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Sample records for posttraumatic lumbar cerebrospinal

  1. Spontaneous recovery of post-traumatic cerebrospinal fluid rhinorrhea following meningitis: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Citisli, Veli; Kocaoglu, Murat; Necan, Ceyda; İbrahimoglu, Muhammet; Celiker, Özkan; Baykara, Eyüp; Ozdemir, Mevci; Acar, Feridun; Coskun, Mehmet Erdal

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present report was to present the patient with an anterior cranial base fracture who developed post-traumatic cerebrospinal fluid rhinorrhea, which recovered after onset of meningitis complication. A 26-year-old male patient who had a traffic accident one week ago was sent to our clinic because of his rhinorrhea persisting for 4 days. On cranial computed tomography, fracture of the left frontal skull base and sinus walls, a fracture line on temporal bone, parenchymal bleeding in the vicinity of the frontal sinus, subarachnoidal bleeding and left temporal extradural hematoma were detected. Then he underwent sinus wall repair and extradural hematoma was drained through bifrontal craniotomy. However, rhinorrhea persisted which resulted a deterioration in consciousness and he entered into a deep somnolent state. When his symptoms of meningitis became apparent, rhinorrhea of the patient disappeared. The patient transferred in intensive care unit and re-connected to a lumbar drainage system. On cerebral magnetic resonance imaging, regression of contrast-enhanced lesions localized in the left anterotemporal and frontal and in the regions lateral to the right trigon and medial to the right thalamus and in the right posteroparietal regions was observed. Despite repair of the anterior cranial fracture and lumbar drainage, rhinorrhea may persist. Herein, development of meningitis caused disappearing of rhinorrhea symptoms without any need for surgical intervention. PMID:26309437

  2. Interpretation of Cerebrospinal Fluid White Blood Cell Counts in Young Infants With a Traumatic Lumbar Puncture.

    PubMed

    Lyons, Todd W; Cruz, Andrea T; Freedman, Stephen B; Neuman, Mark I; Balamuth, Fran; Mistry, Rakesh D; Mahajan, Prashant; Aronson, Paul L; Thomson, Joanna E; Pruitt, Christopher M; Shah, Samir S; Nigrovic, Lise E

    2017-05-01

    We determine the optimal correction factor for cerebrospinal fluid WBC counts in infants with traumatic lumbar punctures. We performed a secondary analysis of a retrospective cohort of infants aged 60 days or younger and with a traumatic lumbar puncture (cerebrospinal fluid RBC count ≥10,000 cells/mm(3)) at 20 participating centers. Cerebrospinal fluid pleocytosis was defined as a cerebrospinal fluid WBC count greater than or equal to 20 cells/mm(3) for infants aged 28 days or younger and greater than or equal to 10 cells/mm(3) for infants aged 29 to 60 days; bacterial meningitis was defined as growth of pathogenic bacteria from cerebrospinal fluid culture. Using linear regression, we derived a cerebrospinal fluid WBC correction factor and compared the uncorrected with the corrected cerebrospinal fluid WBC count for the detection of bacterial meningitis. Of the eligible 20,319 lumbar punctures, 2,880 (14%) were traumatic, and 33 of these patients (1.1%) had bacterial meningitis. The derived cerebrospinal fluid RBCs:WBCs ratio was 877:1 (95% confidence interval [CI] 805 to 961:1). Compared with the uncorrected cerebrospinal fluid WBC count, the corrected one had lower sensitivity for bacterial meningitis (88% uncorrected versus 67% corrected; difference 21%; 95% CI 10% to 37%) but resulted in fewer infants with cerebrospinal fluid pleocytosis (78% uncorrected versus 33% corrected; difference 45%; 95% CI 43% to 47%). Cerebrospinal fluid WBC count correction resulted in the misclassification of 7 additional infants with bacterial meningitis, who were misclassified as not having cerebrospinal fluid pleocytosis; only 1 of these infants was older than 28 days. Correction of the cerebrospinal fluid WBC count substantially reduced the number of infants with cerebrospinal fluid pleocytosis while misclassifying only 1 infant with bacterial meningitis of those aged 29 to 60 days. Copyright © 2016 American College of Emergency Physicians. Published by Elsevier Inc. All

  3. Correction of Cerebrospinal Fluid Protein in Infants With Traumatic Lumbar Punctures.

    PubMed

    Lyons, Todd W; Cruz, Andrea T; Freedman, Stephen B; Arms, Joseph L; Aronson, Paul L; Fleming, Alesia H; Kulik, Dina M; Mahajan, Prashant; Mistry, Rakesh D; Pruitt, Christopher M; Thompson, Amy D; Nigrovic, Lise E

    2017-10-01

    In our multicenter cohort of infants ≤60 days of age, we identified 2646 infants with a traumatic lumbar puncture, of which 31 (1.2%) had bacterial meningitis. For every 1000 cerebrospinal fluid red blood cells/mm, cerebrospinal (cerebrospinal fluid) protein increased 1.1 mg/dL (95% confidence interval: 1.0-1.2 mg/dL).

  4. Lumbar nerve rootlet entrapment by an iatrogenically spliced percutaneous intra-thecal lumbar cerebrospinal fluid catheter.

    PubMed

    Yue, James J; Castro, Carlos A; Scott, David

    2015-01-01

    Complications associated with the use of percutaneous intra-thecal lumbar indwelling spinal catheters include infection, hematoma, neurologic dysfunction, and persistent undesired retention among others. A case of iatrogenic splicing associated with neurologic dysfunction with the use of a percutaneous intra-thecal indwelling spinal catheter is presented in this study. Single case study review. Review of case materials indicate Y pattern splicing/fragmentation of an indwelling intra-thecal catheter causing neurologic dysfunction and resistance to removal during attempted removal. Pain and weakness were evident soon after insertion of the catheter and were amplified with attempted catheter removal. Computed tomography revealed a double dot sign on axial view and a Y appearance on sagittal view. Surgical findings revealed entrapment of nerve rootlets in the axilla of the spliced catheter. Splicing/fragmentation causing neurologic dysfunction as well as catheter retention is described as a potential complication of intra-thecal indwelling cerebrospinal fluid catheters. A symptom of fragmentation of a catheter may include neurologic dysfunction including pain and weakness of a lumbar nerve root. If resistance is experienced upon attempted catheter removal, with or without associated neurologic dysfunction, further attempts at removal should not be attempted. In those cases in which pain and/or lumbar weakness are evident post catheter placement and/or following attempted removal, computed tomography should be performed. If fragmentation of a catheter is evident on CT scan, spinal surgical consultation should be obtained. Recommended spinal surgical intervention includes an open durotomy and visualization of catheter fragments and nerve rootlets and removal of catheter fragments. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  5. Management of Persistent Cerebrospinal Fluid Leakage Following Thoraco-lumbar Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Ilbay, Konuralp; Kim, Michael Sun Min; Selek, Ozgur

    2012-01-01

    Study Design This was a retrospective study of patients who had developed a dural tear after thoracic and lumbar spine surgery that was not recognized during the surgery, and was treated either by lumbar drainage or over-sewing of the wounds. Purpose To revisit the treatment strategies in postoperative dural leaks and present our experience with over-sewing of the wound and lumbar drainage. Overview of Literature Unintended durotomy is a frequent complication of spinal surgery. Management of subsequent cerebrospinal fluid leakage remains controversial. There is no distinct treatment guideline according to the etiology in the current literature. Methods The records of 368 consecutive patients who underwent thoracic and/or lumbar spine surgery from 2006 throug h 2010 were retrospectively reviewed. Seven cerebrospinal fluid fistulas and five pseudomeningoceles were noted in 12 (3.2%) procedures. Cerebrospinal fluid diversion by lumbar drainage in five pseudomeningoceles and over-sewing of wounds in seven cerebrospinal fluid fistulas employed in 12 patients. Clinical grading was evaluated by Wang. Results Of the 12 patients who had a dural tear, 5 were managed successfully with lumbar drainage, and 7 with oversewing of the wound. The clinical outcomes were excellent in 9 patients, good in 2, and poor in 1. Complications such as neurological deficits, or superficial or deep wound infections did not develop. A recurrence of the fistula or pseudomeningocele after the treatment was not seen in any of our patients. Conclusions Pseudomeningoceles respond well to lumbar drainage, whereas over-sewing of the wound is an alternative treatment option in cerebrospinal fluid fistulas without neurological compromise. PMID:22977694

  6. Cerebrospinal fluid infection after lumbar nerve root steroid injection: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Seong-Su; Shim, Sung Min; Cho, Hae Jun

    2017-01-01

    A 45-year-old woman was admitted due to severe headache and neck stiffness. She had visited a local clinic for back pain and received a lumbar nerve root steroid injection 10 days before admission. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging showed psoas abscess, pneumocephalus, and subdural hygroma. She was diagnosed with psoas abscess and meningitis. The abscess and external ventricle were drained, and antibiotics were administered. Unfortunately, the patient died on hospital day 19 due to diffuse leptomeningitis. Lumbar nerve root steroid injections are commonly used to control back pain. Vigilance to "red flag signs" and a rapid diagnosis can prevent lethal outcomes produced by rare and unexpected complications related to infection. Here, we report a case of fatal meningitis after infection of the cerebrospinal fluid following a lumbar nerve root steroid injection. PMID:28184274

  7. Cerebrospinal Fluid Lumbar Tapping Utilization for Suspected Ventriculoperitoneal Shunt Under-Drainage Malfunctions

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jong-Beom; Ahn, Ho-Young; Lee, Hong-Jae; Yang, Ji-Ho; Yi, Jin-Seok; Lee, Il-Woo

    2017-01-01

    Objective The diagnosis of shunt malfunction can be challenging since neuroimaging results are not always correlated with clinical outcomes. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of a simple, minimally invasive cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) lumbar tapping test that predicts shunt under-drainage in hydrocephalus patients. Methods We retrospectively reviewed the clinical and radiological features of 48 patients who underwent routine CSF lumbar tapping after ventriculoperitoneal shunt (VPS) operation using a programmable shunting device. We compared shunt valve opening pressure and CSF lumbar tapping pressure to check under-drainage. Results The mean pressure difference between valve opening pressure and CSF lumbar tapping pressure of all patients were 2.21±24.57 mmH2O. The frequency of CSF lumbar tapping was 2.06±1.26 times. Eighty five times lumbar tapping of 41 patients showed that their VPS function was normal which was consistent with clinical improvement and decreased ventricle size on computed tomography scan. The mean pressure difference in these patients was −3.69±19.20 mmH2O. The mean frequency of CSF lumbar tapping was 2.07±1.25 times. Fourteen cases of 10 patients revealed suspected VPS malfunction which were consistent with radiological results and clinical symptoms, defined as changes in ventricle size and no clinical improvement. The mean pressure difference was 38.07±23.58 mmH2O. The mean frequency of CSF lumbar tapping was 1.44±1.01 times. Pressure difference greater than 35 mmH2O was shown in 2.35% of the normal VPS function group (2 of 85) whereas it was shown in 64.29% of the suspected VPS malfunction group (9 of 14). The difference was statistically significant (p=0.000001). Among 10 patients with under-drainage, 5 patients underwent shunt revision. The causes of the shunt malfunction included 3 cases of proximal occlusion and 2 cases of distal obstruction and valve malfunction. Conclusion Under-drainage of CSF should be

  8. CSF Lumbar Drainage: A Safe Surgical Option in Refractory Intracranial Hypertension Associated with Acute Posttraumatic External Hydrocephalus.

    PubMed

    Manet, R; Schmidt, E A; Vassal, F; Charier, D; Gergelé, L

    2016-01-01

    External lumbar drainage (ELD) of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) in posttraumatic refractory intracranial hypertension (ICHT) is controversial. We report our experience of ELD in ICHT associated with acute disturbance of CSF flow within subarachnoid spaces (SASs). Four adult patients admitted to the neurointensive care unit for severe TBI who presented with secondary ICHT are retrospectively reported. When refractory to second-tier therapy, if external ventricular drainage were not possible or failed, and in the absence of an indication for craniotomy to treat a mass lesion or decompressive craniectomy, we assessed the evolution of CSF volume within cranial SAS and checked the presence of basal cisterns and the absence of tonsillar herniation to evaluate interest in and the safety of ELD. As second-tier therapy failed to lower intracranial pressure (ICP; mean ICP 37 ± 5 mmHg), and computed tomography (CT) showed abnormally enlarged cranial SAS following traumatic subarachnoid hemorrhage, patients received ELD. ICP decreased, with immediate and long-term effect (mean ICP 5 mmHg ± 2 mmHg). There were no complications to report. Acute traumatic external hydrocephalus may explain some of the specific situations of secondary increased ICP, with a "normal" CT scan, that is refractory to medical treatment. In these situations, lumbar drainage should be considered to be a safe, minimally invasive, and effective surgical option.

  9. Is lumbar drainage of postoperative cerebrospinal fluid fistula after spine surgery effective?

    PubMed

    Barbanti Bròdano, G; Serchi, E; Babbi, L; Terzi, S; Corghi, A; Gasbarrini, A; Bandiera, S; Griffoni, C; Colangeli, S; Ghermandi, R; Boriani, S

    2014-03-01

    This study is a retrospective consecutive case series analysis of 198 patients who underwent spine surgery between 2009 and 2010. The aim of this paper was to assess the efficacy and safeness of bed rest and lumbar drainage in treating postoperative CSF fistula. Postoperative cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) fistula is a well-known complication in spine surgery which lead to a significant change in length of hospitalization and possible postoperative complications. Management of CSF leaks has changed little over the past 20 years with no golden standard advocated from literature. Postoperative CSF fistulas were described in 16 of 198 patients (8%) who underwent spine surgery between 2009 and 2010. The choice of the therapeutic strategy was based on the clinical condition of the patients, taking into account the possibility to maintain the prone position continuously and the risk of morbidity due to prolonged bed rest. Six patients were treated conservatively (position prone for three weeks), ten patients were treated by positioning an external CSF lumbar drainage for ten days. The mean follow-up period was ten months. All patients healed their wound properly and no adverse events were recorded. Patients treated conservatively were cured in a mean period of 30 days, while patients treated with CSF drainage were cured in a mean period of 10 days. Lumbar drainage seems to be effective and safe both in preventing CSF fistula in cases of large dural tears and debilitated/irradiated patients and in treating CSF leaks.

  10. [External lumbar drainage with volumetric continuing infusion pump in patients with cerebrospinal fluid leak. A case series].

    PubMed

    Manso Melgosa, Ana Belén; García Gutiérrez, Helena; Fernández Porras, Mónica; Castrillo Manero, Ana Berta; Pérez Marijuán, Belén

    To describe the incidence and complications arising in a number of cases of patients with cerebrospinal fluid leak treated by external lumbar drainage with infusion pump (IP) volumetric continuous from 2001 to 2014. Quantify cerebrospinal fluid leak closed by lumbar drainage with IP. Retrospective descriptive case series study. patients undergoing transsphenoidal pituitary surgery, Chiari surgery and laminectomy, that developed postoperative cerebrospinal fluid leak treated with continuous external lumbar drainage by IP. age, sex, type of intervention, variables related to the practice of the pump and complications. Average and medians were calculated for quantitative variables, frequencies and percentages for qualitative. Sample: 11 subjects. Incidence in running IP: disconnection, occlusion and acoustic alarm activation. Most frequently complication is headache; a case of pneumocephalus. The small number of subjects and the heterogeneity of these do not allow for comparison or establishing associations between variables. The resolution of the cerebrospinal fluid leak with continuous IP is lower in this study than others, and may be influenced by the small number of subjects. It should be noted the frequent activation of the pump alarm for no apparent cause. Protocol would be developed for preparing the IP team to reduce the acoustic alarm activation, and would make a prospective multicenter study. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  11. Fluoroscopy-Guided Lumbar Drainage of Cerebrospinal Fluid for Patients in Whom a Blind Beside Approach Is Difficult

    PubMed Central

    Chee, Choong Guen; Lee, Joon Woo; Lee, Eugene; Kang, Heung Sik

    2015-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the rates of technical success, clinical success, and complications of fluoroscopy-guided lumbar cerebrospinal fluid drainage. Materials and Methods This retrospective study was approved by the Institutional Review Board of our hospital, and informed consent was waived. Ninety-six procedures on 60 consecutive patients performed July 2008 to December 2013 were evaluated. The patients were referred for the fluoroscopy-guided procedure due to failed attempts at a bedside approach, a history of lumbar surgery, difficulty cooperating, or obesity. Fluoroscopy-guided lumbar drainage procedures were performed in the lateral decubitus position with a midline puncture of L3/4 in the interspinous space. The catheter tip was positioned at the T12/L1 level, and the catheter was visualized on contrast agent-aided fluoroscopy. A standard angiography system with a rotatable C-arm was used. The definitions of technical success, clinical success, and complications were defined prior to the study. Results The technical and clinical success rates were 99.0% (95/96) and 89.6% (86/96), respectively. The mean hospital stay for an external lumbar drain was 4.84 days. Nine cases of minor complications and eight major complications were observed, including seven cases of meningitis, and one retained catheter requiring surgical removal. Conclusion Fluoroscopy-guided external lumbar drainage is a technically reliable procedure in difficult patients with failed attempts at a bedside procedure, history of lumbar surgery, difficulties in cooperation, or obesity. PMID:26175586

  12. Cerebrospinal fluid neuropeptide Y in combat veterans with and without posttraumatic stress disorder.

    PubMed

    Sah, Renu; Ekhator, Nosakhare N; Jefferson-Wilson, Lena; Horn, Paul S; Geracioti, Thomas D

    2014-02-01

    Accruing evidence indicates that neuropeptide Y (NPY), a peptide neurotransmitter, is a resilience-to-stress factor in humans. We previously reported reduced cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) NPY concentrations in combat-related posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) subjects as compared with healthy, non-combat-exposed volunteers. Here we report CSF NPY in combat-exposed veterans with and without PTSD. We quantified NPY concentrations in morning CSF from 11 male subjects with PTSD from combat in Iraq and/or Afghanistan and from 14 combat-exposed subjects without PTSD. NPY-like immunoreactivity (NPY-LI) was measured by EIA. The relationship between CSF NPY and clinical symptoms, as measured by the Clinician-Administered PTSD Scale (CAPS) and Beck Depression Inventory (BDI), was assessed, as was the relationship between combat exposure scale (CES) scores and CSF NPY. As compared with the combat-exposed comparison subjects without PTSD, individuals with PTSD had significantly lower concentrations of CSF NPY [mean CSF NPY was 258. 6 ± 21.64 pg/mL in the combat trauma-no PTSD group but only 180.5 ± 12.62 pg/mL in PTSD patients (p=0.008)]. After adjusting for CES and BDI scores the two groups were still significantly different with respect to NPY. Importantly, CSF NPY was negatively correlated with composite CAPS score and intrusive (re-experiencing) subscale scores, but did not significantly correlate with CES or BDI scores. Our current findings further suggest that NPY may regulate the manifestation of PTSD symptomatology, and extend previous observations of low CSF NPY concentrations in the disorder. Central nervous system NPY may be a clinically important pharmacotherapeutic target, and/or diagnostic measure, for PTSD. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  13. Serial lumbar and ventricular cerebrospinal fluid biochemical marker measurements in patients with leptomeningeal metastases from solid and hematological tumors.

    PubMed

    Twijnstra, A; Ongerboer de Visser, B W; van Zanten, A P; Hart, A A; Nooyen, W J

    1989-05-01

    This study presents results of investigations of lumbar and ventricular cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biochemical markers (Beta-glucuronidase (B-gluc), Beta-2-microglobulin (B2-m), and carcinoembrionic antigen (CEA] in 28 patients with five different tumor types with leptomeningeal metastasis diagnosed by CSF cytology and/or autopsy. All received methotrexate and radiotherapy at some stage. Decadron or other symptomatic treatments were not used. Measurements of the concentrations of B-gluc, B2-m and CEA were evaluated with the aim of correlating the results of these measurements to site of disease, of monitoring response and early relapse of leptomeningeal disease, and of establishing the duration of survival. In almost all our patients the results of ventricular CSF B-gluc, B2-m and CEA measurements were lower than those obtained from lumbar CSF. The markers did not correlate with site of disease or CSF cytology. A clear relationship was found between pretreatment lumbar CSF B2-m and CEA levels, response to therapy and survival. The markers are also useful for monitoring response. The findings of this study indicate that B2-m and CEA levels have a prognostic value with regard to response to therapy and time of survival.

  14. Postoperative Low-Flow Cerebrospinal Fluid Leak of Endoscopic Endonasal Transsphenoidal Surgery for Pituitary Adenoma--Wait and See, or Lumbar Drain?

    PubMed

    Zhan, Rucai; Chen, Songyu; Xu, Shujun; Liu, James K; Li, Xingang

    2015-06-01

    To assess the effectiveness of continuous lumbar drainage (LD) for management of postoperative cerebrospinal fluid leaks after endoscopic endonasal transsphenoidal approach for resection of pituitary adenoma. Three hundred eighty-four medical records of patients who were admitted to our institute during a 2.5-year period were retrospectively reviewed, 33 of them experienced low-flow cerebrospinal fluid leak postoperatively. If LD was used, all patients with low-flow cerebrospinal fluid leak were classified into 2 groups, lumbar drained group and conservatively treated group. The age, sex, management of cerebrospinal fluid leaks, and related complications were reviewed. Statistical comparisons between the 2 groups were made using SPSS 19.0 (IBM Corp, Armonk, NY). The differences were considered statistically significant if the P value was less than 0.05.Thirty-three of 384 (8.6%) experienced low-flow postoperative cerebrospinal fluid leaks. Cured rate of cerebrospinal fluid leak was 94.4% (17/18) in continuous lumbar drained group, and 93.3% (14/15) in control group. There were 2 (11.2%) patients who developed meningitis in the LD group and 1 (5.6%) patient in the control group. One patient required endoscopic repair of skull base because of persistent cerebrospinal fluid leak in both groups, with the rates of 5.6% and 6.7%, respectively. There was no significant difference noted in each rate in both groups.Placement of LD may not be necessary for the management of low-flow postoperative cerebrospinal fluid leak after using endoscopic endonasal transsphenoidal approach to pituitary adenoma.

  15. High fibrosis indices in cerebrospinal fluid of patients with shunt-dependent post-traumatic chronic hydrocephalus

    PubMed Central

    Hao, Xu; Junwen, Wang; Jiaqing, Li; Ran, Li; Zhuo, Zhang; Yimin, Huang; Wei, Jiao; Wei, Sun

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective A possible relationship between fibrosis along the route of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) flow and the subsequent development of hydrocephalus has been indicated in previous studies. These changes in the fibrosis index may reflect the severity of hydrocephalus and could potentially become a diagnostic tool. The object of this study was to analyze the levels of procollagen type I C-terminal propeptide (PICP), procollagen type III N-terminal propeptide (PIIINP), hyaluronic acid (HA), and laminin (LN) in the CSF of patients with post-traumatic hydrocephalus and determine the significance of their presence. Subjects and methods Forty-four patients were included in the study: 24 patients with shunt-dependent post-traumatic hydrocephalus (group A - hydrocephalus group); ten brain trauma patients without any sign of hydrocephalus (group B - trauma group); ten patients without brain trauma and hydrocephalus (group C - normal control group). CSF levels of PICP, PIIINP, HA, LN and transforming growth factor-β1(TGF-β1) were detected using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Results Levels of PICP, PIIINP, HA, and LN in the group of hydrocephalus patients were significantly higher than those in the post-trauma patients without hydrocephalus (p < 0.05) and normal control patients (p < 0.05). Moreover, the increased levels of PICP, PIIINP, HA, and LN were positively correlated with the level of TGF-β1 (p < 0.05). Conclusion We demonstrated an increase of fibrosis factors including PICP, PIIINP, HA, and LN, that was positively correlated with TGF-β1 levels. This indicates an important role for the process of fibrosis in the development of post-traumatic chronic hydrocephalus and shows the potential utility of PICP, PIIINP, HA, and LN as a diagnostic index in shunt-dependent post-traumatic chronic hydrocephalus. PMID:28123828

  16. Minimally Invasive Lumbar Port System for the Collection of Cerebrospinal Fluid from Rhesus Macaques (Macaca mulatta).

    PubMed

    MacAllister, Rhonda Pung; Lester McCully, Cynthia M; Bacher, John; Thomas Iii, Marvin L; Cruz, Rafael; Wangari, Solomon; Warren, Katherine E

    2016-01-01

    Biomedical translational research frequently incorporates collection of CSF from NHP, because CSF drug levels are used as a surrogate for CNS tissue penetration in pharmacokinetic and dynamic studies. Surgical placement of a CNS ventricular catheter reservoir for CSF collection is an intensive model to create and maintain and thus may not be feasible or practical for short-term studies. Furthermore, previous NHP lumbar port models require laminectomy for catheter placement. The new model uses a minimally invasive technique for percutaneous placement of a lumbar catheter to create a closed, subcutaneous system for effective, repeated CSF sample collection. None of the rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta; n = 10) implanted with our minimally invasive lumbar port (MILP) system experienced neurologic deficits, postoperative infection of the surgical site, or skin erosion around the port throughout the 21.7-mo study. Functional MILP systems were maintained in 70% of the macaques, with multiple, high-quality, 0.5- to 1.0-mL samples of CSF collected for an average of 3 mo by using aspiration or gravitational flow. Among these macaques, 57% had continuous functionality for a mean of 19.2 mo; 50% of the cohort required surgical repair for port repositioning and replacement during the study. The MILP was unsuccessful in 2 macaques, at an average of 9.5 d after surgery. Nonpatency in these animals was attributed to the position of the lumbar catheter. The MILP system is an appropriate replacement for temporary catheterization and previous models requiring laminectomy and is a short-term alternative for ventricular CSF collection systems in NHP.

  17. Cerebrospinal fluid outflow along lumbar nerves and possible relevance for pain research: case report and review.

    PubMed

    Bechter, Karl; Schmitz, Bernd

    2014-08-28

    CSF outflow through the cribriform plate near the olfactory nerves and the outflow along brain and spinal nerves are together known as peripheral CSF outflow pathway (PCOP). It is still not clear whether the PCOP has pathogenetic relevance. Our previous clinical observations have indicated that CSF may interact with nerves along the PCOP and in this article we present our finding of CSF outflow demonstrated by myelography in a single patient. We also discuss unexplained experimental pain pathomechanisms against the background of the PCOP hypothesis. We observed that CSF flowed along lumbar nerves in distal direction at a speed of about 10 cm per hour on its way through the tissues, mainly muscles. Total CSF outflow volume at the lumbar site was remarkable. CSF outflow at lumbar nerves was also documented by neuroradiology. It is plausible that CSF signaling serves for interaction with nerves along the PCOP, which could explain previously unknown pathomechanisms in pain generation. Experimental findings of tactile pain hypersensitivity within lumbosacral pain pathways could be explained by releasing of molecules, microparticles, or exosomes into the CSF by mast cells, which then move with CSF outflow along the PCOP and interact with nerves, initiating even retrograde synaptic stripping.

  18. Lumbar cerebrospinal fluid concentrations of somatostatin and neuropeptide Y in multiple sclerosis

    SciTech Connect

    Vecsei, L.; Csala, B.; Widerloev, E.E.; Ekman, R.; Czopf, J.; Palffy, G. )

    1990-09-01

    The cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) concentrations of somatostatin and neuropeptide Y were investigated by use of radioimmunoassay in patients suffering from chronic progressive multiple sclerosis. The somatostatin level was significantly decreased in the CSF of patients with multiple sclerosis compared to the control group. The magnitude of this change was more pronounced in patients with severe clinical symptoms of the illness. The CSF neuropeptide Y concentration did not differ from the control values. These findings suggest a selective involvement of somatostatin neurotransmission in multiple sclerosis.

  19. Feasibility of Lumbar Puncture in the Study of Cerebrospinal Fluid Biomarkers for Alzheimer's Disease in Subjects with Down Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Carmona-Iragui, María; Santos, Telma; Videla, Sebastián; Fernández, Susana; Benejam, Bessy; Videla, Laura; Alcolea, Daniel; Blennow, Kaj; Blesa, Rafael; Lleó, Alberto; Fortea, Juan

    2017-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the main medical problem in older adults with Down syndrome (DS). Studies of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) AD biomarkers are limited and the feasibility of lumbar puncture (LP) is controversial in this population. To analyze the frequency of complications after a LP in DS. We collected data from 80 adults with DS that underwent a LP within the Down Alzheimer Barcelona Neuroimaging Initiative. Demographics, cognitive status, headache history, and presence of complications after the LP were recorded in every subject. In 53 of them (active group), this information was collected following a semi-structured and validated protocol that actively looks for complications. Other variables related to the LP procedure were also recorded. A telephone interview to the caregiver was performed 5-7 days after the procedure to ask about complications. Data from 27 subjects (clinical practice group), from whom the presence of complications was obtained in a medical follow-up visit within the three months after the LP, were also included. There were no adverse events in 90% of our participants. The most frequent complication was headache (6.25%); only one subject reported a typical post-lumbar puncture headache with moderate severity that required analgesic treatment. Dizziness (3.75%) and back pain (1.25%) were also reported. All the participants that reported complications belonged to the active group. LP can be safely performed to study CSF biomarkers in DS. The reported complications are qualitatively similar to the general population, but are less frequently reported, even when actively searched for.

  20. Effects of trauma-related audiovisual stimulation on cerebrospinal fluid norepinephrine and corticotropin-releasing hormone concentrations in post-traumatic stress disorder.

    PubMed

    Geracioti, Thomas D; Baker, Dewleen G; Kasckow, John W; Strawn, Jeffrey R; Jeffrey Mulchahey, J; Dashevsky, Boris A; Horn, Paul S; Ekhator, Nosakhare N

    2008-05-01

    Although elevated concentrations of both corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) and norepinephrine are present in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of patients with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), the effects of exposure to traumatic stimuli on these stress-related hormones in CSF are unknown. A randomized, within-subject, controlled, cross-over design was used, in which patients with war-related PTSD underwent 6-h continuous lumbar CSF withdrawal on two occasions per patient (6-9 weeks apart). During one session the patients watched a 1-h film containing combat footage (traumatic film) and in the other a 1-h film on how to oil paint (neutral film). At 10-min intervals, we quantified CRH and norepinephrine in CSF, and ACTH and cortisol in plasma, before, during, and after symptom provocation. Subjective anxiety and mood were monitored using 100-mm visual analog scales. Blood pressure and heart rate were obtained every 10min from a left leg monitor. Eight of 10 patients completed two CSF withdrawal procedures each. A major drop in mood and increases in anxiety and blood pressure occurred during the traumatic relative to the neutral videotape. CSF norepinephrine rose during the traumatic film relative to the neutral videotape; this rise directly correlated with magnitude of mood drop. In contrast, CSF CRH concentrations declined during the trauma-related audiovisual stimulus, both absolutely and relative to the neutral stimulus; the magnitude of CRH decline correlated with degree of subjective worsening of anxiety level and mood. Plasma cortisol concentrations were lower and ACTH levels similar during the stress compared with the neutral videotape. CSF concentrations of the stress hormones norepinephrine and CRH differentially change after exposure to 1h of trauma-related audiovisual stimulation in chronic, combat-related PTSD. While the CSF norepinephrine increase was postulated, the decline in CSF CRH levels is surprising and could be due to audiovisual stress

  1. Prolonged Cerebrospinal Fluid Neurofilament Light Chain Increase in Patients with Post-Traumatic Disorders of Consciousness.

    PubMed

    Bagnato, Sergio; Grimaldi, Luigi M E; Di Raimondo, Giorgio; Sant'Angelo, Antonino; Boccagni, Cristina; Virgilio, Vittorio; Andriolo, Maria

    2017-08-15

    The mechanisms involved in secondary brain injury after the acute phase of severe traumatic brain injury (TBI) are largely unknown. Ongoing axonal degeneration, consequent to the initial trauma, may lead to secondary brain injury. To test this hypothesis, we evaluated the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) level of neurofilament light chain (NF-L), a proposed marker of axonal degeneration, in 10 patients who developed a severe disorder of consciousness after a TBI, including 7 in a minimally conscious state and 3 with unresponsive wakefulness syndrome (time since brain injury, 309 ± 169 days). CSF NF-L level was measured with a commercially available NF-L enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. CSF NF-L level was very high in all 10 patients, ranging from 2.4- to 60.5-fold the upper normal limit (median value, 4458 pg/mL; range, 695-23,000). Moreover, NF-L level was significantly higher after a severe TBI than in a reference group of 9 patients with probable Alzheimer's disease, a population with elevated levels of CSF NF-L attributed to neuronal degeneration (median value, 1173 pg/mL; range, 670-3643; p < 0.01). CSF NF-L level was correlated with time post-TBI (p = 0.04). These results demonstrate prolonged secondary brain injury, suggesting that patients exhibit ongoing axonal degeneration up to 19 months after a severe TBI.

  2. Elevated levels of phosphorylated neurofilament heavy subunit in the cerebrospinal fluid of patients with lumbar spinal stenosis: preliminary findings.

    PubMed

    Ohya, Junichi; Chikuda, Hirotaka; Kato, So; Hayakawa, Kentaro; Oka, Hiroyuki; Takeshita, Katsushi; Tanaka, Sakae; Ogata, Toru

    2015-07-01

    The phosphorylated neurofilament heavy subunit (pNfH) is an axon fiber structural protein that is released into the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) after nerve damage. Although the previous studies have reported elevated CSF levels of pNfH in various neurological diseases, including amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, these levels have not been examined in patients with spinal stenosis. The purpose of this study was to investigate the CSF levels of pNfH in patients with lumbar spinal stenosis (LSS) and to examine the relationship between CSF levels of pNfH and the severity of LSS. This is a prospective observational study. We included consecutive patients with LSS who were undergoing myelography for preoperative evaluation. The CSF samples from patients with idiopathic scoliosis were used as the controls. Physiological measures: CSF levels of pNfH were measured using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The Zurich Claudication Questionnaire (ZCQ) and the Numerical Rating Scale (NRS) for sciatic pain were used to assess the clinical severity of LSS, and patients were grouped into tertiles according to their symptom severity and pain grading. Axial magnetic resonance imaging was used to evaluate the morphological severity of LSS, and patients were classified into three groups based on their morphological grading (using the CSF/rootlet ratio). Analysis of variance was used to examine the relationship between the CSF levels of pNfH and the severity of LSS. Thirty-three patients with LSS were included (13 men and 20 women and mean age 73.2 [range 58-88] years). Most patients (n=32) were positive for pNfH in their CSF (mean 1,344 [149-9,250] pg/mL), whereas all control subjects were negative for pNfH in their CSF. Regarding the association with clinical severity, patients in the third tertiles of ZCQ and NRS tended to have higher levels of pNfH compared with the other groups. There was no association between the CSF level of pNfH and the morphological severity of LSS. This study

  3. High-resolution nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopic study of metabolites in the cerebrospinal fluid of patients with cervical myelopathy and lumbar radiculopathy

    PubMed Central

    Morio, Yasuo; Meshitsuka, Shunsuke; Yamane, Koji; Nanjo, Yoshiro; Teshima, Ryota

    2010-01-01

    There have been few reports describing substances related to oxidative and intermediary metabolism in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) in patients with spinal degenerative disorders. This study investigated whether the concentrations of metabolites in the CSF differed between patients with spinal degenerative disorders and controls, and whether the concentrations of these metabolites correlated with the severity of symptoms. CSF samples were obtained from 30 patients with cervical myelopathy (Group M), 30 patients with lumbar radiculopathy (Group R), and 10 volunteers (control). Metabolites in these CSF samples were measured by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. There were no differences in the concentrations of lactate, alanine, acetate, glutamate, pyruvate, or citrate between Groups M and R, between Group M and the control, or between Group R and the control. In Group M, neither symptom duration nor the Japanese Orthopaedic Association score correlated with the concentration of any metabolite. In Group R, the symptom duration positively correlated with the concentration of lactate, glutamate, and citrate in CSF. The duration of nerve root block showed a negative correlation with the concentrations of acetate in CSF of the patients in Group R. In patients with lumbar radiculopathy, there is a possibility of increased aerobic metabolic activity or decreased gluconeogenic activity in patients with shorter symptom duration, and increased aerobic metabolic activity in patients with severe inflammation around a nerve root. PMID:20490871

  4. Lumbar Cerebrospinal Fluid Biomarkers of Posthemorrhagic Hydrocephalus of Prematurity: Amyloid Precursor Protein, Soluble Amyloid Precursor Protein α, and L1 Cell Adhesion Molecule.

    PubMed

    Morales, Diego M; Silver, Shawgi A; Morgan, Clinton D; Mercer, Deanna; Inder, Terri E; Holtzman, David M; Wallendorf, Michael J; Rao, Rakesh; McAllister, James P; Limbrick, David D

    2017-01-01

    Intraventricular hemorrhage (IVH) is the most frequent, severe neurological complication of prematurity and is associated with posthemorrhagic hydrocephalus (PHH) in up to half of cases. PHH requires lifelong neurosurgical care and is associated with significant cognitive and psychomotor disability. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarkers may provide both diagnostic information for PHH and novel insights into its pathophysiology. To explore the diagnostic ability of candidate CSF biomarkers for PHH. Concentrations of amyloid precursor protein (APP), soluble APPα (sAPPα), soluble APPβ, neural cell adhesion molecule-1 (NCAM-1), L1 cell adhesion molecule (L1CAM), tau, phosphorylated tau, and total protein (TP) were measured in lumbar CSF from neonates in 6 groups: (1) no known neurological disease (n = 33); (2) IVH grades I to II (n = 13); (3) IVH grades III to IV (n = 12); (4) PHH (n = 12); (5) ventricular enlargement without hydrocephalus (n = 10); and (6) hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy (n = 13). CSF protein levels were compared using analysis of variance, and logistic regression was performed to examine the predictive ability of each marker for PHH. Lumbar CSF levels of APP, sAPPα, L1CAM, and TP were selectively increased in PHH compared with all other conditions (all P < .001). The sensitivity, specificity, and odds ratios of candidate CSF biomarkers for PHH were determined for APP, sAPPα, and L1CAM; cut points of 699, 514, and 113 ng/mL yielded odds ratios for PHH of 80.0, 200.0, and 68.75, respectively. Lumbar CSF APP, sAPPα, L1CAM, and TP were selectively increased in PHH. These proteins, and sAPPα, in particular, hold promise as biomarkers of PHH and provide novel insight into PHH-associated neural injury and repair.

  5. Cerebrospinal Fluid Diversion in Endoscopic Skull Base Reconstruction: An Evidence-Based Approach to the Use of Lumbar Drains.

    PubMed

    Tien, Duc A; Stokken, Janalee K; Recinos, Pablo F; Woodard, Troy D; Sindwani, Raj

    2016-02-01

    Before the vascularized pedicled nasoseptal flap was popularized, lumbar drains (LDs) were routinely used for cerebral spinal fluid (CSF) diversion in endoscopic skull base reconstruction. LDs are not necessary in most CSF leaks encountered during skull base surgery. In this article, the use is considered of an LD in select high-risk settings in which a high-flow leak is anticipated and the patient has significant risk factors that make closure of the leak more challenging. Evidence for the use of LDs in preventing postoperative after endoscopic skull base reconstruction is reviewed and a rational framework for their use is proposed.

  6. The Effectiveness of Lumbar Cerebrospinal Fluid Drainage to Reduce the Cerebral Vasospasm after Surgical Clipping for Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Park, Soojeong; Yang, Narae

    2015-01-01

    Objective Removal of blood from subarachnoid space with a lumbar drainage (LD) may decrease development of cerebral vasospasm. We evaluated the effectiveness of a LD for a clinical vasospasm and outcomes after clipping of aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). Methods Between July 2008 and July 2013, 234 patients were included in this study. The LD group consisted of 126 patients, 108 patients in the non LD group. We investigated outcomes as follow : 1) clinical vasospasm, 2) angioplasty, 3) cerebral infarction, 4) Glasgow outcome scale (GOS) score at discharge, 5) GOS score at 6-month follow-up, and 6) mortality. Results Clinical vasospasm occurred in 19% of the LD group and 42% of the non LD group (p<0.001). Angioplasty was performed in 17% of the LD group and 38% of the non LD group (p=0.001). Cerebral infarctions were detected in 29% and 54% of each group respectively (p<0.001). The proportion of GOS score 5 at 6 month follow-up in the LD group was 69%, and it was 58% in the non LD group (p=0.001). Mortality rate showed 5% and 10% in each group respectively. But, there was no difference in shunt between the two groups. Conclusion LD after aneurysmal SAH shows marked reduction of clinical vasospasm and need for angioplasty. With this technique we have shown favorable GOS score at 6 month follow-up. PMID:25810855

  7. Cerebrospinal fluid dynamics study in communicating hydrocephalus.

    PubMed

    Ramesh, Vengalathur Ganesan; Narasimhan, Vidhya; Balasubramanian, Chandramouli

    2017-01-01

    Communicating hydrocephalus often poses a challenge in diagnosis and management decisions. The objective of this study is to measure the opening pressure (Po), pressure volume index (PVI), and cerebrospinal fluid outflow resistance (Rout), in patients with communicating hydrocephalus using bolus lumbar injection method and to evaluate its diagnostic and prognostic value. The study was conducted in 50 patients with communicating hydrocephalus, including normal pressure hydrocephalus (NPH) (19), post-meningitic hydrocephalus (23) and post-traumatic hydrocephalus (8). An improvised bolus lumbar injection method [the Madras Institute of Neurology (MIN) method] was used. In the NPH Group, the CSF dynamics studies correlated well with the clinico-radiological classification. The prediction of shunt responsiveness by CSF dynamics studies correlated with good outcome in 87.5%. In the post-meningitic hydrocephalus group, the value of CSF dynamics studies in predicting patients needing shunt was 89.5%. The CSF dynamics studies detected patients who needed shunt earlier than clinical or radiological indications. In the post-traumatic hydrocephalus group, 62.5% of patients improved with the treatment based on CSF dynamics studies. The improvised bolus lumbar injection method (MIN method) is a very simple test with fairly reliable and reproducible results. Study of CSF dynamics is a valuable tool in communicating hydrocephalus for confirmation of diagnosis and predicting shunt responsiveness. This is the first time that the value of CSF dynamics has been studied in patients with post-meningitic hydrocephalus. It was also useful for early selection of cases for shunting and for identifying patients with atrophic ventriculomegaly, thereby avoiding unnecessary shunt.

  8. Epidural Blood Patch Performed for Severe Intracranial Hypotension Following Lumbar Cerebrospinal Fluid Drainage for Intracranial Aneurysm Surgery. Retrospective Series and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Tanweer, Omar; Kalhorn, Stephen P.; Snell, Jamaal T.; Lieber, Bryan A.; Agarwal, Nitin; Huang, Paul P.; Sutin, Kenneth M.

    2015-01-01

    Intracranial hypotension (IH) can occur following lumbar drainage for clipping of an intracranial aneurysm. We observed 3 cases of IH, which were all successfully treated by epidural blood patch (EBP). Herein, the authors report our cases. PMID:27065093

  9. Diagnostic Lumbar Puncture

    PubMed Central

    Doherty, Carolynne M; Forbes, Raeburn B

    2014-01-01

    Diagnostic Lumbar Puncture is one of the most commonly performed invasive tests in clinical medicine. Evaluation of an acute headache and investigation of inflammatory or infectious disease of the nervous system are the most common indications. Serious complications are rare, and correct technique will minimise diagnostic error and maximise patient comfort. We review the technique of diagnostic Lumbar Puncture including anatomy, needle selection, needle insertion, measurement of opening pressure, Cerebrospinal Fluid (CSF) specimen handling and after care. We also make some quality improvement suggestions for those designing services incorporating diagnostic Lumbar Puncture. PMID:25075138

  10. External lumbar cerebrospinal fluid drainage in patients with aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage: A systematic review and meta-analysis of controlled trials.

    PubMed

    Alcalá-Cerra, G; Paternina-Caicedo, Á; Díaz-Becerra, C; Moscote-Salazar, L R; Gutiérrez-Paternina, J J; Niño-Hernández, L M

    2016-09-01

    External lumbar drainage is a promising measure for the prevention of delayed aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage-related ischemic complications. Controlled studies evaluating the effects of external lumbar drainage in patients with aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage were included. Primary outcomes were: new cerebral infarctions and severe disability. Secondary outcomes were: clinical deterioration due to delayed cerebral ischemia, mortality, and the need of definitive ventricular shunting. Results were presented as pooled relative risks, with their 95% confidence intervals (95% CI). A total of 6 controlled studies were included. Pooled relative risks were: new cerebral infarctions, 0.48 (95% CI: 0.32-0.72); severe disability, 0.5 (95% CI: 0.29-0.85); delayed cerebral ischemia-related clinical deterioration, 0.46 (95% CI: 0.34-0.63); mortality, 0.71 (95% CI: 0.24-2.06), and need of definitive ventricular shunting, 0.80 (95% CI: 0.51-1.24). Assessment of heterogeneity only revealed statistically significant indexes for the analysis of severe disability (I(2)=70% and P=.01). External lumbar drainage was associated with a statistically significant decrease in the risk of delayed cerebral ischemia-related complications (cerebral infarctions and clinical deterioration), as well as the risk of severe disability; however, it was not translated in a lower mortality. Nevertheless, it is not prudent to provide definitive recommendations at this time because of the qualitative and quantitative heterogeneity among included studies. More randomized controlled trials with more homogeneous outcomes and definitions are needed to clarify its impact in patients with aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage. Copyright © 2013 Sociedad Española de Neurología. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  11. Lumbar subdural cerebrospinal fluid collection with acute cauda equina syndrome after posterior fossa decompression for Chiari malformation Type I: case report.

    PubMed

    Darwish, Houssein A; Oldfield, Edward H

    2016-09-01

    This report describes the circumstances of a patient with a cauda equina syndrome due to the development of a lumbar subdural CSF collection with ventral displacement of the cauda equina shortly following posterior fossa decompression for Chiari malformation Type I (CM-I). This unusual, but clinically significant, complication was successfully treated with percutaneous drainage of the extraarachnoid CSF collection. Although there are a few cases of intracranial subdural hygroma developing after surgery for CM-I, often attributed to a pinhole opening in the arachnoid, as far as the authors can determine, a spinal subdural hygroma associated with surgery for CM-I has not been recognized.

  12. Low neuropeptide Y in cerebrospinal fluid in bipolar patients is associated with previous and prospective suicide attempts.

    PubMed

    Sandberg, Johan V; Jakobsson, Joel; Pålsson, Erik; Landén, Mikael; Mathé, Aleksander A

    2014-12-01

    The attempted and accomplished suicide rates in patients with bipolar disorder are 40-50% and 15-20%, respectively. No biological markers that help predict suicide been identified. Human and experimental animal data indicate that dysregulation of the neuropeptide Y (NPY) system plays a role in depression, anxiety, and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). The aim of this study was to explore if low cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) NPY is associated with (1) past suicide attempts, (2) future suicide attempts, and (3) trait anxiety. Lumbar puncture was performed on 120 clinically stable patients with bipolar disorder enrolled in the St Göran Bipolar Project, where the number of previous suicide attempts was documented. NPY-like immunoreactivity (NPY-LI) was determined in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). Patients were reexamined one year after the lumbar puncture and suicide attempts were recorded. NPY-LI was significantly lower in patients with a history of suicide attempt than in patients who had not attempted suicide prior to lumbar puncture. Importantly, NPY-LI was markedly lower in patients who made a suicide attempt during the follow-up period compared to patients who did not. Patients who attempted suicide during the follow-up also had markedly lower NPY-LI than those with previous suicide attempts who did not reattempt. Our results suggest that low CSF NPY-LI predicts future suicide attempts. The data are in line with the hypothesis that NPY signaling is altered in affective disorders and states of emotional dysregulation.

  13. Endoscopic repair of cerebrospinal fluid rhinorrhea.

    PubMed

    Kljajić, Vladimir; Vuleković, Petar; Vlaški, Ljiljana; Savović, Slobodan; Dragičević, Danijela; Papić, Vladimir

    Nasal liquorrhea indicates a cerebrospinal fluid fistula, an open communication between the intracranial cerebrospinal fluid and the nasal cavity. It can be traumatic and spontaneous. The aim of this study was to assess the outcome of endoscopic repair of cerebrospinal fluid fistula using fluorescein. This retrospective study included 30 patients of both sexes, with a mean age of 48.7 years, treated in the period from 2007 to 2015. All patients underwent lumbar administration of 5% sodium fluorescein solution preoperatively. Fistula was closed using three-layer graft and fibrin glue. Cerebrospinal fluid fistulas were commonly located in the ethmoid (37%) and sphenoid sinus (33%). Most patients presented with traumatic cerebrospinal fluid fistulas (2/3 of patients). The reported success rate for the first repair attempt was 97%. Complications occurred in three patients: one patient presented with acute hydrocephalus, one with reversible encephalopathy syndrome on the fifth postoperative day with bilateral loss of vision, and one patient was diagnosed with hydrocephalus two years after the repair of cerebrospinal fluid fistula. Endoscopic diagnosis and repair of cerebrospinal fluid fistulas using fluorescein intrathecally has high success rate and low complication rate. Copyright © 2016 Associação Brasileira de Otorrinolaringologia e Cirurgia Cérvico-Facial. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  14. Cerebellar hemorrhage caused by cerebrospinal fluid leak after spine surgery.

    PubMed

    Farag, Ehab; Abdou, Amgad; Riad, Ihab; Borsellino, Sam R; Schubert, Armin

    2005-02-01

    Spine surgery is associated with a wide range of surgical and anesthetic complications. Excessive cerebrospinal fluid leak can be a cause of cerebellar hemorrhage postoperatively. We report a 43-yr-old patient who had lumbar spine reexploration surgery complicated by a cerebrospinal fluid leak which led to cerebellar hemorrhage manifested by postoperative mental status changes. Early detection and proper management resulted in full recovery.

  15. Sarcoid meningitis with fulminant delirium and markedly abnormal cerebrospinal fluid.

    PubMed

    Noble, James M; Anderson, Christopher Todd; Etienne, Mill; Williams, Olajide; Adams, David J

    2007-01-01

    To describe a patient with an acute fulminant delirium and eventual spinal fluid block secondary to sarcoid meningitis. Case report. Hospital and Neurology Clinic. A previously healthy, 24-year-old man. Antimicrobials, corticosteroids, lumbar puncture, myelography, and lymph node biopsy. Cerebrospinal fluid, clinical status. The patient improved after treatment with corticosteroids. Sarcoid meningitis may present with delirium and spinal block.

  16. Diagnostic value of circulating tumor cells in cerebrospinal fluid

    PubMed Central

    Ning, Mu; Chunhua, Ma; Yuan, Lv; Jinduo, Li; Bin, Wang; Liwei, Sun

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective To assess circulating tumor cells in cerebrospinal fluid as a diagnostic approach to identify meningeal metastasis in patients with non-small cell lung cancer by using tumor marker immunostaining–fluorescence in situ hybridization (TM-iFISH). Methods In 5 non-small cell lung cancer patients who were confirmed to have developed meningeal metastasis by cerebrospinal fluid cytology, 20 ml of cerebrospinal fluid was obtained through lumbar puncture, from which 7.5 ml was utilized for TM-iFISH to identify and quantitate circulating tumor cells, 10ml for cerebrospinal fluid cytology, and 2.5ml for detection of cerebrospinal fluid tumor markers. Results TM-iFISH examination identified 18 to 1,823 circulating tumor cells per 7.5ml cerebrospinal fluid. In contrast, cytology assessment revealed tumor cells in only 2 cases. The expression levels of cerebrospinal fluid tumor markers were all increased in all 5 patients when compared with their respective serum levels. Contrast-enhanced MRI scans demonstrated presence of meningeal metastasis in all 5 cases. Conclusion TM-iFISH may become a novel cerebrospinal fluid-based diagnostic strategy to identify circulating tumor cells and meningeal metastasis as compared to traditional diagnostic approaches, although its superior sensitivity and specificity needs to be confirmed through additional studies with a larger sample size.

  17. Changes with age in leucocyte counts, protein and IgG content of lumbar cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of patients with inflammatory, ischemic, and hemorrhagic diseases or tumors of the central nervous system (CNS).

    PubMed

    Kleine, T O; Weber, L; Zöfel, P

    1988-01-01

    Parameters of blood-brain barrier (BBB) function and of humoral and cellular immune response were determined in lumbar CSF and blood serum samples from 717 patients and statistically compared to "healthy" controls (n = 190). Leucocyte counts (mainly mononuclear cells), total protein and IgG levels in CSF were significantly higher, and prealbumin fraction mostly lower in patients, besides other alterations of protein electrophoresis. Serum fractions (median) of protein electrophoresis were within the reference range. When parameters were correlated with age, a significant increase of total protein of 1.62 mg/dl and of IgG of 0.13 mg/dl per 10 years of age was found in lumbar CSF of controls. Elevated leucocyte counts did not correlate with age of patients, but they increased significantly with age, with respect to controls, to a higher extent in patients with polyneuritis, ischemia and injury; they decreased in patients with brain tumors and polyneuropathy. When compared to controls, elevated total protein levels significantly increased with age only with tumors and injury patients. In multiple sclerosis, IgG increased and beta-globulin fraction decreased significantly in CSF with age. The findings point to age-dependent alterations of BBB and immune response only in some patients groups which were different from those of controls.

  18. Detected EGFR mutation in cerebrospinal fluid of lung adenocarcinoma patients with meningeal metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Chunhua, Ma; Yuan, Lv; Ning, Mu; Jinduo, Li; Bin, Wang; Liwei, Sun

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective To discuss the application of ARMS method to detect EGFR gene mutation in cerebrospinal fluid of lung adenocarcinoma patients with meningeal metastasis. Methods 5 cases of lung adenocarcinoma were identified with meningeal metastasis that were cleared EGFR gene mutation by gene sequencing method. From each patient 5ml cerebrospinal fluid was obtained by lumbar puncture. ARMS method was used to detect EGFR mutations in cerebrospinal fluid. Results 5 samples of cerebrospinal fluid were successfully detected by ARMS method, 3 samples found that EGFR gene mutations, the mutations in line with direct sequencing method. Conclusion ARMS method can be used to detect EGFR gene mutations of cerebrospinal fluid samples in lung adenocarcinoma with meningeal metastasis. But cerebrospinal fluid specimens from histological specimens, blood samples need to be confirmed by further comparative study whether there is advantage.

  19. Diagnostic value of lumbar puncture in afebrile infants with suspected new-onset seizures.

    PubMed

    Lateef, Tarannum M; Tsuchida, Tammy N; Chang, Taeun; Johnson, Jami; Gaillard, William D; Nelson, Karin B

    2008-07-01

    No established guidelines address the need for lumbar puncture in fever-free infants younger than 6 months of age with a first seizure. We analyzed cerebrospinal fluid results in infants and found that lumbar puncture adds little diagnostic value to the evaluation of young, well-appearing infants presenting with possible new-onset seizures.

  20. Remote cerebellar hemorrhage as an early and potentially lethal complication of a discal lumbar herniation surgery.

    PubMed

    Royon, V; Rabehenoina, C; Tourrel, F; Compère, V; Dureuil, B

    2014-01-01

    Remote cerebellar hemorrhage (RCH) is an infrequent but serious complication after lumbar herniation surgery. Little is known about this complication but excessive cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leakage is thought to be a leading cause of RCH. We describe the case of a patient suffering from a life-threatening RCH, which occurred a few hours after lumbar disc herniation surgery.

  1. Diagnostic investigations. Part 1. Lumbar puncture.

    PubMed

    Blows, William

    This article, the first in a three-part series on clinical investigations, discusses the technique and uses of lumbar puncture. This diagnostic procedure involves making a puncture into the subarachnoid space of the spinal cord, to remove an excess of fluid; to obtain fluid for examination and analysis, or to inject medication. The article includes an explanation of the relevant anatomy and the composition and role of cerebrospinal fluid, a detailed description of the procedure and the interpretation of results.

  2. Lumbar lordosis.

    PubMed

    Been, Ella; Kalichman, Leonid

    2014-01-01

    Lumbar lordosis is a key postural component that has interested both clinicians and researchers for many years. Despite its wide use in assessing postural abnormalities, there remain many unanswered questions regarding lumbar lordosis measurements. Therefore, in this article we reviewed different factors associated with the lordosis angle based on existing literature and determined normal values of lordosis. We reviewed more than 120 articles that measure and describe the different factors associated with the lumbar lordosis angle. Because of a variety of factors influencing the evaluation of lumbar lordosis such as how to position the patient and the number of vertebrae included in the calculation, we recommend establishing a uniform method of evaluating the lordosis angle. Based on our review, it seems that the optimal position for radiologic measurement of lordosis is standing with arms supported while shoulders are flexed at a 30° angle. There is evidence that many factors, such as age, gender, body mass index, ethnicity, and sport, may affect the lordosis angle, making it difficult to determine uniform normal values. Normal lordosis should be determined based on the specific characteristics of each individual; we therefore presented normal lordosis values for different groups/populations. There is also evidence that the lumbar lordosis angle is positively and significantly associated with spondylolysis and isthmic spondylolisthesis. However, no association has been found with other spinal degenerative features. Inconclusive evidence exists for association between lordosis and low back pain. Additional studies are needed to evaluate these associations. The optimal lordotic range remains unknown and may be related to a variety of individual factors such as weight, activity, muscular strength, and flexibility of the spine and lower extremities. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Posttraumatic Mucormycosis

    PubMed Central

    Lelievre, Lucie; Garcia-Hermoso, Dea; Abdoul, Hendy; Hivelin, Mickael; Chouaki, Taieb; Toubas, Dominique; Mamez, Anne-Claire; Lantieri, Laurent; Lortholary, Olivier; Lanternier, Fanny

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Data on clinical, mycologic characteristics, and outcome of posttraumatic mucormycosis are scarce and often limited to case reports. From the French nationwide “RetroZygo” study, we compared posttraumatic mucormycosis cases with other forms of mucormycosis. We also reviewed reports of posttraumatic mucormycosis in the English-language literature from 1993 to 2013. We included all proven or probable cases for which underlying condition, route of infection, surgical and antifungal treatments, and outcome were detailed. From our cohort, posttraumatic mucormycosis (n = 16) differed significantly from other forms (n = 85) by rarity of underlying disease (31.2% vs 81%, p < 0.0001), frequency of cutaneous localization (87% vs 7%, p < 0.0001), short time before diagnosis (4.5 vs 21 d, p = 0.0002), species involved (Apophysomyces elegans complex and Saksenaea vasiformis), surgical requirement (93.7% vs 47%, p = 0.0006) and better survival (87.5% vs 47.6% at day 90, p = 0.03). We studied 122 cases of posttraumatic mucormycosis through our literature review. Most frequently reported traumas were traffic (37%), domestic accidents (15.1%), or natural disasters (13.4%). Mucormycosis occurred after extensive soft-tissue damage in 47.5% cases, with symptoms occurring a median of 9.5 days after trauma with necrosis being reported in 76.2% cases. Dissemination was found in 9% of patients, and bacterial coinfection in 41%. Nineteen percent of cases occurred in the Middle East or in India where Apophysomyces elegans complex was the predominant species recovered. Awareness of mucormycosis as a cause of posttrauma soft-tissue infection is warranted, especially in cases of soil-contaminated wounds. Survival is higher than in other forms of mucormycosis, but morbidity remains high. PMID:25500709

  4. Cerebral microbleeds topography and cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers in cognitive impairment.

    PubMed

    Shams, Sara; Granberg, Tobias; Martola, Juha; Charidimou, Andreas; Li, Xiaozhen; Shams, Mana; Fereshtehnejad, Seyed-Mohammad; Cavallin, Lena; Aspelin, Peter; Wiberg-Kristoffersen, Maria; Wahlund, Lars-Olof

    2017-03-01

    Cerebral microbleeds, a marker of small vessel disease, are thought to be of importance in cognitive impairment. We aimed to study topographical distribution of cerebral microbleeds, and their involvement in disease pathophysiology, reflected by cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers; 1039 patients undergoing memory investigation underwent lumbar puncture and a brain magnetic resonance imaging scan. Cerebrospinal fluid samples were analyzed for amyloid β(Aβ)42, total tau(T-tau), tau phosphorylated at threonine 18(P-tau) and cerebrospinal fluid/serum albumin ratios. Magnetic resonance imaging sequences were evaluated for small vessel disease markers, including cerebral microbleeds, white matter hyperintensities and lacunes. Low Aβ42 levels were associated with lobar cerebral microbleeds in the whole cohort and Alzheimer's disease ( P < 0.001). High cerebrospinal fluid/serum albumin ratios were seen with increased number of cerebral microbleeds in the brainstem ( P < 0.001). There were tendencies for increased Aβ42 levels and decreased Tau levels with deep and infratentorial cerebral microbleeds ( P < 0.05). Lobar cerebral microbleeds were associated with white matter hyperintensities and lacunes ( P < 0.001). Probable cerebral amyloid angiopathy-related cerebral microbleeds were associated with low Aβ42 levels and lacunes, whereas probable cerebral amyloid angiopathy-unrelated cerebral microbleeds were associated with white matter hyperintensities ( P < 0.001). Our findings show that cerebral microbleed distribution is associated with different patterns of cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers, supporting different pathogenesis of deep/infratentorial and lobar cerebral microbleeds.

  5. Lumbar Catheter Placement Using Paramedian Approach Under Fluoroscopic Guidance

    PubMed Central

    Qureshi, Adnan I.; Khan, Asif A.; Malik, Ahmed A.; Afzal, Mohammad Rauf; Herial, Nabeel A.; Qureshi, Mushtaq H.; Suri, M. Fareed K.

    2016-01-01

    Background Lumbar catheter placement under fluoroscopic guidance may reduce the rate of technical failures and associated complications seen with insertion guided by manually palpable landmarks. Methods We reviewed our experience with 43 attempted lumbar catheter placements using paramedian approach under fluoroscopic guidance and ascertained rates of technical success, and clinical events. Results Among the 43 patients, 18, 1, and 1 patients were on aspirin (with dipyrimadole in 2), clopidogrel, and combination of both, respectively. Lumbar catheter placement was successful in 42 of 43 attempted placements. Floroscopic guidance was critical in three patients; one patient had severe cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) depletion (empty thecal sac phenomenon) following pituitary surgery leading to no cerebrospinal fluid return despite correct placement confirmation under fluoroscopy. Two patients had spinal needle placement at the junction between epidural and cerebrospinal fluid spaces (junctional position) leading to cerebrospinal fluid return but inability to introduce the lumbar catheter. After confirmation of position by the injection of contrast or radiographic landmarks the needle was advanced by indenting the subcutaneous tissue or reinserting at a spinal level above the first insertion. The lumbar catheter remained in position over a mean period (±standard deviation) of 4.1(±2.3) days. Improvement in hydrocephalus was seen in two patients with intracranial mass lesions. One patient developed cerebrospinal fluid leakage through the insertion track following removal of catheter and required skin suturing at the site of insertion. Conclusions We observed a high technical success rate with low rate of complications even in patients with intracranial mass lesions, those on ongoing antiplatelet medications or in whom insertion would not be possible guided by manually palpable landmarks. PMID:26958156

  6. [The characteristics and treatment of empty sella combined cerebrospinal fluid leakage of nasal].

    PubMed

    Zhai, Xiang; Zhang, Jinling; Liu, Gang

    2012-12-01

    To study the feature and treatment method of patients with empty sella merger cerebro-spinal fluid leakage of nasal. There were 8 cases with empty sella merger cerebrospinal fluid leakage of nasal, 2 cases were accepted the repairing surgery of cerebrospinal fluid leakage one time, 4 cases were accepted the repairing surgery of cerebrospinal fluid leakage used endoscope 2 times, 1 case was accepted repairing surgery of cerebrospinal fluid leakage used endoscope merge craniotomy and ventricle celiac bypass, 1 case recurrences after repairing surgery of cerebrospinal fluid was recurred after conservative treatment. Some postoperative were stayed in bed for three weeks and lumbar drainage for 1 week. One case of cerebral hemorrhage after surgery was cured with craniotomy, followed for 2 years without recurrence. One case was recurred after conservative treatment. Two cases recurrences after surgery 3 years ago were accepted surgery again followed by one year without recurrence. One case who recurrence 1 year later was accepted repairing surgery of cerebrospinal fluid leakage used endoscope merge craniotomy and ventricle celiac bypass followed six months without recurrence. One cash after once surgery was followed half a year without recurrence. One case with recurrence 5 years later was accepted repairing surgery again. The patient with empty sella combined cerebrospinal fluid leakage of nasal was rare, the main method was endoscopic sinus surgery treatment, but it recurred usually. The patients with repeatedly recurrence can be considered to accepted the surgery of ventricle celiac bypass. It required long-term postoperative follow-up and review.

  7. Ultrasound guidance for difficult lumbar puncture in children: pearls and pitfalls.

    PubMed

    Muthusami, Prakash; Robinson, Ashley James; Shroff, Manohar M

    2017-06-01

    Pediatric lumbar puncture can be challenging or unsuccessful for several reasons. At the same time, the excellent sonographic window into the pediatric spine provides a distinct opportunity for ultrasound-guided lumbar puncture. Minimal cerebrospinal fluid and thecal displacement by subdural or epidural hematomas are common after failed clinical attempts. Ultrasound is useful for determining a safe infraconal level for subarachnoid access. Real-time guidance increases not only the success rate but also the safety of diagnostic lumbar puncture and injections for chemotherapy and myelography. In this article, we discuss clinical and technical factors for ultrasound-guided pediatric lumbar puncture.

  8. Cerebrospinal fluid tau proteins in status epilepticus.

    PubMed

    Monti, Giulia; Tondelli, Manuela; Giovannini, Giada; Bedin, Roberta; Nichelli, Paolo F; Trenti, Tommaso; Meletti, Stefano; Chiari, Annalisa

    2015-08-01

    Tau protein is a phosphorylated microtubule-associated protein, principally localized at neuronal level in the central nervous system (CNS). Tau levels in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) are considered to index both axonal and neuronal damage. To date, however, no study has specifically evaluated the CSF levels of tau proteins in patients with status epilepticus (SE). We evaluated these established biomarkers of neuronal damage in patients with SE who received a lumbar puncture during SE between 2007 and 2014. Status epilepticus cases due to acute structural brain damage, including CNS infection, were excluded. Clinical, biological, therapeutic, and follow-up data were collected. Group comparison between patients stratified according to SE response to antiepileptic drugs (AEDs), disability, and epilepsy outcomes were performed. Twenty-eight patients were considered for the analyses (mean age 56 years): 14 patients had abnormally high CSF t-tau level, six patients had abnormally high CSF p-tau level, and only three patients had abnormally low Aβ1-42 level. Cerebrospinal fluid t-tau value was higher in patients who developed a refractory SE compared to patients with seizures controlled by AED. Cerebrospinal fluid t-tau values were positively correlated with SE duration and were higher in patients treated with propofol anesthesia compared to patients that had not received this treatment. Patients with higher CSF t-tau had higher risk of developing disability (OR = 32.5, p = 0.004) and chronic epilepsy (OR = 12; p = 0.016) in comparison with patients with lower CSF t-tau level. Our results suggest that CSF t-tau level might be proposed as a biomarker of SE severity and prognosis. Prospective studies are needed to evaluate the effects of propofol on tau pathology in this setting. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled "Status Epilepticus". Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Lumbar puncture in patients using anticoagulants and antiplatelet agents.

    PubMed

    Domingues, Renan; Bruniera, Gustavo; Brunale, Fernando; Mangueira, Cristóvão; Senne, Carlos

    2016-08-01

    The use of anticoagulants and antiplatelet agents has largely increased. Diagnostic lumbar puncture in patients taking these drugs represents a challenge considering the opposing risks of bleeding and thrombotic complications. To date there are no controlled trials, specific guidelines, nor clear recommendations in this area. In the present review we make some recommendations about lumbar puncture in patients using these drugs. Our recommendations take into consideration the pharmacology of these drugs, the thrombotic risk according to the underlying disease, and the urgency in cerebrospinal fluid analysis. Evaluating such information and a rigorous monitoring of neurological symptoms after lumbar puncture are crucial to minimize the risk of hemorrhage associated neurological deficits. An individualized patient decision-making and an effective communication between the assistant physician and the responsible for conducting the lumbar puncture are essential to minimize potential risks.

  10. Cerebrospinal fluid drainage options for posthemorrhagic hydrocephalus in premature neonates.

    PubMed

    Melo, José Roberto Tude; Passos, Rosane Klein; Carvalho, Marcelo Liberato Coelho Mendes de

    2017-07-01

    The literature describes various cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) drainage techniques to alleviate posthemorrhagic hydrocephalus in preterm newborns; however, consensus has not been reached. The scope of this study was describing a case series of premature neonates with posthemorrhagic hydrocephalus and assessing the outcomes of different approaches used for CSF diversion. A consecutive review of the medical records of neonates with posthemorrhagic hydrocephalus treated with CSF drainage was conducted. Forty premature neonates were included. Serial lumbar puncture, ventriculosubgaleal shunt, and ventriculoperitoneal shunt were the treatments of choice in 25%, 37.5% and 37.5% of the cases, respectively. Cerebrospinal fluid diversion should be tailored to each case with preference given to temporary CSF drainage in neonates with lower age and lower birth-weight, while the permanent ventriculoperitoneal shunt should be considered in healthier, higher birth-weight neonates born closer to term.

  11. Intracranial fat migration: A newly described complication of autologous fat repair of a cerebrospinal fluid leak following supracerebellar infratentorial approach

    PubMed Central

    Ludwig, Cassie A.; Aujla, Parvir; Moreno, Mario; Veeravagu, Anand; Li, Gordon

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Intracranial fat migration following autologous fat graft and placement of a lumbar drain for cerebrospinal fluid leak after pineal cyst resection surgery has not been previously reported. Case presentation The authors present a case of a 39-year-old male with a history of headaches who presented for removal of a pineal cyst from the pineal region. He subsequently experienced cerebrospinal fluid leak and postoperative Escherichia coli (E. Coli) wound infection, and meningitis, which were treated initially with wound washout and antibiotics in addition to bone removal and primary repair with primary suture-closure of the durotomy. A lumbar drain was left in place. The cerebrospinal fluid leak returned two weeks following removal of the lumbar drain; therefore, autologous fat graft repair and lumbar drain placement were performed. Three days later, the patient began experiencing right homonymous hemianopia and was found via computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging to have autologous fat in the infra‑ and supratentorial space, including intraparenchymal and subarachnoid spread. Symptoms began to resolve with supportive care over 48 hours and had almost fully resolved within one week. Discussion This is the first known report of a patient with an autologous fat graft entering the subarachnoid space, intraparenchymal space, and ventricles following fat graft and lumbar drainage. Conclusion This case highlights the importance of monitoring for complications of lumbar drain placement. PMID:25557086

  12. Spectrophotometry of cerebrospinal fluid in subacute and chronic subdural haematomas

    PubMed Central

    Kjellin, K. G.; Steiner, L.

    1974-01-01

    Spectrophotometric examinations were performed on cerebrospinal and subdural fluids in subacute (five patients) and chronic (20 patients) subdural haematomas, with special reference to the diagnostic aid of CSF spectrophotometry. Spectrophotometric xanthochromia of haemorrhagic origin was found in all CSFs examined, while definite visible xanthochromia was observed in only 28% and the CSF was judged as colourless in 52% of those cases. Characteristic bleeding patterns were found spectrophotometrically in all the 20 CSFs examined within 24 hours after lumbar puncture, haematoma patterns being detected in 90-95% of the cases. In many cases the electrophoretically separated protein fractions of CSF and subdural fluids were spectrophotometrically examined. In conclusion, CSF spectrophotometry is a simple, fast, and extremely sensitive method, which in our opinion should be used routinely in the diagnosis of suspected subdural haematomas, if lumbar puncture is not contraindicated. PMID:4140892

  13. Orbital cerebrospinal fluid accumulation after complicated pterional-orbitozygomatic craniotomy.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Michael K; Piluek, Wachirapon Jordan; Ruggiero, Jason P; McDermott, Michael W; McCulley, Timothy J

    2014-12-01

    We describe 2 patients who developed postoperative orbital cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) collection after orbitozygomatic pterional craniotomy. An 18-year-old woman underwent exploratory pterional-orbitozygomatic craniotomy. Five days postoperatively, after removal of a lumbar drain, proptosis and a compressive optic neuropathy developed. Computed tomography demonstrated a CSF collection contiguous with the craniotomy site. Resolution followed percutaneous aspiration and replacement of the lumbar drain. A 57-year-old woman underwent a pterional-orbitozygomatic craniotomy for removal of a left anterior clinoid meningioma, complicated by a large left hemorrhagic stroke requiring decompressive hemicraniectomy. Extracranial CSF collections accumulated in both the orbit and subgaleal spaces. Resolution followed placement of an external ventricular drain. Based on these cases, the mechanism seems to be the combination of iatrogenic formation of a communication with the subarachnoid space and elevated intracranial pressure. Resolution was achieved by normalizing intracranial pressure.

  14. Observations on vitamin B12 in serum and cerebrospinal fluid in multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Basil, W.; Brown, J. K.; Matthews, D. M.

    1965-01-01

    There are several claims that B12 concentrations in serum and cerebrospinal fluid are grossly abnormal in multiple sclerosis, but results are conflicting. This paper reports measurements of these concentrations in 40 serum samples and 23 samples of lumbar cerebrospinal fluid from cases of multiple sclerosis, and in appropriate controls, using Euglena gracilis, z strain. The serum concentrations were found to be normal; the mean concentration in cerebrospinal fluid was slightly reduced, but all values were within the control range. In both control samples and samples from cases of multiple sclerosis, the B12 concentration in lumbar cerebrospinal fluid was correlated with the concentration in serum. There was no correlation between B12 concentration and total protein in cerebrospinal fluid. A number of estimations of serum B12 were also made with Lactobacillus leichmannii, after extraction in the presence and absence of cyanide. These showed a difference between cases of multiple sclerosis and controls, one interpretation of which might be that the serum in multiple sclerosis contains an abnormally low concentration of hydroxocobalamin. PMID:14304244

  15. Management of Cerebrospinal Fluid Leak following Posterior Cranial Fossa Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Altaf, Imran; Vohra, Anjum Habib; Shams, Shahzad

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Cerebrospinal fluid leakage remains a significant cause of morbidity following posterior fossa surgery, and its treatment remains a difficult problem. The aim of the study was to propose a treatment algorithm for its management. Methods: A retrospective, single-center study was conducted on 147 patients who underwent elective posterior fossa surgery for a variety of diseases. Patients with post operative CSF leakage had either been treated initially with conservative measures including re-suturing of the wound, with CSF lumbar drainage to be employed in case the CSF leakage didn’t stop, or the initial intervention was the institution of CSF lumbar drainage simultaneously with conservative measures. VP (ventriculo-peritoneal) shunt was done in patients with gross hydrocephalus on postoperative CT brain. Results: There were 25 (17%) cases of CSF leakage, including 24 incisional CSF leaks and one case of CSF otorrhea. In eight patients with incisional CSF leakage treated initially with conservative measures including re-suturing of the wound, CSF leakage stopped in only two cases. CSF lumbar drainage instituted later on in six cases with persistent leakage stopped the CSF leakage. In fourteen patients managed initially with re-suturing of the wound and concomitant CSF lumbar drainage, CSF leakage settled in all the cases. Two patients with gross hydrocephalus on post operative CT were managed successfully with VP shunt. Re-suturing of the wound with concomitant CSF lumbar drainage was found to be significantly associated (p=0.003) with the stoppage of CSF leakage, and the settlement of meningitis (p= 0.014). Conclusion: Incisional CSF leaks after posterior fossa surgery should be managed with re-suturing of the wound and concomitant CSF lumbar drainage, instead of an initial trial of conservative therapy alone. PMID:28083041

  16. Clinical and Radiological Findings of Nerve Root Herniation after Discectomy of Lumbar Disc Herniation

    PubMed Central

    Bae, Jun Seok; Pee, Yong Hun; Lee, Sang-Ho

    2012-01-01

    The authors report 2 cases of nerve root herniation after discectomy of a large lumbar disc herniation caused by an unrecognized dural tear. Patients complained of the abrupt onset of radiating pain after lumbar discectomy. Magnetic resonance imaging showed cerebrospinal fluid signal in the disc space and nerve root displacement into the disc space. Symptoms improved after the herniated nerve root was repositioned. Clinical symptoms and suggestive radiologic image findings are important for early diagnosis and treatment. PMID:22993682

  17. Automated assay of gamma-aminobutyric acid in human cerebrospinal fluid.

    PubMed

    Böhlen, P; Schechter, P J; van Damme, W; Coquillat, G; Dosch, J C; Koch-Weser, J

    1978-02-01

    We describe an automated amino acid analyzer with fluorescence detection (o-phthalaldehyde) which permits sensitive and rapid determinations of gamma aminobutyric acid in human cerebrospinal fluid. Concentrations as low as 50 nmol/liter can be accurately determined in 100 mul samples at the rate of one sample per hour. Concentrations in untreated cerebrospinal fluid increase rapidly after sampling by lumbar puncture. The concentration in immediately deproteinized samples from 38 patients with intervertebral disc disorders was 220 +/- 81 nmol/liter (mean +/- SD).

