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Sample records for pot1 avoids rna

  1. Two RNA subunits and POT1a are components of Arabidopsis telomerase

    PubMed Central

    Cifuentes-Rojas, Catherine; Kannan, Kalpana; Tseng, Lin; Shippen, Dorothy E.

    2011-01-01

    Telomerase is a ribonucleoprotein (RNP) reverse transcriptase whose essential RNA subunit (TER) functions as a template for telomere repeat synthesis. Here we report the identification of two divergent TER moieties in the flowering plant Arabidopsis thaliana. Although both TER1 and TER2 copurify with telomerase activity and serve as templates for telomerase in vitro, depletion of TER1, but not TER2, leads to decreased telomerase activity and progressive telomere shortening in vivo. Moreover, mutation of the templating domain in TER1 results in the incorporation of mutant telomere repeats on chromosome ends. Thus, TER1 provides the major template for telomerase in vivo. We also show that POT1a binds TER1 with a Kd of 2 × 10-7 M and the two components assemble into an enzymatically active RNP in vivo. In contrast, TER1-POT1b and TER2-POT1a associations were not observed. In other organisms POT1 proteins bind telomeric DNA and provide chromosome end protection. We propose that duplication of TER and POT1 in Arabidopsis fueled the evolution of novel protein–nucleic acid interactions and the migration of POT1 from the telomere to the telomerase RNP. PMID:21164032

  2. POT1 and TRF2 Cooperate To Maintain Telomeric Integrity†

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Qin; Zheng, Yun-Ling; Harris, Curtis C.

    2005-01-01

    Mammalian telomeric DNA contains duplex TTAGGG repeats and single-stranded overhangs. POT1 (protection of telomeres 1) is a telomere-specific single-stranded DNA-binding protein, highly conserved in eukaryotes. The biological function of human POT1 is not well understood. In the present study, we demonstrate that POT1 plays a key role in telomeric end protection. The reduction of POT1 by RNA interference led to the loss of telomeric single-stranded overhangs and induced apoptosis, chromosomal instability, and senescence in cells. POT1 and TRF2 interacted with each other to form a complex with telomeric DNA. A dominant negative TRF2, TRF2ΔBΔM, bound to POT1 and prevented it from binding to telomeres. POT1 overexpression protected against TRF2ΔBΔM-induced loss of telomeric single-stranded overhangs, chromosomal instability, and senescence. These results demonstrate that POT1 and TRF2 share in part in the same pathway for telomere capping and suggest that POT1 binds to the telomeric single-stranded DNA in the D-loop and cooperates with TRF2 in t-loop maintenance. PMID:15657433

  3. Pot1 and Telomere Maintenance

    PubMed Central

    Baumann, Peter; Price, Carolyn

    2010-01-01

    Proteins that specifically bind the single stranded overhang at the ends of telomeres have been identified in a wide range of eukaryotes and play pivotal roles in chromosome end protection and telomere length regulation. Here we summarize recent findings regarding the functions of POT1 proteins in vertebrates and discuss the functional evolution of POT1 proteins following gene duplication in protozoa, plants, nematodes and mice. PMID:20493859

  4. Inhibition and Avoidance of mRNA Degradation by RNA Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Moon, Stephanie L.; Barnhart, Michael D.; Wilusz, Jeffrey

    2012-01-01

    The cellular mRNA decay machinery plays a major role in regulating the quality and quantity of gene expression in cells. This machinery involves multiple enzymes and pathways that converge to promote the exonucleolytic decay of mRNAs. The transcripts made by RNA viruses are susceptible to degradation by this machinery and, in fact, can be actively targeted. Thus, to maintain gene expression and replication, RNA viruses have evolved a number of strategies to avoid and/or inactivate aspects of the cellular mRNA decay machinery. Recent work uncovering the mechanisms used by RNA viruses to maintain the stability of their transcripts is described below. PMID:22626865

  5. DNA-induced dimerization of the single-stranded DNA binding telomeric protein Pot1 from Schizosaccharomyces pombe

    PubMed Central

    Nandakumar, Jayakrishnan; Cech, Thomas R.

    2012-01-01

    Eukaryotic chromosome ends are protected from illicit DNA joining by protein–DNA complexes called telomeres. In most studied organisms, telomeric DNA is composed of multiple short G-rich repeats that end in a single-stranded tail that is protected by the protein POT1. Mammalian POT1 binds two telomeric repeats as a monomer in a sequence-specific manner, and discriminates against RNA of telomeric sequence. While addressing the RNA discrimination properties of SpPot1, the POT1 homolog in Schizosaccharomyces pombe, we found an unanticipated ssDNA-binding mode in which two SpPot1 molecules bind an oligonucleotide containing two telomeric repeats. DNA binding seems to be achieved via binding of the most N-terminal OB domain of each monomer to each telomeric repeat. The SpPot1 dimer may have evolved to accommodate the heterogeneous spacers that occur between S. pombe telomeric repeats, and it also has implications for telomere architecture. We further show that the S. pombe telomeric protein Tpz1, like its mammalian homolog TPP1, increases the affinity of Pot1 for telomeric single-stranded DNA and enhances the discrimination of Pot1 against RNA. PMID:21911358

  6. Structural insights into POT1-TPP1 interaction and POT1 C-terminal mutations in human cancer.

    PubMed

    Chen, Cong; Gu, Peili; Wu, Jian; Chen, Xianyun; Niu, Shuangshuang; Sun, Hong; Wu, Lijie; Li, Na; Peng, Junhui; Shi, Shaohua; Fan, Cuiying; Huang, Min; Wong, Catherine C L; Gong, Qingguo; Kumar-Sinha, Chandan; Zhang, Rongguang; Pusztai, Lajos; Rai, Rekha; Chang, Sandy; Lei, Ming

    2017-04-10

    Mammalian shelterin proteins POT1 and TPP1 form a stable heterodimer that protects chromosome ends and regulates telomerase-mediated telomere extension. However, how POT1 interacts with TPP1 remains unknown. Here we present the crystal structure of the C-terminal portion of human POT1 (POT1C) complexed with the POT1-binding motif of TPP1. The structure shows that POT1C contains two domains, a third OB fold and a Holliday junction resolvase-like domain. Both domains are essential for binding to TPP1. Notably, unlike the heart-shaped structure of ciliated protozoan Oxytricha nova TEBPα-β complex, POT1-TPP1 adopts an elongated V-shaped conformation. In addition, we identify several missense mutations in human cancers that disrupt the POT1C-TPP1 interaction, resulting in POT1 instability. POT1C mutants that bind TPP1 localize to telomeres but fail to repress a DNA damage response and inappropriate repair by A-NHEJ. Our results reveal that POT1 C terminus is essential to prevent initiation of genome instability permissive for tumorigenesis.

  7. TPP1 is a homologue of ciliate TEBP-β and interacts with POT1 to recruit telomerase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xin, Huawei; Liu, Dan; Wan, Ma; Safari, Amin; Kim, Hyeung; Sun, Wen; O'Connor, Matthew S.; Songyang, Zhou

    2007-02-01

    Telomere dysfunction may result in chromosomal abnormalities, DNA damage responses, and even cancer. Early studies in lower organisms have helped to establish the crucial role of telomerase and telomeric proteins in maintaining telomere length and protecting telomere ends. In Oxytricha nova, telomere G-overhangs are protected by the TEBP-α/β heterodimer. Human telomeres contain duplex telomeric repeats with 3' single-stranded G-overhangs, and may fold into a t-loop structure that helps to shield them from being recognized as DNA breaks. Additionally, the TEBP-α homologue, POT1, which binds telomeric single-stranded DNA (ssDNA), associates with multiple telomeric proteins (for example, TPP1, TIN2, TRF1, TRF2 and RAP1) to form the six-protein telosome/shelterin and other subcomplexes. These telomeric protein complexes in turn interact with diverse pathways to form the telomere interactome for telomere maintenance. However, the mechanisms by which the POT1-containing telosome communicates with telomerase to regulate telomeres remain to be elucidated. Here we demonstrate that TPP1 is a putative mammalian homologue of TEBP-β and contains a predicted amino-terminal oligonucleotide/oligosaccharide binding (OB) fold. TPP1-POT1 association enhanced POT1 affinity for telomeric ssDNA. In addition, the TPP1 OB fold, as well as POT1-TPP1 binding, seemed critical for POT1-mediated telomere-length control and telomere-end protection in human cells. Disruption of POT1-TPP1 interaction by dominant negative TPP1 expression or RNA interference (RNAi) resulted in telomere-length alteration and DNA damage responses. Furthermore, we offer evidence that TPP1 associates with the telomerase in a TPP1-OB-fold-dependent manner, providing a physical link between telomerase and the telosome/shelterin complex. Our findings highlight the critical role of TPP1 in telomere maintenance, and support a yin-yang model in which TPP1 and POT1 function as a unit to protect human telomeres, by both

  8. Avoidance of stochastic RNA interactions can be harnessed to control protein expression levels in bacteria and archaea

    PubMed Central

    Umu, Sinan Uğur; Poole, Anthony M; Dobson, Renwick CJ; Gardner, Paul P

    2016-01-01

    A critical assumption of gene expression analysis is that mRNA abundances broadly correlate with protein abundance, but these two are often imperfectly correlated. Some of the discrepancy can be accounted for by two important mRNA features: codon usage and mRNA secondary structure. We present a new global factor, called mRNA:ncRNA avoidance, and provide evidence that avoidance increases translational efficiency. We also demonstrate a strong selection for the avoidance of stochastic mRNA:ncRNA interactions across prokaryotes, and that these have a greater impact on protein abundance than mRNA structure or codon usage. By generating synonymously variant green fluorescent protein (GFP) mRNAs with different potential for mRNA:ncRNA interactions, we demonstrate that GFP levels correlate well with interaction avoidance. Therefore, taking stochastic mRNA:ncRNA interactions into account enables precise modulation of protein abundance. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.13479.001 PMID:27642845

  9. Caenorhabditis elegans POT-1 and POT-2 repress telomere maintenance pathways.

    PubMed

    Shtessel, Ludmila; Lowden, Mia Rochelle; Cheng, Chen; Simon, Matt; Wang, Kyle; Ahmed, Shawn

    2013-02-01

    Telomeres are composed of simple tandem DNA repeats that protect the ends of linear chromosomes from replicative erosion or inappropriate DNA damage response mechanisms. The mammalian Protection Of Telomeres (POT1) protein interacts with single-stranded telomeric DNA and can exert positive and negative effects on telomere length. Of four distinct POT1 homologs in the roundworm Caenorhabditis elegans, deficiency for POT-1 or POT-2 resulted in progressive telomere elongation that occurred because both proteins negatively regulate telomerase. We created a POT-1::mCherry fusion protein that forms discrete foci at C. elegans telomeres, independent of POT-2, allowing for live analysis of telomere dynamics. Transgenic pot-1::mCherry repressed telomerase in pot-1 mutants. Animals deficient for pot-1, but not pot-2, displayed mildly enhanced telomere erosion rates in the absence of the telomerase reverse transcriptase, trt-1. However, trt-1; pot-1 double mutants exhibited delayed senescence in comparison to trt-1 animals, and senescence was further delayed in trt-1; pot-2; pot-1 triple mutants, some of which survived robustly in the absence of telomerase. Our results indicate that POT-1 and POT-2 play independent roles in suppressing a telomerase-independent telomere maintenance pathway but may function together to repress telomerase.

  10. Caenorhabditis elegans POT-1 and POT-2 Repress Telomere Maintenance Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Shtessel, Ludmila; Lowden, Mia Rochelle; Cheng, Chen; Simon, Matt; Wang, Kyle; Ahmed, Shawn

    2013-01-01

    Telomeres are composed of simple tandem DNA repeats that protect the ends of linear chromosomes from replicative erosion or inappropriate DNA damage response mechanisms. The mammalian Protection Of Telomeres (POT1) protein interacts with single-stranded telomeric DNA and can exert positive and negative effects on telomere length. Of four distinct POT1 homologs in the roundworm Caenorhabditis elegans, deficiency for POT-1 or POT-2 resulted in progressive telomere elongation that occurred because both proteins negatively regulate telomerase. We created a POT-1::mCherry fusion protein that forms discrete foci at C. elegans telomeres, independent of POT-2, allowing for live analysis of telomere dynamics. Transgenic pot-1::mCherry repressed telomerase in pot-1 mutants. Animals deficient for pot-1, but not pot-2, displayed mildly enhanced telomere erosion rates in the absence of the telomerase reverse transcriptase, trt-1. However, trt-1; pot-1 double mutants exhibited delayed senescence in comparison to trt-1 animals, and senescence was further delayed in trt-1; pot-2; pot-1 triple mutants, some of which survived robustly in the absence of telomerase. Our results indicate that POT-1 and POT-2 play independent roles in suppressing a telomerase-independent telomere maintenance pathway but may function together to repress telomerase. PMID:23390606

  11. A Small Molecule Inhibitor of Pot1 Binding to Telomeric DNA

    PubMed Central

    Altschuler, Sarah E.; Croy, Johnny E.; Wuttke, Deborah S.

    2012-01-01

    Chromosome ends are complex structures, consisting of repetitive DNA sequence terminating in an ssDNA overhang with many associated proteins. Because alteration of these ends is a hallmark of cancer, telomeres and telomere maintenance have been prime drug targets. The universally conserved ssDNA overhang is sequence-specifically bound and regulated by Pot1 (protection of telomeres), and perturbation of Pot1 function has deleterious effects for proliferating cells. The specificity of the Pot1/ssDNA interaction and the key involvement of this protein in telomere maintenance have suggested directed inhibition of Pot1/ssDNA binding as an efficient means of disrupting telomere function. To explore this idea, we developed a high-throughput time-resolved fluorescence resonance energy transfer (TR-FRET) screen for inhibitors of Pot1/ssDNA interaction. We conducted this screen with the DNA-binding subdomain of S. pombe Pot1 (Pot1pN), which confers the vast majority of Pot1 sequence-specificity and is highly similar to the first domain of human Pot1 (hPOT1). Screening a library of ~20,000 compounds yielded a single inhibitor, which we found interacted tightly with submicromolar affinity. Furthermore, this compound, subsequently identified as the bis-azo dye Congo red, was able to competitively inhibit hPOT1 binding to telomeric DNA. ITC and NMR chemical shift analysis suggest that CR interacts specifically with the ssDNA-binding cleft of Pot1, and that alteration of this surface disrupts CR binding. The identification of a specific inhibitor of ssDNA interaction establishes a new pathway for targeted telomere disruption. PMID:22978652

  12. Fission yeast Pot1 and RecQ helicase are required for efficient chromosome segregation.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Katsunori; Imano, Ryota; Kibe, Tatsuya; Seimiya, Hiroyuki; Muramatsu, Yukiko; Kawabata, Naoki; Tanaka, Genki; Matsumoto, Yoshitake; Hiromoto, Taisuke; Koizumi, Yuka; Nakazawa, Norihiko; Yanagida, Mitsuhiro; Yukawa, Masashi; Tsuchiya, Eiko; Ueno, Masaru

    2011-02-01

    Pot1 is a single-stranded telomere-binding protein that is conserved from fission yeast to mammals. Deletion of Schizosaccharomyces pombe pot1(+) causes immediate telomere loss. S. pombe Rqh1 is a homolog of the human RecQ helicase WRN, which plays essential roles in the maintenance of genomic stability. Here, we demonstrate that a pot1Δ rqh1-hd (helicase-dead) double mutant maintains telomeres that are dependent on Rad51-mediated homologous recombination. Interestingly, the pot1Δ rqh1-hd double mutant displays a "cut" (cell untimely torn) phenotype and is sensitive to the antimicrotubule drug thiabendazole (TBZ). Moreover, the chromosome ends of the double mutant do not enter the pulsed-field electrophoresis gel. These results suggest that the entangled chromosome ends in the pot1Δ rqh1-hd double mutant inhibit chromosome segregation, signifying that Pot1 and Rqh1 are required for efficient chromosome segregation. We also found that POT1 knockdown, WRN-deficient human cells are sensitive to the antimicrotubule drug vinblastine, implying that some of the functions of S. pombe Pot1 and Rqh1 may be conserved in their respective human counterparts POT1 and WRN.

  13. Structural and functional analysis of the human POT1-TPP1 telomeric complex

    DOE PAGES

    Rice, Cory; Shastrula, Prashanth Krishna; Kossenkov, Andrew V.; ...

    2017-04-10

    POT1 and TPP1 are part of the shelterin complex and are essential for telomere length regulation and maintenance. Naturally occurring mutations of the telomeric POT1–TPP1 complex are implicated in familial glioma, melanoma and chronic lymphocytic leukaemia. Here we report the atomic structure of the interacting portion of the human telomeric POT1–TPP1 complex and suggest how several of these mutations contribute to malignant cancer. The POT1 C-terminus (POT1C) forms a bilobal structure consisting of an OB-fold and a holiday junction resolvase domain. TPP1 consists of several loops and helices involved in extensive interactions with POT1C. Biochemical data shows that several ofmore » the cancer-associated mutations, partially disrupt the POT1–TPP1 complex, which affects its ability to bind telomeric DNA efficiently. A defective POT1–TPP1 complex leads to longer and fragile telomeres, which in turn promotes genomic instability and cancer.« less

  14. Both Maintenance and Avoidance of RNA-Binding Protein Interactions Constrain Coding Sequence Evolution.

    PubMed

    Savisaar, Rosina; Hurst, Laurence D

    2017-05-01

    While the principal force directing coding sequence (CDS) evolution is selection on protein function, to ensure correct gene expression CDSs must also maintain interactions with RNA-binding proteins (RBPs). Understanding how our genes are shaped by these RNA-level pressures is necessary for diagnostics and for improving transgenes. However, the evolutionary impact of the need to maintain RBP interactions remains unresolved. Are coding sequences constrained by the need to specify RBP binding motifs? If so, what proportion of mutations are affected? Might sequence evolution also be constrained by the need not to specify motifs that might attract unwanted binding, for instance because it would interfere with exon definition? Here, we have scanned human CDSs for motifs that have been experimentally determined to be recognized by RBPs. We observe two sets of motifs-those that are enriched over nucleotide-controlled null and those that are depleted. Importantly, the depleted set is enriched for motifs recognized by non-CDS binding RBPs. Supporting the functional relevance of our observations, we find that motifs that are more enriched are also slower-evolving. The net effect of this selection to preserve is a reduction in the over-all rate of synonymous evolution of 2-3% in both primates and rodents. Stronger motif depletion, on the other hand, is associated with stronger selection against motif gain in evolution. The challenge faced by our CDSs is therefore not only one of attracting the right RBPs but also of avoiding the wrong ones, all while also evolving under selection pressures related to protein structure. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution.

  15. Detecting respiratory viral RNA using expanded genetic alphabets and self-avoiding DNA.

    PubMed

    Glushakova, Lyudmyla G; Sharma, Nidhi; Hoshika, Shuichi; Bradley, Andrea C; Bradley, Kevin M; Yang, Zunyi; Benner, Steven A

    2015-11-15

    Nucleic acid (NA)-targeted tests detect and quantify viral DNA and RNA (collectively xNA) to support epidemiological surveillance and, in individual patients, to guide therapy. They commonly use polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and reverse transcription PCR. Although these all have rapid turnaround, they are expensive to run. Multiplexing would allow their cost to be spread over multiple targets, but often only with lower sensitivity and accuracy, noise, false positives, and false negatives; these arise by interactions between the multiple nucleic acid primers and probes in a multiplexed kit. Here we offer a multiplexed assay for a panel of respiratory viruses that mitigates these problems by combining several nucleic acid analogs from the emerging field of synthetic biology: (i) self-avoiding molecular recognition systems (SAMRSs), which facilitate multiplexing, and (ii) artificially expanded genetic information systems (AEGISs), which enable low-noise PCR. These are supplemented by "transliteration" technology, which converts standard nucleotides in a target to AEGIS nucleotides in a product, improving hybridization. The combination supports a multiplexed Luminex-based respiratory panel that potentially differentiates influenza viruses A and B, respiratory syncytial virus, severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS), and Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS) coronavirus, detecting as few as 10 MERS virions in a 20-μl sample.

  16. Profiling Pre-MicroRNA and Mature MicroRNA Expressions Using a Single Microarray and Avoiding Separate Sample Preparation

    PubMed Central

    Gan, Lin; Denecke, Bernd

    2013-01-01

    Mature microRNA is a crucial component in the gene expression regulation network. At the same time, microRNA gene expression and procession is regulated in a precise and collaborated way. Pre-microRNAs mediate products during the microRNA transcription process, they can provide hints of microRNA gene expression regulation or can serve as alternative biomarkers. To date, little effort has been devoted to pre-microRNA expression profiling. In this study, three human and three mouse microRNA profile data sets, based on the Affymetrix miRNA 2.0 array, have been re-analyzed for both mature and pre-microRNA signals as a primary test of parallel mature/pre-microRNA expression profiling on a single platform. The results not only demonstrated a glimpse of pre-microRNA expression in human and mouse, but also the relationship of microRNA expressions between pre- and mature forms. The study also showed a possible application of currently available microRNA microarrays in profiling pre-microRNA expression in a time and cost effective manner. PMID:27605179

  17. Essential roles for Pot1b in HSC self-renewal and survival.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yang; Shen, Mei-Feng; Chang, Sandy

    2011-12-01

    Maintenance of mammalian telomeres requires both the enzyme telomerase and shelterin, which protect telomeres from inappropriately activating DNA damage response checkpoints. Dyskeratosis congenita is an inherited BM failure syndrome disorder because of defects in telomere maintenance. We have previously shown that deletion of the shelterin component Pot1b in the setting of telomerase haploinsufficiency results in rapid telomere shortening and fatal BM failure in mice, eliciting phenotypes that strongly resemble human syskeratosis congenita. However, it was unclear why BM failure occurred in the setting of Pot1b deletion. In this study, we show that Pot1b plays an essential role in HSC survival. Deletion of Pot1b results in increased apoptosis, leading to severe depletion of the HSC reserve. BM from Pot1b(Δ/Δ) mice cannot compete with BM from wild-type mice to provide multilineage reconstitution, indicating that there is an intrinsic requirement for Pot1b the maintenance of HSC function in vivo. Elimination of the p53-dependent apoptotic function increased HSC survival and significantly extended the lifespan of Pot1b-null mice deficient in telomerase function. Our results document for the first time the essential role of a component of the shelterin complex in the maintenance of HSC and progenitor cell survival.

  18. Interaction of Berberine derivative with protein POT1 affect telomere function in cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Xiao, Nannan; Chen, Siqi; Ma, Yan; Qiu, Jun; Tan, Jia-Heng; Ou, Tian-Miao; Gu, Lian-Quan; Huang, Zhi-Shu; Li, Ding

    2012-03-16

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The protein POT1 plays an important role in telomere protection. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Functional POT1 was overexpressed in Escherichia coli for the first time, and purified. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Compound Sysu-00692 was found to be the first POT1-binding ligand. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Sysu-00692 could interfere with the binding activity of POT1 in vivo. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Sysu-00692 had inhibition on telomerase and cell proliferation. -- Abstract: The protein POT1 plays an important role in telomere protection, which is related with telomere elongation and cell immortality. The protein has been recognized as a promising drug target for cancer treatment. In the present study, we cloned, overexpressed in Escherichia coli for the first time, and purified recombinant human POT1. The protein was proved to be active through filter binding assay, FRET and CD experiments. In the initial screening for protein binding ligands using SPR, compound Sysu-00692 was found to bind well with the POT1, which was confirmed with EMSA. Its in vivo activity study showed that compound Sysu-00692 could interfere with the binding between human POT1 and the telomeric DNA through chromatin immunoprecipitation. Besides, the compound showed mild inhibition on telomerase and cell proliferation. As we know, compound Sysu-00692 is the first reported POT1-binding ligand, which could serve as a lead compound for further improvement. This work offered a potentially new approach for drug design for the treatment of cancers.

  19. The protein network surrounding the human telomere repeat binding factors TRF1, TRF2, and POT1

    SciTech Connect

    Giannone, Richard J; McDonald, W Hayes; Hurst, Gregory {Greg} B; Shen, Rong-Fong; Wang, Yisong; Liu, Yie

    2010-01-01

    Telomere integrity (including telomere length and capping) is critical in overall genomic stability. Telomere repeat binding factors and their associated proteins play vital roles in telomere length regulation and end protection. In this study, we explore the protein network surrounding telomere repeat binding factors, TRF1, TRF2, and POT1 using dual-tag affinity purification in combination with multidimensional protein identification technology liquid chromatography - tandem mass spectrometry (MudPIT LC-MS/MS). After control subtraction and data filtering, we found that TRF2 and POT1 co-purified all six members of the telomere protein complex, while TRF1 identified five of six components at frequencies that lend evidence towards the currently accepted telomere architecture. Many of the known TRF1 or TRF2 interacting proteins were also identified. Moreover, putative associating partners identified for each of the three core components fell into functional categories such as DNA damage repair, ubiquitination, chromosome cohesion, chromatin modification/remodeling, DNA replication, cell cycle and transcription regulation, nucleotide metabolism, RNA processing, and nuclear transport. These putative protein-protein associations may participate in different biological processes at telomeres or, intriguingly, outside telomeres.

