioners' roles expand into acute care as well as urgent care settings, they are frequently involved in the care of this population. Identifying the patients at risk, ordering appropriate studies, and initiating goal directed therapy are vital to outcomes. For nurse practitioners who are involved in care of neuroscience populations, it is important to be familiar with disease processes. This article provides a literature review of the topic, explores diagnostic methods, discusses management strategies, and presents an illustrative case.

  13. A case of infectious endocarditis due to BCG.

    PubMed

    Fournier, Alice; Gouriet, Frédérique; Fournier, Pierre-Edouard; Casalta, Jean-Paul; Saby, Ludivine; Habib, Gilbert; Drancourt, Michel; Raoult, Didier

    2015-06-01

    The occurrence of bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) disease following instillation for bladder cancer is commonly documented. The intravesical administration of BCG is generally safe, but may present severe complications. A fatal case of native aortic valve infectious endocarditis with septicemia due to BCG in a patient treated with intravesical instillation is reported herein.

  14. MR imaging evaluation of the postoperative meniscus.

    PubMed

    Russo, A; Capasso, R; Varelli, C; Laporta, A; Carbone, M; D'Agosto, G; Giovine, S; Zappia, M; Reginelli, A

    2017-03-01

    MR imaging has been widely evaluated in the assessment of patients with recurrent or residual symptoms following meniscal surgery. Importantly, the causes of such symptoms may relate to failure or complication of the surgical procedure, a possible recurrent or residual meniscal tear, or may be related to other causes of joint symptoms, including tears of the contralateral meniscus, or local hyaline cartilage, or marrow abnormalities subjacent to or distant to the meniscal surgical site. The complex diagnostic issues involved in the MR imaging evaluation of the postoperative meniscus were identified in early MR imaging studies. The knowledge of the normal MR imaging appearance of the knee after the more common repair procedures will allow radiologists to recognize complications associated with such procedures. In this article, we discuss the MR imaging evaluation of the knee after meniscal surgery.

  15. Efficacy of Opioid-free Anesthesia in Reducing Postoperative Respiratory Depression in Children Undergoing Tonsillectomy

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-12-08

    Anesthesia; General Anesthesia; Analgesics, Opioid; Postoperative Complications; Pathologic Processes; Physiologic Effects of Drugs; Narcotics; Analgesics; Sleep Disordered Breathing; Obstructive Sleep Apnea of Child; Tonsillectomy; Respiratory Depression; Dexmedetomidine; Ketamine; Lidocaine; Gabapentin; Pulse Oximetry

  16. Erotic complications.

    PubMed

    Slochower, J

    1999-12-01

    The author argues that erotic transference-countertransference dynamics present particular complexities when they develop between gender constellations other than male analyst and female patient. She addresses the dynamics of a complicated erotic transference in concert with an aversive countertransference response as it evolved between a female analyst and female patient. The intense erotic transference that developed defied classification as either maternallerotic or oedipallerotic, and instead included both features in a rapidly shifting process that was difficult to address analytically. The analyst's confused, often aversive, response to her patient's erotic wishes ultimately revealed a subtle re-enactment involving split-off and erotised experiences of emotional penetration and scrutiny. When these issues were addressed, the erotic transference dissolved, and the analyst's experience of her patient shifted rather dramatically. It is suggested that complex erotic transference sometimes contains within it evidence of previously repressed object experiences that were not primarily sexual in nature.

  17. Relationship between anesthesia and postoperative endophthalmitis

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Hou-Chuan; Tseng, Wei-Cheng; Pao, Shu-I; Wong, Chih-Shung; Huang, Ren-Chih; Chan, Wei-Hung; Wu, Zhi-Fu

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Previous study showed that patients under general anesthesia (GA) had nasopharyngeal secretions on the face at the end of ocular surgery, especially in propofol-based total intravenous anesthesia (TIVA), it might induce postoperative endophthalmitis. Therefore, we conducted a retrospective study to compare the incidence of endophthalmitis after ocular surgery under topical, inhalation anesthesia, and propofol-based TIVA in our medical center from 2011 to 2015. A total of 21,032 patients were included, and we evaluated epidemiologic factors, systemic diseases, other ocular pathologic characteristics, complications during the surgery, technique of ocular surgery, method of antibiotic prophylaxis, vitreous culture, and vision outcome in these patients. Fifteen endophthalmitis cases among 21,032 operations reported, equaling an incidence of 0.071%. The incidence rates under topical, inhalation anesthesia, and propofol-based TIVA were 0.083%, 0.039%, and 0%, respectively (P = 0.39). Moreover, the risk of endophthalmitis under GA (0.024%) was significantly lower than topical anesthesia (0.083%) (P < 0.001). We also found that elder was the risk factor for endophthalmitis following ocular surgery. In conclusion, propofol-based TIVA or inhalation anesthesia did not increase the risk of endophthalmitis after ocular surgery. Thus, GA was not a risk factor for postoperative endophthalmitis. By contrast, elder was the risk factor for postoperative endophthalmitis. PMID:28328861

  18. Feline infectious peritonitis.

    PubMed

    Goodson, Teresa; Randell, Susan; Moore, Lisa

    2009-10-01

    Feline infectious peritonitis (FIP) frequently results in death in cats. It is caused by a mutated, highly contagious coronavirus, and it is more common in indoor cats in multicat households. A complex interaction between the coronavirus and the feline immune system causes disseminated vasculitis, which is the hallmark of FIP. New tests are being developed, but the antemortem diagnosis of FIP continues to be difficult and frustrating. Current treatments are crude and involve supportive care and immunosuppression. Minimizing exposure is the best method of preventing infection.

  19. Globalization and infectious diseases.

    PubMed

    Frenk, Julio; Gómez-Dantés, Octavio; Knaul, Felicia M

    2011-09-01

    This article discusses the nature of the health challenges created by globalization and proposes new forms of international cooperation to confront them. The discussion of global health challenges includes both the transfer of health risks, with an emphasis on infectious diseases, and the international dissemination of health opportunities, including the transfer of knowledge and technology. The authors argue that the health-related challenges and opportunities of an increasingly interdependent world demand new forms of international cooperation. The authors suggest the promotion of 3 elements that, in their essence, contain the idea of collaboration: exchange, evidence, and empathy.

  20. [Postoperative analgesia and dexamethasone].

    PubMed

    Miralles, F S; Cárceles, M D; Micol, J A; Hernández, J; del Pino, A

    1989-01-01

    A randomized, double-blind, prospective study was carried out in 100 patients who had undergone some type of surgical treatment in order to evaluate the degree of pain and relief of pain, the degree of achieved analgesia according to the opinion of the observer and consumption of analgesic agents. The evaluation was carried out on seven occasions during the first 12 hours of the postoperative period. Patients received dexamethasone (4 mg before or after the operation or 8 mg after the operation), 6-methylprednisolone (16 mg at the end of the operation) or nothing (control group). Regardless of type, dose or timing of administration of the drugs, all patients receiving corticosteroids presented less pain, more relief of pain (expressed by themselves or in opinion of the observer) and needed lower doses of analgesics during the studied time.

  1. Imaging of postoperative shoulder instability.

    PubMed

    De Filippo, M; Pesce, A; Barile, A; Borgia, D; Zappia, M; Romano, A; Pogliacomi, F; Verdano, M; Pellegrini, A; Johnson, K

    2017-03-01

    Postoperative imaging in shoulder instability is still a challenge for radiologists due to various postsurgical anatomical findings that could be considered pathologic in treated shoulder. For this reason is very important a deep knowledge about surgical procedures, anatomical changes after surgery and the appropriate diagnostic imaging modalities to work up the symptomatic postoperative shoulder. Postoperative imaging options include use conventional radiography, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), MRI arthrography, computed tomography (CT) and CT arthrography. The purpose of our review is to explain the different surgical procedures and to describe postoperative changes detected with radiological imaging.

  2. Complications in gynecological minimal-access oncosurgery.

    PubMed

    Becker, Sven; De Wilde, Rudy Leon

    2016-08-01

    Complications are the limiting factors of all surgeries. More than performing the actual surgery, learning how to avoid complications before, during, and after surgery is the most important task of every surgeon. Severe complications can lead to patient death. Complications such as ureterovaginal fistulas, resulting from <2 s of inattentive preparation, can lead to years of hardship, suffering, accusation, and litigation. Excellent surgery is about performing the right surgery for the right patient without any complications. Minimally invasive surgery in complex cases is technically challenging. This article details the major causes of complications in laparoscopy for the gynecologic cancer patient and present strategies for prevention, early detection, and intra- and postoperative management.

  3. [Globalization and infectious diseases].

    PubMed

    Mirski, Tomasz; Bartoszcze, Michał; Bielawska-Drózd, Agata

    2011-01-01

    Globalization is a phenomenon characteristic of present times. It can be considered in various aspects: economic, environmental changes, demographic changes, as well as the development of new technologies. All these aspects of globalization have a definite influence on the emergence and spread of infectious diseases. Economic aspects ofglobalization are mainly the trade development, including food trade, which has an impact on the spread of food-borne diseases. The environmental changes caused by intensive development of industry, as a result of globalization, which in turn affects human health. The demographic changes are mainly people migration between countries and rural and urban areas, which essentially favors the global spread of many infectious diseases. While technological advances prevents the spread of infections, for example through better access to information, it may also increase the risk, for example through to create opportunities to travel into more world regions, including the endemic regions for various diseases. The phenomenon ofglobalization is also closely associated with the threat of terrorism, including bioterrorism. It forces the governments of many countries to develop effective programs to protect and fight against this threat.

  4. Mitigating Infectious Disease Outbreaks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davey, Victoria

    The emergence of new, transmissible infections poses a significant threat to human populations. As the 2009 novel influenza A/H1N1 pandemic and the 2014-2015 Ebola epidemic demonstrate, we have observed the effects of rapid spread of illness in non-immune populations and experienced disturbing uncertainty about future potential for human suffering and societal disruption. Clinical and epidemiologic characteristics of a newly emerged infectious organism are usually gathered in retrospect as the outbreak evolves and affects populations. Knowledge of potential effects of outbreaks and epidemics and most importantly, mitigation at community, regional, national and global levels is needed to inform policy that will prepare and protect people. Study of possible outcomes of evolving epidemics and application of mitigation strategies is not possible in observational or experimental research designs, but computational modeling allows conduct of `virtual' experiments. Results of well-designed computer simulations can aid in the selection and implementation of strategies that limit illness and death, and maintain systems of healthcare and other critical resources that are vital to public protection. Mitigating Infectious Disease Outbreaks.

  5. Deep brain stimulation: postoperative issues.

    PubMed

    Deuschl, Günther; Herzog, Jan; Kleiner-Fisman, Galit; Kubu, Cynthia; Lozano, Andres M; Lyons, Kelly E; Rodriguez-Oroz, Maria C; Tamma, Filippo; Tröster, Alexander I; Vitek, Jerrold L; Volkmann, Jens; Voon, Valerie

    2006-06-01

    Numerous factors need to be taken into account when managing a patient with Parkinson's disease (PD) after deep brain stimulation (DBS). Questions such as when to begin programming, how to conduct a programming screen, how to assess the effects of programming, and how to titrate stimulation and medication for each of the targeted sites need to be addressed. Follow-up care should be determined, including patient adjustments of stimulation, timing of follow-up visits and telephone contact with the patient, and stimulation and medication conditions during the follow-up assessments. A management plan for problems that can arise after DBS such as weight gain, dyskinesia, axial symptoms, speech dysfunction, muscle contractions, paresthesia, eyelid, ocular and visual disturbances, and behavioral and cognitive problems should be developed. Long-term complications such as infection or erosion, loss of effect, intermittent stimulation, tolerance, and pain or discomfort can develop and need to be managed. Other factors that need consideration are social and job-related factors, development of dementia, general medical issues, and lifestyle changes. This report from the Consensus on Deep Brain Stimulation for Parkinson's Disease, a project commissioned by the Congress of Neurological Surgeons and the Movement Disorder Society, outlines answers to a series of questions developed to address all aspects of DBS postoperative management and decision-making with a systematic overview of the literature (until mid-2004) and by the expert opinion of the authors. The report has been endorsed by the Scientific Issues Committee of the Movement Disorder Society and the American Society of Stereotactic and Functional Neurosurgery.

  6. Endovascular management of postoperative pseudoaneurysms of the external carotid artery.

    PubMed

    Cohen, José E; Gomori, John M; Moscovici, Samuel; Grigoriadis, Savvas; Ramirez de Noriega, Fernando; Itshayek, Eyal

    2012-05-01

    Hemorrhage secondary to postoperative pseudoaneurysm is a rare event, but may complicate the clinical course of straightforward and common interventions such as sinonasal procedures, tonsillectomy, and maxillofacial and plastic surgeries. We report our experience with the endovascular management of iatrogenic pseudoaneurysm in eight patients who had undergone recent craniomaxillofacial surgery. Computed tomography (CT), including CT-angiography, detected only three of the eight lesions. In all patients, endovascular embolization achieved successful occlusion of the pseudoaneurysm without local or general procedure-related complications. Immediate proximal arterial occlusion with detachable coils was performed in every case, and pseudoaneurysm coiling was performed in three cases presenting with active hemorrhage. Endovascular therapy proved to be safe and effective in the management of postoperative pseudoaneurysms. Surgeons involved in the craniomaxillofacial procedures should be aware of this complication and its management.

  7. Pseudomonas Aeruginosa Endocarditis in Acute Myeloid Leukemia: A Rare Complication

    PubMed Central

    J, Barshay; A, Nemets; A, Ducach; G, Lugassy

    2008-01-01

    Infectious endocarditis is a rarely encountered complication among leukemia patient during induction therapy. We describe a young patient who developed prolonged high fever after aggressive chemotherapy for Acute Myeloid Leukemia. Pseudomonas Aeruginosa endocarditis was found to be the etiology for the febrile state. Our purpose is to emphasize the need for an early diagnosis of this rare, albeit treatable complication. PMID:23675106

  8. Infectious diseases in ancient Egypt.

    PubMed

    Brier, Bob

    2004-03-01

    Techniques for studying infectious disease in the ancient world are discussed. A brief survey of infectious diseases, such as schistosomiasis and malaria, in ancient Egypt is presented, and the physical traces of these diseases are examined. A discussion of the ancient Egyptian physician's response to infectious disease is included. There are two substantial sources of evidence for infectious diseases-physical remains and descriptions in Egyptian medical papyri. This preliminary survey suggests that ancient Egypt was far from the idyllic paradise on the Nile that some historians would like to imagine.

  9. Causative Microorganisms of Infectious Endophthalmitis: A 5-Year Retrospective Study

    PubMed Central

    Duan, Fang; Liao, Jingyu; Zheng, Yongxin; Tan, Junlian

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to identify the microbial etiology of infectious endophthalmitis and to determine the antibacterial susceptibilities of bacterial isolates at an eye hospital in South China. A retrospective analysis was carried out on 330 patients with clinically diagnosed infectious endophthalmitis who underwent microbiological evaluation from January 2010 to December 2014. Of the 330 patients, 193 patients (58.5%) had posttraumatic endophthalmitis, 67 patients (20.3%) had postoperative endophthalmitis, 61 patients (18.5%) had endogenous endophthalmitis, and 9 patients (2.7%) had postcorneal infective endophthalmitis. Of the 105 cases (31.8%) of culture-positive endophthalmitis, 79 cases (75.2%) had bacterial growth and 26 cases (24.8%) had fungal growth. In posttraumatic endophthalmitis, Gram-positive bacteria were the predominant species, followed by Gram-negative bacteria and fungi. In endogenous endophthalmitis, Gram-negative bacteria were the predominant species, followed by fungi and Gram-positive bacteria. In postsurgical endophthalmitis, all infections were bacterial. However, in postcorneal infective endophthalmitis, all infections were fungal. Overall, levofloxacin showed the highest activity against bacterial isolates. There was a significant difference in the susceptibility to tobramycin between the isolates from posttraumatic and postoperative endophthalmitis (p < 0.05). The results of this study identify the microbial spectrum of infectious endophthalmitis in this clinical setting. PMID:27413545

  10. [Valvular heart disease: preoperative assessment and postoperative care].

    PubMed

    Nägele, Reto; Kaufmann, Beat A

    2013-10-30

    Patients with valvular heart disease or with a prosthetic heart valve replacement are seen with increasing frequency in clinical practice. The medical care and evaluation of patients with valvular heart disease before valve surgery, but also the post-operative treatment is complex and managed by general practitioners, cardiologists and cardiac surgeons. In this mini-review we will first discuss the preoperative assessment of the two most common valvulopathies, aortic stenosis and mitral regurgitation. Then we will discuss the post-operative care, which includes the management of anticoagulation, serial follow up and as well as the diagnostic assessment of complications such as thromboembolism, hemolysis, endocarditis and valve dysfunction.

  11. Postoperative nutritional support using needle catheter feeding jejunostomy.

    PubMed Central

    Delany, H M; Carnevale, N; Garvey, J W; Moss, G M

    1977-01-01

    Needle catheter jejunostomy was used as an adjunctive surgical procedure in 110 patients. In 19 patients (or 17%) the jejunostomy was of value for the administration of post-operative nutritional support using an elemental diet and it may serve as an alternative route for the administration of supplementing fluids and electrolytes if intestinal function is intact. The clinical experience with the catheter jejunostomy establishes it as a satisfactory technique for postoperative nutritional support in patients requiring esophageal and proximal gastric resection and repair, and gastric surgery in the elderly and debilitated. It is also useful in patients undergoing complicated biliary, pancreatic, and duodenal surgery in whom anastomotic difficulties are anticipated. PMID:407853

  12. [Treatment of postoperative impairment of gastrointestinal motility, cholangitis and pancreatitis].

    PubMed

    Schulze, T; Heidecke, C-D

    2015-06-01

    Although the mortality associated with major hepatopancreaticobiliary surgery has continuously decreased during the last decades, the morbidity of these procedures remains high. Functional disturbances of normal gastrointestinal motility as well as inflammation and infections of surgically treated organs are frequent complications resulting in considerably prolonged lengths of stay in hospital and increased healthcare costs. This review article highlights the therapeutic approaches and recent developments in the treatment of delayed gastric emptying, prolonged postoperative ileus, postoperative cholangitis and pancreatitis after hepatopancreaticobiliary surgery. Current practice is discussed on the basis of recent results in basic and clinical research, review articles, meta-analyses and guidelines.

  13. Postoperative Atrial Fibrillation: Incidence, Mechanisms, and Clinical Correlates.

    PubMed

    Yadava, Mrinal; Hughey, Andrew B; Crawford, Thomas Christopher

    2016-04-01

    Atrial fibrillation is the most commonly encountered arrhythmia after cardiac surgery. Although usually self-limiting, it represents an important predictor of increased patient morbidity, mortality, and health care costs. Numerous studies have attempted to determine the underlying mechanisms of postoperative atrial fibrillation (POAF) with varied success. A multifactorial pathophysiology is hypothesized, with inflammation and postoperative β-adrenergic activation recognized as important contributing factors. The management of POAF is complicated by a paucity of data relating to the outcomes of different therapeutic interventions in this population. This article reviews the literature on epidemiology, mechanisms, and risk factors of POAF, with a subsequent focus on the therapeutic interventions and guidelines regarding management.

