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Sample records for postoperative pelvic radiation

  1. Pelvic radiation - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    Radiation of the pelvis - discharge; Cancer treatment - pelvic radiation; Prostate cancer - pelvic radiation; Ovarian cancer - pelvic radiation; Cervical cancer - pelvic radiation; Uterine cancer - pelvic radiation; Rectal cancer - ...

  2. Adjuvant postoperative pelvic radiation for carcinoma of the uterine cervix: pattern of cancer recurrence in patients undergoing elective radiation following radical hysterectomy and pelvic lymphadenectomy

    SciTech Connect

    Russell, A.H.; Tong, D.Y.; Figge, D.C.; Tamimi, H.K.; Greer, B.E.; Elder, S.J.

    1984-02-01

    Thirty-seven patients with invasive cervical cancer have been referred to the Department of Radiation Oncology at the University of Washington following radical hysterectomy and pelvic lymphadenectomy. Patients at high-risk for tumor recurrence were selected for adjuvant pelvic irradiation because of adverse risk factors identified on pathological study of the hysterectomy specimen. All patients were treated because of possible residual, microscopic carcinoma. Fourteen patients (38%) developed recurrent cancer, of whom 10 (27%) manifested initial failure within the irradiated volume. Possible explanations for this observation are discussed.

  3. Postoperative pelvic pain: An imaging approach.

    PubMed

    Farah, H; Laurent, N; Phalippou, J; Bazot, M; Giraudet, G; Serb, T; Poncelet, E

    2015-10-01

    Postoperative pelvic pain after gynecological surgery is a readily detected but unspecific sign of complication. Imaging as a complement to physical examination helps establish the etiological diagnosis. In the context of emergency surgery, vascular, urinary and digestive injuries constitute the most frequent intraoperative complications. During the follow-up of patients who had undergone pelvic surgery, imaging should be performed to detect recurrent disease, postoperative fibrosis, adhesions and more specific complications related to prosthetic material. Current guidelines recommend using pelvic ultrasonography as the first line imaging modality whereas the use of pelvic computed tomography and/or magnetic resonance imaging should be restricted to specific situations, depending on local availability of equipment and suspected disease.

  4. Dose–volume analysis of predictors for chronic gastrointestinal complications in patients with cervical cancer treated with postoperative concurrent chemotherapy and whole-pelvic radiation therapy

    PubMed Central

    Isohashi, Fumiaki; Mabuchi, Seiji; Akino, Yuichi; Yoshioka, Yasuo; Seo, Yuji; Suzuki, Osamu; Tamari, Keisuke; Yoshino, Kiyoshi; Sawada, Kenjiro; Ueda, Yutaka; Kobayashi, Eiji; Sumida, Iori; Mizuno, Hirokazu; Okubo, Hirofumi; Kimura, Tadashi; Ogawa, Kazuhiko

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate dose–volume histogram (DVH) predictors for the development of chronic gastrointestinal (GI) complications in patients with cervical cancer who have undergone postoperative concurrent chemotherapy and whole-pelvic radiation therapy (WPRT). The subjects were 135 patients who had undergone postoperative WPRT with concurrent nedaplatin-based chemotherapy between 2000 and 2014. Associations between selected DVH parameters and the incidence of chronic GI complications of G3 or higher were evaluated. Chronic GI complications of severity G3 occurred in 18 (13%) patients. Patients with GI complications had significantly greater V5–V45, mean dose and the generalized equivalent uniform dose (gEUD) of the small bowel loops, compared with those without GI complications. V30–V45, mean dose and gEUD of the bowel bag also showed significant differences between patients with and without GI complications. In contrast, no parameter for the large bowel loop was correlated with GI complications. Receiver operating characteristics curve analysis indicated that V30–V45 of the small bowel loops were better predictors than these respective parameters for the bowel bag. Next, patients were divided into four groups based on the median V15 and V40 of the small bowel loops. The group with both a high V15 and a high V40 showed a significantly higher probability of chronic GI complications. In conclusion, the small bowel loops are better predictors of chronic GI complications compared with the bowel bag, and a relatively high-dose volume (e.g. V40) of the small bowel loops is a useful predictor of chronic GI complications. PMID:27342839

  5. [A randomized study of intensity-modulated radiation therapy versus three dimensional conformal radiation therapy for pelvic radiation in patients of post-operative treatment with gynecologic malignant tumor].

    PubMed

    Ni, J; Yin, Z M; Yuan, S H; Liu, N F; Li, L; Xu, X X; Lou, H M

    2017-03-25

    Objective: To study the difference between intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and three dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT) for pelvic radiation of post-operative treatment with gynecologic malignant tumor. Methods: A prospective investigation study was conducted on 183 patients of post-operative patients with whole pelvic radiation therapy of cervical cancer or endometrial cancer in Zhejiang Cancer Hospital [IMRT group (n=85) and 3D-CRT group (n=98)] from Oct. 2015 to Oct. 2016. The two groups received same dose (45 Gy in 25 fractions). Comparison of two groups with radiation dosimetry:the score according to the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) acute radiation injury grading standards before and after radiotherapy reaction, the score from functional assessment of cancer therapy scale-cervix (FACT-Cx) scale and expanded prostate cancer index composite for clinical practice (EPIC-CP) scale were also analyzed. Results: (1) There were no significant effect with age, culture level, family economic condition and ratio of radiochemotherapy between two groups (all P>0.05). (2) Dosimetric comparison for IMRT vs 3D-CRT: the average dose of planning target volume (PTV) decreased (46.1±0.4) vs (46.4±0.5) Gy, V(45) dose percentage increased (95.2±1.0) % vs (93.3±2.0) %, intestinal bag dose of V(4)0 decreased (24.4±6.8) % vs (36.5±15.9) %, rectal V(40) dose percentage decreased (73.9±12.3) % vs (85.4±8.4) %, and lower rectal V(45) dose percentage (32.8±13.4) % vs (71.5±13.7) %, bladder V(40) dose percentage decreased (55.5±13.0) % vs (84.4±13.0) %. Bone marrow V(20) lower: (67.9±5.4) % vs (79.5±6.6) %, V(1)0 lower: (82.1±6.0) % vs (86.3±6.6) %; there were significant differences (all P<0.05). There was no significant difference between the dose of V(45) in the intestinal pouch and bladder (P>0.05). (3) Acute radiation injury classification for IMRT vs 3D-CRT: big or small intestine: Ⅱ-Ⅲ reaction [13% (11/85) vs 24% (24/98); χ(2

  6. A prospective trial of postoperative vaginal radium/cesium for grade 1-2 less than 50% myometrial invasion and pelvic radiation therapy for grade 3 or deep myometrial invasion in surgical stage I endometrial adenocarcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Piver, M.S.; Hempling, R.E. )

    1990-09-15

    A prospective trial was performed to evaluate the recurrence rate and 5-year disease-free survival rate in patients with surgical Stage I endometrial adenocarcinoma. Patients with Stage I, Grade 1 or 2 disease, less than 50% myometrial invasion, and no evidence of disease outside the corpus of the uterus were treated by hysterectomy and bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy and postoperative vaginal radium/cesium (Group 1). Patients with surgical Stage I, Grade 3 disease or deep myometrial invasion, and histologically negative paraaortic lymph nodes were treated with postoperative pelvic radiation therapy (5000-5040 cGY) (Group 2). Patients with malignant peritoneal cytologic findings also received progesterone therapy. Of the 92 Group 1 patients, there have been no recurrences and the 5-year estimated disease-free survival rate was 99%. Of the 41 Group 2 patients, there have been four (9.7%) recurrences but only one (2.4%) within the treated field (pelvis), and the 5-year estimated disease-free survival rate was 88%. Of the 133 patients, the 5-year estimated disease-free survival rate was 96%, and only one patient (0.7%) had a local pelvic recurrence. Of the 16 patients with malignant peritoneal cytologic findings who were treated with progesterone therapy, none has had a recurrence.

  7. Pelvic Radiation and Normal Tissue Toxicity.

    PubMed

    Nicholas, Sarah; Chen, Linda; Choflet, Amanda; Fader, Amanda; Guss, Zachary; Hazell, Sarah; Song, Daniel Y; Tran, Phuoc T; Viswanathan, Akila N

    2017-10-01

    Radiation is a component of treatment for many pelvic malignancies, most often originating in the gynecologic, gastrointestinal, and genitourinary systems. Therefore, the management of acute and long-term side effects is an important part of practice as a radiation oncologist, and limiting morbidity is a primary goal. Toxicities vary and are dependent on treatment techniques. Advances in radiation delivery, imaging, and knowledge of underlying biologic determinants of radiation-induced normal tissue toxicity can guide treatment of acute and long-term side effects from pelvic radiation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Postoperative Radiotherapy for the Treatment of Solitary Fibrous Tumor With Malignant Transformation of the Pelvic

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Chao; Zhang, Yong; Jing, Ming; Qu, Wei; Li, Jia; Zhao, Xiang-Rong; Yu, Yong-Hua

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Solitary fibrous tumor of the pelvic is an uncommon neoplasm with nonspecific symptoms. Reports of malignant transformation are especially rare. We report a case of solitary fibrous tumor in pelvic. A unique feature of our case compared with previously reported is that this patient relapsed with malignant transformation and had significant response to radiotherapy. The patient was initially treated with surgery, followed by postoperative dimensional conformal intensity modulated radiation therapy (dynamic MLC VRIAN 23EX Linac, inversely optimized by the Eclipse system) to provide a radical cure for residual tumor. In this case, there were no signs of recurrence after six and a half years of further follow-up, indicating that postoperation radiotherapy may be an effective treatment for SFT with malignant transformation in pelvic. PMID:26765426

  9. Morbidity and survival patterns in patients after radical hysterectomy and postoperative adjuvant pelvic radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Fiorica, J.V.; Roberts, W.S.; Greenberg, H.; Hoffman, M.S.; LaPolla, J.P.; Cavanagh, D. )

    1990-03-01

    Morbidity and survival patterns were reviewed in 50 patients who underwent radical hysterectomy, pelvic lymphadenectomy, and adjuvant postoperative pelvic radiotherapy for invasive cervical cancer. Ninety percent of the patients were FIGO stage IB, and 10% were clinical stage IIA or IIB. Indications for adjuvant radiotherapy included pelvic lymph node metastasis, large volume, deep stromal penetration, lower uterine segment involvement, or capillary space involvement. Seventy-two percent of the patients had multiple high-risk factors. An average of 4700 cGy of whole-pelvis radiotherapy was administered. Ten percent of the patients suffered major gastrointestinal complications, 14% minor gastrointestinal morbidity, 12% minor genitourinary complications, one patient a lymphocyst, and one patient lymphedema. Of the five patients with major gastrointestinal morbidity, all occurred within 12 months of treatment. Three patients required intestinal bypass surgery for distal ileal obstructions and all are currently doing well and free of disease. All of the patients who developed recurrent disease had multiple, high-risk factors. The median time of recurrence was 12 months. All patients recurred within the radiated field. Actuarial survival was 90% and disease-free survival 87% at 70 months. It is our opinion that the morbidity of postoperative pelvic radiotherapy is acceptable, and benefit may be gained in such a high-risk patient population.

  10. Laparoscopic pelvic mesh placement with closure of pelvic floor entrance to prevent small intestine radiation trauma - A retrospective cohort analysis.

    PubMed

    Bachmann, R; Heinzelmann, F; Müller, A C; Ladurner, R; Schneider, C C; Königsrainer, A; Zdichavsky, M

    2015-11-01

    In most pelvic malignancies radiation therapy is a main part of the treatment concept. The main dose limiting organ is the small intestine. Different mechanical methods to prevent radiation damage to the small intestine have been described. We herein report a retrospective study of laparoscopic placement of an absorbable vicryl mesh in patients requiring pelvic radiotherapy displacing the bowel out of the radiation field. The study included 6 consecutive patients requiring definitive radiotherapy due to locally advanced prostate cancer. All patients had small intestine within the radiation fields despite the use of non-invasive displacement methods. All patients underwent laparoscopic small bowel displacement from the pelvis and closure of the pelvic floor entrance using vicryl mesh placement. Peri- or postoperative complications were not seen. Postoperative radiotherapy planning CT scans confirmed displacement of the small intestine allowing all patients to receive the planned radiotherapy volume. Laparoscopic mesh placement represents a safe and efficient procedure in patients requiring high-dose pelvic radiation, presenting with unacceptable small intestine volume in the radiation field. As an alternate to native tissue, the vicryl mesh is a safe, effective substitute for small bowel exclusion from external-beam radiation therapy. Copyright © 2015 IJS Publishing Group Limited. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Pelvic radiation disease: Updates on treatment options

    PubMed Central

    Frazzoni, Leonardo; La Marca, Marina; Guido, Alessandra; Morganti, Alessio Giuseppe; Bazzoli, Franco; Fuccio, Lorenzo

    2015-01-01

    Pelvic cancers are among the most frequently diagnosed neoplasms and radiotherapy represents one of the main treatment options. The irradiation field usually encompasses healthy intestinal tissue, especially of distal large bowel, thus inducing gastrointestinal (GI) radiation-induced toxicity. Indeed, up to half of radiation-treated patients say that their quality of life is affected by GI symptoms (e.g., rectal bleeding, diarrhoea). The constellation of GI symptoms - from transient to long-term, from mild to very severe - experienced by patients who underwent radiation treatment for a pelvic tumor have been comprised in the definition of pelvic radiation disease (PRD). A correct and evidence-based therapeutic approach of patients experiencing GI radiation-induced toxicity is mandatory. Therapeutic non-surgical strategies for PRD can be summarized in two broad categories, i.e., medical and endoscopic. Of note, most of the studies have investigated the management of radiation-induced rectal bleeding. Patients with clinically significant bleeding (i.e., causing chronic anemia) should firstly be considered for medical management (i.e., sucralfate enemas, metronidazole and hyperbaric oxygen); in case of failure, endoscopic treatment should be implemented. This latter should be considered the first choice in case of acute, transfusion requiring, bleeding. More well-performed, high quality studies should be performed, especially the role of medical treatments should be better investigated as well as the comparative studies between endoscopic and hyperbaric oxygen treatments. PMID:26677440

  12. Pelvic radiation therapy: Between delight and disaster

    PubMed Central

    Morris, Kirsten AL; Haboubi, Najib Y

    2015-01-01

    In the last few decades radiotherapy was established as one of the best and most widely used treatment modalities for certain tumours. Unfortunately that came with a price. As more people with cancer survive longer an ever increasing number of patients are living with the complications of radiotherapy and have become, in certain cases, difficult to manage. Pelvic radiation disease (PRD) can result from ionising radiation-induced damage to surrounding non-cancerous tissues resulting in disruption of normal physiological functions and symptoms such as diarrhoea, tenesmus, incontinence and rectal bleeding. The burden of PRD-related symptoms, which impact on a patient’s quality of life, has been under appreciated and sub-optimally managed. This article serves to promote awareness of PRD and the vast potential there is to improve current service provision and research activities. PMID:26649150

  13. Pouchitis Associated With Pelvic Radiation for Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kulkarni, Geeta; Liu, Xiuli

    2016-01-01

    Radiation therapy is a viable option in managing potentially life-threatening malignancies including prostate cancer. It is known that pelvic radiation can result in injury of the distal large bowel with the development of radiation proctitis. Despite reports from retrospective studies, there is a lack of direct endoscopic and histologic evidence of external pelvic radiation injury to the ileal pouch-anal anastomosis. We present a case of a 68-year-old male with pouchitis resulting from pelvic radiation for prostate cancer. PMID:27807581

  14. A novel conformal arc technique for postoperative whole pelvic radiotherapy for endometrial cancer.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ruijie; Jiang, Weijuan; Wang, Junjie

    2009-12-01

    Conventional whole pelvic radiotherapy (WPRT) with 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) exposes most of the contents of the true pelvis to the prescribed dose. Intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) provides more conformal dose distribution and better sparing of critical structures for WPRT. However, IMRT is more complicated in planning and delivery, requiring more expensive equipment and time-consuming quality assurance. We explore and evaluate a novel conformal arc radiotherapeutic technique for postoperative WPRT for endometrial cancer in this study. This technique involves 2-axis conformal arc therapy (2A-CAT) with 180-degree rotation around 2 isocenters each in 2 separate dose-shaping structures. Dosimetric comparison with 3D-CRT and IMRT for 10 endometrial cancer patients undergoing postoperative WPRT was performed to evaluate this new 2A-CAT technique. The mean conformity indices were 0.83, 0.61, and 0.88 for 2A-CAT, 3D-CRT, and IMRT, respectively. The mean homogeneity indices were 1.15, 1.08, and 1.10. The mean doses to bowel, rectum, bladder, and pelvic bone marrow were, respectively, 1.19, 3.39, 4.65, and 1.64 Gy lower with 2A-CAT than with 3D-CRT (P < 0.05), whereas a little higher than with IMRT. The mean dose to normal tissue was 1.87 Gy higher with 2A-CAT than with IMRT (P = 0.00). In postoperative WPRT for endometrial cancer, 2A-CAT significantly improves the dose conformity and sparing of bowel, rectum, and bladder compared with 3D-CRT. Despite dose uniformity and conformity being still inferior to those of IMRT, its simplicity and extensive availability combined with further improvement warrant it as a potential shortcut alternative to IMRT.

  15. Pelvic reconstruction with pedicled thigh flaps: indications, surgical techniques, and postoperative imaging.

    PubMed

    Sagebiel, Tara L; Faria, Silvana C; Balachandran, Aparna; Butler, Charles E; Garvey, Patrick B; Bhosale, Priya R

    2014-03-01

    This article will describe and illustrate the relevant anatomy and surgical techniques used in pelvic reconstruction using regional pedicled thigh flaps, which is often necessary in oncologic surgeries. Examples of normal postoperative imaging and common complications that can accompany pelvic reconstruction with anterolateral, gracilis myocutaneous, and posterior thigh fasciocutaneous flaps will be provided. Pelvic reconstruction using regional pedicled thigh flaps is often needed with extirpative oncologic surgeries to eliminate dead space, provide pelvic organ support, restore form and function, and introduce vascularized tissue to promote wound healing. Radiologists need to be aware of the normal postoperative appearance of these flaps so that the flaps are not mistaken for residual or recurrent disease and so that residual or recurrent disease can be identified and treated.

  16. Morbidity and mortality following preoperative radiation therapy and total pelvic exenteration for primary rectal adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Luna-Perez, P; Rodriguez, D F; Flores, D; Delgado, S; Labastida, S

    1995-01-01

    Pelvic exenteration, the standard treatment for patients with locally advanced rectal adenocarcinoma infiltrating neighbouring pelvic visceras, carried a significant morbidity and mortality rate. The aim of this study was to determine the morbidity and mortality rates in a group of patients who were treated with preoperative radiation therapy and total pelvic exenteration. Between January 1980 and January 1995, we treated 18 patients. Pretreatment staging was determined by clinical examination and computed tomography (CT) scan of the abdomen and pelvis. Each patient received preoperative radiation therapy of 45 Gy in 20 fractions delivered to the whole pelvis; approximately 6 weeks later total pelvic exenteration was performed. There were 17 males and 1 female, with a median age of 59 years. All patients underwent and completed the scheduled radiation therapy treatment. The main complaints related to radiotherapy were transient skin erythema in five patients and diarrhoea in four. Blood loss (estimated by the surgeon) ranged from 1000 ml to 4200 ml, with a mean loss of 2020 ml. Eight patients (44%) developed major complications: anastomatic leak from the uretero-intestinal suture line (n = 1); perineal wound infection (n = 2); abnormal wall infection (n = 1); haemorrhage from the right internal iliac vein (n = 1) and pneumonia (n = 1). Three patients required surgical reintervention for immediate postoperative haemorrhage from the sacral venous plexus (n = 1), small bowel obstruction (n = 1), and intra-abdominal and pelvic abscess (n = 1). There were two postoperative deaths (11%). The mean and median follow-up was 41 and 32 months, respectively. Two patients (12%) developed local recurrence at 5 and 8 months, and six developed distant recurrences (37%). The overall 5-year survival rate was 61%. Our treatment approach was associated with high morbidity and mortality rates, but was similar to previously published series based on total pelvic exenteration without

  17. Postoperative radiation and implant capsule contraction

    SciTech Connect

    Caffee, H.H.; Mendenhall, N.P.; Mendenhall, W.M.; Bova, F.J.

    1988-01-01

    Occasionally radiation is required as adjunctive therapy following mastectomy for breast cancer. The effects of radiation on a developing implant capsule are unknown, but they are very important in relation to the increased use of immediate reconstruction. Experiments were performed on rabbits to study the effects of postoperative radiation therapy on capsule contraction and thickness. The results of these experiments suggest that radiation has no effect on implant capsules.

  18. Quality assurance of multifractionated pelvic interstitial brachytherapy for postoperative recurrences of cervical cancers: a prospective study.

    PubMed

    Shukla, Pragya; Chopra, Supriya; Engineer, Reena; Mahantshetty, Umesh; Paul, Siji Nojin; Phurailatpam, Reena; SV, Jamema; Shrivastava, Shyam K

    2012-03-15

    To evaluate three-dimensional needle displacements during multifractionated interstitial brachytherapy (BT) for cervical cancers. Patients scheduled to undergo pelvic interstitial BT for postoperative and or postradiation vault recurrences were included from November 2009 to December 2010. All procedures were performed under spinal anesthesia. Postprocedure BT planning CT scans were obtained with patients in supine position with arms on the chest (interslice thickness of 3 mm). Thereafter, verification CT was repeated at every alternate fraction. Needle displacements were measured in reference to a relocatable bony point. The mean cranial, caudal, anteroposterior, and mediolateral displacements were recorded. Statistical significance of mean interfraction displacements was evaluated with Wilcoxon Test. Twenty patients were included. Seventeen received boost BT (20 Gy/5 fractions/3 days) after external radiation, three received radical BT alone (36 Gy/9 fractions/5-8 days). An average of three scans (range, 2-3) were available per patient, and 357 needle displacements were analyzed. For the entire study cohort, the average of mean needle displacement was 2.5 mm (range, 0-7.4), 17.4 mm (range, 0-27.9), 1.7 mm (range, 0-6.7), 2.1 mm (range, 0-9.5), 1.7 mm (range, 0-9.3), and 0.6 mm (range, 0-7.8) in cranial, caudal, anterior, posterior, right, and left directions, respectively. The mean displacement in the caudal direction was higher between Days 1 and 2 than that between Days 2 and 3 (13.4 mm vs. 3.8 mm; p = 0.01). The average caudal displacements were no different between reirradiation and boost cohort (15.2 vs. 17.8 mm). Clinically significant caudal displacements occur during multifractionated pelvic brachytherapy. Optimal margins need to be incorporated while preplanning brachytherapy to account for interfraction displacements. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Quality Assurance of Multifractionated Pelvic Interstitial Brachytherapy for Postoperative Recurrences of Cervical Cancers: A Prospective Study

    SciTech Connect

    Shukla, Pragya; Chopra, Supriya; Engineer, Reena; Mahantshetty, Umesh; Paul, Siji Nojin; Phurailatpam, Reena; SV, Jamema; Shrivastava, Shyam K.

    2012-03-15

    Purpose: To evaluate three-dimensional needle displacements during multifractionated interstitial brachytherapy (BT) for cervical cancers. Methods and Materials: Patients scheduled to undergo pelvic interstitial BT for postoperative and or postradiation vault recurrences were included from November 2009 to December 2010. All procedures were performed under spinal anesthesia. Postprocedure BT planning CT scans were obtained with patients in supine position with arms on the chest (interslice thickness of 3 mm). Thereafter, verification CT was repeated at every alternate fraction. Needle displacements were measured in reference to a relocatable bony point. The mean cranial, caudal, anteroposterior, and mediolateral displacements were recorded. Statistical significance of mean interfraction displacements was evaluated with Wilcoxon Test. Results: Twenty patients were included. Seventeen received boost BT (20 Gy/5 fractions/3 days) after external radiation, three received radical BT alone (36 Gy/9 fractions/5-8 days). An average of three scans (range, 2-3) were available per patient, and 357 needle displacements were analyzed. For the entire study cohort, the average of mean needle displacement was 2.5 mm (range, 0-7.4), 17.4 mm (range, 0-27.9), 1.7 mm (range, 0-6.7), 2.1 mm (range, 0-9.5), 1.7 mm (range, 0-9.3), and 0.6 mm (range, 0-7.8) in cranial, caudal, anterior, posterior, right, and left directions, respectively. The mean displacement in the caudal direction was higher between Days 1 and 2 than that between Days 2 and 3 (13.4 mm vs. 3.8 mm; p = 0.01). The average caudal displacements were no different between reirradiation and boost cohort (15.2 vs. 17.8 mm). Conclusions: Clinically significant caudal displacements occur during multifractionated pelvic brachytherapy. Optimal margins need to be incorporated while preplanning brachytherapy to account for interfraction displacements.

  20. Transmission block to simplify combined pelvic and inguinal radiation therapy.

    PubMed

    Kalnicki, S; Zide, A; Maleki, N; DeWyngaert, J K; Lipsztein, R; Dalton, J F; Bloomer, W D

    1987-08-01

    A homogeneous dose distribution of radiation to inguinal lymph nodes and deep pelvic structures can be achieved with use of a transmission block over the central portion of a large anterior pelvic-inguinal portal, together with a smaller posterior field. This relatively simple technique permits individualization of isodose distributions and eliminates the problems of matching abutting portals. Reproducibility of daily setup and optimization of machine utilization are both improved.

  1. Postoperative pelvic intensity-modulated radiotherapy in high risk endometrial cancer.

    PubMed

    Shih, Karin K; Milgrom, Sarah A; Abu-Rustum, Nadeem R; Kollmeier, Marisa A; Gardner, Ginger J; Tew, William P; Barakat, Richard R; Alektiar, Kaled M

    2013-03-01

    According to national surveys, the use of intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) in gynecologic cancers is on the rise, yet there is still some reluctance to adopt adjuvant IMRT as standard practice. The purpose of this study is to report a single-institution experience using postoperative pelvic IMRT with or without chemotherapy in high-risk endometrial cancer. From 11/2004 to 12/2009, 46 patients underwent hysterectomy/bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy for stage I-III (22% stage I/II and 78% stage III) endometrial cancer. Median IMRT dose was 50.4Gy. Adjuvant chemotherapy was given to 30 (65%) patients. With a median follow-up of 52months, 4 patients recurred: 1 vaginal plus lung metastasis, 2 isolated para-aortic recurrences, and 1 lungs and liver metastasis. Five-year relapse rate was 9% (95% CI, 0-13.6%). Five-year disease-free survival (DFS) was 88% (95% CI, 77-98%) and overall survival (OS) was 97% (95% CI, 90-100%). There were 2 patients with non-hematological grade 3 toxicity: 1 (2%) acute and 1 (2%) chronic gastrointestinal toxicity. In patients treated with IMRT and chemotherapy (n=30), 5 had grade 3 leukopenia, 8 grade 2 anemia, and 2 grade 2 thrombocytopenia. Oncologic outcomes with postoperative IMRT were very good, with DFS and OS rates of >88% at median follow-up of 52months, despite a preponderance (78%) of stage III disease. Toxicity was minimal even in the setting of an aggressive trimodality (65% of patients) approach. Data from this study and emerging data from RTOG trial 0418 demonstrate the advantages of IMRT in high-risk endometrial cancer. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Enteric morbidity of postoperative pelvic external beam and brachytherapy for uterine cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Potish, R.A.; Dusenbery, K.E. )

    1990-05-01

    From 1970 through 1986, 219 women received postoperative pelvic external beam therapy and vaginal radium or cesium for uterine cancer. Prescribed external beam and total vaginal surface doses ranged from 38 to 51 Gy and from 70 to 119 Gy, respectively. Severe enteric morbidity developed in 7.8% of patients (15 small bowel, 1 sigmoid, 1 rectal). Complications occurred more frequently in patients with pelvic lymph node sampling at hysterectomy, abdominal surgery prior to hysterectomy, and low body weight. Logistic analysis demonstrated no significant effect of pelvic external beam dose, vaginal surface boost dose, or milligram hours. Five and 10-year overall survival rates were 85% and 74%, respectively. There were two proximal and one distal vaginal recurrences. Recommendations for avoiding complications are presented.

  3. Postoperative radiotherapy for prostate cancer : Morbidity of local-only or local-plus-pelvic radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Waldstein, Cora; Dörr, Wolfgang; Pötter, Richard; Widder, Joachim; Goldner, Gregor

    2017-09-19

    The aim of this work was to characterise actuarial incidence and prevalence of early and late side effects of local versus pelvic three-dimensional conformal postoperative radiotherapy for prostate cancer. Based on a risk-adapted protocol, 575 patients received either local (n = 447) or local-plus-pelvic (n = 128) radiotherapy. Gastrointestinal (GI) and genitourinary (GU) side effects (≥grade 2 RTOG/EORTC criteria) were prospectively assessed. Maximum morbidity, actuarial incidence rate, and prevalence rates were compared between the two groups. For local radiotherapy, median follow-up was 68 months, and the mean dose was 66.7 Gy. In pelvic radiotherapy, the median follow-up was 49 months, and the mean local and pelvic doses were 66.9 and 48.3 Gy respectively. Early GI side effects ≥ G2 were detected in 26% and 42% of patients respectively (p < 0.001). Late GI adverse events were detected in 14% in both groups (p = 0.77). The 5‑year actuarial incidence rates were 14% and 14%, while the prevalence rates were 2% and 0% respectively. Early GU ≥ G2 side effects were detected in 15% and 16% (p = 0.96), while late GU morbidity was detected in 18% and 24% (p = 0.001). The 5‑year actuarial incidence rates were 16% and 35% (p = 0.001), while the respective prevalence rates were 6% and 8%. Despite the low prevalence of side effects, postoperative pelvic radiotherapy results in significant increases in the actuarial incidence of early GI and late GU morbidity using a conventional 4‑field box radiotherapy technique. Advanced treatment techniques like intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) or volumetric modulated arc radiotherapy (VMAT) should therefore be considered in pelvic radiotherapy to potentially reduce these side effects.

  4. Postoperative Imaging after Surgical Repair for Pelvic Floor Dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Khatri, Gaurav; Carmel, Maude E; Bailey, April A; Foreman, Melissa R; Brewington, Cecelia C; Zimmern, Philippe E; Pedrosa, Ivan

    2016-01-01

    Pelvic floor dysfunction encompasses an extremely common set of conditions, with various surgical and nonsurgical treatment options. Surgical options include injection of urethral bulking agents, native tissue repair with or without bioabsorbable or synthetic graft material, placement of synthetic midurethral slings or use of vaginal mesh kits, and mesh sacrocolpopexy procedures. Numerous different synthetic products with varied imaging appearances exist, and some of these products may be difficult to identify at imaging. Patients often present with recurrent or new symptoms after surgery; and depending on the presenting complaint and the nature of the initial intervention, imaging with ultrasonography (US), magnetic resonance (MR) imaging, voiding cystourethrography, or computed tomography (CT) may be indicated. US and MR imaging can both be used to image urethral bulking agents; US is often used to follow potential changes in bulking agent volume with time. Compared with MR imaging, US depicts midurethral slings better in the urethrovaginal space, and MR imaging is better than US for depiction of the arms in the retropubic space and obturator foramen. Mesh along the vaginal wall may be depicted with both US and MR imaging; however, the distal arms of the mesh traversing the sacrospinous ligaments or within the ischiorectal fossae (ischioanal fossae) are better depicted with MR imaging. Scarring can mimic slings and mesh at both US and MR imaging. MR imaging is superior to US for depiction of sacrocolpopexy mesh and associated complications. Voiding cystourethrography and CT are used less commonly because they rarely allow direct depiction of implanted material. Online supplemental material is available for this article. (©)RSNA, 2016.

  5. Postoperative abdominopelvic radiation therapy for ovarian cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Goldberg, N.; Peschel, R.E.

    1988-03-01

    From 1963 through 1984, 74 patients with Stage I, II, or III epithelial ovarian cancer who completed a total hysterectomy and debulking procedure and had less than 2 cm residual disease were treated with whole abdominal and pelvic boost radiation therapy (WAP) at Yale-New Haven Hospital. WAP consisted of a whole abdominal dose of 1750 to 2500 cGy (at 100-160 cGy per fraction) and a total pelvic dose of 4000-4600 cGy. Based on stage, amount of residual disease, pathologic type, and grade of tumor, the 74 patients were classified into a favorable group (FG) and an unfavorable group (UG) using the classification scheme developed at the Princess Margaret Hospital (PMH). The actuarial survival at 10 years for the FG patients was 77% (+/- 10%, 95% confidence limits) and for the UG patients was only 7% (+/- 13%). Local control of disease in the abdomen and pelvis was 87% in the FG and only 36% in the UG. Severe long-term complications occurred in 7% of the patients and consisted of small bowel obstruction. Our results strongly indicate that the PMH classification of FG and UG is useful in our patient population in determining which subgroup of patients should be offered WAP.

  6. Inflammatory bowel diseases activity in patients undergoing pelvic radiation therapy

    PubMed Central

    Seisen, Thomas; Klotz, Caroline; Mazeron, Renaud; Maroun, Pierre; Petit, Claire; Deutsch, Eric; Bossi, Alberto; Haie-Meder, Christine; Chargari, Cyrus; Blanchard, Pierre

    2017-01-01

    Background Few studies with contradictory results have been published on the safety of pelvic radiation therapy (RT) in patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Methods From 1989 to 2015, a single center retrospective analysis was performed including all IBD patients who received pelvic external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) or brachytherapy (BT) for a pelvic malignancy. Treatment characteristics, IBD activity and gastrointestinal (GI) toxicity were examined. Results Overall, 28 patients with Crohn’s disease (CD) (n=13) or ulcerative colitis (n=15) were included in the present study. Median follow-up time after irradiation was 5.9 years. Regarding IBD activity, only one and two patients experienced a severe episode within and after 6 months of follow-up, respectively. Grade 3/4 acute GI toxicity occurred in 3 (11%) patients, whereas one (3.6%) patient experienced late grade 3/4 GI toxicity. Only patients with rectal IBD location (P=0.016) or low body mass index (BMI) (P=0.012) experienced more severe IBD activity within or after 6 months following RT, respectively. Conclusions We report an acceptable tolerance of RT in IBD patients with pelvic malignancies. Specifically, a low risk of uncontrolled flare-up was observed. PMID:28280621

  7. Decreasing postoperative narcotics in reconstructive pelvic surgery: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Reagan, Krista M L; O'Sullivan, David M; Gannon, Richard; Steinberg, Adam C

    2017-09-01

    Postoperative pain control is crucial to any successful recovery plan. Many currently used medication regimens are narcotic-focused. The objective of our study was to evaluate the efficacy of a multimodal pain regimen after pelvic reconstructive surgery. The primary outcome measure was narcotic use. Secondary outcomes included pain, nausea, and constipation. Patients were randomized to either usual care postoperative treatment or multimodal pain regimen. Usual care included no specific preoperative or intraoperative medications, and postoperative narcotics with ibuprofen. Multimodal pain regimen included preoperative and postoperative celecoxib, gabapentin, intraoperative and postoperative intravenous and oral acetaminophen and ibuprofen, and narcotics as needed. All narcotics were converted to milligram equivalents of oral morphine for standardization according to Centers for Disease Control and Prevention guidelines where conversion factors for oral hydrocodone = 1, oral oxycodone = 1.5, and oral hydromorphone = 4. Patients were given the validated Brief Pain Inventory survey preoperatively (baseline), at postoperative day 1, and 1 week postoperatively. At 1 week, bowel function and narcotics usage was assessed. Seventy patients were randomized to the usual care arm and 68 to the multimodal pain regimen arm. Patients in the multimodal pain regimen arm used significantly fewer intravenous narcotics in the operating room (90.7 ± 39.1 mg vs 104.6 ± 33.5 mg; P = .026) and while in the hospital (10.8 ± 15.1 mg vs 31.2 ± 29.6 mg; P < .001) and were more likely to use 0 oral narcotics after discharge to home (34.8% of patients vs 10.6%; P = .001). Of the patients who did use oral narcotics after discharge to home, there was no difference in amount used between groups (121.3 ± 103.7 mg in the multimodal pain regimen arm vs 153.0 ± 113.8 mg in the usual care arm; P = .139). Total narcotic usage (operating room + hospital + home) was significantly less in

  8. Postoperative levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine system for pelvic endometriosis-related pain: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Tanmahasamut, Prasong; Rattanachaiyanont, Manee; Angsuwathana, Surasak; Techatraisak, Kitirat; Indhavivadhana, Suchada; Leerasiri, Pichai

    2012-03-01

    To estimate the effectiveness of a postoperative levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine system for relieving pelvic pain in patients with endometriosis. A double-blind randomized controlled trial was conducted in 55 patients with endometriosis and moderate-to-severe dysmenorrhea (visual analog scale, greater than 50 mm) undergoing laparoscopic conservative surgery. After surgery, patients were randomized to a levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine system (n=28) or expectant management (n=27) group. Primary outcome was the change of dysmenorrhea visual analog scale. Secondary outcomes included changes of pelvic pain and dyspareunia visual analog scale, Short Form-36 score, and adverse effects. The two groups were comparable in age, body mass index, parity, and baseline pain scores. At 12 months, the levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine system group had a significantly lower median value of dysmenorrhea and noncyclic pelvic pain score. Compared with the control group, the levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine system group had greater reduction in dysmenorrhea visual analog scale (-81.0 compared with -50.0 mm, P=.006) and pelvic pain visual analog scale (-48.5 compared with -22.0 mm, P=.038) but a comparable reduction in dyspareunia visual analog scale (-15.0 compared with -19.0 mm, P=.831). Two patients in levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine system group (7.4%) and nine in the expectant management group (39.1%) had recurrent dysmenorrhea within 1 year postoperatively (P=.014). Number-needed-to-treat to prevent one case with recurrent dysmenorrhea within the first year was three cases. The Short Form-36 scores improved in the levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine system group but did not change in the expectant management group. There was no serious adverse event during the study period. The levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine system is effective and well accepted for long-term therapy after conservative surgery for patients with moderate to severe pain related to

  9. [Postoperative radiation therapy in lung carcinom].

    PubMed

    Bouchaab, H; Peters, S; Ozsahin, M; Peguret, N; Gonzales, M; Lovis, A

    2014-05-21

    Locally advanced non-small-cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC) is a very heterogeous disease, the role of postoperative radiation therapy (PORT) in pN2 patients with completly resected NSCLC remains controversial. Although an improvment in local control has been described in several studies, the effect on survival has been contradictory or inconclusive. Retrospective evaluation suggest a positive effect of PORT in high risk patients with pN2 disease: RI-resected NSCLC, bulky and multilevel N2. However further evaluation of PORT in prospectively randomized studies in completely resected pN2 NSCLC is needed.

  10. [Influence of postoperative pelvic floor function on different surgical procedures of hysterectomy].

    PubMed

    Tan, A L; Hong, L; Zhao, Y Z; Jiang, L

    2017-05-25

    Objective: To compare the influence of postoperative pelvic floor function after different surgical procedures of hysterectomy. Methods: A total of 260 patients who underwent hysterectomy in Renmin hospital of Wuhan University from January 2012 to January 2014 were enrolled in the study, and divided into 5 groups by different surgical procedures, which were total abdominal hysterectomy (A-TH; 46 cases), total laparoscopic hysterectomy (L-TH; 59 cases), total vaginal hysterectomy (V-TH; 42 cases), abdominal intrafascial hysterectomy (A-CISH; 78 cases), laparoscopic intrafascial hysterectomy (L-CISH; 35 cases). Pelvic examination, pelvic organ prolapse quantitation (POP-Q), test of pelvic muscle strength, pelvic floor distress inventory-short form 20 (PFDI-20) and the female sexual function index (FSFI) questionnaire were measured after 6 months and 12 months. Results: The differences of pelvic organ prolapse incidence after 6 months, A-TH and A-CISH [7% (3/46) versus 3% (2/78)], A-TH and L-CISH [7% (3/46) versus 3% (1/35)] were statistically significance (all P<0.05).POP-Q grade after 6 months between A-TH and A-CISH was statistically different in degree (P<0.05). The differences of incidence of abnormal pelvic floor muscle fatigue after 6 months of A-TH and A-CISH [59% (27/46) versus 29% (23/78)], A-TH and L-CISH [59% (27/46) versus 26% (9/35)] were statistically significant (all P<0.05), after 12 months the difference of L-TH and A-CISH [61% (36/59) versus 29%(23/78)] was statistically different (P<0.05). The differences of incidence of abnormal pelvic floor muscle strength after 6 months of L-TH and A-CISH [53% (31/59) verus 24% (19/78)], V-TH and A-CISH [60% (25/42) verus 24% (19/78)], V-TH and L-CISH [60% (25/42) verus 23% (8/35)] were statistically significant (all P<0.05); after 12 months the difference of V-TH and A-CISH [57% (24/42) versus 26%(20/78)] was statistically significant (P<0.05). Stress urinary incontinence, abnormal bowel movements after 6

  11. Vaginal versus robotic hysterectomy and concomitant pelvic support surgery: a comparison of postoperative vaginal length and sexual function.

    PubMed

    De La Cruz, Jacquia F; Myers, Erinn M; Geller, Elizabeth J

    2014-01-01

    To compare the change from pre- to postoperative total vaginal length (TVL) in women who underwent either a total vaginal hysterectomy (TVH) with uterosacral ligament suspension (USLS) or a robotic hysterectomy (RH) with colpopexy (SCP). Secondary objectives included comparing sexual function, pelvic floor function, and prolapse recurrence between routes of surgery. This was a retrospective cohort study (Canadian Task Force classification II-2). This was conducted at 1 tertiary academic medical center over a 2-year period. Women who underwent either TVH/USLS or RH/SCP. Baseline and postoperative POP-Q Pelvic Organ Prolapse Quantification exams were recorded as well as postoperative validated questionnaires. Twenty-nine subjects were needed in each group to detect a 1.5-cm difference in TVL. There were 38 TVH/USLS and 46 RH/SCP participants. RHs were either total (28/46 [61%]) or supracervical (18/46 [39%]). The mean postoperative follow-up was 9.5 ± 3.1 months. For the primary outcome, women in the TVH/USLS group had a decrease in TVL, whereas women in the RH/SCP group had an increase in TVL (-0.6 ± 1.0 cm vs 0.5 ± 0.8 cm, p < .001). Among sexually active women (55/84, 65.5%), there was no difference in postoperative sexual function between groups based on Pelvic Organ Prolapse/Urinary incontinence Sexual Function Questionnaire short form scores, with good sexual function in both groups (32.6 ± 6.2 TVH/USLS vs 35.1 ± 7.3 RH/SCP, p = .22). Although both groups showed good postoperative apical support, the TVH/USLS group had a slightly lower mean C point compared with the RH/SCP group (-6.8 ± 1.2 vs -7.7 ± 1.8, p = .02). Both groups showed good postoperative pelvic floor function, with no difference in mean postoperative Pelvic Organ Prolapse Distress Inventory scores (42.2 ± 45.4 vs 52.7 ± 46.6, p = .44). Recurrent prolapse (defined as any prolapse at or beyond the hymen) was not different between groups (13.2% for TVH/USLS vs 6.5% for RH/SCP, p = .46

  12. Clinical outcomes of intensity-modulated pelvic radiation therapy for carcinoma of the cervix.

    PubMed

    Hasselle, Michael D; Rose, Brent S; Kochanski, Joel D; Nath, Sameer K; Bafana, Rounak; Yashar, Catheryn M; Hasan, Yasmin; Roeske, John C; Mundt, Arno J; Mell, Loren K

    2011-08-01

    To evaluate disease outcomes and toxicity in cervical cancer patients treated with pelvic intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). We included all patients with Stage I-IVA cervical carcinoma treated with IMRT at three different institutions from 2000-2007. Patients treated with extended field or conventional techniques were excluded. Intensity-modulated radiation therapy plans were designed to deliver 45 Gy in 1.8-Gy daily fractions to the planning target volume while minimizing dose to the bowel, bladder, and rectum. Toxicity was graded according to the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group system. Overall survival and disease-free survival were estimated by use of the Kaplan-Meier method. Pelvic failure, distant failure, and late toxicity were estimated by use of cumulative incidence functions. The study included 111 patients. Of these, 22 were treated with postoperative IMRT, 8 with IMRT followed by intracavitary brachytherapy and adjuvant hysterectomy, and 81 with IMRT followed by planned intracavitary brachytherapy. Of the patients, 63 had Stage I-IIA disease and 48 had Stage IIB-IVA disease. The median follow-up time was 27 months. The 3-year overall survival rate and the disease-free survival rate were 78% (95% confidence interval [CI], 68-88%) and 69% (95% CI, 59-81%), respectively. The 3-year pelvic failure rate and the distant failure rate were 14% (95% CI, 6-22%) and 17% (95% CI, 8-25%), respectively. Estimates of acute and late Grade 3 toxicity or higher were 2% (95% CI, 0-7%) and 7% (95% CI, 2-13%), respectively. Intensity-modulated radiation therapy is associated with low toxicity and favorable outcomes, supporting its safety and efficacy for cervical cancer. Prospective clinical trials are needed to evaluate the comparative efficacy of IMRT vs. conventional techniques. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Clinical Outcomes of Intensity-Modulated Pelvic Radiation Therapy for Carcinoma of the Cervix

    SciTech Connect

    Hasselle, Michael D.; Rose, Brent S.; Kochanski, Joel D.; Nath, Sameer K.; Bafana, Rounak; Yashar, Catheryn M.; Hasan, Yasmin; Roeske, John C.; Mundt, Arno J.; Mell, Loren K.

    2011-08-01

    Purpose: To evaluate disease outcomes and toxicity in cervical cancer patients treated with pelvic intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). Methods and Materials: We included all patients with Stage I-IVA cervical carcinoma treated with IMRT at three different institutions from 2000-2007. Patients treated with extended field or conventional techniques were excluded. Intensity-modulated radiation therapy plans were designed to deliver 45 Gy in 1.8-Gy daily fractions to the planning target volume while minimizing dose to the bowel, bladder, and rectum. Toxicity was graded according to the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group system. Overall survival and disease-free survival were estimated by use of the Kaplan-Meier method. Pelvic failure, distant failure, and late toxicity were estimated by use of cumulative incidence functions. Results: The study included 111 patients. Of these, 22 were treated with postoperative IMRT, 8 with IMRT followed by intracavitary brachytherapy and adjuvant hysterectomy, and 81 with IMRT followed by planned intracavitary brachytherapy. Of the patients, 63 had Stage I-IIA disease and 48 had Stage IIB-IVA disease. The median follow-up time was 27 months. The 3-year overall survival rate and the disease-free survival rate were 78% (95% confidence interval [CI], 68-88%) and 69% (95% CI, 59-81%), respectively. The 3-year pelvic failure rate and the distant failure rate were 14% (95% CI, 6-22%) and 17% (95% CI, 8-25%), respectively. Estimates of acute and late Grade 3 toxicity or higher were 2% (95% CI, 0-7%) and 7% (95% CI, 2-13%), respectively. Conclusions: Intensity-modulated radiation therapy is associated with low toxicity and favorable outcomes, supporting its safety and efficacy for cervical cancer. Prospective clinical trials are needed to evaluate the comparative efficacy of IMRT vs. conventional techniques.

  14. The surgical technique and early postoperative complications of the Gynecare Prolift pelvic floor repair system.

    PubMed

    Lucioni, Alvaro; Rapp, David E; Gong, Edward M; Reynolds, William S; Fedunok, Paula A; Bales, Gregory T

    2008-04-01

    The Gynecare Prolift pelvic floor repair system (GPS) comprises a synthetic mesh placed via a transvaginal, transobturator approach. We present our technique focusing on the safety and feasibility of the GPS. GPS candidates are evaluated in the office with a full history, physical examination, urinalysis and when appropriate, urodynamic evaluation. Patients were offered total vaginal vault prolapse repair or isolated anterior repair dependent of site of defect. Follow-up comprised a full history, physical examination, and global assessment of subjective satisfaction (2 and 6 weeks, 6 months postoperative). Concentration was placed on intraoperative and short-term postoperative complications and assessment of prolapse recurrence. GPS prolapse repair has been used in 12 patients for anterior or total vault prolapse. Mean postoperative follow-up time is 42 weeks. There were no major perioperative complications. De novo enterocele development was seen in one patient without any other incidence of recurrence. No incidence of mesh erosion or sexual dysfunction has been observed. The GPS is a safe and reproducible system for use in transvaginal repairs of vaginal vault prolapse. Long-term studies are needed to evaluate repair durability and for potential complications.

  15. Pre- and postoperative evaluation of pelvic floor muscle function in POP patients using surface electromyography and digital palpation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xinliang; Gong, Yao; Wu, Dan; Li, Xiaocui; Li, Huaifang; Tong, Xiaowen; Cheng, Weiwei

    2014-04-01

    The study aims to evaluate the pelvic floor muscle (PFM) function in patients with pelvic organ prolapse (POP) pre- and postoperatively using digital palpation and surface electromyography. In this non-randomized prospective study, two groups of patients were recruited for assessment. The surgical group included 74 POP patients receiving the modified pelvic reconstructive surgery and the control group consisted of 30 non-POP patients. One physiotherapist conducted the digital palpation and SEMG evaluation. The scale of PFM strength, the duration and voltage of maximum voluntary contraction (MVC) as well as numbers and voltage of short, fast contractions (SFC) by SEMG were documented and compared in both groups. For statistical analysis, t-test, Mann-Whitney U test and Wilcoxon test were used with a significant level 0.05. A total of 68 POP patients finished the two follow-ups. Sixty-four patients were objectively cured with a 94.1% cure rate. Mesh erosions happened in three patients (4.8%). By digital palpation, the PFM strength increased significantly in POP patients after surgery but still lower than non-POP patients (P<0.001). By SEMG, the electrical activity of PFM increased significantly in the surgical group postoperatively (P 0.001). The PFM function was improved 3 months after the modified pelvic reconstructive surgery in POP patients based on digital palpation and SEMG. The evaluation of PFM function should be included in the overall assessment of pelvic reconstructive surgeries. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Percutaneous Transcatheter Ethanol Sclerotherapy and Catheter Drainage of Postoperative Pelvic Lymphoceles

    SciTech Connect

    Akhan, Okan Karcaaltincaba, Musturay; Ozmen, Mustafa N.; Akinci, Devrim; Karcaaltincaba, Deniz; Ayhan, Ali

    2007-04-15

    The aim of this study is to investigate the efficacy and long-term results of percutaneous transcatheter ethanol sclerotherapy (PTES) for postoperative pelvic lymphocele treatment. Fifty-two patients who were referred for lymphocele treatment were included in this study. Sixty lymphoceles of 52 patients were treated by percutaneous treatment with or without ethanol sclerotherapy. Lymphoceles developed in 47 and 5 patients, who underwent gynecologic malignancy operation (31 ovarian cancer, 6 cervix cancer, 10 endometrial cancer) and renal transplantation, respectively. Lymphoceles were catheterized by ultrasonography and fluoroscopy guidance using the Seldinger technique. Lymphoceles smaller than 150 mL underwent single-session ethanol sclerotherapy and the others were treated by multiple-session ethanol scleortherapy. In 10 patients, percutaneous ethanol sclerotherapy could not be performed and they were treated only by percutaneous catheter drainage. The mean lymphocele volume was 329 mL (15-2900 mL). The mean catheterization duration was 11.8 days (1-60 days). The mean follow up time was 25.8 months (2-64 months). The initial treatment was successful in 46 out of 50 (91%) lymphoceles treated with PTES and 7 out of 10 (70%) lymphoceles treated with percutaneous catheter drainage. Minor complications (secondary infection and catheter dislodgement) were noted in seven (11.6%) patients. Recurrence developed in four and three patients who were treated by PTES and percutaneous catheter drainage, respectively. Five of these patients were treated with PTES without further recurrence. Percutaneous transcatheter ethanol sclerotherapy is an effective and reliable method for the treatment of postoperative lymphoceles.

  17. Bladder Cancer Patterns of Pelvic Failure: Implications for Adjuvant Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Baumann, Brian C.; Guzzo, Thomas J.; He Jiwei; Vaughn, David J.; Keefe, Stephen M.; Vapiwala, Neha; Deville, Curtiland; Bekelman, Justin E.; Tucker, Kai; Hwang, Wei-Ting; Malkowicz, S. Bruce; Christodouleas, John P.

    2013-02-01

    Purpose: Local-regional failures (LFs) after cystectomy with or without chemotherapy are common in locally advanced disease. Adjuvant radiation therapy (RT) could reduce LFs, but toxicity has discouraged its use. Modern RT techniques with improved normal tissue sparing have rekindled interest but require knowledge of pelvic failure patterns to design treatment volumes. Methods and Materials: Five-year LF rates after radical cystectomy plus pelvic node dissection with or without chemotherapy were determined for 8 pelvic sites among 442 urothelial bladder carcinoma patients. The impact of pathologic stage, margin status, nodal involvement, and extent of node dissection on failure patterns was assessed using competing risk analysis. We calculated the percentage of patients whose sites of LF would have been completely encompassed within various hypothetical clinical target volumes (CTVs) for postoperative radiation. Results: Compared with stage {<=}pT2, stage {>=}pT3 patients had higher 5-year LF rates in virtually all pelvic sites. Among stage {>=}pT3 patients, margin status significantly altered the failure pattern whereas extent of node dissection and nodal positivity did not. In stage {>=}pT3 patients with negative margins, failure occurred predominantly in the iliac/obturator nodes and uncommonly in the cystectomy bed and/or presacral nodes. Of these patients in whom failure subsequently occurred, 76% would have had all LF sites encompassed within CTVs covering only the iliac/obturator nodes. In stage {>=}pT3 with positive margins, cystectomy bed and/or presacral nodal failures increased significantly. Only 57% of such patients had all LF sites within CTVs limited to the iliac/obturator nodes, but including the cystectomy bed and presacral nodes in the CTV when margins were positive increased the percentage of LFs encompassed to 91%. Conclusions: Patterns of failure within the pelvis are summarized to facilitate design of adjuvant RT protocols. These data suggest

  18. Consensus Guidelines for Delineation of Clinical Target Volume for Intensity-Modulated Pelvic Radiotherapy in Postoperative Treatment of Endometrial and Cervical Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Small, William Mell, Loren K.; Anderson, Penny; Creutzberg, Carien; De Los Santos, Jennifer; Gaffney, David; Jhingran, Anuja; Portelance, Lorraine; Schefter, Tracey; Iyer, Revathy; Varia, Mahesh; Winter, Kathryn M.S.; Mundt, Arno J.

    2008-06-01

    Purpose: To develop an atlas of the clinical target volume (CTV) definitions for postoperative radiotherapy of endometrial and cervical cancer to be used for planning pelvic intensity-modulated radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: The Radiation Therapy Oncology Group led an international collaberation of cooperative groups in the development of the atlas. The groups included the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group, Gynecologic Oncology Group, National Cancer Institute of Canada, European Society of Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology, and American College of Radiology Imaging Network. The members of the group were asked by questionnaire to define the areas that were to be included in the CTV and to outline theses areas on individual computed tomography images. The initial formulation of the group began in late 2004 and culminated with a formal consensus conference in June 2005. Results: The committee achieved a consensus CTV definition for postoperative therapy for endometrial and cervical cancer. The CTV should include the common, external, and internal iliac lymph node regions. The upper 3.0 cm of the vagina and paravaginal soft tissue lateral to the vagina should also be included. For patients with cervical cancer, or endometrial cancer with cervical stromal invasion, it is also recommended that the CTV include the presacral lymph node region. Conclusion: This report serves as an international template for the definition of the CTV for postoperative intensity-modulated radiotherapy for endometrial and cervical cancer.

  19. CONSENSUS GUIDELINES FOR THE DELINEATION OF THE CLINICAL TARGET VOLUME FOR INTENSITY MODULATED PELVIC RADIOTHERAPY IN THE POSTOPERATIVE TREATMENT OF ENDOMETRIAL AND CERVICAL CANCER

    PubMed Central

    Small, William; Mell, Loren K.; Anderson, Penny; Creutzberg, Carien; De Los Santos, Jennifer; Gaffney, David; Jhingran, Anuja; Portelance, Lorraine; Schefter, Tracey; Iyer, Revathy; Varia, Mahesh; Winter, Kathryn; Mundt, Arno J.

    2009-01-01

    PURPOSE To develop an atlas of the clinical target volumes (CTV) definitions for the post-operative radiotherapy of endometrial and cervical cancer to be utilized for planning pelvic Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy (IMRT). METHODS AND MATERIALS The Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) led an international collaberation of cooperative groups in development of the atlas. The groups included RTOG the Gynecologic Oncology Group (GOG), the National Cancer Institute of Canada (NCIC), the European Society of Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology (ESTRO), and the American College of Radiology Imaging Network (ACRIN). Members of the group were asked by questionnaire to define areas that were to be included in the CTV and were asked to outline theses areas on individual Computed Tomography (CT) images. The initial formulation of the group began in late 2004 and culminated with a formal consensus conference in June of 2005. RESULTS The committee achieved a consensus CTV definition for the post-operative therapy of endometrial and cervical cancer. The CTV should include the common, external, and internal iliac lymph node regions. The upper 3.0 cm of vagina and paravaginal soft tissue lateral to the vagina should also be included. For patients with cervical cancer, or endometrial cancer with cervical stromal invasion, it is also recommended that the CTV include the presacral lymph node-region. CONCLUSIONS This manuscript serves as an international template for the definition of the CTV for the post-operative IMRT of endometrial and cervical cancer. PMID:18037584

  20. Consensus guidelines for delineation of clinical target volume for intensity-modulated pelvic radiotherapy in postoperative treatment of endometrial and cervical cancer.

    PubMed

    Small, William; Mell, Loren K; Anderson, Penny; Creutzberg, Carien; De Los Santos, Jennifer; Gaffney, David; Jhingran, Anuja; Portelance, Lorraine; Schefter, Tracey; Iyer, Revathy; Varia, Mahesh; Winter, Kathryn; Mundt, Arno J

    2008-06-01

    To develop an atlas of the clinical target volume (CTV) definitions for postoperative radiotherapy of endometrial and cervical cancer to be used for planning pelvic intensity-modulated radiotherapy. The Radiation Therapy Oncology Group led an international collaboration of cooperative groups in the development of the atlas. The groups included the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group, Gynecologic Oncology Group, National Cancer Institute of Canada, European Society of Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology, and American College of Radiology Imaging Network. The members of the group were asked by questionnaire to define the areas that were to be included in the CTV and to outline theses areas on individual computed tomography images. The initial formulation of the group began in late 2004 and culminated with a formal consensus conference in June 2005. The committee achieved a consensus CTV definition for postoperative therapy for endometrial and cervical cancer. The CTV should include the common, external, and internal iliac lymph node regions. The upper 3.0 cm of the vagina and paravaginal soft tissue lateral to the vagina should also be included. For patients with cervical cancer, or endometrial cancer with cervical stromal invasion, it is also recommended that the CTV include the presacral lymph node region. This report serves as an international template for the definition of the CTV for postoperative intensity-modulated radiotherapy for endometrial and cervical cancer.

  1. Pelvic Normal Tissue Contouring Guidelines for Radiation Therapy: A Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Consensus Panel Atlas

    SciTech Connect

    Gay, Hiram A.; Barthold, H. Joseph; O'Meara, Elizabeth; Bosch, Walter R.; El Naqa, Issam; Al-Lozi, Rawan; Rosenthal, Seth A.; Lawton, Colleen; Lee, W. Robert; Sandler, Howard; Zietman, Anthony; Myerson, Robert; Dawson, Laura A.; Willett, Christopher; Kachnic, Lisa A.; Jhingran, Anuja; Portelance, Lorraine; Ryu, Janice; and others

    2012-07-01

    Purpose: To define a male and female pelvic normal tissue contouring atlas for Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) trials. Methods and Materials: One male pelvis computed tomography (CT) data set and one female pelvis CT data set were shared via the Image-Guided Therapy QA Center. A total of 16 radiation oncologists participated. The following organs at risk were contoured in both CT sets: anus, anorectum, rectum (gastrointestinal and genitourinary definitions), bowel NOS (not otherwise specified), small bowel, large bowel, and proximal femurs. The following were contoured in the male set only: bladder, prostate, seminal vesicles, and penile bulb. The following were contoured in the female set only: uterus, cervix, and ovaries. A computer program used the binomial distribution to generate 95% group consensus contours. These contours and definitions were then reviewed by the group and modified. Results: The panel achieved consensus definitions for pelvic normal tissue contouring in RTOG trials with these standardized names: Rectum, AnoRectum, SmallBowel, Colon, BowelBag, Bladder, UteroCervix, Adnexa{sub R}, Adnexa{sub L}, Prostate, SeminalVesc, PenileBulb, Femur{sub R}, and Femur{sub L}. Two additional normal structures whose purpose is to serve as targets in anal and rectal cancer were defined: AnoRectumSig and Mesorectum. Detailed target volume contouring guidelines and images are discussed. Conclusions: Consensus guidelines for pelvic normal tissue contouring were reached and are available as a CT image atlas on the RTOG Web site. This will allow uniformity in defining normal tissues for clinical trials delivering pelvic radiation and will facilitate future normal tissue complication research.

  2. T1 pelvic angle: a new predictor for postoperative sagittal balance and clinical outcomes in adult scoliosis.

    PubMed

    Qiao, Jun; Zhu, Feng; Xu, Leilei; Liu, Zhen; Zhu, Zezhang; Qian, Bangping; Sun, Xu; Qiu, Yong

    2014-12-01

    A retrospective radiographical study. To compare the prediction abilities of T1 pelvic angle (TPA) and other parameters for postoperative sagittal balance, and investigate the relationships between these parameters and health-related quality of life. Using sagittal vertical axis (SVA) to assess sagittal alignment fails to take account of the pelvic compensation. A new parameter, TPA, has been recommended to represent the global sagittal balance of adult scoliosis. A retrospective review was performed on patients with adult scoliosis undergoing correction surgery from May 2009 to March 2013. The Spearman ρ was used to determine the correlations between the radiographical parameters (preoperative, postoperative, and changes) and the overall Oswestry Disability Index (ODI), visual analogue scale (VAS), and Scoliosis Research Society-22 (SRS-22) questionnaire scores. Significant correlations were found between the changes of TPA and the changes of lumbar lordosis, pelvic tilt, sacral slope, pelvic incidence, SVA, spinosacral angle, ODI, VAS, SRS-22, and pedicle subtraction osteotomy (PSO) degrees (P < 0.05). The changes of SVA were significantly related to the changes of lumbar lordosis, TPA, C7-sacrofemoral distance, ODI, VAS, SRS-22 (P < 0.05) but not PSO degrees (P > 0.05). Significant correlations were found between the changes of spinosacral angle and the changes of thoracolumbar kyphosis, TPA, ODI, VAS, SRS-22, and PSO degrees (P < 0.05). The changes of C7 plumb line to sacrofemoral distance ratio were significantly related to the changes of SVA (P < 0.05), but not the changes of ODI, VAS, SRS-22, or PSO degrees (P > 0.05). TPA could better reflect the postoperative changes of sagittal alignment and health-related quality of life for patients with adult scoliosis. Moreover, the changes of TPA are strongly correlated to the osteotomy degrees for PSO and, TPA could be used as a reference parameter in surgical planning. 4.

  3. Treatment of pathologic fracture following postoperative radiation therapy: clinical study.

    PubMed

    Kim, Chul-Man; Park, Min-Hyeog; Yun, Seong-Won; Kim, Jin-Wook

    2015-12-01

    Pathologic fractures are caused by diseases that lead to weakness of the bone structure. This process sometimes occurs owing to bony change after radiation therapy. Treatment of pathologic fractures may be difficult because of previous radiation therapy. In this study, we analyzed clinical and radiographic data and progress of five patients with mandibular pathological fractures who had received postoperative radiation therapy following cancer surgery. Patients received an average radiation dose of 59.2 (SD, 7.2) Gy. Four of five patients exhibited bone union regardless of whether open reduction and internal fixation (OR/IF) was performed. Patients have the potential to heal after postoperative radiation therapy. Treatment of a pathologic fracture following postoperative radiation therapy, such as traditional treatment for other types of fractures, may be performed using OR/IF or CR. OR/IF may be selected in cases of significant bone deviation, small remaining bone volume, or occlusive change. Patients have the potential to heal after postoperative radiation therapy.

  4. Occult Pelvic Lymph Node Involvement in Bladder Cancer: Implications for Definitive Radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Goldsmith, Benjamin; Baumann, Brian C.; He, Jiwei; Tucker, Kai; Bekelman, Justin; Deville, Curtiland; Vapiwala, Neha; Vaughn, David; Keefe, Stephen M.; Guzzo, Thomas; Malkowicz, S. Bruce; Christodouleas, John P.

    2014-03-01

    Purpose: To inform radiation treatment planning for clinically staged, node-negative bladder cancer patients by identifying clinical factors associated with the presence and location of occult pathologic pelvic lymph nodes. Methods and Materials: The records of patients with clinically staged T1-T4N0 urothelial carcinoma of the bladder undergoing radical cystectomy and pelvic lymphadenectomy at a single institution were reviewed. Logistic regression was used to evaluate associations between preoperative clinical variables and occult pathologic pelvic or common iliac lymph nodes. Percentages of patient with involved lymph node regions entirely encompassed within whole bladder (perivesicular nodal region), small pelvic (perivesicular, obturator, internal iliac, and external iliac nodal regions), and extended pelvic clinical target volume (CTV) (small pelvic CTV plus common iliac regions) were calculated. Results: Among 315 eligible patients, 81 (26%) were found to have involved pelvic lymph nodes at the time of surgery, with 38 (12%) having involved common iliac lymph nodes. Risk of occult pathologically involved lymph nodes did not vary with clinical T stage. On multivariate analysis, the presence of lymphovascular invasion (LVI) on preoperative biopsy was significantly associated with occult pelvic nodal involvement (odds ratio 3.740, 95% confidence interval 1.865-7.499, P<.001) and marginally associated with occult common iliac nodal involvement (odds ratio 2.307, 95% confidence interval 0.978-5.441, P=.056). The percentages of patients with involved lymph node regions entirely encompassed by whole bladder, small pelvic, and extended pelvic CTVs varied with clinical risk factors, ranging from 85.4%, 95.1%, and 100% in non-muscle-invasive patients to 44.7%, 71.1%, and 94.8% in patients with muscle-invasive disease and biopsy LVI. Conclusions: Occult pelvic lymph node rates are substantial for all clinical subgroups, especially patients with LVI on biopsy. Extended

  5. Stage II invasive adenocarcinoma of the ovary: results of treatment by whole abdominal radiation plus pelvic boost versus pelvic radiation plus oral melphalan chemotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Piver, M.S.; Lele, S.B.; Patsner, B.; Krishnamsetty, R.; Emrich, L.J.

    1986-02-01

    Thirty-one patients with histologically confirmed FIGO Stage II adenocarcinoma of the ovary were prospectively treated in two sequential studies: 3000 rad of whole abdominal radiation therapy over 6 weeks by an open field technique followed by 2000 rad pelvic boost over 2 weeks (group 1, 16 patients, 1972-1974) or 5000 rad of pelvic radiation therapy over 5 weeks followed by a year of melphalan chemotherapy at a dose of 0.2 mg/kg/day for 5 days every 4 weeks (group 2, 15 patients, 1975-1982). Abdominal radiation included the entire peritoneal cavity and both diaphragms; the liver was not shielded. Only 2 patients had residual disease greater than 2 cm. No group 1 patients underwent pretherapy restaging laparoscopy prior to radiation or second look laparotomy after treatment. Eighty percent of group 2 patients underwent restaging laparoscopy (10) or staging laparotomy (2) prior to radiation. All group 2 patients underwent second look procedures if no evidence of disease. No patient developed intestinal complications secondary to radiation requiring surgery. Eighty-one percent of group 1 patients and to date 40% of group 2 patients developed recurrences. Size of residual disease prior to radiation, histologic grade, and substage (IIA, B, or C) did not correlate with recurrences. Five-year estimated survival was 40 and 50% for groups 1 and 2, respectively. Three thousand rad of wole abdominal radiation plus 2000 rad pelvic boost or 5000 rad pelvic radiation plus melphalan did not appear to improve survival over surgery alone. The role of radiation therapy in Stage II ovarian cancer remains unclear.

  6. Comparing Postoperative Radiation Therapies for Brain Metastases

    Cancer.gov

    In this clinical trial, patients with one to four brain metastases who have had at least one of the metastatic tumors removed surgically will be randomly assigned to undergo whole-brain radiation therapy or stereotactic radiosurgery.

  7. Dosimetric planning study for the prevention of anal complications after post-operative whole pelvic radiotherapy in cervical cancer patients with hemorrhoids.

    PubMed

    Baek, J G; Kim, E C; Kim, S K; Jang, H

    2015-01-01

    Radiation-induced anal toxicity can be induced by low radiation doses in patients with haemorrhoids. The object of this study was to determine the dosimetric benefits of different whole pelvic radiotherapy (WPRT) techniques in terms of dose delivered to the anal canal in post-operative patients with cervical cancer. The planning CT images of 10 patients with cervical cancer undergoing postoperative radiotherapy were used for comparison of three different plans. All patients had been treated using the conventional box technique WPRT (CV-WPRT), and we tried low-margin-modified WPRT (LM-WPRT), three-dimensional conformal techniques WPRT (CF-WPRT) and intensity-modulated WPRT (IM-WPRT) planning for dosimetric comparison of the anal canal, retrospectively. Mean anal canal doses of the IM-WPRT were significantly lower (p < 0.05) than those of CV-WPRT, LM-WPRT and CF-WPRT, and V10, V20, V30 and V40 to the anal canal were also significantly lower for IM-WPRT (p < 0.05). The proportion of planning target volumes (PTVs) that received ≥98% of the prescribed dose for all plans was >99%, and the proportion that received ≥108% of the prescribed dose for IM-WPRT was <2%. Volumes of bladders and rectums that received ≥30 or ≥40 Gy were significantly lower for IM-WPRT than for three of the four-field WPRT plans (p = 0.000). IM-WPRT can significantly reduce radiation dose delivered to the anal canal and does not compromise PTV coverage. In patients with haemorrhoids, IM-WPRT may be of value for the prevention of anal complications. Although tolerance of the anal canal tends to be ignored in patients undergoing post-operative WPRT, patients with haemorrhoids may suffer complications at low radiation doses. The present study shows IM-WPRT can be meaningful in these patients.

  8. Adjuvant pelvic radiation is associated with improved survival and decreased disease recurrence in pelvic node-positive penile cancer after lymph node dissection: A multi-institutional study.

    PubMed

    Tang, Dominic H; Djajadiningrat, Rosa; Diorio, Gregory; Chipollini, Juan; Ma, Zhenjun; Schaible, Braydon J; Catanzaro, Mario; Ye, Dingwei; Zhu, Yao; Nicolai, Nicola; Horenblas, Simon; Johnstone, Peter A S; Spiess, Philippe E

    2017-06-27

    Few studies have examined the role of radiation therapy in advanced penile squamous cell carcinoma. We sought to evaluate the association of adjuvant pelvic radiation with survival and recurrence for patients with penile cancer and positive pelvic lymph nodes (PLNs) after lymph node dissection. Data were collected retrospectively across 4 international centers of patients with penile squamous cell carcinoma undergoing lymph node dissections from 1980 to 2013. Further, 92 patients with available adjuvant pelvic radiation status and positive PLNs were analyzed. Disease-specific survival (DSS) and recurrence were analyzed using the Kaplan-Meier method and multivariable Cox proportional hazards model. 43% (n = 40) of patients received adjuvant pelvic radiation after a positive PLN dissection. Median follow-up was 9.3 months (interquartile range: 5.2-19.8). Patients receiving adjuvant pelvic radiation had a median DSS of 14.4 months vs. 8 months in the nonradiation group, respectively (P = 0.023). Patients without adjuvant pelvic radiation were associated with worse overall survival (hazard ratio [HR] = 1.7; 95% CI: 1.01-2.92; P = 0.04) and DSS (HR = 1.9; 95% CI: 1.09-3.36; P = 0.02) on multivariable analysis. Median time to recurrence was 7.7 months vs. 5.3 months in the radiation and nonradiation arm, respectively (P = 0.042). Patients without adjuvant pelvic radiation was also independently associated with higher overall recurrence on multivariable analysis (HR = 1.8; 95% CI: 1.06-3.12; P = 0.03). Adjuvant pelvic radiation is associated with improved survival and decreased recurrence in this population of patients with penile cancer with positive PLNs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Postoperative Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy in High Risk Prostate Cancer: A Dosimetric Comparison

    SciTech Connect

    Digesu, Cinzia; Cilla, Savino; De Gaetano, Andrea; Massaccesi, Mariangela; Macchia, Gabriella; Ippolito, Edy; Deodato, Francesco; Panunzi, Simona; Iapalucci, Chiara; Mattiucci, Gian Carlo; D'Angelo, Elisa; Padula, Gilbert D.A.; Valentini, Vincenzo; Cellini, Numa

    2011-10-01

    The aim of this study was to compare intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) with 3D conformal technique (3D-CRT), with respect to target coverage and irradiation of organs at risk for high dose postoperative radiotherapy (PORT) of the prostate fossa. 3D-CRT and IMRT treatment plans were compared with respect to dose to the rectum and bladder. The dosimetric comparison was carried out in 15 patients considering 2 different scenarios: (1) exclusive prostate fossa irradiation, and (2) pelvic node irradiation followed by a boost on the prostate fossa. In scenario (1), a 3D-CRT plan (box technique) and an IMRT plan were calculated and compared for each patient. In scenario (2), 3 treatment plans were calculated and compared for each patient: (a) 3D-CRT box technique for both pelvic (prophylactic nodal irradiation) and prostate fossa irradiation (3D-CRT only); (b) 3D-CRT box technique for pelvic irradiation followed by an IMRT boost to the prostatic fossa (hybrid 3D-CRT and IMRT); and (c) IMRT for both pelvic and prostate fossa irradiation (IMRT only). For exclusive prostate fossa irradiation, IMRT significantly reduced the dose to the rectum (lower Dmean, V50%, V75%, V90%, V100%, EUD, and NTCP) and the bladder (lower Dmean, V50%, V90%, EUD and NTCP). When prophylactic irradiation of the pelvis was also considered, plan C (IMRT only) performed better than plan B (hybrid 3D-CRT and IMRT) as respect to both rectum and bladder irradiation (reduction of Dmean, V50%, V75%, V90%, equivalent uniform dose [EUD], and normal tissue complication probability [NTCP]). Plan (b) (hybrid 3D-CRT and IMRT) performed better than plan (a) (3D-CRT only) with respect to dose to the rectum (lower Dmean, V75%, V90%, V100%, EUD, and NTCP) and the bladder (Dmean, EUD, and NTCP). Postoperative IMRT in prostate cancer significantly reduces rectum and bladder irradiation compared with 3D-CRT.

  10. The effects of early postoperative radiation on vascularized bone grafts

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, H.B.; Brown, S.; Hurst, L.N. )

    1991-06-01

    The effects of early postoperative radiation were assessed in free nonvascularized and free vascularized rib grafts in the canine model. The mandibles of one-half of the dogs were exposed to a cobalt 60 radiation dose of 4080 cGy over a 4-week period, starting 2 weeks postoperatively. The patency of vascularized grafts was confirmed with bone scintigraphy. Histological studies, including ultraviolet microscopy with trifluorochrome labeling, and histomorphometric analyses were performed. Osteocytes persist within the cortex of the vascularized nonradiated grafts to a much greater extent than in nonvascularized, nonradiated grafts. Cortical osteocytes do not persist in either vascularized or nonvascularized grafts subjected to radiation. New bone formation is significantly retarded in radiated grafts compared with nonradiated grafts. Periosteum and endosteum remained viable in the radiated vascularized grafts, producing both bone union and increased bone turnover, neither of which were evident to any significant extent in nonvascularized grafts. Bone union was achieved in vascularized and non-vascularized nonradiated bone. In the radiated group of dogs, union was only seen in the vascularized bone grafts.

  11. Urinary incontinence and other pelvic floor disorders after radiation therapy in endometrial cancer survivors.

    PubMed

    Segal, Saya; John, Gabriella; Sammel, Mary; Andy, Uduak Umoh; Chu, Christina; Arya, Lily A; Brown, Justin; Schmitz, Kathryn

    2017-03-18

    To investigate radiation therapy as a risk factor for urinary or fecal incontinence, pelvic organ prolapse, and sexual dysfunction in endometrial cancer survivors. We performed a retrospective cohort study of endometrial cancer survivors. Data were collected using a mailed survey and the medical record. Validated questionnaires were used to generate rates of urinary incontinence and other pelvic floor disorders. The incidence rates of pelvic floor disorders were compared across groups with different exposures to radiation. Of the 149 endometrial cancer survivors, 41% received radiation therapy. Fifty-one percent of women reported urine leakage. The rates of urinary incontinence in women exposed and not exposed to vaginal brachytherapy (VBT) or whole-pelvis radiation were 48% and 58%, respectively (p=0.47). The incidence of fecal incontinence did not differ between groups, but the score for overall sexual function was significantly higher in women who did not undergo radiation therapy. On multivariable analysis, significant risk factors for urinary incontinence were age (AOR 1.06 95% CI 1.02, 1.10) and BMI (AOR 1.07 95% CI 1.02, 1.11), but treatment with radiation was not significantly associated with urinary incontinence, or fecal incontinence (p>0.05). Age, BMI, and radiation exposure were independent predictors of decreased sexual function score (p<0.01). Local or regional radiation is not associated with urinary or fecal incontinence, but may contribute to sexual dysfunction in endometrial cancer survivors. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Dosimetric planning study for the prevention of anal complications after post-operative whole pelvic radiotherapy in cervical cancer patients with hemorrhoids

    PubMed Central

    Baek, J G; Kim, E C; Kim, S K

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Radiation-induced anal toxicity can be induced by low radiation doses in patients with haemorrhoids. The object of this study was to determine the dosimetric benefits of different whole pelvic radiotherapy (WPRT) techniques in terms of dose delivered to the anal canal in post-operative patients with cervical cancer. Methods: The planning CT images of 10 patients with cervical cancer undergoing postoperative radiotherapy were used for comparison of three different plans. All patients had been treated using the conventional box technique WPRT (CV-WPRT), and we tried low-margin-modified WPRT (LM-WPRT), three-dimensional conformal techniques WPRT (CF-WPRT) and intensity-modulated WPRT (IM-WPRT) planning for dosimetric comparison of the anal canal, retrospectively. Results: Mean anal canal doses of the IM-WPRT were significantly lower (p < 0.05) than those of CV-WPRT, LM-WPRT and CF-WPRT, and V10, V20, V30 and V40 to the anal canal were also significantly lower for IM-WPRT (p < 0.05). The proportion of planning target volumes (PTVs) that received ≥98% of the prescribed dose for all plans was >99%, and the proportion that received ≥108% of the prescribed dose for IM-WPRT was <2%. Volumes of bladders and rectums that received ≥30 or ≥40 Gy were significantly lower for IM-WPRT than for three of the four-field WPRT plans (p = 0.000). Conclusion: IM-WPRT can significantly reduce radiation dose delivered to the anal canal and does not compromise PTV coverage. In patients with haemorrhoids, IM-WPRT may be of value for the prevention of anal complications. Advances in knowledge: Although tolerance of the anal canal tends to be ignored in patients undergoing post-operative WPRT, patients with haemorrhoids may suffer complications at low radiation doses. The present study shows IM-WPRT can be meaningful in these patients. PMID:26395671

  13. Treatment of bulky stage IB and IIB cervical cancers with outpatient neutron brachytherapy, external pelvic radiation and extrafascial hysterectomy

    SciTech Connect

    Van Nagell, J.R.; Maruyama, Y.; Yoneda, J.; Donaldson, E.S.; Hanson, M.B.; Gallion, H.H.; Powell, D.E.; Kryscio, R.J.