  20. POT1-TPP1 Binding and Unfolding of Telomere DNA Discriminates against Structural Polymorphism.

    PubMed

    Mullins, Michael R; Rajavel, Malligarjunan; Hernandez-Sanchez, Wilnelly; de la Fuente, Maria; Biendarra, Sherri M; Harris, Michael E; Taylor, Derek J

    2016-07-03

    Telomeres are nucleoprotein complexes that reside at the ends of linear chromosomes and help maintain genomic integrity. Protection of telomeres 1 (POT1) and TPP1 are telomere-specific proteins that bind as a heterodimer to single-stranded telomere DNA to prevent illicit DNA damage responses and to enhance telomerase-mediated telomere extension. Telomere DNA is guanosine rich and, as such, can form highly stable secondary structures including G-quadruplexes. G-quadruplex DNA folds into different topologies that are determined by several factors including monovalent ion composition and the precise sequence and length of the DNA. Here, we explore the influence of DNA secondary structure on POT1-TPP1 binding. Equilibrium binding assays reveal that the POT1-TPP1 complex binds G-quadruplex structures formed in buffers containing Na(+) with an affinity that is fivefold higher than for G-quadruplex structures formed in the presence of K(+). However, the binding of the second heterodimer is insensitive to DNA secondary structure, presumably due to unfolding resulting from binding of the first POT1-TPP1. We further show that the rate constant for POT1-TPP1-induced unfolding of DNA secondary structure is substantially faster for G-quadruplex topologies formed in the presence of Na(+) ions. When bound to DNA, POT1-TPP1 forms complexes with similar CD spectra and enhances telomerase activity for all DNA substrates tested, regardless of the substrate secondary structure or solution monovalent ion composition. Together, these data indicate that binding of POT1-TPP1 unfolds telomere secondary structure to assist loading of additional heterodimers and to ensure efficient promotion of telomerase-mediated extension. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. POT1 stimulates RecQ helicases WRN and BLM to unwind telomeric DNA substrates.

    PubMed

    Opresko, Patricia L; Mason, Penelope A; Podell, Elaine R; Lei, Ming; Hickson, Ian D; Cech, Thomas R; Bohr, Vilhelm A

    2005-09-16

    Defects in human RecQ helicases WRN and BLM are responsible for the cancer-prone disorders Werner syndrome and Bloom syndrome. Cellular phenotypes of Werner syndrome and Bloom syndrome, including genomic instability and premature senescence, are consistent with telomere dysfunction. RecQ helicases are proposed to function in dissociating alternative DNA structures during recombination and/or replication at telomeric ends. Here we report that the telomeric single-strand DNA-binding protein, POT1, strongly stimulates WRN and BLM to unwind long telomeric forked duplexes and D-loop structures that are otherwise poor substrates for these helicases. This stimulation is dependent on the presence of telomeric sequence in the duplex regions of the substrates. In contrast, POT1 failed to stimulate a bacterial 3'-5'-helicase. We find that purified POT1 binds to WRN and BLM in vitro and that full-length POT1 (splice variant 1) precipitates a higher amount of endogenous WRN protein, compared with BLM, from the HeLa nuclear extract. We propose roles for the cooperation of POT1 with RecQ helicases WRN and BLM in resolving DNA structures at telomeric ends, in a manner that protects the telomeric 3' tail as it is exposed during unwinding.

  2. Nonadditivity in the recognition of single-stranded DNA by the schizosaccharomyces pombe protection of telomeres 1 DNA-binding domain, Pot1-DBD.

    PubMed

    Croy, Johnny E; Altschuler, Sarah E; Grimm, Nicole E; Wuttke, Deborah S

    2009-07-28

    The Schizosaccharomyces pombe protection of telomeres 1 (SpPot1) protein recognizes the 3' single-stranded ends of telomeres and provides essential protective and regulatory functions. The ssDNA-binding activity of SpPot1 is conferred by its ssDNA-binding domain, Pot1-DBD (residues 1-389), which can be further separated into two distinct domains, Pot1pN (residues 1-187) and Pot1pC (residues 188-389). Here we show that Pot1pC, like Pot1pN, can function independently of Pot1-DBD and binds specifically to a minimal nonameric oligonucleotide, d(GGTTACGGT), with a K(D) of 400 +/- 70 nM (specifically recognized nucleotides in bold). NMR chemical shift perturbation analysis indicates that the overall structures of the isolated Pot1pN and Pot1pC domains remain intact in Pot1-DBD. Furthermore, alanine scanning reveals modest differences in the ssDNA-binding contacts provided by isolated Pot1pN and within Pot1-DBD. Although the global character of both Pot1pN and Pot1pC is maintained in Pot1-DBD, chemical shift perturbation analysis highlights localized structural differences within the G1/G2 and T3/T4 binding pockets of Pot1pN in Pot1-DBD, which correlate with its distinct ssDNA-binding activity. Furthermore, we find evidence for a putative interdomain interface on Pot1pN that mediates interactions with Pot1pC that ultimately result in the altered ssDNA-binding activity of Pot1-DBD. Together, these data provide insight into the mechanisms underlying the activity and regulation of SpPot1 at the telomere.

  3. Avoiding microRNA Function Through Alternative Polyandenylation in Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-10-01

    qRTPCR in cells that are androgen- dependent (AR+) versus androgen-independent (AR-). Figure 8. Read Densities generated from RNA- seq...of CFIm25 knockdown cells +/- glutamine supplementation. F. Graph showing glutamine dependent growth kinetics. G. Model of alternative myc... mitochondrial glutaminase expression and glutamine metabolism. (Translated from eng) Nature 458(7239):762-765 (in eng). The packaging of DNA with basic

  4. A POT1 mutation implicates defective telomere end fill-in and telomere truncations in Coats plus.

    PubMed

    Takai, Hiroyuki; Jenkinson, Emma; Kabir, Shaheen; Babul-Hirji, Riyana; Najm-Tehrani, Nasrin; Chitayat, David A; Crow, Yanick J; de Lange, Titia

    2016-04-01

    Coats plus (CP) can be caused by mutations in the CTC1 component of CST, which promotes polymerase α (polα)/primase-dependent fill-in throughout the genome and at telomeres. The cellular pathology relating to CP has not been established. We identified a homozygous POT1 S322L substitution (POT1(CP)) in two siblings with CP. POT1(CP)induced a proliferative arrest that could be bypassed by telomerase. POT1(CP)was expressed at normal levels, bound TPP1 and telomeres, and blocked ATR signaling. POT1(CP)was defective in regulating telomerase, leading to telomere elongation rather than the telomere shortening observed in other telomeropathies. POT1(CP)was also defective in the maintenance of the telomeric C strand, causing extended 3' overhangs and stochastic telomere truncations that could be healed by telomerase. Consistent with shortening of the telomeric C strand, metaphase chromosomes showed loss of telomeres synthesized by leading strand DNA synthesis. We propose that CP is caused by a defect in POT1/CST-dependent telomere fill-in. We further propose that deficiency in the fill-in step generates truncated telomeres that halt proliferation in cells lacking telomerase, whereas, in tissues expressing telomerase (e.g., bone marrow), the truncations are healed. The proposed etiology can explain why CP presents with features distinct from those associated with telomerase defects (e.g., dyskeratosis congenita). © 2016 Takai et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press.

  5. A POT1 mutation implicates defective telomere end fill-in and telomere truncations in Coats plus

    PubMed Central

    Takai, Hiroyuki; Jenkinson, Emma; Kabir, Shaheen; Babul-Hirji, Riyana; Najm-Tehrani, Nasrin; Chitayat, David A.; Crow, Yanick J.; de Lange, Titia

    2016-01-01

    Coats plus (CP) can be caused by mutations in the CTC1 component of CST, which promotes polymerase α (polα)/primase-dependent fill-in throughout the genome and at telomeres. The cellular pathology relating to CP has not been established. We identified a homozygous POT1 S322L substitution (POT1CP) in two siblings with CP. POT1CP induced a proliferative arrest that could be bypassed by telomerase. POT1CP was expressed at normal levels, bound TPP1 and telomeres, and blocked ATR signaling. POT1CP was defective in regulating telomerase, leading to telomere elongation rather than the telomere shortening observed in other telomeropathies. POT1CP was also defective in the maintenance of the telomeric C strand, causing extended 3′ overhangs and stochastic telomere truncations that could be healed by telomerase. Consistent with shortening of the telomeric C strand, metaphase chromosomes showed loss of telomeres synthesized by leading strand DNA synthesis. We propose that CP is caused by a defect in POT1/CST-dependent telomere fill-in. We further propose that deficiency in the fill-in step generates truncated telomeres that halt proliferation in cells lacking telomerase, whereas, in tissues expressing telomerase (e.g., bone marrow), the truncations are healed. The proposed etiology can explain why CP presents with features distinct from those associated with telomerase defects (e.g., dyskeratosis congenita). PMID:27013236

  6. Gene expression analysis of Arc mRNA as a neuronal cell activity marker in the hippocampus and amygdala in two-way active avoidance test in rats.

    PubMed

    Yasuno, Kyohei; Takahashi, Erika; Igarashi, Isao; Iguchi, Takuma; Tsuchiya, Yoshimi; Kai, Kiyonori; Mori, Kazuhiko

    2017-09-27

    Immediate early genes are widely used as neuronal cell activity markers in neuroscience. The present study investigated the relationship between their expression and abnormality in context fear conditioning. The learning test (two-way active avoidance test) was conducted in male rats administered with nonselective muscarinic antagonist scopolamine or selective dopamine D1-like receptor antagonist SCH 23390 at a dose level of 2.0 or 0.1mg/kg, respectively, for 4days. Expression levels of Arc and Fos mRNA in the hippocampus and amygdala were also evaluated on the second day of dosing by fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) and reverse transcriptase-quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR). Scopolamine had no effect on avoidance rate, but decreased freezing in the two-way active avoidance test. SCH 23390 decreased avoidance rate and increased freezing. In FISH and RT-qPCR assays, scopolamine decreased Arc mRNA in the hippocampus and amygdala, whereas SCH 23390 increased Arc mRNA in the hippocampus. By contrast, scopolamine and SCH 23390 did not change Fos mRNA expression compared to Arc mRNA expression. The results of the learning test indicated that scopolamine or SCH 23390 respectively inhibited fear or context conditioning in rats. Furthermore, alteration of the expression of Arc mRNA but not of Fos mRNA in the hippocampus and amygdala of the brain was suggested to be a sensitive neuronal cell activity marker to detect behavioral abnormality in the two-way active avoidance test. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  7. The OB-fold domain 1 of human POT1 recognizes both telomeric and non-telomeric DNA motifs

    PubMed Central

    Kolar, Carol; Yan, Ying; Borgstahl, Gloria E.O.; Ouellette, Michel M.

    2015-01-01

    The POT1 protein plays a critical role in telomere protection and telomerase regulation. POT1 binds single-stranded 5’-TTAGGGTTAG-3’ and forms a dimer with the TPP1 protein. The dimer is recruited to telomeres, either directly or as part of the Shelterin complex. Human POT1 contains two Oligonucleotide/Oligosaccharide Binding (OB) fold domains, OB1 and OB2, which make physical contact with the DNA. OB1 recognizes 5’-TTAGGG whereas OB2 binds to the downstream TTAG-3’. Studies of POT1 proteins from other species have shown that some of these proteins are able to recognize a broader variety of DNA ligands than expected. To explore this possibility in humans, we have used SELEX to reexamine the sequence-specificity of the protein. Using human POT1 as a selection matrix, high-affinity DNA ligands were selected from a pool of randomized single-stranded oligonucleotides. After six successive rounds of selection, two classes of high-affinity targets were obtained. The first class was composed of oligonucleotides containing a cognate POT1 binding sites (5’-TTAGGGTTAG-3’). The second and more abundant class was made of molecules that carried a novel non-telomeric consensus: 5’-TNCANNAGKKKTTAGG-3’ (where K=G/T and N=any base). Binding studies showed that these non-telomeric sites were made of an OB1-binding motif (TTAGG) and a non-telomeric motif (NT motif), with the two motifs recognized by distinct regions of the OB1 domain. POT1 interacted with these non-telomeric binding sites with high affinity and specificity, even when bound to its dimerization partner TPP1. This intrinsic ability of POT1 to recognize NT motifs raises the possibility that the protein may fulfill additional functions at certain non-telomeric locations of the genome, in perhaps gene transcription, replication, or repair. PMID:25934589

  8. The shelterin protein POT-1 anchors Caenorhabditis elegans telomeres through SUN-1 at the nuclear periphery

    PubMed Central

    Ferreira, Helder C.; Towbin, Benjamin D.; Jegou, Thibaud

    2013-01-01

    Telomeres are specialized protein–DNA structures that protect chromosome ends. In budding yeast, telomeres form clusters at the nuclear periphery. By imaging telomeres in embryos of the metazoan Caenorhabditis elegans, we found that telomeres clustered only in strains that had activated an alternative telomere maintenance pathway (ALT). Moreover, as in yeast, the unclustered telomeres in wild-type embryos were located near the nuclear envelope (NE). This bias for perinuclear localization increased during embryogenesis and persisted in differentiated cells. Telomere position in early embryos required the NE protein SUN-1, the single-strand binding protein POT-1, and the small ubiquitin-like modifier (SUMO) ligase GEI-17. However, in postmitotic larval cells, none of these factors individually were required for telomere anchoring, which suggests that additional mechanisms anchor in late development. Importantly, targeted POT-1 was sufficient to anchor chromatin to the NE in a SUN-1–dependent manner, arguing that its effect at telomeres is direct. This high-resolution description of telomere position within C. elegans extends our understanding of telomere organization in eukaryotes. PMID:24297748

  9. The OB-fold domain 1 of human POT1 recognizes both telomeric and non-telomeric DNA motifs.

    PubMed

    Choi, Kyung H; Lakamp-Hawley, Amanda S; Kolar, Carol; Yan, Ying; Borgstahl, Gloria E O; Ouellette, Michel M

    2015-08-01

    The POT1 protein plays a critical role in telomere protection and telomerase regulation. POT1 binds single-stranded 5'-TTAGGGTTAG-3' and forms a dimer with the TPP1 protein. The dimer is recruited to telomeres, either directly or as part of the Shelterin complex. Human POT1 contains two Oligonucleotide/Oligosaccharide Binding (OB) fold domains, OB1 and OB2, which make physical contact with the DNA. OB1 recognizes 5'-TTAGGG whereas OB2 binds to the downstream TTAG-3'. Studies of POT1 proteins from other species have shown that some of these proteins are able to recognize a broader variety of DNA ligands than expected. To explore this possibility in humans, we have used SELEX to reexamine the sequence-specificity of the protein. Using human POT1 as a selection matrix, high-affinity DNA ligands were selected from a pool of randomized single-stranded oligonucleotides. After six successive rounds of selection, two classes of high-affinity targets were obtained. The first class was composed of oligonucleotides containing a cognate POT1 binding sites (5'-TTAGGGTTAG-3'). The second and more abundant class was made of molecules that carried a novel non-telomeric consensus: 5'-TNCANNAGKKKTTAGG-3' (where K = G/T and N = any base). Binding studies showed that these non-telomeric sites were made of an OB1-binding motif (TTAGG) and a non-telomeric motif (NT motif), with the two motifs recognized by distinct regions of the OB1 domain. POT1 interacted with these non-telomeric binding sites with high affinity and specificity, even when bound to its dimerization partner TPP1. This intrinsic ability of POT1 to recognize NT motifs raises the possibility that the protein may fulfill additional functions at certain non-telomeric locations of the genome, in perhaps gene transcription, replication, or repair. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. and Société Française de Biochimie et Biologie Moléculaire (SFBBM). All rights reserved.

  10. The effect of Pot1 binding on the repair of thymine analogs in a telomeric DNA sequence.

    PubMed

    Theruvathu, Jacob A; Darwanto, Agus; Hsu, Chia Wei; Sowers, Lawrence C

    2014-08-01

    Telomeric DNA can form duplex regions or single-stranded loops that bind multiple proteins, preventing it from being processed as a DNA repair intermediate. The bases within these regions are susceptible to damage; however, mechanisms for the repair of telomere damage are as yet poorly understood. We have examined the effect of three thymine (T) analogs including uracil (U), 5-fluorouracil (5FU) and 5-hydroxymethyluracil (5hmU) on DNA-protein interactions and DNA repair within the GGTTAC telomeric sequence. The replacement of T with U or 5FU interferes with Pot1 (Pot1pN protein of Schizosaccharomyces pombe) binding. Surprisingly, 5hmU substitution only modestly diminishes Pot1 binding suggesting that hydrophobicity of the T-methyl group likely plays a minor role in protein binding. In the GGTTAC sequence, all three analogs can be cleaved by DNA glycosylases; however, glycosylase activity is blocked if Pot1 binds. An abasic site at the G or T positions is cleaved by the endonuclease APE1 when in a duplex but not when single-stranded. Abasic site formation thermally destabilizes the duplex that could push a damaged DNA segment into a single-stranded loop. The inability to enzymatically cleave abasic sites in single-stranded telomere regions would block completion of the base excision repair cycle potentially causing telomere attrition.

  11. FOXP2 promotes the nuclear translocation of POT1, but FOXP2(R553H), mutation related to speech-language disorder, partially prevents it

    SciTech Connect

    Tanabe, Yuko; Fujita, Eriko; Momoi, Takashi

    2011-07-08

    Highlights: {yields} We isolated protection of telomeres 1 (POT1) as a FOXP2-associated protein by a yeast two-hybrid. {yields} FOXP2 associated and co-localized with POT1 in the nuclei. {yields} FOXP2(R553H) also co-localized with POT1 in both the cytoplasm and nuclei. {yields} FOXP2(R553H) partially prevented the nuclear translocation of POT1. {yields} FOXP2(R553H) mutation may be associated with the pathogenesis of speech-language disorder. -- Abstract: FOXP2 is a forkhead box-containing transcription factor with several recognizable sequence motifs. However, little is known about the FOXP2-associated proteins except for C-terminal binding protein (CtBP). In the present study, we attempted to isolate the FOXP2-associated protein with a yeast two-hybrid system using the C-terminal region, including the forkhead domain, as a bait probe, and identified protection of telomeres 1 (POT1) as a FOXP2-associated protein. Immunoprecipitation assay confirmed the association with FOXP2 and POT1. POT1 alone localized in the cytoplasm but co-localized with FOXP2 and the forkhead domain of FOXP2 in nuclei. However, both FOXP2 with mutated nuclear localization signals and (R553H) mutated forkhead, which is associated with speech-language disorder, prevented the nuclear translocation of POT1. These results suggest that FOXP2 is a binding partner for the nuclear translocation of POT1. As loss of POT1 function induces the cell arrest, the impaired nuclear translocation of POT1 in the developing neuronal cells may be associated with the pathogenesis of speech-language disorder with FOXP2(R553H) mutation.

  12. Avoidance and Potential Remedy Solutions of Chimeras in Reconstructing the Phylogeny of Aphids Using the 16S rRNA Gene of Buchnera: A Case in Lachninae (Hemiptera).

    PubMed

    Chen, Rui; Wang, Zhe; Chen, Jing; Qiao, Ge-Xia

    2015-08-25

    It is known that PCR amplification of highly homologous genes from complex DNA mixtures can generate a significant proportion of chimeric sequences. The 16S rRNA gene is not only widely used in estimating the species diversity of endosymbionts in aphids but also used to explore the co-diversification of aphids and their endosymbionts. Thus, chimeric sequences may lead to the discovery of non-existent endosymbiont species and mislead Buchnera-based phylogenetic analysis that lead to false conclusions. In this study, a high probability (6.49%) of chimeric sequence occurrence was found in the amplified 16S rRNA gene sequences of endosymbionts from aphid species in the subfamily Lachninae. These chimeras are hybrid products of multiple parent sequences from the dominant species of endosymbionts in each corresponding host. It is difficult to identify the chimeric sequences of a new or unidentified species due to the high variability of their main parent, Buchnera aphidicola, and because the chimeric sequences can confuse the phylogenetic analysis of 16S rRNA gene sequences. These chimeras present a challenge to Buchnera-based phylogenetic research in aphids. Thus, our study strongly suggests that using appropriate methods to detect chimeric 16S rRNA sequences may avoid some false conclusions in endosymbiont-based aphid research.

  13. Neuron type-specific miRNA represses two broadly expressed genes to modulate an avoidance behavior in C. elegans

    PubMed Central

    Drexel, Tanja; Mahofsky, Katharina; Latham, Richard; Zimmer, Manuel

    2016-01-01

    Two broad gene classes are distinguished within multicellular organisms: cell type-specific genes, which confer particular cellular properties, and ubiquitous genes that support general cellular functions. However, certain so-called ubiquitous genes show functionally relevant cell type-specific repression. How such repression is achieved is poorly understood. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are repressors, many of which are expressed with high cell type specificity. Here we show that mir-791, expressed exclusively in the CO2-sensing neurons in Caenorhabditis elegans, represses two otherwise broadly expressed genes. This repression is necessary for normal neuronal function and behavior of the animals toward CO2. miRNA-mediated repression of broadly transcribed genes is a previously unappreciated strategy for cellular specialization. PMID:27688400

  14. FOXP2 promotes the nuclear translocation of POT1, but FOXP2(R553H), mutation related to speech-language disorder, partially prevents it.

    PubMed

    Tanabe, Yuko; Fujita, Eriko; Momoi, Takashi

    2011-07-08

    FOXP2 is a forkhead box-containing transcription factor with several recognizable sequence motifs. However, little is known about the FOXP2-associated proteins except for C-terminal binding protein (CtBP). In the present study, we attempted to isolate the FOXP2-associated protein with a yeast two-hybrid system using the C-terminal region, including the forkhead domain, as a bait probe, and identified protection of telomeres 1 (POT1) as a FOXP2-associated protein. Immunoprecipitation assay confirmed the association with FOXP2 and POT1. POT1 alone localized in the cytoplasm but co-localized with FOXP2 and the forkhead domain of FOXP2 in nuclei. However, both FOXP2 with mutated nuclear localization signals and (R553H) mutated forkhead, which is associated with speech-language disorder, prevented the nuclear translocation of POT1. These results suggest that FOXP2 is a binding partner for the nuclear translocation of POT1. As loss of POT1 function induces the cell arrest, the impaired nuclear translocation of POT1 in the developing neuronal cells may be associated with the pathogenesis of speech-language disorder with FOXP2(R553H) mutation.

  15. Complex karyotypes and KRAS and POT1 mutations impact outcome in CLL after chlorambucil-based chemotherapy or chemoimmunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Herling, Carmen Diana; Klaumünzer, Marion; Rocha, Cristiano Krings; Altmüller, Janine; Thiele, Holger; Bahlo, Jasmin; Kluth, Sandra; Crispatzu, Giuliano; Herling, Marco; Schiller, Joanna; Engelke, Anja; Tausch, Eugen; Döhner, Hartmut; Fischer, Kirsten; Goede, Valentin; Nürnberg, Peter; Reinhardt, Hans Christian; Stilgenbauer, Stephan; Hallek, Michael; Kreuzer, Karl-Anton

    2016-07-21

    Genetic instability is a feature of chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) with adverse prognosis. We hypothesized that chromosomal translocations or complex karyotypes and distinct somatic mutations may impact outcome after first-line chemoimmunotherapy of CLL patients. We performed metaphase karyotyping and next-generation sequencing (NGS) of 85 genes in pretreatment blood samples obtained from 161 patients registered for CLL11, a 3-arm phase 3 trial comparing frontline chlorambucil (Clb) vs Clb plus rituximab (Clb-R) or Clb plus obinutuzumab in CLL patients with significant comorbidity. Chromosomal aberrations as assessed by karyotyping were observed in 68.8% of 154 patients, 31.2% carried translocations, and 19.5% showed complex karyotypes. NGS revealed 198 missense/nonsense mutations and 76 small indels in 76.4% of patients. The most frequently mutated genes were NOTCH1, SF3B1, ATM, TP53, BIRC3, POT1, XPO1, and KRAS Sole chemotherapy, treatment with Clb-R, or genetic lesions in TP53 (9.9% of patients) and KRAS (6.2% of patients) were significantly associated with nonresponse to study therapy. In multivariate models, complex karyotypes and POT1 mutations (8.1% of patients) represented significant prognostic factors for an unfavorable survival, independently of IGHV mutation status, Binet stage, and serum β-2-microglobuline. Patients with the copresence of complex karyotypes and deletions/mutations involving TP53 demonstrated a particularly short survival. In summary, this is the first prospective, controlled study in CLL patients that shows a role of complex karyotype aberrations as an independent prognostic factor for survival after front-line therapy. Moreover, the study identifies mutations in KRAS and POT1 as novel determinants of outcome after chemoimmunotherapy using chlorambucil and anti-CD20 treatment. © 2016 by The American Society of Hematology.

  16. RNA.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Darnell, James E., Jr.

    1985-01-01

    Ribonucleic acid (RNA) converts genetic information into protein and usually must be processed to serve its function. RNA types, chemical structure, protein synthesis, translation, manufacture, and processing are discussed. Concludes that the first genes might have been spliced RNA and that humans might be closer than bacteria to primitive…

  17. RNA.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Darnell, James E., Jr.

    1985-01-01

    Ribonucleic acid (RNA) converts genetic information into protein and usually must be processed to serve its function. RNA types, chemical structure, protein synthesis, translation, manufacture, and processing are discussed. Concludes that the first genes might have been spliced RNA and that humans might be closer than bacteria to primitive…

  18. Shade Avoidance

    PubMed Central

    Casal, Jorge J.

