Science.gov

Sample records for postulated initiating event

  1. The Annular Core Research Reactor (ACRR) postulated limiting event initial and building source terms

    SciTech Connect

    Restrepo, L F

    1992-08-01

    As part of the update of the Safety analysis Report (SAR) for the Annular Core Research Reactor (ACRR), operational limiting events under the category of inadvertent withdrawal of an experiment while at power or during a power pulse were determined to be the most limiting event(s) for this reactor. This report provides a summary of the assumptions, modeling, and results in evaluation of: Reactivity and thermal hydraulics analysis to determine the amount of fuel melt or fuel damage ratios; The reactor inventories following the limiting event; A literature review of post NUREG-0772 release fraction experiment results on severe fuel damages; Decontamination factors due to in-pool transport; and In-building transport modeling and building source term analysis.

  2. Risk assessment of K Basin twelve-inch and four-inch drain valve failure from a postulated seismic initiating event

    SciTech Connect

    MORGAN, R.G.

    1999-06-23

    The Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) Project will transfer metallic SNF from the Hanford 105 K-East and 105 K-West Basins to safe interim storage in the Canister Storage Building in the 200 Area. The initial basis for design, fabrication, installation, and operation of the fuel removal systems was that the basin leak rate which could result from a postulated accident condition would not be excessive relative to reasonable recovery operations. However, an additional potential K Basin water leak path is through the K Basin drain valves. Three twelve-inch drain valves are located in the main basin bays along the north wall. Five four-inch drain valves are located in the north and south loadout pits (NLOP and SLOP), the weasel pit, the technical viewing pit, and the discharge chute pit. The sumps containing the valves are filled with concrete which covers the drain valve body. Visual observations indicate that only the valve's bonnet and stem are exposed above the basin concrete floor for the twelve-inch drain valve and that much less of the valve's bonnet and stem are exposed above the basin concrete floor for the five four-inch drain valves. It was recognized, however, that damage of the drain valve bonnet or stem during a seismic initiating event could provide a potential K Basin water leak path. The objectives of this analysis are to: (1) evaluate the likelihood of damaging the three twelve-inch drain valves located along the north wall of the main basin and the five four-inch drain valves located in the pits from a seismic initiating event, and (2) determine the likelihood of exceeding a specific consequence (initial leak rate) from a damaged valve. The analysis process is a risk-based uncertainty analysis where each variable is modeled using available information and engineering judgement. The uncertainty associated with each variable is represented by a probability distribution (probability density function). Uncertainty exists because of the inherent randomness

  3. Test of Antonovsky's postulate: high sense of coherence helps people avoid negative life events.

    PubMed

    Hochwälder, Jacek

    2015-04-01

    This study tested Antonovsky's postulate that a high sense of coherence (SOC) helps people avoid negative life events. It was assumed that negative life events that were uncontrollable would not show this effect, while those events that potentially could be controlled would show a significant relationship with SOC. 1,012 female nurses (M age=46.9 yr.; SD=8.9) participated in this longitudinal study and were divided into groups with low, moderate, and high SOC. Sixteen negative life events were categorized into uncontrollable and controllable events, with the controllable events divided into three sub-categories. Five one-way analyses of variance (ANOVAs) for independent measures followed up with post hoc tests were performed, with the number of experienced events in a given category by each participant (at Time 2) as the dependent variable and the three SOC groups (formed at Time 1) as the independent variable. The results indicated that the high SOC group reported fewer controllable negative life events, while there was no significant relationship between the SOC level and uncontrollable negative life events. The findings support the postulate in Antonovsky's model, with the distinction between controllable and uncontrollable negative life events.

  4. Westinghouse Small Modular Reactor passive safety system response to postulated events

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, M. C.; Wright, R. F.

    2012-07-01

    The Westinghouse Small Modular Reactor (SMR) is an 800 MWt (>225 MWe) integral pressurized water reactor. This paper is part of a series of four describing the design and safety features of the Westinghouse SMR. This paper focuses in particular upon the passive safety features and the safety system response of the Westinghouse SMR. The Westinghouse SMR design incorporates many features to minimize the effects of, and in some cases eliminates the possibility of postulated accidents. The small size of the reactor and the low power density limits the potential consequences of an accident relative to a large plant. The integral design eliminates large loop piping, which significantly reduces the flow area of postulated loss of coolant accidents (LOCAs). The Westinghouse SMR containment is a high-pressure, compact design that normally operates at a partial vacuum. This facilitates heat removal from the containment during LOCA events. The containment is submerged in water which also aides the heat removal and provides an additional radionuclide filter. The Westinghouse SMR safety system design is passive, is based largely on the passive safety systems used in the AP1000{sup R} reactor, and provides mitigation of all design basis accidents without the need for AC electrical power for a period of seven days. Frequent faults, such as reactivity insertion events and loss of power events, are protected by first shutting down the nuclear reaction by inserting control rods, then providing cold, borated water through a passive, buoyancy-driven flow. Decay heat removal is provided using a layered approach that includes the passive removal of heat by the steam drum and independent passive heat removal system that transfers heat from the primary system to the environment. Less frequent faults such as loss of coolant accidents are mitigated by passive injection of a large quantity of water that is readily available inside containment. An automatic depressurization system is used to

  5. Supplemental Analysis to Support Postulated Events in Process Hazards Analysis for the HEAF

    SciTech Connect

    Lambert, H; Johnson, G

    2001-07-20

    The purpose of this report is to conduct a limit scope risk assessment by generating event trees for the accident scenarios described in table 4-2 of the HEAF SAR, ref 1. Table 4-2 lists the postulated event/scenario descriptions for non-industrial hazards for HEAF. The event tree analysis decomposes accident scenarios into basic causes that appear as branches on the event tree. Bold downward branches indicate paths leading to the accident. The basic causes include conditions, failure of administrative controls (procedural or human error events) or failure of engineered controls (hardware, software or equipment failure) that singly or in combination can cause an accident to occur. Event tree analysis is useful since it can display the minimum number of events to cause an accident. Event trees can address statistical dependency of events such as a sequence of human error events conducted by the same operator. In this case, dependent probabilities are used. Probabilities/frequencies are assigned to each branch. Another example of dependency would be when the same software is used to conduct separate actions such as activating a hard and soft crow bar for grounding detonator circuits. Generally, the first event considered in the event tree describes the annual frequency at which a specific operation is conducted and probabilities are assigned to the remaining branches. An exception may be when the first event represents a condition, then a probability is used to indicate the percentage of time the condition exists. The annual probability (frequency) of the end state leading to the accident scenario in the event tree is obtained by multiplying the branch probabilities together.

  6. Analysis of postulated events for the revised ALMR/PRISM design

    SciTech Connect

    Slovik, G.C.; Van Tuyle, G.J.

    1991-12-31

    The Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) is continuing a pre-application review of the 471 MWt, Liquid Metal Reactor, PRISM by General Electric, with Brookhaven National Laboratory providing technical support. The revised design has been evaluated, using the SSC code, for an unscrammed loss of heat sink (ULOHS), an unscrammed loss of flow (ULOF) with and without the Gas Expansion Modules (GEMs), and a 40{cents} unscrammed transient overpower (UTOP) event. The feedback effects for U-27Pu-10Zr metal fuel were modeled in SSC. The ULOHS accident was determined to be a benign event for the design, with the reactor power transitioning down to a decay heat level within 500s. The power during the postulated ULOF events, with the GEMs functioning, transitioned to decay heat levels without fuel damage, and included a 300K margin to sodium saturation. The case without the GEMs had only a 160K margin to sodium saturation and higher fuel temperatures. In addition, the clad was predicted to quickly pass through the eutectic phase (between fuel and clad), and some clad wastage would result. The 40{cents} UTOP was predicted to raise the power to 1.8 rated, which later stabilized near 1.2 times full power. SSC predicted some localized fuel melting for the event, but the significance of this localized damage has not yet been determined. If necessary, the vendor has options to reduce the maximum reactivity insertion below 40{cents}.

  7. Analysis of postulated events for the revised ALMR/PRISM design

    SciTech Connect

    Slovik, G.C.; Van Tuyle, G.J.

    1991-01-01

    The Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) is continuing a pre-application review of the 471 MWt, Liquid Metal Reactor, PRISM by General Electric, with Brookhaven National Laboratory providing technical support. The revised design has been evaluated, using the SSC code, for an unscrammed loss of heat sink (ULOHS), an unscrammed loss of flow (ULOF) with and without the Gas Expansion Modules (GEMs), and a 40{cents} unscrammed transient overpower (UTOP) event. The feedback effects for U-27Pu-10Zr metal fuel were modeled in SSC. The ULOHS accident was determined to be a benign event for the design, with the reactor power transitioning down to a decay heat level within 500s. The power during the postulated ULOF events, with the GEMs functioning, transitioned to decay heat levels without fuel damage, and included a 300K margin to sodium saturation. The case without the GEMs had only a 160K margin to sodium saturation and higher fuel temperatures. In addition, the clad was predicted to quickly pass through the eutectic phase (between fuel and clad), and some clad wastage would result. The 40{cents} UTOP was predicted to raise the power to 1.8 rated, which later stabilized near 1.2 times full power. SSC predicted some localized fuel melting for the event, but the significance of this localized damage has not yet been determined. If necessary, the vendor has options to reduce the maximum reactivity insertion below 40{cents}.

  8. RAS Initiative - Events

    Cancer.gov

    The NCI RAS Initiative has organized multiple events with outside experts to discuss how the latest scientific and technological breakthroughs can be applied to discover vulnerabilities in RAS-driven cancers.

  9. Initial Events in Bacterial Transcription Initiation

    PubMed Central

    Ruff, Emily F.; Record, M. Thomas; Artsimovitch, Irina

    2015-01-01

    Transcription initiation is a highly regulated step of gene expression. Here, we discuss the series of large conformational changes set in motion by initial specific binding of bacterial RNA polymerase (RNAP) to promoter DNA and their relevance for regulation. Bending and wrapping of the upstream duplex facilitates bending of the downstream duplex into the active site cleft, nucleating opening of 13 bp in the cleft. The rate-determining opening step, driven by binding free energy, forms an unstable open complex, probably with the template strand in the active site. At some promoters, this initial open complex is greatly stabilized by rearrangements of the discriminator region between the −10 element and +1 base of the nontemplate strand and of mobile in-cleft and downstream elements of RNAP. The rate of open complex formation is regulated by effects on the rapidly-reversible steps preceding DNA opening, while open complex lifetime is regulated by effects on the stabilization of the initial open complex. Intrinsic DNA opening-closing appears less regulated. This noncovalent mechanism and its regulation exhibit many analogies to mechanisms of enzyme catalysis. PMID:26023916

  10. Longitudinal hydrodynamics from event-by-event Landau initial conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Sen, Abhisek; Gerhard, Jochen; Torrieri, Giorgio; Read, Kenneth; Wong, Cheuk-Yin

    2015-02-02

    Here we investigate three-dimensional ideal hydrodynamic evolution, with Landau initial conditions, incorporating event-by-event variation with many events and transverse density inhomogeneities. We show that the transition to boost-invariant flow occurs too late for realistic setups, with corrections of θ (20%-30%) expected at freeze-out for most scenarios. Moreover, the deviation from boost invariance is correlated with both transverse flow and elliptic flow, with the more highly transversely flowing regions also showing the most violation of boost invariance. Therefore, if longitudinal flow is not fully developed at the early stages of heavy ion collisions, hydrodynamics where boost invariance holds at midrapidity is inadequate to extract transport coefficients of the quark-gluon plasma. We conclude by arguing that developing experimental probes of boost invariance is necessary, and suggest some promising directions in this regard.

  11. Longitudinal hydrodynamics from event-by-event Landau initial conditions

    DOE PAGES

    Sen, Abhisek; Gerhard, Jochen; Torrieri, Giorgio; ...

    2015-02-02

    Here we investigate three-dimensional ideal hydrodynamic evolution, with Landau initial conditions, incorporating event-by-event variation with many events and transverse density inhomogeneities. We show that the transition to boost-invariant flow occurs too late for realistic setups, with corrections of θ (20%-30%) expected at freeze-out for most scenarios. Moreover, the deviation from boost invariance is correlated with both transverse flow and elliptic flow, with the more highly transversely flowing regions also showing the most violation of boost invariance. Therefore, if longitudinal flow is not fully developed at the early stages of heavy ion collisions, hydrodynamics where boost invariance holds at midrapidity ismore » inadequate to extract transport coefficients of the quark-gluon plasma. We conclude by arguing that developing experimental probes of boost invariance is necessary, and suggest some promising directions in this regard.« less

  12. A review for identification of initiating events in event tree development process on nuclear power plants

    SciTech Connect

    Riyadi, Eko H.

    2014-09-30

    Initiating event is defined as any event either internal or external to the nuclear power plants (NPPs) that perturbs the steady state operation of the plant, if operating, thereby initiating an abnormal event such as transient or loss of coolant accident (LOCA) within the NPPs. These initiating events trigger sequences of events that challenge plant control and safety systems whose failure could potentially lead to core damage or large early release. Selection for initiating events consists of two steps i.e. first step, definition of possible events, such as by evaluating a comprehensive engineering, and by constructing a top level logic model. Then the second step, grouping of identified initiating event's by the safety function to be performed or combinations of systems responses. Therefore, the purpose of this paper is to discuss initiating events identification in event tree development process and to reviews other probabilistic safety assessments (PSA). The identification of initiating events also involves the past operating experience, review of other PSA, failure mode and effect analysis (FMEA), feedback from system modeling, and master logic diagram (special type of fault tree). By using the method of study for the condition of the traditional US PSA categorization in detail, could be obtained the important initiating events that are categorized into LOCA, transients and external events.

  13. A review for identification of initiating events in event tree development process on nuclear power plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riyadi, Eko H.

    2014-09-01

    Initiating event is defined as any event either internal or external to the nuclear power plants (NPPs) that perturbs the steady state operation of the plant, if operating, thereby initiating an abnormal event such as transient or loss of coolant accident (LOCA) within the NPPs. These initiating events trigger sequences of events that challenge plant control and safety systems whose failure could potentially lead to core damage or large early release. Selection for initiating events consists of two steps i.e. first step, definition of possible events, such as by evaluating a comprehensive engineering, and by constructing a top level logic model. Then the second step, grouping of identified initiating event's by the safety function to be performed or combinations of systems responses. Therefore, the purpose of this paper is to discuss initiating events identification in event tree development process and to reviews other probabilistic safety assessments (PSA). The identification of initiating events also involves the past operating experience, review of other PSA, failure mode and effect analysis (FMEA), feedback from system modeling, and master logic diagram (special type of fault tree). By using the method of study for the condition of the traditional US PSA categorization in detail, could be obtained the important initiating events that are categorized into LOCA, transients and external events.

  14. Radiological Impact Assessment (RIA) following a postulated accident in PHWRS

    SciTech Connect

    Soni, N.; Kansal, M.; Rammohan, H. P.; Malhotra, P. K.

    2012-07-01

    Radiological Impact Assessment (RIA) following postulated accident i.e Loss of Coolant Accident (LOCA) with failed Emergency Core Cooling System (ECCS), performed as part of the reactor safety analysis of a typical 700 MWe Indian Pressurized Heavy Water Reactor(PHWR). The rationale behind the assessment is that the public needs to be protected in the event that the postulated accident results in radionuclide release outside containment. Radionuclides deliver dose to the human body through various pathways namely, plume submersion, exposure due to ground deposition, inhalation and ingestion. The total exposure dose measured in terms of total effective dose equivalent (TEDE) is the sum of doses to a hypothetical adult human at exclusion zone boundary by all the exposure pathways. The analysis provides the important inputs to decide upon the type of emergency counter measures to be adopted during the postulated accident. The importance of the various pathways in terms of contribution to the total effective dose equivalent(TEDE) is also assessed with respect to time of exposure. Inhalation and plume gamma dose are the major contributors towards TEDE during initial period of accident whereas ingestion and ground shine dose start dominating in TEDE in the extended period of exposure. Moreover, TEDE is initially dominated by I-131, Kr-88, Te-132, I-133 and Sr-89, whereas, as time progresses, Xe-133,I-131 and Te-132 become the main contributors. (authors)

  15. Bayes' postulate for trinomial trials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diniz, M. A.; Polpo, A.

    2012-10-01

    In this paper, we discuss Bayes' postulate and its interpretation. We extend the binomial trial method proposed by de Finetti [1] to trinomial trials, for which we argue that the consideration of equiprobability a priori for the possible outcomes of the trinomial trials implies that the parameter vector has Dirichlet(1,1) as prior. Based on this result, we agree with Stigler [2] in that the notion in Bayes' postulate stating "absolutely know nothing" is related to the possible outcomes of an experiment and not to "non-information" about the parameter.

  16. QUANTUM MECHANICS WITHOUT STATISTICAL POSTULATES

    SciTech Connect

    G. GEIGER; ET AL

    2000-11-01

    The Bohmian formulation of quantum mechanics describes the measurement process in an intuitive way without a reduction postulate. Due to the chaotic motion of the hidden classical particle all statistical features of quantum mechanics during a sequence of repeated measurements can be derived in the framework of a deterministic single system theory.

  17. Preliminary Identification of Accident Initiating Events for IFE Power Plants

    SciTech Connect

    Cadwallader, Lee Charles; Latkowsk, J. F.

    2001-10-01

    This paper presents initial results of a task to identify accident initiating events for inertial fusion energy (IFE) power plant designs. Initiating events (IEs) are a fundamental building block of a probabilistic risk assessment; they are the ‘accident starters’ that are analyzed to determine the risks posed to members of the public in the vicinity of the power plant. The IE results for the SOMBRERO design are presented in tabular form. The SOMBRERO design was analyzed since it is representative of dry chamber wall, laser driven designs. This work is used to characterize IFE plant risk and to identify potential design changes that would mitigate the plant risk.

  18. Initial Time Dependence of Abundances in Solar Energetic Particle Events

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reames, Donald V.; Ny, C. K.; Tylka, A. J.

    1999-01-01

    We compare the initial behavior of Fe/O and He/H abundance ratios and their relationship to the evolution of the proton energy spectra in "small" and "large" gradual solar energetic particle (SEP) events. The results are qualitatively consistent with the behavior predicted by the theory of Ng et al. (1999a, b). He/H ratios that initially rise with time are a signature of scattering by non-Kolmogorov Alfven wave spectra generated by intense beams of shock-accelerated protons streaming outward in large gradual SEP events.

  19. Initiating Events for Multi-Reactor Plant Sites

    SciTech Connect

    Muhlheim, Michael David; Flanagan, George F.; Poore, III, Willis P.

    2014-09-01

    Inherent in the design of modular reactors is the increased likelihood of events that initiate at a single reactor affecting another reactor. Because of the increased level of interactions between reactors, it is apparent that the Probabilistic Risk Assessments (PRAs) for modular reactor designs need to specifically address the increased interactions and dependencies.

  20. Sensitivity of a Simulated Derecho Event to Model Initial Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wei

    2014-05-01

    Since 2003, the MMM division at NCAR has been experimenting cloud-permitting scale weather forecasting using Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model. Over the years, we've tested different model physics, and tried different initial and boundary conditions. Not surprisingly, we found that the model's forecasts are more sensitive to the initial conditions than model physics. In 2012 real-time experiment, WRF-DART (Data Assimilation Research Testbed) at 15 km was employed to produce initial conditions for twice-a-day forecast at 3 km. On June 29, this forecast system captured one of the most destructive derecho event on record. In this presentation, we will examine forecast sensitivity to different model initial conditions, and try to understand the important features that may contribute to the success of the forecast.

  1. Nonlinear damage analysis: Postulate and evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leis, B. N.; Forte, T. P.

    1983-01-01

    The objective of this program is to assess the viability of a damage postulate which asserts that the fatigue resistance curve of a metal is history dependent due to inelastic action. The study focusses on OFE copper because this simple model material accentuates the inelastic action central to the damage postulate. Data relevant to damage evolution and crack initiation are developed via a study of surface topography. The effects of surface layer residual stresses are explored via comparative testing as were the effects in initial prestraining. The results of the study very clearly show the deformation history dependence of the fatigue resistance of OFE copper. Furthermore the concept of deformation history dependence is shown to qualitatively explain the fatigue resistance of all histories considered. Likewise quantitative predictions for block cycle histories are found to accurately track the observed results. In this respect the assertion that damage per cycle for a given level of the damage parameter is deformation history dependent appears to be physically justified.

  2. Stochastic trajectories of succession initiated by extreme climatic events.

    PubMed

    Kreyling, J; Jentsch, A; Beierkuhnlein, C

    2011-08-01

    Deterministic or rule-based succession is expected under homogeneous biotic and abiotic starting conditions. Effects of extreme climatic events such as drought, however, may alter these assembly rules by adding stochastic elements. We monitored the succession of species composition of 30 twin grassland communities with identical biotic and abiotic starting conditions in an initially sown diversity gradient between 1 and 16 species over 13 years. The stochasticity of succession, measured as the synchrony in the development of the species compositions of the twin plots, was strongly altered by the extreme warm and dry summer of 2003. Moreover, it was independent from past and present plant diversity and neighbourhood species compositions. Extreme climatic events can induce stochastic effects in community development and therefore impair predictability even under homogeneous abiotic conditions. Stochastic events may result in lasting shifts of community composition, as well as adverse and unforeseeable effects on the stability of ecological services. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd/CNRS.

  3. A Simple Lab Exercise Demonstrating Koch's Postulates.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fulton, Michael M.

    1981-01-01

    Describes a laboratory exercise which applies Koch's Postulates to a plant disease, bacterial speck. Includes an explanation of Koch's Postulate, list of equipment needed, advance preparation, outline of the three-week activity, and variations of the laboratory exercise. (DS)

  4. Performance bounds on parallel self-initiating discrete-event

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nicol, David M.

    1990-01-01

    The use is considered of massively parallel architectures to execute discrete-event simulations of what is termed self-initiating models. A logical process in a self-initiating model schedules its own state re-evaluation times, independently of any other logical process, and sends its new state to other logical processes following the re-evaluation. The interest is in the effects of that communication on synchronization. The performance is considered of various synchronization protocols by deriving upper and lower bounds on optimal performance, upper bounds on Time Warp's performance, and lower bounds on the performance of a new conservative protocol. The analysis of Time Warp includes the overhead costs of state-saving and rollback. The analysis points out sufficient conditions for the conservative protocol to outperform Time Warp. The analysis also quantifies the sensitivity of performance to message fan-out, lookahead ability, and the probability distributions underlying the simulation.

  5. Signaling events during initiation of arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis.

    PubMed

    Schmitz, Alexa M; Harrison, Maria J

    2014-03-01

    Under nutrient-limiting conditions, plants will enter into symbiosis with arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi for the enhancement of mineral nutrient acquisition from the surrounding soil. AM fungi live in close, intracellular association with plant roots where they transfer phosphate and nitrogen to the plant in exchange for carbon. They are obligate fungi, relying on their host as their only carbon source. Much has been discovered in the last decade concerning the signaling events during initiation of the AM symbiosis, including the identification of signaling molecules generated by both partners. This signaling occurs through symbiosis-specific gene products in the host plant, which are indispensable for normal AM development. At the same time, plants have adapted complex mechanisms for avoiding infection by pathogenic fungi, including an innate immune response to general microbial molecules, such as chitin present in fungal cell walls. How it is that AM fungal colonization is maintained without eliciting a defensive response from the host is still uncertain. In this review, we present a summary of the molecular signals and their elicited responses during initiation of the AM symbiosis, including plant immune responses and their suppression.

  6. Initial Computations of Vertical Displacement Events with NIMROD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bunkers, Kyle; Sovinec, C. R.

    2014-10-01

    Disruptions associated with vertical displacement events (VDEs) have potential for causing considerable physical damage to ITER and other tokamak experiments. We report on initial computations of generic axisymmetric VDEs using the NIMROD code [Sovinec et al., JCP 195, 355 (2004)]. An implicit thin-wall computation has been implemented to couple separate internal and external regions without numerical stability limitations. A simple rectangular cross-section domain generated with the NIMEQ code [Howell and Sovinec, CPC (2014)] modified to use a symmetry condition at the midplane is used to test linear and nonlinear axisymmetric VDE computation. As current in simulated external coils for large- R / a cases is varied, there is a clear n = 0 stability threshold which lies below the decay-index criterion for the current-loop model of a tokamak to model VDEs [Mukhovatov and Shafranov, Nucl. Fusion 11, 605 (1971)]; a scan of wall distance indicates the offset is due to the influence of the conducting wall. Results with a vacuum region surrounding a resistive wall will also be presented. Initial nonlinear computations show large vertical displacement of an intact simulated tokamak. This effort is supported by U.S. Department of Energy Grant DE-FG02-06ER54850.

  7. Potential biochemical events associated with initiation of labor.

    PubMed

    Vidaeff, A C; Ramin, S M

    2008-01-01

    Much of our understanding and knowledge of human parturition has been blurred by conjecture and extrapolation. The limited available data on human parturition reflect the inability to directly experiment with pregnant human subjects. In spite of this obvious impediment and the scarcity of longitudinal data on fundamental physiological changes in human pregnancy, recent reports have generated a better understanding of the synchronous activities leading to labor. The purpose of this review was to organize, in an evidence-based format, the current understanding of maternal physiologic phenomena leading from uterine quiescence to uterine labor activity. Recent discoveries have prompted a revision of pre-existing classical theories on the initiation of parturition, such as the progesterone block theory or the prostaglandins stimulation of the uterotonic action of oxytocin. The presence in the circulation of extrahypothalamic corticotrophin-releasing hormone (CRH) produced by the placenta and myometrium is an inciting unique feature of primate pregnancy and a promising field for research. The concept of anatomical regionalization in labor promotion, including the cervical physiological inflammatory reaction, is also discussed in the review, especially in support of the strong link between inflammatory activation and onset of preterm labor. Understanding the intimate chain of events leading to parturition is critical, and elucidating the interplay of signals and processes that initiate normal labor may help us to understand the abnormal variant, spontaneous preterm labor, and devise efficacious interventions against it.

  8. First Steps: Initial Information and Communication Technology (ICT) Events.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clarke, Alan

    This document is intended to assist practitioners who are designing and organizing an initial information and communication technology (ICT) experience for adult learners. Section 1 presents an overview of the initial ICT learning experience. The concept of transferable skills is discussed in the context of ICT in Section 2. Section 3 explains new…

  9. Everlasting initial memory threshold for rare events in equilibration processes.

    PubMed

    Lee, J S; Kwon, Chulan; Park, Hyunggyu

    2013-02-01

    Conventional wisdom indicates that initial memory should decay away exponentially in time for general (noncritial) equilibration processes. In particular, time-integrated quantities such as heat are presumed to lose initial memory in a sufficiently long-time limit. However, we show that the large deviation function of time-integrated quantities may exhibit initial memory effect even in the infinite-time limit, if the system is initially prepared sufficiently far away from equilibrium. For a Brownian particle dynamics, as an example, we found a sharp finite threshold rigorously, beyond which the corresponding large deviation function contains everlasting initial memory. The physical origin for this phenomenon is explored with an intuitive argument and also from a toy model analysis. Our results can be applied to general nonequilibrium relaxation processes reaching (non)equilibrium steady states.

  10. Transient vortex events in the initial value problem for turbulence.

    PubMed

    Holm, D D; Kerr, Robert

    2002-06-17

    A vorticity surge event that could be a paradigm for a wide class of bursting events in turbulence is studied. The coherent mechanism is characterized by locally transverse vortex configurations that are intrinsically helical in both physical and Fourier space when there is a peak of the maximum vorticity parallel omega parallel(infinity)(t). At no time are nonhelical, antiparallel vorticity elements observed. This event precedes the appearance of the traditional signatures of an energy cascade such as strong growth of the dissipation, spectra approaching -5/3, and strongly Beltramized vortex tubes. Comparing how different large-eddy simulations reproduce these properties demonstrates the importance of properly modeling nonlinear transport of both energy and helicity.

  11. Koch's postulates, carnivorous cows, and tuberculosis today.

    PubMed

    Tabrah, Frank L

    2011-07-01

    With Koch's announcement in 1882 of his work with the tubercle bacillus, his famous postulates launched the rational world of infectious disease and an abrupt social change--strict patient isolation. The postulates, so successful at their inception, soon began to show some problems, particularly with cholera, which clearly violated some of Koch's requirements. Subsequent studies of other diseases and the discovery of entirely new ones have so altered and expanded the original postulates that they now are little but a precious touch of history. The present additions and replacements of the original concepts are skillful changes that several authors have devised to introduce new order into understanding complex viral and prion diseases. In 1988, this knowledge, with the totally rational response of the British population and its cattle industry, was critical in promptly blocking the threatened epidemic of human prion disease. In contrast, the recent upsurge of tuberculosis (TB) in the worldwide AIDS epidemic in developing countries, and the sudden increase in metabolic syndrome in wealthy ones, suggests the need for focused sociobiologic research seeking ways to affect the damaging lifestyle behavior of many less educated populations in both settings. The world awaits an equivalent of Koch's Postulates in sociobiology to explain and possibly avert large self-destructive behaviors.

  12. Initial healthcare to pediatric population under the radiation events.

    PubMed

    Afanasyev, D E; Kaminskyi, O V; Kopylova, O V; Chikalova, I G; Muraveva, I M; Vakoluk, K O; Pronin, O V; Samoylov, O O; Belingio, T O; Tepla, O V; Rozhkivska, L V; Ylyanchenko, I V; Gryschenko, K V; Tsvet, L O; Dombrovska, N S

    2016-12-01

    The objective of this paper is to analyze the data from scientific literature and available recommendations for health professionals on healthcare providing to pediatric population in the events associated with risk of radiation exposure. Over the past sixty years there were several large scale radiological events with a large number of chil dren affected, namely the atomic bombing of Hiroshima and Nagasaki, accident at the Chornobyl nuclear power plant, contact to 137Cs radiation source unutilized at the hospital shutdown in Brazil etc. Further research has crys tallized injuries and health disorders in the survived children in all cases being much more significant vs. other pop ulations. Analysis of circumstances and features of a number of emergency situations or incidents in the nuclear industry for several decades has shown a high probability of radioactive materials release into the environment. The danger of terrorism with the use of ionizing radiation sources resulting in a considered inevitable hazard to the chil dren is estimated as serious in recent years and deserves an especial mention here. D. E. Afanasyev, O. V. Kaminskyi, O. V. Kopylova, I. G. Chikalova, I. M. Muraveva, K. O. Vakoluk, O. V. Pronin, O. O. Samoylov, T. O. Belingio, O. V. Tepla, L. V. Rozhkivska, I. V. Ylyanchenko, K. V. Gryschenko, L. O. Tsvet, N. S. Dombrovska.

  13. Postulates for measures of genuine multipartite correlations

    SciTech Connect

    Bennett, Charles H.; Grudka, Andrzej; Horodecki, Michal; Horodecki, Ryszard; Horodecki, Pawel

    2011-01-15

    A lot of research has been done on multipartite correlations, but the problem of satisfactorily defining genuine multipartite correlations--those not trivially reducible to lower partite correlations--remains unsolved. In this paper we propose three reasonable postulates which each measure or indicator of genuine multipartite correlations (or genuine multipartite entanglement) should satisfy. We also introduce the concept of degree of correlations, which gives partial characterization of multipartite correlations. Then, we show that covariance does not satisfy two postulates and hence it cannot be used as an indicator of genuine multipartite correlations. Finally, we propose a candidate for a measure of genuine multipartite correlations based on the work that can be drawn from a local heat bath by means of a multipartite state.

  14. Initiating Event Rates at U.S. Nuclear Power Plants. 1988 - 2013

    SciTech Connect

    Schroeder, John A.; Bower, Gordon R.

    2014-02-01

    Analyzing initiating event rates is important because it indicates performance among plants and also provides inputs to several U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) risk-informed regulatory activities. This report presents an analysis of initiating event frequencies at U.S. commercial nuclear power plants since each plant’s low-power license date. The evaluation is based on the operating experience from fiscal year 1988 through 2013 as reported in licensee event reports. Engineers with nuclear power plant experience staff reviewed each event report since the last update to this report for the presence of valid scrams or reactor trips at power. To be included in the study, an event had to meet all of the following criteria: includes an unplanned reactor trip (not a scheduled reactor trip on the daily operations schedule), sequence of events starts when reactor is critical and at or above the point of adding heat, occurs at a U.S. commercial nuclear power plant (excluding Fort St. Vrain and LaCrosse), and is reported by a licensee event report. This report displays occurrence rates (baseline frequencies) for the categories of initiating events that contribute to the NRC’s Industry Trends Program. Sixteen initiating event groupings are trended and displayed. Initiators are plotted separately for initiating events with different occurrence rates for boiling water reactors and pressurized water reactors. p-values are given for the possible presence of a trend over the most recent 10 years.

  15. Development of the granulomatous response in murine toxocariasis. Initial events.

    PubMed Central

    Kayes, S. G.; Oaks, J. A.

    1978-01-01

    The cellular evolution of the persisting, muscle-associated granuloma in murine toxocariasis (visceral larva migrans) was chronicled for 11 weeks by light and electron microscopy. The initial granuloma consisted primarily of eosinophils and appeared to develop from the acute inflammatory infiltrate. During the ensuing 48 hours, most of the eosinophils appeared to loose their granules and disintegrate. The resulting cellular debris was then taken up by newly arrived macrophages which become the predominant mononuclear cell in the lesion by 28 days of infection. By 11 weeks, the granuloma had become a fibrotically encapsulated epithelioid granuloma surrounding the inciting larva. This histologic reaction is compared with the liver granulomatous response to Toxocara and to the well-characterized schistosome egg granuloma. A possible delayed hypersensitive etiology for the Toxocara granuloma is suggested. Images Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 13 Figure 14 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 9 Figure 10 Figure 11 Figure 12 PMID:717533

  16. Biologically induced initiation of Neoproterozoic snowball-Earth events.

    PubMed

    Tziperman, Eli; Halevy, Itay; Johnston, David T; Knoll, Andrew H; Schrag, Daniel P

    2011-09-13

    The glaciations of the Neoproterozoic Era (1,000 to 542 MyBP) were preceded by dramatically light C isotopic excursions preserved in preglacial deposits. Standard explanations of these excursions involve remineralization of isotopically light organic matter and imply strong enhancement of atmospheric CO(2) greenhouse gas concentration, apparently inconsistent with the glaciations that followed. We examine a scenario in which the isotopic signal, as well as the global glaciation, result from enhanced export of organic matter from the upper ocean into anoxic subsurface waters and sediments. The organic matter undergoes anoxic remineralization at depth via either sulfate- or iron-reducing bacteria. In both cases, this can lead to changes in carbonate alkalinity and dissolved inorganic pool that efficiently lower the atmospheric CO(2) concentration, possibly plunging Earth into an ice age. This scenario predicts enhanced deposition of calcium carbonate, the formation of siderite, and an increase in ocean pH, all of which are consistent with recent observations. Late Neoproterozoic diversification of marine eukaryotes may have facilitated the episodic enhancement of export of organic matter from the upper ocean, by causing a greater proportion of organic matter to be partitioned as particulate aggregates that can sink more efficiently, via increased cell size, biomineralization or increased CN of eukaryotic phytoplankton. The scenario explains isotopic excursions that are correlated or uncorrelated with snowball initiation, and suggests that increasing atmospheric oxygen concentrations and a progressive oxygenation of the subsurface ocean helped to prevent snowball glaciation on the Phanerozoic Earth.

  17. Biologically induced initiation of Neoproterozoic snowball-Earth events

    PubMed Central

    Tziperman, Eli; Halevy, Itay; Johnston, David T.; Knoll, Andrew H.; Schrag, Daniel P.

    2011-01-01

    The glaciations of the Neoproterozoic Era (1,000 to 542 MyBP) were preceded by dramatically light C isotopic excursions preserved in preglacial deposits. Standard explanations of these excursions involve remineralization of isotopically light organic matter and imply strong enhancement of atmospheric CO2 greenhouse gas concentration, apparently inconsistent with the glaciations that followed. We examine a scenario in which the isotopic signal, as well as the global glaciation, result from enhanced export of organic matter from the upper ocean into anoxic subsurface waters and sediments. The organic matter undergoes anoxic remineralization at depth via either sulfate- or iron-reducing bacteria. In both cases, this can lead to changes in carbonate alkalinity and dissolved inorganic pool that efficiently lower the atmospheric CO2 concentration, possibly plunging Earth into an ice age. This scenario predicts enhanced deposition of calcium carbonate, the formation of siderite, and an increase in ocean pH, all of which are consistent with recent observations. Late Neoproterozoic diversification of marine eukaryotes may have facilitated the episodic enhancement of export of organic matter from the upper ocean, by causing a greater proportion of organic matter to be partitioned as particulate aggregates that can sink more efficiently, via increased cell size, biomineralization or increased C∶N of eukaryotic phytoplankton. The scenario explains isotopic excursions that are correlated or uncorrelated with snowball initiation, and suggests that increasing atmospheric oxygen concentrations and a progressive oxygenation of the subsurface ocean helped to prevent snowball glaciation on the Phanerozoic Earth. PMID:21825156

  18. Postulated accident scenarios in weapons disassembly

    SciTech Connect

    Payne, S.S.

    1997-06-01

    A very brief summary of three postulated accident scenarios for weapons disassembly is provided in the paper. The first deals with a tetrahedral configuration of four generic pits; the second, an infinite planar array of generic pits with varying interstitial water density; and the third, a spherical shell with internal mass suspension in water varying the size and mass of the shell. Calculations were performed using the Monte Carlo Neutron Photon transport code MCNP4A. Preliminary calculations pointed to a need for higher resolution of small pit separation regimes and snapshots of hydrodynamic processes of water/plutonium mixtures.

  19. 75 FR 38078 - Manufacturing and Services' Manufacture America Initiative and Events

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-01

    ... International Trade Administration Manufacturing and Services' Manufacture America Initiative and Events ACTION... manufacturing. SUMMARY: The International Trade Administration's Manufacturing and Services Unit is launching a... government agencies as well as universities. To address these challenges, the Manufacturing and...

  20. Effect of Two Different Methods of Initiating Atomoxetine on the Adverse Event Profile of Atomoxetine

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenhill, Laurence L.; Newcorn, Jeffrey H.; Gao, Haitao; Feldman, Peter D.

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To compare the effects of two different methods for initiating atomoxetine in terms of the incidence of early adverse events. Method: Data on atomoxetine treatment-emergent adverse events in youths, ages 6 to 18 years, were analyzed from five randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, acute-phase studies. Two studies involve…

  1. Effect of Two Different Methods of Initiating Atomoxetine on the Adverse Event Profile of Atomoxetine

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenhill, Laurence L.; Newcorn, Jeffrey H.; Gao, Haitao; Feldman, Peter D.

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To compare the effects of two different methods for initiating atomoxetine in terms of the incidence of early adverse events. Method: Data on atomoxetine treatment-emergent adverse events in youths, ages 6 to 18 years, were analyzed from five randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, acute-phase studies. Two studies involve…

  2. Graded approach for initiating event selection in a facility hazard analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Majumdar, K.; Altenbach, T.

    1998-04-01

    This paper describes a methodology for selecting initiating events or event scenarios for the hazard analysis of a new Department of Energy (DOE) facility at the Nevada Test Site for nuclear explosive operations called the Device Assembly Facility (DAF). The selection process is a very important first step in conducting the hazard analysis for the facility, which in turn may feed into a quantitative risk analysis. A comprehensive risk analysis is dependent on the identification and inclusion of a complete set of initiating events in the analysis model. A systematic and logical method of grading or screening all the potential initiating events satisfies the needs for completeness within the bounds of efficiency and practicality. By applying the graded approach to the selection of the initiating events, the task and hazard analysis was able to focus its attention on only those events having the potential to develop into credible accident scenarios. Resources were concentrated into the understanding of those scenarios, and assuring that adequate positive measures are in place to control the risk associated with them.

  3. Observations of narrow bipolar events reveal how lightning is initiated in thunderstorms

    SciTech Connect

    Rison, William; Krehbiel, Paul R.; Stock, Michael G.; Edens, Harald E.; Shao, Xuan-Min; Thomas, Ronald J.; Stanley, Mark A.; Zhang, Yang

    2016-02-15

    A long-standing but fundamental question in lightning studies concerns how lightning is initiated inside storms, given the absence of physical conductors. The issue has revolved around the question of whether the discharges are initiated solely by conventional dielectric breakdown or involve relativistic runaway electron processes. Here we report observations of a relatively unknown type of discharge, called fast positive breakdown, that is the cause of high-power discharges known as narrow bipolar events. We find that the breakdown has a wide range of strengths and is the initiating event of numerous lightning discharges. It appears to be purely dielectric in nature and to consist of a system of positive streamers in a locally intense electric field region. It initiates negative breakdown at the starting location of the streamers, which leads to the ensuing flash. The observations show that many or possibly all lightning flashes are initiated by fast positive breakdown.

  4. Observations of narrow bipolar events reveal how lightning is initiated in thunderstorms

    DOE PAGES

    Rison, William; Krehbiel, Paul R.; Stock, Michael G.; ...

    2016-02-15

    A long-standing but fundamental question in lightning studies concerns how lightning is initiated inside storms, given the absence of physical conductors. The issue has revolved around the question of whether the discharges are initiated solely by conventional dielectric breakdown or involve relativistic runaway electron processes. Here we report observations of a relatively unknown type of discharge, called fast positive breakdown, that is the cause of high-power discharges known as narrow bipolar events. We find that the breakdown has a wide range of strengths and is the initiating event of numerous lightning discharges. It appears to be purely dielectric in naturemore » and to consist of a system of positive streamers in a locally intense electric field region. It initiates negative breakdown at the starting location of the streamers, which leads to the ensuing flash. The observations show that many or possibly all lightning flashes are initiated by fast positive breakdown.« less

  5. Observations of narrow bipolar events reveal how lightning is initiated in thunderstorms

    PubMed Central

    Rison, William; Krehbiel, Paul R.; Stock, Michael G.; Edens, Harald E.; Shao, Xuan-Min; Thomas, Ronald J.; Stanley, Mark A.; Zhang, Yang

    2016-01-01

    A long-standing but fundamental question in lightning studies concerns how lightning is initiated inside storms, given the absence of physical conductors. The issue has revolved around the question of whether the discharges are initiated solely by conventional dielectric breakdown or involve relativistic runaway electron processes. Here we report observations of a relatively unknown type of discharge, called fast positive breakdown, that is the cause of high-power discharges known as narrow bipolar events. The breakdown is found to have a wide range of strengths and is the initiating event of numerous lightning discharges. It appears to be purely dielectric in nature and to consist of a system of positive streamers in a locally intense electric field region. It initiates negative breakdown at the starting location of the streamers, which leads to the ensuing flash. The observations show that many or possibly all lightning flashes are initiated by fast positive breakdown. PMID:26876654

  6. Observations of narrow bipolar events reveal how lightning is initiated in thunderstorms.

    PubMed

    Rison, William; Krehbiel, Paul R; Stock, Michael G; Edens, Harald E; Shao, Xuan-Min; Thomas, Ronald J; Stanley, Mark A; Zhang, Yang

    2016-02-15

    A long-standing but fundamental question in lightning studies concerns how lightning is initiated inside storms, given the absence of physical conductors. The issue has revolved around the question of whether the discharges are initiated solely by conventional dielectric breakdown or involve relativistic runaway electron processes. Here we report observations of a relatively unknown type of discharge, called fast positive breakdown, that is the cause of high-power discharges known as narrow bipolar events. The breakdown is found to have a wide range of strengths and is the initiating event of numerous lightning discharges. It appears to be purely dielectric in nature and to consist of a system of positive streamers in a locally intense electric field region. It initiates negative breakdown at the starting location of the streamers, which leads to the ensuing flash. The observations show that many or possibly all lightning flashes are initiated by fast positive breakdown.

  7. Development of transient initiating event frequencies for use in probabilistic risk assessments

    SciTech Connect

    Mackowiak, D.P.; Gentillon, C.D.; Smith, K.L.

    1985-05-01

    Transient initiating event frequencies are an essential input to the analysis process of a nuclear power plant probabilistic risk assessment. These frequencies describe events causing or requiring scrams. This report documents an effort to validate and update from other sources a computer-based data file developed by the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) describing such events at 52 United States commercial nuclear power plants. Operating information from the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission on 24 additional plants from their date of commercial operation has been combined with the EPRI data, and the entire data base has been updated to add 1980 through 1983 events for all 76 plants. The validity of the EPRI data and data analysis methodology and the adequacy of the EPRI transient categories are examined. New transient initiating event frequencies are derived from the expanded data base using the EPRI transient categories and data display methods. Upper bounds for these frequencies are also provided. Additional analyses explore changes in the dominant transients, changes in transient outage times and their impact on plant operation, and the effects of power level and scheduled scrams on transient event frequencies. A more rigorous data analysis methodology is developed to encourage further refinement of the transient initiating event frequencies derived herein. Updating the transient event data base resulted in approx.2400 events being added to EPRI's approx.3000-event data file. The resulting frequency estimates were in most cases lower than those reported by EPRI, but no significant order-of-magnitude changes were noted. The average number of transients per year for the combined data base is 8.5 for pressurized water reactors and 7.4 for boiling water reactors.

  8. Development of a tiered screening strategy for a molecular-initiating event: thyroperoxidase inhibition (SOT)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Adverse outcome pathway (AOP) analyses illustrate that some molecular-initiating events (MIEs) for thyroid disruption, including thyroperoxidase (TPO) inhibition, are not evaluated by current ToxCast/Tox21 high-throughput screening (HTS) assays. A novel HTS assay for TPO inhibiti...

  9. Development of a tiered screening strategy for a molecular-initiating event: thyroperoxidase inhibition (SOT)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Adverse outcome pathway (AOP) analyses illustrate that some molecular-initiating events (MIEs) for thyroid disruption, including thyroperoxidase (TPO) inhibition, are not evaluated by current ToxCast/Tox21 high-throughput screening (HTS) assays. A novel HTS assay for TPO inhibiti...

  10. DNA Replication Origin Interference Increases the Spacing between Initiation Events in Human Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lebofsky, Ronald; Heilig, Roland; Sonnleitner, Max; Weissenbach, Jean

    2006-01-01

    Mammalian DNA replication origins localize to sites that range from base pairs to tens of kilobases. A regular distribution of initiations in individual cell cycles suggests that only a limited number of these numerous potential start sites are converted into activated origins. Origin interference can silence redundant origins; however, it is currently unknown whether interference participates in spacing functional human initiation events. By using a novel hybridization strategy, genomic Morse code, on single combed DNA molecules from primary keratinocytes, we report the initiation sites present on 1.5 Mb of human chromosome 14q11.2. We confirm that initiation zones are widespread in human cells, map to intergenic regions, and contain sequence motifs found at other mammalian initiation zones. Origins used per cell cycle are less abundant than the potential sites of initiation, and their limited use increases the spacing between initiation events. Between-zone interference decreases in proportion to the distance from the active origin, whereas within-zone interference is 100% efficient. These results identify a hierarchical organization of origin activity in human cells. Functional origins govern the probability that nearby origins will fire in the context of multiple potential start sites of DNA replication, and this is mediated by origin interference. PMID:17005913

  11. Understanding initiation and termination events in the primary amine-initiated polymerization of NCAs by high-vacuum techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Pickel, Deanna L; Messman, Jamie M

    2010-01-01

    High-vacuum polymerization of -amino acid-N-carboxyanhydrides (NCAs) affords polymers with controlled molecular weights and narrow polydispersities, however a comprehensive study of the end-group composition of the resulting polypeptides has not yet been performed. This reveals crucial information, as the end-groups are indicative of both the polymerization mechanism (i.e., initiation event) as well as the termination pathways. To this end, poly(O-benzyl-L-tyrosine) initiated by 1,6-diaminohexane was synthesized and subsequently characterized by MALDI-TOF MS, NALDI -TOF MS and 13C NMR spectroscopy to ascertain the end-group structure. Polymers were prepared by both high vacuum and glove box techniques in DMF/THF. Preparation of poly(O-benzyl-L-tyrosine) by high vacuum techniques yielded a polymer initiated exclusively by the normal amine mechanism, and termination by reaction with DMF was observed. In contrast, polymers prepared in the glove box were initiated by the normal amine and activated monomer mechanisms, and several termination products are evident. To our knowledge, this is the first rigorous and comparative analysis of the end-group structure, and it demonstrates the advantage of high vacuum techniques for polymerization of NCAs for the preparation of well-defined polypeptides with end-group fidelity.

  12. Extreme Events and Disaster Risk Reduction - a Future Earth KAN initiative

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frank, Dorothea; Reichstein, Markus

    2017-04-01

    The topic of Extreme Events in the context of global environmental change is both a scientifically challenging and exciting topic, and of very high societal relevance. The Future Earth Cluster initiative E3S organized in 2016 a cross-community/co-design workshop on Extreme Events and Environments from Climate to Society (http://www.e3s-future-earth.eu/index.php/ConferencesEvents/ConferencesAmpEvents). Based on the results, co-design research strategies and established network of the workshop, and previous activities, E3S is thriving to establish the basis for a longer-term research effort under the umbrella of Future Earth. These led to an initiative for a Future Earth Knowledge Action Network on Extreme Events and Disaster Risk Reduction. Example initial key question in this context include: What are meaningful indices to describe and quantify impact-relevant (e.g. climate) extremes? Which system properties yield resistance and resilience to extreme conditions? What are the key interactions between global urbanization processes, extreme events, and social and infrastructure vulnerability and resilience? The long-term goal of this KAN is to contribute to enhancing the resistance, resilience, and adaptive capacity of socio-ecological systems across spatial, temporal and institutional scales, in particular in the light of hazards affected by ongoing environmental change (e.g. climate change, global urbanization and land use/land cover change). This can be achieved by enhanced understanding, prediction, improved and open data and knowledge bases for detection and early warning decision making, and by new insights on natural and societal conditions and governance for resilience and adaptive capacity.

  13. Meteorological factors and timing of the initiating event of human parturition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirsch, Emmet; Lim, Courtney; Dobrez, Deborah; Adams, Marci G.; Noble, William

    2011-03-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether meteorological factors are associated with the timing of either onset of labor with intact membranes or rupture of membranes prior to labor—together referred to as `the initiating event' of parturition. All patients delivering at Evanston Hospital after spontaneous labor or rupture of membranes at ≥20 weeks of gestation over a 6-month period were studied. Logistic regression models of the initiating event of parturition using clinical variables (maternal age, gestational age, parity, multiple gestation and intrauterine infection) with and without the addition of meteorological variables (barometric pressure, temperature and humidity) were compared. A total of 1,088 patients met the inclusion criteria. Gestational age, multiple gestation and chorioamnionitis were associated with timing of initiation of parturition ( P < 0.01). The addition of meteorological to clinical variables generated a statistically significant improvement in prediction of the initiating event; however, the magnitude of this improvement was small (less than 2% difference in receiver-operating characteristic score). These observations held regardless of parity, fetal number and gestational age. Meteorological factors are associated with the timing of parturition, but the magnitude of this association is small.

  14. Meteorological factors and timing of the initiating event of human parturition.

    PubMed

    Hirsch, Emmet; Lim, Courtney; Dobrez, Deborah; Adams, Marci G; Noble, William

    2011-03-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether meteorological factors are associated with the timing of either onset of labor with intact membranes or rupture of membranes prior to labor-together referred to as 'the initiating event' of parturition. All patients delivering at Evanston Hospital after spontaneous labor or rupture of membranes at ≥20 weeks of gestation over a 6-month period were studied. Logistic regression models of the initiating event of parturition using clinical variables (maternal age, gestational age, parity, multiple gestation and intrauterine infection) with and without the addition of meteorological variables (barometric pressure, temperature and humidity) were compared. A total of 1,088 patients met the inclusion criteria. Gestational age, multiple gestation and chorioamnionitis were associated with timing of initiation of parturition (P < 0.01). The addition of meteorological to clinical variables generated a statistically significant improvement in prediction of the initiating event; however, the magnitude of this improvement was small (less than 2% difference in receiver-operating characteristic score). These observations held regardless of parity, fetal number and gestational age. Meteorological factors are associated with the timing of parturition, but the magnitude of this association is small.

  15. Modeling a molecular initiating event to population effects: A case study of aromatase inhibition in fathead minnows

    EPA Science Inventory

    An adverse outcome pathway (AOP) conceptually links a molecular initiating event with measureable key events at higher levels of biological organization that ultimately result in an adverse outcome. Development of an AOP requires experimental data and scientific expertise to ide...

  16. Modeling a molecular initiating event to population effects: A case study of aromatase inhibition in fathead minnows

    EPA Science Inventory

    An adverse outcome pathway (AOP) conceptually links a molecular initiating event with measureable key events at higher levels of biological organization that ultimately result in an adverse outcome. Development of an AOP requires experimental data and scientific expertise to ide...

  17. Inflammatory Markers and Risk of Cerebrovascular Events in Patients Initiating Dialysis

    PubMed Central

    Coresh, Josef; Jaar, Bernard G.; Fink, Nancy E.; Plantinga, Laura C.; Armstrong, Paige A.; Longenecker, J. Craig; Sharrett, A. Richey; Powe, Neil R.; Parekh, Rulan S.

    2011-01-01

    Summary Background and objectives Stroke remains a leading cause of morbidity and mortality for patients on dialysis; however, its risk factors in this population and measures to prevent it are not well understood. Design, setting, participants, & measurements We investigated whether inflammation was associated with cerebrovascular events in a national US cohort of 1041 incident dialysis patients enrolled from October 1995 to June 1998 and followed until January 31, 2004. Incident cerebrovascular events were defined as nonfatal (hospitalized stroke, carotid endarterectomy) and fatal (stroke death) events after dialysis initiation. With Cox proportional hazards regression analysis accounting for the competing risk of nonstroke death, we assessed the independent event risk associated with baseline levels of multiple inflammatory markers (high-sensitivity C-reactive protein [hsCRP], interleukin-6 (IL-6), matrix metalloproteinase-3 [MMP-3], and P-selectin) and hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase inhibitor (statin) use, which may have pleiotropic inflammatory effects. Results 165 patients experienced a cerebrovascular event during 3548 person-years of follow-up; overall incidence rate was 4.9/100 person-years. None of the inflammatory markers were associated with cerebrovascular event risk (adjusted hazard ratios [HRs] per log unit [95% confidence interval]: hsCRP, 0.97 [0.85 to 1.11]; IL-6, 1.04 [0.85 to 1.26]; MMP-3, 1.02 [0.70 to 1.48]; P-selectin, 0.98 [0.57 to 1.68]). Statin use was also not associated with significant risk of events in unadjusted (HR 1.07 [0.69 to 1.68]) or propensity-score adjusted analyses (HR 0.98 [0.61 to 1.56]). Conclusions In conclusion, neither inflammatory markers nor statin use was associated with risk of cerebrovascular events. Further studies are needed to understand the pathophysiology and prevention of stroke in patients on dialysis. PMID:21551022

  18. Initiation and Propagation Phases of Cascadia Episodic Tremor and Slip Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Creager, K. C.; Ulberg, C. W.

    2016-12-01

    Northern Cascadia episodic tremor and slip (ETS) events appear to have distinct initiation and propagation phases. During the 8-day initiation phase, there is a roughly linear increase in tremor amplitude, corresponding to a linear increase in the areal distribution of tremor. These episodes typically initiate down dip, and after approximately 8 days have organized and migrated to fill the up-dip/down-dip width of the tremorgenic zone. Because the increase in tremor amplitude during the initiation phase is proportional to the increase in tremoring area, the source amplitude per unit area is approximately constant, indicating a constant radiated energy rate per unit area associated with tremor. This is consistent with a spatial dimension growing as the square root of time, indicating a diffusion process with a diffusion coefficient of (2-5)*103 m2/s. Ide [2010, Nature] and Ando et al., [2012, JGR] also inferred a diffusive behavior for tremor in Japan with similar diffusion coefficients. There is very little tidal modulation of tremor amplitudes during this diffusive, physically unbounded initiation phase, similar to Ide's conclusion that diffusive behavior was most clear when tidal modulation was weak. In contrast, during the propagation phase, tremor amplitudes vary wildly and are strongly modulated by tidal stresses, as the tremor propagates along strike in one or both directions at roughly 8 km/day, continuing for 3-5 weeks. During this phase the fault slip is bounded by its width in the dip direction. The largest Inter-ETS tremor swarms can begin similarly to ETS events, but do not reach the maximum area and amplitude of ETS events, and instead terminate in less than 5-10 days.

  19. Physical mechanism of initial breakdown pulses and narrow bipolar events in lightning discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, Caitano L.; Pasko, Victor P.

    2015-05-01

    To date the true nature of initial breakdown pulses (IBPs) and narrow bipolar events (NBEs) in lightning discharges remains a mystery. Recent experimental evidence has correlated IBPs to the initial development of lightning leaders inside the thundercloud. NBE wideband waveforms resemble classic IBPs in both amplitude and duration. Most NBEs are quite peculiar in the sense that very frequently they occur in isolation from other lightning processes. The remaining fraction, 16% of positive polarity NBEs, according to Wu et al. (2014), happens as the first event in an otherwise regular intracloud lightning discharge. These authors point out that the initiator type of NBEs has no difference with other NBEs that did not start lightning, except for the fact that they occur deeper inside the thunderstorm (i.e., at lower altitudes). In this paper, we propose a new physical mechanism to explain the source of both IBPs and NBEs. We propose that IBPs and NBEs are the electromagnetic transients associated with the sudden (i.e., stepwise) elongation of the initial negative leader extremity in the thunderstorm electric field. To demonstrate our hypothesis a novel computational/numerical model of the bidirectional lightning leader tree is developed, consisting of a generalization of electrostatic and transmission line approximations found in the literature. Finally, we show how the IBP and NBE waveform characteristics directly reflect the properties of the bidirectional lightning leader (such as step length, for example) and amplitude of the thunderstorm electric field.

  20. Migration experience and premarital sexual initiation in urban Kenya: an event history analysis.

    PubMed

    Luke, Nancy; Xu, Hongwei; Mberu, Blessing U; Goldberg, Rachel E

    2012-06-01

    Migration during the formative adolescent years can affect important life-course transitions, including the initiation of sexual activity. In this study, we use life history calendar data to investigate the relationship between changes in residence and timing of premarital sexual debut among young people in urban Kenya. By age 18, 64 percent of respondents had initiated premarital sex, and 45 percent had moved at least once between the ages of 12 and 18. Results of the event history analysis show that girls and boys who move during early adolescence experience the earliest onset of sexual activity. For adolescent girls, however, other dimensions of migration provide protective effects, with greater numbers of residential changes and residential changes in the last one to three months associated with later sexual initiation. To support young people's ability to navigate the social, economic, and sexual environments that accompany residential change, researchers and policymakers should consider how various dimensions of migration affect sexual activity.

  1. The "Big Bang" in obese fat: Events initiating obesity-induced adipose tissue inflammation.

    PubMed

    Wensveen, Felix M; Valentić, Sonja; Šestan, Marko; Turk Wensveen, Tamara; Polić, Bojan

    2015-09-01

    Obesity is associated with the accumulation of pro-inflammatory cells in visceral adipose tissue (VAT), which is an important underlying cause of insulin resistance and progression to diabetes mellitus type 2 (DM2). Although the role of pro-inflammatory cytokines in disease development is established, the initiating events leading to immune cell activation remain elusive. Lean adipose tissue is predominantly populated with regulatory cells, such as eosinophils and type 2 innate lymphocytes. These cells maintain tissue homeostasis through the excretion of type 2 cytokines, such as IL-4, IL-5, and IL-13, which keep adipose tissue macrophages (ATMs) in an anti-inflammatory, M2-like state. Diet-induced obesity is associated with the loss of tissue homeostasis and development of type 1 inflammatory responses in VAT, characterized by IFN-γ. A key event is a shift of ATMs toward an M1 phenotype. Recent studies show that obesity-induced adipocyte hypertrophy results in upregulated surface expression of stress markers. Adipose stress is detected by local sentinels, such as NK cells and CD8(+) T cells, which produce IFN-γ, driving M1 ATM polarization. A rapid accumulation of pro-inflammatory cells in VAT follows, leading to inflammation. In this review, we provide an overview of events leading to adipose tissue inflammation, with a special focus on adipose homeostasis and the obesity-induced loss of homeostasis which marks the initiation of VAT inflammation. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. Evaluating MJO event initiation and decay in the skeleton model using an RMM-like index

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stachnik, Justin P.; Waliser, Duane E.; Majda, Andrew J.; Stechmann, Samuel N.; Thual, Sulian

    2015-11-01

    The Madden-Julian oscillation (MJO) skeleton model is a low-order dynamic model that is capable of simulating many of the observed features of the MJO. This study develops a model-based "MJO" index that is similar to the well-known real-time multivariate MJO (RMM) index to better facilitate comparison between the skeleton model and observational data. Multivariate and univariate empirical orthogonal function (EOF) analyses were performed on the convective heating and zonal wind data taken from the skeleton model for simulations forced with an idealized warm pool and observed sea surface temperatures (SSTs). The leading EOF modes indicated a wave number 1 convectively coupled circulation anomaly with zonal asymmetries that closely resembled the observed RMM EOFs, especially when the model was forced with observed SSTs. The RMM-like index was used to compute an MJO climatology and document the occurrence of primary, continuing, and terminating MJO events in the skeleton model. The overall amount of MJO activity and event lengths compared reasonably well to observations for such a simple model. Attempts at reconciling the observed geographic distribution of individual MJO initiation and termination events were not successful for the stochastic simulations, though stochasticity is necessary in order to produce composite MJOs that initiate and decay with time scales similar to observations. Finally, analysis indicates that the existence of slow-moving, eastward traveling waves with higher wave numbers (k ≈ 12) embedded within the large-scale flow often precedes MJO termination in the skeleton model.

  3. Risk factors for adverse events after vaccinations performed during the initial hospitalization of infants born prematurely.

    PubMed

    Wilińska, Maria; Warakomska, Małgorzata; Głuszczak-Idziakowska, Ewa; Jackowska, Teresa

    There are significant delays in implementing vaccination among preterm infants. Description of the frequency and kinds of adverse events following immunization in preterms. Establishment of the group of preterms who will distinctively be susceptible to adverse events. Demographical, clinical data and the occurrence of adverse events after DTaP, HIB and pneumococcal vaccination among preterms during their initial hospitalization were prospectively collected with the use of an electronic data form between 1st June 2011 and 31st May 2015. The analysis was conducted on 138 patients. The groups were divided according to maturity (I: ≤ GA 28w n=73 and GA 29-36 w n=65). There were no statistically significant differences between the groups in the occurrence of adverse events. Out of the total group, following vaccination apnoea developed in 6 newborns (4%) and activity dysfunctions were observed in 13 newborns (10%). The occurrence of apnoea after vaccination positively correlated with the time of non-invasive ventilation and the occurrence of late infection. There were no statistically significant demographical or clinical risk factors for the development of activity dysfunctions following vaccination. Term vaccination in clinically stable preterm infants is a safe medical procedure. However, long-term non-invasive respiratory support and late infections are risk factors for apnea following vaccinations. In these patients vaccinations should be considered during hospitalization.

  4. IceCube PeV cascade events initiated by electron-antineutrinos at Glashow resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barger, Vernon; Learned, John; Pakvasa, Sandip

    2013-02-01

    We propose an interpretation of the two neutrino initiated cascade events with PeV energies observed by IceCube: Ultrahigh energy cosmic ray protons (or Fe nuclei) scatter on cosmic microwave background photons through the Delta-resonance (the Berezinsky-Zatsepin process) yielding charged pions and neutrons. The neutron decays give electron-antineutrinos which undergo neutrino oscillations to populate all antineutrino flavors, but the electron-antineutrino flux remains dominant. At 6.3 PeV electron-antineutrino energy their annihilation on electrons in the IceCube detector is enhanced by the Glashow resonance (the W-boson) whose decays can give the PeV showers observed in the IceCube detector. The two observed showers with ˜1PeV energies would need to be from W leptonic decays to electrons and taus. An order of magnitude higher event rate of showers at 6.3 PeV is predicted from W to hadron decays. This interpretation can be tested in the near term. It has significant physics implications on the origin of the highest energy cosmic rays, since neutrino events and cosmic ray events likely share a common origin.

  5. Complex Events Initiated by Individual Spikes in the Human Cerebral Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Komlósi, Gergely; Füle, Miklós; Szabadics, János; Varga, Csaba; Barzó, Pál; Tamás, Gábor

    2008-01-01

    Synaptic interactions between neurons of the human cerebral cortex were not directly studied to date. We recorded the first dataset, to our knowledge, on the synaptic effect of identified human pyramidal cells on various types of postsynaptic neurons and reveal complex events triggered by individual action potentials in the human neocortical network. Brain slices were prepared from nonpathological samples of cortex that had to be removed for the surgical treatment of brain areas beneath association cortices of 58 patients aged 18 to 73 y. Simultaneous triple and quadruple whole-cell patch clamp recordings were performed testing mono- and polysynaptic potentials in target neurons following a single action potential fired by layer 2/3 pyramidal cells, and the temporal structure of events and underlying mechanisms were analyzed. In addition to monosynaptic postsynaptic potentials, individual action potentials in presynaptic pyramidal cells initiated long-lasting (37 ± 17 ms) sequences of events in the network lasting an order of magnitude longer than detected previously in other species. These event series were composed of specifically alternating glutamatergic and GABAergic postsynaptic potentials and required selective spike-to-spike coupling from pyramidal cells to GABAergic interneurons producing concomitant inhibitory as well as excitatory feed-forward action of GABA. Single action potentials of human neurons are sufficient to recruit Hebbian-like neuronal assemblies that are proposed to participate in cognitive processes. PMID:18767905

  6. Anomalous Java cooling at the initiation of positive Indian Ocean Dipole events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delman, Andrew S.; Sprintall, Janet; McClean, Julie L.; Talley, Lynne D.

    2016-08-01

    Anomalous sea surface temperature (SST) cooling south of Java, initiated during May-July, is an important precursor to positive Indian Ocean Dipole (pIOD) events. As shown previously, the Java SST anomalies are spatially and temporally coincident with seasonal upwelling induced locally by southeasterly trade winds. However, we confirm earlier findings that interannual variability of the Java cooling is primarily driven by remote wind forcing from coastal Sumatra and the equatorial Indian Ocean (EqIO); we also find an influence from winds along the Indonesian Throughflow. The wind forcing in the EqIO and along coastal Sumatra does not initiate SST cooling locally due to a deep thermocline and thick barrier layer, but can force upwelling Kelvin waves that induce substantial surface cooling once they reach the seasonally shallower thermocline near the coast of Java. Satellite altimetry is used to obtain a Kelvin wave coefficient that approximates Kelvin wave amplitude variations along the equator. All pIOD years in the satellite record have anomalous levels of upwelling Kelvin wave activity along the equator during April-June, suggesting that upwelling waves during this season are necessary for pIOD event development. However, a change to wind-forced downwelling Kelvin waves during July-August can abruptly terminate cool Java SST anomalies and weaken the pIOD event. Upwelling Kelvin wave activity along the equator and wind stress anomalies west of Sumatra are both robust predictors of the IOD index later in the calendar year, while values of the Kelvin wave coefficient are the most reliable predictor of pIOD events specifically.

  7. Prospective association between negative life events and initiation of sexual intercourse: the influence of family structure and family income.

    PubMed

    Cheney, Marshall K; Oman, Roy F; Vesely, Sara K; Aspy, Cheryl B; Tolma, Eleni L; John, Robert

    2015-03-01

    We examined the prospective association between negative life events and time to initiation of sexual intercourse and the influence of family structure and family income on this association. We followed up a randomly selected sample (n=649) of ethnically diverse parents and their children aged 12 to 17 years over a 5-year period. We conducted Cox proportional hazards regression analysis to examine the relation between negative life events and time to initiation of sexual intercourse. Family structure and family income were assessed as confounders. Negative life events were significant predictors of time to initiation of sexual intercourse in adolescents. After controlling for demographic variables, youths reporting 1 negative life event had a hazard of initiation of sexual intercourse 1.40 times greater and youths reporting 2 or more negative life events had a hazard of initiation of sexual intercourse 1.61 times greater compared with youths reporting no negative life events. Family structure and family income were not significant confounders of the relation between initiation of sexual intercourse and negative life events. Interventions to prevent initiation of sexual intercourse should focus on youths with recent negative life events, regardless of family income and structure.

  8. Prospective Association Between Negative Life Events and Initiation of Sexual Intercourse: The Influence of Family Structure and Family Income

    PubMed Central

    Oman, Roy F.; Vesely, Sara K.; Aspy, Cheryl B.; Tolma, Eleni L.; John, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. We examined the prospective association between negative life events and time to initiation of sexual intercourse and the influence of family structure and family income on this association. Methods. We followed up a randomly selected sample (n = 649) of ethnically diverse parents and their children aged 12 to 17 years over a 5-year period. We conducted Cox proportional hazards regression analysis to examine the relation between negative life events and time to initiation of sexual intercourse. Family structure and family income were assessed as confounders. Results. Negative life events were significant predictors of time to initiation of sexual intercourse in adolescents. After controlling for demographic variables, youths reporting 1 negative life event had a hazard of initiation of sexual intercourse 1.40 times greater and youths reporting 2 or more negative life events had a hazard of initiation of sexual intercourse 1.61 times greater compared with youths reporting no negative life events. Family structure and family income were not significant confounders of the relation between initiation of sexual intercourse and negative life events. Conclusions. Interventions to prevent initiation of sexual intercourse should focus on youths with recent negative life events, regardless of family income and structure. PMID:25602885

  9. Holland's Theory of Vocational Choice and Postulated Value Dimensions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laudeman, Kent A.; Griffeth, Paul

    1978-01-01

    The validity of Holland's vocational personality types and their relationship to value dimensions were examined in light of Holland's theory of vocational choice. The results generally supported Holland's postulated personality typologies and value dimensions. (Author/JKS)

  10. A proof of von Neumann's postulate in Quantum Mechanics

    SciTech Connect

    Conte, Elio

    2010-05-04

    A Clifford algebraic analysis is explained. It gives proof of von Neumann's postulate on quantum measurement. It is of basic significance to explain the problem of quantum wave function reduction in quantum mechanics.

  11. Holland's Theory of Vocational Choice and Postulated Value Dimensions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laudeman, Kent A.; Griffeth, Paul

    1978-01-01

    The validity of Holland's vocational personality types and their relationship to value dimensions were examined in light of Holland's theory of vocational choice. The results generally supported Holland's postulated personality typologies and value dimensions. (Author/JKS)

  12. Pernicious Residues of Foundational Postulates: Their Impact on Women.

    PubMed

    Abrams, Samuel

    2015-01-01

    It has long been recognized that many of the original psychoanalytic views of women were derived from misguided theories. Regrettably, residues of the foundational postulates that informed those theories still persist, assuring a pervasive gender bias even in contemporary psychoanalytic investigations. This contribution describes where those postulates reside, while proposing alternates that could prove far more useful for the theory and practice of our profession.

