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Sample records for postoperative wound complications

  1. [Significance and prevention of post-operative wound complications].

    PubMed

    Napp, M; Gümbel, D; Lange, J; Hinz, P; Daeschlein, G; Ekkernkamp, A

    2014-01-01

    Although surgical site infections (SSI) in dermatologic operative procedures are extremely rare, it is important to understand risks and etiological factors to initiate risk assessment and specific preventive measures. SSI commonly are associated with a complicated, long-term and expensive outcome. Typical wound pathogens of these infections include a variety of multiresistant organisms along with Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus epidermidis, hemolytic streptococci and the gram-negative bacilli Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Effective hygienic measures as part of an adequate quality management system should consider the critical points in the development of SSI, particularly in the setting of an outpatient dermatologic unit, such as preparation of the operative area, preoperative skin antisepsis, hand hygiene, safe and skilled technique by surgeons, and barrier nursing to prevent spread of pathogens. The baseline infection incidence in dermatologic surgery inherently is low; nevertheless significant improvements can be achieved by implementation of risk-adapted infection control measures.

  2. Patient Risk Factors for Mechanical Wound Complications and Postoperative Infections after Elective Open Intestinal Resection

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Wei Chao; Turner, Akiva; Imon, Michael; Dyda, Anthony

    2016-01-01

    Background Few studies focused on the construction of preoperative patient surgical risk profile using only patients’ personal, social history, and comorbidity profiles. Objective To identify risk factors for mechanical wound complications and postoperative infections in patients’ preoperative profiles. Design Quantitative retrospective cohort study using 2009–2011 Health Care Utilization Project (HCUP) Nationwide Inpatient Sample (NIS) databases. Patients 56,853 patients who underwent elective open intestinal resection. Measurements Predictors of mechanical wound complications and postoperative infections in patients’ personal, social history, and comorbidity profiles. Results Patients age 18–39 were more likely to suffer mechanical wound complications compared to patients age 65–79 (OR = 1.9, 95% CI [1.5, 2.4], p < .01) and to patients age 80 and over (OR = 2.9, 95% CI [2.2, 3.8], p < .01). Patients age 18–39 were also more likely to suffer postoperative infections compared to patients age 65–79 (OR = 1.4, 95% CI [1.1, 1.6], p < .01) and to patients age 80 and over (OR = 2.0, 95% CI [1.6, 2.6], p < .01). Other most significant predictors included male gender, fluid and electrolyte disorders, pulmonary circulation disorders, and weight loss, as well as patients with comorbidities. All statistically significant predictors with positive estimates for postoperative infections were also statistically significant predictors of mechanical wound complications. Conclusions Individual patient risk profile can be constructed using preoperative patient profiles for improving perioperative care coordination and patient care quality. Postoperative infections were associated with mechanical wound complications in patients undergoing elective open intestinal resection. PMID:27833511

  3. Application of subcutaneous talc in hernia repair and wide subcutaneous dissection dramatically reduces seroma formation and postoperative wound complications.

    PubMed

    Klima, David A; Brintzenhoff, Rita A; Tsirline, Victor B; Belyansky, Igor; Lincourt, Amy E; Getz, Stanley; Heniford, B Todd

    2011-07-01

    Wound complications after large ventral hernia repairs when combined with wide subcutaneous dissection (OVHR/WSD) are common (33 to 66%). We evaluate a novel technique of applying talc to wound subcutaneous tissues to decrease wound complications. We accessed our prospectively collected surgical outcomes database for OVHR/WSD procedures performed. Patients were divided into those that did and did not receive subcutaneous talc (TALC vs NOTALC). Demographics intraoperative and outcomes data were collected and analyzed. The study included 180 patients (n = 74 TALC, n = 106 NOTALC). Demographics were all similar, but hernias were larger in the TALC group. TALC patients had their drains removed earlier (14.6 vs 25.6 days; P < 0.001) with dramatic reduction in postoperative seromas requiring intervention (20.8 to 2.7%; P < 0.001) and cellulitis (39.0 to 20.6%; P = 0.007). Short-term follow-up demonstrates significantly higher recurrence rates in the NOTALC group with each recurrence related to infection. The use of talc in the subcutaneous space of OVHR/WSD results in significantly earlier removal of subcutaneous drains, fewer wound complications, and a decrease in early hernia recurrence. Use of talc in the subcutaneous space at the time of wound closure is an excellent technique to decrease wound complications in large subcutaneous dissections.

  4. Staphylococcal Scalded-Skin Syndrome Complicating Wound Infection in a Preterm Infant with Postoperative Chylothorax

    PubMed Central

    Peters, Bjoern; Hentschel, Juliane; Mau, Harald; Halle, Elke; Witte, Wolfgang; Obladen, Michael

    1998-01-01

    The course of infection in a 3-week-old premature newborn suffering from extensive dermatitis with flaccid blisters is described. Staphylococcus aureus was recovered from a local wound infection around a chest tube inserted to drain a postoperative chylothorax. The strain isolated tested positive for the eta gene for exfoliative toxin A, the causative agent of staphylococcal scalded-skin syndrome (SSSS). In this case, prematurity and loss of chylus with consecutive lymphopenia may have contributed to development of SSSS. PMID:9738069

  5. [Postoperative complications in plastic surgery].

    PubMed

    Vogt, P M

    2009-09-01

    Plastic surgery covers a broad spectrum of diseases and conditions in the areas of reconstructive surgery, hand, burn and aesthetic surgery. Besides acquired defects or malformations an increasing number of patients are being treated for surgical or multimodal complications. In a considerable number of patients plastic and reconstructive surgery remains the only therapeutic alternative after other therapy has failed. Therefore complication management in plastic surgery is of utmost importance for a successful outcome. In addition patient expectations in the results of plastic surgery as a discipline of invention and problem solving are steadily increasing. This challenge is reflected in clinical patient management by intensive research in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. Patients in plastic surgery are recruited from all age groups of either gender, involving traumatic and oncologic as well as congenital and aesthetic disorders. The demographics of aging, multimorbidity and obesity pose new challenges to plastic surgery. Although age over 70 years is not an independent risk factor per se for complications in plastic surgery, e.g. for complex free flap transfer, medical problems are present at a higher rate, which is to be expected in this age group. Risk factors such as alcoholism and coronary heart diseases seem to be independent predictors of perioperative complications. Therefore older patients can also benefit from plastic surgery and recurrent operations by the corresponding risk and complication management. Complication management necessitates careful patient selection, estimation of operative risks and patient-adapted selection of procedures. In addition to expertise in plastic surgery a thorough knowledge of non-surgical and surgical back-up procedures for technical incidents as well as vascular circulatory and wound healing disorders is required to deal successfully with complications in plastic surgery. This article presents these specific

  6. Postoperative complications of spine surgery.

    PubMed

    Swann, Matthew C; Hoes, Kathryn S; Aoun, Salah G; McDonagh, David L

    2016-03-01

    A variety of surgical approaches are available for the treatment of spine diseases. Complications can arise intraoperatively, in the immediate postoperative period, or in a delayed fashion. These complications may lead to severe or even permanent morbidity if left unrecognized and untreated [1-4]. Here we review a range of complications in the early postoperative period from more benign complications such as postoperative nausea and vomiting (PONV) to more feared complications leading to permanent loss of neurological function or death [5]. Perioperative pain management is covered in a separate review (Chapter 8).

  7. Postoperative pyoderma gangrenosum: a rare complication after appendectomy.

    PubMed

    Faghihi, G; Abtahi-Naeini, B; Nikyar, Z; Jamshidi, K; Bahrami, A

    2015-01-01

    Pyoderma gangrenosum (PG) is an uncommon inflammatory ulcerative skin disease. It is characterized by painful progressive necrosis of the wound margins. Rarely, postoperative pyoderma gangrenosum (PPG) manifests as a severe disturbance of wound healing following surgical interventions. Only rare cases of this complication have been reported after appendectomy. We report a case of PPG in a 29-year-old female after appendectomy. She was successfully treated with oral prednisolone. Postoperative pyoderma gangrenosum should be kept in mind in the differential diagnosis of any postoperative delayed wound healing, because this disease is simply distinguished from a postoperative wound.

  8. Management of postoperative complications: general approach.

    PubMed

    Sanguineti, V Ana; Wild, Jason R; Fain, Mindy J

    2014-05-01

    The goal of postoperative management is to promote early mobility and avoid postoperative complications, recognizing the potentially devastating impact of complications on elderly patients with hip fracture. The recommended approach involves early mobilization; freedom from tethers (indwelling urinary catheters and other devices); effective pain control; treating malnutrition; preventing pressure ulcers; reducing risk for pulmonary, urinary, and wound infections; and managing cognition. This carefully structured and patient-centered management provides older, vulnerable patients their best chance of returning to their previous level of functioning as quickly and safety as possible.

  9. Postoperative continuous wound infusion of ropivacaine has comparable analgesic effects and fewer complications as compared to traditional patient-controlled analgesia with sufentanil in patients undergoing non-cardiac thoracotomy

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Fang-Fang; Liu, Xiao-Ming; Liu, Xiao-Yu; Tang, Jun; Jin, Li; Li, Wei-Yan; Zhang, Li-Dong

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To compare the postoperative analgesic effects of continuous wound infusion of ropivacaine with traditional patient-controlled analgesia (PCA) with sufentanil after non-cardiac thoracotomy. Methods: One hundred and twenty adult patients undergoing open thoracotomy were recruited into this assessor-blinded, randomized study. Patients were randomly assigned to receive analgesia through a wound catheter placed below the fascia and connected to a 2 ml/h ropivacaine 0.5% (RWI group) or sufentanil PCA (SPCA group). Analgesia continued for 48 h. Visual analogue scores (VAS) at rest and movement, Ramsay scores and adverse effects were recorded at 2, 8, 12, 24, 36 and 48 h after surgery. Three months after discharge, patient’s satisfaction, residual pain and surgical wound complications were assessed. Results: General characteristics of patients were comparable between two groups. There were no statistical differences in the VAS scores and postoperative pethidine consumption between two groups (P > 0.05). However, when compared with SPCA group, the incidences of drowsiness, dizziness and respiratory depression, ICU stay and hospital expenditure reduced significantly in RWI group (P < 0.05). Patients’ satisfaction with pain management was also improved markedly in RWI group (P < 0.05). Conclusion: Continuous wound infusion with ropivacaine is effective for postoperative analgesia and has comparable effects to traditional PCA with sufentanil. Furthermore, this therapy may also reduce the incidences of drowsiness, dizziness, respiratory depression and decrease the ICU stay and hospital expenditure. PMID:26131121

  10. Postoperative surgical complications of lymphadenohysterocolpectomy

    PubMed Central

    Marin, F; Pleşca, M; Bordea, CI; Voinea, SC; Burlănescu, I; Ichim, E; Jianu, CG; Nicolăescu, RR; Teodosie, MP; Maher, K; Blidaru, A

    2014-01-01

    Rationale The current standard surgical treatment for the cervix and uterine cancer is the radical hysterectomy (lymphadenohysterocolpectomy). This has the risk of intraoperative accidents and postoperative associated morbidity. Objective The purpose of this article is the evaluation and quantification of the associated complications in comparison to the postoperative morbidity which resulted after different types of radical hysterectomy. Methods and results Patients were divided according to the type of surgery performed as follows: for cervical cancer – group A- 37 classic radical hysterectomies Class III Piver - Rutledge -Smith ( PRS ), group B -208 modified radical hysterectomies Class II PRS and for uterine cancer- group C -79 extended hysterectomies with pelvic lymphadenectomy from which 17 patients with paraaortic lymphnode biopsy . All patients performed preoperative radiotherapy and 88 of them associated radiosensitization. Discussion Early complications were intra-abdominal bleeding ( 2.7% Class III PRS vs 0.48% Class II PRS), supra-aponeurotic hematoma ( 5.4% III vs 2.4% II) , dynamic ileus (2.7% III vs 0.96% II) and uro - genital fistulas (5.4% III vs 0.96% II).The late complications were the bladder dysfunction (21.6% III vs 16.35% II) , lower limb lymphedema (13.5% III vs 11.5% II), urethral strictures (10.8% III vs 4.8% II) , incisional hernias ( 8.1% III vs 7.2% II), persistent pelvic pain (18.91% III vs 7.7% II), bowel obstruction (5.4% III vs 1.4% II) and deterioration of sexual function (83.3% III vs 53.8% II). PRS class II radical hysterectomy is associated with fewer complications than PRS class III radical hysterectomy , except for the complications of lymphadenectomy . A new method that might reduce these complications is a selective lymphadenectomy represented by sentinel node biopsy . In conclusion PRS class II radical hysterectomy associated with neoadjuvant radiotherapy is a therapeutic option for the incipient stages of cervical cancer

  11. Postoperative irradiation impairs or enhances wound strength depending on time of administration

    SciTech Connect

    Vegesna, V.; McBride, W.H.; Withers, H.R.

    1995-08-01

    Irradiation can complicate surgical wound healing, yet little is known of the importance of the time between surgery and irradiation on this process. This study investigated the impact of post-operative irradiation on gain in wound tensile strength in a murine skin model. Irradiation on the same day as wounding or to 2-day-old wounds reduced wound tensile strength. In contrast, postoperative irradiation delivered at 7, 9 and 14 days transiently enhanced wound tensile strength, as measure d 3 but not 4 or 5 weeks later. This effect was independent of the inclusion (hemi-body) or exclusion (skin alone) of the hematopoietic system in the field of irradiation. Radiation-enhanced wound tensile strength was greater and occurred earlier after higher radiation doses. Even though the effect of irradiation in enhancing wound tensile strength is transitory, it could be important in assisting early wound healing. 14 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  12. Post-operative pulmonary complications after thoracotomy

    PubMed Central

    Sengupta, Saikat

    2015-01-01

    Pulmonary complications are a major cause of morbidity and mortality in the post-operative period after thoracotomy. The type of complications and the severity of complications depend on the type of thoracic surgery that has been performed as well as on the patient's pre-operative medical status. Risk stratification can help in predicting the possibility of the post-operative complications. Certain airway complications are more prone to develop with thoracic surgery. Vocal cord injuries, bronchopleural fistulae, pulmonary emboli and post-thoracic surgery non-cardiogenic pulmonary oedema are some of the unique complications that occur in this subset of patients. The major pulmonary complications such as atelectasis, bronchospasm and pneumonia can lead to respiratory failure. This review was compiled after a search for search terms within ‘post-operative pulmonary complications after thoracic surgery and thoracotomy’ on search engines including PubMed and standard text references on the subject from 2000 to 2015. PMID:26556921

  13. Postoperative wound infections after a proctectomy—Patient experiences

    PubMed Central

    Andersson, Kristin; Koinberg, Inga-Lill; Wennström, Berith

    2016-01-01

    Poor perineal wound healing and infections after proctectomy surgery cause a significant proportion of physical and psychological morbidities, such as pain, leakage, and abscesses. In the long run, some of these symptoms will lead to extended periods of hospitalization. These kinds of postoperative complications are also associated with delays in possible chemotherapy treatment. The aim of this study was to describe patient experiences of perineal wound infections following proctectomy due to rectal cancer, and the importance of the communication with and the self-care support from the nurse for these patients. Five women and five men (61–87 years, median age 71 years) were included and interviewed. A qualitative content analysis of the interviews was carried out and the following main categories emerged: “Managing postoperative complications,” “Being independent,” “Feeling safe,” and “Accepting the situation.” A perineal wound infection after a proctectomy is devastating for the individual patient. The limitations and changes to the patients’ lives turn into new daily routines, which force them to find new ways to live and to accept the situation. For many of them, the infections remained for several months and, sometimes, for years. The ability to lead an independent life is drastically reduced, but through continuity in care it is possible to create a feeling of safety. Information, communication, and self-care support are all important and valuable factors for recovery. Specialized care containing an action plan is therefore needed in clinical practice to reduce the number of perineal wound infections postoperatively and should be initiated when the patient is discharged from the ward and continue until recovery. PMID:26900139

  14. The direct perfusion of surgical wounds with local anaesthetic solution: an approach to postoperative pain?

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, D. F.; Lambert, W. G.; Williams, K. L.

    1983-01-01

    A simple technique of wound perfusion with bupivacaine (Marcain) which provides sustained postoperative analgesia is described. No complications nor side effects related to toxicity, hypersensitivity, infection, or impaired wound healing were encountered. Postoperative pain was reduced and analgesic requirements were significantly lower in patients undergoing both intermittent (P less than 0.01) and continuous (P = 0.1) wound perfusion (Student t test). Perfusion with isotonic saline was also found to be effective. This may represent a true therapeutic effect attributable to the removal or dilution of pain mediating substances in the wound. PMID:6347012

  15. Predictors of Postoperative Complications After Trimodality Therapy for Esophageal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Jingya; Wei, Caimiao; Tucker, Susan L.; Myles, Bevan; Palmer, Matthew; Hofstetter, Wayne L.; Swisher, Stephen G.; Ajani, Jaffer A.; Cox, James D.; Komaki, Ritsuko; Liao, Zhongxing; Lin, Steven H.

    2013-08-01

    Purpose: While trimodality therapy for esophageal cancer has improved patient outcomes, surgical complication rates remain high. The goal of this study was to identify modifiable factors associated with postoperative complications after neoadjuvant chemoradiation. Methods and Materials: From 1998 to 2011, 444 patients were treated at our institution with surgical resection after chemoradiation. Postoperative (pulmonary, gastrointestinal [GI], cardiac, wound healing) complications were recorded up to 30 days postoperatively. Kruskal-Wallis tests and χ{sup 2} or Fisher exact tests were used to assess associations between continuous and categorical variables. Multivariate logistic regression tested the association between perioperative complications and patient or treatment factors that were significant on univariate analysis. Results: The most frequent postoperative complications after trimodality therapy were pulmonary (25%) and GI (23%). Lung capacity and the type of radiation modality used were independent predictors of pulmonary and GI complications. After adjusting for confounding factors, pulmonary and GI complications were increased in patients treated with 3-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT) versus intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT; odds ratio [OR], 2.018; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.104-3.688; OR, 1.704; 95% CI, 1.03-2.82, respectively) and for patients treated with 3D-CRT versus proton beam therapy (PBT; OR, 3.154; 95% CI, 1.365-7.289; OR, 1.55; 95% CI, 0.78-3.08, respectively). Mean lung radiation dose (MLD) was strongly associated with pulmonary complications, and the differences in toxicities seen for the radiation modalities could be fully accounted for by the MLD delivered by each of the modalities. Conclusions: The radiation modality used can be a strong mitigating factor of postoperative complications after neoadjuvant chemoradiation.

  16. Modeling the Temporal Evolution of Postoperative Complications

    PubMed Central

    Feld, Shara I.; Cobian, Alexander G.; Tevis, Sarah E.; Kennedy, Gregory D.; Craven, Mark W.

    2016-01-01

    Post-operative complications have a significant impact on patient morbidity and mortality; these impacts are exacerbated when patients experience multiple complications. However, the task of modeling the temporal sequencing of complications has not been previously addressed. We present an approach based on Markov chain models for characterizing the temporal evolution of post-operative complications represented in the American College of Surgeons National Surgery Quality Improvement Program database. Our work demonstrates that the models have significant predictive value. In particular, an inhomogenous Markov chain model effectively predicts the development of serious complications (coma longer than a day, cardiac arrest, myocardial infarction, septic shock, renal failure, pneumonia) and interventional complications (unplanned re-intubation, longer than 2 days on a ventilator and bleeding transfusion). PMID:28269851

  17. [A simple point score for definition of the risk of postoperative complications].

    PubMed

    Grundmann, R; Papoulis, C

    1989-01-01

    During a 5-year-period we recorded prospectively 5,823 patients who had undergone general surgery and documented the postoperative complications as wound infection, pneumonia, reoperations and death. A score including all these complications was developed to evaluate the risk of an operation more exactly than using the wound infection rate alone. This method seems to provide a continuous monitoring and the comparison of the complication risks of certain operations within a quality assurance program. For gastric and colon surgery we found a correlation between postoperative antibiotic use and score, but not between score and postoperative hospitalization time.

  18. Hyperprolactinaemia: a cause of severe postoperative complication after reduction mammaplasty.

    PubMed

    Mestak, Ondrej; Mestak, Jan; Borsky, Jiri

    2014-12-01

    Galactorrhoea is a rare complication of wound healing after breast reduction and its association with necrosis of the areolar skin in women with no recent history of breast feeding has to our knowledge never been described. Galactorrhoea is common and there are many differential diagnoses. We report a case of a 46-year-old woman who had bilateral reductions of the breast and developed hyperprolactinaemia and galactorrhoea six weeks postoperatively. Subsequently she developed dry necrosis of both areolas. All radiographic and laboratory findings were within the reference ranges except for of prolactin.

  19. Incisional Negative Pressure Wound Therapy for Prevention of Postoperative Infections Following Caesarean Section

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-01-30

    Surgical Wound Infection; Infection; Cesarean Section; Cesarean Section; Dehiscence; Complications; Cesarean Section; Complications; Cesarean Section, Wound, Dehiscence; Wound; Rupture, Surgery, Cesarean Section

  20. Management of postoperative complications of lymphadenectomy

    PubMed Central

    Charruf, Amir Zeide; de Oliveira, Rodrigo José; Jacob, Carlos Eduardo; Cecconello, Ivan; Zilberstein, Bruno

    2016-01-01

    Gastric cancer remains a disease with poor prognosis, mainly due to its late diagnosis. Surgery remains as the only treatment with curative intent, where the goal is radical resection with free-margin gastrectomy and extended lymphadenectomy. Over the last two decades there has been an improvement on postoperative outcomes. However, complications rate is still not negligible even in high volume specialized centers and are directly related mainly to the type of gastric resection: total or subtotal, combined with adjacent organs resection and the extension of lymphadenectomy (D1, D2 and D3). The aim of this study is to analyze the complications specific-related to lymphadenectomy in gastric cancer surgery. PMID:28138657

  1. Automatic wound infection interpretation for postoperative wound image

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Jui-Tse; Ho, Te-Wei; Shih, Hsueh-Fu; Chang, Chun-Che; Lai, Feipei; Wu, Jin-Ming

    2017-02-01

    With the growing demand for more efficient wound care after surgery, there is a necessity to develop a machine learning based image analysis approach to reduce the burden for health care professionals. The aim of this study was to propose a novel approach to recognize wound infection on the postsurgical site. Firstly, we proposed an optimal clustering method based on unimodal-rosin threshold algorithm to extract the feature points from a potential wound area into clusters for regions of interest (ROI). Each ROI was regarded as a suture site of the wound area. The automatic infection interpretation based on the support vector machine is available to assist physicians doing decision-making in clinical practice. According to clinical physicians' judgment criteria and the international guidelines for wound infection interpretation, we defined infection detector modules as the following: (1) Swelling Detector, (2) Blood Region Detector, (3) Infected Detector, and (4) Tissue Necrosis Detector. To validate the capability of the proposed system, a retrospective study using the confirmation wound pictures that were used for diagnosis by surgical physicians as the gold standard was conducted to verify the classification models. Currently, through cross validation of 42 wound images, our classifiers achieved 95.23% accuracy, 93.33% sensitivity, 100% specificity, and 100% positive predictive value. We believe this ability could help medical practitioners in decision making in clinical practice.

  2. Risk factors for postoperative complications in total thyroidectomy

    PubMed Central

    Caulley, Lisa; Johnson-Obaseki, Stephanie; Luo, Lindy; Javidnia, Hedyeh

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Thyroid cancer incidence is increasing, and with it, an increase in total thyroidectomy. There are limited studies comparing outcomes in total thyroidectomy performed in the inpatient versus outpatient setting. The objective of this study was to perform a comparative analysis of risk factors and outcomes of postoperative morbidity and mortality in total thyroidectomy performed as an inpatient versus outpatient surgery. Retrospective cohort study of data from the 2005 to 2014 multi-institutional, risk-adjusted American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program (ACS-NSQIP) database. A multivariate regression model with corresponding odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals was used to determine 30-day morbidity and mortality after total thyroidectomies, and also risk factors of postoperative outcomes. From 2005 to 2014, 40,025 total thyroidectomies were performed (48.5% inpatient, 51.5% outpatient). The 30-day complication rate for all total thyroidectomies was 7.74%. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was performed to control for potential confounding variables. Preoperative factors that affected complications rates for inpatient thyroidectomies included: age ≥70, non-Caucasian race, dependent functional status, history of congestive heart failure, smoking history, bleeding disorder, wound infection, and preoperative sepsis (P < 0.05). In addition, preoperative factors affecting complications in thyroidectomy performed as an outpatient surgery included malignant thyroid pathology (P  0.05). We identified a subset of preoperative conditions that affect risk of complications after total thyroidectomy. Recommendations for patient selection for outpatient total thyroidectomies should be modified to account for pre-existing conditions that increase the risk of postoperative morbidity. PMID:28151852

  3. Impact of an absorbent silver-eluting dressing system on lower extremity revascularization wound complications.

    PubMed

    Childress, Beverly B; Berceli, Scott A; Nelson, Peter R; Lee, W Anthony; Ozaki, C Keith

    2007-09-01

    Surgical wounds for lower extremity revascularization are prone to infection and dehiscence. Acticoat Absorbent, an antimicrobial dressing, offers sustained release of ionic silver. We hypothesized that immediate application of Acticoat as a postoperative dressing would reduce wound complications in patients undergoing leg revascularization. All infrainguinal revascularization cases involving leg incisions at a single Veterans Administration Medical Center were identified from July 1, 2002, to September 30, 2005. The control group received conventional dressings, while the treatment group received an Acticoat dressing. Wound complication rates were captured via National Surgical Quality Improvement Program data. Patient characteristics and procedure distributions were similar between groups. The wound complication rate fell 64% with utilization of the Acticoat-based dressing (control 14% [17/118], treatment 5% [7/130]; P = 0.016). An Acticoat-based dressing system offers a potentially useful, cost-effective adjunct to reduce open surgical leg revascularization wound complications.

  4. Postoperative complications after thoracic surgery for lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Maugeri, Laura; Corbo, Giuseppe Maria; Valente, Salvatore

    2004-01-01

    Postoperative complications and related risk factors after lung reduction surgery are analyzed based on a review of the literature. In particular the pathogenesis of some of postoperative respiratory disorders is carefully assessed. Most commonly cardiac arrhythmias, respiratory failure, bronchopleural fistula are observed. Main risk factors for postoperative complications are old age, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, coronary disease, poor nutritional state, neoadjuvant therapy. Attention should be paid to all these factors, both in preoperative assessment and postoperative care, to prevent and promptly treat postoperative complications.

  5. [Postoperative infectious-inflammatory complications of endoscopic surgery for urolithiasis].

    PubMed

    Akilov, F A; Mukhtarov, Sh T; Giiasov, Sh I; Mirkhamidov, D Kh; Nasirov, F R; Muratova, N B

    2013-01-01

    Retrospective analysis of 1027 percutaneous radioendoscopic surgeries for upper urinary tract stones was performed. Postoperative acute pyelonephritis was the most common complication (11.2%), the frequency of which was significantly dependent on the presence of source of infection in the urinary tract, and the frequency of intra- and postoperative complications. When performing PPN, patients with urolithiasis and with the presence of the initial infection in the urinary tract, intra- and postoperative complications should be referred to the group of patients with a high risk of postoperative infectious and inflammatory complications. The analysis showed that the development of acute pyelonephritis after PPN increases the cost of treatment by 25%.

  6. Immediate postoperative complications in transsphenoidal pituitary surgery: A prospective study

    PubMed Central

    Chowdhury, Tumul; Prabhakar, Hemanshu; Bithal, Parmod K.; Schaller, Bernhard; Dash, Hari Hara

    2014-01-01

    Background: Considering the important role of pituitary gland in regulating various endocrine axes and its unique anatomical location, various postoperative complications can be anticipated resulting from surgery on pituitary tumors. We examined and categorized the immediate postoperative complications according to various tumor pathologies. Materials and Methods: We carried out a prospective study in 152 consecutive patients and noted various postoperative complications during neurosurgical intensive care unit stay (within 48 hrs of hospital stay) in patients undergoing transsphenoidal removal of pituitary tumors. Results: In our series, various groups showed different postoperative complications out of which, cerebrospinal fluid leak was the commonest followed by diabetes insipidus, postoperative nausea and vomiting, and hematoma at operation site. Conclusion: Various immediate postoperative complications can be anticipated in transsphenoidal pituitary surgery even though, it is considered to be relatively safe. PMID:25191182

  7. Effect of postoperative use of nasal oxygen catheter supplementation in wound healing following total knee arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Helito, Camilo Partezani; Junqueira, Jader Joel Machado; Gobbi, Ricardo Gomes; Angelini, Fábio Janson; Rezende, Marcia Uchoa; Tírico, Luis Eduardo Passarelli; Demange, Marco Kawamura; da Mota e Albuquerque, Roberto Freire; Pécora, José Ricardo; Camanho, Gilberto Luis

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Healing is an event that is fundamental to the success of total knee arthroplasty. The aims of the present study were to compare the rates of complications related to wound healing between two groups of volunteers submitted to total knee arthroplasty and to evaluate the effects of postoperative oxygen supplementation by means of a nasal catheter. METHOD: A total of 109 patients who underwent total knee arthroplasty were randomized into two groups, namely, groups that did and did not receive postoperative oxygen supplementation via a nasal catheter. The surgical wound was monitored every day during the hospital stay and on the 7th, 14th, 21st, 30th and 42nd postoperative days. Characteristics related to healing were observed, including hyperemia, dehiscence, necrosis, phlyctenules and deep and superficial infection. RESULTS: There were no cases of deep infection. Hyperemia was statistically correlated with the total number of complications in the groups, with oxygen demonstrated to be a protective factor against hyperemia. Approximately 30% of the patients who exhibited hyperemia had other complications, independent of oxygen supplementation. CONCLUSION: Oxygen supplementation following total knee arthroplasty was shown to be effective in diminishing hyperemia around the operative wound. The development of hyperemia was a precursor to other complications, irrespective of whether oxygen supplementation was used. PMID:25518030

  8. Increased mid-abdominal circumference is a predictor for surgical wound complications in kidney transplant recipients: A prospective cohort study.

    PubMed

    Taha, Mohamed; Davis, Niall F; Power, Richard; Mohan, Ponusamy; Forde, James; Smyth, Gordon; Little, Dilly M

    2017-03-15

    Kidney transplant recipients are at an increased risk of developing surgical site wound complications due to their immunosuppressed status. We aimed to determine whether increased mid-abdominal circumference (MAC) is predictive for wound complications in transplant recipients. A prospective study was performed on all kidney transplant recipients from October 2014 to October 2015. "Controls" consisted of kidney transplant recipients without a surgical site wound complication and "cases" consisted of recipients that developed a wound complication. In total, 144 patients underwent kidney transplantation and 107 patients met inclusion criteria. Postoperative wound complications were documented in 28 (26%) patients. Patients that developed a wound complication had a significantly greater MAC, body mass index (BMI), and body weight upon renal transplantation (P<.001, P=.011, and P=.011, respectively). On single and multiple logistic regression analyses, MAC was a significant predictor for developing a surgical wound complication (P=.02). Delayed graft function and a history of preformed anti-HLA antibodies were also predictive for surgical wound complications (P=.003 and P=.014, respectively). Increased MAC is a significant predictor for surgical wound complications in kidney transplant recipients. Integrating clinical methods for measuring visceral adiposity may be useful for stratifying kidney transplant recipients with an increased risk of a surgical wound complication.

  9. Wound breakdown after middle cranial fossa craniotomy: an unusual complication after rhytidectomy.

    PubMed

    Moberly, Aaron C; Tweel, Benjamin C; Welling, D Bradley

    2014-02-01

    Wound complications after middle cranial fossa craniotomy are rare. We describe a patient who underwent a left middle fossa craniotomy for resection of a small internal auditory canal tumor with subsequent development of wound breakdown and infection 1 week postoperatively. Prompting of the patient elicited a history of bilateral rhytidectomies. Wound debridement, hyperbaric oxygen therapy, dermal regeneration template placement, and prolonged antibiotic treatment were performed. Complete secondary intention healing occurred with an acceptable cosmetic outcome. Prior rhytidectomy scars must be identified and incorporated into the surgical planning prior to performing middle fossa craniotomy incisions.

  10. The effect of sutureless wound closure on postoperative pain and swelling after impacted mandibular third molar surgery.

    PubMed

    Hashemi, Hamid Mahmood; Beshkar, Majid; Aghajani, Reihaneh

    2012-04-01

    Our aim was to assess the influence of sutureless and multiple-suture closure of wounds on postoperative complications after extraction of bilateral, impacted, mandibular third molars in 30 patients in a split mouth study. After the teeth had been removed, on one side the flap was replaced but with no suture to hold it in place (study side), and on the other side the wound was closed primarily with three sutures (control side). Recorded complications included pain, swelling, bleeding, and formation of periodontal pockets. The results showed that patients had significantly less postoperative pain and swelling when no sutures were used (p=0.005). There were no signs of excessive bleeding or oozing postoperatively on either side. Six months postoperatively there was no significant difference in the depth of the periodontal pocket around the second molar.

  11. Postoperative interstitial hernia as a cause of obscure incisional wound site pain.

    PubMed

    Modrzejewski, Andrzej; Smietański, Maciej

    2012-03-01

    An interstitial hernia is one in which the hernia sac is located between the layers of the abdominal wall. The analysis of contemporary literature shows that interstitial hernias are most often seen in children as a type of inguinal hernia and often accompany undescended testis. The hernia sac is usually located between the external-oblique and internal-oblique muscles in a lateral-cephalic direction. The authors present 3 cases of interstitial hernia found during laparoscopic exploration of the front abdominal wall done due to incisional wound site pain. No previous diagnosis of hernia was considered in all the cases. Hernias were found as complications of appendectomy and wound healing after radiotherapy of uterine and cervical cancer. In conclusion, in obscure wound site pain, the presence of an interstitial postoperative hernia should be considered as a possible reason for the complaint. Laparoscopic examination of the anterior abdominal wall during adhesiolysis in patients with abdominal pain enables proper diagnosis and treatment.

  12. [Postoperative complications in patients with cervicothoracic injuries].

    PubMed

    Tatarinova, E V; Pogodina, A N; Korovkina, E N

    2014-01-01

    The results of the diagnosis and treatment of 117 patients with cervicothoracic injuries were analyzed. Different complications were observed in 51 (43.6%) cases. The main reasons contributing to the development of complications included late diagnosis of lesions of trachea and esophagus, acute blood loss, inadequate hemostasis during surgery.

  13. The predictive role of delayed cutaneous hypersensitivity testing in postoperative complications.

    PubMed

    Schackert, H K; Betzler, M; Zimmermann, G F; Decker, R; Geelhaar, G H; Edler, L; Hess, C; Herfarth, C

    1986-06-01

    Ten parameters, including delayed cutaneous hypersensitivity testing (DCH), were evaluated with regard to their predictive value in instances of postoperative septic complications. In 302 patients undergoing surgical treatment, 45 complications, including wound infection, abscess, pneumonia and sepsis, were seen postoperatively in 42 patients. When these patients were compared with 260 patients without complications, hemoglobin, leukocyte count, serum albumin, total protein, blood sedimentation rate, age and sex were found not to contribute to the prediction of postoperative complications. In DCH testing, the complication rate increased from 7.5 per cent in normergic patients to 20.6 per cent in anergic patients. With increasing length and severity of operation, the complication rate increased from 6.5 to 26.4 per cent and from 6.5 to 31.8 per cent, respectively. Only in severe, long lasting operations could DCH testing differentiate the complication risk. Normergic patients had a 8.6 per cent complication rate; hypoergic patients, 36.6 per cent, and anergic patients, 37.5 per cent. The results of DCH testing did not correlate with the complication rate in any of the other operative groups. In conclusion, the predictive value of DCH testing is clearly greater in groups of patients highly affected by the operative trauma. The results of this study show that it is important to consider both host defense mechanisms and environmental factors in the assessment of operative risks.

  14. Treatment of postoperative lower extremity wounds using human fibroblast-derived dermis: a retrospective analysis.

    PubMed

    Carlson, Russell M; Smith, Nicholas C; Dux, Katherine; Stuck, Rodney M

    2014-04-01

    Human fibroblast-derived dermis skin substitute is a well-studied treatment for diabetic foot ulcers; however, no case series currently exist for its use in healing postoperative wounds of the lower extremity. A retrospective analysis was conducted on 32 lower extremity postoperative wounds treated weekly with human fibroblast-derived dermis skin substitute. Postoperative wounds were defined as a wound resulting from an open partial foot amputation, surgical wound dehiscence, or nonhealing surgical wound of the lower extremity. Wound surface area was calculated at 4 and 12 weeks or until wound closure if prior to 12 weeks. Postoperative wounds treated with weekly applications showed mean improvement in surface area reduction of 63.6% at 4 weeks and 96.1% at 12 weeks. More than 56% of all wounds healed prior to the 12-week endpoint. Additionally, only one adverse event was noted in this group. This retrospective review supports the use of human fibroblast-derived dermis skin substitute in the treatment of postoperative lower extremity wounds. This advanced wound care therapy aids in decreased total healing time and increased rate of healing for not only diabetic foot wounds but also postoperative wounds of the lower extremity, as demonstrated by this retrospective review.

  15. Management of Bronchopleural Fistula Complicated by Skin Wound Necrosis after Thoracomyoplasty

    PubMed Central

    Barone, Mirko; Zaccagna, Gino; Di Francescantonio, William; Crisci, Roberto

    2017-01-01

    Summary: Skin necrosis is a rare complication after thoracomyoplasty and usually needs conservative treatment. We described positive findings with surgical approach. A 54-year-old man showed bronchopleural fistula after undergoing right pneumonectomy for lung cancer, treated with thoracomyoplasty. On the 20th postoperative day, a skin wound lesion was noted, whose deterioration required a skin flap transposition. Patient was discharged from hospital on the 7th postoperative day and did not show relapse at the 7th year follow-up. Surgery can be the most viable alternative to medical treatments in the management of a chest wall cutaneous complication even in high-risk patients. PMID:28203496

  16. [Postoperative contamination of wounds April-September 1992].

    PubMed

    Aganović, F; Telebak, B; Cibo, S; Aganović, E; Puvacić, Z

    1994-01-01

    In this paper we have analyzed random sample of 108 nosocomial infections at a surgical services of Clinical Center of University and a State Hospital in Sarajevo during april-september of 1992. The overall rate of nosocomial infections of postoperative wound was 69.45%. Gram negative bacterias were more frequently isolated then gram positive bacteria. Pseudomonas aeruginosa was detected at 20.37% of all wound infections, E coli and Klebsiella Sp. with 12.96%, and Staphylococcus pyogenes with 12.03%. Without a continuous germ control of the hospital flora no calculated antibiotic is possible. Pseudomonas has emerged as an important nosocomial pathogen and this suggest that the epidemiology of nosocomial infections differs from epidemics infections.

  17. Increased postoperative complications after protective ileostomy closure delay: An institutional study

    PubMed Central

    Rubio-Perez, Ines; Leon, Miguel; Pastor, Daniel; Diaz Dominguez, Joaquin; Cantero, Ramon

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To study the morbidity and complications associated to ileostomy reversal in colorectal surgery patients, and if these are related to the time of closure. METHODS: A retrospective analysis of 93 patients, who had undergone elective ileostomy closure between 2009 and 2013 was performed. Demographic, clinical and surgical variables were reviewed for analysis. All complications were recorded, and classified according to the Clavien-Dindo Classification. Statistical univariate and multivariate analysis was performed, setting a P value of 0.05 for significance. RESULTS: The patients had a mean age of 60.3 years, 58% male. The main procedure for ileostomy creation was rectal cancer (56%), and 37% had received preoperative chemo-radiotherapy. The average delay from creation to closure of the ileostomy was 10.3 mo. Postoperative complications occurred in 40% of the patients, with 1% mortality. The most frequent were ileus (13%) and wound infection (13%). Pseudomembranous colitis appeared in 4%. Increased postoperative complications were associated with delay in ileostomy closure (P = 0.041). Male patients had more complications (P = 0.042), mainly wound infections (P = 0.007). Pseudomembranous colitis was also associated with the delay in ileostomy closure (P = 0.003). End-to-end intestinal anastomosis without resection was significantly associated with postoperative ileus (P = 0.037). CONCLUSION: Although closure of a protective ileostomy is a fairly common surgical procedure, it has a high rate of complications, and this must be taken into account when the indication is made. The delay in stoma closure can increase the rate of complications in general, and specifically wound infections and colitis. PMID:25276286

  18. Thyroidectomy: post-operative care and common complications.

    PubMed

    Furtado, L

    Any surgical procedure involves risks. Thyroid surgery can cause potentially fatal complications during the early post-operative phase. It is essential that nurses have the knowledge and skills to detect early signs and symptoms of potential complications and take appropriate action. Early detection and rapid response are key to maintaining patient safety and minimising harm.

  19. Dressings and drains in posterior spine surgery and their effect on wound complications.

    PubMed

    Andrew Glennie, R; Dea, Nicolas; Street, John T

    2015-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to systematically search, critically appraise and summarize published randomized control trials (RCT) and non-RCT examining the effect of drains and dressings on wound healing rates and complications in posterior spine surgery. The use of post-operative drains and the type of post-operative dressing is at the discretion of the treating surgeon with no available clinical guidelines. Drains will theoretically decrease incidence of post-operative hematoma and therefore, potentially decrease the risk of neurologic compromise when the neural elements have been exposed. Occlusive dressings have more recently been advocated, potentially maintaining a sterile barrier for longer time periods post-operatively. A systematic review of databases from 1969-2013 was undertaken. All papers examining drains in spine surgery and dressings in primary healing of surgical wounds were included. Revman (version 5.2; The Nordic Cochrane Centre, The Cochrane Collaboration, Oxford, UK) was used to test for overall treatment effect, clinical heterogeneity and risk of bias. Of the papers identified, 1348 examined post-operative drains in spine surgery and 979 wound dressings for primary wound healing of all surgical wounds. Seven studies were included for analysis for post-operative drains and 10 studies were analyzed for primary wound healing. The use of a post-operative drain did not influence healing rates and had no effect secondarily on infection (odds ratio [OR] 1.33; 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.76-2.30). We were not able to establish whether surgical drains prevent hematomas causing neurologic compromise. There was a slight advantage to using occlusive dressings versus non-occlusive dressings in wound healing (OR 2.09; 95% CI 1.44-3.02). Incisional vacuum dressings as both an occlusive barrier and superficial drainage system have shown promise for wounds at risk of dehiscence. There is a relatively high risk of bias in the methodology of many of the

  20. Enterocutaneous fistula as a postoperative complication of laparoscopic inguinal hernia repair.

    PubMed

    Klein, A M; Banever, T C

    1999-01-01

    Trocar injuries to the small bowel during laparoscopic hernia repair are a rare complication, the most common complications being postoperative neuralgias, scrotal swelling, scrotal ecchymosis, and hematoma. A 15-year-old boy was admitted 5 days status-post transabdominal laparoscopic inguinal hernia repair of a symptomatic right pantaloon hernia, with signs and symptoms of a retrocecal abscess. Despite laparotic intervention and appendectomy, the next 2 years passed with almost daily, purulent, right lower quadrant wound drainage, in an otherwise asymptomatic patient. Superficial wound exploration and sinogram in 1996 revealed a sinus tract in direct communication with the small bowel. Elective laparotomy in December 1997 involved a successful resection of a 2.5-cm fistula with involved mesh, and the communicating small bowel through a midline incision, followed by a primary closure of the small-bowel opening. The patient has recovered without complications.

  1. Risk factors for postoperative complications in robotic general surgery.

    PubMed

    Fantola, Giovanni; Brunaud, Laurent; Nguyen-Thi, Phi-Linh; Germain, Adeline; Ayav, Ahmet; Bresler, Laurent

    2017-03-01

    The feasibility and safety of robotically assisted procedures in general surgery have been reported from various groups worldwide. Because postoperative complications may lead to longer hospital stays and higher costs overall, analysis of risk factors for postoperative surgical complications in this subset of patients is clinically relevant. The goal of this study was to identify risk factors for postoperative morbidity after robotic surgical procedures in general surgery. We performed an observational monocentric retrospective study. All consecutive robotic surgical procedures from November 2001 to December 2013 were included. One thousand consecutive general surgery patients met the inclusion criteria. The mean overall postoperative morbidity and major postoperative morbidity (Clavien >III) rates were 20.4 and 6 %, respectively. This included a conversion rate of 4.4 %, reoperation rate of 4.5 %, and mortality rate of 0.2 %. Multivariate analysis showed that ASA score >3 [OR 1.7; 95 % CI (1.2-2.4)], hematocrit value <38 [OR 1.6; 95 % CI (1.1-2.2)], previous abdominal surgery [OR 1.5; 95 % CI (1-2)], advanced dissection [OR 5.8; 95 % CI (3.1-10.6)], and multiquadrant surgery [OR 2.5; 95 % CI (1.7-3.8)] remained independent risk factors for overall postoperative morbidity. It also showed that advanced dissection [OR 4.4; 95 % CI (1.9-9.6)] and multiquadrant surgery [OR 4.4; 95 % CI (2.3-8.5)] remained independent risk factors for major postoperative morbidity (Clavien >III). This study identifies independent risk factors for postoperative overall and major morbidity in robotic general surgery. Because these factors independently impacted postoperative complications, we believe they could be taken into account in future studies comparing conventional versus robot-assisted laparoscopic procedures in general surgery.

  2. Imaging panorama in postoperative complications after liver transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Sureka, Binit; Bansal, Kalpana; Rajesh, S; Mukund, Amar; Pamecha, Viniyendra; Arora, Ankur

    2016-01-01

    The liver is the second most-often transplanted solid organ after the kidney, so it is clear that liver disease is a common and serious problem around the globe. With the advancements in surgical, oncological and imaging techniques, orthotopic liver transplantation has become the first-line treatment for many patients with end-stage liver disease. Ultrasound, and Doppler are the most economical and cost-effective imaging modalities for evaluating postoperative fluid collections and vascular complications. Computed tomography (CT) is used to confirm the findings of ultrasound and look for pulmonary complications. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is used for the diagnosis of biliary complications, bile leaks and neurological complications. This article illustrates the imaging options for diagnosing the various complications that can be encountered in the postoperative period after liver transplantation. PMID:26534929

  3. [Postoperative complications after larynx resection: assessment with video-cinematography].

    PubMed

    Kreuzer, S; Schima, W; Schober, E; Strasser, G; Denk, D M; Swoboda, H

    1998-02-01

    In past decades, the surgical techniques for treating laryngeal carcinoma have been vastly improved. For circumscribed tumors, voice-conserving resections are possible and for extensive neoplasms, radical laryngectomy, sometimes combined with chemoradiation, has been developed. Postoperative complications regarding swallowing function are not uncommon. Radiologic examinations, especially pharyngography and videofluoroscopy, are most often used to evaluate patients with complications after laryngeal surgery. An optimized videofluoroscopic technique for evaluation of complications is described. The radiologic appearance of early and late complications, such as fistulas, hematomas, aspiration, strictures, dysfunction of the pharyngoesophageal sphincter, tumor recurrence, and metachronous tumors is demonstrated.

  4. Risk factors for postoperative complications following oral surgery

    PubMed Central

    SHIGEISHI, Hideo; OHTA, Kouji; TAKECHI, Masaaki

    2015-01-01

    Objective The objective of this study was to clarify significant risk factors for postoperative complications in the oral cavity in patients who underwent oral surgery, excluding those with oral cancer. Material and Methods This study reviewed the records of 324 patients who underwent mildly to moderately invasive oral surgery (e.g., impacted tooth extraction, cyst excision, fixation of mandibular and maxillary fractures, osteotomy, resection of a benign tumor, sinus lifting, bone grafting, removal of a sialolith, among others) under general anesthesia or intravenous sedation from 2012 to 2014 at the Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Reconstructive Surgery, Hiroshima University Hospital. Results Univariate analysis showed a statistical relationship between postoperative complications (i.e., surgical site infection, anastomotic leak) and diabetes (p=0.033), preoperative serum albumin level (p=0.009), and operation duration (p=0.0093). Furthermore, preoperative serum albumin level (<4.0 g/dL) and operation time (≥120 minutes) were found to be independent factors affecting postoperative complications in multiple logistic regression analysis results (odds ratio 3.82, p=0.0074; odds ratio 2.83, p=0.0086, respectively). Conclusion Our results indicate that a low level of albumin in serum and prolonged operation duration are important risk factors for postoperative complications occurring in the oral cavity following oral surgery. PMID:26398515

  5. Reducing the Risk of Postoperative Genital Complications in Male Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dossanova, ?ssem; Lozovoy, Vasiliy; Wood, Dan; ??nekenova, ?enzhekyz; Botabayeva, ?igul; Dossanov, Bolatbek; Lozovaya, Yelena; ?marov, ?algat

    2016-01-01

    The reproductive system of adolescents is exposed to a high risk of anomalies. In spite of the successes of surgical correction, the percentage of postoperative complications remains high. Special attention should be paid to circumcision, which is regarded as a religious tradition in many countries and carried out with sanitary violations. This…

  6. Preoperative Acute Inflammatory Markers as Predictors for Postoperative Complications in Primary Total Knee Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Godoy, Gustavo; Sumarriva, Gonzalo; Ochsner, J. Lockwood; Chimento, George; Schmucker, Dana; Dasa, Vinod; Meyer, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Background: C-reactive protein (CRP) has been suggested as an independent risk factor for cardiovascular pathology in the nonsurgical setting. While postoperative CRP and erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) have an established role in aiding the diagnosis of periprosthetic joint infections, some authors suggest a link between preoperative CRP and postoperative complications in patients undergoing total joint arthroplasty. Methods: We conducted a retrospective cohort study of 351 patients who underwent unilateral primary total knee arthroplasty by a single surgeon during a 28-month period (January 2013 through April 2015). Patient medical records were reviewed for the following complications occurring within 90 days postoperatively: myocardial infarction, arrhythmia, pulmonary embolism, wound infection, acute renal failure, and reoperation. Results: We found no statistically significant link between postoperative complications and preoperative CRP levels (P=0.5005) or ESR levels (P=0.1610). Conclusion: The results of this study do not support the routine inclusion of CRP and ESR analysis as part of the preoperative evaluation for elective total knee arthroplasty. PMID:27999506

  7. Abnormal pigmentation within cutaneous scars: A complication of wound healing

    PubMed Central

    Chadwick, Sarah; Heath, Rebecca; Shah, Mamta

    2012-01-01

    Abnormally pigmented scars are an undesirable consequence of cutaneous wound healing and are a complication every single individual worldwide is at risk of. They present a challenge for clinicians, as there are currently no definitive treatment options available, and render scars much more noticeable making them highly distressing for patients. Despite extensive research into both wound healing and the pigment cell, there remains a scarcity of knowledge surrounding the repigmentation of cutaneous scars. Pigment production is complex and under the control of many extrinsic and intrinsic factors and patterns of scar repigmentation are unpredictable. This article gives an overview of human skin pigmentation, repigmentation following wounding and current treatment options. PMID:23162241

  8. Convergent Validity of Three Methods for Measuring Postoperative Complications

    PubMed Central

    Fritz, Bradley A.; Escallier, Krisztina E.; Abdallah, Arbi Ben; Oberhaus, Jordan; Becker, Jennifer; Geczi, Kristin; McKinnon, Sherry; Helsten, Dan L.; Sharma, Anshuman; Wildes, Troy S.; Avidan, Michael S.

    2016-01-01

    Background Anesthesiologists need tools to accurately track postoperative outcomes. The accuracy of patient report in identifying a wide variety of postoperative complications after diverse surgical procedures has not previously been investigated. Methods In this cohort study, 1,578 adult surgical patients completed a survey at least 30 days after their procedure asking if they had experienced any of 18 complications while in the hospital after surgery. Patient responses were compared to the results of an automated electronic chart review and (for a random subset of 750 patients) to a manual chart review. Results from automated chart review were also compared to those from manual chart review. Forty-two randomly selected patients were contacted by telephone to explore reasons for discrepancies between patient report and manual chart review. Results Comparisons between patient report, automated chart review, and manual chart review demonstrated poor-to-moderate positive agreement (range, 0 to 58%) and excellent negative agreement (range, 82 to 100%). Discordance between patient report and manual chart review was frequently explicable by patients reporting events that happened outside the time period of interest. Conclusions Patient report can provide information about subjective experiences or events that happen after hospital discharge, but often yields different results from chart review for specific in-hospital complications. Effective in-hospital communication with patients and thoughtful survey design may increase the quality of patient-reported complication data. PMID:27028469

  9. Exploring the Frontier of Electronic Health Record Surveillance: The Case of Post-Operative Complications

    PubMed Central

    FitzHenry, Fern; Murff, Harvey J.; Matheny, Michael E.; Gentry, Nancy; Fielstein, Elliot M.; Brown, Steven H; Reeves, Ruth M; Aronsky, Dominik; Elkin, Peter L.; Messina, Vincent P.; Speroff, Theodore

    2013-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to build electronic algorithms using a combination of structured data and natural language processing (NLP) of text notes for potential safety surveillance of nine post-operative complications. Methods Post-operative complications from six medical centers in the Southeastern United States were obtained from the Veterans Affairs Surgical Quality Improvement Program (VASQIP) registry. Development and test datasets were constructed using stratification by facility and date of procedure for patients with and without complication. Algorithms were developed from VASQIP outcome definitions using NLP coded concepts, regular expressions, and structured data. The VASQIP nurse reviewer served as the reference standard for evaluating sensitivity and specificity. The algorithms were designed in the development and evaluated in the test dataset. Results Sensitivity and specificity in the test set were 85% and 92% for acute renal failure, 80% and 93% for sepsis, 56% and 94% for deep vein thrombosis, 80% and 97% for pulmonary embolism, 88% and 89% for acute myocardial infarction, 88% and 92% for cardiac arrest, 80% and 90% for pneumonia, 95% and 80% for urinary tract infection, and 80% and 93% for wound infection, respectively. A third of the complications occurred outside of the hospital setting. Conclusions Computer algorithms on data extracted from the electronic health record produced respectable sensitivity and specificity across a large sample of patients seen in six different medical centers. This study demonstrates the utility of combining natural language processing with structured data for mining the information contained within the electronic health record. PMID:23673394

  10. Efficacy of postoperative continuous wound infiltration with local anesthetic after major abdominal surgery.

    PubMed

    Abadir, Adel R; Nicolas, Fred; Gharabawy, Ramiz; Shah, Trusha; Michael, Rafik

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the analgesic efficacy, safety, opioid sparing effects and improvement of respiratory function when using 0.2% ropivacaine continuous wound infiltration after major intra-abdominal surgery. Forty patients undergoing major intra-abdominal surgery requiring a midline incision of > or = 20 cm were enrolled into this IRB-approved, randomized, prospective controlled study. Group 1: 20 patients, parenteral analgesia (control group). Group II: 20 patients, with local anesthetic wound infiltration (pain pump group). At the end of the procedure, in the pain pump group of patients, a multi hole, 20-gauge catheter was inserted percutaneously, above the fascia. An initial dose of 10 ml of 0.2% ropivacaine was injected in the wound through the catheter. A device provided continuous delivery of 0.2% ropivacaine; the infusion was initiated at 6 ml/h for the following two days. The total "rescue" morphine and oxycodone/acetaminophen tablets administered were significantly lower in the pain pump group. At all time intervals, resting pain scores were significantly lower in the pain pump group when compared with the control group. However, at the 4-48 and 12-48 hours pain scores generated after leg raise and coughing, respectively, were significantly lower in group II. The patient vital capacities were insignificantly higher in group II. We conclude that after major abdominal surgery, infiltration and continuous wound instillation with 0.2% ropivacaine decreases postoperative pain, opioid requirements and oral analgesia. Early patient rehabilitation, hastening convalescence, and preventing respiratory complications are expected outcomes of this approach.

  11. Obesity and post-operative complications in patients undergoing non-bariatric surgery.

    PubMed

    Doyle, S L; Lysaght, J; Reynolds, J V

    2010-12-01

    As the prevalence of obesity continues to rise in society, an increasing number of patients undergoing non-bariatric surgery will be obese. Obesity is known to increase morbidity and mortality in the general population and thus is perceived as a risk factor for adverse post-surgical outcomes. This association is not clear-cut, however, and there is a lack of consensus in the literature on the risk between obesity and specific complications, in particular relating to infection, wound healing, respiratory and venous thromboembolism. The paucity of studies, as well as a lack of consistency of definition of obesity, with an over-reliance on body mass index rather than body composition analysis, may underlie this confusion. Emerging concepts position central/visceral adipose tissue as potentially key to the pathogenesis of the comorbidities associated with obesity, thus this article reviews emerging research investigating the association between visceral obesity, the metabolic syndrome and resulting post-operative complications. It is hypothesized that the state of chronic inflammation and dysmetabolism observed in visceral obese patients negatively influences post-operative outcomes and represents a potential target for pharmaconutrition. The need for further research investigating the influence of visceral adiposity on immune function post surgery and its impact on post-operative morbidity and mortality is highlighted.

  12. EARLY POSTOPERATIVE COMPLICATIONS IN ROUX-EN-Y GASTRIC BYPASS

    PubMed Central

    STOLL, Aluisio; ROSIN, Leandro; DIAS, Mariana Fernandes; MARQUIOTTI, Bruna; GUGELMIN, Giovana; STOLL, Gabriela Fanezzi

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background: Roux-en-Y gastric bypass is one of the most common bariatric surgery and leads to considerable weight loss in the first months. Aim: To quantify the main early postoperative complications in patients submitted to the gastric bypass. Method: Observational retrospective cohort. Data of 1051 patients with class II obesity associated with comorbidities or class III obesity submitted to the gastric bypass with 30 days of follow-up starting from the date of the surgery. Results: The age average was 36 years with a predominance of females (81.1%). The mean preoperative body mass index was 43 kg/m². The major complication was fistula (2.3%), followed by intestinal obstruction (0.5%) and pulmonary embolism (0.5%). Death occurred in 0.6% of the cases. Conclusion: In the period of 30 days after surgery the overall complication rate was 3.8%; reoperation was necessary in 2.6% and death occurred in 0.6%. Fistula was the main complication and the leading cause of hospitalization in intensive care unit, reoperation and death. PMID:27683781

  13. [Postoperative necrotizing fasciitis: a rare and fatal complication].

    PubMed

    Ghezala, Hassen Ben; Feriani, Najla

    2016-01-01

    Postoperative parietal complications can be exceptionally severe and serious threatening vital prognosis. Necrotizing fasciitis is a rare infection of the skin and deep subcutaneous tissues, spreading along fascia and adipose tissue. It is mainly caused by group A streptococcus (streptococcus pyogenes) but also by other bacteria such as Vibrio vulnificus, Clostridium perfringens or Bacteroides fragilis. Necrotizing fasciitis is a real surgical and medical emergency. We report, in this study, a very rare case of abdominal parietal gangrene occurring in a 75-year-old woman on the fifth day after surgery for an ovarian cyst. Evolution was marked by occurrence of a refractory septic shock with a rapidly fatal course on the third day of management.

  14. [Application of prolonged flow-aspiration drainage of laparotomy wounds in order to reduce suppurative septic complications in bowels reconstructive surgery].

    PubMed

    Shcherba, S N; Polovinkin, V V

    2014-01-01

    The article presents the follow-up study of 254 onco-proctologic patients after reconstructive abdominoperitoneal resections. Patients were divided into 4 statistically homogeneous groups (2 main and 2 control groups). A comparative analysis of middle and lateral laparotomy wounds healing was made. Laparotomy wounds were stitched up using conventional method (in layers, tightly) and using other method of prolonged flow-aspiration drainage of hypodermic tissue. Postoperative wound infections were noted in 11.4% patients in case of conventional means. The prolonged flow-aspiration drainage in laparotomy wounds causes only 1.5% of complications.

  15. EXPERIMENTAL-MORPHOLOGICAL SUBSTANTIATION OF EXPEDIENCY TO USE THE SKIN GLUE "DERMABOND" FOR POSTOPERATIVE WOUND CLOSURE.

    PubMed

    Avetikov, D; Loza, K; Starchenko, I; Loza, E; Marushchak, M

    2015-01-01

    We aimed to investigate the morphological features of healing of postoperative wounds in the early stages of reparative process in the experiment, depending on the used type of the wound closure. It is proved that the nature and type of the scar depends on the processes that occur in the wound at the early postoperative stage, which in turn greatly affects the form of suture material used. The experiment included 20 male rats, weighing 180-200 g. All rats were anesthetized by a single intraperitoneal injection of sodium thiopental. After the shaving operative field, 2 cm full-thickness incision wound was made on the anterior surface of the abdomen in the longitudinal direction. As suture material for wound closure in the 1st experimental group (10 rats) we used surgical filament "Polyamide 4-0». In the 2nd experimental group (10 rats) wounds were closured by using skin glue "Dermabond". According from our experiment, the usage of skin glue creates better conditions for wound healing. Thus, to achieve a more aesthetic scar, we recommend applying skin glue instead of using nodal joints.

  16. Prevention of post-operative infections after surgical treatment of bite wounds

    PubMed Central

    Kramer, Axel; Assadian, Ojan; Frank, Matthias; Bender, Claudia; Hinz, Peter

    2010-01-01

    After reviewing the literature about the microbial spectrum, the risk factors of post-operative infections, and the results of surgical interventions, the following recommendation can be made for the management of bite wounds: fresh, open wounds: surgical debridement, if appropriate, then an antiseptic lavage with a fluid consisting of povidone iodine and ethanol (e.g., Betaseptic®), no antibiotics, primary wound closure nearly closed fresh wounds (e.g., cat bites): surgical debridement, if appropriate, dressing with an antiseptic-soaked compress for ~60 minutes with repeated soaking (e.g., Betaseptic®), no antibiotics older wounds after ~4 hours: surgical debridement, if appropriate, dressing with an antiseptic-soaked compress or bandage for ~60 minutes with repeated soaking (e.g., Betaseptic®), at the same time intravenous or dose-adapted oral antibiotics (Amoxicillin and/or clavulanic acid) older wounds after ~24 hours: surgical debridement, then antiseptic lavage (Betaseptic®), in case of clinically apparent infection or inflammation surgical revision with opening of wound and treatment with antibiotics according to resistogram (empirical start with Amoxicillin and/or clavulanic acid). For each kind of bite wound, the patient’s tetanus immunization status as well as the risk of exposure to rabies have to be assessed. Similarly, the possibility of other infections, such as lues (Syphilis), hepatitis B (HBV), hepatitis C (HBC), hepatitis D (HDV) and HIV, in the rare case of a human bite wound, has to be taken into account. PMID:20941334

  17. Postoperative discal cyst: An unusual complication after microendoscopic discectomy in teenagers.

    PubMed

    Jha, Subash C; Tonogai, Ichiro; Higashino, Kosaku; Sakai, Toshinori; Takata, Yoichiro; Goda, Yuichiro; Abe, Mitsunobu; Nagamachi, Akihiro; Fukuta, Shoji; Sairyo, Koichi

    2016-02-01

    Various complications after microendoscopic discectomy (MED) are well known, but postoperative discal cyst is a unique and relatively unknown complication. Here, we report on two teenage patients who presented with postoperative discal cyst after MED for herniated nucleus pulposus (HNP), which resolved after conservative treatment. The patients were diagnosed with HNP at L4-5 and L5-S1 based on MRI and then treated by MED. Postoperative discal cyst was diagnosed on MRI after recurrence of symptoms. Both patients were managed conservatively. T2-weighted MRI demonstrated hyperintense collections adjacent to the operated intervertebral disc level, which were communicating with the corresponding disc annulus. Because the clinical symptoms were relatively mild, the patients were managed conservatively; both made a complete clinical recovery with radiological evidence of improvement. Postoperative discal cyst is a relatively unknown complication after MED for HNP. Surgeons should be aware of this postoperative complication when operating on young individuals with HNP.

  18. [Immunity status in early postoperative complications in children with anomalies of kidneys and upper urinary tract].

    PubMed

    Panikratov, K D; Polozov, V V; Strel'nikov, A I; Sotnikova, N Iu

    2001-01-01

    31 children aged 1 to 9 years with malformations of the kidneys and upper urinary tracts were preoperatively examined for immune status. After plastic operation 14 children developed early postoperative infectious-inflammatory complications. It is suggested that early postoperative complications in some children with renal and upper urinary tract maldevelopments may arise because of weak compensatory abilities and immunodeficiency resultant from the operative stress. These created favourable conditions for activation of latent infection. Immunological assessment of the patient prior to surgery predicts early postoperative complications and thus enables proper preventive measures.

  19. [Relaparotomy and programmed sanation of the abdominal cavity in treatment of early postoperative complications].

    PubMed

    Trofymov, P S; Shestopalov, D V; Karakursakov, N E; Kysliakov, V V; Tatarchuk, P O

    2014-08-01

    The structure and causes of postoperative complications occurrence, necessitating early relaparotomy conduction through last 5 yrs and 30 yrs ago, were analyzed. The complications rate almost did not change, but their structure--essentially. The occurrence rate for eventration, adhesive ileus, relaparotomy performance for abdominal cavity abscess have had lowered significantly due to introduction of a new operative technologies and prophylactic measures. The lowering of lethality after relaparotomy is caused by improvement of the complications diagnosis, timely performance of reoperations, application of laparostomy in the treatment of postoperative peritonitis, what have permitted to govern a postoperative period course.

  20. [Fibrin glue injection therapy with diluted thrombin for complicated postoperative fistulas following digestive surgery].

    PubMed

    Tono, Takeshi; Murakami, Masahiro; Ohtsuru, Minoru; Monden, Takushi

    2014-11-01

    Fibrin glue injection is used for treating postoperative digestive fistulas; however, this method is not always successful, especially in cases of complicated fistulas. Generally, the fibrin glue coagulates immediately after application before it reaches the end of the fistulas. Based on the results of an in vitro study of tensile strength and coagulation time, we utilized fibrin glue injection therapy with diluted thrombin solution (× 30) for treating refractory postoperative complicated fistulas in 23 cancer patients. In 20 of these patients, the fistulas were successfully closed after an average of 2.0 treatment cycles. This simple method of fibrin glue injection with diluted thrombin is useful for treating complicated postoperative digestive fistulas.

  1. Soft tissue sarcoma resection volume associated with wound-healing complications.

    PubMed

    Geller, David S; Hornicek, Francis J; Mankin, Henry J; Raskin, Kevin A

    2007-06-01

    Limb-salvage surgery has become the standard of care for most soft tissue sarcomas. While primary closure is often possible, it is frequently complicated by wound-healing complications in the setting of previously irradiated tissue and surgical wounds closed under tension. We sought to identify a relationship between the volume of resected soft tissue and the rate of wound-healing complications. We retrospectively reviewed 108 patients who were treated over a 17-month period for soft-tissue sarcomas using limb-salvage methods. Of these, 87 patients were treated with primary wound closure and 21 patients underwent primary muscle flap closure at the time of wide surgical excision. Of the 87 patients treated with primary wound closure, the mean volume of resected tissue in the group with wound-healing complications was greater than that the group that healed without complications. The mean volume of resected tissue in the group with wound-healing complications was 919 cm3 +/- 1173 cm3 and the mean volume of resected tissue in the group without wound-healing complications was 456 cm3 +/- 704 cm3. Mean volume of resected tissue in the group of patients treated with primary flap coverage was 1908 cm3, over twice as large as the mean volume of resected tissue in the group of patients treated with primary closure.

  2. Open-label clinical trial comparing the clinical and economic effectiveness of using a polyurethane film surgical dressing with gauze surgical dressings in the care of post-operative surgical wounds.

    PubMed

    Arroyo, Ana Abejón; Casanova, Pabló López; Soriano, José Verdú; Torra I Bou, Joan-Enric

    2015-06-01

    Surgical site infection (SSI) is a common postoperative complication and can cause avoidable morbidity and excessive costs for the health service. Novel dressings, designed specifically for postoperative wounds, can help to reduce the risk of SSI and other complications such as blistering. This study compared the use of a new polyurethane film surgical dressing (Opsite Post-Op Visible, Smith & Nephew, Hull, UK) with gauze and tape in the management of postoperative wounds. The results show that the polyurethane film dressing results in a significant reduction in SSI (1·4% versus 6·6%, P = 0·006) as well as a reduction in other postoperative wound complications (e.g. blistering and erythema). Economic analysis conducted alongside the study suggests that these improved outcomes can be achieved at a lower treatment cost than gauze and tape dressings. The modest incremental cost of the polyurethane film surgical dressing is easily offset by the reduction in the costs related to treating SSI and other wound complications associated with gauze and tape dressings.

  3. Wound Complications in Preoperatively Irradiated Soft-Tissue Sarcomas of the Extremities

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenberg, Lewis A.; Esther, Robert J.; Erfanian, Kamil; Green, Rebecca; Kim, Hong Jin; Sweeting, Raeshell; Tepper, Joel E.

    2013-02-01

    Purpose: To determine whether the involvement of plastic surgery and the use of vascularized tissue flaps reduces the frequency of major wound complications after radiation therapy for soft-tissue sarcomas (STS) of the extremities. Methods and Materials: This retrospective study evaluated patients with STS of the extremities who underwent radiation therapy before surgery. Major complications were defined as secondary operations with anesthesia, seroma/hematoma aspirations, readmission for wound complications, or persistent deep packing. Results: Between 1996 and 2010, 73 patients with extremity STS were preoperatively irradiated. Major wound complications occurred in 32% and secondary operations in 16% of patients. Plastic surgery closed 63% of the wounds, and vascularized tissue flaps were used in 22% of closures. When plastic surgery performed closure the frequency of secondary operations trended lower (11% vs 26%; P=.093), but the frequency of major wound complications was not different (28% vs 38%; P=.43). The use of a vascularized tissue flap seemed to have no effect on the frequency of complications. The occurrence of a major wound complication did not affect disease recurrence or survival. For all patients, 3-year local control was 94%, and overall survival was 72%. Conclusions: The rates of wound complications and secondary operations in this study were very similar to previously published results. We were not able to demonstrate a significant relationship between the involvement of plastic surgery and the rate of wound complications, although there was a trend toward reduced secondary operations when plastic surgery was involved in the initial operation. Wound complications were manageable and did not compromise outcomes.

  4. [Clinical application of the plasma substitutes in patients with postoperative complications after surgeries for brain meningioma].

    PubMed

    Kvasha, M S; Iarotskiĭ, R Iu; Ivashenko, V I; Gavrish, R V; Dmitrieva, N Iu; Ivanovich, I N; Pushkareva, T M

    2011-04-01

    The issues on optimization of the restoration treatment of patients, suffering the brain meningioma, were discussed, basing on analysis of 498 observations. Tactics of the patients management in noncomplicated, complicated and severe course of postoperative period is adduced. The indices of survival and lethality, peculiarities of the infusion therapy were analyzed. The role of plasm-restituting preparations was demonstrated in complicated course of postoperative period. Rational complex approach to the restoration measures and intensive therapy conduction promotes the treatment efficacy raising, the patients fair quality of life securing in the brain meningioma in postoperative period.

