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Sample records for postoperative pelvic external

  1. Enteric morbidity of postoperative pelvic external beam and brachytherapy for uterine cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Potish, R.A.; Dusenbery, K.E. )

    1990-05-01

    From 1970 through 1986, 219 women received postoperative pelvic external beam therapy and vaginal radium or cesium for uterine cancer. Prescribed external beam and total vaginal surface doses ranged from 38 to 51 Gy and from 70 to 119 Gy, respectively. Severe enteric morbidity developed in 7.8% of patients (15 small bowel, 1 sigmoid, 1 rectal). Complications occurred more frequently in patients with pelvic lymph node sampling at hysterectomy, abdominal surgery prior to hysterectomy, and low body weight. Logistic analysis demonstrated no significant effect of pelvic external beam dose, vaginal surface boost dose, or milligram hours. Five and 10-year overall survival rates were 85% and 74%, respectively. There were two proximal and one distal vaginal recurrences. Recommendations for avoiding complications are presented.

  2. Postoperative pelvic pain: An imaging approach.

    PubMed

    Farah, H; Laurent, N; Phalippou, J; Bazot, M; Giraudet, G; Serb, T; Poncelet, E

    2015-10-01

    Postoperative pelvic pain after gynecological surgery is a readily detected but unspecific sign of complication. Imaging as a complement to physical examination helps establish the etiological diagnosis. In the context of emergency surgery, vascular, urinary and digestive injuries constitute the most frequent intraoperative complications. During the follow-up of patients who had undergone pelvic surgery, imaging should be performed to detect recurrent disease, postoperative fibrosis, adhesions and more specific complications related to prosthetic material. Current guidelines recommend using pelvic ultrasonography as the first line imaging modality whereas the use of pelvic computed tomography and/or magnetic resonance imaging should be restricted to specific situations, depending on local availability of equipment and suspected disease.

  3. External Pelvic and Vaginal Irradiation Versus Vaginal Irradiation Alone as Postoperative Therapy in Medium-Risk Endometrial Carcinoma-A Prospective Randomized Study

    SciTech Connect

    Sorbe, Bengt; Horvath, Gyoergy; Andersson, Hakan; Boman, Karin; Lundgren, Caroline; Pettersson, Birgitta

    2012-03-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the value of adjuvant external beam pelvic radiotherapy as adjunct to vaginal brachytherapy (VBT) in medium-risk endometrial carcinoma, with regard to locoregional tumor control, recurrences, survival, and toxicity. Methods and Materials: Consecutive series of 527 evaluable patients were included in this randomized trial. Median follow-up for patients alive was 62 months. The primary study endpoints were locoregional recurrences and overall survival. Secondary endpoints were recurrence-free survival, recurrence-free interval, cancer-specific survival, and toxicity. Results: Five-year locoregional relapse rates were 1.5% after external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) plus VBT and 5% after vaginal irradiation alone (p = 0.013), and 5-year overall survival rates were 89% and 90%, respectively (p = 0.548). Endometrial cancer-related death rates were 3.8% after EBRT plus VBT and 6.8% after VBT (p = 0.118). Pelvic recurrences (exclusively vaginal recurrence) were reduced by 93% by the addition of EBRT to VBT. Deep myometrial infiltration was a significant prognostic factor in this medium-risk group of endometrioid carcinomas but not International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics grade or DNA ploidy. Combined radiotherapy was well tolerated, with serious (Grade 3) late side effects of less than 2%. However, there was a significant difference in favor of VBT alone. Conclusions: Despite a significant locoregional control benefit with combined radiotherapy, no survival improvement was recorded, but increased late toxicity was noted in the intestine, bladder, and vagina. Combined RT should probably be reserved for high-risk cases with two or more high-risk factors. VBT alone should be the adjuvant treatment option for purely medium-risk cases.

  4. Surgical anatomy for pelvic external fixation.

    PubMed

    Solomon, L B; Pohl, A P; Chehade, M J; Malcolm, A M; Howie, D W; Henneberg, M

    2008-10-01

    Pelvic external fixators have a high rate of reported complications, most of which relate to pin placement. In this descriptive study, we analyzed the morphology of the ilium in cadaveric specimens and compared these with the measures obtained from normal human pelvic computer tomograph scans, and how these related to each of the three basic configurations of pin positioning for the external fixation of a pelvis: anterosuperior (Slätis type), anteroinferior (supra-acetabular), and subcristal. The irregular shape and size of the iliac wing and the abdominal wall overlying the pin's insertion site could hinder accurate placement of anterosuperior pins. Potential disadvantages of the use of anteroinferior pins was found related to the deep location of the anterior inferior iliac spine, interference with the hip flexion area, risk of hip joint penetration, and the variable obliquity of the ilium. As subcristal pins are positioned between two superficial bony landmarks of the iliac crest, our findings suggest that they are more likely to have a correct placement and avoid complications. (c) 2008 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  5. Pelvic reconstruction with pedicled thigh flaps: indications, surgical techniques, and postoperative imaging.

    PubMed

    Sagebiel, Tara L; Faria, Silvana C; Balachandran, Aparna; Butler, Charles E; Garvey, Patrick B; Bhosale, Priya R

    2014-03-01

    This article will describe and illustrate the relevant anatomy and surgical techniques used in pelvic reconstruction using regional pedicled thigh flaps, which is often necessary in oncologic surgeries. Examples of normal postoperative imaging and common complications that can accompany pelvic reconstruction with anterolateral, gracilis myocutaneous, and posterior thigh fasciocutaneous flaps will be provided. Pelvic reconstruction using regional pedicled thigh flaps is often needed with extirpative oncologic surgeries to eliminate dead space, provide pelvic organ support, restore form and function, and introduce vascularized tissue to promote wound healing. Radiologists need to be aware of the normal postoperative appearance of these flaps so that the flaps are not mistaken for residual or recurrent disease and so that residual or recurrent disease can be identified and treated.

  6. Management of high-grade stage I adenocarcinoma of the endometrium: hysterectomy following low dose external beam pelvic irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Shimm, D.S.; Wang, C.C.; Fuller, A.F. Jr.; Nelson, J.H. Jr.; Nikrui, N.; Young, R.H.; Scully, R.E.

    1986-02-01

    Sixty-eight patients with FIGO stage I, grade 2 or 3 adenocarcinoma of the endometrium were treated according to a protocol involving 10 Gy external pelvic irradiation, prompt hysterectomy with surgical staging, and postoperative therapy individualized according to surgical-pathologic findings. Five-year survival for the entire group was 78%, 87% for those with grade 2 disease, and 59% for those with grade 3 disease. For patients whose disease was found to be confined to the uterus, surgical stage I, the 5-year survival was 98%. Patients with surgical stage I, grades 2 and 3 disease had 97 and 100% probabilities of surviving 5 years, respectively. Five-year disease-free probability was 96% for all patients with surgical stage I carcinoma, 97% for patients with grade 2 disease, and 94% for patients with grade 3 disease. Myometrial penetration influenced survival; no patient with less than 50% myometrial penetration died or suffered a relapse, while only 40% of patients with deeper penetration survived 5 years. Twenty-three percent of patients with surgically confirmed disease spread beyond the corpus survived 5 years; 29% remained disease-free at this interval. Ten of the 68 patients developed recurrences, none has had a known pelvic recurrence. Two major complications, one requiring surgery, were seen, both in patients receiving postoperative external beam irradiation. The rationale behind low-dose, preoperative external pelvic irradiation is described, and an approach to high-grade, FIGO stage I adenocarcinoma of the endometrium is outlined.

  7. Quality assurance of multifractionated pelvic interstitial brachytherapy for postoperative recurrences of cervical cancers: a prospective study.

    PubMed

    Shukla, Pragya; Chopra, Supriya; Engineer, Reena; Mahantshetty, Umesh; Paul, Siji Nojin; Phurailatpam, Reena; SV, Jamema; Shrivastava, Shyam K

    2012-03-15

    To evaluate three-dimensional needle displacements during multifractionated interstitial brachytherapy (BT) for cervical cancers. Patients scheduled to undergo pelvic interstitial BT for postoperative and or postradiation vault recurrences were included from November 2009 to December 2010. All procedures were performed under spinal anesthesia. Postprocedure BT planning CT scans were obtained with patients in supine position with arms on the chest (interslice thickness of 3 mm). Thereafter, verification CT was repeated at every alternate fraction. Needle displacements were measured in reference to a relocatable bony point. The mean cranial, caudal, anteroposterior, and mediolateral displacements were recorded. Statistical significance of mean interfraction displacements was evaluated with Wilcoxon Test. Twenty patients were included. Seventeen received boost BT (20 Gy/5 fractions/3 days) after external radiation, three received radical BT alone (36 Gy/9 fractions/5-8 days). An average of three scans (range, 2-3) were available per patient, and 357 needle displacements were analyzed. For the entire study cohort, the average of mean needle displacement was 2.5 mm (range, 0-7.4), 17.4 mm (range, 0-27.9), 1.7 mm (range, 0-6.7), 2.1 mm (range, 0-9.5), 1.7 mm (range, 0-9.3), and 0.6 mm (range, 0-7.8) in cranial, caudal, anterior, posterior, right, and left directions, respectively. The mean displacement in the caudal direction was higher between Days 1 and 2 than that between Days 2 and 3 (13.4 mm vs. 3.8 mm; p = 0.01). The average caudal displacements were no different between reirradiation and boost cohort (15.2 vs. 17.8 mm). Clinically significant caudal displacements occur during multifractionated pelvic brachytherapy. Optimal margins need to be incorporated while preplanning brachytherapy to account for interfraction displacements. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Quality Assurance of Multifractionated Pelvic Interstitial Brachytherapy for Postoperative Recurrences of Cervical Cancers: A Prospective Study

    SciTech Connect

    Shukla, Pragya; Chopra, Supriya; Engineer, Reena; Mahantshetty, Umesh; Paul, Siji Nojin; Phurailatpam, Reena; SV, Jamema; Shrivastava, Shyam K.

    2012-03-15

    Purpose: To evaluate three-dimensional needle displacements during multifractionated interstitial brachytherapy (BT) for cervical cancers. Methods and Materials: Patients scheduled to undergo pelvic interstitial BT for postoperative and or postradiation vault recurrences were included from November 2009 to December 2010. All procedures were performed under spinal anesthesia. Postprocedure BT planning CT scans were obtained with patients in supine position with arms on the chest (interslice thickness of 3 mm). Thereafter, verification CT was repeated at every alternate fraction. Needle displacements were measured in reference to a relocatable bony point. The mean cranial, caudal, anteroposterior, and mediolateral displacements were recorded. Statistical significance of mean interfraction displacements was evaluated with Wilcoxon Test. Results: Twenty patients were included. Seventeen received boost BT (20 Gy/5 fractions/3 days) after external radiation, three received radical BT alone (36 Gy/9 fractions/5-8 days). An average of three scans (range, 2-3) were available per patient, and 357 needle displacements were analyzed. For the entire study cohort, the average of mean needle displacement was 2.5 mm (range, 0-7.4), 17.4 mm (range, 0-27.9), 1.7 mm (range, 0-6.7), 2.1 mm (range, 0-9.5), 1.7 mm (range, 0-9.3), and 0.6 mm (range, 0-7.8) in cranial, caudal, anterior, posterior, right, and left directions, respectively. The mean displacement in the caudal direction was higher between Days 1 and 2 than that between Days 2 and 3 (13.4 mm vs. 3.8 mm; p = 0.01). The average caudal displacements were no different between reirradiation and boost cohort (15.2 vs. 17.8 mm). Conclusions: Clinically significant caudal displacements occur during multifractionated pelvic brachytherapy. Optimal margins need to be incorporated while preplanning brachytherapy to account for interfraction displacements.

  9. Anterior pre-tensioned external fixator for pelvic fractures and dislocations. Initial clinical series.

    PubMed

    Queipo-de-Llano, A; Lombardo-Torre, M; Leiva-Gea, A; Delgado-Rufino, F B; Luna-González, F

    2016-12-01

    In the treatment of unstable pelvic ring fractures, external fixators have the limitation of not adequately stabilizing the injured posterior elements. This article presents a novel and simple technique of temporary external fixation of the pelvic ring, able to produce compression of both the anterior and posterior pelvic elements. A curved flexible carbon-fiber rod is used, pre-tensioned before attachment to supra-acetabular Schanz screws. Although more extensive clinical experience is required, favorable preliminary results in a series of 13 patients with unstable pelvic fracture were encouraging: the aim of closing the posterior and anterior elements of the pelvic ring was achieved in all cases treated with this technique, and 12 patients survived. Radiological results were excellent in 3 cases and good in 9 cases. No major complications, such as secondary displacement, vertical re-displacement or deep infection, were observed. Mean operative time was 25min, compatible with emergency management.

  10. Postoperative Radiotherapy for the Treatment of Solitary Fibrous Tumor With Malignant Transformation of the Pelvic

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Chao; Zhang, Yong; Jing, Ming; Qu, Wei; Li, Jia; Zhao, Xiang-Rong; Yu, Yong-Hua

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Solitary fibrous tumor of the pelvic is an uncommon neoplasm with nonspecific symptoms. Reports of malignant transformation are especially rare. We report a case of solitary fibrous tumor in pelvic. A unique feature of our case compared with previously reported is that this patient relapsed with malignant transformation and had significant response to radiotherapy. The patient was initially treated with surgery, followed by postoperative dimensional conformal intensity modulated radiation therapy (dynamic MLC VRIAN 23EX Linac, inversely optimized by the Eclipse system) to provide a radical cure for residual tumor. In this case, there were no signs of recurrence after six and a half years of further follow-up, indicating that postoperation radiotherapy may be an effective treatment for SFT with malignant transformation in pelvic. PMID:26765426

  11. Postoperative radiotherapy for prostate cancer : Morbidity of local-only or local-plus-pelvic radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Waldstein, Cora; Dörr, Wolfgang; Pötter, Richard; Widder, Joachim; Goldner, Gregor

    2017-09-19

    The aim of this work was to characterise actuarial incidence and prevalence of early and late side effects of local versus pelvic three-dimensional conformal postoperative radiotherapy for prostate cancer. Based on a risk-adapted protocol, 575 patients received either local (n = 447) or local-plus-pelvic (n = 128) radiotherapy. Gastrointestinal (GI) and genitourinary (GU) side effects (≥grade 2 RTOG/EORTC criteria) were prospectively assessed. Maximum morbidity, actuarial incidence rate, and prevalence rates were compared between the two groups. For local radiotherapy, median follow-up was 68 months, and the mean dose was 66.7 Gy. In pelvic radiotherapy, the median follow-up was 49 months, and the mean local and pelvic doses were 66.9 and 48.3 Gy respectively. Early GI side effects ≥ G2 were detected in 26% and 42% of patients respectively (p < 0.001). Late GI adverse events were detected in 14% in both groups (p = 0.77). The 5‑year actuarial incidence rates were 14% and 14%, while the prevalence rates were 2% and 0% respectively. Early GU ≥ G2 side effects were detected in 15% and 16% (p = 0.96), while late GU morbidity was detected in 18% and 24% (p = 0.001). The 5‑year actuarial incidence rates were 16% and 35% (p = 0.001), while the respective prevalence rates were 6% and 8%. Despite the low prevalence of side effects, postoperative pelvic radiotherapy results in significant increases in the actuarial incidence of early GI and late GU morbidity using a conventional 4‑field box radiotherapy technique. Advanced treatment techniques like intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) or volumetric modulated arc radiotherapy (VMAT) should therefore be considered in pelvic radiotherapy to potentially reduce these side effects.

  12. Postoperative Imaging after Surgical Repair for Pelvic Floor Dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Khatri, Gaurav; Carmel, Maude E; Bailey, April A; Foreman, Melissa R; Brewington, Cecelia C; Zimmern, Philippe E; Pedrosa, Ivan

    2016-01-01

    Pelvic floor dysfunction encompasses an extremely common set of conditions, with various surgical and nonsurgical treatment options. Surgical options include injection of urethral bulking agents, native tissue repair with or without bioabsorbable or synthetic graft material, placement of synthetic midurethral slings or use of vaginal mesh kits, and mesh sacrocolpopexy procedures. Numerous different synthetic products with varied imaging appearances exist, and some of these products may be difficult to identify at imaging. Patients often present with recurrent or new symptoms after surgery; and depending on the presenting complaint and the nature of the initial intervention, imaging with ultrasonography (US), magnetic resonance (MR) imaging, voiding cystourethrography, or computed tomography (CT) may be indicated. US and MR imaging can both be used to image urethral bulking agents; US is often used to follow potential changes in bulking agent volume with time. Compared with MR imaging, US depicts midurethral slings better in the urethrovaginal space, and MR imaging is better than US for depiction of the arms in the retropubic space and obturator foramen. Mesh along the vaginal wall may be depicted with both US and MR imaging; however, the distal arms of the mesh traversing the sacrospinous ligaments or within the ischiorectal fossae (ischioanal fossae) are better depicted with MR imaging. Scarring can mimic slings and mesh at both US and MR imaging. MR imaging is superior to US for depiction of sacrocolpopexy mesh and associated complications. Voiding cystourethrography and CT are used less commonly because they rarely allow direct depiction of implanted material. Online supplemental material is available for this article. (©)RSNA, 2016.

  13. Morbidity and survival patterns in patients after radical hysterectomy and postoperative adjuvant pelvic radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Fiorica, J.V.; Roberts, W.S.; Greenberg, H.; Hoffman, M.S.; LaPolla, J.P.; Cavanagh, D. )

    1990-03-01

    Morbidity and survival patterns were reviewed in 50 patients who underwent radical hysterectomy, pelvic lymphadenectomy, and adjuvant postoperative pelvic radiotherapy for invasive cervical cancer. Ninety percent of the patients were FIGO stage IB, and 10% were clinical stage IIA or IIB. Indications for adjuvant radiotherapy included pelvic lymph node metastasis, large volume, deep stromal penetration, lower uterine segment involvement, or capillary space involvement. Seventy-two percent of the patients had multiple high-risk factors. An average of 4700 cGy of whole-pelvis radiotherapy was administered. Ten percent of the patients suffered major gastrointestinal complications, 14% minor gastrointestinal morbidity, 12% minor genitourinary complications, one patient a lymphocyst, and one patient lymphedema. Of the five patients with major gastrointestinal morbidity, all occurred within 12 months of treatment. Three patients required intestinal bypass surgery for distal ileal obstructions and all are currently doing well and free of disease. All of the patients who developed recurrent disease had multiple, high-risk factors. The median time of recurrence was 12 months. All patients recurred within the radiated field. Actuarial survival was 90% and disease-free survival 87% at 70 months. It is our opinion that the morbidity of postoperative pelvic radiotherapy is acceptable, and benefit may be gained in such a high-risk patient population.

  14. Biomechanical comparison of supraacetabular external fixation and anterior pelvic bridge plating.

    PubMed

    Çavuşoğlu, Ali Turgay; Erbay, Fatma Kübra; Özsoy, Mehmet Hakan; Demir, Teyfik

    2017-10-01

    Unstable pelvic ring injuries are complex and risky injuries due to high morbidity and mortality. Although anterior pelvic external fixator is a suitable method for rapid stabilization of an injured pelvic ring, due to some disadvantages such as high complication rate, nerve damage, and difficulties of patient's mobility and comfort, there has recently been increased searching for alternative methods for stabilization of the pelvic ring. Pubic symphysis zone freely moves in pelvic models. This study aims to evaluate the biomechanical stability of anterior pelvic bridge plating and compare it with supraacetabular external fixators in an untreated unstable pelvic fracture model. Samples were loaded statically with 2-mm/min loading rate in single leg standing position. Maximum load was 2.3 kN. When loading the samples, photographs were taken continuously. Stiffness values were calculated from the load displacement curves. Some reference parameters were described and were measured from unloaded and 2.3-kN-loaded photographs of the test. The mean stiffness values were 491.14 ± 52.22, 478.55 ± 41.44, and 470.25 ± 44.51 N/mm for anterior pelvic bridge plating group, supraacetabular external fixator group, and Control group, respectively. According to the measured parameters from photographs, the mean displacement at the pubic symphysis was 4.7 ± 0.32, 15.8 ± 2.01, and 18.2 ± 0.47 mm for anterior pelvic bridge plating, supraacetabular external fixator, and Control group, respectively. The highest displacement in the pubic symphysis was found in Control group, and minimum displacement was observed in anterior pelvic bridge plating group. When the perpendicular distance between the right and left lower end of ischium was examined, it was observed that displacement was minimum in anterior pelvic bridge plating group compared to other two groups, regarding to the high stability of pubic symphysis. In conclusion, this study revealed

  15. Decreasing postoperative narcotics in reconstructive pelvic surgery: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Reagan, Krista M L; O'Sullivan, David M; Gannon, Richard; Steinberg, Adam C

    2017-09-01

    Postoperative pain control is crucial to any successful recovery plan. Many currently used medication regimens are narcotic-focused. The objective of our study was to evaluate the efficacy of a multimodal pain regimen after pelvic reconstructive surgery. The primary outcome measure was narcotic use. Secondary outcomes included pain, nausea, and constipation. Patients were randomized to either usual care postoperative treatment or multimodal pain regimen. Usual care included no specific preoperative or intraoperative medications, and postoperative narcotics with ibuprofen. Multimodal pain regimen included preoperative and postoperative celecoxib, gabapentin, intraoperative and postoperative intravenous and oral acetaminophen and ibuprofen, and narcotics as needed. All narcotics were converted to milligram equivalents of oral morphine for standardization according to Centers for Disease Control and Prevention guidelines where conversion factors for oral hydrocodone = 1, oral oxycodone = 1.5, and oral hydromorphone = 4. Patients were given the validated Brief Pain Inventory survey preoperatively (baseline), at postoperative day 1, and 1 week postoperatively. At 1 week, bowel function and narcotics usage was assessed. Seventy patients were randomized to the usual care arm and 68 to the multimodal pain regimen arm. Patients in the multimodal pain regimen arm used significantly fewer intravenous narcotics in the operating room (90.7 ± 39.1 mg vs 104.6 ± 33.5 mg; P = .026) and while in the hospital (10.8 ± 15.1 mg vs 31.2 ± 29.6 mg; P < .001) and were more likely to use 0 oral narcotics after discharge to home (34.8% of patients vs 10.6%; P = .001). Of the patients who did use oral narcotics after discharge to home, there was no difference in amount used between groups (121.3 ± 103.7 mg in the multimodal pain regimen arm vs 153.0 ± 113.8 mg in the usual care arm; P = .139). Total narcotic usage (operating room + hospital + home) was significantly less in

  16. Postoperative levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine system for pelvic endometriosis-related pain: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Tanmahasamut, Prasong; Rattanachaiyanont, Manee; Angsuwathana, Surasak; Techatraisak, Kitirat; Indhavivadhana, Suchada; Leerasiri, Pichai

    2012-03-01

    To estimate the effectiveness of a postoperative levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine system for relieving pelvic pain in patients with endometriosis. A double-blind randomized controlled trial was conducted in 55 patients with endometriosis and moderate-to-severe dysmenorrhea (visual analog scale, greater than 50 mm) undergoing laparoscopic conservative surgery. After surgery, patients were randomized to a levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine system (n=28) or expectant management (n=27) group. Primary outcome was the change of dysmenorrhea visual analog scale. Secondary outcomes included changes of pelvic pain and dyspareunia visual analog scale, Short Form-36 score, and adverse effects. The two groups were comparable in age, body mass index, parity, and baseline pain scores. At 12 months, the levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine system group had a significantly lower median value of dysmenorrhea and noncyclic pelvic pain score. Compared with the control group, the levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine system group had greater reduction in dysmenorrhea visual analog scale (-81.0 compared with -50.0 mm, P=.006) and pelvic pain visual analog scale (-48.5 compared with -22.0 mm, P=.038) but a comparable reduction in dyspareunia visual analog scale (-15.0 compared with -19.0 mm, P=.831). Two patients in levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine system group (7.4%) and nine in the expectant management group (39.1%) had recurrent dysmenorrhea within 1 year postoperatively (P=.014). Number-needed-to-treat to prevent one case with recurrent dysmenorrhea within the first year was three cases. The Short Form-36 scores improved in the levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine system group but did not change in the expectant management group. There was no serious adverse event during the study period. The levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine system is effective and well accepted for long-term therapy after conservative surgery for patients with moderate to severe pain related to

  17. [Influence of postoperative pelvic floor function on different surgical procedures of hysterectomy].

    PubMed

    Tan, A L; Hong, L; Zhao, Y Z; Jiang, L

    2017-05-25

    Objective: To compare the influence of postoperative pelvic floor function after different surgical procedures of hysterectomy. Methods: A total of 260 patients who underwent hysterectomy in Renmin hospital of Wuhan University from January 2012 to January 2014 were enrolled in the study, and divided into 5 groups by different surgical procedures, which were total abdominal hysterectomy (A-TH; 46 cases), total laparoscopic hysterectomy (L-TH; 59 cases), total vaginal hysterectomy (V-TH; 42 cases), abdominal intrafascial hysterectomy (A-CISH; 78 cases), laparoscopic intrafascial hysterectomy (L-CISH; 35 cases). Pelvic examination, pelvic organ prolapse quantitation (POP-Q), test of pelvic muscle strength, pelvic floor distress inventory-short form 20 (PFDI-20) and the female sexual function index (FSFI) questionnaire were measured after 6 months and 12 months. Results: The differences of pelvic organ prolapse incidence after 6 months, A-TH and A-CISH [7% (3/46) versus 3% (2/78)], A-TH and L-CISH [7% (3/46) versus 3% (1/35)] were statistically significance (all P<0.05).POP-Q grade after 6 months between A-TH and A-CISH was statistically different in degree (P<0.05). The differences of incidence of abnormal pelvic floor muscle fatigue after 6 months of A-TH and A-CISH [59% (27/46) versus 29% (23/78)], A-TH and L-CISH [59% (27/46) versus 26% (9/35)] were statistically significant (all P<0.05), after 12 months the difference of L-TH and A-CISH [61% (36/59) versus 29%(23/78)] was statistically different (P<0.05). The differences of incidence of abnormal pelvic floor muscle strength after 6 months of L-TH and A-CISH [53% (31/59) verus 24% (19/78)], V-TH and A-CISH [60% (25/42) verus 24% (19/78)], V-TH and L-CISH [60% (25/42) verus 23% (8/35)] were statistically significant (all P<0.05); after 12 months the difference of V-TH and A-CISH [57% (24/42) versus 26%(20/78)] was statistically significant (P<0.05). Stress urinary incontinence, abnormal bowel movements after 6

  18. Physical examination of the female internal and external genitalia with and without pelvic organ prolapse: A review.

    PubMed

    Pahwa, Avita K; Siegelman, Evan S; Arya, Lily A

    2015-04-01

    Pelvic organ prolapse, a herniation of pelvic organs through the vagina, is a common condition in older women. Pelvic organ prolapse distorts vaginal anatomy making pelvic examination difficult. A clinician must accurately identify anatomic landmarks both in women presenting with symptoms of prolapse and in women noted to have coincidental prolapse during routine gynecologic examination. We present a systematic approach to the female pelvic examination including anatomic landmarks of the external genitalia, vagina, and uterus in women with normal support as well as changes that occur with pelvic organ prolapse. Knowledge and awareness of normal anatomic landmarks will improve a clinician's ability to identify defects in pelvic support and allow for better diagnosis and treatment of pelvic organ prolapse. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Vaginal versus robotic hysterectomy and concomitant pelvic support surgery: a comparison of postoperative vaginal length and sexual function.

    PubMed

    De La Cruz, Jacquia F; Myers, Erinn M; Geller, Elizabeth J

    2014-01-01

    To compare the change from pre- to postoperative total vaginal length (TVL) in women who underwent either a total vaginal hysterectomy (TVH) with uterosacral ligament suspension (USLS) or a robotic hysterectomy (RH) with colpopexy (SCP). Secondary objectives included comparing sexual function, pelvic floor function, and prolapse recurrence between routes of surgery. This was a retrospective cohort study (Canadian Task Force classification II-2). This was conducted at 1 tertiary academic medical center over a 2-year period. Women who underwent either TVH/USLS or RH/SCP. Baseline and postoperative POP-Q Pelvic Organ Prolapse Quantification exams were recorded as well as postoperative validated questionnaires. Twenty-nine subjects were needed in each group to detect a 1.5-cm difference in TVL. There were 38 TVH/USLS and 46 RH/SCP participants. RHs were either total (28/46 [61%]) or supracervical (18/46 [39%]). The mean postoperative follow-up was 9.5 ± 3.1 months. For the primary outcome, women in the TVH/USLS group had a decrease in TVL, whereas women in the RH/SCP group had an increase in TVL (-0.6 ± 1.0 cm vs 0.5 ± 0.8 cm, p < .001). Among sexually active women (55/84, 65.5%), there was no difference in postoperative sexual function between groups based on Pelvic Organ Prolapse/Urinary incontinence Sexual Function Questionnaire short form scores, with good sexual function in both groups (32.6 ± 6.2 TVH/USLS vs 35.1 ± 7.3 RH/SCP, p = .22). Although both groups showed good postoperative apical support, the TVH/USLS group had a slightly lower mean C point compared with the RH/SCP group (-6.8 ± 1.2 vs -7.7 ± 1.8, p = .02). Both groups showed good postoperative pelvic floor function, with no difference in mean postoperative Pelvic Organ Prolapse Distress Inventory scores (42.2 ± 45.4 vs 52.7 ± 46.6, p = .44). Recurrent prolapse (defined as any prolapse at or beyond the hymen) was not different between groups (13.2% for TVH/USLS vs 6.5% for RH/SCP, p = .46

  20. Mechanical testing of a device for subcutaneous internal anterior pelvic ring fixation versus external pelvic ring fixation

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Although useful in the emergency treatment of pelvic ring injuries, external fixation is associated with pin tract infections, the patient’s limited mobility and a restricted surgical accessibility to the lower abdomen. In this study, the mechanical stability of a subcutaneous internal anterior fixation (SIAF) system is investigated. Methods A standard external fixation and a SIAF system were tested on pairs of Polyoxymethylene testing cylinders using a universal testing machine. Each specimen was subjected to a total of 2000 consecutive cyclic loadings at 1 Hz with sinusoidal lateral compression/distraction (+/−50 N) and torque (+/− 0.5 Nm) loading alternating every 200 cycles. Translational and rotational stiffness were determined at 100, 300, 500, 700 and 900 cycles. Results There was no significant difference in translational stiffness between the SIAF and the standard external fixation when compared at 500 (p = .089), 700 (p = .081), and 900 (p = .266) cycles. Rotational stiffness observed for the SIAF was about 50 percent higher than the standard external fixation at 300 (p = .005), 500 (p = .020), and 900 (p = .005) cycles. No loosening or failure of the rod-pin/rod-screw interfaces was seen. Conclusions In comparison with the standard external fixation system, the tested device for subcutaneous internal anterior fixation (SIAF) in vitro has similar translational and superior rotational stiffness. PMID:24684828

  1. A novel conformal arc technique for postoperative whole pelvic radiotherapy for endometrial cancer.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ruijie; Jiang, Weijuan; Wang, Junjie

    2009-12-01

    Conventional whole pelvic radiotherapy (WPRT) with 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) exposes most of the contents of the true pelvis to the prescribed dose. Intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) provides more conformal dose distribution and better sparing of critical structures for WPRT. However, IMRT is more complicated in planning and delivery, requiring more expensive equipment and time-consuming quality assurance. We explore and evaluate a novel conformal arc radiotherapeutic technique for postoperative WPRT for endometrial cancer in this study. This technique involves 2-axis conformal arc therapy (2A-CAT) with 180-degree rotation around 2 isocenters each in 2 separate dose-shaping structures. Dosimetric comparison with 3D-CRT and IMRT for 10 endometrial cancer patients undergoing postoperative WPRT was performed to evaluate this new 2A-CAT technique. The mean conformity indices were 0.83, 0.61, and 0.88 for 2A-CAT, 3D-CRT, and IMRT, respectively. The mean homogeneity indices were 1.15, 1.08, and 1.10. The mean doses to bowel, rectum, bladder, and pelvic bone marrow were, respectively, 1.19, 3.39, 4.65, and 1.64 Gy lower with 2A-CAT than with 3D-CRT (P < 0.05), whereas a little higher than with IMRT. The mean dose to normal tissue was 1.87 Gy higher with 2A-CAT than with IMRT (P = 0.00). In postoperative WPRT for endometrial cancer, 2A-CAT significantly improves the dose conformity and sparing of bowel, rectum, and bladder compared with 3D-CRT. Despite dose uniformity and conformity being still inferior to those of IMRT, its simplicity and extensive availability combined with further improvement warrant it as a potential shortcut alternative to IMRT.

  2. The surgical technique and early postoperative complications of the Gynecare Prolift pelvic floor repair system.

    PubMed

    Lucioni, Alvaro; Rapp, David E; Gong, Edward M; Reynolds, William S; Fedunok, Paula A; Bales, Gregory T

    2008-04-01

    The Gynecare Prolift pelvic floor repair system (GPS) comprises a synthetic mesh placed via a transvaginal, transobturator approach. We present our technique focusing on the safety and feasibility of the GPS. GPS candidates are evaluated in the office with a full history, physical examination, urinalysis and when appropriate, urodynamic evaluation. Patients were offered total vaginal vault prolapse repair or isolated anterior repair dependent of site of defect. Follow-up comprised a full history, physical examination, and global assessment of subjective satisfaction (2 and 6 weeks, 6 months postoperative). Concentration was placed on intraoperative and short-term postoperative complications and assessment of prolapse recurrence. GPS prolapse repair has been used in 12 patients for anterior or total vault prolapse. Mean postoperative follow-up time is 42 weeks. There were no major perioperative complications. De novo enterocele development was seen in one patient without any other incidence of recurrence. No incidence of mesh erosion or sexual dysfunction has been observed. The GPS is a safe and reproducible system for use in transvaginal repairs of vaginal vault prolapse. Long-term studies are needed to evaluate repair durability and for potential complications.

  3. Pre- and postoperative evaluation of pelvic floor muscle function in POP patients using surface electromyography and digital palpation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xinliang; Gong, Yao; Wu, Dan; Li, Xiaocui; Li, Huaifang; Tong, Xiaowen; Cheng, Weiwei

    2014-04-01

    The study aims to evaluate the pelvic floor muscle (PFM) function in patients with pelvic organ prolapse (POP) pre- and postoperatively using digital palpation and surface electromyography. In this non-randomized prospective study, two groups of patients were recruited for assessment. The surgical group included 74 POP patients receiving the modified pelvic reconstructive surgery and the control group consisted of 30 non-POP patients. One physiotherapist conducted the digital palpation and SEMG evaluation. The scale of PFM strength, the duration and voltage of maximum voluntary contraction (MVC) as well as numbers and voltage of short, fast contractions (SFC) by SEMG were documented and compared in both groups. For statistical analysis, t-test, Mann-Whitney U test and Wilcoxon test were used with a significant level 0.05. A total of 68 POP patients finished the two follow-ups. Sixty-four patients were objectively cured with a 94.1% cure rate. Mesh erosions happened in three patients (4.8%). By digital palpation, the PFM strength increased significantly in POP patients after surgery but still lower than non-POP patients (P<0.001). By SEMG, the electrical activity of PFM increased significantly in the surgical group postoperatively (P 0.001). The PFM function was improved 3 months after the modified pelvic reconstructive surgery in POP patients based on digital palpation and SEMG. The evaluation of PFM function should be included in the overall assessment of pelvic reconstructive surgeries. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. [Treatment of external postoperative fistulas of the gastrointestinal tract].

    PubMed

    Urbanowicz, K; Malinowski, P

    1997-01-01

    In the years 1985-1996 82 patients with postoperative external fistulas of gastrointestinal tract (pefgt) were treated in the Department of General Surgery of Hospital in Olsztyn. The age of the patient varied from 18 to 70 years. 37 patients were women and 45 man. Volume of excreted fluid fluctuated from 100 ml to 3000 ml per day. The most frequent cause of pefgt was dehiscence of the anastomosis of jejunum in 31 patients, and operations of complications of gastric or duodenal ulcer disease in 30 patients. 54 patients underwent medical treatment. It was based on compensation of disorders in water and electrolyte balance and acid-base equilibrium, nutritional treatment, protection of the skin, suction of the excreted fluid, controlling of foci of infection, rehabilitation. 7 patients were reoperated for the purpose of closing the fistula and 21 to drain abscess or to stop bleeding. 57 (70%) out of 82 patients recovered, 25 (30%) died. In this number 14 patients among 54 treated conservatively and 11 out from 28 operated. The most frequent cause of death was sepsis (15 patients). The conservative treatment including TPN is successful in majority of patients with pefgt and indispensable in patients treated operatively. Special attention should be given for coexisting intraperitoneal abscessa, peritonitis and sepsis.

  5. Treatment of bulky stage IB and IIB cervical cancers with outpatient neutron brachytherapy, external pelvic radiation and extrafascial hysterectomy

    SciTech Connect

    Van Nagell, J.R.; Maruyama, Y.; Yoneda, J.; Donaldson, E.S.; Hanson, M.B.; Gallion, H.H.; Powell, D.E.; Kryscio, R.J.

    1986-01-01

    From January, 1977, to December, 1982, twenty-nine patients with bulky (>4 cms diameter) Stage IB or IIB cervical cancer were treated at the University of Kentucky Medical Center by a combination of out-patient neutron brachytherapy (Cf-252) and external pelvic radiation followed by extrafascial hysterectomy. Residual tumor was present in the hysterectomy specimens of 25 per cent. Complications during and following radiation therapy and surgery were minimal and included vaginal stenosis, proctitis, and hemorrhagic cystitis. The mean duration of hospitalization for surgery in these patients was 6.6 days (range 5-15 days) and postoperative morbidity was low. No patient required blood transfusion. Four patients developed urinary tract infections and two had superficial wound separations. Following treatment, patients were seen at monthly intervals for one year, every three months for two years, and every six months thereafter. No patient has been lost to follow-up. Two patients (7 per cent) developed tumor recurrence and have died of disease (1 of distant metastases; 1 local). The remaining 27 patients (93 per cent) are alive and well with no evidence of disease 24-89 months (mean 48 months) after therapy. No radiogenic fistulae or bowel obstruction were observed. These preliminary results suggest that the combination of outpatient neutron brachytherapy, external pelvic radiation, and extrafascial hysterectomy for patients with Stage IB and IIB cervical cancer is well tolerated. Complications associated with this treatment regimen have been minimal, and the recurrence rate is low. The duration of intracavitary neutron brachytherapy was short, and outpatient therapy was well received by patients.

  6. External beam boost irradiation for clinically positive pelvic nodes in patients with uterine cervical cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ariga, Takuro; Toita, Takafumi; Kasuya, Goro; Nagai, Yutaka; Inamine, Morihiko; Kudaka, Wataru; Kakinohana, Yasumasa; Aoki, Youichi; Murayama, Sadayuki

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to retrospectively analyze the treatment results of boost external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) to clinically positive pelvic nodes in patients with uterine cervical cancer. The study population comprised 174 patients with FIGO stages 1B1–4A cervical cancer who were treated with definitive radiotherapy (RT) or concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT) and high-dose-rate intracavitary brachytherapy (HDR-ICBT). Patients with positive para-aortic or common iliac nodes (≥10 mm in the shortest diameter, as evaluated by CT/MRI) were ineligible for the study. Fifty-seven patients (33%) had clinically positive pelvic nodes. The median maximum diameter of the nodes was 15 mm (range, 10–60 mm) and the median number of positive lymph nodes was two (range, one to four). Fifty-two of 57 patients (91%) with positive nodes were treated with boost EBRT (6–10 Gy in three to five fractions). The median prescribed dose of EBRT for nodes was 56 Gy. The median follow-up time for all patients was 66 months (range, 3–142 months). The 5-year overall survival rate, disease-free survival rate and pelvic control rate for patients with positive and negative nodes were 73% and 92% (P = 0.001), 58% and 84% (P < 0.001), and 83% and 92% (P = 0.082), respectively. Five of 57 node-positive patients (9%) developed pelvic node recurrences. All five patients with nodal failure had concomitant cervical failure and/or distant metastases. No significant difference was observed with respect to the incidence or severity of late complications by application of boost EBRT. The current retrospective study demonstrated that boost EBRT to positive pelvic nodes achieves favorable nodal control without increasing late complications. PMID:23365264

  7. Postoperative pelvic intensity-modulated radiotherapy in high risk endometrial cancer.

    PubMed

    Shih, Karin K; Milgrom, Sarah A; Abu-Rustum, Nadeem R; Kollmeier, Marisa A; Gardner, Ginger J; Tew, William P; Barakat, Richard R; Alektiar, Kaled M

    2013-03-01

    According to national surveys, the use of intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) in gynecologic cancers is on the rise, yet there is still some reluctance to adopt adjuvant IMRT as standard practice. The purpose of this study is to report a single-institution experience using postoperative pelvic IMRT with or without chemotherapy in high-risk endometrial cancer. From 11/2004 to 12/2009, 46 patients underwent hysterectomy/bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy for stage I-III (22% stage I/II and 78% stage III) endometrial cancer. Median IMRT dose was 50.4Gy. Adjuvant chemotherapy was given to 30 (65%) patients. With a median follow-up of 52months, 4 patients recurred: 1 vaginal plus lung metastasis, 2 isolated para-aortic recurrences, and 1 lungs and liver metastasis. Five-year relapse rate was 9% (95% CI, 0-13.6%). Five-year disease-free survival (DFS) was 88% (95% CI, 77-98%) and overall survival (OS) was 97% (95% CI, 90-100%). There were 2 patients with non-hematological grade 3 toxicity: 1 (2%) acute and 1 (2%) chronic gastrointestinal toxicity. In patients treated with IMRT and chemotherapy (n=30), 5 had grade 3 leukopenia, 8 grade 2 anemia, and 2 grade 2 thrombocytopenia. Oncologic outcomes with postoperative IMRT were very good, with DFS and OS rates of >88% at median follow-up of 52months, despite a preponderance (78%) of stage III disease. Toxicity was minimal even in the setting of an aggressive trimodality (65% of patients) approach. Data from this study and emerging data from RTOG trial 0418 demonstrate the advantages of IMRT in high-risk endometrial cancer. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Percutaneous Transcatheter Ethanol Sclerotherapy and Catheter Drainage of Postoperative Pelvic Lymphoceles

    SciTech Connect

    Akhan, Okan Karcaaltincaba, Musturay; Ozmen, Mustafa N.; Akinci, Devrim; Karcaaltincaba, Deniz; Ayhan, Ali

    2007-04-15

    The aim of this study is to investigate the efficacy and long-term results of percutaneous transcatheter ethanol sclerotherapy (PTES) for postoperative pelvic lymphocele treatment. Fifty-two patients who were referred for lymphocele treatment were included in this study. Sixty lymphoceles of 52 patients were treated by percutaneous treatment with or without ethanol sclerotherapy. Lymphoceles developed in 47 and 5 patients, who underwent gynecologic malignancy operation (31 ovarian cancer, 6 cervix cancer, 10 endometrial cancer) and renal transplantation, respectively. Lymphoceles were catheterized by ultrasonography and fluoroscopy guidance using the Seldinger technique. Lymphoceles smaller than 150 mL underwent single-session ethanol sclerotherapy and the others were treated by multiple-session ethanol scleortherapy. In 10 patients, percutaneous ethanol sclerotherapy could not be performed and they were treated only by percutaneous catheter drainage. The mean lymphocele volume was 329 mL (15-2900 mL). The mean catheterization duration was 11.8 days (1-60 days). The mean follow up time was 25.8 months (2-64 months). The initial treatment was successful in 46 out of 50 (91%) lymphoceles treated with PTES and 7 out of 10 (70%) lymphoceles treated with percutaneous catheter drainage. Minor complications (secondary infection and catheter dislodgement) were noted in seven (11.6%) patients. Recurrence developed in four and three patients who were treated by PTES and percutaneous catheter drainage, respectively. Five of these patients were treated with PTES without further recurrence. Percutaneous transcatheter ethanol sclerotherapy is an effective and reliable method for the treatment of postoperative lymphoceles.

  9. T1 pelvic angle: a new predictor for postoperative sagittal balance and clinical outcomes in adult scoliosis.

    PubMed

    Qiao, Jun; Zhu, Feng; Xu, Leilei; Liu, Zhen; Zhu, Zezhang; Qian, Bangping; Sun, Xu; Qiu, Yong

    2014-12-01

    A retrospective radiographical study. To compare the prediction abilities of T1 pelvic angle (TPA) and other parameters for postoperative sagittal balance, and investigate the relationships between these parameters and health-related quality of life. Using sagittal vertical axis (SVA) to assess sagittal alignment fails to take account of the pelvic compensation. A new parameter, TPA, has been recommended to represent the global sagittal balance of adult scoliosis. A retrospective review was performed on patients with adult scoliosis undergoing correction surgery from May 2009 to March 2013. The Spearman ρ was used to determine the correlations between the radiographical parameters (preoperative, postoperative, and changes) and the overall Oswestry Disability Index (ODI), visual analogue scale (VAS), and Scoliosis Research Society-22 (SRS-22) questionnaire scores. Significant correlations were found between the changes of TPA and the changes of lumbar lordosis, pelvic tilt, sacral slope, pelvic incidence, SVA, spinosacral angle, ODI, VAS, SRS-22, and pedicle subtraction osteotomy (PSO) degrees (P < 0.05). The changes of SVA were significantly related to the changes of lumbar lordosis, TPA, C7-sacrofemoral distance, ODI, VAS, SRS-22 (P < 0.05) but not PSO degrees (P > 0.05). Significant correlations were found between the changes of spinosacral angle and the changes of thoracolumbar kyphosis, TPA, ODI, VAS, SRS-22, and PSO degrees (P < 0.05). The changes of C7 plumb line to sacrofemoral distance ratio were significantly related to the changes of SVA (P < 0.05), but not the changes of ODI, VAS, SRS-22, or PSO degrees (P > 0.05). TPA could better reflect the postoperative changes of sagittal alignment and health-related quality of life for patients with adult scoliosis. Moreover, the changes of TPA are strongly correlated to the osteotomy degrees for PSO and, TPA could be used as a reference parameter in surgical planning. 4.

  10. Pelvic nerve innervation of the external sphincter of urethra as suggested by urodynamic and horse-radish peroxidase studies.

    PubMed

    Morita, T; Nishizawa, O; Noto, H; Tsuchida, S

    1984-03-01

    In view of the fact that the detrusor vesicae and external urethral sphincter perform closely synergic functions in micturition, experiments were conducted to explore the action of the pelvic efferent neurons on the external urethral sphincter. The pelvic efferent neurons are generally recognized, by urodynamic assessments and histochemical study with the technique of retrograde axonal transport of horse-radish peroxidase, to innervate the vesical detrusor. In 7 of 15 adult dogs studied, the external urethral sphincter continued to show a normal synergic electromyogram pattern with enhanced electrical activity on vesical distention and disappearance of discharges on vesical contraction even after bilateral transection of the pudendal nerves. The electrical discharges ceased in the sphincter only after subsequent bilateral pelvic neurotomy. Horse-radish peroxidase-positive cells were demonstrated in the intermediolateral and intermediomedial nuclei and in the Onuf nucleus of the sacral cord in approximately half the dogs whose pelvic nerve was injected with the plant peroxidase. The results suggest that the pelvic nerve may contain somatic fibers innervating the external urethral sphincter.

  11. Consensus Guidelines for Delineation of Clinical Target Volume for Intensity-Modulated Pelvic Radiotherapy in Postoperative Treatment of Endometrial and Cervical Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Small, William Mell, Loren K.; Anderson, Penny; Creutzberg, Carien; De Los Santos, Jennifer; Gaffney, David; Jhingran, Anuja; Portelance, Lorraine; Schefter, Tracey; Iyer, Revathy; Varia, Mahesh; Winter, Kathryn M.S.; Mundt, Arno J.

    2008-06-01

    Purpose: To develop an atlas of the clinical target volume (CTV) definitions for postoperative radiotherapy of endometrial and cervical cancer to be used for planning pelvic intensity-modulated radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: The Radiation Therapy Oncology Group led an international collaberation of cooperative groups in the development of the atlas. The groups included the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group, Gynecologic Oncology Group, National Cancer Institute of Canada, European Society of Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology, and American College of Radiology Imaging Network. The members of the group were asked by questionnaire to define the areas that were to be included in the CTV and to outline theses areas on individual computed tomography images. The initial formulation of the group began in late 2004 and culminated with a formal consensus conference in June 2005. Results: The committee achieved a consensus CTV definition for postoperative therapy for endometrial and cervical cancer. The CTV should include the common, external, and internal iliac lymph node regions. The upper 3.0 cm of the vagina and paravaginal soft tissue lateral to the vagina should also be included. For patients with cervical cancer, or endometrial cancer with cervical stromal invasion, it is also recommended that the CTV include the presacral lymph node region. Conclusion: This report serves as an international template for the definition of the CTV for postoperative intensity-modulated radiotherapy for endometrial and cervical cancer.

  12. CONSENSUS GUIDELINES FOR THE DELINEATION OF THE CLINICAL TARGET VOLUME FOR INTENSITY MODULATED PELVIC RADIOTHERAPY IN THE POSTOPERATIVE TREATMENT OF ENDOMETRIAL AND CERVICAL CANCER

    PubMed Central

    Small, William; Mell, Loren K.; Anderson, Penny; Creutzberg, Carien; De Los Santos, Jennifer; Gaffney, David; Jhingran, Anuja; Portelance, Lorraine; Schefter, Tracey; Iyer, Revathy; Varia, Mahesh; Winter, Kathryn; Mundt, Arno J.

    2009-01-01

    PURPOSE To develop an atlas of the clinical target volumes (CTV) definitions for the post-operative radiotherapy of endometrial and cervical cancer to be utilized for planning pelvic Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy (IMRT). METHODS AND MATERIALS The Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) led an international collaberation of cooperative groups in development of the atlas. The groups included RTOG the Gynecologic Oncology Group (GOG), the National Cancer Institute of Canada (NCIC), the European Society of Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology (ESTRO), and the American College of Radiology Imaging Network (ACRIN). Members of the group were asked by questionnaire to define areas that were to be included in the CTV and were asked to outline theses areas on individual Computed Tomography (CT) images. The initial formulation of the group began in late 2004 and culminated with a formal consensus conference in June of 2005. RESULTS The committee achieved a consensus CTV definition for the post-operative therapy of endometrial and cervical cancer. The CTV should include the common, external, and internal iliac lymph node regions. The upper 3.0 cm of vagina and paravaginal soft tissue lateral to the vagina should also be included. For patients with cervical cancer, or endometrial cancer with cervical stromal invasion, it is also recommended that the CTV include the presacral lymph node-region. CONCLUSIONS This manuscript serves as an international template for the definition of the CTV for the post-operative IMRT of endometrial and cervical cancer. PMID:18037584

  13. Consensus guidelines for delineation of clinical target volume for intensity-modulated pelvic radiotherapy in postoperative treatment of endometrial and cervical cancer.

    PubMed

    Small, William; Mell, Loren K; Anderson, Penny; Creutzberg, Carien; De Los Santos, Jennifer; Gaffney, David; Jhingran, Anuja; Portelance, Lorraine; Schefter, Tracey; Iyer, Revathy; Varia, Mahesh; Winter, Kathryn; Mundt, Arno J

    2008-06-01

    To develop an atlas of the clinical target volume (CTV) definitions for postoperative radiotherapy of endometrial and cervical cancer to be used for planning pelvic intensity-modulated radiotherapy. The Radiation Therapy Oncology Group led an international collaboration of cooperative groups in the development of the atlas. The groups included the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group, Gynecologic Oncology Group, National Cancer Institute of Canada, European Society of Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology, and American College of Radiology Imaging Network. The members of the group were asked by questionnaire to define the areas that were to be included in the CTV and to outline theses areas on individual computed tomography images. The initial formulation of the group began in late 2004 and culminated with a formal consensus conference in June 2005. The committee achieved a consensus CTV definition for postoperative therapy for endometrial and cervical cancer. The CTV should include the common, external, and internal iliac lymph node regions. The upper 3.0 cm of the vagina and paravaginal soft tissue lateral to the vagina should also be included. For patients with cervical cancer, or endometrial cancer with cervical stromal invasion, it is also recommended that the CTV include the presacral lymph node region. This report serves as an international template for the definition of the CTV for postoperative intensity-modulated radiotherapy for endometrial and cervical cancer.

  14. External fixation or arteriogram in bleeding pelvic fracture: initial therapy guided by markers of arterial hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Miller, Preston R; Moore, Phillip S; Mansell, Eric; Meredith, J Wayne; Chang, Michael C

    2003-03-01

    Bleeding pelvic fractures (BPF) carry mortality as high as 60%, yet controversy remains over optimal initial management. Some base initial intervention on fracture pattern, with immediate external fixation (EX FIX) in amenable fractures aimed at controlling venous bleeding. Others feel ongoing hemodynamic instability indicates arterial bleeding, and prefer early angiography (ANGIO) before EX-FIX. Our aim was to evaluate markers of arterial bleeding in patients with BPF, thus identifying patients requiring early ANGIO regardless of fracture pattern. Patients with pelvis fracture were identified from a Level I trauma center registry over a 7-year period and records reviewed. From this group, two subsets were analyzed: those with initial hypotension related to pelvic fracture, and those without hypotension who underwent pelvic ANGIO. Data included hemodynamics, response to resuscitation, presence of contrast blush on CT, fracture treatment and outcome. Adequate response to initial resuscitation (R) was defined as a sustained (>2 hours) improvement of systolic blood pressure to >90 mm Hg systolic after the administration of < or = 2 units packed red blood cells. Those with repeated episodes of hypotension despite resuscitation were classified as non-responders (NR) RESULTS: From 1/94-1/01, 1171 patients were admitted with pelvic ring fracture. Thirty-five (0.3%) had hypotension attributable to pelvis fracture. 28 fell into the NR group, and 26 of these underwent ANGIO. Nineteen (73%) showed arterial bleeding while 3 resuscitation response patients underwent ANGIO with none demonstrating bleeding (p = 0.03). Sensitivity and specificity of inadequate response to initial resuscitation for predicting the presence of arterial bleeding on ANGIO were 100% and 30% respectively while negative and positive predictive value were 100% and 73%. In patients with fractures amenable to external fixation (n = 16), 44% had arterial bleeding on ANGIO, and all were in the NR group. An

  15. Endovascular management of postoperative pseudoaneurysms of the external carotid artery.

    PubMed

    Cohen, José E; Gomori, John M; Moscovici, Samuel; Grigoriadis, Savvas; Ramirez de Noriega, Fernando; Itshayek, Eyal

    2012-05-01

    Hemorrhage secondary to postoperative pseudoaneurysm is a rare event, but may complicate the clinical course of straightforward and common interventions such as sinonasal procedures, tonsillectomy, and maxillofacial and plastic surgeries. We report our experience with the endovascular management of iatrogenic pseudoaneurysm in eight patients who had undergone recent craniomaxillofacial surgery. Computed tomography (CT), including CT-angiography, detected only three of the eight lesions. In all patients, endovascular embolization achieved successful occlusion of the pseudoaneurysm without local or general procedure-related complications. Immediate proximal arterial occlusion with detachable coils was performed in every case, and pseudoaneurysm coiling was performed in three cases presenting with active hemorrhage. Endovascular therapy proved to be safe and effective in the management of postoperative pseudoaneurysms. Surgeons involved in the craniomaxillofacial procedures should be aware of this complication and its management. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. A phase III randomized trial of postoperative pelvic irradiation in stage IB cervical carcinoma with poor prognostic features: Follow-up of a gynecologic oncology group study

    SciTech Connect

    Rotman, Marvin . E-mail: mrotman@downstate.edu; Sedlis, Alexander; Piedmonte, Marion R.; Bundy, Brian; Lentz, Samuel S.; Muderspach, Laila I.; Zaino, Richard J.

    2006-05-01

    Purpose: To investigate, in a phase III randomized trial, whether postoperative external-beam irradiation to the standard pelvic field improves the recurrence-free interval and overall survival (OS) in women with Stage IB cervical cancers with negative lymph nodes and certain poor prognostic features treated by radical hysterectomy and pelvic lymphadenectomy. Methods and Materials: Eligible patients had Stage IB cervical cancer with negative lymph nodes but with 2 or more of the following features: more than one third (deep) stromal invasion, capillary lymphatic space involvement, and tumor diameter of 4 cm or more. The study group included 277 patients: 137 randomized to pelvic irradiation (RT) and 140 randomized to observation (OBS). The planned pelvic dose was from 46 Gy in 23 fractions to 50.4 Gy in 28 fractions. Results: Of the 67 recurrences, 24 were in the RT arm and 43 were in the OBS arm. The RT arm showed a statistically significant (46%) reduction in risk of recurrence (hazard ratio [HR] = 0.54, 90% confidence interval [CI] = 0.35 to 0.81, p = 0.007) and a statistically significant reduction in risk of progression or death (HR = 0.58, 90% CI = 0.40 to 0.85, p = 0.009). With RT, 8.8% of patients (3 of 34) with adenosquamous or adenocarcinoma tumors recurred vs. 44.0% (11 of 25) in OBS. Fewer recurrences were seen with RT in patients with adenocarcinoma or adenosquamous histologies relative to others (HR for RT by histology interaction = 0.23, 90% CI = 0.07 to 0.74, p = 0.019). After an extensive follow-up period, 67 deaths have occurred: 27 RT patients and 40 OBS patients. The improvement in overall survival (HR = 0.70, 90% CI = 0.45 to 1.05, p = 0.074) with RT did not reach statistical significance. Conclusions: Pelvic radiotherapy after radical surgery significantly reduces the risk of recurrence and prolongs progression-free survival in women with Stage IB cervical cancer. RT appears to be particularly beneficial for patients with adenocarcinoma or

  17. Time dose relationships in endometrial adenocarcinoma: importance of the interval from external pelvic irradiation to surgery

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, J.F.; Cox, J.D.; Chahbazian, C.M.; del Regato, J.A.

    1980-05-01

    One hundred twenty-one patients with adenocarcinoma of the endometrium received external pelvic irradiation (EPI) as a preoperative surgical adjuvant to total abdominal hysterectomy between March, 1951 and February, 1977. Either 400 KVP x-rays, Cobalt teletherapy or 25 MeV photons were used. In more than one third of the hysterectomy specimens, there was no histopathological evidence of residual cancer. Statistical analysis shows a significant reduction in the proportion of positive specimens as the interval to hysterectomy increased. The data support the concept that adenocarcinomas are not radioresistant but may be slow to regress following irradiation. Caution is advised against making decisions about therapy based on histopathological findings in patients who receive surgery immediately following short course or intracavitary preoperative irradiation.

  18. Preoperative whole pelvic external irradiation in Stage I endometrial cancer. [/sup 60/Co; /sup 226/Ra

    SciTech Connect

    Ritcher, N.; Lucas, W.E.; Yon, J.L.; Sanford, F.G.

    1981-07-01

    Between 1966 and 1978, 201 patients with adenocarcinoma of the endometrium were treated at two hospitals in San Diego. Of these patients, 161 had disease limited to the corpus at the time of diagnosis. The majority of these patients received external whole-pelvic irradiation, followed as soon as possible by simple extrafascial hysterectomy and bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy. When this treatment method was used, actuarial survivals of 95% for Stage I disease were achieved. Also reported is the low incidence of wound complications in the group of patients operated soon after cessation of irradiation. The patients treated in this fashion had good survival rates, little morbidity from the adjunctive irradiation, and fewer wound complications than previously anticipated.

  19. Postoperative complications associated with external skeletal fixators in cats.

    PubMed

    Beever, Lee; Giles, Kirsty; Meeson, Richard

    2017-07-01

    The objective of this study was to quantify complications associated with external skeletal fixators (ESFs) in cats and to identify potential risk factors. A retrospective review of medical records and radiographs following ESF placement was performed. Case records of 140 cats were reviewed; fixator-associated complications (FACs) occurred in 19% of cats. The region of ESF placement was significantly associated with complication development. Complications developed most frequently in the femur (50%), tarsus (35%) and radius/ulna (33%). Superficial pin tract infection (SPTI) and implant failure accounted for 45% and 41% of all FACs, respectively. SPTI occurred more frequently in the femur, humerus and tibia, with implant failure more frequent in the tarsus. No association between breed, age, sex, weight, fracture type (open vs closed), ESF classification, number of pins per bone segment, degree of fracture load sharing, and the incidence or type of FAC was identified. No association between region of placement, breed, age, sex, weight, fracture type (open vs closed), ESF classification, number of pins per bone segment, fracture load sharing and the time to complication development was identified. Complication development is not uncommon in cats following ESF placement. The higher complication rate in the femur, tarsus and radius/ulna should be considered when reviewing options for fracture management. However, cats appear to have a lower rate of pin tract infections than dogs.

  20. Postoperative spinal wound infections treated by external spinal fixator. Review of three cases.

    PubMed

    Zárate-Kalfópulos, Barón; Juárez-Jiménez, Héctor Gerardo; Alpízar-Aguirre, Armando; Rosales-Olivares, Luis Miguel; Sánchez-Bringas, Guadalupe; Reyes-Sánchez, Alejandro

    2010-01-01

    external fixation in the spine has been used with different objectives: to determine the prognosis of spinal fusion, improve stabilization after decompression in cases of trauma and for the progressive correction of scoliosis. Currently, we have not found any reports about its use in the case of postoperative infection with surgical wound dehiscence. this is a retrospective study of three patients with postoperative infection of the spine and wound dehiscence. All three patients were male and had an average age of 57 years (range: 32-77 years). The infection started at an average of 7 weeks prior to the application of the external fixator (range: 2-12 weeks). Surgical wound dehiscence was on average 7 cm (range: 2-10 cm). The external fixator, on average, was used for 69 days (range: 36-125 days). There were no complications associated with the use of the external fixator. The external fixator was used as definitive treatment in one patient and as a temporary treatment in two patients. the external fixator may be a useful implant for the treatment of patients with postoperative infections of the spine with surgical wound dehiscence and instability.

  1. Treatment of cervical carcinoma by total hysterectomy and postoperative external irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Papavasiliou, C.; Yiogarakis, D.; Pappas, J.; Keramopoulos, A.

    1980-07-01

    The survival rates of 36 patients with early cervical carcinoma who had undergone total hysterectomy and bilateral salpingoophorectomy (THBSO) were compared to the survival rates of 41 patients who were subjected to the radical operation. As an integral part of their therapy both groups postoperatively received adequate doses of external beam supervoltage irradiation. Satisfactory results were obtained in both groups of patients. According to these results THBSO followed by postoperative radiotherapy is adequate treatment for early cervical carcinoma. In comparison to the radical operation or curietherapy alone this type of treatment has the advantage of requiring less surgical or radiotherapeutic expertise; it probably is associated with less morbidity.

  2. Pelvic floor muscles and the external urethral sphincter have different responses to applied bladder pressure during continence

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Hai-Hong; Salcedo, Levilester B.; Song, Bo; Damaser, Margot S.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives To determine the functional innervation of the pelvic floor muscles (PFM) and if there is PFM activity during an external pressure increase to the bladder in female rats. Methods Thirty-one female adult virgin Sprague Dawley rats received an external increase in bladder pressure until urinary leakage was noted while bladder pressure was recorded (leak point pressure; LPP) under urethane anesthesia. Six of the rats underwent repeat LPP testing after bilateral transection of the levator ani nerve. Another 6 rats underwent repeat LPP testing after bilateral transection of the pudendal nerve. Simultaneous recordings of PFM (pubo-/iliococcygeus muscles) electromyogram (EMG) and external urethral sphincter (EUS) EMG were recorded during cystometry and LPP testing. Results Thirteen rats (42%) showed tonic PFM EMG activity during filling cystometry. Eighteen rats (58%) showed no tonic PFM EMG activity at baseline, but PFM EMG could be activated by pinching the perineal skin. This activity could be maintained unless voiding occurred. The external increase in bladder pressure caused significantly increased EUS EMG activity as demonstrated by increased amplitude and frequency. However, there was no such response in PFM EMG. LPP was not significantly different after levator ani nerve transection, but was significantly decreased after pudendal nerve transection. Conclusions PFM activity was not increased during external pressure increases to the bladder in female rats. Experimental designs using rats should consider this result. PMID:20206969

  3. Adjuvant postoperative pelvic radiation for carcinoma of the uterine cervix: pattern of cancer recurrence in patients undergoing elective radiation following radical hysterectomy and pelvic lymphadenectomy

    SciTech Connect

    Russell, A.H.; Tong, D.Y.; Figge, D.C.; Tamimi, H.K.; Greer, B.E.; Elder, S.J.

    1984-02-01

    Thirty-seven patients with invasive cervical cancer have been referred to the Department of Radiation Oncology at the University of Washington following radical hysterectomy and pelvic lymphadenectomy. Patients at high-risk for tumor recurrence were selected for adjuvant pelvic irradiation because of adverse risk factors identified on pathological study of the hysterectomy specimen. All patients were treated because of possible residual, microscopic carcinoma. Fourteen patients (38%) developed recurrent cancer, of whom 10 (27%) manifested initial failure within the irradiated volume. Possible explanations for this observation are discussed.

  4. Effect of intensity-modulated pelvic radiotherapy on second cancer risk in the postoperative treatment of endometrial and cervical cancer.

    PubMed

    Zwahlen, Daniel R; Ruben, Jeremy D; Jones, Phillip; Gagliardi, Frank; Millar, Jeremy L; Schneider, Uwe

    2009-06-01

    To estimate and compare intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) with three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT) in terms of second cancer risk (SCR) for postoperative treatment of endometrial and cervical cancer. To estimate SCR, the organ equivalent dose concept with a linear-exponential, a plateau, and a linear dose-response model was applied to dose distributions, calculated in a planning computed tomography scan of a 68-year-old woman. Three plans were computed: four-field 18-MV 3DCRT and nine-field IMRT with 6- and 18-MV photons. SCR was estimated as a function of target dose (50.4 Gy/28 fractions) in organs of interest according to the International Commission on Radiological Protection. Cumulative SCR relative to 3DCRT was +6% (3% for a plateau model, -4% for a linear model) for 6-MV IMRT and +26% (25%, 4%) for the 18-MV IMRT plan. For an organ within the primary beam, SCR was +12% (0%, -12%) for 6-MV and +5% (-2%, -7%) for 18-MV IMRT. 18-MV IMRT increased SCR 6-7 times for organs away from the primary beam relative to 3DCRT and 6-MV IMRT. Skin SCR increased by 22-37% for 6-MV and 50-69% for 18-MV IMRT inasmuch as a larger volume of skin was exposed. Cancer risk after IMRT for cervical and endometrial cancer is dependent on treatment energy. 6-MV pelvic IMRT represents a safe alternative with respect to SCR relative to 3DCRT, independently of the dose-response model. 18-MV IMRT produces second neutrons that modestly increase the SCR.

  5. Effect of Intensity-Modulated Pelvic Radiotherapy on Second Cancer Risk in the Postoperative Treatment of Endometrial and Cervical Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Zwahlen, Daniel R. Ruben, Jeremy D.; Jones, Phillip; Gagliardi, Frank; Millar, Jeremy L.; Schneider, Uwe

    2009-06-01

    Purpose: To estimate and compare intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) with three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT) in terms of second cancer risk (SCR) for postoperative treatment of endometrial and cervical cancer. Methods and Materials: To estimate SCR, the organ equivalent dose concept with a linear-exponential, a plateau, and a linear dose-response model was applied to dose distributions, calculated in a planning computed tomography scan of a 68-year-old woman. Three plans were computed: four-field 18-MV 3DCRT and nine-field IMRT with 6- and 18-MV photons. SCR was estimated as a function of target dose (50.4 Gy/28 fractions) in organs of interest according to the International Commission on Radiological Protection Results: Cumulative SCR relative to 3DCRT was +6% (3% for a plateau model, -4% for a linear model) for 6-MV IMRT and +26% (25%, 4%) for the 18-MV IMRT plan. For an organ within the primary beam, SCR was +12% (0%, -12%) for 6-MV and +5% (-2%, -7%) for 18-MV IMRT. 18-MV IMRT increased SCR 6-7 times for organs away from the primary beam relative to 3DCRT and 6-MV IMRT. Skin SCR increased by 22-37% for 6-MV and 50-69% for 18-MV IMRT inasmuch as a larger volume of skin was exposed. Conclusion: Cancer risk after IMRT for cervical and endometrial cancer is dependent on treatment energy. 6-MV pelvic IMRT represents a safe alternative with respect to SCR relative to 3DCRT, independently of the dose-response model. 18-MV IMRT produces second neutrons that modestly increase the SCR.

  6. Dosimetric comparison of postoperative whole pelvic radiotherapy for endometrial cancer using three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy, intensity-modulated radiotherapy, and helical tomotherapy.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ruijie; Xu, Shouping; Jiang, Weijuan; Wang, Junjie; Xie, Chuanbin

    2010-01-01

    The use of Intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and Helical tomotherapy (HT) is increasing in gynecological cancer patients. No published studies have performed a dosimetric evaluation of whole pelvic radiotherapy (WPRT) using HT for postoperative endometrial cancer. The purpose of this study was to perform a direct dosimetric comparison of three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT), IMRT and HT plans for WPRT in postoperative endometrial cancer patients, and to evaluate the integral dose to organs at risk (OARs) and normal tissue. We selected ten patients with endometrial cancer undergoing postoperative WPRT. Plans for 3D-CRT, IMRT and HT were developed for each patient. All plans were normalized to deliver 50 Gy to 95% of the PTV. The dosimetry and integral dose to OARs and normal tissue were compared. The significance of differences was tested using a paired two-tailed Student t-test. IMRT were superior to 3D-CRT in dose conformity (conformity index: 0.87 vs. 0.61, p = 0.00) and integral dose to OARs and normal tissue, although a greater volume of normal tissue receiving dose below 10 Gy was observed. The results were similar in HT except that the integral dose to normal tissue increased slightly. Compared directly with IMRT, HT showed better dose homogeneity and lower integral dose to rectum and bladder, but the integral dose to pelvic bones and normal tissue slightly increased. In postoperative WPRT of endometrial cancer, IMRT and HT result in better conformity and lower integral dose to OARs compared with 3D-CRT. The integral dose to normal tissue did not increase significantly in IMRT, although a greater volume of normal tissue is irradiated to the dose below 10 Gy. HT further improves the dose homogeneity and integral dose to rectum and bladder, at the expense of a slightly higher integral dose to pelvic bones and normal tissue.

  7. Postoperative External Beam Radiotherapy for Differentiated Thyroid Cancer: Outcomes and Morbidity With Conformal Treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Schwartz, David L. Lobo, Mark J.; Ang, K. Kian; Morrison, William H.; Rosenthal, David I.; Ahamad, Anesa; Evans, Douglas B.; Clayman, Gary; Sherman, Steven I.; Garden, Adam S.

    2009-07-15

    Purpose: To review institutional outcomes for patients treated for differentiated thyroid cancer with postoperative conformal external beam radiotherapy (EBRT). Methods and Materials: This is a single-institution retrospective review of 131 consecutive patients with differentiated thyroid cancer who underwent EBRT between January 1996 and December 2005. Histologic diagnoses included 104 papillary, 21 follicular, and six mixed papillary-follicular types. American Joint Committee on Cancer stage distribution was Stage III in 2 patients, Stage IVa-IVc in 128, and not assessable in 1. Thirty-four patients (26%) had high-risk histologic types and 76 (58%) had recurrent disease. Extraglandular disease spread was seen in 126 patients (96%), microscopically positive surgical margins were seen in 62 patients (47%), and gross residual disease was seen in 15 patients (11%). Median EBRT dose was 60 Gy (range, 38-72 Gy). Fifty-seven patients (44%) were treated with intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) to a median dose of 60 Gy (range, 56-66 Gy). Median follow-up was 38 months (range, 0-134 months). Results: Kaplan-Meier estimates of locoregional relapse-free survival, disease-specific survival, and overall survival at 4 years were 79%, 76%, and 73%, respectively. On multivariate analysis, high-risk histologic features and gross residual disease predicted for inferior locoregional relapse-free survival, whereas high-risk histologic features, M1 disease, and gross residual disease predicted for inferior disease-specific and overall survival. The IMRT did not impact on survival outcomes, but was associated with less frequent severe late morbidity (12% vs. 2%). Conclusions: Postoperative conformal EBRT provides durable locoregional disease control for patients with high-risk differentiated thyroid cancer if disease is reduced to microscopic burden. Patients with gross disease face significantly worse outcomes. The IMRT may significantly reduce chronic radiation morbidity, but

  8. Comparison of analgesic efficacy of preoperative or postoperative carprofen with or without preincisional mepivacaine epidural anesthesia in canine pelvic or femoral fracture repair.

    PubMed

    Bergmann, Hannes M; Nolte, Ingo; Kramer, Sabine

    2007-10-01

    To compare analgesic efficacy of preoperative versus postoperative administration of carprofen and to determine, if preincisional mepivacaine epidural anesthesia improves postoperative analgesia in dogs treated with carprofen. Blind, randomized clinical study. Dogs with femoral (n=18) or pelvic (27) fractures. Dogs were grouped by restricted randomization into 4 groups: group 1 = carprofen (4 mg/kg subcutaneously) immediately before induction of anesthesia, no epidural anesthesia; group 2 = carprofen immediately after extubation, no epidural anesthesia; group 3 = carprofen immediately before induction, mepivacaine epidural block 15 minutes before surgical incision; and group 4 = mepivacaine epidural block 15 minutes before surgical incision, carprofen after extubation. All dogs were administered carprofen (4 mg/kg, subcutaneously, once daily) for 4 days after surgery. Physiologic variables, nociceptive threshold, lameness score, pain, and sedation (numerical rating scale [NRS], visual analog scale [VAS]), plasma glucose and cortisol concentration, renal function, and hemostatic variables were measured preoperatively and at various times after surgery. Dogs with VAS pain scores >30 were administered rescue analgesia. Group 3 and 4 dogs had significantly lower pain scores and amount of rescue analgesia compared with groups 1 and 2. VAS and NRS pain scores were not significantly different among groups 1 and 2 or among groups 3 and 4. There was no treatment effect on renal function and hemostatic variables. Preoperative carprofen combined with mepivacaine epidural anesthesia had superior postoperative analgesia compared with preoperative carprofen alone. When preoperative epidural anesthesia was performed, preoperative administration of carprofen did not improve postoperative analgesia compared with postoperative administration of carprofen. Preoperative administration of systemic opioid agonists in combination with regional anesthesia and postoperative administration

  9. Rehabilitation considerations for a patient with external hemipelvectomy and hemisacrectomy for recurrent soft tissue pelvic sarcoma: a case report.

    PubMed

    Schaal Wilson, Rachel E

    2015-01-01

    External hemipelvectomy (EHP) is an uncommon procedure involving surgical amputation of the lower extremity and hemipelvis. Soft tissue sarcomas of the pelvis are rare and accompanied by a high risk of disease progression after surgical intervention. The purpose of this case report is to describe the rehabilitation considerations and importance of interdisciplinary collaboration to achieve functional goals to allow discharge with improved independence and decreased caregiver burden. A 58-year-old Caucasian male patient underwent a hemipelvectomy and hemisacrectomy for treatment of a recurrent pelvic soft tissue sarcoma following 4 months of bed confinement secondary to pain and weakness of the involved lower extremity. This report outlines the physical therapy interventions during 3 weeks of inpatient rehabilitation. This case demonstrates that continuous interdisciplinary care of a complex patient with EHP and hemisacrectomy contributes to significant improvement in functional mobility exceeding prior level of function. This case is particularly interesting because in addition to having a rare diagnosis and undergoing an uncommon surgical procedure, this patient was confined to bed for 4 months prior to surgical intervention, and thus began rehabilitation with a baseline of limited functional mobility and high caregiver burden.

  10. Form of presentation, natural history and course of postoperative venous thromboembolism in patients operated on for pelvic and abdominal cancer. Analysis of the RIETE registry.