  13. Koch's postulates, microbial dysbiosis and inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Singh, V P; Proctor, S D; Willing, B P

    2016-07-01

    Over the past 20 years, a growing amount of evidence supports the role of microbes and an imbalanced microbiota in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). While many reviews have been written on the microbiota in IBD, few have considered how they fulfil the Koch's postulates. In this review, we consider how the Koch's postulates might be modified so that they can be fulfilled for polymicrobial diseases, and we discuss the progress made to date in fulfilling them.

  14. Repression of early lateral root initiation events by transient water deficit in barley and maize

    PubMed Central

    Babé, Aurélie; Lavigne, Tristan; Séverin, Jean-Philippe; Nagel, Kerstin A.; Walter, Achim; Chaumont, François; Batoko, Henri; Beeckman, Tom; Draye, Xavier

    2012-01-01

    The formation of lateral roots (LRs) is a key driver of root system architecture and developmental plasticity. The first stage of LR formation, which leads to the acquisition of founder cell identity in the pericycle, is the primary determinant of root branching patterns. The fact that initiation events occur asynchronously in a very small number of cells inside the parent root has been a major difficulty in the study of the molecular regulation of branching patterns. Inducible systems that trigger synchronous lateral formation at predictable sites have proven extremely valuable in Arabidopsis to decipher the first steps of LR formation. Here, we present a LR repression system for cereals that relies on a transient water-deficit treatment, which blocks LR initiation before the first formative divisions. Using a time-lapse approach, we analysed the dynamics of this repression along growing roots and were able to show that it targets a very narrow developmental window of the initiation process. Interestingly, the repression can be exploited to obtain negative control root samples where LR initiation is absent. This system could be instrumental in the analysis of the molecular basis of drought-responsive as well as intrinsic pathways of LR formation in cereals. PMID:22527396

  15. Validity of Taylor's Dissipation-Viscosity Independence Postulate in Variable-Viscosity Turbulent Fluid Mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Kurnchul; Girimaji, Sharath S.; Kerimo, Johannes

    2008-08-01

    G. I. Taylor’s postulate [Proc. R. Soc. APRLAAZ0080-4630 151, 421 (1935)10.1098/rspa.1935.0158] that dissipation is independent of viscosity at high Reynolds numbers is the foundation of many single-fluid turbulence theories and closure models. The validity of this key postulate in an important class of flows, turbulent mixtures, is not yet clearly established. We devise a simple numerical experiment of decaying turbulence in a mixture of two fluids of vastly different viscosities to examine dissipation scaling. Initially, the two fluids are segregated, and dissipation is directly proportional to viscosity. As turbulence evolves and fluids mix, the velocity gradients rapidly adapt to the viscosity field, and within one-half eddy turnover time, dissipation-viscosity independence is established. Viscosity-weighted velocity-gradient skewness is shown to be constant, leading to the validity of Taylor’s postulate in turbulent mixtures.

  16. Examination of loop-operator-initiated events for the advanced test reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Durney, J.L.; Majumdar, D.

    1989-01-01

    The Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) located at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory is a unique high-flux test reactor having nine major test positions for irradiation of reactor materials. These test positions contain inpile tubes (IPT) that are connected to external piping and equipment (loops) to provide the high-temperature, high-pressure environment for the testing. The design of the core has intimately integrated the IPTs into the fuel region by means of a serpentine fuel arrangement resulting in a close reactivity coupling between the loop thermal hydraulics and the core. Consequently, operator actions potentially have an impact on the reactor power transients resulting from off-normal conditions in these facilities. This paper examines these operator-initiated events and their consequences. The analysis of loop-operator-initiated events indicates there is no damage to the reactor core even when assuming no operator intervention for mitigation. However, analysis does assume a scram occurs when required by the reactor protection systems.

  17. The high-risk plaque initiative: primary prevention of atherothrombotic events in the asymptomatic population.

    PubMed

    Falk, Erling; Sillesen, Henrik; Muntendam, Pieter; Fuster, Valentin

    2011-10-01

    The High-Risk Plaque (HRP) Initiative is a research and development effort to advance the understanding, recognition, and management of asymptomatic individuals at risk for a near-term atherothrombotic event such as myocardial infarction or stroke. Clinical studies using the newest technologies have been initiated, including the BioImage Study in which novel approaches are tested in a typical health plan population. Asymptomatic at-risk individuals were enrolled, including a survey-only group (n = 865), a group undergoing traditional risk factor scoring (n = 718), and a group in which all were assessed for both risk factors and subclinical atherosclerosis (n = 6104). The latter two groups underwent baseline examination in a dedicated mobile facility equipped with advanced imaging tools suitable for noninvasive screening for subclinical atherosclerosis (coronary artery calcium by computed tomography [CT], carotid and aortic disease by ultrasound, and ankle-brachial index). Selected participants were offered advanced imaging (contrast-enhanced CT, magnetic resonance imaging, and positron emission tomography/CT). Plasma, PAXgene RNA, and DNA samples were obtained for biomarker discovery studies. All individuals will be followed until 600 major atherothrombotic events have occurred in those undergoing imaging.

  18. Initiation of a major calving event on the Bowdoin Glacier captured by UAV photogrammetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jouvet, Guillaume; Weidmann, Yvo; Seguinot, Julien; Funk, Martin; Abe, Takahiro; Sakakibara, Daiki; Seddik, Hakime; Sugiyama, Shin

    2017-04-01

    In this paper, we analyse the calving activity of the Bowdoin Glacier, north-western Greenland, in 2015 by combining satellite images, UAV (unmanned aerial vehicle) photogrammetry and ice flow modelling. In particular, a high-resolution displacement field is inferred from UAV orthoimages taken immediately before and after the initiation of a large fracture, which induced a major calving event. A detailed analysis of the strain rate field allows us to accurately map the path taken by the opening crack. Modelling results reveal (i) that the crack was more than half-thickness deep, filled with water and getting irreversibly deeper when it was captured by the UAV and (ii) that the crack initiated in an area of high horizontal shear caused by a local basal bump immediately behind the current calving front. The asymmetry of the bed at the front explains the systematic calving pattern observed in May and July-August 2015. As a corollary, we infer that the calving front of the Bowdoin Glacier is currently stabilized by this bedrock bump and might enter into an unstable mode and retreat rapidly if the glacier keeps thinning in the coming years. Beyond this outcome, our study demonstrates that the combination of UAV photogrammetry and ice flow modelling is a promising tool to horizontally and vertically track the propagation of fractures responsible for large calving events.

  19. Initiation of a major calving event captured by high-resolution UAV photogrammetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jouvet, Guillaume; Abe, Takahiro; Funk, Martin; Seguinot, Julien; Sugiyama, Shin; Weidmann, Yvo

    2016-04-01

    During the summer 2015 field campaign on Bowdoin glacier (Northwest Greenland), the camera inboard a UAV captured the initiation of a major calving event with 7 centimetre accuracy. Two UAV flights were operated prior to and during the opening of a large crack that formed about 100 metre upstream from the calving front, propagated laterally over more than a kilometre and eventually lead to calving. The post-processing of the resulting aerial images by structure-from-motion and feature-tracking techniques allowed us to infer surface velocity fields before and during crack opening. Detailed analysis of maximum principal stresses computed from both velocity fields indicate that the event was triggered by high vertical shear stresses between a lateral band of slow flow where the glacier is solidly anchored to shallow bedrock, and a central band of fast flow where the glacier is nearly floating due to deeper bedrock. We estimate that the observed event contributed by 5 to 10% to the annual mass loss by calving.

  20. Quality improvement initiative to reduce serious safety events and improve patient safety culture.

    PubMed

    Muething, Stephen E; Goudie, Anthony; Schoettker, Pamela J; Donnelly, Lane F; Goodfriend, Martha A; Bracke, Tracey M; Brady, Patrick W; Wheeler, Derek S; Anderson, James M; Kotagal, Uma R

    2012-08-01

    Many thousands of patients die every year in the United States as a result of serious and largely preventable safety events or medical errors. Safety events are common in hospitalized children. We conducted a quality improvement initiative to implement cultural and system changes with the goal of reducing serious safety events (SSEs) by 80% within 4 years at our large, urban pediatric hospital. A multidisciplinary SSE reduction team reviewed the safety literature, examined recent SSEs, interviewed internal leaders, and visited other leading organizations. Senior hospital leaders provided oversight, monitored progress, and helped to overcome barriers. Interventions focused on: (1) error prevention; (2) restructuring patient safety governance; (3) a new root cause analysis process and a common cause database; (4) a highly visible lessons learned program; and (5) specific tactical interventions for high-risk areas. Our outcome measures were the rate of SSEs and the change in patient safety culture. SSEs per 10000 adjusted patient-days decreased from a mean of 0.9 at baseline to 0.3 (P < .0001). The days between SSEs increased from a mean of 19.4 at baseline to 55.2 (P < .0001). After a worsening of patient safety culture outcomes in the first year of intervention, significant improvements were observed between 2007 and 2009. Our multifaceted approach was associated with a significant and sustained reduction of SSEs and improvements in patient safety culture. Multisite studies are needed to better understand contextual factors and the significance of specific interventions.

  1. Evaluating MJO Event Initiation and Decay in the Skeleton Model using an RMM-like Index

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stachnik, J. P.; Waliser, D. E.; Majda, A.; Stechmann, S. N.; Thual, S.

    2015-12-01

    The Madden-Julian oscillation (MJO) skeleton model is a low-order dynamic model that is capable of simulating many of the observed features of the MJO. This study develops a model- based "MJO" index that is similar to the well-known real-time multivariate MJO (RMM) index to better facilitate comparison between the skeleton model and observational data. Multivariate and univariate empirical orthogonal function (EOF) analyses were performed on the convective heating and zonal wind data taken from the skeleton model for simulations forced with an idealized warm pool and observed sea surface temperatures (SSTs). The leading EOF modes indicated a wavenumber-1 convectively-coupled circulation anomaly with zonal asymmetries that closely resembled the observed RMM EOFs, especially when the model was forced with observed SSTs. The RMM-like index was used to compute an MJO climatology and document the occurrence of primary, continuing, and terminating MJO events in the skeleton model. The overall amount of MJO activity and event lengths compared reasonably well to observations for such a simple model. Attempts at reconciling the observed geographic distribution of MJO events were not successful for the stochastic simulations, though the introduction of stochasticity to the convective parameterization was necessary in order to produce composite MJOs that initiate and decay with time scales similar to observations. Finally, analysis indicates that the existence of higher-frequency, eastward travelling waves with larger wavenumbers (k ≈ 12) embedded within the large-scale flow often precedes MJO termination in the skeleton model.

  2. Abdominal aortic aneurysm events in the women's health initiative: cohort study.

    PubMed

    Lederle, Frank A; Larson, Joseph C; Margolis, Karen L; Allison, Matthew A; Freiberg, Matthew S; Cochrane, Barbara B; Graettinger, William F; Curb, J David

    2008-10-14

    To assess the association between potential risk factors and subsequent clinically important abdominal aortic aneurysm events (repairs and ruptures) in women. Large prospective observational cohort study with mean follow-up of 7.8 years. 40 clinical centres across the United States. 161 808 postmenopausal women aged 50-79 enrolled in the women's health initiative. Association of self reported or measured baseline variables with confirmed abdominal aortic aneurysm events assessed with multiple logistic regression. Events occurred in 184 women and were strongly associated with age and smoking. Ever smoking, current smoking, and amount smoked all contributed independent risk. Diabetes showed a negative association (odds ratio 0.29, 95% confidence interval 0.13, 0.68), as did postmenopausal hormone therapy. Positive associations were also seen for height, hypertension, cholesterol lowering treatment, and coronary and peripheral artery disease. Our findings confirm the strong positive associations of clinically important abdominal aortic aneurysm with age and smoking in women and the negative association with diabetes previously reported in men.

  3. Event Detection and Location of Earthquakes Using the Cascadia Initiative Dataset

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morton, E.; Bilek, S. L.; Rowe, C. A.

    2015-12-01

    The Cascadia subduction zone (CSZ) produces a range of slip behavior along the plate boundary megathrust, from great earthquakes to episodic slow slip and tremor (ETS). Unlike other subduction zones that produce great earthquakes and ETS, the CSZ is notable for the lack of small and moderate magnitude earthquakes recorded. The seismogenic zone extent is currently estimated to be primarily offshore, thus the lack of observed small, interplate earthquakes may be partially due to the use of only land seismometers. The Cascadia Initiative (CI) community seismic experiment seeks to address this issue by including ocean bottom seismometers (OBS) deployed directly over the locked seismogenic zone, in addition to land seismometers. We use these seismic data to explore whether small magnitude earthquakes are occurring on the plate interface, but have gone undetected by the land-based seismic networks. We select a subset of small magnitude (M0.1-3.7) earthquakes from existing earthquake catalogs, based on land seismic data, whose preliminary hypocentral locations suggest they may have occurred on the plate interface. We window the waveforms on CI OBS and land seismometers around the phase arrival times for these earthquakes to generate templates for subspace detection, which allows for additional flexibility over traditional matched filter detection methods. Here we present event detections from the first year of CI deployment and preliminary locations for the detected events. Initial results of scanning the first year of the CI deployment using one cluster of template events, located near a previously identified subducted seamount, include 473 detections on OBS station M08A (~61.6 km offshore) and 710 detections on OBS station J25A (~44.8 km northeast of M08A). Ongoing efforts include detection using additional OBS stations along the margin, as well as determining locations of clusters detected in the first year of deployment.

  4. Association between gastrointestinal events and osteoporosis treatment initiation in women diagnosed with osteoporosis in France: a retrospective analysis.

    PubMed

    Cortet, Bernard; Modi, Ankita; Tang, Jackson; Fan, Chun-Po Steve; Sajjan, Shiva; Weaver, Jessica Papadopoulos

    2016-04-30

    A substantial portion of women diagnosed with osteoporosis (OP) do not initiate pharmacotherapy to reduce fracture risk. In clinical practice, gastrointestinal (GI) events have been linked with OP therapy discontinuation. However, there is limited research examining GI events as barrier to treatment initiation following an OP diagnosis. The objective of this study was to examine the association between gastrointestinal (GI) events and osteoporosis (OP) treatment initiation among post-menopausal women diagnosed with osteoporosis in France. A retrospective claims analysis of the Mediplus France database during 1997 to 2010 identified women aged ≥ 55 with an OP diagnosis and without prior OP treatment (first diagnosis date was defined as the index date). GI events were identified during the 1 year pre-index and up to 1 year post-index. OP treatment initiation post-index was identified based on the presence of claims for any bisphosphonate (BIS) or non-BIS OP medication within 1 year post-index. Multivariate models (logistic regression, Cox proportional hazards regression and discrete choice) adjusted for pre-index patient characteristics were used to assess the association of pre- and post-index GI events with the likelihood of initiating OP treatment, and the type of treatment initiated (BIS vs. non-BIS). A total of 10,292 women (mean age 70.3 years) were identified; only 25% initiated OP treatment. Post-index GI events occurred in 11.5% of patients, and were associated with a 75.7% lower likelihood of initiating OP treatment. Among treated patients, a discrete choice model estimated that patients with post-index GI events were 34.6% less likely to receive BIS vs non-BIS as compared to patients without post-index GI events. Among women aged ≥ 55 years with an OP diagnosis, post-index GI events were associated with a lower likelihood of OP treatment initiation.

  5. A Method to Quantify Plant Availability and Initiating Event Frequency Using a Large Event Tree, Small Fault Tree Model

    SciTech Connect

    Kee, Ernest J.; Sun, Alice; Rodgers, Shawn; Popova, ElmiraV; Nelson, Paul; Moiseytseva, Vera; Wang, Eric

    2006-07-01

    South Texas Project uses a large fault tree to produce scenarios (minimal cut sets) used in quantification of plant availability and event frequency predictions. On the other hand, the South Texas Project probabilistic risk assessment model uses a large event tree, small fault tree for quantifying core damage and radioactive release frequency predictions. The South Texas Project is converting its availability and event frequency model to use a large event tree, small fault in an effort to streamline application support and to provide additional detail in results. The availability and event frequency model as well as the applications it supports (maintenance and operational risk management, system engineering health assessment, preventive maintenance optimization, and RIAM) are briefly described. A methodology to perform availability modeling in a large event tree, small fault tree framework is described in detail. How the methodology can be used to support South Texas Project maintenance and operations risk management is described in detail. Differences with other fault tree methods and other recently proposed methods are discussed in detail. While the methods described are novel to the South Texas Project Risk Management program and to large event tree, small fault tree models, concepts in the area of application support and availability modeling have wider applicability to the industry. (authors)

  6. Economic Analysis of a Postulated space Tourism Transportation System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, Allan S.

    2002-01-01

    Design concepts and associated costs were defined for a family of launch vehicles supporting a space tourism endeavor requiring the weekly transport of space tourists to and from an Earth- orbiting facility. The stated business goal for the Space Tourist Transportation System (STTS) element of the proposed commercial space venture was to transport and return ~50 passengers a week to LEO at a cost of roughly 50 K per seat commencing in 2005. This paper summarizes the economic analyses conducted within a broader Systems Engineering study of the postulated concept. Parametric costs were derived using TransCostSystems' (TCS) Cost Engineering Handbook, version 7. Costs were developed as a function of critical system characteristics and selected business scenarios. Various economic strategies directed toward achieving a cost of ~50 K per seat were identified and examined. The study indicated that with a `nominal' business scenario, the initial cost for developing and producing a fully reusable, 2-stage STTS element for a baseline of 46-passengers was about 15.5 B assuming a plausible `commercialization factor' of 0.333. The associated per-seat ticket cost was ~890 K, more than an order of magnitude higher than desired. If the system is enlarged to 104 passengers for better efficiency, the STTS initial cost for the nominal business scenario is increased to about 19.8 B and the per-seat ticket cost is reduced to ~530 K. It was concluded that achieving the desired ticket cost of 50 K per seat is not feasible unless the size of the STTS, and therefore of the entire system, is substantially increased. However, for the specified operational characteristics, it was shown that a system capacity of thousands of passengers per week is required. This implies an extremely high total system development cost, which is not very realistic as a commercial venture, especially in the proposed time frame. These results suggested that ambitious commercial space ventures may have to rely on

  7. Pharmacist- versus physician-initiated admission medication reconciliation: impact on adverse drug events.

    PubMed

    Mergenhagen, Kari A; Blum, Sharon S; Kugler, Anne; Livote, Elayne E; Nebeker, Jonathan R; Ott, Michael C; Signor, Daniel; Sung, Soojin; Yeh, Jessica; Boockvar, Kenneth S

    2012-08-01

    Medication reconciliation (MR) has proven to be a problematic task for many hospitals to accomplish. It is important to know the clinical impact of physician- versus pharmacist-initiated MR in the resource-limited hospital environment. This quasi-experimental study took place from December 2005 to February 2006 at an urban US Veterans Affairs hospital. MR was implemented on 2 similar general medical units: one received physician-initiated MR and the other received pharmacist-initiated MR. Adverse drug events (ADEs) and a 72-hour medication-prescribing risk score were ascertained by research pharmacists for all admitted patients by structured record review. Multivariable models were tested for intervention effect, accounting for quasi-experimental design and clustered observations, and were adjusted for patient and encounter covariates. Pharmacists completed the MR process in 102 admissions and physicians completed the process in 116 admissions. In completing the MR process, pharmacists documented statistically more admission medication changes than physicians (3.6 vs 0.8; P < 0.001). The adjusted odds of an ADE caused by an admission prescribing change with pharmacist-initiated MR compared with a physician-initiated MR were 1.04 with a 95% CI of 0.53 to 2.0. The adjusted odds of an ADE caused by an admission prescribing change that was a prescribing error with pharmacist-initiated MR compared with a physician-initiated MR were 0.38 with a confidence interval of 0.14 to 1.05. No difference was observed in 72-hour prescribing risk score (coefficient = 0.10; 95% CI, -0.54 to 0.75). MR performed by pharmacists versus physicians was more comprehensive and was followed by lower odds of ADEs from admission prescribing errors but with similar odds of all types of ADEs. Further research is warranted to examine how MR tasks may be optimally divided among clinicians and the mechanisms by which MR affects the likelihood of subsequent ADEs. Published by EM Inc USA.

  8. When the Sky Falls: Performing Initial Assessments of Bright Atmospheric Events

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooke, William J.; Brown, Peter; Blaauw, Rhiannon; Kingery, Aaron; Moser, Danielle

    2015-01-01

    The 2013 Chelyabinsk super bolide was the first "significant" impact event to occur in the age of social media and 24 hour news. Scientists, used to taking many days or weeks to analyze fireball events, were hard pressed to meet the immediate demands (within hours) for answers from the media, general public, and government officials. Fulfilling these requests forced many researchers to exploit information available from various Internet sources - videos were downloaded from sites like Youtube, geolocated via Google Street View, and quickly analyzed with improvised software; Twitter and Facebook were scoured for eyewitness accounts of the fireball and reports of meteorites. These data, combined with infrasound analyses, enabled a fairly accurate description of the Chelyabinsk event to be formed within a few hours; in particular, any relationship to 2012 DA14 (which passed near Earth later that same day) was eliminated. Results of these analyses were quickly disseminated to members of the NEO community for press conferences and media interviews. Despite a few minor glitches, the rapid initial assessment of Chelyabinsk was a triumph, permitting the timely conveyance of accurate information to the public and the incorporation of social media into fireball analyses. Beginning in 2008, the NASA Meteoroid Environments Office, working in cooperation with Western's Meteor Physics Group, developed processes and software that permit quick characterization - mass, trajectory, and orbital properties - of fireball events. These tools include automated monitoring of Twitter to establish the time of events (the first tweet is usually no more than a few seconds after the fireball), mining of Youtube and all sky camera web archives to locate videos suitable for analyses, use of Google Earth and Street View to geolocate the video locations, and software to determine the fireball trajectory and object orbital parameters, including generation of animations suitable for popular media

  9. SGTR sequence with different initiating events causing loss of heat sink

    SciTech Connect

    Parzer, I.; Petelin, S.; Mavko, B.

    1994-12-31

    Two SGTR transient scenarios with loss of secondary heat sink have been analyzed and compared using RELAP5/MOD3.1 thermal-hydraulic computer code. The findings of the two analyses show that the initiating event, causing the loss of heat sink influences operator actions and further course of the transient significantly. If main feedwater is lost first this leads to much different plant behavior as if reactor and turbine are tripped first. Nevertheless, both analyses have proven that if the operator ignored loss of secondary heat sink in the beginning of the transient and mitigated the consequences of SGTR first, leads to a successful outcome by applying the Feed and Bleed procedure after the SG dryout. The analyses have been performed for Krsko NPP, a two-loop Westinghouse PWR, 640 MWe, located in Slovenia.

  10. Eating epilepsy is associated with initial precipitating events and therapy resistance.

    PubMed

    Kokes, Ulgen; Baykan, Betul; Bebek, Nerses; Gurses, Candan; Gokyigit, Aysen

    2013-04-01

    We present the characteristics of eating epilepsy (EE), which is an underrecognized and complex form of reflex epilepsy. The files of 8996 patients with epilepsy were investigated retrospectively and only 6 cases (0.067%) were found.  Four males and 2 females, aged 20 to 63 years, had focal seizures, mostly with dyscognitive and experiential aura triggered by eating, as well as spontaneous seizures. All had an initial precipitating event for seizures (such as head/birth trauma or encephalitis). In 4 patients, the seizures were induced in the middle of the meal or even closely after the end. In the remaining 2 cases the seizures were at the beginning of the meal, suggesting 2 different mechanisms. Two patients had normal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), whereas the others had heterogeneous findings. The interictal electroencephalographs (EEGs) showed frequent spikes over a large area on the left temporal region in 5 and over the right temporal area in 1 case. We recorded eating-related seizures originating from the left temporal region in 3 cases. Positron-emission tomography (PET) investigations were concordant with the EEG foci in 2 patients. All but 1 had a therapy-resistant course. Our study suggested that EE is extremely rare and occurred many years after an initial precipitating event for seizures. These focal seizures, starting mostly with experiential/dyscognitive aura, usually originated from the left temporal region, had mostly a therapy-resistant course, and were triggered by different mechanisms during eating with a long latency in most of the cases.

  11. The Validity of Self-Initiated, Event-Driven Infectious Disease Reporting in General Population Cohorts

    PubMed Central

    Merk, Hanna; Kühlmann-Berenzon, Sharon; Bexelius, Christin; Sandin, Sven; Litton, Jan-Eric; Linde, Annika; Nyrén, Olof

    2013-01-01

    Background The 2009/2010 pandemic influenza highlighted the need for valid and timely incidence data. In 2007 we started the development of a passive surveillance scheme based on passive follow-up of representative general population cohorts. Cohort members are asked to spontaneously report all instances of colds and fevers as soon as they occur for up to 9 months. Suspecting that compliance might be poor, we aimed to assess the validity of self-initiated, event-driven outcome reporting over long periods. Methods During two 8 week periods in 2008 and 2009, 2376 and 2514 cohort members in Stockholm County were sent one-week recall questionnaires, which served as reference method. Results The questionnaires were completed by 88% and 86% of the cohort members. Whilst the false positive proportion (1–specificity) in the reporting was low (upper bound of the 95% confidence interval [CI] ≤2% in each season), the false negative proportion (failure to report, 1–sensitivity) was considerable (60% [95% CI 52%–67%] in each season). Still, the resulting epidemic curves for influenza-like illness compared well with those from existing General Practitioner-based sentinel surveillance in terms of shape, timing of peak, and year-to-year variation. This suggested that the error was fairly constant. Conclusions Passive long-term surveillance through self-initiated, event-driven outcome reporting underestimates incidence rates of common upper respiratory tract infections. However, because underreporting appears predictable, simple corrections could potentially restore validity. PMID:23613891

  12. Genetic events in tumour initiation and progression in multiple endocrine neoplasia type 2.

    PubMed

    Mulligan, L M; Gardner, E; Smith, B A; Mathew, C G; Ponder, B A

    1993-03-01

    Multiple endocrine neoplasia type 2 (MEN 2) is a familial cancer syndrome arising from mutation at a locus or loci in chromosome region 10p11.2-q11.2. The disease is characterized by medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC) and pheochromocytoma (Pheo). To assess the genetic events in tumour initiation and progression in this disease, we have compiled an allelotype for MTC and Pheo tumours using polymorphic marker loci from each chromosome arm. Using a panel of 58 tumours, we found frequent allele losses on chromosome arms 1p (42%), 3p (30%), 3q (38%), 11p (11%), 13q (10%), 17p (8%), and 22q (29%). Loss of heterozygosity (LOH) for loci on chromosome 10 was detected in a single tumour where one whole chromosome copy was lost. We used a panel of polymorphic markers for each of chromosomes 1, 3, 11, and 17 to define a shortest region of overlap for these regions. The most frequent allele losses were on chromosome 1, spanning the entire short arm of the chromosome but not loci on 1q. LOH on chromosome 3 encompassed a minimal common region of 3q12-qter. The regions of allelic deletion on chromosome 11 (11pter-p13), 17 (17pter-p11.2), and 13 (13q) encompass known tumour suppressor loci (WTI, TP53, RBI) which must therefore be candidates for genes contributing to MTC and Pheo development. Our data suggest allele loss on chromosome 11, 13, or 17 occurs predominantly in tumours with losses on chromosome 3, potentially reflecting the accumulation of genetic change in tumour progression. These events may be associated with more advanced disease in MTC. We suggest that at least 7 genes contribute to tumour development in MEN 2, including an initiating locus on chromosome 10 and loci on chromosomes 1, 3, 11, 13, 17, and 22 which have a progressional role in these tumours.

  13. Quality Improvement Initiative to Reduce Serious Safety Events and Improve Patient Safety Culture

    PubMed Central

    Goudie, Anthony; Schoettker, Pamela J.; Donnelly, Lane F.; Goodfriend, Martha A.; Bracke, Tracey M.; Brady, Patrick W.; Wheeler, Derek S.; Kotagal, Uma R.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: Many thousands of patients die every year in the United States as a result of serious and largely preventable safety events or medical errors. Safety events are common in hospitalized children. We conducted a quality improvement initiative to implement cultural and system changes with the goal of reducing serious safety events (SSEs) by 80% within 4 years at our large, urban pediatric hospital. METHODS: A multidisciplinary SSE reduction team reviewed the safety literature, examined recent SSEs, interviewed internal leaders, and visited other leading organizations. Senior hospital leaders provided oversight, monitored progress, and helped to overcome barriers. Interventions focused on: (1) error prevention; (2) restructuring patient safety governance; (3) a new root cause analysis process and a common cause database; (4) a highly visible lessons learned program; and (5) specific tactical interventions for high-risk areas. Our outcome measures were the rate of SSEs and the change in patient safety culture. RESULTS: SSEs per 10 000 adjusted patient-days decreased from a mean of 0.9 at baseline to 0.3 (P < .0001). The days between SSEs increased from a mean of 19.4 at baseline to 55.2 (P < .0001). After a worsening of patient safety culture outcomes in the first year of intervention, significant improvements were observed between 2007 and 2009. CONCLUSIONS: Our multifaceted approach was associated with a significant and sustained reduction of SSEs and improvements in patient safety culture. Multisite studies are needed to better understand contextual factors and the significance of specific interventions. PMID:22802607

  14. Exploring the Synoptic Differences Between MJO Initiation Events Identified by Multiple Algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vargas Martes, R. M.; Hartten, L. M.

    2015-12-01

    The Madden-Julian Oscillation (MJO) is a tropical phenomenon that develops over the Indian Ocean. This intraseasonal oscillation consists of an extensive area of convection, about 1000 km across, that releases latent heat in the mid-troposphere, and this heating forces planetary-scale waves to travel through the upper troposphere. These waves can affect weather and climate in the extratropical regions. Since our computational models do not simulate the MJO correctly, international efforts are underway to improve our understanding of the processes involved, especially during the MJO's early stages. This study examines and compares MJO initiation events and types (primary, intensifying, non-MJO) identified by researchers using four methods during 1998-2009 boreal winters. Two methods focused on the precipitation aspect of the oscillation, and the others focused on circulation. Five variables were selected for analysis: temperature at 400 hPa, outgoing long-wave radiation (OLR), sea level pressure (SLP), and zonal winds at 200 and 850 hPa. Twelve MJO events were selected, and four were analyzed. The five variables' contributions to each event were mapped using the MJO-like mode recently identified by other scientists from unfiltered five-day mean gridded data. These visualizations show consistent behaviors in OLR, temperature, and SLP. Positive OLR anomalies occurred in the Indian Ocean before MJO convection began, supporting another research group's idea of an MJO "dry dynamic mode." The MJO-like mode also depicts some previously observed behavior in MJO precursor variables. The results also serve to validate the MJO-like mode and demonstrate that it identifies both MJO and non-MJO convection.

  15. Fragile X founder chromosomes in Italy: A few initial events and possible explanation for their heterogeneity

    SciTech Connect

    Chiurazzi, P.; Genuardi, M.; Kozak, L.; Neri, G.

    1996-07-12

    A total of 137 fragile X and 235 control chromosomes from various regions of Italy were haplotyped by analyzing two neighbouring marker microsatellites, FRAXAC1 and DXS548. The number of CGG repeats at the 5{prime} end of the FMR1 gene was also assessed in 141 control chromosomes and correlated with their haplotypes. Significant linkage disequilibrium between some {open_quotes}major{close_quotes} haplotypes and fragile X was observed, while other {open_quotes}minor{close_quotes} haplotypes may have originated by subsequent mutation at the marker microsatellite loci and/or recombination between them. Recent evidence suggests that the initial mechanism leading to CGG instability might consist of rare (10{sup -6/-7}) CGG repeat slippage events and/or loss of a stabilizing AGG via A-to-C transversion. Also, the apparently high variety of fragile X chromosomes may be partly due to the relatively high mutation rate (10{sup -4/-5}) of the microsatellite markers used in haplotyping. Our fragile X sample also showed a higher than expected heterozygosity when compared to the control sample and we suggest that this might be explained by the chance occurrence of the few founding events on different chromosomes, irrespective of their actual frequency in the population. Alternatively, a local mechanism could enhance the microsatellite mutation rate only on fragile X chromosomes, or fragile X mutations might occur more frequently on certain background haplotypes. 59 refs., 4 figs.

  16. Institute of Medicine's Forum on Medical and Public Health Preparedness for Catastrophic Events: current initiatives.

    PubMed

    Stroud, Clare; Altevogt, Bruce M; Goldfrank, Lewis R

    2010-06-01

    It is only possible to achieve a resilient community and an integrated, comprehensive, and resilient health system that can respond effectively to a public health emergency through active collaboration, coordination, and shared responsibility among a broad group of public and private stakeholders and the community itself. The Institute of Medicine established the Forum on Medical and Public Health Preparedness for Catastrophic Events in 2007 to provide a neutral venue for dialogue and collaboration among stakeholders in the preparedness field. In the Forum's first year, the members began to address topics such as medical countermeasures dispensing, crisis standards of care, and medical surge capacity. In the past 9 months, the Forum members have expanded their areas of interest in response to current events and national areas of focus. Current topics include individual, family, and community preparedness and resiliency; medical countermeasures from development through dispensing; and the response to the 2009 H1N1 influenza pandemic. Across all of the initiatives undertaken by the Forum, the common element is that they tackle problems, gaps, and future opportunities that can only be successfully addressed if multiple stakeholders work together.

  17. One Hair Postulate for Hawking Radiation as Tunneling Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Hui; Cai, Qing-Yu; Liu, Xu-Feng; Sun, Chang-Pu

    2014-03-01

    For Hawking radiation, treated as a tunneling process, the no-hair theorem of black hole together with the law of energy conservation is utilized to postulate that the tunneling rate only depends on the external qualities (e.g., the mass for the Schwarzschild black hole) and the energy of the radiated particle. This postulate is justified by the WKB approximation for calculating the tunneling probability. Based on this postulate, a general formula for the tunneling probability is derived without referring to the concrete form of black hole metric. This formula implies an intrinsic correlation between the successive processes of the black hole radiation of two or more particles. It also suggests a kind of entropy conservation and thus resolves the puzzle of black hole information loss in some sense.

  18. Myosin di-phosphorylation and peripheral actin bundle formation as initial events during endothelial barrier disruption.

    PubMed

    Hirano, Mayumi; Hirano, Katsuya

    2016-02-11

    The phosphorylation of the 20-kD myosin light chain (MLC) and actin filament formation play a key role in endothelial barrier disruption. MLC is either mono- or di-phosphorylated (pMLC and ppMLC) at T18 or S19. The present study investigated whether there are any distinct roles of pMLC and ppMLC in barrier disruption induced by thrombin. Thrombin induced a modest bi-phasic increase in pMLC and a robust mono-phasic increase in ppMLC. pMLC localized in the perinuclear cytoplasm during the initial phase, while ppMLC localized in the cell periphery, where actin bundles were formed. Later, the actin bundles were rearranged into stress fibers, where pMLC co-localized. Rho-kinase inhibitors inhibited thrombin-induced barrier disruption and peripheral localization of ppMLC and actin bundles. The double, but not single, mutation of phosphorylation sites abolished the formation of peripheral actin bundles and the barrier disruption, indicating that mono-phosphorylation of MLC at either T18 or S19 is functionally sufficient for barrier disruption. Namely, the peripheral localization, but not the degree of phosphorylation, is suggested to be essential for the functional effect of ppMLC. These results suggest that MLC phosphorylation and actin bundle formation in cell periphery are initial events during barrier disruption.

  19. Safely Teaching Koch's Postulates on the Causation of Infectious Disease.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stewart, Peter R.

    1990-01-01

    Described is an activity in which the interactions between a parasite and its host may be demonstrated using the relationship between yogurt and two species of bacteria. Background information on Koch's postulates is provided. Materials, laboratory procedures, and results are discussed. (CW)

  20. Safely Teaching Koch's Postulates on the Causation of Infectious Disease.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stewart, Peter R.

    1990-01-01

    Described is an activity in which the interactions between a parasite and its host may be demonstrated using the relationship between yogurt and two species of bacteria. Background information on Koch's postulates is provided. Materials, laboratory procedures, and results are discussed. (CW)

  1. A Conceptual Derivation of Einstein's Postulates of Special Relativity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bearden, Thomas E.

    This document presents a discussion and conceptual derivation of Einstein's postulates of special relativity. The perceptron approach appears to be a fundamentally new manner of regarding physical phenomena and it is hoped that physicists will interest themselves in the concept. (Author)

  2. The necessity of the second postulate in special relativity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drory, Alon

    2015-08-01

    Many authors noted that the principle of relativity together with space-time homogeneity and isotropy restricts the form of the coordinate transformations from one inertial frame to another to being Lorentz-like. The equations contain a free parameter, k (equal to c-2 in special relativity), whose value is claimed to be merely an empirical matter, so that special relativity does not need the postulate of constancy of the speed of light. I analyze this claim and argue that the distinction between the cases k=0 and k ≠ 0 is on the level of a postulate and that until we assume one or the other, we have an incomplete structure that leaves many fundamental questions undecided, including basic prerequisites of experimentation. I examine an analogous case in which isotropy is the postulate dropped and use it to illustrate the problem. Finally I analyze two attempts by Sfarti, and Behera and Mukhopadhyay to derive the constancy of the speed of light from the principle of relativity. I show that these attempts make hidden assumptions that are equivalent to the second postulate.

  3. Changing Postulates Can Provide Variety and Meaningful Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mahaffy, Donald

    1982-01-01

    An approach is presented that is based on modifying the standard axiomatic system found in high school geometry books. Such changes start with the introduction of a side-angle-side (SAS) postulate for similar triangles. It is shown how the new system can prove existence and uniqueness of parallel lines. (MP)

  4. SILER: Seismic-Initiated events risk mitigation in Lead-cooled Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Forni, M.; De Grandis, S.

    2012-07-01

    SILER is a Collaborative Project, partially funded by the European Commission, aimed at studying the risk associated to seismic initiated events in Generation IV Heavy Liquid Metal reactors and developing adequate protection measures. The attention is focused on the evaluation of the effects of earthquakes (with particular regards to beyond design seismic events) and to the identification of mitigation strategies, acting both on structures and components design (as well as on the development of seismic isolation devices) which can also have positive effects on economics, leading to an high level of plant design standardization. Attention is also devoted to the identification of plant layout solutions able to avoid risks of radioactive release from both the core and other structures (i.e. the spent fuel storage pools). Specific effort is paid to the development of guidelines and design recommendations for addressing the seismic issue in next generation reactor systems. In addition, consideration will be devoted to transfer the knowledge developed in the project to Generation III advanced systems, in line with the objective of the SNE-TP SRA to support present and future Light Water Reactors and their further development, for which safety issues are key aspects to be addressed. Note, in this respect, that the benefits of base isolation in terms of response to design seismic actions are already widely recognized for Generation III LWRs, along with the possibility of a significant standardization of structural and equipment design. SILER activities started on October 1 st 2011 and are carried out by 18 partners: ENEA (Italy, Coordinator), AREVA NP SAS (France), SCK-CEN (Belgium), FIP Industriale (Italy), MAURER SOHENE (Germany), EC-JRC (Ispra (Italy)), SINTEC (Italy), KTH (Sweden), BOA-BKT (Germany), IDOM (Spain), ANSALDO (Italy), IPUL (Latvia), NUMERIA (Italy), VCE (Austria), SRS (Italy), CEA (France), EA (Spain), NUVIA (France). (authors)

  5. Diet drink consumption and the risk of cardiovascular events: a report from the Women's Health Initiative.

    PubMed

    Vyas, Ankur; Rubenstein, Linda; Robinson, Jennifer; Seguin, Rebecca A; Vitolins, Mara Z; Kazlauskaite, Rasa; Shikany, James M; Johnson, Karen C; Snetselaar, Linda; Wallace, Robert

    2015-04-01

    Data are limited regarding the influence of diet drink consumption on cardiovascular disease (CVD) outcomes. We aimed to evaluate the relationship between diet drink intake and cardiovascular events. We conducted a retrospective cohort study, utilizing data from the national, multicenter Women's Health Initiative Observational Study (WHI OS), recruiting subjects from 1993 to 1998. Post-menopausal women with available diet drink intake data, without pre-existing CVD and who survived ≥ 60 days were included in the study. A composite of incident coronary heart disease, heart failure, myocardial infarction, coronary revascularization procedure, ischemic stroke, peripheral arterial disease and CVD death was used as the primary outcome. CVD death and all-cause mortality were secondary outcomes. Adjusted Cox proportional hazards models were used to compare primary and secondary outcomes across diet drink intake strata. In all, 59,614 women, mean age 62.8 years, were included for analysis. In unadjusted analysis over a follow-up of 8.7 ± 2.7 years, the primary outcome occurred in 8.5 % of the women consuming ≥ 2 diet drinks/day, compared to 6.9 %, 6.8 % and 7.2 % in the 5-7/week, 1-4/week and 0-3/month groups, respectively. After controlling for other CVD risk factors, women who consumed ≥ 2 drinks/day had a higher adjusted risk of CVD events (HR 1.3, 95 % CI 1.1-1.5), CVD mortality (HR 1.5, 95 % CI 1.03-2.3) and overall mortality (HR 1.3, 95 % CI 1.04-1.5) compared to the reference group (0-3 drinks/month). This analysis demonstrates an association between high diet drink intake and CVD outcomes and mortality in post-menopausal women in the WHI OS.

  6. Frequency of cardiac events at four years among initially asymptomatic filipinos with the Brugada type 1 electrocardiographic pattern.

    PubMed

    Domingo, Giselle Gervacio; Jocson, Gabriel; Dans, Antonio

    2011-03-01

    Brugada type 1 electrocardiographic (ECG) pattern occurs in 0.2% of Filipinos. A knowledge gap exists on the natural course of asymptomatic patients with Brugada type 1 ECG pattern. Most studies that reported cohort event rates were taken from hospitals or referral centers. This is the first cohort from an entire country where the subjects were selected randomly. The objective of this study was to describe the frequency of cardiac events at 4 and 6 years of 7 patients with Brugada type 1 ECG pattern of 3,907 patients previously screened from the general population of the Philippines during the National Nutrition and Health Survey. Personal interviews at year 4 using a structured questionnaire were conducted by 1 of the investigators. Occurrences of major (syncope, seizure, unexplained accidents, sudden death) and minor events in subjects and their first- and second-degree relatives were elicited. Six-year follow-up by text messaging was conducted to ascertain vital status and occurrence of cardiac events. All 7 patients with Brugada type 1 ECG pattern were men. Three of the 7 initially asymptomatic subjects (43%, 95 confidence interval 6 to 80) developed a major cardiac event by the fourth year. Those with events were younger than those without events. All 7 were alive by the sixth year. No additional events were noted between the fourth and sixth years. In conclusion, cardiac events are considerable in initially asymptomatic Filipinos with Brugada type 1 ECG pattern.

  7. Initial events during the evolution of C4 photosynthesis in C3 species of Flaveria.

    PubMed

    Sage, Tammy L; Busch, Florian A; Johnson, Daniel C; Friesen, Patrick C; Stinson, Corey R; Stata, Matt; Sultmanis, Stefanie; Rahman, Beshar A; Rawsthorne, Stephen; Sage, Rowan F

    2013-11-01

    The evolution of C4 photosynthesis in many taxa involves the establishment of a two-celled photorespiratory CO2 pump, termed C2 photosynthesis. How C3 species evolved C2 metabolism is critical to understanding the initial phases of C4 plant evolution. To evaluate early events in C4 evolution, we compared leaf anatomy, ultrastructure, and gas-exchange responses of closely related C3 and C2 species of Flaveria, a model genus for C4 evolution. We hypothesized that Flaveria pringlei and Flaveria robusta, two C3 species that are most closely related to the C2 Flaveria species, would show rudimentary characteristics of C2 physiology. Compared with less-related C3 species, bundle sheath (BS) cells of F. pringlei and F. robusta had more mitochondria and chloroplasts, larger mitochondria, and proportionally more of these organelles located along the inner cell periphery. These patterns were similar, although generally less in magnitude, than those observed in the C2 species Flaveria angustifolia and Flaveria sonorensis. In F. pringlei and F. robusta, the CO2 compensation point of photosynthesis was slightly lower than in the less-related C3 species, indicating an increase in photosynthetic efficiency. This could occur because of enhanced refixation of photorespired CO2 by the centripetally positioned organelles in the BS cells. If the phylogenetic positions of F. pringlei and F. robusta reflect ancestral states, these results support a hypothesis that increased numbers of centripetally located organelles initiated a metabolic scavenging of photorespired CO2 within the BS. This could have facilitated the formation of a glycine shuttle between mesophyll and BS cells that characterizes C2 photosynthesis.

  8. Evaluation of Medicare claims data to ascertain peripheral vascular events in the Women's Health Initiative.

    PubMed

    Mell, Matthew W; Pettinger, Mary; Proulx-Burns, Lori; Heckbert, Susan R; Allison, Matthew A; Criqui, Michael H; Hlatky, Mark A; Burwen, Dale R

    2014-07-01

    Capturing long-term outcomes from large clinical databases by use of claims data is a potential strategy for improving efficiency while reducing study costs. We sought to compare the use of Medicare data with data from the Women's Health Initiative (WHI) to determine peripheral vascular events, as defined by the WHI study design. We studied participants from the WHI with both adjudicated outcomes and links to Medicare enrollment and utilization data through 2007. Outcomes of interest included hospitalizations for treatment of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA), lower extremity peripheral artery disease (LE PAD), and carotid artery stenosis (CAS). Events determined by WHI adjudication were compared with events defined by coding algorithms using diagnosis and procedure codes from Medicare data with a pilot data set and then validated with a test data set. We assessed agreement by a κ statistic and evaluated reasons for disagreement. In the pilot set, records from 50,511 participants were analyzed. Agreement between the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services and WHI for admissions with a diagnosis but no treatment procedures for vascular conditions was poor (κ, 0.02-0.18). On the basis of WHI outcome data collection, vascular treatment procedures occurred in 29 participants for AAA, 204 for LE PAD events, and 281 for CAS. Medicare hospital claims recorded 41 treatments for AAA, 255 for LE PAD, and 317 for CAS. For participants with a Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services-captured vascular procedure and a record adjudicated by WHI, κ values for treatment procedures were 0.81 for AAA, 0.77 for PAD, and 0.93 for CAS. For vascular procedures identified by WHI but not by Medicare hospital data (n = 82), 55% were captured by Medicare physician claims. Conversely, for treatments identified by Medicare hospital data but not captured by WHI adjudication (n = 57), 74% had physician claims consistent with the procedure. Fifteen participants with AAA or LE PAD

  9. The Four Postulates of Freudian Unconscious Neurocognitive Convergences

    PubMed Central

    Arminjon, Mathieu

    2011-01-01

    In the 1980s, the terms “cognitive unconscious” were invented to denominate a perspective on unconscious mental processes independent from the psychoanalytical views. For several reasons, the two approaches to unconscious are generally conceived as irreducible. Nowadays, we are witnessing a certain convergence between both fields. The aim of this paper consists in examining the four basic postulates of Freudian unconscious at the light of neurocognitive sciences. They posit: (1) that some psychological processes are unconsciously performed and causally determine conscious processes, (2) that they are governed by their own cognitive rules, (3) that they set out their own intentions, (4) and that they lead to a conflicting organization of psyche. We show that each of these postulates is the subject of empirical and theoretical works. If the two fields refer to more or less similar mechanisms, we propose that their opposition rests on an epistemological misunderstanding. As a conclusion, we promote a conservative reunification of the two perspectives. PMID:21734896

  10. A postulate leading to the Titius-Bode law

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Louise, R.

    1982-02-01

    A formalism similar to Sommerfeld's (1916) is examined, which accounts for the planetary distribution of the solar system. The analysis is based on the early quantum theory, and emphasizes that no connection exists between the Sommerfeld quantum rule and the assumed equation in the present analysis. The assumed equation seems to reflect a nonclassical property of gravitation, and may be a pure coincidence leading to the T-B law, and thus may have no significance other than that of an exotic postulate.

  11. Predicting Initiation of Smoking Cessation Treatment and Outcome Among Adolescents Using Stressful Life Events and Coping Style.

    PubMed

    Schepis, Ty S; Cavallo, Dana A; Kong, Grace; Liss, Thomas; Liss, Amanda; Krishnan-Sarin, Suchitra

    2015-01-01

    Adolescent smoking is a major public health concern, and current treatments are only somewhat effective in promoting abstinence. One way to improve treatments is to identify psychosocial characteristics that impede cessation, allowing development of targeted treatments. This study examined the influence of 2 such characteristics, life event stressors and coping, on initiation of cessation treatment and end-of-treatment abstinence status. One hundred five adolescent smokers were eligible to participate in a validated contingency management (CM) and cognitive-behavioral (CBT) cessation treatment; of those, 72 completed at least 1 treatment session. Data included sociodemographic characteristics, questionnaires assessing past-year life events and coping behavior use, and abstinence status at the end of the 4-week treatment. Logistic regression was used to predict treatment initiation and abstinence status, with life event stressor number, coping, or their interaction as predictors. Higher levels of cognitive and peer support coping predicted treatment initiation, whereas life events were unrelated. End-of-treatment abstinence was predicted by higher numbers of life events and greater use of avoidant coping. The interaction of helpless coping and life events also predicted abstinence, with greater increases in helpless coping as total life events rose in abstinent but not nonabstinent participants. Finally, greater use of behavioral coping predicted abstinence in participants exposed to only CM treatment, whereas lesser use of behavioral coping predicted abstinence in participants receiving combined CM/CBT treatment. Exposure to life event stressors may promote cessation by forcing use of self-control resources prior to the quit attempt, which may strengthen such resources. Techniques that improve self-control resources may improve cessation outcome, and prevention programs may want to emphasize behavioral coping to improve rates of treatment initiation.

  12. Thermal response of a can handling unit (CHU) to a postulated plutonium hydride burn

    SciTech Connect

    Crea, B.A.

    1998-05-21

    A series of analyses were performed to support the design of the Can Handling Unit (CHU). The subject analyses focused on determining the time to repressurize a subatmospheric storage can containing plutonium metal versus the initial hole size and the transient thermal response to a postulated chemical reaction of 150 grams of plutonium hydride. Limiting the amount of gaseous reactants either by inerting the CHU or using a very small hole size for the initial opening appears to be a viable method of controlling the rate of the exothermic chemical reactions and system temperatures.

  13. Piezoelectric-based event sensing and energy-harvesting power sources for thermal battery initiation in gun-fired munitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rastegar, J.; Feng, D.; Pereira, C.

    2014-06-01

    A novel class of piezoelectric-based energy harvesting devices with integrated safety and firing setback event detection electronics and logic circuitry that can be used in gun-fired munitions is presented. In this paper, the application of the device to the development of initiators for thermal reserve batteries in gun-fire munitions is presented. The novel and highly efficient electrical energy collection and storage and event detection and safety electronics used allows the use of a very small piezoelectric element. As a result, such devices can be highly miniaturized for used in small reserve batteries. For thermal battery initiation, when the prescribed firing setback acceleration profile, i.e., the prescribed all-fire condition is detected, a highly efficient charge collection electronic circuitry routes the charges generated by the piezoelectric element of the device to the initiator bridge element, thereby causing the thermal battery pyrotechnic material to be ignited. For munitions powered by thermal reserve batteries, the present initiation device provides a self-powered initiator with full no-fire safety circuitry for protection against accidental drops, transportation vibration, and other similar low amplitude accelerations and/or high amplitude but short duration acceleration events. The device is shown to be readily set to initiate thermal batteries under almost any all-fire conditions. The device can be readily hardened to withstand very high G firing setback accelerations in excess of 100,000 G and the harsh firing environment. The design of prototypes and testing under realistic conditions are presented.

  14. Postulates on electromagnetic activity in biological systems and cancer.

    PubMed

    Pokorný, Jiří; Pokorný, Jan; Kobilková, Jitka

    2013-12-01

    A framework of postulates is formulated to define the existence, nature, and function of a coherent state far from thermodynamic equilibrium in biological systems as an essential condition for the existence of life. This state is excited and sustained by energy supply. Mitochondria producing small packets of energy in the form of adenosine and guanosine triphosphate and strong static electric field around them form boundary elements between biochemical-genetic and physical processes. The transformation mechanism of chemical energy into useful work for biological needs and the excitation of the coherent state far from thermodynamic equilibrium are fundamental problems. The exceptional electrical polarity of biological objects and long-range interactions suggest a basic role of the endogenous electromagnetic field generated by living cells. The formulated postulates encompass generation, properties and function of the electromagnetic field connected with biological activity and its pathological deviations. Excited longitudinal polar oscillations in microtubules in eukaryotic cells generate the endogenous electromagnetic field. The metabolic activity of mitochondria connected with water ordering forms conditions for excitation. The electrodynamic field plays an important role in the establishment of coherence, directional transport, organization of morphological structures, interactions, information transfer, and brain activity. An overview of experimental results and physical models supporting the postulates is included. The existence of the endogenous biological electromagnetic field, its generation by microtubules and supporting effects produced by mitochondria have a reasonable experimental foundation. Cancer transformation is a pathological reduction of the coherent energy state far from thermodynamic equilibrium. Malignancy, i.e. local invasion and metastasis, is a direct consequence of mitochondrial dysfunction, disturbed microtubule polar oscillations and the

  15. W.E. Johnson’s ’Sufficientness’ Postulate.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-11-22

    then serving to distinguish one element of a sample from another. In the situation envisaged by Johnson, Carnap (sea Section 4 below), and others, a...Johnson’s death, Rudolph Carnap and his students vould, unknowingly, reproduce much of Johnson’s work. In 1945 Carnap introduced the function c* [= P{XT.+l...And Just as Johnson grew uneasy with his combination postulate, so too Carnap would later introduce the family of functions fc: 0 < X < am) (-(ni+k)/N

  16. Investigating Progression in Substance Use Initiation Using a Discrete-Time Multiple Event Process Survival Mixture (MEPSUM) Approach

    PubMed Central

    Richmond-Rakerd, Leah S.; Fleming, Kimberly A.; Slutske, Wendy S.

    2015-01-01

    The order and timing of substance initiation has significant implications for later problematic patterns of use. Despite the need to study initiation from a multivariate framework, survival analytic methods typically cannot accommodate more than two substances in one model. The Discrete-Time Multiple Event Process Survival Mixture (MEPSUM; Dean, Bauer, & Shanahan, 2014) model represents an advance by incorporating more than two outcomes and enabling establishment of latent classes within a multivariate hazard distribution. Employing a MEPSUM approach, we evaluated patterns of tobacco, alcohol, and cannabis initiation in the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent to Adult Health (N=18,923). We found four classes that differed in their ages and ordering of peak initiation risk. Demographics, externalizing psychopathology, and personality significantly predicted class membership. Sex differences in the association between delinquency and initiation patterns also emerged. Findings support the utility of the MEPSUM approach in elucidating developmental pathways underlying clinically relevant phenomena. PMID:27127730

  17. Radiation and matter: Electrodynamics postulates and Lorenz gauge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bobrov, V. B.; Trigger, S. A.; van Heijst, G. J.; Schram, P. P.

    2016-11-01

    In general terms, we have considered matter as the system of charged particles and quantized electromagnetic field. For consistent description of the thermodynamic properties of matter, especially in an extreme state, the problem of quantization of the longitudinal and scalar potentials should be solved. In this connection, we pay attention that the traditional postulates of electrodynamics, which claim that only electric and magnetic fields are observable, is resolved by denial of the statement about validity of the Maxwell equations for microscopic fields. The Maxwell equations, as the generalization of experimental data, are valid only for averaged values. We show that microscopic electrodynamics may be based on postulation of the d'Alembert equations for four-vector of the electromagnetic field potential. The Lorenz gauge is valid for the averages potentials (and provides the implementation of the Maxwell equations for averages). The suggested concept overcomes difficulties under the electromagnetic field quantization procedure being in accordance with the results of quantum electrodynamics. As a result, longitudinal and scalar photons become real rather than virtual and may be observed in principle. The longitudinal and scalar photons provide not only the Coulomb interaction of charged particles, but also allow the electrical Aharonov-Bohm effect.

  18. A Postulation of a Concept in Fundamental Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goradia, Shantilal

    2006-10-01

    I am postulating that all fermions have a quantum mouth (Planck size) that radiates a flux density of gravitons as a function of the mass of the particle. Nucleons are not hard balls like light bulbs radiating photons challenging Newtonian concepts of centers and surfaces. The hardball analogy is implicit in coupling constants that compare strong force relative to gravity. The radiating mouth is not localized at the center like a hypothetical point size filament of a light bulb with a hard surface. A point invokes mass of zero volume. It is too precise, inconsistent and illogical. Nothing can be localized with more accuracy that Planck length. Substituting the hard glass bulb surface with flexible plastic surface would clearly make the interacting mouths of particles approach each other as close as possible, but no less than the quantum limit of Planck length. Therefore, surface distance in Newtonian gravity would be a close approximation at particle scale and fits Feynman's road map [1]. My postulation reflected by Fig. 2 of gr-qc/0507130 explains observations of increasing values of coupling constants resulting from decreasing values of Planck length (See physics/0210040 v1). Since Planck length is the fundamental unit of length of nature, its variation can impact our observation of the universe and the evolutionary process.

  19. Initiation of coronal mass ejection event observed on 2010 November 3: multi-wavelength perspective

    SciTech Connect

    Mulay, Sargam; Subramanian, Srividya; Tripathi, Durgesh; Isobe, Hiroaki; Glesener, Lindsay

    2014-10-10

    One of the major unsolved problems in solar physics is that of coronal mass ejection (CME) initiation. In this paper, we have studied the initiation of a flare-associated CME that occurred on 2010 November 3 using multi-wavelength observations recorded by the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory and the Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager. We report an observation of an inflow structure initially in the 304 Å and the 1600 Å images a few seconds later. This inflow structure was detected as one of the legs of the CME. We also observed a non-thermal compact source concurrent and near co-spatial with the brightening and movement of the inflow structure. The appearance of this compact non-thermal source, brightening, and movement of the inflow structure and the subsequent outward movement of the CME structure in the corona led us to conclude that the CME initiation was caused by magnetic reconnection.

  20. Modeling of aircraft unsteady aerodynamic characteristics. Part 1: Postulated models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klein, Vladislav; Noderer, Keith D.

    1994-01-01

    A short theoretical study of aircraft aerodynamic model equations with unsteady effects is presented. The aerodynamic forces and moments are expressed in terms of indicial functions or internal state variables. The first representation leads to aircraft integro-differential equations of motion; the second preserves the state-space form of the model equations. The formulations of unsteady aerodynamics is applied in two examples. The first example deals with a one-degree-of-freedom harmonic motion about one of the aircraft body axes. In the second example, the equations for longitudinal short-period motion are developed. In these examples, only linear aerodynamic terms are considered. The indicial functions are postulated as simple exponentials and the internal state variables are governed by linear, time-invariant, first-order differential equations. It is shown that both approaches to the modeling of unsteady aerodynamics lead to identical models.

  1. A random spatial network model based on elementary postulates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Karlinger, M.R.; Troutman, B.M.

    1989-01-01

    In contrast to the random topology model, this model ascribes a unique spatial specification to generated drainage networks, a distinguishing property of some network growth models. The simplicity of the postulates creates an opportunity for potential analytic investigations of the probabilistic structure of the drainage networks, while the spatial specification enables analyses of spatially dependent network properties. In the random topology model all drainage networks, conditioned on magnitude (number of first-order streams), are equally likely, whereas in this model all spanning trees of a grid, conditioned on area and drainage density, are equally likely. As a result, link lengths in the generated networks are not independent, as usually assumed in the random topology model. -from Authors

  2. Causation and Disease: The Henle-Koch Postulates Revisited 1

    PubMed Central

    Evans, Alfred S.

    1976-01-01

    The Henle-Koch postulates are reviewed in terms of their full validity in Koch's day and in light of subsequent developments. The changing guidelines developed for viral diseases, for viruses in relation to cancer and to chronic central nervous system infection, and for causative agents in chronic diseases are discussed chronologically. A set of guidelines for both acute infectious and chronic diseases is presented. The need for recognizing the role of the host and the spectrum of host responses, for sound biologic sense in evaluating causal roles of agents in disease, and for flexibility in adapting our guidelines to new knowledge are emphasized. ImagesFIG. 1FIG. 2FIG. 3FIG. 4FIG. 5FIG. 6FIG. 7FIG. 8 PMID:782050

  3. Stressful life events and the risk of initial central nervous system demyelination.

    PubMed

    Saul, Alice; Ponsonby, Anne-Louise; Lucas, Robyn M; Taylor, Bruce V; Simpson, Steve; Valery, Patricia; Dwyer, Terence; Kilpatrick, Trevor J; Pender, Michael P; van der Mei, Ingrid Af

    2017-06-01

    There is substantial evidence that stress increases multiple sclerosis disease activity, but limited evidence on its association with the onset of multiple sclerosis. To examine the association between stressful life events and risk of first demyelinating event (FDE). This was a multicentre incident case-control study. Cases ( n = 282 with first diagnosis of central nervous system (CNS) demyelination, including n = 216 with 'classic FDE') were aged 18-59 years. Controls without CNS demyelination ( n = 558) were matched to cases on age, sex and study region. Stressful life events were assessed using a questionnaire based on the Social Readjustment Rating Scale. Those who suffered from a serious illness in the previous 12 months were more likely to have an FDE (odds ratio (OR) = 2.35 (1.36, 4.06), p = 0.002), and when we limited our reference group to those who had no stressful life events, the magnitude of effect became stronger (OR = 5.41 (1.80, 16.28)). The total stress number and stress load were not convincingly associated with the risk of an FDE. Cases were more likely to report a serious illness in the previous 12 months, which could suggest that a non-specific illness provides an additional strain to an already predisposed immune system.

  4. Event-Based Surveillance During EXPO Milan 2015: Rationale, Tools, Procedures, and Initial Results

    PubMed Central

    Manso, Martina Del; Caporali, Maria Grazia; Napoli, Christian; Linge, Jens P.; Mantica, Eleonora; Verile, Marco; Piatti, Alessandra; Pompa, Maria Grazia; Vellucci, Loredana; Costanzo, Virgilio; Bastiampillai, Anan Judina; Gabrielli, Eugenia; Gramegna, Maria; Declich, Silvia

    2016-01-01

    More than 21 million participants attended EXPO Milan from May to October 2015, making it one of the largest protracted mass gathering events in Europe. Given the expected national and international population movement and health security issues associated with this event, Italy fully implemented, for the first time, an event-based surveillance (EBS) system focusing on naturally occurring infectious diseases and the monitoring of biological agents with potential for intentional release. The system started its pilot phase in March 2015 and was fully operational between April and November 2015. In order to set the specific objectives of the EBS system, and its complementary role to indicator-based surveillance, we defined a list of priority diseases and conditions. This list was designed on the basis of the probability and possible public health impact of infectious disease transmission, existing statutory surveillance systems in place, and any surveillance enhancements during the mass gathering event. This article reports the methodology used to design the EBS system for EXPO Milan and the results of 8 months of surveillance. PMID:27314656

  5. Development of Simplified Probabilistic Risk Assessment Model for Seismic Initiating Event

    SciTech Connect

    S. Khericha; R. Buell; S. Sancaktar; M. Gonzalez; F. Ferrante

    2012-06-01

    ABSTRACT This paper discusses a simplified method to evaluate seismic risk using a methodology built on dividing the seismic intensity spectrum into multiple discrete bins. The seismic probabilistic risk assessment model uses Nuclear Regulatory Commission’s (NRC’s) full power Standardized Plant Analysis Risk (SPAR) model as the starting point for development. The seismic PRA models are integrated with their respective internal events at-power SPAR model. This is accomplished by combining the modified system fault trees from the full power SPAR model with seismic event tree logic. The peak ground acceleration is divided into five bins. The g-value for each bin is estimated using the geometric mean of lower and upper values of that particular bin and the associated frequency for each bin is estimated by taking the difference between upper and lower values of that bin. The component’s fragilities are calculated for each bin using the plant data, if available, or generic values of median peak ground acceleration and uncertainty values for the components. For human reliability analysis (HRA), the SPAR HRA (SPAR-H) method is used which requires the analysts to complete relatively straight forward worksheets that include the performance shaping factors (PSFs). The results are then used to estimate human error probabilities (HEPs) of interest. This work is expected to improve the NRC’s ability to include seismic hazards in risk assessments for operational events in support of the reactor oversight program (e.g., significance determination process).

  6. Development and Initial Validation of a Life Event Scale for Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Linden, Wolfgang

    1984-01-01

    Presents a readaptation of the Social Readjustment Rating Scale for college students (N=176). An initial attempt to validate this new scale indicated significantly higher frequencies of medical illness, seeking of psychological help, and academic failures in individuals with above average life change. (Author/JAC)

  7. Summit Fuels Push to Improve High Schools: Money, Initiatives Pledged during Two-Day Event

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olson, Lynn

    2005-01-01

    The nation's governors adjourned their two-day summit on high schools armed with an expanded arsenal of political and financial commitments to prepare all students for success in college and the workplace. But despite the enthusiastic launch of two major initiatives at the February 26-27, 2005 meeting here, observers cautioned that improving…

  8. Activating, Measuring and Manipulating Interest in an Artistic Event: An Initial Interest Modification Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wyatt, Robert O.

    To understand better how reviewing and other forms of evaluative journalism influence audiences and to test a proposed model, a series of experiments on 410 undergraduates assessed how initial film-viewing interest level (low, medium, high) and review direction (negative, mixed, positive) affected interest in film attendance. First, an extended…

  9. Computer simulation of initial events in the biochemical mechanisms of DNA damage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chatterjee, A.; Holley, W. R.

    1993-01-01

    Understanding the systematic and quantitative correlation between the physical events of energy deposition by ionizing radiation and the ensuing chemical and biochemical processes leading to DNA damage is one of the goals in radiation research. Significant progress has been made toward achieving the stated goal by using theoretical modeling techniques. These techniques are strongly dependent on computer simulation procedures. A review of such techniques with details of various stages of simulation development, including a comparison with available experimental data, is presented in this article.

  10. Computer simulation of initial events in the biochemical mechanisms of DNA damage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chatterjee, A.; Holley, W. R.

    1993-01-01

    Understanding the systematic and quantitative correlation between the physical events of energy deposition by ionizing radiation and the ensuing chemical and biochemical processes leading to DNA damage is one of the goals in radiation research. Significant progress has been made toward achieving the stated goal by using theoretical modeling techniques. These techniques are strongly dependent on computer simulation procedures. A review of such techniques with details of various stages of simulation development, including a comparison with available experimental data, is presented in this article.

  11. Initial Single Event Effects Testing of the Xilinx Virtex-4 Field Programmable Gate Array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, Gregory R.; Swift, Gary M.; Carmichael, C.; Tseng, C.

    2007-01-01

    We present initial results for the thin epitaxial Xilinx Virtex-4 Fie ld Programmable Gate Array (FPGA), and compare to previous results ob tained for the Virtex-II and Virtex-II Pro. The data presented was a cquired through a consortium based effort with the common goal of pr oviding the space community with data and mitigation methods for the use of Xilinx FPGAs in space.

  12. Initial Single Event Effects Testing of the Xilinx Virtex-4 Field Programmable Gate Array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, Gregory R.; Swift, Gary M.; Carmichael, C.; Tseng, C.

    2007-01-01

    We present initial results for the thin epitaxial Xilinx Virtex-4 Fie ld Programmable Gate Array (FPGA), and compare to previous results ob tained for the Virtex-II and Virtex-II Pro. The data presented was a cquired through a consortium based effort with the common goal of pr oviding the space community with data and mitigation methods for the use of Xilinx FPGAs in space.

  13. Displaced Water Volume, Potential Energy of Initial Elevation, and Tsunami Intensity: Analysis of Recent Tsunami Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nosov, Mikhail A.; Bolshakova, Anna V.; Kolesov, Sergey V.

    2014-12-01

    We consider recent ocean-bottom earthquakes for which detailed slip distribution data are available. Using these data and the Okada formulae, we calculate the vector fields of co-seismic bottom deformations, which allow us to determine the displaced water volume and the potential energy of initial elevation of the tsunami source. It is shown that, in the majority of cases, the horizontal components of bottom deformation provide an additional contribution to the displaced water volume and virtually never diminish the contribution of the vertical component. The absolute value of the relative contribution of the horizontal components of bottom deformation to the displaced volume varies from 0.07 to 55 %, on average amounting to 14 %. The displaced volume and the energy of initial elevation (tsunami energy) are examined as functions of the moment magnitude, and the relevant regressions (least-squares fits) are derived. The obtained relationships exhibit good correspondence with the theoretical upper limits that had been obtained under the assumption of uniform slip distribution along a rectangular fault. Tsunami energy calculated on the basis of finite fault model data is compared with the earthquake energy determined from the energy-magnitude relationship by Kanamori. It is shown that tsunami takes from 0.001 to 0.34 % of the earthquake energy, and on average 0.04 %. Finally, we analyze the Soloviev-Imamura tsunami intensity as a function of the following three quantities: (1) the moment magnitude, (2) the decimal logarithm of the absolute value of displaced volume, and (3) the decimal logarithm of the potential energy of initial elevation. The first dependence exhibits rather poor correlation, whereas the second and third dependences demonstrate noticeably higher correlation coefficients. This gives us grounds to suggest considering the displaced volume and the energy of initial elevation as measures of the tsunamigenic potential of an earthquake.

  14. Impact of methionine oxidation as an initial event on the pathway of human prion protein conversion

    PubMed Central

    Elmallah, Mohammed IY; Borgmeyer, Uwe; Betzel, Christian; Redecke, Lars

    2013-01-01

    Prion diseases comprise a group of fatal neurodegenerative disorders characterized by the autocatalytic conversion of the cellular prion protein PrPC into the infectious misfolded isoform PrPSc. Increasing evidence supports a specific role of oxidative stress in the onset of pathogenesis. Although the associated molecular mechanisms remain to be elucidated in detail, several studies currently suggest that methionine oxidation already detected in misfolded PrPSc destabilizes the native PrP fold as an early event in the conversion pathway. To obtain more insights about the specific impact of surface-exposed methionine residues on the oxidative-induced conversion of human PrP we designed, produced, and comparatively investigated two new pseudosulfoxidation mutants of human PrP 121–231 that comprises the well-folded C-terminal domain. Applying circular dichroism spectroscopy and dynamic light scattering techniques we showed that pseudosulfoxidation of all surface exposed Met residues formed a monomeric molten globule-like species with striking similarities to misfolding intermediates recently reported by other groups. However, individual pseudosulfoxidation at the polymorphic M129 site did not significantly contribute to the structural destabilization. Further metal-induced oxidation of the partly unfolded pseudosulfoxidation mutant resulted in the formation of an oligomeric state that shares a comparable size and stability with PrP oligomers detected after the application of different other triggers for structural conversion, indicating a generic misfolding pathway of PrP. The obtained results highlight the specific importance of methionine oxidation at surface exposed residues for PrP misfolding, strongly supporting the hypothesis that increased oxidative stress could be one causative event for sporadic prion diseases and other neurodegenerative disorders. PMID:24121542

  15. Impact of methionine oxidation as an initial event on the pathway of human prion protein conversion.

    PubMed

    Elmallah, Mohammed I Y; Borgmeyer, Uwe; Betzel, Christian; Redecke, Lars

    2013-01-01

    Prion diseases comprise a group of fatal neurodegenerative disorders characterized by the autocatalytic conversion of the cellular prion protein PrP(C) into the infectious misfolded isoform PrP(Sc). Increasing evidence supports a specific role of oxidative stress in the onset of pathogenesis. Although the associated molecular mechanisms remain to be elucidated in detail, several studies currently suggest that methionine oxidation already detected in misfolded PrP(Sc) destabilizes the native PrP fold as an early event in the conversion pathway. To obtain more insights about the specific impact of surface-exposed methionine residues on the oxidative-induced conversion of human PrP we designed, produced, and comparatively investigated two new pseudosulfoxidation mutants of human PrP 121-231 that comprises the well-folded C-terminal domain. Applying circular dichroism spectroscopy and dynamic light scattering techniques we showed that pseudosulfoxidation of all surface exposed Met residues formed a monomeric molten globule-like species with striking similarities to misfolding intermediates recently reported by other groups. However, individual pseudosulfoxidation at the polymorphic M129 site did not significantly contribute to the structural destabilization. Further metal-induced oxidation of the partly unfolded pseudosulfoxidation mutant resulted in the formation of an oligomeric state that shares a comparable size and stability with PrP oligomers detected after the application of different other triggers for structural conversion, indicating a generic misfolding pathway of PrP. The obtained results highlight the specific importance of methionine oxidation at surface exposed residues for PrP misfolding, strongly supporting the hypothesis that increased oxidative stress could be one causative event for sporadic prion diseases and other neurodegenerative disorders.