    2012-01-01

    The presence of neighboring vegetation modifies the light environment experienced by plants, generating signals that are perceived by phytochromes and cryptochromes. These signals cause large changes in plant body form and function, including enhanced growth of the hypocotyl and petioles, a more erect position of the leaves and early flowering in Arabidopsis thaliana. Collectively, these so-called shade-avoidance responses tend to reduce the degree of current or future shade by neighbors. Shade light signals increase the abundance of PHYTOCHROME INTERACTING FACTOR 4 (PIF4) and PIF5 proteins, promote the synthesis and redirection of auxin, favor the degradation of DELLA proteins and increase the expression of auxin, gibberellins and brassinosteroid-promoted genes, among other events downstream the photoreceptors. Selectively disrupting these events by genetic or pharmacological approaches affects shade-avoidance responses with an intensity that depends on the developmental context and the environment. Shade-avoidance responses provide a model to investigate the signaling networks used by plants to take advantage of the cues provided by the environment to adjust to the challenges imposed by the environment itself. PMID:22582029

  19. Tetrahymena Pot2 Is a Developmentally Regulated Paralog of Pot1 That Localizes to Chromosome Breakage Sites but Not to Telomeres

    PubMed Central

    Cranert, Stacey; Heyse, Serena; Linger, Benjamin R.; Lescasse, Rachel

    2014-01-01

    Tetrahymena telomeres are protected by a protein complex composed of Pot1, Tpt1, Pat1, and Pat2. Pot1 binds the 3′ overhang and serves multiple roles in telomere maintenance. Here we describe Pot2, a paralog of Pot1 which has evolved a novel function during Tetrahymena sexual reproduction. Pot2 is unnecessary for telomere maintenance during vegetative growth, as the telomere structure is unaffected by POT2 macronuclear gene disruption. Pot2 is expressed only in mated cells, where it accumulates in developing macronuclei around the time of two chromosome processing events: internal eliminated sequence (IES) excision and chromosome breakage. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) demonstrated Pot2 localization to regions of chromosome breakage but not to telomeres or IESs. Pot2 association with chromosome breakage sites (CBSs) occurs slightly before chromosome breakage. Pot2 did not bind CBSs or telomeric DNA in vitro, suggesting that it is recruited to CBSs by another factor. The telomere proteins Pot1, Pat1, and Tpt1 and the IES binding factor Pdd1 fail to colocalize with Pot2. Thus, Pot2 is the first protein found to associate specifically with CBSs. The selective association of Pot2 versus Pdd1 with CBSs or IESs indicates a mechanistic difference between the chromosome processing events at these two sites. Moreover, ChIP revealed that histone marks characteristic of IES processing, H3K9me3 and H3K27me3, are absent from CBSs. Thus, the mechanisms of chromosome breakage and IES excision must be fundamentally different. Our results lead to a model where Pot2 directs chromosome breakage by recruiting telomerase and/or the endonuclease responsible for DNA cleavage to CBSs. PMID:25303953

  20. Organocatalytic one-pot 1,4-/1,6-/1,2-addition sequence for the stereocontrolled formation of six consecutive stereocenters.

    PubMed

    Chauhan, Pankaj; Mahajan, Suruchi; Raabe, Gerhard; Enders, Dieter

    2015-02-11

    An unprecedented stereoselective organocatalytic one-pot 1,4-/1,6-/1,2-addition sequence between β-dicarbonyl compounds, β-nitroalkenes and 4-nitro-5-styrylisoxazoles sequentially catalyzed by low loading of a squaramide catalyst and an achiral base has been developed. The protocol opens an efficient entry to isoxazole bearing cyclohexanes with six consecutive stereogenic centers including one tetrasubstituted carbon in good yields and excellent diastereo- and enantioselectivities.

  1. A mutation in the POT1 gene is responsible for cardiac angiosarcoma in TP53-negative Li-Fraumeni-like families.

    PubMed

    Calvete, Oriol; Martinez, Paula; Garcia-Pavia, Pablo; Benitez-Buelga, Carlos; Paumard-Hernández, Beatriz; Fernandez, Victoria; Dominguez, Fernando; Salas, Clara; Romero-Laorden, Nuria; Garcia-Donas, Jesus; Carrillo, Jaime; Perona, Rosario; Triviño, Juan Carlos; Andrés, Raquel; Cano, Juana María; Rivera, Bárbara; Alonso-Pulpon, Luis; Setien, Fernando; Esteller, Manel; Rodriguez-Perales, Sandra; Bougeard, Gaelle; Frebourg, Tierry; Urioste, Miguel; Blasco, Maria A; Benítez, Javier

    2015-09-25

    Cardiac angiosarcoma (CAS) is a rare malignant tumour whose genetic basis is unknown. Here we show, by whole-exome sequencing of a TP53-negative Li-Fraumeni-like (LFL) family including CAS cases, that a missense variant (p.R117C) in POT1 (protection of telomeres 1) gene is responsible for CAS. The same gene alteration is found in two other LFL families with CAS, supporting the causal effect of the identified mutation. We extend the analysis to TP53-negative LFL families with no CAS and find the same mutation in a breast AS family. The mutation is recently found once in 121,324 studied alleles in ExAC server but it is not described in any other database or found in 1,520 Spanish controls. In silico structural analysis suggests how the mutation disrupts POT1 structure. Functional and in vitro studies demonstrate that carriers of the mutation show reduced telomere-bound POT1 levels, abnormally long telomeres and increased telomere fragility.

  2. A mutation in the POT1 gene is responsible for cardiac angiosarcoma in TP53-negative Li–Fraumeni-like families

    PubMed Central

    Calvete, Oriol; Martinez, Paula; Garcia-Pavia, Pablo; Benitez-Buelga, Carlos; Paumard-Hernández, Beatriz; Fernandez, Victoria; Dominguez, Fernando; Salas, Clara; Romero-Laorden, Nuria; Garcia-Donas, Jesus; Carrillo, Jaime; Perona, Rosario; Triviño, Juan Carlos; Andrés, Raquel; Cano, Juana María; Rivera, Bárbara; Alonso-Pulpon, Luis; Setien, Fernando; Esteller, Manel; Rodriguez-Perales, Sandra; Bougeard, Gaelle; Frebourg, Tierry; Urioste, Miguel; Blasco, Maria A.; Benítez, Javier

    2015-01-01

    Cardiac angiosarcoma (CAS) is a rare malignant tumour whose genetic basis is unknown. Here we show, by whole-exome sequencing of a TP53-negative Li–Fraumeni-like (LFL) family including CAS cases, that a missense variant (p.R117C) in POT1 (protection of telomeres 1) gene is responsible for CAS. The same gene alteration is found in two other LFL families with CAS, supporting the causal effect of the identified mutation. We extend the analysis to TP53-negative LFL families with no CAS and find the same mutation in a breast AS family. The mutation is recently found once in 121,324 studied alleles in ExAC server but it is not described in any other database or found in 1,520 Spanish controls. In silico structural analysis suggests how the mutation disrupts POT1 structure. Functional and in vitro studies demonstrate that carriers of the mutation show reduced telomere-bound POT1 levels, abnormally long telomeres and increased telomere fragility. PMID:26403419

  3. MicroRNA-276a functions in ellipsoid body and mushroom body neurons for naive and conditioned olfactory avoidance in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Li, Wanhe; Cressy, Michael; Qin, Hongtao; Fulga, Tudor; Van Vactor, David; Dubnau, Josh

    2013-03-27

    MicroRNA (miRNA)-mediated gene regulation plays a key role in brain development and function. But there are few cases in which the roles of individual miRNAs have been elucidated in behaving animals. We report a miR-276a::DopR regulatory module in Drosophila that functions in distinct circuits for naive odor responses and conditioned odor memory. Drosophila olfactory aversive memory involves convergence of the odors (conditioned stimulus) and the electric shock (unconditioned stimulus) in mushroom body (MB) neurons. Dopamine receptor DopR mediates the unconditioned stimulus inputs onto MB. Distinct dopaminergic neurons also innervate ellipsoid body (EB), where DopR function modulates arousal to external stimuli. We demonstrate that miR-276a is required in MB neurons for memory formation and in EB for naive responses to odors. Both roles of miR-276a are mediated by tuning DopR expression. The dual role of this miR-276a::DopR genetic module in these two neural circuits highlights the importance of miRNA-mediated gene regulation within distinct circuits underlying both naive behavioral responses and memory.

  4. Teachers Avoiding Learners' Avoidance: Is It Possible?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tadayyon, Maedeh; Zarrinabadi, Nourollah; Ketabi, Saeed

    2016-01-01

    Dealing with learners who prefer to take the back seat and avoid classroom participation can be every teacher's nightmare. This lack of participation may cause teacher frustration, and possibly the only way to reduce this lack of participation is to access the concept of avoidance strategy. Avoidance strategy is the abandonment of a classroom task…

  5. Teachers Avoiding Learners' Avoidance: Is It Possible?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tadayyon, Maedeh; Zarrinabadi, Nourollah; Ketabi, Saeed

    2016-01-01

    Dealing with learners who prefer to take the back seat and avoid classroom participation can be every teacher's nightmare. This lack of participation may cause teacher frustration, and possibly the only way to reduce this lack of participation is to access the concept of avoidance strategy. Avoidance strategy is the abandonment of a classroom task…

  6. Color-avoiding percolation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krause, Sebastian M.; Danziger, Michael M.; Zlatić, Vinko

    2017-08-01

    Many real world networks have groups of similar nodes which are vulnerable to the same failure or adversary. Nodes can be colored in such a way that colors encode the shared vulnerabilities. Using multiple paths to avoid these vulnerabilities can greatly improve network robustness, if such paths exist. Color-avoiding percolation provides a theoretical framework for analyzing this scenario, focusing on the maximal set of nodes which can be connected via multiple color-avoiding paths. In this paper we extend the basic theory of color-avoiding percolation that was published in S. M. Krause et al. [Phys. Rev. X 6, 041022 (2016)], 10.1103/PhysRevX.6.041022. We explicitly account for the fact that the same particular link can be part of different paths avoiding different colors. This fact was previously accounted for with a heuristic approximation. Here we propose a better method for solving this problem which is substantially more accurate for many avoided colors. Further, we formulate our method with differentiated node functions, either as senders and receivers, or as transmitters. In both functions, nodes can be explicitly trusted or avoided. With only one avoided color we obtain standard percolation. Avoiding additional colors one by one, we can understand the critical behavior of color-avoiding percolation. For unequal color frequencies, we find that the colors with the largest frequencies control the critical threshold and exponent. Colors of small frequencies have only a minor influence on color-avoiding connectivity, thus allowing for approximations.

  7. Color-avoiding percolation.

    PubMed

    Krause, Sebastian M; Danziger, Michael M; Zlatić, Vinko

    2017-08-01

    Many real world networks have groups of similar nodes which are vulnerable to the same failure or adversary. Nodes can be colored in such a way that colors encode the shared vulnerabilities. Using multiple paths to avoid these vulnerabilities can greatly improve network robustness, if such paths exist. Color-avoiding percolation provides a theoretical framework for analyzing this scenario, focusing on the maximal set of nodes which can be connected via multiple color-avoiding paths. In this paper we extend the basic theory of color-avoiding percolation that was published in S. M. Krause et al. [Phys. Rev. X 6, 041022 (2016)]2160-330810.1103/PhysRevX.6.041022. We explicitly account for the fact that the same particular link can be part of different paths avoiding different colors. This fact was previously accounted for with a heuristic approximation. Here we propose a better method for solving this problem which is substantially more accurate for many avoided colors. Further, we formulate our method with differentiated node functions, either as senders and receivers, or as transmitters. In both functions, nodes can be explicitly trusted or avoided. With only one avoided color we obtain standard percolation. Avoiding additional colors one by one, we can understand the critical behavior of color-avoiding percolation. For unequal color frequencies, we find that the colors with the largest frequencies control the critical threshold and exponent. Colors of small frequencies have only a minor influence on color-avoiding connectivity, thus allowing for approximations.

  8. Avoiding health information.

    PubMed

    Barbour, Joshua B; Rintamaki, Lance S; Ramsey, Jason A; Brashers, Dale E

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated why and how individuals avoid health information to support the development of models of uncertainty and information management and offer insights for those dealing with the information and uncertainty inherent to health and illness. Participants from student (n = 507) and community (n = 418) samples reported that they avoided health information to (a) maintain hope or deniability, (b) resist overexposure, (c) accept limits of action, (d) manage flawed information, (e) maintain boundaries, and (f) continue with life/activities. They also reported strategies for avoiding information, including removing or ignoring stimuli (e.g., avoiding people who might provide health advice) and controlling conversations (e.g., withholding information, changing the subject). Results suggest a link between previous experience with serious illness and health information avoidance. Building on uncertainty management theory, this study demonstrated that health information avoidance is situational, relatively common, not necessarily unhealthy, and may be used to accomplish multiple communication goals.

  9. Avoiding Cancer Risk Information

    PubMed Central

    Emanuel, Amber S.; Kiviniemi, Marc T.; Howell, Jennifer L.; Hay, Jennifer L.; Waters, Erika A.; Orom, Heather; Shepperd, James A.

    2015-01-01

    RATIONALE Perceived risk for health problems such as cancer is a central construct in many models of health decision making and a target for behavior change interventions. However, some portion of the population actively avoids cancer risk information. The prevalence of, explanations for, and consequences of such avoidance are not well understood. OBJECTIVE We examined the prevalence and demographic and psychosocial correlates of cancer risk information avoidance preference in a nationally representative sample. We also examined whether avoidance of cancer risk information corresponds with avoidance of cancer screening. RESULTS Based on our representative sample, 39% of the population indicated that they agreed or strongly agreed that they would “rather not know [their] chance of getting cancer.” This preference was stronger among older participants, female participants, and participants with lower levels of education. Preferring to avoid cancer risk information was stronger among participants who agreed with the beliefs that everything causes cancer, that there’s not much one can do to prevent cancer, and that there are too many recommendations to follow. Finally, the preference to avoid cancer risk information was associated with lower levels of screening for colon cancer. CONCLUSION These findings suggest that cancer risk information avoidance is a multi-determined phenomenon that is associated with demographic characteristics and psychosocial individual differences and also relates to engagement in cancer screening. PMID:26560410

  10. Avoiding Construction Snafus.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rochefort, Mark; Gosch, Jerry

    2001-01-01

    Discusses risk management planning tips that help schools avoid project-delaying construction problems. Preconstruction planning topics explored include the type of construction method to use, contract selection, and the need for efficient project management. (GR)

  11. Avoidant personality disorder

    MedlinePlus

    American Psychiatric Association. Avoidant personality disorder. Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders: DSM-5 . 5th ed. Arlington, VA: American Psychiatric Publishing. 2013;672-675. Blais MA, Smallwood ...

  12. Avoiding Computer Viruses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rowe, Joyce; And Others

    1989-01-01

    The threat of computer sabotage is a real concern to business teachers and others responsible for academic computer facilities. Teachers can minimize the possibility. Eight suggestions for avoiding computer viruses are given. (JOW)

  13. Operational Collision Avoidance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guit, Bill

    2015-01-01

    This presentation will describe the early days of the EOS Aqua and Aura operational collision avoidance process. It will highlight EOS debris avoidance maneuvers, EOS high interest event statistic and A-Train systematic conjunctions and conclude with future challenges. This is related to earlier e-DAA (tracking number 21692) that an abstract was submitted to a different conference. Eric Moyer, ESMO Deputy Project Manager has reviewed and approved this presentation on May 6, 2015

  14. Reactive Collision Avoidance Algorithm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scharf, Daniel; Acikmese, Behcet; Ploen, Scott; Hadaegh, Fred

    2010-01-01

    The reactive collision avoidance (RCA) algorithm allows a spacecraft to find a fuel-optimal trajectory for avoiding an arbitrary number of colliding spacecraft in real time while accounting for acceleration limits. In addition to spacecraft, the technology can be used for vehicles that can accelerate in any direction, such as helicopters and submersibles. In contrast to existing, passive algorithms that simultaneously design trajectories for a cluster of vehicles working to achieve a common goal, RCA is implemented onboard spacecraft only when an imminent collision is detected, and then plans a collision avoidance maneuver for only that host vehicle, thus preventing a collision in an off-nominal situation for which passive algorithms cannot. An example scenario for such a situation might be when a spacecraft in the cluster is approaching another one, but enters safe mode and begins to drift. Functionally, the RCA detects colliding spacecraft, plans an evasion trajectory by solving the Evasion Trajectory Problem (ETP), and then recovers after the collision is avoided. A direct optimization approach was used to develop the algorithm so it can run in real time. In this innovation, a parameterized class of avoidance trajectories is specified, and then the optimal trajectory is found by searching over the parameters. The class of trajectories is selected as bang-off-bang as motivated by optimal control theory. That is, an avoiding spacecraft first applies full acceleration in a constant direction, then coasts, and finally applies full acceleration to stop. The parameter optimization problem can be solved offline and stored as a look-up table of values. Using a look-up table allows the algorithm to run in real time. Given a colliding spacecraft, the properties of the collision geometry serve as indices of the look-up table that gives the optimal trajectory. For multiple colliding spacecraft, the set of trajectories that avoid all spacecraft is rapidly searched on

  15. Vigour in active avoidance.

    PubMed

    Nord, Camilla L; Prabhu, Gita; Nolte, Tobias; Fonagy, Peter; Dolan, Ray; Moutoussis, Michael

    2017-12-01

    It would be maladaptive to learn about catastrophes by trial and error alone. Investment in planning and effort are necessary. Devoting too many resources to averting disaster, however, can impair quality of life, as in anxiety and paranoia. Here, we developed a novel task to explore how people adjust effort expenditure (vigor) so as to avoid negative consequences. Our novel paradigm is immersive, enabling us to measure vigor in the context of (simulated) disaster. We found that participants (N = 118) exerted effort to avoid disaster-associated states, adjusting their effort expenditure according to the baseline probability of catastrophe, in agreement with theoretical predictions. Furthermore, negative subjective emotional states were associated both with threat level and with increasing vigor in the face of disaster. We describe for the first time effort expenditure in the context of irreversible losses, with important implications for disorders marked by excessive avoidance.

  16. Collision Avoidance System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    Ames Research Center teamed with the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) to study human performance factors associated with the use of the Traffic Alert and Collision Avoidance system (TCAS II) in an operational environment. TCAS is designed to alert pilots of the presence of other aircraft in their vicinity, to identify and track those who could be a threat, and to recommend action to avoid a collision. Ames conducted three laboratory experiments. The first showed that pilots were able to use the TCAS II correctly in the allowable time. The second tested pilots' response to changes in the avoidance advisories, and the third examined pilots' reactions to alternative displays. After a 1989 congressional mandate, the FAA ruled that TCAS would be required on all passenger carrying aircraft (to be phased in completely by 1995).

  17. Psychological Treatments to Avoid

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomason, Timothy C.

    2010-01-01

    Certain psychological treatments should be avoided, and a list of such treatments would provide valuable guidance for counselors, as well as potential clients. It is well established that some therapies are potentially dangerous, and some fringe therapies are highly unlikely to help clients beyond a placebo effect. This article provides an…

  18. Pitcherpot: Avoiding Honeypot Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panchal, Vinod K.; Bhatnagar, Pramod K.; Bhatnagar, Mitul

    This paper explores the various ways honeypots could be detected by the malicious attacker. This includes the different prevalent criteria and characteristics for honeypots generation & their weaknesses. Further this paper proposes a new way of implementation of a honeypot (Pitcher pots Systems) that effectively facilitate its identity avoidance and yet offers better ways to study the attacker.

  19. Helping Students Avoid Plagiarism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilhoit, Stephen

    1994-01-01

    Discusses how and why college students commit plagiarism, suggesting techniques that instructors can use to help student avoid plagiarism. Instructors should define and discuss plagiarism thoroughly; discuss hypothetical cases; review the conventions of quoting and documenting material; require multiple drafts of essays; and offer responses…

  20. Avoiding the "M" Word.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klinger, Donna

    2001-01-01

    Provides an overview of roundtable discussions by top business officers about how higher education can capitalize on strategic alliances. Describes how, by working with one another and with corporate partners, colleges and universities can avoid closing their doors or merging with stronger institutions. (EV)

  1. Plants to Avoid

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Knowledge of poisonous plants is extremely important for home owners, gardeners, farmers, hunters, hikers, and the rest of the general public. Among the most important plants to avoid in the Delta Region are poison ivy, bull nettle, eastern black nightshade, Queen Ann’s lace, jimsonweed, and trumpe...

  2. Avoiding revision rhinoplasty.

    PubMed

    Waite, Peter D

    2011-02-01

    Reoperation of the nose is challenging and sometimes emotionally difficult for the surgeon and patient. There are multiple pitfalls to be avoided and it is always best to carefully diagnose and establish a surgical treatment plan. Even among the best of plans and surgical techniques, revision may be necessary. The patient and surgeon should understand the limitations of the surgical techniques and the individual anatomy. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  3. Landing Hazard Avoidance Display

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abernathy, Michael Franklin (Inventor); Hirsh, Robert L. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    Landing hazard avoidance displays can provide rapidly understood visual indications of where it is safe to land a vehicle and where it is unsafe to land a vehicle. Color coded maps can indicate zones in two dimensions relative to the vehicles position where it is safe to land. The map can be simply green (safe) and red (unsafe) areas with an indication of scale or can be a color coding of another map such as a surface map. The color coding can be determined in real time based on topological measurements and safety criteria to thereby adapt to dynamic, unknown, or partially known environments.

  4. Avoiding Death by Vacuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barroso, A.; Ferreira, P. M.; Ivanov, I.; Santos, R.; Silva, João P.

    2013-07-01

    The two-Higgs doublet model (2HDM) can have two electroweak breaking, CP-conserving, minima. The possibility arises that the minimum which corresponds to the known elementary particle spectrum is metastable, a possibility we call the "panic vacuum". We present analytical bounds on the parameters of the softly broken Peccei-Quinn 2HDM which are necessary and sufficient conditions to avoid this possibility. We also show that, for this particular model, the current LHC data already tell us that we are necessarily in the global minimum of the theory, regardless of any cosmological considerations about the lifetime of the false vacua.

  5. Predicting attention and avoidance: when do avoiders attend?

    PubMed

    Klein, Rupert; Knäuper, Bärbel

    2009-09-01

    Three avoidance measures, the Miller Behavioural Style Scale (MBSS), Index of Self-Regulation of Emotion (ISE) and Mainz Coping Inventory (MCI), were compared in their ability to predict attention and avoidance of threats in the emotional Stroop task. It was also examined if the avoidance mechanism of individuals who would normally avoid threat-indicating words becomes disrupted under conditions of dopamine reduction. Results show that only the ISE predicted attention/avoidance of threat-indicating words. In addition, the avoidance mechanism, as measured by the ISE and MCI, was not activated when regular smokers abstained from smoking.

  6. Collision avoidance in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kessler, D. J.; Cour-Palais, B. G.; Taylor, R. E.; Landry, P. M.

    1980-01-01

    Collisions in earth orbital space between operational payloads and various forms of space debris (nonoperational payloads, nonfunctional mission-related objects and fragments resulting from collisions and explosions) are discussed and possible means of avoiding them are considered. From 10,000 to 15,000 objects are estimated to be in earth orbital space, most of which represent spacecraft fragments and debris too small to be detected and tracked by earth-based sensors, and it is considered likely that some of them will be or have already been involved in direct collisions with the ever increasing number of operational satellites and space stations. Means of protecting proposed large space structures and smaller spacecraft from significant damage by larger space objects, particularly in the 400-4000 km altitude range where most debris occurs, include structural redundancy and the double shielding of sensitive components. Other means of collision avoidance are the collection or relocation of satellites, rocket bodies and other objects by the Space Shuttle, the prevention of explosions and the disposal of spent rocket parts by reentry. Finally, a management structure would be required to administer guidelines for the prevention and elimination of space debris.

  7. Avoidable waste management costs

    SciTech Connect

    Hsu, K.; Burns, M.; Priebe, S.; Robinson, P.

    1995-01-01

    This report describes the activity based costing method used to acquire variable (volume dependent or avoidable) waste management cost data for routine operations at Department of Energy (DOE) facilities. Waste volumes from environmental restoration, facility stabilization activities, and legacy waste were specifically excluded from this effort. A core team consisting of Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site, and Oak Ridge Reservation developed and piloted the methodology, which can be used to determine avoidable waste management costs. The method developed to gather information was based on activity based costing, which is a common industrial engineering technique. Sites submitted separate flow diagrams that showed the progression of work from activity to activity for each waste type or treatability group. Each activity on a flow diagram was described in a narrative, which detailed the scope of the activity. Labor and material costs based on a unit quantity of waste being processed were then summed to generate a total cost for that flow diagram. Cross-complex values were calculated by determining a weighted average for each waste type or treatability group based on the volume generated. This study will provide DOE and contractors with a better understanding of waste management processes and their associated costs. Other potential benefits include providing cost data for sites to perform consistent cost/benefit analysis of waste minimization and pollution prevention (WMIN/PP) options identified during pollution prevention opportunity assessments and providing a means for prioritizing and allocating limited resources for WMIN/PP.

  8. Avoiding dangerous climate change

    SciTech Connect

    Hans Joachim Schellnhuber; Wolfgang Cramer; Nebojsa Nakicenovic; Tom Wigley; Gary Yohe

    2006-02-15

    In 2005 the UK Government hosted the Avoiding Dangerous Climate Change conference to take an in-depth look at the scientific issues associated with climate change. This volume presents the most recent findings from the leading international scientists that attended the conference. The topics addressed include critical thresholds and key vulnerabilities of the climate system, impacts on human and natural systems, socioeconomic costs and benefits of emissions pathways, and technological options for meeting different stabilisation levels of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere. Contents are: Foreword from Prime Minister Tony Blair; Introduction from Rajendra Pachauri, Chairman of the IPCC; followed by 41 papers arranged in seven sections entitled: Key Vulnerabilities of the Climate System and Critical Thresholds; General Perspectives on Dangerous Impacts; Key Vulnerabilities for Ecosystems and Biodiversity; Socio-Economic Effects; Regional Perspectives; Emission Pathways; and Technological Options. Four papers have been abstracted separately for the Coal Abstracts database.