    PubMed

    Bustos Merlo, Ana Belén; Arcelus Martínez, Juan Ignacio; Turiño Luque, Jesús Damián; Valero, Beatriz; Villalobos, Aurora; Aibar, Miguel Ángel; Monreal Bosch, Manuel

    Venous thromboembolism (VTE) represents a serious complication after oncologic surgery. Recent studies have shown that the risk of VTE persists several weeks after surgery. This study assesses the form of presentation and time course of VTE after abdominal and pelvic cancer surgery. Prospective, multicenter, observational study that analyzes data from an international registry (RIETE) that includes consecutive patients with symptomatic VTE. Our study assesses the form and time of presentation of postoperative VTE, as well as main outcomes, in patients operated for abdominopelvic cancer 8 weeks prior to VTE diagnosis. Variables related to the presentation of VTE after hospital discharge are identified. Out of the 766 analyzed patients with VTE, 395 (52%) presented pulmonary embolism (PE). Most VTE cases (84%) were detected after the first postoperative week, and 38% after one month. Among patients with VTE in the first postoperative week, 70% presented PE. VTE presented after hospital discharge in 54% of cases. Colorectal, urologic, and gynecologic tumors, the use of radiotherapy, and blood hemoglobin levels were independently associated with VTE diagnosis after hospital discharge. Complications (thrombosis recurrence, bleeding, and death) occurred in 34% of patients with VTE detected before hospital discharge, compared to 24% in VTE after hospital discharge (P<0.01). VTE occurs after hospital discharge in most patients, particularly in those operated for colorectal, urologic, and gynecologic cancer. Pulmonary embolism is more frequent in patients who develop early VTE, who also have worse prognosis. Copyright © 2017 AEC. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  11. Fracture-Dislocations Demonstrate Poorer Postoperative Functional Outcomes Among Pronation External Rotation IV Ankle Fractures.

    PubMed

    Warner, Stephen J; Schottel, Patrick C; Hinds, Richard M; Helfet, David L; Lorich, Dean G

    2015-06-01

    Pronation external rotation (PER) ankle fractures are relatively uncommon but serious ankle injuries. Although recent studies have demonstrated good outcomes of PER IV fractures after operative treatment, the effect of dislocation on functional outcomes has not yet been evaluated. The objective of this study was to compare short-term functional outcomes in PER IV ankle fractures with and without dislocation. Our database of ankle fractures surgically treated using an anatomic fixation approach by the senior author from 2003 to 2013 was reviewed. All PER IV ankle fracture patients older than 18 years with a minimum of 12 months of follow-up, including Foot and Ankle Outcome Score (FAOS), were included for analysis. Patient demographics, injury characteristics, FAOS, ankle range of motion (ROM), and rate of postoperative complications were compared in PER IV fractures with and without dislocation. Of the 47 PER IV fractures included for analysis, 20 (43%) were fracture-dislocations and 27 (57%) had no dislocation. Mean age of the study cohort was 49 years (range, 24-91 years). The fracture-dislocation cohort demonstrated significantly poorer FAOS (symptoms, 46 vs 70, P = .002; pain, 56 vs 82, P < .001; activities of daily living, 61 vs 84, P = .002; sports, 37 vs 59, P = .036; quality of life, 25 vs 59, P < .001) than the nondislocation cohort. Articular malreduction (33% vs 14%, P = .147) was also more common in the PER IV dislocation group. Rates of syndesmotic malreduction (44% vs 48%, P = .951) were similar between PER IV fractures with and without dislocation. PER IV fracture-dislocations had higher rates of articular malreduction and demonstrated statistically poorer functional outcomes than PER IV fractures with no dislocation. Dislocation in this select subset of ankle fracture patients likely represents a higher energy injury resulting in substantial articular damage and should spur appropriate preoperative patient counseling by the orthopaedic surgeon

  12. External rotation and active supination CT arthrography for the postoperative evaluation of type II superior labral anterior to posterior lesions.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sae Hoon; Choi, Ja-Young; Yoo, Hye Jin; Hong, Sung Hwan

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness of external rotation and active supination CT arthrography in postoperative evaluation by comparing it with neutral CT arthrography and analyzing its agreement with postoperative clinical results after the repair of type II superior labral anterior to posterior (SLAP) lesions. A total of 25 patients who had undergone CT arthrography in neutral, external rotation and active supination position at least 1 year after the arthroscopic repair of SLAP lesions were enrolled. Two radiologists independently evaluated the status of the repaired SLAP lesions with neutral CT arthrography and then with external rotation and active supination CT arthrography. Five patients had residual symptoms and positive findings upon SLAP-specific examinations. Agreements between the presence of symptoms and radiologic diagnoses based on neutral CT arthrography were insignificant for reader 1 (κ = 0.138, p = n.s.) and significant for reader 2 (κ = 0.328, p = 0.027). However, agreements were highly significant in the analysis following the evaluation of external rotation and active supination CT arthrography for both readers (κ = 0.694, p < 0.001 in reader 1; κ = 0.783, p < 0.001 in reader 2). The presence of contrast-filled gaps between the labrum and glenoid on neutral CT arthrography after SLAP repair is frequent with satisfactory clinical outcomes. Gaps without additional widening upon external rotation and active supination CT arthrography may suggest postoperatively stable biceps anchors, so this new method could minimize the overdiagnosis of recurrent SLAP lesions. Additional gap widening on external rotation and active supination CT arthrography could be related to a true recurrent SLAP lesion and the symptoms of the patients. Case series, Level IV.

  13. Soft Tissue Mobilization to Resolve Chronic Pain and Dysfunction Associated With Postoperative Abdominal and Pelvic Adhesions: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Wong, Yui Y; Smith, Ryan W; Koppenhaver, Shane

    2015-12-01

    Case report. Common complications from abdominal and pelvic surgery include adhesions and chronic pain. Laparoscopic adhesiolysis is sometimes used to reduce adhesions and related pain. Physical therapy interventions, such as soft tissue mobilization (STM), may be used for this condition; however, evidence to support its effectiveness is lacking. A 28-year-old woman with a history of 5 abdominal/pelvic surgeries presented with right-sided lower abdominal and anterior hip pain, which had been present since she had undergone a laparoscopic appendectomy with a right ovarian cystectomy surgery 1 year earlier. As an active-duty member in the US Navy, due to pain and weakness, she was unable to perform required curl-ups for her fitness test. Though she had been previously treated both surgically with laparoscopic adhesiolysis and nonsurgically with physical therapy consisting of stretching and strengthening exercises, her pain and function did not improve. She was again evaluated and treated with physical therapy and, based on the examination findings, STM was used to address her pain and dysfunction, which were thought to be related to intra-abdominal adhesions. Following 5 sessions of physical therapy over a 3-week period that included STM and therapeutic exercises, followed by 5 additional sessions over a 4-week period that focused on therapeutic exercises, the patient reported substantially decreased pain, improved function, and a full return to previous level of activity, including unrestricted physical training in a military setting. The outcomes for this patient suggest that STM may be effective as a conservative treatment option for pain and dysfunction related to intra-abdominal adhesions from abdominal/pelvic surgery. Studies with a higher level of evidence, including potential comparison between STM and traditional laparoscopic adhesiolysis, are needed to further determine benefits of nonsurgical care for this condition.

  14. Dosimetric planning study for the prevention of anal complications after post-operative whole pelvic radiotherapy in cervical cancer patients with hemorrhoids.

    PubMed

    Baek, J G; Kim, E C; Kim, S K; Jang, H

    2015-01-01

    Radiation-induced anal toxicity can be induced by low radiation doses in patients with haemorrhoids. The object of this study was to determine the dosimetric benefits of different whole pelvic radiotherapy (WPRT) techniques in terms of dose delivered to the anal canal in post-operative patients with cervical cancer. The planning CT images of 10 patients with cervical cancer undergoing postoperative radiotherapy were used for comparison of three different plans. All patients had been treated using the conventional box technique WPRT (CV-WPRT), and we tried low-margin-modified WPRT (LM-WPRT), three-dimensional conformal techniques WPRT (CF-WPRT) and intensity-modulated WPRT (IM-WPRT) planning for dosimetric comparison of the anal canal, retrospectively. Mean anal canal doses of the IM-WPRT were significantly lower (p < 0.05) than those of CV-WPRT, LM-WPRT and CF-WPRT, and V10, V20, V30 and V40 to the anal canal were also significantly lower for IM-WPRT (p < 0.05). The proportion of planning target volumes (PTVs) that received ≥98% of the prescribed dose for all plans was >99%, and the proportion that received ≥108% of the prescribed dose for IM-WPRT was <2%. Volumes of bladders and rectums that received ≥30 or ≥40 Gy were significantly lower for IM-WPRT than for three of the four-field WPRT plans (p = 0.000). IM-WPRT can significantly reduce radiation dose delivered to the anal canal and does not compromise PTV coverage. In patients with haemorrhoids, IM-WPRT may be of value for the prevention of anal complications. Although tolerance of the anal canal tends to be ignored in patients undergoing post-operative WPRT, patients with haemorrhoids may suffer complications at low radiation doses. The present study shows IM-WPRT can be meaningful in these patients.

  15. Effects of external pelvic compression on isokinetic strength of the thigh muscles in sportsmen with and without hamstring injuries.

    PubMed

    Arumugam, Ashokan; Milosavljevic, Stephan; Woodley, Stephanie; Sole, Gisela

    2015-05-01

    To investigate whether application of a pelvic compression belt affects isokinetic strength of the thigh muscles in sportsmen with and without hamstring injuries. Randomized crossover, cross-sectional. Twenty sportsmen (age 22.0±1.5 years) with hamstring injuries (hamstring-injured group) and 29 (age 23.5±1.5 years) without hamstring injuries (control group) underwent isokinetic testing of the thigh muscles. Testing included five reciprocal concentric quadriceps and hamstring contractions, and five eccentric hamstring contractions at an angular velocity of 60°/s, with and without a pelvic compression belt in randomized order. The outcome measures were average torque normalized to bodyweight for terminal range eccentric hamstring contractions and peak torque normalized to bodyweight for concentric quadriceps, concentric hamstring and eccentric hamstring contractions. There was a significant increase in normalized average torque of eccentric hamstring contractions in the terminal range for both groups (p≤0.044) and normalized peak torque of eccentric hamstring contractions for injured hamstrings (p=0.025) while wearing the pelvic compression belt. No significant changes were found for other torque variables. Injured hamstrings were weaker than the contralateral uninjured hamstrings during terminal range eccentric hamstring (p=0.040), and concentric hamstring (p=0.020) contractions recorded without the pelvic compression belt. However, no between-group differences were found for any of the investigated variables. Wearing the pelvic compression belt appears to have a facilitatory effect on terminal range eccentric hamstring strength in sportsmen with and without hamstring injuries. Future investigations should ascertain whether there is a role for using a pelvic compression belt for rehabilitation of hamstring injuries. Copyright © 2014 Sports Medicine Australia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Dose–volume analysis of predictors for chronic gastrointestinal complications in patients with cervical cancer treated with postoperative concurrent chemotherapy and whole-pelvic radiation therapy

    PubMed Central

    Isohashi, Fumiaki; Mabuchi, Seiji; Akino, Yuichi; Yoshioka, Yasuo; Seo, Yuji; Suzuki, Osamu; Tamari, Keisuke; Yoshino, Kiyoshi; Sawada, Kenjiro; Ueda, Yutaka; Kobayashi, Eiji; Sumida, Iori; Mizuno, Hirokazu; Okubo, Hirofumi; Kimura, Tadashi; Ogawa, Kazuhiko

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate dose–volume histogram (DVH) predictors for the development of chronic gastrointestinal (GI) complications in patients with cervical cancer who have undergone postoperative concurrent chemotherapy and whole-pelvic radiation therapy (WPRT). The subjects were 135 patients who had undergone postoperative WPRT with concurrent nedaplatin-based chemotherapy between 2000 and 2014. Associations between selected DVH parameters and the incidence of chronic GI complications of G3 or higher were evaluated. Chronic GI complications of severity G3 occurred in 18 (13%) patients. Patients with GI complications had significantly greater V5–V45, mean dose and the generalized equivalent uniform dose (gEUD) of the small bowel loops, compared with those without GI complications. V30–V45, mean dose and gEUD of the bowel bag also showed significant differences between patients with and without GI complications. In contrast, no parameter for the large bowel loop was correlated with GI complications. Receiver operating characteristics curve analysis indicated that V30–V45 of the small bowel loops were better predictors than these respective parameters for the bowel bag. Next, patients were divided into four groups based on the median V15 and V40 of the small bowel loops. The group with both a high V15 and a high V40 showed a significantly higher probability of chronic GI complications. In conclusion, the small bowel loops are better predictors of chronic GI complications compared with the bowel bag, and a relatively high-dose volume (e.g. V40) of the small bowel loops is a useful predictor of chronic GI complications. PMID:27342839

  17. Postoperative monitoring of free flap reconstruction: A comparison of external Doppler ultrasonography and the implantable Doppler probe

    PubMed Central

    Hosein, Rayaad C; Cornejo, Agustin; Wang, Howard T

    2016-01-01

    HYPOTHESIS: The time to detection of vascular compromise and the postoperative time to re-exploration are shorter using the implantable Doppler (ID) probe, thereby resulting in earlier surgical re-exploration and a higher flap salvage rate. METHODS: A single-centre experience with 176 consecutive free flap reconstructions in 167 patients from 2000 to 2008 in a university-based teaching hospital by retrospective chart review is presented. RESULTS: There was a significant difference in overall flap survival (ID 98.0%, external Doppler [ED] 89.3%) and total flap loss (ID 2.0%, ED 10.7%) between the two groups (P=0.03). The difference in flap salvage rate was not significant (ID 90.9%, ED 63.6%; P=0.068). The false-positive (ID 0%, ED 3%; P=0.18) and false-negative rates (ID 0.0%, ED 4.5%; P=1.0) were not significantly different. There was also a lower median postoperative time to re-exploration for the ID group, from 48 h to one week after initial surgery (ID 74.5 h, ED 136.8 h; P=0.05). CONCLUSION: The present analysis revealed a potential benefit for the ID probe in the postoperative monitoring of free tissue transfers. PMID:27054132

  18. [Therapy of the neurosurgical postoperative culture negative meningitis by using external lumbar drainage combined with empirical antibiotics treatment].

    PubMed

    Hong, Jian; Wu, Jianjuan; Chen, Budong; Yao, Xin; Yang, Yushan

    2016-05-01

    To evaluate the curative effect of external lumbar drainage combined with empirical antibiotics treatment on the postoperative culture negative meningitis. The clinical data of eighty post-operative meningitis patients with cerebrospinal fluid culture negative were retrospectively analyzed according to inclusive and exclusive criteria from January 2013 to December 2014 in Department of Neurosurgery, Tianjin Huanhu Hospital. All patients were composed of 45 male cases and 35 female cases, aging from 9 to 72 years. All patients were divided into two groups according to receiving the different treatment: one group only receiving a intravenously empirical antibiotics treatment (n=40), another group receiving a combined therapy of external lumbar drainage and intravenously empirical antibiotics treatment (n=40). The volume of drainage of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) were set up from 200 to 300 ml per day. There was no difference in the dosage and interval of the same antibiotics between two groups. The antibiotics usage and therapeutic effect of two groups of patients were observed and analyzed by t-test, Wilcoxon rank test or χ(2) test. The rate of CSF bacterial culture negative was 62.9% (88/140) in the same period. In group of empirical antibiotics treatment, the time of antibiotics treatment was (12.6±3.1) days, the rate of combined with other antibiotics treatment was 40.0% (16/40), the rate of mortality was 15.0% (6/40). However, in group of external lumbar drainage combined with empirical antibiotics treatment, the 3 data were (5.3±1.2) days, 10.0% (4/40), 7.5% (3/40), respectively. The time of antibiotics of the group of empirical antibiotics was longer (t=3.605, P=0.017), while the rate of combined antibiotics and the rate of mortality were lower (χ(2)=3.971, P=0.035; χ(2)=4.136, P=0.027, respectively). The average drainage time was (5.8±1.5) days, 32 patients gained a complete healing only by their first placement, 5 cases need replacement because of

  19. Dosimetric planning study for the prevention of anal complications after post-operative whole pelvic radiotherapy in cervical cancer patients with hemorrhoids

    PubMed Central

    Baek, J G; Kim, E C; Kim, S K

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Radiation-induced anal toxicity can be induced by low radiation doses in patients with haemorrhoids. The object of this study was to determine the dosimetric benefits of different whole pelvic radiotherapy (WPRT) techniques in terms of dose delivered to the anal canal in post-operative patients with cervical cancer. Methods: The planning CT images of 10 patients with cervical cancer undergoing postoperative radiotherapy were used for comparison of three different plans. All patients had been treated using the conventional box technique WPRT (CV-WPRT), and we tried low-margin-modified WPRT (LM-WPRT), three-dimensional conformal techniques WPRT (CF-WPRT) and intensity-modulated WPRT (IM-WPRT) planning for dosimetric comparison of the anal canal, retrospectively. Results: Mean anal canal doses of the IM-WPRT were significantly lower (p < 0.05) than those of CV-WPRT, LM-WPRT and CF-WPRT, and V10, V20, V30 and V40 to the anal canal were also significantly lower for IM-WPRT (p < 0.05). The proportion of planning target volumes (PTVs) that received ≥98% of the prescribed dose for all plans was >99%, and the proportion that received ≥108% of the prescribed dose for IM-WPRT was <2%. Volumes of bladders and rectums that received ≥30 or ≥40 Gy were significantly lower for IM-WPRT than for three of the four-field WPRT plans (p = 0.000). Conclusion: IM-WPRT can significantly reduce radiation dose delivered to the anal canal and does not compromise PTV coverage. In patients with haemorrhoids, IM-WPRT may be of value for the prevention of anal complications. Advances in knowledge: Although tolerance of the anal canal tends to be ignored in patients undergoing post-operative WPRT, patients with haemorrhoids may suffer complications at low radiation doses. The present study shows IM-WPRT can be meaningful in these patients. PMID:26395671

  20. External beam radiotherapy as postoperative treatment of diffuse pigmented villonodular synovitis

    SciTech Connect

    Berger, Bernhard . E-mail: Bernhard.Berger@med.uni-tuebingen.de; Ganswindt, Ute; Bamberg, Michael; Hehr, Thomas

    2007-03-15

    Purpose: Diffuse pigmented villonodular synovitis is a rare proliferative disorder of synovial membranes with invasive and expansive growth patterns. Radical synovectomy is regarded as the treatment of choice. However, because of the high recurrence rates, additive treatment might be useful. Radiotherapy (RT) has been evaluated with positive results, but the optimal treatment schedules are vague. We have reviewed our experience with postoperative RT in cases of suspected or proven residual disease. Methods and Materials: Between December 1996 and January 2006, 7 diffuse pigmented villonodular synovitis patients underwent RT at our institution. The most common location was the knee joint (5 patients). All patients underwent radical surgery and were treated subsequently with 6-MV photon RT. The total doses applied were 30-50 Gy, depending on the resection status and estimated risk of relapse. For analysis, we retrospectively reviewed all patients in April 2006. Results: The mean follow-up time was 29 months (range, 3-112 months). RT had no acute adverse effects. At the assessment, no evidence was found of recurrent or persisting disease in any patient. Of the 7 patients, 6 reported asymptomatic limb function and excellent quality of life; 1 patient had persistent restriction of joint movement after repeated surgery. No radiotherapeutic late effects were seen. Conclusion: The results of our series have confirmed the efficacy and safety of postoperative RT for diffuse pigmented villonodular synovitis. Hence, this treatment should be considered for patients with suspected or proven residual disease.

  1. External-beam radiotherapy and/or HDR brachytherapy in postoperative endometrial cancer patients: clinical outcomes and toxicity rates.

    PubMed

    De Sanctis, V; Agolli, L; Valeriani, M; Narici, S; Osti, M F; Patacchiola, F; Mossa, B; Moscarini, M; Maurizi Enrici, R

    2013-03-01

    The objectives of this study were to evaluate local disease control, overall survival (OS), disease-free survival (DFS) and local relapse-free survival (LRFS) in patients with endometrial cancer undergoing adjuvant vaginal brachytherapy (VBT )± external-beam radiotherapy (EBRT). From September 2007 to February 2011, 40 patients with endometrial cancer were retrospectively analysed. Surgery consisted of total hysterectomy and bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy without node dissection (16 patients) or with bilateral pelvic node dissection (24 patients). The stage distribution was as follows: two IA, nine IB, 12 IC, five IIA, eight IIB, two IIIA and two IIIC. Thirty-four patients underwent EBRT and VBT. Six patients received VBT alone. Median follow-up was 26 months. The 5-year OS and DFS were 96.4% and 86.9%, respectively. No local recurrence was observed. Four patients presented distant disease (three had lung metastases and one had hepatic node metastases). Acute EBRT-related toxicities were seen in 15 (38%) patients. We recorded late toxicities in 14 patients (35%). There was no evidence of grade 3-4 toxicity. Adjuvant EBRT and/or VBT in patients with endometrial cancer showed good outcomes in terms of local disease control, with an acceptable toxicity profile.

  2. Phase II clinical trial using californium 252 fast neutron brachytherapy, external pelvic radiation, and extrafascial hysterectomy in the treatment of bulky, barrel-shaped stage IB cervical cancer.

    PubMed

    van Nagell, J R; Maruyama, Y; Donaldson, E S; Hanson, M B; Gallion, H H; Yoneda, J; Powell, D E; Kryscio, R J; Beach, J L

    1986-05-15

    From June 1977 to June 1983, 32 patients with bulky (greater than 4 cm diameter), barrel-shaped Stage IB cervical cancer were treated at the University of Kentucky Medical Center by a combination of outpatient neutron brachytherapy using californium 252 (252Cf) and external pelvic radiation followed by extrafascial hysterectomy. Nineteen patients had cervical tumors 4 to 6 cm in diameter, and 13 patients had lesions in excess of 6 cm in diameter. A dose of 4500 rad external photon therapy was given from a linear accelerator, and one or two 6-hour 252Cf implants were given during or immediately after external radiation. Extrafascial hysterectomy with bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy was performed 6 weeks after completion of radiation therapy. Complications during and after radiation were minimal and included vaginal stenosis (three) and proctitis (two). Tumor clearance in the hysterectomy specimen was complete in 23 patients (72%) and residual cervical tumor was present in 9 patients (28%). Two patients developed tumor recurrence and died of disease 15 and 27 months after therapy, respectively. Thirty patients remain free of disease 26 to 96 months (median, 52 months) after treatment, and none have been lost to follow-up. The actuarial survival of these patients is 97% at 2 years and 94% at 5 years. Intracavitary neutron therapy is well tolerated and is effective when combined with external radiation and hysterectomy in the treatment of bulky, barrel-shaped Stage IB cervical cancer.

  3. High-dose rate brachytherapy for local recurrent adenoid cystic carcinoma of the tongue base following postoperative external beam radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sun Young; Kim, Jung Soo; Kwon, Hyoung Cheol

    2016-01-01

    Adenoid cystic carcinoma is a rare neoplasm commonly originating from the minor salivary glands. The clinical findings typical of this tumor include slow growth, perineural invasion and high frequency of local recurrence. In this study, a patient presented with a tongue base lesion that was treated with surgical excision and additional postoperative external beam radiotherapy. However, local recurrence occurred 8 months after radiotherapy. If recurrence occurs after radiation therapy, total glossectomy should be considered. However, the patient refused re-operation and, considering the patient's age, brachytherapy was used to ensure organ preservation. Complete remission was achieved following brachytherapy, without serious side effects. There has been no progression of the lesion during a follow-up period of 2 years. PMID:27882233

  4. Pelvic Exam

    MedlinePlus

    ... hyphen, e.g. -historical Searches are case-insensitive Exam, Pelvic Add to My Pictures View /Download : Small: ... 1500x1230 View Download Large: 3000x2460 View Download Title: Exam, Pelvic Description: Pelvic exam; drawing shows a side ...

  5. A Phase II/III randomized controlled trial comparing perioperative versus postoperative chemotherapy with mFOLFOX6 for lower rectal cancer with suspected lateral pelvic node metastasis: Japan Clinical Oncology Group Study JCOG1310 (PRECIOUS study).

    PubMed

    Ohue, Masayuki; Iwasa, Satoru; Kanemitsu, Yukihide; Hamaguchi, Tetsuya; Shiozawa, Manabu; Ito, Masaaki; Yasui, Masayoshi; Katayama, Hiroshi; Mizusawa, Junki; Shimada, Yasuhiro

    2017-01-01

    A randomized phase II/III trial was started in May 2015 comparing perioperative versus postoperative chemotherapy with modified infusional fluorouracil and folinic acid with oxaliplatin for lower rectal cancer patients with suspected lateral pelvic node metastasis. The standard arm is total mesorectal excision or tumor-specific mesorectal excision with lateral pelvic node dissection (LND) followed by postoperative chemotherapy (modified infusional fluorouracil and folinic acid with oxaliplatin; 12 cycles). The experimental (perioperative chemotherapy) arm is six courses of modified infusional fluorouracil and folinic acid with oxaliplatin before and six courses after total mesorectal excision with lateral pelvic node dissection. The aim of this trial is to confirm the superiority of perioperative chemotherapy. A total of 330 patients will be enrolled over 7 years. The primary endpoint in Phase II part is proportion of R0 resection and that in Phase III part is overall survival. Secondary endpoints are progression-free survival, local progression-free survival, etc. This trial has been registered in the UMIN Clinical Trials Registry as UMIN000017603 [http://www.umin.ac.jp/ctr/index-j.htm].

  6. The role of postoperative external-beam radiotherapy in the management of patients with papillary thyroid cancer invading the trachea

    SciTech Connect

    Keum, Ki Chang; Suh, Yang Gun; Koom, Woong Sub; Cho, Jae Ho; Shim, Su Jung; Lee, Chang Geol; Park, Chung Soo; Chung, Woong Youn; Kim, Gwi Eon . E-mail: gekim@yumc.yonsei.ac.kr

    2006-06-01

    Purpose: To determine the role of adjuvant external-beam radiotherapy (EBRT) in the management of patients with well-differentiated thyroid cancer invading the trachea. Methods and Materials: Of 1,098 thyroid cancer patients, 68 (6%) were found to have tracheal invasion, and they all received 'shave' excision of the tracheal cartilage. Among them, 12 patients had no postoperative residuum, 43 patients had microscopic residuum, and 13 patients had macroscopic residuum. All patients were divided into two groups according to treatment modality with or without EBRT; (1) the control group (n = 43) and (2) the EBRT group (n = 25). Results: The locoregional recurrence rate for EBRT patients was much lower than that of control patients (51% for the control group vs. 8% for the EBRT group) (p < 0.01). The 10-year local progression-free survival rate for the EBRT group was significantly better than that of the control group (89% in the EBRT group vs. 38% in the control group) (log-rank, p < 0.01). The use of adjuvant EBRT after conservative surgery was an independent prognostic factor in univariate and multivariate analyses. Conclusions: External-beam radiotherapy was found to be effective, particularly in patients with thyroid cancer invading the trachea with microscopic or gross residuum after conservative surgery.

  7. Does the latissimus dorsi tendon transfer for massive rotator cuff tears remain active postoperatively and restore active external rotation?

    PubMed

    Henseler, Jan Ferdinand; Nagels, Jochem; Nelissen, Rob G H H; de Groot, Jurriaan H

    2014-04-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the muscle activity with surface electromyography (EMG) and the clinical outcome of the latissimus dorsi transfer. It remains unclear whether the clinical results of the latissimus dorsi transfer for massive posterosuperior rotator cuff tears are achieved either by active muscle contractions or by a passive tenodesis effect of the transfer. Eight patients were evaluated preoperatively and at 1 year (SD, 0.1) after the latissimus dorsi transfer. Clinical evaluation of outcomes included active range of motion, Constant score, and visual analog scale (VAS) for pain and activities of daily living (ADL). Muscle activity was recorded with EMG during directional isometric abduction and adduction tasks. The external rotation in adduction improved from 23° to 51° (P = .03). The external rotation in abduction improved from 10° to 70° (P = .02). The mean Constant score improved from 39 to 62 postoperatively (P = .01). The VAS for pain at rest improved from 3.3 preoperatively to 0.1 (P = .02). The VAS for ADL improved from 4.9 to 2.3 (P = .05). The transferred latissimus dorsi remained active in all cases, as reflected by increased latissimus dorsi EMG activity during abduction tasks. In addition, the latissimus dorsi EMG activity shifted from preoperative antagonistic co-activation in adduction to synergistic activation in abduction. The latissimus dorsi has synergistic muscle activity after transfer. Apart from a tenodesis effect, directional muscle activity seems relevant for improved clinical outcome and pain relief. A specific gain was observed for external rotation in elevated arm positions, a motion essential for ADL tasks. Copyright © 2014 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Pelvic radiation - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    Radiation of the pelvis - discharge; Cancer treatment - pelvic radiation; Prostate cancer - pelvic radiation; Ovarian cancer - pelvic radiation; Cervical cancer - pelvic radiation; Uterine cancer - pelvic radiation; Rectal cancer - ...

  9. Chylous ascites and high-output chylous fistula after extended pelvic lymph node dissection for urological cancer: a rare postoperative complication.

    PubMed

    Castillo, Octavio A; Borgna, Vincenzo

    2014-11-01

    Chylous ascites and high-output chylous fistula are rare complications following abdominal or pelvic surgery. We report a series of five cases that occurred after pelvic lymph node dissection for urological cancer, in addition to their clinical presentation, diagnosis, and treatment. The series comprises five patients; four men in whom robotic radical prostatectomy and extended pelvic lymphadenectomy were performed, and one woman with an infiltrating bladder cancer that underwent robotic anterior pelvic exenteration and extended pelvic lymphadenectomy. The first four patients developed chylous ascites, and the female patient a high-output chylous fistula. In all cases, diagnosis of chylous ascites or chylous fistula was confirmed, and they were handled in varied ways, from observation to medical treatment, paracentesis, and surgery, according to their clinical presentation and evolution. We describe a simple treatment algorithm. This rare surgical complication requires a grade of suspicion and a defined treatment according to the probability of the medical compromise. Prevention is an important element. This series, according to our knowledge, is the first description in patients undergoing robotic extended pelvic lymphadenectomy.

  10. Postoperative extended-volume external-beam radiation therapy in high-risk esophageal cancer patients: a prospective experience

    PubMed Central

    Yu, E.; Tai, P.; Younus, J.; Malthaner, R.; Truong, P.; Stitt, L.; Rodrigues, G.; Ash, R.; Dar, R.; Yaremko, B.; Tomiak, A.; Dingle, B.; Sanatani, M.; Vincent, M.; Kocha, W.; Fortin, D.; Inculet, R.

    2009-01-01

    Background and Purpose Extended-volume external-beam radiation therapy (rt) following esophagectomy is controversial. The present prospective study evaluates the feasibility of extended-volume rt treatment in high-risk esophagectomy patients with a cervical anastomosis receiving postoperative combined chemoradiation therapy. Patients and Methods From 2001 to 2006, 15 patients with resected esophageal cancer were prospectively accrued to this pilot study to evaluate the adverse effects of extended-volume rt. Postoperative management was carried out at London Regional Cancer Program. Eligibility criteria were pathology-proven esophageal malignancy (T3–4, N0–1), disease amenable to surgical resection, and esophagectomy with or without resection margin involvement. Patients with distant metastases (M1) and patients treated with previous rt were excluded. All 15 study patients received 4 cycles of 5-fluorouracil–based chemotherapy. External-beam rt was conducted using conformal computed tomography planning, with multi-field arrangement tailored to the pathology findings, with coverage of a clinical target volume encompassing the primary tumour bed and the anastomotic site in the neck. The radiation therapy dose was 50.40 Gy at 1.8 Gy per fraction. The rt was delivered concurrently with the third cycle of chemotherapy. The study outcomes—disease-free survival (dfs) and overall survival (os)—were calculated by the Kaplan–Meier method. Treatment-related toxicities were assessed using the U.S. National Cancer Institute’s Common Toxicity Criteria. Results The study accrued 10 men and 5 women of median age 64 years (range: 48–80 years) and TNM stages T3N0 (n = 1), T2N1 (n = 2), T3N1 (n = 11), and T4N1 (n = 1). Histopathology included 5 adenocarcinomas and 10 squamous-cell carcinomas. Resection margins were clear in 10 patients. The median follow-up time was 19 months (range: 3.5–53.4 months). Before radiation therapy commenced, delay in chemotherapy occurred

  11. A prospective trial of postoperative vaginal radium/cesium for grade 1-2 less than 50% myometrial invasion and pelvic radiation therapy for grade 3 or deep myometrial invasion in surgical stage I endometrial adenocarcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Piver, M.S.; Hempling, R.E. )

    1990-09-15

    A prospective trial was performed to evaluate the recurrence rate and 5-year disease-free survival rate in patients with surgical Stage I endometrial adenocarcinoma. Patients with Stage I, Grade 1 or 2 disease, less than 50% myometrial invasion, and no evidence of disease outside the corpus of the uterus were treated by hysterectomy and bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy and postoperative vaginal radium/cesium (Group 1). Patients with surgical Stage I, Grade 3 disease or deep myometrial invasion, and histologically negative paraaortic lymph nodes were treated with postoperative pelvic radiation therapy (5000-5040 cGY) (Group 2). Patients with malignant peritoneal cytologic findings also received progesterone therapy. Of the 92 Group 1 patients, there have been no recurrences and the 5-year estimated disease-free survival rate was 99%. Of the 41 Group 2 patients, there have been four (9.7%) recurrences but only one (2.4%) within the treated field (pelvis), and the 5-year estimated disease-free survival rate was 88%. Of the 133 patients, the 5-year estimated disease-free survival rate was 96%, and only one patient (0.7%) had a local pelvic recurrence. Of the 16 patients with malignant peritoneal cytologic findings who were treated with progesterone therapy, none has had a recurrence.

  12. Californium-252 neutron brachytherapy combined with external pelvic radiotherapy plus concurrent chemotherapy for cervical cancer: a retrospective clinical study.

    PubMed

    Qian, Shen; Ye, Ling; Tian, Yun-Hong; Wang, Li-Gen; Huang, Zuo-Ping; Li, Feng; Hou, Bing; Song, Ni; Chen, Juan; Liu, Ying; Liu, Xiao; Zhou, Tao

    2017-02-28

    Cervical cancer is the sixth most common cancer in Chinese women. A standard treatment modality for cervical cancer is the combination of surgery, chemotherapy, external-beam radiotherapy and intracavitary brachytherapy. The aim of this study was to retrospectively assess the long-term treatment outcomes of patients with cervical cancer who were treated with californium-252 neutron brachytherapy combined with external-beam radiotherapy plus concurrent chemotherapy. We retrospectively analyzed the medical records of 150 patients with primary stages IB-IVB cervical cancer who received neutron brachytherapy combined with external-beam radiotherapy concurrently with cisplatin chemotherapy. All patients were followed up. Using an actuarial analysis, patient outcomes and treatment-related adverse effects were evaluated and compared. The median overall survival (OS) was 33.2 months. The 3-year progression-free survival rates for patients with stages I-II, III, and IV diseases were 81.0% (68/84), 65.0% (39/60), and 0% (0/6), respectively; the 3-year OS rates were 90.5% (76/84), 85.0% (51/60), and 16.7% (1/6), respectively. Vaginal bleeding was controlled within the median time of 4.0 days. One month after treatment, 97.3% of patients achieved short-term local control. The local recurrence rates for patients with stages I-II, III, and IV disease were 4.8% (4/84), 11.7% (7/60), and 33.3% (2/6), respectively, and the occurrence rates of distant metastasis were 16.7% (14/84), 25.0% (15/60), and 100.0% (6/6), respectively. Cancer stage, tumor size, and lymph node metastasis were identified as prognostic risk factors, but only lymph node metastasis was found to be an independent prognostic factor. The most common adverse effects during treatment were grades 1 and 2 irradiation-related proctitis and radiocystitis. For patients with cervical cancer, neutron brachytherapy combined with external-beam radiotherapy plus concurrent chemotherapy produces a rapid response and greatly

  13. Quality of Life After Whole Pelvic Versus Prostate-Only External Beam Radiotherapy for Prostate Cancer: A Matched-Pair Comparison

    SciTech Connect

    Pinkawa, Michael; Piroth, Marc D.; Holy, Richard; Fischedick, Karin; Klotz, Jens; Szekely-Orban, Dalma; Eble, Michael J.

    2011-09-01

    Purpose: Comparison of health-related quality of life after whole pelvic (WPRT) and prostate-only (PORT) external beam radiotherapy for prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: A group of 120 patients (60 in each group) was surveyed prospectively before radiation therapy (RT) (time A), at the last day of RT (time B), at a median time of 2 months (time C) and >1 year after RT (time D) using a validated questionnaire (Expanded Prostate Cancer Index Composite). All patients were treated with 1.8- to 2.0-Gy fractions up to 70.2 to 72.0 Gy with or without WPRT up to 45 to 46 Gy. Pairs were matched according to the following criteria: age {+-} 5years, planning target volume {+-} 10 cc (considering planning target volume without pelvic nodes for WPRT patients), urinary/bowel/sexual function score before RT {+-} 10, and use of antiandrogens. Results: With the exception of prognostic risk factors, both groups were well balanced with respect to baseline characteristics. No significant differences were found with regard to urinary and sexual score changes. Mean bladder function scores reached baseline levels in both patient subgroups after RT. However, bowel function scores decreased significantly more for patients after WPRT than in those receiving PORT at all times (p < 0.01, respectively). Significant differences were found for most items in the bowel domain in the acute phase. At time D, patients after WPRT reported rectal urgency (>once a day in 15% vs. 3%; p = 0.03), bloody stools ({>=}half the time in 7% vs. 0%; p = 0.04) and frequent bowel movements (>two on a typical day in 32% vs. 7%; p < 0.01) more often than did patients after PORT. Conclusion: In comparison to PORT, WPRT (larger bladder and rectum volumes in medium dose levels, but similar volumes in high dose levels) was associated with decreased bowel quality of life in the acute and chronic phases after treatment but remained without adverse long-term urinary effects.

  14. Laparoscopic pelvic mesh placement with closure of pelvic floor entrance to prevent small intestine radiation trauma - A retrospective cohort analysis.

    PubMed

    Bachmann, R; Heinzelmann, F; Müller, A C; Ladurner, R; Schneider, C C; Königsrainer, A; Zdichavsky, M

    2015-11-01

    In most pelvic malignancies radiation therapy is a main part of the treatment concept. The main dose limiting organ is the small intestine. Different mechanical methods to prevent radiation damage to the small intestine have been described. We herein report a retrospective study of laparoscopic placement of an absorbable vicryl mesh in patients requiring pelvic radiotherapy displacing the bowel out of the radiation field. The study included 6 consecutive patients requiring definitive radiotherapy due to locally advanced prostate cancer. All patients had small intestine within the radiation fields despite the use of non-invasive displacement methods. All patients underwent laparoscopic small bowel displacement from the pelvis and closure of the pelvic floor entrance using vicryl mesh placement. Peri- or postoperative complications were not seen. Postoperative radiotherapy planning CT scans confirmed displacement of the small intestine allowing all patients to receive the planned radiotherapy volume. Laparoscopic mesh placement represents a safe and efficient procedure in patients requiring high-dose pelvic radiation, presenting with unacceptable small intestine volume in the radiation field. As an alternate to native tissue, the vicryl mesh is a safe, effective substitute for small bowel exclusion from external-beam radiation therapy. Copyright © 2015 IJS Publishing Group Limited. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Management of a Case of Severe Pelvic Fracture Related Bladder Trauma

    PubMed Central

    Myers, Jeremy B.; Hotaling, James M.; Brant, William O.; Enniss, Toby M.

    2015-01-01

    A 62-year-old male was admitted after being struck by a bus. He sustained a severe pelvic fracture, sigmoid colon injury, and both intraperitoneal and extraperitoneal bladder injury. He underwent initial successful bladder repair. However, at 7 days post-operatively he manifested a leak from the repair and urine was evident coming from the pins of his pelvic external fixator. A repeat cystogram showed massive extravasation, which was managed by operative ligation of the lower ureters and placement of percutaneous nephrostomy tubes. He underwent ureteral reconstruction and colostomy reversal at 9 months. He has both bladder and bowel control. PMID:26793492

  16. Management of a Case of Severe Pelvic Fracture Related Bladder Trauma.

    PubMed

    Myers, Jeremy B; Hotaling, James M; Brant, William O; Enniss, Toby M

    2015-03-01

    A 62-year-old male was admitted after being struck by a bus. He sustained a severe pelvic fracture, sigmoid colon injury, and both intraperitoneal and extraperitoneal bladder injury. He underwent initial successful bladder repair. However, at 7 days post-operatively he manifested a leak from the repair and urine was evident coming from the pins of his pelvic external fixator. A repeat cystogram showed massive extravasation, which was managed by operative ligation of the lower ureters and placement of percutaneous nephrostomy tubes. He underwent ureteral reconstruction and colostomy reversal at 9 months. He has both bladder and bowel control.

  17. Analysis of the cause, classification, treatment, outcome and associated injuries of pediatric pelvic ring fractures.

    PubMed

    Saglam, Yavuz; Dikmen, Goksel; Bademler, Suleyman; Aksoy, Murat; Dikici, Fatih

    2015-09-01

    Although pediatric pelvis fractures are relatively uncommon, long-term consequences and associated life-treating injuries often have a substantial impact for the rest of a child's life. The prognosis of pediatric pelvic fractures is better than that of the adults because of their greater elasticity, healing capacity and re-modelling. Fractures through the physis may lead to growth disturbance and/or acetabular dysplasia. Non-union is rare and mal-union is usually well-tolerated. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the results of a single trauma center and review the literature approach to pediatric pelvic fractures. Medical records were analyzed for diagnosis, the mechanism of injury, additional injuries, treatment methods, and complications. The types of fractures were classified according to Torode and Zieg classification. Patients were called back and seen at the clinic as a last follow up visit. Twenty eight skeletally immature patients, under the age of 12, were treated for pelvic fracture from 1997 to 2012. Mean age was 6.8±2.4 years. Three children with an unstable pelvic ring injury required pelvic external fixation. One patient died due to pelvic hemorrhage postoperatively. Mean follow up was 5.3±3.6 years. Pediatric pelvic fractures are rare but life-threating injuries. Overall good or excellent long-term results can be expected in most cases with appropriate timing and treatment.

  18. Reconstruction of the pelvis and lumbar-pelvic junction using 2 vascularized autologous bone grafts after en bloc resection for an iliosacral chondrosarcoma.

    PubMed

    Mendel, Ehud; Mayerson, Joel L; Nathoo, Narendra; Edgar, Rick L; Schmidt, Carl; Miller, Michael J

    2011-08-01

    Primary pelvic sarcomas remain challenging and complex surgical problems with significant potential for postoperative impairment of ambulation, as well as bowel, bladder, and sexual function. En bloc resection with negative tumor margins represents the best chance of control or cure as current adjuvant therapies remain ineffective. Tumor involvement of the sacrum with extension to the greater sciatic notch and ipsilateral ilium requires an external hemipelvectomy and sagittal sacrectomy with sacrifice of the lower extremity to achieve en bloc resection, followed by lumbar-pelvic reconstruction. A patient with an iliosacral chondrosarcoma is presented to illustrate a novel lumbar-pelvic reconstruction technique, in which vascularized soft tissue and 2 vascularized bone grafts were harvested from the amputated lower extremity and transferred to the pelvis as composite flaps to restore pelvic ring integrity, augment lumbar-pelvic fusion, and close the soft-tissue defect. The biomechanical dynamics of this unique construct are discussed.

  19. Immediate postoperative morbidity in patients with indwelling double-J stent versus overnight-externalized ureteral catheter after tubeless percutaneous nephrolithotomy: a prospective, randomized study.

    PubMed

    Mercado, Alejandro; Fernández, Mario I; Recabal, Pedro; Fleck, Daniela; Ledezma, Rodrigo; Moya, Francisco; Sepúlveda, Francisco; Vilches, Roberto; Reyes, Diego; Marchant, Fernando

    2013-06-01

    The conventional technique for percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PNL) ends by placing a nephrostomy tube within the access tract. However, feasibility and safety of tubeless PNL have been widely demonstrated. In this modification, a ureteral stent is usually left in place instead of the nephrostomy tube. The aim of this study is to compare the use of a postoperative indwelling double-J stent versus an overnight-externalized ureteral catheter in patients undergoing tubeless PNL. Sixty-eight patients undergoing tubeless PNL were randomized either for a postoperative double-J stent (group 1) or for an overnight-externalized ureteral catheter (group 2). Outcomes evaluated included postoperative pain, hospital stay length, incidence of hemorrhagic complications, residual lithiasis and urinary leakage. Groups were similar according to age, sex, body mass index and stone burden. There were no significant differences in terms of postoperative pain, incidence of perirenal hematomas, residual lithiasis and urinary leakage. However, patients in group 1 presented longer hospital stays (3.7 ± 1.7 vs. 1.9 ± 0.3 days; p < 0.001) and greater hematocrit drops (4.9 ± 2.2 vs. 2.1 ± 1.8 %; p < 0.001). Our results confirm that among patients undergoing tubeless PNL, both alternatives (i.e. leaving a double-J stent or an overnight-externalized ureteral catheter) are reliable and safe. However, further considerations, like the need of double-J stent removal under cystoscopy, need to be taken into account when deciding which modality to use.

  20. External Validation of a Decision Tool To Guide Post-Operative Management of Patients with Secondary Peritonitis.

    PubMed

    Atema, Jasper J; Ram, Kim; Schultz, Marcus J; Boermeester, Marja A

    Timely identification of patients in need of an intervention for abdominal sepsis after initial surgical management of secondary peritonitis is vital but complex. The aim of this study was to validate a decision tool for this purpose and to evaluate its potential to guide post-operative management. A prospective cohort study was conducted on consecutive adult patients undergoing surgery for secondary peritonitis in a single hospital. Assessments using the decision tool, based on one intra-operative and five post-operative variables, were performed on the second and third post-operative days and when the patients' clinical status deteriorated. Scores were compared with the clinical reference standard of persistent sepsis based on the clinical course or findings at imaging or surgery. Additionally, the potential of the decision tool to guide management in terms of diagnostic imaging in three previously defined score categories (low, intermediate, and high) was evaluated. A total of 161 assessments were performed in 69 patients. The majority of cases of secondary peritonitis (68%) were caused by perforation of the gastrointestinal tract. Post-operative persistent sepsis occurred in 28 patients. The discriminative capacity of the decision tool score was fair (area under the curve of the receiver operating characteristic = 0.79). The incidence rate differed significantly between the three score categories (p < 0.001). The negative predictive value of a decision tool score categorized as low probability was 89% (95% confidence interval [CI] 82-94) and 65% (95% CI 47-79) for an intermediate score. Diagnostic imaging was performed more frequently when there was an intermediate score than when the score was categorized as low (46% vs. 24%; p < 0.001). In patients operated on for secondary peritonitis, the decision tool score predicts with fair accuracy whether persistent sepsis is present.

  1. Pelvic incidentalomas

    PubMed Central

    Newmark, G.M.; Thakrar, K.H.; Mehta, U.K.; Berlin, J.W.

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Recent advances in multi-detector computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, and ultrasound have led to the detection of incidental ovarian, uterine, vascular and pelvic nodal abnormalities in both the oncology and non-oncology patient population that in the past remained undiscovered. These incidental pelvic lesions have created a management dilemma for both clinicians and radiologists. Depending on the clinical setting, these lesions may require no further evaluation, additional immediate or serial follow-up imaging, or surgical intervention. In this review, guidelines concerning the diagnosis and management of some of the more common pelvic incidentalomas are presented. PMID:20880789

  2. Postoperative infections in obstetrics and gynecology.

    PubMed

    Jaiyeoba, Oluwatosin

    2012-12-01

    Postoperative infection is the most commonly seen complication of surgery in obstetrics and gynecology. The use of antibiotic prophylaxis has greatly decreased though not completely eliminated this adverse outcome. Postoperative infections include wound cellulitis, wound abscess, endomyometritis, pelvic cellulitis, and pelvic abscess. Infections usually manifest as fever and greater than normal postoperative pain. Refractory fevers maybe because of septic pelvic vein thrombophlebitis or maybe noninfectious in origin. Broad-spectrum antibiotics should be initiated as soon as possible when diagnosis of postoperative infection is made; most patients will respond to treatment within 24 to 48 hours when appropriate antibiotics are selected.

  3. Quality of life and satisfaction with information after radical prostatectomy, radical external beam radiotherapy and postoperative radiotherapy: a long-term follow-up study.

    PubMed

    Nicolaisen, Marianne; Müller, Stig; Patel, Hitendra R H; Hanssen, Tove Aminda

    2014-12-01

    To assess patients' symptoms, quality of life and satisfaction with information three to four years after radical prostatectomy, radical external beam radiotherapy and postoperative radiotherapy and to analyse differences between treatment groups and the relationship between disease-specific, health-related and overall quality of life and satisfaction with information. Radical prostate cancer treatments are associated with changes in quality of life. Differences between patients undergoing different treatments in symptoms and quality of life have been reported, but there are limited long-term data comparing radical prostatectomy with radical external beam radiotherapy and postoperative radiotherapy. A cross-sectional survey design was used. The study sample included 143 men treated with radical prostatectomy and/or radical external beam radiotherapy. Quality of life was measured using the 12-item Short Form Health Survey and the 50-item Expanded Prostate Cancer Index Composite Instrument. Questions assessing overall Quality of life and satisfaction with information were included. Descriptive statistics and interference statistical methods were applied to analyse the data. Radical external beam radiotherapy was associated with less urinary incontinence and better urinary function. There were no differences between the groups for disease-specific quality of life sum scores. Sexual quality of life was reported very low in all groups. Disease-specific quality of life and health-related quality of life were associated with overall quality of life. Patients having undergone surgery were more satisfied with information, and there was a positive correlation between quality of life and patient satisfaction. Pretreatment information and patient education lead to better quality of life and satisfaction. This study indicates a need for structured, pretreatment information and follow-up for all men going through radical prostate cancer treatment. Long-term quality of life

  4. Pelvic Actinomycosis

    PubMed Central

    García-García, Alejandra; Ramírez-Durán, Ninfa; Sandoval-Trujillo, Horacio

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Actinomycosis is a chronic bacterial infection caused by Actinomyces, Gram-positive anaerobic bacteria. Its symptomatology imitates some malignant pelvic tumours, tuberculosis, or nocardiosis, causing abscesses and fistulas. Actinomycoses are opportunistic infections and require normal mucous barriers to be altered. No epidemiological studies have been conducted to determine prevalence or incidence of such infections. Objective To analyse the clinical cases of pelvic actinomycosis reported worldwide, to update the information about the disease. Methods A systematic review of worldwide pelvic actinomycosis cases between 1980 and 2014 was performed, utilising the PubMed, Scopus, and Google Scholar databases. The following information was analysed: year, country, type of study, number of cases, use of intrauterine device (IUD), final and initial diagnosis, and method of diagnosis. Results 63 articles met the search criteria, of which 55 reported clinical cases and 8 reported cross-sectional studies. Conclusions Pelvic actinomycosis is confusing to diagnose and should be considered in the differential diagnosis of pelvic chronic inflammatory lesions. It is commonly diagnosed through a histological report, obtained after a surgery subsequent to an erroneous initial diagnosis. A bacterial culture in anaerobic medium could be useful for the diagnosis but requires a controlled technique and should be performed using specialised equipment. PMID:28684963

  5. Predictors of urinary and rectal toxicity after external conformed radiation therapy in prostate cancer: Correlation between clinical, tumour and dosimetric parameters and radical and postoperative radiation therapy.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Arribas, C M; González-San Segundo, C; Cuesta-Álvaro, P; Calvo-Manuel, F A

    2017-06-15

    To determine rectal and urinary toxicity after external beam radiation therapy (EBRT), assessing the results of patients who undergo radical or postoperative therapy for prostate cancer (pancreatic cancer) and their correlation with potential risk factors. A total of 333 patients were treated with EBRT. Of these, 285 underwent radical therapy and 48 underwent postoperative therapy (39 cases of rescue and 9 of adjuvant therapy). We collected clinical, tumour and dosimetric variable to correlate with toxicity parameters. We developed decision trees based on the degree of statistical significance. The rate of severe acute toxicity, both urinary and rectal, was 5.4% and 1.5%, respectively. The rate of chronic toxicity was 4.5% and 2.7%, respectively. Twenty-seven patients presented haematuria, and 9 presented haemorrhagic rectitis. Twenty-five patients (7.5%) presented permanent limiting sequela. The patients with lower urinary tract symptoms prior to the radiation therapy presented poorer tolerance, with greater acute bladder toxicity (P=0.041). In terms of acute rectal toxicity, 63% of the patients with mean rectal doses >45Gy and anticoagulant/antiplatelet therapy developed mild toxicity compared with 37% of the patients with mean rectal doses <45 Gy and without anticoagulant therapy. We were unable to establish predictors of chronic toxicity in the multivariate analysis. The long-term sequelae were greater in the patients who underwent urological operations prior to the radiation therapy and who were undergoing anticoagulant therapy. The tolerance to EBRT was good, and severe toxicity was uncommon. Baseline urinary symptoms constitute the predictor that most influenced the acute urinary toxicity. Rectal toxicity is related to the mean rectal dose and with anticoagulant/antiplatelet therapy. There were no significant differences in severe toxicity between radical versus postoperative radiation therapy. Copyright © 2017 AEU. Publicado por Elsevier España, S

  6. Effect of postoperative brachytherapy and external beam radiotherapy on functional outcomes of immediate facial nerve repair after radical parotidectomy.

    PubMed

    Hontanilla, Bernardo; Qiu, Shan-Shan; Marré, Diego

    2014-01-01

    There is much controversy regarding the effect of radiotherapy on facial nerve regeneration. However, the effect of brachytherapy has not been studied. Fifty-three patients underwent total parotidectomy of which 13 were radical with immediate facial nerve repair with sural nerve grafts. Six patients (group 1) did not receive adjuvant treatment whereas 7 patients (group 2) received postoperative brachytherapy plus radiotherapy. Functional outcomes were compared using Facial Clima. Mean percentage of blink recovery was 92.6 ± 4.2 for group 1 and 90.7 ± 5.2 for group 2 (p = .37). Mean percentage of commissural excursion restoration was 78.1 ± 3.5 for group 1 and 74.9 ± 5.9 for group 2 (p = .17). Mean time from surgery to first movement was 5.7 ± 0.9 months for group 1 and 6.3 ± 0.5 months for group 2 (p = .15). Brachytherapy plus radiotherapy does not affect the functional outcomes of immediate facial nerve repair with nerve grafts. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. External validation of a proposed prognostic model for the prediction of 1-year postoperative eGFR after living donor nephrectomy.

    PubMed

    Kulik, Ulf; Gwiasda, Jill; Oldhafer, Felix; Kaltenborn, Alexander; Arelin, Viktor; Gueler, Faikah; Richter, Nicolas; Klempnauer, Juergen; Schrem, Harald

    2017-08-21

    The goal of this study was to externally validate the recently proposed prognostic model for the prediction of estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) < 60 ml/min/1.73 m(2) 1 year after living donor nephrectomy. 130 living kidney donors (median age at donation 52.3 years, range 24.7-75.6 years) were investigated before and after donation between March 2000 and April 2016. Preoperative eGFR values varied between 61.7 and 148.4 ml/min (mean: 89, median: 88). Observed eGFR 1 year after transplantation (±45 days) ranged between 36.3 and 97.1 ml/min (mean: 55, median: 53). 70.8% of donors displayed eGFR values < 60 ml/min 1 year after donation. Predicted eGFR 1 year after donation was determined using the prognostic model proposed by Benoit et al. (Int Urol Nephrol 49(5):793-801. doi: 10.1007/s11255-017-1559-1 , 2017): postoperative eGFR ml/min/1.73 m(2) = 31.71 + (0.521 × eGFR in ml/min prior to donation -0.314 × Age in years at donation). Pearson correlation and receiver operating characteristics curve (ROC-curve) were used to assess external validity of the proposed prognostic model to predict postoperative eGFR in ml/min and eGFR < 60 ml/min. The correlation between predicted and observed eGFR 1 year after donation was significant (p < 0.001; R (2) = 0.594). The area under the ROC-curve (AUROC) demonstrated a high sensitivity and specificity for predicted eGFR values < 60 ml/min (AUROC = 0.866). The proposed prognostic model for the prediction of postoperative eGFR was successfully validated in our cohort. We therefore consider the model as generally applicable.

  8. Robotic single-site pelvic lymphadenectomy.

    PubMed

    Tateo, Saverio; Nozza, Arrigo; Del Pezzo, Chiara; Mereu, Liliana

    2014-09-01

    To examine the feasibility of performing pelvic lymphadenectomy with robotic single site approach. Recent papers described the feasibility of robotic-single site hysterectomy [1-3] for benign and malign pathologies but only with the development of new single site 5mm instruments as the bipolar forceps, robotic single site platform can be safely utilized also for lymphadenectomy. A 65 year-old, multiparous patient with a body mass index of 22.5 and diagnosed with well differentiated adenocarcinoma of the endometrium underwent a robotic single-site peritoneal washing, total hysterectomy, bilateral adnexectomy and pelvic lymphadenectomy. The procedure was performed using the da Vinci Si Surgical System (Intuitive Surgical, Sunnyvale, CA) through a single 2,5 cm umbilical incision, with a multi-channel system and two single site robotic 5mm instruments. A 3-dimensional, HD 8.5mm endoscope and a 5mm accessory instrument were also utilized. Type I lymphonodes dissection for external iliac and obturator regions was performed [4]. Total operative time was 210 min; incision, trocar placement and docking time occurring in 12 min. Total console time was 183 min, estimated blood loss was 50 ml, no intra-operative or post-operative complications occurred. Hospital discharge occurred on post operative day 2 and total number of lymphnodes removed was 33. Difficulties in term of instrument's clashing and awkward motions have been encountered. Robotic single-site pelvic lymphadenectomy using bipolar forceps and monopolar hook is feasible. New developments are needed to improve surgical ergonomics and additional studies should be performed to explore possible benefits of this procedure. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Iliosacral screw fixation of the unstable pelvic ring injuries.

    PubMed

    Rysavý, M; Pavelka, T; Khayarin, M; Dzupa, V

    2010-06-01

    To report on the early results and possible complications of iliosacral screw fixation in the management of unstable pelvic ring injuries. One hundred and two unstable pelvic ring injuries were treated using iliosacral screw fixation for posterior pelvic ring disruptions. Closed manipulative reductions of the posterior lesion were attempted for all patients. Open reductions were used in the minority of patients with unsatisfactory closed reductions as assessed fluoroscopically at the time of surgery. Anterior fixations were by means of open reduction in 62 patients and by external fixation in 14 patients, and by screws in 7 patients. Twenty patients had no anterior fixation. Plain anteroposterior, inlet and outlet radiographs of the pelvis were obtained postoperatively at six weeks, three months, six months and one year. A pelvic computed tomography scan was performed postoperatively in those patients where residual displacement or screw misplacement was suspected. Complications were recorded. One patient died 31 days after the trauma due to pneumonia and one died 9 months after the surgery after a fall from a height in a second suicidal attempt. There were two posterior pelvic infections and one anterior pelvic infection. Screw misplacement occurred in seven cases. In six cases a misplaced screw produced transient L5 neuroapraxia. There was no fixation failure requiring revision surgery. There was one case of injury to the superior gluteal artery. Unstable pelvic ring disruptions are severe injuries, associated with a high rate of morbidity and mortality. Pelvic fractures can be treated by variety of methods. Treatment with traction and pelvic slings does not offer accurate reduction and confines the patient to prolong bed rest with all potential complications. Several authors documented lower morbidity and mortality rates and shorter hospital stay in patients treated by early operative stabilization of pelvic injuries. The timing of the surgery is still

  10. Pelvic Pain

    MedlinePlus

    Pelvic pain occurs mostly in the lower abdomen area. The pain might be steady, or it might come and go. If the pain is severe, it might get in the way ... re a woman, you might feel a dull pain during your period. It could also happen during ...

  11. Postoperative Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy for Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the External Auditory Canal and Middle Ear: Treatment Outcomes, Marginal Misses, and Perspective on Target Delineation

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Wan-Yu; Kuo, Sung-Hsin; Chen, Yu-Hsuan; Lu, Szu-Huai; Tsai, Chiao-Ling; Chia-Hsien Cheng, Jason; Hong, Ruey-Long; Chen, Ya-Fang; Hsu, Chuan-Jen; Lin, Kai-Nan; Ko, Jenq-Yuh; Lou, Pei-Jen; Wang, Cheng-Ping; Chong, Fok-Ching; Wang, Chun-Wei

    2012-03-15

    Purpose: To report outcomes of the rare disease of squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of the external auditory canal (EAC) and middle ear treated with surgery and postoperative intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). Failure patterns related to spatial dose distribution were also analyzed to provide insight into target delineation. Methods and Materials: A retrospective review was conducted of the records of 11 consecutive patients with SCC of the EAC and middle ear who were treated with curative surgery and postoperative IMRT at one institution between January 2007 and February 2010. The prescribed IMRT dose was 60 to 66 Gy at 2 Gy per fraction. Three patients also received concurrent cisplatin-based chemotherapy, and 1 patient received concurrent oral tegafur/uracil. The median follow-up time was 19 months (range, 6-33 months). Results: Four patients had locoregional recurrence, yielding an estimated 2-year locoregional control rate of 70.7%. Among them, 1 patient had persistent disease after treatment, and 3 had marginal recurrence. Distant metastasis occurred in 1 patient after extensive locoregional recurrence, yielding an estimated 2-year distant control rate of 85.7%. The estimated 2-year overall survival was 67.5%. The three cases of marginal recurrence were near the preauricular space and glenoid fossa of the temporomandibular joint, adjacent to the apex of the ear canal and glenoid fossa of the temporomandibular joint, and in the postauricular subcutaneous area and ipsilateral parotid nodes, respectively. Conclusions: Marginal misses should be recognized to improve target delineation. When treating SCC of the EAC and middle ear, care should be taken to cover the glenoid fossa of the temporomandibular joint and periauricular soft tissue. Elective ipsilateral parotid irradiation should be considered. The treatment planning procedure should also be refined to balance subcutaneous soft-tissue dosimetry and toxicity.

  12. Pelvic Floor Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... NICHD Research Information Clinical Trials Resources and Publications Pelvic Floor Disorders: Condition Information Skip sharing on social media links Share this: Page Content What is the pelvic floor? The term "pelvic floor" refers to the group ...

  13. Pelvic Organ Prolapse

    MedlinePlus

    ... occurs when the tissue and muscles of the pelvic floor no longer support the pelvic organs resulting in ... organ prolapse. Supporting muscles and tissue of the pelvic floor may become torn or stretched because of labor ...

  14. Pelvic ultrasound - abdominal

    MedlinePlus

    ... you Bladder growths or other problems Kidney stones Pelvic inflammatory disease , an infection of a woman's uterus, ovaries, or tubes Abnormal vaginal bleeding Menstrual problems Problems ... the uterus Pelvic pain Pelvic ultrasound is also used during a ...

  15. Magnitude of preoperative cervical lordotic compensation and C2-T3 angle are correlated to increased risk of postoperative sagittal spinal pelvic malalignment in adult thoracolumbar deformity patients at 2-year follow-up.

    PubMed

    Passias, Peter G; Soroceanu, Alexandra; Scheer, Justin; Yang, Sun; Boniello, Anthony; Smith, Justin S; Protopsaltis, Themistocles; Kim, Han J; Schwab, Frank; Gupta, Munish; Klineberg, Eric; Mundis, Gregory; Lafage, Renaud; Hart, Robert; Shaffrey, Christopher; Lafage, Virginie; Ames, Christopher

    2015-08-01

    Cervical deformity (CD) is prevalent among patients with adult spinal deformity (ASD). The effect of baseline cervical alignment on achieving optimal thoracolumbar alignment in ASD surgery is unclear. This study assesses the relationship between preoperative (preop) cervical spinal parameters and global alignment after thoracolumbar ASD surgery at 2-year follow-up. This study is a retrospective review of a multicenter, prospective database. Surgical ASD patients with 2-year follow-up and cervical X-rays were included. The outcome measures were radiographic parameters and self-reported health-related quality-of-life measures (Short-Form 36 [SF-36], Oswestry Disability Index [ODI], and Scoliosis Research Society 22 [SRS-22]). Surgical ASD patients of 18 years and older with scoliosis greater than or equal to 20° and one of the following radiographic parameters were included: sagittal vertical axis (SVA) greater than or equal to 5 cm, pelvic tilt (PT) greater than or equal to 25°, or thoracic kyphosis (TK) greater than 60°. The SRS-Schwab sagittal modifiers (PT, global alignment, and pelvic incidence and lumbar lordosis [PI-LL]) were assessed at 2-year postoperatively as either normal ("0") or abnormal ("+" or "++"). Patients were classified in the aligned group (AG) or malaligned group (MG) at 2-year follow-up if all three sagittal modifiers were normal or abnormal, respectively. Patients were assessed for CD based on the following criteria: C2-C7 SVA greater than 4 cm, C2-C7 SVA less than 4 cm, cervical kyphosis (CL greater than 0), cervical lordosis (CL less than 0), any deformity (C2-C7 SVA greater than 4 cm or CL greater than 0), and both CD (C2-C7 SVA greater than 4 cm and CL greater than 0). Univariate testing was performed using t or chi-square test, looking at the following preop parameters: CD, C2-C7 SVA, C2-T3 SVA, CL, T1 slope (T1S), T1S-CL, C2-T3 angle, LL, TK, PT, C7-S1 SVA, and PI-LL. One hundred four patients met the initial inclusion criteria with

  16. [A randomized study of intensity-modulated radiation therapy versus three dimensional conformal radiation therapy for pelvic radiation in patients of post-operative treatment with gynecologic malignant tumor].

    PubMed

    Ni, J; Yin, Z M; Yuan, S H; Liu, N F; Li, L; Xu, X X; Lou, H M

    2017-03-25

    Objective: To study the difference between intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and three dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT) for pelvic radiation of post-operative treatment with gynecologic malignant tumor. Methods: A prospective investigation study was conducted on 183 patients of post-operative patients with whole pelvic radiation therapy of cervical cancer or endometrial cancer in Zhejiang Cancer Hospital [IMRT group (n=85) and 3D-CRT group (n=98)] from Oct. 2015 to Oct. 2016. The two groups received same dose (45 Gy in 25 fractions). Comparison of two groups with radiation dosimetry:the score according to the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) acute radiation injury grading standards before and after radiotherapy reaction, the score from functional assessment of cancer therapy scale-cervix (FACT-Cx) scale and expanded prostate cancer index composite for clinical practice (EPIC-CP) scale were also analyzed. Results: (1) There were no significant effect with age, culture level, family economic condition and ratio of radiochemotherapy between two groups (all P>0.05). (2) Dosimetric comparison for IMRT vs 3D-CRT: the average dose of planning target volume (PTV) decreased (46.1±0.4) vs (46.4±0.5) Gy, V(45) dose percentage increased (95.2±1.0) % vs (93.3±2.0) %, intestinal bag dose of V(4)0 decreased (24.4±6.8) % vs (36.5±15.9) %, rectal V(40) dose percentage decreased (73.9±12.3) % vs (85.4±8.4) %, and lower rectal V(45) dose percentage (32.8±13.4) % vs (71.5±13.7) %, bladder V(40) dose percentage decreased (55.5±13.0) % vs (84.4±13.0) %. Bone marrow V(20) lower: (67.9±5.4) % vs (79.5±6.6) %, V(1)0 lower: (82.1±6.0) % vs (86.3±6.6) %; there were significant differences (all P<0.05). There was no significant difference between the dose of V(45) in the intestinal pouch and bladder (P>0.05). (3) Acute radiation injury classification for IMRT vs 3D-CRT: big or small intestine: Ⅱ-Ⅲ reaction [13% (11/85) vs 24% (24/98); χ(2

  17. Effects of external pelvic compression on electromyographic activity of the hamstring muscles during unipedal stance in sportsmen with and without hamstring injuries.

    PubMed

    Arumugam, Ashokan; Milosavljevic, Stephan; Woodley, Stephanie; Sole, Gisela

    2015-06-01

    There is some evidence that hamstring function can be influenced by interventions focusing on the pelvis via an anatomic and neurophysiologic link between these two segments. Previous research demonstrated increased electromyographic activity from injured hamstrings during transition from bipedal to unipedal stance (BUS). The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of a pelvic compression belt (PCB) on electromyographic activity of selected muscles during BUS in sportsmen with and without hamstring injury. Electromyographic amplitudes (normalised to maximum voluntary isometric contraction [MVIC]) of the hamstrings, gluteus maximus, gluteus medius and lumbar multifidus were obtained during BUS from 20 hamstring-injured participants (both sides) and 30 healthy participants (one side, randomly selected). There was an increase in biceps femoris (by 1.23 ± 2.87 %MVIC; p = 0.027) and gluteus maximus (by 0.63 ± 1.13 %MVIC; p = 0.023) electromyographic activity for the hamstring-injured side but no significant differences other than a decrease in multifidus activity (by 1.36 ± 2.92 %MVIC; p = 0.023) were evident for healthy participants while wearing the PCB. However, the effect sizes for these findings were small. Wearing the PCB did not significantly change electromyographic activity of other muscles in either participant group (p > 0.050). Moreover, the magnitude of change induced by the PCB was not significantly different between groups (p > 0.050) for the investigated muscles. Thus, application of a PCB to decrease electromyographic activity of injured hamstrings during BUS is likely to have little effect. Similar research is warranted in participants with acute hamstring injury. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Acute Bladder Necrosis after Pelvic Arterial Embolization for Pelvic Trauma: Lessons Learned from Two Cases of Immediate Postembolization Bladder Necrosis

    PubMed Central

    Osterberg, E. Charles; Elliott, Sean P.; Hittelman, Adam B.

    2016-01-01

    We report two cases of acute bladder injury with bladder neck necrosis identified during the initial operative evaluation and within the early postprocedural period in patients with significant pelvic trauma requiring pelvic vascular embolization. To our knowledge, this is the first report of bladder neck necrosis found during the initial intraoperative surgical evaluation or early postoperative setting. PMID:27656309

  19. Functional pelvic orientation measured from lateral standing and sitting radiographs.

    PubMed

    DiGioia, Anthony M; Hafez, Mahmoud A; Jaramaz, Branislav; Levison, Timothy J; Moody, James E

    2006-12-01

    We prospectively obtained preoperative and 3-month postoperative lateral pelvic radiographs in the standing and sitting positions from 84 patients who underwent total hip arthroplasty. We measured pelvic orientation (flexion extension) using the anterior pelvic plane as defined by the anterior superior iliac spines and pubic tubercles as references. There was a trend towards upright pelvic alignment when standing, with a mean anterior pelvic plane angle of 1.2 degrees (range, -22 degrees - +27 degrees). In the sitting position the pelvis tended to extend posteriorly, with a mean anterior pelvic plane angle of -36.2 degrees (range, -64 degrees - +4 degrees). There was a wide variation in the arc of pelvic flexion extension as patients moved from standing to sitting, with are of pelvic motion in some patients as mobile as 70 degrees and in others as stiff as 5 degrees. There was no significant variation between males and females or between preoperative and postoperative pelvic flexion extension. There were substantial variations in pelvic orientation when comparing standing and sitting for an individual patient and between different patients. This variation can be unpredictable, and may influence implant alignment and stability after total hip arthroplasty.

  20. Less invasive lumbopelvic fixation technique using a percutaneous pedicle screw system for unstable pelvic ring fracture in a patient with severe multiple traumas.

    PubMed

    Yano, Sei; Aoki, Yasuchika; Watanabe, Atsuya; Nakajima, Takayuki; Takazawa, Makoto; Hirasawa, Hiroyuki; Takahashi, Kazuhisa; Nakagawa, Koichi; Nakajima, Arata; Takahashi, Hiroshi; Orita, Sumihisa; Eguchi, Yawara; Suzuki, Takane; Ohtori, Seiji

    2017-02-01

    Pelvic ring fractures are defined as life-threatening injuries that can be treated surgically with external or internal fixation. The authors report on an 81-year-old woman with an unstable pelvic fracture accompanying multiple traumas that was successfully treated with a less invasive procedure. The patient was injured in a traffic accident and sustained a total of 20 fractures, including pelvic ring, bilateral rib, and lumbar transverse processes fractures, and multiple fractures of both upper and lower extremities. The pelvic ring fracture was unstable with fractures of the bilateral sacrum with right sacroiliac disruption, right superior and inferior pubic rami, left superior pubic ramus, and ischium. During emergency surgery, bilateral external fixation was applied to the iliac crest to stabilize the pelvic ring. Second and third surgeries were performed 11 and 18 days after the first emergency surgery, respectively, to treat the multiple fractures. At the third surgery, the pelvic ring fracture was stabilized surgically using a less invasive posterior fixation technique. In this technique, 2 iliac screws were inserted on each side following an 8-cm midline posterior incision from the S-1 to S-3 spinous process, with the subcutaneous tissue detached from the fascia of the paraspinal muscles. The S-2 spinous process was removed and 2 rods were connected to bilateral iliac screws to stabilize the bilateral ilium in a switchback fashion. A crosslink device was applied to connect the 2 rods at the base of the S-2 spinous process. Following pelvic fixation, percutaneous pedicle screws were inserted into L-4 and L-5 vertebral bodies on both sides, and connected to the cranial rod connecting the bilateral iliac screws, thus completing the lumbopelvic fixation. The postoperative course was favorable with no postoperative complications. At the 10-month follow-up, bone union had been achieved at the superior ramus of the pubis, the patient did not complain of pain, and

  1. Aortoiliac aneurysm with congenital right pelvic kidney.

    PubMed

    Date, Kazuma; Okada, Shuuichi; Ezure, Masahiko; Takihara, Hitomi; Okonogi, Shuuichi; Hasegawa, Yutaka; Sato, Yasushi; Kaneko, Tatsuo

    2015-05-01

    The association of congenital pelvic kidney with abdominal aortoiliac aneurysm is an extremely rare clinical finding. Previous reports have described various methods of aneurysm repair with successful preservation of the function of pelvic kidney. However, to our knowledge, reconstruction of more than two renal arteries has not been established. We report a case of abdominal aortic aneurysm complicated by congenital right pelvic kidney in a 72-year-old man. Computed tomography (CT) revealed an abdominal aortic aneurysm with a maximum diameter of 54 mm and a right common iliac aneurysm of 45 mm. In addition, he had a congenital right pelvic kidney and CT angiography identified three right pelvic renal arteries. The upper artery originated from the bifurcation of the terminal aorta and the lower two originated from the right common iliac artery. Three-dimensional CT was helpful for the accurate planning of the operation. Open surgical repair of the aortoiliac aneurysm with a Dacron bifurcated graft replacement was decided and reimplantation of all three right pelvic kidney arteries to the right limb of the graft was also performed. For renal preservation, the right pelvic kidney arteries were perfused with cold Ringer's lactate using a rapid infusion pump and coronary perfusion cannula. The patient's postoperative course was uneventful, and worsening of renal function was not observed. The perfusion of renal arteries with cold Ringer's solution was thought to be a simple and appropriate procedure for renal protection.

  2. Psychosexual adjustment following pelvic exenteration.

    PubMed

    Andersen, B L; Hacker, N F

    1983-03-01

    Fifteen pelvic exenteration patients from 2 institutions participated in semistructured interviews and objective assessment to examine postoperative psychologic, social, and sexual functioning. Analyses of variance indicated significant differences between the sexually active and nonactive patients and the patients with a neovagina and those with no vaginal capacity only in the area of sexual functioning, not in psychologic or social adjustment. Descriptive statistics for the entire group of patients provide a view of psychosocial adjustment for the average pelvic exenteration patient. Long after such patients are asymptomatic and clinically free of disease, they appear mildly distressed and depressed. However, these women report active and satisfactory levels of social and free-time activities. Sexual functioning continues as the area of greatest disruption for these patients and, as a group, they resemble severely sexually dysfunctional healthy women. This investigation provides a substantive look at the post-treatment life circumstances of these patients and offers a data base for future investigations.

  3. Pelvic floor reconstruction by modified rectus abdominis myoperitoneal (MRAM) flap after pelvic exenterations.

    PubMed

    Cibula, D; Zikan, M; Fischerova, D; Kocian, R; Germanova, A; Burgetova, A; Dusek, L; Fartáková, Z; Schneiderová, M; Nemejcová, K; Slama, J

    2017-03-01

    To describe the technique and report experiences with pelvic floor reconstruction by modified rectus abdominis myoperitoneal (MRAM) flap after extensive pelvic procedures. Surgical technique of MRAM harvest and transposition is carefully described. The patients in whom pelvic floor reconstruction with MRAM after either infralevator pelvic exenteration and/or extended lateral pelvic sidewall excision was carried out were enrolled into the study (MRAM group, n=16). Surgical data, post-operative morbidity, and disease status were retrospectively assessed. The results were compared with a historical cohort of patients, in whom an exenterative procedure without pelvic floor reconstruction was performed at the same institution (control group, n=24). Both groups were balanced in age, BMI, tumor types, and previous treatment. Substantially less patients from the MRAM group required reoperation within 60days of the surgery (25% vs. 50%) which was due to much lower rate of complications potentially related to empty pelvis syndrome (1 vs. 7 reoperations) (p=0.114). Late post-operative complication rate was substantially lower in the MRAM group (any grade: 79% vs. 44%; grade≥3: 37% vs. 6%) (p=0.041). The performance status 6months after the surgery was ≤1 in the majority of patients in MRAM (81%) while in only 38% of patients from the control group (p=0.027). There was one incisional hernia in MRAM group while three cases were reported in the controls. Pelvic floor reconstruction by MRAM in patients after pelvic exenterative procedures is associated with a substantial decrease in postoperative complications that are potentially related to empty pelvis syndrome. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Pelvic congestion syndrome and pelvic varicosities.