  5. The Effect of Plasmakinetic Cautery on Wound Healing and Complications in Mastectomy

    PubMed Central

    Gulcelik, Mehmet Ali; Yuksel, Murat; Uyar, Osman; Erdogan, Osman; Reis, Erhan

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Surgical equipment used in breast cancer surgery that affects wound healing and minimizes complications seems to be a popular investigation topic. The aim of this study is to evaluate the effect of plasmakinetic cautery on wound healing in patients receiving mastectomy. Methods Forty-six consecutive breast cancer patients receiving modified radical mastectomy were evaluated prospectively. Plasmakinetic cautery was used in 24 operations and electrocautery was used in 22 operations in random order to manage skin flaps and excise breast tissue. In the postoperative period, vacuum drainage amount and duration time as well as the start time of arm exercises were recorded. Complications like seroma, surgical site infection, hematoma, and flap necrosis were determined. Results Age, body mass index, breast volume and flap area parameters were similar in each group. Mean drainage duration was found to be 5.5 days in the plasmacautery group and 7.9 days in the electrocautery group (p=0.020). In the plasmacautery and electrocautery groups, mean drainage volume was 707 and 1,093 mL, respectively (p=0.025). There was no statistical significance between the groups when operation duration, amount of blood loss, time to start arm exercises, seroma, hematoma, surgical site infection, and flap necrosis were considered. Conclusion Plasmakinetic cautery is a promising new surgical instrument that provides atraumatic, scalpel-like cutting precision and electrosurgical-like hemostasis, resulting in minimal tissue injury. So, plasmacautery shortens the drainage amount and duration time compared to electrocautery without elongating operation duration or increasing the amount of blood loss. PMID:23843853

  6. Randomized Clinical Trial for Early Postoperative Complications of Ex-PRESS Implantation versus Trabeculectomy: Complications Postoperatively of Ex-PRESS versus Trabeculectomy Study (CPETS).

    PubMed

    Arimura, Shogo; Takihara, Yuji; Miyake, Seiji; Iwasaki, Kentaro; Gozawa, Makoto; Matsumura, Takehiro; Tomomatsu, Takeshi; Takamura, Yoshihiro; Inatani, Masaru

    2016-05-17

    We compared early postoperative complications between trabeculectomy and Ex-PRESS implantation. Enrolled patients with 39 primary open-angle or 25 exfoliative glaucoma were randomly assigned to receive trabeculectomy (trabeculectomy group) or Ex-PRESS implantation (Ex-PRESS group). Primary outcomes were early postoperative complications, including postoperative anterior chamber inflammation, frequencies of hyphema, flat anterior chamber, choroidal detachment, hypotonic maculopathy, and the change of visual acuity. The postoperative flare values in trabeculectomy group were higher than those in the Ex-PRESS group (overall, P = 0.004; and 10 days, P = 0.02). Hyphema occurred significantly more frequently in the trabeculectomy group (P = 0.0025). There were no significant differences of the other primary outcomes between the two groups. Additionally, duration of anterior chamber opening was significantly shorter in the Ex-PRESS group (P = 0.0002) and the eyes that had iris contact with Ex-PRESS tube had significantly shallower anterior chambers than did the eyes without the iris contact (P = 0.013). The Ex-PRESS implantation prevented early postoperative inflammation and hyphema in the anterior chamber and shortened the duration of anterior chamber opening. Iris contact with the Ex-PRESS tube occurred more frequently in eyes with open-angle glaucoma and shallow anterior chambers.

  7. Association of pre and intraoperative variables with postoperative complications in coronary artery bypass graft surgery

    PubMed Central

    Gimenes, Camila; Barrile, Silvia Regina; Martinelli, Bruno; Ronchi, Carlos Fernando; Arca, Eduardo Aguilar; Gimenes, Rodrigo; Okoshi, Marina Politi; Okoshi, Katashi

    2013-01-01

    Objective To associate the pre- and intraoperative variables with postoperative complications of patients undergoing coronary artery bypass graft surgery. Methods The pre- and intraoperative risk factors of individuals of both genders with diagnosis of coronary insufficiency undergoing coronary artery bypass graft have been studied. Results Fifty-eight individuals with median age 62 ± 10 year-old were included in the study, 67% of whom were male. Fourteen (24.1%) patients were smokers, 39 (67.2%) had previous myocardial infarction history, 11 (19%) had undergone coronary angioplasty, 74% had hypertension, 27% had diabetes mellitus, 64% had dyslipidemia and 15.5% had chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Eighteen (31%) patients presented postoperative complications, most frequent being: infection in surgical incision, difficulties in deambulation, dyspnea, urinary infection and generalized weakness. Male patients had fewer complications than females (P=0.005). Patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease remained hospitalized for longer time periods (P=0.019). Postoperative complications occurred in 50% of the patients with creatinine increased, while only 27.1% of the patients with normal value of creatinine had complications (P=0.049). In addition, complications occurred in 50% of the patients with diabetes mellitus, while only 23.8% of patients without diabetes mellitus had complications (P=0.032). The intraoperative factors showed no statistically significant differences. Conclusion The preoperative factors are associated with postoperative complications in patients undergoing coronary artery bypass graft surgery. PMID:24598958

  8. Effect of Pre-Designed Instructions for Mothers of Children with Hypospadias on Reducing Postoperative Complications

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mohamed, Sanaa A.

    2015-01-01

    Hypospadias is a common congenital anomaly with a prevalence estimated to be as high as 1 in 125 live male births. Complications after surgical procedures are possible. The incidence of complications can be reduced by meticulous preoperative planning, and judicious postoperative care. So the aim of the study was to investigate the effect of…

  9. Postoperative visual loss following dorsal root entry zone rhizotomy: A dreaded complication after a benign procedure

    PubMed Central

    Mishra, RK; Mahajan, C; Bindra, A; Goyal, K

    2016-01-01

    Postoperative visual loss (POVL) is a rare but grave postoperative complication. It has been mainly reported in patients undergoing cardiac and spinal surgeries. Dorsal root entry zone (DREZ) is pain relieving procedure performed in patients with refractory neuropathic pain with minimal complication rate. We present a case of unilateral POVL following DREZ rhizotomy in prone position in a patient having brachial plexus neuropathy. Exact etiology of vision loss was though not clear; hypotension, use of vasopressors and hemodilution may have led to vision loss in this patient. This case report highlights the associated risk factors for development of this hazardous complication. PMID:27833493

  10. [Septic ascites: a rare post-operative complication].

    PubMed

    La Torre, F; Taglienti, D; de Anna, L; Masoni, L; Gasparrini, M; Viola, M; Nicolai, A P; Lucidi, V; Montori, A

    1995-01-01

    Spontaneous bacterial peritonitis in patients with chronic hepatitis represents a very controversial matter in terms of frequency, pathology and treatment. This unusual complication mainly due to decreased immunological defences and ascitic fluid opsonic activity is not accepted by all the Authors as a rare event. However, there is agreement as far as management is concerned: cultural examination of the ascitic fluid and the relative antibiogram are the best tools in guiding the approach to an adequate antibiotic therapy.

  11. Postoperative Complications of Laparoscopic Total Gastrectomy versus Open Total Gastrectomy for Gastric Cancer in a Meta-Analysis of High-Quality Case-Controlled Studies

    PubMed Central

    Otsuki, Sho; Ogawa, Norihito; Tanioka, Toshiro; Okuno, Keisuke; Gokita, Kentaro; Kawano, Tatsuyuki

    2016-01-01

    Background. Some meta-analyses of case-controlled studies (CCSs) have shown that laparoscopic or laparoscopy-assisted total gastrectomy (LTG) had some short-term advantages over open total gastrectomy (OTG). However, postoperative complications differed somewhat among the meta-analyses, and some CCSs included in the meta-analyses had mismatched factors between LTG and OTG. Methods. CCSs comparing postoperative complications between LTG and OTG were identified in PubMed and Embase. Studies matched for patients' status, tumor stage, and the extents of lymph-node dissection were included. Outcomes of interest, such as anastomotic, other intra-abdominal, wound, and pulmonary complications, were evaluated in a meta-analysis performed using Review Manager version 5.3 software. Result. This meta-analysis included a total of 2,560 patients (LTG, 1,073 patients; OTG, 1,487 patients) from 15 CCSs. Wound complications were significantly less frequent in LTG than in OTG (n = 2,430; odds ratio [OR] 0.30, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.29–0.85, P = 0.01, I2 = 0%, and OR 0.46, 95% CI 0.17–0.52, P < 0.0001, I2 = 0%). However, the incidence of anastomotic complications was slightly but not significantly higher in LTG than in OTG (n = 2,560; OR 1.44, 95% CI 0.96–2.16, P = 0.08, I2 = 0%). Conclusion. LTG was associated with a lower incidence of wound-related postoperative complications than was OTG in this meta-analysis of CCSs; however, some concern remains about anastomotic problems associated with LTG. PMID:28042292

  12. Successful Treatment of a Patient With Complicated Diabetic Foot Wound: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Yurong; Wang, Xingang; Zhang, Liping; You, Chuangang; Feng, Zhanzeng; Han, Chunmao

    2014-06-01

    Foot ulceration is one of the most serious complications of diabetes mellitus and may lead to amputation of the lower extremity. Timely prophylaxis and treatment of diabetic foot ulceration are important to maintain a good quality of life. This article reports a complicated diabetic patient with severe limb-threatening necrotizing infection. We successfully applied endovascular stent insertion, digit amputation, negative pressure wound therapy, and advanced dressings in different wound phases to achieve definitive wound healing after 12 months of treatment. Based on this case report, we would like to emphasize the importance of combined multiple therapies and patient compliance for severe diabetic foot ulcers.

  13. The efficacy of multimodal high-volume wound infiltration in primary total knee replacement in facilitating immediate post-operative pain relief and attainment of early rehabilitation milestones.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Purnajyoti

    2014-05-01

    Inadequate pain relief after lower limb joint replacement surgery has been a well-recognised limiting factor affecting post-operative mobilisation and length of hospital stay. Multimodal local wound infiltration with local anaesthetics, adrenaline and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory agents can lower the opiate intake, reduce the length of stay and enhance early mobilisation in knee replacement patients. A retrospective review of 64 patients undergoing primary total knee replacement was undertaken. Thirty-two patients (cases) had their wounds infiltrated with ropivacaine, adrenaline and ketorolac by the operating surgeon, intraoperatively. Subsequently, a 19G wound catheter placed into the knee joint. They received two further top-up doses of the same combination at 10 and 20 h post-operatively. This group was compared with a control group of 32 patients who did not receive any local infiltration. Both groups were comparable in terms of BMI and age. Post-operative opiate drug consumption in first 48 h after surgery, length of hospital stays and time taken to mobilise after surgery were recorded. There was significant reduction in opiate consumption in the treatment group with an average consumption of 49.35 mg of morphine compared to 71.48 mg in the control group (p = 0.004). The median length of hospital stay was significantly reduced from 5 days in the control group to 4 days in the treatment group (p = 0.03). The patients in the treatment group mobilised around 19 h earlier (p = 0.001). No major post-operative complications were encountered in either group. Wound infiltration is an effective and safe technique that promotes early rehabilitation and discharge of patients following primary total knee replacement.

  14. Tissue Responses to Postoperative Laser Therapy in Diabetic Rats Submitted to Excisional Wounds

    PubMed Central

    de Loura Santana, Cristiano; de Fátima Teixeira Silva, Daniela; Deana, Alessandro Melo; Prates, Renato Araujo; Souza, Amanda Pires; Gomes, Mariana Teixeira; de Azevedo Sampaio, Brunna Pileggi; Shibuya, Josiane Ferraretto; Bussadori, Sandra Kalil; Mesquita-Ferrari, Raquel Agnelli; Fernandes, Kristianne Porta Santos; França, Cristiane Miranda

    2015-01-01

    In a previous study about low-level laser therapy biomodulation on a full-thickness burn model we showed that single and fractionated dose regimens increased wound healing and leukocyte influx similarly when compared with untreated control. In order to verify if this finding would be similar in an impaired wound model, we investigated the effect of single and multiple irradiations on wound closure rate, type of inflammatory infiltrate, myofibroblasts, collagen deposition, and optical retardation of collagen in diabetic rats. Female Wistar rats in the same estrous cycle had diabetes induced with streptozotocin and an 8-mm excisional wound performed with a punch. The experimental groups were: control group – untreated ulcer; single-dose group – ulcer submitted to single dose of diode laser therapy (λ = 660 ± 2 nm; P = 30 mW; energy density: 4 J/cm2) and fractionated-dose group – ulcer submitted to 1 J/cm2 laser therapy on Days 1, 3, 8, and 10. The ulcers were photographed on the experimental days and after euthanasia tissue samples were routinely processed for histological and immunohistochemistry analyses. Independently of the energy density, laser therapy accelerated wound closure by approximately 40% in the first three days in comparison to the control group. Laser therapy increased acute inflammatory infiltrate until Day 3. Both laser groups exhibited more myofibroblasts and better collagen organization than the control group. The findings demonstrate that low-level laser therapy in the immediate postoperative period can enhance the tissue repair process in a diabetes model. Similar effects were achieved with laser therapy applied a single time with an energy density of 4 J/cm2 and applied four times with an energy density of 1 J/cm2. The application of laser therapy in the inflammatory phase was the most important factor to the enhancement of the tissue repair process. PMID:25909480

  15. Tissue responses to postoperative laser therapy in diabetic rats submitted to excisional wounds.

    PubMed

    de Loura Santana, Cristiano; Silva, Daniela de Fátima Teixeira; Deana, Alessandro Melo; Prates, Renato Araujo; Souza, Amanda Pires; Gomes, Mariana Teixeira; de Azevedo Sampaio, Brunna Pileggi; Shibuya, Josiane Ferraretto; Bussadori, Sandra Kalil; Mesquita-Ferrari, Raquel Agnelli; Fernandes, Kristianne Porta Santos; França, Cristiane Miranda

    2015-01-01

    In a previous study about low-level laser therapy biomodulation on a full-thickness burn model we showed that single and fractionated dose regimens increased wound healing and leukocyte influx similarly when compared with untreated control. In order to verify if this finding would be similar in an impaired wound model, we investigated the effect of single and multiple irradiations on wound closure rate, type of inflammatory infiltrate, myofibroblasts, collagen deposition, and optical retardation of collagen in diabetic rats. Female Wistar rats in the same estrous cycle had diabetes induced with streptozotocin and an 8-mm excisional wound performed with a punch. The experimental groups were: control group--untreated ulcer; single-dose group--ulcer submitted to single dose of diode laser therapy (λ = 660 ± 2 nm; P = 30 mW; energy density: 4 J/cm2) and fractionated-dose group--ulcer submitted to 1 J/cm2 laser therapy on Days 1, 3, 8, and 10. The ulcers were photographed on the experimental days and after euthanasia tissue samples were routinely processed for histological and immunohistochemistry analyses. Independently of the energy density, laser therapy accelerated wound closure by approximately 40% in the first three days in comparison to the control group. Laser therapy increased acute inflammatory infiltrate until Day 3. Both laser groups exhibited more myofibroblasts and better collagen organization than the control group. The findings demonstrate that low-level laser therapy in the immediate postoperative period can enhance the tissue repair process in a diabetes model. Similar effects were achieved with laser therapy applied a single time with an energy density of 4 J/cm2 and applied four times with an energy density of 1 J/cm2. The application of laser therapy in the inflammatory phase was the most important factor to the enhancement of the tissue repair process.

  16. Evaluating Patient Usability of an Image-Based Mobile Health Platform for Postoperative Wound Monitoring

    PubMed Central

    Wiseman, Jason

    2016-01-01

    Background Surgical patients are increasingly using mobile health (mHealth) platforms to monitor recovery and communicate with their providers in the postdischarge period. Despite widespread enthusiasm for mHealth, few studies evaluate the usability or user experience of these platforms. Objective Our objectives were to (1) develop a novel image-based smartphone app for postdischarge surgical wound monitoring, and (2) rigorously user test it with a representative population of vascular and general surgery patients. Methods A total of 9 vascular and general surgery inpatients undertook usability testing of an internally developed smartphone app that allows patients to take digital images of their wound and answer a survey about their recovery. We followed the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) 9241-11 guidelines, focusing on effectiveness, efficiency, and user satisfaction. An accompanying training module was developed by applying tenets of adult learning. Sessions were audio-recorded, and the smartphone screen was mirrored onto a study computer. Digital image quality was evaluated by a physician panel to determine usefulness for clinical decision making. Results The mean length of time spent was 4.7 (2.1-12.8) minutes on the training session and 5.0 (1.4-16.6) minutes on app completion. 55.5% (5/9) of patients were able to complete the app independently with the most difficulty experienced in taking digital images of surgical wounds. Novice patients who were older, obese, or had groin wounds had the most difficulty. 81.8% of images were sufficient for diagnostic purposes. User satisfaction was high, with an average usability score of 83.3 out of 100. Conclusion Surgical patients can learn to use a smartphone app for postoperative wound monitoring with high user satisfaction. We identified design features and training approaches that can facilitate ease of use. This protocol illustrates an important, often overlooked, aspect of mHealth development

  17. Impact of postoperative complications on clinical and economic consequences in pancreatic surgery

    PubMed Central

    Jon, Bohumil; Čermáková, Eva; Šubrt, Zdeněk; Ferko, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Patients who develop complications consume a disproportionately large share of available resources in surgery; therefore the attention of healthcare funders focuses on the economic impact of complications. The main objective of this work was to assess the clinical and economic impact of postoperative complications in pancreatic surgery, and furthermore to assess risk factors for increased costs. Methods In all, 161 consecutive patients underwent pancreatic resection. The costs of the treatment were determined and analyzed. Results The overall morbidity rate was 53.4%, and the in-hospital mortality rate was 3.7%. The median of costs for all patients without complication was 3,963 Euro, whereas the median of costs for patients with at least one complication was significantly increased at 10,670 Euro (P < 0.001). In multivariate analysis American Society of Anesthesiologists ≥ 3 (P = 0.006), multivisceral resection (P < 0.001) and any complication (P < 0.001) were independently associated with increased costs. Conclusion Postoperative complications are associated with an increase in mortality, length of hospital stay, and hospital costs. The treatment costs increase with the severity of the postoperative complications. Those factors that are known to increase the treatment costs in pancreatic resection should be considered when planning patients for surgery. PMID:26793689

  18. Postoperative complications and overall survival after pancreaticoduodenectomy for pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Pugalenthi, Amudhan; Protic, Mladjan; Gonen, Mithat; Kingham, T. Peter; D’ Angelica, Michael I.; Dematteo, Ronald P.; Fong, Yuman; Jarnagin, William R.; Allen, Peter J.

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Pancreaticoduodenectomy (PD) performed for pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDA) has a postoperative morbidity of 40–50%. In this study, we analyzed the impact of high grade complications after PD for PDA on overall survival. METHODS 596 patients that underwent PD for PDA between 2001–2009 were identified from a prospective database. Complications were defined and graded (1–5) as per our Institutional Surgical Secondary Events Program. High grade complications were defined as ≥ grade 3. Postoperative mortality (≤ 90 days) was excluded. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed to identify factors associated with overall survival. RESULTS Median survival was 24 months. Overall complication rate was 51% (301/596). Low grade complications were recorded in 266 patients (45%) and high grade complications in 22% (n= 129). Our 90 day mortality was 3.7% (n= 22). Anastomotic fistula/ leak/abscess rate was 14% (n= 82). Multivariate Cox-Regression analysis identified node positivity, estimated blood loss (EBL) > 600 ml, length of stay (LOS) > 10 days, margin positivity and vascular procedures as predictors of decreased overall survival (p < 0.05). High grade complications were not associated with overall survival (p = 0.948). CONCLUSION In this study, the occurrence of high grade postoperative complications was not associated with overall survival. PMID:26678349

  19. Preoperative Nutritional Status and Clinical Complications in the Postoperative Period of Cardiac Surgeries

    PubMed Central

    Gonçalves, Luciana de Brito; de Jesus, Natanael Moura Teixeira; Gonçalves, Maiara de Brito; Dias, Lidiane Cristina Gomes; Deiró, Tereza Cristina Bomfim de Jesus

    2016-01-01

    Objective This study aims to assess the preoperative nutritional status of patients and the role it plays in the occurrence of clinical complications in the postoperative period of major elective cardiac surgeries. Methods Cross-sectional study comprising 72 patients aged 20 years or older, who underwent elective cardiac surgery. The preoperative nutritional assessment consisted of nutritional screening, anthropometry (including the measurement of the adductor pollicis muscle thickness) and biochemical tests. The patients were monitored for up to 10 days after the surgery in order to control the occurrence of postoperative complications. The R software, version 3.0.2, was used to statistically analyze the data. Results Clinical complications were found in 62.5% (n=42) of the studied samples and complications of non-infectious nature were most often found. Serum albumin appeared to be associated with renal complications (P=0.026) in the nutritional status indicators analyzed herein. The adductor pollicis muscle thickness was associated with infectious complications and presented mean of 9.39±2.32 mm in the non-dominant hand (P=0.030). No significant correlation was found between the other indicators and the clinical complications. Conclusion The adductor pollicis muscle thickness and the serum albumin seemed be associated with clinical complications in the postoperative period of cardiac surgeries. PMID:27982346

  20. Imaging of the postoperative liver: review of normal appearances and common complications.

    PubMed

    Mulé, S; Colosio, A; Cazejust, J; Kianmanesh, R; Soyer, P; Hoeffel, C

    2015-10-01

    Several benign and malignant liver diseases may require surgical treatment for cure, including anatomical resections based on the segmental anatomy of the liver, non-anatomical (wedge) resections, and surgical management of biliary cysts. The type of surgery depends not only on the location and the nature of the disease, but also on the expertise of the surgeon. Whereas ultrasonography is often the first-line imaging examination in case of suspected postoperative complication, multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) is of greater value for identifying normal findings after surgery, early postoperative pathologic fluid collections and vascular thromboses, and tumor recurrence in patients who have undergone hepatic surgery. Magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography (MRCP) is the imaging modality of choice for depicting early postoperative bile duct injuries and ischemic cholangitis that may occur in the late postoperative phase. Both MDCT and MRCP can accurately depict tumor recurrence. Radiologists should become familiar with these surgical procedures to better understand postoperative changes, and with the normal imaging appearances of various postoperative complications to better differentiate between complications and normal findings.

  1. [Laparoscopic gastric bypass: computed tomography appearance of common postoperative changes and complications].

    PubMed

    Caracela Zeballos, C R; Diéguez Tapias, S; Cereceda Pérez, C N; Pinto Varela, J M

    2014-01-01

    Laparoscopic Roux-en-Y bypass is being increasingly used for weight reduction in patients with morbid obesity. Unfortunately, some complications can occur after this procedure, the most frequent being intestinal obstruction (due to stenosis of the anastomosis at the distal end of the loop, internal hernias, bands, and adhesions), anastomotic leaks, and bleeding. This article provides basic knowledge about the surgical technique and its correlation with the common postoperative changes with the aim of facilitating the interpretation of CT findings and the identification of postoperative complications in these patients.

  2. Intraoperative antibiotic wound lavage: an attempt to eliminate postoperative infection in arterial and clean general surgical procedures.

    PubMed

    Lord, J W; Rossi, G; Daliana, M

    1977-06-01

    Intraoperative antibiotic wound lavage has been used in all arterial reconstructive procedures for the past 7 years and reduced the incidence of early and late postoperative infections from 1.5% in 400 operations prior to 1969 to 0.23% (one post-hospital) in 434 patients operated since that date. In 226 consecutive clean major general surgical procedures since June 1971 there has been no early or late wound infections following intraoperative antibiotic wound lavage in contrast to an infection rate of 1.5% in 185 operations prior to that date. A double blind study of 200 patients undergoing operations for varicose veins was carried out as follows: The wounds of alternate patients were irrigated either with normal saline or with antibiotic solution. There were no gross (grade II) postoperative wound infections. Minor skin changes were noted in 93 of 632 incisions in the saline group and only 49 of 608 incisions irrigated with antibiotic solution (P less than 0.001). In clean operations without antibiotic wound lavage there was a 0.73% rate of in-hospital wound infections in 685 patients in contrast to a zero rate in 760 patients wherein intraoperative wound lavage was carried out throughout the operative procedure.

  3. Comparison of intraoperative and postoperative complications based on ASA risks in patients who underwent percutaneous nephrolithotomy

    PubMed Central

    Karakaş, Hüseyin Buğra; Çiçekbilek, İzzet; Tok, Adem; Alışkan, Tamer; Akduman, Bülent

    2016-01-01

    Objective In this study we aimed to evaluate intraoperative and postoperative complications which developed according to pre-operative American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) risk criteria in patients who had undergone percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PNL). Material and methods Five hundred and sixty patients who had undergone PNL between 2002 and 2014 were included in the study. Patients operated on the ipsilateral kidney, those with solitary kidney or the cases who had previously undergone more than one access were excluded from this study. Preoperative anesthesia risks were determined according to preoperative classification developed by ASA. Postoperative complications were evaluated using Clavien Complication Grading Scale. Results The mean age of the cases was 47±14 years. The 57% (n=319) of the cases were male, 241 (43%) of them were female. The average indwell time of nephrostomy catheter was 2.88±1.00 (1–8), and length of hospital stay was 4.91±1.54 (2–17) days. When the cases were assessed according to ASA risk groups, intraoperative complications were observed in 9 (5.5%) ASA I, 27 (8.6%) ASA II, and 18 (22%) ASA III patients and and distribution of the patients was statistically significant (p<0.001). When intraoperative complications were evaluated one by one, intraoperative hypotension developed in ASA I (n=3; 1.8%), ASA II (n=20; 6.4%) and ASA III (n=11; 13.4%) risk groups and this distribution (p=0.002) of patients was statistically significant. When assessed according to Clavien Postoperative Scale, postoperative complications developed (p=0.053) in ASAI (n=24; 14.7%), ASA II (n=27, 8.6%) and ASA III (n=13; 15.9%) risk groups, and this distribution of the patients was not statistically significant. In postoperative complications, Grade 3a complications developed in ASA I (n=12; 7.4%), ASA II (n=19; 6%) and ASA III (n=8; 9.8%) risk groups and this distribution was not seen to be statistically significant (p=0.485). Conclusion A statistically

  4. Complications related to the use of spinal cord stimulation for managing persistent postoperative neuropathic pain after lumbar spinal surgery.

    PubMed

    Shamji, Mohammed F; Westwick, Harrison J; Heary, Robert F

    2015-10-01

    OBJECT Structural spinal surgery yields improvement in pain and disability for selected patients with spinal stenosis, spondylolisthesis, or a herniated intervertebral disc. A significant fraction of patients exhibit persistent postoperative neuropathic pain (PPNP) despite technically appropriate intervention, and such patients can benefit from spinal cord stimulation (SCS) to alleviate suffering. The complication profile of this therapy has not been systematically assessed and, thus, was the goal of this review. METHODS A comprehensive literature search was performed to identify prospective cohorts of patients who had PPNP following structurally corrective lumbar spinal surgery and who underwent SCS device implantation. Data about study design, technique of SCS lead introduction, and complications encountered were collected and analyzed. Comparisons of complication incidence were performed between percutaneously and surgically implanted systems, with the level of significance set at 0.05. RESULTS Review of 11 studies involving 542 patients formed the basis of this work: 2 randomized controlled trials and 9 prospective cohorts. Percutaneous implants were used in 4 studies and surgical implants were used in 4 studies; in the remainder, the types were undefined. Lead migration occurred in 12% of cases, pain at the site of the implantable pulse generator occurred in 9% of cases, and wound-related complications occurred in 5% of cases; the latter 2 occurred more frequently among surgically implanted devices. CONCLUSIONS Spinal cord stimulation can provide for improved pain and suffering and for decreased narcotic medication use among patients with PPNP after lumbar spinal surgery. This study reviewed the prospective studies forming the evidence base for this therapy, to summarize the complications encountered and, thus, best inform patients and clinicians considering its use. There is a significant rate of minor complications, many of which require further surgical

  5. Perioperative lung-protective ventilation strategy reduces postoperative pulmonary complications in patients undergoing thoracic and major abdominal surgery

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The occurrence of postoperative pulmonary complications is strongly associated with increased hospital mortality and prolonged postoperative hospital stays. Although protective lung ventilation is commonly used in the intensive care unit, low tidal volume ventilation in the operating room is not a routine strategy. Low tidal volume ventilation, moderate positive end-expiratory pressure, and repeated recruitment maneuvers, particularly for high-risk patients undergoing major abdominal surgery, can reduce postoperative pulmonary complications. Facilitating perioperative bundle care by combining prophylactic and postoperative positive-pressure ventilation with intraoperative lung-protective ventilation may be helpful to reduce postoperative pulmonary complications. PMID:26885294

  6. The Effect of Immunonutrition on the Postoperative Complications in Thymoma with Myasthenia Gravis

    PubMed Central

    Xin, Yanzhong; Cai, Hongfei; Wu, Lihui

    2016-01-01

    Object. To test whether preoperative immunonutrition is efficacious in reducing postoperative complications in patients of thymoma with myasthenia gravis (MG). Material and Methods. A total of 244 patients operated on for thymoma with myasthenia gravis were prospectively assigned to two groups, each receiving seven-day preoperative and seven-day postoperative nutrition. The patients in immunonutrition group were given oral immunonutrition (IN). The patients in control group received oral standard nutrition. Immunonutritional and inflammatory biomarkers (IgA, IgG, IgM, CD3t, CD4t, CD8t, CD4t/CD8t ratio, NK-cell, prealbumin, albumin, white blood cells counts, and C-reactive protein) and clinical variables (age, gender, BMI, performance status, type of thymoma, type of MG, operative time, pathology, operative approach, postoperative complications, quantity of drainage, hospital stays) were examined. Results. A significant reduction in the length of hospital stay, quantity of drainage, and postoperative complications was observed in the IN group (p < 0.05). An increase in the level of IgA, IgG, IgM, CD3+T, CD4+T, CD4+T/CD8+T, WBC, CRP, and NK-cell in the IN group was observed after thymectomy, while a decrease was seen with regard to prealbumin and albumin (p < 0.05). Conclusion. Preoperative immunonutrition support is effective in reducing postoperative complications in patients of thymoma with MG. It helps to lower the risk of postoperative infectious complications and hospital stays. PMID:27956763

  7. [Perioperative hypothermia. Impact on wound healing].

    PubMed

    Pietsch, A P; Lindenblatt, N; Klar, E

    2007-09-01

    Mild perioperative hypothermia is a common complication of anesthesia and surgery associated with several adverse effects including impaired wound healing and more frequently leads to wound infections. Perioperative hypothermia affects the hemostasis and various immune functions and therefore interferes with the initial phases of the wound healing process. Furthermore, perioperative hypothermia contributes to wound complications by inhibition of deposition of collagen and prolongation of postoperative catabolism. Wound complications prolong hospitalization and substantially increase medical costs. Thus, maintaining normothermia perioperatively is essential to reduce the number of wound complications.

  8. Surgical Treatment of Orbital Blowout Fractures: Complications and Postoperative Care Patterns.

    PubMed

    Shew, Matthew; Carlisle, Michael P; Lu, Guanning Nina; Humphrey, Clinton; Kriet, J David

    2016-11-01

    Orbital fractures are a common result of facial trauma. Sequelae and indications for repair include enophthalmos and/or diplopia from extraocular muscle entrapment. Alloplastic implant placement with careful release of periorbital fat and extraocular muscles can effectively restore extraocular movements, orbital integrity, and anatomic volume. However, rare but devastating complications such as retrobulbar hematoma (RBH) can occur after repair, which pose a risk of permanent vision loss if not addressed emergently. For this reason, some surgeons take the precaution of admitting patients for 24-hour postoperative vision checks, while others do not. The incidence of postoperative RBH has not been previously reported and existing data are limited to case reports. Our aim was to examine national trends in postoperative management and to report the incidence of immediate postoperative complications at our institution following orbital repair. A retrospective assessment of orbital blowout fractures was undertaken to assess immediate postoperative complications including RBH. Only patients treated by a senior surgeon in the Department of Otolaryngology were included in the review. In addition, we surveyed AO North America (AONA) Craniomaxillofacial faculty to assess current trends in postoperative management. There were 80 patients treated surgically for orbital blowout fractures over a 9.5-year period. Nearly all patients were observed overnight (74%) or longer (25%) due to other trauma. Average length of stay was 17 hours for those observed overnight. There was one (1.3%) patient with RBH, who was treated and recovered without sequelae. Results of the survey indicated that a majority (64%) of responders observe postoperative patients overnight. Twenty-nine percent of responders indicated that they send patients home the same day of surgery. Performance of more than 20 orbital repairs annually significantly increased the likelihood that faculty would manage patients on

  9. Impact of hypertonic saline on postoperative complications for patients undergoing upper gastrointestinal surgery

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Siqi; Shang, Qingjuan; Geng, Qiankun; Yang, Yang; Wang, Yan; Guo, Chunbao

    2017-01-01

    Abstract The aim of this study was to explore the impact of 3% hypertonic saline (HS) intragastric administration for patients who underwent upper gastrointestinal surgery. During the postoperative period, 3% HS has been suggested as a means to improve the intestinal edema and reduce gastrointestinal complications. The medical records of 111 patients with HS intragastric administration following upper gastrointestinal surgery and 268 patients, served as control, were reviewed retrospectively. Propensity score matching was performed to adjust for selected baseline variables. Clinical outcomes, including early gastrointestinal function recovery, postoperative complications, and length of hospital stay, were compared according to the HS intragastric administration or not. HS intragastric administration was associated with prompt postoperative gastrointestinal function recovery, including first flatus (risk ratio [RR], 1.32; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.89–1.65; P = 0.048) and feeding within 3 postoperative days (RR (95% CI), 0.57 (0.49–0.77); P = 0.036). Early ileus occurred in 25 of 108 patients with HS treatment versus 36 of 108 patients without HS treatment (RR (95% CI), 1.43 (0.63–2.15); P = 0.065). The patients with HS experienced a lower overall postoperative complication (odds ratio [OD] 0.57; 95% CI, 0.33–1.09; P = 0.063), including trend toward a decrease for infectious complications (15[13.9] vs 23[21.3]; P = 0.11; OD, 0.59; 95% CI, 0.29–1.22). There was a decreased incidence of anastomotic leakage (1[0.9] vs 7[6.5]; P = 0.033) and postoperative ileuas (5[4.6%] vs 11[10.2%]; P = 0.096) in the HS administration patients. Our study demonstrated beneficial postoperative clinical effects of HS intragastric administration in patients who had undergone upper gastrointestinal surgery, such as prompt postoperative gastrointestinal function recovery and reduced overall postoperative complications, which may be attributed to a

  10. Doppler ultrasonography in living donor liver transplantation recipients: Intra- and post-operative vascular complications

    PubMed Central

    Abdelaziz, Omar; Attia, Hussein

    2016-01-01

    Living-donor liver transplantation has provided a solution to the severe lack of cadaver grafts for the replacement of liver afflicted with end-stage cirrhosis, fulminant disease, or inborn errors of metabolism. Vascular complications remain the most serious complications and a common cause for graft failure after hepatic transplantation. Doppler ultrasound remains the primary radiological imaging modality for the diagnosis of such complications. This article presents a brief review of intra- and post-operative living donor liver transplantation anatomy and a synopsis of the role of ultrasonography and color Doppler in evaluating the graft vascular haemodynamics both during surgery and post-operatively in accurately defining the early vascular complications. Intra-operative ultrasonography of the liver graft provides the surgeon with useful real-time diagnostic and staging information that may result in an alteration in the planned surgical approach and corrections of surgical complications during the procedure of vascular anastomoses. The relevant intra-operative anatomy and the spectrum of normal and abnormal findings are described. Ultrasonography and color Doppler also provides the clinicians and surgeons early post-operative potential developmental complications that may occur during hospital stay. Early detection and thus early problem solving can make the difference between graft survival and failure. PMID:27468207

  11. Influence of prior radiotherapy on the development of postoperative complications and success of free tissue transfers in head and neck cancer reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Bengtson, B P; Schusterman, M A; Baldwin, B J; Miller, M J; Reece, G P; Kroll, S S; Robb, G L; Goepfert, H

    1993-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether prior radiotherapy had any effect on the development of postoperative complications in patients undergoing microvascular tissue transfers for reconstruction of head and neck cancer. A prospective database was used to review 354 consecutive patients who had a total of 368 free tissue transfers limited to the head and neck during the 4-year period from July 1988 to June 1992. Postoperative complications in 167 patients who received preoperative radiotherapy (XRT) were compared with those of 187 patients who did not undergo radiotherapy preoperatively (NR). No statistical differences in complications or flap loss between the two groups were noted using the chi 2 test or Fisher's exact test (p > 0.2). Total flap loss occurred in 5.3% of the XRT group (9 of 169) and 5.0% of the NR patient group (10 of 199), and partial flap loss occurred in 4.1% of the irradiated patients and 2.5% of the nonirradiated patients. Major wound complications requiring additional surgery occurred in 16% of the XRT group and 11% of the NR group. Minor wound complications that did not require further surgery occurred in 21% of the irradiated patients and 18% of the nonirradiated patients. No significant difference in the timing or dose of preoperative radiation, previous neck dissection, or anastomotic type could be documented in failed versus successful flaps (two-tailed t-test, p > 0.80, and chi 2, p > 0.2). Our results show that, in a large group of cancer patients undergoing free tissue transfers to the head and neck, prior radiotherapy or surgery did not predispose them to a higher rate of acute flap loss or wound complications than their nonirradiated cohorts.

  12. Impact of Nursing Educational Program on Reducing or Preventing Postoperative Complications for Patients after Intracranial Surgery

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elmowla, Rasha Ali Ahmed Abd; El-Lateef, Zienab Abd; El-khayat, Roshdy

    2015-01-01

    Intracranial surgery means any surgery performed inside the skull to treat problems in the brain and surrounding structures. Aim: Evaluate the impact of nursing educational program on reducing or preventing postoperative complications for patients after intracranial surgery. Subjects and methods: Sixty adult patients had intracranial surgery (burr…

  13. Survival outcomes of hepatocellular carcinoma resection with postoperative complications – a propensity-score-matched analysis

    PubMed Central

    Chok, Kenneth S.H.; Chan, Millies M.Y.; Dai, Wing Chiu; Chan, Albert C.Y.; Cheung, Tan To; Wong, Tiffany C.L.; She, Wong Hoi; Lo, Chung Mau

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Curative resection remains the only hope of cure for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), but postoperative complications can have a significant impact on long-term survival. However, only scarce data on such impact can be found in the literature. This retrospective study reviewed the prospectively collected data of patients who underwent primary liver resection for HCC at our hospital during the period from December 1989 to December 2014. Patients with and without postoperative complications were compared. A 1:1 propensity score matching was adopted by matching age, comorbidity, Model of End-stage Liver Disease score, tumor stage, and extent of resection. Totally 1710 patients were eligible for the study. Four hundred and sixty-one (27.0%) of them developed postoperative complications while 1249 (73.0%) did not. After propensity score matching, 922 patients were compared in a 1:1 ratio (461 with postoperative complications and 461 without). Patients who developed postoperative complications were demographically similar to patients who did not, but had more intraoperative blood loss and transfusion (both P < 0.001), longer hospital stay (17 vs 9 days; P < 0.001), worse hospital mortality (12.1% vs 0%; P < 0.001), and shorter overall survival (P < 0.001). On multivariate analysis, factors that might have affected overall survival were cancer stage (HR 1.22, P < 0.001), tumor size (HR 1.02, P = 0.005), tumor number (HR 1.08, P < 0.001), venous invasion (HR 1.38, P = 0.003), extent of resection (HR 1.19, P = 0.045), intraoperative blood loss (HR 1.11, P < 0.001), postoperative complication (HR 1.37, P < 0.001), and era effect (HR 1.27, P = 0.01). Patients should be monitored closely after HCC resection. Prompt treatment of postoperative complications may be salvational. PMID:28328851

  14. Post-Operative Complications in Living Liver Donors: A Single-Center Experience in China

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Songfeng; Chen, Jihao; Wang, Jingqiao; Yang, Cheng; Jin, Mengmeng; Yan, Sheng; Zhang, Mangli; Zhang, Min; Zheng, Shusen

    2015-01-01

    The gap between the growing demand for available organs and the cadaveric organs facilitates the adoption of living donor liver transplantation. We retrospectively identified and evaluated the post-operative complications as per the modified Clavien classification system in 152 living liver donors at at the First Affiliated Hospital, College of Medicine, Zhejiang University between December, 2006 and June, 2014. Post-operative complications were observed in 61 patients (40.1%) in the present study, but no mortality was reported. Complications developed in 58 (40.0%) right, 1 (33.3%) left, and 2 (66.7%) lateral left hepatectomy donors. The prevalence of re-operation was 1.3%. Grade I and II complications were observed in 38 (25.0%) and 11 (7.2%) donors, respectively. Grade IIIa complications developed in 9 (5.9%) donors and only 3 (2.0%) patients reported grade IIIb complications. The most common complication was pleural effusion that occurred in 31 (20.4%) donors. No significant prognostic baseline factor was identified in this study. In conclusion, living donors experienced various complications, which were usually mild and had a good prognosis. PMID:26270475

  15. Hemostasis and Post-operative Care of Oral Surgical Wounds by Hemcon Dental Dressing in Patients on Oral Anticoagulant Therapy: A Split Mouth Randomized Controlled Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, K.R. Ashok; Sarvagna, Jagadesh; Gadde, Praveen; Chikkaboriah, Shwetha

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Hemostasis is a fundamental management issue post-operatively in minor oral surgical procedures. To ensure safety and therapeutic efficacy in patients, under oral anti coagulant therapy, is complicated by necessity for frequent determination of prothrombin time or international normalised ratio. Aim The aim of the study was to determine whether early hemostasis achieved by using Hemcon Dental Dressing (HDD) will affect post-operative care and surgical healing outcome in minor oral surgical procedures. Materials and Methods A total of 30 patients, aged 18 years to 90 years, except those allergic to seafood, who consented to participate, were enrolled into this study. Patients were required to have two or more surgical sites so that they would have both surgical and control sites. All patients taking Oral Anticoagulation Therapy (OAT) were included for treatment in the study without altering the anticoagulant regimens. Institutional Review Board approval was obtained for the same. The collected data was subjected to statistical analysis using unpaired t-test. Results All HDD surgically treated sites achieved hemostasis in 1.49 minutes and control wounds in 4.06 minutes (p < 0.001). Post-operative pain at HDD treated sites (1.87,1.27 on 1st and 3rd day respectively) was significantly lower than the control sites (4.0,1.87 on 1st and 3rd day respectively) p-value (0.001, 0.001 respectively). HDD treated oral surgery wounds achieved statistically significant improved healing both at 1st and 3rd post-operative days (p <0.0001). Conclusion The HDD has been proven to be a clinically effective hemostatic dressing material that significantly shortens bleeding time following minor oral surgical procedures under local anaesthesia, including those patients taking OAT. Patients receiving the HDD had improved surgical wound healing as compared to controls. PMID:27790577

  16. The use of dermabond® as an adjunct to wound closure after total knee arthroplasty: examining immediate post-operative wound drainage.

    PubMed

    El-Gazzar, Yaser; Smith, Daniel C; Kim, Sun Jin; Hirsh, David M; Blum, Yossef; Cobelli, Marcie; Cohen, Hillel W

    2013-04-01

    Wound drainage after total knee arthroplasty (TKA) can be detrimental to surgical outcome. This IRB-approved randomized, prospective, blinded study examined the use of Dermabond® as an adjunct to wound closure after TKA. We proposed that Dermabond® supplementation to wound closure would result in a significant decrease in wound drainage after TKA. After standardized closure, patients were randomized into experimental or control groups with the experimental group receiving Dermabond® supplementation. Standardized dressings were evaluated postoperatively and drainage units were compared using a Mann-Whitney U Test. The median drainage for the Dermabond group (153) was lower than the drainage for the control group (657) at a statistically significant level (P<0.001).

  17. Use of Kaolin-impregnated Gauze for Improvement of Intraoperative Hemostasis and Postoperative Wound Healing in Blepharoplasty

    PubMed Central

    Czyz, Craig N.; Stacey, Andrew W.; Cahill, Kenneth V.; Foster, Jill A.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Kaolin is a mineral shown to be effective in controlling hemorrhage when combined with standard gauze and applied to wounds. This study investigates the application of kaolin to control intraoperative bleeding and promote wound healing in eyelid surgery. Methods: This prospective, randomized, double-blind study recruited patients who underwent eyelid surgery. Following skin incision, kaolin-impregnated gauzewas placed in one eyelid wound bed and cotton gauze in the other, then removed. Distinct, individual areas of bleeding were recorded. Standardized photographs were obtained postoperatively on Day 1, 4, and 7. Photographs were graded for edema and ecchymosis by four blinded observers. Patients also completed a survey inquiring which side had more bruising, swelling, and pain at each return visit. Results: A total of 46 patients completed the study. The number of intraoperative bleeding sites for kaolin versus plain gauze was not significantly different (p=0.96). Photographic grading by blinded observers did not identify any statistically significant differences in postoperative edema at any time point between lids. There was a statistically significant difference for ecchymosis at postoperative Day 4 (p=0.009) and Day 7 (p=0.016). Patient surveys did not show any difference in perceived edema, ecchymosis, or pain between lids. Conclusion: Intraoperative hemostasis was not affected by the use of kaolin-impregnated gauze. The effectiveness of kaolin in wound healing showed improved ecchymosis at Days 4 and 7 when assessed by blinded observers. Patients did not notice any improvement in postoperative edema, ecchymosis, or pain. PMID:27386052

  18. Evaluation of postoperative complications according to treatment of third molars in mandibular angle fracture

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this study was to evaluate the implication of third molars in postoperative complications of mandibular angle fracture with open reduction and internal fixation (ORIF). Materials and Methods Data were collected on patients who presented with mandibular angle fracture at our Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery between January 2011 and December 2015. Of the 63 total patients who underwent ORIF and perioperative intermaxillary fixation (IMF) with an arch bar, 49 patients were identified as having third molars in the fracture line and were followed up with until plate removal. The complications of postoperative infection, postoperative nerve injury, bone healing, and changes in occlusion and temporomandibular joint were evaluated and analyzed using statistical methods. Results In total, 49 patients had third molars in the fracture line and underwent ORIF surgery and perioperative IMF with an arch bar. The third molar in the fracture line was retained during ORIF in 39 patients. Several patients complained of nerve injury, temporomandibular disorder (TMD), change of occlusion, and postoperative infection around the retained third molar. The third molars were removed during ORIF surgery in 10 patients. Some of these patients complained of nerve injury, but no other complications, such as TMD, change in occlusion, or postoperative infection, were observed. There was no delayed union or nonunion in either of the groups. No statistically significant difference was found between the non-extraction group and the retained teeth group regarding complications after ORIF. Conclusion If the third molar is partially impacted or completely nonfunctional, likely to be involved in pathologic conditions later in life, or possible to remove with the plate simultaneously, extraction of the third molar in the fracture line should be considered during ORIF surgery of the mandible angle fracture. PMID:28280708

  19. Postoperative complications following TECA-LBO in the dog and cat.

    PubMed

    Spivack, Rebecca E; Elkins, A Derrell; Moore, George E; Lantz, Gary C

    2013-01-01

    The medical records for 133 total ear canal ablations combined with lateral bulla osteotomies (TECA-LBOs) performed on 82 dogs (121 ears) and 11 cats (12 ears) between 2004 and 2010 were reviewed to determine if the duration of preoperative clinical signs was associated with the incidence of postoperative facial nerve injury and Horner's syndrome. Other perioperative complications, such as a head tilt, nystagmus, incisional drainage, draining tracts, hearing loss, as well as bacterial culture results, were noted. Postoperative facial nerve paresis occurred in 36 of 133 ears (27.1%), and paralysis occurred in 29 of 133 ears (21.8%), with no significant difference between species. Thus, postoperative facial nerve deficits occurred in 48.9% of ears. The median duration of clinically evident temporary facial nerve deficits was 2 wk for dogs and 4 wk for cats. Dogs had a significantly longer duration of preoperative clinical signs and were less likely than cats to have a mass in the ear canal. Dogs were less likely to have residual (> 1 yr) postoperative facial nerve deficits. The incidence of postoperative Horner's syndrome was significantly higher in cats than dogs. The duration of preoperative clinical signs of ear disease was not associated with postoperative facial nerve deficits.

  20. Evaluation of clonidine as an adjuvant to bupivacaine in wound infiltration for providing postoperative analgesia after abdominal hysterectomy

    PubMed Central

    Selvaraj, Venkatesh

    2016-01-01

    Background: Clonidine is an effective adjuvant to local anesthetics in peripheral nerve blocks. We studied the effect of clonidine as an adjuvant in wound infiltration for postoperative analgesia. Aim: To evaluate the role of clonidine as an adjuvant to bupivacaine in wound infiltration in terms of quality and duration of postoperative analgesia in patients undergoing total abdominal hysterectomy. Settings and Study Design: Prospective, randomized, double-blinded study. Materials and Methods: One hundred patients of American Society of Anesthesiologists I–II posted for abdominal hysterectomy were randomly allotted to two groups. Group A received wound infiltration with 45 ml of 0.25% bupivacaine with 3 μg/kg clonidine while Group B received wound infiltration with 45 ml of 0.25% bupivacaine. A standard general anesthesia technique was used in all the patients. Postoperative analgesia was provided with injection ketorolac 0.5 mg/kg intravenous infusion and tramadol being the rescue analgesic. Postoperative pain score, duration of effective analgesia before the first rescue analgesic, percentage of patients requiring rescue analgesic at different time intervals, and total number of rescue analgesic doses in 24 h were compared between the groups. Statistical Analysis: Difference between the bivariate samples in independent groups with Mann–Whitney U-test. For categorical data, Chi-square test was used. Results: Clonidine group has better pain score, longer duration of effective analgesia, lower percentage of patients requiring rescue analgesic, and less number of doses of rescue analgesia in the first 24 h. Conclusion: We conclude that Clonidine 3 μg/kg is an effective adjuvant to bupivacaine for wound infiltration in terms of quality and duration of postoperative analgesia following total abdominal hysterectomy. PMID:27746524

  1. Can Screening Tools for Obstructive Sleep Apnea Predict Postoperative Complications? A Systematic Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Dimitrov, Lilia; Macavei, Vladimir

    2016-01-01

    Study Objectives: Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a common, underdiagnosed condition that is associated with significant morbidity and mortality in the perioperative setting. Increasing evidence suggests that the utility of preoperative screening tools may go beyond identification of OSA, to the prediction of perioperative complications. The primary objective of this study was to systematically review the literature on all studies assessing whether high risk scores on the STOP-Bang questionnaire, American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) checklist, and the Berlin Questionnaire (BQ) are associated with higher rates of postoperative complications. Methods: A systematic review of English language records was performed using Medline, EMBASE, and PsychInfo with additional studies identified by manual search through reference lists. Only studies that evaluated the ability of the STOP-Bang, the BQ, and ASA checklist to predict postoperative complications in adults were included. Results: Twelve studies were included in the final review. Eight studies looked at STOP-Bang, 3 at the Berlin Questionnaire, and 2 at the ASA Checklist. Significant differences across study characteristics prevented a meta-analysis and the studies were evaluated qualitatively. Conclusions: The ASA checklist, Berlin Questionnaire, and STOP-Bang questionnaire may be able to risk stratify patients for perioperative and postoperative complications. Further research is required, with a particular focus on specific surgery types and adjustment of potentially confounding factors in the analysis. Citation: Dimitrov L, Macavei V. Can screening tools for obstructive sleep apnea predict postoperative complications? A systematic review of the literature. J Clin Sleep Med 2016;12(9):1293–1300. PMID:27448417

  2. Correlation of antibiotic prophylaxis and difficulty of extraction with postoperative inflammatory complications in the lower third molar surgery.

    PubMed

    Lee, J Y; Do, H S; Lim, J H; Jang, H S; Rim, J S; Kwon, J J; Lee, E S

    2014-01-01

    Our aim was to investigate the correlation among antibiotic prophylaxis, difficulty of extraction, and postoperative complications in the removal of lower 3rd molars. A total of 1222 such extractions in 890 patients between January 2010 and January 2012 were analysed retrospectively. The difficulty of extraction measured by Pederson's index, antibiotic prophylaxis with cefditoren, and postoperative complications were recorded. The difficulty of extraction was significantly associated with postoperative complications (p=0.03). There were no significant associations between antibiotic prophylaxis and postoperative complications in groups of equal difficulty ("easy" group (class I) p=1.00; "moderate" group (class II) p=1.00; and "difficult" group (class III) p=0.65). There was a small but insignificant increase in the number of dry sockets and infections in class III cases. In conclusion, this study provides further evidence that antibiotic prophylaxis for the prevention of postoperative inflammatory complications is unnecessary for extraction of 3rd molars.

  3. An Alternative Treatment Strategy for Complicated Chronic Wounds: Negative Pressure Therapy over Mesh Skin Graft

    PubMed Central

    Maruccia, Michele; Onesti, Maria G.; Sorvillo, Valentina; Albano, Antonio; Dessy, Luca A.; Carlesimo, Bruno; Tarallo, Mauro; Giudice, Giuseppe; Cigna, Emanuele; Ribuffo, Diego

    2017-01-01

    Extensive skin defect represents a real problem and major challenge in plastic and reconstructive surgery. On one hand, skin grafts offer a practical method to deal with skin defects despite their unsuitability for several complicated wounds. On the other hand, negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT), applied before skin grafting, promotes granulation tissue growth. The aim of the study is to evaluate the improvement in wound healing given by the merger of these two different approaches. We treated 23 patients for large wounds of multiple factors. Of these, 15 were treated with the application of V.A.C.® Therapy (KCI Medical S.r.l., Milan, Italy), in combination with skin grafts after a prior unsuccessful treatment of 4 weeks with mesh skin grafts and dressings. Another 8 were treated with only mesh skin graft. Pain reduction and wound area reduction were found statistically significant (p < 0.0009, p < 0.0001). Infection was resolved in almost all patients. According to our study, the use of the negative pressure wound therapy over mesh skin grafts is significantly effective especially in wounds resistant to conventional therapies, thereby improving the rate of skin graft take. PMID:28299333

  4. Evaluation of Early Postoperative Neurological Complications Following Living Donor Liver Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    OTAN, Emrah; AYDIN, Cemalettin; YÖNDER, Hüseyin; KAYAALP, Cüneyt; KAPLAN, Yüksel; YILMAZ, Sezai

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Liver transplantation is one of the best treatment options for end-stage liver disease. In Turkey, living donor liver transplantation (LDLT) is performed more frequently than cadaveric transplantation, because organ donation is unpopular in our country. Neurological complications contribute to poor postoperative outcomes after liver transplantation. In the present study, we aimed to evaluate the outcomes of LDLT patients in whom such complications developed early during postoperative follow-up in the intensive care unit. Methods Of 217 LDLTs performed between August 2011 and August 2012, neurology consultations were arranged for 29 patients (13.36%) because of development of new-onset neurological symptoms and/or findings in patients with neurologically uneventful preoperative histories. We retrospectively collected data on age, gender, primary disease, Model for End-Stage Liver Disease (MELD) score, and postoperative hospitalization duration of those who survived. The indications for neurological consultation and diagnoses were categorized into acute confusion/encephalopathy, epileptic seizures, leukoencephalopathy, and focal neurological deficits. The immunosuppressive treatment regimens prescribed were also considered. The outcomes of the 2 groups (with and without neurological complications) were compared. Results The mean patient age was 44.52±16.24 years, and males predominated (65.5%, n=19). Acute confusion/encephalopathy was the most frequent complication (62.1%, n=18), followed by epileptic seizures (27.6%, n=8), cerebrovascular disease (6.9%, n=2), and leukoencephalopathy (3.4%, n=1). Statistically significant between-group differences in age (44.5±16.2 vs. 34.33±20.98 years; p<0.001), and proportions of patients with a disease of viral etiology (55.17% vs. 35.63%, p<0.05), were evident. Mortality was significantly higher in the group with neurological complications (65.5% vs. 37.32%, p<0.05). The duration of postoperative hospitalization

  5. Wound complications in joint arthroplasty: comparing traditional and modern methods of skin closure.

    PubMed

    Patel, Ronak M; Cayo, Max; Patel, Arpan; Albarillo, Marie; Puri, Lalit

    2012-05-01

    Various methods of skin closure exist in joint replacement surgery. Although subcuticular skin closure techniques offer an aesthetic advantage over conventional skin stapling, no measurable differences have been reported. Furthermore, newer barbed sutures, such as the V-Loc absorbable suture (Covidien, Mansfield, Massachusetts), theoretically distribute tension evenly through the wound and help decrease knot-related complications. The purpose of this study was to evaluate whether wound complication rates were (1) lower in V-Loc closure cases as theoretically suggested, (2) lower for subcuticular closure vs staples, and (3) significantly different for knee and hip joint reconstruction.A retrospective chart review was conducted of 278 consecutive cases of primary joint reconstruction performed by a single surgeon (L.P.). The study group comprised 106 men and 161 women. Average patient age at surgery was 63 years (range, 18-92 years), and average body mass index of the cohort was 33.7 kg/m(2) (range, 25-51 kg/m(2)). Skin was closed via staple gun or subcuticular stitch (3-0 Biosyn [Covidien] vs V-Loc). Seven (3.9%) wound complications occurred in 181 cases closed with staples. Four (7.8%) wound complications occurred in 51 cases closed via subcuticular Biosyn suture. Six (13.0%) wound complications occurred in 46 cases closed with V-Loc suture. The staple group had a lower rate of complications when compared with the suture group as a whole (P=.033) and when compared specifically with the V-Loc suture group (P=.017).

  6. Accelerating Chart Review Using Automated Methods on Electronic Health Record Data for Postoperative Complications

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Zhen; Melton, Genevieve B.; Moeller, Nathan D.; Arsoniadis, Elliot G.; Wang, Yan; Kwaan, Mary R.; Jensen, Eric H.; Simon, Gyorgy J.

    2016-01-01

    Manual Chart Review (MCR) is an important but labor-intensive task for clinical research and quality improvement. In this study, aiming to accelerate the process of extracting postoperative outcomes from medical charts, we developed an automated postoperative complications detection application by using structured electronic health record (EHR) data. We applied several machine learning methods to the detection of commonly occurring complications, including three subtypes of surgical site infection, pneumonia, urinary tract infection, sepsis, and septic shock. Particularly, we applied one single-task and five multi-task learning methods and compared their detection performance. The models demonstrated high detection performance, which ensures the feasibility of accelerating MCR. Specifically, one of the multi-task learning methods, propensity weighted observations (PWO) demonstrated the highest detection performance, with single-task learning being a close second. PMID:28269941

  7. [THE RISK FACTORS OF LETHAL COMPLICATIONS IN EARLY POSTOPERATIVE PERIOD IN PATIENTS, SUFFERING GASTROESOPHAGEAL ZONE MALIGNANCIES].

    PubMed

    Dumanskiy, Yu V; Stepko, V A; Sinyachenko, O V

    2016-02-01

    Abstract The factors, determining possibility of early postoperative morbidity occurrence in patients, suffering gastro-esophageal zone cancer, were analyzed. After radical operation performance (gastrectomy, gastric and esophageal resection) 5.7% patients died. Insufficience of the anastomosis sutures with peritonitis occurrence, an acute hepato-renal insufficience, an acute coronary syndrome, pulmonary thromboembolism, pneumonia, the brain insult, pancreonecrosis and mesenterial thrombosis constituted the main morbidities. The complications occurrence depends upon the tumoral process course severity, morphological variant of cancer, presence of concomitant diaphragmatic hernia and the blood rheological properties. Initially high indices of the blood sera present a rheological properties of blood serum may serve as a prognostic criterion of the postoperative complications occurrence in the patients.

  8. Preoperative oral health care reduces postoperative inflammation and complications in oral cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Shigeishi, Hideo; Ohta, Kouji; Fujimoto, Shinichi; Nakagawa, Takayuki; Mizuta, Kuniko; Ono, Shigehiro; Shimasue, Hiroshi; Ninomiya, Yoshiaki; Higashikawa, Koichiro; Tada, Misato; Ishida, Fumi; Okui, Gaku; Okumura, Toshiya; Fukui, Akiko; Kubozono, Kazumi; Yamamoto, Kazuhiro; Ishida, Yoko; Seino, Sayaka; Hashikata, Miho; Sasaki, Kazuki; Naruse, Takako; Rahman, Mohammad Zeshaan; Uetsuki, Ryo; Nimiya, Akiko; Takamoto, Megumi; Dainobu, Kana; Tokikazu, Tomoko; Nishi, Hiromi; Sugiyama, Masaru; Takechi, Masaaki

    2016-01-01

    The records of 70 patients with oral cancer who were treated at a single institution between 2008 and 2014 were reviewed. The body temperature, white blood cell count, and C-reactive protein (CRP) levels were compared between those who had received preoperative oral care (oral care group) and those who had not received any (non-oral care group). When the patients were divided into those who underwent minimally invasive surgery and those who underwent severely invasive surgery, the mean CRP level in the early postoperative period was lower in the oral care group as compared with the non-oral care group in those who underwent minimally invasive surgery as well as those who underwent severely invasive surgery. However, the mean CRP level was most evidently reduced in the severely invasive group on days 1 and 3–5. However, no significant differences were observed with regard to the percentage of postoperative infectious complications (for example, surgical site infection, anastomotic leak and pneumonia) between the oral care (13.6%) and non-oral care (20.8%) groups, though a reduced prevalence of postoperative complications following preoperative oral care was noted. The results of the present study suggest that preoperative oral care can decrease inflammation during the early postoperative stage in patients with oral cancer who undergo severely invasive surgery. PMID:27588111

  9. The Evaluation of Risk Factors for Postoperative Infectious Complications after Percutaneous Nephrolithotomy

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Tian; Liu, Shenghua; Wang, Lujia

    2017-01-01

    This study was to evaluate the risk factors of infectious complications after percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PCNL) and build a prediction tool for postoperative complications based on the risk factors. A total of 110 male (67.1%) and 54 female (32.9%) patients who underwent PCNL for renal stones between 2010 and 2014 in our institute were included. A detailed clinical information and laboratory results were obtained from patients. Systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) and postoperative fever were recorded after PCNL surgery. In all, 45 cases (27.4%) developed SIRS and fever was observed in 20 cases (12.2%). In multivariate analysis, stone size (odds ratio, OR = 1.471, p = 0.009) and urine white blood cell (WBC) (OR = 1.001, p = 0.007) were related to the development of SIRS. Stone size (OR = 1.644, p = 0.024), urine WBC (OR = 1.001, p = 0.002) and serum albumin (OR = 0.807, p = 0.021) were associated with postoperative fever. We concluded that patients with larger stone size and preoperative urinary tract infection might have a higher risk of developing SIRS and fever after operation, while a high-normal level of serum albumin might be the protective factor for postoperative fever. PMID:28261611

  10. Analysis of Flap Weight and Postoperative Complications Based on Flap Weight in Patients Undergoing Microsurgical Breast Reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Lam, Gretl; Weichman, Katie E; Reavey, Patrick L; Wilson, Stelios C; Levine, Jamie P; Saadeh, Pierre B; Allen, Robert J; Choi, Mihye; Karp, Nolan S; Thanik, Vishal D

    2017-03-01

    Background Higher body mass index (BMI) has been shown to increase postoperative complications in autologous breast reconstruction. However, the correlation with flap weight is unknown. Here, we explore the relationship of flap weights and complication rates in patients undergoing microvascular breast reconstruction. Methods Retrospective chart review identified all patients undergoing microvascular breast reconstruction with abdominally based flaps at a single institution between November 2007 and April 2013. Breasts with documented flap weight and 1-year follow-up were included. Patients undergoing stacked deep inferior epigastric perforator flaps were excluded. Breasts were divided into quartiles based on flap weight and examined by demographics, surgical characteristics, complications, and revisions. Results A total of 130 patients undergoing 225 flaps were identified. Patients had a mean age of 50.4 years, mean BMI of 27.1 kg/m(2), and mean flap weight of 638.4 g (range: 70-1640 g). Flap weight and BMI were directly correlated. Flaps were divided into weight-based quartiles: first (70-396 g), second (397-615 g), third (616-870 g), and fourth (871-1640 g). There were no associations between flap weight and incidences of venous thrombosis, arterial thrombosis, hematoma, flap loss, fat necrosis, or donor site hernia. However, increased flap weight was associated with increased rate of donor site wound healing problems in both univariate and multivariate analysis. Conclusions Increased flap weight is not associated with added flap complications among patients undergoing microvascular breast reconstruction, however, patients with flaps of 667.5 g or more are more likely to have donor site healing problems. The success and evidence contrary to previous studies may be attributed to surgeon intraoperative flap choice.

  11. Invasive aspergillosis associated with systemic lupus erythematosus and cardiac postoperative complication

    PubMed Central

    Macêdo, Danielle Patrícia Cerqueira; Silva-Júnior, Heraldo Maia; de Souza-Motta, Cristina Maria; Milan, Eveline Pípolo; Neves, Rejane Pereira

    2009-01-01

    Aspergillus is a ubiquitous fungus which can cause a variety of clinical syndromes. This fungus has emerged as agent of systemic infections and has therefore gained considerable public health importance. This paper describes two cases of invasive aspergillosis caused by A. fumigatus in immuno-suppressed patients and underscores the importance of early identification of Aspergillus infection associated with systemic lupus erythematosus and cardiac postoperative complications. PMID:24031340

  12. Development and characterization of cefazolin loaded zinc oxide nanoparticles composite gelatin nanofiber mats for postoperative surgical wounds.

    PubMed

    Rath, Goutam; Hussain, Taqadus; Chauhan, Gaurav; Garg, Tarun; Goyal, Amit Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Systemic antibiotic therapy in post-operative wound care remain controversial leading to escalation in levels of multi-resistant bacteria with unwanted morbidity and mortality. Recently zinc (Zn) because of multiple biophysiological functions, gain considerable interest for wound care. Based on our current understanding, the present study was designed with an intent to produce improve therapeutic approaches for post-operative wound management using composite multi-functional antibiotic carrier. The study involved the fabrication, characterization and pre-clinical evaluation of cefazolin nanofiber mats loaded with zinc oxide (ZnO) and comparing co-formulated mats with individual component, enable a side by side comparison of the benefits of our intervention. Minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of the drug, ZnO nanoparticles (ZnONPs) and drug-ZnONP mixture against Staphylococcus aureus was determined using micro dilution assay. The fabricated nanofibers were then evaluated for in-vitro antimicrobial activity and the mechanism of inhibition was predicted by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Further these nanofiber mats were evaluated in-vivo for wound healing efficacy in Wistar rats. Study revealed that the average diameter of the nanofibers is around 200-900 nm with high entrapment efficiency and display sustained drug release behavior. The combination of ZnO and cefazolin in 1:1 weight ratio showed higher anti-bacterial activity of 1.9 ± 0.2 μg/ml. Transmission electron microscopy of bacterial cells taken from the zone of inhibition revealed the phenomenon of cell lysis in tested combination related to cell wall disruption. Further composite medicated nanofiber mats showed an accelerated wound healing as compared to plain cefazolin and ZnONP loaded mats. Macroscopical and histological evaluations demonstrated that ZnONP hybrid cefazolin nanofiber showed enhanced cell adhesion, epithelial migration, leading to faster and more efficient collagen synthesis

  13. Analysis of Intraoperative and Postoperative Complications in Pseudoexfoliation Eyes Undergoing Cataract Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Shetty, Sathyendranath B

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Pseudoexfoliation (PXE) is a genetically inherited condition affecting usually seen in those aged over 50 years. Surgical management of cataract in patients with PXE pose a challenge due to associated changes in ocular structures. Aim To study the challenges in the management of cataract in patients with PXE. Materials and Methods This was an interventional study conducted in the Ophthalmology Department of MS Ramaiah Medical College and Memorial Hospital, Bangalore from June 2012 to September 2014. All patients admitted for cataract surgery during this period who were diagnosed as cataract associated with PXE above 50 years of age belonging to either sex were included in the study. All patients underwent cataract surgery with intraocular lens implantation. Depending on type of cataract both small incision and phacoemulsification operations were conducted. Intraoperative and postoperative complications were studied. The patients were reviewed up to 6 weeks postoperatively. Results A total of 50 eyes of 50 patients diagnosed as cataract with PXE underwent cataract surgery. Of which 40 eyes (80%) underwent small incision cataract surgery whereas, 10 (20%) underwent phacoemusification. Corneal thinning (<535 microns) was noted in majority of the cases (41 cases). Preoperatively there were 3 cases of zonular weakness. Pseudo exfoliation with glaucoma was seen in 5 cases. Intraoperative complications encountered during surgery were; zonular dialysis in 3 cases, posterior capsular tear in 2 cases, out of these 5 cases vitreous loss was seen in 3 cases. Postoperative complications were corneal odema in 17 cases, of which endothelium de-compensated in one case, while early posterior capsular opacification was seen in 6 cases. Final best corrected visual acuity was between 6/6-6/12 in 39(78%) eyes, 6/18 -6/36 in 6(12%) cases; 6/60 to less in 5(10%) cases. Conclusion Cataract surgery in eyes with PXE has higher incidence of intraoperative and postoperative

  14. Relationship between BMI and Postoperative Complications with Free Flap in Anterolateral Craniofacial Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Yagi, Shunjiro; Toriyama, Kazuhiro; Takanari, Keisuke; Fujimoto, Yasushi; Nishio, Naoki; Fujii, Masazumi; Saito, Kiyoshi; Takahashi, Masakatsu; Kamei, Yuzuru

    2016-01-01

    Background: Although we have seen tremendous advancement in microsurgery over the last 2 decades and free tissue transfer has become standard for head and neck reconstruction, surgeons still struggle to prevent postoperative complications. We examined the relationship between body mass index (BMI) and postoperative complications in patients undergoing rectus abdominis free flap transfer after anterolateral craniofacial resection. Methods: This was a retrospective review of reconstructive surgery using rectus abdominis musculocutaneous free flap in patients with locally advanced maxillary sinus carcinoma from 2003 to 2014 (n = 35, 27 men and 8 women; average age, 60.9 ± 7.8 years). All patients underwent craniofacial reconstruction after anterior and middle cranial fossa skull base resection and maxillectomy (class IV, subtype a) with palatal resection. Patients were categorized based on sex, BMI, and other parameters. Results: Recipient-site infection occurred in 11 patients (31.4%), cerebrospinal fluid leakage in 6 (17.1%), partial flap necrosis in 2 (5.7%), total flap necrosis in 1 (2.9%), and facial fistula in 4 (11.4%). Women showed partial flap necrosis significantly more frequently (P = 0.047), probably owing to poor vascular supply of the subcutaneous fat layer. Patients with low BMI (<20 kg/m2) showed recipient-site infection (P = 0.02) and facial fistula (P = 0.01) significantly more frequently owing to insufficient tissue volume and poor vascular supply. Conclusion: Postoperative recipient-site infection and facial fistula occurred mainly in low-BMI patients. Surgeons should take care to achieve sufficient donor tissue on low-BMI patients. Using a prosthetic obturator in low-BMI patients for craniofacial reconstruction can be a good alternative option to reduce postoperative complications due to insufficient donor tissue volume. PMID:27257566

  15. How to lower postoperative complications after radical cystectomy – a review

    PubMed Central

    Zdrojowy, Romuald; Tupikowski, Krzysztof; Małkiewicz, Bartosz; Kołodziej, Anna

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Lowering morbidity and mortality after RC is subject of considerable interest. Lately, many evidence-based data on improvements in operative technique, anesthetic management, and patient care have been published. In this article, we present a review of literature on how to lower postoperative complications after RC. Material and methods The Medline, and Web of Science databases were searched without a time limit on February 2016 using the terms ‘cystectomy’ in conjunction with ‘radical’, ‘bladder cancer’, ‘complications’ or ‘management’. Boolean operators (NOT, AND, OR) were also used in succession to narrow and broaden the search. The search was limited to the English, Polish and Spanish literature. Results Many complications may be avoided by appropriate patient selection and meticulous introduction of care protocols. Conclusions RC as treatment free of complications, even in the hands of an experienced urologist, does not exist. A large number of complications are acceptable in the name of good long-term results. Optimum results are possible with proper surgical technique, good patients and urinary diversion selection and proper patient management in the pre-, peri, and postoperative period. PMID:28127453

  16. Total mechanical stapled oesophagogastric anastomosis on the neck in oesophageal cancer - prevention of postoperative mediastinal complications.