  9. Micro UAV collision avoidance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merchant, John; Pope, Frank

    2007-04-01

    A range image for micro UAV (unmanned air vehicle) collision avoidance is derived by processing a sequence of conventional images from a single camera on board the UAV. The range image will warn of looming collisions immediately ahead and also provide the 3-D situational awareness over a wide field of view needed for semi-autonomous or autonomous operation of the UAV. This single-camera technique is potentially applicable for other robotic vehicles that may not be large enough for two-camera stereo. The range image is generated by tracking the motion of scene detail along optic flow lines. Performance is estimated in terms of the minimum and maximum ranges of scene detail that can be sensed as a function of its position within the field of view.

  10. Measuring Experiential Avoidance in Adults: The Avoidance and Fusion Questionnaire

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schmalz, Jonathan E.; Murrell, Amy R.

    2010-01-01

    To date, general levels of experiential avoidance are primarily measured by the Acceptance and Action Questionnaire-II (AAQ-II), but it includes items of questionable comprehensibility. The Avoidance and Fusion Questionnaire for Youth (AFQ-Y), previously validated as a measure of experiential avoidance with children and adolescents, was…

  11. Avoiding Infection After Ear Piercing

    MedlinePlus

    ... Text Size Email Print Share Avoiding Infection After Ear Piercing Page Content Article Body What is the best way to avoid infection after ear piercing? Ears may be pierced for cosmetic reasons ...

  12. Mammalian synthetic circuits with RNA binding proteins delivered by RNA

    PubMed Central

    Wroblewska, Liliana; Kitada, Tasuku; Endo, Kei; Siciliano, Velia; Stillo, Breanna; Saito, Hirohide; Weiss, Ron

    2015-01-01

    Synthetic regulatory circuits encoded on RNA rather than DNA could provide a means to control cell behavior while avoiding potentially harmful genomic integration in therapeutic applications. We create post-transcriptional circuits using RNA-binding proteins, which can be wired in a plug-and-play fashion to create networks of higher complexity. We show that the circuits function in mammalian cells when encoded on modified mRNA or self-replicating RNA. PMID:26237515

  13. Spacecraft Collision Avoidance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bussy-Virat, Charles

    The rapid increase of the number of objects in orbit around the Earth poses a serious threat to operational spacecraft and astronauts. In order to effectively avoid collisions, mission operators need to assess the risk of collision between the satellite and any other object whose orbit is likely to approach its trajectory. Several algorithms predict the probability of collision but have limitations that impair the accuracy of the prediction. An important limitation is that uncertainties in the atmospheric density are usually not taken into account in the propagation of the covariance matrix from current epoch to closest approach time. The Spacecraft Orbital Characterization Kit (SpOCK) was developed to accurately predict the positions and velocities of spacecraft. The central capability of SpOCK is a high accuracy numerical propagator of spacecraft orbits and computations of ancillary parameters. The numerical integration uses a comprehensive modeling of the dynamics of spacecraft in orbit that includes all the perturbing forces that a spacecraft is subject to in orbit. In particular, the atmospheric density is modeled by thermospheric models to allow for an accurate representation of the atmospheric drag. SpOCK predicts the probability of collision between two orbiting objects taking into account the uncertainties in the atmospheric density. Monte Carlo procedures are used to perturb the initial position and velocity of the primary and secondary spacecraft from their covariance matrices. Developed in C, SpOCK supports parallelism to quickly assess the risk of collision so it can be used operationally in real time. The upper atmosphere of the Earth is strongly driven by the solar activity. In particular, abrupt transitions from slow to fast solar wind cause important disturbances of the atmospheric density, hence of the drag acceleration that spacecraft are subject to. The Probability Distribution Function (PDF) model was developed to predict the solar wind speed

  14. CAT altitude avoidance system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gary, B. L. (Inventor)

    1982-01-01

    A method and apparatus are provided for indicating the altitude of the tropopause or of an inversion layer wherein clear air turbulence (CAT) may occur, and the likely severity of any such CAT, includes directing a passive microwave radiometer on the aircraft at different angles with respect to the horizon. The microwave radiation measured at a frequency of about 55 GHz represents the temperature of the air at an ""average'' range of about 3 kilometers, so that the sine of the angle of the radiometer times 3 kilometers equals the approximate altitude of the air whose temperature is measured. A plot of altitude (with respect to the aircraft) versus temperature of the air at that altitude, can indicate when an inversion layer is present and can indicate the altitude of the tropopause or of such an inversion layer. The plot can also indicate the severity of any CAT in an inversion layer. If CAT has been detected in the general area, then the aircraft can be flown at an altitude to avoid the tropopause or inversion layer.

  15. Avoid Earth Extinction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Dayong

    2012-11-01

    In 2011, the author supposes: the dark hole will take the dark comet to impact our solar system in 20 years. (see Dayong Cao, BAPS.2011.DFD.LA.24, BAPS.2012.APR.K1.78 and BAPS.2011.APR.K1.17) Asteroid 2011 AG5 will impact on Earth in 2040. (See Donald K. Yoemans, ``Asteroid 2011 AG5 - A Reality Check,'' NASA-JPL, 2012) The dark Asteroid 2011 AG5 (as a dark comet) is made of the dark matte. Sun and its companion-dark hole are a binary system (Their systemic model- SDS for short there in after). The dark hole has a dark comet belt. The dark hole and dark comet are made of the dark matter which has a space-time (as frequence-amplitude square) center- a different systemic model from solar systemic model. Because it absorb the space-time and wave. So it is ``dark.'' When the dark hole goes near the sun every 25-27 million years, it will take its dark comet belt to go into the solar system to impact our earth. In a other hand, it can change all of our systemic model and code which are controled by the SDS, such as the orbit both of the asteroid belt and planet (such as Jupiter), our atomic structure and our genetic code. It can trigger periodic Mass Extinction. We will use the dark matter to change the SDS to avoid forthcoming extinction.

  16. MEST- avoid next extinction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Dayong

    2012-11-01

    Asteroid 2011 AG5 will impact on Earth in 2040. (See Donald K. Yoemans, ``Asteroid 2011 AG5 - A Reality Check,'' NASA-JPL, 2012) In 2011, The author say: the dark hole will take the dark comet to impact our solar system in 20 years, and give a systemic model between the sun and its companion-dark hole to explain why were there periodicity mass extinction on earth. (see Dayong Cao, BAPS.2011.CAL.C1.7, BAPS.2011.DFD.LA.24, BAPS.2012.APR.K1.78 and BAPS.2011.APR.K1.17) The dark Asteroid 2011 AG5 (as a dark comet) is made of the dark matter which has a space-time (as frequence-amplitude square) center- a different systemic model from solar systemic model. It can asborb the space-time and wave. So it is ``dark.'' When many dark matters hit on our earth, they can break our atom structure and our genetic code to trigger the Mass Extinction. In our experiments, consciousness can change the systematic model and code by a life-informational technology. So it can change the output signals of the solar cell. (see Dayong Cao, BAPS.2011.MAR.C1.286 and BAPS.2012.MAR.P33.14) So we will develop the genetic code of lives to evolution and sublimation, will use the dark matter to change the systemic model between dark hole and sun and will avoid next extinction.

  17. Collision avoidance sensor skin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    The objective was to totally eliminate the possibility of a robot (or any mechanism for that matter) inducing a collision in space operations. We were particularly concerned that human beings were safe under all circumstances. This was apparently accomplished, and it is shown that GSFC has a system that is ready for space qualification and flight. However, it soon became apparent that much more could be accomplished with this technology. Payloads could be made invulnerable to collision avoidance and the blind spots behind them eliminated. This could be accomplished by a simple, non-imaging set of 'Capaciflector' sensors on each payload. It also is evident that this system could be used to align and dock the system with a wide margin of safety. Throughout, lighting problems could be ignored, and unexpected events and modeling errors taken in stride. At the same time, computational requirements would be reduced. This can be done in a simple, rugged, reliable manner that will not disturb the form factor of space systems. It will be practical for space applications. The lab experiments indicate we are well on the way to accomplishing this. Still, the research trail goes deeper. It now appears that the sensors can be extended to end effectors to provide precontact information and make robot docking (or any docking connection) very smooth, with minimal loads impacted back into the mating structures. This type of ability would be a major step forward in basic control techniques in space. There are, however, baseline and restructuring issues to be tackled. The payloads must get power and signals to them from the robot or from the astronaut servicing tool. This requires a standard electromechanical interface. Any of several could be used. The GSFC prototype shown in this presentation is a good one. Sensors with their attendant electronics must be added to the payloads, end effectors, and robot arms and integrated into the system.

  18. Stimulus conflict triggers behavioral avoidance.

    PubMed

    Dignath, David; Eder, Andreas B

    2015-12-01

    According to a recent extension of the conflict-monitoring theory, conflict between two competing response tendencies is registered as an aversive event and triggers a motivation to avoid the source of conflict. In the present study, we tested this assumption. Over five experiments, we examined whether conflict is associated with an avoidance motivation and whether stimulus conflict or response conflict triggers an avoidance tendency. Participants first performed a color Stroop task. In a subsequent motivation test, participants responded to Stroop stimuli with approach- and avoidance-related lever movements. These results showed that Stroop-conflict stimuli increased the frequency of avoidance responses in a free-choice motivation test, and also increased the speed of avoidance relative to approach responses in a forced-choice test. High and low proportions of response conflict in the Stroop task had no effect on avoidance in the motivation test. Avoidance of conflict was, however, obtained even with new conflict stimuli that had not been presented before in a Stroop task, and when the Stroop task was replaced with an unrelated filler task. Taken together, these results suggest that stimulus conflict is sufficient to trigger avoidance.

  19. Chemical avoidance responses of fishes.

    PubMed

    Tierney, Keith B

    2016-05-01

    The hydrosphere is a repository for all of our waste and mistakes, be they sewage, garbage, process-affected waters, runoff, and gases. For fish living in environments receiving undesirable inputs, moving away seems an obvious way to avoid harm. While this should occur, there are numerous examples where it will not. The inability to avoid harmful environments may lead to sensory impairments that in turn limit the ability to avoid other dangers or locate benefits. For avoidance to occur, the danger must first be perceived, which may not happen if the fish is 'blinded' in some capacity. Second, the danger must be recognized for what it is, which may also not happen if the fish is cognitively confused or impaired. Third, it is possible that the fish may not be able to leave the area, or worse, learns to prefer a toxic environment. Concerning generating regulations around avoidance, there are two possibilities: that an avoidance threshold be used to set guidelines for effluent release with the intention of driving fishes away; the second is to set a contaminant concentration that would not affect the avoidance or attraction responses to other cues. With the complexities of the modern world in which we release diverse pollutants, from light to municipal effluents full of 1000s of chemicals, to the diversity present in ecosystems, it is impossible to have avoidance data on every stimulus-species combination. Nevertheless, we may be able to use existing avoidance response data to predict the likelihood of avoidance of untested stimuli. Where we cannot, this review includes a framework that can be used to direct new research. This review is intended to collate existing avoidance response data, provide a framework for making decisions in the absence of data, and suggest studies that would facilitate the prediction of risk to fish health in environments receiving intentional and unintentional human-based chemical inputs. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Conflict Avoidance and University Management.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tagliacozzo, Daisy M.

    The conditions that intensify conflict avoidance by the central administration in making strategic decisions, and the consequences of such avoidance for the management of college affairs, are discussed. The implication of an emerging decision-making style for adapting the organization to changing environments is also considered. Some of the…

  1. Cigarette tax avoidance and evasion.

    PubMed

    Stehr, Mark

    2005-03-01

    Variation in state cigarette taxes provides incentives for tax avoidance through smuggling, legal border crossing to low tax jurisdictions, or Internet purchasing. When taxes rise, tax paid sales of cigarettes will decline both because consumption will decrease and because tax avoidance will increase. The key innovation of this paper is to compare cigarette sales data to cigarette consumption data from the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS). I show that after subtracting percent changes in consumption, residual percent changes in sales are associated with state cigarette tax changes implying the existence of tax avoidance. I estimate that the tax avoidance response to tax changes is at least twice the consumption response and that tax avoidance accounted for up to 9.6% of sales between 1985 and 2001. Because of the increase in tax avoidance, tax paid sales data understate the level of smoking and overstate the drop in smoking. I also find that the level of legal border crossing was very low relative to other forms of tax avoidance. If states have strong preferences for smoking control, they must pair high cigarette taxes with effective policies to curb smuggling and other forms of tax avoidance or employ alternative policies such as counter-advertising and smoking restrictions.

  2. RNA Interference

    MedlinePlus

    ... NIGMS Home > Science Education > RNA Interference Fact Sheet RNA Interference Fact Sheet Tagline (Optional) Middle/Main Content Area What is RNA interference? RNA interference (RNAi) is a natural process ...

  3. Juan Bobo and the Pot 1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flores, Nydia; And Others

    This story and coloring book is one in a series of Puerto Rican folktale books and is designed for use in a bilingual/bicultural education setting. This volume is geared to those students just beginning to learn English. The illustrated story is followed by a teacher's guide, consisting of information on the series, background on Puerto Rican…

  4. Ground Collision Avoidance System (Igcas)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Skoog, Mark A (Inventor); Prosser, Kevin (Inventor); Hook, Loyd (Inventor)

    2017-01-01

    The present invention is a system and method for aircraft ground collision avoidance (iGCAS) comprising a modular array of software, including a sense own state module configured to gather data to compute trajectory, a sense terrain module including a digital terrain map (DTM) and map manger routine to store and retrieve terrain elevations, a predict collision threat module configured to generate an elevation profile corresponding to the terrain under the trajectory computed by said sense own state module, a predict avoidance trajectory module configured to simulate avoidance maneuvers ahead of the aircraft, a determine need to avoid module configured to determine which avoidance maneuver should be used, when it should be initiated, and when it should be terminated, a notify Module configured to display each maneuver's viability to the pilot by a colored GUI, a pilot controls module configured to turn the system on and off, and an avoid module configured to define how an aircraft will perform avoidance maneuvers through 3-dimensional space.

  5. Postcopulatory inbreeding avoidance in guppies.

    PubMed

    Fitzpatrick, J L; Evans, J P

    2014-12-01

    In many species, the negative fitness effects of inbreeding have facilitated the evolution of a wide range of inbreeding avoidance mechanisms. Although avoidance mechanisms operating prior to mating are well documented, evidence for postcopulatory mechanisms of inbreeding avoidance remain scarce. Here, we examine the potential for paternity biases to favour unrelated males when their sperm compete for fertilizations though postcopulatory inbreeding avoidance mechanisms in the guppy, Poecilia reticulata. To test this possibility, we used a series of artificial inseminations to deliver an equal number of sperm from a related (either full sibling or half sibling) and unrelated male to a female while statistically controlling for differences in sperm quality between rival ejaculates. In this way, we were able to focus exclusively on postcopulatory mechanisms of inbreeding avoidance and account for differences in sperm competitiveness between rival males. Under these carefully controlled conditions, we report a significant bias in paternity towards unrelated males, although this effect was only apparent when the related male was a full sibling. We also show that sperm competition generally favours males with highly viable sperm and thus that some variance in sperm competitiveness can be attributed to difference in sperm quality. Our findings for postcopulatory inbreeding avoidance are consistent with prior work on guppies, revealing that sperm competition success declines linearly with the level of relatedness, but also that such effects are only apparent at relatedness levels of full siblings or higher. These findings reveal that postcopulatory processes alone can facilitate inbreeding avoidance.

  6. Vertical jumping and signaled avoidance

    PubMed Central

    Cándido, Antonio; Maldonado, Antonio; Vila, Jaime

    1988-01-01

    This paper reports an experiment intended to demonstrate that the vertical jumping response can be learned using a signaled-avoidance technique. A photoelectric cell system was used to record the response. Twenty female rats, divided equally into two groups, were exposed to intertrial intervals of either 15 or 40 s. Subjects had to achieve three successive criteria of acquisition: 3, 5, and 10 consecutive avoidance responses. Results showed that both groups learned the avoidance response, requiring increasingly larger numbers of trials as the acquisition criteria increased. No significant effect of intertrial interval was observed. PMID:16812559

  7. Self-avoiding magnetic chains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shang, C. H.; Liu, B. X.; Li, H. D.

    1991-10-01

    We report a first experimental evidence for the self-avoiding walks in Fe-Cu thin films. Transmission electron microscopy showed that the observed self-avoiding chains result from aggregation of the magnetic Fe particles. Scaling analysis demonstrated that these chains were indeed self-similar structures with fractal dimensions ranging from 1.13 to 1.29. It was found that as the annealing temperature elevated, the fractal dimension of the chains with nearly the same width increased. Rich microstructures pertinent to the self-avoiding magnetic chains are described in detail, and a theoretical attempt based on magnetic interaction is proposed to account for the temperature effect.

  8. Robot Avoids Collisions With Obstacles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheung, Edward; Rosinski, Doug; Wegerif, Dan

    1993-01-01

    Developmental robot equipped with infrared sensors and control system acting in concert to enable manipulator arm to move around obstacles. Robot avoids collisions with other objects, even when moving in unpredictable ways. Control system requires no prior knowledge of environment.

  9. How to avoid exercise injuries

    MedlinePlus

    ... gov/ency/patientinstructions/000859.htm How to avoid exercise injuries To use the sharing features on this ... injury and stay safe during exercise. What Causes Exercise Injuries? Some of the most common causes of ...

  10. Vision-based obstacle avoidance

    DOEpatents

    Galbraith, John

    2006-07-18

    A method for allowing a robot to avoid objects along a programmed path: first, a field of view for an electronic imager of the robot is established along a path where the electronic imager obtains the object location information within the field of view; second, a population coded control signal is then derived from the object location information and is transmitted to the robot; finally, the robot then responds to the control signal and avoids the detected object.

  11. Predator Avoidance in Extremophile Fish

    PubMed Central

    Bierbach, David; Schulte, Matthias; Herrmann, Nina; Zimmer, Claudia; Arias-Rodriguez, Lenin; Indy, Jeane Rimber; Riesch, Rüdiger; Plath, Martin

    2013-01-01

    Extreme habitats are often characterized by reduced predation pressures, thus representing refuges for the inhabiting species. The present study was designed to investigate predator avoidance of extremophile populations of Poecilia mexicana and P. sulphuraria that either live in hydrogen sulfide-rich (sulfidic) springs or cave habitats, both of which are known to have impoverished piscine predator regimes. Focal fishes that inhabited sulfidic springs showed slightly weaker avoidance reactions when presented with several naturally occurring predatory cichlids, but strongest differences to populations from non-sulfidic habitats were found in a decreased shoaling tendency with non-predatory swordtail (Xiphophorus hellerii) females. When comparing avoidance reactions between P. mexicana from a sulfidic cave (Cueva del Azufre) and the adjacent sulfidic surface creek (El Azufre), we found only slight differences in predator avoidance, but surface fish reacted much more strongly to the non-predatory cichlid Vieja bifasciata. Our third experiment was designed to disentangle learned from innate effects of predator recognition. We compared laboratory-reared (i.e., predator-naïve) and wild-caught (i.e., predator-experienced) individuals of P. mexicana from a non-sulfidic river and found no differences in their reaction towards the presented predators. Overall, our results indicate (1) that predator avoidance is still functional in extremophile Poecilia spp. and (2) that predator recognition and avoidance reactions have a strong genetic basis. PMID:25371337

  12. Approach/avoidance in dreams.

    PubMed

    Malcolm-Smith, Susan; Koopowitz, Sheri; Pantelis, Eleni; Solms, Mark

    2012-03-01

    The influential threat simulation theory (TST) asserts that dreaming yields adaptive advantage by providing a virtual environment in which threat-avoidance may be safely rehearsed. We have previously found the incidence of biologically threatening dreams to be around 20%, with successful threat avoidance occurring in approximately one-fifth of such dreams. TST asserts that threat avoidance is over-represented relative to other possible dream contents. To begin assessing this issue, we contrasted the incidence of 'avoidance' dreams with that of their opposite: 'approach' dreams. Because TST states that the threat-avoidance function is only fully activated in ecologically valid (biologically threatening) contexts, we also performed this contrast for populations living in both high- and low-threat environments. We find that 'approach' dreams are significantly more prevalent across both contexts. We suggest these results are more consistent with the view that dreaming is generated by reward-seeking systems than by fear-conditioning systems, although reward-seeking is clearly not the only factor determining the content of dreams.

  13. Automatic Collision Avoidance Technology (ACAT)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swihart, Donald E.; Skoog, Mark A.

    2007-01-01

    This document represents two views of the Automatic Collision Avoidance Technology (ACAT). One viewgraph presentation reviews the development and system design of Automatic Collision Avoidance Technology (ACAT). Two types of ACAT exist: Automatic Ground Collision Avoidance (AGCAS) and Automatic Air Collision Avoidance (AACAS). The AGCAS Uses Digital Terrain Elevation Data (DTED) for mapping functions, and uses Navigation data to place aircraft on map. It then scans DTED in front of and around aircraft and uses future aircraft trajectory (5g) to provide automatic flyup maneuver when required. The AACAS uses data link to determine position and closing rate. It contains several canned maneuvers to avoid collision. Automatic maneuvers can occur at last instant and both aircraft maneuver when using data link. The system can use sensor in place of data link. The second viewgraph presentation reviews the development of a flight test and an evaluation of the test. A review of the operation and comparison of the AGCAS and a pilot's performance are given. The same review is given for the AACAS is given.

  14. Harm Avoidance and Cerebral Infarction

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Robert S.; Boyle, Patricia A.; Levine, Steven R.; Yu, Lei; Hoganson, George M.; Buchman, Aron S.; Schneider, Julie A.; Bennett, David A.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Harm avoidance, a trait indicative of behavioral inhibition, is associated with disability and dementia in old age, but the basis of these associations is uncertain. We test the hypothesis that higher level of harm avoidance is associated with increased likelihood of cerebral infarction. Methods Older persons without dementia completed a standard measure of harm avoidance. During a mean of 3.5 years of follow-up, 257 (of 1,082) individuals died of whom 206 (80%) underwent brain autopsy. Number of chronic cerebral infarcts (microscopic plus gross; expressed as 0,1, or >1) was assessed on neuropathologic examination, completed in 192 individuals at the time of analyses. Results On postmortem examination, chronic cerebral infarcts were found in 89 (42 with 1, 47 with >1). Higher harm avoidance was associated with higher likelihood of infarcts (odds ratio = 1.083, 95% confidence interval 1.040–1.128). A moderately high level of the trait (score=17, 75th percentile) was associated with a 2.4-fold increase in the likelihood of infarction compared to a moderately low level of the trait (score = 6, 25th percentile). These associations persisted in models that controlled for other cardiovascular risk factors. Conclusion Higher level of the harm avoidance trait may be a risk factor for cerebral infarction. PMID:24364391

  15. RNA genetics

    SciTech Connect

    Domingo, E. ); Holland, J.J. . Dept. of Biology); Ahlquist, P. . Dept. of Plant Pathology)

    1988-01-01

    This book contains the proceedings on RNA genetics: Retroviruses, Viroids, and RNA recombination, Volume 2. Topics covered include: Replication of retrovirus genomes, Hepatitis B virus replication, and Evolution of RNA viruses.

  16. Motive to Avoid Success, Locus of Control, and Reinforcement Avoidance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Katovsky, Walter

    Subjects were four groups of 12 college women, high or low in motive to avoid success (MAS) and locus of control (LC), were reinforced for response A on a fixed partial reinforcement schedule on three concept learning tasks, one task consisting of combined reward and punishment, another of reward only, and one of punishment only. Response B was…

  17. Food Avoidance Diets for Dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Scott, Jeffrey F; Hammond, Margaret I; Nedorost, Susan T

    2015-10-01

    Food allergy is relatively common in both children and adults, and its prevalence is increasing. Early exposure of food allergens onto skin with an impaired epidermal barrier predisposes to sensitization and prevents the development of oral tolerance. While immediate-type food allergies are well described, less is known about delayed-type food allergies manifesting as dermatitis. This is due, in part, to limitations with current diagnostic testing for delayed-type food allergy, including atopy patch testing. We conducted a systematic review of food avoidance diets in delayed-type food allergies manifesting as dermatitis. While beneficial in some clinical circumstances, avoidance diets should be used with caution in infants and children, as growth impairment and developmental delay may result. Ultimately, dermatitis is highly multifactorial and avoidance diets may not improve symptoms of delayed-type food allergy until combined with other targeted therapies, including restoring balance in the skin microbiome and re-establishing proper skin barrier function.

  18. A problem of collision avoidance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vincent, T. L.; Cliff, E. M.; Grantham, W. J.; Peng, W. Y.

    1972-01-01

    Collision avoidance between two vehicles of constant speed with limited turning radii, moving in a horizontal plane is investigated. Collision avoidance is viewed as a game by assuming that the operator of one vehicle has perfect knowledge of the state of the other, whereas the operator of the second vehicle is unaware of any impending danger. The situation envisioned is that of an encounter between a commercial aircraft and a small light aircraft. This worse case situation is examined to determine the conditions under which the commercial aircraft should execute a collision avoidance maneuver. Three different zones of vulnerability are defined and the boundaries, or barriers, between these zones are determined for a typical aircraft encounter. A discussion of the methods used to obtain the results as well as some of the salient features associated with the resultant barriers is included.