  14. Multiple sclerosis treatment and infectious issues: update 2013

    PubMed Central

    Winkelmann, A; Loebermann, M; Reisinger, E C; Zettl, U K

    2014-01-01

    Immunomodulation and immunosuppression are generally linked to an increased risk of infection. In the growing field of new and potent drugs for multiple sclerosis (MS), we review the current data concerning infections and prevention of infectious diseases. This is of importance for recently licensed and future MS treatment options, but also for long-term established therapies for MS. Some of the disease-modifying therapies (DMT) go along with threats of specific severe infections or complications, which require a more intensive long-term monitoring and multi-disciplinary surveillance. We update the existing warning notices and infectious issues which have to be considered using drugs for multiple sclerosis. PMID:24134716

  15. [Subacute infectious endocarditis due to the agent of cat scratch fever: Bartonella henselae].

    PubMed

    Grand, A; Celard, M; el Belghiti, R; Ghadban, W; De Gevigney, G; Dabboura, A; Besnard, C; Ouanes, K; Huret, J F; Fichter, P

    2001-02-01

    The diagnosis of severe mitral stenosis with left atrial thrombus was rectified at valvular replacement in a 48-year old immuno-competent man who was a cat owner. The mass in the left atrium was, in fact, a large endocarditic vegetation. Pre- and postoperative blood cultures were negative as was culture of the excised mitral valve. The diagnosis of infectious endocarditis (IE) due to Bartonella Henselae was made from a positive serological test (1600) and identification of the germ by genetic amplification. Antibiotic therapy was continued for 6 months and the patient was cured with a follow-up of 4 years. Bartonella Henselae IE is very rare (14 reported cases) and affects mainly the aortic valve, often giving rise to very large vegetations which, in half the cases, are complicated by systemic emboli. Germs like Batonella are sensitive to most antibiotics, especially the aminosides and macrolides. In Bartonella Henselae IE, valve replacement is the rule (13 out of 14 cases) and the prognosis is usually good. Sero-diagnosis of Bartonellosis should be part of the systematic investigation of all blood culture negative IE.

  16. Emerging and Underrecognized Complications of Illicit Drug Use

    PubMed Central

    Wurcel, Alysse G.; Merchant, Elisabeth A.; Clark, Roger P.; Stone, David R.

    2015-01-01

    Illicit drug use can result in a wide range of medical complications. As the availability, synthesis, and popularity of illicit drugs evolve over time, new syndromes associated with their use may mimic infections. Some of these symptoms are anticipated drug effects, and others are complications of adulterants mixed with drugs or complications from the method of using drugs. Some illicit drugs are associated with rare infections, which are difficult to diagnosis with standard microbiological techniques. The goal of this review is to orient a wide range of clinicians—including general practitioners, emergency medicine providers, and infectious diseases specialists—to complications of illicit drug use that may be underrecognized. Improving awareness of infectious and noninfectious complications of illicit drug can expedite diagnosis and medical treatment of persons who use drugs and facilitate targeted harm reduction counseling to prevent future complications. PMID:26270683

  17. Global mapping of infectious disease.

    PubMed

    Hay, Simon I; Battle, Katherine E; Pigott, David M; Smith, David L; Moyes, Catherine L; Bhatt, Samir; Brownstein, John S; Collier, Nigel; Myers, Monica F; George, Dylan B; Gething, Peter W

    2013-03-19

    The primary aim of this review was to evaluate the state of knowledge of the geographical distribution of all infectious diseases of clinical significance to humans. A systematic review was conducted to enumerate cartographic progress, with respect to the data available for mapping and the methods currently applied. The results helped define the minimum information requirements for mapping infectious disease occurrence, and a quantitative framework for assessing the mapping opportunities for all infectious diseases. This revealed that of 355 infectious diseases identified, 174 (49%) have a strong rationale for mapping and of these only 7 (4%) had been comprehensively mapped. A variety of ambitions, such as the quantification of the global burden of infectious disease, international biosurveillance, assessing the likelihood of infectious disease outbreaks and exploring the propensity for infectious disease evolution and emergence, are limited by these omissions. An overview of the factors hindering progress in disease cartography is provided. It is argued that rapid improvement in the landscape of infectious diseases mapping can be made by embracing non-conventional data sources, automation of geo-positioning and mapping procedures enabled by machine learning and information technology, respectively, in addition to harnessing labour of the volunteer 'cognitive surplus' through crowdsourcing.

  18. Infectious Diseases in Day Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sleator, Esther K.

    Discussed in this publication are infectious illnesses for which children attending day care appear to be at special risk. Also covered are the common cold, some infectious disease problems receiving media attention, and some other annoying but not serious diseases, such as head lice, pinworms, and contagious skin conditions. Causes,…

  19. Immunodeficiencies caused by infectious diseases.

    PubMed

    Sykes, Jane E

    2010-05-01

    Immunodeficiencies caused by infectious agents may result from disruption of normal host barriers or dysregulation of cellular immunity, the latter serving to promote survival of the infectious agent through immune evasion. Such infections may be followed by opportunistic infections with a variety of other microorganisms. Classic infectious causes of immunodeficiency in companion animals are the immunodeficiency retroviruses, including feline immunodeficiency virus and feline leukemia virus. Other important causes include canine distemper virus; canine parvovirus 2; feline infectious peritonitis virus; rickettsial organisms that infect leukocytes; Leishmania; and fungal pathogens, such as Cryptococcus. Considerable research effort has been invested in understanding the mechanisms of pathogen-induced immunosuppression, with the hope that effective therapies may be developed that reverse the immunodeficiencies developed and in turn assist the host to clear persistent or life-threatening infectious diseases.

  20. Immediate and Delayed Complications Following Endoscopic Skull Base Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Naunheim, Matthew R.; Sedaghat, Ahmad R.; Lin, Derrick T.; Bleier, Benjamin S.; Holbrook, Eric H.; Curry, William T.; Gray, Stacey T.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To characterize the temporal distribution and resolution rate of postoperative complications from endoscopic skull base surgery. Design Retrospective review of patients undergoing endoscopic resection of paranasal sinus or skull base neoplasm from 2007 to 2013. Setting Massachusetts General Hospital/Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary Cranial Base Center. Participants Fifty-eight consecutive patients. Main Outcome Measures Postoperative complications were categorized as cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leak, pituitary, orbital, intracranial, or sinonasal. Complications were temporally categorized as “perioperative” (within 1 week), “early” (after 1 week and within 6 months), or “delayed” (after 6 months). Results The most common perioperative complications were diabetes insipidus (19.0%), CSF leak (5.2%), and meningitis (5.2%), with resolution rates of 75%, 100%, and 100%, respectively. Overall, CSF leak occurred in 13.8% of patients and resolved in all cases. A total of 53.8% of all complications were evident within 1 week of surgery. Chronic rhinosinusitis was the most common delayed complication (3.4%). Hypopituitarism and delayed complications were less likely to resolve (p = 0.014 and p = 0.080, respectively). Conclusions Monitoring of complications after endoscopic skull base surgery should focus on neurologic complications and CSF leak in the early postoperative period and development of chronic rhinosinusitis in the long term. Late-onset complications and hypopituitarism are less likely to resolve. PMID:26401482

  1. Post-operative morbidity following the use of the inverted periosteal graft: A case series.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Gazal Kaushelendra; Kulkarni, Mihir Raghavendra; Thomas, Betsy Sara

    2014-01-01

    Post-operative complications following flap surgeries or mucogingival procedures are important factors influencing patient's perception of periodontal procedures. Hence, it is important to foresee such complications and take adequate measures pre- and post-operatively. We treated five consecutive cases of gingival recession in the maxillary canine-premolar area using the inverted periosteal graft with a coronally positioned flap technique. Following each of these surgeries, the patients complained of post-operative swelling the next day involving the canine space or buccal space area. The swelling persisted for at least 5 days, however, it was painless. This paper highlights the post-operative complications associated with the said procedure and makes a case for detail enquiry in the form of controlled studies.

  2. [In-hospital malnutrition: indications of postoperative evolution].

    PubMed

    Farré Rovira, R; Frasquet Pons, I; Ibor Pica, J F

    1998-01-01

    A significant percentage of the patients admitted to our hospitals show signs of malnutrition that are neither detected nor treated and often become more severe during the hospital stay. This malnutrition can contribute to the loss of some important functions as, for instance the capacity for immune response and healing. In this study we use several simple, economical parameters to evaluate the nutritional status upon admittance and upon leaving the hospital of all the patients who in the course of a year occupied four randomly chosen beds in a general surgery ward at a county hospital in the Valencian Community. The results show that hospitalization reduced the number of over weight patients, duplicated the number of hypoalbuminemics and triplicated the number of people with body weight and body mass index (BMI) below normal levels. In patients over 40 hospitalization decrease the values of all the parameters studied, whereas in younger subjects only the weight, the BMI and serum albumin values were affected. Fifty seven percent of the patients suffer some kind of postoperative complication and this incidence is higher among patients with malnutrition upon admittance. The most common complication is the nosocomial pneumonia and urine infection. The nutritional parameters that best predict possible postoperative complications are low values of serum albumin, total lymphocyte count, tricipital fat skin fold and arm circumference. In general, postoperative complications show only a slight positive correlation with the length of the hospital stay, but the longer the stay is the worst the nutritional status becomes.

  3. The role of postoperative chest radiography in pediatric tracheotomy.

    PubMed

    Greenberg, J S; Sulek, M; de Jong, A; Friedman, E M

    2001-07-30

    A postoperative chest radiograph has traditionally been obtained after tracheotomies to evaluate for the presence of a pneumothorax and to assess tube position. Several recent studies in adults have questioned the usefulness of routine postoperative chest radiography in uncomplicated cases, but the role of post-operative chest radiography in pediatric patients has not been previously reviewed. We performed this study to examine the clinical utility of post-tracheotomy chest radiography in pediatric patients and determine if this routine practice impacts patient management enough to merit continued usage. A retrospective review was performed of 200 consecutive pediatric patients who underwent tracheotomies by the otolaryngology service in a tertiary care pediatric hospital from January 1994 to June 1999. All patients received postoperative chest radiographs. Five of 200 patients had a new postoperative radiographic finding, with three requiring interventions. Two patients required chest tube placement for pneumothorax, and one patient required tracheostomy tube change for repositioning. Fifty-one patients, including both pneumothoraces, exhibited clinical signs of pneumothorax (decreased breath sounds or oxygen saturation) in the immediate postoperative period. Chest X-ray ruled out a pneumothorax in the remaining 49 patients. The majority of these 51 patients were less than 2 years old (94%, P=0.002) or weighed less than 17 kg (89%, P=0.004). Postoperative chest X-rays yielded clinically relevant information in 168 patients that fell into one or more of four high risk categories: age less than 2, weight less than 17 kg, emergent procedures, or concomitant central line placement. Avoiding chest X-rays in the remaining 32 patients would have resulted in potential savings of $5000, which does not reflect the actuarial cost of a missed complication. Since the majority of our patients (84%) fell into a high-risk category, we feel it would be prudent to continue

  4. NON-INFECTIOUS DISORDERS OF WARMWATER FISHES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Compared with infectious diseases and disorders, few non-infectious diseases and disorders in cultured fish have severe biologic or economic impact. Culture practices, however, often establish environments that promote infectious disease by weakening the immune response or by pro...

  5. Prioritising Infectious Disease Mapping

    PubMed Central

    Pigott, David M.; Howes, Rosalind E.; Wiebe, Antoinette; Battle, Katherine E.; Golding, Nick; Gething, Peter W.; Dowell, Scott F.; Farag, Tamer H.; Garcia, Andres J.; Kimball, Ann M.; Krause, L. Kendall; Smith, Craig H.; Brooker, Simon J.; Kyu, Hmwe H.; Vos, Theo; Murray, Christopher J. L.; Moyes, Catherine L.; Hay, Simon I.

    2015-01-01

    Background Increasing volumes of data and computational capacity afford unprecedented opportunities to scale up infectious disease (ID) mapping for public health uses. Whilst a large number of IDs show global spatial variation, comprehensive knowledge of these geographic patterns is poor. Here we use an objective method to prioritise mapping efforts to begin to address the large deficit in global disease maps currently available. Methodology/Principal Findings Automation of ID mapping requires bespoke methodological adjustments tailored to the epidemiological characteristics of different types of diseases. Diseases were therefore grouped into 33 clusters based upon taxonomic divisions and shared epidemiological characteristics. Disability-adjusted life years, derived from the Global Burden of Disease 2013 study, were used as a globally consistent metric of disease burden. A review of global health stakeholders, existing literature and national health priorities was undertaken to assess relative interest in the diseases. The clusters were ranked by combining both metrics, which identified 44 diseases of main concern within 15 principle clusters. Whilst malaria, HIV and tuberculosis were the highest priority due to their considerable burden, the high priority clusters were dominated by neglected tropical diseases and vector-borne parasites. Conclusions/Significance A quantitative, easily-updated and flexible framework for prioritising diseases is presented here. The study identifies a possible future strategy for those diseases where significant knowledge gaps remain, as well as recognising those where global mapping programs have already made significant progress. For many conditions, potential shared epidemiological information has yet to be exploited. PMID:26061527

  6. Reduction of postoperative adhesion development.

    PubMed

    Diamond, Michael P

    2016-10-01

    Despite use of meticulous surgical techniques, and regardless of surgical access via laparotomy or laparoscopy, postoperative adhesions develop in the vast majority of women undergoing abdominopelvic surgery. Such adhesions represent not only adhesion reformation at sites of adhesiolysis, but also de novo adhesion formation at sites of surgical procedures. Application of antiadhesion adjuvants compliment the benefits of meticulous surgical techniques, providing an opportunity to further reduce postoperative adhesion development. Improved understanding of the pathophysiology of adhesion development and distinguishing variations in the molecular biologic mechanisms from adhesion-free peritoneal repair represent future opportunities to improve the reduction of postoperative adhesions. Optimization of the reduction of postoperative adhesions will likely require identification of unique, personalized approaches in each individual, representing interindividual variation in peritoneal repair processes.

  7. Infectious Postpartum Sacroiliitis: The Importance and Difficulty of Early Diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Vale-Fernandes, Emídio; Rodrigues, Fedra; Monteiro, Carla; Carvalho, Luís

    2016-08-01

    The sacroiliitis accounts for about 1.5% - 10% of all cases of septic arthritis and it is strongly associated with gynaecological infections, pelvic trauma or drug abuse (3.4% - 12.8% of cases occur during the postpartum period). Early diagnosis is difficult because the symptoms are nonspecific in pregnancy and in the postpartum period, making the delay of treatment a serious risk of irreversible damage to the joint and development of post-infectious complications. The authors describe the case of a 37-year-old puerperal woman presented to hospital, weeks after urgent caesarean section, with endometritis, post-anesthetic epidural hematoma and secondary infectious postpartum sacroiliitis. The diagnosis of sacroiliac joints pathology during pregnancy and puerperium is challenging. The pathogenesis of infectious sacroiliitis results from local contamination by contiguous infection or hematogenous spread of bacterial infections. The prognosis is usually favorable and depends on early diagnosis and treatment.

  8. [INFLAMMATION AND CARDIAC INSUFFICIENCY ASSOCIATED WITH INFECTIOUS ENDOCARDITIS].

    PubMed

    Fedorova, T A; Tazina, S Ya; Kaktursky, L V; Kanareitseva, T D; Stefanenko, N I; Burtsev, V I; Semenenko, N A

    2016-01-01

    The study included 62 patients with uncomplicated primary and secondary infectious endocarditis admitted to S.PBotkin city hospital from 2011 to 2014. The emphasis is laid on diagnostic significance of dynamic measurements of the levels of C-reactive protein, tumour necrosis factor and highly sensitive troponin-1 for the evaluation of activity of the infectious/toxic process, severity of the disease, and detection of complications. The study revealed the relationship of the enhanced level of troponin-1 with changes of inflammation markers, morphofunctional characteristics of myocardium, and circulatory failure. Morphologicl study demonstrated inflammatory and dystrophic changes in myocardium, focal and diffuse cardiofibrosis suggesting development of non-coronarogenic myocardial lesions that play an important role in the progress of cardiac failure associated with infectious endocarditis.

  9. Conflict and Emerging Infectious Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Legros, Dominique; Formenty, Pierre; Connolly, Maire A.

    2007-01-01

    Detection and control of emerging infectious diseases in conflict situations are major challenges due to multiple risk factors known to enhance emergence and transmission of infectious diseases. These include inadequate surveillance and response systems, destroyed infrastructure, collapsed health systems and disruption of disease control programs, and infection control practices even more inadequate than those in resource-poor settings, as well as ongoing insecurity and poor coordination among humanitarian agencies. This article outlines factors that potentiate emergence and transmission of infectious diseases in conflict situations and highlights several priority actions for their containment and control. PMID:18217543

  10. Complications of upper airway surgery in companion animals.

    PubMed

    Mercurio, Andrew

    2011-09-01

    Surgery of the upper airway is performed in dogs for the correction of brachycephalic airway syndrome and laryngeal paralysis and for temporary or permanent tracheostomy. Although technically simple to perform, upper airway surgeries can lead to the development of significant postoperative complications. This article reviews complications associated with common surgical conditions of the upper airway. It involves a discussion of brachycephalic airway syndrome and associated respiratory and gastrointestinal complications. It also covers laryngeal paralysis with a focus on unilateral arytenoid lateralization and the complication of aspiration pneumonia. The condition of acquired laryngeal webbing/stenosis and potential treatment options is also discussed. Finally, tracheostomies and associated complications in dogs and cats are reviewed.

  11. [Rare late complication after subtotal esophagectomy].

    PubMed

    Farsang, Z; Vörös, A; Szántó, I; Gonda, G; Ender, F; Altorjay, A

    2001-06-01

    We report a case of a peptic ulcer developed in the stomach tube used for the replacement of the esophagus. The patient was a 60 years old female who had undergone subtotal esophagectomy for mid esophageal malignancy, with intrapleural stomach replacement. Urgent endoscopy revealed an excavated, bleeding ulcer in the thoracic part of the stomach. After unsuccessful medical treatment urgent operation was performed via right thoracotomy. Opening the stomach an ulcer was found on the posterior wall of the stomach, it was penetrating to the right atrium of the heart. The bleeding was controlled by suturing the atrium wall. The patient treated with i.v. Omeprazol in the postoperative period. On the 21st postoperative day a rebleeding occurred causing shock. After reoperation the patient died. This complication is very rare. We emphasise the importance of postoperative pH measurement investigations showing the presence of duodenogastric reflux disease.

  12. [Postoperative findings in the spinal column].