    PubMed

    Zieliński, Jacek; Jaworski, Radosław; Irga-Jaworska, Ninela; Haponiuk, Ireneusz; Jaśkiewicz, Janusz

    2015-12-01

    Oesophagogastric anastomosis after oesophagus resection is commonly performed on the neck. Even though a few different techniques of oesophagogastric anastomosis have been previously detailed, both manual and mechanical procedures have been burdened with leakages and strictures. Our simple technique of oesophagogastric anastomosis is a modification of mechanical anastomosis with the use of a circular stapler in order to prevent postoperative leak and concomitant mediastinal complications. Since 2008, we have performed nine oesophagogastric anastomoses following oesophagus resection. The mean age of the operated patients was 54 years. There was no mortality among the operated patients in the early post-operative period. The mean follow-up period for the patients operated on in our department was 17 months until the time of the analysis. None of the patients showed any leakage or stricture, and no mediastinal complications were reported in the group. Following our own experience, mechanical anastomosis with the use of a circular stapler seems to decrease the time of the operation as well as significantly reducing the incidence of leakages from the anastomosis. This type of anastomosis may decrease the number of postoperative strictures and the most dangerous mediastinal infections.

  17. Stair-Climbing Test Predicts Postoperative Cardiopulmonary Complications and Hospital Stay in Patients with Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Jingsi; Mao, Yousheng; Li, Jiagen; He, Jie

    2017-01-01

    Background There is currently no reliable method to predict major postoperative cardiopulmonary complications for patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). In this study, we hypothesized that exercise oxygen desaturation (EOD) and heart rate change results in a stair-climbing test (SCT) would predict postoperative cardiopulmonary complications for patients with NSCLC. Material/Methods We examined 171 patients (41 females and 130 males) with NSCLC by preoperative SCT from January 2010 to July 2015. Among them, 27 underwent wedge resection, 122 underwent lobectomy, and 22 underwent pneumonectomy. The correlation between postoperative cardiopulmonary complications and parameters of SCT and pulmonary function test (PFT) parameters were analyzed retrospectively. Results The overall 30-day postoperative morbidity of the patients was 46/171 (26.9%), with death occurring in 3/171(1.8%). The age, FEV1%, MVV, height of climbing, EOD, and heart rate change were found to be significantly different between the group with postoperative cardiopulmonary complications and those without. Binary logistic regression analysis showed that EOD and heart rate change were independently correlated with postoperative cardiopulmonary complications. In addition, a model predicting the probability of postoperative cardiopulmonary complication based on logistic regression for multivariable analysis was used to confirm our findings. Conclusions A symptom-limited SCT with oxygen saturation monitoring is a safe, simple, and low-cost method to evaluate cardiopulmonary function preoperatively. PMID:28336909

  18. Stair-Climbing Test Predicts Postoperative Cardiopulmonary Complications and Hospital Stay in Patients with Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer.

    PubMed

    Dong, Jingsi; Mao, Yousheng; Li, Jiagen; He, Jie

    2017-03-24

    BACKGROUND There is currently no reliable method to predict major postoperative cardiopulmonary complications for patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). In this study, we hypothesized that exercise oxygen desaturation (EOD) and heart rate change results in a stair-climbing test (SCT) would predict postoperative cardiopulmonary complications for patients with NSCLC. MATERIAL AND METHODS We examined 171 patients (41 females and 130 males) with NSCLC by preoperative SCT from January 2010 to July 2015. Among them, 27 underwent wedge resection, 122 underwent lobectomy, and 22 underwent pneumonectomy. The correlation between postoperative cardiopulmonary complications and parameters of SCT and pulmonary function test (PFT) parameters were analyzed retrospectively. RESULTS The overall 30-day postoperative morbidity of the patients was 46/171 (26.9%), with death occurring in 3/171(1.8%). The age, FEV1%, MVV, height of climbing, EOD, and heart rate change were found to be significantly different between the group with postoperative cardiopulmonary complications and those without. Binary logistic regression analysis showed that EOD and heart rate change were independently correlated with postoperative cardiopulmonary complications. In addition, a model predicting the probability of postoperative cardiopulmonary complication based on logistic regression for multivariable analysis was used to confirm our findings. CONCLUSIONS A symptom-limited SCT with oxygen saturation monitoring is a safe, simple, and low-cost method to evaluate cardiopulmonary function preoperatively.

  19. Prevalence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in Post-operative Wound Infection in a Referral Hospital in Haryana, India

    PubMed Central

    Ranjan, K Prabhat; Ranjan, Neelima; Bansal, Satish K; Arora, D R

    2010-01-01

    Background: The objective of our study was to determine the prevalence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in the isolates of postoperative wound and its susceptibility pattern to commonly used antibiotics. Materials and Methods: During a 2-year period, specimens were received as postoperative wound swabs in Microbiology Laboratory, Maharaja Agrasen Medical College, Agroha (Hisar), Haryana, India. Result: Of the 300 bacterial isolates, 89 (29.6%) were P. aeruginosa, followed by Escherichia coli (61, 20.3%), Klebsiella spp. (50, 16.6%), Staphylococcus aureus (43, 14.3%), Proteus spp. (19, 6.3%), Acinetobacter spp. (9, 3.0%), and Citrobacter freundii (2, 0.6%). There was no growth in 27 (9.0%) specimens. Conclusion: P. aeruginosa isolation was higher in male patients and most common in the age group of 21-40 years. The susceptibility pattern showed the organism to be most commonly susceptible to imipenem, followed by meropenem, cefoperazone/sulbactam, ticarcillin/clavulanate, and amikacin. PMID:21346900

  20. Severe postoperative wound healing disturbance in a patient with alpha-1-antitrypsin deficiency: the impact of augmentation therapy.

    PubMed

    Cathomas, Marionna; Schüller, Alexandra; Candinas, Daniel; Inglin, Roman

    2015-10-01

    Wound healing disturbance is a common complication following surgery, but the underlying cause sometimes remains elusive. A 50-year-old Caucasian male developed an initially misunderstood severe wound healing disturbance following colon and abdominal wall surgery. An untreated alpha-1-antitrypsin (AAT) deficiency in the patient's medical history, known since 20 years and clinically apparent as a mild to moderate chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, was eventually found to be at its origin. Further clinical work-up showed AAT serum levels below 30% of the lower reference value; phenotype testing showed a ZZ phenotype and a biopsy taken from the wound area showed the characteristic, disease-related histological pattern of necrotising panniculitits. Augmentation therapy with plasma AAT was initiated and within a few weeks, rapid and adequate would healing was observed. AAT deficiency is an uncommon but clinically significant, possible cause of wound healing disturbances. An augmentation therapy ought to be considered in affected patients during the perioperative period.

  1. Use of indocyanine green videoangiography during intracranial aneurysm surgery reduces the incidence of postoperative ischaemic complications.

    PubMed

    Lai, Leon Tat; Morgan, Michael Kerin

    2014-01-01

    Microscope-integrated near-infrared indocyanine green videoangiography (ICGVA) has been shown to be a useful adjunct for intracranial aneurysm surgery. That the routine application of this technique reduces the risk of postoperative ischaemic complication, however, has not been reported. We present a retrospective matched-pair comparison of ICGVA guided aneurysm surgery versus historic control surgical cohort treated by the same author. Index patients and controls were matched for aneurysm size, location, patient demographics, risk factors, comorbidities, and surgical treatments. Ninety-one eligible patients with 100 intracranial aneurysms were treated using ICGVA assistance. There were no statistically significant differences between the two groups in terms of patient age, sex, risk factors, comorbidities and aneurysm characteristics. Of the 100 aneurysms in the ICGVA group, 107 investigations of ICGVA were performed. In 79 aneurysms (79.0%), ICGVA was considered useful but did not affect surgical management. In six patients (6.0%), ICGVA led to a crucial change of intraoperative strategies. In nine patients (9.0%), it was considered critical in assuring patency of small perforators. ICGVA was of no benefit in four patients (4.0%) and was misleading in two (2.0%). Postoperative ischaemic complications occurred in three patients (3.3%) in the ICGVA group compared with seven patients (7.7%) in the control group (p<0.001). Our study supports the use of ICGVA in aneurysm surgery as a safe and effective modality of intraoperative blood flow assessment. With all limitations of a retrospective matched-pair comparison, the use of ICGVA during routine aneurysm surgery reduces the incidence of postoperative ischaemic complications.

  2. Postoperative Complications in the Ahmed Baerveldt Comparison Study during Five Years of Follow-up

    PubMed Central

    Budenz, Donald L.; Feuer, William J.; Barton, Keith; Schiffman, Joyce; Costa, Vital P.; Godfrey, David G.; Buys, Yvonne M.

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE To compare the late complications in the Ahmed Baerveldt Comparison Study during 5 years of follow-up. DESIGN Multicenter, prospective, randomized clinical trial. METHODS SETTINGS Sixteen international clinical centers. STUDY POPULATION Two hundred seventy six subjects aged 18 to 85 years with previous intraocular surgery or refractory glaucoma with intraocular pressure of > 18 mmHg. INTERVENTIONS Ahmed Glaucoma Valve FP7 or Baerveldt Glaucoma Implant BG 101-350. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES Late postoperative complications (beyond 3 months), reoperations for complications, and decreased vision from complications. RESULTS Late complications developed in 56 subjects (46.8 ± 4.8 5 year cumulative % ± SE) in the Ahmed Glaucoma Valve group and 67 (56.3 ± 4.7 5 year cumulative % ± SE) in the Baerveldt Glaucoma Implant group (P = 0.082). The cumulative rates of serious complications were 15.9% and 24.7% in the Ahmed Glaucoma Valve and Baerveldt Glaucoma Implant groups respectively (P = 0.034) although this was largely driven by subjects who had tube occlusions in the two groups (0.8% in the Ahmed Glaucoma Valve group and 5.7% in the Baerveldt Glaucoma Implant group, P = 0.037). Both groups had a relatively high incidence of persistent diplopia (12%) and corneal edema (20%), although half of the corneal edema cases were likely due to pre-existing causes other than the aqueous shunt. The incidence of tube erosion was 1% and 3% in the Ahmed Glaucoma Valve and Baerveldt Glaucoma Implant groups, respectively (P = 0.04). CONCLUSIONS Long term rates of vision threatening complications and complications resulting in reoperation were higher in the Baerveldt Glaucoma Implant than the Ahmed Glaucoma Valve group over 5 years of follow-up. PMID:26596400

  3. Intraoperative and Postoperative Complications of Laser in situ Keratomileusis Flap Creation Using IntraLase Femtosecond Laser and Mechanical Microkeratomes

    PubMed Central

    Espandar, Ladan; Meyer, Jay

    2010-01-01

    An essential step of laser in situ keratomileusis surgery is corneal flap creation, Femtosecond (FS)-assisted or mechanical microkeratome. Each type has rare intraoperative and postoperative complication rates. Several recent studies have identified risk factors and guidelines to help manage these complications. Fortunately, studies have shown no loss of best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA) after the management of intraoperative and postoperative complications in IntraLase FS and mechanical microkeratome. Refractive surgeons need to be aware of the types of complications that can occur, how to avoid them and how to manage them to ensure the best possible outcomes. PMID:20543937

  4. Intraoperative and Postoperative Complications of Laser in situ Keratomileusis Flap Creation Using IntraLase Femtosecond Laser and Mechanical Microkeratomes.

    PubMed

    Espandar, Ladan; Meyer, Jay

    2010-01-01

    An essential step of laser in situ keratomileusis surgery is corneal flap creation, Femtosecond (FS)-assisted or mechanical microkeratome. Each type has rare intraoperative and postoperative complication rates. Several recent studies have identified risk factors and guidelines to help manage these complications. Fortunately, studies have shown no loss of best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA) after the management of intraoperative and postoperative complications in IntraLase FS and mechanical microkeratome. Refractive surgeons need to be aware of the types of complications that can occur, how to avoid them and how to manage them to ensure the best possible outcomes.

  5. Postoperative Ascites of Unknown Origin following Laparoscopic Appendicectomy: An Unusual Complication of Laparoscopic Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Feretis, M.; Boyd-Carson, H.; Karim, A.

    2014-01-01

    Postoperative ascites is a very rare complication of laparoscopic surgery. Significant iatrogenic injuries to the bowel, the urinary tract, and the lymphatic system should be excluded promptly to avoid devastating results for the patient. In some cases, in spite of investigating patients extensively, no definitive causative factor for the accumulation of fluid can be identified. In such cases, idiopathic allergic or inflammatory reaction of the peritoneum may be responsible for the development of ascites. We present a case of ascites of an unknown origin in a young female patient following a laparoscopic appendicectomy. PMID:24822146

  6. Cerebral salt wasting syndrome: postoperative complication in tumours of the cerebellopontine angle.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Juretschke, Fernando; Arístegui, Miguel; García-Leal, Roberto; Fernández-Carballal, Carlos; Lowy, Alejandro; Martin-Oviedo, Carlos; Panadero, Teresa

    2012-02-01

    Cerebral salt wasting (CSW) is a rare complication in posterior fossa tumour surgery. We present two patients with cerebellopontine angle (CPA) tumours who developed cerebral salt wasting postoperatively. Both patients deteriorated in spite of intensive fluid and salt replacement. On CT scan the patients presented mild to moderate ventricular dilation, which was treated with an external ventricular drainage. After the resolution of hydrocephalus, fluid balance rapidly returned to normal in both patients and the clinical status improved. Identification and treatment of secondary obstructive hydrocephalus may contribute to the management of CSW associated to posterior fossa tumour surgery.

  7. Immunonutrition – the influence of early postoperative glutamine supplementation in enteral/parenteral nutrition on immune response, wound healing and length of hospital stay in multiple trauma patients and patients after extensive surgery

    PubMed Central

    Lorenz, Kai J.; Schallert, Reiner; Daniel, Volker

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: In the postoperative phase, the prognosis of multiple trauma patients with severe brain injuries as well as of patients with extensive head and neck surgery mainly depends on protein metabolism and the prevention of septic complications. Wound healing problems can also result in markedly longer stays in the intensive care unit and general wards. As a result, the immunostimulation of patients in the postoperative phase is expected to improve their immunological and overall health. Patients and methods: A study involving 15 patients with extensive ENT tumour surgery and 7 multiple-trauma patients investigated the effect of enteral glutamine supplementation on immune induction, wound healing and length of hospital stay. Half of the patients received a glutamine-supplemented diet. The control group received an isocaloric, isonitrogenous diet. Results: In summary, we found that total lymphocyte counts, the percentage of activated CD4+DR+ T helper lymphocytes, the in-vitro response of lymphocytes to mitogens, as well as IL-2 plasma levels normalised faster in patients who received glutamine-supplemented diets than in patients who received isocaloric, isonitrogenous diets and that these parameters were even above normal by the end of the second postoperative week. Summary: We believe that providing critically ill patients with a demand-oriented immunostimulating diet is fully justified as it reduces septic complications, accelerates wound healing, and shortens the length of ICU (intensive care unit) and general ward stays. PMID:26734536

  8. Self-powered instrumented knee implant for early detection of postoperative complications.

    PubMed

    Almouahed, Shaban; Gouriou, Manuel; Hamitouche, Chafiaa; Stindel, Eric; Roux, Christian

    2010-01-01

    In-vivo measurement of tibiofemoral forces transmitted through Total Knee Replacement (TKR) during normal walking allows the early detection of postoperative complications such as the tibiofemoral misalignment and soft-tissue imbalance. In addition, the in-vivo data can help to improve the design of TKR in order to reduce polyethylene wear and consequently to increase the lifespan of knee implant. A self-powered custom-designed tibial implant instrumented with four piezoceramics has been developed in order to detect the aforementioned complications by measuring the relative change in pressure center (COP) position for different levels of eccentric compressive loading. Moreover, the energy harvested by the piezoceramics can be used to power a transmission system located at the stem of knee implant to wirelessly transmit the in-vivo data outside the implant for further processing and display.

  9. [Assessment of the predisposing risk factors of the complicated postoperative course after combined operations].

    PubMed

    Federov, A V; Kolygin, A V; Berelavichus, S V; Kriger, A G; Chernova, T G; Goncharova, N N; Solodkiĭ, A V

    2013-01-01

    Results of 335 combined operations were analyzed. Men were 89 (27%), women - 246 (73%), the majority of patients were of middle age. 285 (85%) operations included cholecystectomy. 195 (58%) patients had hernioplasty. The third place belonged to vascular operations - 76 (23%). Certain predisposing factors, correlating with the risk of the complicated postoperative course, were marked out. Indications and contraindications to the combined operation were assigned, based on the number of predisposing factors in a patient. Considering the increased risk of intraoperative complications during the combined operation (increased duration, blood loss), participation of highly experienced surgeons and use of modern high-tech equipment seem to be reasonable. The general results of the analysis prove that combined operations are effective, safe and economically beneficial.

  10. Factors associated with major complications in the short-term postoperative period in dogs undergoing surgery for brachycephalic airway syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Ree, Jennifer J.; Milovancev, Milan; MacIntyre, Laura A.; Townsend, Katy L.

    2016-01-01

    Surgical correction of brachycephalic airway syndrome (BAS) in dogs has been reported to result in low complication rates and good long-term outcomes. Previous reports have not identified risk factors for the development of complications following BAS surgery. This retrospective study evaluated a wide variety of patient- and procedure-related, pre-operative, intra-operative, and post-operative factors for an association with the development of major postoperative complications in the short-term period following BAS surgery. The overall major complication rate, including death or euthanasia, was 4/55 (7%) dogs. Temporary tracheostomy was the only major surgical complication identified (n = 3). Multiple logistic regression identified postoperative radiographic evidence of pneumonia as associated with the development of any major complication overall, requirement of a temporary tracheostomy postoperatively, and death or euthanasia, within the short-term postoperative period. Future prospective studies should evaluate specific risk factors for an association with major complications following BAS surgery in dogs to improve patient outcomes. PMID:27587891

  11. Factors associated with major complications in the short-term postoperative period in dogs undergoing surgery for brachycephalic airway syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ree, Jennifer J; Milovancev, Milan; MacIntyre, Laura A; Townsend, Katy L

    2016-09-01

    Surgical correction of brachycephalic airway syndrome (BAS) in dogs has been reported to result in low complication rates and good long-term outcomes. Previous reports have not identified risk factors for the development of complications following BAS surgery. This retrospective study evaluated a wide variety of patient- and procedure-related, pre-operative, intra-operative, and post-operative factors for an association with the development of major postoperative complications in the short-term period following BAS surgery. The overall major complication rate, including death or euthanasia, was 4/55 (7%) dogs. Temporary tracheostomy was the only major surgical complication identified (n = 3). Multiple logistic regression identified postoperative radiographic evidence of pneumonia as associated with the development of any major complication overall, requirement of a temporary tracheostomy postoperatively, and death or euthanasia, within the short-term postoperative period. Future prospective studies should evaluate specific risk factors for an association with major complications following BAS surgery in dogs to improve patient outcomes.

  12. Prophylactic plastic surgery closure of neurosurgical scalp incisions reduces the incidence of wound complications in previously-operated patients treated with bevacizumab (Avastin®) and radiation.

    PubMed

    Golas, Alyssa Reiffel; Boyko, Tatiana; Schwartz, Theodore H; Stieg, Philip E; Boockvar, John A; Spector, Jason A

    2014-09-01

    Neurosurgical craniotomy, craniectomy, or other trans-galeal interventions are performed for a variety of indications, including the resection of benign or malignant tumors, hematoma evacuation, and for the management of intractable seizure disorders. Despite an overall low complication rate of intervention, wound healing complications such as dehiscence, surgical site infection, and cerebrospinal fluid leak are not uncommon. A retrospective review was performed of all patients who underwent scalp incision closure at a single institution by a single plastic surgeon between 2006 and 2013. Sixty patients (83 procedures) were included in the study. Fifty-seven patients (95.0 %) underwent previous craniotomy, craniectomy, or other trans-galeal procedure. Of the total 60 patients, 35 patients received preoperative radiation. Sixteen patients received bevacizumab prior to their index case, while 12 received bevacizumab postoperatively. Ten patients (16.7 %) required additional plastic surgical intervention for wound complications after their index plastic surgery procedure. Plastic surgery was consulted prophylactically in 34 patients (38 procedures). When plastic surgery was consulted prophylactically, 4 patients (11.8 %) required further wound revision. None of the 14 patients who underwent prophylactic plastic surgery closure for previous scalp incision, preoperative bevacizumab, and XRT administration required re-intervention. Plastic surgery closure of complex scalp incisions reduces the incidence of wound complications among patients who underwent previous neurosurgical intervention, XRT administration, and preoperative bevacizumab administration. This is particularly true when plastic surgery closure is performed "prophylactically." Further collaboration between the neurosurgical and plastic surgery teams is therefore warranted, particularly in the setting of these high-risk cases.

  13. Determinants of Malnutrition and Post-operative Complications in Hospitalized Surgical Patients

    PubMed Central

    de Aquino, José Luiz Braga

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT The study aimed to determine the nutritional status (NS) of hospitalized surgical patients and investigate a possible association between NS and type of disease, type of surgery and post-operative complications. The gender, age, disease, surgery, complications, length of hospital stay, number of medications, laboratory test results, and energy intake of 388 hospitalized surgical patients were recorded. NS was determined by classical anthropometry. The inclusion criteria were: nutritional status assessment done within the first 24 hours of admission, age ≥20 years, and complete medical history. Univariate and multiple Cox's regression analyses were employed to determine which variables were possible risk factors of malnutrition and complications. Malnutrition was more common in males (p=0.017), individuals aged 70 to 79 years (p=0.000), and individuals with neoplasms and digestive tract diseases (p=0.000). Malnourished individuals had longer hospital stays (p=0.013) and required more medications (p=0.001). The risk of malnutrition was associated with age and disease. Individuals aged 70 years or more had a two-fold increased risk of malnutrition (p=0.014; RR=2.207; 95% CI 1.169-4.165); those with neoplasms (p=0.008; RR=14.950; 95% CI 2.011-111.151) and those having digestive tract diseases (p=0.009; RR=14.826; 95% CI 1.939-113.362) had a 14-fold increased risk of malnutrition. Complications prevailed in older individuals (p=0.016), individuals with longer hospital stays (p=0.007), and individuals who died (p=0.002). The risk of complications was associated with age and BMI. In the present study, the risk of malnutrition was associated with age and type of disease; old age and low BMI may increase complications. PMID:25395903

  14. Less wound complications of a sinus tarsi approach compared to an extended lateral approach for the treatment of displaced intraarticular calcaneal fracture

    PubMed Central

    Li, Lian-hua; Guo, Yong-zhi; Wang, Hao; Sang, Qing-hua; Zhang, Jian-zheng; Liu, Zhi; Sun, Tian-sheng

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: We conducted a prospective randomized clinical trial to compare the clinical and radiological outcomes of the sinus tarsi and extended lateral approaches for the surgical treatment of displaced intraarticular calcaneal fractures. Methods: Between January 2009 and January 2014, patients with displaced intraarticular calcaneal fracture were randomly assigned to receive surgical treatment by the sinus tarsi approach or the extended lateral approach using block randomization. We recorded and analyzed data on demographics, time to surgery, wound complications, Böhler angles pre- and postoperatively, and American Orthopedic Foot & Ankle Society score. Results: Sixty-four patients met the inclusion criteria and were randomly assigned to the 2 groups: 32 patients underwent sinus tarsi approach, and 32 patients the extended lateral approach. Baseline characteristics of both groups were similar. The time to surgery in the sinus tarsi approach group was significantly shorter than in the extended lateral approach group (P = 0.04). The wound complication rates were 6.3% and 31.2% in the sinus tarsi approach and extended lateral approach groups, respectively, which was significantly different (P = 0.01). Regarding the clinical outcomes, the groups did not differ significantly on walking visual analogue scale or American Orthopedic Foot & Ankle Society scores at 6 months and 1 year postoperatively. No significant differences existed between groups regarding the Böhler angle at different times and reduction quality of the articular surface and the medial wall. Conclusion: Compared with the extended lateral approach, the sinus tarsi approach decreased wound complications and preoperative waiting time, and achieved similar functional and radiological outcomes for displaced intraarticular calcaneal fractures. PMID:27603354

  15. Effect of azidocillin, erythromycin, clindamycin and doxycycline on postoperative complications after surgical removal of impacted mandibular third molars.

    PubMed

    Bystedt, H; Nord, C E; Nordenram, A

    1980-06-01

    Treatment of osteitis after surgical removal of the third molar of the mandible is still a clinical problem. A total of 140 patients undergoing operations for removal of an impacted third molar of the mandible, were included in a double-blind study. Placebo or antibiotics - azidocillin, erythromycin, clindamycin and doxycycline - were given to the patients preoperatively and for the following 7 days. The concentrations in serum, alveolar serum and mandibular bone were measured and the postoperative courses - pain, trismus, swelling and wound-healing - were recorded. No correlation was obtained between the antibiotic concentration and the postoperative complaints, except in the azidocillin group on day 2, in which fewer complaints were noticed in patients with high concentrations of the drug at the time of operations. The 80 patients in the antibiotic groups responded significantly better with respect to wound-healing than the 60 patients in the placebo groups. Only 15 operations lasted more than 15 min and the three of them which subsequently resulted in alveolitis were in the placebo groups. Antibiotics significantly reduced pain on day 7 postoperatively. In general, no statistically significant differences in trismus and swelling could be demonstrated between the patient groups. However, there was a significant difference between the placebo and doxycycline groups with respect to swelling (day 2 postoperative, P < 0.01; day 5 postoperative, P < 0.05). Thus systemically administered antibiotics offered only slight advantages in routine operations of impacted third mandibular molars, but could decrease the rate of infections after traumatic operations.

  16. Is obesity protective against wound healing complications in pilon surgery? Soft tissue envelope and pilon fractures in the obese.

    PubMed

    Graves, Matthew L; Porter, Scott E; Fagan, Bryan C; Brien, Glenn A; Lewis, Matthew W; Biggers, Marcus D; Woodall, James R; Russell, George V

    2010-08-11

    Open treatment of pilon fractures is associated with wound healing complications. A traumatized, limited soft tissue envelope contributes to wound healing complications. Obese patients have larger soft tissue envelopes around the ankle, theoretically providing a greater area for energy distribution and more accommodation to implants. This led us to test 2 hypotheses: (1) ankle dimensions in obese patients are larger than in lean patients, and (2) the increased soft tissue envelope volume translates into fewer wound complications. A consecutive series of 176 pilon fractures treated from March 2002 to December 2007 were retrospectively reviewed. Inclusion criteria were adults who received a preoperative computed tomography (CT) scan and were treated with a staged protocol including plating. Patients with body mass index (BMI) >30 were compared to those with BMI <30 for CT-derived ankle dimensions and wound complications. Comorbidities were evaluated for their role as potential confounders. Thirty-one fractures in obese patients were compared to 83 in lean patients. The average ratio of bone area to soft tissue area at the tibial plafond was 0.35 for the obese group and 0.38 for the lean group (P=.012). There were 8 major wound-healing complications. Four occurred in the obese group (incidence 13%), and 4 in the lean group (incidence 5%) (P=.252). Ankle dimensions in clinically obese patients are larger than in lean patients. Obesity does not appear to be protective of wound-healing complications, but rather there is a trend toward the opposite.

  17. Examination of a CRP first approach for the detection of postoperative complications in patients undergoing surgery for colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    McSorley, Stephen T.; Khor, Bo Y.; MacKay, Graham J.; Horgan, Paul G.; McMillan, Donald C.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract The aim of the present study was to examine whether a C-reactive protein (CRP) first approach would improve the detection rate of postoperative complications by CT. CRP is a useful biomarker to identify major complications following surgery for colorectal cancer. Patients with histologically confirmed colorectal cancer, who underwent elective surgery between 2008 and 2015 at a single centre were included. Exceeding the established CRP threshold of 150 mg/L on postoperative day (POD) 4 was recorded. Results of CT performed between postoperative days 4 and 14 were recorded. Four hundred ninety-five patients were included. The majority were male (58%), over 65 (68%), with node-negative disease (66%) and underwent open surgery (70%). Those patients who underwent a CT scan (n = 93), versus those who did not (n = 402), were more likely to have a postoperative complication (84% vs 35%, P < 0.001), infective complication (67% vs 21%, P < 0.001), and anastomotic leak (17% vs 2%, P < 0.001). In patients who did not undergo a CT scan (n = 402) exceeding the CRP threshold (n = 117) on POD 4 was associated with a higher rate of postoperative complication (50% vs 29%, P < 0.001), infective complications (36% vs 15%, P < 0.001), and anastomotic leak (4% vs 0.5%, P = 0.009). In patients who did undergo a CT scan (n = 93) exceeding the CRP threshold (n = 53) on POD 4 was associated with earlier CT (median POD 6 vs 8, P = 0.001) but not postoperative complications. A CRP first approach resulted in earlier and improved detection of complications by CT following surgery for colorectal cancer. PMID:28207541

  18. Resection of complex pancreatic injuries: Benchmarking postoperative complications using the Accordion classification

    PubMed Central

    Krige, Jake E; Jonas, Eduard; Thomson, Sandie R; Kotze, Urda K; Setshedi, Mashiko; Navsaria, Pradeep H; Nicol, Andrew J

    2017-01-01

    AIM To benchmark severity of complications using the Accordion Severity Grading System (ASGS) in patients undergoing operation for severe pancreatic injuries. METHODS A prospective institutional database of 461 patients with pancreatic injuries treated from 1990 to 2015 was reviewed. One hundred and thirty patients with AAST grade 3, 4 or 5 pancreatic injuries underwent resection (pancreatoduodenectomy, n = 20, distal pancreatectomy, n = 110), including 30 who had an initial damage control laparotomy (DCL) and later definitive surgery. AAST injury grades, type of pancreatic resection, need for DCL and incidence and ASGS severity of complications were assessed. Uni- and multivariate logistic regression analysis was applied. RESULTS Overall 238 complications occurred in 95 (73%) patients of which 73% were ASGS grades 3-6. Nineteen patients (14.6%) died. Patients more likely to have complications after pancreatic resection were older, had a revised trauma score (RTS) < 7.8, were shocked on admission, had grade 5 injuries of the head and neck of the pancreas with associated vascular and duodenal injuries, required a DCL, received a larger blood transfusion, had a pancreatoduodenectomy (PD) and repeat laparotomies. Applying univariate logistic regression analysis, mechanism of injury, RTS < 7.8, shock on admission, DCL, increasing AAST grade and type of pancreatic resection were significant variables for complications. Multivariate logistic regression analysis however showed that only age and type of pancreatic resection (PD) were significant. CONCLUSION This ASGS-based study benchmarked postoperative morbidity after pancreatic resection for trauma. The detailed outcome analysis provided may serve as a reference for future institutional comparisons.

  19. Comparison of perioperative and short-term postoperative complications of gastrointestinal biopsies via laparoscopic-assisted technique versus laparotomy

    PubMed Central

    Mitterman, Laura; Bonczynski, Jennifer; Hearon, Kendra; Selmic, Laura E.

    2016-01-01

    This retrospective report describes perioperative and short-term postoperative complications of gastrointestinal biopsies obtained via a laparoscopic-assisted technique compared with laparotomy in a population of 60 client-owned dogs and cats with naturally occurring gastrointestinal disease. The medical records were examined for patients that underwent surgery for diagnostic gastrointestinal biopsies. Data were collected regarding perioperative complications such as hypotension, hypercarbia, and hypoxemia, and short-term postoperative complications including seroma and incisional infection/inflammation. The perioperative complication rate was 17.6% for the laparoscopically assisted group and 16.6% for the control group. The short-term postoperative complication rate was 5.9% for the laparoscopically assisted group and 0% for the control group. There was a 0% rate of intestinal dehiscence. There were no statistically significant differences in complication rates between the 2 groups, showing that laparoscopic-assisted gastrointestinal biopsies can be performed with acceptable perioperative and short-term postoperative complication rates. PMID:27041757

  20. Increased risk of wound complications and poor healing following laparotomy in HIV-seropositive and AIDS patients.

    PubMed

    Davis, P A; Corless, D J; Gazzard, B G; Wastell, C

    1999-01-01

    The number of individuals in the UK who are HIV seropositive is increasing as is their presentation with abdominal complications. Poor wound healing following anorectal surgery in HIV-positive patients has been well reported. This study reviews the incidence of wound complications following laparotomy. The hospital records of all HIV-positive patients who underwent laparotomy at a London teaching hospital over a 10-year period were reviewed and compared to an equal number of matched non-HIV patients. Between April 1986 and April 1996, 64 laparotomies were carried out on 53 patients. There was a significantly greater incidence of wound complications (chi2 = 12.75, 1 d.f., p = 0.0003) and wound breakdown (chi2 = 10.45, 1 d.f., p = 0.012) in the HIV group following laparotomy than in the non-HIV control group.

  1. [Logistic, technic and postoperative complications of lung and heart-lung transplantations].

    PubMed

    Bonnette, P

    2010-02-01

    In France, the "Agence de la biomédecine" distributes lung grafts. "Ideal" criteria for lung donor selection are not always respected, driven by the scarcity of suitable donor lungs (10% deaths while waiting). In single lung transplantation, three anastomoses are performed (bronchus near the lobar carina, pulmonary artery, left atrium). For double lung transplantation (twice as frequent around the world), two single lung transplantations are successively performed through two separate anterolateral thoracotomies, often without cardiopulmonary bypass. Heart lung transplantations are now rare (2% around the world). Postoperative mortality has improved (between 10 and 15%): less severe primary graft dysfunctions, treatable with ECMO, fewer bronchial complications, improvement in the diagnosis of hyperacute humoral rejection, improvement in antiviral prophylaxis.

  2. [Basilar impression and malformation of Arnold-Chiari. Postoperative complications in 126 cases (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Gonçalves da Silva, J A; Gonçalves da Silva, C E

    1981-09-01

    Within a period of ten years we operated on 126 cases of basilar impression and/or Arnold-Chiari malformation. Two surgical techniques were employed for decompression of the posterior fossa. In the group I (64 cases) the operation consisted of craniectomy and the dura mater was left open and was fixed to the lateral musculature. The technique of the group II (62 cases) consisted in endotracheal intubation without flexion of the head, position of the head without anterior flexion during the operation and plastic closure of the dura. The dural graft was employed to create more space at the craniocervical joint, to avoid cerebrospinal fluid fistula and to restore the integrity of the dura as a protection for the nervous structures of the posterior fossa. The frequency of postoperative complications and mortality observed in group II was definitely less than in the group I.

  3. Treatment of Early Post-op Wound Infection after Internal Fixation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-10-01

    Approximately 10%-40% of severe fractures fixed with internal fixation develop a deep wound infection during the healing process. Thus, the overall...stable while the bone heals. Approximately 10%-40% of severe fractures fixed with internal fixation develop a deep wound infection during the...a web based system we be able to track medication adherence in a similar fashion as we did with the GlowCaps. The amendment including this adherence

  4. Correlations between anatomic variations of maxillary sinus ostium and postoperative complication after sinus lifting

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Objectives The maxillary sinus mucosa is reported to recover to preoperative sterility after sinus floor elevation. However, when drainage of maxillary sinus is impaired, recovery can be delayed and maxillary sinusitis can occur. Therefore, in this study, we investigated the correlations between anatomic variants that can interrupt the ostium of the maxillary sinus and incidence of complication after sinus lifting. Materials and Methods The subjects are 81 patients who underwent sinus lifting in Wonkwang University Dental Hospital (Iksan, Korea). Computed tomography (CT) images of the subjects were reviewed for presence of nasal septum deviation, anatomic variants of the middle turbinate, and Haller cells. Correlations between anatomic variations and occurrence of maxillary sinusitis were statistically analyzed. Results Patients with anatomic variants of ostio-meatal units, such as deviated nasal septum, concha bullosa or paradoxical curvature of the middle turbinate, or Haller cells, showed a higher rate of complication. However, only presence of Haller cell showed statistically significant. Conclusion Before sinus lifting, CT images are recommended to detect anatomic variants of the ostio-meatal complex. If disadvantageous anatomic variants are detected, the use of nasal decongestants should be considered to reduce the risk of postoperative sinusitis. PMID:27847736

  5. Early Complications and Outcomes in Combat Injury Related Invasive Fungal Wound Infections: A Case-Control Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Lewandowski, Louis R.; Weintrob, Amy C.; Tribble, David R.; Rodriguez, Carlos J.; Petfield, Joseph; Lloyd, Bradley A.; Murray, Clinton K.; Stinner, Daniel; Aggarwal, Deepak; Shaikh, Faraz; Potter, Benjamin K.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Clinicians have anecdotally noted that combat-related invasive fungal wound infections (IFIs) lead to residual limb shortening, additional days and operative procedures prior to initial wound closure, and high early complication rates. We evaluated the validity of these observations and identified risk factors that may impact time to initial wound closure. Design Retrospective review and case-control analysis. Setting Military hospitals. Patients/Participants United States military personnel injured during combat operations (2009–2011). The IFI cases were identified based upon the presence of recurrent, necrotic extremity wounds with mold growth in culture and/or histopathologic fungal evidence. Non-IFI controls were matched on injury pattern and severity. In a supplemental matching analysis, non-IFI controls were also matched by blood volume transfused within 24 hours of injury. Intervention None. Main Outcome Measurements Amputation revision rate and loss of functional levels. Results Seventy-one IFI cases (112 fungal-infected extremity wounds) were identified and matched to 160 control patients (315 non-IFI extremity wounds). The IFI wounds resulted in significantly more changes in amputation level (p<0.001). Additionally, significantly (p<0.001) higher number of operative procedures and longer duration to initial wound closure was associated with IFI. A shorter duration to initial wound closure was significantly associated with wounds lacking IFIs (Hazard ratio: 1.53; 95% CI: 1.17, 2.01). The supplemental matching analysis found similar results. Conclusions Our analysis indicates that IFIs adversely impact wound healing and patient recovery, requiring more frequent proximal amputation revisions and leading to higher early complication rates. PMID:26360542

  6. Insulin Infusion on Postoperative Complications of Coronary Artery Bypass Graft in Patients With Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Masoumi, Gholamreza; Frasatkhish, Rasoul; Bigdelian, Hamid; Ziyaefard, Mohsen; Sadeghpour-Tabae, Ali; Mansouri, Mojtaba; Jalali, Alireza

    2014-01-01

    Background: Cardiovascular events are common in patients with diabetes mellitus (DM), which make coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) a highly demanded surgery in this population. Tight control of blood glucose in patients with DM is beneficial in reducing postoperative complications; however, the adequate range has not been determined yet. Objectives: This study aimed to investigate the effect of semi-tight (moderate) control of DM on complications and serum glucose levels during and after CABG. Patients and Methods: In this prospective clinical trial, 18 and 31 patients with and without DM, respectively, who were referred to Shahid Chamran Hospital, Isfahan, Iran, for elective CABG surgery, were enrolled. For DM group, patients with controlled DM (i.e. glycosylated hemoglobin levels [HgA1C] ≤ 7%) were recruited. Blood glucose level (blood sugar, BS) was measured after anesthesia, during pumping, warming, off pumping, six and 12 hours after Intensive Care Unit (ICU) admission, and at discharging from the hospital. The hemodynamic state of the patients, bleeding, need of blood transfusion, infection, and duration of hospitalization were also monitored and recorded. Results: None of the BS measurements (FBS, after anesthesia, on-pump, warming, off pump, six and 12 hours after ICU admission, and at discharge) were significantly different between study groups (P > 0.05). Frequency of surgery site bleeding and blood transfusion need were not significantly different between these groups (P > 0.05). Conclusions: Semi-tight control of DM with insulin infusion during operation did not led to any difference in the type and rate of CABG complications between patients with well-controlled and those without DM; however, BS levels in patients with well-controlled DM could be more easily controlled. PMID:25478540

  7. Incidence, Predictors, and Postoperative Complications of Blood Transfusion in Thoracic and Lumbar Fusion Surgery: An Analysis of 13,695 Patients from the American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program Database.

    PubMed

    Aoude, Ahmed; Nooh, Anas; Fortin, Maryse; Aldebeyan, Sultan; Jarzem, Peter; Ouellet, Jean; Weber, Michael H

    2016-12-01

    Study Design Retrospective cohort study. Objective To identify predictive factors for blood transfusion and associated complications in lumbar and thoracic fusion surgeries. Methods The American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program (ACS-NSQIP) database was used to identify patients who underwent lumbar or thoracic fusion from 2010 to 2013. Multivariate analysis was used to determine predictive factors and postoperative complications associated with transfusion. Results Out of 13,695 patients, 13,170 had lumbar fusion and 525 had thoracic fusion. The prevalence of transfusion was 31.8% for thoracic and 17.0% for lumbar fusion. The multivariate analysis showed that age between 50 and 60, age between 61 and 70, age > 70, dyspnea, American Society of Anesthesiologists class 3, bleeding disease, multilevel surgery, extended surgical time, return to operation room, and higher preoperative blood urea nitrogen (BUN) were predictors of blood transfusion for lumbar fusion. Multilevel surgery, preoperative BUN, and extended surgical time were predictors of transfusion for thoracic fusion. Patients receiving transfusions who underwent lumbar fusion were more likely to develop wound infection, venous thromboembolism, pulmonary embolism, and myocardial infarction and had longer hospital stay. Patients receiving transfusions who underwent thoracic fusion were more likely to have extended hospital stay. Conclusion This study characterizes incidence, predictors, and postoperative complications associated with blood transfusion in thoracic and lumbar fusion. Pre- and postoperative planning for patients deemed to be at high risk of requiring blood transfusion might reduce postoperative complications in this population.

  8. Postoperative complications necessitating right lower lobectomy in a heart-lung transplant recipient with previous sternotomy.

    PubMed

    Diethrich, E B; Bahadir, I; Gordon, M; Maki, P; Warner, M G; Clark, R; Siever, J; Silverthorn, A

    1987-09-01

    Heart-lung transplantation for treatment of end-stage cardiopulmonary disease continues to be plagued by many problems. Three primary ones are the technical difficulties that can be encountered, particularly in those patients who have undergone previous cardiac operations, the additional restriction on donor availability imposed by the lack of satisfactory preservation techniques, and the need for lung size compatibility. Two of these difficulties and others surfaced postoperatively in a heart-lung transplant recipient who presented a series of unique operative and therapeutic challenges. A 42-year-old woman with chronic pulmonary hypertension and previous atrial septal defect repair underwent a heart-lung transplantation in August 1985. The operative procedure was expectedly complicated by bleeding from extensive mediastinal adhesions from the previous sternotomy and bronchial collateralization. Excessive chest tube drainage postoperatively necessitated reoperation to control bleeding from a right bronchial artery tributary. Phrenic nerve paresis, hepatomegaly, and marked abdominal distention caused persistent atelectasis and eventual right lower lobe collapse. Arteriovenous shunting and low oxygen saturation necessitated right lower lobectomy 15 days after transplantation, believed to be the first use of this procedure in a heart-lung graft recipient. Although oxygenation improved dramatically, continued ventilatory support led to tracheostomy. An intensive, psychologically oriented physical therapy program was initiated to access and retrain intercostal and accessory muscles. The tracheostomy cannula was removed after 43 days and gradual weaning from supplemental oxygen was accomplished. During this protracted recovery period, an episode of rejection was also encountered and successfully managed with steroid therapy. The patient continued to progress satisfactorily and was discharged 83 days after transplantation. She is well and active 20 months after discharge.

  9. The Role of MicroRNAs in Diabetic Complications-Special Emphasis on Wound Healing.

    PubMed

    Moura, João; Børsheim, Elisabet; Carvalho, Eugenia

    2014-09-29

    Overweight and obesity are major problems in today's society, driving the prevalence of diabetes and its related complications. It is important to understand the molecular mechanisms underlying the chronic complications in diabetes in order to develop better therapeutic approaches for these conditions. Some of the most important complications include macrovascular abnormalities, e.g., heart disease and atherosclerosis, and microvascular abnormalities, e.g., retinopathy, nephropathy and neuropathy, in particular diabetic foot ulceration. The highly conserved endogenous small non-coding RNA molecules, the micro RNAs (miRNAs) have in recent years been found to be involved in a number of biological processes, including the pathogenesis of disease. Their main function is to regulate post-transcriptional gene expression by binding to their target messenger RNAs (mRNAs), leading to mRNA degradation, suppression of translation or even gene activation. These molecules are promising therapeutic targets and demonstrate great potential as diagnostic biomarkers for disease. This review aims to describe the most recent findings regarding the important roles of miRNAs in diabetes and its complications, with special attention given to the different phases of diabetic wound healing.

  10. Elevated serum lactoferrin and neopterin are associated with postoperative infectious complications in patients with acute traumatic spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Du, Gang; Wei, Chengshou; Gu, Song; Tang, Jun

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Several studies have shown that lactoferrin (LF) and neopterin (NT) are correlated with infection. The aim of this study is to determine whether serum levels of LF and NT are associated with postoperative infectious complications in patients with acute traumatic spinal cord injury. Material and methods A total of 268 patients with acute traumatic spinal cord injury who underwent spinal surgery were enrolled in this study. Serum levels of LF, NT, and C-reactive protein (CRP), in addition to white blood cell count (WBC) and erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), were measured preoperatively and 24 h postoperatively. Results In total, 22 of 268 patients (8.2%) developed postoperative infectious complications. The levels of serum LF, NT, and CRP were significantly higher in the infected patients than in the non-infected patients. No significant differences were observed in postoperative WBC count and ESR between the two groups. Multivariate logistic regression revealed that LF (OR: 1.004 (1.002–1.007)), NT (OR: 1.137 (1.054–1.227)), and CRP (OR: 1.023 (1.002–1.044)) were significantly associated with the presence of postoperative infectious complications. The area under receiver operating characteristic curves for LF, NT, and CRP was 0.709, 0.779, and 0.629, respectively. Conclusions Elevated serum concentrations of LF and NT are associated with early infection after surgery. Compared to CRP, elevated levels of LF and NT are better indicators for predicting postoperative infectious complications in patients with acute traumatic spinal cord injury. PMID:24273571

  11. Factors Associated with Complications and Postoperative Visual Outcomes of Cataract Surgery; a Study of 1,632 Cases

    PubMed Central

    Thanigasalam, Thevi; Reddy, Sagili Chandrashekara; Zaki, Rafdzah Ahmad

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Cataract surgery is the most common intraocular surgery performed all over the world and has advanced technically in recent years. As in all surgeries, complications are unavoidable. Herein we report factors associated with complications and visual outcomes of cataract surgery. Methods: This retrospective cohort study included data of 1,632 cataract surgeries performed from 2007 to 2010 which was obtained from the cataract registry of the Malaysian National Eye Database. Demographic features, ocular and systemic comorbidites, grade of surgeon expertise and duration of surgery, type of anesthesia, intraoperative and postoperative complications, and the type of intraocular lens were recorded. Best corrected visual acuities were compared before and after the operation. Results: Mean patient age was 66.9 years with equal gender distribution. The majority of subjects had age related cataracts. Phacoemulsification was done faster than other surgeries, especially by specialist surgeons. History of prior ocular surgery and operations performed under general anesthesia were associated with greater complications. Phacoemulsification was associated with less complications and better visual outcomes. The age and etiology of cataract did not affect complications. Malays, absence of ocular comorbidities, left eyes and eyes operated under local anesthesia were more likely to experience more visual improvement. Gender, age, cause of cataract, systemic comorbidities and surgeon expertise as well as intra-and postoperative complications did not affect the visual outcomes. Conclusion: Phacoemulsification had good visual outcomes in cataract surgery. Duration of surgery, expertise of the surgeon and complications did not affect the visual outcomes. PMID:27051481

  12. A case-control study of postoperative pulmonary complications after laparoscopic and open cholecystectomy.

    PubMed

    Hall, J C; Tarala, R A; Hall, J L

    1996-04-01

    Postoperative pulmonary complications (PPC) are common after upper abdominal surgery. The objective of this case-control study was to compare the incidence of PPC after laparoscopic cholecystectomy (LC) and open cholecystectomy (OC) within a tertiary care center. Patients were accrued from two sequential clinical trials that evaluated the role of incentive spirometry in the prevention of PPC after abdominal surgery. Included for study were patients with gallstones undergoing elective surgery who had an American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) classification < 3. All patients included in the study were encouraged to use an incentive spirometer at least 10 times each hour while awake. Patients with chronic bronchitis were excluded from study, as were patients who received other forms of physical therapy. OC was performed through either a transverse or an oblique incision. There was an equitable dispersion of putative risk factors for PPC between the groups at baseline. PPC were defined as clinical features consistent with collapse/consolidation, an otherwise unexplained temperature above 38 degrees C, plus either confirmatory chest radiology or positive sputum microbiology. The incidence of PPC was 2.7% (1/37) after LC and 17.2% (10/58) after OC (p < 0.05). It is concluded that PPC are less common after laparoscopic cholecystectomy than after open cholecystectomy.

  13. Effects of Surgical Wound Infiltration with Bupivacaine on Postoperative Analgesia in Cats Undergoing Bilateral Mastectomy

    PubMed Central

    YILMAZ, Özge Turna; TOYDEMIR, T. Seval Fatma; KIRŞAN, İsmail; DOKUZEYLUL, Banu; GUNAY, Zeynep; KARACAM, Esra

    2014-01-01

    The analgesic effect of wound infiltration with bupivacaine was evaluated in cats undergoing bilateral mastectomy. Twenty-one female cats with mammary gland tumors were anesthetized with propofol and oxygen-isoflurane anesthesia following premedication with atropine. In the trial group (Group I; n=11), 30 ml of saline containing 2 mg/kg of bupivacaine was infiltrated topically into the surgical wound right after removal of the mammary glands, whereas only saline solution was infiltrated in the control group (Group II; n=10). At the same time, carprofen (4 mg/kg) was also administered subcutaneously in both groups. Behavioral signs of pain were monitored during the recovery period after general anesthesia. In order to examine the behavioral changes associated with acute pain, a questionnaire was prepared and given to the owners to be completed 4 hr and then 10 hr after the operation. According to the owners’ anwers to the questionnaire, a pain score was specified using a “numerical rating scale” for each cat. Although some cats showed mild to moderate pain, the pain score recorded at 4 hr after the operation was significantly lower in Group I (P<0.001). No significant difference was found at 10 hr after the operation between the groups. The incidence of vocalization, aggression and convulsion within 2 hr after the operation was also lower in Group I. In conclusion, wound infiltration with bupivacaine before incisional closure provided reliable analgesia at least 4 hr after bilateral radical mastectomy in cats. PMID:25649941

  14. Feasibility of Implementing a Patient-Centered Postoperative Wound Monitoring Program Using Smartphone Images: A Pilot Protocol

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Background Surgical site infections (SSI) represent a significant public health problem as the most common nosocomial infection and a leading cause of unplanned hospital readmissions among surgical patients. Many develop following hospital discharge and often go unrecognized by patients. Telemedicine offers the opportunity to leverage the mobile technology to remotely monitor wound recovery in the transitional period between hospital discharge and routine clinic follow-up. However, many existing telemedicine platforms are episodic, replacing routine follow-up, rather than equipped for continued monitoring; they include only low-risk patient populations and those who already have access to and comfort with the necessary technology; and transmit no visual information. Objective Drawing upon the Coleman model for care transitions and the Proctor model for implementation, we propose a protocol of postoperative wound monitoring using smartphone digital images. In this study, we will establish the feasibility of such a program, both for patients and for the clinical care team. Methods We will recruit 40 patients or patient/caregiver pairs from our inpatient vascular surgery service. Eligible patients will be English-speaking, 18 years of age or older, and have an incision at least 3 cm in length. Participants will receive a training session, during which they will learn to use the device and the wound monitoring smartphone app. Following hospital discharge, they will submit digital images of their wound and responses to a survey about their recovery for 14 days. Experienced health care providers on the vascular surgery inpatient service will review transmitted data daily and contact patients for any concerning findings. Results Primary outcomes will include participant adherence to the protocol, time required for providers to review submissions, time from submission to provider review, and participant satisfaction. Secondary outcomes will include SSI detection and

  15. Surgical anatomy, transperitoneal approach, and early postoperative complications of a ventral lumbar spine surgical model in Lewis rats.

    PubMed

    Damle, Sheela R; Krzyzanowska, Agata; Frawley, Robert J; Cunningham, Matthew E

    2013-10-01

    Surgical models in animals are used extensively to study small molecules and devices for lumbar intervertebral disc repair, replacement, and fusion. Although the ventral lumbar animal models themselves are well described, critical assessment of morbidity and mortality avoidance when using the models have not been reported. Hypothesizing that technique modifications and the relative prevalence and severity of complications would be correlated, we collected and examined peri- and postoperative data stratified by surgical technique. We here report complications associated with the transperitoneal approach to the lumbar spine in 268 Lewis rats and offer data-driven suggestions regarding complication avoidance through technique modification. Compared with wider exposure, limiting the width of exposure to a maximum of 3 mm resulted in fewer neurologic complications in the lower limbs. In addition, avoiding extracorporeal reflection of the small intestine during the exposure was associated with lower incidence of postoperative gastrointestinal distress and fewer situations requiring euthanasia. These findings underscore the importance of detailed approaches in minimizing postoperative morbidity and attrition in surgical models.

  16. Factors associated with postoperative complications and 1-year mortality after surgery for colorectal cancer in octogenarians and nonagenarians

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Young Wan; Kim, Ik Yong

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To identify the factors affecting 30-day postoperative complications and 1-year mortality after surgery for colorectal cancer in octogenarians and nonagenarians. Methods Between 2005 and 2014, a total of 204 consecutive patients aged ≥80 years who underwent major colorectal surgery were included. Results One hundred patients were male (49%) and 52 patients had American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) score ≥3 (25%). Combined surgery was performed in 32 patients (16%). Postoperative complications within 30 days after surgery occurred in 54 patients (26%) and 30-day mortality occurred in five patients (2%). Independent risk factors affecting 30-day postoperative complications were older age (≥90 years, hazard ratio [HR] with 95% confidence interval [CI] =4.95 [1.69−14.47], P=0.004), an ASA score ≥3 (HR with 95% CI =4.19 [1.8−9.74], P=0.001), performance of combined surgery (HR with 95% CI =3.1 [1.13−8.46], P=0.028), lower hemoglobin level (<10 g/dL, HR with 95% CI =7.56 [3.07−18.63], P<0.001), and lower albumin level (<3.4 g/dL, HR with 95% CI =3.72 [1.43−9.69], P=0.007). An ASA score ≥3 (HR with 95% CI =2.72 [1.15−6.46], P=0.023), tumor-node-metastasis (TNM) stage IV (HR with 95% CI =3.47 [1.44−8.39], P=0.006), and occurrence of postoperative complications (HR with 95% CI =4.42 [1.39−14.09], P=0.012) were significant prognostic factors for 1-year mortality. Conclusion Patient-related factors (older age, higher ASA score, presence of anemia, and lower serum albumin) and procedure-related factors (performance of combined surgical procedure) increased postoperative complications. Avoidance of 30-day postoperative complications may decrease 1-year mortality. PMID:27279741

  17. A prospective two-armed trial assessing the efficacy and performance of a silver dressing used postoperatively on high-risk, clean surgical wounds.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, Jamie; Goss, Selena; Facchin, Federico; Manizate, Fotini; Gendics, Cynthia; Braitman, Elissa; Lantis, John

    2014-04-01

    Surgical site infections (SSI) are a known complication of surgery. Silver-containing wound treatments are popular, despite the lack of evidence of SSI reduction. A two-armed study was conducted between July 2007 and November 2008 to evaluate the efficacy and ease of use of a postoperative silver dressing. In the first arm of the study, patients undergoing clean general, vascular, orthopedic, and neurosurgical procedures were allocated to receive a postoperative silver dressing (POSD) or a standard dressing of nonstick gauze under a fluid occlusive dressing. Outcome variables included the incidence of antibiotic initiation for SSI, clinical signs of infection, and leukocyte counts. The second arm of the study was a prospective case series designed to evaluate the performance and handling characteristics of the POSD. Onehundred- ninety-nine (199) patients (mean age 59.2 [range 21-94] years) were enrolled in the first arm of the study. Three out of 99 (3%) patients in the POSD and six out of 100 (6%) control group patients received antibiotic therapy for SSI (P = 0.498). Differences in the percentage of patients with clinical signs of infection following surgery also were not statistically significant (POSD: n = 24, 24.2%; control: n = 30, 30%; P = 0.426). In the second arm, 34 out of 36 patients rated the study dressing easy to apply in (94%), and no pain on removal was noted in 38 out of 57 (66.7%) assessments. No patients in the dressing performance cohort developed an SSI. Prospective, randomized, controlled clinical studies with large sample sizes are warranted to evaluate the efficacy and cost-effectiveness of the POSD.

  18. Radiological contribution to the diagnosis of early postoperative complications after lung resection for primary tumor: a revisional study

    PubMed Central

    Priola, Adriano Massimiliano; Priola, Sandro Massimo; Boccuzzi, Francesco; Dervishi, Najada; Lisi, Elena; Veltri, Andrea; Ardissone, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    In the post-operative course of the interventions of lung resection for primary tumor, complications of different nature and severity can arise, recognizing different pathogenetic mechanisms and differing according to the type of resection performed and to the time elapsed after surgery. The low diagnostic accuracy of chest radiography requires a thorough knowledge of the radiologist about all radiographic findings, both normal and pathological, which can be found in the immediate post-operative period (within 30 days after surgery). This article aims to describe the incidence, the clinical features and the radiological aspects of immediate complications following pulmonary resections, with specific reference to those in which the diagnostic imaging provides a fundamental contribution. PMID:27621893

  19. [Late paraparesis as a postoperative complication in a patient undergoing the repair of a double aortic aneurysm].

    PubMed

    Bonome González, C; Alvarez Refojo, F; Fernández Carballal, F; Rodríguez Alvarez, R

    1993-01-01

    We report a case of a fifty-seven (57)-years old man undergoing elective surgery of a thoracoabdominal and aortoiliac aneurysm in a single surgical time. The patients is operated undergoing general anesthetic combined with thoracic epidural blockade, and it was done two aortic cross-clamping: one to five cm of the aortic arch and the other to the infrarenal level. The most important intraoperative complications were during the thoracic aortic cross-clamping and the most important postoperative complication was related 48 hours later, to paraparesis after a hypotension episode what improved with rehabilitation treatment.

  20. Sarcopenia is an Independent Predictor of Severe Postoperative Complications and Long-Term Survival After Radical Gastrectomy for Gastric Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhuang, Cheng-Le; Huang, Dong-Dong; Pang, Wen-Yang; Zhou, Chong-Jun; Wang, Su-Lin; Lou, Neng; Ma, Liang-Liang; Yu, Zhen; Shen, Xian

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Currently, the association between sarcopenia and long-term prognosis after gastric cancer surgery has not been investigated. Moreover, the association between sarcopenia and postoperative complications remains controversial. This large-scale retrospective study aims to ascertain the prevalence of sarcopenia and assess its impact on postoperative complications and long-term survival in patients undergoing radical gastrectomy for gastric cancer. From December 2008 to April 2013, the clinical data of all patients who underwent elective radical gastrectomy for gastric cancer were collected prospectively. Only patients with available preoperative abdominal CT scan within 30 days of surgery were considered for analysis. Skeletal muscle mass was determined by abdominal (computed tomography) CT scan, and sarcopenia was diagnosed by the cut-off values obtained by means of optimum stratification. Univariate and multivariate analyses evaluating risk factors of postoperative complications and long-term survival were performed. A total of 937 patients were included in this study, and 389 (41.5%) patients were sarcopenic based on the diagnostic cut-off values (34.9 cm2/m2 for women and 40.8 cm2/m2 for men). Sarcopenia was an independent risk factor for severe postoperative complications (OR = 3.010, P < 0.001), but not for total complications. However, sarcopenia did not show significant association with operative mortality. Moreover, sarcopenia was an independent predictor for poorer overall survival (HR = 1.653, P < 0.001) and disease-free survival (HR = 1.620, P < 0.001). Under the adjusted tumor-node-metastasis (TNM) stage, sarcopenia remained an independent risk factor for overall survival and disease-free survival in patients with TNM stage II and III, but not in patients with TNM stage I. Sarcopenia is an independent predictive factor of severe postoperative complications after radical gastrectomy for gastric cancer. Moreover

  1. A Comparative Study of Postoperative Pulmonary Complications Using Fast Track Regimen and Conservative Analgesic Treatment: A Randomized Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Aghdam, Babak Abri; Golzari, Samad Eslam Jamal; Moghadaszadeh, Majid

    2011-01-01

    Background Postoperative pulmonary complications and pain are important causes of postoperative morbidity following thoracotomy. This study aimed to compare the effects of fast track and conservative treatment regimens on patients undergoing thoracotomy. Materials and Methods In this randomized controlled clinical trial, we recruited 60 patients admitted to the thoracic ICU of Imam Reza Hospital in two matched groups of 30 patients each. Group 1 patients received fast track regimen randomly; whereas, group 2 cases randomly received conservative analgesic regimen after thoracotomy and pulmonary resection. The outcome was determined based on the incidence of pulmonary complications and reduction of post-thoracotomy pain in all patients with forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1) <75% predicted value which was measured while the patients were in ICU. The length of ICU stay, thoracotomy pain, morbidity, pulmonary complications and mortality were compared in two groups. Results A total of 60 patients, 45 (75%) males and 15(25%) females with ASA class I-III were recruited in this study. Postoperative pulmonary complications were observed in 5 (16.7%) patients in group 1 versus 17 (56.7%) patients in group 2. There were statistically significant differences in development of postoperative pulmonary complications such as atelectasis and prolonged air leak between both groups (P< 0.001 and P = 0.003). There was also a statistically significant difference in the rate of preoperative FEV1 (p = 0.001) and ASA scoring (p = 0.01) and value of FEV1 < 75% predicted in the two groups. The difference in length of ICU stay in two groups was statistically significant (P= 0.003 and P = 0.017 in FEV1 < 75% group). Four patients in group 1 and 9 patients in group 2 had FEV1reduced to less than 75% of predicted value (p = 0.03). Conclusion Using fast track regimen reduced postoperative pain and incidence of some pulmonary complications significantly when compared to the

  2. The comparative risk of developing postoperative complications in patients with distal radius fractures following different treatment modalities

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Wen-Jun; Li, Yi-Fan; Ji, Yun-Han; Xu, Wei; Zhu, Xiao-Dong; Tang, Xian-Zhong; Zhao, Huan-Li; Wang, Gui-Bin; Jia, Yue-Qing; Zhu, Shi-Cai; Zhang, Feng-Fang; Liu, Hong-Mei

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we performed a network meta-analysis to compare the outcomes of seven most common surgical procedures to fix DRF, including bridging external fixation, non-bridging external fixation, K-wire fixation, plaster fixation, dorsal plating, volar plating, and dorsal and volar plating. Published studies were retrieved through PubMed, Embase and Cochrane Library databases. The database search terms used were the following keywords and MeSH terms: DRF, bridging external fixation, non-bridging external fixation, K-wire fixation, plaster fixation, dorsal plating, volar plating, and dorsal and volar plating. The network meta-analysis was performed to rank the probabilities of postoperative complication risks for the seven surgical modalities in DRF patients. This network meta-analysis included data obtained from a total of 19 RCTs. Our results revealed that compared to DRF patients treated with bridging external fixation, marked differences in pin-track infection (PTI) rate were found in patients treated with plaster fixation, volar plating, and dorsal and volar plating. Cluster analysis showed that plaster fixation is associated with the lowest probability of postoperative complication in DRF patients. Plaster fixation is associated with the lowest risk for postoperative complications in DRF patients, when compared to six other common DRF surgical methods examined. PMID:26549312

  3. Postoperative Cervical Haematoma Complicated by Ipsilateral Carotid Thrombosis and Aphasia after Anterior Cervical Fusion: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Chin, Kingsley R.; Seale, Jason; Butron, Veronica

    2013-01-01

    Hematoma alone is the most common vascular complication reported after anterior cervical decompression and fusion (ACDF). We present this case to report the occurrence of postoperative cervical hematoma complicated by ipsilateral carotid thrombosis and aphasia after an uncomplicated C4–6 ACDF. This is a case of a 65-year-old woman who underwent revision fusions of the C4-5 and C6-7 levels complicated by postoperative cervical hematoma and carotid thrombosis. The patient's history, clinical examination, imaging findings, and treatment are reported. The revision fusions were performed and deemed routine. Approximately eight hours later 200 mL of blood was evacuated from a postoperative cervical hematoma. The patient became unresponsive and disoriented a few hours after evacuating the hematoma. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging of the brain were normal, but magnetic resonance angiography demonstrated total occlusion of the left carotid artery. Thrombectomy was performed and the patient was discharged without residual deficits. At the latest followup she is fully functional and asymptomatic in her neck. We suggest, after evacuating a cervical hematoma, an evaluation of the carotids be made with MRA or cerebral angiography, as this may demonstrate a clot before the patient develops symptoms. PMID:23533432

  4. Factors predicting early postoperative liver cirrhosis-related complications after lung cancer surgery in patients with liver cirrhosis.

    PubMed

    Iwata, Takashi; Inoue, Kiyotoshi; Nishiyama, Noritoshi; Nagano, Koshi; Izumi, Nobuhiro; Tsukioka, Takuma; Hanada, Shoji; Suehiro, Shigefumi

    2007-12-01

    We aimed to determine the factors predicting liver cirrhosis-related complications in the early postoperative period after lung cancer surgery in patients with liver cirrhosis. We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of patients who underwent curative surgery for primary lung cancer in our institute from January 1990 to March 2007, finding 37 cases with comorbid liver cirrhosis. These patients were divided into two groups, according to whether liver failure, bleeding, and critical infection had occurred postoperatively. Various clinical parameters were analyzed statistically between the bigeminal groups. Liver cirrhosis-related complications occurred in seven of the 37 patients (18.9%). Transient liver failure occurred in two patients (5.4%) after pulmonary resection. Acute intrathoracic bleeding occurred in four cases (10.8%). Two patients died (5.4%) in both cases due to sepsis. Preoperative total bilirubin (P<0.05), and indocyanine green retention rate at 15 min (P<0.05) were significantly higher in patients with liver failure. Only serum value of total bilirubin was an independent risk factor (P<0.05) by multivariate analysis. In predicting death from infection, only preoperative nutritional status was a significant risk factor (P<0.05). To avoid postoperative cirrhosis-related complications, preoperative preparation to improve their liver function and nutrition status is essential.

  5. A retrospective analysis of massive blood transfusion and post-operative complications in patients undergoing supra-major orthopaedic oncosurgeries

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Ankit; Kulkarni, Atul

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims: Anaesthetic management of patients undergoing supra-major orthopaedic oncosurgeries is challenging. We wanted to evaluate the effects of pre-operative co-morbid conditions, intraoperative blood loss and transfusion, haemodynamic instability on post-operative complications and hospital outcomes in patients after such surgeries. Methods: We collected data from the patient files, anaesthesia records and the electronic medical records about pre-operative morbidities, intraoperative management, complications, blood loss, fluid therapy and blood products transfused. We also collected data on post-operative complications, intensive care unit (ICU) and hospital length of stay (LOS) and status at discharge. Data were summarised using percentages for categorical data and mean and median for continuous data. Results: The mean blood loss was 4567.44 ml (range 1200–16,000 ml); 95% of all patients received blood transfusion. Twenty patients needed massive blood transfusion. Fresh frozen plasma was needed in 17 patients while 1 patient needed single donor platelets. Haemodynamic instability was present in 38 patients, of which 8 needed continuous vasopressor infusion. Nineteen patients were ventilated post-operatively. Coagulopathy occurred in 22 patients while thrombocytopaenia was seen in 6 patients. The median ICU LOS was 3 (1–6) days, and median hospital stay was 17 (6–53) days. All patients were discharged alive. Conclusion: Supra-major orthopaedic oncosurgeries are associated with massive intraoperative blood loss and transfusion. Common complications include anaemia, coagulopathy and hyperbilirubinaemia and prolonged ICU stay. Meticulous care, anticipating the complications with timely treatment can lead to excellent outcomes. PMID:27141111

  6. Intermediate acting non-depolarizing neuromuscular blocking agents and risk of postoperative respiratory complications: prospective propensity score matched cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Grosse-Sundrup, Martina; Henneman, Justin P; Sandberg, Warren S; Bateman, Brian T; Uribe, Jose Villa; Nguyen, Nicole Thuy; Ehrenfeld, Jesse M; Martinez, Elizabeth A; Kurth, Tobias

    2012-01-01

    Objective To determine whether use of intermediate acting neuromuscular blocking agents during general anesthesia increases the incidence of postoperative respiratory complications. Design Prospective, propensity score matched cohort study. Setting General teaching hospital in Boston, Massachusetts, United States, 2006-10. Participants 18 579 surgical patients who received intermediate acting neuromuscular blocking agents during surgery were matched by propensity score to 18 579 reference patients who did not receive such agents. Main outcome measures The main outcome measures were oxygen desaturation after extubation (hemoglobin oxygen saturation <90% with a decrease in oxygen saturation after extubation of >3%) and reintubations requiring unplanned admission to an intensive care unit within seven days of surgery. We also evaluated effects on these outcome variables of qualitative monitoring of neuromuscular transmission (train-of-four ratio) and reversal of neuromuscular blockade with neostigmine to prevent residual postoperative neuromuscular blockade. Results The use of intermediate acting neuromuscular blocking agents was associated with an increased risk of postoperative desaturation less than 90% after extubation (odds ratio 1.36, 95% confidence interval 1.23 to 1.51) and reintubation requiring unplanned admission to an intensive care unit (1.40, 1.09 to 1.80). Qualitative monitoring of neuromuscular transmission did not decrease this risk and neostigmine reversal increased the risk of postoperative desaturation to values less than 90% (1.32, 1.20 to 1.46) and reintubation (1.76, 1.38 to 2.26). Conclusion The use of intermediate acting neuromuscular blocking agents during anesthesia was associated with an increased risk of clinically meaningful respiratory complications. Our data suggest that the strategies used in our trial to prevent residual postoperative neuromuscular blockade should be revisited. PMID:23077290

  7. Risk of perioperative blood transfusions and postoperative complications associated with serotonergic antidepressants in older adults undergoing hip fracture surgery.