  18. A Rare Case of Pediatric Lumbar Spinal Ependymoma Mimicking Meningitis.

    PubMed

    Ekuma, Ezeali Mike; Ito, Kiyoshi; Chiba, Akihiro; Hara, Yosuke; Kanaya, Kohei; Horiuchi, Tetsuyoshi; Ohaegbulam, Samuel; Hongo, Kazuhiro

    2017-04-01

    Spontaneous acute subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) from lumbar ependymoma in children is rare. We report a case of a 14-year-old boy who developed sudden radicular low back pain while playing baseball. He was initially managed conservatively in a local hospital for suspected lumbar disc herniation, but he later developed meningeal symptoms and fever before being referred to our hospital. He underwent a diagnostic lumbar puncture in the emergency department; his cerebrospinal fluid suggested an SAH. Physical examination showed meningeal signs and cauda equina features. Cerebrospinal fluid analysis was negative for bacterial meningitis. Lumbar magnetic resonance imaging revealed a mass characterized as a hemorrhagic lesion. The patient had an emergent evacuation of the mass through the posterior approach. Postoperatively, his symptoms resolved completely. The histologic diagnosis was, surprisingly, an ependymoma (World Health Organization grade II). This case is particularly interesting because of its rarity in children, and its pattern of presentation. Although bacterial or viral meningitis is the most frequent cause of meningeal features in children, SAH from a hemorrhagic spinal tumor should be considered. Ultimately, a high index of suspicion is needed for prompt diagnosis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Use of Lumbar Punctures in the Management of Ocular Syphilis.

    PubMed

    Reekie, Ian; Reddy, Yaviche

    2016-11-18

    Ocular syphilis has become rare in the developed world, but is a common presentation to ophthalmology departments in South Africa. We investigated the proportion of patients diagnosed with ocular syphilis who went on to receive lumbar punctures, and determined the fraction of these who had cerebrospinal fluid findings suggestive of neurosyphilis. We aimed to determine whether the use of lumbar punctures in ocular syphilis patients was beneficial in picking up cases of neurosyphilis. Retrospective study of case notes of patients admitted to two district hospitals in Durban, South Africa, with ocular syphilis over a 20-month period. A total of 31 of 68 ocular syphilis patients underwent lumbar puncture, and of these, eight (25.8%) had findings suggestive of neurosyphilis. Lumbar puncture in ocular syphilis patients should continue to be a routine part of the investigation of these patients; a large proportion of ocular syphilis patients show cerebrospinal fluid findings suggestive of neurosyphilis, are at risk of the complications of neurosyphilis, and should be managed accordingly.

  20. Spontaneous Intracranial Hypotension Secondary to Lumbar Disc Herniation

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kyoung-Tae

    2010-01-01

    Spontaneous intracranial hypotension is often idiopathic. We report on a patient presenting with symptomatic intracranial hypotension and pain radiating to the right leg caused by a transdural lumbar disc herniation. Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging of the brain revealed classic signs of intracranial hypotension, and an additional spinal MR confirmed a lumbar transdural herniated disc as the cause. The patient was treated with a partial hemilaminectomy and discectomy. We were able to find the source of cerebrospinal fluid leak, and packed it with epidural glue and gelfoam. Postoperatively, the patient's headache and log radiating pain resolved and there was no neurological deficit. Thus, in this case, lumbar disc herniation may have been a cause of spontaneous intracranial hypotension. PMID:20157378

  1. Technique for Performing Lumbar Puncture in Microgravity Using Portable Radiography.

    PubMed

    Lerner, David J; Parmet, Allen J; Don, Steven; Shimony, Joshua S; Goyal, Manu S

    2016-08-01

    Visual Impairment and Intracranial Pressure Syndrome (VIIP) has caused symptomatology during and after long duration missions on the International Space Station (ISS). Only indirect measurements of intracranial pressure (ICP), such as ultrasound, have been performed on ISS. Discussion and interest has happened at NASA about performing lumbar puncture (LP) in microgravity. Only the "blind" palpation approach and the ultrasound-assisted approach have been discussed. This article, as proof of concept, discusses the possibility of portable radiography to assist lumbar punctures in microgravity. An anthropomorphic radiological phantom of an adult lumbar spine was made containing a fluid-filled space in the spinal canal with a latex membrane which simulated the dural sac and cerebrospinal fluid. A portable direct-digital radiography system with wireless transmitting image receptor and screen was used to perform image-guided lumbar puncture. Using the same equipment and technique, this procedure was then performed on a cadaver for final proof of concept. Technical success was achieved in all approaches on the first try without needle redirection. There was no difference between the cadaver model and the phantom model in terms of difficulty in reaching the fluid space or visually confirming needle location. Portable radiography via proof of concept has the potential to guide lumbar puncture while minimizing volume and mass of equipment. This could be ideal for assisting in performing lumbar puncture in microgravity, as this is the standard of care on Earth for difficult or failed "blind" lumbar punctures. Lerner DJ, Parmet AJ, Don S, Shimony JS, Goyal MS. Technique for performing lumbar puncture in microgravity using portable radiography. Aerosp Med Hum Perform. 2016; 87(8):745-747.

  2. Improving posttraumatic facial scars.

    PubMed

    Ardeshirpour, Farhad; Shaye, David A; Hilger, Peter A

    2013-10-01

    Posttraumatic soft-tissue injuries of the face are often the most lasting sequelae of facial trauma. The disfigurement of posttraumatic scarring lies in both their physical deformity and psychosocial ramifications. This review outlines a variety of techniques to improve facial scars and limit their lasting effects. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Vicarious Occupational Posttraumatic Growth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moran, Larry

    2012-01-01

    Traditional studies of posttraumatic growth center on the individual or close family members as they deal with traumatic events. The current study examines workers who experience posttraumatic growth when a coworker has a traumatic experience. The participants in this study were firefighters in suburban Cook County, Illinois. Participants were…

  4. Herniated Lumbar Disc

    MedlinePlus

    ... at and just below the waist. A herniated lumbar disc can press on the nerves in the spine and may cause pain, numbness, ... point injections do not help heal a herniated lumbar ... on and irritating the nerves, causing symptoms of pain and weakness. The most ...

  5. Lumbar Spinal Canal Stenosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... time. This narrowing is called “stenosis.” As the lumbar spinal canal narrows, the nerves that go through it are squeezed. This squeezing ... chest). It’s thought that these positions “open” the lumbar canal and take the pressure off the nerves that go to the legs. In severe cases, ...

  6. Cerebrospinal fluid findings in children with fever-associated status epilepticus: results of the consequences of prolonged febrile seizures (FEBSTAT) study.

    PubMed

    Frank, L Matthew; Shinnar, Shlomo; Hesdorffer, Dale C; Shinnar, Ruth C; Pellock, John M; Gallentine, William; Nordli, Douglas R; Epstein, Leon G; Moshé, Solomon L; Lewis, Darrell V; Sun, Shumei

    2012-12-01

    This prospective multicenter study of 200 patients with fever-associated status epilepticus (FSE), of whom 136 underwent a nontraumatic lumbar puncture, confirms that FSE rarely causes cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) pleocytosis. CSF glucose and protein levels were unremarkable. Temperature, age, seizure focality, and seizure duration did not affect results. CSF pleocytosis should not be attributed to FSE.

  7. Cerebrospinal fluid dynamics at the lumbosacral level in patients with spinal stenosis: A pilot study.

    PubMed

    Chun, Se-Woong; Lee, Hack-Jin; Nam, Koong-Ho; Sohn, Chul-Ho; Kim, Kwang Dong; Jeong, Eun-Jin; Chung, Sun G; Kim, Keewon; Kim, Dong-Joo

    2017-01-01

    Spinal stenosis is a common degenerative condition. However, how neurogenic claudication develops has not been clearly elucidated. Moreover, cerebrospinal fluid physiology at the lumbosacral level has not received adequate attention. This study was conducted to compare cerebrospinal fluid hydrodynamics at the lumbosacral spinal level between patients with spinal stenosis and healthy controls. Twelve subjects (four patients and eight healthy controls; 25-77 years old; seven males) underwent phase-contrast magnetic resonance imaging to quantify cerebrospinal fluid dynamics. The cerebrospinal fluid flow velocities were measured at the L2 and S1 levels. All subjects were evaluated at rest and after walking (to provoke neurogenic claudication in the patients). The caudal peak flow velocity in the sacral spine (-0.25 ± 0.28 cm/s) was attenuated compared to that in the lumbar spine (-0.93 ± 0.46 cm/s) in both patients and controls. The lumbar caudal peak flow velocity was slower in patients (-0.65 ± 0.22 cm/s) than controls (-1.07 ± 0.49 cm/s) and this difference became more pronounced after walking (-0.66 ± 0.37 cm/s in patients, -1.35 ± 0.52 cm/s in controls; p = 0.028). The sacral cerebrospinal fluid flow after walking was barely detectable in patients (caudal peak flow velocity: -0.09 ± 0.03 cm/s). Cerebrospinal fluid dynamics in the lumbosacral spine were more attenuated in patients with spinal stenosis than healthy controls. After walking, the patients experiencing claudication did not exhibit an increase in the cerebrospinal fluid flow rate as the controls did. Altered cerebrospinal fluid dynamics may partially explain the pathophysiology of spinal stenosis. © 2016 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res 35:104-112, 2017.

  8. Effect of cerebrospinal fluid shunts on intracranial pressure and on cerebrospinal fluid dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Fox, John L.; McCullough, David C.; Green, Robert C.

    1973-01-01

    Part 2 describes measurements of intracranial cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) pressure in 18 adult patients with CSF shunts, all pressure measurements being referred to a horizontal plane close to the foramina of Monro. All 18 patients had normal CSF pressure by lumbar puncture; however, in one patient an intracranial pressure of +280 mm was subsequently measured after pneumoencephalography. Twelve patients had pre-shunt CSF pressures measured intracranially: 11 ranged from +20 to +180 mm H2O and one was +280 mm H2O in the supine position. In the upright posture nine patients had values of −10 to −140 mm H2O, while three others were +60, +70, and +280 mm H2O. After CSF shunting in these 18 patients the pressures were −30 to +30 mm H2O in the supine position and −210 to −370 mm in the upright position. The effect of posture on the siphoning action of these longer shunts in the erect, adult patient is a major uncontrollable variable in maintenance of intracranial pressure after shunting. Other significant variables are reviewed. In Part 3 a concept of the hydrocephalus phenomenon is described. Emphasis is placed on the pressure differential (Pd) and force differential (Fd) causing pre-shunt ventricular enlargement and post-shunt ventricular size reduction. The site of Pd, which must be very small and not to be confused with measured ventricular pressure, P, must be at the ventricular wall. Images PMID:4541079

  9. Dopamine beta-hydroxylase immunoreactivity in human cerebrospinal fluid: properties, relationship to central noradrenergic neuronal activity and variation in Parkinson's disease and congenital dopamine beta-hydroxylase deficiency.

    PubMed

    O'Connor, D T; Cervenka, J H; Stone, R A; Levine, G L; Parmer, R J; Franco-Bourland, R E; Madrazo, I; Langlais, P J; Robertson, D; Biaggioni, I

    1994-02-01

    1. Dopamine beta-hydroxylase is stored and released with catecholamines by exocytosis from secretory vesicles in noradrenergic neurons and chromaffin cells. Although dopamine beta-hydroxylase enzymic activity is measurable in cerebrospinal fluid, such activity is unstable, and its relationship to central noradrenergic neuronal activity in humans is not clearly established. To explore the significance of cerebrospinal fluid dopamine beta-hydroxylase, we applied a homologous human dopamine beta-hydroxylase radioimmunoassay to cerebrospinal fluid, in order to characterize the properties and stability of cerebrospinal fluid dopamine beta-hydroxylase, as well as its relationship to central noradrenergic neuronal activity and its variation in disease states such as hypertension, renal failure, Parkinsonism and congenital dopamine beta-hydroxylase deficiency. 2. Authentic, physically stable dopamine beta-hydroxylase immunoreactivity was present in normal human cerebrospinal fluid at a concentration of 31.3 +/- 1.4 ng/ml (range: 18.5-52.5 ng/ml), but at a 283 +/- 27-fold lower concentration than that found in plasma. Cerebrospinal fluid and plasma dopamine beta-hydroxylase concentrations were correlated (r = 0.67, P = 0.001). Some degree of local central nervous system control of cerebrospinal fluid dopamine beta-hydroxylase was suggested by incomplete correlation with plasma dopamine beta-hydroxylase (with an especially marked dissociation in renal disease) as well as the lack of a ventricular/lumbar cerebrospinal dopamine beta-hydroxylase concentration gradient. 3. Cerebrospinal fluid dopamine beta-hydroxylase was not changed by the central alpha 2-agonist clonidine at a dose that diminished cerebrospinal fluid noradrenaline, nor did cerebrospinal fluid dopamine beta-hydroxylase correspond between subjects to cerebrospinal fluid concentrations of noradrenaline or methoxyhydroxyphenylglycol; thus, cerebrospinal fluid dopamine beta-hydroxylase concentration was not closely

  10. Cerebrospinal fluid leak after acoustic neuroma surgery: a comparison of the translabyrinthine, middle fossa, and retrosigmoid approaches.

    PubMed

    Becker, Samuel S; Jackler, Robert K; Pitts, Lawrence H

    2003-01-01

    To determine whether the choice of surgical approach affects the rate of postoperative cerebrospinal fluid leakage in patients who have undergone surgical resection of acoustic neuroma. Retrospective chart review. Tertiary referral center. Three hundred patients who underwent surgery for acoustic neuromas were selected by consecutive medical record number until 100 resections via each surgical approach (translabyrinthine, middle fossa, and retrosigmoid) had been gathered. Surgical approach used, cerebrospinal fluid leak incidence, tumor size, patient age. Postoperative cerebrospinal fluid leak of any severity was observed in 13% of translabyrinthine, 10% of middle fossa, and 10% of retrosigmoid patients. These difference in the rate of cerebrospinal fluid leakage were not statistically significant (p = 0.82). The majority of leaks were managed conservatively with fluid and activity restriction, often accompanied by a period of lumbar subarachnoid drainage. There was a need to return to the operating room for a definitive procedure in 4% of translabyrinthine, 2% of middle fossa, and 3% retrosigmoid patients; again not statistically different among the approaches (p = 0.43). Tumor size was not correlated with cerebrospinal fluid leak rate (p = 0.13). Patient age, for patients older than 50 years, was suggestive of increased odds of cerebrospinal fluid leak (p = 0.06). Neither surgical approach nor tumor size affects the rate of postoperative cerebrospinal fluid leakage or the necessity of managing a leak with a return to the operating room. Cerebrospinal fluid leakage rates have remained stable in recent decades despite numerous innovative attempts to improve dural closure, seal transected air cell tracts, and occlude anatomic pathways. The finding that leak rates were similar among three dissimilar surgical techniques suggests that factors other than techniques of wound closure, such as transient postoperative rises in cerebrospinal fluid pressure, may be

  11. A Framework for Patient-Specific Spinal Intervention Simulation: Application to Lumbar Spinal Durotomy Repair.

    PubMed

    Lau, Jonathan C; Denning, Lynn; Lownie, Stephen P; Peters, Terry M; Chen, Elvis C S

    2016-01-01

    We present a functional and patient-specific lumbar phantom for the training of spinal durotomy and dura closure under microscopic view, consisting of a lumbar model, pressurized dural surrogate, together immersed in a tissue-mimicking layer simulating fat, muscle and skin. The lumbar model was derived from a patient computed tomography scan, preserving the natural shape and curvature of the lumbar column. The inclusion of the simulated soft-tissue layer was critical for preserving the surgical ergonomics and presented a realistic view under the surgical microscope. As the success of dura repair is indicated by the watertight closure of the thecal sac, the dura surrogate was connected to a pressurized and closed-loop water system to provide functional cerebrospinal fluid leakage during durotomy. This functional phantom is inexpensive to construct, provides a realistic tactile and visual environment for spinal durotomy repair, and can be easily extended to simulate other patient-specific spinal interventions.

  12. Subtotal petrosectomy and cerebrospinal fluid leakage in unilateral anacusis.

    PubMed

    Magliulo, Giuseppe; Iannella, Giannicola; Ciniglio Appiani, Mario; Re, Massimo

    2014-12-01

    Objective This study presents a group of patients experiencing recurrent cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leakage associated with ipsilateral anacusis who underwent subtotal petrosectomies with the goal of stopping the CSF leak and preventing meningitis. Materials and Methods Eight patients with CSF leakage were enrolled: three patients with giant vestibular schwannomas had CSF leakage after gamma knife failure and subsequent removal via a retrosigmoid approach; two patients had malformations at the level of the inner ear with consequent translabyrinthine fistulas; two had posttraumatic CSF leakages; and one had a CSF leakage coexisting with an encephalocele. Two patients developed meningitis that resolved with antibiotic therapy. Each patient had preoperative anacusis and vestibular nerve areflexia on the affected side. Results The patients with congenital or posttraumatic CSF leaks had undergone at least one unsuccessful endaural approach to treat the fistula. All eight patients were treated successfully with a subtotal petrosectomy. The symptoms disappeared within 2 months postoperatively. No meningitis, signs of fistula, or other symptoms occurred during the follow-up. Conclusion A subtotal petrosectomy should be the first choice of treatment in patients with recurrent CSF leakage whenever there is associated unilateral anacusis.

  13. Subtotal Petrosectomy and Cerebrospinal Fluid Leakage in Unilateral Anacusis

    PubMed Central

    Magliulo, Giuseppe; Iannella, Giannicola; Appiani, Mario Ciniglio; Re, Massimo

    2014-01-01

    Objective This study presents a group of patients experiencing recurrent cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leakage associated with ipsilateral anacusis who underwent subtotal petrosectomies with the goal of stopping the CSF leak and preventing meningitis. Materials and Methods Eight patients with CSF leakage were enrolled: three patients with giant vestibular schwannomas had CSF leakage after gamma knife failure and subsequent removal via a retrosigmoid approach; two patients had malformations at the level of the inner ear with consequent translabyrinthine fistulas; two had posttraumatic CSF leakages; and one had a CSF leakage coexisting with an encephalocele. Two patients developed meningitis that resolved with antibiotic therapy. Each patient had preoperative anacusis and vestibular nerve areflexia on the affected side. Results The patients with congenital or posttraumatic CSF leaks had undergone at least one unsuccessful endaural approach to treat the fistula. All eight patients were treated successfully with a subtotal petrosectomy. The symptoms disappeared within 2 months postoperatively. No meningitis, signs of fistula, or other symptoms occurred during the follow-up. Conclusion A subtotal petrosectomy should be the first choice of treatment in patients with recurrent CSF leakage whenever there is associated unilateral anacusis. PMID:25452896

  14. Quantification of lumbar endurance on a backup lumbar extension dynamometer.

    PubMed

    Hager, Staci M; Udermann, Brian E; Reineke, David M; Gibson, Mark H; Mayer, John M; Murray, Steven R

    2006-01-01

    We evaluated the reliability of static and dynamic lumbar muscle endurance measurements on a BackUP lumbar extension dynamometer. Sixteen healthy participants (8 male; 8 female) volunteered for this investigation. Fifty percent of each participant's body weight was calculated to determine the weight load utilized for the static (holding time) and dynamic (repetitions) lumbar extension endurance tests. Four separate tests (2 static, 2 dynamic) were conducted with at least a 24-hour rest period between tests. Test-retest intraclass correlations were shown to be high (static lumbar endurance, ICC = 0.92 (p < 0.0005); dynamic lumbar endurance, ICC = 0.93 (p < 0.0005) for both of the performed tests. Our results demonstrated that static and dynamic lumbar endurance can be assessed reliably on a BackUP lumbar extension dynamometer. Key PointsReliability studies that test lumbar endurance on machines that effectively stabilize the pelvis and isolate the lumbar extensors are limited.This is the first study to report reliability measures of static and dynamic lumbar endurance on a BackUP lumbar extension dynamometer.Static and dynamic lumbar endurance on a BackUP lumbar extension dynamometer, which uses a variety of pelvic stabilization mechanisms, can be reliably assessed in apparently healthy individuals.Future research is necessary to examine the reliability of lumbar extension endurance on the BackUP dynamometer in patient populations and validity in various settings.

  15. Lumbar MRI scan

    MedlinePlus

    ... may need a lumbar MRI if you have: Low back pain that does not get better after treatment Leg ... spine Injury or trauma to the lower spine Low back pain and a history or signs of cancer Multiple ...

  16. Posttraumatic Stress Disorder

    MedlinePlus

    ... ON THIS TOPIC Helping Kids Cope With Stress Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder Posttraumatic Stress Disorder Special Needs Factsheet Taking Your ... Childhood Stress About Teen Suicide Sadness and Depression Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder Phobias Five Steps for Fighting Stress Going to ...

  17. Minimally invasive lumbar foraminotomy.

    PubMed

    Deutsch, Harel

    2013-07-01

    Lumbar radiculopathy is a common problem. Nerve root compression can occur at different places along a nerve root's course including in the foramina. Minimal invasive approaches allow easier exposure of the lateral foramina and decompression of the nerve root in the foramina. This video demonstrates a minimally invasive approach to decompress the lumbar nerve root in the foramina with a lateral to medial decompression. The video can be found here: http://youtu.be/jqa61HSpzIA.

  18. Cerebrospinal Fluid Biomarkers in Idiopathic Normal Pressure Hydrocephalus

    PubMed Central

    Leinonen, Ville; Menon, Lata G.; Carroll, Rona S.; Dello Iacono, Donna; Grevet, Jeremy; Jääskeläinen, Juha E.; Black, Peter M.

    2011-01-01

    The diagnosis of idiopathic normal pressure hydrocephalus (iNPH) is still challenging. Alzheimer's disease (AD), along with vascular dementia, the most important differential diagnosis for iNPH, has several potential cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarkers which might help in the selection of patients for shunt treatment. The aim of this study was to compare a battery of CSF biomarkers including well-known AD-related proteins with CSF from patients with suspected iNPH collected from the external lumbar drainage test (ELD). A total of 35 patients with suspected iNPH patients were evaluated with ELD. CSF was collected in the beginning of the test, and the concentrations of total tau, ptau181, Aβ42, NFL, TNF-α, TGFβ1, and VEGF were analysed by ELISA. Twenty-six patients had a positive ELD result—that is, their gait symptoms improved; 9 patients had negative ELD. The levels of all analyzed CSF biomarkers were similar between the groups and none of them predicted the ELD result in these patients. Contrary to expectations lumbar CSF TNF-α concentration was low in iNPH patients. PMID:21660204

  19. Fluorescence imaging of lymphatic outflow of cerebrospinal fluid in mice.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Sunkuk; Janssen, Christopher F; Velasquez, Fred Christian; Sevick-Muraca, Eva M

    2017-10-01

    Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) is known to be reabsorbed by the lymphatic vessels and drain into the lymph nodes (LNs) through peripheral lymphatic vessels. In the peripheral lymphatics, the contractile pumping action of lymphangions mediates lymph drainage; yet it is unknown whether lymphatic vessels draining cranial and spinal CSF show similar function. Herein, we used non-invasive near-infrared fluorescence imaging (NIRFI) to image (i) indocyanine green (ICG) distribution along the neuraxis and (ii) routes of ICG-laden CSF outflow into the lymphatics following intrathecal lumbar administration. We demonstrate lymphatic contractile function in peripheral lymphatics draining from the nasal lymphatics to the mandibular LNs. In addition, we observed afferent sciatic lymphatic vessels, which also show contractile activity and transport spinal CSF into the sciatic LNs. This drainage pattern was also visualized by NIRFI following intrathecal thoracic injection. In situ intravital imaging following intrathecal lumbar injection of blue dye shows similar distributions to that seen in vivo with ICG. NIRFI could be used as a tool to probe CSF pathology including neurological disorders by imaging CSF outflow dynamics to lymphatics. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Oscillations of cerebrospinal fluid pressure in nonhydrocephalic persons.

    PubMed

    Droste, D W; Krauss, J K

    1997-04-01

    Spontaneous cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) pressure oscillations with a wavelength of 0.5-2/min (B-waves) are used as a criterion for shunt insertion in hydrocephalic patients. We describe CSF pressure oscillations in two nonhydrocephalic patients with normal baseline CSF pressure. Intracranial pressure was recorded via a ventricular drainage in a 54-year-old male who had a lumber CSF leak after surgery for lumbar spinal stenosis and disc herniation after the leak was closed. In the second patient, a 42-year-old male, CSF pressure was monitored via a lumbar drainage which was placed for treatment of a subcutaneous CSF effusion after resection of a recurrent temporal meningioma. CSF pressure oscillations of a wavelength of 0.5-2/min were observed with a relative frequency of 50% (patient 1) and 60% (patient 2) of the recorded time. Also longer waves were observed. Our data suggest that CSF pressure oscillations are not confined to hydrocephalic patients with raised intracranial pressure.

  1. [Effect of tiapride on the side effects of cerebrospinal fluid depletions in spinal puncture, pneumoencephalography and air myelography].

    PubMed

    Zenglein, J P; Baldauf, E; Wasser, P h

    1978-04-01

    The authors report their experience of the treatment post-cerebrospinal fluid loss syndrom, following subtraction by lumbar puncture, pneumoencephalography and air myelography. The study of 70 patients, divided in two equal groups, one receiving classic therapy, one receiving tiapride, a new molecule of original conception, lead to emphasize the interest of this drug. Tolerance in general is good, despite the administration of high doses and effects on the syndrom are positive and remarkable in preventive and curative treatment.

  2. Perioperative Management of Adult Patients With External Ventricular and Lumbar Drains: Guidelines From the Society for Neuroscience in Anesthesiology and Critical Care.

    PubMed

    Lele, Abhijit V; Hoefnagel, Amie L; Schloemerkemper, Nina; Wyler, David A; Chaikittisilpa, Nophanan; Vavilala, Monica S; Naik, Bhiken I; Williams, James H; Venkat Raghavan, Lakshmikumar; Koerner, Ines P

    2017-02-06

    External ventricular drains and lumbar drains are commonly used to divert cerebrospinal fluid and to measure cerebrospinal fluid pressure. Although commonly encountered in the perioperative setting and critical for the care of neurosurgical patients, there are no guidelines regarding their management in the perioperative period. To address this gap in the literature, The Society for Neuroscience in Anesthesiology & Critical Care tasked an expert group to generate evidence-based guidelines. The document generated targets clinicians involved in perioperative care of patients with indwelling external ventricular and lumbar drains.

  3. Lack of relationship between resistance to cerebrospinal fluid outflow and intracranial pressure in normal pressure hydrocephalus.

    PubMed

    Eide, P K; Fremming, A D; Sorteberg, A

    2003-12-01

    To explore whether calculation of resistance to cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) outflow (Rout) by the lumbar constant rate infusion test in a reliable way predicts the intracranial pressure (ICP) profile in normal pressure hydrocephalus (NPH). A prospective study was undertaken including 16 cases with clinical signs of normal pressure hydrocephalus that were investigated with both continuous ICP monitoring and the lumbar constant rate infusion test. Intracranial pressure monitoring was performed for about 24 h, and supplied with a simultaneous lumbar constant rate infusion test at the end of the monitoring period. The pressure recordings were analysed using the Sensometrics Pressure Analyser. Various characteristics of the pressure curves were compared. The continuous ICP recordings were considered as normal (mean ICP<11.5 mmHg) in all 16 cases. The lumbar infusion test showed an apparently abnormal resistance to CSF outflow (Rout) (> or =12.0 mmHg/ml/min) in 12 of 16 cases. There was no relationship between lumbar Rout and mean ICP during sleep. We could not find any relationship between lumbar Rout and number of nightly ICP elevations of 1525 mmHg lasting 0.5 or 1 min. Neither resistance to CSF outflow (Rout) nor mean ICP during sleep was related to the ventricular size. The results of this prospective study revealed no significant relationship between resistance to CSF outflow (Rout) and the ICP profile in NPH cases. The results also suggest that caution should be made when predicting the ICP profile on the basis of measuring the lumbar CSF pressure for a few minutes duration.

  4. A Possible Role for Temporary Lumbar Drainage in the Management of Idiopathic Intracranial Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Gates, Peter; McNeill, Peter

    2016-12-01

    This paper reports 14 patients with idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH) who experienced immediate and sustained resolution of their IIH; 13 in the setting of a low-pressure headache and 1 who underwent lumbar drainage for 4 days draining the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) at a rate of 5-15 mL/h. These observations, if confirmed, suggest that draining CSF using a temporary lumbar drain draining CSF at a rate greater than it is produced may potentially have a pivotal role in the management of IIH.

  5. Effects of traumatic brain injury and posttraumatic stress disorder on Alzheimer's disease in veterans, using the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative.

    PubMed

    Weiner, Michael W; Veitch, Dallas P; Hayes, Jacqueline; Neylan, Thomas; Grafman, Jordan; Aisen, Paul S; Petersen, Ronald C; Jack, Clifford; Jagust, William; Trojanowski, John Q; Shaw, Leslie M; Saykin, Andrew J; Green, Robert C; Harvey, Danielle; Toga, Arthur W; Friedl, Karl E; Pacifico, Anthony; Sheline, Yvette; Yaffe, Kristine; Mohlenoff, Brian

    2014-06-01

    Both traumatic brain injury (TBI) and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) are common problems resulting from military service, and both have been associated with increased risk of cognitive decline and dementia resulting from Alzheimer's disease (AD) or other causes. This study aims to use imaging techniques and biomarker analysis to determine whether traumatic brain injury (TBI) and/or PTSD resulting from combat or other traumas increase the risk for AD and decrease cognitive reserve in Veteran subjects, after accounting for age. Using military and Department of Veterans Affairs records, 65 Vietnam War veterans with a history of moderate or severe TBI with or without PTSD, 65 with ongoing PTSD without TBI, and 65 control subjects are being enrolled in this study at 19 sites. The study aims to select subject groups that are comparable in age, gender, ethnicity, and education. Subjects with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) or dementia are being excluded. However, a new study just beginning, and similar in size, will study subjects with TBI, subjects with PTSD, and control subjects with MCI. Baseline measurements of cognition, function, blood, and cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers; magnetic resonance images (structural, diffusion tensor, and resting state blood-level oxygen dependent (BOLD) functional magnetic resonance imaging); and amyloid positron emission tomographic (PET) images with florbetapir are being obtained. One-year follow-up measurements will be collected for most of the baseline procedures, with the exception of the lumbar puncture, the PET imaging, and apolipoprotein E genotyping. To date, 19 subjects with TBI only, 46 with PTSD only, and 15 with TBI and PTSD have been recruited and referred to 13 clinics to undergo the study protocol. It is expected that cohorts will be fully recruited by October 2014. This study is a first step toward the design and statistical powering of an AD prevention trial using at-risk veterans as subjects, and provides the

  6. Spontaneous cerebrospinal fluid leaks in the anterior skull base secondary to idiopathic intracranial hypertension.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Capoccioni, Gabriel; Serramito-García, Ramón; Martín-Bailón, Maria; García-Allut, Alfredo; Martín-Martín, Carlos

    2017-05-01

    Spontaneous cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leaks represent a clinical entity in which CSF rhinorrhea occurs in the absence of any inciting event. Spontaneous CSF leaks are associated with elevated intracranial pressure (ICP) or have underlying idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH). We report a cohort of patients who have undergone nasal endoscopic repair for spontaneous CSF leaks. We review our perioperative complications and the effectiveness of the nasal endoscopic approach to repair spontaneous CSF leaks. Also, we examine the evidence correlating spontaneous CSF leaks and IIH and the role of decreasing ICP in the treatment of nasal spontaneous CSF leaks. A retrospective analysis of patients with nasal spontaneous cerebrospinal fluid leaks was performed. Data on the nature of presentation, patient body mass index, defect location and size, ICP, clinical follow-up, and complications were collected. Thirty-five patients had nasal spontaneous cerebrospinal fluid leaks with evidence of IIH's symptoms. The most common sites were the cribriform plate, the ethmoid roof, and sphenoid lateral pterygoid recess. All patients underwent endonasal endoscopic surgery to repair the defect. Postoperatively, all patients underwent lumbar drainage and acetazolamide therapy. Nasal spontaneous cerebrospinal fluid leaks represent a surgical challenge because of their high recurrence rates. The most important factor for obtaining a successful repair in these patients is reducing their intracranial pressure through nutritional, medical, or surgical means.

  7. The Relief of Unilateral Painful Thoracic Radiculopathy without Headache from Remote Spontaneous Spinal Cerebrospinal Fluid Leak.

    PubMed

    Son, Byung-Chul; Ha, Sang-Woo; Lee, Si-Hoon; Choi, Jin-Gyu

    2016-01-01

    Spontaneous intracranial hypotension (SIH) caused by spontaneous spinal cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leaks produces orthostatic headaches. Although upper arm pain or paresthesia is reportedly associated with SIH from spontaneous spinal CSF leak in the presence of orthostatic headache, low thoracic radicular pain due to spontaneous spinal CSF leak unassociated with postural headache is extremely rare. We report a 67-year-old female who presented with chronic, positional radicular right T11 pain. Computed tomography myelography showed a spontaneous lumbar spinal CSF leak at L2-3 and repeated lumbar epidural blood patches significantly alleviated chronic, positional, and lower thoracic radiculopathic pain. The authors speculate that a chronic spontaneous spinal CSF leak not severe enough to cause typical orthostatic headache or epidural CSF collection may cause local symptoms such as irritation of a remote nerve root. There might be considerable variabilities in the clinical features of SIH which can present a diagnostic challenge.

  8. The Relief of Unilateral Painful Thoracic Radiculopathy without Headache from Remote Spontaneous Spinal Cerebrospinal Fluid Leak

    PubMed Central

    Son, Byung-chul; Ha, Sang-woo; Lee, Si-hoon; Choi, Jin-gyu

    2016-01-01

    Spontaneous intracranial hypotension (SIH) caused by spontaneous spinal cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leaks produces orthostatic headaches. Although upper arm pain or paresthesia is reportedly associated with SIH from spontaneous spinal CSF leak in the presence of orthostatic headache, low thoracic radicular pain due to spontaneous spinal CSF leak unassociated with postural headache is extremely rare. We report a 67-year-old female who presented with chronic, positional radicular right T11 pain. Computed tomography myelography showed a spontaneous lumbar spinal CSF leak at L2-3 and repeated lumbar epidural blood patches significantly alleviated chronic, positional, and lower thoracic radiculopathic pain. The authors speculate that a chronic spontaneous spinal CSF leak not severe enough to cause typical orthostatic headache or epidural CSF collection may cause local symptoms such as irritation of a remote nerve root. There might be considerable variabilities in the clinical features of SIH which can present a diagnostic challenge. PMID:27445613

  9. Pediatric Posttraumatic Headache.

    PubMed

    Kacperski, Joanne; Hung, Ryan; Blume, Heidi K

    2016-02-01

    Concussion and mild traumatic brain injury are common injuries in pediatrics, and posttraumatic headache is the most common complaint following them. Although most children and teens recover from a simple, isolated concussion without incidents within 1-2 weeks, some develop symptoms that can last for months. It is important to manage both acute and persistent posttraumatic headaches appropriately to speed recovery, minimize disability, and maximize function. In this article, we review the definitions, epidemiology, and current recommendations for the evaluation and treatment of acute and persistent posttraumatic headaches. Although this is still a developing field and there is much that we still need to learn about concussion and the best strategies to prevent and treat these injuries and their sequelae, we hope that this review will help providers to understand the current evidence and treatment recommendations to improve care for children with concussion and mild traumatic brain injury. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. [Surgical treatment of degenerative lumbar scoliosis with multi-segment lumbar spinal stenosis].

    PubMed

    Lan, Jiaping; Tang, Xun; Xu, Yongqing; Zhou, Tianhua; Shi, Jian; Cui, Yi; Xiang, Qili; Cai, Zhijun; Zhao, Qingkai; Yang, Xiaoyong; Zhao, Caihua

    2014-08-01

    To explore the surgical indications, decompression and fusion method, and fusion level selection of degenerative lumbar scoliosis (DLS) and multi-segment lumbar spinal stenosis. Between April 2000 and November 2011, 46 cases of DLS and multi-segment lumbar spinal stenosis were treated with multi-level decompression by fenestration and crept enlargement plus internal fixation by interbody and posterior-lateral bone graft fusion (5 segments or above). Of 46 cases, 25 were male and 21 were female, with a mean age of 70.2 years (range, 65-81 years) and with a mean disease duration of 6.4 years (range, 4 years and 6 months to 13 years). X-ray films showed that the lumbar Cobb angle was (26.7 ± 10.0) degrees, and the lumbar lordotic angle was (20.3 ± 8.8)degrees. The lumbar CT and MRI images showed three-segment stenosis in 24 cases, four-segment stenosis in 17 cases, and five-segment stenosis in 5 cases. A total of 165 stenosed segments included 12 L1,2, 34 L2,3, 43 L3,4, 45 L4,5, and 31 L5 and S1. Visual analogue scale (VAS) score, Oswestry disability index (ODI), and Japanese Orthopedic Association (JOA) score (29 points) were employed to evaluate effectiveness. Thirteen patients had leakage of cerebrospinal fluid during operation, and no infection was found after corresponding treatment; pulmonary infection and urinary system infection occurred in 4 and 2 patients respectively, who relieved after received antibiotic therapy; 8 patients with poor wound healing received dressing change, adequate drainage, debridement and suture. No death, paralysis, central nervous system infection, or other complication was observed in these patients. Forty-six cases were followed up 12-72 months (mean, 36.2 months). Lumbago and backache and intermittent claudication of lower extremity were obviously improved. During follow-up, no screw incising, loosening and broken screws, or pseudarthrosis was noted under X-ray film and CT scanning. At last follow-up, the lumbar Cobb angle was

  11. Interactions between Flow Oscillations and Biochemical Parameters in the Cerebrospinal Fluid

    PubMed Central

    Puy, Vincent; Zmudka-Attier, Jadwiga; Capel, Cyrille; Bouzerar, Roger; Serot, Jean-Marie; Bourgeois, Anne-Marie; Ausseil, Jérome; Balédent, Olivier

    2016-01-01

    The equilibrium between the ventricular and lumbar cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) compartments may be disturbed (in terms of flow and biochemistry) in patients with chronic hydrocephalus (CH). Using flow magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and CSF assays, we sought to determine whether changes in CSF were associated with biochemical alterations. Nine elderly patients with CH underwent phase-contrast MRI. An index of CSF dynamics (Idyn) was defined as the product of the lumbar and ventricular CSF flows. During surgery, samples of CSF were collected from the lumbar and ventricular compartments and assayed for chloride, glucose and total protein. The lumbar/ventricular (L/V) ratio was calculated for each analyte. The ratio between measured and expected levels (Ibioch) was calculated for each analyte and compared with Idyn. Idyn varied from 0 to 100.103μl2.s2. In contrast to the L/V ratios for chloride and glucose, the L/V ratio for total protein varied markedly from one patient to another (mean ± standard deviation (SD): 2.63 ± 1.24). The Ibioch for total protein was strongly correlated with the corresponding Idyn (Spearman’s R: 0.98; p < 5 × 10−5).We observed correlated alterations in CSF flow and biochemical parameters in patients with CH. Our findings also highlight the value of dynamic flow analysis in the interpretation of data on CSF biochemistry. PMID:27445797

  12. The relationship between cerebrospinal fluid markers of Alzheimer pathology and positron emission tomography tau imaging.

    PubMed

    Gordon, Brian A; Friedrichsen, Karl; Brier, Matthew; Blazey, Tyler; Su, Yi; Christensen, Jon; Aldea, Patricia; McConathy, Jonathan; Holtzman, David M; Cairns, Nigel J; Morris, John C; Fagan, Anne M; Ances, Beau M; Benzinger, Tammie L S

    2016-08-01

    The two primary molecular pathologies in Alzheimer's disease are amyloid-β plaques and tau-immunoreactive neurofibrillary tangles. Investigations into these pathologies have been restricted to cerebrospinal fluid assays, and positron emission tomography tracers that can image amyloid-β plaques. Tau tracers have recently been introduced into the field, although the utility of the tracer and its relationship to other Alzheimer biomarkers are still unknown. Here we examined tau deposition in 41 cognitively normal and 11 cognitively impaired older adults using the radioactive tau ligand (18)F-AV-1451 (previously known as T807) who also underwent a lumbar puncture to assess cerebrospinal fluid levels of total tau (t-tau), phosphorylated tau181 (p-tau181) and amyloid-β42 Voxel-wise statistical analyses examined spatial patterns of tau deposition associated with cognitive impairment. We then related the amount of tau tracer uptake to levels of cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers. All analyses controlled for age and gender and, when appropriate, the time between imaging and lumbar puncture assessments. Symptomatic individuals (Clinical Dementia Rating > 0) demonstrated markedly increased levels of tau tracer uptake. This elevation was most prominent in the temporal lobe and temporoparietal junction, but extended more broadly into parietal and frontal cortices. In the entire cohort, there were significant relationships among all cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers and tracer uptake, notably for tau-related cerebrospinal fluid markers. After controlling for levels of amyloid-β42, the correlations with tau uptake were r = 0.490 (P < 0.001) for t-tau and r = 0.492 (P < 0.001) for p-tau181 Within the cognitively normal cohort, levels of amyloid-β42, but not t-tau or p-tau181, were associated with elevated tracer binding that was confined primarily to the medial temporal lobe and adjacent neocortical regions. AV-1451 tau binding in the medial temporal, parietal, and frontal cortices

  13. Herniated lumbar disk (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Herniated lumbar disk is a condition in which part or all of the soft, gelatinous central portion of an intervertebral disk (the nucleus pulposus) is forced through a weakened part of the disk, resulting in back pain and nerve root irritation.

  14. A Novel Nonpedicular Screw-Based Fixation in Lumbar Spondylolisthesis

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Objective. The authors present the clinical results obtained in patients who underwent interspinous fusion device (IFD) implantation following posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF). The purpose of this study is investigating the feasibility of IFD with PLIF in the treatment of lumbar spondylolisthesis. Methods. Between September 2013 and November 2014, 39 patients underwent PLIF and subsequent IFD (Romeo®2 PAD, Spineart, Geneva, Switzerland) implantation. Medical records of these patients were retrospectively reviewed to collect relevant data such as blood loss, operative time, and length of hospital stay. Radiographs and clinical outcome were evaluated 6 weeks and 12 months after surgery. Results. All 39 patients were followed up for more than one year. There were no major complications such as dura tear, nerve injuries, cerebrospinal fluid leakage, or deep infection. Both interbody and interspinous fusion could be observed on radiographs one year after surgery. However, there were 5 patients having early retropulsion of interbody fusion devices. Conclusion. The interspinous fusion device appears to achieve posterior fixation and facilitate lumbar fusion in selected patients. However, further study is mandatory for proposing a novel anatomic and radiological scoring system to identify patients suitable for this treatment modality and prevent postoperative complications. PMID:28164125

  15. Conservative Management of Ureteral Injury Caused by a Lumbar Osteophyte

    PubMed Central

    Brekhus, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Osteophytes are bony outgrowths commonly found on lumbar vertebrae. They rarely produce complications with the most common complication being nerve entrapment, but rarer complications including aorta or inferior vena cava rupture, superior mesenteric artery syndrome, compression of the iliopsoas muscle, and cerebrospinal fluid leaks have been described. Rare cases affecting the ureter resulting in ureteral colic or extravasation of urine have been described. Case Presentation: We describe a case in which a lumbar osteophyte bridging the L4 and L5 disks was encircling the ureter and minor trauma caused a ureteral injury, resulting in urine extravasation into the L4 and L5 disks space and the retroperitoneum. Owing to the comorbidities of this patient, this case was treated conservatively with stenting and the patient has suffered no further complications. Conclusion: This is a rare complication of a lumbar osteophyte but should be considered as a potential cause of ureter injury. Treatment should be individualized by patient preference and comorbidities, as some patients would elect to pursue more aggressive therapy whereas others would incline for conservative measures. PMID:28078328

  16. Lumbar spinal stenosis.

    PubMed Central

    Ciricillo, S F; Weinstein, P R

    1993-01-01

    Lumbar spinal stenosis, the results of congenital and degenerative constriction of the neural canal and foramina leading to lumbosacral nerve root or cauda equina compression, is a common cause of disability in middle-aged and elderly patients. Advanced neuroradiologic imaging techniques have improved our ability to localize the site of nerve root entrapment in patients presenting with neurogenic claudication or painful radiculopathy. Although conservative medical management may be successful initially, surgical decompression by wide laminectomy or an intralaminar approach should be done in patients with serious or progressive pain or neurologic dysfunction. Because the early diagnosis and treatment of lumbar spinal stenosis may prevent intractable pain and the permanent neurologic sequelae of chronic nerve root entrapment, all physicians should be aware of the different neurologic presentations and the treatment options for patients with spinal stenosis. Images PMID:8434469

  17. Postoperative lumbar spine.

    PubMed

    Leone, A; Cerase, A; Lauro, L; Cianfoni, A; Aulisa, L

    2000-01-01

    The differentiation between normal sequelae and complications of any surgical treatment of the lumbar spine is of the utmost importance. Clinical and radiological diagnosis is often difficult. Certainly the introduction of computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has improved and refined the diagnostic possibilities, however not all problems have been resolved. For example, the frequent resort in vertebral surgery to metal implants which may limit or even prevent the interpretation of CT or MR images, should be kept in mind. The main types of surgical procedures involving the lumbar spine are briefly reviewed, focusing on CT and MRI appearance of normal sequelae of early or late complications and the recurrence of the lesion that necessitated the first procedure.

  18. LUMBAR DISC HERNIATION

    PubMed Central

    Vialle, Luis Roberto; Vialle, Emiliano Neves; Suárez Henao, Juan Esteban; Giraldo, Gustavo

    2015-01-01

    Lumbar disc herniation is the most common diagnosis among the degenerative abnormalities of the lumbar spine (affecting 2 to 3% of the population), and is the principal cause of spinal surgery among the adult population. The typical clinical picture includes initial lumbalgia, followed by progressive sciatica. The natural history of disc herniation is one of rapid resolution of the symptoms (four to six weeks). The initial treatment should be conservative, managed through medication and physiotherapy, sometimes associated with percutaneous nerve root block. Surgical treatment is indicated if pain control is unsuccessful, if there is a motor deficit greater than grade 3, if there is radicular pain associated with foraminal stenosis, or if cauda equina syndrome is present. The latter represents a medical emergency. A refined surgical technique, with removal of the extruded fragment and preservation of the ligamentum flavum, resolves the sciatic symptoms and reduces the risk of recurrence over the long term. PMID:27019834

  19. Transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion.

    PubMed

    Moskowitz, Alan

    2002-04-01

    Indication and technique of TLIF procedure are described. TLIF provides for anterior column support and posterior tension band. It is a unilateral approach to the spine, and there is no need to expose or manipulate the dura. It provides the benefits of a 360 degrees fusion without performing an anterior approach. It restores the normal anatomy of the motion segment and maintains normal lumbar lordosis. Patients are mobilized quickly and resume activities early.

  20. Paradoxical cerebral herniation secondary to lumbar puncture after decompressive craniectomy for a large space-occupying hemispheric stroke: case report.

    PubMed

    Oyelese, Adetokunbo A; Steinberg, Gary K; Huhn, Stephen L; Wijman, Christine A C

    2005-09-01

    The risk of transtentorial herniation after removal of cerebrospinal fluid from the lumbar cistern in the setting of a supratentorial lesion with significant mass effect, increased cerebrospinal fluid pressure, or midline shift is well known. We report a case of cerebral herniation from intracranial hypotension (so-called paradoxical herniation) secondary to a lumbar puncture 1 month after decompressive hemicraniectomy for a large right hemispheric stroke. A 50-year-old woman was transferred to our neurosurgical service for obtundation 4 days after a lumbar puncture to rule out meningitis and 1 month after decompressive craniectomy for a large right hemispheric stroke. Eighty grams of mannitol was administered before transfer. On arrival at our hospital, the patient was intubated and a computed tomographic scan was performed. The patient was diagnosed with low-pressure herniation after review of the computed tomographic scan. Rehydration was initiated, and the patient was placed in the Trendelenburg position. She became easier to arouse, but her pupils remained dilated. She experienced a sudden severe cardiac arrhythmia leading to a cardiac arrest. Attempted resuscitation was unsuccessful, and the patient was pronounced dead. Lumbar punctures may result in lethal intracranial hypotension in patients after hemicraniectomy and are thus contraindicated unless care is taken to remove the pressure gradient of atmospheric air across the lumbar cistern.

  1. Posttraumatic stiff elbow

    PubMed Central

    Mittal, Ravi

    2017-01-01

    Posttraumatic stiff elbow is a frequent and disabling complication and poses serious challenges for its management. In this review forty studies were included to know about the magnitude of the problem, causes, pathology, prevention, and treatment of posttraumatic stiff elbow. These studies show that simple measures such as internal fixation, immobilization in extension, and early motion of elbow joint are the most important steps that can prevent elbow stiffness. It also supports conservative treatment in selected cases. There are no clear guidelines about the choice between the numerous procedures described in literature. However, this review article disproves two major beliefs-heterotopic ossification is a bad prognostic feature, and passive mobilization of elbow causes elbow stiffness. PMID:28216745

  2. [Post-traumatic stress].

    PubMed

    Ogłodek, Ewa; Araszkiewicz, Aleksander

    2012-01-01

    As civilization advanced, the number of disasters, including their types and size of the threat to humanity. In addition to natural disasters and wars, there are currently a disaster communication, environmental and technological. Disasters "new generation" include increasingly frequent bombings and terrorist attacks. These events are an impediment to long-lasting and deep impact on the mental functioning of the victims of the event. This represents a potential risk of a variety of psychopathological symptoms, which go beyond the limits of human suffering. ICD-I0 classification includes individuals sickness arising as a consequence of pathological after surviving the disaster, which include: acute stress disorder (ASD), post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), post-traumatic stress disorder linked to depression, symptoms anxiety, addictions, dissociative disorders and personality changes and permanent after the disaster.

  3. Lumbar retrodiscal transforaminal injection.

    PubMed

    Jasper, Joseph F

    2007-05-01

    Spinal injections are commonly used to treat lumbar radiculitis and back pain. Delivery of medication to specific targeted pathology is considered important for a successful therapeutic outcome. A variety of routes of injection have been devised for epidural injection of corticosteroid. The author demonstrates a variation of the transforaminal injection technique. The radiographic spread of contrast is described using a more oblique and ventral caudad approach in the epidural space "retrodiscal." It is suggested that the radiographic findings of this technique for discogenic causes of induced radiculitis and/or back pain may yield more precise targeting of putative pathologic sources of radiculopathy and back pain in selected patients. In patients with disc pathology and radiculitis, the anatomy of the lumbar epidural space is reviewed for its potential effect on the flow of injectate. Contrast spread was documented for lumbar transforaminal injection using a needle placement more oblique and behind the disc rather than in the cranial portion. Comparison is made to a typical contrast spread of an infra-pedicular placed transforaminal injection. Retrodiscal contrast injection results in reliable coverage of the retrodiscal region, the exiting nerve at that foraminal level and the proximal portion of the transiting segmental neural sleeve. The radiographic findings demonstrate a difference between classic infra-pedicular versus retrodiscal transforaminal epidural contrast injection patterns, particularly at relatively low volumes. The clinical advantage of one technique versus the other should be established in randomized prospective studies.

  4. The Maze of the Cerebrospinal Fluid Discovery

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The author analyzes a historical, long, and tortuous way to discover the cerebrospinal fluid. At least 35 physicians and anatomists described in the text have laid the fundamentals of recognition of this biological fluid's presence. On the basis of crucial anatomical, experimental, and clinical works there are four greatest physicians who should be considered as equal cerebrospinal fluid's discoverers: Egyptian Imhotep, Venetian Nicolo Massa, Italian Domenico Felice Cotugno, and French François Magendie. PMID:24396600

  5. Posttraumatic Balance Disorders

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-01-01

    69 International Tinnitus Journal, Vol. 13, No. 1, 69–72 (2007) Posttraumatic Balance Disorders Michael E. Hoffer, Ben J. Balough, and Kim R...trauma is being more frequently recognized as a causative agent in balance disorders . Most of the published literature examining traumatic brain injury...TBI) after head trauma has focused on short-term prognostic indicators and neurocognitive disorders . Few data are available to guide those individuals

  6. Pig Lumbar Spine Anatomy and Imaging Guided Lateral Lumbar Puncture: A New Large Animal Model for Intrathecal Drug Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Pleticha, Josef; Maus, Timothy P.; Jeng-Singh, Christian; Marsh, Michael P.; Al-Saiegh, Fadi; Christner, Jodie A.; Lee, Kendall H.; Beutler, Andreas S.

    2014-01-01

    Intrathecal (IT) administration is an important route of drug delivery. Its modeling in a large animal species is a critical step. Although domestic swine is presently a preferred species in preclinical pharmacology, no proven minimally invasive method has been established to deliver agents into the pig IT space. While a “blind” lumbar puncture (LP) can sample cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), it is unreliable for drug delivery in pigs. Using computed tomography (CT) we determined the underlying anatomical reasons. The pig spinal cord was visualized terminating at the S2-S3 level. The lumbar region contained only small amounts of CSF visualized in the lateral recesses. Additional anatomical constraints identified were ossification of the midline ligaments; overlapping lamina with small interlaminar spaces; and a large bulk of epidural adipose tissue. Accommodating the pig CT anatomy, we developed an injection technique termed lateral LP (LLP) that employs advance planning of the needle path and monitoring of the IT injection progress. Key features of the LLP procedure were choosing a vertebral level without overlapping lamina or spinal ligament ossification; a needle trajectory crossing the midline; and entering the IT space in its lateral recess. Effective IT delivery was validated by injection of contrast media thereby obtaining a CT myelogram. LLP represents a safe and reliable method to deliver agents to the lumbar pig IT space, which can be implemented in a straightforward way by any laboratory with access to CT equipment and is therefore an attractive large animal model for preclinical studies of IT therapies. PMID:23518340

  7. Effects of traumatic brain injury and posttraumatic stress disorder on Alzheimer’s disease in veterans, using the Alzheimer’s Disease Neuroimaging Initiative

    PubMed Central

    Weiner, Michael W.; Veitch, Dallas P.; Hayes, Jacqueline; Neylan, Thomas; Grafman, Jordan; Aisen, Paul S.; Petersen, Ronald C.; Jack, Clifford; Jagust, William; Trojanowski, John Q.; Shaw, Leslie M.; Saykin, Andrew J.; Green, Robert C.; Harvey, Danielle; Toga, Arthur W.; Friedl, Karl E.; Pacifico, Anthony; Sheline, Yvette; Yaffe, Kristine; Mohlenoff, Brian

    2015-01-01

    Both traumatic brain injury (TBI) and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) are common problems resulting from military service, and both have been associated with increased risk of cognitive decline and dementia resulting from Alzheimer’s disease (AD) or other causes. This study aims to use imaging techniques and biomarker analysis to determine whether traumatic brain injury (TBI) and/or PTSD resulting from combat or other traumas increase the risk for AD and decrease cognitive reserve in Veteran subjects, after accounting for age. Using military and Department of Veterans Affairs records, 65 Vietnam War veterans with a history of moderate or severe TBI with or without PTSD, 65 with ongoing PTSD without TBI, and 65 control subjects are being enrolled in this study at 19 sites. The study aims to select subject groups that are comparable in age, gender, ethnicity, and education. Subjects with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) or dementia are being excluded. However, a new study just beginning, and similar in size, will study subjects with TBI, subjects with PTSD, and control subjects with MCI. Baseline measurements of cognition, function, blood, and cerebrospinal fluid bio-markers; magnetic resonance images (structural, diffusion tensor, and resting state blood-level oxygen dependent (BOLD) functional magnetic resonance imaging); and amyloid positron emission tomographic (PET) images with florbetapir are being obtained. One-year follow-up measurements will be collected for most of the baseline procedures, with the exception of the lumbar puncture, the PET imaging, and apolipoprotein E genotyping. To date, 19 subjects with TBI only, 46 with PTSD only, and 15 with TBI and PTSD have been recruited and referred to 13 clinics to undergo the study protocol. It is expected that cohorts will be fully recruited by October 2014. This study is a first step toward the design and statistical powering of an AD prevention trial using at-risk veterans as subjects, and provides the

  8. Comparison of enterovirus detection in cerebrospinal fluid with Bacterial Meningitis Score in children

    PubMed Central

    Pires, Frederico Ribeiro; Franco, Andréia Christine Bonotto Farias; Gilio, Alfredo Elias; Troster, Eduardo Juan

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective To measure the role of enterovirus detection in cerebrospinal fluid compared with the Bacterial Meningitis Score in children with meningitis. Methods A retrospective cohort based on analysis of medical records of pediatric patients diagnosed as meningitis, seen at a private and tertiary hospital in São Paulo, Brazil, between 2011 and 2014. Excluded were patients with critical illness, purpura, ventricular shunt or recent neurosurgery, immunosuppression, concomitant bacterial infection requiring parenteral antibiotic therapy, and those who received antibiotics 72 hours before lumbar puncture. Results The study included 503 patients. Sixty-four patients were excluded and 94 were not submitted to all tests for analysis. Of the remaining 345 patients, 7 were in the Bacterial Meningitis Group and 338 in the Aseptic Meningitis Group. There was no statistical difference between the groups. In the Bacterial Meningitis Score analysis, of the 338 patients with possible aseptic meningitis (negative cultures), 121 of them had one or more points in the Bacterial Meningitis Score, with sensitivity of 100%, specificity of 64.2%, and negative predictive value of 100%. Of the 121 patients with positive Bacterial Meningitis Score, 71% (86 patients) had a positive enterovirus detection in cerebrospinal fluid. Conclusion Enterovirus detection in cerebrospinal fluid was effective to differentiate bacterial from viral meningitis. When the test was analyzed together with the Bacterial Meningitis Score, specificity was higher when compared to Bacterial Meningitis Score alone. PMID:28767914

  9. Cerebrospinal Fluid Hypernatremia Elevates Sympathetic Nerve Activity and Blood Pressure via the Rostral Ventrolateral Medulla.

    PubMed

    Stocker, Sean D; Lang, Susan M; Simmonds, Sarah S; Wenner, Megan M; Farquhar, William B

    2015-12-01

    Elevated NaCl concentrations of the cerebrospinal fluid increase sympathetic nerve activity (SNA) in salt-sensitive hypertension. Neurons of the rostral ventrolateral medulla (RVLM) play a pivotal role in the regulation of SNA and receive mono- or polysynaptic inputs from several hypothalamic structures responsive to hypernatremia. Therefore, the present study investigated the contribution of RVLM neurons to the SNA and pressor response to cerebrospinal fluid hypernatremia. Lateral ventricle infusion of 0.15 mol/L, 0.6 mol/L, and 1.0 mol/L NaCl (5 µL/10 minutes) produced concentration-dependent increases in lumbar SNA, adrenal SNA, and arterial blood pressure, despite no change in splanchnic SNA and a decrease in renal SNA. Ganglionic blockade with chlorisondamine or acute lesion of the lamina terminalis blocked or significantly attenuated these responses, respectively. RVLM microinjection of the gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABAA) agonist muscimol abolished the sympathoexcitatory response to intracerebroventricular infusion of 1 mol/L NaCl. Furthermore, blockade of ionotropic glutamate, but not angiotensin II type 1, receptors significantly attenuated the increase in lumbar SNA, adrenal SNA, and arterial blood pressure. Finally, single-unit recordings of spinally projecting RVLM neurons revealed 3 distinct populations based on discharge responses to intracerebroventricular infusion of 1 mol/L NaCl: type I excited (46%; 11/24), type II inhibited (37%; 9/24), and type III no change (17%; 4/24). All neurons with slow conduction velocities were type I cells. Collectively, these findings suggest that acute increases in cerebrospinal fluid NaCl concentrations selectively activate a discrete population of RVLM neurons through glutamate receptor activation to increase SNA and arterial blood pressure. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  10. Supine Digital Subtraction Myelography for the Demonstration of a Dorsal Cerebrospinal Fluid Leak in a Patient with Spontaneous Intracranial Hypotension: A Technical Note

    PubMed Central

    Carstensen, Michael; Chaudhary, Navjot; Leung, Andrew; Ng, Wai

    2012-01-01

    A patient with spontaneous intracranial hypotension due to a spinal cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leak required localization of the leakage site prior to surgical management. Conventional, computed tomography and prone digital subtraction myelography failed to localize the dural tear, which was postulated to be dorsally located. We present here a digital subtraction myelographic approach to accurately localize a dorsal site of CSF leakage by injecting iodinated contrast via a lumbar drain with the patient in the supine position. PMID:23378882

  11. Cerebrospinal fluid flow in adults.

    PubMed

    Bradley, William G; Haughton, Victor; Mardal, Kent-Andre

    2016-01-01

    This chapter uses magnetic resonance imaging phase-contrast cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) flow measurements to predict which clinical normal-pressure hydrocephalus (NPH) patients will respond to shunting as well as which patients with Chiari I are likely to develop symptoms of syringomyelia. Symptomatic NPH patients with CSF flow (measured as the aqueductal CSF stroke volume) which is shown to be hyperdynamic (defined as twice normal) are quite likely to respond to ventriculoperitoneal shunting. The hyperdynamic CSF flow results from normal systolic brain expansion compressing the enlarged ventricles. When atrophy occurs, there is less brain expansion, decreased aqueductal CSF flow, and less likelihood of responding to shunting. It appears that NPH is a "two-hit" disease, starting as benign external hydrocephalus in infancy, followed by deep white-matter ischemia in late adulthood, which causes increased resistance to CSF outflow through the extracellular space of the brain. Using computational flow dynamics (CFD), CSF flow can be modeled at the foramen magnum and in the upper cervical spine. As in the case of NPH, hyperdynamic CSF flow appears to cause the signs and symptoms in Chiari I and can provide an additional indication for surgical decompression. CFD can also predict CSF pressures over the cardiac cycle. It has been hypothesized that elevated pressure pulses may be a significant etiologic factor in some cases of syringomyelia.

  12. Intracranial pressure and cerebrospinal fluid outflow conductance in healthy subjects.

    PubMed

    Albeck, M J; Børgesen, S E; Gjerris, F; Schmidt, J F; Sørensen, P S

    1991-04-01

    Conductance of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) outflow (Cout) is an important parameter to be considered in patients with CSF circulation abnormalities. In patients with normal-pressure hydrocephalus it is the single most important parameter in determining if the patient needs CSF shunting. The lower normal limit for Cout has been estimated from the effect of shunting in patients with normal-pressure hydrocephalus, from patients retrospectively reevaluated after recovering from illness, and from patients with known abnormalities in the brain or the CSF system. The true value of Cout in normal individuals, however, has hitherto not been reported. In the present study, Cout has been measured by a lumbar infusion test in eight young volunteers with no suspicion of disease. The mean intracranial pressure (ICP) was 11 mm Hg and a linear relationship was found between CSF absorption and ICP. The mean Cout was 0.11 ml/min/mm Hg and the lower 95% confidence level was 0.10 ml/min/mm Hg. These values are in accordance with those obtained from previous studies.

  13. Cerebrospinal fluid flow dynamics in the central nervous system.

    PubMed

    Sweetman, Brian; Linninger, Andreas A

    2011-01-01

    Cine-phase-contrast-MRI was used to measure the three-dimensional cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) flow field inside the central nervous system (CNS) of a healthy subject. Image reconstruction and grid generation tools were then used to develop a three-dimensional fluid-structure interaction model of the CSF flow inside the CNS. The CSF spaces were discretized using the finite-element method and the constitutive equations for fluid and solid motion solved in ADINA-FSI 8.6. Model predictions of CSF velocity magnitude and stroke volume were found to be in excellent agreement with the experimental data. CSF pressure gradients and amplitudes were computed in all regions of the CNS. The computed pressure gradients and amplitudes closely match values obtained clinically. The highest pressure amplitude of 77 Pa was predicted to occur in the lateral ventricles. The pressure gradient between the lateral ventricles and the lumbar region of the spinal canal did not exceed 132 Pa (~1 mmHg) at any time during the cardiac cycle. The pressure wave speed in the spinal canal was predicted and found to agree closely with values previously reported in the literature. Finally, the forward and backward motion of the CSF in the ventricles was visualized, revealing the complex mixing patterns in the CSF spaces. The mathematical model presented in this article is a prerequisite for developing a mechanistic understanding of the relationships among vasculature pulsations, CSF flow, and CSF pressure waves in the CNS.

  14. Estimation of cerebrospinal fluid cortisol level in tuberculous meningitis

    PubMed Central

    Mahale, Rohan R.; Mehta, Anish; Uchil, Sudhir

    2015-01-01

    Background: Central nervous system (CNS) involvement in tuberculosis is around 5–10%. Of the various manifestations of CNS tuberculosis, meningitis is the most common (70–80%). Delay in diagnosis and treatment results in significant morbidity and mortality. Objective: To study the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) cortisol levels in tubercular meningitis and compare the levels with controls. Methods: Cross-sectional, prospective, observational, hospital-based study done in 20 patients of tubercular meningitis, 20 patients of aseptic meningitis (AM) and 25 control subjects without any preexisting neurological disorders who have undergone lumbar puncture for spinal anesthesia. Results: Cortisol was detected in all 40 CSF samples of patients (100%). Mean CSF cortisol level was 8.82, 3.47 and 1.05 in tubercular meningitis, AM and controls, respectively. Mean CSF cortisol level in tubercular meningitis was significantly higher as compared to AM and controls (P < 0.0001). Conclusion: Cortisol level estimation in CSF is one of the rapid, relatively inexpensive diagnostic markers in early identification of tubercular meningitis along with CSF findings of elevated proteins, hypoglycorrhachia and lymphocytic pleocytosis. This aids in earlier institution of appropriate treatment and thereby decreasing morbidity and mortality. This is the first study on the estimation of CSF cortisol level in tuberculous meningitis. PMID:26752900

  15. Nimodipine transfer into human breast milk and cerebrospinal fluid.

    PubMed

    Carcas, A J; Abad-Santos, F; de Rosendo, J M; Frias, J

    1996-02-01

    To report nimodipine concentrations in breast milk and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of a lactating woman who was given the drug to prevent a vascular spasm secondary to angiographic examination. A 36-year-old woman received a total dose of nimodipine 46 mg iv over 24 hours. She extracted milk when she noted mammary tightness, and blood samples were taken simultaneously by venipuncture in the arm contralateral to that of the nimodipine infusion. A CSF sample also was taken in a diagnostic lumbar puncture. Nimodipine concentration in milk was much lower than that in serum, with a milk/serum ratio of 0.06-0.15. The CSF/serum ratio was 0.01. We estimate that the infant would have received between 0.008% and 0.092% of the weight-adjusted dose that was administered to the mother if the baby had been nursed. Nimodipine is transferred to human milk in a lower proportion than are other calcium-channel blockers. These results suggest that treating the mother with nimodipine would entail no risk to the nursing infant.

  16. Testing of cerebrospinal compensatory reserve in shunted and non-shunted patients: a guide to interpretation based on an observational study.

    PubMed Central

    Czosnyka, M; Whitehouse, H; Smielewski, P; Simac, S; Pickard, J D

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To design a computerised infusion test to compensate for the disadvantages of Katzman's lumbar infusion method: inadequate accuracy of estimation of the resistance to cerebrospinal fluid outflow and poor predictive value in normal pressure hydrocephalus. METHODS--Accuracy was improved by intracranial pressure signal processing and model analysis for measurement of cerebrospinal compensatory variable. These include the CSF outflow resistance, brain compliance, pressure-volume index, estimated sagittal sinus pressure, CSF formation rate, and other variables. Infusion may be made into the lumbar space, ventricles, or, when assessing shunt function in vivo, the shunt chamber. RESULTS AND CONCLUSIONS--The computerised test has been used for five years in a multicentre study in 350 hydrocephalic patients of various ages, aetiologies, and states of cerebrospinal compensation. The principles of using the test to characterise different types of CSF circulatory disorders in patients presenting with ventricular dilatation, including brain atrophy and normal and high pressure hydrocephalus, are presented and illustrated. Previous studies showed a positive correlation between cerebrospinal compensatory variables and the results of shunting, but such a prediction remains difficult in idiopathic normal pressure hydrocephalus, particularly in elderly patients. The technique is helpful in the assessment of shunt malfunction, including posture-related overdrainage, over-drainage related to the nocturnal B wave activity, and proximal or distal shunt obstruction. The appendix presents an introduction of the mathematical modelling of CSF pressure volume-compensation included in computerised infusion test software. Images PMID:8778261

  17. Oblique Intrathecal Injection in Lumbar Spine Surgery: A Technical Note.

    PubMed

    Jewett, Gordon A E; Yavin, Daniel; Dhaliwal, Perry; Whittaker, Tara; Krupa, JoyAnne; Du Plessis, Stephan

    2017-09-01

    Intrathecal morphine (ITM) is an efficacious method of providing postoperative analgesia and reducing pain associated complications. Despite adoption in many surgical fields, ITM has yet to become a standard of care in lumbar spine surgery. Spine surgeons' reticence to make use of the technique may in part be attributed to concerns of precipitating a cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leak. Herein we describe a method for oblique intrathecal injection during lumbar spine surgery to minimize risk of CSF leak. The dural sac is penetrated obliquely at a 30° angle to offset dural and arachnoid puncture sites. Oblique injection in instances of limited dural exposure is made possible by introducing a 60° bend to a standard 30-gauge needle. The technique was applied for injection of ITM or placebo in 104 cases of lumbar surgery in the setting of a randomized controlled trial. Injection was not performed in two cases (2/104, 1.9%) following preinjection dural tear. In the remaining 102 cases no instances of postoperative CSF leakage attributable to oblique intrathecal injection occurred. Three cases (3/102, 2.9%) of transient CSF leakage were observed immediately following intrathecal injection with no associated sequelae or requirement for postsurgical intervention. In two cases, the observed leak was repaired by sealing with fibrin glue, whereas in a single case the leak was self-limited requiring no intervention. Oblique dural puncture was not associated with increased incidence of postoperative CSF leakage. This safe and reliable method of delivery of ITM should therefore be routinely considered in lumbar spine surgery.

  18. Cerebrospinal fluid leaks following septoplasty.

    PubMed

    Venkatesan, Naren N; Mattox, Douglas E; Del Gaudio, John M

    2014-12-01

    We conducted a retrospective review to identify the characteristics of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leak in patients who had undergone septoplasty and in selected patients who had experienced a spontaneous CSF leak. CSF leak is a known but infrequently reported complication of septoplasty; to the best of our knowledge, only 4 cases have been previously published in the literature. A review of our institution's database revealed 3 cases of postseptoplasty CSF leak. We reviewed all the available data to look for any commonalities among these 7 cases. In addition, we reviewed 6 cases of spontaneous CSF leak selected from our database for the same purpose. For all patients, we noted the side of the cribriform plate defect, its size and, for the postseptoplasty cases, the interval between the septoplasty and the leak repair. Overall, we found that leaks were much more common on the right side than on the left. The sizes of the leaks in the 2 postseptoplasty groups were comparable (mean: 14.0 × 6.4 mm). The interval between septoplasty and leak repair ranged from 2.5 to 20 years in our cases and from 3 days to 22 weeks in the previously published cases. All 3 of the postseptoplasty patients in our database presented with clear rhinorrhea. Two of the 3 patients had meningitis; 1 of these 2 also had pneumocephalus. Of the 6 cases of spontaneous CSF leaks, 4 occurred on the right and 2 on the left; the average size of the defect was 5.8 mm in the greatest dimension. The finding that cribriform plate defects after septoplasty were typically right-sided likely reflects the prevalence of left-sided surgical approaches. Also, the fact that the defects were larger in the postseptoplasty cases than in the spontaneous cases is likely attributable to the torque effect toward the thin skull base that occurs when the perpendicular plate is twisted during septoplasty.

  19. Upper lumbar disk herniations.

    PubMed

    Cedoz, M E; Larbre, J P; Lequin, C; Fischer, G; Llorca, G

    1996-06-01

    Specific features of upper lumbar disk herniations are reviewed based on data from the literature and from a retrospective study of 24 cases treated surgically between 1982 and 1994 (seven at L1-L2 and 17 at L2-L3). Clinical manifestations are polymorphic, misleading (abdominogenital pain suggestive of a visceral or psychogenic condition, meralgia paresthetica, isolated sciatica; femoral neuralgia is uncommon) and sometimes severe (five cases of cauda equina syndrome in our study group). The diagnostic usefulness of imaging studies (radiography, myelography, computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging) and results of surgery are discussed. The risk of misdiagnosis and the encouraging results of surgery are emphasized.

  20. Tau, phospho-tau, and S-100B in the cerebrospinal fluid of children with multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Rostasy, Kevin; Withut, Esther; Pohl, Daniela; Lange, Peter; Ciesielcyk, Barbara; Diem, Ricarda; Gärtner, Jutta; Otto, Markus

    2005-10-01

    Axonal injury and glial activation are an early neuropathologic event in adults with multiple sclerosis. To investigate whether markers of axonal injury and glial activation are already elevated in the cerebrospinal fluid of children with multiple sclerosis, we studied the cerebrospinal fluid of 25 children with multiple sclerosis and 67 controls for the presence of tau, phospho-tau, and S-100B proteins using specific enzyme-linked immunoabsorbent assays. In general, tau, phospho-tau, and S-100B protein levels did not differ significantly between groups. However, in a subgroup of nine children with multiple sclerosis, all of whom had prominent clinical symptoms at the time of lumbar puncture and radiologic disease activity, tau protein levels were significantly elevated when compared with other controls. These data indicate that axonal injury is not restricted to adult multiple sclerosis but can already occur in children with multiple sclerosis.

  1. Ten-Step Minimally Invasive Spine Lumbar Decompression and Dural Repair Through Tubular Retractors.

    PubMed

    Boukebir, Mohamed Abdelatif; Berlin, Connor David; Navarro-Ramirez, Rodrigo; Heiland, Tim; Schöller, Karsten; Rawanduzy, Cameron; Kirnaz, Sertaç; Jada, Ajit; Härtl, Roger

    2017-04-01

    Minimally invasive spine (MIS) surgery utilizing tubular retractors has become an increasingly popular approach for decompression in the lumbar spine. However, a better understanding of appropriate indications, efficacious surgical techniques, limitations, and complication management is required to effectively teach the procedure and to facilitate the learning curve. To describe our experience and recommendations regarding tubular surgery for lumbar disc herniations, foraminal compression with unilateral radiculopathy, lumbar spinal stenosis, synovial cysts, and dural repair. We reviewed our experience between 2008 and 2014 to develop a step-by-step description of the surgical techniques and complication management, including dural repair through tubes, for the 4 lumbar pathologies of highest frequency. We provide additional supplementary videos for dural tear repair, laminotomy for bilateral decompression, and synovial cyst resection. Our overview and complementary materials document the key technical details to maximize the success of the 4 MIS surgical techniques. The review of our experience in 331 patients reveals technical feasibility as well as satisfying clinical results, with no postoperative complications associated with cerebrospinal fluid leaks, 1 infection, and 17 instances (5.1%) of delayed fusion. MIS surgery through tubular retractors is a safe and effective alternative to traditional open or microsurgical techniques for the treatment of lumbar degenerative disease. Adherence to strict microsurgical techniques will allow the surgeon to effectively address bilateral pathology while preserving stability and minimizing complications.

  2. Effect of long-term vigabatrin therapy on selected neurotransmitter concentrations in cerebrospinal fluid.

    PubMed

    Ben-Menachem, E; Persson, L I; Mumford, J; Haegele, K D; Huebert, N

    1991-01-01

    Ten patients, suffering from drug-resistant complex partial seizures were treated for a period of up to 3 years with vigabatrin (Sabril). Vigabatrin is a novel antiepileptic agent, whose action is based on the inhibition of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) aminotransferase, the enzyme responsible for the catabolism of the neurotransmitter GABA. Samples of lumbar cerebrospinal fluid were obtained from the patients prior to commencing vigabatrin therapy, and thereafter at 6 months, 1 year, 2 years, and up to 3 years following the initiation of vigabatrin treatment. The influence of vigabatrin on the cerebrospinal fluid concentrations of free and total GABA, homocarnosine, homovanillic acid, 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid, and 3-methoxy-4-hydroxyphenylethylene glycol, as well as of the drug itself, was assessed. All patients demonstrated a clinical response to vigabatrin, and the drug was well tolerated over the entire observation period. Mean (+/- SD) reduction of seizure frequency was 65% +/- 23% (range, 26% to 100%) when comparing the end of the treatment period to the previgabatrin baseline. The cerebrospinal fluid concentrations of both free and total GABA and of the dipeptide homocarnosine showed approximately 2- to 5-fold increases over baseline values, with free GABA and homocarnosine being the more sensitive variables. Cerebrospinal fluid concentrations of homovanillic acid, 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid, and 3-methoxy-4-hydroxyphenylethylene glycol were not altered in a significant manner over the observation period. These findings support the concept that the effects of vigabatrin are restricted to an effect on GABA catabolism and do not extend to the neurotransmitters dopamine and norepinephrine. Clinical efficacy and elevation of GABA and homocarnosine concentration were sustained over the period of observation.

  3. Factitious posttraumatic stress disorder.

    PubMed

    Sparr, L; Pankratz, L D

    1983-08-01

    A growing number of young men have reported an array of symptoms that suggest a diagnosis of posttraumatic stress disorder. Five such men, all claiming to be Viet Nam veterans, were treated at a VA medical center; three said they were former prisoners of war. In fact, none had been prisoners of war, four had never been in Viet Nam, and two had never even been in the military. Instead, all five suffered factitious disorders. The authors describe the five patients and discuss differential diagnoses; the value of verifying military histories is stressed.

  4. Lumbar radicular pain.

    PubMed

    Govind, Jay

    2004-06-01

    Radicular pain is caused by irritation of the sensory root or dorsal root ganglion of a spinal nerve. The irritation causes ectopic nerve impulses perceived as pain in the distribution of the axon. The pathophysiology is more than just mass effect: it is a combination of compression sensitising the nerve root to mechanical stimulation, stretching, and a chemically mediated noncellular inflammatory reaction. This article discusses the clinical features, assessment and management of lumbar radicular pain (LRP). Lumbar radicular pain is sharp, shooting or lancinating, and is typically felt as a narrow band of pain down the length of the leg, both superficially and deep. It may be associated with radiculopathy (objective sensory and/or motor dysfunction as a result of conduction block) and may coexist with spinal or somatic referred pain. In more than 50% of cases, LRP settles with simple analgesics. Significant and lasting pain relief can be achieved with transforaminal epidural steroid injection. Surgery is indicated for those patients with progressive neurological deficits or severe LRP refractory to conservative measures.