    1986-01-01

    From January, 1977, to December, 1982, twenty-nine patients with bulky (>4 cms diameter) Stage IB or IIB cervical cancer were treated at the University of Kentucky Medical Center by a combination of out-patient neutron brachytherapy (Cf-252) and external pelvic radiation followed by extrafascial hysterectomy. Residual tumor was present in the hysterectomy specimens of 25 per cent. Complications during and following radiation therapy and surgery were minimal and included vaginal stenosis, proctitis, and hemorrhagic cystitis. The mean duration of hospitalization for surgery in these patients was 6.6 days (range 5-15 days) and postoperative morbidity was low. No patient required blood transfusion. Four patients developed urinary tract infections and two had superficial wound separations. Following treatment, patients were seen at monthly intervals for one year, every three months for two years, and every six months thereafter. No patient has been lost to follow-up. Two patients (7 per cent) developed tumor recurrence and have died of disease (1 of distant metastases; 1 local). The remaining 27 patients (93 per cent) are alive and well with no evidence of disease 24-89 months (mean 48 months) after therapy. No radiogenic fistulae or bowel obstruction were observed. These preliminary results suggest that the combination of outpatient neutron brachytherapy, external pelvic radiation, and extrafascial hysterectomy for patients with Stage IB and IIB cervical cancer is well tolerated. Complications associated with this treatment regimen have been minimal, and the recurrence rate is low. The duration of intracavitary neutron brachytherapy was short, and outpatient therapy was well received by patients.

  14. Effects of radiation therapy on the structure and function of the pelvic floor muscles of patients with cancer in the pelvic area: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Bernard, Stéphanie; Ouellet, Marie-Pier; Moffet, Hélène; Roy, Jean-Sébastien; Dumoulin, Chantale

    2016-04-01

    Radiation therapy (RT) is often recommended in the treatment of pelvic cancers. Following RT, a high prevalence of pelvic floor dysfunctions (urinary incontinence, dyspareunia, and fecal incontinence) is reported. However, changes in pelvic floor muscles (PFMs) after RT remain unclear. The purpose of this review was to systematically document the effects of RT on the PFM structure and function in patients with cancer in the pelvic area. An electronic literature search using Pubmed Central, CINAHL, Embase, and SCOPUS was performed from date of inception up to June 2014. The following keywords were used: radiotherapy, muscle tissue, and pelvic floor. Two reviewers selected the studies in accordance with Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses Statement (PRISMA). Out of the 369 articles screened, 13 met all eligibility criteria. The methodological quality was assessed using the QualSyst scoring system, and standardized mean differences were calculated. Thirteen studies fulfilled all inclusion criteria, from which four were of good methodological quality. One presented strong evidence that RT affects PFM structure in men treated for prostate cancer. Four presented high-level evidence that RT affects PFM function in patients treated for rectal cancer. Meta-analysis was not possible due to heterogeneity and lack of descriptive statistics. There is some evidence that RT has detrimental impacts on both PFMs' structure and function. A better understanding of muscle damage and dysfunction following RT treatment will improve pelvic floor rehabilitation and, potentially, prevention of its detrimental impacts.

  15. Spontaneous Twin Pregnancy After Oophoropexy and Pelvic Radiation for Rectal Cancer.

    PubMed

    Wald, Kaitlyn; Easterling, Tom; Swisher, Elizabeth M

    2016-10-01

    Pregnancy after adulthood pelvic radiation is rare. There is a paucity of literature to guide preconception counseling and pregnancy management for these patients. A 36-year-old woman, gravida 2 para 1001, was referred at 28 weeks of gestation with spontaneous twins, preterm premature rupture of membranes, and a history of rectal cancer that had been treated 3 years previously with oophoropexy, chemoradiation, and abdominal perineal resection. Delivery was complicated by difficult fetal extraction and resulted in the demise of twin A. Pregnancy after adulthood pelvic radiation is a potentially morbid event. Patients should be counseled about the potential delivery complications as well as the need for contraception after oophoropexy with intact fallopian tubes.

  16. Pelvic radiation disease management by hyperbaric oxygen therapy: prospective study of 44 patients.

    PubMed

    Ouaïssi, Mehdi; Tran, Stephanie; Mege, Diane; Latrasse, Vivien; Barthelemy, Alain; Pirro, Nicolas; Grandval, Philippe; Lassey, James; Sielezneff, Igor; Sastre, Bernard; Coulange, Mathieu

    2014-01-01

    Pelvic radiation disease (PRD) occurs in 2-11% of patients undergoing pelvic radiation for urologic and gynecologic malignancies. Hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBOT) has previously been described as a noninvasive therapeutic option for the treatment of PRD. the purpose of study was to analyze prospectively the results of HBOT in 44 consecutive patients with PRD who were resistant to conventional oral or topical treatments. Material and Methods. The median age of the cohort was 65.7 years (39-85). Twenty-seven percent of patients required blood transfusion (n = 12). The median of delay between radiotherapy and HBOT was 26 months (3-175). We evaluated the results of HBOT, using SOMA-LENT Scale. Results. SOMA-LENT score was decreased in 59% of patient. The median of SOMA-LENT score before HBOT was significantly higher, being equal to 14 (0-36), than after HBOT with the SOMA-LENT score of 12 (0-38) (P = 0.003). Tenesmus (P = 0.02), bleeding (P = 0.0001), and ulceration (P = 0.001) significantly decreased after HBOT. Regarding patients with colostomy, 33% (n = 4) benefited from colostomies closure. HBOT was generally well tolerated. Only one patient stopped precociously due to transient myopia. Conclusion. This study is in favor of the interest of HBOT in pelvic radiation disease treatment (PRD).

  17. Risk of Hypogonadism From Scatter Radiation During Pelvic Radiation in Male Patients With Rectal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Yau, Ivan; Vuong, Te Garant, Aurelie; Ducruet, Thierry; Doran, Patrick; Faria, Sergio; Liberman, Sender; Richard, Carole; Letellier, Francois; Charlebois, Patrick; Loungnarath, Rasmy; Stein, Barry; Devic, Slobodan

    2009-08-01

    Purpose: Recent studies have reported fluctuations in sex hormones during pelvic irradiation. The objective of this study was to observe the effects of radiation on hormonal profiles for two treatment modalities: conventional external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) and high-dose-rate brachytherapy (HDRBT) given neoadjuvantly for patients with rectal cancer. Methods and Materials: Routine serum follicle stimulating hormone (FSH), luteinizing hormone (LH), and testosterone levels were collected from 119 consecutive male patients receiving either EBRT, using 45.0-50.4 Gy in 25-28 fractions with concurrent 5-fluorouracil chemotherapy or HDRBT using 26 Gy in 4 fractions. Results: Thirty patients with initially abnormal profiles were excluded. Profiles included in this study were collected from 51 patients treated with EBRT and 38 patients treated with HDRBT, all of whom had normal hormonal profiles before treatment. Mean follow-up times were 17 months for the entire patient cohort-14 and 20 months, respectively-for the EBRT and HDRBT arms. Dosimetry results revealed a mean cumulative testicular dose of 1.24 Gy received in EBRT patients compared with 0.27 Gy in the HDRBT group. After treatment, FSH and LH were elevated in all patients but were more pronounced in the EBRT group. The testosterone-to-LH ratio was significantly lower (p = 0.0036) in EBRT patients for tumors in the lower third of the rectum. The 2-year hypogonadism rate observed was 2.6% for HDRBT compared with 17.6% for EBRT (p = 0.09) for tumors in the lower two thirds of the rectum. Conclusion: HDRBT allows better hormonal sparing than EBRT during neoadjuvant treatment of patients with rectal cancer.

  18. Consensus Guidelines and Contouring Atlas for Pelvic Node Delineation in Prostate and Pelvic Node Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, Victoria A.; Staffurth, John; Naismith, Olivia; Esmail, Alikhan; Gulliford, Sarah; Khoo, Vincent; Lewis, Rebecca; Littler, John; McNair, Helen; Sadoyze, Azmat; Scrase, Christopher; Sohaib, Aslam; Syndikus, Isabel; Zarkar, Anjali; Hall, Emma; Dearnaley, David

    2015-07-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to establish reproducible guidelines for delineating the clinical target volume (CTV) of the pelvic lymph nodes (LN) by combining the freehand Royal Marsden Hospital (RMH) and Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) vascular expansion techniques. Methods and Materials: Seven patients with prostate cancer underwent standard planning computed tomography scanning. Four different CTVs (RMH, RTOG, modified RTOG, and Prostate and pelvIs Versus prOsTate Alone treatment for Locally advanced prostate cancer [PIVOTAL] trial) were created for each patient, and 6 different bowel expansion margins (BEM) were created to assess bowel avoidance by the CTV. The resulting CTVs were compared visually and by using Jaccard conformity indices. The volume of overlap between bowel and planning target volume (PTV) was measured to aid selection of an appropriate BEM to enable maximal LN yet minimal normal tissue coverage. Results: In total, 84 nodal contours were evaluated. LN coverage was similar in all groups, with all of the vascular-expansion techniques (RTOG, modified RTOG, and PIVOTAL), resulting in larger CTVs than that of the RMH technique (mean volumes: 287.3 cm{sup 3}, 326.7 cm{sup 3}, 310.3 cm{sup 3}, and 256.7 cm{sup 3}, respectively). Mean volumes of bowel within the modified RTOG PTV were 19.5 cm{sup 3} (with 0 mm BEM), 17.4 cm{sup 3} (1-mm BEM), 10.8 cm{sup 3} (2-mm BEM), 6.9 cm{sup 3} (3-mm BEM), 5.0 cm{sup 3} (4-mm BEM), and 1.4 cm{sup 3} (5-mm BEM) in comparison with an overlap of 9.2 cm{sup 3} seen using the RMH technique. Evaluation of conformity between LN-CTVs from each technique revealed similar volumes and coverage. Conclusions: Vascular expansion techniques result in larger LN-CTVs than the freehand RMH technique. Because the RMH technique is supported by phase 1 and 2 trial safety data, we proposed modifications to the RTOG technique, including the addition of a 3-mm BEM, which resulted in LN-CTV coverage similar

  19. Twelve-year experience in the management of endometrial cancer: a change in surgical and postoperative radiation approaches.

    PubMed

    Barakat, Richard R; Lev, Gali; Hummer, Amanda J; Sonoda, Yukio; Chi, Dennis S; Alektiar, Kaled M; Abu-Rustum, Nadeem R

    2007-04-01

    Over the past 12 years, the primary management of endometrial cancer at a comprehensive cancer center has undergone changes characterized by the increased use of laparoscopic surgery with comprehensive staging resulting in a decreased reliance on postoperative adjuvant whole pelvic radiation therapy (WPRT). The purpose of this study was to analyze the results of these changes. Between 1/93 and 12/04, 1312 patients underwent surgery for endometrial cancer consisting of either abdominal or laparoscopic hysterectomy/bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy (TAH/BSO or LAVH/BSO). Pelvic and para-aortic lymph node dissection was performed at the discretion of the attending physician. Postoperative adjuvant treatment employed in patients with high-risk features consisted mainly of WPRT+/-intravaginal radiation therapy (IVRT). Total direct medical charges incurred from 10 days prior to surgery through 75 days after surgery were determined with charges converted to direct medical costs, taking into account inflationary changes. The median age at diagnosis for all patients was 62 years (range, 21-93 years), with a median follow-up of 31.6 months (range, 0-140 months). There was a significant increase in LAVH/BSO versus TAH/BSO (P<0.001) until 2001 when we began participating in a national randomized trial of laparoscopic versus abdominal surgery. In addition, there was a significant increase in the percentage of patients undergoing lymph node dissection as well as the median number of nodes removed (P<0.001). This was associated with a significant decrease in the use of WPRT during 1993-1998 versus 1999-2004 (P<0.001). The use of IVRT remained the same during these time periods. There was no significant difference in 1-, 2-, or 5-year survival for patients treated in either time period. Cost data were available from 1995 to 2004. There was a significant increase in the median total direct medical costs when comparing periods 1995-1998 with 1999-2004 (P<0.001), although the median

  20. Chylous ascites: a sequel of pelvic radiation therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Sipes, S.L.; Newton, M.; Lurain, J.R.

    1985-12-01

    Chylous ascites is an unusual condition with many causes. Two cases are presented in which it appeared to be related to whole pelvis irradiation in one patient for carcinoma of the vagina and in another for carcinoma of the vulva. The diagnosis is made by paracentesis and analysis of the fluid. The underlying disease usually requires identification by exploratory laparotomy. Although a malignant process is the most common cause, the only findings in the authors' cases were widespread radiation changes in the intestine. After diagnosis treatment by low-fat diet with medium-chain triglyceride supplements resulted in disappearance of chylous ascites.

  1. The effect of surgery with radiation on pelvic Ewing sarcoma survival.

    PubMed

    Ng, Vincent Y; Jones, Robin; Bompadre, Viviana; Louie, Philip; Punt, Stephanie; Conrad, Ernest U

    2015-12-01

    Pelvic Ewing sarcoma (ES) has poorer outcomes than extremity-based lesions and the method of local control is controversial. A retrospective review was performed of 40 primary pelvic or sacral ES treated by a single surgeon. All received modern chemotherapy and those that received radiation were treated with modern dosages. Fifty-five percent were disease-free at latest follow-up (median, 83.1 mos). Sixty-one percent had ≥ 99% necrosis, which was associated with 65% disease-free survival. Larger size (P = 0.016) and the absence of metastatic disease (P = 0.005) was predictive of survival. Eighty-three percent of relapsed patients were DOD. Half of patients who received surgery alone or RT alone have NED while 57% of those who received S/RT have NED. Complication rates were 69% (S/RT), 75% (surgery alone), 10% (RT alone). Functional outcomes were similar. Primary pelvic ES is localized at presentation in 50% and the absence of metastases is the strongest predictor for survival. Chemotherapy is key, but excellent histologic response is neither a guarantee nor a necessity for survival. More than one-third die despite an excellent histologic response and at least one-third with lung metastases survive. With chemotherapy, radiation, and surgery, reasonable control of disease can be achieved. Case-control or retrospective cohort study. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Radiation therapy of pelvic recurrence after radical hysterectomy for cervical carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Ijaz, T; Eifel, P J; Burke, T; Oswald, M J

    1998-08-01

    To evaluate the efficacy of radiation therapy and potential prognostic factors in patients treated for pelvic recurrence of cervical carcinoma after radical hysterectomy. The records of 50 patients treated between 1964 and 1994 for an isolated pelvic recurrence of cervical carcinoma a median of 10.5 months after initial radical hysterectomy were retrospectively reviewed. Patients were categorized according to the extent of disease on clinical examination as group 1, mucosal involvement only (5); group 2, paravaginal extension (11); group 3, central recurrence with pelvic wall extension (13); and group 4, recurrences limited to the pelvic sidewall (21). Seven patients with group 3 or 4 disease who had a poor performance status were treated with palliative intent using hypofractionated radiotherapy. The remaining 43 patients were treated with curative intent, 33 with radiotherapy only and 10 with a combination of cisplatin-based chemotherapy and radiotherapy. Survival rates were calculated from the date of initial recurrence. Median follow-up of surviving patients was 109 months. The overall 5-year survival rate was 33% for all 50 patients (median survival, 18 months), 39% for the 43 patients treated with curative intent, and 25% for patients with isolated sidewall recurrences treated with curative intent. The survival rate was 69% for patients with group 1 and 2 disease and 18% for those treated with curative intent for group 3 disease (P = 0.07). The survival rate was better for patients with recurrent squamous carcinomas (51%) than for those with adenocarcinomas (14%) (P = 0. 05). Three group 4 patients who survived more than 5 years were treated with external-beam radiation alone. Eight-one percent of patients who had a second recurrence had evidence of disease progression. Three patients experienced late treatment complications. Patients who experience an isolated recurrence of cervical cancer after initial radical hysterectomy have an excellent prognosis if

  3. Low Toxicity in Inflammatory Bowel Disease Patients Treated With Abdominal and Pelvic Radiation Therapy.

    PubMed

    White, Evan C; Murphy, James D; Chang, Daniel T; Koong, Albert C

    2015-12-01

    To determine the short-term and long-term toxicity of abdominal and pelvic radiation therapy in a cohort of patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). We hypothesize that with newer techniques, such as intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT), patients with IBD can safely undergo abdominal and pelvic radiation, with low risk for major acute or late toxicity. Nineteen consecutive patients with IBD (14 with ulcerative colitis, 5 with Crohn disease) who were treated with abdominal or pelvic external beam radiation therapy at Stanford University from 1997 to 2011 were identified. Fourteen patients were treated with IMRT and 5 were treated with 3D-CRT. Treated sites included prostate (n=8), gastric/esophageal (n=5), rectal/anal (n=3), and liver (n=3) tumors. Charts were reviewed and toxicity was graded according to the Common Terminology Criteria for Acute Events version 4.0. Median follow-up was 32.5 months. Fisher exact test was used to determine if any clinical and/or treatment factors were associated with toxicity outcomes. Acute grade ≥3 toxicity occurred in 2 patients (11%). Late grade ≥3 toxicity occurred in 1 patient (6%). Acute grade ≥2 toxicity occurred in 28% of patients treated with IMRT versus 100% of patients treated with 3D-CRT (P=0.01). Acute grade ≥2 gastrointestinal toxicity was lower in patients treated with IMRT versus 3D-CRT (14% vs. 100%, respectively, P=0.002). Late grade ≥2 toxicity occurred in 21% of patients. Higher total dose (Gy) and biologically effective dose (Gy) were associated with increased rates of late grade ≥2 toxicity (P=0.02 and 0.03, respectively). These data suggest that select patients with IBD can safely undergo abdominal and pelvic radiation therapy. The use of IMRT was associated with decreased acute toxicity. Acute and late severe toxicity rates were low in this patient population with the use of modern radiation techniques.

  4. Effect of intensity-modulated pelvic radiotherapy on second cancer risk in the postoperative treatment of endometrial and cervical cancer.

    PubMed

    Zwahlen, Daniel R; Ruben, Jeremy D; Jones, Phillip; Gagliardi, Frank; Millar, Jeremy L; Schneider, Uwe

    2009-06-01

    To estimate and compare intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) with three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT) in terms of second cancer risk (SCR) for postoperative treatment of endometrial and cervical cancer. To estimate SCR, the organ equivalent dose concept with a linear-exponential, a plateau, and a linear dose-response model was applied to dose distributions, calculated in a planning computed tomography scan of a 68-year-old woman. Three plans were computed: four-field 18-MV 3DCRT and nine-field IMRT with 6- and 18-MV photons. SCR was estimated as a function of target dose (50.4 Gy/28 fractions) in organs of interest according to the International Commission on Radiological Protection. Cumulative SCR relative to 3DCRT was +6% (3% for a plateau model, -4% for a linear model) for 6-MV IMRT and +26% (25%, 4%) for the 18-MV IMRT plan. For an organ within the primary beam, SCR was +12% (0%, -12%) for 6-MV and +5% (-2%, -7%) for 18-MV IMRT. 18-MV IMRT increased SCR 6-7 times for organs away from the primary beam relative to 3DCRT and 6-MV IMRT. Skin SCR increased by 22-37% for 6-MV and 50-69% for 18-MV IMRT inasmuch as a larger volume of skin was exposed. Cancer risk after IMRT for cervical and endometrial cancer is dependent on treatment energy. 6-MV pelvic IMRT represents a safe alternative with respect to SCR relative to 3DCRT, independently of the dose-response model. 18-MV IMRT produces second neutrons that modestly increase the SCR.

  5. Effect of Intensity-Modulated Pelvic Radiotherapy on Second Cancer Risk in the Postoperative Treatment of Endometrial and Cervical Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Zwahlen, Daniel R. Ruben, Jeremy D.; Jones, Phillip; Gagliardi, Frank; Millar, Jeremy L.; Schneider, Uwe

    2009-06-01

    Purpose: To estimate and compare intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) with three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT) in terms of second cancer risk (SCR) for postoperative treatment of endometrial and cervical cancer. Methods and Materials: To estimate SCR, the organ equivalent dose concept with a linear-exponential, a plateau, and a linear dose-response model was applied to dose distributions, calculated in a planning computed tomography scan of a 68-year-old woman. Three plans were computed: four-field 18-MV 3DCRT and nine-field IMRT with 6- and 18-MV photons. SCR was estimated as a function of target dose (50.4 Gy/28 fractions) in organs of interest according to the International Commission on Radiological Protection Results: Cumulative SCR relative to 3DCRT was +6% (3% for a plateau model, -4% for a linear model) for 6-MV IMRT and +26% (25%, 4%) for the 18-MV IMRT plan. For an organ within the primary beam, SCR was +12% (0%, -12%) for 6-MV and +5% (-2%, -7%) for 18-MV IMRT. 18-MV IMRT increased SCR 6-7 times for organs away from the primary beam relative to 3DCRT and 6-MV IMRT. Skin SCR increased by 22-37% for 6-MV and 50-69% for 18-MV IMRT inasmuch as a larger volume of skin was exposed. Conclusion: Cancer risk after IMRT for cervical and endometrial cancer is dependent on treatment energy. 6-MV pelvic IMRT represents a safe alternative with respect to SCR relative to 3DCRT, independently of the dose-response model. 18-MV IMRT produces second neutrons that modestly increase the SCR.

  6. Reduction of operator radiation dose by a pelvic lead shield during cardiac catheterization by radial access: comparison with femoral access.

    PubMed

    Lange, Helmut W; von Boetticher, Heiner

    2012-04-01

    This study sought to determine the efficacy of patient pelvic lead shielding for the reduction of operator radiation exposure during cardiac catheterization via the radial access in comparison with the femoral access. Cardiac catheterization via the radial access is associated with significantly increased radiation dose to the patient and the operator. Improvements in radiation protection are needed to minimize this drawback. Pelvic lead shielding has the potential to reduce operator radiation dose. We randomly assigned 210 patients undergoing elective coronary angiography by the same operator to a radial and femoral access with and without pelvic lead shielding of the patient. Operator radiation dose was measured by a radiation dosimeter attached to the outside breast pocket of the lead apron. For radial access, operator dose decreased from 20.9 ± 13.8 μSv to 9.0 ± 5.4 μSv, p < 0.0001 with pelvic lead shielding. For femoral access, it decreased from 15.3 ± 10.4 μSv to 2.9 ± 2.7 μSv, p < 0.0001. Pelvic lead shielding significantly decreased the dose-area product-normalized operator dose (operator dose divided by the dose-area product) by the same amount for radial and femoral access (0.94 ± 0.28 to 0.39 ± 0.19 μSv × Gy(-1) × cm(-2) and 0.70 ± 0.26 to 0.16 ± 0.13 μSv × Gy(-1) × cm(-2), respectively). Pelvic lead shielding is highly effective in reducing operator radiation exposure for radial as well as femoral procedures. However, despite its use, radial access remains associated with a higher operator radiation dose. Copyright © 2012 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Dosimetric comparison of postoperative whole pelvic radiotherapy for endometrial cancer using three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy, intensity-modulated radiotherapy, and helical tomotherapy.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ruijie; Xu, Shouping; Jiang, Weijuan; Wang, Junjie; Xie, Chuanbin

    2010-01-01

    The use of Intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and Helical tomotherapy (HT) is increasing in gynecological cancer patients. No published studies have performed a dosimetric evaluation of whole pelvic radiotherapy (WPRT) using HT for postoperative endometrial cancer. The purpose of this study was to perform a direct dosimetric comparison of three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT), IMRT and HT plans for WPRT in postoperative endometrial cancer patients, and to evaluate the integral dose to organs at risk (OARs) and normal tissue. We selected ten patients with endometrial cancer undergoing postoperative WPRT. Plans for 3D-CRT, IMRT and HT were developed for each patient. All plans were normalized to deliver 50 Gy to 95% of the PTV. The dosimetry and integral dose to OARs and normal tissue were compared. The significance of differences was tested using a paired two-tailed Student t-test. IMRT were superior to 3D-CRT in dose conformity (conformity index: 0.87 vs. 0.61, p = 0.00) and integral dose to OARs and normal tissue, although a greater volume of normal tissue receiving dose below 10 Gy was observed. The results were similar in HT except that the integral dose to normal tissue increased slightly. Compared directly with IMRT, HT showed better dose homogeneity and lower integral dose to rectum and bladder, but the integral dose to pelvic bones and normal tissue slightly increased. In postoperative WPRT of endometrial cancer, IMRT and HT result in better conformity and lower integral dose to OARs compared with 3D-CRT. The integral dose to normal tissue did not increase significantly in IMRT, although a greater volume of normal tissue is irradiated to the dose below 10 Gy. HT further improves the dose homogeneity and integral dose to rectum and bladder, at the expense of a slightly higher integral dose to pelvic bones and normal tissue.

  8. Perioperative and postoperative complications of intracavitary radiation for FIGO stage I-III carcinoma of the cervix.

    PubMed

    Jhingran, A; Eifel, P J

    2000-03-15

    To evaluate perioperative and postoperative complications of low-dose-rate (LDR) intracavitary radiation therapy in patients with FIGO Stage I-III carcinoma of the uterine cervix. We retrospectively reviewed the medical and radiotherapy records of all patients treated with radiation between 1960 and 1992 at The University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center for FIGO I-III carcinomas of the cervix. Patients who had had initial hysterectomy or whose treatment did not include intracavitary irradiation were excluded. The final study included 4043 patients who had undergone 7662 intracavitary procedures. Eleven (0. 3%) patients had documented or suspected cases of thromboembolism resulting in 4 deaths. Of these 11 patients, 8 had clinical or radiographic evidence of tumor involving pelvic nodes or fixed pelvic wall. The risk of postoperative thromboembolism did not decrease significantly with the routine use of mini-dose heparin prophylaxis (p = 0.3). Other life-threatening perioperative complications included myocardial infarction (1 death in 5 patients), cerebrovascular accident (2 patients), congestive heart failure or atrial fibrillation (3 patients), and halothane liver toxicity (2 deaths in 2 patients). Intraoperative complications included uterine perforation (2.8%) and vaginal laceration (0.3%), which occurred more frequently in patients >/= 60 years old (p < 0.01). Fourteen percent of patients had a temperature >/= 101 degrees F during at least one hospital stay. The only correlation between minor intraoperative complications and disease-specific survival was found in patients who had Stage III disease and uterine perforation; survival was significantly (p = 0.01) decreased in these patients. Fatal or life-threatening complications of intracavitary treatment were very rare. Deep venous thrombosis (DVT) and pulmonary embolism (PE) did not occur in otherwise healthy patients with early disease and were rare even when disease was more advanced. Minor

  9. Palliation of advanced pelvic malignant disease with large fraction pelvic radiation and misonidazole: final report of RTOG phase I/II study

    SciTech Connect

    Spanos, W.J. Jr.; Wasserman, T.; Meoz, R.; Sala, J.; Kong, J.; Stetz, J.

    1987-10-01

    Between October 1979 and June 1982 forty-six patients were entered on a non-randomized Phase I-II protocol for the evaluation of Misonidazole combined with high dose per fraction radiation for the treatment of advanced pelvic malignancies. Pelvic radiation consisted of 1000 cGy in one fraction repeated at 4-week intervals for a total of three treatments. Oral Misonidazole at a dose of 4 gm/m2 was administered 4-6 hr prior to radiation (total dose 12 g/m2). The distribution of histology consisted of 20 gynecologic, 24 bowel, and 2 prostate malignancies. Of the thirty-seven patients completing the three treatments; there were 6 complete responses (14% CR), 10 partial responses (27% PR) 19 minimal or no response (32% NR), and 4 unevaluable. One patient remains NED 5.5 years following radiation. Toxicity directly related to Misonidazole was minimal and consisted primarily of transcient Grade 1, 2 peripheral neuropathy (20% Grade 1, 4% Grade 2) and Grade 2 ototoxicity (4%). Radiation toxicity was significant for late bowel damage. There were 4 (11%) Grade 3 and 7 (19%) Grade 4 gastro-intestinal (GI) toxicities. Kaplan-Meier plot of GI toxicity showed a progressive increase in incidence with time for projected rate of 49% Grade 3, 4 by 12-month. GI toxicity (Grade 3, 4) was also related to tumor response. The complication rate was 80% (4/6) for CR, 30% (3/10) for PR and 26% (5/19) for NR or progression. Because of the GI complication rate, this protocol for palliation of advanced pelvic malignancies has been replaced by a protocol that uses 4 fractions over 2 days (b.i.d.) of 370 cGy per fraction repeated at 3-week intervals for a total of 3 courses.

  10. Radiation dose and magnification in pelvic X-ray: EOS™imaging system versus plain radiographs.

    PubMed

    Chiron, P; Demoulin, L; Wytrykowski, K; Cavaignac, E; Reina, N; Murgier, J

    2017-09-20

    In plain pelvic X-ray, magnification makes measurement unreliable. The EOS™ (EOS Imaging, Paris France) imaging system is reputed to reproduce patient anatomy exactly, with a lower radiation dose. This, however, has not been assessed according to patient weight, although both magnification and irradiation are known to vary with weight. We therefore conducted a prospective comparative study, to compare: 1) image magnification and 2) radiation dose between the EOS imaging system and plain X-ray. The EOS imaging system reproduces patient anatomy exactly, regardless of weight, unlike plain X-ray. A single-center comparative study of plain pelvic X-ray and 2D EOS radiography was performed in 183 patients: 186 arthroplasties; 104 male, 81 female; mean age 61.3 ± 13.7 years (range, 24-87 years). Magnification and radiation dose (dose-area product: DAP) were compared between the two systems in 186 hips in patients with a mean body-mass index (BMI) of 27.1 ± 5.3kg/m(2) (range, 17.6-42.3kg/m(2)), including 7 with morbid obesity. Mean magnification was zero using the EOS system, regardless of patient weight, compared to 1.15 ± 0.05 (range, 1-1.32) on plain X-ray (p<10(-5)). In patients with BMI <25, mean magnification on plain X-ray was 1.15 ± 0.05 (range, 1-1.25) and, in patients with morbid obesity, 1.22 ± 0.06 (range, 1.18-1.32). The mean radiation dose was 8.19 ± 2.63 dGy/cm(2) (range, 1.77-14.24) with the EOS system, versus 19.38 ± .12.37 dGy/cm(2) (range, 4.77-81.75) with plain X-ray (p<10(-4)). For BMI >40, mean radiation dose was 9.36 ± 2.57 dGy/cm(2) (range, 7.4-14.2) with the EOS system, versus 44.76 ± 22.21 (range, 25.2-81.7) with plain X-ray. Radiation dose increased by 0.20 dGy with each extra BMI point for the EOS system, versus 0.74 dGy for plain X-ray. Magnification did not vary with patient weight using the EOS system, unlike plain X-ray, and radiation dose was 2.5-fold lower. 3, prospective case-control study. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS

  11. Comparison of analgesic efficacy of preoperative or postoperative carprofen with or without preincisional mepivacaine epidural anesthesia in canine pelvic or femoral fracture repair.

    PubMed

    Bergmann, Hannes M; Nolte, Ingo; Kramer, Sabine

    2007-10-01

    To compare analgesic efficacy of preoperative versus postoperative administration of carprofen and to determine, if preincisional mepivacaine epidural anesthesia improves postoperative analgesia in dogs treated with carprofen. Blind, randomized clinical study. Dogs with femoral (n=18) or pelvic (27) fractures. Dogs were grouped by restricted randomization into 4 groups: group 1 = carprofen (4 mg/kg subcutaneously) immediately before induction of anesthesia, no epidural anesthesia; group 2 = carprofen immediately after extubation, no epidural anesthesia; group 3 = carprofen immediately before induction, mepivacaine epidural block 15 minutes before surgical incision; and group 4 = mepivacaine epidural block 15 minutes before surgical incision, carprofen after extubation. All dogs were administered carprofen (4 mg/kg, subcutaneously, once daily) for 4 days after surgery. Physiologic variables, nociceptive threshold, lameness score, pain, and sedation (numerical rating scale [NRS], visual analog scale [VAS]), plasma glucose and cortisol concentration, renal function, and hemostatic variables were measured preoperatively and at various times after surgery. Dogs with VAS pain scores >30 were administered rescue analgesia. Group 3 and 4 dogs had significantly lower pain scores and amount of rescue analgesia compared with groups 1 and 2. VAS and NRS pain scores were not significantly different among groups 1 and 2 or among groups 3 and 4. There was no treatment effect on renal function and hemostatic variables. Preoperative carprofen combined with mepivacaine epidural anesthesia had superior postoperative analgesia compared with preoperative carprofen alone. When preoperative epidural anesthesia was performed, preoperative administration of carprofen did not improve postoperative analgesia compared with postoperative administration of carprofen. Preoperative administration of systemic opioid agonists in combination with regional anesthesia and postoperative administration

  12. Improved tolerance with two radiation fractions per day for treatment of abdominal and pelvic malignancies

    SciTech Connect

    Loeffler, R.K.

    1983-12-01

    The radiation dose is frequently limited by the tolerance of the small intestine and other gastrointestinal tissues. In an attempt to increase the tolerable dose, a twice-daily, 5 day/week fractionation scheme was used. One hundred and thirty-nine patients were started on treatment for abdominal and pelvic malignancies, of whom 124 received the planned dose, usually in the prescribed time. Fifty-five hundred to 6000 rad in about 8 weeks was administered to large volumes of the pelvis and abdomen, frequently with ''boost'' radiation to 7500 rad to limited volumes. Ninety percent of the patients were able to complete treatment without interruption. In 90% of all cases there were no late radiation-related complications. The acute reactions and late complications have been comparable to those incurred when total doses 20-30% less are administered with one fraction per day. The survival rates of these patients indicates a probable improvement in therapeutic ratio. The physical techniques, areas treated, and time-dose sequence are described. A detailed analysis by primary organ, patient characteristics, performance status, types of complications, cause of death, and survival characteristics is presented.

  13. A phase III randomized trial of postoperative pelvic irradiation in stage IB cervical carcinoma with poor prognostic features: Follow-up of a gynecologic oncology group study

    SciTech Connect

    Rotman, Marvin . E-mail: mrotman@downstate.edu; Sedlis, Alexander; Piedmonte, Marion R.; Bundy, Brian; Lentz, Samuel S.; Muderspach, Laila I.; Zaino, Richard J.

    2006-05-01

    Purpose: To investigate, in a phase III randomized trial, whether postoperative external-beam irradiation to the standard pelvic field improves the recurrence-free interval and overall survival (OS) in women with Stage IB cervical cancers with negative lymph nodes and certain poor prognostic features treated by radical hysterectomy and pelvic lymphadenectomy. Methods and Materials: Eligible patients had Stage IB cervical cancer with negative lymph nodes but with 2 or more of the following features: more than one third (deep) stromal invasion, capillary lymphatic space involvement, and tumor diameter of 4 cm or more. The study group included 277 patients: 137 randomized to pelvic irradiation (RT) and 140 randomized to observation (OBS). The planned pelvic dose was from 46 Gy in 23 fractions to 50.4 Gy in 28 fractions. Results: Of the 67 recurrences, 24 were in the RT arm and 43 were in the OBS arm. The RT arm showed a statistically significant (46%) reduction in risk of recurrence (hazard ratio [HR] = 0.54, 90% confidence interval [CI] = 0.35 to 0.81, p = 0.007) and a statistically significant reduction in risk of progression or death (HR = 0.58, 90% CI = 0.40 to 0.85, p = 0.009). With RT, 8.8% of patients (3 of 34) with adenosquamous or adenocarcinoma tumors recurred vs. 44.0% (11 of 25) in OBS. Fewer recurrences were seen with RT in patients with adenocarcinoma or adenosquamous histologies relative to others (HR for RT by histology interaction = 0.23, 90% CI = 0.07 to 0.74, p = 0.019). After an extensive follow-up period, 67 deaths have occurred: 27 RT patients and 40 OBS patients. The improvement in overall survival (HR = 0.70, 90% CI = 0.45 to 1.05, p = 0.074) with RT did not reach statistical significance. Conclusions: Pelvic radiotherapy after radical surgery significantly reduces the risk of recurrence and prolongs progression-free survival in women with Stage IB cervical cancer. RT appears to be particularly beneficial for patients with adenocarcinoma or

  14. Positive Surgical Margins in Soft Tissue Sarcoma Treated With Preoperative Radiation: Is a Postoperative Boost Necessary?

    SciTech Connect

    Al Yami, Ali; Griffin, Anthony M.; Ferguson, Peter C.; Catton, Charles N.; Chung, Peter W.M.

    2010-07-15

    Purpose: For patients with an extremity soft tissue sarcoma (STS) treated with preoperative radiotherapy and surgically excised with positive margins, we retrospectively reviewed whether a postoperative radiation boost reduced the risk of local recurrence (LR). Methods and Materials: A total of 216 patients with positive margins after resection of an extremity STS treated between 1986 and 2003 were identified from our institution's prospectively collected database. Patient demographics, radiation therapy parameters including timing and dose, classification of positive margin status, reasons for not administering a postoperative boost, and oncologic outcome were collected and evaluated. Results: Of the 216 patients with a positive surgical margin, 52 patients were treated with preoperative radiation therapy alone (50 Gy), whereas 41 received preoperative radiation therapy plus a postoperative boost (80% received 16 Gy postoperatively for a total of 66 Gy). There was no difference in baseline tumor characteristics between the two groups. Six of 52 patients in the group receiving preoperative radiation alone developed a LR compared with 9 of 41 in the boost group. Five-year estimated LR-free survivals were 90.4% and 73.8%, respectively (p = 0.13). Conclusions: We found that including the postoperative radiation boost after preoperative radiation and a margin-positive excision did not provide an advantage in preventing LR for patients treated with external beam radiotherapy. Given that higher radiation doses placed patients at greater risk for late complications such as fracture, fibrosis, edema, and joint stiffness, judicious avoidance of the postoperative boost while maintaining an equivalent rate of local control can reduce the risk of these difficult-to-treat morbidities.

  15. Form of presentation, natural history and course of postoperative venous thromboembolism in patients operated on for pelvic and abdominal cancer. Analysis of the RIETE registry.

    PubMed

    Bustos Merlo, Ana Belén; Arcelus Martínez, Juan Ignacio; Turiño Luque, Jesús Damián; Valero, Beatriz; Villalobos, Aurora; Aibar, Miguel Ángel; Monreal Bosch, Manuel

    Venous thromboembolism (VTE) represents a serious complication after oncologic surgery. Recent studies have shown that the risk of VTE persists several weeks after surgery. This study assesses the form of presentation and time course of VTE after abdominal and pelvic cancer surgery. Prospective, multicenter, observational study that analyzes data from an international registry (RIETE) that includes consecutive patients with symptomatic VTE. Our study assesses the form and time of presentation of postoperative VTE, as well as main outcomes, in patients operated for abdominopelvic cancer 8 weeks prior to VTE diagnosis. Variables related to the presentation of VTE after hospital discharge are identified. Out of the 766 analyzed patients with VTE, 395 (52%) presented pulmonary embolism (PE). Most VTE cases (84%) were detected after the first postoperative week, and 38% after one month. Among patients with VTE in the first postoperative week, 70% presented PE. VTE presented after hospital discharge in 54% of cases. Colorectal, urologic, and gynecologic tumors, the use of radiotherapy, and blood hemoglobin levels were independently associated with VTE diagnosis after hospital discharge. Complications (thrombosis recurrence, bleeding, and death) occurred in 34% of patients with VTE detected before hospital discharge, compared to 24% in VTE after hospital discharge (P<0.01). VTE occurs after hospital discharge in most patients, particularly in those operated for colorectal, urologic, and gynecologic cancer. Pulmonary embolism is more frequent in patients who develop early VTE, who also have worse prognosis. Copyright © 2017 AEC. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  16. Increasing source-to-image distance to reduce radiation dose from digital radiography pelvic examinations.

    PubMed

    England, Andrew; Evans, Paula; Harding, Louise; Taylor, Elizabeth M; Charnock, Paul; Williams, Gary

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the effects of increasing source-to-image distance (SID) on radiation dose and image quality for digital radiography examinations of the pelvis. Using a Carestream DirectView DR 7500 unit, anteroposterior pelvic images were obtained on 97 consecutive patients at a standard 115-cm SID (group 1). Ninety-nine patients were examined using the same equipment and acquisition parameters but with the maximum achievable SID (group 2). For each examination, tube potential, milliampere seconds, SID, and source-to-skin distances were recorded. This facilitated the calculation of entrance surface dose, including backscatter, and effective dose using Quality Assurance Dose Data System software. The resultant images were independently assessed for image quality by 3 blinded observers-2 reporting radiographers and 1 consultant radiologist. Image quality was graded using an established scoring system, which assessed image quality at multiple anatomical locations. For group 1, median (interquartile range [IQR]; the median value is presented with the corresponding interquartile range in parentheses) entrance surface dose with backscatter was 1.95 mGy (1.23 mGy-3.10 mGy), which was lower by 1.15 mGy (0.78 mGy-2.22 mGy) for the increased SID group (22 patients at 135 cm, 77 patients at 144 cm) (Mann-Whitney U test, P < .001). Effective dose calculations generated a median (IQR) of 0.32 mSv (0.13 mSv-0.52 mSv) for group 1 and a lower median of 0.19 mSv (0.13 mSv-0.37 mSv) for group 2 (P < .001). No observers (intraclass correlation coefficient = 0.675) found a significant change in image quality by increasing SID (group 1, 2.0 ± 1.8; group 2, 1.6 ± 1.4; P > .05) when comparing the difference in image quality scores with the maximum score available. Our results demonstrate a reduction in entrance surface dose, including backscatter and effective dose, of 39% and 41%, respectively, when operating at extended SIDs. Results were generated from a clinically based study and

  17. Is preoperative radiation therapy as effective as postoperative radiation therapy for heterotopic ossification prevention in acetabular fractures?

    PubMed

    Archdeacon, Michael T; d'Heurle, Albert; Nemeth, Nicole; Budde, Bradley

    2014-11-01

    Prophylactic approaches to prevent heterotopic ossification after acetabular fracture surgery have included indomethacin and/or single-dose external beam radiation therapy administered after surgery. Although preoperative radiation has been used for heterotopic ossification prophylaxis in the THA population, to our knowledge, no studies have compared preoperative and postoperative radiation therapy in the acetabular fracture population. We determined whether heterotopic ossification frequency and severity were different between patients with acetabular fracture treated with prophylactic radiation therapy preoperatively and postoperatively. Between January 2002 and December 2009, we treated 320 patients with a Kocher-Langenbeck approach for acetabular fractures, of whom 50 (34%) were treated with radiation therapy preoperatively and 96 (66%) postoperatively. Thirty-four (68%) and 71 (74%), respectively, had 6-month radiographs available for review and were included. For hospital logistical reasons, patients who underwent operative treatment on a Friday or Saturday received radiation therapy preoperatively, and all others received it postoperatively. The treatment groups were comparable in terms of most demographic parameters, injury severity, and fracture patterns. Six-month postoperative radiographs were reviewed and graded according to Brooker. Followup ranged from 6 to 93 months and 6 to 97 months for the preoperative and postoperative groups, respectively. Post hoc power analysis showed our study was powered to detect a difference of 22% or more between patients with severe heterotopic ossification. Sample size calculations showed 915 subjects would be needed to detect a 5% relative difference in severe heterotopic ossification status between groups. We detected no difference in heterotopic ossification frequency between the preoperative (eight of 36, 22%) and postoperative (19 of 71, 27%) groups (p=0.609). There was also no difference in heterotopic

  18. Dosimetric Predictors of Radiation-Induced Vaginal Stenosis After Pelvic Radiation Therapy for Rectal and Anal Cancer.

    PubMed

    Son, Christina H; Law, Ethel; Oh, Jung Hun; Apte, Aditya P; Yang, T Jonathan; Riedel, Elyn; Wu, Abraham J; Deasy, Joseph O; Goodman, Karyn A

    2015-07-01

    Although vaginal stenosis (VS) is a recognized toxicity in women who receive pelvic radiation therapy (RT), the relationship between RT dose and the volume and extent of toxicity has not been analyzed. We modeled this relationship to identify predictors of VS. We evaluated 54 women, aged 29 to 78 years, who underwent pelvic RT for rectal or anal cancer during 2008 to 2011 and were enrolled in a prospective study evaluating vaginal dilator use. Maximum dilator size was measured before RT (baseline) and 1 month and 12 months after RT. Dilator use was initiated at 1 month. The difference (D) in dilator size before and after RT was recorded. Those with D ≤-1 were classified as having VS (n=35); those with D ≥0 were classified as having no VS (n=19 at 1 month). Dose-volume parameters were extracted, and the generalized equivalent uniform dose (gEUD) was used to build a predictive model. The mean vaginal doses were 50.0 Gy and 36.8 Gy for anal and rectal cancer patients, respectively. One month after RT, a gEUD model using a wide range of a values suggests that sparing of vaginal volume to a low dose may be important. When gEUD (a = -1) was <35 Gy and the mean vaginal dose was <43 Gy, severe VS was reduced (P=.02). A 1-year analysis suggests increasingly negative D values with increasing mean dose. However, patients with compliance <40% were more likely to have toxicity. Vaginal stenosis is influenced by multiple RT dose-volume characteristics. Mean dose and gEUD constraints together may reduce the risk of severe VS. Patients receiving higher mean vaginal doses should have greater compliance with dilator therapy to minimize risk of toxicity. Further validation with independent datasets is needed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Bile Acid Malabsorption After Pelvic and Prostate Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy: An Uncommon but Treatable Condition

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, Victoria; Benton, Barbara; Sohaib, Aslam; Dearnaley, David; Andreyev, H. Jervoise N.

    2012-12-01

    Purpose: Intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) is a significant therapeutic advance in prostate cancer, allowing increased tumor dose delivery and increased sparing of normal tissues. IMRT planning uses strict dose constraints to nearby organs to limit toxicity. Bile acid malabsorption (BAM) is a treatable disorder of the terminal ileum (TI) that presents with symptoms similar to radiation therapy toxicity. It has not been described in patients receiving RT for prostate cancer in the contemporary era. We describe new-onset BAM in men after IMRT for prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: Diagnosis of new-onset BAM was established after typical symptoms developed, selenium-75 homocholic acid taurine (SeHCAT) scanning showed 7-day retention of <15%, and patients' symptoms unequivocally responded to a bile acid sequestrant. The TI was identified on the original radiation therapy plan, and the radiation dose delivered was calculated and compared with accepted dose-volume constraints. Results: Five of 423 men treated in a prospective series of high-dose prostate and pelvic IMRT were identified with new onset BAM (median age, 65 years old). All reported having normal bowel habits before RT. The volume of TI ranged from 26-141 cc. The radiation dose received by the TI varied between 11.4 Gy and 62.1 Gy (uncorrected). Three of 5 patients had TI treated in excess of 45 Gy (equivalent dose calculated in 2-Gy fractions, using an {alpha}/{beta} ratio of 3) with volumes ranging from 1.6 cc-49.0 cc. One patient had mild BAM (SeHCAT retention, 10%-15%), 2 had moderate BAM (SeHCAT retention, 5%-10%), and 2 had severe BAM (SeHCAT retention, <5%). The 3 patients whose TI received {>=}45 Gy developed moderate to severe BAM, whereas those whose TI received <45 Gy had only mild to moderate BAM. Conclusions: Radiation delivered to the TI during IMRT may cause BAM. Identification of the TI from unenhanced RT planning computed tomography scans is difficult and may impede accurate

  20. Bile acid malabsorption after pelvic and prostate intensity modulated radiation therapy: an uncommon but treatable condition.

    PubMed

    Harris, Victoria; Benton, Barbara; Sohaib, Aslam; Dearnaley, David; Andreyev, H Jervoise N

    2012-12-01

    Intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) is a significant therapeutic advance in prostate cancer, allowing increased tumor dose delivery and increased sparing of normal tissues. IMRT planning uses strict dose constraints to nearby organs to limit toxicity. Bile acid malabsorption (BAM) is a treatable disorder of the terminal ileum (TI) that presents with symptoms similar to radiation therapy toxicity. It has not been described in patients receiving RT for prostate cancer in the contemporary era. We describe new-onset BAM in men after IMRT for prostate cancer. Diagnosis of new-onset BAM was established after typical symptoms developed, selenium-75 homocholic acid taurine (SeHCAT) scanning showed 7-day retention of <15%, and patients' symptoms unequivocally responded to a bile acid sequestrant. The TI was identified on the original radiation therapy plan, and the radiation dose delivered was calculated and compared with accepted dose-volume constraints. Five of 423 men treated in a prospective series of high-dose prostate and pelvic IMRT were identified with new onset BAM (median age, 65 years old). All reported having normal bowel habits before RT. The volume of TI ranged from 26-141 cc. The radiation dose received by the TI varied between 11.4 Gy and 62.1 Gy (uncorrected). Three of 5 patients had TI treated in excess of 45 Gy (equivalent dose calculated in 2-Gy fractions, using an α/β ratio of 3) with volumes ranging from 1.6 cc-49.0 cc. One patient had mild BAM (SeHCAT retention, 10%-15%), 2 had moderate BAM (SeHCAT retention, 5%-10%), and 2 had severe BAM (SeHCAT retention, <5%). The 3 patients whose TI received ≥45 Gy developed moderate to severe BAM, whereas those whose TI received <45 Gy had only mild to moderate BAM. Radiation delivered to the TI during IMRT may cause BAM. Identification of the TI from unenhanced RT planning computed tomography scans is difficult and may impede accurate dosimetric evaluation. Thorough toxicity assessment and close

  1. Soft Tissue Mobilization to Resolve Chronic Pain and Dysfunction Associated With Postoperative Abdominal and Pelvic Adhesions: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Wong, Yui Y; Smith, Ryan W; Koppenhaver, Shane

    2015-12-01

    Case report. Common complications from abdominal and pelvic surgery include adhesions and chronic pain. Laparoscopic adhesiolysis is sometimes used to reduce adhesions and related pain. Physical therapy interventions, such as soft tissue mobilization (STM), may be used for this condition; however, evidence to support its effectiveness is lacking. A 28-year-old woman with a history of 5 abdominal/pelvic surgeries presented with right-sided lower abdominal and anterior hip pain, which had been present since she had undergone a laparoscopic appendectomy with a right ovarian cystectomy surgery 1 year earlier. As an active-duty member in the US Navy, due to pain and weakness, she was unable to perform required curl-ups for her fitness test. Though she had been previously treated both surgically with laparoscopic adhesiolysis and nonsurgically with physical therapy consisting of stretching and strengthening exercises, her pain and function did not improve. She was again evaluated and treated with physical therapy and, based on the examination findings, STM was used to address her pain and dysfunction, which were thought to be related to intra-abdominal adhesions. Following 5 sessions of physical therapy over a 3-week period that included STM and therapeutic exercises, followed by 5 additional sessions over a 4-week period that focused on therapeutic exercises, the patient reported substantially decreased pain, improved function, and a full return to previous level of activity, including unrestricted physical training in a military setting. The outcomes for this patient suggest that STM may be effective as a conservative treatment option for pain and dysfunction related to intra-abdominal adhesions from abdominal/pelvic surgery. Studies with a higher level of evidence, including potential comparison between STM and traditional laparoscopic adhesiolysis, are needed to further determine benefits of nonsurgical care for this condition.

  2. Radiation dose reduction in thoracic and abdomen-pelvic CT using tube current modulation: a phantom study.

    PubMed

    Sabarudin, Akmal; Mustafa, Zakira; Nassir, Khadijah Mohd; Hamid, Hamzaini Abdul; Sun, Zhonghua

    2015-01-01

    This phantom study was designed to compare the radiation dose in thoracic and abdomen-pelvic CT scans with and without use of tube current modulation (TCM). Effective dose (ED) and size-specific dose estimation (SSDE) were calculated with the absorbed doses measured at selective radiosensitive organs using a thermoluminescence dosimeter-100 (TLD-100). When compared to protocols without TCM, the ED and SSDE were reduced significantly with use of TCM for both the thoracic and abdomen-pelvic CT. With use of TCM, the ED was 6.50±0.29 mSv for thoracic and 6.01±0.20 mSv for the abdomen-pelvic CT protocols. However without use of TCM, the ED was 20.07±0.24 mSv and 17.30±0.41 mSv for the thoracic and abdomen-pelvic CT protocols, respectively. The corresponding SSDE was 10.18±0.48 mGy and 11.96±0.27 mGy for the thoracic and abdomen-pelvic CT protocols with TCM, and 31.56±0.43 mGy and 33.23±0.05 mGy for thoracic and abdomen-pelvic CT protocols without TCM, respectively. The highest absorbed dose was measured at the breast with 8.58±0.12 mGy in the TCM protocols and 51.52±14.72 mGy in the protocols without TCM during thoracic CT. In the abdomen-pelvic CT, the absorbed dose was highest at the skin with 9.30±1.28 mGy and 29.99±2.23 mGy in protocols with and without use of TCM, respectively. In conclusion, the TCM technique results in significant dose reduction; thus it is to be highly recommended in routine thoracic and abdomen-pelvic CT. PACS numbers: 87.57.Q-, 87.57.qp, 87.53.Bn.

  3. Radiation dose reduction in thoracic and abdomen-pelvic CT using tube current modulation: a phantom study.

    PubMed

    Sabarudin, Akmal; Mustafa, Zakira; Nassir, Khadijah Mohd; Hamid, Hamzaini Abdul; Sun, Zhonghua

    2014-01-08

    This phantom study was designed to compare the radiation dose in thoracic and abdomen-pelvic CT scans with and without use of tube current modulation (TCM). Effective dose (ED) and size-specific dose estimation (SSDE) were calculated with the absorbed doses measured at selective radiosensitive organs using a thermoluminescence dosimeter-100 (TLD-100). When compared to protocols without TCM, the ED and SSDE were reduced significantly with use of TCM for both the thoracic and abdomen-pelvic CT. With use of TCM, the ED was 6.50 ± 0.29 mSv for thoracic and 6.01 ± 0.20 mSv for the abdomen-pelvic CT protocols. However without use of TCM, the ED was 20.07 ± 0.24 mSv and 17.30 ± 0.41 mSv for the thoracic and abdomen-pelvic CT protocols, respectively. The corresponding SSDE was 10.18 ± 0.48 mGy and 11.96 ± 0.27 mGy for the thoracic and abdomen-pelvic CT protocols with TCM, and 31.56 ± 0.43 mGy and 33.23 ± 0.05 mGy for thoracic and abdomen-pelvic CT protocols without TCM, respectively. The highest absorbed dose was measured at the breast with 8.58 ± 0.12 mGy in the TCM protocols and 51.52 ± 14.72 mGy in the protocols without TCM during thoracic CT. In the abdomen-pelvic CT, the absorbed dose was highest at the skin with 9.30 ± 1.28mGy and 29.99 ± 2.23 mGy in protocols with and without use of TCM, respectively. In conclusion, the TCM technique results in significant dose reduction; thus it is to be highly recommended in routine thoracic and abdomen-pelvic CT.

  4. Nutrition in pelvic radiation disease and inflammatory bowel disease: similarities and differences.

    PubMed

    DeWitt, Tiffany; Hegazi, Refaat

    2014-01-01

    Due to the intestinal inflammation, tissue damage, and painful abdominal symptoms restricting dietary intake associated with both diseases, patients with intestinal pelvic radiation disease (PRD) or inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) are at increased risk to develop protein calorie malnutrition and micronutrient deficiencies. In the current paper, we review the nutritional management of both diseases, listing the similar approaches of nutritional management and the nutritional implications of intestinal dysfunction of both diseases. Malnutrition is prevalent in patients with either disease and nutritional risk screening and assessment of nutritional status are required for designing the proper nutritional intervention plan. This plan may include dietary management, oral nutritional supplementation, and enteral and/or parenteral nutrition. In addition to managing malnutrition, nutrients exert immune modulating effects during periods of intestinal inflammation and can play a role in mitigating the risks associated with the disease activity. Consistently, exclusive enteral feeding is recommended for inducing remission in pediatric patients with active Crohn's disease, with less clear guidelines on use in patients with ulcerative colitis. The field of immune modulating nutrition is an evolving science that takes into consideration the specific mechanism of action of nutrients, nutrient-nutrient interaction, and preexisting nutritional status of the patients.

  5. Nutrition in Pelvic Radiation Disease and Inflammatory Bowel Disease: Similarities and Differences

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Due to the intestinal inflammation, tissue damage, and painful abdominal symptoms restricting dietary intake associated with both diseases, patients with intestinal pelvic radiation disease (PRD) or inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) are at increased risk to develop protein calorie malnutrition and micronutrient deficiencies. In the current paper, we review the nutritional management of both diseases, listing the similar approaches of nutritional management and the nutritional implications of intestinal dysfunction of both diseases. Malnutrition is prevalent in patients with either disease and nutritional risk screening and assessment of nutritional status are required for designing the proper nutritional intervention plan. This plan may include dietary management, oral nutritional supplementation, and enteral and/or parenteral nutrition. In addition to managing malnutrition, nutrients exert immune modulating effects during periods of intestinal inflammation and can play a role in mitigating the risks associated with the disease activity. Consistently, exclusive enteral feeding is recommended for inducing remission in pediatric patients with active Crohn's disease, with less clear guidelines on use in patients with ulcerative colitis. The field of immune modulating nutrition is an evolving science that takes into consideration the specific mechanism of action of nutrients, nutrient-nutrient interaction, and preexisting nutritional status of the patients. PMID:24982906

  6. Vaginal Motion and Bladder and Rectal Volumes During Pelvic Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy After Hysterectomy

    SciTech Connect

    Jhingran, Anuja; Salehpour, Mohammad; Sam, Marianne; Levy, Larry; Eifel, Patricia J.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate variations in bladder and rectal volume and the position of the vaginal vault during a 5-week course of pelvic intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) after hysterectomy. Methods and Materials: Twenty-four patients were instructed how to fill their bladders before simulation and treatment. These patients underwent computed tomography simulations with full and empty bladders and then underwent rescanning twice weekly during IMRT; patients were asked to have full bladder for treatment. Bladder and rectal volumes and the positions of vaginal fiducial markers were determined, and changes in volume and position were calculated. Results: The mean full and empty bladder volumes at simulation were 480 cc (range, 122-1,052) and 155 cc (range, 49-371), respectively. Bladder volumes varied widely during IMRT: the median difference between the maximum and minimum volumes was 247 cc (range, 96-585). Variations in rectal volume during IMRT were less pronounced. For the 16 patients with vaginal fiducial markers in place throughout IMRT, the median maximum movement of the markers during IMRT was 0.59 cm in the right-left direction (range, 0-0.9), 1.46 cm in the anterior-posterior direction (range, 0.8-2.79), and 1.2 cm in the superior-inferior direction (range, 0.6-2.1). Large variations in rectal or bladder volume frequently correlated with significant displacement of the vaginal apex. Conclusion: Although treatment with a full bladder is usually preferred because of greater sparing of small bowel, our data demonstrate that even with detailed instruction, patients are unable to maintain consistent bladder filling. Variations in organ position during IMRT can result in marked changes in the position of the target volume and the volume of small bowel exposed to high doses of radiation.

  7. Vaginal motion and bladder and rectal volumes during pelvic intensity-modulated radiation therapy after hysterectomy.

    PubMed

    Jhingran, Anuja; Salehpour, Mohammad; Sam, Marianne; Levy, Larry; Eifel, Patricia J

    2012-01-01

    To evaluate variations in bladder and rectal volume and the position of the vaginal vault during a 5-week course of pelvic intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) after hysterectomy. Twenty-four patients were instructed how to fill their bladders before simulation and treatment. These patients underwent computed tomography simulations with full and empty bladders and then underwent rescanning twice weekly during IMRT; patients were asked to have full bladder for treatment. Bladder and rectal volumes and the positions of vaginal fiducial markers were determined, and changes in volume and position were calculated. The mean full and empty bladder volumes at simulation were 480 cc (range, 122-1,052) and 155 cc (range, 49-371), respectively. Bladder volumes varied widely during IMRT: the median difference between the maximum and minimum volumes was 247 cc (range, 96-585). Variations in rectal volume during IMRT were less pronounced. For the 16 patients with vaginal fiducial markers in place throughout IMRT, the median maximum movement of the markers during IMRT was 0.59 cm in the right-left direction (range, 0-0.9), 1.46 cm in the anterior-posterior direction (range, 0.8-2.79), and 1.2 cm in the superior-inferior direction (range, 0.6-2.1). Large variations in rectal or bladder volume frequently correlated with significant displacement of the vaginal apex. Although treatment with a full bladder is usually preferred because of greater sparing of small bowel, our data demonstrate that even with detailed instruction, patients are unable to maintain consistent bladder filling. Variations in organ position during IMRT can result in marked changes in the position of the target volume and the volume of small bowel exposed to high doses of radiation. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Effect of postoperative radiation therapy on mandibular reconstruction using a modular endoprosthesis - a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Lye, Kok Weng; Chin, Francis Kuok Choon; Tideman, Henk; Merkx, Matthias A W; Jansen, John A

    2013-09-01

    The endoprosthetic system has been shown to be a potential option for mandibular reconstruction. The objective of this pilot in vivo animal study was to determine the effects of postoperative radiation using brachytherapy on bone and soft tissue healing in mandibles reconstructed with the endoprosthesis. Six adult Macaca fascicularis mandibles were reconstructed with a cemented endoprosthesis after segmental body resection. The animals were divided into two groups. The test group was subjected to radiation therapy 1 month postoperation while the control group did not receive any radiation. Results showed no major radiation side effects. Mucosal ulcerations and wound dehiscence at the radiated sites healed within 4 weeks. One animal from each group had prosthesis failure and was unable to complete the study. Micro-CT findings indicated no significant differences between the total bone volume percentage (TBV%) of the study and control groups. Histomorphometrical analysis using grading scales also showed no significant differences between the two groups. Under the study conditions, postoperative brachytherapy did not affect the tissue response around the endoprosthesis within the early 6 months postradiation period. The endoprosthesis, therefore, remains a viable reconstructive option when postoperative radiation is prescribed. Copyright © 2012 European Association for Cranio-Maxillo-Facial Surgery. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Dosimetric Predictors of Radiation-Induced Vaginal Stenosis After Pelvic Radiation Therapy for Rectal and Anal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Son, Christina H.; Law, Ethel; Oh, Jung Hun; Apte, Aditya P.; Yang, T. Jonathan; Riedel, Elyn; Wu, Abraham J.; Deasy, Joseph O.; Goodman, Karyn A.

    2015-07-01

    Purpose: Although vaginal stenosis (VS) is a recognized toxicity in women who receive pelvic radiation therapy (RT), the relationship between RT dose and the volume and extent of toxicity has not been analyzed. We modeled this relationship to identify predictors of VS. Methods and Materials: We evaluated 54 women, aged 29 to 78 years, who underwent pelvic RT for rectal or anal cancer during 2008 to 2011 and were enrolled in a prospective study evaluating vaginal dilator use. Maximum dilator size was measured before RT (baseline) and 1 month and 12 months after RT. Dilator use was initiated at 1 month. The difference (D) in dilator size before and after RT was recorded. Those with D ≤−1 were classified as having VS (n=35); those with D ≥0 were classified as having no VS (n=19 at 1 month). Dose-volume parameters were extracted, and the generalized equivalent uniform dose (gEUD) was used to build a predictive model. Results: The mean vaginal doses were 50.0 Gy and 36.8 Gy for anal and rectal cancer patients, respectively. One month after RT, a gEUD model using a wide range of a values suggests that sparing of vaginal volume to a low dose may be important. When gEUD (a = −1) was <35 Gy and the mean vaginal dose was <43 Gy, severe VS was reduced (P=.02). A 1-year analysis suggests increasingly negative D values with increasing mean dose. However, patients with compliance <40% were more likely to have toxicity. Conclusions: Vaginal stenosis is influenced by multiple RT dose-volume characteristics. Mean dose and gEUD constraints together may reduce the risk of severe VS. Patients receiving higher mean vaginal doses should have greater compliance with dilator therapy to minimize risk of toxicity. Further validation with independent datasets is needed.

  10. Individualized Prediction of Overall Survival After Postoperative Radiation Therapy in Patients With Early-Stage Cervical Cancer: A Korean Radiation Oncology Group Study (KROG 13-03)

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Hyun Jin; Han, Seungbong; Kim, Young Seok; Nam, Joo-Hyun; Kim, Hak Jae; Kim, Jae Weon; Park, Won; Kim, Byoung-Gie; Kim, Jin Hee; Cha, Soon Do; Kim, Juree; Lee, Ki-Heon; Yoon, Mee Sun; and others

    2013-11-15

    Purpose: A nomogram is a predictive statistical model that generates the continuous probability of a clinical event such as death or recurrence. The aim of the study was to construct a nomogram to predict 5-year overall survival after postoperative radiation therapy for stage IB to IIA cervical cancer. Methods and Materials: The clinical data from 1702 patients with early-stage cervical cancer, treated at 10 participating hospitals from 1990 to 2011, were reviewed to develop a prediction nomogram based on the Cox proportional hazards model. Demographic, clinical, and pathologic variables were included and analyzed to formulate the nomogram. The discrimination and calibration power of the model was measured using a concordance index (c-index) and calibration curve. Results: The median follow-up period for surviving patients was 75.6 months, and the 5-year overall survival probability was 87.1%. The final model was constructed using the following variables: age, number of positive pelvic lymph nodes, parametrial invasion, lymphovascular invasion, and the use of concurrent chemotherapy. The nomogram predicted the 5-year overall survival with a c-index of 0.69, which was superior to the predictive power of the International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics (FIGO) staging system (c-index of 0.54). Conclusions: A survival-predicting nomogram that offers an accurate level of prediction and discrimination was developed based on a large multi-center study. The model may be more useful than the FIGO staging system for counseling individual patients regarding prognosis.

  11. Variation in the Definition of Clinical Target Volumes for Pelvic Nodal Conformal Radiation Therapy for Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Lawton, Colleen A.F. Michalski, Jeff; El-Naqa, Issam; Kuban, Deborah; Lee, W. Robert; Rosenthal, Seth A.; Zietman, Anthony; Sandler, Howard; Shipley, William; Ritter, Mark; Valicenti, Richard; Catton, Charles; Roach, Mack; Pisansky, Thomas M.; Seider, Michael

    2009-06-01

    Purpose: We conducted a comparative study of clinical target volume (CTV) definition of pelvic lymph nodes by multiple genitourinary (GU) radiation oncologists looking at the levels of discrepancies amongst this group. Methods and Materials: Pelvic computed tomography (CT) scans from 2 men were distributed to 14 Radiation Therapy Oncology Group GU radiation oncologists with instructions to define CTVs for the iliac and presacral lymph nodes. The CT data with contours were then returned for analysis. In addition, a questionnaire was completed that described the physicians' method for target volume definition. Results: Significant variation in the definition of the iliac and presacral CTVs was seen among the physicians. The minimum, maximum, mean (SD) iliac volumes (mL) were 81.8, 876.6, 337.6 {+-} 203 for case 1 and 60.3, 627.7, 251.8 {+-} 159.3 for case 2. The volume of 100% agreement was 30.6 and 17.4 for case 1 and 2 and the volume of the union of all contours was 1,012.0 and 807.4 for case 1 and 2, respectively. The overall agreement was judged to be moderate in both cases (kappa = 0.53 (p < 0.0001) and kappa = 0.48 (p < 0.0001). There was no volume of 100% agreement for either of the two presacral volumes. These variations were confirmed in the responses to the associated questionnaire. Conclusions: Significant disagreement exists in the definition of the CTV for pelvic nodal radiation therapy among GU radiation oncology specialists. A consensus needs to be developed so as to accurately assess the merit and safety of such treatment.

  12. Outlier identification in radiation therapy knowledge-based planning: A study of pelvic cases.

    PubMed

    Sheng, Yang; Ge, Yaorong; Yuan, Lulin; Li, Taoran; Yin, Fang-Fang; Wu, Qingrong Jackie

    2017-09-04

    The purpose of this study was to apply statistical metrics to identify outliers and to investigate the impact of outliers on knowledge-based planning in radiation therapy of pelvic cases. We also aimed to develop a systematic workflow for identifying and analyzing geometric and dosimetric outliers. Four groups (G1-G4) of pelvic plans were sampled in this study. These include the following three groups of clinical IMRT cases: G1 (37 prostate cases), G2 (37 prostate plus lymph node cases) and G3 (37 prostate bed cases). Cases in G4 were planned in accordance with dynamic-arc radiation therapy procedure and include 10 prostate cases in addition to those from G1. The workflow was separated into two parts: 1. identifying geometric outliers, assessing outlier impact, and outlier cleaning; 2. identifying dosimetric outliers, assessing outlier impact, and outlier cleaning. G2 and G3 were used to analyze the effects of geometric outliers (first experiment outlined below) while G1 and G4 were used to analyze the effects of dosimetric outliers (second experiment outlined below). A baseline model was trained by regarding all G2 cases as inliers. G3 cases were then individually added to the baseline model as geometric outliers. The impact on the model was assessed by comparing leverages of inliers (G2) and outliers (G3). A receiver-operating-characteristic (ROC) analysis was performed to determine the optimal threshold. The experiment was repeated by training the baseline model with all G3 cases as inliers and perturbing the model with G2 cases as outliers. A separate baseline model was trained with 32 G1 cases. Each G4 case (dosimetric outlier) was subsequently added to perturb the model. Predictions of dose-volume histograms (DVHs) were made using these perturbed models for the remaining 5 G1 cases. A Weighted Sum of Absolute Residuals (WSAR) was used to evaluate the impact of the dosimetric outliers. The leverage of inliers and outliers was significantly different. The

  13. Guidance: The practical management of the gastrointestinal symptoms of pelvic radiation disease

    PubMed Central

    Andreyev, H Jervoise N; Muls, Ann C; Norton, Christine; Ralph, Charlotte; Watson, Lorraine; Shaw, Clare; Lindsay, James O

    2015-01-01

    Background A recent randomised trial suggested that an algorithmic approach to investigating and managing gastrointestinal symptoms of pelvic radiation disease (PRD) is beneficial and that specially trained nurses can manage patients as effectively as a gastroenterologist. Aims The aim of the development and peer review of the guide was to make the algorithm used in the trial accessible to all levels of clinician. Methods Experts who manage patients with PRD were asked to review the guide, rating each section for agreement with the recommended measures and suggesting amendments if necessary. Specific comments were discussed and incorporated as appropriate, and this process was repeated for a second round of review. Results 34 gastroenterologists, 10 nurses, 9 dietitians, 7 surgeons and 5 clinical oncologists participated in round one. Consensus (defined prospectively as 60% or more panellists selecting ‘strongly agree’ or ‘agree’) was reached for 27 of the original 28 sections in the guide, with a median of 75% of panellists agreeing with each section. 86% of panellists agreed that the guide was acceptable for publication or acceptable with minor revisions. 55 of the original 65 panellists participated in round two. 89% agreed it was acceptable for publication after the first revision. Further minor amendments were made in response to round two. Conclusions Development of the guide in response to feedback included ▸ improvement of occasional algorithmic steps ▸ a more user-friendly layout ▸ clearer timeframes for referral to other teams ▸ expansion of reference list ▸ addition of procedures to the appendix. PMID:25580207

  14. The role of postoperative radiation therapy in carcinoma ex pleomorphic adenoma of the parotid gland

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Allen M. . E-mail: allenmchen@yahoo.com; Garcia, Joaquin; Bucci, M. Kara; Quivey, Jeanne M.; Eisele, David W.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the impact of postoperative radiation therapy on the clinical course of patients with carcinoma ex pleomorphic adenoma of the parotid gland. Methods and Materials: Between 1960 and 2004, 63 patients were treated with definitive surgery for carcinoma ex pleomorphic adenoma of the parotid gland. Forty patients (63%) received postoperative radiation therapy to a median dose of 60 Gy (range, 45-71 Gy). Adenocarcinoma (29 patients), salivary duct carcinoma (16 patients), and adenoid cystic carcinoma (9 patients) were the most common malignant subtypes. Pathologic T -stage was: 16% T1, 33% T2, 32% T3, and 19% T4. Twenty-one patients (33%) had microscopically positive margins and 39 (62%) had perineural invasion. Median follow-up was 50 months (range, 2-96 months). Results: The use of postoperative therapy significantly improved 5-year local control from 49% to 75% (p = 0.005) and was associated with an improvement in survival among patients without evidence of cervical lymph node metastasis (p = 0.01). A Cox proportional hazard model identified pathologic involvement of cervical lymph nodes as an independent predictor of overall survival. Overall survival was 16% for patients with pathologic N-positive disease compared with 67% for those whose lymph node status was negative or unknown (p = 0.001). Conclusion: Surgery followed by postoperative radiation should be considered the standard of care for patients with carcinoma ex pleomorphic adenoma.

  15. Insufficiency Fractures After Pelvic Radiation Therapy for Uterine Cervical Cancer: An Analysis of Subjects in a Prospective Multi-institutional Trial, and Cooperative Study of the Japan Radiation Oncology Group (JAROG) and Japanese Radiation Oncology Study Group (JROSG)

    SciTech Connect

    Tokumaru, Sunao; Toita, Takafumi; Oguchi, Masahiko; Ohno, Tatsuya; Kato, Shingo; Niibe, Yuzuru; Kazumoto, Tomoko; Kodaira, Takeshi; Kataoka, Masaaki; Shikama, Naoto; Kenjo, Masahiro; Yamauchi, Chikako; Suzuki, Osamu; Sakurai, Hideyuki; Teshima, Teruki; Kagami, Yoshikazu; Nakano, Takashi; Hiraoka, Masahiro; and others

    2012-10-01

    Purpose: To investigate pelvic insufficiency fractures (IF) after definitive pelvic radiation therapy for early-stage uterine cervical cancer, by analyzing subjects of a prospective, multi-institutional study. Materials and Methods: Between September 2004 and July 2007, 59 eligible patients were analyzed. The median age was 73 years (range, 37-84 years). The International Federation of Gynecologic Oncology and Obstetrics stages were Ib1 in 35, IIa in 12, and IIb in 12 patients. Patients were treated with the constant method, which consisted of whole-pelvic external-beam radiation therapy of 50 Gy/25 fractions and high-dose-rate intracavitary brachytherapy of 24 Gy/4 fractions without chemotherapy. After radiation therapy the patients were evaluated by both pelvic CT and pelvic MRI at 3, 6, 12, 18, and 24 months. Diagnosis of IF was made when the patients had both CT and MRI findings, neither recurrent tumor lesions nor traumatic histories. The CT findings of IF were defined as fracture lines or sclerotic linear changes in the bones, and MRI findings of IF were defined as signal intensity changes in the bones, both on T1- and T2-weighted images. Results: The median follow-up was 24 months. The 2-year pelvic IF cumulative occurrence rate was 36.9% (21 patients). Using Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 3.0, grade 1, 2, and 3 IF were seen in 12 (21%), 6 (10%), and 3 patients (5%), respectively. Sixteen patients had multiple fractures, so IF were identified at 44 sites. The pelvic IF were frequently seen at the sacroileal joints (32 sites, 72%). Nine patients complained of pain. All patients' pains were palliated by rest or non-narcotic analgesic drugs. Higher age (>70 years) and low body weight (<50 kg) were thought to be risk factors for pelvic IF (P=.007 and P=.013, Cox hazard test). Conclusions: Cervical cancer patients with higher age and low body weight may be at some risk for the development of pelvic IF after pelvic radiation therapy.

  16. Protective effects of nutritional supplementation with arginine and glutamine on the penis of rats submitted to pelvic radiation.

    PubMed

    Medeiros, J L; Costa, W S; Felix-Patricio, B; Sampaio, F J B; Cardoso, L E M

    2014-11-01

    Radiotherapy is widely used to treat pelvic malignancies, but normal tissues near the target tumour are often affected. Our aims were thus to determine whether the structural organization of the rat penis is altered by radiation, and whether supplementation with L-arginine (ARG) or L-glutamine (GLN) would have protective effects against these alterations. Groups of rats were treated with: no intervention (CONTR); pelvic radiation, followed by sacrifice 7 (RAD7) or 15 (RAD15) days later; and pelvic radiation, daily supplementation with ARG or GLN, followed by sacrifice 7 (RAD7+ARG, RAD7+GLN) or 15 (RAD15+ARG, RAD15+GLN) days after radiation. Structural components in the corpus cavernosum (CC), tunica albuginea of the corpus spongiosum (TACS) and urethral epithelium (UE) were analysed using stereological and immunohistochemical methods. The results showed that in the CC, connective tissue was increased by 18% in RAD15 (p < 0.04), but this change was partially prevented in RAD15+GLN (p < 0.05) and RAD15+ARG (p < 0.04). The fibrous matrix of the CC trabeculae stained evenly for collagen type I. In RAD15, the intensity of the labelling was increased, whereas in RAD15+GLN and RAD15+ARG the staining was similar to that of CONTR. No staining changes were seen in the groups that were sacrificed 7 days after radiation. Cavernosal elastic fibre content in RAD15 was increased by 61% (p < 0.004), and this was prevented in RAD15+ARG (p < 0.004) but not in RAD15+GLN. In TACS, the amino acids protected (p < 0.02) against the radiation-induced 92% increase in elastic fibre content, but only in RAD15. Cell density in the UE, as well as UE thickness, were reduced by 30% in RAD15 (p < 0.004), and there were protective effects of both amino acids. In conclusion, radiation-induced alterations in penile structures tend to be more pronounced 15 days after radiation session. Both ARG and GLN have protective effects against these changes, with the former being slightly more effective.

  17. Postoperative vaginal radiation in endometrial cancer using a remote afterloading technique

    SciTech Connect

    Mandell, L.; Nori, D.; Anderson, L.; Hilaris, B.

    1985-03-01

    Carcinoma of the endometrium is the most common malignancy of the female genital tract. In early stage endometrial cancer, surgery remains the primary mode of treatment while radiation therapy plays an adjuvant role. Prophylactic vaginal radiation has been shown to reduce significantly the incidence of vaginal recurrences. Between the years 1969-1976, 330 patients with FIGO Stages I and II endometrial cancer were treated according to a standard departmental policy in which 40 Gy of external radiation was given to high risk Stage I and II patients in combination with surgery and intravaginal radiation. With this regimen, the mucosal surface received a total equivalent dose of 40 Gy. These treatments were given on an outpatient basis without the need for any sedation or analgesics. The minimum follow-up was 5 years, with a median follow-up of 8.5 years. The overall pelvic and/or vaginal recurrence rate was 2.7%. The incidence of vaginal complications was 3.7%. The advantages of a remote after loading technique in delivering vaginal vault radiation in endometrial cancer are discussed.