    PubMed

    Lieb, J M; Ulmer, S; Kelm, J; Shariat, K; Stippich, C; Ahlhelm, F J

    2011-09-01

    Postoperative imaging after spinal surgery is usually performed to document the correct positioning of implants or to rule out complications if patients still suffer from pain after surgery. Depending on the question various imaging modalities can be used all of which have benefits and limitations. Conventional X-ray is used for the documentation of the correct positioning of spinal implants, stability (olisthesis) and during follow-up to rule out fractures or instability of the implants, whereas soft tissue changes cannot be completely assessed. Besides these indications, imaging is usually performed because of ongoing symptoms (pain for the most part) of the patients. Soft tissue changes including persistent or recurrent herniated disc tissue, hematoma or infection can best be depicted using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) which should be performed within the immediate postoperative period to be able to distinguish physiological development of scar tissue from inflammatory changes in the area of the surgical approach. Often imaging alone cannot differentiate between these and imaging can therefore only be considered as an adjunct. Computed tomography is the modality of choice for the evaluation of bony structures and an adjunct of new therapies such as image-guided application of cement for kyphoplasty or vertebroplasty.

  13. Postoperative Alterations in Taste and Smell

    PubMed Central

    Elterman, Kelly Galina; Mallampati, Seshagiri Rao; Kaye, Alan David; Urman, Richard Dennis

    2014-01-01

    Context: Alterations in taste and smell, including but not limited to anosmia, ageusia, hypogeusia, and dysgeusia, have been described in association with various medications, including anesthetic agents. Frequently, these symptoms occur 1-2 weeks after medication administration and last several months. While such a phenomenon is a rare occurrence, it nonetheless can significantly impact patients’ satisfaction and quality of life. Evidence Acquisition: The methodology consisted of a thorough literature search using the MEDLINE and Cochrane databases utilizing keywords such as anosmia, ageusia, olfactory disorders, postoperative, and anesthesia. Results: Our results yielded several previously published case report, and were not limited to a specific type of anesthesia. Based on available literature, we review the physiology of taste and smell as well as the medications associated with loss of these senses. We describe perioperative agents that could lead to postoperative complications associated with anosmia and and ageusia. Conclusions: Based on available literature recommendations for anesthesiologists caring for patients at risk for this occurrence are presented in this review. The symptoms are usually temporary as in the majority of the patients the sensory receptor cells are able to regenerate themselves after injury. Anesthesia providers need to aware of this phenomenon to be able to reassure patients and possibly avoid anesthetic techniques associated with anosmia and ageusia. PMID:25599025

  14. Perioperative complications in infant cleft repair

    PubMed Central

    Fillies, Thomas; Homann, Christoph; Meyer, Ulrich; Reich, Alexander; Joos, Ulrich; Werkmeister, Richard

    2007-01-01

    Background Cleft surgery in infants includes special risks due to the kind of the malformation. These risks can be attributed in part to the age and the weight of the patient. Whereas a lot of studies investigated the long-term facial outcome of cleft surgery depending on the age at operation, less is known about the complications arising during a cleft surgery in early infancy. Methods We investigated the incidence and severity of perioperative complications in 174 infants undergoing primary cleft surgery. The severity and the complications were recorded during the intraoperative and the early postoperative period according to the classification by Cohen. Results Our study revealed that minor complications occurred in 50 patients. Severe complications were observed during 13 operations. There was no fatal complication in the perioperative period. The risk of complications was found to be directly correlated to the body weight at the time of the surgery. Most of the problems appeared intraoperatively, but they were also followed by complications immediately after the extubation. Conclusion In conclusion, cleft surgery in infancy is accompanied by frequent and sometimes severe perioperative complications that may be attributed to this special surgical field. PMID:17280602

  15. [Postoperative recurrence of Crohn's disease, and its prevention].

    PubMed

    Lakatos, László; Lakatos, Péter László

    2010-05-23

    Crohn's disease is a chronic, progressive disabling condition ultimately leading to stricturing and/or penetrating complications. The need for surgery may be as high as 70% in patients with severe active disease or complications. However, relapse may develop in a significant proportion of the patients after surgery leading to frequent re-operations. Despite emerging data, postoperative prevention is still controversial. After careful evaluation of the individual risk a tailored therapy should be considered. In patients with small risk for relapse mesalazine or in selected cases no-treatment may be an option. In patients with a moderate-to-high risk azathioprine should be considered together with metronidazole in the three months. Follow-up ileocolonoscopy 6-12 months after the surgery is helpful in the determination of endoscopic severity and may assist in the optimization of the therapy. In most severe cases anti-TNF agents may be appropriate for postoperative prevention and therapy.

  16. Off-pump grafting does not reduce postoperative pulmonary dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Izzat, Mohammad Bashar; Almohammad, Farouk; Raslan, Ahmad Fahed

    2017-02-01

    Objectives Pulmonary dysfunction is a recognized postoperative complication that may be linked to use of cardiopulmonary bypass. The off-pump technique of coronary artery bypass aims to avoid some of the complications that may be related to cardiopulmonary bypass. In this study, we compared the influence of on-pump or off-pump coronary artery bypass on pulmonary gas exchange following routine surgery. Methods Fifty patients (mean age 60.4 ± 8.4 years) with no preexisting lung disease and good left ventricular function undergoing primary coronary artery bypass grafting were prospectively randomized to undergo surgery with or without cardiopulmonary bypass. Alveolar/arterial oxygen pressure gradients were calculated prior to induction of anesthesia while the patients were breathing room air, and repeated postoperatively during mechanical ventilation and after extubation while inspiring 3 specific fractions of oxygen. Results Baseline preoperative arterial blood gases and alveolar/arterial oxygen pressure gradients were similar in both groups. At both postoperative stages, the partial pressure of arterial oxygen and alveolar/arterial oxygen pressure gradients increased with increasing fraction of inspired oxygen, but there were no statistically significant differences between patients who underwent surgery with or without cardiopulmonary bypass, either during ventilation or after extubation. Conclusions Off-pump surgery is not associated with superior pulmonary gas exchange in the early postoperative period following routine coronary artery bypass grafting in patients with good left ventricular function and no preexisting lung disease.

  17. [Postoperative respiratory therapy using incentive spirometry].

    PubMed

    Mang, H; Weindler, J; Zapf, C L

    1989-04-01

    The optimal methods of prophylaxis and therapy of postoperative respiratory complications in surgical patients are still open to discussion. In spite of numerous recent clinical investigations, there is still no specific and universally acceptable therapeutic concept. In our department, we identify patients at risk of pulmonary complications by adequate screening, i.e. medical history, physical examination, chest X-ray, and spirometry. In the postoperative period there are a sequence of stages starting with early mobilization, respiratory therapy (including incentive spirometry and IPPB), and when necessary, controlled mechanical ventilation. We have measured and documented the flows and volumes required of patients using various types of incentive spirometer. In addition, we review on the literature and describe our experience with the technique, handling, and organization of sustained maximal inspiration (SMI). After thoracic or major upper abdominal surgery, all lung volumes decrease due to impairment of rib cage movement, changes in chest wall muscle tone, an increase in lung recoil, and airway closure. At the end of each expiration some of the smallest airways collapse either partly or totally. This process continues to some extent until, normally, a deep breath recruits the alveoli. Sighs to the limit of total lung capacity or oscillations of the expiratory baseline ought to be responsible for this effect in healthy humans; the same purpose is intended in incentive spirometry. For this therapy, it is mandatory that the central airways are not occluded by mucus and that the patient is able to breath volumes exceeding his normal tidal volume.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  18. Examination of factors that lead to complications for new home parenteral nutrition patients.

    PubMed

    de Burgoa, Lori Jeris; Seidner, Douglas; Hamilton, Cindy; Stafford, Judy; Steiger, Ezra

    2006-01-01

    Home parenteral nutrition carries a risk of infectious, metabolic, and mechanical complications that cause significant morbidity and mortality. This study investigated the incidence and the causative factors of these complications that occur within the first 90 days after discharge from the hospital to home. Data were prospectively collected and analyzed for 97 adult patients. A complication developed in one third of the patients, and the majority required rehospitalization. Infectious complications were the most prevalent, followed by mechanical and then metabolic complications. The authors describe their methods of collecting data in a quantifiable manner with the ultimate goal of improving patient outcomes.

  19. The Effect of Sterile Acellular Dermal Matrix Use on Complication Rates in Implant-Based Immediate Breast Reconstructions

    PubMed Central

    Park, Youngsoo; Choi, Kyoung Wook; Chung, Kyu-Jin; Kim, Tae Gon; Kim, Yong-Ha

    2016-01-01

    Background The use of acellular dermal matrix (ADM) in implant-based immediate breast reconstruction has been increasing. The current ADMs available for breast reconstruction are offered as aseptic or sterile. No published studies have compared aseptic and sterile ADM in implant-based immediate breast reconstruction. The authors performed a retrospective study to evaluate the outcomes of aseptic versus sterile ADM in implant-based immediate breast reconstruction. Methods Implant-based immediate breast reconstructions with ADM conducted between April 2013 and January 2016 were included. The patients were divided into 2 groups: the aseptic ADM (AlloDerm) group and the sterile ADM (MegaDerm) group. Archived records were reviewed for demographic data and postoperative complication types and frequencies. The complications included were infection, flap necrosis, capsular contracture, seroma, hematoma, and explantation for any cause. Results Twenty patients were reconstructed with aseptic ADM, and 68 patients with sterile ADM. Rates of infection (15.0% vs. 10.3%), flap necrosis (5.0% vs. 7.4%), capsular contracture (20.0% vs. 14.7%), seroma (10.0% vs. 14.7%), hematoma (0% vs. 1.5%), and explantation (10.0% vs. 8.8%) were not significantly different in the 2 groups. Conclusions Sterile ADM did not provide better results regarding infectious complications than aseptic ADM in implant-based immediate breast reconstruction. PMID:27896182

  20. 76 FR 39041 - Infectious Diseases

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-05

    ... healthcare linens, transporting medical specimens, disposing of medical waste, reprocessing medical equipment); maintaining, servicing or repairing medical equipment that is contaminated with infectious agents; conducting... laboratories (e.g., clinical, biomedical research, production laboratories) that result in...

  1. [Mount Fuji sign in postoperative period after surgery for ependymoma of the third ventricle (V3): case report and review of the literature].

    PubMed

    Boumadiane, Abderrahmane; Derkaoui, Ali; Shimi, Abdelkarim; Khatouf, Mohamed

    2016-01-01

    Mount Fuji sign also known as compressive pneumocephalus is a redoubtable postoperative neurosurgical complication. We report the clinical case of a 10 months-old patient, hospitalized in reanimation for postoperative management following surgery for ependymoma of the third ventricle. The evolution was marked by the occurrence of early postoperative compressive pneumocephalus, responsible for neurological and hemodynamic worsening. This study highlights the possibility of occurrence of such an adverse event, as well as the therapeutic and especially preventive measures for this complication.

  2. Can postoperative pulmonary conditions be improved by treatment with the Bartlett-Edwards incentive spirometer after upper abdominal surgery?

    PubMed

    Lyager, S; Wernberg, M; Rajani, N; Bøggild-Madsen, B; Nielsen, L; Nielsen, H C; Andersen, M; Møller, J; Silberschmid, M

    1979-08-01

    During the immediate postoperative course after upper abdominal surgery, pulmonary complications often occur, caused, inter alia, by reduced regional ventilation and by atelectases as a result of: (1) narrowing of the small peripheral bronchi, and (2) impaired respiratory function. Based on these pathophysiological mechanisms, an instrument (Bartlett-Edwards Incentive Spirometer) has been devised, which aims at giving the patient an opportunity of sustained maximal inspiration under standardized and controlled conditions. The use of this instrument has been followed by reports of a considerable reduction in postoperative pulmonary complications. In a controlled clinical investigation of the pre- and postoperative condition of the lungs, we were unable to show any beneficial effect of the instrument. In general, we have a low frequency of severe postoperative pulmonary complications, as compared with the results reported in the literature. We ascribe this to our very effective pre- and postoperative respiratory therapy.

  3. Bioterrorism Preparedness for Infectious Disease

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-01-01

    strain, there is an increased likelihood that the virus will be expressed as a much more severe form of the disease , dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHS...Emerging Infectious Diseases B-3: Presentation: The Global Resurgence of Epidemic Dengue / Dengue Hemorrhagic Fever B-4: Presentation: Joint Clinical... Diseases ", BioTerrorism Preparedness: Clinical Trials in Infectious Disease , June 15-18, 2004, Bangkok, Thailand. (See Appendix B-2) 15 APPENDIX A THE DENGUE

  4. Perioperative vision loss: A complication to watch out

    PubMed Central

    Grover, VK; Jangra, Kiran

    2012-01-01

    Postoperative vision loss, a rare but devastating complication, has been reported after spine, cardiac, and head–neck surgeries. Its incidence following spine surgeries exceeds that after cardiothoracic surgeries. Various causes attributed to postoperative blindness include ischemic optic neuropathy, central or branch retinal artery occlusion, cortical blindness, and rarely external ocular injury. Other contributory factors described are microvascular diseases and intraoperative hemodynamic compromise. However, the exact association of these factors with postoperative blindness has not yet been confirmed. In this review, we describe causes, presentation, and treatment of postoperative blindness and also recommend practical guidelines to avoid this complication. The search strategies for this review included both search of electronic databases as well as manual search of relevant articles. PMID:22345938

  5. [Infectious bone diseases].

    PubMed

    Tiemann, A H; Krenn, V; Krukemeyer, M G; Seyfert, C; Jakobs, M; Baumhoer, D; Hofmann, G O

    2011-05-01

    Bacterial infection of the bone is a severe disease with complications, potentially including long-term physical disability. The diagnosis and therapy of osteomyelitis include several elements: histopathology, microbiology, radiologic imagining, as well as antibiotic and surgical therapy. Histopathologists differentiate between acute osteomyelitis (infiltration of cancellous bone with neutrophil granulocytes); specific osteomyelitis (epithelioid-like granulomatous inflammation, tuberculosis, mycotic infections); primary/secondary chronic osteomyelitis (lymphocytic infiltration); and special forms of chronic osteomyelitis (varying histomorphology, Brodie abscess, SAPHO syndrome). Another important task in the histopathological diagnosis of inflammatory bone diseases is to differentiate osteomyelitis from malignant entities (sarcoma, lymphoma). Therefore, biopsy samples should be of sufficient size for safe diagnosis. Clinical information and imaging as well as interdisciplinary teamwork between radiologists, microbiologists, orthopedic surgeons and pathologists is mandatory to verify these diagnoses.

  6. Therapeutic and inducing effect of corneal crosslinking on infectious keratitis

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Liang-Zhu; Qiu, Shi-Yan; Li, Zhi-Wei; Zhang, Xiao; Tao, Xiang-Chen; Mu, Guo-Ying

    2016-01-01

    The corneal crosslinking (CXL) with riboflavin and ultraviolet-A (UVA) is a new therapy method to successfully treat infectious keratitis in clinical practice. However, there are rare reports on the complications of CXL such as the secondary keratitis. The diverse clinical outcomes on keratitis have highlighted the necessity to further evaluate the efficacy and complications of CXL. We reviewed the positive and negative reports on UVA/riboflavin related with keratitis and provided our opinion on the therapeutic and side effect of UVA/riboflavin crosslinking on keratitis. PMID:28003986

  7. [Management of complications in bariatric surgery].

    PubMed

    Weiner, R A; Stroh, C; El-Sayes, I; Frenken, M; Theodoridou, S; Scheffel, O; Weiner, S

    2015-01-01

    Bariatric surgery is known to be the most effective and long-lasting treatment for morbid obesity and associated comorbidities. These comorbidities together with cardiopulmonary decompensation make morbidly obese patients a high risk group for operative interventions. Early detection of postoperative complications is a challenging task in these patients and requires accurate and timely interpretation of any alarm signals. Symptoms, such as tachycardia and abdominal pain are highly suspicious. The same applies to elevated inflammatory parameters and fever. Early diagnostic laparoscopy is mandatory once cardiopulmonary complications have been excluded. Moreover, it has a higher sensitivity and specificity than other radiological modalities and is a minimally invasive procedure with a highly satisfactory outcome.

  8. Abdominal Wall Haematoma Complicating Laparoscopic Cholecystectomy

    PubMed Central

    Tate, J. J. T.; Davidson, B. R.; Hobbs, K. E. F.

    1994-01-01

    Of 61 consecutive patients undergoing laparoscopic cholecystectomy, 4 (6.25%) developed abdominal wall haematomas. This complication of laparoscopic cholecystectomy may occur more commonly than existing literature suggests, and manifests in the post-operative period (days 2 to 6) by visible bruising, excessive pain or an asymptomatic drop in haematocrit. It is readily confirmed by ultrasonography. While no specific treatment is necessary apart from replacement of significant blood loss, the patient requires reassurance that this apparently alarming complication will rapidly resolve. PMID:8204548

  9. Focus on treatment complications and optimal management surgery

    PubMed Central

    Hendriks, Jeroen M.; Lauwers, Patrick

    2014-01-01

    Thoracic surgery comprises major procedures which may be challenging, not only from a technical point of view but also regarding anesthetic and postoperative management. Complications are common occurrences which are also related to the comorbidity of the patients. After major lung resections pulmonary and pleural complications are often encountered. In this overview more surgically related complications are discussed, focusing on postpneumonectomy pulmonary edema, thromboembolic disease including pulmonary embolism, prolonged air leak, lobar torsion, persistent pleural space, empyema and bronchopleural fistula. Prevention, timely recognition, and early adequate treatment are key points as complications initially considered to be minor, may suddenly turn into life-threatening events. To this end multidisciplinary cooperation is necessary. Preoperative smoking cessation, adequate pain control, attention to nutritional status, incentive spirometry and early mobilization are important factors to reduce the incidence of postoperative complications. PMID:25806298

  10. Imaging Findings of Liposuction with an Emphasis on Postsurgical Complications

    PubMed Central

    You, Je Sung; Baek, Song-Ee; Chung, Sung Phil; Kim, Myeong-Jin

    2015-01-01

    Liposuction is one of the most frequently performed cosmetic surgeries worldwide for reshaping the body contour. Although liposuction is minimally invasive and relatively safe, it is a surgical procedure, and it carries the risk of major and minor complications. These complications vary from postoperative nausea to life-threatening events. Common complications include infection, abdominal wall injury, bowel herniation, bleeding, haematoma, seroma, and lymphoedema. Life-threatening complications such as necrotizing fasciitis, deep vein thrombosis, and pulmonary embolism have also been reported. In this paper, we provide a brief introduction to liposuction with the related anatomy and present computed tomography and ultrasonography findings of a wide spectrum of postoperative complications associated with liposuction. PMID:26576108

  11. Acute gastrointestinal complications after cardiac surgery.

    PubMed

    Halm, M A

    1996-03-01

    Gastrointestinal problems, with an incidence of about 1%, may complicate the postoperative period after cardiovascular surgery, increasing morbidity, length of stay, and mortality. Several risk factors for the development of these complications, including preexisting conditions; advancing age; surgical procedure, especially valve, combined bypass/valve, emergency, reoperative, and aortic dissection repair; iatrogenic conditions; stress; ischemia; and postpump complications, have been identified in multiple research studies. Ischemia is the most significant of these risk factors after cardiovascular surgery. Mechanisms that have been implicated include longer cardiopulmonary bypass and aortic cross-clamp times and hypoperfusion states, especially if inotropic or intra-aortic balloon pump support is required. These risk factors have been linked to upper and lower gastrointestinal bleeding, paralytic ileus, intestinal ischemia, acute diverticulitis, acute cholecystitis, hepatic dysfunction, hyperamylasemia, and acute pancreatitis. Gastrointestinal bleeding accounts for almost half of all complications, followed by hepatic dysfunction, intestinal ischemia, and acute cholecystitis. Identification of these gastrointestinal complications may be difficult because manifestations may be masked by postoperative analgesia or not reported by patients because they are sedated or require prolonged mechanical ventilation. Furthermore, clinical manifestations may be nonspecific and not follow the "classic" clinical picture. Therefore, astute assessment skills are needed to recognize these problems in high-risk patients early in their clinical course. Such early recognition will prompt aggressive medical and/or surgical management and therefore improve patient outcomes for the cardiovascular surgical population.