    PubMed

    Seitz, Dallas P; Bell, Chaim M; Gill, Sudeep S; Reimer, Cara L; Herrmann, Nathan; Anderson, Geoffrey M; Newman, Alice; Rochon, Paula A

    2013-12-01

    Serotonergic antidepressants (SAds) are associated with bleeding-related adverse events. An increased risk of bleeding with SAds may have important implications in surgical settings. Our study evaluates the risk of red blood cell (RBC) transfusions and postoperative complications associated with SAds among older adults undergoing hip fracture surgery. We conducted a retrospective cohort study of individuals 66 years or older who underwent hip fracture surgery in Ontario, Canada. The risk of RBC transfusion among current users of SAds and nonserotonergic antidepressants (NSAds) was compared with recent former SAd users. Secondary outcomes included measures of postoperative morbidity and mortality. Subgroup analyses were undertaken in groups who were coprescribed other medications known to effect bleeding. Multivariable logistic regression was utilized to determine the odds ratios (ORs) for antidepressants and postoperative outcomes. A total 11,384 individuals were included in the study sample. Current SAd users had an increased risk of RBC transfusion compared with recent former users of SAds (OR, 1.28; 95% confidence interval, 1.14-1.43) as did current NSAd users (OR, 1.17; 95% confidence interval, 1.03-1.33). The risk of RBC transfusion with SAds or NSAds was further increased among individuals receiving antiplatelet agents. However, postoperative morbidity and mortality were not increased among either group of antidepressant users. In conclusion, SAds are associated with an increased risk of RBC transfusions, although this does not appear to result in major postoperative complications. Clinicians should be aware of this increased risk, although routine discontinuation of antidepressants before surgery is likely unwarranted in most cases.

  8. Complications of open reduction and internal fixation of ankle fractures.

    PubMed

    Leyes, Manuel; Torres, Raúl; Guillén, Pedro

    2003-03-01

    This article discusses the complications after open reduction and internal fixation of ankle fractures. Complications are classified as perioperative (malreduction, inadequate fixation, and intra-articular penetration of hardware), early postoperative (wound edge dehiscence, necrosis, infection and compartment syndrome), and late (stiffness, distal tibiofibular synostosis, degenerative osteoarthritis, and hardware related complications). Emphasis is placed on preventive measures to avoid such complications.

  9. [Transrectal magnetotherapy of the prostate from Intramag device in prophylaxis of postoperative complications of transurethral resection of prostatic adenoma].

    PubMed

    Neĭmark, A I; Snegirev, I V; Neĭmark, B A

    2006-01-01

    The authors analyse preoperative preparation of 91 patients with benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH). Two groups of patients received conventional preparation (group 1) and magnetotherapy (group 2) before TUR of the prostate. The examination covered immune system, bacteriological indices of urine and prostatic tissue. Infection of the urinary tract is a main risk factor of complications after TUR. Conventional preoperative preparation fails to correct immunity, to change bacterial urine flora, to improve hemodynamics in the prostate. Transrectal magnetotherapy with running magnetic field eliminates deficiency of T- and B-cell immunity, raises functional activity of B-lymphocytes and phagocytic ability of neutrophils, reduces endogenic intoxication, tissue edema, bacterial contamination, number of thrombohemorrhagic complications. This leads to a decrease in the number of postoperative complications.

  10. Evaluation of the role of antibiotics in preventing postoperative complication after routine periodontal surgery: A comparative clinical study

    PubMed Central

    Mohan, Rosh Radhika; Doraswamy, Dwarakanath Chinni; Hussain, Ahad M.; Gundannavar, Gayatri; Subbaiah, Shobha Krishna; Jayaprakash, Deepika

    2014-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Aim of this randomly controlled clinical study was to evaluate the role of antibiotics to prevent postoperative complications after routine periodontal surgery and also to determine whether their administration improved the surgical outcome. Materials and Methods: Forty-five systemically healthy patients with moderate to severe chronic periodontitis requiring flap surgery were enrolled in the study. They were randomly allocated to Amoxicillin, Doxycycline, and control groups. Surgical procedures were carried out with complete asepsis as per the protocol. Postoperative assessment of patient variables like swelling, pain, temperature, infection, ulceration, necrosis, and trismus was performed at intervals of 24 h, 48 h, 1 week, and 3 months. Changes in clinical parameters such as gingival index, plaque index, probing pocket depth, and clinical attachment level were also recorded. Results: There was no incidence of postoperative infection in any of the patients. Patient variables were comparable in all the three groups. Though there was significant improvement in the periodontal parameters in all the groups, no statistically significant result was observed for any group over the others. Conclusion: Results of this study showed that when periodontal surgical procedures were performed following strict asepsis, the incidence of clinical infection was not significant among all the three groups, and also that antibiotic administration did not influence the outcome of surgery. Therefore, prophylactic antibiotics for patients who are otherwise healthy administered following routine periodontal surgery to prevent postoperative infection are unnecessary and have no demonstrable additional benefits. PMID:24872630

  11. Value of a step-up diagnosis plan: CRP and CT-scan to diagnose and manage postoperative complications after major abdominal surgery.

    PubMed

    Straatman, Jennifer; Cuesta, Miguel A; Gisbertz, Suzanne S; Van der Peet, Donald L

    2014-12-01

    Postoperative complications frequently follow major abdominal surgery and are associated with increased morbidity and mortality. Early diagnosis and treatment of complications is associated with improved patient outcome. In this study we assessed the value of a step-up diagnosis plan by C-reactive protein and CT-scan (computed tomography-scan) imaging for detection of postoperative complications following major abdominal surgery.An observational cohort study was conducted of 399 consecutivepatients undergoing major abdominal surgery between January 2009 and January 2011. Indication for operation, type of surgery, postoperative morbidity, complications according to the Clavien-Dindo classification and mortality were recorded. Clinical parameters were recorded until 14 days postoperatively or until discharge. Regular C-reactive protein (CPR) measurements in peripheral blood and on indication -enhanced CT-scans were performed.Eighty-three out of 399 (20.6 %) patients developed a major complication in the postoperative course after a median of seven days (IQR 4-9 days). One hundred and thirty two patients received additional examination consisting of enhanced CT-scan imaging, and treatment by surgical reintervention or intensive care observation. CRP levels were significantly higher in patients with postoperative complications. On the second postoperative dayCRP levels were on average 197.4 mg/L in the uncomplicated group, 220.9 mg/L in patients with a minor complication and 280.1 mg/L in patients with major complications (p < 0,001).CT-scan imaging showed a sensitivity of 91.7 % and specificity of 100 % in diagnosis of major complications. Based on clinical deterioration and the increase of CRP, an additional enhanced CT-scan offered clear discrimination between patients with major abdominal complications and uncomplicated patients. Adequate treatment could then be accomplished.

  12. Prediction of Mortality and Postoperative Complications using the Hip-Multidimensional Frailty Score in Elderly Patients with Hip Fracture

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Jung-Yeon; Cho, Kwan-Jae; Kim, Sun-wook; Yoon, Sol-Ji; Kang, Min-gu; Kim, Kwang-il; Lee, Young-Kyun; Koo, Kyung-Hoi; Kim, Cheol-Ho

    2017-01-01

    High mortality and dependent living after hip fracture pose a significant public health concern. Retrospective study was conducted with 481 hip fracture patients (≥65 years of age) undergoing surgery from March 2009 to May 2014. The Hip-MFS was calculated by Comprehensive Geriatric Assessment (CGA). The primary outcome was the 6-month all-cause mortality rate. The secondary outcomes were 1-year all-cause mortality, postoperative complications and prolonged hospital stay, and institutionalization. Thirty-five patients (7.3%) died within 6 months after surgery (median [interquartile range], 2.9 [1.4–3.9] months). The fully adjusted hazard ratio per 1 point increase in Hip-MFS was 1.458 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.210–1.758) for 6-months mortality and odds ratio were 1.239 (95% CI: 1.115–1.377), 1.156 (95% CI: 1.031–1.296) for postoperative complications and prolonged total hospital stay, respectively. High-risk patients (Hip-MFS > 8) showed higher risk of 6-month mortality (hazard ratio: 3.545, 95% CI: 1.466–8.572) than low-risk patients after adjustment. Hip-MFS successfully predict 6-month mortality, postoperative complications and prolonged hospital stay in elderly hip fracture patients after surgery. Hip-MFS more precisely predict 6-month mortality than age or existing tools (P values of comparison of ROC curve: 0.002, 0.004, and 0.044 for the ASA classification, age and NHFS, respectively). PMID:28233870

  13. Omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids in the prevention of postoperative complications in colorectal cancer: a meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Hai; Chang, Yan-na

    2016-01-01

    Objective To evaluate systematically the clinical efficacy of omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) in the prevention of postoperative complications in colorectal cancer (CRC) patients. Materials and methods Published articles were identified by using search terms in online databases – PubMed, Embase, and the Cochrane Library – up to March 2016. Only randomized controlled trials investigating the efficacy of omega-3 PUFAs in CRC were selected and analyzed through a meta-analysis. Subgroup, sensitivity, and inverted funnel-plot analyses were also conducted. Results Eleven articles with 694 CRC patients were finally included. Compared with control, omega-3 PUFA-enriched enteral or parenteral nutrition during the perioperative period reduced infectious complications (risk ratio [RR] 0.63, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.47–0.86; P=0.004), tumor necrosis factor alpha (standard mean difference [SMD] −0.37, 95% CI −0.66 to −0.07; P=0.01), interleukin-6 (SMD −0.36, 95% CI −0.66 to −0.07; P=0.02), and hospital stay (MD −2.09, 95% CI −3.71 to −0.48; P=0.01). No significant difference was found in total complications, surgical site infection, or CD4+:CD8+ cell ratio. Conclusion Short-term omega-3 PUFA administration was associated with reduced postoperative infectious complications, inflammatory cytokines, and hospital stay after CRC surgery. Due to heterogeneity and relatively small sample size, the optimal timing and route of administration deserve further study. PMID:28003759

  14. Performance in the 6-minute walk test and postoperative pulmonary complications in pulmonary surgery: an observational study

    PubMed Central

    Santos, Bruna F. A.; Souza, Hugo C. D.; Miranda, Aline P. B.; Cipriano, Federico G.; Gastaldi, Ada C.

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To assess functional capacity in the preoperative phase of pulmonary surgery by comparing predicted and obtained values for the six-minute walk test (6MWT) in patients with and without postoperative pulmonary complication (PPC) METHOD: Twenty-one patients in the preoperative phase of open thoracotomy were evaluated using the 6MWT, followed by monitoring of the postoperative evolution of each participant who underwent the routine treatment. Participants were then divided into two groups: the group with PPC and the group without PPC. The results were also compared with the predicted values using reference equations for the 6MWT RESULTS: Over half (57.14%) of patients developed PPC. The 6MWT was associated with the odds for PPC (odds ratio=22, p=0.01); the group without PPC in the postoperative period walked 422.38 (SD=72.18) meters during the 6MWT, while the group with PPC walked an average of 340.89 (SD=100.93) meters (p=0.02). The distance traveled by the group without PPC was 80% of the predicted value, whereas the group with PPC averaged less than 70% (p=0.03), with more appropriate predicted values for the reference equations CONCLUSIONS: The 6MWT is an easy, safe, and feasible test for routine preoperative evaluation in pulmonary surgery and may indicate patients with a higher chance of developing PPC. PMID:26786074

  15. Application of Machine Learning Techniques to High-Dimensional Clinical Data to Forecast Postoperative Complications

    PubMed Central

    Thottakkara, Paul; Ozrazgat-Baslanti, Tezcan; Hupf, Bradley B.; Rashidi, Parisa; Pardalos, Panos; Momcilovic, Petar

    2016-01-01

    Objective To compare performance of risk prediction models for forecasting postoperative sepsis and acute kidney injury. Design Retrospective single center cohort study of adult surgical patients admitted between 2000 and 2010. Patients 50,318 adult patients undergoing major surgery. Measurements We evaluated the performance of logistic regression, generalized additive models, naïve Bayes and support vector machines for forecasting postoperative sepsis and acute kidney injury. We assessed the impact of feature reduction techniques on predictive performance. Model performance was determined using the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve, accuracy, and positive predicted value. The results were reported based on a 70/30 cross validation procedure where the data were randomly split into 70% used for training the model and the 30% for validation. Main Results The areas under the receiver operating characteristic curve for different models ranged between 0.797 and 0.858 for acute kidney injury and between 0.757 and 0.909 for severe sepsis. Logistic regression, generalized additive model, and support vector machines had better performance compared to Naïve Bayes model. Generalized additive models additionally accounted for non-linearity of continuous clinical variables as depicted in their risk patterns plots. Reducing the input feature space with LASSO had minimal effect on prediction performance, while feature extraction using principal component analysis improved performance of the models. Conclusions Generalized additive models and support vector machines had good performance as risk prediction model for postoperative sepsis and AKI. Feature extraction using principal component analysis improved the predictive performance of all models. PMID:27232332

  16. Early enteral feeding, compared with parenteral, reduces postoperative septic complications. The results of a meta-analysis.

    PubMed Central

    Moore, F A; Feliciano, D V; Andrassy, R J; McArdle, A H; Booth, F V; Morgenstein-Wagner, T B; Kellum, J M; Welling, R E; Moore, E E

    1992-01-01

    This two-part meta-analysis combined data from eight prospective randomized trials designed to compare the nutritional efficacy of early enteral (TEN) and parenteral (TPN) nutrition in high-risk surgical patients. The combined data gave sufficient patient numbers (TEN, n = 118; TPN, n = 112) to adequately address whether route of substrate delivery affected septic complication incidence. Phase I (dropouts excluded) meta-analysis confirmed data homogeneity across study sites, that TEN and TPN groups were comparable, and that significantly fewer TEN patients experienced septic complications (TEN, 18%; TPN, 35%; p = 0.01). Phase II meta-analysis, an intent-to-treat analysis (dropouts included), confirmed that fewer TEN patients developed septic complications. Further breakdown by patient type showed that all trauma and blunt trauma subgroups had the most significant reduction in septic complications when fed enterally. In conclusion, this meta-analysis attests to the feasibility of early postoperative TEN in high-risk surgical patients and that these patients have reduced septic morbidity rates compared with those administered TPN. PMID:1386982

  17. Post-operative avascular necrosis of the maxilla: a rare complication following orthognathic surgery

    PubMed Central

    Teemul, Trevor A.; Perfettini, Jean; Morris, David O.; Russell, John L.

    2017-01-01

    We present a patient with sickle cell trait who suffered avascular necrosis of the maxilla as a complication of maxillary osteotomy. Understanding the blood supply of the maxilla and how possible patient related, anaesthetic and operative factors affect it, is important in understanding how the vascularity of the maxilla can become compromised in a surgical procedure. The perioperative parameters were analysed to identify any prognostic elements. Avascular necrosis of the maxilla is a rare complication of orthognathic surgery with few cases reported in the literature. There are identifiable risk factors that can influence the blood supply of the maxilla. Careful preoperative assessment is required to exclude patient factors that have the potential to affect tissue vascularity. This in conjunction with sound anaesthetic and surgical technique should all minimize the risk of avascular necrosis. Even so it is still possible for this rare complication to occur. PMID:28122898

  18. Outcome of primary closure of abdominal wounds following laparotomy for peritonitis in children

    PubMed Central

    Kache, Stephen Akau; Mshelbwala, Philip M.; Ameh, Emmanuel A.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Primary wound closure following laparotomy for peritonitis is generally believed to be associated with wound complications and long hospital stay. Open wound management has long been the most common practice after laparotomy for peritonitis. Primary closure (PC), however, has recently been advocated to reduce cost and morbidity. This study determined the incidence and severity of wound complications and their impact on hospital stay and overall outcome when PC of abdominal wounds is done following laparotomy for peritonitis. Patients and Methods: A prospective review of patients who had PC of abdominal wounds following laparotomy for peritonitis over a 6-year period. Results: Fifty-six children were analysed (35 boys and 21 girls), aged 11 months to 13 years (median: 8 years). The indication for laparotomy was typhoid intestinal perforation 47 (83.9%), perforated appendicitis 4 (7.1%), complicated cholecystitis 3 (5.3%) and penetrating abdominal injury with bowel perforation and intestinal obstruction with bowel perforation, 1 (1.8%) each, respectively. Postoperatively, 34 patients had wound complications. Nine patients (16.1%) had superficial wound infection alone, 12 (21.4%) had superficial wound infection with partial wound dehiscence, 6 (10.7%) had deep wound infection, 7 (12.5%) had deep wound infection with complete wound dehiscence, whereas 22 (39.3%) had no wound complication. Overall, wound complications in 13 (23.2%) patients were considered to be severe, but none resulted in mortality. Hospital stay in patients who developed wound complications was 8–37 days (median: 25 days) and 6–22 days (median: 10 days) in patients who had no wound complications (P = 0.02). Conclusion: The rate of wound complications following PC of dirty abdominal wounds remain but PC is safe and gives good healing outcomes. PMID:28051048

  19. Vitamin a deficiency after gastric bypass surgery: an underreported postoperative complication.

    PubMed

    Zalesin, Kerstyn C; Miller, Wendy M; Franklin, Barry; Mudugal, Dharani; Rao Buragadda, Avdesh; Boura, Judith; Nori-Janosz, Katherine; Chengelis, David L; Krause, Kevin R; McCullough, Peter A

    2011-01-01

    Introduction. Few data are available on vitamin A deficiency in the gastric bypass population. Methods. We performed a retrospective chart review of gastric bypass patients (n = 69, 74% female). The relationship between serum vitamin A concentration and markers of protein metabolism at 6-weeks and 1-year post-operative were assessed. Results. The average weight loss at 6-weeks and 1-year following surgery was 20.1 ± 9.1 kg and 44.1 ± 17.1 kg, respectively. At 6 weeks and 1 year after surgery, 35% and 18% of patients were vitamin A deficient, (<325 mcg/L). Similarly, 34% and 19% had low pre-albumin levels (<18 mg/dL), at these time intervals. Vitamin A directly correlated with pre-albumin levels at 6 weeks (r = 0.67, P < 0.001) and 1-year (r = 0.67,  P < 0.0001). There was no correlation between the roux limb length measurement and pre-albumin or vitamin A serum concentrations at these post-operative follow-ups. Vitamin A levels and markers of liver function testing were also unrelated. Conclusion. Vitamin A deficiency is common after bariatric surgery and is associated with a low serum concentration of pre-albumin. This fat-soluble vitamin should be measured in patients who have undergone gastric bypass surgery and deficiency should be suspected in those with evidence of protein-calorie malnutrition.

  20. Analgesic efficacy of ropivacaine wound infusion after laparoscopic colorectal surgery

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Bo Young; Park, Yoon Ah; Koo, Hye Young; Yun, Seong Hyeon; Kim, Hee Cheol; Lee, Woo Yong; Cho, Juhee; Sim, Woo Seog

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Local anesthetic wound infusion has been previously investigated in postoperative pain management. However, a limited number of studies have evaluated its use in laparoscopic colorectal surgery. This study aims to evaluate whether ropivacaine wound infusion is effective for postoperative pain management after laparoscopic surgery in patients with colorectal cancer. Methods This prospective study included 184 patients who underwent laparoscopic surgery for colorectal cancer between July 2012 and June 2013. The patients were grouped as the combined group (intravenous patient-controlled analgesia [IV-PCA] plus continuous wound infusion with ropivacaine, n = 92) and the PCA group (IV-PCA only, n = 92). Efficacy and safety were assessed in terms of numeric rating scale (NRS) pain score, opioid consumption, postoperative recovery, and complications. Results The total quantity of PCA fentanyl was significantly less in the combined group than in the PCA group (P < 0.001). The NRS score of the combined group was not higher than in the PCA group, despite less opioid consumption. There were no differences between groups for postoperative recovery and most complications, including wound complications. However, the rate of nausea and vomiting was significantly lower in the combined group (P = 0.022). Conclusion Ropivacaine wound infusion significantly reduced postoperative opioid requirements and the rate of nausea/vomiting. This study showed clinical efficacy of ropivacaine wound infusion for postoperative pain control in colorectal cancer patients undergoing laparoscopic surgery. PMID:27757398

  1. Anterograde amnesia as a possible postoperative complication of Midazolam as an agent for intravenous conscious sedation.

    PubMed

    Malamed, S F; Nikchevich, D; Block, J

    1988-01-01

    Anterograde amnesia is often considered to be a beneficial effect of intravenous conscious sedation. The recently introduced benzodiazepine, midazolam, has associated with its administration a significant anterograde amnesic period. In the case presented here, a healthy young female presented for third molar extraction under midazolam conscious sedation and local anesthesia. After uncomplicated removal of the teeth and clinically adequate recovery from sedation, it was noted that the patient had swallowed the postsurgical gauze packs. Efforts at recovery of the gauze packs were futile. Follow-up discussion with the patient revealed a complete lack of recall of all events occurring for up to an hour or more after the administration of intravenous midazolam. The need for written and oral postoperative instructions to both the patient and his/her escort is emphasized.

  2. Anterograde Amnesia as a Possible Postoperative Complication of Midazolam as an Agent for Intravenous Conscious Sedation

    PubMed Central

    Malamed, Stanley F.; Nikchevich, Donald; Block, James

    1988-01-01

    Anterograde amnesia is often considered to be a beneficial effect of intravenous conscious sedation. The recently introduced benzodiazepine, midazolam, has associated with its administration a significant anterograde amnesic period. In the case presented here, a healthy young female presented for third molar extraction under midazolam conscious sedation and local anesthesia. After uncomplicated removal of the teeth and clinically adequate recovery from sedation, it was noted that the patient had swallowed the postsurgical gauze packs. Efforts at recovery of the gauze packs were futile. Follow-up discussion with the patient revealed a complete lack of recall of all events occurring for up to an hour or more after the administration of intravenous midazolam. The need for written and oral postoperative instructions to both the patient and his/her escort is emphasized. PMID:3166354

  3. [Postoperative complications in 139 cases of basilar impression and/or Arnold-Chiari deformity].

    PubMed

    Gonçalves da Silva, J A; Gonçalves da Silva, C E

    1981-09-01

    The many kinds of complication that have been observed following operations of basilar impression and/or malformation of Arnold-Chiari are analysed. Two surgical techniques were adopted in the treatment of the patients. In the first 64 cases, the operation consisted in the craniectomy of the posterior fossa and high cervical laminectomy, while the dura-mater remained opened and saturated to the lateral musculature. Concerning the other 75 cases, it was made a plastic of the dura-mater of the posterior fossa and, in most of the cases, the patients were intubated with no retroflexion of the head and operated in sitting position without anterior flexion of the head. In the second group of patients, it was observed lesser occurrence of complications and death.

  4. Post-operative Streptococcus pneumoniae meningoencephalitis complicating surgery for acromegaly in an identical twin.

    PubMed

    Cote, David J; Iuliano, Sherry L; Smith, Timothy R; Laws, Edward R

    2015-06-01

    This case report provides provocative and useful data regarding two aspects of acromegaly and its management. The patient, who is one of a pair of identical twins, has no known hereditary, genetic or otherwise potentially etiologic factors as compared to her unaffected sister. Secondly, transsphenoidal surgery, which was ultimately successful, was complicated by pneumococcal meningitis, an unusual event with only four previously reported patients, three of whom ended in death or major neurologic deficits. In this case, a 57-year-old woman gradually developed classical signs and symptoms of acromegaly while her identical twin sister remained normal with no evidence of endocrine disease. Endoscopic transsphenoidal surgery was complicated by the development of meningitis 25 days after surgery. This was controlled following a difficult hospital course. Streptococcus pneumoniae meningoencephalitis is a rare but life-threatening complication of transsphenoidal surgery. A high index of suspicion for incipient meningitis should be maintained when patients present with severe headache and increased intracranial pressure, even if they initially lack the typical symptoms and signs. Immediate and aggressive treatment is necessary to avoid significant neurologic deficit.

  5. Gallbladder perforation: a rare complication of postoperative chemotherapy of gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yanlai; Song, Wentao; Hou, Qingsheng; Li, Jianning; Guo, Hongliang

    2015-08-15

    A middle-aged man presented 1 day after being discharged from hospital with completing the first course of postoperative chemotherapy. He suffered a sudden persistent high fever and chills. It was noted that he had a history of a total gastrectomy (with D2 lymphadenectomy) 1 month ago. His admission bloods revealed total bilirubin was 142.2 umol/L, indirect bilirubin of 107.6 umol/L and white cell count of 20.05×10(9)/L. A color doppler ultrasound scan confirmed fluid and gas around liver and hilus lienis while the gallbladder cannot be detected. During Computed Tomography (CT) guided puncture positioning technology and setting a three-channel tube, about 400 ml of foul smell hazel turbid liquid was drained out. He was diagnosed as gallbladder perforation and he was underwent conservative treatment consist of drainage, banning diet, total parenteral nutrition and intravenous antibiotics. Then he recovered well within the subsequent 10 days and was discharged.

  6. Post-operative stress fractures complicating surgery for painful forefoot conditions.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Max R; Jack, Christopher; Jones, Gareth G; Singh, Samrendu K

    2010-01-01

    A stress fracture is caused by repetitive or unusual loading of a bone leading to mechanical failure. Fatigue type stress fractures occur in normal bone exposed to abnormally high repetitive loads, whereas insufficiency type stress fractures occur in abnormal bone exposed to normal loads. We describe three cases of insufficiency stress fractures that have complicated surgery for painful forefoot conditions. The diagnosis and management of these cases are discussed. Stress fractures should be included in the differential diagnosis of any patient who continues or develops pain after surgery to the forefoot.

  7. [Pre- and postoperative radiotherapy of oral carcinoma of a locally advanced stage. An analysis of the results and complications].

    PubMed

    Zini, G; Barbieri, E; Campobassi, A; Dallera, P; Emiliani, E; Frezza, G; Marchetti, C; Neri, S; Romagnoli, D; Silvano, M

    1989-01-01

    The combination of radiotherapy and surgery in the treatment of advanced oral carcinoma (T3 and T4 lesions) yields good possibilities of recovery; whether radiotherapy should be given before or after surgery is still debated. Fifty patients with advanced oral carcinomas were analyzed: 24 of them were irradiated before and 26 after surgery; doses ranged from 40 to 56 Gy for the first group of patients, and from 50 to 68 Gy for the second one. The disease-free survival 48 months after the diagnosis was 36% in patients who received preoperative irradiation, and 53.6% in patients who received postoperative radiotherapy; the latter allowed local control of the disease to be significantly improved (chi 2 3.99, 0.01 less than p less than 0.05). The quality of survival was worse in the group receiving preoperative irradiation, because of radiation-induced surgical complications, which were especially observed in patients with diffuse disease. Our findings suggest that postoperative radiotherapy may be advisable if the tumor is resectable, since tolerance and local control rate were acceptable. On the contrary, nearly inoperable masses and massive neck diseases often require preoperative irradiation.

  8. Aorta-Left Renal Vein Fistula Complicating an Aortic Aneurysm: Preoperative and Postoperative Multislice CT Findings

    SciTech Connect

    Barrier, Pierre Otal, Philippe; Garcia, Olivier; Vahdat, Olivier; Domenech, Brice; Lannareix, Valerie; Joffre, Francis; Rousseau, Herve

    2007-06-15

    Fistulas complicating an abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) are rare, and fistulas involving the left renal vein are particularly uncommon. We highlight here a fistula between an infrarenal aortic aneurysm and a retroaortic left renal vein, revealed by left flank pain associated with hematuria and acute renal failure. The multislice CT angiography performed in this 68-year-old patient revealed communication and equal enhancement between the aorta and the left gonadic vein, suggesting the presence of a fistula. The three-dimensional VRT reconstructions presented in this case were of great value in the preoperative planning, enabling immediate visualization of this unusual feature. Alternative diagnoses to consider when encountering this clinical presentation are reviewed.

  9. Prevention of post-operative infection in spine surgery by wound irrigation with a solution of povidone-iodine and hydrogen peroxide.

    PubMed

    Ulivieri, S; Toninelli, S; Petrini, C; Oliveri, G

    2011-06-01

    Starting from January 2008, we systematically irrigated the surgical wounds of patients undergoing spine surgery with a solution of povidone-iodine and hydrogen peroxide. We prospectively recorded the clinical data of patients who underwent spine surgery during 2008 and we compared the results with retrospectively reviewed clinical records of patients operated during 2007. Patients were analyzed for preoperative risk factors, type of surgical procedure, onset of infection, presentation, treatment and outcome. We performed 490 spine surgeries during 2008 and 460 during 2007. We recorded four postoperative infections in 2007 compared to none in 2008. We consider this solution of povidone-iodine plus hydrogen peroxide effective to further reduce the rate of post-operative infection in spine surgery.

  10. Contrast-enhanced ultrasound with SonoVue in the evaluation of postoperative complications in pediatric liver transplant recipients

    PubMed Central

    Bonini, G.; Pezzotta, G.; Morzenti, C.; Agazzi, R.; Nani, R.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the utility of contrast-enhanced sonography in the study of pediatric liver transplant recipients and its potential impact in reducing the need for invasive diagnostic procedures. Materials and methods From October 2002 to December 2003 we performed routine color Doppler ultrasound and contrast-enhanced ultrasound studies on 30 pediatric patients who had undergone liver transplantation. Findings indicative of complications were confirmed with invasive studies (angiography, computed tomography, and PTC). Results Contrast-enhanced sonography correctly identified four of the five cases of hepatic artery thrombosis and all those involving the portal (n = 6) and hepatic vein (n = 3) thrombosis. It failed to identify one case of hepatic artery thrombosis characterized by collateral circulation arising from the phrenic artery and the single case of hepatic artery stenosis. The latter was more evident on color Doppler, which revealed a typical tardus parvus waveform. The use of contrast offered no significant advantages in the study of biliary complications although it did provide better visualization of bile leaks. Conclusions Contrast-enhanced sonography improves diagnostic confidence and reduces the need for more invasive imaging studies in the postoperative follow-up of pediatric liver transplant recipients. PMID:23396596

  11. Management of gunshot wounds

    SciTech Connect

    Ordog, G.; Drew, R.

    1987-01-01

    Management of Gunshot Wounds provides a review of wound ballistics and a systemic review of gunshot wound management of all major body areas and systems. This volume includes information on pre-hospital care, nursing care, and care of infants, children, and the elderly patient with gunshot wounds. This volume also features information on: lead toxicity; complications of gunshot wounds; socioeconomic aspects of gunshot wounds; the forensic and pathological aspects of gunshot wounds; future directions in the care of gunshot wounds.

  12. Investigation of clinical and dosimetric factors associated with postoperative pulmonary complications in esophageal cancer patients treated with concurrent chemoradiotherapy followed by surgery

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Shulian; Liao Zhongxing . E-mail: zliao@mdanderson.org; Vaporciyan, Ara A.; Tucker, Susan L.; Liu, Helen; Wei Xiong; Swisher, Stephen; Ajani, Jaffer A.; Cox, James D.; Komaki, Ritsuko

    2006-03-01

    Purpose: To assess the association of clinical and especially dosimetric factors with the incidence of postoperative pulmonary complications among esophageal cancer patients treated with concurrent chemoradiation therapy followed by surgery. Method and Materials: Data from 110 esophageal cancer patients treated between January 1998 and December 2003 were analyzed retrospectively. All patients received concurrent chemoradiotherapy followed by surgery; 72 patients also received irinotecan-based induction chemotherapy. Concurrent chemotherapy was 5-fluorouracil-based and in 97 cases included taxanes. Radiotherapy was delivered to a total dose of 41.4-50.4 Gy at 1.8-2.0 Gy per fraction with a three-dimensional conformal technique. Surgery (three-field, Ivor-Lewis, or transhiatal esophagectomy) was performed 27-123 days (median, 45 days) after completion of radiotherapy. The following dosimetric parameters were generated from the dose-volume histogram (DVH) for total lung: lung volume, mean dose to lung, relative and absolute volumes of lung receiving more than a threshold dose (relative V{sub dose} and absolute V{sub dose}), and absolute volume of lung receiving less than a threshold dose (volume spared, or VS{sub dose}). Occurrence of postoperative pulmonary complications, defined as pneumonia or acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) within 30 days after surgery, was the endpoint for all analyses. Fisher's exact test was used to investigate the relationship between categorical factors and incidence of postoperative pulmonary complications. Logistic analysis was used to analyze the relationship between continuous factors (e.g., V{sub dose} or VS{sub dose}) and complication rate. Logistic regression with forward stepwise inclusion of factors was used to perform multivariate analysis of those factors having univariate significance (p < 0.05). The Mann-Whitney test was used to compare length of hospital stay in patients with and without lung complications and to

  13. Delayed wound healing and postoperative surgical site infections in patients with rheumatoid arthritis treated with or without biological disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs.

    PubMed

    Tada, Masahiro; Inui, Kentaro; Sugioka, Yuko; Mamoto, Kenji; Okano, Tadashi; Kinoshita, Takuya; Hidaka, Noriaki; Koike, Tatsuya

    2016-06-01

    Biological disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (bDMARDs) have become more popular for treating rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Whether or not bDMARDs increase the postoperative risk of surgical site infection (SSI) has remained controversial. We aimed to clarify the effects of bDMARDs on the outcomes of elective orthopedic surgery. We used multivariate logistic regression analysis to analyze risk factors for SSI and delayed wound healing among 227 patients with RA (mean age, 65.0 years; disease duration, 16.9 years) after 332 elective orthopedic surgeries. We also attempted to evaluate the effects of individual medications on infection. Rates of bDMARD and conventional synthetic DMARD (csDMARD) administration were 30.4 and 91.0 %, respectively. Risk factors for SSI were advanced age (odds ratio [OR], 1.11; P = 0.045), prolonged surgery (OR, 1.02; P = 0.03), and preoperative white blood cell count >10,000/μL (OR, 3.66; P = 0.003). Those for delayed wound healing were advanced age (OR, 1.16; P = 0.001), prolonged surgery (OR, 1.02; P = 0.007), preoperative white blood cell count >10,000/μL (OR, 4.56; P = 0.02), and foot surgery (OR, 6.60; P = 0.001). Risk factors for SSI and medications did not significantly differ. No DMARDs were risk factors for any outcome examined. Biological DMARDs were not risk factors for postoperative SSI. Foot surgery was a risk factor for delayed wound healing.

  14. Dose-Volume Histogram Predictors of Chronic Gastrointestinal Complications After Radical Hysterectomy and Postoperative Concurrent Nedaplatin-Based Chemoradiation Therapy for Early-Stage Cervical Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Isohashi, Fumiaki; Yoshioka, Yasuo; Mabuchi, Seiji; Konishi, Koji; Koizumi, Masahiko; Takahashi, Yutaka; Ogata, Toshiyuki; Maruoka, Shintaroh; Kimura, Tadashi; Ogawa, Kazuhiko

    2013-03-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to evaluate dose-volume histogram (DVH) predictors for the development of chronic gastrointestinal (GI) complications in cervical cancer patients who underwent radical hysterectomy and postoperative concurrent nedaplatin-based chemoradiation therapy. Methods and Materials: This study analyzed 97 patients who underwent postoperative concurrent chemoradiation therapy. The organs at risk that were contoured were the small bowel loops, large bowel loop, and peritoneal cavity. DVH parameters subjected to analysis included the volumes of these organs receiving more than 15, 30, 40, and 45 Gy (V15-V45) and their mean dose. Associations between DVH parameters or clinical factors and the incidence of grade 2 or higher chronic GI complications were evaluated. Results: Of the clinical factors, smoking and low body mass index (BMI) (<22) were significantly associated with grade 2 or higher chronic GI complications. Also, patients with chronic GI complications had significantly greater V15-V45 volumes and higher mean dose of the small bowel loops compared with those without GI complications. In contrast, no parameters for the large bowel loop or peritoneal cavity were significantly associated with GI complications. Results of the receiver operating characteristics (ROC) curve analysis led to the conclusion that V15-V45 of the small bowel loops has high accuracy for prediction of GI complications. Among these parameters, V40 gave the highest area under the ROC curve. Finally, multivariate analysis was performed with V40 of the small bowel loops and 2 other clinical parameters that were judged to be potential risk factors for chronic GI complications: BMI and smoking. Of these 3 parameters, V40 of the small bowel loops and smoking emerged as independent predictors of chronic GI complications. Conclusions: DVH parameters of the small bowel loops may serve as predictors of grade 2 or higher chronic GI complications after postoperative

  15. Incisional Negative Pressure Wound Therapy in High Risk Patients Undergoing Panniculectomy: A Prospective Randomized Controlled Trial

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-01-03

    Complications Wounds; Negative Pressure Wound Therapy; Wound Healing Delayed; Incisional; Panniculectomy; Incisional Negative Pressure Wound Therapy; Incisional Vac; Wound Vac; Obese; Renal Failure; Kidney Transplant; Complications; Wound Healing Complication

  16. [Preoperative magnetic resonance angiography findings and postoperative neurological complications in 93 cases of CABG with cardiopulmonary bypass].

    PubMed

    Koyama, T; Mochizuki, T; Mitsui, N; Marui, A

    1998-12-01

    Between February 1994 and January 1997, 102 of the 146 patients treated by coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) had undergone magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) of the brain and neck before the operation, and arterial stenosis or occlusion had been detected in 38 (36.9%) of them. Two of these patients had complicating severe calcification of the ascending aorta, and CABG was performed without cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB). Seven patients without stenotic lesions on MRA were also treated by CABG without CPB for other complications. In addition to the 102 patients one patient had been found to have occlusion of the left common carotid artery and poor enhancement of the distal portion, and as a result we switched from CABG to percutaneous transluminal angioplasty (PTCA). We enrolled 93 patients in this study excluding these 10 patients. The patients were distributed into the three groups according to the MRA findings. Group C = no stenotic lesions (58 patients). Group S = stenosis of < 70% (26 patients), Group SS = stenosis of > or = 70% (9 patients). Enhancement distal to the stenotic or occlusive lesions was good in all patients in group S and SS. We then examined them for the incidence of postoperative neurological complications. There were no significant differences among the three groups in regard to age, male/female ratio, or incidence of hypertension and hyperlipidemia. In Group S, the incidence of diabetes was significantly higher than in the other Groups. The incidence of prior stroke was significantly higher and the number of coronary arteries affected was significantly larger in group SS than the other groups. There were no significant differences among the three groups with regard to intraoperative variables. The lowest mean arterial pressure on CPB was 44.3 +/- 7.4 mmHg, 48.0 +/- 8.8 mmHg, 46.3 +/- 7.8 mmHg in Group C, S, and SS, respectively, In all groups the lowest mean arterial pressure on CPB was below 50 mmHg. There were no significant

  17. Intraoperative ventilation strategies to prevent postoperative pulmonary complications: Systematic review, meta-analysis, and trial sequential analysis.

    PubMed

    Serpa Neto, Ary; Schultz, Marcus J; Gama de Abreu, Marcelo

    2015-09-01

    For many years, mechanical ventilation with high tidal volumes (V(T)) was common practice in operating theaters because this strategy recruits collapsed lung tissue, improves ventilation-perfusion mismatch, and thus decreases the need for high oxygen fractions. Positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) was seldom used because it could cause cardiac compromise. Increasing advances in the understanding of the mechanisms of ventilator-induced lung injury from animal studies and randomized controlled trials in patients with uninjured lungs in intensive care unit and operation room have pushed anesthesiologists to consider lung-protective strategies during intraoperative ventilation. These strategies at least include the use of low V(T), and perhaps also the use of PEEP, which when compared to high V(T) with low PEEP may prevent the occurrence of postoperative pulmonary complications (PPCs). Such protective effects, however, are likely ascribed to low V(T) rather than to PEEP. In fact, at least in nonobese patients undergoing open abdominal surgery, high PEEP does not protect against PPCs, and it can impair the hemodynamics. Further studies shall determine whether a strategy consisting of low V(T) combined with PEEP and recruitment maneuvers reduces PPCs in obese patients and other types of surgery (e.g., laparoscopic and thoracic), compared to low V(T) with low PEEP. Furthermore, the role of driving pressure for titrating ventilation settings in patients with uninjured lungs shall be investigated.

  18. Dose–volume analysis of predictors for chronic gastrointestinal complications in patients with cervical cancer treated with postoperative concurrent chemotherapy and whole-pelvic radiation therapy

    PubMed Central

    Isohashi, Fumiaki; Mabuchi, Seiji; Akino, Yuichi; Yoshioka, Yasuo; Seo, Yuji; Suzuki, Osamu; Tamari, Keisuke; Yoshino, Kiyoshi; Sawada, Kenjiro; Ueda, Yutaka; Kobayashi, Eiji; Sumida, Iori; Mizuno, Hirokazu; Okubo, Hirofumi; Kimura, Tadashi; Ogawa, Kazuhiko

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate dose–volume histogram (DVH) predictors for the development of chronic gastrointestinal (GI) complications in patients with cervical cancer who have undergone postoperative concurrent chemotherapy and whole-pelvic radiation therapy (WPRT). The subjects were 135 patients who had undergone postoperative WPRT with concurrent nedaplatin-based chemotherapy between 2000 and 2014. Associations between selected DVH parameters and the incidence of chronic GI complications of G3 or higher were evaluated. Chronic GI complications of severity G3 occurred in 18 (13%) patients. Patients with GI complications had significantly greater V5–V45, mean dose and the generalized equivalent uniform dose (gEUD) of the small bowel loops, compared with those without GI complications. V30–V45, mean dose and gEUD of the bowel bag also showed significant differences between patients with and without GI complications. In contrast, no parameter for the large bowel loop was correlated with GI complications. Receiver operating characteristics curve analysis indicated that V30–V45 of the small bowel loops were better predictors than these respective parameters for the bowel bag. Next, patients were divided into four groups based on the median V15 and V40 of the small bowel loops. The group with both a high V15 and a high V40 showed a significantly higher probability of chronic GI complications. In conclusion, the small bowel loops are better predictors of chronic GI complications compared with the bowel bag, and a relatively high-dose volume (e.g. V40) of the small bowel loops is a useful predictor of chronic GI complications. PMID:27342839

  19. Effects of obstructive sleep apnoea risk on postoperative respiratory complications: protocol for a hospital-based registry study

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Christina H; Zaremba, Sebastian; Devine, Scott; Nikolov, Milcho; Kurth, Tobias; Eikermann, Matthias

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA), the most common type of sleep-disordered breathing, is associated with significant immediate and long-term morbidity, including fragmented sleep and impaired daytime functioning, as well as more severe consequences, such as hypertension, impaired cognitive function and reduced quality of life. Perioperatively, OSA occurs frequently as a consequence of pre-existing vulnerability, surgery and drug effects. The impact of OSA on postoperative respiratory complications (PRCs) needs to be better characterised. As OSA is associated with significant comorbidities, such as obesity, pulmonary hypertension, myocardial infarction and stroke, it is unclear whether OSA or its comorbidities are the mechanism of PRCs. This project aims to (1) develop a novel prediction score identifying surgical patients at high risk of OSA, (2) evaluate the association of OSA risk on PRCs and (3) evaluate if pharmacological agents used during surgery modify this association. Methods Retrospective cohort study using hospital-based electronic patient data and perioperative data on medications administered and vital signs. We will use data from Partners Healthcare clinical databases, Boston, Massachusetts. First, a prediction model for OSA will be developed using OSA diagnostic codes and polysomnography procedural codes as the reference standard, and will be validated by medical record review. Results of the prediction model will be used to classify patients in the database as high, medium or low risk of OSA, and we will investigate the effect of OSA on risk of PRCs. Finally, we will test whether the effect of OSA on PRCs is modified by the use of intraoperative pharmacological agents known to increase upper airway instability, including neuromuscular blockade, neostigmine, opioids, anaesthetics and sedatives. Ethics and dissemination The Partners Human Research Committee approved this study (protocol number: 2014P000218). Study results will be made

  20. Clinical Outcomes of Wulingsan Subtraction Decoction Treatment of Postoperative Brain Edema and Fever as a Complication of Glioma Neurosurgery

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Wei-rong; Zhang, Feng-e; Diao, Bao-zhong; Zhang, Yue-ying

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To evaluate the efficacy of Wulingsan subtraction (五苓散加减 WLSS) decoction in the treatment of postoperative brain edema and fever as a complication of glioma neurosurgery. Methods. This retrospective study was conducted at the Department of Neurosurgery of Liaocheng People's Hospital. Patients hospitalized between March 2011 and December 2014 were divided into three groups: Group A received WLSS oral liquid (50 mL), twice a day; Group B received an intravenous infusion of mannitol; and Group C received WLSS combined with mannitol (n = 30 patients per group). All patients were treated for 10 days continuously. Therapeutic efficacy was evaluated by measuring body temperature and indicators of renal function before and 3, 5, and 10 days after treatment. Results. Compared to the other two groups, significantly greater clinical efficacy was observed in the patients treated with mannitol (Group B; P < 0.05), although marked clinical efficacy was also observed over time in patients treated with WLSS (Group A). After 5 days, the quantifiable effects of the WLSS and mannitol combination group (Group C) were substantial (P < 0.05). The renal damage in Group B was more obvious after 5 days and 10 days. Conclusion. Compared with mannitol treatment alone, WLSS combined with mannitol induced a more rapid reduction in body temperature. Our findings suggest that patients should be started on mannitol for 3 days and then switched to WLSS to achieve obvious antipyretic effects and protect renal function. This method of treatment should be considered for clinical applications. PMID:27019661

  1. Impact of Lifestyle Diseases on Postoperative Complications and Survival in Elderly Patients with Stage I Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Sang Seok; Choi, Pil Jo; Yi, Jung Hoon; Yoon, Sung Sil

    2017-01-01

    Background The influence of lifestyle diseases on postoperative complications and long-term survival in patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is unclear. The aim of this study was to determine whether lifestyle diseases were significant risk factors of perioperative and long-term surgical outcomes in elderly patients with stage I NSCLC. Methods Between December 1995 and November 2013, 110 patients aged 65 years or older who underwent surgical resection of stage I NSCLC at Dong-A University Hospital were retrospectively studied. We assessed the presence of the following lifestyle diseases as risk factors for postoperative complications and long-term mortality: diabetes, hypertension, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, stroke, and ischemic heart disease. Results The mean age of the patients was 71 years (range, 65 to 82 years). Forty-six patients (41.8%) had hypertension, making it the most common lifestyle disease, followed by diabetes (n=23, 20.9%). The in-hospital mortality rate was 0.9% (n=1). The 3-year and 5-year survival rates were 78% and 64%, respectively. Postoperative complications developed in 32 patients (29.1%), including 7 (6.4%) with prolonged air leakage, 6 (5.5%) with atrial fibrillation, 5 (4.5%) with delirium and atelectasis, and 3 (2.7%) with acute kidney injury and pneumonia. Univariate and multivariate analyses showed that the presence of a lifestyle disease was the only independent risk factor for postoperative complications. In survival analysis, univariate analysis showed that age, smoking, body mass index, extent of resection, and pathologic stage were associated with impaired survival. Multivariate analysis revealed that resection type (hazard ratio [HR], 2.20; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.08 to 4.49; p=0.030) and pathologic stage (HR, 1.89; 95% CI, 1.02 to 3.49; p=0.043) had independent adverse impacts on survival. Conclusion This study demonstrated that the presence of a lifestyle disease was a significant prognostic

  2. Female gender and oral anticoagulants are associated with wound complications in lower extremity vein bypass: An analysis of 1404 operations for critical limb ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Louis L.; Brahmanandam, Soma; Bandyk, Dennis F.; Belkin, Michael; Clowes, Alexander W.; Moneta, Gregory L.; Conte, Michael S.

    2010-01-01

    Background Infrainguinal bypass (IB) surgery is an effective means of improving arterial circulation to the lower extremity for patients with critical limb ischemia (CLI). However, wound complications (WC) of the surgical incision following IB can impart significant morbidity. Methods A retrospective analysis of WC from the 1404 patients enrolled in a multicenter clinical trial of vein bypass grafting for CLI was performed. Univariate and multivariable regression models were used to determine WC predictors and associated outcomes, including graft patency, limb salvage, quality of life (QoL), resource utilization (RU), and mortality. Results A total of 543 (39%) patients developed a reported WC within 30 days of surgery, with infections (284, 52%) and hematoma/hemorrhage (121, 22%) being the most common type. Postoperative anticoagulation (odds ratio [OR], 1.554; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.202 to 2.009; P = .0008) and female gender (OR, 1.376; 95% CI, 1.076 to 1.757; P = .0108) were independent factors associated with WC. Primary, primary-assisted, and secondary graft patency rates were not influenced by the presence of WC; though, patients with WC were at increased risk for limb loss (hazard ratio [HR], 1.511; 95% CI 1.096 to 2.079; P = .0116) and higher mortality (HR, 1.449; 95% CI 1.098 to 1.912; P = .0089). WC was not significantly associated with lower QoL at 3 months (4.67 vs 4.79, P = .1947) and 12 months (5.02 vs 5.13, P = .2806). However, the subset of patients with serious WC (SWC) demonstrated significantly lower QoL at 3 months compared with patients without WC, (4.43 vs 4.79, respectively, P = .0166), though this difference was not seen at 12 months (4.94 vs 5.13, P = .2411). Patients with WC had higher RU than patients who did not have WC. Mean index length of hospital stay (LOS) was 2.3 days longer, mean cumulative 1-year LOS was 8.1 days longer, and mean number of hospitalizations was 0.5 occurrences greater for patients with WC compared with

  3. Sarcopenia is an Independent Predictor of Severe Postoperative Complications and Long-Term Survival After Radical Gastrectomy for Gastric Cancer: Analysis from a Large-Scale Cohort.

    PubMed

    Zhuang, Cheng-Le; Huang, Dong-Dong; Pang, Wen-Yang; Zhou, Chong-Jun; Wang, Su-Lin; Lou, Neng; Ma, Liang-Liang; Yu, Zhen; Shen, Xian

    2016-03-01

    Currently, the association between sarcopenia and long-term prognosis after gastric cancer surgery has not been investigated. Moreover, the association between sarcopenia and postoperative complications remains controversial. This large-scale retrospective study aims to ascertain the prevalence of sarcopenia and assess its impact on postoperative complications and long-term survival in patients undergoing radical gastrectomy for gastric cancer. From December 2008 to April 2013, the clinical data of all patients who underwent elective radical gastrectomy for gastric cancer were collected prospectively. Only patients with available preoperative abdominal CT scan within 30 days of surgery were considered for analysis. Skeletal muscle mass was determined by abdominal (computed tomography) CT scan, and sarcopenia was diagnosed by the cut-off values obtained by means of optimum stratification. Univariate and multivariate analyses evaluating risk factors of postoperative complications and long-term survival were performed. A total of 937 patients were included in this study, and 389 (41.5%) patients were sarcopenic based on the diagnostic cut-off values (34.9 cm²/m² for women and 40.8 cm²/m² for men). Sarcopenia was an independent risk factor for severe postoperative complications (OR = 3.010, P < 0.001), but not for total complications. However, sarcopenia did not show significant association with operative mortality. Moreover, sarcopenia was an independent predictor for poorer overall survival (HR = 1.653, P < 0.001) and disease-free survival (HR = 1.620, P < 0.001). Under the adjusted tumor-node-metastasis (TNM) stage, sarcopenia remained an independent risk factor for overall survival and disease-free survival in patients with TNM stage II and III, but not in patients with TNM stage I. Sarcopenia is an independent predictive factor of severe postoperative complications after radical gastrectomy for gastric cancer. Moreover, sarcopenia

  4. Influence of two different surgical techniques on the difficulty of impacted lower third molar extraction and their post-operative complications

    PubMed Central

    Ohanyan, Ani; Kechagias, Nikos; Tsekos, Antonis; Vahtsevanos, Konstantinos

    2015-01-01

    Background Post-operative complications of various degrees of severity are commonly observed in third molar impaction surgery. For this reason, a surgical procedure that decreases the trauma of bone and soft tissues should be a priority for surgeons. In the present study, we compare the efficacy and the post-operative complications of patients to whom two different surgical techniques were applied for impacted lower third molar extraction. Material and Methods Patients of the first group underwent the classical bur technique, while patients of the second group underwent another technique, in which an elevator was placed on the buccal surface of the impacted molar in order to luxate the alveolar socket more easily. Results Comparing the two techniques, we observed a statistically significant decrease in the duration of the procedure and in the need for tooth sectioning when applying the second surgical technique, while the post-operative complications were similar in the two groups. We also found a statistically significant lower incidence of lingual nerve lesions and only a slightly higher frequency of sharp mandibular bone irregularities in the second group, which however was not statistically significant. Conclusions The results of our study indicate that the surgical technique using an elevator on the buccal surface of the tooth seems to be a reliable method to extract impacted third molars safely, easily, quickly and with the minimum trauma to the surrounding tissues. Key words:Mandibular third molar, impacted, surgical technique, extraction, elevator. PMID:26116843

  5. Postoperative survival for patients with thymoma complicating myasthenia gravis—preliminary retrospective results of the ChART database

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Fangrui; Fu, Jianhua; Shen, Yi; Wei, Yucheng; Tan, Lijie; Zhang, Peng; Han, Yongtao; Chen, Chun; Zhang, Renquan; Li, Yin; Chen, Keneng; Chen, Hezhong; Liu, Yongyu; Cui, Youbing; Wang, Yun; Yu, Zhentao; Zhou, Xinming; Liu, Yangchun; Liu, Yuan; Gu, Zhitao

    2016-01-01

    Background It is so far not clear that how myasthenia gravis (MG) affected the prognosis of thymoma patients. The aim of this assay is to compare the postoperative survival between patients with thymoma only and those with both thymoma and MG. Methods The Chinese Alliance for Research in Thymomas (ChART) registry recruited patients with thymoma from 18 centers over the country on an intention to treat basis from 1992 to 2012. Two groups were formed according to whether the patient complicated MG. Demographic and clinical data were reviewed, patients were followed and their survival status were analyzed. Results There were 1,850 patients included in this study, including 421 with and 1,429 without MG. Complete thymectomy were done in 91.2% patients in MG group and 71.0% in non-MG group (P<0.05). There were more percentage of patients with the histology of thymoma AB, B1, or B2 (P<0.05) in MG group, and more percentage of patients with MG were in Masaoka stage I and II. The 5- and 10-year overall survival (OS) rates were both higher in MG group (93% vs. 88%; 83% vs. 81%, P=0.034) respectively. The survival rate was significantly higher in patients with MG when the Masaoka staging was 3/4 (P=0.003). Among patients with advanced stage thymoma (stage 3, 4a, 4b), the constituent ratios of 3, 4a, 4b were similar between MG and non-MG group. Histologically, however, there were significantly more proportion of AB/B1/B2/B3 in the MG group while there were more C in the non-MG group (P=0.000). Univariate analyses for all patients showed that MG, WHO classification, Masaoka stage, surgical approach, chemotherapy and radiotherapy and resectability were significant factors, and multivariate analysis showed WHO classification, Masaoka stage, and resectability were strong independent prognostic indicators. Conclusions Although MG is not an independent prognostic factor, the survival of patients with thymoma was superior when MG was present, especially in late Masaoka stage

  6. A Case of Continuous Negative Pressure Wound Therapy for Abdominal Infected Lymphocele after Kidney Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Franchin, Marco; Tozzi, Matteo; Soldini, Gabriele; Piffaretti, Gabriele

    2014-01-01

    Lymphocele is a common complication after kidney transplantation. Although superinfection is a rare event, it generates a difficult management problem; generally, open surgical drainage is the preferred method of treatment but it may lead to complicated postoperative course and prolonged healing time. Negative pressure wound therapy showed promising outcomes in various surgical disciplines and settings. We present a case of an abdominal infected lymphocele after kidney transplantation managed with open surgery and negative pressure wound therapy. PMID:25374744

  7. Dose-volume modeling of the risk of postoperative pulmonary complications among esophageal cancer patients treated with concurrent chemoradiotherapy followed by surgery

    SciTech Connect

    Tucker, Susan L. . E-mail: sltucker@mdanderson.org; Liu, H. Helen; Wang, Shulian; Wei Xiong; Liao Zhongxing; Komaki, Ritsuko; Cox, James D.; Mohan, Radhe

    2006-11-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of radiation dose distribution in the lung on the risk of postoperative pulmonary complications among esophageal cancer patients. Methods and Materials: We analyzed data from 110 patients with esophageal cancer treated with concurrent chemoradiotherapy followed by surgery at our institution from 1998 to 2003. The endpoint for analysis was postsurgical pneumonia or acute respiratory distress syndrome. Dose-volume histograms (DVHs) and dose-mass histograms (DMHs) for the whole lung were used to fit normal-tissue complication probability (NTCP) models, and the quality of fits were compared using bootstrap analysis. Results: Normal-tissue complication probability modeling identified that the risk of postoperative pulmonary complications was most significantly associated with small absolute volumes of lung spared from doses {>=}5 Gy (VS5), that is, exposed to doses <5 Gy. However, bootstrap analysis found no significant difference between the quality of this model and fits based on other dosimetric parameters, including mean lung dose, effective dose, and relative volume of lung receiving {>=}5 Gy, probably because of correlations among these factors. The choice of DVH vs. DMH or the use of fractionation correction did not significantly affect the results of the NTCP modeling. The parameter values estimated for the Lyman NTCP model were as follows (with 95% confidence intervals in parentheses): n = 1.85 (0.04, {infinity}), m = 0.55 (0.22, 1.02), and D {sub 5} = 17.5 Gy (9.4 Gy, 102 Gy). Conclusions: In this cohort of esophageal cancer patients, several dosimetric parameters including mean lung dose, effective dose, and absolute volume of lung receiving <5 Gy provided similar descriptions of the risk of postoperative pulmonary complications as a function of Radiation dose distribution in the lung.

  8. Role of Recipient-site Preparation Techniques and Post-operative Wound Dressing in the Surgical Management of Vitiligo

    PubMed Central

    Al-Hadidi, Nour; Griffith, James L; Al-Jamal, Mohammed S; Hamzavi, Iltefat

    2015-01-01

    Vitiligo is an acquired skin disorder characterized by the destruction of melanocytes resulting in achromic macules and patches involving the affected skin. Multiple methods of treatments have emerged to manage vitiligo, including medical and surgical techniques. Among the surgical techniques described in the management of vitiligo are minipunch grafting, split-thickness skin grafting, hair follicle transplantation, suction blister grafting, and cultured and non-cultured autologous melanocyte transplantation. However, prior to grafting optimal recipient-site preparation is needed for graft survival and successful repigmentation outcomes. Similarly, post-operative care of the recipient site is vital to yielding a viable graft irrespective of the transplantation technique employed. This article reviews the multiple methods employed to prepare the recipient site in vitiligo surgeries and the post-surgical conditions which optimize graft viability. A pubmed search was conducted utilizing the key words listed below. PMID:26157306

  9. Does the Application of Incisional Negative Pressure Therapy to High-Risk Wounds Prevent Surgical Site Complications? A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Ingargiola, Michael J.; Daniali, Lily N.; Lee, Edward S.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The application of incisional negative pressure wound therapy (INPWT) to clean, closed surgical incisions is a growing clinical practice. A systematic review was conducted to evaluate the effect of INPWT on surgical sites healing by primary intention. The primary outcomes of interest are incidence of complications (infection, dehiscence, seroma, hematoma, skin necrosis, or blistering). Methods: Two independent reviewers performed a search of the Ovid MEDLINE and EMBASE databases from 2006 to 2012 for published articles. Supplemental searches were performed using reference lists and conference proceedings. Studies were selected for inclusion based on predetermined inclusion and exclusion criteria. Data extraction regarding study quality, demographic and clinical characteristics, and outcomes was performed independently, and data on the incidence of infection was combined using a fixed-effects meta-analysis model. Results: Ten (5 randomized controlled trials and 5 observational) studies were included, which investigated the outcomes of 626 incisions on 610 patients. Six studies compared INPWT with sterile dry dressings (SDDs). The literature shows a significant decrease in rates of infection when using INPWT. Results on dehiscence do show a decrease in some studies, but results are inconsistent to make a conclusion. Because of limited studies, it is difficult to make any assertions on seroma, hematoma, and skin necrosis. Conclusions: This systematic review shows possible evidence of a decrease in the incidence of infection with application of INPWT. Looking at other variables such as dehiscence, seroma, hematoma, and skin necrosis show no consistent data and suggest further studies in order for proper recommendations for INPWT. PMID:24106562

  10. Prospective multicenter assessment of perioperative and minimum 2-year postoperative complication rates associated with adult spinal deformity surgery.

    PubMed

    Smith, Justin S; Klineberg, Eric; Lafage, Virginie; Shaffrey, Christopher I; Schwab, Frank; Lafage, Renaud; Hostin, Richard; Mundis, Gregory M; Errico, Thomas J; Kim, Han Jo; Protopsaltis, Themistocles S; Hamilton, D Kojo; Scheer, Justin K; Soroceanu, Alex; Kelly, Michael P; Line, Breton; Gupta, Munish; Deviren, Vedat; Hart, Robert; Burton, Douglas C; Bess, Shay; Ames, Christopher P

    2016-07-01

    OBJECTIVE Although multiple reports have documented significant benefit from surgical treatment of adult spinal deformity (ASD), these procedures can have high complication rates. Previously reported complications rates associated with ASD surgery are limited by retrospective design, single-surgeon or single-center cohorts, lack of rigorous data on complications, and/or limited follow-up. Accurate definition of complications associated with ASD surgery is important and may serve as a resource for patient counseling and efforts to improve the safety of patient care. The authors conducted a study to prospectively assess the rates of complications associated with ASD surgery with a minimum 2-year follow-up based on a multicenter study design that incorporated standardized data-collection forms, on-site study coordinators, and regular auditing of data to help ensure complete and accurate reporting of complications. In addition, they report age stratification of complication rates and provide a general assessment of factors that may be associated with the occurrence of complications. METHODS As part of a prospective, multicenter ASD database, standardized forms were used to collect data on surgery-related complications. On-site coordinators and central auditing helped ensure complete capture of complication data. Inclusion criteria were age older than 18 years, ASD, and plan for operative treatment. Complications were classified as perioperative (within 6 weeks of surgery) or delayed (between 6 weeks after surgery and time of last follow-up), and as minor or major. The primary focus for analyses was on patients who reached a minimum follow-up of 2 years. RESULTS Of 346 patients who met the inclusion criteria, 291 (84%) had a minimum 2-year follow-up (mean 2.1 years); their mean age was 56.2 years. The vast majority (99%) had treatment including a posterior procedure, 25% had an anterior procedure, and 19% had a 3-column osteotomy. At least 1 revision was required in 82

  11. Wound infection after arterial surgical procedures.

    PubMed

    van Himbeeck, F J; van Knippenberg, L A; Niessen, M C; van Griethuysen, A J

    1992-09-01

    During the period October 1983 to March 1987, 603 patients who underwent arterial surgical procedures were studied to determine the incidence and treatment of wound infections. Bypass procedures were performed in 395 patients (65.5%), in which autogenous vein was used for 158 grafts (26%), synthetic Dacron for 216 grafts (36%), and umbilical vein for 21 grafts (3.5%). Thrombo-endarterectomies, embolectomies and patch-grafts were performed in 208 patients (34.5%). An Infection Control Nurse examined and registered the wounds. The definition of wound infection used in our study is equivalent to Szilagyi grade II infection. Vascular surgery is classified as clean surgery, the clean wound infection rate being a useful measurement to evaluate preventative measures and surgical technique. Thirty-one patients (5.1%) developed a wound infection as a postoperative complication. The overall incidence of wound complications including haematoma and seroma following arterial reconstruction was 13%. The site of wound infection was predominantly the groin. The most common pathogen was Staphylococcus aureus which was found in 17 patients (2.8%). All infections resolved without further surgical intervention. The influence of possible aetiological factors is considered and the importance of prophylactic antibiotics and good surgical technique is stressed.

  12. Most women recover from psychological distress after postoperative complications following implant or DIEP flap breast reconstruction: A prospective long-term follow-up study

    PubMed Central

    Gopie, Jessica P.; Brinkman, J. Nick; Kleijne, Annelies; Seynaeve, Caroline; Menke-Pluymers, Marian B. E.; ter Kuile, Moniek M.; Tibben, Aad; Mureau, Marc A. M.

    2017-01-01

    Background Substantial complication rates after postmastectomy breast reconstruction (BR) in breast cancer patients have been reported. Few studies have reported on the resulting psychological distress (PD) and satisfaction with the aesthetic result in relation to postoperative complications after completion of implant or DIEP flap BR. The present study investigated whether women were able to recover from complication related distress in the long term. Methods PD was prospectively measured using questionnaires regarding anxiety, depression and cancer distress. Eligible patients completed questionnaires before BR (T0, n = 144), after one month (T1, n = 139) and after completion of BR, approximately 21 months after initial reconstructive surgery (T2, n = 119). Satisfaction with the aesthetic result was assessed 21 months after BR. Data concerning complications, subsequent additional surgery and total reconstruction failure up to T2 were collected from the medical records. Analyses were performed using multi-level regression analyses correcting for age. Results One or more complications occurred in 61 patients (42%) and 50 women required subsequent surgery (35%). In time, mean PD significantly declined towards baseline scores independent of complications. However, a total reconstruction failure (n = 10) was significantly associated with a large temporary increase in depression scores. After additional surgery due to complications patients were less satisfied with aesthetic outcome, although patient satisfaction was independent of PD. Conclusions PD outcomes generally declined to normal levels after completion of the entire BR course. Patients experiencing a total reconstruction failure reported more depression after this loss, but in the long term recovered to the same level as women without complications. These findings indicate that women generally can cope efficiently with these serious adverse events, even if they were less satisfied with the aesthetic result

  13. Post-operative complications associated with the Arthrex Canine Cranial Cruciate Ligament Repair Anchor System in small- to medium-sized dogs: A retrospective analysis (2009–2012)

    PubMed Central

    Rappa, Nick S.; Radasch, Robert M.

    2016-01-01

    This study classified and determined the post-operative complication rate associated with stabilization of cranial (CCL) ligament deficient stifles in small- to medium-sized dogs with the Arthrex Canine Cranial Cruciate Ligament Repair Anchor System (CCLRAS). Eighty-five medical records from 2009 to 2012 from 1 institution were evaluated. Complications were classified according to previously proposed definitions for orthopedic studies in veterinary medicine. Fifty-two owners were contacted by telephone at least 6 months after surgery and given a questionnaire to classify complications related to the implant. A visual analog scale was used to assess functionality and degree of pain. The overall complication rate was 30.3% with an inflammation-infection rate of 5.4% and a documented infection rate requiring implant removal of 1.8%. Owners reported full or acceptable function in 96% of cases with an average functional score of 86.5. Stabilization of CCL-deficient stifles in small- to medium-sized dogs with the Arthrex Canine CCLRAS is reliable with acceptable complication rates. PMID:27493284

  14. Prospective Study of Postoperative Complications After Total Thyroidectomy for Multinodular Goiters by Surgeons With Experience in Endocrine Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Zambudio, Antonio Ríos; Rodríguez, José; Riquelme, Juan; Soria, Teresa; Canteras, Manuel; Parrilla, Pascual

    2004-01-01

    Objetives: (1) To show that total thyroidectomy (TT) can be performed in multinodular goiter (MG) by surgeons with experience in endocrine surgery with a definitive complication rate of 1% or less; and (2) to analyze the risk factors for complications in these patients. Summary Background Data: There is current controversy over the role of TT in the treatment of MG; although there are potential benefits, high rates of complications are not acceptable in surgery for a benign pathology. Patients and Method: A prospective study was conducted on 301 MGs meeting the following criteria: (1) bilateral MG; (2) no prior cervical surgery; (3) operation by surgeons with experience in endocrine surgery; (4) no associated parathyroid pathology; (5) no initial thoracic approach; and (6) minimum follow-up of 1 year. Age, sex, time of evolution, symptoms, cervical goiter grade, intrathoracic component, thyroid weight, and presence of associated carcinoma were analyzed as risk factors for complications. The χ2 test and a logistic regression analysis were applied. Results: Complications were presented by 62 patients (21%), corresponding to 29 hypoparathyroidisms, 26 recurrent laryngeal nerve injuries, 4 lesions of the superior laryngeal nerve, 3 cervical hematomas, and 1 infection of the cervicotomy. The variables associated with the presence of these complications were hyperthyroidism (P = 0.0033), compressive symptoms (P = 0.0455), intrathoracic component (P = 0.0366), goiter grade (P = 0.0195), and weight of excised specimen (P = 0.0302); hyperthyroidism (relative risk [RR] 2.5) and intrathoracic component (RR 1.5) persisted as independent risk factors. Definitive complications appeared in 3 patients (1%), corresponding to 2 hypoparathyroidisms and 1 recurrent laryngeal nerve injury. Two cases corresponded to a toxic goiter, and the third to an intrathoracic goiter with compressive symptoms. Conclusion: In endocrine surgery units, TT can be performed for MG with a definitive

  15. Puncture wounds of the foot.

    PubMed

    Haverstock, Brent D

    2012-04-01

    Puncture wounds often appear benign but can cause significant pedal morbidity. Podiatric physicians who treat such wounds should educate local emergency room, urgent care center, and primary care physicians as to the potential complications associated with puncture wounds. Timely referral, recognition of the potential complications, and appropriate treatment ensure that the wound does not advance beyond a puncture wound. If complications have developed, aggressive treatment is required to eradicate the infection and prevent pedal amputation.

  16. Postoperative astigmatism.

    PubMed

    Swinger, C A

    1987-01-01

    With the numerous significant advances in surgical methodology--e.g., microinstrumentation, the operating microscope, the surgical keratometer, and intraocular lenses--that have been developed over the past two decades, both surgeons and patients have become increasingly aware of the final optic result of any surgical intervention. This is especially so since the development of refractive surgery, where good uncorrected vision is frequently the final arbiter of success. We have progressed to the stage where the optic manipulation of the cornea, whether intentional or otherwise, can be understood in terms of a number of variables. These include the preparation and closure of the surgical wound, the choice of suture material, and both intraoperative and postoperative manipulations. Where these have failed and postoperative astigmatism still occurs, a number of surgical procedures are available to reduce the astigmatic error to an acceptable level.

  17. [The function of the coagulation hemostatic and fibrinolytic processes in the postoperative period in patients with complicated chronic pancreatitis].

    PubMed

    Shishlov, V I

    1999-01-01

    Intravenous infusion of modified amino acid cocktail (AC), based of the "Aminosyn PF" composition with addition of glutamine, methyonine and selenium was applied in the complex of treatment of patients with complicated chronic pancreatitis. After AC infusion during 3 days after the operation the coagulation indexes restoration was noted while after conventional treatment in these terms the signs of thrombohemorrhagic syndrome were registered.

  18. Procalcitonin as the biomarker of inflammation in diagnostics of pediatric appendicular peritonitis and for the prognosis of early postoperative complications.

    PubMed

    Chakhunashvili, L; Inasaridze, A; Svanidze, S; Samkharadze, J; Chkhaidze, I

    2005-12-01

    A total of 43 patients up to 15 years, who underwent appendectomy with preliminary diagnosis of acute appendicitis have been studied at M. Guramishvili Pediatric Clinic in 2004-2005 years. Procalcitonin concentration has been defined in patients' blood sera using the immunoluminometric method (LUMITest PCT, BRAHMS Diagnostika, Berlin, Germany). Analysis of procalcitonin in different groups of patients has shown that increase in procalcitonin correlates with disease severity, and maximally increases in case of peritonitis due to acute destructive appendicitis. The procalcitonin level can be used to confirm the diagnosis of acute appendicitis. It has been suggested that procalcitonin can be used not only as diagnostic marker for acute appendicitis but also as a prognostic marker of it's complications. Using of procalcitonin in case of acute appendicitis would help to carry out timely surgical interventions and predict disease complications.