    PubMed

    Koo, Sonya; Fan, Chieh-Min

    2014-06-01

    Pelvic venous insufficiency (PVI), defined as retrograde flow in the gonadal and internal iliac veins, is the underlying cause of pelvic congestion syndrome (PCS), a common cause of disabling chronic pelvic pain in women of child-bearing age. PCS is a chronic pain syndrome characterized by positional pelvic pain that is worse in the upright position and is associated with pelvic and vulvar varicosities as well as symptoms of dyspareunia and postcoital pain. Through collaterals to the lower extremity venous system, PVI may also contribute to varicose vein formation and recurrence in the lower extremities. Endovascular embolization of the ovarian and internal iliac veins has become the treatment of choice for PVI and PCS. This article reviews the pelvic retroperitoneal venous anatomy, pathophysiology of PCS, treatment options and techniques, and clinical outcomes of embolotherapy for PCS.

  5. Pelvic Fractures in Children Results from the German Pelvic Trauma Registry

    PubMed Central

    Zwingmann, Jörn; Aghayev, Emin; Südkamp, Norbert P.; Neumann, Mirjam; Bode, Gerrit; Stuby, Fabian; Schmal, Hagen

    2015-01-01

    Abstract As pelvic fractures in children and adolescents are very rare, the surgical management is not well delineated nor are the postoperative complications. The aim of this study using the prospective data from German Pelvic Trauma Registry study was to evaluate the various treatment approaches compared to adults and delineated the differences in postoperative complications after pelvic injuries. Using the prospective pelvic trauma registry established by the German Society of Traumatology and the German Section of the Arbeitsgemeinschaft für Osteosynthesefragen (AO), International in 1991, patients with pelvic fractures over a 12-year time frame submitted by any 1 of the 23 member level I trauma centers were reviewed. We identified a total of 13,525 patients including pelvic fractures in 13,317 adults and 208 children aged ≤14 years and compared these 2 groups. The 2 groups’ Injury Severitiy Score (ISS) did not differ statistically. Lethality in the pediatric group was 6.3%, not statistically different from the adults’ 4.6%. In all, 18.3% of the pediatric pelvic fractures were treated surgically as compared to 22.7% in the adult group. No child suffered any thrombosis/embolism, acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), multiorgan failure (MOF), or neurologic deficit, nor was any septic MOF detected. The differences between adults and children were statistically significant in that the children suffered less frequently from thrombosis/embolism (P = 0.041) and ARDS and MOF (P = 0.006). This prospective multicenter study addressing patients with pelvic fractures reveals that the risk for a thrombosis/embolism, ARDS, and MOF is significant lower in pediatric patients than in adults. No statistical differences could be found in the ratios of operative therapy of the pelvic fractures in children compared to adults. PMID:26705223

  6. The “Pelvic Harness”: a skeletonized mesh implant for safe pelvic floor reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Natalia, Sumerova; Menahem, Neuman; Haim, Krissi; Dmitri, Pushkar

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objectives To evaluate the feasibility, safety and surgical results of skeletonized mesh implants to form a pelvic harness for pelvic floor reconstruction surgery. Study design Patients with advanced pelvic floor prolapse were enrolled to this study. Study model was a kit mesh, reduced to 75% of the original surface area by cutting out mesh material from the central mesh body. Patients were evaluated at the end of the 1st and 6th post-operative months and interviewed at the study conclusion. Results Ninety-five women with advanced pelvic floor prolapse had this implant. Mean follow-up duration was 9 months (6-12 months). The POP-Q point’s measurements showed marked and statistically significant improvements. Bladder over-activity symptoms, fecal incontinence, pelvic pain and constipation rates were all reduced as well. No adverse effects related to the dissection or mesh implantation were marked. The first and sixth post-operative month follow-up records as well as the study conclusion interview findings were satisfactory in terms of subjective and objective cure and adverse effects occurrence. Conclusion This study data proposes that skeletonizing meshes might be safely and successfully implanted for potentially improved pelvic floor reconstruction. PMID:27286114

  7. Pelvic Support Problems

    MedlinePlus

    The pelvic floor is a group of muscles and other tissues that form a sling or hammock across the pelvis. ... place so that they can work properly. The pelvic floor can become weak or be injured. The main ...

  8. Pelvic Organ Prolapse

    MedlinePlus

    ... and layers of connective tissue, which are called fascia, become weakened, stretched, or are torn the pelvic ... delivery) can cause injury to the muscles or fascia of the pelvic floor. The increased pressure of ...

  9. Chronic Pelvic Pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... to treat chronic pelvic pain. They include medications, physical therapy, nutritional therapy, and surgery: Lifestyle changes—Good posture ... are helpful in relieving pelvic pain, especially dysmenorrhea . Physical therapy—Acupuncture, acupressure, and nerve stimulation therapies may be ...

  10. Pelvic Inflammatory Disease (PID)

    MedlinePlus

    Pelvic Inflammatory Disease (PID) - CDC Fact Sheet Untreated sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) can cause pelvic inflammatory disease (PID), a ... tubal blockage; •• Ectopic pregnancy (pregnancy outside the womb); •• Infertility (inability to get pregnant); •• Long-term pelvic/abdominal ...

  11. Evaluation of embolization for periuterine varices involving chronic pelvic pain secondary to pelvic congestion syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Siqueira, Flavio Meirelles; Monsignore, Lucas Moretti; Rosa-e-Silva, Julio Cesar; Poli-Neto, Omero Benedicto; de Castro-Afonso, Luis Henrique; Nakiri, Guilherme Seizem; Muglia, Valdair Francisco; Abud, Daniel Giansante

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the clinical response and success rate after periuterine varices embolization in patients with chronic pelvic pain secondary to pelvic congestion syndrome and to report the safety of endovascular treatment and its rate of complications. METHODS: Retrospective cohort of patients undergoing endovascular treatment of pelvic congestion syndrome in our department from January 2012 to November 2015. Data were analyzed based on patient background, imaging findings, embolized veins, rate of complications, and clinical response as indicated by the visual analog pain scale. RESULTS: We performed periuterine varices embolization in 22 patients during the study, four of which required a second embolization. Seventeen patients reported a reduction in pelvic pain after the first embolization and three patients reported a reduction in pelvic pain after the second embolization. Minor complications were observed in our patients, such as postural hypotension, postoperative pain, and venous perforation during the procedure, without clinical repercussion. CONCLUSION: Periuterine varices embolization in patients with chronic pelvic pain secondary to pelvic congestion syndrome appears to be an effective and safe technique. PMID:28076514

  12. Combination of a fillet flap, free tissue transfer, and autologous tissue grafts in pelvic reconstruction following retroperitoneal sarcoma: a case report.

    PubMed

    Saksena, Anshuman; Aho, Johnathon; Winocour, Sebastian; Maricevich, Renata; Senchenkov, Alex; Rose, Peter; Leibovich, Bradley; Zietlow, Scott; Saint-Cyr, Michel

    2015-05-01

    The resection of large pelvic tumors is challenging due to their infiltrative nature into multiple structures and organ systems. In this report, we describe the use of multiple vascularized and nonvascularized spare parts to reconstruct a pelvic defect in a patient with a uniquely large pelvic sarcoma invading the spinal canal. A 39-year-old Caucasian female who presented with a large retroperitoneal sarcoma where the tumor encased the left ureter, kidney, colon, and external iliac vessels and invaded the L3-S1 vertebral bodies. An extensive hemipelvectomy and reconstruction was performed over two days. A free thigh and leg fillet flap together with ipsilateral fibula flap, based on the superficial femoral artery and venae comitantes, was used for spinal reinforcement as well as abdominal and pelvic wall reconstruction. The postoperative course was uneventful without complications, no flap compromise or wound healing problems. After a follow-up period of 4 months, the patient had no complications and returned to activities of daily living with mild limitations. The success of this flap procedure shows the practicality and usefulness of using the full spectrum of tissue transfer for the purposes of a large pelvic reconstruction.

  13. [Complex pelvic trauma caused by an accidental side split].

    PubMed

    Heinermann, J D B; Hessmann, M H; Rommens, P M

    2005-04-01

    Complex pelvic ring fractures are defined as injuries of the pelvic ring in association with lesions of the pelvic organs or the pelvic soft tissues. These injuries are typically caused by high-energy accidents. In contrast to the typical mechanism of injury a case is described in which a low energy trauma led to a complex pelvic ring trauma. An obese woman suffered an open-book injury of the pelvis with severe open urogenital soft-tissue damage by accidentally doing forced splits. Primary stabilization of the pelvic ring with external fixation and secondary internal fixation with a double-plate osteosynthesis of the symphysis led to a good clinical outcome concerning the osseous lesion. The urogenital injuries with rupture of the bladder, the urethra and the vagina led despite immediate urological management to an incontinence, which finally required definitive urine drainage via an ileum conduit.

  14. Preperitoneal pelvic packing: Technique and outcomes.

    PubMed

    Filiberto, Dina M; Fox, Adam D

    2016-09-01

    Significant pelvic ring fractures are usually secondary to high-energy trauma, and when associated with other life-threatening injuries and hemodynamic instability, result in high mortality rates ranging from 40 to 60%. The major cause of death during the first 24 h after pelvic trauma is attributed to acute blood loss, with later mortality secondary to multisystem organ failure. In a majority of patients, the source of pelvic bleeding is from disruption of the presacral venous plexus and bony fracture sites, while arterial injury is present in only 10-15%. The optimal management algorithm for hemodynamically unstable patients with pelvic fractures remains controversial. The principles of care center on resuscitation, external stabilization of the pelvis, and hemorrhage control with angiography and embolization (AE) and/or preperitoneal pelvic packing (PPP). AE is effective in controlling arterial bleeding and its role in the management of hemodynamically unstable patients with pelvic fractures is supported by the EAST guidelines. However, since most patients suffer from venous bleeding, PPP can be an alternate life saving technique to control hemorrhage, especially if AE is not immediately available. Copyright © 2016 IJS Publishing Group Ltd. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. [Recommendations for Releasing the Pelvic Binder After a Non-Invasive Pelvic Stabilisation Procedure Under Emergency Room Conditions].

    PubMed

    Schweigkofler, U; Wohlrath, B; Paffrath, T; Flohé, S; Wincheringer, D; Hoffmann, R; Trentzsch, H

    2016-10-01

    Severe brain, thoracic and intrapelvic injuries, as well as heavy bleeding, are the main causes of death in patients with major trauma. Unstable pelvic ring fractures can cause this bleeding and the so-called "C problem". This is usually due to haemorrhagic shock caused by the loss of large volumes of blood from the presacral venous plexus, iliac vessels and the fracture surfaces. Many clinical studies have shown that, in the preclinical setting, unstable pelvic ring injuries are often underestimated. The application of a non-invasive external pelvic ring stabilisation (pelvic binder) is therefore recommended if a pelvic fracture is possible. Several circumferential pelvic binders have been developed and their prehospital use is increasing. Clinical and biomechanical studies have demonstrated that there is a favourable haemodynamic effect in unstable fractures, due to rapid closure of the pelvic ring. It is unclear whether the pelvic binder can be safely removed in a presumably haemodynamically stable patient. A correctly placed pelvic binder leads to anatomical closure of the pelvic ring. Therefore unstable pelvic ring fractures may be clinically and radiologically overlooked. This is a particular problem in unconscious patients. Furthermore, the real severity of the injury may then be underestimated in the diagnostic evaluation. Unconsidered opening of the pelvic binder can thus provoke renewed deterioration of the circulatory situation, especially if the injury was adequately treated by the binder and the C problem was controlled. The aim of this article is to describe procedures for handling pelvic binders, particularly as to how to deal with an already applied pelvic binder and how to "clear the pelvic region" while reducing the risk of haemodynamic instability. A detailed analysis of the literature and a Delphi-like discussion among several experts were performed. The following points were raised: 1) Assessment of the clinical situation, including trauma

  16. Haemodynamically Unstable Pelvic Fractures

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-01-01

    of patients with unstable pelvic fractures will be found to have additional musculoskeletal injuries.25,54,80 Injury severity score (ISS) is...create a tamponade effect, since the retro- peritoneum is disrupted.47,53 The ‘‘splinting’’ of pathological pelvic motion is more likely to be the...pelvic CT angiography performedwith 64-detector row CT. Radiology 2008;246:410–9. 5. Balogh Z, Caldwell E, Heetveld M, et al. Institutional practice

  17. Myofascial pelvic pain.

    PubMed

    Spitznagle, Theresa Monaco; Robinson, Caitlin McCurdy

    2014-09-01

    Individuals with pelvic pain commonly present with complaints of pain located anywhere below the umbilicus radiating to the top of their thighs or genital region. The somatovisceral convergence that occurs within the pelvic region exemplifies why examination of not only the organs but also the muscles, connective tissues (fascia), and neurologic input to the region should be performed for women with pelvic pain. The susceptibility of the pelvic floor musculature to the development of myofascial pain has been attributed to unique functional demands of this muscle. Conservative interventions should be considered to address the impairments found on physical examination.

  18. Pelvic Organ Prolapse--Surgery

    MedlinePlus

    ... That Answers to FAQs Learn the Terms Glossary Pelvic Floor Dialogues Printable PDFs on PFDs Patient Fact Sheets ... treatments have failed. The goal of all reconstructive pelvic floor procedures is to restore normal pelvic floor anatomy ...

  19. Chronic Pelvic Pain in Women

    MedlinePlus

    ... hernia — can lead to recurring pelvic pain. Chronic pelvic inflammatory disease. This can occur if a long-term infection, often sexually transmitted, causes scarring that involves your pelvic organs. Ovarian remnant. After surgical removal of the ...

  20. Pelvic Congestion Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Durham, Janette D.; Machan, Lindsay

    2013-01-01

    Patients with pelvic congestion syndrome present with otherwise unexplained chronic pelvic pain that has been present for greater than 6 months, and anatomic findings that include pelvic venous insufficiency and pelvic varicosities. It remains an underdiagnosed explanation for pelvic pain in young, premenopausal, usually multiparous females. Symptoms include noncyclical, positional lower back, pelvic and upper thigh pain, dyspareunia, and prolonged postcoital discomfort. Symptoms worsen throughout the day and are exacerbated by activity or prolonged standing. Examination may reveal ovarian tenderness and unusual varicosities—vulvoperineal, posterior thigh, and gluteal. Diagnosis is suspected by clinical history and imaging that demonstrates pelvic varicosities. Venography is usually necessary to confirm ovarian vein reflux, although transvaginal ultrasound may be useful in documenting this finding. Endovascular therapy has been validated by several large patient series with long-term follow-up using standardized pain assessment surveys. Embolization has been shown to be significantly more effective than surgical therapy in improving symptoms in patients who fail hormonal therapy. Although there has been variation in approaches between investigators, the goal is elimination of ovarian vein reflux with or without direct sclerosis of enlarged pelvic varicosities. Symptom reduction is seen in 70 to 90% of the treated females despite technical variation. PMID:24436564

  1. Pelvic Inflammatory Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Weström, L., Joesoef, R., Reynolds, G., Hagdu, A., Thompson, S.E. (1992). Pelvic inflammatory disease and fertility. A ... Weström, L., Joesoef, R., Reynolds, G., Hagdu, A., Thompson, S.E. (1992). Pelvic inflammatory disease and fertility. A ...

  2. Reduction of irradiated small bowel volume with Trendelenburg position in gynecologic pelvic radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Dirier, A; Adli, M; Andic, F; Cifci, S; Ors, Y; Kuzhan, A

    2010-04-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the effect of Trendelenburg position in comparison to prone position on small bowel volume and treatment dose in gynecologic pelvic external beam radiotherapy using three-dimensional conformal treatment plans. Eight patients with gynecologic cancers, treated with definitive or postoperative pelvic radiotherapy were investigated. Pelvic computerized tomography (CT) scans for treatment planning were performed in prone and 25 degree Trendelenburg positions for each patient. The dose-volume histograms of small bowel within the treatment fields were obtained and compared for both positions. The clinical target volume (CTV) and the planning target volume (PTV) were also defined and evaluated in the subjects. Treatment dose was 5040 cGy to PTV with 180 cGy daily fraction doses in both techniques for all patients. The average irradiated small bowel volume was 726 cc for prone position and 458 cc for the Trendelenburg position. The average irradiated small bowel volume reduction in the Trendelenburg position was 38.0% (95% CI 19.5 +/- 38%) compared with the prone position. The average small bowel percent dose was 25.4% (1280 cGy) for Trendelenburg position and 39.9% (2010 cGy) for prone position. PTV doses were similar in both techniques. The results of this dosimetric study suggest that gynecologic pelvic radiotherapy in the Trendelenburg position decreases the volume of irradiated small bowel compared to prone position and may decrease treatment related small bowel morbidity. Clinical benefit of this position should be evaluated in further clinical studies.

  3. Correction of Pelvic Tilt and Pelvic Rotation in Cup Measurement after THA - An Experimental Study.

    PubMed

    Schwarz, Timo Julian; Weber, Markus; Dornia, Christian; Worlicek, Michael; Renkawitz, Tobias; Grifka, Joachim; Craiovan, Benjamin

    2017-09-01

    Purpose Accurate assessment of cup orientation on postoperative pelvic radiographs is essential for evaluating outcome after THA. Here, we present a novel method for correcting measurement inaccuracies due to pelvic tilt and rotation. Method In an experimental setting, a cup was implanted into a dummy pelvis, and its final position was verified via CT. To show the effect of pelvic tilt and rotation on cup position, the dummy was fixed to a rack to achieve a tilt between + 15° anterior and -15° posterior and 0° to 20° rotation to the contralateral side. According to Murray's definitions of anteversion and inclination, we created a novel corrective procedure to measure cup position in the pelvic reference frame (anterior pelvic plane) to compensate measurement errors due to pelvic tilt and rotation. Results The cup anteversion measured on CT was 23.3°; on AP pelvic radiographs, however, variations in pelvic tilt (± 15°) resulted in anteversion angles between 11.0° and 36.2° (mean error 8.3°± 3.9°). The cup inclination was 34.1° on CT and ranged between 31.0° and 38.7° (m. e. 2.3°± 1.5°) on radiographs. Pelvic rotation between 0° and 20° showed high variation in radiographic anteversion (21.2°-31.2°, m. e. 6.0°± 3.1°) and inclination (34.1°-27.2°, m. e. 3.4°± 2.5°). Our novel correction algorithm for pelvic tilt reduced the mean error in anteversion measurements to 0.6°± 0.2° and in inclination measurements to 0.7° (SD± 0.2). Similarly, the mean error due to pelvic rotation was reduced to 0.4°± 0.4° for anteversion and to 1.3°± 0.8 for inclination. Conclusion Pelvic tilt and pelvic rotation may lead to misinterpretation of cup position on anteroposterior pelvic radiographs. Mathematical correction concepts have the potential to significantly reduce these errors, and could be implemented in future radiological software tools. Key Points  · Pelvic tilt and rotation influence cup orientation

  4. Physical activity and the pelvic floor.

    PubMed

    Nygaard, Ingrid E; Shaw, Janet M

    2016-02-01

    women. However, future research is needed to fill the many gaps in our knowledge. Prospective studies are needed in all populations, including potentially vulnerable women, such as those with high genetic risk, levator ani muscle injury, or asymptomatic pelvic organ prolapse, and on women during potentially vulnerable life periods, such as the early postpartum or postoperative periods.

  5. A postoperative scoring system for distant recurrence in node-positive cervical cancer patients after radical hysterectomy and pelvic lymph node dissection with para-aortic lymph node sampling or dissection.

    PubMed

    Lee, Young-Jae; Kim, Dae-Yeon; Lee, Shin-Wha; Park, Jeong-Yeol; Suh, Dae-Shik; Kim, Jong-Hyeok; Kim, Yong-Man; Kim, Young-Tak; Nam, Joo-Hyun

    2017-03-01

    To identify risk factors for distant recurrence in node-positive cervical cancer patients who underwent radical hysterectomy and pelvic lymph node dissection (PLND) with para-aortic lymph node sampling (PALNS) or para-aortic lymph node dissection (PALND). A total of 299 patients in whom lymph node metastasis was confirmed after radical surgery at Asan Medical Center for stage IA2 to IIB cervical cancer from February 2001 to December 2012 were identified. In all, 72 (24.1%) patients underwent PLND only and 227 (75.9%) underwent PLND with PALNS or PALND. Four patients were excluded due to diagnosed with small cell carcinoma. The clinicopathologic data of 223 patients were retrospectively analyzed. Distant recurrence was defined as recurrence at a site over the pelvic radiation field. Among all 223 study patients, the mean number of positive lymph nodes was 4.46. There were 54 (24.2%) patients with distant metastasis. Multivariate analyses using the Cox proportional hazards model showed that histologic types (HR=3.031, P≤0.001 for adenocarcinoma, HR=2.302, P=0.066 for adenosquamous carcinoma), number of positive lymph nodes (HR=1.077, P≤0.001), and surgical stage (HR=1.264, P=0.022) were independent risk factors for distant recurrence of cervical cancer. A scoring system for the prediction of distant recurrence was generated by incorporating these factors and showed good discrimination and calibration (concordance index of 0.753). In an internal validation set, this scoring system showed good discrimination with a C-statistics of 0.777. According to the Hosmer-Lemeshow test, the chi-square was 0.650 and the P-value was 0.723. We have developed a robust scoring system that can predict the risk of distant recurrence in node-positive cervical cancer patients after radical operation. This scoring system was used to identify a group of patients who required systemic control of distant micrometastasis. This group of patients is an appropriate target for consolidation

  6. [Postoperative hypothyroidism].

    PubMed

    Olifirova, O S; Trynov, N N

    2015-01-01

    There is a number of factors such as the thyroidectomy and limiting subtotal thyroid resection against the background of euthyroidism and initial hypothyroidism (in any extent of operation) which leads to the prediction of early postoperative hypothyroidism origin during 10 days of the postoperative peri- od. The early postoperative hypothyroidism is accompanied by activation processes of lipid peroxide oxidation and at the same time by reduction of antioxidant protection.

  7. Pelvic fracture pattern predicts the need for hemorrhage control intervention -- results of a AAST multi-institutional study.

    PubMed

    Costantini, Todd W; Coimbra, Raul; Holcomb, John B; Podbielski, Jeanette M; Catalano, Richard; Blackburn, Allie; Scalea, Thomas M; Stein, Deborah M; Williams, Lashonda; Conflitti, Joseph; Keeney, Scott; Hoey, Christy; Zhou, Tianhua; Sperry, Jason; Skiada, Dimitra; Inaba, Kenji; Williams, Brian H; Minei, Joseph P; Privette, Alicia; Mackersie, Robert C; Robinson, Brenton R; Moore, Forrest O

    2017-03-23

    Early identification of patients with pelvic fractures at risk for severe bleeding requiring intervention is critical. We performed a multi-institutional study to test our hypothesis that pelvic fracture patterns predict the need for a pelvic hemorrhage control intervention. This prospective, observational multi-center study enrolled patients with pelvic fracture due to blunt trauma. Inclusion criteria included shock on admission (SBP<90 or HR>120 and base deficit > 5, and the ability to review pelvic imaging. Demographic data, open pelvic fracture, blood transfusion, pelvic hemorrhage control intervention (angioembolization, external fixator, pelvic packing and/or REBOA), and mortality were recorded. Pelvic fracture pattern was classified according to Young-Burgess in a blinded fashion. Predictors of pelvic hemorrhage control intervention and mortality were analyzed by univariate and multivariate regression analysis. A total of 163 patients presenting in shock were enrolled from eleven Level-1 trauma centers. The most common pelvic fracture pattern was Lateral Compression (LC) I, followed by LC II, and Vertical Shear. Of the 12 patients with an Anterior-Posterior Compression (APC) III fracture, 10 (83%) required a pelvic hemorrhage control intervention. Factors associated with the need for pelvic fracture hemorrhage control intervention on univariate analysis included vertical shear pelvic fracture pattern, increasing age, and transfusion of blood products. APC III fracture patterns and open pelvic fracture predicted the need for pelvic hemorrhage control intervention on multivariate analysis. Overall in-hospital mortality for patients admitted in shock with pelvic fracture was 30% and did not differ based on pelvic fracture pattern on multivariate analysis. Blunt trauma patients admitted in shock with APC III fracture patterns or patients with open pelvic fracture are at greatest risk of bleeding requiring pelvic hemorrhage control intervention. Prognostic Study

  8. Pelvic fracture pattern predicts the need for hemorrhage control intervention-Results of an AAST multi-institutional study.

    PubMed

    Costantini, Todd W; Coimbra, Raul; Holcomb, John B; Podbielski, Jeanette M; Catalano, Richard D; Blackburn, Allie; Scalea, Thomas M; Stein, Deborah M; Williams, Lashonda; Conflitti, Joseph; Keeney, Scott; Hoey, Christy; Zhou, Tianhua; Sperry, Jason; Skiada, Dimitra; Inaba, Kenji; Williams, Brian H; Minei, Joseph P; Privette, Alicia; Mackersie, Robert C; Robinson, Brenton R; Moore, Forrest O

    2017-06-01

    Early identification of patients with pelvic fractures at risk of severe bleeding requiring intervention is critical. We performed a multi-institutional study to test our hypothesis that pelvic fracture patterns predict the need for a pelvic hemorrhage control intervention. This prospective, observational, multicenter study enrolled patients with pelvic fracture due to blunt trauma. Inclusion criteria included shock on admission (systolic blood pressure <90 mm Hg or heart rate >120 beats/min and base deficit >5, and the ability to review pelvic imaging). Demographic data, open pelvic fracture, blood transfusion, pelvic hemorrhage control intervention (angioembolization, external fixator, pelvic packing, and/or REBOA [resuscitative balloon occlusion of the aorta]), and mortality were recorded. Pelvic fracture pattern was classified according to Young-Burgess in a blinded fashion. Predictors of pelvic hemorrhage control intervention and mortality were analyzed by univariate and multivariate regression analyses. A total of 163 patients presenting in shock were enrolled from 11 Level I trauma centers. The most common pelvic fracture pattern was lateral compression I, followed by lateral compression I, and vertical shear. Of the 12 patients with an anterior-posterior compression III fracture, 10 (83%) required a pelvic hemorrhage control intervention. Factors associated with the need for pelvic fracture hemorrhage control intervention on univariate analysis included vertical shear pelvic fracture pattern, increasing age, and transfusion of blood products. Anterior-posterior compression III fracture patterns and open pelvic fracture predicted the need for pelvic hemorrhage control intervention on multivariate analysis. Overall in-hospital mortality for patients admitted in shock with pelvic fracture was 30% and did not differ based on pelvic fracture pattern on multivariate analysis. Blunt trauma patients admitted in shock with anterior-posterior compression III fracture

  9. Pouchitis Associated With Pelvic Radiation for Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kulkarni, Geeta; Liu, Xiuli

    2016-01-01

    Radiation therapy is a viable option in managing potentially life-threatening malignancies including prostate cancer. It is known that pelvic radiation can result in injury of the distal large bowel with the development of radiation proctitis. Despite reports from retrospective studies, there is a lack of direct endoscopic and histologic evidence of external pelvic radiation injury to the ileal pouch-anal anastomosis. We present a case of a 68-year-old male with pouchitis resulting from pelvic radiation for prostate cancer. PMID:27807581

  10. [Pelvic irradiation in prostate cancer: what place for what volumes?].

    PubMed

    Chapet, O; Enachescu, C; Lorchel, F

    2013-10-01

    External beam radiotherapy alone is a standard treatment for prostate cancer. According to clinical, histological and biological characteristics of the tumour, lymph node irradiation can be done in combination with irradiation of the prostate. The completion of pelvic irradiation remains controversial and may cause complications by increasing volumes of irradiated healthy tissues. The accuracy of the delineation of lymph node becomes an important issue. This article proposes to take on the characteristics of the pelvic lymph node drainage of the prostate, to review the literature on pelvic irradiation and the definition of volumes to be irradiated.

  11. Myofascial pelvic pain.

    PubMed

    Kotarinos, Rhonda

    2012-10-01

    Myofascial pelvic pain is fraught with many unknowns. Is it the organs of the pelvis, is it the muscles of the pelvis, or is the origin of the pelvic pain from an extrapelvic muscle? Is there a single source or multiple? In this state of confusion what is the best way to manage the many symptoms that can be associated with myofascial pelvic pain. This article reviews current studies that attempt to answer some of these questions. More questions seem to develop as each study presents its findings.

  12. Postoperative Delirium

    PubMed Central

    Marcantonio, Edward R.

    2013-01-01

    Delirium (acute confusion) complicates 15% to 50% of major operations in older adults and is associated with other major postoperative complications, prolonged length of stay, poor functional recovery, institutionalization, dementia, and death. Importantly, delirium may be predictable and preventable through proactive intervention. Yet clinicians fail to recognize and address postoperative delirium in up to 80% of cases. Using the case of Ms R, a 76-year-old woman who developed delirium first after colectomy with complications and again after routine surgery, the diagnosis, prevention, and treatment of delirium in the postoperative setting is reviewed. The risk of postoperative delirium can be quantified by the sum of predisposing and precipitating factors. Successful strategies for prevention and treatment of delirium include proactive multifactorial intervention targeted to reversible risk factors, limiting use of sedating medications (especially benzodiazepines), effective management of postoperative pain, and, perhaps, judicious use of antipsychotics. PMID:22669559

  13. PHYSICAL ACTIVITY AND THE PELVIC FLOOR

    PubMed Central

    Nygaard, Ingrid E.; Shaw, Janet M.

    2015-01-01

    , future research is needed to fill the many gaps in our knowledge. Prospective studies are needed in all populations, including potentially vulnerable women, such as those with high genetic risk, levator ani muscle injury, or asymptomatic pelvic organ prolapse, and on women during potentially vulnerable life periods, such as the early postpartum or postoperative periods. PMID:26348380

  14. Pelvic Inflammatory Disease

    MedlinePlus

    Pelvic inflammatory disease (PID) is an infection and inflammation of the uterus, ovaries, and other female reproductive organs. It causes scarring ... United States. Gonorrhea and chlamydia, two sexually transmitted diseases, are the most common causes of PID. Other ...

  15. Pelvic Inflammatory Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Pelvic Inflammatory Disease (PID) STDs & Infertility STDs & Pregnancy Syphilis Trichomoniasis Other STDs See Also ... the upper genital tract. PID can lead to infertility and permanent damage of a woman’s reproductive organs. ...

  16. Pelvic laparoscopy - slideshow

    MedlinePlus

    ... ency/presentations/100131.htm Pelvic laparoscopy - series—Normal anatomy To use the sharing features on this page, ... Bethesda, MD 20894 U.S. Department of Health and Human Services National Institutes of Health Page last updated: ...

  17. Chronic pelvic floor dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Hartmann, Dee; Sarton, Julie

    2014-10-01

    The successful treatment of women with vestibulodynia and its associated chronic pelvic floor dysfunctions requires interventions that address a broad field of possible pain contributors. Pelvic floor muscle hypertonicity was implicated in the mid-1990s as a trigger of major chronic vulvar pain. Painful bladder syndrome, irritable bowel syndrome, fibromyalgia, and temporomandibular jaw disorder are known common comorbidities that can cause a host of associated muscular, visceral, bony, and fascial dysfunctions. It appears that normalizing all of those disorders plays a pivotal role in reducing complaints of chronic vulvar pain and sexual dysfunction. Though the studies have yet to prove a specific protocol, physical therapists trained in pelvic dysfunction are reporting success with restoring tissue normalcy and reducing vulvar and sexual pain. A review of pelvic anatomy and common findings are presented along with suggested physical therapy management. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Case report: pelvic actinomycosis.

    PubMed

    Maxová, K; Menzlová, E; Kolařík, D; Dundr, P; Halaška, M

    2012-01-01

    A case of pelvic actinomycosis is presented. The patient is 42-year-old female with a 5 weeks history of pelvic pain. An intrauterine device (IUD) was taken out 3 weeks ago. There is a lump length 9 cm between rectus muscles. Ultrasound, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and histology are used to make the diagnosis. Actinomycosis can mimic the tumour disease. The definitive diagnosis requires positive anaerobic culture or histological identification of actinomyces granulas. A long lasting antibiotic therapy is performed.

  19. [Pelvic lymph nodes imaging].

    PubMed

    Roy, C

    2013-10-01

    Detecting metastatic pelvic lymph nodes is essential during the survey of a pelvic carcinoma. In routine clinical practice, CT scan is commonly used. However, its accuracy is quite low for small size lymph nodes. Diffusion-weighted imaging could be in the near future an efficient modality. Copyright © 2013 Société française de radiothérapie oncologique (SFRO). Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  20. Pelvic Organ Prolapse.

    PubMed

    Iglesia, Cheryl B; Smithling, Katelyn R

    2017-08-01

    Pelvic organ prolapse is the descent of one or more of the anterior vaginal wall, posterior vaginal wall, the uterus (cervix), or the apex of the vagina (vaginal vault or cuff scar after hysterectomy). Prevalence increases with age. The cause of prolapse is multifactorial but is primarily associated with pregnancy and vaginal delivery, which lead to direct pelvic floor muscle and connective tissue injury. Hysterectomy, pelvic surgery, and conditions associated with sustained episodes of increased intra-abdominal pressure, including obesity, chronic cough, constipation, and repeated heavy lifting, also contribute to prolapse. Most patients with pelvic organ prolapse are asymptomatic. Symptoms become more bothersome as the bulge protrudes past the vaginal opening. Initial evaluation includes a history and systematic pelvic examination including assessment for urinary incontinence, bladder outlet obstruction, and fecal incontinence. Treatment options include observation, vaginal pessaries, and surgery. Most women can be successfully fit with a vaginal pessary. Available surgical options are reconstructive pelvic surgery with or without mesh augmentation and obliterative surgery.

  1. Pelvic organ prolapse.

    PubMed

    Jelovsek, J Eric; Maher, Christopher; Barber, Matthew D

    2007-03-24

    Pelvic organ prolapse is downward descent of female pelvic organs, including the bladder, uterus or post-hysterectomy vaginal cuff, and the small or large bowel, resulting in protrusion of the vagina, uterus, or both. Prolapse development is multifactorial, with vaginal child birth, advancing age, and increasing body-mass index as the most consistent risk factors. Vaginal delivery, hysterectomy, chronic straining, normal ageing, and abnormalities of connective tissue or connective-tissue repair predispose some women to disruption, stretching, or dysfunction of the levator ani complex, connective-tissue attachments of the vagina, or both, resulting in prolapse. Patients generally present with several complaints, including bladder, bowel, and pelvic symptoms; however, with the exception of vaginal bulging, none is specific to prolapse. Women with symptoms suggestive of prolapse should undergo a pelvic examination and medical history check. Radiographic assessment is usually unnecessary. Many women with pelvic organ prolapse are asymptomatic and do not need treatment. When prolapse is symptomatic, options include observation, pessary use, and surgery. Surgical strategies for prolapse can be categorised broadly by reconstructive and obliterative techniques. Reconstructive procedures can be done by either an abdominal or vaginal approach. Although no effective prevention strategy for prolapse has been identified, considerations include weight loss, reduction of heavy lifting, treatment of constipation, modification or reduction of obstetric risk factors, and pelvic-floor physical therapy.

  2. [Pelvic floor and pregnancy].

    PubMed

    Fritel, X

    2010-05-01

    Congenital factor, obesity, aging, pregnancy and childbirth are the main risk factors for female pelvic floor disorders (urinary incontinence, anal incontinence, pelvic organ prolapse, dyspareunia). Vaginal delivery may cause injury to the pudendal nerve, the anal sphincter, or the anal sphincter. However the link between these injuries and pelvic floor symptoms is not always determined and we still ignore what might be the ways of prevention. Of the many obstetrical methods proposed to prevent postpartum symptoms, episiotomy, delivery in vertical position, delayed pushing, perineal massage, warm pack, pelvic floor rehabilitation, results are disappointing or limited. Caesarean section is followed by less postnatal urinary incontinence than vaginal childbirth. However this difference tends to disappear with time and following childbirth. Limit the number of instrumental extractions and prefer the vacuum to forceps could reduce pelvic floor disorders after childbirth. Ultrasound examination of the anal sphincter after a second-degree perineal tear is useful to detect and repair infra-clinic anal sphincter lesions. Scientific data is insufficient to justify an elective cesarean section in order to avoid pelvic floor symptoms in a woman without previous disorders.

  3. Anorectal and Pelvic Pain.

    PubMed

    Bharucha, Adil E; Lee, Tae Hee

    2016-10-01

    Although pelvic pain is a symptom of several structural anorectal and pelvic disorders (eg, anal fissure, endometriosis, and pelvic inflammatory disease), this comprehensive review will focus on the 3 most common nonstructural, or functional, disorders associated with pelvic pain: functional anorectal pain (ie, levator ani syndrome, unspecified anorectal pain, and proctalgia fugax), interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome, and chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome. The first 2 conditions occur in both sexes, while the latter occurs only in men. They are defined by symptoms, supplemented with levator tenderness (levator ani syndrome) and bladder mucosal inflammation (interstitial cystitis). Although distinct, these conditions share several similarities, including associations with dysfunctional voiding or defecation, comorbid conditions (eg, fibromyalgia, depression), impaired quality of life, and increased health care utilization. Several factors, including pelvic floor muscle tension, peripheral inflammation, peripheral and central sensitization, and psychosocial factors, have been implicated in the pathogenesis. The management is tailored to symptoms, is partly supported by clinical trials, and includes multidisciplinary approaches such as lifestyle modifications and pharmacological, behavioral, and physical therapy. Opioids should be avoided, and surgical treatment has a limited role, primarily in refractory interstitial cystitis. Copyright © 2016 Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Anorectal and Pelvic Pain

    PubMed Central

    Bharucha, Adil E.; Lee, Tae Hee

    2016-01-01

    Although pelvic pain is a symptom of several structural anorectal and pelvic disorders (eg, anal fissure, endometriosis, and pelvic inflammatory disease), this comprehensive review will focus on the three most common nonstructural, or functional, disorders associated with pelvic pain: functional anorectal pain (ie, levator ani syndrome, unspecified anorectal pain, and proctalgia fugax), interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome, and chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome. The first two conditions occur in both sexes, while the latter occurs only in men. They are defined by symptoms, supplemented with levator tenderness (levator ani syndrome) and bladder mucosal inflammation (interstitial cystitis). Although distinct, these conditions share several similarities, including associations with dysfunctional voiding or defecation, comorbid conditions (eg, fibromyalgia, depression), impaired quality of life, and increased health care utilization. Several factors, including pelvic floor muscle tension, peripheral inflammation, peripheral and central sensitization, and psychosocial factors, have been implicated in the pathogenesis. The management is tailored to symptoms, is partly supported by clinical trials, and includes multidisciplinary approaches such as lifestyle modifications and pharmacologic, behavioral, and physical therapy. Opioids should not be avoided, and surgery has a limited role, primarily in refractory interstitial cystitis. PMID:27712641

  5. Pelvic Organ Prolapse: New Concepts in Pelvic Floor Anatomy.

    PubMed

    Maldonado, Pedro A; Wai, Clifford Y

    2016-03-01

    As the field of reconstructive pelvic surgery continues to evolve, with descriptions of new procedures to repair pelvic organ prolapse, it remains imperative to maintain a functional understanding of pelvic floor anatomy and support. The goal of this review was to provide a focused, conceptual approach to differentiating anatomic defects contributing to prolapse in the various compartments of the vagina. Rather than provide exhaustive descriptions of pelvic floor anatomy, basic pelvic floor anatomy is reviewed, new and historical concepts of pelvic floor support are discussed, and relevance to the surgical management of specific anatomic defects is addressed. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. The effect of pelvic motion on spino-pelvic parameters.

    PubMed

    Hayden, Andrew M; Hayes, Ann M; Brechbuhler, Jennifer L; Israel, Heidi; Place, Howard M

    2017-08-15

    To date, many studies have examined how pelvic position affects the spinal curvature and spino-pelvic parameters. However, these studies focus on a static relationship, comparing pelvis and spine in a relaxed or baseline position only. Indeed, the spino-pelvic connection is dynamic, as a subject can easily be taught to rotate their pelvis anteriorly or posteriorly on the femoral head, all while maintaining an erect posture. Therefore, for a true understanding of pelvic influence on the spinal column, it is necessary to examine spino-pelvic parameters in multiple pelvic positions within the same subject. The objective of this study was to examine the dynamic effect of pelvic motion on the spine and associated radiographic parameters. Single-center, cross-sectional study of 50 healthy, asymptomatic volunteers. Subjects were recruited and screened based upon the following criteria: *Between 18-79 years of age. *No known spinal, pelvic, or lower extremity pain lasting greater than 48 hours. *No history of spinal, pelvic, or lower extremity dysfunction requiring medical care. *No radiographic evidence of spinal or pelvic abnormality, scoliosis deformity, or other associated spinal pathologies. *Not currently pregnant and with no possibility of being pregnant. *BMI < 30 64 subjects were screened and 14 were excluded for a total of 50 subjects. Thoracic Kyphosis (TK), Lumbar Lordosis (LL), Sagittal Vertical Axis (SVA), Pelvic Tilt (PT) Sacral Slope (SS), and Pelvic Incidence (PI) METHODS: This study was funded by a Small Exploratory Research Grant from the Scoliosis Research Society. Each subject was instructed and observed to stand in 3 different positions: pelvic resting, anterior pelvic rotation and posterior pelvic rotation. Lateral standing radiographs were taken in each position and each image was examined by an Orthopaedic spine surgeon who digitally measured: thoracic kyphosis, lumbar lordosis, sagittal vertical axis, pelvic tilt, sacral slope, and pelvic

  7. Postoperative activity restrictions: any evidence?

    PubMed

    Weir, Larissa F; Nygaard, Ingrid E; Wilken, Jason; Brandt, Debra; Janz, Kathleen F

    2006-02-01

    Because of a widespread but untested belief that increased intra-abdominal pressure contributes to pelvic floor disorders, physicians commonly restrict various activities postoperatively. Our aim was to describe intra-abdominal pressures during common physical activities. Thirty women of wide age and weight ranges who were not undergoing treatment for pelvic floor disorders performed 3 repetitions of various activities while intra-abdominal pressures (baseline and maximal) were approximated via microtip rectal catheters. We calculated median peak and net pressures (centimeters of H(2)O). We assessed correlations between abdominal pressures and body mass index, abdominal circumference, and grip strength (a proxy for overall strength). P < .025 was considered significant. Median peak abdominal pressures ranged from 48 (lifting 8 lb from a counter) to 150 (lifting 35 lb from the floor), with much variation. Many activities did not raise the intra-abdominal pressure more than simply getting out of a chair, including lifting 8, 13, and 20 lb from a counter, lifting 8 or 13 lb from the floor, climbing stairs, walking briskly, or doing abdominal crunches. Body mass index and abdominal circumference each correlated positively with peak, but not net, pressures. Age and grip strength were not associated with abdominal pressure. Some activities commonly restricted postoperatively have no greater effect on intra-abdominal pressures than unavoidable activities like rising from a chair. How lifting is done impacts intra-abdominal pressure. Many current postoperative guidelines are needlessly restrictive. Further research is needed to determine whether increased intra-abdominal pressure truly promotes pelvic floor disorders. III.

  8. Sexual selection targets cetacean pelvic bones

    PubMed Central

    Dines, J. P.; Otárola-Castillo, E.; Ralph, P.; Alas, J.; Daley, T.; Smith, A. D.; Dean, M. D.

    2014-01-01

    Male genitalia evolve rapidly, probably as a result of sexual selection. Whether this pattern extends to the internal infrastructure that influences genital movements remains unknown. Cetaceans (whales and dolphins) offer a unique opportunity to test this hypothesis: since evolving from land-dwelling ancestors, they lost external hind limbs and evolved a highly reduced pelvis which seems to serve no other function except to anchor muscles that maneuver the penis. Here we create a novel morphometric pipeline to analyze the size and shape evolution of pelvic bones from 130 individuals (29 species) in the context of inferred mating system. We present two main findings: 1) males from species with relatively intense sexual selection (inferred by relative testes size) have evolved relatively large penises and pelvic bones compared to their body size, and 2) pelvic bone shape diverges more quickly in species pairs that have diverged in inferred mating system. Neither pattern was observed in the anterior-most pair of vertebral ribs, which served as a negative control. This study provides evidence that sexual selection can affect internal anatomy that controls male genitalia. These important functions may explain why cetacean pelvic bones have not been lost through evolutionary time. PMID:25186496

  9. Sexual selection targets cetacean pelvic bones.

    PubMed

    Dines, James P; Otárola-Castillo, Erik; Ralph, Peter; Alas, Jesse; Daley, Timothy; Smith, Andrew D; Dean, Matthew D

    2014-11-01

    Male genitalia evolve rapidly, probably as a result of sexual selection. Whether this pattern extends to the internal infrastructure that influences genital movements remains unknown. Cetaceans (whales and dolphins) offer a unique opportunity to test this hypothesis: since evolving from land-dwelling ancestors, they lost external hind limbs and evolved a highly reduced pelvis that seems to serve no other function except to anchor muscles that maneuver the penis. Here, we create a novel morphometric pipeline to analyze the size and shape evolution of pelvic bones from 130 individuals (29 species) in the context of inferred mating system. We present two main findings: (1) males from species with relatively intense sexual selection (inferred by relative testes size) tend to evolve larger penises and pelvic bones compared to their body length, and (2) pelvic bone shape has diverged more in species pairs that have diverged in inferred mating system. Neither pattern was observed in the anterior-most pair of vertebral ribs, which served as a negative control. This study provides evidence that sexual selection can affect internal anatomy that controls male genitalia. These important functions may explain why cetacean pelvic bones have not been lost through evolutionary time.

  10. Total pelvic floor reconstruction versus transvaginal hysterectomy for pelvic organ prolapse: a retrospective cohort.

    PubMed

    Shi, R X; Sun, H T

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate the surgical outcomes following total pelvic floor reconstruction (TPFR) and transvaginal hysterectomy (TVH). This was a retrospective cohort study of all patients who underwent TPFR or TVH repair for pelvic organ prolapse (POP) between January 2005 and January 2011. A total of 251 consecutive women were evaluated prior to, and at two, six, and 12 months after surgery. Anatomy, symptoms, and quality of life were measured using the Pelvic Organ Prolapse Quantification system (POP-Q) and pelvic floor distress inventory (PFDI). The surgical outcomes were compared between groups using Student's t-test and ANCOVA tests (p < 0.05). Of the 251 patients, 129 had a total pelvic floor reconstruction (TPFR group), and concomitant modified transobturator inside-out tension-free urethral suspension (TVT-O) was used in pelvic floor dysfunction patients with stress urinary incontinence. The patients that underwent vaginal hysterectomy surgery (TVH group) were 122. At two, six, and 12 months, respectively, 12.40% (TPFR group) and 18.85% (TVH group) of the patients were lost to follow-up. There were no significant differences between TPFR group and TVH group for all preoperative variables (p > 0.05). The TPFR patients had significantly lower operation time, blood loss, anus exhaust time, remaining catheter time, and the length of stay in hospital (p < 0.05). Postoperatively, the recurrence rate in TVH group was higher than that ofTPFR group after surgery at six and 12 months (p < 0.05). The PFDI scorewas significantly different between the groups. The short-term clinical results suggest that the two surgeries are safe and effective in treating female POP. The patients' quality life was improved, but TPFR technique was more conspicuous for treating POP.

  11. Pelvic irradiation for stage II ovarian carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Terada, K Y; Morley, G W; Roberts, J A

    1988-01-01

    Over a 20-year period, 34 patients with FIGO stage II ovarian carcinoma were treated with postoperative pelvic irradiation at the University of Michigan. Complications of radiation treatment were minimal. The overall actuarial disease-free 5-year survival was 53%. This was not significantly different for substages IIA, IIB, or IIC. Patients with well-differentiated tumors had a significantly better survival than patients with moderate or poorly differentiated tumors (P less than 0.05). The implications for managing stage II ovarian carcinoma are discussed.

  12. Pelvic inflammatory disease.

    PubMed

    Gradison, Margaret

    2012-04-15

    Pelvic inflammatory disease is a polymicrobial infection of the upper genital tract. It primarily affects young, sexually active women. The diagnosis is made clinically; no single test or study is sensitive or specific enough for a definitive diagnosis. Pelvic inflammatory disease should be suspected in at-risk patients who present with pelvic or lower abdominal pain with no identified etiology, and who have cervical motion, uterine, or adnexal tenderness. Chlamydia trachomatis and Neisseria gonorrhoeae are the most commonly implicated microorganisms; however, other microorganisms may be involved. The spectrum of disease ranges from asymptomatic to life-threatening tubo-ovarian abscess. Patients should be treated empirically, even if they present with few symptoms. Most women can be treated successfully as outpatients with a single dose of a parenteral cephalosporin plus oral doxycycline, with or without oral metronidazole. Delay in treatment may lead to major sequelae, including chronic pelvic pain, ectopic pregnancy, and infertility. Hospitalization and parenteral treatment are recommended if the patient is pregnant, has human immunodeficiency virus infection, does not respond to oral medication, or is severely ill. Strategies for preventing pelvic inflammatory disease include routine screening for chlamydia and patient education.

  13. Normal Vulvovaginal, Perineal, and Pelvic Anatomy with Reconstructive Considerations

    PubMed Central

    Yavagal, Sujata; de Farias, Thais F.; Medina, Carlos A.; Takacs, Peter

    2011-01-01

    A thorough insight into the female genital anatomy is crucial for understanding and performing pelvic reconstructive procedures. The intimate relationship between the genitalia and the muscles, ligaments, and fascia that provide support is complex, but critical to restore during surgery for correction of prolapse or aesthetic reasons. The external female genitalia include the mons pubis, labia majora and minora, clitoris, vestibule with glands, perineal body, and the muscles and fascia surrounding these structures. Through the perineal membrane and the perineal body, these superficial vulvar structures are structurally related to the deep pelvic muscle levator ani with its fascia. The levator ani forms the pelvic floor with the coccygeus muscle and provides vital support to all the pelvic organs and stability to the perineum. The internal female genital organs include the vagina, cervix, uterus, tubes, and ovaries with their visceral fascia. The visceral fascia also called the endopelvic fascia, surrounds the pelvic organs and connects them to the pelvic walls. It is continuous with the paraurethral and paravaginal fascia, which is attached to the perineal membrane. Thus, the internal and external genitalia are closely related to the muscles and fascia, and work as one functioning unit. PMID:22547969

  14. Evaluation of pelvic floor muscle strength before and after robotic-assisted radical prostatectomy and early outcomes on urinary continence.

    PubMed

    Manley, Lauren; Gibson, Luke; Papa, Nathan; Beharry, Bhawanie Koonj; Johnson, Liana; Lawrentschuk, Nathan; Bolton, Damien M

    2016-12-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the effect of pelvic floor muscle (PFM) assessment and training before and after robot-assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomy (RARP) in improving PFM strength and urinary continence. We performed an analysis of a database of patients who underwent robot-assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomy (RARP) performed by two urologists from 2011 to 2013. Pelvic floor muscle (PFM) activation and strength were graded by a trained pelvic floor physiotherapist. Patients were given an exercise program, grouped according to the strength of their pelvic floor as graded by assessment, to complete before and after surgery. PFM strength was recorded preoperatively, 4 days post-catheter removal and 4 weeks post-catheter removal. Continence was recorded at 4 weeks postop and was defined as the requirement of no continence aids. A total of 98 patients had RARP and a preoperative physiotherapy assessment plus postoperative appointments at around 1 and 4 weeks post-RARP. The majority of men improved their PFM strength regardless of preoperative strength with no significant predictors of postoperative strength found. Age was the only significant predictor of postoperative incontinence. In this pilot study, a majority of patients increased their pelvic floor strength with time. Pelvic floor physiotherapy is an important modifiable patient factor, which does have an impact in improving patients' urinary continence by strengthening the pelvic floor muscles. Patient age influences response to pelvic floor physiotherapy.

  15. Pelvic discontinuity: current solutions.

    PubMed

    Petrie, J; Sassoon, A; Haidukewych, G J

    2013-11-01

    Pelvic discontinuity represents a rare but challenging problem for orthopaedic surgeons. It is most commonly encountered during revision total hip replacement, but can also result from an iatrogentic acetabular fracture during hip replacement. The general principles in management of pelvic discontinuity include restoration of the continuity between the ilium and the ischium, typically with some form of plating. Bone grafting is frequently required to restore pelvic bone stock. The acetabular component is then impacted, typically using an uncemented, trabecular metal component. Fixation with multiple supplemental screws is performed. For larger defects, a so-called 'cup-cage' reconstruction, or a custom triflange implant may be required. Pre-operative CT scanning can greatly assist in planning and evaluating the remaining bone stock available for bony ingrowth. Generally, good results have been reported for constructs that restore stability to the pelvis and allow some form of biologic ingrowth.

  16. Triple Pelvic Osteotomy and Double Pelvic Osteotomy.

    PubMed

    Guevara, Francisco; Franklin, Samuel P

    2017-07-01

    Triple and double pelvic osteotomy (TPO, DPO) are performed with the goal of increasing acetabular ventro-version, increasing femoral head coverage, and decreasing femoral head subluxation. Since the first descriptions of TPO, there have been modifications in technique, most notably omission of the ischial osteotomy for DPO, and improvements in the implants, including availability of locking TPO/DPO bone plates. Associated complication rates seem to have declined accordingly. The most salient questions regarding these procedures remain what selection criteria should be used to identify candidates and whether halting or preventing osteoarthritis is necessary to consider these surgeries clinically beneficial. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. The effect of 3-column spinal osteotomy on anterior pelvic plane and acetabulum position.

    PubMed

    Schroeder, Josh E; Jerabek, Seth; Sama, Andrew; Kaplan, Leon; Girardi, Federico; Lebl, Darren R

    2014-07-01

    Because the spine and pelvis are integrated, changes in spine sagittal balance affect relative acetabulum position. A 1° change of the anterior pelvic plane changes acetabulum anteversion by 0.8°. Three-column spine osteotomies correct fixed sagittal plane deformity. Twenty patients with kyphotic deformity and associated sagittal imbalance underwent corrective 3-column osteotomy. We reviewed upright pelvic and spine radiographs preoperatively and postoperatively and documented the changes in angles. The average sagittal vertical axis was 11.07 cm preoperatively and 4.8 cm postoperatively. Lumbar lordosis changed (on average) from 39° preoperatively to 55° postoperatively (P < .05). Sacral slope increased an average of 6.7° (P = .015). Pelvic tilt decreased by 5.4° (P = .001). The anterior pelvic plane increased by 8.23° (P < .0001). This correction of the sagittal balance is associated with a concomitant increase in sacral slope, pelvic tilt, and the anterior pelvic plane angles. These changes will increase acetabulum anteversion by a predicted 6.54°. This increase will change acetabular cup position and must be considered in patients with spine and pelvic osteoarthritis that requires hip surgery.

  18. [Prostate cancer external beam radiotherapy].

    PubMed

    de Crevoisier, R; Pommier, P; Latorzeff, I; Chapet, O; Chauvet, B; Hennequin, C

    2016-09-01

    The prostate external beam radiotherapy techniques are described, when irradiating the prostate or after prostatectomy, with and without pelvic lymph nodes. The following parts are presented: indications of radiotherapy, total dose and fractionation, planning CT image acquisition, volume of interest delineation (target volumes and organs at risk) and margins, Intensity modulated radiotherapy planning and corresponding dose-volume constraints, and finally Image guided radiotherapy.

  19. Postoperative management.

    PubMed

    Schraag, Stefan

    2016-09-01

    Most patients undergoing major aortic surgery have multiple comorbidities and are at high risk of postoperative complications that affect multiple organ systems. Different aortic pathologies and surgical repair techniques have specific impact on the postoperative course. Ischemia-reperfusion injury is the common denominator in aortic surgery and influences the integrity of end-organ function. Common postoperative problems include hemodynamic instability due to the immediate inflammatory response, renal impairment, spinal cord ischemia, respiratory failure with prolonged mechanical ventilation, and gastrointestinal symptoms such as ileus or mesenteric ischemia. Focused care bundles to establish homeostasis and a team working toward an early functional recovery determine the success of effective rehabilitation and outcomes after aortic surgery. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Sagittal spinal pelvic alignment.

    PubMed

    Klineberg, Eric; Schwab, Frank; Smith, Justin S; Gupta, Munish C; Lafage, Virginie; Bess, Shay

    2013-04-01

    The goal of any ambulatory patient is to maintain a horizontal gaze with the least amount of energy expenditure. With progressive deformity, and in particular sagittal malalignment, significant compensatory mechanisms must be used to achieve this goal. Each pelvis dictates the amount of lumbar lordosis required through its morphometric parameter pelvic incidence. The pelvis may compensate for decreasing lumbar lordosis (eg, age, flat back deformity) by retroverting and increasing pelvic tilt and decreasing the sacral slope. Underappreciation for these spinopelvic compensatory mechanisms leads to surgical under-correction, iatrogenic flat back and poor clinical outcomes. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Postoperative atelectasis.

    PubMed

    Massard, G; Wihlm, J M

    1998-08-01

    Postoperative atelectasis is a common problem following any surgery. Limited atelectasis is usually well-tolerated and easily reversible. However, complete atelectasis of the remaining lung following partial lung resection may be poorly tolerated. Thoracic surgical procedures increase the risk because pain, thoracic muscle injury, chest wall instability, and diaphragmatic dysfunction impair clearance of secretions by cough. In addition, patients with lung diseases are prone to increased bronchial secretions. Prophylaxis includes preoperative and postoperative physiotherapy and medications, which should be graded in accordance to the individual patient's risk factors. Large atelectasis requires bronchoscopy to remove mucous plugs. Tracheostomy should be considered in patients with relapsing atelectasis or swallow disorders.

  2. [PELVIC FLOOR RECONSTRUCTION AFTER PELVIC EVISCERATION USING GRACILIS MUSCULOCUTANEOUS FLAP].

    PubMed

    Pavlov, V N; Bakirov, A A; Kabirov, I R; Izmajlov, A A; Kutlijarov, L M; Safiullin, R L; Urmancev, M F; Sultanov, I M; Abdrahimov, R V

    2015-01-01

    Evisceration of the pelvic organs (EPO) is a fairly uncommon surgical treatment that removes all organs from a patient's pelvic cavity. We use gracilis musculocutaneous flap to repair pelvic floor after EPO. Over the period from November 2013 to December 2014 we carried out EPO with reconstructive repair of the pelvic floor with gracilis musculocutaneous flap in 10 patients with locally advanced pelvic tumors. We describe the surgical procedure and surgical outcomes in these patients. Mean age of the patients was 55 years. Mean duration of EPO with the pelvic floor repair was 285 min., mean blood loss--595 mL and the average length of hospital stay--19 days. Gracilis musculocutaneous flap has a sufficient arterial supply and mobility for pelvic floor reconstruction. Necrosis of flap's distal edge occurred in one of the 10 clinical cases, while the remaining flaps were fully preserved. Complete healing of wounds with no signs of weakening of the pelvic floor muscles was observed in all cases. Pelvic floor reconstruction is an essential procedure in order to reduce complications associated with the evisceration of the pelvic organs. The Gracilis musculocutaneous flap is the logical alternative to repair pelvic floor defect. It does not contribute to complications like functional deficiency of the lower limbs, complications of stoma formation or weakening of the muscles of the anterior abdominal wall.

  3. Persistent pelvic pain and pelvic joint instability.

    PubMed

    Saugstad, L F

    1991-10-08

    As accepted as the condition of pelvic pain and pelvic joint instability (PPPJI) is in pregnancy, as controversial and doubted is the same diagnosis in non-pregnant women. Women suffering severe incapacitating PPPJI for years following parturition have recently founded an association. This offers a unique opportunity to investigate their characteristics. 153 of the 215 members answered a questionnaire. The majority (110) suffered PPPJI in first pregnancy with onset preceding 20 weeks gestation in 84 women. Onset was significantly earlier in users of oral contraceptives than in non-users (16.3 weeks and 20.5 weeks, respectively). The 153 women did not differ from the controls with regard to life-style, diseases prior to reproduction or reproduction. Their 358 deliveries were characterized by a marked excess of post-term deliveries, a raised proportion of infants of 4000 g or more, an extremely low sex-ratio of offspring (0.84) with 54.5% female births, and a significantly raised congenital hip dysplasia rate, consistent with elevated oestrogen and relaxin levels.

  4. Abdominal-Pelvic Actinomycosis Mimicking Malignant Neoplasm

    PubMed Central

    Pusiol, Teresa; Morichetti, Doriana; Pedrazzani, Corrado; Ricci, Francesco

    2011-01-01

    Abdominal-pelvic actinomycosis is often mistaken for other conditions, presenting a preoperative diagnostic challenge. In a 46-year-old female, computed tomography showed an abdominal-pelvic retroperitoneal mass extending from the lower pole of the right kidney to the lower pelvis. The patient had a 3-year history of intrauterine device. The mass appeared to involve the ascending colon, cecum, distal ileum, right Fallopian tube and ovary, and ureter anteriorly and the psoas muscle posteriorly. The resection of retroperitoneal mass, distal ileum appendicectomy, right hemicolectomy, and right salpingo-oophorectomy was performed. The postoperative period was uneventful. Penicillin therapy was given for six months without any complication. The retroperitoneal mass measured 4.5 × 3.5 × 3 cm, surrounded adjacent organs and histologically showed inflammatory granulomatous tissue, agglomeration of filaments, and sulfur granules of Actinomyces, with positive reaction with periodic acid Schiff. Right tubo-ovarian abscess was present. Abdominalpelvic actinomycosis should always be considered in patients with a pelvic mass especially in ones using intrauterine device. PMID:21904441

  5. Pelvic incidence: a fixed value or can you change it?

    PubMed

    Place, Howard M; Hayes, Ann M; Huebner, Stephen B; Hayden, Andy M; Israel, Heidi; Brechbuhler, Jennifer L

    2017-10-01

    There has been renewed interest in the pelvic vertebrae by spinal surgeons recently. Those involved in working with patients with adult spinal deformity focus on the position of the fused spine as it relates to the pelvis, and determine success or failure by specific numbers for given pelvic parameters. The pelvic parameters that are commonly measured for these patients are pelvic tilt, sacral slope, and pelvic incidence (PI). Out of the three, PI has always been considered to be the fixed measurement, whereas pelvic tilt and sacral slope have the capacity to change in relation to external forces. The assumption that the PI does not change has not been proven in a healthy, asymptomatic population. This study aimed to investigate the differences in PI between three pelvic positions used in common functional activities: resting baseline pelvic posture, maximal anterior pelvic rotation, and maximal posterior pelvic rotation. This was a randomized, prospective study of 50 healthy, asymptomatic, individuals who were recruited from the vicinity of our institution. Fifty patients (16 men with a mean age of 26.5±12.1 years; 34 women with a mean age of 27.2±10.8 years) were recruited for this study. Initial screening occurred by telephone. The inclusion criteria consisted of participants being between 18 and 79 years of age, no previous history of spine, pelvic, or lower extremity pain which had lasted longer than 48 hours, or history of any disorder in the spine, pelvis, or lower extremity that had required medical care. Female patients could not be pregnant at the time of participation. Changes in PI were assessed by examining the differences between the values of the PI with each change in pelvic position: resting to maximal anterior pelvic rotation and resting to maximal posterior pelvic rotation. Inter-rater reliability was assessed using Cronbach's alpha. This study was funded by a Small Exploratory Grant from the Scoliosis Research Society. All subjects had an

  6. Pelvic Pain: Other FAQs

    MedlinePlus

    ... Publications Pelvic Pain: Other FAQs Skip sharing on social media links Share this: Page Content Basic information for topics, such as “What is it?” and “How many people are affected?” is available in the Condition Information ...

  7. Pelvic inflammatory disease

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Pelvic inflammatory disease is caused by infection of the upper female genital tract and is often asymptomatic. Pelvic inflammatory disease is the most common gynaecological reason for admission to hospital in the US, and is diagnosed in approximately 1% of women aged 16 to 45 years consulting their GP in England and Wales. Methods and outcomes We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical questions: How do different antimicrobial regimens compare when treating women with confirmed pelvic inflammatory disease? What are the effects of routine antibiotic prophylaxis to prevent pelvic inflammatory disease before intrauterine contraceptive device (IUD) insertion? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library, and other important databases up to September 2013 (Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically; please check our website for the most up to date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA), the European Medicines Agency (EMA), and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). Results We found 13 RCTs or systematic reviews of RCTs that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of evidence for interventions. Conclusions In this systematic review, we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: antibiotics (oral, parenteral, different durations, different regimens) and routine antibiotic prophylaxis (before intrauterine device insertion in women at high risk or low risk). PMID:24330771

  8. Pelvic inflammatory disease.

    PubMed

    Soper, David E

    2010-08-01

    Pelvic inflammatory disease (PID) is an infection-caused inflammatory continuum from the cervix to the peritoneal cavity. Most importantly, it is associated with fallopian tube inflammation, which can lead to infertility, ectopic pregnancy, and chronic pelvic pain. The microbial etiology is linked to sexually transmitted microorganisms, including Chlamydia trachomatis, Neisseria gonorrheae, Mycoplasma genitalium, and bacterial vaginosis-associated microorganisms, predominantly anaerobes. Pelvic pain and fever are commonly absent in women with confirmed PID. Clinicians should consider milder symptoms such as abnormal vaginal discharge, metrorrhagia, postcoital bleeding, and urinary frequency as potential symptoms associated with the disease, particularly in women at risk of sexually transmitted infection. The diagnosis of PID is based on the findings of lower genital tract inflammation associated with pelvic organ tenderness. The outpatient treatment of mild-to-moderate PID should include tolerated antibiotic regimens with activity against the commonly isolated microorganisms associated with PID and usually consists of an extended spectrum cephalosporin in conjunction with either doxycycline or azithromycin. Clinically severe PID should prompt hospitalization and imaging to rule out a tuboovarian abscess. Parenteral broad-spectrum antibiotic therapy with activity against a polymicrobial flora, particularly gram-negative aerobes and anaerobes, should be implemented. Screening for and treatment of Chlamydia infection can prevent PID.

  9. Pelvic inflammatory disease.

    PubMed

    Ross, Jonathan D C

    2013-12-11

    Pelvic inflammatory disease is caused by infection of the upper female genital tract and is often asymptomatic. Pelvic inflammatory disease is the most common gynaecological reason for admission to hospital in the US, and is diagnosed in approximately 1% of women aged 16 to 45 years consulting their GP in England and Wales. We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical questions: How do different antimicrobial regimens compare when treating women with confirmed pelvic inflammatory disease? What are the effects of routine antibiotic prophylaxis to prevent pelvic inflammatory disease before intrauterine contraceptive device (IUD) insertion? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library, and other important databases up to September 2013 (Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically; please check our website for the most up to date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA), the European Medicines Agency (EMA), and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). We found 13 RCTs or systematic reviews of RCTs that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of evidence for interventions. In this systematic review, we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: antibiotics (oral, parenteral, different durations, different regimens) and routine antibiotic prophylaxis (before intrauterine device insertion in women at high risk or low risk).

  10. Laparoscopic pelvic surgery for endometrial cancer.

    PubMed

    Tay, Eng-Hseon

    2009-02-01

    The traditional approach for the treatment of endometrial cancer by laparotomy is increasingly being replaced by laparoscopic surgery. The advantages of laparoscopy have been well-documented. Laparoscopy avoids the morbidity of a laparotomy, overcomes the limitations of vaginal hysterectomy, provides adequate pathological information for an accurate surgical staging and expedites the postoperative recovery of patients. This paper reports the outcome of a series of 50 consecutive cases of laparoscopic hysterectomy and pelvic lymphadenectomy for endometrial cancers that were performed by the author. The objective is to review the perioperative, postoperative experience and survival outcomes of patients with endometrial cancer managed by laparoscopic surgery performed by a single surgeon. The records of 50 consecutive patients with endometrial cancers from October 1995 to October 2007 treated by laparoscopic pelvic lymphadenectomy and laparoscopic hysterectomy (total and assisted) were retrospectively reviewed. Data on patients' attributes, endometrial cancers, surgical procedures, surgical complications and morbidity, perioperative experience, length of hospital stays and clinical outcome were analysed. Laparoscopic surgery was successful in all 50 patients and is clearly an option for the treatment of early endometrial cancer. Careful patient selection and surgical competency are instrumental in ensuring successful treatment.

  11. Clinical review: initial management of blunt pelvic trauma patients with haemodynamic instability.

    PubMed

    Geeraerts, Thomas; Chhor, Vibol; Cheisson, Gaëlle; Martin, Laurent; Bessoud, Bertrand; Ozanne, Augustin; Duranteau, Jacques

    2007-01-01

    Pelvic trauma can lead to severe, uncontrollable haemorrhage and death related to prolonged shock and multiple organ failure. Massive retroperitoneal haematoma should be assumed to be present in cases of post-traumatic haemodynamic instability associated with pelvic fracture in the absence of extrapelvic haemorrhagic lesions. This review describes the pathophysiology of retroperitoneal haematoma in trauma patient with blunt pelvic fracture, considering the roles of venous and arterial bleeding. Efficacy and safety of haemostatic procedures are also discussed, and particular attention is given to the efficacy of pelvic angiographic embolization and external pelvic fixation. A decision making algorithm is proposed for the treatment of trauma patients with pelvic fracture that takes haemodynamic status and associated lesions into account.

  12. [Pelvic floor muscle training and pelvic floor disorders in women].

    PubMed

    Thubert, T; Bakker, E; Fritel, X

    2015-05-01

    Our goal is to provide an update on the results of pelvic floor rehabilitation in the treatment of urinary incontinence and genital prolapse symptoms. Pelvic floor muscle training allows a reduction of urinary incontinence symptoms. Pelvic floor muscle contractions supervised by a healthcare professional allow cure in half cases of stress urinary incontinence. Viewing this contraction through biofeedback improves outcomes, but this effect could also be due by a more intensive and prolonged program with the physiotherapist. The place of electrostimulation remains unclear. The results obtained with vaginal cones are similar to pelvic floor muscle training with or without biofeedback or electrostimulation. It is not known whether pelvic floor muscle training has an effect after one year. In case of stress urinary incontinence, supervised pelvic floor muscle training avoids surgery in half of the cases at 1-year follow-up. Pelvic floor muscle training is the first-line treatment of post-partum urinary incontinence. Its preventive effect is uncertain. Pelvic floor muscle training may reduce the symptoms associated with genital prolapse. In conclusion, pelvic floor rehabilitation supervised by a physiotherapist is an effective short-term treatment to reduce the symptoms of urinary incontinence or pelvic organ prolapse.

  13. Postoperative astigmatism.

    PubMed

    Swinger, C A

    1987-01-01

    With the numerous significant advances in surgical methodology--e.g., microinstrumentation, the operating microscope, the surgical keratometer, and intraocular lenses--that have been developed over the past two decades, both surgeons and patients have become increasingly aware of the final optic result of any surgical intervention. This is especially so since the development of refractive surgery, where good uncorrected vision is frequently the final arbiter of success. We have progressed to the stage where the optic manipulation of the cornea, whether intentional or otherwise, can be understood in terms of a number of variables. These include the preparation and closure of the surgical wound, the choice of suture material, and both intraoperative and postoperative manipulations. Where these have failed and postoperative astigmatism still occurs, a number of surgical procedures are available to reduce the astigmatic error to an acceptable level.

  14. Residual pelvic rotation after single-event multilevel surgery in spastic hemiplegia.

    PubMed

    Chung, C Y; Lee, S H; Choi, I H; Cho, T-J; Yoo, W J; Park, M S

    2008-09-01

    Our aim in this retrospective study of 52 children with spastic hemiplegia was to determine the factors which affected the amount of residual pelvic rotation after single-event multilevel surgery. The patients were divided into two groups, those who had undergone femoral derotation osteotomy and those who had not. Pelvic rotation improved significantly after surgery in the femoral osteotomy group (p < 0.001) but not in the non-femoral osteotomy group. Multiple regressions identified the following three independent variables, which significantly affected residual pelvic rotation: the performance of femoral derotation osteotomy (p = 0.049), the pre-operative pelvic rotation (p = 0.003) and the post-operative internal rotation of the hip (p = 0.001). We concluded that there is a decrease in the amount of pelvic rotation after single-event multilevel surgery with femoral derotation osteotomy. However, some residual rotation may persist when patients have severe rotation before surgery.

  15. Role of pelvic floor in lower urinary tract function.

    PubMed

    Chermansky, Christopher J; Moalli, Pamela A

    2016-10-01

    The pelvic floor plays an integral part in lower urinary tract storage and evacuation. Normal urine storage necessitates that continence be maintained with normal urethral closure and urethral support. The endopelvic fascia of the anterior vaginal wall, its connections to the arcus tendineous fascia pelvis (ATFP), and the medial portion of the levator ani muscles must remain intact to provide normal urethral support. Thus, normal pelvic floor function is required for urine storage. Normal urine evacuation involves a series of coordinated events, the first of which involves complete relaxation of the external urethral sphincter and levator ani muscles. Acquired dysfunction of these muscles will initially result in sensory urgency and detrusor overactivity; however, with time the acquired voiding dysfunction can result in intermittent urine flow and incomplete bladder emptying, progressing to urinary retention in severe cases. This review will start with a discussion of normal pelvic floor anatomy and function. Next various injuries to the pelvic floor will be reviewed. The dysfunctional pelvic floor will be covered subsequently, with a focus on levator ani spasticity and stress urinary incontinence (SUI). Finally, future research directions of the interaction between the pelvic floor and lower urinary tract function will be discussed.

  16. Anterior subcutaneous internal fixation for treatment of unstable pelvic fractures

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Fractures of the pelvic ring including disruption of the posterior elements in high-energy trauma have both high morbidity and mortality rates. For some injury pattern part of the initial resuscitation includes either external fixation or plate fixation to close the pelvic ring and decrease blood loss. In certain situations – especially when associated with abdominal trauma and the need to perform laparotomies – both techniques may put the patient at risk of either pintract or deep plate infections. We describe an operative approach to percutaneously close and stabilize the pelvic ring using spinal implants as an internal fixator and report the results in a small series of patients treated with this technique during the resuscitation phase. Findings Four patients were treated by subcutaneous placement of an internal fixator. Screw fixation was carried out by minimally invasive placement of two supra-acetabular iliac screws. Afterwards, a subcutaneous transfixation rod was inserted and attached to the screws after reduction of the pelvic ring. All patients were allowed to fully weight-bear. No losses of reduction or deep infections occurred. Fracture healing was uneventful in all cases. Conclusion Minimally invasive fixation is an alternative technique to stabilize the pelvic ring. The clinical results illustrate that this technique is able to achieve good results in terms of maintenance of reduction the pelvic ring. Also, abdominal surgeries no longer put the patient at risk of infected pins or plates. PMID:24606833

  17. Successful management of pelvic bleeding after caesarean hysterectomy by means of Foley catheter-condom balloon tamponade

    PubMed Central

    Atilgan, Remzi; Aslan, Kubat; Can, Behzat; Sapmaz, Ekrem

    2014-01-01

    In this case report, we describe a 28-year-old woman with multipar gestation who developed postcaesarean atonia and severe pelvic haemorrhage which continued in spite of peripartum hysterectomy. A balloon tamponade tool was formed with Foley catheter and a condom, and was inserted into the pelvis through the vaginal cuff. The tampon was inflated up to 2200 mL and the pelvic tamponade was applied and bleeding was controlled. On the patient's incapability of urination, the volume of condom was decreased to 1800 mL and urination was achieved. seventy-two h postoperatively the Foley catheter-condom was removed through an abdominal incision. Pelvic bleeding ceased. After monitoring for a week, no postoperative fever, infection, pelvic abscess and haematoma were observed. Use of Foley catheter-condom as a pelvis pressure tampon tool may be a simple and effective method which can be easily used to control pelvic bleeding. PMID:24827667

  18. Successful management of pelvic bleeding after caesarean hysterectomy by means of Foley catheter-condom balloon tamponade.