  5. [Lumbar puncture training using simulation-based educational strategies: Experience in a clinical pediatric residency].

    PubMed

    Vassallo, Juan C; Gouguenheim, Bárbara; Ghiglione, Analía; Bravo, Nélida; Prudencio, Carla I; Villois, Florencia; Abadie, Yamila; Zubieta, Ana; Golini, Carol; Villar, Victoria; Rodríguez, Susana P

    2015-12-01

    Pediatricians should acquire multiple skills during their professional training, including procedural skills. Skill acquisition requires knowledge on theoretical bases, direct observation and, lastly, supervised repetitive practice. Training using simulators allows to learn procedures in a controlled setting, ensuring patients' safety, integrating this as a learning stage prior to the actual contact with patients. Here we report on the teaching experience of a simulated lumbar puncture procedure. Training was provided to 112 first year pediatric residents who entered Hospital Prof. Dr. Juan P. Garrahan in the 2013-2014 period. Educational contents included communication with parents regarding the procedure, material preparation, compliance with biosafety standards, sepsis and general patient care, puncture and subsequent cerebrospinal fluid collection, and specimen collection. Strategies included, in a sequential order, the introduction of theoretical aspects using the bibliography and audiovisual resources available at the hospital's online campus and subsequent practice of lumbar puncture in a 3-month-old infant phantom on a lateral recumbent position that allowed to make a puncture and collect cerebrospinal fluid. At each training session, the level of confidence was measured before and after the procedure, and a checklist was developed to verify an adequate compliance with each step of the procedure. The simulated lumbar puncture training model has been introduced as an educational strategy of our Pediatric Residency Program.

  6. Postlaminectomy Bilateral Lumbar Intraspinal Synovial Cysts

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Sung Ik; Lee, Jung Hwan

    2016-01-01

    Lumbar intraspinal synovial cysts are included in the difference diagnosis of lumbar radiculopathy. Developing imaging modalities has result in increased reporting about these lesions. However, the case of bilateral new lumbar intraspinal synovial cysts after laminectomy has been rarely reported. We report of a rare case with bilateral lumbar intraspinal synovial cysts after laminectomy, requiring surgical excision. PMID:27799997

  7. Assay of gentamicin in cerebrospinal fluid.

    PubMed Central

    Deacon, S

    1976-01-01

    A comparison of standard curves obtained from a conventional plate diffusion assay method revealed significant differences when gentamicin standards were made up in different media. Standards made up in distilled water resulted in a curve which differed from that of standards made up in pooled human cerebrospinal fluid by a factor of up to 4. When the assay medium was supplemented with 0-5% sodium chloride, the difference between the two standard curves was reduced to a factor of about 1-5. The curve obtained from standards made up in 150 mM sodium chloride/4-5 mM calcium chloride correlated well with that from standards made up in cerebrospinal fluid. There was no evidence of gentamicin being bound to protein in the cerebrospinal fluid. PMID:956457

  8. [Post-traumatic tics].

    PubMed

    Alegre, S; Chacón, J; Redondo, L; Navarro-Busto, C; Solana, B

    1996-10-01

    Secondary tics are those in which an aetiology justifying them can be found, as compared to idiopathic tics, which make up the majority, and the Gilles de la Tourette syndrome (SGT), which is, at the moment, of unknown origin. Of the possible aetiologies described as causing tics, craneo-encephalic trauma has been mentioned on very few occasions. We present a case of post-traumatic tics (verbal and neck) in a young man of 24, and review the published cases which can be considered to be of post-traumatic tics. We have found six cases of tics secondary to traumas, all craneo-encephalic, like ours (the one under study). The time interval between the blow and the appearance of the tic or tics varied between 2 weeks and 3 months. The absence of significant lesions seen in the complementary investigations make it impossible for us to discover the site of the lesion caused by the trauma. However, the presence in some cases of other tics before the trauma, and of family histories of tics, supports the idea of a genetic basis or predisposition to suffer this disorder.

  9. Profiling posttraumatic functional impairment.

    PubMed

    Norman, Sonya B; Stein, Murray B; Davidson, Jonathan R T

    2007-01-01

    Many individuals who have been exposed to psychological trauma suffer from impaired functioning, regardless of whether they have PTSD. Our purpose was to identify a subset of PTSD symptoms linked to functional impairment to a) improve the likelihood that individuals with posttraumatic impairment receive treatment, and b) offer a method to assess cost-burden of trauma history in epidemiological studies. We examined patterns of trauma-related symptoms in two independent community surveys (N=1002 and 630). Rank ordering of symptoms and their associations with impairment guided construction of an impairment-related profile in the first data set. The profile was then tested in the second data set. The derived symptom profile, consisting of intense recollections and/or emotional symptoms upon exposure to reminders, plus one or more of numbing/detachment, avoidance, sleep problems, concentration problems, or hypervigilance, detected the majority (88% and 74%) of persons with posttraumatic functional impairment. The symptom profile can help identify traumatized individuals who may benefit from treatment but do not necessarily meet criteria for PTSD.

  10. Complications and Rates of Subsequent Lumbar Surgery Following Lumbar Total Disc Arthroplasty and Lumbar Fusion.

    PubMed

    Eliasberg, Claire D; Kelly, Michael P; Ajiboye, Remi M; SooHoo, Nelson F

    2016-01-01

    Retrospective analysis. To examine complications and rates of subsequent surgery following lumbar spinal fusion (LF) and lumbar total disc arthroplasty (TDA) at up to 5-year follow-up. LF is commonly used in the management of degenerative disc disease causing pain refractory to nonoperative management. Lumbar TDA was developed as an alternative to fusion with the theoretical advantage of reducing rates of adjacent segment pathology and reoperation. Most prior reports comparing these 2 interventions have come from industry-sponsored investigational device exemption trials and no large-scale administrative database comparisons exist. The California Office of Statewide Health Planning and Development discharge database was queried for patients aged 18 to 65 years undergoing lumbar TDA and LF for degenerative disc disease from 2004 to 2010. Patient characteristics were collected, and rates of complications and readmission were identified. Rates of repeat lumbar surgery were calculated at 90-day and 1-, 3-, and 5-year follow-up intervals. A total of 52,877 patients met the inclusion criteria (LF = 50,462, TDA = 2415). Wound infections were more common following LF than TDA (1.03% vs. 0.25%, P < 0.001). Rates of subsequent lumbar surgery at 90-day and 1-year follow-up were lower with lumbar TDA than LF (90-day-TDA: 2.94% vs. LF: 4.01%, P = 0.007; 1-yr-TDA: 3.46% vs. LF: 4.78%, P = 0.009). However, there were no differences in rates of subsequent lumbar surgery between the 2 groups at 3-year and 5-year follow-up. Lumbar TDA was associated with fewer early reoperations, though beyond 1 year, rates of reoperation were similar. Lumbar TDA may be associated with fewer acute infections, though this may be approach related and unrelated to the device itself. 3.

  11. Complications and Rates of Subsequent Lumbar Surgery Following Lumbar Total Disc Arthroplasty and Lumbar Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Eliasberg, Claire D.; Kelly, Michael P.; Ajiboye, Remi M.; SooHoo, Nelson F.

    2015-01-01

    Study Design Retrospective analysis. Objectives To examine complications and rates of subsequent surgery following lumbar spinal fusion (LF) and lumbar total disc arthroplasty (TDA) at up to 5 years follow-up. Summary of Background Data LF is commonly used in the management of degenerative disc disease causing pain refractory to nonoperative management. Lumbar TDA was developed as an alternative to fusion with the theoretical advantage of reducing rates of adjacent segment pathology and reoperation. Most prior reports comparing these two interventions have come from industry-sponsored investigational device exemption trials and no large-scale administrative database comparisons exist. Methods The California Office of Statewide Health Planning and Development discharge database was queried for patients aged 18 to 65 years undergoing lumbar TDA and LF for degenerative disc disease from 2004 to 2010. Patient characteristics were collected, and rates of complications and readmission were identified. Rates of repeat lumbar surgery were calculated at 90-day and 1-, 3-, and 5-year follow-up intervals. Results A total of 52,877 patients met the inclusion criteria (LF = 50462, TDA = 2415). Wound infections were more common following LF than TDA (1.03% vs. 0.25%, p<0.001). Rates of subsequent lumbar surgery at 90-day and 1-year follow-up were lower with lumbar TDA than LF (90-day – TDA: 2.94% vs. LF: 4.01%, p=0.007; 1-year – TDA: 3.46% vs. LF: 4.78%, p=0.009). However, there were no differences in rates of subsequent lumbar surgery between the two groups at 3-year and 5-year follow-up. Conclusions Lumbar TDA was associated with fewer early reoperations, though beyond one year, rates of reoperation were similar. Lumbar TDA may be associated with fewer acute infections, though this may be approach-related and unrelated to the device itself. PMID:26751061

  12. Lumbar puncture during spaceflight: operational considerations, constraints, concerns, and limitations.

    PubMed

    Barr, Yael R

    2014-12-01

    Lumbar puncture (LP) is a commonly performed low-risk procedure terrestrially, used diagnostically for evaluation of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) pressure as well as for collection of CSF for analysis. NASA is investigating noninvasive means for measurement of intracranial pressure (ICP) to assess the potential contribution of elevated intracranial pressures to recently reported changes in astronauts' visual acuity and eye anatomy, known collectively as the Visual Impairment/Intracranial Pressure risk. However, many of these noninvasive technologies are still under development, have limited clinical validation, are several years away from being ready for in-flight use, or only provide qualitative rather than quantitative ICP values. Therefore, performance of in-flight LPs, as part of crewmember evaluation, has also been considered by NASA. This manuscript summarizes the unique operational considerations, constraints, concerns, and limitations of using traditional LP as an adjunct or as an alternative to noninvasive ICP measurements during spaceflight.

  13. Bacterial meningitis in the absence of cerebrospinal fluid pleocytosis: A case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Hase, Ryota; Hosokawa, Naoto; Yaegashi, Makito; Muranaka, Kiyoharu

    2014-09-01

    Elevation of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) cell count is a key sign in the diagnosis of bacterial meningitis. However, there have been reports of bacterial meningitis with no abnormalities in initial CSF testing. This type of presentation is extremely rare in adult patients. Here, a case involving an 83-year-old woman who was later diagnosed with bacterial meningitis caused by Neisseria meningitidis is described, in whom CSF at initial and second lumbar puncture did not show elevation of cell counts. Twenty-six non-neutropenic adult cases of bacterial meningitis in the absence of CSF pleocytosis were reviewed. The frequent causative organisms were Streptococcus pneumoniae and N meningitidis. Nineteen cases had bacteremia and seven died. The authors conclude that normal CSF at lumbar puncture at an early stage cannot rule out bacterial meningitis. Therefore, repeat CSF analysis should be considered, and antimicrobial therapy must be started immediately if there are any signs of sepsis or meningitis.

  14. Acute Foramen Magnum Syndrome Following Single Diagnostic Lumbar Puncture: Consequence of a Small Posterior Fossa?

    PubMed

    Kumar, Amandeep; Agrawal, Mohit; Prakash, Surya; Somorendra, Shambanduram; Singh, Pankaj Kumar; Garg, Ajay; Singh, Manmohan; Sharma, Bhawani Shanker

    2016-07-01

    Type I Chiari malformation (CMI) is a rare complication of lumbar cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) drainage that is usually reported after lumbar drain or lumboperitoneal shunt placement. It usually remains asymptomatic; however, even if it becomes symptomatic, symptoms are usually mild. There are only a few reports of acute foramen magnum syndrome following continuous lumbar CSF drainage, and acute foramen magnum syndrome after a single diagnostic lumbar puncture (LP) has not been previously reported. We encountered this catastrophic complication in one of our patient. A 30-year-old woman with a large supratentorial meningioma and associated asymptomatic CMI presented with holocranial headache. She underwent successful and uneventful excision of the tumor. However, she developed quadriplegia and respiratory arrest 48 hours following a diagnostic LP performed on postoperative day 9. She underwent urgent posterior fossa decompression after magnetic resonance imaging showed increased tonsillar impaction and swelling along with cervicomedullary compression. Postoperatively, she steadily improved and regained normal power after 3 months. Retrospective quantitative analysis of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed a small posterior fossa. The association of intracranial tumors and lumbar CSF drainage with CMI is uncommon. The documentation of a small posterior fossa signifies the importance of both developmental (small posterior fossa) and acquired (intracranial tumor/lumbar CSF drainage) factors in pathogenesis of CMI. Although the extreme rarity of acute deterioration following a single LP does not warrant LP to be contraindicated in such patients, documentation of resolution of CMI with postoperative MRI before performing lumbar CSF drainage (whether therapeutic or diagnostic), might be helpful in avoiding this rare complication. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. [Short-term effectiveness of nano-hydroxyapatite/polyamide-66 intervertebral cage for lumbar interbody fusion in patients with lower lumbar degenerative diseases].

    PubMed

    Yang, Xi; Song, Yueming; Kong, Qingquan; Gong, Quan; Pei, Fuxing; Tu, Chongqi

    2012-12-01

    To evaluate the short-term effectiveness of nano-hydroxyapatite/polyamide-66 (n-HA/PA66) intervertebral cage for lumbar interbody fusion in the patients with lower lumbar degenerative diseases. Between January and October 2011, 20 patients with lower lumbar degenerative diseases underwent transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion with n-HA/PA66 intervertebral cage. There were 8 males and 12 females, aged 22-80 years (mean, 51 years). The disease duration was 1 to 24 months (mean, 4 months). L4,5 fusion was performed in 8 cases, L5, S1 fusion in 9 cases, and L4-S1 fusion in 3 cases. Among 20 cases, 3 were diagnosed as having recurrent lumbar disc protrusion, 5 as having lumbar degenerative spondylolisthesis, 9 as having lumbar isthmic spondylolisthesis, and 3 as having lumbar spinal stenosis. The intervertebral height and lordosis were measured on X-ray film to assess the surgical correction and postoperative sustain while osseous fusion was observed on 3-dimensional CT. The Oswestry disability index (ODI) and short-form 36 health survey scale (SF-36) scores were obtained to assess the status of clinical recovery. All patients had incision healing by first intention. The pain and numb were relieved in varying degrees after operation. No cerebrospinal leakage, nerve root injury, or wound infection was occurred. All patients were followed up 6-9 months (mean, 7 months). No cage displacement or collapse was found. The intervertebral height and lordosis of single fusion segment were significantly improved at 3 days and 3, 6 months after operation when compared with those at preoperation (P < 0.01); there was no significant difference among each time point after operation (P > 0.05). The fusion rate was 74% at 3 months after operation and 96% at 6 months after operation, with an average of 4 months (range, 3-9 months) for interbody fusion. The ODI and SF-36 scores were significantly improved at 3 days and 6 months after operation when compared with the scores at

  16. Occult lumbar spinal stenosis.

    PubMed Central

    Choudhury, A R; Taylor, J C

    1977-01-01

    Twenty-eight patients presenting with low back pain, associated with sciatic or femoral neuropathy, were found to have lateral recess stenosis occurring as a result of hypertrophy of the facet joints, with preservation within normal limits of the sagittal AP diameter of the lumbar canal. Pathology was believed to be traumatic in origin, and the variable nature of the adhesions suggested recurrent inflammation; the hypertrophy of the facet joints may have been the result of traumatic inflammatory hyperaemia. Radiological investigations were unhelpful. The diagnosis of the condition was made at the time of surgical exploration by the findings of alteration of the facet joints, adhesions and fixity of the nerve roots, normal sagittal AP diameter of the canal, and absence of other significant lesions. Gratifying results were obtained with decompression by wide laminectomy with excision of overhanging facet joints and release of adhesions. PMID:894321

  17. [Intradural lumbar disk hernia].

    PubMed

    Alonso-Bartolomé, P; Canga, A; Vázquez-Barquero, A; García-Valtuille, R; Abascal, F; Cerezal, L

    2001-04-01

    Intradural disc herniation is a rare complication of degenerative disc disease. A correct diagnosis of this process is frequently difficult. If this entity is not preoperatively diagnosed and is omitted at surgery, severe neurologic sequels may be provoked. We report a case of a pathologically proven intradural disc herniation preoperatively diagnosed by MR imaging. Clinically, it was manifested by sudden onset of right leg ciatalgia and progressive right lower extremity weakness. The patient also referred a one-month history of sexual dysfunction. MR imaging revealed interruption of the low signal of the anulus fibrosus and of the posterior longitudinal ligament at L2-L3 level and a voluminous disc fragment migrated in the dural sac that showed rim enhancement with gadolinium.The clinical, neuroradiological, and surgical management of lumbar intradural disc herniation are reviewed.

  18. Outcome of Salvage Lumbar Fusion after Lumbar Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Deutsch, Harel

    2014-01-01

    Study Design Retrospective review. Purpose This study aims to define the role of lumbar fusion for persistent back pains after the lumbar disc replacement. Overview of Literature Little is written about lumbar fusion after optimally placed lumbar arthroplasty in patients with persistent lower back pains. Methods Retrospective review of cases of lumbar artificial disc requiring subsequent fusion because of persistent back pains despite optimally placed artificial discs. Outcomes were evaluated using Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) and visual analogue scale (VAS). Clinical improvements indicated 25% improvement in ODI and VAS values. Results Five patients met the study criteria. The mean baseline ODI for the five patients was 52. The mean baseline VAS scores for back and leg pains were 76 and 26, respectively. All the five patients had optimally placed prosthesis. The indication for surgery was the constant low back pains found in all the patients. Revision surgery involved disc explantation and fusion in two of the patients and posterolateral fusion without removing the prosthesis in three. None of the patients achieved adequate pain control after the revision surgery despite the solid bony fusion documented by postoperative computed tomography. The mean ODI value after the fusion was 55. The mean values for back and leg pains VAS were 72 and 30, respectively. Conclusions Lack of good pain relief after successful lumbar artifical disc replacements may indicate different etiology for the back pains. The spine-treating surgeons should have a high threshold level to perform salvage fusion at that level. PMID:24596600

  19. Diagnosis and Management of Spontaneous Lumbar Venous Retroperitoneal Hematoma in Setting of Deep Venous Thrombosis: A Case Report and Algorithm

    PubMed Central

    Tseng, Joseph; Chapman, Todd; Scott, Ryan; Kalinkin, Olga

    2016-01-01

    Retroperitoneal hematoma is rare and benefits from a systematic approach to prevent morbidity and mortality. Management of such bleeds is based upon patient stability, the cause (spontaneous or posttraumatic), and source (arterial or venous). Herein, the authors describe a diagnostic and management algorithm for retroperitoneal hemorrhage with an example of a rare lumbar venous bleed under the complicated clinical setting of deep venous thrombosis. PMID:27795865

  20. Pediatric Posttraumatic Headache: A Review.

    PubMed

    Choe, Meeryo C; Blume, Heidi K

    2016-01-01

    Head injuries are common in pediatrics, and headaches are the most common complaint following mild head trauma. Although moderate and severe traumatic brain injuries occur less frequently, headaches can complicate recovery. There is currently an intense spotlight on concussion and there has been a corresponding increase in the number of children seeking care for headache after mild traumatic brain injury or concussion. Understanding the natural history of, and recognition of factors that are associated with posttraumatic headache will help providers and families to limit disability and may prompt earlier intervention to address disabling headaches. While there are few studies on the treatment of posttraumatic headache, proper evaluation and management of posttraumatic headaches is essential to prevent further injury and to promote recovery. In this article, we will review the current definitions and epidemiology of pediatric posttraumatic headache and discuss current recommendations for the evaluation and management of this syndrome in children and adolescents. © The Author(s) 2015.

  1. Endonasal Endoscopic Closure of Cerebrospinal Fluid Rhinorrhea

    PubMed Central

    Schmerber, S.; Righini, Ch.; Lavielle, J.-P.; Passagia, J.-G.; Reyt, E.

    2001-01-01

    The authors review their experience with endoscopic repair of skull base defects associated with cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) rhinorrhea involving the paranasal sinuses. A total of 22 patients was treated endoscopically between 1992 and 1998. The repair method consisted of closure of the CSF fistula with a free autologous abdominal fat graft and fibrin glue, supported with a sheet of silastic. The primary closure rate was 82% (18/22), and the overall closure rate was 95.5% (21/22) without recurrence or complications within an average follow-up of 5 years (14-83 months). A single patient still complains of cerebrospinal rhinorrhea, although this was never proved by any clinical, endoscopic, or biological (β2-transferrin) examination. The repair of ethmoidal-sphenoidal cerebrospinal fluid fistulae by endonasal endoscopic surgery is an excellent technique, both safe and effective. Fat is a material of choice, as it is tight and resists infection well. The technique and indications for endoscopic management of cerebrospinal fluid leaks are discussed. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3Figure 4Figure 5 PMID:17167603

  2. Endonasal endoscopic closure of cerebrospinal fluid rhinorrhea.

    PubMed

    Schmerber, S; Righini, C; Lavielle, J P; Passagia, J G; Reyt, E

    2001-02-01

    The authors review their experience with endoscopic repair of skull base defects associated with cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) rhinorrhea involving the paranasal sinuses. A total of 22 patients was treated endoscopically between 1992 and 1998. The repair method consisted of closure of the CSF fistula with a free autologous abdominal fat graft and fibrin glue, supported with a sheet of silastic. The primary closure rate was 82% (18/22), and the overall closure rate was 95.5% (21/22) without recurrence or complications within an average follow-up of 5 years (14-83 months). A single patient still complains of cerebrospinal rhinorrhea, although this was never proved by any clinical, endoscopic, or biological (beta(2)-transferrin) examination. The repair of ethmoidal-sphenoidal cerebrospinal fluid fistulae by endonasal endoscopic surgery is an excellent technique, both safe and effective. Fat is a material of choice, as it is tight and resists infection well. The technique and indications for endoscopic management of cerebrospinal fluid leaks are discussed.

  3. Decompressive Surgery in a Patient with Posttraumatic Syringomyelia

    PubMed Central

    Byun, Min Seok; Hwang, Yong Soon; Park, Sang Keun

    2010-01-01

    Posttraumatic syringomyelia may result from a variety of inherent conditions and traumatic events, or from some combination of these. Many hypotheses have arisen to explain this complex disorder, but no consensus has emerged. A 28-year-old man presented with progressive lower extremity weakness, spasticity, and decreased sensation below the T4 dermatome five years after an initial trauma. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed a large, multi-septate syrinx cavity extending from C5 to L1, with a retropulsed bony fragment of L2. We performed an L2 corpectomy, L1-L3 interbody fusion using a mesh cage and screw fixation, and a wide decompression and release of the ventral portion of the spinal cord with an operating microscope. The patient showed complete resolution of his neurological symptoms, including the bilateral leg weakness and dysesthesia. Postoperative MRI confirmed the collapse of the syrinx and restoration of subarachnoid cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) flow. These findings indicate a good correlation between syrinx collapse and symptomatic improvement. This case showed that syringomyelia may develop through obstruction of the subarachnoid CSF space by a bony fracture and kyphotic deformity. Ventral decompression of the obstructed subarachnoid space, with restoration of spinal alignment, effectively treated the spinal canal encroachment and post-traumatic syringomyelia. PMID:20379479

  4. Normal pressure hydrocephalus. Influences on cerebral hemodynamic and cerebrospinal fluid pressure--chemical autoregulation

    SciTech Connect

    Meyer, J.S.; Tachibana, H.; Hardenberg, J.P.; Dowell, R.E. Jr.; Kitagawa, Y.; Mortel, K.F.

    1984-02-01

    Blood flow in the cerebral gray matter was measured in normal pressure hydrocephalus and Alzheimer disease by 133Xe inhalation. Flow values in the frontal and temporal gray matter increased after lowering cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) pressure by lumbar puncture in normal pressure hydrocephalus (p less than 0.05) and also after shunting. One case with cerebral complications did not improve clinically. In Alzheimer disease the reverse (decreases in flow in the gray matter) occurred after removal of CSF. Normal pressure hydrocephalus was associated with impaired cerebral vasomotor responsiveness during 100% oxygen and 5% carbon dioxide inhalation. This complication was restored toward normal after CSF removal and/or shunting. Cerebral blood flow measurements appear to be useful for confirming the diagnosis of normal pressure hydrocephalus and predicting the clinical benefit from shunting.

  5. Normal pressure hydrocephalus. Influences on cerebral hemodynamic and cerebrospinal fluid pressure--chemical autoregulation.

    PubMed

    Meyer, J S; Tachibana, H; Hardenberg, J P; Dowell, R E; Kitagawa, Y; Mortel, K F

    1984-02-01

    Blood flow in the cerebral gray matter was measured in normal pressure hydrocephalus and Alzheimer disease by 133Xe inhalation. Flow values in the frontal and temporal gray matter increased after lowering cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) pressure by lumbar puncture in normal pressure hydrocephalus (p less than 0.05) and also after shunting. One case with cerebral complications did not improve clinically. In Alzheimer disease the reverse (decreases in flow in the gray matter) occurred after removal of CSF. Normal pressure hydrocephalus was associated with impaired cerebral vasomotor responsiveness during 100% oxygen and 5% carbon dioxide inhalation. This complication was restored toward normal after CSF removal and/or shunting. Cerebral blood flow measurements appear to be useful for confirming the diagnosis of normal pressure hydrocephalus and predicting the clinical benefit from shunting.

  6. Brain Gene Expression Signatures From Cerebrospinal Fluid Exosome RNA Profiling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zanello, S. B.; Stevens, B.; Calvillo, E.; Tang, R.; Gutierrez Flores, B.; Hu, L.; Skog, J.; Bershad, E.

    2016-01-01

    While the Visual Impairment and Intracranial Pressure (VIIP) syndrome observations have focused on ocular symptoms, spaceflight has been also associated with a number of other performance and neurologic signs, such as headaches, cognitive changes, vertigo, nausea, sleep/circadian disruption and mood alterations, which, albeit likely multifactorial, can also result from elevation of intracranial pressure (ICP). We therefore hypothesize that these various symptoms are caused by disturbances in the neurophysiology of the brain structures and are correlated with molecular markers in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) as indicators of neurophysiological changes. Exosomes are 30-200 nm microvesicles shed into all biofluids, including blood, urine, and CSF, carrying a highly rich source of intact protein and RNA cargo. Exosomes have been identified in human CSF, and their proteome and RNA pool is a potential new reservoir for biomarker discovery in neurological disorders. The purpose of this study is to investigate changes in brain gene expression via exosome analysis in patients suffering from ICP elevation of varied severity (idiopathic intracranial hypertension -IIH), a condition which shares some of the neuroophthalmological features of VIIP, as a first step toward obtaining evidence suggesting that cognitive function and ICP levels can be correlated with biomarkers in the CSF. Our preliminary work, reported last year, validated the exosomal technology applicable to CSF analysis and demonstrated that it was possible to obtain gene expression evidence of inflammation processes in traumatic brain injury patients. We are now recruiting patients with suspected IIH requiring lumbar puncture at Baylor College of Medicine. Both CSF (5 ml) and human plasma (10 ml) are being collected in order to compare the pattern of differentially expressed genes observed in CSF and in blood. Since blood is much more accessible than CSF, we would like to determine whether plasma biomarkers for

  7. [Management of cerebrospinal fluid leaks according to size. Our experience].

    PubMed

    Alobid, Isam; Enseñat, Joaquim; Rioja, Elena; Enriquez, Karla; Viscovich, Liza; de Notaris, Matteo; Bernal-Sprekelsen, Manuel

    2014-01-01

    We present our experience in the reconstruction of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leaks according to their size and location. Fifty-four patients who underwent advanced skull base surgery (large defects) and 62 patients with CSF leaks of different origin (small and medium-sized defects) were included. Large defects were reconstructed with a nasoseptal pedicled flap positioned on fat and fascia lata and lumbar drainage was used. In small and medium-sized leaks of other origin, intrathecal fluorescein 5% was applied previously to identify the defect. Fascia lata in an underlay position was used for reconstruction, which was then covered with mucoperiosteum from the turbinate. Perioperative antibiotics were administered for 5-7 days. Nasal packing was removed after 24-48 hours. The most frequent aetiology for small and medium-sized defects was spontaneous (48.4%), followed by trauma (24.2%), iatrogenic (5%) and others. The success rate was of 91% after the first surgery and 98% in large skull base defects and small/medium-sized respectively. After rescue surgery, the rate of closure achieved was 100%. The follow-up was 15.6 ± 12.4 months for large defects and 75.3 ± 51.3 months for small/medium-sized defects without recurrence. Endoscopic surgery for closure of any type of skull base defect is the gold standard approach. Defect size does not play a significant role in the success rate. Fascia lata and mucoperiosteum allow a reconstruction of small/medium-sized defects. For larger skull base defects, a combination of fat, fascia lata and nasoseptal pedicled flaps provide a successful reconstruction. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  8. Repeat Lumbar Punctures in Infants with Meningitis in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit

    PubMed Central

    Greenberg, Rachel G.; Benjamin, Daniel K.; Cohen-Wolkowiez, Michael; Clark, Reese H.; Cotten, C. Michael; Laughon, Matthew; Smith, P. Brian

    2010-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study is to examine the results of repeat lumbar puncture in infants with initial positive cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) cultures in order to determine the clinical characteristics and outcomes of infants with repeat positive cultures. Study Design Cohort study of infants with an initial positive CSF culture undergoing repeat lumbar puncture between 1997 and 2004 at 150 neonatal intensive care units managed by the Pediatrix Medical group. We compared the clinical outcomes of infants with repeat positive cultures and infants with repeat negative cultures. Result We identified 118 infants with repeat CSF cultures. Of these, 26 infants had repeat positive cultures. A higher proportion with repeat positive cultures died compared to those with repeat negative cultures, 6/23 (26%) vs. 6/81 (7%), respectively (p=0.02). Conclusion Among infants with a positive CSF culture, a repeat positive CSF culture is common. The presence of a second positive culture is associated with increased mortality. PMID:21164430

  9. [Penetrating stab injury to the lumbar spinal cord in a child].

    PubMed

    Scheiderer, B; Mild, K; Gebhard, F; Scola, A

    2016-03-01

    This article reports the case of an 8-year-old boy with a knife stab injury to the lumbar spine without neurological deficits. The computed tomography (CT) scan revealed a longitudinal penetration of the conus medullaris at the level of the first lumbar vertebra. The knife blade was extracted and primary closure was carried out on the stab wound. The immediately postoperative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) as well as the follow-up examinations after 1 and 6 weeks showed no evidence of compressive spinal bleeding, myelopathy or cerebrospinal fluid leakage. In addition, no secondary changes of the neurological status developed. Consequently, in cases of neurologically asymptomatic patients without concomitant injuries the surgical exploration of a stab wound does not seem to be absolutely necessary.

  10. "Compensated hyperosmolarity" of cerebrospinal fluid and the development of hydrocephalus.

    PubMed

    Klarica, M; Miše, B; Vladić, A; Radoš, M; Orešković, D

    2013-09-17

    Acute osmolar loading of cerebrospinal fluid within one lateral ventricle of dogs was examined as a cause of water extraction from the bloodstream and an increase in intracranial pressure. We have shown that a certain amount of (3)H₂O from the bloodstream enters osmotically loaded cerebrospinal fluid significantly faster, hence causing a significant increase in intracranial pressure. The noted phenomenon in which intracranial pressure still significantly increases, but in which the hyperosmolarity of the cerebrospinal fluid is no longer present, was named "compensated hyperosmolarity". In the case of the sub-chronic application of hyperosmolar solutions into cat ventricles, we observed an increase in cerebrospinal fluid volume and a more pronounced development of hydrocephalus in the area of application, but without significant increase in intracranial pressure and without blockage of cerebrospinal fluid pathways. These results support the newly proposed hypothesis of cerebrospinal fluid hydrodynamics and the ability to develop new strategies for the treatment of cerebrospinal fluid-related diseases.

  11. Evaluation of Spontaneous Spinal Cerebrospinal Fluid Leaks Disease by Computerized Image Processing.

    PubMed

    Yıldırım, Mustafa S; Kara, Sadık; Albayram, Mehmet S; Okkesim, Şükrü

    2016-05-17

    Spontaneous Spinal Cerebrospinal Fluid Leaks (SSCFL) is a disease based on tears on the dura mater. Due to widespread symptoms and low frequency of the disease, diagnosis is problematic. Diagnostic lumbar puncture is commonly used for diagnosing SSCFL, though it is invasive and may cause pain, inflammation or new leakages. T2-weighted MR imaging is also used for diagnosis; however, the literature on T2-weighted MRI states that findings for diagnosis of SSCFL could be erroneous when differentiating the diseased and control. One another technique for diagnosis is CT-myelography, but this has been suggested to be less successful than T2-weighted MRI and it needs an initial lumbar puncture. This study aimed to develop an objective, computerized numerical analysis method using noninvasive routine Magnetic Resonance Images that can be used in the evaluation and diagnosis of SSCFL disease. Brain boundaries were automatically detected using methods of mathematical morphology, and a distance transform was employed. According to normalized distances, average densities of certain sites were proportioned and a numerical criterion related to cerebrospinal fluid distribution was calculated. The developed method was able to differentiate between 14 patients and 14 control subjects significantly with p = 0.0088 and d = 0.958. Also, the pre and post-treatment MRI of four patients was obtained and analyzed. The results were differentiated statistically (p = 0.0320, d = 0.853). An original, noninvasive and objective diagnostic test based on computerized image processing has been developed for evaluation of SSCFL. To our knowledge, this is the first computerized image processing method for evaluation of the disease. Discrimination between patients and controls shows the validity of the method. Also, post-treatment changes observed in four patients support this verdict.

  12. [THE SEARCH AFTER PROGNOSTIC TESTS OF DEVELOPMENT OF UROLITHIASIS OF PATIENTS WITH VERTEBRO-CEREBROSPINAL TRAUMA].

    PubMed

    Stogov, M V; Schurova, E N; Kireieva, E A

    2015-11-01

    The article presents analysis of alterations of biochemical indicators in blood serum and day urine of 22 patients in acute and early periods after vertebro-cerebrospinal trauma. Out of total number of patients in 10 (main group) in post-traumatic period urolithiasis developed In 12 patients no signs of urolithiasis were detected These examinedpatients were included into comparative group. The reference group was composed with 20 healthy individuals. The concentration of urea, creatinine, uric acid, calcium and inorganic phosphate in blood serum and day urine were detected In patients of main group statistically significant increasing of levels of urea and creatinine was detected in blood serum relative to patients of comparative group. In examined patients of main group clearance of urea was reliably lower than both values of comparative group (up to 2.55 times; p < 0.05) and indicators of reference group (up to 3.75 times; p < 0.05). In patients of this group, clearance of uric acid also had reliable differences from indicators both in comparative group and reference group. Therefore, in patients in acute and early periods of vertebro- cerebrospinal trauma expressed disorders of biochemical indicators of blood serum and urine that can be referred to predictors of risk of development of urolithiasis in the following. The most informative tests were increasing of concentration of urea in blood serum more than 5.30 mmol/l (ratio of likelihood ofpositive test--4.26) and decreasing of clearance of uric acid and urea.

  13. Clinical and surgical outcomes after lumbar laminectomy: An analysis of 500 patients

    PubMed Central

    Bydon, Mohamad; Macki, Mohamed; Abt, Nicholas B.; Sciubba, Daniel M.; Wolinsky, Jean-Paul; Witham, Timothy F.; Gokaslan, Ziya L.; Bydon, Ali

    2015-01-01

    Background: The objective of this study is to determine the clinical and surgical outcomes following lumbar laminectomy. Methods: We retrospectively reviewed medical records of neurosurgical patients who underwent first-time, bilateral, 1-3 level laminectomies for degenerative lumbar disease. Patients with discectomy, complete facetectomy, and fusion were excluded. Results: Five hundred patients were followed for an average of 46.79 months. Following lumbar laminectomy, patients experienced statistically significant improvement in back pain, neurogenic claudication, radiculopathy, weakness, and sensory deficits. The rate of intraoperative durotomy was 10.00%; however, 1.60% experienced a postoperative cerebrospinal fluid leak. The risk of experiencing at least one postoperative complication with a lumbar laminectomy was 5.60%. Seventy-two patients (14.40%) required reoperations for progression of degenerative disease over a mean of 3.40 years. The most common symptoms prior to reoperation included back pain (54.17%), radiculopathy (47.22%), weakness (18.06%), sensory deficit (15.28%), and neurogenic claudication (19.44%). The relative risk of reoperation for patients with postoperative back pain was 6.14 times higher than those without postoperative back pain (P < 0.001). Of the 72 patients undergoing reoperations, 55.56% underwent decompression alone, while 44.44% underwent decompression and posterolateral fusions. When considering all-time reoperations, the lifetime risk of requiring a fusion after a lumbar laminectomy based on this study (average follow-up of 46.79 months) was 8.0%. Conclusion: Patients experienced statistically significant improvements in back pain, neurogenic claudication, radiculopathy, motor weakness, and sensory deficit following lumbar laminectomy. Incidental durotomy rate was 10.00%. Following a first-time laminectomy, the reoperation rate was 14.4% over a mean of 3.40 years. PMID:26005583

  14. C-5 palsy after cerebrospinal fluid diversion in posttraumatic syringomyelia: case report.

    PubMed

    Ghobrial, George M; Beygi, Sara; Viereck, Matthew J; Heller, Joshua E; Sharan, Ashwini; Jallo, Jack; Harrop, James S; Prasad, Srinivas

    2015-04-01

    Syringomyelia is a potentially debilitating disease that involves abnormal CSF flow mechanics; its incidence after traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI) is approximately 15%. Treatment consists of restoration of CSF flow, typically via arachnoidolysis and syrinx decompression. The authors present a case of pronounced syringomyelia in a patient with concomitant severe cervical myelomalacia to demonstrate unilateral C-5 palsy as a potential complication of aggressive syrinx decompression at a remote level. A 56-year-old man with a remote history of SCI at T-11 (ASIA [American Spinal Injury Association] Grade A) presented with complaints of ascending motor and sensory weakness into the bilateral upper extremities that had progressed over 1 year. MRI demonstrated severe distortion of the spinal cord at the prior injury level of T10-11, where an old anterior column injury and prior hook-rod construct was visualized. Of note, the patient had a holocord syrinx with demonstrable myelomalacia. To restore CSF flow and decompress the spinal cord, T-2 and T-3 laminectomies, followed by arachnoidolysis and syringopleural shunt placement, were performed. Postoperatively on Day 1, with the exception of a unilateral deltoid palsy, the patient had immediate improvement in upper-extremity strength and myelopathy. He was discharged from the hospital on postoperative Day 5; however, at his 2-week follow-up visit, a persistent unilateral deltoid palsy was noted. MRI demonstrated a significant reduction in the holocord syrinx, no neural foraminal stenosis, and a significant positional shift of the ventral spinal cord. Further motor recovery was noted at the 8-month follow-up. Syringomyelia is a debilitating disease arising most often as a result of traumatic SCI. In the setting of myelomalacia with a pronounced syrinx, C-5 palsy is a potential complication of syrinx decompression.

  15. A short review on a complication of lumbar spine surgery: CSF leak.

    PubMed

    Menon, Sajesh K; Onyia, Chiazor U

    2015-12-01

    Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leak is a common complication of surgery involving the lumbar spine. Over the past decades, there has been significant advancement in understanding the basis, management and techniques of treatment for post-operative CSF leak following lumbar spine surgery. In this article, we review previous work in the literature on the various factors and technical errors during or after lumbar spine surgery that may lead to this feared complication, the available options of management with focus on the various techniques employed, the outcomes and also to highlight on the current trends. We also discuss the presentation, factors contributing to its development, basic concepts and practical aspects of the management with emphasis on the different techniques of treatment. Different outcomes following various techniques of managing post-operative CSF leak after lumbar spine surgery have been well described in the literature. However, there is currently no most ideal technique among the available options. The choice of which technique to be applied in each case is dependent on each surgeon's cumulative experience as well as a clear understanding of the contributory underlying factors in each patient, the nature and site of the leak, the available facilities and equipment. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. [Lumbar stabilization exercises].

    PubMed

    Vásquez-Ríos, Jorge Rodrigo; Nava-Bringas, Tania Inés

    2014-01-01

    Antecedentes: el ejercicio es la intervención con mayor grado de evidencia de eficacia para el tratamiento del dolor crónico de la espalda baja, con beneficio superior en términos de dolor y funcionalidad, en comparación con cualquiera otra intervención. Existe una amplia variedad de ejercicios diseñados; sin embargo, actualmente los llamados ejercicios de estabilización lumbar adquiririeron una popularidad creciente entre los clínicos que están en contacto con enfermedades de la columna. Sin embargo, existe controversia en cuanto a la prescripción adecuada de los mismos y los múltiples protocolos publicados. Objetivo: analizar la bibliografía científica acerca del uso y prescripción de estos ejercicios para favorecer la mejor toma de decisiones enlos clínicos y diseñar, con base a la evidencia, el programa más adecuado para cada paciente. Conclusión: se encontró que este programa es una herramienta esencial en el tratamiento del dolor de espalda baja, en la etapa terapéutica y en la preventiva.

  17. Lumbar Spinal Stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Genevay, Stephane

    2009-01-01

    Lumbar spinal stenosis (LSS) is most commonly due to degenerative changes in older individuals. LSS is being more commonly diagnosed and may relate to better access to advanced imaging and to an aging population. This review focuses on radicular symptoms related to degenerative central and lateral stenosis and updates knowledge of LSS pathophysiology, diagnosis and management. Since patients with anatomic LSS can range from asymptomatic to severely disabled, the clinical diagnosis focuses on symptoms and examination findings associated with LSS. Imaging findings are helpful for patients with persistent, bothersome symptoms in whom invasive treatments are being considered. There is limited information from high quality studies about the relative benefits and harms of commonly used treatments. Interpreting and comparing results of available research is limited by a lack of consensus about the definition of LSS. Nevertheless, evidence supports decompressive laminectomy for patients with persistent and bothersome symptoms. Recommendations favor a shared decision making approach due to important trade-offs between alternative therapies and differences among patients in their preferences and values. PMID:20227646

  18. Lumbar intrathecal ligaments.

    PubMed

    Kershner, David E; Binhammer, Robert T

    2002-03-01

    A meticulous examination was performed on 56 vertebral columns from cadavers between 64 and 89 years of age. Identification of all contents within the dural sac was completed; however, the main focus was the cauda equina and lumbar region. In addition to scope dissection, radiographs and histological preparations were used to identify structures, tissue types, and any possible pathology. Discrete intrathecal ligamentous bands were observed in all cadavers examined. They were found randomly binding the dorsal nerve roots of the cauda equina to the dura. Occasional binding of the ventral nerve roots to the dorsal roots was observed. Histological examination demonstrated a dense collagen ligament varying between 0.13 and 0.35 microm in thickness and from 3 mm to 3.5 cm in length. The average number of ligaments found per cadaver was 18. These ligaments displayed a broad base attachment to the nerve root or dura of approximately 3 mm. Looping of the nerve roots associated with these ligaments was seen in one cadaver with a burst fracture. Electron microscopic studies of these ligaments demonstrated similarities to denticulate ligaments. It is suggested that the intrathecal ligaments represent remnants from fetal development of the denticulate ligaments.

  19. Broadband Infrared Spectroscopy for Non-Contact Measurement of Neurological Disease Biomarkers in Cerebrospinal Fluid.

    PubMed

    Horosh, Michael; Feldman, Haim; Yablonovich, Avi; Firer, Michael A; Abookasis, David

    2017-03-01

    Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) is a clear and colorless biological fluid which circulates within brain ventricles (cavities), the spinal cord's central canal, the space between the brain and the spinal cord, as well as their protective coverings, the meninges. Cerebrospinal fluid contains different constituents, such as albumin and lactate, whose levels are used clinically as biomarkers of neurodegenerative disorders. In current clinical practice, analysis of CSF content for the diagnosis of central nervous system disorders requires an invasive procedure known as lumbar puncture or spinal tap. With the aim of developing a noninvasive alternative, we report here the spectral behavior of albumin and lactate over a broad wavelength range of 600-2000 nm, after each was added separately at varying normal and abnormal concentration levels to artificial CSF ( aCSF). Spectral measurements were conducted simultaneously by two different spectrometers working at different spectral ranges in transmittance mode. Spectral analysis revealed that albumin and lactate each possesses its own first and second derivative absorbance spectra fingerprint between 1660 and 1810 nm. Distinguishing albumin from lactate by their spectral data enabled the differentiation between aCSF conditions modeling different neurological disorders. Spectral changes of each compound strongly correlated ( R(2 )> 0.9) with absorbance derivative spectra peaks at specific wavelengths, when analyzed by linear regression with variations in their concentration. These findings suggest the feasibility of CSF biomarker assessment by broadband infrared spectroscopy.

  20. Performance of Cerebrospinal Fluid Biomarkers of Alzheimer Disease in a Memory Clinic in Norway.

    PubMed

    Knapskog, Anne-Brita; Engedal, Knut; Braekhus, Anne

    2016-01-01

    Although Alzheimer disease (AD) remains a clinical diagnosis, biomarkers are in use to support the diagnosis. Three cerebrospinal biomarkers, amyloid-β (Aβ), total tau (T-tau), and phospho tau (P-tau), reflect neuropathologic changes observed in AD patients. The aim of this study was to explore the performance of the cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers used in a memory clinic setting. We included 205 patients who had been through a standardized examination including lumbar puncture. Diagnoses were made blind to the results of the spinal fluid analyses. By combining low Aβ and high T-tau or P-tau values, the sensitivity was 31.9% and the specificity was 92.5% when comparing patients with AD with other patients. In receiver operating characteristic analyses, the AUC for the Aβ was 0.78 (SE=0.04; 95% CI, 0.7-0.85), for T-tau 0.80 (SE=0.03; 95% CI, 0.73-0.86), and for P-tau 0.76 (SE=0.04; 95% CI, 0.69-0.83). A significant difference was found between the sexes, with higher values of Aβ among younger men (under 65 y of age) with AD [799.8 (SD=317.2) vs. 558.9 (SD=123.5) for women, P-value=0.003]. The present study found a lower performance of the biomarkers than reported previously.

  1. Cellular immune surveillance of central nervous system bypasses blood-brain barrier and blood-cerebrospinal-fluid barrier: revealed with the New Marburg cerebrospinal-fluid model in healthy humans.

    PubMed

    Kleine, Tilmann O

    2015-03-01

    In healthy human brain/spinal cord, blood capillaries and venules are locked differently with junctions and basement membrane (blood-brain barrier, blood-venule barrier). In choroid plexus, epithelial tight junctions and basement membrane lock blood-cerebrospinal-fluid (CSF) barrier. Lymphocytic cell data, quantified with multicolour flow-cytometry or immuno-cytochemical methods in sample pairs of lumbar CSF, ventrictricular CSF and peripheral venous blood, are taken from references; similarly, data of thoracic duct chyle and blood sample pairs. Through three circumventricular organs (median eminence, organum vasculosum lamina terminalis, area postrema), 15-30 μl blood are pressed by blood pressure through fenestrated capillaries, matrix/basement membrane spaces and ependyma cell lacks into ventricular/suboccipital CSF to generate CD3(+) , CD4(+) , CD8(+) , CD3(+) HLA-DR(+) , CD16(+) 56(+) 3(-) NK, CD19(+) 3(-) B subsets; some B, few NK cells adhere in circumventricular organs. Into lumbar CSF, 10-15 μl thoracic chyle with five lymphocyte subsets (without CD3(+) HLA-DR(+) cells) reflux, when CSF drains out with to-and-fro movements of chyle/CSF along nerve roots. Lymphocytes in lumbar CSF represent a mixture of blood and lymph lymphocytic cells with similar HLA-DR(+) CD3(+) cell counts in ventricular and lumbar CSF, higher CD3(+) , CD4(+) , CD8(+) subsets in lumbar CSF, and few NK and B cells due to absorption in circumventricular organs. The Marburg CSF Model reflects origin and turnover of lymphatic cells in CSF realistically; the model differs from ligand-multistep processes of activated lymphocytes through blood-brain-, blood-venule-, and blood-CSF-barriers; because transfer of inactivated native lymphocytes through the barriers is not found with healthy humans, although described so in literature.

  2. Spontaneous cerebrospinal fluid leak at the clivus

    PubMed Central

    Składzien, Jacek; Betlej, Marek; Chrzan, Robert; Mika, Joanna

    2015-01-01

    We present a case report of a 60-year-old woman with a spontaneous cerebrospinal fluid leak at the clivus, obesity and no history of trauma. Follow-up imaging scans confirmed enlargement of the defect within the posterior clival framework to the size of 16 × 9 × 4 mm with a suspected meningocerebral hernia. The surgeons used the “two nostrils – four hands” endoscopic operating technique. The patient reported a history of cerebrospinal fluid leaks lasting for 3 years, with increasingly shorter leak-free periods and an increasing incidence of inflammatory complications. The patient recovered without complications, and she was discharged 14 days after the surgery. Good local outcome and improved patient condition were achieved postoperatively. PMID:26865899

  3. Breast Cancer and Posttraumatic Growth

    PubMed Central

    İnan, Figen Şengün; Üstün, Besti

    2014-01-01

    The current methods for early diagnosis and increased treatment options have improved survival rates in breast cancer. Breast cancer diagnosis effects individuals in physical, psychological and social dimensions either positively or negatively. In the literature, usually the negative effects encountered in the period after the diagnosis of breast cancer are mostly described, with limited data on the positive effects. Nevertheless, the identification of positive changes and defining its determinants is important in supporting and strengthening posttraumatic growth in this group. The objective of this review is to explain posttraumatic growth and its determinants in breast cancer during the post-treatment period in accordance with the relevant literature. In our evaluation, it was noticed that breast cancer survivors experience posttraumatic growth in the post-treatment period, but the literature is limited in explaining the nature of posttraumatic growth and its determinants. Both qualitative and quantitative research that will provide in-depth information on the subject, explaining culture-specific posttraumatic growth and related factors, are required. PMID:28331647

  4. Fistula detection in cerebrospinal fluid leakage1

    PubMed Central

    Allen, Marshall B.; Gammal, Taher el; Ihnen, Menard; Cowan, Morgan A.

    1972-01-01

    In two cases of cerebrospinal fluid rhinorrhoea in which scinticisternography failed to identify the fistulae, the tracts were demonstrated by positive contrast ventriculography. It is postulated that the fistula communicated with the ventricles but was isolated from the subarachnoid space by adhesions (demonstrated at operation in one case). There was `high pressure rhinorrhoea' in one case. The rhinorrhoea ceased after insertion of ventriculoatrial shunt. Images PMID:4538888

  5. Mollaret's meningitis associated with cerebrospinal fluid leak.

    PubMed

    Plit, M L; Miller, G B; Berkowitz, F E; Gear, J H

    1982-10-23

    Mollaret's meningitis or the benign recurrent meningitis syndrome is a rare disorder not previously described in Africa. The syndrome has a characteristic clinical presentation with spinal fluid pleocytosis, often with unusual 'epithelial' cells. With contemporary techniques no causative organism has been incriminated. The aetiology remains speculative, but we report on a patient found to have a cerebrospinal fluid leak, which may represent a factor in the pathogenesis of this disorder.

  6. Cerebrospinal fluid outflow resistance as a diagnostic marker of spontaneous cerebrospinal fluid leakage.

    PubMed

    Beck, Jürgen; Fung, Christian; Ulrich, Christian T; Fiechter, Michael; Fichtner, Jens; Mattle, Heinrich P; Mono, Marie-Luise; Meier, Niklaus; Mordasini, Pasquale; Z'Graggen, Werner J; Gralla, Jan; Raabe, Andreas

    2017-08-01

    OBJECTIVE Spinal CSF leakage causes spontaneous intracranial hypotension (SIH). The aim of this study was to characterize CSF dynamics via lumbar infusion testing in patients with and without proven spinal CSF leakage in order to explore possible discriminators for the presence of an open CSF leak. METHODS This analysis included all patients with suspected SIH who were treated at the authors' institution between January 2012 and February 2015. The gold standard for "proven" CSF leakage is considered to be extrathecal contrast accumulation after intrathecal contrast injection. To characterize CSF dynamics, the authors performed computerized lumbar infusion testing to measure lumbar pressure at baseline (opening pressure) and at plateau, as well as pulse amplitude, CSF outflow resistance (RCSF), craniospinal elastance, and pressure-volume index. RESULTS Thirty-one patients underwent clinical imaging and lumbar infusion testing and were included in the final analysis. A comparison of the 14 patients with proven CSF leakage with the 17 patients without leakage showed a statistically significantly lower lumbar opening pressure (p < 0.001), plateau pressure (p < 0.001), and RCSF (p < 0.001) in the group with leakage. Sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values for an RCSF cutoff of ≤ 5 mm Hg/(ml/min) were 0.86, 1.0, 1.0, and 0.89 (area under the curve of 0.96), respectively. The median pressure-volume index was higher (p = 0.003), and baseline (p = 0.017) and plateau (p < 0.001) pulse amplitudes were lower in patients with a proven leak. CONCLUSIONS Lumbar infusion testing captures a distinct pattern of CSF dynamics associated with spinal CSF leakage. RCSF assessed by computerized lumbar infusion testing has an excellent diagnostic accuracy and is more accurate than evaluating the lumbar opening pressure. The authors suggest inclusion of RCSF in the diagnostic criteria for SIH.

  7. Posttraumatic Resilience in Former Ugandan Child Soldiers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klasen, Fionna; Oettingen, Gabriele; Daniels, Judith; Post, Manuela; Hoyer, Catrin; Adam, Hubertus

    2010-01-01

    The present research examines posttraumatic resilience in extremely exposed children and adolescents based on interviews with 330 former Ugandan child soldiers (age = 11-17, female = 48.5%). Despite severe trauma exposure, 27.6% showed posttraumatic resilience as indicated by the absence of posttraumatic stress disorder, depression, and clinically…

  8. Posttraumatic Resilience in Former Ugandan Child Soldiers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klasen, Fionna; Oettingen, Gabriele; Daniels, Judith; Post, Manuela; Hoyer, Catrin; Adam, Hubertus

    2010-01-01

    The present research examines posttraumatic resilience in extremely exposed children and adolescents based on interviews with 330 former Ugandan child soldiers (age = 11-17, female = 48.5%). Despite severe trauma exposure, 27.6% showed posttraumatic resilience as indicated by the absence of posttraumatic stress disorder, depression, and clinically…

  9. A Trauma Education Workshop on Posttraumatic Stress.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fournier, Robert R.

    2002-01-01

    Article presents a brief and potentially effective method of group education about posttraumatic stress for "victims" of posttraumatic stress, significant others, and health workers. Appropriate use of group education for posttraumatic stress, it is argued, offers empowering meaning and purpose, and faith and hope for healing and well…

  10. The comparison of three methods of drawing cerebrospinal fluid in rabbit.

    PubMed

    Li, Yan; Zhang, Bo; Wen, Wei; Liu, Shuang; Hao, Di; Liu, Ming; Kuang, Hai-Xue; Huang, Shu-Ming

    2012-08-15

    Component analysis of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) is frequently required to probe the cause of disease, pathologic mechanisms and effective drugs in the experimental study of central nervous system. An ideal way of drawing CFS is very important for the successful analysis. However, pros and cons of types of CSF drawing have never been analyzed and compared. The purpose of this study was to choose an ideal method of obtaining CSF in rabbits by comparing the three usual ones: skull drilling, lumbar puncture and atlanto-occipital membrane puncture. In the study, the rabbits were randomly divided into three groups: skull drilling group, lumbar puncture group and atlanto-occipital membrane puncture group, and our modified puncture needles were used. The rates of success, operating time and repeatability, etc. of the three methods were compared. The results suggest that the atlanto-occipital membrane puncture method is the best. The method was the simplest, fastest, and most repeatable of the three, furthermore, with this method, the most CSF was drawn and achieved the highest success rate.

  11. Cerebrospinal fluid penetration of cefpirome in patients with non-inflamed meninges.

    PubMed

    Nix, D E; Wilton, J H; Velasquez, N; Budny, J L; Lassman, H B; Mitchell, P; Divan, K; Schentag, J J

    1992-04-01

    Twenty patients (mean age 52 +/- 12 years, mean weight 75 +/- 15 kg) scheduled for elective myelogram or spinal anaesthesia were enrolled to determine the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) penetration of a new expanded spectrum cephalosporin antibiotic, cefpirome (HR-810). A single 2 g intravenous dose of cefpirome was administered as a bolus between 1 and 8 h before lumbar puncture. Blood samples were collected at 15 pre-determined times and a single CSF sample was obtained at the time of lumbar puncture. Serum and CSF cefpirome concentrations were determined by high performance liquid chromatography. The mean maximal serum concentration of cefpirome was 264 +/- 76 mg/L. A mean steady-state volume of distribution of 20 +/- 4 L, clearance of 7.4 +/- 1.3 L/h, and half-life of 2.5 +/- 0.5 h were determined. Mean CSF concentrations were 0.50 +/- 0.11 mg/L at 1-2 h post dose (n = 4), 0.57 +/- 0.13 mg/L at 2-4 h post dose (n = 4), 0.76 +/- 0.34 mg/L at 4-6 h post dose (n = 7), and 0.83 +/- 0.29 mg/L at 6-8.3 h post dose (n = 5). Blood:brain barrier permeability to cefpirome may not be a limiting factor as CSF concentrations were rapidly attained. Further studies are required to determine the mechanism of cefpirome transport between plasma and CSF.

  12. Cerebrospinal Fluid Biomarker and Brain Biopsy Findings in Idiopathic Normal Pressure Hydrocephalus

    PubMed Central

    Pyykkö, Okko T.; Lumela, Miikka; Rummukainen, Jaana; Nerg, Ossi; Seppälä, Toni T.; Herukka, Sanna-Kaisa; Koivisto, Anne M.; Alafuzoff, Irina; Puli, Lakshman; Savolainen, Sakari; Soininen, Hilkka; Jääskeläinen, Juha E.; Hiltunen, Mikko; Zetterberg, Henrik; Leinonen, Ville

    2014-01-01

    Background The significance of amyloid precursor protein (APP) and neuroinflammation in idiopathic normal pressure hydrocephalus (iNPH) and Alzheimer's disease (AD) is unknown. Objective To investigate the role of soluble APP (sAPP) and amyloid beta (Aβ) isoforms, proinflammatory cytokines, and biomarkers of neuronal damage in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) in relation to brain biopsy Aβ and hyperphosphorylated tau (HPτ) findings. Methods The study population comprised 102 patients with possible NPH with cortical brain biopsies, ventricular and lumbar CSF samples, and DNA available. The final clinical diagnoses were: 53 iNPH (91% shunt-responders), 26 AD (10 mixed iNPH+AD), and 23 others. Biopsy samples were immunostained against Aβ and HPτ. CSF levels of AD-related biomarkers (Aβ42, p-tau, total tau), non-AD-related Aβ isoforms (Aβ38, Aβ40), sAPP isoforms (sAPPα, sAPPβ), proinflammatory cytokines (several interleukins (IL), interferon-gamma, monocyte chemoattractant protein-1, tumor necrosis factor-alpha) and biomarkers of neuronal damage (neurofilament light and myelin basic protein) were measured. All patients were genotyped for APOE. Results Lumbar CSF levels of sAPPα were lower (p<0.05) in patients with shunt-responsive iNPH compared to non-iNPH patients. sAPPβ showed a similar trend (p = 0.06). CSF sAPP isoform levels showed no association to Aβ or HPτ in the brain biopsy. Quantified Aβ load in the brain biopsy showed a negative correlation with CSF levels of Aβ42 in ventricular (r = −0.295, p = 0.003) and lumbar (r = −0.356, p = 0.01) samples, while the levels of Aβ38 and Aβ40 showed no correlation. CSF levels of proinflammatory cytokines and biomarkers of neuronal damage did not associate to the brain biopsy findings, diagnosis, or shunt response. Higher lumbar/ventricular CSF IL-8 ratios (p<0.001) were seen in lumbar samples collected after ventriculostomy compared to the samples collected before the procedure

  13. Lumbar and sacral radiofrequency neurotomy.

    PubMed

    Mazin, David A; Sullivan, Joseph P

    2010-11-01

    Radiofrequency (RF) neurotomy is an interventional procedure used to alleviate certain types of low back pain. RF energy is used to thermally coagulate the specific nerves that transmit pain signals. Recent evidence has shown that this procedure demonstrates significant efficacy in relieving low back pain in lumbar zygapophysial joints, and research is ongoing to determine if pain relief for the sacroiliac joint is also possible. This article provides an evidence-based background for performing RF neurotomy, discusses the relevant anatomy, and highlights the indications and technique for lumbar and sacral RF neurotomy. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Lumbar dural sac dimensions determined by ultrasound helps predict sensory block extent during combined spinal-epidural analgesia for labor.

    PubMed

    Fanning, Niall; Arzola, Cristian; Balki, Mrinalini; Carvalho, Jose C A

    2012-01-01

    The lumbosacral cerebrospinal fluid volume is a major determinant of the intrathecal spread of local anesthetics. Ultrasound imaging of the lumbar spine allows measurement of dural sac dimensions, which may potentially be used as a surrogate of cerebrospinal fluid volume. The purpose of this study was to investigate the correlation between lumbar dural sac diameter, dural sac length (DSL), and dural sac volume (DSV), measured by ultrasound, and the intrathecal spread of isobaric bupivacaine during combined spinal-epidural (CSE) analgesia for labor. We examined 41 women with singleton pregnancies requesting neuraxial analgesia for labor. Using a 5-2-MHz curved-array ultrasound probe in the paramedian sagittal plane, we measured the dural sac width at each lumbar interspace and the DSL from L1-2 to L5-S1 interspace and calculated the dural sac volume (DSV). Following CSE block with 0.25% isobaric bupivacaine 1.75 mg and fentanyl 15 μg, peak sensory levels (PSLs) were recorded using ice, cotton, and pinprick. Statistical correlation coefficients between dural sac dimensions and PSLs were assessed by Spearman rank correlation. In addition, multiple linear regression models were used to select important predictors of PSLs. There was a moderate correlation between DSL and PSL to ice (ρ = -0.62; P < 0.0005) and to pinprick (ρ = -0.52; P = 0.017). Similarly, there was a moderate correlation between DSV and PSL to ice (ρ = -0.56; P = 0.004) and to pinprick (ρ = -0.61; P < 0.0008). Neither the DSL nor DSV correlated with PSL to cotton. Multiple linear regression analysis revealed that DSL, weight, and body mass index contributed to PSLs. The length of the lumbar spine determined by ultrasound, rather than the lumbar spine volume, combined with the weight or body mass index of the subject, is of particular value in predicting the intrathecal spread of isobaric bupivacaine during CSE analgesia for labor.

  15. Lumbar discography: an update.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Mark W

    2004-01-01

    and then come back to reinject more contrast into the disk in question. As radiologists, we tend to focus on the technical aspects of a procedure and the anatomic/morphologic information it provides. However, it cannot be emphasized enough that when performing lumbar discography, the assessment of the patient's pain response during the injection is the most important component of the procedure, and requires not only technical skills, but an understanding of how best to avoid some of the pitfalls that can lead to inaccurate results.

  16. Reconsidering Post-Traumatic Stress

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berman, Dene S.; Davis-Berman, Jennifer

    2005-01-01

    This article serves to challenge the prevailing wisdom that suggests that most trauma is followed by post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), and is best treated with critical incident stress debriefing (CISD). Instead, recent evidence suggests that many individuals exposed to stress do not experience stress responses. Even those who do, however,…

  17. Reconsidering Post-Traumatic Stress

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berman, Dene S.; Davis-Berman, Jennifer

    2005-01-01

    This article serves to challenge the prevailing wisdom that suggests that most trauma is followed by post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), and is best treated with critical incident stress debriefing (CISD). Instead, recent evidence suggests that many individuals exposed to stress do not experience stress responses. Even those who do, however,…

  18. Cerebrospinal fluid lactic acidosis in bacterial meningitis.

    PubMed Central

    Eross, J; Silink, M; Dorman, D

    1981-01-01

    A rapid, microenzymatic method was used to measure cerebrospinal fluid lactate levels in 205 children with suspected bacterial meningitis. Fifty children with normal CSF containing fewer than 0.005 X 10(9)/l WBC, no segmented neutrophils, glucose 3.4 +/- 0.8 mmol/l (61.2 +/- 14.4 mg/100 ml), and a protein of less than 0.30 g/l had CSF lactate levels below 2.0 mmol/l (18 mg/100 ml) (mean and standard deviation 1.3 +/- 0.3 mmol/l (11.8 +/- 2.7 mg/100 ml)). In 31 cases of proved viral meningitis as with 58 cases of clinically diagnosed viral meningitis, levels were below 3.8 mmol/l (34.5 mg/100 ml), being 2.3 +/- 0.6 mmol/l (20.9 +/- 5.4 mg/100 ml), and 2.1 +/- 0.7 mmol/l (19.1 +/- 6.4 mg/100 ml) respectively. Sixty-six cases of bacterial meningitis had CSF lactate levels ranging from 3.9 mmol/l (35.4 mg/100 ml) to greater than 10.0 mmol/l (90.0 mg/100 ml). Longitudinal studies in 7 children with bacterial meningitis showed that cerebrospinal fluid lactate levels differentiated bacterial from viral meningitis up to 4 days after starting treatment with antibiotics. Use of CSF lactate measurement for monitoring the efficacy of treatment is illustrated in a case of bacterial meningitis due to Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The origin of the cerebrospinal fluid lactate acidosis and the role of lactate in the pathophysiological cycle leading to intensification of brain tissue hypoxia and cellular damage is discussed with respect to the short-term prognosis and the long-term neurological sequelae. PMID:7294872

  19. Management of lumbar spinal stenosis.

    PubMed

    Lurie, Jon; Tomkins-Lane, Christy

    2016-01-04

    Lumbar spinal stenosis (LSS) affects more than 200,000 adults in the United States, resulting in substantial pain and disability. It is the most common reason for spinal surgery in patients over 65 years. Lumbar spinal stenosis is a clinical syndrome of pain in the buttocks or lower extremities, with or without back pain. It is associated with reduced space available for the neural and vascular elements of the lumbar spine. The condition is often exacerbated by standing, walking, or lumbar extension and relieved by forward flexion, sitting, or recumbency. Clinical care and research into lumbar spinal stenosis is complicated by the heterogeneity of the condition, the lack of standard criteria for diagnosis and inclusion in studies, and high rates of anatomic stenosis on imaging studies in older people who are completely asymptomatic. The options for non-surgical management include drugs, physiotherapy, spinal injections, lifestyle modification, and multidisciplinary rehabilitation. However, few high quality randomized trials have looked at conservative management. A systematic review concluded that there is insufficient evidence to recommend any specific type of non-surgical treatment. Several different surgical procedures are used to treat patients who do not improve with non-operative therapies. Given that rapid deterioration is rare and that symptoms often wax and wane or gradually improve, surgery is almost always elective and considered only if sufficiently bothersome symptoms persist despite trials of less invasive interventions. Outcomes (leg pain and disability) seem to be better for surgery than for non-operative treatment, but the evidence is heterogeneous and often of limited quality. © BMJ Publishing Group Ltd 2015.

  20. [Cerebrospinal fluid diagnostics in multiple sclerosis].

    PubMed

    Ruprecht, K; Tumani, H

    2016-12-01

    As a chronic inflammatory disease of the central nervous system (CNS), multiple sclerosis (MS) is associated with characteristic abnormalities in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). Thus, in addition to magnetic resonance imaging, CSF examination is a central diagnostic procedure in patients with MS, which can corroborate a diagnosis of MS and may also help to discern differential diagnoses. The most important CSF finding in MS is the detection of persistent polyspecific intrathecal immunoglobulin synthesis. This review summarizes CSF findings of patients with MS and addresses issues of relevance for clinical practice, potential diagnostic pitfalls as well as new developments in CSF diagnostics of MS.

  1. Cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Tumani, Hayrettin; Hartung, Hans-Peter; Hemmer, Bernhard; Teunissen, Charlotte; Deisenhammer, Florian; Giovannoni, Gavin; Zettl, Uwe K

    2009-08-01

    In patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) intensive efforts are directed at identifying biomarkers in bodily fluids related to underlying disease mechanisms, disease activity and progression, and therapeutic response. Besides MR imaging parameters cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarkers provide important and specific information since changes in the CSF composition may reflect disease mechanisms inherent to MS. The different cellular and protein-analytical methods of the CSF and the recommended standard of the diagnostic CSF profile in MS are described. A brief update on possible CSF biomarkers that might reflect key pathological processes of MS such as inflammation, demyelination, neuroaxonal loss, gliosis and regeneration is provided.

  2. Drug transport in brain via the cerebrospinal fluid

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    The human brain has no lymphatic system, but produces over a half-liter each day of cerebrospinal fluid. The cerebrospinal fluid is secreted at the choroid plexus and occupies the cavities of the four ventricles, as well as the cranial and spinal sub-arachnoid space. The cerebrospinal fluid moves over the surfaces of the brain and spinal cord and is rapidly absorbed into the general circulation. The choroid plexus forms the blood-cerebrospinal fluid barrier, and this barrier is functionally distinct from the brain microvascular endothelium, which forms the blood-brain barrier. Virtually all non-cellular substances in blood distribute into cerebrospinal fluid, and drug entry into cerebrospinal fluid is not an index of drug transport across the blood-brain barrier. Drug injected into the cerebrospinal fluid rapidly moves into the blood via bulk flow, but penetrates into brain tissue poorly owing to the limitations of diffusion. Drug transport into cerebrospinal fluid vs. brain interstitial fluid requires knowledge of the relative expression of transporters at the choroid plexus versus the brain microvascular endothelium. PMID:21349155

  3. CEREBROSPINAL FLUID STASIS AND ITS CLINICAL SIGNIFICANCE

    PubMed Central

    Whedon, James M.; Glassey, Donald

    2010-01-01

    We hypothesize that stasis of the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) occurs commonly and is detrimental to health. Physiologic factors affecting the normal circulation of CSF include cardiovascular, respiratory, and vasomotor influences. The CSF maintains the electrolytic environment of the central nervous system (CNS), influences systemic acid-base balance, serves as a medium for the supply of nutrients to neuronal and glial cells, functions as a lymphatic system for the CNS by removing the waste products of cellular metabolism, and transports hormones, neurotransmitters, releasing factors, and other neuropeptides throughout the CNS. Physiologic impedance or cessation of CSF flow may occur commonly in the absence of degenerative changes or pathology and may compromise the normal physiologic functions of the CSF. CSF appears to be particularly prone to stasis within the spinal canal. CSF stasis may be associated with adverse mechanical cord tension, vertebral subluxation syndrome, reduced cranial rhythmic impulse, and restricted respiratory function. Increased sympathetic tone, facilitated spinal segments, dural tension, and decreased CSF flow have been described as closely related aspects of an overall pattern of structural and energetic dysfunction in the axial skeleton and CNS. Therapies directed at affecting CSF flow include osteopathic care (especially cranial manipulation), craniosacral therapy, chiropractic adjustment of the spine and cranium, Network Care (formerly Network Chiropractic), massage therapy (including lymphatic drainage techniques), yoga, therapeutic breathwork, and cerebrospinal fluid technique. Further investigation into the nature and causation of CSF stasis, its potential effects upon human health, and effective therapies for its correction is warranted. PMID:19472865

  4. Cerebrospinal Fluid Biomarker Candidates for Parkinsonian Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Constantinescu, Radu; Mondello, Stefania

    2013-01-01

    The Parkinsonian disorders are a large group of neurodegenerative diseases including idiopathic Parkinson’s disease (PD) and atypical Parkinsonian disorders (APD), such as multiple system atrophy, progressive supranuclear palsy, corticobasal degeneration, and dementia with Lewy bodies. The etiology of these disorders is not known although it is considered to be a combination of genetic and environmental factors. One of the greatest obstacles for developing efficacious disease-modifying treatment strategies is the lack of biomarkers. Reliable biomarkers are needed for early and accurate diagnosis, to measure disease progression, and response to therapy. In this review several of the most promising cerebrospinal biomarker candidates are discussed. Alpha-synuclein seems to be intimately involved in the pathogenesis of synucleinopathies and its levels can be measured in the cerebrospinal fluid and in plasma. In a similar way, tau protein accumulation seems to be involved in the pathogenesis of tauopathies. Urate, a potent antioxidant, seems to be associated to the risk of developing PD and with its progression. Neurofilament light chain levels are increased in APD compared with PD and healthy controls. The new “omics” techniques are potent tools offering new insights in the patho-etiology of these disorders. Some of the difficulties encountered in developing biomarkers are discussed together with future perspectives. PMID:23346074

  5. Cerebrospinal fluid stasis and its clinical significance.

    PubMed

    Whedon, James M; Glassey, Donald

    2009-01-01

    We hypothesize that stasis of the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) occurs commonly and is detrimental to health. Physiologic factors affecting the normal circulation of CSF include cardiovascular, respiratory, and vasomotor influences. The CSF maintains the electrolytic environment of the central nervous system (CNS), influences systemic acid-base balance, serves as a medium for the supply of nutrients to neuronal and glial cells, functions as a lymphatic system for the CNS by removing the waste products of cellular metabolism, and transports hormones, neurotransmitters, releasing factors, and other neuropeptides throughout the CNS. Physiologic impedance or cessation of CSF flow may occur commonly in the absence of degenerative changes or pathology and may compromise the normal physiologic functions of the CSF. CSF appears to be particularly prone to stasis within the spinal canal. CSF stasis may be associated with adverse mechanical cord tension, vertebral subluxation syndrome, reduced cranial rhythmic impulse, and restricted respiratory function. Increased sympathetic tone, facilitated spinal segments, dural tension, and decreased CSF flow have been described as closely related aspects of an overall pattern of structural and energetic dysfunction in the axial skeleton and CNS. Therapies directed at affecting CSF flow include osteopathic care (especially cranial manipulation), craniosacral therapy, chiropractic adjustment of the spine and cranium, Network Care (formerly Network Chiropractic), massage therapy (including lymphatic drainage techniques), yoga, therapeutic breath-work, and cerebrospinal fluid technique. Further investigation into the nature and causation of CSF stasis, its potential effects upon human health, and effective therapies for its correction is warranted.

  6. Degenerative lumbar spinal stenosis and lumbar spine configuration

    PubMed Central

    Hamoud, K.; May, H.; Hay, O.; Medlej, B.; Masharawi, Y.; Peled, N.; Hershkovitz, I.

    2010-01-01

    As life expectancy increases, degenerative lumbar spinal stenosis (DLSS) becomes a common health problem among the elderly. DLSS is usually caused by degenerative changes in bony and/or soft tissue elements. The poor correlation between radiological manifestations and the clinical picture emphasizes the fact that more studies are required to determine the natural course of this syndrome. Our aim was to reveal the association between lower lumbar spine configuration and DLSS. Two groups were studied: the first included 67 individuals with DLSS (mean age 66 ± 10) and the second 100 individuals (mean age 63.4 ± 13) without DLSS-related symptoms. Both groups underwent CT images (Philips Brilliance 64) and the following measurements were performed: a cross-section area of the dural sac, vertebral body dimensions (height, length and width), AP diameter of the bony spinal canal, lumbar lordosis and sacral slope angles. All measurements were taken at L3 to S1. Vertebral body lengths were significantly greater in the DLSS group at all levels compared to the control, whereas anterior vertebral body heights (L3, L4, L5) and middle vertebral heights (L3, L5) were significantly smaller in the LSS group. Lumbar lordosis, sacral slope and bony spinal canal were significantly smaller in the DLSS compared to the control. We conclude that the size and shape of vertebral bodies and canals significantly differed between the study groups. A tentative model is suggested to explain the association between these characteristics and the development of degenerative spinal stenosis. PMID:20652366

  7. Hourly analysis of cerebrospinal fluid glucose shows large diurnal fluctuations.

    PubMed

    Verbeek, Marcel M; Leen, Wilhelmina G; Willemsen, Michèl A; Slats, Diane; Claassen, Jurgen A

    2016-05-01

    Cerebrospinal fluid analysis is important in the diagnostics of many neurological disorders. Since the influence of food intake on the cerebrospinal fluid glucose concentration and the cerebrospinal fluid/plasma glucose ratio is largely unknown, we studied fluctuations in these parameters in healthy adult volunteers during a period of 36 h. Our observations show large physiological fluctuations of cerebrospinal fluid glucose and the cerebrospinal fluid/plasma glucose ratio, and their relation to food intake. These findings provide novel insights into the physiology of cerebral processes dependent on glucose levels such as energy formation (e.g. glycolysis), enzymatic reactions (e.g. glycosylation), and non-enzymatic reactions (e.g. advanced endproduct glycation). © The Author(s) 2016.

  8. [Iatrogenic dural lesions in lumbar neural decompressive surgery].

    PubMed

    Thomsen, Frederik; Amtoft, Ole; Andersen, Mikkel; Bøge-Rasmussen, Torben; Jensen, Tim Toftgaard; Jensen, Lars Emil; Jespersen, Stig; Kruse, Anders; Thomsen, Karsten

    2010-03-01

    Iatrogenic dural tear with cerebrospinal fluid leakage is a known complication of lumbar surgery of the columna. In the literature, the incidence is 3-16%. The study was a retrospective, consecutive review of electronic patient records after spinal surgery at the Private Hospital Hamlet. The study covers cases from the 10-month period from September 1, 2007 to June 30, 2008. Data was collected after this period and consists of surgeon-documented dural tears. At the time of surgery, the surgeon was unaware that there would be a subsequent registration. A total of 634 patients had lumbar neural decompressive surgery - 479 patients were treated for spinal stenosis and 155 for prolapsed disc. The incidence of dural tear was 3.9% (25 dural tears in 634 operations). The risk of a dural tear after secondary surgery was 7.9% versus 3.3% for primary (p = 0.02) and the mean age was 65.9 years for patients with dural tear compared with 58.1 years for patients without (p = 0.00). The difference in the mean duration of surgery was significant being 72 minutes in the group suffering a dural tear compared with 56 minutes (p = 0.03) among the remaining patients, and in the former group length of stay was increased by 1.1 day (p = 0.00). The incidence of iatrogenic dural tear was 3.9%. The incidence of dural tear was doubled in secondary surgery. The duration of surgery increased by 16 minutes and the patients with dural tear were also hospitalized one day longer.