  16. Initiation, maintenance, and properties of convection in an extreme rainfall event during SCMREX: Observational analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hui; Luo, Yali; Jou, Ben Jong-Dao

    2014-12-01

    A long-lived mesoscale convective system (MCS) with extreme rainfall over the western coastal region of Guangdong on 10 May 2013 during the Southern China Monsoon Rainfall Experiment (SCMREX) is studied. The environmental conditions are characterized by little convective inhibition, low-lifting condensation level, moderate convective available potential energy and precipitable water, and lack of low-level jets from the tropical ocean. Repeated convective back building and subsequent northeastward "echo training" of convective cells are found during the MCS's development stages. However, the initiation/maintenance factors and organization of convection differ significantly during the earlier and later stages. From midnight to early morning, convection is continuously initiated as southeasterly flows near the surface impinge on the east side of mesoscale mountains near the coastal lines and then moves northeastward, leading to formation of two quasi-stationary rainbands. From early morning to early afternoon, new convection is repeatedly triggered along a mesoscale boundary between precipitation-induced cold outflows and warm air from South China Sea and Gulf of Tokin, resulting in the formation of "band training" of several parallel rainbands that move eastward in a later time, i.e., two scales of "training" of convective elements are found. As the MCS dissipates, a stronger squall line moves into the region from the west and passes over within about 3.5 h, contributing about 10%-15% to the total rainfall amount. It is concluded that terrain, near-surface winds, warm advection from the upstream ocean in the boundary layer, and precipitation-generated cold outflows play important roles in initiating and maintaining the extreme rain-producing MCS.

  17. Effect of initial conditions and of intra-event rainfall intensity variability on shallow landslide triggering return period

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peres, David Johnny; Cancelliere, Antonino

    2016-04-01

    Assessment of shallow landslide hazard is important for appropriate planning of mitigation measures. Generally, return period of slope instability is assumed as a quantitative metric to map landslide triggering hazard on a catchment. The most commonly applied approach to estimate such return period consists in coupling a physically-based landslide triggering model (hydrological and slope stability) with rainfall intensity-duration-frequency (IDF) curves. Among the drawbacks of such an approach, the following assumptions may be mentioned: (1) prefixed initial conditions, with no regard to their probability of occurrence, and (2) constant intensity-hyetographs. In our work we propose the use of a Monte Carlo simulation approach in order to investigate the effects of the two above mentioned assumptions. The approach is based on coupling a physically based hydrological and slope stability model with a stochastic rainfall time series generator. By this methodology a long series of synthetic rainfall data can be generated and given as input to a landslide triggering physically based model, in order to compute the return period of landslide triggering as the mean inter-arrival time of a factor of safety less than one. In particular, we couple the Neyman-Scott rectangular pulses model for hourly rainfall generation and the TRIGRS v.2 unsaturated model for the computation of transient response to individual rainfall events. Initial conditions are computed by a water table recession model that links initial conditions at a given event to the final response at the preceding event, thus taking into account variable inter-arrival time between storms. One-thousand years of synthetic hourly rainfall are generated to estimate return periods up to 100 years. Applications are first carried out to map landslide triggering hazard in the Loco catchment, located in highly landslide-prone area of the Peloritani Mountains, Sicily, Italy. Then a set of additional simulations are performed

  18. The initiation of blood flow and flow induced events in early vascular development.

    PubMed

    Jones, Elizabeth A V

    2011-12-01

    Within a day of gastrulation, the embryonic heart begins to beat and creates blood flow in the developing cardiovascular system. The onset of blood flow completely changes the environment in which the cardiovascular system is forming. Flow provides physiological feedback such that the developing network adapts to cue provided by the flow. Targeted inactivation of genes that alter early blood fluid dynamics induce secondary defects in the heart and vasculature and therefore proper blood flow is known to be essential for vascular development. Though hemodynamics, or blood fluid dynamics, are known to activate signaling pathways in the mature cardiovascular system in pathologies ranging from artherosclerosis to angiogenesis, the role in development has not been as intensively studied. The question arises how blood vessels in the embryos, which initially lack cells types such as smooth muscle cells, differ in their response to mechanical signals from blood flow as compared to the more mature cardiovascular system. Many genes known to be regulated by hemodynamics in the adult are important for developmental angiogenesis. Therefore the onset of blood flow is of primary importance to vascular development. This review will focus on how blood flow initiates and the effects of the mechanical signals created by blood flow on cardiovascular development.

  19. Alpha/sub 1/ receptor coupling events initiated by methoxy-substituted tolazoline partial agonists

    SciTech Connect

    Wick, P.; Keung, A.; Deth, R.

    1986-03-01

    A series of mono- and dimethyoxy substituted tolazoline derivatives, known to be partial agonists at the alpha/sub 1/ receptor, were compared with the ..cap alpha../sub 1/ selective full agonist phenylephrine (PE) on isolated strips of rabbit aorta Agonist activity was evaluated in contraction, /sup 45/Ca influx, /sup 45/Ca efflux, and /sup 32/P-Phospholipid labelling studies. Maximum contractile responses for the 2-, 3-, and 3, 5- methoxy substituted tolazoline derivatives (10/sup -5/M) were 53.8, 67.6 and 99.7% of the PE (10/sup -5/M) response respectively. These same partial agonists caused a stimulation of /sup 45/Ca influx to the extent of 64, 86, and 95% of the PE response respectively. In /sup 45/Ca efflux studies, (a measure of the intracellular Ca/sup +2/ release) the tolazolines caused: 30%, 63%, and 78% of the PE stimulated level. /sup 32/P-Phosphatidic acid (PA) labelling was measured as an index of PI turnover after ..cap alpha../sub 1/ receptor stimulation. Compared to PE, the 2-, 3-, and 3,5- methoxy substituted tolazoline derivatives caused 22, 46, and 72% PA labelling. The above values are all in reasonable accord with the rank order or agonist activity shown in maximum contractile responses. The results of this investigation suggest that partial agonists stimulate ..cap alpha.. receptor coupling events at a level which is quantitatively comparable to their potencies in causing contraction of arterial smooth muscle.

  20. Choroid plexus dysfunction: the initial event in the pathogenesis of Wernicke's encephalopathy and ethanol intoxication.

    PubMed

    Nixon, Peter F; Jordan, Lindsay; Zimitat, Craig; Rose, Stephen E; Zelaya, Fernando

    2008-08-01

    In both acute ethanol intoxication and in thiamin deficient glucose metabolism, previous studies have detected blood-brain barrier (BBB) and/or blood-CSF-barrier (BCSFB) impairment but were unable to assess their significance in relation to other changes in the brain. Contrast-enhanced, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was used to detect and time any impairment of the BBB or BCSFB in rats given an acute ethanol load or in rats made thiamin deficient to the point of mild ataxia and then given an acute glucose load. The BCSFB at the choroid plexus (CP) was impaired within 10 minutes by either (i) a single i.p. dose of glucose in thiamin-deficiency, an effect that was attenuated by prior MK801 and preceded the published onset of exacerbation of motor incoordination and elevation of brain glutamate derivatives; or (ii) a single i.p. dose of ethanol in thiamin-sufficiency, an effect that was proportional to the blood alcohol concentration and preceded the published onset of signs of intoxication. In contrast to the BCSFB, the BBB remained intact throughout the 90 minutes period of these experiments. In both ethanol intoxication and thiamin-deficient glucose metabolism, BCSFB impairment exposes the CSF and hence the brain extracellular fluid to neuroactive substances from the blood. CP impairment is the earliest detected event in both these animal models; and explains the paraventricular location of WE neuropathology and why WE is associated with, but not dependent on, alcoholism.

  1. Accident progression event tree analysis for postulated severe accidents at N Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Wyss, G.D.; Camp, A.L.; Miller, L.A.; Dingman, S.E.; Kunsman, D.M. ); Medford, G.T. )

    1990-06-01

    A Level II/III probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) has been performed for N Reactor, a Department of Energy (DOE) production reactor located on the Hanford reservation in Washington. The accident progression analysis documented in this report determines how core damage accidents identified in the Level I PRA progress from fuel damage to confinement response and potential releases the environment. The objectives of the study are to generate accident progression data for the Level II/III PRA source term model and to identify changes that could improve plant response under accident conditions. The scope of the analysis is comprehensive, excluding only sabotage and operator errors of commission. State-of-the-art methodology is employed based largely on the methods developed by Sandia for the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission in support of the NUREG-1150 study. The accident progression model allows complex interactions and dependencies between systems to be explicitly considered. Latin Hypecube sampling was used to assess the phenomenological and systemic uncertainties associated with the primary and confinement system responses to the core damage accident. The results of the analysis show that the N Reactor confinement concept provides significant radiological protection for most of the accident progression pathways studied.

  2. Sensitivity of seasonal weather prediction and extreme precipitation events to soil moisture initialization uncertainty using SMOS soil moisture products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khodayar-Pardo, Samiro; Lopez-Baeza, Ernesto; Coll Pajaron, M. Amparo

    Sensitivity of seasonal weather prediction and extreme precipitation events to soil moisture initialization uncertainty using SMOS soil moisture products (1) S. Khodayar, (2) A. Coll, (2) E. Lopez-Baeza (1) Institute for Meteorology and Climate Research, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Karlsruhe Germany (2) University of Valencia. Earth Physics and Thermodynamics Department. Climatology from Satellites Group Soil moisture is an important variable in agriculture, hydrology, meteorology and related disciplines. Despite its importance, it is complicated to obtain an appropriate representation of this variable, mainly because of its high temporal and spatial variability. SVAT (Soil-Vegetation-Atmosphere-Transfer) models can be used to simulate the temporal behaviour and spatial distribution of soil moisture in a given area and/or state of the art products such as the soil moisture measurements from the SMOS (Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity) space mission may be also convenient. The potential role of soil moisture initialization and associated uncertainty in numerical weather prediction is illustrated in this study through sensitivity numerical experiments using the SVAT SURFEX model and the non-hydrostatic COSMO model. The aim of this investigation is twofold, (a) to demonstrate the sensitivity of model simulations of convective precipitation to soil moisture initial uncertainty, as well as the impact on the representation of extreme precipitation events, and (b) to assess the usefulness of SMOS soil moisture products to improve the simulation of water cycle components and heavy precipitation events. Simulated soil moisture and precipitation fields are compared with observations and with level-1(~1km), level-2(~15 km) and level-3(~35 km) soil moisture maps generated from SMOS over the Iberian Peninsula, the SMOS validation area (50 km x 50 km, eastern Spain) and selected stations, where in situ measurements are available covering different vegetation cover

  3. 76 FR 43356 - Evaluations of Explosions Postulated To Occur at Nearby Facilities and on Transportation Routes...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-20

    ... COMMISSION Evaluations of Explosions Postulated To Occur at Nearby Facilities and on Transportation Routes... for public comment draft regulatory guide (DG), DG-1270, ``Evaluations of Explosions Postulated to... assumptions the NRC's staff finds acceptable for evaluating postulated explosions at nearby facilities...

  4. Preliminary analysis of tank 241-C-106 dryout due to large postulated leak and vaporization

    SciTech Connect

    Piepho, M.G.

    1994-12-01

    This analysis assumes that there is a hypothetical large leak at the bottom of Tank 241-C-106 which initiates the dryout of the tank. The time required for a tank to dryout after a leak is of interest for safety reasons. As a tank dries out, its temperature is expected to increase which could affect the structural integrity of the concrete tank dome. Hence, it is of interest to know how fast and how high the temperature in a leaky tank increases, so that mitigation procedures can be planned and implemented in a timely manner. This analysis is focused on tank 241-C-106, which is known to be high thermal tank. The objective of the study was to determine how long it would take for tank 241-C-106 to reach 350 degrees Fahrenheit (about 177 degrees Centigrade) after a postulated large leak develops at the bottom center of the tank. The temperature of 350 degrees Fahrenheit is the minimum temperature that can cause structural damage to concrete (ACI 1992). The postulated leak at the bottom of the tank and the resulting dryout of the sludge in the tank make this analysis different from previous thermal analyses of the C-106 tank and other tanks, especially the double-shell tanks which are mostly liquid.

  5. Coupled prediction of flood response and debris flow initiation during warm and cold season events in the Southern Appalachians, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, J.; Barros, A. P.

    2013-07-01

    Debris flows associated with rainstorms are a frequent and devastating hazard in the Southern Appalachians in the United States. Whereas warm season events are clearly associated with heavy rainfall intensity, the same cannot be said for the cold season events. Instead, there is a relationship between large (cumulative) rainfall events independently of season, and thus hydrometeorological regime, and debris flows. This suggests that the dynamics of subsurface hydrologic processes play an important role as a trigger mechanism, specifically through soil moisture redistribution by interflow. The first objective of this study is to investigate this hypothesis. The second objective is to assess the physical basis for a regional coupled flood prediction and debris flow warning system. For this purpose, uncalibrated model simulations of well-documented debris flows in headwater catchments of the Southern Appalachians using a 3-D surface-groundwater hydrologic model coupled with slope stability models are examined in detail. Specifically, we focus on two vulnerable headwater catchments that experience frequent debris flows, the Big Creek and the Jonathan Creek in the Upper Pigeon River Basin, North Carolina, and three distinct weather systems: an extremely heavy summertime convective storm in 2011; a persistent winter storm lasting several days; and a severe winter storm in 2009. These events were selected due to the optimal availability of rainfall observations, availability of detailed field surveys of the landslides shortly after they occurred, which can be used to evaluate model predictions, and because they are representative of events that cause major economic losses in the region. The model results substantiate that interflow is a useful prognostic of conditions necessary for the initiation of slope instability, and should therefore be considered explicitly in landslide hazard assessments. Moreover, the relationships between slope stability and interflow are

  6. A patient-initiated voluntary online survey of adverse medical events: the perspective of 696 injured patients and families.

    PubMed

    Southwick, Frederick S; Cranley, Nicole M; Hallisy, Julia A

    2015-10-01

    Preventable medical errors continue to be a major cause of death in the USA and throughout the world. Many patients have written about their experiences on websites and in published books. As patients and family members who have experienced medical harm, we have created a nationwide voluntary survey in order to more broadly and systematically capture the perspective of patients and patient families experiencing adverse medical events and have used quantitative and qualitative analysis to summarise the responses of 696 patients and their families. Harm was most commonly associated with diagnostic and therapeutic errors, followed by surgical or procedural complications, hospital-associated infections and medication errors, and our quantitative results match those of previous provider-initiated patient surveys. Qualitative analysis of 450 narratives revealed a lack of perceived provider and system accountability, deficient and disrespectful communication and a failure of providers to listen as major themes. The consequences of adverse events included death, post-traumatic stress, financial hardship and permanent disability. These conditions and consequences led to a loss of patients' trust in both the health system and providers. Patients and family members offered suggestions for preventing future adverse events and emphasised the importance of shared decision-making. This large voluntary survey of medical harm highlights the potential efficacy of patient-initiated surveys for providing meaningful feedback and for guiding improvements in patient care. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  7. D-O Events in the Southern Tropics of East Africa? Initial XRF Results From the Lake Malawi Drilling Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, E. T.; Johnson, T. C.; Scholz, C. A.; King, J.; Cohen, A. S.

    2006-12-01

    As part of the Lake Malawi Drilling Project we have undertaken a 1 cm-scale resolution XRF scanning study of core from site 2A in the Northern Basin of the lake (ca. 10 South latitude). This 38-m core provides an essentially continuous record of regional climate over the past 70,000 years, so our XRF analyses correspond to an average temporal resolution of approximately 20 years. We have focused our initial study on certain parameters, including Fe, Zr:Ti, and Si:Ti. These may be interpreted to represent changing input of terrigenous sediments (delivered to the lake rivers), soils developed from weathered volcanic ash (delivered more effectively under drier windier conditions), and biogenic silica, respectively. Our initial analyses of the XRF results indicate abrupt and strong, millennial-scale variability in regional climate throughout the past 70,000 years. The series of events consists of rapid (~100-year) increases in Zr:Ti and Si:Ti followed by slower decreases toward background values. These events are strikingly similar in form and in timing to Dansgaard- Oeschger events of high northern latitudes. The Younger Dryas and the Holocene "cold" periods in the Northern Hemisphere were times of enhanced input of wind-blown volcanic ash-derived materials and of diatom productivity, probably stimulated by northerly winds and upwelling in the north of the lake. Interestingly, in contrast to the Late Glacial and Holocene, times of higher productivity and enhanced input of volcanic-ash derived material in the earlier part of the record coincide with episodes of warming as recorded in Greenland ice. This suggests that a significant change in the tropical response to climate forcing occurred at the time of waning of Northern Hemisphere glaciation.

  8. Risk prediction for adverse events during initiation of sotalol and dofetilide for the treatment of atrial fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Agusala, Kartik; Oesterle, Adam; Kulkarni, Chiraag; Caprio, Timothy; Subacius, Haris; Passman, Rod

    2015-04-01

    Inpatient antiarrhythmic drug initiation for atrial fibrillation is mandated for dofetilide (DF) and is often performed for sotalol (SL), particularly if proarrhythmia risk factors are present. Whether low-risk patients can be identified to safely allow outpatient initiation is unknown. A single-center retrospective cohort study was performed on patients initiated with DF or SL. Risk factors for adverse events (AEs), defined as any arrhythmia or electrocardiogram change requiring dose reduction or cessation, were identified. Of 329 patients, 227 (69%) received SL and 102 (31%) DF. The cohort had a mean age of 63 ± 13 years; 70% of patients were male and had a baseline QTc of 440 ± 37 ms. A total of 105 AEs occurred in 92 patients: QTc prolongation or ventricular tachyarrhythmia in 70 patients (67% of AEs), bradyarrhythmias in 35 patients (33% of AEs), with some experiencing both AE types. Ventricular arrhythmias were seen in 23 patients (7%) and torsades de pointes in one (0.3%). Total AE rates were similar between drugs (P = 0.09); however, DF patients had more QTc prolongation or ventricular arrhythmias (P = 0.001). In SL patients, there were no predictors for QTc prolongation or ventricular proarrhythmia. In DF patients, higher baseline QTc interval (odds ratio = 1.64/25 ms, P = 0.01) was an independent predictor of QTc prolongation or ventricular proarrhythmias. For patients without proarrhythmia risk factors, overall AE rate was 26%. In conclusion, AEs are common during DF and SL initiation but rarely severe in hospitalized inpatients. Baseline QTc predicts AEs for DF patients only and AE are common even in "low-risk" patients. These results support in-hospital drug initiation for all DF and SL patients. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. PRESSURE INTEGRITY OF 3013 CONTAINER UNDER POSTULATED ACCIDENT CONDITIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Rawls, G.

    2010-02-01

    A series of tests was carried out to determine the threshold for deflagration-to-detonation transition (DDT), structural loading, and structural response of the Department of Energy 3013 storage systems for the case of an accidental explosion of evolved gas within the storage containers. Three experimental fixtures were used to examine the various issues and three mixtures consisting of either stoichiometric hydrogen-oxygen, stoichiometric hydrogen-oxygen with added nitrogen, or stoichiometric hydrogen-oxygen with an added nitrogen-helium mixture were tested. Tests were carried out as a function of initial pressure from 1 to 3.5 bar and initial temperature from room temperature to 150 C. The elevated temperature tests resulted in a slight increase in the threshold pressure for DDT. The elevated temperature tests were performed to ensure the test results were bounding. Because the change was not significant the elevated temperature data are not presented in the paper. The explosions were initiated with either a small spark or a hot surface. Based on the results of these tests under the conditions investigated, it can be concluded that DDT of a stoichiometric hydrogen-oxygen mixture (and mixtures diluted with nitrogen and helium) within the 3013 containment system does not pose a threat to the structural integrity of the outer container.

  10. Further characterization of the luminous variation events that occurred during the initial stage of upward positive leaders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, D.; Watanabe, T.; Takagi, N.

    2010-12-01

    Temporary increase phenomena in luminosity of the lightning luminous channel (optical pulses) often occur regularly (or periodically) during the initial stage of upward leaders. Some authors called these phenomena the steps of positive leaders, similar to that occurred in negative stepped leaders. However, the phenomena observed in upward positive leaders usually have a rise time more than ten times longer than the negative leader steps. In order to underscore such difference, we have simply termed the phenomena occurred in the upward positive leaders luminous variation events (LVEs) (Wang et al., 2007). As far as authors know, LEVs’ mechanism remains unknown. Using a high speed optical imaging system (ALPS) at a time resolution 100 ns and a spatial resolution of about 14 m, in this study we have documented and analyzed 38 LVEs occurred in the initial stages of 5 upward positive leaders from a wind turbine and its lightning protection tower. This presentation is to report our results. For all those LVEs, we are not able to identify at what heights they initiated and how they propagated. After comparing the LVEs’ light signals at different heights, we found that those LEVs can be apparently classified into the following four groups. Group 1: the optical pulses are more or less similar in their wave shapes at different heights of the lightning channels and they account for 63.2%. Group 2: the pulses differ only in their rising fronts and they account for 10.5%. Group 3: the pulses differ only in their decaying tails and they account for 10.5%. Group 4: the pulses differ both in their rising fronts and decaying tails and they account for 15.8%. For different groups of LVEs, their rising times, durations, peak currents, and electrical charges transferred by them are compared. It appears that group 3 and group 4 LVEs tend to have bigger current peak and transfer more charges than group 1 and group 2 LVEs. References D. Wang, N. Takagi, and T. Watanabe, Observed

  11. Pravastatin Reduces the Risk of Atherothrombotic Stroke when Administered within Six Months of an Initial Stroke Event.

    PubMed

    Hosomi, Naohisa; Nagai, Yoji; Kitagawa, Kazuo; Nakagawa, Yoko; Aoki, Shiro; Nezu, Tomohisa; Kagimura, Tatsuo; Maruyama, Hirofumi; Origasa, Hideki; Minematsu, Kazuo; Uchiyama, Shinichiro; Matsumoto, Masayasu

    2017-09-16

    The J-STARS study examined whether pravastatin (10 mg/day) reduces recurrence of stroke in non-cardioembolic ischemic stroke patients who were enrolled within 1 month to 3 years after initial stroke events (ClinicalTrials.gov, NCT00221104). The main results showed that the frequency of atherothrombotic stroke was low in pravastatin-treated patients, although no effect of pravastatin was found for the other stroke subtypes. We evaluated differences of early (within 6 months) or late (after 6 months) pravastatin treatment benefits on the incidence of stroke or transient ischemic attack (TIA), as well as atherothrombotic stroke and the other subtypes. Subjects in the J-STARS study were classified into two cohorts, depending on whether they enrolled early (1 to 6 months) or late (6 months to 3 years) following initial stroke events. A total of 1578 patients (491 female, 66.2±8.5 years) were randomly assigned to either the pravastatin group (n=793; n=426 in the early cohort, n=367 in the late cohort) or the control group (n=785; n=417 in the early cohort, n=368 in the late cohort). During the follow-up of 4.9± 1.4 years, the rate of atherothrombotic stroke was lower in the pravastatin group compared to controls in the early cohort (0.24 vs. 0.88%/year, p=0.01) but not in the late cohort (0.17 vs. 0.39%/year, p=0.29). However, this difference of pravastatin effect on atherothrombotic stroke was not significantly interacted by the early or late cohort (p=0.59). The incidence rates of other stroke subtype were not different in between pravastatin and control groups despite the timing of entry. Pravastatin is likely to reduce atherothrombotic stroke in patients enrolled within 6 months after stroke onset. However, the clinical efficacy for prevention of recurrent stroke was not conclusive with earlier statin treatment.

  12. A Postulated Mechanism that Leads to Materialization and Dematerialization of Matter and to Antigravity

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1975-10-08

    TITLE fand Subtlll») A POSTULATED MECHANISM THAT LEADS TO MATERIALIZATION AND DEMATERIALIZATION OF MATTER AND TO ANTIGRAVITY S. TYPE OF REPORT...m AD-A020 796 A POSTULATED MECHANISM THAT LEADS TO MATERIALIZATION AND DEMATERIALIZATION OF MATTER AND TO ANTIGRAVITY Thomas E. Bearden Army...Jiife’iPi*^ o CM Öb6140 TECHNICAL REPORT SAM-0 76-1 A POSTULATED MECHANISM THAT LEADS TO MATERIALIZATION AND DEMATERIALIZATION OF MATTER AND TO

  13. Bridging EUV and White-Light Observations to Inspect the Initiation Phase of a "Two-Stage" Solar Eruptive Event

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Byrne, J. P.; Morgan, H.; Seaton, D. B.; Bain, H. M.; Habbal, S. R.

    2014-12-01

    The initiation phase of coronal mass ejections (CMEs) is a very important aspect of solar physics, as these phenomena ultimately drive space weather in the heliosphere. This phase is known to occur between the photosphere and low corona, where many models introduce an instability and/or magnetic reconnection that triggers a CME, often with associated flaring activity. To this end, it is important to obtain a variety of observations of the low corona to build as clear a picture as possible of the dynamics that occur therein. Here, we combine the EUV imagery of the Sun Watcher using Active Pixel System Detector and Image Processing (SWAP) instrument onboard the Project for Onboard Autonomy (PROBA2) with the white-light imagery of the ground-based Mark-IV K-coronameter (Mk4) at Mauna Loa Solar Observatory (MLSO) to bridge the observational gap that exists between the disk imagery of the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) onboard the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) and the coronal imagery of the Large Angle Spectrometric Coronagraph (LASCO) onboard the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO). Methods of multiscale image analysis were applied to the observations to better reveal the coronal signal while suppressing noise and other features. This allowed an investigation into the initiation phase of a CME that was driven by a rising flux-rope structure from a "two-stage" flaring event underlying an extended helmet streamer. It was found that the initial outward motion of the erupting loop system in the EUV observations coincided with the first X-ray flare peak and led to a plasma pile-up of the white-light CME core material. The characterized CME core then underwent a strong jerk in its motion, as the early acceleration increased abruptly, simultaneously with the second X-ray flare peak. The overall system expanded into the helmet streamer to become the larger CME structure observed in the LASCO coronagraph images, which later became concave-outward in shape

  14. Recommended plutonium release fractions from postulated fires. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Kogan, V.; Schumacher, P.M.

    1993-12-01

    This report was written at the request of EG&G Rocky Flats, Inc. in support of joint emergency planning for the Rocky Flats Plant (RFP) by EG&G and the State of Colorado. The intent of the report is to provide the State of Colorado with an independent assessment of any respirable plutonium releases that might occur in the event of a severe fire at the plant. Fire releases of plutonium are of interest because they have been used by EG&G to determine the RFP emergency planning zones. These zones are based on the maximum credible accident (MCA) described in the RFP Final Environmental Impact Statement (FEIS) of 1980, that MCA is assumed to be a large airplane crashing into a RFP plutonium building.The objective of this report was first, to perform a worldwide literature review of relevant release experiments from 1960 to the present and to summarize those findings, and second, to provide recommendations for application of the experimental data to fire release analyses at Rocky Flats. The latter step requires translation between experimental and expected RFP accident parameters, or ``scaling.`` The parameters of particular concern are: quantities of material, environmental parameters such as the intensity of a fire, and the physico-chemical forms of the plutonium. The latter include plutonium metal, bulk plutonium oxide powder, combustible and noncombustible wastes contaminated with plutonium oxide powder, and residues from plutonium extraction processes.

  15. Ferrocyanide Safety Program: Analysis of postulated energetic reactions and resultant aerosol generation in Hanford Site Waste Tanks

    SciTech Connect

    Postma, A.K.; Dickinson, D.R.

    1995-09-01

    This report reviews work done to estimate the possible consequences of postulated energetic reactions in ferrocyanide waste stored in underground tanks at the Hanford Site. The issue of explosive reactions was raised in the 1987 Environmental Impact Statement (EIS), where a detonation-like explosion was postulated for the purpose of defining an upper bound on dose consequences for various disposal options. A review of the explosion scenario by the General Accounting Office (GAO) indicated that the aerosol generation and consequent radioactive doses projected for the explosion postulated in the EIS were understated by one to two orders of magnitude. The US DOE has sponsored an extensive study of the hazard posed by uncontrolled exothermic reactions in ferrocyanide waste, and results obtained during the past three years have allowed this hazard to be more realistically assessed. The objective of this report is to summarize the improved knowledge base that now indicates that explosive or vigorous chemical reactions are not credible in the ferrocyanide waste stored in underground tanks. This improved understanding supports the decision not to proceed with further analyses or predictions of the consequences of such an event or with aerosol tests in support of such predictions. 53 refs., 2 tabs.

  16. Hyperphosphatemic familial tumoral calcinosis: response to acetazolamide and postulated mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Finer, Gal; Price, Heather E; Shore, Richard M; White, Kenneth E; Langman, Craig B

    2014-06-01

    Hyperphosphatemic familial tumoral calcinosis (HFTC) is characterized by enhanced renal phosphate absorption, hyperphosphatemia, and tumor-like extraosseous calcifications due to inactivating mutations in FGF23 or associated proteins. Surgical excision is needed when low phosphate diet and phosphate binders are ineffective. Sporadic reports have supported acetazolamide use. We report on a 7-year-old African American boy who presented with severe HFTC requiring numerous surgical excisions. Tumors continued to appear and others reoccurred despite phosphate restriction and sevelamer carbonate. At the age of 9.5 years, acetazolamide (40 mg/kg/day) was added and resulted in mild metabolic acidosis (bicarbonate 25.3 mEq/L vs. 21.4 mEq/L, P < 0.001; serum pH 7.38 vs. 7.31, P = 0.013, pre- and post-acetazolamide, respectively) but no change in tubular reabsorption of phosphate (TRP) (96.9% vs. 95.9%, P = 0.34) or serum phosphate (6.6 mg/dl vs. 6.9 mg/dl, P = 0.52 pre- and post-acetazolamide, respectively). Following the initiation of acetazolamide therapy, the patient experienced significant improvement in disease course as indicated by resolution of localized bone pain, cessation of tumor formation, and no tumor recurrence. Despite mild metabolic acidosis, our patient had improved linear growth and did not develop any other side effects related to therapy. Intact FGF23 remained abnormally low throughout disease course, while C-terminal FGF23 increased with acetazolamide. We conclude that acetazolamide can control severe HFTC by inducing mild metabolic acidosis despite no change in serum phosphate or TRP. This effect may be exerted though improved calcium-phosphate complex solubility and increased FGF23 locally.

  17. Initial Events during the Evolution of C4 Photosynthesis in C3 Species of Flaveria1[W][OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Sage, Tammy L.; Busch, Florian A.; Johnson, Daniel C.; Friesen, Patrick C.; Stinson, Corey R.; Stata, Matt; Sultmanis, Stefanie; Rahman, Beshar A.; Rawsthorne, Stephen; Sage, Rowan F.

    2013-01-01

    The evolution of C4 photosynthesis in many taxa involves the establishment of a two-celled photorespiratory CO2 pump, termed C2 photosynthesis. How C3 species evolved C2 metabolism is critical to understanding the initial phases of C4 plant evolution. To evaluate early events in C4 evolution, we compared leaf anatomy, ultrastructure, and gas-exchange responses of closely related C3 and C2 species of Flaveria, a model genus for C4 evolution. We hypothesized that Flaveria pringlei and Flaveria robusta, two C3 species that are most closely related to the C2 Flaveria species, would show rudimentary characteristics of C2 physiology. Compared with less-related C3 species, bundle sheath (BS) cells of F. pringlei and F. robusta had more mitochondria and chloroplasts, larger mitochondria, and proportionally more of these organelles located along the inner cell periphery. These patterns were similar, although generally less in magnitude, than those observed in the C2 species Flaveria angustifolia and Flaveria sonorensis. In F. pringlei and F. robusta, the CO2 compensation point of photosynthesis was slightly lower than in the less-related C3 species, indicating an increase in photosynthetic efficiency. This could occur because of enhanced refixation of photorespired CO2 by the centripetally positioned organelles in the BS cells. If the phylogenetic positions of F. pringlei and F. robusta reflect ancestral states, these results support a hypothesis that increased numbers of centripetally located organelles initiated a metabolic scavenging of photorespired CO2 within the BS. This could have facilitated the formation of a glycine shuttle between mesophyll and BS cells that characterizes C2 photosynthesis. PMID:24064930

  18. Search for Charmonium States Decaying to J/\\psi\\gamma \\gamma $ Using Initial-State Radiation Events

    SciTech Connect

    Aubert, B.; Barate, R.; Bona, M.; Boutigny, D.; Couderc, F.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Tisserand, V.; Zghiche, A.; Grauges, E.; Palano, A.; Chen, J.C.; Qi, N.D.; Rong, G.; Wang, P.; Zhu, Y.S.; Eigen, G.; Ofte, I.; Stugu, B.; Abrams, G.S.; /LBL, Berkeley /UC, Berkeley /Birmingham U. /Ruhr U., Bochum /Bristol U. /British Columbia U. /Brunel U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UCLA /UC, Riverside /UC, San Diego /UC, Santa Barbara /UC, Santa Cruz /Caltech /Cincinnati U. /Colorado U. /Colorado State U. /Dortmund U. /Dresden, Tech. U. /Ecole Polytechnique /Edinburgh U. /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /Frascati /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /Harvard U. /Heidelberg U. /Imperial Coll., London /Iowa U. /Iowa State U. /Johns Hopkins U. /Karlsruhe U., EKP /LLNL, Livermore /Liverpool U. /Queen Mary, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Louisville U. /Manchester U. /Maryland U. /Massachusetts U., Amherst /MIT, LNS /McGill U. /Milan U. /INFN, Milan /Mississippi U. /Montreal U. /Mt. Holyoke Coll. /Naples U. /INFN, Naples /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /Notre Dame U. /Ohio State U. /Oregon U. /Padua U. /INFN, Padua /Pennsylvania U. /Perugia U. /INFN, Perugia /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Prairie View A-M /Princeton U. /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /Rostock U. /Rutherford /DAPNIA, Saclay /South Carolina U. /SLAC /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SUNY, Stony Brook /Tennessee U. /Texas U. /Texas U., Dallas /Turin U. /INFN, Turin /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /Valencia U., IFIC /Victoria U. /Warwick U. /Wisconsin U., Madison /Yale U.

    2006-11-30

    We study the processes e{sup +}e{sup -} {yields} (J/{psi}{gamma}{gamma}){gamma} and e{sup +}e{sup -} {yields} (J/{psi}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}){gamma} where the hard photon radiated from an initial e{sup +}e{sup -} collision with center-of-mass (CM) energy near 10.58 GeV is detected. In the final state J/{psi}{gamma}{gamma} we consider J/{psi}{pi}{sup 0}, J/{psi}{eta}, {chi}{sub c1}{gamma}, and {chi}c{sub 2}{gamma} candidates. The invariant mass of the hadronic final state defines the effective e{sup +}e{sup -} CM energy in each event, so these data can be compared with direct e{sup +}e{sup -} measurements. We report 90% CL upper limits for the integrated cross section times branching fractions of the J/{psi}{gamma}{gamma} channels in the Y (4260) mass region.

  19. Panic attacks and risk of incident cardiovascular events among postmenopausal women in the Women's Health Initiative Observational Study.

    PubMed

    Smoller, Jordan W; Pollack, Mark H; Wassertheil-Smoller, Sylvia; Jackson, Rebecca D; Oberman, Albert; Wong, Nathan D; Sheps, David

    2007-10-01

    Previous studies have documented an association of depression and phobic anxiety with cardiovascular morbidity and mortality, but little is known about the cardiovascular sequelae of panic anxiety. To determine whether panic attacks are associated with risk of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality in postmenopausal women. Prospective cohort survey. Ten clinical centers of the 40-center Women's Health Initiative. A total of 3369 community-dwelling, generally healthy postmenopausal women (aged 51-83 years) enrolled between 1997 and 2000 in the Myocardial Ischemia and Migraine Study who completed a questionnaire about occurrence of panic attacks in the previous 6 months. Cardiovascular/cerebrovascular outcomes (fatal and nonfatal myocardial infarction and stroke) and all-cause mortality were ascertained after a mean of 5.3 years of follow-up. A 6-month history of full-blown panic attacks, endorsed by 10% of postmenopausal women in this cohort, was associated with both coronary heart disease (hazard ratio, 4.20; 95% confidence interval, 1.76-9.99) and the combined end point of coronary heart disease or stroke (hazard ratio, 3.08; 95% confidence interval, 1.60-5.94) after controlling for multiple potential confounders. The hazard ratio for all-cause mortality, excluding those with a history of cardiovascular/cerebrovascular events, was 1.75 (95% confidence interval, 1.04-2.94). Panic attacks are relatively common among postmenopausal women and appear to be an independent risk factor for cardiovascular morbidity and mortality in older women.

  20. Monitoring and adverse events in relation to ACE inhibitor/angiotensin receptor blocker initiation in people with diabetes in general practice: a population database study.

    PubMed

    Mathieson, L; Severn, A; Guthrie, B

    2013-05-01

    To determine whether angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor/angiotensin receptor blocker (ACEI/ARB) initiation in people with diabetes is monitored as recommended by recent guidelines and the incidence of associated adverse renal events. Retrospective population database analysis of 4056 people in Tayside, Scotland with type 2 diabetes prescribed an ACEI/ARB between 1 January 2005 and 31 December 2009. Measurement of urea and electrolytes (U&Es) before and after ACEI/ARB initiation and renal adverse events; defined as a ≥30% rise in serum creatinine and post-initiation potassium of ≥5.6 mmol/L. Associations of adverse events with patient demographics or co-prescription of drugs with known renal effects were examined. Overall, 89% of initiations were with an ACE inhibitor. A total of 18.84% (CI 95% 18.82-18.86) of patients initiating ACE inhibitor or ARB had U&Es measured in the 90 days before initiation and within 5-14 days after initiation. Only 1.7% of patients had an adverse renal event. Patients prescribed with an ARB were less likely to be monitored than those prescribed with an ACE inhibitor, but no less likely to suffer harm. Current clinical practice of biochemical monitoring of ACE inhibitor/ARB is poor, but adverse events are rare. Further studies with serial U&Es are needed to establish the critical time window for adverse renal events and evaluate whether intensive biochemical monitoring recommended is required in low-risk groups.

  1. Biologically induced initiation of snowball-Earth events, and the circulations of ice and ocean in a globally glaciated scenario

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McPhaden, M. J.; Finn, C.; McEntee, C.; Krause, F.; Harden, J. W.; Rosenbloom, N. A.; Pendall, E.; Alves Jesus Rydin, C.; Krasa, D.; Shrestha, G.; Cavallaro, N.; Kuperberg, J.; Løvholt, F.; Horspool, N.; Cavanaugh, M. A.; Hankin, E. R.; Davis, J. L.; Evans, J. E.; Gurwick, N. P.; Richardson, R. M.; Landau, E. A.; Uhlenbrock, K. M.; Albert, M. R.; Rack, F. R.; Van Wyk de Vries, B.; Giardino, M.; Wiggins, H. V.; Habib, M. A.; Horan, P.; Stover, D. B.; Kuperberg, J.; Koch, D. M.; Jacob, D. J.; Isern, A. R.; Borg, S. G.; Ryabinin, V.; Hik, D.; Winther, J.; McConnell, W. J.; Baerwald, T. J.; Liu, J.; Winter, J. M.; Ruane, A. C.; Rosenzweig, C.; Jacobs, C. A.; Zanzerkia, E. E.; Cummins, P. R.; Harjadi, P.; Widiyantoro, S.; Natawidjaja, D. H.; Netting, R.; Grunsfeld, J. M.; Freilich, M. H.; Green, J. L.; Giles, B. L.; Stammer, D.; Wefer, G.; Lefebvre, A.; Lucarini, V.; Kanzow, T.; Goddard, L.; McCreary, J. P.; Sprintall, J.; Patterson, M.; Manduca, C. A.; Bralower, T. J.; Egger, A. E.; Klimchuk, J. A.; Nave, L. E.; Harden, J. W.; Horan, P.; Koch, D. M.; Laviolette, R.; Frost, G. J.; Middleton, P.; Uhle, M. E.; Gurney, R. J.; Impey, A.; Carroll, M.; Brown, M. E.; Escobar, V. M.; Murphy, F.; Callaghan, S.; Graber, J. R.; Lawford, R. G.; Koike, T.; Cripe, D.; Gundersen, L. C.; Valette-Silver, N. J.; Bohan, M.; Kaye, J. A.; Freilich, M. H.; Volz, S. M.; Friedl, L.; Komar, G.; Jacobberger-Jellison, P. A.; Luce, P.; Torn, M. S.; Baldocchi, D. D.; Agarwal, D.; Biraud, S. C.; Billesbach, D. P.; Humphrey, M.; Law, B. E.; Papale, D.; Wofsy, S. C.; Quadrelli, R.; Wilson, S.; Liverman, D. M.; Liss, P. S.; Killeen, T.; Watson, R.; Zebiak, S. E.; Tang, Q.; Hong, Y.; Chen, D.; Yang, D.; Rumburg, J.; Newmark, J. S.; Giles, B. L.; DeLuca, E.; Hagan, M. E.; Studinger, M.; Jezek, K. C.; Richter-Menge, J.; Lea, P.; Passalacqua, P.; Oskin, M. E.; Crosby, C.; Glennie, C. L.; Lechner, H. N.; Bowman, L. J.; Barton, T.; Uhle, M. E.; Anderson, G. J.; Fountain, D. M.; Hess, J. W.; Harper, H. E.; Gingerich, P. D.; Groffman, P. M.; Weathers, K. C.; Bernhardt, E. S.; SanClements, M.; Loescher, H. W.; Pitelka, L.; Sandgathe, S. A.; Eleuterio, D. P.; Cortinas, J. V.; McElroy, B. J.; Hsu, L.; Kim, W.; Martin, R. L.; Arrowsmith, R.; Hill, M. C.; Freymueller, J. T.; Marks, D. G.; Sztein, E.; Eichelberger, J. C.; Ismail-Zadeh, A.; Gordeev, E.; Myers, M.; Scholl, D. W.; Ackley, S. F.; Schofield, O.; Costa, D. P.; Marin, J. A.; Pilpipenko, V. A.; Vega, P.; Zesta, E.; Stepanova, M. V.; Uozumi, T.; Nolin, A. W.; Sturm, M.; Tziperman, E.; Abbot, D. S.; Ashkenazy, Y.; Gildor, H.; Halevy, I.; Johnston, D. T.; Knoll, A.; Losch, M. J.; Pollard, D.; Schoof, C.; Schrag, D. P.

    2012-12-01

    , Martin Losch, Hezi Gildor, Dan Schrag). References: Eli Tziperman, I. Halevy, D. T. Johnston, A. H. Knoll, and D. P. Schrag. Biologically induced initiation of Neoproterozoic Snowball-Earth events. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A., 108(37):15091-15096, doi/10.1073/pnas.1016361108, 2011. Eli Tziperman, Dorian Schuyler Abbot, Yosef Ashkenazy, Hezi Gildor, David Pollard, Christian Schoof, and Daniel P. Schrag. Continental constriction and sea ice thickness in a Snowball-Earth scenario. J. Geophys. Res., 117(C05016):doi:10.1029/2011JC007730, 2012. Yosef Ashkenazy et al, in prep. 2012.

  2. The dynamic relationship between current and previous severe hypoglycemic events: a lagged dependent variable analysis among patients with type 2 diabetes who have initiated basal insulin.

    PubMed

    Ganz, Michael L; Li, Qian; Wintfeld, Neil S; Lee, Yuan-Chi; Sorli, Christopher; Huang, Joanna C

    2015-01-01

    Past studies have found episodes of severe hypoglycemia (SH) to be serially dependent. Those studies, however, only considered the impact of a single (index) event on future risk; few have analyzed SH risk as it evolves over time in the presence (or absence) of continuing events. The objective of this study was to determine the dynamic risks of SH events conditional on preceding SH events among patients with type 2 diabetes (T2D) who have initiated basal insulin. We used an electronic health records database from the United States that included encounter and laboratory data and clinical notes on T2D patients who initiated basal insulin therapy between 2008 and 2011 and to identify SH events. We used a repeated-measures lagged dependent variable logistic regression model to estimate the impact of SH in one quarter on the risk of SH in the next quarter. We identified 7235 patients with T2D who initiated basal insulin. Patients who experienced ≥1 SH event during any quarter were more likely to have ≥1 SH event during the subsequent quarter than those who did not (predicted probabilities of 7.4% and 1.0%, respectively; p < 0.01). This effect was stronger than the impact of history of SH before starting basal insulin (predicted probabilities of 1.0% and 3.2%, respectively; p < 0.01) or of a history of SH during the titration period (predicted probabilities of 1.1% and 2.8%, respectively; p < 0.01). The risk of experiencing a SH event is highly dependent on a patient's immediate history of SH events and therefore the value of preventing one SH event may be substantial. These results can inform patient care by providing clinicians with dynamic data on a patient's risk of SH, which in turn can facilitate appropriate adjustment of the risk-benefit ratio for individualized patient care. These results should, however, be interpreted in light of the key limitations of our study: not all SH events may have been captured or coded in the database, data on filled

  3. Characteristics of medication errors and adverse drug events in hospitals participating in the California Pediatric Patient Safety Initiative.

    PubMed

    Takata, Glenn S; Taketomo, Carol K; Waite, Steven

    2008-11-01

    The characteristics of medication errors and adverse drug events (ADEs) in hospitals participating in the California Pediatric Patient Safety Initiative (CaPPSI) were studied to identify opportunities for improvement. Data were collected to identify pharmacy intervention medication errors (PIMEs) with significant harm potential and ADEs identified by a validated pediatric trigger method (TADEs) and by voluntary incident reports (VADEs) from November 2003 through April 2004. Electronic trigger identification was used. The primary outcomes measured were PIMEs, TADEs, and VADEs and the characteristics of these medication errors and ADEs. A secondary outcome measure was the positive predictive value of the trigger tool. The rates of PIMEs, TADEs, and VADEs were 2.67, 22.3, and 1.7 per 1000 patient days, respectively. PIMEs and ADEs occurred mostly among patients age one year or older during days 0 and 1 of admission and involved the following medication categories: antiinfectives and antibiotics, analgesics and antipyretics, and electrolytic-, caloric-, and water balance-replacement preparations. Most PIMEs involved an incorrect dosage or the wrong drug. Primary diagnoses differed between those with PIMEs and VADEs and those with TADEs. All medication processes were in need of improvement except dispensing. The trigger tool identified more ADEs than did voluntary incident reports by a factor of 11 and had a positive predictive value of 16.8%. Baseline rates of PIMEs, TADEs, and VADEs for pediatric hospitals in California were determined through collaborative efforts of CaPPSI facilities. Identification of ADEs was more effective when a trigger tool was used than when incidents were voluntarily reported.

  4. Breast cancer, endometrial cancer, and cardiovascular events in participants who used vaginal estrogen in the Women's Health Initiative Observational Study.

    PubMed

    Crandall, Carolyn J; Hovey, Kathleen M; Andrews, Christopher A; Chlebowski, Rowan T; Stefanick, Marcia L; Lane, Dorothy S; Shifren, Jan; Chen, Chu; Kaunitz, Andrew M; Cauley, Jane A; Manson, JoAnn E

    2017-08-14

    To determine the association between use of vaginal estrogen and risk of a global index event (GIE), defined as time to first occurrence of coronary heart disease (CHD), invasive breast cancer, stroke, pulmonary embolism, hip fracture, colorectal cancer, endometrial cancer, or death from any cause. For this prospective observational cohort study, we used data from participants of the Women's Health Initiative Observational Study, who were recruited at 40 US clinical centers, aged 50 to 79 years at baseline and did not use systemic estrogen therapy during follow-up (n = 45,663, median follow-up 7.2 years). We collected data regarding incident CHD, invasive breast cancer, stroke, pulmonary embolism, hip fracture, colorectal cancer, endometrial cancer, death, and self-reported use of vaginal estrogen (cream, tablet). We used Cox proportional-hazards regression models to adjust for covariates. Among women with an intact uterus, the risks of stroke, invasive breast cancer, colorectal cancer, endometrial cancer, and pulmonary embolism/deep vein thrombosis were not significantly different between vaginal estrogen users and nonusers, whereas the risks of CHD, fracture, all-cause mortality, and GIE were lower in users than in nonusers (GIE adjusted hazard ratio 0.68, 95% confidence interval 0.55-0.86). Among hysterectomized women, the risks of each of the individual GIE components and of the overall GIE were not significantly different in users versus nonusers of vaginal estrogen (GIE adjusted hazard ratio 0.94, 95% confidence interval 0.70-1.26). The risks of cardiovascular disease and cancer were not elevated among postmenopausal women using vaginal estrogens, providing reassurance about the safety of treatment.

  5. Initial events during phagocytosis by macrophages viewed from outside and inside the cell: membrane-particle interactions and clathrin

    PubMed Central

    1982-01-01

    The initial events during phagocytosis of latex beads by mouse peritoneal macrophages were visualized by high-resolution electron microscopy of platinum replicas of freeze-dried cells and by conventional thin-section electron microscopy of macrophages postfixed with 1% tannic acid. On the external surface of phagocytosing macrophages, all stages of particle uptake were seen, from early attachment to complete engulfment. Wherever the plasma membrane approached the bead surface, there was a 20-nm-wide gap bridged by narrow strands of material 12.4 nm in diameter. These strands were also seen in thin sections and in replicas of critical-point-dried and freeze-fractured macrophages. When cells were broken open and the plasma membrane was viewed from the inside, many nascent phagosomes had relatively smooth cytoplasmic surfaces with few associated cytoskeletal filaments. However, up to one-half of the phagosomes that were still close to the cell surface after a short phagocytic pulse (2-5 min) had large flat or spherical areas of clathrin basketwork on their membranes, and both smooth and clathrin-coated vesicles were seen fusing with or budding off from them. Clathrin-coated pits and vesicles were also abundant elsewhere on the plasma membranes of phagocytosing and control macrophages, but large flat clathrin patches similar to those on nascent phagosomes were observed only on the attached basal plasma membrane surfaces. These resulted suggest that phagocytosis shares features not only with cell attachment and spreading but also with receptor-mediated pinocytosis. PMID:6813339

  6. Preliminary analysis of tank 241-C-106 dryout due to large postulated leak and vaporization

    SciTech Connect

    Piepho, M.G.

    1995-03-01

    At the Hanford site in SE Washington, there are 149 single-shell tanks containing radionuclide wastes in the form of liquids, sludges and salt cakes. One of the tanks, tank 241-C-106, is heated to the boiling point due to radionuclide decay (primarily Sr-90). Water is added to the tank, which is ventilated, in order to cool the tank. This analysis assumes that there is a hypothetical large leak at the bottom of Tank 241-C-106 which initiates the dryout of the tank. The time required for a tank to dryout after a leak is of interest for safety reasons. As a tank dries outs, its temperature is expected to greatly increase, which could affect the structural integrity of the concrete tank dome. Hence, it is of interest to know how fast the temperature in a leaky tank increases, so that mitigation procedures can be planned and implemented in a timely manner. The objective of the study was to determine how long it would take for tank 241-C-106 to reach 350 degrees Fahrenheit (about 177 degrees Centigrade) after a postulated large leak develops at the bottom center of the tank.

  7. Does short-term virologic failure translate to clinical events in antiretroviral-naïve patients initiating antiretroviral therapy in clinical practice?

    PubMed Central

    The Antiretroviral Cohort Collaboration (ART-CC); Mugavero, Michael J.; May, Margaret; Harris, Ross; Saag, Michael S.; Costagliola, Dominique; Egger, Matthias; Phillips, Andrew; Günthard, Huldrych F.; Dabis, Francois; Hogg, Robert; De Wolf, Frank; Fatkenheuer, Gerd; John Gill, M.; Justice, Amy; D'Arminio Monforte, Antonella; Lampe, Fiona; Miró, Jose M.; Staszewski, Schlomo; Sterne, Jonathan A. C.

    2008-01-01

    Objective To determine if differences in short-term virologic failure among commonly used ART regimens translate to differences in clinical events in antiretroviral-naïve patients initiating ART. Design Observational cohort study of patients initiating ART between January 2000 and December 2005. Setting The Antiretroviral Therapy Cohort Collaboration (ART-CC) is a collaboration of 15 HIV cohort studies from Canada, Europe, and the United States. Subjects, participants A total of 13,546 antiretroviral-naïve HIV-positive patients initiating ART with efavirenz (EFV), nevirapine (NVP), lopinavir/ritonavir (LPV/r), nelfinavir (NFV), or abacavir (ABC) as third drugs in combination with a zidovudine and lamivudine NRTI backbone. Main outcome measures Short-term (24-week) virologic failure (>500 copies/mL) and clinical events within 2 years of ART initiation (incident AIDS-defining event, death, and a composite measure of these two outcomes). Results Compared with EFV as initial third drug, short-term virologic failure was more common with all other third drugs evaluated; NVP (adjusted odds ratio=1.87, 95%CI=1.58,2.22), LPV/r (1.32, 95%CI=1.12–1.57), NFV (3.20, 95%CI=2.74,3.74), and ABC (2.13, 95%CI=1.82,2.50). However, the rate of clinical events within 2 years of ART initiation appeared higher only with NVP (adjusted hazard ratio for composite outcome measure 1.27, 95%CI=1.04,1.56) and ABC (1.22, 95%CI=1.00,1.48). Conclusions Among antiretroviral-naïve patients initiating therapy, between-ART regimen differences in short-term virologic failure do not necessarily translate to differences in clinical outcomes. Our results should be interpreted with caution because of the possibility of residual confounding by indication. PMID:19005271

  8. High levels of the adhesion molecule CD44 on leukemic cells generate acute myeloid leukemia relapse after withdrawal of the initial transforming event

    PubMed Central

    Quéré, R; Andradottir, S; Brun, A C M; Zubarev, R A; Karlsson, G; Olsson, K; Magnusson, M; Cammenga, J; Karlsson, S

    2011-01-01

    Multiple genetic hits are detected in patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML). To investigate this further, we developed a tetracycline-inducible mouse model of AML, in which the initial transforming event, overexpression of HOXA10, can be eliminated. Continuous overexpression of HOXA10 is required to generate AML in primary recipient mice, but is not essential for maintenance of the leukemia. Transplantation of AML to secondary recipients showed that in established leukemias, ∼80% of the leukemia-initiating cells (LICs) in bone marrow stopped proliferating upon withdrawal of HOXA10 overexpression. However, the population of LICs in primary recipients is heterogeneous, as ∼20% of the LICs induce leukemia in secondary recipients despite elimination of HOXA10-induced overexpression. Intrinsic genetic activation of several proto-oncogenes was observed in leukemic cells resistant to inactivation of the initial transformation event. Interestingly, high levels of the adhesion molecule CD44 on leukemic cells are essential to generate leukemia after removal of the primary event. This suggests that extrinsic niche-dependent factors are also involved in the host-dependent outgrowth of leukemias after withdrawal of HOXA10 overexpression event that initiates the leukemia. PMID:21116281

  9. Effect of Promotional Initiatives on Visits to a Dedicated Website for Physical Activity and Non-Communicable Disease in Luxembourg: An Event Study.

    PubMed

    Lion, Alexis; Thornton, Jane S; Vaillant, Michel; Pertuy, Juliette; Besenius, Eric; Hardy, Cyrille; Delagardelle, Charles; Seil, Romain; Urhausen, Axel; Theisen, Daniel

    2017-01-01

    The Sport-Santé project and its website (www.sport-sante.lu) promote physical activity for individuals with non-communicable diseases (NCDs) in Luxembourg. Our purpose was to perform an event study analysis to evaluate the effects of communication and promotional initiatives on the number of visits to the Sport-Santé website. Between September 2015 and May 2016, the Sport-Santé website was promoted during different initiatives, including participation in health-related events or publication of articles in local journals. The daily number of visits to www.sport-sante.lu website (i.e., our outcome) was recorded using Google Analytics and compared to a counterfactual collected with its benchmarking tool. The counterfactual was defined as the daily number of visits to websites in the same field. A model was created to evaluate the relationship between the number of visits to www.sport-sante.lu website and the number of visits to similar websites during a control period with no promotional initiatives (from July 2015 to September 2015). The effect of promotional initiatives was subsequently tested, by comparing the actual number of visits to our website (up to 2 days after each event) with the theoretical number of visits predicted by the model. Twenty-two initiatives were identified, of which 11 were participations at major health-related events and 11 publications of popular science articles. Of these 22 initiatives, the event study identified 2 popular science articles and 1 interactive workshop that significantly increased the daily number of visits to the www.sport-sante.lu website. One of the two articles was published on the day before the workshop was held, which did not allow us to distinguish its specific impact. The second article was published in the main national newspaper. This is the first time to our knowledge that an event study analysis has been used to evaluate the impact of promotional initiatives on the number of visits to a dedicated website

  10. Effect of Promotional Initiatives on Visits to a Dedicated Website for Physical Activity and Non-Communicable Disease in Luxembourg: An Event Study

    PubMed Central

    Lion, Alexis; Thornton, Jane S.; Vaillant, Michel; Pertuy, Juliette; Besenius, Eric; Hardy, Cyrille; Delagardelle, Charles; Seil, Romain; Urhausen, Axel; Theisen, Daniel

    2017-01-01

    The Sport-Santé project and its website (www.sport-sante.lu) promote physical activity for individuals with non-communicable diseases (NCDs) in Luxembourg. Our purpose was to perform an event study analysis to evaluate the effects of communication and promotional initiatives on the number of visits to the Sport-Santé website. Between September 2015 and May 2016, the Sport-Santé website was promoted during different initiatives, including participation in health-related events or publication of articles in local journals. The daily number of visits to www.sport-sante.lu website (i.e., our outcome) was recorded using Google Analytics and compared to a counterfactual collected with its benchmarking tool. The counterfactual was defined as the daily number of visits to websites in the same field. A model was created to evaluate the relationship between the number of visits to www.sport-sante.lu website and the number of visits to similar websites during a control period with no promotional initiatives (from July 2015 to September 2015). The effect of promotional initiatives was subsequently tested, by comparing the actual number of visits to our website (up to 2 days after each event) with the theoretical number of visits predicted by the model. Twenty-two initiatives were identified, of which 11 were participations at major health-related events and 11 publications of popular science articles. Of these 22 initiatives, the event study identified 2 popular science articles and 1 interactive workshop that significantly increased the daily number of visits to the www.sport-sante.lu website. One of the two articles was published on the day before the workshop was held, which did not allow us to distinguish its specific impact. The second article was published in the main national newspaper. This is the first time to our knowledge that an event study analysis has been used to evaluate the impact of promotional initiatives on the number of visits to a dedicated website

  11. Deadly Choices™ community health events: a health promotion initiative for urban Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.

    PubMed

    Malseed, Claire; Nelson, Alison; Ware, Robert; Lacey, Ian; Lander, Keiron

    2014-01-01

    The present study was an evaluation of the effectiveness of Deadly Choices™ community events for improving participants' short-term knowledge of chronic disease and risk factors, and increasing community engagement with local health services. Surveys were completed directly before and after participating in health education activities (pre and post surveys, respectively) assessing knowledge of chronic diseases and risk factors at three Deadly Choices community events and four National Aboriginal and Islander Day Observance Committee (NAIDOC) events in south-east Queensland where Deadly Choices health education activities took place. An audit trail was conducted at two Deadly Choices community events in Brisbane to identify the proportion of participants who undertook a health screen at the event who then followed up for a Medicare-funded health check (MBS item 715) or other appointment at an Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander clinic in the local area within 2 months. Results were compared with a sample of participants who attended one Deadly Choices community event but did not complete a health screen. There were 472 community members who completed a pre and post survey. All knowledge scores significantly improved between baseline and follow up. Although based on a small sample, the audit trail results suggest individuals who participated in a health screen at the community day were approximately twice as likely to go back to a clinic to receive a full health check or have an alternative appointment compared with attendees who did not participate in a screen. Community events that include opportunities for health education and health screening are an effective strategy to improve chronic disease health literacy skills and appear to have the potential to increase community engagement with local Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health services.

  12. Seismic constraints on a large dyking event and initiation of a transform fault zone in Western Gulf of Aden

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, AbdulHakim; Doubre, Cecile; Leroy, Sylvie; Perrot, Julie; Audin, Laurence; Rolandone, Frederique; Keir, Derek; Al-Ganad, Ismael; Sholan, Jamal; Khanbari, Khaled; Mohamed, Kassim; Vergne, Jerome; Jacques, Eric; Nercessian, Alex

    2013-04-01

    In November 2010, a large number of events were recorded by the world seismic networks showing important activity occurring along the western part of the Aden Ridge. West of the Shulka El Sheik fracture zone, events in this large seismic swarm (magnitudes above 5) occurred in a complex area, where the change of both the ridge direction and the bathymetry suggest the propagation of the ridge into a continental lithosphere and the influence of the Afar plume. We combine several sets of data from permanent networks and temporary 3C broad stations installed after the beginning of the event along the southern and eastern coasts of Yemen and Djibouti respectively, we located more than 600 earthquakes with magnitudes ranging from 2.5 to 5.6 that occurred during the first months following the first event. The spatial distribution of the main seismicity reveals a very clear N115° -trending alignment, parallel to the mean direction of the en-echelon spreading segments that form the ridge at this longitude. Half of the events, which represent half of the total seismic energy released during the first months, are located in the central third section of the segment. Here several volcanic cones and recent lava flows observed from bathymetric and acoustic reflectivity data during the Tadjouraden cruise (Audin, 1999, Dauteuil et al., 2001) constitute the sea floor. In addition to this main activity, two small groups of events suggest the activiation of landslides into a large fan and the activity in a volcanic area 50 km due east from the main active zone. The time evolution of the seismicity shows several bursts of activity. Some of them are clearly related to sudden activities within the volcanic areas, when others exhibit horizontal migration of the events, with velocity around ˜ 1 km/h. The time-space evolution of the seismicity clearly reveals the intrusion of dykes associated with magma propagation from the crustal magmatic centres into the rift zone. Taking into account

  13. Preliminary analysis of the postulated changes needed to achieve rail cask handling capabilities at selected light water reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Konzek, G.J.

    1986-02-01

    Reactor-specific railroad and crane information for all LWRs in the US was extracted from current sources of information. Based on this information, reactors were separated into two basic groups consisting of reactors with existing, usable rail cask capabilities and those without these capabilities. The latter group is the main focus of this study. The group of reactors without present rail cask handling capabilities was further separated into two subgroups consisting of reactors considered essentially incapable of handling a large rail cask of about 100 tons and reactors where postulated facility changes could result in rail cask handling capabilities. Based on a selected population of 127 reactors, the results of this assessment indicate that usable rail cask capabilities exist at 83 (65%) of the reactors. Twelve (27%) of the remaining 44 reactors are deemed incapable of handling a large rail cask without major changes, and 32 reactors are considered likely candidates for potentially achieving rail cask handling capabilities. In the latter group, facility changes were postulated that would conceptually enable these reactors to handle large rail casks. The estimated cost per plant of required facility changes varied widely from a high of about $35 million to a low of <$0.3 million. Only 11 of the 32 plants would require crane upgrades. Spur track and right-of-way costs would apparently vary widely among sites. These results are based on preliminary analyses using available generic cost data. They represent lower bound values that are useful for developing an initial assessment of the viability of the postulated changes on a system-wide basis, but are not intended to be absolute values for specific reactors or sites.

  14. Initial Comparison Between a 3D MHD Model and the HAFv2 Kinematic 3D Model: The October/November 2003 Events from the Sun to 6 AU

    SciTech Connect

    Intriligator, Devrie S.; Detman, Thomas; Fry, Craig D.; Sun Wei; Deehr, Charles; Intriligator, James

    2005-08-01

    A first-generation 3D kinematic, space weather forecasting solar wind model (HAFv2) has been used to show the importance of solar generated disturbances in Voyager 1 and Voyager 2 observations in the outer heliosphere. We extend this work by using a 3D MHD model (HHMS) that, like HAFv2, incorporates a global, pre-event, inhomogeneous, background solar wind plasma and interplanetary magnetic field. Initial comparisons are made between the two models of the solar wind out to 6 AU and with in-situ observations at the ACE spacecraft before and after the October/November 2003 solar events.

  15. WRF prediction of two winter season Saharan dust events using PM10 concentrations: Boundary versus initial conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jenkins, Gregory S.; Diokhane, Aminita Mbow

    2017-10-01

    During the northern hemisphere winter and spring seasons Saharan dust events overspreading West Africa are frequent and linked to mid-latitude interactions. The dust events have the ability to produce low visibilities, poor air quality and can promote respiratory disease. While a number of case studies have been undertaken, the ability to forecast Saharan dust events is largely unknown. To investigate this matter, we have performed hindcasts using the weather research and forecasting (WRF) model with the Goddard Chemistry Aerosols Radiation Transport (GOCART) module, with 6-h boundary conditions from the NOAA ' National Center for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) final analysis (FNL). We use observed and forecasted PM10 concentrations to evaluate the hindcasts. The hindcasts begin with different conditions 3-8 days before two Saharan dust events where the maximum Particulate matter at 10 microns (PM10) concentrations are observed on 20 January and 7 February 2012 in Dakar, Senegal. The results show that all hindcasts are able to capture the timing of the peak on 20 January but the maximum peak during the second dust event occurs one day prior to the observed peak on 7 February with similar pattern from satellite based aerosol optical depth (AOD) estimates. The hindcasts have positive biases in PM10 concentrations relative to the observations in Dakar Senegal. The hindcasts suggest that WRF model has the potential to effectively forecasts Saharan dust events in real-time forecasts, however, they must be evaluated against additional surface PM10 observations at varying locations, which are currently sparse over West Africa.

  16. An Initial Investigation of the Orbitofrontal Cortex Hyperactivity in Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder: Exaggerated Representations of Anticipated Aversive Events?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ursu, Stefan; Carter, Cameron S.

    2009-01-01

    Orbitofrontal cortical (OFC) dysfunction has been repeatedly involved in obsessive-compulsive disorder, but the precise significance of this abnormality is still unclear. Current neurocognitive models propose that specific areas of the OFC contribute to behavioral regulation by representing the anticipated affective value of future events. This…

  17. The medical effects of postulated accidental release of radioactive material from Heysham Nuclear Power Station.

    PubMed

    Oliver, D W

    1991-01-01

    The effects of a postulated reactor accident at one of the four AGRs at Heysham, NW England, have been studied, assuming a 10% release of the radioactive core. Methods used are a computer program TIRION, analysis of the radiation doses from the Chernobyl release of 1986 and the Windscale fire of 1957. Fatal cases predicted are 200 on-site, 3000 within 30 km and 250,000 in the cloud paths over Northern England. The results would suggest the incidence of fatal cancer would increase from roughly 20% to 27% in the postulated exposed population of 3.6 million.

  18. Comparison of the initial errors most likely to cause a spring predictability barrier for two types of El Niño events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Ben; Duan, Wansuo

    2016-08-01

    In this paper, the spring predictability barrier (SPB) problem for two types of El Niño events is investigated. This is enabled by tracing the evolution of a conditional nonlinear optimal perturbation (CNOP) that acts as the initial error with the biggest negative effect on the El Niño predictions. We show that the CNOP-type errors for central Pacific-El Niño (CP-El Niño) events can be classified into two types: the first are CP-type-1 errors possessing a sea surface temperature anomaly (SSTA) pattern with negative anomalies in the equatorial central western Pacific, positive anomalies in the equatorial eastern Pacific, and accompanied by a thermocline depth anomaly pattern with positive anomalies along the equator. The second are, CP-type-2 errors presenting an SSTA pattern in the central eastern equatorial Pacific, with a dipole structure of negative anomalies in the east and positive anomalies in the west, and a thermocline depth anomaly pattern with a slight deepening along the equator. CP-type-1 errors grow in a manner similar to an eastern Pacific-El Niño (EP-El Niño) event and grow significantly during boreal spring, leading to a significant SPB for the CP-El Niño. CP-type-2 errors initially present as a process similar to a La Niña-like decay, prior to transitioning into a growth phase of an EP-El Niño-like event; but they fail to cause a SPB. For the EP-El Niño events, the CNOP-type errors are also classified into two types: EP-type-1 errors and 2 errors. The former is similar to a CP-type-1 error, while the latter presents with an almost opposite pattern. Both EP-type-1 and 2 errors yield a significant SPB for EP-El Niño events. For both CP- and EP-El Niño, their CNOP-type errors that cause a prominent SPB are concentrated in the central and eastern tropical Pacific. This may indicate that the prediction uncertainties of both types of El Niño events are sensitive to the initial errors in this region. The region may represent a common

  19. A Postulated Mechanism That Leads to Materialization and Dematerialization of Matter and to Antigravity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bearden, Thomas E.

    This document presents a discussion of the postulated mechanism that leads to the materialization and dematerialization of matter and to antigravity. The mechanism also explains why an orbital electron does not radiate energy, in contradiction to classical electromagnetic theory. One of the paradoxes of special relativity is explained. A new model…

  20. Application of a postulate based control theory for an artificial arm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacobsen, S. C.; Jerard, R. B.

    1975-01-01

    The biocontroller, remnant of the natural arm, and feedback elements must be considered in designing a controller for an above elbow artificial arm for amputees. This fundamental postulate is used to derive equations for developing the controller, which is shown in block diagrams.

  1. An Inexpensive and Safe Experiment to Demonstrate Koch's Postulates Using Citrus Fruit

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jakobi, Steven

    2010-01-01

    Citrus fruit (oranges, tangerines, grapefruit or lemons) purchased in a grocery store can be experimentally infected with readily-available sources of "Penicillium digitatum" to demonstrate the four basic steps of Koch's postulates, also known as proof of pathogenicity. The mould is isolated from naturally-infected citrus fruit into pure culture…

  2. Free Radical Halogenation, Selectivity, and Thermodynamics: The Polanyi Principle and Hammond's Postulate

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scala, Alfred A.