  19. Perineal resuturing versus expectant management following vaginal delivery complicated by a dehisced wound (PREVIEW): a nested qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    Dudley, L; Kettle, C; Waterfield, J; Ismail, Khaled M K

    2017-01-01

    Objective To explore women's lived experiences of a dehisced perineal wound following childbirth and how they felt participating in a pilot and feasibility randomised controlled trial (RCT). Design A nested qualitative study using semistructured interviews, underpinned by descriptive phenomenology. Participants and setting A purposive sample of six women at 6–9 months postnatal who participated in the RCT were interviewed in their own homes. Results Following Giorgi's analytical framework the verbatim transcripts were analysed for key themes. Women's lived experiences revealed 4 emerging themes: (1) Physical impact, with sub-themes focusing upon avoiding infection, perineal pain and the impact of the wound dehiscence upon daily activities; (2) Psychosocial impact, with sub-themes of denial, sense of failure or self-blame, fear, isolation and altered body image; (3) Sexual impact; and (4) Satisfaction with wound healing. A fifth theme ‘participating in the RCT’ was ‘a priori’ with sub-themes centred upon understanding the randomisation process, completing the trial questionnaires, attending for hospital appointments and acceptability of the treatment options. Conclusions To the best of our knowledge, this is the first qualitative study to grant women the opportunity to voice their personal experiences of a dehisced perineal wound and their views on the management offered. The powerful testimonies presented disclose the extent of morbidity experienced while also revealing a strong preference for a treatment option. Trial registration number ISRCTN05754020; results. PMID:28188152

  20. Primary closure of contaminated wounds in perforated appendicitis.

    PubMed

    Burnweit, C; Bilik, R; Shandling, B

    1991-12-01

    We studied the clinical course of 506 children consecutively admitted with appendicitis at The Hospital for Sick Children from 1985 to 1989. One hundred eighty-one children (35%), ranging in age from 1 to 17 years, presented with perforation verified by histological examination. Ninety-six of them (53%) had generalized peritonitis, 47 (26%) had localized peritonitis, and 38 (21%) had abscess formation. Usually, triple antibiotics were begun preoperatively if perforation was suspected; otherwise, cefoxitin was started. Triple antibiotics were used postoperatively for 5 to 7 days in almost all children in the perforated group. Neither abdominal nor subcutaneous drainage was routinely used even in cases of intraabdominal abscess. The skin was closed primarily with steri-strips (63%), staples (20%), subcutaneous Dexon (11%), or silk (4%). Postoperative wound infection arose in 20 children (11%). Wound infections were noted from 1 to 14 days postoperatively (mean, 5.9 days). Whereas 9 of these were treated with local therapy only, 11 delayed the child's discharge or necessitated readmission. No patient suffered major complications from wound infection in that there were no cases of necrotizing fasciitis, reoperation for debridement, sepsis, or death. The intraabdominal abscess rate in this group of 181 children was 6% (n = 11). The low rate of infective complications fully justifies the policy of primary closure in contaminated wounds. This policy eliminates the necessity for painful and time-consuming dressing changes, shortens hospitalization, and obviates the trauma of delayed suturing of wounds in children.

  1. A Study of Sepsis in Surgical Wounds

    PubMed Central

    Hnatko, S. I.; Macdonald, G. R.; Rodin, A. E.

    1963-01-01

    Published records of the frequency of wound sepsis are often unreliable sources of information on the general frequency of this complication because of unstandardized methods of reporting and because of the various views of different investigators as to what constitutes sepsis. A method of infection reporting, its study and analysis are outlined. A survey of postoperative infections by this method for the years 1959, 1960 and 1961 revealed infection rates of 2.02%, 1.20% and 1.14%, respectively. For the same period the percentages of wound infections caused by Staph. aureus were 83.06%, 69.8% and 51.8%, respectively. The most prevalent phage types were 55/53/54 and 52/80/81/82, although types 80/81/82 and 80 were also involved. Infections with Gram-negative organisms were encountered more often in 1961 than in 1959. The majority of these were of mixed type, and followed abdominal surgery. There is need for more comprehensive study and analysis of postoperative wound sepsis and its complications. It was apparent from this study that, statistically, a relatively low rate of postoperative infections may mask a high rate following a specific surgical procedure. PMID:13954844

  2. Postoperative vascular complications in unrecognised Obstructive Sleep apnoea (POSA) study protocol: an observational cohort study in moderate-to-high risk patients undergoing non-cardiac surgery

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Matthew T V; Wang, Chew-Yin; Seet, Edwin; Tam, Stanley; Lai, Hou-Yee; Walker, Stuart; Short, Timothy G; Halliwell, Richard; Chung, Frances

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Emerging epidemiological data suggest that obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) is common in the general surgical population. Unfortunately, the majority of these patients are unrecognised and untreated at the time of surgery. There is substantial biological rationale to indicate that patients with unrecognised OSA are at a higher risk of postoperative vascular events. However, the extent of this morbidity is currently unknown. We have initated the postoperative vascular complications in the unrecognised obstructive sleep apnoea (POSA) study to determine the associations between OSA, nocturnal hypoxia and major postoperative vascular events in 1200 moderate-to-high risk patients undergoing major non-cardiac surgery. Methods and analysis The POSA study is an international prospective observational cohort study. Using a type 3 portable sleep monitoring device and ambulatory oximetry, we will quantify the severity of OSA. The primary outcome is a composite of vascular death, myocardial infarction; non-fatal cardiac arrest; stroke; pulmonary embolism; congestive heart failure and new arrhythmia within 30 days of surgery. As of November 2013, we have recruited over 700 patients from nine centres in six countries. The mean age is 68 years, the mean body mass index is 27 kg/m2 and 55% of patients are men. 27.9% of patients have known coronary artery disease, over 76% have diabetes. The majority of patients underwent orthopaedic surgery (28%) and colorectal resection (18.5%). Ethics and dissemination The POSA study has received ethics approval from all study sites before patient recruitment. Informed consent will be obtained from all patients. The POSA study will determine the risk of unrecognised OSA in major non-cardiac surgery. We will publish these findings in peer-reviewed journals. Trial Registration: ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT01494181 PMID:24413351

  3. Risk factors of postoperative pulmonary complications following elective craniotomy for patients with tumors of the brainstem or adjacent to the brainstem

    PubMed Central

    CHU, HUI; DANG, BIN-WEN

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to analyze the risk factors of postoperative pulmonary complications (PPCs) of elective craniotomy for patients presenting with brainstem tumors or tumors adjacent to the brainstem. A total of 162 consecutive patients with a brainstem tumor or adjacent brainstem tumor undergoing elective craniotomy were included and monitored. Potential risk factors were identified by data collection and monitoring of the PPCs, as well as the performance of single factor analysis (using the χ2 test). In addition, the independent risk factors of PPCs were screened by logistic analysis. A total of 39 cases of PPC were included in the current study, with an incidence rate of 23.9%. The analysis indicated that smoking history, previous pulmonary diseases, an American Society of Anesthesiologists classification >II and partial tumor resection were risk factors of PPC following an elective craniotomy. Smoking history and partial tumor resection were identified to be independent risk factors of PPCs. PMID:25202352

  4. In-vitro antimicrobial activity screening of some ethnoveterinary medicinal plants traditionally used against mastitis, wound and gastrointestinal tract complication in Tigray Region, Ethiopia

    PubMed Central

    Kalayou, Shewit; Haileselassie, Mekonnen; Gebre-egziabher, Gebremedhin; Tiku'e, Tsegay; Sahle, Samson; Taddele, Habtamu; Ghezu, Mussie

    2012-01-01

    Objective To screen the antibacterial activity of nine ethnoveterinary plants traditionally used for the treatment of mastitis, wound and gastrointestinal complications. Methods Hydroalcoholic exctracts of medicinal plants namely, Achyranthes aspera (A. aspera) L. (Family Asparagaceae), Ficus caria (F. caria) (Family Moraceae), Malvi parviflora (M. parviflora) (Family Malvaceae), Vernonia species (V. species) (local name Alakit, Family Asteraceae), Solanum hastifolium (S. hastifolium) (Family Solanaceae), Calpurinia aurea (C. aurea) (Ait) Benth (Family Fabaceae), Nicotiana tabacum (N. tabacum) L. (Family Solanaceae), Ziziphus spina-christi (Z. spina-christi) (Family Rhamnaceae), Croton macrostachys (C. macrostachys) (Family Euphorbiaceae), were screened against clinical bacterial isolates of veterinary importance from October 2007 to April 2009. The antibacterial activity was tested using disc diffusion at two concentrations (200 mg/mL and 100 mg/mL) and broth dilution methods using 70% methanol macerated leaf extracts. Results With the exception of S. hastifolium all plant extracts exhibited antibacterial activity. Among the medicinal plants tested C. aurea, C. macrostachyus, A. aspera, N. tabacum and vernonia species (Alakit) showed the most promising antimicrobial properties. Conclusions It can be concluded that many of the tested plants have antibacterial activity and supports the traditional usage of the plants for mastitis, wound and gastrointestinal complications treatment. Further studies into their toxicity and phytochemistry is advocated. PMID:23569962

  5. Dosimetric planning study for the prevention of anal complications after post-operative whole pelvic radiotherapy in cervical cancer patients with hemorrhoids

    PubMed Central

    Baek, J G; Kim, E C; Kim, S K

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Radiation-induced anal toxicity can be induced by low radiation doses in patients with haemorrhoids. The object of this study was to determine the dosimetric benefits of different whole pelvic radiotherapy (WPRT) techniques in terms of dose delivered to the anal canal in post-operative patients with cervical cancer. Methods: The planning CT images of 10 patients with cervical cancer undergoing postoperative radiotherapy were used for comparison of three different plans. All patients had been treated using the conventional box technique WPRT (CV-WPRT), and we tried low-margin-modified WPRT (LM-WPRT), three-dimensional conformal techniques WPRT (CF-WPRT) and intensity-modulated WPRT (IM-WPRT) planning for dosimetric comparison of the anal canal, retrospectively. Results: Mean anal canal doses of the IM-WPRT were significantly lower (p < 0.05) than those of CV-WPRT, LM-WPRT and CF-WPRT, and V10, V20, V30 and V40 to the anal canal were also significantly lower for IM-WPRT (p < 0.05). The proportion of planning target volumes (PTVs) that received ≥98% of the prescribed dose for all plans was >99%, and the proportion that received ≥108% of the prescribed dose for IM-WPRT was <2%. Volumes of bladders and rectums that received ≥30 or ≥40 Gy were significantly lower for IM-WPRT than for three of the four-field WPRT plans (p = 0.000). Conclusion: IM-WPRT can significantly reduce radiation dose delivered to the anal canal and does not compromise PTV coverage. In patients with haemorrhoids, IM-WPRT may be of value for the prevention of anal complications. Advances in knowledge: Although tolerance of the anal canal tends to be ignored in patients undergoing post-operative WPRT, patients with haemorrhoids may suffer complications at low radiation doses. The present study shows IM-WPRT can be meaningful in these patients. PMID:26395671

  6. Comparison of Treatment Outcomes of Surgical Repair in Inguinal Hernia with Classic versus Preperitoneal Methods on Reduction of Postoperative Complications

    PubMed Central

    Mahmoudvand, Hormoz; Forutani, Shahab

    2017-01-01

    Background. This study aims to evaluate and compare the results of inguinal herniorrhaphy with mesh in classic and preperitoneal method. Methods. Our study community includes 150 candidate patients for inguinal herniorrhaphy with mesh. Totally, 150 candidate patients for inguinal herniorrhaphy were randomly divided into two groups: (1) classic group in which the floor of the canal was repaired and the mesh was located on the floor of the canal and (2) preperitoneal group in which the mesh was installed under the canal and then the floor was repaired. Results. The frequency of recurrence was 10 (13.3%) and 2 (2.66%) in the classic and preperitoneal group, respectively. The frequency of postsurgical pain was 21 (28%) in the classic group and 9 (12%) in the preperitoneal group. The postsurgical hematoma was observed in 7 (9.3%) and 9 (12%) in the classic and preperitoneal group, respectively. Also, the frequency of postsurgical seroma was 8 (10.7%) and 1 (1.3%) in the patients treated with the classic and preperitoneal method, respectively. Conclusion. The findings of the present study demonstrated that the preperitoneal method is a more suitable method for inguinal herniorrhaphy than the classic one because of fewer complications, according to the findings of this study. PMID:28232939

  7. The impact of nutritional status and appetite on the hospital length of stay and postoperative complications in elderly patients with severe aortic stenosis before aortic valve replacement

    PubMed Central

    Jagielak, Dariusz; Wernio, Edyta; Bramlage, Peter; Gruchała-Niedoszytko, Marta; Rogowski, Jan; Małgorzewicz, Sylwia

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Severe aortic stenosis (AS) is associated with the reduction of physical activity and muscle mass and may be associated with decreased appetite. Aim To assess the nutritional status and the impact of nutritional status and appetite on the hospital length of stay and postoperative complications in elderly patients with severe AS before aortic valve replacement. Material and methods Ninety-nine patients (55 male, 44 female; 74.3 ±5.2 years old) with severe AS and an indication for aortic valve replacement (AVR) were included. The nutritional status was assessed by different questionnaires (7-point Subjective Global Assessment Score – 7-SGA, full-Mini Nutritional Assessment – full-MNA) and anthropometric measurements (body mass index (BMI) kg/m2). Body composition was estimated using multi-frequency bioelectrical impedance analysis. Appetite was assessed by the Simplified Nutrition Assessment Questionnaire (SNAQ). Results The average BMI of patients was 28.8 ±5.8 kg/m2. Results of the 7-SGA and f-MNA questionnaires revealed that 39 patients (39.4%) were at risk of malnutrition. The mean SNAQ score was 15.8 ±1.8. The average length of hospital stay was 10 ±5.8 days. There was a positive correlation of LOS with age (r = 0.26, p = 0.03) and a negative correlation with fat mass (kg) (r = –0.28, p = 0.04) and BMI (r = –0.22, p = 0.03). Postoperative complications were observed in 37 patients (37.4%). Patients who developed complications were older and had poorer nutritional status according to the results of the 7-SGA. Conclusions Despite many patients undergoing AVR being overweight and obese, a considerable proportion displayed clinical signs of malnutrition. The results suggest that an assessment of nutritional status and appetite in this group of patients should be conducted regularly and that the 7-SGA scale could represent a reliable tool to assess malnutrition. PMID:27516781

  8. [Wound healing and wound dressing].

    PubMed

    Eitel, F; Sklarek, J

    1988-01-01

    This review article intends to discuss the clinical management of wounds in respect to a pathophysiological background. Recent results of research in the field of wound healing are demonstrated. Wound healing can be seen as aseptic inflammatory response to a traumatic stimulus. The activation of the clotting cascade by the trauma induces a sequence of humoral and cellular reactions. Platelets, granulocytes and macrophages are activated stepwisely. In the first phase of wound healing the wounded tissue area will be prepared for phagocytosis by enzymatic degradation of ground substance and depolymerisation of protein macromolecules (wound edema). Following the phagocytic microdebridement mesenchymal cells proliferate and produce matrix substance. Microcirculation within the traumatized area will be restored by angiogenesis, macroscopically observed as new formed granulation tissue. This leads to the wound healing phase of scar tissue formation. In this complexity of reactions naturally many possibilities of impairment are given. The most common complication during wound healing is the infection. It can be seen as self reinforcing process. The therapy of the impairment of wound healing consists in the disruption of the specific vicious circle, in the case of an osseus infection that would be a macrodebridement (that is necrectomy) and biomechanical stabilization. The surgical management of wounds principally consists in ensuring an undisturbed sequence of the healing process. This can be done by the wound excision that supports the phagocytic microdebridement. A further possibility is to avoid overwhelming formation of edema by eliminating the traumatic stimulus, by immobilization of the injured region and by ensuring a physiological microenvironment with a primary suture if possible. There are up to the present no drugs available to enhance cell proliferation and to regulate wound healing but it seems that experimental research is successful in characterizing

  9. [Some aspects of surgical treatment of postoperative ventral hernia].

    PubMed

    Lukomskiĭ, G I; Shulutko, A M; Antropova, N V; Moiseev, A Iu; El-Said, A Kh

    1995-01-01

    The results of surgical treatment of of 392 patients with postoperative ventral hernia are discussed. The algorithm of treatment of patients with large hernias was developed. Special preoperative management by dosed pneumocompression in an antioverload costume makes it possible to avoid menacing complications after the operation, which are caused by increased intraabdominal pressure. Test for tolerance to increase of intraabodominal pressure allowed prognostication of the character of the operative intervention: with or without decrease of the volume of the abdominal cavity (autoplasty or alloplasty, respectively). Prevention of wound complications consisted in control of infection, improvement of operative techniques, and use of modern surgical instruments. The prevention of recurrent hernias should be directed at correct choice of the method of plastics and removal of wound complications.

  10. Comparison Study between Conventional Sequence and Slice-Encoding Metal Artifact Correction (SEMAC) in the Diagnosis of Postoperative Complications in Patients Receiving Lumbar Inter-Body Fusion and Pedicle Screw Fixation Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Han, Sol Bee; Kwon, Jong Won

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose Slice-Encoding Metal Artifact Correction (SEMAC) sequence is one of the metal artifact reduction techniques of anatomical structure, but there has been no report about evaluation of post-operative complications. The purpose of this article is to compare the anatomical visibility between fast spin echo (FSE) and FSE-SEMAC and to evaluate the additional value of FSE-SEMAC in diagnostic confidence of the complications. Materials and Methods We conducted a retrospective study with 54 patients who received lumbar spinal surgery and MR images including FSE-SEMAC. For the semi-quantitative evaluation, the visibility of anatomical structures (neural foramen, bone-inter-body cage interface, central canal, nerve root in epidural space, back muscle, and bone-pedicle screw interface) was evaluated. For qualitative evaluation, we evaluated FSE and FSE with FSE-SEMAC independently, and recorded the diagnostic confidence level of post-operative complications. Generalized estimating equation regression analysis was used for statistical analysis, and a weighted kappa was used for inter-observer agreement. Results Scores of 6 imaging findings with FSE-SEMAC were significantly higher than that of FSE (P-value < .0001). Inter-observer agreements show good reliability (weighted kappa = 0.45–0.75). Both reviewers deemed 37 (reviewer 1) or 19 more (reviewer 2) post-operative complications with FSE plus FSE-SEMAC, compared to FSE only. Except for central canal stenosis (P-value = .2408), diagnostic confidence level for other post-operative complications were significantly higher with FSE plus FSE-SEMAC (P-value = .0000) than FSE. Conclusions FSE-SEMAC significantly reduces image distortion, compared to FSE sequence in 3.0-T MR. Also, diagnostic confidence for post-operative complications was higher when FSE with additional FSE-SEMAC compared to FSE only. PMID:27711137

  11. Ultra-delayed lumbar surgical wound hematoma

    PubMed Central

    Kinon, Merritt D.; Nakhla, Jonathan; Brown, Kenroy; Bhashyam, Niketh; Yassari, Reza

    2016-01-01

    Background: There exists an inherent risk of increased venous thromboembolism (VTE) in surgical spine patients, which is independent of their existing risk factors. Prophylaxis and treatment of VTE is an imprecise practice and may have serious complications even well after the initial surgery. Furthermore, there are no clear guidelines on how to manage postoperative spine patients with regards to the timing of anticoagulation. Case Description: Here, we present the case of a middle-aged male, status post L2/3 laminectomy and discectomy who developed bilateral below the knee deep venous thrombosis. He was started on Enoxaparin and transitioned to Warfarin and returned with axial back pain, and was found to have a postoperative hematoma almost 3 weeks later in a delayed fashion. Conclusion: Delayed surgical wound hematoma with neural compression is an important complication to identify and should remain high on the differential diagnosis in patients on warfarin who present with axial spinal pain. PMID:28144491

  12. A Single Dose of Amoxicillin and Dexamethasone for Prevention of Postoperative Complications in Third Molar Surgery: A Randomized, Double-Blind, Placebo Controlled Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Bortoluzzi, Marcelo Carlos; Capella, Diogo Lenzi; Barbieri, Tharzon; Pagliarini, Micheli; Cavalieri, Talita; Manfro, Rafael

    2013-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to assess the efficacy of a single prophylactic dose of amoxicillin and/or dexamethasone in preventing postoperative complications (PC) after a surgical removal of a single mandibular third molar (M3). Methods This study is a randomized, placebo controlled clinical trial. Four groups were included: Group 1 (G1) included a prophylactic dose of 2 g of amoxicillin and 8 mg of dexamethasone; Group 2 (G2) included a prophylactic dose of 2 g of amoxicillin and 8 mg of placebo; Group 3 (G3) included a prophylactic dose of 8 mg of dexamethasone and 2 g of placebo and; Group 4 (G4) placebo. Results Fifty patients were included. It was observed one case of alveolar infection (2%) and two of alveolar osteitis (4%) resulting in three PC (6%). No statistical differences were observed between therapeutic groups for development of PC, trismus, pain and edema. The use of antibiotics showed an absolute risk reduction (ARR) for PC development of 3.52% and the number needed to treat (NNT) was 29. Conclusion Prophylactic antibiotics and corticoid in a single dose regimen did not bring any benefit on M3 surgeries. PMID:23390473

  13. Complications in operative fixation of calcaneal fractures

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ying; Bao, Rong-Hua; Jiang, Zhi-Qiang; Wu, Huo-Yan

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study focused on a number of factors that have been implicated in calcaneal complications and find the incidence of wound complications. Methods: This was a retrospective study. A total of 162 patients (176 feet) who underwent calcaneal fractures between 2007 and 2012 were included. The patient’s personal details, age, time from injury to surgery, cause of injury, type of fracture, operative details, operating and tourniquet times were collected from hospital computers and paper records. Evidence of complications including wound infection, wound necrosis, pain, malunion, nonunion, impingement, loss of fixation, ect were studied. Results: Forty-seven of one hundred and seventy-six fractures (26.704%) had complications, wound infection was noted in seven fractures (3.977%), twelve fractures developed necrosis (6.818%), 14 fractures (7.955%) developed pain. Malunion was found in five fractures (2.841%), nonunion in two fractures (1.136%) and loss of fixation in four fractures (2.272%). Three neurologic injury was also seen in our study (1.705%). Operating time, time from injury to surgery and type of fracture had some association with complications in operative fixation of calcaneal fractures, which showed a statistically significant improvement (P=0.000, 0.031, 0.020, respectively), but there were no evidence that age and tourniquet time affect the incidence of complication after calcaneal fracture surgery (P=0.119, 0.682, respectively). Conclusions: Despite developments in the surgical treatment of calcaneal fracture, wound complications still remain inevitable. Advanced imaging techniques, less invasive surgical procedures, wealth of anatomical knowledge, surgical experience and better postoperative care should be ensured. PMID:27648028

  14. Wound healing: part II. Clinical applications.

    PubMed

    Janis, Jeffrey; Harrison, Bridget

    2014-03-01

    Treatment of all wounds requires adequate wound bed preparation, beginning with irrigation and débridement. Complicated or chronic wounds may also require treatment adjuncts or specialized wound healing products. An extensive body of research and development has introduced novel wound healing therapies and scar management options. In this second of a two-part continuing medical education series on wound healing, the reader is offered an update on current wound healing technologies and recommendations for obtaining optimal outcomes.

  15. Analysis of Complications in Postbariatric Abdominoplasty: Our Experience

    PubMed Central

    Grieco, Michele; Grignaffini, Eugenio; Simonacci, Francesco; Raposio, Edoardo

    2015-01-01

    Abdominoplasty is one of the most popular body-contouring procedures. It is associated with a significant number of complications: the most common ones are seroma, hematoma, infection, wound-healing problems, and skin flap necrosis. From January 2012 to December 2014, 25 patients (18 women and 7 men) (mean age: 51 years) underwent abdominoplastic surgery at the Plastic Surgery Section, Department of Surgical Sciences, University of Parma, Italy. All patients reported a weight loss between 15 kg and 47 kg. All of the of 25 patients were included in the study; minor and major complications were seen in 17 (68%) and 8 (32%) patients, respectively. The percentage of complications in our patients was as follows: 9 patients with seroma (36%); 4 patients with wound dehiscence with delayed wound healing (16%); 3 cases with hematoma (12%); 2 patients with postoperative bleeding (8%); 1 patient (4%) with an umbilical necrosis; 1 patient (4%) with a deep vein thrombosis; 3 patients with infected seroma (12%); and 2 patients with wound infection (8%). There were no cases of postoperative mortality. The aim of this study is to analyze our complications in postbariatric abdominoplasty. PMID:26236501

  16. High Complication Rate With Anterior Total Hip Arthroplasties on a Fracture Table

    PubMed Central

    Collis, Dennis K.

    2010-01-01

    Background Recent attention in THA has focused on minimally invasive techniques and their short-term outcomes. Despite much debate over the outcomes and complications of the two-incision and the mini-lateral and mini-posterior approaches, complications arising from use of the anterior THA on a fracture table are not well documented. Questions/purposes We determined the intraoperative and postoperative complications with the anterior approach to THA through an extended single-surgeon patient series. Methods We reviewed 800 primary THAs performed anteriorly with the aid of a fracture table over 5 years and recorded all intraoperative and postoperative complications up to latest followup (average, 1.8 years; range, 0–5 years). Patients with severe acetabular deformity or severe flexion contractures were excluded and those surgeries were performed with a lateral approach during the time period of this study. Results Intraoperative complications included 19 trochanteric fractures, three femoral perforations, one femoral fracture, one acetabular fracture, one bleeding complication, and one case of cardiovascular collapse. There were no ankle fractures. Postoperative complications included seven patients with dislocations; seven with deep infections; one with delayed femur fracture; 37 with wound complications, among which 13 had reoperation for local débridement; 14 with deep venous thrombosis; and two with pulmonary embolism; and 31 other nonfatal medical complications. Conclusions The main intraoperative complications of trochanteric fractures and perforations occurred mostly early in the series, while the main postoperative complications related to wound healing were prevalent throughout the entire series. Despite potential advantages of use of a fracture table, surgeons should be aware of the potential complications of trochanteric fractures, perforations, and wound-healing problems associated with this technique. Level of Evidence Level IV, therapeutic study

  17. Piezoelectric compared with conventional rotary osteotomy for the prevention of postoperative sequelae and complications after surgical extraction of mandibular third molars: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Badenoch-Jones, E K; David, M; Lincoln, T

    2016-12-01

    The purpose of this review was to determine if postoperative sequelae (facial swelling, trismus, pain) and neurological complications are reduced when mandibular third molars are surgically extracted using a piezoelectric device for osteotomy compared with conventional rotary burs, and to determine if there is a difference in operating time between the two techniques. Clinical trials were identified through a search (April 2015) on the PubMed, EMBASE, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) and Google Scholar databases. Studies were assessed by study type, characteristics of participants, sample size, surgical technique, cointerventions, outcomes, risk of bias, and findings. We calculated a Grading of Recommendations, Assessment, Development, and Evaluation (GRADE) rating of confidence in the effect estimates. We identified 2515 citations and found 15 eligible clinical trials. Patients who had osteotomies with the piezoelectric device had less facial swelling (standard mean difference -1.15; 95% CI -2.02 to -0.27; p<0.0001), trismus (greater maximum mouth opening, standard mean difference 0.78; 95% CI 0.56 to 1.00; p=0.33) and pain (standard mean difference -0.84; 95% CI -1.55 to -0.13; p<0.0001) at day 1, less facial swelling at day 7 (standard mean difference -0.98; 95% CI -1.52 to -0.44; p=0.05), and a reduced risk of neurological complications (odds ratio (OR) 0.28; 95% CI 0.09 to 0.89; p=0.79). Trismus at day 7 and pain at day 5 did not differ significantly between the two methods. Operating time was longer with the piezoelectric device (standard mean difference 0.83; 95% CI 0.57 to 1.09; p=0.001). The confidence in the effect estimates was low or very low across all outcomes. The findings raise the possibility of an improved clinical healing response to osteotomy with the piezoelectric device compared with one done with conventional rotary burs for surgical extractions of mandibular third molars.

  18. Successful closure of feline axillary wounds by reconstruction of the elbow skin fold.

    PubMed

    Brinkley, C H

    2007-02-01

    This report describes the successful closure of five chronic feline axillary wounds. The aetiology was known to be forelimb entrapment in a neck collar in three cases and was suspected in the others. Each cat underwent a single surgical procedure during which the wound was debrided, the normal structure of the elbow skin fold was restored and the remaining skin defect was closed primarily. None of the cats had undergone any previous reconstruction attempts. No postoperative complications were observed and the wounds healed uneventfully. Cats have well-developed elbow skin folds, allowing a wide range of limb motion to occur. Having a forelimb trapped in a neck collar not only creates a wound in the axilla but also disrupts the normal anatomy of the skin fold. This report demonstrates that restoring the elbow skin fold before closing the wound may improve the chances of a successful reconstruction at the first surgical intervention.

  19. Mitogen-activated protein kinase phosphatase-3 (MKP-3) in the surgical wound is necessary for the resolution of postoperative pain in mice

    PubMed Central

    Skopelja-Gardner, Sladjana; Saha, Madhurima; Alvarado-Vazquez, Perla Abigail; Liponis, Brenna S; Martinez, Elena; Romero-Sandoval, E Alfonso

    2017-01-01

    Mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) phosphatase-3 (MKP-3) and its substrates (extracellular signal-regulated kinase [ERK] and p38) play an important role in pathophysiological mechanisms of acute postoperative and chronic neuropathic pain in the spinal cord. This study aimed to understand the role of MKP-3 and its target MAPKs at the site of surgical incision in nociceptive behavior. Wild-type (WT) and MKP-3 knockout (KO) mice underwent unilateral plantar hind paw incision. Mechanical allodynia was assessed by using von Frey filaments. Peripheral ERK-1/2 and p38 phosphorylation were measured by Western blot. Cell infiltration was determined using hematoxylin and eosin histological staining. Peripheral phosphorylated ERK-1/2 (p-ERK-1/2) inhibition was performed in MKP-3 KO mice. In WT mice, mechanical hypersensitivity was observed on postoperative day 1 (0.69±0.17 g baseline vs 0.13±0.08 g day 1), which resolved normally by postoperative day 12 (0.46±0.08 g, N=6). In MKP-3 KO mice, this hypersensitivity persisted at least 12 days after surgery (0.19±0.06 g; N=6). KO mice displayed higher numbers of infiltrating cells (51.4±6 cells/0.1 mm2) than WT mice (8.7±1.2 cells/0.1 mm2) on postoperative day 1 (vs 5–6 cells/0.1 mm2 at baseline) that returned to baseline 12 days after surgery (10–12 cells/0.1 mm2). In WT mice, peripheral p-p38 and p-ERK-1/2 expression increased (5- and 3-fold, respectively) on postoperative days 1 and 5, and returned to basal levels 7–12 days after surgery (N=3 per group). Peripheral p-p38 levels in MKP-3 KO mice followed a similar expression pattern as WT mice. Peripheral p-ERK-1/2 levels in MKP-3 KO mice remained elevated 12 days after surgery (2.5-fold, N=3 per group). Administration of PD98059 (MEK inhibitor, N=8, vehicle N=9) reduced p-ERK-1/2 expression in the incised tissue and blocked hypersensitivity in MKP-3 KO mice (N=6). The findings of this study suggest that MKP-3 is pivotal for normal resolution of acute

  20. Wound closure after split-thickness skin grafting is accelerated with the use of continuous direct anodal microcurrent applied to silver nylon wound contact dressings.

    PubMed

    Huckfeldt, Roger; Flick, A Bart; Mikkelson, Debbie; Lowe, Cindy; Finley, Phillip J

    2007-01-01

    Wound healing after graft closure of excised burn wounds is a critical factor in the recovery process after thermal injury. Processes that speed time to stable wound closure should lead to improved outcomes, shorter lengths of hospital stays, and decreased complications. A randomized clinical trial to test the ability of continuous direct anodal microcurrent application to silver nylon wound contact dressings was designed. Time for wound closure after split-thickness skin grafting was observed. Thirty patients with full-thickness thermal burns were randomized into two groups. The control group received postoperative dressing care using moistened silver nylon fabric covered with gauze after tangential burn wound excision and split-thickness skin grafting. The study group received an identical protocol with the addition of continuous direct anodal microcurrent application. Time to 95% wound closure was measured using digital photography. The digital photographs were evaluated by a burn surgeon blinded to the patient's randomization. An independent t-test was used to analyze the data. The study group experienced a 36% reduction in time to wound closure (mean of 4.6 days) as compared to the control group (mean of 7.2 days). This was statistically significant at a P value of <.05. The use of continuous direct anodal microcurrent decreased time to wound closure after split-thickness skin grafting.

  1. Application of the Single Use Negative Pressure Wound Therapy Device (PICO) on a Heterogeneous Group of Surgical and Traumatic Wounds

    PubMed Central

    Payne, Caroline; Edwards, Daren

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: Traumatic wounds and surgery inherently have their complications. Localized infections, wound dehiscence, and excessive wound leakage can be devastating to the patient with a prolonged recovery, but it is also costly to the hospital with an increased length of stay, extra workload, and dressing changes. The single use PICO (Smith and Nephew Healthcare, Hull, United Kingdom) negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) dressing has revolutionized our management of various acute, chronic, and high output wounds. It requires fewer dressing changes than conventional practice, is used in the outpatient setting, and is a necessary adjuvant therapy to hasten wound healing. Aims: To observe the efficacy of the PICO vacuum-assisted healing within a cost improvement programme. Settings: Plastic surgery department, Royal London Hospital. Materials and Methods: Twenty-one patients with a diversity of postoperative or posttraumatic wounds were considered suitable for PICO application and treated totally on an outpatient basis once the PICO dressing was applied. All wounds were then subjected to continued PICO dressings until healed. Results: All patients tolerated the PICO well with no dressing failure or failure to comply. The number of dressings per patient ranged from 1 to 7. The cost per patient of treatment ranged from £120 to £1578. Estimated cost of all PICO dressing for 21 patients including plastic surgery dressing clinic appointments = £13,345. Median length of treatment to healing (days) = 16; standard deviation = 9.5. Eight patients would have had an inpatient bed stay with conventional therapy, total 24 bed days saved at Bartshealth @£325 per day. Conclusions: The outpatient application of a disposable NPWT can benefit a wide range of clinical wounds that optimizes patient care, promotes rapid wound healing, and importantly helps manage costs. PMID:24917894

  2. Wound Care.

    PubMed

    Balsa, Ingrid M; Culp, William T N

    2015-09-01

    Wound care requires an understanding of normal wound healing, causes of delays of wound healing, and the management of wounds. Every wound must be treated as an individual with regard to cause, chronicity, location, and level of microbial contamination, as well as patient factors that affect wound healing. Knowledge of wound care products available and when negative pressure wound therapy and drain placement is appropriate can improve outcomes with wound healing. Inappropriate product use can cause delays in healing. As a wound healing progresses, management of a wound and the bandage material used must evolve.

  3. MRSA infection in lower extremity wounds.

    PubMed

    Edris, Bree; Reed, James F

    2008-03-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is one of the most frequently isolated bacteria in wound cultures. MRSA has been linked to lengthened wound healing times, an increase in adverse postoperative outcomes, and mortality. This study investigated the incidence of MRSA in lower extremity wounds and examined outcomes associated with MRSA-infected wounds versus non-MRSA-infected wounds. A retrospective study was conducted. Patients with MRSA-infected wounds were compared with those with uninfected wounds in a 1:2 ratio. Demographics, infection, and stay information were collected. Data were analyzed using SPSS 15.0. 51 patients were included (17 with MRSA and 34 without MRSA). Patients with MRSA had increased lengths of stay and a higher incidence of adverse postoperative outcomes compared with non-MRSA patients. An MRSA infection adversely affects a patient's hospital course. Preoperative screening for MRSA and postoperative surveillance should be considered to prevent and eliminate the spread of this virulent bacterium.

  4. Postoperative permanent pressure alopecia.

    PubMed

    Chang, Zi Yun; Ngian, Jan; Chong, Claudia; Chong, Chin Ted; Liew, Qui Yin

    2016-04-01

    A 49-year-old Chinese female underwent elective laparoscopic assisted Whipple's surgery lasting 12 h. This was complicated by postoperative pressure alopecia at the occipital area of the scalp. Pressure-induced hair loss after general anaesthesia is uncommon and typically temporary, but may be disconcerting to the patient. We report this case of postoperative permanent pressure alopecia due to its rarity in the anaesthesia/local literature, and review the risk factors for its development.

  5. Complicated sea urchin-induced wound infection caused by Vibrio alginolyticus and Staphylococcus lugdunensis in a 14-year-old boy

    PubMed Central

    Steiß, Jens-Oliver; Langner, Cornelia; Benkert, Birgit; Havener, Magdalena; Küsters, Uta; Hühn-Lindenbein, Stephan Georg; Mack, Dietrich

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Wound infections with Vibrio alginolyticus, a Gram-negative bacterium found in all temperate oceans, are rarely reported. However, a rising incidence of wound infections caused by V. alginolyticus requires better knowledge about this infectious agent. Case presentation: We report the case of a 14-year-old boy suffering from a wound infection caused by V. alginolyticus and Staphylococcus lugdunensis after stepping on a sea urchin. Despite wound debridement and antibiotic therapy with cefaclor, the lesion did not heal over several weeks. After identification of the pathogens and antibiotic-susceptibility testing, antibiotic therapy was switched to ciprofloxacin, followed by trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole. Two months after the accident the wound was re-epithelialized. Follow up after 6 months revealed a painful scar. Conclusion: Non-cholera vibrios like V. alginolyticus should be considered as possible causative agents in seawater-contaminated wounds. S. lugdunensis is a relevant pathogen in mixed wound infections. Early microbiological diagnosis and antibiotic-susceptibility testing is crucial to prevent therapeutic failure. PMID:28348795

  6. [Characteristics of postoperative peritonitis].

    PubMed

    Lock, J F; Eckmann, C; Germer, C-T

    2016-01-01

    Postoperative peritonitis is still a life-threatening complication after abdominal surgery and approximately 10,000 patients annually develop postoperative peritonitis in Germany. Early recognition and diagnosis before the onset of sepsis has remained a clinical challenge as no single specific screening test is available. The aim of therapy is a rapid and effective control of the source of infection and antimicrobial therapy. After diagnosis of diffuse postoperative peritonitis surgical revision is usually inevitable after intestinal interventions. Peritonitis after liver, biliary or pancreatic surgery is managed as a rule by means of differentiated therapy approaches depending on the severity.

  7. [Errors in wound management].

    PubMed

    Filipović, Marinko; Novinscak, Tomislav

    2014-10-01

    Chronic ulcers have adverse effects on the patient quality of life and productivity, thus posing financial burden upon the healthcare system. Chronic wound healing is a complex process resulting from the interaction of the patient general health status, wound related factors, medical personnel skill and competence, and therapy related products. In clinical practice, considerable improvement has been made in the treatment of chronic wounds, which is evident in the reduced rate of the severe forms of chronic wounds in outpatient clinics. However, in spite of all the modern approaches, efforts invested by medical personnel and agents available for wound care, numerous problems are still encountered in daily practice. Most frequently, the problems arise from inappropriate education, of young personnel in particular, absence of multidisciplinary approach, and inadequate communication among the personnel directly involved in wound treatment. To perceive them more clearly, the potential problems or complications in the management of chronic wounds can be classified into the following groups: problems mostly related to the use of wound coverage and other etiology related specificities of wound treatment; problems related to incompatibility of the agents used in wound treatment; and problems arising from failure to ensure aseptic and antiseptic performance conditions.

  8. Effect of unrestricted bottle-feeding on early postoperative course after cleft palate repair.

    PubMed

    Kim, Eun Key; Lee, Taik Jong; Chae, Soo Wook

    2009-09-01

    Although bottle-feeding after cheiloplasty is widely accepted, postoperative feeding regimen after palatoplasty is still controversial. The aim of this prospective randomized study was to evaluate the effect of bottle-feeding on early postoperative course after palatoplasty in a relatively homogeneous group of patients. Eighty-two consecutive patients with nonsyndromic cleft palate undergoing 2-flap palatoplasty by a single surgeon were randomized to feeding from a bottle with the usual nipple (G1, N = 42) or to feeding with a spoon, cup, or syringe (G2, N = 40). Complication rates, postoperative sedative use, oral intake for the first 6 days, and relative weight gain at 1 and 2 months were compared. There were no significant complications such as bleeding or respiratory problem. The overall complication rate including wound dehiscence and oronasal fistula was similar in G1 and G2 (11.9% versus 12.5%, P = 1.000) as was postoperative sedative use and mean daily oral intake for the first 5 days. Mean intake on the sixth day was significantly higher in G1. There were no significant between-group differences in relative weight gain after 1 and 2 months. In conclusion, bottle-feeding had no adverse effect on the early postoperative course after palatoplasty including complication rate, oral intake, and weight gain. These findings suggest that an unrestricted feeding regimen is appropriate immediately after palatoplasty.

  9. Combined vacuum-assisted closure treatment with laparoscopic mobilization of an omental flap and meshed skin grafts for reconstruction of infected sternotomy wounds: two cases.

    PubMed

    Veir, Zoran; Smud, Sanda; Bogdanić, Branko; Cvjeticanin, Bruno; Bagatin, Dinko; Dujmović, Anto; Duduković, Mladen; Ivrlac, Radojko; Bulić, Kresimir; Mijatović, Davor

    2009-12-01

    In cardiac surgery, poststernotomy wounds are life threatening complications, with mortality up to 50%. We described two patients, who underwent coronary artery bypass grafting and postoperatively developed a deep sternal wound infection. Reconstruction was combined with vacuum-assisted closure treatment, laparoscopic mobilization of an omental flap and split thickens skin grafts. The omental flap is a well-vascularized local flap with a large surface area and has excellent immunologic and angiogenic properties. Both patients recovered completely. In our opinion, vacuum-assisted closure treatment and laparoscopic mobilization of great omentum is suitable option for treating deep sternal wounds.

  10. Effects of Postoperative Pain Management on Immune Function After Laparoscopic Resection of Colorectal Cancer: A Randomized Study.

    PubMed

    Kim, So Yeon; Kim, Nam Kyu; Baik, Seung Hyuk; Min, Byung Soh; Hur, Hyuk; Lee, Jinae; Noh, Hyun-Young; Lee, Jong Ho; Koo, Bon-Neyo

    2016-05-01

    There has been a rising interest in the possible association between perioperative opioid use and postoperative outcomes in cancer patients. Continuous surgical wound infiltration with local anesthetics is a nonopioid analgesic technique that can be used as a postoperative pain management alternative to opioid-based intravenous patient-controlled analgesia (IV PCA). The aim of this study was to compare the effects of an opioid-based analgesic regimen versus a local anesthetic wound infiltration-based analgesic regimen on immune modulation and short-term cancer recurrence or metastasis in patients undergoing laparoscopic resection of colorectal cancer.Sixty patients undergoing laparoscopic resection of colorectal cancer were randomly assigned to either the opioid group or the ON-Q group. For postoperative analgesia during the first 48 hours, the opioid group (n = 30) received fentanyl via IV PCA, whereas the ON-Q group (n = 30) received continuous wound infiltration of 0.5% ropivacaine with an ON-Q pump and tramadol via IV PCA. Pethidine for the opioid group and ketorolac or propacetamol for the ON-Q group were used as rescue analgesics. Anesthesia was induced and maintained with propofol and remifentanil. The primary outcome was postoperative immune function assessed by natural killer cell cytotoxicity (NKCC) and interleukin-2. Secondary outcomes were postoperative complications, cancer recurrence, or metastasis within 1 year after surgery, and postoperative inflammatory responses measured by white blood cell count, neutrophil percentage, and C-reactive protein. Immune function and inflammatory responses were measured before surgery and 24 and 48 hours after surgery.Fifty-nine patients completed the study. In the circumstance of similar pain control efficacy between the opioid group and the ON-Q group, postoperative NKCC and interleukin-2 levels did not differ between the 2 groups. The incidence of postoperative complications and recurrence or

  11. Wound Dehiscence and Device Migration after Subconjunctival Bevacizumab Injection with Ahmed Glaucoma Valve Implantation

    PubMed Central

    Miraftabi, Arezoo; Nilforushan, Naveed

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To report a complication pertaining to subconjunctival bevacizumab injection as an adjunct to Ahmed Glaucoma Valve (AGV) implantation. Case Report: A 54-year-old woman with history of complicated cataract surgery was referred for advanced intractable glaucoma. AGV implantation with adjunctive subconjunctival bevacizumab (1.25 mg) was performed with satisfactory results during the first postoperative week. However, 10 days after surgery, she developed wound dehiscence and tube exposure. The second case was a 33-year-old man with history of congenital glaucoma and uncontrolled IOP who developed AGV exposure and wound dehiscence after surgery. In both cases, for prevention of endophthalmitis and corneal damage by the unstable tube, the shunt was removed and the conjunctiva was re-sutured. Conclusion: The potential adverse effect of subconjunctival bevacizumab injection on wound healing should be considered in AGV surgery. PMID:27195095

  12. [Management of postoperative pancreatic fistula].

    PubMed

    Hackert, T; Büchler, M W

    2015-06-01

    The occurrence of a postoperative pancreatic fistula is one of the most important complications following pancreatic resections. The frequency of this complication varies between 3 % after pancreatic head resection and up to 35 % following distal pancreatectomy. In 2005, the international definition of postoperative pancreatic fistula was standardized according to the approach of the International Study Group of Pancreatic Surgery (ISGPS) including an A-C grading system of the severity. Consequently, results from different studies have become comparable and the historically reported fistula rates can be evaluated more critically. The present review summarises the currently available data on incidence, risk factors, fistula-associated complications and management of postoperative pancreatic fistula.

  13. Bacteriophage Therapy for Staphylococcus aureus Biofilm-Infected Wounds: A New Approach to Chronic Wound Care

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-02-01

    lidocaine and 1:100,000 epineph- rine at the planned wound sites. Six full-thickness dermal wounds, 6 mm in diameter, were created on the ventral ear...inoculated with wild-type or mutant S. aureus on postoperative day 3. Bac- terial solutions were diluted such that each wound was inoculated with a...antibiotics (Mupirocin 2% oint- ment; Teva Pharmaceuticals, Sellersville, Pa.) were applied on postoperative day 4 to eliminate free-floating, planktonic

  14. Postpancreatectomy Complications and Management.

    PubMed

    Malleo, Giuseppe; Vollmer, Charles M

    2016-12-01

    Although mortality rates after pancreatectomy have decreased, the incidence of postoperative morbidity remains high. The major procedure-related complications are pancreatic fistula, delayed gastric emptying, and postpancreatectomy hemorrhage. The International Study Group of Pancreatic Surgery defined leading complications in a standardized fashion, allowing unbiased comparison of operative results and management strategies. Risk factors for postoperative complications have been investigated and quantitative scoring systems established to estimate patient-specific risks. Management of postpancreatectomy complications has shifted from an operative to a conservative approach. Nevertheless, postoperative morbidities may have a profound impact on patient recovery and length of hospital stay and are associated with increased hospital costs.

  15. Comparing primary and secondary wound healing discomfort after mandibular third molar surgery: a randomized, double-blind clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Refo'a, Youshiaho; Ouatik, Nabil; Golchin, Foroogh; Mahboobi, Nima

    2011-01-01

    Extraction of impacted mandibular third molars is one of the most common procedures in the oral cavity and often is followed by pain, swelling, and postextraction alveolitis and trismus. It has been suggested that postoperative discomfort is in relation to the type of surgical wound healing. The aim of this study was to compare pain, swelling, and maximum mouth opening in two groups of patients with primary and secondary wound healing after impacted mandibular third molar surgery. Thirty-two patients were enrolled in this study and randomly divided into two equal groups, quantitatively and by gender. After the surgical procedures, 16 patients received primary wound closure, while the other 16 participants received secondary wound closure. A visual analog scale was used to collect pain data three days after the surgeries. A checklist was used to record data regarding swelling size and maximum mouth opening before, immediately following, three days after, and one week after surgery. Frequency tests and a t-test were used for statistical analysis and a P value of <0.05 was considered to be statistically significant. Patients in the secondary wound healing group showed statistically significant lower discomfort regarding pain, swelling size, and maximal mouth opening compared to the primary wound healing group. The authors suggest the use of secondary wound healing closure to reduce postoperative complications such as pain, maximal mouth opening, and swelling size after impacted mandibular third molar extractions.

  16. Management of Complications Following Emergency and Elective Surgery for Diverticulitis

    PubMed Central

    Holmer, Christoph; Kreis, Martin E.

    2015-01-01

    Background The clinical spectrum of sigmoid diverticulitis (SD) varies from asymptomatic diverticulosis to symptomatic disease with potentially fatal complications. Sigmoid colectomy with restoration of continuity has been the prevailing modality for treating acute and recurrent SD, and is often performed as a laparoscopy-assisted procedure. For elective sigmoid colectomy, the postoperative morbidity rate is 15-20% whereas morbidity rates reach up to 30% in patients who undergo emergency surgery for perforated SD. Some of the more common and serious surgical complications after sigmoid colectomy are anastomotic leaks and peritonitis, wound infections, small bowel obstruction, postoperative bleeding, and injuries to the urinary tract structures. Regarding the management of complications, it makes no difference whether the complication is a result of an emergency or an elective procedure. Methods The present work gives an overview of the management of complications in the surgical treatment of SD based on the current literature. Results To achieve successful management, early diagnosis is mandatory in cases of deviation from the normal postoperative course. If diagnostic procedures fail to deliver a correlate for the clinical situation of the patient, re-laparotomy or re-laparoscopy still remain among the most important diagnostic and/or therapeutic principles in visceral surgery when a patient's clinical status deteriorates. Conclusion The ability to recognize and successfully manage complications is a crucial part of the surgical treatment of diverticular disease and should be mastered by any surgeon qualified in this field. PMID:26989382

  17. Perineal resuturing versus expectant management following vaginal delivery complicated by a dehisced wound (PREVIEW): a pilot and feasibility randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Dudley, L; Kettle, C; Thomas, P W; Ismail, K M K

    2017-01-01

    Objective To establish the feasibility of conducting a definitive randomised controlled trial (RCT) comparing the effectiveness of resuturing versus expectant management for dehisced perineal wounds. Design A multicentre pilot and feasibility RCT. Setting Ten UK maternity units from July 2011 to July 2013. Population Eligible women with a dehisced perineal wound within 2 weeks of childbirth. Methods The interventions were resuturing or expectancy. Randomisation was via web or telephone, stratified by participating centre. Blinding was not possible due to the nature of the interventions. Analysis was by intention-to-treat. Outcome The primary outcome measure was wound healing at 6–8 weeks. Results The study revealed a number of feasibility issues, particularly strong patient and clinician preference for treatment options at recruiting centres and the timing of the primary outcome measure. Thirty-four women were randomised (17 in each arm). Data from 33 women were analysed on an intention-to-treat analysis to obtain preliminary estimates of effect size. There was a difference in wound healing at 2 weeks favouring resuturing (OR 20.00, 95% CI 2.04 to 196.37, p=0.004). However, by 6–8 weeks all but one wound in both groups had healed. Conclusions PREVIEW revealed a number of feasibility issues, which impacted on recruitment rate. These will have to be taken into account in the design of any future definitive study. In this feasibility study, resuturing was associated with quicker wound healing and women reported higher satisfaction rates with the outcome at 3 months. Trial registration number ISRCTN05754020. PMID:28188151

  18. [Postoperative hypothyroidism].

    PubMed

    Olifirova, O S; Trynov, N N

    2015-01-01

    There is a number of factors such as the thyroidectomy and limiting subtotal thyroid resection against the background of euthyroidism and initial hypothyroidism (in any extent of operation) which leads to the prediction of early postoperative hypothyroidism origin during 10 days of the postoperative peri- od. The early postoperative hypothyroidism is accompanied by activation processes of lipid peroxide oxidation and at the same time by reduction of antioxidant protection.

  19. Bilayered negative-pressure wound therapy preventing leg incision morbidity in coronary artery bypass graft patients

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Yongchao; Song, Zhigang; Xu, Zhiyun; Ye, Xiaofei; Xue, Chunyu; Li, Junhui; Bi, Hongda

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Backgrounds: The harvesting of great saphenous veins for coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) patients may result in significant complications, including lymphorrhagia, lymphoedema, incision infection, wound dehiscence, and skin flap necrosis. We investigated the function of a self-designed bilayered negative pressure wound therapy (b-NPWT) for reducing the above-mentioned complications using a clinical randomized controlled trial. Methods: A single-center, pilot randomized controlled trial was conducted. From December 2013 to March 2014, a total of 72 coronary heart disease patients (48 men and 24 women) received CABG therapy, with great saphenous veins were selected as grafts. Patients were equally randomized into a treatment and a control group. After the harvesting of the great saphenous veins and direct closure of the wound with sutures, b-NPWT was used for the thigh incision in the treatment group for 5 days (treatment thigh). Traditional surgical pads were applied to both the shank incisions of the treatment group patients (treatment shank) and the entire incisions of the control group (control thigh, control shank). Postoperative complications were recorded and statistically analyzed based on outcomes of thigh treatment, shank treatment, thigh control, and shank control groups. Results: The incidence rates of early complications, such as lymphorrhagia, lymphoedema, infection, wound dehiscence, and skin flap necrosis, of the vascular donor site in the thigh treatment group was significantly lower than those in the 3 other groups. Conclusions: The self-designed b-NPWT can effectively reduce postoperative complications, such as lymphedema, incision infection, wound dehiscence, and skin flap necrosis, in CABG patients who underwent great saphenous veins harvesting. Trial registration: ClinicalTrials.gov. The unique registration number is NCT02010996. PMID:28099357

  20. Complications after Loop Ileostomy Closure: A Retrospective Analysis of 132 Patients

    PubMed Central

    Poskus, Eligijus; Kildusis, Edvinas; Smolskas, Edgaras; Ambrazevicius, Marijus; Strupas, Kestutis

    2014-01-01

    Summary Background Closure of a loop ileostomy is a relatively simple procedure although many studies have demonstrated high morbidity rates following it. Methods to reduce the number of complications, such as timing of closure or different surgical closure techniques, are investigated. The aim of this study was to evaluate the experience of the Abdominal Surgery Center at Vilnius University Hospital (VUH) ‘Santariskiu klinikos’ to review the complications after closure of loop ileostomy and to identify potential risk factors for postoperative complications. Methods Data from 132 patients who underwent closure of loop ileostomy from 2003 to 2013 at the Abdominal Surgery Center of VUH were collected, including demographics, causes of ileostomy formation, additional diseases, time from creation to closure of ileostomy, anastomotic technique, duration of the operation, postoperative complications, and hospital stay after surgery. The operations were performed by 15 surgeons with varying experience assisted by surgical residents. Experience in ileostomy closure was defined by the number of procedures performed. Results Complications occurred in 24 patients (18.2%), with 20 of them having surgical complications: bowel obstruction (9 (6.8%)), wound infection (4 (3.0%)), peritonitis due to anastomotic leak (3 (2.3%)), intra-abdominal abscess (2 (1.5%)), anastomotic leak with enterocutaneous fistula (1 (0.76%)), and bleeding (1 (0.76%)). 4 patients had non-surgical complications: postoperative diarrhea (2 (1.5%)), urinary retention (1 (0.76%)), and deep vein thrombosis (1 (0.76%)). Most complications were classified as group II according to the Clavien-Dindo classification. 2 patients died (1.5%). The anastomotic technique used did not affect the outcome. The experience of the surgeon as judged by the frequency of the procedure was the main factor affecting postoperative morbidity significantly (p = 0.03). Conclusion Our study revealed that the rate of postoperative

  1. [Ozone-ultrasonic therapy in the treatment of purulent wounds].

    PubMed

    Lipatov, K V; Sopromadze, M A; Shekhter, A B; Rudenko, T G; Emel'ianov, A Iu

    2002-01-01

    Based on planimetric, bacteriologic and histologic study high efficiency of local ozonotherapy of wound in combination with low-frequency ultrasound was demonstrated experimentally on rat model of infected purulent skin wound. This method was used in 45 patients with purulent wounds of soft tissues (postoperative, posttraumatic, burn, sore spot) that led to fast cleaning of wound surface, decrease of bacterial contamination and granulations. It permitted to eliminate inflammation and to create optimum conditions for wound closure.

  2. Effect of low-dose dexketoprofen trometamol and paracetamol on postoperative complications after impacted third molar surgery on healthy volunteers: A pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Durmus, Ercan; Kiresi, Demet

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of the present study was to investigate the analgesic and anti-inflammatory effects of dexketoprofen trometamol (DT) and paracetamol on deep acute somatic pain and inflammation in patients undergoing impacted third molar surgery. This study was planned to present benefits that we could obtain with low burden of drug. Study Design: Effects of drugs, which were administered preemptively before the procedure, on pain, mouth-opening limitation, and swelling were assessed by visual analogue scale (VAS), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and mouth-opening measurement. Following surgery, time intervals when the patients first need to receive the drug were measured. Results: The VAS scores of the patients were lower in the side treated with DT than that in the paracetamol treated side. There was no significant difference between the groups in terms of mouth-opening limitation. MRI recordings revealed that swelling was lower in the side treated with paracetamol than DT treated side. Conclusions: Administration of the drugs before surgery contributed to the postoperative patient comfort. The analgesic activity of 12.5 mg dose of DT was similar to, even better than, the analgesic activity of 500 mg dose of paracetamol; however, DT had insufficient anti-inflammatory efficacy. Key words:Dexketoprofen trometamol, paracetamol, magnetic resonance imaging. PMID:25129247

  3. A Minimally Invasive Approach For Treating Postoperative Seromas After Incisional Hernia Repair

    PubMed Central

    Lehr, Shannon C.

    2001-01-01

    Background: The most frequent wound complication following repair of large incisional hernias is seroma formation, especially when the use of a mesh onlay requires extensive subcutaneous undermining. Treatment options for postoperative seromas include observation for spontaneous resolution, percutaneous aspiration, closed suction drainage, abdominal binders, and sclerosant. Methods: A novel technique for treating persistent postoperative seromas is presented herein. This technique involves a 3-puncture minimally invasive approach that can be performed in an outpatient setting. Evacuation of serous fluid and fibrinous debris is followed by argon beam scarification of the seroma cavity lining. Talc slurry is then introduced into the cavity. Three patients have been treated with this technique. Results: All 3 patients had successful ablation of seromas that had persisted despite standard treatment modalities. Conclusion: A minimally invasive approach is a reasonable and safe alternative for treating persistent postoperative seromas. PMID:11548834

  4. Puncture wounds of the foot.

    PubMed

    Racz, Roger S; Ramanujam, Crystal L; Zgonis, Thomas

    2010-10-01

    Puncture wounds are common injuries of the foot. Although most puncture wounds are benign, devastating complications are possible without adequate treatment. These injuries can occur in all age groups and in various circumstances. Early diagnosis and appropriate medical and surgical management is paramount in achieving successful outcomes.

  5. Gentamicin-Impregnated Collagen Sponge: Effectiveness in Preventing Sternal Wound Infection in High-Risk Cardiac Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Rapetto, Filippo; Bruno, Vito D.; Guida, Gustavo; Marsico, Roberto; Chivasso, Pierpaolo; Zebele, Carlo

    2016-01-01

    Sternal wound infections represent one of the most frequent complications after cardiac surgery and are associated with high postoperative mortality. Several preventive methods have been introduced, and recently, gentamicin-impregnated collagen sponges (GICSs) have shown a promising effect in reducing the incidence of this type of complications. Gentamicin is an aminoglycoside antibiotic that has been widely used to treat infections caused by multiresistant bacteria; despite its effectiveness, its systemic use carries a risk of toxicity. GICSs appear to overcome this side effect, topically delivering high antibiotic concentrations to the wound and thus reducing the toxic-related events. Although several retrospective analyses and randomized controlled trials have studied the use of GICSs in cardiac surgery, conclusions regarding their efficacy in preventing sternal wound infection are inconsistent. We have reviewed the current literature focusing on high-risk patients. PMID:27279734

  6. An Inexpensive Modified Primary Closure Technique for Class IV (Dirty) Wounds Significantly Decreases Superficial and Deep Surgical Site Infection.

    PubMed

    Kim, Bradford J; Aloia, Thomas A

    2016-11-01

    Despite the creation of several programs to decrease the incidence of surgical site infection, it remains a common complication that has a significant impact on patient recovery and medical costs. The following is a description and brief outcome report of a modified primary closure technique used for dirty (Class IV) wounds. There were 14 consecutive patients who had a laparotomy with Class IV wounds treated by a single surgeon (TAA) from 2011 to 2015. All patients had a history of cancer and either showed signs suggestive for an acute abdomen and required an emergent exploratory laparotomy or were found to have purulent intraabdominal infection at the time of elective surgery. The operation and "modified primary closure" technique (subcutaneous wound wicks with stapled skin closure) were performed in every case. The modified primary closure technique was utilized in 14 patients with a Class IV wound. There were no 30-day mortalities or readmissions. Wound wicks were slowly advanced out over a 7-day period, and only one patient required subsequent wound packing of a single-wicked area. There were no superficial or deep surgical site infections, or wound dehiscence during the hospital course, or 30-day postoperative period. The modified primary closure technique is efficient and inexpensive and was effective in a series of 14 patients with wounds classified as dirty.

  7. Management of complications and compromised free flaps following major head and neck surgery.

    PubMed

    Kucur, Cuneyt; Durmus, Kasim; Uysal, Ismail O; Old, Matthew; Agrawal, Amit; Arshad, Hassan; Teknos, Theodoros N; Ozer, Enver

    2016-01-01

    Microvascular free flaps are preferred for most major head and neck reconstruction surgeries because of better functional outcomes, improved esthetics, and generally higher success rates. Numerous studies have investigated measures to prevent flap loss, but few have evaluated the optimal treatment for free flap complications. This study aimed to determine the complication rate after free flap reconstructions and discusses our management strategies. Medical records of 260 consecutive patients who underwent free flap reconstructions for head and neck defects between July 2006 and June 2010 were retrospectively reviewed for patient and surgical characteristics and postoperative complications. The results revealed that microvascular free flaps were extremely reliable, with a 3.5 % incidence of flap failure. There were 78 surgical site complications. The most common complication was neck wound infection, followed by dehiscence, vascular congestion, abscess, flap necrosis, hematoma, osteoradionecrosis, and brisk bleeding. Twenty patients with poor wound healing received hyperbaric oxygen therapy, which was ineffective in three patients who eventually experienced complete flap loss. Eleven patients with vascular congestion underwent medicinal leech therapy, which was effective. Among the 78 patients with complications, 44 required repeat surgery, which was performed for postoperative brisk bleeding in three. Eventually, ten patients experienced partial flap loss and nine experienced complete flap loss, with the latter requiring subsequent pectoralis major flap reconstruction. Microvascular free flap reconstruction represents an essential and reliable technique for head and neck defects and allows surgeons to perform radical resection with satisfactory functional results and acceptable complication rates.

  8. [Timing of dressing removal in the healing of surgical wounds by primary intention: a meta-analysis].

    PubMed

    Eberhardt, Doris; Berg, Almuth; Fleischer, Steffen; Langer, Gero

    2013-08-01

    An appropriate postoperative wound management helps to prevent surgical site infections. However, ideal timing of dressing removal is an unresolved issue in current practice. The objective of this systematic review therefore was to provide a comprehensive synthesis of existing evidence concerning the efficacy of different periods of postoperative dressing removal in surgical wounds which are healing by primary intention. We searched MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, The Cochrane Library (all in August 2011), and hand-searched additional sources. All randomised controlled trials that were comparing different periods of leaving dressings in place, including not dressing the surgical site at all, and covering wounds until suture removal were included. We conducted our systematic review and meta-analysis in accordance with the recommendations of the Cochrane Collaboration. Eight trials with a total of 2097 participants were included in our meta-analysis. All studies were at high or unclear risk of bias. This meta-analysis did not show a higher rate of wound infections or other wound complications associated with an early dressing removal in wounds that are healing by primary intention: risk difference (RD) -0.01; 95%-confidence interval (CI) -0.03, 0.01. However, conclusions are limited due to bad study quality of included studies. Finally more sound research is needed.

  9. Chronic Wound Biofilm Model

    PubMed Central

    Ganesh, Kasturi; Sinha, Mithun; Mathew-Steiner, Shomita S.; Das, Amitava; Roy, Sashwati; Sen, Chandan K.

    2015-01-01

    Significance: Multispecies microbial biofilms may contribute to wound chronicity by derailing the inherent reparative process of the host tissue. In the biofilm form, bacteria are encased within an extracellular polymeric substance and become recalcitrant to antimicrobials and host defenses. For biofilms of relevance to human health, there are two primary contributing factors: the microbial species involved and host response which, in turn, shapes microbial processes over time. This progressive interaction between microbial species and the host is an iterative process that helps evolve an acute-phase infection to a pathogenic chronic biofilm. Thus, long-term wound infection studies are needed to understand the longitudinal cascade of events that culminate into a pathogenic wound biofilm. Recent Advances: Our laboratory has recently published the first long-term (2 month) study of polymicrobial wound biofilm infection in a translationally valuable porcine wound model. Critical Issues: It is widely recognized that the porcine system represents the most translationally valuable approach to experimentally model human skin wounds. A meaningful experimental biofilm model must be in vivo, include mixed species of clinically relevant microbes, and be studied longitudinally long term. Cross-validation of such experimental findings with findings from biofilm-infected patient wounds is critically important. Future Directions: Additional value may be added to the experimental system described above by studying pigs with underlying health complications (e.g., metabolic syndrome), as is typically seen in patient populations. PMID:26155380

  10. The Negligible Influence of Chronic Obesity on Hospitalization, Clinical Status, and Complications in Elective Posterior Lumbar Interbody Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Kombos, Theodoros; Bode, Frank

    2016-01-01

    Background. Posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF) is a common surgical treatment for degenerative spinal instability, but many surgeons consider obesity a contraindication for elective spinal fusion. The aim of this study was to analyze whether obesity has any influence on hospitalization parameters, change in clinical status, or complications. Methods. In this prospective study, regression analysis was used to analyze the influence of the body mass index (BMI) on operating time, postoperative care, hospitalization time, type of postdischarge care, change in paresis or sensory deficits, pain level, wound complications, cerebrospinal fluid leakage, and implant complications. Results. Operating time increased only 2.5 minutes for each increase of BMI by 1. The probability of having a wound complication increased statistically with rising BMI. Nonetheless, BMI accounted for very little of the variation in the data, meaning that other factors or random chances play a much larger role. Conclusions. Obesity has to be considered a risk factor for wound complications in patients undergoing elective PLIF for degenerative instability. However, BMI showed no significant influence on other kinds of peri- or postoperative complications, nor clinical outcomes. So obesity cannot be considered a contraindication for elective PLIF. PMID:27478866

  11. Administration of Tranexamic Acid Reduces Postoperative Blood Loss in Calcaneal Fractures: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    Xie, Bing; Tian, Jing; Zhou, Da-peng

    2015-01-01

    The present randomized controlled trial was undertaken to evaluate the effect of tranexamic acid (TXA) on reducing postoperative blood loss in calcaneal fractures. A total of 90 patients with a unilateral closed calcaneal fracture were randomized to the TXA (n = 45) and control (n = 45) groups. The corresponding groups received 15 mg/kg body weight of TXA or placebo (0.9% sodium chloride solution) intravenously before the skin incision was made. Open reduction and internal fixation was performed for all patients and selective bone grafting was performed. The patients were examined 3 months after surgery. The intraoperative and postoperative blood loss, blood test results, and wound complications were compared between the 2 groups. The complications of TXA were also investigated. No statistically significant differences were found in the baseline characteristics between the TXA and control groups. Also, no significant difference was noted in the intraoperative blood loss between the 2 groups. However, in the TXA group, the postoperative blood loss during the first 24 hours was significantly lower than that in the control group (110.0 ± 160.0 mL versus 320.0 ± 360.0 mL; p < .001). The incidence of wound complications was also reduced compared with that in the control group (7.3% versus 23.8%; p = .036). No significant difference was found in the incidence of thromboembolic events or adverse drug reactions between the 2 groups. We concluded that preoperative single-dose TXA can effectively reduce postoperative blood loss and wound complications in patients with calcaneal fractures and that no significant side effects developed compared with the control group.

  12. Staged reconstruction after gunshot wounds to the abdomen.

    PubMed

    Cohen, M; Morales, R; Fildes, J; Barrett, J

    2001-07-01

    developed a postoperative hernia, two developed superficial wound dehiscence that healed without further surgery, and one required re-exploration for a failed anastomosis after colostomy closure. All but one patient maintained a stable abdominal wall after the reconstruction. The authors concluded that staged abdominal wall reconstruction should be primarily recommended for patients with complex abdominal wounds and a compromised general condition that precludes primary closure. With this treatment protocol, patients can recover faster from their trauma surgery and the risk of perioperative complications can be reduced. After final reconstruction, the continuity, stability, and strength of the abdominal wall are maintained in the vast majority of cases with the use of autogenous tissue and without the need for alloplastic material. With close cooperation between the trauma team and the plastic surgeon and appropriate timing and planning of each stage, the success rate of the technique is high and the incidence of complications limited.

  13. Postoperative diet advancement: surgical dogma vs evidence-based medicine.

    PubMed

    Warren, Jeremy; Bhalla, Varun; Cresci, Gail

    2011-04-01

    Postoperative ileus is a natural part of recovery following abdominal and intestinal surgery. Research in the laboratory and clinical arenas has challenged the long-held belief that enteral nutrition (EN) should not be administered until bowel function has resumed, which is typically judged by a subjective bowel function assessment. Traditional postoperative management begins with clinical monitoring of return of bowel function, followed by a clear liquid diet that is advanced to regular solid food as tolerated. Studies have consistently demonstrated that early EN is safe and well tolerated, showing a reduction in wound morbidity and healing, fewer septic complications, diminished weight loss, and improved protein kinetics in patients administered early EN. Barriers to early enteral feeding include fear of GI morbidity, anastomotic disruption or leak but have not been proven valid in clinical or experimental trials. A clear liquid diet is the most frequently ordered first postoperative meal regardless of early or delayed administration. Although generally well tolerated, this diet fails to provide adequate nutrients to the postsurgical patient. In contrast, advancement to a regular diet as the initial meal has been shown to be well tolerated and provides significantly more nutrients than a clear liquid diet. This article reviews basic GI physiology, including motility, nutrient absorption, and the changes that occur in regulation and function of the GI tract following surgery, as well as clinical data regarding postoperative GI function and diet advancement. This will be applied to the clinical practices of postoperative dietary advancement to discuss the timing and choice of initial feeding in the postoperative patient.

  14. Ultraviolet light and hyperpigmentation in healing wounds

    SciTech Connect

    Wiemer, D.R.; Spira, M.

    1983-10-01

    The concept of permanent hyperpigmentation in wounds following ultraviolet light exposure during the postoperative period has found a place in plastic surgical literature but has not been documented. This study evaluates the effect of ultraviolet light on healing wounds in paraplegics. It failed to confirm permanent alteration in pigmentation response to ultraviolet exposure and suggests that other factors are of greater importance in the development of hyperpigmentation in the healing wound.

  15. The enhanced healing of a high-risk, clean, sutured surgical incision by prophylactic negative pressure wound therapy as delivered by Prevena™ Customizable™: cosmetic and therapeutic results.