    PubMed

    Atilgan, Remzi; Aslan, Kubat; Can, Behzat; Sapmaz, Ekrem

    2014-05-14

    In this case report, we describe a 28-year-old woman with multipar gestation who developed postcaesarean atonia and severe pelvic haemorrhage which continued in spite of peripartum hysterectomy. A balloon tamponade tool was formed with Foley catheter and a condom, and was inserted into the pelvis through the vaginal cuff. The tampon was inflated up to 2200 mL and the pelvic tamponade was applied and bleeding was controlled. On the patient's incapability of urination, the volume of condom was decreased to 1800 mL and urination was achieved. seventy-two h postoperatively the Foley catheter-condom was removed through an abdominal incision. Pelvic bleeding ceased. After monitoring for a week, no postoperative fever, infection, pelvic abscess and haematoma were observed. Use of Foley catheter-condom as a pelvis pressure tampon tool may be a simple and effective method which can be easily used to control pelvic bleeding. 2014 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd.

  19. [Pelvic inflammatory disease].

    PubMed

    Hoof, Kathrin

    2007-07-01

    Pelvic inflammatory disease and upper genital tract infection describe inflammatory changes in the upper female genital tract of any combination: endometritis, salpingitis, tubo-ovarian abscess and peritonitis in the small pelvis. In most cases the infection is ascending, Chlamydia trachomatis and Neisseria gonorrhoeae are common with increasing incidence. The spectrum ranges from subclinical, asymptomatic infection to severe, life-threatening illness. Antibiotic treatment should be initiated promptly and must cover a broad spectrum of germs. Surgical treatment is necessary in cases of failure of antibiotic treatment and in cases with persisting symptoms after antibiotic treatment. Pelvic inflammatory diseases are one of the main causes of tubal sterility, ectopic pregnancies and chronic abdominal pain.

  20. Low rate of lymphedema after extended pelvic lymphadenectomy followed by pelvic irradiation of node-positive prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The aim of the present study was to evaluate the prevalence and severity of lower limb lymphedema after pelvic lymphadenectomy and radiotherapy to the pelvic lymph nodes in patients with prostate cancer. Methods Twenty-six patients underwent combined treatment for high-risk node-positive prostate cancer at Skåne University Hospital between April 2008 and March 2011. The treatment consisted of extended pelvic lymphadenectomy followed by androgen deprivation therapy and radiotherapy. The pelvic lymphnodes, prostate and seminal vesicles were treated with external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) to an absorbed dose of 50 Gy followed by a brachytherapy (BT) boost of 2x10 Gy to the prostate only. Twenty-two patients accepted an invitation to a clinical examination with focus on lower limb swelling. The median time between the end of radiotherapy and examination was 2.2 years (range 1.2–4.1). Results Six patients (27%) experienced grade 1 lymphedema and two patients (9%) grade 2 while none had grade 3 or 4 according to the CTC Common Toxicity Criteria scale 4.0. Three patients required treatment with compression stockings. Conclusion Brachytherapy and pelvic EBRT have a low incidence of lymphedema (at median 2.2 y after treatment) in patients with high-risk node-positive prostate cancer that have undergone pelvic lymph node dissection. PMID:24252686

  1. Pelvic Fasciae in Urology

    PubMed Central

    Raychaudhuri, B; Cahill, D

    2008-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Despite the vast literature on pelvic fascia, there is confusion over the periprostatic structures and their nomenclature, including their orientation, the neurovascular bundles and the existence of the prostatic ‘capsule’. In this review, we seek to clarify some of these issues. MATERIALS AND METHODS Review of published medical literature relating to the anatomy of the pelvic fascia including a Pubmed search using the terms – pelvic fascia, Denonvilliers' fascia, prostate capsule, neurovascular bundle of Walsh, pubo-prostatic ligament and the detrusor apron. CONCLUSIONS The findings of the study were as follows: The ‘capsule’ of the prostate does not exist. Rather, the fibromuscular band surrounding the prostate forms an integral part of the gland.The prostate is surrounded by fascial structures – anteriorly/anterolaterally by the prostatic fascia and posteriorly by the Denonvilliers' fascia. Laterally, the prostatic fascia merges with the endopelvic fascia.The posterior longitudinal fascia of the detrusor comprises a ‘posterior layer’ of the detrusor apron, extending from the bladder neck to the prostate base.The neurovascular structures tend to be located posterolaterally, but may not always form a bundle. A significant proportion of fibres may lie away from the main nerve structures, along the lateral/posterior aspects of the prostate. PMID:18828961

  2. Pelvic inflammatory disease

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    Introduction Pelvic inflammatory disease is caused by infection of the upper female genital tract and is often asymptomatic. Pelvic inflammatory disease is the most common gynaecological reason for admission to hospital in the USA and is diagnosed in almost 2% of women aged 16 to 45 years consulting their GP in England and Wales. Methods and outcomes We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical questions: What are the effects of empirical treatment compared with treatment delayed until the results of microbiological investigations are known? How do different antimicrobial regimens compare? What are the effects of routine antibiotic prophylaxis to prevent pelvic inflammatory disease before intrauterine contraceptive device (IUD) insertion? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library, and other important databases up to May 2007 (Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically; please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). Results We found nine systematic reviews, RCTs, or observational studies that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of evidence for interventions. Conclusions In this systematic review, we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: antibiotics (oral, parenteral, empirical treatment, treatment guided by test results, different durations, outpatient, inpatient), and routine antibiotic prophylaxis (before intrauterine device insertion in women at high risk or low risk). PMID:19450319

  3. [Postoperative pain.].

    PubMed

    Bergmann, H

    1987-07-01

    A short survey about the different methods available for producing postoperative analgesia is given, the goal being to make it clear to the clinician that there are quite a number of techniques to be used although the everyday clinical practice often sticks to simple and not too effective methods of pain treatment following surgery. Initially presenting short informations about the neurophysiology of pain and the pathogenesis and causes of postoperative pain two main groups of producing analgesia are then discussed.Thefirst group deals with the systemic use of analgesics be it nonnarcotic analgesic antipyretics or narcotic analgesics (opioids). As for the first subgroup the peripheral action of these drugs (metamizol, acetylsalicylic acid, paracetamol) is brought about by blocking the synthesis of prostaglandins. These substances can only be used for very moderate postoperative pain f.i. following head and neck surgery. The strong acting opioids belong to the second subgroup. Recent informations on receptor sites in the brain and cord and the subgrouping of the receptors throws new light on the understanding of the different effects of these drugs and on the pathomechanisms of agonistic, antagonistic and mixed activities. The clinically used opioids then are mentioned (morphine, fentanyl, methadon, pethidin, piritramide, tilidin, buprenorphin and pentazocine) and dosage, duration of action, antagonisms and untoward side effects are presented. Stress is laid on the recent development of patient-controlled analgesia with all its advantages. Thesecond main group of methods for postoperative analgesia consists of regional anesthesia techniques as there are brachial plexus block, intercostal block and the continuous epidural analgesia using both local anesthetics and spinal opioids. The brachial plexus block in continuous form is absolutely able to prevent pain after operations in the shoulder-arm-region and can be prolonged even for weeks using catheter techniques. The

  4. Triple pelvic osteotomy in the treatment of hip dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Vukasinović, Zoran; Spasovski, Dusko; Zivković, Zorica; Slavković, Nemanja; Cerović, Sofija

    2009-01-01

    Insufficient femoral head coverage is found in a variety of diseases, with acetabular dysplasia as the most frequent disorder and triple pelvic osteotomy as the most recently introduced surgical treatment. This study analyses pre- and postoperative pathoanatomic characteristics of triple in comparison to Salter and Chiari osteotomies, with a logistic regression analysis of outcome predictor and effect explanator factors in relation to the chosen type of operation. The study involved 136 adolescents treated with Salter and Chiari osteotomies or a triple pelvic osteotomy at the Institute of Orthopaedic Surgery "Banjica" in Belgrade. The patients were between 10-20 years old at the time of operation. We collected and analyzed data from all the patients: illness history, operative parameters, preoperative and postoperative pathoanatomic data. The data was statistically processed using the statistical software SPSS, defining standard descriptive values, and by using the appropriate tests of analytic statistics: t-test for dependent and independent variables, chi2-test, Fisher's exact test, Wilcoxon's test, parameter correlation, one-way ANOVA, multi-factorial ANOVA and logistic regression, according to the type of the analyzed data and the conditions under which the statistical methods were applied. The average CE angle after triple pelvic osteotomy was 43.5 degrees, more improved than after the Salter osteotomy (33.0 degrees) and Chiari osteotomy (31.4 degrees) (F = 16.822; p < 0.01). Postoperative spherical congruence was also more frequent after the triple osteotomy than after the other two types of operations, and with a high significance. Preoperative painful discomfort was found to be a valid predictor of indications for the triple osteotomy over both Chiari and Salter osteotomies. The valid explanators of effect for the triple osteotomy are: postoperative joint congruence (compared to the Chiari osteotomy) and increase in joint coverage (compared to Salter

  5. Neurobiological Mechanisms of Pelvic Pain

    PubMed Central

    Leone Roberti Maggiore, Umberto; Candiani, Massimo

    2014-01-01

    Pelvic pain is a common condition which significantly deteriorates health-related quality of life. The most commonly identified causes of pain in the pelvic region are gynaecologic, urologic, gastrointestinal, neurological, and musculoskeletal. However, in up to 33% of patients the source of this symptom is not identified, frustrating both patients and health-care professionals. Pelvic pain may involve both the somatic and visceral systems, making the differential diagnosing challenging. This paper aimed to review the mechanisms involved in pelvic pain perception by analyzing the neural plasticity and molecules which are involved in these complex circuits. PMID:25110704

  6. Musculoskeletal etiologies of pelvic pain.

    PubMed

    Prather, Heidi; Camacho-Soto, Alejandra

    2014-09-01

    Several musculoskeletal diagnoses are frequently concomitant with pelvic floor pathology and pain. The definition of pelvic pain itself often depends on the medical specialist evaluating the patient. Because there is variability among disorders associated with pelvic pain, patients may seek treatment for extended periods as various treatment options are attempted. Further, health care providers should recognize that there may not be a single source of dysfunction. This article discusses the musculoskeletal disorders of the pelvic girdle (structures within the bony pelvis) and their association with lumbar spine and hip disorders.

  7. Delayed complication of pelvic lymphocele: Ileal conduit obstruction.

    PubMed

    Bankar, Sanket S; Bakshi, Ganesh K; Prakash, Gagan; Sable, Nilesh P

    2015-01-01

    Radical cystectomy is the standard treatment for muscle invasive bladder cancer. Lymphocele is a common sequalae of pelvic lymphadenectomy. We report an unusual presentation of pelvic lymphocele developing after radical cystectomy reconstructed with an ileal conduit where the patient developed obstruction of the ileal conduit loop due to external pressure of the lymphocele. Catheter drainage of the conduit relieved the symptoms and a computerized tomography scan showed a large lymphocele causing acute angulation and resultant obstruction of the ileal conduit. The patient was treated with percutaneous drainage of the lymphocele and remains symptom-free on follow-up at 1 year.

  8. Delayed complication of pelvic lymphocele: Ileal conduit obstruction

    PubMed Central

    Bankar, Sanket S.; Bakshi, Ganesh K.; Prakash, Gagan; Sable, Nilesh P.

    2015-01-01

    Radical cystectomy is the standard treatment for muscle invasive bladder cancer. Lymphocele is a common sequalae of pelvic lymphadenectomy. We report an unusual presentation of pelvic lymphocele developing after radical cystectomy reconstructed with an ileal conduit where the patient developed obstruction of the ileal conduit loop due to external pressure of the lymphocele. Catheter drainage of the conduit relieved the symptoms and a computerized tomography scan showed a large lymphocele causing acute angulation and resultant obstruction of the ileal conduit. The patient was treated with percutaneous drainage of the lymphocele and remains symptom-free on follow-up at 1 year. PMID:26166973

  9. Cefotaxime Treatment of Pelvic Inflammatory Disease

    PubMed Central

    Monson, Thomas P.; Miller, Timothy T.; Nolan, Charles M.

    1981-01-01

    We studied cefotaxime in the treatment of gonococcal and nongonococcal pelvic inflammatory disease. Cefotaxime was uniformly effective against gonococcal pelvic inflammatory disease. However, 4 of 11 patients with nongonococcal pelvic inflammatory disease had a suboptimal response. PMID:6275789

  10. Can I prevent Pelvic Organ Prolapse

    MedlinePlus

    ... That Answers to FAQs Learn the Terms Glossary Pelvic Floor Dialogues Printable PDFs on PFDs Patient Fact Sheets ... or retrain the nerves and muscles of the pelvic floor. Regular daily exercising of the pelvic muscles can ...

  11. [Retroperitoneal hematoma in pelvic fractures].

    PubMed

    Purghel, F; Jemna, C; Ciuvică, R

    2011-01-01

    Retroperitoneal trauma implies a wide variety of organs in multiple systems (digestive, urinary, circulatory, musculoskeletal); although their common result is the retroperitoneal hematoma, their management is completely different, an intervention indicated for a particular lesion being able to completely decompensate other lesions in case of insufficient diagnostic. The present material highlights the recent diagnostic and therapeutic particularities in retroperitoneal hematoma from pelvic fractures. We noted a recent trend in diminishing the role of the fracture pattern on standard pelvis X-ray in assessing the risk of hemodinamic instability, new markers being indicated as more predictive. CT scan with contrast substance, when applies, remains the gold standard in identifying the source of the vascular bleeding and in guiding the subsequent therapeutic maneuvers. The angiographic embolisation in arterial lesions remains the main therapeutic procedure in hemodinamical unstable patients, with the possibility of repeating it when needed; the C-clamp external fixator application is associated. The pre-peritoneal packing constantly gains support as an emergency hemostasis maneuver. The treatment should be adapted in each case, the hemodinamic instability being the trigger in initiation and repetition of the emergency therapeutic interventions mentioned above.

  12. Piezosurgery in External Dacryocystorhinostomy.

    PubMed

    Czyz, Craig N; Fowler, Amy M; Dutton, Jonathan J; Cahill, Kenneth V; Foster, Jill A; Hill, Robert H; Everman, Kelly R; Nabavi, Cameron B

    Dacryocystorhinostomy (DCR) can be performed via an external or endoscopic approach. The use of ultrasonic or piezosurgery has been well described for endoscopic DCRs but is lacking for external DCRs. This study presents a case series of external DCRs performed using piezosurgery evaluating results and complications. Prospective, consecutive case series of patients undergoing primary external DCR for lacrimal drainage insufficiency. A standard external DCR technique was used using 1 of 2 piezosurgery systems for all bone incision. All patients received silicone intubation to the lacrimal system. Surgical outcome was measured in terms of patient-reported epiphora as follows: 1) complete resolution, 2) improvement >50%, 3) improvement <50%, and 4) No improvement. Intra and postoperative complications were also recorded. Fifty-two patients, 14 male and 38 female, were included in the study, with 2 patients having bilateral surgery. The average age of the patients was 55.8 years. The average length of follow up was 221 days. Surgical outcomes showed 72% of patients with complete resolution of epiphora and 21% with >50% improvement. There were 4 patients (7%) who had <50% improvement. There was 1 (2%) intraoperative complication and 2 (4%) postoperative complications recorded. Piezourgery is a viable modality for performing external DCRs. The lack of surgical complications shows a potential for decreased soft tissues damage. The surgical success rate based on patient-reported epiphora is similar to those published for mechanical external DCRs. This modality may benefit the novice surgeon in the reduction of soft and mucosal tissue damage.

  13. Influence of pelvic asymmetry and idiopathic scoliosis in adolescents on postural balance during sitting.

    PubMed

    Jung, Ji-Yong; Cha, Eun-Jong; Kim, Kyung-Ah; Won, Yonggwan; Bok, Soo-Kyung; Kim, Bong-Ok; Kim, Jung-Ja

    2015-01-01

    The effects of pelvic asymmetry and idiopathic scoliosis on postural balance during sitting were studied by measuring inclination angles, pressure distribution, and electromyography. Participants were classified into a control group, pelvic asymmetry group, scoliosis group, and scoliosis with pelvic asymmetry and then performed anterior, posterior, left, and right pelvic tilting while sitting on the unstable board for 5 seconds to assess their postural balance. Inclination and obliquity angles between the groups were measured by an accelerometer located on the unstable board. Pressure distribution (maximum force and peak pressure) was analyzed using a capacitive seat sensor. In addition, surface electrodes were attached to the abdominal and erector spinae muscles of each participant. Inclination and obliquity angles increased more asymmetrically in participants with both pelvic asymmetry and scoliosis than with pelvic asymmetry or scoliosis alone. Maximum forces and peak pressures of each group showed an asymmetrical pressure distribution caused by the difference in height between the left and right pelvis and curve type of the patients' spines when performing anterior, posterior, left, and right pelvic tilting while sitting. Muscle contraction patterns of external oblique, thoracic erector spinae, lumbar erector spinae, and lumbar multifidus muscles may be influenced by spine curve type and region of idiopathic scoliosis. Asymmetrical muscle activities were observed on the convex side of scoliotic patients and these muscle activity patterns were changed by the pelvic asymmetry. From these results, it was confirmed that pelvic asymmetry and idiopathic scoliosis cause postural asymmetry, unequal weight distribution, and muscular imbalance during sitting.

  14. Occult Pelvic Lymph Node Involvement in Bladder Cancer: Implications for Definitive Radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Goldsmith, Benjamin; Baumann, Brian C.; He, Jiwei; Tucker, Kai; Bekelman, Justin; Deville, Curtiland; Vapiwala, Neha; Vaughn, David; Keefe, Stephen M.; Guzzo, Thomas; Malkowicz, S. Bruce; Christodouleas, John P.

    2014-03-01

    Purpose: To inform radiation treatment planning for clinically staged, node-negative bladder cancer patients by identifying clinical factors associated with the presence and location of occult pathologic pelvic lymph nodes. Methods and Materials: The records of patients with clinically staged T1-T4N0 urothelial carcinoma of the bladder undergoing radical cystectomy and pelvic lymphadenectomy at a single institution were reviewed. Logistic regression was used to evaluate associations between preoperative clinical variables and occult pathologic pelvic or common iliac lymph nodes. Percentages of patient with involved lymph node regions entirely encompassed within whole bladder (perivesicular nodal region), small pelvic (perivesicular, obturator, internal iliac, and external iliac nodal regions), and extended pelvic clinical target volume (CTV) (small pelvic CTV plus common iliac regions) were calculated. Results: Among 315 eligible patients, 81 (26%) were found to have involved pelvic lymph nodes at the time of surgery, with 38 (12%) having involved common iliac lymph nodes. Risk of occult pathologically involved lymph nodes did not vary with clinical T stage. On multivariate analysis, the presence of lymphovascular invasion (LVI) on preoperative biopsy was significantly associated with occult pelvic nodal involvement (odds ratio 3.740, 95% confidence interval 1.865-7.499, P<.001) and marginally associated with occult common iliac nodal involvement (odds ratio 2.307, 95% confidence interval 0.978-5.441, P=.056). The percentages of patients with involved lymph node regions entirely encompassed by whole bladder, small pelvic, and extended pelvic CTVs varied with clinical risk factors, ranging from 85.4%, 95.1%, and 100% in non-muscle-invasive patients to 44.7%, 71.1%, and 94.8% in patients with muscle-invasive disease and biopsy LVI. Conclusions: Occult pelvic lymph node rates are substantial for all clinical subgroups, especially patients with LVI on biopsy. Extended

  15. Total pelvic exenteration for the treatment of advanced primary or recurrent pelvic neoplasia.

    PubMed

    Carballo, Laura; Enríquez-Navascués, José M; Saralegui, Yolanda; Placer, Carlos; Timoteo, Ander; Borda, Nerea; Carrillo, Alberto; Sainz-Lete, Aitor

    2015-03-01

    Complete resection with clear margins in locally advanced pelvic visceral tumors, primary or recurrent, occasionally requires total pelvic exenteration (TPE). We reviewed the results of EFA in 34 consecutive patients operated on between June 2006 and December 2013. Median age was 62 (40-82) years; 24 (70%) were male. The tumor origin most frequent was advanced primary rectal tumor (APRT), with 19 cases (55.9%) and most common type of exenteration was supraelevator (61.8%). R₀ resection was achieved in 24 (70.6%) patients and in 16 (85%) of the APRT. Fifteen (79%) patients had pT₄ APRT, and 4 (20%) pN +. Reconstruction of the bowel and bladder was performed with two stomas in 17 cases (50%), colorectal anastomosis and Bricker in 11 (32.3%) and wet double barreled colostomy in 6 (17.6%). There was no postoperative mortality; 23 (67,5%) patients had complications, and 5 (14.6%) required a postoperative reoperation to solve them. Median follow-up was 23 (13-45) months. Overall survival (OS) and disease free survival (DFS) at 2 years were 67% and 58% respectively, and the median OS and DFS was 59 months (95% CI 26-110) and 39 months (95% CI 14-64), respectively. The DFS of R₀ was significantly better (p=0.003) than R₁. TPE is a potentially curative procedure for advanced pelvic visceral malignancies with similar morbi-mortality than other extended excisional surgery. Copyright © 2014 AEC. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  16. Laparoscopy for pelvic floor disorders.

    PubMed

    Van Geluwe, B; Wolthuis, A; D'Hoore, A

    2014-02-01

    Surgical treatment of pelvic floor disorders has significantly evolved during the last decade, with increasing understanding of anatomy, pathophysiology and the minimally-invasive 'revolution' of laparoscopic surgery. Laparoscopic pelvic floor repair requires a thorough knowledge of pelvic floor anatomy and its supportive components before repair of defective anatomy is possible. Several surgical procedures have been introduced and applied to treat rectal prolapse syndromes. Transabdominal procedures include a variety of rectopexies with the use of sutures or prosthesis and with or without resection of redundant sigmoid colon. Unfortunately there is lack of one generally accepted standard treatment technique. This article will focus on recent advances in the management of pelvic floor disorders affecting defecation, with a brief overview of contemporary concepts in pelvic floor anatomy and different laparoscopic treatment options.

  17. Dynamic sagittal imbalance of the spine in degenerative flat back: significance of pelvic tilt in surgical treatment.

    PubMed

    Lee, C S; Lee, C K; Kim, Y T; Hong, Y M; Yoo, J H

    2001-09-15

    A retrospective study of 26 patients with degenerative flat back treated with corrective osteotomy. To analyze dynamic sagittal imbalance and to elucidate the cause of postoperative persistent stooping in degenerative flat back. Sagittal spinal imbalance in degenerative flat back was more evident on walking, suggesting its dynamic nature. The most puzzling complication in its surgical treatment was postoperative persistent stooping. This study analyzed 26 surgically treated patients with preoperative gait analysis. Patients were divided into two groups according to postoperative improvement in stooping: Group 1 with marked improvement in stooping and Group 2 with persistent stooping. Various radiographic and gait parameters were compared between the two groups. Comparison of radiographic parameters, representing the static status of the spine, did not indicate any clue to the mechanism for persistent stooping. However, comparison of gait parameters, representing the dynamic status of the spine, revealed meaningful differences between the two groups. Among various gait parameters compared, pelvic tilt seemed to be the most important clue. Patients in Group 1 showed posterior pelvic tilt, whereas those in Group 2 showed marked anterior pelvic tilt. Degenerative flat back could be classified into two types based on pelvic position during walking: one with posterior pelvic tilt and the other with marked anterior pelvic tilt. In the former type, corrective surgery improved the stooping. In the latter, corrective surgery was ineffective, resulting in postoperative persistent stooping.

  18. Pressure-volume characteristics of the intact and disrupted pelvic retroperitoneum.

    PubMed

    Grimm, M R; Vrahas, M S; Thomas, K A

    1998-03-01

    Hemorrhage is a major cause of mortality in pelvic fractures. Bleeding can be controlled in hypotensive patients by direct ligation, angiographic embolization, pelvic packing, and acute external fixation. Acute application of an external fixator can reduce pelvic volume and reduce bleeding fractures to effect tamponade. This therapy assumes that the pelvis represents a closed space, which clearly is not true anatomically. However, the premise may hold functionally. This study explored the relationship between pressure and volume in the intact and disrupted pelvic retroperitoneum. In cadaveric specimens, the external iliac vein was dissected, ruptured, and cannulated. This method allowed controlled flow of fluid, with simultaneous measurement of pressure, into the intact retroperitoneum. Open book pelvic fractures were created by applying external rotation to the pelvis through the femoral heads. The pressure-volume measurements, without and with external fixation applied, were repeated after the fracture, as well as after a laparotomy. In the intact retroperitoneum, pressures rapidly rose to an average of 30 mm Hg after infusion of 5 liters of fluid. After fracture, up to 20 liters of fluid could be infused at pressures not exceeding 35 mm Hg. External fixation increased pressures approximately 3 mm Hg at low fluid volumes, and approximately 11 mm Hg at the highest fluid volumes. Laparotomy decreased retroperitoneal pressure from approximately 35 mm Hg to approximately 15 mm Hg. The results of the study suggest that low-pressure venous hemorrhage may be tamponaded by an external fixator, given that enough fluid volume is present in the pelvic retroperitoneum. However, external fixation may not generate sufficient pressure to stop arterial bleeding. In any case, it seems that a large volume of fluid must be lost into the pelvis before an external fixator can have much effect on retroperitoneal pressures.

  19. PELVIC INJURY IN CHILDHOOD: WHAT IS ITS CURRENT IMPORTANCE?

    PubMed Central

    GUERRA, MARÍA ROXANA VIAMONT; BRAGA, SUSANA REIS; AKKARI, MIGUEL; SANTILI, CLAUDIO

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: The purpose of this study was to assess the importance of pelvic fractures in childhood by analyzing epidemiological characteristics and associated injuries. Methods: This is a retrospective study performed between 2002 and 2012 at two trauma referral centers in São Paulo. We identified 25 patients aged 16 years old or younger with pelvic fracture. Results: The main mechanism of trauma was traffic accident (80%), followed by fall from height (16%). At hospital admission, 92% had traumatic brain injury and 40% had hemodynamic instability. Besides pelvic fractures, 56% of the children had other associated injuries (genitourinary, abdominal, vascular, chest and neurological), and 79% of them required operative treatment. According to the Torode and Zieg classification, the majority of cases were types III and IV. Seventy-two percent of all pelvic fractures were treated by surgery; 52% involved external fixation and 20% involved open reduction and internal fixation. Conclusions: The pelvic fractures in childhood can be considered a marker for injury severity, because the associated injuries usually are severe, needing operative treatment and leading to a high mortality rate (12%). Level of Evidence IV, Case Series. PMID:27217818

  20. Postoperative hyperkalemia.

    PubMed

    Ayach, Taha; Nappo, Robert W; Paugh-Miller, Jennifer L; Ross, Edward A

    2015-03-01

    Hyperkalemia occurs frequently in hospitalized patients and is of particular concern for those who have undergone surgery, with postoperative care provided by clinicians of many disciplines. This review describes the normal physiology and how multiple perioperative factors can disrupt potassium homeostasis and lead to severe elevations in plasma potassium concentration. The pathophysiologic basis of diverse causes of hyperkalemia was used to broadly classify etiologies into those with altered potassium distribution (e.g. increased potassium release from cells or other transcellular shifts), reduced urinary excretion (e.g. reduced sodium delivery, volume depletion, and hypoaldosteronism), or an exogenous potassium load (e.g. blood transfusions). Surgical conditions of particular concern involve: rhabdomyolysis from malpositioning, trauma or medications; bariatric surgery; vascular procedures with tissue ischemia; acidosis; hypovolemia; and volume or blood product resuscitation. Certain acute conditions and chronic co-morbidities present particular risk. These include chronic kidney disease, diabetes mellitus, many outpatient preoperative medications (e.g. beta blockers, salt substitutes), and inpatient agents (e.g. succinylcholine, hyperosmolar volume expanders). Clinicians need to be aware of these pathophysiologic mechanisms for developing perioperative hyperkalemia as many of the risks can be minimized or avoided.

  1. [Quality of life in women after anterior pelvic exenteration].

    PubMed

    Loran, O B; Veliev, E I; Seregin, A V; Khachatryan, A L; Guspanov, R I; Seregin, I V

    2016-04-01

    60 women, who underwent anterior pelvic exenteration with different types of urine derivation since 2004 till 2014 years in urology department, RMAPO, S.P. Botkin city hospital, were included in retrospective investigation. Middle age of patients was 53,2+/-3 (32-68). 38 women with bladder cancer and 22 women with urinary injuries after radiation therapy underwent anterior pelvic exenteration. Aim of this work is to perform quality of life comparison of patients after anterior pelvic exenteration with different types of urine derivation. Patients were divided in 3 groups: 1-st group 39 (65%) women, who underwent Brickers operation, 2-nd group 19 (31,66% ) women, who had Studers operation and 3-rd group - 2 (3,34%), patients who underwent continent urine derivation with formation of catheterizing urinary reservoir. Questionnaire (SF-36) was used to evaluate quality of life. Observation period was from 2 to 10 years. Postsurgical lethality was 3%, 5-years survival rate was 60,9+/-15,8% and 5-years recurrence-free survival rate was 55,4+/-12,6%. We established that quality of life in women who underwent orthotopic urine derivation was higher than in patients who underwent incontinent ileoconduit formation. Better quality of life was demonstrated by women, who had catheterizing urinary reservoir, but it is difficult to compare this group with the others, because of small number of patients with heterotopic catheterizing reservoir. Regarding the results of our investigation we made next conclusions: In spite of difficult technique, high risk of postoperative complications and lethality, anterior pelvic exenteration provide 5-years survival rate for 70% of patients In locally advanced tumors of pelvic organs anterior pelvic exenteration is salvational operation and keep satisfactory quality of life Orthotopic intestinal urine derivation is better to provide satisfactory quality of life for patients with invasive bladder cancer. For women with urinary injuries after

  2. Early Experiences of Sandwich Technique to Preserve Pelvic Circulation during Endovascular Aneurysm Repair.

    PubMed

    Kim, Daehwan; Chung, Jung Kee; Park, Hyung Sub; Jung, In Mok; Lee, Taeseung

    2017-06-01

    To report experiences of the sandwich technique (ST) for preservation of pelvic flow during endovascular repair of complex aortic or aortoiliac aneurysms. Eight patients underwent elective endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) using the ST between March 2013 and February 2017. The anatomic indications for the ST were complex aortoiliac aneurysms (5 cases), abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA) with non-diseased short common iliac arteries (2 cases) and AAA with unilateral occluded iliac artery (1 case). The ST was performed through both femoral and brachial approach. Patient clinical and radiologic data were collected and analyzed. Eight patients (7 male; mean age, 73.4 years) were followed over a mean period of 277 days (range, 9-1,106 days). The technical success rate was 100%. The primary patency rate of the iliac stent-grafts was 88% (14/16 cases). One internal iliac and 1 external iliac stent-graft occlusion was observed during the early postoperative period. There was 1 gutter endoleak which disappeared spontaneously within 4 days, and there were 2 type II endoleaks: one treated by coil embolization after 13 months, and the other observed without treatment. There were no cases of sac growth or aneurysm-related deaths, and no cases of buttock claudication or impotence. The ST is a safe and feasible technique to preserve pelvic circulation during endovascular treatment of complex aortoiliac aneurysms. The need to expand the indications for complex EVARs with adjunctive procedures, such as the ST is highlighted in situations where branched/fenestrated device availability is limited.

  3. Laparoscopic management of a strangulated internal hernia underneath the left external iliac artery☆

    PubMed Central

    Dumont, Karl-Andreas; Wexels, Jan Cyril

    2013-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Internal herniation of a small bowel behind pelvic vessels is a rare complication seen after pelvic lymphadenectomy. PRESENTATION OF CASE A 56-year-old woman was operated due to a gynecological cancer. 4 years thereafter she presented with a 2 days history of abdominal pain and vomiting. Clinical and radiological findings indicated a small bowel obstruction. A loop of small bowel had herniated behind the left external iliac artery. Using laparoscopic technique the herniated bowel was reduced. Due to limited peritoneum around the area and skeletonized vessel, we decided not to do any repair of the hernia orifice. The postoperative recovery was uneventful, bowel activity returned to normal and she was discharged the next day. Follow-up was done at 1 month and the latest at 10 months. She didn’t experience pain or discomfort after the operation. DISCUSSION Due to limited peritoneum around the skeletonized vessel, we decided to leave the hernia orifice unrepaired. We found it hazardous to do any direct suture of the orifice or use a free peritoneal graft to repair the defect as the fibrosis and inflammatory process might have compromised the artery or the vein. A longer follow-up of the patient is needed to clearly conclude if this simple procedure has been sufficient. We agreed that if the patient would experience any sign of recurrence and need another operation we would close the defect at that time. CONCLUSION 4 years after pelvic lymphadenectomy a small bowel herniation behind an external iliac artery occurred. The patient was successfully treated with reduction of the small bowel using laparoscopic technique. A quick recovery with minimal discomfort and no sign of recurrence after 10 months made our approach an acceptable surgical option. PMID:24121051

  4. Pelvic Floor Ultrasound: A Review.

    PubMed

    Dietz, Hans Peter

    2017-03-01

    Female pelvic floor dysfunction encompasses a number of prevalent conditions and includes pelvic organ prolapse, urinary and fecal incontinence, obstructed defecation, and sexual dysfunction. In most cases neither etiology nor pathophysiology are well understood. Imaging has great potential to enhance both research and clinical management capabilities, and to date this potential is underutilized. Of the available techniques such as x-ray, computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, and ultrasound, the latter is generally superior for pelvic floor imaging, especially in the form of perineal or translabial imaging. The technique is safe, simple, cheap, easily accessible and provides high spatial and temporal resolutions.

  5. Changes in Sexual Function and Comparison of Questionnaires Following Surgery for Pelvic Organ Prolapse

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Soo Rim; Moon, Yeo Jung; Kim, Sei Kwang

    2014-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of surgical repair of pelvic organ prolapse on female sexual function and to assess correlations between the two using two current standardized questionnaires. Materials and Methods From October 2009 to September 2010, 143 patients with posterior compartment or combined vaginal prolapse were included. We assessed surgical outcomes according to anatomical change in the vagina and results of the Female Sexual Function Index (FSFI) and Pelvic Organ Prolapse/Urinary Incontinence Sexual Function questionnaire (PISQ-12) both pre- and postoperatively. Results Among the 143 preoperative patients, 99 and 84 patients responded to the PISQ-12 and FSFI, respectively. The mean PISQ-12 score increased after surgery (p<0.001). Specifically, postoperative scores for questions 8 and 12 were higher than their respective preoperative scores (p<0.001). Postoperatively, mean FSFI score changed only slightly (p=0.76), and only the score for the satisfaction domain was improved (p=0.023). In regards to vaginal anatomy, vaginal length was significantly greater postoperatively (6.99±0.18 vs. 7.56±1.08, p<0.001), and postoperative vaginal caliber was narrowed to a two-finger width. Conclusion In this study, surgery for pelvic organ prolapse was shown to affect female sexual function. Moreover, menopause was associated with a change in postoperative sexual function. PMID:24339303

  6. Pelvic floor muscle training exercises

    MedlinePlus

    ... nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22258946 . Dumoulin C, Hay-Smith J. Pelvic floor muscle training versus no treatment, ... nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20091581 . Herderschee R, Hay-Smith EJC, Herbison GP, Roovers JP, Heineman MJ. Feedback ...

  7. Pelvic Inflammatory Disease (For Teens)

    MedlinePlus

    ... might cause ongoing pelvic pain, infertility, or an ectopic pregnancy. What Are the Symptoms of PID? PID ... has more of a chance of being infertile. Ectopic pregnancy. If a girl who has had PID ...

  8. Benign mesothelioma of peritoneum presenting as a pelvic mass.

    PubMed

    Asghar, Samina; Qureshi, Navid; Awan, Ali

    2008-11-01

    A large solitary multiloculated pelvic cyst in a 40-year-old woman with chronic pelvic pain was diagnosed to be a Multicystic Benign Mesothelioma (MBM) of peritoneum at laparotomy. Operative findings showed dense adhesions between uterus and bladder anteriorly, small intestines and pouch of Douglas posteriorly, a right ovarian cyst cm containing clear serous fluid and two nodular deposits were seen in the pouch of Douglas, small multiple deposits was found over the mesentery of small intestine and parietal peritoneum. Total abdominal hysterectomy with bilateral oophorectomy and infracolic omentectomy was done. During surgery, there was injury to the small intestine hence, resection of 10 inches of small intestine with re-anastomosis was carried out. Postoperative recovery was satisfactory. At 3 years follow-up, patient is symptom-free.

  9. The Impact of Pelvic Floor Disorders and Pelvic Surgery on Women's Sexual Satisfaction and Function.

    PubMed

    Yount, Susan M

    2013-01-01

    Pelvic floor disorders have a significant impact on women's daily lives. Sexual health, which includes sexual satisfaction and function, can be altered by pelvic floor disorders and pelvic surgery. This article reviews common pelvic floor disorders (pelvic organ prolapse, urinary and fecal incontinence) and the effect they have on sexual satisfaction and function. Associations between sexual function and pelvic floor disorders are described, as are the relationships between sexual function and pelvic surgery. Women of all ages need to know their options and understand the impact pelvic surgery can have on sexual satisfaction, function, and activity.

  10. Changes in Pelvic Incidence, Pelvic Tilt, and Sacral Slope in Situations of Pelvic Rotation.

    PubMed

    Jin, Hai-Ming; Xu, Dao-Liang; Xuan, Jun; Chen, Jiao-Xiang; Chen, Kai; Goswami, Amit; Chen, Yu; Kong, Qiu-Yan; Wang, Xiang-Yang

    2017-08-01

    Digitally reconstructed radiograph-based study. Using a computer-based method to determine what degree of pelvic rotation is acceptable for measuring the pelvic incidence (PI), pelvic tilt (PT), and sacral slope (SS). The effectiveness of a geometrical formula used to calculate the angle of pelvic rotation proposed in a previous article was assessed. It is unclear whether PI, PT, and SS are valid with pelvic rotation while acquiring a radiograph. Ten 3-dimensionally reconstructed models were established with software and placed in a neutral orientation to orient all of the bones in a standing position. Next, 140 digitally reconstructed radiographs were obtained by rotating the models around the longitudinal axis of each pelvis in the software from 0 to 30 degrees at 2.5-degree intervals. PI, PT, and SS were measured. The rotation angle was considered to be acceptable when the change in the measured angle (compared with the "correct" position) was <6 degrees. The rotation angle (α) on the images was calculated by a geometrical formula. Consistency between the measured value and the set angle was assessed. The acceptable maximum angle of rotation for reliable measurements of PI was 17.5 degrees, and the changes in PT and SS were within an acceptable range (<6 degrees) when the pelvic rotation increased from 0 to 30 degrees. The effectiveness of the geometrical formula was shown by the consistency between the set and the calculated rotation angles of the pelvis (intraclass correlation coefficient=0.99). Our study provides insight into the influence of pelvic rotation on the PI, PT, and SS. PI changes with pelvic rotation. The acceptable maximum angle for reliable values of PI, PT, and SS was 17.5 degrees, and the rotation angle of the pelvis on a lateral spinopelvic radiograph can be calculated reliably.

  11. Robotic hybrid technique in rectal surgery for deep pelvic endometriosis.

    PubMed

    Cassini, Diletta; Cerullo, Guido; Miccini, Michelangelo; Manoochehri, Farshad; Ercoli, Alfredo; Baldazzi, Gianandrea

    2014-02-01

    Deep pelvic endometriosis is a complex disorder that affects 6% to 12% of all women in childbearing age. The incidence of bowel endometriosis ranges between 5.3% and 12%, with rectum and sigma being the most frequently involved tracts, accounting for about 80% of cases. It has been reported that segmental colorectal resection is the best surgical option in terms of recurrence rate and improvement of symptoms. The aim of this study is to analyze indications, feasibility, limits, and short-term results of robotic (Da Vinci Surgical System)-assisted laparoscopic rectal sigmoidectomy for the treatment of deep pelvic endometriosis. Between January 2006 and December 2010, 19 women with bowel endometriosis underwent colorectal resection through the robotic-assisted laparoscopic approach. Intraoperative and postoperative data were collected. All procedures were performed in a single center and short-term complications were evaluated. Nineteen robotic-assisted laparoscopic colorectal resections for infiltrating endometriosis were achieved. Additional procedures were performed in 7 patients (37%). No laparotomic conversion was performed. No intraoperative complications were observed. The mean operative time was 370 minutes (range = 250-720 minutes), and the estimated blood loss was 250 mL (range = 50-350 mL). The overall complication rate was 10% (2 rectovaginal fistulae). Deep pelvic endometriosis is a benign condition but may have substantial impact on quality of life due to severe pelvic symptoms. We believe that robotic-assisted laparoscopic colorectal resection is a feasible and relatively safe procedure in the context of close collaboration between gynecologists and surgeons for treatment of deep pelvic endometriosis with intestinal involvement, with low rates of complications and significant improvement of intestinal symptoms.

  12. Spino-pelvic parameters after surgery can be predicted: a preliminary formula and validation of standing alignment.

    PubMed

    Lafage, Virginie; Schwab, Frank; Vira, Shaleen; Patel, Ashish; Ungar, Benjamin; Farcy, Jean-Pierre

    2011-06-01

    Prospective and retrospective radiographic study of adult patients with spinal deformities. Construct predictive models for pelvic tilt (PT) and global sagittal balance (sagittal vertical axis [SVA]) and evaluate the effectiveness of these predictive models against a group of patients after pedicle subtraction osteotomy. Spinal balance involves a complex interaction between the pelvis and vertebral column. In the setting of adult spinal deformity, prediction of postoperative alignment can be challenging. The study included 219 adult patients treated for spinal deformity. Full-length standing films were available for all subjects. Multilinear models with a stepwise condition were used on the first group of patients (n = 179) to predict PT and global sagittal balance (measured by the SVA). Prediction models were then applied on a second group of patients (n = 40) to estimate postoperative radiographic parameters after pedicle subtraction osteotomy surgery. Differences between estimated parameters and real values were evaluated. Multilinear regression analysis applied on the first group of patients led to a predictive formula for PT (r = 0.93, standard error = 4.4°) using the following parameters: pelvic incidence, maximal lordosis, and maximal kyphosis. These parameters with the addition of the predicted PT were then used to predict the SVA (r = 0.89, standard error = 32 mm). Validation of predictive models (second group of patients) used pelvic incidence and postoperative sagittal curves. Postoperative PT was predicted with a mean error of 4.3° (SD 3.5°) and postoperative SVA was predicted with a mean error of 29 mm (SD = 23 mm). This is the first study to develop and validate pragmatic predictive models for key spino-pelvic parameters (PT and SVA) in the setting of adult spinal deformity. Using a morphologic pelvic parameter (pelvic incidence) and spinal parameters modifiable through surgery (lumbar lordosis and thoracic kyphosis), postoperative sagittal

  13. Pelvic floor function before and after robotic sacrocolpopexy: one-year outcomes.

    PubMed

    Geller, Elizabeth J; Parnell, Brent A; Dunivan, Gena C

    2011-01-01

    Estimate pelvic floor function and support 1 year after robotic sacrocolpopexy. Prospective cohort analysis of women undergoing robotic sacrocolpopexy for correction of advanced pelvic organ prolapse (Canadian Task Force Classification III). Primary outcome was pelvic floor function. Secondary outcomes included anatomic support and long-term surgical failures and complications. One university hospital in the southeastern United States. Primarily postmenopausal women (mean age 60) with advanced pelvic organ prolapse. All subjects underwent robotic sacrocolpopexy during the study period. Subjects then underwent 1-year postoperative assessment of pelvic floor function via validated condition-specific quality of life questionnaires and assessment of pelvic floor support, long-term surgical failures, and complications via physical examination. From November 2007 to April 2009, there were 28 subjects, 25 of whom (89.3%) were evaluated. Mean time since surgery was 14.8 months. Pelvic floor function remained significantly improved over preoperative baseline: PFDI-20 (117 vs 38, p <.001), PFIQ-7 (60 vs 10, p = .001), with stable high sexual function: PISQ-12 (34 vs. 36, p = .17), and improved pelvic support on POP-Q: Ba (+3 vs -2, p = .001), Bp (+0.5 vs -1, p = .092), C (+2.25 vs -8, p = .001). Anatomic cure for vault prolapse was 100% at 1 year. There were two mesh exposures and two subsequent prolapse surgeries. Robotic sacrocolpopexy demonstrates durable improvement in pelvic floor function and support, with high sexual function and reasonable failure and complication rates 1 year after surgery. Copyright © 2011 AAGL. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Managing chronic pelvic pain following reconstructive pelvic surgery with transvaginal mesh.

    PubMed

    Gyang, Anthony N; Feranec, Jessica B; Patel, Rakesh C; Lamvu, Georgine M

    2014-03-01

    In 2001, the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved the first transvaginal mesh kit to treat pelvic organ prolapse (POP). Since the introduction of vaginal mesh kits, some vaginal meshes have been associated with chronic pelvic pain after reconstructive pelvic floor surgery. Pelvic pain results in between 0 % and 30 % of patients following transvaginal mesh placement. Common causes of chronic pelvic pain include pelvic floor muscle spasm, pudendal neuralgia, and infection. Paucity of data exists on the effective management of chronic pelvic pain after pelvic reconstructive surgery with mesh. We outline the management of chronic pelvic pain after transvaginal mesh placement for reconstructive pelvic floor repair based on our clinical experience and adaptation of data used in other aspects of managing chronic pelvic pain conditions.

  15. The pelvic floor in health and disease.

    PubMed Central

    Shelton, A A; Welton, M L

    1997-01-01

    Normal pelvic floor function involves a set of learned and reflex responses that are essential for the normal control and evacuation of stool. A variety of functional disturbances of the pelvic floor, including incontinence and constipation, are not life threatening, but can cause significant distress to affected patients. Understanding the normal anatomy and physiology of the pelvic floor is essential to understanding and treating these disorders of defecation. This article describes the normal function of the pelvic floor, the diagnostic tools available to investigate pelvic floor dysfunction, and the etiology, diagnosis, and management of the functional pelvic floor disorders that lead to incontinence and constipation. Images Figure 1. PMID:9291746

  16. Myofascial Pelvic Pain and Related Disorders.

    PubMed

    Bonder, Jaclyn H; Chi, Michelle; Rispoli, Leia

    2017-08-01

    Myofascial pelvic pain refers to pain in the pelvic floor muscles, the pelvic floor connective tissue, and the surrounding fascia. The cause is often multifactorial and requires treatment that encompasses multiple modalities. This type of pain is often associated with other abdominopelvic disorders, so providers in these specialties need to be aware of these connections. A comprehensive musculoskeletal examination, including evaluation of the pelvic floor muscles, and history are key to diagnosing myofascial pelvic pain. Treatments include physical therapy, muscle relaxers, oral neuromodulators, cognitive-behavioral therapy, and pelvic floor muscle injections. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Factors affecting pelvic rotation in idiopathic scoliosis

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yunfei; Qi, Lin; Yang, Jun; Zhu, Xiaodong; Yang, Changwei; Li, Ming

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Pelvic rotation (PR) is commonly seen in patients with idiopathic scoliosis (IS), but factors contributing to this phenomenon and its relationship with the surgical outcome are not well established. This retrospective study included 85 IS patients in 2 groups: thoracic curve dominance group (group A) and lumbar curve dominance group (group B). Pre- and postoperative PR was measured on standing posteroanterior radiographs by the left/right ratio (L/R ratio) of horizontal distance between the anterior superior iliac spine (ASIS) and the inferior ilium (SI) at the sacroiliac joint on the same side in both groups. Other radiographic data, age, sex, and Risser sign of each patient were recorded to analyze their correlations with PR before and after operation. The patients ranged in age from 10 to 35 years with a mean of 17.0 ± 5.2 years. The mean L/R ratio of PR before operation was 0.99 (0.73–1.40) versus 0.98 (0.87–1.26) after operation. The L/R ration was beyond the range of 1 ± 0.1 (indicating the presence of PR) in 17 (20%) patients before operation and in 14 (16.5%) patients after operation. There was no significant difference in PR between the 2 groups of patients either before (P = 0.468) or after (P = 0.944) surgery. The preoperative PR showed a very low correlation with Risser sign (r = 0.220, P = 0.043), apex vertebral rotation (AVR) in the proximal thoracic curve (r = 0.242, P = 0.026), and AVR in the lumbar curve (r = 0.213, P = 0.049), while the postoperative PR showed a very low correlation with Risser sign (r = −0.341, P = 0.001) and postoperative trunk shift (TS) (r = −0.282, P = 0.009). Multiple stepwise regression analysis showed that preoperative PR was affected by proximal thoracic curve AVR and lumbar curve AVR. There was no significant difference between PR before operation and 2 years after operation. Preoperative PR was mainly correlated with Risser sign and the rotation

  18. Obesity and Pelvic Floor Disorders: A Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Pomian, Andrzej; Lisik, Wojciech; Kosieradzki, Maciej; Barcz, Ewa

    2016-01-01

    Overweight and obesity are becoming a worldwide health problem associated with numerous co-morbidities. National costs of obesity and pelvic flor disorders have been rising since the 1950s across the world. Obesity is thought to have a very strong effect on pelvic floor disorders, and, considering the high prevalence of both problems worldwide, it is of utmost importance to evaluate the association between these pathologies as well as the impact of obesity on treatment efficacy. This review is based on a selection of reports in the literature (PubMed search), including guidelines and Cochrane reviews. Obesity seems to be a well-documented risk factor for lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) and is a predictor of exacerbation of stress urinary incontinence (SUI) and overactive bladder (OAB). Weight loss is also associated with improvement or resolution of SUI and OAB. In the case of pelvic organ prolapse (POP), weight loss is associated with improvement in quality of life. Although obesity is associated with POP in general, the exact role of obesity in symptomatic POP remains uncertain. While outcomes of anti-incontinence surgery among obese women are similar to those in non-obese women, postoperative urge incontinence is more likely to occur. It seems that obesity is not a risk factor for postoperative complications or short-term efficacy of POP surgical treatment. Long-term effects are still uncertain. Obesity is a strong risk factor for LUTS, but in most cases it does not affect efficacy of operative treatment. It may be associated with some post-operative complications. Weight loss in many cases allows avoiding surgical intervention. PMID:27255341

  19. Obesity and Pelvic Floor Disorders: A Review of the Literature.

    PubMed

    Pomian, Andrzej; Lisik, Wojciech; Kosieradzki, Maciej; Barcz, Ewa

    2016-06-03

    Overweight and obesity are becoming a worldwide health problem associated with numerous co-morbidities. National costs of obesity and pelvic flor disorders have been rising since the 1950s across the world. Obesity is thought to have a very strong effect on pelvic floor disorders, and, considering the high prevalence of both problems worldwide, it is of utmost importance to evaluate the association between these pathologies as well as the impact of obesity on treatment efficacy. This review is based on a selection of reports in the literature (PubMed search), including guidelines and Cochrane reviews. Obesity seems to be a well-documented risk factor for lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) and is a predictor of exacerbation of stress urinary incontinence (SUI) and overactive bladder (OAB). Weight loss is also associated with improvement or resolution of SUI and OAB. In the case of pelvic organ prolapse (POP), weight loss is associated with improvement in quality of life. Although obesity is associated with POP in general, the exact role of obesity in symptomatic POP remains uncertain. While outcomes of anti-incontinence surgery among obese women are similar to those in non-obese women, postoperative urge incontinence is more likely to occur. It seems that obesity is not a risk factor for postoperative complications or short-term efficacy of POP surgical treatment. Long-term effects are still uncertain. Obesity is a strong risk factor for LUTS, but in most cases it does not affect efficacy of operative treatment. It may be associated with some post-operative complications. Weight loss in many cases allows avoiding surgical intervention.

  20. Inflammatory bowel diseases activity in patients undergoing pelvic radiation therapy

    PubMed Central

    Seisen, Thomas; Klotz, Caroline; Mazeron, Renaud; Maroun, Pierre; Petit, Claire; Deutsch, Eric; Bossi, Alberto; Haie-Meder, Christine; Chargari, Cyrus; Blanchard, Pierre

    2017-01-01

    Background Few studies with contradictory results have been published on the safety of pelvic radiation therapy (RT) in patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Methods From 1989 to 2015, a single center retrospective analysis was performed including all IBD patients who received pelvic external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) or brachytherapy (BT) for a pelvic malignancy. Treatment characteristics, IBD activity and gastrointestinal (GI) toxicity were examined. Results Overall, 28 patients with Crohn’s disease (CD) (n=13) or ulcerative colitis (n=15) were included in the present study. Median follow-up time after irradiation was 5.9 years. Regarding IBD activity, only one and two patients experienced a severe episode within and after 6 months of follow-up, respectively. Grade 3/4 acute GI toxicity occurred in 3 (11%) patients, whereas one (3.6%) patient experienced late grade 3/4 GI toxicity. Only patients with rectal IBD location (P=0.016) or low body mass index (BMI) (P=0.012) experienced more severe IBD activity within or after 6 months following RT, respectively. Conclusions We report an acceptable tolerance of RT in IBD patients with pelvic malignancies. Specifically, a low risk of uncontrolled flare-up was observed. PMID:28280621

  1. Radiographic diagnosis of sagittal plane rotational displacement in pelvic fractures: a cadaveric model and clinical case study.

    PubMed

    Shui, Xiaolong; Ying, Xiaozhou; Kong, Jianzhong; Feng, Yongzeng; Hu, Wei; Guo, Xiaoshan; Wang, Gang

    2015-08-01

    Our objective was to measure the sagittal plane rotational (flexion and extension) displacement of hemipelvis radiologically and analyze the ratio of flexion and extension displacement of unstable pelvic fractures. We used 8 cadaveric models to study the radiographic evidence of pelvic fractures in the sagittal plane. We performed pelvic osteotomy on 8 cadavers to simulate anterior and posterior pelvic ring injury. Radiological data were measured in the flexion and extension group under different angles (5°, 10°, 15°, 20°, and 25°). We retrospectively reviewed 164 patients who were diagnosed with a unilateral fracture of the pelvis. Pelvic ring displacement was identified and recorded radiographically in cadaveric models. The flexion and extension displacement of pelvic fractures was measured in terms of the vertical distance of fracture from the top of iliac crest to the pubic tubercle (CD) or from the top of iliac crest to the lowest point of ischial tuberosity (AB). Fifty-seven pelves showed flexion displacement and 15 showed extension displacement. Closed reduction including internal fixation and external fixation was successfully used in 141 cases (86.0 %). The success rates of closed reduction in flexion and extension displacement groups were 77 and 73 %, respectively, which were lower than in unstable pelvic ring fractures. The sagittal plane rotation (flexion and extension) displacement of pelvic fractures could be measured by special points and lines on the radiographs. Minimally invasive reduction should be based on clearly identified differences between the sagittal plane rotation and the vertical displacement of pelvic fractures.

  2. Examination under anesthetic for occult pelvic ring instability.

    PubMed

    Sagi, H Claude; Coniglione, Franco M; Stanford, Jason H

    2011-09-01

    To describe the technique and results of stress examination with fluoroscopy under anesthesia (EUA) to determine stability and the need for operative stabilization of traumatic pelvic ring injuries. Retrospective chart and radiographic review. Level I trauma center. Skeletally mature patients with traumatic incomplete posterior pelvic ring injuries. Patients were consented for EUA if preoperative radiographs and computed tomographic scanning of the pelvis demonstrated an incomplete injury to the posterior pelvic ring (Orthopaedic Trauma Association [OTA] 61-B type injuries). Patients with nondisplaced anterior compression fractures of the sacral ala without internal rotation or a fracture line exiting the posterior cortex were excluded from this analysis. Similarly, skeletally immature patients or those with complete instability of the pelvic ring (OTA 61-C type injuries) were excluded. All patients meeting inclusion criteria were taken to the operating room, anesthetized, and placed in the supine position for stress examination (EUA) of the pelvic ring using intraoperative dynamic fluoroscopy. Examination consisted of a resting static film followed by internal rotation, external rotation, and push-pull maneuvers of both lower extremities. Each of these maneuvers was performed using the anteroposterior, inlet, and outlet projections, providing a total of 15 distinct images for each patient's examination. The preoperative classification of the pelvic ring injury was then accepted or redefined based on the amount of rotational and translational instability in the axial, coronal, and sagittal planes. The decision to proceed with anterior and/or posterior operative reduction and stabilization was subsequently based on the degree of pelvic ring instability noted during the EUA. A total of sixty-eight patients underwent an EUA of their pelvis by the senior author. Fifty males and 18 females with an average age of 35 years comprised the study group. In all, 37

  3. Functional anatomy of pelvic floor.

    PubMed

    Rocca Rossetti, Salvatore

    2016-03-31

    Generally, descriptions of the pelvic floor are discordant, since its complex structures and the complexity of pathological disorders of such structures; commonly the descriptions are sectorial, concerning muscles, fascial developments, ligaments and so on. On the contrary to understand completely nature and function of the pelvic floor it is necessary to study it in the most unitary view and in the most global aspect, considering embriology, philogenesy, anthropologic development and its multiple activities others than urological, gynaecological and intestinal ones. Recent acquirements succeeded in clarifying many aspects of pelvic floor activity, whose musculature has been investigated through electromyography, sonography, magnetic resonance, histology, histochemistry, molecular research. Utilizing recent research concerning not only urinary and gynecologic aspects but also those regarding statics and dynamics of pelvis and its floor, it is now possible to study this important body part as a unit; that means to consider it in the whole body economy to which maintaining upright position, walking and behavior or physical conduct do not share less than urinary, genital, and intestinal functions. It is today possible to consider the pelvic floor as a musclefascial unit with synergic and antagonistic activity of muscular bundles, among them more or less interlaced, with multiple functions and not only the function of pelvic cup closure.

  4. Total pelvic floor reconstruction during non-nerve-sparing laparoscopic radical prostatectomy: impact on early recovery of urinary continence.

    PubMed

    Hoshi, Akio; Nitta, Masahiro; Shimizu, Yuuki; Higure, Taro; Kawakami, Masayoshi; Nakajima, Nobuyuki; Hanai, Kazuya; Nomoto, Takeshi; Usui, Yukio; Terachi, Toshiro

    2014-11-01

    To develop a modified technique of "total pelvic floor reconstruction" during non-nerve-sparing laparoscopic radical prostatectomy, and to determine its effect on postoperative urinary outcomes. A total of 128 patients who underwent non-nerve-sparing laparoscopic radical prostatectomy were evaluated, including 81 with total pelvic floor reconstruction and 47 with non-total pelvic floor reconstruction. Nerve-sparing cases were excluded. Urinary outcomes were assessed with self-administrated questionnaires (Expanded Prostate Cancer Index Composite) at 1, 3, 6 and 12 months after laparoscopic radical prostatectomy. The total pelvic floor reconstruction technique included two concepts involving posterior and anterior reconstructions. In posterior reconstruction, Denonvilliers' fascia was approximated to the bladder neck and the median dorsal raphe by slipknot. The anterior surface of the bladder-neck was approximated to the anterior detrusor apron and the puboprostatic ligament collar for anterior reconstruction. There were no significant differences between the two groups in the patients' characteristics, and in perioperative and oncological outcomes. In the total pelvic floor reconstruction group, the continence rates at 3, 6 and 12 months after laparoscopic radical prostatectomy were 45.7%, 71.4%, and 84.6%, respectively. In the non-total pelvic floor reconstruction group, the continence rates were 26.1%, 46.8% and 60.9%, respectively. The total pelvic floor reconstruction technique resulted in significantly higher continence rates at 3, 6 and 12 months after laparoscopic radical prostatectomy, respectively (all P < 0.05). The mean interval to achieve continence was significantly shorter in the total pelvic floor reconstruction group (mean 7.7 months) than in the non-total pelvic floor reconstruction group (mean 9.8 months; P = 0.0003). The total pelvic floor reconstruction technique allows preservation of the blood supply to the urethra and physical

  5. How Are Pelvic Floor Disorders Diagnosed?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Information Clinical Trials Resources and Publications How are pelvic floor disorders diagnosed? Skip sharing on social media links ... fee ). This test is used to evaluate the pelvic floor and rectum while the patient is having a ...

  6. Postoperative irradiation in endometrial cancer: still a matter of controversy.

    PubMed

    Jereczek-Fossa, B A

    2001-02-01

    Although endometrial cancer is the most common female malignancy, evidence-based uniform guidelines for postoperative therapy have not been established. The most logical management is adjuvant irradiation tailored to the extent of surgery, the tumour grade, depth of myometrial invasion, degree of lymph node involvement and age of the patient. Currently, the only widely accepted treatment recommendations are no further therapy in low-risk patients who underwent extensive surgical staging, and external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) in high-risk patients. Most authors recommend postoperative application of only one radiotherapy modality: either brachytherapy (BRT) or EBRT, as their routine combination does not clearly improve the outcome but does increase the risk of late complications. A combination of BRT and EBRT should however be considered in patients with stage II disease, for infiltration of the lower uterine segment, vaginal involvement, positive or close surgical margins, capillary space involvement or unfavourable histology. Two recent randomized studies including mostly intermediate-risk patients managed with either extensive surgical staging or total abdominal hysterectomy and bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy (TAH&BSO) with or without postoperative EBRT, showed better local control but no survival benefit from adjuvant irradiation. Two ongoing Gynecologic Oncology Group (GOG) studies compare adjuvant chemotherapy with pelvic or abdominal irradiation in patients with high risk of local relapse. The role of adjuvant radiotherapy (EBRT with or without BRT) in high-risk patients as well as the value of lymphadenectomy in patients fit for such surgery is being addressed in a trial co-ordinated by the Medical Research Council. Future studies are warranted to define whether any irradiation should be employed in intermediate-risk patients and which radiotherapy modality should be used in high-risk node-negative patients with stage I tumours (stage Ib grade 3 and all

  7. Microbiota and Pelvic Inflammatory Disease

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Harsha; Tal, Reshef; Clark, Natalie A.; Segars, James H.

    2014-01-01

    Female genital tract microbiota play a crucial role in maintaining health. Disequilibrium of the microbiota has been associated with increased risk of pelvic infections. In recent years, culture-independent molecular techniques have expanded understanding of the composition of genital microbiota and the dynamic nature of the microbiota. There is evidence that upper genital tract may not be sterile and may harbor microflora in the physiologic state. The isolation of bacterial vaginosis-associated organisms in women with genital infections establishes a link between pelvic infections and abnormal vaginal flora. With the understanding of the composition of the microbiota in healthy and diseased states, the next logical step is to identify the function of the newly identified microbes. This knowledge will further expand our understanding of the causation of pelvic infections, which may lead to more effective prevention and treatment strategies. PMID:24390920

  8. Porcine Small Intestinal Submucosa Mesh for Treatment of Pelvic Organ Prolapsed

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Ting-Ting; Sun, Xiu-Li; Wang, Shi-Yan; Yang, Xin; Wang, Jian-Liu

    2016-01-01

    Background: Pelvic organ prolapse (POP) is a major health concern that affects women. Surgeons have increasingly used prosthetic meshes to correct POP. However, the most common used is synthetic mesh, and absorbable mesh is less reported. This research aimed to evaluate the clinical effectiveness of porcine small intestinal submucosa (SIS). Methods: Consecutive forty POP patients who met the inclusion criteria underwent pelvic reconstruction surgery with SIS between March 2012 and December 2013. The patients’ clinical characteristics were recorded preoperatively. Surgical outcomes, measured by objective and subjective success rates, were investigated. We evaluated the quality of life (QOL) using the Pelvic Floor Distress Inventory-20 (PFDI-20) and the Pelvic Floor Impact Questionnaire-7 (PFIQ-7). Sexual QOL was assessed by the Pelvic Organ Prolapse/Urinary Incontinence Sexual Function Questionnaire-12 (PISQ-12). Results: At postoperative 12 months, the subjective recurrence rate (7.5%) was much lower than the objective recurrence rate (40.0%). Postoperatively, no erosion was identified. One underwent a graft release procedure because of urinary retention, and one had anus sphincter reconstruction surgery due to defecation urgency. Another experienced posterior vaginal wall infection where the mesh was implanted, accompanied by severe vaginal pain. Estrogen cream relieved the pain. One patient with recurrence underwent a secondary surgery with Bard Mesh because of stage 3 anterior vaginal wall prolapse. Scoring system of PFDI-20 was from 59.150 ± 13.143 preoperatively to 8.400 ± 4.749 postoperatively and PFIQ-7 was from 73.350 ± 32.281 to 7.150 ± 3.110, while PISQ-12 was from 15.825 ± 4.050 to 12.725 ± 3.471. Conclusions: QOL and the degree of subjective satisfaction were significantly improved postoperatively. Anterior repair deserves more attention because of the higher recurrence rate. The long-term follow-up of the patient is warranted to draw firm

  9. Postoperative surgical complications of lymphadenohysterocolpectomy

    PubMed Central

    Marin, F; Pleşca, M; Bordea, CI; Voinea, SC; Burlănescu, I; Ichim, E; Jianu, CG; Nicolăescu, RR; Teodosie, MP; Maher, K; Blidaru, A

    2014-01-01

    Rationale The current standard surgical treatment for the cervix and uterine cancer is the radical hysterectomy (lymphadenohysterocolpectomy). This has the risk of intraoperative accidents and postoperative associated morbidity. Objective The purpose of this article is the evaluation and quantification of the associated complications in comparison to the postoperative morbidity which resulted after different types of radical hysterectomy. Methods and results Patients were divided according to the type of surgery performed as follows: for cervical cancer – group A- 37 classic radical hysterectomies Class III Piver - Rutledge -Smith ( PRS ), group B -208 modified radical hysterectomies Class II PRS and for uterine cancer- group C -79 extended hysterectomies with pelvic lymphadenectomy from which 17 patients with paraaortic lymphnode biopsy . All patients performed preoperative radiotherapy and 88 of them associated radiosensitization. Discussion Early complications were intra-abdominal bleeding ( 2.7% Class III PRS vs 0.48% Class II PRS), supra-aponeurotic hematoma ( 5.4% III vs 2.4% II) , dynamic ileus (2.7% III vs 0.96% II) and uro - genital fistulas (5.4% III vs 0.96% II).The late complications were the bladder dysfunction (21.6% III vs 16.35% II) , lower limb lymphedema (13.5% III vs 11.5% II), urethral strictures (10.8% III vs 4.8% II) , incisional hernias ( 8.1% III vs 7.2% II), persistent pelvic pain (18.91% III vs 7.7% II), bowel obstruction (5.4% III vs 1.4% II) and deterioration of sexual function (83.3% III vs 53.8% II). PRS class II radical hysterectomy is associated with fewer complications than PRS class III radical hysterectomy , except for the complications of lymphadenectomy . A new method that might reduce these complications is a selective lymphadenectomy represented by sentinel node biopsy . In conclusion PRS class II radical hysterectomy associated with neoadjuvant radiotherapy is a therapeutic option for the incipient stages of cervical cancer

  10. Magnitude of interfractional vaginal cuff movement: implications for external irradiation.

    PubMed

    Ma, Daniel J; Michaletz-Lorenz, Martha; Goddu, S Murty; Grigsby, Perry W

    2012-03-15

    To quantify the extent of interfractional vaginal cuff movement in patients receiving postoperative irradiation for cervical or endometrial cancer in the absence of bowel/bladder instruction. Eleven consecutive patients with cervical or endometrial cancer underwent placement of three gold seed fiducial markers in the vaginal cuff apex as part of standard of care before simulation. Patients subsequently underwent external irradiation and brachytherapy treatment based on institutional guidelines. Daily megavoltage CT imaging was performed during each external radiation treatment fraction. The daily positions of the vaginal apex fiducial markers were subsequently compared with the original position of the fiducial markers on the simulation CT. Composite dose-volume histograms were also created by summing daily target positions. The average (± standard deviation) vaginal cuff movement throughout daily pelvic external radiotherapy when referenced to the simulation position was 16.2 ± 8.3 mm. The maximum vaginal cuff movement for any patient during treatment was 34.5 mm. In the axial plane the mean vaginal cuff movement was 12.9 ± 6.7 mm. The maximum vaginal cuff axial movement was 30.7 mm. In the craniocaudal axis the mean movement was 10.3 ± 7.6 mm, with a maximum movement of 27.0 mm. Probability of cuff excursion outside of the clinical target volume steadily dropped as margin size increased (53%, 26%, 4.2%, and 1.4% for 1.0, 1.5, 2.0, and 2.5 cm, respectively.) However, rectal and bladder doses steadily increased with larger margin sizes. The magnitude of vaginal cuff movement is highly patient specific and can impact target coverage in patients without bowel/bladder instructions at simulation. The use of vaginal cuff fiducials can help identify patients at risk for target volume excursion. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. [Preclinical and clinical treatment of instable pelvic injuries : Results of an online survey].

    PubMed

    Wohlrath, B; Trentzsch, H; Hoffmann, R; Kremer, M; Schmidt-Horlohè, K; Schweigkofler, U

    2016-09-01

    Instable pelvic injuries are often associated with a high blood loss, which can effectively be curtailed by rapid external stabilization of the pelvis. The S3 guidelines on the treatment of multiple trauma and the severely injured recommend an initial stability testing in cases of an instable pelvis and hemodynamic instability even though the sensitivity is very low, with subsequent external stabilization. Radiological diagnostic procedures are also becoming more important for early diagnostics. An online survey of the current management of instable pelvic injuries was carried out with 266 participants via the e-mail distribution list of the German Society of Trauma Surgery (DGU).Most answers in the survey were received from very experienced senior and chief physicians at level 1 trauma centers. The vast majority of the participants recommended carrying out mechanical stabilization testing and most wanted to do the testing themselves independent of any previous findings. Most participants would only carry out a pelvic stabilization if they themselves had recognized instability during the stability testing and many of them even in cases of hemodynamic instability alone, although several studies have reported a very low sensitivity of 26-44 % for stability testing. The preferred procedure for emergency stabilization in the emergency room was the pelvic sling, which in contrast to invasive tools was often implemented before radiological imaging was completed. In preclinical treatment the vacuum mattress was used more often for stabilization than the pelvic sling. In radiological examinations a whole body computed tomography (CT) scan was mostly used, sometimes combined with an anteroposterior pelvic x-ray. In cases of persisting hemorrhage in spite of external stabilization, most participants preferred a pelvic tamponade but angioembolization was also highly rated.Because many of the participants relied on their own findings from stability testing for a decision on

  12. Analysis of muscle activity during active pelvic tilting in sagittal plane

    PubMed Central

    TAKAKI, Sho; KANEOKA, Koji; OKUBO, Yu; OTSUKA, Satoru; TATSUMURA, Masaki; SHIINA, Itsuo; MIYAKAWA, Shumpei

    2016-01-01

    Background: Pelvic tilting is performed to improve lumbopelvic flexibility or retrain the motor control of local muscles. However, few studies investigated the activity of local muscles during pelvic tilting. Purpose: The purpose of this study was to investigate muscle activity during anterior and posterior pelvic tilting. Method: Twelve healthy males (age, 22.6 ± 1.4 years) participated. Fine-wire electrodes were inserted into the bilateral lumbar multifidus (MF) and transversus abdominis (TrA). Surface electrodes were used to record activity of the bilateral rectus abdominis, external oblique, and erector spinae (ES), and the unilateral right latissimus dorsi, gluteus maximus, semitendinosus, and rectus femoris muscles. The electromyographic activities during anterior and posterior pelvic tilting in a standing position were recorded and expressed as a percentage of the maximum voluntary contraction (%MVC) for each muscle. Results: The activities of the bilateral MF (right: 23.9 ± 15.9 %MVC, left: 23.9 ± 15.1 %MVC) and right ES (19.0 ± 13.3 %MVC) were significantly greater than those of the other muscles during anterior pelvic tilting. The activity of the left TrA (14.8 ± 16.4 %MVC) was significantly greater than that of the other muscles during posterior pelvic tilting. Conclusions: The results suggested that the MF and ES are related to anterior pelvic tilting. The activity of the TrA, which was classified as a local muscle, was greater during posterior pelvic tilting. This study indicated that local muscles such as the MF and TrA may be related to pelvic tilting. PMID:28289581

  13. Opioid use following gynecologic and pelvic reconstructive surgery.

    PubMed

    Hota, Lekha S; Warda, Hussein A; Haviland, Miriam J; Searle, Frances M; Hacker, Michele R

    2017-09-09

    Opioid use, addiction, and overdose are a growing epidemic in the USA. Our objective was to determine whether the amount of opioid medication prescribed following gynecologic and pelvic reconstructive surgery is insufficient, adequate, or in excess. We hypothesized that we were overprescribing postoperative opioids. Participants who were at least 18 years old and underwent gynecologic and/or pelvic reconstructive surgery from April through August 2016 were eligible to participate. Routine practice for pain management is to prescribe 30 tablets of opioids for major procedures and ten to 15 tablets for minor procedures. At the 2-week postoperative visit, participants completed a questionnaire regarding the number of tablets prescribed and used, postoperative pain control, and relevant medical history. Fisher's exact test was used to compare data. Sixty-five participants completed questionnaires. Half (49.1%) reported being prescribed more opioids than needed, while two (3.5%) felt the amount was less than needed. Though not significant, participants who underwent major surgeries were more likely to report being prescribed more than needed (53.5%) compared with participants who underwent minor surgeries (35.7%; p = 0.47). Though not significant, participants with anxiety were less likely to report being prescribed more tablets than needed compared with participants without anxiety (44.4% vs. 57.1%; p = 0.38). This was also true of participants with depression compared with those without (37.5% vs. 58.3%; p = 0.17), and those with chronic pain compared with those without (33.3% vs. 60.0%; p = 0.10). Our current opioid prescription practice for postoperative pain management may exceed what patients need.

  14. Voiding trial outcome following pelvic floor repair without incontinence procedures

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Rui; Won, Sara; Haviland, Miriam J.; Bargen, Emily Von; Hacker, Michele R.; Li, Janet

    2016-01-01

    Introduction and hypothesis Our aim was to identify predictors of postoperative voiding trial failure among patients who had a pelvic floor repair without a concurrent incontinence procedure in order to identify low-risk patients in whom postoperative voiding trials may be modified. Methods We conducted a retrospective cohort study of women who underwent pelvic floor repair without concurrent incontinence procedures at two institutions from 1 November 2011 through 13 October 2013 after abstracting demographic and clinical data from medical records. The primary outcome was postoperative retrograde voiding trial failure. We used modified Poisson regression to calculate the risk ratio (RR) and 95 % confidence interval (CI). Results Of the 371 women who met eligibility criteria, 294 (79.2 %) had complete data on the variables of interest. Forty nine (16.7%) failed the trial, and those women were less likely to be white (p = 0.04), more likely to have had an anterior colporrhaphy (p = 0.001), and more likely to have had a preoperative postvoid residual (PVR) ≥150 ml (p = 0.001). After adjusting for race, women were more likely to fail their voiding trial if they had a preoperative PVR of ≥150 ml (RR: 1.9; 95 % CI: 1.1–3.2); institution also was associated with voiding trial failure (RR: 3.0; 95 % CI: 1.6–5.4). Conclusions Among our cohort, postoperative voiding trial failure was associated with a PVR of ≥150 ml and institution at which the surgery was performed. PMID:26886553

  15. Prevalence of pelvic adhesions on ultrasound examination in women with a history of Cesarean section.

    PubMed

    Moro, F; Mavrelos, D; Pateman, K; Holland, T; Hoo, W L; Jurkovic, D

    2015-02-01

    To investigate the prevalence and location of pelvic adhesions in women with a history of Cesarean section and to identify risk factors for their formation and symptoms associated with their presence. This was a prospective observational study of women in whom one or more Cesarean sections had been performed > 12 months previously and who attended for a gynecological ultrasound examination. In all women, both transvaginal and transabdominal scans were performed in order to identify the presence of pelvic adhesions. Medical and surgical history was recorded and a structured questionnaire was used to enquire about any history of pelvic pain and urinary symptoms. A total of 308 women were recruited into the study. On ultrasound examination, 139 (45.1% (95% CI, 39.7-50.7%)) women showed evidence of adhesions within the pelvis. Adhesions in the vesicouterine pouch were the most common and were found in a total of 79 (25.6% (95% CI, 20.7-30.5%)) women. In women with a history of no surgery other than Cesarean section(s) (n = 220), an increasing number of Cesarean sections (odds ratio (OR) 3.4 (95% CI, 2.1-5.5)) and a postoperative wound infection (OR 11.7 (95% CI, 3.5-39.5)) increased the likelihood of adhesions developing in the anterior pelvic compartment. There was a significant association between the presence of anterior compartment adhesions and chronic pelvic pain. Multivariable logistic regression analysis identified anterior abdominal wall adhesions (OR 2.4 (95% CI, 1.0-5.9)) and any adhesions present on ultrasound scan (OR 2.6 (95% CI, 1.2-5.7)) as independent predictors of chronic pelvic pain. Pelvic adhesions are present in more than a third of women with a history of Cesarean section and they are associated with chronic pelvic pain. Copyright © 2014 ISUOG. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Laparoscopic assisted percutaneous nephrolithotomy in chronic kidney disease patients with ectopic pelvic kidney

    PubMed Central

    Patwardhan, Sujata K.; Shelke, Umesh Ravikant; Patil, Bhushan P.; Pamecha, Yash R.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: Patients with deranged renal functions have a number of associated factors which can impair healing of wound and increase postoperative morbidity. This study was conducted to assess the problems while managing ectopic pelvic kidney calculi using laparoscopic approach for percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PCNL) in chronic kidney disease patients. Subjects and Methods: Patients with calculi in ectopic kidney with increased serum creatinine level secondary to obstruction were included in the study. Initially, obstruction was relieved. Patients later underwent laparoscopic-assisted PCNL. Patients were monitored postoperatively. Results: Three patients with large renal calculi in ectopic pelvic kidney had presented in 2 years. Laparoscopic-assisted PCNL was done to remove the stone. Patients had persistent urine leak post-operatively. Mean duration for removal of nephrostomy tube and drain removal were 4.67 days and 6.67 days, respectively. These patients also had paralytic ileus for prolonged duration. Conclusion: Although laparoscopic assisted PCNL is an option in the management of patients with stone disease in ectopic pelvic kidney, prolonged time for healing of tract may increase postoperative morbidity in these patients with impaired renal function. PMID:28794593

  17. Pelvic floor muscle rehabilitation using biofeedback.

    PubMed

    Newman, Diane K

    2014-01-01

    Pelvic floor muscle exercises have been recommended for urinary incontinence since first described by obstetrician gynecologist Dr. Arnold Kegel more than six decades ago. These exercises are performed to strengthen pelvic floor muscles, provide urethral support to prevent urine leakage, and suppress urgency. In clinical urology practice, expert clinicians also teach patients how to relax the muscle to improve bladder emptying and relieve pelvic pain caused by muscle spasm. When treating lower urinary tract symptoms, an exercise training program combined with biofeedback therapy has been recommended as first-line treatment. This article provides clinical application of pelvic floor muscle rehabilitation using biofeedback as a technique to enhance pelvic floor muscle training.