    2004-01-01

    The underlying ideas of the Polanyi principle and Hammond's postulate in relation to the simple free halogenation reactions and their selectivity and thermodynamics is presented. The results indicate that the chlorine atom exhibits a slightly less selectivity in the liquid phase as compared to in the gas phase.

  3. Fun Microbiology: Using a Plant Pathogenic Fungus To Demonstrate Koch's Postulates.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mitchell, James K.; Orsted, Kathy M.; Warnes, Carl E.

    1997-01-01

    Describes an experiment using a plant pathogenic fungus in which students learn to follow aseptic techniques, grow and produce spores of a fungus, use a hemacytometer for enumerating spores, prepare serial dilutions, grow and inoculate plants, isolate a pure culture using agar streak plates, and demonstrate the four steps of Koch's postulates.…

  4. Affiliation Related to Age, Gender, Identity, and Marital Status: A Confirmatory Study of C. Gilligan's Postulate.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Musser, Carolyn Sue

    Attachment and separation are concepts that depict the struggle within individuals between isolated self and involvement with others. Many authors have written about this struggle in a variety of terms. The theory evaluated by this study was elaborated by C. Gilligan (1982). It postulated that there existed two views of life experiences: one based…

  5. Fun Microbiology: Using a Plant Pathogenic Fungus To Demonstrate Koch's Postulates.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mitchell, James K.; Orsted, Kathy M.; Warnes, Carl E.

    1997-01-01

    Describes an experiment using a plant pathogenic fungus in which students learn to follow aseptic techniques, grow and produce spores of a fungus, use a hemacytometer for enumerating spores, prepare serial dilutions, grow and inoculate plants, isolate a pure culture using agar streak plates, and demonstrate the four steps of Koch's postulates.…

  6. Sequence-based identification of microbial pathogens: a reconsideration of Koch's postulates.

    PubMed Central

    Fredericks, D N; Relman, D A

    1996-01-01

    Over 100 years ago, Robert Koch introduced his ideas about how to prove a causal relationship between a microorganism and a disease. Koch's postulates created a scientific standard for causal evidence that established the credibility of microbes as pathogens and led to the development of modern microbiology. In more recent times, Koch's postulates have evolved to accommodate a broader understanding of the host-parasite relationship as well as experimental advances. Techniques such as in situ hybridization, PCR, and representational difference analysis reveal previously uncharacterized, fastidious or uncultivated, microbial pathogens that resist the application of Koch's original postulates, but they also provide new approaches for proving disease causation. In particular, the increasing reliance on sequence-based methods for microbial identification requires a reassessment of the original postulates and the rationale that guided Koch and later revisionists. Recent investigations of Whipple's disease, human ehrlichiosis, hepatitis C, hantavirus pulmonary syndrome, and Kaposi's sarcoma illustrate some of these issues. A set of molecular guidelines for establishing disease causation with sequence-based technology is proposed, and the importance of the scientific concordance of evidence in supporting causal associations is emphasized. PMID:8665474

  7. An Inexpensive and Safe Experiment to Demonstrate Koch's Postulates Using Citrus Fruit

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jakobi, Steven

    2010-01-01

    Citrus fruit (oranges, tangerines, grapefruit or lemons) purchased in a grocery store can be experimentally infected with readily-available sources of "Penicillium digitatum" to demonstrate the four basic steps of Koch's postulates, also known as proof of pathogenicity. The mould is isolated from naturally-infected citrus fruit into pure culture…

  8. Free Radical Halogenation, Selectivity, and Thermodynamics: The Polanyi Principle and Hammond's Postulate

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scala, Alfred A.

    2004-01-01

    The underlying ideas of the Polanyi principle and Hammond's postulate in relation to the simple free halogenation reactions and their selectivity and thermodynamics is presented. The results indicate that the chlorine atom exhibits a slightly less selectivity in the liquid phase as compared to in the gas phase.

  9. Evidence and Perspectives on the 24-hour Management of Hypertension: Hemodynamic Biomarker-Initiated 'Anticipation Medicine' for Zero Cardiovascular Event.

    PubMed

    Kario, Kazuomi

    There are notable differences between Asians and Westerners regarding hypertension (HTN) and the relationship between HTN and cardiovascular disease (CVD). Asians show greater morning surges in blood pressure (BP) and a steeper slope illustrating the link between higher BP and the risk of CVD events. It is thus particularly important for Asian hypertensives to achieve 24-h BP control, including morning and night-time control. There are three components of 'perfect 24-h BP control:' the 24-h BP level, nocturnal BP dipping, and BP variability (BPV), such as the morning BP surge that can be assessed by ambulatory BP monitoring. The morning BP-guided approach using home BP monitoring (HBPM) is the first step toward perfect 24-h BP control, followed by the control of nocturnal HTN. We have been developing new HBPM devices that can measure nocturnal BP. BPV includes different time-phase variability from the shortest beat-by-beat, positional, diurnal, day-by-day, visit-to-visit, seasonal, and yearly changes. The synergistic resonance of each type of BPV would produce a great dynamic BP surge (resonance hypothesis), which triggers a CVD event, especially in the high-risk patients with systemic hemodynamic atherothrombotic syndrome (SHATS). In the future, the innovative management of HTN based on the simultaneous assessment of the resonance of all of the BPV phenotypes using a beat by beat wearable 'surge' BP monitoring device (WSP) and an information and communication technology (ICT)-based data analysis system will produce a paradigm shift from 'dots' BP management to 'seamless' ultimate individualized 'anticipation medication' for reaching a zero CVD event rate. Copyright © 2016 The Author. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. The impact of user- and system-initiated personalization on the user experience at large sports events.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xu; May, Andrew; Wang, Qingfeng

    2016-05-01

    This article describes an experimental study investigating the impact on user experience of two approaches of personalization of content provided on a mobile device, for spectators at large sports events. A lab-based experiment showed that a system-driven approach to personalization was generally preferable, but that there were advantages to retaining some user control over the process. Usability implications for a hybrid approach, and design implications are discussed, with general support for countermeasures designed to overcome recognised limitations of adaptive systems. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd and The Ergonomics Society. All rights reserved.

  11. Effect of initiation-inhibition and handedness on the patterns of the P50 event-related potential component: a low resolution electromagnetic tomography study

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Recent research recognizes the association between handedness, linguistic processes and cerebral networks subserving executive functioning, but the nature of this association remains unclear. Since the P50 event related potential (ERP) is considered to reflect thalamocortical processes in association with working memory (WM) operation the present study focuses on P50 patterns elicited during the performance of a linguistic related executive functioning test in right- and left-handers. Methods In 64 young adults with a high educational level (33 left-handed) the P50 event-related potential was recorded while performing the initiation and inhibition condition of a modified version of the Hayling Sentence Completion test adjusted to induce WM. The manual preference of the participants was evaluated with the use of the Edinburgh Handedness Inventory (EHI). Results P50 showed greater amplitudes in left- than in right-handers, mainly in frontal leads, in the initiation condition. Reduced amplitudes in inhibition compared to initiation condition were observed in left-handers. Low Resolution Electromagnetic Tomography (LORETA) analysis showed lower frontal lobe activation in the inhibition than in the initiation condition in both right- and left-handers. Also, LORETA yielded that right-handers exhibited greater activation in the inhibition condition than left-handers. Additionally, LORETA showed assymetrical hemispheric activation patterns in right-handers, in contrast to symmetrical patterns observed in left-handers. Higher P50 amplitudes were recorded in right-hemisphere of right-handers in the initiation condition. Conclusion Brain activation, especially the one closely related to thalamocortical function, elicited during WM operation involving initiation and inhibition processes appears to be related to handedness. PMID:20034384

  12. Observations and modelling of soil slip-debris flow initiation processes in pyroclastic deposits: the Sarno 1998 event

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crosta, G. B.; Dal Negro, P.

    Pyroclastic soils mantling a wide area of the Campanian Apennines are subjected to recurrent instability phenomena. This study analyses the 5 and 6 May 1998 event which affected the Pizzo d'Alvano (Campania, southern Italy). More than 400 slides affecting shallow pyroclastic deposits were triggered by intense and prolonged but not extreme rainfall. Landslides affected the pyroclastic deposits that cover the steep calcareous ridges and are soil slip-debris flows and rapid mudflows. About 30 main channels were deeply scoured by flows which reached the alluvial fans depositing up to 400 000 m3 of material in the piedmont areas. About 75% of the landslides are associated with morphological discontinuities such as limestone cliffs and roads. The sliding surface is located within the pyroclastic cover, generally at the base of a pumice layer. Geotechnical characterisation of pyroclastic deposits has been accomplished by laboratory and in situ tests. Numerical modelling of seepage processes and stability analyses have been run on four simplified models representing different settings observed at the source areas. Seepage modelling showed the formation of pore pressure pulses in pumice layers and the localised increase of pore pressure in correspondence of stratigraphic discontinuities as response to the rainfall event registered between 28 April and 5 May. Numerical modelling provided pore pressure values for stability analyses and pointed out critical conditions where stratigraphic or morphological discontinuities occur. This study excludes the need of a groundwater flow from the underlying bedrock toward the pyroclastic cover for instabilities to occur.

  13. (When and where) Do extreme climate events trigger extreme ecosystem responses? - Development and initial results of a holistic analysis framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hauber, Eva K.; Donner, Reik V.

    2015-04-01

    In the context of ongoing climate change, extremes are likely to increase in magnitude and frequency. One of the most important consequences of these changes is that the associated ecological risks and impacts are potentially rising as well. In order to better anticipate and understand these impacts, it therefore becomes more and more crucial to understand the general connection between climate extremes and the response and functionality of ecosystems. Among other region of the world, Europe presents an excellent test case for studies concerning the interaction between climate and biosphere, since it lies in the transition region between cold polar and warm tropical air masses and thus covers a great variety of different climatic zones and associated terrestrial ecosystems. The large temperature differences across the continent make this region particularly interesting for investigating the effects of climate change on biosphere-climate interactions. However, previously used methods for defining an extreme event typically disregard the necessity of taking seasonality as well as seasonal variance appropriately into account. Furthermore, most studies have focused on the impacts of individual extreme events instead of considering a whole inventory of extremes with their respective spatio-temporal extents. In order to overcome the aforementioned research gaps, this work introduces a new approach to studying climate-biosphere interactions associated with extreme events, which comprises three consecutive steps: (1) Since Europe exhibits climatic conditions characterized by marked seasonality, a novel method is developed to define extreme events taking into account the seasonality in all quantiles of the probability distribution of the respective variable of interest. This is achieved by considering kernel density estimates individually for each observation date during the year, including the properly weighted information from adjacent dates. By this procedure, we obtain

  14. An advanced initiative for tracking operationally aerosol events over the last decade based on MSG/SEVIRI satellite observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrer, Dominique; Ceamanos, Xavier; Moparthy, Suman; Six, Bruno; Roujean, Jean-Louis; Descloitres, Jacques

    2017-04-01

    The major difficulty to detect properly the aerosol signal by using remote sensing observations in the visible range relies on a clear separation of the scattering components between the atmospheric layer and the ground surface. This turns to be quite challenging over bright targets like deserts. We propose a method that combines the directional and temporal dimensions of the satellite signal through out the use of a semi-empirical BRDF kernel-driven model of the surface/atmosphere coupled system. As a result, a simultaneous retrieval of surface albedo and aerosol properties (optical thickness) is performed. The method proves to be meaningful to track anthropogenic aerosol emissions in the troposphere, to monitor volcanic ash release and above all to estimate dust events over bright targets. The proposed method is applied to MSG/SEVIRI slots in the three spectral bands (VIS, NIR, SWIR) at the frequency of 15min and for a geographic coverage that encompasses Europe, Africa, and South America regions. The SEVIRI-derived optical aerosol depth (AOD) estimates compare favourably with measurements carried on over well distributed AERONET stations. The comparison with state of art MODIS-derived (Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectro-radiometer), and MISR-derived (Multi-angle Imaging Spectro-Radiometer) AOD products falls within 20% of accuracy while it reveals the capability of AERUS-GEO to depict more aerosol events still quantitatively. Owing to that, more AOD products offers new insights to better estimate the aerosol radiative forcing (ARF) from GEO compared to low-orbit elevation orbit (LEO) satellite data. The AERUS-GEO algorithm was implemented in the ICARE/AERIS Data Center based in Lille (France) (http://www.icare.univ-lille1.fr). It disseminates operationally from 2014 a daily AOD product (AERUS-GEO) at 670 nm over the MSG disk. In addition to the NRT AOD product, a long term reprocessing is also available over the last decade.

  15. Treatment effect expressed as the novel Delay of Event measure is associated with high willingness to initiate preventive treatment - A randomized survey experiment comparing effect measures.

    PubMed

    Berglund, Erik; Westerling, Ragnar; Sundström, Johan; Lytsy, Per

    2016-12-01

    This study aimed to investigate patients' willingness to initiate a preventive treatment and compared two established effect measures to the newly developed Delay of Events (DoE) measure that expresses treatment effect as a gain in event-free time. In this cross-sectional, randomized survey experiment in the general Swedish population,1079 respondents (response rate 60.9%) were asked to consider a preventive cardiovascular treatment. Respondents were randomly allocated to one of three effect descriptions: DoE, relative risk reduction (RRR), or absolute risk reduction (ARR). Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed investigating willingness to initiate treatment, views on treatment benefit, motivation and importance to adhere and willingness to pay for treatment. Eighty-one percent were willing to take the medication when the effect was described as DoE, 83.0% when it was described as RRR and 62.8% when it was described as ARR. DoE and RRR was further associated with positive views on treatment benefit, motivation, importance to adhere and WTP. Presenting treatment effect as DoE or RRR was associated with a high willingness to initiate treatment. An approach based on the novel time-based measure DoE may be of value in clinical communication and shared decision making. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  16. Skeletal-related events among breast and prostate cancer patients: towards new treatment initiation in Malaysia's hospital setting.

    PubMed

    Ezat, Sharifa Wan Puteh; Syed Junid, Syed Mohamed Aljunid; Noraziani, Khamis; Zafar, Ahmed; Saperi, Sulong; Nur, Amrizal Muhammad; Aizuddin, Azimatun Noor; Ismail, Fuad; Abdullah, Norlia; Zainuddin, Zulkifli Md; Mohd Kassim, Abdul Yazid; Haflah, Nor Hazla Mohamed

    2013-01-01

    The human skeleton is the most common organ to be affected by metastatic cancer and bone metastases are a major cause of cancer morbidity. The five most frequent cancers in Malaysia among males includes prostate whereas breast cancer is among those in females, both being associated with skeletal lesions. Bone metastases weaken bone structure, causing a range of symptoms and complications thus developing skeletal-related events (SRE). Patients with SRE may require palliative radiotherapy or surgery to bone for pain, having hypercalcaemia, pathologic fractures, and spinal cord compression. These complications contribute to a decline in patient health- related quality of life. The multidimensional assessment of health-related quality of life for those patients is important other than considering a beneficial treatment impact on patient survival, since the side effects of treatment and disease symptoms can significantly impact health-related quality of life. Cancer treatment could contribute to significant financial implications for the healthcare system. Therefore, it is essential to assess the health-related quality of life and treatment cost, among prostate and breast cancer patients in countries like Malaysia to rationalized cost-effective way for budget allocation or utilization of health care resources, hence helping in providing more personalized treatment for cancer patients.

  17. [Recurrent deep vein thrombosis and myeloproliferative syndrom: emergence of JAK2 mutation five years after the initial event].

    PubMed

    Salort, A; Seinturier, C; Molina, L; Lévèque, P; Imbert, B; Pernod, G

    2014-05-01

    JAK 2 mutation is the molecular event responsible for 95% of polycythemia cases and 50% of thrombocythemia vera and myelofibrosis cases. It can be used as a tool for the diagnosis of myeloproliferative disorders. We report a case illustrating the fact that a negative result does not definitively eliminate the diagnosis. A 40-year old woman, with a medical history of familial deep vein thrombosis, developed thrombosis of the inferior vena cava with extension to the suprahepatic veins and pulmonary embolism. No constitutional or acquired thrombophilia was diagnosed; search for JAK 2 mutation was negative. The patient was treated with fluindione. Five years later, she relapsed with popliteo-femoral and vena cava deep vein thrombosis. The etiological work-up included a PET scan which revealed diffuse uptake in bones and suspected neoplasic bone marrow invasion. Progenitor cell cultures were positive and JAK 2 mutation was confirmed. The bone marrow aspirate had the cytologic appearance of a myeloproliferative disorder. This case illustrates the fact that JAK 2 mutation can be identified several years after onset of a latent myeloproliferative disorder. Cases with a high clinical likelihood should lead to renewed search for this mutation. Secondary discovery of this mutation can be explained by a higher proportion of mutation expressing clones. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  18. Initiation and early evolution of the Franklin magmatic event preserved in the 720 Ma Natkusiak Formation, Victoria Island, Canadian Arctic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williamson, Nicole M. B.; Ootes, Luke; Rainbird, Robert H.; Bédard, Jean H.; Cousens, Brian

    2016-03-01

    Our understanding of the onset and evolution of flood basalt volcanism is rooted in the study of the character and internal architecture of its eruptive products. Neoproterozoic continental flood basalts of the ca. 720 Ma Franklin magmatic event are preserved as the Natkusiak Formation and are exposed within the Minto Inlier on Victoria Island, Northwest Territories, Canada. The 200 m volcanic succession evaluated in this study has features similar to those of other continental flood basalt provinces and consists of four volcanic units: a basal unit of laterally discontinuous flows with evidence for lava-sediment interactions, a mafic volcaniclastic deposit emplaced as a mass flow, a quartz-rich volcanic sandstone that records the re-establishment of small river channels, and a unit of thick, high-titanium tholeiitic sheet flows that mark the onset of the main phase of flood volcanism. The basal units show marked lateral thickness variations that imply the existence of paleotopography during their eruption and/or deposition. In addition, two newly discovered volcanic vent complexes within the Natkusiak succession preserve the products of explosive, vent-forming basaltic pyroclastic fall eruptions. Differences in major element geochemistry between the basal and upper basaltic flow units, in conjunction with the lithological characteristics of each volcanic unit, are used to correlate the units on a scale of over 100 km from the south of the Minto Inlier to the north.

  19. Examining the feasibility and effectiveness of a community-based organization implementing an event-based knowledge mobilization initiative to promote physical activity guidelines for people with spinal cord injury among support personnel.

    PubMed

    Gainforth, Heather L; Latimer-Cheung, Amy E; Athanasopoulos, Peter; Martin Ginis, Kathleen A

    2015-01-01

    Community-based organizations (CBOs) and support personnel that serve marginalized members of society have the potential to be important partners in knowledge mobilization (KM). A CBO in partnership with researchers developed an event-based KM initiative to disseminate evidence-based physical activity guidelines for people with spinal cord injury. The purpose of this case study is to demonstrate a) how a CBO can implement a KM initiative and b) the effectiveness of the initiative for disseminating the guidelines to support personnel. The KM initiative consisted of 12 events about the new guidelines held within the CBO's regional areas. Evaluation of the events was guided by the RE-AIM (reach, efficacy or effectiveness, adoption, implementation, and maintenance) framework. Adoption of the events was high, with 88% of regions hosting an event. Overall fidelity to the event protocol was high among researchers (100.00% ± .00), peers (65% ± 33.74), and staff (70.00% ± 34.96). The events reached 140 support personnel who attended the events. Significant increases in support personnel's self-efficacy and intentions to promote physical activity to people with spinal cord injury were seen at Time 2 but not maintained at Time 3. Event-based KM initiatives may be an effective strategy for CBOs to disseminate information to support personnel and ensure that KM initiatives are supported by staff and delivered as intended. © 2014 Society for Public Health Education.

  20. Coupled prediction of flood response and debris flow initiation during warm- and cold-season events in the Southern Appalachians, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, J.; Barros, A. P.

    2014-01-01

    Debris flows associated with rainstorms are a frequent and devastating hazard in the Southern Appalachians in the United States. Whereas warm-season events are clearly associated with heavy rainfall intensity, the same cannot be said for the cold-season events. Instead, there is a relationship between large (cumulative) rainfall events independently of season, and thus hydrometeorological regime, and debris flows. This suggests that the dynamics of subsurface hydrologic processes play an important role as a trigger mechanism, specifically through soil moisture redistribution by interflow. We further hypothesize that the transient mass fluxes associated with the temporal-spatial dynamics of interflow govern the timing of shallow landslide initiation, and subsequent debris flow mobilization. The first objective of this study is to investigate this relationship. The second objective is to assess the physical basis for a regional coupled flood prediction and debris flow warning system. For this purpose, uncalibrated model simulations of well-documented debris flows in headwater catchments of the Southern Appalachians using a 3-D surface-groundwater hydrologic model coupled with slope stability models are examined in detail. Specifically, we focus on two vulnerable headwater catchments that experience frequent debris flows, the Big Creek and the Jonathan Creek in the Upper Pigeon River Basin, North Carolina, and three distinct weather systems: an extremely heavy summertime convective storm in 2011; a persistent winter storm lasting several days; and a severe winter storm in 2009. These events were selected due to the optimal availability of rainfall observations; availability of detailed field surveys of the landslides shortly after they occurred, which can be used to evaluate model predictions; and because they are representative of events that cause major economic losses in the region. The model results substantiate that interflow is a useful prognostic of conditions

  1. Supplementary documentation for an Environmental Impact Statement regarding the Pantex Plant: dispersion analysis for postulated accidents

    SciTech Connect

    Dewart, J.M.; Bowen, B.M.; Elder, J.C.

    1982-12-01

    This report documents work performed in support of preparation of an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) regarding the Department of Energy (DOE) Pantex Plant near Amarillo, Texas. The report covers the calculation of atmospheric dispersion and deposition of plutonium following postulated nonnuclear detonations of nuclear weapons. Downwind total integrated air concentrations and ground deposition values for each postulated accident are presented. The model used to perform these calculations is the DIFOUT model, developed at Sandia National Laboratories in conjunction with Operation Roller Coaster, a field experiment involving sampling and measurements of nuclear material dispersed by four detonations. The DIFOUT model is described along with the detonation cloud sizes, aerosol parameters, and meteorological data used as input data. A verification study of the DIFOUT model has also been performed; the results are presented.

  2. Design basis for protection of light water nuclear power plants against effects of postulated pipe rupture

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-01-01

    This standard addresses the design bases for light water reactor, nuclear power plant structures and components essential for the protection of public health and safety from the potential adverse effects of pipe whip, jet impingement, pressurization of compartments outside containment, environmental conditions and flooding associated with a postulated pipe rupture. The design bases for missile protection and the design bases for containment pressurization are not within this standard.

  3. A physical theory based solely on the first postulate of relativity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, J. P.; Hsu, Leonardo

    1994-12-01

    Using the first postulate of relativity only, we develop a general theory, termed taiji relativity, which has four-dimensional symmetry and is consistent with experiments. Within this framework, the speed of light is no longer a universal constant. Thus, quantum electrodynamics has only two fundamental constants, ē and J, which are the analogues of e and h̷. Some new results are implied.

  4. Clonal analysis in recurrent astrocytic, oligoastrocytic and oligodendroglial tumors implicates IDH1- mutation as common tumor initiating event.

    PubMed

    Lass, Ulrike; Nümann, Astrid; von Eckardstein, Kajetan; Kiwit, Jürgen; Stockhammer, Florian; Horaczek, Jörn A; Veelken, Julian; Herold-Mende, Christel; Jeuken, Judith; von Deimling, Andreas; Mueller, Wolf

    2012-01-01

    To investigate the dynamics of inter- and intratumoral molecular alterations during tumor progression in recurrent gliomas. To address intertumoral heterogeneity we investigated non-microdissected tumor tissue of 106 gliomas representing 51 recurrent tumors. To address intratumoral heterogeneity a set of 16 gliomas representing 7 tumor pairs with at least one recurrence, and 4 single mixed gliomas were investigated by microdissection of distinct oligodendroglial and astrocytic tumor components. All tumors and tumor components were analyzed for allelic loss of 1p/19q (LOH 1p/19q), for TP53- mutations and for R132 mutations in the IDH1 gene. The investigation of non-microdissected tumor tissue revealed clonality in 75% (38/51). Aberrant molecular alterations upon recurrence were detected in 25% (13/51). 64% (9/14) of these were novel and associated with tumor progression. Loss of previously detected alterations was observed in 36% (5/14). One tumor pair (1/14; 7%) was significant for both. Intratumoral clonality was detected in 57% (4/7) of the microdissected tumor pairs and in 75% (3/4) of single microdissected tumors. 43% (3/7) of tumor pairs and one single tumor (25%) revealed intratumoral heterogeneity. While intratumoral heterogeneity affected both the TP53- mutational status and the LOH1p/19q status, all tumors with intratumoral heterogeneity shared the R132 IDH1- mutation as a common feature in both their microdissected components. The majority of recurrent gliomas are of monoclonal origin. However, the detection of divertive tumor cell clones in morphological distinct tumor components sharing IDH1- mutations as early event may provide insight into the tumorigenesis of true mixed gliomas.

  5. Reconstituting Initial Events during the Assembly of ApoB-containing Lipoproteins in a Cell-free System

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Z. Gordon; Liu, Yuhang; Hussain, M. Mahmood; Atkinson, David; McKnight, C. James

    2008-01-01

    Summary The synthesis of apolipoprotein B (apoB) dictates the formation of chylomicrons and very low density lipoproteins (VLDL), two major lipoprotein precursors in the human plasma. Despite its biological significance, the mechanism of the assembly of these apoB-containing lipoproteins remains elusive. An essential obstacle is the lack of systems that allow fine dissection of key components during assembly, including nascent apoB peptide, lipids in defined forms, chaperones, and microsomal triglyceride transfer protein (MTP). In this study, we use a prokaryotic cell-free expression system to reconstitute early events in the assembly of apoB-containing lipoprotein that involve the N-terminal domains of apoB. Our study shows that the N-terminal domains larger than 20.5% of apoB (B20.5) have an intrinsic ability to remodel vesicular phospholipid bilayers into discrete protein-lipid complexes. The presence of appropriate lipid substrates during apoB translation plays a pivotal role for successful lipid recruitment, and similar lipid recruitment fails to occur if the lipids are added posttranslationally. Cotranslational presence of MTP can dramatically promote the folding of B6.4–20.5 and B6.4–22. Furthermore, apoB translated in the presence of MTP retains its phospholipid recruitment capability posttranslationally. Our data suggest that during the synthesis of apoB, the N-terminal domain has a short window for intrinsic phospholipid recruitment, the timeframe of which is predetermined by the environment where apoB synthesis occurs. The presence of MTP prolongs this window of time by acting as a chaperone. The absence of either proper lipid substrate or MTP may result in the improper folding of apoB and consequently its degradation. PMID:18804479

  6. Higher-order interference and single-system postulates characterizing quantum theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnum, Howard; Müller, Markus P.; Ududec, Cozmin

    2014-12-01

    We present a new characterization of quantum theory in terms of simple physical principles that is different from previous ones in two important respects: first, it only refers to properties of single systems without any assumptions on the composition of many systems; and second, it is closer to experiment by having absence of higher-order interference as a postulate, which is currently the subject of experimental investigation. We give three postulates—no higher-order interference, classical decomposability of states, and strong symmetry—and prove that the only non-classical operational probabilistic theories satisfying them are real, complex, and quaternionic quantum theory, together with three-level octonionic quantum theory and ball state spaces of arbitrary dimension. Then we show that adding observability of energy as a fourth postulate yields complex quantum theory as the unique solution, relating the emergence of the complex numbers to the possibility of Hamiltonian dynamics. We also show that there may be interesting non-quantum theories satisfying only the first two of our postulates, which would allow for higher-order interference in experiments while still respecting the contextuality analogue of the local orthogonality principle.

  7. A Review of Inherent Safety Characteristics of Metal-Alloy SFR Fuel Against Postulated Accidents

    SciTech Connect

    Sofu, Tanju

    2015-04-01

    The thermal, mechanical, and neutronic performance of the metal alloy fast reactor fuel design complements the safety advantages of the liquid metal cooling and the pool-type primary system. Together, these features provide large safety margins in both normal operating modes and for a wide range of postulated accidents. In particular, they maximize the measures of safety associated with inherent reactor response to unprotected, double-fault accidents, and to minimize risk to the public and plant investment. High thermal conductivity and high gap conductance play the most significant role in safety advantages of the metallic fuel, resulting in a flatter radial temperature profile within the pin and much lower normal operation and transient temperatures in comparison to oxide fuel. Despite the big difference in melting point, both oxide and metal fuels have a relatively similar margin to melting during postulated accidents. When the metal fuel cladding fails, it typically occurs below the coolant boiling point and the damaged fuel pins remain cool-able. Metal fuel is compatible with sodium coolant, eliminating the potential of energetic fuel coolant reactions and flow blockages. All these, and the low retained heat leading to a longer grace period for operator action, are significant contributing factors to the inherently benign response of metallic fuel to postulated accidents. This paper summarizes the past analytical and experimental results obtained in past sodium-cooled fast reactor safety programs in the United States, and presents an overview of fuel safety performance as observed in laboratory and in-pile tests.

  8. How a Small Change in Retinal Leads to G-Protein Activation: Initial Events Suggested by Molecular Dynamics Calculations

    PubMed Central

    Crozier, Paul S.; Stevens, Mark J.; Woolf, Thomas B.

    2010-01-01

    Rhodopsin is the prototypical G-protein coupled receptor, coupling light activation with high efficiency to signaling molecules. The dark-state X-ray structures of the protein provide a starting point for consideration of the relaxation from initial light activation to conformational changes that may lead to signaling. In this study we create an energetically unstable retinal in the light activated state and then use molecular dynamics simulations to examine the types of compensation, relaxation, and conformational changes that occur following the cis–trans light activation. The results suggest that changes occur throughout the protein, with changes in the orientation of Helices 5 and 6, a closer interaction between Ala 169 on Helix 4 and retinal, and a shift in the Schiff base counterion that also reflects changes in sidechain interactions with the retinal. Taken together, the simulation is suggestive of the types of changes that lead from local conformational change to light-activated signaling in this prototypical system. PMID:17109408

  9. A Mechanistic Study of a-Amino Acid-N-Carboxy Anhydride Polymerization: Comparing Initiation and Termination Events in High Vacuum and Traditional Polymerization Techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Pickel, Deanna L; Politakos, Nikolaos; Avgeropoulos, Apostolos; Messman, Jamie M

    2009-01-01

    High-vacuum polymerization of -amino acid-N-carboxyanhydride (NCAs) affords polymers with controlled molecular weights and narrow polydispersities, however a comprehensive study of the end-group composition of the resulting poly(amino acid)s has not yet been performed. This reveals crucial information, as the end-groups are indicative of both the polymerization mechanism (i.e., initiation event) as well as the termination pathways. To this end, poly(O-benzyl-L-tyrosine) initiated by 1,6-diaminohexane was synthesized and subsequently characterized by MALDI-TOF MS, NALDI -TOF MS and 13C NMR spectroscopy to ascertain the end-group structure. Polymers were prepared by both high vacuum and glove box techniques in DMF/THF. Preparation of poly(O-benzyl-L-tyrosine) by high vacuum techniques yielded a polymer initiated exclusively by the normal amine mechanism, and termination by reaction with DMF was observed. In contrast, polymers prepared in the glove box were initiated by the normal amine and activated monomer mechanisms, and several termination products are evident. To our knowledge, this is the first rigorous and comparative analysis of the end-group structure, and it demonstrates the advantage of high vacuum techniques for polymerization of NCAs for the preparation of well-defined poly(amino acid)s with end-group fidelity.

  10. A prospective study of low fasting glucose with cardiovascular disease events and all-cause mortality: The Women's Health Initiative.

    PubMed

    Mongraw-Chaffin, Morgana; LaCroix, Andrea Z; Sears, Dorothy D; Garcia, Lorena; Phillips, Lawrence S; Salmoirago-Blotcher, Elena; Zaslavsky, Oleg; Anderson, Cheryl A M

    2017-05-01

    While there is increasing recognition of the risks associated with hypoglycemia in patients with diabetes, few studies have investigated incident cause-specific cardiovascular outcomes with regard to low fasting glucose in the general population. We hypothesized that low fasting glucose would be associated with cardiovascular disease risk and all-cause mortality in postmenopausal women. To test our hypothesis, we used both continuous incidence rates and Cox proportional hazards models in 17,287 participants from the Women's Health Initiative with fasting glucose measured at baseline. Participants were separated into groups based on fasting glucose level: low (<80mg/dL), normal/reference (80-99mg/dL), impaired (100-125mg/dL), and diabetic (≥126mg/dL). Participants were free of cardiovascular disease at enrollment, had mean age of 62years, and were 52% Caucasian, 24% African American, 8% Asian, and 12% Hispanic. Median follow-up was 15years. Graphs of continuous incidence rates compared to fasting glucose distribution exhibited evidence of a weak J-shaped association with heart failure and mortality that was predominantly due to participants with treated diabetes. Impaired and diabetic fasting glucose were positively associated with all outcomes. Associations for low fasting glucose differed, with coronary heart disease (HR=0.64 (0.42, 0.98)) significantly inverse; stroke (0.73 (0.48, 1.13)), combined cardiovascular disease (0.91 (0.73, 1.14)), and all-cause mortality (0.97 (0.79, 1.20)) null or inverse and not significant; and heart failure (1.27 (0.80, 2.02)) positive and not significant. Fasting glucose at the upper range, but not the lower range, was significantly associated with incident cardiovascular disease and all-cause mortality. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Initial Events in Infectious Salmon Anemia Virus Infection: Evidence for the Requirement of a Low-pH Step

    PubMed Central

    Eliassen, Trygve Meum; Frøystad, Marianne Kristin; Dannevig, Birgit Helene; Jankowska, Monika; Brech, Andreas; Falk, Knut; Romøren, Kristine; Gjøen, Tor

    2000-01-01

    We have investigated the initial steps in the interaction between infectious salmon anemia virus (ISAV) and cultured cells from Atlantic salmon (SHK-1 cell line). Using radioactively or fluorescently labelled viral particles we have studied the binding and fusion kinetics and the effect of pH on binding, uptake, and fusion of ISAV to SHK-1 cells and liposomes. As pH in the medium was reduced from 7.5 to 4.5, the association of virus to the cells was nearly doubled. The same effect of pH was observed when fusion between ISAV and liposomes was analyzed. In addition, the binding of ISAV to intact SHK-1 cells and to cell membrane proteins blotted onto filters was neuraminidase sensitive. However, the increased binding induced by low pH was not neuraminidase sensitive, probably reflecting activation of a fusion peptide at low pH. By using confocal fluorescence microscopy, the increased fusion of fluorescently labelled ISAV with the plasma membrane due to low pH could be demonstrated. When vacuolar pH in the cells was raised during inoculation with chloroquine or ammonium chloride, both electron and confocal microscopy showed accumulation of ISAV in endosomes and lysosomes. Production of infectious virus could be increased by lowering the extracellular pH during infection. Furthermore, chloroquine present during virus inoculation also caused a reduction in the synthesis of viral proteins in ISAV-infected cells as well as in the production of infective virus. These results indicate that ISAV binds to sialic acid residues on the cell surface and that the fusion between virus and cell membrane takes place in the acid environment of endosomes. This provides further evidence for a high degree of similarity between ISAV and influenza virus and extends the basis for the classification of this virus as a member of the Orthomyxoviridae family. PMID:10590109

  12. Re-presentations and recurrent events following initial management of the acute paediatric scrotum: a 5-year review.

    PubMed

    Lala, Shareena; Price, Neil; Upadhyay, Vipul

    2017-02-27

    Previous reviews report relatively low rates of post-operative complications for acute scrotal exploration. The aim of this study was to evaluate the re-presentation to hospital in boys with previous acute scrotal pathology, reviewing contralateral symptoms, post-operative complications, testicular torsion following fixation and failure of conservative management of testicular appendage (TA) torsion. All boys under 16 years presenting to our unit with an acute scrotum from January 2008 to December 2012 (5-year period) were identified. A retrospective review of clinical records was performed. A total of 683 boys presented over this 5-year period, with an overall re-presentation rate of 10%. Seventeen (25%) re-presentations were metachronous. Post-operative complication rate was 2.2%. Testicular torsion rate following orchiopexy was 0.3% (1/292). Thirty-three percent of those managed conservatively for TA torsion returned with ongoing pain; 80% underwent scrotal exploration on return. Eight boys returned following excision of a torted TA with contralateral torted TA confirmed, accounting for 2.6% (8/308) of boys with a torted TA at first presentation. This gives a number-needed-to-treat of 39 for bilateral scrotal exploration and prophylactic excision of contralateral non-torted TA, to prevent one boy from returning to hospital with a metachronous presentation. Further prolonged follow-up is needed to adequately assess recurrence rates of testicular torsion following orchiopexy to validate routine orchiopexy. Post-operative complication rates equal that of the return rate for a contralateral torted TA; this needs to be considered in proceeding to bilateral scrotal exploration on finding a torted TA at initial presentation. © 2017 Royal Australasian College of Surgeons.

  13. Initial Results on the Meteoritic Component of new Sediment Cores Containing Deposits of the Eltanin Impact Event

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kyte, Frank T.; Gersonde, Rainer; Kuhn, Gerhard

    2002-01-01

    The late Pliocene impact of the Eltanin asteroid is the only known asteroid impact in a deep- ocean (-5 km) basin . This was first discovered in 1981 as an Ir anomaly in sediment cores collected by the USNS Eltanin in 1965. In 1995, Polarstern expedition ANT XII/4 made the first geological survey of the suspected impact region. Three sediment cores sampled around the San Martin seamounts (approx. 57.5 S, 91 W) contained well-preserved impact deposits that include disturbed ocean sediments and meteoritic impact ejecta. The latter is composed of shock-melted asteroidal materials and unmelted meteorites. In 2001, the FS Polarstern returned to the impact area during expedition ANT XVIIU5a. At least 16 cores were recovered that contain ejecta deposits. These cores and geophysical data from the expedition can be used to map the effects of the impact over a region of about 80,000 square km. To date we have measured Ir concentrations in sediments from seven of the new cores and preliminary data should be available for a few more by the time of the meeting. Our initial interpretation of these data is that there is a region in the vicinity of the San Martin Seamounts comprising at least 20,000 square km in which the average amount of meteoritic material deposited was more than 1 g per square cm. This alone is enough material to support a 500 m asteroid. Beyond this is a region of about 60,000 square km, mostly to the north and west, where the amount of ejecta probably averages about 0.2 g per square cm. Another 400 km to the east, USNS Eltanin core E10-2 has about 0.05 g per square cm, so we know that ejecta probably occurs across more than a million square km of ocean floor. A key to future exploration of this impact is to find evidence of the ejecta at more sites distant from the seamounts. We currently have almost no data from regions to the west or south of the San Martin seamounts.

  14. Initial Results on the Meteoritic Component of new Sediment Cores Containing Deposits of the Eltanin Impact Event

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kyte, Frank T.; Gersonde, Rainer; Kuhn, Gerhard

    2002-01-01

    The late Pliocene impact of the Eltanin asteroid is the only known asteroid impact in a deep- ocean (-5 km) basin . This was first discovered in 1981 as an Ir anomaly in sediment cores collected by the USNS Eltanin in 1965. In 1995, Polarstern expedition ANT XII/4 made the first geological survey of the suspected impact region. Three sediment cores sampled around the San Martin seamounts (approx. 57.5 S, 91 W) contained well-preserved impact deposits that include disturbed ocean sediments and meteoritic impact ejecta. The latter is composed of shock-melted asteroidal materials and unmelted meteorites. In 2001, the FS Polarstern returned to the impact area during expedition ANT XVIIU5a. At least 16 cores were recovered that contain ejecta deposits. These cores and geophysical data from the expedition can be used to map the effects of the impact over a region of about 80,000 square km. To date we have measured Ir concentrations in sediments from seven of the new cores and preliminary data should be available for a few more by the time of the meeting. Our initial interpretation of these data is that there is a region in the vicinity of the San Martin Seamounts comprising at least 20,000 square km in which the average amount of meteoritic material deposited was more than 1 g per square cm. This alone is enough material to support a 500 m asteroid. Beyond this is a region of about 60,000 square km, mostly to the north and west, where the amount of ejecta probably averages about 0.2 g per square cm. Another 400 km to the east, USNS Eltanin core E10-2 has about 0.05 g per square cm, so we know that ejecta probably occurs across more than a million square km of ocean floor. A key to future exploration of this impact is to find evidence of the ejecta at more sites distant from the seamounts. We currently have almost no data from regions to the west or south of the San Martin seamounts.

  15. Measuring trauma and stressful events in childhood and adolescence among patients with first-episode psychosis: Initial factor structure, reliability, and validity of the Trauma Experiences Checklist

    PubMed Central

    Cristofaro, Sarah L.; Cleary, Sean D.; Wan, Claire Ramsay; Broussard, Beth; Chapman, Colby; Haggard, Patrick J.; Jananeh, Sara; Myers, Neely L.; Compton, Michael T.

    2013-01-01

    Past trauma and stressful events, especially in childhood and adolescence, are common among individuals with serious mental illnesses like schizophrenia. Traumatic experiences are thought to be a socio-environmental risk factor not only for poorer outcomes, but also potentially for the onset of these disorders. Because improved measurement tools are needed, we developed and studied, among 205 first-episode psychosis patients, the factor structure, internal consistency reliability, and initial validity of the Trauma Experiences Checklist (TEC), our measure of trauma and stressful events during childhood/adolescence. We assessed validity of subscales using correlations with Childhood Trauma Questionnaire-Short Form, Parental Harsh Discipline, Violence Exposure, and TEC-Informant Version scores. Exploratory factor analysis resulted in two internally consistent subscales (Cronbach’s =0.79 and 0.80, respectively), interpersonal abuse and family stress, and violence, death, and legal involvement. Scores from the former subscale were substantially associated with CTQ-SF physical, emotional, and sexual abuse (r=0.42–0.57, all p<0.001) and Violence Exposure (r=0.49, p<0.001). On the other hand, violence, death, and legal involvement scores were most highly correlated with Violence Exposure (r=0.49, p<0.001), and not with most CTQ-SF subscales. The TEC is a potentially useful tool in assessing diverse traumatic life events across various social contexts during childhood and adolescence. PMID:23850437

  16. Kidney Function and Cardiovascular Events in Postmenopausal Women: The Impact of Race and Ethnicity in the Women’s Health Initiative

    PubMed Central

    Arce, Cristina M.; Rhee, Jinnie J.; Cheung, Katharine L.; Hedlin, Haley; Kapphahn, Kristopher; Franceschini, Nora; Kalil, Roberto S.; Martin, Lisa W.; Qi, Lihong; Shara, Nawar M.; Desai, Manisha; Stefanick, Marcia L.; Winkelmayer, Wolfgang C.

    2015-01-01

    Background Kidney disease disproportionately affects minority populations including African Americans and Hispanics; therefore, understanding the relationship of kidney function to cardiovascular (CV) outcomes within different racial/ethnic groups is of considerable interest. We investigated the relationship between kidney function and CV events and assessed effect modification by race/ethnicity in the Women’s Health Initiative. Study Design Prospective cohort study Setting & Participants Baseline serum creatinine concentrations (assay traceable to isotope-dilution mass spectrometry standard) of 19,411 postmenopausal women aged 50–79 years who self-identified as either non-Hispanic white (n=8921), African American (n=7436), or Hispanic (n=3054) were used to calculate estimated glomerular filtration rates (eGFRs). Predictors Categories of eGFR (exposure); race/ethnicity (effect modifier). Outcomes The primary outcome was the composite of three physician-adjudicated CV events: myocardial infarction (MI), stroke, or CV-related death. Measurements We evaluated the multivariable-adjusted associations between categories of eGFR and CV events using proportional hazards regression and formally tested for effect modification by race/ethnicity. Results Over a mean follow-up of 7.6 years, 1424 CV events (653 MI, 627 strokes, 297 CV-related deaths) were observed. The association between eGFR and CV events was curvilinear; however, the association of eGFR with CV outcomes differed by race (P=0.006). In stratified analyses, we observed that the U-shaped association was present in non-Hispanic whites, whereas African American participants had a rather curvilinear relationship with lower eGFR being associated with higher CV risk and higher eGFR with reduced CV risk. Analyses among Hispanic women were inconclusive owing to few Hispanic women having very low or high eGFR and very few events occurring in these categories. Limitations Lack of urinary albumin measurements; residual

  17. Alternative splicing within the elk-1 5' untranslated region serves to modulate initiation events downstream of the highly conserved upstream open reading frame 2.

    PubMed

    Rahim, Gwendoline; Araud, Tanguy; Jaquier-Gubler, Pascale; Curran, Joseph

    2012-05-01

    The 5' untranslated region (UTR) plays a central role in the regulation of mammalian translation initiation. Key components include RNA structure, upstream AUGs (uAUGs), upstream open reading frames (uORFs), and internal ribosome entry site elements that can interact to modulate the readout. We previously reported the characterization of two alternatively spliced 5' UTR isoforms of the human elk-1 gene. Both contain two uAUGs and a stable RNA stem-loop, but the long form (5' UTR(L)) was more repressive than the short form (5' UTR(S)) for initiation at the ELK-1 AUG. We now demonstrate that ELK-1 expression arises by a combination of leaky scanning and reinitiation, with the latter mediated by the small uORF2 conserved in both spliced isoforms. In HEK293T cells, a considerable fraction of ribosomes scans beyond the ELK-1 AUG in a reinitiation mode. These are sequestered by a series of out-of-frame AUG codons that serve to prevent access to a second in-frame AUG start site used to express short ELK-1 (sELK-1), an N-terminally truncated form of ELK-1 that has been observed only in neuronal cells. We present evidence that all these events are fine-tuned by the nature of the 5' UTR and the activity of the α subunit of eukaryotic initiation factor 2 and provide insights into the neuronal specificity of sELK-1 expression.

  18. Modeling and analyses of postulated UF{sub 6} release accidents in gaseous diffusion plant

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, S.H.; Taleyarkhan, R.P.; Keith, K.D.; Schmidt, R.W.; Carter, J.C.; Dyer, R.H.

    1995-10-01

    Computer models have been developed to simulate the transient behavior of aerosols and vapors as a result of a postulated accident involving the release of uranium hexafluoride (UF{sub 6}) into the process building of a gaseous diffusion plant. UF{sub 6} undergoes an exothermic chemical reaction with moisture (H{sub 2}O) in the air to form hydrogen fluoride (HF) and radioactive uranyl fluoride (UO{sub 2}F{sub 2}). As part of a facility-wide safety evaluation, this study evaluated source terms consisting of UO{sub 2}F{sub 2} as well as HF during a postulated UF{sub 6} release accident in a process building. In the postulated accident scenario, {approximately}7900 kg (17,500 lb) of hot UF{sub 6} vapor is released over a 5 min period from the process piping into the atmosphere of a large process building. UO{sub 2}F{sub 2} mainly remains as airborne-solid particles (aerosols), and HF is in a vapor form. Some UO{sub 2}F{sub 2} aerosols are removed from the air flow due to gravitational settling. The HF and the remaining UO{sub 2}F{sub 2} are mixed with air and exhausted through the building ventilation system. The MELCOR computer code was selected for simulating aerosols and vapor transport in the process building. MELCOR model was first used to develop a single volume representation of a process building and its results were compared with those from past lumped parameter models specifically developed for studying UF{sub 6} release accidents. Preliminary results indicate that MELCOR predicted results (using a lumped formulation) are comparable with those from previously developed models.

  19. The Light-Velocity Postulate: The Essential Difference between the Theories of Lorentz-Poincare and Einstein

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abiko, Seiya

    2005-01-01

    Einstein, who had already developed the light-quantum theory, knew the inadequacy of Maxwell's theory in the microscopic sphere. Therefore, in writing his paper on special relativity, he had to set up the light-velocity postulate independently of the relativity postulate in order to make the electromagnetic foundation of physics compatible with…

  20. The Light-Velocity Postulate: The Essential Difference between the Theories of Lorentz-Poincare and Einstein

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abiko, Seiya

    2005-01-01

    Einstein, who had already developed the light-quantum theory, knew the inadequacy of Maxwell's theory in the microscopic sphere. Therefore, in writing his paper on special relativity, he had to set up the light-velocity postulate independently of the relativity postulate in order to make the electromagnetic foundation of physics compatible with…

  1. Guidelines for time-to-event end point definitions in breast cancer trials: results of the DATECAN initiative (Definition for the Assessment of Time-to-event Endpoints in CANcer trials)†.

    PubMed

    Gourgou-Bourgade, S; Cameron, D; Poortmans, P; Asselain, B; Azria, D; Cardoso, F; A'Hern, R; Bliss, J; Bogaerts, J; Bonnefoi, H; Brain, E; Cardoso, M J; Chibaudel, B; Coleman, R; Cufer, T; Dal Lago, L; Dalenc, F; De Azambuja, E; Debled, M; Delaloge, S; Filleron, T; Gligorov, J; Gutowski, M; Jacot, W; Kirkove, C; MacGrogan, G; Michiels, S; Negreiros, I; Offersen, B V; Penault Llorca, F; Pruneri, G; Roche, H; Russell, N S; Schmitt, F; Servent, V; Thürlimann, B; Untch, M; van der Hage, J A; van Tienhoven, G; Wildiers, H; Yarnold, J; Bonnetain, F; Mathoulin-Pélissier, S; Bellera, C; Dabakuyo-Yonli, T S

    2015-05-01

    Using surrogate end points for overall survival, such as disease-free survival, is increasingly common in randomized controlled trials. However, the definitions of several of these time-to-event (TTE) end points are imprecisely which limits interpretation and cross-trial comparisons. The estimation of treatment effects may be directly affected by the definitions of end points. The DATECAN initiative (Definition for the Assessment of Time-to-event Endpoints in CANcer trials) aims to provide recommendations for definitions of TTE end points. We report guidelines for randomized cancer clinical trials (RCTs) in breast cancer. A literature review was carried out to identify TTE end points (primary or secondary) reported in publications of randomized trials or guidelines. An international multidisciplinary panel of experts proposed recommendations for the definitions of these end points based on a validated consensus method that formalize the degree of agreement among experts. Recommended guidelines for the definitions of TTE end points commonly used in RCTs for breast cancer are provided for non-metastatic and metastatic settings. The use of standardized definitions should facilitate comparisons of trial results and improve the quality of trial design and reporting. These guidelines could be of particular interest to those involved in the design, conducting, reporting, or assessment of RCT. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Society for Medical Oncology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  2. Investigation of reactions postulated to occur during inhibition of ribonucleotide reductases by 2'-azido-2'-deoxynucleotides.

    PubMed

    Dang, Thao P; Sobczak, Adam J; Mebel, Alexander M; Chatgilialoglu, Chryssostomos; Wnuk, Stanislaw F

    2012-07-08

    Model 3'-azido-3'-deoxynucleosides with thiol or vicinal dithiol substituents at C2' or C5' were synthesized to study reactions postulated to occur during inhibition of ribonucleotide reductases by 2'-azido-2'-deoxynucleotides. Esterification of 5'-(tert-butyldiphenylsilyl)-3'-azido-3'-deoxyadenosine and 3'-azido-3'-deoxythymidine (AZT) with 2,3-S-isopropylidene-2,3-dimercaptopropanoic acid or N-Boc-S-trityl-L-cysteine and deprotection gave 3'-azido-3'-deoxy-2'-O-(2,3-dimercaptopropanoyl or cysteinyl)adenosine and the 3'-azido-3'-deoxy-5'-O-(2,3-dimercaptopropanoyl or cysteinyl)thymidine analogs. Density functional calculations predicted that intramolecular reactions between generated thiyl radicals and an azido group on such model compounds would be exothermic by 33.6-41.2 kcal/mol and have low energy barriers of 10.4-13.5 kcal/mol. Reduction of the azido group occurred to give 3'-amino-3'-deoxythymidine, which was postulated to occur with thiyl radicals generated by treatment of 3'-azido-3'-deoxy-5'-O-(2,3-dimercaptopropanoyl)thymidine with 2,2'-azobis-(2-methyl-2-propionamidine) dihydrochloride. Gamma radiolysis of N(2)O-saturated aqueous solutions of AZT and cysteine produced 3'-amino-3'-deoxythymidine and thymine most likely by both radical and ionic processes.

  3. Analysis of radiation doses from operation of postulated commercial spent fuel transportation systems: Main report

    SciTech Connect

    Schneider, K.J.; Hostick, C.J.; Ross, W.A.; Peterson, R.W.; Smith, R.I.; Stiles, D.L.; Daling, P.M.; Weakley, S.A.; Grinde, R.B.; Young, J.R.

    1987-11-01

    This report contains a system study of estimated radiation doses to the public and workers resulting from the transport of spent fuel from commercial nuclear power reactors to a geologic repository. The report contains a detailed breakdown of activities and a description of time/distance/dose-rate estimates for each activity within the system. Collective doses are estimated for each of the major activities at the reactor site, in transit, and at the repository receiving facility. Annual individual doses to the maximally exposed individuals or groups of individuals are also estimated. A total of 17 alternatives and subalternatives to the postulated reference transportation system are identified, conceptualized, and their dose-reduction potentials and costs estimated. Resulting ratios of ..delta..cost/..delta..collective system dose for each alternative relative to the postulated reference transportation system are given. Most of the alternatives evaluated are estimated to provide both cost and dose reductions. Major reductions in transportation system dose and cost are estimated to result from using higher-capacity rail and truck casks, and particularly when replacing legalweight truck casks with ''advanced design'' overweight truck casks. The greatest annual dose reduction to the highest exposed individual workers (i.e., at the repository) is estimated to be achieved by using remote handling equipment for the cask handling operations at the repository. Additional shielding is also effective in reducing doses to both radiation workers at the reactor and repository and to transport workers. 69 refs., 36 figs., 156 tabs.

  4. The impact of Westerly wind bursts and ocean initial state on the development and diversity of El Niño events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, S.; Fedorov, A. V.; Lengaigne, M.; Guilyardi, E.

    2013-12-01

    Westerly wind bursts (WWBs) that occur in the tropical Pacific near the Dateline are believed to play an important role in the development of El Niño events, even though the direct link is sometimes difficult to establish. Here, following the study of Lengaigne et al. (2004), we conduct numerical simulations in which we reexamine the response of the climate system to an observed wind burst added to a coupled model. Two sets of ensemble experiments are conducted. In the first set, the initial ocean heat content of the system is higher than the model climatology (or recharged), while in the second set it is nearly normal (neutral). For the recharged state, in the absence of WWBs, a moderate central Pacific El Niño (CP) develops in about a year. In contrast, for the neutral state, there develops a weak La Niña. However, when the WWB is imposed, the situation changes dramatically: the recharged state slides into an eastern Pacific El Niño (EP), while the neutral set shifts into a weak CP El Niño instead of previous La Niña conditions. The different response of the system to the exact same perturbations is controlled by the initial state of the ocean and the subsequent ocean-atmosphere interactions involving an interplay between the eastward shift of the warm pool and the warming of the eastern equatorial Pacific. Consequently, the occurrence of different flavors of El Niño, including extreme events, may depend on stochastic atmospheric processes, modulating El Niño properties within a broad continuum.

  5. Whole-genome sequencing of multiple myeloma from diagnosis to plasma cell leukemia reveals genomic initiating events, evolution, and clonal tides.

    PubMed

    Egan, Jan B; Shi, Chang-Xin; Tembe, Waibhav; Christoforides, Alexis; Kurdoglu, Ahmet; Sinari, Shripad; Middha, Sumit; Asmann, Yan; Schmidt, Jessica; Braggio, Esteban; Keats, Jonathan J; Fonseca, Rafael; Bergsagel, P Leif; Craig, David W; Carpten, John D; Stewart, A Keith

    2012-08-02

    The longitudinal evolution of a myeloma genome from diagnosis to plasma cell leukemia has not previously been reported. We used whole-genome sequencing (WGS) on 4 purified tumor samples and patient germline DNA drawn over a 5-year period in a t(4;14) multiple myeloma patient. Tumor samples were acquired at diagnosis, first relapse, second relapse, and end-stage secondary plasma cell leukemia (sPCL). In addition to the t(4;14), all tumor time points also shared 10 common single-nucleotide variants (SNVs) on WGS comprising shared initiating events. Interestingly, we observed genomic sequence variants that waxed and waned with time in progressive tumors, suggesting the presence of multiple independent, yet related, clones at diagnosis that rose and fell in dominance. Five newly acquired SNVs, including truncating mutations of RB1 and ZKSCAN3, were observed only in the final sPCL sample suggesting leukemic transformation events. This longitudinal WGS characterization of the natural history of a high-risk myeloma patient demonstrated tumor heterogeneity at diagnosis with shifting dominance of tumor clones over time and has also identified potential mutations contributing to myelomagenesis as well as transformation from myeloma to overt extramedullary disease such as sPCL.

  6. Dynamics of initial ionization events in biological molecules: Formation and fate of free radicals. Final technical report, May 1, 1994--December 31, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Castleman, A.W. Jr.

    1997-08-01

    Study of early time events following the absorption of electromagnetic radiation in biological systems has potentially significant impact on several areas of importance. In this context, the studies being conducted under this program provided insight into the conformational changes as well as the reactions leading to a variety of transformations that culminate from hydrogen atom and proton transfer events. These studies enabled an investigation of molecular details of structure-function relationships. In a second aspect of the program, investigations were conducted to provide basic underpinning research that contributed to a quantification of the behavior of radionuclides and pollutants associated with advanced energy activities after these materials emanate from their source and become transferred through the environment to the biota and human receptor. The approach to elucidating factors governing the difference between reactions in the gas and condensed phase was to study the initiating steps at progressively higher degrees of cluster aggregation. The author employed ultrafast laser techniques, in combination with selected molecules, carefully prepared in tailored compositions, to investigation the primary mechanisms involved in various molecular functional groups following the absorption of electromagnetic radiation. He also studied various molecules representing chromophores in such biologically important molecules as tyrosine and amines.

  7. Whole-genome sequencing of multiple myeloma from diagnosis to plasma cell leukemia reveals genomic initiating events, evolution, and clonal tides

    PubMed Central

    Egan, Jan B.; Shi, Chang-Xin; Tembe, Waibhav; Christoforides, Alexis; Kurdoglu, Ahmet; Sinari, Shripad; Middha, Sumit; Asmann, Yan; Schmidt, Jessica; Braggio, Esteban; Keats, Jonathan J.; Fonseca, Rafael; Bergsagel, P. Leif; Craig, David W.; Carpten, John D.

    2012-01-01

    The longitudinal evolution of a myeloma genome from diagnosis to plasma cell leukemia has not previously been reported. We used whole-genome sequencing (WGS) on 4 purified tumor samples and patient germline DNA drawn over a 5-year period in a t(4;14) multiple myeloma patient. Tumor samples were acquired at diagnosis, first relapse, second relapse, and end-stage secondary plasma cell leukemia (sPCL). In addition to the t(4;14), all tumor time points also shared 10 common single-nucleotide variants (SNVs) on WGS comprising shared initiating events. Interestingly, we observed genomic sequence variants that waxed and waned with time in progressive tumors, suggesting the presence of multiple independent, yet related, clones at diagnosis that rose and fell in dominance. Five newly acquired SNVs, including truncating mutations of RB1 and ZKSCAN3, were observed only in the final sPCL sample suggesting leukemic transformation events. This longitudinal WGS characterization of the natural history of a high-risk myeloma patient demonstrated tumor heterogeneity at diagnosis with shifting dominance of tumor clones over time and has also identified potential mutations contributing to myelomagenesis as well as transformation from myeloma to overt extramedullary disease such as sPCL. PMID:22529291

  8. Pathological wave dynamics: a postulate for sudden cardiac death in athletes.

    PubMed

    Pahlevan, Niema M; Gharib, Morteza

    2014-01-01

    Sudden death (SD) in young athletes is a shocking and disturbing event with significant societal impact. Previous studies have demonstrated that sudden cardiac death (SCD) is the leading medical cause of SD in athletes. Various structural and pathological cardiovascular abnormalities have identified as the underlying causes of SCD in young athletes. However, there have been reported cases of SCD in athletes with no structural or pathological cardiovascular disorders. Our proposed hypothesis in this article is that abnormalities in aortic wave dynamics and coronary wave dynamics may be responsible for SCD in these athletes. These abnormal waves-pathological waves-can act as a trigger toward cardiac death in the presence of cardiovascular diseases. These waves may initiate SCD in the absence of apparent cardiovascular abnormalities. In summary, when the aortic and coronary wave dynamics are abnormal, the myocardial oxygen demand can exceed the oxygen delivery during exercise, hence creating acute ischemia which leads to death. It is explained in this article how increased oxygen demand may be the result of pathological aortic waves while reduced oxygen delivery is mainly due to pathological coronary waves. Additionally, our pathological wave hypothesis is able to provide a plausible explanation for Commotio Cordis.

  9. A Numerical Model of CME Initiation and Shock Development for the 1998 May 2 Event: Implications for the Acceleration of GeV Protons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roussev, I. I.; Sokolov, I. V.; Forbes, T. G.; Gombosi, T. I.; Lee, M. A.

    2004-05-01

    We present modeling results on the initiation and evolution of the coronal mass ejection which occurred on 1998 May 2 in NOAA AR8210. This is done within the framework of a global model of the solar magnetic field as it was observed by the Wilcox Solar Observatory. Our calculations are fully three-dimensional and involve compressible magnetohydrodynamics. We begin by first producing a steady-state solar wind for Carrington Rotation 1935/6. The solar eruption is initiated by slowly evolving the boundary conditions until a critical point is reached where the configuration loses mechanical equilibrium. As this point, the field erupts, and a flux rope is ejected away from the Sun, reaching a maximum speed in excess of 1,000 km/s. The shock that forms in front of the rope reaches a fast-mode Mach number in excess of 4 and a compression ratio greater than 3 by the time it has traveled a distance of 5 solar radii from the surface. Thus, by constructing a fully three-dimensional numerical model, which incorporates magnetic field data and a loss-of-equilibrium mechanism, we have been able to demonstrate that a shock can develop close to the Sun sufficiently strong to account for the energization of solar particles. For this event, diffusive-shock-acceleration theory predicts a distribution of solar energetic protons with a cut-off energy of about 10 GeV.

  10. Association Between Paradoxical HDL Cholesterol Decrease and Risk of Major Adverse Cardiovascular Events in Patients Initiated on Statin Treatment in a Primary Care Setting.

    PubMed

    Hasvold, Pål; Thuresson, Marcus; Sundström, Johan; Hammar, Niklas; Kjeldsen, Sverre E; Johansson, Gunnar; Holme, Ingar; Bodegård, Johan

    2016-03-01

    Statin-induced changes in high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) are unrelated. Many patients initiated on statins experience a paradoxical decrease in HDL-C. The aim of this study was to evaluate the association between a decrease in HDL-C and risk of major adverse cardiovascular events (MACE). Data from 15,357 primary care patients initiated on statins during 2004-2009 were linked with data from mandatory national hospital, drug-dispensing, and cause-of-death registers, and were grouped according to HDL-C change: decreased ≥0.1 mmol/L, unchanged ±0.1 or ≥0.1 mmol/L increased. To evaluate the association between decrease in HDL-C and risk of MACE, a sample of propensity score-matched patients from the decreased and unchanged groups was created, using the latter group as reference. MACE was defined as myocardial infarction, unstable angina pectoris, ischaemic stroke, or cardiovascular mortality. Cox proportional hazards models were used to estimate relative risks. HDL-C decreased in 20%, was unchanged in 58%, and increased in 22% of patients initiated on statin treatment (96% treated with simvastatin). The propensity score-matched sample comprised 5950 patients with mean baseline HDL-C and LDL-C of 1.69 and 4.53 mmol/L, respectively. HDL-C decrease was associated with 56% higher MACE risk (hazard ratio 1.56; 95% confidence interval 1.12-2.16; p < 0.01) compared with the unchanged HDL-C group. Paradoxical statin-induced reduction in HDL-C was relatively common and was associated with increased risk of MACE.

  11. Risk of cardiovascular events after initiation of long-acting bronchodilators in patients with chronic obstructive lung disease: A population-based study

    PubMed Central

    Aljaafareh, Almotasembellah; Valle, Jose Ruben; Lin, Yu-Li; Kuo, Yong-Fang; Sharma, Gulshan

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Long-acting bronchodilators are mainstay treatment for moderate to severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. A growing body of evidence indicates an increased risk of cardiovascular events upon initiation of these medications. We hypothesize that this risk is higher in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease who had a preexisting cardiovascular disease regardless of receipt of any cardiovascular medication. Methods: A retrospective cohort of patients with a diagnosis of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease based on two outpatient visits or one inpatient visit for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (International Classification of Diseases, 9th Edition, Clinical Modification codes 491.x, 492.x, 496) in any year between 2001 and 2012 from a commercial insurance database. We then selected those initiating long-acting bronchodilator treatments between April 2001 and September 2012. Each patient had a 1 year look back period to determine history of cardiovascular disease or cardiovascular disease treatment from the time of first prescription of long-acting beta agonist, long-acting muscarinic antagonist, or long-acting beta agonist combined with inhaled corticosteroids. Patients were followed for 90 days for hospitalizations or emergency department visits for cardiovascular event. The cohort was divided into four groups based on the presence of cardiovascular disease (including ischemic heart disease, hypertension, ischemic stroke, heart failure, tachyarrhythmias and artery disease based on International Classification of Diseases, 9th Edition, Clinical Modification codes) and cardiovascular disease treatment defined as acetylsalicylic acid, beta blockers, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, angiotensin receptor blockers, antiplatelet, anticoagulants, calcium channel blockers, nitrate, digoxin, diuretics, antiarrhythmics or statins. Odds of emergency department visit or hospitalization in the 90 days after prescription were

  12. Guidelines for time-to-event end point definitions in sarcomas and gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST) trials: results of the DATECAN initiative (Definition for the Assessment of Time-to-event Endpoints in CANcer trials)†.

    PubMed

    Bellera, C A; Penel, N; Ouali, M; Bonvalot, S; Casali, P G; Nielsen, O S; Delannes, M; Litière, S; Bonnetain, F; Dabakuyo, T S; Benjamin, R S; Blay, J-Y; Bui, B N; Collin, F; Delaney, T F; Duffaud, F; Filleron, T; Fiore, M; Gelderblom, H; George, S; Grimer, R; Grosclaude, P; Gronchi, A; Haas, R; Hohenberger, P; Issels, R; Italiano, A; Jooste, V; Krarup-Hansen, A; Le Péchoux, C; Mussi, C; Oberlin, O; Patel, S; Piperno-Neumann, S; Raut, C; Ray-Coquard, I; Rutkowski, P; Schuetze, S; Sleijfer, S; Stoeckle, E; Van Glabbeke, M; Woll, P; Gourgou-Bourgade, S; Mathoulin-Pélissier, S

    2015-05-01

    The use of potential surrogate end points for overall survival, such as disease-free survival (DFS) or time-to-treatment failure (TTF) is increasingly common in randomized controlled trials (RCTs) in cancer. However, the definition of time-to-event (TTE) end points is rarely precise and lacks uniformity across trials. End point definition can impact trial results by affecting estimation of treatment effect and statistical power. The DATECAN initiative (Definition for the Assessment of Time-to-event End points in CANcer trials) aims to provide recommendations for definitions of TTE end points. We report guidelines for RCT in sarcomas and gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST). We first carried out a literature review to identify TTE end points (primary or secondary) reported in publications of RCT. An international multidisciplinary panel of experts proposed recommendations for the definitions of these end points. Recommendations were developed through a validated consensus method formalizing the degree of agreement among experts. Recommended guidelines for the definition of TTE end points commonly used in RCT for sarcomas and GIST are provided for adjuvant and metastatic settings, including DFS, TTF, time to progression and others. Use of standardized definitions should facilitate comparison of trials' results, and improve the quality of trial design and reporting. These guidelines could be of particular interest to research scientists involved in the design, conduct, reporting or assessment of RCT such as investigators, statisticians, reviewers, editors or regulatory authorities. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Society for Medical Oncology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  13. OVERVIEW OF MODULAR HTGR SAFETY CHARACTERIZATION AND POSTULATED ACCIDENT BEHAVIOR LICENSING STRATEGY

    SciTech Connect

    Ball, Sydney J

    2014-06-01

    This report provides an update on modular high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) accident analyses and risk assessments. One objective of this report is to improve the characterization of the safety case to better meet current regulatory practice, which is commonly geared to address features of today s light water reactors (LWRs). The approach makes use of surrogates for accident prevention and mitigation to make comparisons with LWRs. The safety related design features of modular HTGRs are described, along with the means for rigorously characterizing accident selection and progression methodologies. Approaches commonly used in the United States and elsewhere are described, along with detailed descriptions and comments on design basis (and beyond) postulated accident sequences.

  14. Existence of an information unit as a postulate of quantum theory

    PubMed Central

    Masanes, Lluís; Müller, Markus P.; Augusiak, Remigiusz; Pérez-García, David

    2013-01-01

    Does information play a significant role in the foundations of physics? Information is the abstraction that allows us to refer to the states of systems when we choose to ignore the systems themselves. This is only possible in very particular frameworks, like in classical or quantum theory, or more generally, whenever there exists an information unit such that the state of any system can be reversibly encoded in a sufficient number of such units. In this work, we show how the abstract formalism of quantum theory can be deduced solely from the existence of an information unit with suitable properties, together with two further natural assumptions: the continuity and reversibility of dynamics, and the possibility of characterizing the state of a composite system by local measurements. This constitutes a set of postulates for quantum theory with a simple and direct physical meaning, like the ones of special relativity or thermodynamics, and it articulates a strong connection between physics and information. PMID:24062431

  15. Fission product transport and behavior during two postulated loss of flow transients in the air

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, J.P.; Carboneau, M.L.

    1991-01-01

    This document discusses fission product behavior during two postulated loss-of-flow accidents (leading to high- and low-pressure core degradation, respectively) in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR). These transients are designated ATR Transient LCPI5 (high-pressure) and LPP9 (low-pressure). Normally, transients of this nature would be easily mitigated using existing safety systems and procedures. In these analyses, failure of these safety systems was assumed so that core degradation and fission product release could be analyzed. A probabilistic risk assessment indicated that the probability of occurrence for these two transients is of the order of 10{sup {minus}5 }and 10{sup {minus}7} per reactor year for LCP15 and LPP9, respectively.

  16. Fission product transport and behavior during two postulated loss of flow transients in the air

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, J.P.; Carboneau, M.L.

    1991-12-31

    This document discusses fission product behavior during two postulated loss-of-flow accidents (leading to high- and low-pressure core degradation, respectively) in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR). These transients are designated ATR Transient LCPI5 (high-pressure) and LPP9 (low-pressure). Normally, transients of this nature would be easily mitigated using existing safety systems and procedures. In these analyses, failure of these safety systems was assumed so that core degradation and fission product release could be analyzed. A probabilistic risk assessment indicated that the probability of occurrence for these two transients is of the order of 10{sup {minus}5 }and 10{sup {minus}7} per reactor year for LCP15 and LPP9, respectively.