  18. Preoperative concurrent 5-Fluorouracil infusion, Mitomycin C and pelvic radiation therapy in tethered and fixed rectal carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Chan, A.; Wong, A.; Langevin, J.; Khoo, R. )

    1993-04-02

    This is a Phase 1/2 study of preoperative concurrent radiation and chemotherapy in tethered and fixed rectal carcinoma. This study examined the curative resectability, the acute toxicities during chemo-radiation and the surgical complications. Between 1986 and 1990, 46 patients were treated with preoperative pelvic radiation (4,000 cGy in 20 fractions in 4 weeks), 5-Fluorouracil infusion (20 mg/m[sup 2], days 1--4 and 15--18) and Mitomycin C (8 mg/m[sup 2], day 1). This was followed by surgery 6 to 8 weeks later. 30 patients had tethered tumors and 16 patients had fixed tumors. After preoperative chemo-radiation, 41 patients (89%) underwent curative resection. Two patients (4%) had no residual tumor found (T0N0M0). Seven patients (15%) had nodal metastases. Two patients developed grade 3 neutropenia (WBC = 1--2 [times] 10[sup 9]/L) during chemo-radiation. Five patients had delay in perineal wound healing. One patient had an anastomotic leak. Four patients developed stomal stenosis which required surgical revision. The 2-year actuarial survival was 73%. The 2-year local relapse rate was 16%. Patients with fixed carcinoma had a higher incidence of local failure (28% vs. 10%) and the difference was statistically significant (p = 0.0036). The 2-year distant failure rate was 41%, and the rates were similar for both tethered and fixed carcinomas. Preoperative pelvic radiation, chemotherapy and surgery could achieve a curative resection rate of 89% in tethered and fixed rectal carcinomas. However, distant metastases remained the major cause of failure. 42 refs., 6 figs., 4 tabs.

  19. Distinction between postoperative recurrent glioma and radiation injury using MR diffusion tensor imaging.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jun-Ling; Li, Yong-Li; Lian, Jian-Min; Dou, She-wei; Yan, Feng-Shan; Wu, Hui; Shi, Da-peng

    2010-12-01

    This study aims to evaluate the differentiated effectiveness of MR diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) to postoperative recurrent glioma and radiation injury. Conventional MRI and DTI examination were performed using Siemens 3.0 T MR System for patients with new contrast-enhancing lesions at the site of treated tumor with postoperative radiotherapy. The region of interest was manually drawn on ADC and FA maps at contrast-enhancing lesion area, peri-lesion edema, and the contra-lateral normal white matter. Then ADC and FA values were measured and, the ADC ratio and FA ratio were calculated. Twenty patients with recurrent tumor and 15 with radiation injury were confirmed by histopathologic examination (23 patients) and clinical imaging follow-up (12 patients), respectively. The mean ADC ratio and FA ratio were compared between the two lesion types. The mean ADC ratio at contrast-enhancing lesion area was significantly lower in patients with recurrent tumor (1.34 ± 0.15) compared to that with radiation injury (1.62 ± 0.17; P < 0.01). The mean FA ratio at contrast-enhancing lesion area was significantly higher in patients with recurrent tumor (0.45 ± 0.03) compared to that with radiation injury (0.32 ± 0.03; P < 0.01). Neither mean ADC ratio nor FA ratio in edema areas had statistical difference between the two groups. A recurrent tumor was suggested when either ADC ratio <1.65 or/and FA ratio >0.36 at contrast-enhancing lesion area according to the receiver operating characteristics curve analysis. Three patients with recurrent tumor and two with radiation injury were misclassified. DTI is a valuable method to distinguish postoperative recurrent glioma and radiation injury.

  20. Complications of combined radical hysterectomy-postoperative radiation therapy in women with early stage cervical cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Barter, J.F.; Soong, S.J.; Shingleton, H.M.; Hatch, K.D.; Orr, J.W. Jr.

    1989-03-01

    Fifty patients with cervical cancer were treated with radical hysterectomy and lymphadenectomy followed by postoperative radiation therapy for high risk factors (nodal metastases, lymphvascular space invasion, close or involved margins) at the University of Alabama at Birmingham Medical Center from 1969 to 1984. Fifteen (30%) of the patients treated had serious complications, 8 (16%) requiring an operation, and 1 (2%) dying as a result of treatment-related problems. This combined modality approach is associated with significant complications.

  1. Prospective study of functional bone marrow-sparing intensity modulated radiation therapy with concurrent chemotherapy for pelvic malignancies.

    PubMed

    Liang, Yun; Bydder, Mark; Yashar, Catheryn M; Rose, Brent S; Cornell, Mariel; Hoh, Carl K; Lawson, Joshua D; Einck, John; Saenz, Cheryl; Fanta, Paul; Mundt, Arno J; Bydder, Graeme M; Mell, Loren K

    2013-02-01

    To test the hypothesis that intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) can reduce radiation dose to functional bone marrow (BM) in patients with pelvic malignancies (phase IA) and estimate the clinical feasibility and acute toxicity associated with this technique (phase IB). We enrolled 31 subjects (19 with gynecologic cancer and 12 with anal cancer) in an institutional review board-approved prospective trial (6 in the pilot study, 10 in phase IA, and 15 in phase IB). The mean age was 52 years; 8 of 31 patients (26%) were men. Twenty-one subjects completed (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG)-positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) simulation and magnetic resonance imaging by use of quantitative IDEAL (IDEAL IQ; GE Healthcare, Waukesha, WI). The PET/CT and IDEAL IQ were registered, and BM subvolumes were segmented above the mean standardized uptake value and below the mean fat fraction within the pelvis and lumbar spine; their intersection was designated as functional BM for IMRT planning. Functional BM-sparing vs total BM-sparing IMRT plans were compared in 12 subjects; 10 were treated with functional BM-sparing pelvic IMRT per protocol. In gynecologic cancer patients, the mean functional BM V(10) (volume receiving ≥10 Gy) and V(20) (volume receiving ≥20 Gy) were 85% vs 94% (P<.0001) and 70% vs 82% (P<.0001), respectively, for functional BM-sparing IMRT vs total BM-sparing IMRT. In anal cancer patients, the corresponding values were 75% vs 77% (P=.06) and 62% vs 67% (P=.002), respectively. Of 10 subjects treated with functional BM-sparing pelvic IMRT, 3 (30%) had acute grade 3 hematologic toxicity or greater. IMRT can reduce dose to BM subregions identified by (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose-PET/CT and IDEAL IQ. The efficacy of BM-sparing IMRT is being tested in a phase II trial. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Prospective Study of Functional Bone Marrow-Sparing Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy With Concurrent Chemotherapy for Pelvic Malignancies

    SciTech Connect

    Liang Yun; Bydder, Mark; Yashar, Catheryn M.; Rose, Brent S.; Cornell, Mariel; Hoh, Carl K.; Lawson, Joshua D.; Einck, John; Saenz, Cheryl; Fanta, Paul; Mundt, Arno J.; Bydder, Graeme M.; and others

    2013-02-01

    Purpose: To test the hypothesis that intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) can reduce radiation dose to functional bone marrow (BM) in patients with pelvic malignancies (phase IA) and estimate the clinical feasibility and acute toxicity associated with this technique (phase IB). Methods and Materials: We enrolled 31 subjects (19 with gynecologic cancer and 12 with anal cancer) in an institutional review board-approved prospective trial (6 in the pilot study, 10 in phase IA, and 15 in phase IB). The mean age was 52 years; 8 of 31 patients (26%) were men. Twenty-one subjects completed {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG)-positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) simulation and magnetic resonance imaging by use of quantitative IDEAL (IDEAL IQ; GE Healthcare, Waukesha, WI). The PET/CT and IDEAL IQ were registered, and BM subvolumes were segmented above the mean standardized uptake value and below the mean fat fraction within the pelvis and lumbar spine; their intersection was designated as functional BM for IMRT planning. Functional BM-sparing vs total BM-sparing IMRT plans were compared in 12 subjects; 10 were treated with functional BM-sparing pelvic IMRT per protocol. Results: In gynecologic cancer patients, the mean functional BM V{sub 10} (volume receiving {>=}10 Gy) and V{sub 20} (volume receiving {>=}20 Gy) were 85% vs 94% (P<.0001) and 70% vs 82% (P<.0001), respectively, for functional BM-sparing IMRT vs total BM-sparing IMRT. In anal cancer patients, the corresponding values were 75% vs 77% (P=.06) and 62% vs 67% (P=.002), respectively. Of 10 subjects treated with functional BM-sparing pelvic IMRT, 3 (30%) had acute grade 3 hematologic toxicity or greater. Conclusions: IMRT can reduce dose to BM subregions identified by {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose-PET/CT and IDEAL IQ. The efficacy of BM-sparing IMRT is being tested in a phase II trial.

  3. The effect of interferon gamma on conventional fractionated radiation-induced damage and fibrosis in the pelvic tissue of rabbits

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yunyi; Liu, Zi; Wang, Juan; Chai, Yanlan; Su, Jin; Shi, Fan; Wang, Jiquan; Che, Shao Min

    2016-01-01

    We aim to investigate the effect of interferon gamma (IFN-γ) on conventional fractionated radiation–induced damage and fibrosis in ureter and colorectal mucosa. Fifty-two rabbits were randomly divided into three groups comprising a conventional radiation group, an IFN-γ group, and a control group. X-rays were used to irradiate the pelvic tissues of the rabbits in the IFN-γ and conventional radiation groups. Five days after radiation exposure, the rabbits in the IFN-γ group were administered 250,000 U/kg IFN-γ intramuscularly once a week for 5 weeks. The rabbits in the conventional radiation group received 5.0 mL/kg saline. The rabbits were sacrificed at 4, 8, 12, and 16 weeks postradiation, and the rectal and ureteral tissues within the radiation areas were collected. The results showed that the morphology of rectal and ureteral tissues was changed by X-ray radiation. The degree of damage at 4, 8, and 12 weeks, but not at 16 weeks, postradiation was significantly different between the IFN-γ and conventional radiation groups. The expression of transforming growth factor beta 1 mRNA in the ureter and colorectal mucosa of the IFN-γ group was significantly lower than that in the conventional radiation group at 4, 8, 12, and 16 weeks postradiation, but it was still higher than that in the control group. There were significant differences in the expression of collagen III among the three groups. IFN-γ can inhibit the radiation-induced upregulation of transforming growth factor beta 1 mRNA and collagen III protein in the ureter and colorectal mucosa and attenuate radiation-induced damage and fibrosis. PMID:27274263

  4. Postoperative radiation in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma and target volume delineation

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Yingming; Li, Minghuan; Kong, Li; Yu, Jinming

    2016-01-01

    Esophageal cancer is the sixth leading cause of cancer death worldwide, and patients who are treated with surgery alone, without neoadjuvant therapies, experience frequent relapses. Whether postoperative therapies could reduce the recurrence or improve overall survival is still controversial for these patients. The purpose of our review is to figure out the value of postoperative adjuvant therapy and address the disputes about target volume delineation according to published data. Based on the evidence of increased morbidity and disadvantages on patient survival caused by postoperative chemotherapy or radiotherapy (RT) alone provided by studies in the early 1990s, the use of postoperative adjuvant therapies in cases of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma has diminished substantially and has been replaced gradually by neoadjuvant chemoradiation. With advances in surgery and RT, accumulating evidence has recently rekindled interest in the delivery of postoperative RT or chemoradiotherapy in patients with stage T3/T4 or N1 (lymph node positive) carcinomas after radical surgery. However, due to complications with the standard radiation field, a nonconforming modified field has been adopted in most studies. Therefore, we analyze different field applications and provide suggestions on the optimization of the radiation field based on the major sites of relapse and the surgical non-clearance area. For upper and middle thoracic esophageal carcinomas, the bilateral supraclavicular and superior mediastinal areas remain common sites of recurrence and should be encompassed within the clinical target volume. In contrast, a consensus has yet to be reached regarding lower thoracic esophageal carcinomas; the “standard” clinical target volume is still recommended. Further studies of larger sample sizes should focus on different recurrence patterns, categorized by tumor locations, refined classifications, and differing molecular biology, to provide more information on the

  5. Myofascial pelvic pain.

    PubMed

    Spitznagle, Theresa Monaco; Robinson, Caitlin McCurdy

    2014-09-01

    Individuals with pelvic pain commonly present with complaints of pain located anywhere below the umbilicus radiating to the top of their thighs or genital region. The somatovisceral convergence that occurs within the pelvic region exemplifies why examination of not only the organs but also the muscles, connective tissues (fascia), and neurologic input to the region should be performed for women with pelvic pain. The susceptibility of the pelvic floor musculature to the development of myofascial pain has been attributed to unique functional demands of this muscle. Conservative interventions should be considered to address the impairments found on physical examination.

  6. Nodal Clearance Rate and Long-Term Efficacy of Individualized Sentinel Node-Based Pelvic Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy for High-Risk Prostate Cancer.

    PubMed

    Müller, Arndt-Christian; Eckert, Franziska; Paulsen, Frank; Zips, Daniel; Stenzl, Arnulf; Schilling, David; Alber, Markus; Bares, Roland; Martus, Peter; Weckermann, Dorothea; Belka, Claus; Ganswindt, Ute

    2016-02-01

    To assess the efficacy of individual sentinel node (SN)-guided pelvic intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) by determining nodal clearance rate [(n expected nodal involvement - n observed regional recurrences)/n expected nodal involvement] in comparison with surgically staged patients. Data on 475 high-risk prostate cancer patients were examined. Sixty-one consecutive patients received pelvic SN-based IMRT (5 × 1.8 Gy/wk to 50.4 Gy [pelvic nodes + individual SN] and an integrated boost with 5 × 2.0 Gy/wk to 70.0 Gy to prostate + [base of] seminal vesicles) and neo-/adjuvant long-term androgen deprivation therapy; 414 patients after SN-pelvic lymph node dissection were used to calculate the expected nodal involvement rate for the radiation therapy sample. Biochemical control and overall survival were estimated for the SN-IMRT patients using the Kaplan-Meier method. The expected frequency of nodal involvement in the radiation therapy group was estimated by imputing frequencies of node-positive patients in the surgical sample to the pattern of Gleason, prostate-specific antigen, and T category in the radiation therapy sample. After a median follow-up of 61 months, 5-year OS after SN-guided IMRT reached 84.4%. Biochemical control according to the Phoenix definition was 73.8%. The nodal clearance rate of SN-IMRT reached 94%. Retrospective follow-up evaluation is the main limitation. Radiation treatment of pelvic nodes individualized by inclusion of SNs is an effective regional treatment modality in high-risk prostate cancer patients. The pattern of relapse indicates that the SN-based target volume concept correctly covers individual pelvic nodes. Thus, this SN-based approach justifies further evaluation, including current dose-escalation strategies to the prostate in a larger prospective series. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Pelvic Exam

    MedlinePlus

    ... hyphen, e.g. -historical Searches are case-insensitive Exam, Pelvic Add to My Pictures View /Download : Small: ... 1500x1230 View Download Large: 3000x2460 View Download Title: Exam, Pelvic Description: Pelvic exam; drawing shows a side ...

  8. A Phase II/III randomized controlled trial comparing perioperative versus postoperative chemotherapy with mFOLFOX6 for lower rectal cancer with suspected lateral pelvic node metastasis: Japan Clinical Oncology Group Study JCOG1310 (PRECIOUS study).

    PubMed

    Ohue, Masayuki; Iwasa, Satoru; Kanemitsu, Yukihide; Hamaguchi, Tetsuya; Shiozawa, Manabu; Ito, Masaaki; Yasui, Masayoshi; Katayama, Hiroshi; Mizusawa, Junki; Shimada, Yasuhiro

    2017-01-01

    A randomized phase II/III trial was started in May 2015 comparing perioperative versus postoperative chemotherapy with modified infusional fluorouracil and folinic acid with oxaliplatin for lower rectal cancer patients with suspected lateral pelvic node metastasis. The standard arm is total mesorectal excision or tumor-specific mesorectal excision with lateral pelvic node dissection (LND) followed by postoperative chemotherapy (modified infusional fluorouracil and folinic acid with oxaliplatin; 12 cycles). The experimental (perioperative chemotherapy) arm is six courses of modified infusional fluorouracil and folinic acid with oxaliplatin before and six courses after total mesorectal excision with lateral pelvic node dissection. The aim of this trial is to confirm the superiority of perioperative chemotherapy. A total of 330 patients will be enrolled over 7 years. The primary endpoint in Phase II part is proportion of R0 resection and that in Phase III part is overall survival. Secondary endpoints are progression-free survival, local progression-free survival, etc. This trial has been registered in the UMIN Clinical Trials Registry as UMIN000017603 [http://www.umin.ac.jp/ctr/index-j.htm].

  9. Correlation of smoking history and other patient characteristics with major complications of pelvic radiation therapy for cervical cancer.

    PubMed

    Eifel, Patricia J; Jhingran, Anuja; Bodurka, Diane C; Levenback, Charles; Thames, Howard

    2002-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify patient-related factors that influence the risk of serious late complications of pelvic radiation therapy. The records of 3,489 patients treated with radiation therapy for International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics stage I or II carcinoma of the cervix were reviewed for information about patient characteristics, treatment details, and outcomes. Any complication occurring or persisting more than 3 months after treatment that required hospitalization, transfusion, or an operation or caused severe symptoms or the patient's death was considered a major late complication. Complication rates were calculated actuarially. The median duration of follow-up was 85 months, and 99% of patients were followed for at least 3 years or until they died. Heavy smoking was the strongest independent predictor of overall complications (multivariate hazard ratio, 2.30; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.84 to 2.87). The most striking influence of smoking was on the incidence of small bowel complications (hazard ratio for smokers of one or more packs per day, 3.25; 95% CI, 2.21 to 4.78). Hispanics had a significantly lower rate of small bowel complications than whites, and blacks had higher rates of bladder and rectal complications than whites. Thin women had an increased risk of gastrointestinal complications, and obese women were more likely to have serious bladder complications. Complications of pelvic radiation therapy are strongly correlated with smoking, race, and other patient characteristics. These factors should be considered before the results of clinical studies are generalized to different cultural and racial groups.

  10. Radiosurgery to the Postoperative Tumor Bed for Metastatic Carcinoma Versus Whole Brain Radiation After Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Scheitler-Ring, Kristen; Ge, Bin; Petroski, Greg; Biedermann, Gregory

    2016-01-01

    Background The treatment paradigm from postoperative whole brain radiation therapy (WBRT) to post-operative stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) to the tumor bed has shifted with little data to evaluate whether each treatment modality confers equivalent tumor control and survival outcomes. Methods Patients with surgical resection of single brain metastases from January 2010 to December 2014 were treated postoperatively with either WBRT or SRS. Retrospective patient data was compared for local control, distant brain recurrence, overall survival, and radiation complications. Results Forty-six received WBRT, and 37 received tumor bed SRS. Twelve of 35 (34%) SRS patients experienced local recurrence compared to 17 of 31 (55%) WBRT patients (p = 0.09). The median survival was 440 days (14.7 months) for SRS and 202 days (6.7 months) for WBRT (p = 0.062, log-rank). SRS demonstrated improved survival benefit in the first six months (p = 0.0034; Wilcoxon). Radiation-related adverse changes after SRS (22%) were not statistically different from WBRT (8.7%) (p = 0.152). Age (p = 0.08), systemic cancer status (p = 0.30), Graded Prognostic Assessment (p = 0.28), number of brain metastases at diagnosis (p = 0.65), tumor volume at diagnosis (p = 0.13), new brain lesions (p = 0.74) and neurologic versus systemic cause of death (p = 0.11) did not differ between the groups. Conclusions Following surgical resection, tumor bed SRS can be used effectively in lieu of WBRT to treat brain metastases with comparable local control and distant control and without significantly more adverse events. PMID:28003949

  11. MRI simulation: end-to-end testing for prostate radiation therapy using geometric pelvic MRI phantoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Jidi; Dowling, Jason; Pichler, Peter; Menk, Fred; Rivest-Henault, David; Lambert, Jonathan; Parker, Joel; Arm, Jameen; Best, Leah; Martin, Jarad; Denham, James W.; Greer, Peter B.

    2015-04-01

    To clinically implement MRI simulation or MRI-alone treatment planning requires comprehensive end-to-end testing to ensure an accurate process. The purpose of this study was to design and build a geometric phantom simulating a human male pelvis that is suitable for both CT and MRI scanning and use it to test geometric and dosimetric aspects of MRI simulation including treatment planning and digitally reconstructed radiograph (DRR) generation. A liquid filled pelvic shaped phantom with simulated pelvic organs was scanned in a 3T MRI simulator with dedicated radiotherapy couch-top, laser bridge and pelvic coil mounts. A second phantom with the same external shape but with an internal distortion grid was used to quantify the distortion of the MR image. Both phantoms were also CT scanned as the gold-standard for both geometry and dosimetry. Deformable image registration was used to quantify the MR distortion. Dose comparison was made using a seven-field IMRT plan developed on the CT scan with the fluences copied to the MR image and recalculated using bulk electron densities. Without correction the maximum distortion of the MR compared with the CT scan was 7.5 mm across the pelvis, while this was reduced to 2.6 and 1.7 mm by the vendor’s 2D and 3D correction algorithms, respectively. Within the locations of the internal organs of interest, the distortion was <1.5 and <1 mm with 2D and 3D correction algorithms, respectively. The dose at the prostate isocentre calculated on CT and MRI images differed by 0.01% (1.1 cGy). Positioning shifts were within 1 mm when setup was performed using MRI generated DRRs compared to setup using CT DRRs. The MRI pelvic phantom allows end-to-end testing of the MRI simulation workflow with comparison to the gold-standard CT based process. MRI simulation was found to be geometrically accurate with organ dimensions, dose distributions and DRR based setup within acceptable limits compared to CT.

  12. Radiation therapy and pelvic node dissection in the management of cancer of the prostate.

    PubMed

    Hilaris, B S; Whitmore, W F; Batata, M A; Grabstald, H

    1974-08-01

    A technique involving a pelvic lymphadenectomy and a retropubic implantation of the prostate with iodine 125 encapsulated sources is under investigation at Memorial Hospital. This technique is simple and applicable to patients with localized cancer of the prostate, clinically stage B or C. It has increased the accuracy of staging, carries no mortality and has low morbidity. The results have been encouraging with substantial local tumor control and no late urinary or rectal disturbances in the 49 patients who have been followed from 6 to 30 months.

  13. Stereotactic body radiation therapy for abdominal and pelvic oligometastases: Dosimetric targets for safe and effective local control.

    PubMed

    Rwigema, Jean-Claude M; King, Christopher; Wang, Pin-Chieh; Kamrava, Mitchell; Kupelian, Patrick; Steinberg, Michael L; Lee, Percy

    2015-01-01

    To investigate correlates and predictors of outcomes of stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) for patients with abdominal and pelvic oligometastases from different primary tumors. We evaluated outcomes of 38 consecutive patients with 44 unresectable nodal and soft-tissue oligometastases in the abdominal pelvic region who were treated with SBRT between November 2008 and April 2014. Thirty-two patients had solitary lesions and 6 patients had 2 lesions. The median prescription dose was 40 Gy (24-50 Gy) delivered in 4-5 fractions. The median gross tumor volume was 18.7 mL (0.7-194.1 mL). We evaluated tumor response, local control (LC), and overall survival (OS) rates as well as acute and chronic toxicities. At a median follow-up of 19 months (0.9-53.4 months), tumor responses were: complete response 31.8%, partial response 38.6%, standard deviation 20.5%, and progressive disease 9.1%. The overall 1- to 2-year LC and OS rates were 100%/75.1% (95% confidence interval [CI], 54.4%-88.4%) and 95.2% (95% CI, 82.8%-98.8%)/88.9% (95% CI, 68.1%-95.1%), respectively. On univariate analysis, increasing SBRT dose, smaller gross tumor volume, and asymptomatic lesions were associated with improved LC (P = .01, P<.001, and P = .01, respectively). On multivariate analysis, advanced original primary disease stage predicted for worse OS (P = .001). One patient developed a colovesicular fistula at 20.9 months in the setting of local tumor progression with a volume of bowel receiving 20 Gy (V(20Gy)) = 26.9 mL. The overall mean bowel V(20Gy) achieved was 16 ± 22.9 mL. Another patient had grade 2 proctitis at 13 months after SBRT. Pain relief was achieved in 81.8% of patients with symptomatic lesions (N = 11). Our results suggest that SBRT doses 40-50 Gy in 5 fractions (biological effective dose 72-100 Gy10) with bowel V(20Gy) ≤20 mL are efficacious and associated with minimal toxicity for abdominal pelvic nodal and soft-tissue oligometastases. Palliation of symptoms is achievable

  14. Extrahepatic Bile Duct Cancers: Surgery Alone Versus Surgery Plus Postoperative Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Gwak, Hee Keun; Kim, Woo Chul; Kim, Hun Jung; Park, Jeong Hoon

    2010-09-01

    Purpose: The goal of this study was to determine the role of radiotherapy after curative-intent surgery in the management of extrahepatic bile duct (EHBD) cancers. Methods and Materials: From 1997 through 2005, 78 patients with EHBD cancer were surgically staged. These patients were stratified by the absence of adjuvant radiation (n = 47, group I) versus radiation (n = 31, group II) after resection. Pathology examination showed 27 cases in group I and 20 cases in group II had microscopically positive resection margins. The patients in group II received 45 to 54 Gy of external beam radiotherapy. The primary endpoints of this study were overall survival, disease-free survival, and prognostic factors. Results: There were no differences between the 5-year overall survival rates for the two groups (11.6% in group I vs. 21% in group II). However, the patients with microscopically positive resection margins who received adjuvant radiation therapy had higher median disease-free survival rates than those who underwent surgery alone (21 months vs. 10 months, respectively, p = 0.042). Decreasing local failure was found in patients who received postoperative radiotherapy (61.7% in group I and 35.6% in group II, p = 0.02). Outcomes of the patients with a positive resection margin and lymph node metastasis who received postoperative radiation therapy were doubled compared to those of patients without adjuvant radiotherapy. Resection margin status, lymph node metastasis, and pathology differentiation were significant prognostic factors in disease-free survival. Conclusions: Adjuvant radiotherapy might be useful in patients with EHBD cancer, especially for those patients with microscopic residual tumors and positive lymph nodes after resection for increasing local control.

  15. Late gastrointestinal effects of pelvic radiation: a nurse-led service.

    PubMed

    Ludlow, Helen; Green, John; Turner, Jeff

    2017-02-23

    There are currently at least 2 million people in the UK living with and following a cancer diagnosis. Typically four out of every ten people with cancer will receive radiotherapy, but a large proportion of people who have pelvic radiotherapy may go on to develop gastrointestinal (GI) symptoms. This includes rectal bleeding and faecal incontinence, which can have a huge impact on quality of life. These problems often go under-reported by patients and are also under-recognised or under-treated by health professionals. Cancer survivorship is a growing topic that is likely to have a major impact on the NHS, with increasing numbers of patients presenting. A late GI effects of pelvic radiotherapy clinic was set up to address these growing needs of patients with GI symptoms following radiotherapy. This article also shares insights from a doctoral study that is underway looking at people's experiences of living with symptoms following their treatment, in order to improve awareness of the major impact that this can have.

  16. Chylous ascites and high-output chylous fistula after extended pelvic lymph node dissection for urological cancer: a rare postoperative complication.

    PubMed

    Castillo, Octavio A; Borgna, Vincenzo

    2014-11-01

    Chylous ascites and high-output chylous fistula are rare complications following abdominal or pelvic surgery. We report a series of five cases that occurred after pelvic lymph node dissection for urological cancer, in addition to their clinical presentation, diagnosis, and treatment. The series comprises five patients; four men in whom robotic radical prostatectomy and extended pelvic lymphadenectomy were performed, and one woman with an infiltrating bladder cancer that underwent robotic anterior pelvic exenteration and extended pelvic lymphadenectomy. The first four patients developed chylous ascites, and the female patient a high-output chylous fistula. In all cases, diagnosis of chylous ascites or chylous fistula was confirmed, and they were handled in varied ways, from observation to medical treatment, paracentesis, and surgery, according to their clinical presentation and evolution. We describe a simple treatment algorithm. This rare surgical complication requires a grade of suspicion and a defined treatment according to the probability of the medical compromise. Prevention is an important element. This series, according to our knowledge, is the first description in patients undergoing robotic extended pelvic lymphadenectomy.

  17. Dosimetric comparison study between intensity modulated radiation therapy and three-dimensional conformal proton therapy for pelvic bone marrow sparing in the treatment of cervical cancer.

    PubMed

    Song, William Y; Huh, Soon N; Liang, Yun; White, Greg; Nichols, R Charles; Watkins, W Tyler; Mundt, Arno J; Mell, Loren K

    2010-08-15

    The objective was to compare intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) with 3D conformal proton therapy (3DCPT) in the treatment of cervical cancer. In particular, each technique's ability to spare pelvic bone marrow (PBM) was of primary interest in this study. A total of six cervical cancer patients (3 postoperative and 3 intact) were planned and analyzed. All plans had uniform 1.0 cm CTV-PTV margin and satisfied the 95% PTV with 100% isodose (prescription dose = 45 Gy) coverage. Dose-volume histograms (DVH) were analyzed for comparison. The overall PTV and PBM volumes were 1035.9 ± 192.2 cc and 1151.4 ± 198.3 cc, respectively. In terms of PTV dose conformity index (DCI) and dose homogeneity index (DHI), 3DCPT was slightly superior to IMRT with 1.00 ± 0.001, 1.01 ± 0.02, and 1.10 ± 0.02, 1.13 ± 0.01, respectively. In addition, 3DCPT demonstrated superiority in reducing lower doses (i.e., V30 or less) to PBM, small bowel and bladder. Particularly in PBM, average V10 and V20 reductions of 10.8% and 7.4% (p = 0.001 and 0.04), respectively, were observed. However, in the higher dose range, IMRT provided better sparing (> V30). For example, in small bowel and PBM, average reductions in V45 of 4.9% and 10.0% (p = 0.048 and 0.008), respectively, were observed. Due to its physical characteristics such as low entrance dose, spread-out Bragg peak and finite particle range of protons, 3DCPT illustrated superior target coverage uniformity and sparing of the lower doses in PBM and other organs. Further studies are, however, needed to fully exploit the benefits of protons for general use in cervical cancer.

  18. A Phase II Study of Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy to the Pelvis for Postoperative Patients With Endometrial Carcinoma: Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Trial 0418

    SciTech Connect

    Jhingran, Anuja; Winter, Kathryn; Portelance, Lorraine; Miller, Brigitte; Salehpour, Mohammad; Gaur, Rakesh; Souhami, Luis; Small, William; Berk, Lawrence; Gaffney, David

    2012-09-01

    Purpose: To determine the feasibility of pelvic intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) for patients with endometrial cancer in a multi-institutional setting and to determine whether this treatment is associated with fewer short-term bowel adverse events than standard radiation therapy. Methods: Patients with adenocarcinoma of the endometrium treated with pelvic radiation therapy alone were eligible. Guidelines for target definition and delineation, dose prescription, and dose-volume constraints for the targets and critical normal structures were detailed in the study protocol and a web-based atlas. Results: Fifty-eight patients were accrued by 25 institutions; 43 were eligible for analysis. Forty-two patients (98%) had an acceptable IMRT plan; 1 had an unacceptable variation from the prescribed dose to the nodal planning target volume. The proportions of cases in which doses to critical normal structures exceeded protocol criteria were as follows: bladder, 67%; rectum, 76%; bowel, 17%; and femoral heads, 33%. Twelve patients (28%) developed grade {>=}2 short-term bowel adverse events. Conclusions: Pelvic IMRT for endometrial cancer is feasible across multiple institutions with use of a detailed protocol and centralized quality assurance (QA). For future trials, contouring of vaginal and nodal tissue will need continued monitoring with good QA and better definitions will be needed for organs at risk.

  19. Pelvic irradiation for stage II ovarian carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Terada, K Y; Morley, G W; Roberts, J A

    1988-01-01

    Over a 20-year period, 34 patients with FIGO stage II ovarian carcinoma were treated with postoperative pelvic irradiation at the University of Michigan. Complications of radiation treatment were minimal. The overall actuarial disease-free 5-year survival was 53%. This was not significantly different for substages IIA, IIB, or IIC. Patients with well-differentiated tumors had a significantly better survival than patients with moderate or poorly differentiated tumors (P less than 0.05). The implications for managing stage II ovarian carcinoma are discussed.

  20. Discordance Between Preoperative and Postoperative Bladder Cancer Location: Implications for Partial-Bladder Radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Goldsmith, Benjamin; Tucker, Kai; Conway, Robert Greg; He, Jiwei; Guzzo, Thomas; Bekelman, Justin; Deville, Curtiland; Vapiwala, Neha; Malkowicz, S. Bruce; Christodouleas, John

    2013-03-01

    Purpose: There is strong interest in partial-bladder radiation whether as a boost or definitive therapy to limit long-term toxicity. It is unclear that a standard preoperative examination can accurately identify all sites of disease within the bladder. The purpose of this study was to determine the correlation between preoperative localization of bladder tumors with postoperative findings to facilitate partial-bladder radiation techniques when appropriate. Methods and Materials: We examined patients with clinically staged T1-T4 invasive transitional cell carcinoma (TCC) or TCC with variant histology with no history of radiation or partial cystectomy undergoing radical cystectomy. Patients were scored as “under-detected” if a bladder site was involved with invasive disease (≥T1) at the time of cystectomy, but not identified preoperatively. Patients were additionally scored as “widely under-detected” if they had postoperative lesions that were not identified preoperatively in a given site, nor in any adjacent site. Rates of under-detected and widely under-detected lesions, as well as univariate and multivariate association between clinical variables and under-detection, were evaluated using logistic regression. Results: Among 222 patients, 96% (213/222) had at least 1 area of discordance. Fifty-eight percent of patients were under-detected in at least 1 location, whereas 12% were widely under-detected. Among 24 patients with a single site of disease on preoperative evaluation, 21/24 (88%) had at least 1 under-detected lesion and 14/24 (58%) were widely under-detected. On multivariate analysis, only solitary site of preoperative disease was associated with increased levels of under-detection of invasive disease (OR = 4.161, 95% CI, 1.368-12.657). Conclusion: Our study shows a stark discordance between preoperative and postoperative localization of bladder tumors. From a clinical perspective, incomplete localization of all sites of disease within the bladder

  1. Is "pelvic radiation disease" always the cause of bowel symptoms following prostate cancer intensity-modulated radiotherapy?

    PubMed

    Min, Myo; Chua, Benjamin; Guttner, Yvonne; Abraham, Ned; Aherne, Noel J; Hoffmann, Matthew; McKay, Michael J; Shakespeare, Thomas P

    2014-02-01

    Pelvic radiation disease (PRD) also widely known as "radiation proctopathy" is a well recognised late side-effect following conventional prostate radiotherapy. However, endoscopic evaluation and/or specialist referral for new or persistent post-prostate radiotherapy bowel symptoms is not routine and serious diagnoses may potentially be missed. Here we report a policy of endoscopic evaluation of bowel symptoms persisting >90 days post radiotherapy for prostate cancer. A consecutive series of 102 patients who had radical prostate intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT)/image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) and who had new or ongoing bowel symptoms or positive faecal occult blood tests (FOBT) on follow up visits more than three months after treatment, were referred for endoscopic examination. All but one (99%) had full colonoscopic investigation. Endoscopic findings included gastric/colonic/rectal polyps (56%), diverticular disease (49%), haemorrhoids (38%), radiation proctopathy (29%), gastritis/oesophagitis (8%) and rarer diagnoses, including bowel cancer which was found in 3%. Only four patients (4%) had radiation proctopathy without associated pathology and 65 patients (63%) had more than one diagnosis. If flexible sigmoidoscopy alone were used, 36.6% of patients and 46.6% patients with polyp(s) would have had their diagnoses missed. Our study has shown that bowel symptoms following prostate IMRT/IGRT are due to numerous diagnoses other than PRD, including malignancy. Routine referral pathways should be developed for endoscopic evaluation/specialist review for patients with new or persistent bowel symptoms (or positive FOBT) following prostate radiotherapy. This recommendation should be considered for incorporation into national guidelines. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Whole-pelvic nodal radiation therapy in the context of hypofractionation for high-risk prostate cancer patients: a step forward.

    PubMed

    Kaidar-Person, Orit; Roach, Mack; Créhange, Gilles

    2013-07-15

    Given the low α/β ratio of prostate cancer, prostate hypofractionation has been tested through numerous clinical studies. There is a growing body of literature suggesting that with high conformal radiation therapy and even with more sophisticated radiation techniques, such as high-dose-rate brachytherapy or image-guided intensity modulated radiation therapy, morbidity associated with shortening overall treatment time with higher doses per fraction remains low when compared with protracted conventional radiation therapy to the prostate only. In high-risk prostate cancer patients, there is accumulating evidence that either dose escalation to the prostate or hypofractionation may improve outcome. Nevertheless, selected patients who have a high risk of lymph node involvement may benefit from whole-pelvic radiation therapy (WPRT). Although combining WPRT with hypofractionated prostate radiation therapy is feasible, it remains investigational. By combining modern advances in radiation oncology (high-dose-rate prostate brachytherapy, intensity modulated radiation therapy with an improved image guidance for soft-tissue sparing), it is hypothesized that WPRT could take advantage of recent results from hypofractionation trials. Moreover, the results from hypofractionation trials raise questions as to whether hypofractionation to pelvic lymph nodes with a high risk of occult involvement might improve the outcomes in WPRT. Although investigational, this review discusses the challenging idea of WPRT in the context of hypofractionation for patients with high-risk prostate cancer.

  3. Whole-Pelvic Nodal Radiation Therapy in the Context of Hypofractionation for High-Risk Prostate Cancer Patients: A Step Forward

    SciTech Connect

    Kaidar-Person, Orit; Roach, Mack; Créhange, Gilles

    2013-07-15

    Given the low α/β ratio of prostate cancer, prostate hypofractionation has been tested through numerous clinical studies. There is a growing body of literature suggesting that with high conformal radiation therapy and even with more sophisticated radiation techniques, such as high-dose-rate brachytherapy or image-guided intensity modulated radiation therapy, morbidity associated with shortening overall treatment time with higher doses per fraction remains low when compared with protracted conventional radiation therapy to the prostate only. In high-risk prostate cancer patients, there is accumulating evidence that either dose escalation to the prostate or hypofractionation may improve outcome. Nevertheless, selected patients who have a high risk of lymph node involvement may benefit from whole-pelvic radiation therapy (WPRT). Although combining WPRT with hypofractionated prostate radiation therapy is feasible, it remains investigational. By combining modern advances in radiation oncology (high-dose-rate prostate brachytherapy, intensity modulated radiation therapy with an improved image guidance for soft-tissue sparing), it is hypothesized that WPRT could take advantage of recent results from hypofractionation trials. Moreover, the results from hypofractionation trials raise questions as to whether hypofractionation to pelvic lymph nodes with a high risk of occult involvement might improve the outcomes in WPRT. Although investigational, this review discusses the challenging idea of WPRT in the context of hypofractionation for patients with high-risk prostate cancer.

  4. Post-operative radiation therapy for advanced-stage oropharyngeal cancer.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Eric; Panwala, Kathryn; Holland, John

    2002-11-01

    Between 1985 and 1999, 43 patients with locally-advanced, resectable oropharyngeal cancer were treated with combined surgery and post-operative radiation therapy (RT) at Oregon Health and Science University. Five patients (12 per cent) had Stage III disease and 38 patients (88 per cent) had Stage IV disease. All patients had gross total resections of the primary tumour. Thirty-seven patients had neck dissections for regional disease. RT consisted of a mean tumour-bed dose of 63.0 Gy delivered in 1.8-2.0 Gy fractions over a mean of 49 days. At three- and five-years, the actuarial local control was 96 per cent and the actuarial local/regional control was 80 per cent. The three- and five-year actuarial rates of distant metastases were 41 per cent and 46 per cent, respectively. The actuarial overall survival at three- and five-years was 41 per cent and 34 per cent, respectively. The actuarial rates of progression-free survival were 49 per cent at three-years and 45 per cent at five years. Combined surgery and post-operative RT for advanced-stage oropharyngeal cancer results in excellent local/regional control. This particular group of patients experienced a high-rate of developing distant metastases.

  5. Prevention of heterotopic bone formation after total hip arthroplasty: a prospective randomised study comparing postoperative radiation therapy with indomethacin medication.

    PubMed

    Kienapfel, H; Koller, M; Wüst, A; Sprey, C; Merte, H; Engenhart-Cabillic, R; Griss, P

    1999-01-01

    Heterotopic ossification (HO) after total hip arthroplasty is known to be a major complication with an impact on the functional outcome. Efforts have been made to prevent the occurrence of HO by means of either radiation therapy or pharmacotherapy. To date, there are no data available regarding the relative benefit of radiation versus medication with non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. The objective of this study was to compare single-dose 600-cGy radiation therapy with indomethacin medication for their effect on the prevention of heterotopic bone formation after total hip arthroplasty. In all, 154 patients were included in the study. All patients underwent primary total hip arthroplasty due to osteoarthritis. Patients were randomly assigned to three different therapeutic groups. (a) The radiation group received a single radiation dose of 600 cGy between the 2nd and 4th postoperative day. (b) The indomethacin group received an oral application of indomethacin 2 x 50 mg per day from the 1st to 42nd postoperative day. (c) The control group received neither radiation nor indomethacin medication. There were significant group differences (P < 0.001). A least significant difference test (LSD) revealed that the mean of the control group was significantly different from that of the radiation and indomethacin groups. The 13 patients (8.4%) classified Brooker 3 or 4 were all in the control group. Again, this effect was statistically significant (chi-square, P < 0.001). In conclusion, this study demonstrated that both radiation and indomethacin therapy are effective in the prevention of postoperative HO. The choice for either one of the treatments has to be based on availability, contraindications, side-effects, practicability, standardisation and cost. Based on these considerations together with the results of this study, we currently use postoperative radiation with 600 cGy for all patients undergoing primary total hip arthroplasty.

  6. Overall Survival Benefit From Postoperative Radiation Therapy for Organ-Confined, Margin-Positive Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Dillman, Robert O.; Hafer, Russell; Cox, Craig; McClure, Stephanie E.

    2011-03-01

    Purpose: Radical prostatectomy for invasive prostate cancer is associated with positive margin rates in 10% to 50% of resected specimens. Postoperative radiation therapy may benefit patients who have organ-confined prostate cancer with positive margins. Methods and Materials: We performed a retrospective analysis to examine whether adjunctive radiation therapy enhanced long-term survival for prostate cancer patients who underwent prostatectomy for localized prostate cancer but with positive margins. We used the Hoag Cancer Center database to identify patients diagnosed with invasive prostate cancer. Relative and overall survival rates were calculated. Results: Among 1,474 patients diagnosed with localized invasive prostate cancer during the years 1990 to 2006 and undergoing prostatectomy, 113 (7.7%) were identified who had positive margins and did not have local extension of disease, positive lymph nodes, or distant metastases. A total of 17 patients received adjunctive radiation therapy (Group A), whereas 96 did not (Group B; 3 received hormonal therapy). Both groups had a median age of 64 years and median follow-up of 7.5 years. In Group A, no patients have died as of last follow-up, but in Group B, 18 have died. Estimated 10-year and 15-year overall survival rates were both 100% for Group A compared with 85% and 57% respectively for Group B (p{sub 2} = 0.050, log rank). Relative 10- and 15 year survival rates were both 100% for Group A compared with 100% and 79% respectively for Group B. Conclusions: This retrospective analysis suggests that prostate cancer patients with localized disease but positive margins do derive a survival benefit from adjuvant radiation therapy.

  7. An analysis of appropriate delivery of postoperative radiation therapy for endometrial cancer using the RAND/UCLA Appropriateness Method: Executive summary.

    PubMed

    Jones, Ellen; Beriwal, Sushil; Beyer, David; Chino, Junzo; Jhingran, Anuja; Lee, Larissa; Michalski, Jeff; Mundt, Arno J; Patton, Caroline; Petersen, Ivy; Portelance, Lorraine; Schwarz, Julie K; McCloskey, Susan

    2016-01-01

    To summarize the results of American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO)'s analysis of appropriate delivery of postoperative radiation therapy (RT) for endometrial cancer using the RAND/University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA) Appropriateness Method, outline areas of convergence and divergence with the 2014 ASTRO endometrial Guideline, and highlight where this analysis provides new information or perspective. The RAND/UCLA Appropriateness Method was used to combine available evidence with expert opinion. A comprehensive literature review was conducted and a multidisciplinary panel rated the appropriateness of RT options for different clinical scenarios. Treatments were categorized by the median rating as Appropriate, Uncertain, or Inappropriate. The ASTRO endometrial Guideline and this analysis using the RAND/UCLA Appropriateness Method did not recommend adjuvant RT for early-stage, low-risk endometrioid cancers and largely agree regarding use of vaginal brachytherapy for low-intermediate and high-intermediate risk patients. For more advanced endometrioid cancer, chemotherapy with RT is supported by both documents. The Guideline and the RAND/UCLA analysis diverged regarding use of pelvic radiation. For stages II and III, this analysis rated external beam RT plus vaginal brachytherapy Appropriate, whereas the Guideline preferred external beam alone. In addition, this analysis offers insight on the role of histology, extent of nodal dissection, and para-aortic nodal irradiation; the use of intensity modulated RT; and management of stage IVA. This analysis based on the RAND/UCLA Method shows significant agreement with the 2014 endometrial Guideline. Areas of divergence, often in scenarios with low-level evidence, included use of external beam RT plus vaginal brachytherapy in stages II and III and external beam RT alone in early-stage patients. Furthermore, the analysis explores other important questions regarding management of this disease site.

  8. Preliminary report of a new treatment strategy for advanced pelvic malignancy: surgical resection and radiation therapy using afterloading catheters plus an inflatable displacement prosthesis in the treatment of advanced primary and recurrent rectal cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Edington, H.D.; Hancock, S.; Coe, F.L.; Sugarbaker, P.H.

    1986-09-01

    An unsolved problem in colon and rectal surgery involves the treatment of locally invasive primary and recurrent rectal cancer. An approach is described that uses intracavitary iridium-192 sources in combination with a pelvic displacement prosthesis to augment external beam radiation doses to sites of residual disease identified at surgery. This approach should permit administration of tumoricidal doses of radiation to positive surgical margins minimizing radiation toxicity to the small bowel. The radiation source and all prosthetic materials are removed at the bedside within 2 weeks of surgery, ensuring accurate radiation dosimetry, minimizing infectious complications, and sparing the patient the need for full high-dose pelvic irradiation.

  9. Radiation-Related Predictors of Hematologic Toxicity After Concurrent Chemoradiation for Cervical Cancer and Implications for Bone Marrow-Sparing Pelvic IMRT

    SciTech Connect

    Albuquerque, Kevin; Giangreco, David; Morrison, Courtney; Siddiqui, Mohammed; Sinacore, Jim; Potkul, Ronald; Roeske, John

    2011-03-15

    Purpose: To determine factors predictive for hematologic toxicity (HT) associated with concurrent chemoradiation for Stage II through IV cervical cancer. Methods and Materials: The medical records of 40 women receiving concurrent chemoradiation for cervical cancer were reviewed. Hematologic toxicity was defined by use of Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events (version 3.0). Variables predicting for HT including age, body mass index, transfusions, and bone marrow volumes irradiated were included in the data analysis. Results: Of the patients, 13 (32.5%) had Grade 0 or 1 HT and 27 (67.5%) had Grade 2 through 4 HT (HT2+). Multiple logistic regression analysis of potential predictors showed that only the volume of bone receiving 20 Gy (V20) for whole pelvic bone tended toward significance for predicting HT2+. A strong correlation was noted between HT2+ and V20 (r = 0.8, p < 0.0001). A partitioning analysis to predict HT2+ showed a cutoff value of 79.42% (approximately 80%) for V20 of whole pelvic bone. That is, if the V20 of the whole pelvis exceeds 80%, the risk of HT2+ developing increases by a factor (odds ratio) of 4.5 (95%, confidence interval, 1.08-18.69) (p < 0.05). Conclusions: We have shown a correlation between bone marrow volume radiated and development of HT. This has implications for use of pelvic intensity-modulated radiation therapy, which can potentially decrease the volume of bone marrow radiated.

  10. Phase II trial of adjuvant pelvic radiation "sandwiched" between combination paclitaxel and carboplatin in women with uterine papillary serous carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Einstein, Mark H; Frimer, Marina; Kuo, Dennis Y-S; Reimers, Laura L; Mehta, Keyur; Mutyala, Subhakar; Huang, Gloria S; Hou, June Y; Goldberg, Gary L

    2012-01-01

    To evaluate the safety and survival in women treated with adjuvant pelvic radiation "sandwiched" between six cycles of paclitaxel and carboplatin chemotherapy with completely resected UPSC. Surgically staged women with UPSC (FIGO stage 1-4) and no visible residual disease were enrolled. Treatment involved paclitaxel (175 mg/m(2)) and carboplatin (AUC=6.0-7.5) every 21 days for 3 doses, followed by radiation therapy (RT), followed by an additional 3 cycles of paclitaxel and carboplatin (AUC=5-6). Survival analysis, using Kaplan-Meier methods, was performed on patients who completed at least 3 cycles of chemotherapy and RT. A total of 81 patients were enrolled, of which 72 patients completed the first 3 cycles of chemotherapy followed by prescribed RT. Median age was 67 years (range: 43-82 years). 59/72 (82%) had disease confined to the uterus and 13/72 (18%) had completely resected extra-uterine disease (stage 3 and 4). 65 (83%) completed the protocol. Overall PFS and OS for combined stage 1 and 2 patients was 65.5 ± 3.6 months and 76.5 ± 4.3 months, respectively. PFS and OS for combined stage 3 and 4 patients was 25.8 ± 3.0 and 35.9 ± 5.3 months, respectively. Three-year % survival probability for stage 1 and 2 patients was 84% and for stage 3 and 4 patients was 50%. Of the 435 chemotherapy cycles administered, there were 11(2.5%) G3/G4 non-hematologic toxicities. 26(6.0%) cycles had dose reductions and 37(8.5%) had dose delays. Compared to prior studies of single modality adjuvant therapy, RT "sandwiched" between paclitaxel and carboplatin chemotherapy is well-tolerated and highly efficacious in women with completely resected UPSC. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Nutritional supplementation with L-arginine prevents pelvic radiation-induced changes in morphology, density, and regulating factors of blood vessels in the wall of rat bladder.

    PubMed

    Costa, Waldemar S; Ribeiro, Monica N; Cardoso, Luiz E M; Dornas, Maria C; Ramos, Cristiane F; Gallo, Carla B M; Sampaio, Francisco J B

    2013-06-01

    To determine whether L-arginine has protective effects against radiation-induced alterations in the morphology and regulatory factors of vesical blood vessels in rats. Male rats aged 3-4 months were divided into groups of 10 animals each: (a) controls, consisting of non-treated animals; (b) radiated-only rats; and (c) radiated rats receiving L-arginine supplementation. Radiation was in one session of 10 Gy and was aimed at the pelvic-abdominal region. L-arginine was administered once a day (0.65 g/kg body weight), starting 7 days before radiation and continuing until killing on the 16th day after radiation. The density, relative area, and wall thickness of blood vessels were measured in the vesical lamina propria using histological methods, and the expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and fibroblast growth factors (FGF) in the bladder wall was assessed by RT-PCR. Compared with controls, radiation alone decreased the density and relative area of blood vessels by 32 % (p < 0.01) and 25 % (p < 0.05), respectively, and reduced the arterial wall thickness by 42 % (p < 0.004). VEGF and FGF mRNA levels after radiation were diminished by 67 % (p < 0.002) and 56 % (p < 0.04), respectively. The radiated animals supplemented with L-arginine were not significantly different from controls. Pelvic radiation leads to significant vesical modifications, as in the morphology of blood vessels and in VEGF and FGF expression. All these changes, however, were prevented by L-arginine treatment. These results emphasize, therefore, the potential use of this amino acid as a radioprotective drug.

  12. Delayed postoperative radiation therapy in local control of squamous cell carcinoma of the tongue and floor of the mouth

    PubMed Central

    Amar, Ali; Chedid, Helma Maria; Curioni, Otávio Alberto; Dedivitis, Rogério Aparecido; Rapoport, Abrão; Cernea, Claudio Roberto; Brandão, Lenine Garcia

    2014-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the effect of time between surgery and postoperative radiation therapy on local recurrence of squamous cell carcinoma of the tongue and floor of the mouth. Methods A total of 154 patients treated between 1996 and 2007 were selected considering local recurrence rate and time of the adjuvant radiotherapy. Results Local recurrence was diagnosed in 54 (35%) patients. Radiation therapy reduced the rate of local recurrences, although with no statistical significance. The time between surgery and initiation of postoperative radiotherapy did not significantly influence the risk of local recurrence in patients referred to adjuvant treatment (p=0.49). Conclusion In the presence of risk factors for local recurrence, a short delay in starting the adjuvant radiation therapy does not contraindicate its performance. PMID:25628200

  13. Postoperative Single-Fraction Radiation for Prevention of Heterotopic Ossification of the Elbow

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, Clifford G.; Polster, Joshua M.; Reddy, Chandana A.; Lyons, Janice A.; Evans, Peter J.; Lawton, Jeffrey N.; Graham, Thomas J.; Suh, John H.

    2010-08-01

    Purpose: Heterotopic ossification (HO) about the elbow has been described after surgery, trauma, and burns. Even limited deposits can lead to significant functional deficits. Little data exist regarding outcomes of patients treated with radiation therapy (RT) after elbow surgery. We report here the Cleveland Clinic experience with single-fraction radiation following surgery to the elbow. The primary endpoint was the rate of new HO after RT. Secondary endpoints were range of motion, functional compromise, and toxicity. Methods and Materials: From May 1993 to July 2006, 36 patients underwent elbow surgery followed by single-fraction RT. Range of motion data were collected before and during surgery and at last follow-up. Radiographs were reviewed for persistent or new HO. Patient and treatment factors were analyzed for correlation with development of HO or functional compromise. Results: Median follow-up was 8.7 months, median age was 42 years, and 75% of patients were male. Twenty-six (72%) patients had HO prior to surgery. All patients had significant limitations in flexion/extension or pronation/supination at baseline. Thirty-one (86%) patients had prior elbow trauma, and 26 (72%) patients had prior surgery. RT was administered a median of 1 day postoperatively (range, 1-4 days). Thirty-four patients received 700 cGy, and 2 patients received 600 cGy. Three (8%) patients developed new HO after RT. All patients had improvement in range of motion from baseline. No patient or treatment factors were significantly associated with the development of HO or functional compromise. Conclusions: Single-fraction RT after surgery to the elbow is associated with favorable functional and radiographic outcomes.

  14. Radiation alone in the treatment of cancer of the uterine cervix: Analysis of pelvic failure and dose response relationship

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, R.Y.; Trotti, A.; Wu, C.J.; Soong, S.J.; Salter, M.M. )

    1989-11-01

    This retrospective analysis involves 569 patients with invasive cancer of the uterine cervix treated with irradiation alone between 1969 and 1980. Treatment consisted of external and intracavitary irradiation and treatment policy remained consistent throughout the study interval. In early stage disease (FIGO IA, IB, and IIA), pelvic failure was 4.6%, 11.2%, and 8.2%, respectively. In late stage disease (FIGO IIB, III, and IVA), pelvic failure was 30.1%, 52.3%, and 69.2%, respectively. Further analysis revealed that total dose at point A is well correlated with pelvic control. An aggressive treatment is crucial in late stage disease in determining the probability of pelvic tumor control and survival. Methods of dose prescription, dose-response relationships, treatment philosophy and its therapeutic implications are discussed.

  15. The role of thallium-201 whole body scan with pelvic SPECT in patients with uterine cervical cancer treated by radiation therapy: a preliminary report.

    PubMed

    Liang, Ji-An; Kao, Chia-Hung; Chen, Shang-Wen; Yang, Shih-Neng; Sun, Shung-Shung

    2003-10-01

    Evaluation of tumor extent before treatment and its response to therapy is important. The aim of this report is to assess the usefulness with thallium-201 (Tl-201) imaging study including whole body scan and pelvic single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) in patients with uterine cervical cancers treated by radiation therapy. Before irradiation, eleven patients received detailed physical examination and Tl-201 imaging studies. A 4-score grading system was set for evaluation. The interval between Tl-201 imaging follow-up and completion of radiotherapy is one to four months, and its findings were compared with those from CT scan and clinical evidence. Before radiation, left supraclavicular and paraaortic lymphadenopathy was identified in one patient from whole body scan. Accumulation of Tl-201 uptake is observed from pelvic SPECT in all patients. It seems that patients with more tumor bulk had more intense uptake, except for one case with history of suspected pelvic inflammatory disease (PID). After radiotherapy, complete or partial regression is observed. For 6 patients with complete regression (score = 0), no evidence of recurrence is confirmed by follow-up examinations. For three patients with little residual uptake (score = 1), one is suspected with residual density and she is under close follow-up, the other two patients seem due to uterine myoma or short latency. These three patients received another Tl-201 scan 6 months after irradiation completion and the score became zero. One patient with residual intense uptake (score = 2) suffered from relapse in the pelvis and abdomen. This preliminary report indicates that Tl-201 whole body scan and pelvic SPECT has potential in the assessment of response to radiotherapy in patients with uterine cervical cancers. However, further studies including more cases and longer follow-up are needed.

  16. [Clinical analysis of postoperative radiotherapy for stage I endometrial cancer].

    PubMed

    Li, Z; Shen, W; Wang, J

    1998-05-01

    To evaluate the role and complications of adjuvant radiotherapy for stage I endometrial cancer after surgery. From May, 1986 to December, 1995, 20 patients with stage I endometrial cancer received total abdominal hysterectomy with bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy(TAH/BSO), and additional pelvic lymph node dissection in 5 cases. Most of the patients received radio therapy in 2-4 weeks after surgery. The radiation fields included pelvic lymph nodes with a total dose of 40-50 Gy. All the patients had survived for 10 years. Only one patient developed distant metastases. Acute radiation reaction was observed in all patients. Late radiation-induced damage occured in six patients and was severe in two. Postoperative radiotherapy in the management of stage I endometrial cancer is beneficial for the controal of local recurrence but has relatively high frequency of late radiation injury.

  17. Autologous blood stem-cell transplantation in patients with advanced Hodgkin's disease and prior radiation to the pelvic site

    SciTech Connect

    Koerbling, M.H.; Holle, R.; Haas, R.; Knauf, W.; Doerken, B.H.; Ho, A.D.; Kuse, R.; Pralle, H.; Fliedner, T.M.; Hunstein, W. )

    1990-06-01

    Patients with relapsed Hodgkin's disease who respond to salvage therapy are successfully treated with cyclophosphamide, carmustine (BCNU), and etoposide (VP-16) (CBV) followed by autologus bone marrow transplantation (ABMT). Because of heavy pretreatment including radiation to the pelvic site, marrow harvest was not feasible in those patients. We therefore used blood-derived hemopoietic precursor cells as an alternative stem-cell source to rescue them after superdose chemotherapy. Hemopoietic precursor cells were mobilized into the peripheral blood either by chemotherapeutic induction of transient myelosuppression followed by an overshooting of blood stem-cell concentration, or by continuous intravenous (IV) granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) administration. The median time to reach 1,000 WBC per microliter, 500 polymorphonuclear cells (PMN) per microliter, or 20,000 platelets per microliter was 10, 20.5, and 38 days, respectively, for 50% of all patients. The platelet counts of two patients never dropped below 20,000/microL following autologous blood stem-cell transplantation (ABSCT), whereas two other patients had to be supported with platelets for 75 and 86 days posttransplant until a stable peripheral platelet count of 20,000/microL was attained. Among the 11 assessable patients, seven are in unmaintained complete remission (CR) at a median follow-up of 318 days. This is a first report on a series of ABSCTs in patients with advanced Hodgkin's disease proving that, despite prior damage to the marrow site, the circulating stem-cell pool is still a sufficient source of hemopoietic precursor cells for stem-cell rescue.

  18. [Quality of life in women after anterior pelvic exenteration].

    PubMed

    Loran, O B; Veliev, E I; Seregin, A V; Khachatryan, A L; Guspanov, R I; Seregin, I V

    2016-04-01

    60 women, who underwent anterior pelvic exenteration with different types of urine derivation since 2004 till 2014 years in urology department, RMAPO, S.P. Botkin city hospital, were included in retrospective investigation. Middle age of patients was 53,2+/-3 (32-68). 38 women with bladder cancer and 22 women with urinary injuries after radiation therapy underwent anterior pelvic exenteration. Aim of this work is to perform quality of life comparison of patients after anterior pelvic exenteration with different types of urine derivation. Patients were divided in 3 groups: 1-st group 39 (65%) women, who underwent Brickers operation, 2-nd group 19 (31,66% ) women, who had Studers operation and 3-rd group - 2 (3,34%), patients who underwent continent urine derivation with formation of catheterizing urinary reservoir. Questionnaire (SF-36) was used to evaluate quality of life. Observation period was from 2 to 10 years. Postsurgical lethality was 3%, 5-years survival rate was 60,9+/-15,8% and 5-years recurrence-free survival rate was 55,4+/-12,6%. We established that quality of life in women who underwent orthotopic urine derivation was higher than in patients who underwent incontinent ileoconduit formation. Better quality of life was demonstrated by women, who had catheterizing urinary reservoir, but it is difficult to compare this group with the others, because of small number of patients with heterotopic catheterizing reservoir. Regarding the results of our investigation we made next conclusions: In spite of difficult technique, high risk of postoperative complications and lethality, anterior pelvic exenteration provide 5-years survival rate for 70% of patients In locally advanced tumors of pelvic organs anterior pelvic exenteration is salvational operation and keep satisfactory quality of life Orthotopic intestinal urine derivation is better to provide satisfactory quality of life for patients with invasive bladder cancer. For women with urinary injuries after

  19. The Rationale for Post-Operative Radiation in Localized Bladder Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Baumann, Brian C.; Sargos, Paul; Eapen, Libni J.; Efstathiou, Jason A.; Choudhury, Ananya; Bahl, Amit; Murthy, Vedang; Ballas, Leslie K.; Fonteyne, Valérie; Richaud, Pierre M.; Zaghloul, Mohamed S.; Christodouleas, John P.

    2017-01-01

    Local-regional recurrence for patients with ≥pT3 disease after radical cystectomy is a significant problem. Chemotherapy has not been shown to reduce the risk of local-regional recurrences in randomized prospective trials, and salvage therapies for local-regional failure are rarely successful. There is promising evidence, particularly from a recent Egyptian NCI trial, that radiation therapy plus chemotherapy can significantly reduce local recurrences compared to chemotherapy alone, and that this improvement in local-regional control may translate to meaningful improvements in disease-free and overall survival with acceptable toxicity. In light of the high rates of local failure following cystectomy for locally advanced disease and the progress that has been made in identifying patients at high risk of failure and the patterns of failure in the pelvis, the NCCN guidelines were revised in 2016 to include post-operative radiotherapy as an option to consider for patients with ≥pT3 disease. Despite advances in our understanding of the problem of local-regional failure after cystectomy and the potential role of adjuvant radiotherapy, the question of whether adjuvant radiotherapy should have a defined role for patients with locally advanced urothelial carcinoma has not yet been determined. The results of the NRG, European, Indian, and Egyptian trials on adjuvant radiotherapy are eagerly awaited. While none of these trials on their own may provide definitive conclusions, their aggregate outcomes will help clarify whether this treatment should have a role in the management of patients with locally advanced bladder cancer. PMID:28149931

  20. New insights for pelvic radiation disease treatment: Multipotent stromal cell is a promise mainstay treatment for the restoration of abdominopelvic severe chronic damages induced by radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Chapel, Alain; Francois, Sabine; Douay, Luc; Benderitter, Marc; Voswinkel, Jan

    2013-01-01

    Radiotherapy may induce irreversible damage on healthy tissues surrounding the tumor. It has been reported that the majority of patients receiving pelvic radiation therapy show early or late tissue reactions of graded severity as radiotherapy affects not only the targeted tumor cells but also the surrounding healthy tissues. The late adverse effects of pelvic radiotherapy concern 5% to 10% of them, which could be life threatening. However, a clear medical consensus concerning the clinical management of such healthy tissue sequelae does not exist. Although no pharmacologic interventions have yet been proven to efficiently mitigate radiotherapy severe side effects, few preclinical researches show the potential of combined and sequential pharmacological treatments to prevent the onset of tissue damage. Our group has demonstrated in preclinical animal models that systemic mesenchymal stromal cell (MSC) injection is a promising approach for the medical management of gastrointestinal disorder after irradiation. We have shown that MSCs migrate to damaged tissues and restore gut functions after irradiation. We carefully studied side effects of stem cell injection for further application in patients. We have shown that clinical status of four patients suffering from severe pelvic side effects resulting from an over-dosage was improved following MSC injection in a compationnal situation. PMID:24179599

  1. Comparison of surface matching and target matching for image-guided pelvic radiation therapy for both supine and prone patient positions.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Hui; Wang, Brian; Sarkar, Vikren; Rassiah-Szegedi, Prema; Huang, Y Jessica; Szegedi, Martin; Huang, Long; Gonzalez, Victor; Salter, Bill

    2016-05-08

    We investigate the difference between surface matching and target matching for pelvic radiation image guidance. The uniqueness of our study is that all patients have multiple CT-on-rails (CTOR) scans to compare to corresponding AlignRT images. Ten patients receiving pelvic radiation were enrolled in this study. Two simulation CT scans were performed in supine and prone positions for each patient. Body surface contours were generated in treatment planning system and exported to AlignRT to serve as reference images. During treatment day, the patient was aligned to treatment isocenter with room lasers, and then scanned with both CTOR and AlignRT. Image-guidance shifts were calculated for both modalities by com-parison to the simulation CT and the differences between them were analyzed for both supine and prone positions, respectively. These procedures were performed for each patient once per week for five weeks. The difference of patient displace-ment between AlignRT and CTOR was analyzed. For supine position, five patients had an average difference of displacement between AlignRT and CTOR along any direction (vertical, longitudinal, and lateral) greater than 0.5 cm, and one patient greater than 1 cm. Four patients had a maximum difference greater than 1 cm. For prone position, seven patients had an average difference greater than 0.5 cm, and three patients greater than 1 cm. Nine patients had a maximum difference greater than 1 cm. The difference of displacement between AlignRT and CTOR was greater for the prone position than for the supine position. For the patients studied here, surface matching does not appear to be an advisable image-guidance approach for pelvic radiation therapy for patients with either supine or prone position. There appears to be a potential for large alignment discrepancies (up to 2.25 cm) between surface matching and target matching.

  2. Comparison of surface matching and target matching for image-guided pelvic radiation therapy for both supine and prone patient positions.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Hui; Wang, Brian; Sarkar, Vikren; Rassiah-Szegedi, Prema; Huang, Y Jessica; Szegedi, Martin; Huang, Long; Gonzalez, Victor; Salter, Bill

    2016-05-01

    We investigate the difference between surface matching and target matching for pelvic radiation image guidance. The uniqueness of our study is that all patients have multiple CT-on-rails (CTOR) scans to compare to corresponding AlignRT images. Ten patients receiving pelvic radiation were enrolled in this study. Two simulation CT scans were performed in supine and prone positions for each patient. Body surface contours were generated in treatment planning system and exported to AlignRT to serve as reference images. During treatment day, the patient was aligned to treatment isocenter with room lasers, and then scanned with both CTOR and AlignRT. Image-guidance shifts were calculated for both modalities by comparison to the simulation CT and the differences between them were analyzed for both supine and prone positions, respectively. These procedures were performed for each patient once per week for five weeks. The difference of patient displacement between AlignRT and CTOR was analyzed. For supine position, five patients had an average difference of displacement between AlignRT and CTOR along any direction (vertical, longitudinal, and lateral) greater than 0.5 cm, and one patient greater than 1 cm. Four patients had a maximum difference greater than 1 cm. For prone position, seven patients had an average difference greater than 0.5 cm, and three patients greater than 1 cm. Nine patients had a maximum difference greater than 1 cm. The difference of displacement between AlignRT and CTOR was greater for the prone position than for the supine position. For the patients studied here, surface matching does not appear to be an advisable image-guidance approach for pelvic radiation therapy for patients with either supine or prone position. There appears to be a potential for large alignment discrepancies (up to 2.25 cm) between surface matching and target matching. PACS number(s): 87.55.-x.

  3. Evaluation of the impact of the urinary symptoms on quality of life of patients with painful bladder syndrome/chronic pelvic pain and radiation cystitis: EURCIS study.

    PubMed

    Rapariz-González, M; Castro-Díaz, D; Mejía-Rendón, D

    2014-05-01

    To evaluate the impact of urinary symptoms of Painful Bladder/Pelvic Pain Syndrome and Radiation Cystitis (PBCPPS) on the Quality of Life, and self-esteem of the patient. An observational, multicenter, epidemiological and cross-sectional study was performed on patients with Painful Bladder/Chronic Pelvic Pain Syndrome and Radiation Cystitis. Data was recorded on severity of urinary symptoms and QoL impairment using the PUF Score. The patients evaluated the QoL deterioration grade through the King's Health Questionnaire (KHQ), and the level of their anxiety and self-esteem with the Goldberg's Anxiety Scale (GAS) and Rosenberg's Self-Esteem Scale (RSES), respectively. Post-hoc comparisons were performed between the results of the KHQ of this study and a sample of patients with urinary incontinence (UI). Results on RSES were analyzed with data from the general population and from patients with erectile dysfunction. A total of 530 cases, mostly female patients, who had been diagnosed with PBCPPS, were analyzed. High levels of deterioration in QoL were described: KHQ scores were significantly higher when compared with patients with UI (P<.01). Involvement of self-esteem was higher in patients with RC and men, who obtained scores similar to those of patients with erectile dysfunction. Patients with Painful Bladder Syndrome/Chronic Pelvic Pain Syndrome and Radiation Cystitis present high levels of anxiety, and significant reductions in both quality of life and self-esteem. Especially for men, this affectation is similar to that caused by erectile dysfunction. Copyright © 2013 AEU. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  4. External Pelvic and Vaginal Irradiation Versus Vaginal Irradiation Alone as Postoperative Therapy in Medium-Risk Endometrial Carcinoma-A Prospective Randomized Study

    SciTech Connect

    Sorbe, Bengt; Horvath, Gyoergy; Andersson, Hakan; Boman, Karin; Lundgren, Caroline; Pettersson, Birgitta

    2012-03-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the value of adjuvant external beam pelvic radiotherapy as adjunct to vaginal brachytherapy (VBT) in medium-risk endometrial carcinoma, with regard to locoregional tumor control, recurrences, survival, and toxicity. Methods and Materials: Consecutive series of 527 evaluable patients were included in this randomized trial. Median follow-up for patients alive was 62 months. The primary study endpoints were locoregional recurrences and overall survival. Secondary endpoints were recurrence-free survival, recurrence-free interval, cancer-specific survival, and toxicity. Results: Five-year locoregional relapse rates were 1.5% after external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) plus VBT and 5% after vaginal irradiation alone (p = 0.013), and 5-year overall survival rates were 89% and 90%, respectively (p = 0.548). Endometrial cancer-related death rates were 3.8% after EBRT plus VBT and 6.8% after VBT (p = 0.118). Pelvic recurrences (exclusively vaginal recurrence) were reduced by 93% by the addition of EBRT to VBT. Deep myometrial infiltration was a significant prognostic factor in this medium-risk group of endometrioid carcinomas but not International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics grade or DNA ploidy. Combined radiotherapy was well tolerated, with serious (Grade 3) late side effects of less than 2%. However, there was a significant difference in favor of VBT alone. Conclusions: Despite a significant locoregional control benefit with combined radiotherapy, no survival improvement was recorded, but increased late toxicity was noted in the intestine, bladder, and vagina. Combined RT should probably be reserved for high-risk cases with two or more high-risk factors. VBT alone should be the adjuvant treatment option for purely medium-risk cases.

  5. Postoperative Radiation Therapy With or Without Concurrent Chemotherapy for Node-Positive Thoracic Esophageal Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Junqiang; Pan, Jianji; Liu, Jian; Li, Jiancheng; Zhu, Kunshou; Zheng, Xiongwei; Chen, Mingqiang; Chen, Ming; Liao, Zhongxing

    2013-07-15

    Purpose: To retrospectively compare the efficacy of radiation therapy (RT) and chemotherapy plus RT (CRT) for the postoperative treatment of node-positive thoracic esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (TESCC) and to determine the incidence and severity of toxic reactions. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively reviewed data from 304 patients who had undergone esophagectomy with 3-field lymph node dissection for TESCC and were determined by postoperative pathology to have lymph node metastasis without distant hematogenous metastasis. Of these patients, 164 underwent postoperative chemotherapy (cisplatin 80 mg/m{sup 2}, average days 1-3, plus paclitaxel 135 mg/m{sup 2}, day 1; 21-day cycle) plus RT (50 Gy), and 140 underwent postoperative RT alone. Results: The 5-year overall survival rates for the CRT and RT groups were 47.4% and 38.6%, respectively (P=.030). The distant metastasis rate, the mixed (regional lymph node and distant) metastasis rate, and the overall recurrence rate were significantly lower in the CRT group than in the RT group (P<.05). However, mild and severe early toxic reactions, including neutropenia, radiation esophagitis, and gastrointestinal reaction, were significantly more common in the CRT group than in the RT group (P<.05). No significant differences in incidence of late toxic reactions were found between the 2 groups. Conclusions: Our results show that in node-positive TESCC patients, postoperative CRT is significantly more effective than RT alone at increasing the overall survival and decreasing the rates of distant metastasis, mixed metastasis, and overall recurrence. Severe early toxic reactions were more common with CRT than with RT alone, but patients could tolerate CRT.

  6. Pelvic incidentalomas

    PubMed Central

    Newmark, G.M.; Thakrar, K.H.; Mehta, U.K.; Berlin, J.W.

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Recent advances in multi-detector computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, and ultrasound have led to the detection of incidental ovarian, uterine, vascular and pelvic nodal abnormalities in both the oncology and non-oncology patient population that in the past remained undiscovered. These incidental pelvic lesions have created a management dilemma for both clinicians and radiologists. Depending on the clinical setting, these lesions may require no further evaluation, additional immediate or serial follow-up imaging, or surgical intervention. In this review, guidelines concerning the diagnosis and management of some of the more common pelvic incidentalomas are presented. PMID:20880789

  7. Clinical Response of Pelvic and Para-aortic Lymphadenopathy to a Radiation Boost in the Definitive Management of Locally Advanced Cervical Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Rash, Dominique L.; Lee, Yongsook C.; Kashefi, Amir; Durbin-Johnson, Blythe; Mathai, Mathew; Valicenti, Richard; Mayadev, Jyoti S.

    2013-10-01

    Purpose: Optimal treatment with radiation for metastatic lymphadenopathy in locally advanced cervical cancer remains controversial. We investigated the clinical dose response threshold for pelvic and para-aortic lymph node boost using radiographic imaging and clinical outcomes. Methods and Materials: Between 2007 and 2011, 68 patients were treated for locally advanced cervical cancer; 40 patients had clinically involved pelvic and/or para-aortic lymph nodes. Computed tomography (CT) or 18F-labeled fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography scans obtained pre- and postchemoradiation for 18 patients were reviewed to assess therapeutic radiographic response of individual lymph nodes. External beam boost doses to involved nodes were compared to treatment response, assessed by change in size of lymph nodes by short axis and change in standard uptake value (SUV). Patterns of failure, time to recurrence, overall survival (OS), and disease-free survival (DFS) were determined. Results: Sixty-four lymph nodes suspicious for metastatic involvement were identified. Radiation boost doses ranged from 0 to 15 Gy, with a mean total dose of 52.3 Gy. Pelvic lymph nodes were treated with a slightly higher dose than para-aortic lymph nodes: mean 55.3 Gy versus 51.7 Gy, respectively. There was no correlation between dose delivered and change in size of lymph nodes along the short axis. All lymph nodes underwent a decrease in SUV with a complete resolution of abnormal uptake observed in 68%. Decrease in SUV was significantly greater for lymph nodes treated with ≥54 Gy compared to those treated with <54 Gy (P=.006). Median follow-up was 18.7 months. At 2 years, OS and DFS for the entire cohort were 78% and 50%, respectively. Locoregional control at 2 years was 84%. Conclusions: A biologic response, as measured by the change in SUV for metastatic lymph nodes, was observed at a dose threshold of 54 Gy. We recommend that involved lymph nodes be treated to this minimum dose.

  8. Factors Associated With Neurological Recovery of Brainstem Function Following Postoperative Conformal Radiation Therapy for Infratentorial Ependymoma

    SciTech Connect

    Merchant, Thomas E.; Chitti, Ramana M.; Li Chenghong; Xiong Xiaoping; Sanford, Robert A.; Khan, Raja B.

    2010-02-01

    Purpose: To identify risk factors associated with incomplete neurological recovery in pediatric patients with infratentorial ependymoma treated with postoperative conformal radiation therapy (CRT). Methods: The study included 68 patients (median age +- standard deviation of 2.6 +- 3.8 years) who were followed for 5 years after receiving CRT (54-59.4 Gy) and were assessed for function of cranial nerves V to VII and IX to XII, motor weakness, and dysmetria. The mean (+- standard deviation) brainstem dose was 5,487 (+-464) cGy. Patients were divided into four groups representing those with normal baseline and follow-up, those with abnormal baseline and full recovery, those with abnormal baseline and partial or no recovery, and those with progressive deficits at 12 (n = 62 patients), 24 (n = 57 patients), and 60 (n = 50 patients) months. Grouping was correlated with clinical and treatment factors. Results: Risk factors (overall risk [OR], p value) associated with incomplete recovery included gender (male vs. female, OR = 3.97, p = 0.036) and gross tumor volume (GTV) (OR/ml = 1.23, p = 0.005) at 12 months, the number of resections (>1 vs. 1; OR = 23.7, p = 0.003) and patient age (OR/year = 0.77, p = 0.029) at 24 months, and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) shunting (Yes vs. No; OR = 21.9, p = 0.001) and GTV volume (OR/ml = 1.18, p = 0.008) at 60 months. An increase in GTV correlated with an increase in the number of resections (p = 0.001) and CSF shunting (p = 0.035); the number of resections correlated with CSF shunting (p < 0.0001), and male patients were more likely to undergo multiple tumor resections (p = 0.003). Age correlated with brainstem volume (p < 0.0001). There were no differences in outcome based on the absolute or relative volume of the brainstem that received more than 54 Gy. Conclusions: Incomplete recovery of brainstem function after CRT for infratentorial ependymoma is related to surgical morbidity and the volume and the extent of tumor.

  9. Clinical trial evaluating cholestyramine to prevent diarrhea in patients maintained on low-fat diets during pelvic radiation therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Chary, S.; Thomson, D.H.

    1984-10-01

    A prospective randomized trial to determine the value of a low fat diet with or without cholestyramine in the treatment of acute intestinal complications of pelvic irradiation is presented. A total of 35 patients receiving pelvic irradiation were entered in the study and all patients had received a 40 gm fat diet. The group was then randomized to receive either placebo (17 patients) or cholestyramine (18 patients). Diarrhea occurred in six out of 16 evaluable patients in the control group and only one of the 17 evaluable patients in the cholestyramine group. The frequency of diarrhea and the diarrhea scale remained high in the placebo group in the entire observation period. Statistical analysis had revealed better diarrhea control in the cholestyramine group. In this report mechanism by which diarrhea occurs following pelvic irradiation is discussed. The adverse effects associated with the use of cholestyramine have been presented. It was concluded that cholestyramine is effective in preventing acute diarrhea induced by pelvic irradiation in patients receiving a low fat diet but is associated with side effects.

  10. Monte Carlo evaluation of the effect of inhomogeneities on dose calculation for low energy photons intra-operative radiation therapy in pelvic area.