  9. Transdural retrieval of a retropulsed lumbar interbody cage: Technical case report.

    PubMed

    Zaidi, Hasan Aqdas; Shah, Ashish; Kakarla, Udaya Kumar

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this case report was to describe a novel method to retrieve a herniated lumbar interbody cage. Transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF) is an increasingly popular method of spinal fixation and fusion. Unexpected retropulsion of an interbody is a rare event that can result in intractable pain or motor compromise necessitating surgical retrieval of the interbody. Both anterior and posterior approaches to removing migrated cages may be associated with significant surgical morbidity and mortality. A 60-year-old woman underwent an L4-S1 TLIF coupled with pedicle screw fixation at a previous hospital 5 years prior to admission. She noted sudden-onset bilateral lower extremity weakness and right-sided foot drop. Magnetic resonance imaging and radiographs were notable for purely centrally herniated interbody. A posterior, midline transdural approach was used to retrieve the interbody. Situated in between nerve rootlets to the ventral canal, this virgin corridor allowed us to easily visualize and protect neurological structures while safely retrieving the interbody. The patient experienced an immediate improvement in symptoms and was discharged on postoperative day 3. At 12-month follow-up, she had no evidence of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leak and had returned to normal activities of daily living. While the risk of CSF leak may be higher with a transdural approach, we maintain that avoiding unnecessary retraction of the nerve roots may outweigh this risk. To our knowledge, this is the first case report of a transdural approach for the retrieval of a retropulsed lumbar interbody cage.

  10. Communicating Hydrocephalus Due to Traumatic Lumbar Spine Injury: Case Report and Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Dragojlovic, Nikola; Stampas, Argyrios; Kitagawa, Ryan S; Schmitt, Karl M; Donovan, William

    2016-06-17

    : Hydrocephalus is a rare complication of traumatic spine injury. A literature review reflects the rare occurrence with cervical spine injury. We present a case of traumatic injury to the lumbar spine from a gunshot wound, which caused communicating hydrocephalus. The patient sustained a gunshot wound to the lumbar spine and had an L4-5 laminectomy with exploration and removal of foreign bodies. At the time of surgery, the patient was found to have dense subarachnoid hemorrhage in the spinal column. He subsequently had intermittent headaches and altered mental status that resolved without intervention. The headaches worsened, so a computed tomography scan of the brain was obtained, which revealed hydrocephalus. A ventriculoperitoneal shunt was placed, and subsequent computed tomography scan of the brain showed reduced ventricle size. The patient returned to rehabilitation with complete resolution of hydrocephalus symptoms. Intrathecal hemorrhage with subsequent obstruction or decreased absorption of cerebrospinal fluid at the distal spinal cord was thought to lead to communicating hydrocephalus in this case of lumbar penetrating trauma. In patients with a history of hemorrhagic, traumatic spinal injury who subsequently experience headaches or altered mental status, hydrocephalus should be included in the differential diagnosis and adequately investigated.

  11. The human lumbar dorsal rami.

    PubMed Central

    Bogduk, N; Wilson, A S; Tynan, W

    1982-01-01

    The L 1-4 dorsal rami tend to form three branches, medial, lateral, and intermediate, which are distributed, respectively, to multifidus, iliocostalis, and longissimus. The intertransversarii mediales are innervated by a branch of the dorsal ramus near the origin of the medial branch. The L 4 dorsal ramus regularly forms three branches while the L 1-3 levels the lateral and intermediate branches may, alternatively, arise from a short common stem. The L 5 dorsal ramus is much longer than the others and forms only a medial and an intermediate branch. Each lumbar medial branch innervates two adjacent zygapophysial joints and ramifies in multifidus, supplying only those fascicles which arise from the spinous process with the same segmental number as the nerve. The comparative anatomy of the lumbar dorsal rami is discussed and the applied anatomy with respect to 'rhizolysis', 'facet denervation' and diagnostic paraspinal electromyography is described. PMID:7076562

  12. [Post-traumatic stress disorder after childbirth].

    PubMed

    Korábová, I; Masopustová, Z

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to introduce the issue of post-traumatic stress disorder after childbirth to health care professionals. The text focuses on the diagnostic definition of post-traumatic stress disorder after childbirth, symptoms, physiological background, prevalence, course, risk factors and consequences of post-traumatic stress disorder after childbirth for a woman, her child and her partner. Options for interventions and therapy are outlined as well.

  13. Lumbar lordosis of extinct hominins.

    PubMed

    Been, Ella; Gómez-Olivencia, Asier; Kramer, Patricia A

    2012-01-01

    The lordotic curvature of the lumbar spine (lumbar lordosis) in humans is a critical component in the ability to achieve upright posture and bipedal gait. Only general estimates of the lordotic angle (LA) of extinct hominins are currently available, most of which are based on the wedging of the vertebral bodies. Recently, a new method for calculating the LA in skeletal material has become available. This method is based on the relationship between the lordotic curvature and the orientation of the inferior articular processes relative to vertebral bodies in the lumbar spines of living primates. Using this relationship, we developed new regression models in order to calculate the LAs in hominins. The new models are based on primate group-means and were used to calculate the LAs in the spines of eight extinct hominins. The results were also compared with the LAs of modern humans and modern nonhuman apes. The lordotic angles of australopithecines (41° ± 4), H. erectus (45°) and fossil H. sapiens (54° ± 14) are similar to those of modern humans (51° ± 11). This analysis confirms the assumption that human-like lordotic curvature was a morphological change that took place during the acquisition of erect posture and bipedalism as the habitual form of locomotion. Neandertals have smaller lordotic angles (LA = 29° ± 4) than modern humans, but higher angles than nonhuman apes (22° ± 3). This suggests possible subtle differences in Neandertal posture and locomotion from that of modern humans.

  14. [Regional anesthesia for lumbar microdiscectomy].

    PubMed

    Dagher, Christine; Naccache, Nicole; Narchi, Patrick; Hage, Paul; Antakly, Marie-Claire

    2002-01-01

    Lumbar microdiscectomy surgery is already performed under spinal anesthesia (SA) in many institutions. The aim of this study is to compare the quality of analgesia and recovery after SA when compared to general anesthesia (GA) after lumbar microdiscectomy surgery. Following light sedation, SA is performed with the patient in the left lateral decubitus position, one to two levels above the herniated disc level. Isobaric 0.5% bupivacaine 3-3.5 ml was injected intrathecally followed by wound infiltration with 15 ml of bupivacaine with 1/200 000 epinephrine prior to surgical incision. Despite randomization, we found significantly more females in the GA group. Pain scores at 4 and 8 h postoperatively were lower in SA group as well as total analgesic consumption during the first 24 h. Postoperative recovery including time to drinking, eating and walking were more rapid after SA when compared to GA. During the postoperative period, the incidence of urinary retention was comparable between groups but the occurrence of postoperative nausea and vomiting was significantly higher in the GA group. Moreover, the overall patient's and surgeon's satisfaction were significantly better in the SA group. SA associated to wound infiltration using bupivacaine is an interesting alternative to general anesthesia for outpatient lumbar microdiscectomy surgery.

  15. Elbow arthroscopy for posttraumatic arthrosis.

    PubMed

    Geib, Timothy M; Savoie, Felix H

    2009-01-01

    Posttraumatic stiffness is a common complication after injury to the elbow. The loss of motion may significantly limit an individual's ability to perform normal activities of daily living. If conservative measures including medication, physical therapy, static splinting, and selective injection fail to restore functional range of motion, surgical intervention may be warranted. Open procedures have been described with reasonable success in restoring motion. However, arthroscopic techniques may provide several advantages in these patients who have often undergone previous extensive open surgery.

  16. [Psychosomatic posttraumatic resonances in refugees].

    PubMed

    Ottino, Saskia von Overbeck

    2016-06-22

    The recent flow of refugees in our countries connects the clinician to new challenges: posttraumatic consequences, exile pathologies, cultural differences. Moreover, the psychic pains express themselves often through the body in more or less qualified ways, making a clear understanding of them difficult. From the therapist's side, the confrontation to war violences and cultural differences might create difficulties in establishing an empathic and fruitful therapeutic alliance.

  17. Assessment of Lumbar Lordosis and Lumbar Core Strength in Information Technology Professionals

    PubMed Central

    Mehta, Roma Satish; Dabadghav, Rachana; Rairikar, Savita; Shayam, Ashok; Sancheti, Parag

    2016-01-01

    Study Design Observational study. Purpose To correlate lumbar lordosis and lumbar core strength in information technology (IT) professionals. Overview of Literature IT professionals have to work for long hours in a sitting position, which can affect lumbar lordosis and lumbar core strength. Methods Flexicurve was used to assess the lumbar lordosis, and pressure biofeedback was used to assess the lumbar core strength in the IT professionals. All subjects, both male and female, with and without complaint of low back pain and working for two or more years were included, and subjects with a history of spinal surgery or spinal deformity were excluded from the study. Analysis was done using Pearson's correlation. Results For the IT workers, no correlation was seen between lumbar lordosis and lumbar core strength (r=–0.04); however, a weak negative correlation was seen in IT people who complained of pain (r=–0.12), while there was no correlation of lumbar lordosis and lumbar core in IT people who had no complains of pain (r=0.007). Conclusions The study shows that there is no correlation of lumbar lordosis and lumbar core strength in IT professionals, but a weak negative correlation was seen in IT people who complained of pain. PMID:27340529

  18. Assessment of Lumbar Lordosis and Lumbar Core Strength in Information Technology Professionals.

    PubMed

    Mehta, Roma Satish; Nagrale, Sanket; Dabadghav, Rachana; Rairikar, Savita; Shayam, Ashok; Sancheti, Parag

    2016-06-01

    Observational study. To correlate lumbar lordosis and lumbar core strength in information technology (IT) professionals. IT professionals have to work for long hours in a sitting position, which can affect lumbar lordosis and lumbar core strength. Flexicurve was used to assess the lumbar lordosis, and pressure biofeedback was used to assess the lumbar core strength in the IT professionals. All subjects, both male and female, with and without complaint of low back pain and working for two or more years were included, and subjects with a history of spinal surgery or spinal deformity were excluded from the study. Analysis was done using Pearson's correlation. For the IT workers, no correlation was seen between lumbar lordosis and lumbar core strength (r=-0.04); however, a weak negative correlation was seen in IT people who complained of pain (r=-0.12), while there was no correlation of lumbar lordosis and lumbar core in IT people who had no complains of pain (r=0.007). The study shows that there is no correlation of lumbar lordosis and lumbar core strength in IT professionals, but a weak negative correlation was seen in IT people who complained of pain.

  19. Clinical anatomy and 3D virtual reconstruction of the lumbar plexus with respect to lumbar surgery.

    PubMed

    Lu, Sheng; Chang, Shan; Zhang, Yuan-zhi; Ding, Zi-hai; Xu, Xin Ming; Xu, Yong-qing

    2011-04-14

    Exposure of the anterior or lateral lumbar via the retroperitoneal approach easily causes injuries to the lumbar plexus. Lumbar plexus injuries which occur during anterior or transpsoas lumbar spine exposure and placement of instruments have been reported. This study aims is to provide more anatomical data and surgical landmarks in operations concerning the lumbar plexus in order to prevent lumbar plexus injuries and to increase the possibility of safety in anterior approach lumbar surgery. To study the applied anatomy related to the lumbar plexus of fifteen formaldehyde-preserved cadavers, Five sets of Virtual Human (VH) data set were prepared and used in the study. Three-dimensional (3D) computerized reconstructions of the lumbar plexus and their adjacent structures were conducted from the VH female data set. The order of lumbar nerves is regular. From the anterior view, lumbar plexus nerves are arranged from medial at L5 to lateral at L2. From the lateral view, lumbar nerves are arranged from ventral at L2 to dorsal at L5. The angle of each nerve root exiting outward to the corresponding intervertebral foramen increases from L1 to L5. The lumbar plexus nerves are observed to be in close contact with transverse processes (TP). All parts of the lumbar plexus were located by sectional anatomy in the dorsal third of the psoas muscle. Thus, access to the psoas major muscle at the ventral 2/3 region can safely prevent nerve injuries. 3D reconstruction of the lumbar plexus based on VCH data can clearly show the relationships between the lumbar plexus and the blood vessels, vertebral body, kidney, and psoas muscle. The psoas muscle can be considered as a surgical landmark since incision at the ventral 2/3 of the region can prevent lumbar plexus injuries for procedures requiring exposure of the lateral anterior of the lumbar. The transverse process can be considered as a landmark and reference in surgical operations by its relative position to the lumbar plexus. 3D

  20. Cerebrospinal Fluid Biomarkers for Huntington's Disease.

    PubMed

    Byrne, Lauren M; Wild, Edward J

    2016-01-01

    Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) is enriched in brain-derived components and represents an accessible and appealing means of interrogating the CNS milieu to study neurodegenerative diseases and identify biomarkers to facilitate the development of novel therapeutics. Many such CSF biomarkers have been proposed for Huntington's disease (HD) but none has been validated for clinical trial use. Across many studies proposing dozens of biomarker candidates, there is a notable lack of statistical power, consistency, rigor and validation. Here we review proposed CSF biomarkers including neurotransmitters, transglutaminase activity, kynurenine pathway metabolites, oxidative stress markers, inflammatory markers, neuroendocrine markers, protein markers of neuronal death, proteomic approaches and mutant huntingtin protein itself. We reflect on the need for large-scale, standardized CSF collections with detailed phenotypic data to validate and qualify much-needed CSF biomarkers for clinical trial use in HD.

  1. Imhotep and the Discovery of Cerebrospinal Fluid

    PubMed Central

    Blomstedt, Patric

    2014-01-01

    Herbowski (2013) suggested recently the Egyptian Imhotep from the 3rd dynasty in Egypt to be the discoverer of cerebrospinal fluid. There are, however, no sources within the first 2000 years after Imhotep suggesting him to be in any way connected with the field of medicine. Over the course of three millennia Imhotep evolves into the sage who besides architecture also masters the arts of medicine, magic, astronomy, and astrology, at the same time as him being transformed from man to demi-God, and finally to a God. The identification of Imhotep as a doctor has thus little to do with facts and it is unlikely that he had anything to do with the Edwin-Smith papyrus from a much later period where CSF is first mentioned. PMID:24744920

  2. Minimally invasive neurosurgery for cerebrospinal fluid disorders.

    PubMed

    Guillaume, Daniel J

    2010-10-01

    This article focuses on minimally invasive approaches used to address disorders of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) circulation. The author covers the primary CSF disorders that are amenable to minimally invasive treatment, including aqueductal stenosis, fourth ventricular outlet obstruction (including Chiari malformation), isolated lateral ventricle, isolated fourth ventricle, multiloculated hydrocephalus, arachnoid cysts, and tumors that block CSF flow. General approaches to evaluating disorders of CSF circulation, including detailed imaging studies, are discussed. Approaches to minimally invasive management of such disorders are described in general, and for each specific entity. For each procedure, indications, surgical technique, and known outcomes are detailed. Specific complications as well as strategies for their avoidance and management are addressed. Lastly, future directions and the need for structured outcome studies are discussed.

  3. Imhotep and the discovery of cerebrospinal fluid.

    PubMed

    Blomstedt, Patric

    2014-01-01

    Herbowski (2013) suggested recently the Egyptian Imhotep from the 3rd dynasty in Egypt to be the discoverer of cerebrospinal fluid. There are, however, no sources within the first 2000 years after Imhotep suggesting him to be in any way connected with the field of medicine. Over the course of three millennia Imhotep evolves into the sage who besides architecture also masters the arts of medicine, magic, astronomy, and astrology, at the same time as him being transformed from man to demi-God, and finally to a God. The identification of Imhotep as a doctor has thus little to do with facts and it is unlikely that he had anything to do with the Edwin-Smith papyrus from a much later period where CSF is first mentioned.

  4. Characterization of individual mouse cerebrospinal fluid proteomes

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Jeffrey S.; Angel, Thomas E.; Chavkin, Charles; Orton, Daniel J.; Moore, Ronald J.; Smith, Richard D.

    2014-03-20

    Analysis of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) offers key insight into the status of the central nervous system. Characterization of murine CSF proteomes can provide a valuable resource for studying central nervous system injury and disease in animal models. However, the small volume of CSF in mice has thus far limited individual mouse proteome characterization. Through non-terminal CSF extractions in C57Bl/6 mice and high-resolution liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis of individual murine samples, we report the most comprehensive proteome characterization of individual murine CSF to date. Utilizing stringent protein inclusion criteria that required the identification of at least two unique peptides (1% false discovery rate at the peptide level) we identified a total of 566 unique proteins, including 128 proteins from three individual CSF samples that have been previously identified in brain tissue. Our methods and analysis provide a mechanism for individual murine CSF proteome analysis.

  5. Elevated cerebrospinal fluid tau in Wernicke encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Frijlink, Daphne W; Tilanus, Joachim J; Roks, Gerwin

    2012-08-08

    Wernicke encephalopathy (WE) commonly presents with oculomotor abnormalities, gait ataxia and confusion. WE can mimic rapidly progressive dementia syndromes, such as Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD). Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) tau is frequently used for diagnosis of several dementia subtypes, predominantly CJD and Alzheimer's disease. The combination of very high CSF tau (tau) and normal phosphorylated tau (p-tau) levels is almost exclusively seen in aggressive diseases, such as CJD. The authors present a case of a woman with WE, caused by chronic insufficient dietary intake, with highly elevated CSF tau and normal p-tau. The clinical symptoms and CSF findings raised the suspicion of CJD. However, shortly after immediate treatment with thiamine the patient clinically improved. At follow-up, 2.5 months later, she had made a good recovery. This case of rapidly progressive dementia illustrates that, even in the case of a highly elevated CSF tau, clinicians should be alert for treatable causes such as WE.

  6. Comparison between the lumbar infusion and CSF tap tests to predict outcome after shunt surgery in suspected normal pressure hydrocephalus

    PubMed Central

    Kahlon, B; Sundbarg, G; Rehncrona, S

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To compare the lumbar infusion test and the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) tap test for predicting the outcome of shunt surgery in patients with suspected normal pressure hydrocephalus. Methods: 68 patients with suspected normal pressure hydrocephalus were studied. The absence of preceding history indicated idiopathic disease in 75% of these. All patients were assessed twice with walking and psychometric tests before lumbar infusion test and tap test assessments. The lumbar infusion test was done using a constant infusion rate (0.80 ml/min) and regarded as positive if the steady state CSF plateau pressure reached levels of > 22 mm Hg (resistance to outflow > 14 mm Hg/ml/min). The tap test was regarded as positive if two or more of four different test items improved after CSF removal. As the variability in baseline test results was large, the better of two evaluations was used in comparisons with the results after CSF removal, as well as to evaluate the outcome after shunt surgery. Only patients with a positive lumbar infusion test or a positive tap test had surgery. Results: The results of the CSF tap test and the lumbar infusion test agreed in only 45% of the patients. Of the total cohort, 47 (69%) had positive test results and were operated on; 45 (96%) of these reported subjective improvement, and postoperative assessments verified the improvements in 38 (81%). Improvements were highly significant in walking, memory, and reaction time tests (p < 0.001). Most of the patients improved by surgery (84%) were selected by a positive lumbar infusion test, and only 42% by a positive tap test. Positive predictive values were 80% for lumbar infusion test and 94% for tap test. The false negative predictions in the operated group were much higher (58%) with the tap test than with the lumbar infusion test (16%). Conclusions: Both the lumbar infusion test and the tap test can predict a positive outcome of shunt operations in unselected patients with suspected normal

  7. Volumetric relief map for intracranial cerebrospinal fluid distribution analysis.

    PubMed

    Lebret, Alain; Kenmochi, Yukiko; Hodel, Jérôme; Rahmouni, Alain; Decq, Philippe; Petit, Éric

    2015-09-01

    Cerebrospinal fluid imaging plays a significant role in the clinical diagnosis of brain disorders, such as hydrocephalus and Alzheimer's disease. While three-dimensional images of cerebrospinal fluid are very detailed, the complex structures they contain can be time-consuming and laborious to interpret. This paper presents a simple technique that represents the intracranial cerebrospinal fluid distribution as a two-dimensional image in such a way that the total fluid volume is preserved. We call this a volumetric relief map, and show its effectiveness in a characterization and analysis of fluid distributions and networks in hydrocephalus patients and healthy adults.

  8. Cerebrospinal fluid eosinophilia in a child with neuroborreliosis.

    PubMed

    Buda, Piotr; Zawadka, Konrad; Wadowska-Kłopotek, Weronika; Smorczewska-Kiljan, Anna; Wieteska-Klimczak, Anna; Marczyńska, Magdalena; Książyk, Janusz

    2015-01-01

    Cerebrospinal fluid eosinophilia is rare and usually associated with eosinophilic meningitis caused by helminthic infections. It is also observed in bacterial or fungal meningitis (syphilis, tuberculosis, coccidioidomycosis), in patients with malignancies, ventriculoperitonial shunts, hypereosinophilic syndrome or allergy to some medications. Here we present a case of an 8-year-old boy admitted with fever and clinical signs of meningitis. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) analysis showed marked eosinophilia. Basing on further serological CSF testing the diagnosis of borreliosis was established. Cerebrospinal fluid eosinophilia in Borrelia burgdorferi infection has never been reported before.

  9. Concentration of Donepezil in the Cerebrospinal Fluid of AD Patients: Evaluation of Dosage Sufficiency in Standard Treatment Strategy.

    PubMed

    Valis, Martin; Masopust, Jiri; Vysata, Oldrich; Hort, Jakub; Dolezal, Rafael; Tomek, Jiri; Misik, Jan; Kuca, Kamil; Karasova, Jana Zdarova

    2017-01-01

    Although some studies have described the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of donepezil in the peripheral compartment, studies focused on drug transport across the blood-brain barrier are still very rare. To our knowledge, the fluctuation in the cerebrospinal fluid concentration of donepezil after administration of the drug has not been described in the literature so far. We recruited 16 patients regularly taking a standard therapeutic dose of donepezil (10 mg per day). All patients (Caucasian race) were treated for at least three months with a stable dose of 10 mg per day prior to sample collection. Patients were divided into two groups depending on the time of plasma and cerebrospinal fluid sampling: 12 h (n = 9; 4 M/5F aged 78.68 ± 7.35 years) and 24 h (n = 7; 3 M/4F aged 77.14 ± 5.87 years) after donepezil administration. The cerebrospinal fluid sample was collected by standard lumbar puncture technique using a single-use traumatic needle. The samples were analysed on an Agilent 1260 Series liquid chromatograph comprising a degasser, a quaternary pump, a light-tight autosampler unit set, a thermostated column compartment, and a UV/VIS detector. Agilent ChemStation software, the statistical software Prism4, version 5.0 (GraphPad Software, USA), and IBM(®) SPSS(®) Statistics were used for the analysis of the results. The difference in plasma concentration of donepezil after 12 h (mean ± SEM; 39.99 ± 5.90 ng/ml) and after 24 h (29.38 ± 1.71 ng/ml) was nonsignificant. In contrast, the donepezil concentration in the cerebrospinal fluid was significantly higher in the 24-h interval (7.54 ± 0.55 ng/ml) compared with the 12-h interval (5.19 ± 0.83 ng/ml, which is ~70 % based on mean cerebrospinal fluid values). Based on these data, it is plausible to predict that donepezil might produce a stronger AChE inhibition in the brain at 24 h compared with 12 h following the administration. This information may help physicians

  10. Risk factors for postoperative cerebrospinal fluid leak and meningitis after expanded endoscopic endonasal surgery.

    PubMed

    Ivan, Michael E; Iorgulescu, J Bryan; El-Sayed, Ivan; McDermott, Michael W; Parsa, Andrew T; Pletcher, Steven D; Jahangiri, Arman; Wagner, Jeffrey; Aghi, Manish K

    2015-01-01

    Postoperative cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leak is a serious complication of transsphenoidal surgery, which can lead to meningitis and often requires reparative surgery. We sought to identify preoperative risk factors for CSF leaks and meningitis. We reviewed 98 consecutive expanded endoscopic endonasal surgeries performed from 2008-2012 and analyzed preoperative comorbidities, intraoperative techniques, and postoperative care. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed. The most common pathologies addressed included pituitary adenoma, Rathke cyst, chordoma, esthesioneuroblastoma, meningioma, nasopharyngeal carcinoma, and squamous cell carcinoma. There were 11 CSF leaks (11%) and 10 central nervous system (CNS) infections (10%). Univariate and multivariate analysis of preoperative risk factors showed that patients with non-ideal body mass index (BMI) were associated with higher rate of postoperative CSF leak and meningitis (both p<0.01). Also, patients with increasing age were associated with increased CSF leak (p = 0.03) and the length of time a lumbar drain was used postoperatively was associated with infection in a univariate analysis. In addition, three of three endoscopic transsphenoidal surgeries combined with open cranial surgery had a postoperative CSF leak and CNS infection rate which was a considerably higher rate than for transsphenoidal surgeries alone or surgeries staged with open cases (p<0.01 and p=0.04, respectively) In this series of expanded endoscopic transsphenoidal surgeries, preoperative BMI remains the most important preoperative predictor for CSF leak and infection. Other risk factors include age, intraoperative CSF leak, lumbar drain duration, and cranial combined cases. Risks associated with complex surgical resections when combining open and endoscopic approaches could be minimized by staging these procedures. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Cerebrospinal fluid volume replacement following large endoscopic anterior cranial base resection.

    PubMed

    Blount, Angela; Riley, Kristen; Cure, Joel; Woodworth, Bradford A

    2012-01-01

    Large endoscopic skull-base resections often result in extensive postoperative pneumocephalus secondary to copious evacuation of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) during the procedures. Replacing CSF lost during craniotomy with saline is a common technique in neurosurgery, but is difficult after extensive transnasal resection of the anterior cranial base because direct transnasal CSF augmentation will escape until the skull base reconstruction is sealed. The present study evaluated the effectiveness of intraoperative CSF volume replacement via lumbar drains on improving postoperative outcomes. Ten large endoscopic anterior skull-base resections (>2.5 cm) were performed from 2008 to 2011. Sellar, parasellar, and transplanum resections were excluded. Etiologies included esthesioneuroblastoma (2), squamous cell carcinoma (2), intracranial dermoid (2), adenocarcinoma (1), adenoid cystic carcinoma (1), melanoma (1), and meningioma (1). Six patients were administered preservative-free normal saline via lumbar drain during skull-base reconstruction. Data collected included volume of postoperative pneumocephalus, intravenous pain medicine requirements 24 hours after surgery, and length of hospital stay. Volume of pneumocephalus (4.78 cm vs 12.8 cm(3) , p = 0.04) and length of hospital stay (2.17 days vs 8.5 days, p = 0.03) were significantly decreased in the normal saline volume replacement group. Average intravenous pain medication requirements were reduced in the first 24 hours postoperatively (8 mg morphine vs 14 mg morphine, p = 0.25), but did not reach statistical significance. Evacuation of intracranial air by transthecal administration of saline during reconstruction of large anterior cranial base defects was an effective technique to decrease postoperative pneumocephalus and length of hospital stay. Further evaluation is warranted. Copyright © 2012 American Rhinologic Society-American Academy of Otolaryngic Allergy, LLC.

  12. Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder - Multiple Languages

    MedlinePlus

    ... Are Here: Home → Multiple Languages → All Health Topics → Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder URL of this page: https://medlineplus.gov/languages/ ... V W XYZ List of All Topics All Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder - Multiple Languages To use the sharing features on ...

  13. Near-Death Experiences and Posttraumatic Growth.

    PubMed

    Khanna, Surbhi; Greyson, Bruce

    2015-10-01

    Posttraumatic growth denotes positive psychological change after a traumatic experience that is an improvement over the state before the trauma. Inasmuch as it involves existential reevaluation, posttraumatic growth overlaps with spiritual change, although it also encompasses other domains of positive outcome. This study investigated posttraumatic growth and presence and depth of near-death experience at the time of the close brush with death among 251 survivors of a close brush with death, using the Posttraumatic Growth Inventory and the Near-Death Experience (NDE) Scale. Near-death experiences were associated with greater posttraumatic growth than were close brushes with death in the absence of such an experience, and scores on the NDE Scale were significantly correlated with scores on the Posttraumatic Growth Inventory. To the extent that NDEs are interpreted as spiritual events, these findings support prior research suggesting that spiritual factors make a significant contribution to posttraumatic growth and are consistent with the model that posits challenges to the assumptive worldview as a major stimulus to posttraumatic growth.

  14. Chronic Stress and Posttraumatic Stress Disorders.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davidson, Laura M.; Baum, Andrew

    1986-01-01

    Examined the relationship between chronic stress and symptoms of posttraumatic stress syndrome in people living within five miles of the Three Mile Island (TMI) nuclear power station. Results provided evidence of substantive links between chronic stress and development of mild symptoms of posttraumatic stress disorder. (Author/BL)

  15. Angiogenic potential of the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of patients with high-grade gliomas measured with the chick embryo chorioallantoic membrane assay (CAM).

    PubMed

    Sinning, Mariana; Letelier, René; Rosas, Carlos; Fuenzalida, Marcela; Lemus, David

    2012-01-01

    High-grade gliomas are highly vascularized tumors. Neo-angiogenesis plays a key role in tumor growth and resistance to therapy. A cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) sample could be a useful way to obtain pro-angiogenic predictive or prognostic markers at different stages of the disease. As a first step we looked for pro-angiogenic activity in the CSF of patients with high-grade gliomas. We performed the chicken embryo chorio-allantoic membrane (CAM) assay to study the angiogenic potential of the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), obtained either by lumbar puncture (LP) or craniotomy from six patients with high-grade brain tumors (three glioblastoma (WHO grade IV), one anaplastic oligodendroglioma (WHO grade III), two anaplastic ganglioglioma (WHO grade III)), and four healthy controls. Significantly increased neo-angiogenesis was observed on the surface of the growing CAM in the 6 patients with high-grade gliomas compared to controls (3.69 ± 1.23 versus 2.16 ± 0.97 capillaries per area (mean ± SD), p<0.005). There was no statistical difference related to the hystological grade of the tumor (WHO grade III or IV), previous treatment (radio-chemotherapy plus temozolomide, temozolomide alone or no treatment), or the site of CSF sample (surgery or lumbar puncture). Our results suggest a pro-angiogenic potential in the CSF of patients with high-grade gliomas.

  16. Risk Factors and Management of Incidental Durotomy in Lumbar Interbody Fusion Surgery.

    PubMed

    Enders, Frederik; Ackemann, Amelie; Müller, Simon; Kiening, Karl; Orakcioglu, Berk

    2017-08-28

    This is a retrospective study analysis. In this retrospective study we evaluated risk factors for incidental durotomy and its impact on the postoperative course. Lumbar interbody fusion (LIF) is increasingly applied for the treatment of degenerative instability. A known complication is incidental durotomy. A cohort of 541 patients who underwent primary LIF surgery between 2005 and 2015 was analyzed. Previous lumbar surgery, age, surgeon's experience, intraoperative use of a microscope, and the number of operated levels were assessed and the risk for incidental durotomy was estimated using the Log-likelihood test and Wald test, respectively. The association of incidental durotomy and outcome parameters was analyzed using the quantile regression model. In 77 (14.2%) patients intraoperative cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) fistula was observed. Previous lumbar surgery (P<0.001), number of operated levels (P=0.03), and surgeon's experience (P=0.01) were significantly associated with incidental durotomy. Incidental durotomy was significantly associated with a prolonged bed rest (P<0.001), hospital stay (P=0.041), and an increased use of postoperative antibiotics (P<0.001). Eleven of 77 patients with incidental durotomy (14.3%) developed postoperative CSF fistula of whom 10 (91%) needed revision surgery for dural repair. We could identify important risk factors for incidental durotomy in LIF surgery. In patients who had undergone previous lumbar surgery and those with multilevel disease particular precaution is required. Furthermore, we were able to verify the morbidity associated with CSF fistula as shown by increased immobilization and follow-up surgeries for postoperative CSF fistula which emphasizes the importance to develop strategies to minimize the risk for incidental durotomy.

  17. Spontaneous hemorrhage into a lumbar synovial cyst

    PubMed Central

    Alen, Jose F.; Ramos, Ana; Lobato, Ramiro D.; Lagares, Alfonso

    2010-01-01

    Lumbar synovial cysts frequently present with back pain, chronic radiculopathy and/or progressive symptoms of spinal canal compromise. These cysts generally appear in the context of degenerative lumbar spinal disease. Few cases of spontaneous hemorrhage into synovial cysts have been reported in the literature. PMID:20174835

  18. Primary lumbar hernia: A rarely encountered hernia

    PubMed Central

    Sundaramurthy, Sharada; Suresh, H.B.; Anirudh, A.V.; Prakash Rozario, Anthony

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Lumbar hernia is an uncommon abdominal wall hernia, making its diagnosis and management a challenge to the treating surgeon. Presentation may be misleading and diagnosis often missed. An imaging study forms an indispensable aid in the diagnosis and surgery is the only treatment option. Presentation of case A 42 year old male presented with history of pain in lower back of 4 years duration and was being treated symptomatically over 4 years with analgesics and physiotherapy. He had noticed a swelling over the left side of his mid-back and consequently on examination was found to have a primary acquired lumbar hernia arising from the deep superior lumbar triangle of Grynfelt. Diagnosis was confirmed by Computed Tomographic imaging. Discussion A lumbar hernia may be primary or secondary with only about 300 cases of primary lumbar hernia reported in literature. Lumbar hernias manifest through two possible defects in the posterior abdominal wall, the superior being more common. Management remains surgical with various techniques emerging over the years. The patient at our center underwent an open sublay mesh repair with excellent outcome. Conclusion A surgeon may encounter a primary lumbar hernia perhaps once in his lifetime making it an interesting surgical challenge. Sound anatomical knowledge and adequate imaging are indispensable. Inspite of advances in minimally invasive surgery, it cannot be universally applied to patients with lumbar hernia and management requires a more tailored approach. PMID:26812667

  19. Lumbar adhesive arachnoiditis. Etiologic and pathologic aspects.

    PubMed

    Quiles, M; Marchisello, P J; Tsairis, P

    1978-03-01

    The etiologic factors and pathologic findings in 38 patients with lumbar arachnoiditis are presented. Lumbar spine surgery and the injection of contrast materials prior to the diagnosis of this condition are considered the most important factors in its genesis. In this series, there was microscopic evidence of arachnoiditis ossificans in 3 patients and arachnoiditis calcificans in 1 patient.

  20. Oxygenation of the cerebrospinal fluid with artificial cerebrospinal fluid can ameliorate a spinal cord ischemic injury in a rabbit model.

    PubMed

    Kanda, Keisuke; Adachi, Osamu; Kawatsu, Satoshi; Sakatsume, Ko; Kumagai, Kiichiro; Kawamoto, Shunsuke; Saiki, Yoshikatsu

    2016-11-01

    We evaluated the effect of cerebrospinal fluid oxygenation for the prevention of spinal cord ischemic injury after infrarenal aortic occlusion in a rabbit model. Twenty white Japanese rabbits were categorized into the following 4 groups (5 in each): group S (sham), balloon catheter insertion on to the aorta; group C (control), spinal cord ischemic injury by infrarenal abdominal aortic balloon occlusion for 15 minutes; group N (nonoxygenated), spinal cord ischemic injury with cerebrospinal fluid replacement by nonoxygenated artificial cerebrospinal fluid; and group O (oxygenated), spinal cord ischemic injury with cerebrospinal fluid replacement by nanobubble-oxygenated artificial cerebrospinal fluid. The changes in cerebrospinal fluid partial pressure of oxygen during the peri-ischemic period, modified Tarlov score, and histopathology of the spinal cord 48 hours after aortic maneuvers were evaluated. Cerebrospinal fluid partial pressure of oxygen significantly increased in group O compared with group N after cerebrospinal fluid replacement (254.5 ± 54.8 mm Hg vs 136.1 ± 43.5 mm Hg, P = .02). After 15 minutes of spinal cord ischemic injury, cerebrospinal fluid partial pressure of oxygen in group C decreased to 65.8 ± 18.6 mm Hg compared with baseline (148.8 ± 20.6 mm Hg, P < .01), whereas cerebrospinal fluid partial pressure of oxygen in group O was maintained at remarkably high levels after spinal cord ischemic injury (291.9 ± 51.8 mm Hg), which was associated with improved neurologic function, with 20% of spinal cord ischemic injury having a Tarlov score less than 5 compared with 100% of spinal cord ischemic injury in group C. Preservation of anterior horn neurons in groups N and O was confirmed by histopathologic analysis with significant reduction of degenerated neurons compared with group C. Cerebrospinal fluid oxygenation with artificial cerebrospinal fluid can exert a protective effect against spinal cord ischemic injury in rabbits

  1. [Lumbar pain in old age].

    PubMed

    Baumgartner, H

    1996-10-22

    In advanced age, lumbar pain is less frequently caused by occupational stress and psychosomatic factors. Unstable segments and spondylo-arthrotic degeneration can lead to muscular strain whenever insufficient secondary stability and missing muscular equilibrium are involved. In the differential diagnosis one must distinguish between osteoporosis and spinal stenosis, which increases in frequency with age. Pain due to internal or gynecological problems must be excluded. From the therapeutic point of view, patients should be instructed in ergonomics and the simple application of physiotherapeutic procedures, e.g. heat and cold. Analgetics become increasingly important with age, consequently resulting in reduced use of antirheumatics. There exists enough evidence to show that muscular training of the lumbar muscles play an important role in the secondary prevention of lumbar pain in elderly people as well. Essentially, it can be stated that physical age is not directly related to possible ailment. The change of occupational obligations, with possibilities to adapt to personal stress levels, as well as the positive attitude towards everyday life in retirement have a major influence in accepting and handling ability of problems, concerning pain. In the department of Physical Medicine, Rehabilitation and Rheumatology of the Clinic Wilhelm Schulthess it was found that among 7806 patients with lower back pain (1990-1995) 43.3% involved the ages of 40 to 60 and 31.3% the ages of 60 to 80. More distinctly than in younger patients, older aged patients tend to show a marked discrepancy between radiological findings and effective pain. Lower back pains of elderly patients are of a different nature from those found in younger or middle-aged people. Ischialgia due to the protrusion of an intervertebral disk or an acute lumbovertebral syndrome caused by muscular instability are found much less frequently.

  2. Depressed suicide attempters with posttraumatic stress disorder.

    PubMed

    Ramberg, Maria; Stanley, Barbara; Ystgaard, Mette; Mehlum, Lars

    2015-01-01

    Posttraumatic stress disorder and major depressive disorder are well-established risk factors for suicidal behavior. This study compared depressed suicide attempters with and without comorbid posttraumatic stress disorder with respect to additional diagnoses, global functioning, depressive symptoms, substance abuse, history of traumatic exposure, and suicidal behavior. Adult patients consecutively admitted to a general hospital after a suicide attempt were interviewed and assessed for DSM-IV diagnosis and clinical correlates. Sixty-four patients (71%) were diagnosed with depression; of them, 21 patients (32%) had posttraumatic stress disorder. There were no group differences in social adjustment, depressive symptoms, or suicidal intent. However, the group with comorbid depression and posttraumatic stress disorder had more additional Axis I diagnoses, a higher degree of childhood trauma exposure, and more often reported previous suicide attempts, non-suicidal self-harm, and vengeful suicidal motives. These findings underline the clinical importance of diagnosis and treatment of posttraumatic stress disorder in suicide attempters.

  3. Posttraumatic resilience in former Ugandan child soldiers.

    PubMed

    Klasen, Fionna; Oettingen, Gabriele; Daniels, Judith; Post, Manuela; Hoyer, Catrin; Adam, Hubertus

    2010-01-01

    The present research examines posttraumatic resilience in extremely exposed children and adolescents based on interviews with 330 former Ugandan child soldiers (age = 11-17, female = 48.5%). Despite severe trauma exposure, 27.6% showed posttraumatic resilience as indicated by the absence of posttraumatic stress disorder, depression, and clinically significant behavioral and emotional problems. Among these former child soldiers, posttraumatic resilience was associated with lower exposure to domestic violence, lower guilt cognitions, less motivation to seek revenge, better socioeconomic situation in the family, and more perceived spiritual support. Among the youth with significant psychopathology, many of them had symptoms extending beyond the criteria for posttraumatic stress disorder, in keeping with the emerging concept of developmental trauma disorder. Implications for future research, intervention, and policy are discussed.

  4. Pesticides, polychlorinated biphenyls and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in cerebrospinal fluid of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis patients: a case-control study.

    PubMed

    Vinceti, Marco; Violi, Federica; Tzatzarakis, Manolis; Mandrioli, Jessica; Malagoli, Carlotta; Hatch, Elizabeth E; Fini, Nicola; Fasano, Antonio; Rakitskii, Valerii N; Kalantzi, Olga-Ioanna; Tsatsakis, Aristides

    2017-05-01

    Neurotoxic chemicals including several pesticides have been suggested to play a role in the etiology of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). We investigated the relation between organochlorine pesticides and their metabolites (OCPs), polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in the etiology of sporadic ALS, determining for the first time their levels in cerebrospinal fluid as indicator of antecedent exposure. We recruited 38 ALS patients and 38 controls referred to an Italian clinical center for ALS care, who underwent a lumbar puncture for diagnostic purposes between 1994-2013, and had 1mL of cerebrospinal fluid available for the determination of OCPs, PCBs and PAHs. Many chemicals were undetectable in both case and control CSF samples, and we found little evidence of any increased disease risk according to higher levels of exposure. Among males >60 years, we found a slight but statistically very unstable increased ALS risk with higher levels of the congener PCB 28 and the OCP metabolite p,p'-DDE. Overall, these results do not suggest an involvement of the neurotoxic chemicals investigated in this study in disease etiology, although small numbers limited the precision of our results. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Lumbar intraspinal extradural ganglion cysts.

    PubMed

    Cho, Sung Min; Rhee, Woo Tack; Choi, Soo Jung; Eom, Dae Woon

    2009-07-01

    The lumbar intraspinal epidural ganglion cyst has been a rare cause of the low back pain or leg pain. Ganglion cysts and synovial cysts compose the juxtafacet cysts. Extensive studies have been performed about the synovial cysts, however, very little has been known about the ganglion cyst. Current report is about two ganglion cysts associated with implicative findings in young male patients. We discuss about the underlying pathology of the ganglion cyst based on intraoperative evidences, associated disc herniation at the same location or severe degeneration of the ligament flavum that the cyst originated from in young patients.

  6. Soluble CD27 Levels in Cerebrospinal Fluid as a Prognostic Biomarker in Clinically Isolated Syndrome.

    PubMed

    van der Vuurst de Vries, Roos M; Mescheriakova, Julia Y; Runia, Tessel F; Jafari, Naghmeh; Siepman, Theodora A M; Hintzen, Rogier Q

    2017-03-01

    There is a growing number of therapies that could be administered after the first symptom of central nervous system demyelination. These drugs can delay multiple sclerosis (MS) diagnosis and slow down future disability. However, treatment of patients with benign course may not be needed; therefore, there is a need for biomarkers to predict long-term prognosis in patients with clinically isolated syndrome (CIS). To investigate whether the T-cell activation marker soluble CD27 (sCD27) measured in cerebrospinal fluid of patients at time of a first attack is associated with a subsequent diagnosis of MS and a higher relapse rate. This prospective study included 77 patients with CIS between March 2002 and May 2015 in a tertiary referral center for multiple sclerosis, in collaboration with several regional hospitals. Patients with CIS underwent a lumbar puncture and magnetic resonance imaging scan within 6 months after first onset of symptoms. Soluble CD27 levels were determined in cerebrospinal fluid using a commercially available enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Cox regression analyses was used to calculate univariate and multivariate hazard ratios for MS diagnosis. Association between sCD27 levels and relapse rate was assessed using a negative binomial regression model. Among 77 patients with CIS, 50 were female (79.5%), and mean (SD) age was 32.7 (7.4) years. Mean (SD) age in the control individuals was 33.4 (9.5) years, and 20 were female (66.7%).Patients with CIS had higher cerebrospinal fluid sCD27 levels than control individuals (geometric mean, 31.3 U/mL; 95% CI, 24.0-40.9 vs mean, 4.67 U/mL; 95% CI, 2.9-7.5; P < .001). During a mean (SD) follow-up of 54.8 (35.1) months, 39 of 77 patients (50.6%) were diagnosed as having MS. In a model adjusted for magnetic resonance imaging and cerebrospinal fluid measurements, sCD27 levels were associated with a diagnosis of MS (hazard ratio, 2.4 per 100 U/mL increase in sCD27 levels; 95% CI, 1.27-4.53; P = .007

  7. Lumbar Epidural Varix Mimicking Disc Herniation

    PubMed Central

    Bursalı, Adem; Guvenal, Ahmet Burak; Yaman, Onur

    2016-01-01

    Lumbar radiculopathy is generally caused by such well-recognized entity as lumbar disc herniation in neurosurgical practice; however rare pathologies such as thrombosed epidural varix may mimic them by causing radicular symptoms. In this case report, we present a 26-year-old man with the complaint of back and right leg pain who was operated for right L4–5 disc herniation. The lesion interpreted as an extruded disc herniation preoperatively was found to be a thrombosed epidural varix compressing the nerve root preoperatively. The nerve root was decompressed by shrinking the lesion with bipolar thermocoagulation and excision. The patient's complaints disappeared in the postoperative period. Thrombosed lumbar epidural varices may mimic lumbar disc herniations both radiologically and clinically. Therefore, must be kept in mind in the differential diagnosis of lumbar disc herniations. Microsurgical techniques are mandatory for the treatment of these pathologies and decompression with thermocoagulation and excision is an efficient method. PMID:27446525

  8. A Simplified Culture Method for Specific Diagnosis of Cerebrospinal Meningitis.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    efficient than chocolate agar and blood agar plates when tested in parallel on 460 cerebrospinal fluid specimens. The culture bottles are inexpensive, portable, and durable making them highly suited to studies in the field. (Author)

  9. Posttraumatic cortical defect of femur.

    PubMed

    Nadarajah, Jeyaseelan; Srivastava, Deep N; Malhotra, Rajesh; Palaniswamy, Aravindh

    2013-01-01

    Posttraumatic cortical defect of bone is a rare entity which occurs in a maturing skeleton following green stick or torus fracture. Most of the cases are asymptomatic and they are detected incidentally on radiograph. These lesions usually require no treatment. However, the appearance of these lesions can mimic various pathological conditions affecting bone. Knowledge about this entity is important as it avoids unnecessary investigations. We present this case as the occurrence of this entity in femur is very rare and the child was symptomatic.

  10. The relationship between posttraumatic stress and posttraumatic growth among adolescent and young adult (AYA) cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Zebrack, Brad; Kwak, Minyoung; Salsman, John; Cousino, Melissa; Meeske, Kathleen; Aguilar, Christine; Embry, Leanne; Block, Rebecca; Hayes-Lattin, Brandon; Cole, Steve

    2015-02-01

    Theories of posttraumatic growth suggest that some degree of distress is necessary to stimulate growth; yet, investigations of the relationship between stress and growth following trauma are mixed. This study aims to understand the relationship between posttraumatic stress symptoms and posttraumatic growth in adolescent and young adult (AYA) cancer patients. 165 AYA patients aged 14-39 years at diagnosis completed standardized measures of posttraumatic stress and posttraumatic growth at 12 months following diagnosis. Locally weighted scatterplot smoothing and regression were used to examine linear and curvilinear relationships between posttraumatic stress and posttraumatic growth. No significant relationships between overall posttraumatic stress severity and posttraumatic growth were observed at 12-month follow-up. However, curvilinear relationships between re-experiencing (a posttraumatic stress symptom) and two of five posttraumatic growth indicators (New Possibilities, Personal Strengths) were observed. Findings suggest that re-experiencing is associated with some aspects of posttraumatic growth but not others. Although re-experiencing is considered a symptom of posttraumatic stress disorder, it also may represent a cognitive process necessary to achieve personal growth for AYAs. Findings call into question the supposed psychopathological nature of re-experiencing and suggest that re-experiencing, as a cognitive process, may be psychologically adaptive. Opportunities to engage family, friends, cancer survivors, or health care professionals in frank discussions about fears, worries, or concerns may help AYAs re-experience cancer in a way that enhances their understanding of what happened to them and contributes to positive adaptation to life after cancer. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  11. Distribution in cerebrospinal fluid, blood, and lymph of epidurally injected morphine and inulin in dogs

    SciTech Connect

    Durant, P.A.; Yaksh, T.L.

    1986-06-01

    We describe procedures for catheterizing the epidural space, the azygos vein, and the thoracic lymph duct of dogs without using fluoroscopy. The success rates of the procedures were 100, 80, and 50%, respectively (n = 10). To assess the validity of the model, /sup 3/H-morphine and unlabeled morphine (2 mg) were injected epidurally in ten dogs. Lumbar cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), azygos venous blood, arterial blood, and lymph were sampled before and 5, 20, 60, 120, 180, 240, 300 and 360 min after injection. During the first 20 min, morphine levels in the azygos vein were about three and ten times greater than arterial and lymphatic levels, respectively (n = 3; P less than 0.01). Morphine levels were significantly greater in the azygos vein (n = 8) and the femoral artery (n = 10) during the first 20 and 60 min than they were later, respectively (P less than 0.05). In the lymph (n = 5), the levels of morphine at 60 min were statistically greater (P less than 0.05) than levels at 4, 5, and 6 hr. At no time were the concurrent arterial and lymph levels different from each other. In the lumbar CSF, the morphine peak concentration was reached 5-60 min after epidural injection and ranged between 5 and 93 micrograms/ml. In the CSF, the levels of morphine were significantly greater during the first 20 min than later (n = 7; P less than 0.05). The washout of the lumbar CSF curve for morphine appeared to be fitted by a two-compartment open model. The t1/2-alpha and t1/2-beta values were 14.7 +/- 7.2 min and 106 +/- 45 min, respectively (mean +/- SD). Cumulative percentages of the epidural dose of morphine passed into the azygos system within the first 5, 20, 60, and 120 min after injection were calculated to be 4.0 +/- 2.1, 23.5 +/- 14.6, 49.2 +/- 34.2, and 55.9 +/- 35.3, respectively (mean +/- SD; n = 8).

  12. Post-traumatic basal ganglia haemorrhage in a child with primary central nervous system lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Jankowski, Pawel P; Levy, Michael L; Crawford, John Ross

    2013-07-31

    Primary central nervous system lymphoma (PCNSL) is a rare tumour of childhood with 15-20 cases reported yearly in North America. We present a case of a 13-year-old boy diagnosed with PCNSL who presented more than one-and-a-half years post-treatment with high dose cytosine arabinoside and methotrexate with a right-sided basal ganglia haemorrhage on MRI following a concussion while playing organised football against medical advice. There was no evidence of an underlying vascular malformation or recurrent disease by MRI, cerebrospinal fluid analysis or positron emission tomography computed tomography (PET-CT). However, 6 months post-injury he presented with asymptomatic disease recurrence of the frontal lobe. Our case reports an unusual MRI pattern of post-traumatic injury in a child previously treated for PCNSL that would support a recommendation for the avoidance of contact sports in this population.

  13. Posttraumatic oxytocin dysregulation: Is it a link among posttraumatic self disorders, posttraumatic stress disorder, and pelvicvisceral dysregulation conditions in women?

    PubMed Central

    Seng, Julia S.

    2010-01-01

    This paper explicates a theory that oxytocin, a sexually dimorphic neurotransmitter and paracrine hormone, is a plausible mechanism linking early relational trauma with posttraumatic self disorders (e.g., dissociation, somatization, and interpersonal sensitivity), posttraumatic stress disorder per se and pelvicvisceral dysregulationdisorders (e.g., irritable bowel syndrome, chronic pelvic pain, interstitial cystitis, and hyperemesis gravidarum). This Posttraumatic Oxytocin Dysregulation Disorders theory is consistent with historic and contemporary literature. It integrates attention to psychological and physical comorbidities and could account for the increased incidence of these disorders among females. Specific propositions are explored in data from studies of traumatic stress and women's health. PMID:20938865

  14. Proteome analysis of chick embryonic cerebrospinal fluid.

    PubMed

    Parada, Carolina; Gato, Angel; Aparicio, Mariano; Bueno, David

    2006-01-01

    During early stages of embryo development, the brain cavity is filled with embryonic cerebrospinal fluid (E-CSF), a complex fluid containing different protein fractions that contributes to the regulation of the survival, proliferation and neurogenesis of the neuroectodermal stem cells. Using 2-DE, protein sequencing and database searches, we identified and analyzed the proteome of the E-CSF from chick embryos (Gallus gallus). We identified 26 different gene products, including proteins related to the extracellular matrix, proteins associated with the regulation of osmotic pressure and metal transport, proteins related to cell survival, MAP kinase activators, proteins involved in the transport of retinol and vitamin D, antioxidant and antimicrobial proteins, intracellular proteins and some unknown proteins. Most of these gene products are involved in the regulation of developmental processes during embryogenesis in systems other than E-CSF. Interestingly, 14 of them are also present in adult human CSF proteome, and it has been reported that they are altered in the CSF of patients suffering neurodegenerative diseases and/or neurological disorders. Understanding these molecules and the mechanisms they control during embryonic neurogenesis is a key contribution to the general understanding of CNS development, and may also contribute to greater knowledge of these human diseases.

  15. Cerebrospinal Fluid Flow Studies and Recent Advancements.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Erin J; Yamada, Shinya

    2016-04-01

    This article provides an overview of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques used to assess cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) movement in the central nervous system (CNS), including Phase-Contrast (PC), Time-Spatial Labeling Inversion Pulse, and simultaneous multi slice echo planar phase contrast imaging. These techniques have been used to assess CSF movement in the CNS under normal and pathophysiological situations. PC can quantitatively measure stroke volume in selected regions, particularly the aqueduct of Sylvius, as synchronized to the heartbeat. The PC is frequently used to investigate those patients with suspected normal pressure hydrocephalus and a Chiari I malformation. Time-Spatial Labeling Inversion Pulse, with high signal-to-noise ratio, captures motion of CSF anywhere in the CNS over a time period of up to 5 seconds. Variations of PC-MRI improved temporal resolution and included contributions from respiration. With non-invasive imaging such as these, more can be understood about CSF dynamics, especially with respect to the relative effects of cardiac and respiratory changes on CSF movement. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Quantitative evaluation fo cerebrospinal fluid shunt flow

    SciTech Connect

    Chervu, S.; Chervu, L.R.; Vallabhajosyula, B.; Milstein, D.M.; Shapiro, K.M.; Shulman, K.; Blaufox, M.D.

    1984-01-01

    The authors describe a rigorous method for measuring the flow of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) in shunt circuits implanted for the relief of obstructive hydrocephalus. Clearance of radioactivity for several calibrated flow rates was determined with a Harvard infusion pump by injecting the Rickham reservoir of a Rickham-Holter valve system with 100 ..mu..Ci of Tc-99m as pertechnetate. The elliptical and the cylindrical Holter valves used as adjunct valves with the Rickham reservoir yielded two different regression lines when the clearances were plotted against flow rats. The experimental regression lines were used to determine the in vivo flow rates from clearances calculated after injecting the Rickham reservoirs of the patients. The unique clearance characteristics of the individual shunt systems available requires that calibration curves be derived for an entire system identical to one implanted in the patient being evaluated, rather than just the injected chamber. Excellent correlation between flow rates and the clinical findings supports the reliability of this method of quantification of CSF shunt flow, and the results are fully accepted by neurosurgeons.

  17. Doxepin concentrations in plasma and cerebrospinal fluid.

    PubMed

    Schomburg, Robert; Remane, Daniela; Fassbender, Klaus; Maurer, Hans H; Spiegel, Jörg

    2011-04-01

    Doxepin--like other antidepressant drugs (ADs)--shows a variable antidepressant effect in clinical practice. The cause for this variability is as yet unclear; however, pharmacokinetic factors such as the variable permeability of doxepin into the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), may contribute to the difference in therapeutic efficacy. We measured and correlated the concentration of doxepin and its active metabolite nordoxepin in both the plasma and CSF. Plasma and CSF samples were taken simultaneously from 21 patients who were treated with doxepin due to different clinical indications. The plasma concentration of both doxepin and nordoxepin correlated significantly with the oral dosage of doxepin (doxepin: r = +0.66, p < 0.001; nordoxepin: r = +0.78, p < 0.0001; Spearman's correlation). Furthermore, we found significant correlations between the plasma and CSF concentrations of both doxepin (r = +0.71; p < 0.001; Pearson's correlation) and nordoxepin (r = +0.74; p < 0.001). These highly significant correlations between the plasma and CSF concentrations indicate a constant CSF permeability of doxepin and its active metabolite nordoxepin.

  18. Cerebrospinal Fluid HIV Escape from Antiretroviral Therapy.

    PubMed

    Ferretti, Francesca; Gisslen, Magnus; Cinque, Paola; Price, Richard W

    2015-06-01

    CNS infection is a nearly constant facet of systemic CNS infection and is generally well controlled by suppressive systemic antiretroviral therapy (ART). However, there are instances when HIV can be detected in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) despite suppression of plasma viruses below the clinical limits of measurement. We review three types of CSF viral escape: asymptomatic, neuro-symptomatic, and secondary. The first, asymptomatic CSF escape, is seemingly benign and characterized by lack of discernable neurological deterioration or subsequent CNS disease progression. Neuro-symptomatic CSF escape is an uncommon, but important, entity characterized by new or progressive CNS disease that is critical to recognize clinically because of its management implications. Finally, secondary CSF escape, which may be even more uncommon, is defined by an increase of CSF HIV replication in association with a concomitant non-HIV infection, as a consequence of the local inflammatory response. Understanding these CSF escape settings not only is important for clinical diagnosis and management but also may provide insight into the CNS HIV reservoir.

  19. A new look at cerebrospinal fluid circulation.

    PubMed

    Brinker, Thomas; Stopa, Edward; Morrison, John; Klinge, Petra

    2014-01-01

    According to the traditional understanding of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) physiology, the majority of CSF is produced by the choroid plexus, circulates through the ventricles, the cisterns, and the subarachnoid space to be absorbed into the blood by the arachnoid villi. This review surveys key developments leading to the traditional concept. Challenging this concept are novel insights utilizing molecular and cellular biology as well as neuroimaging, which indicate that CSF physiology may be much more complex than previously believed. The CSF circulation comprises not only a directed flow of CSF, but in addition a pulsatile to and fro movement throughout the entire brain with local fluid exchange between blood, interstitial fluid, and CSF. Astrocytes, aquaporins, and other membrane transporters are key elements in brain water and CSF homeostasis. A continuous bidirectional fluid exchange at the blood brain barrier produces flow rates, which exceed the choroidal CSF production rate by far. The CSF circulation around blood vessels penetrating from the subarachnoid space into the Virchow Robin spaces provides both a drainage pathway for the clearance of waste molecules from the brain and a site for the interaction of the systemic immune system with that of the brain. Important physiological functions, for example the regeneration of the brain during sleep, may depend on CSF circulation.

  20. A new look at cerebrospinal fluid circulation

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    According to the traditional understanding of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) physiology, the majority of CSF is produced by the choroid plexus, circulates through the ventricles, the cisterns, and the subarachnoid space to be absorbed into the blood by the arachnoid villi. This review surveys key developments leading to the traditional concept. Challenging this concept are novel insights utilizing molecular and cellular biology as well as neuroimaging, which indicate that CSF physiology may be much more complex than previously believed. The CSF circulation comprises not only a directed flow of CSF, but in addition a pulsatile to and fro movement throughout the entire brain with local fluid exchange between blood, interstitial fluid, and CSF. Astrocytes, aquaporins, and other membrane transporters are key elements in brain water and CSF homeostasis. A continuous bidirectional fluid exchange at the blood brain barrier produces flow rates, which exceed the choroidal CSF production rate by far. The CSF circulation around blood vessels penetrating from the subarachnoid space into the Virchow Robin spaces provides both a drainage pathway for the clearance of waste molecules from the brain and a site for the interaction of the systemic immune system with that of the brain. Important physiological functions, for example the regeneration of the brain during sleep, may depend on CSF circulation. PMID:24817998

  1. Analysis of extracellular RNA in cerebrospinal fluid

    PubMed Central

    Saugstad, Julie A.; Lusardi, Theresa A.; Van Keuren-Jensen, Kendall R.; Phillips, Jay I.; Lind, Babett; Harrington, Christina A.; McFarland, Trevor J.; Courtright, Amanda L.; Reiman, Rebecca A.; Yeri, Ashish S.; Kalani, M. Yashar S.; Adelson, P. David; Arango, Jorge; Nolan, John P.; Duggan, Erika; Messer, Karen; Akers, Johnny C.; Galasko, Douglas R.; Quinn, Joseph F.; Carter, Bob S.; Hochberg, Fred H.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT We examined the extracellular vesicle (EV) and RNA composition of pooled normal cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) samples and CSF from five major neurological disorders: Alzheimer’s disease (AD), Parkinson’s disease (PD), low-grade glioma (LGG), glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), and subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH), representing neurodegenerative disease, cancer, and severe acute brain injury. We evaluated: (I) size and quantity of EVs by nanoparticle tracking analysis (NTA) and vesicle flow cytometry (VFC), (II) RNA yield and purity using four RNA isolation kits, (III) replication of RNA yields within and between laboratories, and (IV) composition of total and EV RNAs by reverse transcription–quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) and RNA sequencing (RNASeq). The CSF contained ~106 EVs/μL by NTA and VFC. Brain tumour and SAH CSF contained more EVs and RNA relative to normal, AD, and PD. RT-qPCR and RNASeq identified disease-related populations of microRNAs and messenger RNAs (mRNAs) relative to normal CSF, in both total and EV fractions. This work presents relevant measures selected to inform the design of subsequent replicative CSF studies. The range of neurological diseases highlights variations in total and EV RNA content due to disease or collection site, revealing critical considerations guiding the selection of appropriate approaches and controls for CSF studies. PMID:28717417

  2. Disseminated Cerebrospinal Embryonal Tumor in the Adult

    PubMed Central

    Armocida, Daniele; Caporlingua, Federico; Lapadula, Gennaro; Elefante, Grazia Maria; Antonelli, Manila; Salvati, Maurizio

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. According to the 2016 World Health Organization classification of Tumors of the Central Nervous System, the term Primitive Neuroectodermal Tumor has been replaced by the term Embryonal Tumor (ET). We present a case of disseminated cerebrospinal ET presenting in an adult patient. Illustrative Case. A 49-year-old male presenting with low back pain, dysuria, and hypoesthesia of the lower extremities referred to our emergency department. Brain and whole spine contrast-enhanced MRI documented a diffusively disseminated heterogeneous neoplasm with intradural extra- and intramedullary involvement of the cervicothoracic tract and cauda equina. A primary biopsy of the lumbosacral localization was performed through L5 bilateral laminectomy. Histologic diagnosis was Embryonal Tumor Not Otherwise Specified. The patient underwent chemotherapy with postoperative adjuvant alternating Vincristine-Doxorubicin-Ifosfamide (VAI) and Ifosfamide-Etoposide (IE). Discussion. Spinal ETs are exceedingly rare especially when presenting in the adult patient. Neurosurgical and oncologic management is still unclear. When feasible, surgical removal should always be performed to obtain a histologic diagnosis. Postoperative adjuvant therapy might entail both chemo- and radiotherapy; however a consensus on this matter is still lacking. PMID:27818821

  3. [Conservative management of posttraumatic diplopia].

    PubMed

    Tokarz-Sawińska, Ewa; Lachowicz, Ewelina

    2015-01-01

    To determine the effect of prism correction with physicotherapeutic procedures on symptomatic improvement in posttraumatic oculomotor, trochlear and abducent nerves palsy. Twenty eight patients (five women and twenty three men) at the age range from 23 to 50 years (mean age of 36.5 y.o.) with the posttraumatic ophthalmic complications underwent routine ophthalmic and strabologic examination. Prism correction and vitaminum B1 in iontophoresis were used due to unilateral oculomotor, trochlear and abducent nerve palsy, at 3-11 (mean interval between the trauma and treatment commencement of 7 months) months after traffic accident. Additionally, oculomotor muscles motility training and orthoptic exercises were applied. The duration of therapy ranged from 11 to 18 months (mean treatment duration of 14.5 months). All patients were considered cured at the end of treatment. We achieved the increased ocular range of motion (100%), the reduced horizontal and vertical deviation angle (75%), the extension of palpebral fissure (100%) and regression of diplopia (100%). The binocular vision in the free- and instrument-space environment evaluation improved after treatment (100% simultaneous perception, 100% fusion, 96,43% stereopsis) in 75% and 25% of patients without and with prism correction, respectively. The use of prism correction led to regression of diplopia, ortophoria without compensatory head position and improved binocular vision function. Prism correction and physicotherapeutic procedures resulted in early improvement of ocular range of motion and accommodation.

  4. Cerebrospinal fluid profiles with increasing number of cerebral microbleeds in a continuum of cognitive impairment.

    PubMed

    Shams, Sara; Granberg, Tobias; Martola, Juha; Li, Xiaozhen; Shams, Mana; Fereshtehnejad, Seyed-Mohammad; Cavallin, Lena; Aspelin, Peter; Kristoffersen-Wiberg, Maria; Wahlund, Lars-Olof

    2016-03-01

    Cerebral microbleeds (CMBs) are hypothesised to have an important yet unknown role in the dementia disease pathology. In this study we analysed increasing number of CMBs and their independent associations with routine cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarkers in a continuum of cognitive impairment. A total of 1039 patients undergoing dementia investigation were analysed and underwent lumbar puncture, and an MRI scan. CSF samples were analysed for amyloid β (Aβ) 42, total tau (T-tau), tau phosphorylated at threonine 18 (P-tau) and CSF/serum albumin ratios. Increasing number of CMBs were independently associated with low Aβ42 levels, in the whole cohort, Alzheimer's disease and mild cognitive impairment (p < 0.05). CSF/serum albumin ratios were high with multiple CMBs (p < 0.001), reflecting accompanying blood-brain barrier dysfunction. T-tau and P-tau levels were lower in Alzheimer's patients with multiple CMBs when compared to zero CMBs, but did not change in the rest of the cohort. White matter hyperintensities were associated with low Aβ42 in the whole cohort and Alzheimer's disease (p < 0.05). Aβ42 is the routine CSF-biomarker mainly associated with CMBs in cognitive impairment, and there is an accumulative effect with increasing number of CMBs.

  5. Glioblastoma multiforme with epithelial differentiation: a potential diagnostic pitfall in cerebrospinal fluid cytology.

    PubMed

    Gill, Simpal K; Padmanabhan, Vijayalakshmi; Hickey, William F; Marotti, Jonathan D

    2015-08-01

    Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) cytology provides valuable diagnostic and prognostic information for diseases of the central nervous system (CNS) and remains the gold standard for the detection of neoplastic meningitis. Metastatic involvement of the CSF by non-CNS neoplasms far surpasses that of primary brain tumors, although conventional glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) can occasionally be identified in the CSF. GBM with epithelial differentiation is an uncommon variant that may contain features such as adenoid structures, signet ring cells, or squamous metaplasia. Herein, we present a case of GBM with epithelial differentiation to highlight a potential diagnostic pitfall in CSF cytology. A 55-year-old man presented with neurological symptoms and a 6.4 cm left temporal lobe cystic mass. Primary resection revealed GBM with focal epithelial differentiation confirmed by cytokeratin, epithelial membrane antigen, and glial fibrillary acidic protein immunohistochemical studies. Four months following primary resection, the patient developed severe headache for which a lumbar puncture with CSF cytologic evaluation was performed. The cytospin preparation showed numerous malignant epithelioid cells with high nuclear-cytoplasmic ratio and prominent cytoplasmic vacuoles resembling metastatic carcinoma. However, the lesional cells were cytomorphologically identical to the epithelial component present in the patient's recently diagnosed GBM. This case illustrates the potential for GBM with epithelial differentiation to closely mimic metastatic carcinoma from a non-CNS site in CSF cytology, which expands the differential diagnosis and emphasizes the necessity of clinical correlation.

  6. The circulation of the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) in the spinal canal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanchez, Antonio L.; Martinez-Bazan, Carlos; Lasheras, Juan C.

    2016-11-01

    Cerebrospinal Fluid (CSF) is secreted in the choroid plexus in the lateral sinuses of the brain and fills the subarachnoid space bathing the external surfaces of the brain and the spinal canal. Absence of CSF circulation has been shown to impede its physiological function that includes, among others, supplying nutrients to neuronal and glial cells and removing the waste products of cellular metabolism. Radionuclide scanning images published by Di Chiro in 1964 showed upward migration of particle tracers from the lumbar region of the spinal canal, thereby suggesting the presence of an active bulk circulation responsible for bringing fresh CSF into the spinal canal and returning a portion of it to the cranial vault. However, the existence of this slow moving bulk circulation in the spinal canal has been a subject of dispute for the last 50 years. To date, there has been no physical explanation for the mechanism responsible for the establishment of such a bulk motion. We present a perturbation analysis of the flow in an idealized model of the spinal canal and show how steady streaming could be responsible for the establishment of such a circulation. The results of this analysis are compared to flow measurements conducted on in-vitro models of the spinal canal of adult humans.

  7. Sellar Reconstruction and Rates of Delayed Cerebrospinal Fluid Leak after Endoscopic Pituitary Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Sanders-Taylor, Chris; Anaizi, Amjad; Kosty, Jennifer; Zimmer, Lee A.; Theodosopoulos, Phillip V.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Delayed cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leaks are a complication in transsphenoidal surgery, potentially causing morbidity and longer hospital stays. Sella reconstruction can limit this complication, but is it necessary in all patients? Design Retrospective review. Setting Single-surgeon team (2005–2012) addresses this trend toward graded reconstruction. Participants A total of 264 consecutive patients with pituitary adenomas underwent endoscopic transsphenoidal resections. Sellar defects sizable to accommodate a fat graft were reconstructed. Main outcomes Delayed CSF leak and autograft harvesting. Results Overall, 235 (89%) had reconstruction with autograft (abdominal fat, septal bone/cartilage) and biological glue. Delayed CSF leak was 1.9%: 1.7%, and 3.4% for reconstructed and nonreconstructed sellar defects, respectively (p = 0.44). Complications included one reoperation for leak, two developed meningitis, and autograft harvesting resulted in abdominal hematoma in 0.9% and wound infection in 0.4%. Conclusion In our patients, delayed CSF leaks likely resulted from missed intraoperative CSF leaks or postoperative changes. Universal sellar reconstruction can preemptively treat missed leaks and provide a barrier for postoperative changes. When delayed CSF leaks occurred, sellar reconstruction often allowed for conservative treatment (i.e., lumbar drain) without repeat surgery. We found universal reconstruction provides a low risk of delayed CSF leak with minimal complications. PMID:26225317

  8. Floating dural sac sign is a sensitive magnetic resonance imaging finding of spinal cerebrospinal fluid leakage.

    PubMed

    Hosoya, Takaaki; Hatazawa, Jun; Sato, Shinya; Kanoto, Masafumi; Fukao, Akira; Kayama, Takamasa

    2013-01-01

    We would like to propose floating dural sac sign, which is observed as a hyperintense band or rim around the spinal dural sac on axial T2-weighted images, as a sensitive sign to identify cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leakage. One hundred patients with orthostatic headache were prospectively registered in 11 hospitals. These patients were examined by brain magnetic resonance (MR) imaging (n = 89), radioisotope cisternography (n = 89), MR myelography (n = 86), axial T2-weighted imaging of the spine (n = 70), and computed tomography myelography (n = 2). In this study, we separately evaluated the imaging findings of intracranial hypotension and spinal CSF leakage. Among 100 patients, 16 patients were diagnosed as having spinal CSF leaks. Of 70 patients examined with axial T2-weighted imaging, 14 patients were diagnosed with spinal CSF leaks, and floating dural sac sign was observed in 17 patients, 13 patients with spinal CSF leaks and 4 without CSF leaks (sensitivity 92.9%, specificity 92.9%). Of 86 patients examined by MR myelography, extradural fluid was observed in only 3 patients (sensitivity 21.4%, specificity 100%). The floating dural sac sign was a sensitive sign that can be used to identify CSF leakage. Spinal axial T2-weighted imaging might be a good screening method for spinal CSF leakage that can help to avoid the need for lumbar puncture.

  9. Interaction between personality traits and cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers of Alzheimer's disease pathology modulates cognitive performance.

    PubMed

    Tautvydaitė, Domilė; Kukreja, Deepti; Antonietti, Jean-Philippe; Henry, Hugues; von Gunten, Armin; Popp, Julius

    2017-02-02

    During adulthood, personality characteristics may contribute to the individual capacity to compensate the impact of developing cerebral Alzheimer's disease (AD) pathology on cognitive impairment in later life. In this study we aimed to investigate whether and how premorbid personality traits interact with cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) markers of AD pathology to predict cognitive performance in subjects with mild cognitive impairment or mild AD dementia and in participants with normal cognition. One hundred and ten subjects, of whom 66 were patients with mild cognitive impairment or mild AD dementia and 44 were healthy controls, had a comprehensive medical and neuropsychological examination as well as lumbar puncture to measure CSF biomarkers of AD pathology (amyloid beta1-42, phosphorylated tau and total-tau). Participants' proxies completed the Revised NEO Personality Inventory, Form R to retrospectively assess subjects' premorbid personality. In hierarchical multivariate regression analyses, including age, gender, education, APOEε4 status and cognitive level, premorbid neuroticism, conscientiousness and agreeableness modulated the effect of CSF biomarkers on cognitive performance. Low premorbid openness independently predicted lower levels of cognitive functioning after controlling for biomarker concentrations. Our findings suggest that specific premorbid personality traits are associated with cerebral AD pathology and modulate its impact on cognitive performance. Considering personality characteristics may help to appraise a person's cognitive reserve and the risk of cognitive decline in later life.

  10. Cerebrospinal fluid profiles with increasing number of cerebral microbleeds in a continuum of cognitive impairment

    PubMed Central

    Granberg, Tobias; Martola, Juha; Li, Xiaozhen; Shams, Mana; Fereshtehnejad, Seyed-Mohammad; Cavallin, Lena; Aspelin, Peter; Kristoffersen-Wiberg, Maria; Wahlund, Lars-Olof

    2015-01-01

    Cerebral microbleeds (CMBs) are hypothesised to have an important yet unknown role in the dementia disease pathology. In this study we analysed increasing number of CMBs and their independent associations with routine cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarkers in a continuum of cognitive impairment. A total of 1039 patients undergoing dementia investigation were analysed and underwent lumbar puncture, and an MRI scan. CSF samples were analysed for amyloid β (Aβ) 42, total tau (T-tau), tau phosphorylated at threonine 18 (P-tau) and CSF/serum albumin ratios. Increasing number of CMBs were independently associated with low Aβ42 levels, in the whole cohort, Alzheimer’s disease and mild cognitive impairment (p < 0.05). CSF/serum albumin ratios were high with multiple CMBs (p < 0.001), reflecting accompanying blood–brain barrier dysfunction. T-tau and P-tau levels were lower in Alzheimer’s patients with multiple CMBs when compared to zero CMBs, but did not change in the rest of the cohort. White matter hyperintensities were associated with low Aβ42 in the whole cohort and Alzheimer’s disease (p < 0.05). Aβ42 is the routine CSF-biomarker mainly associated with CMBs in cognitive impairment, and there is an accumulative effect with increasing number of CMBs. PMID:26661151

  11. Measurement of fluorescent probes concentration ratio in the cerebrospinal fluid for early detection of Alzheimer's disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harbater, Osnat; Gannot, Israel

    2014-03-01

    The pathogenic process of Alzheimer's Disease (AD), characterized by amyloid plaques and neurofibrillary tangles in the brain, begins years before the clinical diagnosis. Here, we suggest a novel method which may detect AD up to nine years earlier than current exams, minimally invasive, with minimal risk, pain and side effects. The method is based on previous reports which relate the concentrations of biomarkers in the Cerebrospinal Fluid (CSF) (Aβ and Tau proteins) to the future development of AD in mild cognitive impairment patients. Our method, which uses fluorescence measurements of the relative concentrations of the CSF biomarkers, replaces the lumbar puncture process required for CSF drawing. The process uses a miniature needle coupled trough an optical fiber to a laser source and a detector. The laser radiation excites fluorescent probes which were prior injected and bond to the CSF biomarkers. Using the ratio between the fluorescence intensities emitted from the two biomarkers, which is correlated to their concentration ratio, the patient's risk of developing AD is estimated. A theoretical model was developed and validated using Monte Carlo simulations, demonstrating the relation between fluorescence emission and biomarker concentration. The method was tested using multi-layered tissue phantoms simulating the epidural fat, the CSF in the sub-arachnoid space and the bone. These phantoms were prepared with different scattering and absorption coefficients, thicknesses and fluorescence concentrations in order to simulate variations in human anatomy and in the needle location. The theoretical and in-vitro results are compared and the method's accuracy is discussed.