  18. Ultrasound Imaging of the Pelvic Floor.

    PubMed

    Stone, Daniel E; Quiroz, Lieschen H

    2016-03-01

    This article discusses the background and appraisal of endoluminal ultrasound of the pelvic floor. It provides a detailed anatomic assessment of the muscles and surrounding organs of the pelvic floor. Different anatomic variability and pathology, such as prolapse, fecal incontinence, urinary incontinence, vaginal wall cysts, synthetic implanted material, and pelvic pain, are easily assessed with endoluminal vaginal ultrasound. With pelvic organ prolapse in particular, not only is the prolapse itself seen but the underlying cause related to the anatomic and functional abnormalities of the pelvic floor muscle structures are also visualized.

  19. Chronic Pelvic Pain in Women.

    PubMed

    Speer, Linda M; Mushkbar, Saudia; Erbele, Tara

    2016-03-01

    Chronic pelvic pain in women is defined as persistent, noncyclic pain perceived to be in structures related to the pelvis and lasting more than six months. Often no specific etiology can be identified, and it can be conceptualized as a chronic regional pain syndrome or functional somatic pain syndrome. It is typically associated with other functional somatic pain syndromes (e.g., irritable bowel syndrome, nonspecific chronic fatigue syndrome) and mental health disorders (e.g., posttraumatic stress disorder, depression). Diagnosis is based on findings from the history and physical examination. Pelvic ultrasonography is indicated to rule out anatomic abnormalities. Referral for diagnostic evaluation of endometriosis by laparoscopy is usually indicated in severe cases. Curative treatment is elusive, and evidence-based therapies are limited. Patient engagement in a biopsychosocial approach is recommended, with treatment of any identifiable disease process such as endometriosis, interstitial cystitis/painful bladder syndrome, and comorbid depression. Potentially beneficial medications include depot medroxyprogesterone, gabapentin, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, and gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonists with add-back hormone therapy. Pelvic floor physical therapy may be helpful. Behavioral therapy is an integral part of treatment. In select cases, neuromodulation of sacral nerves may be appropriate. Hysterectomy may be considered as a last resort if pain seems to be of uterine origin, although significant improvement occurs in only about one-half of cases. Chronic pelvic pain should be managed with a collaborative, patient-centered approach.

  20. Bone Health and Pelvic Radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Higham, C E; Faithfull, S

    2015-11-01

    Survivors who have received pelvic radiotherapy make up many of the long-term cancer population, with therapies for gynaecological, bowel, bladder and prostate malignancies. Individuals who receive radiotherapy to the pelvis as part of their cancer treatment are at risk of insufficiency fractures. Symptoms of insufficiency fractures include pelvic and back pain and immobility, which can affect substantially quality of life. This constellation of symptoms can occur within 2 months of radiotherapy up to 63 months post-treatment, with a median incidence of 6-20 months. As a condition it is under reported and evidence is poor as to the contributing risk factors, causation and best management to improve the patient's bone health and mobility. As radiotherapy advances, chronic symptoms, such as insufficiency fractures, as a consequence of treatment need to be better understood and reviewed. This overview explores the current evidence for the effect of radiotherapy on bone health and insufficiency fractures and identifies what we know and where gaps in our knowledge lie. The overview concludes with the need to take seriously complaints of pelvic pain from patients after pelvic radiotherapy and to investigate and manage these symptoms more effectively. There is a clear need for definitive research in this field to provide the evidence-based guidance much needed in practice.

  1. The value of vaginal packing in pelvic floor surgery: a randomised double-blind study.

    PubMed

    Thiagamoorthy, G; Khalil, A; Cardozo, L; Srikrishna, S; Leslie, G; Robinson, D

    2014-05-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of vaginal packing following pelvic floor surgery with regard to post-operative pain, bleeding and infection. This was a double-blind randomised study of women undergoing vaginal hysterectomy and/or pelvic floor repair at a tertiary urogynaecology unit. The primary outcome of day 1 post-operative pain was assessed using the short-form McGill Pain score. Secondary outcomes were haematological and infective morbidity, evaluated using changes in full blood count, and cultures of midstream urine and high vaginal swabs. A transvaginal ultrasound scan to exclude pelvic haematoma was performed at 6 weeks in all women who underwent vaginal hysterectomy with or without a pelvic floor repair. In total, 190 women were recruited: mean age 58.3 years (27-91 years), mean body mass index 27.4 kg/m(2) and median parity 3. Women were randomised into the 'pack' (n = 86) and 'no pack' (n = 87) arms with no demographic differences between the groups. No statistically significant differences in the post-operative pain scores or secondary outcome measures were demonstrated. Incidence of haematoma formation (14.8 % no pack, 7.3 % pack, p = 0.204) was not statistically significant. There were three clinically significant complications in the no pack group and none in the pack group. This is the first study to examine pain in association with post-operative vaginal packing. There is no evidence to suggest that packing increases pain scores or post-operative morbidity. A trend towards increased haematoma and significant complications was seen in the no pack group. As vaginal packing does no harm and may be of some benefit it may be argued that packing should be recommended as routine clinical practice.

  2. Endometrical cancer metastases in the region of abdominal muscles and pelvic wall.

    PubMed

    Djurdjević, S; Mladenović-Segedi, L; Djolai, M

    2006-01-01

    We present a case of surgical removal of solitary metastases in the region of anterior and lateral pelvic wall following primary surgery, pelvic irradiation (external beam-Linac X 6 MV to whole pelvis, followed by intra-vaginal Ir(192)), and adjuvant chemotherapy (carboplatin/adriamycin) in a patient with endometrial adenocarcinoma, FIGO stage IIIA, performed on 3 consecutive recurrences. All recurrences were histologically well-differentiated. The first of them was in the region of m. Rectus abdominis and m. psoas, and was totally removed. The location of the last 2 recurrences occured approximately at the same site, and, after surgical removal, the patient received 4 cycles of paclitaxel and adjuvant irradiation to the lateral pelvic wall (external beam-Linac X 6 MV) in order to possibly prolong the disease-free interval. The patient is in good general condition with no evidence of disease 36 months following primary surgery.

  3. Retrospective clinical evaluation of hypobaric spinal anaesthesia in dogs undergoing pelvic limb orthopaedic surgery.

    PubMed

    De Gennaro, C; Vettorato, E; Corletto, F

    2014-10-01

    To evaluate intraoperative effects, complications, postoperative rescue analgesia requirement and presence of postoperative unilateral blockade after hypobaric spinal anaesthesia in dogs. Retrospective review of case records of dogs that underwent pelvic limb orthopaedic surgery and received hypobaric spinal anaesthesia. Cases that contained complete information on perioperative analgesia, end tidal anaesthetic agent, arterial blood pressure, postoperative urination, motor function and assessment at the sixth week re-examination were selected. Twenty-four of forty-eight records were sufficiently complete to meet the selection criteria. Local anaesthetic dose and volume of the solution administered were 0 · 22 (±0 · 06) mg/kg and 0 · 16 (±0 · 05) mL/kg, respectively. Fentanyl was administered intraoperatively in seven dogs (29%); mean ± sd end-expired isoflurane was 1 · 09 ± 0 · 17%; hypotension was observed in nine dogs (37 · 5%). Unilateral blockade was documented in 18 dogs (75%); 6 dogs (25%) required methadone postoperatively; urinary retention was not observed. One dog developed steroid responsive meningitis arteritis. Hypobaric spinal anaesthesia achieved unilateral postoperative pelvic limb motor blockade in dogs, although bilateral block occurred in a proportion of animals; intraoperative hypotension was not infrequent. Fentanyl and postoperative methadone might be required to control nociception and pain, despite technical success in performing spinal anaesthesia. © 2014 British Small Animal Veterinary Association.

  4. Role of pelvic ultrasound simulation.

    PubMed

    Arya, Sushila; Mulla, Zuber D; Kupesic Plavsic, Sanja

    2017-10-10

    Pelvic ultrasound is a critical diagnostic imaging tool in obstetrics and gynaecology. Training opportunities in transvaginal ultrasound have not kept pace with the demand among learners because of the increased complexity of modern ultrasound technology and duty-hour restrictions. Ultrasound simulation training has the potential to overcome this gap. Training opportunities in transvaginal ultrasound have not kept pace with the demand OBJECTIVE: Our study aimed to determine the usefulness, applicability and attitudes toward pelvic ultrasound simulation training among residents, sonographers and practising doctors. Pelvic ultrasound simulation activity using high-fidelity virtual reality ultrasound simulators lasted 4 hours and consisted of three modules: abnormal uterine bleeding, adnexal masses and bleeding in pregnancy. All learners completed a pre- and post-encounter quiz, and an anonymous post-simulation survey on the relevance of ultrasound simulation to clinical learning, and its usefulness to improve scanning performance and interpretation skills. Thirty-one participants attended the workshop, and 28 (90.3%) of them responded to the survey. Five respondents agreed and 23 strongly agreed that pelvic ultrasound simulation applies to their clinical ultrasound practice, and seven of them agreed and 21 strongly agreed that their performance of ultrasound and interpretation skills will be improved following their simulation training. The average post-activity knowledge score for all three topics significantly increased (paired Student's t-test, p < 0.0001). All 28 respondents believe that ultrasound simulation is a useful complement to learning with real patients, with the potential to improve their pelvic ultrasound performance, interpretation skills and clinical reasoning. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd and The Association for the Study of Medical Education.

  5. [Complex pelvic injury in childhood].

    PubMed

    Schmal, H; Klemt, C; Haag, C; Bonnaire, F

    2002-08-01

    Pelvic disruptions are rare in children caused by the flexible anchoring of bony parts associated with a high elasticity of the skeleton. Portion of pelvic fractures in infants is lower than 5% even when reviewing cases of specialized centers. The part of complex pelvic injuries and multiple injured patients in infants is higher when compared to adults, a fact caused by the more intense forces that are necessary to lead to pelvic disruption in children. Combination of a rare injury and the capability of children to compensate blood loss for a long time may implicate a wrong security and prolong diagnostic and therapeutic procedures--a problem that definitely should be avoided. Three cases were analyzed and established algorithms for treatment of patients matching these special injury-features demonstrated. A good outcome may only be achieved when all components of injury pattern get recognized and treatment is organized following the hierarchy of necessity. Therefore in the time table first life-saving steps have to be taken and then accompanying injuries can be treated that often decisively influence life quality. As seen in our cases unstable and dislocated fractures require open reduction and internal fixation ensuring nerval decompression, stop of hemorrhage and realizing the prerequisite for effective treatment of soft tissue damage. The acute hemorrhagic shock is one of the leading causes of death following severe pelvic injuries. After stabilization of fracture, surgical treatment of soft tissue injuries and intraabdominal bleeding sources the immediate diagnostic angiography possibly in combination with a therapeutic selective embolization is a well established part of the treatment. The aim of complete restitution can only be accomplished by cooperation of several different specialists and consultants in a trauma center.

  6. The effect of contralateral pelvic drop and trunk lean on frontal plane knee biomechanics during single limb standing.

    PubMed

    Takacs, Judit; Hunt, Michael A

    2012-11-15

    Pelvic drop as a result of hip abductor weakness has been hypothesized as a potential modifier of frontal plane knee joint kinetics during gait in individuals with pathology such as knee osteoarthritis (OA). However, hip muscle strengthening interventions have failed to find significant reductions in frontal plane loading measures such as the external knee adduction moment (KAM) with altered hip strength. Since this could in part be due to a lack of change in pelvic kinematics between conditions or test sessions or due to alterations in lateral trunk lean angle, the relationship between pelvic drop and subsequent changes in centre of mass with knee joint loading remains unclear. The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of a consciously altered frontal plane centre of mass position (pelvic drop and trunk lean to the contralateral side) on the KAM during single limb standing. Twenty healthy individuals performed a series of single limb standing trials, where they were asked to balance on their dominant leg. KAM was assessed during single limb stance in two conditions: with pelvis and trunk maintained in a level position, and with contralateral pelvic drop. A third condition involving contralateral pelvic drop and trunk lean was assessed to examine exaggerated changes in centre of mass. The KAM increased significantly with contralateral pelvic drop (p=0.001) and with combined contralateral pelvic drop and trunk lean (p<0.001) compared to the level pelvis trials. These findings suggest that pelvic drop alone can significantly increase KAM magnitude, a risk factor for the progression of knee OA. Assessment of pelvic obliquity prior to treatment may allow those with marked pelvic drop to be targeted for hip muscle strengthening.

  7. Fluid dynamic modelling of renal pelvic pressure during endoscopic stone removal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oratis, Alexandros; Subasic, John; Bird, James; Eisner, Brian

    2015-11-01

    Endoscopic kidney stone removal procedures are known to increase internal pressure in the renal pelvis, the kidney's urinary collecting system. High renal pelvic pressure incites systemic absorption of irrigation fluid, which can increase the risk of postoperative fever and sepsis or the unwanted absorption of electrolytes. Urologists choose the appropriate surgical procedure based on patient history and kidney stone size. However, no study has been conducted to compare the pressure profiles of each procedure, nor is there a precise sense of how the renal pelvic pressure scales with various operational parameters. Here we develop physical models for the flow rates and renal pelvic pressure for various procedures. We show that the results of our models are consistent with existing urological data on each procedure and that the models can predict pressure profiles where data is unavailable.

  8. Major Pelvic Bleeding Following a Stapled Transanal Rectal Resection: Use of Laparoscopy as a Diagnostic Tool

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Abdul Qayyum; Keane, Sean

    2016-01-01

    Stapled transanal rectal resection (STARR) and stapled hemorrhoidopexy (SH) are well-established techniques for treating rectal prolapse and obstructed defecation syndrome (ODS). Occasionally, they can be associated with severe complications. We describe the case of a 59-year-old woman who underwent STARR for ODS and developed a postoperative pelvic hemorrhage. A computed tomography (CT) scan revealed a vast pelvic, retroperitoneal hematoma and free gas in the abdomen. Laparoscopy ruled out any bowel lesions, but identified a hematoma of the pelvis. Flexible sigmoidoscopy showed a small leakage of the rectal suture. The patient was treated conservatively and recovered completely. Surgeons performing STARR and SH must be aware of the risk of this rare, but severe, complication. If the patient is not progressing after a STARR or SH, a CT scan can be indicated to rule out intra-abdominal and pelvic hemorrhage. Laparoscopy is a diagnostic tool and should be associated with intraluminal exploration with flexible sigmoidoscopy. PMID:27847791

  9. The first pelvic examination for an adolescent: is this rite of passage used to its full potential?

    PubMed

    Siwe, Karin; Wijma, Barbro

    2013-10-01

    Adolescents' experiences of their first pelvic examination (external inspection, speculum examination and bimanual palpation) may have a marked influence on future experiences; why examination techniques and strategies for creating a positive experience of this situation need to be developed. This review addresses to what extent that ambition is reflected in recent literature. The majority of articles on 'pelvic examination during adolescence' come from the United States, which skews the review's perspective. Several researchers recommend using investigations based on new technology rather than a pelvic examination when medical indications for a full examination are present. The profession's attitudes toward annual check-ups and pelvic examinations (in the United States) are currently debated, for teens as well as for adults.How to perform a first pelvic examination on an adolescent is not often discussed, nor are strategies for creating a positive experience of this event.The contexts in which a first pelvic examination is performed probably differ among societies. The Swedish and the US contexts are compared as an illustration; for example preventive healthcare and sex education is in Sweden the responsibility of schools, open for anybody and without admission fees. Recent literature does not mirror a need for developing examination techniques and strategies for creating a positive experience of the first pelvic examination, nor for exploiting its maximal potential as a positive rite of passage.The ongoing US debate on indications for pelvic examinations and annual check-ups is even more relevant for adolescents, in whom contraindications need to be considered.

  10. Female pelvic floor anatomy: the pelvic floor, supporting structures, and pelvic organs.

    PubMed

    Herschorn, Sender

    2004-01-01

    The development of novel, less invasive therapies for stress urinary incontinence in women requires a thorough knowledge of the relationship between the pathophysiology of incontinence and anatomy. This article provides a review of the anatomy of the pelvic floor and lower urinary tract. Also discussed is the hammock hypothesis, which describes urethral support within the pelvis and provides an explanation of the continence mechanism.

  11. Prospective Phase I-II Trial of Helical Tomotherapy With or Without Chemotherapy for Postoperative Cervical Cancer Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Schwarz, Julie K.; Wahab, Sasa; Grigsby, Perry W.

    2011-12-01

    Purpose: To investigate, in a prospective trial, the acute and chronic toxicity of patients with cervical cancer treated with surgery and postoperative intensity-modulated radiotherapy (RT) delivered using helical tomotherapy, with or without the administration of concurrent chemotherapy. Patients and Methods: A total of 24 evaluable patients entered the study between March 2006 and August 2009. The indications for postoperative RT were tumor size, lymphovascular space invasion, and the depth of cervical stromal invasion in 15 patients; 9 patients underwent postoperative RT because of surgically positive lymph nodes. All patients underwent pelvic RT delivered with helical tomotherapy and intracavitary high-dose-rate brachytherapy. Treatment consisted of concurrent weekly platinum in 17, sequential carboplatin/Taxol in 1, and RT alone in 6. The patients were monitored for acute and chronic toxicity using the Common Toxicity Criteria, version 3.0. Results: The median follow-up was 24 months (range, 4-49). At the last follow-up visit, 23 patients were alive and disease free. Of the 24 patients, 12 (50%) experienced acute Grade 3 gastrointestinal toxicity (anorexia in 5, diarrhea in 4, and nausea in 3). One patient developed acute Grade 4 genitourinary toxicity (vesicovaginal fistula). For patients treated with concurrent chemotherapy, the incidence of acute Grade 3 and 4 hematologic toxicity was 71% and 24%, respectively. For patients treated without concurrent chemotherapy, the incidence of acute Grade 3 and 4 hematologic toxicity was 29% and 14%, respectively. Two long-term toxicities occurred (vesicovaginal fistula at 25 months and small bowel obstruction at 30 months). The overall and progression-free survival rate at 3 years for all patients was 100% and 89%, respectively. Conclusion: The results of our study have shown that postoperative external RT for cervical cancer delivered with helical tomotherapy and high-dose-rate brachytherapy and with or without

  12. External validation of a preoperative renal stone grading system: reproducibility and inter-rater concordance of the Guy's stone score using preoperative computed tomography and rigorous postoperative stone-free criteria.

    PubMed

    Ingimarsson, Johann P; Dagrosa, Lawrence M; Hyams, Elias S; Pais, Vernon M

    2014-01-01

    To validate the Guy's stone score (GSS) using preoperative computed tomography (CT) and to assess its inter-rater concordance and association with rigorous definitions of stone clearance. The preoperative CT scans of 166 consecutive percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PCNL) patients treated by a single surgeon were independently reviewed by 2 urology residents and graded according to GSS. Concordance was calculated using Cohen's kappa score. Residual fragments (RFs) were evaluated on CT or plain radiography on postoperative day 1. GSS was correlated with 3 different outcomes; RFs <4 mm, RFs <2 mm, or no RFs. Higher GSS was associated with decreased stone clearance by any metric on a CT scan: RFs <4 mm (P = .03), RFs <2 mm (P = .02), or no RFs (P = .02). On plain radiography, higher GSS was only associated with lower likelihood of no RFs (P <.005). Inter-rater concordance was good (κ = 0.72), with 78% of cases categorized the same by both raters. Twelve of 36 cases (33%) of disagreement were between categories II and III and 20 of 36 cases (56%) pertained to unclear definitions of "partial staghorn stone" and "abnormal anatomy." The GSS is a straightforward grading system of the complexity of renal stones. When applied to preoperative CT scans, it offers good inter-rater concordance and is associated with rigorous endpoints of stone clearance. The inter-rater concordance could be further improved by explicit definitions of abnormal anatomy, partial vs complete staghorn stones, and the size of a calculus that constitutes a separate stone. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. The effectiveness of two different laparoscopic surgeries for apical support of pelvic organ prolapse.

    PubMed

    Li, Shunshuang; Ji, Mei; Zhao, Zhao

    2015-05-01

    To evaluate the efficacy of laparoscopic colpo-uterine butterfly suspension and compare it to laparoscopic sacrocervicopexy for apical support in sexually active patients of pelvic organ prolapse. Twenty-there women with symptomatic prolapse of apical prolapse underwent laparoscopic colpo-uterine butterfly suspension and forty-five underwent laparoscopic sacrocervicopexy at the first affiliated of Zhengzhou University between January 2010 and June 2013. They all presented with at least a stage 2 apical prolapse. Pre- and post-operative data referring to pelvic organ prolapse quantification (POP-Q) system were compared. At the same time, validated questionnaire of the Pelvic Floor Distress Inventory (PFDI-20), the Pelvic Floor Impact Questionnaire (PFIQ-7) and the Pelvic organ prolapse urinary Incontinence Sexual Questionnaire (PISQ-12) were included. From 2010 to 2013, 68 patients were included. Only 3 cases lost the follow-up in the Laparoscopic sacrocervicopexy. In the laparoscopic colpo-uterine butterfly suspension, there was no recurrence versus in five the laparoscopic sacrocervicopexy. When considered the operating time and blood loss, the laparoscopic colpo-uterine butterfly suspension was more favorable. Erosion was higher in the laparoscopic sacrocervicopexy compared to the other group (0% vs 21.4%). There was no difference in the postoperative PFDI-20 score (P=0.3079), and PFIQ-7 score (P=0.8889) between the two groups, while the PISQ-12 score was much higher in the laparoscopic colpo-uterine butterfly suspension than the other group (P=0.0076). Laparoscopic colpo-uterine butterfly suspension is a more effective option for sexually active women with pelvic organ prolapse. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Morbidity and mortality following preoperative radiation therapy and total pelvic exenteration for primary rectal adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Luna-Perez, P; Rodriguez, D F; Flores, D; Delgado, S; Labastida, S

    1995-01-01

    Pelvic exenteration, the standard treatment for patients with locally advanced rectal adenocarcinoma infiltrating neighbouring pelvic visceras, carried a significant morbidity and mortality rate. The aim of this study was to determine the morbidity and mortality rates in a group of patients who were treated with preoperative radiation therapy and total pelvic exenteration. Between January 1980 and January 1995, we treated 18 patients. Pretreatment staging was determined by clinical examination and computed tomography (CT) scan of the abdomen and pelvis. Each patient received preoperative radiation therapy of 45 Gy in 20 fractions delivered to the whole pelvis; approximately 6 weeks later total pelvic exenteration was performed. There were 17 males and 1 female, with a median age of 59 years. All patients underwent and completed the scheduled radiation therapy treatment. The main complaints related to radiotherapy were transient skin erythema in five patients and diarrhoea in four. Blood loss (estimated by the surgeon) ranged from 1000 ml to 4200 ml, with a mean loss of 2020 ml. Eight patients (44%) developed major complications: anastomatic leak from the uretero-intestinal suture line (n = 1); perineal wound infection (n = 2); abnormal wall infection (n = 1); haemorrhage from the right internal iliac vein (n = 1) and pneumonia (n = 1). Three patients required surgical reintervention for immediate postoperative haemorrhage from the sacral venous plexus (n = 1), small bowel obstruction (n = 1), and intra-abdominal and pelvic abscess (n = 1). There were two postoperative deaths (11%). The mean and median follow-up was 41 and 32 months, respectively. Two patients (12%) developed local recurrence at 5 and 8 months, and six developed distant recurrences (37%). The overall 5-year survival rate was 61%. Our treatment approach was associated with high morbidity and mortality rates, but was similar to previously published series based on total pelvic exenteration without

  15. Pelvic muscles during rest: responses to pelvic muscle exercise.

    PubMed

    Griffin, C; Dougherty, M C; Yarandi, H

    1994-01-01

    The purpose of the research was to study pelvic muscle changes in the resting phase between voluntary contractions (during pelvic muscle assessment) and in response to pelvic muscle exercise (PME) through secondary analysis of data. The sample consisted of healthy women (N = 38) aged 35 to 54. Analysis of variance showed a significant difference in resting pressure within each assessment (F = 2.92, p < .04). A significant difference in resting pressures within subjects was found (F = 3.54, p < .02). Within-subject variance suggests exercises performed without a warmup may result in incomplete relaxation prior to contraction. Significant change between baseline and Level 1 of the graded PME program suggests slow relaxation of untrained muscles. Increases in resting pressure at Levels 3 and 4 may be a more accurate reflection of muscle hypertrophy. The results of this research indicate that care should be taken in establishing the point from which changes during contractions are measured. It is recommended that the resting pressure be used. Exercise continued for more than 3 or 4 weeks accounts for nearly all strength gains and explains the increases in resting pressure at PME Levels 3 and 4.

  16. The effects of a pelvic belt on trunk and lower extremity muscles in the bridge position

    PubMed Central

    Cha, Hyun-Gyu; Wu, Yan-Ting; Kim, Myoung-Kwon

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of a pelvic belt on the activities of trunk and lower extremity muscles in normal adults. [Subjects and Methods] The subjects were 20 normal individuals without a history of orthopedic problems. The pelvic compression belt (The Com-Pressor, OPTP, Minneapolis, MN, USA) was an adjustable body belt with four elastic compression bands that provide stabilizing pressure and was designed to adjust the amount of force applied and to alter sites of compression. The body belt was placed below the anterior superior iliac spine, and stabilizing pressure was applied to the belt using the elastic compression bands in the bridge position after confirming the site of compression. [Results] The subjects showed a significant decrease in muscle activation in the erector spinae, oblique internus abdominis, rectus femoris, and biceps femoris while wearing the pelvic belt. [Conclusion] The use of a pelvic compression belt with external pelvic compression might improve pelvic joint stability and alter neuromotor control of the lumbopelvic and thigh muscles. PMID:28174437

  17. Does pelvic hematoma on admission computed tomography predict active bleeding at angiography for pelvic fracture?

    PubMed

    Brown, Carlos V R; Kasotakis, George; Wilcox, Alison; Rhee, Peter; Salim, Ali; Demetriades, Demetrios

    2005-09-01

    Pelvic angiography plays an increasing role in the management of pelvic fractures (PFs). Little has been written regarding the size of pelvic hematoma on admission computed tomography (CT) and how it relates to angiography results after PF. This is a retrospective review of trauma patients with PF who underwent an admission abdominal/pelvic CT scan and pelvic angiography from 2001 to 2003. CT pelvic hematoma was measured and classified as minimal or significant based on hematoma dimensions. Presence of a contrast blush on CT scan was also documented. Thirty-seven patients underwent an admission CT scan and went on to pelvic angiography. Of the 22 patients with significant pelvic hematoma, 73 per cent (n = 16) had bleeding at angiography. Fifteen patients had minimal pelvic hematoma, with 67 per cent (n = 10) showing active bleeding at angiography. In addition, five of six patients (83%) with no pelvic hematoma had active bleeding at angiography. Six patients had a blush on CT scan, with five of these (83%) having a positive angiogram. But, 22 of 31 (71%) patients with no blush on CT scan had bleeding at angiography. The absence of a pelvic hematoma or contrast blush should not alter indications for pelvic angiography, as they do not reliably exclude active pelvic bleeding.

  18. Improvements in hip- and pelvic motion for patients with osseointegrated trans-femoral prostheses.

    PubMed

    Tranberg, R; Zügner, R; Kärrholm, J

    2011-02-01

    This study describes the changes in hip and pelvic kinematics in 19 trans-femoral amputees, who were treated with an osseointegrated trans-femoral prosthesis. Patients were studied with 3-dimensional gait analysis, walking with socket prosthesis within two days before the osseointergration procedure. The post-operative gait analysis was carried out at the 2 year follow-up visit. Fifty-seven; age-, side- and gender-matched healthy subjects served as controls. Post-operative data showed that patients who had an osseointegrated transfemoral prosthesis increased their hip extension by 7.3° (p=0.007), changing from -2.6° (range -13.4° to 10.7°) to -9.9° (range -29.4° to 5°). Moreover, the pre-operative anterior pelvic tilt was reduced by 4.0° (p=0.016), changing from 21.7° (range 11.9-34.8°) to 17.7° (range 5.5-25.7°). Values for hip extension and pelvic tilt changed toward those of controls. These results confirm that patients treated with osseointegrated trans-femoral prosthesis encounter significant changes of their kinematic pattern in terms of hip extension and anterior pelvic tilt. Even though the changes were moderate they may, in the long-term have a positive influence on low-back biomechanics and could contribute to reducing the risk of further problems with low back pain.

  19. Laparoscopically guided bilateral pelvic lymphadenectomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gershman, Alex; Danoff, Dudley; Chandra, Mudjianto; Grundfest, Warren S.

    1991-07-01

    Pelvic node dissection has gained widespread acceptance as the final staging procedure in patients with normal acid phospatase and bone scan free of metastatic disease prior to definitive therapy for cure. However, the procedure has had a high morbidity (20-34%) and a major economic impact on the patient due to lengthy hospitalization and recuperative time. The development of laparoscopic biopsy techniques suggests that the need for open surgical lymphadenectomy may be reduced by a laparoscopically performed lymphadenectomy. The goal of this report is to investigate the possibility of laparoscopic pelvic lymphadenectomy in an animal model. Our interest in laparoscopy is based on the ability of this technique to permit tissue removal without the need for major incisions. In laparoscopic cholecystectomy and laparoscopic appendectomy, the surgical procedure is essentially unaltered. The diseased organ is removed and there is no need for a large abdominal incision.

  20. Obesity and pelvic floor dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Ramalingam, Kalaivani; Monga, Ash

    2015-05-01

    Obesity is associated with a high prevalence of pelvic floor disorders. Patients with obesity present with a range of urinary, bowel and sexual dysfunction problems as well as uterovaginal prolapse. Urinary incontinence, faecal incontinence and sexual dysfunction are more prevalent in patients with obesity. Uterovaginal prolapse is also more common than in the non-obese population. Weight loss by surgical and non-surgical methods plays a major role in the improvement of these symptoms in such patients. The treatment of symptoms leads to an improvement in their quality of life. However, surgical treatment of these symptoms may be accompanied by an increased risk of complications in obese patients. A better understanding of the mechanism of obesity-associated pelvic floor dysfunction is essential.

  1. [Stereotactic radiotherapy for pelvic tumors].

    PubMed

    Mazeron, R; Fumagalli, I

    2014-01-01

    Extracranial stereotactic radiotherapy is booming. The development and spread of dedicated accelerators coupled with efficient methods of repositioning can now allow treatments of mobile lesions with moderate size, with high doses per fraction. Intuitively, except for the prostate, pelvic tumours, often requiring irradiation of regional lymph node drainage, lend little to this type of treatment. However, in some difficult circumstances, such as boost or re-radiation, stereotactic irradiation condition is promising and clinical experiences have already been reported.

  2. The female orgasm: pelvic contractions.

    PubMed

    Bohlen, J G; Held, J P; Sanderson, M O; Ahlgren, A

    1982-10-01

    Eleven nulliparous women manually self-stimulated to orgasm, each on three separate occasions. Pelvic contraction pressure was measured by an anal probe and a vaginal probe simultaneously. Near the perceived start of orgasm, a series of regular contractions began in nine of the women. Anal and vaginal contraction waveforms were synchronized with each other, and the same number of orgasmic contractions occurred in each lumen. Anal pressure had a higher resting baseline and greater amplitude contractions than vaginal pressure. The perceived start of orgasm did not correspond precisely with the onset of regular contractions. Mean intercontraction intervals increased linearly at an increment of about 0.1 second through the series of regular contractions. Amplitudes of contraction pressure waveforms, representing pelvic muscular force, were initially low, increased through the first half of the regular series, and then decreased. Area and net area of the pressure waveforms, reflecting pelvic muscular exertion (force x time), increased during the regular orgasmic contractions. Three of the women's orgasms consistently included only a series of regular contractions (orgasm type I). For six other women, orgasms consistently continued beyond the regular series with additional irregular contractions (orgasm type II). Types I and II had been identified previously in men. Two women had no regular contractions during reported orgasms. This pattern, type IV, had not been recorded in men. Women of different types showed marked differences in orgasm duration and number of contractions. Identification of these types in subjects is important for meaningful comparison of contraction parameters in different studies.

  3. Successful Treatment of a Large Pelvic Abscess Using Intraluminal VAC: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Aras, Abbas; Celik, Sebahattin; Kiziltan, Remzi; Yilmaz, Özkan; Kotan, Çetin

    2016-04-01

    The most feared complication of the surgical treatment of rectal cancer is anastomotic leakage, which is related to high rates of mortality and morbidity. Here, we present a patient who could not be treated with surgical drainage but treated by intraluminal Vacuum Associated Closure (VAC). A 34-year-old male patient was treated for rectal cancer by low anterior resection, colorectal anastomosis, and diverting ileostomy following neoadjuvant CRT. The patient reported with a postoperative anastomotic disruption and a large pelvic abscess. Due to the continuation of foul-smell drainage inspite of perianal incision and drainage, intraluminal VAC was applied and the pelvic abscess and the foul-smell were successfully treated. The presence of an adequate anal sphincter tonus is a disadvantage in anastomotic leakage, since it prevents the emptying of the intestinal content and also precludes the drainage of the pelvic abscess. The endoluminal application of VAC, similar to the results of application of VAC in open wounds, has been demonstrated to decrease fibrin and necrotic tissue in the pelvic cavity and increase granulation tissue. VAC, which has long been used in the treatment of open wounds, is a promising method in the treatment of large pelvic abscesses due to anastomotic leakage following rectum resection.

  4. SURGICAL TREATMENT OF UNSTABLE PELVIC RING FRACTURE IN SKELETALLY IMMATURE PATIENTS

    PubMed Central

    Guimarães, Joao Antonio Matheus; de Souza Portes Meirelles, Ricardo; Júnior, Luiz Augusto Peçanha Tavares; Goldsztajn, Flávio; Rocha, Tito; Mendes, Pedro Henrique Barros

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To present the outcomes from definitive surgical treatment for unstable fractures of the pelvic ring in children undergoing surgical reduction and stabilization. Methods: We studied 10 patients with immature skeletons who suffered unstable fractures of the pelvic ring and were treated between March 2004 and January 2008. The study was retrospective, based on clinical and radiographic evaluations. Results: The mean age at the time of the trauma was 8.8 years (2 to 13 years). Seven patients were female and three was male. There were eight cases of trauma caused by being run over, and one case each of a motorcycle accident and falling from a height. Five patients had other associated injuries such as fractures of the clavicle, femoral diaphysis, proximal humerus, lower leg bones, olecranon and bladder injury. All the patients evaluated showed an excellent clinical outcome. The pelvic asymmetry before surgery ranged from 0.7 to 2.9 cm (mean 1.45 cm), and dropped to values between 0.2 and 0.9 cm (mean 0.39 cm) after reduction. In no case was any change observed in pelvic asymmetry measured in the immediate postoperative period and at the end of follow-up. Conclusion: Pelvic ring fractures in skeletally immature patients are rare and surgical treatment is unusual. Several authors have questioned conservative treatment because of the complications encountered. Bone remodeling does not seem enough to cause an improvement in pelvic asymmetry, and this justifies the choice of surgical treatment for reduction and correction of pelvic ring deformities. PMID:27026968

  5. How important is the number of pelvic lymph node retrieved to locorregional staging of cervix cancer?

    PubMed Central

    Batista, Thales Paulo; Bezerra, Artur Lício Rocha; Martins, Mário Rino; Carneiro, Vandré Cabral Gomes

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: To explore how important is the number of pelvic lymph nodes dissected for the nodal staging in FIGO IA2-IB2 cervical cancer, submitted to radical surgical treatment. Methods: A cross-sectional study was carried out on patients who underwent Piver class II radical hysterectomy and pelvic lymphadenectomy, in two centers in the state of Pernambuco, from January, 2001 to December, 2008. The analysis of the area under the ROC curve was adopted as a summary-measure of discriminatory power of the number of nodes dissected in predicting the pelvic nodal status. Additionally, we also confirm our findings using logistic regression and the Fisher's exact test. Results: The postoperative pathological study included 662 pelvic lymph nodes dissected (median per-patient=9, q25=6 − q75=13) from 69 patients. The ROC curve analysis revealed AUC=0.642, for the discriminatory value of the number of nodes dissected in predicting the pelvic nodal status. Similar findings were found after categorization using 10 and 15 lymph nodes as cut-offs (AUC=0.605 and 0.526, respectively). Logistic regression revealed odds ratio of 0.912 (95% CI=0.805-1.032; p=0.125) for the predictive value of the number of nodes dissected, and a number of nodes ≥10 or ≥15 lymph nodes was not significantly associated with the nodal status by the Fischer's exact test (p=0.224 and p=0.699, respectively). Conclusion: The number of pelvic lymph nodes dissected did not correlate with pelvic lymph node metastatic involvement. This study suggests that dissection of a greater number of lymph nodes does not increase locoregional nodal staging in cervical cancer. PMID:24488383

  6. Pelvic trauma: WSES classification and guidelines.

    PubMed

    Coccolini, Federico; Stahel, Philip F; Montori, Giulia; Biffl, Walter; Horer, Tal M; Catena, Fausto; Kluger, Yoram; Moore, Ernest E; Peitzman, Andrew B; Ivatury, Rao; Coimbra, Raul; Fraga, Gustavo Pereira; Pereira, Bruno; Rizoli, Sandro; Kirkpatrick, Andrew; Leppaniemi, Ari; Manfredi, Roberto; Magnone, Stefano; Chiara, Osvaldo; Solaini, Leonardo; Ceresoli, Marco; Allievi, Niccolò; Arvieux, Catherine; Velmahos, George; Balogh, Zsolt; Naidoo, Noel; Weber, Dieter; Abu-Zidan, Fikri; Sartelli, Massimo; Ansaloni, Luca

    2017-01-01

    Complex pelvic injuries are among the most dangerous and deadly trauma related lesions. Different classification systems exist, some are based on the mechanism of injury, some on anatomic patterns and some are focusing on the resulting instability requiring operative fixation. The optimal treatment strategy, however, should keep into consideration the hemodynamic status, the anatomic impairment of pelvic ring function and the associated injuries. The management of pelvic trauma patients aims definitively to restore the homeostasis and the normal physiopathology associated to the mechanical stability of the pelvic ring. Thus the management of pelvic trauma must be multidisciplinary and should be ultimately based on the physiology of the patient and the anatomy of the injury. This paper presents the World Society of Emergency Surgery (WSES) classification of pelvic trauma and the management Guidelines.

  7. Gynecological pelvic pain as emergency pathology.

    PubMed

    Rivera Domínguez, A; Mora Jurado, A; García de la Oliva, A; de Araujo Martins-Romeo, D; Cueto Álvarez, L

    Acute pelvic pain is a common condition in emergency. The sources of acute pelvic pain are multifactorial, so it is important to be familiar with this type of pathologies. The purpose of this article is review the main causes of gynecological acute pelvic pain and their radiologic appearances to be able to make an accurate diagnosis and provide objective criteria for patient management. Copyright © 2016 SERAM. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  8. Recognizing Myofascial Pelvic Pain in the Female Patient with Chronic Pelvic Pain

    PubMed Central

    Pastore, Elizabeth Anne; Katzman, Wendy B.

    2012-01-01

    Myofascial pelvic pain (MFPP) is a major component of chronic pelvic pain (CPP) and often is not properly identified by healthcare providers. The hallmark diagnostic indicator of MFPP is myofascial trigger points in the pelvic floor musculature that refer pain to adjacent sites. Effective treatments are available to reduce MFPP, including myofascial trigger point release, PMID:22862153

  9. Osteosarcoma of pelvic bones: imaging features.

    PubMed

    Park, Se Kyoung; Lee, In Sook; Cho, Kil Ho; Lee, Young Hwan; Yi, Jae Hyuck; Choi, Kyung Un

    The metaphyseal locations of tubular bones with osteoid mineralization in young patients are important diagnostic radiologic features of osteosarcoma. The pelvic bones are an unusual location of osteosarcoma. Although osteosarcoma occurring in pelvic bones is not common, the osteoid matrix may be a critical finding for differentiating osteosarcoma from other common pelvic bone tumors. Therefore, the possibility of osteosarcoma in pelvic bones may be considered in the presence of osteoid matrix even in the old age group. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  10. Female Pelvic Floor Anatomy: The Pelvic Floor, Supporting Structures, and Pelvic Organs

    PubMed Central

    Herschorn, Sender

    2004-01-01

    The development of novel, less invasive therapies for stress urinary incontinence in women requires a thorough knowledge of the relationship between the pathophysiology of incontinence and anatomy. This article provides a review of the anatomy of the pelvic floor and lower urinary tract. Also discussed is the hammock hypothesis, which describes urethral support within the pelvis and provides an explanation of the continence mechanism. PMID:16985905

  11. [Incidence and influencing factors of distal external iliac lymph node metastasis in early cervical cancer].

    PubMed

    Yin, Yueju; Sheng, Xiugui; Li, Xinglan; Li, Dapeng; Han, Xiaoyun; Zhang, Xiaoling; Zhang, Tingting

    2014-06-01

    The distal external iliac lymph nodes are located along the external iliac artery between the deep circumflex iliac vein and the inguinal canal. Our study aimed to investigate the incidence of metastasis in distal external iliac lymph nodes and its association with clinicopathological factors in patients with early stage cervical cancer, and to determine the role of distal external iliac lymph nodes dissection in the surgery. Five hundred and twenty-four patients with early stage cervical cancer underwent radical hysterectomy and bilateral pelvic lymphadenectomy in the Shandong Province Cancer Hospital between June 1995 and December 2011, and their clinicopathological features were analyzed retrospectively. Of the 524 patients, 124 (23.7%) had pelvic lymph node metastasis. The metastasis rates were 16.2% (85 of 524 patients) in the obturator lymph nodes, 12.2% (64 of 524 patients) in the internal and external iliac lymph nodes, 2.9% (15 of 524 patients) in the common iliac lymph nodes, 2.1% (11 of 524 patients) in the distal external iliac lymph nodes, and 1.7% (9 of 524 patients) in the para-aortic nodes. The incidence of isolated positive distal external iliac lymph nodes was 0.2%. Univariate analysis showed that lymphovascular space invasion, pelvic lymph node metastases (excluding distal external iliac lymph nodes) were significantly associated with distal external iliac lymph node metastasis (P < 0.05). Logistic regression analysis showed that pelvic lymph node metastasis (excluding distal external iliac lymph nodes) was the independent risk factor for metastasis to distal external iliac lymph nodes. In early stage cervical cancer, distal external iliac lymph node metastasis is rare, especially in cases with stage IA or without pelvic lymph node metastasis. Less extensive pelvic lymphadenectomy may be considered in these patients in order to reduce operative complications and improve patients' quality of life. The deep circumflex iliac vein may be an

  12. [Postoperative pain in craniotomy].

    PubMed

    Peón, Andréa Ungaro; Diccini, Solange

    2005-01-01

    In the postoperative period, 47% to 75% of the patients report some degree of pain. This study aimed to evaluate pain in the pre and postoperative period of patients submitted to craniotomy. This prospective research was carried out at the neurosurgery unit of a large Brazilian hospital. For a quantitative evaluation of pain, the verbal numeric 0-10 rating scale was used. Forty patients with a mean age of 36 years were evaluated. In the preoperative period, 34 (85%) patients indicated headache as the main cause of pain. In the postoperative period, 37 (93%) patients complained of pain while three (7%) reported absence of pain. Pain peaks were observed on the 2nd postoperative day, when 12 (32%) of the patients reported severe pain and 10 (27%) moderate pain. Absence of severe pain occurred after the 8th postoperative day. It was concluded that protocols of analgesia in craniotomy are needed, such as training nurses to better evaluate and handle pain.

  13. Lumbo-pelvic related indexes: impact on adult spinal deformity surgery.

    PubMed

    Boissière, Louis; Vital, Jean-Marc; Aunoble, Stéphane; Fabre, Thierry; Gille, Olivier; Obeid, Ibrahim

    2015-06-01

    Lumbo-pelvic indexes appeared recently in the literature taking advantage from the relationship between pelvic incidence (PI) and lumbar lordosis (LL). Schwab proposed to subtract LL from PI (PI-LL) as Boissière proposed the lumbar lordosis index (LLI), which is the ratio between LL and PI (LL/PI). Both indexes have been described to weight LL by a constant parameter not affected by degenerative processes, the PI. The aim of this study is to evaluate these parameters in adult spinal deformity (ASD) by analyzing their relationship with spinal malalignment and vertebral osteotomies. Two groups of patients with an ASD were realized; an adult scoliosis group (n = 78) and a postoperative flat-back syndrome group (n = 20). In the adult scoliosis group, 28 patients underwent an osteotomy [pedicle subtraction osteotomy (PSO) or Smith Petersen osteotomy] and 50 patients were corrected by posterior fusion without osteotomy. In the postoperative flat-back syndrome group all patients underwent a PSO. All patients had preoperative and postoperative full spine EOS radiographies to measure spino-pelvic parameters. The lack of lordosis was calculated, after prediction of theoretical LL from Legaye's formula, by subtracting measured LL to theoretical LL. Correlation analysis between the different parameters was performed. Both lumbo-pelvic parameters highly correlated with spinal malalignment (r = 0.97 for PI-LL and r = -0.97 for LLI for total patients) and were highly predictive of a spinal osteotomy performance (r = 0.88 for PI-LL >28° and r = 0.94 for LLI <0.5). Sagittal vertical axis (r = 0.67) and pelvic tilt (r = 0.64) correlated moderately with spinal malalignment for total patients. The LLI was more correlated with spinal osteotomies in the adult scoliosis group (r = 0.86 for PI-LL >28° and r = 0.94 for LLI <0.5), as Schwab's index was more precise to predict osteotomies in the postoperative flat-back syndrome group (Youden index = 0.95 for PI-LL >28° vs 0.90 for LLI <0

  14. Multimodal nociceptive mechanisms underlying chronic pelvic pain

    PubMed Central

    HELLMAN, Kevin M.; PATANWALA, Insiyyah Y.; POZOLO, Kristen E.; TU, Frank F.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To evaluate candidate mechanisms underlying the pelvic floor dysfunction in women with chronic pelvic pain and/or painful bladder syndrome/interstitial cystitis. Notably, prior studies have not consistently controlled for potential confounding by psychological or anatomical factors. Study Design As part of a larger study on pelvic floor pain dysfunction and bladder pain sensitivity, we compared a measure of mechanical pain sensitivity, pressure pain thresholds, between women with pelvic pain and pain-free controls. We also assessed a novel pain measure using degree and duration of post-exam pain aftersensation, and conducted structural and functional assessments of the pelvic floor to account for any potential confounding. Phenotypic specificity of pelvic floor measures was assessed with receiver-operator characteristic curves adjusted for prevalence. Results A total of 23 women with chronic pelvic pain, 23 painful bladder syndrome, and 42 pain-free controls completed the study. Women with chronic pelvic pain or painful bladder syndrome exhibited enhanced pain sensitivity with lower pressure pain thresholds (1.18 [interquartile range: 0.87–1.41] kg/cm2) than pain-free participants (1.48 [1.11–1.76] kg/cm2; p<0.001) and prolonged pain aftersensation (3.5 [0–9] vs 0 [0–1] minutes; p< 0.001). Although genital hiatus (p<0.01) was wider in women with chronic pelvic pain there were no consistently observed group differences in pelvic floor anatomy, muscle tone or strength. The combination of pressure pain thresholds and aftersensation duration correlated with severity of pelvic floor tenderness (R2 =41–51, p’s< 0.01). Even after adjustment for prevalence, the combined metrics discriminated pain-free controls from women with chronic pelvic pain or painful bladder syndrome (area under the curve=0.87). Conclusion Both experimental assessment of pelvic floor pain thresholds and measurement of sustained pain are independently associated with pelvic pain

  15. Current status of laparoscopic and robotic ventral mesh rectopexy for external and internal rectal prolapse

    PubMed Central

    van Iersel, Jan J; Paulides, Tim J C; Verheijen, Paul M; Lumley, John W; Broeders, Ivo A M J; Consten, Esther C J

    2016-01-01

    External and internal rectal prolapse with their affiliated rectocele and enterocele, are associated with debilitating symptoms such as obstructed defecation, pelvic pain and faecal incontinence. Since perineal procedures are associated with a higher recurrence rate, an abdominal approach is commonly preferred. Despite the description of greater than three hundred different procedures, thus far no clear superiority of one surgical technique has been demonstrated. Ventral mesh rectopexy (VMR) is a relatively new and promising technique to correct rectal prolapse. In contrast to the abdominal procedures of past decades, VMR avoids posterolateral rectal mobilisation and thereby minimizes the risk of postoperative constipation. Because of a perceived acceptable recurrence rate, good functional results and low mesh-related morbidity in the short to medium term, VMR has been popularized in the past decade. Laparoscopic or robotic-assisted VMR is now being progressively performed internationally and several articles and guidelines propose the procedure as the treatment of choice for rectal prolapse. In this article, an outline of the current status of laparoscopic and robotic ventral mesh rectopexy for the treatment of internal and external rectal prolapse is presented. PMID:27275090

  16. External hydrocephalus in two cats.

    PubMed

    Dewey, Curtis W; Coates, Joan R; Ducoté, Julie M; Stefanacci, Joseph D; Walker, Michael A; Marino, Dominic J

    2003-01-01

    External hydrocephalus describes an accumulation of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) between the cerebral hemispheres and the overlying arachnoid membrane, rather than within the lateral ventricles. Two young cats with encephalopathic signs were diagnosed with external hydrocephalus, one via magnetic resonance imaging and one via computed tomography. Both cats had abnormally large, broad heads, with no evidence of open fontanelles. A surgical shunt was placed in each cat to divert the accumulated CSF within the cranial cavity to the peritoneal space. Both cats improved dramatically soon after surgical shunting was performed, and they continue to do well clinically, approximately 42 months and 8 months postoperatively, respectively.

  17. Pelvic architectural distortion is associated with pelvic organ prolapse.

    PubMed

    Huebner, Markus; Margulies, Rebecca U; DeLancey, John O L

    2008-06-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether there is an association between architectural distortion seen on magnetic resonance (MR) scans (lateral "spill" of the vagina and posterior extension of the space of Retzius) and pelvic organ prolapse. Secondary analysis of MR imaging scans from a case-control study of women with prolapse (maximum point > or = + 1 cm; N = 144) and normal controls (maximum point < or = -1 cm; N= 126) was done. Two independent investigators, blinded to prolapse status and previously established levator-defect scores, determined the presence of architectural distortion on axial MR scans. Women were categorized into three groups based on levator defects and architectural distortion. Among the three groups, women with levator defects and architectural distortion have the highest proportion of prolapse (78%; p < 0.001). Among women with levator defects, those with prolapse had an odds ratio of 2.2 for the presence of architectural distortion (95% CI = 1.1-4.6). Pelvic organ prolapse is associated with the presence of visible architectural distortion on MR scans.

  18. Pelvic sepsis after stapled hemorrhoidopexy

    PubMed Central

    van Wensen, Remco JA; van Leuken, Maarten H; Bosscha, Koop

    2008-01-01

    Stapled hemorrhoidopexy is a surgical procedure used worldwide for the treatment of grade III and IV hemorrhoids in all age groups. However, life-threatening complications occur occasionally. The following case report describes the development of pelvic sepsis after stapled hemorrhoidopexy. A literature review of techniques used to manage major septic complications after stapled hemorrhoidopexy was performed. There is no standardized treatment currently available. Stapled hemorrhoidopexy is a safe, effective and time-efficient procedure in the hands of experienced colorectal surgeons. PMID:18855996

  19. Predicting postoperative gait in cerebral palsy.

    PubMed

    Galarraga C, Omar A; Vigneron, Vincent; Dorizzi, Bernadette; Khouri, Néjib; Desailly, Eric

    2016-11-09

    In this work, postoperative lower limb kinematics are predicted with respect to preoperative kinematics, physical examination and surgery data. Data of 115 children with cerebral palsy that have undergone single-event multilevel surgery were considered. Preoperative data dimension was reduced utilizing principal component analysis. Then, multiple linear regressions with 80% confidence intervals were performed between postoperative kinematics and bilateral preoperative kinematics, 36 physical examination variables and combinations of 9 different surgical procedures. The mean prediction errors on test vary from 4° (pelvic obliquity and hip adduction) to 10° (hip rotation and foot progression), depending on the kinematic angle. The unilateral mean sizes of the confidence intervals vary from 5° to 15°. Frontal plane angles are predicted with the lowest errors, however the same performance is achieved when considering the postoperative average signals. Sagittal plane angles are better predicted than transverse plane angles, with statistical differences with respect to the average postoperative kinematics for both plane's angles except for ankle dorsiflexion. The mean prediction errors are smaller than the variability of gait parameters in cerebral palsy. The performance of the system is independent of the preoperative state severity of the patient. Even if the system is not yet accurate enough to define a surgery plan, it shows an unbiased estimation of the most likely outcome, which can be useful for both the clinician and the patient. More patients' data are necessary for improving the precision of the model in order to predict the kinematic outcome of a large number of possible surgeries and gait patterns.

  20. Understanding postoperative fatigue.

    PubMed

    Rose, E A; King, T C

    1978-07-01

    Performance characteristics of the central nervous, cardiovascular, respiratory and muscular systems in man postoperatively have received little investigative attention, despite the well known syndrome of postoperative fatigue. The impairmen in perception and psychomotor skills that has been shown to result from caloric restriction, bedrest, sedation and sleep deprivation suggests that a similar deficit may occur after surgical procedures. After a simple elective surgical procedure, maximal oxygen uptake decreases and the adaptability of heart rate to submaximal workloads is impaired. Similar deleterious effects on cardiorespiratory performance have been documented with starvation and bedrest; an understanding of cardiorespiratory performance postoperatively awaits further investigation. Maximal muscular force of contraction is also impaired by caloric restriction and bedrest, suggesting that similar effects may be seen in the postoperative state, although this has not been studied. A better understanding of the syndrome of postoperative fatigue could be achieved by a descriptive analysis of physiologic performance postoperatively. Such descriptive data could form the basis for objective evaluation of therapeutic measures intended to improve performance, such as nutritional supplementation and pharmacologic intervention. The observation that exercise with the patient in the supine position may decrease the impairment in maximal aerobic power otherwise expected in immobilized patients suggests that controlled exercise therapy may be of value in reducing physiologic impairment postoperatively.

  1. Radiation alone in the treatment of cancer of the uterine cervix: Analysis of pelvic failure and dose response relationship

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, R.Y.; Trotti, A.; Wu, C.J.; Soong, S.J.; Salter, M.M. )

    1989-11-01

    This retrospective analysis involves 569 patients with invasive cancer of the uterine cervix treated with irradiation alone between 1969 and 1980. Treatment consisted of external and intracavitary irradiation and treatment policy remained consistent throughout the study interval. In early stage disease (FIGO IA, IB, and IIA), pelvic failure was 4.6%, 11.2%, and 8.2%, respectively. In late stage disease (FIGO IIB, III, and IVA), pelvic failure was 30.1%, 52.3%, and 69.2%, respectively. Further analysis revealed that total dose at point A is well correlated with pelvic control. An aggressive treatment is crucial in late stage disease in determining the probability of pelvic tumor control and survival. Methods of dose prescription, dose-response relationships, treatment philosophy and its therapeutic implications are discussed.

  2. [Clinical analysis of postoperative radiotherapy for stage I endometrial cancer].

    PubMed

    Li, Z; Shen, W; Wang, J

    1998-05-01

    To evaluate the role and complications of adjuvant radiotherapy for stage I endometrial cancer after surgery. From May, 1986 to December, 1995, 20 patients with stage I endometrial cancer received total abdominal hysterectomy with bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy(TAH/BSO), and additional pelvic lymph node dissection in 5 cases. Most of the patients received radio therapy in 2-4 weeks after surgery. The radiation fields included pelvic lymph nodes with a total dose of 40-50 Gy. All the patients had survived for 10 years. Only one patient developed distant metastases. Acute radiation reaction was observed in all patients. Late radiation-induced damage occured in six patients and was severe in two. Postoperative radiotherapy in the management of stage I endometrial cancer is beneficial for the controal of local recurrence but has relatively high frequency of late radiation injury.

  3. Postoperative stereotactic body radiotherapy for spinal metastases.

    PubMed

    Alghamdi, Majed; Tseng, Chia-Lin; Myrehaug, Sten; Maralani, Pejman; Heyn, Chris; Soliman, Hany; Lee, Young; Ruschin, Mark; Da Costa, Leodante; Yang, Victor; Campbell, Mikki; Sahgal, Arjun

    2017-09-01

    Spine is a common site of metastases in cancer patients. Spine surgery is indicated for select patients, typically those with mechanical instability and/or malignant epidural spinal cord (or cauda equina) compression. Although post-operative conventional palliative external beam radiation therapy has been the standard of care, technical improvements in radiation planning and image-guided radiotherapy have allowed for the application of stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) to the spine. Spine SBRT is intended to ablate residual tumor and optimize local control by delivering several fold greater biologically effective doses. Early clinical experience of postoperative spinal SBRT report encouraging results in terms of safety and efficacy. In this review, we summarize the clinical and technical aspects pertinent to a safe and effective practice of postoperative SBRT for spinal metastases.

  4. Primary pelvic hydatid cyst: a case report.

    PubMed

    Parray, Fazl Q; Wani, Shadab Nabi; Bazaz, Sajid; Khan, Shakeel-Ur Rehman; Malik, Nighat Shaffi

    2011-01-01

    This is a case report of a young man who presented to us as a case of hypogastric pain and frequency of micturation. General physical examination and radiological evaluation confirmed a multiloculated pelvic swelling. Patient was subjected to laparotomy which confirmed the diagnosis of a primary pelvic hydatid disease. Patient was put on chemotherapy after surgery and is doing well on follow up.

  5. 38 CFR 4.67 - Pelvic bones.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Pelvic bones. 4.67 Section 4.67 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS SCHEDULE FOR RATING DISABILITIES Disability Ratings The Musculoskeletal System § 4.67 Pelvic bones. The variability of residuals...

  6. 38 CFR 4.67 - Pelvic bones.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Pelvic bones. 4.67 Section 4.67 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS SCHEDULE FOR RATING DISABILITIES Disability Ratings The Musculoskeletal System § 4.67 Pelvic bones. The variability of residuals...

  7. 38 CFR 4.67 - Pelvic bones.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Pelvic bones. 4.67 Section 4.67 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS SCHEDULE FOR RATING DISABILITIES Disability Ratings The Musculoskeletal System § 4.67 Pelvic bones. The variability of residuals...

  8. 38 CFR 4.67 - Pelvic bones.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Pelvic bones. 4.67 Section 4.67 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS SCHEDULE FOR RATING DISABILITIES Disability Ratings The Musculoskeletal System § 4.67 Pelvic bones. The variability of residuals...

  9. 38 CFR 4.67 - Pelvic bones.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Pelvic bones. 4.67 Section 4.67 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS SCHEDULE FOR RATING DISABILITIES Disability Ratings The Musculoskeletal System § 4.67 Pelvic bones. The variability of residuals...

  10. Prevalence and Resolution of Auditory Passage of Vaginal Air in Women With Pelvic Floor Disorders.

    PubMed

    Miranne, Jeannine M; Marek, Tania M; Mete, Mihriye; Iglesia, Cheryl B

    2015-07-01

    To estimate the prevalence of auditory vaginal air passage among women with and without pelvic organ prolapse (POP) in a population with pelvic floor disorders. This prospective cohort study included women with urinary incontinence and POP who sought consultation at a single center from January 2012 to August 2013. Women with rectovaginal fistula, prior surgery for POP or incontinence, and current pregnancy were excluded. Participants completed a nonvalidated questionnaire about auditory vaginal air passage, also known as vaginal wind. The subset who had pelvic reconstructive surgery completed the same questionnaire 6 months postoperatively. Baseline demographic and clinical characteristics and preoperative and postoperative POP quantification data were collected. One hundred thirty-two women were approached for participation, of whom 110 (83%) completed baseline study questionnaires. Of these 110, 59 had POP and 51 had normal pelvic support. The mean age was 55±12 years. Sixty-nine percent (76/110, 95% confidence interval [CI] 60-78%) experienced vaginal wind an average of 2.1±8.7 times weekly. There was no difference in the prevalence of vaginal wind between women with and without POP. Women with vaginal wind were younger than those without vaginal wind (mean age 52±12 years compared with 62±11 years, P<.001). The majority with vaginal wind experienced symptoms during intercourse (65/75 [87%], 95% CI 77-93%) and were at least somewhat bothered by it (49/76 [64%], 95% CI 53-75%), but only 22% (17/76, 95% CI 14-33%) reported a negative effect on quality of life. Vaginal wind is common among women with pelvic floor disorders but is not associated with POP. II.

  11. The impact of pelvic floor surgery on female sexual function: a mixed quantitative and qualitative study.

    PubMed

    Roos, A M; Thakar, R; Sultan, A H; de Leeuw, J W; Paulus, A T G

    2014-01-01

    To assess whether the current condition-specific sexual function questionnaire provides full insight into sexual function following pelvic floor surgery. Prospective, mixed quantitative and qualitative study. Urogynaecology clinic in a large university hospital. Thirty-seven women undergoing surgery for pelvic organ prolapse (POP) and/or stress urinary incontinence (SUI). Women were seen before surgery and 3 months postoperatively. At both visits the Pelvic Organ Prolapse/Urinary Incontinence Sexual Function Questionnaire (PISQ) was completed and a qualitative face-to-face semi-structured interview was conducted. PISQ total and domain scores, as well as the change in the preoperative and postoperative score, were calculated and analysed using Wilcoxon signed rank test and one-sample t-test. The qualitative data were systematically analysed using data-matrices. The impact of pelvic floor surgery on female sexual function. Significant improvement was seen for PISQ total score (P = 0.003) as well as Physical (P < 0.001) and Partner-related (P = 0.002) domains, but not for the Behavioural/Emotive domain (P = 0.220). Analysis of qualitative data showed that improvement in sexual function was a result of cure of POP and SUI symptoms. Deterioration of sexual function was due to dyspareunia, fear of causing damage to the surgical result, new symptoms and a disappointing result of surgery. Our qualitative data show that PISQ is limited in the assessment of sexual function after pelvic floor surgery as it does not assess most surgery-specific negative effects on sexual function. © 2013 Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists.

  12. [Chronic postoperative pain].

    PubMed

    Cachemaille, Matthieu; Blanc, Catherine

    2016-06-22

    Chronic postoperative pain remains a frequent pathology whose global impact approximates 20 and 30% and accounts for 20% of the consultations in a pain center. Risk factors consider firstly each patient's feature and comorbidity and also different surgical procedures with their technical approach. Neuropathic pain compared to nociceptive pain is a great component in the postoperative period and needs to be recognized by specific tests (DN4). Pain prevention involves risk factors' detection, appropriate anesthetic support and effective postoperative pain management. Treatment is based on the type of pain and includes a multimodal analgesia with interventional pain therapy.

  13. [Characteristics of postoperative peritonitis].

    PubMed

    Lock, J F; Eckmann, C; Germer, C-T

    2016-01-01

    Postoperative peritonitis is still a life-threatening complication after abdominal surgery and approximately 10,000 patients annually develop postoperative peritonitis in Germany. Early recognition and diagnosis before the onset of sepsis has remained a clinical challenge as no single specific screening test is available. The aim of therapy is a rapid and effective control of the source of infection and antimicrobial therapy. After diagnosis of diffuse postoperative peritonitis surgical revision is usually inevitable after intestinal interventions. Peritonitis after liver, biliary or pancreatic surgery is managed as a rule by means of differentiated therapy approaches depending on the severity.

  14. The relationship between pelvic alignment and dysmenorrhea.

    PubMed

    Kim, Moon-Jeong; Baek, Il-Hun; Goo, Bong-Oh

    2016-03-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between pelvic alignment and dysmenorrhea in general women. [Subjects and Methods] One hundred two females participated in this study. They were divided into a dysmenorrhea group and a normal group based on the results of a Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) assessment of pain and the Menstrual Distress Questionnaire (MDQ). The survey data was collecting from 5th July to 20th September, 2014. Formetric 4D was used to measure the pelvic alignment, including the values of Trunk Imbalance, Pelvic Tilt, Surface Rotation, Lateral Deviation, Kyphosis Angle, Lordosis Angle. [Results] There was a difference in the spine alignments of each group. The value of pelvic torsion was 2.4 ± 1.8 degree in those with dysmenorrhea, while it was 1.7 ± 1.1 degree in those without. [Conclusion] In conclusion, the results suggest that there is a relationship between menstrual pain and pelvic torsion.

  15. Male pelvic floor: history and update.

    PubMed

    Dorey, Grace

    2005-08-01

    Our understanding of the male pelvic floor has evolved over more than 2,000 years. Gradually medical science has sought to dispel ancient myths and untruths. The male pelvic floor has many diverse functions. Importantly, it helps to support the abdominal contents, maintains urinary and fecal continence, and plays a major role in gaining and maintaining penile erection. Weakness of the male pelvic floor muscles may cause urinary and fecal incontinence and erectile dysfunction. Function may be restored in each of these areas by a comprehensive pelvic floor muscle training program. Spasm of the pelvic floor muscles may produce pain and require relaxation techniques. Additional research is needed to add further evidence to our knowledge base.

  16. [Current echography diagnosis of pelvic congestion syndrome].

    PubMed

    Malinova, M; Shopov, A

    2012-01-01

    Chronic pelvic pain is a common condition. The sources of pelvic pain are multifactorial, and their causes are difficult to determine. Pelvic congestion syndrome (PCS) is associated with varicose ovarian veins and/or varicose veins in the pelvis. The syndrome is associated with constant dull pelvic pain, abnormal menstrual bleeding, tenderness to touch in lower abdomen, pain during intercourse, painful menstrual periods, vaginal discharge, PCOS. The specific diagnosis of Pelvic Congestion Syndrome is made using several tests which include ultrasound, CAT, MIR, MDCT (multidetector) and venogram. The ultrasound is the first test of choice. It can assess the uterus and other organs in the pelvis. Doppler ultrasound can also help visualize the blood flow and asses the presence of varicosities in the pelvis.

  17. Pelvic incidence-lumbar lordosis mismatch predisposes to adjacent segment disease after lumbar spinal fusion.

    PubMed

    Rothenfluh, Dominique A; Mueller, Daniel A; Rothenfluh, Esin; Min, Kan

    2015-06-01

    Several risk factors and causes of adjacent segment disease have been debated; however, no quantitative relationship to spino-pelvic parameters has been established so far. A retrospective case-control study was carried out to investigate spino-pelvic alignment in patients with adjacent segment disease compared to a control group. 45 patients (ASDis) were identified that underwent revision surgery for adjacent segment disease after on average 49 months (7-125), 39 patients were selected as control group (CTRL) similar in the distribution of the matching variables, such as age, gender, preoperative degenerative changes, and numbers of segments fused with a mean follow-up of 84 months (61-142) (total n = 84). Several radiographic parameters were measured on pre- and postoperative radiographs, including lumbar lordosis measured (LL), sacral slope, pelvic incidence (PI), and tilt. Significant differences between ASDis and CTRL groups on preoperative radiographs were seen for PI (60.9 ± 10.0° vs. 51.7 ± 10.4°, p = 0.001) and LL (48.1 ± 12.5° vs. 53.8 ± 10.8°, p = 0.012). Pelvic incidence was put into relation to lumbar lordosis by calculating the difference between pelvic incidence and lumbar lordosis (∆PILL = PI-LL, ASDis 12.5 ± 16.7° vs. CTRL 3.4 ± 12.1°, p = 0.001). A cutoff value of 9.8° was determined by logistic regression and ROC analysis and patients classified into a type A (∆PILL <10°) and a type B (∆PILL ≥10°) alignment according to pelvic incidence-lumbar lordosis mismatch. In type A spino-pelvic alignment, 25.5 % of patients underwent revision surgery for adjacent segment disease, whereas 78.3 % of patients classified as type B alignment had revision surgery. Classification of patients into type A and B alignments yields a sensitivity for predicting adjacent segment disease of 71 %, a specificity of 81 % and an odds ratio of 10.6. In degenerative disease of the lumbar spine a high pelvic incidence with diminished lumbar lordosis seems

  18. Does Pelvic Organ Prolapse Quantification Examination D Point Predict Uterosacral Ligament Suspension Outcomes?

    PubMed

    Richter, Lee A; Park, Amy J; Boileau, Jenine E; Janni, Megan; Desale, Sameer; Iglesia, Cheryl B

    2016-01-01

    The best predictors for postoperative anatomic apical success after transvaginal uterosacral ligament suspension remain unknown. The aim of this study was to determine if there is a correlation between the preoperative D point and anatomic outcomes for apical prolapse after 1 year. This retrospective cohort study included subjects undergoing transvaginal uterosacral ligament suspension from 2008 through 2013 who had at least 1 year follow-up. Demographic information, preoperative and postoperative Pelvic Organ Prolapse Quantification (POPQ) examination measurements, need for retreatment or repeat surgery, and assessment of pelvic floor symptoms were reviewed. Postoperative apical success was defined as C point descent no more than one third into the vaginal canal. One hundred twenty-five women met inclusion criteria and had follow-up at 1 year or more. Concomitant procedures included anterior/posterior repair and midurethral sling. Mean follow-up time was 22.8 months (range, 12-63 months). At last follow-up, 96% met criteria for apical success. A more negative preoperative D point was significantly related to improved postoperative apical support, with each 1-cm descent in preoperative D point resulting in a postoperative C point that was 0.21 cm lower (P = 0.0005). Based on the receiver operating characteristic curve, a "cutoff" D point value of -4.25 (sensitivity, 0.8; specificity, 0.65) was determined to be a predictor of postoperative apical success at 1 year or more. The preoperative D point correlates with postoperative apical support, and a clinically meaningful relationship exists between the preoperative D point and anatomic apical success.

  19. Predicting urinary incontinence after surgery for pelvic organ prolapse.

    PubMed

    Jelovsek, John E

    2016-10-01

    Many women choosing to have surgery for pelvic organ prolapse also choose to undergo continence surgery. This review focuses on available evidence that clinicians may use to counsel patients when choosing whether to perform continence surgery and how predictive analytic tools improve this decision-making process. Midurethral sling, Burch cystourethropexy and bladder neck sling are highly effective for the surgical treatment of stress urinary incontinence. Trials demonstrate that continence surgery may be routinely performed to reduce the risk of postoperative incontinence in women undergoing surgery for pelvic organ prolapse with or without preoperative stress urinary incontinence. Although these procedures are effective and well tolerated on average, media concerns, regulatory warnings and litigation reinforce the need for a balanced discussion regarding efficacy and potential adverse events directed at the individual patient during the preoperative visit. Advances in predictive analytics allow surgeons to quantitate individual risk using algorithms that tailor estimates for the individual patient and facilitate shared understanding of risks and benefits. These models are less prone to cognitive biases and frequently outperform experienced clinicians. This review discusses how predictive analytic tools can be used to improve decisions about continence surgery in the woman planning to undergo prolapse surgery.

  20. Pelvic primary staphylococcal infection presenting as a thigh abscess.

    PubMed

    Abbas, T O

    2013-01-01

    Intra-abdominal disease can present as an extra-abdominal abscess and can follow several routes, including the greater sciatic foramen, obturator foramen, femoral canal, pelvic outlet, and inguinal canal. Nerves and vessels can also serve as a route out of the abdomen. The psoas muscle extends from the twelfth thoracic and fifth lower lumbar vertebrae to the lesser trochanter of the femur, which means that disease in this muscle group can migrate along the muscle, out of the abdomen, and present as a thigh abscess. We present a case of a primary pelvic staphylococcal infection presenting as a thigh abscess. The patient was a 60-year-old man who presented with left posterior thigh pain and fever. Physical examination revealed a diffusely swollen left thigh with overlying erythematous, shiny, and tense skin. X-rays revealed no significant soft tissue lesions, ultrasound was suggestive of an inflammatory process, and MRI showed inflammatory changes along the left hemipelvis and thigh involving the iliacus muscle group, left gluteal region, and obturator internus muscle. The abscess was drained passively via two incisions in the posterior left thigh, releasing large amounts of purulent discharge. Subsequent bacterial culture revealed profuse growth of Staphylococcus aureus. The patient recovered uneventfully except for a moderate fever on the third postoperative day.

  1. Uterine sparing surgical methods in pelvic organ prolapse

    PubMed Central

    Tola, Esra Nur; Erdemoğlu, Evrim; Erdemoğlu, Ebru

    2015-01-01

    Pelvic organ prolapse (POP) is defined as the protrusion of pelvic organs to the vagen and is an important health problem in patients of older age. Today, most women with POP prefer uterine sparing surgery due to the changes in lifestyle, beliefs, pregnancy desire, and understanding the role of the uterus and cervix in sexual function. Therefore, the need for newer surgical procedures that involve less invasive surgery, reduced intraoperative and postoperative risks, and a faster healing time in POP surgery have gained importance. Vaginal, abdominal, laparoscopic, and robotic methods are defined in uterine preserving surgery but there is not yet a consensus on which of them should be chosen. In choosing the proper technique, the patient’s general status, accompanying disease, correct indication, and the surgeon’s experience are all important. In our practice we prefer laparoscopic mesh sacrohysteropexy in patients who prefer to preserve their uterus because of the lower costs and high success rates compared with abdominal and robotic techniques. PMID:28913063

  2. Sexual Function Before and After Sacrocolpopexy for Pelvic Organ Prolapse

    PubMed Central

    Handa, Victoria L.; Zyczynski, Halina M.; Brubaker, Linda; Nygaard, Ingrid; Janz, Nancy K.; Richter, Holly E.; Wren, Patricia A.; Brown, Morton B.; Weber, Anne M.