    PubMed

    Scalise, Alessandro; Tartaglione, Caterina; Bolletta, Elisa; Calamita, Roberto; Nicoletti, Giovanni; Pierangeli, Marina; Grassetti, Luca; Di Benedetto, Giovanni

    2015-04-01

    According to the literature, incisional closure complications may range from postoperative surgical site infections, representing 17-22% of health care-associated infections, surgical wound dehiscence and formation of haematomas or seromas, and can lead to delayed or impaired incision healing. These kinds of situations are more common when wounds are closed under tension or in specific patient morbidities. Obesity, in particular, is associated with an impaired blood flow to tissues, predisposing the patient to increased risk of wound complications by various mechanisms. Incisional complications can become relevant economic burdens for health care systems because of an increase in the average length of hospital stay and readmissions, and additional medical and surgical procedures. Thus, a preventive therapy may have a critical role in the management of healing. Negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) technology as delivered by Prevena™ Customizable™ (Kinetic Concepts Inc., San Antonio, TX) has recently been the focus of a new investigation, as a prophylactic measure to prevent complications via immediate postoperative application in high-risk, clean, closed surgical incisions. The authors present a 62-year-old class II obese female, who underwent bilateral inguinal dermolipectomy. Prophylactic NPWT as delivered by Prevena™ was performed successfully over surgical incisions. Cosmetic and therapeutic results are shown.

  16. Association Between Preoperative Nutritional Status and Postoperative Outcome in Head and Neck Cancer Patients.

    PubMed

    Leung, John S L; Seto, Alfred; Li, George K H

    2017-04-01

    Head and neck cancer patients treated with surgery often experience significant postoperative morbidities. Administering preoperative nutritional intervention may improve surgical outcomes, but there is currently a paucity of data reviewing the association between preoperative nutritional status and postoperative outcome. It is therefore of importance to investigate this association among head and neck cancer patients. To assess the association between preoperative nutritional status and postoperative outcome in head and neck cancer patients treated with surgery, a retrospective study of 70 head and neck cancer patients who were surgically treated between 2013 and 2014 in a tertiary referral head and neck surgery center in Hong Kong was conducted. Clinical data regarding preoperative nutritional status and postoperative outcome were retrieved from a computer record system. Logistic and linear regressions were used to analyze the appropriate parameters. A higher preoperative albumin level was associated with lower rates of postoperative complications and better wound healing (P < 0.05). In contrast, preoperative body mass index, hemoglobin level, and absolute lymphocyte count did not demonstrate significant associations with postoperative outcome. As high albumin levels are associated with better surgical outcome in head and neck cancer patients, preoperative intervention strategies that boost albumin levels could be considered for improving surgical outcome.

  17. Negative pressure wound therapy for management of the surgical incision in orthopaedic surgery

    PubMed Central

    Karlakki, S.; Brem, M.; Giannini, S.; Khanduja, V.; Stannard, J.; Martin, R.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives The period of post-operative treatment before surgical wounds are completely closed remains a key window, during which one can apply new technologies that can minimise complications. One such technology is the use of negative pressure wound therapy to manage and accelerate healing of the closed incisional wound (incisional NPWT). Methods We undertook a literature review of this emerging indication to identify evidence within orthopaedic surgery and other surgical disciplines. Literature that supports our current understanding of the mechanisms of action was also reviewed in detail. Results A total of 33 publications were identified, including nine clinical study reports from orthopaedic surgery; four from cardiothoracic surgery and 12 from studies in abdominal, plastic and vascular disciplines. Most papers (26 of 33) had been published within the past three years. Thus far two randomised controlled trials – one in orthopaedic and one in cardiothoracic surgery – show evidence of reduced incidence of wound healing complications after between three and five days of post-operative NPWT of two- and four-fold, respectively. Investigations show that reduction in haematoma and seroma, accelerated wound healing and increased clearance of oedema are significant mechanisms of action. Conclusions There is a rapidly emerging literature on the effect of NPWT on the closed incision. Initiated and confirmed first with a randomised controlled trial in orthopaedic trauma surgery, studies in abdominal, plastic and vascular surgery with high rates of complications have been reported recently. The evidence from single-use NPWT devices is accumulating. There are no large randomised studies yet in reconstructive joint replacement. Cite this article: Bone Joint Res 2013;2:276–84. PMID:24352756

  18. Wound infections in clean and potentially contaminated surgery. Importance of bacterial and non-bacterial factors.

    PubMed

    Bröte, L

    1976-01-01

    Postoperative wound infections in clean--and potentially contaminated surgery were studied with regard to demonstrable wound contamination and the occurrence of non-bacterial wound infection promoting factors. The incidence of demonstrable wound contamination in clean surgery was low, and observed rates of wound infection could not be related to differences in wound contamination, but to the occurrence of non-bacterial wound infection potentiating factors, e.g. implantation of foreign materials (osteosynthesis), cicatrical tissues or a compromized host. Corresponding studies in potentially contaminated surgery revealed a significantly higher incidence of wound contamination compared to clean surgery and a significant correlation between Gram negative wound contamination and rates of postoperative wound infections in certain types of gastrointestinal surgery. Patient factors, such as age or malignancy, did not influence the wound infection frequency when the incidence of wound contamination was taken into consideration.

  19. INFLUENCE OF SURGICAL TECHNIQUE IN THE PERITONEAL CARCINOMATOSIS SURGICAL WOUND IMPLANT: EXPERIMENTAL MODEL IN MICE

    PubMed Central

    ROSA, Roberto Maranhão; CAIADO, Rafael Coelho; REIS, Paulo Roberto de Melo; LACERDA, Elisângela de Paula Silveira; SUGITA, Denis Masashi; MRUÉ, Fátima

    2015-01-01

    Background The number of malignancies increased alarmingly. Surgery constitutes one of the most efficient therapeutic modalities for the treatment of solid tumors. The neoplastic implant in surgical wound is a complication whose percentage of occurrence reported in the literature is variable, but sets with high morbidity and therapeutic difficulties. Protecting the wound is one of the recommended principles of oncologic surgery. Aim To evaluate the influence of wound protection in the development of tumor implantation. Methods Sarcoma 180 tumor cells were used, with intraperitoneal inoculation in Swiss mice. After the establishment of neoplastic ascites, animals were randomized into two groups of 10, each group consisting of five males and five females. In both groups, laparotomy and manipulation of intra-abdominal organs was performed. In a group laparotomy was performed using the protection of the abdominal wound and the other group without it. On the 9th postoperative day macroscopic evaluation of the operative scar was performed, which was later removed for microscopic evaluation. Results There was microscopic infiltration of tumor cells in the wound of all animals. However, the group that held the protection, infiltration was less intense when compared to the group without it. The infiltration was also more severe in females than in males of the same group. Conclusion Tumor infiltration into the wound was more intense in the group in which the protection of the surgical site was not performed, and in females when compared to males of the same group. PMID:25861061

  20. Infection in conflict wounded

    PubMed Central

    Eardley, W. G. P.; Brown, K. V.; Bonner, T. J.; Green, A. D.; Clasper, J. C.

    2011-01-01

    Although mechanisms of modern military wounding may be distinct from those of ancient conflicts, the infectious sequelae of ballistic trauma and the evolving microbial flora of war wounds remain a considerable burden on both the injured combatant and their deployed medical systems. Battlefield surgeons of ancient times favoured suppuration in war wounding and as such Galenic encouragement of pus formation would hinder progress in wound care for centuries. Napoleonic surgeons eventually abandoned this mantra, embracing radical surgical intervention, primarily by amputation, to prevent infection. Later, microscopy enabled identification of microorganisms and characterization of wound flora. Concurrent advances in sanitation and evacuation enabled improved outcomes and establishment of modern military medical systems. Advances in medical doctrine and technology afford those injured in current conflicts with increasing survivability through rapid evacuation, sophisticated resuscitation and timely surgical intervention. Infectious complications in those that do survive, however, are a major concern. Addressing antibiotic use, nosocomial transmission and infectious sequelae are a current clinical management and research priority and will remain so in an era characterized by a massive burden of combat extremity injury. This paper provides a review of infection in combat wounding from a historical setting through to the modern evidence base. PMID:21149356

  1. Negative Pressure Wound Therapy

    PubMed Central

    2006-01-01

    Executive Summary Objective This review was conducted to assess the effectiveness of negative pressure wound therapy. Clinical Need: Target Population and Condition Many wounds are difficult to heal, despite medical and nursing care. They may result from complications of an underlying disease, like diabetes; or from surgery, constant pressure, trauma, or burns. Chronic wounds are more often found in elderly people and in those with immunologic or chronic diseases. Chronic wounds may lead to impaired quality of life and functioning, to amputation, or even to death. The prevalence of chronic ulcers is difficult to ascertain. It varies by condition and complications due to the condition that caused the ulcer. There are, however, some data on condition-specific prevalence rates; for example, of patients with diabetes, 15% are thought to have foot ulcers at some time during their lives. The approximate community care cost of treating leg ulcers in Canada, without reference to cause, has been estimated at upward of $100 million per year. Surgically created wounds can also become chronic, especially if they become infected. For example, the reported incidence of sternal wound infections after median sternotomy is 1% to 5%. Abdominal surgery also creates large open wounds. Because it is sometimes necessary to leave these wounds open and allow them to heal on their own (secondary intention), some may become infected and be difficult to heal. Yet, little is known about the wound healing process, and this makes treating wounds challenging. Many types of interventions are used to treat wounds. Current best practice for the treatment of ulcers and other chronic wounds includes debridement (the removal of dead or contaminated tissue), which can be surgical, mechanical, or chemical; bacterial balance; and moisture balance. Treating the cause, ensuring good nutrition, and preventing primary infection also help wounds to heal. Saline or wet-to-moist dressings are reported as

  2. Clinical evaluations of autologous fibrin glue and polyglycolic acid sheets as oral surgical wound coverings after partial glossectomy.

    PubMed

    Kouketsu, Atsumu; Nogami, Shinnosuke; Fujiwara, Minami; Mori, Shiro; Yamauchi, Kensuke; Hashimoto, Wataru; Miyashita, Hitoshi; Kurihara, Jun; Kawai, Tadashi; Higuchi, Keisuke; Takahashi, Tetsu

    2016-08-01

    Polyglycolic acid (PGA) sheets and commercial fibrin glue are commonly used to cover open wound surfaces in oral surgery. Compared to commercial fibrin glue composed of pooled allogeneic blood, autologous fibrin glue is less expensive and poses lower risks of viral infection and allergic reaction. Here, we evaluated postoperative pain, scar contracture, ingestion, tongue dyskinesia, and postoperative bleeding in 24 patients who underwent partial glossectomy plus the application of a PGA sheet and an autologous fibrin glue covering (autologous group) versus 11 patients in whom a PGA sheet and commercial fibrin glue were used (allogeneic group). The evaluated clinical measures were nearly identical in both groups. Remarkable wound surface granulation was recognized in two cases in the autologous group. No complications were observed in either group, including viral infection or allergic reaction. Abnormal postoperative bleeding in the wound region was observed in one case in the allogeneic group. Coagulation and adhesion of the autologous fibrin glue were equivalent to those of conventional therapy with a PGA sheet and commercial fibrin glue. Thus, our results show that covering wounds with autologous fibrin glue and PGA sheets may help avoid the risks of viral infection and allergic reaction in partial glossectomy cases.

  3. Imaging of the Postoperative Orbit.

    PubMed

    Learned, Kim O; Nasseri, Farbod; Mohan, Suyash

    2015-08-01

    Imaging evaluation of the postoperative orbit remains challenging even for the expert neuroradiologist. This article provides a simplified framework for understanding the complex postoperative appearances of the orbit, in an attempt to enhance the diagnostic accuracy of postoperative computed tomography and MR imaging of the orbit. Readers are familiarized with the normal appearances of common eye procedures and orbit reconstructions to help avoid interpretative pitfalls. Also reviewed are imaging features of common surgical complications, and evaluation of residual/recurrent neoplasm in the setting of oncologic imaging surveillance.

  4. [Postoperative imaging of the shoulder].

    PubMed

    Wörtler, K; Rummeny, E J

    2004-06-01

    Correct interpretation of imaging findings in the postoperative shoulder is impaired by surgical distortion of normal anatomy and possible artifacts. Advanced postoperative imaging of the shoulder in addition to the selection of the best suited modality necessitates familiarity with the surgical procedure that has been performed and its consecutive morphological changes. This article reviews the most common arthroscopic and open techniques used for treatment of shoulder instability, lesions of the superior labral-bicipital complex, primary impingement, and rotator cuff tears, their typical postoperative imaging findings, as well as the diagnostic performance of cross sectional imaging techniques in the detection of recurrent lesions and complications.

  5. [Application of modern wound dressings in the treatment of chronic wounds].

    PubMed

    Triller, Ciril; Huljev, Dubravko; Smrke, Dragica Maja

    2012-10-01

    Chronic and acute infected wounds can pose a major clinical problem because of associated complications and slow healing. In addition to classic preparations for wound treatment, an array of modern dressings for chronic wound care are currently available on the market. These dressings are intended for the wounds due to intralesional physiological, pathophysiological and pathological causes and which failed to heal as expected upon the use of standard procedures. Classic materials such as gauze and bandage are now considered obsolete and of just historical relevance because modern materials employed in wound treatment, such as moisture, warmth and appropriate pH are known to ensure optimal conditions for wound healing. Modern wound dressings absorb wound discharge, reduce bacterial contamination, while protecting wound surrounding from secondary infection and preventing transfer of infection from the surrounding area onto the wound surface. The use of modern wound dressings is only justified when the cause of wound development has been established or chronic wound due to the underlying disease has been diagnosed. Wound dressing is chosen according to wound characteristics and by experience. We believe that the main advantages of modern wound dressings versus classic materials include more efficient wound cleaning, simpler placement of the dressing, reduced pain to touch, decreased sticking to the wound surface, and increased capacity of absorbing wound exudate. Modern wound dressings accelerate the formation of granulation tissue, reduce the length of possible hospital stay and facilitate personnel work. Thus, the overall cost of treatment is reduced, although the price of modern wound dressings is higher than that of classic materials. All types of modern wound dressings, their characteristics and indications for use are described.

  6. Postoperative Complications Leading to Death after Coagulum Pyelolithotomy in a Tetraplegic Patient: Can We Prevent Prolonged Ileus, Recurrent Intestinal Obstruction due to Adhesions Requiring Laparotomies, Chest Infection Warranting Tracheostomy, and Mechanical Ventilation?

    PubMed Central

    Vaidyanathan, Subramanian; Soni, Bakul; Singh, Gurpreet; Hughes, Peter

    2013-01-01

    A 22-year-old male sustained C-6 tetraplegia in 1992. In 1993, intravenous pyelography revealed normal kidneys. Suprapubic cystostomy was performed. He underwent open cystolithotomy in 2004 and 2008. In 2009, computed tomography revealed bilateral renal calculi. Coagulum pyelolithotomy of left kidney was performed. Pleura and peritoneum were opened. Peritoneum could not be closed. Following surgery, he developed pulmonary atelectasis; he required tracheostomy and mechanical ventilation. He did not tolerate nasogastric feeding. CT of abdomen revealed bilateral renal calculi and features of proximal small bowel obstruction. Laparotomy revealed small bowel obstruction due to dense inflammatory adhesions involving multiple small bowel loops which protruded through the defect in sigmoid mesocolon and fixed posteriorly over the area of previous intervention. All adhesions were divided. The wide defect in mesocolon was not closed. In 2010, this patient again developed vomiting and distension of abdomen. Laparotomy revealed multiple adhesions. He developed chest infection and required ventilatory support again. He developed pressure sores and depression. Later abdominal symptoms recurred. This patient's general condition deteriorated and he expired in 2011. Conclusion. Risk of postoperative complications could have been reduced if minimally invasive surgery had been performed instead of open surgery to remove stones from left kidney. Suprapubic cystostomy predisposed to repeated occurrence of stones in urinary bladder and kidneys. Spinal cord physicians should try to establish intermittent catheterisation regime in tetraplegic patients. PMID:23533931

  7. Autologous platelet gel fails to show beneficial effects on wound healing after saphenectomy in CABG patients.

    PubMed

    Buchwald, Dirk; Kaltschmidt, Christian; Haardt, Helmut; Laczkovics, Axel; Reber, Delawer

    2008-09-01

    Wound healing impairment in the leg after removal of the saphenous vein within the framework of a coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) operation represents a clinically significant problem. Patients suffer from this complication, and treatment of the wounds is costly in terms of both time and money. No method is known to date that reliably prevents postoperative wound healing disturbances. The effect of autologous platelet gel to stimulate wound healing is known from various medical disciplines. Within a prospective randomized study, we wanted to determine whether intraoperative use of autologous platelet gel on the leg during a CABG operation could reduce the incidence of postoperative wound healing disturbances. The application group (AG) included 35 patients and was compared to a control group (CG) that also had 35 patients. The platelet gel, as well as the thrombin required to activate the platelets, was prepared from autologous patient blood during the operation. Validation of the platelet gel comprised measurement of the growth factors platelet-derived growth factor AB (PDGF AB) and epidermal growth factor (EGF), as well as the thrombocyte and leukocyte counts. Wound healing was photographically documented after surgery, and the patients were contacted by telephone on day 50 after surgery to obtain information on wound healing status. After cell separation, the platelet count was 1616 +/- 845/microL, which is higher than in whole blood by a factor of 7.1 +/- 2.0, with a platelet yield of 47.0% +/- 13.2%. The PDGF AB concentration after activation of the platelets was raised by a median factor of 158 and EGF by a median factor of 64 compared with whole blood. During the primary clinical stay, no statistically significant differences were recorded in the number of hematomas, postoperative leg swelling, or pain level. Large-area hematomas were less frequent in the application group (AG, 29.4% vs. CG, 60%, p = .007). In the follow-up 51 +/- 9 days after surgery

  8. A Real World, Observational Registry of Chronic Wounds and Ulcers

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-05-18

    Diabetic Foot; Varicose Ulcer; Pressure Ulcer; Surgical Wound Dehiscence; Vasculitis; Skin Ulcer; Leg Ulcer; Wounds and Injuries; Pyoderma; Peripheral Arterial Disease; Diabetic Neuropathies; Lymphedema; Venous Insufficiency; Diabetes Complications; Amputation Stump

  9. Emergency abdominal wall reconstruction with polypropylene mesh: short-term benefits versus long-term complications.

    PubMed Central

    Voyles, C R; Richardson, J D; Bland, K I; Tobin, G R; Flint, L M; Polk, H C

    1981-01-01

    The acute replacement of full-thickness abdominal wall has been facilitated by polypropylene mesh (Marlex) (PPM), allowing debridement of nonviable tissue and restoration of abdominal wall integrity without tension. However, no substantial long-term follow-up has been reported on the definitive wound coverage after the use of PPM in open wounds. Since 1976, we have placed PPM in 31 patients; 25 for infectious complication, three for massive bowel distension preventing abdominal closure, and three for shotgun wounds with extensive tissue loss. In 29 of 31 patients, the mesh was placed in heavily contaminated wounds; extensive fasciitis was present in 23 patients and 21 had intra-abdominal abscesses. Following mesh placement, 23 reoperations were required for continuing complications. No patients eviscerated, despite these multiple procedures. Polypropylene mesh was highly effective in restoring abdominal wall continuity. Despite advantages when PPM was used, significant long-term problems developed. Seven patients died from their primary illness in the postoperative period. Nine wounds were closed by granulation and subsequent split-thickness skin grafts. All nine developed mesh extrusion and/or enteric fistulae. Nine wounds healed by secondary intention, six developed enteric fistulae or continuing mesh extrusion. Full-thickness flap coverage after granulation provided the best means of wound closure. Polypropylene mesh had significant early advantages for providing abdominal wall integrity even in the presence of severe infection. However, long-term problems were common when wounds were closed to skin grafts or secondary intention. If the mesh cannot be completely removed, strong consideration should be given to myocutaneous flaps for coverage after the primary illness has resolved. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 3. PMID:6455099

  10. Burn Wound Infections

    PubMed Central

    Church, Deirdre; Elsayed, Sameer; Reid, Owen; Winston, Brent; Lindsay, Robert

    2006-01-01

    Burns are one of the most common and devastating forms of trauma. Patients with serious thermal injury require immediate specialized care in order to minimize morbidity and mortality. Significant thermal injuries induce a state of immunosuppression that predisposes burn patients to infectious complications. A current summary of the classifications of burn wound infections, including their diagnosis, treatment, and prevention, is given. Early excision of the eschar has substantially decreased the incidence of invasive burn wound infection and secondary sepsis, but most deaths in severely burn-injured patients are still due to burn wound sepsis or complications due to inhalation injury. Burn patients are also at risk for developing sepsis secondary to pneumonia, catheter-related infections, and suppurative thrombophlebitis. The introduction of silver-impregnated devices (e.g., central lines and Foley urinary catheters) may reduce the incidence of nosocomial infections due to prolonged placement of these devices. Improved outcomes for severely burned patients have been attributed to medical advances in fluid resuscitation, nutritional support, pulmonary and burn wound care, and infection control practices. PMID:16614255

  11. Conventional single-port laparoscopic appendectomy for complicated appendicitis in children: Efficient and cost-effective

    PubMed Central

    Karakuş, Osman Zeki; Ulusoy, Oktay; Ateş, Oğuz; Hakgüder, Gülce; Olguner, Mustafa; Akgür, Feza Miraç

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Laparoscopic appendectomy (LA) is gradually gaining popularity among paediatric surgeons for complicated appendicitis. A retrospective study was conducted to compare conventional single port LA, multiport LA and open appendectomy (OA) for complicated appendicitis in children. PATIENTS AND METHODS: From January 1995 from December 2014, 1,408 patients (604 girls, 804 boys) underwent surgery for uncomplicated and complicated appendicitis. The patient characteristics, operation times, duration of hospitalization, operative costs, and postoperative complications were recorded. A 10-mm 0° scope with a parallel eye piece and an integrated 6 mm working channel were inserted through an 11-mm “conventional umbilical port” for single port LA. RESULTS: A total of 314 patients with complicated appendicitis (128 girls, 186 boys) underwent appendectomy. Among these, 102 patients (32.4%) underwent single port LA, 17 patients (5.4%) underwent multiport LA and 195 patients (62.1%) underwent OA. The hospital stay of the single port LA group was significantly less (3.88 ± 1.1) compared with multiport LA (5.41 ± 1.2) and OA groups (6.14 ± 1.1) (P < 0.001). Drain usage, wound infection and adhesive intestinal obstruction rates were significantly high in the OA group. There was no significant difference between the groups in postoperative intraabdominal abscess formation. Single-port LA performed for complicated appendicitis was cheaper compared with the other groups. CONCLUSIONS: The present study has shown that single-port LA for complicated appendicitis can be conducted in a reasonable operative time; it shortens the hospitalization period, markedly reduces postoperative wound infection and adhesive intestinal obstruction rates and does not increase the operative cost. PMID:26917914

  12. A comparative study of postoperative pain for open thyroidectomy versus bilateral axillo-breast approach robotic thyroidectomy using a self-reporting application for iPad

    PubMed Central

    Chai, Young Jun; Song, Junho; Kang, Jiyoung; Woo, Jung-Woo; Song, Ra-Yeong; Kwon, Hyungju; Kim, Su-Jin; Choi, June Young

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Postoperative pain for robotic thyroid surgeries including bilateral axillo-breast approach (BABA) has not been well studied. In this study, we have developed a self-reporting application (SRA) for iPad and prospectively collected pain scores from open thyroidectomy (OT) and BABA robotic thyroidectomy (RT) patients. Methods Female patients who underwent total thyroidectomy for papillary thyroid carcinoma were included. Patients recorded pain scores for throat, anterior neck, posterior neck, chest, and back on postoperative days 1, 2, and 3. Once discharged, on postoperative day 14, a survey was also conducted on satisfaction of SRA and cosmesis. Results A total of 54 patients were enrolled (27 BABA RT and 27 OT). There were no significant differences between the 2 groups in clinicopathological characteristics and postoperative complication rates. Postoperative pain scores at days 1, 2, 3, and 14 were not significantly different between the groups for throat, anterior neck, posterior neck, or back. Postoperative analgesic requirements were similar between the 2 groups. Wound satisfaction scores were significantly higher in the BABA RT group (BABA RT 7.4 vs. OT 5.7; P = 0.016). Satisfaction scores for the usefulness of SRA were above 7.2 for all four questionnaire items on the 10-point scale. Conclusion Postoperative pain for BABA RT is equivalent to OT but offers greater cosmetic satisfaction for patients. A mobile device application such as SRA may facilitate proper assessment and management of pain in postoperative patients. PMID:27186567

  13. Orthotopic liver transplantation: reversible Doppler US findings in the immediate postoperative period.

    PubMed

    Sanyal, Rupan; Lall, Chandana G; Lamba, Ramit; Verma, Sadhna; Shah, Shetal N; Tirkes, Temel; Berry, William A; Sandrasegaran, Kumaresan

    2012-01-01

    Orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT) is the only definitive treatment for irreversible acute liver failure and chronic liver disease. In the immediate postoperative period after OLT, patients are closely monitored with Doppler ultrasonography (US) to detect treatable vascular complications and ensure graft survival. The first postoperative Doppler US examination is performed fairly early on the first postoperative day, before surgical wound closure has been performed. The immediate postoperative images, obtained when the effects of surgery are very recent, often reveal an array of findings that may appear alarming but that tend to normalize within a few days and are compatible with changes related to the surgery itself. These findings include a starry-sky appearance of reperfusion hepatic edema, transient foci of increased echogenicity, pneumobilia, small fluid collections, perihepatic hematomas, pleural effusion, temporary elevation of hepatic arterial velocity, transient elevation of resistive index (RI), decreased RI with tardus parvus waveform, increased portal venous flow and mono- or biphasic waveforms of the hepatic veins. Most of these changes revert to normal in the first postoperative week; deterioration atypical of transient changes requires further evaluation.

  14. Evaluation of Risk Factors of Surgical Wound Dehiscence in Adults After Laparotomy

    PubMed Central

    Aksamija, Goran; Mulabdic, Adi; Rasic, Ismar; Aksamija, Lejla

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: The percentage of patients with difficult and prolonged healing of the wound is still high, while the immediate complications such as wound dehiscence occurs in up to 3 % of all treated patients in abdominal surgery. The aim of study was to analyze the risk factors and comorbidities in the group patients undergoing laparotomy and associated with early postoperative wound dehiscence. Methods: The retrospective study included all patients treated surgically at Clinic of General and Abdominal surgery, Clinical Center of the University of Sarajevo in the period from January 1, 2013 until January 1, 2016, with clinically verified surgical wound dehiscence. Results: The results showed statistically proportion of male patients (70%) compared to female (30%). The largest number of respondents were in age group 71-80. Surgical wound infection was evident in 61% of patients, malignant staining in 52%, hypoproteinemia was found in 50% of patients, anemia in 43%, peritonitis in 36% and diabetes in 14% of respondents. Of the total respondents with surgical wound dehiscence, 30 (68%) had comorbidities present. By analyzing the prevalence of comorbidity and risk factors recorded in relation to comorbidity, it was noted that hypertension is most often associated with hypoproteinemia (X2=4.399; p=0.036), wound infection (X2=4.112; p=0.043) and malignant diseases (X2=4.016; p=0.045). The frequency of the anemia, peritonitis and diabetes in the sample was not different in relation to the comorbidity conditions (p >0.05). Conclusions: The risk factors occurrence of surgical wound dehiscence in our study were identified as hypoproteinemia, malignant disease, anemia and peritonitis. The highest incidence of dehiscence was in patients operated on in medical emergencies, and in patients with malignant disease. PMID:27994299

  15. Prophylactic vacuum sealing drainage (VSD) in the prevention of postoperative surgical site infections in pediatric patients with contaminated laparotomy incisions.

    PubMed

    Chen, Bailin; Hao, Fabao; Yang, Yang; Shang, Qingjuan; Guo, Chunbao

    2017-03-01

    Surgical site infection (SSI) continues to be an issue in abdominal surgery, especially for contaminated (class III) and dirty-infected (class IV) wounds. Vacuum sealing drainage (VSD) was reported effective in the management of various types of wounds or skin grafts. Our goal was to investigate the efficacy of prophylactic VSD to better orient their medicosurgical care of high-risk incisions following laparotomy in a pediatric population.A total of 331 pediatric patients with contaminated (class III) and dirty-infected (class IV) wounds following emergency laparotomy were retrospectively reviewed between January 2005 and January 2013. Among them, 111 cases were placed with prophylactic VSD when incisions were closed. Clinical outcomes, including, overall surgical site complication, device effectiveness, and mean postoperative LOS were evaluated based on VSD usage or not.VSD was applied for an average of 5.8 days (range, 5-7 days), with 3 to 15 mL sucked fluid. The overall SSIs rate was 3% for patients with prophylactic VSD and 17% for patients with convention dressing (OR, 0.27; 95% CI, 0.10-0.71, P = 0.004). In patients with prophylactic VSD, only 1 of 96 wound developed postoperative incision dehiscence, which is significant reduced compared with patients for conventional dressings (OR, 0.12; 95% CI, 0.01-0.95; P = 0.017) (Table 2). It also exhibited a decreased mean postoperative LOS (P < 0.001) for prophylactic VSD over conventional dressings.Our study demonstrated beneficial postoperative clinical effects of prophylactic VSD for high-risk laparotomy incisions following emergency laparotomy, such as shorter length of hospitalization, which may be attributed to the reduced overall SSIs rate.

  16. Prophylactic vacuum sealing drainage (VSD) in the prevention of postoperative surgical site infections in pediatric patients with contaminated laparotomy incisions

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Bailin; Hao, Fabao; Yang, Yang; Shang, Qingjuan; Guo, Chunbao

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Surgical site infection (SSI) continues to be an issue in abdominal surgery, especially for contaminated (class III) and dirty-infected (class IV) wounds. Vacuum sealing drainage (VSD) was reported effective in the management of various types of wounds or skin grafts. Our goal was to investigate the efficacy of prophylactic VSD to better orient their medicosurgical care of high-risk incisions following laparotomy in a pediatric population. A total of 331 pediatric patients with contaminated (class III) and dirty-infected (class IV) wounds following emergency laparotomy were retrospectively reviewed between January 2005 and January 2013. Among them, 111 cases were placed with prophylactic VSD when incisions were closed. Clinical outcomes, including, overall surgical site complication, device effectiveness, and mean postoperative LOS were evaluated based on VSD usage or not. VSD was applied for an average of 5.8 days (range, 5–7 days), with 3 to 15 mL sucked fluid. The overall SSIs rate was 3% for patients with prophylactic VSD and 17% for patients with convention dressing (OR, 0.27; 95% CI, 0.10–0.71, P = 0.004). In patients with prophylactic VSD, only 1 of 96 wound developed postoperative incision dehiscence, which is significant reduced compared with patients for conventional dressings (OR, 0.12; 95% CI, 0.01–0.95; P = 0.017) (Table 2). It also exhibited a decreased mean postoperative LOS (P < 0.001) for prophylactic VSD over conventional dressings. Our study demonstrated beneficial postoperative clinical effects of prophylactic VSD for high-risk laparotomy incisions following emergency laparotomy, such as shorter length of hospitalization, which may be attributed to the reduced overall SSIs rate. PMID:28353606

  17. Facial bite wounds: management update.

    PubMed

    Stefanopoulos, P K; Tarantzopoulou, A D

    2005-07-01

    Bite wounds are frequently located on the face; injuries inflicted by dogs are most common, especially in children. Bacteriology of infected dog and cat bite wounds includes Pasteurella multocida, Staphylococcus aureus, viridans streptococci, Capnocytophaga canimorsus, and oral anaerobes. Infected human bites yield a similar spectrum of bacteria except for Pasteurellae and C. canimorsus; instead human bites are frequently complicated by Eikenella corrodens. Antibiotic therapy against these bacteria is indicated both for infected bite wounds and fresh wounds considered at risk for infection. Amoxicillin-clavulanate (and other combinations of extended-spectrum penicillins with beta-lactamase inhibitors) and moxifloxacin offer the best in vitro coverage of the pathogenic flora. Initial wound management consisting in irrigation and debridement is at least equally important with antibiotics for prevention of infection. The need for prophylaxis against systemic infectious complications, particularly tetanus, should also be evaluated. Primary surgical repair is the treatment of choice for most clinically uninfected facial bite wounds, whereas delayed closure should be reserved for certain high risk or already infected wounds. Avulsive injuries with significant tissue loss represent the most difficult cases for definitive management and are also those most likely to require hospitalization.

  18. Sternal wound infections.

    PubMed

    Mauermann, William J; Sampathkumar, Priya; Thompson, Rodney L

    2008-09-01

    Deep sternal wound infections (DSWI) continue to be a relatively uncommon event occurring in about 1%-2% of all patients undergoing cardiac surgery. However, the sheer number of cardiac surgery patients and the relatively high mortality associated with DSWIs makes them of clinical relevance. This review will describe the current incidence of DSWIs and their associated morbidity and mortality as well as risk factors for the development of this complication. The microbiology of DSWIs will be reviewed and strategies to prevent these complications will be discussed with a focus on interventions that may be undertaken by the clinical anesthesiologist.

  19. Postoperative Pain Control with the Fentanyl Patch and Continuous Paravertebral Anesthetic Infusion after Posterior Occipitocervical Junction Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Sivakumar, Walavan; Karsy, Michael; Brock, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Postoperative pain is a significant concern for patients who undergo surgery via a midline posterior approach to the occipitocervical junction and spinal axis. The development of the disposable, ambulatory pain pump presents a novel alternative for treatment of postoperative pain. The authors describe a multimodal treatment algorithm for postoperative pain after posterior occipitocervical junction surgery that uses the On-Q pain catheter system (I-Flow Corp., Lake Forest, CA) and a fentanyl patch. The On-Q PainBuster catheter system is a disposable, ambulatory device that allows for continuous anesthetic delivery directly into or adjacent to the wound. On-Q catheters are placed in the nuchal musculature for continuous infusion of 0.5% bupivacaine. The On-Q catheter infusion is continued for three days, and the catheters are then withdrawn. Patients are also provided with a transdermal fentanyl patch at the start of surgery. In regards to complications at our facility, there have been no cases of respiratory depression or arrest postoperatively and no wound infections, but one case of inadvertent subdural placement. The technique described for the use of the fentanyl patch and a continuous anesthetic delivery device in surgery of the occipitocervical junction presents a novel alternative to the current standard of care in pain control after suboccipital decompression. PMID:27433423

  20. Complications of groin hernia repair: their prevention and management.

    PubMed

    Gaines, R D

    1978-03-01

    An estimated overall complication rate of approximately ten percent is found in the half million patients who annually undergo groin hernia repair in the United States. Certain features in the operative technique are emphasized which should prevent many of these complications.Intraoperative complications during the groin hernia repair are primarily hemorrhage and injury to the vas deferens, the three nerves in the area, the vascular supply of the testis, and the abdominal and pelvic viscera. Miscellaneous intraoperative complications relate to problems associated with the repair of massive hernias, missed hernia, and the loss of strangulated bowel into the abdominal cavity.Early postoperative complications may be either systemic or local with cardiac and respiratory conditions comprising the former group. The early local complications are primarily wound problems of infection, hematoma formation, and scrotal swelling involving the skin and testis. High ligation in excision of the sac in all hernias, repair of the defect in the plane of its occurrence, and suture of fascia to fascia in the same plane without tension are the basic tenets of inguinal hernia repair which should result in a low incidence of recurrence.The most effective prophylactic measures necessary for the prevention of complications considered are a thorough knowledge of inguinofemoral anatomy, mature surgical judgment, and meticulous surgical technique.

  1. Surgical wound infections. A 5-year prospective study of 20,193 wounds at the Minneapolis VA Medical Center.

    PubMed Central

    Olson, M; O'Connor, M; Schwartz, M L

    1984-01-01

    This report describes a 5-year prospective study of postoperative wound sepsis utilizing a careful program of wound surveillance. Surgical wounds following 20,193 operations on all surgical services were surveyed by a trained nurse epidemiologist. Daily examination of wounds, culture of all suspicious wounds, and 30-day outpatient clinic follow-up were performed. Results were disseminated at monthly intervals to all involved surgeons and operating room personnel. Prospective and ongoing analysis of results facilitated identification and rectification of specific problem areas. Wound infection rates demonstrated a steady decline over the course of the study, overall rates dropping from 4.2% to 1.9% (p less than 0.05). This reduction in incidence of postoperative wound sepsis of 55% is estimated to have saved 2740 inhospital days and nearly $750,000. PMID:6703787

  2. Epidural Analgesia in the Postoperative Period

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-10-01

    violations. VI ABSTRACT Postoperative pain is an unwanted side effect of surgery, and is associated with many postoperative complications...This descriptive study was conducted to determine which surgical patients experienced the most analgesia with the fewest side effects when...epidural medication, side effects , incidence of breakthrough pain, and treatments were recorded and cross-tabulated. The following surgical categories

  3. Surgical complications and their impact on patients’ psychosocial well-being: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Pinto, Anna; Faiz, Omar; Davis, Rachel; Almoudaris, Alex; Vincent, Charles

    2016-01-01

    Objective Surgical complications may affect patients psychologically due to challenges such as prolonged recovery or long-lasting disability. Psychological distress could further delay patients’ recovery as stress delays wound healing and compromises immunity. This review investigates whether surgical complications adversely affect patients’ postoperative well-being and the duration of this impact. Methods The primary data sources were ‘PsychINFO’, ‘EMBASE’ and ‘MEDLINE’ through OvidSP (year 2000 to May 2012). The reference lists of eligible articles were also reviewed. Studies were eligible if they measured the association of complications after major surgery from 4 surgical specialties (ie, cardiac, thoracic, gastrointestinal and vascular) with adult patients’ postoperative psychosocial outcomes using validated tools or psychological assessment. 13 605 articles were identified. 2 researchers independently extracted information from the included articles on study aims, participants’ characteristics, study design, surgical procedures, surgical complications, psychosocial outcomes and findings. The studies were synthesised narratively (ie, using text). Supplementary meta-analyses of the impact of surgical complications on psychosocial outcomes were also conducted. Results 50 studies were included in the narrative synthesis. Two-thirds of the studies found that patients who suffered surgical complications had significantly worse postoperative psychosocial outcomes even after controlling for preoperative psychosocial outcomes, clinical and demographic factors. Half of the studies with significant findings reported significant adverse effects of complications on patient psychosocial outcomes at 12 months (or more) postsurgery. 3 supplementary meta-analyses were completed, 1 on anxiety (including 2 studies) and 2 on physical and mental quality of life (including 3 studies). The latter indicated statistically significantly lower physical and

  4. Management of minor acute cutaneous wounds: importance of wound healing in a moist environment.

    PubMed

    Korting, H C; Schöllmann, C; White, R J

    2011-02-01

    Moist wound care has been established as standard therapy for chronic wounds with impaired healing. Healing in acute wounds, in particular in minor superficial acute wounds - which indeed are much more numerous than chronic wounds - is often taken for granted because it is assumed that in those wounds normal phases of wound healing should run per se without any problems. But minor wounds such as small cuts, scraps or abrasions also need proper care to prevent complications, in particular infections. Local wound care with minor wounds consists of thorough cleansing with potable tap water or normal saline followed by the application of an appropriate dressing corresponding to the principles of moist wound treatment. In the treatment of smaller superficial wounds, it appears advisable to limit the choice of dressing to just a few products that fulfil the principles of moist wound management and are easy to use. Hydroactive colloid gels combining the attributes of hydrocolloids and hydrogels thus being appropriate for dry and exuding wounds appear especially suitable for this purpose - although there is still a lack of data from systematic studies on the effectiveness of these preparations.

  5. Telemedicine and wound care.

    PubMed

    Ong, Cheri A

    2008-01-01

    former in post-operative patients and the follow-up of chronic wounds. Either way, both have been underutilized and underdeveloped. With the advances in the field of telecommunications in connecting people across distances at a fraction of the time and costs, improved outcomes reported in other fields of telemedicine and positive legislative changes, there is an enormous potential in this field. We now have the ability, knowledge and resources to develop telewound care programs, which can provide high quality patient care in a more concise and cost-effective way. It is certainly a welcoming relief to a field that has traditionally been known to pose an emotional, physical and financial drain to all those involved.

  6. Current wound healing procedures and potential care

    PubMed Central

    Dreifke, Michael B.; Jayasuriya, Amil A.; Jayasuriya, Ambalangodage C.

    2015-01-01

    In this review, we describe current and future potential wound healing treatments for acute and chronic wounds. The current wound healing approaches are based on autografts, allografts, and cultured epithelial autografts, and wound dressings based on biocompatible and biodegradable polymers. The Food and Drug Administration approved wound healing dressings based on several polymers including collagen, silicon, chitosan, and hyaluronic acid. The new potential therapeutic intervention for wound healing includes sustained delivery of growth factors, and siRNA delivery, targeting micro RNA, and stem cell therapy. In addition, environment sensors can also potentially utilize to monitor and manage micro environment at wound site. Sensors use optical, odor, pH, and hydration sensors to detect such characteristics as uric acid level, pH, protease level, and infection – all in the hopes of early detection of complications. PMID:25579968

  7. Current wound healing procedures and potential care.

    PubMed

    Dreifke, Michael B; Jayasuriya, Amil A; Jayasuriya, Ambalangodage C

    2015-03-01

    In this review, we describe current and future potential wound healing treatments for acute and chronic wounds. The current wound healing approaches are based on autografts, allografts, and cultured epithelial autografts, and wound dressings based on biocompatible and biodegradable polymers. The Food and Drug Administration approved wound healing dressings based on several polymers including collagen, silicon, chitosan, and hyaluronic acid. The new potential therapeutic intervention for wound healing includes sustained delivery of growth factors, and siRNA delivery, targeting microRNA, and stem cell therapy. In addition, environment sensors can also potentially utilize to monitor and manage microenvironment at wound site. Sensors use optical, odor, pH, and hydration sensors to detect such characteristics as uric acid level, pH, protease level, and infection - all in the hopes of early detection of complications.

  8. Perioperative Complications of Total En Bloc Spondylectomy: Adverse Effects of Preoperative Irradiation

    PubMed Central

    Yokogawa, Noriaki; Murakami, Hideki; Demura, Satoru; Kato, Satoshi; Yoshioka, Katsuhito; Hayashi, Hiroyuki; Ishii, Takayoshi; Igarashi, Takashi; Fang, Xiang; Tsuchiya, Hiroyuki

    2014-01-01

    Background Total en bloc spondylectomy (TES) is associated with a high complication rate because it is technically demanding and involves patients compromised by cancer. Specifically, perioperative complications are more likely to occur in patients receiving preoperative irradiation. We examined the perioperative complications associated with TES in patients receiving preoperative irradiation. Methods Seventy-seven patients underwent TES between May 2010 and April 2013. We performed a retrospective review of prospectively collected data for 50 patients with metastatic tumors of the thoracic spine, excluding patients with primary spinal tumors, lumbar spinal metastasis, and combined anterior and posterior approach TES. Patients were divided into 2 groups: those with preoperative irradiation (RT-TES group, 18 patients) and those without preoperative irradiation (TES group, 32 patients). The following perioperative complications, occurring within 2 months of surgery, were compared between the groups: intraoperative dural injuries, epidural hematomas, deep surgical-site infections, postoperative cerebrospinal fluid leakage, wound dehiscence, pleural effusions, and neurological deficits. Results Significant differences in patient characteristics were not observed between the RT-TES and TES groups. Perioperative TES complications occurred in 20/50 patients (40.0%). The complication rate in the RT-TES group was 77.8% (14 out of 18), threefold higher than the 18.8% (6 out of 32) in the TES group (P<0.01). The incidence of complications, including intraoperative dural injuries, postoperative cerebrospinal fluid leakage, wound dehiscence, and pleural effusions, was significantly higher in the RT-TES group (P<0.01). Conclusion The perioperative complication rate associated with TES for spinal metastasis was significantly higher among patients receiving preoperative irradiation than among those not receiving preoperative irradiation. PMID:24893004

  9. Dressings and Products in Pediatric Wound Care

    PubMed Central

    King, Alice; Stellar, Judith J.; Blevins, Anne; Shah, Kara Noelle

    2014-01-01

    Significance: The increasing complexity of medical and surgical care provided to pediatric patients has resulted in a population at significant risk for complications such as pressure ulcers, nonhealing surgical wounds, and moisture-associated skin damage. Wound care practices for neonatal and pediatric patients, including the choice of specific dressings or other wound care products, are currently based on a combination of provider experience and preference and a small number of published clinical guidelines based on expert opinion; rigorous evidence-based clinical guidelines for wound management in these populations is lacking. Recent Advances: Advances in the understanding of the pathophysiology of wound healing have contributed to an ever-increasing number of specialized wound care products, most of which are predominantly marketed to adult patients and that have not been evaluated for safety and efficacy in the neonatal and pediatric populations. This review aims to discuss the available data on the use of both more traditional wound care products and newer wound care technologies in these populations, including medical-grade honey, nanocrystalline silver, and soft silicone-based adhesive technology. Critical Issues: Evidence-based wound care practices and demonstration of the safety, efficacy, and appropriate utilization of available wound care dressings and products in the neonatal and pediatric populations should be established to address specific concerns regarding wound management in these populations. Future Directions: The creation and implementation of evidence-based guidelines for the treatment of common wounds in the neonatal and pediatric populations is essential. In addition to an evaluation of currently marketed wound care dressings and products used in the adult population, newer wound care technologies should also be evaluated for use in neonates and children. In addition, further investigation of the specific pathophysiology of wound healing in

  10. The postanesthetic period. Complications.

    PubMed

    Malamed, S F

    1987-01-01

    Postanesthetic complications can occur even in the best of circumstances. Proper preparation of the staff, aggressive monitoring of the recovering patient, and early recognition and management of the complications are essential if the outcome is to be successful. In reviewing postanesthetic complications, two factors are present in the overwhelming majority of situations--hypoxia and hypercarbia--often the direct result of inadequate monitoring during the postanesthetic period. The anesthetic procedure is not over once the anesthetic agents are discontinued. The skillful anesthetist is aware of the possibilities of postoperative complications and prevents problems by employing enhanced monitoring techniques during the recovery phase.

  11. An update on the evaluation and management of plantar puncture wounds and Pseudomonas osteomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Inaba, A S; Zukin, D D; Perro, M

    1992-02-01

    The management of children who present to the ED with plantar puncture wounds is dependent upon the nature of the injury, the examination of the puncture site, and the potential risk of a retained foreign body. Not all patients will require wound enlargement and a search for a retained foreign body. Close follow-up of all children who are being treated as outpatients is of vital importance in detecting an early development of an infectious complication. Pseudomonas osteomyelitis should be suspected in all patients who present with foot pain, swelling, and a decreased ability to bear weight after sustaining a nail puncture through a sneaker. The current consensus favors open surgical débridement followed by a course of intravenous antibiotics. The exact duration of the postoperative antibiotic course is still being debated.

  12. Postoperative hyperkalemia.

    PubMed

    Ayach, Taha; Nappo, Robert W; Paugh-Miller, Jennifer L; Ross, Edward A

    2015-03-01

    Hyperkalemia occurs frequently in hospitalized patients and is of particular concern for those who have undergone surgery, with postoperative care provided by clinicians of many disciplines. This review describes the normal physiology and how multiple perioperative factors can disrupt potassium homeostasis and lead to severe elevations in plasma potassium concentration. The pathophysiologic basis of diverse causes of hyperkalemia was used to broadly classify etiologies into those with altered potassium distribution (e.g. increased potassium release from cells or other transcellular shifts), reduced urinary excretion (e.g. reduced sodium delivery, volume depletion, and hypoaldosteronism), or an exogenous potassium load (e.g. blood transfusions). Surgical conditions of particular concern involve: rhabdomyolysis from malpositioning, trauma or medications; bariatric surgery; vascular procedures with tissue ischemia; acidosis; hypovolemia; and volume or blood product resuscitation. Certain acute conditions and chronic co-morbidities present particular risk. These include chronic kidney disease, diabetes mellitus, many outpatient preoperative medications (e.g. beta blockers, salt substitutes), and inpatient agents (e.g. succinylcholine, hyperosmolar volume expanders). Clinicians need to be aware of these pathophysiologic mechanisms for developing perioperative hyperkalemia as many of the risks can be minimized or avoided.

  13. The effects of a topical gel containing chitosan, 0,2% chlorhexidine, allantoin and despanthenol on the wound healing process subsequent to impacted lower third molar extraction

    PubMed Central

    Madrazo-Jiménez, Marta; Rodríguez-Caballero, Ángela; Serrera-Figallo, María-Ángeles; Garrido-Serrano, Roberto; Gutiérrez-Corrales, Aida; Gutiérrez-Pérez, José-Luis

    2016-01-01

    Background Despite efforts to prevent postoperative discomfort, there are still many immediate side effects associated with the surgical extraction of impacted lower third molars. Cicatrization is a physiological process through which the loss of integrity of oral mucosa is recovered and damaged tissues are repaired. Bexident Post (ISDIN, Spain) is a topical gel that contains chitosan, 0.2% chlorhexidine, allantoin and dexpanthenol. While this gel has many clinical indications, there are no published clinical trials evaluating its use in impacted mandibular third molar surgery. This study aims to clinically evaluate the efficacy of a gel containing chitosan, 0.2% chlorhexidine, allantoin and dexpanthenol on wound healing and reduction of postoperative side effects and complications after extraction of an impacted mandibular third molar. Material and Methods A split-mouth design study was carried out on a total of 50 bilaterally and symmetrically impacted third molar extractions, which were randomly placed into either a control group (CG=25) or an experimental group (EG=25). Patients were all informed of the purpose of the study and provided written consent. All procedures were carried out by the same dental practitioner, in accordance with standard surgical protocol. A different dental practitioner, unaware of which treatment had been applied, provided follow-up care. The EG applied 10 ml of topical gel composed of chitosan, 0.2% chlorhexidine, allantoin and dexpanthenol to the surgical wound three times a day for 10 days, patients in the CG did not apply any gel. Results The groups were homogeneous insofar as potentially confounding variables. No significant findings were found regarding postoperative swelling and pain. Neither of the groups displayed poor healing or infectious complications of the wound during the postoperative period. In all the recorded follow-ups (Day 7 p=0.001, and Day 14 p=0.01), the wound’s aesthetic appearance was better in the EG

  14. Comparison of single incision and multi incision diagnostic laparoscopy on evaluation of diaphragmatic status after left thoracoabdominal penetrating stab wounds

    PubMed Central

    İlhan, Mehmet; Gök, Ali Fuat Kaan; Bademler, Süleyman; Cücük, Ömer Cenk; Soytaş, Yiğit; Yanar, Hakan Teoman

    2017-01-01

    AIM: Single incision diagnostic laparoscopy (SIDL) may be an alternative procedure to multi-incision diagnostic laparoscopy (MDL) for penetrating thoracoabdominal stab wounds. The purpose of this study is sharing our experience and comparing two techniques for diaphragmatic status. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Medical records of 102 patients with left thoracoabdominal penetrating stab injuries who admitted to Istanbul School of Medicine, Trauma and Emergency Surgery Clinic between February 2012 and April 2016 were examined. The patients were grouped according to operation technique. Patient records were retrospectively reviewed for data including, age, sex, length of hospital stay, diaphragm injury rate, surgical procedure, operation time and operation time with wound repair, post-operative complications and accompanying injuries. RESULTS: The most common injury location was the left anterior thoracoabdomen. SIDL was performed on 26 patients. Nine (34.6%) of the 26 patients had a diaphragm injury. Seventy-six patients underwent MDL. Diaphragmatic injury was detected in 20 (26.3%) of 76 patients. The average operation time and post-operative complications were similar; there was no statistically significant difference between MDL and SIDL groups. CONCLUSION: SIDL can be used as a safe and feasible procedure in the repair of a diaphragm wounds. SIDL may be an alternative method in the diagnosis and treatment of these patients. PMID:27934791

  15. Free jejunal flap for pharyngoesophageal reconstruction in head and neck cancer patients: An evaluation of donor site complications

    PubMed Central

    Razdan, Shantanu N.; Albornoz, Claudia R.; Matros, Evan; Paty, Philip B.; Cordeiro, Peter G.

    2016-01-01

    Background Free jejunal transfer for pharyngoesophageal reconstruction has often been criticized for its associated donor site morbidity. Conversely, the same argument has been invoked to support use of fasciocutaneous flaps, given their low incidence of donor site complications. The purpose of the current study was to document donor site complication rate with free jejunal flaps for pharyngoesophageal reconstruction, in the hands of an experienced surgeon. Methods A retrospective chart review was performed of consecutive patients who underwent free jejunal transfer between 1992 and 2012 by the senior author. Demographic data, abdominal complications, surgical characteristics of small bowel anastomoses and postoperative bowel function were specifically noted. Results Ninety-two jejunal flap reconstructions were performed in 90 patients. Mean follow up time was 29 months. Twelve (13%) patients had prior abdominal surgery. Donor site complications included ileus (n=2), wound cellulitis (n=1), wound dehiscence (n=1) and small bowel obstruction (n=1). Mean time to initiation of tube feeds after reconstruction was 5 days. Seventy-seven (86.5%) patients were discharged on an oral diet. The perioperative mortality rate of 2% was not associated with any donor site complication. Conclusion Free jejunal transfer is associated with minimal and acceptable donor site complication rates. The choice of flap for pharyngoesophageal reconstruction should be determined by the type of defect, potential recipient site complications and the surgeon’s familiarity with the flap. Potential donor site complications should not be a deterrent for free jejunal flaps given the low rate described in this study. PMID:26220434

  16. How wounds heal

    MedlinePlus

    ... care to prevent infection. Continue Reading Stages of Wound Healing Wounds heal in stages. The smaller the wound, ... How lacerations heal References Leong M, Phillips LG. Wound healing. In: Townsend CM, Beauchamp RD, Evers BM, Mattox ...

  17. Bacterial Wound Culture

    MedlinePlus

    ... and services. Advertising & Sponsorship: Policy | Opportunities Bacterial Wound Culture Share this page: Was this page helpful? Also known as: Aerobic Wound Culture; Anaerobic Wound Culture Formal name: Culture, wound Related ...

  18. Surgical Adhesive Drape (IO-ban) as Postoperative Surgical Site Dressing

    PubMed Central

    Syed, Hasan R; Snyder, Rita; McGowan, Jason E; Jha, Ribhu T; Nair, Mani N

    2015-01-01

    Study Design: Retrospective chart analysis. Objective: The objective of this study is to describe the senior author’s (MNN) experience applying a widely available surgical drape as a postoperative sterile surgical site dressing for both cranial and spinal procedures. Summary of Background Data: Surgical site infection (SSI) is an important complication of spine surgery that can result in significant morbidity. There is wide variation in wound care management in practice, including dressing type. Given the known bactericidal properties of the surgical drape, there may be a benefit of continuing its use immediately postoperatively. Methods: All of the senior author’s cases from September 2014 through September 2015 were reviewed. These were contrasted to the previous year prior to the institution of a sterile surgical drape as a postoperative dressing. Results: Only one surgical case out of 157 operative interventions (35 cranial, 124 spinal) required operative debridement due to infection. From September 2013 to September 2014, prior to the institution of a sterile surgical drape as dressing, the author had five infections out of 143 operations (46 cranial, 97 spinal) requiring intervention. Conclusion: The implementation of a sterile surgical drape as a closed postoperative surgical site dressing has led to a decrease in surgical site infections. The technique is simple and widely available, and should be considered for use to diminish surgical site infections. PMID:26798570

  19. Management of Sports-Induced Skin Wounds

    PubMed Central

    Foster, Danny T.; Rowedder, Laura J.; Reese, Steven K.

    1995-01-01

    Skin wounds are common in sports but are rarely documented by the certified athletic trainer. The literature is unclear about wound types, and none of the articles reviewed reported frequencies. The purpose of this paper is to discuss the frequency of common athletic skin wounds and their specific management. Management of skin wounds can sometimes be problematic. Hydrogen peroxide has been used on wounds since 1947, yet some researchers report that hydrogen peroxide and iodophor solution can delay or interfere with wound healing, or cause damage to the wounded area if use is intense and prolonged. Occlusive dressings have been reported to have considerable advantage in maintaining a moist wound bed and in decreasing healing time. Infection rates beneath occlusive dressings, however, are similar to those associated with other types of dressings. Complications to wounds, with or without the use of occlusive dressings, such as keloids and seborrheic dermatitis, occur in low frequencies. Due to a lack of specific information about sports-induced skin wounds and their management, we recommend that standardized documentation for common wounds be developed along with further study of techniques for management. PMID:16558324

  20. Complications of Laparoscopic Cholecystectomy: Our Experience from a Retrospective Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Radunovic, Miodrag; Lazovic, Ranko; Popovic, Natasa; Magdelinic, Milorad; Bulajic, Milutin; Radunovic, Lenka; Vukovic, Marko; Radunovic, Miroslav

    2016-01-01

    AIM: The aim of this study was to evaluate the intraoperative and postoperative complications of laparoscopic cholecystectomy, as well as the frequency of conversions. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Medical records of 740 patients who had laparoscopic cholecystectomy were analysed retrospectively. We evaluated patients for the presence of potential risk factors that could predict the development of complications such as age, gender, body mass index, white blood cell count and C-reactive protein (CRP), gallbladder ultrasonographic findings, and pathohistological analysis of removed gallbladders. The correlation between these risk factors was also analysed. RESULTS: There were 97 (13.1%) intraoperative complications (IOC). Iatrogenic perforations of a gallbladder were the most common complication - 39 patients (5.27%). Among the postoperative complications (POC), the most common ones were bleeding from abdominal cavity 27 (3.64%), biliary duct leaks 14 (1.89%), and infection of the surgical wound 7 patients (0.94%). There were 29 conversions (3.91%). The presence of more than one complication was more common in males (OR = 2.95, CI 95%, 1.42-4.23, p < 0.001). An especially high incidence of complications was noted in patients with elevated white blood cell count (OR = 3.98, CI 95% 1.68-16.92, p < 0.01), and CRP (OR = 2.42, CI 95% 1.23-12.54, p < 0.01). The increased incidence of complications was noted in patients with ultrasonographic finding of gallbladder empyema and increased thickness of the gallbladder wall > 3 mm (OR = 4.63, CI 95% 1.56-17.33, p < 0.001), as well as in patients with acute cholecystitis that was confirmed by pathohistological analysis (OR = 1.75, CI 95% 2.39-16.46, p < 0.001). CONCLUSION: Adopting laparoscopic cholecystectomy as a new technique for treatment of cholelithiasis, introduced a new spectrum of complications. Major biliary and vascular complications are life threatening, while minor complications cause patient discomfort and prolongation of

  1. A case of nonisland pedicled foot fillet flap for below-knee amputation stump wound: treatment option for compartment syndrome after fibular free flap surgery.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Jae Ha; Kim, Kwang Seog; Lee, Sam Yong

    2014-02-01

    Despite the frequent use of the fibular free flap, there have been no reports of severe compartment syndrome of the donor leg that necessitated limb amputation. A 66-yr-old man had a fibular osseous free flap transfer from the left leg to the mandible that was complicated by postoperative compartment syndrome. An extensive chronic leg wound resulted, which was treated with multiple debridements and finally with below-knee amputation. Successful coverage of the below-knee amputation stump was accomplished with a nonisland pedicled foot fillet flap. Various foot fillet flaps may be used acutely as a free or an island pedicled flap, but dissection of the vascular pedicle may be difficult in a chronically inflamed wound because of inflammation and adhesions to surrounding tissue. The nonisland pedicled foot fillet flap may be considered as a useful option for treatment of a chronically inflamed stump wound after below-knee amputation.

  2. Postoperative Care using a Secure Online Patient Portal: Changing the (inter)Face of General Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Kummerow Broman, Kristy; Oyefule, Omobolanle O; Phillips, Sharon E; Baucom, Rebeccah B; Holzman, Michael D; Sharp, Kenneth W; Pierce, Richard A; Nealon, William H; Poulose, Benjamin K

    2015-01-01

    Background Many patients seek greater accessibility to healthcare. Meanwhile surgeons face increasing time constraints due to workforce shortages and elevated performance demands. Online postoperative care may improve patient access while increasing surgeon efficiency. We aimed to evaluate patient and surgeon acceptance of online postoperative care after elective general surgical operations. Study Design A prospective pilot study within an academic general surgery service compared online and in-person postoperative visits from May-December 2014. Included patients underwent elective laparoscopic cholecystectomy, laparoscopic ventral hernia repair, umbilical hernia repair, or inguinal hernia repair by one of five surgeons. Patients submitted symptom surveys and wound pictures, then corresponded with their surgeons using an online patient portal. The primary outcome was patient-reported acceptance of online visits in lieu of in-person visits. Secondary outcomes included detection of complications via online visits, surgeon-reported effectiveness, and visit times. Results Fifty patients completed both online and in-person visits. Online visits were acceptable to most patients as their only follow-up (76%). For 68% of patients, surgeons reported that both visit types were equally effective, while clinic visits were more effective in 24% and online visits in 8%. No complications were missed via online visits, which took significantly less time for patients (15 versus 103 minutes, p<0.01) and surgeons (5 versus 10 minutes, p<0.01). Conclusions In this population, online postoperative visits were accepted by patients and surgeons, took less time, and effectively identified patients who required further care. Further evaluation is needed to establish the safety and potential benefit of online postoperative visits in specific populations. PMID:26453260

  3. Are there any complications with bioabsorbable fixation devices? A 10 year review in orthognathic surgery.

    PubMed

    Laine, P; Kontio, R; Lindqvist, C; Suuronen, R

    2004-04-01

    Bioabsorbable fixation devices have been used in our departments between November 1991 and November 2001 in orthognathic surgery. The aim of this retrospective study was to assess all complications experienced during this time period, when we have operated 163 patients who have undergone 329 orthognathic osteotomies fixated with bioresorbable devices. No postoperative intermaxillary fixation was used. Light guiding elastics were used for 5 to 7 weeks. Patients' acceptance was generally excellent and very few complications occurred during this follow-up of 10 years. The complications were minor and did not affect the end results of the operations. Minor complications occurred in 14 patients (8.6%). Only one patient (0.6%) had a postoperative infection with elevated infection parameters. The other minor complications consisted mainly of dehiscence of the wound and plate exposure together with granulation tissue in the operation field. The rest of the complications occurred in the beginning of our study, when large screw heads on top of the bone irritated the patient and had to be removed. Insufficient fixation resulted in open bite in three patients (1.8%) in the beginning of the trial use of new devices, which no longer are used. Based on our experience, bioresorbable devices are safe to be used in orthognathic procedures. However, there is a learning curve, as there is with all new methods introduced.

  4. Post-operative urinary retention.

    PubMed

    Steggall, Martin; Treacy, Colm; Jones, Mark

    Urinary retention is a common complication of surgery and anaesthesia. The risk of post-operative urinary retention is increased following certain surgical procedures and anaesthetic modalities, and with patients' advancing age. Patients at increased risk of post-operative urinary retention should be identified before surgery or the condition should be identified and treated in a timely manner following surgery. If conservative measures do not help the patient to pass urine, the bladder will need to be drained using either an intermittent catheter or an indwelling urethral catheter, which can result in catheter-associated urinary tract infections. This article provides an overview of normal bladder function, risk factors for developing post-operative urinary retention, and treatment options. Guidance drawn from the literature aims to assist nurses in identifying at-risk patients and inform patient care.

  5. [Wound dressings].

    PubMed

    Breuninger, H

    1988-01-01

    The wide variety of dermatologic surgical procedures has resulted in a corresponding choice of wound dressings. Considering the chemical and physical properties as well as the function of the dressings, standardized dressing techniques can be performed with relatively few materials. This saves both time and money.

  6. Postoperative fluid management

    PubMed Central

    Kayilioglu, Selami Ilgaz; Dinc, Tolga; Sozen, Isa; Bostanoglu, Akin; Cete, Mukerrem; Coskun, Faruk

    2015-01-01

    Postoperative care units are run by an anesthesiologist or a surgeon, or a team formed of both. Management of postoperative fluid therapy should be done considering both patients’ status and intraoperative events. Types of the fluids, amount of the fluid given and timing of the administration are the main topics that determine the fluid management strategy. The main goal of fluid resuscitation is to provide adequate tissue perfusion without harming the patient. The endothelial glycocalyx dysfunction and fluid shift to extracellular compartment should be considered wisely. Fluid management must be done based on patient’s body fluid status. Patients who are responsive to fluids can benefit from fluid resuscitation, whereas patients who are not fluid responsive are more likely to suffer complications of over-hydration. Therefore, common use of central venous pressure measurement, which is proved to be inefficient to predict fluid responsiveness, should be avoided. Goal directed strategy is the most rational approach to assess the patient and maintain optimum fluid balance. However, accessible and applicable monitoring tools for determining patient’s actual fluid need should be further studied and universalized. The debate around colloids and crystalloids should also be considered with goal directed therapies. Advantages and disadvantages of each solution must be evaluated with the patient’s specific condition. PMID:26261771

  7. Wound Healing Essentials: Let There Be Oxygen

    PubMed Central

    Sen, Chandan K.

    2009-01-01

    The state of wound oxygenation is a key determinant of healing outcomes. From a diagnostic standpoint, measurements of wound oxygenation are commonly used to guide treatment planning such as amputation decision. In preventive applications, optimizing wound perfusion and providing supplemental O2 in the peri-operative period reduces the incidence of post-operative infections. Correction of wound pO2 may, by itself, trigger some healing responses. Importantly, approaches to correct wound pO2 favorably influence outcomes of other therapies such as responsiveness to growth factors and acceptance of grafts. Chronic ischemic wounds are essentially hypoxic. Primarily based on the tumor literature, hypoxia is generally viewed as being angiogenic. This is true with the condition that hypoxia be acute and mild to modest in magnitude. Extreme near-anoxic hypoxia, as commonly noted in problem wounds, is not compatible with tissue repair. Adequate wound tissue oxygenation is required but may not be sufficient to favorably influence healing outcomes. Success in wound care may be improved by a personalized health care approach. The key lies in our ability to specifically identify the key limitations of a given wound and in developing a multifaceted strategy to specifically address those limitations. In considering approaches to oxygenate the wound tissue it is important to recognize that both too little as well as too much may impede the healing process. Oxygen dosing based on the specific need of a wound therefore seems prudent. Therapeutic approaches targeting the oxygen sensing and redox signaling pathways are promising. PMID:19152646

  8. Island Posterior Thigh Flap Revisited in Covering Extensive Sacral Wounds: Our Experience with Two Patients

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Deep sacral wounds are best covered by flaps. Posterior thigh flaps have routinely been used to cover such wounds. The flap can however be modified as an island flap. Two patients with extensive sacral wounds were managed with island posterior thigh flaps. Both patients were admitted secondary to road traffic accident with subsequent soft tissue loss of the sacral area. The sacral defects in both patients were approximately 17 cm by 23 cm in dimensions. Unilateral island posterior thigh flap was raised and used to cover the wounds. Postoperatively both patients did well; the donor site and recipient sites healed without any complications. Island posterior thigh flap is thus an option in covering extensive defects of the sacral area. The flap is reliable and easy to raise and has minimal donor site morbidity. By raising it as an island flap the dog ear defect is avoided and the flap is able to be tunneled under the gluteal muscle. This maneuver enables the flap to be advanced further allowing it to cover more distal and extensive defects. PMID:28321356

  9. A comprehensive approach including a new enlargement technique to prevent complications after De Quervain tendinopathy surgery.

    PubMed

    Perno-Ioanna, D; Papaloïzos, M

    2016-06-01

    The goal of this study was to evaluate the outcome of our surgical approach aimed at preventing complications following surgery for De Quervain tendinopathy. Our stepwise surgical procedure is described in detail. We reviewed 56 cases operated by a senior surgeon over 5years, and re-evaluated them with a minimum 15months' follow-up. Complications mentioned in the literature (poor wound healing, adhesions, nerve injury, incomplete decompression, tendon subluxation) were not present in any of the cases; the satisfaction rate was very high. Slight residual discomfort was noted in 16 cases. Among them, 13 had an associated pathology. In summary, the outcome after the comprehensive approach presented here is highly predictable. Properly applied, good to excellent results can be expected in most patients. Potential postoperative complications are effectively prevented. Some caution is needed in cases of associated pathologies.

  10. Effects of perioperative antiinflammatory and immunomodulating therapy on surgical wound healing.

    PubMed

    Busti, Anthony J; Hooper, Justin S; Amaya, Christopher J; Kazi, Salahuddin

    2005-11-01

    Patients with various rheumatologic and inflammatory disease states commonly require drugs known to decrease the inflammatory or autoimmune response for adequate control of their condition. Such drugs include nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 inhibitors, corticosteroids, disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs), and biologic response modifiers. These drugs affect inflammation and local immune responses, which are necessary for proper wound healing in the perioperative setting, thereby potentially resulting in undesirable postoperative complications. Such complications include wound dehiscence, infection, and impaired collagen synthesis. The end result is delayed healing of soft tissue and bone wounds. The current literature provides insight into the effect of some of these drugs on wound healing. For certain drugs, such as methotrexate, trials have been conducted in humans and direct us on what to do during the perioperative period. Whereas with other drugs, we must rely on either small-animal studies or extrapolation of data from human studies that did not specifically look at wound healing. Unfortunately, no clear consensus exists on the need and optimum time for withholding therapy before surgery. Likewise, clinicians are often uncertain of the appropriate time to resume therapy after the procedure. For those drugs with limited or no data in this setting, the use of pharmacokinetic properties and biologic effects of each drug should be considered individually. In some cases, discontinuation of therapy may be required up to 4 weeks before surgery because of the long half-lives of the drugs. In doing so, patients may experience an exacerbation or worsening of disease. Clinicians must carefully evaluate individual patient risk factors, disease severity, and the pharmacokinetics of available therapies when weighing the risks and benefits of discontinuing therapy in the perioperative setting.

  11. Microcurrent skin patches for postoperative pain control in total knee arthroplasty: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    El-Husseini, T; El-Kawy, S; Shalaby, H; El-Sebai, M

    2007-04-01

    Pain control following painful orthopaedic procedures such as total knee arthroplasty (TKA) is an ongoing challenge, as current pain management techniques often result in under-medication and/or complications. In a study designed to test the effect of the micro-current skin patch (MCT) on pain relief in patients following TKA, we followed 24 patients, randomly divided into two groups, one group receiving MCT plus tramadol hydrochloride (tramadol) for pain relief and a control group receiving only tramadol, for 10 days postoperatively. Tramadol was given intramuscularly in increment doses of 100 mg, as needed, for the duration of the study period. Pain was assessed daily using a visual analogue score (VAS). Other parameters, including the effect of MCT on the dose of tramadol needed for pain relief, the degree of wound healing measured at the end of the follow-up period, category of the wound 10 days postoperatively (1, 2 or 3) and total drain fluid volume, were also assessed. During the 10-day postoperative period there was a progressive decrease in pain in patients of both groups, however the patients of the MCT group showed a consistently lower VAS throughout the observation period, most markedly on those follow-up days with the highest pain scores in patients of the control group. This effect was monitored on the basis of the average dose of tramadol administered per day: 200.0+/-7.0 mg/day in the control group and 63.3+/-15.8 mg/day in the MCT group. Wound healing was better with the application of the MCT patch: grade 1 wounds were observed in 50% of the patients of the MCT group as compared to 8.3% in control group. The total drain volume was lower in patients of the MCT group compared to the controls (1020.8+/-211.6 and 1170.8+/-243.5 ml, respectively). None of the patients indicated that they wished to discontinue MCT therapy. This pilot study shows that MCT therapy led to better pain control with a markedly lower need for tramadol as compared to the

  12. Complications following hepatectomy.

    PubMed

    Russell, Maria C

    2015-01-01

    As the number of liver resections in the United States has increased, operations are more commonly performed on older patients with multiple comorbidities. The advent of effective chemotherapy and techniques such as portal vein embolization, have compounded the number of increasingly complex resections taking up to 75% of healthy livers. Four potentially devastating complications of liver resection include postoperative hemorrhage, venous thromboembolism, bile leak, and post-hepatectomy liver failure. The risk factors and management of these complications are herein explored, stressing the importance of identifying preoperative factors that can decrease the risk for these potentially fatal complications.