  12. Rapid sterilisation of cerebrospinal fluid in meningococcal meningitis: Implications for treatment duration.

    PubMed

    Crosswell, Julie M; Nicholson, W Ross; Lennon, Diana R

    2006-04-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the time and total cumulative dose of parenteral antibiotic, required to sterilize the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of children presenting with meningococcal meningitis (MM). The study was a retrospective audit of children aged 0-14 years who presented between January 1995 and December 1999 with MM. All cases had a delayed lumbar puncture (LP) at least 1 h after commencing antibiotic therapy and demonstrated at least one of the following: (i) a positive CSF culture of Neisseria meningitidis (n = 6); (ii) Gram negative diplococci on Gram stain (n = 16) or (iii) a positive CSF plasma clearance rate test for N. meningitidis (n = 26). Forty-eight children were identified with a mean age of 4.4 years. The cumulative dose of antibiotic prior to LP, ranged from 22 to 440 mg/kg body weight. All cases (n = 24) who received a cumulative dose of at least 150 mg/kg of antibiotic, prior to LP, had a sterile CSF. No CSF taken more than 5 h after commencing antibiotics grew N. meningitidis. Children in this study with MM had rapid sterilisation of the CSF in less than 6 h. This would support recent recommendations to reduce the duration of antibiotic therapy to 4 days. There is however, lack of long-term data on sequelae with 4 days of treatment.

  13. Elevated levels of kynurenic acid in the cerebrospinal fluid of patients with bipolar disorder

    PubMed Central

    Olsson, Sara K.; Samuelsson, Martin; Saetre, Peter; Lindström, Leif; Jönsson, Erik G.; Nordin, Conny; Engberg, Göran; Erhardt, Sophie; Landén, Mikael

    2010-01-01

    Background Patients with schizophrenia show elevated brain levels of the neuroactive tryptophan metabolite kynurenic acid (KYNA). This astrocyte-derived mediator acts as a neuroprotectant and modulates sensory gating and cognitive function. We measured the levels of KYNA in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of patients with bipolar disorder and healthy volunteers to investigate the putative involvement of KYNA in bipolar disorder. Methods We obtained CSF by lumbar puncture from 23 healthy men and 31 euthymic men with bipolar disorder. We analyzed the samples using high-performance liquid chromatography. Results Patients with bipolar disorder had increased levels of KYNA in their CSF compared with healthy volunteers (1.71 nM, standard error of the mean [SEM] 0.13 v. 1.13 nM, SEM 0.09; p = 0.002. The levels of KYNA were positively correlated with age among bipolar patients but not healthy volunteers. Limitations The influence of ongoing drug treatment among patients cannot be ruled out. We conducted our study during the euthymic phase of the disease. Conclusion Brain KYNA levels are increased in euthymic men with bipolar disorder. In addition, KYNA levels increased with age in these patients. These findings indicate shared mechanisms between bipolar disorder and schizophrenia. Elevated levels of brain KYNA may provide further insight to the pathophysiology and progression of bipolar disorder. PMID:20420770

  14. Transfer of liraglutide from blood to cerebrospinal fluid is minimal in patients with type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Christensen, M; Sparre-Ulrich, A H; Hartmann, B; Grevstad, U; Rosenkilde, M M; Holst, J J; Vilsbøll, T; Knop, F K

    2015-11-01

    Treatment with liraglutide leads to weight loss. We investigated whether blood-to-cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) transfer of liraglutide occurs, and if so, whether it associates with clinical weight loss following liraglutide treatment in humans. We performed lumbar puncture and blood sampling in eight patients with type 2 diabetes (mean (range)): age 63 (54-79) years; actual body weight: 90 (75-118) kg treated with 1.8 mg liraglutide for 14 (5-22) months and with a treatment-induced weight loss of 8.4 (7-11) kg. We measured liraglutide in plasma and CSF with a radioimmunoassay specific for the N-terminus of the GLP-1 moiety of liraglutide. Mean plasma liraglutide was 31 (range: 21-63) nmol l(-1). The mean CSF-liraglutide concentration was 6.5 (range: 0.9-13.9) pmol l(-1). Ratio of CSF: plasma-liraglutide concentrations was 0.02 (range: 0.07-0.002)% and plasma liraglutide did not correlate with CSF-liraglutide levels (P=0.67). Body weight loss tended to correlate with plasma-liraglutide levels (P=0.06), but not with CSF-liraglutide levels (P=0.69). In conclusion, we measured very low concentrations of liraglutide in CSF, and the levels of CSF liraglutide did not correlate with the actual clinical weight loss in these patients. The amount of liraglutide in plasma tended to correlate with the clinical weight loss.

  15. The predictive value of cerebrospinal fluid tap-test in normal pressure hydrocephalus.

    PubMed

    Damasceno, B P; Carelli, E F; Honorato, D C; Facure, J J

    1997-06-01

    Eighteen patients (mean age of 66.5 years) with normal pressure hydrocephalus (NPH) underwent a ventriculo-peritoneal shunt surgery. Prior to operation a cerebrospinal fluid tap-test (CSF-TT) was performed with measurements of gait pattern and psychometric functions (memory, visuo-motor speed and visuo-constructive skills) before and after the removal of 50 ml CSF by lumbar puncture (LP). Fifteen patients improved and 3 were unchanged after surgery. Short duration of disease, gait disturbance preceding mental deterioration, wide temporal horns and small sulci on CT-scan were associated with good outcome after shunting. There was a good correlation between the results of CSF-TT and shunt surgery (chi 2 = 4.11, phi = 0.48, p < 0.05), with gait test showing highest correlation (r = 0.99, p = 0.01). In conclusion, this version of CSF-TT proved to be an effective test to predict improvement after shunting in patients with NPH.

  16. Clinical utility of cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers in the diagnosis of early Alzheimer’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Blennow, Kaj; Dubois, Bruno; Fagan, Anne M.; Lewczuk, Piotr; de Leon, Mony J.; Hampel, Harald

    2015-01-01

    Several potential disease-modifying drugs for Alzheimer’s disease (AD) have failed to show any effect on disease progression in clinical trials, conceivably because the AD subjects are already too advanced to derive clinical benefit from treatment and because diagnosis based on clinical criteria alone introduces a high misdiagnosis rate. Thus, well-validated biomarkers for early detection and accurate diagnosis are crucial. Low cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) concentrations of the amyloid-β (Aβ1-42) peptide, in combination with high total tau and phosphorylated tau, are sensitive and specific biomarkers highly predictive of progression to AD dementia in patients with mild cognitive impairment. However, interlaboratory variations in the results seen with currently available immunoassays are of concern. Recent worldwide standardization efforts and quality control programs include standard operating procedures for both preanalytical (e.g., lumbar puncture and sample handling) and analytical (e.g., preparation of calibration curve) procedures. Efforts are also ongoing to develop highly reproducible assays on fully automated instruments. These global standardization and harmonization measures will provide the basis for the generalized international application of CSF bio-markers for both clinical trials and routine clinical diagnosis of AD. PMID:24795085

  17. Fibrinogen is not elevated in the cerebrospinal fluid of patients with multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Elevated plasma fibrinogen levels are a well known finding in acute infectious diseases, acute stroke and myocardial infarction. However its role in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of acute and chronic central (CNS) and peripheral nervous system (PNS) diseases is unclear. Findings We analyzed CSF and plasma fibrinogen levels together with routine parameters in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS), acute inflammatory diseases of the CNS (bacterial and viral meningoencephalitis, BM and VM) and PNS (Guillain-Barré syndrome; GBS), as well as in non-inflammatory neurological controls (OND) in a total of 103 patients. Additionally, MS patients underwent cerebral MRI scans at time of lumbar puncture. CSF and plasma fibrinogen levels were significantly lower in patients with MS and OND patients as compared to patients with BM, VM and GBS. There was a close correlation between fibrinogen levels and albumin quotient (rho = 0.769, p < 0.001) which strongly suggests passive transfer of fibrinogen through the blood-CSF-barrier during acute inflammation. Hence, in MS, the prototype of chronic neuroinflammation, CSF fibrinogen levels were not elevated and could not be correlated to clinical and neuroradiological outcome parameters. Conclusions Although previous work has shown clear evidence of the involvement of fibrinogen in MS pathogenesis, this is not accompanied by increased fibrinogen in the CSF compartment. PMID:22029888

  18. Association between cerebrospinal fluid leak and meningitis after skull base surgery.

    PubMed

    Horowitz, Gilad; Fliss, Dan M; Margalit, Nevo; Wasserzug, Oshri; Gil, Ziv

    2011-10-01

    Meningitis and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leak are serious complications of skull base surgery, but whether postoperative CSF leak increases the risk of meningitis is unknown. To evaluate any association between meningitis and CSF leak after open or endoscopic skull base resection. A retrospective case series with chart review in a tertiary care university-affiliated medical center. A total of 156 patients underwent intradural tumor resection in our institution between 1994 and 2009, 135 (86%) via the subcranial approach and 21 (14%) through the expanded endonasal approach. All occurrences of meningitis, brain abscess, and CSF leak had been recorded and were available for analysis. Nine patients (5.7%) had postoperative meningitis, and 3 patients had postoperative CSF leak (1.9%). The risk of meningitis in patients without CSF leak was 4.5% (7/153) compared to 66% (2/3) in those with CSF leak. A statistical analysis revealed a significant association between CSF leak and meningitis, with a relative risk of 14.6 (95% confidence interval, 4.95-42; P = .008). Postoperative CSF leak significantly increases the risk of meningitis. Most cases of meningitis after skull base operation are probably associated with lumbar drainage infection or from an obscure leak.

  19. Effects of blood contamination and the rostro-caudal gradient on the human cerebrospinal fluid proteome.

    PubMed

    Aasebø, Elise; Opsahl, Jill Anette; Bjørlykke, Yngvild; Myhr, Kjell-Morten; Kroksveen, Ann Cathrine; Berven, Frode S

    2014-01-01

    Over the last years there has been an increased focus on the importance of knowing the effect of pre-analytical influence on the proteomes under study, particularly in the field of biomarker discovery. We present three proteomics studies examining the effect of blood contamination and the rostro-caudal gradient (RCG) on the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) proteome, in addition to plasma/CSF protein ratios. The studies showed that the central nervous system (CNS) derived proteins appeared to be unaffected by the RCG, while the plasma-derived proteins showed an increase in concentration towards the lumbar area. This implies that the concentration of the plasma-derived proteins in CSF will vary depending on the volume of CSF that is collected. In the CSF samples spiked with blood, 262 of 814 quantified proteins showed an abundance increase of more than 1.5 fold, while 403 proteins had a fold change of less than 1.2 and appeared to be unaffected by blood contamination. Proteins with a high plasma/CSF ratio appeared to give the largest effect on the CSF proteome upon blood contamination. The results give important background information on how factors like blood contamination, RCG and blood-CNS-barrier influences the CSF proteome. This information is particularly important in the field of biomarker discovery, but also for routine clinical measurements. The data from the blood contamination and RCG discovery studies have been deposited to the ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD000401.

  20. Lumbar interspinous bursitis in active polymyalgia rheumatica.

    PubMed

    Salvarani, Carlo; Barozzi, Libero; Boiardi, Luigi; Pipitone, Nicolò; Bajocchi, Gian Luigi; Macchioni, Pier Luigi; Catanoso, Mariagrazia; Pazzola, Giulia; Valentino, Massimo; De Luca, Carlo; Hunder, Gene G

    2013-01-01

    To evaluate the inflammatory involvement of lumbar interspinous bursae in patients with polymyalgia rheumatica (PMR) using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Ten consecutive, untreated new patients with PMR and pain in the shoulder and pelvic girdles were investigated. Seven patients with spondyloarthritis (4 with psoriatic spondyloarthrits, one with entheropatic spondyloarthritis, and 2 with ankylosing spondylitis) as well as 2 patients with spinal osteoarthritis and 2 patients with rheumatoid arthritis with lumbar pain served as controls. MRI of lumbar spine was performed in all PMR patients and controls. Nine patients (5 PMR patients and 4 controls) also had MRI of the thoracic spine. MRI evidence of interspinous lumbar bursitis was found in 9/10 patients with PMR and in 5/11 controls. A moderate to marked (grade ≥2 on a semiquantitative 0-3 scale) lumbar bursitis occurred significantly more frequently in patients with PMR than in control patients (60% vs. 9%, p=0.020). In most of the patients and controls lumbar bursitis was found at the L3-L5 interspaces. Only 2 patients had bursitis at a different level (one patient had widespread lumbar bursitis, and one control at L2-L4). No interspinous bursitis was demonstrated by MRI of the thoracic spine in patients and controls. Inflammation of lumbar bursae may be responsible for the low back pain reported by patients with PMR. The prominent inflammatory involvement of bursae including those of the lumbar spine supports the hypothesis that PMR may be a disorder affecting predominantly extra-articular synovial structures.

  1. Posttraumatic stress disorders in children and adolescents.

    PubMed

    Perry, B D; Azad, I

    1999-08-01

    Millions of children are exposed to traumatic experiences each year. Over 30% of these children develop a clinical syndrome with emotional, behavioral, cognitive, social, and physical symptoms called posttraumatic stress disorder. The symptoms of posttraumatic stress disorder fall into three clusters: reenactment of the traumatic event: avoidance of cues associated with the event or general withdrawal; and physiological hyperreactivity. Significant physical and medical problems in childhood, adolescence, and adulthood appear to be related to childhood trauma. Current treatment approaches include postacute psychoeducation, individual psychotherapy, pharmacotherapy, and cognitive-behavioral therapy. Despite increasing attention over the past 10 years, childhood posttraumatic stress disorder remains an understudied public health problem.

  2. Lumbar stenosis: clinical case☆☆☆

    PubMed Central

    Sá, Pedro; Marques, Pedro; Alpoim, Bruno; Rodrigues, Elisa; Félix, António; Silva, Luís; Leal, Miguel

    2014-01-01

    Lumbar stenosis is an increasingly common pathological condition that is becoming more frequent with increasing mean life expectancy, with high costs for society. It has many causes, among which degenerative, neoplastic and traumatic causes stand out. Most of the patients respond well to conservative therapy. Surgical treatment is reserved for patients who present symptoms after implementation of conservative measures. Here, a case of severe stenosis of the lumbar spine at several levels, in a female patient with pathological and surgical antecedents in the lumbar spine, is presented. The patient underwent two different decompression techniques within the same operation. PMID:26229836

  3. ISASS Policy Statement – Lumbar Artificial Disc

    PubMed Central

    Garcia, Rolando

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The primary goal of this Policy Statement is to educate patients, physicians, medical providers, reviewers, adjustors, case managers, insurers, and all others involved or affected by insurance coverage decisions regarding lumbar disc replacement surgery. Procedures This Policy Statement was developed by a panel of physicians selected by the Board of Directors of ISASS for their expertise and experience with lumbar TDR. The panel's recommendation was entirely based on the best evidence-based scientific research available regarding the safety and effectiveness of lumbar TDR. PMID:25785243

  4. Adhesive arachnoiditis following lumbar myelography.

    PubMed

    Skalpe, I O

    1978-03-01

    Late sequelae (adhesive arachnoiditis) have been reported following myelography with the oily contrast medium (Pantopaque) and with the ionic water-soluble contrast media methiodal sodium (Abrodil, Conturex, Kontrast U) meglumine iothalamate (Conray Meglumine) and meglumine iocarmate (Bis-Conray, Dimer-X). Adhesive arachnoiditis has not yet been reported after the use of the nonionic water-soluble contrast medium metrizamide (Amipaque). Thus, this is considered the contrast medium of choice for lumbar myelography. Using the recommended dose of 10 ml with an iodine concentration of 170 mg/ml for this examination, adhesive arachnoiditis is unlikely to occur. Increased osmolality of spinal fluid after injection of contrast medium is related to increased frequency of arachnoiditis.

  5. Quantitative proteomics of delirium cerebrospinal fluid

    PubMed Central

    Poljak, A; Hill, M; Hall, R J; MacLullich, A M; Raftery, M J; Tai, J; Yan, S; Caplan, G A

    2014-01-01

    Delirium is a common cause and complication of hospitalization in older people, being associated with higher risk of future dementia and progression of existing dementia. However relatively little data are available on which biochemical pathways are dysregulated in the brain during delirium episodes, whether there are protein expression changes common among delirium subjects and whether there are any changes which correlate with the severity of delirium. We now present the first proteomic analysis of delirium cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), and one of few studies exploring protein expression changes in delirium. More than 270 proteins were identified in two delirium cohorts, 16 of which were dysregulated in at least 8 of 17 delirium subjects compared with a mild Alzheimer's disease neurological control group, and 31 proteins were significantly correlated with cognitive scores (mini-mental state exam and acute physiology and chronic health evaluation III). Bioinformatics analyses revealed expression changes in several protein family groups, including apolipoproteins, secretogranins/chromogranins, clotting/fibrinolysis factors, serine protease inhibitors and acute-phase response elements. These data not only provide confirmatory evidence that the inflammatory response is a component of delirium, but also reveal dysregulation of protein expression in a number of novel and unexpected clusters of proteins, in particular the granins. Another surprising outcome of this work is the level of similarity of CSF protein profiles in delirium patients, given the diversity of causes of this syndrome. These data provide additional elements for consideration in the pathophysiology of delirium as well as potential biomarker candidates for delirium diagnosis. PMID:25369144

  6. Endoscopic management of cerebrospinal fluid rhinorrhea

    PubMed Central

    Yadav, Yad Ram; Parihar, Vijay; Janakiram, Narayanan; Pande, Sonjay; Bajaj, Jitin; Namdev, Hemant

    2016-01-01

    Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) rhinorrhea occurs due to communication between the intracranial subarachnoid space and the sinonasal mucosa. It could be due to trauma, raised intracranial pressure (ICP), tumors, erosive diseases, and congenital skull defects. Some leaks could be spontaneous without any specific etiology. The potential leak sites include the cribriform plate, ethmoid, sphenoid, and frontal sinus. Glucose estimation, although non-specific, is the most popular and readily available method of diagnosis. Glucose concentration of > 30 mg/dl without any blood contamination strongly suggests presence and the absence of glucose rules out CSF in the fluid. Beta-2 transferrin test confirms the diagnosis. High-resolution computed tomography and magnetic resonance cisternography are complementary to each other and are the investigation of choice. Surgical intervention is indicated, when conservative management fails to prevent risk of meningitis. Endoscopic closure has revolutionized the management of CSF rhinorrhea due to its less morbidity and better closure rate. It is usually best suited for small defects in cribriform plate, sphenoid, and ethmoid sinus. Large defects can be repaired when sufficient experience is acquired. Most frontal sinus leaks, although difficult, can be successfully closed by modified Lothrop procedure. Factors associated with increased recurrences are middle age, obese female, raised ICP, diabetes mellitus, lateral sphenoid leaks, superior and lateral extension in frontal sinus, multiple leaks, and extensive skull base defects. Appropriate treatment for raised ICP, in addition to proper repair, should be done to prevent recurrence. Long follow-up is required before leveling successful repair as recurrences may occur very late. PMID:27366243

  7. Lumbar herniated disc: spontaneous regression

    PubMed Central

    Yüksel, Kasım Zafer

    2017-01-01

    Background Low back pain is a frequent condition that results in substantial disability and causes admission of patients to neurosurgery clinics. To evaluate and present the therapeutic outcomes in lumbar disc hernia (LDH) patients treated by means of a conservative approach, consisting of bed rest and medical therapy. Methods This retrospective cohort was carried out in the neurosurgery departments of hospitals in Kahramanmaraş city and 23 patients diagnosed with LDH at the levels of L3−L4, L4−L5 or L5−S1 were enrolled. Results The average age was 38.4 ± 8.0 and the chief complaint was low back pain and sciatica radiating to one or both lower extremities. Conservative treatment was administered. Neurological examination findings, durations of treatment and intervals until symptomatic recovery were recorded. Laségue tests and neurosensory examination revealed that mild neurological deficits existed in 16 of our patients. Previously, 5 patients had received physiotherapy and 7 patients had been on medical treatment. The number of patients with LDH at the level of L3−L4, L4−L5, and L5−S1 were 1, 13, and 9, respectively. All patients reported that they had benefit from medical treatment and bed rest, and radiologic improvement was observed simultaneously on MRI scans. The average duration until symptomatic recovery and/or regression of LDH symptoms was 13.6 ± 5.4 months (range: 5−22). Conclusions It should be kept in mind that lumbar disc hernias could regress with medical treatment and rest without surgery, and there should be an awareness that these patients could recover radiologically. This condition must be taken into account during decision making for surgical intervention in LDH patients devoid of indications for emergent surgery. PMID:28119770

  8. Neurogenic Shock Immediately following Posterior Lumbar Interbody Fusion: Report of Two Cases

    PubMed Central

    Matsumoto, Tomiya; Okuda, Shinya; Haku, Takamitsu; Maeda, Kazuya; Maeno, Takafumi; Yamashita, Tomoya; Yamasaki, Ryoji; Kuratsu, Shigeyuki; Iwasaki, Motoki

    2014-01-01

    Study Design Case report. Objective To present two cases of neurogenic shock that occurred immediately following posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF) and that appeared to have been caused by the vasovagal reflex after dural injury and incarceration of the cauda equina. Case Report We present two cases of neurogenic shock that occurred immediately following PLIF. One patient had bradycardia, and the other developed cardiac arrest just after closing the surgical incision and opening the drainage tube. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation was performed immediately, and the patients recovered successfully, but they showed severe motor loss after awakening. The results of laboratory data, chest X-ray, electrocardiogram, computed tomography, and echocardiography ruled out pulmonary embolism, hemorrhagic shock, and cardiogenic shock. Although the reasons for the postoperative shock were obscure, reoperation was performed to explore the cause of paralysis. At reoperation, a cerebrospinal fluid collection and the incarceration of multiple cauda equina rootlets through a small dural tear were observed. The incarcerated cauda equina rootlets were reduced, and the dural defect was closed. In both cases, the reoperation was uneventful. From the intraoperative findings at reoperation, it was thought that the pathology was neurogenic shock via the vasovagal reflex. Conclusion Incarceration of multiple cauda equina rootlets following the accidental dural tear by suction drainage caused a sudden decrease of cerebrospinal fluid pressure and traction of the cauda equina, which may have led to the vasovagal reflex. PMID:26225287

  9. Neurogenic Shock Immediately following Posterior Lumbar Interbody Fusion: Report of Two Cases.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Tomiya; Okuda, Shinya; Haku, Takamitsu; Maeda, Kazuya; Maeno, Takafumi; Yamashita, Tomoya; Yamasaki, Ryoji; Kuratsu, Shigeyuki; Iwasaki, Motoki

    2015-08-01

    Study Design Case report. Objective To present two cases of neurogenic shock that occurred immediately following posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF) and that appeared to have been caused by the vasovagal reflex after dural injury and incarceration of the cauda equina. Case Report We present two cases of neurogenic shock that occurred immediately following PLIF. One patient had bradycardia, and the other developed cardiac arrest just after closing the surgical incision and opening the drainage tube. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation was performed immediately, and the patients recovered successfully, but they showed severe motor loss after awakening. The results of laboratory data, chest X-ray, electrocardiogram, computed tomography, and echocardiography ruled out pulmonary embolism, hemorrhagic shock, and cardiogenic shock. Although the reasons for the postoperative shock were obscure, reoperation was performed to explore the cause of paralysis. At reoperation, a cerebrospinal fluid collection and the incarceration of multiple cauda equina rootlets through a small dural tear were observed. The incarcerated cauda equina rootlets were reduced, and the dural defect was closed. In both cases, the reoperation was uneventful. From the intraoperative findings at reoperation, it was thought that the pathology was neurogenic shock via the vasovagal reflex. Conclusion Incarceration of multiple cauda equina rootlets following the accidental dural tear by suction drainage caused a sudden decrease of cerebrospinal fluid pressure and traction of the cauda equina, which may have led to the vasovagal reflex.

  10. Clinical characteristics and cerebrospinal fluid parameters in patients with peripheral facial palsy caused by Lyme neuroborreliosis compared with facial palsy of unknown origin (Bell's palsy)

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Bell's palsy and Lyme neuroborreliosis are the two most common diagnoses in patients with peripheral facial palsy in areas endemic for Borrelia burgdorferi. Bell's palsy is treated with corticosteroids, while Lyme neuroborreliosis is treated with antibiotics. The diagnosis of Lyme neuroborreliosis relies on the detection of Borrelia antibodies in blood and/or cerebrospinal fluid, which is time consuming. In this study, we retrospectively analysed clinical and cerebrospinal fluid parameters in well-characterised patient material with peripheral facial palsy caused by Lyme neuroborreliosis or Bell's palsy, in order to obtain a working diagnosis and basis for treatment decisions in the acute stage. Methods Hospital records from the Department of Infectious Diseases, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, for patients with peripheral facial palsy that had undergone lumbar puncture, were reviewed. Patients were classified as Bell's palsy, definite Lyme neuroborreliosis, or possible Lyme neuroborreliosis, on the basis of the presence of Borrelia antibodies in serum and cerebrospinal fluid and preceding erythema migrans. Results One hundred and two patients were analysed; 51 were classified as Bell's palsy, 34 as definite Lyme neuroborreliosis and 17 as possible Lyme neuroborreliosis. Patients with definite Lyme neuroborreliosis fell ill during the second half of the year, with a peak in August, whereas patients with Bell's palsy fell ill in a more evenly distributed manner over the year. Patients with definite Lyme neuroborreliosis had significantly more neurological symptoms outside the paretic area of the face and significantly higher levels of mononuclear cells and albumin in their cerebrospinal fluid. A reported history of tick bite was uncommon in both groups. Conclusions We found that the time of the year, associated neurological symptoms and mononuclear pleocytosis were strong predictive factors for Lyme neuroborreliosis as a cause of peripheral facial palsy

  11. Clinical characteristics and cerebrospinal fluid parameters in patients with peripheral facial palsy caused by Lyme neuroborreliosis compared with facial palsy of unknown origin (Bell's palsy).

    PubMed

    Bremell, Daniel; Hagberg, Lars

    2011-08-10

    Bell's palsy and Lyme neuroborreliosis are the two most common diagnoses in patients with peripheral facial palsy in areas endemic for Borrelia burgdorferi. Bell's palsy is treated with corticosteroids, while Lyme neuroborreliosis is treated with antibiotics. The diagnosis of Lyme neuroborreliosis relies on the detection of Borrelia antibodies in blood and/or cerebrospinal fluid, which is time consuming. In this study, we retrospectively analysed clinical and cerebrospinal fluid parameters in well-characterised patient material with peripheral facial palsy caused by Lyme neuroborreliosis or Bell's palsy, in order to obtain a working diagnosis and basis for treatment decisions in the acute stage. Hospital records from the Department of Infectious Diseases, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, for patients with peripheral facial palsy that had undergone lumbar puncture, were reviewed. Patients were classified as Bell's palsy, definite Lyme neuroborreliosis, or possible Lyme neuroborreliosis, on the basis of the presence of Borrelia antibodies in serum and cerebrospinal fluid and preceding erythema migrans. One hundred and two patients were analysed; 51 were classified as Bell's palsy, 34 as definite Lyme neuroborreliosis and 17 as possible Lyme neuroborreliosis. Patients with definite Lyme neuroborreliosis fell ill during the second half of the year, with a peak in August, whereas patients with Bell's palsy fell ill in a more evenly distributed manner over the year. Patients with definite Lyme neuroborreliosis had significantly more neurological symptoms outside the paretic area of the face and significantly higher levels of mononuclear cells and albumin in their cerebrospinal fluid. A reported history of tick bite was uncommon in both groups. We found that the time of the year, associated neurological symptoms and mononuclear pleocytosis were strong predictive factors for Lyme neuroborreliosis as a cause of peripheral facial palsy in an area endemic for Borrelia. For

  12. Outcomes of posttraumatic stress disorder.

    PubMed

    Breslau, N

    2001-01-01

    The typical reaction to a life-threatening experience is one of distress, anxiety, and fear. This is characteristic of the basic survival instinct; these emotions enhance the individual's memory of the traumatic experience and thus serve to help in the recognition and avoidance of similarly dangerous situations in the future. In a significant minority of individuals, however, the natural reaction to trauma becomes uncontrollably and disastrously intensified, resulting in the symptoms of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). PTSD varies in severity and duration between individuals, often relating to personal characteristics and the nature of the trauma to which a person is subjected. However, several factors, namely, chronicity, impairment, comorbidity, and somatization, are significantly related to and can influence the course of PTSD and subsequent outcome. This article briefly reviews each of these factors.

  13. Evaluation and Management of Posttraumatic Cognitive Impairments

    PubMed Central

    Arciniegas, David B.; Frey, Kimberly L.; Newman, Jody; Wortzel, Hal S.

    2011-01-01

    Psychiatrists are increasingly called upon to care for individuals with cognitive, emotional, and behavioral disturbances after TBI, especially in settings serving military service personnel and Veterans. In both the early and late post-injury periods, cognitive impairments contribute to disability among persons with TBI and are potentially substantial sources of suffering for persons with TBI and their families. In this article, the differential diagnosis, evaluation, and management of posttraumatic cognitive complaints is reviewed. The importance of pre-treatment evaluation as well as consideration of non-cognitive contributors to cognitive problems and functional limitations is emphasized first. The course of recovery after TBI, framed as a progression through posttraumatic encephalopathy, is reviewed next and used to anchor the evaluation and treatment of posttraumatic cognitive impairments in relation to injury severity as well as time post-injury. Finally, pharmacologic and rehabilitative interventions that may facilitate cognitive and functional recovery at each stage of posttraumatic encephalopathy are presented. PMID:21270968

  14. Lumbar Puncture (Spinal Tap) (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... treatment while waiting for the results of the culture. Risks A lumbar puncture is considered a safe procedure with minimal risks. Most of the time, there are no complications. In some instances, a ...

  15. New techniques and technology to repair cerebrospinal fluid rhinorrhea.

    PubMed

    Paludetti, G; Sergi, B; Rigante, M; Campioni, P; Galli, J

    2004-06-01

    Cerebrospinal fluid rhinorrhea occurs as a result of abnormal communication between the subarachnoid space and the pneumatized portion of the skull base, the paranasal sinuses and the middle ear. Conservative measures may be sufficient in the management of cerebrospinal fluid rhinorrhea, but, in some cases, surgical treatment may be required. Transnasal endoscopic techniques are constantly being used in preference to the intra- and extracranial approaches. Recently, image guidance systems have been adopted in neurosurgery, skull base and paranasal sinus surgery. The present report refers to 4 cases of nasal cerebrospinal fluid rhinorrhea leak successfully treated with a transnasal endoscopic approach using various techniques and materials to close the bone defect, in 2 of which, the navigation system (Stealth Station Treon ENT Image Guidance System with Landmark X, Software, Medtronic, XOMED, Jacksonville, FL, USA) was also used. In all cases, correct localization and repair of the leak was achieved and no major complications occurred. Following a review of the literature, the Authors conclude that, at present, transnasal endoscopic repair of cerebrospinal fluid rhinorrhea is the surgical treatment of choice when the techniques and materials are correctly used. Furthermore, preliminary findings indicate that it is possible to make routine use of the navigation systems and that this technology may be usefully employed, above all, in the management of cerebrospinal fluid leaks.

  16. Cerebrospinal fluid oligoclonal bands in childhood opsoclonus-myoclonus.

    PubMed

    Pranzatelli, Michael R; Slev, Patricia R; Tate, Elizabeth D; Travelstead, Anna L; Colliver, Jerry A; Joseph, Suja Anne

    2011-07-01

    Oligoclonal bands in cerebrospinal fluid reflect local B-cell responses associated with various neuroinflammatory disorders. In opsoclonus-myoclonus syndrome, cerebrospinal fluid B-cell expansion was demonstrated, but no studies of oligoclonal bands are available. In a prospective case-control study of 132 children (103 with opsoclonus-myoclonus, 29 neurologic control subjects), cerebrospinal fluid oligoclonal bands, measured by isoelectric focusing with immunofixation, were observed in 35% with opsoclonus-myoclonus and none of the control subjects, with the highest frequency in severe cases (56%). In oligoclonal band-positive patients, the mean band number was 5 ± 3 S.D. (range, 2-10) and the total severity score was significantly higher than in band-negative patients, whereas the frequency of CD19(+) B cells, opsoclonus-myoclonus duration, neuroblastoma detection, and relapse history did not differ. The cerebrospinal fluid immunoglobulin G synthesis rate, immunoglobulin index, and Q albumin were normal. In 17 untreated children receiving adrenocorticotropic hormone, intravenous immunoglobulins, and rituximab, the number of oligoclonal band-positive decreased by 75%, and the mean band count fell by 80%. Oligoclonal band detection adds useful information to neuroimmunologic "staging" in opsoclonus-myoclonus. However, flow cytometry provides a more sensitive measure of B-cell infiltration. Cerebrospinal fluid oligoclonal bands warrant monitoring in long-term follow-up studies of disease-modifying drugs for opsoclonus-myoclonus.

  17. The 1H NMR Profile of Healthy Dog Cerebrospinal Fluid

    PubMed Central

    Musteata, Mihai; Nicolescu, Alina; Solcan, Gheorghe; Deleanu, Calin

    2013-01-01

    The availability of data for reference values in cerebrospinal fluid for healthy humans is limited due to obvious practical and ethical issues. The variability of reported values for metabolites in human cerebrospinal fluid is quite large. Dogs present great similarities with humans, including in cases of central nervous system pathologies. The paper presents the first study on healthy dog cerebrospinal fluid metabolomic profile using 1H NMR spectroscopy. A number of 13 metabolites have been identified and quantified from cerebrospinal fluid collected from a group of 10 mix breed healthy dogs. The biological variability as resulting from the relative standard deviation of the physiological concentrations of the identified metabolites had a mean of 18.20% (range between 9.3% and 44.8%). The reported concentrations for metabolites may be used as normal reference values. The homogeneity of the obtained results and the low biologic variability show that the 1H NMR analysis of the dog’s cerebrospinal fluid is reliable in designing and interpreting clinical and therapeutic trials in dogs with central nervous system pathologies. PMID:24376499

  18. The concept of post-traumatic mood disorder and its implications for adolescent suicidal behavior.

    PubMed

    Sher, L

    2008-12-01

    Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is a common psychiatric disorder which is frequently comorbid with major depressive disorder (MDD). It has been suggested that some or all individuals diagnosed with comorbid PTSD and MDD have a separate psychobiological condition that can be termed ''post-traumatic mood disorder'' (PTMD). The idea was based on the fact that a significant number of studies suggested that patients suffering from comorbid PTSD and MDD differed clinically and biologically from individuals with PTSD alone or MDD alone. Individuals with comorbid PTSD and MDD are characterized by greater severity of symptoms and the higher level of impairment in social and occupational functioning compared to individuals with PTSD alone or MDD alone. Neurobiological evidence supporting the concept of PTMD includes the findings from neuroendocrine challenge, cerebrospinal fluid, neuroimaging, sleep and other studies. It has been demonstrated that child abuse increases the risk for PTSD, MDD, and suicidal behavior in adolescents and adults. Many victims of childhood abuse develop comorbid PTSD and depression, i.e., they develop PTMD. PTMD is associated with suicidal behavior. The link between childhood abuse, suicidal behavior in adolescents and PTMD indicates that it is important to develop interventions to prevent PTMD in victims of child abuse; to develop measures to prevent suicidal behavior in adolescents with PTMD; and to study psychobiology of PTMD in order to develop treatments for PTMD. Priorities for intervening to reduce adolescent suicidal behavior lie with interventions focused upon the improved recognition, treatment and management of adolescents with psychiatric disorders including PTMD.

  19. Gene Therapy for Post-Traumatic Osteoarthritis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-10-01

    chronic, degenerative, often crippling disease that primarily affects large weight bearing joints. There is strong evidence that interleukin - 1 (IL- 1 ) is a...Osteoarthritis (OA) Gene Therapy Equine Adeno-Associated Virus (AAV) Interleukin - 1 Receptor Antagonist (IL-1Ra) Post-traumatic OA (PTOA) Self...AD______________ AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-14- 1 -0498 TITLE: Gene Therapy for Post-Traumatic Osteoarthritis PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Steven C

  20. Posteroanterior versus anteroposterior lumbar spine radiology

    SciTech Connect

    Tsuno, M.M.; Shu, G.J. )

    1990-03-01

    The posteroanterior view of the lumbar spine has important features including radiation protection and image quality; these have been studied by various investigators. Investigators have shown that sensitive tissues receive less radiation dosage in the posteroanterior view of the spine for scoliosis screening and intracranial tomography without altering the image quality. This paper emphasizes the importance of the radiation safety aspect of the posteroanterior view and shows the improvement in shape distortion in the lumbar vertebrae.

  1. Factors that influence recurrent lumbar disc herniation.

    PubMed

    Yaman, M E; Kazancı, A; Yaman, N D; Baş, F; Ayberk, G

    2017-06-01

    The most common cause of poor outcome following lumbar disc surgery is recurrent herniation. Recurrence has been noted in 5% to 15% of patients with surgically treated primary lumbar disc herniation. There have been many studies designed to determine the risk factors for recurrent lumbar disc herniation. In this study, we retrospectively analysed the influence of disc degeneration, endplate changes, surgical technique, and patient's clinical characteristics on recurrent lumbar disc herniation. Patients who underwent primary single-level L4-L5 lumbar discectomy and who were reoperated on for recurrent L4-L5 disc herniation were retrospectively reviewed. All these operations were performed between August 2004 and September 2009 at the Neurosurgery Department of Ataturk Education and Research Hospital in Ankara, Turkey. During the study period, 126 patients were reviewed, with 101 patients underwent primary single-level L4-L5 lumbar discectomy and 25 patients were reoperated on for recurrent L4-L5 disc herniation. Preoperative higher intervertebral disc height (P<0.001) and higher body mass index (P=0.042) might be risk factors for recurrence. Modic endplate changes were statistically significantly greater in the recurrent group than in the non-recurrent group (P=0.032). Our study suggests that patients who had recurrent lumbar disc herniation had preoperative higher disc height and higher body mass index. Modic endplate changes had a higher tendency for recurrence of lumbar disc herniation. Well-planned and well-conducted large-scale prospective cohort studies are needed to confirm this and enable convenient treatment modalities to prevent recurrent disc pathology.

  2. Latent classes of posttraumatic stress and growth.

    PubMed

    Birkeland, Marianne Skogbrott; Hafstad, Gertrud Sofie; Blix, Ines; Heir, Trond

    2015-01-01

    Potentially traumatic events may lead to different patterns of posttraumatic stress symptoms and posttraumatic growth. The objective of the present study was to identify subgroups with different patterns of posttraumatic reactions, and to determine whether these subgroups differed in terms of personal and social resources and indicators of adjustment. This study used survey data collected 10 months after the 2011 Oslo bombing attack to investigate patterns of reactions among ministerial employees (N=1970). We applied latent class analyses with covariates to extract subgroups of individuals. Three classes of individual reactions were extracted, and these were similar among those who were and those who were not physically proximate to the bombing attack: "High stress/high growth" (27% and 11%, respectively), "Low stress/high growth" (74% and 42%, respectively), and "Low stress/low growth" (only among the not physically proximate: 47%). The classes differed in terms of gender, neuroticism, and social support as well as life satisfaction and daily functioning. Heterogeneous patterns of posttraumatic reactions were found. Physical proximity is not necessary to experience posttraumatic stress or growth after political violence. Among individuals with low stress, posttraumatic growth may not encompass higher life satisfaction or functioning.

  3. Posttraumatic stress following childbirth: a review.

    PubMed

    Olde, Eelco; van der Hart, Onno; Kleber, Rolf; van Son, Maarten

    2006-01-01

    To assess the empirical basis of prevalence and risk factors of childbirth-related posttraumatic stress symptoms and PTSD in mothers, the relevant literature was critically reviewed. A MEDLINE and PSYCHLIT search using the key words "posttraumatic stress", "PTSD", "childbirth" and "traumatic delivery" was performed. The generated list of articles was supplemented by a review of their bibliographies. A total of 31 articles was selected. The primary inclusion criterion was report of posttraumatic stress symptoms or PTSD specifically related to childbirth. Case studies and quantitative studies on regular childbirth and childbirth by emergency cesarean section were identified. Consistency among studies was found with regard to development of posttraumatic stress symptoms as a consequence of traumatic delivery. Methodological issues concerning prevalence and risk factors were discussed. Case studies and quantitative studies confirm that childbirth may be experienced as so emotionally intense that it can lead to the development of posttraumatic stress symptoms or even a PTSD-profile. Among the identified risk factors were a history of psychological problems, trait anxiety, obstetric procedures, negative aspects in staff-mother contact, feelings of loss of control over the situation, and lack of partner support. The conclusion of the current review is twofold. First, traumatic reactions to childbirth are an important public health issue. Secondly, studying childbirth offers opportunity to prospectively study the development of posttraumatic stress reactions.

  4. Extraforaminal ligament attachments of human lumbar nerves.

    PubMed

    Kraan, G A; Delwel, E J; Hoogland, P V J M; van der Veen, M R; Wuisman, P I J M; Stoeckart, R; Kleinrensink, G J; Snijders, C J

    2005-03-15

    An anatomic study of the extraforaminal attachments of the lumbar spinal nerves was performed using human lumbar spinal columns. To identify and describe the existence of ligamentous structures at each lumbar level that attach lumbar spinal nerves to structures at the level of the extraforaminal region. During the last 120 years, several mechanisms to protect the spinal nerve against traction have been described. All these structures involved are located in the spinal canal, proximal to the intervertebral foramen. Five embalmed human lumbar spines (T12-S1) were used. Bilaterally, the extraforaminal region was dissected to describe and measure anatomic structures and their relationships. Histology was performed with staining on the sites of attachment and along the ligament. The levels T12-L2 show bilaterally 2 ligaments, a superior extraforaminal ligament and an inferior extraforaminal ligament. The superior extraforaminal ligament emerges from the joint capsule of the facet joints and inserts in both, the intervertebral disc and the ventral crista of the intervertebral foramen, passing the spinal nerve laterally. In one specimen on level L2-L3, the superior extraforaminal ligament is not attached to the spinal nerve. The inferior extraforaminal ligament emerges from the intervertebral disc, passing the nerve medially and attaching the spinal nerve. At the levels L2-L5, the inferior extraforaminal ligaments are only attached to the intervertebral disc, not to the joint capsule. Histologically, the ligaments consisted of mainly collagenous structures. Ligamentous connections exist between lumbar extraforaminal spinal nerves and nearby structures.

  5. Scoliosis secondary to lumbar osteoid osteoma

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Haiping; Niu, Xingbang; Wang, Biao; He, Simin; Hao, Dingjun

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Rationale: Lumbar osteoid osteoma has a low incidence, which could easily lead to scoliosis. Patient concerns: Scoliosis secondary to lumbar osteoid osteoma could be easily misdiagnosed when patients do not complain of obvious symptoms. Diagnoses: We reported a case of a 9-year-old boy with back deformity that was firstly diagnosed with scoliosis at the local hospital. After prescribed with orthosis, the patient experienced aggravating pain that could not be relieved with painkillers. After he admitted to our hospital for further medical advice, he was prescribed to complete radiological examinations. Considering his radiological examination results and his medical history, correct diagnosis of lumbar osteoid osteoma was made. Interventions: Surgical intervention of posterior lesion resection was conducted after diagnosis. Intra-operative frozen pathology indicated features of osteoid osteoma. As the lesion involved inferior articular process of L5, which could cause lumbar instability after lesion resection, internal fixation was conducted at L4-S1 segment, and posterolateral bone fusion was also conducted at L5-S1 segment. Outcomes: Three months after operation, the patient showed marked improvement of scoliosis deformity and great relief of lumbar pain. Lessons subsections: Although spine osteoid osteoma is clinically rare, it shall not be overlooked when young patients present with scoliosis first. Radiological results including computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging shall be taken carefully as reference when making diagnosis. Surgical intervention of lesion resection could well improve scoliosis and relieve lumbar pain. PMID:27893671

  6. Automatic Lumbar Spondylolisthesis Measurement in CT Images.

    PubMed

    Liao, Shu; Zhan, Yiqiang; Dong, Zhongxing; Yan, Ruyi; Gong, Liyan; Zhou, Xiang Sean; Salganicoff, Marcos; Fei, Jun

    2016-07-01

    Lumbar spondylolisthesis is one of the most common spinal diseases. It is caused by the anterior shift of a lumbar vertebrae relative to subjacent vertebrae. In current clinical practices, staging of spondylolisthesis is often conducted in a qualitative way. Although meyerding grading opens the door to stage spondylolisthesis in a more quantitative way, it relies on the manual measurement, which is time consuming and irreproducible. Thus, an automatic measurement algorithm becomes desirable for spondylolisthesis diagnosis and staging. However, there are two challenges. 1) Accurate detection of the most anterior and posterior points on the superior and inferior surfaces of each lumbar vertebrae. Due to the small size of the vertebrae, slight errors of detection may lead to significant measurement errors, hence, wrong disease stages. 2) Automatic localize and label each lumbar vertebrae is required to provide the semantic meaning of the measurement. It is difficult since different lumbar vertebraes have high similarity of both shape and image appearance. To resolve these challenges, a new auto measurement framework is proposed with two major contributions: First, a learning based spine labeling method that integrates both the image appearance and spine geometry information is designed to detect lumbar vertebrae. Second, a hierarchical method using both the population information from atlases and domain-specific information in the target image is proposed for most anterior and posterior points positioning. Validated on 258 CT spondylolisthesis patients, our method shows very similar results to manual measurements by radiologists and significantly increases the measurement efficiency.

  7. The lumbar sympathetic. Anatomy and surgical implications.

    PubMed

    Simeone, F A

    1977-01-01

    The ganglionated lumbar sympathetic chains lie on the lateral aspects of the bodies of the lumbar vertebrae and not more laterally as in the thorax where the chain lies in relation to the heads and necks of the ribs. Lumbar ganglia vary in number. They are best numbered according to the spinal nerve to which the particular ganglion sends its postganglionic fibers, but, at operation, the surgeon is unable to obtain this kind of information. It is customary to mark the extent of resection by the application of a dura clip to the proximal and distal ends of the trunk. Roentgenographic visualization later can approximate the level of resection in relation to the vertebrae. Anomalies can lead to unsuccessful denervation of the lower extremities. These include extraganglionic connecting sympathetic nerve trunks, intermediate ganglia, and cross-over fibers connecting the right and left lumbar sympathetic trunks usually at the level of the fourth and fifth lumbar segments, but anatomically sometimes as high as the third and second. Specific complications of lumbar sympathectomy include failure of adequate denervation, brief paralytic ileus, hyperidrosis in parts of the body which remain normally innervated, sexual dysfunction, and post-sympathectomy neuralgia.

  8. Lumbar puncture requirement in acute hemiparesis: diagnosis of tuberculous meningitis after hemiparesis in a child.

    PubMed

    Sahin, Sevim; Cansu, Ali; Kamaşak, Tülay; Eyüboğlu, İlker; Esenülkü, Gülnur; Ökten, Ayşenur

    2014-12-01

    Infections are an important acquired cause of cerebral arteriopathy. Tuberculous (TB) meningitis leading to infectious cerebral vasculopathy is a rare cause of acute hemiparesis. A 14-year-old male patient was examined after acute hemiparesis developing within 1 day. Neurological examination revealed total hemiplegia on the left side. Brain MRI findings showed bilateral focal T2-weighted signal hyperintensity in the subcortical and deep white matter regions. There were also areas of restricted diffusion in the right basal ganglia. Although the father had a history of pulmonary TB, the patient had not been given TB prophylaxis because of PPD negativity. At lumbar puncture, opening cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) pressure was 50 cm/H20, CSF protein 66.9 mg/dL, and glucose 54 mg/dL (concurrent blood glucose 93 mg/dL); 170 polymorphonuclear leukocytes per cubic millimeter were present in CSF. Following tests for TB, treatment was started immediately with four anti-TB drugs. TB PCR of CSF and acid-fast bacteria (AFB) staining in gastric aspirate were positive. At clinical follow-up, the patient was able to walk with support at the end of the first month. Various infectious agents have been reported as causes of cerebral vasculopathy. TB, which affects a significant number of patients worldwide, should be kept in mind in terms of cerebral vascular complications. Lumbar puncture is essential in order to diagnose TB meningitis.

  9. Orgasmic dural tear: an unusual delayed presentation of postural headache following lumbar discectomy.

    PubMed

    Dannawi, Zaher; Lennon, Shirley Evelyn; Zaidan, Ammar; Khazim, Rabi

    2014-11-28

    A 28-year-old woman presented with a severe unremitting frontal postural headache associated with photophobia. This started immediately after standing following reaching orgasm during sexual intercourse. Fifty-two days previously, the patient underwent bilateral L4-L5 decompression laminotomies and a left L4-L5 discectomy for excision of a large herniated intervertebral disc. Subarachnoid haemorrhage was excluded with a CT scan. Brain and lumbar MRI showed enhancement of the pachymeninges and a cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leak into the deep soft tissue planes. Conservative treatment for 5 days failed to alleviate the patient's symptoms. An exploration and repair of a dural tear was performed. Subsequently, the headache subsided but the patient developed a low-grade infection requiring 12 weeks of antibiotics. Six months later the patient was asymptomatic. This is the first case report of a delayed presentation of a dural tear occurring during sexual intercourse following lumbar surgery. 2014 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd.

  10. Cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers of infantile congenital hydrocephalus

    PubMed Central

    Limbrick, David D.; Baksh, Brandon; Morgan, Clinton D.; Habiyaremye, Gakwaya; McAllister, James P.; Inder, Terrie E.; Mercer, Deanna; Holtzman, David M.; Strahle, Jennifer; Wallendorf, Michael J.; Morales, Diego M.

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Hydrocephalus is a complex neurological disorder with a pervasive impact on the central nervous system. Previous work has demonstrated derangements in the biochemical profile of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) in hydrocephalus, particularly in infants and children, in whom neurodevelopment is progressing in parallel with concomitant neurological injury. The objective of this study was to examine the CSF of children with congenital hydrocephalus (CHC) to gain insight into the pathophysiology of hydrocephalus and identify candidate biomarkers of CHC with potential diagnostic and therapeutic value. Methods CSF levels of amyloid precursor protein (APP) and derivative isoforms (sAPPα, sAPPβ, Aβ42), tau, phosphorylated tau (pTau), L1CAM, NCAM-1, aquaporin 4 (AQP4), and total protein (TP) were measured by ELISA in 20 children with CHC. Two comparative groups were included: age-matched controls and children with other neurological diseases. Demographic parameters, ventricular frontal-occipital horn ratio, associated brain malformations, genetic alterations, and surgical treatments were recorded. Logistic regression analysis and receiver operating characteristic curves were used to examine the association of each CSF protein with CHC. Results CSF levels of APP, sAPPα, sAPPβ, Aβ42, tau, pTau, L1CAM, and NCAM-1 but not AQP4 or TP were increased in untreated CHC. CSF TP and normalized L1CAM levels were associated with FOR in CHC subjects, while normalized CSF tau levels were associated with FOR in control subjects. Predictive ability for CHC was strongest for sAPPα, especially in subjects ≤12 months of age (p<0.0001 and AUC = 0.99), followed by normalized sAPPβ (p = 0.0001, AUC = 0.95), tau, APP, and L1CAM. Among subjects ≤12 months, a normalized CSF sAPPα cut-point of 0.41 provided the best prediction of CHC (odds ratio = 528, sensitivity = 0.94, specificity = 0.97); these infants were 32 times more likely to have CHC. Conclusions CSF proteins such as s

  11. Subcommissural organ, cerebrospinal fluid circulation, and hydrocephalus.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Fígares, J M; Jimenez, A J; Rodríguez, E M

    2001-03-01

    Under normal physiological conditions the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) is secreted continuously, although this secretion undergoes circadian variations. Mechanisms operating at the vascular side of the choroidal cells involve a sympathetic and a cholinergic innervation, with the former inhibiting and the latter stimulating CSF secretion. There are also regulatory mechanisms operating at the ventricular side of the choroidal cells, where receptors for monoamines such as dopamine, serotonin, and melatonin, and for neuropeptides such as vasopressin, atrial natriuretic hormone, and angiotensin II, have been identified. These compounds, that are normally present in the CSF, participate in the regulation of CSF secretion. Although the mechanisms responsible for the CSF circulation are not fully understood, several factors are known to play a role. There is evidence that the subcommissural organ (SCO)--Reissner's fiber (RF) complex is one of the factors involved in the CSF circulation. In mammals, the predominant route of escape of CSF into blood is through the arachnoid villi. In lower vertebrates, the dilatation of the distal end of the central canal, known as terminal ventricle or ampulla caudalis, represents the main site of CSF escape into blood. Both the function and the ultrastructural arrangement of the ampulla caudalis suggest that it may be the ancestor structure of the mammalian arachnoid villi. RF-glycoproteins reaching the ampulla caudalis might play a role in the formation and maintenance of the route communicating the CSF and blood compartments. The SCO-RF complex may participate, under physiological conditions, in the circulation and reabsorption of CSF. Under pathological conditions, the SCO appears to be involved in the pathogeneses of congenital hydrocephalus. Changes in the SCO have been described in all species developing congenital hydrocephalus. In these reports, the important question whether the changes occurring in the SCO precede hydrocephalus, or

  12. Trait Resilience Moderates the Longitudinal Linkage between Adolescent Posttraumatic Stress Disorder Symptoms and Posttraumatic Growth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ying, Liuhua; Wang, Yanli; Lin, Chongde; Chen, Chuansheng

    2016-01-01

    The current study examined the longitudinal association between posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms and posttraumatic growth (PTG) as well as the moderating role of trait resilience in that association. Participants completed measures of PTSD symptoms, PTG, and trait resilience at 12, 18, and 24 months after the Wenchuan earthquake.…

  13. Trait Resilience Moderates the Longitudinal Linkage between Adolescent Posttraumatic Stress Disorder Symptoms and Posttraumatic Growth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ying, Liuhua; Wang, Yanli; Lin, Chongde; Chen, Chuansheng

    2016-01-01

    The current study examined the longitudinal association between posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms and posttraumatic growth (PTG) as well as the moderating role of trait resilience in that association. Participants completed measures of PTSD symptoms, PTG, and trait resilience at 12, 18, and 24 months after the Wenchuan earthquake.…

  14. Subacute post-traumatic ascending myelopathy after T12 burst fracture in a 32-year-old male: case report and surgical result of cervical durotomy.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jian; Wang, Huili; Liu, Haiying; Wang, Guangshun

    2016-01-01

    To draw attention to a rare neurological deterioration after spinal cord injury (SCI) and to discuss evidence supporting an increase in cerebrospinal fluid pressure (CSFP), we present an extremely rare case of subacute post-traumatic ascending myelopathy (SPAM) in which the patient sustained a T12 fracture initially resulting in paraplegia and after undergoing posterior fixation and anterior decompression. The patient was a 32-year-old healthy man who sustained a T12 burst fracture with complete paraplegia after a fall injury. The patient underwent a posterior reduction and short-segment fixation 8 h after the injury and an anterior thoracoscopic-assisted decompression on post-traumatic day 8. On post-traumatic day 21, he had a progressive neurological deterioration with dyspnoea and decreased muscle strength of both upper extremities that could not be relieved by conservative intervention. After undergoing a cervical posterior laminectomy and durotomy, the patient exhibited the clinical manifestation of brain herniation. There was no recovery of autonomous respiration, and the patient entered a coma. The patient died on post-traumatic day 25 because of cardiac and respiratory arrest. SPAM is a rare, potentially fatal neurological deterioration after SCI; however, a prompt diagnosis can be made by magnetic resonance imaging. Our observations suggest that an increase in CSFP may be the main cause of SPAM. The paraplegic level should be recorded daily so that neurological deterioration can be recognised as soon as possible.

  15. Rehabilitation after lumbar disc surgery.

    PubMed

    Ostelo, R W; de Vet, H C; Waddell, G; Kerckhoffs, M R; Leffers, P; van Tulder, M W

    2002-01-01

    Although several rehabilitation programs, physical fitness programs or protocols regarding instruction for patients to return to work after lumbar disc surgery have been suggested, little is known about the efficacy and effectiveness of these treatments. There are still persistent fears of causing re-injury, re-herniation, or instability. The objective of this systematic review was to evaluate the effectiveness of active treatments that are used in the rehabilitation after first-time lumbar disc surgery. We searched the MEDLINE, EMBASE and Psyclit databases up to April 2000 and the Cochrane Controlled Trials Register 2001, Issue 3. Both randomized and non-randomized controlled trials on any type of active rehabilitation program after first-time disc surgery were included. Two independent reviewers performed the inclusion of studies and two other reviewers independently performed the methodological quality assessment. A rating system that consists of four levels of scientific evidence summarizes the results. Thirteen studies were included, six of which were of high quality. There is no strong evidence for the effectiveness for any treatment starting immediately post-surgery, mainly because of lack of (good quality) studies. For treatments that start four to six weeks post-surgery there is strong evidence (level 1) that intensive exercise programs are more effective on functional status and faster return to work (short-term follow-up) as compared to mild exercise programs and there is strong evidence (level 1) that on long term follow up there is no difference between intensive exercise programs and mild exercise programs with regard to overall improvement. For all other primary outcome measures for the comparison between intensive and mild exercise programs there is conflicting evidence (level 3) with regard to long-term follow-up. Furthermore, there is no strong evidence for the effectiveness of supervised training as compared to home exercises. There was also no

  16. [Chronic cerebrospinal venous insufficiency--pathophysiology and treament].

    PubMed

    Tuchendler, Marek; Zwolinski, Jerzy; Stankowski, Jacek; Zapotoczny, Norbert; Witkiewicz, Wojciech; Piatkowski, Marcin

    2013-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (sclerosis multiplex--SM) is a chronic nervous sytem disease, which through formation of demyenilisation focus in the central nervous system leads to deterioration of its various functions. In the consequence it may cause invalidity of patient. Etiology of this disease is still unknown. In this article authors describe theory of Chronic Cerebrospinal Venous Insufficiency as a possible cause of multiple sclerosis and methods of treatment of this pathology, with all doubts and controversies connected with this method. Autors also present an experimental treatment of Chronic Cerebrospinal Venous Insufficiency in patients with multiple sclerosis, which is being performed as a scientific program to evaluate neurological outcomes of endovasculat treatment of CCSVI.

  17. Stereoscopic virtual reality presurgical planning for cerebrospinal otorrhea.

    PubMed

    Shen, Ming; Zhang, Xiao-Luo; Yang, De-Lin; Wu, Jin-Song

    2010-07-01

    We present a complicated case of spontaneous cerebrospinal otorrhea, which had not been cured despite undergoing 5 surgical interventions in the past. The disability to identify the location of the fistula was the main crux of the past failures. On this occasion, stereoscopic virtual reality presurgical planning was applied to identify the exact location of the fistula and a surgical simulation was performed, and was later confirmed during the actual operation. Interactive manipulation in a stereoscopic virtual environment makes the decision making process easier in the treatment of cerebrospinal otorrhea.

  18. Alzheimer's disease cerebrospinal fluid biomarker in cognitively normal subjects.

    PubMed

    Toledo, Jon B; Zetterberg, Henrik; van Harten, Argonde C; Glodzik, Lidia; Martinez-Lage, Pablo; Bocchio-Chiavetto, Luisella; Rami, Lorena; Hansson, Oskar; Sperling, Reisa; Engelborghs, Sebastiaan; Osorio, Ricardo S; Vanderstichele, Hugo; Vandijck, Manu; Hampel, Harald; Teipl, Stefan; Moghekar, Abhay; Albert, Marilyn; Hu, William T; Monge Argilés, Jose A; Gorostidi, Ana; Teunissen, Charlotte E; De Deyn, Peter P; Hyman, Bradley T; Molinuevo, Jose L; Frisoni, Giovanni B; Linazasoro, Gurutz; de Leon, Mony J; van der Flier, Wiesje M; Scheltens, Philip; Blennow, Kaj; Shaw, Leslie M; Trojanowski, John Q

    2015-09-01

    In a large multicentre sample of cognitively normal subjects, as a function of age, gender and APOE genotype, we studied the frequency of abnormal cerebrospinal fluid levels of Alzheimer's disease biomarkers including: total tau, phosphorylated tau and amyloid-β1-42. Fifteen cohorts from 12 different centres with either enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays or Luminex® measurements were selected for this study. Each centre sent nine new cerebrospinal fluid aliquots that were used to measure total tau, phosphorylated tau and amyloid-β1-42 in the Gothenburg laboratory. Seven centres showed a high correlation with the new Gothenburg measurements; therefore, 10 cohorts from these centres are included in the analyses here (1233 healthy control subjects, 40-84 years old). Amyloid-β amyloid status (negative or positive) and neurodegeneration status (negative or positive) was established based on the pathological cerebrospinal fluid Alzheimer's disease cut-off values for cerebrospinal fluid amyloid-β1-42 and total tau, respectively. While gender did not affect these biomarker values, APOE genotype modified the age-associated changes in cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers such that APOE ε4 carriers showed stronger age-related changes in cerebrospinal fluid phosphorylated tau, total tau and amyloid-β1-42 values and APOE ε2 carriers showed the opposite effect. At 40 years of age, 76% of the subjects were classified as amyloid negative, neurodegeneration negative and their frequency decreased to 32% at 85 years. The amyloid-positive neurodegeneration-negative group remained stable. The amyloid-negative neurodegeneration-positive group frequency increased slowly from 1% at 44 years to 16% at 85 years, but its frequency was not affected by APOE genotype. The amyloid-positive neurodegeneration-positive frequency increased from 1% at 53 years to 28% at 85 years. Abnormally low cerebrospinal fluid amyloid-β1-42 levels were already frequent in midlife and APOE genotype strongly

  19. Toward dynamic lumbar punctures guidance based on single element synthetic tracked aperture ultrasound imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Haichong K.; Lin, Melissa; Kim, Younsu; Paredes, Mateo; Kannan, Karun; Patel, Nisu; Moghekar, Abhay; Durr, Nicholas J.; Boctor, Emad M.

    2017-03-01

    Lumbar punctures (LPs) are interventional procedures used to collect cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), a bodily fluid needed to diagnose central nervous system disorders. Most lumbar punctures are performed blindly without imaging guidance. Because the target window is small, physicians can only accurately palpate the appropriate space about 30% of the time and perform a successful procedure after an average of three attempts. Although various forms of imaging based guidance systems have been developed to aid in this procedure, these systems complicate the procedure by including independent image modalities and requiring image-to-needle registration to guide the needle insertion. Here, we propose a simple and direct needle insertion platform utilizing a single ultrasound element within the needle through dynamic sensing and imaging. The needle-shaped ultrasound transducer can not only sense the distance between the tip and a potential obstacle such as bone, but also visually locate structures by combining transducer location tracking and back projection based tracked synthetic aperture beam-forming algorithm. The concept of the system was validated through simulation first, which revealed the tolerance to realistic error. Then, the initial prototype of the single element transducer was built into a 14G needle, and was mounted on a holster equipped with a rotation tracking encoder. We experimentally evaluated the system using a metal wire phantom mimicking high reflection bone structures and an actual spine bone phantom with both the controlled motion and freehand scanning. An ultrasound image corresponding to the model phantom structure was reconstructed using the beam-forming algorithm, and the resolution was improved compared to without beam-forming. These results demonstrated the proposed system has the potential to be used as an ultrasound imaging system for lumbar puncture procedures.

  20. Intracranial subdural empyema after surgery for lumbar lipomyelomeningocele: A rare complication

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Ha Son; Foy, Andrew; Havens, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Background: Surgery is routinely recommended for lumbar lipomyelomeningocele, especially in the setting of tethered cord syndrome. The most common complications are wound infections and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leak, which remain confined to the surgical site. To the best of our knowledge, there have been no prior reports relating an intracranial subdural empyema following detethering surgery. Prompt diagnosis is essential since subdural empyema is a neurosurgical emergency. Case Description: The patient was an 11-month-old male who underwent detethering surgery for a lumbar lipomyelomeningocele. This was followed by wound drainage consistent with CSF leak, requiring revision. Cultures grew three aerobes (Escherichia coli, Enterococcus, and Klebsiella) and three anaerobes (Clostridium, Veillonella, and Bacteroides). He was started on cefepime, vancomycin, and flagyl. The patient required two more wound revisions and placement of an external ventricular drain (EVD) secondary to persistent wound leakage. A subsequent magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) brain was carried out due to protracted irritability, which revealed extensive left subdural empyema along the parietooccipital region and the inferior and anterior temporal lobe. He underwent evacuation of the subdural empyema where cultures exhibited no growth. Subsequently, he progressed well. His lumbar incision continued to heal. Serial MRI brains and inflammatory markers were reassuring. He weaned off his EVD and went home to complete a 6-week course of antibiotics. Upon completion of his antibiotics, he returned for a clinic visit; he exhibited no interim fevers or wound issues; cranial imaging documented no evidence of a residual or recurrent subdural empyema. Conclusion: Intracranial subdural empyema may occur after wound complications from detethering surgery despite early initiation of broad-spectrum antibiotics. Possible etiology may be local wound infection that seeds the subdural space and travels to the

  1. Lumbar degenerative kyphosis: radiologic analysis and classifications.

    PubMed

    Jang, Jee-Soo; Lee, Sang-Ho; Min, Jun-Hong; Han, Kyoung-Mi

    2007-11-15

    Retrospective study of a consecutive patient series. To review the radiographic classification of patients with sagittal imbalance due to lumbar degenerative kyphosis (LDK) and to determine correlation between thoracic and lumbar curve. Lumbar degenerative kyphosis is one of the common spinal deformities in Asian countries, especially Korea and Japan. However, there have been few studies regarding the classification and treatment of this disease. Seventy-eight patients with LDK were analyzed and classified according to the standing lateral whole spine findings. Total lumbar lordosis (L1-S1), thoracic kyphosis (T5-T12), sacral slope, thoracolumbar angle (T11-L1), and sagittal vertical axis (SVA) were measured on the lateral view of the whole spine. Spinal curve deformities were classified into 2 groups according to the thoracolumbar (T-L) junction angle: flat or lordotic angle (Group 1; N = 53) and kyphotic angle (Group 2; N = 25). In Group 1, significant correlations between the thoracic and lumbar curves (r = 0.772, P < 0.0001), and between the lumbar curve and sacral slope (r = 0.785, P < 0.0001) were observed. By this result, Group 1 was classified as sagittal thoracic compensated group. In contrast, In Group 2, no correlation was found between the thoracic and lumbar curves in the decompensated group (r = 0.179, P = 0.391), but we found a significant correlation between lordosis and sacral slope (r = 0.442, P = 0.027). By this result, Group 2 was classified as sagittal thoracic decompensated group. There was significant difference in SVA between 2 groups (P = 0.020). The angle of the thoracolumbar junction is an important parameter in determining whether a sagittal thoracic compensatory mechanism exists in LDK. We assumed that existence of a compensatory mechanism in the proximal spine is central to the determination of the fusion levels in the treatment of LDK.

  2. CNS Penetration of Intrathecal-Lumbar Idursulfase in the Monkey, Dog and Mouse: Implications for Neurological Outcomes of Lysosomal Storage Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Jing; Savioli, Nancy; Belov, Vasily; Huang, Yan; Lotterhand, Jason; Alessandrini, Mary; Liu, Nan; Fischman, Alan J.; Powell, Jan L.; Heartlein, Michael W.

    2012-01-01

    A major challenge for the treatment of many central nervous system (CNS) disorders is the lack of convenient and effective methods for delivering biological agents to the brain. Mucopolysaccharidosis II (Hunter syndrome) is a rare inherited lysosomal storage disorder resulting from a deficiency of iduronate-2-sulfatase (I2S). I2S is a large, highly glycosylated enzyme. Intravenous administration is not likely to be an effective therapy for disease-related neurological outcomes that require enzyme access to the brain cells, in particular neurons and oligodendrocytes. We demonstrate that intracerebroventricular and lumbar intrathecal administration of recombinant I2S in dogs and nonhuman primates resulted in widespread enzyme distribution in the brain parenchyma, including remarkable deposition in the lysosomes of both neurons and oligodendrocytes. Lumbar intrathecal administration also resulted in enzyme delivery to the spinal cord, whereas little enzyme was detected there after intraventricular administration. Mucopolysaccharidosis II model is available in mice. Lumbar administration of recombinant I2S to enzyme deficient animals reduced the storage of glycosaminoglycans in both superficial and deep brain tissues, with concurrent morphological improvements. The observed patterns of enzyme transport from cerebrospinal fluid to the CNS tissues and the resultant biological activity (a) warrant further investigation of intrathecal delivery of I2S via lumbar catheter as an experimental treatment for the neurological symptoms of Hunter syndrome and (b) may have broader implications for CNS treatment with biopharmaceuticals. PMID:22279584

  3. Effect of Cognitive Reserve on Age-Related Changes in Cerebrospinal Fluid Biomarkers of Alzheimer Disease.

    PubMed

    Almeida, Rodrigo P; Schultz, Stephanie A; Austin, Benjamin P; Boots, Elizabeth A; Dowling, N Maritza; Gleason, Carey E; Bendlin, Barbara B; Sager, Mark A; Hermann, Bruce P; Zetterberg, Henrik; Carlsson, Cynthia M; Johnson, Sterling C; Asthana, Sanjay; Okonkwo, Ozioma C

    2015-06-01

    Although advancing age is the strongest risk factor for the development of symptomatic Alzheimer disease (AD), recent studies have shown that there are individual differences in susceptibility to age-related alterations in the biomarkers of AD pathophysiology. To investigate whether cognitive reserve (CR) modifies the adverse influence of age on key cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarkers of AD. A cross-sectional cohort of 268 individuals (211 in a cognitively normal group and 57 in a cognitively impaired group) from the Wisconsin Registry for Alzheimer's Prevention and the Wisconsin Alzheimer's Disease Research Center participated in this study. They underwent lumbar puncture for collection of CSF samples, from which Aβ42, total tau (t-tau), and phosphorylated tau (p-tau) were immunoassayed. In addition, we computed t-tau/Aβ42 and p-tau/Aβ42 ratios. Cognitive reserve was indexed by years of education, with 16 or more years taken to confer high reserve. Covariate-adjusted regression analyses were used to test whether the effect of age on CSF biomarkers was modified by CR. The study dates were March 5, 2010, to February 13, 2013. Cerebrospinal fluid levels of Aβ42, t-tau, p-tau, t-tau/Aβ42, and p-tau/Aβ42. There were significant age × CR interactions for CSF t-tau (β [SE] = -6.72 [2.84], P = .02), p-tau (β [SE] = -0.71 [0.27], P = .01), t-tau/Aβ42 (β [SE] = -0.02 [0.01], P = .02), and p-tau/Aβ42 (β [SE] = -0.002 [0.001], P = .004). With advancing age, individuals with high CR exhibited attenuated adverse alterations in these CSF biomarkers compared with individuals with low CR. This attenuation of age effects by CR tended to be more pronounced in the cognitively impaired group compared with the cognitively normal group. There was evidence of a dose-response relationship such that the effect of age on the biomarkers was progressively attenuated given additional years of schooling. In a sample composed of a cognitively normal group

  4. Cerebrospinal fluid total tau concentration predicts clinical phenotype in Huntington's disease.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Filipe Brogueira; Byrne, Lauren; McColgan, Peter; Robertson, Nicola; Tabrizi, Sarah J; Leavitt, Blair R; Zetterberg, Henrik; Wild, Edward J

    2016-10-01

    Huntington's disease (HD) is a hereditary neurodegenerative condition with no therapeutic intervention known to alter disease progression, but several trials are ongoing and biomarkers of disease progression are needed. Tau is an axonal protein, often altered in neurodegeneration, and recent studies pointed out its role on HD neuropathology. Our goal was to study whether cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) tau is a biomarker of disease progression in HD. After informed consent, healthy controls, pre-symptomatic and symptomatic gene expansion carriers were recruited from two HD clinics. All participants underwent assessment with the Unified HD Rating Scale '99 (UHDRS). CSF was obtained according to a standardized lumbar puncture protocol. CSF tau was quantified using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Comparisons between two groups were tested using ancova. Pearson's correlation coefficients were calculated for disease progression. Significance level was defined as p < 0.05. Seventy-six participants were included in this cross-sectional multicenter international pilot study. Age-adjusted CSF tau was significantly elevated in gene expansion carriers compared with healthy controls (p = 0.002). UHDRS total functional capacity was significantly correlated with CSF tau (r = -0.29, p = 0.004) after adjustment for age, and UHDRS total motor score was significantly correlated with CSF tau after adjustment for age (r = 0.32, p = 0.002). Several UHDRS cognitive tasks were also significantly correlated with CST total tau after age-adjustment. This study confirms that CSF tau concentrations in HD gene mutation carriers are increased compared with healthy controls and reports for the first time that CSF tau concentration is associated with phenotypic variability in HD. These conclusions strengthen the case for CSF tau as a biomarker in HD. In the era of novel targeted approaches to Huntington's disease, reliable biomarkers are needed. We quantified Tau protein, a marker of

  5. Lumbar posture and muscular activity while sitting during office work.

    PubMed

    Mörl, Falk; Bradl, Ingo

    2013-04-01

    Field study, cross-sectional study to measure the posture and sEMG of the lumbar spine during office work for a better understanding of the lumbar spine within such conditions. There is high incidence of low back pain in office workers. Currently there is little information about lumbar posture and the activity of lumbar muscles during extended office work. Thirteen volunteers were examined for around 2h of their normal office work. Typical tasks were documented and synchronised to a portable long term measuring device for sEMG and posture examination. The correlation of lumbar spine posture and sEMG was tested statistically. The majority of time spent in office work was sedentary (82%). Only 5% of the measured time was undertaken in erect body position (standing or walking). The sEMG of the lumbar muscles under investigation was task dependent. A strong relation to lumbar spine posture was found within each task. The more the lumbar spine was flexed, the less there was activation of lumbar muscles (P < .01). Periods of very low or no activation of lumbar muscles accounted for about 30% of relaxed sitting postures. Because of very low activation of lumbar muscles while sitting, the load is transmitted by passive structures like ligaments and intervertebral discs. Due to the viscoelasticity of passive structures and low activation of lumbar muscles, the lumbar spine may incline into de-conditioning. This may be a reason for low back pain. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. More Than the Brain's Drain: Does Cerebrospinal Fluid Help the Brain Convey Messages?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Travis, John

    1999-01-01

    Examines the role of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), a clear, colorless liquid that constantly bathes the brain and spinal cord. Scientists argue that cerebrospinal fluid carries important signals for sleep, appetite, and sex. Evaluates past and current research documenting the purpose of cerebrospinal fluid in the brain. (CCM)

  7. More Than the Brain's Drain: Does Cerebrospinal Fluid Help the Brain Convey Messages?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Travis, John

    1999-01-01

    Examines the role of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), a clear, colorless liquid that constantly bathes the brain and spinal cord. Scientists argue that cerebrospinal fluid carries important signals for sleep, appetite, and sex. Evaluates past and current research documenting the purpose of cerebrospinal fluid in the brain. (CCM)

  8. Multimodal Approach to Identifying Malingered Posttraumatic Stress Disorder: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Jabeen, Shagufta; Alam, Farzana

    2015-01-01

    The primary aim of this article is to aid clinicians in differentiating true posttraumatic stress disorder from malingered posttraumatic stress disorder. Posttraumatic stress disorder and malingering are defined, and prevalence rates are explored. Similarities and differences in diagnostic criteria between the fourth and fifth editions of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders are described for posttraumatic stress disorder. Possible motivations for malingering posttraumatic stress disorder are discussed, and common characteristics of malingered posttraumatic stress disorder are described. A multimodal approach is described for evaluating posttraumatic stress disorder, including interview techniques, collection of collateral data, and psychometric and physiologic testing, that should allow clinicians to distinguish between those patients who are truly suffering from posttraumatic disorder and those who are malingering the illness. PMID:25852974

  9. Multimodal approach to identifying malingered posttraumatic stress disorder: a review.

    PubMed

    Ali, Shahid; Jabeen, Shagufta; Alam, Farzana

    2015-01-01

    The primary aim of this article is to aid clinicians in differentiating true posttraumatic stress disorder from malingered posttraumatic stress disorder. Posttraumatic stress disorder and malingering are defined, and prevalence rates are explored. Similarities and differences in diagnostic criteria between the fourth and fifth editions of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders are described for posttraumatic stress disorder. Possible motivations for malingering posttraumatic stress disorder are discussed, and common characteristics of malingered posttraumatic stress disorder are described. A multimodal approach is described for evaluating posttraumatic stress disorder, including interview techniques, collection of collateral data, and psychometric and physiologic testing, that should allow clinicians to distinguish between those patients who are truly suffering from posttraumatic disorder and those who are malingering the illness.

  10. Learning and memory in Holocaust survivors with posttraumatic stress disorder.

    PubMed

    Yehuda, Rachel; Golier, Julia A; Halligan, Sarah L; Harvey, Philip D

    2004-02-01

    Impairments in explicit memory have been observed in Holocaust survivors with posttraumatic stress disorder. To evaluate which memory components are preferentially affected, the California Verbal Learning Test was administered to Holocaust survivors with (n = 36) and without (n = 26) posttraumatic stress disorder, and subjects not exposed to the Holocaust (n = 40). Posttraumatic stress disorder subjects showed impairments in learning and short-term and delayed retention compared to nonexposed subjects; survivors without posttraumatic stress disorder did not. Impairments in learning, but not retention, were retained after controlling for intelligence quotient. Older age was associated with poorer learning and memory performance in the posttraumatic stress disorder group only. The most robust impairment observed in posttraumatic stress disorder was in verbal learning, which may be a risk factor for or consequence of chronic posttraumatic stress disorder. The negative association between performance and age may reflect accelerated cognitive decline in posttraumatic stress disorder.