  19. Organocatalytic one-pot 1,4-/1,6-/1,2-addition sequence for the stereocontrolled formation of six consecutive stereocenters† †Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. CCDC 1037530. For ESI and crystallographic data in CIF or other electronic format see DOI: 10.1039/c4cc09730k

    PubMed Central

    Chauhan, Pankaj; Mahajan, Suruchi; Raabe, Gerhard

    2015-01-01

    An unprecedented stereoselective organocatalytic one-pot 1,4-/1,6-/1,2-addition sequence between β-dicarbonyl compounds, β-nitroalkenes and 4-nitro-5-styrylisoxazoles sequentially catalyzed by low loading of a squaramide catalyst and an achiral base has been developed. The protocol opens an efficient entry to isoxazole bearing cyclohexanes with six consecutive stereogenic centers including one tetrasubstituted carbon in good yields and excellent diastereo- and enantioselectivities. PMID:25563802

  20. Avoiding plagiarism in academic writing.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Irene

    Plagiarism means taking the work of another and presenting it as one's own, resulting in potential upset for the original author and disrepute for the professions involved. This article aims to explore the issue of plagiarism and some mechanisms for detection and avoidance.

  1. Avoiding unfavourable outcomes in liposuction.

    PubMed

    Khanna, Atul; Filobbos, George

    2013-05-01

    The origin of liposuction can be traced to an adverse event by Dujarrier in 1921 when he used a uterine curette to remove fat from the knees of a ballerina ending in an amputation secondary to damage of the femoral artery. The history of liposuction since then has been one of avoiding complications and optimising outcome. After this adverse event, liposuction was abandoned until the 1960's when Schrudde revived the practice using small stab incisions and sharp curettage with the secondary suction to aspirate the freed tissue. This technique was associated with a high incidence of complications especially seroma and skin necrosis. Illouz then replaced the curette with a blunt cannula connected to vacuum pump thus avoiding the complications of a sharp curette. Despite the presence of various techniques for liposuction, suction assisted liposuction (SAL) is still the standard technique of liposuction. This article aims to discuss literature regarding the various aspects of liposuction (SAL) and to highlight the salient points in the literature and in the senior author's experience in order to avoid unfavourable outcomes in liposuction. A literature review on avoiding complication is in liposuction including some of the seminal papers on liposuction. Liposuction is generally a safe procedure with reproducible outcome. Just like any surgical procedure it should be treated with the utmost care. Illouz published 10 commandments for liposuction in 1989 and we review these commandments to demonstrate how liposuction has evolved.

  2. Structured interviewing: avoiding selection problems.

    PubMed

    Pursell, E D; Campion, M A; Gaylord, S R

    1980-11-01

    In place of the old-fashioned, casual interview, which is unreliable and occasionally invalid in the context of EEO and affirmative action developments, the authors propose the adoption of structured interviewing for job selection. They contend that objective testing--oral, written and physical--would be more reliable, avoid the labyrinth of EEO, and ultimately yield better candidates for the jobs offered.

  3. Biochar aging reduces earthworm avoidance

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Biochar, a black carbon substance produced by the pyrolysis of organic feedstocks, has been used in many soil improvement strategies ranging from nutrient addition to sequestration of C. Simple toxicity studies and laboratory preference/avoidance assays are recommended but results rarely reported. ...

  4. Avoiding unfavourable outcomes in liposuction

    PubMed Central

    Khanna, Atul; Filobbos, George

    2013-01-01

    The origin of liposuction can be traced to an adverse event by Dujarrier in 1921 when he used a uterine curette to remove fat from the knees of a ballerina ending in an amputation secondary to damage of the femoral artery. The history of liposuction since then has been one of avoiding complications and optimising outcome. After this adverse event, liposuction was abandoned until the 1960's when Schrudde revived the practice using small stab incisions and sharp curettage with the secondary suction to aspirate the freed tissue. This technique was associated with a high incidence of complications especially seroma and skin necrosis. Illouz then replaced the curette with a blunt cannula connected to vacuum pump thus avoiding the complications of a sharp curette. Despite the presence of various techniques for liposuction, suction assisted liposuction (SAL) is still the standard technique of liposuction. This article aims to discuss literature regarding the various aspects of liposuction (SAL) and to highlight the salient points in the literature and in the senior author's experience in order to avoid unfavourable outcomes in liposuction. A literature review on avoiding complication is in liposuction including some of the seminal papers on liposuction. Liposuction is generally a safe procedure with reproducible outcome. Just like any surgical procedure it should be treated with the utmost care. Illouz published 10 commandments for liposuction in 1989 and we review these commandments to demonstrate how liposuction has evolved. PMID:24501475

  5. Omnipotent RNA.

    PubMed

    Spirin, Alexander S

    2002-10-23

    The capability of polyribonucleotide chains to form unique, compactly folded structures is considered the basis for diverse non-genetic functions of RNA, including the function of recognition of various ligands and the catalytic function. Together with well-known genetic functions of RNA - coding and complementary replication - this has led to the concept of the functional omnipotence of RNA and the hypothesis that an ancient RNA world supposedly preceded the contemporary DNA-RNA-protein life. It is proposed that the Woese universal precursor in the ancient RNA world could be a cell-free community of mixed RNA colonies growing and multiplying on solid surfaces.

  6. Human avoidance and approach learning: evidence for overlapping neural systems and experiential avoidance modulation of avoidance neurocircuitry.

    PubMed

    Schlund, Michael W; Magee, Sandy; Hudgins, Caleb D

    2011-12-01

    Adaptive functioning is thought to reflect a balance between approach and avoidance neural systems with imbalances often producing pathological forms of avoidance. Yet little evidence is available in healthy adults demonstrating a balance between approach and avoidance neural systems and modulation in avoidance neurocircuitry by vulnerability factors for avoidance. Consequently, we used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to compare changes in brain activation associated with human avoidance and approach learning and modulation of avoidance neurocircuitry by experiential avoidance. fMRI tracked trial-by-trial increases in activation while adults learned through trial and error an avoidance response that prevented money loss and an approach response that produced money gain. Avoidance and approach cues elicited similar experience-dependent increases in activation in a fronto-limbic-striatal network. Positive and negative reinforcing outcomes (i.e., money gain and avoidance of loss) also elicited similar increases in activation in frontal and striatal regions. Finally, increased experiential avoidance and self-punishment coping was associated with decreased activation in medial/superior frontal regions, anterior cingulate, amygdala and hippocampus. These findings suggest avoidance and approach learning recruit a similar fronto-limbic-striatal network in healthy adults. Increased experiential avoidance also appears to be associated with reduced frontal and limbic reactivity in avoidance, establishing an important link between maladaptive avoidance coping and altered responses in avoidance neurocircuitry. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. RNA Crystallization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golden, Barbara L.; Kundrot, Craig E.

    2003-01-01

    RNA molecules may be crystallized using variations of the methods developed for protein crystallography. As the technology has become available to syntheisize and purify RNA molecules in the quantities and with the quality that is required for crystallography, the field of RNA structure has exploded. The first consideration when crystallizing an RNA is the sequence, which may be varied in a rational way to enhance crystallizability or prevent formation of alternate structures. Once a sequence has been designed, the RNA may be synthesized chemically by solid-state synthesis, or it may be produced enzymatically using RNA polymerase and an appropriate DNA template. Purification of milligram quantities of RNA can be accomplished by HPLC or gel electrophoresis. As with proteins, crystallization of RNA is usually accomplished by vapor diffusion techniques. There are several considerations that are either unique to RNA crystallization or more important for RNA crystallization. Techniques for design, synthesis, purification, and crystallization of RNAs will be reviewed here.

  8. RNA Crystallization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golden, Barbara L.; Kundrot, Craig E.

    2003-01-01

    RNA molecules may be crystallized using variations of the methods developed for protein crystallography. As the technology has become available to syntheisize and purify RNA molecules in the quantities and with the quality that is required for crystallography, the field of RNA structure has exploded. The first consideration when crystallizing an RNA is the sequence, which may be varied in a rational way to enhance crystallizability or prevent formation of alternate structures. Once a sequence has been designed, the RNA may be synthesized chemically by solid-state synthesis, or it may be produced enzymatically using RNA polymerase and an appropriate DNA template. Purification of milligram quantities of RNA can be accomplished by HPLC or gel electrophoresis. As with proteins, crystallization of RNA is usually accomplished by vapor diffusion techniques. There are several considerations that are either unique to RNA crystallization or more important for RNA crystallization. Techniques for design, synthesis, purification, and crystallization of RNAs will be reviewed here.

  9. RNA helicases

    PubMed Central

    Owttrim, George W.

    2013-01-01

    Similar to proteins, RNA molecules must fold into the correct conformation and associate with protein complexes in order to be functional within a cell. RNA helicases rearrange RNA secondary structure and RNA-protein interactions in an ATP-dependent reaction, performing crucial functions in all aspects of RNA metabolism. In prokaryotes, RNA helicase activity is associated with roles in housekeeping functions including RNA turnover, ribosome biogenesis, translation and small RNA metabolism. In addition, RNA helicase expression and/or activity are frequently altered during cellular response to abiotic stress, implying they perform defined roles during cellular adaptation to changes in the growth environment. Specifically, RNA helicases contribute to the formation of cold-adapted ribosomes and RNA degradosomes, implying a role in alleviation of RNA secondary structure stabilization at low temperature. A common emerging theme involves RNA helicases acting as scaffolds for protein-protein interaction and functioning as molecular clamps, holding RNA-protein complexes in specific conformations. This review highlights recent advances in DEAD-box RNA helicase association with cellular response to abiotic stress in prokaryotes. PMID:23093803

  10. Estimating avoidable causes of cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Davis, D L; Muir, C

    1995-01-01

    Evidence that much cancer is preventable derives from observations of time trends and geographic patterns of cancer, birth cohort changes, high risks in groups with well-defined exposures, and experimental studies. In an effort to identify additional opportunities for reducing the impact of cancer on society, this conference assessed avoidable causes of cancer. The magnitude and extent of preventable causes of cancer are subjects of intense debate, with discrepancies often related to the use of different time frames and different weights for epidemiologic and toxicologic evidence. There is much agreement, however, about the exposures that increase risk, notably tobacco, alcohol, diet, radiation, medications, occupational exposures, general environmental exposures, and infectious agents. Interactions between carcinogenic exposures and genetic susceptibility are also important. Concerted efforts are needed to identify avoidable causes of cancer and to apply knowledge already obtained to reduce the cancer burden. PMID:8741803

  11. Avoiding congestion in recommender systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Xiaolong; Lü, Linyuan; Liu, Runran; Zhang, Jianlin

    2014-06-01

    Recommender systems use the historical activities and personal profiles of users to uncover their preferences and recommend objects. Most of the previous methods are based on objects’ (and/or users’) similarity rather than on their difference. Such approaches are subject to a high risk of increasingly exposing users to a narrowing band of popular objects. As a result, a few objects may be recommended to an enormous number of users, resulting in the problem of recommendation congestion, which is to be avoided, especially when the recommended objects are limited resources. In order to quantitatively measure a recommendation algorithm's ability to avoid congestion, we proposed a new metric inspired by the Gini index, which is used to measure the inequality of the individual wealth distribution in an economy. Besides this, a new recommendation method called directed weighted conduction (DWC) was developed by considering the heat conduction process on a user-object bipartite network with different thermal conductivities. Experimental results obtained for three benchmark data sets showed that the DWC algorithm can effectively avoid system congestion, and greatly improve the novelty and diversity, while retaining relatively high accuracy, in comparison with the state-of-the-art methods.

  12. Rapid jamming avoidance in biosonar.

    PubMed

    Gillam, Erin H; Ulanovsky, Nachum; McCracken, Gary F

    2007-03-07

    The sonar systems of bats and dolphins are in many ways superior to man-made sonar and radar systems, and considerable effort has been devoted to understanding the signal-processing strategies underlying these capabilities. A major feature determining the efficiency of sonar systems is the sensitivity to noise and jamming signals. Previous studies indicated that echolocating bats may adjust their signal structure to avoid jamming ('jamming avoidance response'; JAR). However, these studies relied on behavioural correlations and not controlled experiments. Here, we provide the first experimental evidence for JAR in bats. We presented bats (Tadarida brasiliensis) with 'playback stimuli' consisting of recorded echolocation calls at one of six frequencies. The bats exhibited a JAR by shifting their call frequency away from the presented playback frequency. When the approaching bats were challenged by an abrupt change in the playback stimulus, they responded by shifting their call frequencies upwards, away from the playback. Interestingly, even bats initially calling below the playback's frequency shifted their frequencies upwards, 'jumping' over the playback frequency. These spectral shifts in the bats' calls occurred often within less than 200 ms, in the first echolocation call emitted after the stimulus switch-suggesting that rapid jamming avoidance is important for the bat.

  13. Rapid jamming avoidance in biosonar

    PubMed Central

    Gillam, Erin H; Ulanovsky, Nachum; McCracken, Gary F

    2006-01-01

    The sonar systems of bats and dolphins are in many ways superior to man-made sonar and radar systems, and considerable effort has been devoted to understanding the signal-processing strategies underlying these capabilities. A major feature determining the efficiency of sonar systems is the sensitivity to noise and jamming signals. Previous studies indicated that echolocating bats may adjust their signal structure to avoid jamming (‘jamming avoidance response’; JAR). However, these studies relied on behavioural correlations and not controlled experiments. Here, we provide the first experimental evidence for JAR in bats. We presented bats (Tadarida brasiliensis) with ‘playback stimuli’ consisting of recorded echolocation calls at one of six frequencies. The bats exhibited a JAR by shifting their call frequency away from the presented playback frequency. When the approaching bats were challenged by an abrupt change in the playback stimulus, they responded by shifting their call frequencies upwards, away from the playback. Interestingly, even bats initially calling below the playback's frequency shifted their frequencies upwards, ‘jumping’ over the playback frequency. These spectral shifts in the bats' calls occurred often within less than 200 ms, in the first echolocation call emitted after the stimulus switch—suggesting that rapid jamming avoidance is important for the bat. PMID:17254989

  14. Admission avoidance hospital at home.

    PubMed

    Shepperd, Sasha; Iliffe, Steve; Doll, Helen A; Clarke, Mike J; Kalra, Lalit; Wilson, Andrew D; Gonçalves-Bradley, Daniela C

    2016-09-01

    Admission avoidance hospital at home provides active treatment by healthcare professionals in the patient's home for a condition that otherwise would require acute hospital inpatient care, and always for a limited time period. This is the third update of the original review. To determine the effectiveness and cost of managing patients with admission avoidance hospital at home compared with inpatient hospital care. We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), MEDLINE, EMBASE, two other databases, and two trials registers on 2 March 2016. We checked the reference lists of eligible articles. We sought unpublished studies by contacting providers and researchers who were known to be involved in the field. Randomised controlled trials recruiting participants aged 18 years and over. Studies comparing admission avoidance hospital at home with acute hospital inpatient care. We followed the standard methodological procedures expected by Cochrane and the Effective Practice and Organisation of Care (EPOC) Group. We performed meta-analysis for trials that compared similar interventions and reported comparable outcomes with sufficient data, requested individual patient data from trialists, and relied on published data when this was not available. We used the GRADE approach to assess the certainty of the body of evidence for the most important outcomes. We included 16 randomised controlled trials with a total of 1814 participants; three trials recruited participants with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, two trials recruited participants recovering from a stroke, six trials recruited participants with an acute medical condition who were mainly elderly, and the remaining trials recruited participants with a mix of conditions. We assessed the majority of the included studies as at low risk of selection, detection, and attrition bias, and unclear for selective reporting and performance bias. Admission avoidance hospital at home probably makes little

  15. Telomerase RNA stem terminus element affects template boundary element function, telomere sequence, and shelterin binding.

    PubMed

    Webb, Christopher J; Zakian, Virginia A

    2015-09-08

    The stem terminus element (STE), which was discovered 13 y ago in human telomerase RNA, is required for telomerase activity, yet its mode of action is unknown. We report that the Schizosaccharomyces pombe telomerase RNA, TER1 (telomerase RNA 1), also contains a STE, which is essential for telomere maintenance. Cells expressing a partial loss-of-function TER1 STE allele maintained short stable telomeres by a recombination-independent mechanism. Remarkably, the mutant telomere sequence was different from that of wild-type cells. Generation of the altered sequence is explained by reverse transcription into the template boundary element, demonstrating that the STE helps maintain template boundary element function. The altered telomeres bound less Pot1 (protection of telomeres 1) and Taz1 (telomere-associated in Schizosaccharomyces pombe 1) in vivo. Thus, the S. pombe STE, although distant from the template, ensures proper telomere sequence, which in turn promotes proper assembly of the shelterin complex.

  16. RNA genetics

    SciTech Connect

    Domingo, E. ); Holland, J.J. . Dept. of Biology); Ahlquist, P. . Dept. of Plant Pathology)

    1988-01-01

    This book contains the proceedings on RNA gentics: Variability of RNA genomes, Volume III. Topics covered include: High error rate, population equilibrium, and evolution of RNA replication systems; Influenza viruses; High rate of nutation and evolution; and Sequence space and quasi species distribution.

  17. RNA genetics

    SciTech Connect

    Domingo, E. ); Holland, J.J. . Dept. of Biology); Ahlquist, P. . Dept. of Plant Pathology)

    1988-01-01

    This book contains the proceedings on RNA genetics: RNA-directed virus replication Volume 1. Topics covered include: Replication of the poliovirus genome; Influenza viral RNA transcription and replication; and Relication of the reoviridal: Information derived from gene cloning and expression.

  18. Adaptive avoidance of reef noise.

    PubMed

    Simpson, Stephen D; Radford, Andrew N; Tickle, Edward J; Meekan, Mark G; Jeffs, Andrew G

    2011-02-04

    Auditory information is widely used throughout the animal kingdom in both terrestrial and aquatic environments. Some marine species are dependent on reefs for adult survival and reproduction, and are known to use reef noise to guide orientation towards suitable habitat. Many others that forage in food-rich inshore waters would, however, benefit from avoiding the high density of predators resident on reefs, but nothing is known about whether acoustic cues are used in this context. By analysing a sample of nearly 700,000 crustaceans, caught during experimental playbacks in light traps in the Great Barrier Reef lagoon, we demonstrate an auditory capability in a broad suite of previously neglected taxa, and provide the first evidence in any marine organisms that reef noise can act as a deterrent. In contrast to the larvae of species that require reef habitat for future success, which showed an attraction to broadcasted reef noise, taxa with a pelagic or nocturnally emergent lifestyle actively avoided it. Our results suggest that a far greater range of invertebrate taxa than previously thought can respond to acoustic cues, emphasising yet further the potential negative impact of globally increasing levels of underwater anthropogenic noise.

  19. Adaptive Avoidance of Reef Noise

    PubMed Central

    Simpson, Stephen D.; Radford, Andrew N.; Tickle, Edward J.; Meekan, Mark G.; Jeffs, Andrew G.

    2011-01-01

    Auditory information is widely used throughout the animal kingdom in both terrestrial and aquatic environments. Some marine species are dependent on reefs for adult survival and reproduction, and are known to use reef noise to guide orientation towards suitable habitat. Many others that forage in food-rich inshore waters would, however, benefit from avoiding the high density of predators resident on reefs, but nothing is known about whether acoustic cues are used in this context. By analysing a sample of nearly 700,000 crustaceans, caught during experimental playbacks in light traps in the Great Barrier Reef lagoon, we demonstrate an auditory capability in a broad suite of previously neglected taxa, and provide the first evidence in any marine organisms that reef noise can act as a deterrent. In contrast to the larvae of species that require reef habitat for future success, which showed an attraction to broadcasted reef noise, taxa with a pelagic or nocturnally emergent lifestyle actively avoided it. Our results suggest that a far greater range of invertebrate taxa than previously thought can respond to acoustic cues, emphasising yet further the potential negative impact of globally increasing levels of underwater anthropogenic noise. PMID:21326604

  20. Obstacle-avoiding navigation system

    DOEpatents

    Borenstein, Johann; Koren, Yoram; Levine, Simon P.

    1991-01-01

    A system for guiding an autonomous or semi-autonomous vehicle through a field of operation having obstacles thereon to be avoided employs a memory for containing data which defines an array of grid cells which correspond to respective subfields in the field of operation of the vehicle. Each grid cell in the memory contains a value which is indicative of the likelihood, or probability, that an obstacle is present in the respectively associated subfield. The values in the grid cells are incremented individually in response to each scan of the subfields, and precomputation and use of a look-up table avoids complex trigonometric functions. A further array of grid cells is fixed with respect to the vehicle form a conceptual active window which overlies the incremented grid cells. Thus, when the cells in the active window overly grid cell having values which are indicative of the presence of obstacles, the value therein is used as a multiplier of the precomputed vectorial values. The resulting plurality of vectorial values are summed vectorially in one embodiment of the invention to produce a virtual composite repulsive vector which is then summed vectorially with a target-directed vector for producing a resultant vector for guiding the vehicle. In an alternative embodiment, a plurality of vectors surrounding the vehicle are computed, each having a value corresponding to obstacle density. In such an embodiment, target location information is used to select between alternative directions of travel having low associated obstacle densities.

  1. Threshold-avoiding proteomics pipeline.

    PubMed

    Suits, Frank; Hoekman, Berend; Rosenling, Therese; Bischoff, Rainer; Horvatovich, Peter

    2011-10-15

    We present a new proteomics analysis pipeline focused on maximizing the dynamic range of detected molecules in liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) data and accurately quantifying low-abundance peaks to identify those with biological relevance. Although there has been much work to improve the quality of data derived from LC-MS instruments, the goal of this study was to extend the dynamic range of analyzed compounds by making full use of the information available within each data set and across multiple related chromatograms in an experiment. Our aim was to distinguish low-abundance signal peaks from noise by noting their coherent behavior across multiple data sets, and central to this is the need to delay the culling of noise peaks until the final peak-matching stage of the pipeline, when peaks from a single sample appear in the context of all others. The application of thresholds that might discard signal peaks early is thereby avoided, hence the name TAPP: threshold-avoiding proteomics pipeline. TAPP focuses on quantitative low-level processing of raw LC-MS data and includes novel preprocessing, peak detection, time alignment, and cluster-based matching. We demonstrate the performance of TAPP on biologically relevant sample data consisting of porcine cerebrospinal fluid spiked over a wide range of concentrations with horse heart cytochrome c.

  2. RNA epigenetics

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Nian; Pan, Tao

    2014-01-01

    Summary Mammalian messenger and long non-coding RNA contain tens of thousands of post-transcriptional chemical modifications. Among these, the N6-methyl-adenosine (m6A) modification is the most abundant and can be removed by specific mammalian enzymes. M6A modification is recognized by families of RNA binding proteins that affect many aspects of mRNA function. mRNA/lncRNA modification represents another layer of epigenetic regulation of gene expression, analogous to DNA methylation and histone modification. PMID:24768686

  3. Autonomous hazard detection and avoidance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pien, Homer

    1992-01-01

    During GFY 91, Draper Laboratory was awarded a task by NASA-JSC under contract number NAS9-18426 to study and evaluate the potential for achieving safe autonomous landings on Mars using an on-board autonomous hazard detection and avoidance (AHDA) system. This report describes the results of that study. The AHDA task had four objectives: to demonstrate, via a closed-loop simulation, the ability to autonomously select safe landing sites and the ability to maneuver to the selected site; to identify key issues in the development of AHDA systems; to produce strawman designs for AHDA sensors and algorithms; and to perform initial trade studies leading to better understanding of the effect of sensor/terrain/viewing parameters on AHDA algorithm performance. This report summarizes the progress made during the first year, with primary emphasis on describing the tools developed for simulating a closed-loop AHDA landing. Some cursory performance evaluation results are also presented.

  4. Bone tumor mimics: avoiding misdiagnosis.

    PubMed

    Gould, C Frank; Ly, Justin Q; Lattin, Grant E; Beall, Douglas P; Sutcliffe, Joseph B

    2007-01-01

    Whether discovered incidentally or as part of a focused diagnostic evaluation, the finding of a benign osseous lesion that has radiologic features resembling a bone tumor is not uncommon. Some of the more common benign and nonneoplastic entities that can sometimes be confused with tumors are the following: cortical desmoid, Brodie abscess, synovial herniation pit, pseudocyst, enostosis, intraosseous ganglion cyst, fibrous dysplasia, stress fracture, avulsion fracture (healing stage), bone infarct, myositis ossificans, brown tumor, and subchondral cyst. Accurate diagnosis and management of these lesions require a basic understanding of their epidemiology, clinical presentations, anatomic distributions, imaging features, differential considerations, and therapeutic options. This in-depth review of 13 potential bone tumor mimics will assist the radiologist in correctly identifying these benign lesions and in avoiding misdiagnosis and related morbidity. This review will also aid the radiologist in making appropriate recommendations to the referring physician for management or further imaging.

  5. The avoidable costs of population.

    PubMed

    Sadie, J L

    1987-07-01

    The social and economic consequences of current demographic trends in South Africa are analyzed using the concept of avoidable costs. The author presents projections of the population up to the year 2000 organized under four major categories: executive and managerial; professional; semi-skilled; and the unskilled, peasants, underemployed, and very poor. Comparisons are made with projections for the same four categories for Canada to show the problems faced by South Africa, in that relatively small growth in the first two classes is contrasted to massive growth in the other, and particularly the least privileged, classes. Consideration is given to the implications for the provision of schools and for the labor force. The author concludes that "if a problem is to be tackled at its roots it is to the control of human numbers that our attention is to be directed."