  13. Complications associated with orthognathic surgery

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    While most patients undergo orthognathic surgery for aesthetic purposes, aesthetic improvements are most often followed by postoperative functional complications. Therefore, patients must carefully decide whether their purpose of undergoing orthognathic surgery lies on the aesthetic side or the functional side. There is a wide variety of complications associated with orthognathic surgery. There should be a clear distinction between malpractice and complications. Complications can be resolved without any serious problems if the cause is detected early and adequate treatment provided. Oral and maxillofacial surgeons must have a full understanding of the types, causes, and treatment of complications, and should deliver this information to patients who develop these complications. PMID:28280704

  14. Adhesion barrier reduces postoperative adhesions after cardiac surgery.

    PubMed

    Kaneko, Yukihiro; Hirata, Yasutaka; Achiwa, Ikuya; Morishita, Hiroyuki; Soto, Hajime; Kobayahsi, Jotaro

    2012-06-01

    Reoperation in cardiac surgery is associated with increased risk due to surgical adhesions. Application of a bioresorbable material could theoretically reduce adhesions and allow later development of a free dissection plane for cardiac reoperation. Twenty-one patients in whom a bioresorbable hyaluronic acid-carboxymethylcellulose adhesion barrier had been applied in a preceding surgery underwent reoperations, while 23 patients underwent reoperations during the same period without a prior adhesion barrier. Blinded observers graded the tenacity of the adhesions from surgical video recordings of the reoperations. No excessive bleeding requiring wound reexploration, mediastinal infection, or other complication attributable to the adhesion barrier occurred. Multiple regression analysis showed that shorter duration of the preceding surgery, non-use of cardiopulmonary bypass in the preceding surgery, and use of the adhesion barrier were significantly associated with less tenacious surgical adhesions. The use of a bioresorbable material in cardiac surgery reduced postoperative adhesions, facilitated reoperation, and did not promote complications. The use of adhesion barrier is recommended in planned staged procedures and those in which future reoperation is likely.

  15. Complications After Mastectomy and Immediate Breast Reconstruction for Breast Cancer: A Claims-Based Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Jagsi, Reshma; Jiang, Jing; Momoh, Adeyiza O.; Alderman, Amy; Giordano, Sharon H.; Buchholz, Thomas A.; Pierce, Lori J.; Kronowitz, Steven J.; Smith, Benjamin D.

    2016-01-01

    Objective To evaluate complications after post-mastectomy breast reconstruction, particularly in the setting of adjuvant radiotherapy. Summary-Background Data Most studies of complications after breast reconstruction have been conducted at centers of excellence; relatively little is known about complication rates in radiated patients treated in the broader community. This information is relevant for breast cancer patients' decision-making. Methods Using the claims-based MarketScan database, we described complications in 14,894 women undergoing mastectomy for breast cancer from 1998-2007 who received immediate autologous reconstruction (n=2637), immediate implant-based reconstruction (n=3007), or no reconstruction within the first two postoperative years (n=9250). We used a generalized estimating equation to evaluate associations between complications and radiotherapy over time. Results Wound complications were diagnosed within the first two postoperative years in 2.3% of patients without reconstruction, 4.4% with implants, and 9.5% with autologous reconstruction (p<0.001). Infection was diagnosed within the first two postoperative years in 12.7% of patients without reconstruction, 20.5% with implants, and 20.7% with autologous reconstruction (p<0.001). 5219 (35%) women received radiation. Radiation was not associated with infection in any surgical group within the first six months but was associated with an increased risk of infection in months 7-24 in all three groups (each p<0.001). In months 7-24, radiation was associated with higher odds of implant removal in patients with implant reconstruction (OR 1.48, p<0.001) and fat necrosis in those with autologous reconstruction (OR=1.55; P=0.01). Conclusions Complication risks after immediate breast reconstruction differ by approach. Radiation therapy appears to modestly increase certain risks, including infection and implant removal. PMID:25876011

  16. Postoperative Delirium in the Geriatric Patient

    PubMed Central

    Schenning, Katie J.; Deiner, Stacie G.

    2015-01-01

    SYNOPSIS Postoperative delirium, a common complication in older surgical patients, is independently associated with increased morbidity and mortality. Patients over the age of 65 years receive greater than 1/3 of the over 40 million anesthetics delivered yearly in the United States. This number is expected to increase with the aging of the population. Thus, it is increasingly important that perioperative clinicians who care for geriatric patients have an understanding of the complex syndrome of postoperative delirium. PMID:26315635

  17. Epidural Analgesia in the Postoperative Period

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-10-01

    an unwanted side effect of surgery, and is associated with many postoperative complications. This descriptive study was conducted to determine which...surgical patients experienced the most analgesia with the fewest side effects when receiving epidural analgesia in the postoperative period. A...hospital. A description of the patients age, gender, type of surgery, type of epidural medication, side effects , incidence of breakthrough pain, and

  18. Ileostomy Complications in Infants less than 1500 grams – Frequent but Manageable

    PubMed Central

    Kargl, Simon; Wagner, Oliver; Pumberger, Wolfgang

    2017-01-01

    Background: In very low birth weight infants abdominal emergency surgery may result in ileostomy formation. We observed a frequent stoma complications in these patients. This retrospective analysis put light on ileostomy-related problems and complications in very low birth weight (VLBW) infants. Materials and Methods: In a seven-year retrospective chart review (2008 - 2014) infants with ileostomy formation weighing less than 1500 grams at time of operation were identified and reviewed. Data analysis included demographic data, complications and short term outcomes. Results: Thirty patients were included. Ileostomy was formed for spontaneous intestinal perforation (SIP) (n=17), meconium obstruction of prematurity (MOP) (n=6), midgut volvulus (MV) (n=5), necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC) (n=1) and Hirschsprung’s disease (HD) (n=1). Three patients died before ileostomy reversal was considered. In seven patients planned ileostomy reversal was done. Twenty infants had stoma related complications (stoma prolapse, prestomal obstruction, stoma retraction, high output stoma, peristomal skin excoriation, and stomal ischemia). Complications did not correlate with underlying diseases. Stomal complications necessitated earlier stoma reversal (mean 62 days). Postoperative complications after stoma reversal occurred in three children (wound dehiscence, adhesion ileus, anastomotic stricture). Conclusions: Although ileostomy related complications are frequent in very low birth weight infants, mortality is low. Morbidity is manageable. PMID:28083490

  19. Postoperative Immunosuppression After Open and Laparoscopic Liver Resection: Assessment of Cellular Immune Function and Monocytic HLA-DR Expression

    PubMed Central

    Haacke, Nadine; Meisel, Christian; Unterwalder, Nadine; Fikatas, Panagiotis; Schmidt, Sven C.

    2013-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Major abdominal procedures are strongly associated with postoperative immunosuppression and subsequent increased patient morbidity. It is believed that laparoscopic surgery causes less depletion of the systemic immune function because of the reduced tissue trauma. Various cytokines and monocytic HLA-DR expression have been successfully implemented to assess postoperative immune function. The aim of our study was to show the difference in immunologic profiles after minimally invasive versus conventional liver resection. Methods: Ten animals underwent either laparoscopic or conventional open left lateral liver resection. Flow cytometric characteristics of HLA-DR expression on monocytes and lipopolysaccharide-stimulated cellular secretion of tumor necrosis factor α, interferon γ, interleukin 6, and interleukin 8 were measured and analyzed in ex vivo whole blood samples. Intraoperative and postoperative clinical outcome parameters were also documented and evaluated. Results: All animals survived the procedures. Postoperative complications were fever (n = 3), wound infections (n = 2), and biloma (n = 1). Open surgery showed a morbidity rate of 80% compared with 40% after laparoscopic surgery. Laparoscopic liver resection showed no postoperative immunoparalysis. Major histocompatibility complex class II expression in this group was elevated, whereas the open surgery group showed decreased major histocompatibility complex class II expression on postoperative day 1. Postoperative secretion of tumor necrosis factor α, interleukin 6, and interferon γ was lower in the open surgery group. Elevated transaminase levels after laparoscopy might have resulted from an ischemia/reperfusion injury caused by the capnoperitoneum. Conclusion: Major immunoparalysis depression was not observed in either group. Laparoscopic surgery shows a tendency to improve immunologic recovery after liver resection. PMID:24398205

  20. COMPLICATIONS REQUIRING HOSPITAL MANAGEMENT AFTER BARIATRIC SURGERY

    PubMed Central

    WRZESINSKI, Aline; CORRÊA, Jéssica Moraes; FERNANDES, Tainiely Müller Barbosa; MONTEIRO, Letícia Fernandes; TREVISOL, Fabiana Schuelter; do NASCIMENTO, Ricardo Reis

    2015-01-01

    Background: The actual gold standard technique for obesity treatment is the Roux-en-Y gastric bypass. However, complications may occur and the surgeon must be prepared for them. Aim: To evaluate retrospectively the complications occurrence and associated factors in patients who underwent bariatric surgery. Methods: In this study, 469 medical charts were considered, from patients and from data collected during outpatient consultations. The variables considered were gender, age, height, pre-operatory BMI, pre-operatory weight, pre-operatory comorbidities, time of hospital stay, postoperative complications that demanded re-admission to the hospital and the time elapsed between the procedure and the complication. The patients' follow up was, at least, one year. Results: The incidence of postoperative complications that demanded a hospital care was 24,09%. The main comorbidity presented in this sample was hepatic steatosis. The comorbidity that was associated with the postoperative period was type 2 diabetes. There was a tendency for the female gender be related to the complications. The cholecystectomy was the most frequent complication. Complications occurred during the first year in 57,35%. Conclusion: The most frequent complication was the need to perform a cholecystectomy, where the most frequent comorbidity was hepatic steatosis. Over half the complications occurred during the first year postoperatively. Type 2 diabetes was associated with the occurrence of postoperative complications; women had the highest incidence; body mass index was not associated with the occurrence of complications. PMID:26537263

  1. Raman spectroscopy and the spectral correlation index for predicting wound healing outcome: towards in vivo application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berger, Adam G.; Crane, Nicole J.; Elster, Eric A.

    2016-03-01

    Combat wounds are sometimes confounded by healing complications that are not as prevalent in civilian wounds due to their high energy etiology. One complication of wound healing is dehiscence, where a surgically closed wound reopens after closure. This complication can have serious consequences for the patient, but knowledge about the molecular composition of the wound bed beyond what is readily visible may help clinicians mitigate these complications. It is necessary to develop techniques that can be used in vivo to assess and predict wound healing pointof- care so that care-takers can decide the best way to make informed clinical decisions regarding their patient's healing. Raman spectroscopy is a perfect candidate for predicting wound healing due to its ability to provide a detailed molecular fingerprint of the wound bed noninvasively. Here, we study the spectral correlation index, a measure of orthogonality, with ten reference tissue components to stratify wounds based on how they heal. We analyze these indexes over time to show the modulation of these tissue components over the wound healing process. Results show that qualitative observation of the spectra cannot reveal major differences between the dehisced and normal healing wounds, but the spectral correlation index can. Analysis of the spectral correlations across the wound healing process demonstrates the changes throughout the wound healing process, showing that early differences in tissue components may portend wound healing. Furthermore, Raman spectroscopy coupled with the spectral correlation index presents as a possible point-of-care tool for enabling discrimination of wounds with impaired healing.

  2. Cervicofacial necrotizing fasciitis. A devastating complication of blepharoplasty.

    PubMed

    Ray, A M; Bressler, K; Davis, R E; Gallo, J F; Patete, M L

    1997-06-01

    We report a case of cervicofacial necrotizing fasciitis that developed after blepharoplasty, an occurrence that, to our knowledge, has not previously been reported in the medical literature. A patient who presented to our institution 3 days after undergoing blepharoplasty of the upper eyelid was diagnosed as having fulminant fasciitis involving extensive areas of the face, scalp, and neck. We review the case in detail and discuss clinical and radiological clues to diagnosis, surgical and medical management, wound care, and subsequent scar contracture. This case emphasizes the need for individualized, appropriate postoperative care and for an awareness of this rare, potentially fatal complication. Early recognition and aggressive treatment of cervicofacial fasciitis can arrest its rapid progression and prevent devastating sequelae.

  3. Retained Sponge: A Rare Complication in Acetabular Osteosinthesis

    PubMed Central

    Chana-Rodríguez, Francisco; Mañanes, Rubén Pérez; Rojo-Manaute, José; Moran-Blanco, Luz María; Vaquero-Martín, Javier

    2015-01-01

    Retained sponges after a surgical treatment of polytrauma may cause a broad spectrum of clinical symptoms and present a difficult diagnostic problem. We report a case of retained surgical sponge in a 35-year-old man transferred from another hospital, that sustained a open acetabular fracture. The fracture was reduced through a limited ilio-inguinal approach. After 4 days, he presented massive wound dehiscence of the surgical approach. An abdominal CT scan showed, lying adjacent to the outer aspect of the left iliac crest, a mass of 10 cm, identified as probable foreign body. The possibility of this rare complication should be in the differential diagnosis of any postoperative patient who presents with pain, infection, or palpable mass. PMID:26312116

  4. Gunshot wounds -- aftercare

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000737.htm Gunshot wounds - aftercare To use the sharing features on this ... or body are likely to cause more damage. Wound Care If the wound was severe, you may ...

  5. Postoperative (pressure) alopecia following sacrocolpopexy.

    PubMed

    Bagaria, Madhu; Luck, Ali Maria

    2015-06-01

    Postoperative alopecia is a rare occurrence seen after a variety of surgical procedures performed under general anesthesia. The speculated cause is pressure-induced ischemia due to prolonged head immobilization. This case describes a patient who developed this complication after undergoing sacrocolpopexy. A 57-year-old postmenopausal Caucasian female was consented to undergo a robotic-assisted sacrocolpopexy, perineoplasty, and midurethral sling with possible conversion to an open procedure. The indication was symptomatic proximal and distal rectocele with foreshortened vagina. It was converted to laparotomy due to difficult presacral dissection. Her total operative time was 540 with 240 min in the Trendelenburg position. No intraoperative hypotension or excessive blood loss was noted. She started complaining of scalp pain in the postoperative recovery area. She developed soreness, crusting, and later alopecia in the same area. It was noted at her 3-week office visit. Referral was made for dermatology and anesthesiology evaluation. There was spontaneous full recovery by the 5th month. Postoperative alopecia is a rare condition mimicking alopecia areata but it is preceded by inciting events. There is some evidence to suggest that it is a preventable condition by frequent head repositioning during surgery. This case report is intended to increase the surgeon's awareness about this rare complication as its occurrence can be distressing for the patient.

  6. Effects of wound closure on wound healing in gynecologic surgery: a systematic literature review.

    PubMed

    Boesch, Cedric E; Umek, Wolfgang

    2009-03-01

    A systematic review was undertaken using the Cochrane and PubMed databases to answer the question of how wound closure affects wound healing after gynecologic surgery. Leaving the vaginal vault open after vaginal and abdominal hysterectomy is as safe as closing it. When closing the vaginal vault, there is no difference between sutures and staples. Nonclosure of the peritoneum is a safe method after vaginal and abdominal hysterectomy. After laparotomy there is no difference between continuous and interrupted sutures regarding wound infection and/or dehiscence. After vertical midline incisions it is possible to close Camper's fascia, use drainage or close the skin only. The overall wound complication rate after laparoscopic surgery is lower when using transcutaneous as compared to subcuticular sutures. Adhesive paper tapes save time when closing smaller skin incisions. In conclusion, specific wound closure techniques improve wound healing after gynecologic operations.

  7. [Specificities in children wound healing].

    PubMed

    Sanchez, J; Antonicelli, F; Tuton, D; Mazouz Dorval, S; François, C

    2016-10-01

    Children have specific characteristics of wound healing. The aim of this study was to describe the specific clinical characteristics of wounds healing in children and to present the current knowledge on the specific mechanisms with regard to infant age. The tissue insult or injury in fetus can heal without scar, mainly due to reduced granulation tissue associated to diminished or even no inflammatory phase, modified extracellular matrix such as the concentration of hyaluronic acid in amniotic liquid, expression and arrangement of collagen and tenascin. Thickness of children skin is a serious negative factor in case of trauma, whereas poor co-morbidities and efficient growth tissue mechanisms are beneficial to good evolution, even in cases of extensive damage and loss of tissue. The subsequent tissue mechanical forces, wound healing during childhood, spanning from the age of 2 until the end of puberty, is associated with more hypertrophic scars, both in duration and in intensity. Consequently, unnecessary surgery has to be avoided during this period when possible, and children with abnormal or pathologic wound healing should benefit from complementary treatments (hydration, massage, brace, silicone, hydrotherapy…), which represent efficient factors to minimize tissue scarring. After wound healing, the growth body rate can be responsible for specific complications, such as contractures, alopecia, and scar intussusceptions. Its evolutionary character implies the need of an attentive follow-up until adult age. Psychologic repercussions, as a consequence of pathologic scars, must be prevented and investigated by the surgeon.

  8. Electrical stimulation to accelerate wound healing

    PubMed Central

    Thakral, Gaurav; LaFontaine, Javier; Najafi, Bijan; Talal, Talal K.; Kim, Paul; Lavery, Lawrence A.

    2013-01-01

    Background There are several applications of electrical stimulation described in medical literature to accelerate wound healing and improve cutaneous perfusion. This is a simple technique that could be incorporated as an adjunctive therapy in plastic surgery. The objective of this review was to evaluate the results of randomized clinical trials that use electrical stimulation for wound healing. Method We identified 21 randomized clinical trials that used electrical stimulation for wound healing. We did not include five studies with treatment groups with less than eight subjects. Results Electrical stimulation was associated with faster wound area reduction or a higher proportion of wounds that healed in 14 out of 16 wound randomized clinical trials. The type of electrical stimulation, waveform, and duration of therapy vary in the literature. Conclusion Electrical stimulation has been shown to accelerate wound healing and increase cutaneous perfusion in human studies. Electrical stimulation is an adjunctive therapy that is underutilized in plastic surgery and could improve flap and graft survival, accelerate postoperative recovery, and decrease necrosis following foot reconstruction. PMID:24049559

  9. Monitoring diabetic wound healing by NIR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Papazoglou, Elisabeth S; Zubkov, Leonid; Zhu, Linda; Weingarten, Michael S; Tyagi, Som; Pourrezaei, Kambiz

    2005-01-01

    Chronic wounds represent one of the most serious complications of diabetes. Lack of quantitative assessment of healing progress makes diabetic wound management a clinical challenge. We constructed an optical device based on near infrared diffuse optical spectroscopy and monitored the change in wound optical properties during healing. A single source, four detector frequency domain instrument with multiple wavelengths was employed in a streptozotocin induced diabetic rat animal model. Optical properties including absorption and reduced scattering coefficients were measured. Our results show that there is significant difference in the absorption and reduced scattering coefficient of the wounds between diabetic and controls rats, and such difference persists throughout the healing period. Our technique would be highly useful in monitoring and quantifying the wound healing process.

  10. Use of Cryopreserved, Particulate Human Amniotic Membrane and Umbilical Cord (AM/UC) Tissue: A Case Series Study for Application in the Healing of Chronic Wounds.

    PubMed

    Swan, Jennifer

    2014-11-01

    Human amniotic membrane and umbilical cord tissues (AM/UC) are fetal tissues that contain proteins, cytokines, and growth factors that, when transplanted, can modulate inflammation and promote healing. Lyophilized, particulate AM/UC tissues can be used as wound coverings for chronic dermal ulcers or defects to promote granulation tissue formation and rapid re-epithelialization. This study reviews a case series of 5 patients presenting with chronic nonhealing wounds that received particulate AM/UC tissues (NEOX® FLO, Amniox Medical, Atlanta, GA). For all cases, wounds were debrided in the office setting and a single application of lyophilized particulate was used with minimal additional dressings. The lyophilized AM/UC tissue was placed within the wound bed and a dressing consisting of Adaptic®, 2x2 or 4x4 (Systagenix, Quincy, MA), Kling® (Johnson & Johnson, New Brunswick, NJ), and ACE™ (3M, St. Paul, MN) wrap were applied. Dressings were kept in place until weekly follow-up appointments in which a new Adaptic, 2x2 and Kling were applied. Overall, healing of wounds was noted to have a mean of 5 weeks to complete epithelialization. Upon complete healing patients were able to return to planned postoperative care and rehabilitation. Wound complications occur despite the best standard of care. Chronic wounds that remain weeks after surgery inhibit patients from progressing to physical rehabilitation and significantly affect patients both physically and mentally. These case presentations demonstrate how use of human AM/UC tissue may help wounds heal quickly and help patients return to normal function.

  11. Postoperative singultus: an osteopathic approach.

    PubMed

    Petree, Kristie; Bruner, Jonathan

    2015-03-01

    Singultus, or hiccups, is a common medical condition. Despite exponential leaps in medicine, the pathophysiologic cause remains poorly defined. Persistent singultus has been associated with conditions such as pulmonary embolism and myocardial infarction. Singultus is also a well-known postoperative complication. The criterion standard of care for patients with singultus involves ruling out lethal pathologic causes, attempting physical stimulation with Valsava maneuvers or drinking water, and, if no relief has been achieved, administering drugs to ease the symptoms. The authors report a case of a man whose postoperative singultus was successfully managed with osteopathic manipulative treatment. This approach addresses many of the possible underlying neuromechanical causes of the aberrant reflex with minimal potential for adverse effects. Physicians should consider osteopathic manipulative treatment in the care of patients with singultus.

  12. Facial gunshot wound debridement: debridement of facial soft tissue gunshot wounds.

    PubMed

    Shvyrkov, Michael B

    2013-01-01

    Over the period 1981-1985 the author treated 1486 patients with facial gunshot wounds sustained in combat in Afghanistan. In the last quarter of 20th century, more powerful and destructive weapons such as M-16 rifles, AK-47 and Kalashnikov submachine guns, became available and a new approach to gunshot wound debridement is required. Modern surgeons have little experience in treatment of such wounds because of rare contact with similar pathology. This article is intended to explore modern wound debridement. The management of 502 isolated soft tissue injuries is presented. Existing principles recommend the sparing of damaged tissues. The author's experience was that tissue sparing lead to a high rate of complications (47.6%). Radical primary surgical debridement (RPSD) of wounds was then adopted with radical excision of necrotic non-viable wound margins containing infection to the point of active capillary bleeding and immediate primary wound closure. After radical debridement wound infection and breakdown decreased by a factor of 10. Plastic operations with local and remote soft tissue were made on 14, 7% of the wounded. Only 0.7% patients required discharge from the army due to facial muscle paralysis and/or facial skin impregnation with particles of gunpowder from mine explosions. Gunshot face wound; modern debridement.

  13. Hemorrhagic complications in dermatologic surgery

    PubMed Central

    Bunick, Christopher G.; Aasi, Sumaira Z.

    2014-01-01

    The ability to recognize, manage, and, most importantly, prevent hemorrhagic complications is critical to performing dermatologic procedures that have safe and high quality outcomes. This article reviews the preoperative, intraoperative, and postoperative factors and patient dynamics that are central to preventing such an adverse outcome. Specifically, the role that anticoagulants and antiplatelet agents, hypertension, and other medical conditions play in the development of postoperative hemorrhage are discussed. In addition, this article provides practical guidelines on managing bleeding during and after surgery. PMID:22515669

  14. Negative Pressure Wound Therapy: Experience in 45 Dogs

    PubMed Central

    Pitt, Kathryn A.; Stanley, Bryden J.

    2016-01-01

    Objective To report experience with negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) in 45 consecutive dogs admitted with extensive cutaneous wounds and to determine if NPWT is feasible in veterinary hospital practice. Study Design Prospective descriptive study Animals Dogs (n = 45) Methods Collected data were organized into 6 categories: patient data, wound data, NPWT data, adjunctive treatments, complications, and final outcome Results Wounds (53 in 45 dogs) were largely traumatic in origin, and distributed fairly evenly to the trunk, proximal and distal aspects of the limbs. Most wounds (34 dogs, 76%) had no granulation tissue and were treated a mean of 4.2 days after wounding, whereas 11 dogs had granulating wounds that were initially treated a mean of 87 days after wounding. Median NPWT use was 3 days with a mean hospitalization of 7.8 days. Most wounds (33; 62%) were closed surgically after NPWT and were healed by 14 days. The other 18 wounds healed (mean, 21 days) by second intention after hospital discharge. Overall, 96% of the wounds healed; 2 dogs died before definitive closure could be attempted. Conclusion NPWT is applicable to a wide variety of canine wounds is well tolerated, allows for several days between dressing changes, and can used to optimize the wound bed for surgical closure or second intention healing. PMID:24512302

  15. Neurological Complications of Bariatric Surgery.

    PubMed

    Goodman, Jerry Clay

    2015-12-01

    Obesity has attained pandemic proportions, and bariatric surgery is increasingly being employed resulting in turn to more neurological complications which must be recognized and managed. Neurological complications may result from mechanical or inflammatory mechanisms but primarily result from micro-nutritional deficiencies. Vitamin B12, thiamine, and copper constitute the most frequent deficiencies. Neurological complications may occur at reasonably predictable times after bariatric surgery and are associated with the type of surgery used. During the early post-operative period, compressive or stretch peripheral nerve injury, rhabdomyolysis, Wernicke's encephalopathy, and inflammatory polyradiculoneuropathy may occur. Late complications ensue after months to years and include combined system degeneration (vitamin B12 deficiency) and hypocupric myelopathy. Bariatric surgery patients require careful nutritional follow-up with routine monitoring of micronutrients at 6 weeks and 3, 6, and 12 months post-operatively and then annually after surgery and multivitamin supplementation for life. Sustained vigilance for common and rare neurological complications is essential.

  16. Assesment of inflammatory response intensity in early postoperative period in patients after hernioplasty operated on with classic stoppa method and videoscopic TEP method.

    PubMed

    Libiszewski, Michał; Drozda, Rafał; Białecki, Jacek; Wieloch, Maria; Hedayati, Masoud; Kuzdak, Krzysztof; Kołomecki, Krzysztof

    2011-09-01

    THE AIM OF THE STUDY was comparison of inflammatory response intensity through estimation of CRP, IL-6 and WBC concentration in blood serum in patients before and after inguinal hernia operations with Stoppa and TEP method. MATERIAL AND METHODS. The study involoved 117 patients operated on inguinal hernia between 2006-2008. The patients were divided into two groups. In the first group (group I - 56) Stopp'a method was used, in the second (group II - 61) TEP method. The patients selection was coincidental. All examined patients were men between 25-75 years old (mean age 54.3). Moreover, the operation's time, state of postoperative wound, the average hospitalization time and intensity of pain were estimated. The observations were directed over two weeks after operation. RESULTS. The inflammatory response estimated with CRP, IL-6 concentration in blood serum was considerably higher in patients operated with Stoppa method. There wasn't observed a relevant difference in increase of white blood cells' concentration in both groups. Moreover, the patients operated on with TEP method experienced lower pain. In group, operated on with Stoppa method, 3 cases of wound healing complications were observed. The operation's time was considerably shorter in the first group. The hospitalization time, was considerably shorter in patients operated on with videoscopic method. CONCLUSIONS. The operation of inguinal hernia with TEP technique in comparison with Stopp'a method is connected with considerably lower inflammatory response of organism, what directly involve with postoperative pain abridgment and reduction of hospitalization time. Moreover it may have influence on frequency of postoperative complications related with wound healing.

  17. Effect of polylactic film (Surgi-Wrap) on preventing postoperative ileus after major hepato-pancreato-biliary surgery

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Chang Hyung; Kim, Hongbeom; Kim, Suh Min; Kwak, Beom Seok; Baik, Yong Hae; Park, Young Jin; Oh, Min Gu

    2016-01-01

    Backgrounds/Aims Major hepato-pancreato-biliary (HPB) surgery is usually performed via an open method rather than a laparoscopic method. Postoperative ileus (POI) is a classic complication after open surgery. The purpose of this study was to determine whether polylactic film is useful in the prevention of POI. Methods A total of 179 patients who underwent major HPB surgery between 2005 and 2014, were retrospectively reviewed. A diagnosis of POI was made by a physical examination, laboratory, and radiological findings. Surgi-Wrap® polylactic film was preferentially used intraperitoneally by surgeons, just before wound closure. Results Major HPB surgery included pancreatoduodenectomy (n=48), distal or subtotal pancreatectomy (n=24), hepatectomy (n=67), other bile duct or gallbladder operations (n=35), and others (n=5). Although patients with polylactic film showed a significantly lower incidence of POI (n=3, 4.1% vs. n=14, 13.3%, p=0.041), they showed a significantly higher complication rate (n=20, 27.0% vs. n=19, 18.1%, p=0.004), particularly intra-abdominal fluid collection (n=7, 9.4% vs. n=2, 1.9%), and wound infections (n=6, 8.1% vs. n=3, 2.9%), than those who did not receive the film, respectively. Conclusions Although the polylactic film prevented POI, more complications other than POI were observed. Well-designed randomized controlled trials, using this anti-adhesive product, are needed to evaluate its effect on POI after major HPB surgery. PMID:28261699

  18. Effectiveness of pre-peritoneal continuous wound infusion with lidocaine for pain control following ovariohysterectomy in dogs.

    PubMed

    Morgaz, Juan; Muñoz-Rascón, Pilar; Serrano-Rodríguez, Juan Manuel; Navarrete, Rocío; Domínguez, Juan Manuel; Fernández-Sarmiento, José Andrés; Gómez-Villamandos, Rafael J; Serrano, Juan Manuel; Granados, María Del Mar

    2014-12-01

    This study compared the post-operative analgesic efficacy of continuous lidocaine administration with that of intramuscular (IM) methadone in dogs undergoing ovariohysterectomy. Thirty-eight dogs were divided randomly into two groups. Following surgery, the lidocaine group (L) received a continuous lidocaine infusion (2 mg/kg/h) through a wound catheter inserted in the pre-peritoneal space; the control group (C) received methadone (0.2 mg/kg IM). A dynamic and interactive visual analogue scale (DIVAS), the Scale-Form Glasgow Composite Measure Scale (CMPS-SF), mechanical wound thresholds, heart rate, respiratory rate and blood pressure were assessed pre-operatively and 2, 4, 6, 18, and 24 h after surgery. The presence of the wound catheter prevented the evaluator from remaining blinded to group allocations. Plasma lidocaine and cortisol levels were measured 2, 6, 18, and 24 h after surgery. There were no intergroup differences in any pain assessment scale scores at any time point. Stable intravenous lidocaine levels were observed. Four animals in the control group but none in the lidocaine group required rescue analgesia. There were no differences in complication rates between groups. Continuous locoregional lidocaine delivered via a wound catheter between the parietal peritoneum and abdominal muscle offers effective analgesia in dogs during ovariohysterectomy and appears to be a promising analgesic option in veterinary surgery.

  19. Integrated Detection of Pathogens and Host Biomarkers for Wounds

    SciTech Connect

    Jaing, C

    2012-03-19

    The increasing incidence and complications arising from combat wounds has necessitated a reassessment of methods for effective treatment. Infection, excessive inflammation, and incidence of drug-resistant organisms all contribute toward negative outcomes for afflicted individuals. The organisms and host processes involved in wound progression, however, are incompletely understood. We therefore set out, using our unique technical resources, to construct a profile of combat wounds which did or did not successfully resolve. We employed the Lawrence Livermore Microbial Detection Array and identified a number of nosocomial pathogens present in wound samples. Some of these identities corresponded with bacterial isolates previously cultured, while others were not obtained via standard microbiology. Further, we optimized proteomics protocols for the identification of host biomarkers indicative of various stages in wound progression. In combination with our pathogen data, our biomarker discovery efforts will provide a profile corresponding to wound complications, and will assist significantly in treatment of these complex cases.

  20. [Clinical and functional considerations in some cases of postoperative endophthalmitis].

    PubMed

    Muşat, O; Toma, Oana; Cristescu, R; Coman, Corina; Asandi, R; Burcea, M

    2013-01-01

    We present 3 cases of postsurgery endophthalmitis, with good initial operatory technique, which were admitted in our hospital within variable time, to which a second surgery was performed, with good postoperative evolution, without any inflammatory signs and preserving the eye. We analyse the pre and post-operative treatment of endophthalmitis, but also the ways to prevent the appearance of this post-operative complication.

  1. Biofilms in chronic wounds.

    PubMed

    James, Garth A; Swogger, Ellen; Wolcott, Randall; Pulcini, Elinor deLancey; Secor, Patrick; Sestrich, Jennifer; Costerton, John W; Stewart, Philip S

    2008-01-01

    Chronic wounds including diabetic foot ulcers, pressure ulcers, and venous leg ulcers are a worldwide health problem. It has been speculated that bacteria colonizing chronic wounds exist as highly persistent biofilm communities. This research examined chronic and acute wounds for biofilms and characterized microorganisms inhabiting these wounds. Chronic wound specimens were obtained from 77 subjects and acute wound specimens were obtained from 16 subjects. Culture data were collected using standard clinical techniques. Light and scanning electron microscopy techniques were used to analyze 50 of the chronic wound specimens and the 16 acute wound specimens. Molecular analyses were performed on the remaining 27 chronic wound specimens using denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis and sequence analysis. Of the 50 chronic wound specimens evaluated by microscopy, 30 were characterized as containing biofilm (60%), whereas only one of the 16 acute wound specimens was characterized as containing biofilm (6%). This was a statistically significant difference (p<0.001). Molecular analyses of chronic wound specimens revealed diverse polymicrobial communities and the presence of bacteria, including strictly anaerobic bacteria, not revealed by culture. Bacterial biofilm prevalence in specimens from chronic wounds relative to acute wounds observed in this study provides evidence that biofilms may be abundant in chronic wounds.

  2. Extremity trauma, dressings, and wound infection: should every acute limb wound have a silver lining?

    PubMed

    Eardley, William G P; Watts, Sarah A; Clasper, Jon C

    2012-09-01

    The manner in which high-energy transfer limb injuries are dressed can alter the wound environment through manipulation of the bacterial burden, thus minimizing tissue degradation and influencing healing potential. Infection is the principal complication of such wounds, and antiseptic soaked gauze is accepted in early coverage of extremity wounds despite a lack of evidence to support this practice. There has been resurgence in the use of silver in acute wounds, through dressings manipulated to deliver sustained elemental silver to the wound interface. In vitro and in vivo experimentation of silver dressings are characterized however by methodological compromise, primarily through lack of similarity of models to the physiology of the healing wound. Results from in vitro studies caution against the use of silver because of evidence of cytotoxicity, but this is not reproduced in in vivo or clinical experimentation, leading to ambiguity. Review of silver dressing application in burns and chronic wound studies fails to support its use over other dressing systems. Similarly, evidence for the use of silver in acute limb wounds is lacking. This article provides a comprehensive overview of the use of silver dressings in acute wound care and highlights in particular the paucity of evidence regarding its routine use in extremity injury.

  3. Aloe vera and Vitis vinifera improve wound healing in an in vivo rat burn wound model.

    PubMed

    Lin, Li-Xin; Wang, Peng; Wang, Yu-Ting; Huang, Yong; Jiang, Lei; Wang, Xue-Ming

    2016-02-01

    Aloe vera and Vitis vinifera have been traditionally used as wound healing agents. The present study aimed to investigate the effects of aloe emodin and resveratrol in the burn wound healing procedure. Burn wounds are common in developed and developing countries, however, in developing countries, the incidence of severe complications is higher and financial resources are limited. The results of the present study demonstrated that neither aloe emodin or resveratrol were cytotoxic to THP-1 macrophages at concentrations of 1, 100 and 500 ng/ml. A significant increase in wound-healing activity was observed in mice treated with the aloe emodin and resveratrol, compared with those which received control treatments. The levels of IL-1β in the exudates of the burn wound area of the treated mice increased in a time-dependent manner over 7 days following burn wound injury. At 10 days post-injury, steady and progressive wound healing was observed in the control animals. The present study confirmed that increased wound healing occurs following treatment with aloe emodin,, compared with resveratrol, providing support for the use of Aloe vera plants to improve burn wound healing.

  4. Importance of critical view of safety in laparoscopic cholecystectomy: a survey of 120 serial patients, with no incidence of complications

    PubMed Central

    Fersahoglu, Mehmet Mahir; Kilic, Fatih; Onur, Ender; Memisoglu, Kemal

    2017-01-01

    Backgrounds/Aims To determine the importance of critical view of safety techniques in laparoscopic cholecystectomy. Methods A total of 120 patients were included in the study, between January 2015 to March 2016. Hydrodissection was performed for cases presenting with severe adhesions or cholecystitis. A critical view of safety was performed for all patients undergoing the procedure for isolation of cystic duct and cystic artery with cystic plate dissection. Demographic characteristics of the patients, as well as intraoperative and postoperative minor or major complications were recorded. Results A total of 81 (67.5%) female and 39 (32.5%) male patients succesfully underwent surgeries following the critical view of safety and hydrodissection technique. Acute/chronic cholecystitis, or severe adhesions in the surgical field, were detected in 34 (28.3%) patients. There were no intraoperative or postoperative biliary complications. Wound infection was detected in 5 (4.1%) patients. All patients were discharged on either the first, second or third postoperative day. Conclusions Biliary duct injury during laparoscopic cholecystectomy is an important complication. In this study, we show that the critical view of safety and hydrodissection techniquesminimizes the bile duct injury during laparoscopic cholecystectomy, including in difficult cases. PMID:28317041

  5. Effect of day-case unilateral cochlear implantation in adults on general and disease-specific quality of life, postoperative complications and hearing results, tinnitus, vertigo and cost-effectiveness: protocol for a randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Derks, Laura S M; Wegner, Inge; Smit, Adriana L; Thomeer, Hans G X M; Topsakal, Vedat; Grolman, Wilko

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Cochlear implantation is an increasingly common procedure in the treatment of severe to profound sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL) in children and adults. It is often performed as a day-case procedure. The major drive towards day-case surgery has been from a logistical, economical and societal perspective, but we also speculate that the patient's quality of life (QoL) is at least equal to inpatient surgery if not increased as a result of rapid discharge and rehabilitation. Even though cochlear implantation seems well suited to a day-case approach and this even seems to be common practice in some countries, evidence is scarce and of low quality to guide us towards the preferred treatment option. Methods and analysis A single-centre, non-blinded, randomised, controlled trial was designed to (primarily) investigate the effect on general QoL of day-case cochlear implantation compared to inpatient cochlear implantation and (secondarily) the effect of both methods on (subjective) hearing improvement, disease-specific QoL, tinnitus, vertigo and cost-effectiveness. 30 adult patients with severe to profound bilateral postlingual SNHL who are eligible for unilateral cochlear implantation will be randomly assigned to either the day-case or inpatient treatment group. The outcome measures will be assessed using auditory evaluations, questionnaires (preoperatively, at 1-week, 3-week, 3-month and 1-year follow-up) and costs diaries (weekly during the first month postoperatively, after which once in a month until 1-year follow-up). Preoperative and postoperative outcomes will be compared. The difference in costs and benefit will be represented using the incremental cost utility/effectiveness ratio. The analyses will be carried out on an intention-to-treat basis. Ethics and dissemination This research protocol was approved by the Institutional Review Board of the UMC Utrecht (NL45590.041.13; V.5, November 2015). The trial results will be disseminated through peer

  6. Complications After Laparoscopic and Conventional Cholecystectomy: A Comparative Study

    PubMed Central

    Brune, Iris B.; Schönleben, K.; Omran, S.

    1994-01-01

    The growing popularity of laparoscopic cholecystectomy (LC) has made extensive series comparing laparoscopic and conventional cholecystectomy in a prospective, randomized way nearly impossible. To evaluate LC we compared retrospectively 800 laparoscopic with 748 conventional cholecystectomies (CC). Of the 800 LC, 10 (1.2%) were converted to laparotomy. 6 conversions were related to aberrant anatomical features or features making dissection very difficult, 4 conversions were due to complications. There were 5 (0, 6%) intraoperative complications during LC and 4 (0.5%) during CC. Postoperative morbidity was 2.1% (n = 17) after LC and 3.7% (n = 28) after CC. Particularly the incidence of wound problems was only 0.5% (n = 4) after LC while it was 1.3% (n = 10) after CC. Overall morbidity was 2.7% (n = 22) for LC and 4.2% (n = 32) for CC. Mortality rate after CC was 0.4% (n = 3), there were no deaths after LC. Common bile duct-injury rate was 0.2% (n = 2) for both groups. Complication rates after LC have been rapidly decreasing with growing experience. Laparoscopic cholecystectomy can safely be performed by appropriately trained surgeons in more than 90% of patients suffering from gallbladder disease. The low morbidity and mortality together with the significant advantages to patient recovery makes laparoscopic cholecystectomy the treatment of choice for symptomatic cholecystolithiasis. PMID:7993860

  7. Acceleration of wound repair by curcumin in the excision wound of mice exposed to different doses of fractionated γ radiation.

    PubMed

    Jagetia, Ganesh Chandra; Rajanikant, Golgod Krishnamurthy

    2012-02-01

    Fractionated irradiation (IR) before or after surgery of malignant tumours causes a high frequency of wound healing complications. Our aim was to investigate the effect of curcumin (CUM) on the healing of deep excision wound of mice exposed to fractionated IR by mimicking clinical conditions. A full-thickness dermal excision wound was created on the shaved dorsum of mice that were orally administered or not with 100 mg of CUM per kilogram body weight before partial body exposure to 10, 20 or 40 Gy given as 2 Gy/day for 5, 10 or 20 days. The wound contraction was determined periodically by capturing video images of the wound from day 1 until complete healing of wounds. Fractionated IR caused a dose-dependent delay in the wound contraction and prolonged wound healing time, whereas CUM administration before fractionated IR caused a significant elevation in the wound contraction and reduced mean wound healing time. Fractionated IR reduced the synthesis of collagen, deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) and nitric oxide (NO) at different post-IR times and treatment of mice with CUM before IR elevated the synthesis of collagen, DNA and NO significantly. Histological examination showed a reduction in the collagen deposition, fibroblast and vascular densities after fractionated IR, whereas CUM pre-treatment inhibited this decline significantly. Our study shows that CUM pre-treatment accelerated healing of irradiated wound and could be a substantial therapeutic strategy in the management of irradiated wounds.

  8. Wound Healing Effects of Rose Placenta in a Mouse Model of Full-Thickness Wounds

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yang Woo; Baek, Seung Ryeol; Lee, Eun Sook; Lee, Sang Ho; Moh, Sang Hyun; Kim, Soo Yun; Moh, Ji Hong; Kondo, Chieko

    2015-01-01

    Background Rosa damascena, a type of herb, has been used for wound healing in Eastern folk medicine. The goal of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of rose placenta from R. damascena in a full-thickness wound model in mice. Methods Sixty six-week-old C57BL/6N mice were used. Full-thickness wounds were made with an 8-mm diameter punch. Two wounds were made on each side of the back, and wounds were assigned randomly to the control and experimental groups. Rose placenta (250 µg) was injected in the experimental group, and normal saline was injected in the control group. Wound sizes were measured with digital photography, and specimens were harvested. Immunohistochemical staining was performed to assess the expression of epidermal growth factor (EGF), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1), and CD31. Vessel density was measured. Quantitative analysis using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for EGF was performed. All evaluations were performed on postoperative days 0, 2, 4, 7, and 10. Statistical analyses were performed using the paired t-test. Results On days 4, 7, and 10, the wounds treated with rose placenta were significantly smaller. On day 2, VEGF and EGF expression increased in the experimental group. On days 7 and 10, TGF-β1 expression decreased in the experimental group. On day 10, vessel density increased in the experimental group. The increase in EGF on day 2 was confirmed with ELISA. Conclusions Rose placenta was found to be associated with improved wound healing in a mouse full-thickness wound model via increased EGF release. Rose placenta may potentially be a novel drug candidate for enhancing wound healing. PMID:26618114

  9. [Complications of tubal sterilization].

    PubMed

    Schreiner, W E

    1986-05-01

    In Europe and the US, tubal sterilization by laparoscopy has become the most widely used technique for female sterilization. The overall rate of intra- and postoperative complications differs between 0.145% and 0.85% in the numerous studies which have been done. This means 1 severe complication in 120-700 laparoscopic sterilizations. The lethality of tubal sterilization by laparoscopy lies between 3-10 deaths/100,000 interventions. The so-called "post-tubal ligation syndrome" is a rare complication. The overall pregnancy rate after tubal sterilization is 3-10/1000 women. The rate of ectopic pregnancy is very high and varies between 13.6% and 90%. Only 5% of the sterilized women show dissatisfaction. Several factors are relevant with regard to psychological sequelae and must be considered before tubal sterilization can be performed. 1 of the most important is the individual comprehensive counselling of the female or the couple prior to the sterilization.

  10. Effect of cultured autologous oral keratinocyte suspension in fibrin glue on oral wound healing in rabbits.

    PubMed

    Lis, G J; Zarzecka, J; Litwin, J A; Jasek, E; Cichocki, T; Zapała, J

    2012-09-01

    The effect of cultured autologous oral keratinocyte suspension in fibrin glue on the healing of surgically produced oral mucosal wounds was assessed in the rabbit model. Using the light microscope and a digital image analysis system, the epithelization parameters (marginal epithelization and percentage of wound re-epithelization) were measured in haematoxylin-eosin stained sections of the wound area and compared with those of wounds treated with fibrin glue alone and untreated ones. The epithelization was significantly higher in keratinocytes plus fibrin glue-treated wounds on postoperative days 3 and 7. No significant differences were observed on postoperative day 1, when the healing process had just begun, and on postoperative day 14, when re-epithelization was completed or nearly completed in all groups. The inflammatory infiltration of the wounded mucosa was weakest in keratinocyte-treated wounds and strongest in untreated wounds. In conclusion, suspension of cultured autologous oral keratinocytes in fibrin glue significantly accelerates oral wound healing in the rabbit model and could be beneficial in the treatment of oral wounds in patients.

  11. Postoperative pelvic pain: An imaging approach.

    PubMed

    Farah, H; Laurent, N; Phalippou, J; Bazot, M; Giraudet, G; Serb, T; Poncelet, E

    2015-10-01

    Postoperative pelvic pain after gynecological surgery is a readily detected but unspecific sign of complication. Imaging as a complement to physical examination helps establish the etiological diagnosis. In the context of emergency surgery, vascular, urinary and digestive injuries constitute the most frequent intraoperative complications. During the follow-up of patients who had undergone pelvic surgery, imaging should be performed to detect recurrent disease, postoperative fibrosis, adhesions and more specific complications related to prosthetic material. Current guidelines recommend using pelvic ultrasonography as the first line imaging modality whereas the use of pelvic computed tomography and/or magnetic resonance imaging should be restricted to specific situations, depending on local availability of equipment and suspected disease.

  12. Assessment of Severe Extremity Wound Bioburden at the Time of Definitive Wound Closure or Coverage: Correlation With Subsequent Postclosure Deep Wound Infection (Bioburden Study).

    PubMed

    Bosse, Michael J; Murray, Clinton K; Carlini, Anthony R; Firoozabadi, Reza; Manson, Theodore; Scharfstein, Daniel O; Wenke, Joseph C; Zadnik, Mary; Castillo, Renan C

    2017-04-01

    Infection remains the most common and significant complication after high-energy fractures. The Bioburden Study is a multicenter, prospective, observational cohort study of wound bacterial bioburden and antibiotic care in severe open lower extremity fractures. The aims of this study are to (1) characterize the contemporary extremity wound "bioburden" at the time of definitive wound closure; (2) determine the concordance between polymerase chain reaction results and hospital microbiology; (3) determine, among those who develop deep infections, the concordance between the pathogens at wound closure and at deep infection; and (4) compare the probability of deep infection between those who did and did not receive an appropriate course of antibiotics based on bioburden at the time of wound closure. To address these aims, sites collected tissue samples from severe lower extremity injuries at the time of wound closure and at first surgery for treatment of a deep infection, nonunion, flap failure, amputation, or other complications (because these surgeries may be due to undetected infection). Otherwise, if no further surgical treatment occurred, participants were followed for 12 months. The study was conducted at 38 US trauma centers and has enrolled 655 participants aged 18-64 years. This is the first large multi-institutional study evaluating the wound bioburden of severe open tibia fractures and correlating this bioburden with the risk of wound complications after definitive soft tissue closure.

  13. Video-assisted thoracic surgery complications

    PubMed Central

    Kozak, Józef

    2014-01-01

    Video-assisted thoracic surgery (VATS) is a miniinvasive technique commonly applied worldwide. Indications for VATS are very broad and include the diagnosis of mediastinal, lung and pleural diseases, as well as large resection procedures such as pneumonectomy. The most frequent complication is prolonged postoperative air leak. The other significant complications are bleeding, infections, postoperative pain and recurrence at the port site. Different complications of VATS procedures can occur with variable frequency in various diseases. Despite the large number of their types, such complications are rare and can be avoided through the proper selection of patients and an appropriate surgical technique. PMID:25561984

  14. [Gunshot wounds: forensic pathology].

    PubMed

    Lorin de la Grandmaison, Geoffroy

    2012-02-01

    Gunshot wounds are among the most complex traumatic lesions encountered in forensic pathology. At the time of autopsy, careful scrutiny of the wounds is essential for correct interpretation of the lesions. Complementary pathological analysis has many interests: differentiation between entrance and exit wounds, estimation of firing distance, differentiation between vital and post mortem wounds and wounds dating. In case of multiple headshots, neuropathological examination can provide arguments for or against suicide. Sampling of gunshot wounds at autopsy must be systematic. Pathological data should be confronted respectively to autopsy and death scene investigation data and also ballistic studies. Forensic pathologist must be aware of the limits of optic microscopy.

  15. Treatment of complications of parotid gland surgery

    PubMed Central

    Marchese-Ragona, R; De Filippis, C; Marioni, G; Staffieri, A

    2005-01-01

    Summary Although several reports in the literature have documented the surgical technique, and the oncological outcome achieved with parotidectomy, only a few articles have described the complications of parotid gland surgery and their management. Several complications have been reported in parotid surgery. We re-classified the complications of parotidectomy in intra-operative and post-operative (early and late). The commonest complications after parotidectomy are temporary or permanent facial palsy and Frey’s syndrome. PMID:16450773

  16. Management of gunshot wounds to the mandible.

    PubMed

    Peleg, Michael; Sawatari, Yoh

    2010-07-01

    The gunshot wound to the mandible is a unique traumatic injury. The resultant injury from the gunshot wound is diverse because of the variability of the projectile, motion, velocity, and tissue characteristics. When a high-velocity projectile strikes the mandible, often times the wound will consist of a severely comminuted mandible surrounded by nonvital soft tissues and the implantation of multiple foreign bodies. This represents a challenge for the treating surgeon. The anatomy and function of the mandible make it such that the care of the gunshot wound requires a combination of trauma and reconstructive surgeries. There are varying techniques advocated for the management of gunshot wound to the face. However, for the comminuted mandible fracture sustained from a gunshot wound, an approach involving the fabrication of an occlusal splint, intermaxillary fixation, aggressive debridement of hard and soft tissues, and immediate reconstruction with a titanium plate is a comprehensive approach that can restore the appropriate function and contour of the patient. At the Division of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, University of Miami, this approach to the comminuted mandible fracture secondary to the gunshot wound has led to the effective management of this specific subset of injury. The complication rate is comparable with the current literature and provides an advantage as a 1-stage management to restore appropriate function and cosmesis to the patient.

  17. Pregnancy Complications

    MedlinePlus

    ... To receive Pregnancy email updates Enter email Submit Pregnancy complications Complications of pregnancy are health problems that ... pregnancy. Expand all | Collapse all Health problems before pregnancy Before pregnancy, make sure to talk to your ...

  18. [Postoperative pain in craniotomy].

    PubMed

    Peón, Andréa Ungaro; Diccini, Solange

    2005-01-01

    In the postoperative period, 47% to 75% of the patients report some degree of pain. This study aimed to evaluate pain in the pre and postoperative period of patients submitted to craniotomy. This prospective research was carried out at the neurosurgery unit of a large Brazilian hospital. For a quantitative evaluation of pain, the verbal numeric 0-10 rating scale was used. Forty patients with a mean age of 36 years were evaluated. In the preoperative period, 34 (85%) patients indicated headache as the main cause of pain. In the postoperative period, 37 (93%) patients complained of pain while three (7%) reported absence of pain. Pain peaks were observed on the 2nd postoperative day, when 12 (32%) of the patients reported severe pain and 10 (27%) moderate pain. Absence of severe pain occurred after the 8th postoperative day. It was concluded that protocols of analgesia in craniotomy are needed, such as training nurses to better evaluate and handle pain.

  19. Assessing the complications and effectiveness of open carpal tunnel release in a tertiary care centre in a developing country

    PubMed Central

    Rahman, Khaleeq ur; Rahman, Shafiq; Khan, Adnan; Khan, Nauman Aman; Khan, Farman Ullah; khan, Rehman Ali; Farooq, Shama; Khan, Hamid

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Open surgical release for carpal tunnel syndrome is not devoid of complications and its quantitative assessment with the Boston questionnaire in a developing country had not been conducted, where, lack of facilities and surgical technique can influence the outcome. PRESENTATION OF CASE This was a prospective study in which all cases of carpal tunnel syndrome undergoing open release between June 2007 and June 2012 and who returned for follow up were included. Each patient was requested to fill out the Boston questionnaire twice both pre and post op at 3 months. All complications were recorded as well as bio-data of patients and co morbidities. Follow up was at 2 weeks and at 3 months. Those reporting complications at 3 months were further followed up until 6 months. 373 patients were included in the study. Twenty four patients developed complications. Of these, 12 experienced pain resulting from reflex sympathetic dystrophy. Three patients developed wound dehiscence, 2 cases acquired infections, 4 patients developed immediate post-operative haemorrhage and in 3 patients there was late recurrence of median nerve compression. The symptom severity score pre-operatively was 3.30 (±0.60) and it improved to 1.65 (±0.75) post-operatively indicating a significant change (p < 0.0001). The preoperative functional status score was 2.58 (±0.75) and post-op it became 1.60 (±0.80) again implying a good improvement with an effect size of 1.3. DISCUSSION All of the complications produced were well managed. The complication incidence was low. The open release procedure produced good improvement in hand function and in decreasing the symptom severity. CONCLUSION Conducting open release for carpal tunnel syndrome in a tertiary referral centre in a developing country offers a good outcome. PMID:24667074

  20. Gastrointestinal complications postthoracotomy and postvagotomy.

    PubMed

    Kokoska, E R; Naunheim, K S

    1998-08-01

    Postthoracotomy gastrointestinal complications, although relatively uncommon, can be associated with significant morbidity and mortality. It is necessary to identify patients who are at high risk for gastrointestinal complications during the preoperative evaluation. Appropriate stress ulcer prophylaxis should be provided to high-risk patients, and enteral feeds should be initiated as early in the postoperative course as possible. Postoperative hypotension and massive blood transfusions can be avoided with early reexploration in the case of postoperative hemorrhage. Finally, unexplained abdominal pain must not be ignored; a high index of suspicion should be maintained, with early and liberal use of diagnostic tools such as standard radiography, CT, endoscopy, and angiography. Consultation should be requested from a surgeon experienced in abdominal catastrophes. Early laparotomy with aggressive operative management can be lifesaving therapy but must be not applied in a cavalier fashion, as many of these disorders can and should be managed conservatively.

  1. A Rare Complication of Septorhinoplasty

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Summary: Septoplasty and septorhinoplasty are common procedures. A 28-year-old woman underwent the procedure and presented postoperatively with headache and vomiting and had developed a large pneumocephalus. We describe the case in detail and analyze the possible causes and ways to prevent such a complication. PMID:25587507

  2. Heterotopic ossification in wartime wounds.

    PubMed

    Forsberg, Jonathan Agner; Potter, Benjamin Kyle

    2010-01-01

    Heterotopic ossification (HO) refers to the formation of mature lamellar bone in nonosseous tissue. In the setting of high-energy wartime extremity wounds, HO is expected to complicate up to 64% of patients, has a predilection for the residual limbs of amputees, and remains a significant source of disability. Although the inciting events and the definitive cell(s) of origin continue to remain elusive, animal models and human histology samples suggest that HO formation follows a predictable sequence of events culminating in endochondral ossification. Primary prophylaxis is not medically or logistically practical in most cases because patients have generally sustained massive wounds and are undergoing serial debridements during an intercontinental aeromedical evacuation. Surgical excision of symptomatic lesions is warranted only after an appropriate trial of conservative measures and is associated with low recurrence rates in appropriately selected patients. Future research regarding prognostication and defining the early molecular biology of ectopic bone may permit individualized prophylaxis and development of novel targeted therapies.

  3. The Role of Wound Healing and Its Everyday Application in Plastic Surgery: A Practical Perspective and Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Ireton, Jordan E.; Unger, Jacob G.

    2013-01-01

    Background: After surgery it is often recommended that patients should refrain from strenuous physical activity for 4–6 weeks. This recommendation is based on the time course of wound healing. Here, we present an overview of incisional wound healing with a focus on 2 principles that guide our postoperative recommendations: the gain of tensile strength of a wound over time and the effect of mechanical stress on wound healing. Methods: A systematic search of the English literature was conducted using OVID, Cochrane databases, and PubMed. Inclusion criteria consisted of articles discussing the dynamics of incisional wound healing, and exclusion criteria consisted of articles discussing nonincisional wounds. Results: Experiments as early as 1929 laid the groundwork for our postoperative activity recommendations. Research using animal models has shown that the gain in tensile strength of a surgical wound is sigmoidal in trajectory, reaching maximal strength approximately 6 weeks postoperatively. Although human and clinical data are limited, the principles gained from laboratory investigation have provided important insights into the relationship among mechanical stress, collagen dynamics, and the time course of wound healing. Conclusion: Our postoperative activity recommendations are based on a series of animal studies. Clinical research supporting these recommendations is minimal, with the most relevant clinical data stemming from early motion protocols in the orthopedic literature. We must seek to establish clinical data to support our postoperative activity recommendations so that we can maximize the physiologic relationships between wound healing and mechanical stress. PMID:25289204

  4. Promoting safety of postoperative orthopaedic patients with obstructive sleep apnea.

    PubMed

    Veney, Amy J

    2013-01-01

    Orthopaedic patients with obstructive sleep apnea are at risk for postoperative complications related to administration of pain medications, anxiolytics, and antiemetics. They are more likely to experience respiratory and cardiac complications, be transferred to an intensive care unit, or have an increased length of stay in the hospital. This informational article is for nurses who care for postoperative orthopaedic patients with obstructive sleep apnea. The focus is on promoting patient safety through communication, vigilant postoperative sedation assessment, and nursing interventions that include appropriate patient positioning, patient education, and involving patients and their families in care.

  5. Remote Postoperative Epidural Hematoma after Brain Tumor Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Ho-Jung; Park, Jae-Sung; Jeun, Sin-Soo

    2015-01-01

    A postoperative epidural hematoma (EDH) is a serious and embarrassing complication, which usually occurs at the site of operation after intracranial surgery. However, remote EDH is relatively rare. We report three cases of remote EDH after brain tumor surgery. All three cases seemed to have different causes of remote postoperative EDH; however, all patients were managed promptly and showed excellent outcomes. Although the exact mechanism of remote postoperative EDH is unknown, surgeons should be cautious of the speed of lowering intracranial pressure and implement basic procedures to prevent this hazardous complication of brain tumor surgery. PMID:26605271

  6. Risks and complications in rhinoplasty

    PubMed Central

    Rettinger, Gerhard

    2008-01-01

    Rhinoplasty is regarded to be associated with many risks as the expectations of patient and physician are not always corresponding. Besides of postoperative deformities many other risks and complications have to be considered. Reduction-rhinoplasty e.g. can cause breathing disturbances which are reported in 70% of all revision-rhinoplasty-patients. One has to be aware however that scars and loss of mucosal-sensation can also give the feeling of a “blocked nose”. The main risks of autogenous transplants are dislocation and resorption, while alloplasts can cause infection and extrusion. In this respect silicone implants can have a complication rate between 5-20%. Less complications are reported with other materials like Gore-Tex. Complications of skin and soft tissues can be atrophy, fibrosis, numbness, cysts originating from displaced mucosa or subcutaneous granulomas caused by ointment material. Postoperative swelling depends mainly on the osteotomy technique. Percutaneous osteotomies cause less trauma, but may result in visible scars. Infections are rare but sometimes life-threatening (toxic-shock-syndrome). The risk is higher, when sinus surgery and rhinoplasty are combined. Osteotomies can also cause injuries of the orbital region. Necrosis of eye-lids by infections and blindness by central artery occlusion are known. There are reports on various other risks like rhinoliquorrhea, brain damage, fistulas between sinus-cavernosus and carotid artery, aneurysms and thrombosis of the cavernous sinus. Discoloration of incisors are possible by damage of vessels and nerves. Rhinoplasty can also become a court-case in dissatisfied patients, a situation that may be called a “typical complication of rhinoplasty”. It can be avoided by proper patient selection and consideration of psychological disturbances. Postoperative deformities are considered as main risks of rhinoplasty, causing revision surgery in 5% to 15% of the cases. The analysis of postoperative

  7. [New directions of research related to chronic wound healing].

    PubMed

    Rusak, Agnieszka; Rybak, Zbigniew

    2013-01-01

    Optimal nutrition, immunological state and psychological condition play an important role in the process of chronic wound healing. Infections caused by pathogens resistant to commonly used antibiotics additionally complicate and disturb regeneration of wounds. As part of the treatment, modern wound dressings are used, for example designed on the basis of alginates, dextranomers, hydrogels, hydrofiber, polyurethanes foams, hydrocolloids and liquids for wound debridement such us 0.9% NaCl, the PWE liquid, Ringer's liquid, octenidine. Owing to their features, treatment in accordance with TIME concept could be realized, because they provide moisture wound bed, protection against contamination, gas exchange, protection of wound edges and infection control. Repairing process in chronic wounds is dependent on blood flow in tissues, which may be insufficient. The result is a permanent hypoxia. Natural occurring antioxidants are becoming more crucial in chronic wound treatment. They decrease oxygen radical concentration, increase angiogenesis, reduce inflammatory response, stimulate fibroblasts and keratinocytes proliferation, possess antibacterial properties against chemotherapeutic resistant strains. There are a lot of antioxidants in honey, papaya fruit (Carrica papaia L.), transgenic flax (Linum usitatissimum), and in orange oil (Citrus sinensis), stem of acanthus (Acanthus ebracteatus), leafs of tea (Camellia sinensis). Application of biologically active, natural derived compounds is nowadays a direction of intense in vitro and in vivo research focused on the chronic wound treatment. Results suggest beneficial influence of antioxidant on wound repairing process. Clinical research are needed to state effective influence of natural compound in the chronic wound treatment.

  8. Wound healing and treating wounds: Chronic wound care and management.

    PubMed

    Powers, Jennifer G; Higham, Catherine; Broussard, Karen; Phillips, Tania J

    2016-04-01

    In the United States, chronic ulcers--including decubitus, vascular, inflammatory, and rheumatologic subtypes--affect >6 million people, with increasing numbers anticipated in our growing elderly and diabetic populations. These wounds cause significant morbidity and mortality and lead to significant medical costs. Preventative and treatment measures include disease-specific approaches and the use of moisture retentive dressings and adjunctive topical therapies to promote healing. In this article, we discuss recent advances in wound care technology and current management guidelines for the treatment of wounds and ulcers.

  9. Diabetic Wound Care

    MedlinePlus

    ... Health Information Diabetic Wound Care What is a Diabetic Foot Ulcer? A diabetic foot ulcer is an open sore or wound that ... key factors in the appropriate treatment of a diabetic foot ulcer: Prevention of infection Taking the pressure off ...

  10. Surgical wound infection - treatment

    MedlinePlus

    ... wounds heal, you may have a wound VAC (vacuum-assisted closure) dressing. It increases blood flow in ... helps with healing. This is a negative pressure (vacuum) dressing. There is a vacuum pump, a foam ...

  11. Wound care centers

    MedlinePlus

    ... types of dressings as your wound heals. Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy Depending on the type of wound, your doctor may recommend hyperbaric oxygen therapy . Oxygen is important for healing. During this ...

  12. The 'French Fry' VAC technique: hybridisation of traditional open wound NPWT with closed incision NPWT.

    PubMed

    Chopra, Karan; Tadisina, Kashyap K; Singh, Devinder P

    2016-04-01

    Surgical site occurrences (SSO), specifically surgical site infections represent a significant burden in the US health care system. It has been hypothesised that postoperative dressing can help drive down SSO. We describe the successful use of a novel technique combining both closed incision and open negative pressure wound therapy in the management of a high-risk wound associated with lymphoedema of obesity.

  13. Rectal Culture-Guided Targeted Antimicrobial Prophylaxis Reduces the Incidence of Post-Operative Infectious Complications in Men at High Risk for Infections Submitted to Transrectal Ultrasound Prostate Biopsy – Results of a Cross-Sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Boeri, Luca; Fontana, Matteo; Gallioli, Andrea; Zanetti, Stefano Paolo; Catellani, Michele; Longo, Fabrizio; Mangiarotti, Barbara; Montanari, Emanuele

    2017-01-01

    The role of rectal culture-guided antimicrobial prophylaxis (TAP) in reducing infectious complications (IC) after transrectal-ultrasound prostate biopsy (TRUSPBx) is conflicting. We assessed the prevalence of IC in a cohort of men at high risk for IC submitted to TRUSPBx and treated with either TAP or empirical prophylaxis (EAP). Data from 53 patients at high risk for IC undergoing TRUSPBx were collected. Patients who did not receive a rectal swab (RS) were treated with EAP with fluoroquinolones (FQs). Of those who received the RS, patients with FQ-susceptible organisms received ciprofloxacin while those with FQ-resistant organisms received TAP. Office visits were scheduled to investigate the rate of complication at day 7 and 30 after TRUSPBx. Comorbidities were scored with the Charlson Comorbidity Index (CCI). Descriptive statistics and logistic regression models detailed the association between clinical parameters and IC rate. Out of 53 men, 17 (32.1%) had RS while 36 (67.9%) did not. All RS cultures were positive for E. Coli and 4 (23.5%) reported FQ-resistant pathogens. Considering risk factors for IC, no difference was found in terms of CCI, rate of diabetes, UTIs or recent antibiotic utilization between groups. Overall, 12 (22.6%) men reported IC, with a greater proportion of them belonging to the group treated with EAP (30.6% vs 5.9%; p = 0.045). Of these, 9 (25.0%) patients, all treated with EAP, developed post biopsy UTIs. E. Coli sustained all UTIs and 7 (77.7%) were FQ resistant. At multivariable analysis, CCI≥1, a history of UTIs/prostatitis and recent antibiotic utilization (all p<0.04) were the most powerful predictors for ICs. In conclusion, we found that compared to EAP, TAP significantly reduces ICs, in men at high risk for post TRUSPBx IC. Patients at risk for IC, especially those with recent antibiotic utilization, CCI≥1 and a history of UTIs/prostatitis before biopsy, could benefit from TAP. PMID:28122053

  14. Rectal Culture-Guided Targeted Antimicrobial Prophylaxis Reduces the Incidence of Post-Operative Infectious Complications in Men at High Risk for Infections Submitted to Transrectal Ultrasound Prostate Biopsy - Results of a Cross-Sectional Study.

    PubMed

    Boeri, Luca; Fontana, Matteo; Gallioli, Andrea; Zanetti, Stefano Paolo; Catellani, Michele; Longo, Fabrizio; Mangiarotti, Barbara; Montanari, Emanuele

    2017-01-01

    The role of rectal culture-guided antimicrobial prophylaxis (TAP) in reducing infectious complications (IC) after transrectal-ultrasound prostate biopsy (TRUSPBx) is conflicting. We assessed the prevalence of IC in a cohort of men at high risk for IC submitted to TRUSPBx and treated with either TAP or empirical prophylaxis (EAP). Data from 53 patients at high risk for IC undergoing TRUSPBx were collected. Patients who did not receive a rectal swab (RS) were treated with EAP with fluoroquinolones (FQs). Of those who received the RS, patients with FQ-susceptible organisms received ciprofloxacin while those with FQ-resistant organisms received TAP. Office visits were scheduled to investigate the rate of complication at day 7 and 30 after TRUSPBx. Comorbidities were scored with the Charlson Comorbidity Index (CCI). Descriptive statistics and logistic regression models detailed the association between clinical parameters and IC rate. Out of 53 men, 17 (32.1%) had RS while 36 (67.9%) did not. All RS cultures were positive for E. Coli and 4 (23.5%) reported FQ-resistant pathogens. Considering risk factors for IC, no difference was found in terms of CCI, rate of diabetes, UTIs or recent antibiotic utilization between groups. Overall, 12 (22.6%) men reported IC, with a greater proportion of them belonging to the group treated with EAP (30.6% vs 5.9%; p = 0.045). Of these, 9 (25.0%) patients, all treated with EAP, developed post biopsy UTIs. E. Coli sustained all UTIs and 7 (77.7%) were FQ resistant. At multivariable analysis, CCI≥1, a history of UTIs/prostatitis and recent antibiotic utilization (all p<0.04) were the most powerful predictors for ICs. In conclusion, we found that compared to EAP, TAP significantly reduces ICs, in men at high risk for post TRUSPBx IC. Patients at risk for IC, especially those with recent antibiotic utilization, CCI≥1 and a history of UTIs/prostatitis before biopsy, could benefit from TAP.

  15. Improved wound management by regulated negative pressure-assisted wound therapy and regulated, oxygen- enriched negative pressure-assisted wound therapy through basic science research and clinical assessment.

    PubMed

    Topaz, Moris

    2012-05-01

    Regulated negative pressure-assisted wound therapy (RNPT) should be regarded as a state-of-the-art technology in wound treatment and the most important physical, nonpharmaceutical, platform technology developed and applied for wound healing in the last two decades. RNPT systems maintain the treated wound's environment as a semi-closed, semi-isolated system applying external physical stimulations to the wound, leading to biological and biochemical effects, with the potential to substantially influence wound-host interactions, and when properly applied may enhance wound healing. RNPT is a simple, safe, and affordable tool that can be utilized in a wide range of acute and chronic conditions, with reduced need for complicated surgical procedures, and antibiotic treatment. This technology has been shown to be effective and safe, saving limbs and lives on a global scale. Regulated, oxygen-enriched negative pressure-assisted wound therapy (RO-NPT) is an innovative technology, whereby supplemental oxygen is concurrently administered with RNPT for their synergistic effect on treatment and prophylaxis of anaerobic wound infection and promotion of wound healing. Understanding the basic science, modes of operation and the associated risks of these technologies through their fundamental clinical mechanisms is the main objective of this review.