    2008-01-01

    Objective To describe sexual function before and after sacrocolpopexy. Study design In the Colpopexy and Urinary Reduction Efforts trial, sexual function was assessed in 224 women with sexual partners before and 1 year after surgery using validated questionnaires. Results After surgery, significantly fewer women reported sexual interference from “pelvic or vaginal symptoms” (32.5% one year after surgery versus 7.8% prior to surgery), fear of incontinence (10.7% versus 3.3%), vaginal bulging (47.3% versus 4.6%), or pain (39.9% versus 21.6%). The proportion of women with infrequent sexual desire (32%) did not change. More women were sexually active 1 year after surgery (171, 76.3%) than before surgery (148, 66.1%). The 11 women (7.4%) who became sexually inactive were more likely than sexually active women to report infrequent sexual desire (70.05% versus 22.1%, p<0.001). The addition of Burch colposuspension did not impact postoperative sexual function. Conclusions After sacrocolpopexy, most women reported improvements in pelvic floor symptoms that previously interfered with sexual function. These improvements were not impacted by concomitant Burch colposuspension. PMID:18060957

  3. Pelvic hemangiopericytoma. An unusual location of a vascular tumor.

    PubMed

    Álvarez Abad, Irene; García González, Jose Mª; Agirre Etxabe, Leire; Quintana Rivera, Ana Mª; Colina Alonso, Alberto

    2017-01-15

    The hemangiopericytoma is an uncommon vascular tumour. We report a case of interest because of its rarity, size and location. We present the case of a 63-year-old woman who consulted for abdominal pain. TAC, MRI and arteriography showed a pelvic mass occupying Douglas' space, displacing the uterus, bladder and sigma, with vascularisation relative to the inferior mesenteric artery and both hypogastric arteries. The vascularity of the tumour itself was selectively embolised before the mass was resected. There were no intra- or postoperative complications. Pathology confirmed the diagnosis of hemangiopericitoma. The patient is being monitored as an outpatient, with no signs of recurrence to date. The hemangiopericytoma is a tumour of the pericyte cells so it can occur in any location. The pelvic location is exceptional. The tumour may appear as nonspecific abdominal pain, show signs of compression of adjacent organs or occasionally be associated with paraneoplastic syndromes. The diagnosis is suspected via CT and angiography findings, but confirmation is only made by analysing the surgical specimen. The treatment of choice is surgery, in some cases after preoperative embolisation of the vascularisation of the mass. There is no agreement on chemo/radiotherapy as the primary treatment for hemangiopericytoma, although adjuvant radiation therapy has been found to improve local control and reduce recurrences. The prognosis is good if complete resection is achieved, with five- and 10-year survival rates between 70 and 80%, depending on the series.

  4. Postoperative permanent pressure alopecia.

    PubMed

    Chang, Zi Yun; Ngian, Jan; Chong, Claudia; Chong, Chin Ted; Liew, Qui Yin

    2016-04-01

    A 49-year-old Chinese female underwent elective laparoscopic assisted Whipple's surgery lasting 12 h. This was complicated by postoperative pressure alopecia at the occipital area of the scalp. Pressure-induced hair loss after general anaesthesia is uncommon and typically temporary, but may be disconcerting to the patient. We report this case of postoperative permanent pressure alopecia due to its rarity in the anaesthesia/local literature, and review the risk factors for its development.

  5. Primary vaginal reconstruction at the time of pelvic exenteration for gynecologic cancer: morbidity revisited.

    PubMed

    Jurado, Matías; Bazán, Antonio; Alcázar, Juan Luis; Garcia-Tutor, Emilio

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study is to analyze our experience about the benefits and morbidity of primary vaginal reconstruction in pelvic exenteration. Over a 10-year period, 64 patients underwent a pelvic exenteration for gynecologic cancer, except for ovarian and fallopian cancer. Twenty-nine patients underwent pelvic exenteration with vaginal reconstruction [21 cases with transverse rectus-abdominis myocutaneous (TRAM) flap and eight cases with Singapore fascio-cutaneous flap]. Thirty-five patients did not undergo vaginal reconstruction. Postoperative morbidity was recorded and a comparative analysis of morbidity between groups was made. Pelvic abscess and small bowel fistula occurred more frequently in the no neovagina group (20% versus 6.9% and 20% versus 3.4%, respectively). There were no differences between groups regarding fever, colorectal anastomosis (CRA) dehiscence-leakage, prolonged ileus, deep venous thrombosis, pulmonary embolism or wound complications. Surgery time was significantly longer for the neovagina group. There was only one perioperative death, which occurred in the neovagina group. Vaginal stenosis, necrosis, and shortness occurred less frequently for TRAM flap compared with Singapore flap (19.0% versus 28.6%, 14.5% versus 50% and 0% versus 100%, respectively). CRA dehiscence-leakage appeared more frequently (83.3% versus 28.6%) in the Singapore group. Nevertheless, this complication was statistically associated (p = 0.0009) with low CRA (<5 cm). TRAM flap seems to be the preferable option for reconstructing the vagina after pelvic exenteration. The Singapore fascio-cutaneous flap carries a higher rate of complications, does not work as functional neovagina after pelvic exenteration, and does not seem to be a good choice in cases of low colorectal anastomosis.

  6. Pelvic joint fusion in patients with severe pelvic girdle pain - a prospective single-subject research design study.

    PubMed

    Kibsgård, Thomas J; Røise, Olav; Stuge, Britt

    2014-03-15

    The fusion of the pelvic joints in patients with severe pelvic girdle pain (PGP) is a controversial and insufficiently studied procedure. The aims of this study were to evaluate physical function and pain after sacroiliac joint (SIJ) fusion. A single-subject research design study with repeated measurements was conducted; pre-operatively and at 3, 6 and 12 months post-operatively. The outcome measures considered were the Oswestry disability index (ODI), visual analogue scale (VAS), and SF-36. Eight patients with severe PGP received open-accessed unilateral anterior SIJ fusion and fusion of the pubic symphysis. Seven patients reported positive results from the surgery. At 1 year post-operation, significant (p < 0.001) reductions in ODI (54 to 37) and VAS (82 to 57) were reported. The physical functioning, bodily pain, and social functioning scores in the SF-36 were also improved. Positive and significant changes in disability and pain at 1 year after SIJ fusion were observed. Despite these positive results, open accessed anterior fusion of the SIJ was associated with adverse events and complications such as infection and nerve damage.

  7. Total pelvic floor ultrasound for pelvic floor defaecatory dysfunction: a pictorial review.

    PubMed

    Hainsworth, Alison J; Solanki, Deepa; Schizas, Alexis M P; Williams, Andrew B

    2015-01-01

    Total pelvic floor ultrasound is used for the dynamic assessment of pelvic floor dysfunction and allows multicompartmental anatomical and functional assessment. Pelvic floor dysfunction includes defaecatory, urinary and sexual dysfunction, pelvic organ prolapse and pain. It is common, increasingly recognized and associated with increasing age and multiparity. Other options for assessment include defaecation proctography and defaecation MRI. Total pelvic floor ultrasound is a cheap, safe, imaging tool, which may be performed as a first-line investigation in outpatients. It allows dynamic assessment of the entire pelvic floor, essential for treatment planning for females who often have multiple diagnoses where treatment should address all aspects of dysfunction to yield optimal results. Transvaginal scanning using a rotating single crystal probe provides sagittal views of bladder neck support anteriorly. Posterior transvaginal ultrasound may reveal rectocoele, enterocoele or intussusception whilst bearing down. The vaginal probe is also used to acquire a 360° cross-sectional image to allow anatomical visualization of the pelvic floor and provides information regarding levator plate integrity and pelvic organ alignment. Dynamic transperineal ultrasound using a conventional curved array probe provides a global view of the anterior, middle and posterior compartments and may show cystocoele, enterocoele, sigmoidocoele or rectocoele. This pictorial review provides an atlas of normal and pathological images required for global pelvic floor assessment in females presenting with defaecatory dysfunction. Total pelvic floor ultrasound may be used with complementary endoanal ultrasound to assess the sphincter complex, but this is beyond the scope of this review.

  8. Detecting active pelvic arterial haemorrhage on admission following serious pelvic fracture in multiple trauma patients.

    PubMed

    Brun, Julien; Guillot, Stéphanie; Bouzat, Pierre; Broux, Christophe; Thony, Frédéric; Genty, Céline; Heylbroeck, Christophe; Albaladejo, Pierre; Arvieux, Catherine; Tonetti, Jérôme; Payen, Jean-Francois

    2014-01-01

    The early diagnosis of pelvic arterial haemorrhage is challenging for initiating treatment by transcatheter arterial embolization (TAE) in multiple trauma patients. We use an institutional algorithm focusing on haemodynamic status on admission and on a whole-body CT scan in stabilized patients to screen patients requiring TAE. This study aimed to assess the effectiveness of this approach. This retrospective cohort study included 106 multiple trauma patients admitted to the emergency room with serious pelvic fracture [pelvic abbreviated injury scale (AIS) score of 3 or more]. Of the 106 patients, 27 (25%) underwent pelvic angiography leading to TAE for active arterial haemorrhage in 24. The TAE procedure was successful within 3h of arrival in 18 patients. In accordance with the algorithm, 10 patients were directly admitted to the angiography unit (n=8) and/or operating room (n=2) for uncontrolled haemorrhagic shock on admission. Of the remaining 96 stabilized patients, 20 had contrast media extravasation on pelvic CT scan that prompted pelvic angiography in 16 patients leading to TAE in 14. One patient underwent a pelvic angiography despite showing no contrast media extravasation on pelvic CT scan. All 17 stabilized patients who underwent pelvic angiography presented a more severely compromised haemodynamic status on admission, and they required more blood products during their initial management than the 79 patients who did not undergo pelvic angiography. The incidence of unstable pelvic fractures was however comparable between the two groups. Overall, haemodynamic instability and contrast media extravasation on the CT-scan identified 26 out of the 27 patients who required subsequent pelvic angiography leading to TAE in 24. An algorithm focusing on haemodynamic status on arrival and on the whole-body CT scan in stabilized patients may be effective at triaging multiple trauma patients with serious pelvic fractures. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Evaluation of the single-incision Elevate system to treat pelvic organ prolapse: follow-up from 15 to 45 months.

    PubMed

    Huang, Kuan-Hui; Huang, Li-Yi; Chu, Li-Ching; Chuang, Fei-Chi; Wu, Ming-Ping; Kung, Fu-Tsai

    2015-09-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the 2-year clinical outcomes of pelvic reconstructive surgery with the single-incision Elevate system (American Medical Systems, Minnetonka, MN, USA). This retrospective study was conducted from November 2010 to August 2013, and included 210 patients with pelvic organ prolapse stage 3 or 4 who underwent pelvic reconstructive surgery with an Elevate system and were followed for 1 to 3 years postoperatively. Assessments included pre- and postoperative Pelvic Organ Prolapse Quantification (POP-Q) stage, Urogenital Distress Inventory (UDI-6), Incontinence Impact Questionnaire (IIQ-7) and multi-channel urodynamic examinations. Anatomical success was defined as postoperative POP-Q stage 0 or I. The anatomical success rates were 95 % for the anterior vaginal wall, 99 % for the posterior vaginal wall and 94 % for the apical vaginal wall after a median 27 months of follow-up. POP-Q, UDI-6 and IIQ-7 scores, maximal flow rate and post-voiding residual urine all improved significantly after surgery. Complications included 1 case of internal bleeding, 4 cases of mesh exposure, 5 cases of recurrent prolapse that required salvage operations, and 3 cases of urine retention that required intermittent catheterization. There were no bladder or bowel injuries during surgery. Pelvic reconstructive surgery with the Elevate system yielded good anatomical outcomes and symptom improvement after 2 years of follow-up.

  10. Pelvic rotation torque during fast-pitch softball hitting under three ball height conditions.

    PubMed

    Iino, Yoichi; Fukushima, Atsushi; Kojima, Takeji

    2014-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the relevance of hip joint angles to the production of the pelvic rotation torque in fast-pitch softball hitting and to examine the effect of ball height on this production. Thirteen advanced female softball players hit stationary balls at three different heights: high, middle, and low. The pelvic rotation torque, defined as the torque acting on the pelvis through the hip joints about the pelvic superior-inferior axis, was determined from the kinematic and force plate data using inverse dynamics. Irrespective of the ball heights, the rear hip extension, rear hip external rotation, front hip adduction, and front hip flexion torques contributed to the production of pelvic rotation torque. Although the contributions of the adduction and external rotation torques at each hip joint were significantly different among the ball heights, the contributions of the front and rear hip joint torques were similar among the three ball heights owing to cancelation of the two torque components. The timings of the peaks of the hip joint torque components were significantly different, suggesting that softball hitters may need to adjust the timings of the torque exertions fairly precisely to rotate the upper body effectively.

  11. [Treatment of pelvic Ewing's sarcoma in children and the effect on the skeletal growth and development].

    PubMed

    Fu, Jun; Guo, Zheng; Wang, Zhen; Li, Xiang-dong; Li, Jing; Chen, Guo-jing; Wu, Zhi-gang

    2012-12-01

    To explore the effect of neo-adjuvant chemotherapy and computer-assisted surgery on children and adolescents with primary pelvic Ewing's sarcoma, and assess the therapeutic effect on the pelvic skeletal growth and development. This is a retrospective analysis of 10 children with primary pelvic Ewing's sarcoma treated between Jan 2001 and Oct 2010 at the Department of Oncologic Orthopaedics at Xijing Hospital. There were 3 girls and 7 boys in the age of 7 to 16 years (average 12.7 years). All patients were pathologically diagnosed as Ewing's sarcoma. There were two cases in the sacroiliac joint, one in the ilium, one in the pubic bone, and 6 cases in peri-acetabular area including 5 below the triradiate cartilage and one above the triradiate cartilage, without cartilage invasion. All patients underwent neo-adjuvant chemotherapy, resection and reconstruction surgery and postoperative chemotherapy. CDP, ADM and IFO regimen chemotherapy were given as the main treatment. Five cases were treated by traditional resection and reconstruction, and after 2008, five cases were treated by computer-assisted surgery. During the reconstruction, the hip rotation center was put at a depressed location. All of the 10 cases underwent postoperative radiotherapy in a dose of 45-55 Gy. All patients were followed-up for 12-72 months (mean: 37.8 months). One child had tumor recurrence and lung metastasis and 9 patients had no evidence of disease (NED). After neo-adjuvant chemotherapy, the oncologic statuses (RECIST) were: 1 CR, 8 PR and 1 SD. The functional recoveries after surgery (Enneking's) were: 4 cases excellent, 4 good, 1 fair and 1 poor. Five cases who underwent computer-assisted surgery achieved a good reconstruction without local recurrence. There were no effects on skeletal growth in 8 cases. An unbalanced hip rotational center occurred in one case, and a compemsatory scoliosis was found in another case. There were no serious complications in all patients. The comprehensive

  12. Vertically unstable pelvic fractures fixed with percutaneous iliosacral screws: does posterior injury pattern predict fixation failure?

    PubMed

    Griffin, Damian R; Starr, Adam J; Reinert, Charles M; Jones, Alan L; Whitlock, Shelly

    2003-07-01

    To measure the failure rate of percutaneous iliosacral screw fixation of vertically unstable pelvic fractures and particularly to test the hypothesis that fixations in which the posterior injury is a vertical fracture of the sacrum are more likely to fail than fixations with dislocations or fracture-dislocations of the sacroiliac joint. Retrospective review. Level 1 trauma center. All patients with pelvic fractures admitted between January 1, 1993, and December 31, 1998, were identified from the trauma registry. Hospital records were used to identify patients treated with iliosacral screws. Radiologic studies were examined to identify patients who had unequivocally vertically unstable pelvic fractures. Immediate postoperative and follow-up anteroposterior, inlet, and outlet radiographs from a minimum of 12 months postinjury were examined. Position, length, and numbers of iliosacral screws and any evidence of screw failure (eg, bending or breakage) were recorded. Residual postoperative displacement and late displacement of the posterior pelvis were measured. The main outcome measure was failure, defined as at least 1cm of combined vertical displacement of the posterior pelvis compared with immediate postoperative position. The main analysis was for association between fracture pattern and failure. Patient demographic data, iliosacral screw position, and anterior pelvic fixation method also were studied. The study group comprised 62 patients with unequivocally vertically unstable pelvic fractures in whom the posterior injury was treated with closed reduction and percutaneous iliosacral screw fixation. Of patients, 32 had dislocations or fracture-dislocations of the sacroiliac joint, and 30 had vertical fractures of the sacrum. Fixation failed in four patients, all with vertical sacral fractures and all within the first 3 weeks after surgery. These four patients required revision fixation. In two further cases with vertical sacral fractures, there was evidence that

  13. Vertically unstable pelvic fractures fixed with percutaneous iliosacral screws: does posterior injury pattern predict fixation failure?

    PubMed

    Griffin, Damian R; Starr, Adam J; Reinert, Charles M; Jones, Alan L; Whitlock, Shelly

    2006-01-01

    To measure the failure rate of percutaneous iliosacral screw fixation of vertically unstable pelvic fractures and particularly to test the hypothesis that fixations in which the posterior injury is a vertical fracture of the sacrum are more likely to fail than fixations with dislocations or fracture-dislocations of the sacroiliac joint. Retrospective review. Level 1 trauma center. All patients with pelvic fractures admitted between January 1, 1993, and December 31, 1998, were identified from the trauma registry. Hospital records were used to identify patients treated with iliosacral screws. Radiologic studies were examined to identify patients who had unequivocally vertically unstable pelvic fractures. Immediate postoperative and follow- up anteroposterior, inlet, and outlet radiographs from a minimum of 12 months postinjury were examined. Position, length, and numbers of iliosacral screws and any evidence of screw failure (eg, bending or breakage) were recorded. Residual postoperative displacement and late displacement of the posterior pelvis were measured. The main outcome measure was failure, defined as at least 1cm of combined vertical displacement of the posterior pelvis compared with immediate postoperative position. The main analysis was for association between fracture pattern and failure. Patient demographic data, iliosacral screw position, and anterior pelvic fixation method also were studied. The study group comprised 62 patients with unequivocally vertically unstable pelvic fractures in whom the posterior injury was treated with closed reduction and percutaneous iliosacral screw fixation. Of patients, 32 had dislocations or fracture-dislocations of the sacroiliac joint, and 30 had vertical fractures of the sacrum. Fixation failed in four patients, all with vertical sacral fractures and all within the first 3 weeks after surgery. These four patients required revision fixation. In two further cases with vertical sacral fractures, there was evidence that

  14. Post-external dacryocystorhinostomy lagophthalmos.

    PubMed

    Odat, Thabit A; Odat, Haitham A; Khraisat, Heba; Odat, Mohannad A; Alzoubi, Firas Q

    2015-06-01

    To describe lagophthalmos and eyelid closure abnormality after external dacryocystorhinostomy (DCR). A retrospective review of medical records and postoperative photographs of 79 patients who underwent external DCR for nasolacrimal duct obstruction and developed eyelid closure abnormality and lagophthalmos with or without exposure keratopathy was conducted. Collected data included age, sex, indication for surgery, laterality, length and type of incision, length of follow-up duration, presence of punctate epithelial keratopathy, and time for resolution of eyelid closure abnormalities. Twenty-seven patients with 28 external dacryocystorhinostomy had postoperative eyelid closure abnormalities. Male to female ratio was 1:6. The mean age was 40.1 years (range 9-80 years). All surgeries were performed through diagonal skin incision. Lagophthalmos involving the medial third of the palpebral fissure was noticed in 28.6 % of cases. All patients had hypometric blink mainly of the upper eyelid. One patient had punctate epithelial keratopathy. Resolution of lagophthalmos was noticed over a period of 1-5 weeks with an average of 3 weeks. None of the patients continued to have residual hypometric blink or punctate keratopathy at the last follow-up time. The mean follow-up period was 4.2 months (range 3-6 months). Eyelid closure abnormality and lagophthalmos after external DCR are underestimated problems. Spontaneous resolution is seen in all cases weeks to months after surgery.

  15. Traumatic pelvic fractures in children and adolescents.

    PubMed

    DeFrancesco, Christopher J; Sankar, Wudbhav N

    2017-02-01

    Although traumatic pelvic fractures in children are relatively rare, these injuries are identified in about 5% of children admitted to level 1 trauma centers after blunt trauma.(1-4) Such injuries differ from adult pelvic fractures in important ways and require distinct strategies for management. While the associated mortality rate for children with pelvic fractures is much lower than that for adults, the patient may require urgent surgical intervention for associated life-threatening injuries such as head trauma and abdominal injury. Unstable pelvic ring fractures should be acutely managed using an initial approach similar to that used in adult orthopedic traumatology. Although very few pediatric pelvic fractures will ultimately need surgical treatment, patients with these injuries must be followed over time to confirm proper healing, ensure normal pelvic growth, and address any potential complications. The trauma team suspecting a pelvic fracture in a child must understand the implication of such a finding, identify fracture patterns that increase suspicion of associated injuries, and involve pediatric or adult orthopedic specialists as appropriate during the management of the patient. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Female sexual function and pelvic floor disorders.

    PubMed

    Handa, Victoria L; Cundiff, Geoffrey; Chang, Howard H; Helzlsouer, Kathy J

    2008-05-01

    To investigate the hypothesis that pelvic floor disorders are associated with female sexual problems, independently of other related factors. The study population included 301 adult women seeking outpatient gynecologic and urogynecologic care. Pelvic floor disorders were assessed with the Pelvic Floor Disorders Inventory-20 (PFDI-20) and the pelvic organ prolapse quantification examination. Sexual function was assessed with the Personal Experiences Questionnaire. Using ordinal regression analysis, we identified characteristics and conditions associated with decreased libido, infrequent orgasm, decreased arousal, and dyspareunia. Sexual function was poorer among 78 women (26%) without a current sexual partner than among 223 with a partner (P<.01). Among the 223 with a current partner, women with a high Pelvic Floor Disorders Inventory score were significantly more likely to report decreased arousal (P<.01), infrequent orgasm (P<.01), and increased dyspareunia (P<.01). A similar pattern was observed for the urinary, colorectal-anal, and prolapse scales of the Pelvic Floor Disorders Inventory, although some associations were marginally significant. Stage III-IV prolapse was significantly associated with infrequent orgasm (P=.02), but other sexual complaints were not more common with increasing prolapse stage. Pelvic floor symptoms are significantly associated with reduced sexual arousal, infrequent orgasm, and dyspareunia. We conclude that sexual function is worse in women with symptomatic prolapse but not in women with asymptomatic prolapse. II.

  17. Adjuvant Chemotherapy and Vaginal Vault Brachytherapy With or Without Pelvic Radiotherapy for Stage 1 Papillary Serous or Clear Cell Endometrial Cancer.

    PubMed

    Tétreault-Laflamme, Audrey; Nguyen-Huynh, Thu Van; Carrier, Jean-François; Samouëlian, Vanessa; Sauthier, Philippe; Beauchemin, Marie-Claude; Barkati, Maroie

    2016-02-01

    The aim of this study was to assess and compare adjuvant chemotherapy followed by either high-dose-rate vaginal vault brachytherapy (VBT) alone or combined with pelvic external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) for International Federation of Gynaecology and Obstetrics stage 1 serous or clear cell (CC) endometrial cancer. Between 2006 and 2012, 84 women with stage 1 serous or CC endometrial cancer were evaluated postoperatively for adjuvant treatment at our hospital. More than 80% of patients had pelvic lymphadenectomy. Patients declining or not completing adjuvant treatments were excluded. Twenty-five women received 4 to 6 cycles of carboplatin/paclitaxel followed by EBRT and VBT. Thirty-two women received 6 cycles of carboplatin/paclitaxel followed by VBT. Locoregional control and toxicities were assessed during follow-up. The 3-year disease-free survival and overall survival rates for the VBT group compared with the EBRT + VBT group were 88% versus 84%, P = 0.6, and 100% versus 94%, P = 0.6, respectively. Only 1 patient in the EBRT + VBT group developed a distant recurrence. One patient had grade 3 toxicity (chronic gastrointestinal [GI] toxicity) in the EBRT + VBT group. Acute grade 1-to-2 GI and grade 1 genitourinary (GU) toxicities were less frequent in the VBT group compared with the EBRT + VBT group (P = 0.008 and P = 0.019, respectively). Late GI and GU toxicities were comparable. Grade 1 vaginal toxicity was similar in both groups. No acute or late grade 2 GU or vaginal toxicities were reported. According to this study, VBT alone seems to be as effective as EBRT and VBT for stage 1 serous and CC endometrial cancer treated with surgery and adjuvant chemotherapy. Furthermore, less acute GI and GU toxicities were seen in the VBT group.

  18. The effect of an external hip joint stabiliser on gait function after surgery for tumours located around the circumference of the pelvis: analysis of seven cases of internal hemipelvectomy or proximal femur resection.

    PubMed

    Akiyama, Toru; Saita, Kazuo; Ogura, Koichi; Kawai, Akira; Imanishi, Jungo; Yazawa, Yasuo; Kawashima, Noritaka; Ogata, Toru

    2016-03-01

    Limb-sparing resection of malignant pelvic tumours provides the opportunity for patients to obtain better post-operative mobility. However, because few studies have examined in detail the gait function of patients following pelvic tumour resection, the factors affecting gait performance remain to be clarified. Here, with the laboratory-based computer-assisted gait analysis, we evaluated these patients' gait objectively and the impact of a hip-stabilising supporter on gait improvement was simultaneously examined. Three-dimensional gait analysis was performed to obtain cross-sectional data for seven post-operative patients (mean age, 42.7 years; range, 20-61 years) who underwent various types of resection, including P1/4 internal hemipelvectomy (IH), P1/2/3 IH, and proximal femur resection with prosthetic reconstruction. To assess the immediate effects of a hip joint stabiliser, we instructed subjects to walk at their self-selected preferred speed and compared gait parameters with and without use of the hip stabiliser. At baseline, the average walking speed was 0.75 m/s (95% CI 0.53-0.97). As shown by the intra-subject comparison, the hip stabiliser increased walking speed in all but one subject, increasing both temporal and spatial parameters. Ground reaction force of operated limbs increased for some subjects, while step length increased on at least one side in all subjects. Improvement in the gait parameters is indicative of better control provided by the external hip stabiliser over the affected limb. Moreover, our findings show the potential of a biomechanical approach to improve gait function following pelvic tumour resection.

  19. Delayed postoperative hematoma formation after inflatable penile prosthesis implantation.

    PubMed

    Garber, Bruce B; Bickell, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Infrequent but serious postoperative complications following inflatable penile prosthesis (IPP) insertion include infection, malfunction, and bleeding. Although prior publications report methods to reduce immediate postoperative bleeding, there is little in the literature concerning the etiology, diagnosis, imaging, and management of delayed bleeding after IPP insertion. The aim of the study was to review cases of delayed postoperative bleeding following IPP insertion in a large single-surgeon series. We carried out a retrospective chart review of 600 patients implanted with a Coloplast Titan IPP with One-Touch Release pump by a single surgeon, and analyzed cases of delayed postoperative bleeding. The main outcome measure was an analysis of the incidence, causes, diagnostic methods, treatment, and final outcome of these cases. Three out of 600 consecutive patients (0.5%) developed a delayed (defined as >5 days postoperative) hematoma following IPP insertion. All patients presented postoperatively with a swollen surgical site, and all were evaluated with a pelvic computed tomography scan to completely define the extent of the hematoma. Two patients developed a delayed hematoma because of excessive physical activity; the remaining patient bled because of premature administration of enoxaparin sodium (Lovenox) by his cardiologist. All three patients were successfully treated with hospital admission, intravenous antibiotics, wound exploration, hematoma evacuation, and antibiotic washout. All three IPPs were successfully salvaged; none developed peri-prosthetic infection. The incidence of delayed postoperative hematoma following IPP surgery was 0.5% in our series of 600 cases. All cases were successfully managed with intravenous antibiotics, hematoma evacuation, and antibiotic washout. Because of the low incidence of this complication, definitive statements concerning prevention and management cannot be made. However, we now recommend avoiding postoperative

  20. Our experience with open dismembered pyeloplasty for uretero-pelvic junction obstruction

    PubMed Central

    Shahnawaz; Shahzad, Ali; Shahzad, Iqbal; Baloch, Muhammad Umar

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To report our experience with open dismembered pyeloplasty for uretero-pelvic junction obstruction. Methods: Retrospective study was conducted in the Department of Urology, Jinnah Postgraduate Medical Centre, Karachi for a period of five and half years from May, 2006 to December, 2011. All patients with uretero-pelvic junction obstruction were entered into a database to record patients clinical features, diagnostic tools, operative and post-operative details and follow-up. Over a five-years period, 13 procedures were performed. After clinical evaluation all patient had extensive haematological and radiological workup for diagnosis of uretero-pelvic junction obstruction. All were subjected to open pyeloplasties, out of these 13 patients; one had an aberrant lower pole vessel compressing uretero-pelvic-junction. All procedures were stented. Repair was done with 3/0 vicryl sutures all patients were catheterized and wound drained. Results: Mean operating time was 60 – 100 minutes with about 100cc blood loss requiring no transfusion. The mean follow up was one year. One patient developed post-operative haematuria and was managed conservatively. Two patients developed fever secondary to urinary tract infection despite adequate treatment of urinary tract infection according to culture and sensitivity pre-operatively. One patient developed surgical emphysema detected post-operatively, which required tube thoracostomy. Neither patient developed recurrent symptoms nor had any evidence of obstruction on the renogram on follow-up. Objectively all patients were followed up by intravenous urogram, stress renogram, Urine C/S. Subjective and objective follow-up revealed success in 100% of patients whereas success is defined as no or minimal holder on DTPA renogram, improving renal function and decreasing dilatation on successive intravenous urogram. All patients had a mean post-operative hospital stay of 02 – 04 days Folley catheter was removed after 10-days, double

  1. Pelvic floor muscle exercise for fecal incontinence quality of life after coloanal anastomosis.

    PubMed

    Hung, Shu-Ling; Lin, Yu-Hua; Yang, Hsing-Yu; Kao, Chia-Chan; Tung, Hong-Yu; Wei, Li-Hsiang

    2016-09-01

    To assess the efficacy of pelvic floor muscle exercise for enhancing fecal incontinence quality of life after coloanal anastomosis in colorectal cancer patients. Methods of improving incontinence have been evaluated in many countries, but never in a Taiwan population. A longitudinal experimental study. Fifty-two colorectal cancer patients who had received colostomy closure and coloanal anastomosis surgery were recruited from a general hospital in southern Taiwan and randomly assigned to an experimental group (n = 26) or a control group (n = 26). Both groups received routine postoperative care. However, the experimental group received private consultations, educational DVDs and pamphlets to instruct them in performing pelvic flow muscle exercise. In all participants, the Fecal Incontinence Quality of Life Scale was used to measure quality of life before discharge and at one, two, three, six and nine months after discharge. Generalised estimating equations were used to compare longitudinal effects between the two groups. The generalised estimating equations revealed that all participants had significantly improved Fecal Incontinence Quality of Life Scale scores at two, three, six and nine months after discharge. Compared to the controls, however, the experimental group had significantly higher scores at two, three, and six months after discharge. Patient education in pelvic floor muscle exercise positively affects Fecal Incontinence Quality of Life Scale scores in patients who have received coloanal anastomosis. Early education in pelvic floor muscle exercise can improve management of fecal incontinence symptoms after coloanal anastomosis and can improve quality of life. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Transvaginal Drainage of Pelvic Abscesses and Collections Using Transabdominal Ultrasound Guidance.

    PubMed

    Ching, Kevin C; Sumkin, Jules H

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. To evaluate clinical outcomes following transvaginal catheter placement using transabdominal ultrasound guidance for management of pelvic fluid collections. Methods. A retrospective review was performed for all patients who underwent transvaginal catheter drainage of pelvic fluid collections utilizing transabdominal ultrasound guidance between July 2008 and July 2013. 24 consecutive patients were identified and 24 catheters were placed. Results. The mean age of patients was 48.1 years (range = 27-76 y). 88% of collections were postoperative (n = 21), 8% were from pelvic inflammatory disease (n = 2), and 4% were idiopathic (n = 1). Of the 24 patients, 83% of patients (n = 20) had previously undergone a hysterectomy and 1 patient (4%) was pregnant at the time of drainage. The mean volume of initial drainage was 108 mL (range = 5 to 570). Catheters were left in place for an average of 4.3 days (range = 1-17 d). Microbial sampling was performed in all patients with 71% (n = 17) returning a positive culture. All collections were successfully managed percutaneously. There were no technical complications. Conclusions. Transvaginal catheter drainage of pelvic fluid collections using transabdominal ultrasound guidance is a safe and clinically effective procedure. Appropriate percutaneous management can avoid the need for surgery.

  3. Pelvic and para-aortic lymphadenectomy for surgical staging of endometrial cancer: morbidity and mortality.

    PubMed

    Larson, D M; Johnson, K; Olson, K A

    1992-06-01

    This analysis compared retrospectively the morbidity and mortality of patients with endometrial cancer who had total abdominal hysterectomy with bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy (TAH/BSO) alone or with pelvic and para-aortic lymphadenectomy performed by the same surgeon at one private institution. Between August 1987 and March 1991, 77 women with endometrial cancer were staged surgically by a standard protocol without preoperative radiotherapy. Thirty-five patients (45%) had TAH/BSO alone and 42 (55%) had TAH/BSO with pelvic and para-aortic lymphadenectomy. The median number of lymph nodes removed was 18. Patients having lymphadenectomy had an increased mean (+/- standard deviation) operative time (129 +/- 29 versus 87 +/- 26 minutes; P less than .0001), increased mean estimated blood loss (391 +/- 192 versus 272 +/- 219 mL; P = .013), and a longer postoperative hospital stay (P = .017) compared with patients having TAH/BSO alone. However, there was no difference in transfusion rate, febrile morbidity, postoperative complications, or mortality. We conclude that pelvic and para-aortic lymphadenectomy can be added to TAH/BSO in patients with endometrial cancer without a clinically significant increase in morbidity or mortality.

  4. [Patients with hemodynamic unstable pelvic fractures in extremis: pelvic packing or angiography?].

    PubMed

    Liñán-Padilla, A; Giráldez-Sánchez, M Á; Serrano-Toledano, D; Lázaro-Gonzálvez, A; Cano-Luís, P

    2013-01-01

    The multidisciplinary management of patients with pelvic trauma has improved prognosis, but mortality is still very high. The appropriate treatment strategy remains controversial, especially regarding the control of bleeding in patients whose clinical situation is extreme by using angiography or pelvic packing. We propose using a tool of evidence-based medicine (CAT) the benefit of the completion of pelvic packing in relation to a specific clinical question from a specific situation. What is best for the management of bleeding, extraperitoneal pelvic packing or angiography, in patients with hemodynamically unstable pelvic fracture in extremis? From this study we can conclude that angiography may improve control of bleeding in patients with arterial bleeding and hemodynamically stable but the packing has priority in patients with pelvic fractures and hemodynamic instability.

  5. Informed Consent for Reconstructive Pelvic Surgery.

    PubMed

    Alam, Pakeeza; Iglesia, Cheryl B

    2016-03-01

    Informed consent is the process in which a patient makes a decision about a surgical procedure or medical intervention after adequate information is relayed by the physician and understood by the patient. This process is critical for reconstructive pelvic surgeries, particularly with the advent of vaginal mesh procedures. In this article, we review the principles of informed consent, the pros and cons of different approaches in reconstructive pelvic surgery, the current legal issues surrounding mesh use for vaginal surgery, and tips on how to incorporate this information when consenting patients for pelvic floor surgery. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Locally vascularized pelvic accessory spleen.

    PubMed

    Iorio, F; Frantellizzi, V; Drudi, Francesco M; Maghella, F; Liberatore, M

    2016-01-01

    Polysplenism and accessory spleen are congenital, usually asymptomatic anomalies. A rare case of polysplenism with ectopic spleen in pelvis of a 67-year-old, Caucasian female is reported here. A transvaginal ultrasound found a soft well-defined homogeneous and vascularized mass in the left pelvis. Patient underwent MRI evaluation and contrast-CT abdominal scan: images with parenchymal aspect, similar to spleen were obtained. Abdominal scintigraphy with 99mTc-albumin nanocolloid was performed and pelvic region was studied with planar scans and SPECT. The results showed the presence of an uptake area of the radiopharmaceutical in the pelvis, while the spleen was normally visualized. These findings confirmed the presence of an accessory spleen with an artery originated from the aorta and a vein that joined with the superior mesenteric vein. To our knowledge, in the literature, there is just only one case of a true ectopic, locally vascularized spleen in the pelvis.

  7. Cervical spine balance: postoperative radiologic changes in adult scoliosis surgery.

    PubMed

    Boissière, Louis; Bernard, Jean; Vital, Jean-Marc; Pointillart, Vincent; Mariey, Rémi; Gille, Olivier; Obeid, Ibrahim

    2015-07-01

    Cervical spine alignment interests appeared recently and relationships between the pelvis and the cervical spine have been reported but remain unclear. In this study, postoperative changes for cranial, cervical, lumbar and sagittal balance parameters have been measured in adult scoliosis surgery without major sagittal malalignment to appreciate the adaptation of the cervical spine. Twenty-nine consecutive patients with a surgical adult degenerative scoliosis treated with a T8-T11 to iliac fusion without PSO or multiple Ponte's osteotomies had preoperative and postoperative full spine EOS radiographies to measure spino-pelvic parameters. Correlation analysis between the different parameters was performed. Lower cervical, lordosis, lumbar lordosis and thoracic kyphosis were increased in postoperative as no changes were observed for upper cervical lordosis. C1-C7 CL highly correlated (0.85 in preoperative and 0.87 in postoperative) with C7 slope, which highly correlated itself with global balance parameters (0.74 in preoperative and 0.71 in postoperative for CAM-PL) underlining the relationship between cervical spine alignment and global malalignment. Modifications of lower CL are observed, as upper CL remains constant. If no correlation was found for LL, TK and CL changes, CL appears to be highly correlated with C7 slope, which highly correlated itself with sagittal global balance parameters. C7 slope appears as a base for CL influenced by the spine global alignment.

  8. [Functional anatomy of the female pelvic floor: interdisciplinary continence and pelvic floor surgery].

    PubMed

    Muctar, S; Schmidt, W U; Batzill, W; Westphal, J

    2011-07-01

    Knowledge of functional anatomy is a prerequisite for the safe and targeted reconstructive therapy of incontinence and the prolapse syndrome of the female pelvic floor. We illustrate the interaction of muscles and connective tissue of the pelvic floor with anatomical illustrations and demonstrate their impact on the function of the urethra, bladder, vagina, uterus and rectum. Examples for the therapeutic rationale for a surgical reconstruction of the pelvic floor are defined and justified from their functional anatomy.

  9. [Aging-related changes of the female pelvic floor].

    PubMed

    Scheiner, David; Betschart, Cornelia; Perucchini, Daniele

    2010-01-01

    The pelvic floor as lower closure of the abdominal cavity has to withstand the abdominal pressure. Meanwhile, the pelvic floor has to allow physiologic functions like micturition, defecation, sexual function and reproduction. But while pregnancy and vaginal delivery damage the pelvic floor directly, chronic stress like caugh, heavy lifting, or obesity lead to a chronic overstraining of the pelvic floor. Aging, structural changes, and possibly estrogen deficiency have a negative impact on the pelvic floor.

  10. [External pancreatic fistulas management].

    PubMed

    Stepan, E V; Ermolov, A S; Rogal', M L; Teterin, Yu S

    2017-01-01

    The main principles of treatment of external postoperative pancreatic fistulas are viewed in the article. Pancreatic trauma was the reason of pancreatic fistula in 38.7% of the cases, operations because of acute pancreatitis - in 25.8%, and pancreatic pseudocyst drainage - in 35.5%. 93 patients recovered after the treatment. Complex conservative treatment of EPF allowed to close fistulas in 74.2% of the patients with normal patency of the main pancreatic duct (MPD). The usage of octreotide 600-900 mcg daily for at least 5 days to decrease pancreatic secretion was an important part of the conservative treatment. Endoscopic papillotomy was performed in patients with major duodenal papilla obstruction and interruption of transporting of pancreatic secretion to duodenum. Stent of the main pancreatic duct was indicated in patients with extended pancreatic duct stenosis to normalize transport of pancreatic secretion to duodenum. Surgical formation of anastomosis between distal part of the main pancreatic duct and gastro-intestinal tract was carried out when it was impossible to fulfill endoscopic stenting of pancreatic duct either because of its interruption and diastasis between its ends, or in the cases of unsuccessful conservative treatment of external pancreatic fistula caused by drainage of pseudocyst.

  11. The Influence of Pelvic Ramus Fracture on the Stability of Fixed Pelvic Complex Fracture

    PubMed Central

    Lei, Jianyin; Zhang, Yue; Wu, Guiying; Wang, Zhihua; Cai, Xianhua

    2015-01-01

    This study aims to evaluate the biomechanical mechanism of pelvic ring injury for the stability of pelvis using the finite element (FE) method. Complex pelvic fracture (i.e., anterior column with posterior hemitransverse lesion) combined with pelvic ramus fracture was used to evaluate the biomechanics stability of the pelvis. Three FE fracture models (i.e., Dynamic Anterior Plate-Screw System for Quadrilateral Area (DAPSQ) for complex pelvic fracture with intact pubic ramus, DAPSQ for complex pelvic fracture with pubic ramus fracture, and DAPSQ for complex pelvic fracture with fixed pubic ramus fracture) were established to explore the biomechanics stability of the pelvis. The pubic ramus fracture leads to an unsymmetrical situation and an unstable situation of the pelvis. The fixed pubic ramus fracture did well in reducing the stress levels of the pelvic bone and fixation system, as well as displacement difference in the pubic symphysis, and it could change the unstable situation back to a certain extent. The pelvic ring integrity was the prerequisite of the pelvic stability and should be in a stable condition when the complex fracture is treated. PMID:26495033

  12. State of Pelvic and Acetabular Surgery in the Developing World: A Global Survey of Orthopaedic Surgeons at Surgical Implant Generation Network (SIGN) Hospitals.

    PubMed

    Whiting, Paul S; Anderson, Duane R; Galat, Daniel D; Zirkle, Lewis G; Lundy, Douglas W; Mir, Hassan R

    2017-07-01

    To document the current state of pelvic and acetabular surgery in the developing world and to identify critical areas for improvement in the treatment of these complex injuries. A 50-question online survey. International, multicenter. One hundred eighty-one orthopaedic surgeons at Surgical Implant Generation Network (SIGN) hospitals, which represent a cross-section of institutions in low- and middle-income countries that treat high-energy musculoskeletal trauma. Administration and analysis of 50-question survey. Surgeon training and experience; hospital resources; volume and patterns of pelvic/acetabular fracture management; postoperative protocols and resources for rehabilitation; financial responsibilities for patients with pelvic/acetabular fractures. Complete surveys were returned by 75 institutions, representing 61.8% of the global SIGN nail volume. Although 96% of respondents were trained in orthopaedic surgery, 53.3% have no formal training in pelvic or acetabular surgery. Emergency access to the operating room is available at all responding sites, but computed tomography scanners are available at only 60% of sites, and a mere 21% of sites have access to angiography for pelvic embolization. Cannulated screws (53.3%) and pelvic reconstruction plates (56%) are available at just over half of the sites, and 68% of sites do not have pelvic reduction clamps and retractors. 21.3% of sites do not have access to intraoperative fluoroscopy. Responding hospitals see an average of 38.8 pelvic ring injuries annually, with 24% of sites treating them all nonoperatively. Sites treated an average of 22.5 acetabular fractures annually, with 34.7% of institutions treating them all nonoperatively. Patients travel up to 1000 km or 20 hours for pelvic/acetabular treatment at some sites. Although 78.7% of sites have inpatient physical or occupational therapy services, only 17% report access to home physical therapy, and only 9% report availability of nursing or rehabilitation

  13. The improvement of pelvic floor muscle function in POP patients after the Prolift procedure: results from surface electromyography.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lihua; Chen, Xinliang; Li, Xiaocui; Gong, Yao; Li, Huaifang; Tong, Xiaowen

    2013-10-01

    Patients with pelvic organ prolapse (POP) have lower pelvic floor muscle (PFM) function. We hypothesized that pelvic reconstructive surgery could improve PFM function and strength. The controlled, nonrandomized study recruited 37 POP patients in the Prolift group and 30 non-POP patients in the control group. Two urogynecologists performed the Prolift procedure. One experienced physiotherapist who was blinded to the grouping conducted the surface electromyography (SEMG) evaluation using an intravaginal probe. The patient was considered objectively cured if she had stage 0 or I according to the Pelvic Organ Prolapse Quantification system (POP-Q) at the 3rd month postoperatively. Two types of contractions, namely maximum voluntary contraction (MVC) and short, fast contractions (SFC) in 6 s were performed at each SEMG measurement. The SEMG data were collected once in the control group on admission and twice in the Prolift group (on admission and at the 3rd month postoperatively). The t test, Mann-Whitney U test, and Wilcoxon test were used for statistical analysis. A total of 36 POP patients were cured by the Prolift procedure. At the 3-month follow-up, the voltage and duration of MVC as well as the numbers and voltage of SFC increased significantly in the Prolift group. These variables were lower in POP patients compared to women without POP. The restoration of pelvic anatomy may account for the improved PFM function with increased electrical activity in POP patients verified by SEMG. Evaluation of PFM function may be used as a clinical tool in the overall assessment of pelvic reconstructive surgeries.

  14. Does ovarian suspension following laparoscopic surgery for endometriosis reduce postoperative adhesions? An RCT.

    PubMed

    Hoo, Wee Liak; Stavroulis, Andreas; Pateman, Kate; Saridogan, Ertan; Cutner, Alfred; Pandis, George; Tong, Edward N C; Jurkovic, Davor

    2014-04-01

    Is temporary ovarian suspension following laparoscopic surgery for severe pelvic endometriosis an effective method for reducing the prevalence of postoperative ovarian adhesions? Temporary ovarian suspension for 36-48 h following laparoscopic treatment of severe endometriosis does not result in a significant reduction of postoperative ovarian adhesions. Pelvic adhesions often develop following laparoscopic surgery for severe pelvic endometriosis. Adhesions can cause chronic pelvic pain and fertility problems compromising the success of treatment. Small observational studies suggested that temporary postoperative ovarian suspension to the abdominal wall may significantly reduce the prevalence of postoperative ovarian adhesions. This was a prospective within group comparison double-blind RCT. We recruited premenopausal women with severe pelvic endometriosis who required extensive laparoscopic surgery with preservation of the uterus and ovaries. Severity of the disease and eligibility for inclusion were determined at surgery. A total of 55 women were randomized to unilateral ovarian suspension for 36-48 h, 52 of which were included in the final analysis. Both ovaries were routinely suspended to the anterior abdominal wall during surgery. At the end of the operation, each woman was randomized to having only one ovary suspended postoperatively. The suture suspending the contralateral ovary was cut and a new transabdominal suture was inserted to act as a placebo. Both sutures were removed 36-48 h after surgery prior to discharge. Three months after surgery, all women attended for a detailed transvaginal ultrasound scan to assess ovarian mobility. Both the women and the ultrasound operators were blinded as to the side of postoperative ovarian suspension. The primary outcome was the prevalence of ovarian adhesions as described on ultrasound examination. Secondary outcomes were the severity of adhesions and the presence and intensity of postoperative pain. All 55

  15. Postoperative infusional continuous regional analgesia. A technique for relief of postoperative pain following major extremity surgery.

    PubMed

    Malawer, M M; Buch, R; Khurana, J S; Garvey, T; Rice, L

    1991-05-01

    A new technique using postoperative infusional continuous regional analgesia (PICRA) for postoperative pain relief was investigated in 23 surgical patients treated by amputation (12 patients) or by limb-salvage resection operations (11 patients). Bupivacaine was delivered into peripheral nerve sheaths via catheters placed therein at the time of surgery. Only patients in whom the nerves were easily accessible were treated. Catheters were placed in the axillary sheath, the lumbosacral trunk, and the femoral nerve sheaths of patients treated with shoulder girdle and pelvic procedures (resections and amputations), and within the sciatic nerve sheath of those treated with lower extremity procedures. The anesthetic agent was delivered at controllable rates. Regional analgesia was obtained in the operative site with minimal motor or sensory decrease. To assess the efficacy of this technique, the results of this study group were compared with those of a matched group of 11 patients treated with similar surgical procedures but who received epidural morphine. Eleven of the 23 patients on PICRA required no supplemental narcotic agents. The mean level of the narcotic agents required by the remaining 13 PICRA patients was approximately one third of that required by the matched group of 11 patients receiving epidural morphine. Overall, the patients on PICRA had an 80% reduction of narcotic requirements when compared to the historical controls. The technique is reliable and can be performed by the surgeon, requiring about a ten-minute increase in operating time. It has potentially wide application in orthopedics in procedures in which the major nerves are easily accessible (e.g., pelvic fractures and revision hip surgery) and for patients with intractable pain of the extremities.

  16. Postoperative intussusception in children.

    PubMed

    Türkyilmaz, Z; Sönmez, K; Demiroğullari, B; Karabulut, R; Ozen, I O; Moralioğlu, S; Başaklar, A C; Kale, N

    2005-04-01

    Postoperative intussusception (POI) is an uncommon cause of postoperative mechanical bowel obstruction in children. Four cases of POI during a period of 15 years (1987-2001) were analysed retrospectively. Symptoms developed after a median period of 2.5 days following the operation. All cases were succesfully treated with operative manual reduction. POI occurs after a wide variety of surgical procedures and is often difficult to diagnose because the symptoms are often obscure. As a conclusion, we state that reaching a diagnose requires a high index of suspicion.

  17. Pelvic Surgical Site Infections in Gynecologic Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Lachiewicz, Mark P.; Moulton, Laura J.; Jaiyeoba, Oluwatosin

    2015-01-01

    The development of surgical site infection (SSI) remains the most common complication of gynecologic surgical procedures and results in significant patient morbidity. Gynecologic procedures pose a unique challenge in that potential pathogenic microorganisms from the skin or vagina and endocervix may migrate to operative sites and can result in vaginal cuff cellulitis, pelvic cellulitis, and pelvic abscesses. Multiple host and surgical risk factors have been identified as risks that increase infectious sequelae after pelvic surgery. This paper will review these risk factors as many are modifiable and care should be taken to address such factors in order to decrease the chance of infection. We will also review the definitions, microbiology, pathogenesis, diagnosis, and management of pelvic SSIs after gynecologic surgery. PMID:25788822

  18. Primary Pelvic Hydatid Cyst: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Parray, Fazl Q.; Wani, Shadab Nabi; Bazaz, Sajid; Khan, Shakeel-ur Rehman; Malik, Nighat Shaffi

    2011-01-01

    This is a case report of a young man who presented to us as a case of hypogastric pain and frequency of micturation. General physical examination and radiological evaluation confirmed a multiloculated pelvic swelling. Patient was subjected to laparotomy which confirmed the diagnosis of a primary pelvic hydatid disease. Patient was put on chemotherapy after surgery and is doing well on follow up. PMID:22606594

  19. Pelvic actinomycosis associated with intrauterine devices.

    PubMed

    O'Connor, K F; Bagg, M N; Croley, M R; Schabel, S I

    1989-02-01

    The authors describe two women with pelvic pain, long-term use of an intrauterine device, and a pelvic mass due to Actinomyces israelii. The diagnostic imaging findings were nonspecific but included mass effect and mucosal irregularity of the rectosigmoid colon at barium enema examination and complex masses and inflammatory changes at computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging. Radiologists should be aware of the imaging findings of this potentially lethal but curable condition.

  20. Experience with 32 Pelvic Fracture Urethral Defects Associated with Urethrorectal Fistulas: Transperineal Urethroplasty with Gracilis Muscle Interposition.

    PubMed

    Guo, Hailin; Sa, Yinglong; Fu, Qiang; Jin, Chongrui; Wang, Lin

    2017-07-01

    Pelvic fracture urethral defects associated with urethrorectal fistulas are rare and difficult to repair. The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of transperineal urethroplasty with gracilis muscle interposition for the repair of pelvic fracture urethral defects associated with urethrorectal fistulas. We identified 32 patients who underwent transperineal urethroplasty with gracilis muscle interposition to repair pelvic fracture urethral defects associated with urethrorectal fistulas. Patient demographics as well as preoperative, operative and postoperative data were obtained. Mean followup was 33 months (range 6 to 64). The overall success rate was 91% (29 of 32 cases). One-stage repair was successful in 17 of 18 patients (94%) using perineal anastomosis with separation of the corporeal body and in 12 of 14 (86%) using perineal anastomosis with inferior pubectomy and separation of the corporeal body. All 22 patients (100%) without a previous history of repair were successfully treated. However, only 7 of 10 patients (70%) with a previous history of failed urethroplasty and urethrorectal fistula repair were cured. Recurrent urethral strictures developed in 2 cases. One patient was treated successfully with optical internal urethrotomy and the other was treated successfully with tubed perineoscrotal flap urethroplasty. Recurrent urethrorectal fistulas associated with urethral strictures developed in an additional patient. Transperineal urethroplasty with gracilis muscle interposition is a safe and effective surgical procedure for most pelvic fracture urethral defects associated with urethrorectal fistulas. Several other factors may affect its postoperative efficiency. Copyright © 2017 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Early postoperative acetabular discontinuity after total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Desai, Gaurav; Ries, Michael D

    2011-12-01

    Periprosthetic acetabular fracture is a rare complication after total hip arthroplasty (THA). However, we have treated 2 patients with acute postoperative acetabular discontinuity that occurred 2 and 3 weeks after primary THA. Both fractures were in elderly osteoporotic female patients with minimal trauma and may have developed from unrecognized intraoperative fractures. Pelvic stability was restored with acetabular revision using medial morselized bone grafting and a cemented reconstruction cage. This report demonstrates that early postoperative periprosthetic acetabular discontinuity after THA is a risk in elderly patients with severe osteoporosis and that salvage of acetabular fixation can be achieved with cemented cage reconstruction and medial morselized bone grafting. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Sexual function in women before and after transvaginal mesh repair for pelvic organ prolapse.

    PubMed

    Sentilhes, Loïc; Berthier, Aurélien; Sergent, Fabrice; Verspyck, Eric; Descamps, Philippe; Marpeau, Loïc

    2008-06-01

    The aim of the study was to assess sexual function in women before and after surgery with transvaginal mesh for pelvic organ prolapse. Women were invited to complete a sexual function questionnaire including the Lemack and the Pelvic Organ Prolapse Urinary Incontinence Sexual Questionnaires (PISQ-12) before undergoing surgery and 1 year after surgery. Eighty-three complete pre and postoperative questionnaires were analyzed. Mean age was 65.1 years. Forty-six were sexually inactive and 37 were sexually active women. Two sexually active women completed the preoperative PISQ-12 questionnaire retrospectively after surgery. There were no significant differences after surgery in the answers to the Lemack questionnaire and PISQ-12 scores. These results suggest that nonabsorbable transvaginal mesh repair of genital prolapse does not impair sexual function 1 year after surgery. Nevertheless, patients should not necessarily expect a significant improvement in sexual function outcome following transvaginal mesh repair for genital prolapse.

  3. Breast malignant phyllodes tumor with rare pelvic metastases and long-term overall survival

    PubMed Central

    Shan, Jinlan; Zhang, Shizhen; Wang, Zhen; Fu, Yanbiao; Li, Ling; Wang, Xiaochen

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Malignant phyllodes tumor (PT) is a rare fibro epithelial neoplasm of the breast, which is poor prognosis due to high risk of recurrence and distant metastasis. Methods: We report a case of malignant PT. It had recurred locally five times, and the sixth relapse was occurred 54 months after first diagnosis, presenting a huge pelvic mass (14 cm × 11 cm) by CT scan. Histopathological examination has demonstrated a metastatic phyllodes tumor. After postoperative chemotherapy treatment, a longer survival has been achieved, which is more than 72 months. Results: Our case report describes a breast PT with several local recurrences and a rare metastasis (pelvic cavity), but long-term overall survival was achieved after surgery and chemotherapy. Conclusion: We conclude that trustworthy prognosticators that identify patients with excessive potential of aggressive clinical course should be explored. Moreover, proper treatment could prolong overall survival of metastatic PT patients. PMID:27661051

  4. Phase III trial to confirm the superiority of pelvic and para-aortic lymphadenectomy to pelvic lymphadenectomy alone for endometrial cancer: Japan Clinical Oncology Group Study 1412 (SEPAL-P3).

    PubMed

    Watari, Hidemichi; Katayama, Hiroshi; Shibata, Taro; Ushijima, Kimio; Satoh, Toyomi; Onda, Takashi; Aoki, Daisuke; Fukuda, Haruhiko; Yaegashi, Nobuo; Sakuragi, Noriaki

    2017-10-01

    To prospectively investigate the survival benefit of para-aortic lymphadenectomy, we launched a new study, the JCOG1412. This is a randomized Phase III trial to confirm the superiority of pelvic and para-aortic lymphadenectomy to pelvic lymphadenectomy alone. Patients corresponding to possible FIGO Stage IB, II, IIIA, IIIB, and a part of IIIC1 are eligible for the first registration before surgery. Next, those patients without evidence of para-aortic lymph node metastasis and multiple pelvic lymph node metastasis during surgery will be included in the second registration and randomized to either the pelvic lymphadenectomy alone arm or the pelvic and para-aortic lymphadenectomy arm. After the initial surgery, patients with post-operative recurrence risks receive adjuvant chemotherapy. The primary endpoint is overall survival. Secondary endpoints include relapse-free survival, short-term surgical outcomes, adverse events related to adjuvant chemotherapy and recurrence patterns. This trial has been registered at the UMIN Clinical Trials Registry [http://www.umin.ac.jp/ctr/index.htm] as UMIN000025399. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  5. Vaginal Parity and Pelvic Organ Prolapse

    PubMed Central

    Quiroz, Lieschen H.; Muñoz, Alvaro; Shippey, Stuart H.; Gutman, Robert E.; Handa, Victoria L.

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To investigate whether the odds of pelvic organ prolapse vary significantly with the number of vaginal births and whether cesarean birth is associated with prolapse. STUDY DESIGN In this cross-sectional study of women over the age of 40, pelvic organ prolapse was defined as descent to or beyond the hymen. Logistic regression was used to estimate the relative odds of pelvic organ prolapse for each vaginal birth or cesarean birth, controlling for confounders. RESULTS Two hundred ninety women underwent a pelvic organ prolapse quantification POPQ examination, and 72 were found to have pelvic organ prolapse. A single vaginal birth significantly increased the odds of prolapse (OR 9.73, 95% CI 2.68-35.35). Additional vaginal births were not associated with a significant increase in the odds of prolapse. Cesarean births were not associated with prolapse (OR 1.31, 95% CI 0.49-3.54). CONCLUSION The odds of pelvic organ prolapse were almost 10 times higher after a single vaginal birth. The mnrginal impact of additiotull births on this association was small. PMID:20506667

  6. Vaginal parity and pelvic organ prolapse.

    PubMed

    Quiroz, Lieschen H; Muñoz, Alvaro; Shippey, Stuart H; Gutman, Robert E; Handa, Victoria L

    2010-01-01

    To investigate whether the odds of pelvic organ prolapse vary significantly with the number of vaginal births and whether cesarean birth is associated with prolapse. In this cross-sectional study of women over the age of 40, pelvic organ prolapse was defined as descent to or beyond the hymen. Logistic regression was used to estimate the relative odds of pelvic organ prolapse for each vaginal birth or cesarean birth, controlling for confounders. Two hundred ninety women underwent a pelvic organ prolapse quantification POPQ examination, and 72 were found to have pelvic organ prolapse. A single vaginal birth significantly increased the odds of prolapse (OR 9.73, 95% CI 2.68-35.35). Additional vaginal births were not associated with a significant increase in the odds of prolapse. Cesarean births were not associated with prolapse (OR 1.31, 95% CI 0.49-3.54). The odds of pelvic organ prolapse were almost 10 times higher after a single vaginal birth. The marginal impact of additional births on this association was small.

  7. Seasonal trend of acute pelvic inflammatory disease.

    PubMed

    Xholli, Anjeza; Cannoletta, Marianna; Cagnacci, Angelo

    2014-05-01

    Many infections follow a seasonal trend. Aim of our study was to check whether acute pelvic inflammatory disease (PID) follows a seasonal progress. In a retrospective study on 12,152 hospital records, 158 cases of acute pelvic inflammatory disease were identified. Periodogram analysis was applied to the date of pelvic inflammatory disease admission and to related environmental factors, such as temperature and photoperiod. Pelvic inflammatory disease follows a seasonal rhythm with mean to peak variation of 23 % and maximal values in September (±37.2 days). The rhythm, more evident in married women, is related to the rhythm of temperature advanced by 2 months and of photoperiod advanced by 3 months. Cases of pelvic inflammatory disease are more frequent than expected in unmarried (36 vs. 17.3/34,626, p = 0.015), particularly divorced women 30-40 years of age. Our study evidences a seasonal trend and confirms unmarried, particularly divorced status, as important risk factor for acute pelvic inflammatory disease.

  8. Intraoperative pelvic nerve stimulation performed under continuous electromyography of the internal anal sphincter.

    PubMed

    Kneist, Werner; Kauff, Daniel W; Rahimi Nedjat, Roman K; Rink, Andreas D; Heimann, Axel; Somerlik, Karin; Koch, Klaus P; Doerge, Thomas; Lang, Hauke

    2010-11-01

    The aim of this animal study was to investigate the effect of intraoperative pelvic nerve stimulation on internal anal sphincter electromyographic signals in order to evaluate its possible use for neuromonitoring during nerve-sparing pelvic surgery. Eight pigs underwent low anterior rectal resection. The intersphincteric space was exposed, and the internal (IAS) and external anal sphincter (EAS) were identified. Electromyography of both sphincters was performed with bipolar needle electrodes. Intermittent bipolar electric stimulation of the inferior hypogastric plexus and the pelvic splanchnic nerves was carried out bilaterally. The recorded signals were analyzed in its frequency spectrum. In all animals, electromyographic recordings of IAS and EAS were successful. Intraoperative nerve stimulation resulted in a sudden amplitude increase in the time-based electromyographic signals of IAS (1.0 (0.5-9.0) μV vs. 4.0 (1.0-113.0) μV) and EAS (p < 0.001). The frequency spectrum of IAS in the resting state ranged from 0.15 to 5 Hz with highest activity in median at 0.77 Hz (46 cycles/min). Pelvic nerve stimulation resulted in an extended spectrum ranging from 0.15 to 20 Hz. EAS signals showed higher frequencies mainly in a range of 50 to 350 Hz. However, after muscle relaxation with pancuronium bromide, only the low frequency spectrum of the IAS signals was still present. Intraoperative verification of IAS function by stimulation of pelvic autonomic nerves is possible. The IAS electromyographic response could be used to monitor pelvic autonomic nerve preservation.

  9. Postoperative intravenous morphine titration.

    PubMed

    Aubrun, F; Mazoit, J-X; Riou, B

    2012-02-01

    Relief of acute pain during the immediate postoperative period is an important task for anaesthetists. Morphine is widely used to control moderate-to-severe postoperative pain and the use of small i.v. boluses of morphine in the post-anaesthesia care unit allows a rapid titration of the dose needed for adequate pain relief. The essential principle of a titration regimen must be to adapt the morphine dose to the pain level. Although morphine would not appear to be the most appropriate choice for achieving rapid pain relief, this is the sole opioid assessed in many studies of immediate postoperative pain management using titration. More than 90% of the patients have pain relief using a protocol of morphine titration and the mean dose required to obtain pain relief is 12 (7) mg, after a median of four boluses. Sedation is frequent during i.v. morphine titration and should be considered as a morphine-related adverse event and not evidence of pain relief. The incidence of ventilatory depression is very low when the criteria to limit the dose of i.v. morphine are enforced. Morphine titration can be used with caution in elderly patients, in children, or in obese patients. In practice, i.v. morphine titration allows the physician to meet the needs of individual patients rapidly and limits the risk of overdose making this method the first step in postoperative pain management.

  10. Laparoscopic ventral rectopexy for rectoanal intussusception: postoperative evaluation with proctography.

    PubMed

    Tsunoda, Akira; Ohta, Tomoyuki; Kiyasu, Yoshiyuki; Kusanagi, Hiroshi

    2015-04-01

    Laparoscopic ventral rectopexy can relieve symptoms of obstructed defecation and fecal incontinence in patients with rectoanal intussusception. However, pelvic floor imaging after surgery has not been reported. This study was designed to assess the outcome of patients who underwent laparoscopic ventral rectopexy for rectoanal intussusception, with special reference to the postoperative findings on evacuation proctography. This study was a retrospective analysis of prospectively collected data. The study was conducted from 2012 to 2013 at the Department of Surgery, Kameda Medical Center, Japan. We included 26 patients with symptomatic rectoanal intussusception. Laparoscopic ventral rectopexy was performed. Evacuation proctography was performed before and 6 months after the procedure. Defecatory function was evaluated using the Constipation Scoring System and Fecal Incontinence Severity Index. Of 26 patients with rectoanal intussusception preoperatively, 22 had symptoms of obstructed defecation and 21 complained of fecal incontinence. Postoperatively, rectoanal intussusception was eliminated in all patients, though 8 developed recto rectal intussusception. There was an overall reduction in both grade 2 rectocele size (median preop 26 mm vs. postop 11 mm; p < 0.0001) and pelvic floor descent (median preop 26 mm vs. postop 20 mm; p < 0.0001). 6 months after surgery, a reduction of at least 50% was observed in the Constipation Scoring System score for 9 patients (41%) with obstructive defecation and in the Fecal Incontinence Severity Index score for 14 incontinent patients (67%). This was a preliminary study with a small sample size, no control group, and short follow-up time. Evacuation proctography showed anatomical correction in patients with rectoanal intussusception who underwent laparoscopic ventral rectopexy. However, the data also indicate that such correction does not necessarily result in meaningful symptomatic relief.

  11. The comparative, long-term effect of the Salter osteotomy and Pemberton acetabuloplasty on pelvic height, scoliosis and functional outcome.

    PubMed

    Wang, C-W; Wang, T-M; Wu, K-W; Huang, S-C; Kuo, K N

    2016-08-01

    This study compared the long-term results following Salter osteotomy and Pemberton acetabuloplasty in children with developmental dysplasia of the hip (DDH). We assessed if there was a greater increase in pelvic height following the Salter osteotomy, and if this had a continued effect on pelvic tilt, lumbar curvature or functional outcomes. We reviewed 42 children at more than ten years post-operatively following a unilateral Salter osteotomy or Pemberton acetabuloplasty. We measured the increase in pelvic height and the iliac crest tilt and sacral tilt at the most recent review and at an earlier review point in the first decade of follow-up. We measured the lumbar Cobb angle and the Short Form-36 (SF-36) and Harris hip scores were collected at the most recent review. During the first decade of follow-up, there was a greater increase in pelvic height in the children who had a Salter osteotomy (Salter, 10.1%; Pemberton, 4.3%, p < 0.001). The difference in the increase in pelvic height was insignificant at the most recent review (Salter, 4.4%; Pemberton, 3.1%, p = 0.249). There was no significant difference between the two groups for the lumbar Cobb angle, (Salter, 3.1°; Pemberton, 3.3°, p = 0.906). A coronal lumbar curve was seen in 41 children (97%), 30 of these had a compensatory curve. Sacral tilt was the radiographic parameter for pelvic imbalance that correlated most with the lumbar Cobb angle (Pearson correlation co-efficient 0.59). The Harris hip score and SF-36 were good and showed no differences between the two groups. In the long-term, we found no difference in the functional results or pelvic imbalance between Salter osteotomy and Pemberton acetabuloplasty in the management of children with DDH. Cite this article: Bone Joint J 2016;98-B:1145-50. ©2016 The British Editorial Society of Bone & Joint Surgery.

  12. Postoperative incentive spirometry use.

    PubMed

    Hassanzadeh, Hamid; Jain, Amit; Tan, Eric W; Stein, Benjamin E; Van Hoy, Megan L; Stewart, Nadine N; Lemma, Mesfin A

    2012-06-01

    The authors hypothesized that the use of incentive spirometry by orthopedic patients is less than the recommended level and is affected by patient-related factors and type of surgery. To determine its postoperative use, the authors prospectively surveyed all patients in their institution's general orthopedic ward who had undergone elective spine surgery or total knee or hip arthroplasty during a consecutive 3-month period in 2010, excluding patients with postoperative delirium or requiring a monitored bed. All 182 patients (74 men, 108 women; average age, 64.5 years; range, 32-88 years; spine group, n=55; arthroplasty group, n=127), per protocol, received preoperative spirometry education by a licensed respiratory therapist (recommended use, 10 times hourly) and reinforcement education by nurses. Patients were asked twice daily (morning and evening) regarding their spirometry use during the previous 1-hour period by a registered nurse on postoperative days 1 through 3. All data were collected by the same 2 nurses using the same standardized questionnaire. Spirometry use was correlated with surgery type, postoperative day/time, and patient's age and sex. Student's t test, Spearman test, and one-way analysis of variance were used to compare differences (P<.05). Spirometry use averaged 4.1 times per hour (range, 0-10 times). No statistical correlations were found between spirometry use and age. Sex did not influence spirometry use. The arthroplasty group reported significantly higher use than did the spine group: 4.3 and 3.5 times per hour, respectively. Mean use increased significantly between postoperative days 1, 2, and 3.

  13. Chronic Pelvic Pain due to Pelvic Congestion Syndrome: The Role of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology

    SciTech Connect

    Ganeshan, Arul; Upponi, Sara; Hon, Lye-Quen; Uthappa, M. C.; Warakaulle, Dinuke R.; Uberoi, Raman

    2007-11-15

    Chronic pelvic pain (CPP) is a common cause of gynecologic referral. Pelvic congestion syndrome, which is said to occurs due to ovarian vein incompetence, is a recognized cause of CPP. The aim of this paper is to briefly describe the clinical manifestations, and to review the role of diagnostic and interventional radiology in the management of this probably under-diagnosed condition.

  14. Demonstration of Pelvic Anatomy by Modified Midline Transection that Maintains Intact Internal Pelvic Organs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steinke, Hanno; Saito, Toshiyuki; Herrmann, Gudrun; Miyaki, Takayoshi; Hammer, Niels; Sandrock, Mara; Itoh, Masahiro; Spanel-Borowski, Katharina

    2010-01-01

    Gross dissection for demonstrating anatomy of the human pelvis has traditionally involved one of two approaches, each with advantages and disadvantages. Classic hemisection in the median plane through the pelvic ring transects the visceral organs but maintains two symmetric pelvic halves. An alternative paramedial transection compromises one side…

  15. Current treatment of pelvic organ prolapse correlated with chronic pelvic pain, bladder and bowel dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Liedl, Bernhard; Goeschen, Klaus; Durner, Leopold

    2017-05-01

    The purpose of this review is to critically analyze the relationship between symptoms of abnormal emptying of the bladder, urgency, pelvic pain, anorectal dysfunction and pelvic organ prolapse (POP) and to present evidence in order to show how many of the above mentioned symptoms can be cured or substantially improved by repair of specific pelvic ligaments. In this review, we provide evidence to show how often these dysfunctions occur and how they can be cured in 42-94% by appropriate pelvic floor surgery in the longer term, up to 2 years. Laxity in ligaments and/or vaginal membrane due to damaged connective tissue may prevent the normal opening and closure mechanism of urethra and anus, because muscles need finite lengths to contract properly. Hypermobility of the apex can irritate the pelvic plexus causing chronic pelvic pain. In consequence, dysfunctions as abnormal emptying of the bladder, urgency, pelvic pain, fecal incontinence and obstructed defecation can occur in women with different degrees of POP. In conclusion, it has to be recognized that women bothered by these symptoms should be examined for POP and appropriately advised for possibility of cure by pelvic floor surgery after careful selection. VIDEO ABSTRACT.

  16. Demonstration of Pelvic Anatomy by Modified Midline Transection that Maintains Intact Internal Pelvic Organs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steinke, Hanno; Saito, Toshiyuki; Herrmann, Gudrun; Miyaki, Takayoshi; Hammer, Niels; Sandrock, Mara; Itoh, Masahiro; Spanel-Borowski, Katharina

    2010-01-01

    Gross dissection for demonstrating anatomy of the human pelvis has traditionally involved one of two approaches, each with advantages and disadvantages. Classic hemisection in the median plane through the pelvic ring transects the visceral organs but maintains two symmetric pelvic halves. An alternative paramedial transection compromises one side…

  17. Fecal Impaction Causing Pelvic Venous Compression and Edema

    PubMed Central

    Naramore, Sara; Aziz, Faisal; Alexander, Chandran Paul; Methratta, Sosamma; Cilley, Robert; Rocourt, Dorothy

    2015-01-01

    Chronic constipation is a common condition which may result in fecal impaction. A 13-year-old male with chronic constipation and encopresis presented with fecal impaction for three weeks. The impaction caused abdominal pain, distension, encopresis, and decreased oral intake. He was found in severe distress with non-pitting edema of his feet and ankles along with perineal edema. The pedal edema worsened after receiving a fluid bolus, so concern arose for venous compression or a thrombus. A Duplex Ultrasound demonstrated changes in the venous waveforms of the bilateral external iliac and common femoral veins without thrombosis. Manual disimpaction and polyethylene glycol 3350 with electrolytes resolved the pedal and perineal edema. Four months later, he had soft bowel movements without recurrence of the edema. A repeat Duplex Ultrasound was normal. We present a child in whom severe fecal impaction caused pelvic venous compression resulting in bilateral pedal and perineal edema. PMID:26500749

  18. Management of Postoperative Respiratory Failure.

    PubMed

    Mulligan, Michael S; Berfield, Kathleen S; Abbaszadeh, Ryan V

    2015-11-01

    Despite best efforts, postoperative complications such as postoperative respiratory failure may occur and prompt recognition of the process and management is required. Postoperative respiratory failure, such as postoperative pneumonia, postpneumonectomy pulmonary edema, acute respiratory distress-like syndromes, and pulmonary embolism, are associated with high morbidity and mortality. The causes of these complications are multifactorial and depend on preoperative, intraoperative, and postoperative factors, some of which are modifiable. The article identifies some of the risk factors, causes, and treatment strategies for successful management of the patient with postoperative respiratory failure. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. [Percutaneous screw fixation for pelvic fractures with fluoroscopy-based navigation].

    PubMed

    Gao, Bo; Xiang, Zhou; Fang, Yue; Kong, Qing-Quan; Huang, Fu-Guo; Cen, Shi-Qiang; Zhong, Gang; Ma, Jun; Wang, Lei

    2012-01-01

    To investigate the applications of fluoroscopy-based navigation in pelvic fractures and related surgical considerations. From May 2010 to December, 16 patients with pelvic fractures were treated with computerized navigation. There were 12 males and 4 females with an average age of 37 years (ranged from 20 to 54 years). Fractures were caused by traffic accident in 5 cases, crush injury in 5 cases and falling from height in 6 cases. Based on the Tile classification, there were 15 cases of Tile C type and 1 case of Tile B type. In these patients, 4 patients were treated with sacroiliac screw fixation; 2 patients were treated with sacroiliac screw fixation, screw fixation for pubic symphysis diastasis and pubic fractures; 8 patients were treated with sacroiliac screw fixation and screw fixation for pubic fractures; 2 patients were treated with screw fixation for pubic fractures. The index such as screw inserting time, accurance of inserting screws, intra-operative blood losing, injuries of nerve, vascular and other organs, reduction conditions were observed. A total of 36 screws were inserted. The average time was 20 min for each screw placement. The blood loss ranged from 10 to 20 ml. There were no wound infections, neurovascualr injuries and other organ injuries. The postoperative pelvic X-ray and three-dimensional CT showed that the fractures had good reduction and all the screws had good position. Percutaneous screw fixation of pelvic fractures with fluoroscopy-based navigation have advantages such as little trauma, less blood loss, little complication, reliable fixation and no blood transfusion, which can reconstruct the stability of the pelvic ring, but need adequate preoperative reperation and high requirements for the surgeon.

  20. New concepts on functional chronic pelvic and perineal pain: pathophysiology and multidisciplinary management.

    PubMed

    Ploteau, Stéphane; Labat, Jean Jacques; Riant, Thibault; Levesque, Amélie; Robert, Roger; Nizard, Julien

    2015-03-01

    The management of chronic pelvic and perineal pain has been improved by a better understanding of the mechanisms of this pain and an optimized integrated multidisciplinary approach to the patient. The concept of organic lesions responsible for a persistent nociceptive factor has gradually been replaced by that of dysregulation of nociceptive messages derived from the pelvis and perineum. In this setting, painful diseases identified by organ specialists are usually also involved and share several common denominators (triggering factors, predisposing clinical context). These diseases include painful bladder syndrome, irritable bowel syndrome, vulvodynia, and chronic pelvic pain syndrome. The painful symptoms vary from one individual to another and according to his or her capacity to activate pain inhibition/control processes. Although the patient often attributes chronic pain to a particular organ (with the corollary that pain will persist until the organ has been treated), this pain is generally no longer derived from the organ but is expressed via this organ. Several types of clinical presentation of complex pelvic pain have therefore been pragmatically identified to facilitate the management of treatment failures resulting from a purely organ-based approach, which can also reinforce the patient's impression of incurability. These subtypes correspond to neuropathic pain, central sensitization (fibromyalgia), complex regional pain syndrome, and emotional components similar to those observed in post-traumatic stress disorder. These various components are also often associated and self-perpetuating. Consequently, when pelvic pain cannot be explained by an organ disease, this model, using each of these four components associated with their specific mechanisms, can be used to propose personalized treatment options and also to identify patients at high risk of postoperative pelvic pain (multi-operated patients, central sensitization, post-traumatic stress disorder, etc

  1. Neurourology and pelvic floor dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Madersbacher, H

    2004-08-01

    The levator ani muscles, endopelvic fascia, and muscular structures of the sphincter and the pelvic floor musculature (PFM) comprise one system. The physiological organization of Onuf's nuclei and of levator ani motorneurons as well as the reflex control of the tonic activity, that is essential for the generation of maintained force in slow-twitch muscle fibers, is an important part of the normal function of this system. In the human the motor cortex is crucial in voluntary motor control also of PFM, but other areas in the brain are involved in activities of the PFM related to emotional behavior e.g. micturition. Coordination between the urinary bladder, the urethra and the PFM is mediated by multiple reflex pathways organized in the brain and spinal cord. Some reflexes promote urine storage, whereas others facilitate voiding. It is also possible that individual reflexes might be linked together in a serial manner to create complex feedback mechanisms. The control of striated muscle in neurological lesions of the lower urinary tract is an active area of research and is producing results that are relevant to the problems of the neurogenic and idiopathic overactive bladder, whether these are caused by central nervous system or peripheral nerve lesions.