  12. Perioperative Non-Invasive Indocyanine Green-Clearance Testing to Predict Postoperative Outcome after Liver Resection

    PubMed Central

    Haegele, Stefanie; Reiter, Silvia; Wanek, David; Offensperger, Florian; Pereyra, David; Stremitzer, Stefan; Fleischmann, Edith; Brostjan, Christine; Gruenberger, Thomas; Starlinger, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    Background Postoperative liver dysfunction may lead to morbidity and mortality after liver resection. Preoperative liver function assessment is critical to identify preexisting liver dysfunction in patients prior to resection. The aim of this study was to evaluate the predictive potential of perioperative indocyanine green (ICG)-clearance testing to prevent postoperative liver dysfunction and morbidity using standardized outcome parameters in a routine Western-clinical-setting. Study Design 137 patients undergoing partial hepatectomy between 2011 and 2013, at the general hospital of Vienna, were included. ICG-clearance was recorded one day prior to surgery as well as on the first and fifth postoperative day. Postoperative liver dysfunction was defined according to the International Study Group of Liver Surgery and evaluation of morbidity was based on the Dindo-Clavien classification. Statistical analyses were based on non-parametric tests. Results Preoperative reduced ICG—plasma disappearance rate (PDR) as well as increased ICG—retention rate at 15 min (R15) were able to significantly predict postoperative liver dysfunction (Area under the curve = PDR: 0.716, P = 0.018; R15: 0.719, P = 0.016). Furthermore, PDR <17%/min. or R15 >8%, were able to accurately predict postoperative complications prior to surgery. In addition to this, ICG-clearance on postoperative day 1 comparably predicted postoperative liver dysfunction (Area under the curve = PDR: 0.895; R15: 0.893; both P <0.001), specifically, PDR <10%/min or R15 >20% on postoperative day 1 predicted poor postoperative outcome. Conclusion PDR and R15 may represent useful parameters to distinguish preoperative high and low risk patients in a Western collective as well as on postoperative day 1, to identify patients who require closer monitoring for potential complications. PMID:27812143

  13. [Common pediatric infectious diseases following natural disasters].

    PubMed

    Yao, Kai-Hu

    2013-06-01

    Natural disasters may lead to the outbreaks of infectious diseases because they increase the risk factors for infectious diseases. This paper reviews the risk factors for infectious diseases after natural disasters, especially earthquake, and the infectious diseases following disasters reported in recent years. The infectious diseases after earthquake include diarrhea, cholera, viral hepatitis, upper respiratory tract infection, tuberculosis, measles, leptospirosis, dengue fever, tetanus, and gas gangrene, as well as some rare infections. Children are vulnerable to infectious diseases, so pediatricians should pay more attention to the research on relationship between infectious diseases and natural disasters.

  14. Morbidity and mortality predictivity of nutritional assessment tools in the postoperative care unit

    PubMed Central

    Özbilgin, Şule; Hancı, Volkan; Ömür, Dilek; Özbilgin, Mücahit; Tosun, Mine; Yurtlu, Serhan; Küçükgüçlü, Semih; Arkan, Atalay

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The aim was to evaluate the nutritional situation of patients admitted to the Postoperative Acute Care Unit using classic methods of objective anthropometry, systemic evaluation methods, and Nutrition Risk in Critically Ill (NUTRIC) score, and to compare them as a predictor of morbidity and mortality. At admission to the postoperative care unit, patients undergoing various surgeries were assessed for the following items: Subjective Global Assessment (SGA), Nutritional Risk Index (NRI), Nutritional Risk Screening (NRS)-2002, Mini Nutritional Assessment (MNA), Charlson comorbidity index (CCI), and NUTRIC score, anthropometric measurements, serum total protein, serum albumin, and lymphocyte count. Patients were monitored for postoperative complications until death or discharge. Correlation of complications with these parameters was also analyzed. A total of 152 patients were included in the study. In this study a positive correlation was determined between mortality and NRS-2002, SGA, CCI, Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation , Sepsis-related Organ Failure Assessment, and NUTRIC score, whereas a negative correlation was determined between mortality and NRI. There was a correlation between NUTRIC score and pneumonia, development of atrial fibrillation, delirium, renal failure, inotrope use, and duration of mechanical ventilation. In our study group of postoperative patients, MNA had no predictive properties for any complication, whereas SGA had no predictive properties for any complications other than duration of hospital stay and mortality. The NUTRIC score is an important indicator of mortality and morbidity in postoperative surgical patients. NRI correlated with many postoperative complications, and though SGA and NRS were correlated with mortality, they were not correlated with the majority of complications. MNA was determined not to have any correlation with any complication, mortality, and duration of hospital stay in our patient group. PMID

  15. Morbidity and mortality predictivity of nutritional assessment tools in the postoperative care unit.

    PubMed

    Özbilgin, Şule; Hanc, Volkan; Ömür, Dilek; Özbilgin, Mücahit; Tosun, Mine; Yurtlu, Serhan; Küçükgüçlü, Semih; Arkan, Atalay

    2016-10-01

    The aim was to evaluate the nutritional situation of patients admitted to the Postoperative Acute Care Unit using classic methods of objective anthropometry, systemic evaluation methods, and Nutrition Risk in Critically Ill (NUTRIC) score, and to compare them as a predictor of morbidity and mortality.At admission to the postoperative care unit, patients undergoing various surgeries were assessed for the following items: Subjective Global Assessment (SGA), Nutritional Risk Index (NRI), Nutritional Risk Screening (NRS)-2002, Mini Nutritional Assessment (MNA), Charlson comorbidity index (CCI), and NUTRIC score, anthropometric measurements, serum total protein, serum albumin, and lymphocyte count. Patients were monitored for postoperative complications until death or discharge. Correlation of complications with these parameters was also analyzed.A total of 152 patients were included in the study. In this study a positive correlation was determined between mortality and NRS-2002, SGA, CCI, Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation , Sepsis-related Organ Failure Assessment, and NUTRIC score, whereas a negative correlation was determined between mortality and NRI. There was a correlation between NUTRIC score and pneumonia, development of atrial fibrillation, delirium, renal failure, inotrope use, and duration of mechanical ventilation. In our study group of postoperative patients, MNA had no predictive properties for any complication, whereas SGA had no predictive properties for any complications other than duration of hospital stay and mortality.The NUTRIC score is an important indicator of mortality and morbidity in postoperative surgical patients. NRI correlated with many postoperative complications, and though SGA and NRS were correlated with mortality, they were not correlated with the majority of complications. MNA was determined not to have any correlation with any complication, mortality, and duration of hospital stay in our patient group.

  16. Intelligent postoperative morbidity prediction of heart disease using artificial intelligence techniques.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Nan-Chen; Hung, Lun-Ping; Shih, Chun-Che; Keh, Huan-Chao; Chan, Chien-Hui

    2012-06-01

    Endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) is an advanced minimally invasive surgical technology that is helpful for reducing patients' recovery time, postoperative morbidity and mortality. This study proposes an ensemble model to predict postoperative morbidity after EVAR. The ensemble model was developed using a training set of consecutive patients who underwent EVAR between 2000 and 2009. All data required for prediction modeling, including patient demographics, preoperative, co-morbidities, and complication as outcome variables, was collected prospectively and entered into a clinical database. A discretization approach was used to categorize numerical values into informative feature space. Then, the Bayesian network (BN), artificial neural network (ANN), and support vector machine (SVM) were adopted as base models, and stacking combined multiple models. The research outcomes consisted of an ensemble model to predict postoperative morbidity after EVAR, the occurrence of postoperative complications prospectively recorded, and the causal effect knowledge by BNs with Markov blanket concept.

  17. IDBD: infectious disease biomarker database.

    PubMed

    Yang, In Seok; Ryu, Chunsun; Cho, Ki Joon; Kim, Jin Kwang; Ong, Swee Hoe; Mitchell, Wayne P; Kim, Bong Su; Oh, Hee-Bok; Kim, Kyung Hyun

    2008-01-01

    Biomarkers enable early diagnosis, guide molecularly targeted therapy and monitor the activity and therapeutic responses across a variety of diseases. Despite intensified interest and research, however, the overall rate of development of novel biomarkers has been falling. Moreover, no solution is yet available that efficiently retrieves and processes biomarker information pertaining to infectious diseases. Infectious Disease Biomarker Database (IDBD) is one of the first efforts to build an easily accessible and comprehensive literature-derived database covering known infectious disease biomarkers. IDBD is a community annotation database, utilizing collaborative Web 2.0 features, providing a convenient user interface to input and revise data online. It allows users to link infectious diseases or pathogens to protein, gene or carbohydrate biomarkers through the use of search tools. It supports various types of data searches and application tools to analyze sequence and structure features of potential and validated biomarkers. Currently, IDBD integrates 611 biomarkers for 66 infectious diseases and 70 pathogens. It is publicly accessible at http://biomarker.cdc.go.kr and http://biomarker.korea.ac.kr.

  18. Thoracic Infectious Spondylitis After Surgical Treatments of Herniated Lumbar Intervertebral Disc

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jin-Hyun; Kang, Jung-Il; Kim, Min Jeong; Lee, Jongmin; Lee, In-Sik; Jung, Heeyoune

    2013-01-01

    The postoperative infectious spondylitis has been reported to occur among every 1% to 12%. It is difficult to early diagnose in some cases. If the diagnosis is delayed, it can be a life-threatening condition. We report a 32-year-old male patient with postoperative infectious spondylitis. He had surgical treatments for traumatic intervertebral disc herniations in L3-4 and L4-5. Three weeks after surgery, he complained for fever and paraplegia. Cervicothoracic magnetic resonance imaging showed the collapsed T2 and T3 vertebral body with changes of bone marrow signal intensity. Moreover, it showed anterior and posterior epidural masses causing spinal cord compressions which suggested infectious spondylitis. After the use of antibiotics and surgical decompressions T2-T3, his general conditions were improved and muscle power of lower extremities began to be gradually restored. However, we could not identify the exact organisms that may be the cause of infectious spondylitis. It could be important that the infectious spondylitis, which is presented away from the primary operative level, should be observed in patients with fevers of unknown origin and paraplegia. PMID:24236263

  19. Avoiding Failure in Hip Arthroscopy: Complications, Pearls, and Pitfalls.

    PubMed

    Burrus, Matthew Tyrrell; Cowan, James B; Bedi, Asheesh

    2016-07-01

    Although most patients have successful outcomes after hip arthroscopy, a minority of patients experience complications that may impact their recovery and long-term benefit. As most of these complications can be minimized by appropriate surgical technique, many tips have been recommended. Additionally, the reasons behind clinical failure postoperatively have been scrutinized, which include, most commonly, incomplete correction of osseous pathomorphology, underappreciated preexisting hip osteoarthritis, and/or an incorrect preoperative diagnosis. Meticulous preoperative planning, evaluation of advanced imaging studies, and proper patient selection will help to reduce the number of postoperative failures and increase the chance of a successful outcome following hip arthroscopy.

  20. Surgical Treatment of Tattoo Complications.

    PubMed

    Sepehri, Mitra; Jørgensen, Bo

    2017-01-01

    With a continuing increase in the number of tattoos performed worldwide, the need to treat tattoo complications is growing. Earlier treatments of chronic inflammatory tattoo reactions were dominated by a medical approach, or with no active intervention. In this chapter, we will address modern surgical approaches applied to situations when medical treatment is inefficient and lasers are not applicable. Dermatome shaving is positioned as first-line treatment of allergic tattoo reactions and also indicated in a number of other tattoo reactions, supplemented with excision in selected cases. The methods allow fundamental treatment with removal of the culprit pigment from the dermis. The different instruments, surgical methods, and treatment schedules are reviewed, and a guide to surgeons is presented. Postoperative treatments and the long-term outcomes are described in detail. An algorithm on specialist treatment and follow-up of tattoo reactions, which can be practiced in other countries, is presented.

  1. Gray-scale ultrasound: utility preoperatively and postoperatively in a patient with obstructive jaundice.

    PubMed

    Robinson, S H; Hayt, D B; Reynolds, B; Patel, H

    1977-09-01

    We present a case of obstructing calculi of the common bile duct diagnosed by ultrasonography. Postoperatively, a sterile abscess due to bile leakage at the distal common bile duct developed, and was also diagnosed by ultrasound Ultrasonography was useful in following the course of clearing of the bile collection. Preoperative ultrasound evaluation of the jaundiced patient should be followed by postoperative sonography, especially if complications occur.

  2. Postoperative osteomyelitis following implant arthroplasty of the foot: diagnosis with indium-111 white blood cell scintigraphy

    SciTech Connect

    Bakst, R.H.; Kanat, I.O.

    1987-11-01

    Many complications can occur following insertion of silicone elastomer implants into the foot. Postoperative infection may be difficult to distinguish from other conditions such as dislodgment, fracture, ectopic and heterotopic new bone formation, synovitis, and bursitis. White blood cell scintigraphy, in conjunction with the clinical scenario, may prove to be an invaluable tool in the diagnosis of postoperative osteomyelitis, subsequent to implant arthroplasties. 32 references.

  3. Infectious Disease, Endangerment, and Extinction

    PubMed Central

    MacPhee, Ross D. E.; Greenwood, Alex D.

    2013-01-01

    Infectious disease, especially virulent infectious disease, is commonly regarded as a cause of fluctuation or decline in biological populations. However, it is not generally considered as a primary factor in causing the actual endangerment or extinction of species. We review here the known historical examples in which disease has, or has been assumed to have had, a major deleterious impact on animal species, including extinction, and highlight some recent cases in which disease is the chief suspect in causing the outright endangerment of particular species. We conclude that the role of disease in historical extinctions at the population or species level may have been underestimated. Recent methodological breakthroughs may lead to a better understanding of the past and present roles of infectious disease in influencing population fitness and other parameters. PMID:23401844

  4. Infectious disease, endangerment, and extinction.

    PubMed

    Macphee, Ross D E; Greenwood, Alex D

    2013-01-01

    Infectious disease, especially virulent infectious disease, is commonly regarded as a cause of fluctuation or decline in biological populations. However, it is not generally considered as a primary factor in causing the actual endangerment or extinction of species. We review here the known historical examples in which disease has, or has been assumed to have had, a major deleterious impact on animal species, including extinction, and highlight some recent cases in which disease is the chief suspect in causing the outright endangerment of particular species. We conclude that the role of disease in historical extinctions at the population or species level may have been underestimated. Recent methodological breakthroughs may lead to a better understanding of the past and present roles of infectious disease in influencing population fitness and other parameters.

  5. The infectious etiology of vasculitis.

    PubMed

    Lidar, Merav; Lipschitz, Noga; Langevitz, Pnina; Shoenfeld, Yehuda

    2009-08-01

    Infectious agents have been implicated in the etiopathogenesis of various vasculitides via numerous and overlapping mechanisms including direct microbial invasion of endothelial cells, immune complex mediated vessel wall damage and stimulation of autoreactive B and/or T cells through molecular mimicry and superantigens. While the causative role of hepatitis B virus in polyarteritis nodosa and hepatitis C virus in mixed cryoglobulinemia is clearly established, evidence for the association of other infectious agents with vasculitis, including human immunodeficiency virus, parvovirus B19, cytomegalovirus, varicella zoster virus, Staphylococcus aureus, rickettsiaceae, Treponema pallidum and Borrelia burgdorferi, among numerous others, is accumulating. The spectrum of association of infectious agents; bacteria, viruses and parasites, with systemic vasculitides, will be reviewed herewith.

  6. Assessment of pain during rest and during activities in the postoperative period of cardiac surgery

    PubMed Central

    de Mello, Larissa Coelho; Rosatti, Silvio Fernando Castro; Hortense, Priscilla

    2014-01-01

    Objective to assess the intensity and site of pain after Cardiac Surgery through sternotomy during rest and while performing five activities. Method descriptive study with a prospective cohort design. A total of 48 individuals participated in the study. A Multidimensional Scale for Pain Assessment was used. Results postoperative pain from cardiac surgery was moderate during rest and decreased over time. Pain was also moderate during activities performed on the 1st and 2nd postoperative days and decreased from the 3rd postoperative day, with the exception of coughing, which diminished only on the 6th postoperative day. Coughing, turning over, deep breathing and rest are presented in decreased order of intensity. The region of the sternum was the most frequently reported site of pain. Conclusion the assessment of pain in the individuals who underwent cardiac surgery during rest and during activities is extremely important to adapt management and avoid postoperative complications and delayed surgical recovery. PMID:24553714

  7. Nutritional Predictors of Complications Following Radical Cystectomy

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, David C.; Riggs, Stephen B.; Nielsen, Matthew E.; Matthews, Jonathan E.; Woods, Michael E.; Wallen, Eric M.; Pruthi, Raj S.; Smith, Angela B.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To determine the impact of preoperative nutritional status on the development of surgical complications following cystectomy using the American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program (ACS-NSQIP). Methods We performed a retrospective review of the NSQIP 2005–2012 Participant Use Data Files. ACS-NSQIP collects data on 135 variables, including pre- and intraoperative data and 30-day post-operative complications and mortality on all major surgical procedures at participating institutions. Preoperative albumin (<3.5 or >3.5 g/dl), weight loss 6 months before surgery (>10%), and BMI were identified as nutritional variables within the database. The overall complication rate was calculated and predictors of complications were identified using multivariable logistic regression models. Results 1,213 patients underwent cystectomy for bladder cancer between 2005–2012. The overall 30-day complication rate was 55.1% (n=668). While 14.7% (n=102) had a preoperative albumin <3.5 g/dL, 3.4% had >10% weight loss in the 6 months prior to surgery, and the mean BMI was 28 kg/m2. After controlling for age, sex, medical comorbidities, medical resident involvement, operation year, operative time and prior operation, only albumin <3.5g/dl was a significant predictor of experiencing a postoperative complication (p=0.03). This remained significant when albumin was evaluated as a continuous variable (p=0.02) Conclusions Poor nutritional status measured by serum albumin is predictive of an increased rate of surgical complications following radical cystectomy. This finding supports the importance of preoperative nutritional status in this population and highlights the need for the development of effective nutritional interventions in the preoperative setting. PMID:25240535

  8. Infectious causes of necrotizing enterocolitis

    PubMed Central

    Coggins, Sarah A.; Wynn, James L.; Weitkamp, Jörn-Hendrik

    2014-01-01

    Necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) is the most common gastrointestinal emergency among premature infants. Although a large body of research has focused on understanding its pathogenesis, the exact mechanism has not been elucidated. Of particular interest is the potential causative role of infectious culprits in the development of NEC. A variety of reports describe bacterial, viral, and fungal infections occurring in association with NEC; however, no organism has emerged as being definitively involved in NEC pathogenesis. In this review, we summarize the body of research on infectious causes of necrotizing enterocolitis. PMID:25678001

  9. Local complications in dental implant surgery: prevention and treatment

    PubMed Central

    ANNIBALI, S.; RIPARI, M.; LA MONACA, G.; TONOLI, F.; CRISTALLI, M.P.