    PubMed

    Chiavassa, Sophie; Buge, François; Hervé, Chloé; Delpon, Gregory; Rigaud, Jérome; Lisbona, Albert; Supiot, Sthéphane

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of inhomogeneities on dose calculation for low energy photons intra-operative radiation therapy (IORT) in pelvic area. A GATE Monte Carlo model of the INTRABEAM® was adapted for the study. Simulations were performed in the CT scan of a cadaver considering a homogeneous segmentation (water) and an inhomogeneous segmentation (5 tissues from ICRU44). Measurements were performed in the cadaver using EBT3 Gafchromic® films. Impact of inhomogeneities on dose calculation in cadaver was 6% for soft tissues and greater than 300% for bone tissues. EBT3 measurements showed a better agreement with calculation for inhomogeneous media. However, dose discrepancy in soft tissues led to a sub-millimeter (0.65 mm) shift in the effective point dose in depth. Except for bone tissues, the effect of inhomogeneities on dose calculation for low energy photons intra-operative radiation therapy in pelvic area was not significant for the studied anatomy. Copyright © 2015 Associazione Italiana di Fisica Medica. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Postoperative infections in obstetrics and gynecology.

    PubMed

    Jaiyeoba, Oluwatosin

    2012-12-01

    Postoperative infection is the most commonly seen complication of surgery in obstetrics and gynecology. The use of antibiotic prophylaxis has greatly decreased though not completely eliminated this adverse outcome. Postoperative infections include wound cellulitis, wound abscess, endomyometritis, pelvic cellulitis, and pelvic abscess. Infections usually manifest as fever and greater than normal postoperative pain. Refractory fevers maybe because of septic pelvic vein thrombophlebitis or maybe noninfectious in origin. Broad-spectrum antibiotics should be initiated as soon as possible when diagnosis of postoperative infection is made; most patients will respond to treatment within 24 to 48 hours when appropriate antibiotics are selected.

  12. [The efficacy of polychromatic visible and infrared radiation used for the postoperative immunological rehabilitation of patients with breast cancer].

    PubMed

    zhevago, N A; Samoĭlova, K A; Davydova, N I; Bychkova, N V; Glazanova, T V; Chubukina, Zh V; Buĭniakova, A I; Zimin, A A

    2012-01-01

    The immunological rehabilitation of the patients with oncological problems after the completion of standard anti-tumour therapy remains a topical problem in modern medicine. The up-to-date phototherapeutic methods find the increasingly wider application for the treatment of such patients including the use of monochromatic visible (VIS) and near infrared (nIR) radiation emitted from lasers and photodiodes. The objective of the present study was to substantiate the expediency of postoperative immune rehabilitation of the patients with breast cancer (BC) by means of irradiation of the body surface with polychromatic visible (pVIS) in combination with polychromatic infrared (pIR) light similar to the natural solar radiation without its minor UV component. The study included 19 patients with stage I--II BC at the mean age of 54.0 +/- 4.28 years having the infiltrative-ductal form of the tumour who had undergone mastectomy. These patients were randomly allocated to two groups, one given the standard course of postoperative rehabilitation (control), the other (study group) additionally treated with pVIS + pIR radiation applied to the lumbar-sacral region from days 1 to 7 after surgery. A Bioptron-2 phototherapeutic device, Switzerland, was used for the purpose (480-3400 nm, 40 mW/cm2, 12 J/cm2, with the light spot diameter of 15 cm). The modern standard immunological methods were employed. It was found that mastectomy induced changes of many characteristics of cellular and humoral immunity; many of them in different patients were oppositely directed. These changes were apparent within the first 7 days postoperatively. The course of phototherapy (PT) was shown to prevent the postoperative decrease in the counts of monocytes and natural killer (NK) cells, the total amount of CD3+ -T-lymphocytes (LPC), CD4+ -T-helpers, activated T-lymphocytes (CD3+ HLA-DR+ cells) and IgA levels as well as intracellular digestion rate of neutrophil-phagocyted bacteria. Moreover PT promoted

  13. Predictors of urinary and rectal toxicity after external conformed radiation therapy in prostate cancer: Correlation between clinical, tumour and dosimetric parameters and radical and postoperative radiation therapy.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Arribas, C M; González-San Segundo, C; Cuesta-Álvaro, P; Calvo-Manuel, F A

    2017-06-15

    To determine rectal and urinary toxicity after external beam radiation therapy (EBRT), assessing the results of patients who undergo radical or postoperative therapy for prostate cancer (pancreatic cancer) and their correlation with potential risk factors. A total of 333 patients were treated with EBRT. Of these, 285 underwent radical therapy and 48 underwent postoperative therapy (39 cases of rescue and 9 of adjuvant therapy). We collected clinical, tumour and dosimetric variable to correlate with toxicity parameters. We developed decision trees based on the degree of statistical significance. The rate of severe acute toxicity, both urinary and rectal, was 5.4% and 1.5%, respectively. The rate of chronic toxicity was 4.5% and 2.7%, respectively. Twenty-seven patients presented haematuria, and 9 presented haemorrhagic rectitis. Twenty-five patients (7.5%) presented permanent limiting sequela. The patients with lower urinary tract symptoms prior to the radiation therapy presented poorer tolerance, with greater acute bladder toxicity (P=0.041). In terms of acute rectal toxicity, 63% of the patients with mean rectal doses >45Gy and anticoagulant/antiplatelet therapy developed mild toxicity compared with 37% of the patients with mean rectal doses <45 Gy and without anticoagulant therapy. We were unable to establish predictors of chronic toxicity in the multivariate analysis. The long-term sequelae were greater in the patients who underwent urological operations prior to the radiation therapy and who were undergoing anticoagulant therapy. The tolerance to EBRT was good, and severe toxicity was uncommon. Baseline urinary symptoms constitute the predictor that most influenced the acute urinary toxicity. Rectal toxicity is related to the mean rectal dose and with anticoagulant/antiplatelet therapy. There were no significant differences in severe toxicity between radical versus postoperative radiation therapy. Copyright © 2017 AEU. Publicado por Elsevier España, S

  14. Phase II clinical trial using californium 252 fast neutron brachytherapy, external pelvic radiation, and extrafascial hysterectomy in the treatment of bulky, barrel-shaped stage IB cervical cancer.

    PubMed

    van Nagell, J R; Maruyama, Y; Donaldson, E S; Hanson, M B; Gallion, H H; Yoneda, J; Powell, D E; Kryscio, R J; Beach, J L

    1986-05-15

    From June 1977 to June 1983, 32 patients with bulky (greater than 4 cm diameter), barrel-shaped Stage IB cervical cancer were treated at the University of Kentucky Medical Center by a combination of outpatient neutron brachytherapy using californium 252 (252Cf) and external pelvic radiation followed by extrafascial hysterectomy. Nineteen patients had cervical tumors 4 to 6 cm in diameter, and 13 patients had lesions in excess of 6 cm in diameter. A dose of 4500 rad external photon therapy was given from a linear accelerator, and one or two 6-hour 252Cf implants were given during or immediately after external radiation. Extrafascial hysterectomy with bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy was performed 6 weeks after completion of radiation therapy. Complications during and after radiation were minimal and included vaginal stenosis (three) and proctitis (two). Tumor clearance in the hysterectomy specimen was complete in 23 patients (72%) and residual cervical tumor was present in 9 patients (28%). Two patients developed tumor recurrence and died of disease 15 and 27 months after therapy, respectively. Thirty patients remain free of disease 26 to 96 months (median, 52 months) after treatment, and none have been lost to follow-up. The actuarial survival of these patients is 97% at 2 years and 94% at 5 years. Intracavitary neutron therapy is well tolerated and is effective when combined with external radiation and hysterectomy in the treatment of bulky, barrel-shaped Stage IB cervical cancer.

  15. Pelvic Actinomycosis

    PubMed Central

    García-García, Alejandra; Ramírez-Durán, Ninfa; Sandoval-Trujillo, Horacio

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Actinomycosis is a chronic bacterial infection caused by Actinomyces, Gram-positive anaerobic bacteria. Its symptomatology imitates some malignant pelvic tumours, tuberculosis, or nocardiosis, causing abscesses and fistulas. Actinomycoses are opportunistic infections and require normal mucous barriers to be altered. No epidemiological studies have been conducted to determine prevalence or incidence of such infections. Objective To analyse the clinical cases of pelvic actinomycosis reported worldwide, to update the information about the disease. Methods A systematic review of worldwide pelvic actinomycosis cases between 1980 and 2014 was performed, utilising the PubMed, Scopus, and Google Scholar databases. The following information was analysed: year, country, type of study, number of cases, use of intrauterine device (IUD), final and initial diagnosis, and method of diagnosis. Results 63 articles met the search criteria, of which 55 reported clinical cases and 8 reported cross-sectional studies. Conclusions Pelvic actinomycosis is confusing to diagnose and should be considered in the differential diagnosis of pelvic chronic inflammatory lesions. It is commonly diagnosed through a histological report, obtained after a surgery subsequent to an erroneous initial diagnosis. A bacterial culture in anaerobic medium could be useful for the diagnosis but requires a controlled technique and should be performed using specialised equipment. PMID:28684963

  16. [Analyses of clinicopathologic factors affecting neck control after postoperative radiation as adjuvant treatment for lymph node metastasis in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma].

    PubMed

    Di, B; Li, X M; Zhang, J J; Liu, S; Song, Q; Tao, Z F; Fan, C

    2016-07-07

    To investigate the clinicopathologic factors associated with neck control and distant metastasis in patients with neck metastases in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) after postoperative radiation as adjuvant treatment. Clinicopathologic data of 208 pathologic N+ (pN+ ) patients with HNSCC initially treated with neck dissection and postoperative radiation in Bethune International Peace Hospital of China from January 2004 to December 2009 were reviewed. The clinicopathologic factors, includeding age, sex, primary tumor site, pathologic T and N stage, tumor growth pattern, histological grade, tumor resection margin, size and number of positive lymph node, number of levels with positive lymph node, and extracapsular nodal spread (ECS), were evaluated for their association with neck control and distant metastasis in patients with HNSCC after postoperative radiation. Univariate χ(2) test and multiple stepwise logistic regression model were used for the analysis. Overall 5-year neck control rate after postoperative radiotherapy was 72.6% (151/208), with 84.0% (63/75) for SND, 72.9% (78/107) for MRND, and 38.5% (10/26) for RND, respectively. Univariate analysis showed that neck control after postoperative radiation was related with following factors: primary tumor site, pathologic N stage, size of positive node, number of levels with positive node, number of positive node, and ECS. Pathologic N stage and number of levels with positive lymph node were associated with distant metastasis. Multivariate analysis indicated that ECS was the most significant risk factor for neck metastasis after surgery and postoperative radiotherapy and the number of levels with positive node was the most significant risk factor for distant metastasis. ECS is the most important pathologic factor in planning postoperative adjuvant treatment for pN+ patients with HNSCC, therefore ECS should be evaluated routinely after neck dissection. The value of postoperative radiotherapy in

  17. The Role of Postoperative Radiation Therapy in the Treatment of Meningeal Hemangiopericytoma—Experience From the SEER Database

    SciTech Connect

    Stessin, Alexander M.; Sison, Cristina; Nieto, Jaime; Raifu, Muri; Li, Baoqing

    2013-03-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to examine the effect of postoperative radiation therapy (RT) on cause-specific survival in patients with meningeal hemangiopericytomas. Methods and Materials: The Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results database from 1990-2008 was queried for cases of surgically resected central nervous system hemangiopericytoma. Patient demographics, tumor location, and extent of resection were included in the analysis as covariates. The Kaplan-Meier product-limit method was used to analyze cause-specific survival. A Cox proportional hazards regression analysis was conducted to determine which factors were associated with cause-specific survival. Results: The mean follow-up time is 7.9 years (95 months). There were 76 patients included in the analysis, of these, 38 (50%) underwent gross total resection (GTR), whereas the other half underwent subtotal resection (STR). Postoperative RT was administered to 42% (16/38) of the patients in the GTR group and 50% (19/38) in the STR group. The 1-year, 10-year, and 20-year cause-specific survival rates were 99%, 75%, and 43%, respectively. On multivariate analysis, postoperative RT was associated with significantly better survival (HR = 0.269, 95% CI 0.084-0.862; P=.027), in particular for patients who underwent STR (HR = 0.088, 95% CI: 0.015-0.528; P<.008). Conclusions: In the absence of large prospective trials, the current clinical decision-making of hemangiopericytoma is mostly based on retrospective data. We recommend that postoperative RT be considered after subtotal resection for patients who could tolerate it. Based on the current literature, the practical approach is to deliver limited field RT to doses of 50-60 Gy while respecting the normal tissue tolerance. Further investigations are clearly needed to determine the optimal therapeutic strategy.

  18. Postoperative radiation therapy for rectal cancer. An interim analysis of a prospective, randomized multicenter trial in The Netherlands

    SciTech Connect

    Treurniet-Donker, A.D.; van Putten, W.L.; Wereldsma, J.C.; Bruggink, E.D.; Hoogenraad, W.J.; Roukema, J.A.; Snijders-Keilholz, A.; Meijer, W.S.; Meerwaldt, J.H.; Wijnmaalen, A.J. )

    1991-04-15

    The authors assessed the potential benefit of postoperative radiation therapy for rectal cancer in a two-arm, prospective multicenter trial. One hundred seventy-two patients who had undergone surgical resection for rectal adenocarcinoma were randomly assigned to either treatment consisting of external irradiation to a dose of 5000 cGy in 5 weeks or a control group (no adjuvant therapy). It was assumed that the number of cells remaining after radical surgery would be low and that the dose of 5000 cGy would be adequate in eradicating the majority of those cells. The number of local recurrences was lower in the treated group of patients, but the difference was not statistically significant. It was assumed that if a significant reduction in the number of local recurrences could be obtained, improved (disease-free) survival would result. No influence on disease-free or overall survival could be detected. These results were in agreement with those reported in Europe and the US, and it was concluded that postoperative radiation therapy alone cannot be justified as a routine procedure in the primary management of resectable rectal cancer.

  19. Postoperative radiation therapy for rectal cancer. An interim analysis of a prospective, randomized multicenter trial in The Netherlands.

    PubMed

    Treurniet-Donker, A D; van Putten, W L; Wereldsma, J C; Bruggink, E D; Hoogenraad, W J; Roukema, J A; Snijders-Keilholz, A; Meijer, W S; Meerwaldt, J H; Wijnmaalen, A J

    1991-04-15

    The authors assessed the potential benefit of postoperative radiation therapy for rectal cancer in a two-arm, prospective multicenter trial. One hundred seventy-two patients who had undergone surgical resection for rectal adenocarcinoma were randomly assigned to either treatment consisting of external irradiation to a dose of 5000 cGy in 5 weeks or a control group (no adjuvant therapy). It was assumed that the number of cells remaining after radical surgery would be low and that the dose of 5000 cGy would be adequate in eradicating the majority of those cells. The number of local recurrences was lower in the treated group of patients, but the difference was not statistically significant. It was assumed that if a significant reduction in the number of local recurrences could be obtained, improved (disease-free) survival would result. No influence on disease-free or overall survival could be detected. These results were in agreement with those reported in Europe and the US, and it was concluded that postoperative radiation therapy alone cannot be justified as a routine procedure in the primary management of resectable rectal cancer.

  20. Phase III, Double-Blind Study of Depot Octreotide Versus Placebo in the Prevention of Acute Diarrhea in Patients Receiving Pelvic Radiation Therapy: Results of North Central Cancer Treatment Group N00CA

    PubMed Central

    Martenson, James A.; Halyard, Michele Y.; Sloan, Jeff A.; Proulx, Gary M.; Miller, Robert C.; Deming, Richard L.; Dick, Stephen J.; Johnson, Harold A.; Tai, T.H. Patricia; Zhu, Angela W.; Keit, Joan; Stien, Kathy J.; Atherton, Pamela J.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose To assess the effectiveness of depot octreotide for the prevention of diarrhea during pelvic radiation therapy. Patients and Methods Patients receiving pelvic radiation therapy (planned minimum dose, 45 Gy; 1.7 to 2.1 Gy daily) were eligible for the study. From May 10, 2002, through October 14, 2005, 125 patients were randomly allocated in a double-blind fashion to receive octreotide (100 μg, administered subcutaneously on day 1, followed by depot octreotide, 20 mg, administered intramuscularly on days 2 and 29; n = 62) or to receive a placebo (n = 63). Results Grade 0, 1, 2, and 3 diarrhea were observed in 18%, 31%, 31%, and 21% of patients in the octreotide arm, respectively, and in 25%, 32%, 22%, and 21% of patients in the placebo arm, respectively (P = .64). Grade 0, 1, 2, and 3 abdominal cramps were observed in 32%, 45%, 21%, and 2% of patients receiving octreotide, respectively, and in 51%, 24%, 21%, and 5% of patients receiving the placebo, respectively (P = .053). Some patient-reported symptoms were worse in the octreotide group, including nocturnal bowel movements (70% v 45%; P = .004), clustering of bowel movements (90% v 69%; P = .004), and bleeding with bowel movements (57% v 35%; P = .01). Conclusion As administered in this study, octreotide did not decrease diarrhea during pelvic radiation therapy. Some gastrointestinal symptoms were worse in patients treated with octreotide. Octreotide is not indicated for prevention of diarrhea during pelvic radiation therapy. PMID:18768432

  1. Incidence, Causative Mechanisms, and Anatomic Localization of Stroke in Pituitary Adenoma Patients Treated With Postoperative Radiation Therapy Versus Surgery Alone

    SciTech Connect

    Sattler, Margriet G.A.; Vroomen, Patrick C.; Sluiter, Wim J.; Schers, Henk J.; Berg, Gerrit van den; Langendijk, Johannes A.; Wolffenbuttel, Bruce H.R.; Bergh, Alphons C.M. van den; Beek, André P. van

    2013-09-01

    Purpose: To assess and compare the incidence of stroke and stroke subtype in pituitary adenoma patients treated with postoperative radiation therapy (RT) and surgery alone. Methods and Materials: A cohort of 462 pituitary adenoma patients treated between 1959 and 2008 at the University Medical Center Groningen in The Netherlands was studied. Radiation therapy was administered in 236 patients. The TOAST (Trial of ORG 10172 in Acute Stroke Treatment) and the Oxfordshire Community Stroke Project classification methods were used to determine causative mechanism and anatomic localization of stroke. Stroke incidences in patients treated with RT were compared with that observed after surgery alone. Risk factors for stroke incidence were studied by log–rank test, without and with stratification for other significant risk factors. In addition, the stroke incidence was compared with the incidence rate in the general Dutch population. Results: Thirteen RT patients were diagnosed with stroke, compared with 12 surgery-alone patients. The relative risk (RR) for stroke in patients treated with postoperative RT was not significantly different compared with surgery-alone patients (univariate RR 0.62, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.28-1.35, P=.23). Stroke risk factors were coronary or peripheral artery disease (univariate and multivariate RR 10.4, 95% CI 4.7-22.8, P<.001) and hypertension (univariate RR 3.9, 95% CI 1.6-9.8, P=.002). There was no difference in TOAST and Oxfordshire classification of stroke. In this pituitary adenoma cohort 25 strokes were observed, compared with 16.91 expected (standard incidence ratio 1.48, 95% CI 1.00-1.96, P=.049). Conclusions: In pituitary adenoma patients, an increased incidence of stroke was observed compared with the general population. However, postoperative RT was not associated with an increased incidence of stroke or differences in causative mechanism or anatomic localization of stroke compared with surgery alone. The primary stroke risk

  2. Consensus Contouring Guidelines for Postoperative Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy for Metastatic Solid Tumor Malignancies to the Spine.

    PubMed

    Redmond, Kristin J; Robertson, Scott; Lo, Simon S; Soltys, Scott G; Ryu, Samuel; McNutt, Todd; Chao, Samuel T; Yamada, Yoshiya; Ghia, Amol; Chang, Eric L; Sheehan, Jason; Sahgal, Arjun

    2017-01-01

    To develop consensus contouring guidelines for postoperative stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) for spinal metastases. Ten spine SBRT specialists representing 10 international centers independently contoured the clinical target volume (CTV), planning target volume (PTV), spinal cord, and spinal cord planning organ at risk volume (PRV) for 10 representative clinical scenarios in postoperative spine SBRT for metastatic solid tumor malignancies. Contours were imported into the Computational Environment for Radiotherapy Research. Agreement between physicians was calculated with an expectation minimization algorithm using simultaneous truth and performance level estimation with κ statistics. Target volume definition guidelines were established by finding optimized confidence level consensus contours using histogram agreement analyses. Nine expert radiation oncologists and 1 neurosurgeon completed contours for all 10 cases. The mean sensitivity and specificity were 0.79 (range, 0.71-0.89) and 0.94 (range, 0.90-0.99) for the CTV and 0.79 (range, 0.70-0.95) and 0.92 (range, 0.87-0.99) for the PTV), respectively. Mean κ agreement, which demonstrates the probability that contours agree by chance alone, was 0.58 (range, 0.43-0.70) for CTV and 0.58 (range, 0.37-0.76) for PTV (P<.001 for all cases). Optimized consensus contours were established for all patients with 80% confidence interval. Recommendations for CTV include treatment of the entire preoperative extent of bony and epidural disease, plus immediately adjacent bony anatomic compartments at risk of microscopic disease extension. In particular, a "donut-shaped" CTV was consistently applied in cases of preoperative circumferential epidural extension, regardless of extent of residual epidural extension. Otherwise more conformal anatomic-based CTVs were determined and described. Spinal instrumentation was consistently excluded from the CTV. We provide consensus contouring guidelines for common scenarios in

  3. Defining the “Hostile Pelvis” for Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy: The Impact of Anatomic Variations in Pelvic Dimensions on Dose Delivered to Target Volumes and Organs at Risk in Patients With High-Risk Prostate Cancer Treated With Whole Pelvic Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Yirmibeşoğlu Erkal, Eda; Karabey, Sinan; Karabey, Ayşegül; Hayran, Mutlu; Erkal, Haldun Şükrü

    2015-07-15

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of variations in pelvic dimensions on the dose delivered to the target volumes and the organs at risk (OARs) in patients with high-risk prostate cancer (PCa) to be treated with whole pelvic radiation therapy (WPRT) in an attempt to define the hostile pelvis in terms of intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). Methods and Materials: In 45 men with high-risk PCa to be treated with WPRT, the target volumes and the OARs were delineated, the dose constraints for the OARs were defined, and treatment plans were generated according to the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group 0924 protocol. Six dimensions to reflect the depth, width, and height of the bony pelvis were measured, and 2 indexes were calculated from the planning computed tomographic scans. The minimum dose (D{sub min}), maximum dose (D{sub max}), and mean dose (D{sub mean}) for the target volumes and OARs and the partial volumes of each of these structures receiving a specified dose (V{sub D}) were calculated from the dose-volume histograms (DVHs). The data from the DVHs were correlated with the pelvic dimensions and indexes. Results: According to an overall hostility score (OHS) calculation, 25 patients were grouped as having a hospitable pelvis and 20 as having a hostile pelvis. Regarding the OHS grouping, the DVHs for the bladder, bowel bag, left femoral head, and right femoral head differed in favor of the hospitable pelvis group, and the DVHs for the rectum differed for a range of lower doses in favor of the hospitable pelvis group. Conclusions: Pelvimetry might be used as a guide to define the challenging anatomy or the hostile pelvis in terms of treatment planning for IMRT in patients with high-risk PCa to be treated with WPRT.

  4. A female pelvic bone shape model for air/bone separation in support of synthetic CT generation for radiation therapy.

    PubMed

    Liu, Lianli; Cao, Yue; Fessler, Jeffrey A; Jolly, Shruti; Balter, James M

    2016-01-07

    Separating bone from air in MR data is one of the major challenges in using MR images to derive synthetic CT. The problem is further complicated when the anatomic regions filled with air are altered across scans due to air mobility, for instance, in pelvic regions, thereby the air regions estimated using an ultrashort echo time (UTE) sequence are invalid in other image series acquired for multispectral classification. This study aims to develop and investigate a female pelvic bone shape model to identify low intensity regions in MRI where air is unlikely to be present in support of synthetic CT generation without UTE imaging. CT scans of 30 patients were collected for the study, 17 of them also have corresponding MR scans. The shape model was built from the CT dataset, where the reference image was aligned to each of the training images using B-spline deformable registration. Principal component analysis was performed on B-spline coefficients for a compact model where shape variance was described by linear combination of principal modes. The model was applied to identify pelvic bone in MR images by deforming the corresponding MR data of the reference image to target MR images, where the search space of the deformation process was constrained within the subspace spanned by principal modes. The local minima in the search space were removed effectively by the shape model, thus supporting an efficient binary search for the optimal solution. We evaluated the model by its efficacy in identifying bone voxels and excluding air regions. The model was tested across the 17 patients that have corresponding MR scans using a leave-one-out cross validation. A simple model using the first leading principal mode only was found to achieve reasonable accuracy, where an averaged 87% of bone voxels were correctly identified. Finally dilation of the optimally fit bone mask by 5 mm was found to cover 96% of bone voxels while minimally impacting the overlap with air (below 0.4%).

  5. A female pelvic bone shape model for air/bone separation in support of synthetic CT generation for radiation therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Lianli; Cao, Yue; Fessler, Jeffrey A.; Jolly, Shruti; Balter, James M.

    2016-01-01

    Separating bone from air in MR data is one of the major challenges in using MR images to derive synthetic CT. The problem is further complicated when the anatomic regions filled with air are altered across scans due to air mobility, for instance, in pelvic regions, thereby the air regions estimated using an ultrashort echo time (UTE) sequence are invalid in other image series acquired for multispectral classification. This study aims to develop and investigate a female pelvic bone shape model to identify low intensity regions in MRI where air is unlikely to be present in support of synthetic CT generation without UTE imaging. CT scans of 30 patients were collected for the study, 17 of them also have corresponding MR scans. The shape model was built from the CT dataset, where the reference image was aligned to each of the training images using B-spline deformable registration. Principal component analysis was performed on B-spline coefficients for a compact model where shape variance was described by linear combination of principal modes. The model was applied to identify pelvic bone in MR images by deforming the corresponding MR data of the reference image to target MR images, where the search space of the deformation process was constrained within the subspace spanned by principal modes. The local minima in the search space were removed effectively by the shape model, thus supporting an efficient binary search for the optimal solution. We evaluated the model by its efficacy in identifying bone voxels and excluding air regions. The model was tested across the 17 patients that have corresponding MR scans using a leave-one-out cross validation. A simple model using the first leading principal mode only was found to achieve reasonable accuracy, where an averaged 87% of bone voxels were correctly identified. Finally dilation of the optimally fit bone mask by 5 mm was found to cover 96% of bone voxels while minimally impacting the overlap with air (below 0.4%).

  6. Impact of Chemotherapy on Normal Tissue Complication Probability Models of Acute Hematologic Toxicity in Patients Receiving Pelvic Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Bazan, Jose G.; Luxton, Gary; Kozak, Margaret M.; Anderson, Eric M.; Hancock, Steven L.; Kapp, Daniel S.; Kidd, Elizabeth A.; Koong, Albert C.; Chang, Daniel T.

    2013-12-01

    Purpose: To determine how chemotherapy agents affect radiation dose parameters that correlate with acute hematologic toxicity (HT) in patients treated with pelvic intensity modulated radiation therapy (P-IMRT) and concurrent chemotherapy. Methods and Materials: We assessed HT in 141 patients who received P-IMRT for anal, gynecologic, rectal, or prostate cancers, 95 of whom received concurrent chemotherapy. Patients were separated into 4 groups: mitomycin (MMC) + 5-fluorouracil (5FU, 37 of 141), platinum ± 5FU (Cis, 32 of 141), 5FU (26 of 141), and P-IMRT alone (46 of 141). The pelvic bone was contoured as a surrogate for pelvic bone marrow (PBM) and divided into subsites: ilium, lower pelvis, and lumbosacral spine (LSS). The volumes of each region receiving 5-40 Gy were calculated. The endpoint for HT was grade ≥3 (HT3+) leukopenia, neutropenia or thrombocytopenia. Normal tissue complication probability was calculated using the Lyman-Kutcher-Burman model. Logistic regression was used to analyze association between HT3+ and dosimetric parameters. Results: Twenty-six patients experienced HT3+: 10 of 37 (27%) MMC, 14 of 32 (44%) Cis, 2 of 26 (8%) 5FU, and 0 of 46 P-IMRT. PBM dosimetric parameters were correlated with HT3+ in the MMC group but not in the Cis group. LSS dosimetric parameters were well correlated with HT3+ in both the MMC and Cis groups. Constrained optimization (0

  7. Pelvic Pain

    MedlinePlus

    Pelvic pain occurs mostly in the lower abdomen area. The pain might be steady, or it might come and go. If the pain is severe, it might get in the way ... re a woman, you might feel a dull pain during your period. It could also happen during ...

  8. Randomized controlled trial of dietary fiber for the prevention of radiation-induced gastrointestinal toxicity during pelvic radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Wedlake, Linda; Shaw, Clare; McNair, Helen; Lalji, Amyn; Mohammed, Kabir; Klopper, Tanya; Allan, Lindsey; Tait, Diana; Hawkins, Maria; Somaiah, Navita; Lalondrelle, Susan; Taylor, Alexandra; VanAs, Nicholas; Stewart, Alexandra; Essapen, Sharadah; Gage, Heather; Whelan, Kevin; Andreyev, H Jervoise N

    2017-09-01

    Background: Therapeutic radiotherapy is an important treatment of pelvic cancers. Historically, low-fiber diets have been recommended despite a lack of evidence and potentially beneficial mechanisms of fiber.Objective: This randomized controlled trial compared low-, habitual-, and high-fiber diets for the prevention of gastrointestinal toxicity in patients undergoing pelvic radiotherapy.Design: Patients were randomly assigned to low-fiber [≤10 g nonstarch polysaccharide (NSP)/d], habitual-fiber (control), or high-fiber (≥18 g NSP/d) diets and received individualized counseling at the start of radiotherapy to achieve these targets. The primary endpoint was the difference between groups in the change in the Inflammatory Bowel Disease Questionnaire-Bowel Subset (IBDQ-B) score between the starting and nadir (worst) score during treatment. Other measures included macronutrient intake, stool diaries, and fecal short-chain fatty acid concentrations.Results: Patients were randomly assigned to low-fiber (n = 55), habitual-fiber (n = 55), or high-fiber (n = 56) dietary advice. Fiber intakes were significantly different between groups (P < 0.001). The difference between groups in the change in IBDQ-B scores between the start and nadir was not significant (P = 0.093). However, the change in score between the start and end of radiotherapy was smaller in the high-fiber group (mean ± SD: -3.7 ± 12.8) than in the habitual-fiber group (-10.8 ± 13.5; P = 0.011). At 1-y postradiotherapy (n = 126) the difference in IBDQ-B scores between the high-fiber (+0.1 ± 14.5) and the habitual-fiber (-8.4 ± 13.3) groups was significant (P = 0.004). No significant differences were observed in stool frequency or form or in short-chain fatty acid concentrations. Significant reductions in energy, protein, and fat intake occurred in the low- and habitual-fiber groups only.Conclusions: Dietary advice to follow a high-fiber diet during pelvic radiotherapy resulted in reduced gastrointestinal

  9. Effect of time to initiation of postoperative radiation therapy on survival in surgically managed head and neck cancer.

    PubMed

    Graboyes, Evan M; Garrett-Mayer, Elizabeth; Ellis, Mark A; Sharma, Anand K; Wahlquist, Amy E; Lentsch, Eric J; Nussenbaum, Brian; Day, Terry A

    2017-08-25

    The objective of this study was to determine the effects of National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN) guideline-adherent initiation of postoperative radiation therapy (PORT) and different time-to-PORT intervals on the overall survival (OS) of patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). The National Cancer Data Base was reviewed for the period of 2006-2014, and patients with HNSCC undergoing surgery and PORT were identified. Kaplan-Meier survival estimates, Cox regression analysis, and propensity score matching were used to determine the effects of initiating PORT within 6 weeks of surgery and different time-to-PORT intervals on survival. This study included 41,291 patients. After adjustments for covariates, starting PORT >6 weeks postoperatively was associated with decreased OS (adjusted hazard ratio [aHR], 1.13; 99% confidence interval [CI], 1.08-1.19). This finding remained in the propensity score-matched subset (hazard ratio, 1.21; 99% CI, 1.15-1.28). In comparison with starting PORT 5 to 6 weeks postoperatively, initiating PORT earlier was not associated with improved survival (aHR for ≤ 4 weeks, 0.93; 99% CI, 0.85-1.02; aHR for 4-5 weeks, 0.92; 99% CI, 0.84-1.01). Increasing durations of delay beyond 7 weeks were associated with small, progressive survival decrements (aHR, 1.09, 1.10, and 1.12 for 7-8, 8-10, and >10 weeks, respectively). Nonadherence to NCCN guidelines for initiating PORT within 6 weeks of surgery was associated with decreased survival. There was no survival benefit to initiating PORT earlier within the recommended 6-week timeframe. Increasing durations of delay beyond 7 weeks were associated with small, progressive survival decrements. Cancer 2017. © 2017 American Cancer Society. © 2017 American Cancer Society.

  10. Prognostic significance of survivin in rectal cancer patients treated with surgery and postoperative concurrent chemo-radiation therapy

    PubMed Central

    Il Yu, Jeong; Lee, Hyebin; Park, Hee Chul; Choi, Doo Ho; Choi, Yoon-La; Do, In-Gu; Kim, Hee Cheol; Lee, Woo Yong; Yun, Seong Hyeon; Cho, Yong Beom; Huh, Jung Wook; Park, Yoon Ah; Park, Young Suk; Park, Joon Oh; Kim, Seung Tae; Park, Won

    2016-01-01

    Background & Aims This study is designed to investigate the expression of survivin and p53 in human rectal cancer tissues and analyze associations between expression and clinical outcomes in terms of disease recurrence and survival duration. Results During follow-up (median 119.0, range 6.6 to 161.3 months), tumor recurrence was detected in 50 patients (43.1%), and local recurrence developed as a first failure site in 13 patients (11.2%). Positive immunostaining of nuclear and cytoplasmic survivin was observed in about one quarter of patients, and about half of all patients had positive staining for p53. Both survivin and p53 were significant prognostic factors of disease-free survival in the univariate analyses, but only survivin remained a significant prognostic factor in the multivariate analysis. Methods We performed a retrospective study with 116 locally advanced rectal cancer patients who underwent total mesorectal excision (TME) followed by postoperative concurrent chemo-radiation therapy (CCRT). Immunohistochemical staining was conducted using antibodies for survivin or p53, and their expression was analyzed using an individual score that combined the percentage of positive cells and staining intensity. Conclusions Overexpression of nuclear and cytoplasmic survivin in locally advanced rectal cancer patients was associated with a higher recurrence rate in rectal cancer patients treated with TME followed by postoperative CCRT. PMID:27391438

  11. Need for High Radiation Dose (>=70 Gy) in Early Postoperative Irradiation After Radical Prostatectomy: A Single-Institution Analysis of 334 High-Risk, Node-Negative Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Cozzarini, Cesare; Montorsi, Francesco; Fiorino, Claudio; Alongi, Filippo; Bolognesi, Angelo; Da Pozzo, Luigi Filippo; Guazzoni, Giorgio; Freschi, Massimo; Roscigno, Marco; Scattoni, Vincenzo; Rigatti, Patrizio; Di Muzio, Nadia

    2009-11-15

    Purpose: To determine the clinical benefit of high-dose early adjuvant radiotherapy (EART) in high-risk prostate cancer (hrCaP) patients submitted to radical retropubic prostatectomy plus pelvic lymphadenectomy. Patients and Methods: The clinical outcome of 334 hrCaP (pT3-4 and/or positive resection margins) node-negative patients submitted to radical retropubic prostatectomy plus pelvic lymphadenectomy before 2004 was analyzed according to the EART dose delivered to the prostatic bed, <70.2 Gy (lower dose, median 66.6 Gy, n = 153) or >=70.2 Gy (median 70.2 Gy, n = 181). Results: The two groups were comparable except for a significant difference in terms of median follow-up (10 vs. 7 years, respectively) owing to the gradual increase of EART doses over time. Nevertheless, median time to prostate-specific antigen (PSA) failure was almost identical, 38 and 36 months, respectively. At univariate analysis, both 5-year biochemical relapse-free survival (bRFS) and disease-free survival (DFS) were significantly higher (83% vs. 71% [p = 0.001] and 94% vs. 88% [p = 0.005], respectively) in the HD group. Multivariate analysis confirmed EART dose >=70 Gy to be independently related to both bRFS (hazard ratio 2.5, p = 0.04) and DFS (hazard ratio 3.6, p = 0.004). Similar results were obtained after the exclusion of patients receiving any androgen deprivation. After grouping the hormone-naive patients by postoperative PSA level the statistically significant impact of high-dose EART on both 5-year bRFS and DFS was maintained only for those with undetectable values, possibly owing to micrometastatic disease outside the irradiated area in case of detectable postoperative PSA values. Conclusion: This series provides strong support for the use of EART doses >=70 Gy after radical retropubic prostatectomy in hrCaP patients with undetectable postoperative PSA levels.

  12. Combined surgery and postoperative radiation therapy for advanced laryngeal and hypopharyngeal carcinomas

    SciTech Connect

    Mirimanoff, R.O.; Wang, C.C.; Doppke, K.P.

    1985-03-01

    The survival, pattern of failure and complications in 47 patients with Stage III and IV cancers of the glottis, supraglottis and hypopharynx treated with surgery and postoperative radiotherapy using a new treatment technique referred to as mini-mantle were analyzed. The absolute survival probability of the entire group was 53 and 31% at 3 and 5 years. The local control probability at 3 and 5 years was 63 and 58%, and was higher for the supraglottic/hypopharyngeal than for glottic carcinomas. Five patients developed complications requiring surgical correction, but none experienced mortality. Moderate complications were treated conservatively without lasting sequelae. This technique is a reasonable safe and efficient procedure and can be effectively employed for the management of advanced laryngeal and hypopharyngeal carcinomas after definitive surgery.

  13. Postoperative Treatment of Primary Glioblastoma Multiforme With Radiation and Concomitant Temozolomide in Elderly Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Combs, Stephanie E. Wagner, Johanna; Bischof, Marc; Welzel, Thomas; Wagner, Florian; Debus, Juergen; Schulz-Ertner, Daniela

    2008-03-15

    Purpose: To evaluate efficacy and toxicity in elderly patients with glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) treated with postoperative radiochemotherapy with temozolomide (TMZ). Patients and Methods: Forty-three patients aged 65 years or older were treated with postoperative with radiochemotherapy using TMZ for primary GBM. Median age at primary diagnosis was 67 years; 14 patients were female, 29 were male. A complete surgical resection was performed in 12 patients, subtotal resection in 17 patients, and biopsy only in 14 patients. Radiotherapy was applied with a median dose of 60 Gy, in a median fractionation of 5 x 2 Gy/wk. Thirty-five patients received concomitant TMZ at 50 mg/m{sup 2}, and in 8 patients 75 mg/m{sup 2} of TMZ was applied. Adjuvant cycles of TMZ were prescribed in 5 patients only. Results: Median overall survival was 11 months in all patients; the actuarial overall survival rate was 48% at 1 year and 8% at 2 years. Median overall survival was 18 months after complete resection, 16 months after subtotal resection, and 6 months after biopsy only. Median progression-free survival was 4 months; the actuarial progression-free survival rate was 41% at 6 months and 18% at 12 months. Radiochemotherapy was well tolerated in most patients and could be completed without interruption in 38 of 43 patients. Four patients developed hematologic side effects greater than Common Terminology Criteria Grade 2, which led to early discontinuation of TMZ in 1 patient. Conclusions: Radiochemotherapy is safe and effective in a subgroup of elderly patients with GBM and should be considered in patients without major comorbidities.

  14. A postoperative scoring system for distant recurrence in node-positive cervical cancer patients after radical hysterectomy and pelvic lymph node dissection with para-aortic lymph node sampling or dissection.

    PubMed

    Lee, Young-Jae; Kim, Dae-Yeon; Lee, Shin-Wha; Park, Jeong-Yeol; Suh, Dae-Shik; Kim, Jong-Hyeok; Kim, Yong-Man; Kim, Young-Tak; Nam, Joo-Hyun

    2017-03-01

    To identify risk factors for distant recurrence in node-positive cervical cancer patients who underwent radical hysterectomy and pelvic lymph node dissection (PLND) with para-aortic lymph node sampling (PALNS) or para-aortic lymph node dissection (PALND). A total of 299 patients in whom lymph node metastasis was confirmed after radical surgery at Asan Medical Center for stage IA2 to IIB cervical cancer from February 2001 to December 2012 were identified. In all, 72 (24.1%) patients underwent PLND only and 227 (75.9%) underwent PLND with PALNS or PALND. Four patients were excluded due to diagnosed with small cell carcinoma. The clinicopathologic data of 223 patients were retrospectively analyzed. Distant recurrence was defined as recurrence at a site over the pelvic radiation field. Among all 223 study patients, the mean number of positive lymph nodes was 4.46. There were 54 (24.2%) patients with distant metastasis. Multivariate analyses using the Cox proportional hazards model showed that histologic types (HR=3.031, P≤0.001 for adenocarcinoma, HR=2.302, P=0.066 for adenosquamous carcinoma), number of positive lymph nodes (HR=1.077, P≤0.001), and surgical stage (HR=1.264, P=0.022) were independent risk factors for distant recurrence of cervical cancer. A scoring system for the prediction of distant recurrence was generated by incorporating these factors and showed good discrimination and calibration (concordance index of 0.753). In an internal validation set, this scoring system showed good discrimination with a C-statistics of 0.777. According to the Hosmer-Lemeshow test, the chi-square was 0.650 and the P-value was 0.723. We have developed a robust scoring system that can predict the risk of distant recurrence in node-positive cervical cancer patients after radical operation. This scoring system was used to identify a group of patients who required systemic control of distant micrometastasis. This group of patients is an appropriate target for consolidation

  15. [Postoperative warming therapy in the recovery room. A comparison of radiative and convective warmers].

    PubMed

    Weyland, W; Fritz, U; Fabian, S; Jaeger, H; Crozier, T; Kietzmann, D; Braun, U

    1994-10-01

    Hypothermia (Tcore < 36 degrees C) can be observed in 60%-80% of all admissions to the post-anaesthetic recovery unit. Effective warming devices may accelerate rewarming, improve patient comfort, and suppress shivering thermogenesis. This study was designed to compare the efficiency of warming devices in extubated postoperative patients and their effect on postoperative oxygen uptake (VO2). METHODS. Thirty-five ASA I and II patients after laparoscopic hernioplastic repair with core temperatures < 36 degrees C were randomly assigned to either postoperative nursing under a radiant heater (group R, n = 11, Aragona Thermal Ceilings CTC X, Aragona Medical AB, Täby, Sweden), a forced air system (group L, n = 12, Bair Hugger, Augustine Medical Inc., Eden Prairie, Minnesota, USA), or a normal cotton hospital blanket (group K, n = 12). Anaesthesia was conducted totally intravenously with propofol, alfentanil, and vecuronium. Mean body temperature and total body heat were calculated from urinary bladder temperature and four subcutaneous temperature measurements. The rate of thermogenesis was calculated from continuous measurement of VO2 (Datex Deltatrac Metabolic Monitor, Datex Instrumentarium Corp., Helsinki, Finland). Heat balance was derived from the increase in total body heat minus body heat production. Heart rate and noninvasive blood pressure were measured by the Cardiocap (Datex Instrumentarium Corp., Helsinki, Finland). All data were transferred to an IBM-compatible computer at 60-s intervals. Measurements were stopped when core temperature reached 37 degrees C. The rate of change was calculated for each variable for the period 15 min after the beginning of rewarming to attainment of 37 degrees C. Data are presented as median, minima, and maxima (min<==>max); the Mann-Whitney U test was used to test for significance of group differences. RESULTS. All groups were comparable for body weight, height, age, and amount of postoperative infusions. Temperatures at

  16. Protocol for a phase III randomised trial of image-guided intensity modulated radiotherapy (IG-IMRT) and conventional radiotherapy for late small bowel toxicity reduction after postoperative adjuvant radiation in Ca cervix

    PubMed Central

    Chopra, Supriya; Engineer, Reena; Mahantshetty, Umesh; Misra, Shagun; Phurailatpam, Reena; Paul, Siji N; Kannan, Sadhna; Kerkar, Rajendra; Maheshwari, Amita; Shylasree, TS; Ghosh, Jaya; Gupta, Sudeep; Thomas, Biji; Singh, Shalini; Sharma, Sanjiv; Chilikuri, Srinivas; Shrivastava, Shyam Kishore

    2012-01-01

    Introduction External beam radiation followed by vaginal brachytherapy (±chemotherapy) leads to reduction in the risk of local recurrence and improves progression-free survival in patients with adverse risk factors following Wertheim's hysterectomy albeit at the risk of late bowel toxicity. Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy (IMRT) results in reduction in bowel doses and has potential to reduce late morbidity, however, needs to be confirmed prospectively in a randomised trial. The present randomised trial tests reduction if any in late small bowel toxicity with the use of IMRT in postoperative setting. Methods and analysis Patients more than 18 years of age who need adjuvant (chemo) radiation will be eligible. Patients with residual pelvic or para-aortic nodal disease, history of multiple abdominal surgeries or any other medical bowel condition will be excluded. The trial will randomise patients into standard radiation or IMRT. The primary aim is to compare differences in late grades II–IV bowel toxicity between the two arms. The secondary aims of the study focus on evaluating correlation of dose–volume parameters and late toxicity and quality of life. The trial is planned as a multicentre randomised study. The trial is designed to detect a 13% difference in late grades II–IV bowel toxicity with an α of 0.05 and β of 0.80. A total of 240 patients will be required to demonstrate the aforesaid difference. Ethics and dissemination The trial is approved by institutional ethics review board and will be routinely monitored as per standard guidelines. The study results will be disseminated via peer reviewed scientific journals, conference presentations and submission to regulatory authorities. Registration The trial is registered with clinicaltrials.gov (NCT 01279135). PMID:23242243

  17. A Dosimetric Comparison of Tomotherapy and Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy in the Treatment of High-Risk Prostate Cancer With Pelvic Nodal Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Pasquier, David; Cavillon, Fabrice; Lacornerie, Thomas; Touzeau, Claire; Tresch, Emmanuelle; Lartigau, Eric

    2013-02-01

    Purpose: To compare the dosimetric results of volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) and helical tomotherapy (HT) in the treatment of high-risk prostate cancer with pelvic nodal radiation therapy. Methods and Materials: Plans were generated for 10 consecutive patients treated for high-risk prostate cancer with prophylactic whole pelvic radiation therapy (WPRT) using VMAT and HT. After WPRT, a sequential boost was delivered to the prostate. Plan quality was assessed according to the criteria of the International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements 83 report: the near-minimal (D98%), near-maximal (D2%), and median (D50%) doses; the homogeneity index (HI); and the Dice similarity coefficient (DSC). Beam-on time, integral dose, and several organs at risk (OAR) dosimetric indexes were also compared. Results: For WPRT, HT was able to provide a higher D98% than VMAT (44.3 {+-} 0.3 Gy and 43.9 {+-} 0.5 Gy, respectively; P=.032) and a lower D2% than VMAT (47.3 {+-} 0.3 Gy and 49.1 {+-} 0.7 Gy, respectively; P=.005), leading to a better HI. The DSC was better for WPRT with HT (0.89 {+-} 0.009) than with VMAT (0.80 {+-} 0.02; P=.002). The dosimetric indexes for the prostate boost did not differ significantly. VMAT provided better rectum wall sparing at higher doses (V70, V75, D2%). Conversely, HT provided better bladder wall sparing (V50, V60, V70), except at lower doses (V20). The beam-on times for WPRT and prostate boost were shorter with VMAT than with HT (3.1 {+-} 0.1 vs 7.4 {+-} 0.6 min, respectively; P=.002, and 1.5 {+-} 0.05 vs 3.7 {+-} 0.3 min, respectively; P=.002). The integral dose was slightly lower for VMAT. Conclusion: VMAT and HT provided very similar and highly conformal plans that complied well with OAR dose-volume constraints. Although some dosimetric differences were statistically significant, they remained small. HT provided a more homogeneous dose distribution, whereas VMAT enabled a shorter delivery time.

  18. Outcomes of oral cavity cancer patients treated with surgery followed by postoperative intensity modulated radiation therapy.

    PubMed

    Quinlan-Davidson, Sean R; Mohamed, Abdallah S R; Myers, Jeffrey N; Gunn, Gary B; Johnson, Faye M; Skinner, Heath; Beadle, Beth M; Gillenwater, Ann M; Phan, Jack; Frank, Steven J; William, William N; Wong, Andrew J; Lai, Stephen Y; Fuller, Clifton D; Morrison, William H; Rosenthal, David I; Garden, Adam S

    2017-09-01

    Although treatment paradigms have not changed significantly, radiotherapy, surgery, and imaging techniques have improved, leading us to investigate oncologic and survival outcomes for oral cavity squamous cell cancer (OCSCC) patients treated with surgery followed by postoperative IMRT. Records of patients with pathological diagnosis of OCSCC treated between 2000 and 2012 were retrospectively reviewed. Patients' demographic, disease, and treatment criteria were extracted. Kaplan-Meier method was used to calculate survival curves. Two hundred eighty-nine patients were analyzed. Median follow-up was 35months. Two hundred sixty-eight had neck dissections (93%), of which 66% had nodal involvement, and 51% of those positive dissections had extracapsular extension. Forty patients received induction chemotherapy and 107 received concurrent chemotherapy. Median dose to high risk clinical target volume was 60Gy/30 fractions. The 5-year locoregional control and overall survival rates were 76% and 57%, respectively. Tumors with >1.5cm depth of invasion had significantly higher risk of local failure compared with ≤1.5cm (p<0.001). In multivariate analysis, positive and no neck dissection (p=0.01), positive lymphovascular invasion (p=0.006) and >1.5cm depth of invasion (p=0.003) were independent predictors of poorer survival. Disease outcomes were consistent with historical data and did not appear compromised by the use of IMRT. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Pelvic Floor Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... NICHD Research Information Clinical Trials Resources and Publications Pelvic Floor Disorders: Condition Information Skip sharing on social media links Share this: Page Content What is the pelvic floor? The term "pelvic floor" refers to the group ...

  20. Pelvic Organ Prolapse

    MedlinePlus

    ... occurs when the tissue and muscles of the pelvic floor no longer support the pelvic organs resulting in ... organ prolapse. Supporting muscles and tissue of the pelvic floor may become torn or stretched because of labor ...

  1. Pelvic ultrasound - abdominal

    MedlinePlus

    ... you Bladder growths or other problems Kidney stones Pelvic inflammatory disease , an infection of a woman's uterus, ovaries, or tubes Abnormal vaginal bleeding Menstrual problems Problems ... the uterus Pelvic pain Pelvic ultrasound is also used during a ...

  2. The risk of lymphedema after postoperative radiation therapy in endometrial cancer

    PubMed Central

    Catalano, Paul J.; Cimbak, Nicole; Muto, Michael G.; Viswanathan, Akila N.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Lower extremity lymphedema adversely affects quality of life by causing discomfort, impaired mobility and increased risk of infection. The goal of this study is to investigate factors that influence the likelihood of lymphedema in patients with endometrial cancer who undergo adjuvant radiation with or without chemotherapy. Methods A retrospective chart review identified all stage I–III endometrial cancer patients who had a hysterectomy with or without complete staging lymphadenectomy and adjuvant radiation therapy between January 2006 and February 2013. Patients with new-onset lymphedema after treatment were identified. Logistic regression was used to find factors that influenced lymphedema risk. Results Of 212 patients who met inclusion criteria, 15 patients (7.1%) developed new-onset lymphedema. Lymphedema was associated with lymph-node dissection (odds ratio [OR], 5.6; 95% CI, 1.01 to 105.5; p=0.048) and with the presence of pathologically positive lymph nodes (OR, 4.1; 95% CI, 1.4 to 12.3; p=0.01). Multivariate logistic regression confirmed the association with lymph-node positivity (OR, 3.2; 95% CI, 1.0007 to 10.7; p=0.0499) when controlled for lymph-node dissection. Median time to lymphedema onset was 8 months (range, 1 to 58 months) with resolution or improvement in eight patients (53.3%) after a median of 10 months. Conclusion Lymph-node positivity was associated with an increased risk of lymphedema in endometrial cancer patients who received adjuvant radiation. Future studies are needed to explore whether node-positive patients may benefit from early lymphedema-controlling interventions. PMID:26463430

  3. Magnitude of preoperative cervical lordotic compensation and C2-T3 angle are correlated to increased risk of postoperative sagittal spinal pelvic malalignment in adult thoracolumbar deformity patients at 2-year follow-up.

    PubMed

    Passias, Peter G; Soroceanu, Alexandra; Scheer, Justin; Yang, Sun; Boniello, Anthony; Smith, Justin S; Protopsaltis, Themistocles; Kim, Han J; Schwab, Frank; Gupta, Munish; Klineberg, Eric; Mundis, Gregory; Lafage, Renaud; Hart, Robert; Shaffrey, Christopher; Lafage, Virginie; Ames, Christopher

    2015-08-01

    Cervical deformity (CD) is prevalent among patients with adult spinal deformity (ASD). The effect of baseline cervical alignment on achieving optimal thoracolumbar alignment in ASD surgery is unclear. This study assesses the relationship between preoperative (preop) cervical spinal parameters and global alignment after thoracolumbar ASD surgery at 2-year follow-up. This study is a retrospective review of a multicenter, prospective database. Surgical ASD patients with 2-year follow-up and cervical X-rays were included. The outcome measures were radiographic parameters and self-reported health-related quality-of-life measures (Short-Form 36 [SF-36], Oswestry Disability Index [ODI], and Scoliosis Research Society 22 [SRS-22]). Surgical ASD patients of 18 years and older with scoliosis greater than or equal to 20° and one of the following radiographic parameters were included: sagittal vertical axis (SVA) greater than or equal to 5 cm, pelvic tilt (PT) greater than or equal to 25°, or thoracic kyphosis (TK) greater than 60°. The SRS-Schwab sagittal modifiers (PT, global alignment, and pelvic incidence and lumbar lordosis [PI-LL]) were assessed at 2-year postoperatively as either normal ("0") or abnormal ("+" or "++"). Patients were classified in the aligned group (AG) or malaligned group (MG) at 2-year follow-up if all three sagittal modifiers were normal or abnormal, respectively. Patients were assessed for CD based on the following criteria: C2-C7 SVA greater than 4 cm, C2-C7 SVA less than 4 cm, cervical kyphosis (CL greater than 0), cervical lordosis (CL less than 0), any deformity (C2-C7 SVA greater than 4 cm or CL greater than 0), and both CD (C2-C7 SVA greater than 4 cm and CL greater than 0). Univariate testing was performed using t or chi-square test, looking at the following preop parameters: CD, C2-C7 SVA, C2-T3 SVA, CL, T1 slope (T1S), T1S-CL, C2-T3 angle, LL, TK, PT, C7-S1 SVA, and PI-LL. One hundred four patients met the initial inclusion criteria with

  4. [Postoperative radiation therapy for a patient with osteogenesis imperfecta: case report].

    PubMed

    Ducournau, A; Lagarde, P; Henriques de Figueiredo, B; Antoine, M; Breton-Callu, C; Petit, A; Dallaudière, B; Sargos, P

    2014-03-01

    Osteogenesis imperfecta is an unusual disease also called Lobstein disease. Characterized by abnormalities of collagen biosynthesis, a possible mutation on 17th chromosome is described. On the other hand, 29% of breast cancers present a mutation on the same chromosome. Nevertheless, the association of osteogenesis imperfecta and breast cancer is at the moment unknown. Therapeutic management is very difficult because of a loss in dihydropyrimidine dehydrogenase for patients having osteogenesis imperfecta, generating some toxicity by default in catabolism of 5-fluorouracil. We report the case of a 49-year-old woman with a breast cancer in the context of osteogenesis imperfecta. Dosimetric considerations permitting to reduce chess dose level have been performed for this patient. With a follow-up of 6 months, no imaging fracture has been revealed after radiotherapy. No evident conclusion about radiation injury from a case report could be described in case of osteogenesis imperfecta. To our knowledge, this is the first case which take into account potential radiation induced toxicities. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier SAS.

  5. Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy in Treating Long-Term Gastrointestinal Adverse Effects Caused by Radiation Therapy in Patients With Pelvic Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2011-07-14

    Bladder Cancer; Cervical Cancer; Colorectal Cancer; Endometrial Cancer; Gastrointestinal Complications; Long-term Effects Secondary to Cancer Therapy in Adults; Ovarian Cancer; Prostate Cancer; Radiation Toxicity; Sarcoma; Testicular Germ Cell Tumor; Vaginal Cancer

  6. Postoperative Stereotactic Radiosurgery Without Whole-Brain Radiation Therapy for Brain Metastases: Potential Role of Preoperative Tumor Size

    SciTech Connect

    Hartford, Alan C.; Paravati, Anthony J.; Spire, William J.; Li, Zhongze; Jarvis, Lesley A.; Fadul, Camilo E.; Erkmen, Kadir; Friedman, Jonathan; Gladstone, David J.; Hug, Eugen B.; Roberts, David W.; Simmons, Nathan E.

    2013-03-01

    Purpose: Radiation therapy following resection of a brain metastasis increases the probability of disease control at the surgical site. We analyzed our experience with postoperative stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) as an alternative to whole-brain radiotherapy (WBRT), with an emphasis on identifying factors that might predict intracranial disease control and overall survival (OS). Methods and Materials: We retrospectively reviewed all patients through December 2008, who, after surgical resection, underwent SRS to the tumor bed, deferring WBRT. Multiple factors were analyzed for time to intracranial recurrence (ICR), whether local recurrence (LR) at the surgical bed or “distant” recurrence (DR) in the brain, for time to WBRT, and for OS. Results: A total of 49 lesions in 47 patients were treated with postoperative SRS. With median follow-up of 9.3 months (range, 1.1-61.4 months), local control rates at the resection cavity were 85.5% at 1 year and 66.9% at 2 years. OS rates at 1 and 2 years were 52.5% and 31.7%, respectively. On univariate analysis (preoperative) tumors larger than 3.0 cm exhibited a significantly shorter time to LR. At a cutoff of 2.0 cm, larger tumors resulted in significantly shorter times not only for LR but also for DR, ICR, and salvage WBRT. While multivariate Cox regressions showed preoperative size to be significant for times to DR, ICR, and WBRT, in similar multivariate analysis for OS, only the graded prognostic assessment proved to be significant. However, the number of intracranial metastases at presentation was not significantly associated with OS nor with other outcome variables. Conclusions: Larger tumor size was associated with shorter time to recurrence and with shorter time to salvage WBRT; however, larger tumors were not associated with decrements in OS, suggesting successful salvage. SRS to the tumor bed without WBRT is an effective treatment for resected brain metastases, achieving local control particularly for tumors up to

  7. Acute Bladder Necrosis after Pelvic Arterial Embolization for Pelvic Trauma: Lessons Learned from Two Cases of Immediate Postembolization Bladder Necrosis

    PubMed Central

    Osterberg, E. Charles; Elliott, Sean P.; Hittelman, Adam B.

    2016-01-01

    We report two cases of acute bladder injury with bladder neck necrosis identified during the initial operative evaluation and within the early postprocedural period in patients with significant pelvic trauma requiring pelvic vascular embolization. To our knowledge, this is the first report of bladder neck necrosis found during the initial intraoperative surgical evaluation or early postoperative setting. PMID:27656309

  8. Adenoid cystic carcinoma of the head and neck treated by surgery with or without postoperative radiation therapy: Prognostic features of recurrence

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Allen M.; Bucci, M. Kara . E-mail: mkbucci@mdanderson.org; Weinberg, Vivian; Garcia, Joaquin; Quivey, Jeanne M.; Schechter, Naomi R.; Phillips, Theodore L.; Fu, Karen K.; Eisele, David W.

    2006-09-01

    Purpose: This study sought to review a single-institution experience with the management of adenoid cystic carcinoma of the head and neck. Methods and Materials: Between 1960 and 2004, 140 patients with adenoid cystic carcinoma of the head and neck were treated with definitive surgery. Ninety patients (64%) received postoperative radiation to a median dose of 64 Gy (range, 54-71 Gy). Distribution of T stage was: 26% T1, 28% T2, 20% T3, and 26% T4. Seventy-eight patients (56%) had microscopically positive margins. Median follow-up was 66 months (range, 7-267 months). Results: The 5- and 10-year rate estimates of local control were 88% and 77%, respectively. A Cox proportional hazards model identified T4 disease (p = 0.0001), perineural invasion (p = 0.008), omission of postoperative radiation (p = 0.007), and major nerve involvement (p = 0.02) as independent predictors of local recurrence. Radiation dose lower than 60 Gy (p = 0.0004), T4 disease (p 0.005), and major nerve involvement (p = 0.02) were predictors of local recurrence among those treated with surgery and postoperative radiation. The 10-year overall survival and distant metastasis-free survival were 64% and 66%, respectively. Conclusion: Combined-modality therapy with surgery followed by radiation to doses in excess of 60 Gy should be considered the standard of care for adenoid cystic carcinoma of the head and neck.

  9. Functional pelvic orientation measured from lateral standing and sitting radiographs.

    PubMed

    DiGioia, Anthony M; Hafez, Mahmoud A; Jaramaz, Branislav; Levison, Timothy J; Moody, James E

    2006-12-01

    We prospectively obtained preoperative and 3-month postoperative lateral pelvic radiographs in the standing and sitting positions from 84 patients who underwent total hip arthroplasty. We measured pelvic orientation (flexion extension) using the anterior pelvic plane as defined by the anterior superior iliac spines and pubic tubercles as references. There was a trend towards upright pelvic alignment when standing, with a mean anterior pelvic plane angle of 1.2 degrees (range, -22 degrees - +27 degrees). In the sitting position the pelvis tended to extend posteriorly, with a mean anterior pelvic plane angle of -36.2 degrees (range, -64 degrees - +4 degrees). There was a wide variation in the arc of pelvic flexion extension as patients moved from standing to sitting, with are of pelvic motion in some patients as mobile as 70 degrees and in others as stiff as 5 degrees. There was no significant variation between males and females or between preoperative and postoperative pelvic flexion extension. There were substantial variations in pelvic orientation when comparing standing and sitting for an individual patient and between different patients. This variation can be unpredictable, and may influence implant alignment and stability after total hip arthroplasty.

  10. Evaluating adjacent organ radiation doses from postoperative intracavitary vaginal vault brachytherapy for endometrial cancer.

    PubMed

    Caon, Julianna; Holloway, Caroline; Dubash, Rustom; Yuen, Conrad; Aquino-Parsons, Christina

    2014-01-01

    To document doses received by critical organs during adjuvant high-dose-rate (HDR) vaginal vault brachytherapy. Patients treated with HDR vaginal vault radiation between January 1, 2009, and January 31, 2012, who had a CT simulation with the treatment cylinder in situ were included. The CT scans were retrospectively reviewed and the rectum, sigmoid, small bowel, and bladder were contoured. Standardized plans treating the upper 4 cm of the vaginal vault were used to deliver a total of 21 Gy (Gy) at 0.5 cm from the apex of the vaginal vault in three fractions. There were 41 patients. Median age was 62 years. The median vaginal cylinder diameter was 3 cm. The mean 2cc dose to the rectum, sigmoid, small bowel, and bladder were 5.7, 4.7, 4.0, and 5.6 Gy, respectively. Bladder volume ranged from 67-797cc. Assuming minimal interfraction organ variation, the equivalent dose in 2 Gy/fraction was extrapolated from data and may be near or beyond organ tolerance for rectum, sigmoid, and small bowel in some cases. Spearman correlation found that increased bladder volume was not associated with adjacent organs at risk dose but may be associated with a trend (p=0.06) toward increased bladder dose (R=0.30). This study describes the dose received by adjacent critical structures during vaginal vault HDR brachytherapy. This is important information for documentation in the rare setting of treatment-related toxicity or recurrence. Bladder volume was not associated with dose to adjacent organs. Crown Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Phase II trial of adjuvant pelvic radiation "sandwiched" between ifosfamide or ifosfamide plus cisplatin in women with uterine carcinosarcoma.

    PubMed

    Einstein, Mark H; Klobocista, Merieme; Hou, June Y; Lee, Stephen; Mutyala, Subhakar; Mehta, Keyur; Reimers, Laura L; Kuo, Dennis Y-S; Huang, Gloria S; Goldberg, Gary L

    2012-01-01

    Uterine carcinosarcoma (CS) is a rare uterine tumor with an extremely poor prognosis. In the adjuvant setting, efficacy has been shown with radiotherapy (RT), systemic chemotherapy, or both. This is the first report describing the efficacy and toxicity of adjuvant ifosfamide or ifosfamide plus cisplatin "sandwiched" with RT in patients with surgically staged and completely resected uterine carcinosarcoma. Women with surgically staged CS with no gross residual disease were initially administered ifosfamide (1.2 g/m(2)/day×5 days) with cisplatin (20 mg/m(2)/day×5 days) every 3 weeks for 3 cycles followed by pelvic external beam RT and brachytherapy followed by 3 additional cycles of ifosfamide (1.0 g/m2/day) with cisplatin (20 mg/m(2)/day×5 days) every 3 weeks. Similar to the GOG trial in recurrent CS (Sutton et al., 2000), the addition of cisplatin added toxicity without additional efficacy, so mid-study, the cisplatin was eliminated from the regimen. Toxicities were recorded and disease-free survival (DFS) was calculated with Kaplan-Meier statistical methods. In total, 12 patients received ifosfamide and cisplatin and 15 patients received ifosfamide alone, both 'sandwiched' with RT. The median follow up was 35.9 months (range 6-88). The 2 year DFS was similar in both the ifosfamide/cisplatin and ifosfamide groups (log-rank p=0.16), so they were combined for analysis. 19 patients (70%) completed the protocol. As expected, stage 1 patients had a better 2-year DFS (18.75 ± 1.12 months; log-rank p=0.008 when compared to stages 2, 3, 4). Also, in stages 2, 3 and 4 patients, the DFS was 15.81 ± 1.73 months. Grade 3/4 neutropenia, anemia and thrombocytopenia occurred in 18%, 4% and 4% of cycles, respectively. Ifosfamide "sandwiched" with RT appears to be an efficacious regimen for surgically staged CS patients with no residual disease, even in patients with advanced stage. The addition of cisplatin to the regimen added toxicity without improving efficacy. Even with

  12. Changing aspects of radiation enteropathy

    SciTech Connect

    Morgenstern, L.; Hart, M.; Lugo, D.; Friedman, N.B.

    1985-11-01

    Fifty-two patients with radiation enteropathy secondary to radiation for abdominal or pelvic malignant neoplasms are described. This series (1977 to 1984) is compared with a series of 50 patients from the same institution over an earlier period (1961 to 1977). Intestinal obstruction was the principal complication in both series; 96% of the patients underwent either intestinal resection or anastomotic bypass of the affected segment. Changes that have occurred since the last report are as follows: changes in source of radiation energy (linear accelerator); less evidence of mucosal damage; increased serosal reaction (''serosal peel''); and increased use of elemental diets, parenteral nutrition, and long intestinal tubes in surgical management. Since postoperative radiation injury occurs most frequently in the pelvis, new developments for the exclusion of small bowel from the pelvis during radiation are reviewed. Changes in fractionation of radiation dosage should also be considered in patients with enteric symptoms during radiation therapy.

  13. Phase II Trial of Adjuvant Pelvic Radiation “Sandwiched” Between Combination Paclitaxel and Carboplatin in Women with Uterine Papillary Serous Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Einstein, Mark H.; Frimer, Marina; Kuo, Dennis Y-S; Reimers, Laura L.; Mehta, Keyur; Mutyala, Subhakar; Huang, Gloria S.; Hou, June Y.; Goldberg, Gary L.

    2013-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the safety and survival in women treated with adjuvant pelvic radiation “sandwiched” between six cycles of paclitaxel and carboplatin chemotherapy with completely resected UPSC. Methods Surgically staged women with UPSC (FIGO stage 1-4) and no visible residual disease were enrolled. Treatment involved paclitaxel (175 mg/m2) and carboplatin (AUC=6.0-7.5) every 21 days for 3 doses, followed by radiation therapy (RT), followed by an additional 3 cycles of paclitaxel and carboplatin (AUC=5-6). Survival analysis, using Kaplan-Meier methods, was performed on patients who completed at least 3 cycles of chemotherapy and RT. Results A total of 81 patients were enrolled, of which 72 patients completed the first 3 cycles of chemotherapy followed by prescribed RT. Median age was 67 years (range: 43–82 years). 59/72 (82%) had disease confined to the uterus and 13/72 (18%) had completely resected extra-uterine disease (stage 3&4). 65 (83%) completed the protocol. Overall PFS and OS for combined stage 1&2 patients was 65.5±3.6 months and 76.5±4.3 months, respectively. PFS and OS for combined stage 3&4 patients was 25.8±3.0 and 35.9±5.3 months, respectively. Three-year % survival probability for stage 1&2 patients was 84% and for stage 3&4 patients was 50%. Of the 435 chemotherapy cycles administered, there were 11(2.5%) G3/G4 non-hematologic toxicities. 26(6.0%) cycles had dose reductions and 37(8.5%) had dose delays. Conclusions Compared to prior studies of single modality adjuvant therapy, RT “sandwiched” between paclitaxel and carboplatin chemotherapy is well-tolerated and highly efficacious in women with completely resected UPSC. PMID:22035806

  14. Role of postoperative radiation therapy (PORT) in pT1-T2 N0 deep tongue cancers.

    PubMed

    Gokavarapu, Sandhya; Parvataneni, Nagendra; Rao S, L M Chandrasekhara; Reddy, Rammohan; Raju, K V V N; Chander, Ravi

    2015-12-01

    Carcinoma of tongue is associated with a high risk of occult metastasis and mortality despite early-stage detection and therapy; the critical tumor thickness at which this risk increases has been demonstrated as 4 mm or greater. There are no sufficient data in the published literature to evaluate the role of postoperative radiation therapy (PORT) in the treatment of pT1-T2 N0 oral tongue cancers with depth of invasion 4 mm or greater. Historical cohorts of patients with primary pT1-T2 N0 oral tongue cancer of depth of invasion 4 mm or greater treated surgically from January 2010 to December 2012 were included in the study, and negative margins on initial resection were filtered. Locoregional recurrence and death were analyzed among the patients who received PORT and those who did not. A total of 103 patients fulfilled the above-mentioned criteria, with 62 patients receiving PORT and 41 patients not receiving PORT; median period of follow-up was 41.3 months. Logistic and Cox regression models showed no significant difference in locoregional recurrences (P = .078) and survival (P = .339) between patients who received PORT and those who did not receive PORT. PORT did not influence survival of patients with stage I and stage II deep tongue cancers, with 4 mm or greater tumor invasion depth. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Pelvic Nodal Dosing With Registration to the Prostate: Implications for High-Risk Prostate Cancer Patients Receiving Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Kishan, Amar U. Lamb, James M.; Jani, Shyam S.; Kang, Jung J.; Steinberg, Michael L.; King, Christopher R.

    2015-03-15

    Purpose: To determine whether image guidance with rigid registration (RR) to intraprostatic markers (IPMs) yields acceptable coverage of the pelvic lymph nodes in the context of a stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) regimen. Methods and Materials: Four to seven kilovoltage cone-beam CTs (CBCTs) from 12 patients with high-risk prostate cancer were analyzed, allowing approximation of an SBRT regimen. The nodal clinical target volume (CTV{sub N}) and bladder were contoured on all kilovoltage CBCTs. The V{sub 100} CTV{sub N}, expressed as a ratio to the same parameter on the initial plan, and the magnitude of translational shift between RR to the IPMs versus RR to the pelvic bones, were computed. The ability of a multimodality bladder filling protocol to minimize bladder height variation was assessed in a separate cohort of 4 patients. Results: Sixty-five CBCTs were assessed. The average V{sub 100} CTV{sub N} was 92.6%, but for a subset of 3 patients the average was 80.0%, compared with 97.8% for the others (P<.0001). The average overall and superior–inferior axis magnitudes of the bony-to-fiducial translations were significantly larger in the subgroup with suboptimal nodal coverage (8.1 vs 3.9 mm and 5.8 vs 2.4 mm, respectively; P<.0001). Relative bladder height changes were also significantly larger in the subgroup with suboptimal nodal coverage (42.9% vs 18.5%; P<.05). Use of a multimodality bladder-filling protocol minimized bladder height variation (P<.001). Conclusion: A majority of patients had acceptable nodal coverage after RR to IPMs, even when approximating SBRT. However, a subset of patients had suboptimal nodal coverage. These patients had large bony-to-fiducial translations and large variations in bladder height. Nodal coverage should be excellent if the superior–inferior axis bony-to-fiducial translation and the relative bladder height change (both easily measured on CBCT) are kept to a minimum. Implementation of a strict bladder filling

  16. Postoperative extended-volume external-beam radiation therapy in high-risk esophageal cancer patients: a prospective experience

    PubMed Central

    Yu, E.; Tai, P.; Younus, J.; Malthaner, R.; Truong, P.; Stitt, L.; Rodrigues, G.; Ash, R.; Dar, R.; Yaremko, B.; Tomiak, A.; Dingle, B.; Sanatani, M.; Vincent, M.; Kocha, W.; Fortin, D.; Inculet, R.

    2009-01-01

    Background and Purpose Extended-volume external-beam radiation therapy (rt) following esophagectomy is controversial. The present prospective study evaluates the feasibility of extended-volume rt treatment in high-risk esophagectomy patients with a cervical anastomosis receiving postoperative combined chemoradiation therapy. Patients and Methods From 2001 to 2006, 15 patients with resected esophageal cancer were prospectively accrued to this pilot study to evaluate the adverse effects of extended-volume rt. Postoperative management was carried out at London Regional Cancer Program. Eligibility criteria were pathology-proven esophageal malignancy (T3–4, N0–1), disease amenable to surgical resection, and esophagectomy with or without resection margin involvement. Patients with distant metastases (M1) and patients treated with previous rt were excluded. All 15 study patients received 4 cycles of 5-fluorouracil–based chemotherapy. External-beam rt was conducted using conformal computed tomography planning, with multi-field arrangement tailored to the pathology findings, with coverage of a clinical target volume encompassing the primary tumour bed and the anastomotic site in the neck. The radiation therapy dose was 50.40 Gy at 1.8 Gy per fraction. The rt was delivered concurrently with the third cycle of chemotherapy. The study outcomes—disease-free survival (dfs) and overall survival (os)—were calculated by the Kaplan–Meier method. Treatment-related toxicities were assessed using the U.S. National Cancer Institute’s Common Toxicity Criteria. Results The study accrued 10 men and 5 women of median age 64 years (range: 48–80 years) and TNM stages T3N0 (n = 1), T2N1 (n = 2), T3N1 (n = 11), and T4N1 (n = 1). Histopathology included 5 adenocarcinomas and 10 squamous-cell carcinomas. Resection margins were clear in 10 patients. The median follow-up time was 19 months (range: 3.5–53.4 months). Before radiation therapy commenced, delay in chemotherapy occurred

  17. Aortoiliac aneurysm with congenital right pelvic kidney.

    PubMed

    Date, Kazuma; Okada, Shuuichi; Ezure, Masahiko; Takihara, Hitomi; Okonogi, Shuuichi; Hasegawa, Yutaka; Sato, Yasushi; Kaneko, Tatsuo

    2015-05-01

    The association of congenital pelvic kidney with abdominal aortoiliac aneurysm is an extremely rare clinical finding. Previous reports have described various methods of aneurysm repair with successful preservation of the function of pelvic kidney. However, to our knowledge, reconstruction of more than two renal arteries has not been established. We report a case of abdominal aortic aneurysm complicated by congenital right pelvic kidney in a 72-year-old man. Computed tomography (CT) revealed an abdominal aortic aneurysm with a maximum diameter of 54 mm and a right common iliac aneurysm of 45 mm. In addition, he had a congenital right pelvic kidney and CT angiography identified three right pelvic renal arteries. The upper artery originated from the bifurcation of the terminal aorta and the lower two originated from the right common iliac artery. Three-dimensional CT was helpful for the accurate planning of the operation. Open surgical repair of the aortoiliac aneurysm with a Dacron bifurcated graft replacement was decided and reimplantation of all three right pelvic kidney arteries to the right limb of the graft was also performed. For renal preservation, the right pelvic kidney arteries were perfused with cold Ringer's lactate using a rapid infusion pump and coronary perfusion cannula. The patient's postoperative course was uneventful, and worsening of renal function was not observed. The perfusion of renal arteries with cold Ringer's solution was thought to be a simple and appropriate procedure for renal protection.

  18. Long-Term Follow-Up of Preoperative Pelvic Radiation Therapy and Concomitant Boost Irradiation in Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer Patients: A Multi-Institutional Phase II Study (KROG 04-01)

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Jong Hoon; Kim, Dae Yong; Nam, Taek-Keun; Yoon, Sei-Chul; Lee, Doo Seok; Park, Ji Won; Oh, Jae Hwan; Chang, Hee Jin; Yoon, Mee Sun; Jeong, Jae-Uk; Jang, Hong Seok

    2012-11-15

    Purpose: To perform a prospective phase II study to investigate the efficacy and safety of preoperative pelvic radiation therapy and concomitant small-field boost irradiation with 5-fluorouracil and leucovorin for 5 weeks in locally advanced rectal cancer patients. Methods and Materials: Sixty-nine patients with locally advanced, nonmetastatic, mid-to-lower rectal cancer were prospectively enrolled. They had received preoperative chemoradiation therapy and total mesorectal excision. Pelvic radiation therapy of 43.2 Gy in 24 fractions plus concomitant boost radiation therapy of 7.2 Gy in 12 fractions was delivered to the pelvis and tumor bed for 5 weeks. Two cycles of 5-fluorouracil and leucovorin were administered for 3 days in the first and fifth week of radiation therapy. The pathologic response, survival outcome, and treatment toxicity were evaluated for the study endpoints. Results: Of 69 patients, 8 (11.6%) had a pathologically complete response. Downstaging rates were 40.5% for T classification and 68.1% for N classification. At the median follow-up of 69 months, 36 patients have been followed up for more than 5 years. The 5-year disease-free survival (DFS) and overall survival rates were 66.0% and 75.3%, respectively. Higher pathologic T (P = .045) and N (P = .032) classification were significant adverse prognostic factors for DFS, and high-grade histology was an adverse prognostic factor for both DFS (P = .025) and overall survival (P = .031) on the multivariate analysis. Fifteen patients (21.7%) experienced grade 3 or 4 acute toxicity, and 7 patients (10.1%) had long-term toxicity. Conclusion: Preoperative pelvic radiation therapy with concomitant boost irradiation with 5-fluorouracil and leucovorin for 5 weeks showed acceptable acute and long-term toxicities. However, the benefit of concomitant small-field boost irradiation for 5 weeks in rectal cancer patients was not demonstrated beyond conventional irradiation for 6 weeks in terms of tumor response and

  19. Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Consensus Panel Guidelines for the Delineation of the Clinical Target Volume in the Postoperative Treatment of Pancreatic Head Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Goodman, Karyn A.; Regine, William F.; Dawson, Laura A.; Ben-Josef, Edgar; Haustermans, Karin; Bosch, Walter R.; Turian, Julius; Abrams, Ross A.