  2. Medium-term comparison of uterus preservation versus hysterectomy in pelvic organ prolapse treatment with Prolift™ mesh.

    PubMed

    Huang, Li-Yi; Chu, Li-Ching; Chiang, Hsin-Ju; Chuang, Fei-Chi; Kung, Fu-Tsai; Huang, Kuan-Hui

    2015-07-01

    We conducted a medium-term assessment of clinical outcomes and complications after surgical repair of pelvic organ prolapse (POP) using Prolift™ mesh, and sought to determine whether concomitant hysterectomy clinically influenced the outcome of pelvic reconstruction in patients without a prior history of urogenital surgery. Patients diagnosed with POP-Q stage 3/4 uterine prolapse at a tertiary referral urogynecology unit in South Taiwan who had undergone POP repair with Prolift mesh from May 2007 to July 2010 were identified by chart review. Concomitant hysterectomy was performed in 24 patients (hysterectomy group), and uterus-sparing surgery in 78 (uterus-sparing group) Preoperative and postoperative subjective assessments of urinary and prolapse symptoms, objective POP-Q score, urodynamic examination, and postoperative adverse events were compared between the groups. The mean follow-up periods were 25.7 months (range 6.2 - 73.1 months) and 31.7 months (range 6.0 - 78.4 months) in the concomitant hysterectomy and uterus-sparing groups, respectively. There were no between-group differences in functional and anatomic outcomes after surgery. No statistically significant differences were found in postoperative adverse events between the groups. Pelvic reconstruction using Prolift with concomitant hysterectomy and uterus-sparing surgery have similar anatomic and functional results at 2.5 years. Therefore, we consider uterus-sparing surgery to be an alternative to hysterectomy in uterine prolapse repair.

  3. Pelvic packing method (after two laparotomies): a salvage procedure to control intractable pelvic hemorrhage after vaginal hysterectomy: a case report.

    PubMed

    Kale, A; Kuyumcuoğlu, U

    2008-01-01

    Hysterectomy is one of the most commonly performed operative procedures in the world and hemorrhage continues to be a serious complication of both obstetrical and gynecologic surgeries. The pelvic packing technique is a useful alternative to control pelvic bleeding when standard measures fail. A 45-year-old premenopausal women with a history of pelvic pain and obstructive voiding symptoms underwent vaginal hysterectomy. Intraabdominal bleeding persisted after surgery and relaparotomy was performed. After routine surgical techniques failed to achieve adequate hemostasis, a pelvic packing technique was successfully used to tamponade the pelvic bleeding. When traditional methods of controlling pelvic hemorrhage fail, pelvic packing can be used as an unusual method for intractable pelvic hemorrhage. We successfully used the pelvic packing technique in a premenopousal patient with intractable hemorrhage after vaginal hysterectomy and this technique saved the patient's life.

  4. Chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome and pelvic floor spasm: can we diagnose and treat?

    PubMed

    Westesson, Karin E; Shoskes, Daniel A

    2010-07-01

    National Institutes of Health category III prostatitis, also known as chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome, is a common condition with significant impact on quality of life. This clinically defined syndrome has a multifactorial etiology and seems to respond best to multimodal therapy. At least half of these patients have pelvic floor spasm. There are several approaches to therapy including biofeedback, acupuncture, and myofascial release physical therapy. However, the only multicenter study of pelvic floor physical therapy for pelvic floor spasm in men failed to show an advantage over conventional Western massage. We have proposed a clinical phenotyping system called UPOINT to classify patients with urologic chronic pelvic pain and subsequently direct appropriate therapy. Here, we review the current approach to category III prostatitis and describe how clinical phenotyping with UPOINT may improve therapy outcomes.

  5. Postoperative pain management.

    PubMed

    Joshi, G P

    1994-01-01

    Inadequately treated pain is a major cause of unanticipated hospital admissions after ambulatory surgery. The ability to provide adequate pain relief by simple methods that are readily available to the day-care patient in his or her home environment is one of the major challenges for providers of ambulatory surgery and anesthesia. The increasing number of extensive and painful surgical procedures (e.g., laparoscopic cholecystectomy, laminectomy, knee construction, hysterectomies) being undertaken on an ambulatory basis presents new challenges with respect to acute postoperative pain. Hence the availability of more sophisticated and effective treatment modalities, such as ambulatory PCA and continuous local and regional anesthetic blocks, with minimal side effects, are necessary to optimize the benefits of ambulatory surgery for both patient and health care provider. However, outcome studies are needed to evaluate the effect of these newer therapeutic approaches with respect to postoperative side effects and other important recovery parameters. Recent studies suggest that factors other than pain per se must be controlled to reduce postoperative morbidity and facilitate the recovery process. Not surprisingly, the anesthetic technique can influence analgesic requirement in the early postoperative period. Although oral analgesic agents will continue to play an important role, the adjunctive use of local anesthetic agents is likely to assume an even greater role in the future. Use of drug combinations (e.g., opiates and local anesthetics, opiates and NSAIDs) may provide improved analgesia with fewer side effects. Finally, safer and simpler analgesic delivery systems are needed to improve our ability to provide cost-effective pain relief after ambulatory surgery. In conclusion, as a result of our enhanced understanding of the mechanisms of acute pain and the physiological basis of nociception, the provision of "stress-free" anesthesia with minimal postoperative

  6. Female sexual function and pelvic floor disorders

    PubMed Central

    Handa, Victoria L.; Cundiff, Geoffrey; Chang, Howard H.; Helzlsouer, Kathy J.

    2009-01-01

    Objectives Sexual function is an important dimension of adult life and yet very little is known about the relationships between female sexuality and chronic health conditions, including pelvic floor disorders. Our goal was to investigate the hypothesis that pelvic floor disorders are associated with female sexual problems, independent of other related factors. Methods The study population included 301 adult women seeking outpatient gynecologic and urogynecologic care. Pelvic floor disorders were assessed with the Pelvic Floor Disorders Inventory-20 (PFDI) and the Pelvic Organ Prolapse Quantification examination. Sexual function was assessed with the Personal Experiences Questionnaire. Using ordinal regression analysis, we identified characteristics and conditions associated with decreased libido, infrequent orgasm, decreased arousal, and dyspareunia. Results Sexual function was poorer among 78 women (26%) without a current sexual partner than among 223 with a partner (p<0.01). Among the 223 with a current partner, women with a high PFDI score were significantly more likely to report decreased arousal (p<0.01), infrequent orgasm (p<0.01) and increased dyspareunia (p<0.01). A similar pattern was observed for the urinary, colorectal-anal, and prolapse scales of the PFDI, although some associations were marginally significant. Stage III–IV prolapse was significantly associated with infrequent orgasm (p=0.02), but other sexual complaints were not more common with increasing prolapse stage. Conclusion Pelvic floor symptoms are significantly associated with reduced sexual arousal, infrequent orgasm, and dyspareunia. Clinicians who care for women with pelvic floor disorders should be aware of this association and should specifically address sexual concerns with women seeking treatment of incontinence and prolapse. PMID:18448734

  7. Postoperative Lower Extremity Edema in Patients with Primary Endometrial Cancer.

    PubMed

    Bae, Hyo Sook; Lim, Myong Cheol; Lee, Jeong Seon; Lee, Yumi; Nam, Byung Ho; Seo, Sang-Soo; Kang, Sokbom; Chung, Seung Hyun; Kim, Joo-Young; Park, Sang-Yoon

    2016-01-01

    The goal of this study was to investigate clinical manifestations of lower extremity edema (LEE) after lymph node dissection in patients with primary endometrial cancer. Women with primary endometrial cancer who underwent staging surgery between November 2001 and March 2011 were included in the study. Medical records and/or responses to the Gynecologic Cancer Lymphedema Questionnaire (GCLQ) were used for LEE evaluation. All 154 patients underwent pelvic lymph node dissection, and 126 patients (81.8 %) underwent paraaortic LN dissection. The median age of the patients was 52 years, the majority had stage I cancer (78.6 %), and most had endometrioid histology (90.9 %). The most frequent GCLQ responses were "experienced swelling" (35.7 %), "experienced numbness" (30.5 %), "experienced heaviness" (29.9 %), and "experienced aching" (29.9 %). Sixty-four patients (41.6 %) had previous (9/64, 14.1 %) and/or current (55/64, 85.9 %) patient-reported LEE. Most patients developed LEE within 12 months after surgery (39/56, 69.6 %), and LEE lasted for more than 12 months in most patients (45/56, 80.4 %). Three patients reported recurrent LEE after recovery. Multivariate logistic regression identified the number of dissected pelvic lymph node (≥21) as a risk factor for LEE [odds ratio (OR) 3.28; 95 % confidence interval (CI) 1.058-10.136] and postoperative radiotherapy (OR 3.81, 95 % CI 1.67-8.69). LEE developed in more than one-third of patients with endometrial cancer after surgery, and LEE lasted for more than 12 months in most patients. A high number of dissected pelvic lymph nodes and postoperative radiotherapy is associated with LEE.

  8. Evaluation of the levator ani and pelvic wall muscles in levator ani syndrome.

    PubMed

    Hull, Margaret; Corton, Marlene M

    2009-01-01

    Chronic pelvic pain is a difficult problem to evaluate and treat. Knowledge of the pelvic floor and pelvic wall muscles may enable the provider to identify levator ani spasm syndrome, a possible cause of chronic pelvic pain.

  9. Sagittal spino-pelvic alignment failures following three column thoracic osteotomy for adult spinal deformity.

    PubMed

    Lafage, Virginie; Smith, Justin S; Bess, Shay; Schwab, Frank J; Ames, Christopher P; Klineberg, Eric; Arlet, Vincent; Hostin, Richard; Burton, Douglas C; Shaffrey, Christopher I

    2012-04-01

    Three column thoracic osteotomy (TCTO) is effective to correct rigid thoracic deformities, however, reasons for residual postoperative spinal deformity are poorly defined. Our objective was to evaluate risk factors for poor spino-pelvic alignment (SPA) following TCTO for adult spinal deformity (ASD). Multicenter, retrospective radiographic analysis of ASD patients treated with TCTO. Radiographic measures included: correction at the osteotomy site, thoracic kyphosis (TK), lumbar lordosis (LL), sagittal vertical axis (SVA), pelvic tilt (PT), and pelvic incidence (PI). Final SVA and PT were assessed to determine if ideal SPA (SVA < 4 cm, PT < 25°) was achieved. Differences between the ideal (IDEAL) and failed (FAIL) SPA groups were evaluated. A total of 41 consecutive ASD patients treated with TCTO were evaluated. TCTO significantly decreased TK, maximum coronal Cobb angle, SVA and PT (P < 0.05). Ideal SPA was achieved in 32 (78%) and failed in 9 (22%) patients. The IDEAL and FAIL groups had similar total fusion levels and similar focal, SVA and PT correction (P > 0.05). FAIL group had larger pre- and post-operative SVA, PT and PI and a smaller LL than IDEAL (P < 0.05). Poor SPA occurred in 22% of TCTO patients despite similar operative procedures and deformity correction as patients in the IDEAL group. Greater pre-operative PT and SVA predicted failed post-operative SPA. Alternative or additional correction procedures should be considered when planning TCTO for patients with large sagittal global malalignment, otherwise patients are at risk for suboptimal correction and poor outcomes.

  10. OBSTETRIC TRAUMA, PELVIC FLOOR INJURY AND FECAL INCONTINENCE: A POPULATION-BASED CASE-CONTROL STUDY

    PubMed Central

    Bharucha, Adil E.; Fletcher, J.G.; Melton, L. Joseph; Zinsmeister, Alan R.

    2012-01-01

    Background and Aims Current concepts based on referral center data suggest that pelvic floor injury from obstetric trauma is a major risk factor for fecal incontinence (FI) in women. In contrast, a majority of community women only develop FI decades after vaginal delivery, and obstetric events are not independent risk factors for FI. However, obstetric events are imperfect surrogates for anal and pelvic floor injury, which is often clinically occult. Hence, our objectives were to evaluate the relationship between prior obstetric events, pelvic floor injury, and FI among community women. Design In this nested case-control study of 68 women with FI (cases; mean age 57y) and 68 age-matched controls from a population-based cohort in Olmsted County, MN, pelvic floor anatomy and motion during voluntary contraction and defecation were assessed by MRI. Obstetric events and bowel habits were recorded. Results By multivariable analysis, internal sphincter injury (cases-28%, controls-6%; odds ratio [OR], 8.8; 95% CI, 2.3–34) and reduced perineal descent during defecation (cases-2.6 ± 0.2 cm, controls-3.1 ± 0.2 cm; OR, 1.7; 95% CI, 1.2–2.4) increased FI risk, but external sphincter injury (cases-25%, controls-4%;p < 0.005) was not independently predictive. Puborectalis injury was associated (p<0.05) with impaired anorectal motion during squeeze, but was not independently associated with FI. Grade 3–4 episiotomy (OR, 3.9; 95% CI, 1.4–11) but not other obstetric events increased the risk for pelvic floor injury. Heavy smoking (≥ 20 pack-years) was associated (p=0.052) with external sphincter atrophy. Conclusions State-of-the-art imaging techniques reveal pelvic floor injury or abnormal anorectal motion in a minority of community women with FI. Internal sphincter injury and reduced perineal descent during defecation are independent risk factors for FI. In addition to grade 3–4 episiotomy, smoking may be a potentially preventable, risk factor for pelvic floor injury

  11. Obstetric trauma, pelvic floor injury and fecal incontinence: a population-based case-control study.

    PubMed

    Bharucha, Adil E; Fletcher, J G; Melton, L Joseph; Zinsmeister, Alan R

    2012-06-01

    Current concepts based on referral center data suggest that pelvic floor injury from obstetric trauma is a major risk factor for fecal incontinence (FI) in women. In contrast, a majority of community women only develop FI decades after vaginal delivery, and obstetric events are not independent risk factors for FI. However, obstetric events are imperfect surrogates for anal and pelvic floor injury, which is often clinically occult. Hence, the objectives of this study were to evaluate the relationship between prior obstetric events, pelvic floor injury, and FI among community women. In this nested case-control study of 68 women with FI (cases; mean age 57 years) and 68 age-matched controls from a population-based cohort in Olmsted County, MN, pelvic floor anatomy and motion during voluntary contraction and defecation were assessed by magnetic resonance imaging. Obstetric events and bowel habits were recorded. By multivariable analysis, internal sphincter injury (cases-28%, controls-6%; odds ratio (OR): 8.8; 95% confidence interval (CI): 2.3-34) and reduced perineal descent during defecation (cases-2.6 ± 0.2 cm, controls-3.1 ± 0.2 cm; OR: 1.7; 95% CI: 1.2-2.4) increased FI risk, but external sphincter injury (cases-25%, controls-4%; P<0.005) was not independently predictive. Puborectalis injury was associated (P<0.05) with impaired anorectal motion during squeeze, but was not independently associated with FI. Grades 3-4 episiotomy (OR: 3.9; 95% CI: 1.4-11) but not other obstetric events increased the risk for pelvic floor injury. Heavy smoking (≥ 20 pack-years) was associated (P=0.052) with external sphincter atrophy. State-of-the-art imaging techniques reveal pelvic floor injury or abnormal anorectal motion in a minority of community women with FI. Internal sphincter injury and reduced perineal descent during defecation are independent risk factors for FI. In addition to grades 3-4 episiotomy, smoking may be a potentially preventable, risk factor for pelvic floor

  12. Comparison of two pelvic positioning belt configurations in a pediatric wheelchair.

    PubMed

    Cimolin, Veronica; Avellis, Martino; Piccinini, Luigi; Corbetta, Claudio; Cazzaniga, Andrea; Turconi, Anna Carla; Galli, Manuela

    2013-01-01

    Maintenance of stability for children in a wheelchair, particularly for those with spasticity, can be achieved through external stabilization components, such as pelvic positioning belts. Different kinds of pelvic belts exist on the market and one of the main characteristics is the different number of attachment points between the seat and the belt. As literature on this topic is limited to qualitative assessments, this study compared quantitatively 4-point versus 2-point pelvic positioning belts for the trunk fixation in 20 young patients with spasticity. Our data showed that 70% of the children required the use of pelvic belts on wheelchairs for stability and a better stability was observed with the 4-point belts than compared to the 2-point. Data generally showed in fact a higher percent of variation in terms of trunk flexion angleand knee joint angle with the 2-point belt than the 4-point belt, indicating increased submarining with the 2-point belt during sitting maintenance if compared to the 4-point belt (p < 0.05). According to our results, the 4-point belts seem to be the most effective configuration for patient stabilization, suggesting that its use prevents the thigh from submarining.

  13. Initial experiences with laparoscopy and flexible ureteroscopy combination pyeloplasty in management of ectopic pelvic kidney with stone and ureter-pelvic junction obstruction.

    PubMed

    Yin, Zhuo; Wei, Y B; Liang, B L; Zhou, K Q; Gao, Y L; Yan, B; Wang, Z; Yang, J R

    2015-06-01

    To demonstrate the safety and efficacy of combine laparoscopy and flexible ureteroscopy to treat ectopic pelvic kidneys with ureteropelvic junction obstruction (UPJO) and stones. 16 patients of ectopic pelvic kidneys with ureteropelvic junction obstruction and stones were treated with laparoscopy and flexible ureteroscopy (FURS). The operative time, required dose of tramadol, visual analog pain scale (VAPS), postoperative day, stone-free rates (SFRs), perioperative complications, and serum creatinine were evaluated. The SFRs were evaluated with noncontrasted renal computed tomography (CT). Intravenous pyelography (IVP) and CT scan were used to evaluate the UPJO. Stone-free status was defined as absence of stone fragments in kidney or the size of that is less than 3 mm. Operation time from 118 to 225 min, average time (171 ± 28) min; lithotomy time from 16 to 45 min, average time (32 ± 6) min. Average tramadol required at the first day postoperation was (118 ± 49.6) mg; at the second day was (78 ± 24.8) mg. VAPS score at 24 h (5.0 ± 0.7), VAPS score at 48 h (2.5 ± 0.8). Postoperative day (3.9 ± 0.6) days. Stone-free rate was 100%. Average serum creatinine was (88.7 ± 24.3) mol/L before surgery and (92.8 ± 21.6) mol/L after surgery. No major complication. No stone and obstruction recurrence in the follow-up of average 29.3 months. Combined FUR and LC is a good option for patient of ectopic pelvic kidney with renal stone and UPJO. From our initial experience, the SFRs and the effect of pyeloplasty are satisfactory and without major complication, the operative time is acceptable.

  14. Pelvic exenteration, University of Michigan: 100 patients at 5 years.

    PubMed

    Morley, G W; Hopkins, M P; Lindenauer, S M; Roberts, J A

    1989-12-01

    One hundred patients undergoing pelvic exenteration (total 69, anterior 13, posterior 18) at the University of Michigan Medical Center from 1964-1984 are reported. All patients were followed for at least 5 years or until time of death. The overall cumulative survival was 66% at 3 years and 61% at 5 years. The age of the patients ranged from 21-74 years (median 53). The type of pelvic neoplasm included squamous cell of the cervix, 57; adenocarcinoma of the cervix, nine; squamous cell carcinoma of the vulva, 12; squamous cell carcinoma of the vagina, eight; vaginal sarcoma, four; adenocarcinoma of the vagina, one; adenocarcinoma of the endometrium, four; uterine sarcoma, four; and adenocarcinoma of the ovary, one. The cumulative 5-year survival was significantly related to the presence of metastatic disease to the regional lymph nodes (8% 3-year and 0% 5-year survival), time interval from primary diagnosis to exenteration (within 1 year 44%, 1-10 years 60%, and over 10 years 95%), and cell type (squamous cell 68%, sarcoma 62%, and adenocarcinoma 26%). Patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the cervix (N = 57) had a cumulative 5-year survival of 73%, compared with nine patients with adenocarcinoma of the cervix, who had a 22% 5-year survival. No significant difference in survival existed for the type of exenteration, original stage of squamous cell cervical carcinoma, size of recurrent squamous cell lesion, or age of the patient. Early or late complications occurred in 49 patients. Two patients died in the postoperative period. Small-bowel obstruction was the most common complication seen in this series.

  15. Keratophakia--postoperative astigmatism.

    PubMed

    Swinger, C A; Troutman, R C; Forman, J S

    1987-01-01

    Forty-nine cases of primary keratophakia and 13 cases of secondary keratophakia were analyzed for postoperative astigmatism. For primary cases, the surgically induced astigmatism was 1.55 D, whereas for secondary cases it was 0.19 D (insignificant). There was a tendency for both procedures to induce against-the-rule astigmatism, and both procedures were found capable of producing irregular astigmatism.

  16. [Factors affecting postoperative pain].

    PubMed

    Soler Company, E; Faus Soler, M; Montaner Abasolo, M; Morales Olivas, F; Martínez-Pons Navarro, V

    2001-04-01

    To determine the influence on the intensity of postoperative pain of the following variables: sex, age, type of surgery, surgical approach, anesthetic technique and analgesia administered. Six hundred twenty-three hospitalized patients were enrolled from the units of general and digestive surgery, gynecology and obstetrics, ophthalmology, otorhinolaryngology, traumatology and orthopedics, and urology. Pain intensity was measured on a visual analog scale (VAS) when the patient left the post-anesthesia recovery ward (PARU) and 24 and 48 h after surgery, and on a verbal evaluation scale (VES) during the first and second days after surgery. Gynecology is the department where the most pain is reported, both when the patient leaves the PARU (>= 4 for 56.6% of patients) and during the first day on the ward (71.3% of patients suffer pain of moderate or high intensity). The correlation of pain with duration of procedure was strongest in the urology and surgery units, with common variances of 32.3% and 23.4%, respectively. More pain is felt during open procedures in the traumatology and urology units, which is not the case in gynecology and surgery. Patients receiving general anesthesia leave the PARU with pain at 3.4 +/- 1.8 cm on the VAS scale, versus 1.3 +/- 1.6 cm for patients receiving locoregional anesthesia. Patients who received only ketorolac for pain in the PARU generally experienced less intense pain (2.5 +/- 2.0 cm) than did those who received metamizol (3.3 +/- 1.5 cm), morphine (4.0 +/- 1.8 cm) or tramadol (4.5 +/- 1.8 cm). Surgical department, surgical approach, anesthetic technique and, finally, analgesic administered are the factors that determine the intensity of postoperative pain. These factors should therefore be taken into account when establishing treatment protocols to assure adequate control of postoperative pain. Neither sex nor age were determining factors for the intensity of postoperative pain.

  17. Compression treatment of pelvic congestion syndrome.

    PubMed

    Gavrilov, S G; Karalkin, A V; Turischeva, O O

    2017-01-01

    Aim To study the influence of compression treatment on clinical manifestations and venous hemodynamics of the pelvis in patients with pelvic congestion syndrome. Materials and methods A prospective study of the various options and modes of compression treatment was carried out and included 74 patients with pelvic congestion syndrome in 2008-2015. The patients were divided into three groups. The first group consisted of 48 patients with symptoms of pelvic congestion syndrome and chronic pelvic pain. They used Class II compression shorts. In the second group, there were 14 patients with pelvic congestion syndrome, vulvar varicosities without pelvic pain. They used Class II compression shorts and stockings. In the third group, 12 women with pelvic congestion syndrome and chronic pelvic pain used only the Class II compression stockings. The treatment continued for 14 days. A clinical criterion was the change of severity of chronic pelvic pain. The evaluation of the treatments has been performed using radionuclide venography and emission computed tomography with labeled in vivo red blood cells. Results Group 1: The compression shorts had a positive effect on the disease in 81.3% of patients. Chronic pelvic pain decreased from 6.4 ± 1.6 to 1.2 ± 0.7 points. The coefficient of pelvic congestion syndrome (Cpcs) decreased from 1.73 ± 0.32 to 1.12 ± 0.27 (p < 0.05). In 18.8% of patients, no positive effect was observed. Group 2: The results of radionuclide venographyshowed accelerating outflow of blood from the lower limbs and reduction of insufficiency of perforating veins. Mean radionuclide transit time decreased in all patients in the tendon, muscle pump parts, popliteal vein and was respectively: 23.6 ± 2.2 s, 29.6 ± 3.4 s, 32.3 ± 4.2 s and after treatment 16.4 ± 3.1 s, 22.1 ± 2.5 s, 25.7 ± 1.9 s (p < 0.05). Group 3: The use of compression stockings class II on the clinical manifestations of pelvic

  18. Surgical management of pelvic organ prolapse in a woman with achondroplasia.

    PubMed

    Frankman, Elizabeth A; Guido, Richard; Zyczynski, Halina M

    2010-08-01

    Achondroplasia is an autosomal-dominant disorder resulting in short-limbed dwarfism. Limited data exist regarding the management of pelvic organ prolapse in women with achondroplasia. A young nulligravid woman with stage IV uterovaginal prolapse desired surgical correction of her prolapse with uterine preservation. The severity of her prolapse, profound cervical elongation, and distortion of the bony pelvis presented surgical challenges. She underwent abdominal lumbohysteropexy with polypropylene mesh. At 1 year postoperative, she has marked improvement in symptoms and objective findings. Abdominal lumbohysteropexy appears to be an effective surgical approach in women with achondroplasia desiring uterine preservation.

  19. Pelvic-fracture urethral injury in children

    PubMed Central

    Hagedorn, Judith C.; Voelzke, Bryan B.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To review paediatric posterior urethral injuries and the current potential management options; because urethral injury due to pelvic fracture in children is rare and has a low incidence, the management of this type of trauma and its complications remains controversial. Methods We reviewed previous reports identified by searching the PubMed Medline electronic database for clinically relevant articles published in the past 25 years. The search was limited to the keywords ‘pediatric’, ‘pelvic fracture’, ‘urethral injury’, ‘stricture’, ‘trauma’ and ‘reconstruction’. Results Most paediatric urethral injuries are a result of pelvic fractures after high-impact blunt trauma. After the diagnosis, immediate bladder drainage via a suprapubic cystotomy, or urethral realignment, are the initial management options, except for a possible immediate primary repair in girls. The common complications of pelvic fracture-associated urethral injury include urethral stricture formation, incontinence and erectile dysfunction. Excellent results can be achieved with delayed urethroplasty for pelvic fracture-associated urethral injuries. Conclusion Traumatic injury to the paediatric urethra is rare and calls for an immediate diagnosis and management. These devastating injuries have a high complication rate and therefore a close follow-up is warranted to assure adequate delayed repair by a reconstructive urologist. PMID:26019977

  20. Pelvic girdle and fin of Tiktaalik roseae.

    PubMed

    Shubin, Neil H; Daeschler, Edward B; Jenkins, Farish A

    2014-01-21

    A major challenge in understanding the origin of terrestrial vertebrates has been knowledge of the pelvis and hind appendage of their closest fish relatives. The pelvic girdle and appendage of tetrapods is dramatically larger and more robust than that of fish and contains a number of structures that provide greater musculoskeletal support for posture and locomotion. The discovery of pelvic material of the finned elpistostegalian, Tiktaalik roseae, bridges some of these differences. Multiple isolated pelves have been recovered, each of which has been prepared in three dimensions. Likewise, a complete pelvis and partial pelvic fin have been recovered in association with the type specimen. The pelves of Tiktaalik are paired and have broad iliac processes, flat and elongate pubes, and acetabulae that form a deep socket rimmed by a robust lip of bone. The pelvis is greatly enlarged relative to other finned tetrapodomorphs. Despite the enlargement and robusticity of the pelvis of Tiktaalik, it retains primitive features such as the lack of both an attachment for the sacral rib and an ischium. The pelvic fin of Tiktaalik (NUFV 108) is represented by fin rays and three endochondral elements: other elements are not preserved. The mosaic of primitive and derived features in Tiktaalik reveals that the enhancement of the pelvic appendage of tetrapods and, indeed, a trend toward hind limb-based propulsion have antecedents in the fins of their closest relatives.

  1. Pelvic girdle and fin of Tiktaalik roseae

    PubMed Central

    Shubin, Neil H.; Daeschler, Edward B.; Jenkins, Farish A.

    2014-01-01

    A major challenge in understanding the origin of terrestrial vertebrates has been knowledge of the pelvis and hind appendage of their closest fish relatives. The pelvic girdle and appendage of tetrapods is dramatically larger and more robust than that of fish and contains a number of structures that provide greater musculoskeletal support for posture and locomotion. The discovery of pelvic material of the finned elpistostegalian, Tiktaalik roseae, bridges some of these differences. Multiple isolated pelves have been recovered, each of which has been prepared in three dimensions. Likewise, a complete pelvis and partial pelvic fin have been recovered in association with the type specimen. The pelves of Tiktaalik are paired and have broad iliac processes, flat and elongate pubes, and acetabulae that form a deep socket rimmed by a robust lip of bone. The pelvis is greatly enlarged relative to other finned tetrapodomorphs. Despite the enlargement and robusticity of the pelvis of Tiktaalik, it retains primitive features such as the lack of both an attachment for the sacral rib and an ischium. The pelvic fin of Tiktaalik (NUFV 108) is represented by fin rays and three endochondral elements: other elements are not preserved. The mosaic of primitive and derived features in Tiktaalik reveals that the enhancement of the pelvic appendage of tetrapods and, indeed, a trend toward hind limb-based propulsion have antecedents in the fins of their closest relatives. PMID:24449831

  2. The reconstruction of periprosthetic pelvic discontinuity.

    PubMed

    Rogers, Benedict A; Whittingham-Jones, Paul M; Mitchell, Philip A; Safir, Oleg A; Bircher, Martin D; Gross, Allan E

    2012-09-01

    The surgical techniques and outcomes of acetabular reconstruction for periprosthetic pelvic discontinuity cases are reported. The mean time to surgery for 9 patients with acute pelvic discontinuity was 16.3 days, with 8 patients (88%) having posterior column plating and a porous metal acetabular cup. No cases required revision surgery, with a mean follow-up of 34 months (range, 24-67 months). Of the 62 chronic pelvic discontinuity cases, 20 had an ilioischial cage, with a revision rate of 29%. There were 42 cup-cage reconstructions with an 8-year survivorship of 86.3%, with a mean follow-up of 35 months (range, 24-93 months). Stable reconstruction of chronic pelvic discontinuity was achievable by distraction using a cup-cage acetabular reconstruction; however, satisfactory stability of acute pelvic discontinuity was achieved with compression of the posterior column using screw augmentation of the acetabular shell supplemented by posterior column plating. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. An analysis of appropriate delivery of postoperative radiation therapy for endometrial cancer using the RAND/UCLA Appropriateness Method: Executive summary.

    PubMed

    Jones, Ellen; Beriwal, Sushil; Beyer, David; Chino, Junzo; Jhingran, Anuja; Lee, Larissa; Michalski, Jeff; Mundt, Arno J; Patton, Caroline; Petersen, Ivy; Portelance, Lorraine; Schwarz, Julie K; McCloskey, Susan

    2016-01-01

    To summarize the results of American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO)'s analysis of appropriate delivery of postoperative radiation therapy (RT) for endometrial cancer using the RAND/University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA) Appropriateness Method, outline areas of convergence and divergence with the 2014 ASTRO endometrial Guideline, and highlight where this analysis provides new information or perspective. The RAND/UCLA Appropriateness Method was used to combine available evidence with expert opinion. A comprehensive literature review was conducted and a multidisciplinary panel rated the appropriateness of RT options for different clinical scenarios. Treatments were categorized by the median rating as Appropriate, Uncertain, or Inappropriate. The ASTRO endometrial Guideline and this analysis using the RAND/UCLA Appropriateness Method did not recommend adjuvant RT for early-stage, low-risk endometrioid cancers and largely agree regarding use of vaginal brachytherapy for low-intermediate and high-intermediate risk patients. For more advanced endometrioid cancer, chemotherapy with RT is supported by both documents. The Guideline and the RAND/UCLA analysis diverged regarding use of pelvic radiation. For stages II and III, this analysis rated external beam RT plus vaginal brachytherapy Appropriate, whereas the Guideline preferred external beam alone. In addition, this analysis offers insight on the role of histology, extent of nodal dissection, and para-aortic nodal irradiation; the use of intensity modulated RT; and management of stage IVA. This analysis based on the RAND/UCLA Method shows significant agreement with the 2014 endometrial Guideline. Areas of divergence, often in scenarios with low-level evidence, included use of external beam RT plus vaginal brachytherapy in stages II and III and external beam RT alone in early-stage patients. Furthermore, the analysis explores other important questions regarding management of this disease site.

  4. Analysis of usage and associated cost of external fixators at an urban level 1 trauma centre.

    PubMed

    Chaus, George W; Dukes, Chase; Hak, David J; Mauffrey, Cyril; Mark Hammerberg, E

    2014-10-01

    To determine the usage, indication, duration, and cost associated with external fixation usage. Additionally, to show the significant cost associated with external fixator use and reinvigorate discussions on external fixator reuse. A retrospective review of a prospectively gathered trauma database was undertaken to identify all patients treated with external fixation frames for pelvic and lower extremity injuries between September 2007 and July 2010. We noted the indications for frame use, and we determined the average duration of external fixation for each indication. The cost of each frame was calculated from implant records. 341 lower extremity and pelvic fractures were treated with external fixation frames during the study period. Of these, 92% were used as temporary external fixation. The average duration of temporary external fixation was 10.5 days. The cost of external fixation frame components was $670,805 per year. The average cost per external fixation frame was $5900. The majority of external fixators are intended as temporary frames, in place for a limited period of time prior to definitive fixation of skeletal injuries. As such, most frames are not intended to withstand physiologic loads, nor are they expected provide a precise maintenance of reduction. Given the considerable expense associated with external fixation frame components, the practice of purchasing external fixation frame components as disposable "single-use" items appears to be somewhat wasteful. Level II. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Preoperative prediction of severe postoperative pain.

    PubMed

    Kalkman, C J; Visser, K; Moen, J; Bonsel, G J; Grobbee, D E; Moons, K G M

    2003-10-01

    We developed and validated a prediction rule for the occurrence of early postoperative severe pain in surgical inpatients, using predictors that can be easily documented in a preoperative setting. A cohort of surgical inpatients (n=1416) undergoing various procedures except cardiac surgery and intracranial neurosurgery in a University Hospital were studied. Preoperatively the following predictors were collected: age, gender, type of scheduled surgery, expected incision size, blood pressure, heart rate, Quetelet index, the presence and severity of preoperative pain, health-related quality of life the (SF-36), Spielberger's State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI) and the Amsterdam Preoperative Anxiety and Information Scale (APAIS). The outcome was the presence of severe postoperative pain (defined as Numeric Rating Scale > or =8) within the first hour postoperatively. Multivariate logistic regression in combination with bootstrapping techniques (as a method for internal validation) was used to derive a stable prediction model. Independent predictors of severe postoperative pain were younger age, female gender, level of preoperative pain, incision size and type of surgery. The area under the receiver operator characteristic (ROC) curve was 0.71 (95% CI: 0.68-0.74). Adding APAIS scores (measures of preoperative anxiety and need for information), but not STAI, provided a slightly better model (ROC area 0.73). The reliability of this extended model was good (Hosmer and Lemeshow test p-value 0.78). We have demonstrated that severe postoperative pain early after awakening from general anesthesia can be predicted with a scoring rule, using a small set of variables that can be easily obtained from all patients at the preoperative visit. Before this internally validated preoperative prediction rule can be applied in clinical practice to support anticipatory pain management, external validation in other clinical settings is necessary.

  6. Prevention and management of pelvic organ prolapse

    PubMed Central

    Giarenis, Ilias

    2014-01-01

    Pelvic organ prolapse is a highly prevalent condition in the female population, which impairs the health-related quality of life of affected individuals. Despite the lack of robust evidence, selective modification of obstetric events or other risk factors could play a central role in the prevention of prolapse. While the value of pelvic floor muscle training as a preventive treatment remains uncertain, it has an essential role in the conservative management of prolapse. Surgical trends are currently changing due to the controversial issues surrounding the use of mesh and the increasing demand for uterine preservation. The evolution of laparoscopic and robotic surgery has increased the use of these techniques in pelvic floor surgery. PMID:25343034

  7. Pelvic organ prolapse: A primer for urologists

    PubMed Central

    Bureau, Michel; Carlson, Kevin V.

    2017-01-01

    Pelvic organ prolapse (POP) results from weakness or injury of the pelvic floor supports with resulting descent of one or more vaginal compartments (anterior, apical and/or posterior). Women typically become symptomatic from the bulging vaginal wall or related organ dysfunction once this descent reaches the introitus. POP is a common condition, affecting more than half of adult women. Many women presenting to an urologist for stress urinary incontinence or overactive bladder will have associated POP; therefore, it is important for urologists who treat these conditions to be familiar with its diagnosis and management. While POP is part of the core urology training curriculum in some jurisdictions, it is not in Canada.1 This article reviews the diagnosis of POP, including pertinent symptoms to query in the history, important facets of a systematic pelvic examination, and the appropriate use of ancillary tests. Treatment options are also discussed, including conservative measures, pessaries, and various reconstructive and obliterative techniques. PMID:28616110

  8. [Quality of life after extensive pelvic surgery].

    PubMed

    Levý, M; Lipská, L; Visokai, V; Šimša, J

    Multiorgan resections in the small pelvis are standard procedures in oncosurgery and some indications have no alternative. In advanced pelvic cancer, pelvic exenteration with en bloc resection of the involved organs and structures, including portions of the bony pelvis, is indicated. The 5-year survival rate is fairly good, around 50%, but little is known about the long-term quality of life. The aim was to describe the quality of life of long-term total pelvic exenteration survivors. In total, 63 pelvic exenterations were performed between 2000 to 2015 at the Department of Surgery, Thomayer Hospital, First Faculty of Medicine, Charles University in Prague, mostly for primary or relapsed rectal cancer. In this retrospective cohort study, the quality of life was assessed using the EORTC QLQ-C30 (version 3.0) and the EORTC QLQ-CR29 questionnaires. The completed questionnaires were scored according to EORTC instructions. At the time of this survey, 24 patients after TPE were surviving longer than one year after the surgery. The five-year survival of all patients was 49%, median survival 4.6 years, and median follow-up 15 months. Most of our patients reported a good level of their physical, emotional, cognitive and social functions. Some patients reported a worse body image, and of course a worsening in their sexual life. Regarding symptom-oriented questions, some patients evaluated the necessity of more frequent care of the stomia as slightly problematic; most patients reported impotence (men) or painful sexual intercourse (women). Long-term quality of life in survivors of pelvic exenteration for rectal cancer is comparable with reported results following primary rectal cancer resection with the exception of the sexual function. The quality of life gradually improves in the course of weeks to months from the surgery. pelvic exenteration quality of life.

  9. [Characteristics of postoperative period in children with funnel chest deformity after thoracoplasty].

    PubMed

    Mishina, T P; Isalabdulaeva, P A; Magomedov, A D; Makhachev, S M

    2010-01-01

    The efficiency of postoperative analgesia using the epidural infusion of bupivacaine (0.2 mg/kg/hr) in 42 children and with opioid analgesics (1 mg per year of life) was studied in 17 children after Paltia thoracoplasty for funnel chest deformity. Analysis of hemodynamic and external respiratory parameters and visual pain scores demonstrated the high postoperative efficiency of analgesia using the epidural infusion of bupivacaine. By causing respiratory depression, opioid analgesics did not deteriorate alveolar ventilation during active postoperative management.

  10. Open Pelvic Fractures: Review of 30 Cases

    PubMed Central

    Giordano, Vincenzo; Koch, Hilton Augusto; Gasparini, Savino; Serrão de Souza, Felipe; Labronici, Pedro José; do Amaral, Ney Pecegueiro

    2016-01-01

    Background: Open pelvic fractures are rare but usually associated with a high incidence of complications and increased mortality rates. The aim of this study was to retrospectively evaluate all consecutive open pelvic fractures in patients treated at a single Level-1 Trauma Center during a 10-year interval. Patients and Methods: In a 10-year interval, 30 patients with a diagnosis of open pelvic fracture were admitted at a Level-1 Trauma Center. A retrospective analysis was conducted on data obtained from the medical records, which included patient’s age, sex, mechanism of injury, classification of the pelvic lesion, Injury Severity Score (ISS), emergency interventions, surgical interventions, length of hospital and Intensive Care Unit stay, and complications, including perioperative complications and death. The Jones classification was used to characterize the energy of the pelvic trauma and the Faringer classification to define the location of the open wound. Among the survivors, the results were assessed in the last outpatient visit using the EuroQol EQ-5D and the Blake questionnaires. It was established the relationship between the mortality and morbidity and these classification systems by using the Mann-Whitney non-parametric test, with a level of significance of 5%. Results: Twelve (40%) patients died either from the pelvic lesion or related injuries. All of them had an ISS superior to 35. The Jones classification showed a direct relationship to the mortality rate in those patients (p = 0.012). In the 18 (60%) other patients evaluated, the mean follow-up was 16.3 months, ranging from 24 to 112 months. Eleven (61%) patients had a satisfactory outcome. The Jones classification showed a statistically significant relationship both to the objective and subjective outcomes (p < 5%). The Faringer classification showed a statistically significant relationship to the subjective, but not to the objective outcome. In addition, among the 18 patients evaluated at the

  11. Pelvic Radiation and Normal Tissue Toxicity.

    PubMed

    Nicholas, Sarah; Chen, Linda; Choflet, Amanda; Fader, Amanda; Guss, Zachary; Hazell, Sarah; Song, Daniel Y; Tran, Phuoc T; Viswanathan, Akila N

    2017-10-01

    Radiation is a component of treatment for many pelvic malignancies, most often originating in the gynecologic, gastrointestinal, and genitourinary systems. Therefore, the management of acute and long-term side effects is an important part of practice as a radiation oncologist, and limiting morbidity is a primary goal. Toxicities vary and are dependent on treatment techniques. Advances in radiation delivery, imaging, and knowledge of underlying biologic determinants of radiation-induced normal tissue toxicity can guide treatment of acute and long-term side effects from pelvic radiation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Diagnosis and therapy of pelvic actinomycosis.

    PubMed

    Taga, Shigeki

    2007-12-01

    Pelvic actinomycosis is difficult to diagnose. In most cases, it is not diagnosed until after surgery. If this condition is diagnosed preoperatively, it can be treated in many cases. Three cases of actinomycosis are reported here. Three women with intrauterine devices (IUD) each presented with lower abdominal pain and pelvic mass, and elevated white blood cell count and C-reactive protein. Left salpingo-oophorectomy was performed for one the women. The pathological diagnosis was actinomycosis. For the other two women, a Gram or Papanicolaou stain of the IUD sample showed actinomycetes. They were discharged after intravenous administration of penicillin without surgery.

  13. Role of female pelvic anatomy in infertility.

    PubMed

    Harris-Glocker, Miranda; McLaren, Janet F

    2013-01-01

    Infertility is defined as a couple's failure to achieve pregnancy after one year of regular, unprotected intercourse. The etiology of infertility can be due to female factors, male factors, combined male and female factors, or have an unknown etiology. This review focuses on the role of female pelvic anatomy in infertility. Normal anatomy and the physiology of reproduction will be discussed, as well as the anatomic and pathophysiologic processes that cause infertility including ovulatory disorders, endometriosis, pelvic adhesions, tubal blockage, mullerian anomalies, and abnormalities affecting the uterine cavity such as leiomyomata and endometrial polyps.

  14. Pelvic radiograph in skeletal dysplasias: An approach

    PubMed Central

    Jana, Manisha; Nair, Nikhil; Gupta, Arun K; Kabra, Madhulika; Gupta, Neerja

    2017-01-01

    The bony pelvis is constituted by the ilium, ischium, pubis, and sacrum. The pelvic radiograph is an important component of the skeletal survey performed in suspected skeletal dysplasia. Most of the common skeletal dysplasias have either minor or major radiological abnormalities; hence, knowledge of the normal radiological appearance of bony pelvis is vital for recognizing the early signs of various skeletal dysplasias. This article discusses many common and some uncommon radiological findings on pelvic radiographs along with the specific dysplasia in which they are seen; common differential diagnostic considerations are also discussed. PMID:28744080

  15. Pelvic floor muscle training in males: practical applications.

    PubMed

    Siegel, Andrew L

    2014-07-01

    The pelvic floor muscles are vital to male genitourinary health. Pelvic floor muscle training may prove helpful in a variety of clinical circumstances: stress urinary incontinence that follows prostate surgery, overactive bladder, postvoid dribbling, erectile dysfunction, ejaculation issues including premature ejaculation, and pelvic pain due to levator muscle spasm.

  16. Changes in serum sodium, sodium balance, water balance, and plasma hormone levels as the result of pelvic surgery in women.

    PubMed

    Amede, Francis J; James, Kenneth A; Michelis, Michael F; Gleim, Gilbert W

    Postoperative hyponatremia in women has been associated with the development of serious neurological disorders and even death, with a predisposition for menstruant women. The objective of this study was to evaluate the immediate hormonal, water and electrolyte responses to pelvic surgery in both pre and postmenopausal women. Of the twenty-five consecutive women studied, twenty were premenopausal while five were postmenopausal. Mean age was 45.4 +/- 1.6 years. Measurements of plasma renin activity, follicular stimulating hormone and luteinizing hormone showed no significant change pre to postoperatively. There was a significant decrease in pre to postoperative values of estrogen, 97.4 +/- 20.3 to 36.3 +/- 7.5 pg/mL (p < 0.05). There was also a significant decline in postoperative values for plasma aldosterone and plasma progesterone. Data were similar in pre and postmenopausal patients. Serum sodium levels decreased from 141.5 +/- 0.5 to 137.2 +/- 0.5 mEq/L (p < 0.01). During the twenty-four hours following surgery, mean net sodium balance was positive 122 mEq and mean measured fluid balance was positive 1108 mL. Ringers lactate or normal saline were used. On the first postoperative day, plasma arginine vasopressin levels were elevated at 4.0 +/- 0.8 pg/mL, with a mean urine osmolality of 504 +/- 29 mOsm/kg H2O. The data illustrate that women undergoing pelvic surgery decrease their serum sodium in the immediate postoperative period. Despite both positive sodium and water balance, there is a stronger tendency to conserve water. Decreased estrogen levels occur and this decrease may facilitate brain cell adaptation to plasma hypotonicity. Since the administration of isotonic fluid will not protect against the decrease in serum sodium, postoperative sodium concentration should be carefully monitored.

  17. Assessment of the pubic force as a pelvic injury criterion in side impact.

    PubMed

    Leport, Tiphaine; Baudrit, Pascal; Trosseille, Xavier; Petit, Philippe; Palisson, Anna; Vallancien, Guy

    2007-10-01

    In the literature, injuries at the ischio or ilio pubic ramus level are reported to occur to approximately (3/4) of the occupants injured at the pelvis during side impact. Assuming that the load going through the pubis was a good indicator of the ramus stress, the pubic force was widely accepted as a protection criterion for pelvic fractures on side impact dummies. However, no data regarding the actual loads going through the pubis is currently available in the literature for Post Mortem Human Subjects (PMHS) in dynamic conditions. The goal of this study was to determine pelvic biofidelity specifications in terms of load path, to evaluate the pertinence of the pubic force as a criterion, and to develop a pelvic injury risk curve as a function of the pubic force. For that purpose, a pubic load cell was developed for PMHS use, and 16 side impact tests were performed on 8 PMHS using boundary conditions similar to impactor tests and sled tests reported in the literature. One kind of impact was applied on one side of a subject and the other kind of impact was then applied on the other side of the same subject, at non injury severities. The ratio between the peak external force and the peak pubic force was calculated for each subject, and a mean ratio was then calculated for each of the test conditions. These ratios were finally used to calculate the pubic forces from the external pelvic forces for 90 PMHS side impact test data available in the literature. Injury risk curves as a function of the pubic force were developed from these data. Two normalized pubic force corridors from the 16 tests are presented, the first one for the impactor tests, the second one for the sled-like tests. The test results show statistically different ratios between the peak external force and the peak pubic force, for the two configurations (an average ratio of 3.3 for impactor tests and 4.6 for sled-like tests). The PMHS injury risk curves based on the external pelvic force were observed to

  18. [Pathophysiology of postoperative pain].

    PubMed

    Wordliczek, J; Dobrogowski, J

    2000-01-01

    The rapid progress in neurophysiology and neuropharmacology has made it possible to understand an entire series of pain-related processes. The discovery of endogenic opioid system, the noradrenergic and serotoninergic antinociceptive systems, peripheral opioid receptors and of the role of NMDA, muscarinic and nicotinic receptors in nociception allowed for an optimization of pain treatment through the use of new drugs and therapies. An appropriate pain treatment procedure prevents the development of persistent postoperative pain, which is described as a pathological chronic pain that endures following the operation despite normal healing process having taken place in affected tissues.

  19. Postoperative conversion disorder.

    PubMed

    Afolabi, Kola; Ali, Sameer; Gahtan, Vivian; Gorji, Reza; Li, Fenghua; Nussmeier, Nancy A

    2016-05-01

    Conversion disorder is a psychiatric disorder in which psychological stress causes neurologic deficits. A 28-year-old female surgical patient had uneventful general anesthesia and emergence but developed conversion disorder 1 hour postoperatively. She reported difficulty speaking, right-hand numbness and weakness, and right-leg paralysis. Neurologic examination and imaging revealed no neuronal damage, herniation, hemorrhage, or stroke. The patient mentioned failing examinations the day before surgery and discontinuing her prescribed antidepressant medication, leading us to diagnose conversion disorder, with eventual confirmation by neuroimaging and follow-up examinations. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Postoperative urinary retention.

    PubMed

    Darrah, Daniela M; Griebling, Tomas L; Silverstein, Jeffrey H

    2009-09-01

    Postoperative urinary retention (PUR) is a common complication of surgery and anesthesia. The risk of retention is especially high after anorectal surgery, hernia repair, and orthopedic surgery and increases with advancing age. Certain anesthetic and analgesic modalities, particularly spinal anesthesia with long-acting local anesthetics and epidural analgesia, promote the development of urinary retention. Portable ultrasound provides rapid and accurate assessment of bladder volume and aids in the diagnosis and management of PUR. Catheterization is recommended when bladder volume exceeds 600 mL to prevent the negative sequelae of prolonged bladder overdistention.

  1. Male urinary and sexual function after robotic pelvic autonomic nerve-preserving surgery for rectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Wang, Gang; Wang, Zhiming; Jiang, Zhiwei; Liu, Jiang; Zhao, Jian; Li, Jieshou

    2017-03-01

    Urinary and sexual dysfunction is the potential complication of rectal cancer surgery. The aim of this study was to evaluate the urinary and sexual function in male patients with robotic surgery for rectal cancer. This prospective study included 137 of the 336 male patients who underwent surgery for rectal cancer. Urinary and male sexual function was studied by means of a questionnaire based on the International Prostatic Symptom Score and International Index of Erectile Function. All data were collected before surgery and 12 months after surgery. Patients who underwent robotic surgery had significantly decreased incidence of partial or complete erectile dysfunction and sexual dysfunction than patients with laparoscopic surgery. The pre- and post-operative total IPSS scores in patients with robotic surgery were significantly less than that with laparoscopic surgeries. Robotic surgery shows distinct advantages in protecting the pelvic autonomic nerves and relieving post-operative sexual dysfunction. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  2. Clinical and radiological outcomes of lumbar posterior subtraction osteotomies are correlated to pelvic incidence and FBI index : Prospective series of 63 cases.

    PubMed

    Cogniet, A; Aunoble, S; Rigal, J; Demezon, H; Sadikki, R; Le Huec, J C

    2016-08-01

    Pedicle subtraction osteotomy (PSO) is one of the surgical options for treating alignment disorders of the fused spine (due to post-surgical fusion or related to arthritis). It enables satisfactory sagittal realignment and improved function due to economic sagittal balance. The aim of this study was to analyze clinical and radiological results of PSO after a minimum follow-up of 2 years and demonstrate the benefit of sub-group analysis as a function of pelvic incidence (PI). A descriptive prospective single center study of 63 patients presenting with spinal global malalignment who underwent correction by PSO. Function was assessed by the Oswestry disability index (ODI), a visual analog scale of lumbar pain (VAS) and a SF-36 questionnaire. Radiographic analyses of pre- and post-operative pelvic-spinal parameters were performed on X-rays obtained by EOS(®) imaging after 3D modeling. Global analysis and analysis of sub-groups as a function of pelvic incidence were performed and the full balance integrated index (FBI) was calculated. this series showed a marked clinical improvement and significant progress of functional scores. Global post-operative radiological analysis showed a significant improvement in all pelvic and spinal parameters. The mean correction obtained after PSO was 31.7° ± 8.4°, hence global improvement of lumbar lordosis of 22°. The sagittal vertical angle (SVA) decreased from +9 cm before surgery to +4.3 cm after surgery. Sub-group analysis demonstrated greater improvement in pelvic tilt, sacral slope and spinal parameters of patients with a small or moderate pelvic incidence; all had an FBI index <10°. Most of the pelvic and spinal parameters of patients with a large pelvic incidence were insufficiently corrected and they had an FBI index >10° PSO is a surgical procedure enabling correction of multiplane rigid spinal deformities that require major sagittal correction. It was seen to be highly effective in patients with a small or

  3. Minimally invasive treatment of unstable pelvic ring injuries with modified pedicle screw-rod fixator.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xiao-Tian; Liu, Zuo-Qing; Fu, Wen-Qin; Zhao, Shan

    2017-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the clinical application of the minimally invasive modified pedicle screw-rod fixator for unstable pelvic ring injuries, including its feasibility, merits, and limitations. Methods Twenty-three patients (13 males, 10 females; average age, 36.3 years) with unstable pelvic ring injuries underwent anterior fixation using a modified pedicle screw-rod fixator with or without posterior fixation using a transiliac internal fixator. The clinical findings were assessed using Majeed scores. The quality of reduction was evaluated using the Matta criteria. Results Clinical results at 1 year postoperatively were excellent in 14 patients, good in 7, and fair in 2. The two patients with fair results had intermittent pain at the sacroiliac joint because of the posterior implant. One woman complained of persistent pain at the pubic tubercle during sexual intercourse. Iatrogenic neuropraxia of the unilateral lateral femoral cutaneous nerve occurred in three patients. Unilateral femoral nerve palsy occurred in one patient. The quality of fracture reduction was excellent in 12 patients, good in 8, and fair in 3. Heterotopic ossification occurred in eight patients; all were asymptomatic. Conclusions Minimally invasive modified pedicle screw-rod fixation is an effective alternative treatment for pelvic ring injuries.

  4. A clinical study on the trocar-guided mesh repair system for pelvic organ prolapse surgery

    PubMed Central

    Bak, Seul Gi; Moon, Jeong Beom; Kim, Kyoung Jin; Kim, Kyoung A; Lee, Ju Hyang

    2016-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the complication and recurrence rates in patients undergoing trocar-guided mesh implant for pelvic organ prolapse (POP) treatment. Methods A retrospective study was performed based on the medical records of patients who had undergone mesh implant by one surgeon from May 2006 to August 2013 at the Presbyterian Medical Center in Korea. We evaluated perioperative complications such as bladder injury, mesh exposure, urinary symptoms, infections, and chronic pelvic pain. Recurrence was defined as a POP-quantification system stage ≥II or any symptomatic prolapse. Results Sixty-seven patients were evaluated, and the mean age of patients was 65.4±7.2 years. Stage ≥III POP-quantification Ba was noted in 61 patients (91%). Intraoperative complications included three cases of bladder injury (4.5%). The mean follow-up period was 44.1±7.9 months. Postoperative complications occurred in seven women (10.5%): four cases of urinary symptoms (6%), two cases of infections (3%), and one case of chronic pelvic pain (1.5%). Mesh exposure did not occur (0%). Prolapse recurrence was reported in five patients (7.5%). Conclusion Based on our operational result, the trocar-guided mesh implant seems to provide safe and effective outcomes. PMID:27200311

  5. Abdominal aortic aneurysm repair in a patient with a congenital solitary pelvic kidney. A case report.

    PubMed

    Murakami, T; Makino, Y; Suto, Y; Yasuda, K

    2004-10-01

    Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) is rarely associated witha congenital pelvic kidney. To date only 11 cases have been reported in the literature in which a solitary pelvic' kidney was associated in only 1 patient. Repair of thesaneurysm is technically demanding because the abnormal origin of the renal arteries presents the problem of renal ischemia duringaortic cross-clamping. We report a case of a 77-year-old man who was found to have an AAA associated with a congenital solitary pelvic kidney. An abdominal aortography dearly showed 2 aberrant renal arteries, one of which originated from the aortic wall just above the aortic bifurcation and the other from the left common iliac artery. At surgery, we found other associated anomalies including malrotation of the gut and a left undescended testis. The surgical procedure consisted of an aneurysmorrhaphy followed by a tube graft replacement with therenal arteries being left intact to the distal aortic wall or below. Renal preservation during aortic cross-clamping was achieved by direct perfusion of the upper renal artery with cold lactated Ringer's solution together with topical cooling with ice slush. The patient's postoperative course was uneventful. Urinary output was satisfactory and serum creatinine level remained unchanged throughout his hospital stay. The renal preservation method used in this case was simple and effective.

  6. Ultrasound-guided core needle biopsy in diagnosis of abdominal and pelvic neoplasm in pediatric patients.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hailing; Li, Fangxuan; Liu, Juntian; Zhang, Sheng

    2014-01-01

    Ultrasound-guided core needle biopsy of abdominal and pelvic masses in adults has gained tremendous popularity. However, the application of the same treatment in children is not as popular because of apprehensions regarding inadequate tissues for the biopsy and accidental puncture of vital organs. Data of the application of ultrasound-guided core needle biopsy in 105 pediatric patients with clinically or ultrasound-diagnosed abdominopelvic masses were reviewed. Diagnostic procedures were conducted in our institution from May 2011 to May 2013. The biopsies were conducted on 86 malignant lesions and 19 benign lesions. 86 malignant tumors comprised neuroblastomas (30 cases), hepatoblastomas (15 cases), nephroblastomas (11 cases), and primitive neuroectodermal tumors/malignant small round cells (6 cases). Among malignant tumor cases, only a pelvic primitive neuroectodermal tumor did not receive a pathological diagnosis. Therefore, the biopsy accuracy was 98.8 % in malignant tumor. However, the biopsies for one neuroblastomas and one malignant small round cell tumor were inadequate for cytogenetic analysis. Therefore, 96.5 % of the malignant tumor patients received complete diagnosis via biopsy. 19 benign tumors comprised mature teratoma (10 cases), hemangioendothelioma (3 cases), paraganglioma (2 cases), and infection (2 cases). The diagnostic accuracy for benign neoplasm was 100 %. Five patients experienced postoperative complications, including pain (2 patients), bleeding from the biopsy site (2 patients), and wound infection (1 patient). Ultrasound-guided core needle biopsy is an efficient, minimally invasive, accurate, and safe diagnostic method that can be applied in the management of abdominal or pelvic mass of pediatric patients.

  7. Dose-Effect Relationships for Individual Pelvic Floor Muscles and Anorectal Complaints After Prostate Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Smeenk, Robert Jan; Hoffmann, Aswin L.; Hopman, Wim P.M.; Lin, Emile N.J. Th. van; Kaanders, Johannes H.A.M.

    2012-06-01

    Purpose: To delineate the individual pelvic floor muscles considered to be involved in anorectal toxicity and to investigate dose-effect relationships for fecal incontinence-related complaints after prostate radiotherapy (RT). Methods and Materials: In 48 patients treated for localized prostate cancer, the internal anal sphincter (IAS) muscle, the external anal sphincter (EAS) muscle, the puborectalis muscle (PRM), and the levator ani muscles (LAM) in addition to the anal wall (Awall) and rectal wall (Rwall) were retrospectively delineated on planning computed tomography scans. Dose parameters were obtained and compared between patients with and without fecal urgency, incontinence, and frequency. Dose-effect curves were constructed. Finally, the effect of an endorectal balloon, which was applied in 28 patients, was investigated. Results: The total volume of the pelvic floor muscles together was about three times that of the Awall. The PRM was exposed to the highest RT dose, whereas the EAS received the lowest dose. Several anal and rectal dose parameters, as well as doses to all separate pelvic floor muscles, were associated with urgency, while incontinence was associated mainly with doses to the EAS and PRM. Based on the dose-effect curves, the following constraints regarding mean doses could be deduced to reduce the risk of urgency: {<=}30 Gy to the IAS; {<=}10 Gy to the EAS; {<=}50 Gy to the PRM; and {<=}40 Gy to the LAM. No dose-effect relationships for frequency were observed. Patients treated with an endorectal balloon reported significantly less urgency and incontinence, while their treatment plans showed significantly lower doses to the Awall, Rwall, and all pelvic floor muscles. Conclusions: Incontinence-related complaints show specific dose-effect relationships to individual pelvic floor muscles. Dose constraints for each muscle can be identified for RT planning. When only the Awall is delineated, substantial components of the continence apparatus are

  8. Obliterative LeFort colpocleisis for pelvic organ prolapse in elderly women aged 70 years and over.

    PubMed

    Ng, Soo-Cheen; Chen, Gin-Den

    2016-02-01

    Treatment of genital prolapse in elderly women is challenging. The aim of this study was to evaluate the long-term postoperative patient satisfaction and objective improvement in women aged 70 years and over with high stages of pelvic organ prolapse treated with obliterative LeFort colpocleisis. From January 2003 to December 2013, female patients aged 70 years and over who underwent colpocleisis surgery were included in this study. We reviewed the charts for preoperative and postoperative medical history, severity of prolapse, urodynamic studies, and early postoperative complications related to this procedure in these patients. Subjective outcomes were assessed by a nursing coordinator who interviewed patients by telephone in June 2014. Colpocleisis was performed in 22 elderly patients and 59% patients were of advanced age (≥ 80 years). The mean postoperative follow-up duration was 48.1 months (range, 7-118) months. Six patients (27.3%) had died of medical problems at the time of the telephone interview. Fourteen patients (87.5%) reported a successful outcome after the operation and two patients (12.5%) reported improvement. For present satisfaction, 93.8% of patients reported that they were satisfied. Colpocleisis should be considered as one of the surgical options for treating advanced pelvic organ prolapse in elderly patients who do not wish to preserve vaginal function for sexual intercourse. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  9. Bladder incarceration following anterior external fixation of a traumatic pubic symphysis diastasis treated with immediate open reduction and internal fixation

    PubMed Central

    Finnan, Ryan P; Herbenick, Michael A; Prayson, Michael J; McCarthy, Mary C

    2008-01-01

    Anterior pelvic ring disruptions are often associated with injuries to the genitourinary structures with the potential for considerable resultant morbidity. Herniation of the bladder into the symphyseal region after injury with subsequent entrapment upon reduction of the symphyseal diastasis has seldom been reported in the literature. We report such a case involving bladder herniation and subsequent entrapment after attempted closed reduction with anterior pelvic external fixation immediately treated with open reduction and internal fixation along with a review of the literature. PMID:18928569

  10. [Severe haemorrhage secondary to an osteoporotic pelvic fracture: presentation of a case].

    PubMed

    Palacio, J; Albareda, J

    2014-01-01

    Low-energy osteoporotic pelvic fractures in the elderly are a very common problem. They are usually stable fractures, non-life threatening and only require conservative treatment. The pelvic bone structure is closely related to important vascular structures. The Corona Mortis, located in the retropubis, has an important anastomotic value as it serves as communication between the internal and external iliac vessels. The case is presented of an 87 year-old woman, who, after a casual fall, was diagnosed with an osteoporotic fracture of the left pubic rami associated to a lesion of the Corona Mortis, which led to a severe picture of haemodynamic instability. After angiography with supra-selective embolisation of the lesioned vessel, and the transfusion of several haemoderivatives, the patient progressed satisfactorily, and was discharged after a few days.

  11. [Evaluation of image quality of the Iso C3D image processor in comparison to computer tomography. Use in the pelvic area].

    PubMed

    König, B; Erdmenger, U; Schröder, R J; Wienas, G; Schaefer, J; Pech, M; Stöckle, U

    2005-05-01

    Intraoperative 3-D visualization using the Siremobil Iso C(3D) (Siemens, Erlangen, Germany) has been approved for use in spine and long bone surgery since its recent clinical launch. In preparation for the clinical use of the Siremobil Iso C(3D) in pelvic surgery, the aim of this study was to grade the quality of visualization in comparison with the gold standard of computer tomography in four therapy relevant pelvic regions in eight human cadavers, including SI screws to exemplify implants in the dorsal pelvic ring. Besides the influence of the body mass index and the interference of metal artefacts, visualization quality was evaluated in different pelvic regions (sacroiliac joint, acetabulum, femoral neck and anterior pelvic ring) using a score with five subgroups, rating the applicability of Siremobil Iso C(3D) in pelvic surgery. The grading of image quality in comparable standard projections was performed independently by three surgeons and three radiologists.Visualization quality appeared sufficient for both intraoperative and postoperative control in cases with a known preoperative diagnosis. There was no influence of body mass index found in any of the eight cadavers. Implants positioned in the dorsal pelvic ring reduced visualization quality, but sufficient estimation of bony structures was still possible. For primary diagnostics, computer tomography remains a clearly superior option due to better image quality. For intraoperative control of the reduction and positioning of implants in pelvic surgery, however, the additional intraoperative use of Siremobil Iso C(3D) is considered to offer clear advantages over current 2-D C-arm visualization tools.

  12. Postoperative fluid management

    PubMed Central

    Kayilioglu, Selami Ilgaz; Dinc, Tolga; Sozen, Isa; Bostanoglu, Akin; Cete, Mukerrem; Coskun, Faruk

    2015-01-01

    Postoperative care units are run by an anesthesiologist or a surgeon, or a team formed of both. Management of postoperative fluid therapy should be done considering both patients’ status and intraoperative events. Types of the fluids, amount of the fluid given and timing of the administration are the main topics that determine the fluid management strategy. The main goal of fluid resuscitation is to provide adequate tissue perfusion without harming the patient. The endothelial glycocalyx dysfunction and fluid shift to extracellular compartment should be considered wisely. Fluid management must be done based on patient’s body fluid status. Patients who are responsive to fluids can benefit from fluid resuscitation, whereas patients who are not fluid responsive are more likely to suffer complications of over-hydration. Therefore, common use of central venous pressure measurement, which is proved to be inefficient to predict fluid responsiveness, should be avoided. Goal directed strategy is the most rational approach to assess the patient and maintain optimum fluid balance. However, accessible and applicable monitoring tools for determining patient’s actual fluid need should be further studied and universalized. The debate around colloids and crystalloids should also be considered with goal directed therapies. Advantages and disadvantages of each solution must be evaluated with the patient’s specific condition. PMID:26261771

  13. Vaginal and pelvic recurrences in stage I and II endometrial carcinoma--survival and prognostic factors.

    PubMed

    Blecharz, P; Brandys, P; Urbański, K; Reinfuss, M; Patla, A

    2011-01-01

    The analysis of prognostic factors and treatment outcomes in 106 patients with Stage I and II endometrial carcinoma (EC) treated between 1980 and 2005 in the Center of Oncology, Maria Skłodowska-Curie Memorial Institute, Kracow, Poland, who developed vaginal or pelvic recurrences. The median age of patients was 61. Stage IB and IC of EC was diagnosed in 48 (45.3%) patients and Stage IIA and IIB in 58 (54.7%) patients. All patients were treated previously with surgery (TAH-BSO) and postoperative radiotherapy. There were 17 (16%) patients with vaginal vault recurrences, 30 (28.3%) with lower one-third vaginal recurrences, and 59 (55.7%) with pelvic recurrences. Palliative treatment (chemo- or hormonotherapy) or best supportive care only was undertaken in 53 (50.0%) patients. Radical treatment was conducted in 70.6% (12/17) of vault recurrences, 86.7% (26/30) of lower one-third vagina recurrences, and 25.4% (15/59) of pelvic recurrences, with surgery (4 patients), brachytherapy +/- chemotherapy (34 patients), and teleradiotherapy +/- chemotherapy (15 patients). The 5-year overall survival rate in the observed group was 17%. Five-year survival was 23.3% (14/60) for patients with KPS 60-70 vs 8.7% (4/46) with KPS 40-50, 25% (12/48) patients with Stage I EC vs 10.3% (6/58) with Stage II EC, and 34% (16/47) patients with vaginal recurrence vs 3.4% (2/59) with pelvic recurrences. In the analyzed group of 106 patients with Stage I and II EC, treated previously with surgery and postoperative radiotherapy, 5-year overall survival rate was low; in radically treated patients it was 42.1%, and 13.3% for vaginal and pelvis recurrences, respectively. Univariate analysis showed a statistically significant, unfavorable impact of KPS < 60, Stage II and recurrence pelvic. Cox multivariate analysis demonstrated that the only independent prognostic factor for 5-year overall survival was the site of recurrence.

  14. Double pelvic osteotomy for the treatment of hip dysplasia in young dogs.

    PubMed

    Vezzoni, A; Boiocchi, S; Vezzoni, L; Vanelli, A B; Bronzo, V

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of the double pelvic osteotomy (DPO) (osteotomy of the ilium and pubis) to treat clinical cases of hip dyplasia in young dogs instead of performing a triple pelvic osteotomy (TPO) (osteotomy of the ilium, pubis, and ischium). Candidates for DPO were 4.5- to nine-month-old dogs with coxofemoral joint subluxation and laxity, indicative of susceptibility to future development of severe hip dysplasia. The angle of reduction (AR) and angle of subluxation (AS) with Ortolani's sign, Norberg angle (NA), percentage of femoral head (PC) covered by the acetabulum, and the pelvic diameters and their relationships were measured clinically and radiographically before and after surgery. The surgical technique was similar to the TPO technique, but excluded ischiatic osteotomy. A DPO was carried out in 53 joints of 34 dogs; AR and AS values immediately postoperatively and at the one- and two-month follow-up examinations were significantly lower than the preoperative values (p <0.01). The complications encountered were mainly represented by implant failure (3.5%), partial plate pull-out (9.4%), and incomplete fracture of the ischial table (7.5%). Changes in PC and NA values obtained immediately after surgery and at the first and second follow-up examinations were significantly greater (p <0.01 both) than values obtained before surgery. Sufficient acetabular ventroversion was achieved to counteract joint subluxation and the modifications of AR and AS. The NA and PC direct postoperative values reflected a significant improvement in the dorsal acetabular coverage. Restoration of normal joint congruity (PC from 50 to 72%) and maintenance of the pelvic geometry without pelvic narrowing were the most intriguing features of DPO. The complications observed were greatly reduced when using dedicated DPO plates. Based on our experience, the morbidity after unilateral and bilateral DPO was lower than after TPO because elimination of the

  15. Efficacy of extra-peritoneal pelvic packing in hemodynamically unstable pelvic fractures, a Propensity Score Analysis.

    PubMed

    Chiara, Osvaldo; di Fratta, Emanuele; Mariani, Anna; Michaela, Bertuzzi; Prestini, Lucia; Sammartano, Fabrizio; Cimbanassi, Stefania

    2016-01-01

    An option for emergency control of pelvic hemorrhage is Extra-peritoneal Pelvic Packing (EPP), which addresses the retroperitoneal source of exsanguination in pelvic fractures. The aim of this study was to demonstrate the efficacy of early EPP in reducing mortality due to hemorrhage from pelvic fractures, and to evaluate the impact of packing on transfusion requirements within the first 24 h and ICU length of stay (ICU-LOS). All data pertaining trauma patients admitted from October 2002 and December 2103 with hemodynamic instability and pelvic fractures were selected from the Hospital Trauma Registry. Patients with severe brain injury and bleeding from extra-pelvic sources were excluded. Patient population was divided into two groups: EPP group, including patients admitted from 2009 to 2013, with EPP as part of the treatment algorithm, and NO-EPP group, from 2002 to 2008, without EPP as atherapeutic option. Descriptive statistical analysis was performed on allpatients. Twenty-five patients of each group with similar features were matched using Propensity Score Analysis (PSA). Six hundred eighty out of 4659 major trauma (14.6 %) presented a pelvic fracture. In 78 hemodynamically unstable patients (30 in EPP group,48 in NO-EPP group) the major source of bleeding was the pelvis. Among patients selected by PSA early mortality was significantly reduced in EPP group (20 vs 52 %, p = .03) compared to NO-EPP, notwithstanding similar hemodynamic impairment. No difference was observed in transfusion requirements and ICU-LOS. The EPP is a safe and quick procedure, able to improve hemodynamic stabilization and to reduce acute mortality due to hemorrhage in patients with pelvic fracture, in combination with optimized transfusion protocol. EPP may be useful as a bridge for time-consuming procedures, such as angio-embolization.

  16. Pelvic Inflammatory Disease: Diagnosis And Treatment In The Emergency Department.

    PubMed

    Bugg, Charles Walter; Taira, Taku

    2016-12-01

    Pelvic inflammatory disease is a common disease that is associated with significant complications including infertility, chronic pelvic pain, ruptured tubo-ovarian abscess, and ectopic pregnancy. The diagnosis may be delayed when the presentation has nonspecific signs and symptoms. Even when it is properly identified, pelvic inflammatory disease is often treated suboptimally. This review provides evidence-based recommendations for the diagnosis, treatment, disposition, and follow-up of patients with pelvic inflammatory disease. Arranging follow-up of patients within 48 to 72 hours and providing clear patient education are fundamental to ensuring good patient outcomes. Emerging issues, including new pathogens and evolving resistance patterns among pelvic inflammatory disease pathogens are reviewed.

  17. Magnetic resonance imaging of pelvic endometriosis.

    PubMed

    Méndez Fernández, R; Barrera Ortega, J

    Endometriosis is common in women of reproductive age; it can cause pelvic pain and infertility. It is important to diagnose endometriosis and to thoroughly evaluate its extension, especially when surgical treatment is being considered. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with careful examination technique and interpretation enables more accurate and complete diagnosis and staging than ultrasonography, especially in cases of deep pelvic endometriosis. Furthermore, MRI can identify implants in sites that can be difficult to access in endoscopic or laparoscopic explorations. In this article, we describe the appropriate MRI protocol for the study of pelvic endometriosis and the MRI signs of pelvic organ involvement. It is necessary to know the subtle findings and to look for them so we can ensure that they are not overlooked. We describe clinical grading systems for endometriosis and review the diagnostic efficacy of MRI in comparison with other imaging techniques and surgery. Copyright © 2017 SERAM. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  18. Iatrogenic water intoxication after pelvic ultrasonography imaging.

    PubMed

    Camkurt, Meltem Akkaş; Coşkun, Figen; Aksu, Nalan Metin; Akpinar, Erhan; Ay, Didem

    2010-03-01

    Ultrasound (US) is a simple, easily accessible, and noninvasive method. Thus, it is commonly used. The bladder should be sufficiently filled to acquire pelvic images by US. This report describes water poisoning in 3 patients with no hepatic, cardiac, or renal disease. Both patients had a history of excessive fluid intake.

  19. Magnetic resonance imaging of fetal pelvic cysts.

    PubMed

    Archontaki, Styliani; Vial, Yvan; Hanquinet, Sylviane; Meuli, Reto; Alamo, Leonor

    2016-12-01

    The detection of fetal anomalies has improved in the last years as a result of the generalization of ultrasound pregnancy screening exams. The presence of a cystic imaging in the fetal pelvis is a relatively common finding, which can correspond to a real congenital cystic lesion or result from the anomalous liquid accumulation in a whole pelvic organ, mainly the urinary bladder, the uterus, or the vagina. In selected cases with poor prognosis and/or inconclusive echographic findings, magnetic resonance may bring additional information in terms of the characterization, anatomical location, and real extension of the pathology. This pictorial essay describes the normal pelvic fetal anatomy, as well as the most common pelvic cysts. It also describes the causes of an anomalous distension of the whole pelvic organs detected in utero, with emphasis on prenatal magnetic resonance imaging exams. Moreover, it proposes practical teaching points to reduce the differential diagnosis of these lesions based on the sex of the fetus, the division of the pelvis in anatomical spaces, and the imaging findings of the pathology. Finally, it discusses the real utility of complementary MRI.