  11. Sudden post-traumatic sciatica caused by a thoracic spinal meningioma.

    PubMed

    Mariniello, Giuseppe; Malacario, Francesca; Dones, Flavia; Severino, Rocco; Ugga, Lorenzo; Russo, Camilla; Elefante, Andrea; Maiuri, Francesco

    2016-10-01

    Spinal meningiomas usually present with slowly progressive symptoms of cord and root compression, while a sudden clinical onset is very rare. A 35-year-old previously symptom-free woman presented sudden right sciatica and weakness of her right leg following a fall with impact to her left foot. A neurological examination showed paresis of the right quadriceps, tibial and sural muscles, increased bilateral knee and ankle reflexes and positive Babinski sign. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed the presence of a spinal T11 meningioma in the left postero-lateral compartment of the spinal canal; at this level, the spinal cord was displaced to the contralateral side with the conus in the normal position. At surgery, a meningioma with dural attachment of the left postero-lateral dural surface was removed. The intervention resulted in rapid remission of both pain and neurological deficits. Spinal meningiomas may exceptionally present with sudden pain and neurological deficits as result of tumour bleeding or post-traumatic injury of the already compressed nervous structures, both in normal patients and in those with conus displacement or tethered cord. In this case, the traumatic impact of the left foot was transmitted to the spine, resulting in stretching of the already compressed cord and of the contralateral lombosacral roots. This case suggests that low thoracic cord compression should be suspected in patients with post-traumatic radicular leg pain with normal lumbar spine MRI. © The Author(s) 2016.

  12. Pharmacotherapy for posttraumatic stress disorder.

    PubMed

    Stein, D J; Zungu-Dirwayi, N; van Der Linden GJ; Seedat, S

    2000-01-01

    Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is a prevalent and disabling disorder. By definition prior psychological trauma plays a causal role in the disorder, and psychotherapy is a widely accepted intervention. Nevertheless there is growing evidence that PTSD is characterized by specific psychobiological dysfunctions, and this has contributed to a growing interest in the use of medication in its treatment. The authors aimed to undertake a systematic review of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) of the pharmacotherapy of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) following the guidelines and using the software of the Cochrane Collaboration, and to provide an estimate of the effects of medication in this disorder. Secondary objectives were to explore questions about whether particular classes of medication are more effective and/or acceptable than others in the treatment of PTSD, and about which factors (clinical and methodological) predict response to pharmacotherapy. Studies of the pharmacotherapy of PTSD were identified using literature searches of MEDLINE (1966 to 1999, using the textwords posttraumatic, post-traumatic, medication, pharmacotherapy) and other electronic databases (PSYCLIT; National PTSD Center Pilots database; Dissertation Abstracts; Cochrane Collaboration Depression, Anxiety & Neurosis Controlled Trials Register). In addition, published and unpublished RCTs were requested from PTSD researchers and pharmaceutical companies. An initial broad strategy was undertaken to find not only RCTs, but also open-label trials and reviews of the pharmacotherapy of PTSD; additional studies were sought in reference lists of retrieved articles and included studies in any language. All RCTs of PTSD (including both placebo controlled and comparative trials), whether published or unpublished, but completed prior to the end of 1999 were considered for the review. Selected RCTs were independently assessed and collated by 2 raters, and Review Manager (RevMan) software was used to

  13. Sterile post-traumatic immunosuppression

    PubMed Central

    Islam, Md Nahidul; Bradley, Benjamin A; Ceredig, Rhodri

    2016-01-01

    After major trauma, the human immune system initiates a series of inflammatory events at the injury site that is later followed by suppression of local inflammation favoring the repair and remodeling of the damaged tissues. This local immune response involves complex interactions between resident cells such as macrophages and dendritic cells, soluble mediators such as cytokines and chemokines, and recruited cells such as neutrophils, monocytes and mesenchymal stromal cells. If of sufficient magnitude, these initial immune responses nevertheless have systemic consequences resulting in a state called post-traumatic immunosuppression (PTI). However, controversy exists regarding the exact immunological changes occurring in systemic compartments triggered by these local immune responses. PTI is one of the leading causes of post-surgical mortality and makes patients vulnerable to hospital-acquired infections, multiple organ failure and many other complications. In addition, hemorrhage, blood transfusion, immunesenescence and immunosuppressant drugs aggravate PTI. PTI has been intensively studied, but published results are frequently cloudy. The purpose of this review is to focus on the contributions made by different responsive modalities to immunosuppression following sterile trauma and to try to integrate these into an overall scheme of PTI. PMID:27195120

  14. Tuberculosis presenting as posttraumatic panophthalmitis

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Pankaj; Singh, Ramandeep; Gupta, Suruchi; Kumar, Abhiraj; Kakkar, Nandita

    2016-01-01

    Panophthalmitis is one of rare manifestations of tuberculosis described in atypical situations such as children, immune compromised patients, or drug abuse. The present report describes the first case of tubercular panophthalmitis developing after trauma in an otherwise healthy adult patient. A 46-year-old female patient presented with corneal infiltrate and endophthalmitis that developed after an injury to right eye with wooden object. Corneal scrapings and vitreous tap were sterile. The patient did not improve with antibiotics and developed panophthalmitis. On evisceration of the painful blind eye, histopathology showed the presence of granulomatous inflammation and acid-fast bacilli. The patient had no other systemic focus of tubercular infection. The patient was managed with anti-tubercular therapy for 6 months. Atypical presentations of tuberculosis like panophthalmitis pose a difficult problem in diagnosis as well as treatment. Direct inoculation of bacilli during trauma is a rare source of infection. This case report presents unusual development of tubercular panophthalmitis following direct inoculation of bacilli during trauma. Ocular tuberculosis should be considered in differential diagnosis of posttraumatic endophthalmitis and panophthalmitis, especially in endemic regions like India. PMID:27013830

  15. Post-traumatic stress disorder.

    PubMed

    Yehuda, Rachel; Hoge, Charles W; McFarlane, Alexander C; Vermetten, Eric; Lanius, Ruth A; Nievergelt, Caroline M; Hobfoll, Stevan E; Koenen, Karestan C; Neylan, Thomas C; Hyman, Steven E

    2015-10-08

    Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) occurs in 5-10% of the population and is twice as common in women as in men. Although trauma exposure is the precipitating event for PTSD to develop, biological and psychosocial risk factors are increasingly viewed as predictors of symptom onset, severity and chronicity. PTSD affects multiple biological systems, such as brain circuitry and neurochemistry, and cellular, immune, endocrine and metabolic function. Treatment approaches involve a combination of medications and psychotherapy, with psychotherapy overall showing greatest efficacy. Studies of PTSD pathophysiology initially focused on the psychophysiology and neurobiology of stress responses, and the acquisition and the extinction of fear memories. However, increasing emphasis is being placed on identifying factors that explain individual differences in responses to trauma and promotion of resilience, such as genetic and social factors, brain developmental processes, cumulative biological and psychological effects of early childhood and other stressful lifetime events. The field of PTSD is currently challenged by fluctuations in diagnostic criteria, which have implications for epidemiological, biological, genetic and treatment studies. However, the advent of new biological methodologies offers the possibility of large-scale approaches to heterogeneous and genetically complex brain disorders, and provides optimism that individualized approaches to diagnosis and treatment will be discovered.

  16. Posttraumatic symptom structure across age groups.

    PubMed

    Helpman, Liat; Rachamim, Lilach; Aderka, Idan M; Gabai-Daie, Ayala; Schindel-Allon, Inbal; Gilboa-Schechtman, Eva

    2015-01-01

    The applicability of diagnostic criteria of Posttraumatic Stress Disorder to the pediatric population has been a focus of much debate (e.g., Carrion, Weems, Ray, & Reiss, 2002 ), informing changes in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (5th ed.; DSM-5). The current study examined the factor structure of posttraumatic distress among adult versus pediatric samples using confirmatory factor analysis. The analysis was performed on the DSM-IV-adherent Posttraumatic Diagnostic Scale (Foa, Cashman, Jaycox, & Perry, 1997 ) and Child Posttraumatic Symptom Scale (Foa, Johnson, Feeny, & Treadwell, 2001 ). The sample included 378 adult and 204 child and adolescent victims of diverse single-event traumas. A series of models based on previous findings and DSM-IV specification were evaluated. A 4-factor model (Intrusions, Avoidance, Dysphoria, and Hyperarousal), similar to the DSM-5 model, best fit the data among adults, and a different 4-factor model (Intrusion, Avodiance, Numbing, and Hyperarousal) best fit the data among children and adolescents. Despite some similarity, the posttraumatic symptom profiles of pediatric and adult samples may differ. These differences are not fully incorporated into the DSM-5, and warrant further examination.

  17. Application of transport phenomena analysis technique to cerebrospinal fluid.

    PubMed

    Lam, C H; Hansen, E A; Hall, W A; Hubel, A

    2013-12-01

    The study of hydrocephalus and the modeling of cerebrospinal fluid flow have proceeded in the past using mathematical analysis that was very capable of prediction phenomenonologically but not well in physiologic parameters. In this paper, the basis of fluid dynamics at the physiologic state is explained using first established equations of transport phenomenon. Then, microscopic and molecular level techniques of modeling are described using porous media theory and chemical kinetic theory and then applied to cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) dynamics. Using techniques of transport analysis allows the field of cerebrospinal fluid dynamics to approach the level of sophistication of urine and blood transport. Concepts such as intracellular and intercellular pathways, compartmentalization, and tortuosity are associated with quantifiable parameters that are relevant to the anatomy and physiology of cerebrospinal fluid transport. The engineering field of transport phenomenon is rich and steeped in architectural, aeronautical, nautical, and more recently biological history. This paper summarizes and reviews the approaches that have been taken in the field of engineering and applies it to CSF flow.

  18. Coccidioides immitis presenting as a hyphal form in cerebrospinal fluid.

    PubMed Central

    Zepeda, M. R.; Kobayashi, G. K.; Appleman, M. D.; Navarro, A.

    1998-01-01

    This article reports a case of Coccidioides immitis that presented as a hyphal form in a 38-year-old patient. The organism was observed growing exclusively as hyphae in the cerebrospinal fluid by microscopic examination. Coccidioides immitis was the only organism cultured. The identification of C immitis was confirmed by both standard culture methods and DNA probe studies. Images Figure PMID:9685779

  19. MicroRNA Changes in Cerebrospinal Fluid After Subarachnoid Hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Bache, Søren; Rasmussen, Rune; Rossing, Maria; Laigaard, Finn Pedersen; Nielsen, Finn Cilius; Møller, Kirsten

    2017-09-01

    Delayed cerebral ischemia (DCI) accounts for a major part of the morbidity and mortality after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are pathophysiologically involved in acute cerebral ischemia. This study compared miRNA profiles in cerebrospinal fluid from neurologically healthy patients, as well as SAH patients with and without subsequent development of DCI. In a prospective case-control study of SAH patients treated with external ventricular drainage and neurologically healthy patients, miRNA profiles in cerebrospinal fluid were screened and validated using 2 different high-throughput real-time quantification polymerase chain reaction techniques. The occurrence of DCI was documented in patient charts and subsequently reviewed independently by 2 physicians. MiRNA profiles from 27 SAH patients and 10 neurologically healthy patients passed quality control. In the validation, 66 miRNAs showed a relative increase in cerebrospinal fluid from SAH patients compared with neurologically healthy patients (P<0.001); 2 (miR-21 and miR-221) showed a relative increase in SAH patients with DCI compared with those without (P<0.05) in both the screening and validation. SAH is associated with marked changes in the cerebrospinal fluid miRNA profile. These changes could be associated to the development of DCI. URL: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT01791257. © 2017 The Authors.

  20. Closure of cerebrospinal fluid leakage after transsphenoidal surgery: technical note.

    PubMed

    Freidberg, S R; Hybels, R L; Bohigian, R K

    1994-07-01

    It is necessary to pack the sella turcica to prevent the leakage of cerebrospinal fluid after transsphenoidal surgery if the arachnoid has been torn. The packing is usually supported by nasal cartilage. If this is not available, we recommend the Synthes minifragment plate to support the intradural pack.

  1. Entamoeba histolytica meningoencephalitis diagnosed by trophozoites in cerebrospinal fluid

    PubMed Central

    Goh, L M L; Marrone, J R

    2013-01-01

    Entamoeba histolytica meningoencephalitis has not been described in the modern literature, which is distinct from that caused by free-living amoebae. We report the first case of E. histolytica meningoencephalitis without liver or brain abscesses. Cerebrospinal fluid revealed 2 + very motile trophozoites. Our patient was successfully treated with intravenous metronidazole. PMID:25356319

  2. Entamoeba histolytica meningoencephalitis diagnosed by trophozoites in cerebrospinal fluid.

    PubMed

    Goh, L M L; Marrone, J R

    2013-10-01

    Entamoeba histolytica meningoencephalitis has not been described in the modern literature, which is distinct from that caused by free-living amoebae. We report the first case of E. histolytica meningoencephalitis without liver or brain abscesses. Cerebrospinal fluid revealed 2 + very motile trophozoites. Our patient was successfully treated with intravenous metronidazole.

  3. Minimally invasive procedures on the lumbar spine

    PubMed Central

    Skovrlj, Branko; Gilligan, Jeffrey; Cutler, Holt S; Qureshi, Sheeraz A

    2015-01-01

    Degenerative disease of the lumbar spine is a common and increasingly prevalent condition that is often implicated as the primary reason for chronic low back pain and the leading cause of disability in the western world. Surgical management of lumbar degenerative disease has historically been approached by way of open surgical procedures aimed at decompressing and/or stabilizing the lumbar spine. Advances in technology and surgical instrumentation have led to minimally invasive surgical techniques being developed and increasingly used in the treatment of lumbar degenerative disease. Compared to the traditional open spine surgery, minimally invasive techniques require smaller incisions and decrease approach-related morbidity by avoiding muscle crush injury by self-retaining retractors, preventing the disruption of tendon attachment sites of important muscles at the spinous processes, using known anatomic neurovascular and muscle planes, and minimizing collateral soft-tissue injury by limiting the width of the surgical corridor. The theoretical benefits of minimally invasive surgery over traditional open surgery include reduced blood loss, decreased postoperative pain and narcotics use, shorter hospital length of stay, faster recover and quicker return to work and normal activity. This paper describes the different minimally invasive techniques that are currently available for the treatment of degenerative disease of the lumbar spine. PMID:25610845

  4. Automatic lumbar spine measurement in CT images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, Yunxiang; Zheng, Dong; Liao, Shu; Peng, Zhigang; Yan, Ruyi; Liu, Junhua; Dong, Zhongxing; Gong, Liyan; Zhou, Xiang Sean; Zhan, Yiqiang; Fei, Jun

    2017-03-01

    Accurate lumbar spine measurement in CT images provides an essential way for quantitative spinal diseases analysis such as spondylolisthesis and scoliosis. In today's clinical workflow, the measurements are manually performed by radiologists and surgeons, which is time consuming and irreproducible. Therefore, automatic and accurate lumbar spine measurement algorithm becomes highly desirable. In this study, we propose a method to automatically calculate five different lumbar spine measurements in CT images. There are three main stages of the proposed method: First, a learning based spine labeling method, which integrates both the image appearance and spine geometry information, is used to detect lumbar and sacrum vertebrae in CT images. Then, a multiatlases based image segmentation method is used to segment each lumbar vertebra and the sacrum based on the detection result. Finally, measurements are derived from the segmentation result of each vertebra. Our method has been evaluated on 138 spinal CT scans to automatically calculate five widely used clinical spine measurements. Experimental results show that our method can achieve more than 90% success rates across all the measurements. Our method also significantly improves the measurement efficiency compared to manual measurements. Besides benefiting the routine clinical diagnosis of spinal diseases, our method also enables the large scale data analytics for scientific and clinical researches.

  5. Strength gains through lumbar lordosis restoration

    PubMed Central

    Morningstar, Mark W

    2003-01-01

    Abstract Objective To test the hypothesis that restoring the lumbar lordosis will increase a patient's voluntary muscular strength and decrease back pain symptoms. Clinical Features A patient was diagnosed with mechanical low back pain. The initial radiographic study revealed a loss of the lumbar lordosis. The patient determined his maximum bench press prior to the treatment program. The treatment outcome was based upon post-intervention radiographs, a Borg pain scale, and the patient's post-intervention maximum bench press. Intervention and Outcome The treatment program consisted of warm-up exercises, spinal manipulation, rehabilitative exercises, neuromuscular re-education, and prescribed home care. The treatment period consisted of 12 visits in the first 4 weeks, followed by once weekly for another 12 weeks, for a total of 24 visits in 4 months. In the first month, the Borg scale decreased from 5/10 to 0/10, and after 4 months the lumbar lordosis was increased from 2° to 31°. The sacral base angle (Ferguson's angle) increased from 18° to 31°. The patient's maximum bench press also increased from 245 pounds to 305 pounds. Conclusion Restoration of the lumbar lordosis appears to have a positive effect on muscular strength. This study supports the previous premise that a lumbar lordosis provides an inherent mechanical advantage for strength and stability. PMID:19674610

  6. Economic impact of minimally invasive lumbar surgery

    PubMed Central

    Hofstetter, Christoph P; Hofer, Anna S; Wang, Michael Y

    2015-01-01

    Cost effectiveness has been demonstrated for traditional lumbar discectomy, lumbar laminectomy as well as for instrumented and noninstrumented arthrodesis. While emerging evidence suggests that minimally invasive spine surgery reduces morbidity, duration of hospitalization, and accelerates return to activites of daily living, data regarding cost effectiveness of these novel techniques is limited. The current study analyzes all available data on minimally invasive techniques for lumbar discectomy, decompression, short-segment fusion and deformity surgery. In general, minimally invasive spine procedures appear to hold promise in quicker patient recovery times and earlier return to work. Thus, minimally invasive lumbar spine surgery appears to have the potential to be a cost-effective intervention. Moreover, novel less invasive procedures are less destabilizing and may therefore be utilized in certain indications that traditionally required arthrodesis procedures. However, there is a lack of studies analyzing the economic impact of minimally invasive spine surgery. Future studies are necessary to confirm the durability and further define indications for minimally invasive lumbar spine procedures. PMID:25793159

  7. Effect of the drainage of cerebrospinal fluid in patients with aneurismal subarachnoid hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Qian, Cong; Yu, Xiaobo; Chen, Jingyin; Gu, Chi; Wang, Lin; Chen, Gao; Dai, Yuying

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background and objectives: Vasospasm-related injury such as delayed ischemic neurological defect (DIND) or cerebral infarction is an important prognostic factor for aneurismal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). Whether cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) drainage can achieve a better outcome in aneurismal SAH patients after coiling or clipping remains the subject of debate. Here, we report a meta-analysis of the related available literature to assess the effect of continuous CSF drainage on clinical outcomes in patients with aneurismal SAH. Methods: Case-control studies regarding the association between aneurismal SAH and CSF drainage were systematically identified through online databases (PubMed, Web of Science, Elsevier Science Direct, and Springer Link). Inclusion and exclusion criteria were defined for the eligible studies. The fixed-effects model was performed when homogeneity was indicated. Alternatively, the random-effects model was utilized. Results: This meta-analysis included 11 studies. Continuous CSF drainage obviously improved patients’ long-term outcome (odds ratio [OR] of 2.86, 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.37–5.98, P < 0.01). CSF drainage also reduced angiographic vasospasm (OR of 0.35, 95% CI, 0.23–0.51, P < 0.01), symptomatic vasospasm (OR of 0.32, 95% CI, 0.32–0.43, P < 0.01), and DIND (OR of 0.48, 95% CI, 0.25–0.91, P = 0.03), but there was no significant difference between the CSF drainage group and the no CSF drainage group on shunt-dependent hydrocephalus (SDHC) prevention (OR of 1.04, 95% CI, 0.52–2.07, P = 0.91). Further analysis on lumbar drainage (LD) and external ventricular drainage (EVD) indicated that LD had a better outcome (OR of 3.11, 95% CI, 1.18–8.23, P = 0.02), whereas no significant difference in vasospasm-related injury was detected between the groups (OR of 1.13, 95% CI, 0.54–2.37, P = 0.75). Conclusion: Continuous CSF drainage is an effective treatment for aneurismal SAH patients; lumbar drainage

  8. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI): Lumbar Spine (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... If You Have Questions en español Resonancia magnética: columna lumbar What It Is Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) ... MORE ON THIS TOPIC Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI): Cervical Spine Lumbar Puncture (Spinal Tap) Magnetic Resonance Imaging ( ...

  9. Cerebral vasospasm following intracranial hypotension caused by cerebrospinal fluid leak from an incidental lumbar durotomy. Case report.

    PubMed

    Chaves, Claudia; Freidberg, Stephen R; Lee, Grace; Zerris, Vasilios; Ries, Sarah; Chavali, Ram

    2005-01-01

    The authors report on the unusual case of a patient with intracranial hypotension following an incidental durotomy complicated by an extensive but reversible cerebral vasospasm. Despite the dural tear repair and correction of the intracranial hypotension, the vasospasm ran its course. The precise mechanism of the cerebral vasospasm in this patient is unclear.

  10. Examination of the Content Specificity of Posttraumatic Cognitions in Combat Veterans With Posttraumatic Stress Disorder.

    PubMed

    Raab, Phillip A; Mackintosh, Margaret-Anne; Gros, Daniel F; Morland, Leslie A

    2015-01-01

    Cognitive theories have proposed the idea of content specificity, which holds that emotional disorders are associated with unique sets of negative cognitions. The existent research exploring the content specificity related to posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and depression is sparse, and research is especially needed in veteran samples. The purpose of this study was to examine the associations of PTSD symptom clusters and comorbid depressive symptoms with posttraumatic cognitions. This study was cross-sectional in design, and the sample consisted of data from 150 male combat veterans with PTSD drawn from the baseline assessments of a large clinical trial. Analyses involved a series of separate and simultaneous linear regressions to examine the unique associations of comorbid depressive symptoms and PTSD symptom clusters with posttraumatic cognitions, as well as post hoc analyses to examine the mediational role of comorbid depressive symptoms. Findings demonstrated that posttraumatic negative cognitions about the self and self-blame were most strongly associated with comorbid depressive symptoms and the depression-related PTSD numbing cluster. Comorbid depressive symptoms also partially mediated nearly all the relationships between posttraumatic cognitions and PTSD symptom clusters. The findings of this study suggest that posttraumatic cognitions about the self and self-blame are not specific to PTSD but rather are more strongly related to symptoms of depression and negative affect. The results also suggest a potential pathway from posttraumatic cognitions to PTSD through the partially mediating influence of comorbid depression, and highlight the need to assess and treat comorbid depression in veterans with PTSD.

  11. Effect of Lumbar Progressive Resistance Exercise on Lumbar Muscular Strength and Core Muscular Endurance in Soldiers.

    PubMed

    Mayer, John M; Childs, John D; Neilson, Brett D; Chen, Henian; Koppenhaver, Shane L; Quillen, William S

    2016-11-01

    Low back pain is common, costly, and disabling for active duty military personnel and veterans. The evidence is unclear on which management approaches are most effective. The purpose of this study was to assess the effectiveness of lumbar extensor high-intensity progressive resistance exercise (HIPRE) training versus control on improving lumbar extension muscular strength and core muscular endurance in soldiers. A randomized controlled trial was conducted with active duty U.S. Army Soldiers (n = 582) in combat medic training at Fort Sam Houston, Texas. Soldiers were randomized by platoon to receive the experimental intervention (lumbar extensor HIPRE training, n = 298) or control intervention (core stabilization exercise training, n = 284) at one set, one time per week, for 11 weeks. Lumbar extension muscular strength and core muscular endurance were assessed before and after the intervention period. At 11-week follow-up, lumbar extension muscular strength was 9.7% greater (p = 0.001) for HIPRE compared with control. No improvements in core muscular endurance were observed for HIPRE or control. Lumbar extensor HIPRE training is effective to improve isometric lumbar extension muscular strength in U.S. Army Soldiers. Research is needed to explore the clinical relevance of these gains. Reprint & Copyright © 2016 Association of Military Surgeons of the U.S.

  12. The lumbar lordosis below Harrington instrumentation for scoliosis.

    PubMed

    Swank, S M; Mauri, T M; Brown, J C

    1990-03-01

    This retrospective study evaluates lumbar lordosis in 43 patients before and after Harrington instrumentation into the lumbar spine. The authors measured overall lumbar lordosis, lordosis of unfused lumbar levels, and sagittal vertical axis. Lordosis decreased progressively in lower levels of fusion. The increase in lordosis below the fusion did not compensate for the overall loss of lordosis. The sagittal vertical axis moved forward, producing a subtle, asymptomatic form of flat back syndrome.

  13. Imaging of current spinal hardware: lumbar spine.

    PubMed

    Ha, Alice S; Petscavage-Thomas, Jonelle M

    2014-09-01

    The purposes of this article are to review the indications for and the materials and designs of hardware more commonly used in the lumbar spine; to discuss alternatives for each of the types of hardware; to review normal postoperative imaging findings; to describe the appropriateness of different imaging modalities for postoperative evaluation; and to show examples of hardware complications. Stabilization and fusion of the lumbar spine with intervertebral disk replacement, artificial ligaments, spinous process distraction devices, plate-and-rod systems, dynamic posterior fusion devices, and newer types of material incorporation are increasingly more common in contemporary surgical practice. These spinal hardware devices will be seen more often in radiology practice. Successful postoperative radiologic evaluation of this spinal hardware necessitates an understanding of fundamental hardware design, physiologic objectives, normal postoperative imaging appearances, and unique complications. Radiologists may have little training and experience with the new and modified types of hardware used in the lumbar spine.

  14. Cervical Meningomyelitis After Lumbar Epidural Steroid Injection

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Joon-Sung; Kim, Ji Yeon

    2015-01-01

    Epidural steroid injections (ESI) are a common treatment for back pain management. ESI-related complications have increased with the growing number of procedures. We report a case of cervical meningomyelitis followed by multiple lumbar ESI. A 60-year-old male with diabetes mellitus presented to our hospital with severe neck pain. He had a history of multiple lumbar injections from a local pain clinic. After admission, high fever and elevated inflammatory values were detected. L-spine magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed hematoma in the S1 epidural space. Antibiotic treatment began under the diagnosis of a lumbar epidural abscess. Despite the treatment, he started to complain of weakness in both lower extremities. Three days later, the weakness progressed to both upper extremities. C-spine MRI revealed cervical leptomeningeal enhancement in the medulla oblongata and cervical spinal cord. Removal of the epidural abscess was performed, but there was no neurological improvement. PMID:26161360

  15. Biomechanical implications of lumbar spinal ligament transection.

    PubMed

    Von Forell, Gregory A; Bowden, Anton E

    2014-11-01

    Many lumbar spine surgeries either intentionally or inadvertently damage or transect spinal ligaments. The purpose of this work was to quantify the previously unknown biomechanical consequences of isolated spinal ligament transection on the remaining spinal ligaments (stress transfer), vertebrae (bone remodelling stimulus) and intervertebral discs (disc pressure) of the lumbar spine. A finite element model of the full lumbar spine was developed and validated against experimental data and tested in the primary modes of spinal motion in the intact condition. Once a ligament was removed, stress increased in the remaining spinal ligaments and changes occurred in vertebral strain energy, but disc pressure remained similar. All major biomechanical changes occurred at the same spinal level as the transected ligament, with minor changes at adjacent levels. This work demonstrates that iatrogenic damage to spinal ligaments disturbs the load sharing within the spinal ligament network and may induce significant clinically relevant changes in the spinal motion segment.

  16. Concomitant cervical and lumbar intradural intramedullary lipoma.

    PubMed

    Muthusubramanian, Vikram; Pande, Anil; Vasudevan, Madhabushi Chakravarthy; Ramamurthi, Ravi

    2008-03-01

    Lipomas of the spinal cord are often a component of spinal dysraphic states. Nondysraphic intramedullary spinal cord lipomas are rare, and concomitant isolated cervical and lumbar intradural intramedullary lipomata are very rare. One patient with concomitant isolated nondysraphic cervical and lumbar spinal cord lipomata has been reported and management options discussed. A young girl presented with insidious-onset diffuse neck pain and early myelopathic signs. Conventional radiographs were normal. Magnetic resonance imaging of the whole neuraxis revealed concomitant cervical and lumbar intradural intramedullary lipoma. Subtotal resection of the lesion was performed at both levels, after which the patient improved symptomatically and was ambulant independently. Concomitant intradural lipomas at 2 different locations unassociated with a dysraphic state is very rare. Magnetic resonance imaging with fat suppression study is the investigation of choice. Adequate decompression with subtotal removal is the treatment of choice.

  17. Blood brain barrier impairment is associated with cerebrospinal fluid markers of neuronal damage in HIV-positive patients.

    PubMed

    Calcagno, A; Atzori, C; Romito, A; Vai, D; Audagnotto, S; Stella, M L; Montrucchio, C; Imperiale, D; Di Perri, G; Bonora, S

    2016-02-01

    Blood brain barrier impairment occurs early in the course of infection by HIV and it may persist in a subset of patients despite effective antiretroviral treatment. We tested the hypothesis that HIV-positive patients with dysfunctional blood brain barrier may have altered biomarkers of neuronal damage. In adult HIV-positive highly active antiretroviral treatment (HAART)-treated patients (without central nervous system infections and undergoing lumbar punctures for clinical reasons) cerebrospinal fluid albumin to serum ratios (CSAR), total tau, phosphorylated tau, 1-42 beta amyloid, and neopterin were measured. In 101 adult patients, cerebrospinal fluid-to-serum albumin ratios were 4.8 (3.7-6.1) with 12 patients (11.9%) presenting age-defined impaired blood brain barrier. A significant correlation was observed between CSAR and total tau (p = 0.005), phosphorylated tau (p = 0.008), and 1-42 beta amyloid (p = 0.040). Patients with impaired blood brain barrier showed significantly higher total tau (201.6 vs. 87.3 pg/mL, p = 0.010), phosphorylated tau (35.3 vs. 32.1 ng/mL, p = 0.035), and 1-42 beta amyloid (1134 vs. 830 pg/mL, p = 0.045). Despite effective antiretroviral treatment, blood brain barrier impairment persists in some HIV-positive patients: it is associated with markers of neuronal damage and it was not associated with CSF neopterin concentrations.

  18. Benefit of cerebrospinal fluid spectrophotometry in the assessment of CT scan negative suspected subarachnoid haemorrhage: a diagnostic accuracy study.

    PubMed

    Hann, Angus; Chu, Kevin; Greenslade, Jaimi; Williams, Julian; Brown, Anthony

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to determine if performing cerebrospinal fluid spectrophotometry in addition to visual inspection detects more ruptured cerebral aneurysms than performing cerebrospinal fluid visual inspection alone in patients with a normal head CT scan but suspected of suffering an aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH). We performed a single-centre retrospective study of patients presenting to the emergency department of a tertiary hospital who underwent both head CT scan and lumbar puncture to exclude SAH. The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV) and negative predictive value (NPV) of an approach utilising both spectrophotometry and visual inspection (combined approach) was compared to visual inspection alone. A total of 409 patients (mean age 37.8 years, 56.2% female) were recruited and six (1.5%) had a cerebral aneurysm on angiography. The sensitivity of visual inspection was 50% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 12.4-82.6%), specificity was 99% (95% CI: 97.5-99.7%), PPV was 42.9% (95% CI: 10.4-81.3%) and NPV was 99.2% (95% CI: 97.8-99.8%). The combined approach had a sensitivity of 100% (95% CI: 54.1-100%), specificity of 79.7% (95% CI: 75.4-83.5%), PPV of 6.8% (95% CI: 2.6-14.3%) and a NPV of 100% (95% CI: 98.8-100%). The sensitivity of the combined approach was not significantly different to that of visual inspection alone (p=0.25). Visual inspection had a significantly higher specificity than the combined approach (p<0.01). The combined approach detected more cases of aneurysmal SAH than visual inspection alone, however the difference in sensitivity was not statistically significant. Visual xanthochromia should prompt angiography because of a superior specificity and PPV. Due to its reduced sensitivity, caution should be applied when using only visual inspection of the supernatant.

  19. A Foundation for Systems Anthropometry: Lumbar/Pelvic Kinematics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-02-01

    Roentgenographic Measurement of Lumbar Intervertebral Disc Height ." Spine , 6(2):154:158. Andriacchi, T., Schultz, A... measured , enabling coupled motion (Wite and Panjabi, 1978), for example, in lateral bending of the lumbar spine , to be investigated. Two different...to seated position. They describe measured positions of the lumbar spine , sacrum, and inncminate with anatomical landmarks important to

  20. [Lumbar disc protrusion in childhood. Description of a case].

    PubMed

    Lins, E; Basedow, H

    1976-02-01

    This is a case of lumbar disc protrusion in a 14 year old girl, with typical symptomatology. Special attention should be called to the rarity of this case. The clinical and myelographic diagnosis showed a lumbar herniation L 4/L5. Treatment was performed by lumbar hemilaminectomie. The post operative controll showed remission of the clinical findings.

  1. Early experience with automatic pressure-controlled cerebrospinal fluid drainage during thoracic endovascular aortic repair.

    PubMed

    Kotelis, Drosos; Bianchini, Claudio; Kovacs, Bence; Müller, Thomas; Bischoff, Moritz; Böckler, Dittmar

    2015-06-01

    To report initial experience with automatic pressure-controlled cerebrospinal fluid drainage (CSFD) during thoracic endovascular aortic repair (TEVAR). A prospective nonrandomized study enrolled 30 consecutive patients (median age 68 years, range 42-89; 18 men) who underwent TEVAR between March 2012 and July 2013 and were considered to be at high risk for postoperative spinal cord ischemia (SCI), fulfilling 2 of the following criteria: stent-graft length >20 cm, left subclavian artery coverage, and previous infrarenal aortic repair. All patients received perioperative CSFD via the LiquoGuard system. The protocol aimed for a CSF pressure of 10 mm Hg and duration of CSFD of 3 or 7 days in asymptomatic or symptomatic patients, respectively. Muscle strength of the lower extremities was assessed with the Oxford muscle strength grading scale. Completion of the CSFD protocol was achieved in 26 (87%) of 30 patients. CSFD was prematurely stopped due to catheter dislocation in 1 patient and bloody spinal fluid in 3 patients. CSFD was performed for a median of 3 days (range 1-7). Median total CSFD volume was 714 mL (range 13-2369), with a median 192 mL drained per 24 hours. The SCI rate was 3% (1/30). CSFD-related complications were observed in 33% of the patients: 1 fatal intracranial hemorrhage, 3 bloody spinal fluid episodes, 3 persistent CSF leaks requiring epidural blood patch, and 3 post lumbar puncture headaches. Mortality during a median follow-up of 16 months (range 10-25) was 3% (1/30). Prophylactic CSFD was associated with a low SCI rate in a high-risk patient collective undergoing TEVAR. Monitoring and drainage by an automatic modus was feasible, reproducible, and reliable but associated with relevant drainage-associated complications. © The Author(s) 2015.

  2. Regional cortical thinning and cerebrospinal biomarkers predict worsening daily functioning across the Alzheimer disease spectrum

    PubMed Central

    Marshall, Gad A.; Lorius, Natacha; Locascio, Joseph J.; Hyman, Bradley T.; Rentz, Dorene M.; Johnson, Keith A.; Sperling, Reisa A.

    2014-01-01

    Background Impairment in instrumental activities of daily living (IADL) heralds the transition from mild cognitive impairment (MCI) to dementia and is a major source of burden for both the patient and caregiver. Objective To investigate the relationship between IADL and regional cortical thinning and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) Alzheimer disease (AD) biomarkers cross-sectionally and longitudinally in clinically normal (CN) elderly, MCI, and mild AD dementia subjects. Methods Two hundred and twenty nine CN, 395 MCI, and 188 AD dementia subjects participating in the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative underwent baseline magnetic resonance imaging, baseline lumbar puncture, and clinical assessments, including the Functional Activities Questionnaire used to measure IADL, every 6 to 12 months up to 3 years. General linear regression and mixed effects models were employed. Results IADL impairment was associated with the interactions between lower inferior temporal cortical thickness and diagnosis (p<0.0001), greater lateral occipital cortical thickness and diagnosis (p<0.0001), and greater amyloid-beta 1-42 (Aβ1-42) and diagnosis (p=0.0002) at baseline (driven by AD dementia). Lower baseline supramarginal (p=0.02) and inferior temporal (p=0.05) cortical thickness, lower Aβ1-42 (p<0.0001), and greater total tau (t-tau) (p=0.02) were associated with greater rate of IADL impairment over time. Conclusions Temporal atrophy is associated with IADL impairment in mild AD dementia at baseline, while baseline parietal and temporal atrophy, lower CSF Aβ1-42, and greater t-tau predict worsening IADL impairment over time across the AD spectrum. These results emphasize the importance of assessing IADL at the stage of MCI and even at the transition from CN to MCI. PMID:24685624

  3. Cerebrospinal fluid white cell count: discriminatory or otherwise for enteroviral meningitis in infants and young children?

    PubMed

    Tan, Natalie Woon Hui; Lee, Elis Yuexian; Khoo, Gloria Mei Chin; Tee, Nancy Wen Sim; Krishnamoorthy, Subramania; Choong, Chew Thye

    2016-04-01

    Non-polio enteroviruses (EV) are the most common viruses causing aseptic meningitis in children. We aim to evaluate the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) characteristics of neonates and children with EV meningitis with a view to determine whether it could be discriminatory or otherwise in making a positive diagnosis. We performed a 3-year (July 2008-July 2011) retrospective study of children ≤16 years, treated at a tertiary children's hospital, with positive CSF EV polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and negative blood and CSF bacterial cultures. A total of 206 children were studied. The median CSF white cell count was 79 cells/mm(3) (range 0-4608 cells/mm(3)). CSF pleocytosis was observed in 99/150 (66%) aged ≤90 days, 3/4 (75%) aged 90 days-1 year, and 49/52 (94%) children ≥3 years. There was a huge variability in CSF pleocytosis in infants ≤90 days, where 34% of them had no pleocytosis, while in 66%, a wide range of pleocytosis that might even suggest bacterial meningitis was noted. CSF red cells were low, and protein or sugar values were not discriminatory. CSF pleocytosis in relation to increasing age was found to be statistically significant (p < 0.001). Early lumbar puncture within 48 h of symptoms and absence of CSF pleocytosis was also statistically significant (p = 0.039). CSF pleocytosis in EV meningitis is commoner in older children. As there was a huge variability in CSF pleocytosis in infants ≤90 days particularly, CSF analysis including EV PCR could avoid unnecessary antibiotic therapy.

  4. Cerebrospinal fluid asparagine depletion during pegylated asparaginase therapy in children with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia.

    PubMed

    Henriksen, Louise T; Nersting, Jacob; Raja, Raheel A; Frandsen, Thomas L; Rosthøj, Steen; Schrøder, Henrik; Albertsen, Birgitte K

    2014-07-01

    L-asparaginase is an important drug in the treatment of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL). Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) asparagine depletion is considered a marker of asparaginase effect in the central nervous system (CNS) and may play a role in CNS-directed anti-leukaemia therapy. The objective of this study was to describe CSF asparagine depletion during 30 weeks of pegylated asparaginase therapy, 1000 iu/m(2) i.m. every second week, and to correlate CSF asparagine concentration with serum L-asparaginase enzyme activity. Danish children (1-17 years) with ALL, treated according to the Nordic Society of Paediatric Haematology and Oncology ALL2008 protocol, standard and intermediate risk, were included. CSF samples were obtained throughout L-asparaginase treatment at every scheduled lumbar puncture. A total of 128 samples from 31 patients were available for analysis. Median CSF asparagine concentration decreased from a pre-treatment level of 5·3 μmol/l to median levels ≤1·5 μmol/l. However, only 4/31 patients (five samples) had CSF asparagine concentrations below the limit of detection (0·1 μmol/l). In 11 patients, 24 paired same day serum and CSF samples were obtained. A decrease in CSF asparagine corresponded to serum enzyme activities above 50 iu/l. Higher serum enzyme activities were not followed by more extensive depletion. In conclusion, pegylated asparaginase 1000 iu/m(2) i.m. every second week effectively reduced CSF asparagine levels.

  5. Modified Graded Repair of Cerebrospinal Fluid Leaks in Endoscopic Endonasal Transsphenoidal Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jae-Hyun; Choi, Jai Ho; Kim, Young-Il; Kim, Sung Won

    2015-01-01

    Objective Complete sellar floor reconstruction is critical to avoid postoperative cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leakage during transsphenoidal surgery. Recently, the pedicled nasoseptal flap has undergone many modifications and eventually proved to be valuable and efficient. However, using these nasoseptal flaps in all patients who undergo transsphenoidal surgery, including those who had none or only minor CSF leakage, appears to be overly invasive and time-consuming. Methods Patients undergoing endoscopic endonasal transsphenoidal tumor surgery within a 5 year-period were reviewed. Since 2009, we classified the intraoperative CSF leakage into grades from 0 to 3. Sellar floor reconstruction was tailored to each leak grade. We did not use any tissue grafts such as abdominal fat and did not include any procedures of CSF diversions such as lumbar drainage. Results Among 200 cases in 188 patients (147 pituitary adenoma and 41 other pathologies), intraoperative CSF leakage was observed in 27.4% of 197 cases : 14.7% Grade 1, 4.6% Grade 2a, 3.0% Grade 2b, and 5.1% Grade 3. Postoperative CSF leakage was observed in none of the cases. Septal bone buttress was used for Grade 1 to 3 leakages instead of any other foreign materials. Pedicled nasoseptal flap was used for Grades 2b and 3 leakages. Unused septal bones and nasoseptal flaps were repositioned. Conclusion Modified classification of intraoperative CSF leaks and tailored repair technique in a multilayered fashion using an en-bloc harvested septal bone and vascularized nasoseptal flaps is an effective and reliable method for the prevention of postoperative CSF leaks. PMID:26279811

  6. Effects of Lowering Cerebrospinal Fluid Pressure on the Shape of the Peripapillary Retina in Intracranial Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Sibony, Patrick; Kupersmith, Mark J.; Honkanen, Robert; Rohlf, F. James; Torab-Parhiz, Ali

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. To analyze the deformations of the peripapillary retinal pigment epithelium–basement membrane (ppRPE/BM) layer in response to procedures that lower intracranial pressure (ICP). Second, to demonstrate how shape changes may complement the mean retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) thickness as a measure of intracranial hypertension (ICH) and papilledema. Methods. We used geometric morphometrics on spectral-domain optical coherence tomography images to analyze shape change of the ppRPE/BM layer after several interventions that lower cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) pressure. We also evaluated the effects of pressure-lowering interventions on both the anterior–posterior displacement of ppRPE/BM and the mean RNFL thickness. Forty-one patients with ICH and papilledema were studied before and after lumbar puncture (20), CSF shunt (9), and medical treatment of idiopathic ICH (23). We also compared the shape of 30 normal subjects to 23 patients whose papilledema resolved after medical treatment. Results. The ppRPE/BM-layer in ICH and papilledema is characterized by an asymmetric anterior deformation that moves posteriorly and becomes more V-shaped after each pressure-lowering intervention. The differences were statistically significant for all three groups. These shape changes also occur in patients with ongoing ICH who have secondary optic atrophy (without papilledema). Posterior displacement at the margin of the ppRPE/BM layer correlated strongly with overall shape changes. Conclusions. The subsurface contour of the ppRPE/BM layer is a dynamic property that changes with CSF pressure-lowering interventions. It can supplement the RNFL thickness as an indirect gauge of ICP and is particularly helpful in patients with secondary optic atrophy. Direct measurements of displacement at the basement membrane opening may serve as a more convenient office-based surrogate for shape analysis. PMID:25406288

  7. Low cerebrospinal fluid hypocretin levels during sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) risk period.

    PubMed

    Lancien, Marion; Inocente, Clara Odilia; Dauvilliers, Yves; Kugener, Beatrice; Scholz, Sabine; Raverot, Veronique; Lin, Jian-Sheng; Guyon, Aurore; Gustin, Marie-Paule; Franco, Patricia

    2017-05-01

    The temporal association between sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) and sleep suggests that the arousability from sleep provides a protective mechanism for survival. Recently, the hypocretin system, which promotes wakefulness, has been implicated in SIDS, since it has been reported that SIDS victims have fewer hypocretin neurons than infants who have died from other causes. To understand the role of hypocretin in SIDS, it is essential to better understand how this system matures. The present study compared cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) hypocretin in children aged 2-6 months, which is the age of peak incidence for SIDS, to both younger and older children. Hypocretin levels were measured in CSF samples from 101 children who underwent a clinically relevant lumbar puncture. Children were separated into five age groups: 0-2 months, 2-6 months, 1-5 years, 5-10 years, and 10-18 years. Hypocretin levels were not significantly different between 1-5 years, 5-10 years, and 10-18 years. Therefore, these three groups were pooled into a single one (1-18 years) for further analysis. Between the 0-2 month, 2-6 month, and 1-18 year groups, a significant difference in CSF hypocretin levels existed (p = 0.001). Simple comparisons showed that CSF hypocretin levels in the 2-6 month age group were significantly lower than hypocretin levels in both the 0-2 month and 1-18 year group (p < 0.001 and p = 0.008, respectively), but not significantly between 0-2 month and 1-18 year children. The CSF hypocretin levels were lower at the age of peak incidence for SIDS. This could underlie an increased vulnerability to SIDS at this specific age. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  8. Proteomic analysis of the cerebrospinal fluid of patients with restless legs syndrome/Willis-Ekbom disease.

    PubMed

    Patton, Stephanie M; Cho, Yong Won; Clardy, Thomas W; Allen, Richard P; Earley, Christopher J; Connor, James R

    2013-06-07

    Restless Legs Syndrome/Willis-Ekbom Disease (RLS/WED) is a sensorimotor disorder that causes patients to experience overwhelming and distressing sensations in the legs compelling the patient to move their legs to provide relief. The purpose of this study was to determine if biomarkers in the cerebrospinal fluid can distinguish RLS/WED patients from neurological controls. We obtained CSF samples by lumbar puncture from 5 early-onset RLS/WED patients and 5 controls. We performed 2-dimensional difference in-gel electrophoresis (2D-DIGE). Proteins that were significantly altered were identified by Student's t-test. Protein spots that were differentially expressed (p ≤ 0.05, Av. Ratio ≥ 2.0) between RLS/WED and control CSF samples were identified using MALDI-TOF-MS. Statistical analyses of the validation immunoblot assays were performed using Student's t-test. In this discovery study we identified 6 candidate CSF protein markers for early-onset RLS/WED. Four proteins (Cystatin C, Lipocalin-type Prostaglandin D2 Synthase, Vitamin D binding Protein, and β-Hemoglobin) were increased and 2 proteins (Apolipoprotein A1 and α-1-acid Glycoprotein) were decreased in RLS/WED patients. Our results reveal a protein profile in the RLS/WED CSF that is consistent with clinical findings of disruptive sleep, cardiovascular dysfunction and painful symptoms. Moreover, protein profiles are consistent with neuropathological findings of activation of hypoxia inducible factor (HIF) pathways and alterations in dopaminergic systems. These data indicate the CSF of RLS/WED patients may provide information relevant to biological basis for RLS/WED, treatment strategies and potential new treatment targets.

  9. Alzheimer's disease cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers are not influenced by gravity drip or aspiration extraction methodology.

    PubMed

    Rembach, Alan; Evered, Lisbeth A; Li, Qiao-Xin; Nash, Tabitha; Vidaurre, Lesley; Fowler, Christopher J; Pertile, Kelly K; Rumble, Rebecca L; Trounson, Brett O; Maher, Sarah; Mooney, Francis; Farrow, Maree; Taddei, Kevin; Rainey-Smith, Stephanie; Laws, Simon M; Macaulay, S Lance; Wilson, William; Darby, David G; Martins, Ralph N; Ames, David; Collins, Steven; Silbert, Brendan; Masters, Colin L; Doecke, James D

    2015-11-19

    Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarkers, although of established utility in the diagnostic evaluation of Alzheimer's disease (AD), are known to be sensitive to variation based on pre-analytical sample processing. We assessed whether gravity droplet collection versus syringe aspiration was another factor influencing CSF biomarker analyte concentrations and reproducibility. Standardized lumbar puncture using small calibre atraumatic spinal needles and CSF collection using gravity fed collection followed by syringe aspirated extraction was performed in a sample of elderly individuals participating in a large long-term observational research trial. Analyte assay concentrations were compared. For the 44 total paired samples of gravity collection and aspiration, reproducibility was high for biomarker CSF analyte assay concentrations (concordance correlation [95%CI]: beta-amyloid1-42 (Aβ42) 0.83 [0.71 - 0.90]), t-tau 0.99 [0.98 - 0.99], and phosphorylated tau (p-tau) 0.82 [95 % CI 0.71 - 0.89]) and Bonferroni corrected paired sample t-tests showed no significant differences (group means (SD): Aβ42 366.5 (86.8) vs 354.3 (82.6), p = 0.10; t-tau 83.9 (46.6) vs 84.7 (47.4) p = 0.49; p-tau 43.5 (22.8) vs 40.0 (17.7), p = 0.05). The mean duration of collection was 10.9 minutes for gravity collection and <1 minute for aspiration. Our results demonstrate that aspiration of CSF is comparable to gravity droplet collection for AD biomarker analyses but could considerably accelerate throughput and improve the procedural tolerability for assessment of CSF biomarkers.

  10. Cerebrospinal fluid Presenilin-1 increases at asymptomatic stage in genetically determined Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Sogorb-Esteve, Aitana; García-Ayllón, María-Salud; Fortea, Juan; Sánchez-Valle, Raquel; Lleó, Alberto; Molinuevo, José-Luis; Sáez-Valero, Javier

    2016-09-29

    Presenilin-1 (PS1), the active component of the intramembrane γ-secretase complex, can be detected as soluble heteromeric aggregates in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). The aim of this study was to examine the different soluble PS1 complexes in the lumbar CSF (CSF-PS1) of individuals with Alzheimer's disease (AD), particularly in both symptomatic and asymptomatic genetically determined AD, in order to evaluate their potential as early biomarkers. Western blotting, differential centrifugation and co-immunoprecipitation served to determine and characterize CSF-PS1 complexes. We also monitored the assembly of soluble PS1 into complexes in a cell model, and the participation of Aβ in the dynamics and robustness of the stable PS1 complexes. There was an age-dependent increase in CSF-PS1 levels in cognitively normal controls, the different complexes represented in similar proportions. The total levels of CSF-PS1, and in particular the proportion of the stable 100-150 kDa complexes, increased in subjects with autosomal dominant AD that carried PSEN1 mutations (eight symptomatic and six asymptomatic ADAD) and in Down syndrome individuals (ten demented and ten non-demented DS), compared with age-matched controls (n = 23), even prior to the appearance of symptoms of dementia. The proportion of stable CSF-PS1 complexes also increased in sporadic AD (n = 13) and mild-cognitive impaired subjects (n = 12), relative to age-matched controls (n = 17). Co-immunoprecipitation demonstrated the association of Aβ oligomers with soluble PS1 complexes, particularly the stable complexes. Our data suggest that CSF-PS1 complexes may be useful as an early biomarker for AD, reflecting the pathology at asymptomatic state.

  11. European Mitochondrial DNA Haplogroups are Associated with Cerebrospinal Fluid Biomarkers of Inflammation in HIV Infection

    PubMed Central

    Samuels, David C.; Kallianpur, Asha R.; Ellis, Ronald J.; Bush, William S.; Letendre, Scott; Franklin, Donald; Grant, Igor; Hulgan, Todd

    2017-01-01

    Background Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) haplogroups are ancestry-related patterns of single-nucleotide polymorphisms that are associated with differential mitochondrial function in model systems, neurodegenerative diseases in HIV-negative populations, and chronic complications of HIV infection, including neurocognitive impairment. We hypothesized that mtDNA haplogroups are associated with neuroinflammation in HIV-infected adults. Methods CNS HIV Antiretroviral Therapy Effects Research (CHARTER) is a US-based observational study of HIV-infected adults who underwent standardized neurocognitive assessments. Participants who consented to DNA collection underwent whole blood mtDNA sequencing, and a subset also underwent lumbar puncture. IL-6, IL-8, TNF-α (high-sensitivity), and IP-10 were measured in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) by immunoassay. Multivariable regression of mtDNA haplogroups and log-transformed CSF biomarkers were stratified by genetic ancestry using whole-genome nuclear DNA genotyping (European [EA], African [AA], or Hispanic ancestry [HA]), and adjusted for age, sex, antiretroviral therapy (ART), detectable CSF HIV RNA, and CD4 nadir. A total of 384 participants had both CSF cytokine measures and genetic data (45% EA, 44% AA, 11% HA, 22% female, median age 43 years, 74% on ART). Results In analyses stratified by the 3 continental ancestry groups, no haplogroups were significantly associated with the 4 biomarkers. In the subgroup of participants with undetectable plasma HIV RNA on ART, European haplogroup H participants had significantly lower CSF TNF-α (P = 0.001). Conclusions Lower CSF TNF-α may indicate lower neuroinflammation in the haplogroup H participants with well-controlled HIV on ART. PMID:28317034

  12. Computed tomography-guided epidural patching of postoperative cerebrospinal fluid leaks.

    PubMed

    Mihlon, Frank; Kranz, Peter G; Gafton, Andreia Roxana; Gray, Linda

    2014-11-01

    Cerebrospinal fluid leaks due to unrecognized durotomy during spinal surgery are often managed with a second surgery for dural closure. CT-guided percutaneous patching targeted to the dural defect offers an alternative to surgery since it can be performed in a minimally invasive fashion without the need for general anesthesia. This case series describes the authors' experience using targeted CT-guided percutaneous patching to repair incidental durotomies incurred during spinal surgery. This investigation is a retrospective case series involving patients who underwent CT-guided percutaneous patching of surgical incidental durotomies and were referred between January 2007 and June 2013. Their presenting clinical history, myelographic findings, and clinical outcomes, including the need for eventual surgical duraplasty, were reviewed. Nine cases were identified, including 7 durotomies incurred during lumbar discectomy, one due to a medial transpedicular screw breach, and one incurred during vertebrectomy for spinal osteosarcoma. All patients who had favorable outcomes with percutaneous intervention alone had 2 common features: dural defect of 4 mm or smaller and absence of a pseudomeningocele. Patients with CSF leaks complicated by pseudomeningocele and those with a dural defect of 6 mm or more all required eventual surgical management. The authors' results suggest that findings on CT myelography may help predict which patients with postsurgical durotomy can be treated with percutaneous intervention. In particular, CT-guided patching may be more likely to be successful in those patients with dural defects of less than 5 mm and without pseudomeningocele. In patients with larger dural defects or pseudomeningoceles, percutaneous blood patching alone is unlikely to be successful.

  13. Cerebrospinal fluid and plasma oxytocin concentrations are positively correlated and negatively predict anxiety in children.

    PubMed

    Carson, D S; Berquist, S W; Trujillo, T H; Garner, J P; Hannah, S L; Hyde, S A; Sumiyoshi, R D; Jackson, L P; Moss, J K; Strehlow, M C; Cheshier, S H; Partap, S; Hardan, A Y; Parker, K J

    2015-09-01

    The neuropeptide oxytocin (OXT) exerts anxiolytic and prosocial effects in the central nervous system of rodents. A number of recent studies have attempted to translate these findings by investigating the relationships between peripheral (e.g., blood, urinary and salivary) OXT concentrations and behavioral functioning in humans. Although peripheral samples are easy to obtain in humans, whether peripheral OXT measures are functionally related to central OXT activity remains unclear. To investigate a possible relationship, we quantified OXT concentrations in concomitantly collected cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and blood samples from child and adult patients undergoing clinically indicated lumbar punctures or other CSF-related procedures. Anxiety scores were obtained in a subset of child participants whose parents completed psychometric assessments. Findings from this study indicate that plasma OXT concentrations significantly and positively predict CSF OXT concentrations (r=0.56, P=0.0064, N=27). Moreover, both plasma (r=-0.92, P=0.0262, N=10) and CSF (r=-0.91, P=0.0335, N=10) OXT concentrations significantly and negatively predicted trait anxiety scores, consistent with the preclinical literature. Importantly, plasma OXT concentrations significantly and positively (r=0.96, P=0.0115, N=10) predicted CSF OXT concentrations in the subset of child participants who provided behavioral data. This study provides the first empirical support for the use of blood measures of OXT as a surrogate for central OXT activity, validated in the context of behavioral functioning. These preliminary findings also suggest that impaired OXT signaling may be a biomarker of anxiety in humans, and a potential target for therapeutic development in individuals with anxiety disorders.

  14. Slow wave sleep disruption increases cerebrospinal fluid amyloid-β levels.

    PubMed

    Ju, Yo-El S; Ooms, Sharon J; Sutphen, Courtney; Macauley, Shannon L; Zangrilli, Margaret A; Jerome, Gina; Fagan, Anne M; Mignot, Emmanuel; Zempel, John M; Claassen, Jurgen A H R; Holtzman, David M

    2017-08-01

    See Mander et al. (doi:10.1093/awx174) for a scientific commentary on this article.Sleep deprivation increases amyloid-β, suggesting that chronically disrupted sleep may promote amyloid plaques and other downstream Alzheimer's disease pathologies including tauopathy or inflammation. To date, studies have not examined which aspect of sleep modulates amyloid-β or other Alzheimer's disease biomarkers. Seventeen healthy adults (age 35-65 years) without sleep disorders underwent 5-14 days of actigraphy, followed by slow wave activity disruption during polysomnogram, and cerebrospinal fluid collection the following morning for measurement of amyloid-β, tau, total protein, YKL-40, and hypocretin. Data were compared to an identical protocol, with a sham condition during polysomnogram. Specific disruption of slow wave activity correlated with an increase in amyloid-β40 (r = 0.610, P = 0.009). This effect was specific for slow wave activity, and not for sleep duration or efficiency. This effect was also specific to amyloid-β, and not total protein, tau, YKL-40, or hypocretin. Additionally, worse home sleep quality, as measured by sleep efficiency by actigraphy in the six nights preceding lumbar punctures, was associated with higher tau (r = 0.543, P = 0.045). Slow wave activity disruption increases amyloid-β levels acutely, and poorer sleep quality over several days increases tau. These effects are specific to neuronally-derived proteins, which suggests they are likely driven by changes in neuronal activity during disrupted sleep. © The Author (2017). Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Guarantors of Brain. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  15. Overton's Rule Helps To Estimate the Penetration of Anti-Infectives into Patients' Cerebrospinal Fluid

    PubMed Central

    Djukic, Marija; Munz, Martin; Sörgel, Fritz; Holzgrabe, Ulrike; Eiffert, Helmut

    2012-01-01

    In 1900, Ernst Overton found that the entry of anilin dyes through the cell membranes of living cells depended on the lipophilicity of the dyes. The brain is surrounded by barriers consisting of lipid layers that possess several inward and outward active transport systems. In the absence of meningeal inflammation, the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) penetration of anti-infectives in humans estimated by the ratio of the area under the concentration-time curve (AUC) in CSF (AUCCSF) to that in serum (AUCCSF/AUCS) correlated positively with the lipid-water partition coefficient at pH 7.0 (log D) (Spearman's rank correlation coefficient rS = 0.40; P = 0.01) and negatively with the molecular mass (MM) (rS = −0.33; P = 0.04). The ratio of AUCCSF to the AUC of the fraction in serum that was not bound (AUCCSF/AUCS,free) strongly correlated with log D (rS = 0.67; P < 0.0001). In the presence of meningeal inflammation, AUCCSF/AUCS also correlated positively with log D (rS = 0.46; P = 0.002) and negatively with the MM (rS = −0.37; P = 0.01). The correlation of AUCCSF/AUCS,free with log D (rS = 0.66; P < 0.0001) was as strong as in the absence of meningeal inflammation. Despite these clear correlations, Overton's rule was able to explain only part of the differences in CSF penetration of the individual compounds. The site of CSF withdrawal (lumbar versus ventricular CSF), age of the patients, underlying diseases, active transport, and alterations in the pharmacokinetics by comedications also appeared to strongly influence the CSF penetration of the drugs studied. PMID:22106225

  16. Impact of frequent cerebrospinal fluid sampling on Aβ levels: systematic approach to elucidate influencing factors.

    PubMed

    Van Broeck, Bianca; Timmers, Maarten; Ramael, Steven; Bogert, Jennifer; Shaw, Leslie M; Mercken, Marc; Slemmon, John; Van Nueten, Luc; Engelborghs, Sebastiaan; Streffer, Johannes Rolf

    2016-05-19

    Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) amyloid-beta (Aβ) peptides are predictive biomarkers for Alzheimer's disease and are proposed as pharmacodynamic markers for amyloid-lowering therapies. However, frequent sampling results in fluctuating CSF Aβ levels that have a tendency to increase compared with baseline. The impact of sampling frequency, volume, catheterization procedure, and ibuprofen pretreatment on CSF Aβ levels using continuous sampling over 36 h was assessed. In this open-label biomarker study, healthy participants (n = 18; either sex, age 55-85 years) were randomized into one of three cohorts (n = 6/cohort; high-frequency sampling). In all cohorts except cohort 2 (sampling started 6 h post catheterization), sampling through lumbar catheterization started immediately post catheterization. Cohort 3 received ibuprofen (800 mg) before catheterization. Following interim data review, an additional cohort 4 (n = 6) with an optimized sampling scheme (low-frequency and lower volume) was included. CSF Aβ(1-37), Aβ(1-38), Aβ(1-40), and Aβ(1-42) levels were analyzed. Increases and fluctuations in mean CSF Aβ levels occurred in cohorts 1-3 at times of high-frequency sampling. Some outliers were observed (cohorts 2 and 3) with an extreme pronunciation of this effect. Cohort 4 demonstrated minimal fluctuation of CSF Aβ both on a group and an individual level. Intersubject variability in CSF Aβ profiles over time was observed in all cohorts. CSF Aβ level fluctuation upon catheterization primarily depends on the sampling frequency and volume, but not on the catheterization procedure or inflammatory reaction. An optimized low-frequency sampling protocol minimizes or eliminates fluctuation of CSF Aβ levels, which will improve the capability of accurately measuring the pharmacodynamic read-out for amyloid-lowering therapies. ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01436188 . Registered 15 September 2011.

  17. Importance and impact of preanalytical variables on Alzheimer disease biomarker concentrations in cerebrospinal fluid.

    PubMed

    Le Bastard, Nathalie; De Deyn, Peter Paul; Engelborghs, Sebastiaan

    2015-05-01

    Analyses of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarkers (β-amyloid protein, total tau protein, and hyperphosphorylated tau protein) are part of the diagnostic criteria of Alzheimer disease. Different preanalytical sample procedures contribute to variability of CSF biomarker concentrations, hampering between-laboratory comparisons. The aim of this study was to explore the influence of fractionated sampling, centrifugation, freezing temperature, freezing delay, and freeze-thaw cycles on CSF biomarker analyses. We studied fractionated sampling in sequential aliquots of lumbar CSF. Centrifuged and noncentrifuged samples from the same fraction were compared. CSF samples were subjected to different protocols (liquid nitrogen, -80 °C, and -20 °C; 24 h at 2-8 °C; and 24 and 48 h at room temperature). To study the influence of freeze-thaw cycles, samples were thawed up to 4 times and refrozen at -80 °C. CSF was collected in polypropylene tubes. We measured CSF biomarker concentrations with commercially available single-analyte Innotest assays. CSF biomarker concentrations from non-blood-contaminated samples are not influenced by centrifugation or fractionated sampling. Freezing temperature and delayed storage can affect biomarker concentrations; freezing of CSF samples at -80 °C as soon as possible after collection is recommended. Consecutive freezing and thawing of CSF samples up to 3 times had little effect. Temperature of freezing, delay until freezing, and freeze-thaw cycles significantly influence CSF biomarker concentrations, stressing the need for standard operating procedures for preanalytical sample handling. The differences observed in this study are, however, relatively small, and the impact on the clinical value of these CSF biomarkers needs to be determined. © 2015 American Association for Clinical Chemistry.

  18. Concordance between brain (18)F-FDG PET and cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers in diagnosing Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Rubí, S; Noguera, A; Tarongí, S; Oporto, M; García, A; Vico, H; Espino, A; Picado, M J; Mas, A; Peña, C; Amer, G

    2017-06-20

    Cortical posterior hypometabolism on PET imaging with (18)F-FDG (FDG-PET), and altered levels of Aß1-42 peptide, total Tau (tTau) and phosphorylated Tau (pTau) proteins in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) are established diagnostic biomarkers in Alzheimer's disease (AD). An evaluation has been made of the concordance and relationship between the results of FDG-PET and CSF biomarkers in symptomatic patients with suspected AD. A retrospective review was carried out on 120 patients with cognitive impairment referred to our Cognitive Neurology Unit, and who were evaluated by brain FDG-PET and a lumbar puncture for CSF biomarkers. In order to calculate their Kappa coefficient of concordance, the result of the FDG-PET and the set of the three CSF biomarkers in each patient was classified as normal, inconclusive, or AD-compatible. The relationship between the results of both methods was further assessed using logistic regression analysis, including the Aß1-42, tTau and pTau levels as quantitative predictors, and the FDG-PET result as the dependent variable. The weighted Kappa coefficient between FDG-PET and CSF biomarkers was 0.46 (95% CI: 0.35-0.57). Logistic regression analysis showed that the Aß1-42 and tTau values together were capable of discriminating an FDG-PET result metabolically suggestive of AD from one non-suggestive of AD, with a 91% sensitivity and 93% specificity at the cut-off line Aß1-42=44+1.3×tTau. The level of concordance between FDG-PET and CSF biomarkers was moderate, indicating their complementary value in diagnosing AD. The Aß1-42 and tTau levels in CSF help to predict the patient FDG-PET cortical metabolic status. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y SEMNIM. All rights reserved.

  19. Cerebrospinal fluid leaks after planned intradural spine surgery: a single-center analysis of 91 cases.

    PubMed

    Koechlin, Nicolas Olmo; Burkhardt, Jan-Karl; Scherer, Moritz; Krayenbühl, Niklaus; Sarnthein, Johannes; Bernays, René-Ludwig; Bozinov, Oliver

    2013-07-01

    BACKGROUND AND STUDY OBJECT: A leak-proof dura closure after elective surgery for intradural spinal lesions is important to achieve an uncomplicated postoperative course. Because many different closure techniques and dura substitutes exist, we tried to identify the superior material and technique to avoid cerebrospinal fluid leaks (CSFLs). Between 2004 and 2009, 91 patients underwent surgical treatment of intradural spinal pathologies with primary dura closure with or without the use of dura substitutes at our institution. Pre- and postoperative images and the clinical course were analyzed retrospectively with respect to the occurrence of CSFL. In 34% of the 91 patients, radiological signs of CSFL were observed. A total of 12 patients (13%) were symptomatic for CSFL and required a single puncture, lumbar drain, or surgical revision. No significant relation between CSFL and patient characteristics, underlying diagnosis, localization, or extension was noted. In contrast, the incidence of CSFL was significantly increased if more than one substitute for dura closure was used. The results showed that 41.7% of these patients showed radiological signs of CSFL as compared with 10.4% of patients in which only a single material was used. In our study, none of the applied products appeared to be superior to the others. Surgery with the combined use of multiple dura closure substitutes was associated with the enhanced incidence of postoperative CSFL. However, our findings concerning the various dura sealants could not be used to compare those different materials, due to the great variety of combinations of dura sealants and the retrospective analysis of the data. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  20. Body mass index has a linear relationship with cerebrospinal fluid pressure.

    PubMed

    Berdahl, John P; Fleischman, David; Zaydlarova, Jana; Stinnett, Sandra; Allingham, R Rand; Fautsch, Michael P

    2012-03-01

    To examine the relationship between body mass index (BMI) and cerebrospinal fluid pressure (CSFP), as low BMI and low CSFP have recently been described as risk factors for primary open-angle glaucoma (POAG). This was a retrospective review of the electronic medical records of patients who had CSFP measured by lumbar puncture and data to calculate BMI at the Mayo Clinic (Rochester, MN). Exclusion criteria included diagnoses, surgical procedures and medications known to affect CSFP. Mean CSFP for each unit BMI was calculated. The probabilities were two-tailed, and the α level was set at P < 0.05. Patients with documented BMI, CSFP, and intraocular pressure (IOP) were analyzed for the relationship between IOP and BMI. A total of 4235 patients, primarily of Caucasian descent, met the entry criteria. Median BMI was 26 and the mean CSFP was 10.9 ± 2.6 mm Hg. The increase in CSFP with increasing BMI was linear with an r(2) = 0.20 (P < 0.001). CSFP increased by 37.7% from BMI 18 (8.6 ± 2.1 mm Hg) to BMI 39 (14.1 ± 2.5 mm Hg). The r(2) (0.21) of the model of BMI and sex was similar to the r(2) of a BMI-only model (0.20). There was no relation between IOP and BMI within a subgroup of the study population (r (2) = 0.005; P = 0.14). CSFP has a positive, linear relationship with BMI. IOP is not influenced by BMI. If CSFP influences the risk for POAG, then individuals with a lower BMI may have an increased risk for developing POAG. Similarly, a higher BMI may be protective.

  1. Endovascular Management of Posttraumatic Arteriovenous Fistulae

    SciTech Connect

    Koshy, Chiramel George Keshava, Shyamkumar Nigudala; Surendrababu, Narayanam R. S.; Moses, Vinu; Stephen, Edwin; Agarwal, Sunil

    2009-09-15

    Surgery is considered to be the treatment of choice for vascular injuries caused by trauma. However, endovascular techniques are emerging as an alternative means of treatment. In this article, we describe three patients with posttraumatic arteriovenous fistulae in different body regions that were managed using endovascular techniques. Each case had its unique set of associated problems requiring innovative methods and a multidisciplinary approach. While the short-term results are encouraging, long-term follow-up of posttraumatic arteriovenous fistulae that have been treated with endovascular techniques is still required.

  2. Lumbar microendoscopic discectomy: surgical technique and nuances.

    PubMed

    Azab, Waleed A; Nasim, Khurram; Najibullah, Mostafa

    2016-04-01

    Lumbar microendoscopic discectomy (MED) is a minimally invasive transmuscular approach that combines standard lumbar microsurgical techniques with endoscopy. MED advantages include reduced tissue trauma, direct visualization of the nerve root and disc disease, and allowing bony decompression in cases with spinal or lateral recess stenosis. Operative charts and videos of patients undergoing MED were retrieved from our database and reviewed. A description of the surgical technique was then formulated. The surgical technique of MED is described and is essentially similar to conventional microdiscectomy. Some modifications are, however, necessary owing to the difference between microscopic and endoscopic views.

  3. DEGENERATIVE STENOSIS OF THE LUMBAR SPINE

    PubMed Central

    Zylbersztejn, Sérgio; Spinelli, Leandro de Freitas; Rodrigues, Nilson Rodinei; Werlang, Pablo Mariotti; Kisaki, Yorito; Rios, Aldemar Roberto Mieres; Bello, Cesar Dall

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents an update on degenerative stenosis of the lumbar spine, which is a common pathological condition among patients over the age of 65 years. The anamnesis and physical examination need to be precise, since radiography often only provides indirect signs. Magnetic resonance imaging is necessary if the symptoms persist. The treatment for lumbar stenosis is a matter of controversy. However, there seems to be some benefit from surgical treatment rather than conservative treatment, such that surgery brings improvements in symptoms and functions for a period of up to two years. PMID:27042635

  4. Lumbar vertebral pedicles: radiologic anatomy and pathology

    SciTech Connect

    Patel, N.P.; Kumar, R.; Kinkhabwala, M.; Wengrover, S.I.

    1988-01-01

    With the advancement of high-resolution computed tomography (CT) scanning the spine has added new knowledge to the various conditions affecting the pedicles. We wish to review the entire spectrum of pedicular lesions: the embryology, normal anatomy, normal variants, pitfalls, congenital anomalies, and pathological conditions are discussed. Different imaging modalities involving CT, isotope bone scanning, and Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) are used to complement plain films of the lumbar spine. This subject review is an excellent source for future reference to lumbar pedicular lesions. 27 references.

  5. Computed tomography of the postoperative lumbar spine

    SciTech Connect

    Teplick, J.G.; Haskin, M.E.

    1983-11-01

    In the postoperative patient ordinary radiographs of the spine generally add very little information, revealing the usual postoperative bone changes and often postoperative narrowing of the intervertebral space. Myelography may sometimes be informative, showing evidence of focal arachnoiditis or a focal defect at the surgical site. However, the latter finding is difficult to interpret. As experience with high-resolution CT scanning of the lumbar spine has been increasing, it is becoming apparent that this noninvasive and easily performed study can give considerably more information about the postoperative spine than any of the other current imaging methods. About 750 patients with previous lumbar laminectomies had CT scanning within a 28 month period.

  6. Mini-open anterior lumbar interbody fusion.

    PubMed

    Gandhoke, Gurpreet S; Ricks, Christian; Tempel, Zachary; Zuckerbraun, Brian; Hamilton, D Kojo; Okonkwo, David O; Kanter, Adam S

    2016-07-01

    In deformity surgery, anterior lumbar interbody fusion provides excellent biomechanical support, creates a broad surface area for arthrodesis, and induces lordosis in the lower lumbar spine. Preoperative MRI, plain radiographs, and, when available, CT scan should be carefully assessed for sacral slope as it relates to pubic symphysis, position of the great vessels (especially at L4/5), disc space height, or contraindication to an anterior approach. This video demonstrates the steps in an anterior surgical procedure with minimal open exposure. The video can be found here: https://youtu.be/r3bC4_vu1hQ .

  7. Iatrogenic lumbar meningocoele: report of three cases

    PubMed Central

    Rinaldi, Italo; Hodges, Thomas O.

    1970-01-01

    We have reported three cases of iatrogenic lumbar meningocoeles after surgery for herniated lumbar intervertebral discs. We reject the term spurious, pseudo, or false as given by earlier writers. We feel that, in reality, these sacs are true meningocoeles, with complete arachnoidal lining and freely communicating with the intraspinal subarachnoid space. We have also given a brief outline of the clinical features, elucidated the mechanisms operative in the production of symptoms, and suggested the cardinal features of radiographic diagnosis. Prevention is, of course, the best way to avoid this complication. If a dural tear does occur, every effort should be made to suture it in a watertight manner. Images PMID:4918460

  8. Comparison of enterovirus detection in cerebrospinal fluid with Bacterial Meningitis Score in children.

    PubMed

    Pires, Frederico Ribeiro; Franco, Andréia Christine Bonotto Farias; Gilio, Alfredo Elias; Troster, Eduardo Juan

    2017-01-01

    To measure the role of enterovirus detection in cerebrospinal fluid compared with the Bacterial Meningitis Score in children with meningitis. A retrospective cohort based on analysis of medical records of pediatric patients diagnosed as meningitis, seen at a private and tertiary hospital in São Paulo, Brazil, between 2011 and 2014. Excluded were patients with critical illness, purpura, ventricular shunt or recent neurosurgery, immunosuppression, concomitant bacterial infection requiring parenteral antibiotic therapy, and those who received antibiotics 72 hours before lumbar puncture. The study included 503 patients. Sixty-four patients were excluded and 94 were not submitted to all tests for analysis. Of the remaining 345 patients, 7 were in the Bacterial Meningitis Group and 338 in the Aseptic Meningitis Group. There was no statistical difference between the groups. In the Bacterial Meningitis Score analysis, of the 338 patients with possible aseptic meningitis (negative cultures), 121 of them had one or more points in the Bacterial Meningitis Score, with sensitivity of 100%, specificity of 64.2%, and negative predictive value of 100%. Of the 121 patients with positive Bacterial Meningitis Score, 71% (86 patients) had a positive enterovirus detection in cerebrospinal fluid. Enterovirus detection in cerebrospinal fluid was effective to differentiate bacterial from viral meningitis. When the test was analyzed together with the Bacterial Meningitis Score, specificity was higher when compared to Bacterial Meningitis Score alone. Avaliar o papel da pesquisa de enterovírus no líquido cefalorraquidiano em comparação com o Escore de Meningite Bacteriana em crianças com meningite. Coorte retrospectiva, realizada pela análise de prontuários, incluindo pacientes pediátricos, com diagnóstico de meningite e atendidos em um hospital privado e terciário, localizado em São Paulo, entre 2011 e 2014. Foram excluídos os pacientes com doença crítica, púrpura, deriva

  9. [Therapy of the neurosurgical postoperative culture negative meningitis by using external lumbar drainage combined with empirical antibiotics treatment].