  6. Why People with Autism Avoid Eye Contact

    MedlinePlus

    ... 166988.html Why People With Autism Avoid Eye Contact Direct gaze stresses part of the brain tied ... Hospital's Center for Biomedical Imaging. While avoiding eye contact is often regarded as a sign of social ...

  7. ACAT Ground Collision Avoidance Flight Tests Over

    NASA Image and Video Library

    NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center has concluded flight tests of an Automatic Ground Collision Avoidance System (Auto GCAS) under the joint U.S. Air Force/NASA F-16D Automatic Collision Avoidance...

  8. See and Avoid/Cockpit Visibility

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-10-01

    potential for significant reduction of collision risk. See and Avoid prevents the majority of collisions which would occur without it, particularly at...the failure to see. Column 5 in table 1 gives estimates of the effectiveness of See and Avoid (See and Avoid Effectiveness) in preventing encounters...to see (in daytime). 2. See and Avoid prevents the majority of collisions which would occur without it, particularly at low closing speeds. 3. At high

  9. 49 CFR 260.49 - Avoiding defaults.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Avoiding defaults. 260.49 Section 260.49... Avoiding defaults. Borrowers are encouraged to contact the Administrator prior to the occurrence of an event of default to explore possible avenues for avoiding such an occurrence. ...

  10. Termites eavesdrop to avoid competitors

    PubMed Central

    Evans, Theodore A.; Inta, Ra; Lai, Joseph C. S.; Prueger, Stefan; Foo, Nyuk Wei; Fu, Eugene Wei'en; Lenz, Michael

    2009-01-01

    Competition exclusion, when a single species dominates resources due to superior competitiveness, is seldom observed in nature. Termites compete for resources with deadly consequences, yet more than one species can be found feeding in the same wooden resource. This is especially surprising when drywood species, with colonies of a few hundred, are found cohabiting with subterranean species, with colonies of millions. Termites communicate vibro-acoustically and, as these signals can travel over long distances, they are vulnerable to eavesdropping. We investigated whether drywood termites could eavesdrop on vibration cues from subterranean species. We show, using choice experiments and recordings, that the drywood termite Cryptotermes secundus can distinguish its own species from the dominant competitor in the environment, the subterranean termite Coptotermes acinaciformis. The drywood termite was attracted to its own vibration cues, but was repelled by those of the subterranean species. This response increased with decreasing wood size, corresponding with both increased risk and strength of the cue. The drywood termites appear to avoid confrontation by eavesdropping on the subterranean termites; these results provide further evidence that vibro-acoustic cues are important for termite sensory perception and communication. PMID:19710058

  11. Obstacle avoidance sonar for submarines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dugas, Albert C.; Webman, Kenneth M.

    2002-05-01

    The Advanced Mine Detection Sonar (AMDS) system was designed to operate in poor environments with high biological and/or shallow-water boundary conditions. It provides increased capability for active detection of volume, close-tethered, and bottom mines, as well as submarine and surface target active/passive detection for ASW and collision avoidance. It also provides bottom topography mapping capability for precise submarine navigation in uncharted littoral waters. It accomplishes this by using advanced processing techniques with extremely narrow beamwidths. The receive array consists of 36 modules arranged in a 15-ft-diameter semicircle at the bottom of the submarine sonar dome to form a chin-mounted array. Each module consists of 40 piezoelectric rubber elements. The modules provide the necessary signal conditioning to the element data prior to signal transmission (uplink) through the hull. The elements are amplified, filtered, converted to digital signals by an A/D converter, and multiplexed prior to uplink to the inboard receiver. Each module also has a downlink over which it receives synchronization and mode/gain control. Uplink and downlink transmission is done using fiberoptic telemetry. AMDS was installed on the USS Asheville. The high-frequency chin array for Virginia class submarines is based on the Asheville design.

  12. Allergen Avoidance in Allergic Asthma

    PubMed Central

    Cipriani, Francesca; Calamelli, Elisabetta; Ricci, Giampaolo

    2017-01-01

    Allergic asthma is the most frequent disease among the chronic respiratory disorders in pediatric age with an important social impact. In the last years, many efforts have been made to identify effective preventive approaches to get a better control of symptoms and to obtain the best future outcomes for the patients. In patients with allergic asthma triggered by the exposure to indoor allergens, the avoidance is the first intervention to prevent the appearance or the worsening of bronchial symptoms. This review article summarized the most recent evidence from literature about the efficacy of specific control interventions for the most important allergens. Even if a wide spectrum of interventions has been suggested and may help to reduce exposure to trigger allergy for sensitized patients suffering from respiratory allergy, evidence supporting the efficacy of these approaches is still weak and subject of controversy. However, the exposure control to specific airborne allergens is still widely recommended and may be effective as part of a holistic approach to reduce the severity of allergic respiratory symptoms in sensitized individuals. PMID:28540285

  13. Avoidance of aluminum by rainbow trout

    SciTech Connect

    Exley, C.

    2000-04-01

    Aluminum is the principal toxicant in fish in acid waters. The ability to avoid Al, particularly at low concentrations, would confer a considerable ecological advantage, but previous research into avoidance of Al has produced mixed results. The author used a cylindrical perspex tank, 150 cm in length, to study avoidance of Al by rainbow trout fry. The fish avoided Al, and their response was dependent on pH. Avoidance that was demonstrated at pHs of 5.00, 5.50, 5.50, and 5.75 was abolished at a pH of 6.00. Fry avoided very low Al concentrations being sensitive to [Al] > 1.00 {micro}mol L{sup {minus}1} at a pH of 5.00. This unequivocal demonstration of avoidance by rainbow trout fry of Al may have important implications for the ecology of indigenous fish populations in surface waters impacted by acidic deposition.

  14. RNA helicases

    PubMed Central

    Ranji, Arnaz

    2010-01-01

    RNA helicases serve multiple roles at the virus-host interface. In some situations, RNA helicases are essential host factors to promote viral replication; however, in other cases they serve as a cellular sensor to trigger the antiviral state in response to viral infection. All family members share the conserved ATP-dependent catalytic core linked to different substrate recognition and protein-protein interaction domains. These flanking domains can be shuffled between different helicases to achieve functional diversity. This review summarizes recent studies, This review summarizes recent studies of RNA helicases in virus biology. First, RNA helicases are catalysts of progressive RNA-protein rearrangements that begin at gene transcription and culminate in release of infectious virus. Second, RNA helicases can act as a scaffold for alternative protein-protein interactions that can defeat the antiviral state. The mounting fundamental understanding of RNA helicases is being used to develop selective and efficacious drugs against human and animal pathogens. The analysis of RNA helicases in virus model systems continues to provide insights into virology, cell biology and immunology and has provided fresh perspective to continue unraveling the complexity of virus-host interactions. PMID:21173576

  15. RNA. Introduction.

    PubMed

    Bao, Marie Z; Kruger, Robert P; Rivas, Fabiola; Smith, Orla; Szewczak, Lara

    2009-02-20

    Two scientists walk into a bar. After a pint and an exchange of pleasantries, one says to the other, "Where do you come from? Scientifically, I mean." The queried scientist responds, "Out of the RNA world." "Don't we all," the asker responds chuckling. Fifteen years ago, the joke would have been made with a nod to the notion that life arose from an RNA-based precursor, the so-called "RNA world." Yet had this conversation happened last week, the scientists would also be grinning in appreciation of the extent to which contemporary cellular biology is steeped in all things RNA. Ours is truly an RNA world.In this year's special review issue, the Cell editorial team has brought together articles focused on RNA in the modern world, providing perspectives on classical and emerging areas of inquiry. We extend our thanks to the many distinguished experts who contributed their time and effort as authors and reviewers to make the issue informative, thought-provoking, and timely. We hope that this collection of articles, written as we stand on the verge of a new wave of RNA biology, edifies and inspires by revealing the inner workings of these versatile molecules and by highlighting the next key questions that need to be addressed as we strive to understand the full functional scope of RNA in cells.

  16. Detection And Avoidance Of Obstacles By Helicopters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheng, Victor H. L.; Sridhar, Banavar

    1992-01-01

    Report discusses problems relevant to control subsystems enabling helicopters on nap-of-the-Earth flight paths to detect and avoid obstacles automatically. Indicates similarities between this and obstacle-avoidance problem of industrial mobile robots. Two approaches extend two-dimensional obstacle-avoidance concept to three dimensions. First involves direct search of three-dimensional range-map data for indications of openings between obstacles. Second involves compression of data into two-dimensional map for path search.

  17. Generalization of socially transmitted and instructed avoidance

    PubMed Central

    Cameron, Gemma; Schlund, Michael W.; Dymond, Simon

    2015-01-01

    Excessive avoidance behavior, in which an instrumental action prevents an upcoming aversive event, is a defining feature of anxiety disorders. Left unchecked, both fear and avoidance of potentially threatening stimuli may generalize to perceptually related stimuli and situations. The behavioral consequences of generalization mean that aversive learning experiences with specific threats may lead to the inference that classes of related stimuli are threatening, potentially dangerous, and need to be avoided, despite differences in physical form. Little is known however about avoidance generalization in humans and the learning pathways by which it may be transmitted. In the present study, we compared two pathways to avoidance—instructions and social observation—on subsequent generalization of avoidance behavior, fear expectancy and physiological arousal. Participants first learned that one cue was a danger cue (conditioned stimulus, CS+) and another was a safety cue (CS−). Groups were then either instructed that a simple avoidance response in the presence of the CS+ cancelled upcoming shock (instructed-learning group) or observed a short movie showing a demonstrator performing the avoidance response to prevent shock (observational-learning group). During generalization testing, danger and safety cues were presented along with generalization stimuli that parametrically varied in perceptual similarity to the CS+. Reinstatement of fear and avoidance was also tested. Findings demonstrate, for the first time, generalization of socially transmitted and instructed avoidance: both groups showed comparable generalization gradients in fear expectancy, avoidance behavior and arousal. Return of fear was evident, suggesting that generalized avoidance remains persistent following extinction testing. The utility of the present paradigm for research on avoidance generalization is discussed. PMID:26150773

  18. Integration of Weather Avoidance and Traffic Separation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Consiglio, Maria C.; Chamberlain, James P.; Wilson, Sara R.

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes a dynamic convective weather avoidance concept that compensates for weather motion uncertainties; the integration of this weather avoidance concept into a prototype 4-D trajectory-based Airborne Separation Assurance System (ASAS) application; and test results from a batch (non-piloted) simulation of the integrated application with high traffic densities and a dynamic convective weather model. The weather model can simulate a number of pseudo-random hazardous weather patterns, such as slow- or fast-moving cells and opening or closing weather gaps, and also allows for modeling of onboard weather radar limitations in range and azimuth. The weather avoidance concept employs nested "core" and "avoid" polygons around convective weather cells, and the simulations assess the effectiveness of various avoid polygon sizes in the presence of different weather patterns, using traffic scenarios representing approximately two times the current traffic density in en-route airspace. Results from the simulation experiment show that the weather avoidance concept is effective over a wide range of weather patterns and cell speeds. Avoid polygons that are only 2-3 miles larger than their core polygons are sufficient to account for weather uncertainties in almost all cases, and traffic separation performance does not appear to degrade with the addition of weather polygon avoidance. Additional "lessons learned" from the batch simulation study are discussed in the paper, along with insights for improving the weather avoidance concept. Introduction

  19. Flight Tests Validate Collision-Avoidance System

    NASA Image and Video Library

    Flights tests of a smartphone-assisted automatic ground collision avoidance system at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center consistently commanded evasive maneuvers when it sensed that the unmanned ...

  20. RNA Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    It is generally believed that an RNA World existed at an early stage in the history of life. During this early period, RNA molecules are seen to be potentially involved in both catalysis and the storage of genetic information. It is widely believed that this RNA World was extensive and therefore a sophisticated nucleic acid replication machinery would presumably predate the translation machinery which would not be needed until later stages in the development of life. This view of an extended RNA World is not necessarily correct. From the point of view of exobiology, the difference in these two views mainly affects the significance of studies of the extent of catalysis possible by RNA- In either case, the origin of the translation machinery and the principles of RNA evolution remain central problems in exobiology. Translation presents several interrelated themes of inquiry for exobiology. First, it is essential, for understanding the very origin of life, how peptides and eventually proteins might have come to be made on the early Earth in a template directed manner. Second, it is necessary to understand how a machinery of similar complexity to that found in the ribosomes of modem organisms came to exist by the time of the last common ancestor (as detected by 16S RRNA sequence studies). Third, the RNAs that comprise the ribosome are themselves likely of very early origin and studies of their history may be very informative about the nature of the RNA World. Moreover, studies of these RNAs will contribute to a better understanding of the potential roles of RNA in early evolution.

  1. Human Hippocampus Arbitrates Approach-Avoidance Conflict

    PubMed Central

    Bach, Dominik R.; Guitart-Masip, Marc; Packard, Pau A.; Miró, Júlia; Falip, Mercè; Fuentemilla, Lluís; Dolan, Raymond J.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Animal models of human anxiety often invoke a conflict between approach and avoidance [1, 2]. In these, a key behavioral assay comprises passive avoidance of potential threat and inhibition, both thought to be controlled by ventral hippocampus [2–6]. Efforts to translate these approaches to clinical contexts [7, 8] are hampered by the fact that it is not known whether humans manifest analogous approach-avoidance dispositions and, if so, whether they share a homologous neurobiological substrate [9]. Here, we developed a paradigm to investigate the role of human hippocampus in arbitrating an approach-avoidance conflict under varying levels of potential threat. Across four experiments, subjects showed analogous behavior by adapting both passive avoidance behavior and behavioral inhibition to threat level. Using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), we observe that threat level engages the anterior hippocampus, the human homolog of rodent ventral hippocampus [10]. Testing patients with selective hippocampal lesions, we demonstrate a causal role for the hippocampus with patients showing reduced passive avoidance behavior and inhibition across all threat levels. Our data provide the first human assay for approach-avoidance conflict akin to that of animal anxiety models. The findings bridge rodent and human research on passive avoidance and behavioral inhibition and furnish a framework for addressing the neuronal underpinnings of human anxiety disorders, where our data indicate a major role for the hippocampus. PMID:24560572

  2. Human hippocampus arbitrates approach-avoidance conflict.

    PubMed

    Bach, Dominik R; Guitart-Masip, Marc; Packard, Pau A; Miró, Júlia; Falip, Mercè; Fuentemilla, Lluís; Dolan, Raymond J

    2014-03-03

    Animal models of human anxiety often invoke a conflict between approach and avoidance. In these, a key behavioral assay comprises passive avoidance of potential threat and inhibition, both thought to be controlled by ventral hippocampus. Efforts to translate these approaches to clinical contexts are hampered by the fact that it is not known whether humans manifest analogous approach-avoidance dispositions and, if so, whether they share a homologous neurobiological substrate. Here, we developed a paradigm to investigate the role of human hippocampus in arbitrating an approach-avoidance conflict under varying levels of potential threat. Across four experiments, subjects showed analogous behavior by adapting both passive avoidance behavior and behavioral inhibition to threat level. Using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), we observe that threat level engages the anterior hippocampus, the human homolog of rodent ventral hippocampus. Testing patients with selective hippocampal lesions, we demonstrate a causal role for the hippocampus with patients showing reduced passive avoidance behavior and inhibition across all threat levels. Our data provide the first human assay for approach-avoidance conflict akin to that of animal anxiety models. The findings bridge rodent and human research on passive avoidance and behavioral inhibition and furnish a framework for addressing the neuronal underpinnings of human anxiety disorders, where our data indicate a major role for the hippocampus. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. 47 CFR 74.604 - Interference avoidance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Interference avoidance. 74.604 Section 74.604 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) BROADCAST RADIO SERVICES EXPERIMENTAL RADIO... Stations § 74.604 Interference avoidance. (a) (b) Where two or more licensees are assigned a common...

  4. Information Seeking and Avoiding in Health Contexts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brashers, Dale E.; Goldsmith, Daena J.; Hsieh, Elaine

    2002-01-01

    Suggests a research agenda that would provide a basis for proposing normative recommendations for information management in health contexts. Overviews information seeking and avoiding processes. Describes challenges and dilemmas faced by those who seek, avoid, and provide information. Offers research questions derived from a normative agenda for…

  5. How Do Speakers Avoid Ambiguous Linguistic Expressions?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferreira, V.S.; Slevc, L.R.; Rogers, E.S.

    2005-01-01

    Three experiments assessed how speakers avoid linguistically and nonlinguistically ambiguous expressions. Speakers described target objects (a flying mammal, bat) in contexts including foil objects that caused linguistic (a baseball bat) and nonlinguistic (a larger flying mammal) ambiguity. Speakers sometimes avoided linguistic-ambiguity, and they…

  6. Recommendations for Sense and Avoid Policy Compliance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    Since unmanned aircraft do not have a human on board, they need to have a sense and avoid capability that provides an "equivalent level of safety" (ELOS) to manned aircraft. The question then becomes - is sense and avoid ELOS for unmanned aircraft adequate to satisfy the requirements of 14 CFR 91.113? Access 5 has proposed a definition of sense and avoid, but the question remains as to whether any sense and avoid system can comply with 14 CFR 91.113 as currently written. The Access 5 definition of sense and avoid ELOS allows for the development of a sense and avoid system for unmanned aircraft that would comply with 14 CFR 91.113. Compliance is based on sensing and avoiding other traffic at an equivalent level of safety for collision avoidance, as manned aircraft. No changes to Part 91 are necessary, with the possible exception of changing "see" to "sense," or obtaining an interpretation from the FAA General Counsel that "sense" is equivalent to "see."

  7. How Do Speakers Avoid Ambiguous Linguistic Expressions?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferreira, V.S.; Slevc, L.R.; Rogers, E.S.

    2005-01-01

    Three experiments assessed how speakers avoid linguistically and nonlinguistically ambiguous expressions. Speakers described target objects (a flying mammal, bat) in contexts including foil objects that caused linguistic (a baseball bat) and nonlinguistic (a larger flying mammal) ambiguity. Speakers sometimes avoided linguistic-ambiguity, and they…

  8. Population properties affect inbreeding avoidance in moose.

    PubMed

    Herfindal, Ivar; Haanes, Hallvard; Røed, Knut H; Solberg, Erling J; Markussen, Stine S; Heim, Morten; Sæther, Bernt-Erik

    2014-12-01

    Mechanisms reducing inbreeding are thought to have evolved owing to fitness costs of breeding with close relatives. In small and isolated populations, or populations with skewed age- or sex distributions, mate choice becomes limited, and inbreeding avoidance mechanisms ineffective. We used a unique individual-based dataset on moose from a small island in Norway to assess whether inbreeding avoidance was related to population structure and size, expecting inbreeding avoidance to be greater in years with larger populations and even adult sex ratios. The probability that a potential mating event was realized was negatively related to the inbreeding coefficient of the potential offspring, with a stronger relationship in years with a higher proportion or number of males in the population. Thus, adult sex ratio and population size affect the degree of inbreeding avoidance. Consequently, conservation managers should aim for sex ratios that facilitate inbreeding avoidance, especially in small and isolated populations.

  9. Living with food allergy: allergen avoidance.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jennifer S; Sicherer, Scott H

    2011-04-01

    The primary treatment of food allergy is to avoid the culprit foods. This is a complex undertaking that requires education about reading the labels of manufactured products, understanding how to avoid cross-contact with allergens during food preparation, and communicating effectively with persons who are providing allergen-safe meals including relatives and restaurant personnel. Successful avoidance also requires a knowledge of nuances such as appropriate cleaning practices, an understanding of the risks of ingestion compared to skin contact or inhalation, that exposure could occur through unanticipated means such as through sharing utensils or passionate kissing, and that food may be a component of substances that are not ingested such as cosmetics, bath products, vaccines and medications. The authors review the necessary tools of avoidance that physicians and medical practitioners can use to guide their patients through the complexities of food avoidance.

  10. Higher threat avoidance costs reduce avoidance behaviour which in turn promotes fear extinction in humans.

    PubMed

    Rattel, Julina A; Miedl, Stephan F; Blechert, Jens; Wilhelm, Frank H

    2016-12-15

    Theoretical models specifying the underlying mechanisms of the development and maintenance of anxiety and related disorders state that fear responses acquired through classical Pavlovian conditioning are maintained by repeated avoidance behaviour; thus, it is assumed that avoidance prevents fear extinction. The present study investigated behavioural avoidance decisions as a function of avoidance costs in a naturalistic fear conditioning paradigm. Ecologically valid avoidance costs - manipulated between participant groups - were represented via time-delays during a detour in a gamified computer task. After differential acquisitions of shock-expectancy to a predictive conditioned stimulus (CS+), participants underwent extinction where they could either take a risky shortcut, while anticipating shock signaled by the CS+, or choose a costly avoidance option (lengthy detour); thus, they were faced with an approach-avoidance conflict. Groups with higher avoidance costs (longer detours) showed lower proportions of avoiders. Avoiders gave heightened shock-expectancy ratings post-extinction, demonstrating 'protecting from extinction', i.e. failure to extinguish. Moreover, there was an indirect effect of avoidance costs on protection from extinction through avoidance behaviour. No moderating role of trait-anxiety was found. Theoretical implications of avoidance behaviour are discussed, considering the involvement of instrumental learning in the maintenance of fear responses.

  11. Disease-avoidant behaviour and its consequences.

    PubMed

    Kouznetsova, Daria; Stevenson, Richard J; Oaten, Megan J; Case, Trevor I

    2012-01-01

    Medical conditions that are non-contagious, but that appear contagious, seem to result in the sufferer being avoided. Error management theory (EMT), suggests that such false alarms occur because the cost of infection poses a greater threat to ones fitness than avoidance. Study 1 attempted to demonstrate a disease-related false alarm effect by asking participants, to evaluate a series of vignettes, featuring people with infectious diseases, non-infectious diseases that looked infectious and non-infectious diseases that did not. Judgements of contracting infection under varying levels of contact, and desire to avoid were obtained. Consistent with EMT, a false alarm effect was evident. Study 2 examined the importance of the face as a key indicator of real and apparent infection, by determining whether facial symptoms result in a greater desire to avoid people with infectious and non-infectious diseases. Consistent with expectation, participants reported a greater desire to avoid people with facially displayed symptoms. Together, these results support the idea that humans have evolved a general tendency to avoid individuals with disease signs, especially if displayed upon the face. One consequence is that where a facially displayed disease sign persists, even if known to be benign, its bearer will experience chronic avoidance.

  12. Moving Obstacle Avoidance for Unmanned Aerial Vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Yucong

    There has been a vast increase in applications of Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs) in civilian domains. To operate in the civilian airspace, a UAV must be able to sense and avoid both static and moving obstacles for flight safety. While indoor and low-altitude environments are mainly occupied by static obstacles, risks in space of higher altitude primarily come from moving obstacles such as other aircraft or flying vehicles in the airspace. Therefore, the ability to avoid moving obstacles becomes a necessity for Unmanned Aerial Vehicles. Towards enabling a UAV to autonomously sense and avoid moving obstacles, this thesis makes the following contributions. Initially, an image-based reactive motion planner is developed for a quadrotor to avoid a fast approaching obstacle. Furthermore, A Dubin's curve based geometry method is developed as a global path planner for a fixed-wing UAV to avoid collisions with aircraft. The image-based method is unable to produce an optimal path and the geometry method uses a simplified UAV model. To compensate these two disadvantages, a series of algorithms built upon the Closed-Loop Rapid Exploratory Random Tree are developed as global path planners to generate collision avoidance paths in real time. The algorithms are validated in Software-In-the-Loop (SITL) and Hardware-In-the-Loop (HIL) simulations using a fixed-wing UAV model and in real flight experiments using quadrotors. It is observed that the algorithm enables a UAV to avoid moving obstacles approaching to it with different directions and speeds.

  13. When Is Topic Avoidance Unsatisfying? Examining Moderators of the Association between Avoidance and Dissatisfaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Caughlin, John P.; Afifi, Tamara D.

    2004-01-01

    Despite theoretical arguments that avoiding certain topics can be functional, there is consistent evidence that avoiding topics tends to be associated with dissatisfying relationships. This disparity between theory and empirical findings suggests a need to understand better the connection between topic avoidance and relational dissatisfaction. The…

  14. Automatic attitudes and health information avoidance.

    PubMed

    Howell, Jennifer L; Ratliff, Kate A; Shepperd, James A

    2016-08-01

    Early detection of disease is often crucially important for positive health outcomes, yet people sometimes decline opportunities for early detection (e.g., opting not to screen). Although some health-information avoidance reflects a deliberative decision, we propose that information avoidance can also reflect an automatic, nondeliberative reaction. In the present research, we investigated whether people's automatic attitude toward learning health information predicted their avoidance of risk feedback. In 3 studies, we gave adults the opportunity to learn their risk for a fictitious disease (Study 1), melanoma skin cancer (Study 2), or heart disease (Study 3), and examined whether they opted to learn their risk. The primary predictors were participants' attitudes about learning health information measured using a traditional (controlled) self-report instrument and using speeded (automatic) self-report measure. In addition, we prompted participants in Study 3 to contemplate their motives for seeking or avoiding information prior to making their decision. Across the 3 studies, self-reported (controlled) and implicitly measured (automatic) attitudes about learning health information independently predicted avoidance of the risk feedback, suggesting that automatic attitudes explain unique variance in the decision to avoid health information. In Study 3, prompting participants to contemplate their reasons for seeking versus avoiding health information reduced information avoidance. Surprisingly, it did so by inducing reliance on automatic, rather than controlled, attitudes. The data suggests that automatic processes play an important role in predicting health information avoidance and suggest that interventionists aiming to increase information seeking might fruitfully target automatic processes. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  15. 6 Tips to Avoid Medication Mistakes

    MedlinePlus

    ... For Consumers Consumer Updates 6 Tips to Avoid Medication Mistakes Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing ... dietary supplements you use. back to top Computerized Medication Box FDA has cleared for marketing the Electronic ...