  20. Methemoglobinemia following chromopertubation in treated pelvic tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Mhaskar, R; Mhaskar, A M

    2002-04-01

    Methylene blue administered through cervix is used to check tubal patency at laparoscopy. Although methylene blue is used to treat methemoglobinemia it can also produce methemoglobinemia in susceptible individuals. A case of methemoglobinemia induced by methylene blue in a patient with treated pelvic tuberculosis is presented.

  1. Pelvic lymphangioleiomyomatosis treated successfully with everolimus

    PubMed Central

    Wahid, Sharjil; Chiang, Ping Chia; Luo, Hao Lun; Huang, Shun-Chen; Tsai, Eing-Mei; Chiang, Po Hui

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background: Lymphangioleiomyomatosis (LAM) is a rare disease affecting young women caused by abnormal proliferation of smooth muscle-like cells (LAM cells) in the lungs and extrapulmonary sites (extrapulmonary LAM). The objective of this case series is to demonstrate marked regression in 2 cases of retroperitoneal LAM after treatment with everolimus, an mTOR inhibitor. Methods: We enrolled 2 cases with large volume, extrapulmonary pelvic LAM, and evaluated them with contrast-enhanced abdominal computed tomographic (CT) scans at presentation and serially during treatment with everolimus. Results were objectively quantified using the Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors, RECIST, Version 1.1. Results: After 12 to 18 months of treatment with everolimus, both patients showed substantial reduction in the volume of their tumors. The first had about 50% regression of the pelvic LAM and renal angiomyolipoma (AML). The second patient had extensive abdomino-pelvic LAM which after treatment showed complete remission. Both patients have not demonstrated disease progression after nearly 4 and 2 years of follow-up, respectively. Conclusions: This case series demonstrates the enormous value of mTOR inhibitors (specifically everolimus) in the management of extrapulmonary pelvic LAM, of which there is no effective treatment currently available. PMID:28272193

  2. [Pelvic hydatid yst: apropos of 8 cases].

    PubMed

    Laghzaoui Boukaidi, M; Bouhya, S; Soummani, A; Hermas, S; Bennan, O; Sefrioui, O; Aderdour, M

    2001-05-01

    The hydatidosis fisues in the endemic state in Morocco, its pelvigenital localization is rare and doubtful. The objective of this study is to examine the epidemio-clinic appearance, the diagnosis means and the therapeutic flow of the pelvigenital hydatid cyst in Morocco. This retrospective study is about eight patients hospitalized and cured for pelvigenital hydatid cyst in lalla Meryem maternity of Casablanca during a period of six years (1992-1997). The hydatid cyst diagnosis was confirmed by anatomopathology. This affection represented 0.80% of the pelvic mass operated during the same periode. The majority of our patients was from rural origin, their age varies between 22 and 70 years old. The discovery circumstances were dominated by abdomino-pelvic mass. The diagnosis was nearly certain prior to the surgery for half of the cases. The genital organs were the most reached by the pelvic hydatidosis (75%). The treatment was purely surgical, adapted to each case in according to the localization, the volume and the contribution of the cyst. The medical treatment has been prescribed in one case in post surgery. The evolution was good in all the cases. The hydatidos cyst must always be present in mind when dealing with cyst pelvic formation in an endemic country like Morocco. The prophylaxia preserves its important value and must constitute a hinder against this disease in endemic countries.

  3. Effects of Soft Tissue Surgery on Pelvic and Hip Rotation in Patients with Spastic Diplegia: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Hun Jae; Yoon, Ji Yeon; Oh, Min Kyung; Kim, Young Chang; Kim, Jae Hyun; Eom, Tae Woong

    2016-01-01

    Background There are several different opinions regarding the improvements seen on the transverse plane after soft tissue surgery alone in independently ambulant patients with cerebral palsy. We performed a meta-analysis using data from previous studies to identify the effects of soft tissue surgery alone on pelvic and hip rotation in children with spastic diplegia. Methods We conducted a pilot study to evaluate the improvement in pelvic and hip rotation after muscle-tendon lengthening surgery in children with spastic diplegia. We also searched EMBASE and PubMed and selected 2 previous studies using the same test conditions with kinematic data on the pelvis and hip joints. A meta-analysis of the results of these 3 studies, including this pilot study, was then performed. Results The meta-analysis results showed an external rotation decrease (p = 0.005) in the mean difference of pelvic rotation of -3.61 (95% confidence interval [CI], -6.13 to –1.09) and a mean difference in hip rotation of 6.60 (95% CI, 3.34 to 9.86), indicating a significant increase in the hip external rotation after surgery (p < 0.001). Conclusions In independently community-ambulant pediatric patients with spastic diplegia, pelvic retraction and hip internal rotation could be improved after soft tissue surgery. PMID:27247745

  4. Pelvic floor dysfunction in inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Bondurri, A; Maffioli, A; Danelli, P

    2015-12-01

    Advances in tailored medical therapy and introduction of biologic agents for inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) treatment have ensured long-term disease remission. Some patients, however, still report defecatory symptoms. Patients present with a wide spectrum of conditions - anal incontinence, obstructed defecation and pelvic pain among the most frequent - that have a great impact on their quality of life. Due to IBD diagnosis, little relevance is attributed to this type of symptoms and their epidemiologic distribution is unknown. Pathogenetic hypotheses are currently under investigation. Routine diagnostic workflow and therapeutic options in pelvic floor service are often underused. The evaluation of these disorders starts with an endoscopy to rule out ongoing disease; the following diagnostic workflow is the same as in patients without IBD. For fecal incontinence and obstructed defecation, simple conservative therapy with dietary modifications and appropriate fluid intake is effective in most cases. In non-responding patients, anorectal physiology tests and imaging are required to select patients for pelvic floor muscle training and biofeedback. These treatments have been proven effective in IBD patients. Some new minimally invasive alternative strategies are available for IBD patients, as sacral nerve and posterior tibial nerve stimulation; for other ones (e.g., bulking agent implantation) IBD still remains an exclusion criterion. In order to preserve anatomical areas that could be useful for future reconstructive techniques, surgical options to cure pelvic floor dysfunction are indicated only in a small group of IBD patients, due to the high risk of failure in wound healing and to the possible side effects of surgery, which can lead to anal incontinence or to a possible proctectomy. A particular issue among defecatory symptoms in patients with IBD is paradoxical puborectalis contraction after restorative proctocolectomy: if this disorder is properly diagnosed, a

  5. [Establishment of pelvic nerve denervation modal in mice].

    PubMed

    Shi, Huiwen; Tian, Yue; Dai, Feixiang; Xiao, Lei; Ke, Zhigang; Tong, Weidong

    2017-05-25

    To establishment and verify pelvic nerve denervation (PND) model in mice. (1) Establishment of models. Seventy-two healthy male SPE class C57 mice with age of 7 weeks and body weight of (25±1) g were chosen. These 72 mice were randomly divided into PND group containing 36 mice and sham operation group containing 36 mice. Referring to the establishment method of PND rats, after anesthesia, a laparotomy was performed on the mouse with an abdominal median incision. Under the dissection microscope, the pelvic nerves behind and after each sides of the prostate gland were bluntly separated with cotton swabs and cut with a dissecting scissor. After the operation, the urination of mice was assisted twice every day. For the mice of sham operation group, the pelvic nerves were only exposed without cutting. (2) Detection of models. Colonic transit test was performed in 18 mice chosen randomly from each group to detect the colonic transit ratio (colored colon by methylene blue/ whole colon) and visceral sensitivity tests was performed in the rest mice to observe and record the changes of electromyogram. Three mice died of colonic transit test in each group. Uroschesis occurred in all the mice of PND group and needed bladder massage to assist the urination. Colonic transit test showed that the colonic transit ratios of sham operation group at postoperative day (POD) 1, 3 and 7 were (0.4950±0.3858)%, (0.6386±0.1293)% and (0.6470±0.1088)% without significant difference (F=0.3647, P=0.058), while in PND group, the colonic transit ratio at POD 7 [(0.6044±0.1768) %] was obviously higher than that both at POD 3[(0.3876±0.1364)%, P=0.022] and POD 1[(0.2542±0.0371)%, P=0.001], indicating a recovery trend of colonic transit function (F=9.143, P=0.004). Compared with the sham operation group, the colonic transit function in PND group decreased significantly at POD 1 and POD 3(both P<0.05), and at POD 7, there was no significant difference between two groups. Visceral sensitivity

  6. Female pelvic floor dysfunction--an imaging perspective.

    PubMed

    Dietz, Hans Peter

    2011-12-20

    Female pelvic floor dysfunction encompasses a range of morbidities, including urinary incontinence, female pelvic organ prolapse, anal incontinence and obstructed defecation. Patients often present with symptoms covered by several specialties including gastroenterology, colorectal surgery, urology and gynecology. Imaging can therefore bring clinicians from multiple specialties together by revealing that we frequently deal with different aspects of one underlying problem or pathophysiological process. This article provides an interdisciplinary imaging perspective on the pelvic floor. Modern pelvic floor imaging comprises defecation proctography, translabial and endorectal ultrasound, and static and dynamic MRI. This Perspectives focuses on the potential use of translabial ultrasound, including 3D and 4D applications, for diagnosis of pelvic floor disorders. Over the next decade, pelvic floor imaging will most likely be integrated into mainstream diagnostics in obstetrics and gynecology and colorectal surgery. Using imaging to facilitate communication between different specialties has the potential to greatly improve the multidisciplinary management of complex pelvic floor disorders.

  7. [Study on modified Prolift for pelvic floor reconstruction in the prevention of stress urinary incontinence].

    PubMed

    Ma, Ning; Wang, Feng-mei; Huang, Hui-juan; Song, Yan-feng

    2012-07-01

    To evaluate the safety and efficacy of modified Prolift pelvic floor reconstruction with improving the placement of Prolift-A in treatment of severe pelvic floor dysfunction and stress urinary incontinence (SUI). From July 2008 to September 2010, 170 cases with severe pelvic organ prolapse (POP) treated by modified Prolift pelvic floor reconstruction surgery in Fuzhou General Hospital were enrolled in this study. The Prolift-A was laid tension-free under the mid-urethra with the position of Prolift-A displaced from the neck of bladder to the mid-urethra. No concomitant tension-free urethra suspender via vagina was performed. Primary outcomes were assessed with POP quantitation (POP-Q) system to evaluate the postoperative anatomical replacement stage. Secondary outcome measure were: urogenital distress inventory 6 (UDI-6), the incontinence impact questionnaire 7 (IIQ-7) and the pelvic floor incontinence questionnaire 7 (PFIQ-7) to evaluate the impact on life quality at the follow-up of 1, 6, 12 months. At 6 and 12 months after surgery, 168 cases and 163 cases were followed up. The anatomical cure rates were 98.8% (166/168) at 6 months and 97.5% (159/163) at 12 months, respectively. One case with bladder injury and 1 case with rectum injury were observed. Five cases with recurrence were observed, including 2 cases with anterior vagina prolapse, 2 cases with uterine prolapse and 1 case with posterior vagina prolapse. Meanwhile, 3 cases with hematoma and 7 cases with mesh erosion were observed. Quality of life of all patients were improved significantly by UDI-6, IIQ-7 and PFIQ-7 scoring system evaluation. Among 79 POP patients with SUI, the cure rate of SUI was 93.7% (74/79). Of 5 cases with symptomatic SUI, 2 cases were needed surgical intervention. Twenty-three cases were found with minimal SUI symptoms and subjective satisfaction without objective influence on quality of life. Seven patients presented dysuria after surgery, 5 cases recovered urination with 10 days

  8. Combined latissimus dorsi and serratus anterior flaps for pelvic reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Phan, Truong Q V; Spilker, Gerald; Theodorou, Panagiotis; Gossmann, Andreas; Heiss, Michael; Weinand, Christian

    2011-10-01

    In recurrent pressure sores, adjacent tissue has already been consumed by multiple surgeries. Additional problems are several co-morbidities of patients. Especially, severe atherosclerosis would be a contraindication for using free flaps. However, microsurgical techniques allow circumventing these limitations and preparing even severely atherosclerotic vessels. We performed a total of eight sacral pressure sore coverage in our standardized fashion, using the free combined latissimus dorsi and serratus anterior free flaps. All patients had severe atherosclerosis and needed large soft tissue coverage of the sacral defects. Five patients presented after bowel resection, three with recurrent sacral pressure sores. The average follow-up was 12 months. Postoperatively, all patients were allowed to be prone on the operated area. One minor wound dehiscence was sutured in local anesthesia. CT imaging analysis of the pelvis showed complete void space coverage. The combined latissimus dorsi and serratus anterior flaps are a valuable tool for pelvic reconstruction in our hands. In addition, severe atherosclerosis should not be considered an obstacle to microsurgery and the use of free flaps.

  9. Delayed primary closure of bladder exstrophy: immediate postoperative management leading to successful outcomes.

    PubMed

    Baradaran, Nima; Stec, Andrew A; Schaeffer, Anthony J; Gearhart, John P; Mathews, Ranjiv I

    2012-02-01

    To present the critical features of our postoperative plan for children undergoing delayed primary bladder closure because appropriate postoperative management is crucial to successful exstrophy repair. Using an institutionally approved database, patients with bladder exstrophy whose primary bladder closure was performed at least 1 month after birth were identified. All aspects of the postoperative management were reviewed. A total of 20 patients (18 boys) were identified: 19 with classic bladder extrosphy and 1 with an exstrophy variant. The patients underwent closure at a mean age of 9.9 months. All patients underwent pelvic osteotomy and immobilization for an average of 34.8 days. Analgesia was administered by way of a tunneled epidural catheter in 90% of patients for an average of 18.8 days, and 12 patients (60%) required adjunct intravenous analgesia. Bilateral ureteral catheters and suprapubic tubes were used in all patients. Total parenteral nutrition was administered to 10 (83%) of 12 patients who underwent closure after 2000. All patients received preoperative antibiotics and 2 weeks of postoperative intravenous antibiotics that was followed by oral prophylaxis. The mean hospital stay was 6.3 weeks. With an average follow-up of 7.4 years, delayed closure was 100% successful. Successful delayed primary closure of bladder exstrophy requires a multidisciplinary approach. The keys to success include osteotomy, pelvic immobilization, analgesia, nutritional support, maximal bladder drainage, and infection prophylaxis. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  10. Comparative study of laparoscopic pyelolithotomy versus percutaneous nephrolithotomy in the management of large renal pelvic stones

    PubMed Central

    Haggag, Yasser M.; Morsy, Gamal; Badr, Magdy M.; Al Emam, Abdel Baset A.; Farid, Mourad; Etafy, Mohamed

    2013-01-01

    Background The aim of the study is to investigate whether laparoscopic pyelolithotomy (LPL) could be used to manage large renal pelvic stones, generally considered excellent indications for percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PNL). Methods: This study was performed from May 2009 to March 2012 at Al-Azhar University Hospitals (Assiut and Cairo), Egypt. It included two groups of patients with large renal pelvic stones; only patients with stones 2.5 cm2 or greater were included. Group 1 included 40 patients treated by PNL and Group 2 included 10 patients treated by LPL. The differences between the two procedures were compared and analyzed. Results: There was no difference between the two groups regarding patient demographics and stone size. There was a statistically significant difference between the groups regarding mean estimated blood loss (65 ± 12.25 [range: 52.75–77.25] vs. 180 ± 20.74 [range: 159.26–200.74] mL, p ≤ 0001), mean hospital stay (2.3 ± 0.64 [range: 1.66–2.94] vs. 3.7 ± 1.4 [range: 2.3–5.1] days, p ≤ 0.006), rate of postoperative blood transfusion (0% vs. 4.8%, p ≤ 0.0024), and stone-free rate (80% vs. 78.6%, p ≤ 0.23). The mean operative time was significantly longer in Group 2 (LPL) (131 ± 22.11 [range: 108.89–153.11) vs. 51.19 ± 24.39 [range: 26.8–75.58] min, p ≤ 0001), respectively. Conclusion: Although PNL is the standard treatment in most cases of renal pelvic stones, LPL is another feasible surgical technique for patients with large renal pelvic stones. PMID:23589752

  11. Efficacy of Laparoscopic Sacrocervicopexy for Apical Support of Pelvic Organ Prolapse

    PubMed Central

    Rosati, Maurizio; Bracale, Umberto; Pignata, Giusto; Azioni, Guglielmo

    2013-01-01

    Background and Objectives: To evaluate the efficacy of laparoscopic sacrocervicopexy for apical support in sexually active patients with pelvic organ prolapse. Methods: One-hundred thirty-five women with symptomatic prolapse of the central compartment (Pelvic Organ Prolapse Quantitative [POP-Q] stage 2) underwent laparoscopic sacrocervicopexy. The operating physicians used synthetic mesh to attach the anterior endopelvic fascia to the anterior longitudinal ligament of the sacral promontory with subtotal hysterectomy. Anterior and posterior colporrhaphy was performed when necessary. The patients returned for follow-up examinations 1 month after surgery and then over subsequent years. On follow-up a physician evaluated each patient for the recurrence of genital prolapse and for recurrent or de novo development of urinary or bowel symptoms. We define “surgical failure” as any grade of recurrent prolapse of stage II or more of the POP-Q test. Patients also gave feedback about their satisfaction with the procedure. Results: The mean follow-up period was 33 months. The success rate was 98.4% for the central compartment, 94.2% for the anterior compartment, and 99.2% for the posterior compartment. Postoperatively, the percentage of asymptomatic patients (51.6%) increased significantly (P < .01), and we observed a statistically significant reduction (P < .05) of urinary urge incontinence, recurrent cystitis, pelvic pain, dyspareunia, and discomfort. The present study showed 70.5% of patients stated they were very satisfied with the operation and 18.8% stated high satisfaction. Conclusion: Laparoscopic sacrocervicopexy is an effective option for sexually active women with pelvic organ prolapse. PMID:23925017

  12. A case of adolescent pelvic inflammatory disease caused by a rare bacterium: Fusobacterium nucleatum.

    PubMed

    McKinnon, Allison; Black, Amanda Y; Lortie, Karine; Fleming, Nathalie A

    2013-12-01

    Pelvic inflammatory disease (PID) is a polymicrobial infection that typically occurs in sexually active females. PID is rare in premenarchal and/or noncoital young women; however, there are case reports of PID occurring in virginal females. We present the first reported case of PID associated with F. nucleatum. In this unusual case of PID in an adolescent, the responsible organism may have originated from the patient's oral cavity. A 13-year-old noncoital Caucasian female presented to a tertiary children's hospital with fever and acute abdominal/pelvic pain. She had experienced a perforated appendix 14 months prior, which was treated by laparoscopy. Postoperatively, she experienced intermittent episodes of recurrent abdominal pain. During this presentation, the physical examination and ultrasound findings were suspicious for an ovarian torsion. She was taken to the operating room where she had an examination under anesthesia and a diagnostic laparoscopy. Findings at the time of laparoscopy were in keeping with a diagnosis of pelvic inflammatory disease. Oral and pelvic fluid cultures were positive for F. nucleatum. She was subsequently treated with antibiotics and her symptoms resolved. This case highlights the importance of including PID in the differential diagnosis of noncoital adolescent females presenting with an acute abdomen. Although most Fusobacteria infections are periodontal in nature, translocated infections to the pelvis may have long-term implications for reproductive health. This case also highlights the importance of the role of diagnostic laparoscopy in young women who have persistent pain following previous surgery due to the potential of missed pathology or subclinical infection. Copyright © 2013 North American Society for Pediatric and Adolescent Gynecology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. The Role of Hand Assist Laparoscopic Surgery (HALS) in Pelvic Surgery for Nonmalignant Disease

    PubMed Central

    McCarus, Steven; Jones, Kathy Y.; Redan, Jay; Kim, John C.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: Hand assist laparoscopic surgery (HALS) is a surgical modality rarely used in benign gynecology. We analyzed nonmalignant pelvic disorders that utilized HALS to see whether there is any benefit over standard laparotomy. Methods: A case control chart review identified patients who underwent HALS for a variety of benign gynecological conditions from 2004 through 2007. Cases were then compared with a control group of all the patients who underwent similar procedures for the same diagnosis via laparotomy (ELAP) in our center within the same time period. The groups were comparable with respect to age, BMI, and surgical indication. Results: Twenty-nine patients were analyzed: 12 cases (HALS) and 17 controls (ELAP). Each group was broken up into 2 subsets: Group A, older patients who underwent surgery for pelvic organ prolapse or diverticulitis with adnexectomy and Group B, younger patients who underwent surgery for pelvic pain, endometriosis, or both. Hospital stay in Group B was statistically lower in the HALS cases vs. the ELAP controls, (2.9 vs. 5.4 days, P=0.04). All HALS and ELAP patients were then analyzed for overall trends. HALS cases had shorter hospitalization than ELAP controls had (3.3 vs 4.5 days, P=0.035). Estimated blood loss was also less overall in the HALS cases vs. the ELAP controls (175 vs 355.9 mL, P=0.021). There were 2 adverse outcomes reported in Group A of the HALS cases. These 2 patients experienced postoperative hernias though the hand-assist port-site incision. Conclusion: Compared with laparotomy, overall, HALS offers the advantage of decreased hospitalization and decreased intraoperative blood loss. Postoperative hernias through the HA port site may be a potential problem with this technique. PMID:20529531

  14. [Value of pudendal nerve stimulation for predicting the stress urinary incontinence following pelvic prolapse surgery].

    PubMed

    Wang, A P; Song, J; Lyu, X L; Chen, L M; Zhong, X L; Song, Y F

    2016-06-25

    To seek the predictive value of pudendal nerve function that need preventive anti-incontinence surgery at the same time following pelvic prolapse surgery in severe pelvic organ prolapse (POP) patients. Seventy women completed this study from January 2014 to June 2015 in Fuzhou General Hospital of Nanjing Military Command, dividing into four groups: POP with or without coexisting occult stress urinary incontinence (OSUI) in preoperation, women with persistent stress urinary incontinence (SUI) in postoperation, women without SUI in postoperation. The pudendal nerve function in preoperation was measured by using Solar Urodynamic Neuro Module, including pudendal nerve terminal motor latency (PNTML), and amplitude. There were statistical significance on bilateral PNTML between POP coexisting OSUI group and only severe POP group [(2.62±0.23) versus (2.40±0.26) ms in right of PNTML, (2.55± 0.21) versus (2.37 ±0.30) ms in left of PNTML; all P<0.05], but no statistical significance on bilateral amplitude (P>0.05). Compared de novo SUI group with POP group in postoperation, de novo SUI group's right of PNTML was significantly increased [(2.74±0.16) versus (2.47±0.26) ms; P< 0.05]; and the right of PNTML was extending 2.5 standard deviation at least compared with the health's [(2.10±0.20) ms]. The PNTML of pudendal nerve of POP coexisting OSUI is severe than only severe POP, the velocity of nerve conduction is slowing, and PNTML extension has a predictive value for postoperative urinary incontinence. When the right of PNTML of preoperative POP increased by at least 2.5 standard deviations than health's, the risk of SUI postoperative strongly increased, and a anti-incontinence surgery at the same time following pelvic prolapse surgery should be adviced.

  15. [Postoperative analgesia and dexamethasone].

    PubMed

    Miralles, F S; Cárceles, M D; Micol, J A; Hernández, J; del Pino, A

    1989-01-01

    A randomized, double-blind, prospective study was carried out in 100 patients who had undergone some type of surgical treatment in order to evaluate the degree of pain and relief of pain, the degree of achieved analgesia according to the opinion of the observer and consumption of analgesic agents. The evaluation was carried out on seven occasions during the first 12 hours of the postoperative period. Patients received dexamethasone (4 mg before or after the operation or 8 mg after the operation), 6-methylprednisolone (16 mg at the end of the operation) or nothing (control group). Regardless of type, dose or timing of administration of the drugs, all patients receiving corticosteroids presented less pain, more relief of pain (expressed by themselves or in opinion of the observer) and needed lower doses of analgesics during the studied time.

  16. Modified pedicle screw-rod fixation as a minimally invasive treatment for anterior pelvic ring injuries: an initial case series.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xiaotian; Liu, Zuoqing; Fu, Wenqin; Zhao, Shan; Feng, Juntao

    2017-06-06

    Unstable pelvic ring injuries often involve high mortality and morbidity. This study was aimed to evaluate the modified minimally invasive pedicle screw-rod fixation for anterior pelvic ring injuries, in the respects of its feasibility, merits, and limitations. Twenty-three patients with unstable pelvic ring injuries underwent the modified anterior pedicle screw-rod fixation, with or without posterior fixation. The clinical outcomes were assessed using Majeed scores, and the quality of reduction was evaluated according to the criteria of Matta. Majeed scores showed that the clinical outcomes at postoperatively 1 year were excellent in 14 patients, good in 7, and fair in 2. One woman complained of persistent pain at the pubic tubercle during sexual intercourse. Iatrogenic neuropraxia of the unilateral lateral femoral cutaneous nerve occurred in 3 patients. Unilateral femoral nerve palsy occurred in 1 patient. The reduction was found to be excellent in 12 patients, good in 8, and fair in 3. Heterotopic ossification occurred in 8 patients, all being asymptomatic. The modified pedicle screw-rod fixation with the minimally invasive technique offered an effective alternative for unstable anterior pelvic ring injuries.

  17. Topography of the pelvic autonomic nervous system and its potential impact on surgical intervention in the pelvis.

    PubMed

    Baader, B; Herrmann, M

    2003-03-01

    Bladder, bowel, and sexual dysfunction caused by iatrogenic lesions of the inferior hypogastric plexus (IHP) are well known and commonly tolerated in pelvic surgery. Because the pelvic autonomic nerves are difficult to define and dissect in surgery, and their importance often ignored, we conducted a gross anatomic study of 90 adult and four fetal hemipelves. Using various non-surgical approaches, the anatomic relations and pathways of the IHP were dissected. The IHP extended from the sacrum to the genital organs at the level of the lower sacral vertebrae. It originated from three different sources: the hypogastric nerve, the sacral splanchnic nerves from the sacral sympathetic trunk (mostly the S2 ganglion), and the pelvic splanchnic nerves, which branched primarily from the third and fourth sacral ventral rami. These fibers converge to form a uniform nerve plate medial to the vascular layer and deep to the peritoneum. The posterior portion of the IHP supplied the rectum and the anterior portion of the urogenital organs; nerve fibers traveled directly from the IHP to the anterolateral wall of the rectum and to the inferolateral and posterolateral aspects of the urogenital organs. The autonomic supply from the IHP was supplemented by nerves accompanying the ureter and the arteries. An understanding of the location of the autonomic pelvic network, including important landmarks, should help prevent iatrogenic injury through the adoption of surgical techniques that reduce or prevent postoperative autonomic dysfunction.

  18. Imaging of postoperative shoulder instability.

    PubMed

    De Filippo, M; Pesce, A; Barile, A; Borgia, D; Zappia, M; Romano, A; Pogliacomi, F; Verdano, M; Pellegrini, A; Johnson, K

    2017-03-01

    Postoperative imaging in shoulder instability is still a challenge for radiologists due to various postsurgical anatomical findings that could be considered pathologic in treated shoulder. For this reason is very important a deep knowledge about surgical procedures, anatomical changes after surgery and the appropriate diagnostic imaging modalities to work up the symptomatic postoperative shoulder. Postoperative imaging options include use conventional radiography, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), MRI arthrography, computed tomography (CT) and CT arthrography. The purpose of our review is to explain the different surgical procedures and to describe postoperative changes detected with radiological imaging.

  19. Outcomes of a comprehensive nonsurgical approach to pelvic floor rehabilitation for urinary symptoms, defecatory dysfunction, and pelvic pain.

    PubMed

    Starr, Julie A; Drobnis, Erma Z; Lenger, Stacy; Parrot, Jessica; Barrier, Breton; Foster, Raymond

    2013-01-01

    The authors' intent was to determine the clinical efficacy of comprehensive pelvic floor rehabilitation among women with symptoms of pelvic floor dysfunction (PFD). We performed a retrospective analysis of women referred to an academic female pelvic medicine and reconstructive surgery practice for PFD. Data were gathered from the records of 778 women referred for pelvic floor therapy for urinary, bowel, pelvic pain, and sexual symptoms over the course of 4 years. Patients who completed at least 5 therapy sessions reported a mean symptom improvement of 80% in each of the 3 main categories analyzed, namely, urinary incontinence, defecatory dysfunction, and pelvic pain. Comprehensive, nonoperative management of PFD including pelvic floor muscle training, biofeedback, electrogalvanic stimulation, constipation management, behavioral modification, incontinence devices, and pharmacotherapy including vaginal estrogen is effective in the treatment of women with PFD.

  20. Pre- and postoperative spinopelvic sagittal balance in adolescent patients with lenke type 5 idiopathic scoliosis.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xi; Liu, Limin; Song, Yueming; Zhou, Chunguang; Zhou, Zhongjie; Wang, Lei; Wang, Liang

    2015-01-15

    A retrospective study. To investigate the preoperative spinopelvic sagittal alignment in Lenke 5 patients with adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS), and analyze how it alters after posterior correction. The structural thoracolumbar or lumbar curve may change the local sagittal alignment thereby altering the sagittal balance in Lenke 5 patients with AIS. However, few studies have evaluated the spinopelvic sagittal alignment before and after the surgery in these patients. Forty-eight Lenke 5 patients with AIS who underwent posterior correction and fusion were included in this study. Preoperative and postoperative radiographs were reviewed measuring both the coronal and sagittal parameters. Three pelvic sagittal states (anteverted, normal, or retroverted) were evaluated according to the magnitude relationship of individual pelvic tilt with pelvic incidence (PI). Both the coronal and sagittal parameters between different pelvic sagittal states were compared. The alterations of these parameters by surgery would also be analyzed. The mean follow-up was 1.8 years. Preoperatively, the mean PI was 44.3° with a pelvic tilt of 4.1°. There was 48% patients showing the anteverted pelvis, whereas the remaining 52% showing normal. The patients with anteverted pelvis showed a smaller PI and more distal lower end vertebra than normal pelvis ones. Logistic regression analysis revealed PI (odds ratio [OR] = 0.62, P = 0.024) and lower end vertebra (OR = 2.1, P = 0.037) were significantly associated with the risk of developing anteverted pelvis. The pelvic tilt was significantly increased and 61% of patients with preoperative anteverted pelvis had recovered. Logistic regression analysis revealed PI (OR = 0.7, P = 0.034) and lower instrumented vertebra (OR = 6.5, P = 0.002) were significantly associated with the risk of postoperative uncovered of anteverted pelvis. Anteverted pelvis appears in almost half of Lenke 5 patients with AIS, especially in who have smaller PI or distal lower

  1. Intraoperative gastrojejunoscopy-assisted fistulojejunostomy for postoperative pancreatic fistula.

    PubMed

    Toihata, Tasuku; Hashimoto, Daisuke; Hayashi, Hiromitsu; Chikamoto, Akira; Beppu, Toru; Baba, Hideo

    2014-11-01

    Postoperative pancreatic fistula is a known complication after pancreaticojejunostomy. When an anastomosis collapses completely, two-stage reconstruction is necessary. Herein, we describe the case of a 70-year-old woman who underwent subtotal stomach-preserving pancreaticoduodenectomy with pancreaticojejunostomy after she had developed a severe postoperative pancreatic fistula. The pancreaticojejunostomy was divided, and an external pancreatic drainage tube was placed. Four months later, fistulojejunostomy between the pancreas and the stump of the jejunum was performed successfully using intraoperative gastrojejunoscopy. © 2014 Japan Society for Endoscopic Surgery, Asia Endosurgery Task Force and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  2. Pelvic Insufficiency Fracture After Pelvic Radiotherapy for Cervical Cancer: Analysis of Risk Factors

    SciTech Connect

    Oh, Dongryul; Huh, Seung Jae Nam, Heerim; Park, Won; Han, Youngyih; Lim, Do Hoon; Ahn, Yong Chan; Lee, Jeong Won; Kim, Byoung Gie; Bae, Duk Soo; Lee, Je Ho

    2008-03-15

    Purpose: To investigate the incidence, clinical characteristics, and risk factors of pelvic insufficiency fracture (PIF) after pelvic radiotherapy (RT) in cervical cancer. Methods and Materials: Medical records and imaging studies, including bone scintigraphy, CT, and MRI of 557 patients with cervical cancer who received whole-pelvic RT between January 1998 and August 2005 were reviewed. Results: Eighty-three patients were diagnosed as having PIF after pelvic RT. The 5-year cumulative incidence of PIF was 19.7%. The most commonly involved site was the sacroiliac joint. Pelvic pain developed in 48 patients (57.8%) at diagnosis. Eleven patients (13.3%) needed admission or narcotics because of severe pain, and others had good relief of symptoms with conservative management. In univariate analysis, age {>=}55 years (p < 0.001), anteroposterior/posteroanterior parallel opposing technique (p = 0.001), curative treatment (p < 0.001), and radiation dose {>=}50.4 Gy (p = 0.005) were the predisposing factors for development of PIF. Concurrent chemotherapy (p = 0.78) was not significant. Multivariate analysis showed that age {>=}55 years (p < 0.001), body weight <55 kg (p = 0.02), curative treatment (p = 0.03), and radiation dose {>=}50.4 Gy (p = 0.04) were significant predisposing factors for development of PIF. Conclusion: The development of PIF is not rare after pelvic RT. The use of multibeam arrangements to reduce the volume and dose of irradiated pelvic bone can be helpful to minimize the risk of fracture, especially in elderly women with low body weight.

  3. Minimally invasive transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion with expandable versus static interbody devices: radiographic assessment of sagittal segmental and pelvic parameters.

    PubMed

    Hawasli, Ammar H; Khalifeh, Jawad M; Chatrath, Ajay; Yarbrough, Chester K; Ray, Wilson Z

    2017-08-01

    OBJECTIVE Minimally invasive transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (MIS-TLIF) has been adopted as an alternative technique to hasten recovery and minimize postoperative morbidity. Advances in instrumentation technologies and operative techniques have evolved to maximize patient outcomes as well as radiographic results. The development of expandable interbody devices allows a surgeon to perform MIS-TLIF with minimal tissue disruption. However, sagittal segmental and pelvic radiographic outcomes after MIS-TLIF with expandable interbody devices are not well characterized. The object of this study is to evaluate the radiographic sagittal lumbar segmental and pelvic parameter outcomes of MIS-TLIF performed using an expandable interbody device. METHODS A retrospective review of MIS-TLIFs performed between 2014 and 2016 at a high-volume center was performed. Radiographic measurements were performed on lateral radiographs before and after MIS-TLIF with static or expandable interbody devices. Radiographic measurements included disc height, foraminal height, fused disc angle, lumbar lordosis, pelvic incidence, sacral slope, and pelvic tilt. Mismatch between pelvic incidence and lumbar lordosis were calculated for each radiograph. RESULTS A total of 48 MIS-TLIFs were performed, predominantly at the L4-5 level, in 44 patients. MIS-TLIF with an expandable interbody device led to a greater and more sustained increase in disc height when compared with static interbody devices. Foraminal height increased after MIS-TLIF with expandable but not with static interbody devices. MIS-TLIF with expandable interbody devices increased index-level segmental lordosis more than with static interbody devices. The increase in segmental lordosis was sustained in the patients with expandable interbody devices but not in patients with static interbody devices. For patients with a collapsed disc space, MIS-TLIF with an expandable interbody device provided superior and longer-lasting increases in

  4. The External Degree.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Houle, Cyril O.

    This book examines the external degree in relation to the extremes of attitudes, myths, and data. Emphasis is placed on the emergence of the American external degree, foreign external-degree programs, the purpose of the external degree, the current scene, institutional issues, and problems of general policy. (MJM)

  5. An Atraumatic Symphysiolysis with a Unilateral Injured Sacroiliac Joint in a Patient with Cushing's Disease: A Loss of Pelvic Stability Related to Ligamentous Insufficiency?

    PubMed Central

    Höch, Andreas; Pieroh, Philipp; Dehghani, Faramarz; Josten, Christoph; Böhme, Jörg

    2016-01-01

    Glucocorticoids are well known for altering bone structure and elevating fracture risk. Nevertheless, there are very few reports on pelvic ring fractures, compared to other bones, especially with a predominantly ligamentous insufficiency, resulting in a rotationally unstable pelvic girdle. We report a 39-year-old premenopausal woman suffering from an atraumatic symphysiolysis and disruption of the left sacroiliac joint. She presented with external rotational pelvic instability and immobilization. Prior to the injury, she received high-dose glucocorticoids for a tentative diagnosis of rheumatoid arthritis over two months. This diagnosis was not confirmed. Other causes leading to the unstable pelvic girdle were excluded by several laboratory and radiological examinations. Elevated basal cortisol and adrenocorticotropic hormone levels were measured and subsequent corticotropin-releasing hormone stimulation, dexamethasone suppression test, and petrosal sinus sampling verified the diagnosis of adrenocorticotropic hormone-dependent Cushing's disease. The combination of adrenocorticotropic hormone-dependent Cushing's disease and the additional application of exogenous glucocorticoids is the most probable cause of a rare atraumatic rotational pelvic instability in a premenopausal patient. To the authors' knowledge, this case presents the first description of a rotationally unstable pelvic ring fracture involving a predominantly ligamentous insufficiency in the context of combined exogenous and endogenous glucocorticoid elevation. PMID:26904337

  6. Radiological outcome of postoperative sagittal balance on standing radiographs in comparison to intraoperative radiographs in prone position when performing lumbar spinal fusion.

    PubMed

    Greimel, Felix; Wolkerstorfer, Stefanie; Spörrer, Jan-Frederik; Zeman, Florian; Hoffstetter, Patrick; Grifka, Joachim; Benditz, Achim

    2017-07-11

    Aim of this study is to show the outcome of postoperatively measured lumbar lordosis in upright position in comparison to the intraoperatively estimated lumbar lordosis in prone position, as the lumbar lordosis is one of the most important factors for the clinical outcome after spinal fusion. Eighty-two patients, receiving lumbar fusion were included in this retrospective study. Intraoperative radiographs were scanned. Then radiographs of the whole spine pre- and postoperatively, as well as 1 year after surgery were measured by a spine surgeon and a radiologist. The visible segment lordosis angles were measured and compared (L2-S1, L3-S1, L4-S1, L5-S1). In addition, the pelvic parameters pelvic incidence, pelvic tilt and sacral slope were measured pre- and postoperatively. The intraobserver reliability was almost perfect. The mean lordosis angle L4-S1 was 32.6° ± 7.8° intraoperatively and 29° ± 10.8° postoperatively. A linear correlation of these two measurements can be seen. In mean, the postoperative lordosis is 4° smaller than intraoperatively. This trend can also be seen in the level L3-S1. In levels L2-S1 and L5-S1 the postoperative values were slightly higher than intraoperatively, but without any significance. Also, 1 year after surgery there were no significant changes in global lumbar lordosis. Measuring lordosis angles intraoperatively resulted in almost the same values as measurements in standing plane radiographs postoperatively, despite prone position. These findings could especially be shown for the level L4-S1. The intraobserver reliability was almost perfect for both, intra- and postoperative measurements. In conclusion, the intraoperative measurement of a lumbar lordosis angle can perfectly predict the postoperative result.

  7. Augmentation mastopexy using adjustable implants with external injection domes.

    PubMed

    Becker, Hilton; Hartog, Jeffrey

    2006-01-01

    For augmentation mastopexy, the authors use adjustable implants that are deflated at the end of the procedure and then inflated to the desired size 5 to 10 days postoperatively using external injection domes. Reported advantages, based on 175 cases, include increased perioperative safety for the nipple areolar complex, the ability to adjust for size and symmetry postoperatively with patient input, and better scar healing with less widening.

  8. Pelvic radiotherapy in the setting of rheumatoid arthritis: Refining the paradigm.

    PubMed

    Felefly, T; Mazeron, R; Huertas, A; Canova, C H; Maroun, P; Kordahi, M; Morice, P; Deutsch, É; Haie-Méder, C; Chargari, C

    2017-04-01

    Conflicting results concerning the toxicity of radiotherapy in the setting of rheumatoid arthritis were reported in literature. This work describes the toxicity profiles of patients with rheumatoid arthritis undergoing pelvic radiotherapy for gynecologic malignancies at our institution. Charts of patients with rheumatoid arthritis who underwent pelvic radiotherapy for cervical or endometrial cancer in a curative intent at the Gustave-Roussy Cancer Campus between 1990 and 2015 were reviewed for treatment-related toxicities. Acute and late effects were graded as per the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 4.0 scoring system. Eight patients with cervical cancer and three with endometrial cancer were identified. Median follow-up was 56 months. Median external beam radiotherapy dose was 45Gy. All patients received a brachytherapy boost using either pulse- or low-dose rate technique. Concomitant chemotherapy was used in seven cases. Median time from rheumatoid arthritis diagnosis to external beam radiation therapy was 5 years. No severe acute gastrointestinal or genitourinary toxicity was reported. One patient had grade 3 dermatitis. Any late toxicity occurred in 7 /11 patients, and one patient experienced severe late toxicities. One patient with overt systemic rheumatoid arthritis symptoms at the time of external beam radiation therapy experienced late grade 3 ureteral stenosis, enterocolitis and lumbar myelitis. Pelvic radiotherapy, in the setting of rheumatoid arthritis, appears to be feasible, with potentially slight increase in low grade late events compared to other anatomic sites. Patients with overt systemic rheumatoid arthritis manifestation at the time of radiotherapy might be at risk of potential severe toxicities. Copyright © 2017 Société française de radiothérapie oncologique (SFRO). Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  9. [Extra peritoneal anterior pelvic exenteration with total urethrectomy and vaginectomy for bladder and urethra cancer - clinical case and review of literature].

    PubMed

    Kovachev, S; Dragiev, D

    2013-01-01

    The anterior pelvic exenteration is technically demanding surgical intervention carried out in advanced malignant genito-urethral process origin. It is characterized by a high percentage of intra and postoperative complications. They can be reduced through new surgical techniques, such as extra peritoneal approach to perform this operation. We present a clinical case of 56 years old patient with adenocarcinoma of the urethra/bladder established histologically by TUR (Transurethral) - biopsy. Of the clinical and imaging studies - data for the invasion to the anterior vaginal wall. The patient is after Total Hysterectomy with bilateral salpingo oophorectomy on the occasion of the fibroids in the uterus. After a routine preoperative preparation, we did: extra peritoneal anterior pelvic exenteration with total urethrectomy and vaginectomy. Bilateral extra peritoneal ureterocutaneostomy with "JJ" stents. Bilateral extra peritoneal pelvic lymph dissection. Our clinical case, proves the thesis of many authors about the benefits of extra peritoneal approach for anterior pelvic exenteration. Reduce significantly the intra/post-operative complications, hospital stay and a time to follow postoperative therapy. We consider that the extra peritoneal approach for radical surgery should be applied whenever possible in the interest of the health of the patient.

  10. Mild analgesics in postoperative pain

    PubMed Central

    Tammisto, T.; Tigerstedt, I.

    1980-01-01

    1 The intensity of postoperative pain is influenced by many factors, for example, individual variation, site of incision and type of operation, anaesthetic technique, and the interval from the end of operation to the appearance of pain. 2 These factors affect the efficacy of analgesics. 3 Mild analgesics provide adequate pain relief in half of our patients in the immediate postoperative phase when the pain is slight to moderate. 4 The maximum effect of mild analgesics corresponds to that produced by morphine 6-10 mg. Adequate analgesia may not therefore be provided for the treatment of severe postoperative pain unless narcotic analgesics have been used peroperatively. 5 When mild analgesics are combined with narcotics synergism is achieved. 6 As postoperative pain decreases with time, mild analgesics usually provide adequate pain relief on the first and following postoperative days. PMID:7437275

  11. [Therapeutic approach to postoperative anemia].

    PubMed

    Bisbe Vives, E; Moltó, L

    2015-06-01

    Postoperative anemia is a common finding in patients who undergo major surgery, and it can affect early rehabilitation and the return to daily activities. Allogeneic blood transfusion is still the most widely used method for restoring hemoglobin levels rapidly and effectively. However, the potential risks of transfusions have led to the review of this practice and to a search for alternative measures for treating postoperative anemia. The early administration of intravenous iron appears to improve the evolution of postoperative hemoglobin levels and reduce allogeneic transfusions, especially in patients with significant iron deficiency or anemia. What is not clear is whether this treatment heavily influences rehabilitation and quality of life. There is a lack of well-designed, sufficiently large, randomized prospective studies to determine whether postoperative or perioperative intravenous iron treatment, with or without recombinant erythropoietin, has a role in the recovery from postoperative anemia, in reducing transfusions and morbidity rates and in improving exercise capacity and quality of life.

  12. [Management of postoperative chylothorax].

    PubMed

    Smati, B; Sadok Boudaya, M; Marghli, A; Mestiri, T; Baccari, S; Hantous, T; Djilani, H; Kilani, T

    2006-04-01

    A chylothorax can occur following any intrathoracic procedure. It is generally straightforward to make the diagnosis but optimal management can be problematic. Between 1995 and 2002, three women and one man aged from 13 to 58 years were treated for chylothorax after thoracic surgery. Their initial illnesses were a right pulmonary hydatid cyst associated with hepatic disease, a tumour of the posterior mediastinum, an oesophageal carcinoma and metastases in the left lung. These patients had: a pulmonary and hepatic cystectomies, a resection of the mediastinal tumor, an Akyama oesophagectomy and a resection of four left pulmonary metastases. Chylothorax became apparent post operatively between the 1st and the 4th day. All patients were treated with a medium-chain triglyceride diet. Two patients were re-explored with ligation of lymphatic vessels. One woman who did not have further surgery was treated with etilefrine. In the patient who had had an oesophagectomy, chylothorax persisted after re-operation. He was successfully treated by talc pleurodesis via a chest drain, which prevented further recurrence. In the management of postoperative chylothorax, medical treatment must be started early but surgery should not be delayed as operative risk is increased by the development of malnutrition and immune deficiency.

  13. Postoperative Prostate-Specific Antigen Velocity Independently Predicts for Failure of Salvage Radiotherapy After Prostatectomy

    SciTech Connect

    King, Christopher R. Presti, Joseph C.; Brooks, James D.; Gill, Harcharan; Spiotto, Michael T.

    2008-04-01

    Purpose: Identification of patients most likely to benefit from salvage radiotherapy (RT) using postoperative (postop) prostate-specific antigen (PSA) kinetics. Methods and Materials: From 1984 to 2004, 81 patients who fit the following criteria formed the study population: undetectable PSA after radical prostatectomy (RP); pathologically negative nodes; biochemical relapse defined as a persistently detectable PSA; salvage RT; and two or more postop PSAs available before salvage RT. Salvage RT included the whole pelvic nodes in 55 patients and 4 months of total androgen suppression in 56 patients. The median follow-up was >5 years. All relapses were defined as a persistently detectable PSA. Kaplan-Meier and Cox proportional hazards multivariable analysis were performed for all clinical, pathological, and treatment factors predicting for biochemical relapse-free survival (bRFS). Results: There were 37 biochemical relapses observed after salvage RT. The 5-year bRFS after salvage RT for patients with postop prostate-specific antigen velocity {<=}1 vs. >1 ng/ml/yr was 59% vs. 29%, p = 0.002. In multivariate analysis, only postop PSAV (p = 0.0036), pre-RT PSA level {<=}1 (p = 0.037) and interval-to-relapse >10 months (p = 0.012) remained significant, whereas pelvic RT, hormone therapy, and RT dose showed a trend (p = {approx}0.06). PSAV, but not prostate-specific antigen doubling time, predicted successful salvage RT, suggesting an association of zero-order kinetics with locally recurrent disease. Conclusions: Postoperative PSA velocity independently predicts for the failure of salvage RT and can be considered in addition to high-risk features when selecting patients in need of systemic therapy following biochemical failure after RP. For well-selected patients, salvage RT can achieve high cure rates.

  14. Management of pelvic trauma: neurological damage, urinary tract disruption and pelvic fractures.

    PubMed

    Meeson, Richard; Corr, Sandra

    2011-05-01

    Cats commonly present with pelvic trauma following road traffic accidents (RTAs). A logical step-wise approach to diagnostics and subsequent management can significantly improve the prognosis in the majority of cases. This article provides a practical guide to assist decision-making and optimise management of these cats. Affected cats may have sustained trauma to several body systems and, hence, their management can be complex, requiring good clinical, diagnostic and surgical skills (often both soft tissue and orthopaedic!). Any cat allowed access to the outdoors is potentially at risk of being involved in an RTA and sustaining pelvic trauma. Young male cats are most commonly affected. Many original articles and textbook chapters have been published on aspects of pelvic trauma. However, to the authors' knowledge, this is the first comprehensive overview of the assessment and management of the feline pelvic trauma case. The review begins by discussing initial triage and neurological examination, and then focuses, in turn, on assessment and management of the 'tail pull' injury, the diagnosis and management of urinary tract rupture, and the approach to managing specific pelvic fractures. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Immunological Mechanisms Underlying Chronic Pelvic Pain and Prostate Inflammation in Chronic Pelvic Pain Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Breser, María L; Salazar, Florencia C; Rivero, Viginia E; Motrich, Rubén D

    2017-01-01

    Chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome (CP/CPPS) is the most common urologic morbidity in men younger than 50 years and is characterized by a diverse range of pain and inflammatory symptoms, both in type and severity, that involve the region of the pelvis, perineum, scrotum, rectum, testes, penis, and lower back. In most patients, pain is accompanied by inflammation in the absence of an invading infectious agent. Since CP/CPPS etiology is still not well established, available therapeutic options for patients are far from satisfactory for either physicians or patients. During the past two decades, chronic inflammation has been deeply explored as the cause of CP/CPPS. In this review article, we summarize the current knowledge regarding immunological mechanisms underlying chronic pelvic pain and prostate inflammation in CP/CPPS. Cumulative evidence obtained from both human disease and animal models indicate that several factors may trigger chronic inflammation in the form of autoimmunity against prostate, fostering chronic prostate recruitment of Th1 cells, and different other leukocytes, including mast cells, which might be the main actors in the consequent development of chronic pelvic pain. Thus, the local inflammatory milieu and the secretion of inflammatory mediators may induce neural sensitization leading to chronic pelvic pain development. Although scientific advances are encouraging, additional studies are urgently needed to establish the relationship between prostatitis development, mast cell recruitment to the prostate, and the precise mechanisms by which they would induce pelvic pain.

  16. Immunological Mechanisms Underlying Chronic Pelvic Pain and Prostate Inflammation in Chronic Pelvic Pain Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Breser, María L.; Salazar, Florencia C.; Rivero, Viginia E.; Motrich, Rubén D.

    2017-01-01

    Chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome (CP/CPPS) is the most common urologic morbidity in men younger than 50 years and is characterized by a diverse range of pain and inflammatory symptoms, both in type and severity, that involve the region of the pelvis, perineum, scrotum, rectum, testes, penis, and lower back. In most patients, pain is accompanied by inflammation in the absence of an invading infectious agent. Since CP/CPPS etiology is still not well established, available therapeutic options for patients are far from satisfactory for either physicians or patients. During the past two decades, chronic inflammation has been deeply explored as the cause of CP/CPPS. In this review article, we summarize the current knowledge regarding immunological mechanisms underlying chronic pelvic pain and prostate inflammation in CP/CPPS. Cumulative evidence obtained from both human disease and animal models indicate that several factors may trigger chronic inflammation in the form of autoimmunity against prostate, fostering chronic prostate recruitment of Th1 cells, and different other leukocytes, including mast cells, which might be the main actors in the consequent development of chronic pelvic pain. Thus, the local inflammatory milieu and the secretion of inflammatory mediators may induce neural sensitization leading to chronic pelvic pain development. Although scientific advances are encouraging, additional studies are urgently needed to establish the relationship between prostatitis development, mast cell recruitment to the prostate, and the precise mechanisms by which they would induce pelvic pain. PMID:28824626

  17. Male chronic pelvic pain: An update

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Christopher P.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome (CP/CPPS) and interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome collectively referred to as urologic CPPS (UCPPS) is defined by the absence of identifiable bacterial infection as a cause for the chronic pain and urinary symptoms. Methods: A PubMed search of all recent relevant articles using the keywords/phrases: CPPS, CPPS, and male pelvic pain, was conducted. Results: CPPS has a high worldwide prevalence and its negative impact on quality of life compares with or exceeds common chronic morbidities. Triggers include certain comestibles as well as psychosocial factors that promote catastrophizing and illness focused behavior. Several validated tools are currently available to help diagnose and direct targeted therapy. Treatment should begin with the most simple and least invasive based on the presenting clinical phenotype. Conclusions: Although no gold-standard treatment exists, a multidisciplinary approach with multimodal therapy gives the UCPPS patient the best chance of symptom relief. PMID:26941492

  18. [Urogenital trauma associated with pelvic ring fractures].

    PubMed

    Pavelka, T; Houcek, P; Hora, M; Hlavácová, J; Linhart, M

    2010-02-01

    To evaluate, in a retrospective study, injuries to the urogenital tract in patients with pelvic ring fractures. MATERIAL In the years 1998-2007, a total of 308 patients with pelvic ring fractures were treated. The study did not comprise patients with low-energy fractures, such as apophyseolysis in children, osteoporotic bone fractures or pathologic fractures. It also did not include patients with multiple injuries who died within 6 hours of admission to the hospital. The group consisted of 186 men and 122 women with an average age of 34 (range, 6 to 76) years. The fractures sustained were classified as type A in 5 %, type B in 57 % and type C in 38 % of the patients. The average follow-up was 71 (range, 13 to 121) months. A primary injury to the urogenital tract was recorded in 50 (16 %) patients. Injury to the urethra was found in 23 (7.5%) and urinary bladder trauma in 18 (6%) patients, vaginal injury was in four women (1%), and penis injury in three (1%) and lacerated testicles in two men (1%). Injury to the urogenital tract was associated with a pelvic ring fracture type A in 5 %, type B in 34 % and type C in 61 % of the patients. Out of the 23 patients with urethral trauma, only six (26 %) were free from functional and subjective complaints; eight (35 %) continued to receive therapy for urethral stenosis seven (30 %) reported urinary incontinence, and seven men (30 %) had erection problems. In six patients (26%) the lasting sequelae were combined. The 18 patients with injury to the bladder reported no subjective complaints at a one-year follow-up. Two patients with penis root injury had erectile dysfunction. Two patients with the loss of both testicles were in the care of a psychiatrist. The patients' satisfaction was evaluated on a 0-to10-point scale. The average value for the whole group was 4.1 points. In the patients with erectile dysfunction, the value was 0.8, and in those with isolated injury to the urinary bladder it was 9.4 points. The increasing

  19. Prominent metalware from pelvic surgery causing dyspareunia.

    PubMed

    Nambiar, Mithun; Heaton, Samuel Raymond; Stevenson, Andrew John; Bucknill, Andrew Thomas

    2017-01-06

    We present a case of female dyspareunia secondary to metalware placement during extensive pelvic surgery following a motor vehicle accident. The patient initially had an uneventful recovery from her operations. However, she noticed pain with vaginal intercourse, due to a screw tip which was palpable on vaginal examination. X-ray imaging confirmed long screws in the medial part of an anterior column plate, which were impacting on the anterior vaginal wall. Subsequent percutaneous removal of two screws resulted in resolution of her symptoms of painful vaginal intercourse. While the pain from mechanical irritation of the vagina was resolved, the patient continues to have difficulty with intercourse, which is related to hip pain as a result of her initial injury and complex pelvic surgery.

  20. Surgical Treatment for Chronic Pelvic Pain

    PubMed Central

    1998-01-01

    The source of chronic pelvic pain may be reproductive organ, urological, musculoskeletal - neurological, gastrointestinal, or myofascial. A psychological component almost always is a factor, whether as an antecedent event or presenting as depression as result of the pain. Surgical interventions for chronic pelvic pain include: 1) resection or vaporization of vulvar/vestibular tissue for human papillion virus (HPV) induced or chronic vulvodynia/vestibulitis; 2) cervical dilation for cervix stenosis; 3) hysteroscopic resection for intracavitary or submucous myomas or intracavitary polyps; 4) myomectomy or myolysis for symptomatic intramural, subserosal or pedunculated myomas; 5) adhesiolysis for peritubular and periovarian adhesions, and enterolysis for bowel adhesions, adhesiolysis for all thick adhesions in areas of pain as well as thin ahesions affecting critical structures such as ovaries and tubes; 6) salpingectomy or neosalpingostomy for symptomatic hydrosalpinx; 7) ovarian treatment for symptomatic ovarian pain; 8) uterosacral nerve vaporization for dysmenorrhea; 9) presacral neurectomy for disabling central pain primarily of uterine but also of bladder origin; 10) resection of endometriosis from all surfaces including removal from bladder and bowel as well as from the rectovaginal septal space. Complete resection of all disease in a debulking operation is essential; 11) appendectomy for symptoms of chronic appendicitis, and chronic right lower quadrant pain; 12) uterine suspension for symptoms of collision dyspareunia, pelvic congestion, severe dysmenorrhea, cul-desac endometriosis; 13) repair of all hernia defects whether sciatic, inguinal, femoral, Spigelian, ventral or incisional; 14) hysterectomy if relief has not been achieved by organ-preserving surgery such as resection of all endometriosis and presacral neurectomy, or the central pain continues to be disabling. Before such a radical step is taken, MRI of the uterus to confirm presence of adenomyosis

  1. [Our results of surgical management of unstable pelvic ring injuries].

    PubMed

    Pavelka, T; Dzupa, V; Stulík, J; Grill, R; Báca, V; Skála-Rosenbaum, J

    2007-02-01

    -three patients (12 %) died during hospitalization. The difference in death rate between the patients with type C and those with type B fractures was significant (p = 0.021). Excellent and good clinical outcomes were achieved in 83 % and 70 % of the patients with type B and type C fractures, respectively. The difference was not significant (p = 0.236). Radiographs showed excellent reduction in 83 % of type B fractures and in 61 % of type C fractures; the difference was not significant (p = 0.271). Intra-operative complications were recorded in 22 %, early post-operative ones in 13 % and late complications in 11 % of the patients. The significant difference in primary neurological deficit between the patients with type C fractures and those with type B fractures was attributed to more severe injury and vertical dislocation of the posterior segment in type C fractures. On the other hand, the fact that urogenital involvement was not significantly higher in type C fractures can be explained by an equal presence of anterior segment injury in both type B and type C fractures. The significantly higher number of deaths in patients with type C fractures, as compared with those with type B fractures, was related more to severe injuries of other organ systems in polytraumatized patients than to injuries of the pelvis itself, although severe injury to the posterior segment in type C fractures can result in massive bleeding into the retroperitoneum. An active approach to the treatment of patients with unstable pelvic fractures, which is based on the correct diagnosis, comprehensive multi-disciplinary care, urgent primary stabilization and early definitive fixation by internal osteosynthesis, offers a prospect of survival and a good functional outcome for the patient. However, a high proportion of lasting sequelae due to altered biomechanics of the pelvic ring, and irreversible injuries to neural structures and the urogenital system may lessen good results achieved by a demanding surgical

  2. Sacral roots stimulation in chronic pelvic pain.

    PubMed

    Sokal, Paweł; Zieliński, Piotr; Harat, Marek

    2015-01-01

    Chronic pelvic pain is a syndrome of chronic non-malignant pain of multifactorial pathophysiology. Perineal, anal and coccygeal pain can be a form of failed-back surgery syndrome or complex regional pain syndrome. Apart from conservative treatment interventional methods are useful in this condition as neurolytic blocks or non-destructive neuromodulation procedures. Peripheral nerve, spinal cord stimulation or sacral stimulation can be applied. We describe a minimally invasive method of sacral roots stimulation with percutaneous electrodes implanted through the sacral hiatus in the treatment of chronic pelvic pain. We evaluated a series of nine female patients with pelvic pain treated with sacral roots stimulation in regard of efficacy and complications of this method. Short-term results in all patients were satisfactory with statistically significant improvement (median VAS=9 before surgery) (median VAS=2 after implantation, p=0.001), (median VAS=3 after 6 months, p=0.043). The long-term follow-up revealed less satisfactory result (median VAS=6 after 12 months). High incidence of complications was noted: mainly infection in 3/9 patients. Sacral roots stimulation is a non-destructive and minimally invasive neuromodulation method in the treatment of chronic pelvic pain. It can be effective even in the long-term observation but special care is advised to secure aseptic conditions in the implantation and to prevent the infection which leads to removal of the stimulating system. Copyright © 2015 Polish Neurological Society. Published by Elsevier Urban & Partner Sp. z o.o. All rights reserved.

  3. Uterine preservation for advanced pelvic organ prolapse repair: Anatomical results and patient satisfaction

    PubMed Central

    Fink, Keshet; Shachar, Inbar Ben; Braun, Naama Marcus

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: The aims of the current study were to evaluate outcomes and patient satisfaction in cases of uterine prolapse treated with vaginal mesh, while preserving the uterus. Materials and Methods: This is a retrospective cohort study that included all patients operated for prolapse repair with trocar-less vaginal mesh while preserving the uterus between October 2010 and March 2013. Data included: patients pre-and post-operative symptoms, POP-Q and operative complications. Success was defined as prolapse < than stage 2. A telephone survey questionnaire was used to evaluate patient's satisfaction. Results: Sixty-six patients with pelvic organ prolapse stage 3, including uterine pro-lapse of at least stage 2 (mean point C at+1.4 (range+8-(-1)) were included. Mean follow-up was 22 months. Success rate of the vaginal mesh procedure aimed to repair uterine prolapse was 92% (61/66), with mean point C at −6.7 (range (-1) - (-9)). No major intra-or post-operative complication occurred. A telephone survey questionnaire was conducted post-operatively 28 months on average. Ninety-eight percent of women were satisfied with the decision to preserve their uterus. Eighteen patients (34%) received prior consultation elsewhere for hysterectomy due to their prolapse, and decided to have the operation at our center in order to preserve the uterus. Conclusions: Uterine preservation with vaginal mesh was found to be a safe and effective treatment, even in cases with advanced uterine prolapse. Most patients prefer to keep their uterus. Uterus preservation options should be discussed with every patient before surgery for pelvic organ prolapse. PMID:27564289

  4. Sacrohysteropexy performed as uterus conserving surgery for pelvic organ prolapse: Review of case files.

    PubMed

    Khan, Ayesha; Jaleel, Riffat; Nasrullah, Farah Deeba

    2016-01-01

    To assess the outcome and safety of sacrohysteropexy as uterus conserving surgery for pelvic organ prolapse in young women and to assess patients' satisfaction with the procedure. This is a case series of patients operated at Sind Government Lyari General Hospital and Civil Hospital Karachi, between January, 2007 to October, 2015. Data of the patients who had sacrohysteropexy were reviewed. Complications during surgery and post-operative period including haemorrhage, visceral injury, paralytic ileus and peritonitis were studied. Success of procedure, need of blood transfusion, hospital stay and condition on discharge and six weeks follow-up were noted. Data were analyzed using SPSS version 16. Mean ± SD was calculated for numerical, while frequencies were computed for categorical variables. Data of 60 patients were reviewed. Early post-operative success was 100%. Duration of surgery was less than two hours in 57 (95%) patients. Blood loss was negligible in majority of cases. Out of all 60 cases, 52 (86.7%) did not suffer any complication. One patient had ureteric injury, while one patient sustained bowel injury. Two patients had paralytic ileus. Four patients suffered from abdominal wound infection. All patients were managed satisfactorily. Mean duration of stay in hospital was four days. Upon follow up 96.7% patients were satisfied with results of operative procedure. Sixteen (26.7%) patients complained of backache on follow-up visit. This review concludes that sacrohysteropexy was successful in all cases in early post-operative period. It is a safe procedure and should be considered as an option for the treatment of pelvic organ prolapse in young women, in whom uterine conservation is required.

  5. Uterine preservation for advanced pelvic organ prolapse repair: Anatomical results and patient satisfaction.

    PubMed

    Fink, Keshet; Shachar, Inbar Ben; Braun, Naama Marcus

    2016-01-01

    The aims of the current study were to evaluate outcomes and patient satisfaction in cases of uterine prolapse treated with vaginal mesh, while preserving the uterus. This is a retrospective cohort study that included all patients operated for prolapse repair with trocar-less vaginal mesh while preserving the uterus between October 2010 and March 2013. Data included: patients pre-and post-operative symptoms, POP-Q and operative complications. Success was defined as prolapse < than stage 2. A telephone survey questionnaire was used to evaluate patient's satisfaction. Sixty-six patients with pelvic organ prolapse stage 3, including uterine prolapse of at least stage 2 (mean point C at+1.4 (range+8-(-1)) were included. Mean follow-up was 22 months. Success rate of the vaginal mesh procedure aimed to repair uterine prolapse was 92% (61/66), with mean point C at -6.7 (range (-1) - (-9)). No major intra-or post-operative complication occurred. A telephone survey questionnaire was conducted post-operatively 28 months on average. Ninety-eight percent of women were satisfied with the decision to preserve their uterus. Eighteen patients (34%) received prior consultation elsewhere for hysterectomy due to their prolapse, and decided to have the operation at our center in order to preserve the uterus. Uterine preservation with vaginal mesh was found to be a safe and effective treatment, even in cases with advanced uterine prolapse. Most patients prefer to keep their uterus. Uterus preservation options should be discussed with every patient before surgery for pelvic organ prolapse. Copyright© by the International Brazilian Journal of Urology.

  6. Sacrohysteropexy performed as uterus conserving surgery for pelvic organ prolapse: Review of case files

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Ayesha; Jaleel, Riffat; Nasrullah, Farah Deeba

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To assess the outcome and safety of sacrohysteropexy as uterus conserving surgery for pelvic organ prolapse in young women and to assess patients’ satisfaction with the procedure. Methods: This is a case series of patients operated at Sind Government Lyari General Hospital and Civil Hospital Karachi, between January, 2007 to October, 2015. Data of the patients who had sacrohysteropexy were reviewed. Complications during surgery and post-operative period including haemorrhage, visceral injury, paralytic ileus and peritonitis were studied. Success of procedure, need of blood transfusion, hospital stay and condition on discharge and six weeks follow-up were noted. Data were analyzed using SPSS version 16. Mean ± SD was calculated for numerical, while frequencies were computed for categorical variables. Results: Data of 60 patients were reviewed. Early post-operative success was 100%. Duration of surgery was less than two hours in 57 (95%) patients. Blood loss was negligible in majority of cases. Out of all 60 cases, 52 (86.7%) did not suffer any complication. One patient had ureteric injury, while one patient sustained bowel injury. Two patients had paralytic ileus. Four patients suffered from abdominal wound infection. All patients were managed satisfactorily. Mean duration of stay in hospital was four days. Upon follow up 96.7% patients were satisfied with results of operative procedure. Sixteen (26.7%) patients complained of backache on follow-up visit. Conclusion: This review concludes that sacrohysteropexy was successful in all cases in early post-operative period. It is a safe procedure and should be considered as an option for the treatment of pelvic organ prolapse in young women, in whom uterine conservation is required. PMID:27882016

  7. Development and psychometric properties of a measure of catheter burden with bladder drainage after pelvic reconstructive surgery.

    PubMed

    Carpenter, Janet S; Heit, Michael; Rand, Kevin L

    2017-04-01

    Catheter burden after pelvic reconstructive surgery is an important patient-reported quality of life outcome in research and clinical practice. However, existing tools focus on long-term catheter users rather than short-term postoperative patients. The study aim was to evaluate the psychometric properties of a modified version of the intermittent self-catheterization questionnaire (ISC-Q) in postoperative pelvic reconstructive patients. After experts convened to discuss and modify the ISC-Q items based on their knowledge of women's experiences and clinical practices, 178 women (108 with transurethral and 70 with suprapubic catheters) completed the modified scale and other measures as part of a larger parent study designed to assess health-related quality of life (HRQoL) following pelvic reconstructive surgery requiring bladder drainage. During psychometric testing, the modified ISC-Q was reduced to six items encompassing two factors: a three-item difficulty of use factor and a 3-item embarrassment factor. The new scale was named the short-term catheter burden questionnaire (STCBQ). The two-factor model was robust in both subsamples. Only scores within and not between subsamples can be meaningfully compared due to a lack of scalar invariance. Correlations among STCBQ total scores, subscores, and a single satisfaction item indicated good construct validity. Correlations with patient demographics provided further information about the scale. The STCBQ is a short, efficient assessment of short-term catheter burden following pelvic reconstructive surgery. The scale can be used as an important patient reported outcome measure in clinical practice and research. Neurourol. Urodynam. 36:1140-1146, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Can application of a pelvic belt change injured hamstring muscle activity?

    PubMed

    Arumugam, Ashokan; Milosavljevic, Stephan; Woodley, Stephanie; Sole, Gisela

    2012-02-01

    Hamstring injuries are commonly reported in various sports involving sprinting, high-velocity running and kicking. Aberrant biomechanics and neuromotor control of the lumbopelvic and thigh segments have been reported to play a significant role in hamstring injury incidence and recurrence. Recent evidence suggests that external pelvic compression (EPC) applied with a pelvic belt can augment the stability of the pelvic joints, and alter neuromotor control of the lumbopelvic and thigh muscles in individuals with and without (somatic) lumbopelvic and groin dysfunction. However, the effects of EPC on neuromotor control of injured hamstring muscles remain unknown. We have explored the putative neuromotor link between the lumbopelvic segment and hamstring muscles, and generated hypotheses based on plausible mechanisms through which EPC could affect injured hamstring muscle strength and recruitment. Recent guidelines argue that rehabilitation of hamstring injuries should follow a multi-modal approach and include strategies to improve stability and neuromotor control of the lumbopelvic segment. Further investigations exploring these hypotheses would confirm whether EPC could be recommended as an assessment, intervention and rehabilitation tool for hamstring injury. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Defecatory disorders, anorectal and pelvic floor dysfunction: a polygamy? Radiologic and manometric studies in 41 patients.

    PubMed

    Siproudhis, L; Ropert, A; Lucas, J; Raoul, J L; Heresbach, D; Bretagne, J F; Gosselin, M

    1992-06-01

    A consecutive series of 41 patients with defecatory disorders was prospectively studied by anal manometry and evacuation proctography to determine the relationship between abnormalities and symptoms. The patients (29 female, 12 male, aged 41 +/- 2.3 years) all complained of difficulty in evacuation. All had normal colonoscopy and biochemistry. There was no evidence of megacolon or megarectum, and no symptoms had been previously treated by pelvic floor surgery. All subjects completed detailed questionnaires related to gastrointestinal symptoms with special reference to excessive straining and discomfort, digital manipulations during defecation, a sense of pelvic heaviness and incomplete evacuation. Each patient underwent clinical examination, anal manometry and defecography during a single outpatient visit. Rectocele (16 patients) was significantly associated with vaginal digitation, lower stool frequency, delayed rectal emptying and decreased rectal sensation to distension. Increased anal pressure on straining (14 patients) was also related to a poor rectal emptying in 13 patients. Neither perineal descent (24 patients) nor external rectal prolapse (12 patients) was related to objective obstruction. Nevertheless there was an association with pelvic heaviness and lower anal manometric recordings. Five among 16 patients with rectocele had manometric anismus. Forty percent of patients with intussusception also had a paradoxical sphincter response during defaecation. Furthermore, associated abnormalities were extremely common (34 of 41 patients), accurate interpretation of which was necessary for planning effective therapy.

  10. Omental transposition for low pelvic anastomoses.

    PubMed

    Topor, B; Acland, R D; Kolodko, V; Galandiuk, S

    2001-11-01

    Surgeons' opinions differ regarding the role of the omentum in low pelvic intestinal anastomoses. This study was undertaken to define the anatomy and surgical technique of omental transposition to the pelvis. We studied 45 cadavers to elucidate surgical aspects of omental mobilization, lengthening, and transposition into the pelvic cavity. In addition, intraoperative studies of omental transposition to the pelvis were performed in 20 patients with chronic ulcerative colitis, familial adenomatous polyposis, and rectal cancer who were undergoing ileal J-pouch anal anastomosis or low anterior resection. The most important anatomic variables for omental transposition are three variants of arterial blood supply: (1) In 56% of patients, there is one right, one (or two) middle, and one left omental artery. (2) In 26% of patients, the middle omental artery is absent. (3) In the remaining 18% of patients, the gastroepiploic artery is continued as a left omental artery but with various smaller connections to the right or middle omental artery. The first stage of omental lengthening is detachment of the omentum from the transverse colon mesentery. This must be performed carefully, as the omentum is closely adherent to the right transverse mesocolon. The second stage is the actual lengthening of the omentum. The third stage is placement of the omental flap into the pelvis. Creation of an omental pedicle is a simple surgical procedure. This procedure can be performed quickly, does not involve significant blood loss, and may reduce the frequency of complications after low pelvic anastomoses.

  11. Pelvic radiation disease: Updates on treatment options

    PubMed Central

    Frazzoni, Leonardo; La Marca, Marina; Guido, Alessandra; Morganti, Alessio Giuseppe; Bazzoli, Franco; Fuccio, Lorenzo

    2015-01-01

    Pelvic cancers are among the most frequently diagnosed neoplasms and radiotherapy represents one of the main treatment options. The irradiation field usually encompasses healthy intestinal tissue, especially of distal large bowel, thus inducing gastrointestinal (GI) radiation-induced toxicity. Indeed, up to half of radiation-treated patients say that their quality of life is affected by GI symptoms (e.g., rectal bleeding, diarrhoea). The constellation of GI symptoms - from transient to long-term, from mild to very severe - experienced by patients who underwent radiation treatment for a pelvic tumor have been comprised in the definition of pelvic radiation disease (PRD). A correct and evidence-based therapeutic approach of patients experiencing GI radiation-induced toxicity is mandatory. Therapeutic non-surgical strategies for PRD can be summarized in two broad categories, i.e., medical and endoscopic. Of note, most of the studies have investigated the management of radiation-induced rectal bleeding. Patients with clinically significant bleeding (i.e., causing chronic anemia) should firstly be considered for medical management (i.e., sucralfate enemas, metronidazole and hyperbaric oxygen); in case of failure, endoscopic treatment should be implemented. This latter should be considered the first choice in case of acute, transfusion requiring, bleeding. More well-performed, high quality studies should be performed, especially the role of medical treatments should be better investigated as well as the comparative studies between endoscopic and hyperbaric oxygen treatments. PMID:26677440

  12. EAU guidelines on chronic pelvic pain.

    PubMed

    Fall, Magnus; Baranowski, Andrew P; Elneil, Sohier; Engeler, Daniel; Hughes, John; Messelink, Embert J; Oberpenning, Frank; de C Williams, Amanda C

    2010-01-01

    These guidelines were prepared on behalf of the European Association of Urology (EAU) to help urologists assess the evidence-based management of chronic pelvic pain (CPP) and to incorporate the recommendations into their clinical practice. To revise guidelines for the diagnosis, therapy, and follow-up of CPP patients. Guidelines were compiled by a working group and based on a systematic review of current literature using the PubMed database, with important papers reviewed for the 2003 EAU guidelines as a background. A panel of experts weighted the references. The full text of the guidelines is available through the EAU Central Office and the EAU Web site (www.uroweb.org). This article is a short version of the full guidelines text and summarises the main conclusions from the guidelines on the management of CPP. A guidelines text is presented including chapters on chronic prostate pain and bladder pain syndromes, urethral pain, scrotal pain, pelvic pain in gynaecologic practice, neurogenic dysfunctions, the role of the pelvic floor and pudendal nerve, psychological factors, general treatment of CPP, nerve blocks, and neuromodulation. These guidelines have been drawn up to provide support in the management of the large and difficult group of patients suffering from CPP.

  13. [Pelvic floor disorders from the surgeon's viewpoint].

    PubMed

    Schiedeck, T H

    2013-10-01

    Pelvic floor disorders present very differently with regard to symptoms and manifestation. Both diagnostic and treatment options require specific experience and an interdisciplinary approach. Diagnostic work-up is primarily based on medical history, physical examination and procto-rectoscopy. Furthermore, endosonography and perineal sonography have also gained importance. In almost all cases following these basic examinations conservative therapy options should be considered. As the interdisciplinary concept is very important, for careful diagnosis of pelvic floor disorders it became crucial to find an adequate form of treatment. Every decision for surgical therapy should not only focus on the results of previous examinations but should also consider the individual situation of each patient. In pelvic floor disorders a large variety of symptoms are confronted with a vast number of different and often highly specific procedures. The decisions on who to treat and how to treat are not only based on individual patient requests and desires but also on the experience and preference of the surgeon.

  14. Synthetic vaginal mesh for pelvic organ prolapse.

    PubMed

    Iglesia, Cheryl B

    2011-10-01

    The purpose of this review is to summarize recently published comparative trials on synthetic vaginal mesh versus traditional native tissue repairs for pelvic organ prolapse. Although studies suggest benefit from the use of synthetic vaginal mesh for anterior compartment prolapse, data are limited on the use of mesh for posterior and apical prolapse when compared with nati