  17. A priori postulated and real power in cluster randomized trials: mind the gap.

    PubMed

    Guittet, Lydia; Giraudeau, Bruno; Ravaud, Philippe

    2005-08-18

    Cluster randomization design is increasingly used for the evaluation of health-care, screening or educational interventions. The intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) defines the clustering effect and be specified during planning. The aim of this work is to study the influence of the ICC on power in cluster randomized trials. Power contour graphs were drawn to illustrate the loss in power induced by an underestimation of the ICC when planning trials. We also derived the maximum achievable power given a specified ICC. The magnitude of the ICC can have a major impact on power, and with low numbers of clusters, 80% power may not be achievable. Underestimating the ICC during planning cluster randomized trials can lead to a seriously underpowered trial. Publication of a priori postulated and a posteriori estimated ICCs is necessary for a more objective reading: negative trial results may be the consequence of a loss of power due to a mis-specification of the ICC.

  18. Estimation of Downstream Cesium Concentrations Following a Postulated PAR Pond Dam Break

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, K.F.

    2002-07-08

    Following a postulated PAR Pond dam break, some of the PAR Pond sediment including the cesium could be eroded and be transported downstream to the Savannah River through the Lower Three Runs Creek. Studies showed that most of the eroded sediment including the cesium would deposit in the Lower Three Runs Creek and the remainder would discharge to the Savannah River from the mouth of Lower Three Runs Creek. A WASP5 model was developed to simulate the eroded sediment and cesium transport from the Lower Three Runs Creek mouth to the Atlantic coast. The dissolved cesium concentrations at the Highway 301 bridge and near the City of Savannah Industrial and Domestic Water Supply Plant are 30 and 27 pCi/l, respectively. The concentrations at both locations are less than the U. S. Environmental Protection Agency drinking water standard of 200 pCi/l.

  19. Fritz Zwicky's Postulate of Freedom from Prejudice Considered from the Standpoint of the Theory of Knowledge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lutz, Markus

    What can we say about unprejudiced thinking as postulated by Ritz Zwicky? Freedom from prejudice in opposition to stamped by theory. How does knowledge come about? Through sense perception and thought. The phenomenon is always mediated by organs, respectively by technical instruments. Which conclusion can we draw from this fact? Is the organ of knowledge by which we know nature a part of nature? Can the dialectic materialism explain the processes of human consciousness? What is the fundamental difference between think and perceive? Has human consciousness only a share in nature or also in the spiritual world? The role of the observer in the Copenhagen interpretation. Is the quantum theory applicable to psychic phenomena?

  20. Existence of an information unit as a postulate of quantum theory.

    PubMed

    Masanes, Lluís; Müller, Markus P; Augusiak, Remigiusz; Pérez-García, David

    2013-10-08

    Does information play a significant role in the foundations of physics? Information is the abstraction that allows us to refer to the states of systems when we choose to ignore the systems themselves. This is only possible in very particular frameworks, like in classical or quantum theory, or more generally, whenever there exists an information unit such that the state of any system can be reversibly encoded in a sufficient number of such units. In this work, we show how the abstract formalism of quantum theory can be deduced solely from the existence of an information unit with suitable properties, together with two further natural assumptions: the continuity and reversibility of dynamics, and the possibility of characterizing the state of a composite system by local measurements. This constitutes a set of postulates for quantum theory with a simple and direct physical meaning, like the ones of special relativity or thermodynamics, and it articulates a strong connection between physics and information.

  1. News Conference: The Big Bangor Day Meeting Lecture: Charterhouse plays host to a physics day Festival: Science on Stage festival 2013 arrives in Poland Event: Scottish Physics Teachers' Summer School Meeting: Researchers and educators meet at Lund University Conference: Exeter marks the spot Recognition: European Physical Society uncovers an historic site Education: Initial teacher education undergoes big changes Forthcoming events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2013-09-01

    Conference: The Big Bangor Day Meeting Lecture: Charterhouse plays host to a physics day Festival: Science on Stage festival 2013 arrives in Poland Event: Scottish Physics Teachers' Summer School Meeting: Researchers and educators meet at Lund University Conference: Exeter marks the spot Recognition: European Physical Society uncovers an historic site Education: Initial teacher education undergoes big changes Forthcoming events

  2. Effect of Microgravity on Early Events of Biological Nitrogen Fixation in Medicago Truncatula: Initial Results from the SyNRGE Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stutte, Gary W.; Roberts, Michael S.

    2011-01-01

    SyNRGE (Symbiotic Nodulation in a Reduced Gravity Environment) was a sortie mission on STS-135 in the Biological Research in Canisters (BRIC) hardware to study the effect of microgravity on a plant-microbe symbiosis resulting in biological nitrogen fixation. Medicago truncatula, a model species of the legume family, was inoculated with its bacterial symbiont, Sinorhizobium meliloti, to observe early events associated with infection and nodulation in Petri Dish Fixation Units (PDFUs). Two sets of experiments were conducted in orbit and in 24-hour delayed ground controls. Experiment one was designed to determine if S. meliloti infect M. truncatula and initiate physiological changes associated with nodule formation. Roots of five-day-old M. truncatula cultivar Jemalong A17 (Enodll::gus) were inoculated 24 hr before launch with either S. meliloti strain 1021 or strain ABS7 and integrated into BRIC-PDFU hardware placed in a 4 C Cold Bag for launch on Atlantis. Inoculated plants and uninoculated controls were maintained in the dark at ambient temperature in the middeck of STS-135 for 11 days before fixation in RNAlater(tM) by crew activation of the PDFU. Experiment two was designed to determine if microgravity altered the process of bacterial infection and host plant nodule formation. Seeds of two M. truncatula cultivar Jemalong A17 lines, the Enodll::gus used in experiment 1, and SUNN, a super-nodulating mutant of A17, were germinated on orbit for 11 days in the middeck cabin and returned to Earth alive inside of BRIC-PDFU's at 4 C. S. meliloti strains 1021 and ABS7 were cultivated separately in broth culture on orbit and also returned to Earth alive. After landing, flight- and groundgrown plants and bacteria were transferred from BRIC-PDFU's into Nunc(tm) 4-well plates for reciprocity crosses. Rates of plant growth and nodule development on Buffered Nodulation Medium (lacking nitrogen) were measured for 14 days. Preliminary analysis' of Experiment 1 confirms that

  3. Fulfilling Koch's postulates confirms the mycotic origin of Lethargic Crab Disease.

    PubMed

    Orélis-Ribeiro, Raphael; Boeger, Walter A; Vicente, Vânia A; Chammas, Marcelo; Ostrensky, Antonio

    2011-03-01

    In the northeast region of the Brazilian coast, a disease has been causing massive mortalities of populations of the mangrove land crab, Ucides cordatus (L.) since 1997. The clinical signs of this disease, which include lethargy and ataxia, led to the disease being termed Lethargic Crab Disease (LCD). Evidence from a variety of sources indicates that there is an association between LCD and a new species of black yeast, Exophiala cancerae de Hoog, Vicente, Najafzadeh, Badali, Seyedmousavi & Boeger. This study tests this putative correlation through in vivo experiments. Disease-free specimens of U. cordatus were experimentally infected with Exophiala cancerae (strain CBS 120420) isolate. During the 30-day experimental period, only a single death was observed within the control crabs. However, at the end of this period, crabs that were inoculated once or three-times with mycelial elements and hyphae of E. cancerae had a 60% and 50% mortality rates, respectively (n = 6 and n = 5). These results support that the fungal agent is pathogenic and is the causative agent of LCD. Species-specific molecular markers confirm the presence of E. cancerae (strain CBS 120420) in recovered colonies and tissue samples from the infected animals. The experimentally infected crabs manifested signs (lethargy, ataxia and tetany) that were consistent to LCD-affected animals in the environment. These results fulfil Koch's postulates and the hypothesis that the tested strain of Exophiala cancerae is a causative agent of LCD is accepted.

  4. Analysis of pressurization of plutonium oxide storage vials during a postulated fire

    SciTech Connect

    Laurinat, J.; Kesterson, M.; Hensel, S.

    2015-02-10

    The documented safety analysis for the Savannah River Site evaluates the consequences of a postulated 1000 °C fire in a glovebox. The radiological dose consequences for a pressurized release of plutonium oxide powder during such a fire depend on the maximum pressure that is attained inside the oxide storage vial. To enable evaluation of the dose consequences, pressure transients and venting flow rates have been calculated for exposure of the storage vial to the fire. A standard B vial with a capacity of approximately 8 cc was selected for analysis. The analysis compares the pressurization rate from heating and evaporation of moisture adsorbed onto the plutonium oxide contents of the vial with the pressure loss due to venting of gas through the threaded connection between the vial cap and body. Tabulated results from the analysis include maximum pressures, maximum venting velocities, and cumulative vial volumes vented during the first 10 minutes of the fire transient. Results are obtained for various amounts of oxide in the vial, various amounts of adsorbed moisture, different vial orientations, and different surface fire exposures.

  5. Analysis of a Schnute postulate-based unified growth mode for model selection in evolutionary computations

    PubMed Central

    Bentil, D.E.; Osei, B.M.; Ellingwood, C.D.; Hoffmann, J.P.

    2007-01-01

    In order to evaluate the feasibility of a combined evolutionary algorithm-information theoretic approach to select the best model from a set of candidate invasive species models in ecology, and/or to evolve the most parsimonious model from a suite of competing models by comparing their relative performance, it is prudent to use a unified model that covers a myriad of situations. Using Schnute’s postulates as a starting point, we present a single, unified model for growth that can be successfully utilized for model selection in evolutionary computations. Depending on the parameter settings, the unified equation can describe several growth mechanisms. Such a generalized model mechanism, which encompasses a suite of competing models, can be successfully implemented in evolutionary computational algorithms to evolve the most parsimonious model that best fits ground truth data. We have done exactly this by testing the effectiveness of our reaction-diffusion-advection (RDA) model in an evolutionary computation model selection algorithm. The algorithm was validated (with success) against field data sets of the Zebra mussel invasion of Lake Champlain in the United States. PMID:17197072

  6. Transient behavior of a scaled RCCS test facility under postulated fault and accident scenarios

    SciTech Connect

    Lisowski, Darius D.; Hu, Rui; Bucknor, Matthew D.; Gerardi, Craig D.; Farmer, Mitch T.

    2016-01-01

    Tests were performed on the Natural convection Shutdown heat removal Test Facility (NSTF) to simulate design basis accident and postulated fault scenarios. Residing at Argonne National Laboratory, the NSTF stands nearly 26-m in total height and reflects a ½ scale reactor cavity cooling system (RCCS) for high temperature gas cooled reactors. The following manuscript details three test conditions performed on the experimental test facility. The first simulated the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) boundary condition during depressurized conduction cool down accident with small primary leak, and was repeated during both winter and summer seasons. The second examined a short-circuit break between the inlet and outlet flow paths, and was performed in three incremental stages of nominal flow area break size. The third and final test case studied system behavior with varying amounts of cooling channel blockages, up to and including 50% flow areas. Nominal component temperatures, heat removal performance, and system stability will be presented to characterize the behavior at these conditions.

  7. Preliminary risks associated with postulated tritium release from production reactor operation

    SciTech Connect

    O'Kula, K.R.; Horton, W.H.

    1988-01-01

    The Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA) of Savannah River Plant (SRP) reactor operation is assessing the off-site risk due to tritium releases during postulated full or partial loss of heavy water moderator accidents. Other sources of tritium in the reactor are less likely to contribute to off-site risk in non-fuel melting accident scenarios. Preliminary determination of the frequency of average partial moderator loss (including incidents with leaks as small as .5 kg) yields an estimate of /approximately/1 per reactor year. The full moderator loss frequency is conservatively chosen as 5 /times/ 10/sup /minus/3/ per reactor year. Conditional consequences, determined with a version of the MACCS code modified to handle tritium, are found to be insignificant. The 95th percentile individual cancer risk is 4 /times/ 10/sup /minus/8/ per reactor year within 16 km of the release point. The full moderator loss accident contributes about 75% of the evaluated risks. 13 refs., 4 figs., 5 tabs.

  8. A Solution NMR Investigation into the Early Events of Amelogenin Nanosphere Self-Assembly Initiated with Sodium Chloride or Calcium Chloride†

    PubMed Central

    Buchko, Garry W.; Tarasevich, Barbara J.; Bekhazi, Jacky; Snead, Malcolm L.; Shaw, Wendy J.

    2009-01-01

    Using solution-state NMR spectroscopy, new insights into the early events governing amelogenin supramolecular self-assembly have been identified using sodium chloride and calcium chloride to trigger the association. Two-dimensional 1H–15N HSQC spectra were recorded for 15N- and 13C-labeled murine amelogenin as a function of increasing NaCl and CaCl2 concentration beginning with solution conditions of 2% acetic acid at pH 3.0, where amelogenin was monomeric. Residue specific changes in molecular dynamics, manifested by the reduction in intensity and disappearance of 1H–15N HSQC cross-peaks, were observed with the addition of either salt to the protein. With increasing NaCl concentrations, residues between T21 and R31 near the N-terminus were affected first, suggesting that these residues may initiate amelogenin dimerization, the first step in nanosphere assembly. At higher NaCl concentrations, more residues near the N-terminus (Y12–I51) were affected, and with further additions of NaCl, residues near the C-terminus (L141–T171) began to show a similar change in molecular dynamics. With increasing CaCl2 concentrations, a similar stepwise change in molecular dynamics involving essentially the same set of amelogenin residues was observed. As the concentration of either salt was increased, a concomitant increase in the estimated overall rotational correlation time (τc) was observed, consistent with assembly. Self-assembly into a dimer or trimer was established with dynamic light scattering studies under similar conditions that showed an increase in diameter of the smallest species from 4.1 nm in the absence of salt to ~10 nm in the presence of salt. These results suggest a possible stepwise interaction mechanism, starting with the N-terminus and followed by the C-terminus, leading to amelogenin nanosphere assembly. PMID:19086270

  9. A solution NMR investigation into the early events of amelogenin nanosphere self-assembly initiated with sodium chloride or calcium chloride.

    PubMed

    Buchko, Garry W; Tarasevich, Barbara J; Bekhazi, Jacky; Snead, Malcolm L; Shaw, Wendy J

    2008-12-16

    Using solution-state NMR spectroscopy, new insights into the early events governing amelogenin supramolecular self-assembly have been identified using sodium chloride and calcium chloride to trigger the association. Two-dimensional 1H-15N HSQC spectra were recorded for 15N- and 13C-labeled murine amelogenin as a function of increasing NaCl and CaCl2 concentration beginning with solution conditions of 2% acetic acid at pH 3.0, where amelogenin was monomeric. Residue specific changes in molecular dynamics, manifested by the reduction in intensity and disappearance of 1H-15N HSQC cross-peaks, were observed with the addition of either salt to the protein. With increasing NaCl concentrations, residues between T21 and R31 near the N-terminus were affected first, suggesting that these residues may initiate amelogenin dimerization, the first step in nanosphere assembly. At higher NaCl concentrations, more residues near the N-terminus (Y12-I51) were affected, and with further additions of NaCl, residues near the C-terminus (L141-T171) began to show a similar change in molecular dynamics. With increasing CaCl2 concentrations, a similar stepwise change in molecular dynamics involving essentially the same set of amelogenin residues was observed. As the concentration of either salt was increased, a concomitant increase in the estimated overall rotational correlation time (tau(c)) was observed, consistent with assembly. Self-assembly into a dimer or trimer was established with dynamic light scattering studies under similar conditions that showed an increase in diameter of the smallest species from 4.1 nm in the absence of salt to 10 nm in the presence of salt. These results suggest a possible stepwise interaction mechanism, starting with the N-terminus and followed by the C-terminus, leading to amelogenin nanosphere assembly.

  10. Rapid inhibition of pyruvate dehydrogenase: an initiating event in high dietary fat-induced loss of metabolic flexibility in the heart.

    PubMed

    Crewe, Clair; Kinter, Michael; Szweda, Luke I

    2013-01-01

    Cardiac function depends on the ability to switch between fatty acid and glucose oxidation for energy production in response to changes in substrate availability and energetic stress. In obese and diabetic individuals, increased reliance on fatty acids and reduced metabolic flexibility are thought to contribute to the development of cardiovascular disease. Mechanisms by which cardiac mitochondria contribute to diet-induced metabolic inflexibility were investigated. Mice were fed a high fat or low fat diet for 1 d, 1 wk, and 20 wk. Cardiac mitochondria isolated from mice fed a high fat diet displayed a diminished ability to utilize the glycolytically derived substrate pyruvate. This response was rapid, occurring within the first day on the diet, and persisted for up to 20 wk. A selective increase in the expression of pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase 4 and inhibition of pyruvate dehydrogenase are responsible for the rapid suppression of pyruvate utilization. An important consequence is that pyruvate dehydrogenase is sensitized to inhibition when mitochondria respire in the presence of fatty acids. Additionally, increased expression of pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase 4 preceded any observed diet-induced reductions in the levels of glucose transporter type 4 and glycolytic enzymes and, as judged by Akt phosphorylation, insulin signaling. Importantly, diminished insulin signaling evident at 1 wk on the high fat diet did not occur in pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase 4 knockout mice. Dietary intervention leads to a rapid decline in pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase 4 levels and recovery of pyruvate dehydrogenase activity indicating an additional form of regulation. Finally, an overnight fast elicits a metabolic response similar to that induced by high dietary fat obscuring diet-induced metabolic changes. Thus, our data indicate that diet-induced inhibition of pyruvate dehydrogenase may be an initiating event in decreased oxidation of glucose and increased reliance of the heart on

  11. Acute deep brain stimulation in the thalamic reticular nucleus protects against acute stress and modulates initial events of adult hippocampal neurogenesis.

    PubMed

    Magdaleno-Madrigal, Víctor Manuel; Pantoja-Jiménez, Christopher Rodrigo; Bazaldúa, Adrián; Fernández-Mas, Rodrigo; Almazán-Alvarado, Salvador; Bolaños-Alejos, Fernanda; Ortíz-López, Leonardo; Ramírez-Rodriguez, Gerardo Bernabé

    2016-11-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) is used as an alternative therapeutic procedure for pharmacoresistant psychiatric disorders. Recently the thalamic reticular nucleus (TRN) gained attention due to the description of a novel pathway from the amygdala to this nucleus suggesting that may be differentially disrupted in mood disorders. The limbic system is implicated in the regulation of these disorders that are accompanied by neuroplastic changes. The hippocampus is highly plastic and shows the generation of new neurons, process affected by stress but positively regulated by antidepressant drugs. We explored the impact of applying acute DBS to the TRN (DBS-TRN) in male Wistar rats exposed to acute stress caused by the forced-swim Porsolt's test (FST) and on initial events of hippocampal neurogenesis. After the first session of forced-swim, rats were randomly subdivided in a DBS-TRN and a Sham group. Stimulated rats received 10min of DBS, thus the depressant-like behavior reflected as immobility was evaluated in the second session of forced-swim. Locomotricity was evaluated in the open field test. Cell proliferation and doublecortin-associated cells were quantified in the hippocampus of other cohorts of rats. No effects of electrode implantation were found in locomotricity. Acute DBS-TRN reduced immobility in comparison to the Sham group (p<0.001). DBS-TRN increased cell proliferation (Ki67 or BrdU-positive cells; p=0.02, p=0.02) and the number of doublecortin-cells compared to the Sham group (p<0.02). Similar effects were found in rats previously exposed to the first session of forced-swim. Our data could suggest that TRN brain region may be a promising target for DBS to treat intractable depression.

  12. Assessment of potential doses to workers during postulated accident conditions at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Hoover, M.D.; Farrell, R.F.; Newton, G.J.

    1995-12-01

    The recent 1995 WIPP Safety Analysis Report (SAR) Update provided detailed analyses of potential radiation doses to members of the public at the site boundary during postulated accident scenarios at the U.S. Department of Energy`s Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). The SAR Update addressed the complete spectrum of potential accidents associated with handling and emplacing transuranic waste at WIPP, including damage to waste drums from fires, punctures, drops, and other disruptions. The report focused on the adequacy of the multiple layers of safety practice ({open_quotes}defense-in-depth{close_quotes}) at WIPP, which are designed to (1) reduce the likelihood of accidents and (2) limit the consequences of those accidents. The safeguards which contribute to defense-in-depth at WIPP include a substantial array of inherent design features, engineered controls, and administrative procedures. The SAR Update confirmed that the defense-in-depth at WIPP is adequate to assure the protection of the public and environment. As a supplement to the 1995 SAR Update, we have conducted additional analyses to confirm that these controls will also provide adequate protection to workers at the WIPP. The approaches and results of the worker dose assessment are summarized here. In conformance with the guidance of DOE Standard 3009-94, we emphasize that use of these evaluation guidelines is not intended to imply that these numbers constitute acceptable limits for worker exposures under accident conditions. However, in conjunction with the extensive safety assessment in the 1995 SAR Update, these results indicate that the Carlsbad Area Office strategy for the assessment of hazards and accidents assures the protection of workers, members of the public, and the environment.

  13. Risk stratification for the development of respiratory adverse events following vascular surgery using the Society of Vascular Surgery's Vascular Quality Initiative.

    PubMed

    Genovese, Elizabeth A; Fish, Larry; Chaer, Rabih A; Makaroun, Michel S; Baril, Donald T

    2017-02-01

    Postoperative respiratory adverse events (RAEs) are associated with high rates of morbidity and mortality in general surgery, however, little is known about these complications in the vascular surgery population, a frail subset with multiple comorbidities. The objective of this study was to describe the contemporary incidence of RAEs in vascular surgery patients, the risk factors for this complication, and the overall impact of RAEs on patient outcomes. The Vascular Quality Initiative was queried (2003-2014) for patients who underwent endovascular abdominal aortic repair, open abdominal aortic aneurysm repair, thoracic endovascular aortic repair, suprainguinal bypass, or infrainguinal bypass. A mixed-effects logistic regression model determined the independent risk factors for RAEs. Using a random 85% of the cohort, a risk prediction score for RAEs was created, and the score was validated using the remaining 15% of the cohort, comparing the predicted to the actual incidence of RAE and determining the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve. The independent risk of in-hospital mortality and discharge to a nursing facility associated with RAEs was determined using a mixed-effects logistic regression to control for baseline patient characteristics, operative variables, and other postoperative adverse events. The cohort consisted of 52,562 patients, with a 5.4% incidence of RAEs. The highest rates of RAEs were seen in current smokers (6.1%), recent acute myocardial infarction (10.1%), symptomatic congestive heart failure (9.9%), chronic obstructive pulmonary disease requiring oxygen therapy (11.0%), urgent and emergent procedures (6.4% and 25.9%, respectively), open abdominal aortic aneurysm repairs (17.6%), in situ suprainguinal bypasses (9.68%), and thoracic endovascular aortic repairs (9.6%). The variables included in the risk prediction score were age, body mass index, smoking status, congestive heart failure severity, chronic obstructive pulmonary

  14. Range Variability of Bed Shear Stress: a Postulate for Stream Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paik, K.; Kumar, P.

    2004-12-01

    Over the past decades, efforts to discover possible natural laws that drive the fluvial landscape evolution have led to countless hypotheses, such as minimum variance, minimum energy dissipation rate, minimum Froude number etc. However, these extremal theory based formulations have had limited degrees of success in explaining the various natural formations such as stream network, plan form, hydraulic geometry, grain size distribution along stream, and bed profile. We postulate, based on channel equilibrium theory, that the nature seeks a certain range of stability constrained by multiple thresholds of bed shear stress to avoid both systematic erosion and deposition. This argument especially questions the validity of the extremal hypotheses which pursue single objectives. To test the adequacy of this `range variability' theory, a 1-D stream evolution model, considering the bed shear stress as the control variable, is developed. For constant discharge above certain value, this model shows bed erosion which results in flatter and linear bed profile. The downstream variation of discharge seems a key for generating concave bed profiles. As discharge Q varies as Q∝ xθ where x is the distance from the headwater, regardless of {θ } and width variation, the concave bed profile forms as the slope S∝ Qz. The exponent z widely varies depending on {θ } and width variation. However, z approaches -0.3 for {θ } in the range 1.5 and 2, regardless of width variation. This signifies that {θ } between 1.5 and 2 is the necessary condition to induce concave bed profile evolution resulting in z close to -0.3, under the `range variability' theory. It is noteworthy that these values of {θ } and z correspond to the observed values for natural streams. When width varies downstream as W∝ Q0.5, the stream evolution shows downstream hydraulic geometry very close to the observed relationships, i.e. V∝ Q0.1 and H∝ Q0.4. These agreements with observation support the validity of

  15. Guidelines for time-to-event end-point definitions in trials for pancreatic cancer. Results of the DATECAN initiative (Definition for the Assessment of Time-to-event End-points in CANcer trials).

    PubMed

    Bonnetain, Franck; Bonsing, Bert; Conroy, Thierry; Dousseau, Adelaide; Glimelius, Bengt; Haustermans, Karin; Lacaine, François; Van Laethem, Jean Luc; Aparicio, Thomas; Aust, Daniela; Bassi, Claudio; Berger, Virginie; Chamorey, Emmanuel; Chibaudel, Benoist; Dahan, Laeticia; De Gramont, Aimery; Delpero, Jean Robert; Dervenis, Christos; Ducreux, Michel; Gal, Jocelyn; Gerber, Erich; Ghaneh, Paula; Hammel, Pascal; Hendlisz, Alain; Jooste, Valérie; Labianca, Roberto; Latouche, Aurelien; Lutz, Manfred; Macarulla, Teresa; Malka, David; Mauer, Muriel; Mitry, Emmanuel; Neoptolemos, John; Pessaux, Patrick; Sauvanet, Alain; Tabernero, Josep; Taieb, Julien; van Tienhoven, Geertjan; Gourgou-Bourgade, Sophie; Bellera, Carine; Mathoulin-Pélissier, Simone; Collette, Laurence

    2014-11-01

    Using potential surrogate end-points for overall survival (OS) such as Disease-Free- (DFS) or Progression-Free Survival (PFS) is increasingly common in randomised controlled trials (RCTs). However, end-points are too often imprecisely defined which largely contributes to a lack of homogeneity across trials, hampering comparison between them. The aim of the DATECAN (Definition for the Assessment of Time-to-event End-points in CANcer trials)-Pancreas project is to provide guidelines for standardised definition of time-to-event end-points in RCTs for pancreatic cancer. Time-to-event end-points currently used were identified from a literature review of pancreatic RCT trials (2006-2009). Academic research groups were contacted for participation in order to select clinicians and methodologists to participate in the pilot and scoring groups (>30 experts). A consensus was built after 2 rounds of the modified Delphi formal consensus approach with the Rand scoring methodology (range: 1-9). For pancreatic cancer, 14 time to event end-points and 25 distinct event types applied to two settings (detectable disease and/or no detectable disease) were considered relevant and included in the questionnaire sent to 52 selected experts. Thirty experts answered both scoring rounds. A total of 204 events distributed over the 14 end-points were scored. After the first round, consensus was reached for 25 items; after the second consensus was reached for 156 items; and after the face-to-face meeting for 203 items. The formal consensus approach reached the elaboration of guidelines for standardised definitions of time-to-event end-points allowing cross-comparison of RCTs in pancreatic cancer. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Aesthetic Response: An Overview of Selected Theories and the Postulation of a Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    King, Alison

    In response to a growing interest among educators in improving aesthetic education, this paper explores aesthetic response, defined as what happens in the mind and body of a person who encounters an aesthetic object or phenomenon. An initial section overviews the major theories of aesthetic response, including the work of Plato, Aristotle, Freud,…

  17. Aesthetic Response: An Overview of Selected Theories and the Postulation of a Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    King, Alison

    In response to a growing interest among educators in improving aesthetic education, this paper explores aesthetic response, defined as what happens in the mind and body of a person who encounters an aesthetic object or phenomenon. An initial section overviews the major theories of aesthetic response, including the work of Plato, Aristotle, Freud,…

  18. Russian Military and Security Forces: A Postulated Reaction to a Nuclear Detonation

    SciTech Connect

    Ball, D

    2005-04-29

    In this paper, we will examine how Russia's military and security forces might react to the detonation of a 10-kiloton nuclear weapon placed next to the walls surrounding the Kremlin. At the time of this 'big bang,' Putin is situated outside Moscow and survives the explosion. No one claims responsibility for the detonation. No other information is known. Numerous variables will determine how events ultimately unfold and how the military and security forces will respond. Prior to examining these variables in greater detail, it is imperative to elucidate first what we mean by Russia's military and security forces.

  19. A Rare Occurrence of Simultaneous Venous and Arterial Thromboembolic Events – Lower Limb Deep Venous Thrombosis and Pulmonary Thromboembolism as Initial Presentation in Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Kutiyal, Aditya S.; Dharmshaktu, Pramila; Kataria, Babita; Garg, Abhilasha

    2016-01-01

    The development of acute myeloid leukemia has been attributed to various factors, including hereditary, radiation, drugs, and certain occupational exposures. The association between malignancy and venous thromboembolism events is well established. Here, we present a case of a 70-year-old Indian man who had presented with arterial and venous thrombosis, and the patient was later diagnosed with acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL). In our case, the patient presented with right lower limb deep venous thrombosis and pulmonary thromboembolism four months prior to the diagnosis of APL. Although thromboembolic event subsequent to the diagnosis of malignancy, and especially during the chemotherapy has been widely reported, this prior presentation with simultaneous occurrence of both venous and arterial thromboembolism has rarely been reported. We take this opportunity to state the significance of a complete medical evaluation in cases of recurrent or unusual thrombotic events. PMID:26949347

  20. Events during eucaryotic rRNA transcription initiation and elongation: Conversion from the closed to the open promoter complex requires nucleotide substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Bateman, E.; Paule, M.R.

    1988-05-01

    Chemical footprinting and topological analysis were carried out on the Acanthamoeba castellanii rRNA transcription initiation factor (TIF) and RNA polymerase I complexes with DNA during transcription initiation and elongation. The results show that the binding of TIF and polymerase to the promoter does not alter the supercoiling of the DNA template and the template does not become sensitive to modification by diethylpyro-carbonate, which can identify melted DNA regions. Thus, in contrast to bacterial RNA polymerase, the eucaryotic RNA polymerase I-promoter complex is in a closed configuration preceding addition of nucleotides in vitro. Initiation and 3'-O-methyl CTP-limited translocation by RNA polymerase I results in separation of the polymerase-TIF footprints, leaving the TIF footprint unaltered. In contrast, initiation and translocation result in a significant change in the conformation of the polymerase-DNA complex, culminating in an unwound DNA region of at least 10 base pairs.

  1. Event-by-event distribution of the ratio of magnetic field energy to initial fluid energy density in √{sN N}=200 GeV Au-Au collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, Victor; Pu, Shi

    2015-12-01

    We estimate the event-by-event (e-by-e) distribution of the ratio (σ ) of the magnetic and electric field energy density to the fluid energy density in the transverse plane of Au-Au collisions at √{sN N}=200 GeV. A Monte Carlo (MC) Glauber model is used to calculate σ in the transverse plane for impact parameter b =0 , 12 fm at time τi˜0.5 fm. The fluid energy density is obtained by using Gaussian smoothing with two different smoothing parameter σg=0.25 , 0.5 fm. For b =0 fm collisions σ is found to be ≪1 in the central region of the fireball and σ ≳1 at the periphery. For b =12 fm collisions σ ≳1 is observed for some events. The e-by-e correlation between σ and the fluid energy density (ɛ ) is studied. We did not find strong correlation between σ and ɛ at the center of the fireball, whereas they are mostly anticorrelated at the periphery of the fireball.

  2. Compelling Evidence of the Need for Corporate Work/Life Balance Initiatives: Results from a National Survey of Stressful Life-Events.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hobson, Charles J.; Delunas, Linda; Kesic, Dawn

    2001-01-01

    Considers how failure to balance excessive work and life/family demands can lead to negative consequences for both individuals and organizations, including higher stress levels, increased absenteeism, and lower productivity. Discusses results of a survey on stressful life events that offers an explanation of why work/life balance programs are so…

  3. Compelling Evidence of the Need for Corporate Work/Life Balance Initiatives: Results from a National Survey of Stressful Life-Events.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hobson, Charles J.; Delunas, Linda; Kesic, Dawn

    2001-01-01

    Considers how failure to balance excessive work and life/family demands can lead to negative consequences for both individuals and organizations, including higher stress levels, increased absenteeism, and lower productivity. Discusses results of a survey on stressful life events that offers an explanation of why work/life balance programs are so…

  4. The Light-Velocity Postulate: The Essential Difference between the Theories of Lorentz-Poincaré and Einstein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abiko, Seiya

    Einstein, who had already developed the light-quantum theory, knew the inadequacy of Maxwell's theory in the microscopic sphere. Therefore, in writing his paper on special relativity, he had to set up the light-velocity postulate independently of the relativity postulate in order to make the electromagnetic foundation of physics compatible with Planck's radiation formula. This constitutes the essential difference between the theories of Lorentz-Poincaré and Einstein. The reason that students of the history of special relativity hitherto overlooked this fact lies in a crucial error contained in Einstein's "Autobiographical Notes". The correction, introduced first in the German edition of 1955, revealed that the first core ingredient of Einstein's research program was "thermodynamics". Einstein's theory survived the quantum revolution, while Lorentz-Poincaré's did not. Some educational implications are also discussed.

  5. A case study of chiropractic management of pregnancy-related heartburn with postulated fetal epigenome implications.

    PubMed

    Peterson, Caroline

    2012-01-01

    This case study reports on chiropractic care for pregnancy-related heartburn. The purpose of this article is to relate the benefit of chiropractic treatment for one individual, to contrast chiropractic management with the biomedical standard of care for pregnancy-related heartburn, and to point to potential epigenetic implications of the standard of care. A 32-year-old woman who was 24 weeks pregnant presented with persistent heartburn that she was treating with ranitidine (Zantac®) and calcium carbonate (Tums®) daily at the initiation of chiropractic care. Findings of the initial examination were thoracic intersegmental dysfunction and pain upon palpation of the diaphragm, with hypertonicity noted. Therapy localization was positive for reflexes associated with the esophagus and lower esophageal sphincter, suggesting spasms. Emotional components also were identified in association with the symptoms by the use of a mind-body therapy called NeuroEmotional Technique. The patient was treated by adjusting the thoracic spine, manually releasing the diaphragm spasms, and releasing the esophageal spasm with an activator (a small hand-held instrument that creates a percussive force). The patient was symptom-free and did not use medication after the fifth treatment. She was followed throughout the remainder of her pregnancy and was asymptomatic and required no further treatment. A larger study should investigate the effectiveness of chiropractic care for the treatment of pregnancy-related heartburn. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. American National Standard: design basis for protection of light water nuclear power plants against effects of postulated pipe rupture

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-12-31

    This standard addresses the design bases for light water reactor, nuclear power plant structures and components essential for the protection of public health and safety from the potential adverse effects of pipe whip, jet impingement, pressurization of compartments outside containment, environmental conditions and flooding associated with a postulated pipe rupture. The design bases for missile protection and the design bases for containment pressurization are not within this standard.

  7. Eliciting the child’s voice in adverse event reporting in oncology trials: Cognitive interview findings from the Pediatric Patient-Reported Outcomes version of the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events initiative

    PubMed Central

    Reeve, Bryce B.; McFatrich, Molly; Pinheiro, Laura C.; Weaver, Meaghann S.; Sung, Lillian; Withycombe, Janice S.; Baker, Justin N.; Mack, Jennifer W.; Waldron, Mia K.; Gibson, Deborah; Tomlinson, Deborah; Freyer, David R.; Mowbray, Catriona; Jacobs, Shana; Palma, Diana; Martens, Christa E.; Gold, Stuart H.; Jackson, Kathryn D.; Hinds, Pamela S.

    2017-01-01

    Background Adverse event (AE) reporting in oncology trials is required, but current practice does not directly integrate the child’s voice. The Pediatric Patient-Reported Outcomes version of the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events (PRO-CTCAE) is being developed to assess symptomatic AEs via child/adolescent self-report or proxy-report. This qualitative study evaluates the child’s/adolescent’s understanding and ability to provide valid responses to the PRO-CTCAE to inform questionnaire refinements and confirm content validity. Procedure From seven pediatric research hospitals, children/adolescents ages 7–15 years who were diagnosed with cancer and receiving treatment were eligible, along with their parent-proxies. The Pediatric PRO-CTCAE includes 130 questions that assess 62 symptomatic AEs capturing symptom frequency, severity, interference, or presence. Cognitive interviews with retrospective probing were completed with children in the age groups of 7–8, 9–12, and 13–15 years. The children/adolescents and proxies were interviewed independently. Results Two rounds of interviews involved 81 children and adolescents and 74 parent-proxies. Fifteen of the 62 AE terms were revised after Round 1, including refinements to the questions assessing symptom severity. Most participants rated the PRO-CTCAE AE items as “very easy” or “somewhat easy” and were able to read, understand, and provide valid responses to questions. A few AE items assessing rare events were challenging to understand. Conclusions The Pediatric and Proxy PRO-CTCAE performed well among children and adolescents and their proxies, supporting its content validity. Data from PRO-CTCAE may improve symptomatic AE reporting in clinical trials and enhance the quality of care that children receive. PMID:27650708

  8. Comparative proteomic and biochemical analyses reveal different molecular events occurring in the process of fiber initiation between wild-type allotetraploid cotton and its fuzzless-lintless mutant.

    PubMed

    Yao, Yuan; Zhang, Bing; Dong, Chun-Juan; Du, Ying; Jiang, Lin; Liu, Jin-Yuan

    2015-01-01

    To explore lint fiber initiation-related proteins in allotetraploid cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.), a comparative proteomic analysis was performed between wild-type cotton (Xu-142) and its fuzzless-lintless mutant (Xu-142-fl) at five developmental time points for lint fiber initiation from -3 to +3 days post-anthesis (dpa). Using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE) combined with mass spectrometry (MS) analyses, 91 differentially accumulated protein (DAP) species that are related to fiber initiation were successfully identified, of which 58 preferentially accumulated in the wild-type and 33 species in the fl mutant. These DAPs are involved in various cellular and metabolic processes, mainly including important energy/carbohydrate metabolism, redox homeostasis, amino acid and fatty acid biosynthesis, protein quality control, cytoskeleton dynamics, and anthocyanidin metabolism. Further physiological and biochemical experiments revealed dynamic changes in the carbohydrate flux and H2O2 levels in the cotton fiber initiation process. Compared with those in the fl mutant, the contents of glucose and fructose in wild-type ovules sharply increased after anthesis with a relatively higher rate of amino acid biosynthesis. The relative sugar starvation and lower rate of amino acid biosynthesis in the fl mutant ovules may impede the carbohydrate/energy supply and cell wall synthesis, which is consistent with the proteomic results. However, the H2O2 burst was only observed in the wild-type ovules on the day of anthesis. Cotton boll injection experiments in combination with electron microscope observation collectively indicated that H2O2 burst, which is negatively regulated by ascorbate peroxidases (APx), plays an important role in the fiber initiation process. Taken together, our study demonstrates a putative network of DAP species related to fiber initiation in cotton ovules and provides a foundation for future studies on the specific functions of these proteins in fiber

  9. Damage initiation and propagation assessed from stress-induced microseismic events during a mine-by test in the Opalinus Clay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Gonidec, Y.; Sarout, J.; Wassermann, J.; Nussbaum, C.

    2014-07-01

    We report in this paper an original analysis of microseismic events (MSEs) induced by an excavation operation in the clay environment of the Mont Terri underground rock laboratory. In order to identify the MSEs with confidence, we develop a restrictive but efficient multistep method for filtering the recorded events. We deduce the spatial distribution and processes associated with the excavation-induced damage from the spatial location and focal mechanisms of the MSEs. We observe an asymmetric geometry of the excavation damaged zone around the excavated gallery, without notable microseismic activity in the sandy facies sidewall, in contrast with the shaly facies sidewall where a first burst of events is recorded, followed by two smaller bursts: one locates ahead of the excavation front and is associated with a dominant double-couple component, suggesting bedding plane reworking, that is, shear fracture mode, and the MSEs of the other cluster inside the shaly sidewall of the gallery, with a dominant compensated linear vector dipole component, suggesting extensive cracking. We identify and discuss four major factors that seem to control the MSEs source mechanisms: lithology, geometry of the geological features, gallery orientation and direction of the main compressive stress.

  10. A Postulated Planetary Collision, the Terrestrial Planets, the Moon and Smaller Solar-System Bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woolfson, M. M.

    2013-11-01

    In a scenario produced by the Capture Theory of planetary formation, a collision between erstwhile solar-system giant planets, of masses 798.75 and 598.37 M ⊕, is simulated using smoothed-particle hydrodynamics. Due to grain-surface chemistry that takes place in star-forming clouds, molecular species containing hydrogen, with a high D/H ratio taken as 0.01, form a layer around each planetary core. Temperatures generated by the collision initiate D-D reactions in these layers that, in their turn, trigger a reaction chain involving heavier elements. The nuclear explosion shatters and disperses both planets, leaving iron-plus-silicate stable residues identified as a proto-Venus and proto-Earth. A satellite of one of the colliding planets, captured or retained by the proto-Earth core, gave the Moon; two massive satellites released into heliocentric orbits became Mercury and Mars. For the Moon and Mars, abrasion of their surfaces exposed to collision debris results in hemispherical asymmetry. Mercury, having lost a large part of its mantle due to massive abrasion, reformed to give the present high-density body. Debris from the collision gave rise to asteroids and comets, much of the latter forming an inner reservoir stretching outwards from the inner Kuiper Belt that replenishes the Oort Cloud when it is depleted by a severe perturbation. Other features resulting from the outcome of the planetary collision are the relationship of Pluto and Triton to Neptune, the presence of dwarf planets and light-atom isotopic anomalies in meteorites.

  11. Elucidating the role of vegetation in the initiation of rainfall-induced shallow landslides: Insights from an extreme rainfall event in the Colorado Front Range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGuire, Luke A.; Rengers, Francis K.; Kean, Jason W.; Coe, Jeffrey A.; Mirus, Benjamin B.; Baum, Rex L.; Godt, Jonathan W.

    2016-09-01

    More than 1100 debris flows were mobilized from shallow landslides during a rainstorm from 9 to 13 September 2013 in the Colorado Front Range, with the vast majority initiating on sparsely vegetated, south facing terrain. To investigate the physical processes responsible for the observed aspect control, we made measurements of soil properties on a densely forested north facing hillslope and a grassland-dominated south facing hillslope in the Colorado Front Range and performed numerical modeling of transient changes in soil pore water pressure throughout the rainstorm. Using the numerical model, we quantitatively assessed interactions among vegetation, rainfall interception, subsurface hydrology, and slope stability. Results suggest that apparent cohesion supplied by roots was responsible for the observed connection between debris flow initiation and slope aspect. Results suggest that future climate-driven modifications to forest structure could substantially influence landslide hazards throughout the Front Range and similar water-limited environments where vegetation communities may be more susceptible to small variations in climate.

  12. Elucidating the role of vegetation in the initiation of rainfall-induced shallow landslides: Insights from an extreme rainfall event in the Colorado Front Range

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McGuire, Luke; Rengers, Francis; Kean, Jason W.; Coe, Jeffrey A.; Mirus, Benjamin B.; Baum, Rex L.; Godt, Jonathan W.

    2016-01-01

    More than 1100 debris flows were mobilized from shallow landslides during a rainstorm from 9 to 13 September 2013 in the Colorado Front Range, with the vast majority initiating on sparsely vegetated, south facing terrain. To investigate the physical processes responsible for the observed aspect control, we made measurements of soil properties on a densely forested north facing hillslope and a grassland-dominated south facing hillslope in the Colorado Front Range and performed numerical modeling of transient changes in soil pore water pressure throughout the rainstorm. Using the numerical model, we quantitatively assessed interactions among vegetation, rainfall interception, subsurface hydrology, and slope stability. Results suggest that apparent cohesion supplied by roots was responsible for the observed connection between debris flow initiation and slope aspect. Results suggest that future climate-driven modifications to forest structure could substantially influence landslide hazards throughout the Front Range and similar water-limited environments where vegetation communities may be more susceptible to small variations in climate.

  13. Identifying the initiating events of anti-Listeria responses using mice with conditional loss of IFNγ receptor subunit 1 (IFNGR1)

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sang Hun; Carrero, Javier A.; Uppaluri, Ravindra; White, J. Michael; Archambault, Jessica M.; Lai, Koon Siew; Chan, Szeman Ruby; Sheehan, Kathleen C. F.; Unanue, Emil R.; Schreiber, Robert D.

    2013-01-01

    Whereas IFNγ is required for resolution of Listeria monocytogenes infection, the identities of the IFNγ responsive cells that initiate the process remain unclear. We addressed this question using novel mice with conditional loss of the IFNγ receptor (IFNGR1). Itgax-cre+Ifngr1f/f mice with selective IFNγ unresponsiveness in CD8α+ dendritic cells displayed increased susceptibility to infection. This phenotype was due to the inability of IFNγ unresponsive CD8α+ DCs to produce the initial burst of IL-12 induced by IFNγ from TNFα-activated NK/NKT cells. The defect in early IL-12 production resulted in increased IL-4 production that established a myeloid cell environment favoring Listeria growth. Neutralization of IL-4 restored Listeria resistance in Itgax-cre+Ifngr1f/f mice. We also found that Itgax-cre+Ifngr1f/f mice survived infection with low dose Listeria due to a second wave of IL-12 produced by Ly6Chi monocytes. Thus, an IFNγ-driven cascade involving CD8α+ DCs and NK/NKT cells induces the rapid production of IL-12 that initiates the anti-Listeria response. PMID:24048899

  14. A review of inherent safety characteristics of metal alloy sodium-cooled fast reactor fuel against postulated accidents

    DOE PAGES

    Sofu, Tanju

    2015-04-01

    The thermal, mechanical, and neutronic performance of the metal alloy fast reactor fuel design complements the safety advantages of the liquid metal cooling and the pool-type primary system. Together, these features provide large safety margins in both normal operating modes and for a wide range of postulated accidents. In particular, they maximize the measures of safety associated with inherent reactor response to unprotected, double-fault accidents, and to minimize risk to the public and plant investment. High thermal conductivity and high gap conductance play the most significant role in safety advantages of the metallic fuel, resulting in a flatter radial temperaturemore » profile within the pin and much lower normal operation and transient temperatures in comparison to oxide fuel. Despite the big difference in melting point, both oxide and metal fuels have a relatively similar margin to melting during postulated accidents. When the metal fuel cladding fails, it typically occurs below the coolant boiling point and the damaged fuel pins remain coolable. Metal fuel is compatible with sodium coolant, eliminating the potential of energetic fuel--coolant reactions and flow blockages. All these, and the low retained heat leading to a longer grace period for operator action, are significant contributing factors to the inherently benign response of metallic fuel to postulated accidents. This paper summarizes the past analytical and experimental results obtained in past sodium-cooled fast reactor safety programs in the United States, and presents an overview of fuel safety performance as observed in laboratory and in-pile tests.« less

  15. Environmental consequences of postulated plutonium releases from Exxon Nuclear MOFP, Richland, Washington, as a result of severe natural phenomena

    SciTech Connect

    Jamison, J.D.; Watson, E.C.

    1980-02-01

    Potential environmental consequences in terms of radiation dose to people are presented for postulated plutonium releases caused by severe natural phenomena at the Exxon Nuclear Company Mixed Oxide Fabrication Plant (MOFP), Richland, Washington. The severe natural phenomena considered are earthquakes, tornadoes, high straight-line winds, and floods. Maximum plutonium deposition values are given for significant locations around the site. All important potential exposure pathways are examined. The most likely 50-year committed dose equivalents are given for the maximum-exposed individual and the population within a 50-mile radius of the plant. The maximum plutonium deposition values most likely to occur offsite are also given.

  16. Early events in xenograft development from the human embryonic stem cell line HS181--resemblance with an initial multiple epiblast formation.

    PubMed

    Gertow, Karin; Cedervall, Jessica; Jamil, Seema; Ali, Rouknuddin; Imreh, Marta P; Gulyas, Miklos; Sandstedt, Bengt; Ahrlund-Richter, Lars

    2011-01-01

    Xenografting is widely used for assessing in vivo pluripotency of human stem cell populations. Here, we report on early to late events in the development of mature experimental teratoma from a well-characterized human embryonic stem cell (HESC) line, HS181. The results show an embryonic process, increasingly chaotic. Active proliferation of the stem cell derived cellular progeny was detected already at day 5, and characterized by the appearance of multiple sites of engraftment, with structures of single or pseudostratified columnar epithelium surrounding small cavities. The striking histological resemblance to developing embryonic ectoderm, and the formation of epiblast-like structures was supported by the expression of the markers OCT4, NANOG, SSEA-4 and KLF4, but a lack of REX1. The early neural marker NESTIN was uniformly expressed, while markers linked to gastrulation, such as BMP-4, NODAL or BRACHYURY were not detected. Thus, observations on day 5 indicated differentiation comparable to the most early transient cell populations in human post implantation development. Confirming and expanding on previous findings from HS181 xenografts, these early events were followed by an increasingly chaotic development, incorporated in the formation of a benign teratoma with complex embryonic components. In the mature HS181 teratomas not all types of organs/tissues were detected, indicating a restricted differentiation, and a lack of adequate spatial developmental cues during the further teratoma formation. Uniquely, a kinetic alignment of rare complex structures was made to human embryos at diagnosed gestation stages, showing minor kinetic deviations between HS181 teratoma and the human counterpart.

  17. Age influences initial dose and compliance to imatinib in chronic myeloid leukemia elderly patients but concomitant comorbidities appear to influence overall and event-free survival.

    PubMed

    Breccia, Massimo; Luciano, Luigiana; Latagliata, Roberto; Castagnetti, Fausto; Ferrero, Dario; Cavazzini, Francesco; Trawinska, Malgorzata Monica; Annunziata, Mario; Stagno, Fabio; Tiribelli, Mario; Binotto, Gianni; Crisà, Elena; Musto, Pellegrino; Gozzini, Antonella; Cavalli, Laura; Montefusco, Enrico; Iurlo, Alessandra; Russo, Sabina; Cedrone, Michele; Rossi, Antonella Russo; Pregno, Patrizia; Endri, Mauro; Spadea, Antonio; Molica, Matteo; Giglio, Gianfranco; Celesti, Francesca; Sorà, Federica; Storti, Sergio; D'Addosio, Ada; Cambrin, Giovanna Rege; Isidori, Alessandro; Sica, Simona; Abruzzese, Elisabetta; Speccha, Giorgina; Rosti, Gianantonio; Alimena, Giuliana

    2014-10-01

    We applied Charlson comorbidity index (CCI) stratification on a large cohort of chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) very elderly patients (>75 years) treated with imatinib, in order to observe the impact of concomitant diseases on both compliance and outcome. One hundred and eighty-one patients were recruited by 21 Italian centers. There were 95 males and 86 females, median age 78.6 years (range 75-93.6). According to Sokal score, 106 patients were classified as intermediate risk and 55 as high risk (not available in 20 patients). According to CCI stratification, 71 patients had score 0 and 110 a score ≥ 1. Imatinib standard dose was reduced at start of therapy (200-300 mg/day) in 68 patients independently from the evaluation of baseline comorbidities, but based only on physician judgement: 43.6% of these patients had score 0 compared to 34% of patients who had score ≥ 1. Significant differences were found in terms of subsequent dose reduction (39% of patients with score 0 compared to 53% of patients with score ≥ 1) and in terms of drug discontinuation due to toxicity (35% of patients with score 0 vs 65% of patients with score ≥ 1). We did not find significant differences as regards occurrence of hematologic side effects, probably as a consequence of the initial dose reduction: 39% of patients with score 0 experienced grade 3/4 hematologic toxicity (most commonly anemia) compared to 42% of patients with score ≥ 1. Independently from the initial dose, comorbidities again did not have an impact on development of grade 3/4 non-hematologic side effects (most commonly skin rash, muscle cramps and fluid retention): 62% of patients with score 0 compared to 52.5% of patients with score ≥ 1. Notwithstanding the reduced dose and the weight of comorbidities we did not find significant differences but only a trend in terms of efficacy: 66% of patients with score 0 achieved a CCyR compared to 54% of patients with score ≥ 1. Comorbidities appeared to have an impact on

  18. A Solution NMR Investigation into the Early Events of Amelogenin Nanosphere Self-Assembly Initiated with Sodium Chloride or Calcium Chloride

    SciTech Connect

    Buchko, Garry W.; Tarasevich, Barbara J.; Bekhazi, Jacky G.; Snead, Malcolm L.; Shaw, Wendy J.

    2008-12-08

    Using solution-state NMR spectroscopy, new insights into the early intermolecular interactions stabilizing amelogenin supramolecular assembly and the potential role of calcium ions have been discovered. Two-dimensional 1H-15N spectra were recorded for 15N-labeled amelogenin as a function of increasing Ca2+ concentration starting from monomeric conditions. Evidence for protein-protein interactions were observed between residues E18 and E40 in the N-terminus. At higher Ca2+ concentrations there was concurrent involvement of residues in both the N- (Y12-Q56) and the C-terminus (Q144-T171). Neither specific residues nor their stepwise interaction have previously been identified in the initial stages of nanosphere assembly.

  19. Dynamical response of multi-patch, flux-based models to the input of infected people: Epidemic response to initiated events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rho, Young-Ah; Liebovitch, Larry S.; Schwartz, Ira B.

    2008-07-01

    The time course of an epidemic can be modeled using the differential equations that describe the spread of disease and by dividing people into “patches” of different sizes with the migration of people between these patches. We used these multi-patch, flux-based models to determine how the time course of infected and susceptible populations depends on the disease parameters, the geometry of the migrations between the patches, and the addition of infected people into a patch. We found that there are significantly longer lived transients and additional “ancillary” epidemics when the reproductive rate R is closer to 1, as would be typical of SARS (Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome) and bird flu, than when R is closer to 10, as would be typical of measles. In addition we show, both analytical and numerical, how the time delay between the injection of infected people into a patch and the corresponding initial epidemic that it produces depends on R.

  20. miR-21 Might be Involved in Breast Cancer Promotion and Invasion Rather than in Initial Events of Breast Cancer Development.

    PubMed

    Petrović, Nina

    2016-04-01

    Breast cancer (BC) is a heterogeneous disease that develops into a large number of varied phenotypes. One of the features used in its classification and therapy selection is invasiveness. MicroRNA-21 (miR-21) is considered to be an important element of BC invasiveness, and miR-21 levels are frequently increased in different tumor types compared with normal tissue, including the breast. Experimental and literature research has highlighted that miR-21 was always significantly elevated in every study that included invasive breast carcinomas compared with healthy breast tissue. The main goal of this research was to specify the predominant role of miR-21 in the different phases of BC pathogenesis, i.e. whether it was involved in the early (initiation), later (promotion), or late (propagation, progression) phases. Our second goal was to explain the roles of miR-21 targets in BC by an in silico approach and literature review, and to associate the importance of miR-21 with particular phases of BC pathogenesis through the action of its target genes. Analysis has shown that changes in miR-21 levels might be important for the later and/or late phases of breast cancerogenesis rather than for the initial early phases. Targets of miR-21 (TIMP3, PDCD4, PTEN, TPM1 and RECK) are also primarily involved in BC promotion and progression, especially invasion, angiogenesis and metastasis. miR-21 expression levels could perhaps be used in conjunction with the standard diagnostic parameters as an indicator of BC presence, and to indicate a phenotype likely to show early invasion/metastasis detection and poor prognosis.

  1. The role of high-energy events (hurricanes and/or tsunamis) in the sedimentation, diagenesis and karst initiation of tropical shallow water carbonate platforms and atolls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourrouilh-Le Jan, F. G.

    1998-06-01

    Karst morphology appears early, even during carbonate sediment deposition. Examples from modern to 125-ka-old sub-, inter- and supratidal sediments are given from the Bahamas (Atlantic Ocean) and from Tuamotuan atolls (southeastern Pacific Ocean), with mineralogical and hydrological analyses. Karstification is favoured by the aragonitic composition of bioclasts coming from the shallow marine bio-factory. Lithification by aragonite cements appears as a rim around carbonate deposits and dissolution and non-cementation start at the same time on modern supratidal deposits (Andros micrite or atoll coral rudite) and provoke the formation of a central depression on small or large carbonate platforms. In fact, this early solution of the centre of platforms is closely related to the location of each of the studied examples on hurricane tracks. High-energy events, such as hurricanes and tsunamis, affect sediment transport but hurricanes also affect diagenesis as a result of the enormous volume of freshwater carried and discharged along their paths. This couple, lithification-solution, is localised at sea level and accompanies sea-level fluctuations along the eustatic curve. Because of the precise location of hurricane action all around the Earth, early karstification by aragonite solution, cementation and supratidal carbonate sediment accumulations (high-energy trails) act together on all the platforms and atolls located inside the Tropics (23°27') between roughly 5°-10° and 25° on both hemispheres. However, early karstification acts alone on shallow carbonate platforms including atolls along the equatorial belt between 5°-10°N and 5°-10°S. These early steps of karstification are linked to the ocean-atmosphere interface due to the bathymetrical position of shallow carbonate platforms, including atolls. They lead to complex karstified emerged platforms, called high carbonate islands, where carbonate diagenesis, together with the development of bauxite- and/or a

  2. Numerical simulation of an initial tsunami waveform based on sea-level data inversion: case study for the Shicotan event of the 4th October 1994

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voronina, T.

    2012-04-01

    The recent disaster of Japanese tsunami in March 2011, which caused nearly 16,000 deaths and estimated at US35-billion to US40-billion the insured cost, served as a last wake-up call to world community. Since then, the development of technology of an early warning system including methods for forecasting in real-time the tsunami waves propagation has provided a way to mitigate the adverse impacts of future tsunamis. The development of tsunami simulation models makes it possible to identify regions at tsunami risk. One of the most important issues of the tsunami modeling is gaining some insight of a tsunami source - the case in hand is the tsunami wave generated by the sea surface deformation. The latter is presumed to be equal to the co-seismic vertical displacement of the sea floor. This paper proposes an approach to recover initial tsunami waveform in tsunami source area based on the inversion of remote measurements of sea-level data. This inverse problem is treated as an ill-posed problem of hydrodynamic inversion with tsunami tide gauge records. Tsunami wave propagation is considered within the scope of the linear shallow-water theory. The direct problem is approximated by a finite-difference technique. The ill-posed inverse problem of recovering initial tsunami waveform is regularized by means of a least square inversion using the truncated SVD approach. The numerical simulating yields the so-called r-solution. The algorithm is verified with bathymetry data of the Sea of Okhotsk, synthetic and real records. In this paper, we make an attempt to answer the following questions: (1) How accurately can a tsunami source be recovered using recordings at a given tide gauge network? (2) Is it possible to improve the quality of recovering a tsunami source by distinguishing the "most informative" part of the given observation system? For answering these questions, we have carried out a series of numerical experiments. Based on the characteristics of a given tide gauges

  3. Measurements of e+e-→K+K-η, K+K-π0, and Ks0K±π∓ cross sections using initial state radiation events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aubert, B.; Bona, M.; Boutigny, D.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J. P.; Poireau, V.; Prudent, X.; Tisserand, V.; Zghiche, A.; Tico, J. Garra; Grauges, E.; Lopez, L.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Sun, L.; Abrams, G. S.; Battaglia, M.; Brown, D. N.; Button-Shafer, J.; Cahn, R. N.; Groysman, Y.; Jacobsen, R. G.; Kadyk, J. A.; Kerth, L. T.; Kolomensky, Yu. G.; Kukartsev, G.; Lopes Pegna, D.; Lynch, G.; Mir, L. M.; Orimoto, T. J.; Osipenkov, I. L.; Ronan, M. T.; Tackmann, K.; Tanabe, T.; Wenzel, W. A.; Del Amo Sanchez, P.; Hawkes, C. M.; Watson, A. T.; Koch, H.; Schroeder, T.; Walker, D.; Asgeirsson, D. J.; Cuhadar-Donszelmann, T.; Fulsom, B. G.; Hearty, C.; Mattison, T. S.; McKenna, J. A.; Barrett, M.; Khan, A.; Saleem, M.; Teodorescu, L.; Blinov, V. E.; Bukin, A. D.; Druzhinin, V. P.; Golubev, V. B.; Onuchin, A. P.; Serednyakov, S. I.; Skovpen, Yu. I.; Solodov, E. P.; Todyshev, K. Yu.; Bondioli, M.; Curry, S.; Eschrich, I.; Kirkby, D.; Lankford, A. J.; Lund, P.; Mandelkern, M.; Martin, E. C.; Stoker, D. P.; Abachi, S.; Buchanan, C.; Gary, J. W.; Liu, F.; Long, O.; Shen, B. C.; Vitug, G. M.; Zhang, L.; Paar, H. P.; Rahatlou, S.; Sharma, V.; Berryhill, J. W.; Campagnari, C.; Cunha, A.; Dahmes, B.; Hong, T. M.; Kovalskyi, D.; Richman, J. D.; Beck, T. W.; Eisner, A. M.; Flacco, C. J.; Heusch, C. A.; Kroseberg, J.; Lockman, W. S.; Schalk, T.; Schumm, B. A.; Seiden, A.; Wilson, M. G.; Winstrom, L. O.; Chen, E.; Cheng, C. H.; Fang, F.; Hitlin, D. G.; Narsky, I.; Piatenko, T.; Porter, F. C.; Andreassen, R.; Mancinelli, G.; Meadows, B. T.; Mishra, K.; Sokoloff, M. D.; Blanc, F.; Bloom, P. C.; Chen, S.; Ford, W. T.; Hirschauer, J. F.; Kreisel, A.; Nagel, M.; Nauenberg, U.; Olivas, A.; Smith, J. G.; Ulmer, K. A.; Wagner, S. R.; Zhang, J.; Gabareen, A. M.; Soffer, A.; Toki, W. H.; Wilson, R. J.; Winklmeier, F.; Altenburg, D. D.; Feltresi, E.; Hauke, A.; Jasper, H.; Merkel, J.; Petzold, A.; Spaan, B.; Wacker, K.; Klose, V.; Kobel, M. J.; Lacker, H. M.; Mader, W. F.; Nogowski, R.; Schubert, J.; Schubert, K. R.; Schwierz, R.; Sundermann, J. E.; Volk, A.; Bernard, D.; Bonneaud, G. R.; Latour, E.; Lombardo, V.; Thiebaux, Ch.; Verderi, M.; Clark, P. J.; Gradl, W.; Muheim, F.; Playfer, S.; Robertson, A. I.; Watson, J. E.; Xie, Y.; Andreotti, M.; Bettoni, D.; Bozzi, C.; Calabrese, R.; Cecchi, A.; Cibinetto, G.; Franchini, P.; Luppi, E.; Negrini, M.; Petrella, A.; Piemontese, L.; Prencipe, E.; Santoro, V.; Anulli, F.; Baldini-Ferroli, R.; Calcaterra, A.; de Sangro, R.; Finocchiaro, G.; Pacetti, S.; Patteri, P.; Peruzzi, I. M.; Piccolo, M.; Rama, M.; Zallo, A.; Buzzo, A.; Contri, R.; Lo Vetere, M.; Macri, M. M.; Monge, M. R.; Passaggio, S.; Patrignani, C.; Robutti, E.; Santroni, A.; Tosi, S.; Chaisanguanthum, K. S.; Morii, M.; Wu, J.; Dubitzky, R. S.; Marks, J.; Schenk, S.; Uwer, U.; Bard, D. J.; Dauncey, P. D.; Flack, R. L.; Nash, J. A.; Panduro Vazquez, W.; Tibbetts, M.; Behera, P. K.; Chai, X.; Charles, M. J.; Mallik, U.; Cochran, J.; Crawley, H. B.; Dong, L.; Eyges, V.; Meyer, W. T.; Prell, S.; Rosenberg, E. I.; Rubin, A. E.; Gao, Y. Y.; Gritsan, A. V.; Guo, Z. J.; Lae, C. K.; Denig, A. G.; Fritsch, M.; Schott, G.; Arnaud, N.; Béquilleux, J.; D'Orazio, A.; Davier, M.; Grosdidier, G.; Höcker, A.; Lepeltier, V.; Le Diberder, F.; Lutz, A. M.; Pruvot, S.; Rodier, S.; Roudeau, P.; Schune, M. H.; Serrano, J.; Sordini, V.; Stocchi, A.; Wang, L.; Wang, W. F.; Wormser, G.; Lange, D. J.; Wright, D. M.; Bingham, I.; Burke, J. P.; Chavez, C. A.; Fry, J. R.; Gabathuler, E.; Gamet, R.; Hutchcroft, D. E.; Payne, D. J.; Schofield, K. C.; Touramanis, C.; Bevan, A. J.; George, K. A.; di Lodovico, F.; Sacco, R.; Cowan, G.; Flaecher, H. U.; Hopkins, D. A.; Paramesvaran, S.; Salvatore, F.; Wren, A. C.; Brown, D. N.; Davis, C. L.; Allison, J.; Barlow, N. R.; Barlow, R. J.; Chia, Y. M.; Edgar, C. L.; Lafferty, G. D.; West, T. J.; Yi, J. I.; Anderson, J.; Chen, C.; Jawahery, A.; Roberts, D. A.; Simi, G.; Tuggle, J. M.; Dallapiccola, C.; Hertzbach, S. S.; Li, X.; Moore, T. B.; Salvati, E.; Saremi, S.; Cowan, R.; Dujmic, D.; Fisher, P. H.; Koeneke, K.; Sciolla, G.; Spitznagel, M.; Taylor, F.; Yamamoto, R. K.; Zhao, M.; Zheng, Y.; McLachlin, S. E.; Patel, P. M.; Robertson, S. H.; Lazzaro, A.; Palombo, F.; Bauer, J. M.; Cremaldi, L.; Eschenburg, V.; Godang, R.; Kroeger, R.; Sanders, D. A.; Summers, D. J.; Zhao, H. W.; Brunet, S.; Côté, D.; Simard, M.; Taras, P.; Viaud, F. B.; Nicholson, H.; de Nardo, G.; Fabozzi, F.; Lista, L.; Monorchio, D.; Sciacca, C.; Baak, M. A.; Raven, G.; Snoek, H. L.; Jessop, C. P.; Knoepfel, K. J.; Losecco, J. M.; Benelli, G.; Corwin, L. A.; Honscheid, K.; Kagan, H.; Kass, R.; Morris, J. P.; Rahimi, A. M.; Regensburger, J. J.; Sekula, S. J.; Wong, Q. K.; Blount, N. L.; Brau, J.; Frey, R.; Igonkina, O.; Kolb, J. A.; Lu, M.; Rahmat, R.; Sinev, N. B.; Strom, D.; Strube, J.; Torrence, E.; Gagliardi, N.; Gaz, A.; Margoni, M.; Morandin, M.; Pompili, A.; Posocco, M.; Rotondo, M.; Simonetto, F.; Stroili, R.; Voci, C.; Ben-Haim, E.; Briand, H.; Calderini, G.; Chauveau, J.; David, P.; Del Buono, L.; de La Vaissière, Ch.; Hamon, O.; Leruste, Ph.; Malclès, J.; Ocariz, J.; Perez, A.; Prendki, J.; Gladney, L.; Biasini, M.; Covarelli, R.; Manoni, E.; Angelini, C.; Batignani, G.; Bettarini, S.; Carpinelli, M.; Cenci, R.; Cervelli, A.; Forti, F.; Giorgi, M. A.; Lusiani, A.; Marchiori, G.; Mazur, M. A.; Morganti, M.; Neri, N.; Paoloni, E.; Rizzo, G.; Walsh, J. J.; Biesiada, J.; Elmer, P.; Lau, Y. P.; Lu, C.; Olsen, J.; Smith, A. J. S.; Telnov, A. V.; Baracchini, E.; Bellini, F.; Cavoto, G.; Del Re, D.; di Marco, E.; Faccini, R.; Ferrarotto, F.; Ferroni, F.; Gaspero, M.; Jackson, P. D.; Mazzoni, M. A.; Morganti, S.; Piredda, G.; Polci, F.; Renga, F.; Voena, C.; Ebert, M.; Hartmann, T.; Schröder, H.; Waldi, R.; Adye, T.; Castelli, G.; Franek, B.; Olaiya, E. O.; Roethel, W.; Wilson, F. F.; Emery, S.; Escalier, M.; Gaidot, A.; Ganzhur, S. F.; Hamel de Monchenault, G.; Kozanecki, W.; Vasseur, G.; Yèche, Ch.; Zito, M.; Chen, X. R.; Liu, H.; Park, W.; Purohit, M. V.; White, R. M.; Wilson, J. R.; Allen, M. T.; Aston, D.; Bartoldus, R.; Bechtle, P.; Claus, R.; Coleman, J. P.; Convery, M. R.; Dingfelder, J. C.; Dorfan, J.; Dubois-Felsmann, G. P.; Dunwoodie, W.; Field, R. C.; Glanzman, T.; Gowdy, S. J.; Graham, M. T.; Grenier, P.; Hast, C.; Innes, W. R.; Kaminski, J.; Kelsey, M. H.; Kim, H.; Kim, P.; Kocian, M. L.; Leith, D. W. G. S.; Li, S.; Luitz, S.; Luth, V.; Lynch, H. L.; Macfarlane, D. B.; Marsiske, H.; Messner, R.; Muller, D. R.; Nelson, S.; O'Grady, C. P.; Ofte, I.; Perazzo, A.; Perl, M.; Pulliam, T.; Ratcliff, B. N.; Roodman, A.; Salnikov, A. A.; Schindler, R. H.; Schwiening, J.; Snyder, A.; Su, D.; Sullivan, M. K.; Suzuki, K.; Swain, S. K.; Thompson, J. M.; Va'Vra, J.; Wagner, A. P.; Weaver, M.; Wisniewski, W. J.; Wittgen, M.; Wright, D. H.; Yarritu, A. K.; Yi, K.; Young, C. C.; Ziegler, V.; Burchat, P. R.; Edwards, A. J.; Majewski, S. A.; Miyashita, T. S.; Petersen, B. A.; Wilden, L.; Ahmed, S.; Alam, M. S.; Bula, R.; Ernst, J. A.; Pan, B.; Saeed, M. A.; Wappler, F. R.; Zain, S. B.; Spanier, S. M.; Wogsland, B. J.; Eckmann, R.; Ritchie, J. L.; Ruland, A. M.; Schilling, C. J.; Schwitters, R. F.; Izen, J. M.; Lou, X. C.; Ye, S.; Bianchi, F.; Gallo, F.; Gamba, D.; Pelliccioni, M.; Bomben, M.; Bosisio, L.; Cartaro, C.; Cossutti, F.; Della Ricca, G.; Lanceri, L.; Vitale, L.; Azzolini, V.; Lopez-March, N.; Martinez-Vidal, F.; Milanes, D. A.; Oyanguren, A.; Albert, J.; Banerjee, Sw.; Bhuyan, B.; Hamano, K.; Kowalewski, R.; Nugent, I. M.; Roney, J. M.; Sobie, R. J.; Harrison, P. F.; Ilic, J.; Latham, T. E.; Mohanty, G. B.; Band, H. R.; Chen, X.; Dasu, S.; Flood, K. T.; Hollar, J. J.; Kutter, P. E.; Pan, Y.; Pierini, M.; Prepost, R.; Wu, S. L.; Neal, H.