    2012-07-01

    Purpose: To develop contouring guidelines to be used in the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group protocol 0848, a Phase III randomized trial evaluating the benefit of adjuvant chemoradiation in patients with resected head of pancreas cancer. Methods and Materials: A consensus committee of six radiation oncologists with expertise in gastrointestinal radiotherapy developed stepwise contouring guidelines and an atlas for the delineation of the clinical target volume (CTV) in the postoperative treatment of pancreas cancer, based on identifiable regions of interest and margin expansions. Areas at risk for subclinical disease to be included in the CTV were defined, including nodal regions, anastomoses, and the preoperative primary tumor location. Regions of interest that could be reproducibly contoured on postoperative imaging after a pancreaticoduodenectomy were identified. Standardized expansion margins to encompass areas at risk were developed after multiple iterations to determine the optimal margin expansions. Results: New contouring recommendations based on CT anatomy were established. Written guidelines for the delineation of the postoperative CTV and normal tissues, as well as a Web-based atlas, were developed. Conclusions: The postoperative abdomen has been a difficult area for effective radiotherapy. These new guidelines will help physicians create fields that better encompass areas at risk and minimize dose to normal tissues.

  20. Psychosexual adjustment following pelvic exenteration.

    PubMed

    Andersen, B L; Hacker, N F

    1983-03-01

    Fifteen pelvic exenteration patients from 2 institutions participated in semistructured interviews and objective assessment to examine postoperative psychologic, social, and sexual functioning. Analyses of variance indicated significant differences between the sexually active and nonactive patients and the patients with a neovagina and those with no vaginal capacity only in the area of sexual functioning, not in psychologic or social adjustment. Descriptive statistics for the entire group of patients provide a view of psychosocial adjustment for the average pelvic exenteration patient. Long after such patients are asymptomatic and clinically free of disease, they appear mildly distressed and depressed. However, these women report active and satisfactory levels of social and free-time activities. Sexual functioning continues as the area of greatest disruption for these patients and, as a group, they resemble severely sexually dysfunctional healthy women. This investigation provides a substantive look at the post-treatment life circumstances of these patients and offers a data base for future investigations.

  1. Early clinical outcomes and toxicity of intensity modulated versus conventional pelvic radiation therapy for locally advanced cervix carcinoma: a prospective randomized study.

    PubMed

    Gandhi, Ajeet Kumar; Sharma, Daya Nand; Rath, Goura Kisor; Julka, Pramod Kumar; Subramani, Vellaiyan; Sharma, Seema; Manigandan, Durai; Laviraj, M A; Kumar, Sunesh; Thulkar, Sanjay

    2013-11-01

    To evaluate the toxicity and clinical outcome in patients with locally advanced cervical cancer (LACC) treated with whole pelvic conventional radiation therapy (WP-CRT) versus intensity modulated radiation therapy (WP-IMRT). Between January 2010 and January 2012, 44 patients with International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics (FIGO 2009) stage IIB-IIIB squamous cell carcinoma of the cervix were randomized to receive 50.4 Gy in 28 fractions delivered via either WP-CRT or WP-IMRT with concurrent weekly cisplatin 40 mg/m(2). Acute toxicity was graded according to the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, version 3.0, and late toxicity was graded according to the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group system. The primary and secondary endpoints were acute gastrointestinal toxicity and disease-free survival, respectively. Of 44 patients, 22 patients received WP-CRT and 22 received WP-IMRT. In the WP-CRT arm, 13 patients had stage IIB disease and 9 had stage IIIB disease; in the IMRT arm, 12 patients had stage IIB disease and 10 had stage IIIB disease. The median follow-up time in the WP-CRT arm was 21.7 months (range, 10.7-37.4 months), and in the WP-IMRT arm it was 21.6 months (range, 7.7-34.4 months). At 27 months, disease-free survival was 79.4% in the WP-CRT group versus 60% in the WP-IMRT group (P=.651), and overall survival was 76% in the WP-CRT group versus 85.7% in the WP-IMRT group (P=.645). Patients in the WP-IMRT arm experienced significantly fewer grade ≥2 acute gastrointestinal toxicities (31.8% vs 63.6%, P=.034) and grade ≥3 gastrointestinal toxicities (4.5% vs 27.3%, P=.047) than did patients receiving WP-CRT and had less chronic gastrointestinal toxicity (13.6% vs 50%, P=.011). WP-IMRT is associated with significantly less toxicity compared with WP-CRT and has a comparable clinical outcome. Further studies with larger sample sizes and longer follow-up times are warranted to justify its use in routine clinical practice. Copyright © 2013

  2. Early Clinical Outcomes and Toxicity of Intensity Modulated Versus Conventional Pelvic Radiation Therapy for Locally Advanced Cervix Carcinoma: A Prospective Randomized Study

    SciTech Connect

    Gandhi, Ajeet Kumar; Sharma, Daya Nand; Rath, Goura Kisor; Julka, Pramod Kumar; Subramani, Vellaiyan; Sharma, Seema; Manigandan, Durai; Laviraj, M.A.; Kumar, Sunesh; Thulkar, Sanjay

    2013-11-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the toxicity and clinical outcome in patients with locally advanced cervical cancer (LACC) treated with whole pelvic conventional radiation therapy (WP-CRT) versus intensity modulated radiation therapy (WP-IMRT). Methods and Materials: Between January 2010 and January 2012, 44 patients with International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics (FIGO 2009) stage IIB-IIIB squamous cell carcinoma of the cervix were randomized to receive 50.4 Gy in 28 fractions delivered via either WP-CRT or WP-IMRT with concurrent weekly cisplatin 40 mg/m{sup 2}. Acute toxicity was graded according to the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, version 3.0, and late toxicity was graded according to the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group system. The primary and secondary endpoints were acute gastrointestinal toxicity and disease-free survival, respectively. Results: Of 44 patients, 22 patients received WP-CRT and 22 received WP-IMRT. In the WP-CRT arm, 13 patients had stage IIB disease and 9 had stage IIIB disease; in the IMRT arm, 12 patients had stage IIB disease and 10 had stage IIIB disease. The median follow-up time in the WP-CRT arm was 21.7 months (range, 10.7-37.4 months), and in the WP-IMRT arm it was 21.6 months (range, 7.7-34.4 months). At 27 months, disease-free survival was 79.4% in the WP-CRT group versus 60% in the WP-IMRT group (P=.651), and overall survival was 76% in the WP-CRT group versus 85.7% in the WP-IMRT group (P=.645). Patients in the WP-IMRT arm experienced significantly fewer grade ≥2 acute gastrointestinal toxicities (31.8% vs 63.6%, P=.034) and grade ≥3 gastrointestinal toxicities (4.5% vs 27.3%, P=.047) than did patients receiving WP-CRT and had less chronic gastrointestinal toxicity (13.6% vs 50%, P=.011). Conclusion: WP-IMRT is associated with significantly less toxicity compared with WP-CRT and has a comparable clinical outcome. Further studies with larger sample sizes and longer follow-up times are warranted to justify

  3. Transabdominal Ultrasonography-Defined Optimal and Definitive Bladder-Filling Protocol With Time Trends During Pelvic Radiation for Cervical Cancer.

    PubMed

    Umesh, Mahantshetty; Kumar, Deepak P; Chadha, Pranav; Choudary, Rajiv; Kembhavi, Seema; Thakur, Meenakshi; Reena, Engineer; Chopra, Supriya; Shrivastava, Shyamkishore

    2017-01-01

    Advanced radiotherapy techniques have emphasized on the importance of accurate target volume localization and delineation. The aim of this study was to determine time taken to achieve moderate bladder volume under physiological conditions, using transabdominal ultrasound. Patients with cervical cancer undergoing radical radiation with or without concomitant chemotherapy underwent serial ultrasound to estimate bladder filling. With a strict bladder protocol of consuming 1000 mL of water orally over 30 minutes after emptying the bladder, ultrasound was done after 45 minutes from bladder emptying time and repeated at 15-minute interval till 300 (25) mL filling was achieved and repeated every week. Forty-six patients with weekly ultrasound for bladder-filling documentation were evaluated. The mean (standard deviation) bladder volume measured at 45 minutes was 220 (93), 210 (95), 195 (91), 195 (96), and 190 (85) mL (average: 200; median: 195 mL) for the first to fifth week, respectively, and the mean (standard deviation) volume at 75 minutes was 300 (95), 310 (80), 290 (80), 295 (80), and 285 (70) mL (average: 295; median: 300 mL). The mean (standard deviation) time for bladder filling to 300 mL in the first, second, third, fourth, and fifth week was 57 ( 13.5), 67 (16.6), 66 (16.7), 66 (15.5), and 69 (17.1) minutes, respectively. Bladder filling to a definitive moderate volume at a reasonably fixed time period in each week of radiation is well tolerated, feasible, and measurable by weekly transabdominal ultrasound measurements.

  4. Pelvic floor reconstruction by modified rectus abdominis myoperitoneal (MRAM) flap after pelvic exenterations.

    PubMed

    Cibula, D; Zikan, M; Fischerova, D; Kocian, R; Germanova, A; Burgetova, A; Dusek, L; Fartáková, Z; Schneiderová, M; Nemejcová, K; Slama, J

    2017-03-01

    To describe the technique and report experiences with pelvic floor reconstruction by modified rectus abdominis myoperitoneal (MRAM) flap after extensive pelvic procedures. Surgical technique of MRAM harvest and transposition is carefully described. The patients in whom pelvic floor reconstruction with MRAM after either infralevator pelvic exenteration and/or extended lateral pelvic sidewall excision was carried out were enrolled into the study (MRAM group, n=16). Surgical data, post-operative morbidity, and disease status were retrospectively assessed. The results were compared with a historical cohort of patients, in whom an exenterative procedure without pelvic floor reconstruction was performed at the same institution (control group, n=24). Both groups were balanced in age, BMI, tumor types, and previous treatment. Substantially less patients from the MRAM group required reoperation within 60days of the surgery (25% vs. 50%) which was due to much lower rate of complications potentially related to empty pelvis syndrome (1 vs. 7 reoperations) (p=0.114). Late post-operative complication rate was substantially lower in the MRAM group (any grade: 79% vs. 44%; grade≥3: 37% vs. 6%) (p=0.041). The performance status 6months after the surgery was ≤1 in the majority of patients in MRAM (81%) while in only 38% of patients from the control group (p=0.027). There was one incisional hernia in MRAM group while three cases were reported in the controls. Pelvic floor reconstruction by MRAM in patients after pelvic exenterative procedures is associated with a substantial decrease in postoperative complications that are potentially related to empty pelvis syndrome. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Readout-segmented echo-planar diffusion-weighted imaging improves geometric performance for image-guided radiation therapy of pelvic tumors.

    PubMed

    Foltz, Warren D; Porter, David A; Simeonov, Anna; Aleong, Amanda; Jaffray, David; Chung, Peter; Han, Kathy; Ménard, Cynthia

    2015-12-01

    Diffusion-weighted imaging using echo-planar imaging (EPI) is prone to geometric inaccuracy, which may limit application to image-guided radiation therapy planning, as well as for voxel-based quantitative multi-parametric or multi-modal approaches. This research investigates pelvic applications at 3 T of a standard single-shot (ssEPI) and a prototype readout-segmented (rsEPI) technique. Apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) accuracy and geometric performance of rsEPI and ssEPI were compared using phantoms, and in vivo, involving 8 patients prior to MR-guided brachytherapy for locally advanced cervical cancer, and 19 patients with prostate cancer planned for tumor-targeted radiotherapy. Global and local deviations in geometric performance were tested using Dice Similarity Coefficients (DC) and Hausdorff Distances (HD). In cervix patients, DC increased from 0.76±0.14 to 0.91±0.05 for the high risk clinical target volume, and 0.62±0.26 to 0.85±0.08 for the gross tumor target volume. Tumors in the peripheral zone of the prostate gland were partly projected erroneously outside of the posterior anatomic boundary of the gland by 3.1±1.6 mm in 11 of 19 patients using ADC-ssEPI but not with ADC-rsEPI. Both cervix and prostate ssEPI are prone to clinically relevant geometric distortions at 3T. rsEPI provides improved geometric performance without post-processing. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Pelvic congestion syndrome and pelvic varicosities.

    PubMed

    Koo, Sonya; Fan, Chieh-Min

    2014-06-01

    Pelvic venous insufficiency (PVI), defined as retrograde flow in the gonadal and internal iliac veins, is the underlying cause of pelvic congestion syndrome (PCS), a common cause of disabling chronic pelvic pain in women of child-bearing age. PCS is a chronic pain syndrome characterized by positional pelvic pain that is worse in the upright position and is associated with pelvic and vulvar varicosities as well as symptoms of dyspareunia and postcoital pain. Through collaterals to the lower extremity venous system, PVI may also contribute to varicose vein formation and recurrence in the lower extremities. Endovascular embolization of the ovarian and internal iliac veins has become the treatment of choice for PVI and PCS. This article reviews the pelvic retroperitoneal venous anatomy, pathophysiology of PCS, treatment options and techniques, and clinical outcomes of embolotherapy for PCS.

  7. Pelvic Fractures in Children Results from the German Pelvic Trauma Registry

    PubMed Central

    Zwingmann, Jörn; Aghayev, Emin; Südkamp, Norbert P.; Neumann, Mirjam; Bode, Gerrit; Stuby, Fabian; Schmal, Hagen

    2015-01-01

    Abstract As pelvic fractures in children and adolescents are very rare, the surgical management is not well delineated nor are the postoperative complications. The aim of this study using the prospective data from German Pelvic Trauma Registry study was to evaluate the various treatment approaches compared to adults and delineated the differences in postoperative complications after pelvic injuries. Using the prospective pelvic trauma registry established by the German Society of Traumatology and the German Section of the Arbeitsgemeinschaft für Osteosynthesefragen (AO), International in 1991, patients with pelvic fractures over a 12-year time frame submitted by any 1 of the 23 member level I trauma centers were reviewed. We identified a total of 13,525 patients including pelvic fractures in 13,317 adults and 208 children aged ≤14 years and compared these 2 groups. The 2 groups’ Injury Severitiy Score (ISS) did not differ statistically. Lethality in the pediatric group was 6.3%, not statistically different from the adults’ 4.6%. In all, 18.3% of the pediatric pelvic fractures were treated surgically as compared to 22.7% in the adult group. No child suffered any thrombosis/embolism, acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), multiorgan failure (MOF), or neurologic deficit, nor was any septic MOF detected. The differences between adults and children were statistically significant in that the children suffered less frequently from thrombosis/embolism (P = 0.041) and ARDS and MOF (P = 0.006). This prospective multicenter study addressing patients with pelvic fractures reveals that the risk for a thrombosis/embolism, ARDS, and MOF is significant lower in pediatric patients than in adults. No statistical differences could be found in the ratios of operative therapy of the pelvic fractures in children compared to adults. PMID:26705223

  8. The “Pelvic Harness”: a skeletonized mesh implant for safe pelvic floor reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Natalia, Sumerova; Menahem, Neuman; Haim, Krissi; Dmitri, Pushkar

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objectives To evaluate the feasibility, safety and surgical results of skeletonized mesh implants to form a pelvic harness for pelvic floor reconstruction surgery. Study design Patients with advanced pelvic floor prolapse were enrolled to this study. Study model was a kit mesh, reduced to 75% of the original surface area by cutting out mesh material from the central mesh body. Patients were evaluated at the end of the 1st and 6th post-operative months and interviewed at the study conclusion. Results Ninety-five women with advanced pelvic floor prolapse had this implant. Mean follow-up duration was 9 months (6-12 months). The POP-Q point’s measurements showed marked and statistically significant improvements. Bladder over-activity symptoms, fecal incontinence, pelvic pain and constipation rates were all reduced as well. No adverse effects related to the dissection or mesh implantation were marked. The first and sixth post-operative month follow-up records as well as the study conclusion interview findings were satisfactory in terms of subjective and objective cure and adverse effects occurrence. Conclusion This study data proposes that skeletonizing meshes might be safely and successfully implanted for potentially improved pelvic floor reconstruction. PMID:27286114

  9. Postoperative simultaneous integrated boost-intensity modulated radiation therapy for patients with locoregionally advanced papillary thyroid carcinoma: preliminary results of a phase II trial and propensity score analysis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Eun Kyung; Lee, You Jin; Jung, Yuh-S; Ryu, Junsun; Kim, Tae Hyun; Lee, Chang Yoon; Ryu, Chang Hwan; Kim, Tae Sung; Kim, Seok Ki; Chung, Ki-Wook; Kim, Sang Soo; Kim, Dae Yong; Kim, Joo Young; Cho, Kwan Ho

    2015-03-01

    With recent technical advances in radiotherapy (RT) planning, simultaneous integrated boost intensity modulated radiotherapy (SIB-IMRT) has made possible the delivery of high radiation dose to the tumor, minimizing surrounding normal tissues. This study aimed to evaluate the clinical effectiveness and safety of postoperative SIB-IMRT in patients with locoregionally advanced papillary thyroid cancer (PTC). This was a propensity score-matched case control study conducted at a tertiary referring center. This study included locoregionally advanced patients with PTC (pT4 or N1b) who underwent thyroid cancer surgery and radioactive iodine ablation (RIA) followed by postoperative SIB-IMRT (RT group) under a phase II trial or no postoperative RT (Non-RT group) Intervention: Postoperative SIB-IMRT was the intervention. locoregional relapse-free survival (LRFS) was compared between RT group and Non-RT group. Multivariate analysis showed that several factors, including sex, American Thyroid Association risk category, and use of postoperative RT were significantly associated with LRFS in all 201 patients (P < .05 each). In the 118 propensity score-matched patients, there were no significant differences in baseline characteristics between the RT and Non-RT groups, but the LRFS rate was significantly higher in the RT than in the Non-RT group (4 y: 100% vs 84.6%, P = .002). Overall, SIB-IMRT was well tolerated, with no grade ≥3 toxicity, and was completed as planned in all patients. Postoperative SIB-IMRT is feasible and effective in improving locoregional control in patients with locally advanced PTC. Large-scale randomized studies are warranted.

  10. [Stereotactic radiotherapy for pelvic tumors].

    PubMed

    Mazeron, R; Fumagalli, I

    2014-01-01

    Extracranial stereotactic radiotherapy is booming. The development and spread of dedicated accelerators coupled with efficient methods of repositioning can now allow treatments of mobile lesions with moderate size, with high doses per fraction. Intuitively, except for the prostate, pelvic tumours, often requiring irradiation of regional lymph node drainage, lend little to this type of treatment. However, in some difficult circumstances, such as boost or re-radiation, stereotactic irradiation condition is promising and clinical experiences have already been reported.

  11. Pelvic Support Problems

    MedlinePlus

    The pelvic floor is a group of muscles and other tissues that form a sling or hammock across the pelvis. ... place so that they can work properly. The pelvic floor can become weak or be injured. The main ...

  12. Pelvic Organ Prolapse

    MedlinePlus

    ... and layers of connective tissue, which are called fascia, become weakened, stretched, or are torn the pelvic ... delivery) can cause injury to the muscles or fascia of the pelvic floor. The increased pressure of ...

  13. Chronic Pelvic Pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... to treat chronic pelvic pain. They include medications, physical therapy, nutritional therapy, and surgery: Lifestyle changes—Good posture ... are helpful in relieving pelvic pain, especially dysmenorrhea . Physical therapy—Acupuncture, acupressure, and nerve stimulation therapies may be ...

  14. Pelvic Inflammatory Disease (PID)

    MedlinePlus

    Pelvic Inflammatory Disease (PID) - CDC Fact Sheet Untreated sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) can cause pelvic inflammatory disease (PID), a ... tubal blockage; •• Ectopic pregnancy (pregnancy outside the womb); •• Infertility (inability to get pregnant); •• Long-term pelvic/abdominal ...

  15. Evaluation of embolization for periuterine varices involving chronic pelvic pain secondary to pelvic congestion syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Siqueira, Flavio Meirelles; Monsignore, Lucas Moretti; Rosa-e-Silva, Julio Cesar; Poli-Neto, Omero Benedicto; de Castro-Afonso, Luis Henrique; Nakiri, Guilherme Seizem; Muglia, Valdair Francisco; Abud, Daniel Giansante

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the clinical response and success rate after periuterine varices embolization in patients with chronic pelvic pain secondary to pelvic congestion syndrome and to report the safety of endovascular treatment and its rate of complications. METHODS: Retrospective cohort of patients undergoing endovascular treatment of pelvic congestion syndrome in our department from January 2012 to November 2015. Data were analyzed based on patient background, imaging findings, embolized veins, rate of complications, and clinical response as indicated by the visual analog pain scale. RESULTS: We performed periuterine varices embolization in 22 patients during the study, four of which required a second embolization. Seventeen patients reported a reduction in pelvic pain after the first embolization and three patients reported a reduction in pelvic pain after the second embolization. Minor complications were observed in our patients, such as postural hypotension, postoperative pain, and venous perforation during the procedure, without clinical repercussion. CONCLUSION: Periuterine varices embolization in patients with chronic pelvic pain secondary to pelvic congestion syndrome appears to be an effective and safe technique. PMID:28076514

  16. Survival Outcomes of Whole-Pelvic Versus Prostate-Only Radiation Therapy for High-Risk Prostate Cancer Patients With Use of the National Cancer Data Base.

    PubMed

    Amini, Arya; Jones, Bernard L; Yeh, Norman; Rusthoven, Chad G; Armstrong, Hirotatsu; Kavanagh, Brian D

    2015-12-01

    The addition of whole pelvic (WP) compared with prostate-only (PO) radiation therapy (RT) for clinically node-negative prostate cancer remains controversial. The purpose of our study was to evaluate the survival benefit of adding WPRT versus PO-RT for high-risk, node-negative prostate cancer, using the National Cancer Data Base (NCDB). Patients with high-risk prostate cancer treated from 2004 to 2006, with available data for RT volume, coded as prostate and pelvis (WPRT) or prostate alone (PO-RT) were included. Multivariate analysis (MVA) and propensity-score matched analysis (PSM) were performed. Recursive partitioning analysis (RPA) based on overall survival (OS) using Gleason score (GS), T stage, and pretreatment prostate-specific antigen (PSA) was also conducted. A total of 14,817 patients were included: 7606 (51.3%) received WPRT, and 7211 (48.7%) received PO-RT. The median follow-up time was 81 months (range, 2-122 months). Under MVA, the addition of WPRT for high-risk patients had no OS benefit compared with PO-RT (HR 1.05; P=.100). On subset analysis, patients receiving dose-escalated RT also did not benefit from WPRT (HR 1.01; P=.908). PSM confirmed no survival benefit with the addition of WPRT for high-risk patients (HR 1.05; P=.141). In addition, RPA was unable to demonstrate a survival benefit of WPRT for any subset. Other prognostic factors for inferior OS under MVA included older age (HR 1.25; P<.001), increasing comorbidity scores (HR 1.46; P<.001), higher T stage (HR 1.17; P<.001), PSA (HR 1.81; P<.001), and GS (HR 1.29; P<.001), and decreasing median county household income (HR 1.15; P=.011). Factors improving OS included the addition of androgen deprivation therapy (HR 0.92; P=.033), combination external beam RT plus brachytherapy boost (HR 0.71; P<.001), and treatment at an academic/research institution (HR 0.84; P=.002). In the largest reported analysis of WPRT for patients with high-risk prostate cancer treated in the dose-escalated era, the

  17. Pelvic hemangiopericytoma. An unusual location of a vascular tumor.

    PubMed

    Álvarez Abad, Irene; García González, Jose Mª; Agirre Etxabe, Leire; Quintana Rivera, Ana Mª; Colina Alonso, Alberto

    2017-01-15

    The hemangiopericytoma is an uncommon vascular tumour. We report a case of interest because of its rarity, size and location. We present the case of a 63-year-old woman who consulted for abdominal pain. TAC, MRI and arteriography showed a pelvic mass occupying Douglas' space, displacing the uterus, bladder and sigma, with vascularisation relative to the inferior mesenteric artery and both hypogastric arteries. The vascularity of the tumour itself was selectively embolised before the mass was resected. There were no intra- or postoperative complications. Pathology confirmed the diagnosis of hemangiopericitoma. The patient is being monitored as an outpatient, with no signs of recurrence to date. The hemangiopericytoma is a tumour of the pericyte cells so it can occur in any location. The pelvic location is exceptional. The tumour may appear as nonspecific abdominal pain, show signs of compression of adjacent organs or occasionally be associated with paraneoplastic syndromes. The diagnosis is suspected via CT and angiography findings, but confirmation is only made by analysing the surgical specimen. The treatment of choice is surgery, in some cases after preoperative embolisation of the vascularisation of the mass. There is no agreement on chemo/radiotherapy as the primary treatment for hemangiopericytoma, although adjuvant radiation therapy has been found to improve local control and reduce recurrences. The prognosis is good if complete resection is achieved, with five- and 10-year survival rates between 70 and 80%, depending on the series.

  18. The effect of postoperative beam, implant, and combination radiation therapy on GI and bladder toxicities in female Medicare beneficiaries with stage I uterine cancer.

    PubMed

    Samper-Ternent, Rafael; Asem, Humera; Zhang, Dong D; Kuo, Yong-Fang; Hatch, Sandra S; Freeman, Jean L; Berenson, Abbey B

    2012-10-01

    OBJECTIVE: Determine the risk of late gastrointestinal (GI) and bladder toxicities in women treated for Stage I uterine cancer with postoperative beam, implant, or combination radiation. METHODS: The Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) tumor registry and Medicare claims were used to estimate the risk of developing late GI and bladder toxicities by type of radiation received. Bladder and GI diagnoses were identified 6-60 months after cancer diagnosis. Cox-proportional hazard models were used to estimate risk of any late GI or bladder toxicity due to type of radiation received. RESULTS: A total of 3,024 women with uterine cancer diagnosed from 1992-2005 were identified for analysis with a mean age of 73.9 (Standard Deviation (SD) ± 6.5). Bladder and GI toxicities occurred most frequently in the combination group, and least in the implant group. After controlling for demographic characteristics, tumor grade, diagnosis year, SEER region, comorbidities, prior GI and bladder diagnosis, and chemotherapy, women receiving implant radiation had a 21% absolute decrease in GI toxicities compared to women receiving combination radiation (Hazard Ratio (HR) 0.79, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.68-0.92). No differences were observed between those receiving beam and combination in GI (HR 1.01 (0.89-1.14)) and bladder (HR 0.95 (0.80-1.11)) toxicities. CONCLUSIONS: Older women receiving combined radiation had the highest rates of GI and bladder toxicities, while women receiving implant radiation alone had the lowest rates. When selecting type of radiation for a patient, these toxicities should be considered. Counseling older women surviving cancer on late toxicities due to radiation must be a priority for physicians caring for them.

  19. Pelvic irradiation with concurrent chemotherapy versus pelvic and para-aortic irradiation for high-risk cervical cancer: an update of radiation therapy oncology group trial (RTOG) 90-01.

    PubMed

    Eifel, Patricia J; Winter, Kathryn; Morris, Mitchell; Levenback, Charles; Grigsby, Perry W; Cooper, Jay; Rotman, Marvin; Gershenson, David; Mutch, David G

    2004-03-01

    To report mature results of a randomized trial that compared extended-field radiotherapy (EFRT) versus pelvic radiotherapy with concomitant fluorouracil and cisplatin (CTRT) in women with locoregionally advanced carcinomas of the uterine cervix. Four hundred three women with cervical cancer were randomly assigned to receive either EFRT or CTRT. Patients were eligible if they had stage IIB to IVA disease, stage IB to IIA disease with a tumor diameter > or = 5 cm, or positive pelvic lymph nodes. Patients were stratified by stage and by method of lymph node evaluation. The median follow-up time for 228 surviving patients was 6.6 years. The overall survival rate for patients treated with CTRT was significantly greater than that for patients treated with EFRT (67% v 41% at 8 years; P <.0001). There was an overall reduction in the risk of disease recurrence of 51% (95% CI, 36% to 66%) for patients who received CTRT. Patients with stage IB to IIB disease who received CTRT had better overall and disease-free survival than those treated with EFRT (P <.0001); 116 patients with stage III to IVA disease had better disease-free survival (P =.05) and a trend toward better overall survival (P =.07) if they were randomly assigned to CTRT. The rate of serious late complications of treatment was similar for the two treatment arms. Mature analysis confirms that the addition of fluorouracil and cisplatin to radiotherapy significantly improved the survival rate of women with locally advanced cervical cancer without increasing the rate of late treatment-related side effects.

  20. Predictors of Grade 3 or Higher Late Bowel Toxicity in Patients Undergoing Pelvic Radiation for Cervical Cancer: Results From a Prospective Study

    SciTech Connect

    Chopra, Supriya; Dora, Tapas; Chinnachamy, Anand N.; Thomas, Biji; Kannan, Sadhna; Engineer, Reena; Mahantshetty, Umesh; Phurailatpam, Reena; Paul, Siji N.; Shrivastava, Shyam Kishore

    2014-03-01

    Purpose: The present study investigates relationship between dose–volume parameters and severe bowel toxicity after postoperative radiation treatment (PORT) for cervical cancer. Methods and Materials: From June 2010 to December 2012, a total of 71 patients undergoing PORT were included. Small bowel (SB) and large bowel (LB) loops were contoured 2 cm above the target volume. The volume of SB and LB that received 15 Gy, 30 Gy, and 40 Gy was calculated (V15 SB, V15 LB, V30 SB, V30 LB, V40 SB, V 40 LB). On follow-up, bowel toxicity was scored using Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events (CTCAE), version 3.0. A reciever operating characteristic (ROC) curve identified volume thresholds that predicted for grade 3 or higher toxicity with highest specificity. All data was dichotomized across these identified cut-off values. Univariate and multivariate analysis was performed using SPSS, version 15. Results: The median patient age was 47 years (range, 35-65 years). Of the 71 patients, 46 received image-guided intensity modulated radiation therapy, and 25 received conformal radiation (50 Gy in 25 fractions for 5 weeks). Overall, 63 of 71 patients received concurrent chemotherapy. On a median follow-up of 18 months (range, 8-29 months), grade 2 or higher bowel toxicity was seen in 22 of 71 patients (30.9%) and grade 3 or higher bowel toxicity was seen in 9 patients (12.6%). On univariate analysis, V15 SB <275 cc (P=.01), V30 SB <190 cc (P=.02), V40 SB <150 cc (P=.01), and V15 LB <250 cc (P=.03), and V40 LB <90 cc (P=.04) predicted for absence of grade 3 or higher toxicity. No other patient- or treatment-related factors were statistically significant. On multivariate analysis, only V15 SB (P=.002) and V15 LB (P=.03) were statistically significant. Conclusions: V 15 Gy SB and LB are independent predictors of late grade 3 or higher toxicity. Restricting V15 SB and V15 LB to <275 cc and <250 cc can reduce grade 3 or higher toxicity to less than 5%.

  1. Predictors of grade 3 or higher late bowel toxicity in patients undergoing pelvic radiation for cervical cancer: results from a prospective study.

    PubMed

    Chopra, Supriya; Dora, Tapas; Chinnachamy, Anand N; Thomas, Biji; Kannan, Sadhna; Engineer, Reena; Mahantshetty, Umesh; Phurailatpam, Reena; Paul, Siji N; Shrivastava, Shyam Kishore

    2014-03-01

    The present study investigates relationship between dose-volume parameters and severe bowel toxicity after postoperative radiation treatment (PORT) for cervical cancer. From June 2010 to December 2012, a total of 71 patients undergoing PORT were included. Small bowel (SB) and large bowel (LB) loops were contoured 2 cm above the target volume. The volume of SB and LB that received 15 Gy, 30 Gy, and 40 Gy was calculated (V15 SB, V15 LB, V30 SB, V30 LB, V40 SB, V 40 LB). On follow-up, bowel toxicity was scored using Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events (CTCAE), version 3.0. A reciever operating characteristic (ROC) curve identified volume thresholds that predicted for grade 3 or higher toxicity with highest specificity. All data was dichotomized across these identified cut-off values. Univariate and multivariate analysis was performed using SPSS, version 15. The median patient age was 47 years (range, 35-65 years). Of the 71 patients, 46 received image-guided intensity modulated radiation therapy, and 25 received conformal radiation (50 Gy in 25 fractions for 5 weeks). Overall, 63 of 71 patients received concurrent chemotherapy. On a median follow-up of 18 months (range, 8-29 months), grade 2 or higher bowel toxicity was seen in 22 of 71 patients (30.9%) and grade 3 or higher bowel toxicity was seen in 9 patients (12.6%). On univariate analysis, V15 SB <275 cc (P=.01), V30 SB <190 cc (P=.02), V40 SB <150 cc (P=.01), and V15 LB <250 cc (P=.03), and V40 LB <90 cc (P=.04) predicted for absence of grade 3 or higher toxicity. No other patient- or treatment-related factors were statistically significant. On multivariate analysis, only V15 SB (P=.002) and V15 LB (P=.03) were statistically significant. V 15 Gy SB and LB are independent predictors of late grade 3 or higher toxicity. Restricting V15 SB and V15 LB to <275 cc and <250 cc can reduce grade 3 or higher toxicity to less than 5%. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. A randomized study comparing the use of a pelvic lead shield during trans-radial interventions: Threefold decrease in radiation to the operator but double exposure to the patient.

    PubMed

    Musallam, Anees; Volis, Ina; Dadaev, Svetlana; Abergel, Eitan; Soni, Amit; Yalonetsky, Sergey; Kerner, Arthur; Roguin, Ariel

    2015-06-01

    To determine the efficacy of a 0.5-mm lead apron across the patient's abdomen in addition to standard operator protection for the reduction of scatter radiation on operator and patient radiation exposure Cardiac angiography using the radial access compared to the femoral approach is associated with reduced complication rate and improved patient comfort but has significantly increased radiation dose. Improvements in radiation protection are needed We randomly assigned 332 patients undergoing coronary angiography to a group with pelvic lead shielding and a group with standard protection. In each procedure, eight digital dosimeters were used to measure operator radiation dose [under the lead apron, outside the thyroid shield, and at the left side of the head], patient dose at the level of the umbilicus [above and beneath the lead apron], and two on the acrylic shielding and one on the image receptor to measure scattered radiation Both groups were similar in BMI, procedures performed, and number of sequences. Usage of lead shielding statistically significantly reduced the radiation dose of the operator at all three sites measured: under lead apron [all in µSv]: 0.53 ± 1.4 vs. 0.17 ± 0.6, on thyroid collar 5.9 ± 7.7 vs. 2.9 ± 3.4, and left side of head 3.3 ± 3.4 vs. 2.1 ± 2.2, P<0.001. However the radiation to the patient was doubled from 15.4 ± 24.1 to 28.9 ± 81.1, P=0.04 CONCLUSIONS: The use of a pelvic lead shield during radial angiography reduced the operator radiation exposure at multiple measurement sites. However there was an increased exposure to the patient. This balance should be further investigated before the widespread adoption of this method. . © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Evidence-based recommendations of postoperative radiotherapy in lung cancer from Oncologic Group for the Study of Lung Cancer (Spanish Radiation Oncology Society).

    PubMed

    Gómez, A; González, J A; Couñago, F; Vallejo, C; Casas, F; de Dios, N Rodríguez

    2016-04-01

    Locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is a diversified illness in which postoperative radiation therapy (PORT) for complete resection with positive hiliar (pN1) and/or mediastinal (pN2) lymph nodes is controversial. Although several studies have shown that PORT has beneficial effects, randomized trials are needed to demonstrate its impact on overall survival. In this review, the Spanish Radiation Oncology Group for Lung Cancer describes the most relevant literature on PORT in NSCLC patients stage pN1-2. In addition, we have outlined the current recommendations of different national and international clinical guidelines and have also specified practical issues regarding treatment volume definition, doses and fractionation.

  4. Haemodynamically Unstable Pelvic Fractures

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-01-01

    of patients with unstable pelvic fractures will be found to have additional musculoskeletal injuries.25,54,80 Injury severity score (ISS) is...create a tamponade effect, since the retro- peritoneum is disrupted.47,53 The ‘‘splinting’’ of pathological pelvic motion is more likely to be the...pelvic CT angiography performedwith 64-detector row CT. Radiology 2008;246:410–9. 5. Balogh Z, Caldwell E, Heetveld M, et al. Institutional practice

  5. Pelvic Organ Prolapse--Surgery

    MedlinePlus

    ... That Answers to FAQs Learn the Terms Glossary Pelvic Floor Dialogues Printable PDFs on PFDs Patient Fact Sheets ... treatments have failed. The goal of all reconstructive pelvic floor procedures is to restore normal pelvic floor anatomy ...

  6. Chronic Pelvic Pain in Women

    MedlinePlus

    ... hernia — can lead to recurring pelvic pain. Chronic pelvic inflammatory disease. This can occur if a long-term infection, often sexually transmitted, causes scarring that involves your pelvic organs. Ovarian remnant. After surgical removal of the ...

  7. Italian survey in postoperative radiation therapy for prostate carcinoma by the AIRO National Working Group on Prostate Radiotherapy: definitive results.

    PubMed

    Malinverni, Giuseppe; Greco, Carlo; Bianchi, Pieromaria; Busutti, Luciano; Cagna, Emanuela; Cozzarini, Cesare; Del Duca, Massimo; Franzone, Paola; Frezza, Giovanni; Gabriele, Pietro; Genovesi, Domenico; Girelli, Giuseppe Franco; Italia, Corrado; Mandoliti, Giovanni; Mauro, Floranna; Nava, Simonetta; Pratissoli, Silvia; Saracino, Maria Bianca; Squillace, Luigi; Signor, Marco; Tagliagambe, Angiolo; Vavassori, Vittorio; Villa, Sergio; Zini, Giampaolo; Valdagni, Riccardo

    2005-01-01

    The National Working Group on Prostate Radiotherapy of AIRO (Associazione Italiana Radioterapia Oncologica, Italian Association of Radiotherapeutic Oncology) was established in March 2001. A retrospective multi-center survey was performed to analyze the patterns of care for prostate cancer patients treated with postoperative radiotherapy following radical prostatectomy in Italy with regard to the year 2000. A structured questionnaire was mailed to 47 Italian radiotherapy centers to assess patient accrual in the postoperative setting in the interval comprised between period January-December 2000. Numbers of patients treated for different stages, specific prognostic factors indicating the need for adjuvant radiotherapy, fractionation schedules and prescription doses were acquired as well as other clinically important factors such as radiotherapy timing and the use of hormone therapy. More technical features of the treatment, such as patient positioning, mode of simulation, typical field setup and dose prescription criteria were also included in the questionnaire. The questionnaire was returned by 24 radiotherapy Institutions (51%) with a total number of 470 patients treated postoperatively in the year 2000. An average of about 20 patients were enrolled by each radiotherapy center. The age range was 45-81 years. Radiotherapy was delivered within 6 months of radical prostatectomy in 297 patients (65.4%) (mean, 3.4 months). In 157 (34.6%), the treatment was delivered as a salvage approach for biochemical or micro-macroscopic recurrence. Most of patients had locally advanced stage disease (pT3-pT4) (76%). Unfavorable prognostic factors, such as positive margins, capsular invasion, Gleason pattern score > 7 were present in about 50% of patients. The study confirmed that important risk factors for recurrences are present in a significant percentage of patients treated by radical prostatectomy. The number of patients that would benefit from adjuvant radiotherapy is

  8. Pelvic Congestion Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Durham, Janette D.; Machan, Lindsay

    2013-01-01

    Patients with pelvic congestion syndrome present with otherwise unexplained chronic pelvic pain that has been present for greater than 6 months, and anatomic findings that include pelvic venous insufficiency and pelvic varicosities. It remains an underdiagnosed explanation for pelvic pain in young, premenopausal, usually multiparous females. Symptoms include noncyclical, positional lower back, pelvic and upper thigh pain, dyspareunia, and prolonged postcoital discomfort. Symptoms worsen throughout the day and are exacerbated by activity or prolonged standing. Examination may reveal ovarian tenderness and unusual varicosities—vulvoperineal, posterior thigh, and gluteal. Diagnosis is suspected by clinical history and imaging that demonstrates pelvic varicosities. Venography is usually necessary to confirm ovarian vein reflux, although transvaginal ultrasound may be useful in documenting this finding. Endovascular therapy has been validated by several large patient series with long-term follow-up using standardized pain assessment surveys. Embolization has been shown to be significantly more effective than surgical therapy in improving symptoms in patients who fail hormonal therapy. Although there has been variation in approaches between investigators, the goal is elimination of ovarian vein reflux with or without direct sclerosis of enlarged pelvic varicosities. Symptom reduction is seen in 70 to 90% of the treated females despite technical variation. PMID:24436564

  9. Pelvic Inflammatory Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Weström, L., Joesoef, R., Reynolds, G., Hagdu, A., Thompson, S.E. (1992). Pelvic inflammatory disease and fertility. A ... Weström, L., Joesoef, R., Reynolds, G., Hagdu, A., Thompson, S.E. (1992). Pelvic inflammatory disease and fertility. A ...

  10. Correction of Pelvic Tilt and Pelvic Rotation in Cup Measurement after THA - An Experimental Study.

    PubMed

    Schwarz, Timo Julian; Weber, Markus; Dornia, Christian; Worlicek, Michael; Renkawitz, Tobias; Grifka, Joachim; Craiovan, Benjamin

    2017-09-01

    Purpose Accurate assessment of cup orientation on postoperative pelvic radiographs is essential for evaluating outcome after THA. Here, we present a novel method for correcting measurement inaccuracies due to pelvic tilt and rotation. Method In an experimental setting, a cup was implanted into a dummy pelvis, and its final position was verified via CT. To show the effect of pelvic tilt and rotation on cup position, the dummy was fixed to a rack to achieve a tilt between + 15° anterior and -15° posterior and 0° to 20° rotation to the contralateral side. According to Murray's definitions of anteversion and inclination, we created a novel corrective procedure to measure cup position in the pelvic reference frame (anterior pelvic plane) to compensate measurement errors due to pelvic tilt and rotation. Results The cup anteversion measured on CT was 23.3°; on AP pelvic radiographs, however, variations in pelvic tilt (± 15°) resulted in anteversion angles between 11.0° and 36.2° (mean error 8.3°± 3.9°). The cup inclination was 34.1° on CT and ranged between 31.0° and 38.7° (m. e. 2.3°± 1.5°) on radiographs. Pelvic rotation between 0° and 20° showed high variation in radiographic anteversion (21.2°-31.2°, m. e. 6.0°± 3.1°) and inclination (34.1°-27.2°, m. e. 3.4°± 2.5°). Our novel correction algorithm for pelvic tilt reduced the mean error in anteversion measurements to 0.6°± 0.2° and in inclination measurements to 0.7° (SD± 0.2). Similarly, the mean error due to pelvic rotation was reduced to 0.4°± 0.4° for anteversion and to 1.3°± 0.8 for inclination. Conclusion Pelvic tilt and pelvic rotation may lead to misinterpretation of cup position on anteroposterior pelvic radiographs. Mathematical correction concepts have the potential to significantly reduce these errors, and could be implemented in future radiological software tools. Key Points  · Pelvic tilt and rotation influence cup orientation

  11. Physical activity and the pelvic floor.

    PubMed

    Nygaard, Ingrid E; Shaw, Janet M

    2016-02-01

    women. However, future research is needed to fill the many gaps in our knowledge. Prospective studies are needed in all populations, including potentially vulnerable women, such as those with high genetic risk, levator ani muscle injury, or asymptomatic pelvic organ prolapse, and on women during potentially vulnerable life periods, such as the early postpartum or postoperative periods.

  12. Survival prediction models for estimating the benefit of post-operative radiation therapy for gallbladder cancer and lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Kalpathy-Cramer, Jayashree; Hersh, William; Kim, Jong Song; Thomas, Charles R; Wang, Samuel J

    2008-11-06

    The role of post-operative radiotherapy (PORT) is still controversial for some cancer sites. In the absence of large randomized controlled trials, survival prediction models can help estimate the predicted benefit of PORT for specific settings. The purpose of this study was to compare the performance of two types of prediction models for estimating the benefit of PORT for 2 cancer sites. Using data from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results database, we constructed prediction models for gallbladder (GB) cancer and non-small cell lung cancer (NSMLC), using Cox proportional hazards and Random Survival Forests. We compared validation measures for discrimination and found that both the CPH and RSF models had comparable C-indices. For GB cancer, PORT was associated with improved survival for node positive patients, and for NSCLC, PORT was associated with a survival benefit for patients with N2 disease.

  13. [Postoperative hypothyroidism].

    PubMed

    Olifirova, O S; Trynov, N N

    2015-01-01

    There is a number of factors such as the thyroidectomy and limiting subtotal thyroid resection against the background of euthyroidism and initial hypothyroidism (in any extent of operation) which leads to the prediction of early postoperative hypothyroidism origin during 10 days of the postoperative peri- od. The early postoperative hypothyroidism is accompanied by activation processes of lipid peroxide oxidation and at the same time by reduction of antioxidant protection.

  14. Postoperative Spot-Scanning Proton Radiation Therapy for Chordoma and Chondrosarcoma in Children and Adolescents: Initial Experience at Paul Scherrer Institute

    SciTech Connect

    Rutz, Hans Peter Weber, Damien C.; Goitein, Gudrun; Ares, Carmen; Bolsi, Alessandra; Lomax, Antony J.; Pedroni, Eros; Coray, Adolf; Hug, Eugen B.; Timmermann, Beate

    2008-05-01

    Purpose: To evaluate postoperative spot-scanning proton radiation therapy (PT) and intensity-modulated PT (IMPT) for chordoma and chondrosarcoma in pediatric patients. Methods and Materials: Between 2000 and 2005, 10 patients (six male patients, four female patients; six chordomas, four chondrosarcomas), aged 10-20 years (median, 16 years), were treated at our institute. Tumor sites were in the brain (one case), skull base (five cases), cervical (three cases), and lumbar spine (one case). Three children had complete resections. In seven children, resection was incomplete, leaving residual tumor behind (range, 2.3-46.3 mL). PT was delivered using spot scanning, with (three patients) or without (seven patients) IMPT. Total dose was 74.0 cobalt Gray equivalents (CGE) for chordoma, and 63.2-68.0 CGE for chondrosarcoma (median, 66.0), depending on histopathological grading and whether the patient had concurrent chemotherapy. Results: Median follow-up time was 36 months (range, 8-77 months). Radiation treatment was well tolerated. All patients remained failure-free at their last follow-up. Late adverse events were reported in three patients and were mild (neurosensory in one patient; alopecia and hypoaccusis in one patient) to moderate (one patient, Grade 2 pituitary insufficiency). Conclusions: Postoperative spot-scanning PT, delivered in combination with and without IMPT, for chordoma and chondrosarcoma in children and adolescents was tolerated without unacceptable adverse event and initial outcome is perfectly satisfactory in this small cohort. Longer follow-up time and larger cohort are needed to more fully assess tumor control, adverse events, as well as functional and cosmetic outcome.

  15. Development of RTOG Consensus Guidelines for the Definition of the Clinical Target Volume for Postoperative Conformal Radiation Therapy for Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Michalski, Jeff M.; Lawton, Colleen; El Naqa, Issam; Ritter, Mark; O'Meara, Elizabeth C.; Seider, Michael J.; Lee, W. Robert; Rosenthal, Seth A.; Pisansky, Thomas; Catton, Charles; Valicenti, Richard K.; Zietman, Anthony L.; Bosch, Walter R.; Sandler, Howard; Buyyounouski, Mark K.; Menard, Cynthia

    2010-02-01

    Purpose: To define a prostate fossa clinical target volume (PF-CTV) for Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) trials using postoperative radiotherapy for prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: An RTOG-sponsored meeting was held to define an appropriate PF-CTV after radical prostatectomy. Data were presented describing radiographic failure patterns after surgery. Target volumes used in previous trials were reviewed. Using contours independently submitted by 13 radiation oncologists, a statistical imputation method derived a preliminary 'consensus' PF-CTV. Results: Starting from the model-derived CTV, consensus was reached for a CT image-based PF-CTV. The PF-CTV should extend superiorly from the level of the caudal vas deferens remnant to >8-12 mm inferior to vesicourethral anastomosis (VUA). Below the superior border of the pubic symphysis, the anterior border extends to the posterior aspect of the pubis and posteriorly to the rectum, where it may be concave at the level of the VUA. At this level, the lateral border extends to the levator ani. Above the pubic symphysis, the anterior border should encompass the posterior 1-2 cm of the bladder wall; posteriorly, it is bounded by the mesorectal fascia. At this level, the lateral border is the sacrorectogenitopubic fascia. Seminal vesicle remnants, if present, should be included in the CTV if there is pathologic evidence of their involvement. Conclusions: Consensus on postoperative PF-CTV for RT after prostatectomy was reached and is available as a CT image atlas on the RTOG website. This will allow uniformity in defining PF-CTV for clinical trials that include postprostatectomy RT.

  16. Hematologic Toxicity in RTOG 0418: A Phase 2 Study of Postoperative IMRT for Gynecologic Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Klopp, Ann H.; Moughan, Jennifer; Portelance, Lorraine; Miller, Brigitte E.; Salehpour, Mohammad R.; Hildebrandt, Evangeline; Nuanjing, Jenny; D'Souza, David; Souhami, Luis; Small, William; Gaur, Rakesh; Jhingran, Anuja

    2013-05-01

    Purpose: Intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), compared with conventional 4-field treatment, can reduce the volume of bone marrow irradiated. Pelvic bone marrow sparing has produced a clinically significant reduction in hematologic toxicity (HT). This analysis investigated HT in Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) 0418, a prospective study to test the feasibility of delivering postoperative IMRT for cervical and endometrial cancer in a multiinstitutional setting. Methods and Materials: Patients in the RTOG 0418 study were treated with postoperative IMRT to 50.4 Gy to the pelvic lymphatics and vagina. Endometrial cancer patients received IMRT alone, whereas patients with cervical cancer received IMRT and weekly cisplatin (40 mg/m{sup 2}). Pelvic bone marrow was defined within the treatment field by using a computed tomography density-based autocontouring algorithm. The volume of bone marrow receiving 10, 20, 30, and 40 Gy and the median dose to bone marrow were correlated with HT, graded by Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, version 3.0, criteria. Results: Eighty-three patients were eligible for analysis (43 with endometrial cancer and 40 with cervical cancer). Patients with cervical cancer treated with weekly cisplatin and pelvic IMRT had grades 1-5 HT (23%, 33%, 25%, 0%, and 0% of patients, respectively). Among patients with cervical cancer, 83% received 5 or more cycles of cisplatin, and 90% received at least 4 cycles of cisplatin. The median percentage volume of bone marrow receiving 10, 20, 30, and 40 Gy in all 83 patients, respectively, was 96%, 84%, 61%, and 37%. Among cervical cancer patients with a V40 >37%, 75% had grade 2 or higher HT compared with 40% of patients with a V40 less than or equal to 37% (P =.025). Cervical cancer patients with a median bone marrow dose of >34.2 Gy also had higher rates of grade ≥2 HT than did those with a dose of ≤34.2 Gy (74% vs 43%, P=.049). Conclusions: Pelvic IMRT with weekly cisplatin is

  17. Myofascial pelvic pain.

    PubMed

    Kotarinos, Rhonda

    2012-10-01

    Myofascial pelvic pain is fraught with many unknowns. Is it the organs of the pelvis, is it the muscles of the pelvis, or is the origin of the pelvic pain from an extrapelvic muscle? Is there a single source or multiple? In this state of confusion what is the best way to manage the many symptoms that can be associated with myofascial pelvic pain. This article reviews current studies that attempt to answer some of these questions. More questions seem to develop as each study presents its findings.

  18. Ultrasound guided transrectal catheter drainage of pelvic collections.

    PubMed

    Thakral, Anuj; Sundareyan, Ramaniwas; Kumar, Sheo; Arora, Divya

    2015-01-01

    The transrectal approach to draining deep-seated pelvic collections may be used to drain The transrectal approach to draining deep-seated pelvic collections may be used to drain intra-abdominal collections not reached by the transabdominal approach. We discuss 6 patients with such pelvic collections treated with transrectal drainage using catheter placement via Seldinger technique. Transrectal drainage helped achieve clinical and radiological resolution of pelvic collections in 6 and 5 of 6 cases, respectively. It simultaneously helped avoid injury to intervening bowel loops and neurovascular structures using real-time visualization of armamentarium used for drainage. Radiation exposure from fluoroscopic/CT guidance was avoided. Morbidity and costs incurred in surgical exploration were reduced using this much less invasive ultrasound guided transrectal catheter drainage of deep-seated pelvic collections.

  19. Postoperative Delirium

    PubMed Central

    Marcantonio, Edward R.

    2013-01-01

    Delirium (acute confusion) complicates 15% to 50% of major operations in older adults and is associated with other major postoperative complications, prolonged length of stay, poor functional recovery, institutionalization, dementia, and death. Importantly, delirium may be predictable and preventable through proactive intervention. Yet clinicians fail to recognize and address postoperative delirium in up to 80% of cases. Using the case of Ms R, a 76-year-old woman who developed delirium first after colectomy with complications and again after routine surgery, the diagnosis, prevention, and treatment of delirium in the postoperative setting is reviewed. The risk of postoperative delirium can be quantified by the sum of predisposing and precipitating factors. Successful strategies for prevention and treatment of delirium include proactive multifactorial intervention targeted to reversible risk factors, limiting use of sedating medications (especially benzodiazepines), effective management of postoperative pain, and, perhaps, judicious use of antipsychotics. PMID:22669559

  20. PHYSICAL ACTIVITY AND THE PELVIC FLOOR

    PubMed Central

    Nygaard, Ingrid E.; Shaw, Janet M.

    2015-01-01

    , future research is needed to fill the many gaps in our knowledge. Prospective studies are needed in all populations, including potentially vulnerable women, such as those with high genetic risk, levator ani muscle injury, or asymptomatic pelvic organ prolapse, and on women during potentially vulnerable life periods, such as the early postpartum or postoperative periods. PMID:26348380

  1. Long-term results of post-operative radiation therapy following mastectomy with or without chemotherapy in Stage I--III breast cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Uematsu, Minoru; Bornstein, B.A.; Recht, A.; Abner, A.; Silver, B. ); Come, S.E. Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA ); Shulman, L.N. Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA ); Harris, J.R.

    1993-04-02

    The purpose of this work was to determine the risk of local-regional failure following post-mastectomy radiotherapy and the incidence of complications associated with such treatment. The authors retrospectively analyzed the results in 309 patients with Stage I--III invasive breast cancer treated with post-mastectomy radiation therapy between 1975 and 1985. The median radiotherapy dose was 45 Gy in 1.8 to 2.25 Gy fractions. One hundred forty-seven (48%) of the patients received adjuvant systemic chemotherapy with 115 (78%) of these receiving a CMF-based or doxorubicin-containing regime. The median follow-up time of surviving patients was 130 months (range, 28 to 191 months) after mastectomy. Seventeen patients (6%) developed a local-regional failure at an interval of 4 to 87 months after radiotherapy. Moderate or severe complications related to radiotherapy and requiring treatment were uncommon. Symptomatic radiation pneumonitis occurred in four patients (1.3%), arm edema in 18 (5.8%), and brachial plexopathy in 2 (0.6%). The authors conclude that post-operative radiotherapy is a safe and effective means of reducing local-regional failure following mastectomy. The efficacy of post-mastectomy radiotherapy in improving survival should be addressed in new large randomized controlled studies. 33 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

  2. Pelvic Inflammatory Disease

    MedlinePlus

    Pelvic inflammatory disease (PID) is an infection and inflammation of the uterus, ovaries, and other female reproductive organs. It causes scarring ... United States. Gonorrhea and chlamydia, two sexually transmitted diseases, are the most common causes of PID. Other ...

  3. Pelvic Inflammatory Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Pelvic Inflammatory Disease (PID) STDs & Infertility STDs & Pregnancy Syphilis Trichomoniasis Other STDs See Also ... the upper genital tract. PID can lead to infertility and permanent damage of a woman’s reproductive organs. ...

  4. Pelvic laparoscopy - slideshow

    MedlinePlus

    ... ency/presentations/100131.htm Pelvic laparoscopy - series—Normal anatomy To use the sharing features on this page, ... Bethesda, MD 20894 U.S. Department of Health and Human Services National Institutes of Health Page last updated: ...

  5. Chronic pelvic floor dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Hartmann, Dee; Sarton, Julie

    2014-10-01

    The successful treatment of women with vestibulodynia and its associated chronic pelvic floor dysfunctions requires interventions that address a broad field of possible pain contributors. Pelvic floor muscle hypertonicity was implicated in the mid-1990s as a trigger of major chronic vulvar pain. Painful bladder syndrome, irritable bowel syndrome, fibromyalgia, and temporomandibular jaw disorder are known common comorbidities that can cause a host of associated muscular, visceral, bony, and fascial dysfunctions. It appears that normalizing all of those disorders plays a pivotal role in reducing complaints of chronic vulvar pain and sexual dysfunction. Though the studies have yet to prove a specific protocol, physical therapists trained in pelvic dysfunction are reporting success with restoring tissue normalcy and reducing vulvar and sexual pain. A review of pelvic anatomy and common findings are presented along with suggested physical therapy management. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Case report: pelvic actinomycosis.

    PubMed

    Maxová, K; Menzlová, E; Kolařík, D; Dundr, P; Halaška, M

    2012-01-01

    A case of pelvic actinomycosis is presented. The patient is 42-year-old female with a 5 weeks history of pelvic pain. An intrauterine device (IUD) was taken out 3 weeks ago. There is a lump length 9 cm between rectus muscles. Ultrasound, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and histology are used to make the diagnosis. Actinomycosis can mimic the tumour disease. The definitive diagnosis requires positive anaerobic culture or histological identification of actinomyces granulas. A long lasting antibiotic therapy is performed.

  7. [Pelvic lymph nodes imaging].

    PubMed

    Roy, C

    2013-10-01

    Detecting metastatic pelvic lymph nodes is essential during the survey of a pelvic carcinoma. In routine clinical practice, CT scan is commonly used. However, its accuracy is quite low for small size lymph nodes. Diffusion-weighted imaging could be in the near future an efficient modality. Copyright © 2013 Société française de radiothérapie oncologique (SFRO). Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  8. Pelvic Insufficiency Fracture After Pelvic Radiotherapy for Cervical Cancer: Analysis of Risk Factors

    SciTech Connect

    Oh, Dongryul; Huh, Seung Jae Nam, Heerim; Park, Won; Han, Youngyih; Lim, Do Hoon; Ahn, Yong Chan; Lee, Jeong Won; Kim, Byoung Gie; Bae, Duk Soo; Lee, Je Ho

    2008-03-15

    Purpose: To investigate the incidence, clinical characteristics, and risk factors of pelvic insufficiency fracture (PIF) after pelvic radiotherapy (RT) in cervical cancer. Methods and Materials: Medical records and imaging studies, including bone scintigraphy, CT, and MRI of 557 patients with cervical cancer who received whole-pelvic RT between January 1998 and August 2005 were reviewed. Results: Eighty-three patients were diagnosed as having PIF after pelvic RT. The 5-year cumulative incidence of PIF was 19.7%. The most commonly involved site was the sacroiliac joint. Pelvic pain developed in 48 patients (57.8%) at diagnosis. Eleven patients (13.3%) needed admission or narcotics because of severe pain, and others had good relief of symptoms with conservative management. In univariate analysis, age {>=}55 years (p < 0.001), anteroposterior/posteroanterior parallel opposing technique (p = 0.001), curative treatment (p < 0.001), and radiation dose {>=}50.4 Gy (p = 0.005) were the predisposing factors for development of PIF. Concurrent chemotherapy (p = 0.78) was not significant. Multivariate analysis showed that age {>=}55 years (p < 0.001), body weight <55 kg (p = 0.02), curative treatment (p = 0.03), and radiation dose {>=}50.4 Gy (p = 0.04) were significant predisposing factors for development of PIF. Conclusion: The development of PIF is not rare after pelvic RT. The use of multibeam arrangements to reduce the volume and dose of irradiated pelvic bone can be helpful to minimize the risk of fracture, especially in elderly women with low body weight.

  9. Pelvic Organ Prolapse.

    PubMed

    Iglesia, Cheryl B; Smithling, Katelyn R

    2017-08-01

    Pelvic organ prolapse is the descent of one or more of the anterior vaginal wall, posterior vaginal wall, the uterus (cervix), or the apex of the vagina (vaginal vault or cuff scar after hysterectomy). Prevalence increases with age. The cause of prolapse is multifactorial but is primarily associated with pregnancy and vaginal delivery, which lead to direct pelvic floor muscle and connective tissue injury. Hysterectomy, pelvic surgery, and conditions associated with sustained episodes of increased intra-abdominal pressure, including obesity, chronic cough, constipation, and repeated heavy lifting, also contribute to prolapse. Most patients with pelvic organ prolapse are asymptomatic. Symptoms become more bothersome as the bulge protrudes past the vaginal opening. Initial evaluation includes a history and systematic pelvic examination including assessment for urinary incontinence, bladder outlet obstruction, and fecal incontinence. Treatment options include observation, vaginal pessaries, and surgery. Most women can be successfully fit with a vaginal pessary. Available surgical options are reconstructive pelvic surgery with or without mesh augmentation and obliterative surgery.

  10. Pelvic organ prolapse.

    PubMed

    Jelovsek, J Eric; Maher, Christopher; Barber, Matthew D

    2007-03-24

    Pelvic organ prolapse is downward descent of female pelvic organs, including the bladder, uterus or post-hysterectomy vaginal cuff, and the small or large bowel, resulting in protrusion of the vagina, uterus, or both. Prolapse development is multifactorial, with vaginal child birth, advancing age, and increasing body-mass index as the most consistent risk factors. Vaginal delivery, hysterectomy, chronic straining, normal ageing, and abnormalities of connective tissue or connective-tissue repair predispose some women to disruption, stretching, or dysfunction of the levator ani complex, connective-tissue attachments of the vagina, or both, resulting in prolapse. Patients generally present with several complaints, including bladder, bowel, and pelvic symptoms; however, with the exception of vaginal bulging, none is specific to prolapse. Women with symptoms suggestive of prolapse should undergo a pelvic examination and medical history check. Radiographic assessment is usually unnecessary. Many women with pelvic organ prolapse are asymptomatic and do not need treatment. When prolapse is symptomatic, options include observation, pessary use, and surgery. Surgical strategies for prolapse can be categorised broadly by reconstructive and obliterative techniques. Reconstructive procedures can be done by either an abdominal or vaginal approach. Although no effective prevention strategy for prolapse has been identified, considerations include weight loss, reduction of heavy lifting, treatment of constipation, modification or reduction of obstetric risk factors, and pelvic-floor physical therapy.

  11. [Pelvic floor and pregnancy].

    PubMed

    Fritel, X

    2010-05-01

    Congenital factor, obesity, aging, pregnancy and childbirth are the main risk factors for female pelvic floor disorders (urinary incontinence, anal incontinence, pelvic organ prolapse, dyspareunia). Vaginal delivery may cause injury to the pudendal nerve, the anal sphincter, or the anal sphincter. However the link between these injuries and pelvic floor symptoms is not always determined and we still ignore what might be the ways of prevention. Of the many obstetrical methods proposed to prevent postpartum symptoms, episiotomy, delivery in vertical position, delayed pushing, perineal massage, warm pack, pelvic floor rehabilitation, results are disappointing or limited. Caesarean section is followed by less postnatal urinary incontinence than vaginal childbirth. However this difference tends to disappear with time and following childbirth. Limit the number of instrumental extractions and prefer the vacuum to forceps could reduce pelvic floor disorders after childbirth. Ultrasound examination of the anal sphincter after a second-degree perineal tear is useful to detect and repair infra-clinic anal sphincter lesions. Scientific data is insufficient to justify an elective cesarean section in order to avoid pelvic floor symptoms in a woman without previous disorders.

  12. Anorectal and Pelvic Pain.

    PubMed

    Bharucha, Adil E; Lee, Tae Hee

    2016-10-01

    Although pelvic pain is a symptom of several structural anorectal and pelvic disorders (eg, anal fissure, endometriosis, and pelvic inflammatory disease), this comprehensive review will focus on the 3 most common nonstructural, or functional, disorders associated with pelvic pain: functional anorectal pain (ie, levator ani syndrome, unspecified anorectal pain, and proctalgia fugax), interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome, and chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome. The first 2 conditions occur in both sexes, while the latter occurs only in men. They are defined by symptoms, supplemented with levator tenderness (levator ani syndrome) and bladder mucosal inflammation (interstitial cystitis). Although distinct, these conditions share several similarities, including associations with dysfunctional voiding or defecation, comorbid conditions (eg, fibromyalgia, depression), impaired quality of life, and increased health care utilization. Several factors, including pelvic floor muscle tension, peripheral inflammation, peripheral and central sensitization, and psychosocial factors, have been implicated in the pathogenesis. The management is tailored to symptoms, is partly supported by clinical trials, and includes multidisciplinary approaches such as lifestyle modifications and pharmacological, behavioral, and physical therapy. Opioids should be avoided, and surgical treatment has a limited role, primarily in refractory interstitial cystitis. Copyright © 2016 Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Anorectal and Pelvic Pain

    PubMed Central

    Bharucha, Adil E.; Lee, Tae Hee

    2016-01-01

    Although pelvic pain is a symptom of several structural anorectal and pelvic disorders (eg, anal fissure, endometriosis, and pelvic inflammatory disease), this comprehensive review will focus on the three most common nonstructural, or functional, disorders associated with pelvic pain: functional anorectal pain (ie, levator ani syndrome, unspecified anorectal pain, and proctalgia fugax), interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome, and chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome. The first two conditions occur in both sexes, while the latter occurs only in men. They are defined by symptoms, supplemented with levator tenderness (levator ani syndrome) and bladder mucosal inflammation (interstitial cystitis). Although distinct, these conditions share several similarities, including associations with dysfunctional voiding or defecation, comorbid conditions (eg, fibromyalgia, depression), impaired quality of life, and increased health care utilization. Several factors, including pelvic floor muscle tension, peripheral inflammation, peripheral and central sensitization, and psychosocial factors, have been implicated in the pathogenesis. The management is tailored to symptoms, is partly supported by clinical trials, and includes multidisciplinary approaches such as lifestyle modifications and pharmacologic, behavioral, and physical therapy. Opioids should not be avoided, and surgery has a limited role, primarily in refractory interstitial cystitis. PMID:27712641

  14. Pelvic Organ Prolapse: New Concepts in Pelvic Floor Anatomy.

    PubMed

    Maldonado, Pedro A; Wai, Clifford Y

    2016-03-01

    As the field of reconstructive pelvic surgery continues to evolve, with descriptions of new procedures to repair pelvic organ prolapse, it remains imperative to maintain a functional understanding of pelvic floor anatomy and support. The goal of this review was to provide a focused, conceptual approach to differentiating anatomic defects contributing to prolapse in the various compartments of the vagina. Rather than provide exhaustive descriptions of pelvic floor anatomy, basic pelvic floor anatomy is reviewed, new and historical concepts of pelvic floor support are discussed, and relevance to the surgical management of specific anatomic defects is addressed. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Late Consequential Surgical Bed Soft Tissue Necrosis in Advanced Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinomas Treated With Transoral Robotic Surgery and Postoperative Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Lukens, J. Nicholas; Lin, Alexander; Gamerman, Victoria; Mitra, Nandita; Grover, Surbhi; McMenamin, Erin M.; Weinstein, Gregory S.; O'Malley, Bert W.; Cohen, Roger B.; Orisamolu, Abimbola; Ahn, Peter H.; Quon, Harry

    2014-08-01

    Purpose: A subset of patients with oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (OP-SCC) managed with transoral robotic surgery (TORS) and postoperative radiation therapy (PORT) developed soft tissue necrosis (STN) in the surgical bed months after completion of PORT. We investigated the frequency and risk factors. Materials and Methods: This retrospective analysis included 170 consecutive OP-SCC patients treated with TORS and PORT between 2006 and 2012, with >6 months' of follow-up. STN was defined as ulceration of the surgical bed >6 weeks after completion of PORT, requiring opioids, biopsy, or hyperbaric oxygen therapy. Results: A total of 47 of 170 patients (28%) had a diagnosis of STN. Tonsillar patients were more susceptible than base-of-tongue (BOT) patients, 39% (41 of 104) versus 9% (6 of 66), respectively. For patients with STN, median tumor size was 3.0 cm (range 1.0-5.6 cm), and depth of resection was 2.2 cm (range 1.0-5.1 cm). Median radiation dose and dose of fraction to the surgical bed were 6600 cGy and 220 cGy, respectively. Thirty-one patients (66%) received concurrent chemotherapy. Median time to STN was 2.5 months after PORT. All patients had resolution of STN after a median of 3.7 months. Multivariate analysis identified tonsillar primary (odds ratio [OR] 4.73, P=.01), depth of resection (OR 3.12, P=.001), total radiation dose to the resection bed (OR 1.51 per Gy, P<.01), and grade 3 acute mucositis (OR 3.47, P=.02) as risk factors for STN. Beginning May 2011, after implementing aggressive avoidance of delivering >2 Gy/day to the resection bed mucosa, only 8% (2 of 26 patients) experienced STN (all grade 2). Conclusions: A subset of OP-SCC patients treated with TORS and PORT are at risk for developing late consequential surgical bed STN. Risk factors include tonsillar location, depth of resection, radiation dose to the surgical bed, and severe mucositis. STN risk is significantly decreased with carefully avoiding a radiation dosage of >2 Gy/day to the

  16. Late consequential surgical bed soft tissue necrosis in advanced oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinomas treated with transoral robotic surgery and postoperative radiation therapy.

    PubMed

    Lukens, J Nicholas; Lin, Alexander; Gamerman, Victoria; Mitra, Nandita; Grover, Surbhi; McMenamin, Erin M; Weinstein, Gregory S; O'Malley, Bert W; Cohen, Roger B; Orisamolu, Abimbola; Ahn, Peter H; Quon, Harry

    2014-08-01

    A subset of patients with oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (OP-SCC) managed with transoral robotic surgery (TORS) and postoperative radiation therapy (PORT) developed soft tissue necrosis (STN) in the surgical bed months after completion of PORT. We investigated the frequency and risk factors. This retrospective analysis included 170 consecutive OP-SCC patients treated with TORS and PORT between 2006 and 2012, with >6 months' of follow-up. STN was defined as ulceration of the surgical bed >6 weeks after completion of PORT, requiring opioids, biopsy, or hyperbaric oxygen therapy. A total of 47 of 170 patients (28%) had a diagnosis of STN. Tonsillar patients were more susceptible than base-of-tongue (BOT) patients, 39% (41 of 104) versus 9% (6 of 66), respectively. For patients with STN, median tumor size was 3.0 cm (range 1.0-5.6 cm), and depth of resection was 2.2 cm (range 1.0-5.1 cm). Median radiation dose and dose of fraction to the surgical bed were 6600 cGy and 220 cGy, respectively. Thirty-one patients (66%) received concurrent chemotherapy. Median time to STN was 2.5 months after PORT. All patients had resolution of STN after a median of 3.7 months. Multivariate analysis identified tonsillar primary (odds ratio [OR] 4.73, P=.01), depth of resection (OR 3.12, P=.001), total radiation dose to the resection bed (OR 1.51 per Gy, P<.01), and grade 3 acute mucositis (OR 3.47, P=.02) as risk factors for STN. Beginning May 2011, after implementing aggressive avoidance of delivering >2 Gy/day to the resection bed mucosa, only 8% (2 of 26 patients) experienced STN (all grade 2). A subset of OP-SCC patients treated with TORS and PORT are at risk for developing late consequential surgical bed STN. Risk factors include tonsillar location, depth of resection, radiation dose to the surgical bed, and severe mucositis. STN risk is significantly decreased with carefully avoiding a radiation dosage of >2 Gy/day to the surgical bed. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All

  17. The effect of pelvic motion on spino-pelvic parameters.

    PubMed

    Hayden, Andrew M; Hayes, Ann M; Brechbuhler, Jennifer L; Israel, Heidi; Place, Howard M

    2017-08-15

    To date, many studies have examined how pelvic position affects the spinal curvature and spino-pelvic parameters. However, these studies focus on a static relationship, comparing pelvis and spine in a relaxed or baseline position only. Indeed, the spino-pelvic connection is dynamic, as a subject can easily be taught to rotate their pelvis anteriorly or posteriorly on the femoral head, all while maintaining an erect posture. Therefore, for a true understanding of pelvic influence on the spinal column, it is necessary to examine spino-pelvic parameters in multiple pelvic positions within the same subject. The objective of this study was to examine the dynamic effect of pelvic motion on the spine and associated radiographic parameters. Single-center, cross-sectional study of 50 healthy, asymptomatic volunteers. Subjects were recruited and screened based upon the following criteria: *Between 18-79 years of age. *No known spinal, pelvic, or lower extremity pain lasting greater than 48 hours. *No history of spinal, pelvic, or lower extremity dysfunction requiring medical care. *No radiographic evidence of spinal or pelvic abnormality, scoliosis deformity, or other associated spinal pathologies. *Not currently pregnant and with no possibility of being pregnant. *BMI < 30 64 subjects were screened and 14 were excluded for a total of 50 subjects. Thoracic Kyphosis (TK), Lumbar Lordosis (LL), Sagittal Vertical Axis (SVA), Pelvic Tilt (PT) Sacral Slope (SS), and Pelvic Incidence (PI) METHODS: This study was funded by a Small Exploratory Research Grant from the Scoliosis Research Society. Each subject was instructed and observed to stand in 3 different positions: pelvic resting, anterior pelvic rotation and posterior pelvic rotation. Lateral standing radiographs were taken in each position and each image was examined by an Orthopaedic spine surgeon who digitally measured: thoracic kyphosis, lumbar lordosis, sagittal vertical axis, pelvic tilt, sacral slope, and pelvic

  18. Postoperative Chemoradiotherapy and Cetuximab for High-Risk Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Head and Neck: Radiation Therapy Oncology Group RTOG-0234

    PubMed Central

    Harari, Paul M.; Harris, Jonathan; Kies, Merrill S.; Myers, Jeffrey N.; Jordan, Richard C.; Gillison, Maura L.; Foote, Robert L.; Machtay, Mitchell; Rotman, Marvin; Khuntia, Deepak; Straube, William; Zhang, Qiang; Ang, Kian

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To report results of a randomized phase II trial (Radiation Therapy Oncology Group RTOG-0234) examining concurrent chemoradiotherapy and cetuximab in the postoperative treatment of patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (SCCHN) with high-risk pathologic features. Patients and Methods Eligibility required pathologic stage III to IV SCCHN with gross total resection showing positive margins and/or extracapsular nodal extension and/or two or more nodal metastases. Patients were randomly assigned to 60 Gy radiation with cetuximab once per week plus either cisplatin 30 mg/m2 or docetaxel 15 mg/m2 once per week. Results Between April 2004 and December 2006, 238 patients were enrolled. With a median follow-up of 4.4 years, 2-year overall survival (OS) was 69% for the cisplatin arm and 79% for the docetaxel arm; 2-year disease-free survival (DFS) was 57% and 66%, respectively. Patients with p16-positive oropharynx tumors showed markedly improved survival outcome relative to patients with p16-negative oropharynx tumors. Grade 3 to 4 myelosuppression was observed in 28% of patients in the cisplatin arm and 14% in the docetaxel arm; mucositis was observed in 56% and 54%, respectively. DFS in this study was compared with that in the chemoradiotherapy arm of the RTOG-9501 trial (Phase III Intergroup Trial of Surgery Followed by Radiotherapy Versus Radiochemotherapy for Resectable High Risk Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Head and Neck), which had a hazard ratio of 0.76 for the cisplatin arm versus control (P = .05) and 0.69 for the docetaxel arm versus control (P = .01), reflecting absolute improvement in 2-year DFS of 2.5% and 11.1%, respectively. Conclusion The delivery of postoperative chemoradiotherapy and cetuximab to patients with SCCHN is feasible and tolerated with predictable toxicity. The docetaxel regimen shows favorable outcome with improved DFS and OS relative to historical controls and has commenced formal testing in a phase II/III trial

  19. Postoperative activity restrictions: any evidence?

    PubMed

    Weir, Larissa F; Nygaard, Ingrid E; Wilken, Jason; Brandt, Debra; Janz, Kathleen F

    2006-02-01

    Because of a widespread but untested belief that increased intra-abdominal pressure contributes to pelvic floor disorders, physicians commonly restrict various activities postoperatively. Our aim was to describe intra-abdominal pressures during common physical activities. Thirty women of wide age and weight ranges who were not undergoing treatment for pelvic floor disorders performed 3 repetitions of various activities while intra-abdominal pressures (baseline and maximal) were approximated via microtip rectal catheters. We calculated median peak and net pressures (centimeters of H(2)O). We assessed correlations between abdominal pressures and body mass index, abdominal circumference, and grip strength (a proxy for overall strength). P < .025 was considered significant. Median peak abdominal pressures ranged from 48 (lifting 8 lb from a counter) to 150 (lifting 35 lb from the floor), with much variation. Many activities did not raise the intra-abdominal pressure more than simply getting out of a chair, including lifting 8, 13, and 20 lb from a counter, lifting 8 or 13 lb from the floor, climbing stairs, walking briskly, or doing abdominal crunches. Body mass index and abdominal circumference each correlated positively with peak, but not net, pressures. Age and grip strength were not associated with abdominal pressure. Some activities commonly restricted postoperatively have no greater effect on intra-abdominal pressures than unavoidable activities like rising from a chair. How lifting is done impacts intra-abdominal pressure. Many current postoperative guidelines are needlessly restrictive. Further research is needed to determine whether increased intra-abdominal pressure truly promotes pelvic floor disorders. III.

  20. Total pelvic floor reconstruction versus transvaginal hysterectomy for pelvic organ prolapse: a retrospective cohort.

    PubMed

    Shi, R X; Sun, H T

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate the surgical outcomes following total pelvic floor reconstruction (TPFR) and transvaginal hysterectomy (TVH). This was a retrospective cohort study of all patients who underwent TPFR or TVH repair for pelvic organ prolapse (POP) between January 2005 and January 2011. A total of 251 consecutive women were evaluated prior to, and at two, six, and 12 months after surgery. Anatomy, symptoms, and quality of life were measured using the Pelvic Organ Prolapse Quantification system (POP-Q) and pelvic floor distress inventory (PFDI). The surgical outcomes were compared between groups using Student's t-test and ANCOVA tests (p < 0.05). Of the 251 patients, 129 had a total pelvic floor reconstruction (TPFR group), and concomitant modified transobturator inside-out tension-free urethral suspension (TVT-O) was used in pelvic floor dysfunction patients with stress urinary incontinence. The patients that underwent vaginal hysterectomy surgery (TVH group) were 122. At two, six, and 12 months, respectively, 12.40% (TPFR group) and 18.85% (TVH group) of the patients were lost to follow-up. There were no significant differences between TPFR group and TVH group for all preoperative variables (p > 0.05). The TPFR patients had significantly lower operation time, blood loss, anus exhaust time, remaining catheter time, and the length of stay in hospital (p < 0.05). Postoperatively, the recurrence rate in TVH group was higher than that ofTPFR group after surgery at six and 12 months (p < 0.05). The PFDI scorewas significantly different between the groups. The short-term clinical results suggest that the two surgeries are safe and effective in treating female POP. The patients' quality life was improved, but TPFR technique was more conspicuous for treating POP.