  16. Physicians’ Religious Topic Avoidance during Clinical Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Villagran, Melinda M.; MacArthur, Brenda L.; Lee, Lauren E.; Ledford, Christy J. W.; Canzona, Mollie R.

    2017-01-01

    Religious and spiritual (R/S) conversations at the end-of-life function to help patients and their families find comfort in difficult circumstances. Physicians who feel uncertain about how to discuss topics related to religious beliefs may seek to avoid R/S conversations with their patients. This study utilized a two-group objective structured clinical examination with a standardized patient to explore differences in physicians’ use of R/S topic avoidance tactics during a clinical interaction. Results indicated that physicians used more topic avoidance tactics in response to patients’ R/S inquiries than patients’ R/S disclosures; however, the use of topic avoidance tactics did not eliminate the need to engage in patient-initiated R/S interactions. PMID:28481290

  17. The challenges for scientists in avoiding plagiarism.

    PubMed

    Fisher, E R; Partin, K M

    2014-01-01

    Although it might seem to be a simple task for scientists to avoid plagiarism and thereby an allegation of research misconduct, assessment of trainees in the Responsible Conduct of Research and recent findings from the National Science Foundation Office of Inspector General regarding plagiarism suggests otherwise. Our experiences at a land-grant academic institution in assisting researchers in avoiding plagiarism are described. We provide evidence from a university-wide multi-disciplinary course that understanding how to avoid plagiarism in scientific writing is more difficult than it might appear, and that a failure to learn the rules of appropriate citation may cause dire consequences. We suggest that new strategies to provide training in avoiding plagiarism are required.

  18. Active Collision Avoidance for Planetary Landers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rickman, Doug; Hannan, Mike; Srinivasan, Karthik

    2014-01-01

    Present day robotic missions to other planets require precise, a priori knowledge of the terrain to pre-determine a landing spot that is safe. Landing sites can be miles from the mission objective, or, mission objectives may be tailored to suit landing sites. Future robotic exploration missions should be capable of autonomously identifying a safe landing target within a specified target area selected by mission requirements. Such autonomous landing sites must (1) 'see' the surface, (2) identify a target, and (3) land the vehicle. Recent advances in radar technology have resulted in small, lightweight, low power radars that are used for collision avoidance and cruise control systems in automobiles. Such radar systems can be adapted for use as active hazard avoidance systems for planetary landers. The focus of this CIF proposal is to leverage earlier work on collision avoidance systems for MSFC's Mighty Eagle lander and evaluate the use of automotive radar systems for collision avoidance in planetary landers.

  19. Avoid the Consequences of High Blood Pressure

    MedlinePlus

    ... Aneurysm More Avoid the Consequences of High Blood Pressure Infographic Updated:Oct 31,2016 View a downloadable version of this infographic High Blood Pressure • Home • Get the Facts About HBP • Know Your ...

  20. The vigilance-avoidance model of avoidant recognition: An ERP study under threat priming.

    PubMed

    Zhai, Jing; Chen, Xu; Ma, Jianling; Yang, Qingqing; Liu, Ying

    2016-12-30

    Our study examined attachment-related electrophysiological differences in recognition using event-related potentials (ERPs) measured during a study-test paradigm after threat priming. We identified ERP correlates of recognition by comparing the ERPs of attachment-related positive and negative images between avoidant and secure attachment orientations. Our results revealed that the distribution of early old/new effects was broader in avoidant individuals than in secure individuals, and an early parietal old/new effect was observed in avoidant individuals, which reflected their implicit memory. The late old/new effect was found only in secure individuals when evoked by negative pictures, and was not observed in avoidant individuals. The results suggest that avoidant individuals adopt the "vigilance-avoidance" dual-process model to recognize both positive and negative attachment-related stimuli and carry out preferential familiarity matching at the automatic level and avoidant retrieval at the controlled-processing level.

  1. Singularity avoidance and time in quantum gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Kreienbuehl, Andreas

    2009-06-15

    We consider the quantization of a Friedmann-Robertson-Walker universe. We derive a reduced square root Hamiltonian by choosing the scale factor as time variable and quantize the theory using Pauli matrices a la Dirac. From the resulting spinor equation we show that there is no semiclassical wave packet that avoids the big bang singularity. Our work raises the question concerning the relationship between the choice of time and singularity avoidance.

  2. Pathological demand avoidance: exploring the behavioural profile.

    PubMed

    O'Nions, Elizabeth; Viding, Essi; Greven, Corina U; Ronald, Angelica; Happé, Francesca

    2014-07-01

    'Pathological Demand Avoidance' is a term increasingly used by practitioners in the United Kingdom. It was coined to describe a profile of obsessive resistance to everyday demands and requests, with a tendency to resort to 'socially manipulative' behaviour, including outrageous or embarrassing acts. Pathological demand avoidance is thought to share aspects of social impairment with autism spectrum disorders, but autism spectrum disorder-appropriate strategies, such as routine and repetition, are described as unhelpful. Outrageous acts and lack of concern for their effects draw parallels with conduct problems and callous-unemotional traits. However, reward-based techniques, effective with conduct problems and callous-unemotional traits, seem not to work in pathological demand avoidance. Despite increasing interest and controversy over the pathological demand avoidance label, there is only one published study to date. We present the first systematic comparison of the behavioural profile of children receiving the term pathological demand avoidance (N = 25) to children with autism spectrum disorders (N = 39) or conduct problems and callous-unemotional traits (N = 28), using parent-report indices of psychopathology. The pathological demand avoidance group displayed comparable levels of autistic traits and peer problems to the autism spectrum disorders group and anti-social traits approaching those seen in the conduct problems and callous-unemotional traits group. Emotional symptoms in pathological demand avoidance exceeded both comparison groups. Findings highlight the extreme behavioural impairment associated with pathological demand avoidance and the need to explore whether behavioural overlap reflects a similar neurocognitive basis to existing groups. © The Author(s) 2013.

  3. Do approach-avoidance actions create attitudes?

    PubMed

    Centerbar, David B; Clore, Gerald L

    2006-01-01

    Do approach-avoidance actions create attitudes? Prior influential studies suggested that rudimentary attitudes could be established by simply pairing novel stimuli (Chinese ideographs) with arm flexion (approach) or arm extension (avoidance). In three experiments, we found that approach-avoidance actions alone were insufficient to account for such effects. Instead, we found that these affective influences resulted from the interaction of these actions with a priori differences in stimulus valence. Thus, with negative stimuli, the effect of extension on attitude was more positive than the effect of flexion. Experiment 2 demonstrated that the affect from motivationally compatible or incompatible action can also influence task evaluations. A final experiment, using Chinese ideographs from the original studies, confirmed these findings. Both approach and avoidance actions led to more positive evaluations of the ideographs when the actions were motivationally compatible with the prior valence of the ideographs. The attitudinal impact of approach-avoidance action thus reflects its situated meaning, which depends on the valence of stimuli being approached or avoided.

  4. Engineering Structurally Interacting RNA (sxRNA)

    PubMed Central

    Doyle, Francis; Lapsia, Sameer; Spadaro, Salvatore; Wurz, Zachary E.; Bhaduri-McIntosh, Sumita; Tenenbaum, Scott A.

    2017-01-01

    RNA-based three-way junctions (3WJs) are naturally occurring structures found in many functional RNA molecules including rRNA, tRNA, snRNA and ribozymes. 3WJs are typically characterized as resulting from an RNA molecule folding back on itself in cis but could also form in trans when one RNA, for instance a microRNA binds to a second structured RNA, such as a mRNA. Trans-3WJs can influence the final shape of one or both of the RNA molecules and can thus provide a means for modulating the availability of regulatory motifs including potential protein or microRNA binding sites. Regulatory 3WJs generated in trans represent a newly identified regulatory category that we call structurally interacting RNA or sxRNA for convenience. Here we show that they can be rationally designed using familiar cis-3WJ examples as a guide. We demonstrate that an sxRNA “bait” sequence can be designed to interact with a specific microRNA “trigger” sequence, creating a regulatable RNA-binding protein motif that retains its functional activity. Further, we show that when placed downstream of a coding sequence, sxRNA can be used to switch “ON” translation of that sequence in the presence of the trigger microRNA and the amount of translation corresponded with the amount of microRNA present. PMID:28350000

  5. Engineering Structurally Interacting RNA (sxRNA).

    PubMed

    Doyle, Francis; Lapsia, Sameer; Spadaro, Salvatore; Wurz, Zachary E; Bhaduri-McIntosh, Sumita; Tenenbaum, Scott A

    2017-03-28

    RNA-based three-way junctions (3WJs) are naturally occurring structures found in many functional RNA molecules including rRNA, tRNA, snRNA and ribozymes. 3WJs are typically characterized as resulting from an RNA molecule folding back on itself in cis but could also form in trans when one RNA, for instance a microRNA binds to a second structured RNA, such as a mRNA. Trans-3WJs can influence the final shape of one or both of the RNA molecules and can thus provide a means for modulating the availability of regulatory motifs including potential protein or microRNA binding sites. Regulatory 3WJs generated in trans represent a newly identified regulatory category that we call structurally interacting RNA or sxRNA for convenience. Here we show that they can be rationally designed using familiar cis-3WJ examples as a guide. We demonstrate that an sxRNA "bait" sequence can be designed to interact with a specific microRNA "trigger" sequence, creating a regulatable RNA-binding protein motif that retains its functional activity. Further, we show that when placed downstream of a coding sequence, sxRNA can be used to switch "ON" translation of that sequence in the presence of the trigger microRNA and the amount of translation corresponded with the amount of microRNA present.

  6. Beyond negligence: avoidability and medical injury compensation.

    PubMed

    Kachalia, Allen B; Mello, Michelle M; Brennan, Troyen A; Studdert, David M

    2008-01-01

    Disenchantment with the tort system and negligence standard in the United States is fueling interest in alternate compensation systems for medical injury. One possibility is experimentation with administrative "health courts," through which specialized adjudicators would utilize neutral experts to render compensability determinations. Compensation would be based not on negligence, but rather on a broader avoidable medical injury (avoidability) standard. Although considerable interest in health courts exists, stakeholders frequently express uncertainty about the meaning and operation of an avoidability standard. Three nations-Sweden, Denmark, and New Zealand-have long operated administrative schemes. We conducted interviews with administrators and stakeholders in these systems. Our goal was to garner lessons on how to operate a health court, and specifically, how to develop and apply alternate compensation criteria such as avoidability. This article reports our findings on the origins and operations of the systems, the evolution of their compensation criteria, and how these criteria are actually applied. We found that all three systems had their primary genesis in ensuring compensation for the injured, as opposed to sanctioning providers. All have abandoned the negligence standard. The Nordic systems use an avoidability standard, principally defined as injury that would not occur in the hands of the best practitioner. Their experience demonstrates that this definition is feasible to apply. New Zealand's recent move to a no-fault system sheds light on the benefits and drawbacks of a variety of compensation standards. Key lessons for successfully applying an alternate standard, such as avoidability, include a strict adherence to national precedent, the use of neutral and experienced experts, and a block on routine transfer of information from compensation investigations to disciplinary authorities. Importantly, all three nations are harnessing their systems' power to

  7. Key conclusions from AVOID Work Stream One

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warren, Rachel

    2010-05-01

    AVOID work stream (WS1)one has produced emission scenarios that simulate potential future global emission pathways for greenhouse gases during the 21st century. The study explored the influence of three key features of such pathways: (1) the year in which emissions peak globally, (2) the rate of emission reduction, and (3) the minimum level to which emissions are eventually reduced. It examined the resultant climate change, climate change impacts and economic implications using computer simulations. Avoided impacts, carbon taxes and GDP change increase throughout the 21st century in the models. AVOID-WS1 showed that in the absence of climate policy it is very likely that global mean temperatures would exceed 3 degrees and there are evens chances that the temperature would rise by 4 degrees relative to pre-industrial times. Scenarios that peak emissions in 2016 were more effective at constraining temperatures to below 3 degrees than those that peaked in 2030: one ‘2016' scenario achieved a probability of 45% of avoiding breaching of a 2 degree threshold. Scenarios peaking in 2030 were inconsistent with constraining temperatures to below 2 degrees. Correspondingly, scenarios that peak in 2030 are more effective at avoiding climate impacts than scenarios that peak in 2016, for all sectors that we studied. Hence the date at which emissions peak is more important than the rate of subsequent emissions reduction in determining the avoided impacts. Avoided impacts increase with time, being negligible in the 2030s, significant by the 2050s and large by the 2080s. Finally, the choice of GCM influences the magnitude of the avoided impacts strongly, so that the uncertainties in our estimates of avoided impacts for each scenario are larger than the difference between the scenarios. Our economic analysis is based on models which differ greatly in the assumptions that they make, but generally show that the date at which emissions peak is a stronger driver of induced GDP changes

  8. Rape avoidance behavior among Slovak women.

    PubMed

    Prokop, Pavol

    2013-05-28

    Rape has been a recurrent adaptive problem for many species, including humans. Rape is costly to women in terms of disease transmission, partner abandonment, and unwanted pregnancy (among other costs). Therefore, behavioral strategies which allow women to avoid coercive men may have been favored by selection. In line with this evolutionary reasoning, the current research documented that physically stronger women and those in a committed romantic relationship reported more rape avoidance behavior. In addition, virgin women tended to perform more rape avoidance behavior compared with their non-virgin counterparts. Women with high conception risk perceived themselves as physically stronger, which may protect them against a potential rapist. Fear of unwanted pregnancy from rape decreased as age increased, reflecting higher fertility among younger participants. However, older women reported more rape avoidance behavior, which contradicts evolutionary predictions. The results provide some support for evolutionary hypotheses of rape avoidance behavior which suggest that woman's perception of rape is influenced by parental investment and perceived physical condition.

  9. Obstacle-avoiding router for custom VLSI

    SciTech Connect

    Hamachi, G.T.

    1986-01-01

    Magic's automatic routing system combines the flexibility of hand routing with the speed and quality of automatic channel routers by allowing chip designers to prewire selected nets by hand. The router then works around this previously-placed layout, called obstacles, to automatically wire the remaining nets. This ability to partially hand route an integrated circuit gives designers complete control over critical paths, power and ground routing, and other special nets. At the same time, the router provides a fast way to make the remaining connections in the design. The system's novel features include a fast channel decomposer, an obstacle-avoiding global router, and an obstacle avoiding switchbox router. The router's channel decomposition algorithm relies on a corner stitched data structure to efficiently produce a small number of large channels. The global router considers obstacles during path generation, trading off net length and channel complexity to simplify the subsequent channel routing task. While able to cope with obstacles, Magic's switchbox router is still comparable to the best traditional (non-obstacle-avoiding) channel routers. The router's obstacle-avoidance features rely on two underlying concepts: (1) a preferred direction for crossing an obstacle, and (2) hazards or areas the routing should avoid.

  10. Avoidance of Phycomyces in a controlled environment.

    PubMed Central

    Meyer, P W; Matus, I J; Berg, H C

    1987-01-01

    The sporangiophore of the fungus Phycomyces bends away from nearby objects without ever touching them. It has been thought that these objects act as aerodynamic obstacles that damp random winds, thereby generating asymmetric distributions of a growth-promoting gas emitted by the growth zone. In the interest of testing this hypothesis, we studied avoidance in an environmental chamber in which convection was suppressed by a shallow thermal gradient. We also controlled pressure, temperature, and relative humidity of the air, electrostatic charge, and ambient light. A protocol was established that yielded avoidance rates constant from sporangiophore to sporangiophore to within +/- 10%. We found that avoidance occurred at normal rates in the complete absence of random winds. The rates were smaller at 100% than at lower values of relative humidity, but not by much. Remarkably, at a distance as great as 0.5 mm, avoidance from a 30-micron diam glass fiber (aligned parallel to the sporangiophore) was about the same as that from a planar glass sheet. However, the rate for the fiber fell more rapidly with distance. The rate for the sheet remained nearly constant out to approximately 4 mm. We conclude that avoidance depends either on adsorption by the barrier of a growth-inhibiting substance or emission by the barrier of a growth-promoting substance; it cannot occur by passive reflection. Models that can explain these effects are analyzed in the Appendix. PMID:3567313

  11. Harm avoidance and disability in old age.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Robert S; Buchman, Aron S; Arnold, Steven E; Shah, Raj C; Tang, Yuxiao; Bennett, David A

    2006-01-01

    The relation of personality to disability in old age is not well understood. The authors examined the relation of harm avoidance, a trait indicating a tendency to worry, fear uncertainty, be shy, and tire easily, to disability in a group of 474 older persons without dementia. Participants completed the 35-item Harm Avoidance scale. Disability was assessed with the Rosow-Breslau scale, a self-report measure of physical mobility. Performance-based tests of lower limb functions were also administered from which composite measures of gait, balance, and strength were derived. In a logistic regression model controlled for age, sex, education, and lower limb function, persons with high levels of harm avoidance were nearly three times as likely to report mobility limitations as persons with low levels, and these effects largely reflected fatigability and fear of uncertainty. The association of harm avoidance with disability was not explained or modified by frailty, physical activity, depressive symptoms, neuroticism, extraversion, or cognition. The results suggest that harm avoidance is associated with disability in old age.

  12. Avoidance of hydrolyzed casein by mice

    PubMed Central

    Field, Kristin L.; Kimball, Bruce A.; Mennella, Julie A.; Beauchamp, Gary K.; Bachmanov, Alexander A.

    2008-01-01

    When casein, a milk protein, is hydrolyzed, it renders human foods that contain it (e.g., hypoallergenic infant formula, cheeses) distasteful to many people. This rejection of hydrolyzed casein (HC)-containing foods has recently been found to also occur in a non-human species (deer, Odocoileus spp.). Identifying other animals that avoid HC would facilitate understanding how and why HC-containing food is often rejected. This study determined whether HC-containing food is avoided by Mus musculus and whether consumption patterns were sensitive to testing conditions, specifically food form (powder, pellet or dough) and food access (ad libitum or 1.5 h/day following 6 h of food deprivation). Diets were offered in two-choice tests that paired an HC-containing food with an intact casein-containing alternative at seven protein concentrations (0%–50% w/w). Five experimental groups were tested under different combinations of food form and food access. Three groups (ad lib/powder, ad lib/pellet, and 1.5 h/pellet) avoided the HC diet starting at the 30% protein level. At the 40% and 50% protein levels, all groups showed strong avoidance of HC. Although testing conditions influenced total caloric intake and body weight gain, avoidance of HC at the highest concentrations was robust to the manipulations in experimental conditions. Our study suggests that mice may be a useful model for understanding the mechanisms of HC rejection. PMID:17900635

  13. Imipramine attenuates neuroinflammatory signaling and reverses stress-induced social avoidance.

    PubMed

    Ramirez, Karol; Shea, Daniel T; McKim, Daniel B; Reader, Brenda F; Sheridan, John F

    2015-05-01

    Psychosocial stress is associated with altered immunity, anxiety and depression. Previously we showed that repeated social defeat (RSD) promoted microglia activation and social avoidance behavior that persisted for 24days after cessation of RSD. The aim of the present study was to determine if imipramine (a tricyclic antidepressant) would reverse RSD-inducedsocial avoidance and ameliorate neuroinflammatory responses. To test this, C57BL/6 mice were divided into treatment groups. One group from RSD and controls received daily injections of imipramine for 24days, following 6 cycles of RSD. Two other groups were treated with saline. RSD mice spent significantly less time in the interaction zone when an aggressor was present in the cage. Administration of imipramine reversed social avoidance behavior, significantly increasing the interaction time, so that it was similar to that of control mice. Moreover, 24days of imipramine treatment in RSD mice significantly decreased stress-induced mRNA levels for IL-6 in brain microglia. Following ex vivo LPS stimulation, microglia from mice exposed to RSD, had higher mRNA expression of IL-6, TNF-α, and IL-1β, and this was reversed by imipramine treatment. In a second experiment, imipramine was added to drinking water confirming the reversal of social avoidant behavior and decrease in mRNA expression of IL-6 in microglia. These data suggest that the antidepressant imipramine may exert its effect, in part, by down-regulating microglial activation.

  14. Is Avoiding an Aversive Outcome Rewarding? Neural Substrates of Avoidance Learning in the Human Brain

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hackjin; Shimojo, Shinsuke

    2006-01-01

    Avoidance learning poses a challenge for reinforcement-based theories of instrumental conditioning, because once an aversive outcome is successfully avoided an individual may no longer experience extrinsic reinforcement for their behavior. One possible account for this is to propose that avoiding an aversive outcome is in itself a reward, and thus avoidance behavior is positively reinforced on each trial when the aversive outcome is successfully avoided. In the present study we aimed to test this possibility by determining whether avoidance of an aversive outcome recruits the same neural circuitry as that elicited by a reward itself. We scanned 16 human participants with functional MRI while they performed an instrumental choice task, in which on each trial they chose from one of two actions in order to either win money or else avoid losing money. Neural activity in a region previously implicated in encoding stimulus reward value, the medial orbitofrontal cortex, was found to increase, not only following receipt of reward, but also following successful avoidance of an aversive outcome. This neural signal may itself act as an intrinsic reward, thereby serving to reinforce actions during instrumental avoidance. PMID:16802856

  15. Is avoiding an aversive outcome rewarding? Neural substrates of avoidance learning in the human brain.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hackjin; Shimojo, Shinsuke; O'Doherty, John P

    2006-07-01

    Avoidance learning poses a challenge for reinforcement-based theories of instrumental conditioning, because once an aversive outcome is successfully avoided an individual may no longer experience extrinsic reinforcement for their behavior. One possible account for this is to propose that avoiding an aversive outcome is in itself a reward, and thus avoidance behavior is positively reinforced on each trial when the aversive outcome is successfully avoided. In the present study we aimed to test this possibility by determining whether avoidance of an aversive outcome recruits the same neural circuitry as that elicited by a reward itself. We scanned 16 human participants with functional MRI while they performed an instrumental choice task, in which on each trial they chose from one of two actions in order to either win money or else avoid losing money. Neural activity in a region previously implicated in encoding stimulus reward value, the medial orbitofrontal cortex, was found to increase, not only following receipt of reward, but also following successful avoidance of an aversive outcome. This neural signal may itself act as an intrinsic reward, thereby serving to reinforce actions during instrumental avoidance.

  16. Chloroplast avoidance movement reduces photodamage in plants.

    PubMed

    Kasahara, Masahiro; Kagawa, Takatoshi; Oikawa, Kazusato; Suetsugu, Noriyuki; Miyao, Mitsue; Wada, Masamitsu

    When plants are exposed to light levels higher than those required for photosynthesis, reactive oxygen species are generated in the chloroplasts and cause photodamage. This can occur even under natural growth conditions. To mitigate photodamage, plants have developed several protective mechanisms. One is chloroplast avoidance movement, in which chloroplasts move from the cell surface to the side walls of cells under high light conditions, although experimental support is still awaited. Here, using different classes of mutant defective in chloroplast avoidance movement, we show that these mutants are more susceptible to damage in high light than wild-type plants. Damage of the photosynthetic apparatus and subsequent bleaching of leaf colour and necrosis occur faster under high light conditions in the mutants than in wild-type plants. We conclude that chloroplast avoidance movement actually decreases the amount of light absorption by chloroplasts, and might therefore be important to the survival of plants under natural growth conditions.

  17. Active Collision Avoidance for Planetary Landers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rickman, Doug; Hannan, Mike; Srinivasan, Karthik

    2015-01-01

    The use of automotive radar systems are being evaluated for collision avoidance in planetary landers. Our focus is to develop a low-cost, light-weight collision avoidance system that overcomes the drawbacks identified with optical-based systems. We also seek to complement the Autonomous Landing and Hazard Avoidance Technology system by providing mission planners an alternative system that can be used on low-cost, small robotic missions and in close approach. Our approach takes advantage of how electromagnetic radiation interacts with solids. As the wavelength increases, the sensitivity of the radiation to isolated solids of a specific particle size decreases. Thus, rocket exhaust-blown dust particles, which have major significance in visible wavelengths, have much less significance at radar wavelengths.

  18. Learning processes underlying avoidance of negative outcomes.

    PubMed

    Andreatta, Marta; Michelmann, Sebastian; Pauli, Paul; Hewig, Johannes

    2017-04-01

    Successful avoidance of a threatening event may negatively reinforce the behavior due to activation of brain structures involved in reward processing. Here, we further investigated the learning-related properties of avoidance using feedback-related negativity (FRN). The FRN is modulated by violations of an intended outcome (prediction error, PE), that is, the bigger the difference between intended and actual outcome, the larger the FRN amplitude is. Twenty-eight participants underwent an operant conditioning paradigm, in which a behavior (button press) allowed them to avoid a painful electric shock. During two learning blocks, participants could avoid an electric shock in 80% of the trials by pressing one button (avoidance button), or by not pressing another button (punishment button). After learning, participants underwent two test blocks, which were identical to the learning ones except that no shocks were delivered. Participants pressed the avoidance button more often than the punishment button. Importantly, response frequency increased throughout the learning blocks but it did not decrease during the test blocks, indicating impaired extinction and/or habit formation. In line with a PE account, FRN amplitude to negative feedback after correct responses (i.e., unexpected punishment) was significantly larger than to positive feedback (i.e., expected omission of punishment), and it increased throughout the blocks. Highly anxious individuals showed equal FRN amplitudes to negative and positive feedback, suggesting impaired discrimination. These results confirm the role of negative reinforcement in motivating behavior and learning, and reveal important differences between high and low anxious individuals in the processing of prediction errors.