    2008-05-01

    This paper reports measurements of processes: e+e-→γKS0K±π∓, e+e-→γK+K-π0, e+e-→γϕη, and e+e-→γϕπ0. The initial-state radiated photon allows to cover the hadronic final state in the energy range from thresholds up to ≈4.6GeV. The overall size of the data sample analyzed is 232fb-1, collected by the BABAR detector running at the PEP-II e+e- storage ring. From the Dalitz plot analysis of the KS0K±π∓ final state, moduli, and relative phase of the isoscalar and the isovector components of the e+e-→KK*(892) cross section are determined. Parameters of ϕ and ρ recurrences are also measured, using a global fitting procedure which exploits the interconnection among amplitudes, moduli, and phases of the e+e-→KS0K±π∓, K+K-π0, ϕη final states. The cross section for the OZI-forbidden process e+e-→ϕπ0, and the J/ψ branching fractions to KK*(892) and K+K-η are also measured.

  4. Eukaryotic Translation Initiation Factor 4E Is a Feed-Forward Translational Coactivator of Transforming Growth Factor β Early Protransforming Events in Breast Epithelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Decarlo, Lindsey; Mestel, Celine; Barcellos-Hoff, Mary-Helen; Schneider, Robert J

    2015-08-01

    Eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4E (eIF4E) is overexpressed early in breast cancers in association with disease progression and reduced survival. Much remains to be understood regarding the role of eIF4E in human cancer. We determined, using immortalized human breast epithelial cells, that elevated expression of eIF4E translationally activates the transforming growth factor β (TGF-β) pathway, promoting cell invasion, a loss of cell polarity, increased cell survival, and other hallmarks of early neoplasia. Overexpression of eIF4E is shown to facilitate the selective translation of integrin β1 mRNA, which drives the translationally controlled assembly of a TGF-β receptor signaling complex containing α3β1 integrins, β-catenin, TGF-β receptor I, E-cadherin, and phosphorylated Smad2/3. This receptor complex acutely sensitizes nonmalignant breast epithelial cells to activation by typically substimulatory levels of activated TGF-β. TGF-β can promote cellular differentiation or invasion and transformation. As a translational coactivator of TGF-β, eIF4E confers selective mRNA translation, reprogramming nonmalignant cells to an invasive phenotype by reducing the set point for stimulation by activated TGF-β. Overexpression of eIF4E may be a proinvasive facilitator of TGF-β activity. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  5. Eukaryotic Translation Initiation Factor 4E Is a Feed-Forward Translational Coactivator of Transforming Growth Factor β Early Protransforming Events in Breast Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Decarlo, Lindsey; Mestel, Celine; Barcellos-Hoff, Mary-Helen

    2015-01-01

    Eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4E (eIF4E) is overexpressed early in breast cancers in association with disease progression and reduced survival. Much remains to be understood regarding the role of eIF4E in human cancer. We determined, using immortalized human breast epithelial cells, that elevated expression of eIF4E translationally activates the transforming growth factor β (TGF-β) pathway, promoting cell invasion, a loss of cell polarity, increased cell survival, and other hallmarks of early neoplasia. Overexpression of eIF4E is shown to facilitate the selective translation of integrin β1 mRNA, which drives the translationally controlled assembly of a TGF-β receptor signaling complex containing α3β1 integrins, β-catenin, TGF-β receptor I, E-cadherin, and phosphorylated Smad2/3. This receptor complex acutely sensitizes nonmalignant breast epithelial cells to activation by typically substimulatory levels of activated TGF-β. TGF-β can promote cellular differentiation or invasion and transformation. As a translational coactivator of TGF-β, eIF4E confers selective mRNA translation, reprogramming nonmalignant cells to an invasive phenotype by reducing the set point for stimulation by activated TGF-β. Overexpression of eIF4E may be a proinvasive facilitator of TGF-β activity. PMID:25986608

  6. Probabilities of Natural Events Occurring at Savannah River Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, J.C.

    2001-07-17

    This report documents the comprehensive evaluation of probability models of natural events which are applicable to Savannah River Plant. The probability curves selected for these natural events are recommended to be used by all SRP/SRL safety analysts. This will ensure a consistency in analysis methodology for postulated SAR incidents involving natural phenomena.

  7. Measurements of e+e- to KKeta, KKpi0 and KsKpi CrossSections Using Initial State Radiation Events

    SciTech Connect

    Aubert, B.

    2007-11-12

    This paper reports measurements of processes: e{sup +}e{sup -} {yields} {gamma}K{sup 0}{sub s}K{sup {+-}}{pi}{sup {+-}}, e{sup +}e{sup -} {yields} {gamma}K{sup +}K{sup -}{pi}{sup 0}, e{sup +}e{sup -} {yields} {gamma}{phi}{eta} and e{sup +}e{sup -} {yields} {gamma}{phi}{pi}{sup 0}. The initial state radiated photon allows to cover the hadronic final state in the energy range from thresholds up to {approx} 4.6 GeV. The overall size of the data sample analyzed is 232 fb{sup -1}, collected by the BABAR detector running at the PEP-II e{sup +}e{sup -} storage ring. From the Dalitz plot analysis of the K{sup 0}{sub s}K{sup {+-}}{pi}{sup {+-}} final state, moduli and relative phase of the isoscalar and the isovector components of the e{sup +}e{sup -} {yields} KK*(892) cross section are determined. Parameters of {phi} and {rho} recurrences are also measured, using a global fitting procedure which exploits the interconnection among amplitudes, moduli and phases of the e{sup +}e{sup -} {yields}K{sup 0}{sub s}K{sup {+-}}{pi}{sup {+-}}, K{sup +}K{sup -}{pi}{sup 0}, {phi}{eta} final states. The cross section for the OZI-forbidden process e{sup +}e{sup -} {yields} {phi}{pi}{sup 0} and the J/{psi} branching fractions to KK*(892) and K{sup +}K{sup -}{eta} are also measured.

  8. Associations of Inflammatory Markers with AIDS and non-AIDS Clinical Events after Initiation of Antiretroviral Therapy: AIDS Clinical Trials Group A5224s, a substudy of ACTG A5202

    PubMed Central

    McComsey, Grace A; Kitch, Douglas; Sax, Paul E; Tierney, Camlin; Jahed, Nasreen C; Melbourne, Kathleen; Ha, Belinda; Brown, Todd T; Bloom, Anthony; Fedarko, Neal; Daar, Eric S

    2013-01-01

    Background The association of inflammatory biomarkers with clinical events after antiretroviral therapy (ART) initiation is unclear. Methods A5202 randomized 1857 treatment-naive subjects to abacavir/lamivudine or tenofovir-DF/emtricitabine with efavirenz or atazanavir/ritonavir. Substudy A5224s measured inflammatory biomarkers on subjects with available plasma from baseline and weeks 24 or 96. An exploratory analysis of the association of hsCRP, IL-6, sTNF-RI, sTNF-RII, TNF-α, sVCAM-1, and sICAM-1 with times to AIDS and to non-AIDS events used Cox proportional hazards models. Results Analysis included 244 subjects; 85% male, 48% white non-Hispanic, with median age 39 years, HIV-1 RNA 4.6 log10 copies/mL, and CD4 240 cells/μL. Overall, 13 AIDS events (9 opportunistic infections; 3 AIDS-cancers, 1 recurrent bacterial pneumonia) and 18 non-AIDS events (6 diabetes, 4 cancers, 3 cardiovascular, 5 pneumonias) occurred. Higher baseline IL-6, sTNF-RI, sTNF-RII, and sICAM-1 were significantly associated with increased risk of AIDS-defining events. Adjustment for baseline HIV-1 RNA did not change results, while adjusting for baseline CD4 count left only sTNF-RI and sICAM-1 significantly associated with increased risk. Time-updated values of IL-6, sTNFR-I and II, and sICAM-1 were also associated with an increased risk. For non-AIDS events, only higher baseline hsCRP was significantly associated with increased risk, while higher IL-6 was marginally associated with higher risk. Analyses of time-updated biomarker values showed TNF-α to be significantly associated with increased risk, even after adjustment for ART, and CD4 count or HIV-1 RNA. Conclusion Higher levels of several inflammatory biomarkers were independently associated with increased risk of AIDS and non-AIDS events. PMID:24121755

  9. Potential health risks from postulated accidents involving the Pu-238 RTG on the Ulysses solar exploration mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldman, Marvin; Hoover, Mark D.; Nelson, Robert C.; Templeton, William; Bollinger, Lance; Anspaugh, Lynn

    1991-01-01

    Potential radiation impacts from launch of the Ulysses solar exploration experiment were evaluated using eight postulated accident scenarios. Lifetime individual dose estimates rarely exceeded 1 mrem. Most of the potential health effects would come from inhalation exposures immediately after an accident, rather than from ingestion of contaminated food or water, or from inhalation of resuspended plutonium from contaminated ground. For local Florida accidents (that is, during the first minute after launch), an average source term accident was estimated to cause a total added cancer risk of up to 0.2 deaths. For accidents at later time after launch, a worldwide cancer risk of up to three cases was calculated (with a four in a million probability). Upper bound estimates were calculated to be about 10 times higher.

  10. Potential health risks from postulated accidents involving the Pu-238 RTG (radioisotope thermoelectric generator) on the Ulysses solar exploration mission

    SciTech Connect

    Goldman, M. ); Nelson, R.C. ); Bollinger, L. ); Hoover, M.D. . Inhalation Toxicology Research Inst.); Templeton, W. ); Anspaugh, L. (Lawren

    1990-11-02

    Potential radiation impacts from launch of the Ulysses solar exploration experiment were evaluated using eight postulated accident scenarios. Lifetime individual dose estimates rarely exceeded 1 mrem. Most of the potential health effects would come from inhalation exposures immediately after an accident, rather than from ingestion of contaminated food or water, or from inhalation of resuspended plutonium from contaminated ground. For local Florida accidents (that is, during the first minute after launch), an average source term accident was estimated to cause a total added cancer risk of up to 0.2 deaths. For accidents at later times after launch, a worldwide cancer risk of up to three cases was calculated (with a four in a million probability). Upper bound estimates were calculated to be about 10 times higher. 83 refs.

  11. Comparative Reaction Diagrams for the SN2 Reaction Formulated According to the Leffler Analysis and the Hammond Postulate.

    PubMed

    Haddon, Robert C; Tian, Ziqi; Jiang, De-En

    2016-05-06

    The Hammond Postulate and the Leffler analysis have provided a cornerstone in the understanding of reaction processes in organic chemistry for over 60 years, yet quantitative applications of these methodologies over the range of reactions envisaged in the original works remain elusive. In the present paper, we analyze a series of SN2 reactions in three solvents that lead to endothermic and exothermic reaction processes, and we show that within the hybridization reaction coordinate the SN2 reaction is fully consistent with both treatments. We give new presentations of the reaction energies as a function of reaction progress, which allow the generation of unified reaction coordinate diagrams that show a linear relationship between the hybridization metric of reaction progress and the relative energies of the stationary points on the potential surface as a function of structure and solvent as originally envisaged by Leffler and Hammond.

  12. Investigation of reactions postulated to occur during inhibition of ribonucleotide reductases by 2′-azido-2′-deoxynucleotides

    PubMed Central

    Dang, Thao P.; Sobczak, Adam J.; Mebel, Alexander M.; Chatgilialoglu, Chryssostomos; Wnuk, Stanislaw F.

    2012-01-01

    Model 3′-azido-3′-deoxynucleosides with thiol or vicinal dithiol substituents at C2′ or C5′ were synthesized to study reactions postulated to occur during inhibition of ribonucleotide reductases by 2′-azido-2′-deoxynucleotides. Esterification of 5′-(tert-butyldiphenylsilyl)-3′-azido-3′-deoxyadenosine and 3′-azido-3′-deoxythymidine (AZT) with 2,3-S-isopropylidene-2,3-dimercaptopropanoic acid or N-Boc-S-trityl-L-cysteine and deprotection gave 3′-azido-3′-deoxy-2′-O-(2,3-dimercaptopropanoyl or cysteinyl)adenosine and the 3′-azido-3′-deoxy-5′-O-(2,3-dimercaptopropanoyl or cysteinyl)thymidine analogs. Density functional calculations predicted that intramolecular reactions between generated thiyl radicals and an azido group on such model compounds would be exothermic by 33.6-41.2 kcal/mol and have low energy barriers of 10.4-13.5 kcal/mol. Reduction of the azido group occurred to give 3′-amino-3′-deoxythymidine, which was postulated to occur with thiyl radicals generated by treatment of 3′-azido-3′-deoxy-5′-O-(2,3-dimercaptopropanoyl)thymidine with 2,2′-azobis-(2-methyl-2-propionamidine) dihydrochloride. Gamma radiolysis of N2O-saturated aqueous solutions of AZT and cysteine produced 3′-amino-3′-deoxythymidine and thymine most likely by both radical and ionic processes. PMID:22711937

  13. The role of von Neumann and Lueders postulates in the Einstein, Podolsky, and Rosen considerations: Comparing measurements with degenerate and nondegenerate spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Khrennikov, Andrei

    2008-05-15

    We show that the projection postulate plays a crucial role in the discussion on the so-called quantum nonlocality, in particular, in the Einstein, Podolsky, and Rosen argument. We stress that the original von Neumann projection postulate was crucially modified by extending it to observables with degenerate spectra (the Lueders postulate) and we show that this modification is highly questionable from a physical point of view and is the real source of quantum nonlocality. The use of the original von Neumann postulate eliminates this problem: instead of an action at a distance nonlocality we obtain a classical measurement nonlocality, which is related to the synchronization of two measurements (on the two parts of a composite system)

  14. Influence of Offshore Initial Moisture Field and Convection on the Development of Coastal Convection in a Heavy Rainfall Event over South China during the Pre-summer Rainy Season

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Rong; Sun, Jianhua; Fu, Shenming

    2017-04-01

    This paper utilizes the observation data from the Southern China Monsoon Rainfall Experiment (SCMREX) and the numerical experiments to investigate the influence of moisture amount and convection development over the northern South China Sea on a heavy rainfall event in coastal South China on May 8, 2014. Intensive sounding and wind profiles data reveal that there existed a convergence region formed by the southwesterly and easterly jet in the Pearl River delta, which provided favorable conditions for the development of convection. Whether the initial relative humidity field was increased or decreased in the offshore area, or turning off sensible and latent heat release from the cumulus and microphysical processes, had significant effects on the intensity and movement of convection in the coastal areas of Guangdong owing to the adjustment of temperature and wind fields. Especially, when increasing offshore initial humidity, prosperous sea convection modified the circulation in the entire simulation area, and suppressed the development of convection over land. Moreover, if sensible and latent heat from cumulus and microphysical processes was turned off, the low-level jets could reach further north, and the convective system moved to the northeast in the later stage. These experiments indicate that offshore initial moisture filed and convection activity are indeed important for precipitation forecast in the coastal areas, therefore it's necessary to enhance offshore observation and data assimilation methods in the future.

  15. An Ambiguous Statement Called the "tetrad Postulate" and the Correct Field Equations Satisfied by the Tetrad Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodrigues, Waldyr A.; Souza, Quintino A. G.

    The names tetrad, tetrads, cotetrads have been used with many different meanings in the physics literature, not all of them equivalent from the mathematical point of view. In this paper, we introduce unambiguous definitions for each of those terms, and show how the old miscellanea made many authors introduce in their formalism an ambiguous statement called the "tetrad postulate," which has been the source of much misunderstanding, as we show explicitly by examining examples found in the literature. Since formulating Einstein's field equations intrinsically in terms of cotetrad fields θa, a = 0, 1, 2, 3 is a worthy enterprise, we derive the equation of motion of each θa using modern mathematical tools (the Clifford bundle formalism and the theory of the square of the Dirac operator). Indeed, we identify (giving all details and theorems) from the square of the Dirac operator some noticeable mathematical objects, namely, the Ricci, Einstein, covariant D'Alembertian and the Hodge Laplacian operators, which permit us to show that each θa satisfies a well-defined wave equation. Also, we present for completeness a detailed derivation of the cotetrad wave equations from a variational principle. We compare the cotetrad wave equation satisfied by each θa with some others appearing in the literature, and which are unfortunately in error.

  16. A critical review of the postulated role of the non-essential amino acid, β-N-methylamino-L-alanine, in neurodegenerative disease in humans.

    PubMed

    Chernoff, N; Hill, D J; Diggs, D L; Faison, B D; Francis, B M; Lang, J R; Larue, M M; Le, T-T; Loftin, K A; Lugo, J N; Schmid, J E; Winnik, W M

    2017-01-01

    The compound BMAA (β-N-methylamino-L-alanine) has been postulated to play a significant role in four serious neurological human diseases: Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis/Parkinsonism Dementia Complex (ALS/PDC) found on Guam, and ALS, Parkinsonism, and dementia that occur globally. ALS/PDC with symptoms of all three diseases first came to the attention of the scientific community during and after World War II. It was initially associated with cycad flour used for food because BMAA is a product of symbiotic cycad root-dwelling cyanobacteria. Human consumption of flying foxes that fed on cycad seeds was later suggested as a source of BMAA on Guam and a cause of ALS/PDC. Subsequently, the hypothesis was expanded to include a causative role for BMAA in other neurodegenerative diseases including Alzheimer's disease (AD) through exposures attributed to proximity to freshwaters and/or consumption of seafood due to its purported production by most species of cyanobacteria. The hypothesis that BMAA is the critical factor in the genesis of these neurodegenerative diseases received considerable attention in the medical, scientific, and public arenas. This review examines the history of ALS/PDC and the BMAA-human disease hypotheses; similarities and differences between ALS/PDC and the other diseases with similar symptomologies; the relationship of ALS/PDC to other similar diseases, studies of BMAA-mediated effects in lab animals, inconsistencies and data gaps in the hypothesis; and other compounds and agents that were suggested as the cause of ALS/PDC on Guam. The review concludes that the hypothesis of a causal BMAA neurodegenerative disease relationship is not supported by existing data.

  17. [Changes in mitochondrial membrane potentials and its exponential relation with phosphatidylserine translocation in the plasma membrane as markers in the initial events of apoptosis: evaluation in different spermatic fractions].

    PubMed

    Barroso Villa, Gerardo; Karchmer Krivitzky, Samuel; Castelazo Morales, Ernesto; Carballo Mondragón, Esperanza; Kably Ambe, Alberto

    2002-04-01

    To determine the integrity of the plasmatic membrane through phosphatidylserine (PS) translocation in two spermatic fractions and their correlation with the spermatic mitochondrial membrane potential. The analysis of both spermatic fractions was carried out through a discontinuous gradient separation with Percoli, in order to obtain two samples with high and low mobility (90-40%). Twelve patients were recruited for the initial evaluation of seminal parameters. Mitochondrial membrane integrity was determined using a second antibody (Mitosensor), and was analyzed by fluorescence microscopy, evaluating an average of 200 cells. A 450-490 nm excitation filter was used for this analysis. Cytoplasmatic assessment was carried out by anexine V bonding to PS, in order to determine the initial events of cellular death. Non parameter tests were used in order to determine the differences between mitochondrial potentials and plasmatic membrane processes. Linear correlation tests were used for the anexine V and Mitosensor ratios. Due to the study's design, some differences were observed regarding the displacement parameters and the presence of apoptosis, both, in the plasmatic membrane and in mitochondrial membrane potentials. A positive correlation between both, mitochondrial and cytoplasmic membrane functions was also found. This is the first study performing a comparative analysis between mitochondrial membrane function and cytoplasmatic PS expression as early cellular death markers. The male infertility population is probably associated with an increase in this kind of apoptosis processes.

  18. The postulations á la D’Alembert and á la Cauchy for higher gradient continuum theories are equivalent: a review of existing results

    PubMed Central

    Seppecher, P.

    2015-01-01

    In order to found continuum mechanics, two different postulations have been used. The first, introduced by Lagrange and Piola, starts by postulating how the work expended by internal interactions in a body depends on the virtual velocity field and its gradients. Then, by using the divergence theorem, a representation theorem is found for the volume and contact interactions which can be exerted at the boundary of the considered body. This method assumes an a priori notion of internal work, regards stress tensors as dual of virtual displacements and their gradients, deduces the concept of contact interactions and produces their representation in terms of stresses using integration by parts. The second method, conceived by Cauchy and based on the celebrated tetrahedron argument, starts by postulating the type of contact interactions which can be exerted on the boundary of every (suitably) regular part of a body. Then it proceeds by proving the existence of stress tensors from a balance-type postulate. In this paper, we review some relevant literature on the subject, discussing how the two postulations can be reconciled in the case of higher gradient theories. Finally, we underline the importance of the concept of contact surface, edge and wedge s-order forces. PMID:26730215

  19. The postulations á la D'Alembert and á la Cauchy for higher gradient continuum theories are equivalent: a review of existing results.

    PubMed

    dell'Isola, F; Seppecher, P; Corte, A Della

    2015-11-08

    In order to found continuum mechanics, two different postulations have been used. The first, introduced by Lagrange and Piola, starts by postulating how the work expended by internal interactions in a body depends on the virtual velocity field and its gradients. Then, by using the divergence theorem, a representation theorem is found for the volume and contact interactions which can be exerted at the boundary of the considered body. This method assumes an a priori notion of internal work, regards stress tensors as dual of virtual displacements and their gradients, deduces the concept of contact interactions and produces their representation in terms of stresses using integration by parts. The second method, conceived by Cauchy and based on the celebrated tetrahedron argument, starts by postulating the type of contact interactions which can be exerted on the boundary of every (suitably) regular part of a body. Then it proceeds by proving the existence of stress tensors from a balance-type postulate. In this paper, we review some relevant literature on the subject, discussing how the two postulations can be reconciled in the case of higher gradient theories. Finally, we underline the importance of the concept of contact surface, edge and wedge s-order forces.

  20. Ex Vivo and In Vivo Mice Models to Study Blastocystis spp. Adhesion, Colonization and Pathology: Closer to Proving Koch's Postulates

    PubMed Central

    Ajjampur, Sitara S. R.; Png, Chin Wen; Chia, Wan Ni; Zhang, Yongliang; Tan, Kevin S. W.

    2016-01-01

    Blastocystis spp. are widely prevalent extra cellular, non-motile anerobic protists that inhabit the gastrointestinal tract. Although Blastocystis spp. have been associated with gastrointestinal symptoms, irritable bowel syndrome and urticaria, their clinical significance has remained controversial. We established an ex vivo mouse explant model to characterize adhesion in the context of tissue architecture and presence of the mucin layer. Using confocal microscopy with tissue whole mounts and two axenic isolates of Blastocystis spp., subtype 7 with notable differences in adhesion to intestinal epithelial cells (IEC), isolate B (ST7-B) and isolate H (more adhesive, ST7-H), we showed that adhesion is both isolate dependent and tissue trophic. The more adhesive isolate, ST7-H was found to bind preferentially to the colon tissue than caecum and terminal ileum. Both isolates were also found to have mucinolytic effects. We then adapted a DSS colitis mouse model as a susceptible model to study colonization and acute infection by intra-caecal inoculation of trophic Blastocystis spp.cells. We found that the more adhesive isolate ST7-H was also a better colonizer with more mice shedding parasites and for a longer duration than ST7-B. Adhesion and colonization was also associated with increased virulence as ST7-H infected mice showed greater tissue damage than ST7-B. Both the ex vivo and in vivo models used in this study showed that Blastocystis spp. remain luminal and predominantly associated with mucin. This was further confirmed using colonic loop experiments. We were also successfully able to re-infect a second batch of mice with ST7-H isolates obtained from fecal cultures and demonstrated similar histopathological findings and tissue damage thereby coming closer to proving Koch’s postulates for this parasite. PMID:27508942

  1. The body has a brake: micrin is a postulated new gonadal hormone curbing tissue overgrowth and restricting reproduction.

    PubMed

    Hart, John E

    2014-12-01

    There is evidence for an unrecognised classical hormone secreted by the mammalian gonad. This postulated hormone--'micrin' (pronounced 'my-crin')--represents the body's brake against tissue overgrowth. When oestrogens are administered in high doses to female rats there is a considerable (non-artefactual) increase in the relative size and weight of organs such as the pituitary, adrenals, uterus and liver--suggesting an organotrophic (organ-building) role for endogenous oestrogens. This effect is exaggerated if the animals are first ovariectomized, indicating the removal of a negative ovarian factor, micrin. These organ enlargements can be reduced by pretreating the rats with large doses of antioestrogens such as clomiphene and tamoxifen. This antiestrogenic blockade of exogenous oestrogens is itself blunted by prior removal of the ovaries. It is proposed that antioestrogens (e.g. tamoxifen in breast cancer treatment) antagonize the organotrophic effects of oestrogens by competing for the oestrogen receptor peripherally and centrally and via an increase in the secretion of ovarian micrin. It is deduced that micrin is the testicular 'inhibin' proposed in the 1930s, not the molecule that now bears that name, which acts at the pituitary tier as a downregulator of follicle-stimulating hormone. The hallmark of micrin deficiency in the male rat is a pituitary hypertrophy that follows castration. This is reversible with a steroid-depleted aqueous bovine testicular extract, the micrin within which suppresses the hypothalamus, normalizing the pituitary. Micrin probably acts as a brake on peripheral tissues directly but also indirectly at the meta-level via the hypothalamic-pituitary axis, resetting a hypothalamic 'organostat' controlling organ and tissue masses, part of the 'organotrophic system' of internal size regulation. Besides endocrine (circulating) micrin from the gonads there is probably paracrine (locally acting) micrin produced in the brain. This is involved in a

  2. Unique cellular events occurring during the initial interaction of macrophages with matrix-retained or methylated aggregated low density lipoprotein (LDL). Prolonged cell-surface contact during which ldl-cholesteryl ester hydrolysis exceeds ldl protein degradation.

    PubMed

    Buton, X; Mamdouh, Z; Ghosh, R; Du, H; Kuriakose, G; Beatini, N; Grabowski, G A; Maxfield, F R; Tabas, I

    1999-11-05

    A critical event in atherogenesis is the interaction of arterial wall macrophages with subendothelial lipoproteins. Although most studies have investigated this interaction by incubating cultured macrophages with monomeric lipoproteins dissolved in media, arterial wall macrophages encounter lipoproteins that are mostly bound to subendothelial extracellular matrix, and these lipoproteins are often aggregated or fused. Herein, we utilize a specialized cell-culture system to study the initial interaction of macrophages with aggregated low density lipoprotein (LDL) bound to extracellular matrix. The aggregated LDL remains extracellular for a relatively prolonged period of time and becomes lodged in invaginations in the surface of the macrophages. As expected, the degradation of the protein moiety of the LDL was very slow. Remarkably, however, hydrolysis of the cholesteryl ester (CE) moiety of the LDL was 3-7-fold higher than that of the protein moiety, in stark contrast to the situation with receptor-mediated endocytosis of acetyl-LDL. Similar results were obtained using another experimental system in which the degradation of aggregated LDL protein was delayed by LDL methylation rather than by retention on matrix. Additional experiments indicated the following properties of this interaction: (a) LDL-CE hydrolysis is catalyzed by lysosomal acid lipase; (b) neither scavenger receptors nor the LDL receptor appear necessary for the excess LDL-CE hydrolysis; and (c) LDL-CE hydrolysis in this system is resistant to cellular potassium depletion, which further distinguishes this process from receptor-mediated endocytosis. In summary, experimental systems specifically designed to mimic the in vivo interaction of arterial wall macrophages with subendothelial lipoproteins have demonstrated an initial period of prolonged cell-surface contact in which CE hydrolysis exceeds protein degradation.

  3. Observations and Modeling of Composition of Upper Troposphere/Lower Stratosphere (UTILS): Isentropic Mixing Events and Morphology of HNO3 as Observed by HIRDLS and Comparison with Results from Global Modeling Initiative

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rodriquez, J. M.; Douglass, A.R.; Yoshida, Y.; Strahan, S.; Duncan, B.; Olsen, M.; Gille, J.; Yudin, V.; Nardi, B.

    2008-01-01

    isentropic exchange of air masses between the tropical upper troposphere and mid-latitude lowermost stratosphere (the so-called "middle world") is an important pathway for stratospheric-tropospheric exchange. A seasonal, global view of this process has been difficult to obtain, in part due to the lack of the vertical resolution in satellite observations needed to capture the laminar character of these events. Ozone observations at a resolution of about 1 km from the High Resolution Dynamic Limb Sounder (HIRDLS) on NASA's Aura satellite show instances of these intrusions. Such intrusions should also be observable in HN03 observations; however, the abundances of nitric acid could be additionally controlled by chemical processes or incorporation and removal into ice clouds. We present a systematic examination of the HIRDLS data on O3 and HNO3 to determine the seasonal and spatial characteristics of the distribution of isentropic intrusions. At the same time, we compare the observed distributions with those calculated by the Global Modeling Initiative combined tropospheric-stratospheric model, which has a vertical resolution of about I km. This Chemical Transport Model (CTM) is driven by meteorological fields obtained from the GEOS-4 system of NASA/Goddard Global Modeling and Assimilation Office (GMAO), for the Aura time period, at a vertical resolution of about 1 km. Such comparison brings out the successes and limitations of the model in representing isentropic stratospheric-tropospheric exchange, and the different processes controlling HNO3 in the UTAS.

  4. Fulfillment of Koch’s postulates and partial host range of Septoria lepidii Desm., a fungal pathogen for potential biological control of hoary cress (Lepidium spp.)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    We have fulfilled Koch’s postulates and conducted host range tests with Septoria lepidii Desm. on five geographical accessions of hoary cress. Host range results showed the fungus specific to Lepidium spp. and damaging to hoary cress. This fungus is potentially an important biological control agent ...

  5. Event Perception.

    PubMed

    Radvansky, Gabriel; Zacks, Jeffrey M

    2011-11-01

    Events are central elements of human experience. Formally, they can be individuated in terms of the entities that compose them, the features of those entities, and the relations amongst entities. Psychologically, representations of events capture their spatiotemporal location, the people and objects involved, and the relations between these elements. Here, we present an account of the nature of psychological representations of events and how they are constructed and updated. Event representations are like images in that they are isomorphic to the situations they represent. However, they are like models or language in that they are constructed of components rather than being holistic. Also, they are partial representations that leave out some elements and abstract others. Representations of individual events are informed by schematic knowledge about general classes of events. Event representations are constructed in a process that segments continuous activity into discrete events. The construction of a series of event representations forms a basis for predicting the future, planning for that future, and imagining alternatives.

  6. Event Perception

    PubMed Central

    Radvansky, Gabriel; Zacks, Jeffrey M.

    2012-01-01

    Events are central elements of human experience. Formally, they can be individuated in terms of the entities that compose them, the features of those entities, and the relations amongst entities. Psychologically, representations of events capture their spatiotemporal location, the people and objects involved, and the relations between these elements. Here, we present an account of the nature of psychological representations of events and how they are constructed and updated. Event representations are like images in that they are isomorphic to the situations they represent. However, they are like models or language in that they are constructed of components rather than being holistic. Also, they are partial representations that leave out some elements and abstract others. Representations of individual events are informed by schematic knowledge about general classes of events. Event representations are constructed in a process that segments continuous activity into discrete events. The construction of a series of event representations forms a basis for predicting the future, planning for that future, and imagining alternatives. PMID:23082236

  7. Initial Results on Soil Moisture in Relation to Timing of Snowpack, Temperature, and Heavy Vs. Moderate Rain Events from a New Soil Monitoring Network in the Southern Rocky Mountains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osenga, E. C.; Schnissel, J.; Katzenberger, J.

    2014-12-01

    The Roaring Fork Valley (RFV) in the Rocky Mountains of Colorado is comprised of a diversity of ecosystems occurring within a single watershed. From one end of the valley to the other, the landscape undergoes an over 1500m gain in elevation, creating a unique opportunity for comparison of conditions in different habitats of close geographic proximity. Interested in comparing the ecological responses of these different habitats in the context of rising global temperatures, the Aspen Global Change Institute (AGCI) partnered with City of Aspen, Pitkin Country Open Space and Trails, and the Aspen Center for Environmental Studies to install soil monitoring stations at multiple elevations within the watershed. Soil moisture was identified as the primary indicator for monitoring because there is a dearth of local soil moisture data, and soil moisture plays a vital role in plant survival and correlates closely with precipitation and air temperature. Additionally, as precipitation regimes shift in the future, there is a need to better understand the interplay between vegetative water availability during the critical early growing season and timing, areal extent, and depth of snowpack. Two initial soil monitoring stations were installed in undeveloped, montane ecosystems of the Roaring Fork Watershed in 2012. Each station measures air temperature; relative humidity; rainfall; and soil moisture at 5, 20, and 52 cm depths. Two additional soil monitoring stations are being established over the summer of 2014, and additional stations within the Roaring Fork soil moisture network are planned for future years. Early data from the existing sites indicate the importance of timing of snowmelt in maintaining soil moisture through the early dry months of summer and dissimilarity between the impact of moderate and heavy rain events on soil moisture at different depths. These data have implications for restoration, management, and planning for local ecosystems and have significance for

  8. Event Shape Sorting: selecting events with similar evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomášik, Boris; Kopečná, Renata

    2017-03-01

    We present novel method for the organisation of events. The method is based on comparing event-by-event histograms of a chosen quantity Q that is measured for each particle in every event. The events are organised in such a way that those with similar shape of the Q-histograms end-up placed close to each other. We apply the method on histograms of azimuthal angle of the produced hadrons in ultrarelativsitic nuclear collisions. By selecting events with similar azimuthal shape of their hadron distribution one chooses events which are likely that they underwent similar evolution from the initial state to the freeze-out. Such events can more easily be compared to theoretical simulations where all conditions can be controlled. We illustrate the method on data simulated by the AMPT model.

  9. Estimated subsidence in the Chino-Riverside and Bunker Hill-Yucaipa areas in Southern California for a postulated water-level lowering, 1965-2015

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lofgren, Ben Elder

    1971-01-01

    One of the alternate plans for water utilization being considered by the California Department of Water Resources in the Chino-Riverside and Bunker Hill-Yucaipa areas in southern California involves partial mining of ground water during the period 1965-2015, and consequent substantial lowering of water levels. The Department wants to know whether land subsidence would be a problem as a result of the postulated lowering. To answer this question, to the extent that leveling control permits, the present study has been made at the request of and in cooperation with the State of California.At a few locations in the Chino-Riverside and Bunker Hill-Yucaipa areas, comparable water-level decline and subsidence data are available from which rough estimates can be made of subsidence that would occur as a result of the postulated lowering from 1965 to 2015. Limited leveling control, and apparent discrepancies in the data, preclude accurate determination of amounts of subsidence caused by historic water-level decline.Based on 1965-2015 water-level changes postulated by the California Department of Water Resources and on available subsidence/head decline ratios, as much as 6 feet of subsidence might occur northeast of the San Jacinto fault between Loma Linda and San Bernardino, in an area of more than 350 feet of projected water-level decline. Also, as much as 1.5 feet of subsidence might occur in the vicinity of Ontario.

  10. EVENT SEGMENTATION

    PubMed Central

    Zacks, Jeffrey M.; Swallow, Khena M.

    2012-01-01

    One way to understand something is to break it up into parts. New research indicates that segmenting ongoing activity into meaningful events is a core component of ongoing perception, with consequences for memory and learning. Behavioral and neuroimaging data suggest that event segmentation is automatic and that people spontaneously segment activity into hierarchically organized parts and sub-parts. This segmentation depends on the bottom-up processing of sensory features such as movement, and on the top-down processing of conceptual features such as actors’ goals. How people segment activity affects what they remember later; as a result, those who identify appropriate event boundaries during perception tend to remember more and learn more proficiently. PMID:22468032

  11. Childhood leukemia genetic bottleneck phenomenon related to TEL-AML1: the postulation by a mathematical model.

    PubMed

    Ivanovski, Petar; Ivanovski, Ivan; Nikolić, Dimitrije; Jovanović, Ivana

    2012-03-01

    Childhood leukemia bottleneck phenomenon is the most mysterious corollary of the prenatal origin discovery of leukemogenic chromosome translocations. The bottleneck is evidence that leukemia initiation, by in utero acquired chromosome translocations that generate functional fusion genes, is far more common than the incidence rate of corresponding leukemia. For childhood TEL-AML1(+) acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) this equates to approximately 100 times. Practically this means that among a hundred children born with TEL-AML1 fusion gene, only one child will later in its life develop ALL. The key data necessary for unraveling of this mystery were discovered in 2002. It was the level of TEL-AML1(+) cells’ frequency. The bottleneck is caused by the very low body TEL-AML1(+) cell count. Only one out of a thousand B cells carries TEL-AML1 fusion gene. TEL-AML1(+) body cell count is low because TEL-AML1 fusion is generated at cell level of 10(-3) to 10(-4) just during the late fetal lymphopoiesis i.e. after the 36th gestational week.

  12. Mysterious Decomposition of Alkoxyphosphonium Chlorides: Postulated Involvement of the HCl2 Anion and Its Capture in the Solid State.

    PubMed

    Nikitin, Kirill; Müller-Bunz, Helge; Muldoon, Jimmy; Gilheany, Declan G

    2017-04-06

    P-Alkoxyphosphonium (AP) chlorides were generated by reacting P-chlorophosphonium chlorides with alcohols. Their well-known spontaneous Arbuzov-type collapse leading to phosphine oxides was studied and its rate found to be dependent on a number of factors in an unexpected fashion: it is inversely proportional to the initial concentration and it shows strong dependence on the acidity of the media but is not very sensitive to the presence of base. To explain these observations, we evoke a self-inhibition model with the formation of the less nucleophilic hydrodichloride anion HCl2 in solution. Detailed analysis of the kinetic data yields the association constant (K=3×10(2)  m(-1) ) of the putative HCl2 species in chloroform. Experimental observations for the collapse of highly enriched diastereomeric alkoxyphosphonium (DAP) chlorides are fully analogous to the achiral AP also implying the involvement of HCl2 anions. Moreover, crystallisation of a highly enriched DAP salt derived from (-)-menthol furnished, for the first time, crystals of individual (RP )-DAP hydrodichloride as confirmed by X-ray diffractometry. Importantly, the P-configuration and detailed conformation of the DAP moiety is in good agreement with DFT-level computational results. The thermal collapse of (RP )-DAP⋅HCl2 proceeds with complete retention of the P-configuration furnishing the phosphine oxide of exceptional enantiomeric purity.

  13. Transformational Events

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Denning, Peter J.; Hiles, John E.

    2006-01-01

    Transformational Events is a new pedagogic pattern that explains how innovations (and other transformations) happened. The pattern is three temporal stages: an interval of increasingly unsatisfactory ad hoc solutions to a persistent problem (the "mess"), an offer of an invention or of a new way of thinking, and a period of widespread adoption and…

  14. Transformational Events

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Denning, Peter J.; Hiles, John E.

    2006-01-01

    Transformational Events is a new pedagogic pattern that explains how innovations (and other transformations) happened. The pattern is three temporal stages: an interval of increasingly unsatisfactory ad hoc solutions to a persistent problem (the "mess"), an offer of an invention or of a new way of thinking, and a period of widespread adoption and…

  15. Complex Event Recognition Architecture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fitzgerald, William A.; Firby, R. James

    2009-01-01

    Complex Event Recognition Architecture (CERA) is the name of a computational architecture, and software that implements the architecture, for recognizing complex event patterns that may be spread across multiple streams of input data. One of the main components of CERA is an intuitive event pattern language that simplifies what would otherwise be the complex, difficult tasks of creating logical descriptions of combinations of temporal events and defining rules for combining information from different sources over time. In this language, recognition patterns are defined in simple, declarative statements that combine point events from given input streams with those from other streams, using conjunction, disjunction, and negation. Patterns can be built on one another recursively to describe very rich, temporally extended combinations of events. Thereafter, a run-time matching algorithm in CERA efficiently matches these patterns against input data and signals when patterns are recognized. CERA can be used to monitor complex systems and to signal operators or initiate corrective actions when anomalous conditions are recognized. CERA can be run as a stand-alone monitoring system, or it can be integrated into a larger system to automatically trigger responses to changing environments or problematic situations.

  16. Postulating that our neurological models for musculoskeletal support, movement, and emotional expression come from archetypal forms in early organisms.

    PubMed

    Appleton, John A

    2006-01-01

    The ability for humans, in principle, to almost effortlessly support themselves against gravity, to move with grace, and to express themselves in subtle and beautiful ways is amazing, given the number of moveable joints, variety of obstacles and intentions, and possible emotions to express. The actual mechanics are obviously astonishing but the models for these activities, in origin, must be simple. The basic hypotheses concerning these models are the following: The neurological model for the control of our musculoskeletal system is a simple support system from early organisms. This model involves a complementary relationship between the dorsal and ventral surfaces. There are three functionally distinct parts of the body, though not visually observable. These parts, named here "the director, motor, and rudder segments," are functionally distinct in optimal posture and movement. Healthy balance, posture, and movement result from their relatively independent yet coordinated actions. Forms of locomotion used by early organisms: peristalsis, lateral undulation, and dorsal-ventral undulation are present in us yet. Four frozen phases of the dorsal-ventral wave, for example, constitute four distinct postural and personality styles. I present these hypotheses together in this short paper as an introduction to a new illustration-dependent way to conceive some of our psychophysical realities. The hypotheses came from efforts to develop mental imagery to assist students in learning the Alexander technique (AT). In addition, a little known theory concerning four basic emotions and personality types, called the Fusion Theory, provided an initial concept of personality types. Four fixed postural patterns that I observed in teaching AT linked well to this personality typology. There is research that supports the use of mental imagery to affect change in body use, mostly in the sports and dance fields, but none exists addressing the specific imagery derived from these hypotheses

  17. Postulation of rust resistance genes in Nordic spring wheat genotypes and identification of widely effective sources of resistance against the Australian rust flora.

    PubMed

    Randhawa, Mandeep; Bansal, Urmil; Lillemo, Morten; Miah, Hanif; Bariana, Harbans

    2016-11-01

    Wild relatives, landraces and cultivars from different geographical regions have been demonstrated as the sources of genetic variation for resistance to rust diseases. This study involved assessment of diversity for resistance to three rust diseases among a set of Nordic spring wheat cultivars. These cultivars were tested at the seedling stage against several pathotypes of three rust pathogens in the greenhouse. All stage stem rust resistance genes Sr7b, Sr8a, Sr12, Sr15, Sr17, Sr23 and Sr30, and leaf rust resistance genes Lr1, Lr3a, Lr13, Lr14a, Lr16 and Lr20 were postulated either singly or in different combinations among these cultivars. A high proportion of cultivars were identified to carry linked rust resistance genes Sr15 and Lr20. Although 51 cultivars showed variation against Puccinia striiformis f. sp. tritici (Pst) pathotypes used in this study, results were not clearly contrasting to enable postulation of stripe rust resistance genes in these genotypes. Stripe rust resistance gene Yr27 was postulated in four cultivars and Yr1 was present in cultivar Zebra. Cultivar Tjalve produced low stripe rust response against all Pst pathotypes indicating the presence either of a widely effective resistance gene or combination of genes with compensating pathogenic specificities. Several cultivars carried moderate to high level of APR to leaf rust and stripe rust. Seedling stem rust susceptible cultivar Aston exhibited moderately resistant to moderately susceptible response, whereas other cultivars belonging to this class were rated moderately susceptible or higher. Molecular markers linked with APR genes Yr48, Lr34/Yr18/Sr57, Lr68 and Sr2 detected the presence of these genes in some genotypes.

  18. Rare Events

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-10-01

    terrorists are likely to acquire and use WMDs over the next ten years. • Provide means to target areas, entities and persons facilitating adver - sary WMD...complicated and unpredictable to begin with, but also that human adver - saries (unlike physical disasters) will react and adapt to our planning to try to make...virulent vaccine strain (Keim et al., 2001). The latter might not be regarded as a bioterrorism event, even though it caused seven deaths and incited

  19. Temporal event sequence simplification.

    PubMed

    Monroe, Megan; Lan, Rongjian; Lee, Hanseung; Plaisant, Catherine; Shneiderman, Ben

    2013-12-01

    Electronic Health Records (EHRs) have emerged as a cost-effective data source for conducting medical research. The difficulty in using EHRs for research purposes, however, is that both patient selection and record analysis must be conducted across very large, and typically very noisy datasets. Our previous work introduced EventFlow, a visualization tool that transforms an entire dataset of temporal event records into an aggregated display, allowing researchers to analyze population-level patterns and trends. As datasets become larger and more varied, however, it becomes increasingly difficult to provide a succinct, summarizing display. This paper presents a series of user-driven data simplifications that allow researchers to pare event records down to their core elements. Furthermore, we present a novel metric for measuring visual complexity, and a language for codifying disjoint strategies into an overarching simplification framework. These simplifications were used by real-world researchers to gain new and valuable insights from initially overwhelming datasets.

  20. Environmental consequences of postulated radionuclide releases from the Battelle Memorial Institute Columbus Laboratories JN-1b Building at the West Jefferson site as a result of severe natural phenomena

    SciTech Connect

    Jamison, J.D.; Watson, E.C.

    1982-02-01

    Potential environmental consequences in terms of radiation dose to people are presented for postulated radionuclide releases caused by severe natural phenomena at the Battelle Memorial Institute Columbus Laboratories JN-1b Building at the West Jefferson site. The severe natural phenomena considered are earthquakes, tornadoes, and high straight-line winds. Maximum radioactive material deposition values are given for significant locations around the site. All important potential exposure pathways are examined. The most likely 50-year committed dose equivalents are given for the maximum-exposed individual and the population within a 50-mile radius of the plant. The maximum radioactive material deposition values likely to occur offsite are also given. The most likely calculated 50-year collective committed dose equivalents are all much lower than the collective dose equivalent expected from 50 years of exposure to natural background radiation and medical x-rays. The most likely maximum residual plutonium contamination estimated to be deposited offsite following the events are well below the Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) proposed guideline for plutonium in the general environment of 0.2 ..mu..Ci/m/sup 2/. The likely maximum residual contamination from beta and gamma emitters are far below the background produced by fallout from nuclear weapons tests in the atmosphere.

  1. Sweepoviruses Cause Disease in Sweet Potato and Related Ipomoea spp.: Fulfilling Koch's Postulates for a Divergent Group in the Genus Begomovirus

    PubMed Central

    Márquez-Martín, Belén; Moriones, Enrique; Navas-Castillo, Jesús

    2011-01-01

    Sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas) and related Ipomoea species are frequently infected by monopartite begomoviruses (genus Begomovirus, family Geminiviridae), known as sweepoviruses. Unlike other geminiviruses, the genomes of sweepoviruses have been recalcitrant to rendering infectious clones to date. Thus, Koch's postulates have not been fullfilled for any of the viruses in this group. Three novel species of sweepoviruses have recently been described in Spain: Sweet potato leaf curl Lanzarote virus (SPLCLaV), Sweet potato leaf curl Spain virus (SPLCSV) and Sweet potato leaf curl Canary virus (SPLCCaV). Here we describe the generation of the first infectious clone of an isolate (ES:MAL:BG30:06) of SPLCLaV. The clone consisted of a complete tandem dimeric viral genome in a binary vector. Successful infection by agroinoculation of several species of Ipomoea (including sweet potato) and Nicotiana benthamiana was confirmed by PCR, dot blot and Southern blot hybridization. Symptoms observed in infected plants consisted of leaf curl, yellowing, growth reduction and vein yellowing. Two varieties of sweet potato, ‘Beauregard’ and ‘Promesa’, were infected by agroinoculation, and symptoms of leaf curl and interveinal loss of purple colouration were observed, respectively. The virus present in agroinfected plants was readily transmitted by the whitefly Bemisia tabaci to I. setosa plants. The progeny virus population present in agroinfected I. setosa and sweet potato plants was isolated and identity to the original isolate was confirmed by sequencing. Therefore, Koch's postulates were fulfilled for the first time for a sweepovirus. PMID:22073314

  2. Geophysical events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    This is a summary of SEAN Bulletin, 13(2), February 29, 1988, a publication of the Smithsonian Institution's Scientific Event Alert Network. The complete bulletin is available in the microfiche edition of Eos as a microfiche supplement or as a paper reprint. For the microfiche, order document E88-002 at $2.50 (U.S.) by writing to AGU Orders, 2000 Florida Avenue, N.W., Washington, DC 20009 or by calling toll free on 800-424-2488. For the paper reprint, order SEAN Bulletin (giving volume and issue numbers and issue date) through the same address; the price is $3.50 for one copy of each issue number for those who do not have a deposit account, $2 for those who do; additional copies of each issue number are $ 1.

  3. Reactivity initiated accident test series Test RIA 1-4

    SciTech Connect

    Martinson, Z.R.; El-Genk, M.S.; Fukuda, S.K.; LaPointe, R.E.; Osetek, D.J.

    1980-05-01

    The Reactivity Initiated Accident (RIA) Test RIA 1-4, the first 9-rod fuel rod bundle RIA Test to be performed at BWR hot startup conditions, was completed on April 16, 1980. The test was performed in the Power Burst Facility (PBF). Objective for Test RIA 1-4 was to provide information regarding loss-of-coolable fuel rod geometry following a RIA event for a peak fuel enthalpy equivalent to the present licensing criteria of 280 cal/g. The most severe RIA is the postulated Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) control rod drop during reactor startup. Therefore the test was conducted at BWR hot startup coolant conditions (538 K, 6.45 MPa, 0.8 1/sec). The test sequence began with steady power operation to condition the fuel, establish a short-lived fission product inventory, and calibrate the calorimetric measurements and core power chambers, neutron flux and gamma flux detectors. The test train was removed from the in-pile tube (IPT) to replace one of the fuel rods with a nominally identical irradiated rod and twelve flux wire monitors. A 2.8 ms period power burst was then performed. Coolant flow measurements were made before and after the power burst to characterize the flow blockage that occurred as a result of fuel rod failure.

  4. Events diary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2000-01-01

    as Imperial College, the Royal Albert Hall, the Royal College of Art, the Natural History and Science Museums and the Royal Geographical Society. Under the heading `Shaping the future together' BA2000 will explore science, engineering and technology in their wider cultural context. Further information about this event on 6 - 12 September may be obtained from Sandra Koura, BA2000 Festival Manager, British Association for the Advancement of Science, 23 Savile Row, London W1X 2NB (tel: 0171 973 3075, e-mail: sandra.koura@britassoc.org.uk ). Details of the creating SPARKS events may be obtained from creating.sparks@britassoc.org.uk or from the website www.britassoc.org.uk . Other events 3 - 7 July, Porto Alegre, Brazil VII Interamerican conference on physics education: The preparation of physicists and physics teachers in contemporary society. Info: IACPE7@if.ufrgs.br or cabbat1.cnea.gov.ar/iacpe/iacpei.htm 27 August - 1 September, Barcelona, Spain GIREP conference: Physics teacher education beyond 2000. Info: www.blues.uab.es/phyteb/index.html

  5. Computer programs for developing source terms for a UF{sub 6} dispersion model to simulate postulated UF{sub 6} releases from buildings

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, W.R.

    1985-03-01

    Calculational methods and computer programs for the analysis of source terms for postulated releases of UF{sub 6} are presented. Required thermophysical properties of UF{sub 6}, HF, and H{sub 2}O are described in detail. UF{sub 6} reacts with moisture in the ambient environment to form HF and H{sub 2}O. The coexistence of HF and H{sub 2}O significantly alters their pure component properties, and HF vapor polymerizes. Transient compartment models for simulating UF{sub 6} releases inside gaseous diffusion plant feed and withdrawl buildings and cascade buildings are also described. The basic compartment model mass and energy balances are supported by simple heat transfer, ventilation system, and deposition models. A model that can simulate either a closed compartment or a steady-state ventilation system is also discussed. The transient compartment models provide input to an atmospheric dispersion model as output.

  6. Source term evaluation for postulated UF{sub 6} release accidents in gaseous diffusion plants -- Summer ventilation mode (non-seismic cases)

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, S.H.; Chen, N.C.J.; Taleyarkhan, R.P.; Wendel, M.W.; Keith, K.D.; Schmidt, R.W.; Carter, J.C.; Dyer, R.H.

    1996-12-30

    Computer models have been developed to simulate the transient behavior of aerosols and vapors as a result of a postulated accident involving the release of uranium hexafluoride (UF{sub 6}) into the process building of a gaseous diffusion plant. For the current study, gaseous UF{sub 6} is assumed to get released in the cell housing atmosphere through B-line break at 58.97 kg/s for 10 min and 30 min duration at the Paducah and Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plants. The released UF{sub 6} undergoes an exothermic chemical reaction with moisture (H{sub 2}O) in the air to form hydrogen fluoride (HF) and radioactive uranyl fluoride (UO{sub 2}F{sub 2}) while it disperses throughout the process building. As part of a facility-wide safety evaluation, this study evaluated source terms consisting of UO{sub 2}F{sub 2} as well as HF during a postulated UF{sub 6} release accident in a process building. UO{sub 2}F{sub 2} mainly remains as airborne-solid particles (aerosols), and HF is in a vapor form. Some UO{sub 2}F{sub 2} aerosols are removed from the air flow due to gravitational settling. The HF and the remaining UO{sub 2}F{sub 2} are mixed with air and exhausted through the building ventilation system. The MELCOR computer code was selected for simulating aerosols and vapor transport in the process building. To characterize leakage flow through the cell housing wall, 3-D CFD tool (CFDS-FLOW3D) was used. About 57% of UO{sub 2}F{sub 2} was predicted to be released into the environment. Since HF was treated as vapor, close to 100% was estimated to get released into the environment.

  7. Geophysical events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    This is a summary of SEAN Bulletin, 13 (6), June 30, 1988, a publication of the Smithsonian Institution's Scientific Event Alert Network. The complete bulletin is available in the microfiche edition of Eos as a microfiche supplement or as a paper reprint. For the microfiche, order document E88-005 at $2.50 (U.S.) by writing to AGU Orders, 2000 Florida Avenue, N.W., Washington, DC 20009 or by calling toll free on 800-424-2488. For the paper reprint, order SEAN Bulletin (giving volume and issue numbers and issue date) through the same address; the price is $3.50 for one copy of each issue number for those who do not have a deposit account, $2 for those who do; additional copies of each issue number are $ 1. Subscriptions to SEAN Bulletin are also available from AGU-Orders; the price is $18 for 12 monthly issues mailed to a U.S. address, $28 if mailed elsewhere, and must be prepaid. SEAN Bulletin is available on Kosmos. Type CHECK SEAN on Part A of Kosmos.

  8. Geophysical events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    This is a summary of SEAN Bulletin, 25(10), October 31, 1988, a publication of the Smithsonian Institution's Scientific Event Alert Network. The complete bulletin is available in the microfiche edition of Eos as a microfiche supplement or as a paper reprint. For the microfiche, order document E88-010 at $2.50 (U.S.) by writing to AGU Orders, 2000 Florida Avenue, N.W., Washington, DC 20009 or by calling toll free on 800-424-2488. For the paper reprint, order SEAN Bulletin (giving volume and issue numbers and issue date) through the same address; the price is $3.50 for one copy of each issue number for those who do not have a deposit account, $2 for those who do; additional copies of each issue number are $ 1 . Subscriptions to SEAN Bulletin are also available from AGU-Orders; the price is $18 for 12 monthly issues mailed to a U.S. address, $28 if mailed elsewhere, and must be prepaid. SEAN Bulletin is available on Kosmos. Type CHECK SEAN on Part A of Kosmos

  9. Geophysical events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    This is a summary of SEAN Bulletin, 13(3), March 31, 1988, a publication of the Smithsonian Institution's Scientific Event Alert Network. The complete bulletin is available in the microfiche edition of Eos as a microfiche supplement or as a paper reprint. For the microfiche, order document E88-002 at $2.50 (U.S.) by writing to AGU Orders, 2000 Florida Avenue, N.W., Washington, DC 20009 or by calling toll free on 800-424-2488. For the paper reprint, order SEAN Bulletin (giving volume and issue numbers and issue date) through the same address; the price is $3.50 for one copy of each issue number for those who do not have a deposit account, $2 for those who do; additional copies of each issue number are $1. Subscriptions to SEAN Bulletin are also available from AGU-Orders; the price is $18 for 12 monthly issues mailed to a U.S. address, $28 if mailed elsewhere, and must be prepaid.

  10. Geophysical events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    This is a summary of SEAN Bulletin, 13 (7), July 31, 1988, a publication of the Smithsonian Institution's Scientific Event Alert Network. The complete bulletin is available in the microfiche edition of Eos as a microfiche supplement or as a paper reprint. For the microfiche, order document E88-007 at $2.50 (U.S.) by writing to AGU Orders, 2000 Florida Avenue, N.W., Washington, DC 20009 or by calling toll free on 800-424-2488. For the paper reprint, order SEAN Bulletin (giving volume and issue numbers and issue date) through the same address; the price is $3.50 for one copy of each issue number for those who do not have a deposit account, $2 for those who do; additional copies of each issue number are $1. Subscriptions to SEAN Bulletin are also available from AGU-Orders; the price is $18 for 12 monthly issues mailed to a U.S. address, $28 if mailed elsewhere, and must be prepaid. SEAN Bulletin is available on Kosmos. Type CHECK SEAN on Part A of Kosmos.

  11. Geophysical events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    This is a summary of SEAN Bulletin, 13 (1), January 31, 1988, a publication of the Smithsonian Institution's Scientific Event Alert Network. The complete bulletin is available in the microfiche edition of Eos as a microfiche supplement or as a paper reprint. For the microfiche, order document E88-001 at $2.50 (U.S.) by writing to AGU Orders, 2000 Florida Avenue, N.W., Washington, DC 20009 or by calling toll free on 800-424-2488. For the paper reprint, order SEAN Bulletin (giving volume and issue numbers and issue date) through the same address; the price is $3.50 for one copy of each issue number for those who do not have a deposit account, $2 for those who do; additional copies of each issue number are $ 1. Subscriptions to SEAN Bulletin are also available from AGU Orders; the price is $18 for 12 monthly issues mailed to a U.S. address, $28 if mailed elsewhere, and must be prepaid.

  12. Geophysical events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    This is a summary of SEAN Bulletin, 13(9), September 30, 1988, a publication of the Smithsonian Institution's Scientific Event Alert Network. The complete bulletin is available in the microfiche edition of Eos as a microfiche supplement or as a paper reprint. For the microfiche, order document E88-013 at $2.50 (U.S.) by writing to AGU Orders, 2000 Florida Avenue, N.W., Washington, DC 20009 or by calling toll free on 800-424-2488. For the paper reprint, order SEAN Bulletin (giving volume and issue numbers and issue date) through the same address; the price is $3.50 for one copy of each issue number for those who do not have a deposit account, $2 for those who do; additional copies of each issue number are $1. Subscriptions to SEAN Bulletin are also available from AGU-Orders; the price is $18 for 12 monthly issues mailed to a U.S. address, $28 if mailed elsewhere, and must be prepaid. SEAN Bulletin is available on Kosmos. Type CHECK SEAN on Part A of Kosmos.

  13. Geophysical events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    This is a summary of SEAN Bulletin, 13 (5), May 31, 1988, a publication of the Smithsonian Institution's Scientific Event Alert Network. The complete bulletin is available in the microfiche edition of Eos as a microfiche supplement or as a paper reprint. For the microfiche, order document E88-004 at $2.50 (U.S.) by writing to AGU Orders, 2000 Florida Avenue, N.W., Washington, DC 20009 or by calling toll free on 800-424-2488. For the paper reprint, order SEAN Bulletin (giving volume and issue numbers and issue date) through the same address; the price is $3.50 for one copy of each issue number for those who do not have a deposit account, $2 for those who do; additional copies of each issue number are $ 1. Subscriptions to SEAN Bulletin are also available from AGU-Orders; the price is $18 for 12 monthly issues mailed to a U.S. address, $28 if mailed elsewhere, and must be prepaid. SEAN Bulletin is available on Kosmos. Type CHECK SEAN on Part A of Kosmos.

  14. Moon Express Media Event

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-11-03

    Tom Engler, deputy director of Center Planning and Development at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, speaks to members of the media during an event to announce the agency's Lunar Cargo Transportation and Landing by Soft Touchdown, or Lunar CATALYST, initiative and introduced one of the partners, Moon Express Inc. of Moffett Field, California. The event took place at Kennedy's automated landing and hazard avoidance technology, or ALHAT, hazard field at the north end of the Shuttle Landing Facility. Moon Express is developing a lander with capabilities that will enable delivery of payloads to the surface of the moon, as well as new science and exploration missions of interest to NASA and scientific and academic communities. Moon Express will base its activities at Kennedy and utilize the Morpheus ALHAT field and a hangar nearby for CATALYST testing. The Advanced Exploration Systems Division of NASA's Human Exploration and Operations Mission Directorate manages Lunar CATALYST.

  15. Moon Express Media Event

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-11-03

    Rob Mueller, NASA senior technologist in the Surface Systems Office in Kennedy Space Center's Engineering and Technology Directorate, demonstrates the Regolith Advanced Surface System Operations Robot, or RASSOR, during a media event at Kennedy's automated landing and hazard avoidance technology, or ALHAT, hazard field at the north end of the Shuttle Landing Facility. The event was held to announce Moon Express Inc., of Moffett Field, California is selected to utilize Kennedy facilities for NASA's Lunar Cargo Transportation and Landing by Soft Touchdown, or Lunar CATALYST, initiative. Moon Express is developing a lander with capabilities that will enable delivery of payloads to the surface of the moon, as well as new science and exploration missions of interest to NASA and scientific and academic communities. Moon Express will base its activities at Kennedy and utilize the Morpheus ALHAT field and a hangar nearby for CATALYST testing. The Advanced Exploration Systems Division of NASA's Human Exploration and Operations Mission Directorate manages Lunar CATALYST.

  16. Moon Express Media Event

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-11-03

    Greg C. Shavers, Lander Technology director at Marshall Space Flight Center in Alabama, speaks to members of the media during an event to announce the agency's Lunar Cargo Transportation and Landing by Soft Touchdown, or Lunar CATALYST, initiative and introduced one of the partners, Moon Express Inc. of Moffett Field, California. The event took place at Kennedy's automated landing and hazard avoidance technology, or ALHAT, hazard field at the north end of the Shuttle Landing Facility. Moon Express is developing a lander with capabilities that will enable delivery of payloads to the surface of the moon, as well as new science and exploration missions of interest to NASA and scientific and academic communities. Moon Express will base its activities at Kennedy and utilize the Morpheus ALHAT field and a hangar nearby for CATALYST testing. The Advanced Exploration Systems Division of NASA's Human Exploration and Operations Mission Directorate manages Lunar CATALYST.

  17. Moon Express Media Event

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-11-03

    Bob Richards, co-founder and chief executive officer of Moon Express Inc., of Moffett Field, California, speaks to the media during an event to announce the company's selection to use Kennedy Space Center's facilities as part of NASA's Lunar Cargo Transportation and Landing by Soft Touchdown, or Lunar CATALYST, initiative. The event took place at Kennedy's automated landing and hazard avoidance technology, or ALHAT, hazard field at the north end of the Shuttle Landing Facility. Moon Express is developing a lander with capabilities that will enable delivery of payloads to the surface of the moon, as well as new science and exploration missions of interest to NASA and scientific and academic communities. Moon Express will base its activities at Kennedy and utilize the Morpheus ALHAT field and a hangar nearby for CATALYST testing. The Advanced Exploration Systems Division of NASA's Human Exploration and Operations Mission Directorate manages Lunar CATALYST.

  18. Discourse Updating after Reading a Counterfactual Event

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Vega, Manuel; Urrutia, Mabel

    2012-01-01

    This paper explores the temporal course of discourse updating after reading counterfactual events. To test the accessibility to discourse information, readers were asked to identify probes related to initial events in the text, previous to the counterfactual, or probes related to the critical counterfactual events. Experiment 1 showed that 500 ms…

  19. Marginal regression of gaps between recurrent events.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yijian; Chen, Ying Qing

    2003-09-01

    Recurrent event data typically exhibit the phenomenon of intra-individual correlation, owing to not only observed covariates but also random effects. In many applications, the population may be reasonably postulated as a heterogeneous mixture of individual renewal processes, and the inference of interest is the effect of individual-level covariates. In this article, we suggest and investigate a marginal proportional hazards model for gaps between recurrent events. A connection is established between observed gap times and clustered survival data with informative cluster size. We subsequently construct a novel and general inference procedure for the latter, based on a functional formulation of standard Cox regression. Large-sample theory is established for the proposed estimators. Numerical studies demonstrate that the procedure performs well with practical sample sizes. Application to the well-known bladder tumor data is given as an illustration.

  20. Ports Initiative

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    EPA's Ports Initiative works in collaboration with the port industry, communities, and government to improve environmental performance and increase economic prosperity. This effort helps people near ports breath cleaner air and live better lives.

  1. Event segmentation ability uniquely predicts event memory.

    PubMed

    Sargent, Jesse Q; Zacks, Jeffrey M; Hambrick, David Z; Zacks, Rose T; Kurby, Christopher A; Bailey, Heather R; Eisenberg, Michelle L; Beck, Taylor M

    2013-11-01

    Memory for everyday events plays a central role in tasks of daily living, autobiographical memory, and planning. Event memory depends in part on segmenting ongoing activity into meaningful units. This study examined the relationship between event segmentation and memory in a lifespan sample to answer the following question: Is the ability to segment activity into meaningful events a unique predictor of subsequent memory, or is the relationship between event perception and memory accounted for by general cognitive abilities? Two hundred and eight adults ranging from 20 to 79years old segmented movies of everyday events and attempted to remember the events afterwards. They also completed psychometric ability tests and tests measuring script knowledge for everyday events. Event segmentation and script knowledge both explained unique variance in event memory above and beyond the psychometric measures, and did so as strongly in older as in younger adults. These results suggest that event segmentation is a basic cognitive mechanism, important for memory across the lifespan.

  2. Keep off the grass: marijuana use and acute cardiovascular events.

    PubMed

    Caldicott, David G E; Holmes, James; Roberts-Thomson, Kurt C; Mahar, Leo

    2005-10-01

    Marijuana is one of the most widely used recreational substances in the world, considered by many consumers as a relatively safe drug with few significant side-effects. We report the case of a 21-year-old man who suffered an acute myocardial infarction following the use of marijuana, despite having no other identifiable risk factors for an acute cardiovascular event. We review the published medical literature regarding acute cardiovascular events following marijuana use and postulate a possible mechanism for this unusual pathological consequence of marijuana use.

  3. A model for the release, dispersion and environmental impact of a postulated reactor accident from a submerged commercial nuclear power plant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertch, Timothy Creston

    1998-12-01

    Nuclear power plants are inherently suitable for submerged applications and could provide power to the shore power grid or support future underwater applications. The technology exists today and the construction of a submerged commercial nuclear power plant may become desirable. A submerged reactor is safer to humans because the infinite supply of water for heat removal, particulate retention in the water column, sedimentation to the ocean floor and inherent shielding of the aquatic environment would significantly mitigate the effects of a reactor accident. A better understanding of reactor operation in this new environment is required to quantify the radioecological impact and to determine the suitability of this concept. The impact of release to the environment from a severe reactor accident is a new aspect of the field of marine radioecology. Current efforts have been centered on radioecological impacts of nuclear waste disposal, nuclear weapons testing fallout and shore nuclear plant discharges. This dissertation examines the environmental impact of a severe reactor accident in a submerged commercial nuclear power plant, modeling a postulated site on the Atlantic continental shelf adjacent to the United States. This effort models the effects of geography, decay, particle transport/dispersion, bioaccumulation and elimination with associated dose commitment. The use of a source term equivalent to the release from Chernobyl allows comparison between the impacts of that accident and the postulated submerged commercial reactor plant accident. All input parameters are evaluated using sensitivity analysis. The effect of the release on marine biota is determined. Study of the pathways to humans from gaseous radionuclides, consumption of contaminated marine biota and direct exposure as contaminated water reaches the shoreline is conducted. The model developed by this effort predicts a significant mitigation of the radioecological impact of the reactor accident release

  4. Youth Initiatives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Employment and Training Administration (DOL), Washington, DC. Office of Youth Programs.

    Summarizing the first eight months of the planning, design, and implementation of the new federal youth programs created by the Youth Employment and Demonstration Projects Act of 1977 (YEDPA) and the efforts for expansion and enrichment of the Job Corps, this report explains the charters of the two projects and their initial successes in and…

  5. Environmental consequences of postulate plutonium releases from Atomics International's Nuclear Materials Development Facility (NMDF), Santa Susana, California, as a result of severe natural phenomena

    SciTech Connect

    Jamison, J.D.; Watson, E.C.

    1982-02-01

    Potential environmental consequences in terms of radiation dose to people are presented for postulated plutonium releases caused by severe natural phenomena at the Atomics International's Nuclear Materials Development Facility (NMDF), in the Santa Susana site, California. The severe natural phenomena considered are earthquakes, tornadoes, and high straight-line winds. Plutonium deposition values are given for significant locations around the site. All important potential exposure pathways are examined. The most likely 50-year committed dose equivalents are given for the maximum-exposed individual and the population within a 50-mile radius of the plant. The maximum plutonium deposition values likely to occur offsite are also given. The most likely calculated 50-year collective committed dose equivalents are all much lower than the collective dose equivalent expected from 50 years of exposure to natural background radiation and medical x-rays. The most likely maximum residual plutonium contamination estimated to be deposited offsite following the earthquake, and the 150-mph and 170-mph tornadoes are above the Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) proposed guideline for plutonium in the general environment of 0.2 ..mu..Ci/m/sup 2/. The deposition values following the 110-mph and the 130-mph tornadoes are below the EPA proposed guideline.

  6. Environmental consequences of postulated plutonium releases from General Electric Company Vallecitos Nuclear Center, Vallecitos, California, as a result of severe natural phenomena

    SciTech Connect

    Jamison, J.D.; Watson, E.C.

    1980-11-01

    Potential environmental consequences in terms of radiation dose to people are presented for postulated plutonium releases caused by severe natural phenomena at the General Electric Company Vallecitos Nuclear Center, Vallecitos, California. The severe natural phenomena considered are earthquakes, tornadoes, and high straight-line winds. Maximum plutonium deposition values are given for significant locations around the site. All important potential exposure pathways are examined. The most likely 50-year committed dose equivalents are given for the maximum-exposed individual and the population within a 50-mile radius of the plant. The maximum plutonium deposition values likely to occur offsite are also given. The most likely calculated 50-year collective committed dose equivalents are all much lower than the collective dose equivalent expected from 50 years of exposure to natural background radiation and medical x-rays. The most likely maximum residual plutonium contamination estimated to be deposited offsite following the earthquakes, and the 180-mph and 230-mph tornadoes are above the Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) proposed guideline for plutonium in the general environment of 0.2 ..mu..Ci/m/sup 2/. The deposition values following the 135-mph tornado are below the EPA proposed guidelines.