  1. Scintimammography and single-photon emission computed tomography for postoperative image guidance for radiation treatment planning in breast cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Piperkova, E; Chavdarova, L; Garanina, Z; Gocheva, L; Parvanova, V; Tzonevska, A; Dimitrova, M

    2011-01-01

    To evaluate post-surgical tumor-metabolic regions outside of the computed tomography (CT)-defined volume for radiation therapy (RT) planning using functional imaging of scintimammography (SMG) ± single photon emission computerized tomography (SPECT) in breast cancer (BC) patients. 62 operated high-risk BC females, mean age 50.45 years, underwent SMG±SPECT before RT planning. Twenty-one and twelve patients with stage I and IIa respectively had lumpectomy (LT) with axillary lymph node dissection (ALND), and modified radical mastectomy (Patay) + ALND was realized in 29 stage IIb-III patients. All SMG images, positive for viable tumor tissue (VTT) or metastatically involved lymph nodes (LNs) were verified cytologically/ histologically. Three early planar and delayed images were acquired after i.v. administration of 550-740 MBq 99mTc- MIBI or 99mTc-TF. Uptake values (UV) > 1.65 revealed VTT. Data in 49 (79%) of 62 patients were characterized as true-negative (TN; UV<1.35). In 13 (21%) patients SMG visualized 22 true-positive (TP) malignant lesions: 2 residual VTT in scars, 1 newly defined BC in the contralateral breast and 18 regional LN metastases (6 axillary, 6 parasternal, 1 sub- and 5 supraclavicular). All 22 TP VTT lesions were imaged by scintigraphy using different tumor-seeking radiopharmaceuticals: 99mTc-MIBI - 17 (77%) and 99mTc- TF - 5 (23%) of the TP lesions. One false-positive (FP) (inflammation: UV>1.65) and one false-negative (FN) (UV<1.35) foci were found. Applying SMG±SPECT for BC restaging after surgery, the RT volume was changed in 13 of 62 (21%) patients. SMG is a reliable imaging method for evaluating residual VTT, LN metastases or altered biological activity in the scars after BC surgery and could modify the irradiated volume, optimizing the therapeutic effect and minimizing RT side effects.

  2. A Model for Precise and Uniform Pelvic- and Limb-Sparing Abdominal Irradiation to Study the Radiation-Induced Gastrointestinal Syndrome in Mice Using Small Animal Irradiation Systems

    PubMed Central

    Brodin, N. Patrik; Velcich, Anna; Guha, Chandan

    2017-01-01

    Background and Purpose: Currently, no readily available mitigators exist for acute abdominal radiation injury. Here, we present an animal model for precise and homogenous limb-sparing abdominal irradiation (LSAIR) to study the radiation-induced gastrointestinal syndrome (RIGS). Materials and Methods: The LSAIR technique was developed using the small animal radiation research platform (SARRP) with image guidance capabilities. We delivered LSAIR at doses between 14 and 18 Gy on 8- to 10-week-old male C57BL/6 mice. Histological analysis was performed to confirm that the observed mortality was due to acute abdominal radiation injury. Results: A steep dose–response relationship was found for survival, with no deaths seen at doses below 16 Gy and 100% mortality at above 17 Gy. All deaths occurred between 6 and 10 days after irradiation, consistent with the onset of RIGS. This was further confirmed by histological analysis showing clear differences in the number of regenerative intestinal crypts between animals receiving sublethal (14 Gy) and 100% lethal (18 Gy) radiation. Conclusion: The developed LSAIR technique provides uniform dose delivery with a clear dose response, consistent with acute abdominal radiation injury on histological examination. This model can provide a useful tool for researchers investigating the development of mitigators for accidental or clinical high-dose abdominal irradiation. PMID:28203121

  3. Pelvic inflammatory disease.

    PubMed

    Gradison, Margaret

    2012-04-15

    Pelvic inflammatory disease is a polymicrobial infection of the upper genital tract. It primarily affects young, sexually active women. The diagnosis is made clinically; no single test or study is sensitive or specific enough for a definitive diagnosis. Pelvic inflammatory disease should be suspected in at-risk patients who present with pelvic or lower abdominal pain with no identified etiology, and who have cervical motion, uterine, or adnexal tenderness. Chlamydia trachomatis and Neisseria gonorrhoeae are the most commonly implicated microorganisms; however, other microorganisms may be involved. The spectrum of disease ranges from asymptomatic to life-threatening tubo-ovarian abscess. Patients should be treated empirically, even if they present with few symptoms. Most women can be treated successfully as outpatients with a single dose of a parenteral cephalosporin plus oral doxycycline, with or without oral metronidazole. Delay in treatment may lead to major sequelae, including chronic pelvic pain, ectopic pregnancy, and infertility. Hospitalization and parenteral treatment are recommended if the patient is pregnant, has human immunodeficiency virus infection, does not respond to oral medication, or is severely ill. Strategies for preventing pelvic inflammatory disease include routine screening for chlamydia and patient education.

  4. Intrapelvic prosthesis to prevent injury of the small intestine with high dosage pelvic irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Sugarbaker, P.H.

    1983-09-01

    The major complication to delivering tumoricidal dosages of radiation to the pelvis is radiation damage to the loops of the small intestine located within the radiation field. To exclude the small intestine from the pelvis after extensive pelvic surgical treatment, prosthetic materials are used. A transabdominal baffle made of prosthetic mesh separates pelvic and abdominal cavities. A Silastic implant, usually used in the reconstruction of the breast, is used in the pelvis to occupy space. In so doing, all of the small intestine can be excluded from the pelvic cavity and dosages of radiation to 6,500 rads can be administered.

  5. Postoperative treatment of glioblastoma multiforme with radiation therapy plus concomitant and adjuvant temozolomide : A mono-institutional experience of 215 patients.

    PubMed

    Julka, Pramod Kumar; Sharma, Daya Nand; Mallick, Supriya; Gandhi, Ajeet Kumar; Joshi, Nikhil; Rath, Goura Kisor

    2013-01-01

    To study the clinical results and prognostic factors of patients with glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) treated by postoperative radiation therapy (PORT) and concomitant temozolomide followed by adjuvant temozolomide. From 2005 to 2008, 215 patients (median age 48 years) with GBM were treated with PORT plus temozolomide chemotherapy. Radiation therapy (RT) was employed with a dose of 60 Gy in 30 fractions over 6 weeks by conventional fractionation with concomitant temozolomide (75 mg/m(2)/day). Adjuvant therapy consisted of 6 cycles of temozolomide (150 mg/m(2) for 5 days, 28 days cycle). The primary end point of the study was overall survival (OS), and the secondary end points were progression free survival (PFS) and toxicity. OS was determined with respect to different variables to study the prognostic significance. Median follow up was 11 months (range 2-50 months). Median OS and PFS were 13 months and 11 months respectively. The 1-year and 2-year OS was 44% and 18% respectively. There was no statistical significant impact of age, sex, KP score, anatomical location and extent of surgery. Presentation without seizures (on univariate analysis) and 6 cycles of adjuvant temozolomide therapy (on univariate as well as multivariate analysis) were found significant prognostic factors. Sixteen patients developed grade III-IV neutropenia/thrombocytopenia during the course of RT. Our results authenticate the role of concomitant and adjuvant temozolomide chemotherapy in combination with PORT for the management of GBM patients. We strongly recommend complete 6 cycle of adjuvant temozolomide since it significantly improved the survival in our study.

  6. Evaluation of pelvic floor muscle strength before and after robotic-assisted radical prostatectomy and early outcomes on urinary continence.

    PubMed

    Manley, Lauren; Gibson, Luke; Papa, Nathan; Beharry, Bhawanie Koonj; Johnson, Liana; Lawrentschuk, Nathan; Bolton, Damien M

    2016-12-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the effect of pelvic floor muscle (PFM) assessment and training before and after robot-assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomy (RARP) in improving PFM strength and urinary continence. We performed an analysis of a database of patients who underwent robot-assisted laparoscopic radical prostatectomy (RARP) performed by two urologists from 2011 to 2013. Pelvic floor muscle (PFM) activation and strength were graded by a trained pelvic floor physiotherapist. Patients were given an exercise program, grouped according to the strength of their pelvic floor as graded by assessment, to complete before and after surgery. PFM strength was recorded preoperatively, 4 days post-catheter removal and 4 weeks post-catheter removal. Continence was recorded at 4 weeks postop and was defined as the requirement of no continence aids. A total of 98 patients had RARP and a preoperative physiotherapy assessment plus postoperative appointments at around 1 and 4 weeks post-RARP. The majority of men improved their PFM strength regardless of preoperative strength with no significant predictors of postoperative strength found. Age was the only significant predictor of postoperative incontinence. In this pilot study, a majority of patients increased their pelvic floor strength with time. Pelvic floor physiotherapy is an important modifiable patient factor, which does have an impact in improving patients' urinary continence by strengthening the pelvic floor muscles. Patient age influences response to pelvic floor physiotherapy.

  7. Long-term local control rates of patients with adenoid cystic carcinoma of the head and neck managed by surgery and postoperative radiation.

    PubMed

    Ali, Safina; Palmer, Frank L; Katabi, Nora; Lee, Nancy; Shah, Jatin P; Patel, Snehal G; Ganly, Ian

    2017-10-01

    To report long-term local control in patients with adenoid cystic cancer (ACC) of the head and neck managed by surgery and identify factors predictive for local failure. Single-institution retrospective cohort study. Eighty-seven patients who had surgery for ACC between 1985 and 2009 were identified. Patient, tumor, and treatment characteristics were recorded. Local recurrence-free survival (LRFS) was recorded by the Kaplan-Meier method. Predictors of local control were identified. The median age was 54 years. Seventy-two (83%) patients had perineural invasion, 61 (70%) had close/positive margins, and 58 (67%) had pT 1T2. Fifty-nine (68%) patients had postoperative radiation therapy (PORT). With a median follow-up of 85 months, the 10-year LRFS was 78.7%. There were 14 local recurrences. On multivariable analysis, pathological tumor (T)3T4 stage and no PORT were independent predictors for local failure. Patients with no PORT had a 13-fold increased risk of local failure compared to patients treated with PORT (P = 0.003) after adjusting for stage. After adjusting for T stage, patients who do not get PORT are more likely to have local recurrence. 4. Laryngoscope, 127:2265-2269, 2017. © 2017 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  8. Patterns of nodal relapse after surgery and postoperative radiation therapy for carcinomas of the major and minor salivary glands: What is the role of elective neck irradiation?

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Allen M. . E-mail: allenmchen@yahoo.com; Garcia, Joaquin; Lee, Nancy Y.; Bucci, M. Kara; Eisele, David W.

    2007-03-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the incidence of nodal relapses from carcinomas of the salivary glands among patients with clinically negative necks in an attempt to determine the potential utility of elective neck irradiation (ENI). Methods and Materials: Between 1960 and 2004, 251 patients with clinically N0 carcinomas of the salivary glands were treated with surgery and postoperative radiation therapy. None of the patients had undergone previous neck dissection. Histology was: adenoid cystic (84 patients), mucoepidermoid (60 patients), adenocarcinoma (58 patients), acinic cell (21 patients), undifferentiated (11 patients), carcinoma ex pleomorphic adenoma (7 patients), squamous cell (7 patients), and salivary duct carcinoma (3 patients); 131 patients (52%) had ENI. Median follow-up was 62 months (range, 3-267 months). Results: The 5- and 10-year actuarial estimates of nodal relapse were 11% and 13%, respectively. The 10-year actuarial rates of nodal failure were 7%, 5%, 12%, and 16%, for patients with T1, T2, T3, and T4 disease, respectively (p = 0.11). The use of ENI reduced the 10-year nodal failure rate from 26% to 0% (p = 0.0001). The highest crude rates of nodal relapse among those treated without ENI were found in patients with squamous cell carcinoma (67%), undifferentiated carcinoma (50%), adenocarcinoma (34%), and mucoepidermoid carcinoma (29%). There were no nodal failures observed among patients with adenoid cystic or acinic cell histology. Conclusion: ENI effectively prevents nodal relapses and should be used for select patients at high risk for regional failure.

  9. Feasibility and efficacy of accelerated weekly concomitant boost postoperative radiation therapy combined with concomitant chemotherapy in patients with locally advanced head and neck cancer.

    PubMed

    Pehlivan, Berrin; Luthi, Francois; Matzinger, Oscar; Betz, Michael; Dragusanu, Daniela; Bulling, Shelley; Bron, Luc; Pasche, Philippe; Seelentag, Walter; Mirimanoff, René O; Zouhair, Abderrahim; Ozsahin, Mahmut

    2009-05-01

    The aim of this study was to assess feasibility and efficacy of weekly concomitant boost accelerated postoperative radiation therapy (PORT) with concomitant chemotherapy (CT) in patients with locally advanced head and neck cancer (LAHNC). Conformal or intensity-modulated 66-Gy RT was performed in 5.5 weeks in 40 patients. Cisplatin was given at days 1, 22, and 43. Median follow-up was 36 months. Grade 3 mucositis, dysphagia, and erythema was observed in ten (25%), nine (23%), and six (13%) patients, respectively. Grade 3 or more anemia was observed in two (6%) patients, and leukopenia in five (13%) patients. No grade 3 or 4 thrombocytopenia was observed. Grade 3 nephrotoxicity was observed in one patient (3%). No treatment-related mortality was observed. Grade 2 or more xerostomia and edema were observed in ten (25%) and one (3%) patient, respectively. Locoregional relapse occurred in eight patients, and seven patients developed distant metastases. Median time to locoregional relapse was 6 months. Three-year overall, disease-free survival, and locoregional control rates were 63%, 62%, and 81%, respectively. Multivariate analysis revealed that the only prognostic factor was nodal status. Reducing overall treatment time using accelerated PORT/CT by weekly concomitant boost (six fractions per week) combined with concomitant cisplatin CT is easily feasible with acceptable morbidity.

  10. Pelvic discontinuity: current solutions.

    PubMed

    Petrie, J; Sassoon, A; Haidukewych, G J

    2013-11-01

    Pelvic discontinuity represents a rare but challenging problem for orthopaedic surgeons. It is most commonly encountered during revision total hip replacement, but can also result from an iatrogentic acetabular fracture during hip replacement. The general principles in management of pelvic discontinuity include restoration of the continuity between the ilium and the ischium, typically with some form of plating. Bone grafting is frequently required to restore pelvic bone stock. The acetabular component is then impacted, typically using an uncemented, trabecular metal component. Fixation with multiple supplemental screws is performed. For larger defects, a so-called 'cup-cage' reconstruction, or a custom triflange implant may be required. Pre-operative CT scanning can greatly assist in planning and evaluating the remaining bone stock available for bony ingrowth. Generally, good results have been reported for constructs that restore stability to the pelvis and allow some form of biologic ingrowth.

  11. Triple Pelvic Osteotomy and Double Pelvic Osteotomy.

    PubMed

    Guevara, Francisco; Franklin, Samuel P

    2017-07-01

    Triple and double pelvic osteotomy (TPO, DPO) are performed with the goal of increasing acetabular ventro-version, increasing femoral head coverage, and decreasing femoral head subluxation. Since the first descriptions of TPO, there have been modifications in technique, most notably omission of the ischial osteotomy for DPO, and improvements in the implants, including availability of locking TPO/DPO bone plates. Associated complication rates seem to have declined accordingly. The most salient questions regarding these procedures remain what selection criteria should be used to identify candidates and whether halting or preventing osteoarthritis is necessary to consider these surgeries clinically beneficial. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. The effect of 3-column spinal osteotomy on anterior pelvic plane and acetabulum position.

    PubMed

    Schroeder, Josh E; Jerabek, Seth; Sama, Andrew; Kaplan, Leon; Girardi, Federico; Lebl, Darren R

    2014-07-01

    Because the spine and pelvis are integrated, changes in spine sagittal balance affect relative acetabulum position. A 1° change of the anterior pelvic plane changes acetabulum anteversion by 0.8°. Three-column spine osteotomies correct fixed sagittal plane deformity. Twenty patients with kyphotic deformity and associated sagittal imbalance underwent corrective 3-column osteotomy. We reviewed upright pelvic and spine radiographs preoperatively and postoperatively and documented the changes in angles. The average sagittal vertical axis was 11.07 cm preoperatively and 4.8 cm postoperatively. Lumbar lordosis changed (on average) from 39° preoperatively to 55° postoperatively (P < .05). Sacral slope increased an average of 6.7° (P = .015). Pelvic tilt decreased by 5.4° (P = .001). The anterior pelvic plane increased by 8.23° (P < .0001). This correction of the sagittal balance is associated with a concomitant increase in sacral slope, pelvic tilt, and the anterior pelvic plane angles. These changes will increase acetabulum anteversion by a predicted 6.54°. This increase will change acetabular cup position and must be considered in patients with spine and pelvic osteoarthritis that requires hip surgery.

  13. Postoperative management.

    PubMed

    Schraag, Stefan

    2016-09-01

    Most patients undergoing major aortic surgery have multiple comorbidities and are at high risk of postoperative complications that affect multiple organ systems. Different aortic pathologies and surgical repair techniques have specific impact on the postoperative course. Ischemia-reperfusion injury is the common denominator in aortic surgery and influences the integrity of end-organ function. Common postoperative problems include hemodynamic instability due to the immediate inflammatory response, renal impairment, spinal cord ischemia, respiratory failure with prolonged mechanical ventilation, and gastrointestinal symptoms such as ileus or mesenteric ischemia. Focused care bundles to establish homeostasis and a team working toward an early functional recovery determine the success of effective rehabilitation and outcomes after aortic surgery. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. New developed DR detector performs radiographs of hand, pelvic and premature chest anatomies at a lower radiation dose and/or a higher image quality.

    PubMed

    Precht, Helle; Tingberg, Anders; Waaler, Dag; Outzen, Claus Bjørn

    2014-02-01

    A newly developed Digital Radiography (DR) detector has smaller pixel size and higher fill factor than earlier detector models. These technical advantages should theoretically lead to higher sensitivity and higher spatial resolution, thus making dose reduction possible without scarifying image quality compared to previous DR detector versions. To examine whether the newly developed Canon CXDI-70C DR detector provides an improved image quality and/or allows for dose reductions in hand and pelvic bone examinations as well as premature chest examinations, compared to the previous (CXDI-55C) DR detector version. A total of 450 images of a technical Contrast-Detail phantom were imaged on a DR system employing various kVp and mAs settings, providing an objective image quality assessment. In addition, 450 images of anthropomorphic phantoms were taken and analyzed by three specialized radiologists using Visual Grading Analysis (VGA). The results from the technical phantom studies showed that the image quality expressed as IQFINV values was on average approximately 45 % higher with the CXDI-70C detector compared to the CXDI-55C detector. Consistently, the VGA results from the anatomical phantom studies indicated that by using the CXDI-70C detector, diagnostic image quality could be maintained at a dose reduction of in average 30 %, depending on anatomy and kVp level. This indicates that the CXDI-70C detector is significantly more sensitive than the previous model, and supports a better clinical image quality. By using the newly developed DR detector a significant dose reduction is possible while maintaining image quality.

  15. Sagittal spinal pelvic alignment.

    PubMed

    Klineberg, Eric; Schwab, Frank; Smith, Justin S; Gupta, Munish C; Lafage, Virginie; Bess, Shay

    2013-04-01

    The goal of any ambulatory patient is to maintain a horizontal gaze with the least amount of energy expenditure. With progressive deformity, and in particular sagittal malalignment, significant compensatory mechanisms must be used to achieve this goal. Each pelvis dictates the amount of lumbar lordosis required through its morphometric parameter pelvic incidence. The pelvis may compensate for decreasing lumbar lordosis (eg, age, flat back deformity) by retroverting and increasing pelvic tilt and decreasing the sacral slope. Underappreciation for these spinopelvic compensatory mechanisms leads to surgical under-correction, iatrogenic flat back and poor clinical outcomes. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Postoperative atelectasis.

    PubMed

    Massard, G; Wihlm, J M

    1998-08-01

    Postoperative atelectasis is a common problem following any surgery. Limited atelectasis is usually well-tolerated and easily reversible. However, complete atelectasis of the remaining lung following partial lung resection may be poorly tolerated. Thoracic surgical procedures increase the risk because pain, thoracic muscle injury, chest wall instability, and diaphragmatic dysfunction impair clearance of secretions by cough. In addition, patients with lung diseases are prone to increased bronchial secretions. Prophylaxis includes preoperative and postoperative physiotherapy and medications, which should be graded in accordance to the individual patient's risk factors. Large atelectasis requires bronchoscopy to remove mucous plugs. Tracheostomy should be considered in patients with relapsing atelectasis or swallow disorders.

  17. [PELVIC FLOOR RECONSTRUCTION AFTER PELVIC EVISCERATION USING GRACILIS MUSCULOCUTANEOUS FLAP].

    PubMed

    Pavlov, V N; Bakirov, A A; Kabirov, I R; Izmajlov, A A; Kutlijarov, L M; Safiullin, R L; Urmancev, M F; Sultanov, I M; Abdrahimov, R V

    2015-01-01

    Evisceration of the pelvic organs (EPO) is a fairly uncommon surgical treatment that removes all organs from a patient's pelvic cavity. We use gracilis musculocutaneous flap to repair pelvic floor after EPO. Over the period from November 2013 to December 2014 we carried out EPO with reconstructive repair of the pelvic floor with gracilis musculocutaneous flap in 10 patients with locally advanced pelvic tumors. We describe the surgical procedure and surgical outcomes in these patients. Mean age of the patients was 55 years. Mean duration of EPO with the pelvic floor repair was 285 min., mean blood loss--595 mL and the average length of hospital stay--19 days. Gracilis musculocutaneous flap has a sufficient arterial supply and mobility for pelvic floor reconstruction. Necrosis of flap's distal edge occurred in one of the 10 clinical cases, while the remaining flaps were fully preserved. Complete healing of wounds with no signs of weakening of the pelvic floor muscles was observed in all cases. Pelvic floor reconstruction is an essential procedure in order to reduce complications associated with the evisceration of the pelvic organs. The Gracilis musculocutaneous flap is the logical alternative to repair pelvic floor defect. It does not contribute to complications like functional deficiency of the lower limbs, complications of stoma formation or weakening of the muscles of the anterior abdominal wall.

  18. Persistent pelvic pain and pelvic joint instability.

    PubMed

    Saugstad, L F

    1991-10-08

    As accepted as the condition of pelvic pain and pelvic joint instability (PPPJI) is in pregnancy, as controversial and doubted is the same diagnosis in non-pregnant women. Women suffering severe incapacitating PPPJI for years following parturition have recently founded an association. This offers a unique opportunity to investigate their characteristics. 153 of the 215 members answered a questionnaire. The majority (110) suffered PPPJI in first pregnancy with onset preceding 20 weeks gestation in 84 women. Onset was significantly earlier in users of oral contraceptives than in non-users (16.3 weeks and 20.5 weeks, respectively). The 153 women did not differ from the controls with regard to life-style, diseases prior to reproduction or reproduction. Their 358 deliveries were characterized by a marked excess of post-term deliveries, a raised proportion of infants of 4000 g or more, an extremely low sex-ratio of offspring (0.84) with 54.5% female births, and a significantly raised congenital hip dysplasia rate, consistent with elevated oestrogen and relaxin levels.

  19. Abdominal-Pelvic Actinomycosis Mimicking Malignant Neoplasm

    PubMed Central

    Pusiol, Teresa; Morichetti, Doriana; Pedrazzani, Corrado; Ricci, Francesco

    2011-01-01

    Abdominal-pelvic actinomycosis is often mistaken for other conditions, presenting a preoperative diagnostic challenge. In a 46-year-old female, computed tomography showed an abdominal-pelvic retroperitoneal mass extending from the lower pole of the right kidney to the lower pelvis. The patient had a 3-year history of intrauterine device. The mass appeared to involve the ascending colon, cecum, distal ileum, right Fallopian tube and ovary, and ureter anteriorly and the psoas muscle posteriorly. The resection of retroperitoneal mass, distal ileum appendicectomy, right hemicolectomy, and right salpingo-oophorectomy was performed. The postoperative period was uneventful. Penicillin therapy was given for six months without any complication. The retroperitoneal mass measured 4.5 × 3.5 × 3 cm, surrounded adjacent organs and histologically showed inflammatory granulomatous tissue, agglomeration of filaments, and sulfur granules of Actinomyces, with positive reaction with periodic acid Schiff. Right tubo-ovarian abscess was present. Abdominalpelvic actinomycosis should always be considered in patients with a pelvic mass especially in ones using intrauterine device. PMID:21904441

  20. MR imaging in deep pelvic endometriosis: a pictorial essay.

    PubMed

    Coutinho, Antônio; Bittencourt, Leonardo Kayat; Pires, Cíntia E; Junqueira, Flávia; Lima, Cláudio Márcio Amaral de Oliveira; Coutinho, Elisa; Domingues, Marisa A; Domingues, Romeu C; Marchiori, Edson

    2011-01-01

    Deep pelvic endometriosis is an important gynecologic disorder that is responsible for severe pelvic pain and is defined as subperitoneal invasion that exceeds 5 mm in depth. Deep pelvic endometriosis can affect the retrocervical region, uterosacral ligaments, rectum, rectovaginal septum, vagina, urinary tract, and other extraperitoneal pelvic sites. It is commonly associated with dysmenorrhea, dyspareunia, pelvic pain, urinary tract symptoms, and infertility. Because surgery remains the best therapeutic option for affected patients, the accurate preoperative assessment of the extension of endometriotic disease is extremely important. Pelvic magnetic resonance (MR) imaging is a noninvasive method with high spatial resolution that allows multiplanar evaluation of deep pelvic endometriosis and good tissue characterization, but without the use of ionizing radiation or iodinated contrast agents. MR imaging yields important findings that help grade the disease and identify subperitoneal lesion extension and other associated disease entities, thereby facilitating accurate diagnosis and adequate treatment. Radiologists should be familiar with the MR imaging findings of deep infiltrating endometriosis in various anatomic locations so that they can provide information that allows adequate presurgical counseling.

  1. The anal canal as a risk organ in cervical cancer patients with hemorrhoids undergoing whole pelvic radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Jang, Hyunsoo; Baek, Jong Geun; Jo, Sunmi

    2015-01-01

    Tolerance of the anal canal tends to be ignored in patients with cervical cancer undergoing whole pelvic radiotherapy. However, patients with hemorrhoids may be troubled with low radiation dose. We tried to analyze the dose-volume statistics of the anal canal in patients undergoing whole pelvic radiotherapy. The records of 31 patients with cervical cancer who received definite or postoperative radiotherapy at one institution were reviewed. Acute anal symptoms, such as anal pain and bleeding, were evaluated from radiotherapy start to 1 month after radiotherapy completion. Various clinical and dosimetric factors were analyzed to characterize relations with acute anal complications. The anal verge was located an average of 1.2 cm (range -0.6~3.9) below the lower border of the ischial tuberosity and an average of 2.7 cm (range -0.6~5.7) behind the sacral promontory level. The presence of hemorrhoids before radiotherapy was found to be significantly associated with acute radiation-induced anal symptoms (p = 0.001), and the mean induction dose for anal symptoms was 36.9 Gy. No patient without hemorrhoids developed an anal symptom during radiotherapy. Dosimetric analyses of V30 and V40 showed marginal correlations with anal symptoms (p = 0.07). The present study suggests a relation between acute anal symptoms following radiotherapy and acute hemorrhoid aggravation. Furthermore, the location of the anal verge was found to be variable, and consequently doses administered to the anal canal also varied substantially. Our results caution careful radiation treatment planning for whole pelvic radiotherapy, and that proper clinical management be afforded patients with hemorrhoids during radiotherapy.

  2. Phase II trial of adjuvant pelvic radiation “sandwiched” between ifosfamide or ifosfamide plus cisplatin in women with uterine carcinosarcoma✰,✰✰,★

    PubMed Central

    Einstein, Mark H.; Klobocista, Merieme; Hou, June Y.; Lee, Stephen; Mutyala, Subhakar; Mehta, Keyur; Reimers, Laura L.; Kuo, Dennis Y.-S.; Huang, Gloria S.; Goldberg, Gary L.

    2013-01-01

    Objective Uterine carcinosarcoma (CS) is a rare uterine tumor with an extremely poor prognosis. In the adjuvant setting, efficacy has been shown with radiotherapy (RT), systemic chemotherapy, or both. This is the first report describing the efficacy and toxicity of adjuvant ifosfamide or ifosfamide plus cisplatin “sandwiched” with RT in patients with surgically staged and completely resected uterine carcinosarcoma. Methods Women with surgically staged CS with no gross residual disease were initially administered ifosfamide (1.2 g/m2/day × 5 days) with cisplatin (20 mg/m2/day × 5 days) every 3 weeks for 3 cycles followed by pelvic external beam RT and brachytherapy followed by 3 additional cycles of ifosfamide (1.0 g/m2/day) with cisplatin (20 mg/m2/day × 5 days) every 3 weeks. Similar to the GOG trial in recurrent CS (Sutton et al, 2000), the addition of cisplatin added toxicity without additional efficacy, so mid-study, the cisplatin was eliminated from the regimen. Toxicities were recorded and disease-free survival (DFS) was calculated with Kaplan-Meier statistical methods. Results In total, 12 patients received ifosfamide and cisplatin and 15 patients received ifosfamide alone, both ‘sandwiched’ with RT. The median follow up was 35.9 months (range 6–88). The 2 year DFS was similar in both the ifosfamide/cisplatin and ifosfamide groups (log-rank p = 0.16), so they were combined for analysis. 19 patients (70%) completed the protocol. As expected, stage 1 patients had a better 2-year DFS (18.75 ± 1.12 months; log-rank p = 0.008 when compared to stages 2, 3, 4). Also, in stages 2, 3 and 4 patients, the DFS was 15.81 ± 1.73 months. Grade 3/4 neutropenia, anemia and thrombocytopenia occurred in 18%, 4% and 4% of cycles, respectively. Conclusions Ifosfamide “sandwiched” with RT appears to be an efficacious regimen for surgically staged CS patients with no residual disease, even in patients with advanced stage. The addition of cisplatin to the regimen

  3. An Update of the Phase III Trial Comparing Whole Pelvic to Prostate Only Radiotherapy and Neoadjuvant to Adjuvant Total Androgen Suppression: Updated Analysis of RTOG 94-13, With Emphasis on Unexpected Hormone/Radiation Interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Lawton, Colleen A. DeSilvio, Michelle; Roach, Mack; Uhl, Valery; Kirsch, Robert; Seider, Michael; Rotman, Marvin; Jones, Christopher; Asbell, Sucha; Valicenti, Richard; Hahn, Stephen; Thomas, Charles R.

    2007-11-01

    Purpose: This trial was designed to test the hypothesis that total androgen suppression and whole pelvic radiotherapy (WPRT) followed by a prostate boost improves progression-free survival (PFS) by {>=}10% compared with total androgen suppression and prostate only RT (PORT). This trial was also designed to test the hypothesis that neoadjuvant hormonal therapy (NHT) followed by concurrent total androgen suppression and RT improves PFS compared with RT followed by adjuvant hormonal therapy (AHT) by {>=}10%. Methods and Materials: Patients eligible for the study included those with clinically localized adenocarcinoma of the prostate and an elevated prostate-specific antigen level of <100 ng/mL. Patients were stratified by T stage, prostate-specific antigen level, and Gleason score and were required to have an estimated risk of lymph node involvement of >15%. Results: The difference in overall survival for the four arms was statistically significant (p = 0.027). However, no statistically significant differences were found in PFS or overall survival between NHT vs. AHT and WPRT compared with PORT. A trend towards a difference was found in PFS (p = 0.065) in favor of the WPRT + NHT arm compared with the PORT + NHT and WPRT + AHT arms. Conclusions: Unexpected interactions appear to exist between the timing of hormonal therapy and radiation field size for this patient population. Four Phase III trials have demonstrated better outcomes when NHT was combined with RT compared with RT alone. The Radiation Therapy Oncology Group 9413 trial results have demonstrated that when NHT is used in conjunction with RT, WPRT yields a better PFS than does PORT. It also showed that when NHT + WPRT results in better overall survival than does WPRT + short-term AHT. Additional studies are warranted to determine whether the failure to demonstrate an advantage for NHT + WPRT compared with PORT + AHT is chance or, more likely, reflects a previously unrecognized biologic phenomenon.

  4. Prospective double-blinded study of abdominal-pelvic computed tomography guided by the region of tenderness: estimation of detection of acute pathology and radiation exposure reduction.

    PubMed

    Broder, Joshua S; Hollingsworth, Caroline L; Miller, Chad M; Meyer, Jennifer L; Paulson, Erik K

    2010-08-01

    Computed tomography (CT) is increasingly used for emergency department (ED) patients with abdominal tenderness. CT-related radiation contributes to 2% of US cancers. We hypothesized that in the ED patient with nontraumatic abdominal tenderness, the tender region accurately delineates acute pathology. z axis-restricted CT guided by this region could detect pathology while reducing radiation dose. This was a prospective double-blinded observational trial with informed consent and was institutional review board-approved and registered with ClinicalTrials.gov. A convenience sample of ED patients undergoing abdominal CT was recruited, excluding pregnant women, patients with altered mental status or abdominal sensation, preverbal children, and patients with abdominal trauma or surgery in the previous month. Before standard CT, physicians demarcated the tender region with labels invisible to radiologists on abdominal windows. Radiologists blinded to the tender region recorded cephalad-caudad limits of pathology on CT. Personnel blinded to pathology location recorded label positions on lung windows. Two hypothetical CT strategies were then explored: CT restricted to the tender region and CT from the cephalad skin marker to the lower caudad limit of the usual CT. The percentage of the pathologic region contained within the extent of the 2 hypothetical z axis restricted CTs was calculated. z axis reduction, which is linearly related to radiation reduction, from the restricted CTs was determined. One hundred two subjects were enrolled, 93 with complete data for analysis. Fifty-one subjects had acute pathology on CT. CT limited to the tender region would reduce z axis (radiation exposure) by 69% (95% confidence interval [CI] 60% to 78%). All acute pathology was included within these boundaries in 17 of the 51 abnormal cases (33%; 95% CI 22% to 47%). CT from the cephalad marker through the caudad abdomen and pelvis would reduce z axis (radiation exposure) by 38% (95% CI 29% to

  5. Pelvic Pain: Other FAQs

    MedlinePlus

    ... Publications Pelvic Pain: Other FAQs Skip sharing on social media links Share this: Page Content Basic information for topics, such as “What is it?” and “How many people are affected?” is available in the Condition Information ...

  6. Pelvic inflammatory disease

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Pelvic inflammatory disease is caused by infection of the upper female genital tract and is often asymptomatic. Pelvic inflammatory disease is the most common gynaecological reason for admission to hospital in the US, and is diagnosed in approximately 1% of women aged 16 to 45 years consulting their GP in England and Wales. Methods and outcomes We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical questions: How do different antimicrobial regimens compare when treating women with confirmed pelvic inflammatory disease? What are the effects of routine antibiotic prophylaxis to prevent pelvic inflammatory disease before intrauterine contraceptive device (IUD) insertion? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library, and other important databases up to September 2013 (Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically; please check our website for the most up to date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA), the European Medicines Agency (EMA), and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). Results We found 13 RCTs or systematic reviews of RCTs that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of evidence for interventions. Conclusions In this systematic review, we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: antibiotics (oral, parenteral, different durations, different regimens) and routine antibiotic prophylaxis (before intrauterine device insertion in women at high risk or low risk). PMID:24330771

  7. Pelvic inflammatory disease.

    PubMed

    Soper, David E

    2010-08-01

    Pelvic inflammatory disease (PID) is an infection-caused inflammatory continuum from the cervix to the peritoneal cavity. Most importantly, it is associated with fallopian tube inflammation, which can lead to infertility, ectopic pregnancy, and chronic pelvic pain. The microbial etiology is linked to sexually transmitted microorganisms, including Chlamydia trachomatis, Neisseria gonorrheae, Mycoplasma genitalium, and bacterial vaginosis-associated microorganisms, predominantly anaerobes. Pelvic pain and fever are commonly absent in women with confirmed PID. Clinicians should consider milder symptoms such as abnormal vaginal discharge, metrorrhagia, postcoital bleeding, and urinary frequency as potential symptoms associated with the disease, particularly in women at risk of sexually transmitted infection. The diagnosis of PID is based on the findings of lower genital tract inflammation associated with pelvic organ tenderness. The outpatient treatment of mild-to-moderate PID should include tolerated antibiotic regimens with activity against the commonly isolated microorganisms associated with PID and usually consists of an extended spectrum cephalosporin in conjunction with either doxycycline or azithromycin. Clinically severe PID should prompt hospitalization and imaging to rule out a tuboovarian abscess. Parenteral broad-spectrum antibiotic therapy with activity against a polymicrobial flora, particularly gram-negative aerobes and anaerobes, should be implemented. Screening for and treatment of Chlamydia infection can prevent PID.

  8. Pelvic inflammatory disease.

    PubMed

    Ross, Jonathan D C

    2013-12-11

    Pelvic inflammatory disease is caused by infection of the upper female genital tract and is often asymptomatic. Pelvic inflammatory disease is the most common gynaecological reason for admission to hospital in the US, and is diagnosed in approximately 1% of women aged 16 to 45 years consulting their GP in England and Wales. We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical questions: How do different antimicrobial regimens compare when treating women with confirmed pelvic inflammatory disease? What are the effects of routine antibiotic prophylaxis to prevent pelvic inflammatory disease before intrauterine contraceptive device (IUD) insertion? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library, and other important databases up to September 2013 (Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically; please check our website for the most up to date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA), the European Medicines Agency (EMA), and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). We found 13 RCTs or systematic reviews of RCTs that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of evidence for interventions. In this systematic review, we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: antibiotics (oral, parenteral, different durations, different regimens) and routine antibiotic prophylaxis (before intrauterine device insertion in women at high risk or low risk).

  9. Laparoscopic pelvic surgery for endometrial cancer.

    PubMed

    Tay, Eng-Hseon

    2009-02-01

    The traditional approach for the treatment of endometrial cancer by laparotomy is increasingly being replaced by laparoscopic surgery. The advantages of laparoscopy have been well-documented. Laparoscopy avoids the morbidity of a laparotomy, overcomes the limitations of vaginal hysterectomy, provides adequate pathological information for an accurate surgical staging and expedites the postoperative recovery of patients. This paper reports the outcome of a series of 50 consecutive cases of laparoscopic hysterectomy and pelvic lymphadenectomy for endometrial cancers that were performed by the author. The objective is to review the perioperative, postoperative experience and survival outcomes of patients with endometrial cancer managed by laparoscopic surgery performed by a single surgeon. The records of 50 consecutive patients with endometrial cancers from October 1995 to October 2007 treated by laparoscopic pelvic lymphadenectomy and laparoscopic hysterectomy (total and assisted) were retrospectively reviewed. Data on patients' attributes, endometrial cancers, surgical procedures, surgical complications and morbidity, perioperative experience, length of hospital stays and clinical outcome were analysed. Laparoscopic surgery was successful in all 50 patients and is clearly an option for the treatment of early endometrial cancer. Careful patient selection and surgical competency are instrumental in ensuring successful treatment.

  10. Comparing pre-operative stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) to post-operative whole brain radiation therapy (WBRT) for resectable brain metastases: a multi-institutional analysis.

    PubMed

    Patel, Kirtesh R; Burri, Stuart H; Boselli, Danielle; Symanowski, James T; Asher, Anthony L; Sumrall, Ashley; Fraser, Robert W; Press, Robert H; Zhong, Jim; Cassidy, Richard J; Olson, Jeffrey J; Curran, Walter J; Shu, Hui-Kuo G; Crocker, Ian R; Prabhu, Roshan S

    2017-02-01

    Pre-operative stereotactic radiosurgery (pre-SRS) has been shown as a viable treatment option for resectable brain metastases (BM). The aim of this study is to compare oncologic outcomes and toxicities for pre-SRS and post-operative WBRT (post-WBRT) for resectable BM. We reviewed records of consecutive patients who underwent resection of BM and either pre-SRS or post-WBRT between 2005 and 2013 at two institutions. Overall survival (OS) was calculated using the Kaplan-Meier method. Cumulative incidence was used for intracranial outcomes. Multivariate analysis (MVA) was performed using the Cox and Fine and Gray models, respectively. Overall, 102 patients underwent surgical resection of BM; 66 patients with 71 lesions received pre-SRS while 36 patients with 42 cavities received post-WBRT. Baseline characteristics were similar except for the pre-SRS cohort having more single lesions (65.2% vs. 38.9%, p = 0.001) and smaller median lesion volume (8.3 cc vs. 15.3 cc, p = 0.006). 1-year OS was similar between cohorts (58% vs. 56%, respectively) (p = 0.43). Intracranial outcomes were also similar (2-year outcomes, pre-SRS vs. post-WBRT): local recurrence: 24.5% vs. 25% (p = 0.81), distant brain failure (DBF): 53.2% vs. 45% (p = 0.66), and leptomeningeal disease (LMD) recurrence: 3.5% vs. 9.0% (p = 0.66). On MVA, radiation cohort was not independently associated with OS or any intracranial outcome. Crude rates of symptomatic radiation necrosis were 5.6 and 0%, respectively. OS and intracranial outcomes were similar for patients treated with pre-SRS or post-WBRT for resected BM. Pre-SRS is a viable alternative to post-WBRT for resected BM. Further confirmatory studies with neuro-cognitive outcomes comparing these two treatment paradigms are needed.

  11. [Pelvic floor muscle training and pelvic floor disorders in women].

    PubMed

    Thubert, T; Bakker, E; Fritel, X

    2015-05-01

    Our goal is to provide an update on the results of pelvic floor rehabilitation in the treatment of urinary incontinence and genital prolapse symptoms. Pelvic floor muscle training allows a reduction of urinary incontinence symptoms. Pelvic floor muscle contractions supervised by a healthcare professional allow cure in half cases of stress urinary incontinence. Viewing this contraction through biofeedback improves outcomes, but this effect could also be due by a more intensive and prolonged program with the physiotherapist. The place of electrostimulation remains unclear. The results obtained with vaginal cones are similar to pelvic floor muscle training with or without biofeedback or electrostimulation. It is not known whether pelvic floor muscle training has an effect after one year. In case of stress urinary incontinence, supervised pelvic floor muscle training avoids surgery in half of the cases at 1-year follow-up. Pelvic floor muscle training is the first-line treatment of post-partum urinary incontinence. Its preventive effect is uncertain. Pelvic floor muscle training may reduce the symptoms associated with genital prolapse. In conclusion, pelvic floor rehabilitation supervised by a physiotherapist is an effective short-term treatment to reduce the symptoms of urinary incontinence or pelvic organ prolapse.

  12. Acute anal toxicity after whole pelvic radiotherapy in patients with asymptomatic haemorrhoids: identification of dosimetric and patient factors.

    PubMed

    Jang, H; Baek, J G; Yoo, S-J

    2015-06-01

    Patients with asymptomatic haemorrhoids are known to be less tolerant of radiation doses lower than known tolerance doses. In the present study, the authors sought to identify the risk factors of acute haemorrhoid aggravation after whole pelvic radiotherapy (WPRT). The records of 33 patients with cervical, rectal or prostate cancer with asymptomatic haemorrhoids, which were confirmed by colonoscopy before the start of radiotherapy (RT), were reviewed. Acute anal symptoms, such as anal pain and bleeding, were observed up to 1 month after RT completion. Dosimetric and patient factors were analysed, and subgroup analyses were performed. The median induction dose for acute anal symptoms was 34.1 Gy (range, 28.8-50.4 Gy). Post-operative treatment intent showed more acute anal toxicity of patient factors (p = 0.04). In subgroup analysis, post-operative treatment intent and concurrent chemoradiotherapy were found to be related to acute anal symptoms (p < 0.01). Of the dosimetric factors, V10 tended to be related to acute anal symptoms (p = 0.08). This study indicates that asymptomatic haemorrhoid may deteriorate after low-dose radiation and that patient factors, such as treatment intent and concurrent chemotherapy, probably influence anal toxicity. In patients with asymptomatic haemorrhoids, WPRT requires careful dosimetry and clinical attention. The tolerance of anal canal tends to be ignored in patients with pelvic cancer who are undergoing WPRT. However, patients with asymptomatic haemorrhoids may be troubled by low radiation doses, and further studies are required.

  13. Postoperative astigmatism.

    PubMed

    Swinger, C A

    1987-01-01

    With the numerous significant advances in surgical methodology--e.g., microinstrumentation, the operating microscope, the surgical keratometer, and intraocular lenses--that have been developed over the past two decades, both surgeons and patients have become increasingly aware of the final optic result of any surgical intervention. This is especially so since the development of refractive surgery, where good uncorrected vision is frequently the final arbiter of success. We have progressed to the stage where the optic manipulation of the cornea, whether intentional or otherwise, can be understood in terms of a number of variables. These include the preparation and closure of the surgical wound, the choice of suture material, and both intraoperative and postoperative manipulations. Where these have failed and postoperative astigmatism still occurs, a number of surgical procedures are available to reduce the astigmatic error to an acceptable level.

  14. Residual pelvic rotation after single-event multilevel surgery in spastic hemiplegia.

    PubMed

    Chung, C Y; Lee, S H; Choi, I H; Cho, T-J; Yoo, W J; Park, M S

    2008-09-01

    Our aim in this retrospective study of 52 children with spastic hemiplegia was to determine the factors which affected the amount of residual pelvic rotation after single-event multilevel surgery. The patients were divided into two groups, those who had undergone femoral derotation osteotomy and those who had not. Pelvic rotation improved significantly after surgery in the femoral osteotomy group (p < 0.001) but not in the non-femoral osteotomy group. Multiple regressions identified the following three independent variables, which significantly affected residual pelvic rotation: the performance of femoral derotation osteotomy (p = 0.049), the pre-operative pelvic rotation (p = 0.003) and the post-operative internal rotation of the hip (p = 0.001). We concluded that there is a decrease in the amount of pelvic rotation after single-event multilevel surgery with femoral derotation osteotomy. However, some residual rotation may persist when patients have severe rotation before surgery.

  15. Successful management of pelvic bleeding after caesarean hysterectomy by means of Foley catheter-condom balloon tamponade

    PubMed Central

    Atilgan, Remzi; Aslan, Kubat; Can, Behzat; Sapmaz, Ekrem

    2014-01-01

    In this case report, we describe a 28-year-old woman with multipar gestation who developed postcaesarean atonia and severe pelvic haemorrhage which continued in spite of peripartum hysterectomy. A balloon tamponade tool was formed with Foley catheter and a condom, and was inserted into the pelvis through the vaginal cuff. The tampon was inflated up to 2200 mL and the pelvic tamponade was applied and bleeding was controlled. On the patient's incapability of urination, the volume of condom was decreased to 1800 mL and urination was achieved. seventy-two h postoperatively the Foley catheter-condom was removed through an abdominal incision. Pelvic bleeding ceased. After monitoring for a week, no postoperative fever, infection, pelvic abscess and haematoma were observed. Use of Foley catheter-condom as a pelvis pressure tampon tool may be a simple and effective method which can be easily used to control pelvic bleeding. PMID:24827667

  16. Successful management of pelvic bleeding after caesarean hysterectomy by means of Foley catheter-condom balloon tamponade.

    PubMed

    Atilgan, Remzi; Aslan, Kubat; Can, Behzat; Sapmaz, Ekrem

    2014-05-14

    In this case report, we describe a 28-year-old woman with multipar gestation who developed postcaesarean atonia and severe pelvic haemorrhage which continued in spite of peripartum hysterectomy. A balloon tamponade tool was formed with Foley catheter and a condom, and was inserted into the pelvis through the vaginal cuff. The tampon was inflated up to 2200 mL and the pelvic tamponade was applied and bleeding was controlled. On the patient's incapability of urination, the volume of condom was decreased to 1800 mL and urination was achieved. seventy-two h postoperatively the Foley catheter-condom was removed through an abdominal incision. Pelvic bleeding ceased. After monitoring for a week, no postoperative fever, infection, pelvic abscess and haematoma were observed. Use of Foley catheter-condom as a pelvis pressure tampon tool may be a simple and effective method which can be easily used to control pelvic bleeding. 2014 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd.

  17. [Pelvic inflammatory disease].

    PubMed

    Hoof, Kathrin

    2007-07-01

    Pelvic inflammatory disease and upper genital tract infection describe inflammatory changes in the upper female genital tract of any combination: endometritis, salpingitis, tubo-ovarian abscess and peritonitis in the small pelvis. In most cases the infection is ascending, Chlamydia trachomatis and Neisseria gonorrhoeae are common with increasing incidence. The spectrum ranges from subclinical, asymptomatic infection to severe, life-threatening illness. Antibiotic treatment should be initiated promptly and must cover a broad spectrum of germs. Surgical treatment is necessary in cases of failure of antibiotic treatment and in cases with persisting symptoms after antibiotic treatment. Pelvic inflammatory diseases are one of the main causes of tubal sterility, ectopic pregnancies and chronic abdominal pain.

  18. Role of Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy with Volumetric-Modulated Arcs and High-Intensity Photon Beams for the Treatment of Abdomino-Pelvic Lymph-Node Metastases.

    PubMed

    Franzese, Ciro; Cozzi, Luca; Franceschini, Davide; D'Agostino, Giuseppe; Comito, Tiziana; De Rose, Fiorenza; Navarria, Pierina; Mancosu, Pietro; Tomatis, Stefano; Fogliata, Antonella; Scorsetti, Marta

    2016-08-08

    To study clinical outcome for oligometastatic patients (abdominal lymph-node metastases) treated with stereotactic body radiation therapy. Seventy-one patients were studied retrospectively. Dose prescription was 45 Gy in six fractions. Clinical outcome was assessed with actuarial analysis. The median follow-up was 1.5 years; 45 patients (63.3%) had solitary metastasis, and 26 (36.6%) had multiple lesions. Local control was achieved in 97.5% with a 1-year actuarial rate of 83%. Two-year progression-free survival was 63.1%, and the overall survival was 76.9%. Two patients (3%) developed grade 2 gastro-enteric toxicity. The treatment provided adequate clinical response in the management of oligometastatic cases.

  19. Assessment of peri- and postoperative complications and Karnofsky-performance status in head and neck cancer patients after radiation or chemoradiation that underwent surgery with regional or free-flap reconstruction for salvage, palliation, or to improve function

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Surgery after (chemo)radiation (RCTX/RTX) is felt to be plagued with a high incidence of wound healing complications reported to be as high as 70%. The additional use of vascularized flaps may help to decrease this high rate of complications. Therefore, we examined within a retrospective single-institutional study the peri--and postoperative complications in patients who underwent surgery for salvage, palliation or functional rehabilitation after (chemo)radiation with regional and free flaps. As a second study end point the Karnofsky performance status (KPS) was determined preoperatively and 3 months postoperatively to assess the impact of such extensive procedures on the overall performance status of this heavily pretreated patient population. Findings 21 patients were treated between 2005 and 2010 in a single institution (17 male, 4 female) for salvage (10/21), palliation (4/21), or functional rehabilitation (7/21). Overall 23 flaps were performed of which 8 were free flaps. Major recipient site complications were observed in only 4 pts. (19%) (1 postoperative haemorrhage, 1 partial flap loss, 2 fistulas) and major donor site complications in 1 pt (wound dehiscence). Also 2 minor donor site complications were observed. The overall complication rate was 33%. There was no free flap loss. Assessment of pre- and postoperative KPS revealed improvement in 13 out of 21 patients (62%). A decline of KPS was noted in only one patient. Conclusions We conclude that within this (chemo)radiated patient population surgical interventions for salvage, palliation or improve function can be safely performed once vascularised grafts are used. PMID:21896171

  20. Acetabular distraction: an alternative approach to pelvic discontinuity in failed total hip replacement.

    PubMed

    Brown, N M; Hellman, M; Haughom, B H; Shah, R P; Sporer, S M; Paprosky, W G

    2014-11-01

    A pelvic discontinuity occurs when the superior and inferior parts of the hemi-pelvis are no longer connected, which is difficult to manage when associated with a failed total hip replacement. Chronic pelvic discontinuity is found in 0.9% to 2.1% of hip revision cases with risk factors including severe pelvic bone loss, female gender, prior pelvic radiation and rheumatoid arthritis. Common treatment options include: pelvic plating with allograft, cage reconstruction, custom triflange implants, and porous tantalum implants with modular augments. The optimal technique is dependent upon the degree of the discontinuity, the amount of available bone stock and the likelihood of achieving stable healing between the two segments. A method of treating pelvic discontinuity using porous tantalum components with a distraction technique that achieves both initial stability and subsequent long-term biological fixation is described.

  1. Pelvic Fasciae in Urology

    PubMed Central

    Raychaudhuri, B; Cahill, D

    2008-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Despite the vast literature on pelvic fascia, there is confusion over the periprostatic structures and their nomenclature, including their orientation, the neurovascular bundles and the existence of the prostatic ‘capsule’. In this review, we seek to clarify some of these issues. MATERIALS AND METHODS Review of published medical literature relating to the anatomy of the pelvic fascia including a Pubmed search using the terms – pelvic fascia, Denonvilliers' fascia, prostate capsule, neurovascular bundle of Walsh, pubo-prostatic ligament and the detrusor apron. CONCLUSIONS The findings of the study were as follows: The ‘capsule’ of the prostate does not exist. Rather, the fibromuscular band surrounding the prostate forms an integral part of the gland.The prostate is surrounded by fascial structures – anteriorly/anterolaterally by the prostatic fascia and posteriorly by the Denonvilliers' fascia. Laterally, the prostatic fascia merges with the endopelvic fascia.The posterior longitudinal fascia of the detrusor comprises a ‘posterior layer’ of the detrusor apron, extending from the bladder neck to the prostate base.The neurovascular structures tend to be located posterolaterally, but may not always form a bundle. A significant proportion of fibres may lie away from the main nerve structures, along the lateral/posterior aspects of the prostate. PMID:18828961

  2. Pelvic inflammatory disease

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    Introduction Pelvic inflammatory disease is caused by infection of the upper female genital tract and is often asymptomatic. Pelvic inflammatory disease is the most common gynaecological reason for admission to hospital in the USA and is diagnosed in almost 2% of women aged 16 to 45 years consulting their GP in England and Wales. Methods and outcomes We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical questions: What are the effects of empirical treatment compared with treatment delayed until the results of microbiological investigations are known? How do different antimicrobial regimens compare? What are the effects of routine antibiotic prophylaxis to prevent pelvic inflammatory disease before intrauterine contraceptive device (IUD) insertion? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library, and other important databases up to May 2007 (Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically; please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). Results We found nine systematic reviews, RCTs, or observational studies that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of evidence for interventions. Conclusions In this systematic review, we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: antibiotics (oral, parenteral, empirical treatment, treatment guided by test results, different durations, outpatient, inpatient), and routine antibiotic prophylaxis (before intrauterine device insertion in women at high risk or low risk). PMID:19450319

  3. [Postoperative pain.].

    PubMed

    Bergmann, H

    1987-07-01

    A short survey about the different methods available for producing postoperative analgesia is given, the goal being to make it clear to the clinician that there are quite a number of techniques to be used although the everyday clinical practice often sticks to simple and not too effective methods of pain treatment following surgery. Initially presenting short informations about the neurophysiology of pain and the pathogenesis and causes of postoperative pain two main groups of producing analgesia are then discussed.Thefirst group deals with the systemic use of analgesics be it nonnarcotic analgesic antipyretics or narcotic analgesics (opioids). As for the first subgroup the peripheral action of these drugs (metamizol, acetylsalicylic acid, paracetamol) is brought about by blocking the synthesis of prostaglandins. These substances can only be used for very moderate postoperative pain f.i. following head and neck surgery. The strong acting opioids belong to the second subgroup. Recent informations on receptor sites in the brain and cord and the subgrouping of the receptors throws new light on the understanding of the different effects of these drugs and on the pathomechanisms of agonistic, antagonistic and mixed activities. The clinically used opioids then are mentioned (morphine, fentanyl, methadon, pethidin, piritramide, tilidin, buprenorphin and pentazocine) and dosage, duration of action, antagonisms and untoward side effects are presented. Stress is laid on the recent development of patient-controlled analgesia with all its advantages. Thesecond main group of methods for postoperative analgesia consists of regional anesthesia techniques as there are brachial plexus block, intercostal block and the continuous epidural analgesia using both local anesthetics and spinal opioids. The brachial plexus block in continuous form is absolutely able to prevent pain after operations in the shoulder-arm-region and can be prolonged even for weeks using catheter techniques. The

  4. Triple pelvic osteotomy in the treatment of hip dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Vukasinović, Zoran; Spasovski, Dusko; Zivković, Zorica; Slavković, Nemanja; Cerović, Sofija

    2009-01-01

    Insufficient femoral head coverage is found in a variety of diseases, with acetabular dysplasia as the most frequent disorder and triple pelvic osteotomy as the most recently introduced surgical treatment. This study analyses pre- and postoperative pathoanatomic characteristics of triple in comparison to Salter and Chiari osteotomies, with a logistic regression analysis of outcome predictor and effect explanator factors in relation to the chosen type of operation. The study involved 136 adolescents treated with Salter and Chiari osteotomies or a triple pelvic osteotomy at the Institute of Orthopaedic Surgery "Banjica" in Belgrade. The patients were between 10-20 years old at the time of operation. We collected and analyzed data from all the patients: illness history, operative parameters, preoperative and postoperative pathoanatomic data. The data was statistically processed using the statistical software SPSS, defining standard descriptive values, and by using the appropriate tests of analytic statistics: t-test for dependent and independent variables, chi2-test, Fisher's exact test, Wilcoxon's test, parameter correlation, one-way ANOVA, multi-factorial ANOVA and logistic regression, according to the type of the analyzed data and the conditions under which the statistical methods were applied. The average CE angle after triple pelvic osteotomy was 43.5 degrees, more improved than after the Salter osteotomy (33.0 degrees) and Chiari osteotomy (31.4 degrees) (F = 16.822; p < 0.01). Postoperative spherical congruence was also more frequent after the triple osteotomy than after the other two types of operations, and with a high significance. Preoperative painful discomfort was found to be a valid predictor of indications for the triple osteotomy over both Chiari and Salter osteotomies. The valid explanators of effect for the triple osteotomy are: postoperative joint congruence (compared to the Chiari osteotomy) and increase in joint coverage (compared to Salter

  5. Neurobiological Mechanisms of Pelvic Pain

    PubMed Central

    Leone Roberti Maggiore, Umberto; Candiani, Massimo

    2014-01-01

    Pelvic pain is a common condition which significantly deteriorates health-related quality of life. The most commonly identified causes of pain in the pelvic region are gynaecologic, urologic, gastrointestinal, neurological, and musculoskeletal. However, in up to 33% of patients the source of this symptom is not identified, frustrating both patients and health-care professionals. Pelvic pain may involve both the somatic and visceral systems, making the differential diagnosing challenging. This paper aimed to review the mechanisms involved in pelvic pain perception by analyzing the neural plasticity and molecules which are involved in these complex circuits. PMID:25110704

  6. Musculoskeletal etiologies of pelvic pain.

    PubMed

    Prather, Heidi; Camacho-Soto, Alejandra

    2014-09-01

    Several musculoskeletal diagnoses are frequently concomitant with pelvic floor pathology and pain. The definition of pelvic pain itself often depends on the medical specialist evaluating the patient. Because there is variability among disorders associated with pelvic pain, patients may seek treatment for extended periods as various treatment options are attempted. Further, health care providers should recognize that there may not be a single source of dysfunction. This article discusses the musculoskeletal disorders of the pelvic girdle (structures within the bony pelvis) and their association with lumbar spine and hip disorders.

  7. Cefotaxime Treatment of Pelvic Inflammatory Disease

    PubMed Central

    Monson, Thomas P.; Miller, Timothy T.; Nolan, Charles M.

    1981-01-01

    We studied cefotaxime in the treatment of gonococcal and nongonococcal pelvic inflammatory disease. Cefotaxime was uniformly effective against gonococcal pelvic inflammatory disease. However, 4 of 11 patients with nongonococcal pelvic inflammatory disease had a suboptimal response. PMID:6275789

  8. Can I prevent Pelvic Organ Prolapse

    MedlinePlus

    ... That Answers to FAQs Learn the Terms Glossary Pelvic Floor Dialogues Printable PDFs on PFDs Patient Fact Sheets ... or retrain the nerves and muscles of the pelvic floor. Regular daily exercising of the pelvic muscles can ...

  9. Predictors of late bowel toxicity using three different methods of contouring in patients undergoing post-operative radiation for cervical cancer.

    PubMed

    Chopra, Supriya; Krishnatry, Rahul; Dora, Tapas; Kannan, Sadhna; Thomas, Biji; Sonawone, Supriya; Engineer, Reena; Paul, Siji; Phurailatpam, Reena; Mahantshetty, Umesh; Shrivastava, Shyam

    2015-01-01

    This study investigates the correlation between dose-volume histogram derived from three bowel contouring methods and late toxicity in patients undergoing post-operative radiation therapy (PORT) for cervical cancer. From June 2010 to May 2013, 103 patients undergoing PORT were included. Three different contouring methods were used: (a) individual small bowel (SB) and large bowel (LB) loops, (b) total bowel (TB; including SB and LB) and (c) peritoneal cavity (PC). The volume of SB, LB, TB and PC receiving 15, 30 and 40 Gy was calculated. Acute and late bowel toxicities were scored using Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse events v. 3.0. Receiver operating characteristic curve identified thresholds predicting late toxicity with the highest specificity. All data were dichotomized across these thresholds. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed using SPSS(®) v. 20 (IBM Corporation, Armonk, NY; formerly SPSS Inc., Chicago, IL). On univariate analysis, V30 PC ≥ 900 cm(3) (p = 0.01), V40 PC ≥ 750 cm(3) (p = 0.03) and V40 TB ≥ 280 cm(3) (p = 0.03) and use of concurrent chemotherapy (p = 0.03) predicted grade ≥II acute toxicity. On multivariate analysis, use of concurrent chemotherapy [odds ratio (OR) 3.5, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.1-11.1, p = 0.03] and V30 PC ≥ 900 cm(3) (OR 2.3, 95% CI 1-5.5, p = 0.05) predicted acute grade ≥II toxicity. On univariate analysis for late toxicity, SB (V30 ≥ 190 cm(3), p = 0.009; V40 ≥ 150 cm(3), p = 0.03), LB (V15 ≥ 250 cm(3), p = 0.04), V40 PC (V40 ≥ 750 cm(3), p = 0.001) and presence of acute grade ≥III toxicity (p = 0.006), treatment technique (three-dimensional conformal radiation or intensity modulated radiotherapy, p = 0.02) predicted more than or equal to grade ll late bowel toxicity. On multivariate analysis, only body mass index ≥25 kg m(-2) (OR 7.3, 95% CI 1.6-31.6, p = 0.008) and

  10. Predictors of late bowel toxicity using three different methods of contouring in patients undergoing post-operative radiation for cervical cancer

    PubMed Central

    Krishnatry, Rahul; Dora, Tapas; Kannan, Sadhna; Thomas, Biji; Sonawone, Supriya; Engineer, Reena; Paul, Siji; Phurailatpam, Reena; Mahantshetty, Umesh; Shrivastava, Shyam

    2015-01-01

    Objective: This study investigates the correlation between dose–volume histogram derived from three bowel contouring methods and late toxicity in patients undergoing post-operative radiation therapy (PORT) for cervical cancer. Methods: From June 2010 to May 2013, 103 patients undergoing PORT were included. Three different contouring methods were used: (a) individual small bowel (SB) and large bowel (LB) loops, (b) total bowel (TB; including SB and LB) and (c) peritoneal cavity (PC). The volume of SB, LB, TB and PC receiving 15, 30 and 40 Gy was calculated. Acute and late bowel toxicities were scored using Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse events v. 3.0. Receiver operating characteristic curve identified thresholds predicting late toxicity with the highest specificity. All data were dichotomized across these thresholds. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed using SPSS® v. 20 (IBM Corporation, Armonk, NY; formerly SPSS Inc., Chicago, IL). Results: On univariate analysis, V30 PC ≥ 900 cm3 (p = 0.01), V40 PC ≥ 750 cm3 (p = 0.03) and V40 TB ≥ 280 cm3 (p = 0.03) and use of concurrent chemotherapy (p = 0.03) predicted grade ≥II acute toxicity. On multivariate analysis, use of concurrent chemotherapy [odds ratio (OR) 3.5, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.1–11.1, p = 0.03] and V30 PC ≥ 900 cm3 (OR 2.3, 95% CI 1–5.5, p = 0.05) predicted acute grade ≥II toxicity. On univariate analysis for late toxicity, SB (V30 ≥ 190 cm3, p = 0.009; V40 ≥ 150 cm3, p = 0.03), LB (V15 ≥ 250 cm3, p = 0.04), V40 PC (V40 ≥ 750 cm3, p = 0.001) and presence of acute grade ≥III toxicity (p = 0.006), treatment technique (three-dimensional conformal radiation or intensity modulated radiotherapy, p = 0.02) predicted more than or equal to grade ll late bowel toxicity. On multivariate analysis, only body mass index ≥25 kg m−2 (OR 7.3, 95% CI 1.6–31

  11. Radiation Proctopathy

    PubMed Central

    Grodsky, Marc B.; Sidani, Shafik M.

    2015-01-01

    Radiation therapy is a widely utilized treatment modality for pelvic malignancies, including prostate cancer, rectal cancer, and cervical cancer. Given its fixed position in the pelvis, the rectum is at a high risk for injury secondary to ionizing radiation. Despite advances made in radiation science, up to 75% of the patients will suffer from acute radiation proctitis and up to 20% may experience chronic symptoms. Symptoms can be variable and include diarrhea, bleeding, incontinence, and fistulization. A multitude of treatment options exist. This article summarizes the latest knowledge relating to radiation proctopathy focusing on the vast array of treatment options. PMID:26034407

  12. Magnetic Resonance of Pelvic and Gastrointestinal Emergencies.

    PubMed

    Wongwaisayawan, Sirote; Kaewlai, Rathachai; Dattwyler, Matthew; Abujudeh, Hani H; Singh, Ajay K

    2016-05-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging is gaining increased acceptance in the emergency setting despite the continued dominance of computed tomography. MR has the advantages of more precise tissue characterization, superior soft tissue contrast, and a lack of ionizing radiation. Traditional barriers to emergent MR are being overcome by streamlined imaging protocols and newer rapid-acquisition sequences. As the utilization of MR imaging in the emergency department increases, a strong working knowledge of the MR appearance of the most commonly encountered abdominopelvic pathologies is essential. In this article, MR imaging protocols and findings of acute pelvic, scrotal, and gastrointestinal pathologies are discussed. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Total pelvic exenteration for the treatment of advanced primary or recurrent pelvic neoplasia.

    PubMed

    Carballo, Laura; Enríquez-Navascués, José M; Saralegui, Yolanda; Placer, Carlos; Timoteo, Ander; Borda, Nerea; Carrillo, Alberto; Sainz-Lete, Aitor

    2015-03-01

    Complete resection with clear margins in locally advanced pelvic visceral tumors, primary or recurrent, occasionally requires total pelvic exenteration (TPE). We reviewed the results of EFA in 34 consecutive patients operated on between June 2006 and December 2013. Median age was 62 (40-82) years; 24 (70%) were male. The tumor origin most frequent was advanced primary rectal tumor (APRT), with 19 cases (55.9%) and most common type of exenteration was supraelevator (61.8%). R₀ resection was achieved in 24 (70.6%) patients and in 16 (85%) of the APRT. Fifteen (79%) patients had pT₄ APRT, and 4 (20%) pN +. Reconstruction of the bowel and bladder was performed with two stomas in 17 cases (50%), colorectal anastomosis and Bricker in 11 (32.3%) and wet double barreled colostomy in 6 (17.6%). There was no postoperative mortality; 23 (67,5%) patients had complications, and 5 (14.6%) required a postoperative reoperation to solve them. Median follow-up was 23 (13-45) months. Overall survival (OS) and disease free survival (DFS) at 2 years were 67% and 58% respectively, and the median OS and DFS was 59 months (95% CI 26-110) and 39 months (95% CI 14-64), respectively. The DFS of R₀ was significantly better (p=0.003) than R₁. TPE is a potentially curative procedure for advanced pelvic visceral malignancies with similar morbi-mortality than other extended excisional surgery. Copyright © 2014 AEC. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  14. Robotic single-site pelvic lymphadenectomy.

    PubMed

    Tateo, Saverio; Nozza, Arrigo; Del Pezzo, Chiara; Mereu, Liliana

    2014-09-01

    To examine the feasibility of performing pelvic lymphadenectomy with robotic single site approach. Recent papers described the feasibility of robotic-single site hysterectomy [1-3] for benign and malign pathologies but only with the development of new single site 5mm instruments as the bipolar forceps, robotic single site platform can be safely utilized also for lymphadenectomy. A 65 year-old, multiparous patient with a body mass index of 22.5 and diagnosed with well differentiated adenocarcinoma of the endometrium underwent a robotic single-site peritoneal washing, total hysterectomy, bilateral adnexectomy and pelvic lymphadenectomy. The procedure was performed using the da Vinci Si Surgical System (Intuitive Surgical, Sunnyvale, CA) through a single 2,5 cm umbilical incision, with a multi-channel system and two single site robotic 5mm instruments. A 3-dimensional, HD 8.5mm endoscope and a 5mm accessory instrument were also utilized. Type I lymphonodes dissection for external iliac and obturator regions was performed [4]. Total operative time was 210 min; incision, trocar placement and docking time occurring in 12 min. Total console time was 183 min, estimated blood loss was 50 ml, no intra-operative or post-operative complications occurred. Hospital discharge occurred on post operative day 2 and total number of lymphnodes removed was 33. Difficulties in term of instrument's clashing and awkward motions have been encountered. Robotic single-site pelvic lymphadenectomy using bipolar forceps and monopolar hook is feasible. New developments are needed to improve surgical ergonomics and additional studies should be performed to explore possible benefits of this procedure. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Laparoscopy for pelvic floor disorders.

    PubMed

    Van Geluwe, B; Wolthuis, A; D'Hoore, A

    2014-02-01

    Surgical treatment of pelvic floor disorders has significantly evolved during the last decade, with increasing understanding of anatomy, pathophysiology and the minimally-invasive 'revolution' of laparoscopic surgery. Laparoscopic pelvic floor repair requires a thorough knowledge of pelvic floor anatomy and its supportive components before repair of defective anatomy is possible. Several surgical procedures have been introduced and applied to treat rectal prolapse syndromes. Transabdominal procedures include a variety of rectopexies with the use of sutures or prosthesis and with or without resection of redundant sigmoid colon. Unfortunately there is lack of one generally accepted standard treatment technique. This article will focus on recent advances in the management of pelvic floor disorders affecting defecation, with a brief overview of contemporary concepts in pelvic floor anatomy and different laparoscopic treatment options.

  16. Dynamic sagittal imbalance of the spine in degenerative flat back: significance of pelvic tilt in surgical treatment.

    PubMed

    Lee, C S; Lee, C K; Kim, Y T; Hong, Y M; Yoo, J H

    2001-09-15

    A retrospective study of 26 patients with degenerative flat back treated with corrective osteotomy. To analyze dynamic sagittal imbalance and to elucidate the cause of postoperative persistent stooping in degenerative flat back. Sagittal spinal imbalance in degenerative flat back was more evident on walking, suggesting its dynamic nature. The most puzzling complication in its surgical treatment was postoperative persistent stooping. This study analyzed 26 surgically treated patients with preoperative gait analysis. Patients were divided into two groups according to postoperative improvement in stooping: Group 1 with marked improvement in stooping and Group 2 with persistent stooping. Various radiographic and gait parameters were compared between the two groups. Comparison of radiographic parameters, representing the static status of the spine, did not indicate any clue to the mechanism for persistent stooping. However, comparison of gait parameters, representing the dynamic status of the spine, revealed meaningful differences between the two groups. Among various gait parameters compared, pelvic tilt seemed to be the most important clue. Patients in Group 1 showed posterior pelvic tilt, whereas those in Group 2 showed marked anterior pelvic tilt. Degenerative flat back could be classified into two types based on pelvic position during walking: one with posterior pelvic tilt and the other with marked anterior pelvic tilt. In the former type, corrective surgery improved the stooping. In the latter, corrective surgery was ineffective, resulting in postoperative persistent stooping.

  17. Postoperative hyperkalemia.

    PubMed

    Ayach, Taha; Nappo, Robert W; Paugh-Miller, Jennifer L; Ross, Edward A

    2015-03-01

    Hyperkalemia occurs frequently in hospitalized patients and is of particular concern for those who have undergone surgery, with postoperative care provided by clinicians of many disciplines. This review describes the normal physiology and how multiple perioperative factors can disrupt potassium homeostasis and lead to severe elevations in plasma potassium concentration. The pathophysiologic basis of diverse causes of hyperkalemia was used to broadly classify etiologies into those with altered potassium distribution (e.g. increased potassium release from cells or other transcellular shifts), reduced urinary excretion (e.g. reduced sodium delivery, volume depletion, and hypoaldosteronism), or an exogenous potassium load (e.g. blood transfusions). Surgical conditions of particular concern involve: rhabdomyolysis from malpositioning, trauma or medications; bariatric surgery; vascular procedures with tissue ischemia; acidosis; hypovolemia; and volume or blood product resuscitation. Certain acute conditions and chronic co-morbidities present particular risk. These include chronic kidney disease, diabetes mellitus, many outpatient preoperative medications (e.g. beta blockers, salt substitutes), and inpatient agents (e.g. succinylcholine, hyperosmolar volume expanders). Clinicians need to be aware of these pathophysiologic mechanisms for developing perioperative hyperkalemia as many of the risks can be minimized or avoided.

  18. Pathways of extrapelvic spread of pelvic disease: imaging findings.

    PubMed

    Tan, Cher Heng; Vikram, Raghunandan; Boonsirikamchai, Piyaporn; Faria, Silvana C; Charnsangavej, Chusilp; Bhosale, Priya R

    2011-01-01

    The complex extraperitoneal anatomy of the pelvis includes various outlets for the transit of organs and neurovascular structures to the rest of the body. These outlets include the greater sciatic foramen, lesser sciatic foramen, inguinal canal, femoral triangle, obturator canal, anal and genitourinary hiatuses of the pelvic floor, prevesical space, and iliopsoas compartment. All of these structures serve as conduits for the dissemination of malignant and benign inflammatory diseases from the pelvic cavity and into the soft-tissue structures of the abdominal wall, buttocks, and upper thigh. Knowledge of the pelvic anatomy is crucial to understand these patterns of disease spread. Cross-sectional imaging provides important anatomic information and depicts the extent of disease and its involvement of surrounding extrapelvic structures, information that is important for planning surgery and radiation therapy. RSNA, 2011

  19. CT-guided Perineural Injections for Chronic Pelvic Pain.

    PubMed

    Wadhwa, Vibhor; Scott, Kelly M; Rozen, Shai; Starr, Adam J; Chhabra, Avneesh

    2016-01-01

    Chronic pelvic pain is a disabling condition that affects a large number of men and women. It may occur after a known inciting event, or it could be idiopathic. A common cause of pelvic pain syndrome is neuropathy of the pelvic nerves, including the femoral and genitofemoral nerves, ilioinguinal and iliohypogastric nerves, pudendal nerve, obturator nerve, lateral and posterior femoral cutaneous nerves, inferior cluneal nerves, inferior rectal nerve, sciatic nerve, superior gluteal nerve, and the spinal nerve roots. Pelvic neuropathy may result from entrapment, trauma, inflammation, or compression or may be iatrogenic, secondary to surgical procedures. Imaging-guided nerve blocks can be used for diagnostic and therapeutic management of pelvic neuropathies. Ultrasonography (US)-guided injections are useful for superficial locations; however, there can be limitations with US, such as its operator dependence, the required skill, and the difficulty in depicting various superficial and deep pelvic nerves. Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging-guided injections are radiation free and lead to easy depiction of the nerve because of the superior soft-tissue contrast; although the expense, the required skill, and the limited availability of MR imaging are major hindrances to its widespread use for this purpose. Computed tomography (CT)-guided injections are becoming popular because of the wide availability of CT scanners, the lower cost, and the shorter amount of time required to perform these injections. This article outlines the technique of perineural injection of major pelvic nerves, illustrates the different target sites with representative case examples, and discusses the pitfalls. (©)RSNA, 2016.

  20. Pelvic radiotherapy and sexual function in women

    PubMed Central

    Froeding, Ligita Paskeviciute

    2015-01-01

    Background During the past decade there has been considerable progress in developing new radiation methods for cancer treatment. Pelvic radiotherapy constitutes the primary or (neo) adjuvant treatment of many pelvic cancers e.g., locally advanced cervical and rectal cancer. There is an increasing focus on late effects and an increasing awareness that patient reported outcomes (PROs) i.e., patient assessment of physical, social, psychological, and sexual functioning provides the most valid information on the effects of cancer treatment. Following cure of cancer allow survivors focus on quality of life (QOL) issues; sexual functioning has proved to be one of the most important aspects of concern in long-term survivors. Methods An updated literature search in PubMed was performed on pelvic radiotherapy and female sexual functioning/dysfunction. Studies on gynaecological, urological and gastrointestinal cancers were included. The focus was on the period from 2010 to 2014, on studies using PROs, on potential randomized controlled trials (RCTs) where female sexual dysfunction (FSD) at least constituted a secondary outcome, and on studies reporting from modern radiotherapy modalities. Results The literature search revealed a few RCTs with FSD evaluated as a PRO and being a secondary outcome measure in endometrial and in rectal cancer patients. Very limited information could be extracted regarding FSD in bladder, vulva, and anal cancer patients. The literature before and after 2010 confirms that pelvic radiotherapy, independent on modality, increases the risk significantly for FSD both compared to data from age-matched healthy control women and compared to data on patients treated by surgery only. There was only very limited data available on modern radiotherapy modalities. These are awaited during the next five years. Several newer studies confirm that health care professionals are still reluctant to discuss treatment induced sexual dysfunction with patients. Conclusions

  1. Iliosacral screw fixation of the unstable pelvic ring injuries.

    PubMed

    Rysavý, M; Pavelka, T; Khayarin, M; Dzupa, V

    2010-06-01

    To report on the early results and possible complications of iliosacral screw fixation in the management of unstable pelvic ring injuries. One hundred and two unstable pelvic ring injuries were treated using iliosacral screw fixation for posterior pelvic ring disruptions. Closed manipulative reductions of the posterior lesion were attempted for all patients. Open reductions were used in the minority of patients with unsatisfactory closed reductions as assessed fluoroscopically at the time of surgery. Anterior fixations were by means of open reduction in 62 patients and by external fixation in 14 patients, and by screws in 7 patients. Twenty patients had no anterior fixation. Plain anteroposterior, inlet and outlet radiographs of the pelvis were obtained postoperatively at six weeks, three months, six months and one year. A pelvic computed tomography scan was performed postoperatively in those patients where residual displacement or screw misplacement was suspected. Complications were recorded. One patient died 31 days after the trauma due to pneumonia and one died 9 months after the surgery after a fall from a height in a second suicidal attempt. There were two posterior pelvic infections and one anterior pelvic infection. Screw misplacement occurred in seven cases. In six cases a misplaced screw produced transient L5 neuroapraxia. There was no fixation failure requiring revision surgery. There was one case of injury to the superior gluteal artery. Unstable pelvic ring disruptions are severe injuries, associated with a high rate of morbidity and mortality. Pelvic fractures can be treated by variety of methods. Treatment with traction and pelvic slings does not offer accurate reduction and confines the patient to prolong bed rest with all potential complications. Several authors documented lower morbidity and mortality rates and shorter hospital stay in patients treated by early operative stabilization of pelvic injuries. The timing of the surgery is still

  2. Pelvic Floor Ultrasound: A Review.

    PubMed

    Dietz, Hans Peter

    2017-03-01

    Female pelvic floor dysfunction encompasses a number of prevalent conditions and includes pelvic organ prolapse, urinary and fecal incontinence, obstructed defecation, and sexual dysfunction. In most cases neither etiology nor pathophysiology are well understood. Imaging has great potential to enhance both research and clinical management capabilities, and to date this potential is underutilized. Of the available techniques such as x-ray, computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, and ultrasound, the latter is generally superior for pelvic floor imaging, especially in the form of perineal or translabial imaging. The technique is safe, simple, cheap, easily accessible and provides high spatial and temporal resolutions.