  16. Episiotomy and obstetric perineal wound dehiscence: beyond soreness.

    PubMed

    Kamel, A; Khaled, M

    2014-04-01

    Postpartum episiotomy dehiscence is a rare complication of vaginal delivery. Infection rates in episiotomy wounds are surprisingly low; however, it remains the most common cause of wound dehiscence, which may lead to major physical, psychological and social problems if left untreated. Most dehisced perineal wounds are left to heal naturally by secondary intention. This approach often results in a protracted period of significant morbidity for women. There is emerging evidence that early re-suturing closure of broken-down perineal wounds may have a better outcome, but randomised controlled trials are needed to yield evidence-based guidance for this management approach.

  17. Wound healing efficacy of a 660-nm diode laser in a rat incisional wound model.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Ryoichi; Takakuda, Kazuo

    2016-11-01

    This study aimed to elucidate the optimum usage parameters of low reactive-level laser therapy (LLLT) in a rat incisional wound model. In Sprague-Dawley rats, surgical wounds of 15-mm length were made in the dorsal thoracic region. They were divided into groups to receive 660-nm diode laser irradiation 24 h after surgery at an energy density of 0 (control), 1, 5, or 10 J/cm(2). Tissue sections collected on postoperative day 3 were stained with hematoxylin-eosin and an antibody for ED1 to determine the number of macrophages around the wound. Samples collected on day 7 were stained with hematoxylin-eosin and observed via polarized light microscopy to measure the area occupied by collagen fibers around the wound; day 7 skin specimens were also subjected to mechanical testing to evaluate tensile strength. On postoperative day 3, the numbers of macrophages around the wound were significantly lower in the groups receiving 1 and 5 J/cm(2) irradiation, compared to the control and 10 J/cm(2) irradiation groups (p < 0.01). The area occupied by collagen fibers in day 7 was largest in 5 J/cm(2) group, followed by 1 J/cm(2) group, although this difference was not significant. The day 7 tensile test demonstrated significantly greater rupture strength in healing tissues from 1 and 5 J/cm(2) irradiation groups, compared to the control group (p < 0.05). Thus, LLLT with a 660-nm diode laser with energy density of 1 and 5 J/cm(2) enhanced wound healing in a rat incisional wound model. However, a higher radiation energy density yielded no significant enhancement.

  18. Wound Volume Measurement.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-01-01

    III and IV decubitus ulcers ). Wounds can also be classified by etiology as (a) surgical, (b) traumatic (such as mechanical or thermal injuries), and...had either decubitus ulcers or venous stasis ulcers . Each patient’s wound was measured with each of the three methods. First, the wound was...standardized and clinically available method to estimate wound volume is needed to determine rate of pressure ulcer healing. This quasi-experimental

  19. Studies on Wound Healing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-04-01

    therapy on wound repair have been amply demonstrated. Increased oxygen supply promotes wound healing whereas decreased oxygen supply retards repair...appmarn as early as 6 hms afte the a~ddton of DMF (Figl. 2). The increase was linea during the 24 hrs period of observaumoe in order toconfimn if the...Examine the effect of superoxide on collagen synthesis in vivo, * Examine the effect of increased superoxide levels on wound healing , and * Develop strategies to administer superoxide to wounds.

  20. Understanding postoperative fatigue.

    PubMed

    Rose, E A; King, T C

    1978-07-01

    Performance characteristics of the central nervous, cardiovascular, respiratory and muscular systems in man postoperatively have received little investigative attention, despite the well known syndrome of postoperative fatigue. The impairmen in perception and psychomotor skills that has been shown to result from caloric restriction, bedrest, sedation and sleep deprivation suggests that a similar deficit may occur after surgical procedures. After a simple elective surgical procedure, maximal oxygen uptake decreases and the adaptability of heart rate to submaximal workloads is impaired. Similar deleterious effects on cardiorespiratory performance have been documented with starvation and bedrest; an understanding of cardiorespiratory performance postoperatively awaits further investigation. Maximal muscular force of contraction is also impaired by caloric restriction and bedrest, suggesting that similar effects may be seen in the postoperative state, although this has not been studied. A better understanding of the syndrome of postoperative fatigue could be achieved by a descriptive analysis of physiologic performance postoperatively. Such descriptive data could form the basis for objective evaluation of therapeutic measures intended to improve performance, such as nutritional supplementation and pharmacologic intervention. The observation that exercise with the patient in the supine position may decrease the impairment in maximal aerobic power otherwise expected in immobilized patients suggests that controlled exercise therapy may be of value in reducing physiologic impairment postoperatively.

  1. [Combined penetrating wounds of the heart, abdomen and trunk--case report].

    PubMed

    Martinović, Zeljko; Martinović, Cvita

    2010-01-01

    This is an overview of a forty-year-old male with combined penetrating knife inflicted stab wounds to the left chest, heart, abdomen and trunk. Presented are clinical manifestations, course of first aid and overall surgical help given to the injured with multiple stab wounds. Efficiency of rapid diagnostics and surgical approach to penetrating stab wound of the heart is pointed out. Postoperative course and definitive outcome of treatment are presented.

  2. Complications and Short-Term Outcomes of Medial Opening Wedge High Tibial Osteotomy Using a Locking Plate for Medial Osteoarthritis of the Knee

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Seung-Suk; Kim, Ok-Gul; Seo, Jin-Hyeok; Kim, Do-Hoon; Kim, Youn-Gu; Lee, In-Seung

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to investigate complications and radiologic and clinical outcomes of medial opening wedge high tibial osteotomy (MOWHTO) using a locking plate. Materials and Methods This study reviewed 167 patients who were treated with MOWHTO using a locking plate from May 2012 to June 2014. Patients without complications were classified into group 1 and those with complications into group 2. Medical records, operative notes, and radiographs were retrospectively reviewed to identify complications. Clinically, Oxford Knee score and Knee Injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome score (KOOS) were evaluated. Results Overall, complications were observed in 49 patients (29.3%). Minor complications included lateral cortex fracture (15.6%), neuropathy (3.6%), correction loss (2.4%), hematoma (2.4%), delayed union (2.4%), delayed wound healing (2.4%), postoperative stiffness (1.2%), hardware irritation (1.2%), tendinitis (1.2%), and hardware failure without associated symptoms (0.6%). Major complications included hardware failure with associated symptoms (0.6%), deep infection (0.6%), and nonunion (0.6%). At the first-year follow-up, there were no significant differences in radiologic measurements between groups 1 and 2. There were no significant differences in knee scores except for the KOOS pain score. Conclusions Our data showed that almost all complications of the treatment were minor and the patients recovered without any problems. Most complications did not have a significant impact on radiologic and clinical outcomes. PMID:27894176

  3. [Advances in the research of the role of mesenchymal stem cell in wound healing].

    PubMed

    Liu, Lingying; Chai, Jiake; Yu, Yonghui; Hou, Yusen

    2014-04-01

    Wound healing is a dynamic and complicated process, which generally takes three overlapping phases: inflammation, proliferation, and remodeling. If wounds complicated by severe trauma, diabetes, vascular dysfunction disease, or a massive burn injury failed to pass through the three normal phases of healing, they might end up as chronic and refractory wounds. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) play different important roles in the regulation of all the phases of wound healing. MSCs can be recruited into wound and differentiated into wound repair cells, as well as promote wound healing by exerting functions like anti-inflammation, anti-apoptosis, and neovascularization. This review focuses on the role and mechanism of MSCs in each phase of the wound healing process.

  4. Wound Healing and Care

    MedlinePlus

    ... Loss Surgery? A Week of Healthy Breakfasts Shyness Wound Healing and Care KidsHealth > For Teens > Wound Healing and Care Print A A A What's in ... mouth, or sunken eyes. There's good news about wound healing when you're a teen: Age is on ...

  5. Combination Short-Course Preoperative Irradiation, Surgical Resection, and Reduced-Field High-Dose Postoperative Irradiation in the Treatment of Tumors Involving the Bone

    SciTech Connect

    Wagner, Timothy D. Kobayashi, Wendy; Dean, Susan; Goldberg, Saveli I.; Kirsch, David G.; Suit, Herman D.; Hornicek, Francis J.; Pedlow, Francis X.; Raskin, Kevin A.; Springfield, Dempsey S.; Yoon, Sam S.; Gebhardt, Marc C.; Mankin, Henry J.; DeLaney, Thomas F.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the feasibility and outcomes of combination short-course preoperative radiation, resection, and reduced-field (tumor bed without operative field coverage) high-dose postoperative radiation for patients with solid tumors mainly involving the spine and pelvis. Methods and Materials: Between 1982 and 2006, a total of 48 patients were treated using this treatment strategy for solid tumors involving bone. Radiation treatments used both photons and protons. Results: Of those treated, 52% had chordoma, 31% had chondrosarcoma, 8% had osteosarcoma, and 4% had Ewing's sarcoma, with 71% involving the pelvis/sacrum and 21% elsewhere in the spine. Median preoperative dose was 20 Gy, with a median of 50.4 Gy postoperatively. With 31.8-month median follow-up, the 5-year overall survival (OS) rate is 65%; 5-year disease-free survival (DFS) rate, 53.8%; and 5-year local control (LC) rate, 72%. There were no significant differences in OS, DFS, and LC according to histologic characteristics. Between primary and recurrent disease, there was no significant difference in OS rates (74.4% vs. 51.4%, respectively; p = 0.128), in contrast to DFS (71.5% vs. 18.3%; p = 0.0014) and LC rates (88.9% vs. 30.9%; p = 0.0011) favoring primary disease. After resection, 10 patients experienced delayed wound healing that did not significantly impact on OS, DFS, or LC. Conclusion: This approach is promising for patients with bone sarcomas in which resection will likely yield close/positive margins. It appears to inhibit tumor seeding with an acceptable rate of wound-healing complications. Dose escalation is accomplished without high-dose preoperative radiation (likely associated with higher rates of acute wound healing delays) or large-field postoperative radiation only (likely associated with late normal tissue toxicity). The LC and DFS rates are substantially better for patients with primary than recurrent sarcomas.

  6. Negative pressure wound therapy for Gustilo Anderson grade IIIb open tibial fractures

    PubMed Central

    Park, Chul Hyun; Shon, Oog Jin; Kim, Gi Beom

    2016-01-01

    Background: Traditionally, Gustilo Anderson grade IIIb open tibial fractures have been treated by initial wide wound debridement, stabilization of fracture with external fixation, and delayed wound closure. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the clinical and radiological results of staged treatment using negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) for Gustilo Anderson grade IIIb open tibial fractures. Materials and Methods: 15 patients with Gustilo Anderson grade IIIb open tibial fractures, treated using staged protocol by a single surgeon between January 2007 and December 2011 were reviewed in this retrospective study. The clinical results were assessed using a Puno scoring system for severe open fractures of the tibia at the last followup. The range of motion (ROM) of the knee and ankle joints and postoperative complication were evaluated at the last followup. The radiographic results were assessed using time to bone union, coronal and sagittal angulations and a shortening at the last followup. Results: The mean score of Puno scoring system was 87.4 (range 67–94). The mean ROM of the knee and ankle joints was 121.3° (range 90°–130°) and 37.7° (range 15°–50°), respectively. Bone union developed in all patients and the mean time to union was 25.3 weeks (range 16–42 weeks). The mean coronal angulation was 2.1° (range 0–4°) and sagittal was 2.7° (range 1–4°). The mean shortening was 4.1 mm (range 0–8 mm). Three patients had partial flap necrosis and 1 patient had total flap necrosis. There was no superficial and deep wound infection. Conclusion: Staged treatment using NPWT decreased the risks of infection and requirement of flap surgeries in Gustilo Anderson grade IIIb open tibial fractures. Therefore, staged treatment using NPWT could be a useful treatment option for Gustilo Anderson grade IIIb open tibial fractures. PMID:27746498

  7. Endoscopic management of post-bariatric surgery complications

    PubMed Central

    Boules, Mena; Chang, Julietta; Haskins, Ivy N; Sharma, Gautam; Froylich, Dvir; El-Hayek, Kevin; Rodriguez, John; Kroh, Matthew

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the technical constructs of bariatric surgery is important to the treating endoscopist to maximize effective endoluminal therapy. Post-operative complication rates vary widely based on the complication of interest, and have been reported to be as high as 68% following adjustable gastric banding. Similarly, there is a wide range of presenting symptoms for post-operative bariatric complications, including abdominal pain, nausea and vomiting, dysphagia, gastrointestinal hemorrhage, and weight regain, all of which may provoke an endoscopic assessment. Bleeding and anastomotic leak are considered to be early (< 30 d) complications, whereas strictures, marginal ulcers, band erosions, and weight loss failure or weight recidivism are typically considered late (> 30 d) complications. Treatment of complications in the immediate post-operative period may require unique considerations. Endoluminal therapies serve as adjuncts to surgical and radiographic procedures. This review aims to summarize the spectrum and efficacy of endoscopic management of post-operative bariatric complications. PMID:27668069

  8. Endoscopic management of post-bariatric surgery complications.

    PubMed

    Boules, Mena; Chang, Julietta; Haskins, Ivy N; Sharma, Gautam; Froylich, Dvir; El-Hayek, Kevin; Rodriguez, John; Kroh, Matthew

    2016-09-16

    Understanding the technical constructs of bariatric surgery is important to the treating endoscopist to maximize effective endoluminal therapy. Post-operative complication rates vary widely based on the complication of interest, and have been reported to be as high as 68% following adjustable gastric banding. Similarly, there is a wide range of presenting symptoms for post-operative bariatric complications, including abdominal pain, nausea and vomiting, dysphagia, gastrointestinal hemorrhage, and weight regain, all of which may provoke an endoscopic assessment. Bleeding and anastomotic leak are considered to be early (< 30 d) complications, whereas strictures, marginal ulcers, band erosions, and weight loss failure or weight recidivism are typically considered late (> 30 d) complications. Treatment of complications in the immediate post-operative period may require unique considerations. Endoluminal therapies serve as adjuncts to surgical and radiographic procedures. This review aims to summarize the spectrum and efficacy of endoscopic management of post-operative bariatric complications.

  9. [Chronic postoperative pain].

    PubMed

    Cachemaille, Matthieu; Blanc, Catherine

    2016-06-22

    Chronic postoperative pain remains a frequent pathology whose global impact approximates 20 and 30% and accounts for 20% of the consultations in a pain center. Risk factors consider firstly each patient's feature and comorbidity and also different surgical procedures with their technical approach. Neuropathic pain compared to nociceptive pain is a great component in the postoperative period and needs to be recognized by specific tests (DN4). Pain prevention involves risk factors' detection, appropriate anesthetic support and effective postoperative pain management. Treatment is based on the type of pain and includes a multimodal analgesia with interventional pain therapy.

  10. Increased Postoperative Bleeding Risk among Patients with Local Flap Surgery under Continued Clopidogrel Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Eichhorn, Wolfgang; Haase, Martina; Kluwe, Lan; Zeuch, Jürgen; Smeets, Ralf; Hanken, Henning; Wehrmann, Manfred; Gröbe, Alexander; Heiland, Max; Birkelbach, Moritz; Rendenbach, Carsten

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. The purpose of the study was to evaluate the influence of a continued antiplatelet therapy with clopidogrel on postoperative bleeding risk in patients undergoing skin tumor resection and reconstruction with local flaps or skin grafts under outpatient conditions. Patients and Methods. The authors designed and implemented a retrospective clinical cohort study at the General Hospital Balingen. The primary endpoint was the bleeding ratio in patients with clopidogrel treatment in comparison to patients without any anticoagulant or antiplatelet therapy. Wound healing was evaluated on days 1, 3, 5, 7, 10, and 14. Results. 650 procedures were performed, 123 of them under continued clopidogrel therapy. There were significantly more postoperative bleeding complications among patients with continued antiplatelet therapy. Regarding the whole study population, malignant lesions, a larger defect size, and skin grafts were accompanied by a higher rate of bleeding incidents. However, there were no significant findings in the univariate analysis of the clopidogrel group. All bleeding incidents were easily manageable. Conclusion. Despite an increased bleeding ratio among patients under continued clopidogrel therapy, the performance of simple surgical procedures can be recommended. However, cautious preparation and careful hemostasis are indispensable. PMID:26345612

  11. Complications in the use of bilateral inferiorly based nasolabial flaps for advanced oral submucous fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Kshirsagar, Rajesh; Mohite, Ajay; Gupta, Suman; Patankar, Amod; Sane, Vikrant; Raut, Pratik

    2016-01-01

    Surgical management of advanced oral submucous fibrosis (OSMF) using bilateral inferiorly based nasolabial flaps is becoming increasingly popular. However no comprehensive analysis of delayed complications using this technique is available in the literature. The authors have conducted a retrospective study to examine the delayed complications of bilateral inferiorly based nasolabial flaps used in advanced oral submucous fibrosis at their institute along with a detailed review of literature on the subject. Thirty-two patients from January 2004 to December 2015 with OSMF and an interincisal distance less than 15 mm were included. All patients were treated with bilateral inferiorly based nasolabial flaps for correction of the restricted mouth opening. All patients had postoperative physiotherapy and were followed up for a minimum period of 6 months. All complaints of patients during the follow up phase were included in this study. In this series, complications such as partial necrosis, intra-oral hair growth, unacceptable extra-oral scar, wound dehiscence, orocutaneous fistula, and pincushioning effect were observed. Numerous complications can occur with the use of nasolabial flaps for the management of advanced oral submucous fibrosis. Although most complications are of inconsequential nature the surgeon must observe due diligence when using this flap. PMID:28356681

  12. Wound healing: a new approach to the topical wound care.

    PubMed

    Öztürk, Ferdi; Ermertcan, Aylin Türel

    2011-06-01

    Cutaneous wound healing is a complex and well-coordinated interaction between inflammatory cells and mediators, establishing significant overlap between the phases of wound healing. Wound healing is divided into three major phases: inflammatory phase, proliferative phase, and remodeling phase. Unlike the acute wound, the nonhealing wound is arrested in one of the phases of healing, typically the inflammatory phase. A systematic approach to the management of the chronic nonhealing wound emphasizes three important elements of wound bed preparation in chronic wounds: debridement, moisture, and countering bacterial colonization and infection. In this article, wound-healing process and new approaches to the topical wound care have been reviewed.

  13. Management and complications of stomas.

    PubMed

    Bafford, Andrea C; Irani, Jennifer L

    2013-02-01

    Stomas are created for a wide range of indications such as temporary protection of a high-risk anastomosis, diversion of sepsis, or permanent relief of obstructed defecation or incontinence. Yet this seemingly benign procedure is associated with an overall complication rate of up to 70%. Therefore, surgeons caring for patients with gastrointestinal diseases must be proficient not only with stoma creation but also with managing postoperative stoma-related complications. This article reviews the common complications associated with ostomy creation and strategies for their management.

  14. Postoperative radicular neuroma. Case report.

    PubMed

    Erman, T; Tuna, M; Göçer, A I; Idan, F; Akgül, E; Zorludemir, S

    2001-11-15

    Lumbar discectomy is the most common surgical procedure performed in neurosurgery clinics. Such a large number of procedures underscore not only the prevalence of conditions such as intervertebral disc herniation, but also the strong belief of surgeons that the operation does provide benefits to patients suffering from sciatica. In spite of this belief, sciatic pain may continue after the surgery. The recurrence of sciatic and/or back pain after primary discectomy is called the "failed back surgery syndrome." The rate of the complications involved in standard lumbar discectomy ranges from 5.4 to 14%. One of the complications of the lumbar disc surgery is nerve root injury. The complication rate of this injury ranges from 0.7 to 2.2%. Postoperative radicular neuroma must be considered in differential diagnosis for the patient who has failed back surgery syndrome. In this study the authors evaluate a patient who had undergone surgery for lumbar disc herniation and suffered intractable pain. A traumatic radicular neuroma is demonstrated and the pertinent literature is presented.

  15. Special postoperative diet orders: Irrational, obsolete, and imprudent.

    PubMed

    Sriram, Krishnan; Ramasubramanian, Vidhya; Meguid, Michael M

    2016-04-01

    There are no indications to prescribed special diets for postoperative patients. Low-sodium and low-fat or low-cholesterol diets are examples of restricted diets, especially in patients with heart disease and atherosclerosis. These restricted diets are unpalatable. Postoperative nausea, paralytic ileus, and vomiting caused by residual anesthetic effects and opioids used for pain control further contribute to the problem. Long-term adherence to these diets is necessary to derive benefits. Prescribing regular and palatable diets in the immediate postoperative period to meet protein and energy goals is important for wound healing and is commensurate with best clinical practices. In the following, we review the pertinent literature and offer clinical evidence that routine special diet orders for postoperative patients are not necessary.

  16. Endoscopic management of acute colorectal anastomotic complications with temporary stent.

    PubMed

    Abbas, Maher A

    2009-01-01

    Acute postoperative anastomotic complications following colorectal resection include leak and obstruction. Often an operation is necessary to treat these complications. The role of endoluminal procedures to treat these complications has been limited. This article illustrates that such an approach is technically feasible and can be used to treat some colorectal anastomotic complications.

  17. Complications of third molar surgery.

    PubMed

    Bouloux, Gary F; Steed, Martin B; Perciaccante, Vincent J

    2007-02-01

    This article addresses the incidence of specific complications and, where possible, offers a preventive or management strategy. Injuries of the inferior alveolar and lingual nerves are significant issues that are discussed separately in this text. Surgical removal of third molars is often associated with postoperative pain, swelling, and trismus. Factors thought to influence the incidence of complications after third molar removal include age, gender, medical history, oral contraceptives, presence of pericoronitis, poor oral hygiene, smoking, type of impaction, relationship of third molar to the inferior alveolar nerve, surgical time, surgical technique, surgeon experience, use of perioperative antibiotics, use of topical antiseptics, use of intra-socket medications, and anesthetic technique. Complications that are discussed further include alveolar osteitis, postoperative infection, hemorrhage, oro-antral communication, damage to adjacent teeth, displaced teeth, and fractures.

  18. Air leakage on the postoperative day: powerful factor of postoperative recurrence after thoracoscopic bullectomy

    PubMed Central

    Jeon, Hyun Woo; Kye, Yeo Kon; Kim, Kyung Soo

    2016-01-01

    Background Primary spontaneous pneumothorax (PSP) is a relatively common disorder in young patients. Although various surgical techniques have been introduced, recurrence after video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery (VATS) remains high. The aim of study was to identify the risk factors for postoperative recurrence after thoracoscopic bullectomy in the spontaneous pneumothorax. Methods From January 2011 through March 2013, two hundreds and thirty two patients underwent surgery because of pneumothorax. Patients with a secondary pneumothorax, as well as cases of single port surgery, an open procedure, additional pleural procedure (pleurectomy, pleural abrasion) or lack of medical records were excluded. The records of 147 patients with PSP undergoing 3-port video-assisted thoracoscopic bullectomy with staple line coverage using an absorbable polyglycolic acid (PGA) sheet were retrospectively reviewed. Results The median age was 19 years (range, 11−34 years) with male predominance (87.8%). Median postoperative hospital stay was 3 days (range, 1−10 days) without mortality. Complications were developed in five patients. A total of 24 patients showed postoperative recurrence (16.3%). Younger age less than 17 years old and immediate postoperative air leakage were risk factors for postoperative recurrence after thoracoscopic bullectomy by multivariate analysis. Conclusions Immediate postoperative air leakage was the risk factor for postoperative recurrence. However, further study will be required for the correlation of air leakage with recurrence. PMID:26904217

  19. Normal Postoperative Computed Tomography Findings after a Variety of Pancreatic Surgeries

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Ji Won; Hwang, Ho Kyoung; Lee, Minwook; Kim, Ki Whang; Kang, Chang Moo; Kim, Myeong-Jin

    2017-01-01

    Pancreatic surgery remains the only curative treatment for pancreatic neoplasms, and plays an important role in the management of medically intractable diseases. Since the original Whipple operation in the 20th century, surgical techniques have advanced, resulting in decreased postoperative complications and better clinical outcomes. Normal postoperative imaging findings vary greatly depending on the surgical technique used. Radiologists are required to be familiar with the normal postoperative imaging findings, in order to distinguish from postoperative complications or tumor recurrence. In this study, we briefly review a variety of surgical techniques for the pancreas, and present the normal postoperative computed tomography findings. PMID:28246510

  20. Antimicrobial effect of continuous lidocaine infusion in a Staphylococcus aureus-induced wound infection in a mouse model.

    PubMed

    Lu, Cheng-Wei; Lin, Tzu-Yu; Shieh, Jiann-Shing; Wang, Ming-Jiuh; Chiu, Kuan-Ming

    2014-11-01

    Continuous infusion of local anesthetics in surgical wounds has been shown to be an effective technique for postoperative analgesia. To investigate the potential antimicrobial effect of continuous local anesthetic infusion, we adapted a mouse model of surgical wound infection to examine effects on antibacterial response. Forty male BALB/c mice were randomized into 2 groups. An incision wound was made over the dorsal flank and instilled with Staphylococcus aureus. An osmotic pump was then implanted to deliver either 0.9% NaCl or 2% lidocaine continuously. Each wound was cultured postoperatively at 2 days, and the colony count of S. aureus was determined. Results showed that the number of colony-forming units of S. aureus measured in wounds treated with lidocaine displayed a nearly 10-fold reduction compared to the wounds in the saline group (P=0.009). The demonstrated antibacterial activity indicates that local anesthetic infusion may play a role in prophylaxis for surgical wound infections.

  1. Morphine Plus Bupivacaine Vs. Morphine Peridural Analgesia in Abdominal Surgery: The Effects on Postoperative Course in Major Hepatobiliary Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Barzoi, G.; Carluccio, S.; Bianchi, B.; Vassia, S.; Colucci, G.

    2000-01-01

    Anaesthesia and surgical procedures lead to a reduction of intestinal motility, and opioids may produce a postoperative ileus, that might delay postoperative feeding. The aim of this prospective randomised study is to test whether or not different kinds of epidural analgesia (Group A: morphine 0.00 17 mg/kg/h and bupivacaine 0.125% – 0.058 mg/kg/h; Group B: morphine alone 0.035mg/kg/12h in the postoperative period) allow earlier postoperative enteral feeding, enhance intestinal motility a passage of flatus and help avoid complications, such as nausea, vomiting, ileus, diarrhoea, pneumonia or other infective diseases. We included in the study 60 patients (28 males and 32 females) with a mean age of 61.2 years (range 50–70) and with an ASA score of 2 or 3. All patients had hepato–biliary-pancreatic neoplasm and were candidates for major surgery. We compared two different pharmacological approaches, i.e., morphine plus bupivacaine (30 patients, Group A)versus morphine alone (30 patients, Group B). Each medication was administered by means of a thoracic epidural catheter for the control of postoperative pain. In the postoperative course we recorded every 6 hours peristaltic activity. We also noted morbidity (pneumonia, wound sepsis) and mortality. Effective peristalsis was present in all patients in Group A within the first six postoperative hours; in Group B, after 30 hours. Six patients in Group A had bowel motions in the first postoperative day, 11 in the second day, 10 in the third day and 3 in fourth day, while in Group B none in the first day, two in the second, 7 in the third, 15 in the fourth, and 6 in the fifth: the difference between the two groups was significant (P<0.05 in 1st, 2nd, 4th and 5th days). Pneumonia occurred in 2 patients of Group A, and in 10 of Group B (P<0.05). We conclude that epidural analgesia with morphine plus bupivacaine allowed a move rapid return to normal gut activity and early enteral nutrition compared with epidural analgesia

  2. VLAP: results immediately post-op

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cowles, Robert S.

    1996-05-01

    Visual laser ablation of the prostate (VLAP) has been shown to be as effective with fewer complications than TURP in the treatment of bladder outlet obstruction secondary to benign prostatic hyperplasia. Questions have been raised about VLAP regarding prolonged irritative and obstructive voiding symptoms postoperatively. It is postulated that these symptoms are due to the slow slough of necrotic debris following VLAP. In an effort to improve upon the technique of VLAP, patients underwent lasing of the prostate in the routine manner (2, 4, 8, and 10 o'clock positions with sixty watts for sixty seconds) using Nd:YAG free beam energy. A bladder neck incision was then performed using a contact laser fiber. International prostate symptom score assessments were done preoperatively; one week and six weeks postoperatively. Post void residual urine volumes and prostate size were also evaluated. The findings indicate that symptom scores and post void residual urine volumes have significantly improved within ten days postoperatively using this technique.

  3. Surgical Site Infection Complicating Breast Cancer Surgery in Kuwait

    PubMed Central

    Omar, Abeer A.; Al-Mousa, Haifaa H.

    2013-01-01

    Background and Objectives. Surgical site infection (SSI) is the most common postoperative complication associated with breast cancer surgery. The present investigation aimed to determine the SSI rate after breast cancer surgeries and the causative microorganisms. Patients and Methods. All patients who underwent breast surgery in Kuwait Cancer Control Center as a treatment for breast cancer from January 2009–December 2010 were prospectively followed for the development of SSI. Indirect detection was used to identify SSIs through medical record to review and discussion with the treating surgeons. Results. The number of operations was 438. Females represented 434 (99.1%) cases while males constituted only 4 (0.9%) cases. SSIs were diagnosed after 10 operations, all for female cases. Most of the SSIs (8 cases; 80%) were detected after patients were discharged, during outpatient followup. Out of those 5/8; (62.5%) were readmitted for management of SSI. Nine patients (90%) received systemic antibiotic therapy for management of their wound infection. The SSI rate was 2.3%. The main causative organism was Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) which was responsible for 40% of infections. Gram negative bacteria were isolated from 40% of the cases. Conclusion. SSI is an important complication following breast cancer surgery. Microbiological diagnosis is an essential tool for proper management of such patients. PMID:24967132

  4. Life threatening iatrogenic major vascular injuries complicating groin hernia repair.

    PubMed

    Aghaji, M A; Ojimba, T A

    1993-01-01

    Major vascular injuries complicating groin hernia repairs are very rare. Five such cases seen at the vascular unit of the Department of Surgery, UNTH, Enugu, Nigeria over a five year period are presented. The patients all of whom were adults (age range 49-65) had initial problems of hypovolaemia due to massive blood loss followed by infection and anaemia. One of the patients died from irreversible shock while still in the Casualty Unit. The vascular injuries were dealt with by either primary repair, vein graft or dacron graft depending on the prevailing conditions e.g. presence or absence of infection. The other 4 patients who had surgery did well postoperatively and on 5 to 58 months follow-up. Emphasis is laid on the underlying causes of these iatrogenic injuries which include inexperience on the part of the operator and inadequate anaesthesia (often wrongly applied local anaesthesia). If this complication however occurs, the wound should be tightly packed and patient sent immediately to a unit with vascular surgical facilities.

  5. Prophylactic negative pressure wound therapy in colorectal surgery. Effects on surgical site events: current status and call to action.

    PubMed

    Pellino, Gianluca; Sciaudone, Guido; Selvaggi, Francesco; Canonico, Silvestro

    2015-09-01

    Surgical site events, including surgical site infections (SSI), represent a major problem in general surgery. SSI are responsible of nuisance for patients, and can lead to important complications and disability, often needing prolonged postoperative stay with specific treatment and recovery in Intensive Care Units. These justify the higher costs due to SSI. Despite the growing body of evidence concerning SSI in general surgery, literature dealing with SSI after colorectal surgery is scarce, reflecting in suboptimal perception of such a relevant issue by colorectal surgeons and health authorities in Italy, though colorectal surgery is associated with higher rates of SSI. The best strategy for reducing the impact of SSI on costs of care and patients quality of life would be the development of a preventive bundle, similar to that adopted in the US through the colorectal section of the National Surgery Quality Improvement Project of the American College of Surgeons (ACS-NSQIP). This policy has been showed to significantly reduce the rates of SSI. In this scenario, incisional negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) is likely to play a pivotal role. We herein reviewed the literature to report on the current status of preventive NPWT on surgical wounds of patients undergoing colorectal procedures with primary wound closure, suggesting evidence-based measures to reduce the impact of SSI, and to contain the costs associated with conventional NPWT devices by means of newer available technologies. Some explicative real life cases are presented.

  6. [Computerized tomography in craniocerebral, maxillofacial, cervical, and spinal gunshot wounds. Part II--Clinical contribution and medico- legal aspects].

    PubMed

    Scialpi, M; Boccuzzi, F; Romeo, F; Ax, G; Scapati, C; Rotondo, A; Angelelli, G

    1996-12-01

    To assess the diagnostic and medicolegal contribution of Computed Tomography (CT) in patients with craniocerebral, maxillofacial, neck and spine gunshot wounds, we submitted to CT 106 patients with gunshot wounds examined over a 7-year period (February, 1988 to December, 1994). Twenty-four of them had craniocerebral injuries (23%), 9 maxillofacial (8%), 8 neck (8%) and 10 vertebral (9%) injuries. Emergency CT demonstrated the mechanism of the injury, the bullet path and site, the site of bone and/or metallic fragments, and damage extent. In all perforating cranioencephalic injuries (n = 7) intracerebral or extrathecal bone fragments were demonstrated adjacent to the bullet entrance and exit holes, respectively. In injury monitoring. CT showed injury evolution, retained fragments and complications, thus enabling damage extent assessment. High Resolution Computed Tomography (HRCT) was useful in locating minute orbitary retrobulbar and intraspinal fragments. Magnetic Resonance (MR) Imaging in postoperative patients proved a valuable tool to assess the extent of spinal cord damage. To conclude, CT is a useful technique to examine the patients with gunshot wounds, which helps plan adequate treatment and solve complex medicolegal problems.

  7. Wound size measurement of lower extremity ulcers using segmentation algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dadkhah, Arash; Pang, Xing; Solis, Elizabeth; Fang, Ruogu; Godavarty, Anuradha

    2016-03-01

    Lower extremity ulcers are one of the most common complications that not only affect many people around the world but also have huge impact on economy since a large amount of resources are spent for treatment and prevention of the diseases. Clinical studies have shown that reduction in the wound size of 40% within 4 weeks is an acceptable progress in the healing process. Quantification of the wound size plays a crucial role in assessing the extent of healing and determining the treatment process. To date, wound healing is visually inspected and the wound size is measured from surface images. The extent of wound healing internally may vary from the surface. A near-infrared (NIR) optical imaging approach has been developed for non-contact imaging of wounds internally and differentiating healing from non-healing wounds. Herein, quantitative wound size measurements from NIR and white light images are estimated using a graph cuts and region growing image segmentation algorithms. The extent of the wound healing from NIR imaging of lower extremity ulcers in diabetic subjects are quantified and compared across NIR and white light images. NIR imaging and wound size measurements can play a significant role in potentially predicting the extent of internal healing, thus allowing better treatment plans when implemented for periodic imaging in future.

  8. Plasminogen is a critical regulator of cutaneous wound healing.

    PubMed

    Sulniute, Rima; Shen, Yue; Guo, Yong-Zhi; Fallah, Mahsa; Ahlskog, Nina; Ny, Lina; Rakhimova, Olena; Broden, Jessica; Boija, Hege; Moghaddam, Aliyeh; Li, Jinan; Wilczynska, Malgorzata; Ny, Tor

    2016-05-02

    Wound healing is a complicated biological process that consist of partially overlapping inflammatory, proliferation and tissue remodelling phases. A successful wound healing depends on a proper activation and subsequent termination of the inflammatory phase. The failure to terminate the inflammation halts the completion of wound healing and is a known reason for formation of chronic wounds. Previous studies have shown that wound closure is delayed in plasminogen-deficient mice, and a role for plasminogen in dissection of extracellular matrix was suggested. However, our finding that plasminogen is transported to the wound by inflammatory cells early during the healing process, where it potentiates inflammation, indicates that plasminogen may also have other roles in the wound healing process. Here we report that plasminogen-deficient mice have extensive fibrin and neutrophil depositions in the wounded area long after re-epithelialisation, indicating inefficient debridement and chronic inflammation. Delayed formation of granulation tissue suggests that fibroblast function is impaired in the absence of plasminogen. Therefore, in addition to its role in the activation of inflammation, plasminogen is also crucial for subsequent steps, including resolution of inflammation and activation of the proliferation phase. Importantly, supplementation of plasminogen-deficient mice with human plasminogen leads to a restored healing process that is comparable to that in wild-type mice. Besides of being an activator of the inflammatory phase during wound healing, plasminogen is also required for the subsequent termination of inflammation. Based on these results, we propose that plasminogen may be an important future therapeutic agent for wound treatment.

  9. Developing a toolbox for analysis of warrior wound biopsies: vibrational spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crane, Nicole J.; O'Brien, Frederick P.; Forsberg, Jonathan A.; Potter, Benjamin K.; Elster, Eric A.

    2011-03-01

    The management of modern traumatic war wounds remains a significant challenge for clinicians. This is a reflection of the extensive osseous and soft-tissue damage caused by blasts and high-energy projectiles. The ensuing inflammatory response ultimately dictates the pace of wound healing and tissue regeneration. Consequently, the eventual timing of wound closure or definitive coverage is often subjectively based. Some wounds require an extended period of time to close or fail to remain closed, despite the use and application of novel wound-specific treatment modalities. Aside from impaired wound healing, additional wound complications include wound infection, biofilm formation, and heterotopic ossification (the pathological mineralization of soft tissues). An understanding of the molecular environment of acute wounds throughout the debridement process can provide valuable insight into the mechanisms associated with the eventual wound outcome. The analysis of Raman spectra of ex vivo wound biopsy tissue obtained from serial traumatic wound debridements reveals a decreased 1665 cm-1/1445 cm-1 band area ratio in impaired healing wounds, indicative of an impaired remodeling process, in addition to a decreased 1240 cm-1/1270cm-1. The examination of debrided tissue exhibits mineralization during the early development of heterotopic ossification. Finally, preliminary results suggest that Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) images of wound effluent may be able to provide early microbiological information about the wound.

  10. Bio-Conjugated Polycaprolactone Membranes: A Novel Wound Dressing

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Elijah Zhengyang; Teo, Erin Yiling; Jing, Lim; Koh, Yun Pei; Qian, Tan Si; Wen, Feng; Lee, James Wai Kit; Hing, Eileen Chor Hoong; Yap, Yan Lin; Lee, Hanjing; Lee, Chuen Neng; Teoh, Swee-Hin; Lim, Jane

    2014-01-01

    Background The combination of polycaprolactone and hyaluronic acid creates an ideal environment for wound healing. Hyaluronic acid maintains a moist wound environment and accelerates the in-growth of granulation tissue. Polycaprolactone has excellent mechanical strength, limits inflammation and is biocompatible. This study evaluates the safety and efficacy of bio-conjugated polycaprolactone membranes (BPM) as a wound dressing. Methods 16 New Zealand white rabbits were sedated and local anaesthesia was administered. Two 3.0×3.0 cm full-thickness wounds were created on the dorsum of each rabbit, between the lowest rib and the pelvic bone. The wounds were dressed with either BPM (n=12) or Mepitel (n=12) (control), a polyamide-silicon wound dressing. These were evaluated macroscopically on the 7th, 14th, 21st, and 28th postoperative days for granulation, re-epithelialization, infection, and wound size, and histologically for epidermal and dermal regeneration. Results Both groups showed a comparable extent of granulation and re-epithelialization. No signs of infection were observed. There was no significant difference (P>0.05) in wound size between the two groups. BPM (n=6): 8.33 cm2, 4.90 cm2, 3.12 cm2, 1.84 cm2; Mepitel (n=6): 10.29 cm2, 5.53 cm2, 3.63 cm2, 2.02 cm2; at the 7th, 14th, 21st, and 28th postoperative days. The extents of epidermal and dermal regeneration were comparable between the two groups. Conclusions BPM is comparable to Mepitel as a safe and efficacious wound dressing. PMID:25396174

  11. Predictive Factors of Postoperative Pain and Postoperative Anxiety in Children Undergoing Elective Circumcision: A Prospective Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Tsamoudaki, Stella; Ntomi, Vasileia; Yiannopoulos, Ioannis; Christianakis, Efstratios; Pikoulis, Emmanuel

    2015-01-01

    Background Although circumcision for phimosis in children is a minor surgical procedure, it is followed by pain and carries the risk of increased postoperative anxiety. This study examined predictive factors of postoperative pain and anxiety in children undergoing circumcision. Methods We conducted a prospective cohort study of children scheduled for elective circumcision. Circumcision was performed applying one of the following surgical techniques: sutureless prepuceplasty (SP), preputial plasty technique (PP), and conventional circumcision (CC). Demographics and base-line clinical characteristics were collected, and assessment of the level of preoperative anxiety was performed. Subsequently, a statistical model was designed in order to examine predictive factors of postoperative pain and postoperative anxiety. Assessment of postoperative pain was performed using the Faces Pain Scale (FPS). The Post Hospitalization Behavior Questionnaire study was used to assess negative behavioral manifestations. Results A total of 301 children with a mean age of 7.56 ± 2.61 years were included in the study. Predictive factors of postoperative pain measured with the FPS included a) the type of surgical technique, b) the absence of siblings, and c) the presence of postoperative complications. Predictive factors of postoperative anxiety included a) the type of surgical technique, b) the level of education of mothers, c) the presence of preoperative anxiety, and d) a history of previous surgery. Conclusions Although our study was not without its limitations, it expands current knowledge by adding new predictive factors of postoperative pain and postoperative anxiety. Clearly, further randomized controlled studies are needed to confirm its results. PMID:26495079

  12. A Novel Option of Uninterrupted Closure of Surgical Wounds

    PubMed Central

    Sulamanidze, Marlen A; Sulamanidze, George M

    2009-01-01

    Background: A cosmetically pleasing postoperative scar is an important aim of all aesthetic surgeries. Use of proper suture materials for delicate and gentle suturing of the operative injury is an important requirement for achieving satisfactory scars. However, closure of the edges of wounds by means of conventional suture materials does not always meet the requirements to achieve this objective. Aim: To simplify and facilitate the process of surgical wound closure, to improve the quality of scar, and to achieve a good cosmetic effect through the introduction of a new type of suture material. Materials and Methods: We have introduced a new surgical suturing material—a nontraumatic, barbed thread connected with the suture needle—APTOS SUTURE (European patent 1075843 as of 1999). Presented herein is a new modification of the technique of uninterrupted subcutaneous and intracutaneous suturing of wound edges, and the details of our experience with this material. Results: Our experience shows that, with use of APTOS, wound closure is carried out easily and quickly. The wound remains stable, the time of healing is shortened, and the process of suture removal is simplified, resulting in an aesthetically pleasing scar. Conclusions: The technique of surgical wound suturing proposed herein is a simple, facilitated, and efficient option of wound-edge closure, which can successfully be used, both in general and in aesthetic surgery for wound closure, such as plasty of scars, face lift, mammoplasty, and abdominal plasty. PMID:20808595

  13. Metalloproteinases and Wound Healing

    PubMed Central

    Caley, Matthew P.; Martins, Vera L.C.; O'Toole, Edel A.

    2015-01-01

    Significance: Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are present in both acute and chronic wounds. They play a pivotal role, with their inhibitors, in regulating extracellular matrix degradation and deposition that is essential for wound reepithelialization. The excess protease activity can lead to a chronic nonhealing wound. The timed expression and activation of MMPs in response to wounding are vital for successful wound healing. MMPs are grouped into eight families and display extensive homology within these families. This homology leads in part to the initial failure of MMP inhibitors in clinical trials and the development of alternative methods for modulating the MMP activity. MMP-knockout mouse models display altered wound healing responses, but these are often subtle phenotypic changes indicating the overlapping MMP substrate specificity and inter-MMP compensation. Recent Advances: Recent research has identified several new MMP modulators, including photodynamic therapy, protease-absorbing dressing, microRNA regulation, signaling molecules, and peptides. Critical Issues: Wound healing requires the controlled activity of MMPs at all stages of the wound healing process. The loss of MMP regulation is a characteristic of chronic wounds and contributes to the failure to heal. Future Directions: Further research into how MMPs are regulated should allow the development of novel treatments for wound healing. PMID:25945285

  14. Current concepts in wound management and wound healing products.

    PubMed

    Davidson, Jacqueline R

    2015-05-01

    Current concepts in wound management are summarized. The emphasis is on selection of the contact layer of the bandage to promote a moist wound environment. Selection of an appropriate contact layer is based on the stage of wound healing and the amount of wound exudate. The contact layer can be used to promote autolytic debridement and enhance wound healing.

  15. Intraoperative laparoscopic complications for urological cancer procedures

    PubMed Central

    Montes, Sergio Fernández-Pello; Rodríguez, Ivan Gonzalez; Ugarteburu, Rodrigo Gil; Villamil, Luis Rodríguez; Mendez, Begoña Diaz; Gil, Patricio Suarez; Madera, Javier Mosquera

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To structure the rate of intraoperative complications that requires an intraoperative or perioperative resolution. METHODS: We perform a literature review of Medline database. The research was focused on intraoperative laparoscopic procedures inside the field of urological oncology. General rate of perioperative complications in laparoscopic urologic surgery is described to be around 12.4%. Most of the manuscripts published do not make differences between pure intraoperative, intraoperative with postoperative consequences and postoperative complications. RESULTS: We expose a narrative statement of complications, possible solutions and possible preventions for most frequent retroperitoneal and pelvic laparoscopic surgery. We expose the results with the following order: retroperitoneal laparoscopic surgery (radical nephrectomy, partial nephrectomy, nephroureterectomy and adrenalectomy) and pelvic laparoscopic surgery (radical prostatectomy and radical cystectomy). CONCLUSION: Intraoperative complications vary from different series. More scheduled reports should be done in order to better understand the real rates of complications. PMID:25984519

  16. Influence of pH on wound-healing: a new perspective for wound-therapy?

    PubMed

    Schneider, Lars Alexander; Korber, Andreas; Grabbe, Stephan; Dissemond, Joachim

    2007-02-01

    Wound healing is a complex regeneration process, which is characterised by intercalating degradation and re-assembly of connective tissue and epidermal layer. The pH value within the wound-milieu influences indirectly and directly all biochemical reactions taking place in this process of healing. Interestingly it is so far a neglected parameter for the overall outcome. For more than three decades the common assumption amongst physicians was that a low pH value, such as it is found on normal skin, is favourable for wound healing. However, investigations have shown that in fact some healing processes such as the take-rate of skin-grafts require an alkaline milieu. The matter is thus much more complicated than it was assumed. This review article summarises the existing literature dealing with the topic of pH value within the wound-milieu, its influence on wound healing and critically discusses the currently existing data in this field. The conclusion to be drawn at present is that the wound pH indeed proves to be a potent influential factor for the healing process and that different pH ranges are required for certain distinct phases of wound healing. Further systematic data needs to be collected for a better understanding of the pH requirements under specific circumstances. This is important as it will help to develop new pH targeted therapeutic strategies.

  17. Use of Platelet Rich Plasma and Hyaluronic Acid in the Treatment of Complications of Achilles Tendon Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Gentile, Pietro; De Angelis, Barbara; Agovino, Annarita; Orlandi, Fabrizio; Migner, Alessandra; Di Pasquali, Camilla; Cervelli, Valerio

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND The platelet-rich plasma (PRP) and hyaluronic acid (HA) constitute a system of tissue growth that can regenerate damaged tissue. This study was performed to evaluate the effect of PRP and HA in treatment of complications of Achilles tendon reconstruction. METHODS We selected ten patients affected by Achilles tendon injuries resulting from post-surgical complications subsequent to tenorrhaphy and have treated them with autologous PRP in combination with HA to evaluate the improvement of lesions with wound closure. RESULTS The treatment with PRP and HA for post-surgical complications of Achilles tendon was effective in healing and regeneration of soft and hard tissues. The healing time was shortened, and the treated area preserved a satisfying strength in plantar flexion and extension of the ankle, denoting to a decisive improvement in texture and a more rapid healing and a good cutaneous elasticity, with a significant reduction of the costs of hospitalization and the pain already the immediate postoperatively. The functional rehabilitation in terms of deambulation and joint mobility was complete. CONCLUSION The treatment we proposed allowed an easier and more rapid wound closure with excellent aesthetic improvement. Furthermore, the minimally invasive technique is well tolerated by patients. PMID:27579267

  18. Prevention of complications in dermatosurgery.

    PubMed

    Situm, Mirna; Buljan, Marija; Cavka, Vlatka; Di Biagio, Nevena Skroza; Sebetić, Klaudija; Poduje, Sanja

    2008-01-01

    Dermatosurgery has become ever more popular and important in recent years, mostly due to the increasing prevalence of skin malignancies. It also encompasses a wide variety of methods to remove or modify skin tissue for numerous cosmetic reasons. Nowadays, many dermatologists provide complete dermatologic care for their patients, including surgery. Therefore, it is important to be aware of the possible complications and to be able to manage them properly. Complications in cutaneous surgery are not very often, but they can be serious and worrisome including bleeding, infections, allergic reactions, syncope, wound dehiscence, necrosis, and others. In this article special attention is given to bleeding, which is the most common complication in this field. The best way to reduce the number of possible complications is to recognize patients at risk. Thus, complete history and physical examination are required before performing any dermatosurgical operation.

  19. [Advances in wound care].

    PubMed

    Raffoul, Wassim

    2008-03-05

    Wound care made great progress during last years related to several factors. The first is an awakening of the importance of wounds. The progress made in the comprehension of the physiopathology of wounds led to innovations in all stages of this complex process which is the wound healing. Autologus platelet concentrate producing growth factors are in use to stimulate the first phase of the healing. The second phase which is the phase of proliferation and secretion is currently better managed with new categories of bandages which are true local treatments. The nutrition became one of the pillars of wound treatments especially among old patients. The reconstructive surgery took great steps since the physiology and the vascular anatomy of the skin and soft tissues are better known. Finally the bio-engineering has entered the treatment of the wound there is more than 20 years ago and methods have improved and become more reliable.

  20. Innovation and wound healing.

    PubMed

    Harding, Keith

    2015-04-01

    Innovation in medicine requires unique partnerships between academic research, biotech or pharmaceutical companies, and health-care providers. While innovation in medicine has greatly increased over the past 100 years, innovation in wound care has been slow, despite the fact that chronic wounds are a global health challenge where there is a need for technical, process and social innovation. While novel partnerships between research and the health-care system have been created, we still have much to learn about wound care and the wound-healing processes.

  1. Wound healing in urology.

    PubMed

    Ninan, Neethu; Thomas, Sabu; Grohens, Yves

    2015-03-01

    Wound healing is a dynamic and complex phenomenon of replacing devitalized tissues in the body. Urethral healing takes place in four phases namely inflammation, proliferation, maturation and remodelling, similar to dermal healing. However, the duration of each phase of wound healing in urology is extended for a longer period when compared to that of dermatology. An ideal wound dressing material removes exudate, creates a moist environment, offers protection from foreign substances and promotes tissue regeneration. A single wound dressing material shall not be sufficient to treat all kinds of wounds as each wound is distinct. This review includes the recent attempts to explore the hidden potential of growth factors, stem cells, siRNA, miRNA and drugs for promoting wound healing in urology. The review also discusses the different technologies used in hospitals to treat wounds in urology, which make use of innovative biomaterials synthesised in regenerative medicines like hydrogels, hydrocolloids, foams, films etc., incorporated with growth factors, drug molecules or nanoparticles. These include surgical zippers, laser tissue welding, negative pressure wound therapy, and hyperbaric oxygen treatment.

  2. Burn Wound Infection

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-09-01

    wound invasion was identified only Nine of 97 patients (9%) with histologic burn wound after septic or cardiogenic shock had been present in invasion...051= ADA12589 Th JouRHAL oP TRAUMA Vol. 21, No. 9 Copyright 0 1981 by The Williams & Wilkins Co. ,r, Prin U.S.A. . Burn Wound Infection WILLIAM F...admitted to a burn center during a 3-year period C had histologically confirmed bacterial or tungal burn wound invasion. Nine of t X Q these 97

  3. INTRATHORACIC COMBAT WOUNDS.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    THORAX, BATTLES), (*BATTLES, THERAPY), (*MILITARY MEDICINE, BATTLES), SURGERY, WARFARE, VIETNAM, ETIOLOGY, WEAPONS, HEMORRHAGE, MORTALITY RATES , LUNG, SPLEEN, LIVER, PATHOLOGY, WOUNDS AND INJURIES, CASUALTIES, (U)CASUALTIES

  4. Inflammation in Chronic Wounds

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Ruilong; Liang, Helena; Clarke, Elizabeth; Jackson, Christopher; Xue, Meilang

    2016-01-01

    Non-healing chronic wounds present a major biological, psychological, social, and financial burden on both individual patients and the broader health system. Pathologically extensive inflammation plays a major role in the disruption of the normal healing cascade. The causes of chronic wounds (venous, arterial, pressure, and diabetic ulcers) can be examined through a juxtaposition of normal healing and the rogue inflammatory response created by the common components within chronic wounds (ageing, hypoxia, ischaemia-reperfusion injury, and bacterial colonisation). Wound bed care through debridement, dressings, and antibiotics currently form the basic mode of treatment. Despite recent setbacks, pharmaceutical adjuncts form an interesting area of research. PMID:27973441

  5. Is skin closure with cyanoacrylate glue effective for the prevention of sternal wound infections?

    PubMed

    Chambers, Anthony; Scarci, Marco

    2010-05-01

    A best evidence topic in cardiac surgery was written according to a structured protocol. The question addressed whether cyanoacrylate glue was effective at preventing wound infection following sternotomy incision. Altogether more than 108 papers were found using the reported search, of which seven represented the best evidence to answer the clinical question. The authors, journal, date and country of publication, patient group studied, study type, relevant outcomes and results of these papers are tabulated. We conclude that applying cyanoacrylate glue to a sternal wound has superior outcomes in terms of infection rates, both if applied preoperatively (decreasing from 10.8% to 2.7% or 7.8% to 1.1%, according to two studies) and postoperatively (4.9%-2.1%). This trend is true of both deep surgical site infections (0.6%-0%) and superficial site infections (4.3%-2.1%). Furthermore, in patients who had developed mediastinitis following cardiac surgery rates of recurrent sternal detachment and osteomyelitis were significantly reduced in cases where sealant was applied compared to controls (35.3% vs. 0%). In all studies examining hospital stay, duration was reduced in cases where cyanoacrylate glue was used, both in patients treated for recurrent mediastinitis (24.06 vs. 14.16 days) and those with uncomplicated recovery following cardiac surgery (13 vs. 9 days). In addition, two studies examining the use of cyanoacrylate glue to secure the sternum in complicated cases of recurrent detachment report success rates of 86% and 100%.

  6. Non-Coding RNAs: New Players in Skin Wound Healing

    PubMed Central

    Herter, Eva K.; Xu Landén, Ning

    2017-01-01

    Significance: Wound healing is a basic physiological process that is utilized to keep the integrity of the skin. Impaired wound repair, such as chronic wounds and pathological scars, presents a major health and economic burden worldwide. To date, efficient targeted treatment for these wound disorders is still lacking, which is largely due to our limited understanding of the biological mechanisms underlying these diseases. Research driven around discovering new therapies for these complications is, therefore, an urgent need. Recent Advances: The vast majority of the human genome is transcribed to RNAs that lack protein-coding capacity. Intensive research in the recent decade has revealed that these non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) function as important regulators of cellular physiology and pathology, which makes them promising therapeutic and diagnostic entities. Critical Issues: A class of short ncRNAs, microRNAs, has been found to be indispensable for all the phases of skin wound healing and plays important roles in the pathogenesis of wound complications. The role of long ncRNAs (lncRNA) in skin wound healing remains largely unexplored. Recent studies revealed the essential role of lncRNAs in epidermal differentiation and stress response, indicating their potential importance for skin wound healing, which warrants future research. Future Directions: An investigation of ncRNAs will add new layers of complexity to our understanding of normal skin wound healing as well as to the pathogenesis of wound disorders. Development of ncRNA-based biomarkers and treatments is an interesting and important avenue for future research on wound healing. PMID:28289554

  7. Non-Coding RNAs: New Players in Skin Wound Healing.

    PubMed

    Herter, Eva K; Xu Landén, Ning

    2017-03-01

    Significance: Wound healing is a basic physiological process that is utilized to keep the integrity of the skin. Impaired wound repair, such as chronic wounds and pathological scars, presents a major health and economic burden worldwide. To date, efficient targeted treatment for these wound disorders is still lacking, which is largely due to our limited understanding of the biological mechanisms underlying these diseases. Research driven around discovering new therapies for these complications is, therefore, an urgent need. Recent Advances: The vast majority of the human genome is transcribed to RNAs that lack protein-coding capacity. Intensive research in the recent decade has revealed that these non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) function as important regulators of cellular physiology and pathology, which makes them promising therapeutic and diagnostic entities. Critical Issues: A class of short ncRNAs, microRNAs, has been found to be indispensable for all the phases of skin wound healing and plays important roles in the pathogenesis of wound complications. The role of long ncRNAs (lncRNA) in skin wound healing remains largely unexplored. Recent studies revealed the essential role of lncRNAs in epidermal differentiation and stress response, indicating their potential importance for skin wound healing, which warrants future research. Future Directions: An investigation of ncRNAs will add new layers of complexity to our understanding of normal skin wound healing as well as to the pathogenesis of wound disorders. Development of ncRNA-based biomarkers and treatments is an interesting and important avenue for future research on wound healing.

  8. Anesthesia, Microcirculation and Wound Repair in Aging

    PubMed Central

    Bentov, Itay; Reed, May J.

    2014-01-01

    Age related changes in skin contribute to impaired wound healing after surgical procedures. Changes in skin with age include decline in thickness and composition, a decrease in the number of most cell types and diminished microcirculation. The microcirculation provides tissue perfusion, fluid homeostasis, and delivery of oxygen and other nutrients. It also controls temperature and the inflammatory response. Surgical incisions cause further disruption of the microvasculature of aged skin. Perioperative management can be modified to minimize insults to aged tissues. Judicious use of fluids, maintenance of normal body temperature, pain control and increased tissue oxygen tension are examples of adjustable variables that support the microcirculation. Anesthetic agents influence the microcirculation from a combination of effects on cardiac output, arterial pressure and local micro-vascular changes. We examine the role of anesthetic management in optimizing the microcirculation and potentially improving post-operative wound repair in older persons. PMID:24195972

  9. Management of complications of Dupuytren contracture.

    PubMed

    Cheung, Kevin; Walley, Kempland C; Rozental, Tamara D

    2015-05-01

    This evidence-based article discusses the current management options of Dupuytren disease and strategies to avoid and manage any potential complications. Treatment options include fasciectomy, needle fasciotomy/aponeurotomy, and collagenase injection. Complications include digital nerve and artery injury, flexor tendon injury, skin fissures and wound healing complications, hematoma, infection, flare reaction/complex regional pain syndrome, and recurrence. Complication rates, prevention, and management differ with each treatment modality. A detailed understanding of each of these options allows hand surgeons to select the most appropriate treatment for each patient.

  10. Postoperative intravenous morphine titration.

    PubMed

    Aubrun, F; Mazoit, J-X; Riou, B

    2012-02-01

    Relief of acute pain during the immediate postoperative period is an important task for anaesthetists. Morphine is widely used to control moderate-to-severe postoperative pain and the use of small i.v. boluses of morphine in the post-anaesthesia care unit allows a rapid titration of the dose needed for adequate pain relief. The essential principle of a titration regimen must be to adapt the morphine dose to the pain level. Although morphine would not appear to be the most appropriate choice for achieving rapid pain relief, this is the sole opioid assessed in many studies of immediate postoperative pain management using titration. More than 90% of the patients have pain relief using a protocol of morphine titration and the mean dose required to obtain pain relief is 12 (7) mg, after a median of four boluses. Sedation is frequent during i.v. morphine titration and should be considered as a morphine-related adverse event and not evidence of pain relief. The incidence of ventilatory depression is very low when the criteria to limit the dose of i.v. morphine are enforced. Morphine titration can be used with caution in elderly patients, in children, or in obese patients. In practice, i.v. morphine titration allows the physician to meet the needs of individual patients rapidly and limits the risk of overdose making this method the first step in postoperative pain management.

  11. [Postoperative complications of cochlear implant: eight years of experience].

    PubMed

    Yépez-Pabón, Daniela; Guevara-Sánchez, Marco

    2015-01-01

    Introducción: el implante coclear es una cirugía con poca morbimortalidad. Las complicaciones posquirúrgicas pueden ser menores y mayores. Las menores requieren manejo conservador; las mayores, reintervención o retiro del implante. El objetivo de este trabajo es determinar nuestras complicaciones y cotejarlas con series internacionales y latinoamericanas. Métodos: se analizan retrospectivamente 275 casos intervenidos entre diciembre 2005 y diciembre 2013. Se incluyen niños y adultos entre 11 meses hasta 82 años de edad. Se evalúan datos demográficos, colocación uni o bilateral, tipo de cirugía y las complicaciones posquirúrgicas. El seguimiento fue por 20 meses. Resultados: el 57.46 % son niños y adolescentes; el 33.81 % jóvenes y adultos, y el 8.73 % adultos mayores. El índice de complicaciones es del 12 % (n = 33), 6.91 % en mujeres y 5.09 % en hombres. Entre los 19 a 60 años hay más complicaciones. Las complicaciones menores representan el 7.64 %: infección local (n = 9), parálisis facial transitoria tardía (n = 7), vértigo (n = 3) y tinnitus (n = 2). Prevalecen en niños y adultos. Las complicaciones mayores son el 4.36 %: hematomas postquirúrgicos (n = 8), extrusiones (n = 2) e inadecuada colocación de electrodos (n = 2). Predominan en los adultos entre 19 a 60 años. No se presentan casos de meningitis ni decesos. Conclusiones: la implantación coclear tiene baja incidencia de complicaciones. Nuestros resultados, los únicos reportados a nivel nacional, son similares a los que menciona la literatura.

  12. Wireless Microcurrent-Generating Antimicrobial Wound Dressing in Primary Total Knee Arthroplasty: A Single-Center Experience.

    PubMed

    Chow, James

    2016-06-27

    The spread of multidrug-resistant bacteria and financial burden of periprosthetic joint infection (PJI) further the need for treatments to address pathogenic contamination and expedite healing. This retrospective study was a chart review of a series of 92 patients who underwent 100 total knee arthroplasties performed by the same surgeon and treated with a novel microcurrent-generating antimicrobial dressing (MCD). Mean hospital length of stay was 2.3±0.9 days, while the mean length of treatment with MCD was 8.3±1.2 days. No major complications, PJI or major infectious complications were reported, with two readmissions (2%) within 30 days of surgery. Knee Society Score function showed statistically significant improvements post-operatively, with a mean six-month score of 75.0±20.3 and mean change from baseline of 36.3±21.1 (P<0.0001). These results support previous findings that use of the MCD may result in improved outcomes as an element in post-operative wound management.

  13. Wireless Microcurrent-Generating Antimicrobial Wound Dressing in Primary Total Knee Arthroplasty: A Single-Center Experience

    PubMed Central

    Chow, James

    2016-01-01

    The spread of multidrug-resistant bacteria and financial burden of periprosthetic joint infection (PJI) further the need for treatments to address pathogenic contamination and expedite healing. This retrospective study was a chart review of a series of 92 patients who underwent 100 total knee arthroplasties performed by the same surgeon and treated with a novel microcurrent-generating antimicrobial dressing (MCD). Mean hospital length of stay was 2.3±0.9 days, while the mean length of treatment with MCD was 8.3±1.2 days. No major complications, PJI or major infectious complications were reported, with two readmissions (2%) within 30 days of surgery. Knee Society Score function showed statistically significant improvements post-operatively, with a mean six-month score of 75.0±20.3 and mean change from baseline of 36.3±21.1 (P<0.0001). These results support previous findings that use of the MCD may result in improved outcomes as an element in post-operative wound management. PMID:27433298

  14. Postoperative incentive spirometry use.

    PubMed

    Hassanzadeh, Hamid; Jain, Amit; Tan, Eric W; Stein, Benjamin E; Van Hoy, Megan L; Stewart, Nadine N; Lemma, Mesfin A

    2012-06-01

    The authors hypothesized that the use of incentive spirometry by orthopedic patients is less than the recommended level and is affected by patient-related factors and type of surgery. To determine its postoperative use, the authors prospectively surveyed all patients in their institution's general orthopedic ward who had undergone elective spine surgery or total knee or hip arthroplasty during a consecutive 3-month period in 2010, excluding patients with postoperative delirium or requiring a monitored bed. All 182 patients (74 men, 108 women; average age, 64.5 years; range, 32-88 years; spine group, n=55; arthroplasty group, n=127), per protocol, received preoperative spirometry education by a licensed respiratory therapist (recommended use, 10 times hourly) and reinforcement education by nurses. Patients were asked twice daily (morning and evening) regarding their spirometry use during the previous 1-hour period by a registered nurse on postoperative days 1 through 3. All data were collected by the same 2 nurses using the same standardized questionnaire. Spirometry use was correlated with surgery type, postoperative day/time, and patient's age and sex. Student's t test, Spearman test, and one-way analysis of variance were used to compare differences (P<.05). Spirometry use averaged 4.1 times per hour (range, 0-10 times). No statistical correlations were found between spirometry use and age. Sex did not influence spirometry use. The arthroplasty group reported significantly higher use than did the spine group: 4.3 and 3.5 times per hour, respectively. Mean use increased significantly between postoperative days 1, 2, and 3.

  15. Sigmoid Volvulus Complicating Postpartum Period

    PubMed Central

    Blake, Erin; Gonzalez, Eduardo; Pieracci, Frederic

    2017-01-01

    Background. Sigmoid volvulus is a rare complication of pregnancy and the puerperium. Case. A 19-year-old patient, gravida 1 para 0 at 41 0/7 weeks of gestation, admitted for late-term induction of labor underwent an uncomplicated primary low transverse cesarean delivery for arrest of descent. Her postoperative period was complicated by sudden onset of abdominal pain and the ultimate diagnosis of sigmoid volvulus. Conclusion. Prompt surgical evaluation of an acute abdomen in the postpartum period is essential; delayed diagnosis and treatment can lead to significant maternal morbidity and mortality. PMID:28251004

  16. Pulmonary complications of general surgery.

    PubMed

    Pierce, A K; Robertson, J

    1977-01-01

    1. Patients should be divided preoperatively into low- or high-risk categories, depending on their probability of developing postoperative pulmonary complications. The evaluation should include spirometry as well as an assessment of the previously defined risk factors. 2. Patients in a low-risk category need only instruction in deep breathing pre- and postoperatively. Routine use of supplemented oxygen postoperatively is reasonable until it can be demonstrated whether such is necessary. 3. High-risk patients should be as free as possible of respiratory secretions at the time of surgery. A regimen for this purpose includes cessation of smoking, and administration of inhaled bronchodilators followed by chest percussion and postural drainage. 4. High-risk patients should be carefully instructed in deep breathing and coughing preoperatively. A mechanical device such as an incentive spirometer may be beneficial in this regard. If it is not possible to achieve spontaneous deep breathing, an attempt to accomplish this by IPPB may be undertaken. The tidal volume desired should be ordered. If IPPB does not result in large tidal volumes, it should be discontinued. 5. The deep breathing procedure found to be most successful preoperativelly should be continued postoperatively. 6. The patient should be as mobile as possible while in bed and ambulated as soon as is feasible. 7. Patients with preoperative expiratory flows of less than 20% of predicted values or with chronic hypercapnia should be carefully observed for postoperative ventilatory failure.

  17. Wound Healing and Care

    MedlinePlus

    ... of collagen. So they're tougher and less flexible than the skin around them. Caring for Serious Wounds at Home Serious wounds don't heal overnight. It can take weeks for the body to build new tissue. So after you leave ...

  18. Surgical wound care - open

    MedlinePlus

    Surgical incision care; Open wound care ... your wound again with sutures, you need to care for it at home, since it may take ... Your health care provider will tell you how often to change your dressing . To prepare for the dressing change: Clean your ...

  19. Source Control and Graft Preservation Using Negative Pressure Wound Therapy with Antibiotic Instillation: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, Timothy; Grossi, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) is widely used to treat many types of complex wounds, and the advent of the instillation and dwell time (NPWTi-d) technique has enhanced this system with the addition of automated treatment with topical solutions. In the field of vascular surgery, NPWT is utilized to help close wounds over underlying grafts; however keeping these wounds free of infection and avoiding large reoperation when infection occurs remains a challenge. In this case report we present a patient who required acute intervention for limb ischemia, with a large wound created in the groin for anastomosis of a prosthetic graft bypass. Postoperatively, the wound became infected, and the challenge became balancing infection control and graft preservation with the patient’s multiple comorbidities including postoperative non-ST segment elevation myocardial infarction (NSTEMI). To avoid a large reoperation, we chose NPWTi-d with automated instillation of an antibiotic solution. There was no reinfection or return to the operating room (OR), the patient was discharged after four weeks and the wound closed on its own shortly thereafter. This case demonstrates that for high-risk surgical patients with known wound infections in the proximity of a bypass graft, NPWTi-d with antibiotic instillation may be an effective augmentation to current treatment strategies and may be considered as a stand-alone technique for wound closure in select cases. PMID:27909643

  20. Management of complications with flap procedures and replantation.

    PubMed

    Sammer, Douglas M

    2015-05-01

    Replantation and flap procedures employ microvascular techniques to salvage or reconstruct a severely damaged limb or digit. The most devastating complications include complete or partial flap loss, or replantation failure due to vascular complications. Often, these complications can be prevented by appropriate patient selection, careful surgical planning, meticulous technique, and proper postoperative management. This article discusses complications related to replantation and flap procedures in the upper limb, focusing on preventing and managing these complications.

  1. Sirtuin-6 deficiency exacerbates diabetes induced impairment of wound healing

    PubMed Central

    Thandavarayan, Rajarajan A; Garikipati, Venkata Naga Srikanth; Joladarashi, Darukeshwara; Babu, Sahana Suresh; Jeyabal, Prince; Verma, Suresh K; Mackie, Alexander R; Khan, Mohsin; Arumugam, Somasundaram; Watanabe, Kenichi; Kishore, Raj; Krishnamurthy, Prasanna

    2015-01-01

    Delayed wound healing is one of the major complications in diabetes and is characterized by chronic proinflammatory response, and abnormalities in angiogenesis and collagen deposition. Sirtuin family proteins regulate numerous pathophysiological processes, including those involved in promotion of longevity, DNA repair, glycolysis and inflammation. However the role of sirtuin 6 (SIRT6), a NAD+-dependent nuclear deacetylase, in wound healing specifically under diabetic condition remains unclear. To analyze the role of SIRT6 in cutaneous wound healing, paired 6 mm stented wound were created in diabetic db/db mice and injected siRNA against SIRT6 in the wound margins (transfection agent alone and non-sensed siRNA served as controls). Wound time to closure was assessed by digital planimetry, and wounds were harvested for histology, immunohistochemistry and Western blotting. SIRT6-siRNA treated diabetic wound showed impaired healing, which was associated with reduced capillary density (CD31 staining vessels) when compared to control treatment. Interestingly, SIRT6 deficiency decreased vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression and proliferation markers in the wounds. Furthermore, SIRT6 ablation in diabetic wound promotes nuclear factor kB (NF-kB) activation resulting in increased expression of proinflammatory markers (intercellular adhesion molecule-1, vascular cell adhesion molecule-1, tumor necrosis factor-α and interleukin-1β) and increased oxidative stress. Collectively, our findings demonstrate that loss of SIRT6 in cutaneous wound aggravates proinflammatory response by increasing NF-kB activation, oxidative stress and decrease in angiogenesis in the diabetic mice. Based on these findings, we speculate that activation of SIRT6 signaling might be a potential therapeutic approach for promoting wound healing in diabetics. PMID:26010430