    2008-01-01

    SUMMARY There are many detailed articles regarding accidents and local complications in dental implantation. Comparison of the data they report is not always easy because different criteria have been followed in the various classifications and there is confusion between the terms accident and complication. The aim of this paper is to propose a classification that considers the timing of the events and makes a distinction between the two terms. Accidents are events that occur during surgery and complications are all the pathological conditions that appear postoperatively. The proper diagnostic procedures and surgical techniques for complications prevention and treatment are also described. PMID:23285333

  10. Postoperative diet advancement: surgical dogma vs evidence-based medicine.

    PubMed

    Warren, Jeremy; Bhalla, Varun; Cresci, Gail

    2011-04-01

    Postoperative ileus is a natural part of recovery following abdominal and intestinal surgery. Research in the laboratory and clinical arenas has challenged the long-held belief that enteral nutrition (EN) should not be administered until bowel function has resumed, which is typically judged by a subjective bowel function assessment. Traditional postoperative management begins with clinical monitoring of return of bowel function, followed by a clear liquid diet that is advanced to regular solid food as tolerated. Studies have consistently demonstrated that early EN is safe and well tolerated, showing a reduction in wound morbidity and healing, fewer septic complications, diminished weight loss, and improved protein kinetics in patients administered early EN. Barriers to early enteral feeding include fear of GI morbidity, anastomotic disruption or leak but have not been proven valid in clinical or experimental trials. A clear liquid diet is the most frequently ordered first postoperative meal regardless of early or delayed administration. Although generally well tolerated, this diet fails to provide adequate nutrients to the postsurgical patient. In contrast, advancement to a regular diet as the initial meal has been shown to be well tolerated and provides significantly more nutrients than a clear liquid diet. This article reviews basic GI physiology, including motility, nutrient absorption, and the changes that occur in regulation and function of the GI tract following surgery, as well as clinical data regarding postoperative GI function and diet advancement. This will be applied to the clinical practices of postoperative dietary advancement to discuss the timing and choice of initial feeding in the postoperative patient.

  11. Experience versus complication rate in third molar surgery

    PubMed Central

    Jerjes, Waseem; El-Maaytah, Mohammed; Swinson, Brian; Banu, Bilquis; Upile, Tahwinder; D'Sa, Sapna; Al-Khawalde, Mohammed; Chaib, Boussad; Hopper, Colin

    2006-01-01

    Objectives The records of 1087 patients who underwent surgical removal of third molar teeth were prospectively examined to analyse the possible relationship between postoperative complications and the surgeon's experience parameter. Method and materials Seven surgeons (three specialists in surgical dentistry [specialists SD] and four oral and maxillofacial Senior House Officers [OMFS residents]) carried out the surgical procedures. For each patient, several variables were recorded including age, gender, radiographic position of extracted teeth, treating surgeon, duration of surgery and postoperative complications. Results Analysis of the data revealed some differences in the incidence of complications produced by the specialists SD and OMFS residents. The main statistically relevant differences were increase the incidences of trismus, nerve paraesthesia, alveolar osteitis and infection in the resident-treated group, while the specialist-treated group showed higher rates of post-operative bleeding. Conclusion The higher rate of postoperative complications in the resident-treated group suggests that at least some of the complications might be related to surgical experience. Further work needs to compare specialists of training programmes with different years of experience, using large cross – sectional studies. PMID:16725024

  12. Complications of multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Bladé, Joan; Rosiñol, Laura

    2007-12-01

    Multiple myeloma, also known as myeloma or plasma cell myeloma, is a progressive hematologic disease. Complications of multiple myeloma include renal insufficiency, hematologic complications (anemia, bone marrow failure, bleeding disorders), infections, bone complications (pathologic fractures, spinal cord compression, hyercalcemia), and neurologic complications (spinal cord and nerve root compression, intracranial plasmacytomas, leptomeningeal involvement, among others). This article reviews these various complications connected to multiple myeloma, examining their various causes and possible treatment.

  13. Multicenter study on adult growth hormone level in postoperative pituitary tumor patients.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Jing-min; Gu, Jian-wen; Kuang, Yong-qin; Ma, Yuan; Xia, Xun; Yang, Tao; Lu, Min; He, Wei-qi; Sun, Zhi-yong; Zhang, Yan-chao

    2015-03-01

    The objective of this study is to observe the adult growth hormone level in postoperative pituitary tumor patients of multi-centers, and explore the change of hypophyseal hormones in postoperative pituitary tumor patients. Sixty patients with pituitary tumor admitted during March, 2011-March, 2012 were selected. Postoperative hypophyseal hormone deficiency and the change of preoperative, intraoperative, and postoperative growth hormone levels were recorded. Growth hormone hypofunction was the most common hormonal hypofunction, which took up to 85.0 %. Adrenocortical hormone hypofunction was next to it and accounted for 58.33 %. GH + ACTH + TSH + Gn deficiency was the most common in postoperative hormone deficiency, which took up to 40.00 %, and GH + ACTH + TSH + Gn + AVP and GH deficiencies were next to it and accounted for 23.33 and 16.67 %, respectively. The hormone levels in patients after total pituitary tumor resection were significantly lower than those after partial pituitary tumor resection, and the difference was statistically significant; growth hormone and serum prolactin levels after surgery in two groups were decreased, and the difference was statistically significant. The incidence rate of growth hormone deficiency in postoperative pituitary tumor patients is high, which is usually complicated with deficiency of various hypophyseal hormones. In clinical, we should pay attention to the levels of the hypopnyseal hormones, and take timely measures to avoid postoperative complications.

  14. Nefopam and Ketamine Comparably Enhance Postoperative Analgesia

    PubMed Central

    Kapfer, Barbara; Alfonsi, Pascal; Guignard, Bruno; Sessler, Daniel I.; Chauvin, Marcel

    2005-01-01

    Summary Opioids alone sometimes provide insufficient postoperative analgesia. Co-administration of drugs may reduce opioid use and to improve opioid efficacy. We therefore tested the hypothesis that administration of ketamine or nefopam, to postoperative patients with pain only partly alleviated by morphine, limits the amount of subsequent opioid necessary to produce adequate analgesia. Patients (n=77) recovering from major surgery were given up to 9 mg intravenous morphine. Those still suffering from pain were randomly assigned to blinded administration of: 1) isotonic saline (Control, n=21); 2) ketamine 10 mg (Ketamine, n=22); or, 3) nefopam 20 mg (Nefopam, n=22). Three-mg morphine boluses were subsequently given at 5-minute intervals until adequate analgesia was obtained, or 60 minutes elapsed after the beginning of the study drug administration, or ventilation became insufficient (respiratory rate < 10 breath/minute or saturation by pulse oxymetery < 95%). Supplemental morphine (i.e., after test drug administration) requirements were significantly greater in the Control group [17 ± 10 (SD) mg] than in the Nefopam (10 ± 5 mg, P < 0.005) or Ketamine (9 ± 5 mg, P < 0.001) groups. Morphine titration was successful in all Ketamine and Nefopam patients, but failed in four Control patients (two from respiratory toxicity and two from persistent pain). Tachycardia and profuse sweating were more frequent in patients given nefopam and sedation was greater with ketamine; however, the incidence of other potential complications did not differ between groups. Implications We conclude that ketamine 10 mg and nefopam 20 mg comparably potentiate opioid analgesia, each reducing opioid need by approximately 40%. Ketamine administration was associated with sedation whereas nefopam produced tachycardia and sweating. However, none of the side effects was serious. Either drug can thus be used to potentiate opioid analgesia. PMID:15616073

  15. A Minimally Invasive Approach for Postoperative Pancreatic Fistula

    SciTech Connect

    Yamazaki, Shintaro Kuramoto, Kenmei; Itoh, Yutaka; Watanabe, Yoshika; Ueda, Toshisada

    2003-11-15

    Pancreas fistula is a well-known and severe complication of pancreaticoduodenectomy. It is difficult to control with conservative therapy, inducing further complications and severe morbidity. Until now, re-operation has been the only way to resolve pancreatic fistula causing complete dehiscence of the pancreatic-enteric anastomosis (complete pancreatic fistula). Percutaneous transgastric fistula drainage is one of the treatments for pancreatic fistula. This procedure allows both pancreas juice drainage and anastomosis re-construction at the same time. This is effective and minimally invasive but difficult to adapt to a long or complicated fistula. In particular, dilatation of the main pancreatic duct is indispensable. This paper reports the successful resolution of a postoperative pancreatic fistula by a two-way-approach percutaneous transgastric fistula drainage procedure. Using a snare catheter from the fistula and a flexible guidewire from the transgastric puncture needle, it can be performed either with or without main pancreatic duct dilatation.

  16. [Some aspects of surgical treatment of postoperative ventral hernia].

    PubMed

    Lukomskiĭ, G I; Shulutko, A M; Antropova, N V; Moiseev, A Iu; El-Said, A Kh

    1995-01-01

    The results of surgical treatment of of 392 patients with postoperative ventral hernia are discussed. The algorithm of treatment of patients with large hernias was developed. Special preoperative management by dosed pneumocompression in an antioverload costume makes it possible to avoid menacing complications after the operation, which are caused by increased intraabdominal pressure. Test for tolerance to increase of intraabodominal pressure allowed prognostication of the character of the operative intervention: with or without decrease of the volume of the abdominal cavity (autoplasty or alloplasty, respectively). Prevention of wound complications consisted in control of infection, improvement of operative techniques, and use of modern surgical instruments. The prevention of recurrent hernias should be directed at correct choice of the method of plastics and removal of wound complications.

  17. Outcomes of WHO Grade I Meningiomas Receiving Definitive or Postoperative Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Tanzler, Emily; Morris, Christopher G.; Kirwan, Jessica M.; Amdur, Robert J.; Mendenhall, William M.

    2011-02-01

    Purpose: We analyzed long-term local control and complications in patients with either pathologically confirmed or clinical World Health Organization Grade I meningiomas treated with definitive or postoperative radiotherapy (RT) at the University of Florida. Methods: Between 1984 and 2006, 146 patients were treated with definitive (n = 88) or postoperative RT after subtotal resection (n = 57) or gross total resection (n = 1). Patients were treated with conventional (n = 41), stereotactic (n = 103), or intensity-modulated RT (n = 2) to a median dose of 52.7 Gy and followed for a median of 7.3 years (range, 0.6-22.0 years) Results: The local control rates at 5 and 10 years were as follows: definitive RT, 99% and 99%; postoperative RT, 96% and 93%; and overall, 97% and 96%, respectively. The 5- and 10-year cause-specific survival rates were as follows: definitive RT 94% and 94%, postoperative RT, 100% and 96%; and overall, 96% and 95%, respectively. The 5- and 10-year overall survival rates were as follows: definitive RT, 81% and 75%; postoperative RT, 96% and 85%; and overall, 87% and 79%, respectively. Severe RT complications occurred in 6.8% of patients; severe surgery-related complications occurred in 10 (17%) of 58 patients treated surgically. Conclusions: The likelihood of cure after definitive RT or following subtotal resection is excellent. However, a small population of patients experience severe complications, even at the moderate dose used for this disease.

  18. Effect of unrestricted bottle-feeding on early postoperative course after cleft palate repair.

    PubMed

    Kim, Eun Key; Lee, Taik Jong; Chae, Soo Wook

    2009-09-01

    Although bottle-feeding after cheiloplasty is widely accepted, postoperative feeding regimen after palatoplasty is still controversial. The aim of this prospective randomized study was to evaluate the effect of bottle-feeding on early postoperative course after palatoplasty in a relatively homogeneous group of patients. Eighty-two consecutive patients with nonsyndromic cleft palate undergoing 2-flap palatoplasty by a single surgeon were randomized to feeding from a bottle with the usual nipple (G1, N = 42) or to feeding with a spoon, cup, or syringe (G2, N = 40). Complication rates, postoperative sedative use, oral intake for the first 6 days, and relative weight gain at 1 and 2 months were compared. There were no significant complications such as bleeding or respiratory problem. The overall complication rate including wound dehiscence and oronasal fistula was similar in G1 and G2 (11.9% versus 12.5%, P = 1.000) as was postoperative sedative use and mean daily oral intake for the first 5 days. Mean intake on the sixth day was significantly higher in G1. There were no significant between-group differences in relative weight gain after 1 and 2 months. In conclusion, bottle-feeding had no adverse effect on the early postoperative course after palatoplasty including complication rate, oral intake, and weight gain. These findings suggest that an unrestricted feeding regimen is appropriate immediately after palatoplasty.

  19. Peri-operative dexamethasone therapy and post-operative psychosis in patients undergoing major oral and maxillofacial surgery.

    PubMed

    Koteswara, Chethan Manohara; Patnaik, Pritish

    2014-01-01

    A broad array of behavioral symptoms, including psychosis, can transpire post-operatively following a variety of surgeries. It is difficult to diagnose the exact cause of post-operative psychosis. We report three cases, which developed psychosis post-operatively after undergoing major oral and maxillofacial surgeries. All the three patients were administered dexamethasone peri-operatively. Dexamethasone is used to prevent or reduce post-operative edema. The exact dose of dexamethasone, which can cause psychosis, is unknown. It is important to raise awareness about this potential complication so that measures for management can be put in place in anticipation of such an event.

  20. Postoperative blood loss prevention in total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Samik; Kapadia, Bhaveen H; Issa, Kimona; McElroy, Mark J; Khanuja, Harpal S; Harwin, Steven F; Mont, Michael A

    2013-12-01

    Blood loss is a serious concern during lower extremity total joint arthroplasty with the estimated reduction in hemoglobin concentration known to vary between 2 and 4 g/dL after total knee arthroplasty (TKA). Allogeneic transfusions are commonly used to treat the acute blood loss and postoperative anemia to diminish the potential cardiovascular risks in up to 50% of such cases with a high volume of blood loss. However, these transfusions are associated with the risks of immunologic reactions, immunosuppression, and infection transmission. Multiple blood-saving strategies have been developed to minimize blood loss, to reduce transfusion rates, to decrease complications, and to improve outcomes in the postoperative period. Currently, there are no clear guidelines on the blood management strategies adopted to lessen the blood loss associated with TKA. The aim of this study was to review the literature and provide a broad summary of the efficacy and complications associated with several blood-saving measures that are currently used in the postoperative period. Evidence suggests that simple techniques such as limb elevation, cryotherapy, compression dressings, and drain clamping may reduce external drainage, however, whether these techniques lead to less allogeneic transfusions is currently debatable. Further research on using a combination of these strategies and their cost-effectiveness are needed.

  1. Postoperative Residual Neuromuscular Paralysis at an Australian Tertiary Children's Hospital

    PubMed Central

    O'Dea, Brendan; Meyerkort, Luke; Hegarty, Mary; von Ungern-Sternberg, Britta S.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. Residual neuromuscular blockade (RNMB) is known to be a significant but frequently overlooked complication after the use of neuromuscular blocking agents (NMBA). Aim of this prospective audit was to investigate the incidence and severity of RNMB at our Australian tertiary pediatric center. Methods. All children receiving NMBA during anesthesia were included over a 5-week period at the end of 2011 (Mondays to Fridays; 8 a.m.–6 p.m.). At the end of surgery, directly prior to tracheal extubation, the train-of-four (TOF) ratio was assessed quantitatively. Data related to patient postoperative outcome was collected in the postoperative acute care unit. Results. Data of 64 patients were analyzed. Neostigmine was given in 34 cases and sugammadex in 1 patient. The incidence of RNMB was 28.1% overall (without reversal: 19.4%; after neostigmine: 37.5%; n.s.). Severe RNMB (TOF ratio < 0.7) was found in 6.5% after both no reversal and neostigmine, respectively. Complications in the postoperative acute care unit were infrequent, with no differences between reversal and no reversal groups. Conclusions. In this audit, RNMB was frequently observed, particularly in cases where patients were reversed with neostigmine. These findings underline the well-known problems associated with the use of NMBA that are not fully reversed. PMID:26064105

  2. Oral complications of cancer therapies. Description and incidence of oral complications

    SciTech Connect

    Dreizen, S. )

    1990-01-01

    No part of the body reflects the complications of cancer chemotherapy as visibly and as vividly as the mouth. The infectious, hemorrhagic, cytotoxic, nutritional, and neurologic signs of drug toxicity are reflected in the mouth by changes in the color, character, comfort, and continuity of the mucosa. The stomatologic complications of radiotherapy for oral cancer are physical and physiological in nature, transient or lasting in duration, and reversible or irreversible in type. Some linger as permanent mementos long after the cancer has been destroyed. They stem from radiation injury to the salivary glands, oral mucosa, oral musculature, alveolar bone, and developing teeth. They are expressed clinically by xerostomia, trismus, radiation dermatitis, nutritional stomatitis, and dentofacial malformation. In both cancer chemotherapy and cancer radiotherapy, the oral complications vary in pattern, duration, intensity, and number, with not every patient developing every complication. 21 references.