  3. Changes in Sexual Function and Comparison of Questionnaires Following Surgery for Pelvic Organ Prolapse

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Soo Rim; Moon, Yeo Jung; Kim, Sei Kwang

    2014-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of surgical repair of pelvic organ prolapse on female sexual function and to assess correlations between the two using two current standardized questionnaires. Materials and Methods From October 2009 to September 2010, 143 patients with posterior compartment or combined vaginal prolapse were included. We assessed surgical outcomes according to anatomical change in the vagina and results of the Female Sexual Function Index (FSFI) and Pelvic Organ Prolapse/Urinary Incontinence Sexual Function questionnaire (PISQ-12) both pre- and postoperatively. Results Among the 143 preoperative patients, 99 and 84 patients responded to the PISQ-12 and FSFI, respectively. The mean PISQ-12 score increased after surgery (p<0.001). Specifically, postoperative scores for questions 8 and 12 were higher than their respective preoperative scores (p<0.001). Postoperatively, mean FSFI score changed only slightly (p=0.76), and only the score for the satisfaction domain was improved (p=0.023). In regards to vaginal anatomy, vaginal length was significantly greater postoperatively (6.99±0.18 vs. 7.56±1.08, p<0.001), and postoperative vaginal caliber was narrowed to a two-finger width. Conclusion In this study, surgery for pelvic organ prolapse was shown to affect female sexual function. Moreover, menopause was associated with a change in postoperative sexual function. PMID:24339303

  4. Cone-beam CT versus multi-slice CT systems for postoperative imaging of cochlear implantation--a phantom study on image quality and radiation exposure using human temporal bones.

    PubMed

    Theunisse, Henricus J; Joemai, Raoul M S; Maal, Thomas J J; Geleijns, Jacob; Mylanus, Emmanuel A M; Verbist, Berit M

    2015-04-01

    Image quality of low-dose multi-slice computed tomography (MSCT) after cochlear implantation is comparable to that of cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT). CBCT has been described as a low-dose alternative with superior image quality to MSCT for postoperative cochlear implant (CI) imaging, but to our knowledge, no dose-matched comparisons of image quality have been published. Five human cochleae were implanted with CI electrodes and scanned on two CBCT and two MSCT systems. Four independent observers rated aspects of image quality on a five-point scale. CBCT scans were compared to clinical and dose-matched MSCT scans. Declining-dose MSCT protocols were compared to the clinical protocol. CT phantoms were used to determine effective dose and resolution for each acquisition protocol. Effective dose of the CBCT protocols was 6 to 16% of the clinical MSCT dose. Visibility of cochlear inner and outer walls and overall image quality were positively correlated with radiation dose on MSCT and image quality was better with clinical MSCT than with CBCT protocols. In other comparisons, differences between systems were found, but a distinction between CBCT and MSCT could not be made. CBCT and dose-matched MSCT are both suitable for postoperative CI imaging. Selecting a CT system and radiation dose depends on which cochlear structures need to be visualized.

  5. Correlation between bone marrow dose volumes and acute hematological toxicity in postoperative gynecological cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Li, Qian; Jiang, Ming-Hua; Chen, Jing; Liu, Wei; Zhu, Bi-Qing; Lu, E-Mei

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To identify the association between radiation dose volume and acute hematological toxicity (HT) in postoperative gynecological cancer patients receiving whole pelvic radiotherapy (RT) or intensity-modulated RT (IMRT), a principal component regression model was used to calculate HT. Methods: Women (n=100) receiving with or without chemotherapy RT were retrospectively analyzed, 52 of whom received chemotherapy (paclitaxel and nedaplatin). The pelvis and lumbar vertebrae, defined as the prolong-pelvic bone marrow, were divided into the (1) combined ilium, ischium and pubis and the (2) lumbar vertebrae and the sacrum. The V5-V40 of subsides was calculated. The complete blood counts were recorded weekly. The principal component analysis was performed on volumes which generated the principal components (PCs), followed by using a logistic regression model. Results: Forty-seven patients presented with grade 2-3 HT during RT. Chemotherapy increased the incidence of HT compared with RT alone (70.21% vs. 29.79%; p=0.001). Fifty-three patients with persistent HT developed more serious HT at an earlier stage of RT. The chemotherapy cycles and three PCs associated with grade 2-3 HT was identified to form the resulting principal logistic regression model. Conclusion: A new method to calculate the NTCP was achieved by PCs logistic regression. PMID:28083062

  6. Analysis of the cause, classification, treatment, outcome and associated injuries of pediatric pelvic ring fractures.

    PubMed

    Saglam, Yavuz; Dikmen, Goksel; Bademler, Suleyman; Aksoy, Murat; Dikici, Fatih

    2015-09-01

    Although pediatric pelvis fractures are relatively uncommon, long-term consequences and associated life-treating injuries often have a substantial impact for the rest of a child's life. The prognosis of pediatric pelvic fractures is better than that of the adults because of their greater elasticity, healing capacity and re-modelling. Fractures through the physis may lead to growth disturbance and/or acetabular dysplasia. Non-union is rare and mal-union is usually well-tolerated. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the results of a single trauma center and review the literature approach to pediatric pelvic fractures. Medical records were analyzed for diagnosis, the mechanism of injury, additional injuries, treatment methods, and complications. The types of fractures were classified according to Torode and Zieg classification. Patients were called back and seen at the clinic as a last follow up visit. Twenty eight skeletally immature patients, under the age of 12, were treated for pelvic fracture from 1997 to 2012. Mean age was 6.8±2.4 years. Three children with an unstable pelvic ring injury required pelvic external fixation. One patient died due to pelvic hemorrhage postoperatively. Mean follow up was 5.3±3.6 years. Pediatric pelvic fractures are rare but life-threating injuries. Overall good or excellent long-term results can be expected in most cases with appropriate timing and treatment.

  7. NRG Oncology/RTOG 0921: A phase 2 study of postoperative intensity-modulated radiotherapy with concurrent cisplatin and bevacizumab followed by carboplatin and paclitaxel for patients with endometrial cancer.

    PubMed

    Viswanathan, Akila N; Moughan, Jennifer; Miller, Brigitte E; Xiao, Ying; Jhingran, Anuja; Portelance, Lorraine; Bosch, Walter R; Matulonis, Ursula A; Horowitz, Neil S; Mannel, Robert S; Souhami, Luis; Erickson, Beth A; Winter, Kathryn A; Small, William; Gaffney, David K

    2015-07-01

    The current study was conducted to assess acute and late adverse events (AEs), overall survival (OS), pelvic failure, regional failure, distant failure, and disease-free survival in a prospective phase 2 clinical trial of bevacizumab and pelvic intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) with chemotherapy in patients with high-risk endometrial cancer. Patients underwent a hysterectomy and lymph node removal, and had ≥1 of the following high-risk factors: grade 3 carcinoma with >50% myometrial invasion, grade 2 or 3 disease with any cervical stromal invasion, or known extrauterine extension confined to the pelvis. Treatment included pelvic IMRT and concurrent cisplatin on days 1 and 29 of radiation and bevacizumab (at a dose of 5 mg/kg on days 1, 15, and 29 of radiation) followed by adjuvant carboplatin and paclitaxel for 4 cycles. The primary endpoint was grade ≥3 AEs occurring within the first 90 days (toxicity was graded according to the National Cancer Institute Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events [version 4.0]). A total of 34 patients were accrued from November 2009 through December 2011, 30 of whom were eligible and received study treatment. Seven of 30 patients (23.3%; 1-sided 95% confidence interval, 10.6%-36.0%) developed grade ≥3 treatment-related nonhematologic toxicities within 90 days; an additional 6 patients experienced grade ≥3 toxicities between 90 and 365 days after treatment. The 2-year OS rate was 96.7% and the disease-free survival rate was 79.1%. No patient developed a within-field pelvic failure and no patients with International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics stage I to IIIA disease developed disease recurrence after a median follow-up of 26 months. Postoperative bevacizumab added to chemotherapy and pelvic IMRT appears to be well tolerated and results in high OS rates at 2 years for patients with high-risk endometrial carcinoma. © 2015 American Cancer Society.

  8. Pelvic floor muscle training exercises

    MedlinePlus

    ... nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22258946 . Dumoulin C, Hay-Smith J. Pelvic floor muscle training versus no treatment, ... nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20091581 . Herderschee R, Hay-Smith EJC, Herbison GP, Roovers JP, Heineman MJ. Feedback ...

  9. Pelvic Inflammatory Disease (For Teens)

    MedlinePlus

    ... might cause ongoing pelvic pain, infertility, or an ectopic pregnancy. What Are the Symptoms of PID? PID ... has more of a chance of being infertile. Ectopic pregnancy. If a girl who has had PID ...

  10. Benign mesothelioma of peritoneum presenting as a pelvic mass.

    PubMed

    Asghar, Samina; Qureshi, Navid; Awan, Ali

    2008-11-01

    A large solitary multiloculated pelvic cyst in a 40-year-old woman with chronic pelvic pain was diagnosed to be a Multicystic Benign Mesothelioma (MBM) of peritoneum at laparotomy. Operative findings showed dense adhesions between uterus and bladder anteriorly, small intestines and pouch of Douglas posteriorly, a right ovarian cyst cm containing clear serous fluid and two nodular deposits were seen in the pouch of Douglas, small multiple deposits was found over the mesentery of small intestine and parietal peritoneum. Total abdominal hysterectomy with bilateral oophorectomy and infracolic omentectomy was done. During surgery, there was injury to the small intestine hence, resection of 10 inches of small intestine with re-anastomosis was carried out. Postoperative recovery was satisfactory. At 3 years follow-up, patient is symptom-free.

  11. The Impact of Pelvic Floor Disorders and Pelvic Surgery on Women's Sexual Satisfaction and Function.

    PubMed

    Yount, Susan M

    2013-01-01

    Pelvic floor disorders have a significant impact on women's daily lives. Sexual health, which includes sexual satisfaction and function, can be altered by pelvic floor disorders and pelvic surgery. This article reviews common pelvic floor disorders (pelvic organ prolapse, urinary and fecal incontinence) and the effect they have on sexual satisfaction and function. Associations between sexual function and pelvic floor disorders are described, as are the relationships between sexual function and pelvic surgery. Women of all ages need to know their options and understand the impact pelvic surgery can have on sexual satisfaction, function, and activity.

  12. Double-barreled wet colostomy: a safe and simple method after pelvic exenteration.

    PubMed

    Osorio Gullón, A; de Oca, J; Lopéz Costea, M A; Virgili, J; Ramos, E; del Rio, C; Martí Ragué, J

    1997-01-01

    The clinical and functional outcome of ureteric division to the distal segment of a loop colostomy: the double-barrelled wet colostomy have been analysed. 13 patients (8 female and 5 male, age 37 to 72 years) underwent pelvic exenteration with double-barrelled wet colostomy. The primary tumour included endometrial (n = 6), rectal (n = 1), anal (n = 1), cervical (n = 2), prostatic (n = 1) and bladder (n = 2). Indications for pelvic exenteration were locally advanced disease, recurrence and severe radiation or surgical damage. Six patients had pre-existing colostomy, and three had a Bricker ureteroileal diversion. The double-barrelled-wet colostomy technique consisted in anastomosing both ureters to a colon segment 25 cm distal to the loop colostomy. There was no operative mortality. Complications included one urinary leak which closed with conservative management and one case of recurrent episodes of pyelonephritis which finally required nephrectomy. Intravenous urography in the remaining patients showed good flow through the ureters to the conduit with no reflux. Postoperative plasma electrolytes, urea and creatinine were normal from day seven onwards. Urodynamic studies in four patients showed efficient contraction of the colon conduit with pressure levels similar to those in the colon proximal to the colostomy. In five cases biopsies of the conduit were taken at 3 and 16 months; no dysplasias were found. Four patients died due to disease progression. The overall mean survival was 41.2 months. The remainder are currently disease-free, maximum followup period being 19 months. Double-barrelled wet colostomy is a safe and simple technique with low morbidity. The patient needs to carry only one stoma and functional results are good.

  13. An antiarch placoderm shows that pelvic girdles arose at the root of jawed vertebrates

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Min; Yu, Xiaobo; Choo, Brian; Wang, Junqing; Jia, Liantao

    2012-01-01

    Almost all gnathostomes or jawed vertebrates (including osteichthyans, chondrichthyans, ‘acanthodians’ and most placoderms) possess paired pectoral and pelvic fins. To date, it has generally been believed that antiarch placoderms (extinct armoured jawed fishes from the Silurian–Devonian periods) lacked pelvic fins. The putative absence of pelvic fins is a key character bearing on the monophyly or paraphyly of placoderms. It also has far-reaching implications for studying the sequence of origin of pelvic girdles versus that of movable jaws in the course of vertebrate evolution. Parayunnanolepis xitunensis represents the only example of a primitive antiarch with extensive post-thoracic preservation, and its original description has been cited as confirming the primitive lack of pelvic fins in early antiarchs. Here, we present a revised description of Parayunnanolepis and offer the first unambiguous evidence for the presence of pelvic girdles in antiarchs. As antiarchs are placed at the base of the gnathostome radiation in several recent studies, our finding shows that all jawed vertebrates (including antiarch placoderms) primitively possess both pectoral and pelvic fins and that the pelvic fins did not arise within gnathostomes at a point subsequent to the origin of jaws. PMID:22219394

  14. Treatment of unstable fractures of the pelvic ring in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Loegters, Tim; Briem, Daniel; Gatzka, Christian; Linhart, Wolfgang; Begemann, Phillip G; Rueger, Johannes M; Windolf, Joachim

    2005-04-01

    Unstable fractures of the posterior pelvic ring during pregnancy are rare. Pregnancy increases the high demands on the therapy of these types of fractures. The aim of the therapeutic strategy in such a situation is a good functional outcome of the mother without influencing the fetal health. Some osteosynthetic techniques result in good functional outcomes, but they are associated with high amounts of ionizing radiation. We report the case of a pregnant woman who sustained a vertical unstable fracture of the posterior pelvic ring as a result of a traffic accident. The fracture was treated surgically by open reduction and internal fixation with two transiliac reconstruction plates with minimal radiographic exposure to the fetus. One year later, a good functional result concerning the mother was shown. The child was healthy without any signs of prenatal impairment. Surgical treatment of an unstable fracture of the pelvic ring during pregnancy is possible with a justifiable risk to the mother and the child. Consideration of the expected fetal radiation exposure in the course of the therapy is particularly recommended. Using minimal doses of ionizing radiation, the described method results in a good clinical outcome of the mother while simultaneously reducing the radiation exposure of the fetus to an acceptable level.

  15. Changes in Pelvic Incidence, Pelvic Tilt, and Sacral Slope in Situations of Pelvic Rotation.

    PubMed

    Jin, Hai-Ming; Xu, Dao-Liang; Xuan, Jun; Chen, Jiao-Xiang; Chen, Kai; Goswami, Amit; Chen, Yu; Kong, Qiu-Yan; Wang, Xiang-Yang

    2017-08-01

    Digitally reconstructed radiograph-based study. Using a computer-based method to determine what degree of pelvic rotation is acceptable for measuring the pelvic incidence (PI), pelvic tilt (PT), and sacral slope (SS). The effectiveness of a geometrical formula used to calculate the angle of pelvic rotation proposed in a previous article was assessed. It is unclear whether PI, PT, and SS are valid with pelvic rotation while acquiring a radiograph. Ten 3-dimensionally reconstructed models were established with software and placed in a neutral orientation to orient all of the bones in a standing position. Next, 140 digitally reconstructed radiographs were obtained by rotating the models around the longitudinal axis of each pelvis in the software from 0 to 30 degrees at 2.5-degree intervals. PI, PT, and SS were measured. The rotation angle was considered to be acceptable when the change in the measured angle (compared with the "correct" position) was <6 degrees. The rotation angle (α) on the images was calculated by a geometrical formula. Consistency between the measured value and the set angle was assessed. The acceptable maximum angle of rotation for reliable measurements of PI was 17.5 degrees, and the changes in PT and SS were within an acceptable range (<6 degrees) when the pelvic rotation increased from 0 to 30 degrees. The effectiveness of the geometrical formula was shown by the consistency between the set and the calculated rotation angles of the pelvis (intraclass correlation coefficient=0.99). Our study provides insight into the influence of pelvic rotation on the PI, PT, and SS. PI changes with pelvic rotation. The acceptable maximum angle for reliable values of PI, PT, and SS was 17.5 degrees, and the rotation angle of the pelvis on a lateral spinopelvic radiograph can be calculated reliably.

  16. Robotic hybrid technique in rectal surgery for deep pelvic endometriosis.

    PubMed

    Cassini, Diletta; Cerullo, Guido; Miccini, Michelangelo; Manoochehri, Farshad; Ercoli, Alfredo; Baldazzi, Gianandrea

    2014-02-01

    Deep pelvic endometriosis is a complex disorder that affects 6% to 12% of all women in childbearing age. The incidence of bowel endometriosis ranges between 5.3% and 12%, with rectum and sigma being the most frequently involved tracts, accounting for about 80% of cases. It has been reported that segmental colorectal resection is the best surgical option in terms of recurrence rate and improvement of symptoms. The aim of this study is to analyze indications, feasibility, limits, and short-term results of robotic (Da Vinci Surgical System)-assisted laparoscopic rectal sigmoidectomy for the treatment of deep pelvic endometriosis. Between January 2006 and December 2010, 19 women with bowel endometriosis underwent colorectal resection through the robotic-assisted laparoscopic approach. Intraoperative and postoperative data were collected. All procedures were performed in a single center and short-term complications were evaluated. Nineteen robotic-assisted laparoscopic colorectal resections for infiltrating endometriosis were achieved. Additional procedures were performed in 7 patients (37%). No laparotomic conversion was performed. No intraoperative complications were observed. The mean operative time was 370 minutes (range = 250-720 minutes), and the estimated blood loss was 250 mL (range = 50-350 mL). The overall complication rate was 10% (2 rectovaginal fistulae). Deep pelvic endometriosis is a benign condition but may have substantial impact on quality of life due to severe pelvic symptoms. We believe that robotic-assisted laparoscopic colorectal resection is a feasible and relatively safe procedure in the context of close collaboration between gynecologists and surgeons for treatment of deep pelvic endometriosis with intestinal involvement, with low rates of complications and significant improvement of intestinal symptoms.

  17. Spino-pelvic parameters after surgery can be predicted: a preliminary formula and validation of standing alignment.

    PubMed

    Lafage, Virginie; Schwab, Frank; Vira, Shaleen; Patel, Ashish; Ungar, Benjamin; Farcy, Jean-Pierre

    2011-06-01

    Prospective and retrospective radiographic study of adult patients with spinal deformities. Construct predictive models for pelvic tilt (PT) and global sagittal balance (sagittal vertical axis [SVA]) and evaluate the effectiveness of these predictive models against a group of patients after pedicle subtraction osteotomy. Spinal balance involves a complex interaction between the pelvis and vertebral column. In the setting of adult spinal deformity, prediction of postoperative alignment can be challenging. The study included 219 adult patients treated for spinal deformity. Full-length standing films were available for all subjects. Multilinear models with a stepwise condition were used on the first group of patients (n = 179) to predict PT and global sagittal balance (measured by the SVA). Prediction models were then applied on a second group of patients (n = 40) to estimate postoperative radiographic parameters after pedicle subtraction osteotomy surgery. Differences between estimated parameters and real values were evaluated. Multilinear regression analysis applied on the first group of patients led to a predictive formula for PT (r = 0.93, standard error = 4.4°) using the following parameters: pelvic incidence, maximal lordosis, and maximal kyphosis. These parameters with the addition of the predicted PT were then used to predict the SVA (r = 0.89, standard error = 32 mm). Validation of predictive models (second group of patients) used pelvic incidence and postoperative sagittal curves. Postoperative PT was predicted with a mean error of 4.3° (SD 3.5°) and postoperative SVA was predicted with a mean error of 29 mm (SD = 23 mm). This is the first study to develop and validate pragmatic predictive models for key spino-pelvic parameters (PT and SVA) in the setting of adult spinal deformity. Using a morphologic pelvic parameter (pelvic incidence) and spinal parameters modifiable through surgery (lumbar lordosis and thoracic kyphosis), postoperative sagittal

  18. Pelvic floor function before and after robotic sacrocolpopexy: one-year outcomes.

    PubMed

    Geller, Elizabeth J; Parnell, Brent A; Dunivan, Gena C

    2011-01-01

    Estimate pelvic floor function and support 1 year after robotic sacrocolpopexy. Prospective cohort analysis of women undergoing robotic sacrocolpopexy for correction of advanced pelvic organ prolapse (Canadian Task Force Classification III). Primary outcome was pelvic floor function. Secondary outcomes included anatomic support and long-term surgical failures and complications. One university hospital in the southeastern United States. Primarily postmenopausal women (mean age 60) with advanced pelvic organ prolapse. All subjects underwent robotic sacrocolpopexy during the study period. Subjects then underwent 1-year postoperative assessment of pelvic floor function via validated condition-specific quality of life questionnaires and assessment of pelvic floor support, long-term surgical failures, and complications via physical examination. From November 2007 to April 2009, there were 28 subjects, 25 of whom (89.3%) were evaluated. Mean time since surgery was 14.8 months. Pelvic floor function remained significantly improved over preoperative baseline: PFDI-20 (117 vs 38, p <.001), PFIQ-7 (60 vs 10, p = .001), with stable high sexual function: PISQ-12 (34 vs. 36, p = .17), and improved pelvic support on POP-Q: Ba (+3 vs -2, p = .001), Bp (+0.5 vs -1, p = .092), C (+2.25 vs -8, p = .001). Anatomic cure for vault prolapse was 100% at 1 year. There were two mesh exposures and two subsequent prolapse surgeries. Robotic sacrocolpopexy demonstrates durable improvement in pelvic floor function and support, with high sexual function and reasonable failure and complication rates 1 year after surgery. Copyright © 2011 AAGL. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Managing chronic pelvic pain following reconstructive pelvic surgery with transvaginal mesh.

    PubMed

    Gyang, Anthony N; Feranec, Jessica B; Patel, Rakesh C; Lamvu, Georgine M

    2014-03-01

    In 2001, the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved the first transvaginal mesh kit to treat pelvic organ prolapse (POP). Since the introduction of vaginal mesh kits, some vaginal meshes have been associated with chronic pelvic pain after reconstructive pelvic floor surgery. Pelvic pain results in between 0 % and 30 % of patients following transvaginal mesh placement. Common causes of chronic pelvic pain include pelvic floor muscle spasm, pudendal neuralgia, and infection. Paucity of data exists on the effective management of chronic pelvic pain after pelvic reconstructive surgery with mesh. We outline the management of chronic pelvic pain after transvaginal mesh placement for reconstructive pelvic floor repair based on our clinical experience and adaptation of data used in other aspects of managing chronic pelvic pain conditions.

  20. The pelvic floor in health and disease.

    PubMed Central

    Shelton, A A; Welton, M L

    1997-01-01

    Normal pelvic floor function involves a set of learned and reflex responses that are essential for the normal control and evacuation of stool. A variety of functional disturbances of the pelvic floor, including incontinence and constipation, are not life threatening, but can cause significant distress to affected patients. Understanding the normal anatomy and physiology of the pelvic floor is essential to understanding and treating these disorders of defecation. This article describes the normal function of the pelvic floor, the diagnostic tools available to investigate pelvic floor dysfunction, and the etiology, diagnosis, and management of the functional pelvic floor disorders that lead to incontinence and constipation. Images Figure 1. PMID:9291746

  1. Myofascial Pelvic Pain and Related Disorders.

    PubMed

    Bonder, Jaclyn H; Chi, Michelle; Rispoli, Leia

    2017-08-01

    Myofascial pelvic pain refers to pain in the pelvic floor muscles, the pelvic floor connective tissue, and the surrounding fascia. The cause is often multifactorial and requires treatment that encompasses multiple modalities. This type of pain is often associated with other abdominopelvic disorders, so providers in these specialties need to be aware of these connections. A comprehensive musculoskeletal examination, including evaluation of the pelvic floor muscles, and history are key to diagnosing myofascial pelvic pain. Treatments include physical therapy, muscle relaxers, oral neuromodulators, cognitive-behavioral therapy, and pelvic floor muscle injections. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Factors affecting pelvic rotation in idiopathic scoliosis

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yunfei; Qi, Lin; Yang, Jun; Zhu, Xiaodong; Yang, Changwei; Li, Ming

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Pelvic rotation (PR) is commonly seen in patients with idiopathic scoliosis (IS), but factors contributing to this phenomenon and its relationship with the surgical outcome are not well established. This retrospective study included 85 IS patients in 2 groups: thoracic curve dominance group (group A) and lumbar curve dominance group (group B). Pre- and postoperative PR was measured on standing posteroanterior radiographs by the left/right ratio (L/R ratio) of horizontal distance between the anterior superior iliac spine (ASIS) and the inferior ilium (SI) at the sacroiliac joint on the same side in both groups. Other radiographic data, age, sex, and Risser sign of each patient were recorded to analyze their correlations with PR before and after operation. The patients ranged in age from 10 to 35 years with a mean of 17.0 ± 5.2 years. The mean L/R ratio of PR before operation was 0.99 (0.73–1.40) versus 0.98 (0.87–1.26) after operation. The L/R ration was beyond the range of 1 ± 0.1 (indicating the presence of PR) in 17 (20%) patients before operation and in 14 (16.5%) patients after operation. There was no significant difference in PR between the 2 groups of patients either before (P = 0.468) or after (P = 0.944) surgery. The preoperative PR showed a very low correlation with Risser sign (r = 0.220, P = 0.043), apex vertebral rotation (AVR) in the proximal thoracic curve (r = 0.242, P = 0.026), and AVR in the lumbar curve (r = 0.213, P = 0.049), while the postoperative PR showed a very low correlation with Risser sign (r = −0.341, P = 0.001) and postoperative trunk shift (TS) (r = −0.282, P = 0.009). Multiple stepwise regression analysis showed that preoperative PR was affected by proximal thoracic curve AVR and lumbar curve AVR. There was no significant difference between PR before operation and 2 years after operation. Preoperative PR was mainly correlated with Risser sign and the rotation

  3. Obesity and Pelvic Floor Disorders: A Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Pomian, Andrzej; Lisik, Wojciech; Kosieradzki, Maciej; Barcz, Ewa

    2016-01-01

    Overweight and obesity are becoming a worldwide health problem associated with numerous co-morbidities. National costs of obesity and pelvic flor disorders have been rising since the 1950s across the world. Obesity is thought to have a very strong effect on pelvic floor disorders, and, considering the high prevalence of both problems worldwide, it is of utmost importance to evaluate the association between these pathologies as well as the impact of obesity on treatment efficacy. This review is based on a selection of reports in the literature (PubMed search), including guidelines and Cochrane reviews. Obesity seems to be a well-documented risk factor for lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) and is a predictor of exacerbation of stress urinary incontinence (SUI) and overactive bladder (OAB). Weight loss is also associated with improvement or resolution of SUI and OAB. In the case of pelvic organ prolapse (POP), weight loss is associated with improvement in quality of life. Although obesity is associated with POP in general, the exact role of obesity in symptomatic POP remains uncertain. While outcomes of anti-incontinence surgery among obese women are similar to those in non-obese women, postoperative urge incontinence is more likely to occur. It seems that obesity is not a risk factor for postoperative complications or short-term efficacy of POP surgical treatment. Long-term effects are still uncertain. Obesity is a strong risk factor for LUTS, but in most cases it does not affect efficacy of operative treatment. It may be associated with some post-operative complications. Weight loss in many cases allows avoiding surgical intervention. PMID:27255341

  4. Obesity and Pelvic Floor Disorders: A Review of the Literature.

    PubMed

    Pomian, Andrzej; Lisik, Wojciech; Kosieradzki, Maciej; Barcz, Ewa

    2016-06-03

    Overweight and obesity are becoming a worldwide health problem associated with numerous co-morbidities. National costs of obesity and pelvic flor disorders have been rising since the 1950s across the world. Obesity is thought to have a very strong effect on pelvic floor disorders, and, considering the high prevalence of both problems worldwide, it is of utmost importance to evaluate the association between these pathologies as well as the impact of obesity on treatment efficacy. This review is based on a selection of reports in the literature (PubMed search), including guidelines and Cochrane reviews. Obesity seems to be a well-documented risk factor for lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) and is a predictor of exacerbation of stress urinary incontinence (SUI) and overactive bladder (OAB). Weight loss is also associated with improvement or resolution of SUI and OAB. In the case of pelvic organ prolapse (POP), weight loss is associated with improvement in quality of life. Although obesity is associated with POP in general, the exact role of obesity in symptomatic POP remains uncertain. While outcomes of anti-incontinence surgery among obese women are similar to those in non-obese women, postoperative urge incontinence is more likely to occur. It seems that obesity is not a risk factor for postoperative complications or short-term efficacy of POP surgical treatment. Long-term effects are still uncertain. Obesity is a strong risk factor for LUTS, but in most cases it does not affect efficacy of operative treatment. It may be associated with some post-operative complications. Weight loss in many cases allows avoiding surgical intervention.

  5. The influence of postoperative lymph node radiation therapy on overall survival of patients with stage III melanoma, a National Cancer Database analysis

    PubMed Central

    Danish, Hasan H.; Patel, Kirtesh R.; Switchenko, Jeffrey M.; Gillespie, Theresa W.; Jhaveri, Jaymin; Chowdhary, Mudit; Abugideiri, Mustafa; Delman, Keith A.; Lawson, David H.; Khan, Mohammad K.

    2017-01-01

    Recently, TROG 02.01 results showed that in stage III melanoma patients with nodal metastasis, adjuvant radiation to lymph node basin after nodal dissection improves lymph node field relapse without an overall survival (OS) benefit. However, this trial was neither designed nor powered to detect an OS difference. In the present study, we analyzed patients in the National Cancer Database (NCDB) with stage III melanoma with pathologically involved nodes and compared survival outcomes of adjuvant radiation and no-radiation cohorts. Inclusion criteria were as follows: age at least 18 years; diagnosed 2003–2011; surgery to regional lymph nodes; pathologically involved lymph nodes; and American Joint Committee on Cancer stage (IIIA-C). We used propensity score matching analysis to compare the OS of patients with similar baseline demographic, clinical, and pathologic characteristics who received adjuvant radiation and no adjuvant radiation. Overall, 912 patients were analyzed with an average age at diagnosis of 54.4 years and a median follow-up time of 5.5 years. In this cohort, the 5-year OS was 69.0, 51.1, and 30.6% for stage IIIA, IIIB, and IIIC, respectively. On propensity score-adjusted multivariate analysis, we found that adjuvant radiation had no statistically significant impact on OS (hazard ratio: 1.09, 95% confidence interval: 0.75–1.58, P=0.640). Furthermore, age older than 60 years, number of nodes, increasing pathologic stage, and absence of immunotherapy correlated with worse OS. In this NCDB analysis, we found that the adjuvant radiotherapy for node-positive, stage III melanoma patients did not improve OS. This is consistent with TROG 02.01; however, there may be patient selection bias not accounted for by the NCDB. PMID:27575390

  6. Long-term follow-up of patients with pituitary macroadenomas after postoperative radiation therapy: analysis of tumor control and functional outcome.

    PubMed

    Langsenlehner, Tanja; Stiegler, Claudia; Quehenberger, Franz; Feigl, Günther C; Jakse, Gabi; Mokry, Michael; Langsenlehner, Uwe; Kapp, Karin S; Mayer, Ramona

    2007-05-01

    Evaluation of long-term tumor control, normalization of hormonal hypersecretion, including incidence and time course of pituitary dysfunction following postoperative radiotherapy of pituitary macroadenomas. In a retrospective study, the data of 87 patients with pituitary macroadenomas (61 non-secreting adenomas, 26 secreting adenomas) treated between 1984 and 1994 were analyzed. All patients underwent surgery and received postoperative external-beam radiotherapy with a mean dose of 50.4 Gy (range 46-54 Gy). After a follow-up of 15 years the local tumor control rate achieved was 93.0% for non-secreting adenomas and 100% for secreting adenomas, respectively. Normalization of endocrine hypersecretion was noted in 24 of 26 patients (92%). Detailed endocrinological follow-up data were analyzed by an experienced endocrinologist in 77 patients. After a median follow-up of 10.54 years (mean 10.22; range 1.39-20.75 years), in 75 of 77 patients (97%) a hypopituitarism was observed (partial hypopituitarism, n = 28 [36%], panhypopituitarism, n = 47 [61%]), and 68 out of 77 patients (88%) showed evidence of radiotherapy-induced pituitary disorders. The somatotropic function was most commonly affected, followed by gonadal, thyroid and adrenal function. The gonadal axis showed to be the first to be disturbed. 67 patients (87%) required a hormone replacement therapy. Radiotherapy after pituitary surgery is highly effective in reducing hormonal hypersecretion and preventing recurrences of pituitary adenomas. However, pituitary insufficiencies are commonly observed after radiotherapy requiring a close follow-up to ensure timely diagnosis of pituitary dysfunction and an early inception of hormone replacement therapy.

  7. Functional anatomy of pelvic floor.

    PubMed

    Rocca Rossetti, Salvatore

    2016-03-31

    Generally, descriptions of the pelvic floor are discordant, since its complex structures and the complexity of pathological disorders of such structures; commonly the descriptions are sectorial, concerning muscles, fascial developments, ligaments and so on. On the contrary to understand completely nature and function of the pelvic floor it is necessary to study it in the most unitary view and in the most global aspect, considering embriology, philogenesy, anthropologic development and its multiple activities others than urological, gynaecological and intestinal ones. Recent acquirements succeeded in clarifying many aspects of pelvic floor activity, whose musculature has been investigated through electromyography, sonography, magnetic resonance, histology, histochemistry, molecular research. Utilizing recent research concerning not only urinary and gynecologic aspects but also those regarding statics and dynamics of pelvis and its floor, it is now possible to study this important body part as a unit; that means to consider it in the whole body economy to which maintaining upright position, walking and behavior or physical conduct do not share less than urinary, genital, and intestinal functions. It is today possible to consider the pelvic floor as a musclefascial unit with synergic and antagonistic activity of muscular bundles, among them more or less interlaced, with multiple functions and not only the function of pelvic cup closure.

  8. Total pelvic floor reconstruction during non-nerve-sparing laparoscopic radical prostatectomy: impact on early recovery of urinary continence.

    PubMed

    Hoshi, Akio; Nitta, Masahiro; Shimizu, Yuuki; Higure, Taro; Kawakami, Masayoshi; Nakajima, Nobuyuki; Hanai, Kazuya; Nomoto, Takeshi; Usui, Yukio; Terachi, Toshiro

    2014-11-01

    To develop a modified technique of "total pelvic floor reconstruction" during non-nerve-sparing laparoscopic radical prostatectomy, and to determine its effect on postoperative urinary outcomes. A total of 128 patients who underwent non-nerve-sparing laparoscopic radical prostatectomy were evaluated, including 81 with total pelvic floor reconstruction and 47 with non-total pelvic floor reconstruction. Nerve-sparing cases were excluded. Urinary outcomes were assessed with self-administrated questionnaires (Expanded Prostate Cancer Index Composite) at 1, 3, 6 and 12 months after laparoscopic radical prostatectomy. The total pelvic floor reconstruction technique included two concepts involving posterior and anterior reconstructions. In posterior reconstruction, Denonvilliers' fascia was approximated to the bladder neck and the median dorsal raphe by slipknot. The anterior surface of the bladder-neck was approximated to the anterior detrusor apron and the puboprostatic ligament collar for anterior reconstruction. There were no significant differences between the two groups in the patients' characteristics, and in perioperative and oncological outcomes. In the total pelvic floor reconstruction group, the continence rates at 3, 6 and 12 months after laparoscopic radical prostatectomy were 45.7%, 71.4%, and 84.6%, respectively. In the non-total pelvic floor reconstruction group, the continence rates were 26.1%, 46.8% and 60.9%, respectively. The total pelvic floor reconstruction technique resulted in significantly higher continence rates at 3, 6 and 12 months after laparoscopic radical prostatectomy, respectively (all P < 0.05). The mean interval to achieve continence was significantly shorter in the total pelvic floor reconstruction group (mean 7.7 months) than in the non-total pelvic floor reconstruction group (mean 9.8 months; P = 0.0003). The total pelvic floor reconstruction technique allows preservation of the blood supply to the urethra and physical

  9. Trimodality strategy for treating malignant pleural mesothelioma: results of a feasibility study of induction pemetrexed plus cisplatin followed by extrapleural pneumonectomy and postoperative hemithoracic radiation (Japan Mesothelioma Interest Group 0601 Trial).

    PubMed

    Hasegawa, Seiki; Okada, Morihito; Tanaka, Fumihiro; Yamanaka, Takeharu; Soejima, Toshinori; Kamikonya, Norihiko; Tsujimura, Tohru; Fukuoka, Kazuya; Yokoi, Kohei; Nakano, Takashi

    2016-06-01

    We conducted a prospective multi-institutional study to determine the feasibility of trimodality therapy (TMT) comprising induction chemotherapy followed by extrapleural pneumonectomy (EPP) and radiation therapy in Japanese patients with malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM). Major eligibility criteria were histologically confirmed diagnosis of MPM, including clinical subtypes T0-3, N0-2, M0 disease; no prior treatment for the disease; age 20-75 years; Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status 0 or 1; predicted postoperative forced expiratory volume >1000 ml in 1 s; written informed consent. Treatment methods comprised induction chemotherapy using pemetrexed (500 mg/m(2)) plus cisplatin (60 mg/m(2)) for three cycles, followed by EPP and postoperative hemithoracic radiation therapy (54 Gy). Primary endpoints were macroscopic complete resection (MCR) rate for EPP and treatment-related mortality for TMT. Forty-two eligible patients were enrolled: median age 64.5 (range 43-74) years; M:F = 39:3, clinical stage I:II:III = 14:13:15; histological type epithelioid were sarcomatoid; biphasic; others = 28:1:9:4. Of 42 patients, 30 completed EPP with MCR and 17 completed TMT. The trial met the primary endpoints, with an MCR rate of 71 % (30/42) and treatment-related mortality of 9.5 % (4/42). Overall median survival time and 2-year survival rate for 42 registered patients were 19.9 months and 42.9 %, respectively. Two-year relapse-free survival rate of 30 patients who completed EPP with MCR was 37.0 %. This phase II study met the predefined primary endpoints, but its risk/benefit ratio was not satisfactory.

  10. How Are Pelvic Floor Disorders Diagnosed?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Information Clinical Trials Resources and Publications How are pelvic floor disorders diagnosed? Skip sharing on social media links ... fee ). This test is used to evaluate the pelvic floor and rectum while the patient is having a ...

  11. Microbiota and Pelvic Inflammatory Disease

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Harsha; Tal, Reshef; Clark, Natalie A.; Segars, James H.

    2014-01-01

    Female genital tract microbiota play a crucial role in maintaining health. Disequilibrium of the microbiota has been associated with increased risk of pelvic infections. In recent years, culture-independent molecular techniques have expanded understanding of the composition of genital microbiota and the dynamic nature of the microbiota. There is evidence that upper genital tract may not be sterile and may harbor microflora in the physiologic state. The isolation of bacterial vaginosis-associated organisms in women with genital infections establishes a link between pelvic infections and abnormal vaginal flora. With the understanding of the composition of the microbiota in healthy and diseased states, the next logical step is to identify the function of the newly identified microbes. This knowledge will further expand our understanding of the causation of pelvic infections, which may lead to more effective prevention and treatment strategies. PMID:24390920

  12. Management of a Case of Severe Pelvic Fracture Related Bladder Trauma

    PubMed Central

    Myers, Jeremy B.; Hotaling, James M.; Brant, William O.; Enniss, Toby M.

    2015-01-01

    A 62-year-old male was admitted after being struck by a bus. He sustained a severe pelvic fracture, sigmoid colon injury, and both intraperitoneal and extraperitoneal bladder injury. He underwent initial successful bladder repair. However, at 7 days post-operatively he manifested a leak from the repair and urine was evident coming from the pins of his pelvic external fixator. A repeat cystogram showed massive extravasation, which was managed by operative ligation of the lower ureters and placement of percutaneous nephrostomy tubes. He underwent ureteral reconstruction and colostomy reversal at 9 months. He has both bladder and bowel control. PMID:26793492

  13. Management of a Case of Severe Pelvic Fracture Related Bladder Trauma.

    PubMed

    Myers, Jeremy B; Hotaling, James M; Brant, William O; Enniss, Toby M

    2015-03-01

    A 62-year-old male was admitted after being struck by a bus. He sustained a severe pelvic fracture, sigmoid colon injury, and both intraperitoneal and extraperitoneal bladder injury. He underwent initial successful bladder repair. However, at 7 days post-operatively he manifested a leak from the repair and urine was evident coming from the pins of his pelvic external fixator. A repeat cystogram showed massive extravasation, which was managed by operative ligation of the lower ureters and placement of percutaneous nephrostomy tubes. He underwent ureteral reconstruction and colostomy reversal at 9 months. He has both bladder and bowel control.

  14. Porcine Small Intestinal Submucosa Mesh for Treatment of Pelvic Organ Prolapsed

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Ting-Ting; Sun, Xiu-Li; Wang, Shi-Yan; Yang, Xin; Wang, Jian-Liu

    2016-01-01

    Background: Pelvic organ prolapse (POP) is a major health concern that affects women. Surgeons have increasingly used prosthetic meshes to correct POP. However, the most common used is synthetic mesh, and absorbable mesh is less reported. This research aimed to evaluate the clinical effectiveness of porcine small intestinal submucosa (SIS). Methods: Consecutive forty POP patients who met the inclusion criteria underwent pelvic reconstruction surgery with SIS between March 2012 and December 2013. The patients’ clinical characteristics were recorded preoperatively. Surgical outcomes, measured by objective and subjective success rates, were investigated. We evaluated the quality of life (QOL) using the Pelvic Floor Distress Inventory-20 (PFDI-20) and the Pelvic Floor Impact Questionnaire-7 (PFIQ-7). Sexual QOL was assessed by the Pelvic Organ Prolapse/Urinary Incontinence Sexual Function Questionnaire-12 (PISQ-12). Results: At postoperative 12 months, the subjective recurrence rate (7.5%) was much lower than the objective recurrence rate (40.0%). Postoperatively, no erosion was identified. One underwent a graft release procedure because of urinary retention, and one had anus sphincter reconstruction surgery due to defecation urgency. Another experienced posterior vaginal wall infection where the mesh was implanted, accompanied by severe vaginal pain. Estrogen cream relieved the pain. One patient with recurrence underwent a secondary surgery with Bard Mesh because of stage 3 anterior vaginal wall prolapse. Scoring system of PFDI-20 was from 59.150 ± 13.143 preoperatively to 8.400 ± 4.749 postoperatively and PFIQ-7 was from 73.350 ± 32.281 to 7.150 ± 3.110, while PISQ-12 was from 15.825 ± 4.050 to 12.725 ± 3.471. Conclusions: QOL and the degree of subjective satisfaction were significantly improved postoperatively. Anterior repair deserves more attention because of the higher recurrence rate. The long-term follow-up of the patient is warranted to draw firm

  15. Radiation

    NASA Image and Video Library

    Outside the protective cocoon of Earth's atmosphere, the universe is full of harmful radiation. Astronauts who live and work in space are exposed not only to ultraviolet rays but also to space radi...

  16. Postoperative surgical complications of lymphadenohysterocolpectomy

    PubMed Central

    Marin, F; Pleşca, M; Bordea, CI; Voinea, SC; Burlănescu, I; Ichim, E; Jianu, CG; Nicolăescu, RR; Teodosie, MP; Maher, K; Blidaru, A

    2014-01-01

    Rationale The current standard surgical treatment for the cervix and uterine cancer is the radical hysterectomy (lymphadenohysterocolpectomy). This has the risk of intraoperative accidents and postoperative associated morbidity. Objective The purpose of this article is the evaluation and quantification of the associated complications in comparison to the postoperative morbidity which resulted after different types of radical hysterectomy. Methods and results Patients were divided according to the type of surgery performed as follows: for cervical cancer – group A- 37 classic radical hysterectomies Class III Piver - Rutledge -Smith ( PRS ), group B -208 modified radical hysterectomies Class II PRS and for uterine cancer- group C -79 extended hysterectomies with pelvic lymphadenectomy from which 17 patients with paraaortic lymphnode biopsy . All patients performed preoperative radiotherapy and 88 of them associated radiosensitization. Discussion Early complications were intra-abdominal bleeding ( 2.7% Class III PRS vs 0.48% Class II PRS), supra-aponeurotic hematoma ( 5.4% III vs 2.4% II) , dynamic ileus (2.7% III vs 0.96% II) and uro - genital fistulas (5.4% III vs 0.96% II).The late complications were the bladder dysfunction (21.6% III vs 16.35% II) , lower limb lymphedema (13.5% III vs 11.5% II), urethral strictures (10.8% III vs 4.8% II) , incisional hernias ( 8.1% III vs 7.2% II), persistent pelvic pain (18.91% III vs 7.7% II), bowel obstruction (5.4% III vs 1.4% II) and deterioration of sexual function (83.3% III vs 53.8% II). PRS class II radical hysterectomy is associated with fewer complications than PRS class III radical hysterectomy , except for the complications of lymphadenectomy . A new method that might reduce these complications is a selective lymphadenectomy represented by sentinel node biopsy . In conclusion PRS class II radical hysterectomy associated with neoadjuvant radiotherapy is a therapeutic option for the incipient stages of cervical cancer

  17. Prospective study of nutritional support during pelvic irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Kinsella, T.J.; Malcolm, A.W.; Bothe, A. Jr.; Valerio, D.; Blackburn, G.L.

    1981-04-01

    A prospective study of nutritional support during pelvic irradiation was carried out in 32 patients with a primary pelvic malignancy and prior weight loss. Both curative and palliative patients were eligible for the study. Seventeen patients were randomized to receive intravenous hyperalimentation (IVH) and fifteen patients served as controls who were maintained on their regular diet. Patients were stratified by percent body weight loss. Tolerance to therapy was assessed by evaluation of functional status and by using nutritional parameters of body weight change, change in serum protein levels, and response to delayed hypersensitivity skin tests. The curative IVH group tolerated therapy well by both functional and nutritional measurements. All curative IVH patients completed the planned radiation therapy without a treatment break and were fully active following treatment. Patients gained an average of 4.0 kg body weight during irradiation, which was significantly different from the curative control patients. They demonstrated a significant increase in serum transferrin reflecting an improvement in visceral protein. In addition, all showed a positive response to delayed hypersensitivity skin tests at the completion of irradiation. The palliative IVH patients often did poorly because of progression of disease and demonstrated only an elevation of serum transferrin during treatment. The results in the curative IVH group suggest a potential adjunctive role for intravenous hyperalimentation in the malnourished cancer patient undergoing pelvic irradiation. Clearly, further study of nutritional support during pelvic irradiation is needed using curative patients with a single tumor type and significant prior weight loss.

  18. Patterns of postoperative radiotherapy for head and neck cancer in Italy: a prospective, observational study by the head and neck group of the Italian Association for Radiation Oncology (AIRO).

    PubMed

    Palazzi, Mauro; Alterio, Daniela; Tonoli, Sandro; Caspiani, Orietta; Bolner, Andrea; Colombo, Sara; Dall'oglio, Stefano; Lastrucci, Luciana; Bunkheila, Feisal; Cianciulli, Michele; Vigna Taglianti, Riccardo; Cante, Domenico; Merlotti, Anna; Bianchi, Ernestina; Rampino, Monica; Podhradska, Andrea; Fontana, Antonella; Paiar, Fabiola; Miccichè, Francesco; Manzo, Roberto; Ursino, Stefano; Bruschieri, Lorenza; Bacigalupo, Almalina; Iannone, Tiziana; Barca, Raffaella; Tomatis, Stefano

    2011-01-01

    Our previous survey showed that the patterns of postoperative radiotherapy (PORT) for head and neck cancer (HNC) in Italy might be suboptimal. A prospective observational study was therefore designed to evaluate this issue in greater detail. All radiotherapy centers involved in the HNC Working Group of the Italian Radiation Oncology Association were asked to enter into the study all patients treated with PORT during a 6-month period. A total of 200 patients were accrued by 24 centers from December 2008 to May 2009. Larynx (38%) and oral cavity (34%) were the most common primary sites. The median time between surgery and the start of radiotherapy was 69 days (range, 25-215 days). Seventy-nine percent of cases with no evidence of risk factors for local recurrence were treated with high-dose radiotherapy to the primary site. In about 75% of cases the pN0 neck was included in the target volume. Concomitant chemotherapy was delivered to about 60% of patients with major risk factors and 21% of patients with no risk factors. Three issues emerged from our study as potential targets for future investigations: the impact on clinical outcome of the interval between surgery and the start of PORT; factors driving radiation oncologists to overtreat volumes at low risk of recurrence; and problems associated with the delivery of concomitant chemotherapy.

  19. Is there a role for postoperative radiotherapy following open partial laryngectomy when prognostic factors on the pathological specimen are unfavourable? A survey of head and neck surgical/radiation oncologists.

    PubMed

    Russi, E G; Sanguineti, G; Chiesa, F; Franco, P; Succo, G; Merlotti, A; Ansarin, M; Melano, A; Alterio, D; Pergolizzi, S; Buglione, M; Reali, A; Ricardi, U; Corvò, R

    2013-10-01

    Our aim was to survey the opinions of Italian radiation and ENT oncologists regarding the role of postoperative radiotherapy (PRT) and the appropriate dose to be given to patients with remnant larynx (RL) after open partial laryngectomy (OPL). The radio-oncologists (ROs) of the Italian Radiation-Oncologist Association (AIRO) and the ENTs of the Head-Neck Oncology Society (AIOCC-IHNS) were contacted through a SurveyMonkey online interface questionnaire. There were 148 usable responses. The majority of ROs recommended PRT in the case of positive/close margins (R(+)/R(close)) or in the case of initial involvement of thyroid cartilage (pT3(tci)). In the same cases, ENTs prefer a "watch and wait" policy (w&w). Both disciplines recommended w&w in the case of negative margins (R(-)). Finally, the majority of RO s recommended irradiating RL with 62-66 Gy in R(+), with 56-66 Gy (61.4%) in R(close) and with 56-60 Gy (34%) in pT3(tci). In Conclusion, OPL raises new considerations about PRT.

  20. Opioid use following gynecologic and pelvic reconstructive surgery.

    PubMed

    Hota, Lekha S; Warda, Hussein A; Haviland, Miriam J; Searle, Frances M; Hacker, Michele R

    2017-09-09

    Opioid use, addiction, and overdose are a growing epidemic in the USA. Our objective was to determine whether the amount of opioid medication prescribed following gynecologic and pelvic reconstructive surgery is insufficient, adequate, or in excess. We hypothesized that we were overprescribing postoperative opioids. Participants who were at least 18 years old and underwent gynecologic and/or pelvic reconstructive surgery from April through August 2016 were eligible to participate. Routine practice for pain management is to prescribe 30 tablets of opioids for major procedures and ten to 15 tablets for minor procedures. At the 2-week postoperative visit, participants completed a questionnaire regarding the number of tablets prescribed and used, postoperative pain control, and relevant medical history. Fisher's exact test was used to compare data. Sixty-five participants completed questionnaires. Half (49.1%) reported being prescribed more opioids than needed, while two (3.5%) felt the amount was less than needed. Though not significant, participants who underwent major surgeries were more likely to report being prescribed more than needed (53.5%) compared with participants who underwent minor surgeries (35.7%; p = 0.47). Though not significant, participants with anxiety were less likely to report being prescribed more tablets than needed compared with participants without anxiety (44.4% vs. 57.1%; p = 0.38). This was also true of participants with depression compared with those without (37.5% vs. 58.3%; p = 0.17), and those with chronic pain compared with those without (33.3% vs. 60.0%; p = 0.10). Our current opioid prescription practice for postoperative pain management may exceed what patients need.

  1. Voiding trial outcome following pelvic floor repair without incontinence procedures

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Rui; Won, Sara; Haviland, Miriam J.; Bargen, Emily Von; Hacker, Michele R.; Li, Janet

    2016-01-01

    Introduction and hypothesis Our aim was to identify predictors of postoperative voiding trial failure among patients who had a pelvic floor repair without a concurrent incontinence procedure in order to identify low-risk patients in whom postoperative voiding trials may be modified. Methods We conducted a retrospective cohort study of women who underwent pelvic floor repair without concurrent incontinence procedures at two institutions from 1 November 2011 through 13 October 2013 after abstracting demographic and clinical data from medical records. The primary outcome was postoperative retrograde voiding trial failure. We used modified Poisson regression to calculate the risk ratio (RR) and 95 % confidence interval (CI). Results Of the 371 women who met eligibility criteria, 294 (79.2 %) had complete data on the variables of interest. Forty nine (16.7%) failed the trial, and those women were less likely to be white (p = 0.04), more likely to have had an anterior colporrhaphy (p = 0.001), and more likely to have had a preoperative postvoid residual (PVR) ≥150 ml (p = 0.001). After adjusting for race, women were more likely to fail their voiding trial if they had a preoperative PVR of ≥150 ml (RR: 1.9; 95 % CI: 1.1–3.2); institution also was associated with voiding trial failure (RR: 3.0; 95 % CI: 1.6–5.4). Conclusions Among our cohort, postoperative voiding trial failure was associated with a PVR of ≥150 ml and institution at which the surgery was performed. PMID:26886553

  2. Prevalence of pelvic adhesions on ultrasound examination in women with a history of Cesarean section.

    PubMed

    Moro, F; Mavrelos, D; Pateman, K; Holland, T; Hoo, W L; Jurkovic, D

    2015-02-01

    To investigate the prevalence and location of pelvic adhesions in women with a history of Cesarean section and to identify risk factors for their formation and symptoms associated with their presence. This was a prospective observational study of women in whom one or more Cesarean sections had been performed > 12 months previously and who attended for a gynecological ultrasound examination. In all women, both transvaginal and transabdominal scans were performed in order to identify the presence of pelvic adhesions. Medical and surgical history was recorded and a structured questionnaire was used to enquire about any history of pelvic pain and urinary symptoms. A total of 308 women were recruited into the study. On ultrasound examination, 139 (45.1% (95% CI, 39.7-50.7%)) women showed evidence of adhesions within the pelvis. Adhesions in the vesicouterine pouch were the most common and were found in a total of 79 (25.6% (95% CI, 20.7-30.5%)) women. In women with a history of no surgery other than Cesarean section(s) (n = 220), an increasing number of Cesarean sections (odds ratio (OR) 3.4 (95% CI, 2.1-5.5)) and a postoperative wound infection (OR 11.7 (95% CI, 3.5-39.5)) increased the likelihood of adhesions developing in the anterior pelvic compartment. There was a significant association between the presence of anterior compartment adhesions and chronic pelvic pain. Multivariable logistic regression analysis identified anterior abdominal wall adhesions (OR 2.4 (95% CI, 1.0-5.9)) and any adhesions present on ultrasound scan (OR 2.6 (95% CI, 1.2-5.7)) as independent predictors of chronic pelvic pain. Pelvic adhesions are present in more than a third of women with a history of Cesarean section and they are associated with chronic pelvic pain. Copyright © 2014 ISUOG. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Laparoscopic assisted percutaneous nephrolithotomy in chronic kidney disease patients with ectopic pelvic kidney

    PubMed Central

    Patwardhan, Sujata K.; Shelke, Umesh Ravikant; Patil, Bhushan P.; Pamecha, Yash R.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: Patients with deranged renal functions have a number of associated factors which can impair healing of wound and increase postoperative morbidity. This study was conducted to assess the problems while managing ectopic pelvic kidney calculi using laparoscopic approach for percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PCNL) in chronic kidney disease patients. Subjects and Methods: Patients with calculi in ectopic kidney with increased serum creatinine level secondary to obstruction were included in the study. Initially, obstruction was relieved. Patients later underwent laparoscopic-assisted PCNL. Patients were monitored postoperatively. Results: Three patients with large renal calculi in ectopic pelvic kidney had presented in 2 years. Laparoscopic-assisted PCNL was done to remove the stone. Patients had persistent urine leak post-operatively. Mean duration for removal of nephrostomy tube and drain removal were 4.67 days and 6.67 days, respectively. These patients also had paralytic ileus for prolonged duration. Conclusion: Although laparoscopic assisted PCNL is an option in the management of patients with stone disease in ectopic pelvic kidney, prolonged time for healing of tract may increase postoperative morbidity in these patients with impaired renal function. PMID:28794593

  4. Pelvic floor muscle rehabilitation using biofeedback.

    PubMed

    Newman, Diane K

    2014-01-01

    Pelvic floor muscle exercises have been recommended for urinary incontinence since first described by obstetrician gynecologist Dr. Arnold Kegel more than six decades ago. These exercises are performed to strengthen pelvic floor muscles, provide urethral support to prevent urine leakage, and suppress urgency. In clinical urology practice, expert clinicians also teach patients how to relax the muscle to improve bladder emptying and relieve pelvic pain caused by muscle spasm. When treating lower urinary tract symptoms, an exercise training program combined with biofeedback therapy has been recommended as first-line treatment. This article provides clinical application of pelvic floor muscle rehabilitation using biofeedback as a technique to enhance pelvic floor muscle training.

  5. Ultrasound Imaging of the Pelvic Floor.

    PubMed

    Stone, Daniel E; Quiroz, Lieschen H

    2016-03-01

    This article discusses the background and appraisal of endoluminal ultrasound of the pelvic floor. It provides a detailed anatomic assessment of the muscles and surrounding organs of the pelvic floor. Different anatomic variability and pathology, such as prolapse, fecal incontinence, urinary incontinence, vaginal wall cysts, synthetic implanted material, and pelvic pain, are easily assessed with endoluminal vaginal ultrasound. With pelvic organ prolapse in particular, not only is the prolapse itself seen but the underlying cause related to the anatomic and functional abnormalities of the pelvic floor muscle structures are also visualized.

  6. Chronic Pelvic Pain in Women.

    PubMed

    Speer, Linda M; Mushkbar, Saudia; Erbele, Tara

    2016-03-01

    Chronic pelvic pain in women is defined as persistent, noncyclic pain perceived to be in structures related to the pelvis and lasting more than six months. Often no specific etiology can be identified, and it can be conceptualized as a chronic regional pain syndrome or functional somatic pain syndrome. It is typically associated with other functional somatic pain syndromes (e.g., irritable bowel syndrome, nonspecific chronic fatigue syndrome) and mental health disorders (e.g., posttraumatic stress disorder, depression). Diagnosis is based on findings from the history and physical examination. Pelvic ultrasonography is indicated to rule out anatomic abnormalities. Referral for diagnostic evaluation of endometriosis by laparoscopy is usually indicated in severe cases. Curative treatment is elusive, and evidence-based therapies are limited. Patient engagement in a biopsychosocial approach is recommended, with treatment of any identifiable disease process such as endometriosis, interstitial cystitis/painful bladder syndrome, and comorbid depression. Potentially beneficial medications include depot medroxyprogesterone, gabapentin, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, and gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonists with add-back hormone therapy. Pelvic floor physical therapy may be helpful. Behavioral therapy is an integral part of treatment. In select cases, neuromodulation of sacral nerves may be appropriate. Hysterectomy may be considered as a last resort if pain seems to be of uterine origin, although significant improvement occurs in only about one-half of cases. Chronic pelvic pain should be managed with a collaborative, patient-centered approach.

  7. Bone Health and Pelvic Radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Higham, C E; Faithfull, S

    2015-11-01

    Survivors who have received pelvic radiotherapy make up many of the long-term cancer population, with therapies for gynaecological, bowel, bladder and prostate malignancies. Individuals who receive radiotherapy to the pelvis as part of their cancer treatment are at risk of insufficiency fractures. Symptoms of insufficiency fractures include pelvic and back pain and immobility, which can affect substantially quality of life. This constellation of symptoms can occur within 2 months of radiotherapy up to 63 months post-treatment, with a median incidence of 6-20 months. As a condition it is under reported and evidence is poor as to the contributing risk factors, causation and best management to improve the patient's bone health and mobility. As radiotherapy advances, chronic symptoms, such as insufficiency fractures, as a consequence of treatment need to be better understood and reviewed. This overview explores the current evidence for the effect of radiotherapy on bone health and insufficiency fractures and identifies what we know and where gaps in our knowledge lie. The overview concludes with the need to take seriously complaints of pelvic pain from patients after pelvic radiotherapy and to investigate and manage these symptoms more effectively. There is a clear need for definitive research in this field to provide the evidence-based guidance much needed in practice.

  8. Absence of bile acid malabsorption as a late effect of pelvic irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Schuster, J.J.; Stryker, J.A.; Demers, L.M.; Mortel, R.

    1986-09-01

    The pathophysiology of chronic radiation-induced diarrhea was evaluated in 28 patients who had undergone pelvic irradiation for gynecologic neoplasms 2 to 7 years previously. Twenty-seven patients undergoing radiotherapy with techniques that did not require abdominal or pelvic irradiation served as controls. The glycine conjugates of cholic acid (GC) were measured in serum by radioimmunoassay. Fasting and 2 hr. pp GC levels for the pelvic irradiated patients were 11.0 +/- 11.1 (mean +/- SD) and 24.8 +/- 17.3 micrograms/dl. Fasting and 2 hr. pp GC levels for controls were 12.6 +/- 7.4 and 28.0 +/- 14.7. There were no significant differences in the post-prandial increases in serum GC between pelvic irradiated patients and controls (p = .23, Type II error probability = .13). There was also no significant difference in the 2 hr. pp and fasting GC ratio (p = .39). There was significant difference between the stool frequency (p less than .01) and the prevalence of diarrhea (p less than .02) between pelvic irradiated patients and controls. The data suggest that bile acid malabsorption due to ileal dysfunction is not an inevitable late complication of pelvic irradiation and is not the major determinant in the pathophysiology of chronic radiation-induced diarrhea.

  9. The value of vaginal packing in pelvic floor surgery: a randomised double-blind study.

    PubMed

    Thiagamoorthy, G; Khalil, A; Cardozo, L; Srikrishna, S; Leslie, G; Robinson, D

    2014-05-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of vaginal packing following pelvic floor surgery with regard to post-operative pain, bleeding and infection. This was a double-blind randomised study of women undergoing vaginal hysterectomy and/or pelvic floor repair at a tertiary urogynaecology unit. The primary outcome of day 1 post-operative pain was assessed using the short-form McGill Pain score. Secondary outcomes were haematological and infective morbidity, evaluated using changes in full blood count, and cultures of midstream urine and high vaginal swabs. A transvaginal ultrasound scan to exclude pelvic haematoma was performed at 6 weeks in all women who underwent vaginal hysterectomy with or without a pelvic floor repair. In total, 190 women were recruited: mean age 58.3 years (27-91 years), mean body mass index 27.4 kg/m(2) and median parity 3. Women were randomised into the 'pack' (n = 86) and 'no pack' (n = 87) arms with no demographic differences between the groups. No statistically significant differences in the post-operative pain scores or secondary outcome measures were demonstrated. Incidence of haematoma formation (14.8 % no pack, 7.3 % pack, p = 0.204) was not statistically significant. There were three clinically significant complications in the no pack group and none in the pack group. This is the first study to examine pain in association with post-operative vaginal packing. There is no evidence to suggest that packing increases pain scores or post-operative morbidity. A trend towards increased haematoma and significant complications was seen in the no pack group. As vaginal packing does no harm and may be of some benefit it may be argued that packing should be recommended as routine clinical practice.

  10. Retrospective clinical evaluation of hypobaric spinal anaesthesia in dogs undergoing pelvic limb orthopaedic surgery.

    PubMed

    De Gennaro, C; Vettorato, E; Corletto, F

    2014-10-01

    To evaluate intraoperative effects, complications, postoperative rescue analgesia requirement and presence of postoperative unilateral blockade after hypobaric spinal anaesthesia in dogs. Retrospective review of case records of dogs that underwent pelvic limb orthopaedic surgery and received hypobaric spinal anaesthesia. Cases that contained complete information on perioperative analgesia, end tidal anaesthetic agent, arterial blood pressure, postoperative urination, motor function and assessment at the sixth week re-examination were selected. Twenty-four of forty-eight records were sufficiently complete to meet the selection criteria. Local anaesthetic dose and volume of the solution administered were 0 · 22 (±0 · 06) mg/kg and 0 · 16 (±0 · 05) mL/kg, respectively. Fentanyl was administered intraoperatively in seven dogs (29%); mean ± sd end-expired isoflurane was 1 · 09 ± 0 · 17%; hypotension was observed in nine dogs (37 · 5%). Unilateral blockade was documented in 18 dogs (75%); 6 dogs (25%) required methadone postoperatively; urinary retention was not observed. One dog developed steroid responsive meningitis arteritis. Hypobaric spinal anaesthesia achieved unilateral postoperative pelvic limb motor blockade in dogs, although bilateral block occurred in a proportion of animals; intraoperative hypotension was not infrequent. Fentanyl and postoperative methadone might be required to control nociception and pain, despite technical success in performing spinal anaesthesia. © 2014 British Small Animal Veterinary Association.

  11. Role of pelvic ultrasound simulation.

    PubMed

    Arya, Sushila; Mulla, Zuber D; Kupesic Plavsic, Sanja

    2017-10-10

    Pelvic ultrasound is a critical diagnostic imaging tool in obstetrics and gynaecology. Training opportunities in transvaginal ultrasound have not kept pace with the demand among learners because of the increased complexity of modern ultrasound technology and duty-hour restrictions. Ultrasound simulation training has the potential to overcome this gap. Training opportunities in transvaginal ultrasound have not kept pace with the demand OBJECTIVE: Our study aimed to determine the usefulness, applicability and attitudes toward pelvic ultrasound simulation training among residents, sonographers and practising doctors. Pelvic ultrasound simulation activity using high-fidelity virtual reality ultrasound simulators lasted 4 hours and consisted of three modules: abnormal uterine bleeding, adnexal masses and bleeding in pregnancy. All learners completed a pre- and post-encounter quiz, and an anonymous post-simulation survey on the relevance of ultrasound simulation to clinical learning, and its usefulness to improve scanning performance and interpretation skills. Thirty-one participants attended the workshop, and 28 (90.3%) of them responded to the survey. Five respondents agreed and 23 strongly agreed that pelvic ultrasound simulation applies to their clinical ultrasound practice, and seven of them agreed and 21 strongly agreed that their performance of ultrasound and interpretation skills will be improved following their simulation training. The average post-activity knowledge score for all three topics significantly increased (paired Student's t-test, p < 0.0001). All 28 respondents believe that ultrasound simulation is a useful complement to learning with real patients, with the potential to improve their pelvic ultrasound performance, interpretation skills and clinical reasoning. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd and The Association for the Study of Medical Education.

  12. [Complex pelvic injury in childhood].

    PubMed

    Schmal, H; Klemt, C; Haag, C; Bonnaire, F

    2002-08-01

    Pelvic disruptions are rare in children caused by the flexible anchoring of bony parts associated with a high elasticity of the skeleton. Portion of pelvic fractures in infants is lower than 5% even when reviewing cases of specialized centers. The part of complex pelvic injuries and multiple injured patients in infants is higher when compared to adults, a fact caused by the more intense forces that are necessary to lead to pelvic disruption in children. Combination of a rare injury and the capability of children to compensate blood loss for a long time may implicate a wrong security and prolong diagnostic and therapeutic procedures--a problem that definitely should be avoided. Three cases were analyzed and established algorithms for treatment of patients matching these special injury-features demonstrated. A good outcome may only be achieved when all components of injury pattern get recognized and treatment is organized following the hierarchy of necessity. Therefore in the time table first life-saving steps have to be taken and then accompanying injuries can be treated that often decisively influence life quality. As seen in our cases unstable and dislocated fractures require open reduction and internal fixation ensuring nerval decompression, stop of hemorrhage and realizing the prerequisite for effective treatment of soft tissue damage. The acute hemorrhagic shock is one of the leading causes of death following severe pelvic injuries. After stabilization of fracture, surgical treatment of soft tissue injuries and intraabdominal bleeding sources the immediate diagnostic angiography possibly in combination with a therapeutic selective embolization is a well established part of the treatment. The aim of complete restitution can only be accomplished by cooperation of several different specialists and consultants in a trauma center.

  13. Long-term urinary adverse effects of pelvic radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Malaeb, Bahaa S.

    2011-01-01

    Objective Radiation for tumors arising in the pelvis has been utilized for over a 100 years. Adverse effects (AEs) of radiotherapy (RT) continue to accumulate with time and are reported to show decades after treatment. The benefit of RT for pelvic tumors is well described as is their acute AEs. Late AEs are less well described. The burden of treatment for the late AEs is large given the high utilization of RT. Review For prostate cancer, 37% of patients will receive radiation during the first 6 months after diagnosis. Low-and high-grade AEs are reported to occur in 20–43 and 5–13%, respectively, with a median follow-up of ∼60 months. For bladder cancer, the grade 2 and grade 3 late AEs occur in 18–27 and 6–17% with a median follow-up of 29–76 months. For cervical cancer, the risk of low-grade AEs following radiation can be as high as 28%. High-grade AEs occur in about 8% at 3 years and 14.4% at 20 years or ∼0.34% per year. Radiation AEs appear to be less common or at least less well studied after radiation for rectal and endometrial cancers. Conclusion Properly delineating the rate of long-term AEs after pelvic RT is instrumental to counseling patients about their options for cancer treatment. Further studies are needed that are powered to specifically evaluate long-term AEs. PMID:20959990

  14. Fluid dynamic modelling of renal pelvic pressure during endoscopic stone removal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oratis, Alexandros; Subasic, John; Bird, James; Eisner, Brian

    2015-11-01

    Endoscopic kidney stone removal procedures are known to increase internal pressure in the renal pelvis, the kidney's urinary collecting system. High renal pelvic pressure incites systemic absorption of irrigation fluid, which can increase the risk of postoperative fever and sepsis or the unwanted absorption of electrolytes. Urologists choose the appropriate surgical procedure based on patient history and kidney stone size. However, no study has been conducted to compare the pressure profiles of each procedure, nor is there a precise sense of how the renal pelvic pressure scales with various operational parameters. Here we develop physical models for the flow rates and renal pelvic pressure for various procedures. We show that the results of our models are consistent with existing urological data on each procedure and that the models can predict pressure profiles where data is unavailable.

  15. Major Pelvic Bleeding Following a Stapled Transanal Rectal Resection: Use of Laparoscopy as a Diagnostic Tool

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Abdul Qayyum; Keane, Sean

    2016-01-01

    Stapled transanal rectal resection (STARR) and stapled hemorrhoidopexy (SH) are well-established techniques for treating rectal prolapse and obstructed defecation syndrome (ODS). Occasionally, they can be associated with severe complications. We describe the case of a 59-year-old woman who underwent STARR for ODS and developed a postoperative pelvic hemorrhage. A computed tomography (CT) scan revealed a vast pelvic, retroperitoneal hematoma and free gas in the abdomen. Laparoscopy ruled out any bowel lesions, but identified a hematoma of the pelvis. Flexible sigmoidoscopy showed a small leakage of the rectal suture. The patient was treated conservatively and recovered completely. Surgeons performing STARR and SH must be aware of the risk of this rare, but severe, complication. If the patient is not progressing after a STARR or SH, a CT scan can be indicated to rule out intra-abdominal and pelvic hemorrhage. Laparoscopy is a diagnostic tool and should be associated with intraluminal exploration with flexible sigmoidoscopy. PMID:27847791

  16. Female pelvic floor anatomy: the pelvic floor, supporting structures, and pelvic organs.

    PubMed

    Herschorn, Sender

    2004-01-01

    The development of novel, less invasive therapies for stress urinary incontinence in women requires a thorough knowledge of the relationship between the pathophysiology of incontinence and anatomy. This article provides a review of the anatomy of the pelvic floor and lower urinary tract. Also discussed is the hammock hypothesis, which describes urethral support within the pelvis and provides an explanation of the continence mechanism.

  17. The effectiveness of two different laparoscopic surgeries for apical support of pelvic organ prolapse.

    PubMed

    Li, Shunshuang; Ji, Mei; Zhao, Zhao

    2015-05-01

    To evaluate the efficacy of laparoscopic colpo-uterine butterfly suspension and compare it to laparoscopic sacrocervicopexy for apical support in sexually active patients of pelvic organ prolapse. Twenty-there women with symptomatic prolapse of apical prolapse underwent laparoscopic colpo-uterine butterfly suspension and forty-five underwent laparoscopic sacrocervicopexy at the first affiliated of Zhengzhou University between January 2010 and June 2013. They all presented with at least a stage 2 apical prolapse. Pre- and post-operative data referring to pelvic organ prolapse quantification (POP-Q) system were compared. At the same time, validated questionnaire of the Pelvic Floor Distress Inventory (PFDI-20), the Pelvic Floor Impact Questionnaire (PFIQ-7) and the Pelvic organ prolapse urinary Incontinence Sexual Questionnaire (PISQ-12) were included. From 2010 to 2013, 68 patients were included. Only 3 cases lost the follow-up in the Laparoscopic sacrocervicopexy. In the laparoscopic colpo-uterine butterfly suspension, there was no recurrence versus in five the laparoscopic sacrocervicopexy. When considered the operating time and blood loss, the laparoscopic colpo-uterine butterfly suspension was more favorable. Erosion was higher in the laparoscopic sacrocervicopexy compared to the other group (0% vs 21.4%). There was no difference in the postoperative PFDI-20 score (P=0.3079), and PFIQ-7 score (P=0.8889) between the two groups, while the PISQ-12 score was much higher in the laparoscopic colpo-uterine butterfly suspension than the other group (P=0.0076). Laparoscopic colpo-uterine butterfly suspension is a more effective option for sexually active women with pelvic organ prolapse. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Pregnancy-related pelvic girdle pain: an update

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    A large number of scientists from a wide range of medical and surgical disciplines have reported on the existence and characteristics of the clinical syndrome of pelvic girdle pain during or after pregnancy. This syndrome refers to a musculoskeletal type of persistent pain localised at the anterior and/or posterior aspect of the pelvic ring. The pain may radiate across the hip joint and the thigh bones. The symptoms may begin either during the first trimester of pregnancy, at labour or even during the postpartum period. The physiological processes characterising this clinical entity remain obscure. In this review, the definition and epidemiology, as well as a proposed diagnostic algorithm and treatment options, are presented. Ongoing research is desirable to establish clear management strategies that are based on the pathophysiologic mechanisms responsible for the escalation of the syndrome's symptoms to a fraction of the population of pregnant women. PMID:21324134

  19. Pregnancy-related pelvic girdle pain: an update.

    PubMed

    Kanakaris, Nikolaos K; Roberts, Craig S; Giannoudis, Peter V

    2011-02-15

    A large number of scientists from a wide range of medical and surgical disciplines have reported on the existence and characteristics of the clinical syndrome of pelvic girdle pain during or after pregnancy. This syndrome refers to a musculoskeletal type of persistent pain localised at the anterior and/or posterior aspect of the pelvic ring. The pain may radiate across the hip joint and the thigh bones. The symptoms may begin either during the first trimester of pregnancy, at labour or even during the postpartum period. The physiological processes characterising this clinical entity remain obscure. In this review, the definition and epidemiology, as well as a proposed diagnostic algorithm and treatment options, are presented. Ongoing research is desirable to establish clear management strategies that are based on the pathophysiologic mechanisms responsible for the escalation of the syndrome's symptoms to a fraction of the population of pregnant women.

  20. Pelvic muscles during rest: responses to pelvic muscle exercise.

    PubMed

    Griffin, C; Dougherty, M C; Yarandi, H

    1994-01-01

    The purpose of the research was to study pelvic muscle changes in the resting phase between voluntary contractions (during pelvic muscle assessment) and in response to pelvic muscle exercise (PME) through secondary analysis of data. The sample consisted of healthy women (N = 38) aged 35 to 54. Analysis of variance showed a significant difference in resting pressure within each assessment (F = 2.92, p < .04). A significant difference in resting pressures within subjects was found (F = 3.54, p < .02). Within-subject variance suggests exercises performed without a warmup may result in incomplete relaxation prior to contraction. Significant change between baseline and Level 1 of the graded PME program suggests slow relaxation of untrained muscles. Increases in resting pressure at Levels 3 and 4 may be a more accurate reflection of muscle hypertrophy. The results of this research indicate that care should be taken in establishing the point from which changes during contractions are measured. It is recommended that the resting pressure be used. Exercise continued for more than 3 or 4 weeks accounts for nearly all strength gains and explains the increases in resting pressure at PME Levels 3 and 4.

  1. Reconstruction of the pelvis and lumbar-pelvic junction using 2 vascularized autologous bone grafts after en bloc resection for an iliosacral chondrosarcoma.

    PubMed

    Mendel, Ehud; Mayerson, Joel L; Nathoo, Narendra; Edgar, Rick L; Schmidt, Carl; Miller, Michael J

    2011-08-01

    Primary pelvic sarcomas remain challenging and complex surgical problems with significant potential for postoperative impairment of ambulation, as well as bowel, bladder, and sexual function. En bloc resection with negative tumor margins represents the best chance of control or cure as current adjuvant therapies remain ineffective. Tumor involvement of the sacrum with extension to the greater sciatic notch and ipsilateral ilium requires an external hemipelvectomy and sagittal sacrectomy with sacrifice of the lower extremity to achieve en bloc resection, followed by lumbar-pelvic reconstruction. A patient with an iliosacral chondrosarcoma is presented to illustrate a novel lumbar-pelvic reconstruction technique, in which vascularized soft tissue and 2 vascularized bone grafts were harvested from the amputated lower extremity and transferred to the pelvis as composite flaps to restore pelvic ring integrity, augment lumbar-pelvic fusion, and close the soft-tissue defect. The biomechanical dynamics of this unique construct are discussed.

  2. Do elite athletes experience low back, pelvic girdle and pelvic floor complaints during and after pregnancy?

    PubMed

    Bø, K; Backe-Hansen, K L

    2007-10-01

    The aim of the present investigation was to study prevalence of low back pain, pelvic girdle pain (PGP) and pelvic floor disorders during pregnancy and after childbirth in elite athletes. A postal questionnaire was sent to all elite athletes who had given birth registered with The Norwegian Olympic Committee and Confederation of Sports (n=40). Eighty age-matched women served as the control group. The response rates were 77.5% and 57.5% in the elite athletes and control groups, respectively. There were no significant differences in the prevalence of low back and PGP, urinary or fecal incontinence among elite athletes and controls at any time point. The prevalence of low back pain without radiation to the leg in elite athletes was 25.8%, 18.5%, 9.7% and 29% the year before pregnancy, during pregnancy, 6 weeks postpartum and at the time of completing the questionnaire, respectively. The prevalence of PGP was 0, 29.6%, 12.9% and 19.4%. Prevalence of stress urinary incontinence was 12.9%, 18.5%, 29% and 35.5%. None of the elite athletes had fecal incontinence at any time point. There were no differences in mode of delivery or birthweight between elite athletes and controls. The elite athletes had a significantly lower body mass index at 6 weeks postpartum and at present compared with the control group.