  7. Supplementary documentation for an Environmental Impact Statement regarding the Pantex Plant: radiological consequences of immediate inhalation of plutonium dispersed by postulated accidents

    SciTech Connect

    Elder, J.C.; Olsher, R.H.; Graf, J.M.

    1982-12-01

    This report documents work performed in support of preparation of an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) regarding the Department of Energy's (DOE) Pantex Plant near Amarillo, Texas. It describes methods used to estimate potential health consequences offsite resulting from inhalation of plutonium dispersed by each of several postulated accidents. The primary topic of this report is the delayed health effects of the plutonium in a nonnuclear detonation debris inhaled directly by members of the population in the cloud path. The expected form and size of the plutonium particles are derived from experimental data obatined in the Roller Coaster test series of 1963. Retention characteristics based on the International Commission on Radiation Protection (ICRP) Task Group Lung Model and organ dose calculations based on a modified computer model are described. Health risk estimates based on organ dose are made using appropriate risk factors recommended by international radiation protection organizations. The relative seriousness of each accident at each alternative site is assessed on the basis of the health risk estiamtes.

  8. Health information seeking and scanning among US adults aged 50-75 years: Testing a key postulate of the information overload model.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Jakob D; Liu, Miao; Carcioppolo, Nick; John, Kevin K; Krakow, Melinda; Sun, Ye

    2017-06-01

    Past research has found that older US adults (aged 50-75 years) exhibit high levels of cancer information overload and cancer worry; however, no study to date has examined whether these perceptions are related to information seeking/scanning. To explore this relationship, older adults ( N = 209, Mage = 55.56, SD = 4.24) were recruited to complete a survey measuring seeking, scanning, cancer information overload, and cancer worry. Most participants were high-scan/seekers (40.2%) followed by low-scan/seekers (21.1%), high-scan/no seekers (19.6%), and low-scan/no seekers (19.1%). Low-scan/no seekers had significantly higher cancer information overload compared to all other groups, consistent with the postulate that overload and seeking/scanning are negatively related. Low-scan/no seekers and high-scan/seekers both exhibited higher cancer worry severity, consistent with past research suggesting that cancer worry explains high levels of activity/inactivity.

  9. Lessons from the Chelyabinsk event

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emel'Yanenko, Vacheslav V.

    2016-01-01

    Recent investigations on small asteroids, initiated by the Chelyabinsk event, are reviewed. New estimates of the terrestrial impact rate, importance of Sun-grazing conditions in the evolution of near-Earth objects, and problems associated with dangerous objects approaching the Earth from the Sun direction are discussed.

  10. SCB initiator

    DOEpatents

    Bickes Jr., Robert W.; Renlund, Anita M.; Stanton, Philip L.

    1994-11-01

    A detonator for high explosives initiated by mechanical impact includes a cylindrical barrel, a layer of flyer material mechanically covering the barrel at one end, and a semiconductor bridge ignitor including a pair of electrically conductive pads connected by a semiconductor bridge. The bridge is in operational contact with the layer, whereby ignition of said bridge forces a portion of the layer through the barrel to detonate the explosive. Input means are provided for igniting the semiconductor bridge ignitor.

  11. SCB initiator

    DOEpatents

    Bickes, Jr., Robert W.; Renlund, Anita M.; Stanton, Philip L.

    1994-01-01

    A detonator for high explosives initiated by mechanical impact includes a cylindrical barrel, a layer of flyer material mechanically covering the barrel at one end, and a semiconductor bridge ignitor including a pair of electrically conductive pads connected by a semiconductor bridge. The bridge is in operational contact with the layer, whereby ignition of said bridge forces a portion of the layer through the barrel to detonate the explosive. Input means are provided for igniting the semiconductor bridge ignitor.

  12. Creating Special Events

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    deLisle, Lee

    2009-01-01

    "Creating Special Events" is organized as a systematic approach to festivals and events for students who seek a career in event management. This book looks at the evolution and history of festivals and events and proceeds to the nuts and bolts of event management. The book presents event management as the means of planning, organizing, directing,…

  13. Creating Special Events

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    deLisle, Lee

    2009-01-01

    "Creating Special Events" is organized as a systematic approach to festivals and events for students who seek a career in event management. This book looks at the evolution and history of festivals and events and proceeds to the nuts and bolts of event management. The book presents event management as the means of planning, organizing, directing,…

  14. Cross sections for the reactions e+e-→KS0KL0π0 , KS0KL0η , and KS0KL0π0π0 from events with initial-state radiation

    DOE PAGES

    Lees, J. P.; Poireau, V.; Tisserand, V.; ...

    2017-03-06

    Here, we study the processes e + e - → Kmore » $$0\\atop{S}$$ K$$0\\atop{L}$$ π 0 γ , K $$0\\atop{S}$$ K$$0\\atop{L}$$ η γ , and K$$0\\atop{S}$$ K$$0\\atop{L}$$ π 0 π 0 γ , where the photon is radiated from the initial state, providing cross section measurements for the hadronic final states over a continuum of center-of-mass energies. The results are based on 469 fb-1 of data collected at or near the Υ ( 4 S ) resonance with the BABAR detector at SLAC. We present the first measurements of the e+ e- → K$$0\\atop{S}$$ K$$0\\atop{L}$$ π 0 , K$$0\\atop{S}$$ K$$0\\atop{L}$$ η , and K$$0\\atop{S}$$ K$$0\\atop{L}$$ π 0π0 cross sections up to a center-of-mass energy of 4 GeV and study their intermediate resonance structures. We observe J / ψ decays to all of these final states for the first time, present measurements of their J / ψ branching fractions, and search for ψ (2S) decays.« less

  15. [Emergency drills and exercises to prepare the initial response and countermeasures for a disaster: an evacuation simulation for the hospital's outpatient blood collection room in the event of an earthquake].

    PubMed

    Kaneko, Makoto; Nakao, Hiroyuki; Morita, Kazuharu; Sone, Shinji; Masuda, Akiko; Yatomi, Yutaka

    2013-12-01

    In case of a disaster, the clinical laboratory's departmental staff is not only responsible for recovery efforts of routine work and the continuation of emergency tests, but also for protecting patients against both dangers and possible risks in the blood collecting room and physiology laboratory. For this reason, we decided to participate in an emergency drill, which focuses on the initial response to a disaster, specifically evacuation procedures and the cessation of phlebotomy operations. Since there were no existing manuals regarding disasters in our blood collection room, we first made a draft disaster plan. Additionally, since we were absolute beginners with regard to training and had inadequate knowledge of disaster countermeasures, we conducted theoretical simulations in advance. We decided to explain the evacuation details and had each participant in the exercise perform their own role in accordance with our scenario. Furthermore, we asked the participants to discuss the effectiveness of the training and seek out ways to improve our manuals. Although this was the first practice for the blood collection room, we were able to achieve our first goal by raising awareness of disaster prevention activities. The precautions against disaster that eliminate accidents require an immense amount of time and effort. Thus, it is necessary to continue training in order to increase the staffs awareness of disaster defense and to continue to improve our skills in the future.

  16. Cross sections for the reactions e+e-→KS0KL0π0 , KS0KL0η , and KS0KL0π0π0 from events with initial-state radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lees, J. P.; Poireau, V.; Tisserand, V.; Grauges, E.; Palano, A.; Eigen, G.; Brown, D. N.; Kolomensky, Yu. G.; Fritsch, M.; Koch, H.; Schroeder, T.; Hearty, C.; Mattison, T. S.; McKenna, J. A.; So, R. Y.; Blinov, V. E.; Buzykaev, A. R.; Druzhinin, V. P.; Golubev, V. B.; Kravchenko, E. A.; Onuchin, A. P.; Serednyakov, S. I.; Skovpen, Yu. I.; Solodov, E. P.; Todyshev, K. Yu.; Lankford, A. J.; Gary, J. W.; Long, O.; Eisner, A. M.; Lockman, W. S.; Panduro Vazquez, W.; Chao, D. S.; Cheng, C. H.; Echenard, B.; Flood, K. T.; Hitlin, D. G.; Kim, J.; Miyashita, T. S.; Ongmongkolkul, P.; Porter, F. C.; Röhrken, M.; Huard, Z.; Meadows, B. T.; Pushpawela, B. G.; Sokoloff, M. D.; Sun, L.; Smith, J. G.; Wagner, S. R.; Bernard, D.; Verderi, M.; Bettoni, D.; Bozzi, C.; Calabrese, R.; Cibinetto, G.; Fioravanti, E.; Garzia, I.; Luppi, E.; Santoro, V.; Calcaterra, A.; de Sangro, R.; Finocchiaro, G.; Martellotti, S.; Patteri, P.; Peruzzi, I. M.; Piccolo, M.; Rotondo, M.; Zallo, A.; Passaggio, S.; Patrignani, C.; Lacker, H. M.; Bhuyan, B.; Mallik, U.; Chen, C.; Cochran, J.; Prell, S.; Ahmed, H.; Gritsan, A. V.; Arnaud, N.; Davier, M.; Le Diberder, F.; Lutz, A. M.; Wormser, G.; Lange, D. J.; Wright, D. M.; Coleman, J. P.; Gabathuler, E.; Hutchcroft, D. E.; Payne, D. J.; Touramanis, C.; Bevan, A. J.; Di Lodovico, F.; Sacco, R.; Cowan, G.; Banerjee, Sw.; Brown, D. N.; Davis, C. L.; Denig, A. G.; Gradl, W.; Griessinger, K.; Hafner, A.; Schubert, K. R.; Barlow, R. J.; Lafferty, G. D.; Cenci, R.; Jawahery, A.; Roberts, D. A.; Cowan, R.; Robertson, S. H.; Dey, B.; Neri, N.; Palombo, F.; Cheaib, R.; Cremaldi, L.; Godang, R.; Summers, D. J.; Taras, P.; De Nardo, G.; Sciacca, C.; Raven, G.; Jessop, C. P.; LoSecco, J. M.; Honscheid, K.; Kass, R.; Gaz, A.; Margoni, M.; Posocco, M.; Simi, G.; Simonetto, F.; Stroili, R.; Akar, S.; Ben-Haim, E.; Bomben, M.; Bonneaud, G. R.; Calderini, G.; Chauveau, J.; Marchiori, G.; Ocariz, J.; Biasini, M.; Manoni, E.; Rossi, A.; Batignani, G.; Bettarini, S.; Carpinelli, M.; Casarosa, G.; Chrzaszcz, M.; Forti, F.; Giorgi, M. A.; Lusiani, A.; Oberhof, B.; Paoloni, E.; Rama, M.; Rizzo, G.; Walsh, J. J.; Smith, A. J. S.; Anulli, F.; Faccini, R.; Ferrarotto, F.; Ferroni, F.; Pilloni, A.; Piredda, G.; Bünger, C.; Dittrich, S.; Grünberg, O.; Heß, M.; Leddig, T.; Voß, C.; Waldi, R.; Adye, T.; Wilson, F. F.; Emery, S.; Vasseur, G.; Aston, D.; Cartaro, C.; Convery, M. R.; Dorfan, J.; Dunwoodie, W.; Ebert, M.; Field, R. C.; Fulsom, B. G.; Graham, M. T.; Hast, C.; Innes, W. R.; Kim, P.; Leith, D. W. G. S.; Luitz, S.; MacFarlane, D. B.; Muller, D. R.; Neal, H.; Ratcliff, B. N.; Roodman, A.; Sullivan, M. K.; Va'vra, J.; Wisniewski, W. J.; Purohit, M. V.; Wilson, J. R.; Randle-Conde, A.; Sekula, S. J.; Bellis, M.; Burchat, P. R.; Puccio, E. M. T.; Alam, M. S.; Ernst, J. A.; Gorodeisky, R.; Guttman, N.; Peimer, D. R.; Soffer, A.; Spanier, S. M.; Ritchie, J. L.; Schwitters, R. F.; Izen, J. M.; Lou, X. C.; Bianchi, F.; De Mori, F.; Filippi, A.; Gamba, D.; Lanceri, L.; Vitale, L.; Martinez-Vidal, F.; Oyanguren, A.; Albert, J.; Beaulieu, A.; Bernlochner, F. U.; King, G. J.; Kowalewski, R.; Lueck, T.; Nugent, I. M.; Roney, J. M.; Sobie, R. J.; Tasneem, N.; Gershon, T. J.; Harrison, P. F.; Latham, T. E.; Prepost, R.; Wu, S. L.; BaBar Collaboration

    2017-03-01

    We study the processes e+e- →KS0KL0π0 γ , KS0KL0η γ , and KS0KL0π0π0 γ , where the photon is radiated from the initial state, providing cross section measurements for the hadronic final states over a continuum of center-of-mass energies. The results are based on 469 fb-1 of data collected at or near the Υ (4 S ) resonance with the BABAR detector at SLAC. We present the first measurements of the e+e- →KS0KL0π0 , KS0KL0η , and KS0KL0π0π0 cross sections up to a center-of-mass energy of 4 GeV and study their intermediate resonance structures. We observe J /ψ decays to all of these final states for the first time, present measurements of their J /ψ branching fractions, and search for ψ (2 S ) decays.

  17. Modeling and analysis framework for core damage propagation during flow-blockage-initiated accidents in the Advanced Neutron Source reactor at Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, S.H.; Taleyarkhan, R.P.; Navarro-Valenti, S.; Georgevich, V.

    1995-12-31

    This paper describes modeling and analysis to evaluate the extent of core damage during flow blockage events in the Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) reactor planned to be built at ORNL. Damage propagation is postulated to occur from thermal conduction between dmaged and undamaged plates due to direct thermal contact. Such direct thermal contact may occur beause of fuel plate swelling during fission product vapor release or plate buckling. Complex phenomena of damage propagation were modeled using a one-dimensional heat transfer model. A parametric study was done for several uncertain variables. The study included investigating effects of plate contact area, convective heat transfer coefficient, thermal conductivity on fuel swelling, and initial temperature of the plate being contacted by the damaged plate. Also, the side support plates were modeled to account for their effects of damage propagation. Results provide useful insights into how variouss uncertain parameters affect damage propagation.

  18. An increase in liver PPARγ2 is an initial event to induce fatty liver in response to a diet high in butter: PPARγ2 knockdown improves fatty liver induced by high-saturated fat.

    PubMed

    Yamazaki, Tomomi; Shiraishi, Sayaka; Kishimoto, Kyoko; Miura, Shinji; Ezaki, Osamu

    2011-06-01

    The effects of a diet rich in saturated fat on fatty liver formation and the related mechanisms that induce fatty liver were examined. C57BL/6J mice were fed butter or safflower oil as a high-fat (HF) diet (40% fat calories) for 2, 4, 10, or 17 weeks. Although both HF diets induced similar levels of obesity, HF butter-fed mice showed a two to threefold increase in liver triacylglycerol (TG) concentration compared to HF safflower oil-fed mice at 4 or 10 weeks without hyperinsulinemia. At 4 weeks, increases in peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ2 (PPARγ2), CD36, and adipose differentiation-related protein (ADRP) mRNAs were observed in HF butter-fed mice; at 10 weeks, an increase in sterol regulatory element-binding protein-1c (SREBP-1c) was observed; at 17 weeks, these increases were attenuated. At 4 weeks, a single injection of adenoviral vector-based short hairpin interfering RNA against PPARγ2 in HF butter-fed mice reduced PPARγ protein and mRNA of its target genes (CD36 and ADRP) by 43%, 43%, and 39%, respectively, with a reduction in liver TG concentration by 38% in 5 days. PPARγ2 knockdown also reduced mRNAs in lipogenic genes (fatty-acid-synthase, stearoyl-CoA desaturase 1, acetyl-CoA carboxylase 1) without alteration of SREBP-1c mRNA. PPARγ2 knockdown reduced mRNAs in genes related to inflammation (CD68, interleukin-1β, tumor necrosis factor-α, and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1). In conclusion, saturated fatty acid-rich oil induced fatty liver in mice, and this was triggered initially by an increase in PPARγ2 protein in the liver, which led to increased expression of lipogenic genes. Inactivation of PPARγ2 may improve fatty liver induced by HF saturated fat.

  19. The Advanced Photon Source event system

    SciTech Connect

    Lenkszus, F.R.; Laird, R.

    1995-12-31

    The Advanced Photon Source, like many other facilities, requires a means of transmitting timing information to distributed control system 1/0 controllers. The APS event system provides the means of distributing medium resolution/accuracy timing events throughout the facility. It consists of VME event generators and event receivers which are interconnected with 10OMbit/sec fiber optic links at distances of up to 650m in either a star or a daisy chain configuration. The systems event throughput rate is 1OMevents/sec with a peak-to-peak timing jitter down to lOOns depending on the source of the event. It is integrated into the EPICS-based A.PS control system through record and device support. Event generators broadcast timing events over fiber optic links to event receivers which are programmed to decode specific events. Event generators generate events in response to external inputs, from internal programmable event sequence RAMS, and from VME bus writes. The event receivers can be programmed to generate both pulse and set/reset level outputs to synchronize hardware, and to generate interrupts to initiate EPICS record processing. In addition, each event receiver contains a time stamp counter which is used to provide synchronized time stamps to EPICS records.

  20. Assessment of a large break loss of coolant accident scenario requiring operator action to initiate safety injection

    SciTech Connect

    Grendys, R.C.; Nissley, M.E.; Baker, D.C.

    1996-11-01

    As part of the licensing basis for a nuclear power plant, the acceptability of the Emergency Core Cooling Systems (ECCS) following a postulated Loss-of-Coolant Accident (LOCA) as described in the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), Title 10, Chapter 1, Part 50.46, must be verified. The LOCA analysis is performed with an acceptable ECCS Evaluation Model and results must show compliance with the 10 CFR 50.46 acceptance criteria. Westinghouse Electric Corporation performs Large and Small Break LOCA and LOCA-related analyses to support the licensing basis of various nuclear power plants and also performs evaluations against the licensing basis analyses as required. Occasionally, the need arises for the holder of an operating license of a nuclear power plant to submit a Licensee Event Report (LER) to the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (USNRC) for any event of the type described in the Code of Federal Regulations, Title 10, Chapter 1, Part 50.73. To support the LER, a Justification for Past Operation (JPO) may be performed to assess the safety consequences and implications of the event based on previous operating conditions. This paper describes the work performed for the Large Break LOCA to assess the impact of an event discovered by Florida Power and Light and reported in LER-94-005-02. For this event, it was determined that under certain circumstances, operator action would have been required to initiate safety injection (SI), thus challenging the acceptability of the ECCS. This event was specifically addressed for the Large Break LOCA by using an advanced thermal hydraulic analysis methodology with realistic input assumptions.

  1. The ancient tropical rainforest tree Symphonia globulifera L. f. (Clusiaceae) was not restricted to postulated Pleistocene refugia in Atlantic Equatorial Africa

    PubMed Central

    Budde, K B; González-Martínez, S C; Hardy, O J; Heuertz, M

    2013-01-01

    Understanding the history of forests and their species' demographic responses to past disturbances is important for predicting impacts of future environmental changes. Tropical rainforests of the Guineo-Congolian region in Central Africa are believed to have survived the Pleistocene glacial periods in a few major refugia, essentially centred on mountainous regions close to the Atlantic Ocean. We tested this hypothesis by investigating the phylogeographic structure of a widespread, ancient rainforest tree species, Symphonia globulifera L. f. (Clusiaceae), using plastid DNA sequences (chloroplast DNA [cpDNA], psbA-trnH intergenic spacer) and nuclear microsatellites (simple sequence repeats, SSRs). SSRs identified four gene pools located in Benin, West Cameroon, South Cameroon and Gabon, and São Tomé. This structure was also apparent at cpDNA. Approximate Bayesian Computation detected recent bottlenecks approximately dated to the last glacial maximum in Benin, West Cameroon and São Tomé, and an older bottleneck in South Cameroon and Gabon, suggesting a genetic effect of Pleistocene cycles of forest contraction. CpDNA haplotype distribution indicated wide-ranging long-term persistence of S. globulifera both inside and outside of postulated forest refugia. Pollen flow was four times greater than that of seed in South Cameroon and Gabon, which probably enabled rapid population recovery after bottlenecks. Furthermore, our study suggested ecotypic differentiation—coastal or swamp vs terra firme—in S. globulifera. Comparison with other tree phylogeographic studies in Central Africa highlighted the relevance of species-specific responses to environmental change in forest trees. PMID:23572126

  2. The ancient tropical rainforest tree Symphonia globulifera L. f. (Clusiaceae) was not restricted to postulated Pleistocene refugia in Atlantic Equatorial Africa.

    PubMed

    Budde, K B; González-Martínez, S C; Hardy, O J; Heuertz, M

    2013-07-01

    Understanding the history of forests and their species' demographic responses to past disturbances is important for predicting impacts of future environmental changes. Tropical rainforests of the Guineo-Congolian region in Central Africa are believed to have survived the Pleistocene glacial periods in a few major refugia, essentially centred on mountainous regions close to the Atlantic Ocean. We tested this hypothesis by investigating the phylogeographic structure of a widespread, ancient rainforest tree species, Symphonia globulifera L. f. (Clusiaceae), using plastid DNA sequences (chloroplast DNA [cpDNA], psbA-trnH intergenic spacer) and nuclear microsatellites (simple sequence repeats, SSRs). SSRs identified four gene pools located in Benin, West Cameroon, South Cameroon and Gabon, and São Tomé. This structure was also apparent at cpDNA. Approximate Bayesian Computation detected recent bottlenecks approximately dated to the last glacial maximum in Benin, West Cameroon and São Tomé, and an older bottleneck in South Cameroon and Gabon, suggesting a genetic effect of Pleistocene cycles of forest contraction. CpDNA haplotype distribution indicated wide-ranging long-term persistence of S. globulifera both inside and outside of postulated forest refugia. Pollen flow was four times greater than that of seed in South Cameroon and Gabon, which probably enabled rapid population recovery after bottlenecks. Furthermore, our study suggested ecotypic differentiation-coastal or swamp vs terra firme-in S. globulifera. Comparison with other tree phylogeographic studies in Central Africa highlighted the relevance of species-specific responses to environmental change in forest trees.

  3. Deep proteome coverage based on ribosome profiling aids mass spectrometry-based protein and peptide discovery and provides evidence of alternative translation products and near-cognate translation initiation events.

    PubMed

    Menschaert, Gerben; Van Criekinge, Wim; Notelaers, Tineke; Koch, Alexander; Crappé, Jeroen; Gevaert, Kris; Van Damme, Petra

    2013-07-01

    An increasing number of studies involve integrative analysis of gene and protein expression data, taking advantage of new technologies such as next-generation transcriptome sequencing and highly sensitive mass spectrometry (MS) instrumentation. Recently, a strategy, termed ribosome profiling (or RIBO-seq), based on deep sequencing of ribosome-protected mRNA fragments, indirectly monitoring protein synthesis, has been described. We devised a proteogenomic approach constructing a custom protein sequence search space, built from both Swiss-Prot- and RIBO-seq-derived translation products, applicable for MS/MS spectrum identification. To record the impact of using the constructed deep proteome database, we performed two alternative MS-based proteomic strategies as follows: (i) a regular shotgun proteomic and (ii) an N-terminal combined fractional diagonal chromatography (COFRADIC) approach. Although the former technique gives an overall assessment on the protein and peptide level, the latter technique, specifically enabling the isolation of N-terminal peptides, is very appropriate in validating the RIBO-seq-derived (alternative) translation initiation site profile. We demonstrate that this proteogenomic approach increases the overall protein identification rate 2.5% (e.g. new protein products, new protein splice variants, single nucleotide polymorphism variant proteins, and N-terminally extended forms of known proteins) as compared with only searching UniProtKB-SwissProt. Furthermore, using this custom database, identification of N-terminal COFRADIC data resulted in detection of 16 alternative start sites giving rise to N-terminally extended protein variants besides the identification of four translated upstream ORFs. Notably, the characterization of these new translation products revealed the use of multiple near-cognate (non-AUG) start codons. As deep sequencing techniques are becoming more standard, less expensive, and widespread, we anticipate that mRNA sequencing

  4. An Initial Event in Insect Innate Immune Response: Structural and Biological Studies of Interactions between β-1,3-glucan and the N-terminal Domain of β-1,3-glucan Recognition Protein

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Huaien; Hiromasa, Yasuaki; Takahashi, Daisuke; VanderVelde, David; Fabrick, Jeffrey A.; Kanost, Michael R.; Krishnamoorthi, Ramaswamy

    2012-01-01

    ligand-bound protein molecules contribute in part to the stability of N-βGRP:laminarin macro complex and that a decreased stability is accompanied by a reduced activation of the proPO pathway. Increased β-1,6 branching in laminarin also results in destabilization of the macro complex. These novel findings suggest that ligand-induced self-association of βGRP:β-1,3-glucan complex may form a platform on a microbial surface for recruitment of downstream proteases, as a means of amplification of the initial signal of pathogen recognition for the activation of the proPO pathway. PMID:23237493

  5. Event-by-event elliptic flow fluctuations from PHOBOS.

    SciTech Connect

    Alver, B.; Back, B. B.; Baker, M. D.; Ballintijn, M.; Barton, D. S.; Physics; BNL; Inst. of Nuclear Physics; Massachusetts Inst. of Tech.; National Central Univ.; Univ. of Maryland; Univ. of Rochester

    2009-04-01

    Recently PHOBOS has focused on the study of fluctuations and correlations in particle production in heavy-ion collisions at the highest energies delivered by the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). In this report, we present results on event-by-event elliptic flow fluctuations in Au + Au collisions at {radical}s{sub NN} = 200 GeV. A data-driven method was used to estimate the dominant contribution from non-flow correlations. Over the broad range of collision centralities, the observed large elliptic flow fluctuations are in agreement with the fluctuations in the initial source eccentricity.

  6. Assessing Special Events.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neff, Bonita Dostal

    Special events defined as being "newsworthy events" are becoming a way of American life. They are also a means for making a lot of money. Examples of special events that are cited most frequently are often the most minor of events; e.g., the open house, the new business opening day gala, or a celebration of some event in an organization.…

  7. Moon Express Media Event

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-11-03

    Bob Richards, standing at left in front of the cameras, co-founder and chief executive officer of Moon Express Inc., of Moffett Field, California, speaks to the media during an event to announce the company's selection to utilize Kennedy Space Center facilities as part of NASA's Lunar Cargo Transportation and Landing by Soft Touchdown, or Lunar CATALYST, initiative. Third from left in the group is former NASA Apollo astronaut Buzz Aldrin. The event took place at Kennedy's automated landing and hazard avoidance technology, or ALHAT, hazard field at the north end of the Shuttle Landing Facility. Moon Express is developing a lander with capabilities that will enable delivery of payloads to the surface of the moon, as well as new science and exploration missions of interest to NASA and scientific and academic communities. Moon Express will base its activities at Kennedy and utilize the Morpheus ALHAT field and a hangar nearby for CATALYST testing. The Advanced Exploration Systems Division of NASA's Human Exploration and Operations Mission Directorate manages Lunar CATALYST.

  8. Event Segmentation Ability Uniquely Predicts Event Memory

    PubMed Central

    Sargent, Jesse Q.; Zacks, Jeffrey M.; Hambrick, David Z.; Zacks, Rose T.; Kurby, Christopher A.; Bailey, Heather R.; Eisenberg, Michelle L.; Beck, Taylor M.

    2013-01-01

    Memory for everyday events plays a central role in tasks of daily living, autobiographical memory, and planning. Event memory depends in part on segmenting ongoing activity into meaningful units. This study examined the relationship between event segmentation and memory in a lifespan sample to answer the following question: Is the ability to segment activity into meaningful events a unique predictor of subsequent memory, or is the relationship between event perception and memory accounted for by general cognitive abilities? Two hundred and eight adults ranging from 20 to 79 years old segmented movies of everyday events and attempted to remember the events afterwards. They also completed psychometric ability tests and tests measuring script knowledge for everyday events. Event segmentation and script knowledge both explained unique variance in event memory above and beyond the psychometric measures, and did so as strongly in older as in younger adults. These results suggest that event segmentation is a basic cognitive mechanism, important for memory across the lifespan. PMID:23942350

  9. Disruptive Event Biosphere Doser Conversion Factor Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    M. Wasiolek

    2000-12-28

    The purpose of this report was to document the process leading to, and the results of, development of radionuclide-, exposure scenario-, and ash thickness-specific Biosphere Dose Conversion Factors (BDCFs) for the postulated postclosure extrusive igneous event (volcanic eruption) at Yucca Mountain. BDCF calculations were done for seventeen radionuclides. The selection of radionuclides included those that may be significant dose contributors during the compliance period of up to 10,000 years, as well as radionuclides of importance for up to 1 million years postclosure. The approach documented in this report takes into account human exposure during three different phases at the time of, and after, volcanic eruption. Calculations of disruptive event BDCFs used the GENII-S computer code in a series of probabilistic realizations to propagate the uncertainties of input parameters into the output. The pathway analysis included consideration of different exposure pathway's contribution to the BDCFs. BDCFs for volcanic eruption, when combined with the concentration of radioactivity deposited by eruption on the soil surface, allow calculation of potential radiation doses to the receptor of interest. Calculation of radioactivity deposition is outside the scope of this report and so is the transport of contaminated ash from the volcano to the location of the receptor. The integration of the biosphere modeling results (BDCFs) with the outcomes of the other component models is accomplished in the Total System Performance Assessment (TSPA), in which doses are calculated to the receptor of interest from radionuclides postulated to be released to the environment from the potential repository at Yucca Mountain.

  10. Trace elements in bivalves from the Rio Cruces, Chile, trace watershed evolution after a major earthquake and challenge a postulated chemical spill from a pulp plant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Risk, M.; Burchell, M.; Nairn, R.; Tubrett, M.; Forsterra, G.

    2009-05-01

    In May, 1960, the largest recorded earthquake in the history of the planet hit southern Chile, dropping part of the course of the Rio Cruces by 2m and creating an extensive wetland. The Brazilian Waterweed Egeria densa colonised the area, and became a primary food source for large populations of the Black-necked Swan, Cygnus melancoryphus. In 2004, a large pulp mill commenced operations upstream on the river. According to local reports, immediately after the opening of the plant, the weed died and the swans left. There was public outcry, and a search for a cause or a culprit. It was postulated that some sort of chemical spill from the plant caused the weed to die, resulting in departure of the swans. In 2008, we collected specimens of the bivalve Diplodon chilensis from several locations downstream from the Plant and towards the wetland to see if there was evidence of a chemical spill recorded in the shells. We prepared thin-sections of the shells to observe growth line development and patterns. Additionally, shell samples were analysed for stable oxygen isotopes and trace elements, using LA-ICP/MS. Based on annual growth lines, some of the bivalves were long-lived, with an age of more than 50 years. These individuals settled in the river shortly after the earthquake, and have lived there continuously ever since. Annual and sub-annual banding was clear, and the annual cyclicity of the major bands was verified with oxygen isotope analysis. There are no changes in growth corresponding to 2004. Trace element scans provided a wealth of information on the evolution of this earthquake-impacted wetland. Barium, Strontium and Manganese all showed strong annual cyclicity. From the analysis of older specimens, we interpret the high peaks of the Ba signal as reflecting soil erosion-Ba peaks are large immediately after the earthquake, then they diminish through time. Sr is likely a temperature signal, and Mn reflects runoff. Minor peaks in Cu, As and Pb probably reflect

  11. [Problems in Life-event research from its psychodynamic aspects].

    PubMed

    Schloss, G

    1984-01-01

    The present essay gives a survey of theory of the Life-Event-research up to now with special relevance to psychiatric diseases, which was developed by sociology and behaviourism. There is some evidence that the originally epidemiologic orientated approach, which is restricted to relation Life-Event - disease, will now be extended by establishing of a "subjective" and social factor in form of Coping Processes, the Cognitive Models, the interactions are resources of Social Network. But till now there was no possibility for any differentiation between cause and result. This traditional approach, which is restricted to the objectives, covers differences in individual characters and creates arbitrariness in research whereby a wrong praemiss was taken as a basis, namely the postulated homogeneous of characters by which each event will produce the same deleterious effect. In comparison with that a psychodynamic viewpoint favours the "Selbst-Relvanz" of events. By this mean an interpretation of events is senseless if they are not applied to individual character structure and development through which "early" Life Events will be of great account. With the aid of a clinical example it will be demonstrated by a psychodynamic viewpoint how the deleterious effects of specific Life Events are comprehensible by applying them to individual development and object relations. By that there is possibility of calling specific triggering events for the break out of Schizophrenia (beginning/finishing of a "love relation"; a new daily burden) and of associating certain clinical pictures of Schizophrenia to certain macroscopic and microscopic Life Events.

  12. Holter and Event Monitors

    MedlinePlus

    ... Share this page from the NHLBI on Twitter. Holter and Event Monitors Also known as ambulatory EKG; continuous EKG; EKG event monitors. Holter and event monitors are small, portable electrocardiogram devices ...

  13. Event-Based Science.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, Russell G.

    1992-01-01

    Suggests that an event-based science curriculum can provide the framework for deciding what to retain in an overloaded science curriculum. Provides examples of current events and the science concepts explored related to the event. (MDH)

  14. Openness initiative

    SciTech Connect

    Duncan, S.S.

    1995-12-31

    Although antinuclear campaigns seem to be effective, public communication and education efforts on low-level radioactive waste have mixed results. Attempts at public information programs on low-level radioactive waste still focus on influencing public opinion. A question then is: {open_quotes}Is it preferable to have a program focus on public education that will empower individuals to make informed decisions rather than trying to influence them in their decisions?{close_quotes} To address this question, a case study with both quantitative and qualitative data will be used. The Ohio Low-Level Radioactive Waste Education Program has a goal to provide people with information they want/need to make their own decisions. The program initiated its efforts by conducting a statewide survey to determine information needed by people and where they turned for that information. This presentation reports data from the survey and then explores the program development process in which programs were designed and presented using the information. Pre and post data from the programs reveal attitude and knowledge shifts.

  15. Lexical Processing Deficits in Children with Developmental Language Disorder: An Event-Related Potentials Study

    PubMed Central

    Kornilov, Sergey A.; Magnuson, James S.; Rakhlin, Natalia; Landi, Nicole; Grigorenko, Elena L.

    2015-01-01

    Lexical processing deficits in children with developmental language disorder (DLD) have been postulated to arise as sequelae of their grammatical deficits (either directly or via compensatory mechanisms) and vice versa. We examined event-related potential indices of lexical processing in children with DLD (n = 23) and their typically developing peers (n = 16) using a picture–word matching paradigm. We found that children with DLD showed markedly reduced N400 amplitudes in response both to auditorily presented words that had initial phonological overlap with the name of the pictured object and to words that were not semantically or phonologically related to the pictured object. Moreover, this reduction was related to behavioral indices of phonological and lexical but not grammatical development. We also found that children with DLD showed a depressed phonological mapping negativity component in the early time window, suggesting deficits in phonological processing or early lexical access. The results are partially consistent with the overactivation account of lexical processing deficits in DLD and point to the relative functional independence of lexical/phonological and grammatical deficits in DLD, supporting a multidimensional view of the disorder. The results also, although indirectly, support the neuroplasticity account of DLD, according to which language impairment affects brain development and shapes the specific patterns of brain responses to language stimuli. PMID:25997765

  16. Initiation of parturition in humans.

    PubMed

    Drover, J W; Casper, R F

    1983-02-15

    The mechanism by which parturition is initiated in humans is largely unknown. The placenta and fetal membranes appear to play the major role in the initiation of labour, and the fetus may influence the timing of labour. Clinical observations and experiments with animals have revealed that placental neuropeptides may be able to control steroid metabolism and trigger the onset of labour, while the fetus may be able to interact with such events to initiate parturition at an appropriate time. However, further study is needed to determine the role of placental releasing factors and glycoprotein hormones and their ability to control placental steroid metabolism.

  17. Hydrodynamics from Landau initial conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Sen, Abhisek; Gerhard, Jochen; Torrieri, Giorgio; Read jr, Kenneth F.; Wong, Cheuk-Yin

    2015-01-01

    We investigate ideal hydrodynamic evolution, with Landau initial conditions, both in a semi-analytical 1+1D approach and in a numerical code incorporating event-by-event variation with many events and transverse density inhomogeneities. The object of the calculation is to test how fast would a Landau initial condition transition to a commonly used boost-invariant expansion. We show that the transition to boost-invariant flow occurs too late for realistic setups, with corrections of O (20 - 30%) expected at freezeout for most scenarios. Moreover, the deviation from boost-invariance is correlated with both transverse flow and elliptic flow, with the more highly transversely flowing regions also showing the most violation of boost invariance. Therefore, if longitudinal flow is not fully developed at the early stages of heavy ion collisions, 2+1 dimensional hydrodynamics is inadequate to extract transport coefficients of the quark-gluon plasma. Based on [1, 2

  18. Microdrill Initiative - Initial Market Evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Spears & Associates, Inc

    2003-07-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is launching a major research and development initiative to create a small, fast, inexpensive and environmentally friendly rig for drilling 5000 feet boreholes to investigate potential oil and gas reservoirs. DOE wishes to get input from petroleum industry operators, service companies and equipment suppliers on the operation and application of this coiled-tubing-based drilling unit. To that end, DOE has asked Spears & Associates, Inc. (SAI) to prepare a special state-of-the-market report and assist during a DOE-sponsored project-scoping workshop in Albuquerque near the end of April 2003. The scope of the project is four-fold: (1) Evaluate the history, status and future of demand for very small bore-hole drilling; (2) Measure the market for coiled tubing drilling and describe the state-of-the-art; (3) Identify companies and individuals who should have an interest in micro drilling and invite them to the DOE workshop; and (4) Participate in 3 concurrent workshop sessions, record and evaluate participant comments and report workshop conclusions.

  19. Albedo maps of Pluto and Charon - Initial mutual event results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buie, Marc W.; Tholen, David J.; Horne, Keith

    1992-01-01

    By applying the technique of maximum entropy image reconstruction to invert observed lightcurves, surface maps of single-scattering albedo are obtained for the surfaces of Pluto and Charon from 1954 to 1986. The albedo features of the surface of Pluto are similar to those of the Buie and Tholen (1989) spot model maps; a south polar cap is evident. The map of Charon is somewhat darker, with single-scattering albedos as low as 0.03.

  20. Enhancing Decision Making during Initial Operations at Surge Events

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-12-01

    and considered to be a novice when commanding the response to a release of sulfuric acid . The concept of naturalistic decision making was further...Crisis, Disaster and Risk Management, 2002. 261. 41 Ibid., 257. 42 U.S. Department of Commerce. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration...Situation Awareness and Decision-making in a Warning Environment (Washington, DC: National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. 7. 18 which

  1. The Toarcian Oceanic Anoxic Event: a shallow-water perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bodin, Stephane; Krencker, Francois-Nicolas; Kabiri, Lahcen; Immenhauser, Adrian

    2015-04-01

    The Toarcian ocean anoxic event (T-OAE, ca. 183 Ma) corresponds to a major perturbation of the carbon cycle as reflected by a marked decrease (2 to 7 per mil) in carbon-isotope ratios of various carbonate and organic matter phases. Severe environmental perturbations and biotic turnovers are accompanying the unfolding of the T-OAE, which is thought to be initiated by the activity of the Karoo-Ferrar large igneous province. Most of the studies dedicated to the T-OAE were however undertaken in mud-rich, deep-water setting, leaving vast uncertainties about its shallow-water expression and accompanying sea-level fluctuations. Here we present an extensive sedimentological dataset of the shallow-water record of the T-OAE within the Central High Atlas Basin of Morocco. The combination of ammonite and brachiopod biostratigraphy, together with carbon-isotope chemostratigraphy (on both carbonate and organic matter) allows a precise location of the T-OAE in the studied shallow-water sections. Thanks to well-exposed and thick successions, relative sea-level variations were reconstructed on a high-resolution scale, highlighting several important facts. Firstly, the T-OAE interval is preceded by a 50 meters-deep incised valley, observed within the uppermost Polymorphum ammonite zone. Similar observations have been reported from Euro-boreal basins and, together with published evidences of coeval occurrence of relatively cool seawater temperature and low atmospheric pCO2, we postulate that this forced regression is driven by glacio-eustasy. This points at the occurrence of a "cold snap" event just prior to the onset of the T-OAE. Secondly, the inception of the T-OAE is marked by the demise of the Lithiotid-dominated neritic carbonate factory, replaced by siliciclastic-dominated sedimentation during the T-OAE negative carbon isotope shift. Thirdly, an important progradation of oo-biodetritic shoal occurs during the negative carbon isotope plateau, underlying that the renewal of

  2. Learning to Describe Events.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duchan, Judith Felson

    1986-01-01

    The article discusses language structures of three hierarchical levels of event descriptions: (1) single-action events (semantic relations, aspectual meaning and lexical verbs or verb phrases, (2) event relations (tense markers, conjunctions, adverbs, perfect tense); (3) event schemas (lexical terms and phrases marking beginnings and endings). A…

  3. Event-by-event jet quenching

    SciTech Connect

    Fries, R.J.; Rodriguez, R.; Ramirez, E.

    2010-08-14

    High momentum jets and hadrons can be used as probes for the quark gluon plasma (QGP) formed in nuclear collisions at high energies. We investigate the influence of fluctuations in the fireball on jet quenching observables by comparing propagation of light quarks and gluons through averaged, smooth QGP fireballs with event-by-event jet quenching using realistic inhomogeneous fireballs. We find that the transverse momentum and impact parameter dependence of the nuclear modification factor R{sub AA} can be fit well in an event-by-event quenching scenario within experimental errors. However the transport coefficient {cflx q} extracted from fits to the measured nuclear modification factor R{sub AA} in averaged fireballs underestimates the value from event-by-event calculations by up to 50%. On the other hand, after adjusting {cflx q} to fit R{sub AA} in the event-by-event analysis we find residual deviations in the azimuthal asymmetry v{sub 2} and in two-particle correlations, that provide a possible faint signature for a spatial tomography of the fireball. We discuss a correlation function that is a measure for spatial inhomogeneities in a collision and can be constrained from data.

  4. Algorithmic independence of initial condition and dynamical law in thermodynamics and causal inference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janzing, Dominik; Chaves, Rafael; Schölkopf, Bernhard

    2016-09-01

    We postulate a principle stating that the initial condition of a physical system is typically algorithmically independent of the dynamical law. We discuss the implications of this principle and argue that they link thermodynamics and causal inference. On the one hand, they entail behavior that is similar to the usual arrow of time. On the other hand, they motivate a statistical asymmetry between cause and effect that has recently been postulated in the field of causal inference, namely, that the probability distribution {P}{{cause}} contains no information about the conditional distribution {P}{{effect}| {{cause}}} and vice versa, while {P}{{effect}} may contain information about {P}{{cause}| {{effect}}}.

  5. Adverse events in healthcare: learning from mistakes.

    PubMed

    Rafter, N; Hickey, A; Condell, S; Conroy, R; O'Connor, P; Vaughan, D; Williams, D

    2015-04-01

    Large national reviews of patient charts estimate that approximately 10% of hospital admissions are associated with an adverse event (defined as an injury resulting in prolonged hospitalization, disability or death, caused by healthcare management). Apart from having a significant impact on patient morbidity and mortality, adverse events also result in increased healthcare costs due to longer hospital stays. Furthermore, a substantial proportion of adverse events are preventable. Through identifying the nature and rate of adverse events, initiatives to improve care can be developed. A variety of methods exist to gather adverse event data both retrospectively and prospectively but these do not necessarily capture the same events and there is variability in the definition of an adverse event. For example, hospital incident reporting collects only a very small fraction of the adverse events found in retrospective chart reviews. Until there are systematic methods to identify adverse events, progress in patient safety cannot be reliably measured. This review aims to discuss the need for a safety culture that can learn from adverse events, describe ways to measure adverse events, and comment on why current adverse event monitoring is unable to demonstrate trends in patient safety.

  6. New constraints on oceanographic vs. seismic control on submarine landslide initiation: a geotechnical approach off Uruguay and northern Argentina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ai, Fei; Strasser, Michael; Preu, Benedict; Hanebuth, Till J. J.; Krastel, Sebastian; Kopf, Achim

    2014-10-01

    Submarine landslides are common along the Uruguayan and Argentinean continental margin, but size, type and frequency of events differ significantly between distinct settings. Previous studies have proposed sedimentary and oceanographic processes as factors controlling slope instability, but also episodic earthquakes have been postulated as possible triggers. However, quantitative geotechnical slope stability evaluations for this region and, for that matter, elsewhere in the South Atlantic realm are lacking. This study quantitatively assesses continental slope stability for various scenarios including overpressure and earthquake activity, based on sedimentological and geotechnical analyses on three up to 36 m long cores collected on the Uruguayan slope, characterized by muddy contourite deposits and a locus of landslides (up to 2 km3), and in a canyon-dominated area on the northern Argentinean slope characterized by sandy contourite deposits. The results of shear and consolidation tests reveal that these distinct lithologies govern different stability conditions and failure modes. The slope sectors are stable under present-day conditions (factor of safety >5), implying that additional triggers would be required to initiate failure. In the canyon area, current-induced oversteepening of weaker sandy contourite deposits would account for frequent, small-scale slope instabilities. By contrast, static vs. seismic slope stability calculations reveal that a peak ground acceleration of at least 2 m/s2 would be required to cause failure of mechanically stronger muddy contourite deposits. This implies that, also along the western South Atlantic passive margin, submarine landslides on open gentle slopes require episodic large earthquakes as ultimate trigger, as previously postulated for other, northern hemisphere passive margins.

  7. Episodes, events, and models

    PubMed Central

    Khemlani, Sangeet S.; Harrison, Anthony M.; Trafton, J. Gregory

    2015-01-01

    We describe a novel computational theory of how individuals segment perceptual information into representations of events. The theory is inspired by recent findings in the cognitive science and cognitive neuroscience of event segmentation. In line with recent theories, it holds that online event segmentation is automatic, and that event segmentation yields mental simulations of events. But it posits two novel principles as well: first, discrete episodic markers track perceptual and conceptual changes, and can be retrieved to construct event models. Second, the process of retrieving and reconstructing those episodic markers is constrained and prioritized. We describe a computational implementation of the theory, as well as a robotic extension of the theory that demonstrates the processes of online event segmentation and event model construction. The theory is the first unified computational account of event segmentation and temporal inference. We conclude by demonstrating now neuroimaging data can constrain and inspire the construction of process-level theories of human reasoning. PMID:26578934

  8. Modeling and analysis framework for core damage propagation during flow-blockage-initiated accidents in the Advanced Neutron Source Reactor at Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, S.H.; Taleyarkhan, R.P.; Navarro-Valenti, S.; Georgevich, V.

    1995-09-01

    This paper describes modeling and analysis to evaluate the extent of core damage during flow blockage events in the Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) reactor planned to be built at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). Damage propagation is postulated to occur from thermal conduction between damaged and undamaged plates due to direct thermal contact. Such direct thermal contact may occur because of fuel plate swelling during fission product vapor release or plate buckling. Complex phenomena of damage propagation were modeled using a one-dimensional heat transfer model. A scoping study was conducted to learn what parameters are important for core damage propagation, and to obtain initial estimates of core melt mass for addressing recriticality and steam explosion events. The study included investigating the effects of the plate contact area, the convective heat transfer coefficient, thermal conductivity upon fuel swelling, and the initial temperature of the plate being contacted by the damaged plate. Also, the side support plates were modeled to account for their effects on damage propagation. The results provide useful insights into how various uncertain parameters affect damage propagation.

  9. Modeling and analysis framework for core damage propagation during flow-blockage-initiated accidents in the advanced neutron source reactor at Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, S.H.; Taleyarkhan, R.P.; Navarro-Valenti, S.; Georgevich, V.

    1995-09-01

    This paper describes modeling and analysis to evaluate the extent of core damage during flow blockage events in the Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) reactor planned to be built at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). Damage propagation is postulated to occur from thermal conduction between damaged and undamaged plates due to direct thermal contact. Such direct thermal contact may occur because of fuel plate swelling during fission product vapor release or plate buckling. Complex phenomena of damage propagation were modeled using a one-dimensional heat transfer model. A scoping study was conducted to learn what parameters are important for core damage propagation, and to obtain initial estimates of core melt mass for addressing recriticality and steam explosion events. The study included investigating the effect of the plate contact area, the convective heat transfer coefficient, thermal conductivity upon fuel swelling, and the initial temperature of the plate being contacted by the damaged plate. Also, the side support plates were modeled to account for their effects on damage propagation. The results provide useful insights into how various uncertain parameters affect damage propagation.

  10. Ab initio molecular dynamics simulations of nitromethane under shock initiation conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Decker, S. A.; Chau, D.; Woo, T. K.; Zhang, F.

    Detonation theories for homogeneous, condensed energetic materials have focused on 1-d analysis in which the detonation ignition physics forms the most difficult part. The classic ZND model considers detonation ignition through a frozen shock transition followed by an induction period, in which the shock temperature induces vibrational, rotational and electronic excitation followed by molecular dissociation (i.e., thermal decomposition). The frozen shock assumption has been the topic of debate and an alternative model has been proposed whereby detonation ignition arises from excitation of the translational degrees of freedom in the shock front [1]. This raises an important postulation of detonation ignition of molecular condensed matter being initiated by non-equilibrium kinetic events within the shock front rather than equilibrium thermal molecular dissociation due to the shock temperature. Experimental support for this hypothesis must be derived from observations inside the shock front thereby requiring measurements on the time scale of 10-2-1 ps, which remains beyond the scope of current experimental techniques. However, the recent development of ab initio molecular dynamics simulations offers an alternative approach to elucidate possible mechanisms of detonation ignition. These methods are based on first-principle quantum mechanical calculations that allow for the simulation of chemical processes at the atomic level. Molecular dynamics simulations of bimolecular collisions using density functional theories serve as a most simplified model for shock-induced dissociation [2-3], while multimolecular collisions including neighbourhood molecules serve as a simple model for shock dissociation in bulk liquid [4].

  11. El Nino-like events during Miocene

    SciTech Connect

    Casey, R.E.; Nelson, C.O.; Weinheimer, A.L.; Oeth, P.A.; Swanson, R.J.

    1988-03-01

    El Nino-like events have been recorded from the Miocene laminated siliceous facies of the Monterey Formation. These El Nino-like Miocene events are compared to El Nino events recorded from Holocene varved sediments deposited within the anoxic Santa Barbara basin. Strong El Nino events can be recognized from Holocene Santa Barbara basin sediments by increases in radiolarian flux to the sea floor during those events. For the last 100-plus years, frequency of strong El Ninos has been on the order of one extremely strong event about every 100 years, and one easily recognizable event about every 18 years. Frequencies in the laminated (varved) Miocene range from about every 4-5 years to over 20 years. The higher frequencies occur within generally warm intervals and the lower frequencies within generally cold intervals. Perhaps the frequencies of these events may, in fact, be an important indicator in determining whether the intervals were cold or warm. Reconstructions of the paleo-California Current system during El Nino-like periods have been made for the west coast from the Gulf of California to northern California. Strong El Nino-like events occurred 5.5 and 8 Ma, and a strong anti-El Nino-like event occurred at about 6.5 Ma. Evidence from the 5.5 and 8 Ma events combined with other evidence suggests that modern El Ninos, similar to today's, were initiated at 5.5 Ma or earlier.

  12. Moon Express Media Event

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-11-03

    Rob Mueller, left, NASA senior technologist in the Surface Systems Office in Kennedy Space Center's Engineering and Technology Directorate, talks with former NASA Apollo astronaut Buzz Aldrin during a demonstration of the Regolith Advanced Surface Systems Operations Robot, or RASSOR, at the automated landing and hazard avoidance technology, or ALHAT, hazard field at the north end of the Shuttle Landing Facility at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. The event was held to announce Moon Express Inc., of Moffett Field, California is selected to utilize Kennedy facilities for NASA's Lunar Cargo Transportation and Landing by Soft Touchdown, or Lunar CATALYST, initiative. Moon Express is developing a lander with capabilities that will enable delivery of payloads to the surface of the moon, as well as new science and exploration missions of interest to NASA and scientific and academic communities. Moon Express will base its activities at Kennedy and utilize the Morpheus ALHAT field and a hangar nearby for CATALYST testing. The Advanced Exploration Systems Division of NASA's Human Exploration and Operations Mission Directorate manages Lunar CATALYST.

  13. Moon Express Media Event

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-11-03

    Rob Mueller, left, NASA senior technologist in the Surface Systems Office in Kennedy Space Center's Engineering and Technology Directorate, talks with former NASA Apollo astronaut Buzz Aldrin during a demonstration of the Regolith Advanced Surface System Operations Robot, or RASSOR, at the automated landing and hazard avoidance technology, or ALHAT, hazard field at the north end of the Shuttle Landing Facility at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. The event was held to announce Moon Express Inc., of Moffett Field, California is selected to utilize Kennedy facilities for NASA's Lunar Cargo Transportation and Landing by Soft Touchdown, or Lunar CATALYST, initiative. Moon Express is developing a lander with capabilities that will enable delivery of payloads to the surface of the moon, as well as new science and exploration missions of interest to NASA and scientific and academic communities. Moon Express will base its activities at Kennedy and utilize the Morpheus ALHAT field and a hangar nearby for CATALYST testing. The Advanced Exploration Systems Division of NASA's Human Exploration and Operations Mission Directorate manages Lunar CATALYST.

  14. Moon Express Media Event

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-11-03

    Members of the media watch a demonstration of the Regolith Advanced Surface System Operations Robot, or RASSOR, during a media event at the automated landing and hazard avoidance technology, or ALHAT, hazard field at the north end of the Shuttle Landing Facility at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. Tom Engler, center, in the suit, deputy director of Kennedy's Center Planning and Development, announced Moon Express Inc., of Moffett Field, California is selected to utilize Kennedy facilities for NASA's Lunar Cargo Transportation and Landing by Soft Touchdown, or Lunar CATALYST, initiative. Moon Express is developing a lander with capabilities that will enable delivery of payloads to the surface of the moon, as well as new science and exploration missions of interest to NASA and scientific and academic communities. Moon Express will base its activities at Kennedy and utilize the Morpheus ALHAT field and a hangar nearby for CATALYST testing. The Advanced Exploration Systems Division of NASA's Human Exploration and Operations Mission Directorate manages Lunar CATALYST.

  15. Succession of Caledonian tectonic events in the pre-Devonian basement of NW-Spitsbergen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piepjohn, Karsten; von Gosen, Werner

    2017-04-01

    In the Liefdefjorden area, NW Spitsbergen, a several km-thick sequence of Proterozoic metasedimentary rock units was affected by a polyphase structural evolution during the Caledonian Orogeny. In the field, a relative succession of tectonic events could be detected by structural field work. As a result, the Early Caledonian development was initiated by three ductile events (E1 to E3), which are recorded by the development of a metamorphic layering (S1), the formation of two generations of isoclinal folds (F2, F3) and the development of a penetrative foliation (S3) in mica schists and marbles of the Krossfjorden Group in Early to Middle Ordovician times. While the fold axes of the first isoclinal folding (F2) are more or less E-W oriented, the trend of the second isoclinal folding (F3) is dominated by N-S fold axes. The Early Caledonian evolution E1-E3 was followed by a thermal event (E4) in the Late Ordovician/Early Silurian, which was characterized by migmatization of large parts of the basement in NW Spitsbergen and by the emplacement of the so-called grey granite and pegmatite and aplitic dikes in Middle to Late Silurian times. The late orogenic development was dominated by mylonitization (E5) in the Late Silurian, which affected the deformed metasedimentary rocks and undeformed migmatites, granites and dikes. N-S to NE-SW trending lineations on the mylonite foliation characterize this event. The Caledonian Orogeny was terminated by folding with the formation of km-scale synforms and antiforms (E6) around N-S trending axes, the intrusion of late-orogenic granites (E7) in Late Silurian/Early Devonian times, and late-orogenic extension (E8). The structural field studies demonstrate that the tectonic evolution during the Caledonian Orogeny in NW-Spitsbergen was much more complex than seen before. The separation of different tectonic units and interpretation of the kinematics during the different events as well as possible relations to the other pre

  16. Vaccine Adverse Events

    MedlinePlus

    ... Vaccines, Blood & Biologics Animal & Veterinary Cosmetics Tobacco Products Vaccines, Blood & Biologics Home Vaccines, Blood & Biologics Safety & Availability ( ... Center for Biologics Evaluation & Research Vaccine Adverse Events Vaccine Adverse Events Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More ...

  17. The remembering of auditory event durations.

    PubMed

    Boltz, M G

    1992-09-01

    Three experiments examined the incidental remembering of event durations. In each study, Ss engaged in an initial learning phase in which they performed a set of perceptual ratings on events for a varying number of trials. These events consisted of tonal sequences or ecological sounds that varied in their internal structure and ending. Ss were then given a surprise memory task in which they were asked to recognize the duration of each event (Experiments 1 and 3) or extrapolate its completion (Experiment 2). Results showed that in contrast to irregularly timed events, those filled with regularly timed or continuous pitch information yielded high levels of accuracy that increased with greater learning experience. In addition, durations marked by a nonarbitrary ending were more accurately remembered than those marked by an arbitrary ending which, in fact, were misremembered as shorter than their actual duration. These findings are discussed in terms of an approach that emphasizes the role of event structure on perceiving and remembering activities.

  18. Results of simulated abnormal heating events for full-length nuclear fuel rods

    SciTech Connect

    Guenther, R.J.

    1983-01-01

    Full-length nuclear fuel rods were tested in a furnace to simulate the slow heating rates postulated for commercial pressurized water reactor fuel rods exposed to an overheating event in a storage cask. Fuel rod temperatures and internal gas pressures were monitored during the test and are presented along with mensural data for cladding. Metallography of the cladding provided data on grain growth, hydriding, oxidation, cladding stresses, and the general nature of the failures.

  19. Event Logic Assistant (Elan)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-07-14

    as a basis for Phase II research. 2 Background 2.1 Event logic 2.1.1 Event structures Intuitively, an event structure is an abstract algebraic ...Theoretical Computer Science, 149:257–298, 1995. [2] Uri Abraham. Models for Concurrency, volume 11 of Algebra , Logic and Applications Series. Gordon...the ordering of events in a distributed system. Comms. ACM, 21(7):558–65, 1978. [28] Leslie Lamport. Hybrid systems in TLA+. In Grossman , Nerode, Ravn

  20. New PHOBOS results on event-by-event fluctuations

    SciTech Connect

    Alver, B.; Ballintijn, M.; Busza, W.; Decowski, M. P.; Gulbrandsen, K.; Henderson, C.; Kane, J. L.; Kulinich, P.; Li, W.; Loizides, C.; Reed, C.; Roland, C.; Roland, G.; Rosenberg, L.; Sarin, P.; Stephans, G. S. F.; Vale, C.; Nieuwenhuizen, G. J. van; Vaurynovich, S. S.; Verdier, R.

    2006-04-11

    We present new results from the PHOBOS experiment at RHIC on event-by-event fluctuations of particle multiplicities and angular distributions in nucleus-nucleus collisions at RHIC. Our data for Au+Au collisions at {radical}(s{sub NN}) = 200 GeV show that at a level of 10-4 or less, no rare, large-amplitude fluctuations in the total multiplicity distributions or the shape of the pseudorapidity distributions are observed. We however find significant short-range multiplicity correlations in these data, that can be described as particle production in clusters. In Cu+Cu collisions, we observe large final-state azimuthal anisotropies {nu}2. A common scaling behavior for Cu+Cu and Au+Au for these anisotropies emerges when fluctuations in the initial state geometry are taken into account.

  1. The Chelyabinsk Airburst Event

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boslough, Mark

    2013-10-01

    On Feb. 15, 2013, an asteroid exploded about 40 km from the Russian city of Chelyabinsk. Its proximity led to many injuries and widespread blast damage, but also yielded a plethora of data, providing means to determine the projectile size and entry parameters, and develop a self-consistent model. We will present results of the first physics simulations to be initialized with accurate energy deposition derived from observations. The best estimate of the explosive yield is 400-500 kilotons, making Chelyabinsk the most powerful such event observed since Tunguska (3-5 megatons). Analysis of video combined with subsequent on-site stellar calibrations enable precise estimates of entry velocity (19 km/s), angle (17° elevation) and altitude of peak brightness (29 km). This implies a pre-entry diameter of ~20 m and mass of ~1200 tonnes. Satellite sensors recorded the emission peak at 03:20:33 UT, with a total radiated energy of 3.75×1014 J 90 kilotons). A typical bolide luminous efficiency of 20% implies a total energy of ~450 kilotons, consistent with infrasound and other observations. The maximum radiant intensity was 2.7×1013 W/ster, corresponding to a magnitude of -28. The shallow entry angle led to a long bolide duration (16.5 s) and energy was deposited over 100s of km leading to an extended, near-horizontal, linear explosion. The blast was distributed over a large area, and was much weaker than for a steep entry and a more concentrated explosion closer to the surface. The orientation also led to different phenomena than expected for a more vertical entry. There was no ballistic plume as observed from SL9 impacts (45°) or calculated for Tunguska 35°). Instead, buoyant instabilities grew into mushroom clouds and bifurcated the trail into two contra-rotating vortices. Chelyabinsk and Tunguska are “once-per-century” and “once-per-millennium” events, respectively. These outliers imply that the frequency of large airbursts is underestimated. Models also

  2. Flexibility of Event Boundaries in Autobiographical Memory

    PubMed Central

    Hohman, Timothy J.; Peynircioğlu, Zehra F.; Beason-Held, Lori L.

    2014-01-01

    Events have clear and consistent boundaries that are defined during perception in a manner that influences memory performance. The natural process of event segmentation shapes event definitions during perception, and appears to play a critical role in defining distinct episodic memories at encoding. However, the role of retrieval processes in modifying event definitions is not clear. We explored how such processes changed event boundary definitions at recall. In Experiment 1 we showed that distance from encoding is related to boundary flexibility. Participants were more likely to move self-reported event boundaries to include information reported beyond those boundaries when recalling more distant events compared to more recent events. In Experiment 2, we showed that age also influenced boundary flexibility. Older Age adults were more likely to move event boundaries than College Age adults, and the relationship between distance from encoding and boundary flexibility seen in Experiment 1 was present only in College Age and Middle Age adults. These results suggest that factors at retrieval have a direct impact on event definitions in memory and that, although episodic memories may be initially defined at encoding, these definitions are not necessarily maintained in long-term memory. PMID:22989194

  3. Early Events in RNA Folding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thirumalai, D.; Lee, Namkyung; Woodson, Sarah A.; Klimov, Dk

    2001-10-01

    We describe a conceptual framework for understanding the way large RNA molecules fold based on the notion that their free-energy landscape is rugged. A key prediction of our theory is that RNA folding can be described by the kinetic partitioning mechanism (KPM). According to KPM a small fraction of molecules folds rapidly to the native state whereas the remaining fraction is kinetically trapped in a low free-energy non-native state. This model provides a unified description of the way RNA and proteins fold. Single-molecule experiments on Tetrahymena ribozyme, which directly validate our theory, are analyzed using KPM. We also describe the earliest events that occur on microsecond time scales in RNA folding. These must involve collapse of RNA molecules that are mediated by counterion-condensation. Estimates of time scales for the initial events in RNA folding are provided for the Tetrahymena ribozyme.

  4. Life events at the onset of bipolar affective illness.

    PubMed

    Dunner, D L; Patrick, V; Fieve, R R

    1979-04-01

    The authors assessed the occurrence of stressful life events before the initial or subsequent episodes of affective illness in a group of 79 bipolar I manic-depressive patients who were attending a lithium clinic. About half of the patients recalled a life event in the 3-month interval before their initial episode; postpartum onset was prominent among these events. Few patients recalled life events for subsequent episodes. Finally, history data did not differentiate patients who recalled life events and those who did not. These data may be useful in assessing environmental antecedents of populations at risk for bipolar illness.

  5. The Arithmetic of events and a new theory of Gravitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbasi, Malek

    2012-04-01

    Of fundamental importance in physics is the concept of event. This study tries; first, to provide a mathematical background showing how must deal with these events and based on what laws the watches, another important concept used frequently in this research, record them. Armed, then, with this mathematical background, the Gravitational Clouds Theory, a novel theory of gravitation concerning the role of the matter and energy in the universe, is proposed. This completely new theory leads to miscellanies results some of which are: the second Einstein's postulate; the well known identity E = mc2; the time-dilation phenomenon and Fitzgerald-Lorentz contraction. This theory will also explain why indeed we never feel the speed of the Earth, what is the origin of Dark matter-energy and many other extraordinary results associated with cosmology.

  6. The Arithmetic of Events and a New Theory of Gravitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbasi, Malek

    2012-10-01

    Of fundamental importance in physics is the concept of event. This study tries, first, to provide a mathematical background showing how must deal with these events and based on what laws the watches, another important concept used frequently in this research, record them. Armed, then, with this mathematical background, the Gravitational Clouds Theory, a novel theory of gravitation concerning the role of the matter and energy in the universe, is proposed. This completely new theory leads to miscellanies results some of which are: the second Einstein's postulate; the well known identity E = mc2; the time-dilation phenomenon and Fitzgerald-Lorentz contraction. This theory will also explain why indeed we never feel the speed of the Earth, what is the origin of Dark matter-energy and many other extraordinary results associated with cosmology.

  7. Heat fluctuations and initial ensembles.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kwangmoo; Kwon, Chulan; Park, Hyunggyu

    2014-09-01

    Time-integrated quantities such as work and heat increase incessantly in time during nonequilibrium processes near steady states. In the long-time limit, the average values of work and heat become asymptotically equivalent to each other, since they only differ by a finite energy change in average. However, the fluctuation theorem (FT) for the heat is found not to hold with the equilibrium initial ensemble, while the FT for the work holds. This reveals an intriguing effect of everlasting initial memory stored in rare events. We revisit the problem of a Brownian particle in a harmonic potential dragged with a constant velocity, which is in contact with a thermal reservoir. The heat and work fluctuations are investigated with initial Boltzmann ensembles at temperatures generally different from the reservoir temperature. We find that, in the infinite-time limit, the FT for the work is fully recovered for arbitrary initial temperatures, while the heat fluctuations significantly deviate from the FT characteristics except for the infinite initial-temperature limit (a uniform initial ensemble). Furthermore, we succeed in calculating finite-time corrections to the heat and work distributions analytically, using the modified saddle point integral method recently developed by us. Interestingly, we find noncommutativity between the infinite-time limit and the infinite-initial-temperature limit for the probability distribution function (PDF) of the heat.

  8. Dialogue on private events

    PubMed Central

    Palmer, David C.; Eshleman, John; Brandon, Paul; Layng, T. V. Joe; McDonough, Christopher; Michael, Jack; Schoneberger, Ted; Stemmer, Nathan; Weitzman, Ray; Normand, Matthew

    2004-01-01

    In the fall of 2003, the authors corresponded on the topic of private events on the listserv of the Verbal Behavior Special Interest Group. Extracts from that correspondence raised questions about the role of response amplitude in determining units of analysis, whether private events can be investigated directly, and whether covert behavior differs from other behavior except in amplitude. Most participants took a cautious stance, noting not only conceptual pitfalls and empirical difficulties in the study of private events, but doubting the value of interpretive exercises about them. Others argued that despite such obstacles, in domains where experimental analyses cannot be done, interpretation of private events in the light of laboratory principles is the best that science can offer. One participant suggested that the notion that private events can be behavioral in nature be abandoned entirely; as an alternative, the phenomena should be reinterpreted only as physiological events. PMID:22477293

  9. Electric Field Change and VHF Radiation during Lightning Initiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marshall, T. C.; Karunarathne, S.; Bandara, S. A.; Karunarathne, N. D.; Siedlecki, R.; Stolzenburg, M.

    2016-12-01

    Recent studies of lightning initiation [e.g., Marshall et al., JGR 2014; Marshall et al., AGU 2015] have shown that an initial electric field change (IEC) occurs for about 1 ms before the first initial breakdown (IB) pulse in most (and perhaps all) lightning flashes. The same studies indicate that the IEC itself begins after an event that radiates strongly in the VHF radio band; this event seems to be the real lightning initiation event [e.g., Rison et al., Nature Communications 2016]. During the summer of 2016 we used an array of E-change sensors and VHF sensors located in north Mississippi to obtain correlated data on the VHF lightning initiation event, the IEC, and the IB pulses of nearby lightning flashes. In this presentation we show examples of lightning initiation events and their subsequent IECs at multiple sensors. In addition, we show examples of the VHF radiation associated with IB pulses.

  10. The end-triassic mass extinction event

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hallam, A.

    1988-01-01

    The end-Triassic is the least studied of the five major episodes of mass extinction recognized in the Phanerozoic, and the Triassic-Jurassic boundary is not precisely defined in most parts of the world, with a paucity of good marine sections and an insufficiency of biostratigraphically valuable fossils. Despite these limitations it is clear that there was a significant episode of mass extinction, affecting many groups, in the Late Norian and the existing facts are consistent with it having taken place at the very end of the period. The best record globally comes from marine strata. There was an almost complete turnover of ammonites across the T-J boundary, with perhaps no more than one genus surviving. About half the bivalve genera and most of the species went extinct, as did many archaeogastropods. Many Paleozoic-dominant brachiopods also disappeared, as did the last of the conodonts. There was a major collapse and disappearance of the Alpine calcareous sponge. Among terrestrial biota, a significant extinction event involving tetrapods was recognized. With regard to possible environmental events that may be postulated to account for the extinctions, there is no evidence of any significant global change of climate at this time. The existence of the large Manicouagan crater in Quebec, dated as about late or end-Triassic, has led to the suggestion that an impact event might be implicated, but so far despite intensive search no unequivocal iridium anomaly or shocked quartz was discovered. On the other hand there is strong evidence for significant marine regression in many parts of the world. It is proposed therefore that the likeliest cause of the marine extinctions is severe reduction in habitat area caused either by regression of epicontinental seas, subsequent widespread anoxia during the succeeding transgression, or a combination of the two.

  11. Landscape of international event-based biosurveillance.

    PubMed

    Hartley, Dm; Nelson, Np; Walters, R; Arthur, R; Yangarber, R; Madoff, L; Linge, Jp; Mawudeku, A; Collier, N; Brownstein, Js; Thinus, G; Lightfoot, N

    2010-01-01

    Event-based biosurveillance is a scientific discipline in which diverse sources of data, many of which are available from the Internet, are characterized prospectively to provide information on infectious disease events. Biosurveillance complements traditional public health surveillance to provide both early warning of infectious disease events and situational awareness. The Global Health Security Action Group of the Global Health Security Initiative is developing a biosurveillance capability that integrates and leverages component systems from member nations. This work discusses these biosurveillance systems and identifies needed future studies.