  3. Preventing Infectious Disease in Sports.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howe, Warren B.

    2003-01-01

    Preventing infectious disease in sports is fundamental to maintaining team effectiveness and helping athletes avoid the adverse effects of illness. Good hygiene, immunization, minimal exposure to specific diseases, and certain prophylactic measures are essential. Teammates, coaches, trainers, officials, healthcare providers, and community public…

  4. Deforestation and avian infectious diseases.

    PubMed

    Sehgal, R N M

    2010-03-15

    In this time of unprecedented global change, infectious diseases will impact humans and wildlife in novel and unknown ways. Climate change, the introduction of invasive species, urbanization, agricultural practices and the loss of biodiversity have all been implicated in increasing the spread of infectious pathogens. In many regards, deforestation supersedes these other global events in terms of its immediate potential global effects in both tropical and temperate regions. The effects of deforestation on the spread of pathogens in birds are largely unknown. Birds harbor many of the same types of pathogens as humans and in addition can spread infectious agents to humans and other wildlife. It is thought that avifauna have gone extinct due to infectious diseases and many are presently threatened, especially endemic island birds. It is clear that habitat degradation can pose a direct threat to many bird species but it is uncertain how these alterations will affect disease transmission and susceptibility to disease. The migration and dispersal of birds can also change with habitat degradation, and thus expose populations to novel pathogens. Some recent work has shown that the results of landscape transformation can have confounding effects on avian malaria, other haemosporidian parasites and viruses. Now with advances in many technologies, including mathematical and computer modeling, genomics and satellite tracking, scientists have tools to further research the disease ecology of deforestation. This research will be imperative to help predict and prevent outbreaks that could affect avifauna, humans and other wildlife worldwide.

  5. Diagnostic vitrectomy for infectious uveitis

    PubMed Central

    Jeroudi, Abdallah; Yeh, Steven

    2014-01-01

    The identification of an infectious or noninfectious uveitis syndrome is important to determine the range of therapeutic and prognostic implications of that disease entity. Diagnostic dilemmas arise with atypical history, atypical clinical presentations, inconclusive diagnostic workup, and persistent or worsened inflammation despite appropriate immunosuppression. More invasive intraocular testing is indicated in these situations particularly in infectious uveitis where a delay in treatment may result in worsening of the patient’s disease and a poor visual outcome. Laboratory analysis of vitreous fluid via diagnostic pars plana vitrectomy is an important technique in the diagnostic armamentarium, but the most important aspects of sample collection include rapid processing, close coordination with an ophthalmic pathology laboratory, and directed testing on this limited collected sample. Culture and staining has utility in bacterial, fungal, and nocardial infection. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) analysis has shown promising results for bacterial endophthalmitis and infection with mycobacterium tuberculosis whereas PCR testing for viral retinitides and ocular toxoplasmosis has a more established role. Antibody testing is appropriate for toxoplasmosis and toxocariasis, and may be complementary to PCR for viral retinitis. Masquerade syndromes represent neoplastic conditions that clinically appear as infectious or inflammatory conditions and should be considered as part of the differential diagnosis. Diagnostic vitrectomy and chorioretinal biopsy are thus critical tools for the management of patients in whom an infectious etiology of uveitis is suspected. PMID:24613892

  6. Deforestation and avian infectious diseases

    PubMed Central

    Sehgal, R. N. M.

    2010-01-01

    In this time of unprecedented global change, infectious diseases will impact humans and wildlife in novel and unknown ways. Climate change, the introduction of invasive species, urbanization, agricultural practices and the loss of biodiversity have all been implicated in increasing the spread of infectious pathogens. In many regards, deforestation supersedes these other global events in terms of its immediate potential global effects in both tropical and temperate regions. The effects of deforestation on the spread of pathogens in birds are largely unknown. Birds harbor many of the same types of pathogens as humans and in addition can spread infectious agents to humans and other wildlife. It is thought that avifauna have gone extinct due to infectious diseases and many are presently threatened, especially endemic island birds. It is clear that habitat degradation can pose a direct threat to many bird species but it is uncertain how these alterations will affect disease transmission and susceptibility to disease. The migration and dispersal of birds can also change with habitat degradation, and thus expose populations to novel pathogens. Some recent work has shown that the results of landscape transformation can have confounding effects on avian malaria, other haemosporidian parasites and viruses. Now with advances in many technologies, including mathematical and computer modeling, genomics and satellite tracking, scientists have tools to further research the disease ecology of deforestation. This research will be imperative to help predict and prevent outbreaks that could affect avifauna, humans and other wildlife worldwide. PMID:20190120

  7. Preoperative versus postoperative initiation of dalteparin thromboprophylaxis in THA.

    PubMed

    Borgen, Pål O; Dahl, Ola E; Reikeras, Olav

    2010-01-01

    Chemical thromboprophylaxis in total hip arthroplasty (THA) may increase surgical site bleeding. The drug dose and timing of such therapy is therefore important. We studied two cohorts of 298 and 301 patients undergoing THA. The first group received their first dose of dalteparin sodium 5000 IU subcutaneously the evening before surgery and the second group a half dose six hours postoperatively, followed by 5000 units daily in both groups. Blood loss was reduced by 146 ml from 1230 ml to 1084 ml (p<0.001) with postoperative prophylaxis alone. The number of patients receiving blood transfusion decreased from 53% to 35% (p=0.001), and the use of transfused packed red blood cells was reduced from 1.25 to 0.83 units per patient (p=0.001). The overall rates of non-vascular complications 6 months after surgery were 12% and 11%, bleeding related events 6.0% and 4.0%, and thromboembolic related events were 2.0% and 2.3% in the preoperative and the postoperative cohorts. Two patients died in the preoperative group and one in the postoperative group due to venous and arterial thromboembolism. This study show that 2500 IU dose of dalteparin started 6 hours after surgery significantly reduced blood loss and transfusions compared to 5000 IU dalteparin injected 12 hours before surgery. Few thromboembolic events occurred, and these were equally distributed.

  8. Central line complications

    PubMed Central

    Kornbau, Craig; Lee, Kathryn C; Hughes, Gwendolyn D; Firstenberg, Michael S

    2015-01-01

    Central venous access is a common procedure performed in many clinical settings for a variety of indications. Central lines are not without risk, and there are a multitude of complications that are associated with their placement. Complications can present in an immediate or delayed fashion and vary based on type of central venous access. Significant morbidity and mortality can result from complications related to central venous access. These complications can cause a significant healthcare burden in cost, hospital days, and patient quality of life. Advances in imaging, access technique, and medical devices have reduced and altered the types of complications encountered in clinical practice; but most complications still center around vascular injury, infection, and misplacement. Recognition and management of central line complications is important when caring for patients with vascular access, but prevention is the ultimate goal. This article discusses common and rare complications associated with central venous access, as well as techniques to recognize, manage, and prevent complications. PMID:26557487

  9. Strategies to reduce pulmonary complications after esophagectomy

    PubMed Central

    Weijs, Teus J; Ruurda, Jelle P; Nieuwenhuijzen, Grard AP; van Hillegersberg, Richard; Luyer, Misha DP

    2013-01-01

    Esophagectomy, the surgical removal of all or part of the esophagus, is a surgical procedure that is associated with high morbidity and mortality. Pulmonary complications are an especially important postoperative problem. Therefore, many perioperative strategies to prevent pulmonary complications after esophagectomy have been investigated and introduced in daily clinical practice. Here, we review these strategies, including improvement of patient performance and technical advances such as minimally invasive surgery that have been implemented in recent years. Furthermore, interventions such as methylprednisolone, neutrophil elastase inhibitor and epidural analgesia, which have been shown to reduce pulmonary complications, are discussed. Benefits of the commonly applied routine nasogastric decompression, delay of oral intake and prophylactic mechanical ventilation are unclear, and many of these strategies are also evaluated here. Finally, we will discuss recent insights and new developments aimed to improve pulmonary outcomes after esophagectomy. PMID:24151374

  10. [Candida arthritis of the TM joint complicating chronic otitis media].

    PubMed

    Semlali, S; Nassar, I; Fikri, M; El Quessar, A; El Hassani, Mr; Chakir, N; Jiddane, M

    2004-11-01

    Infectious arthritis of the temporomandibular joint is very uncommon, and arthritis of the TM joint as a result of candida albicans infection has not previously been reported. The authors describe a patient treated for chronic otitis media complicated by arthritis of the temporomandibular joint. The diagnosis was made using CT scan and bacteriologic sampling.

  11. Postoperative pain assessment after septorhinoplasty.

    PubMed

    Wittekindt, D; Wittekindt, C; Schneider, G; Meissner, W; Guntinas-Lichius, O

    2012-06-01

    Postoperative pain after septorhinoplasty and its optimal management has not been described in detail. Fifty-two adult septorhinoplasty patients were included in a prospective cohort single center study. Patients' and surgical characteristics were evaluated. Outcome and process parameters were analyzed using the questionnaires of the German-wide project Quality Improvement in Postoperative Pain Management (QUIPS) on the first postoperative day. Pain during the first operative day after septorhinoplasty was moderate. Pain management predominately consisted of remifentanil intraoperatively, metamizole in the recovery room, in combination with piritramide in one-third of the patients, and metamizole on ward. Patients younger than 31 years were less satisfied with pain management (P = 0.018). Open rhinoplasty was associated with less satisfaction with pain management (P = 0.007). Use of rib grafts led to more mobility, breathing, sleeping and mood disturbances (P = 0.003, 0.047; 0.047; 0.022, respectively). Preoperative pain counseling was followed by higher satisfaction, less breathing and mood disturbances after surgery (P = 0.021; 0.004; 0.046, respectively). Opioids in the recovery room in addition to non-opioids and treatment with non-opioids on ward led to less maximal pain (P = 0.027 and 0.040, respectively). We conclude that QUIPS is an easy tool to evaluate the quality of postoperative pain management following rhinoplasty. Preoperative pain counseling, specific care for patients with rib grafts, consequent use of opioids in the recovery room in addition to non-opioids, and use of non-opioids on ward seem to be effective to improve pain management after septorhinoplasty.

  12. Complications of Compressive Neuropathy: Prevention and Management Strategies

    PubMed Central

    Santosa, Katherine B.; Chung, Kevin C.; Waljee, Jennifer F.

    2016-01-01

    Compressive neuropathies of the upper extremity are common and can result in profound disability if left untreated. Nerve releases are frequently performed, but can be complicated by both iatrogenic events as well as progression of neuropathy. In this review, we will examine the management of post-operative complications following two common nerve compression release procedures: carpal tunnel release and cubital tunnel release. PMID:25934192

  13. [Treatment and outcome of complications after free flap-plasty].

    PubMed

    Giunta, R; Geisweid, A; Lukas, B; Feller, A M

    2000-05-01

    Free tissue transplantation is a routine procedure in reconstructive surgery. Although a lot of free flap techniques have been described, the postoperative management of complications has gained only little interest. Nevertheless, complications of perfusion after free tissue transplantation are not rare and require a systematic approach. The aim of this study is to classify perfusion failures with a simple grading system prospectively on a large clinical series and to evaluate the results of treatment to improve management. In the past ten months, 70 consecutive free flaps have been performed. By the end of the operation, the operating surgeon gave a prognosis concerning the probability of a possible perfusion complication. Postoperative monitoring was done exclusively by clinical examination (colour, time for recapillarisation and bleeding after puncture). According to these parameters, arterial and venous insufficiencies have been classified into four grades. After recording type, time and treatment of a postoperative complication, the result of treatment was rated subjectively and a cause was noted when possible. The final result was classified either as total flap loss, partial flap loss or successful tissue transplantation. A total of 28 (40%) complications, which were treated with an average of 2.1 options, were recorded. The ratio between arterial and venous failure was 15:13. In 21 cases surgical intervention became necessary (intraoperative n = 12, postoperative n = 9). The arising complication was diagnosed correctly in nine cases by the operating surgeon. In ten cases, the cause of the complication remained unclear. In 18 cases, the complication was treated successfully without any flap loss. In six cases partial flap loss was observed and in four cases a total flap loss had to be accepted. Our results confirm that only few objective criteria for treatment options with perfusion failures after free tissue transplantation exist. Nevertheless, the

  14. Early complications after interventions in patients with acute pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Ai-Lin; Guo, Qiang; Wang, Ming-Jun; Hu, Wei-Ming; Zhang, Zhao-Da

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To identify the possible predictors of early complications after the initial intervention in acute necrotizing pancreatitis. METHODS: We collected the medical records of 334 patients with acute necrotizing pancreatitis who received initial intervention in our center. Complications associated with predictors were analyzed. RESULTS: The postoperative mortality rate was 16% (53/334). Up to 31% of patients were successfully treated with percutaneous catheter drainage alone. The rates of intra-abdominal bleeding, colonic fistula, and progressive infection were 15% (50/334), 20% (68/334), and 26% (87/334), respectively. Multivariate analysis indicated that Marshall score upon admission, multiple organ failure, preoperative respiratory infection, and sepsis were the predictors of postoperative progressive infection (P < 0.05). Single organ failure, systemic inflammatory response syndrome upon admission, and C-reactive protein level upon admission were the risk factors of postoperative colonic fistula (P < 0.05). Moreover, preoperative Marshall score, organ failure, sepsis, and preoperative systemic inflammatory response syndrome were the risk factors of postoperative intra-abdominal bleeding (P < 0.05). CONCLUSION: Marshall score, organ failures, preoperative respiratory infection, sepsis, preoperative systemic inflammatory response syndrome, and C-reactive protein level upon admission are associated with postoperative complications. PMID:26973421

  15. Resection for oesophageal cancer - complications and survival.

    PubMed

    Grøtting, Marie Sæthre; Løberg, Else Marit; Johannessen, Hans-Olaf; Johnson, Egil

    2016-05-01

    BACKGROUND Surgery is considered necessary to achieve a cure for oesophageal cancer. Minimally invasive oesophageal resection is increasingly performed with the aim of reducing the number of complications compared with open surgery. The purpose of this study was to investigate postoperative complications, mortality and long-term survival following hybrid oesophageal resection by laparoscopy and thoracotomy.MATERIAL AND METHOD Patients with oesophageal cancer who underwent hybrid resection with curative intent at Oslo University Hospital Ullevål from 1 November 2007 to 1 June 2013 were included (n = 109). Complications were graded according to the Clavien-Dindo classification and survival figures were recorded.RESULTS Median age was 65 years, 79 % were men. Altogether 118 complications were recorded in 70 patients (64.2 %). Distribution of complications was 1.8 % for stage I, 29.4 % for stage II, 22.1 % for stage III and 11.0 % for stage IV. Anastomotic leakage occurred in 4.6 %. There was no postoperative mortality. The proportion of R0 resections with microscopic radicality was 91 % (n = 100). For the entire patient population, the estimated 5-year survival rate was 48 % (95 % CI 36 - 60 %), for R0 resection 51 % (38 - 63 %) and for R1-2 resection 0 %. Estimated median survival with R0-2, R0 and R1-2 resection was 55, 55 and 10 months (0 - 28 months), respectively. R status and stage had a significant bearing on survival.INTERPRETATION There was a low percentage of serious complications, no mortality and few anastomotic leakages after hybrid resection for oesophageal cancer. The 5-year survival rate was good.

  16. Postoperative discomfort of dental rehabilitation under general anesthesia

    PubMed Central

    Cantekin, Kenan; Yildirim, Mustafa Denizhan; Delikan, Ebru; Çetin, Seçil

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To find out postoperative discomfort in children undergoing dental rehabilitation under general anesthesia (DRGA). Methods: This study involved 78 (4 to 10 year-old) healthy patients who were scheduled for DRGA and were needed extensive dental treatment because of severe caries, and showed high dental fear and/or behavioral management problems. The children had to be fit for DRGA administration by fulfilling the American Society of Anesthesiologists physical status I or II and no associated mental health or communication problems. Data were collected by structured interview either face to face (immediately post operation) or using a telephone (post operation after discharge). One of the study’s investigators recorded all data related to the immediate postoperative period during the child’s stay in the post-anesthesia care unit (PACU). The questionnaire consisted of questions related to postoperative problems experienced by the patient in the period after their day-stay attendance. The questionnaire, consisting of questions regarding and generally related to the child’s activities. In addition, pain was assessed using the face, legs, activity, cry, consolability (FLACC) scale. Results: The prevalence of postoperative problems was 46 out of 78 (59%). The mean FLACC score was 1.8 (SD=2.1). Some of the patients having more than one reported problem. Forty-one percent of the children showed nasal discomfort (P<0.01). Thirty-three percent and 43% of the children experienced throat or mouth discomfort. The most common experienced postoperative symptom after DRGA was bleeding. Nasal bleeding, however, was an uncommon complication and did not cause serious morbidity or mortality in children intubated nasotracheally. In addition, postoperative discomfort was related to number of the extractions. Children who had 4 or more extractions were more likely to experience pain. Findings associated with other bodily functions were assessed. Nausea and vomiting were

  17. Laboratory diagnosis of infectious diarrhoea syndrome; a three years study in two hospitals of infectious diseases.

    PubMed

    Damian, Maria; Tatu-Chiţoiu, Dorina; Usein, Codruţa-Romaniţa; Oprişan, Gabriela; Palade, Andi-Marian; Dinu, Sorin; Szmal, Camelia; Ciontea, Simona Adriana; Ceciu, Stefania; Condei, Maria; Persu, Ana; Baicuş, Anda; Pop, Mariana; Neagoe, Ionela; Steriu, Dan; Codreanu, Radu; Graur, Marian; Cretu, Michaela Carmen; Cilievici, Suzana; Nica, Maria; Ecovoiu, Alexandru; Gavrili, Lucian

    2009-01-01

    Infectious diarrhoea is a syndrome caused by a variety of bacterial, viral and parasitic organisms which represents a major cause of morbidity and mortality all over the world. The wide diversity of etiological agents impairs the surveillance and the diagnosis and affects the correct treatment applied to reduce the long-term complications. Besides well known enteric pathogens such as Salmonella, Shigella and Yersinia, a high number of emergent and re-emergent aetiologies are now recognised to be at the origin of diarrhoea. The lack of a correct diagnostic algorithm and adequate methods of analyses leads to under-evaluation and incertitude in an important number of clinical cases. Our study was designed as a complex analysis of the stool specimens collected from the patients, in the purpose to improve the laboratory diagnostic and to enhance the number of confirmed cases of infectious diarrhoea. A number of 756 samples from inpatients with diarrhoea were tested targeting pathogenic and opportunistic bacteria, viruses and parasites by classical and molecular methods. We documented that, in case of non-Salmonella, non-Shigella, non-Yersinia diarrhoea, the quality of diagnostic was improved by increasing the percentage of positive specimens to 22.49% compared to 11.12% when only bacteria, 5.56% when only viruses and 4.10% when only parasites were investigated. The laboratory data are of great value in evaluating the diarrhoea syndrome offering the documentation for an accurate epidemiological response and an adequate treatment.