  3. [Surgical treatment of intestinal complications of pelvic radiotherapy].

    PubMed

    Bannura, G

    1995-08-01

    One hundred forty patients treated for intestinal complications of pelvic irradiation are presented. The most common clinical expression was radiation rectitis, complicated with rectovaginal fistulas in 58% of cases. These patients were subjected to Parks procedure for fistula repair with satisfactory results. Half the operated patients remained with an ostomy as a definitive sequel and overall perioperative mortality in these patients was 10%. Radiation enteritis has a high operative mortality due to delays in diagnosis and to severe septic complications. It must be suspected in irradiated patients presenting with chronic diarrhea and weight loss. Urological complications and involvement of several intestinal segments are bad prognostic factors. Resections and anastomoses with undamaged segments are the safest surgical procedures. Improvements of radiation techniques and the use of a reabsorbable mesh to seal the pelvis during radiation therapy are adequate preventive measures.

  4. Does pelvic hematoma on admission computed tomography predict active bleeding at angiography for pelvic fracture?

    PubMed

    Brown, Carlos V R; Kasotakis, George; Wilcox, Alison; Rhee, Peter; Salim, Ali; Demetriades, Demetrios

    2005-09-01

    Pelvic angiography plays an increasing role in the management of pelvic fractures (PFs). Little has been written regarding the size of pelvic hematoma on admission computed tomography (CT) and how it relates to angiography results after PF. This is a retrospective review of trauma patients with PF who underwent an admission abdominal/pelvic CT scan and pelvic angiography from 2001 to 2003. CT pelvic hematoma was measured and classified as minimal or significant based on hematoma dimensions. Presence of a contrast blush on CT scan was also documented. Thirty-seven patients underwent an admission CT scan and went on to pelvic angiography. Of the 22 patients with significant pelvic hematoma, 73 per cent (n = 16) had bleeding at angiography. Fifteen patients had minimal pelvic hematoma, with 67 per cent (n = 10) showing active bleeding at angiography. In addition, five of six patients (83%) with no pelvic hematoma had active bleeding at angiography. Six patients had a blush on CT scan, with five of these (83%) having a positive angiogram. But, 22 of 31 (71%) patients with no blush on CT scan had bleeding at angiography. The absence of a pelvic hematoma or contrast blush should not alter indications for pelvic angiography, as they do not reliably exclude active pelvic bleeding.

  5. Improvements in hip- and pelvic motion for patients with osseointegrated trans-femoral prostheses.

    PubMed

    Tranberg, R; Zügner, R; Kärrholm, J

    2011-02-01

    This study describes the changes in hip and pelvic kinematics in 19 trans-femoral amputees, who were treated with an osseointegrated trans-femoral prosthesis. Patients were studied with 3-dimensional gait analysis, walking with socket prosthesis within two days before the osseointergration procedure. The post-operative gait analysis was carried out at the 2 year follow-up visit. Fifty-seven; age-, side- and gender-matched healthy subjects served as controls. Post-operative data showed that patients who had an osseointegrated transfemoral prosthesis increased their hip extension by 7.3° (p=0.007), changing from -2.6° (range -13.4° to 10.7°) to -9.9° (range -29.4° to 5°). Moreover, the pre-operative anterior pelvic tilt was reduced by 4.0° (p=0.016), changing from 21.7° (range 11.9-34.8°) to 17.7° (range 5.5-25.7°). Values for hip extension and pelvic tilt changed toward those of controls. These results confirm that patients treated with osseointegrated trans-femoral prosthesis encounter significant changes of their kinematic pattern in terms of hip extension and anterior pelvic tilt. Even though the changes were moderate they may, in the long-term have a positive influence on low-back biomechanics and could contribute to reducing the risk of further problems with low back pain.

  6. [Radiotherapy in pelvic recurrences of rectal cancer].

    PubMed

    Morganti, A G; Santoni, R; Osti, M F

    2001-01-01

    Patients with locally recurrent rectal carcinoma have an unfavourable prognosis for the high incidence of distant metastases, the infrequent feasibility of radical surgical resection, and, in these last cases, the high incidence of re-recurrences. Based on the low resectability rate of pelvic recurrences, the clear impact of tumor diameter on resectability and outcome, and the documented possibility to achieve a significant tumor downstaging and downsizing with the use of concurrent chemoradiation, it is evident that the most promising treatment several authors have considered concurrent chemoradiation followed, if feasible, by radical resection. Furthermore, based on the high local and distant failure rate after surgery, the utilization of intraoperative radiation therapy (IORT) and adjuvant chemotherapy seems justified. Some published comparisons between patients treated with and without IORT seems to suggest the possible improvement in both local control and survival in these patients. Particularly interesting issues in this field are: 1) the definition of the most effective treatment modality (both in terms of radiation dose, fractionation and techniques, and drugs to be used concurrently to radiotherapy); 2) the analysis of the prognostic impact of several factors, with the aim of designing and validating staging systems of local rectal recurrences; 3) the possibility to treat with relatively high doses also patients previously irradiated on the pelvis.

  7. Laparoscopically guided bilateral pelvic lymphadenectomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gershman, Alex; Danoff, Dudley; Chandra, Mudjianto; Grundfest, Warren S.

    1991-07-01

    Pelvic node dissection has gained widespread acceptance as the final staging procedure in patients with normal acid phospatase and bone scan free of metastatic disease prior to definitive therapy for cure. However, the procedure has had a high morbidity (20-34%) and a major economic impact on the patient due to lengthy hospitalization and recuperative time. The development of laparoscopic biopsy techniques suggests that the need for open surgical lymphadenectomy may be reduced by a laparoscopically performed lymphadenectomy. The goal of this report is to investigate the possibility of laparoscopic pelvic lymphadenectomy in an animal model. Our interest in laparoscopy is based on the ability of this technique to permit tissue removal without the need for major incisions. In laparoscopic cholecystectomy and laparoscopic appendectomy, the surgical procedure is essentially unaltered. The diseased organ is removed and there is no need for a large abdominal incision.

  8. Obesity and pelvic floor dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Ramalingam, Kalaivani; Monga, Ash

    2015-05-01

    Obesity is associated with a high prevalence of pelvic floor disorders. Patients with obesity present with a range of urinary, bowel and sexual dysfunction problems as well as uterovaginal prolapse. Urinary incontinence, faecal incontinence and sexual dysfunction are more prevalent in patients with obesity. Uterovaginal prolapse is also more common than in the non-obese population. Weight loss by surgical and non-surgical methods plays a major role in the improvement of these symptoms in such patients. The treatment of symptoms leads to an improvement in their quality of life. However, surgical treatment of these symptoms may be accompanied by an increased risk of complications in obese patients. A better understanding of the mechanism of obesity-associated pelvic floor dysfunction is essential.

  9. The female orgasm: pelvic contractions.

    PubMed

    Bohlen, J G; Held, J P; Sanderson, M O; Ahlgren, A

    1982-10-01

    Eleven nulliparous women manually self-stimulated to orgasm, each on three separate occasions. Pelvic contraction pressure was measured by an anal probe and a vaginal probe simultaneously. Near the perceived start of orgasm, a series of regular contractions began in nine of the women. Anal and vaginal contraction waveforms were synchronized with each other, and the same number of orgasmic contractions occurred in each lumen. Anal pressure had a higher resting baseline and greater amplitude contractions than vaginal pressure. The perceived start of orgasm did not correspond precisely with the onset of regular contractions. Mean intercontraction intervals increased linearly at an increment of about 0.1 second through the series of regular contractions. Amplitudes of contraction pressure waveforms, representing pelvic muscular force, were initially low, increased through the first half of the regular series, and then decreased. Area and net area of the pressure waveforms, reflecting pelvic muscular exertion (force x time), increased during the regular orgasmic contractions. Three of the women's orgasms consistently included only a series of regular contractions (orgasm type I). For six other women, orgasms consistently continued beyond the regular series with additional irregular contractions (orgasm type II). Types I and II had been identified previously in men. Two women had no regular contractions during reported orgasms. This pattern, type IV, had not been recorded in men. Women of different types showed marked differences in orgasm duration and number of contractions. Identification of these types in subjects is important for meaningful comparison of contraction parameters in different studies.

  10. Successful Treatment of a Large Pelvic Abscess Using Intraluminal VAC: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Aras, Abbas; Celik, Sebahattin; Kiziltan, Remzi; Yilmaz, Özkan; Kotan, Çetin

    2016-04-01

    The most feared complication of the surgical treatment of rectal cancer is anastomotic leakage, which is related to high rates of mortality and morbidity. Here, we present a patient who could not be treated with surgical drainage but treated by intraluminal Vacuum Associated Closure (VAC). A 34-year-old male patient was treated for rectal cancer by low anterior resection, colorectal anastomosis, and diverting ileostomy following neoadjuvant CRT. The patient reported with a postoperative anastomotic disruption and a large pelvic abscess. Due to the continuation of foul-smell drainage inspite of perianal incision and drainage, intraluminal VAC was applied and the pelvic abscess and the foul-smell were successfully treated. The presence of an adequate anal sphincter tonus is a disadvantage in anastomotic leakage, since it prevents the emptying of the intestinal content and also precludes the drainage of the pelvic abscess. The endoluminal application of VAC, similar to the results of application of VAC in open wounds, has been demonstrated to decrease fibrin and necrotic tissue in the pelvic cavity and increase granulation tissue. VAC, which has long been used in the treatment of open wounds, is a promising method in the treatment of large pelvic abscesses due to anastomotic leakage following rectum resection.

  11. SURGICAL TREATMENT OF UNSTABLE PELVIC RING FRACTURE IN SKELETALLY IMMATURE PATIENTS

    PubMed Central

    Guimarães, Joao Antonio Matheus; de Souza Portes Meirelles, Ricardo; Júnior, Luiz Augusto Peçanha Tavares; Goldsztajn, Flávio; Rocha, Tito; Mendes, Pedro Henrique Barros

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To present the outcomes from definitive surgical treatment for unstable fractures of the pelvic ring in children undergoing surgical reduction and stabilization. Methods: We studied 10 patients with immature skeletons who suffered unstable fractures of the pelvic ring and were treated between March 2004 and January 2008. The study was retrospective, based on clinical and radiographic evaluations. Results: The mean age at the time of the trauma was 8.8 years (2 to 13 years). Seven patients were female and three was male. There were eight cases of trauma caused by being run over, and one case each of a motorcycle accident and falling from a height. Five patients had other associated injuries such as fractures of the clavicle, femoral diaphysis, proximal humerus, lower leg bones, olecranon and bladder injury. All the patients evaluated showed an excellent clinical outcome. The pelvic asymmetry before surgery ranged from 0.7 to 2.9 cm (mean 1.45 cm), and dropped to values between 0.2 and 0.9 cm (mean 0.39 cm) after reduction. In no case was any change observed in pelvic asymmetry measured in the immediate postoperative period and at the end of follow-up. Conclusion: Pelvic ring fractures in skeletally immature patients are rare and surgical treatment is unusual. Several authors have questioned conservative treatment because of the complications encountered. Bone remodeling does not seem enough to cause an improvement in pelvic asymmetry, and this justifies the choice of surgical treatment for reduction and correction of pelvic ring deformities. PMID:27026968

  12. How important is the number of pelvic lymph node retrieved to locorregional staging of cervix cancer?

    PubMed Central

    Batista, Thales Paulo; Bezerra, Artur Lício Rocha; Martins, Mário Rino; Carneiro, Vandré Cabral Gomes

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: To explore how important is the number of pelvic lymph nodes dissected for the nodal staging in FIGO IA2-IB2 cervical cancer, submitted to radical surgical treatment. Methods: A cross-sectional study was carried out on patients who underwent Piver class II radical hysterectomy and pelvic lymphadenectomy, in two centers in the state of Pernambuco, from January, 2001 to December, 2008. The analysis of the area under the ROC curve was adopted as a summary-measure of discriminatory power of the number of nodes dissected in predicting the pelvic nodal status. Additionally, we also confirm our findings using logistic regression and the Fisher's exact test. Results: The postoperative pathological study included 662 pelvic lymph nodes dissected (median per-patient=9, q25=6 − q75=13) from 69 patients. The ROC curve analysis revealed AUC=0.642, for the discriminatory value of the number of nodes dissected in predicting the pelvic nodal status. Similar findings were found after categorization using 10 and 15 lymph nodes as cut-offs (AUC=0.605 and 0.526, respectively). Logistic regression revealed odds ratio of 0.912 (95% CI=0.805-1.032; p=0.125) for the predictive value of the number of nodes dissected, and a number of nodes ≥10 or ≥15 lymph nodes was not significantly associated with the nodal status by the Fischer's exact test (p=0.224 and p=0.699, respectively). Conclusion: The number of pelvic lymph nodes dissected did not correlate with pelvic lymph node metastatic involvement. This study suggests that dissection of a greater number of lymph nodes does not increase locoregional nodal staging in cervical cancer. PMID:24488383

  13. Pelvic trauma: WSES classification and guidelines.

    PubMed

    Coccolini, Federico; Stahel, Philip F; Montori, Giulia; Biffl, Walter; Horer, Tal M; Catena, Fausto; Kluger, Yoram; Moore, Ernest E; Peitzman, Andrew B; Ivatury, Rao; Coimbra, Raul; Fraga, Gustavo Pereira; Pereira, Bruno; Rizoli, Sandro; Kirkpatrick, Andrew; Leppaniemi, Ari; Manfredi, Roberto; Magnone, Stefano; Chiara, Osvaldo; Solaini, Leonardo; Ceresoli, Marco; Allievi, Niccolò; Arvieux, Catherine; Velmahos, George; Balogh, Zsolt; Naidoo, Noel; Weber, Dieter; Abu-Zidan, Fikri; Sartelli, Massimo; Ansaloni, Luca

    2017-01-01

    Complex pelvic injuries are among the most dangerous and deadly trauma related lesions. Different classification systems exist, some are based on the mechanism of injury, some on anatomic patterns and some are focusing on the resulting instability requiring operative fixation. The optimal treatment strategy, however, should keep into consideration the hemodynamic status, the anatomic impairment of pelvic ring function and the associated injuries. The management of pelvic trauma patients aims definitively to restore the homeostasis and the normal physiopathology associated to the mechanical stability of the pelvic ring. Thus the management of pelvic trauma must be multidisciplinary and should be ultimately based on the physiology of the patient and the anatomy of the injury. This paper presents the World Society of Emergency Surgery (WSES) classification of pelvic trauma and the management Guidelines.

  14. Postoperative stereotactic body radiotherapy for spinal metastases.

    PubMed

    Alghamdi, Majed; Tseng, Chia-Lin; Myrehaug, Sten; Maralani, Pejman; Heyn, Chris; Soliman, Hany; Lee, Young; Ruschin, Mark; Da Costa, Leodante; Yang, Victor; Campbell, Mikki; Sahgal, Arjun

    2017-09-01

    Spine is a common site of metastases in cancer patients. Spine surgery is indicated for select patients, typically those with mechanical instability and/or malignant epidural spinal cord (or cauda equina) compression. Although post-operative conventional palliative external beam radiation therapy has been the standard of care, technical improvements in radiation planning and image-guided radiotherapy have allowed for the application of stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) to the spine. Spine SBRT is intended to ablate residual tumor and optimize local control by delivering several fold greater biologically effective doses. Early clinical experience of postoperative spinal SBRT report encouraging results in terms of safety and efficacy. In this review, we summarize the clinical and technical aspects pertinent to a safe and effective practice of postoperative SBRT for spinal metastases.

  15. Gynecological pelvic pain as emergency pathology.

    PubMed

    Rivera Domínguez, A; Mora Jurado, A; García de la Oliva, A; de Araujo Martins-Romeo, D; Cueto Álvarez, L

    Acute pelvic pain is a common condition in emergency. The sources of acute pelvic pain are multifactorial, so it is important to be familiar with this type of pathologies. The purpose of this article is review the main causes of gynecological acute pelvic pain and their radiologic appearances to be able to make an accurate diagnosis and provide objective criteria for patient management. Copyright © 2016 SERAM. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  16. Adenocarcinoma of the endometrium: survival comparisons of patients with and without pelvic node sampling.

    PubMed

    Kilgore, L C; Partridge, E E; Alvarez, R D; Austin, J M; Shingleton, H M; Noojin, F; Conner, W

    1995-01-01

    From 1969 to 1990, 649 patients with adenocarcinoma of the endometrium were surgically managed by gynecologic oncologists from the University of Alabama at Birmingham. All patients underwent TAH-BSO and washings. Two hundred twelve patients had multiple-site pelvic node sampling (mean number of nodes, 11), 205 patients had limited site pelvic node sampling (mean number of nodes, 4), and in 208 patients, nodes were not sampled. Historical prognostic features, including tumor grade, depth of invasion, adnexal metastasis, cervical involvement, and positive cytology, were equally distributed in the three groups. Mean follow-up was 3 years. Patients undergoing multiple-site pelvic node sampling had significantly better survival than patients without node sampling (P = 0.0002). When patients were categorized as low risk (disease confined to the corpus) or as high risk (disease in the cervix, adnexa, uterine serosa, or washings) multiple-site pelvic node sampling again provided a significant survival advantage compared to patients without node sampling (high risk, P = 0.0006; low risk, P = 0.026). In a comparison of patients receiving whole pelvic radiation for grade III lesions or deep myometrial invasion, patients with multiple-site pelvic node sampling had better survival than those in whom nodes were not sampled (P = 0.0027). The significant survival advantage for patients having multiple-site node sampling, overall and in high- and low-risk groups, strongly suggests a therapeutic benefit. Additionally, adjuvant therapy may be more appropriate directed in these patients.

  17. Phase II Trial of Preoperative Radiation With Concurrent Capecitabine, Oxaliplatin, and Bevacizumab Followed by Surgery and Postoperative 5-Fluorouracil, Leucovorin, Oxaliplatin (FOLFOX), and Bevacizumab in Patients With Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer: 5-Year Clinical Outcomes ECOG-ACRIN Cancer Research Group E3204.

    PubMed

    Landry, Jerome C; Feng, Yang; Prabhu, Roshan S; Cohen, Steven J; Staley, Charles A; Whittington, Richard; Sigurdson, Elin Ruth; Nimeiri, Halla; Verma, Udit; Benson, Al Bowen

    2015-06-01

    The 5-year oncologic outcomes from the trial regimen were excellent. However, the neoadjuvant and surgical toxicity of this regimen was significant and was the primary reason for the low compliance with adjuvant systemic therapy.Due to the lack of an improvement in the pathologic complete response rate, the substantial associated toxicity, and the negative phase III trials of adjuvant bevacizumab in colon cancer, this regimen will not be pursued for further study. The addition of bevacizumab to chemotherapy improves overall survival for metastatic colorectal cancer. We initiated a phase II trial to evaluate preoperative capecitabine, oxaliplatin, and bevacizumab with radiation therapy (RT) followed by surgery and postoperative 5-fluorouracil, leucovorin, oxaliplatin (FOLFOX), and bevacizumab for locally advanced rectal cancer. The purpose of this report is to describe the 5-year oncologic outcomes of this regimen. In a phase II Simon two-stage design study, we evaluated preoperative treatment with capecitabine (825 mg/m(2) b.i.d. Monday-Friday), oxaliplatin (50 mg/m(2) weekly), bevacizumab (5 mg/kg on days 1, 15, and 29), and RT (50.4 Gy). Surgery was performed by 8 weeks after RT. Beginning 8-12 weeks after surgery, patients received FOLFOX plus bevacizumab (5 mg/kg) every 2 weeks for 12 cycles (oxaliplatin stopped after 9 cycles). The primary endpoint was a pathologic complete response (path-CR) rate of 30%. Fifty-seven patients with resectable T3/T4 rectal adenocarcinoma were enrolled between 2006 and 2010. Of 57 enrolled patients, 53 were eligible and included in the analysis. Forty-eight (91%) patients completed preoperative therapy, all of whom underwent curative surgical resection. Nine patients (17%) achieved path-CR. There were 29 worst grade 3 events, 8 worst grade 4 events, and 2 patient deaths, 1 of which was attributed to study therapy. Twenty-six patients (54%) began adjuvant chemotherapy. After a median follow-up period of 41 months, the 5-year

  18. Recognizing Myofascial Pelvic Pain in the Female Patient with Chronic Pelvic Pain

    PubMed Central

    Pastore, Elizabeth Anne; Katzman, Wendy B.

    2012-01-01

    Myofascial pelvic pain (MFPP) is a major component of chronic pelvic pain (CPP) and often is not properly identified by healthcare providers. The hallmark diagnostic indicator of MFPP is myofascial trigger points in the pelvic floor musculature that refer pain to adjacent sites. Effective treatments are available to reduce MFPP, including myofascial trigger point release, PMID:22862153

  19. Osteosarcoma of pelvic bones: imaging features.

    PubMed

    Park, Se Kyoung; Lee, In Sook; Cho, Kil Ho; Lee, Young Hwan; Yi, Jae Hyuck; Choi, Kyung Un

    The metaphyseal locations of tubular bones with osteoid mineralization in young patients are important diagnostic radiologic features of osteosarcoma. The pelvic bones are an unusual location of osteosarcoma. Although osteosarcoma occurring in pelvic bones is not common, the osteoid matrix may be a critical finding for differentiating osteosarcoma from other common pelvic bone tumors. Therefore, the possibility of osteosarcoma in pelvic bones may be considered in the presence of osteoid matrix even in the old age group. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  20. Female Pelvic Floor Anatomy: The Pelvic Floor, Supporting Structures, and Pelvic Organs

    PubMed Central

    Herschorn, Sender

    2004-01-01

    The development of novel, less invasive therapies for stress urinary incontinence in women requires a thorough knowledge of the relationship between the pathophysiology of incontinence and anatomy. This article provides a review of the anatomy of the pelvic floor and lower urinary tract. Also discussed is the hammock hypothesis, which describes urethral support within the pelvis and provides an explanation of the continence mechanism. PMID:16985905

  1. [Postoperative pain in craniotomy].

    PubMed

    Peón, Andréa Ungaro; Diccini, Solange

    2005-01-01

    In the postoperative period, 47% to 75% of the patients report some degree of pain. This study aimed to evaluate pain in the pre and postoperative period of patients submitted to craniotomy. This prospective research was carried out at the neurosurgery unit of a large Brazilian hospital. For a quantitative evaluation of pain, the verbal numeric 0-10 rating scale was used. Forty patients with a mean age of 36 years were evaluated. In the preoperative period, 34 (85%) patients indicated headache as the main cause of pain. In the postoperative period, 37 (93%) patients complained of pain while three (7%) reported absence of pain. Pain peaks were observed on the 2nd postoperative day, when 12 (32%) of the patients reported severe pain and 10 (27%) moderate pain. Absence of severe pain occurred after the 8th postoperative day. It was concluded that protocols of analgesia in craniotomy are needed, such as training nurses to better evaluate and handle pain.

  2. Gut microbial dysbiosis may predict diarrhea and fatigue in patients undergoing pelvic cancer radiotherapy: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Wang, Aiping; Ling, Zongxin; Yang, Zhixiang; Kiela, Pawel R; Wang, Tao; Wang, Cheng; Cao, Le; Geng, Fang; Shen, Mingqiang; Ran, Xinze; Su, Yongping; Cheng, Tianmin; Wang, Junping

    2015-01-01

    Fatigue and diarrhea are the most frequent adverse effects of pelvic radiotherapy, while their etiologies are largely unknown. The aim of this study is to investigate the correlations between fatigue, diarrhea, and alterations in gut microbiota induced by pelvic radiotherapy. During the 5-week treatment of pelvic radiotherapy in 11 cancer patients, the general fatigue score significantly increased and was more prominent in the patients with diarrhea. The fatigue score was closely correlated with the decrease of serum citrulline (an indicator of the functional enterocyte mass) and the increases of systemic inflammatory proteins, including haptoglobin, orosomuoid, α1-antitrypsin and TNF-α. Serum level of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) was also elevated, especially in the patients with diarrhea indicating epithelial barrier breach and endotoxemia. Pyrosequencing analysis of 16S rRNA gene revealed that microbial diversity, richness, and the Firmicutes/Bacteroidetes ratio were significantly altered prior to radiotherapy in patients who later developed diarrhea. Pelvic radiotherapy induced further changes in fecal microbial ecology, some of which were specific to the patients with or without diarrhea. Our results indicate that gut microbial dysbiosis prior to radiation therapy may be exploited to predict development of diarrhea and to guide preventive treatment options. Radiation-induced dysbiosis may contribute to pelvic radiation disease, including mucositis, diarrhea, systemic inflammatory response, and pelvic radiotherapy-associated fatigue in cancer patients.

  3. Lumbo-pelvic related indexes: impact on adult spinal deformity surgery.

    PubMed

    Boissière, Louis; Vital, Jean-Marc; Aunoble, Stéphane; Fabre, Thierry; Gille, Olivier; Obeid, Ibrahim

    2015-06-01

    Lumbo-pelvic indexes appeared recently in the literature taking advantage from the relationship between pelvic incidence (PI) and lumbar lordosis (LL). Schwab proposed to subtract LL from PI (PI-LL) as Boissière proposed the lumbar lordosis index (LLI), which is the ratio between LL and PI (LL/PI). Both indexes have been described to weight LL by a constant parameter not affected by degenerative processes, the PI. The aim of this study is to evaluate these parameters in adult spinal deformity (ASD) by analyzing their relationship with spinal malalignment and vertebral osteotomies. Two groups of patients with an ASD were realized; an adult scoliosis group (n = 78) and a postoperative flat-back syndrome group (n = 20). In the adult scoliosis group, 28 patients underwent an osteotomy [pedicle subtraction osteotomy (PSO) or Smith Petersen osteotomy] and 50 patients were corrected by posterior fusion without osteotomy. In the postoperative flat-back syndrome group all patients underwent a PSO. All patients had preoperative and postoperative full spine EOS radiographies to measure spino-pelvic parameters. The lack of lordosis was calculated, after prediction of theoretical LL from Legaye's formula, by subtracting measured LL to theoretical LL. Correlation analysis between the different parameters was performed. Both lumbo-pelvic parameters highly correlated with spinal malalignment (r = 0.97 for PI-LL and r = -0.97 for LLI for total patients) and were highly predictive of a spinal osteotomy performance (r = 0.88 for PI-LL >28° and r = 0.94 for LLI <0.5). Sagittal vertical axis (r = 0.67) and pelvic tilt (r = 0.64) correlated moderately with spinal malalignment for total patients. The LLI was more correlated with spinal osteotomies in the adult scoliosis group (r = 0.86 for PI-LL >28° and r = 0.94 for LLI <0.5), as Schwab's index was more precise to predict osteotomies in the postoperative flat-back syndrome group (Youden index = 0.95 for PI-LL >28° vs 0.90 for LLI <0

  4. Multimodal nociceptive mechanisms underlying chronic pelvic pain

    PubMed Central

    HELLMAN, Kevin M.; PATANWALA, Insiyyah Y.; POZOLO, Kristen E.; TU, Frank F.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To evaluate candidate mechanisms underlying the pelvic floor dysfunction in women with chronic pelvic pain and/or painful bladder syndrome/interstitial cystitis. Notably, prior studies have not consistently controlled for potential confounding by psychological or anatomical factors. Study Design As part of a larger study on pelvic floor pain dysfunction and bladder pain sensitivity, we compared a measure of mechanical pain sensitivity, pressure pain thresholds, between women with pelvic pain and pain-free controls. We also assessed a novel pain measure using degree and duration of post-exam pain aftersensation, and conducted structural and functional assessments of the pelvic floor to account for any potential confounding. Phenotypic specificity of pelvic floor measures was assessed with receiver-operator characteristic curves adjusted for prevalence. Results A total of 23 women with chronic pelvic pain, 23 painful bladder syndrome, and 42 pain-free controls completed the study. Women with chronic pelvic pain or painful bladder syndrome exhibited enhanced pain sensitivity with lower pressure pain thresholds (1.18 [interquartile range: 0.87–1.41] kg/cm2) than pain-free participants (1.48 [1.11–1.76] kg/cm2; p<0.001) and prolonged pain aftersensation (3.5 [0–9] vs 0 [0–1] minutes; p< 0.001). Although genital hiatus (p<0.01) was wider in women with chronic pelvic pain there were no consistently observed group differences in pelvic floor anatomy, muscle tone or strength. The combination of pressure pain thresholds and aftersensation duration correlated with severity of pelvic floor tenderness (R2 =41–51, p’s< 0.01). Even after adjustment for prevalence, the combined metrics discriminated pain-free controls from women with chronic pelvic pain or painful bladder syndrome (area under the curve=0.87). Conclusion Both experimental assessment of pelvic floor pain thresholds and measurement of sustained pain are independently associated with pelvic pain

  5. Spatial mapping of functional pelvic bone marrow using FLT PET.

    PubMed

    McGuire, Sarah M; Menda, Yusuf; Boles Ponto, Laura L; Gross, Brandie; TenNapel, Mindi; Smith, Brian J; Bayouth, John E

    2014-07-08

    The purpose of this study was to determine the ability of regions identified with bony landmarks on CT imaging to accurately represent active bone marrow when compared to FLT PET imaging. These surrogate regions could then be used to create a bone marrow sparing radiation therapy plan when FLT PET imaging is not available. Whole body (WB) FLT PET images were obtained of 18 subjects prior to chemoradiation therapy. The FLT image of each subject was registered to a CT image acquired for that subject to obtain anatomic information of the pelvis. Seventeen regions were identified based on features of the pelvic bones, sacrum, and femoral heads. The probability of FLT uptake being located in each of 17 different CT-based regions of the bony pelvis was calculated using Tukey's multiple comparison test. Statistical analysis of FLT uptake in the pelvis indicated four distinct groups within the 17 regions that had similar levels of activity. Regions located in the central part of the pelvis, including the superior part of the sacrum, the inner halves of the iliac crests, and the L5 vertebral body, had greater FLT uptake than those in the peripheral regions (p-value < 0.05). We have developed a method to use CT-defined pelvic bone regions to represent FLT PET-identified functional bone marrow. Individual regions that have a statistically significant probability of containing functional bone marrow can be used as avoidance regions to reduce radiation dose to functional bone marrow in radiation therapy planning. However, because likely active bone marrow regions and pelvic targets typically overlap, patient-specific spatial detail may be advantageous in IMRT planning scenarios and may best be provided using FLT PET imaging.

  6. Pelvic architectural distortion is associated with pelvic organ prolapse.

    PubMed

    Huebner, Markus; Margulies, Rebecca U; DeLancey, John O L

    2008-06-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether there is an association between architectural distortion seen on magnetic resonance (MR) scans (lateral "spill" of the vagina and posterior extension of the space of Retzius) and pelvic organ prolapse. Secondary analysis of MR imaging scans from a case-control study of women with prolapse (maximum point > or = + 1 cm; N = 144) and normal controls (maximum point < or = -1 cm; N= 126) was done. Two independent investigators, blinded to prolapse status and previously established levator-defect scores, determined the presence of architectural distortion on axial MR scans. Women were categorized into three groups based on levator defects and architectural distortion. Among the three groups, women with levator defects and architectural distortion have the highest proportion of prolapse (78%; p < 0.001). Among women with levator defects, those with prolapse had an odds ratio of 2.2 for the presence of architectural distortion (95% CI = 1.1-4.6). Pelvic organ prolapse is associated with the presence of visible architectural distortion on MR scans.

  7. Atlas-Based Segmentation Improves Consistency and Decreases Time Required for Contouring Postoperative Endometrial Cancer Nodal Volumes

    SciTech Connect

    Young, Amy V.; Wortham, Angela; Wernick, Iddo; Evans, Andrew; Ennis, Ronald D.

    2011-03-01

    Purpose: Accurate target delineation of the nodal volumes is essential for three-dimensional conformal and intensity-modulated radiotherapy planning for endometrial cancer adjuvant therapy. We hypothesized that atlas-based segmentation ('autocontouring') would lead to time savings and more consistent contours among physicians. Methods and Materials: A reference anatomy atlas was constructed using the data from 15 postoperative endometrial cancer patients by contouring the pelvic nodal clinical target volume on the simulation computed tomography scan according to the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group 0418 trial using commercially available software. On the simulation computed tomography scans from 10 additional endometrial cancer patients, the nodal clinical target volume autocontours were generated. Three radiation oncologists corrected the autocontours and delineated the manual nodal contours under timed conditions while unaware of the other contours. The time difference was determined, and the overlap of the contours was calculated using Dice's coefficient. Results: For all physicians, manual contouring of the pelvic nodal target volumes and editing the autocontours required a mean {+-} standard deviation of 32 {+-} 9 vs. 23 {+-} 7 minutes, respectively (p = .000001), a 26% time savings. For each physician, the time required to delineate the manual contours vs. correcting the autocontours was 30 {+-} 3 vs. 21 {+-} 5 min (p = .003), 39 {+-} 12 vs. 30 {+-} 5 min (p = .055), and 29 {+-} 5 vs. 20 {+-} 5 min (p = .0002). The mean overlap increased from manual contouring (0.77) to correcting the autocontours (0.79; p = .038). Conclusion: The results of our study have shown that autocontouring leads to increased consistency and time savings when contouring the nodal target volumes for adjuvant treatment of endometrial cancer, although the autocontours still required careful editing to ensure that the lymph nodes at risk of recurrence are properly included in the target

  8. Pelvic sepsis after stapled hemorrhoidopexy

    PubMed Central

    van Wensen, Remco JA; van Leuken, Maarten H; Bosscha, Koop

    2008-01-01

    Stapled hemorrhoidopexy is a surgical procedure used worldwide for the treatment of grade III and IV hemorrhoids in all age groups. However, life-threatening complications occur occasionally. The following case report describes the development of pelvic sepsis after stapled hemorrhoidopexy. A literature review of techniques used to manage major septic complications after stapled hemorrhoidopexy was performed. There is no standardized treatment currently available. Stapled hemorrhoidopexy is a safe, effective and time-efficient procedure in the hands of experienced colorectal surgeons. PMID:18855996

  9. Predicting postoperative gait in cerebral palsy.

    PubMed

    Galarraga C, Omar A; Vigneron, Vincent; Dorizzi, Bernadette; Khouri, Néjib; Desailly, Eric

    2016-11-09

    In this work, postoperative lower limb kinematics are predicted with respect to preoperative kinematics, physical examination and surgery data. Data of 115 children with cerebral palsy that have undergone single-event multilevel surgery were considered. Preoperative data dimension was reduced utilizing principal component analysis. Then, multiple linear regressions with 80% confidence intervals were performed between postoperative kinematics and bilateral preoperative kinematics, 36 physical examination variables and combinations of 9 different surgical procedures. The mean prediction errors on test vary from 4° (pelvic obliquity and hip adduction) to 10° (hip rotation and foot progression), depending on the kinematic angle. The unilateral mean sizes of the confidence intervals vary from 5° to 15°. Frontal plane angles are predicted with the lowest errors, however the same performance is achieved when considering the postoperative average signals. Sagittal plane angles are better predicted than transverse plane angles, with statistical differences with respect to the average postoperative kinematics for both plane's angles except for ankle dorsiflexion. The mean prediction errors are smaller than the variability of gait parameters in cerebral palsy. The performance of the system is independent of the preoperative state severity of the patient. Even if the system is not yet accurate enough to define a surgery plan, it shows an unbiased estimation of the most likely outcome, which can be useful for both the clinician and the patient. More patients' data are necessary for improving the precision of the model in order to predict the kinematic outcome of a large number of possible surgeries and gait patterns.

  10. Understanding postoperative fatigue.

    PubMed

    Rose, E A; King, T C

    1978-07-01

    Performance characteristics of the central nervous, cardiovascular, respiratory and muscular systems in man postoperatively have received little investigative attention, despite the well known syndrome of postoperative fatigue. The impairmen in perception and psychomotor skills that has been shown to result from caloric restriction, bedrest, sedation and sleep deprivation suggests that a similar deficit may occur after surgical procedures. After a simple elective surgical procedure, maximal oxygen uptake decreases and the adaptability of heart rate to submaximal workloads is impaired. Similar deleterious effects on cardiorespiratory performance have been documented with starvation and bedrest; an understanding of cardiorespiratory performance postoperatively awaits further investigation. Maximal muscular force of contraction is also impaired by caloric restriction and bedrest, suggesting that similar effects may be seen in the postoperative state, although this has not been studied. A better understanding of the syndrome of postoperative fatigue could be achieved by a descriptive analysis of physiologic performance postoperatively. Such descriptive data could form the basis for objective evaluation of therapeutic measures intended to improve performance, such as nutritional supplementation and pharmacologic intervention. The observation that exercise with the patient in the supine position may decrease the impairment in maximal aerobic power otherwise expected in immobilized patients suggests that controlled exercise therapy may be of value in reducing physiologic impairment postoperatively.

  11. Primary pelvic hydatid cyst: a case report.

    PubMed

    Parray, Fazl Q; Wani, Shadab Nabi; Bazaz, Sajid; Khan, Shakeel-Ur Rehman; Malik, Nighat Shaffi

    2011-01-01

    This is a case report of a young man who presented to us as a case of hypogastric pain and frequency of micturation. General physical examination and radiological evaluation confirmed a multiloculated pelvic swelling. Patient was subjected to laparotomy which confirmed the diagnosis of a primary pelvic hydatid disease. Patient was put on chemotherapy after surgery and is doing well on follow up.

  12. 38 CFR 4.67 - Pelvic bones.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Pelvic bones. 4.67 Section 4.67 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS SCHEDULE FOR RATING DISABILITIES Disability Ratings The Musculoskeletal System § 4.67 Pelvic bones. The variability of residuals...

  13. 38 CFR 4.67 - Pelvic bones.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Pelvic bones. 4.67 Section 4.67 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS SCHEDULE FOR RATING DISABILITIES Disability Ratings The Musculoskeletal System § 4.67 Pelvic bones. The variability of residuals...

  14. 38 CFR 4.67 - Pelvic bones.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Pelvic bones. 4.67 Section 4.67 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS SCHEDULE FOR RATING DISABILITIES Disability Ratings The Musculoskeletal System § 4.67 Pelvic bones. The variability of residuals...

  15. 38 CFR 4.67 - Pelvic bones.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Pelvic bones. 4.67 Section 4.67 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS SCHEDULE FOR RATING DISABILITIES Disability Ratings The Musculoskeletal System § 4.67 Pelvic bones. The variability of residuals...

  16. 38 CFR 4.67 - Pelvic bones.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Pelvic bones. 4.67 Section 4.67 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS SCHEDULE FOR RATING DISABILITIES Disability Ratings The Musculoskeletal System § 4.67 Pelvic bones. The variability of residuals...

  17. Genetic Variants of NPAT-ATM and AURKA are Associated With an Early Adverse Reaction in the Gastrointestinal Tract of Patients With Cervical Cancer Treated With Pelvic Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Ishikawa, Atsuko; Suga, Tomo; Shoji, Yoshimi; Kato, Shingo; Ohno, Tatsuya; Ishikawa, Hitoshi; Yoshinaga, Shinji; Ohara, Kiyoshi; Ariga, Hisanori; Nomura, Kuninori; Shibamoto, Yuta; Ishikawa, Ken-Ichi; Moritake, Takashi; Michikawa, Yuichi; Iwakawa, Mayumi; Imai, Takashi

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: This study sought to associate polymorphisms in genes related to cell cycle regulation or genome maintenance with radiotherapy (RT)-induced an early adverse reaction (EAR) in patients with cervical cancer. Methods and Materials: This study enrolled 243 cervical cancer patients who were treated with pelvic RT. An early gastrointestinal reaction was graded using the National Cancer Institute Common Toxicity Criteria, version 2. Clinical factors of the enrolled patients were analyzed, and 208 patients were grouped for genetic analysis according to their EAR (Grade {<=}1, n = 150; Grade {>=}2, n = 58). Genomic DNA was genotyped, and association with the risk of EAR for 44 functional single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of 19 candidate genes was assessed by single-locus, haplotype, and multilocus analyses. Results: Our analysis revealed two haplotypes to be associated with an increased risk of EAR. The first, comprising rs625120C, rs189037T, rs228589A, and rs183460G, is located between the 5' ends of NPAT and ATM (OR = 1.86; 95% CI, 1.21-2.87), whereas the second is located in the AURKA gene and comprises rs2273535A and rs1047972G (OR = 1.75; 95% CI, 1.10-2.78). A third haplotype, rs2273535T and rs1047972A in AURKA, was associated with a reduced EAR risk (OR = 0.42; 95% CI, 0.20-0.89). The risk of EAR was significantly higher among patients with both risk diplotypes than in those possessing the other diplotypes (OR = 3.24; 95% CI, 1.52-6.92). Conclusions: Individual radiosensitivity of intestine may be determined by haplotypes in the NPAT-ATM and AURKA genes. These variants should be explored in larger association studies in cervical cancer patients.

  18. Prevalence and Resolution of Auditory Passage of Vaginal Air in Women With Pelvic Floor Disorders.

    PubMed

    Miranne, Jeannine M; Marek, Tania M; Mete, Mihriye; Iglesia, Cheryl B

    2015-07-01

    To estimate the prevalence of auditory vaginal air passage among women with and without pelvic organ prolapse (POP) in a population with pelvic floor disorders. This prospective cohort study included women with urinary incontinence and POP who sought consultation at a single center from January 2012 to August 2013. Women with rectovaginal fistula, prior surgery for POP or incontinence, and current pregnancy were excluded. Participants completed a nonvalidated questionnaire about auditory vaginal air passage, also known as vaginal wind. The subset who had pelvic reconstructive surgery completed the same questionnaire 6 months postoperatively. Baseline demographic and clinical characteristics and preoperative and postoperative POP quantification data were collected. One hundred thirty-two women were approached for participation, of whom 110 (83%) completed baseline study questionnaires. Of these 110, 59 had POP and 51 had normal pelvic support. The mean age was 55±12 years. Sixty-nine percent (76/110, 95% confidence interval [CI] 60-78%) experienced vaginal wind an average of 2.1±8.7 times weekly. There was no difference in the prevalence of vaginal wind between women with and without POP. Women with vaginal wind were younger than those without vaginal wind (mean age 52±12 years compared with 62±11 years, P<.001). The majority with vaginal wind experienced symptoms during intercourse (65/75 [87%], 95% CI 77-93%) and were at least somewhat bothered by it (49/76 [64%], 95% CI 53-75%), but only 22% (17/76, 95% CI 14-33%) reported a negative effect on quality of life. Vaginal wind is common among women with pelvic floor disorders but is not associated with POP. II.

  19. The impact of pelvic floor surgery on female sexual function: a mixed quantitative and qualitative study.

    PubMed

    Roos, A M; Thakar, R; Sultan, A H; de Leeuw, J W; Paulus, A T G

    2014-01-01

    To assess whether the current condition-specific sexual function questionnaire provides full insight into sexual function following pelvic floor surgery. Prospective, mixed quantitative and qualitative study. Urogynaecology clinic in a large university hospital. Thirty-seven women undergoing surgery for pelvic organ prolapse (POP) and/or stress urinary incontinence (SUI). Women were seen before surgery and 3 months postoperatively. At both visits the Pelvic Organ Prolapse/Urinary Incontinence Sexual Function Questionnaire (PISQ) was completed and a qualitative face-to-face semi-structured interview was conducted. PISQ total and domain scores, as well as the change in the preoperative and postoperative score, were calculated and analysed using Wilcoxon signed rank test and one-sample t-test. The qualitative data were systematically analysed using data-matrices. The impact of pelvic floor surgery on female sexual function. Significant improvement was seen for PISQ total score (P = 0.003) as well as Physical (P < 0.001) and Partner-related (P = 0.002) domains, but not for the Behavioural/Emotive domain (P = 0.220). Analysis of qualitative data showed that improvement in sexual function was a result of cure of POP and SUI symptoms. Deterioration of sexual function was due to dyspareunia, fear of causing damage to the surgical result, new symptoms and a disappointing result of surgery. Our qualitative data show that PISQ is limited in the assessment of sexual function after pelvic floor surgery as it does not assess most surgery-specific negative effects on sexual function. © 2013 Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists.

  20. [Chronic postoperative pain].

    PubMed

    Cachemaille, Matthieu; Blanc, Catherine

    2016-06-22

    Chronic postoperative pain remains a frequent pathology whose global impact approximates 20 and 30% and accounts for 20% of the consultations in a pain center. Risk factors consider firstly each patient's feature and comorbidity and also different surgical procedures with their technical approach. Neuropathic pain compared to nociceptive pain is a great component in the postoperative period and needs to be recognized by specific tests (DN4). Pain prevention involves risk factors' detection, appropriate anesthetic support and effective postoperative pain management. Treatment is based on the type of pain and includes a multimodal analgesia with interventional pain therapy.

  1. [Characteristics of postoperative peritonitis].

    PubMed

    Lock, J F; Eckmann, C; Germer, C-T

    2016-01-01

    Postoperative peritonitis is still a life-threatening complication after abdominal surgery and approximately 10,000 patients annually develop postoperative peritonitis in Germany. Early recognition and diagnosis before the onset of sepsis has remained a clinical challenge as no single specific screening test is available. The aim of therapy is a rapid and effective control of the source of infection and antimicrobial therapy. After diagnosis of diffuse postoperative peritonitis surgical revision is usually inevitable after intestinal interventions. Peritonitis after liver, biliary or pancreatic surgery is managed as a rule by means of differentiated therapy approaches depending on the severity.

  2. Patterns of Local-Regional Failure in Completely Resected Stage IIIA(N2) Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Cases: Implications for Postoperative Radiation Therapy Clinical Target Volume Design

    SciTech Connect

    Feng, Wen; Fu, Xiao-Long; Cai, Xu-Wei; Yang, Huan-Jun; Wu, Kai-Liang; Fan, Min; Xiang, Jia-Qing; Zhang, Ya-Wei; Chen, Hai-Quan

    2014-04-01

    Purpose: To analyze patterns of local-regional failure (LRF) for completely resected stage IIIA(N2) non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients treated in our hospital and to propose a clinical target volume (CTV) for postoperative radiation therapy (PORT) in these patients. Methods and Materials: From 2005 to 2011, consecutive patients with pT1-3N2 NSCLC who underwent complete resection in our hospital but who did not receive PORT were identified. The patterns of first LRF were assessed and evaluated as to whether these areas would be encompassed by our proposed PORT CTV. Results: With a median follow-up of 24 months, 173 of 250 patients (69.2%) experienced disease recurrence. Of the 54 patients with LRF as the first event, 48 (89%) had recurrence within the proposed PORT CTV, and 6 (11%) had failures occurring both within and outside the proposed CTV (all of which occurred in patients with right-lung cancer). Ninety-three percent of failure sites (104 of 112) would have been contained within the proposed PORT CTV. For left-sided lung cancer, the most common lymph node station failure site was 4R, followed by 7, 4L, 6, 10L, and 5. For right-sided lung cancer, the most common site was station 2R, followed by 10R, 4R, and 7. Conclusions: LRF following complete surgery was an important and potentially preventable pattern of failure in stage IIIA(N2) patients. Ipsilateral superior mediastinal recurrences dominated for right-sided tumors, whereas left-sided tumors frequently involved the bilateral superior mediastinum. Most of the LRF sites would have been covered by the proposed PORT CTV. A prospective investigation of patterns of failure after PORT (following our proposed CTV delineation guideline) is presently underway and will be reported in a separate analysis.

  3. The relationship between pelvic alignment and dysmenorrhea.

    PubMed

    Kim, Moon-Jeong; Baek, Il-Hun; Goo, Bong-Oh

    2016-03-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between pelvic alignment and dysmenorrhea in general women. [Subjects and Methods] One hundred two females participated in this study. They were divided into a dysmenorrhea group and a normal group based on the results of a Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) assessment of pain and the Menstrual Distress Questionnaire (MDQ). The survey data was collecting from 5th July to 20th September, 2014. Formetric 4D was used to measure the pelvic alignment, including the values of Trunk Imbalance, Pelvic Tilt, Surface Rotation, Lateral Deviation, Kyphosis Angle, Lordosis Angle. [Results] There was a difference in the spine alignments of each group. The value of pelvic torsion was 2.4 ± 1.8 degree in those with dysmenorrhea, while it was 1.7 ± 1.1 degree in those without. [Conclusion] In conclusion, the results suggest that there is a relationship between menstrual pain and pelvic torsion.

  4. Male pelvic floor: history and update.

    PubMed

    Dorey, Grace

    2005-08-01

    Our understanding of the male pelvic floor has evolved over more than 2,000 years. Gradually medical science has sought to dispel ancient myths and untruths. The male pelvic floor has many diverse functions. Importantly, it helps to support the abdominal contents, maintains urinary and fecal continence, and plays a major role in gaining and maintaining penile erection. Weakness of the male pelvic floor muscles may cause urinary and fecal incontinence and erectile dysfunction. Function may be restored in each of these areas by a comprehensive pelvic floor muscle training program. Spasm of the pelvic floor muscles may produce pain and require relaxation techniques. Additional research is needed to add further evidence to our knowledge base.

  5. [Current echography diagnosis of pelvic congestion syndrome].

    PubMed

    Malinova, M; Shopov, A

    2012-01-01

    Chronic pelvic pain is a common condition. The sources of pelvic pain are multifactorial, and their causes are difficult to determine. Pelvic congestion syndrome (PCS) is associated with varicose ovarian veins and/or varicose veins in the pelvis. The syndrome is associated with constant dull pelvic pain, abnormal menstrual bleeding, tenderness to touch in lower abdomen, pain during intercourse, painful menstrual periods, vaginal discharge, PCOS. The specific diagnosis of Pelvic Congestion Syndrome is made using several tests which include ultrasound, CAT, MIR, MDCT (multidetector) and venogram. The ultrasound is the first test of choice. It can assess the uterus and other organs in the pelvis. Doppler ultrasound can also help visualize the blood flow and asses the presence of varicosities in the pelvis.

  6. Pelvic incidence-lumbar lordosis mismatch predisposes to adjacent segment disease after lumbar spinal fusion.

    PubMed

    Rothenfluh, Dominique A; Mueller, Daniel A; Rothenfluh, Esin; Min, Kan

    2015-06-01

    Several risk factors and causes of adjacent segment disease have been debated; however, no quantitative relationship to spino-pelvic parameters has been established so far. A retrospective case-control study was carried out to investigate spino-pelvic alignment in patients with adjacent segment disease compared to a control group. 45 patients (ASDis) were identified that underwent revision surgery for adjacent segment disease after on average 49 months (7-125), 39 patients were selected as control group (CTRL) similar in the distribution of the matching variables, such as age, gender, preoperative degenerative changes, and numbers of segments fused with a mean follow-up of 84 months (61-142) (total n = 84). Several radiographic parameters were measured on pre- and postoperative radiographs, including lumbar lordosis measured (LL), sacral slope, pelvic incidence (PI), and tilt. Significant differences between ASDis and CTRL groups on preoperative radiographs were seen for PI (60.9 ± 10.0° vs. 51.7 ± 10.4°, p = 0.001) and LL (48.1 ± 12.5° vs. 53.8 ± 10.8°, p = 0.012). Pelvic incidence was put into relation to lumbar lordosis by calculating the difference between pelvic incidence and lumbar lordosis (∆PILL = PI-LL, ASDis 12.5 ± 16.7° vs. CTRL 3.4 ± 12.1°, p = 0.001). A cutoff value of 9.8° was determined by logistic regression and ROC analysis and patients classified into a type A (∆PILL <10°) and a type B (∆PILL ≥10°) alignment according to pelvic incidence-lumbar lordosis mismatch. In type A spino-pelvic alignment, 25.5 % of patients underwent revision surgery for adjacent segment disease, whereas 78.3 % of patients classified as type B alignment had revision surgery. Classification of patients into type A and B alignments yields a sensitivity for predicting adjacent segment disease of 71 %, a specificity of 81 % and an odds ratio of 10.6. In degenerative disease of the lumbar spine a high pelvic incidence with diminished lumbar lordosis seems

  7. C14ORF166 overexpression is associated with pelvic lymph node metastasis and poor prognosis in uterine cervical cancer.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Weijing; Ou, Jianping; Lei, Fangyong; Hou, Teng; Wu, Shu; Niu, Chunhao; Xu, Liqun; Zhang, Yanna

    2016-01-01

    C14ORF166 (chromosome 14 open reading frame 166) is a transcriptional repressor related to the regulation of centrosome architecture. However, the role of C14ORF166 in the development and progression of cancer remains largely unknown. The aim of this study was to investigate the expression and clinicopathological significance of C14ORF166 in cervical cancer. C14ORF166 expression was analyzed using quantitative real-time PCR (RT-PCR) and Western blotting in cervical cancer cell lines and eight paired cervical cancer samples and the adjacent normal tissues. Immunohistochemistry was used to analyze C14ORF166 protein expression in 148 clinicopathologically characterized cervical cancer specimens. Statistical analyses were performed to evaluate the relationship between the expression of C14ORF166 and clinicopathologic features and prognosis. C14ORF166 mRNA and protein expression were significantly upregulated in cervical cancer cell lines and tissue samples (P < 0.05). Immunohistochemical analysis revealed a high expression of C14ORF166 was observed in 39.9 % (59/148) of the cervical cancer specimens; the remaining samples expressed low levels or did not express any detectable C14ORF166. The chi-square test indicated that high-level expression of C14ORF166 was significantly associated with International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics (FIGO) stage (P < 0.001), vital status (P = 0.026), tumor size (P = 0.034), serum squamous cell carcinoma antigen level (SCC-Ag; P = 0.035), and pelvic lymph node metastasis (P < 0.001). Patients with highly expressed C14ORF166 showed a tendency to receive postoperative chemotherapy (P = 0.005) and postoperative radiation (P = 0.008). Furthermore, high C14ORF166 expression was associated with poorer overall survival compared to low C14ORF166 expression, and C14ORF166 was a significant prognostic factor in univariate and multivariate analysis (P < 0.05). High C14ORF166 expression had prognostic

  8. Does Pelvic Organ Prolapse Quantification Examination D Point Predict Uterosacral Ligament Suspension Outcomes?

    PubMed

    Richter, Lee A; Park, Amy J; Boileau, Jenine E; Janni, Megan; Desale, Sameer; Iglesia, Cheryl B

    2016-01-01

    The best predictors for postoperative anatomic apical success after transvaginal uterosacral ligament suspension remain unknown. The aim of this study was to determine if there is a correlation between the preoperative D point and anatomic outcomes for apical prolapse after 1 year. This retrospective cohort study included subjects undergoing transvaginal uterosacral ligament suspension from 2008 through 2013 who had at least 1 year follow-up. Demographic information, preoperative and postoperative Pelvic Organ Prolapse Quantification (POPQ) examination measurements, need for retreatment or repeat surgery, and assessment of pelvic floor symptoms were reviewed. Postoperative apical success was defined as C point descent no more than one third into the vaginal canal. One hundred twenty-five women met inclusion criteria and had follow-up at 1 year or more. Concomitant procedures included anterior/posterior repair and midurethral sling. Mean follow-up time was 22.8 months (range, 12-63 months). At last follow-up, 96% met criteria for apical success. A more negative preoperative D point was significantly related to improved postoperative apical support, with each 1-cm descent in preoperative D point resulting in a postoperative C point that was 0.21 cm lower (P = 0.0005). Based on the receiver operating characteristic curve, a "cutoff" D point value of -4.25 (sensitivity, 0.8; specificity, 0.65) was determined to be a predictor of postoperative apical success at 1 year or more. The preoperative D point correlates with postoperative apical support, and a clinically meaningful relationship exists between the preoperative D point and anatomic apical success.

  9. Predicting urinary incontinence after surgery for pelvic organ prolapse.

    PubMed

    Jelovsek, John E

    2016-10-01

    Many women choosing to have surgery for pelvic organ prolapse also choose to undergo continence surgery. This review focuses on available evidence that clinicians may use to counsel patients when choosing whether to perform continence surgery and how predictive analytic tools improve this decision-making process. Midurethral sling, Burch cystourethropexy and bladder neck sling are highly effective for the surgical treatment of stress urinary incontinence. Trials demonstrate that continence surgery may be routinely performed to reduce the risk of postoperative incontinence in women undergoing surgery for pelvic organ prolapse with or without preoperative stress urinary incontinence. Although these procedures are effective and well tolerated on average, media concerns, regulatory warnings and litigation reinforce the need for a balanced discussion regarding efficacy and potential adverse events directed at the individual patient during the preoperative visit. Advances in predictive analytics allow surgeons to quantitate individual risk using algorithms that tailor estimates for the individual patient and facilitate shared understanding of risks and benefits. These models are less prone to cognitive biases and frequently outperform experienced clinicians. This review discusses how predictive analytic tools can be used to improve decisions about continence surgery in the woman planning to undergo prolapse surgery.

  10. Pelvic primary staphylococcal infection presenting as a thigh abscess.

    PubMed

    Abbas, T O

    2013-01-01

    Intra-abdominal disease can present as an extra-abdominal abscess and can follow several routes, including the greater sciatic foramen, obturator foramen, femoral canal, pelvic outlet, and inguinal canal. Nerves and vessels can also serve as a route out of the abdomen. The psoas muscle extends from the twelfth thoracic and fifth lower lumbar vertebrae to the lesser trochanter of the femur, which means that disease in this muscle group can migrate along the muscle, out of the abdomen, and present as a thigh abscess. We present a case of a primary pelvic staphylococcal infection presenting as a thigh abscess. The patient was a 60-year-old man who presented with left posterior thigh pain and fever. Physical examination revealed a diffusely swollen left thigh with overlying erythematous, shiny, and tense skin. X-rays revealed no significant soft tissue lesions, ultrasound was suggestive of an inflammatory process, and MRI showed inflammatory changes along the left hemipelvis and thigh involving the iliacus muscle group, left gluteal region, and obturator internus muscle. The abscess was drained passively via two incisions in the posterior left thigh, releasing large amounts of purulent discharge. Subsequent bacterial culture revealed profuse growth of Staphylococcus aureus. The patient recovered uneventfully except for a moderate fever on the third postoperative day.

  11. Uterine sparing surgical methods in pelvic organ prolapse

    PubMed Central

    Tola, Esra Nur; Erdemoğlu, Evrim; Erdemoğlu, Ebru

    2015-01-01

    Pelvic organ prolapse (POP) is defined as the protrusion of pelvic organs to the vagen and is an important health problem in patients of older age. Today, most women with POP prefer uterine sparing surgery due to the changes in lifestyle, beliefs, pregnancy desire, and understanding the role of the uterus and cervix in sexual function. Therefore, the need for newer surgical procedures that involve less invasive surgery, reduced intraoperative and postoperative risks, and a faster healing time in POP surgery have gained importance. Vaginal, abdominal, laparoscopic, and robotic methods are defined in uterine preserving surgery but there is not yet a consensus on which of them should be chosen. In choosing the proper technique, the patient’s general status, accompanying disease, correct indication, and the surgeon’s experience are all important. In our practice we prefer laparoscopic mesh sacrohysteropexy in patients who prefer to preserve their uterus because of the lower costs and high success rates compared with abdominal and robotic techniques. PMID:28913063

  12. Sexual Function Before and After Sacrocolpopexy for Pelvic Organ Prolapse

    PubMed Central

    Handa, Victoria L.; Zyczynski, Halina M.; Brubaker, Linda; Nygaard, Ingrid; Janz, Nancy K.; Richter, Holly E.; Wren, Patricia A.; Brown, Morton B.; Weber, Anne M.

    2008-01-01

    Objective To describe sexual function before and after sacrocolpopexy. Study design In the Colpopexy and Urinary Reduction Efforts trial, sexual function was assessed in 224 women with sexual partners before and 1 year after surgery using validated questionnaires. Results After surgery, significantly fewer women reported sexual interference from “pelvic or vaginal symptoms” (32.5% one year after surgery versus 7.8% prior to surgery), fear of incontinence (10.7% versus 3.3%), vaginal bulging (47.3% versus 4.6%), or pain (39.9% versus 21.6%). The proportion of women with infrequent sexual desire (32%) did not change. More women were sexually active 1 year after surgery (171, 76.3%) than before surgery (148, 66.1%). The 11 women (7.4%) who became sexually inactive were more likely than sexually active women to report infrequent sexual desire (70.05% versus 22.1%, p<0.001). The addition of Burch colposuspension did not impact postoperative sexual function. Conclusions After sacrocolpopexy, most women reported improvements in pelvic floor symptoms that previously interfered with sexual function. These improvements were not impacted by concomitant Burch colposuspension. PMID:18060957

  13. Postoperative permanent pressure alopecia.

    PubMed

    Chang, Zi Yun; Ngian, Jan; Chong, Claudia; Chong, Chin Ted; Liew, Qui Yin

    2016-04-01

    A 49-year-old Chinese female underwent elective laparoscopic assisted Whipple's surgery lasting 12 h. This was complicated by postoperative pressure alopecia at the occipital area of the scalp. Pressure-induced hair loss after general anaesthesia is uncommon and typically temporary, but may be disconcerting to the patient. We report this case of postoperative permanent pressure alopecia due to its rarity in the anaesthesia/local literature, and review the risk factors for its development.

  14. Primary vaginal reconstruction at the time of pelvic exenteration for gynecologic cancer: morbidity revisited.

    PubMed

    Jurado, Matías; Bazán, Antonio; Alcázar, Juan Luis; Garcia-Tutor, Emilio

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study is to analyze our experience about the benefits and morbidity of primary vaginal reconstruction in pelvic exenteration. Over a 10-year period, 64 patients underwent a pelvic exenteration for gynecologic cancer, except for ovarian and fallopian cancer. Twenty-nine patients underwent pelvic exenteration with vaginal reconstruction [21 cases with transverse rectus-abdominis myocutaneous (TRAM) flap and eight cases with Singapore fascio-cutaneous flap]. Thirty-five patients did not undergo vaginal reconstruction. Postoperative morbidity was recorded and a comparative analysis of morbidity between groups was made. Pelvic abscess and small bowel fistula occurred more frequently in the no neovagina group (20% versus 6.9% and 20% versus 3.4%, respectively). There were no differences between groups regarding fever, colorectal anastomosis (CRA) dehiscence-leakage, prolonged ileus, deep venous thrombosis, pulmonary embolism or wound complications. Surgery time was significantly longer for the neovagina group. There was only one perioperative death, which occurred in the neovagina group. Vaginal stenosis, necrosis, and shortness occurred less frequently for TRAM flap compared with Singapore flap (19.0% versus 28.6%, 14.5% versus 50% and 0% versus 100%, respectively). CRA dehiscence-leakage appeared more frequently (83.3% versus 28.6%) in the Singapore group. Nevertheless, this complication was statistically associated (p = 0.0009) with low CRA (<5 cm). TRAM flap seems to be the preferable option for reconstructing the vagina after pelvic exenteration. The Singapore fascio-cutaneous flap carries a higher rate of complications, does not work as functional neovagina after pelvic exenteration, and does not seem to be a good choice in cases of low colorectal anastomosis.

  15. Pelvic joint fusion in patients with severe pelvic girdle pain - a prospective single-subject research design study.

    PubMed

    Kibsgård, Thomas J; Røise, Olav; Stuge, Britt

    2014-03-15

    The fusion of the pelvic joints in patients with severe pelvic girdle pain (PGP) is a controversial and insufficiently studied procedure. The aims of this study were to evaluate physical function and pain after sacroiliac joint (SIJ) fusion. A single-subject research design study with repeated measurements was conducted; pre-operatively and at 3, 6 and 12 months post-operatively. The outcome measures considered were the Oswestry disability index (ODI), visual analogue scale (VAS), and SF-36. Eight patients with severe PGP received open-accessed unilateral anterior SIJ fusion and fusion of the pubic symphysis. Seven patients reported positive results from the surgery. At 1 year post-operation, significant (p < 0.001) reductions in ODI (54 to 37) and VAS (82 to 57) were reported. The physical functioning, bodily pain, and social functioning scores in the SF-36 were also improved. Positive and significant changes in disability and pain at 1 year after SIJ fusion were observed. Despite these positive results, open accessed anterior fusion of the SIJ was associated with adverse events and complications such as infection and nerve damage.

  16. Locally advanced carcinoma of the cervix associated with pelvic kidney treated with intensity-modulated radiotherapy: Overcoming a therapeutic challenge.

    PubMed

    Kashyap, Lakhan; Gandhi, Ajeet Kumar; Pandey, Rambha; Sharma, Daya Nand

    2017-01-01

    The simultaneous occurrence of carcinoma of the cervix and pelvic kidney is rare. As the pelvic kidney occupies the conventional radiation portal for carcinoma of the cervix, treatment of these patients with radiation presents a therapeutic challenge. A 48-year-old stage IIIB cervical carcinoma patient with an incidental diagnosis of pelvic kidney was treated with radical chemoradiotherapy using intensity-modulated radiotherapy with concurrent weekly cisplatin, followed by intracavitary radiotherapy. The bilateral kidney dose was restricted within a tolerance limit of 16.6 Gy. At the 18-month follow-up, the patient was disease free and had no deterioration in kidney function. Intensity-modulated radiotherapy provided the necessary means for delivering radical radiation doses in this case scenario with adequate sparing of the kidney. © 2016 Japan Society of Obstetrics and Gynecology.

  17. Radiation enteritis and radiation scoliosis

    SciTech Connect

    Shah, M.; Eng, K.; Engler, G.L.

    1980-09-01

    Any patient with radiation scoliosis should be suspected of having a visceral lesion as well. Chronic radiation enteritis may be manifested by intestinal obstruction, fistulas, perforation, and hemorrhage. Intestinal obstruction is the most common complication, and must be differentiated from postoperative cast or from spinal-traction syndrome. Obstruction that does not respond promptly to conservative measures must be treated surgically. Irradiated bowel is ischemic, and necrosis with spontaneous perforation can only be avoided with early diagnosis and surgical intervention.

  18. Total pelvic floor ultrasound for pelvic floor defaecatory dysfunction: a pictorial review.

    PubMed

    Hainsworth, Alison J; Solanki, Deepa; Schizas, Alexis M P; Williams, Andrew B

    2015-01-01

    Total pelvic floor ultrasound is used for the dynamic assessment of pelvic floor dysfunction and allows multicompartmental anatomical and functional assessment. Pelvic floor dysfunction includes defaecatory, urinary and sexual dysfunction, pelvic organ prolapse and pain. It is common, increasingly recognized and associated with increasing age and multiparity. Other options for assessment include defaecation proctography and defaecation MRI. Total pelvic floor ultrasound is a cheap, safe, imaging tool, which may be performed as a first-line investigation in outpatients. It allows dynamic assessment of the entire pelvic floor, essential for treatment planning for females who often have multiple diagnoses where treatment should address all aspects of dysfunction to yield optimal results. Transvaginal scanning using a rotating single crystal probe provides sagittal views of bladder neck support anteriorly. Posterior transvaginal ultrasound may reveal rectocoele, enterocoele or intussusception whilst bearing down. The vaginal probe is also used to acquire a 360° cross-sectional image to allow anatomical visualization of the pelvic floor and provides information regarding levator plate integrity and pelvic organ alignment. Dynamic transperineal ultrasound using a conventional curved array probe provides a global view of the anterior, middle and posterior compartments and may show cystocoele, enterocoele, sigmoidocoele or rectocoele. This pictorial review provides an atlas of normal and pathological images required for global pelvic floor assessment in females presenting with defaecatory dysfunction. Total pelvic floor ultrasound may be used with complementary endoanal ultrasound to assess the sphincter complex, but this is beyond the scope of this review.

  19. Detecting active pelvic arterial haemorrhage on admission following serious pelvic fracture in multiple trauma patients.

    PubMed

    Brun, Julien; Guillot, Stéphanie; Bouzat, Pierre; Broux, Christophe; Thony, Frédéric; Genty, Céline; Heylbroeck, Christophe; Albaladejo, Pierre; Arvieux, Catherine; Tonetti, Jérôme; Payen, Jean-Francois

    2014-01-01

    The early diagnosis of pelvic arterial haemorrhage is challenging for initiating treatment by transcatheter arterial embolization (TAE) in multiple trauma patients. We use an institutional algorithm focusing on haemodynamic status on admission and on a whole-body CT scan in stabilized patients to screen patients requiring TAE. This study aimed to assess the effectiveness of this approach. This retrospective cohort study included 106 multiple trauma patients admitted to the emergency room with serious pelvic fracture [pelvic abbreviated injury scale (AIS) score of 3 or more]. Of the 106 patients, 27 (25%) underwent pelvic angiography leading to TAE for active arterial haemorrhage in 24. The TAE procedure was successful within 3h of arrival in 18 patients. In accordance with the algorithm, 10 patients were directly admitted to the angiography unit (n=8) and/or operating room (n=2) for uncontrolled haemorrhagic shock on admission. Of the remaining 96 stabilized patients, 20 had contrast media extravasation on pelvic CT scan that prompted pelvic angiography in 16 patients leading to TAE in 14. One patient underwent a pelvic angiography despite showing no contrast media extravasation on pelvic CT scan. All 17 stabilized patients who underwent pelvic angiography presented a more severely compromised haemodynamic status on admission, and they required more blood products during their initial management than the 79 patients who did not undergo pelvic angiography. The incidence of unstable pelvic fractures was however comparable between the two groups. Overall, haemodynamic instability and contrast media extravasation on the CT-scan identified 26 out of the 27 patients who required subsequent pelvic angiography leading to TAE in 24. An algorithm focusing on haemodynamic status on arrival and on the whole-body CT scan in stabilized patients may be effective at triaging multiple trauma patients with serious pelvic fractures. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Preoperative Concurrent Radiation Therapy and Chemotherapy for Bulky Stage IB2, IIA, and IIB Carcinoma of the Uterine Cervix With Proximal Parametrial Invasion

    SciTech Connect

    Huguet, Florence; Cojocariu, Oana-Maria; Levy, Pierre; Lefranc, Jean-Pierre; Darai, Emile; Jannet, Denis; Ansquer, Yan; Lhuillier, Pierre-Eugene; Benifla, Jean-Louis; Seince, Nathalie; Touboul, Emmanuel

    2008-12-01

    Purpose: To evaluate toxicity, local tumor control, and survival after preoperative chemoradiation for operable bulky cervical carcinoma. Methods and Materials: Between December 1991 and July 2006, 92 patients with operable bulky stage IB2, IIA, and IIB cervical carcinoma without pelvic or para-aortic nodes on pretreatment imaging were treated. Treatment consisted of preoperative external beam pelvic radiation therapy (EBRT) and concomitant chemotherapy (CT) during the first and fourth weeks of radiation combining 5-fluorouracil and cisplatin. The pelvic radiation dose was 40.5 Gy over 4.5 weeks. EBRT was followed by low-dose rate uterovaginal brachytherapy with a total dose of 20 Gy in 62 patients. After a median rest period of 44 days, all patients underwent Class II modified radical hysterectomy with bilateral pelvic lymphadenectomy. Thirty patients who had not received preoperative uterovaginal brachytherapy underwent postoperative low-dose-rate vaginal brachytherapy at a dose of 20 Gy. The mean follow-up was 46 months. Results: Pathologic residual tumor was observed in 43 patients. After multivariate analysis, additional preoperative uterovaginal brachytherapy was the single significant predictive factor for pathologic complete response rate (p = 0.019). The 2- and 5-year disease-free survival (DFS) rates were 80.4% and 72.2%, respectively. Pathologic residual cervical tumor was the single independent factor decreasing the probability of DFS (p = 0.020). Acute toxicities were moderate. Two severe ureteral complications requiring surgical intervention were observed. Conclusions: Concomitant chemoradiation followed by surgery for operable bulky stage I-II cervical carcinoma without clinical lymph node involvement can be used with acceptable toxicity. Pathologic complete response increases the probability of DFS.

  1. Evaluation of the single-incision Elevate system to treat pelvic organ prolapse: follow-up from 15 to 45 months.

    PubMed

    Huang, Kuan-Hui; Huang, Li-Yi; Chu, Li-Ching; Chuang, Fei-Chi; Wu, Ming-Ping; Kung, Fu-Tsai

    2015-09-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the 2-year clinical outcomes of pelvic reconstructive surgery with the single-incision Elevate system (American Medical Systems, Minnetonka, MN, USA). This retrospective study was conducted from November 2010 to August 2013, and included 210 patients with pelvic organ prolapse stage 3 or 4 who underwent pelvic reconstructive surgery with an Elevate system and were followed for 1 to 3 years postoperatively. Assessments included pre- and postoperative Pelvic Organ Prolapse Quantification (POP-Q) stage, Urogenital Distress Inventory (UDI-6), Incontinence Impact Questionnaire (IIQ-7) and multi-channel urodynamic examinations. Anatomical success was defined as postoperative POP-Q stage 0 or I. The anatomical success rates were 95 % for the anterior vaginal wall, 99 % for the posterior vaginal wall and 94 % for the apical vaginal wall after a median 27 months of follow-up. POP-Q, UDI-6 and IIQ-7 scores, maximal flow rate and post-voiding residual urine all improved significantly after surgery. Complications included 1 case of internal bleeding, 4 cases of mesh exposure, 5 cases of recurrent prolapse that required salvage operations, and 3 cases of urine retention that required intermittent catheterization. There were no bladder or bowel injuries during surgery. Pelvic reconstructive surgery with the Elevate system yielded good anatomical outcomes and symptom improvement after 2 years of follow-up.

  2. On the apparent failure of adjuvant pelvic radiotherapy to improve survival for women with uterine sarcomas confined to the uterus.

    PubMed

    Dusenbery, Kathryn E; Potish, Roger A; Argenta, Peter A; Judson, Patricia L

    2005-06-01

    Despite numerous studies documenting reduction of pelvic relapses after adjuvant pelvic radiotherapy stage I and II uterine sarcomas, improved survival remains unproven. This retrospective report analyzes patterns of failure, survival, and toxicity in 42 women with stage I and 7 patients with stage II uterine sarcomas treated from 1972 through 1998 to identify patients likely to benefit from pelvic or abdominal radiotherapy and chemotherapy. Four of these patients also received adjuvant chemotherapy. There were 20 leiomyosarcomas, 18 homologous mixed mullerian tumors, and 11 heterologous mixed mullerian tumors. Disease-free survivals for mixed mullerian tumors were 65% at 5 years and 61% at 15 years. Disease-free survivals for leiomyosarcomas were 40% at 5 years and 40% at 15 years. There were 14 distant only, 5 distant and abdominal, 1 abdominal, 1 distant and pelvic, and 2 unknown initial sites of failure. Acute toxicity was acceptable as measured by a median 1-kg weight loss from radiotherapy and a 2% rate of failure to complete therapy. Chronic toxicity consisted of 3 small bowel obstructions and 1 sigmoid colon obstruction. In conclusion, the efficacy of adjuvant pelvic radiation is demonstrated by the absence of any isolated pelvic failures. Although the frequent occurrence of peritoneal failures suggests a role for prophylactic abdominal radiation for mixed mullerian tumors, more effective systemic therapy is necessary to substantially increase the chance of cure for women with early-stage uterine sarcomas.

  3. [Treatment of pelvic Ewing's sarcoma in children and the effect on the skeletal growth and development].

    PubMed

    Fu, Jun; Guo, Zheng; Wang, Zhen; Li, Xiang-dong; Li, Jing; Chen, Guo-jing; Wu, Zhi-gang

    2012-12-01

    To explore the effect of neo-adjuvant chemotherapy and computer-assisted surgery on children and adolescents with primary pelvic Ewing's sarcoma, and assess the therapeutic effect on the pelvic skeletal growth and development. This is a retrospective analysis of 10 children with primary pelvic Ewing's sarcoma treated between Jan 2001 and Oct 2010 at the Department of Oncologic Orthopaedics at Xijing Hospital. There were 3 girls and 7 boys in the age of 7 to 16 years (average 12.7 years). All patients were pathologically diagnosed as Ewing's sarcoma. There were two cases in the sacroiliac joint, one in the ilium, one in the pubic bone, and 6 cases in peri-acetabular area including 5 below the triradiate cartilage and one above the triradiate cartilage, without cartilage invasion. All patients underwent neo-adjuvant chemotherapy, resection and reconstruction surgery and postoperative chemotherapy. CDP, ADM and IFO regimen chemotherapy were given as the main treatment. Five cases were treated by traditional resection and reconstruction, and after 2008, five cases were treated by computer-assisted surgery. During the reconstruction, the hip rotation center was put at a depressed location. All of the 10 cases underwent postoperative radiotherapy in a dose of 45-55 Gy. All patients were followed-up for 12-72 months (mean: 37.8 months). One child had tumor recurrence and lung metastasis and 9 patients had no evidence of disease (NED). After neo-adjuvant chemotherapy, the oncologic statuses (RECIST) were: 1 CR, 8 PR and 1 SD. The functional recoveries after surgery (Enneking's) were: 4 cases excellent, 4 good, 1 fair and 1 poor. Five cases who underwent computer-assisted surgery achieved a good reconstruction without local recurrence. There were no effects on skeletal growth in 8 cases. An unbalanced hip rotational center occurred in one case, and a compemsatory scoliosis was found in another case. There were no serious complications in all patients. The comprehensive

  4. Vertically unstable pelvic fractures fixed with percutaneous iliosacral screws: does posterior injury pattern predict fixation failure?

    PubMed

    Griffin, Damian R; Starr, Adam J; Reinert, Charles M; Jones, Alan L; Whitlock, Shelly

    2003-07-01

    To measure the failure rate of percutaneous iliosacral screw fixation of vertically unstable pelvic fractures and particularly to test the hypothesis that fixations in which the posterior injury is a vertical fracture of the sacrum are more likely to fail than fixations with dislocations or fracture-dislocations of the sacroiliac joint. Retrospective review. Level 1 trauma center. All patients with pelvic fractures admitted between January 1, 1993, and December 31, 1998, were identified from the trauma registry. Hospital records were used to identify patients treated with iliosacral screws. Radiologic studies were examined to identify patients who had unequivocally vertically unstable pelvic fractures. Immediate postoperative and follow-up anteroposterior, inlet, and outlet radiographs from a minimum of 12 months postinjury were examined. Position, length, and numbers of iliosacral screws and any evidence of screw failure (eg, bending or breakage) were recorded. Residual postoperative displacement and late displacement of the posterior pelvis were measured. The main outcome measure was failure, defined as at least 1cm of combined vertical displacement of the posterior pelvis compared with immediate postoperative position. The main analysis was for association between fracture pattern and failure. Patient demographic data, iliosacral screw position, and anterior pelvic fixation method also were studied. The study group comprised 62 patients with unequivocally vertically unstable pelvic fractures in whom the posterior injury was treated with closed reduction and percutaneous iliosacral screw fixation. Of patients, 32 had dislocations or fracture-dislocations of the sacroiliac joint, and 30 had vertical fractures of the sacrum. Fixation failed in four patients, all with vertical sacral fractures and all within the first 3 weeks after surgery. These four patients required revision fixation. In two further cases with vertical sacral fractures, there was evidence that

  5. Vertically unstable pelvic fractures fixed with percutaneous iliosacral screws: does posterior injury pattern predict fixation failure?

    PubMed

    Griffin, Damian R; Starr, Adam J; Reinert, Charles M; Jones, Alan L; Whitlock, Shelly

    2006-01-01

    To measure the failure rate of percutaneous iliosacral screw fixation of vertically unstable pelvic fractures and particularly to test the hypothesis that fixations in which the posterior injury is a vertical