    PubMed

    Hong, Jian; Wu, Jianjuan; Chen, Budong; Yao, Xin; Yang, Yushan

    2016-05-01

    To evaluate the curative effect of external lumbar drainage combined with empirical antibiotics treatment on the postoperative culture negative meningitis. The clinical data of eighty post-operative meningitis patients with cerebrospinal fluid culture negative were retrospectively analyzed according to inclusive and exclusive criteria from January 2013 to December 2014 in Department of Neurosurgery, Tianjin Huanhu Hospital. All patients were composed of 45 male cases and 35 female cases, aging from 9 to 72 years. All patients were divided into two groups according to receiving the different treatment: one group only receiving a intravenously empirical antibiotics treatment (n=40), another group receiving a combined therapy of external lumbar drainage and intravenously empirical antibiotics treatment (n=40). The volume of drainage of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) were set up from 200 to 300 ml per day. There was no difference in the dosage and interval of the same antibiotics between two groups. The antibiotics usage and therapeutic effect of two groups of patients were observed and analyzed by t-test, Wilcoxon rank test or χ(2) test. The rate of CSF bacterial culture negative was 62.9% (88/140) in the same period. In group of empirical antibiotics treatment, the time of antibiotics treatment was (12.6±3.1) days, the rate of combined with other antibiotics treatment was 40.0% (16/40), the rate of mortality was 15.0% (6/40). However, in group of external lumbar drainage combined with empirical antibiotics treatment, the 3 data were (5.3±1.2) days, 10.0% (4/40), 7.5% (3/40), respectively. The time of antibiotics of the group of empirical antibiotics was longer (t=3.605, P=0.017), while the rate of combined antibiotics and the rate of mortality were lower (χ(2)=3.971, P=0.035; χ(2)=4.136, P=0.027, respectively). The average drainage time was (5.8±1.5) days, 32 patients gained a complete healing only by their first placement, 5 cases need replacement because of

  10. Comparison of electromyographic activities of lumbar iliocostalis and lumbar multifidus muscles during stabilization exercises in prone, quadruped, and sitting positions

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, Marie; Jacobs, Dee; Wooten, Mary E.; Edeer, Ayse Ozcan

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The purposes of this study were: 1) describe a hierarchy of electromyographic activity production, using percentage maximum voluntary contraction of lumbar iliocostalis and lumbar multifidus muscles during prone, quadruped and sitting exercises; and 2) identify optimal recruitment exercises for both lumbar iliocostalis as a global multi-segmental stabilizer and lumbar multifidus as a segmental stabilizer. [Subjects] Twelve healthy volunteers (six male and six female) aged 24 to 45 participated. [Methods] Surface electromyographic activity data were collected bilaterally from lumbar iliocostalis and lumbar multifidus muscles during exercises. [Results] Two-way ANOVA showed that prone extension, and prone alternate arm and leg lifting exercises produce a statistically significant difference in percent maximum voluntary contraction of lumbar iliocostalis and lumbar multifidus bilaterally compared to other exercises. Quadruped alternate arm and leg lifting exercises produce greater activity in lumbar multifidus muscle than sitting exercises [Conclusion] Prone exercises generate the greatest electromyographic activity and may be the most effective exercises for strengthening both lumbar iliocostalis and lumbar multifidus muscles. Quadruped alternate arm and leg lifting produces electromyographic activity at the recommended percent maximum voluntary contraction for training the lumbar multifidus in its role as a segmental stabilizer and is an effective training exercise for this goal. PMID:27821968

  11. Quantitation of free light chains in the cerebrospinal fluid reliably predicts their intrathecal synthesis.

    PubMed

    Zeman, David; Kušnierová, Pavlína; Bartoš, Vladimír; Hradílek, Pavel; Kurková, Barbora; Zapletalová, Olga

    2016-01-01

    The results of free light chains quantitation in the cerebrospinal fluid were recently compared with the presence of cerebrospinal fluid-restricted oligoclonal IgG, but not oligoclonal free kappa light chains and oligoclonal free lambda light chains. We therefore aimed to compare the performance of the quantitative tests with the qualitative one for the same molecule. Seventy-five paired cerebrospinal fluid and serum samples were analysed for oligoclonal IgG, oligoclonal free kappa light chains and oligoclonal free lambda light chains. Cerebrospinal fluid and serum free kappa and lambda light chains were quantified using Freelite™ kits on SPA Plus analyzer. ROC curves were analysed for the prediction of intrathecal synthesis and compared for cerebrospinal fluid concentration, cerebrospinal fluid/serum quotient (QfLC) and index (QfLC/QAlbumin). The presence of cerebrospinal fluid-restricted oligoclonal free kappa light chains and oligoclonal free lambda light chains bands was used as reference. No statistically significant differences were observed among cerebrospinal fluid concentration, QfLC and index for the prediction of free light chain intrathecal synthesis. Each parameter was able to predict the occurrence of cerebrospinal fluid-restricted oligoclonal free light chain bands (AUCs 0.932-0.999). However, we noted elevated cerebrospinal fluid free light chain concentrations in the absence of cerebrospinal fluid-restricted oligoclonal free light chain bands in two patients with very high serum free light chain values. Quantitation of cerebrospinal fluid free light chains reliably predicts their intrathecal synthesis. Yet, cerebrospinal fluid/serum quotient may still be preferred to correct for high serum free light chain concentrations. An appropriate formula should be sought to correct for blood-cerebrospinal fluid barrier status. © The Author(s) 2015.

  12. Tau Rather than TDP-43 Proteins are Potential Cerebrospinal Fluid Biomarkers for Frontotemporal Lobar Degeneration Subtypes: A Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Kuiperij, H Bea; Versleijen, Alexandra A M; Beenes, Marijke; Verwey, Nicolaas A; Benussi, Luisa; Paterlini, Anna; Binetti, Giuliano; Teunissen, Charlotte E; Raaphorst, Joost; Schelhaas, Helenius J; Küsters, Benno; Pijnenburg, Yolande A L; Ghidoni, Roberta; Verbeek, Marcel M

    2017-01-01

    Frontotemporal dementia (FTD) is a heterogeneous disease both at the clinical, genetic, and pathobiological level. The underlying pathological spectrum (termed FTLD, frontotemporal lobar degeneration) is in most cases defined by accumulation of either tau (FTLD-tau) or TDP-43 proteins (FTLD-TDP). Biomarkers to differentiate these subtypes are not yet available, whereas these are essential requirements to study the natural course of disease and for homogeneous inclusion of patients in clinical studies. To study if a combination of total (t-) and phosphorylated (p-)tau, and t-TDP-43 and p-TDP-43 proteins in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) is suitable to discriminate FTLD-tau and FTLD-TDP subtypes. We developed immunoassays for the quantification of t-TDP-43 and p-TDP-43 proteins and used commercially available assays for the quantification of t-tau and p-tau proteins. We quantified these proteins in ventricular CSF samples from neuropathologically defined FTLD-tau and FTLD-TDP cases to study the reflection of underlying brain pathology in CSF composition, and in lumbar CSF samples from FTLD-tau and FTLD-TDP patients to study the diagnostic potential of CSF biomarkers. In ventricular CSF, t-TDP-43 and t-tau levels, when combined into one model, were significantly different between neuropathologically-defined FTLD-tau and FTLD-TDP cases. In a pilot study using lumbar CSF, the p-tau/t-tau ratio, but not t-TDP-43 levels, were significantly different between FTLD-TDP and FTLD-tau patients. We conclude that with current available methods, CSF tau, rather than TDP-43 proteins, may have diagnostic value in the differentiation of FTLD patients with either tau or TDP-43 pathology.

  13. Posttraumatic Symptoms and Posttraumatic Growth of Israeli Firefighters, at One Month following the Carmel Fire Disaster

    PubMed Central

    Leykin, Dmitry; Lahad, Mooli; Bonneh, Nira

    2013-01-01

    Wildfire disasters are potentially traumatic events which directly and indirectly affect both citizens and first responders. The study of posttraumatic growth is scarcely found in the context of firefighters and only few studies have addressed this construct. In the current study, posttraumatic symptoms and posttraumatic growth were investigated among Israeli firefighters (N = 65), approximately one month after the Carmel Fire Disaster. Eight firefighters (12.3%) were found to be above the cut-off score for probable PTSD, with intrusion symptoms as the most frequent finding compared to avoidance and hyper-arousal symptoms. Posttraumatic growth (PTG) was evident to a small but considerable degree; noticeable changes were found regarding personal strength and appreciation of life. Results also revealed significant linear and quadratic relationships between PTSD and PTG. Results are discussed in light of past research on psychological responses among firefighters and first responders. PMID:24286064

  14. Factors Associated With the Onset and Persistence of Post–Lumbar Puncture Headache

    PubMed Central

    Monserrate, Andrés E.; Ryman, Davis C.; Ma, Shengmei; Xiong, Chengjie; Noble, James M.; Ringman, John M.; Morris, John C.; Danek, Adrian; Müller-Sarnowski, Felix; Clifford, David B.; McDade, Eric M.; Brooks, William S.; Darby, David G.; Masters, Colin L.; Weston, Philip S. J.; Farlow, Martin R.; Graff-Radford, Neill R.; Salloway, Stephen P.; Fagan, Anne M.; Oliver, Angela; Bateman, Randall J.

    2015-01-01

    IMPORTANCE This study assesses factors associated with the most common adverse event following lumbar puncture. OBJECTIVE To identify factors associated with the risk, onset, and persistence of post–dural puncture headache (PDPH). DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS We performed univariate and multivariable analyses of 338 lumbar punctures in the Dominantly Inherited Alzheimer Network observational study using linear mixed models, adjusting for participant-level and family-level random effects. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES We directly evaluated associations of 3 post–lumbar puncture outcomes (immediate postprocedural headache, PDPH at 24-hour follow-up, and PDPH receiving a therapeutic blood patch) with participant age and sex, positioning, collection method, needle size, needle insertion site, and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) volume collected. RESULTS The incidence of adverse events included 73 immediate postprocedural headaches (21.6%), 59 PDPHs at 24-hour follow-up (17.5%), and 15 PDPHs receiving a therapeutic blood patch (4.4%). Greater volume of CSF collected was associated with increased risk of immediate postprocedural headache, largely owing to a nonlinear increase in risk on collection of volumes above 30 mL (odds ratio, 3.73 for >30 mL and 0.98 for <17 mL). In contrast, collection of higher volumes showed a protective effect in decreasing rates of PDPH at 24-hour follow-up and rates of PDPH receiving a therapeutic blood patch (odds ratio, 0.35 per 10 mL). Although differences in needle size did not reach statistical significance, no participant in the 24G needle group received a therapeutic blood patch compared to 8 of 253 for the larger 22G needles. CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE Factors that acutely lower CSF pressure (eg, seated positioning or extracting very high volumes of CSF) may be associated with transient post-lumbar puncture headache, without increasing rates of persistent PDPH or therapeutic blood patch. Collection of up to 30 mL of CSF appears to be

  15. Midsagittal anatomy of lumbar lordosis in adult egyptians: MRI study.

    PubMed

    Hegazy, Abdelmonem A; Hegazy, Raafat A

    2014-01-01

    Despite the increasing recognition of the functional and clinical importance of lumbar lordosis, little is known about its description, particularly in Egypt. At the same time, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has been introduced as a noninvasive diagnostic technique. The aim of this study was to investigate the anatomy of the lumbar lordosis using midsagittal MRIs. Normal lumbar spine MRIs obtained from 93 individuals (46 males, 47 females; 25-57 years old) were evaluated retrospectively. The lumbar spine curvature and its segments "vertebrae and discs" were described and measured. The lumbar lordosis angle (LLA) was larger in females than in males. Its mean values increased by age. The lumbar height (LH) was longer in males than in females. At the same time, the lumbar breadth (LB) was higher in females than in males. Lumbar index (LI = LB/LH × 100) showed significant gender differences (P < 0.0001). Lordosis was formed by wedging of intervertebral discs and bodies of lower lumbar vertebrae. In conclusion, MRI might clearly reveal the anatomy of the lumbar lordosis. Use of LI in association with LLA could be useful in evaluation of lumbar lordosis.

  16. Current Status of Lumbar Interbody Fusion for Degenerative Spondylolisthesis

    PubMed Central

    TAKAHASHI, Toshiyuki; HANAKITA, Junya; OHTAKE, Yasufumi; FUNAKOSHI, Yusuke; OICHI, Yuki; KAWAOKA, Taigo; WATANABE, Mizuki

    2016-01-01

    Instrumented lumbar fusion can provide immediate stability and assist in satisfactory arthrodesis in patients who have pain or instability of the lumbar spine. Lumbar adjunctive fusion with decompression is often a good procedure for surgical management of degenerative spondylolisthesis (DS). Among various lumbar fusion techniques, lumbar interbody fusion (LIF) has an advantage in that it maintains favorable lumbar alignment and provides successful fusion with the added effect of indirect decompression. This technique has been widely used and represents an advancement in spinal instrumentation, although the rationale and optimal type of LIF for DS remains controversial. We evaluated the current status and role of LIF in DS treatment, mainly as a means to augment instrumentation. We addressed the basic concept of LIF, its indications, and various types including minimally invasive techniques. It also has acceptable biomechanical features, and offers reconstruction with ideal lumbar alignment. Postsurgical adverse events related to each LIF technique are also addressed. PMID:27169496

  17. Fractures of the Thoracic and Lumbar Spine

    MedlinePlus

    ... Surgical treatment. Fracture-dislocations of the thoracic and lumbar spine are caused by very high-energy trauma. They can be extremely unstable injuries that often result in serious spinal cord or nerve damage. These injuries require stabilization through surgery. The ...

  18. Lumbar spine anomalies in a pycnodysostosis case.

    PubMed

    Beguiristain, J L; Arriola, F J; Leyes, M

    1995-01-01

    We report a case of pycnodysostosis in which several clefts in the laminas, interarticular parts, and pedicles of the whole lumbar spine were revealed for the first time on CT. We review similar findings in the literature, and discuss their pathogenesis.

  19. [A case of giant lumbar neurinoma].

    PubMed

    Bocchini, R; Broggi, S; Gandini, G; Nessi, F; Ponzio, F

    1987-11-30

    A rare case of a giant extradural neurinoma of the IV lumbar root with an anterior development and a soft neurological picture is reported. The Authors stress the important role of CT both in the neurinoma diagnosis and in the correct preoperative evaluation of its extension and its relationship with contiguous organs.

  20. Multiple lumbar arachnoid cysts. Case report.

    PubMed

    Pappalardo, S; Cassarino, A; Braidotti, P

    1986-09-01

    Arachnoid cysts are a rare cause of compression of the contents of the lumbar spinal canal; in the literature only about 100 cases are reported. The various methods of diagnosis are discussed in the light of a recent case observed by the authors.

  1. Lumbar Discitis Caused by Clostridium perfringens

    PubMed Central

    Popoff, M. R.; Degand, Nicolas; Lotte, Laurene; Bouvet, Philippe; Baudin, Guillaume; Cua, Eric; Roger, Pierre-Marie; Ruimy, Raymond

    2014-01-01

    We report here a rare case of chronic lumbar discitis caused by Clostridium perfringens in an elderly patient that was treated with a combination of β-lactams and clindamycin. Molecular analysis performed on the strain revealed an unusual toxin gene pattern. PMID:25056327

  2. Lumbar discitis caused by Clostridium perfringens.

    PubMed

    Lotte, Romain; Popoff, M R; Degand, Nicolas; Lotte, Laurene; Bouvet, Philippe; Baudin, Guillaume; Cua, Eric; Roger, Pierre-Marie; Ruimy, Raymond

    2014-10-01

    We report here a rare case of chronic lumbar discitis caused by Clostridium perfringens in an elderly patient that was treated with a combination of β-lactams and clindamycin. Molecular analysis performed on the strain revealed an unusual toxin gene pattern. Copyright © 2014, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  3. [Lumbar pain and bilateral adrenal masses].

    PubMed

    García, Elena; Sánchez, Raquel; Martínez, Guillermo; Bernal, Carmen; Calatayud, M; Partida, M; Hawkins, Federico

    2009-05-01

    Many problems may arise when defining whether adrenal lesions are primary to the adrenal glands or represent other tissue, whether they are benign or malignant and whether they are functioning or nonfunctioning. Adrenal imaging complements the clinical and hormonal evaluation of these patients. We present a patient with lumbar pain and bilateral adrenal masses.

  4. Posttraumatic Growth and HIV Disease Progression

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Milam, Joel

    2006-01-01

    The relationship between posttraumatic growth (PTG; perceiving positive changes since diagnosis) and disease status, determined by changes in viral load and CD4 count over time, was examined among 412 people living with HIV. In controlled multiple regression models, PTG was not associated with disease status over time for the entire sample.…

  5. Gender Differences in Posttraumatic Stress Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olff, Miranda; Langeland, Willie; Draijer, Nel; Gersons, Berthold P. R.

    2007-01-01

    One of the most consistent findings in the epidemiology of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is the higher risk of this disorder in women. Explanations reviewed within a psychobiological model of PTSD suggest that women's higher PTSD risk may be due to the type of trauma they experience, their younger age at the time of trauma exposure, their…

  6. Post-traumatic knee stiffness: surgical techniques.

    PubMed

    Pujol, N; Boisrenoult, P; Beaufils, P

    2015-02-01

    Post-traumatic knee stiffness and loss of range of motion is a common complication of injuries to the knee area. The causes of post-traumatic knee stiffness can be divided into flexion contractures, extension contractures, and combined contractures. Post-traumatic stiffness can be due to the presence of dense intra-articular adhesions and/or fibrotic transformation of peri-articular structures. Various open and arthroscopic surgical treatments are possible. A precise diagnosis and understanding of the pathology is mandatory prior to any surgical treatment. Failure is imminent if all pathologies are not addressed correctly. From a general point of view, a flexion contracture is due to posterior adhesions and/or anterior impingement. On the other hand, extension contractures are due to anterior adhesions and/or posterior impingement. This overview will describe the different modern surgical techniques for treating post-traumatic knee stiffness. Any bony impingements must be treated before soft tissue release is performed. Intra-articular stiff knees with a loss of flexion can be treated by an anterior arthroscopic arthrolysis. Extra-articular pathology causing a flexion contracture can be treated by open or endoscopic quadriceps release. Extension contractures can be treated by arthroscopic or open posterior arthrolysis. Postoperative care (analgesia, rehabilitation) is essential to maintaining the range of motion obtained intra-operatively. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  7. Brief Psychotherapy for Posttraumatic Stress Disorders.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brom, Daniel; And Others

    1989-01-01

    Examined the effectiveness of psychotherapeutic methods for the treatment of posttraumatic stress disorders. Compared trauma desensitization, hypnotherapy, psychodynamic therapy and control condition for 112 persons suffering from serious disorders resulting from traumatic events in the past 5 years. Results indicated that treated cases were…

  8. Adolescent Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yule, William

    2003-01-01

    Based on over a decade of work in the area of PTSD, including a longitudinal study of PTSD among adolescents, Dr. Yule provides an introduction to post-traumatic stress disorder as it occurs in youth. This includes a look at the manifestations of stress reactions, the incidence and prevalence of PTSD, and the relationship between levels of…

  9. Imagery Rescripting in Posttraumatic Stress Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hackmann, Anne

    2011-01-01

    This article provides an overview of methods of working with imagery to change meanings and ameliorate posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). It opens with a description of phenomenology in this disorder, usually characterized by a small number of recurrent images of the trauma, each representing a moment that warned of a threat to the physical or…

  10. Post-traumatic unilateral plantar hyperhidrosis.

    PubMed

    Eren, Y; Yavasoglu, N G; Comoglu, S S

    2016-02-01

    Localized unilateral hyperhidrosis is rare and poorly understood, sometimes stemming from trauma. Feet, quite vulnerable to trauma are affected by disease-mediated plantar hyperhidrosis, usually bilaterally. This report describes partial hyperhidrosis developing post-traumatically on the left plantar region of a 52-year-old male.

  11. Adolescent Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yule, William

    2003-01-01

    Based on over a decade of work in the area of PTSD, including a longitudinal study of PTSD among adolescents, Dr. Yule provides an introduction to post-traumatic stress disorder as it occurs in youth. This includes a look at the manifestations of stress reactions, the incidence and prevalence of PTSD, and the relationship between levels of…

  12. Traumatic brain injury and posttraumatic stress disorder.

    PubMed

    Bahraini, Nazanin H; Breshears, Ryan E; Hernández, Theresa D; Schneider, Alexandra L; Forster, Jeri E; Brenner, Lisa A

    2014-03-01

    Given the upsurge of research in posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and traumatic brain injury (TBI), much of which has focused on military samples who served in Iraq and Afghanistan, the purpose of this article is to review the literature published after September 11th, 2001 that addresses the epidemiology, pathophysiology, evaluation, and treatment of PTSD in the context of TBI.

  13. Cerebrospinal fluid cutaneous fistula following obstetric epidural analgaesia. Case report.

    PubMed

    Fedriani de Matos, J J; Quintero Salvago, A V; Gómez Cortés, M D

    2017-10-01

    Cutaneous fistula of cerebrospinal fluid is a rare complication of neuroaxial blockade. We report the case of a parturient in whom an epidural catheter was placed for labour analgesia and 12h after the catheter was removed, presented an abundant asymptomatic fluid leak from the puncture site, compatible in the cyto-chemical analysis with cerebrospinal fluid. She was treated with acetazolamide, compression of skin orifice of the fluid leakage, antibiotic prophylaxis, hydration and rest, and progressed satisfactorily without requiring blood patch. Copyright © 2017 Sociedad Española de Anestesiología, Reanimación y Terapéutica del Dolor. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  14. Upcoming candidate cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers of Alzheimer’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Fagan, Anne M; Perrin, Richard J

    2012-01-01

    Dementia due to Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is estimated to reach epidemic proportions by the year 2030. Given the limited accuracy of current AD clinical diagnosis, biomarkers of AD pathologies are currently being sought. Reductions in cerebrospinal fluid levels of β-amyloid 42 (a marker of amyloid plaques) and elevations in tau species (markers of neurofibrillary tangles and/or neurodegeneration) are well-established as biomarkers useful for AD diagnosis and prognosis. However, novel markers for other features of AD pathophysiology (e.g., β-amyloid processing, neuroinflammation and neuronal stress/dysfunction) and for other non-AD dementias are required to improve the accuracy of AD disease diagnosis, prognosis, staging and therapeutic monitoring (theragnosis). This article discusses the potential of several promising novel cerebrospinal fluid analytes, highlights the next steps critical for advancement in the field, and provides a prediction on how the field may evolve in 5–10 years. PMID:22917147

  15. Lumbar lordosis in female collegiate dancers and gymnasts.

    PubMed

    Ambegaonkar, Jatin P; Caswell, Amanda M; Kenworthy, Kristen L; Cortes, Nelson; Caswell, Shane V

    2014-12-01

    Postural deviations can predispose an individual to increased injury risk. Specifically, lumbar deviations are related to increased low back pain and injury. Dancers and gymnasts are anecdotally suggested to have exaggerated lumbar lordosis and subsequently may be at increased risk of lumbar pathologies. Our objective was to examine lumbar lordosis levels in dancers and gymnasts. We examined lumbar lordosis in 47 healthy collegiate females (17 dancers, 29 gymnasts; mean age 20.2 ± 1.6 yrs) using 2-dimensional sagittal plane photographs and the Watson MacDonncha Posture Analysis instrument. Participants' lordosis levels were cross-tabulated and a Mann-Whitney U-test compared lumbar lordosis between groups (p<0.05). Most participants (89.4%, n=42) exhibited either marked (dancers 50%, n=9; gymnasts 62.1%, n=18; combined 57.4%, n=27) or moderate (dancers 27.8%, n=5; gymnasts 34.5%, n=10; combined 31.9%, n=15) lumbar lordosis deviations. The distribution of lordosis was similar across groups (p=0.22). Most dancers and gymnasts had moderate or marked lumbar lordosis. The extreme ranges of motion required during dancing and gymnastics may contribute to the participants' high lumbar lordosis. Instructors should be aware that there may be links between repetitive hyperextension activities and lumbar lordosis levels in dancers and gymnasts. Thus, they should proactively examine lumbar lordosis in their dancers and gymnasts. How much age of training onset, regimens, survivor bias, or other factors influence lumbar lordosis requires study. Longitudinal studies are also needed to determine if lumbar lordosis levels influence lumbar injury incidence in dancers and gymnasts.

  16. Cerebrospinal Fluid Dynamics and the Pathophysiology of Hydrocephalus: New Concepts.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Shinya; Kelly, Erin

    2016-04-01

    Many controversies remain regarding basic cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) physiology and the mechanism behind the development of hydrocephalus. Recent information obtained from CSF time spatial spin labeling inversion pulse method discovers different aspect of CSF dynamics. In this article, we would discuss how recent CSF imaging advances are leading to new concepts of CSF flow dynamics and the pathophysiology of hydrocephalus, with an emphasis on time spatial spin labeling inversion pulse imaging of CSF dynamics.

  17. Cerebrospinal fluid involvement in acute promyelocytic leukaemia at presentation

    PubMed Central

    Mishra, Jyoti; Gupta, Mayank

    2015-01-01

    In acute promyelocytic leukaemia (APL), extramedullary disease (EMD) is rare but can occur in those who relapse following therapy. Although the most common site of EMD in APL is central nervous system (CNS) and skin, CNS involvement in recently diagnosed patients with APL is very rare and rarely described. We report cerebrospinal fluid involvement in a case of APL, on day 3 of induction therapy. PMID:25754165

  18. Temporal Profile of Cerebrospinal Fluid, Plasma, and Brain Interleukin-6 After Normothermic Fluid-Percussion Brain Injury: Effect of Secondary Hypoxia

    PubMed Central

    Chatzipanteli, Katina; Vitarbo, Elizabeth; Alonso, Ofelia F.; Bramlett, Helen M.

    2012-01-01

    Interleukin-6 (IL-6) is a proinflammatory cytokine that may play multiple roles in the pathogenesis of traumatic brain injury (TBI). The present study determined time-dependent changes in IL-6 concentrations in vulnerable brain regions, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) samples, and plasma after normothermic TBI. Because secondary insults are common in head injured patients, we also assessed the consequences of a post-traumatic secondary hypoxic insult on this pleiotropic cytokine. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were intubated, anesthetized, and underwent a moderate parasagittal fluid-percussion brain injury (1.8–2.1 atm, 37°C) followed by either 30 minutes of normoxic or hypoxic (pO2=30–40 mmHg) gas levels. Rats were sacrificed 3, 6, or 24 hours after TBI or sham-operated procedures. Brain samples, including the ipsilateral cerebral cortex and hippocampus were dissected and analyzed. Plasma and CSF samples were collected at similar times and stored at −80°C until analysis. IL-6 levels were significantly increased (p<0.05) at 3, 6, and 24 hours in the cerebral cortex and at 6 hours in the hippocampus after TBI. IL-6 levels in the TBI normoxic group for both structures returned to control levels by 24 hours. Plasma levels of IL-6 were elevated at all time points, while CSF levels were high at 3 and 6 hours, but normalized by 24 hours. Post-traumatic hypoxia led to significantly elevated (p<0.05) IL-6 protein levels in the cerebral cortex at 24 hours compared to sham-operated controls. These findings demonstrate that moderate TBI leads to an early increase in IL-6 brain, plasma, and CSF protein levels. Secondary post-traumatic hypoxia, a common secondary injury mechanism, led to prolonged elevations in plasma IL-6 levels that may participate in the pathophysiology of this complicated TBI model. PMID:23667780

  19. Stereotactic injection of cerebrospinal fluid from anti-NMDA receptor encephalitis into rat dentate gyrus impairs NMDA receptor function.

    PubMed

    Würdemann, Till; Kersten, Maxi; Tokay, Tursonjan; Guli, Xiati; Kober, Maria; Rohde, Marco; Porath, Katrin; Sellmann, Tina; Bien, Christian G; Köhling, Rüdiger; Kirschstein, Timo

    2016-02-15

    Autoimmune encephalitis is increasingly recognized in patients with otherwise unexplained encephalopathy with epilepsy. Among these, patients with anti-N-methyl D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) encephalitis present epileptic seizures, memory deficits, and psychiatric symptoms. However, the functional consequences of such autoantibodies are poorly understood. In order to investigate the pathophysiology of this disease, we stereotactically injected either cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) from three anti-NMDAR encephalitis patients or commercially available anti-NMDAR1 into the dentate gyrus of adult female rats. Control animals were injected with either CSF obtained from three epilepsy patients (ganglioglioma, posttraumatic epilepsy, focal cortical dysplasia) lacking anti-NMDAR or saline. Intracellular recordings from dentate gyrus granule cells showed a significant reduction of the NMDAR-evoked excitatory postsynaptic potentials (NMDAR-EPSPs) in animals treated with anti-NMDAR. As a consequence of this, action potential firing in these cells by NMDAR-EPSPs was significantly impaired. Long-term potentiation in the dentate gyrus was also significantly reduced in rats injected with anti-NMDAR as compared to control animals. This was accompanied by a significantly impaired learning performance in the Morris water maze hidden platform task when the animals had been injected with anti-NMDAR antibody-containing CSF. Our findings suggest that anti-NMDAR lead to reduced NMDAR function in vivo which could contribute to the memory impairment found in patients with anti-NMDAR encephalitis.

  20. Metabolomics of Human Cerebrospinal Fluid Identifies Signatures of Malignant Glioma*

    PubMed Central

    Locasale, Jason W.; Melman, Tamar; Song, Susan; Yang, Xuemei; Swanson, Kenneth D.; Cantley, Lewis C.; Wong, Eric T.; Asara, John M.

    2012-01-01

    Cerebrospinal fluid is routinely collected for the diagnosis and monitoring of patients with neurological malignancies. However, little is known as to how its constituents may change in a patient when presented with a malignant glioma. Here, we used a targeted mass-spectrometry based metabolomics platform using selected reaction monitoring with positive/negative switching and profiled the relative levels of over 124 polar metabolites present in patient cerebrospinal fluid. We analyzed the metabolic profiles from 10 patients presenting malignant gliomas and seven control patients that did not present malignancy to test whether a small sample size could provide statistically significant signatures. We carried out multiple unbiased forms of classification using a series of unsupervised techniques and identified metabolic signatures that distinguish malignant glioma patients from the control patients. One subtype identified contained metabolites enriched in citric acid cycle components. Newly diagnosed patients segregated into a different subtype and exhibited low levels of metabolites involved in tryptophan metabolism, which may indicate the absence of an inflammatory signature. Together our results provide the first global assessment of the polar metabolic composition in cerebrospinal fluid that accompanies malignancy, and demonstrate that data obtained from high throughput mass spectrometry technology may have suitable predictive capabilities for the identification of biomarkers and classification of neurological diseases. PMID:22240505

  1. [Cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers for the early diagnosis of Parkinson's disease].

    PubMed

    da Costa, Andreia Gomes; Gago, Miguel Fernandes; Garrett, Carolina

    2011-12-01

    In current medical practice, the diagnosis of Parkinson's disease remains essentially clinical. This practice determines that the diagnosis of Parkinson's disease is done in an already advanced neuropathological stage of the disease. The aim of this study is to review the validity of cerebrospinal fluid protein biological markers in the early diagnosis of Parkinson's disease. The a-synuclein and DJ-1 proteins, due to their role in the hereditary Parkinson's disease, have been the most widely studied cerebrospinal biomarkers. Nevertheless, they have had divergent results mostly owing to different processing, identification and control of laboratory techniques. The new proteomic techniques, directed to the detection of multiple undifferentiated proteins in cerebrospinal fluid (eg. ceruloplasmin, chromogranin B, apoH), are promising. The early diagnosis of Parkinson's disease is imperious as it is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder that causes extensive morbidity. Most of current scientific research in Parkinson's disease is focused on the discovery of neuroprotective drugs. Thus, the definition of biomarkers for the early diagnosis of Parkinson's disease is highly relevant.

  2. A plasma polymerization technique to overcome cerebrospinal fluid shunt infections.

    PubMed

    Cökeliler, D; Caner, H; Zemek, J; Choukourov, A; Biederman, H; Mutlu, M

    2007-03-01

    Prosthetic devices, mainly shunts, are frequently used for temporary or permanent drainage of cerebrospinal fluid. The pathogenesis of shunt infection is a very important problem in modern medicine and generally this is characterized by staphylococcal adhesion to the cerebrospinal fluid shunt surfaces. In this paper, the prevention of the attachment of test microorganism Staphylococcus epidermidis on the cerebrospinal fluid shunt surfaces by 2-hydroxyethylmethacrylate (HEMA) precursor modification in the plasma polymerization system, is reported. Different plasma polymerization conditions (RF discharge power 10-20-30 W, exposure time 5-10-15 min) were employed during the surface modification. The surface chemistry and topology of unmodified and modified shunts was characterized by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). Also, static contact angle measurements were performed to state the change of surface hydrophilicity. All samples were tested in vitro with Staphylococcus epidermidis. A plasma-polymerized HEMA film (PP HEMA) was found to be an alternative simple method to decrease the microorganism attachment and create bacterial anti-fouling surfaces. The attachment of the model microorganism Staphylococcus epidermidis on the shunt surface modified by PP HEMA at 20 W and 15 min was reduced 62.3% if compared to the unmodified control surface of the shunt.

  3. Flow cytometry of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) lymphocytes: alterations of blood/CSF ratios of lymphocyte subsets in inflammation disorders of human central nervous system (CNS).

    PubMed

    Kleine, T O; Albrecht, J; Zöfel, P

    1999-03-01

    Flow cytometry was adapted to measure lymphocytes in human cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). The method was sufficiently precise, reproducible and accurate despite low cell counts. In lumbar CSF of controls with 500 to 3500 (10(3)/l) leukocytes, lymphocyte counts correlated with those in corresponding venous blood: blood/CSF ratios of approximately 2000 : 1 were found for total T cells (CD3+) and CD3+ HLA-DR-, CD3+4+, CD3+8+ subsets, ratios were increased for the lymphocyte subsets CD3+ HLA-DR+ < or = CD3+16+56+ < CD16+56+3- < CD8+3- < CD19+; CD8+4+ ratio was half of CD3+ ratio. Data indicate selective barriers (blood-brain and blood-CSF barriers) to blood lymphocyte subsets which favor the transfer of T subsets. Correlation of the subset ratios to the CD3+ ratio indicates distinct barrier properties which changed differently with acute and subacute inflammations and neuroimmunological diseases of central nervous system (CNS) in lumbar or ventricular CSF, but not with simple protein barrier disturbance. HLA DR+ T ratios were higher than HLA DR- T ratios only with controls and some neuroimmunological diseases. Lymphocyte barrier characteristics were related to protein leakage situated at the same barriers, indicating for the lymphocyte subsets selective transfer routes in control subjects and non-selective routes in patients with CNS inflammation where altered ratios revealed a mixture of both routes.

  4. Clinical usefulness of assessing lumbar somatosensory evoked potentials in lumbar spinal stenosis. Clinical article.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xinyu; Konno, Shunsuke; Miyamoto, Masabumi; Gembun, Yoshikazu; Horiguchi, Gen; Ito, Hiromoto

    2009-07-01

    The aim of this retrospective study was to evaluate the clinical usefulness of assessing lumbar somatosensory evoked potentials (SSEPs) in central lumbar spinal stenosis (LSS). The latencies of lumbar SSEPs were recorded in 40 patients with central LSS, including 16 men and 24 women. The mean age of the patients was 67.3 +/- 7.4 years. The diagnosis was LSS in 23 cases and LSS associated with degenerative spondylolisthesis in 17 cases. The average duration of symptoms was 43.8 +/- 51.2 months. Twenty-two cases had bilateral and 18 cases had unilateral leg symptoms. Thirty-seven cases were associated with neurogenic intermittent claudication and the mean walking distance of patients with this condition was 246.8 +/- 232.7 m. The mean Japanese Orthopedic Association scale score, as well as the visual analog scale (VAS) scores of low-back pain, leg pain, and numbness, were 16.5 +/- 3.5, 6.0 +/- 2.5, 6.9 +/- 2.1, and 7.8 +/- 2.2, respectively. The minimal cross-sectional area of the dural sac on MR imaging was 0.44 +/- 0.21 cm(2). Thirty-nine cases of cervical spondylotic myelopathy without lumbar and peripheral neuropathy were chosen as the control group. The latencies of lumbar SSEPs in patients with LSS and in the control group were 23.0 +/- 2.0 ms and 21.6 +/- 1.9 ms, respectively. There was a statistically significant difference between the LSS and control groups (p < 0.05). The latency of lumbar SSEPs was significant correlated with the VAS score of leg numbness (p < 0.05). The latency of lumbar SSEPs in LSS was clearly delayed when the VAS score of leg numbness was > or = 8 (p < 0.05). Lumbar SSEPs are able to detect neurological deficit in the lumbar area effectively, and they can reflect part of the subjective severity of sensory disturbance (numbness) in LSS. Both lumbar SSEPs and VAS scores of leg numbness may be useful for clinical evaluation in patients with LSS.

  5. Impaired lumbar movement perception in association with postural stability and motor- and somatosensory-evoked potentials in lumbar spinal stenosis.

    PubMed

    Leinonen, Ville; Määttä, Sara; Taimela, Simo; Herno, Arto; Kankaanpää, Markku; Partanen, Juhani; Kansanen, Martti; Hänninen, Osmo; Airaksinen, Olavi

    2002-05-01

    A descriptive study of the associations between different neurophysiologic findings in patients with lumbar spinal stenosis. To evaluate the ability to sense a change in lumbar position and the associations between lumbar movement perception, postural stability, and motor-evoked potentials and somatosensory-evoked potentials. Patients with low back pain have impaired postural control and impaired lumbar proprioception. Altered motor-evoked potentials and somatosensory-evoked potentials have been often observed in lumbar spinal stenosis. The study included 26 patients with clinically and radiologically diagnosed lumbar spinal stenosis. Their ability to sense lumbar rotation was assessed in a previously validated motorized trunk rotation unit in the seated position. The abilities to indicate the movement direction and the movement magnitude were used as indexes of the ability to sense the lumbar rotatory movement. The postural stability was measured with a vertical force platform. The motor-evoked potentials were elicited by transcranial and lumbar stimulation and recorded from anterior tibialis muscles. The somatosensory-evoked potentials were elicited by transcutaneous electrical stimulation of the tibial nerve at the ankle. Twenty patients (76.9%; P = 0.006) reported the wrong movement direction. Furthermore, the patients consistently localized the movement sensation in their shoulders instead of the lumbar region. The altered motor-evoked potentials and somatosensory-evoked potentials were observed in 11 and 16 patients, respectively. Abnormal motor-evoked potentials had inconsistent associations with impaired movement perception and postural stability and abnormal somatosensory-evoked potentials had no associations with other findings. Many patients with lumbar spinal stenosis have difficulties in sensing the lumbar rotational movement, which may indicate impaired proprioceptive abilities. Abnormal motor-evoked potentials and somatosensory-evoked potentials are

  6. Atlanto-occipital dislocation with traumatic pseudomeningocele formation and post-traumatic syringomyelia.

    PubMed

    Reed, Christopher M; Campbell, Scot E; Beall, Douglas P; Bui, Jeffrey S; Stefko, Raymond M

    2005-03-01

    A case report of traumatic atlanto-occipital dislocation complicated by the development of anterior and posterolateral pseudomeningoceles and the late development of syringohydromyelia is presented. To describe a unique post-traumatic and postsurgical course following atlanto-occipital dislocation. Syringomyelia is a significant potential long-term complication in patients recovering from traumatic atlanto-occipital dislocation. Cord enlargement and increased T2 signal can be a marker of abnormal cerebrospinal fluid flow dynamics. This "presyrinx state" can be seen before clinical evidence of neurologic compromise. Pseudomeningocele formation after atlanto-occipital dislocation is rare, with only 3 reported cases. To our knowledge, all reported cases describe retropharyngeal pseudomeningoceles, and posterolateral pseudomeningocele as seen in this case has not previously been described. A single case is reported with an emphasis on the imaging findings related to the patient's subsequent neurologic deterioration. Following a pedestrian-motor vehicle collision, the patient received initial evaluation and treatment at a local foreign medical facility, where his cervical spine was cleared. Several days following stabilizing treatment and surgery, the patient was transferred to a foreign-based United States military medical facility and ultimately to our institution, where magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated occipitocervical dissociation. The patient was taken to the operating room for surgical stabilization. Four months after his index operation, the patient underwent halo removal. Follow-up magnetic resonance imaging revealed thickening of the cervical spinal cord in conjunction with diffuse high cord T2 signal and a small low cervical segment of syringomyelia. The patient was observed with follow-up magnetic resonance imaging obtained after 1 month. At this time, the low cervical syrinx had enlarged slightly, a small thoracic syrinx was observed, and cine imaging

  7. Cerebrospinal fluid histamine levels are decreased in patients with narcolepsy and excessive daytime sleepiness of other origin.

    PubMed

    Bassetti, Claudio L; Baumann, Christian R; Dauvilliers, Yves; Croyal, Michael; Robert, Philippe; Schwartz, Jean-Charles

    2010-12-01

    Histaminergic neurons of the hypothalamic tuberomammillary nucleus constitute a major wake-promoting system. In animals, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) histamine levels are increased during wakefulness and after sleep deprivation and decreased during sleep. An involvement of the histamine system in human disorders has not, to our knowledge, been reported. We measured hypocretin-1 and histamine levels in the lumbar CSF of 28 patients with and without excessive daytime sleepiness (EDS) as assessed by the Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS). There were 10 patients with EDS (ESS > 10, mean ESS = 14). Diagnoses included narcolepsy (n = 4), idiopathic hypersomnia (n = 2), sleep apnoea (n = 2) and multiple sclerosis (n = 2). Three patients were treated with stimulants. Their mean CSF histamine was 258 ± 159 PM. There were 18 patients without EDS (ESS < 9, mean ESS = 5). No patients were treated with stimulants. Their mean CSF histamine was significantly higher (624 ± 481 PM, P = 0.007). There was a significant inverse correlation (r = -0.48, P = 0.02) between ESS and both CSF histamine and hypocretin-1 levels. These observations suggest that narcolepsy and EDS of other origin are associated in humans with lower CSF histamine levels and therefore with a reduced activity of the wake-promoting histaminergic neuronal system.

  8. Vitamin D Binding Protein Isoforms and Apolipoprotein E in Cerebrospinal Fluid as Prognostic Biomarkers of Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Lis, Katarzyna; Minari, Nicoletta; Falvo, Sara; Marnetto, Fabiana; Caldano, Marzia; Reviglione, Raffaella; Berchialla, Paola; Capobianco, Marco A.; Malentacchi, Maria; Corpillo, Davide; Bertolotto, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Background Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a multifactorial autoimmune disease of the central nervous system with a heterogeneous and unpredictable course. To date there are no prognostic biomarkers even if they would be extremely useful for early patient intervention with personalized therapies. In this context, the analysis of inter-individual differences in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) proteome may lead to the discovery of biological markers that are able to distinguish the various clinical forms at diagnosis. Methods To this aim, a two dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE) study was carried out on individual CSF samples from 24 untreated women who underwent lumbar puncture (LP) for suspected MS. The patients were clinically monitored for 5 years and then classified according to the degree of disease aggressiveness and the disease-modifying therapies prescribed during follow up. Results The hierarchical cluster analysis of 2-DE dataset revealed three protein spots which were identified by means of mass spectrometry as Apolipoprotein E (ApoE) and two isoforms of vitamin D binding protein (DBP). These three protein spots enabled us to subdivide the patients into subgroups correlated with clinical classification (MS aggressive forms identification: 80%). In particular, we observed an opposite trend of values for the two protein spots corresponding to different DBP isoforms suggesting a role of a post-translational modification rather than the total protein content in patient categorization. Conclusions These findings proved to be very interesting and innovative and may be developed as new candidate prognostic biomarkers of MS aggressiveness, if confirmed. PMID:26046356

  9. Sensitivity and specificity of cerebrospinal fluid flow cytometry for the diagnosis of leukemic meningitis in acute lymphoblastic leukemia/lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Mitri, Zahi; Siddiqui, Momin T; El Rassi, Fuad; Holden, Jeannine T; Heffner, Leonard T; Langston, Amelia; Waller, Edmund K; Winton, Elliott; McLemore, Morgan; Bernal-Mizrachi, Leon; Jaye, David; Arellano, Martha; Khoury, Hanna Jean

    2014-07-01

    The presence of leukemic blasts detected by light microscopy in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) establishes the diagnosis of leukemic meningitis in acute lymphoblastic leukemia/lymphoma (ALL). Flow cytometry immunophenotyping (FCI) is a very sensitive method that detects a minute number of aberrant cells, and is increasingly performed on CSF samples. We sought to determine the sensitivity and specificity of CSF FCI for the diagnosis of leukemic meningitis in ALL. Between November 2007 and August 2011, 800 CSF samples from 80 patients with ALL were available from diagnostic lumbar punctures (LPs; n = 80), follow-up LPs (n = 687) and at the time of relapse (n = 33). FCI was performed on 267 samples, and only identified aberrant cells in cytologically confirmed cases of leukemic meningitis. A blinded review of all cases with detectable CSF nucleated cells confirmed these findings. We conclude that CSF FCI has a 100% sensitivity and specificity for the detection of lymphoblasts. However, additional studies are needed to define the role this procedure plays in the diagnosis of leukemic meningitis.

  10. Higher Cerebrospinal Fluid pH may Contribute to the Development of Delayed Cerebral Ischemia after Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Hidenori; Shiba, Masato; Nakatsuka, Yoshinari; Nakano, Fumi; Nishikawa, Hirofumi

    2017-04-01

    Recent investigations have shown that many factors may cause delayed cerebral ischemia (DCI) after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). To find new potential contributors to DCI, this retrospective study compared gas data in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) between patients with and without DCI. The subjects were 61 consecutive patients with SAH classified as Fisher group III on admission computed tomography scans, whose aneurysms were obliterated by clipping or coiling within 24 h post-SAH. Thirty-three patients were treated with CSF drainage. CSF samples were chronologically obtained from CSF drains or lumbar taps. Patients with DCI were more frequently treated with CSF drainage, especially cisternal drainage, and were associated with significantly higher pH and lower partial pressure of carbon dioxide (PCO2) in the CSF compared with patients without DCI, although CSF concentrations of bicarbonate ion as well as arterial blood gas data were not different between the two groups. Total hemoglobin concentrations in the drained or tapped CSF were higher in patients with no DCI compared with patients with DCI at any sampling time, suggesting that CSF hemoglobin was not efficiently removed in patients with DCI. This study revealed higher CSF pH and lower CSF PCO2 as new potential contributors to the development of DCI, which might result from inappropriate CSF drainage that failed to remove clot and acid metabolites in it efficiently. Both of the disturbed CSF gas and inappropriate CSF drainage may cause constriction of the arteries and arterioles, leading to DCI.

  11. Alzheimer's disease: Elevated pigment epithelium-derived factor in the cerebrospinal fluid is mostly of systemic origin.

    PubMed

    Lang, Veronika; Zille, Marietta; Infante-Duarte, Carmen; Jarius, Sven; Jahn, Holger; Paul, Friedemann; Ruprecht, Klemens; Pina, Ana Luisa

    2017-04-15

    Pigment-epithelium derived factor (PEDF) is a neurotrophic factor with neuroprotective, anti-tumorigenic, and anti-angiogenic effects. Elevated levels of PEDF have previously been proposed as a cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarker for Alzheimer's disease. However, the origin of PEDF in CSF, i.e. whether it is derived from the brain or from the systemic circulation, and the specificity of this finding hitherto remained unclear. Here, we analyzed levels of PEDF in paired CSF and serum samples by ELISA in patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD, n=12), frontotemporal dementia (FTD, n=6), vascular dementia (n=4), bacterial meningitis (n=8), multiple sclerosis (n=32), pseudotumor cerebri (n=36), and diverse non-inflammatory neurological diseases (n=19). We established CSF/serum quotient diagrams to determine the fraction of intrathecally synthesized PEDF in CSF. We found that PEDF is significantly increased in CSF of patients with AD, FTD, and bacterial meningitis. Remarkably, PEDF concentrations were also significantly elevated in serum of patients with AD. CSF/serum quotient diagrams demonstrated that elevated PEDF concentrations in CSF of patients with AD are mostly due to elevated PEDF concentrations in serum. These findings underscore the importance of relating concentrations of proteins in CSF to their respective concentrations in serum to avoid erroneous interpretations of increased protein concentrations in lumbar CSF.

  12. Is it worth to report the presence of a single and additional band in the cerebrospinal fluid detected by isoelectrofocusing?

    PubMed

    Lefèvre, Camille; Derache, Nathalie; Grandhomme, Frédérique; Fradin, Sabine; Allouche, Stéphane

    2016-08-01

    Despite the revisions of the Mac Donald criteria of multiple sclerosis (MS) in 2010, the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) analysis by isoelectrofocusing (IEF) remains useful for atypical presentations of MS. The IEF is considered as positive when at least two or more additional bands are detected in the CSF by comparison with the patient's serum but sometimes, the IEF interpretation is more difficult. The goal of our study was to determine the significance when a single band in the CSF is detected by IEF. We conducted a retrospective study on 990 patients who underwent a lumbar puncture followed by a CSF analysis by IEF. Only 2% display such IEF profile (i.e. single and additional band in the CSF). A diagnosis of clinically isolated syndrome or MS was evidenced in 4 among those 21 patients. In conclusion, our data suggest that even if the presence of a single and additional band in the CSF is a rare situation, it should be mentioned to clinicians to not exclude the hypothesis of an inflammatory demyelinating disease of the central nervous system.

  13. Cerebrospinal fluid corticotropin-releasing factor and perceived early-life stress in depressed patients and healthy control subjects.

    PubMed

    Carpenter, Linda L; Tyrka, Audrey R; McDougle, Christopher J; Malison, Robert T; Owens, Michael J; Nemeroff, Charles B; Price, Lawrence H

    2004-04-01

    Previous studies have reported elevated concentrations of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) in patients with major depression. Elevations of CSF CRF have also been reported in adult laboratory animals exposed to the stress of brief maternal deprivation or maternal neglect in the neonatal or preweaning period. The present study was designed to determine whether major depression and a history of perceived early adversity in childhood are independently associated with elevated CSF CRF concentrations in adults. In this case-control study, 27 medication-free adults with major depression and 25 matched controls underwent standardized lumbar puncture for collection of a single CSF sample at 1200. Subjects provided data about significant adverse early-life experiences and rated their global perceived level of stress during pre-school and preteen years on a six-point Likert scale. The mean difference in CSF CRF between depressed patients and controls did not reach statistical significance. In a regression model, perceived early-life stress was a significant predictor of CSF CRF, but depression was not. Perinatal adversity and perceived adversity in the preteen adversity years (ages 6-13 years) were both independently associated with decreasing CSF CRF concentrations. The relationship observed between perceived early-life stress and adult CSF CRF concentrations in this study closely parallels recent preclinical findings. More work is needed to elucidate the critical nature and timing of early events that may be associated with enduring neuroendocrine changes in humans.

  14. Post-traumatic Stress Disorder.

    PubMed

    Javidi, H; Yadollahie, M

    2012-01-01

    Unexpected extreme sudden traumatic stressor may cause post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Important traumatic events include war, violent personal assault (e.g., sexual assault, and physical attack), being taken hostage or kidnapped, confinement as a prisoner of war, torture, terrorist attack, severe car accidents, and natural disasters. In childhood age sexual abuse or witnessing serious injuries or unexpected death of a beloved one are among important traumatic events.PTSD can be categorized into two types of acute and chronic PTSD: if symptoms persist for less than three months, it is termed "acute PTSD," otherwise, it is called "chronic PTSD." 60.7% of men and 51.2% of women would experience at least one potentially traumatic event in their lifetime. The lifetime prevalence of PTSD is significantly higher in women than men. Lifetime prevalence of PTSD varies from 0.3% in China to 6.1% in New Zealand. The prevalence of PTSD in crime victims are between 19% and 75%; rates as high as 80% have been reported following rape. The prevalence of PTSD among direct victims of disasters was reported to be 30%-40%; the rate in rescue workers was 10%-20%. The prevalence of PTSD among police, fire, and emergency service workers ranged from 6%-32%. An overall prevalence rate of 4% for the general population, the rate in rescue/recovery occupations ranged from 5% to 32%, with the highest rate reported in search and rescue personnel (25%), firefighters (21%), and workers with no prior training for facing disaster. War is one of the most intense stressors known to man. Armed forces have a higher prevalence of depression, anxiety disorders, alcohol abuse and PTSD. High-risk children who have been abused or experienced natural disasters may have an even higher prevalence of PTSD than adults.Female gender, previous psychiatric problem, intensity and nature of exposure to the traumatic event, and lack of social support are known risk factors for work-related PTSD. Working with

  15. Sellar repair with autologous muscle and composite septal cartilage grafts for treatment of cerebrospinal fluid leakage following trans-sphenoidal pituitary surgery

    PubMed Central

    El Shazly, Ayman A.; El Wardany, Mohammed A.; Abo El Ezz, Tamer A.

    2016-01-01

    Context: Many reconstructive techniques have been proposed to prevent postoperative cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leakage after trans-sphenoidal pituitary surgery. However, no total agreement has been reached to the best technique. Aim: Assessment of the efficacy of sellar repair with autologous muscle and composite septal cartilage grafts for treatment of intraoperative and delayed postoperative CSF leakage following trans-sphenoidal pituitary surgery without the use of postoperative external lumbar CSF drain. Study Design: This is a retrospective case series study, level IV evidence. Materials and Methods : Twenty three patients were involved in this study. Seventeen patients had intraoperative CSF leakage and were treated immediately by our technique. Six patients had postoperative CSF rhinorrhea and had delayed treatment with our technique after failure of conservative measures and external lumbar CSF drainage for more than three days. The technique involved intradural placement of autologous muscle graft supplemented with extradural composite septal cartilage graft, composed of a piece of the posterior cartilaginous septum with its covering mucoperichondrium on one side only to fit into the sellar defect as a double layer button. Results: CSF leak was of grade 1 in 6 patients (26.1%), grade 2 in 10 patients (43.5%) and grade 3 in 7 patients (30.4%). None of the patients in our study had postoperative CSF leak after the use of our technique during the follow up period (mean 24 ± 10.47 standard deviation months). None of the patients developed treatment-related complications. All the patients had well developed mucosal covering of the sellar defect after two months. Conclusion: Our technique of sellar repair by using autologous muscle and composite septal cartilage grafts is effective in treatment of intraoperative and delayed postoperative CSF leakage following trans-sphenoidal pituitary surgery without the use of postoperative external lumbar CSF drain even in

  16. Efficacy of the pedicled nasoseptal flap without cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) diversion for repair of skull base defects: incidence of postoperative CSF leaks.

    PubMed

    Eloy, Jean Anderson; Kuperan, Arjuna B; Choudhry, Osamah J; Harirchian, Sanaz; Liu, James K

    2012-01-01

    The advances in endoscopic skull base surgery have led to the resection of increasingly larger cranial base lesions and the creation of larger skull base defects with the potential for increased postoperative high-flow cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leaks. These concerns led to the development of the vascularized pedicled nasoseptal flap (PNSF), which is now used as the mainstay for repair of large skull base defects in many academic centers. In this report, we review the incidence of postoperative CSF leaks in our institution in patients undergoing endoscopic skull base repair of high-flow CSF leaks with a vascularized PNSF without concurrent CSF diversion. We performed a retrospective analysis at our tertiary care medical center on patients who underwent endoscopic repair of high-flow CSF leaks using a PNSF without CSF diversion between July 2008 and August 2011. Repair materials, incidence of postoperative CSF leaks, and demographic data were collected. Fifty-nine high-flow CSF leaks were repaired with a PNSF and other repair materials, without the use of lumbar catheter drainage. No postoperative CSF leak occurred in this cohort of patients. The overall postoperative CSF leak rate was 0%. Meticulous multilayer-closure of skull base defects is critical to prevent postoperative CSF leaks. Although lumbar drainage may be useful in select scenarios, it carries inherent risks of intracranial hypotension and pneumocephalus, and may not be necessary for routine management of high-flow CSF leaks in conjunction with a robust PNSF. Further prospective randomized controlled studies may be warranted to evaluate the efficacy of postoperative lumbar drainage. Copyright © 2012 American Rhinologic Society-American Academy of Otolaryngic Allergy, LLC.

  17. [The place and the meaning of cerebrospinal anaesthesia in modern surgical practice].

    PubMed

    Polinchuk, I S

    2005-09-01

    The modern views concerning application of cerebrospinal anaesthesia in surgical practice were presented. Although last 15 years many new preparations for general anaesthesia have appeared on the pharmaceutical market of Ukraine, but the cerebrospinal anaesthesia did not lose its actuality. While performing cerebrospinal anaesthesia the one-use instruments are applied. It constitute significant factor of the hepatitis and AIDS prophylaxis. Surgeons have had acknowledged in the cerebrospinal anaesthesia security and safety. There were analyzed the results of the cerebrospinal anaesthesia application in more than 6200 patients for the 7-year period of work of the clinical hospital surgical departments. It was proved, that cerebrospinal anaesthesia constitutes secure, safe, simple and not expensive method of anaesthesia.

  18. Posttraumatic Growth and Dyadic Adjustment among War Veterans and their Wives.

    PubMed

    Lahav, Yael; Kanat-Maymon, Yaniv; Solomon, Zahava

    2017-01-01

    The controversy regarding the nature of posttraumatic growth includes two main competing claims: one which argues that posttraumatic growth reflects authentic positive changes and the other which argues that posttraumatic growth reflects illusory defenses. While the former might suggest that posttraumatic growth enhances intimacy and close relationships, the latter might imply that posttraumatic growth hinders interpersonal relations. The present study aimed to test these claims by investigating the association between posttraumatic growth and dyadic adjustment over time at both the individual and dyadic levels, and the potential role of posttraumatic stress symptoms. Former prisoners of war and comparable war veterans and their wives (n = 229) were assessed twice, 30-31 (T1) and 35-38 (T2) years after the 1973 Yom Kippur War in Israel, with regard to posttraumatic growth, posttraumatic stress symptoms and dyadic adjustment. Results indicated that posttraumatic growth was associated with both elevated posttraumatic stress symptoms and low dyadic adjustment among both husbands and wives. Posttraumatic stress symptoms at T1 and T2 mediated the association between posttraumatic growth and dyadic adjustment. Wives' posttraumatic growth at T1 predicted posttraumatic growth and dyadic adjustment of the husbands at T2. The higher the wives' posttraumatic growth, the higher the posttraumatic growth and the lower the dyadic adjustment of the husbands in the subsequent measure. The findings suggest that posttraumatic growth reflects defensive beliefs which undermine marital relationships and that posttraumatic growth might be transmitted between spouses and implicated in the deterioration of the marital relationship over time.

  19. The relationship between post-traumatic stress and post-traumatic growth among adolescent and young adult (AYA) cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Zebrack, Brad; Kwak, Minyoung; Salsman, John; Cousino, Melissa; Meeske, Kathleen; Aguilar, Christine; Embry, Leanne; Block, Rebecca; Hayes-Lattin, Brandon; Cole, Steve

    2014-01-01

    Objective Theories of posttraumatic growth suggest that some degree of distress is necessary to stimulate growth; yet investigations of the relationship between stress and growth following trauma are mixed. This study aims to understand the relationship between posttraumatic stress symptoms and posttraumatic growth in adolescent and young adult (AYA) cancer patients. Method 165 AYA patients aged 14–39 years at diagnosis completed standardized measures of posttraumatic stress and posttraumatic growth at 12 months following diagnosis. Locally weighted scatterplot smoothing and regression were used to examine linear and curvilinear relationship between posttraumatic stress and posttraumatic growth. Results No significant relationships between overall posttraumatic stress severity and posttraumatic growth were observed at 12-month follow-up. However, curvilinear relationships between re-experiencing (a posttraumatic stress symptom) and two of five posttraumatic growth indicators (New possibilities, Personal strengths) were observed. Conclusion Findings suggest that re-experiencing is associated with some aspects of posttraumatic growth but not others. Although re-experiencing is considered a symptom of post-traumatic stress disorder, it also may represent a cognitive process necessary to achieve personal growth for AYAs. Findings call into question the supposed psychopathological nature of re-experiencing and suggest that re-experiencing, as a cognitive process, may be psychologically adaptive. Opportunities to engage family, friends, cancer survivors, or health care professionals in frank discussions about fears, worries, or concerns may help AYAs re-experiencing cancer in a way that enhances their understanding of what happened to them and contributes to positive adaptation to life after cancer. PMID:24916740

  20. Chemokine CXCL13 concentration in cerebrospinal fluid in patients with neuroborreliosis--own observations.

    PubMed

    Kępa, Lucjan; Oczko-Grzesik, Barbara; Sobala-Szczygieł, Barbara; Boroń-Kaczmarska, Anna

    2015-01-01

    of the study was to evaluate the usefulness of cerebrospinal fluid chemokine CXCL13 concentration assay in diagnostics of neuroborreliosis in adults. Investigations were carried out in 22 patients treated for neuroborreliosis , manifested as lymphocytic meningitis, at the Department of Infectious Diseases, Medical University of Silesia, in Bytom between 2011-2013. Based on the presence or absence of anti-borrelial antibodies in the cerebrospinal fluid, the examined individuals were divided into two groups on the day of admission: group I--patients with antiborrelial antibodies in the cerebrospinal fluid (confirmed diagnosis of neuroborreliosis), group II--patients without antiborrelial antibodies in the cerebrospinal fluid (possible diagnosis of neuroborreliosis). In all patients the cerebrospinal fluid CXCL13 level was assessed on the first day of hospitalization. Control tests were performed in both groups after 14 days of therapy with antibiotics. Mean cerebrospinal fluid CXCL13 concentration in group I on the 1st day was 4123 pg/mL, and in group II--3422 pg/mL. Differences in mean concentrations of this chemokine were statistically insignificant. No correlations between examined mean CXCL13 concentrations and other cerebrospinal fluid inflammatory parameters were revealed. The control tests showed the evident decrease of CXCL13 level in cerebrospinal fluid in both groups. Besides, in individuals of group II anti-Borrelia burgdorferi antibodies appeared in cerebrospinal fluid, whereas in group I, the control results of this parameter were similar to preliminary values. The obtained results indicate a kind of usefulness of estimation of cerebrospinal fluid chemokine CXCL13 concentration in diagnostics of early, acute neuroborreliosis, manifested as lymphocytic meningitis, especially in case of anti-borrelia antibodies absence in cerebrospinal fluid. Changes in this chemokine concentrations, opposite to cerebrospinal fluid levels of anti-borrelia antibodies, may

  1. The Effect of an Adjustable Hinged Operating Table on Lumbar Lordosis during Lumbar Surgery.

    PubMed

    Sebastian, Arjun; Ahmed, Amin; Vernon, Brian; Nguyen, Emily C; Aleem, Ilyas; Clarke, Michelle J; Currier, Bradford L; Anderson, Paul; Bydon, Mohamad; Nassr, Ahmad

    2017-07-24

    Prospective observational study OBJECTIVES.: Quantify the amount of lumbar lordosis achieved on a hinged operative table in neutral, flexion, and extension. Hinged operative tables may allow surgeons to adjust lumbar spine positioning intraoperatively. The amount of lumbar lordosis in neutral, flexion, and extension positions has not been quantified prospectively using a hinged table. Thirty patients undergoing elective lumbar surgery were enrolled. Standing x-rays taken in neutral, maximal flexion, and maximal extension were obtained. Following prone positioning on a hinged operative table, x-rays in neutral, maximal flexion, and maximal extension were taken. Total lumbar lordosis was calculated for all 6 images by two physicians. Disc degeneration was graded using Pfirrmann grades. Lumbar lordosis on the operative table was 56.5 ± 2.1, 43.6 ± 2.2, 63.2 ± 2.0 compared to 46.9 ± 3.1, 33.2 ± 2.8, 52.3 ± 3.3 on the standing films in neutral, flexion, and extension respectively. Average flexion (12.9 ± 1.1) and extension (6.7 ± 1.2) were significantly different from neutral on the table (p < .001). Lumbar lordosis was significantly higher on the operative table (p < .001). Total range of motion was 19.6 ± 1.9 on the table and 19.1 ± 2.0 with standing (p = 0.42). Average Pfirrmann disc grade was 2.77 ± 0.10 which did not correlate with range of motion (p = 0.40). In this cohort, the hinged operative table allowed for a physiologic arc of motion of nearly 20 from flexion to extension. A considerable amount of lumbar sagittal motion can be obtained on hinged operative tables without decreasing overall lumbar lordosis below physiologic levels. 3.

  2. Posttraumatic nightmares and psychopathology in children after road traffic accidents.

    PubMed

    Wittmann, Lutz; Zehnder, Daniel; Schredl, Michael; Jenni, Oskar G; Landolt, Markus A

    2010-04-01

    Posttraumatic nightmares are considered as a reexperiencing symptom of the DSM-IV posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) diagnosis. Different types of posttraumatic nightmares, however, may differ in their relation to psychopathology. Thirty-two children were longitudinally assessed 10 days, 2 months, and 6 months after traffic accidents. Occurrence and characteristics of nightmares were examined and their relation to psychopathology assessed. Thirty-four percent of children reported posttraumatic nightmares during at least one assessment. Exact replicative nightmares at baseline assessment predicted PTSD symptoms 2 and 6 months postaccident, but not depressive symptoms. Exact replicative nightmares revealed the strongest cross-sectional association with trauma-specific psychopathology but not with depression. The authors conclude that posttraumatic nightmares--especially exact replicative ones--may be closely related to psychopathological mechanisms of posttraumatic stress in children.

  3. Effects of lumbar stabilization exercise on functional disability and lumbar lordosis angle in patients with chronic low back pain

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Igsoo; Jeon, Chunbae; Lee, Sangyong; Lee, Daehee; Hwangbo, Gak

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] This study examined the effects of lumbar stabilization exercises on the functional disability and lumbar lordosis angles in patients with chronic low back pain. [Subjects] The subjects were 30 patients with chronic low back pain divided into a lumbar stabilization exercise group (n = 15) and a conservative treatment group (n = 15). [Methods] The lumbar stabilization exercise and conservative treatment groups performed an exercise program and conservative physical treatment, respectively. Both programs were performed 3 times a week for 6 weeks. The degree of functional disability was assessed by the Oswestry disability index, and lumbar lordosis angles were measured by plain radiography. [Results] The Oswestry disability index decreased significantly in the both groups; however, it was significantly lower in the lumbar stabilization exercise group. The lumbar lordosis angle increased significantly in the lumbar stabilization exercise group after treatment and was also significantly greater than that in the conservative treatment group. [Conclusion] Lumbar stabilization exercise is more effective than conservative treatment for improving functional disability and lumbar lordosis angles. PMID:26180363

  4. Changes in bending stiffness and lumbar spine range of movement following lumbar mobilization and manipulation.

    PubMed

    Stamos-Papastamos, Nikolaos; Petty, Nicola J; Williams, Jonathan M

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of lumbar rotational manipulation and lumbar central posteroanterior mobilization on lumbar bending stiffness and flexion and extension range of motion (ROM). A same-subject, repeated-measures, crossover design was used using 32 asymptomatic subjects (16 female and 16 male; mean [SD] age, 25.5 [4.5] years; weight, 65.7 [11.8] kg; and height, 1.70 [0.08] m). Each subject received mobilization or manipulation on 2 different occasions. Bending stiffness was calculated using a 3-point bending model using an electromagnetic tracking device and a force platform; lumbar flexion and extension ROM was measured using an electromagnetic tracking device. All variables were measured pre- and postintervention. Their effect was compared using paired t tests. Manipulation and mobilization did not significantly alter either bending stiffness or lumbar flexion and extension ROM (mobilization: P = .175, P = .613, and P = .535; manipulation: P = .973, P = .323, and P = .439). Bending stiffness changes were not correlated to changes in ROM (Pearson r for stiffness-flexion = -0.102, P = .586; Pearson r for stiffness-extension = 0.014, P = .941). Manipulation and mobilization had no significant effect on bending stiffness or flexion and extension ROM for this group of subjects. Some individual variations in effect were observed. Copyright © 2011 National University of Health Sciences. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Single incision endoscopic surgery for lumbar hernia.

    PubMed

    Kawaguchi, Masahiko; Ishikawa, Norihiko; Shimizu, Satsuki; Shin, Hisato; Matsunoki, Aika; Watanabe, Go

    2011-01-01

    Single Incision Endoscopic Surgery (SIES) has emerged as a less invasive surgery among laparoscopic surgeries, and this approach for incisional hernia was reported recently. This is the first report of SIES for an incisional lumbar hernia. A 66-year-old Japanese woman was referred to our institution because of a left flank hernia that developed after left iliac crest bone harvesting. A 20-mm incision was created on the left side of the umbilicus and all three trocars (12, 5, and 5 mm) were inserted into the incision. The hernial defect was 14 × 9 cm and was repaired with intraperitoneal onlay mesh and a prosthetic graft. The postoperative course was uneventful. SIES for lumbar hernia offers a safe and effective outcome equivalent compared to laparoscopic surgery. In addition, SIES is less invasive and has a cosmetic benefit.

  6. [Polish nomenclature of lumbar disc disease].

    PubMed

    Radło, Paweł; Smetkowski, Andrzej; Tesiorowski, Maciej

    2014-01-01

    Lumbar disc herniation is one of the most common damage of musculoskeletal system. The incidence of pain of lumbosacral spine is estimated approximately on 60-90% in general population, whereas the incidence of disc herniation in patients experiencing low back pain is about 91%. Despite the high incidence and uncomplicated pathogenesis of disc disease there is a problem with the nomenclature. In the vast majority of cases, the naming confusion stems from ignorance of the etiology of low back pain. Different terminologies: morphological, topographical, Radiological and Clinical are used interchangeably. In addition, diagnosis is presented in a variety of languages: Polish, English and Latin. Moreover, the medical and traditional language are used alternately. The authors found in Polish literature more, than 20 terms to describe lumbar disc herniation. All of these terms in the meaning of the authors are used to determine one pathology--mechanical damage to the intervertebral disc and moving the disc material beyond the anatomical area.

  7. Diskography outcomes in patients following lumbar diskectomy.

    PubMed

    Siambanes, David; Kposowa, Augustine J; Michelsen, Steven

    2003-08-01

    The results of lumbar diskography at post-diskectomy and nonoperative disk levels in postoperative patients and patients without prior back surgery were reviewed over 3 years. Other possible predictive factors, including disk degeneration (per the Adam's classification), end-point resistance, gender, and age, also were reviewed. The results revealed that no statistically significant association was noted between the presence of a prior diskectomy and the outcome of diskography. However, disk degeneration classified as ruptured and fissured correlated statistically with positive diskography. Additionally, age between 30 and 39 years and male gender were statistically associated with a positive diskogram. Disk levels displaying a poor end point during diskography injection (not amendable to pressurization) were statistically related to ruptured or fissured disk levels and thus positive diskography. Based on these results, the assumption that disabling low-back pain presenting after lumbar procedure is due to diskogenic disease arising from the surgical level is not supported.

  8. Recognition of lumbar disk herniation with NMR

    SciTech Connect

    Chafetz, N.I.; Genant, H.K.; Moon, K.L.; Helms, C.A.; Morris, J.M.

    1983-12-01

    Fifteen nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) studies of 14 patients with herniated lumbar intervertebral disks were performed on the UCSF NMR imager. Computed tomographic (CT) scans done on a GE CT/T 8800 or comparable scanner were available at the time of NMR scan interpretation. Of the 16 posterior disk ruptures seen at CT, 12 were recognized on NMR. Diminished nucleus pulposus signal intensity was present in all ruptured disks. In one patient, NMR scans before and after chymopapain injection showed retraction of the protruding part of the disk and loss of signal intensity after chemonucleolysis. Postoperative fibrosis demonstrated by CT in one patient and at surgery in another showed intermediate to high signal intensity on NMR, easily distinguishing it from nearby thecal sac and disk. While CT remains the method of choice for evaluation of the patient with suspected lumbar disk rupture, the results of this study suggest that NMR may play a role in evaluating this common clinical problem.

  9. [Vascular complications associated with lumbar spinal surgery].

    PubMed

    Riedemann-Wistuba, M; Alonso-Pérez, M; Llaneza-Coto, J M

    2016-01-01

    Although there are currently less invasive techniques available for the treatment of spinal injuries, open surgery is still required in many cases. Vascular injuries occurring during lumbar spine surgery, although uncommon, are of great importance due to their potential gravity. Clinical manifestations vary from an acute hemorrhagic shock that needs urgent treatment to save the patient's life, to insidious injuries or an asymptomatic evolution, and should be studied to choose the best therapeutic alternative. Four cases are reported that represent this range of possibilities and emphasize the importance of a careful surgical technique during lumbar spine interventions, and the need for high clinical suspicion, essential for the early diagnosis of these vascular complications. The current therapeutic options are also discussed. Copyright © 2014 SECOT. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  10. Prevention of the Posttraumatic Fibrotic Response in Joints

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-10-01

    Distribution Unlimited 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT The ongoing study addresses the critical clinical problem of posttraumatic joint stiffness, a...of the Posttraumatic Fibrotic Response in Joints”. No changes were made to the original plan presented in the initial statement of work. The current...study addresses the critical clinical problem of posttraumatic joint stiffness, a pathology that reduces the range of motion (ROM) of injured joints

  11. Pain flashbacks in posttraumatic stress disorder.

    PubMed

    Salomons, Timothy V; Osterman, Janet E; Gagliese, Lucia; Katz, Joel

    2004-01-01

    Surgical patients who regain consciousness while under general anesthesia may develop symptoms of Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD). One common PTSD symptom is the experiencing of abnormal perceptions during which the patient feels as if the trauma is recurring. The objective of this report is to document the re-occurrence of pain as part of the PTSD sequelae. We present two patients who developed PTSD following an episode of awareness under anesthesia. In both cases, posttraumatic sequelae persisted for years and included pain symptoms that resembled, in quality and location, pain experienced during surgery. In addition to their similarity to the original pain, these pain symptoms were triggered by stimuli associated with the traumatic situation, suggesting that they were flashbacks to the episode of awareness under anesthesia. The similarity between the patients' pain symptoms and pain experienced during trauma, the triggering by traumatic cues, and the associated emotional arousal and avoidance suggest the involvement of a somatosensory memory mechanism.

  12. [Brain function recovery after prolonged posttraumatic coma].

    PubMed

    Klimash, A V; Zhanaidarov, Z S

    2016-01-01

    To explore the characteristics of brain function recovery in patients after prolonged posttraumatic coma and with long-unconscious states. Eighty-seven patients after prolonged posttraumatic coma were followed-up for two years. An analysis of a clinical/neurological picture after a prolonged episode of coma was based on the dynamics of vital functions, neurological status and patient's reactions to external stimuli. Based on the dynamics of the clinical/neurological picture that shows the recovery of functions of the certain brain areas, three stages of brain function recovery after a prolonged episode of coma were singled out: brain stem areas, diencephalic areas and telencephalic areas. These functional/anatomic areas of brain function recovery after prolonged coma were compared to the present classifications.

  13. The perioperative implications of posttraumatic stress disorder.

    PubMed

    Wofford, Ken; Hertzberg, Michael; Vacchiano, Charles

    2012-12-01

    Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is an anxiety disorder that develops after exposure to a traumatic event and is characterized by symptoms of reexperiencing, emotional numbing, persistent arousal, and avoidance. Approximately 6.8% of the people in the United States will be diagnosed with PTSD at some point in their lives. The presence of PTSD in a surgical patient can be important because PTSD is associated with the use of psychoactive medications, risky health behaviors, cardiovascular comorbidities, depression, chronic pain, and cognitive dysfunction, all of which may influence the risk of perioperative morbidity and mortality. In addition, patients with PTSD are anxious around unfamiliar people and in unfamiliar environments. The purposes of this journal course are to provide anesthetists with a working knowledge of the symptoms, treatments, and comorbidities associated with PTSD and to suggest ways of interacting with patients with the disorder that increase trust and decrease the risk of evoking posttraumatic symptoms in the perioperative environment.

  14. Characteristics of PMHS Lumbar Motion Segments in Lateral Shear.

    PubMed

    Sundararajan, Srini; Prasad, Priya; Rouhana, Stephen W; Demetropoulos, Constantine K; Yang, King H; King, Albert I; Nolte, Lutz P

    2005-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the characteristics of eighteen lumbar spine motion segments subjected to lateral shear forces under quasi-static (0.5 mm/s) and dynamic (500 mm/s) test conditions. The quasi-static test was also performed on the lumbar spine of a side impact anthropomorphic test device, the EuroSID-2 (ES-2). In the quasi-static tests, the maximum force before disc-endplate separation in the PMHS lumbar motion segments was 1850 +/- 612 N, while the average linear stiffness of PMHS lumbar motion segments was 323 +/- 126 N/mm. There was a statistically significant difference between the quasi-static (1850 +/- 612 N) and dynamic (2616 +/- 1151 N) maximum shear forces. The ES-2 lumbar spine (149 N/mm) was more compliant than the PMHS lumbar segments under the quasi-static test condition.

  15. [Serious thromboembolitic incidents during lumbar spine phlebography].

    PubMed

    Gatti, P; Valat, J P; Videgrain, M

    1983-02-01

    From a series of 400 cases of lumbar spine phlebography by selective catheterisation, 4 serious thrombo-embolic episodes were observed, including 2 cases of severe pulmonary embolism which responded favourably to medical treatment. In 3 cases, risk factors were found (prolonged immobilisation in bed, past history of phlebitis). One case developed severe phlebitis of the lower limbs despite prophylactic treatment with low dose calcium heparin. In the other cases, no anti-coagulant therapy was prescribed before or during the examination.

  16. Lumbar nerve root: the enigmatic eponyms.

    PubMed

    Dyck, P

    1984-01-01

    Man's quest for recognition has not escaped the physician, whose contributions to medicine perpetuate his name in print. It is a final grasp for professional immortality, which for men like Imhotep and Hippocrates, has prevailed for millennia. This fervor was particularly evident in the latter 19th century, which created a flurry of eponyms, often two or more physicians publishing the same clinical observation. This article reviews the eponym epidemic as it relates to lumbar radiculopathy.

  17. Lumbar discal cyst in an elite athlete.

    PubMed

    Singleton, Alex; Agarwal, Vikas; Casagranda, Bethany; Hughes, Marion A; Rothfus, William E

    2013-01-01

    Our patient, a 22-year-old starting wide receiver for an NCAA Division I football team, presented with low back pain and sciatica. A lumbar-spine MRI without contrast demonstrated findings suspicious for discal cyst. The patient was referred for surgery, and the lesion was resected. The rarity of discal cyst makes it difficult to diagnose because most radiologists are not aware of the entity. An organized approach to diagnosis can facilitate appropriate management.

  18. Congenitally absent lumbar pedicle: a reappraisal

    SciTech Connect

    Wortzman, G.; Steinhardt, M.I.

    1984-09-01

    Three patients who had a diagnosis of congenitally absent lumbar pedicle underwent CT examination. Findings showed that each patient had an aberrant hypoplastic pedicle plus a retroisthmic defect in their ipsilateral lamina rather than an absent pedicle. Axial CT was the diagnostic modality of choice; reformated images were of little value. The differential diagnosis to be considered from the findings of plain film radiography includes pediculate thinning, neoplastic disease, neurofibroma, mesodermal dysplasia associated with neurofibromatosis, and vascular anomalies.