  18. Carotid Stenosis in Cardiac Surgery-No Difference in Postoperative Outcomes.

    PubMed

    Schultheis, Molly; Saadat, Siavash; Dombrovskiy, Victor; Frenchu, Kiersten; Kanduri, Jaya; Romero, Joseph; Lemaire, Anthony; Ghaly, Aziz; Bastides, George; Rahimi, Saum; Lee, Leonard

    2016-02-23

    Background Debate over revascularization of asymptomatic carotid stenosis before cardiac surgery is ongoing. In this study, we analyze cardiac surgery outcomes in patients with asymptomatic carotid stenosis at a single hospital. Methods In this study, 1,781 patients underwent cardiac surgery from January 2012 to June 2013; 1,357 with preoperative screening carotid duplex were included. Patient demographics, comorbidities, degree of stenosis, postoperative complications, and mortality were evaluated. Chi-square test and logistic regression analysis were performed. Results Asymptomatic stenosis was found in 403/1,357 patients (29.7%; 355 moderate and 48 severe). Patients with stenosis, compared with those without, were older (71.7 ± 11 vs. 66.3 ± 12 years; p < 0.01). Females were more likely to have stenosis (odd ratio, = 1.7; 95% confidence interval, 1.4-2.2); however, patients were predominantly male in both groups. There were no significant differences in the rates of mortality and postoperative complications, including stroke and transient ischemic attack (TIA). Postoperative TIA occurred in 3/1,357(0.2%); only one had moderate stenosis. Inhospital stroke occurred in 21/1,357 (1.5%) patients; stroke rates were 2.3% (8/355) with moderate stenosis and 2.1% (1/48) severe stenosis. There were 59/1,357 (4.3%) deaths; patients with stenosis had a mortality rate of 4.2% (17/403); however, no postoperative stroke lead to death. Multivariable logistic regression analysis with adjustment for age, gender, race, comorbidities, and postoperative complications did not show an impact of carotid stenosis on postoperative mortality and development of stroke after cardiac surgery. Conclusion This study suggests that patients with asymptomatic carotid stenosis undergoing cardiac surgery are not at increased risk of postoperative complications and mortality; thus, prophylactic carotid revascularization may not be indicated.

  19. Management of Complications Following Emergency and Elective Surgery for Diverticulitis

    PubMed Central

    Holmer, Christoph; Kreis, Martin E.

    2015-01-01

    Background The clinical spectrum of sigmoid diverticulitis (SD) varies from asymptomatic diverticulosis to symptomatic disease with potentially fatal complications. Sigmoid colectomy with restoration of continuity has been the prevailing modality for treating acute and recurrent SD, and is often performed as a laparoscopy-assisted procedure. For elective sigmoid colectomy, the postoperative morbidity rate is 15-20% whereas morbidity rates reach up to 30% in patients who undergo emergency surgery for perforated SD. Some of the more common and serious surgical complications after sigmoid colectomy are anastomotic leaks and peritonitis, wound infections, small bowel obstruction, postoperative bleeding, and injuries to the urinary tract structures. Regarding the management of complications, it makes no difference whether the complication is a result of an emergency or an elective procedure. Methods The present work gives an overview of the management of complications in the surgical treatment of SD based on the current literature. Results To achieve successful management, early diagnosis is mandatory in cases of deviation from the normal postoperative course. If diagnostic procedures fail to deliver a correlate for the clinical situation of the patient, re-laparotomy or re-laparoscopy still remain among the most important diagnostic and/or therapeutic principles in visceral surgery when a patient's clinical status deteriorates. Conclusion The ability to recognize and successfully manage complications is a crucial part of the surgical treatment of diverticular disease and should be mastered by any surgeon qualified in this field. PMID:26989382

  20. Risk factors for pulmonary complications after percutaneous nephrolithotomy

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Jihion; Choi, Jae Moon; Lee, Joonho; Kwon, Koo; Kong, Yu-Gyeong; Seo, Hyungseok; Hwang, Jai-Hyun; Park, Hyung Keun; Kim, Young-Kug

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Although percutaneous nephrolithotomy is minimally invasive, it is associated with several complications, including extravasation of fluid and urine, the need for a blood transfusion, and septicemia. However, little is known about pulmonary complications after this procedure. Therefore, we aimed to evaluate the risk factors for and outcomes of pulmonary complications after percutaneous nephrolithotomy. All consecutive patients who underwent percutaneous nephrolithotomy between 2001 and 2014 were identified and divided into group A (no clinically significant pulmonary complications) and group B (clinically significant pulmonary complications). Preoperative and intraoperative variables and postoperative outcomes were evaluated. Independent risk factors for postoperative pulmonary complications were evaluated by univariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses. The study included 560 patients: 378 (67.5%) in group A and 182 (32.5%) in group B. Multivariate logistic regression analysis revealed that the independent risk factors for pulmonary complications after percutaneous nephrolithotomy were a higher body mass index (odds ratio = 1.062, P = 0.026), intraoperative red blood cell transfusion (odds ratio = 2.984, P = 0.012), and an intercostal surgical approach (odds ratio = 3.046, P < 0.001). Furthermore, the duration of hospital stay was significantly longer (8.4 ± 4.3 days vs 7.6 ± 3.4 days, P = 0.010) and the intensive care unit admission rate was significantly higher [13 (7.1%) vs 1 (0.3%), P < 0.001] in group B than in group A. Risk factors for pulmonary complications after percutaneous nephrolithotomy were a higher body mass index, intraoperative red blood cell transfusion, and an intercostal surgical approach. Postoperative pulmonary complications were associated with poor outcomes. These results may provide useful information for the perioperative management of pulmonary complications after

  1. Intestinal Complications of IBD

    MedlinePlus

    ... that only affects the colon). LOCAL COMPLICATIONS OF CROHN’S DISEASE INTESTINAL OBSTRUCTION The most common complication of Crohn’s disease, obstruction may arise from swelling and the formation ...

  2. Complications of Sinusitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... A Complications of Sinusitis Epistaxis (Nosebleeds) Allergic Rhinitis (Hay Fever) Headaches and Sinus Disease Disorders of Smell & Taste ... A Complications of Sinusitis Epistaxis (Nosebleeds) Allergic Rhinitis (Hay Fever) Headaches and Sinus Disease Disorders of Smell & Taste ...

  3. Skin Complications of IBD

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home > Resources > Skin Complications of IBD Go Back Skin Complications of IBD Email Print + Share After arthritis, ... about 5% of people with inflammatory bowel disease. SKIN DISORDERS COMMONLY SEEN IN IBD ERHTHEMA NODOSUM The ...

  4. Eye Complications in IBD

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home > Resources > Eye Complications in IBD Go Back Eye Complications in IBD Email Print + Share Approximately 10% ... doctor’s attention sooner rather than later. TYPES OF EYE DISORDERS UVEITIS One of the most common eye ...

  5. Extraintestinal Complications: Kidney Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... Extraintestinal Complications: Kidney Disorders Go Back Extraintestinal Complications: Kidney Disorders Email Print + Share The kidneys filter the ... but some less serious ones occur more frequently. Kidney stones These are probably the most commonly encountered ...

  6. Pregnancy Complications: Anemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Close X Home > Complications & Loss > Pregnancy complications > Anemia Anemia E-mail to a friend Please fill in ... anemia at a prenatal care visit . What causes anemia? Usually, a woman becomes anemic (has anemia) because ...

  7. Pregnancy Complications: Liver Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... X Home > Complications & Loss > Pregnancy complications > Liver disorders Liver disorders Now playing: E-mail to a friend ... have blood on them (razors, toothbrushes). Acute fatty liver of pregnancy What is acute fatty liver of ...

  8. Major complications following hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Afessa, Bekele; Peters, Steve G

    2006-06-01

    Tens of thousands of patients undergo hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) annually, 15 to 40% of whom are admitted to the intensive care unit. Pulmonary complications are the most life threatening conditions that develop in HSCT recipients. Both infectious and noninfectious complications occur more frequently in allogeneic HSCT. The management of HSCT recipients requires knowledge of their immune status, appropriate diagnostic evaluation, and early treatment. During the pre-engraftment phase (0 to 30 days after transplant), the most prevalent pathogens causing infection are bacteria and Candida species and, if the neutropenia persists, Aspergillus species. The early post-engraftment phase (30 to 100 days) is characterized by cytomegalovirus (CMV), Pneumocystis jiroveci, and Aspergillus infections. During the late posttransplant phase (> 100 days), allogeneic HSCT recipients are at risk for CMV, community-acquired respiratory virus, and encapsulated bacterial infections. Antigen and polymerase chain reaction assays are important for the diagnosis of CMV and Aspergillus infections. Diffuse alveolar hemorrhage (DAH) and peri-engraftment respiratory distress syndrome occur in both allogeneic and autologous HSCT recipients, usually during the first 30 days. Bronchiolitis obliterans occurs exclusively in allogeneic HSCT recipients with graft versus host disease. Idiopathic pneumonia syndrome occurs at any time following transplant. Bronchoscopy is usually helpful for the diagnosis of the infectious pulmonary complications and DAH.

  9. Gut microbiome, surgical complications and probiotics

    PubMed Central

    Stavrou, George; Kotzampassi, Katerina

    2017-01-01

    The trigger for infectious complications in patients following major abdominal operations is classically attributed to endogenous enteral bacterial translocation, due to the critical condition of the gut. Today, extensive gut microbiome analysis has enabled us to understand that almost all “evidence-based” surgical or medical intervention (antibiotics, bowel preparation, opioids, deprivation of nutrition), in addition to stress-released hormones, could affect the relative abundance and diversity of the enteral microbiome, allowing harmful bacteria to proliferate in the place of depressed beneficial species. Furthermore, these bacteria, after tight sensing of host stress and its consequent humoral alterations, can and do switch their virulence accordingly, towards invasion of the host. Probiotics are the exogenously given, beneficial clusters of live bacteria that, upon digestion, seem to succeed in partially restoring the distorted microbial diversity, thus reducing the infectious complications occurring in surgical and critically ill patients. This review presents the latest data on the interrelationship between the gut microbiome and the occurrence of complications after colon surgery, and the efficacy of probiotics as therapeutic instruments for changing the bacterial imbalance. PMID:28042237

  10. [Ogilvie syndrome as a complication following extensive total abdominal hysterectomy].

    PubMed

    Schreiner, B

    1988-05-14

    Acute pseudoobstruction of the colon (Ogilvie syndrome) is a rare entity observed postoperatively or in association with various medical conditions. Appropriate therapy avoids the life-threatening complication of cecal perforation with its attendant high mortality rate of over 40%. Today colonoscopic decompression is the treatment of choice.

  11. Massive scrotal edema as a complication of abdominoplasty.

    PubMed

    Girardeau, J T; Young, V L

    1985-10-01

    Massive scrotal edema is an unreported complication of abdominoplasty. This patient's postoperative decompensation of medial thigh and scrotal lymphatic return may well have been due to an occult lymphedema tarda or previously compromised lymphatics from the fibrosis of venous stasis disease and obesity.

  12. Complication during Postacute Rehabilitation: Patients with Posttraumatic Hydrocephalus

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Denes, Zoltan; Barsi, Peter; Szel, Istvan; Boros, Erzsebet; Fazekas, Gabor

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the incidence of posttraumatic hydrocephalus (PTH) among patients in our rehabilitation unit for traumatic brain injury. Furthermore, we aimed to assess the effect of shunt implantation and to identify the postoperative complication rate. This is a retrospective cohort study, in which between 2000 and…

  13. IMMUNIZATION OF RABBITS TO INFECTIOUS PAPILLOMATOSIS

    PubMed Central

    Shope, Richard E.

    1937-01-01

    Two intraperitoneal injections of either infectious or non-infectious rabbit papilloma suspensions actively immunize rabbits against papillomatosis. The capacity of the non-infectious suspensions to immunize is considered as evidence that they contain papilloma virus even though none can be demonstrated by the usual infection test. PMID:19870596

  14. The Infectious Pathogenesis of Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-03-01

    progression; 2-) To characterize the role of the infectious protozoa T. vaginalis in prostate carcinogenesis and progression. The current study is...understanding of the infectious pathogenesis of prostate cancer. Aim II. To characterize the role of the infectious protozoa T. vaginalis in prostate

  15. Infectious keratitis and cyanoacrylate adhesive.

    PubMed

    Cavanaugh, T B; Gottsch, J D

    1991-04-15

    We studied three patients with infectious keratitis that occurred after cyanoacrylate gluing despite prophylactic antibiotic therapy. Two patients developed culture-positive bacterial ulcers, one caused by a methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and the other by Haemophilus influenzae. The third patient developed a fungal keratitis. Two patients required penetrating keratoplasty. Each infection and perforation was concealed by the opaqueness of the glue. The pain of the infectious ulcers may have been obscured by the ocular surface irritation and drying induced by glue. Tissue toxicity, microbial colonization, use of bandage lenses, and long-term broad-spectrum antibiotics may precipitate glue-related corneal infections. Masking of underlying infection and the development of resistant organisms should be considered when using this mode of therapy.

  16. Pterygia: Single-fraction postoperative beta irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Beyer, D.C. )

    1991-02-01

    A retrospective evaluation was performed with records of 128 patients with 146 eyes that underwent applications of strontium-90 after pterygium excisions performed between 1982 and 1988. With a median follow-up of 13 months, 135 eyes were evaluable. Most pterygia (127 of 135) were treated with a single postoperative application of Sr-90 that delivered 3,000 cGy of beta radiation in one fraction. The actuarial freedom from relapse was 87%; all recurrences occurred within the first 18 months, and 46% of these within the first 3 months. Of the 13 recurrences, 10 have been re-treated with surgery and a second course of beta irradiation with excellent results. All eight eyes for which follow-up was available had no evidence of disease. The ultimate control rate was 96.3% for the series. Correlation of various treatment parameters, including age, bilaterality, prior recurrence, and interval from surgery to irradiation, was performed, and no statistically significant difference was seen. No serious complications have developed. Transient conjunctivitis and photophobia were almost universally seen, with five cases lasting beyond 5 months. The authors conclude that a single application of Sr-90 after surgery is effective and safe in managing pterygia.

  17. Infectious causes of chronic diarrhoea.

    PubMed

    Kaiser, Lisa; Surawicz, Christina M

    2012-10-01

    Infections are an uncommon cause of chronic diarrhoea. Parasites are most likely, including protozoa like giardia, cryptosporidia and cyclospora. Bacteria are unlikely to cause chronic diarrhoea in immunocompetent individuals with the possible exception of Yersinia, Plesiomonas and Aeromonas. Infectious diarrhoea can trigger other causes of chronic diarrhoea, including inflammatory bowel disease, irritable bowel syndrome and "Brainerd-type" diarrhoea. A thorough evaluation should detect most infections causing chronic diarrhoea.

  18. Global warming and infectious disease.

    PubMed

    Khasnis, Atul A; Nettleman, Mary D

    2005-01-01

    Global warming has serious implications for all aspects of human life, including infectious diseases. The effect of global warming depends on the complex interaction between the human host population and the causative infectious agent. From the human standpoint, changes in the environment may trigger human migration, causing disease patterns to shift. Crop failures and famine may reduce host resistance to infections. Disease transmission may be enhanced through the scarcity and contamination of potable water sources. Importantly, significant economic and political stresses may damage the existing public health infrastructure, leaving mankind poorly prepared for unexpected epidemics. Global warming will certainly affect the abundance and distribution of disease vectors. Altitudes that are currently too cool to sustain vectors will become more conducive to them. Some vector populations may expand into new geographic areas, whereas others may disappear. Malaria, dengue, plague, and viruses causing encephalitic syndromes are among the many vector-borne diseases likely to be affected. Some models suggest that vector-borne diseases will become more common as the earth warms, although caution is needed in interpreting these predictions. Clearly, global warming will cause changes in the epidemiology of infectious diseases. The ability of mankind to react or adapt is dependent upon the magnitude and speed of the change. The outcome will also depend on our ability to recognize epidemics early, to contain them effectively, to provide appropriate treatment, and to commit resources to prevention and research.

  19. Complications of Strabismus Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Olitsky, Scott E.; Coats, David K.

    2015-01-01

    All surgeries carry risks of complications, and there is no way to avoid ever having a complication. Strabismus surgery is no different in this regard. There are methods to reduce the risk of a complication during or after surgery, and these steps should always be taken. When a complication occurs, it is important to first recognize it and then manage it appropriately to allow for the best outcome possible. This article will discuss some of the more common and/or most devastating complications that can occur during or after strabismus surgery as well as thoughts on how to avoid them and manage them should they happen. PMID:26180463

  20. Complications of mandibular fractures.

    PubMed

    Zweig, Barry E

    2009-03-01

    Before any definitive treatment of mandibular fractures, the patient needs to be evaluated for more potentially life-threatening injuries. Complications can and do occur with treatment of mandibular fractures and can occur during any of the phases of treatment. The development of an accurate diagnosis and appropriate treatment plan is vital in achieving optimal success and decreasing complications. Knowledge of the anatomy and the principles of bone healing is also an important factor in preventing complications. To limit long-term untoward effects, complications should be recognized early and the appropriate treatment should be started before a minor complication becomes a complex one that is more difficult to manage.

  1. Haematological complications in otherwise healthy children hospitalized for varicella.

    PubMed

    Elena, Bozzola; Anna, Quondamcarlo; Andrzej, Krzysztofiak; Elisabetta, Pandolfi; Laura, Lancella; Alberto, Tozzi

    2011-02-11

    Although varicella is commonly regarded as a mild childhood disease, complications may occur and frequently require hospitalization. The aim of this study was to establish the type and frequency of varicella complications among hospitalized paediatric patients over a 4.5-year period. This analysis included the medical charts of 306 patients admitted to the Infectious Disease Unit, Children Hospital Bambino Gesù, Roma, Italy from 2006 to 2010 for varicella disease. The most common complications were haematological disorders (41.5%) followed by neurological ones (23.5%). Varicella vaccination in childhood immunization program must be increased.