  12. Landscape of international event-based biosurveillance

    PubMed Central

    Hartley, DM; Nelson, NP; Walters, R; Arthur, R; Yangarber, R; Madoff, L; Linge, JP; Mawudeku, A; Collier, N; Brownstein, JS; Thinus, G; Lightfoot, N

    2010-01-01

    Event-based biosurveillance is a scientific discipline in which diverse sources of data, many of which are available from the Internet, are characterized prospectively to provide information on infectious disease events. Biosurveillance complements traditional public health surveillance to provide both early warning of infectious disease events and situational awareness. The Global Health Security Action Group of the Global Health Security Initiative is developing a biosurveillance capability that integrates and leverages component systems from member nations. This work discusses these biosurveillance systems and identifies needed future studies. PMID:22460393

  13. Forward flux sampling for rare event simulations.

    PubMed

    Allen, Rosalind J; Valeriani, Chantal; Rein Ten Wolde, Pieter

    2009-11-18

    Rare events are ubiquitous in many different fields, yet they are notoriously difficult to simulate because few, if any, events are observed in a conventional simulation run. Over the past several decades, specialized simulation methods have been developed to overcome this problem. We review one recently developed class of such methods, known as forward flux sampling. Forward flux sampling uses a series of interfaces between the initial and final states to calculate rate constants and generate transition paths for rare events in equilibrium or nonequilibrium systems with stochastic dynamics. This review draws together a number of recent advances, summarizes several applications of the method and highlights challenges that remain to be overcome.

  14. Atmospheric transmission of North Atlantic Heinrich events

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hostetler, S.W.; Clark, P.U.; Bartlein, P.J.; Mix, A.C.; Pisias, N.J.

    1999-01-01

    We model the response of the climate system during Heinrich event 2 (H2) by employing an atmospheric general circulation model, using boundary conditions based on the concept of a "canonical" Heinrich event. The canonical event is initialized with a full-height Laurentide ice sheet (LIS) and CLIMAP sea surface temperatures (SSTs), followed by lowering of the LIS, then warming of North Atlantic SSTs. Our modeled temperature and wind fields exhibit spatially variable responses over the Northern Hemisphere at each stage of the H2 event. In some regions the climatic responses are additive, whereas in other regions they cancel or are of opposite sign, suggesting that Heinrich event climatic variations may have left complex signatures in geologic records. We find variations in the tropical water balance and the mass balance of ice sheets, and implications for variations in terrestrial methane production from the contraction of northern permafrost regions and the expansion of tropical wetlands. Copyright 1999 by the American Geophysical Union.

  15. Play Initiating Behaviors and Responses in Red Colobus Monkeys

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Worch, Eric A.

    2012-01-01

    Red colobus monkeys are playful primates, making them an important species in which to study animal play. The author examines play behaviors and responses in the species for its play initiation events, age differences in initiating frequency and initiating behavior, and the types of social play that result from specific initiating behaviors. Out…

  16. Rapid (10-yr) recovery of terrestrial productivity in a simulation study of the terminal Cretaceous impact event

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lomax, Barry; Beerling, David; Upchurch, Garland; Otto-Bliesner, Bette

    2001-10-01

    Investigations of short-term (up to 10 3 yr) environmental change across the Cretaceous-Tertiary boundary provide evidence for reduced temperatures, consistent with the injection of debris and sulphate aerosols into the upper atmosphere by a large impact event. Concomitant with this was a postulated massive addition of CO 2 to the atmospheric carbon reservoir by impact vaporisation of the Chicxulub carbonate platform. Taken together, a high CO 2 but low irradiance environment would have created unusual conditions for the operation of the terrestrial biosphere. Here, we have evaluated this environmental influence on terrestrial ecosystems using a process-based dynamic global vegetation model forced with post-impact global climates, derived by modification of the GENESIS atmospheric climate model simulation for the latest Cretaceous. Our results suggest that terrestrial primary productivity initially collapsed and then recovered to pre-impact levels within a decade. Global terrestrial carbon storage in vegetation biomass exhibited a similar collapse but complete recovery took place on a 60-80 yr timescale. The recovery of both terrestrial net primary productivity and vegetation biomass was largely mediated by the high CO 2 concentration stimulating ecosystem photosynthetic productivity in the warm low latitudes. An apparently rapid recovery of terrestrial ecosystem function stands in marked contrast to the situation for the marine realm, where the organic carbon flux to the deep ocean was suppressed for up to 3 million years.

  17. Event-by-Event Simulation of Induced Fission

    SciTech Connect

    Vogt, R; Randrup, J

    2007-12-13

    We are developing a novel code that treats induced fission by statistical (or Monte-Carlo) simulation of individual decay chains. After its initial excitation, the fissionable compound nucleus may either deexcite by evaporation or undergo binary fission into a large number of fission channels each with different energetics involving both energy dissipation and deformed scission prefragments. After separation and Coulomb acceleration, each fission fragment undergoes a succession of individual (neutron) evaporations, leading to two bound but still excited fission products (that may further decay electromagnetically and, ultimately, weakly), as well as typically several neutrons. (The inclusion of other possible ejectiles is planned.) This kind of approach makes it possible to study more detailed observables than could be addressed with previous treatments which have tended to focus on average quantities. In particular, any type of correlation observable can readily be extracted from a generated set of events. With a view towards making the code practically useful in a variety of applications, emphasis is being put on making it numerically efficient so that large event samples can be generated quickly. In its present form, the code can generate one million full events in about 12 seconds on a MacBook laptop computer. The development of this qualitatively new tool is still at an early stage and quantitative reproduction of existing data should not be expected until a number of detailed refinement have been implemented.

  18. Event-by-Event Simulation of Induced Fission

    SciTech Connect

    Vogt, Ramona; Randrup, Joergen

    2008-04-17

    We are developing a novel code that treats induced fission by statistical (or Monte-Carlo) simulation of individual decay chains. After its initial excitation, the fissionable compound nucleus may either de-excite by evaporation or undergo binary fission into a large number of fission channels each with different energetics involving both energy dissipation and deformed scission pre-fragments. After separation and Coulomb acceleration, each fission fragment undergoes a succession of individual (neutron) evaporations, leading to two bound but still excited fission products (that may further decay electromagnetically and, ultimately, weakly), as well as typically several neutrons. (The inclusion of other possible ejectiles is planned.) This kind of approach makes it possible to study more detailed observables than could be addressed with previous treatments which have tended to focus on average quantities. In particular, any type of correlation observable can readily be extracted from a generated set of events. With a view towards making the code practically useful in a variety of applications, emphasis is being put on making it numerically efficient so that large event samples can be generated quickly. In its present form, the code can generate one million full events in about 12 seconds on a MacBook laptop computer. The development of this qualitatively new tool is still at an early stage and quantitative reproduction of existing data should not be expected until a number of detailed refinement have been implemented.

  19. Features, Events, and Processes: Disruptive Events

    SciTech Connect

    J. King

    2004-03-31

    The primary purpose of this analysis is to evaluate seismic- and igneous-related features, events, and processes (FEPs). These FEPs represent areas of natural system processes that have the potential to produce disruptive events (DE) that could impact repository performance and are related to the geologic processes of tectonism, structural deformation, seismicity, and igneous activity. Collectively, they are referred to as the DE FEPs. This evaluation determines which of the DE FEPs are excluded from modeling used to support the total system performance assessment for license application (TSPA-LA). The evaluation is based on the data and results presented in supporting analysis reports, model reports, technical information, or corroborative documents that are cited in the individual FEP discussions in Section 6.2 of this analysis report.

  20. Event-by-Event Fission with FREYA

    SciTech Connect

    Randrup, J; Vogt, R

    2010-11-09

    The recently developed code FREYA (Fission Reaction Event Yield Algorithm) generates large samples of complete fission events, consisting of two receding product nuclei as well as a number of neutrons and photons, all with complete kinematic information. Thus it is possible to calculate arbitrary correlation observables whose behavior may provide unique insight into the fission process. The presentation first discusses the present status of FREYA, which has now been extended up to energies where pre-equilibrium emission becomes significant and one or more neutrons may be emitted prior to fission. Concentrating on {sup 239}Pu(n,f), we discuss the neutron multiplicity correlations, the dependence of the neutron energy spectrum on the neutron multiplicity, and the relationship between the fragment kinetic energy and the number of neutrons and their energies. We also briefly suggest novel fission observables that could be measured with modern detectors.

  1. On the initial regime of pre-big bang cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gasperini, M.

    2017-09-01

    The production of a background of super-horizon curvature perturbations with the appropriate (red) spectrum needed to trigger the cosmic anisotropies observed on large scales is associated, in the context of pre-big bang inflation, with a phase of growing string coupling. The extension towards the past of such a phase is not limited in time by the dynamical backreaction of the quantum perturbations of the cosmological geometry and of its sources. A viable, slightly red spectrum of scalar perturbations can thus be the output of an asymptotic, perturbative regime which is well compatible with an initial string-vacuum state satisfying the postulate of "Asymptotic Past Triviality".

  2. Features, Events, and Processes: Disruptive Events

    SciTech Connect

    P. Sanchez

    2004-11-08

    The purpose of this analysis report is to evaluate and document the inclusion or exclusion of the disruptive events features, events, and processes (FEPs) with respect to modeling used to support the total system performance assessment for license application (TSPA-LA). A screening decision, either ''Included'' or ''Excluded,'' is given for each FEP, along with the technical basis for screening decisions. This information is required by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) at 10 CFR 63.114 (d), (e), and (f) [DIRS 156605]. The FEPs addressed in this report deal with both seismic and igneous disruptive events, such as fault displacements through the repository and an igneous intrusion into the repository. For included FEPs, this analysis summarizes the implementation of the FEP in TSPA-LA (i.e., how the FEP is included). For excluded FEPs, this analysis provides the technical basis for exclusion from TSPA-LA (i.e., why the FEP is excluded). Previous versions of this report were developed to support the total system performance assessments (TSPA) for various prior repository designs. This revision addresses the repository design for the license application (LA).

  3. Committed Sport Event Volunteers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Han, Keunsu; Quarterman, Jerome; Strigas, Ethan; Ha, Jaehyun; Lee, Seungbum

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationships among selected demographic characteristics (income, education and age), motivation and commitment of volunteers at a sporting event. Three-hundred and five questionnaires were collected from volunteers in a marathon event and analyzed using structural equation modeling (SEM). Based on…

  4. Improving Seismic Event Characterisation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1996-07-22

    according to age, four regions of low volcanic and earthquake activity, in addition to a region termed tectonic continent where activity is high. We... Queensland . 0 * il-’gme 7.2 shows tire locations of events whichl have been used. Ti1𔃼 events l:cI , ’"re,: hcc.eI with a inininmm of fcu; iecords

  5. CHED Events: Philadelphia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wink, Donald J.

    2008-08-01

    These Division of Chemical Education (CHED) Committee meetings and events are planned for the Fall 2008 ACS Meeting in Philadelphia. Most will take place in the Sheraton Philadelphia City Center Hotel, 17th and Race Streets: This includes the Sunday evening Reception and Social Event; there will be no CHED Banquet.

  6. Events by Objectives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barton, David W.

    1980-01-01

    Institutions need coordinated events programs that support institutional goals and are closely related to them, whether the objective is fund raising, student recruitment, or improvement of the college image. Carefully selected and planned events create news, affect perceptions, influence attitudes, spark emotions, and affect people's decisions…

  7. Activating Event Knowledge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hare, Mary; Jones, Michael; Thomson, Caroline; Kelly, Sarah; McRae, Ken

    2009-01-01

    An increasing number of results in sentence and discourse processing demonstrate that comprehension relies on rich pragmatic knowledge about real-world events, and that incoming words incrementally activate such knowledge. If so, then even outside of any larger context, nouns should activate knowledge of the generalized events that they denote or…

  8. Event generator overview

    SciTech Connect

    Pang, Y.

    1997-12-01

    Due to their ability to provide detailed and quantitative predictions, the event generators have become an important part of studying relativistic heavy ion physics and of designing future experiments. In this talk, the author will briefly summarize recent progress in developing event generators for the relativistic heavy ion collisions.

  9. Contrasting Large Solar Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lanzerotti, Louis J.

    2010-10-01

    After an unusually long solar minimum, solar cycle 24 is slowly beginning. A large coronal mass ejection (CME) from sunspot 1092 occurred on 1 August 2010, with effects reaching Earth on 3 August and 4 August, nearly 38 years to the day after the huge solar event of 4 August 1972. The prior event, which those of us engaged in space research at the time remember well, recorded some of the highest intensities of solar particles and rapid changes of the geomagnetic field measured to date. What can we learn from the comparisons of these two events, other than their essentially coincident dates? One lesson I took away from reading press coverage and Web reports of the August 2010 event is that the scientific community and the press are much more aware than they were nearly 4 decades ago that solar events can wreak havoc on space-based technologies.

  10. Oxidation events and skin aging.

    PubMed

    Kammeyer, A; Luiten, R M

    2015-05-01

    The rate of skin aging, or that of tissue in general, is determined by a variable predominance of tissue degeneration over tissue regeneration. This review discusses the role of oxidative events of tissue degeneration and aging in general, and for the skin in particular. The mechanisms involved in intrinsic and extrinsic (photo-) aging are described. Since photoaging is recognized as an important extrinsic aging factor, we put special emphasize on the effects of UV exposure on aging, and its variable influence according to global location and skin type. We here summarise direct photochemical effects of UV on DNA, RNA, proteins and vitamin D, the factors contributing to UV-induced immunosuppression, which may delay aging, the nature and origin of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and reactive nitrogen species (RNS) as indirect contributors for aging, and the consequences of oxidative events for extracellular matrix (ECM) degradation, such as that of collagen. We conclude that conflicting data on studies investigating the validity of the free radical damage theory of aging may reflect variations in the level of ROS induction which is difficult to quantify in vivo, and the lack of targeting of experimental ROS to the relevant cellular compartment. Also mitohormesis, an adaptive response, may arise in vivo to moderate ROS levels, further complicating interpretation of in vivo results. We here describes how skin aging is mediated both directly and indirectly by oxidative degeneration.This review indicates that skin aging events are initiated and often propagated by oxidation events, despite recently recognized adaptive responses to oxidative stress. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. The underlying event in hard scattering processes

    SciTech Connect

    R. Field

    2002-02-08

    The authors study the behavior of the underlying event in hard scattering proton-antiproton collisions at 1.8 TeV and compare with the QCD Monte-Carlo models. The underlying event is everything except the two outgoing hard scattered jets and receives contributions from the beam-beam remnants plus initial and final-state radiation. The data indicate that neither ISAJET or HERWIG produce enough charged particles (with p{sub T} > 0.5 GeV/c) from the beam-beam remnant component and that ISAJET produces too many charged particles from initial-state radiation. PYTHIA which uses multiple parton scattering to enhance the underlying event does the best job describing the data.

  12. PRELIMINARY SELECTION OF MGR DESIGN BASIS EVENTS

    SciTech Connect

    J.A. Kappes

    1999-09-16

    The purpose of this analysis is to identify the preliminary design basis events (DBEs) for consideration in the design of the Monitored Geologic Repository (MGR). For external events and natural phenomena (e.g., earthquake), the objective is to identify those initiating events that the MGR will be designed to withstand. Design criteria will ensure that radiological release scenarios resulting from these initiating events are beyond design basis (i.e., have a scenario frequency less than once per million years). For internal (i.e., human-induced and random equipment failures) events, the objective is to identify credible event sequences that result in bounding radiological releases. These sequences will be used to establish the design basis criteria for MGR structures, systems, and components (SSCs) design basis criteria in order to prevent or mitigate radiological releases. The safety strategy presented in this analysis for preventing or mitigating DBEs is based on the preclosure safety strategy outlined in ''Strategy to Mitigate Preclosure Offsite Exposure'' (CRWMS M&O 1998f). DBE analysis is necessary to provide feedback and requirements to the design process, and also to demonstrate compliance with proposed 10 CFR 63 (Dyer 1999b) requirements. DBE analysis is also required to identify and classify the SSCs that are important to safety (ITS).

  13. Event-by-event shape and flow fluctuations of relativistic heavy-ion collision fireballs

    SciTech Connect

    Qiu Zhi; Heinz, Ulrich

    2011-08-15

    Heavy-ion collisions create deformed quark-gluon plasma (QGP) fireballs which explode anisotropically. The viscosity of the fireball matter determines its ability to convert the initial spatial deformation into momentum anisotropies that can be measured in the final hadron spectra. A quantitatively precise empirical extraction of the QGP viscosity thus requires a good understanding of the initial fireball deformation. This deformation fluctuates from event to event, and so does the finally observed momentum anisotropy. We present a harmonic decomposition of the initial fluctuations in shape and orientation of the fireball and perform event-by-event (2 + 1)-dimensional ideal fluid dynamical simulations to extract the resulting fluctuations in the magnitude and direction of the corresponding harmonic components of the final anisotropic flow at midrapidity. The final harmonic flow coefficients are found to depend nonlinearly on the initial harmonic eccentricity coefficients. We show that, on average, initial density fluctuations suppress the buildup of elliptic flow relative to what one obtains from a smooth initial profile of the same eccentricity and discuss implications for the phenomenological extraction of the QGP shear viscosity from experimental elliptic flow data.

  14. Incidence and economic burden of suspected adverse events and adverse event monitoring during AF therapy.

    PubMed

    Kim, M H; Lin, J; Hussein, M; Battleman, D

    2009-12-01

    Rhythm- and rate-control therapies are an essential part of atrial fibrillation (AF) management; however, the use of existing agents is often limited by the occurrence of adverse events. The aim of this study was to evaluate suspected adverse events and adverse event monitoring, and associated medical costs, in patients receiving AF rhythm-control and/or rate-control therapy. This retrospective cohort study used claims data from the Integrated Healthcare Information Systems National Managed Care Benchmark Database from 2002-2006. Patients hospitalized for AF (primary diagnosis), and who had at least 365 days' enrollment before and after the initial (index) AF hospitalization, were included in the analysis. Suspected AF therapy-related adverse events and function tests for adverse event monitoring were identified according to pre-specified diagnosis codes/procedures, and examined over the 12 months following discharge from the index hospitalization. Events/function tests had to have occurred within 90 days of a claim for AF therapy to be considered a suspected adverse event/adverse event monitoring. Of 4174 AF patients meeting the study criteria, 3323 received AF drugs; 428 received rhythm-control only (12.9%), 2130 rate-control only (64.1%), and 765 combined rhythm/rate-control therapy (23.0%). Overall, 50.1% of treated patients had a suspected adverse event and/or function test for adverse event monitoring (45.5% with rate-control, 53.5% with rhythm-control, and 61.2% with combined rhythm/rate-control). Suspected cardiovascular adverse events were the most common events (occurring in 36.1% of patients), followed by pulmonary (6.1%), and endocrine events (5.9%). Overall, suspected adverse events/function tests were associated with mean annual per-patient costs of $3089 ($1750 with rhythm-control, $2041 with rate control, and $6755 with combined rhythm/rate-control). As a retrospective analysis, the study is subject to potential selection bias, while its reliance on

  15. Historical Radiological Event Monitoring

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    During and after radiological events EPA's RadNet monitors the environment for radiation. EPA monitored environmental radiation levels during and after Chernobyl, Fukushima and other international and domestic radiological incidents.

  16. "Universe" event at AIMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2008-06-01

    Report of event of 11 May 2008 held at the African Institute of Mathematical Sciences (Muizenberg, Cape), with speakers Michael Griffin (Administrator of NASA), Stephen Hawking (Cambridge), David Gross (Kavli Institute, Santa Barbara) and George Smoot (Berkeley).

  17. Special Event Production.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Currents, 2002

    2002-01-01

    Offers a descriptive table of software that helps higher education institutions orchestrate events. Information includes vendor, contact, software, price, database engine/server platform, specific features, and client type. (EV)

  18. News and Events

    Cancer.gov

    The latest news from the Office of Cancer Nanotechnology Research and the Alliance, as well as upcoming and past events attended by the Office of Cancer Nanotechnology Research staff, and relevant upcoming scientific meetings.

  19. CCG - News & Events

    Cancer.gov

    NCI's Center for Cancer Genomics (CCG) has been widely recognized for its research efforts to facilitiate advances in cancer genomic research and improve patient outcomes. Find the latest news about and events featuring CCG.

  20. Special Event Production.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Currents, 2002

    2002-01-01

    Offers a descriptive table of software that helps higher education institutions orchestrate events. Information includes vendor, contact, software, price, database engine/server platform, specific features, and client type. (EV)

  1. Event-sequence detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanna, M. F.

    1973-01-01

    Detector consists of matrix of storage elements which are activated by coincidence of failure-voltage pulses and clock pulses. Clock frequency used for event sequence detector can be selected to provide time resolution demanded by test at hand.

  2. 2016 ROVER CHALLENGE EVENTS

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2015-01-08

    2016 ROVER CHALLENGE EVENTS AT THE U.S. SPACE AND ROCKET CENTER IN HUNTSVILLE, ALABAMA. NATIONAL AND INTERNATIONAL COLLEGE AND HIGH SCHOOL STUDENTS COME TOGETHER TO TEST THEIR ENGINEERING SKILLS OVER A SIMULATED OUTER PLANET OBSTACLE COURSE.

  3. Spatial remapping of tactile events

    PubMed Central

    Azañón, Elena

    2008-01-01

    During the apparently mindless act of localizing a tactile sensation, our brain must realign its initial spatial representation (somatotopicaly arranged) according to current body posture (arising from proprioception, vision and even audition).1–3 We have recently illustrated4 the temporal course of this recoding of tactile space from somatotopic to external coordinates using a crossmodal cueing psychophysical paradigm5,6 where behavioral reactions to visual targets are evaluated as a function of the location of irrelevant tactile cues. We found that the tactile events are initially represented in terms of a fleeting, non-conscious but nevertheless behaviorally consequential somatotopic format, which is quickly replaced by the representations referred to external spatial locations that prevail in our everyday experience. In this addendum, we test the intuition that frequent changes in body posture will make it harder to update the spatial remapping system and thus, produce stronger psychophysical correlates of the initial somatotopically-based spatial representations. Contrary to this expectation, however, we found no evidence for a modulation when preventing adaptation to a body posture. PMID:19704788

  4. QCD (&) event generators

    SciTech Connect

    Skands, Peter Z.; /Fermilab

    2005-07-01

    Recent developments in QCD phenomenology have spurred on several improved approaches to Monte Carlo event generation, relative to the post-LEP state of the art. In this brief review, the emphasis is placed on approaches for (1) consistently merging fixed-order matrix element calculations with parton shower descriptions of QCD radiation, (2) improving the parton shower algorithms themselves, and (3) improving the description of the underlying event in hadron collisions.

  5. CHED Events: New Orleans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wink, Donald J.

    2008-03-01

    These Division of Chemical Education (CHED) Committee meetings and events are planned for the Spring 2008 ACS Meeting in New Orleans. Most will take place in the Hilton Riverside Hotel, 2 Poydras Street; this includes the Sunday evening Reception and Social Event; there will be no CHED Banquet. Exceptions are the Sunday evening Poster Session and the Undergraduate Poster Sessions, which will be in Hall A of the Morial Convention Center.

  6. Spaces of Abstract Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chajda, Ivan; Länger, Helmut

    2013-06-01

    We generalize the concept of a space of numerical events in such a way that this generalization corresponds to arbitrary orthomodular posets whereas spaces of numerical events correspond to orthomodular posets having a full set of states. Moreover, we show that there is a natural one-to-one correspondence between orthomodular posets and certain posets with sectionally antitone involutions. Finally, we characterize orthomodular lattices among orthomodular posets.

  7. Small Business Procurement Event

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-08-13

    Small Business Procurement Event 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 5e. TASK...distribution unlimited 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES NDIA 27th Navy Gold Coast Small Business Procurement Event , 12-13 Aug 2014, San Diego, CA. 14. ABSTRACT...18 Target the Small Business Accessible Market within the Department of the Navy $77.8B Department of the Navy Total SB Eligible Spend

  8. The Plus 50 Initiative Evaluation: Initiative Impact

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Association of Community Colleges (NJ1), 2012

    2012-01-01

    The American Association of Community Colleges (AACC), with funding from The Atlantic Philanthropies, created the Plus 50 Initiative (2008-2012). This initiative was designed to build the capacity of community colleges nationwide to develop programming that engages the plus 50 learner. This report contains: (1) An overview of the Plus 50…

  9. Seismic event classification system

    DOEpatents

    Dowla, F.U.; Jarpe, S.P.; Maurer, W.

    1994-12-13

    In the computer interpretation of seismic data, the critical first step is to identify the general class of an unknown event. For example, the classification might be: teleseismic, regional, local, vehicular, or noise. Self-organizing neural networks (SONNs) can be used for classifying such events. Both Kohonen and Adaptive Resonance Theory (ART) SONNs are useful for this purpose. Given the detection of a seismic event and the corresponding signal, computation is made of: the time-frequency distribution, its binary representation, and finally a shift-invariant representation, which is the magnitude of the two-dimensional Fourier transform (2-D FFT) of the binary time-frequency distribution. This pre-processed input is fed into the SONNs. These neural networks are able to group events that look similar. The ART SONN has an advantage in classifying the event because the types of cluster groups do not need to be pre-defined. The results from the SONNs together with an expert seismologist's classification are then used to derive event classification probabilities. 21 figures.

  10. Seismic event classification system

    DOEpatents

    Dowla, Farid U.; Jarpe, Stephen P.; Maurer, William

    1994-01-01

    In the computer interpretation of seismic data, the critical first step is to identify the general class of an unknown event. For example, the classification might be: teleseismic, regional, local, vehicular, or noise. Self-organizing neural networks (SONNs) can be used for classifying such events. Both Kohonen and Adaptive Resonance Theory (ART) SONNs are useful for this purpose. Given the detection of a seismic event and the corresponding signal, computation is made of: the time-frequency distribution, its binary representation, and finally a shift-invariant representation, which is the magnitude of the two-dimensional Fourier transform (2-D FFT) of the binary time-frequency distribution. This pre-processed input is fed into the SONNs. These neural networks are able to group events that look similar. The ART SONN has an advantage in classifying the event because the types of cluster groups do not need to be pre-defined. The results from the SONNs together with an expert seismologist's classification are then used to derive event classification probabilities.

  11. Activating Event Knowledge

    PubMed Central

    Hare, Mary; Jones, Michael; Thomson, Caroline; Kelly, Sarah; McRae, Ken

    2009-01-01

    An increasing number of results in sentence and discourse processing demonstrate that comprehension relies on rich pragmatic knowledge about real-world events, and that incoming words incrementally activate such knowledge. If so, then even outside of any larger context, nouns should activate knowledge of the generalized events that they denote or typically play a role in. We used short stimulus onset asynchrony priming to demonstrate that (1) event nouns prime people (sale-shopper) and objects (trip-luggage) commonly found at those events; (2) location nouns prime people/animals (hospital-doctor) and objects (barn-hay) commonly found at those locations; and (3) instrument nouns prime things on which those instruments are commonly used (key-door), but not the types of people who tend to use them (hose-gardener). The priming effects are not due to normative word association. On our account, facilitation results from event knowledge relating primes and targets. This has much in common with computational models like LSA or BEAGLE in which one word primes another if they frequently occur in similar contexts. LSA predicts priming for all six experiments, whereas BEAGLE correctly predicted that priming should not occur for the instrument-people relation but should occur for the other five. We conclude that event-based relations are encoded in semantic memory and computed as part of word meaning, and have a strong influence on language comprehension. PMID:19298961

  12. Activating event knowledge.

    PubMed

    Hare, Mary; Jones, Michael; Thomson, Caroline; Kelly, Sarah; McRae, Ken

    2009-05-01

    An increasing number of results in sentence and discourse processing demonstrate that comprehension relies on rich pragmatic knowledge about real-world events, and that incoming words incrementally activate such knowledge. If so, then even outside of any larger context, nouns should activate knowledge of the generalized events that they denote or typically play a role in. We used short stimulus onset asynchrony priming to demonstrate that (1) event nouns prime people (sale-shopper) and objects (trip-luggage) commonly found at those events; (2) location nouns prime people/animals (hospital-doctor) and objects (barn-hay) commonly found at those locations; and (3) instrument nouns prime things on which those instruments are commonly used (key-door), but not the types of people who tend to use them (hose-gardener). The priming effects are not due to normative word association. On our account, facilitation results from event knowledge relating primes and targets. This has much in common with computational models like LSA or BEAGLE in which one word primes another if they frequently occur in similar contexts. LSA predicts priming for all six experiments, whereas BEAGLE correctly predicted that priming should not occur for the instrument-people relation but should occur for the other five. We conclude that event-based relations are encoded in semantic memory and computed as part of word meaning, and have a strong influence on language comprehension.

  13. Bull Creek Environment and the ET Event

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bement, L. C.; Carter, B. J.

    2008-12-01

    A recent hypothesis states that an extra-terrestrial (ET) event, in this case a comet explosion over NE North America, initiated the Younger Dryas chronozone--~11,000-10,000 radiocarbon years before present (RCYBP)--and left event specific markers including magnetic grains with iridium, magnetic microspherules, charcoal, soot, carbon spherules, glass-like carbon containing nanodiamonds, and fullerenes with ET helium. This hypothesis results in several predictions, including shuffling of plant and animal communities, disruption of human cultural adaptations, and megafaunal extinctions immediately following the ET event. This poster investigates the question: Does evidence exist for a disruptive event centered at ~11,000 RCYBP in the paleoenvironmental proxy records within the Bull Creek project area, Oklahoma Panhandle, USA? Evidence from multiple proxies, including particle size distribution, stable carbon isotopes, pollen, and phytoliths, is employed to reconstruct the paleoenvironment and search for discontinuities in the data sets.

  14. Gamma-Ray Bursts: Sans Second Postulate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fritzius, R.

    In 1950, Albert Einstein intimated to Robert Shankland that in the years prior to 1905 he had considered using an emission theory [similar to that which Swiss Physicist Walter Ritz propounded in 1908.] In Ritz's theory the velocity of light with respect to an observer is c + v, where c is the velocity of light with respect to its source, and v is the relative velocity between the source and the observer. Einstein abandoned the c+v approach because he could think of no form of differential equation that could have solutions representing waves whose velocity depended [in part] on the motion of the source. For binary stars the c + v approach would predict "observed" phase relations for light arriving from different parts of a given component's orbit, such that the observed light would be, according to Einstein, all badly "mixed up" and might even "back up on itself." In 1913, the Dutch astronomer, Willem de Sitter, urged abandonment of Ritz's c + v relativity by showing that binary stars failed to provide evidence of the "mixed up" light phasing. (Apparent departures from Keplerian motion, including seeing the same star on opposite sides of its orbit at the same time [at the appropriate observer distance] were predicted by Ritz's c +v relativity.) In 1987, Vladimir Sekerin, at Tomsk University, announced that de Sitter failed to address the fact that for the observer-distances required to produce the star-in-two-places-at-once phenomenon, the angular diameter of the binary component's orbit (from the observer's viewpoint) would be too small for our atmospherically limited earth-borne "seeing" to resolve the images. In essence, de Sitter did not "de throne" Ritz. Sekerin then showed how de Sitter's binary star scenario could be interpreted as evidence "for" the Ritzian theory. (Two images briefly on top of one another will be briefly twice as bright as a single image.) He used de Sitter's equations to analog compute light curves of a number of different kinds variable stars starting with Cepheid variables. The author cleared up a critical flaw in Sekerin's reasoning regarding the computed value of the periodic spectral variations involved, and created software simulations of binary star orbits which produce the light curves and spectral variations predicted by the Ritzian theory. (Constant speed-of-light simulations do not produce the variations.) A limited number of these simulations including some for various kinds of Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs) are to be shown as part of this presentation. High-resolution spectral studies of variable stars, including GRBs, may eventually help us decide whether or not Ritz was as wrong as is currently generally thought. Further information on this topic is available at: http://www.ebicom.net/~rsf1/binaries.htm

  15. Particle transport in 3 He-rich events: wave-particle interactions and particle anisotropy measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsurutani, B. T.; Zhang, L. D.; Mason, G. L.; Lakhina, G. S.; Hada, T.; Arballo, J. K.; Zwickl, R. D.

    2002-04-01

    Energetic particles and MHD waves are studied using simultaneous ISEE-3 data to investigate particle propagation and scattering between the source near the Sun and 1 AU. 3 He-rich events are of particular interest because they are typically low intensity "scatter-free" events. The largest solar proton events are of interest because they have been postulated to generate their own waves through beam instabilities. For 3 He-rich events, simultaneous interplanetary magnetic spectra are measured. The intensity of the interplanetary "fossil" turbulence through which the particles have traversed is found to be at the "quiet" to "intermediate" level of IMF activity. Pitch angle scattering rates and the corresponding particle mean free paths l

  16. What is satisfying about satisfying events? Testing 10 candidate psychological needs.

    PubMed

    Sheldon, K M; Elliot, A J; Kim, Y; Kasser, T

    2001-02-01

    Three studies compared 10 candidate psychological needs in an attempt to determine which are truly most fundamental for humans. Participants described "most satisfying events" within their lives and then rated the salience of each of the 10 candidate needs within these events. Supporting self-determination theory postulates (Ryan & Deci, 2000)--autonomy, competence, and relatedness, were consistently among the top 4 needs, in terms of both their salience and their association with event-related affect. Self-esteem was also important, whereas self-actualization or meaning, physical thriving, popularity or influence, and money-luxury were less important. This basic pattern emerged within three different time frames and within both U.S. and South Korean samples and also within a final study that asked, "What's unsatisfying about unsatisfying events?" Implications for hierarchical theories of needs are discussed.

  17. Response of structures to energetic events for the Savannah River Site production reactors probabilistic risk assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Santa Cruz, S.M.; Smith, D.C.; Yau, W.F.

    1992-10-01

    The response of structures to energetic events postulated to arise in a probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) of a Savannah River Site (SRS) production reactor is addressed. Energetic events that arise in PRAs can damage structures and therefore have a significant influence on subsequent accident progression. Consequently, the structural response is important to the calculated risk of operating a plant. Difficulties are encountered, however, in the analysis of structural response of components to energetic loadings. First, the analysis of energetic events often does not provide well-defined static or dynamic loads acting on the structures. Secondly, risk assessments, by their nature, address a wide range of events that are not necessarily precisely defined. This paper describes an approach taken to develop the structural analysis required to support the PRA of the SRS production reactor, that overcomes these difficulties.

  18. Response of structures to energetic events for the Savannah River Site production reactors probabilistic risk assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Santa Cruz, S.M.; Smith, D.C. ); Yau, W.F. )

    1992-01-01

    The response of structures to energetic events postulated to arise in a probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) of a Savannah River Site (SRS) production reactor is addressed. Energetic events that arise in PRAs can damage structures and therefore have a significant influence on subsequent accident progression. Consequently, the structural response is important to the calculated risk of operating a plant. Difficulties are encountered, however, in the analysis of structural response of components to energetic loadings. First, the analysis of energetic events often does not provide well-defined static or dynamic loads acting on the structures. Secondly, risk assessments, by their nature, address a wide range of events that are not necessarily precisely defined. This paper describes an approach taken to develop the structural analysis required to support the PRA of the SRS production reactor, that overcomes these difficulties.

  19. Concepts of event-by-event analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Stroebele, H.

    1995-07-15

    The particles observed in the final state of nuclear collisions can be divided into two classes: those which are susceptible to strong interactions and those which are not, like leptons and the photon. The bulk properties of the {open_quotes}matter{close_quotes} in the reaction zone may be read-off the kinematical characteristics of the particles observable in the final state. These characteristics are strongly dependent on the last interaction these particles have undergone. In a densly populated reaction zone strongly interacting particles will experience many collisions after they have been formed and before they emerge into the asymptotic final state. For the particles which are not sensitive to strong interactions their formation is also their last interaction. Thus photons and leptons probe the period during which they are produced whereas hadrons reflect the so called freeze-out processes, which occur during the late stage in the evolution of the reaction when the population density becomes small and the mean free paths long. The disadvantage of the leptons and photons is their small production cross section; they cannot be used in an analysis of the characteristics of individual collision events, because the number of particles produced per event is too small. The hadrons, on the other hand, stem from the freeze-out period. Information from earlier periods requires multiparticle observables in the most general sense. It is one of the challenges of present day high energy nuclear physics to establish and understand global observables which differentiate between mere hadronic scenarios, i.e superposition of hadronic interactions, and the formation of a partonic (short duration) steady state which can be considered a new state of matter, the Quark-Gluon Plasma.

  20. Initialized Fractional Calculus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lorenzo, Carl F.; Hartley, Tom T.

    2000-01-01

    This paper demonstrates the need for a nonconstant initialization for the fractional calculus and establishes a basic definition set for the initialized fractional differintegral. This definition set allows the formalization of an initialized fractional calculus. Two basis calculi are considered; the Riemann-Liouville and the Grunwald fractional calculi. Two forms of initialization, terminal and side are developed.

  1. Identification of the "minimal triangle" and other common event-to-event transitions in conflict and containment incidents.

    PubMed

    Bowers, Len; James, Karen; Quirk, Alan; Wright, Steve; Williams, Hilary; Stewart, Duncan

    2013-07-01

    Although individual conflict and containment events among acute psychiatric inpatients have been studied in some detail, the relationship of these events to each other has not. In particular, little is known about the temporal order of events for individual patients. This study aimed to identify the most common pathways from event to event. A sample of 522 patients was recruited from 84 acute psychiatric wards in 31 hospital locations in London and the surrounding areas during 2009-2010. Data on the order of conflict and containment events were collected for the first two weeks of admission from patients' case notes. Event-to-event transitions were tabulated and depicted diagrammatically. Event types were tested for their most common temporal placing in sequences of events. Most conflict and containment occurs within and between events of the minimal triangle (verbal aggression, de-escalation, and PRN medication), and the majority of these event sequences conclude in no further events; a minority transition to other, more severe, events. Verbal abuse and medication refusal were more likely to start sequences of disturbed behaviour. Training in the prevention and management of violence needs to acknowledge that a gradual escalation of patient behaviour does not always occur. Verbal aggression is a critical initiator of conflict events, and requires more detailed and sustained research on optimal management and prevention strategies. Similar research is required into medication refusal by inpatients.

  2. Comparison of the 26 May 2012 SEP Event with the 3 November 2011 SEP Event

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makela, P. A.; Gopalswamy, N.; Thakur, N.; Xie, H.

    2015-12-01

    We compare the solar and interplanetary events associated with two large solar energetic particle (SEP) events on 26 May 2012 and 3 November 2011. Both SEP events were detected at three longitudinally widely separated locations by STEREO A and B spacecraft (more than 100 deg away from Earth) and the Wind and SOHO spacecraft near Earth. In Earth view, the November 2011 eruption occurred far behind the east limb at N09E154, whereas the May 2012 eruption occurred closer to the west limb at N15W121, suggesting that SEPs accelerated during the 2012 event might have easier access to Earth. Even though the 2012 event was more intense in the GOES >10 MeV proton channel (peak intensity 14 pfu) than the 2011 event (peak intensity 4 pfu), we find that the latter event was more intense at higher energies (> 40 MeV). Also, the initial rise at lower energies was slightly faster for the 2011 event as measured by SOHO/ERNE. In addition, the CME associated with the May 2012 event was faster with an estimated space speed of ~2029 km/s than that in the November 2011 event (1188 km/s). STEREO/EUVI images of the associated post-eruption arcades (PEAs) indicate that their orientations were different: the PEA of the May 2012 event had a high inclination (north-south), while the inclination of the PEA of the 2011 event was more moderate. Differences in the flux rope orientation may also have effect on the longitudinal extent of the SEP events. These observations suggest that the dependence of solar proton intensities on the observer's longitudinal distance from the solar source is more complex than traditionally assumed.

  3. Initial Cladding Condition

    SciTech Connect

    E. Siegmann

    2000-08-22

    The purpose of this analysis is to describe the condition of commercial Zircaloy clad fuel as it is received at the Yucca Mountain Project (YMP) site. Most commercial nuclear fuel is encased in Zircaloy cladding. This analysis is developed to describe cladding degradation from the expected failure modes. This includes reactor operation impacts including incipient failures, potential degradation after reactor operation during spent fuel storage in pool and dry storage and impacts due to transportation. Degradation modes include cladding creep, and delayed hydride cracking during dry storage and transportation. Mechanical stresses from fuel handling and transportation vibrations are also included. This Analysis and Model Report (AMR) does not address any potential damage to assemblies that might occur at the YMP surface facilities. Ranges and uncertainties have been defined. This analysis will be the initial boundary condition for the analysis of cladding degradation inside the repository. In accordance with AP-2.13Q, ''Technical Product Development Planning'', a work plan (CRWMS M&O 2000c) was developed, issued, and utilized in the preparation of this document. There are constraints, caveats and limitations to this analysis. This cladding degradation analysis is based on commercial Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) fuel with Zircaloy cladding but is applicable to Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) fuel. Reactor operating experience for both PWRs and BWRs is used to establish fuel reliability from reactor operation. It is limited to fuel exposed to normal operation and anticipated operational occurrences (i.e. events which are anticipated to occur within a reactor lifetime), and not to fuel that has been exposed to severe accidents. Fuel burnup projections have been limited to the current commercial reactor licensing environment with restrictions on fuel enrichment, oxide coating thickness and rod plenum pressures. The information provided in this analysis will be used in

  4. Solar extreme events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hudson, Hugh S.

    2015-08-01

    Solar flares and CMEs have a broad range of magnitudes. This review discusses the possibility of “extreme events,” defined as those with magnitudes greater than have been seen in the existing historical record. For most quantitative measures, this direct information does not extend more than a century and a half into the recent past. The magnitude distributions (occurrence frequencies) of solar events (flares/CMEs) typically decrease with the parameter measured or inferred (peak flux, mass, energy etc. Flare radiation fluxes tend to follow a power law slightly flatter than S-2, where S represents a peak flux; solar particle events (SPEs) follow a still flatter power law up to a limiting magnitude, and then appear to roll over to a steeper distribution, which may take an exponential form or follow a broken power law. This inference comes from the terrestrial 14C record and from the depth dependence of various radioisotope proxies in the lunar regolith and in meteorites. Recently major new observational results have impacted our use of the relatively limited historical record in new ways: the detection of actual events in the 14C tree-ring records, and the systematic observations of flares and “superflares” by the Kepler spacecraft. I discuss how these new findings may affect our understanding of the distribution function expected for extreme solar events.

  5. RETRIEVAL EVENTS EVALUATION

    SciTech Connect

    T. Wilson

    1999-11-12

    The purpose of this analysis is to evaluate impacts to the retrieval concept presented in the Design Analysis ''Retrieval Equipment and Strategy'' (Reference 6), from abnormal events based on Design Basis Events (DBE) and Beyond Design Basis Events (BDBE) as defined in two recent analyses: (1) DBE/Scenario Analysis for Preclosure Repository Subsurface Facilities (Reference 4); and (2) Preliminary Preclosure Design Basis Event Calculations for the Monitored Geologic Repository (Reference 5) The objective of this task is to determine what impacts the DBEs and BDBEs have on the equipment developed for retrieval. The analysis lists potential impacts and recommends changes to be analyzed in subsequent design analyses for developed equipment, or recommend where additional equipment may be needed, to allow retrieval to be performed in all DBE or BDBE situations. This analysis supports License Application design and therefore complies with the requirements of Systems Description Document input criteria comparison as presented in Section 7, Conclusions. In addition, the analysis discusses the impacts associated with not using concrete inverts in the emplacement drifts. The ''Retrieval Equipment and Strategy'' analysis was based on a concrete invert configuration in the emplacement drift. The scope of the analysis, as presented in ''Development Plan for Retrieval Events Evaluation'' (Reference 3) includes evaluation and criteria of the following: Impacts to retrieval from the emplacement drift based on DBE/BDBEs, and changes to the invert configuration for the preclosure period. Impacts to retrieval from the main drifts based on DBE/BDBEs for the preclosure period.

  6. Initiation of a coronal transient

    SciTech Connect

    Low, B.C.; Munro, R.H.; Fisher, R.R.

    1982-03-01

    This paper analyzes the coronal transient/eruptive prominence event of 1980 August 5 observed by the Mauna Loa experiment system. This event yielded data on the early development of the transient in the low corona between 1.2 R/sub sun/ and 2.2 R/sub sun/, information which was not available when earlier attempts were made to explain transient phenomena. The transient's initial appearance in the form of a rising density-depleted structure, prior to the eruption of the associated prominence, can be explained as an effect of magnetic buoyancy. The data indicate that this transient has a density depletion of 17% to 33% relative to an undisturbed corona which is approximately isothermal with a temperature of 1.5 x 10/sup 6/ K and a coronal density of 1.0 x 10/sup 9/ cm/sup -3/ at the base of the corona. The height versus base length relationship of the evolving transient resembles, remarkably well, the theoretical predictions obtained from a quasi-static model of a margnetically buoyant loop system. By matching this relationship with the theoretical model, we estimate the magnetic field at the base of the transient to be between 2 and 3 gauss. It is also shown that the initial, nearly constant speed of the top of the transient, 80 +- 20 km s/sup -1/, is consistent with a theoretical estimate calculated from the quasi-static model. These results suggest that some transients are not initiated impulsively, the initial stage of the development being driven by a quasi-static response to a slow change in magnetic field conditions at the base of the corona.

  7. Multiple casualty terror events: the anesthesiologist's perspective.

    PubMed

    Shamir, Micha Y; Weiss, Yoram G; Willner, Dafna; Mintz, Yoav; Bloom, Allan I; Weiss, Yuval; Sprung, Charles L; Weissman, Charles

    2004-06-01

    In a 28-mo period 14 multiple-casualty terror events occurred in Jerusalem, challenging the Department of Anesthesiology and Critical Care Medicine of the city's sole Level 1 trauma center. We performed a retrospective review of the response of the department to evaluate staff activities, resource use (emergency department, operating rooms, and intensive care unit [ICU]), and patient flow. A total of 1062 people were injured in the 14 multi-casualty terror incidents. The emergency department treated 355 victims; 108 of them were hospitalized, and 58 underwent surgery during the first 8 h. Only two surgeries were performed during the first hour, and the average time to the first surgery was 124 min. Fifty-one patients were admitted to the ICU an average of 5.5 h after the terror event. After a terrorist act, multiple, simultaneous efforts were required of the anesthesiology department, including taking part in the initial resuscitation in the emergency department, anesthetizing victims for surgery and angiographies, and caring for them in the recovery room and ICU. Therefore, anesthesiology departments are greatly impacted by such events and must plan for them to maximize the use of available personnel and to have the appropriate equipment and supplies available. Anesthesiologists provide essential care to patients injured in terror events, from the initial resuscitation through therapeutic/diagnostic procedures and surgeries. Operational issues faced by a department of anesthesiology during the initial 8 h after terrorist actions were examined. Multiple, and often parallel, efforts were required of the department.

  8. Event sequence detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanna, M. F. (Inventor)

    1973-01-01

    An event sequence detector is described with input units, each associated with a row of bistable elements arranged in an array of rows and columns. The detector also includes a shift register which is responsive to clock pulses from any of the units to sequentially provide signals on its output lines each of which is connected to the bistable elements in a corresponding column. When the event-indicating signal is received by an input unit it provides a clock pulse to the shift register to provide the signal on one of its output lines. The input unit also enables all its bistable elements so that the particular element in the column supplied with the signal from the register is driven to an event-indicating state.

  9. Space Borne Event Timer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turko, B.

    1980-01-01

    The Space Borne Event Timer is a part of the NASA laser ranging system that is intended to operate aboard the Space Shuttle orbiting over California. The object is to measure, by laser ranging, the earth movement along the San Andreas fault and possibly forecast future earthquakes. A number of cube reflector targets will be placed along both sides of the fault. The ranging system aboard the Space Shuttle will fire a burst of laser pulses at each target and detect the reflected light. Time differences between pulses from the two sides of the fault will indicate earth displacements. The Space Borne Event Timer is a CAMAC compatible system that provides extremely accurate timing data and controls the operation of the ranging system. For each event the time is given in 19.53 increments from the instant of firing the laser to the instant the reflected light is received back, within a range of 130 days.

  10. Detection of anomalous events

    DOEpatents

    Ferragut, Erik M.; Laska, Jason A.; Bridges, Robert A.

    2016-06-07

    A system is described for receiving a stream of events and scoring the events based on anomalousness and maliciousness (or other classification). The system can include a plurality of anomaly detectors that together implement an algorithm to identify low-probability events and detect atypical traffic patterns. The anomaly detector provides for comparability of disparate sources of data (e.g., network flow data and firewall logs.) Additionally, the anomaly detector allows for regulatability, meaning that the algorithm can be user configurable to adjust a number of false alerts. The anomaly detector can be used for a variety of probability density functions, including normal Gaussian distributions, irregular distributions, as well as functions associated with continuous or discrete variables.

  11. The emergence of events.

    PubMed

    Avrahami, J; Kareev, Y

    1994-12-01

    Although the concept of an event is widely used as the basic unit in the organization of experience, memory and meaning, little attention has been paid to how events emerge or what determines the boundaries of an event. It is usually taken for granted that one knows what an event is or how events are demarcated. In this paper an explanation is offered for the emergence of events, the cut hypothesis, which states: "A sub-sequence of stimuli is cut out of a sequence to become a cognitive entity if it has been experienced many times in different contexts", and three experiments to demonstrate the predictive power of the hypothesis are described. The stimuli in all three experiments were video films, constructed by randomly assembling short excerpts from movies. In the first experiment the cut hypothesis was juxtaposed with the thesis of demarcation at major changes, and it was shown that, after experiencing a certain repeating sequence, subjects hardly considered dividing at an internal point, even if it was a point of maximal change; points of maximal change were determined on the basis of performance by control subjects who did not experience the repeating sequence. In the second experiment the cut hypothesis was juxtaposed with an associationistic explanation; it was shown that subjects who viewed a certain sequence repeating in variable contexts recognized it better than subjects who had viewed the same sequence repeating always in the same context. In the third experiment a prediction of the hypothesis on recall behaviour was tested and it was shown that experience with sequences of stimuli repeating in various contexts results in cohesion of their elements.

  12. Low latency counter event indication

    DOEpatents

    Gara, Alan G.; Salapura, Valentina

    2010-08-24

    A hybrid counter array device for counting events with interrupt indication includes a first counter portion comprising N counter devices, each for counting signals representing event occurrences and providing a first count value representing lower order bits. An overflow bit device associated with each respective counter device is additionally set in response to an overflow condition. The hybrid counter array includes a second counter portion comprising a memory array device having N addressable memory locations in correspondence with the N counter devices, each addressable memory location for storing a second count value representing higher order bits. An operatively coupled control device monitors each associated overflow bit device and initiates incrementing a second count value stored at a corresponding memory location in response to a respective overflow bit being set. The incremented second count value is compared to an interrupt threshold value stored in a threshold register, and, when the second counter value is equal to the interrupt threshold value, a corresponding "interrupt arm" bit is set to enable a fast interrupt indication. On a subsequent roll-over of the lower bits of that counter, the interrupt will be fired.

  13. Low latency counter event indication

    DOEpatents

    Gara, Alan G.; Salapura, Valentina

    2008-09-16

    A hybrid counter array device for counting events with interrupt indication includes a first counter portion comprising N counter devices, each for counting signals representing event occurrences and providing a first count value representing lower order bits. An overflow bit device associated with each respective counter device is additionally set in response to an overflow condition. The hybrid counter array includes a second counter portion comprising a memory array device having N addressable memory locations in correspondence with the N counter devices, each addressable memory location for storing a second count value representing higher order bits. An operatively coupled control device monitors each associated overflow bit device and initiates incrementing a second count value stored at a corresponding memory location in response to a respective overflow bit being set. The incremented second count value is compared to an interrupt threshold value stored in a threshold register, and, when the second counter value is equal to the interrupt threshold value, a corresponding "interrupt arm" bit is set to enable a fast interrupt indication. On a subsequent roll-over of the lower bits of that counter, the interrupt will be fired.

  14. Scenario evolution: Interaction between event tree construction and numerical analyses

    SciTech Connect

    Barr, G.E.; Barnard, R.W.; Dockery, H.A.; Dunn, E.; MacIntyre, A.T.

    1990-12-31

    Construction of well-posed scenarios for the range of conditions possible at any proposed repository site is a critical first step to assessing total system performance. Event tree construction is the method that is being used to develop potential failure scenarios for the proposed nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain. An event tree begins with an initial event or condition. Subsequent events are listed in a sequence, leading eventually to release of radionuclides to the accessible environment. Ensuring the validity of the scenarios requires iteration between problems constructed using scenarios contained in the event tree sequence, experimental results, and numerical analyses. Details not adequately captured within the tree initially may become more apparent as a result of analyses. To illustrate this process, the authors discuss the iterations used to develop numerical analyses for PACE-90 (Performance Assessment Calculational Exercises) using basaltic igneous activity and human-intrusion event trees.

  15. Biological Event Modeling for Response Planning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGowan, Clement; Cecere, Fred; Darneille, Robert; Laverdure, Nate

    People worldwide continue to fear a naturally occurring or terrorist-initiated biological event. Responsible decision makers have begun to prepare for such a biological event, but critical policy and system questions remain: What are the best courses of action to prepare for and react to such an outbreak? Where resources should be stockpiled? How many hospital resources—doctors, nurses, intensive-care beds—will be required? Will quarantine be necessary? Decision analysis tools, particularly modeling and simulation, offer ways to address and help answer these questions.

  16. Superradiance initiated inside the ergoregion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eskin, Gregory

    2016-11-01

    We consider the stationary metrics that have both the black hole and the ergoregion. The class of such metric contains, in particular, the Kerr metric. We study the Cauchy problem with highly oscillatory initial data supported in a neighborhood inside the ergoregion with some initial energy E0. We prove that when the time variable x0 increases this solution splits into two parts: one with the negative energy - E1 ending at the event horizon in a finite time, and the second part, with the energy E2 = E0 + E1 > E0, escaping, under some conditions, to the infinity when x0 → +∞. Thus we get the superradiance phenomenon. In the case of the Kerr metric the superradiance phenomenon is “short-lived”, since both the solutions with positive and negative energies cross the outer event horizon in a finite time (modulo O(1 k)) where k is a large parameter. We show that these solutions end on the singularity ring in a finite time. We study also the case of naked singularity.

  17. Language As Social Event.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harste, Jerome C.

    A taxonomy developed for the study of the growth and development of written language from the perspective of social event was tested with a group of 68 children, aged three to six years. The subjects were presented with a wide variety of environmental print messages (road signs, toys, fast food signs, and household products) and were questioned…

  18. Unusually Large Runup Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia-Medina, G.; Ozkan-Haller, H. T.; Holman, R. A.; Ruggiero, P.

    2016-02-01

    Understanding the primary hydrodynamic processes that cause extreme runup events is important for the prediction of dune erosion and coastal flooding. Large runups may be caused by a superposition of physical and environmental conditions, bore-bore capture, infragravity-short wave interaction, and/or swash-backwash interaction. To investigate the conditions leading to these events we combine optical remote sensing observations (Argus) and state-of-the-art phase resolving numerical modeling (primarily NHWAVE). We evaluate runup time series derived from across-shore transects of pixel intensities in two very different beaches: Agate (Oregon, USA) and Duck (North Carolina, USA). The former is a dissipative beach where the runup is dominated by infragravity energy, whereas the latter is a reflective beach where the runup is dominated by short surface gravity waves. Phase resolving numerical models are implemented to explore an expanded parameter set and identify the mechanisms that control these large runups. Model results are in good qualitative agreement with observations. We also distinguish unexpected runups, which are defined by having an unexpectedly large excursion distance in comparison to the hourly-to-daily local runup conditions and do not necessarily represent a statistical extrema. These events pose significant safety hazards. We evaluate the relative contribution of the dominating physics to extreme and unexpected runup events.

  19. Brief resolved unexplained event

    PubMed Central

    Arane, Karen; Claudius, Ilene; Goldman, Ran D.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Question For many years, the term apparent life-threatening event (ALTE) was associated with sudden infant death syndrome, and parents who described an acute event in their infants were sent to the hospital for admission. I understand that for infants new terminology is recommended. What is the current approach to a near-death experience of an infant? Answer A recent clinical practice guideline revised the name and definition of an ALTE to a brief resolved unexplained event (BRUE). The diagnosis of BRUE in infants younger than 1 year of age is made when infants experience 1 of the following BRUE symptoms: a brief episode (ie, less than 1 minute and usually less than 20 to 30 seconds) that is entirely resolved (infant is at baseline), which remains unexplained after the history and physical examination are completed, and includes an event characterized by cyanosis or pallor; absent, decreased, or irregular breathing; hypertonia or hypotonia; or altered responsiveness. Low-risk infants should not be admitted to the hospital and overtesting is discouraged. PMID:28115439

  20. Teaching with Current Events

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peralta, Andrew

    2005-01-01

    This article describes how a teacher changed all his plans to teach the hurricane. When the Hurricane Katrina hit the Gulf Coast, kids become naturally curious and seek answers in an event this big. The author suggests the use of tragedies to help them grow as students and as citizens.

  1. Teaching with Current Events

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peralta, Andrew

    2005-01-01

    This article describes how a teacher changed all his plans to teach the hurricane. When the Hurricane Katrina hit the Gulf Coast, kids become naturally curious and seek answers in an event this big. The author suggests the use of tragedies to help them grow as students and as citizens.

  2. NASA STEM Event

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-01-19

    School children are taught to build their own spacecraft and habitat during a Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math (STEM) education event held at the Ritz-Carlton Hotel in Arlington, VA on Saturday, Jan. 19, 2013. Students were able to meet with Astronaut Leland Melvin, conduct experiments, build their own space jab, and touch a mockup space suit. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  3. NASA STEM Event

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-01-19

    School children react to food shrinking in a vacuum chamber during an Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math (STEM) education event held at the Ritz-Carlton Hotel in Arlington, VA on Saturday, Jan. 19, 2013. Students were able to meet with Astronaut Melvin, conduct experiments, build their own space jab, and touch a mockup space suit. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  4. Television Ceremonial Events.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dayan, Daniel; Katz, Elihu

    1985-01-01

    Analyzes the impact of televised ceremonies (such as the marriage of Prince Charles and Lady Diana) as "media events" which allow viewers to vicariously enter into the ceremony. Compares them with cult movies that, over repeated viewing, encourage audience "participation." Focuses on the narrator's/commentator's role in shaping…

  5. Individual Events Judging Philosophy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cronn-Mills, Daniel

    Understanding communication (of which individual events is a part) requires a triangle among theory-practice-criticism, and any missing component dramatically hinders understanding and ability. Students compete in, and judges judge, forensics to better enhance communication understanding and abilities. The process of oral interpretation requires a…

  6. Naive Probability: Model-Based Estimates of Unique Events.

    PubMed

    Khemlani, Sangeet S; Lotstein, Max; Johnson-Laird, Philip N

    2015-08-01

    We describe a dual-process theory of how individuals estimate the probabilities of unique events, such as Hillary Clinton becoming U.S. President. It postulates that uncertainty is a guide to improbability. In its computer implementation, an intuitive system 1 simulates evidence in mental models and forms analog non-numerical representations of the magnitude of degrees of belief. This system has minimal computational power and combines evidence using a small repertoire of primitive operations. It resolves the uncertainty of divergent evidence for single events, for conjunctions of events, and for inclusive disjunctions of events, by taking a primitive average of non-numerical probabilities. It computes conditional probabilities in a tractable way, treating the given event as evidence that may be relevant to the probability of the dependent event. A deliberative system 2 maps the resulting representations into numerical probabilities. With access to working memory, it carries out arithmetical operations in combining numerical estimates. Experiments corroborated the theory's predictions. Participants concurred in estimates of real possibilities. They violated the complete joint probability distribution in the predicted ways, when they made estimates about conjunctions: P(A), P(B), P(A and B), disjunctions: P(A), P(B), P(A or B or both), and conditional probabilities P(A), P(B), P(B|A). They were faster to estimate the probabilities of compound propositions when they had already estimated the probabilities of each of their components. We discuss the implications of these results for theories of probabilistic reasoning. © 2014 Cognitive Science Society, Inc.

  7. Structured events in Pamir carbon X-ray chambers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leptukh, G. G.

    1985-01-01

    Experimental and theoretical investigations of structured events or narrow groups of hadrons in the Pamir carbon chambers are presented. These events are formed by the usual fluctuations of in-chamber development of nuclear electromagnetic cascade (NEC) initiated by a single hadron from the atmosphere.

  8. Dioxin Exposure Initiative

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The Dioxin Exposure Initiative (DEI) is no longer active. This page contains a summary of the dioxin exposure initiative with illustrations, contact and background information.Originally supported by scientist Matthew Lorber, who retired in Mar 2017.

  9. Agriculture: Natural Events and Disasters

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Natural Events and DiasastersInformation on Natural Events and Disasters. Every year natural disasters, such as hurricanes, floods, fires, earthquakes, and tornadoes, challenge agricultural production.

  10. Biological event composition

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background In recent years, biological event extraction has emerged as a key natural language processing task, aiming to address the information overload problem in accessing the molecular biology literature. The BioNLP shared task competitions have contributed to this recent interest considerably. The first competition (BioNLP'09) focused on extracting biological events from Medline abstracts from a narrow domain, while the theme of the latest competition (BioNLP-ST'11) was generalization and a wider range of text types, event types, and subject domains were considered. We view event extraction as a building block in larger discourse interpretation and propose a two-phase, linguistically-grounded, rule-based methodology. In the first phase, a general, underspecified semantic interpretation is composed from syntactic dependency relations in a bottom-up manner. The notion of embedding underpins this phase and it is informed by a trigger dictionary and argument identification rules. Coreference resolution is also performed at this step, allowing extraction of inter-sentential relations. The second phase is concerned with constraining the resulting semantic interpretation by shared task specifications. We evaluated our general methodology on core biological event extraction and speculation/negation tasks in three main tracks of BioNLP-ST'11 (GENIA, EPI, and ID). Results We achieved competitive results in GENIA and ID tracks, while our results in the EPI track leave room for improvement. One notable feature of our system is that its performance across abstracts and articles bodies is stable. Coreference resolution results in minor improvement in system performance. Due to our interest in discourse-level elements, such as speculation/negation and coreference, we provide a more detailed analysis of our system performance in these subtasks. Conclusions The results demonstrate the viability of a robust, linguistically-oriented methodology, which clearly distinguishes

  11. Empirical reconstruction of storm-time steady magnetospheric convection events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stephens, G. K.; Sitnov, M. I.; Kissinger, J.; Tsyganenko, N. A.; McPherron, R. L.; Korth, H.; Anderson, B. J.

    2013-12-01

    We investigate the storm-scale morphology of the magnetospheric magnetic field as well as underlying distributions of electric currents, equatorial plasma pressure and entropy for four Steady Magnetospheric Convection (SMC) events that occurred during the May 2000 and October 2011 magnetic storms. The analysis is made using the empirical geomagnetic field model TS07D, in which the structure of equatorial currents is not predefined and it is dictated by data. The model also combines the strengths of statistical and event-oriented approaches in mining data for the reconstruction of the magnetic field. The formation of a near-Earth minimum of the equatorial magnetic field in the midnight sector is inferred from data without ad hoc assumptions of a special current system postulated in earlier empirical reconstructions. In addition, a new SMC class is discovered where the minimum equatorial field is substantially larger and located closer to Earth. The magnetic field tailward of the minimum is also much larger, and the corresponding region of accumulated magnetic flux may occupy a very short tail region. The equatorial current and plasma pressure are found to be strongly enhanced far beyond geosynchronous orbit and in a broad local time interval covering the whole nightside region. This picture is consistent with independent recent statistical studies of the SMC pressure distributions, global MHD and kinetic RCM-E simulations. Distributions of the flux tube volume and entropy inferred from data reveal different mechanisms of the magnetotail convection crisis resolution for two classes of SMC events.

  12. A mechanical energy analysis of gait initiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, C. A.; Verstraete, M. C.

    1999-01-01

    The analysis of gait initiation (the transient state between standing and walking) is an important diagnostic tool to study pathologic gait and to evaluate prosthetic devices. While past studies have quantified mechanical energy of the body during steady-state gait, to date no one has computed the mechanical energy of the body during gait initiation. In this study, gait initiation in seven normal male subjects was studied using a mechanical energy analysis to compute total body energy. The data showed three separate states: quiet standing, gait initiation, and steady-state gait. During gait initiation, the trends in the energy data for the individual segments were similar to those seen during steady-state gait (and in Winter DA, Quanbury AO, Reimer GD. Analysis of instantaneous energy of normal gait. J Biochem 1976;9:253-257), but diminished in amplitude. However, these amplitudes increased to those seen in steady-state during the gait initiation event (GIE), with the greatest increase occurring in the second step due to the push-off of the foundation leg. The baseline level of mechanical energy was due to the potential energy of the individual segments, while the cyclic nature of the data was indicative of the kinetic energy of the particular leg in swing phase during that step. The data presented showed differences in energy trends during gait initiation from those of steady state, thereby demonstrating the importance of this event in the study of locomotion.

  13. A mechanical energy analysis of gait initiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, C. A.; Verstraete, M. C.

    1999-01-01

    The analysis of gait initiation (the transient state between standing and walking) is an important diagnostic tool to study pathologic gait and to evaluate prosthetic devices. While past studies have quantified mechanical energy of the body during steady-state gait, to date no one has computed the mechanical energy of the body during gait initiation. In this study, gait initiation in seven normal male subjects was studied using a mechanical energy analysis to compute total body energy. The data showed three separate states: quiet standing, gait initiation, and steady-state gait. During gait initiation, the trends in the energy data for the individual segments were similar to those seen during steady-state gait (and in Winter DA, Quanbury AO, Reimer GD. Analysis of instantaneous energy of normal gait. J Biochem 1976;9:253-257), but diminished in amplitude. However, these amplitudes increased to those seen in steady-state during the gait initiation event (GIE), with the greatest increase occurring in the second step due to the push-off of the foundation leg. The baseline level of mechanical energy was due to the potential energy of the individual segments, while the cyclic nature of the data was indicative of the kinetic energy of the particular leg in swing phase during that step. The data presented showed differences in energy trends during gait initiation from those of steady state, thereby demonstrating the importance of this event in the study of locomotion.

  14. Event boundaries and anaphoric reference.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Alexis N; Radvansky, Gabriel A

    2016-06-01

    The current study explored the finding that parsing a narrative into separate events impairs anaphor resolution. According to the Event Horizon Model, when a narrative event boundary is encountered, a new event model is created. Information associated with the prior event model is removed from working memory. So long as the event model containing the anaphor referent is currently being processed, this information should still be available when there is no narrative event boundary, even if reading has been disrupted by a working-memory-clearing distractor task. In those cases, readers may reactivate their prior event model, and anaphor resolution would not be affected. Alternatively, comprehension may not be as event oriented as this account suggests. Instead, any disruption of the contents of working memory during comprehension, event related or not, may be sufficient to disrupt anaphor resolution. In this case, reading comprehension would be more strongly guided by other, more basic language processing mechanisms and the event structure of the described events would play a more minor role. In the current experiments, participants were given stories to read in which we included, between the anaphor and its referent, either the presence of a narrative event boundary (Experiment 1) or a narrative event boundary along with a working-memory-clearing distractor task (Experiment 2). The results showed that anaphor resolution was affected by narrative event boundaries but not by a working-memory-clearing distractor task. This is interpreted as being consistent with the Event Horizon Model of event cognition.

  15. Initiation of vascular development.

    PubMed

    Ohashi-Ito, Kyoko; Fukuda, Hiroo

    2014-06-01

    The initiation of vascular development occurs during embryogenesis and the development of lateral organs, such as lateral roots and leaves. Understanding the mechanism underlying the initiation of vascular development has been an important goal of plant biologists. Auxin flow is a crucial factor involved in the initiation of vascular development. In addition, recent studies have identified key factors that regulate the establishment of vascular initial cells in embryos and roots. In this review, we summarize the recent findings in this field and discuss the initiation of vascular development.

  16. Events and subjective well-being: only recent events matter.

    PubMed

    Suh, E; Diener, E; Fujita, F

    1996-05-01

    The effect of life events on subjective well-being (SWB) was explored in a 2-year longitudinal study of 115 participants. It was found that only life events during the previous 3 months influenced life satisfaction and positive and negative affect. Although recent life events influenced SWB even when personality at Time 1 was controlled, distal life events did not correlate with SWB. SWB and life events both showed a substantial degree of temporal stability. It was also found that good and bad life events tend to covary, both between individuals and across periods of the lives of individuals. Also, when events of the opposite valence were controlled, events correlated more strongly with SWB. The counterintuitive finding that good and bad events co-occur suggests an exciting avenue for explorations of the structure of life events.

  17. Single event mass spectrometry

    DOEpatents

    Conzemius, Robert J.

    1990-01-16

    A means and method for single event time of flight mass spectrometry for analysis of specimen materials. The method of the invention includes pulsing an ion source imposing at least one pulsed ion onto the specimen to produce a corresponding emission of at least one electrically charged particle. The emitted particle is then dissociated into a charged ion component and an uncharged neutral component. The ion and neutral components are then detected. The time of flight of the components are recorded and can be used to analyze the predecessor of the components, and therefore the specimen material. When more than one ion particle is emitted from the specimen per single ion impact, the single event time of flight mass spectrometer described here furnis This invention was made with Government support under Contract No. W-7405-ENG82 awarded by the Department of Energy. The Government has certain rights in the invention.

  18. Transionospheric chirp event classifier

    SciTech Connect

    Argo, P.E.; Fitzgerald, T.J.; Freeman, M.J.

    1995-09-01

    In this paper we will discuss a project designed to provide computer recognition of the transionospheric chirps/pulses measured by the Blackbeard (BB) satellite, and expected to be measured by the upcoming FORTE satellite. The Blackbeard data has been perused by human means -- this has been satisfactory for the relatively small amount of data taken by Blackbeard. But with the advent of the FORTE system, which by some accounts might ``see`` thousands of events per day, it is important to provide a software/hardware method of accurately analyzing the data. In fact, we are providing an onboard DSP system for FORTE, which will test the usefulness of our Event Classifier techniques in situ. At present we are constrained to work with data from the Blackbeard satellite, and will discuss the progress made to date.

  19. Transionospheric chirp event classifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Argo, P. E.; Fitzgerald, T. J.; Freeman, M. J.

    In this paper we will discuss a project designed to provide computer recognition of the transionospheric chirps/pulses measured by the Blackbeard (BB) satellite, and expected to be measured by the upcoming FORTE satellite. The Blackbeard data has been perused by human means - this has been satisfactory for the relatively small amount of data taken by Blackbeard. But with the advent of the FORTE system, which by some accounts might 'see' thousands of events per day, it is important to provide a software/hardware method of accurately analyzing the data. In fact, we are providing an onboard DSP system for FORTE, which will test the usefulness of our Event Classifier techniques in situ. At present we are constrained to work with data from the Blackbeard satellite, and will discuss the progress made to date.

  20. 2017 Solar Eclipse Event

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-06-11

    Brad Addona views the beginning of the August 21, 2017 at a viewing event for Marshall Space Flight Center’s activities building for Marshall employees. The Huntsville area experienced 97 percent occultation, nearly a complete blocking out of the sun by the orbit of Earth's moon. The next opportunity to view a solar eclipse in the eastern and central United States will occur in April 2024.