  19. Retrograde ejaculation after anterior lumbar spine surgery.

    PubMed

    Lindley, Emily M; McBeth, Zachary L; Henry, Sarah E; Cooley, Robert; Burger, Evalina L; Cain, Christopher M J; Patel, Vikas V

    2012-09-15

    A retrospective cohort study. To compare the incidence of retrograde ejaculation (RE) after anterior lumbar spine surgery with disc replacement versus fusion with the use of recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP). Anterior lumbar interbody fusion (ALIF) has become a popular choice for treating a number of pathologies, largely because it preserves the posterior paravertebral muscles and ligaments. Despite these advantages, the anterior approach is also associated with various complications, one of which is RE. A recent study has questioned whether the risk of RE is increased by the use of BMP in ALIF procedures rather than by the approach alone. We conducted a retrospective review of all male patients who received ALIF using BMP or artificial disc replacement (ADR) on at least the L5-S1 level between 2004 and 2011. Medical records were evaluated for the occurrence of RE, and patients were contacted via the phone to obtain current information. The incidence of RE was then compared between the 2 anterior lumbar surgery procedures. Of the 95 cases of anterior surgery including L5-S1, 54 patients underwent ALIF with BMP (56.8%) and 41 patients were treated with ADR (43.2%). Postoperative RE occurred in 4 of the 54 ALIF patients (7.4%) and in 4 of the 41 ADR patients (9.8%). The incidence of RE was not significantly different between groups (P = 0.7226). At latest follow-up, 1 ALIF and 1 ADR patient reported resolution of the RE. This study found that RE occurred at a similar rate in patients treated with ADR and ALIF with BMP. The overall rate of RE after retroperitoneal anterior lumbar surgery was higher than expected, which underscores the importance of counseling patients about this risk and specifically questioning patients about the symptoms of RE at postoperative visits.

  20. Catecholamines in Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-07-01

    could lead to memories that are too strong, contributing to the recurrent, intrusive retrieval of the traumatic events that occurs in PTSD. As a...emotionally arousing experiences are typically vivid and persistent. The recurrent, intrusive memories of traumatic events in post-traumatic stress disorder...signaling plays a critical role in the maintenance of waking and in the regulation of REM sleep. J Neurophysiol 92:2071–2082. Ouyang M, Zhang L, Zhu

  1. Posttraumatic stress disorder: the missed diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Grasso, Damion; Boonsiri, Joseph; Lipschitz, Deborah; Guyer, Amanda; Houshyar, Shadi; Douglas-Palumberi, Heather; Massey, Johari; Kaufman, Joan

    2009-01-01

    Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is frequently underdiagnosed in maltreated samples. Protective services information is critical for obtaining complete trauma histories and determining whether to survey PTSD symptoms in maltreated children. In the current study, without protective services information to supplement parent and child report, diagnosing PTSD was missed in a significant proportion of the cases. Collaboration between mental health professionals and protective service workers is critical in determining psychiatric diagnoses and treatment needs of children involved with the child welfare system.

  2. Incidence of Posttraumatic Shoulder Dislocation in Poland

    PubMed Central

    Szyluk, Karol J.; Jasiński, Andrzej; Mielnik, Michał; Koczy, Bogdan

    2016-01-01

    Background The incidence of shoulder joint dislocation has been estimated at 11–26 per 100 000 population per year. In our opinion, basic epidemiological data need to be continually updated in studies of large populations. To study the incidence of posttraumatic dislocation of the shoulder joint in the Polish population. Material/Methods We retrospectively investigated the entire Polish population between 1 January 2010 and 1 January 2015. To identify the study group, data collected in the electronic database of the National Health Fund were used. The study group was divided into subgroups to detect possible differences in the incidence of shoulder dislocation with regard to age, sex, and season of the year (month) when the dislocation occurred. Results The cumulative size of the study sample was 192.72 million over the 5 years of the study. We identified 51 409 patients with first posttraumatic shoulder dislocation, at a mean age of 50.83 years (SD 21.12), from 0 to 104 years. The incidence of traumatic shoulder dislocations for the entire study group ranged from 24.75/100 000/year (number of posttraumatic shoulder dislocations per 100 000 persons per year) to 29.09/100 000/year, for a mean of 26.69/100 000/year. Conclusions In this study, the overall incidence of first-time posttraumatic shoulder dislocations in the Polish general population was 26.69 per 100 000 persons per year. These results are higher than estimates presented by other authors. It is necessary to study, regularly update, and monitor this problem in the general population. PMID:27777396

  3. Linear Lumbar Localized Lysis of Elastic Fibers

    PubMed Central

    Tschen, Jaime A.

    2013-01-01

    Background: The absence or loss of elastic fibers in the skin is referred to as dermal elastolysis. Purpose: This paper describes a woman with a distinctive clinical presentation of mid-dermal elastolysis characterized morphologically by multiple horizontal raised bands on the lower back. Methods: A 20-year-old Filipino woman presented with multiple asymptomatic, flesh-colored, raised, firm, linear, cord-like bands on the lumbar area of her back. There were neither similar lesions elsewhere nor a family member with this condition. Results: Microscopic examination of the raised band showed nearly complete absence of elastic fibers in the mid dermis. In contrast, a biopsy of symmetrically located normal-appearing skin showed a uniform distribution of elastic fibers throughout the dermis. Linear lumbar localized elastolysis is a descriptive designation that accurately reflects a correlation of the clinical and pathological changes of this condition. Conclusion: The clinical differential of raised horizontal cord-like bands on the lower back (without a family history of an inherited elastic fiber disorder, a prior history of trauma, or a significant change in weight or exercise habit) includes linear focal elastosis and linear lumbar localized elastolysis. Microscopic evaluation of a Verhoeff-van Gieson stained lesion specimen (which may be accompanied by a biopsy of normal-appearing skin for comparison) will readily differentiate these conditions. The former is usually characterized by increased elastic fibers, whereas the latter, as in this patient, shows a paucity or absence of elastic fibers in the mid dermis. PMID:23882313

  4. Subarachnoid hemorrhage due to retained lumbar drain.

    PubMed

    Guppy, Kern H; Silverthorn, James W; Akins, Paul T

    2011-12-01

    Intrathecal spinal catheters (lumbar drains) are indicated for several medical and surgical conditions. In neurosurgical procedures, they are used to reduce intracranial and intrathecal pressures by diverting CSF. They have also been placed for therapeutic access to administer drugs, and more recently, vascular surgeons have used them to improve spinal cord perfusion during the treatment of thoracic aortic aneurysms. Insertion of these lumbar drains is not without attendant complications. One complication is the shearing of the distal end of the catheter with a resultant retained fragment. The authors report the case of a 65-year-old man who presented with a subarachnoid hemorrhage due to the migration of a retained lumbar drain that sheared off during its removal. To the best of the authors' knowledge, this is the first case of rostral migration of a retained intrathecal catheter causing subarachnoid hemorrhage. The authors review the literature on retained intrathecal spinal catheters, and their findings support either early removal of easily accessible catheters or close monitoring with serial imaging.

  5. Minimally Invasive Laminectomy in Spondylolisthetic Lumbar Stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Caralopoulos, Ilias N.; Bui, Cuong J.

    2014-01-01

    Background Degenerative lumbar stenosis associated with spondylolisthesis is common in elderly patients. The most common symptoms are those of neurogenic claudication with leg pain. Surgery is indicated for those who fail conservative management. The generally accepted recommendation is to perform a laminectomy and a fusion at the involved level. Methods We reviewed our results for minimally invasive single-level decompression without fusion performed by the senior author in patients with symptomatic lumbar stenosis with spondylolisthesis with no dynamic instability from 2008 to 2011 at a single institution. Outcomes were measured using the visual analog scale (VAS), Prolo Economic Functional Rating Scale, and revised Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) at initial presentation and at 3-month, 6-month, and 1-year follow-up time points. Results Records for 28 patients (19 males, 9 females) were reviewed. The success rate, defined as improvement in pain and functional outcome without the need for surgical fusion, was 86%. VAS scores decreased by 6.3 points, Prolo scores increased by 3.5 points, and the ODI decreased by 31% at 1 year. All changes were statistically significant. Conclusion Minimally invasive decompression alone can be a reasonable alternative to decompression and fusion for patients with spondylolisthetic lumbar stenosis and neurogenic claudication with leg pain. Decompression without fusion should be considered for older patients and for patients who are not ideal fusion candidates. PMID:24688331

  6. Design concepts in lumbar total disc arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Bellini, Chiara M.; Zweig, Thomas; Ferguson, Stephen; Raimondi, Manuela T.; Lamartina, Claudio; Brayda-Bruno, Marco; Fornari, Maurizio

    2008-01-01

    The implantation of lumbar disc prostheses based on different design concepts is widely accepted. This paper reviews currently available literature studies on the biomechanics of TDA in the lumbar spine, and is targeted at the evaluation of possible relationships between the aims of TDA and the geometrical, mechanical and material properties of the various available disc prostheses. Both theoretical and experimental studies were analyzed, by a PUBMED search (performed in February 2007, revised in January 2008), focusing on single level TDA. Both semi-constrained and unconstrained lumbar discs seem to be able to restore nearly physiological IAR locations and ROM values. However, both increased and decreased ROM was stated in some papers, unrelated to the clinical outcome. Segmental lordosis alterations after TDA were reported in most cases, for both constrained and unconstrained disc prostheses. An increase in the load through the facet joints was documented, for both semi-constrained and unconstrained artificial discs, but with some contrasting results. Semi-constrained devices may be able to share a greater part of the load, thus protecting the surrounding biological structure from overloading and possible early degeneration, but may be more susceptible to wear. The next level of development will be the biomechanical integration of compression across the motion segment. All these findings need to be supported by long-term clinical outcome studies. PMID:18946684

  7. Risk Factors for Recurrent Lumbar Disc Herniations

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The most common complication after lumbar discectomy is reherniation. As the first step in reducing the rate of recurrence, many studies have been conducted to find out the factors that may increase the reherniation risk. Some reported factors are age, sex, the type of lumbar disc herniation, the amount of fragments removed, smoking, alcohol consumption and the length of restricted activities. In this review, the factors studied thus far are summarized, excepting factors which cannot be chosen or changed, such as age or sex. Apart from the factors shown here, many other risk factors such as diabetes, family history, history of external injury, duration of illness and body mass index are considered. Few are agreed upon by all. The reason for the diverse opinions may be that many clinical and biomechanical variables are involved in the prognosis following operation. For the investigation of risk factors in recurrent lumbar disc herniation, large-scale multicenter prospective studies will be required in the future. PMID:24761206

  8. Effect of Load Carriage on Lumbar Spine Kinematics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-01-01

    markers 14 – 16 , 18 and ground force plates 7 , 18 , 19 to measure body positioning and ground reac- tion forces . These methods approach...data obtained in this setting do not refl ect the state of the lumbar spine in the upright position due to alterations in bone- muscle interactions...lumbar spine might be related to the greater forces acting on inferior levels through the lumbar spine 38 and that IVDs of inferior levels undergo

  9. Lumbar Spine Musculoskeletal Physiology and Biomechanics During Simulated Military Operations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-06-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-13-2-0043 TITLE: Lumbar Spine Musculoskeletal Physiology and Biomechanics During Simulated Military Operations PRINCIPAL...TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Lumbar Spine Musculoskeletal Physiology and Biomechanics During Simulated Military Operations 5b. GRANT NUMBER...evaluated the relationship between 3D geometry of the lumbar spine, under different loading conditions and positions, and the pathophysiology of the

  10. Lumbar Spine Musculoskeletal Physiology and Biomechanics During Simulated Military Operations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-06-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-13-2-0043 TITLE: Lumbar Spine Musculoskeletal Physiology and Biomechanics During Simulated Military Operations PRINCIPAL...TITLE AND SUBTITLE Sa. CONTRACT NUMBER Lumbar Spine Musculoske l etal Physiol ogy and Biomechanics Dur i ng s i mul ated Military Operati ons Sb...l ationship between 3D geometry of the lumbar spine, under different l oading conditions and positions , and the pathophysiol ogy of the

  11. Lumbar Spine Musculoskeletal Physiology and Biomechanics During Simulated Military Operations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-06-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-13-2-0043 TITLE: Lumbar Spine Musculoskeletal Physiology and Biomechanics During Simulated Military Operations PRINCIPAL...31May2016 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Lumbar Spine Musculoskeletal Physiology and Biomechanics 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER During Simulated Military Operations 5b...ABSTRACT This study evaluated the relationship between 3D geometry of the lumbar spine, under different loading conditions and positions, and the

  12. The Neandertal vertebral column 2: The lumbar spine.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Olivencia, Asier; Arlegi, Mikel; Barash, Alon; Stock, Jay T; Been, Ella

    2017-05-01

    Here we provide the most extensive metric and morphological analysis performed to date on the Neandertal lumbar spine. Neandertal lumbar vertebrae show differences from modern humans in both the vertebral body and in the neural arch, although not all Neandertal lumbar vertebrae differ from modern humans in the same way. Differences in the vertebral foramen are restricted to the lowermost lumbar vertebrae (L4 and L5), differences in the orientation of the upper articular facets appear in the uppermost lumbar vertebrae (probably in L1 and L2-L3), and differences in the horizontal angle of the transverse process appear in L2-L4. Neandertals, when compared to modern humans, show a smaller degree of lumbar lordosis. Based on a still limited fossil sample, early hominins (australopiths and Homo erectus) had a lumbar lordosis that was similar to but below the mean of modern humans. Here, we hypothesize that from this ancestral degree of lumbar lordosis, the Neandertal lineage decreased their lumbar lordosis and Homo sapiens slightly increased theirs. From a postural point of view, the lower degree of lordosis is related to a more vertical position of the sacrum, which is also positioned more ventrally with respect to the dorsal end of the pelvis. This results in a spino-pelvic alignment that, though different from modern humans, maintained an economic postural equilibrium. Some features, such as a lower degree of lumbar lordosis, were already present in the middle Pleistocene populations ancestral to Neandertals. However, these middle Pleistocene populations do not show the full suite of Neandertal lumbar morphologies, which probably means that the characteristic features of the Neandertal lumbar spine did not arise all at once. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Post-traumatic elbow rotational stiffness

    PubMed Central

    Ling, Samuel KK; Faan, Yan Sui; Lui, Paulina WY; Ngai, Wai Kit

    2014-01-01

    Background The elbow is an important but complex structure, with movement in both the sagittal plane in flexion and extension, as well as the rotational plane in forearm supination and pronation. Trauma is a common cause of elbow stiffness, which significantly hampers daily function. There are currently no gold-standard management guidelines for post-traumatic elbow stiffness, and most of the published literature focuses solely on the sagittal plane of motion. Methods This is a retrospective case series reviewing all patients who underwent a surgical release for treatment of post-traumatic elbow stiffness during a 36-month period. Motion range and the shortened version of the Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand scores were serially measured and analyzed. Results The results obtained showed that both the sagittal and rotational range of motion directly influenced upper limb function; however, the relationship between these two motion planes was weak, meaning that both sagittal and rotational motion in the elbow need be addressed individually. Post-traumatic elbow stiffness could be aptly managed by various surgical approaches, including arthroscopic-assisted procedures; these were all effective in increasing both the sagittal and rotational range of motion. More importantly, this gain in range translated to a statistically significant improvement in upper limb function. Conclusions Management of elbow stiffness needs to be tackled in both the sagittal and rotational motion planes. PMID:27582925

  14. Etiology of lumbar lordosis and its pathophysiology: a review of the evolution of lumbar lordosis, and the mechanics and biology of lumbar degeneration.

    PubMed

    Sparrey, Carolyn J; Bailey, Jeannie F; Safaee, Michael; Clark, Aaron J; Lafage, Virginie; Schwab, Frank; Smith, Justin S; Ames, Christopher P

    2014-05-01

    The goal of this review is to discuss the mechanisms of postural degeneration, particularly the loss of lumbar lordosis commonly observed in the elderly in the context of evolution, mechanical, and biological studies of the human spine and to synthesize recent research findings to clinical management of postural malalignment. Lumbar lordosis is unique to the human spine and is necessary to facilitate our upright posture. However, decreased lumbar lordosis and increased thoracic kyphosis are hallmarks of an aging human spinal column. The unique upright posture and lordotic lumbar curvature of the human spine suggest that an understanding of the evolution of the human spinal column, and the unique anatomical features that support lumbar lordosis may provide insight into spine health and degeneration. Considering evolution of the skeleton in isolation from other scientific studies provides a limited picture for clinicians. The evolution and development of human lumbar lordosis highlight the interdependence of pelvic structure and lumbar lordosis. Studies of fossils of human lineage demonstrate a convergence on the degree of lumbar lordosis and the number of lumbar vertebrae in modern Homo sapiens. Evolution and spine mechanics research show that lumbar lordosis is dictated by pelvic incidence, spinal musculature, vertebral wedging, and disc health. The evolution, mechanics, and biology research all point to the importance of spinal posture and flexibility in supporting optimal health. However, surgical management of postural deformity has focused on restoring posture at the expense of flexibility. It is possible that the need for complex and costly spinal fixation can be eliminated by developing tools for early identification of patients at risk for postural deformities through patient history (genetics, mechanics, and environmental exposure) and tracking postural changes over time.

  15. Delayed Retroperitoneal Hemorrhage due to Lumbar Artery Pseudoaneurysm after Lumbar Posterolateral Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Young Min; Choi, Ha Young

    2013-01-01

    A 55-year-old female patient presented with lower back pain and neurogenic intermittent claudication and underwent L3-L4 posterolateral fusion. To prepare the bone fusion bed, the transverse process of L3 and L4 was decorticated with a drill. On the 9th post-operative day, the patient complained of a sudden onset of severe abdominal pain and distension. Abdominal computed tomography revealed retroperitoneal hematoma in the right psoas muscle and iatrogenic right L3 transverse process fracture. Lumbar spinal angiography showed the delayed hematoma due to rupture of the 2nd lumbar artery pseudoaneurysm and coil embolization was done at the ruptured lumbar artery pseudoaneusyrm. Since then, the patient's postoperative progress proceeded normally with recovery of the hemodynamic parameters. PMID:24294460

  16. Risk-benefit analysis of lumbar puncture to evaluate for nontraumatic subarachnoid hemorrhage in adult ED patients.

    PubMed

    Migdal, Victoria L; Wu, W Kelly; Long, Drew; McNaughton, Candace D; Ward, Michael J; Self, Wesley H

    2015-11-01

    The objective of the study is to compare the risks and benefits of lumbar puncture (LP) to evaluate for subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) after a normal head computed tomographic (CT) scan. This was an observational study of adult emergency department patients at a single hospital who presented with headache and underwent LP after a normal head CT to evaluate for SAH. Lumbar puncture results classified as indicating a SAH included xanthochromia in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) or red blood cells in the final tube of CSF with an aneurysm or arteriovenous malformation on cerebral angiography. An LP-related complication was defined as hospitalization or a return visit due to symptoms attributed to the LP. Proportions of the study patients who had SAH diagnosed by LP and who experienced an LP-related complication were compared. The study included 302 patients, including 2 (0.66%) who were diagnosed with SAH based on LP (number needed to diagnose, 151); both of these patients had a known intracranial aneurysm. Eighteen (5.96%) patients experienced an LP-related complication (P < .01 compared with number with SAH diagnosed; number needed to harm, 17). Complications included 12 patients with low-pressure headaches, 4 with pain at the LP site, and 2 with contaminated CSF cultures. The yield of LP for diagnosing SAH in adults with nontraumatic headache after a normal head CT was very low. The severity of LP-related complications was low, but complications were more common than SAH diagnoses. Lumbar puncture may not be advisable after a normal head CT to evaluate for SAH, particularly in patients with low-risk clinical features for SAH. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. MRI of the lumbar spine at 7 Tesla in healthy volunteers and a patient with congenital malformations.

    PubMed

    Grams, Astrid E; Kraff, Oliver; Umutlu, Lale; Maderwald, Stefan; Dammann, Philipp; Ladd, Mark E; Forsting, Michael; Gizewski, Elke R

    2012-05-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate sequences that are established at lower magnetic field strengths for lumbar spine imaging at 7 Tesla (7 T) MR imaging. The lumbar spine of five healthy volunteers and a patient with spina bifida and meningocele were evaluated at 7 T. The examination included a T2-TSE (turbo spin echo), a 3D-DESS (double-echo steady-state sequence), a 3D-CISS (constructive interference in steady-state sequence), and a 3D-VIBE (volumetric interpolated breath hold examination) sequence. Imaging quality was evaluated by two raters on a three-level scale. The assessment included visualization of intraforaminal structures, the cauda equina, facet joints, and any abnormalities. Contrast ratios for intervertebral discs/vertebral bodies, vertebral bodies/cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and CSF/spinal cord were calculated. The 3D-VIBE sequence provided best differentiation between intraforaminal structures. Visualization of the facet joints was reliable with VIBE, DESS, and CISS. Individual nerve roots of the cauda equina could only be delineated with the 3D-CISS sequence. CISS and DESS provided good contrast between vertebral bodies and intervertebral discs. Contrast between CSF and vertebral bodies was most pronounced for the T2-TSE sequence. Sufficient contrast between CSF and the spinal cord was only achieved with the T2-TSE sequence. VIBE and DESS sequences demonstrated best the bony malformations. Visualization of the meningocele was only possible with the 3D-CISS sequence. At 7 T most structures of the lumbar spine were visualized with a combination of sequences. At present, imaging quality is not superior to 1.5 T or 3 T, precluding routine clinical use.

  18. Analysis of the Cerebrospinal Fluid Proteome in Alzheimer's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Khoonsari, Payam Emami; Häggmark, Anna; Lönnberg, Maria; Mikus, Maria; Kilander, Lena; Lannfelt, Lars; Bergquist, Jonas; Ingelsson, Martin; Nilsson, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease is a neurodegenerative disorder accounting for more than 50% of cases of dementia. Diagnosis of Alzheimer’s disease relies on cognitive tests and analysis of amyloid beta, protein tau, and hyperphosphorylated tau in cerebrospinal fluid. Although these markers provide relatively high sensitivity and specificity for early disease detection, they are not suitable for monitor of disease progression. In the present study, we used label-free shotgun mass spectrometry to analyse the cerebrospinal fluid proteome of Alzheimer’s disease patients and non-demented controls to identify potential biomarkers for Alzheimer’s disease. We processed the data using five programs (DecyderMS, Maxquant, OpenMS, PEAKS, and Sieve) and compared their results by means of reproducibility and peptide identification, including three different normalization methods. After depletion of high abundant proteins we found that Alzheimer’s disease patients had lower fraction of low-abundance proteins in cerebrospinal fluid compared to healthy controls (p<0.05). Consequently, global normalization was found to be less accurate compared to using spiked-in chicken ovalbumin for normalization. In addition, we determined that Sieve and OpenMS resulted in the highest reproducibility and PEAKS was the programs with the highest identification performance. Finally, we successfully verified significantly lower levels (p<0.05) of eight proteins (A2GL, APOM, C1QB, C1QC, C1S, FBLN3, PTPRZ, and SEZ6) in Alzheimer’s disease compared to controls using an antibody-based detection method. These proteins are involved in different biological roles spanning from cell adhesion and migration, to regulation of the synapse and the immune system. PMID:26950848

  19. Kinematic analysis of dynamic lumbar motion in patients with lumbar segmental instability using digital videofluoroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Maroufi, Nader; Behtash, Hamid; Zekavat, Hajar; Parnianpour, Mohamad

    2009-01-01

    The study design is a prospective, case–control. The aim of this study was to develop a reliable measurement technique for the assessment of lumbar spine kinematics using digital video fluoroscopy in a group of patients with low back pain (LBP) and a control group. Lumbar segmental instability (LSI) is one subgroup of nonspecific LBP the diagnosis of which has not been clarified. The diagnosis of LSI has traditionally relied on the use of lateral functional (flexion–extension) radiographs but use of this method has proven unsatisfactory. Fifteen patients with chronic low back pain suspected to have LSI and 15 matched healthy subjects were recruited. Pulsed digital videofluoroscopy was used to investigate kinematics of lumbar motion segments during flexion and extension movements in vivo. Intersegmental linear translation and angular displacement, and pathway of instantaneous center of rotation (PICR) were calculated for each lumbar motion segment. Movement pattern of lumbar spine between two groups and during the full sagittal plane range of motion were analyzed using ANOVA with repeated measures design. Intersegmental linear translation was significantly higher in patients during both flexion and extension movements at L5–S1 segment (p < 0.05). Arc length of PICR was significantly higher in patients for L1–L2 and L5–S1 motion segments during extension movement (p < 0.05). This study determined some kinematic differences between two groups during the full range of lumbar spine. Devices, such as digital videofluoroscopy can assist in identifying better criteria for diagnosis of LSI in otherwise nonspecific low back pain patients in hope of providing more specific treatment. PMID:19727854

  20. Percutaneous endoscopic transforaminal lumbar spinal canal decompression for lumbar spinal stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Bingtao; Zhang, Xifeng; Zhang, Lin; Huang, Peng; Zheng, Guoquan

    2016-01-01

    Abstract This study aimed to evaluate the safety and curative effect of percutaneous endoscopic transforaminal lumbar spinal canal decompression in the treatment of lumbar spinal stenosis. This retrospective study recruited 64 patients with lumbar spinal stenosis who underwent percutaneous endoscopic lumbar spinal canal decompression via surgical approach of posterolateral intervertebral foramen. The postoperation neurological function and pain status were evaluated by the visual analog scale (VAS) score of pain and the Oswestry disability index (ODI), and the patient satisfaction was evaluated according to the MacNab outcome criteria. The data, including preoperative comorbidities, operation time, the quantity of bleeding, bed rest time, and intraoperative and postoperative complications, were recorded. The mean operation time was 78 min, the mean quantity of bleeding was 20 mL and bed rest time was 6 h to 3 days. All patients were followed-up for 4 months to 5 years. The mean preoperative VAS score was 7.7 ± 1.2, while postoperative 3 months, 6 months, and final follow-up VAS scores were 2.8 ± 0.7, 2.1 ± 0.6, and 0.8 ± 0.6, respectively (P < 0.001). The mean preoperative ODI score was 72.4 ± 1.2, while postoperative 3 months, 6 months, and final follow-up ODI scores were 29.7 ± 4.9, 23.9 ± 4.0, and 12.5 ± 3.9, respectively (P < 0.001). The excellent and good rate reached 73.4% at the final follow-up. The percutaneous endoscopic transforaminal lumbar spinal canal decompression is an easy, safe, and effective minimally invasive surgery for patients with lumbar spinal stenosis. PMID:27977571

  1. Weightlifter Lumbar Physiology Health Influence Factor Analysis of Sports Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiangyang

    2015-01-01

    Chinese women's weightlifting project has been in the advanced world level, suggests that the Chinese coaches and athletes have many successful experience in the weight lifting training. Little weight lifting belongs to high-risk sports, however, to the lumbar spine injury, some young good athletes often due to lumbar trauma had to retire, and the national investment and athletes toil is regret things. This article from the perspective of sports medicine, weightlifting athletes training situation analysis and put forward Suggestions, aimed at avoiding lumbar injury, guarantee the health of athletes. In this paper, first of all to 50 professional women's weightlifting athletes doing investigation, found that 82% of the athletes suffer from lumbar disease symptoms, the reason is mainly composed of lumbar strain, intensity is too large, motion error caused by three factors. From the Angle of sports medicine and combined with the characteristics of the structure of human body skeleton athletes lumbar structural mechanics analysis, find out the lumbar force's two biggest technical movement, study, and regulate the action standard, so as to minimize lumbar force, for athletes to contribute to the health of the lumbar spine. PMID:26981162

  2. Cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers of neurodegeneration in chronic neurological diseases.

    PubMed

    Tumani, Hayrettin; Teunissen, Charlotte; Süssmuth, Sigurd; Otto, Markus; Ludolph, Albert C; Brettschneider, Johannes

    2008-07-01

    Chronic neurological diseases (CND) like amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), dementia or multiple sclerosis (MS) share a chronic progressive course of disease that frequently leads to the common pathological pathway of neurodegeneration, including neuroaxonal damage, apoptosis and gliosis. There is an ongoing search for biomarkers that could support early diagnosis of CND and help to identify responders to interventions in therapeutic treatment trials. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) is a promising source of biomarkers in CND, since the CSF compartment is in close anatomical contact with the brain interstitial fluid, where biochemical changes related to CND are reflected. We review recent advances in CSF biomarkers research in CND and thereby focus on markers associated with neurodegeneration.

  3. Confocal Raman microscopy of pathologic cells in cerebrospinal fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonchukov, S. A.; Lonkina, T. V.; Minaeva, S. A.; Sundukov, A. V.; Migmanov, T. E.; Lademann, J.; Darvin, M. E.; Bagratashvili, V. N.

    2014-01-01

    In this work, the spatial localization of leucocytes, bacteria, and erythrocytes in the crystal pattern of a dried droplet of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) is established. Characteristic lines are detected and identified in the Raman spectrum of the CSF that point to the presence of pathologic cells therein and can be used in a timely way to diagnose meningitis, the spectroscopic sample preparation procedure being simple enough. A dry CSF sample retains its characteristic spectral features for no less than three days, which is important for its safe keeping and transportation, and also for the computer processing of its spectra.

  4. Secretion of laminin alpha 2 chain in cerebrospinal fluid.

    PubMed

    Yamada, H; Hori, H; Tanaka, T; Fujita, S; Fukuta-Ohi, H; Hojo, S; Tamura, A; Shimizu, T; Matsumura, K

    1995-11-27

    The absence of laminin alpha 2 chain causes muscle cell degeneration and peripheral dysmyelination in congenital muscular dystrophy patients and dy mice, suggesting its role in the maintenance of sarcolemmal architecture and peripheral myelinogenesis. Here we demonstrate the secretion of laminin alpha 2 chain in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). Laminin alpha 2 chain was detected as a minor component of the total CSF proteins or glycoproteins. Laminin alpha 2 chain was localized in the cytoplasm of epithelial cells of choroid plexus, suggesting active secretion. Our results suggest that immunochemical analysis of CSF laminin alpha 2 chain could be useful as an aid for the diagnosis of congenital muscular dystrophy.

  5. Cerebrospinal Fluid and Hydrocephalus: Physiology, Diagnosis, and Treatment.

    PubMed

    Filis, Andreas K; Aghayev, Kamran; Vrionis, Frank D

    2017-01-01

    Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) is found around and inside the brain and vertebral column. CSF plays a crucial role in the protection and homeostasis of neural tissue. Key points on the physiology of CSF as well as the diagnostic and treatment options for hydrocephalus are discussed. Understanding the fundamentals of the production, absorption, dynamics, and pathophysiology of CSF is crucial for addressing hydrocephalus. Shunts and endoscopic third ventriculostomy have changed the therapeutic landscape of hydrocephalus. The treatment of hydrocephalus in adults and children represents a large part of everyday practice for the neurologist, both in benign cases and cancer-related diagnoses.

  6. [Strategies for cerebrospinal fluid analysis - Integrated results report].

    PubMed

    Uhr, M; Tumani, H; Lange, P

    2016-12-01

    Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) analysis requires a combined assessment of all individual test findings in an integrated total report in order to achieve a reliable and specific diagnostic conclusion. Such a standard assessment strategy allows the identification of disease-typical result patterns and plausibility checks to avoid analytical errors. The integrated total report consists of 1) a basic CSF program with cytological and protein chemical parameters, 2) an expanded CSF program with special parameters for detection of pathogens and markers of neurodegeneration and 3) a final contextual interpretation considering methodological and clinical aspects.

  7. Methods for chromatofocusing of cerebrospinal fluid and serum immunoglobulin G.

    PubMed

    Gallo, P; Olsson, O; Sidén, A

    1985-06-26

    Chromatofocusing programs were designed for separations of submilligram amounts of normal and abnormal human IgG. The Pharmacia FPLC system, equipped with a Mono P column or a specially designed, small column was used for the separations. Normal IgG in paired cerebrospinal fluid and serum samples, paired samples from patients with intrathecal immunoglobulin G synthesis, as well as sera with IgG M components were examined. Abnormal immunoglobulin G components, especially those with pI values greater than ca. 7.0 pH units, were easily identified.

  8. Cerebrospinal fluid rhinorrhea and unilateral nasal polyposis: a case report.

    PubMed

    Gallina, E; Gallo, O; Bottai, G V; Ammannati, F

    1990-01-01

    We report a case of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) rhinorrhea and unilateral polyposis in a 53-year-old woman. The clinical features, tomograms, and CT scan with Metrizamide infusion are examined. The analysis of this case evidences that: 1) A CSF can occur also after a long time (3 years) following a head injury; 2) CT cisternography with Metrizamide can demonstrate a leakage, but not always the fluid egress from the intracranial cavity; and 3) A CSF rhinorrhea may be the primary cause and not an occasional association or complication of a reactive phlogistic nasal disease.

  9. Entamoeba histolytica encephalitis diagnosed by PCR of cerebrospinal fluid.

    PubMed

    Solaymani-Mohammadi, Shahram; Lam, Maggie M; Zunt, Joseph R; Petri, William A

    2007-03-01

    Extra-intestinal amebiasis is secondary to invasive intestinal infections and usually results in an amebic liver abscess. Other organs, including lungs, brain, skin, spleen and kidneys, may be involved. Diagnosis of the cerebral infection is of the utmost importance and is most often made by detection of the organism at the time of brain biopsy or at autopsy. We report the first case of Entamoeba histolytica encephalitis diagnosed by PCR of the cerebrospinal fluid. The patient was treated successfully with metronidazole. PCR is an increasingly useful tool for the diagnosis of central nervous system infection and can provide rapid diagnosis.

  10. Revision Surgery Following Operations for Lumbar Stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Deyo, Richard A.; Martin, Brook I.; Kreuter, William; Jarvik, Jeffrey G.; Angier, Heather; Mirza, Sohail K.

    2011-01-01

    Background: For carefully selected patients with lumbar stenosis, decompression surgery is more efficacious than nonoperative treatment. However, some patients undergo repeat surgery, often because of complications, the failure to achieve solid fusion following arthrodesis procedures, or persistent symptoms. We assessed the probability of repeat surgery following operations for the treatment of lumbar stenosis and examined its association with patient age, comorbidity, previous surgery, and the type of surgical procedure. Methods: We performed a retrospective cohort analysis of Medicare claims. The index operation was performed in 2004 (n = 31,543), with follow-up obtained through 2008. Operations were grouped by complexity as decompression alone, simple arthrodesis (one or two disc levels and a single surgical approach), or complex arthrodesis (more than two disc levels or combined anterior and posterior approach). Reoperation rates were calculated for each follow-up year, and the time to reoperation was analyzed with proportional hazards models. Results: The probability of repeat surgery fell with increasing patient age or comorbidity. Aside from age, the strongest predictor was previous lumbar surgery: at four years the reoperation rate was 17.2% among patients who had had lumbar surgery prior to the index operation, compared with 10.6% among those with no prior surgery (p < 0.001). At one year, the reoperation rate for patients who had been managed with decompression alone was slightly higher than that for patients who had been managed with simple arthrodesis, but by four years the rates for these two groups were identical (10.7%) and were lower than the rate for patients who had been managed with complex arthrodesis (13.5%) (p < 0.001). This difference persisted after adjusting for demographic and clinical features (hazard ratio for complex arthrodesis versus decompression 1.56, 95% confidence interval, 1.26 to 1.92). A device-related complication was reported

  11. Lumbar discal cyst with spontaneous regression and subsequent occurrence of lumbar disc herniation.

    PubMed

    Takeshima, Yasuhiro; Takahashi, Toshiyuki; Hanakita, Junya; Watanabe, Mizuki; Kitahama, Yoshihiro; Kuraishi, Keita; Uesaka, Toshio; Minami, Manabu; Nakase, Hiroyuki

    2011-01-01

    A 39-year-old man presented with an extremely rare discal cyst at the L3-4 level manifesting as a left L4 radiculopathy. Two months after onset, he suffered right L4 radiculopathy with new lumbar disc protrusion. Five months after medical treatment, the patient's symptoms improved, and the discal cyst showed complete regression on magnetic resonance imaging. Most cases of discal cyst are surgically treated, with only two previous cases of spontaneous regression. The present case suggests clinical and radiological recovery of symptomatic lumbar discal cyst can be obtained by only conservative therapy.

  12. Characterization of lumbar spinous process morphology: a cadaveric study of 2,955 human lumbar vertebrae.

    PubMed

    Shaw, Jeremy D; Shaw, Daniel L; Cooperman, Daniel R; Eubanks, Jason D; Li, Ling; Kim, David H

    2015-07-01

    Despite the interest in lumbar spinous process (SP)-based surgical innovation, there are no large published studies that have characterized the morphometry of lumbar SPs. To provide accurate level-specific morphometric data with respect to human lumbar SPs using a human cadaveric lumbar spine model and to describe the morphometric variation of lumbar SPs with respect to gender, race, and age. An anatomic observational study. This study used 2,955 cadaveric lumbar vertebrae from 591 adult spines at the Hamann-Todd Human Osteological Collection. Specimens were aged 20 to 79 years. Each vertebra was photographed in standardized positions and measured using ImageJ software. Direct measurements were made for the SP length, width, height, slope, and caudal morphology. Gender, race, and age were recorded and analyzed. Spinous process length was 24.8±4.6 mm (L5) to 33.9±3.9 mm (L3). Effective length varied from 19.5±2.6 mm (L1) to 24.6±3.3 mm (L4). Height was shortest at L5 (18.2±2.7 mm). Caudal width was greater than the cranial width. Slope, caudal morphology, and radius measures showed large interspecimen variation. Slope at L5 was steeper than other levels (23.7°±10.5°, p<.0001). Most specimens demonstrated convex caudal morphology. L4 had the highest proportion of convexity (80.7%). L1 was the only level with predominantly concave morphology. Measurements for female SPs were smaller, but the slope was steeper. Anatomic and effective SP lengths were longer for specimens from white individuals. Specimens from black individuals had larger width and height, as well as steeper slope. Black specimens had more convex morphology at L4 and L5. With increasing age, the SP length, effective length, and width increased. Height increased with age only at L4 and L5. Slope and caudal radius of curvature decreased with age, and increasingly convex morphology was noted at most levels. This large cadaveric study provides level-specific morphometric data regarding the osseous

  13. Pelvic incidence-lumbar lordosis mismatch predisposes to adjacent segment disease after lumbar spinal fusion.

    PubMed

    Rothenfluh, Dominique A; Mueller, Daniel A; Rothenfluh, Esin; Min, Kan

    2015-06-01

    Several risk factors and causes of adjacent segment disease have been debated; however, no quantitative relationship to spino-pelvic parameters has been established so far. A retrospective case-control study was carried out to investigate spino-pelvic alignment in patients with adjacent segment disease compared to a control group. 45 patients (ASDis) were identified that underwent revision surgery for adjacent segment disease after on average 49 months (7-125), 39 patients were selected as control group (CTRL) similar in the distribution of the matching variables, such as age, gender, preoperative degenerative changes, and numbers of segments fused with a mean follow-up of 84 months (61-142) (total n = 84). Several radiographic parameters were measured on pre- and postoperative radiographs, including lumbar lordosis measured (LL), sacral slope, pelvic incidence (PI), and tilt. Significant differences between ASDis and CTRL groups on preoperative radiographs were seen for PI (60.9 ± 10.0° vs. 51.7 ± 10.4°, p = 0.001) and LL (48.1 ± 12.5° vs. 53.8 ± 10.8°, p = 0.012). Pelvic incidence was put into relation to lumbar lordosis by calculating the difference between pelvic incidence and lumbar lordosis (∆PILL = PI-LL, ASDis 12.5 ± 16.7° vs. CTRL 3.4 ± 12.1°, p = 0.001). A cutoff value of 9.8° was determined by logistic regression and ROC analysis and patients classified into a type A (∆PILL <10°) and a type B (∆PILL ≥10°) alignment according to pelvic incidence-lumbar lordosis mismatch. In type A spino-pelvic alignment, 25.5 % of patients underwent revision surgery for adjacent segment disease, whereas 78.3 % of patients classified as type B alignment had revision surgery. Classification of patients into type A and B alignments yields a sensitivity for predicting adjacent segment disease of 71 %, a specificity of 81 % and an odds ratio of 10.6. In degenerative disease of the lumbar spine a high pelvic incidence with diminished lumbar lordosis seems

  14. Trauma-exposed firefighters: relationships among posttraumatic growth, posttraumatic stress, resource availability, coping and critical incident stress debriefing experience.

    PubMed

    Sattler, David N; Boyd, Bill; Kirsch, Julie

    2014-12-01

    This project examines protective factors associated with resilience/posttraumatic growth and risk factors associated with posttraumatic stress among firefighters exposed to critical incidents. The participants were 286 (257 men and 29 women) volunteer and paid firefighters in Whatcom County, Washington. Participants completed an anonymous survey asking about demographics, critical incident exposure, posttraumatic stress symptoms, posttraumatic growth, resource availability, coping, occupational stress and critical incident stress debriefing experience. Most participants had significant critical incident exposure, and about half had attended critical incident stress debriefing sessions. Posttraumatic growth was associated with being female, critical incident exposure, critical incident stress debriefing attendance, posttraumatic stress symptoms (negative association), occupational support, occupation satisfaction, occupational effort, problem-focused coping, emotion-focused coping and personal characteristic resources. Posttraumatic stress symptoms were positively associated with years of firefighting, burnout, occupational effort and disengagement coping and negatively associated with critical incident stress debriefing attendance, posttraumatic growth, social support, internal locus of control, personal characteristic resources, energy resources and condition resources. The findings support conservation of resources stress theory and show that the maintenance and acquisition of resources can offset losses and facilitate resilience/posttraumatic growth. Implications of the findings for enhancing firefighter resources, facilitating resilience and minimizing occupational stressors are discussed. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  15. Intraocular pressure and estimated cerebrospinal fluid pressure. The Beijing Eye Study 2011.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ya Xing; Jonas, Jost B; Wang, Ningli; You, Qi Sheng; Yang, Diya; Xie, Xiao Bin; Xu, Liang

    2014-01-01

    To examine a potential association between intraocular pressure (IOP) and cerebrospinal fluid pressure (CSFP) in a population-based setting. The population-based Beijing Eye Study 2011 included 3468 individuals with a mean age of 64.6±9.8 years (range: 50-93 years). A detailed ophthalmic examination was performed. Based on a previous study with lumbar cerebrospinal fluid pressure (CSFP) measurements, CSFP was calculated as CSFP [mm Hg] = 0.44×Body Mass Index [kg/m2]+0.16×Diastolic Blood Pressure [mm Hg]-0.18×Age [Years]. In multivariate analysis, IOP was associated with higher estimated CSFP (P<0.001; standardized correlation coefficient beta: 0.27; regression coefficient B: 0.20; 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.16, 0.24), after adjusting for thinner central corneal thickness (P<0.001; beta: 0.45; B: 0.04;95%CI: 0.04,0.04), smaller corneal curvature radius (P<0.001; beta:-0.11; B:-1.13;95%CI:-1.61,-0.64), shallower anterior chamber depth (P = 0.01; beta:-0.05; B:-0.33;95%CI:-0.59,-0.08) and longer axial length (P = 0.002; beta: 0.08; B: 0.20;95%CI: 0.08,0.32)), and after adjusting for the systemic parameters of higher pulse rate (P<0.001; beta: 0.08; B: 0.02;95%CI: 0.01,0.03), higher prevalence of arterial hypertension (P = 0.002; beta: 0.06; B: 0.32;95%CI: 0.12,0.53)), frequency of drinking alcohol (P = 0.02; beta: 0.04; B: 0.09;95%CI: 0.01,0.17), higher blood concentration of triglycerides (P = 0.001; beta: 0.06; B: 0.06;95%CI: 0.02,0.10) and cholesterol (P = 0.049; beta: 0.04; B: 0.08;95%CI: 0.00,0.17), and body mass index (P<0.001; beta:-0.13; B:-0.09;95%CI:-0.13,-0.06). In a parallel manner, estimated CSFP (mean: 10.8±3.7 mm Hg) was significantly associated with higher IOP (P<0.001; beta: 0.13; B: 0.18;95%CI: 0.13,0.23) after adjusting for rural region of habitation (P<0.001; beta:-0.37; B:-2.78;95%CI:-3.07,-2.48), higher systolic blood pressure (P<0.001; beta: 0.34; B: 0.06;95%CI: 0.05,0.07), higher pulse rate (P = 0

  16. The Effects of Stretching with Lumbar Traction on VAS and Oswestry Scales of Patients with Lumbar 4–5 Herniated Intervertebral Disc

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Hae-sun; Yoo, Won-gyu

    2014-01-01

    [Purpose] This study investigated the effect of stretching with lumbar traction on VAS and Oswestry scale scores of lumbar 4–5 herniated intervertebral disc (HIVD) patients. [Subjects] We recruited 20 lumbar 4–5 HIVD patients. [Methods] We performed stretching with lumbar traction for lumbar 4–5 HIVD patients during 4 weeks. The VAS and Oswestry scales were measured before and 4 weeks after the intervention. [Results] The results showed a significant decrease in VAS scale scores for stretching with lumbar traction in lumbar 4–5 HIVD patients, from 18±1.29 to 2.1±1.35. The Oswestry scale scores also decreased significantly, from 20.35±2.01 to 3.5±2.84, after stretching with lumbar traction. [Conclusion] Thus, we suggest stretching with lumbar traction for lumbar 4–5 HIVD patients. PMID:25140094

  17. Posttraumatic Hydrocephalus as a Confounding Influence on Brain Injury Rehabilitation: Incidence, Clinical Characteristics, and Outcomes.

    PubMed

    Weintraub, Alan H; Gerber, Donald J; Kowalski, Robert G

    2017-02-01

    To describe incidence, clinical characteristics, complications, and outcomes in posttraumatic hydrocephalus (PTH) after traumatic brain injury (TBI) for patients treated in an inpatient rehabilitation program. Cohort study with retrospective comparative analysis. Inpatient rehabilitation hospital. All patients admitted for TBI from 2009 to 2013 diagnosed with PTH (N=59), defined as ventriculomegaly, delayed clinical recovery discordant with injury severity, hydrocephalus symptoms, or positive lumbar puncture results. None. Primary measures were incidence of PTH and patient and injury characteristics. Secondary measures included frequency and timing of ventriculoperitoneal (VP) shunt, related complications, emergence from and duration of posttraumatic amnesia (PTA), Rancho Los Amigos Scale (RLAS) score, and FIM score at rehabilitation admission and discharge. Of 701 patients with TBI admitted, 59 (8%) were diagnosed with PTH. Of these, the median age was 25 years, with 73% being men. At initial presentation, 52 (88%) did not follow commands. Fifty-two (90%) patients with PTH had a VP shunt placed. Median time from injury to shunt placement was 69 (range, 9-366) days. Seven (12%) patients with PTH experienced postsurgical seizure, 3 (6%) had shunt infection, and 7 (12%) had shunt malfunction. Thirty-six (61%) patients with PTH emerged from PTA during rehabilitation. Median total FIM score at rehabilitation admission was 20 (range, 18-76), and at discharge it was 43 (range, 18-118). Injury severity predicted outcome at rehabilitation admission, whereas shunt timing predicted outcome at rehabilitation discharge. Incidence of PTH was observed in 8% of patients with TBI in inpatient rehabilitation. Earlier shunting predicted improved outcome during rehabilitation. Future studies should prospectively examine clinical decision rules, type, and timing of intervention and the coeffectiveness of rehabilitation treatment on outcomes. Copyright © 2016 American Congress of

  18. Posttraumatic Hydrocephalus after Decompressive Craniectomy in 126 Patients with Severe Traumatic Brain Injury.

    PubMed

    Fotakopoulos, George; Tsianaka, Eleni; Siasios, Giannis; Vagkopoulos, Konstantinos; Fountas, Kostas

    2016-03-01

    Severe traumatic brain injuries (TBIs) occur frequently. In some of these patients decompressive craniectomy (DC) must be performed. Posttraumatic hydrocephalus (PTH) can develop after TBI further damaging the brain. DC is considered to be one of the causes of PTH. This study defines the incidence of PTH in TBI patients who underwent DC and tries to determine associated factors. We conducted a retrospective study (2009-2013) that included 126 patients with severe TBI and DC. The collected data were demographics, the craniectomy size, the presence or absence of hydrocephalus, the need for changing the opening pressure of the valve of the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) shunt or replacing all or parts of the CSF shunt, and the interval between cranioplasty and shunt placement. We excluded patients with additional intraventricular hemorrhage and those with bilateral or bifrontal DC. Ten of the 126 patients (7.9%) developed PTH and were treated with a CSF shunt. There was no statistical correlation between development of PTH and age or sex, but a statistically significant correlation between development of PTH and the size of DC. Our study suggests that PTH development is multifactorial and shows that PTH is not that rare. We showed a correlation between craniectomy size and the incidence of PTH. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  19. The role of spinal tissue scarring in the pathogenesis of progressive post-traumatic myelomalacia.

    PubMed

    Morikawa, Toshie; Takami, Toshihiro; Tsuyuguchi, Naohiro; Sakamoto, Hiroaki; Ohata, Kenji; Hara, Mitsuhiro

    2006-12-01

    Experimental spinal cord injury (SCI) with focal spinal tissue scarring was studied to better understand the progressive post-traumatic myelomalacia (PPM). Using a stereotactic device, the authors developed an acute compression of spinal cord at Th-10 in the adult rat. In Group A, the rat thoracic spinal cord was compressed epidurally with preservation of local cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) dynamics. In Group B (spinal tissue scarring), the rat thoracic spinal cord was compressed directly after disruption of meninges of dura mater and arachnoid membrane, followed by gelatine sponge sealing. All rats were maintained for 12 weeks after injury. Imaging analysis revealed the significant increase of cystic cavitation in the contused spinal cord in Group B compared with Group A. Anterograde axonal tracing demonstrated that the labeled corticospinal axons had extended axonal sprouting into the nearby gray matter and displayed prominent dieback at the rostral interface of the spinal cord lesion in both groups. No significant difference in motor and sensory functions between the two groups was noted. The new experimental model of PPM formation was devised. Spinal tissue scarring at the injury site may cause a tethering effect on the spinal cord, which may lead to significant alteration of the spinal cord parenchyma. Although the devastating effect of PPM on motor and sensory functions is still not resolved completely, the results in the present study suggest the importance of careful analysis in the treatment of PPM after SCI.

  20. Distribution of /sup 3/H-morphine following lumbar subarachnoid injection in unanesthetized rabbits

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, B.C.; Hiller, J.M.; Simon, E.J.; Hillman, D.E.; Rosenberg, C.; Turndorf, H.

    1989-05-01

    Morphine sulfate (40-100 micrograms) and /sup 3/H-morphine (125-200 pmol) were injected into the lumbar subarachnoid space of 18 unanesthetized rabbits through a surgically implanted catheter. Radioactivity remaining in the spinal cord 2, 4, 6, and 12 h later revealed recovery (mean +/- SEM) of 45 +/- 5.6% (n = 3), 30.5 +/- 14.1% (n = 4), 11.23 +/- 4.4% (n = 3), and 3.7 +/- 1.1% (n = 3), respectively, of the injected radioactivity. Tritiated morphine was found to be predominantly centered around the injection site, with limited rostral and caudal spread in the cord. No significant radioactivity was detected in plasma or cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) samples from the cisterna magna taken at 5, 15, 30, min and 1, 2, 4, 6, 12, and 24 h after receiving radioactive labeled drug (with the exception of that in one rabbit). Of the injected radioactivity, 75% was recovered in the urine in 12 h. These results suggest that the persistence of morphine in the spinal cord could account for its prolonged analgesic effect following intrathecal administration.

  1. Pathophysiology, diagnosis and treatment of intermittent claudication in patients with lumbar canal stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Kobayashi, Shigeru

    2014-01-01

    Spinal nerve roots have a peculiar structure, different from the arrangements in the peripheral nerve. The nerve roots are devoid of lymphatic vessels but are immersed in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) within the subarachnoid space. The blood supply of nerve roots depends on the blood flow from both peripheral direction (ascending) and the spinal cord direction (descending). There is no hypovascular region in the nerve root, although there exists a so-called water-shed of the bloodstream in the radicular artery itself. Increased mechanical compression promotes the disturbance of CSF flow, circulatory disturbance starting from the venous congestion and intraradicular edema formation resulting from the breakdown of the blood-nerve barrier. Although this edema may diffuse into CSF when the subarachnoid space is preserved, the endoneurial fluid pressure may increase when the area is closed by increased compression. On the other hand, the nerve root tissue has already degenerated under the compression and the numerous macrophages releasing various chemical mediators, aggravating radicular symptoms that appear in the area of Wallerian degeneration. Prostaglandin E1 (PGE1) is a potent vasodilator as well as an inhibitor of platelet aggregation and has therefore attracted interest as a therapeutic drug for lumbar canal stenosis. However, investigations in the clinical setting have shown that PGE1 is effective in some patients but not in others, although the reason for this is unclear. PMID:24829876

  2. Pathophysiology, diagnosis and treatment of intermittent claudication in patients with lumbar canal stenosis.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Shigeru

    2014-04-18

    Spinal nerve roots have a peculiar structure, different from the arrangements in the peripheral nerve. The nerve roots are devoid of lymphatic vessels but are immersed in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) within the subarachnoid space. The blood supply of nerve roots depends on the blood flow from both peripheral direction (ascending) and the spinal cord direction (descending). There is no hypovascular region in the nerve root, although there exists a so-called water-shed of the bloodstream in the radicular artery itself. Increased mechanical compression promotes the disturbance of CSF flow, circulatory disturbance starting from the venous congestion and intraradicular edema formation resulting from the breakdown of the blood-nerve barrier. Although this edema may diffuse into CSF when the subarachnoid space is preserved, the endoneurial fluid pressure may increase when the area is closed by increased compression. On the other hand, the nerve root tissue has already degenerated under the compression and the numerous macrophages releasing various chemical mediators, aggravating radicular symptoms that appear in the area of Wallerian degeneration. Prostaglandin E1 (PGE1) is a potent vasodilator as well as an inhibitor of platelet aggregation and has therefore attracted interest as a therapeutic drug for lumbar canal stenosis. However, investigations in the clinical setting have shown that PGE1 is effective in some patients but not in others, although the reason for this is unclear.

  3. Life-Threatening Intracranial Hypotension after Skull Base Surgery with Lumbar Drainage.

    PubMed

    Hirono, Seiichiro; Kawauchi, Daisuke; Higuchi, Yoshinori; Setoguchi, Taiki; Kihara, Kazunori; Horiguchi, Kentaro; Kado, Ken; Sato, Motoki; Fukuda, Kazumasa; Nakamura, Takao; Saeki, Naokatsu; Yamakami, Iwao

    2015-07-01

    Although lumbar drainage (LD) is widely used in skull base surgery (SBS), no cases with intracranial hypotension (IH) following LD-assisted SBS have been reported, and skull base surgeons lack awareness of this potentially life-threatening condition. We report two cases of IH after LD-assisted SBS, a spheno-orbital meningioma and an osteosarcoma in the orbit. Despite a minimal amount of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) drainage and early LD removal, severe postural headache and even a deteriorating consciousness level were observed in the early postoperative course. Neuroimages demonstrated epidural fluid collections, severe midline shift, and tonsillar sag compatible with IH. Epidural blood patch (EBP) immediately and completely reversed the clinical and radiologic findings in both patients. IH should be included in the differential diagnosis of postural headache after LD-assisted SBS that can be managed successfully with EBP. Persistent leakage of CSF at the LD-inserted site leads to IH. Broad dural dissection and wide removal of bony structure may be involved in the midline shift. EBP should be performed soon after conservative management fails. Further reports will determine the risk factors for IH development following LD-assisted SBS.

  4. Effect of resting pressure on the estimate of cerebrospinal fluid outflow conductance

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background A lumbar infusion test is commonly used as a predictive test for patients with normal pressure hydrocephalus and for evaluation of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) shunt function. Different infusion protocols can be used to estimate the outflow conductance (Cout) or its reciprocal the outflow resistance (Rout), with or without using the baseline resting pressure, Pr. Both from a basic physiological research and a clinical perspective, it is important to understand the limitations of the model on which infusion tests are based. By estimating Cout using two different analyses, with or without Pr, the limitations could be explored. The aim of this study was to compare the Cout estimates, and investigate what effect Prhad on the results. Methods Sixty-three patients that underwent a constant pressure infusion protocol as part of their preoperative evaluation for normal pressure hydrocephalus, were included (age 70.3 ± 10.8 years (mean ± SD)). The analysis was performed without (Cexcl Pr) and with (Cincl Pr) Pr. The estimates were compared using Bland-Altman plots and paired sample t-tests (p < 0.05 considered significant). Results Mean Cout for the 63 patients was: Cexcl Pr = 7.0 ± 4.0 (mean ± SD) μl/(s kPa) and Cincl Pr = 9.1 ± 4.3 μl/(s kPa) and Rout was 19.0 ± 9.2 and 17.7 ± 11.3 mmHg/ml/min, respectively. There was a positive correlation between methods (r = 0.79, n = 63, p < 0.01). The difference, ΔCout= -2.1 ± 2.7 μl/(s kPa) between methods was significant (p < 0.01) and ΔRout was 1.2 ± 8.8 mmHg/ml/min). The Bland-Altman plot visualized that the variation around the mean difference was similar all through the range of measured values and there was no correlation between ΔCout and Cout. Conclusions The difference between Cout estimates, obtained from analyses with or without Pr, needs to be taken into consideration when comparing results from studies using different infusion test protocols. The study suggests variation in CSF formation rate

  5. Enantioselective distribution of albendazole metabolites in cerebrospinal fluid of patients with neurocysticercosis

    PubMed Central

    Takayanagui, O M; Bonato, P S; Dreossi, S A C; Lanchote, V L

    2002-01-01

    Aims Albendazole (ABZ) is effective in the treatment of neurocysticercosis. ABZ undergoes extensive metabolism to (+) and (−)-albendazole sulphoxide (ASOX), which are further metabolized to albendazole sulphone (ASON). We have investigated the distribution of (+)-ASOX (−)-ASOX, and ASON in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of patients with neurocysticercosis. Methods Twelve patients with a diagnosis of active brain parenchymal neurocysticercosis treated with albendazole for 8 days (15 mg kg−1 day−1) were investigated. On day 8, serial blood samples were collected during the dose interval (0–12 h) and one CSF sample was taken from each patient by lumbar puncture at different time points up to 12 h after the last albendazole dose. Albendazole metabolites were determined in CSF and plasma samples by h.p.l.c. using a Chiralpak AD column and fluorescence detection. Population curves for CSF albendazole metabolite concentration vs time were constructed. Results The mean plasma/CSF ratios were 2.6 (95% CI: 1.9, 3.3) for (+)-ASOX and 2.7 (95% CI: 1.8, 3.7) for (−)-ASOX, with the two-tailed P value of 0.9873 being non-significant. These data indicate that the transport of ASOX through the blood–brain barrier is not enantioselective, but rather depends on passive diffusion. The present results suggest the accumulation of the (+)-ASOX metabolite in the CSF of patients with neurocysticercosis. The CSF AUC(+)/AUC(−) ratio was 3.4 for patients receiving albendazole every 12 h. The elimination half-life of both ASOX enantiomers in CSF was 2.5 h. ASOX was the predominant metabolite in the CSF compared with ASON; the CSF AUCASOX/AUCASON ratio was approximately 20 and the elimination half-life of ASON in CSF was 2.6 h. Conclusions We have demonstrated accumulation of the (+)-ASOX metabolite in CSF, which was about three times greater than the (−) antipode. ASOX concentrations were approximately 20 times higher than those observed for the ASON metabolite. PMID:12207631

  6. Cerebrospinal fluid mitochondrial DNA – a novel DAMP in pediatric traumatic brain injury

    PubMed Central

    Walko, Thomas D.; Bola, R. Aaron; Hong, John D.; Au, Alicia K; Bell, Michael J; Kochanek, Patrick M.; Clark, Robert S. B; Aneja, Rajesh K.

    2014-01-01

    Background Danger associated molecular patterns (DAMPs) are nuclear or cytoplasmic proteins that are released from the injured tissues and activate the innate immune system. Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) is a novel DAMP that is released into the extracellular milieu subsequent to cell death and injury. We hypothesized that cell death within the central nervous system in children with traumatic brain injury (TBI) would lead to release of mtDNA into the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and has the potential to predict the outcome after trauma. Methods CSF was collected from children with severe TBI that required intracranial pressure monitoring with Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) scores ≤ 8 via an externalized ventricular drain. Control CSF was obtained in children without TBI or meningoencephalitis that demonstrated no leukocytes in the diagnostic lumbar puncture. Results The median age for patients with TBI was 6.3 y and 62% were male. The common mechanisms of injury included motor vehicle collision (35.8%) followed by falls (21.5%) and inflicted TBI (19%); 6 children (14.2%) died during their ICU course. The mean CSF mtDNA concentration was 1.10E +05 ± 2.07E+05 and 1.63E+03 ± 1.80E+03 copies/µL in the pediatric TBI and control population respectively. Furthermore, the mean CSF mtDNA concentration in pediatric patients who later died or had severe disability was significantly higher than that of the survivors (1.63E+ 05 ± 2.77E+05 vs. 5.05E+04 ± 6.21E+04 copies/µL) (p<0.0001). We found a significant correlation between CSF mtDNA and HMGB1, another prototypical DAMP, concentrations (ρ = 0.574, p<0.05), supporting the notion that both DAMPs are increased in the CSF following TBI. Conclusions Our data suggest that CSF mtDNA is novel DAMP in TBI, and appears to be a useful biomarker that correlates with neurological outcome after TBI. Further inquiry into the components of mtDNA that modulate the innate immune response will be helpful in understanding the mechanism of local

  7. Optical analysis of suspended particles in the cerebrospinal fluid obtained by puncture from patients diagnosed with the disorders of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) circulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Staroń, Waldemar; Herbowski, Leszek; Gurgul, Henryk

    2007-04-01

    The goal of the work was to determine the values of cumulative parameters of the cerebrospinal fluid. Values of the parameters characterise statistical cerebrospinal fluid obtained by puncture from the patients diagnosed due to suspicion of normotensive hydrocephalus. The cerebrospinal fluid taken by puncture for the routine examinations carried out at the patients suspected of normotensive hydrocephalus was analysed. In the paper there are presented results of examinations of several dozens of puncture samples of the cerebrospinal fluid coming from various patients. Each sample was examined under the microscope and photographed in 20 randomly chosen places. On the basis of analysis of the pictures showing the area of 100 x 100μm, the selected cumulative parameters such as count, numerical density, field area and field perimeter were determined for each sample. Then the average value of the parameters was determined as well.

  8. Neurogranin as a Cerebrospinal Fluid Biomarker for Synaptic Loss in Symptomatic Alzheimer Disease

    PubMed Central

    Kester, Maartje I.; Teunissen, Charlotte E.; Crimmins, Daniel L.; Herries, Elizabeth M.; Ladenson, Jack. H.; Scheltens, Philip; van der Flier, Wiesje M.; Morris, John C.; Holtzman, David M.; Fagan, Anne M.

    2015-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Neurogranin (NGRN) seems to be a promising novel cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarker for synaptic loss; however, clinical, and especially longitudinal, data are sparse. OBJECTIVE To examine the utility of NGRN, with repeated CSF sampling, for diagnosis, prognosis, and monitoring of Alzheimer disease (AD). DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS Longitudinal study of consecutive patients who underwent 2 lumbar punctures between the beginning of 1995 and the end of 2010 within the memory clinic–based Amsterdam Dementia Cohort. The study included 163 patients: 37 cognitively normal participants (mean [SE] age, 64 [2] years; 38% female; and mean [SE] Mini-Mental State Examination [MMSE] score, 28 [0.3]), 61 patients with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) (mean [SE] age, 68 [1] years; 38% female; and mean [SE] MMSE score, 27 [0.3]), and 65 patients with AD (mean [SE] age, 65 [1] years; 45% female; and mean [SE] MMSE score, 22 [0.7]). The mean (SE) interval between lumbar punctures was 2.0 (0.1) years, and the mean (SE) duration of cognitive follow-up was 3.8 (0.2) years. Measurements of CSF NGRN levels were obtained in January and February 2014. MAIN OUTCOME AND MEASURE Levels of NGRN in CSF samples. RESULTS Baseline CSF levels of NGRN in patients with AD (median level, 2381 pg/mL [interquartile range, 1651-3416 pg/mL]) were higher than in cognitively normal participants (median level, 1712 pg/mL [interquartile range, 1206-2724 pg/mL]) (P = .04). Baseline NGRN levels were highly correlated with total tau and tau phosphorylated at threonine 181 in all patient groups (all P < .001), but not with Aβ42. Baseline CSF levels of NGRN were also higher in patients with MCI who progressed to AD (median level, 2842 pg/mL [interquartile range, 1882-3950 pg/mL]) compared with those with stable MCI (median level, 1752 pg/mL [interquartile range, 1024-2438 pg/mL]) (P = .004), and they were predictive of progression from MCI to AD (hazard ratio, 1.8 [95% CI, 1.1-2.9]; stratified

  9. Neurogranin as a Cerebrospinal Fluid Biomarker for Synaptic Loss in Symptomatic Alzheimer Disease.

    PubMed

    Kester, Maartje I; Teunissen, Charlotte E; Crimmins, Daniel L; Herries, Elizabeth M; Ladenson, Jack H; Scheltens, Philip; van der Flier, Wiesje M; Morris, John C; Holtzman, David M; Fagan, Anne M

    2015-11-01

    Neurogranin (NGRN) seems to be a promising novel cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarker for synaptic loss; however, clinical, and especially longitudinal, data are sparse. To examine the utility of NGRN, with repeated CSF sampling, for diagnosis, prognosis, and monitoring of Alzheimer disease (AD). Longitudinal study of consecutive patients who underwent 2 lumbar punctures between the beginning of 1995 and the end of 2010 within the memory clinic-based Amsterdam Dementia Cohort. The study included 163 patients: 37 cognitively normal participants (mean [SE] age, 64 [2] years; 38% female; and mean [SE] Mini-Mental State Examination [MMSE] score, 28 [0.3]), 61 patients with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) (mean [SE] age, 68 [1] years; 38% female; and mean [SE] MMSE score, 27 [0.3]), and 65 patients with AD (mean [SE] age, 65 [1] years; 45% female; and mean [SE] MMSE score, 22 [0.7]). The mean (SE) interval between lumbar punctures was 2.0 (0.1) years, and the mean (SE) duration of cognitive follow-up was 3.8 (0.2) years. Measurements of CSF NGRN levels were obtained in January and February 2014. Levels of NGRN in CSF samples. Baseline CSF levels of NGRN in patients with AD (median level, 2381 pg/mL [interquartile range, 1651-3416 pg/mL]) were higher than in cognitively normal participants (median level, 1712 pg/mL [interquartile range, 1206-2724 pg/mL]) (P = .04). Baseline NGRN levels were highly correlated with total tau and tau phosphorylated at threonine 181 in all patient groups (all P < .001), but not with Aβ42. Baseline CSF levels of NGRN were also higher in patients with MCI who progressed to AD (median level, 2842 pg/mL [interquartile range, 1882-3950 pg/mL]) compared with those with stable MCI (median level, 1752 pg/mL [interquartile range, 1024-2438 pg/mL]) (P = .004), and they were predictive of progression from MCI to AD (hazard ratio, 1.8 [95% CI, 1.1-2.9]; stratified by tertiles). Linear mixed-model analyses demonstrated that within

  10. Functional aspects of strepsirrhine lumbar vertebral bodies and spinous processes.

    PubMed

    Shapiro, Liza J; Simons, Cornelia V M

    2002-06-01

    The relationship between form and function in the lumbar vertebral column has been well documented among platyrrhines and especially catarrhines, while functional studies of postcranial morphology among strepsirrhines have concentrated predominantly on the limbs. This morphometric study investigates biomechanically relevant attributes of the lumbar vertebral morphology of 20 species of extant strepsirrhines. With this extensive sample, our goal is to address the influence of positional behavior on lumbar vertebral form while also assessing the effects of body size and phylogenetic history. The results reveal distinctions in lumbar vertebral morphology among strepsirrhines in functional association with their habitual postures and primary locomotor behaviors. In general, strepsirrhines that emphasize pronograde posture and quadrupedal locomotion combined with leaping (from a pronograde position) have the relatively longest lumbar regions and lumbar vertebral bodies, features promoting sagittal spinal flexibility. Indrids and galagonids that rely primarily on vertical clinging and leaping with orthograde posture share a relatively short (i.e., stable and resistant to bending) lumbar region, although the length of individual lumbar vertebral bodies varies phylogenetically and possibly allometrically. The other two vertical clingers and leapers, Hapalemur and Lepilemur, more closely resemble the pronograde, quadrupedal taxa. The specialized, suspensory lorids have relatively short lumbar regions as well, but the lengths of their lumbar regions are influenced by body size, and Arctocebus has dramatically longer vertebral bodies than do the other lorids. Lumbar morphology among galagonids appears to reflect a strong phylogenetic signal superimposed on a functional one. In general, relative length of the spinous processes follows a positively allometric trend, although lorids (especially the larger-bodied forms) have relatively short spinous processes for their body size

  11. Endoscopic Transmaxillary Transposition of Temporalis Flap for Recurrent Cerebrospinal Fluid Leak Closure.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Regi; Girishan, Shabari; Chacko, Ari George

    2016-12-01

    Objective To describe the technique of endoscopic transmaxillary temporalis muscle flap transposition for the repair of a persistent postoperative sphenoidal cerebrospinal fluid leak. Design The repair of a recurrent cerebrospinal fluid leak for a patient who had undergone endoscopic transsphenoidal excision of an invasive silent corticotroph Hardy C and Knosp Grade IV pituitary adenoma was undertaken. The patient had completed postoperative radiotherapy for the residual tumor and presented with cerebrospinal fluid leak, 1 year later. The initial two attempts to repair the cerebrospinal fluid leak with free grafts failed. Therefore, an endoscopic transmaxillary transposition of the temporalis muscle flap was attempted to stop the cerebrospinal fluid leak. Results The endoscopic transmaxillary transposition of the vascularized temporalis muscle flap onto the cerebrospinal fluid leak repair site resulted in successful closure of the cerebrospinal fluid leak. Conclusion Endoscopic transmaxillary transposition of the temporalis flap resulted in closure of recurrent cerebrospinal fluid leak in a patient with recurrent pituitary adenoma, who had undergone previous surgery and radiotherapy. This technique has advantages over the endoscopic transpterygoid transposition of the same flap and could be used as a complementary technique in selected patients.

  12. Identification of immunodiagnostic antigens for cerebrospinal filariasis in horses by western blot analysis.

    PubMed

    Takesue, Masataka; Osaka, Yuki; Muranaka, Masanori; Katayama, Yoshinari; Ikadai, Hiromi

    2016-01-01

    In the present study, the serum and cerebrospinal fluid of horses diagnosed with Setaria digitata cerebrospinal filariasis were analyzed by western blot. The results revealed S. digitata protein bands measuring 65, 34, 22, and 18 kDa in molecular weight. In particular, the 18 kDa band is a possible candidate for clinical immunodiagnosis on the basis of western blot findings.

  13. Ganciclovir penetrates into the cerebrospinal fluid of an infant with congenital cytomegalovirus infection.

    PubMed

    Natale, Fabio; Bizzarri, Bianca; Cardi, Veronica; Gaeta, Aurelia; Villani, Paola; Liuzzi, Giuseppina; De Curtis, Mario

    2015-03-31

    Currently, there is no evidence whether ganciclovir, or its oral prodrug valganciclovir, penetrates into the cerebrospinal fluid of human infants treated for congenital cytomegalovirus infection. Here, we report a case study providing evidence that ganciclovir, administered as valganciclovir, reaches the infant's cerebrospinal fluid when used at the currently recommended dose for congenital cytomegalovirus infection.

  14. Cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers for Parkinson's disease - a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Andersen, A D; Binzer, M; Stenager, E; Gramsbergen, J B

    2017-01-01

    Diagnosis of Parkinson's disease (PD) relies on clinical history and physical examination, but misdiagnosis is common in early stages. Identification of biomarkers for PD may allow early and more precise diagnosis and monitoring of dopamine replacement strategies and disease modifying treatments. Developments in analytical chemistry allow the detection of large numbers of molecules in plasma or cerebrospinal fluid, associated with the pathophysiology or pathogenesis of PD. This systematic review includes cerebrospinal fluid biomarker studies focusing on different disease pathways: oxidative stress, neuroinflammation, lysosomal dysfunction and proteins involved in PD and other neurodegenerative disorders, focusing on four clinical domains: their ability to (1) distinguish PD from healthy subjects and other neurodegenerative disorders as well as their relation to (2) disease duration after initial diagnosis, (3) severity of disease (motor symptoms) and (4) cognitive dysfunction. Oligomeric alpha-synuclein might be helpful in the separation of PD from controls. Through metabolomics, changes in purine and tryptophan metabolism have been discovered in patients with PD. Neurofilament light chain (NfL) has a significant role in distinguishing PD from other neurodegenerative diseases. Several oxidative stress markers are related to disease severity, with the antioxidant urate also having a prognostic value in terms of disease severity. Increased levels of amyloid and tau-proteins correlate with cognitive decline and may have prognostic value for cognitive deficits in PD. In the future, larger longitudinal studies, corroborating previous research on viable biomarker candidates or using metabolomics identifying a vast amount of potential biomarkers, could be a good approach.

  15. Pathogenesis of non-traumatic cerebrospinal fluid rhinorrhea.

    PubMed

    Bjerre, P; Lindholm, J; Gyldensted, C

    1982-08-01

    15 consecutive patients with non-traumatic cerebrospinal fluid rhinorrhea were studied. 13 operations were performed on 10 patients. In 8 transcranial operations, an assumed defect in the anterior fossa was plugged with muscle, but only 3 operations were successful. In 4 operations, either transcranial or transsphenoidal, the sella was packed with muscle and rhinorrhea ceased immediately. Based on radiological and operative findings, 3 groups of patients appeared (1) 9 patients had pathology related to the pituitary gland or the sella turcica: enlarged sella, empty sella, pituitary tumour, intrasellar cyst or erosion of the sellar osseous border. (2) 2 patients had rhinorrhea from extrasellar origin. (3) In 4 patients no abnormality could be found. Prior to the rhinorrhea, 6 patients (5 from group 1 and 1 from group 3) had experienced episodes of neurological symptoms, compatible with a pituitary apoplexy. It is suggested that non-traumatic cerebrospinal fluid rhinorrhea in most cases is the result of a spontaneous necrosis in a pituitary adenoma, which has caused sellar bony erosion.

  16. Extremely rare complications in cerebrospinal fluid shunt operations.

    PubMed

    Surchev, J; Georgiev, K; Enchev, Y; Avramov, R

    2002-06-01

    The cerebrospinal fluid shunt operation, from its first realization in 1908 by Kausch till our days, is still of a significant importance for the long-term treatment of the internal hydrocephalus. Well known are many complications connected with the use of the valve systems (malfunction, infectious, overdrainage, secondary craniosynostosis and etc.). For a period of 17 years (1984-2000) at the Clinic of Pediatric Neurosurgery, Department of Neurosurgery, Sofia Medical University, 414 cerebrospinal fluid shunt operations were performed on children. 216 were drained to the right atrium of the heart, 198 to the peritoneal cavity. They were followed up by catamnesis until the year 2001. The authors describe 2 extremely rare cases with post-shunt complication as a result of a malfunction of the valve system, owing to a migration of the distal catheter: 1) in the anus; 2) in the urethra. In the first case the distal catheter perforated the colon transversum and by the way of the intestines went out through the anus. In the second case the distal catheter protruded out of the body through the bladder and the urethra. Their clinical appearance, the diagnostic examinations and the operative treatment are shown.

  17. Cytologic diagnosis of spinal cord ependymoma in cerebrospinal fluid.

    PubMed

    Kalogeraki, A; Tamiolakis, D; Sinatkas, V; Xekalou, A; Papadakis, M; Stathopoulos, E N

    2012-12-01

    Ependymoma cells are known to rarely exfoliate into cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). However, the frequency of CSF involvement in patients with ependymoma is unclear, and to the author's knowledge the cytomorphologic features of tumour cells have not been well described to date. In this study, the CSF findings in a patient with ependymoma and the cytopathological features of this tumor are reported. The patient presented at the University Hospital of Heraklion, Crete, suffering from a chest to back pain. Computed tomography, scanning and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) were performed and a mass of 3x2 cm in the thoracic aspect of the spinal cord was found. A sample of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) was sent for cytologic examination and a diagnosis of ependymoma was made. A biopsy was performed and histology confirmed the cytologic diagnosis of ependymoma grade II (WHO). Exfoliated cells from ependymomas of spinal cord are rarely recognizable in CSF samples. Except in patients with myxopapillary tumours and anaplastic tumours, cytomorphologic features of ependymoma have been described only in case reports of intraoperative imprinting or fine needle aspiration biopsies (FNABs) and not in CSF cytology.

  18. Posttraumatic Growth Moderates Suicide Risk among Trauma Exposed Undergraduates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sheline, Kelly T.; Rosén, Lee A.

    2017-01-01

    We assessed the moderating role of posttraumatic growth on the relationship between traumatic life events and suicidal ideation and behavior, suicide risk, and college adjustment. The sample of 557 college students completed questionnaires measuring their severity and number of traumatic life events, posttraumatic growth, suicidal thoughts,…

  19. Trajectories of posttraumatic growth and depreciation after two major earthquakes.

    PubMed

    Marshall, Emma M; Frazier, Patricia; Frankfurt, Sheila; Kuijer, Roeline G

    2015-03-01

    This study examined trajectories of posttraumatic growth or depreciation (i.e., positive or negative life change) in personal strength and relationships after 2 major earthquakes in Canterbury, New Zealand using group-based trajectory modeling. Participants completed questionnaires regarding posttraumatic growth or depreciation in personal strength and relationship domains 1 month after the first earthquake in September 2010 (N = 185) and 3 months (n = 156) and 12 months (n = 144) after the more severe February 2011 earthquake. Three class