  2. Incidence and types of complications after ablative oral cancer surgery with primary microvascular free flap reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Lodders, Johannes N.; Parmar, Satyesh; Stienen, Niki LM.; Martin, Timothy J.; Karagozoglu, K. Hakki; Heymans, Martijn W.; Nandra, Baljeet

    2015-01-01

    Background The aims of the study were 1) to evaluate the incidence and types of postoperative complications after ablative oral cancer surgery with primary free flap reconstruction and 2) identify prognostic variables for postoperative complications. Material and Methods Desired data was retrieved from a computer database at the department of Oral and Maxillofacial Department, Queen Elisabeth hospital Birmingham, United Kingdom, between June 2007 and October 2012. Logistic regression was used to study relationships between preoperative variables and postoperative outcomes. Results The study population consisted 184 patients, comprising 189 composite resections with reconstruction. Complications developed in 40.2% of the patients. Three patients (1.6%) died, 11.1% returned to the operating room, 5.3% developed donor site complications and 6.9% flap complications of which 3.2% total flap failure. In the multivariable analysis systemic complications were associated with anaesthesia time and hospital stay with red cell transfusion. Conclusions A significant proportion of the patients with primary free flap reconstructions after oral cancer surgery develops postoperative complications. Prolonged anaesthesia time and red cell transfusion are possible predictors for systemic complications and hospital stay respectively. Preoperative screening for risk factors is advocated for patient selection and to have realistic information and expectations. Key words:Free flap, complications, oral cancer, risk factors, reconstruction. PMID:26116846

  3. Comparison of Postoperative Drain Insertion versus No Drain Insertion in Thyroidectomies

    PubMed Central

    Al-Habsi, Asma S.; Al-Sulaimani, Al-Anood K.; Taqi, Kadhim M.; Al-Qadhi, Hani A.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives A thyroidectomy is a frequently performed surgical procedure which can result in life-threatening complications. The insertion of a drain after a thyroidectomy has been suggested to prevent such complications. This study aimed to evaluate the use of surgical drains following thyroidectomies in relation to postoperative complications and mass sizes. Methods This retrospective case-control study included all thyroidectomies conducted at the Sultan Qaboos University Hospital, Muscat, Oman, from January 2011 to December 2013. Length of hospital stay, readmission, postoperative complications and mass size were evaluated. Results During the study period, 250 surgeries were carried out on 241 patients. The majority of patients were female (87.2%). Drains were inserted postoperatively after 202 surgeries (80.8%) compared to 48 surgeries (19.2%) without drains. A total of 32 surgeries (12.8%) were conducted on patients with thyroid masses <1 cm, 138 (55.2%) on those with masses between 1–4 cm and 80 (32.0%) on those with masses >4 cm. The association between drain use and mass size was not significant (P = 0.439). Although postoperative complications were more prevalent in patients with drains, the relationship between these factors was not significant (P >0.050). Length of hospital stay was significantly longer among patients with postoperative drains (P <0.010). Conclusion The routine insertion of drains after thyroid surgeries was found to result in longer hospital stays and did not reduce rates of post-thyroidectomy complications. Thyroid mass size should not be used as an indicator for the insertion of a drain after thyroidectomy. PMID:28003893

  4. Enterovirus A71 DNA-Launched Infectious Clone as a Robust Reverse Genetic Tool

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Chee Wah; Tee, Han Kang; Lee, Michelle Hui Pheng; Sam, I-Ching; Chan, Yoke Fun

    2016-01-01

    Enterovirus A71 (EV-A71) causes major outbreaks of hand, foot and mouth disease, and is occasionally associated with neurological complications and death in children. Reverse genetics is widely used in the field of virology for functional study of viral genes. For EV-A71, such tools are limited to clones that are transcriptionally controlled by T7/SP6 bacteriophage promoter. This is often time-consuming and expensive. Here, we describe the development of infectious plasmid DNA-based EV-A71 clones, for which EV-A71 genome expression is under transcriptional control by the CMV-intermediate early promoter and SV40 transcriptional-termination signal. Transfection of this EV-A71 infectious DNA produces good virus yield similar to in vitro-transcribed EV-A71 infectious RNA, 6.4 and 5.8 log10PFU/ml, respectively. Infectious plasmid with enhanced green fluorescence protein and Nano luciferase reporter genes also produced good virus titers, with 4.3 and 5.0 log10 PFU/ml, respectively. Another infectious plasmid with both CMV and T7 promoters was also developed for easy manipulation of in vitro transcription or direct plasmid transfection. Transfection with either dual-promoter infectious plasmid DNA or infectious RNA derived from this dual-promoter clone produced infectious viral particles. Incorporation of hepatitis delta virus ribozyme, which yields precise 3’ ends of the DNA-launched EV-A71 genomic transcripts, increased infectious viral production. In contrast, the incorporation of hammerhead ribozyme in the DNA-launched EV-A71 resulted in lower virus yield, but improved the virus titers for T7 promoter-derived infectious RNA. This study describes rapid and robust reverse genetic tools for EV-A71. PMID:27617744

  5. Pulmonary complications following orthotopic liver transplant.

    PubMed

    Durán, F G; Piqueras, B; Romero, M; Carneros, J A; de Diego, A; Salcedo, M; Santos, L; Ferreiroa, J; Cos, E; Clemente, G

    1998-01-01

    Pulmonary complications after orthotopic liver transplant (OLT) are frequent, involving high morbidity and mortality. We have determined the pulmonary complication incidence in 187 patients submitted to OLT at the General University Hospital "Gregorio Marañón" in the last 4 years, analyzing the type of infection, evolution, diagnostic and therapeutic measures and their influence on OLT mortality. A total of 120 patients had pulmonary complications, the most frequent being pleural effusion (61.94%), pneumonia (43.36%), and pneumothorax (11.5%). Serious pulmonary hypertension was diagnosed by invasive methods in two patients at the time of surgery (unidentified before OLT); both died at early post postoperative times. Pleural effusion was noted in 70 patients, 31.42% of them requiring thoracic tube drainage, complications developing in 22.72%. Thirteen patients were diagnosed of pneumothorax, the most frequent etiologies being percutaneous liver biopsy, thoracic tube drainage for pleural effusion, and postoperative complications in 41.6, 33.3, and 23.3%, respectively. Pneumonia was diagnosed in the 1st month after OLT in 45 patients. Tests to diagnose and identify the etiological agent were made in 71.1% of diagnosed pneumonia patients, identification being obtained in 62.5%. Telescope catheter culture identified the agent in 48%, fiber optic bronchoscopy in 50%, and lung or pleural biopsy in 100%. Respiratory insufficiency was noted in 64 patients (34.22% of transplanted patients). Factors involved in their development were pneumonia (42.18%), graft dysfunction (39.06%, pleural effusion (34.37%), sepsis (28.18%), and poor nutritional status (7.81%). Fifty patients (41.66%) died, pulmonary pathology being the determinant factor in 28.8%. Patient mortality with respiratory insufficiency was greater, especially in those with three factors involved the development of respiratory insufficiency.

  6. [Postoperative cortical blindness after right upper lung lobectomy].

    PubMed

    Bausili, M; Abreu, S; Unzueta, M C; García Álvarez, M; Crespí, J; Moral, M V

    2012-03-01

    Changes in vision after non-ophthalmic surgery are a serious complication that can have devastating consequences due to its potential irreversibility. This not only leads to medical problems, but also legal ones. Many causes that affect sight during the peri-operative period have been identified, whether due to optic nerve damage or of extra-ocular origin (in the neuro-optic pathways and/or cerebral cortex). AU these may have a multifactorial origin, and there is still controversy as regards it pathogenesis and treatment. We present the case of a thoracic surgery patient who had a bilateral amaurosis in the post-operative period, which had a favourable outcome.

  7. Infectious keratitis with corneal perforation associated with corneal hydrops and contact lens wear in keratoconus.

    PubMed Central

    Donnenfeld, E D; Schrier, A; Perry, H D; Ingraham, H J; Lasonde, R; Epstein, A; Farber, B

    1996-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Corneal perforation is an uncommon complication associated with keratoconus. The first cases of infectious keratitis and corneal perforation associated with corneal hydrops and contact lens wear are reported in two keratoconus patients. METHODS: A retrospective chart review and histopathological examination were carried out. RESULTS: Both patients progressed to corneal perforation and emergency penetrating keratoplasty. One patient cultured Fusarium and the second patient Serratia marcesens. Both patients wore contact lenses against medical advice. CONCLUSIONS: The tear in Descement's membrane, stromal oedema, and epithelial bedewing associated with corneal hydrops results in loss of the epithelial-endothelial barrier of the cornea, creating a conduit for infectious organisms through the cornea. Acute hydrops associated with epithelial keratitis, stromal swelling, and a Descement's membrane tear may be a significant risk factor for infectious keratitis and corneal perforation. Contact lenses should not be worn during an active corneal hydrops owing to the increased risk for severe infectious keratitis and corneal perforation. Images PMID:8695560

  8. [Postoperative radiotherapy of prostate cancer].

    PubMed

    Guérif, S; Latorzeff, I; Lagrange, J-L; Hennequin, C; Supiot, S; Garcia, A; François, P; Soulié, M; Richaud, P; Salomon, L

    2014-10-01

    Between 10 and 40% of patients who have undergone a radical prostatectomy may have a biologic recurrence. Local or distant failure represents the possible patterns of relapse. Patients at high-risk for local relapse have extraprostatic disease, positive surgical margins or seminal vesicles infiltration or high Gleason score at pathology. Three phase-III randomized clinical trials have shown that, for these patients, adjuvant irradiation reduces the risk of tumoral progression without higher toxicity. Salvage radiotherapy for late relapse allows a disease control in 60-70% of the cases. Several research in order to improve the therapeutic ratio of the radiotherapy after prostatectomy are evaluate in the French Groupe d'Étude des Tumeurs Urogénitales (Gétug) and of the French association of urology (Afu). The Gétug-Afu 17 trial will provide answers to the question of the optimal moment for postoperative radiotherapy for pT3-4 R1 pN0 Nx patients, with the objective of comparing an immediate treatment to a differed early treatment initiated at biological recurrence. The Gétug-Afu 22 questions the place of a short hormonetherapy combined with image-guided, intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) in adjuvant situation for a detectable prostate specific antigen (PSA). The implementation of a multicenter quality control within the Gétug-Afu in order to harmonize a modern postoperative radiotherapy will allow the development of a dose escalation IMRT after surgery.

  9. [Artificial respiration for the postoperative care after major surgery (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Hack, G; Rommelsheim, K

    1976-02-01

    An analysis was made of the postoperative course of 158 cases of major surgery performed during 1971-1973. The operations comprised thoraco-abdominal resection of the oesophageal and cardia, abdominal duodenopancreatectomy, partial gastrectomy and enterectomy and partial hepatectomy. 63 per cent of the patients were given artificial respiration either prophylactically immediately after the operation (47 per cent) or at a later stage (53 per cent) on account of respiratory complications (arterial hypoxia below 55 mm Hg pO2). Postoperative mortality for the group of patients who did not have artificial respiration was 46 per cent, as compared with 32 per cent for the artifically ventilated patients - a difference of 14 per cent. The causes for this discrepancy, and especially the role of non-respiratory complications are discussed and the indications for prophylactic postoperative artificial respiration are reviewed.

  10. First case of infectious endocarditis caused by Parvimonas micra.

    PubMed

    Gomez, Carlos A; Gerber, Daniel A; Zambrano, Eduardo; Banaei, Niaz; Deresinski, Stan; Blackburn, Brian G

    2015-12-01

    P. micra is an anaerobic Gram-positive cocci, and a known commensal organism of the human oral cavity and gastrointestinal tract. Although it has been classically described in association with endodontic disease and peritonsillar infection, recent reports have highlighted the role of P. micra as the primary pathogen in the setting of invasive infections. In its most recent taxonomic classification, P. micra has never been reported causing infectious endocarditis in humans. Here, we describe a 71 year-old man who developed severe native valve endocarditis complicated by aortic valvular destruction and perivalvular abscess, requiring emergent surgical intervention. Molecular sequencing enabled identification of P. micra.

  11. CORRELATION BETWEEN PRE AND POSTOPERATIVE UPPER DIGESTIVE ENDOSCOPY IN PATIENTS WHO UNDERWENT ROUX-EN-Y GASTROJEJUNAL BYPASS

    PubMed Central

    CZECZKO, Leticia Elizabeth Augustin; CRUZ, Manoela Aguiar; KLOSTERMANN, Flávia Caroline; CZECZKO, Nicolau Gregori; NASSIF, Paulo Afonso Nunes; CZECZKO, Alexandre Eduardo Augusto

    2016-01-01

    Background: Bariatric operations have variable range of complications and postoperative benefits. Gastroesophageal reflux is considered potential factor that may result in damage to the esophageal mucosa and this subject is quite controversial in the literature. Aim : To evaluate patients who underwent to Roux-en-Y gastrojejunal bypass correlating epidemiologic and endoscopic findings in pre and postoperative periods. Method : A retrospective, paired study which evaluated 110 patients. Inclusion criteria were formal indication for bariatric surgery and patients with pre and postoperative endoscopy. Exclusion criteria were previous bariatric surgery, patients subjected to other types of bariatric surgery and those who had no pre or postoperative upper digestive endoscopy. The epidemiological variables were: sex, age, body mass index, type 2 diabetes mellitus or impaired glucose tolerance, and preoperative dyslipidemia. Results : The preoperative upper endoscopy was normal in 26.4% of the patients. Among endoscopic alterations, the hiatus hernia was the most prevalent followed by non-erosive gastritis. The postoperative upper endoscopy was normal in 40.9% and stenosis was the most prevalent followed by marginal ulcer. Correlation on pre and postoperative endoscopies, was found 100% reduction of hiatal hernias and 88% of esophagitis. There was no statistical significance in relationship to anastomotic stenosis with preoperative other variables. Conclusions: There was significant decrease in postoperative hiatus hernia, erosive esophagitis, non-erosive esophagitis, erosive gastritis and non-erosive gastritis with the operation. Stenosis of the gastrojejunostomy anastomosis was the most prevalent postoperative complication with no correlation with preoperative variables. PMID:27120737

  12. Postoperative posterior ischemic optic neuropathy (PION) following right pterional meningioma surgery

    PubMed Central

    Maramattom, Boby Varkey; Sundar, Shyam; Thomas, Dalvin; Panikar, Dilip

    2016-01-01

    Postoperative visual loss (POVL) is an unpredictable complication of nonocular surgeries. Posterior ischemic optic neuropathy (PION) is particularly feared in spinal surgeries in the prone position. We report a rare case of PION occurring after surgery for a pterional meningioma and discuss the various factors implicated in POVL. PMID:27570391

  13. Visual evoked potentials monitoring in a case of transient post-operative visual loss

    PubMed Central

    Capon, Marie; Boven, Michel Van; van Pesch, Vincent; Hantson, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    Post-operative visual loss (POVL) is a rare, albeit potentially serious complication of general anaesthesia. This report describes the case of a 54-year-old woman who developed transient POVL after general anaesthesia following a left posterior parietal meningioma surgery in the prone position and discusses the usefulness of visual evoked potentials monitoring in such situations. PMID:27601743

  14. Aspiration pneumonia caused by inadvertent insertion of gastric tube in an obtunded patient postoperatively

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Zhang; Li, Wenxian

    2011-01-01

    A nasogastric feeding tube is commonly inserted to facilitate patient meeting nutritional needs after oral surgery. But sometimes incorrect position may cause a severe iatrogenic damage. The authors present a case of an aspiration pneumonia complication with the result of malposition of nasogastric tube while the patient was intubated postoperatively. He recovered 3 weeks later with antibody therapy. PMID:22674097

  15. Acute postoperative inflammatory polyarthritis associated with a lone IgM cardiolipin antibody

    PubMed Central

    Chua, Ignatius; Jawad, Ali

    2015-01-01

    While the most recognised complication after joint surgery is septic arthritis, other forms of joint pathology may occur. We present a case of postoperative polyarthritis with high inflammatory markers, which responded to a course of prednisolone. The occurrence of high IgM cardiolipin antibodies that normalised with treatment suggests that this condition is a form of transient autoimmunity. PMID:25733090

  16. Infections complicating pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Reilly, K; Clemenson, N

    1993-09-01

    Common infectious disease problems that occur in pregnancy are outlined, including implications for pregnancy, appropriate diagnostic techniques, treatments, and methods for prevention of disease in mother and infant. Also included is general information about the use of immunizations and antibiotics in pregnancy.

  17. Complications of Microsurgery of Vestibular Schwannoma

    PubMed Central

    Zvěřina, Eduard; Balogová, Zuzana; Skřivan, Jiří; Kraus, Josef; Syka, Josef; Chovanec, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Background. The aim of this study was to analyze complications of vestibular schwannoma (VS) microsurgery. Material and Methods. A retrospective study was performed in 333 patients with unilateral vestibular schwannoma indicated for surgical treatment between January 1997 and December 2012. Postoperative complications were assessed immediately after VS surgery as well as during outpatient followup. Results. In all 333 patients microsurgical vestibular schwannoma (Koos grade 1: 12, grade 2: 34, grade 3: 62, and grade 4: 225) removal was performed. The main neurological complication was facial nerve dysfunction. The intermediate and poor function (HB III–VI) was observed in 124 cases (45%) immediately after surgery and in 104 cases (33%) on the last followup. We encountered disordered vestibular compensation in 13%, permanent trigeminal nerve dysfunction in 1%, and transient lower cranial nerves (IX–XI) deficit in 6%. Nonneurological complications included CSF leakage in 63% (lateral/medial variant: 99/1%), headache in 9%, and intracerebral hemorrhage in 5%. We did not encounter any case of meningitis. Conclusions. Our study demonstrates that despite the benefits of advanced high-tech equipment, refined microsurgical instruments, and highly developed neuroimaging technologies, there are still various and significant complications associated with vestibular schwannomas microsurgery. PMID:24987677

  18. Incentive spirometry decreases respiratory complications following major abdominal surgery.

    PubMed

    Westwood, K; Griffin, M; Roberts, K; Williams, M; Yoong, K; Digger, T

    2007-12-01

    Pulmonary complications are the leading cause of morbidity and mortality following major abdominal surgery. Chest physiotherapy aims to decrease the likelihood of these complications and hasten recovery. Exercises aimed at maximising inspiratory effort are the most beneficial for the patients. The incentive spirometer is a handheld device that patients use to achieve effective inspiration. In a nonrandomised pilot study of 263 patients we have found that the addition of the incentive spirometer, as part of an intensive post-operative physiotherapy programme, decreased the occurrence of pulmonary complications (6 vs 17%, p = 0.01) and length of stay on the surgical high dependency unit (3.1 vs 4 days p = 0.03). The two groups were comparable when age, sex, smoking history, the need for emergency surgery and post-operative analgesia were compared.

  19. Effect of Sugammadex on Postoperative Bleeding and Coagulation Parameters After Septoplasty: A Randomized Prospective Study

    PubMed Central

    Taş, Nilay; Korkmaz, Hakan; Yağan, Özgür; Korkmaz, Mukadder

    2015-01-01

    Backround Sugammadex is a reversal agent with well known advantages but it’s effects on haemostasis and bleeding have been a topic of interest. Septoplasty is a common surgical procedure with postoperative respiratory complications and bleeding. The aim of this study is to investigate the effects of sugammadex on postoperative coagulation parameters and bleeding after septoplasty procedure. Material/Methods In this randomized controlled study, fifty patients were grouped into two groups; neostigmine (Group N) vs. sugammadex (Group S). For the evaluation of PT, aPTT and INR, blood samples were taken for at the postoperative 120th minutes and alteration of these values with respect to preoperative values were documented. Postoperative bleeding was measured by evaluating the amount of blood absorbed on the nasal tip dressing during 3 hours postoperatively. Results Postoperative bleeding amount was significantly higher in the Group S compared to Group N (p=0.013). No significant difference was observed between two groups according to coagulation parameters (PT; p=0.953, aPTT; p=0.734, INR; p=0.612). Conclusions Sugammadex was associated with higher amount of postoperative bleeding than neostigmine in septoplasty patients. In surgical procedures having high risk of bleeding the safety of sugammadex need to be verified. PMID:26271275

  20. Effects of ketoprofen for prevention of postoperative cognitive dysfunction in aged rats.

    PubMed

    Kawano, Takashi; Takahashi, Tetsuya; Iwata, Hideki; Morikawa, Akihiro; Imori, Satoko; Waki, Sayaka; Tamura, Takahiko; Yamazaki, Fumimoto; Eguchi, Satoru; Kumagai, Naoko; Yokoyama, Masataka

    2014-12-01

    Postoperative cognitive dysfunction is a common geriatric complication that may be associated with increased mortality. Here, we investigated the effects of pos