  19. Do allergic families avoid keeping furry pets?

    PubMed

    Bertelsen, R J; Carlsen, K C L; Granum, B; Carlsen, K-H; Håland, G; Devulapalli, C S; Munthe-Kaas, M C; Mowinckel, P; Løvik, M

    2010-06-01

    Studies addressing the relationship between pet keeping and development of asthma and allergies may be influenced by pet avoidance in families with a history of allergic disease. Following a cohort of 1019 children in Oslo till 10 years of age, we studied the association of pet keeping with socio-economic factors and allergic disease in the family. A family history of asthma and rhinoconjunctivitis was not significantly associated with pet ownership at birth or with pet removal by 10 years. Acquiring cats and dogs was less likely if the child had allergic rhinoconjunctivitis, whereas no association was seen with asthma (in any family member). Single parenthood increased the likelihood of acquiring a cat, smoking parents more often had cats or dogs, and having older siblings was associated with keeping dogs and other furry pets. Among 319 families reporting pet avoidance, 70% never had pets, 8% had given up pets, and 22% avoided a particular type of pet only. Twenty-four per cent of the parents failed to retrospectively report pet keeping during the child's first year of life. Overall, allergic rhinitis, but not asthma was associated with actual pet avoidance, whereas the strongest predictors for keeping pets were found to be socio-economic factors. Allergic disease in a child most often does not lead to the removal of the family's furry pet. Pet avoidance is associated with allergic symptoms, but not asthma. Socio-economic factors like parental education, single parenthood and smoking affects the families' decisions on pet keeping, including the type of pets the families will avoid or acquire. The large recall error demonstrated points to the need for prospective data regarding pet keeping.

  20. Telerobotics with whole arm collision avoidance

    SciTech Connect

    Wilhelmsen, K.; Strenn, S.

    1993-09-01

    The complexity of teleorbotic operations in a cluttered environment is exacerbated by the need to present collision information to the operator in an understandable fashion. In addition to preventing movements which will cause collisions, a system providing some form of virtual force reflection (VFR) is desirable. With this goal in mind, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has installed a kinematically master/slave system and developed a whole arm collision avoidance system which interacts directly with the telerobotic controller. LLNL has also provided a structure to allow for automated upgrades of workcell models and provide collision avoidance even in a dynamically changing workcell.

  1. Autonomous Landing and Hazard Avoidance Technology (ALHAT)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Epp, Chirold

    2007-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the work towards technology that will result in an autonomous landing on the lunar surface, that will avoid the hazards of lunar landing. In October 2005, the Exploration Systems Mission Directorate at NASA Headquarters assigned the development of new technologies to support the return to the moon. One of these was Autonomous Precision Landing and Hazard Detection and Avoidance Technology now known as ALHAT ALHAT is a lunar descent and landing GNC technology development project led by Johnson Space Center (JSC) with team members from Langley Research Center (LaRC), Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), Draper Laboratories (CSDL) and the Applied Physics Laboratory (APL)

  2. Integrated Collision Avoidance System for Air Vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, Ching-Fang (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    Collision with ground/water/terrain and midair obstacles is one of the common causes of severe aircraft accidents. The various data from the coremicro AHRS/INS/GPS Integration Unit, terrain data base, and object detection sensors are processed to produce collision warning audio/visual messages and collision detection and avoidance of terrain and obstacles through generation of guidance commands in a closed-loop system. The vision sensors provide more information for the Integrated System, such as, terrain recognition and ranging of terrain and obstacles, which plays an important role to the improvement of the Integrated Collision Avoidance System.

  3. Collision avoidance for CTV: Requirements and capabilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nosek, Thomas; Rourke, Kenneth

    1991-01-01

    Collision avoidance must be ensured during Cargo Transfer Vehicle (CTV) operations near the space station. The design of the Collision Avoidance Maneuver (CAM) will involve analysis of CTV failure modes during rendezvous and proximity operations as well as analysis of possible problems external to the CTV, but that would require CTV to execute a CAM. In considering the requirements and design of the CAM for the CTV, the CAM design for the Orbital Maneuvering Vehicle (OMV) is a useful reference point from which some lessons can be learned and many CTV design options can be set forth.

  4. Collision avoidance for CTV: Requirements and capabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nosek, Thomas; Rourke, Kenneth

    Collision avoidance must be ensured during Cargo Transfer Vehicle (CTV) operations near the space station. The design of the Collision Avoidance Maneuver (CAM) will involve analysis of CTV failure modes during rendezvous and proximity operations as well as analysis of possible problems external to the CTV, but that would require CTV to execute a CAM. In considering the requirements and design of the CAM for the CTV, the CAM design for the Orbital Maneuvering Vehicle (OMV) is a useful reference point from which some lessons can be learned and many CTV design options can be set forth.

  5. A collision avoidance system for workpiece protection

    SciTech Connect

    Schmitt, D.J.; Weber, T.M.; Novak, J.L.; Maslakowski, J.E.

    1995-04-01

    This paper describes an application of Sandia`s non-contact capacitive sensing technology for collision avoidance during the manufacturing of rocket engine thrust chambers. The collision avoidance system consists of an octagon shaped collar with a capacitive proximity sensor mounted on each face. The sensors produced electric fields which extend several inches from the face of the collar and detect potential collisions between the robot and the workpiece. A signal conditioning system processes the sensor output and provides varying voltage signals to the robot controller for stopping the robot.

  6. Collision Avoidance Short Course Part I: Theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hejduk, Matthew D.

    2017-01-01

    Satellite conjunction assessment is perhaps the fastest-growing area in space situational awareness and protection, with military, civil, and commercial satellite owner operators embracing more and more sophisticated processes to avoid the avoidable namely collisions between high-value space assets and orbital debris. NASA and CNES have collaborated to offer an introductory short course on all the major aspects of the conjunction assessment problem. This half-day course will cover satellite conjunction dynamics and theory, JSpOC conjunction data products, major risk assessment parameters and plots, conjunction remediation decision support, and present and future challenges. This briefing represents the NASA portion of the course.

  7. Spectrophotometric assays for monitoring tRNA aminoacylation and aminoacyl-tRNA hydrolysis reactions.

    PubMed

    First, Eric A; Richardson, Charles J

    2017-01-15

    Aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases play a central role in protein synthesis, catalyzing the attachment of amino acids to their cognate tRNAs. Here, we describe a spectrophotometric assay for tyrosyl-tRNA synthetase in which the Tyr-tRNA product is cleaved, regenerating the tRNA substrate. As tRNA is the limiting substrate in the assay, recycling it substantially increases the sensitivity of the assay while simultaneously reducing its cost. The tRNA aminoacylation reaction is monitored spectrophotometrically by coupling the production of AMP to the conversion of NAD(+) to NADH. We have adapted the tyrosyl-tRNA synthetase assay to monitor: (1) aminoacylation of tRNA by l- or d-tyrosine, (2) cyclodipeptide formation by cyclodipeptide synthases, (3) hydrolysis of d-aminoacyl-tRNAs by d-tyrosyl-tRNA deacylase, and (4) post-transfer editing by aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases. All of these assays are continuous and homogenous, making them amenable for use in high-throughput screens of chemical libraries. In the case of the cyclodipeptide synthase, d-tyrosyl-tRNA deacylase, and post-transfer editing assays, the aminoacyl-tRNAs are generated in situ, avoiding the need to synthesize and purify aminoacyl-tRNA substrates prior to performing the assays. Lastly, we describe how the tyrosyl-tRNA synthetase assay can be adapted to monitor the activity of other aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases and how the approach to regenerating the tRNA substrate can be used to increase the sensitivity and decrease the cost of commercially available aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase assays.

  8. Development of a Measure of Experiential Avoidance: The Multidimensional Experiential Avoidance Questionnaire

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gamez, Wakiza; Chmielewski, Michael; Kotov, Roman; Ruggero, Camilo; Watson, David

    2011-01-01

    Experiential avoidance (EA) has been conceptualized as the tendency to avoid negative internal experiences and is an important concept in numerous conceptualizations of psychopathology as well as theories of psychotherapy. Existing measures of EA have either been narrowly defined or demonstrated unsatisfactory internal consistency and/or evidence…

  9. A collision avoidance model for two-pedestrian groups: Considering random avoidance patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Zhuping; Cai, Yifei; Ke, Ruimin; Yang, Jiwei

    2017-06-01

    Grouping is a common phenomenon in pedestrian crowds and group modeling is still an open challenging problem. When grouping pedestrians avoid each other, different patterns can be observed. Pedestrians can keep close with group members and avoid other groups in cluster. Also, they can avoid other groups separately. Considering this randomness in avoidance patterns, we propose a collision avoidance model for two-pedestrian groups. In our model, the avoidance model is proposed based on velocity obstacle method at first. Then grouping model is established using Distance constrained line (DCL), by transforming DCL into the framework of velocity obstacle, the avoidance model and grouping model are successfully put into one unified calculation structure. Within this structure, an algorithm is developed to solve the problem when solutions of the two models conflict with each other. Two groups of bidirectional pedestrian experiments are designed to verify the model. The accuracy of avoidance behavior and grouping behavior is validated in the microscopic level, while the lane formation phenomenon and fundamental diagrams is validated in the macroscopic level. The experiments results show our model is convincing and has a good expansibility to describe three or more pedestrian groups.

  10. Development of a Measure of Experiential Avoidance: The Multidimensional Experiential Avoidance Questionnaire

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gamez, Wakiza; Chmielewski, Michael; Kotov, Roman; Ruggero, Camilo; Watson, David

    2011-01-01

    Experiential avoidance (EA) has been conceptualized as the tendency to avoid negative internal experiences and is an important concept in numerous conceptualizations of psychopathology as well as theories of psychotherapy. Existing measures of EA have either been narrowly defined or demonstrated unsatisfactory internal consistency and/or evidence…

  11. Flight Test Evaluation of AVOID II. (Avionic Observation of Intruder Danger) Collision Avoidance System

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1976-10-13

    31 General Operation Tests ........................................ 31 Altitude Boundary and Altit~ude Discrimination ...Summary ............................... 57 Altitude Zone Discrimination .................................... 61 AVOID I - AVOID II COMPI.TIBILITY...Figure 16. Commad Display Logic. - 33 - NADC-76141 -60 4 ALTITUDE BOUNDARIES AND ALTITUDE DISCRIMINATION TESTS The main objective of these encounters

  12. The Advocacy or Avoidance of Only Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Falbo, Toni

    A brief review of the psychological literature on the characteristics of only children is presented in order to determine if the one-child family should be avoided or advocated. The relevant literature is found to be limited in quantity and conceptualization of the only child. Previous literature is divided into three types of study: those with…

  13. An Examination of Avoided Costs in Utah

    SciTech Connect

    Bolinger, Mark; Wiser, Ryan

    2005-01-07

    The Utah Wind Working Group (UWWG) believes there are currently opportunities to encourage wind power development in the state by seeking changes to the avoided cost tariff paid to qualifying facilities (QFs). These opportunities have arisen as a result of a recent renegotiation of Pacificorp's Schedule 37 tariff for wind QFs under 3 MW, as well as an ongoing examination of Pacificorp's Schedule 38 tariff for wind QFs larger than 3 MW. It is expected that decisions made regarding Schedule 38 will also impact Schedule 37. Through the Laboratory Technical Assistance Program (Lab TAP), the UWWG has requested (through the Utah Energy Office) that LBNL provide technical assistance in determining whether an alternative method of calculating avoided costs that has been officially adopted in Idaho would lead to higher QF payments in Utah, and to discuss the pros and cons of this method relative to the methodology recently adopted under Schedule 37 in Utah. To accomplish this scope of work, I begin by summarizing the current method of calculating avoided costs in Utah (per Schedule 37) and Idaho (the ''surrogate avoided resource'' or SAR method). I then compare the two methods both qualitatively and quantitatively. Next I present Pacificorp's four main objections to the use of the SAR method, and discuss the reasonableness of each objection. Finally, I conclude with a few other potential considerations that might add value to wind QFs in Utah.

  14. Pathological Demand Avoidance: Exploring the Behavioural Profile

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Nions, Elizabeth; Viding, Essi; Greven, Corina U; Ronald, Angelica; Happé, Francesca

    2014-01-01

    "Pathological Demand Avoidance" is a term increasingly used by practitioners in the United Kingdom. It was coined to describe a profile of obsessive resistance to everyday demands and requests, with a tendency to resort to "socially manipulative" behaviour, including outrageous or embarrassing acts. Pathological demand…

  15. Learn to Avoid or Overcome Leadership Obstacles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    D'Auria, John

    2015-01-01

    Leadership is increasingly recognized as an important factor in moving schools forward, yet we have been relatively random in how we prepare and support them. Four obstacles often block or diminish their effectiveness. Avoiding or overcoming each of these requires an underlying set of skills and knowledge that we believe can be learned and…

  16. Doppler micro sense and avoid radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorwara, Ashok; Molchanov, Pavlo; Asmolova, Olga

    2015-10-01

    There is a need for small Sense and Avoid (SAA) systems for small and micro Unmanned Aerial Systems (UAS) to avoid collisions with obstacles and other aircraft. The proposed SAA systems will give drones the ability to "see" close up and give them the agility to maneuver through tight areas. Doppler radar is proposed for use in this sense and avoid system because in contrast to optical or infrared (IR) systems Doppler can work in more harsh conditions such as at dusk, and in rain and snow. And in contrast to ultrasound based systems, Doppler can better sense small sized obstacles such as wires and it can provide a sensing range from a few inches to several miles. An SAA systems comprised of Doppler radar modules and an array of directional antennas that are distributed around the perimeter of the drone can cover the entire sky. These modules are designed so that they can provide the direction to the obstacle and simultaneously generate an alarm signal if the obstacle enters within the SAA system's adjustable "Protection Border". The alarm signal alerts the drone's autopilot to automatically initiate an avoidance maneuver. A series of Doppler radar modules with different ranges, angles of view and transmitting power have been designed for drones of different sizes and applications. The proposed Doppler radar micro SAA system has simple circuitry, works from a 5 volt source and has low power consumption. It is light weight, inexpensive and it can be used for a variety of small unmanned aircraft.

  17. Digital-Difference Processing For Collision Avoidance.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shores, Paul; Lichtenberg, Chris; Kobayashi, Herbert S.; Cunningham, Allen R.

    1988-01-01

    Digital system for automotive crash avoidance measures and displays difference in frequency between two sinusoidal input signals of slightly different frequencies. Designed for use with Doppler radars. Characterized as digital mixer coupled to frequency counter measuring difference frequency in mixer output. Technique determines target path mathematically. Used for tracking cars, missiles, bullets, baseballs, and other fast-moving objects.

  18. Learn to Avoid or Overcome Leadership Obstacles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    D'Auria, John

    2015-01-01

    Leadership is increasingly recognized as an important factor in moving schools forward, yet we have been relatively random in how we prepare and support them. Four obstacles often block or diminish their effectiveness. Avoiding or overcoming each of these requires an underlying set of skills and knowledge that we believe can be learned and…

  19. Perspectives in avoidance-preference bioassays

    SciTech Connect

    Steele, C.W.; Taylor, D.H.; Strickler-Shaw, S.

    1996-12-31

    Although behavioral endpoints are used in hazard assessment, establishment of water quality criteria and assessment of a contaminant`s hazard to aquatic life rely primarily on standard acute and chronic toxicity tests. Sublethal effects of pollutants should, however, be of major concern because more organisms experience sublethal rather than acutely or chronically lethal exposures of contaminants. The avoidance-preference approach to behavioral bioassays is very useful in screening pollutants for which the mechanisms of perception or response are largely unknown. The underlying philosophy of these studies is that an animal which perceives a chemical can be attracted or repulsed by it. No response is frequently assumed to indicate lack of perception. All three responses have broad ecological implications. The authors discuss the conditions required for performing avoidance-preference bioassays, as well as their sensitivities, advantages, and limitations. In this regard, a comparative approach is used in examining the results of avoidance-preference bioassays with zebrafish in two different apparatuses. Finally, they compare the results of avoidance-preference studies with other measures of the behavioral toxicity of lead to tadpoles.

  20. Specific Language Impairment at Adolescence: Avoiding Complexity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tuller, Laurice; Henry, Celia; Sizaret, Eva; Barthez, Marie-Anne

    2012-01-01

    This study explores complex language in adolescents with specific language impairment (SLI) with the aim of finding out how aspects of language characteristic of typical syntactic development after childhood fare and, in particular, whether there is evidence that individuals with SLI avoid using structures whose syntactic derivation involves…

  1. Avoiding the claim of patient abandonment.

    PubMed

    Thieman, S

    1996-10-01

    Because of the fiduciary nature of the relationship, a physician cannot precipitously "call it quits" when the physician-patient relationship becomes untenable. However, termination of the relationship with adequate notice, clear communication, documentation and attention to the patient's continuing needs can successfully avoid any liability for patient abandonment.

  2. Disgust as a Disease-Avoidance Mechanism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oaten, Megan; Stevenson, Richard J.; Case, Trevor I.

    2009-01-01

    Many researchers have claimed that the emotion of disgust functions to protect us from disease. Although there have been several discussions of this hypothesis, none have yet reviewed the evidence in its entirety. The authors derive 14 hypotheses from a disease-avoidance account and evaluate the evidence for each, drawing upon research on pathogen…

  3. 47 CFR 74.604 - Interference avoidance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... Stations § 74.604 Interference avoidance. (a) (b) Where two or more licensees are assigned a common channel..., including time sharing arrangements, to assure an equitable distribution of available frequencies. (c) For those interference disputes brought to the Commission for resolution, TV broadcast auxiliary...

  4. Freeze tolerance and avoidance in plants

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Cold acclimation is a multigenic, quantitative trait that involves biochemical and structural changes that effect the physiology of a plant. Mechanisms associated with freeze tolerance or freeze avoidance develop and are lost on an annual cycle. When conducting studies to characterize and determin...

  5. Proactive strategies to avoid infectious disease.

    PubMed

    Stevenson, Richard J; Case, Trevor I; Oaten, Megan J

    2011-12-12

    Infectious disease exerts a large selective pressure on all organisms. One response to this has been for animals to evolve energetically costly immune systems to counter infection, while another--the focus of this theme issue--has been the evolution of proactive strategies primarily to avoid infection. These strategies can be grouped into three types, all of which demonstrate varying levels of interaction with the immune system. The first concerns maternal strategies that function to promote the immunocompetence of their offspring. The second type of strategy influences mate selection, guiding the selection of a healthy mate and one who differs maximally from the self in their complement of antigen-coding genes. The third strategy involves two classes of behaviour. One relates to the capacity of the organisms to learn associations between cues indicative of pathogen threat and immune responses. The other relates to prevention and even treatment of infection through behaviours such as avoidance, grooming, quarantine, medicine and care of the sick. In humans, disease avoidance is based upon cognition and especially the emotion of disgust. Human disease avoidance is not without its costs. There is a propensity to reject healthy individuals who just appear sick--stigmatization--and the system may malfunction, resulting in various forms of psychopathology. Pathogen threat also appears to have been a highly significant and unrecognized force in shaping human culture so as to minimize infection threats. This cultural shaping process--moralization--can be co-opted to promote human health.

  6. Social Work Education and Avoidable Ignorance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gambrill, Eileen

    2014-01-01

    The quality of professional education affects the quality of services offered to clients. Examples of avoidable ignorance that dilute the quality of education social workers receive are suggested, indicating that we have not been honest and energetic brokers of knowledge and ignorance. Related reasons are suggested, including a reluctance to take…

  7. Organising European technical documentation to avoid duplication.

    PubMed

    Donawa, Maria

    2006-04-01

    The development of comprehensive accurate and well-organised technical documentation that demonstrates compliance with regulatory requirements is a resource-intensive, but critically important activity for medical device manufacturers. This article discusses guidance documents and method of organising technical documentation that may help avoid costly and time-consuming duplication.

  8. Avoiding rejections by European ethics committees.

    PubMed

    Donawa, Maria

    2003-06-01

    The Competent Authority has been notified. The clinical investigator is anxious to begin. Just when the process of conducting a clinical investigation is proceeding as planned, the ethics committee issues an unfavourable opinion. This article discusses the actions that should be taken to avoid this occurrence and how to meet other requirements related to ethics committees.

  9. Teaching Preschool Children to Avoid Poison Hazards

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dancho, Kelly A.; Thompson, Rachel H.; Rhoades, Melissa M.

    2008-01-01

    We evaluated the effectiveness of group safety training and in situ feedback and response interruption to teach preschool children to avoid consuming potentially hazardous substances. Three children ingested ambiguous substances during a baited baseline assessment condition and continued to ingest these substances following group safety training.…

  10. Procedural Variation in Behavioral Avoidance Tests

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bernstein, Douglas A.; Nietzel, Michael T.

    1973-01-01

    The data on approach to snakes provides srong support for the contention that the behavorial avoidance test is not immune to bias introduced by the operation of situational variables that have usually been allowed to vary in uncontrolled fashion in psychotherapy analogue research. Behavior of test subjects can be influenced not only in terms of…

  11. Metacognitive evaluation in the avoidance of demand.

    PubMed

    Dunn, Timothy L; Lutes, David J C; Risko, Evan F

    2016-09-01

    In the current set of experiments our goal was to test the hypothesis that individuals avoid courses of action based on a kind of metacognitive evaluation of demand in a Demand Selection Task (DST). Individuals in Experiment 1 completed a DST utilizing visual stimuli known to yield a dissociation between performance and perceived demand. Patterns of demand avoidance followed that of perceived demand. Experiment 2 provided a replication of the aforementioned results, in addition to demonstrating a second dissociation between a peripheral physiological measure of demand (i.e., blink rates) and demand avoidance. Experiment 3 directly tested the assumption that individuals make use of a general metacognitive evaluation of task demand during selections. A DST was utilized in a forced-choice paradigm that required individuals to either select the most effortful, time demanding, or least accurate of 2 choices. Patterns of selections were similar across all rating dimensions, lending credit to this notion. Findings are discussed within a metacognitive framework of demand avoidance and contrasted to current theories. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  12. Pathological Demand Avoidance: Exploring the Behavioural Profile

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Nions, Elizabeth; Viding, Essi; Greven, Corina U; Ronald, Angelica; Happé, Francesca

    2014-01-01

    "Pathological Demand Avoidance" is a term increasingly used by practitioners in the United Kingdom. It was coined to describe a profile of obsessive resistance to everyday demands and requests, with a tendency to resort to "socially manipulative" behaviour, including outrageous or embarrassing acts. Pathological demand…

  13. Social Work Education and Avoidable Ignorance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gambrill, Eileen

    2014-01-01

    The quality of professional education affects the quality of services offered to clients. Examples of avoidable ignorance that dilute the quality of education social workers receive are suggested, indicating that we have not been honest and energetic brokers of knowledge and ignorance. Related reasons are suggested, including a reluctance to take…

  14. Specific Language Impairment at Adolescence: Avoiding Complexity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tuller, Laurice; Henry, Celia; Sizaret, Eva; Barthez, Marie-Anne

    2012-01-01

    This study explores complex language in adolescents with specific language impairment (SLI) with the aim of finding out how aspects of language characteristic of typical syntactic development after childhood fare and, in particular, whether there is evidence that individuals with SLI avoid using structures whose syntactic derivation involves…

  15. Pathogen evolution under host avoidance plasticity.

    PubMed

    McLeod, David V; Day, Troy

    2015-09-07

    Host resistance consists of defences that limit pathogen burden, and can be classified as either adaptations targeting recovery from infection or those focused upon infection avoidance. Conventional theory treats avoidance as a fixed strategy which does not vary from one interaction to the next. However, there is increasing empirical evidence that many avoidance strategies are triggered by external stimuli, and thus should be treated as phenotypically plastic responses. Here, we consider the implications of avoidance plasticity for host-pathogen coevolution. We uncover a number of predictions challenging current theory. First, in the absence of pathogen trade-offs, plasticity can restrain pathogen evolution; moreover, the pathogen exploits conditions in which the host would otherwise invest less in resistance, causing resistance escalation. Second, when transmission trades off with pathogen-induced mortality, plasticity encourages avirulence, resulting in a superior fitness outcome for both host and pathogen. Third, plasticity ensures the sterilizing effect of pathogens has consequences for pathogen evolution. When pathogens castrate hosts, selection forces them to minimize mortality virulence; moreover, when transmission trades off with sterility alone, resistance plasticity is sufficient to prevent pathogens from evolving to fully castrate. © 2015 The Author(s).

  16. Complications to Avoid with Pre-Diabetes

    MedlinePlus

    ... Thromboembolism Aortic Aneurysm More Complications to Avoid with Pre-diabetes Updated:Nov 19,2015 If I ignore ... all. This content was last reviewed August 2015. Pre-diabetes • Introduction • About Pre-diabetes • What's the Problem? ...

  17. Avoiding Mathematics Trauma: Alternative Teaching Methods.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ufuktepe, Unal; Ozel, Claire Thomas

    Children in primary education often encounter mathematics having picked up a general fear of mathematics from the society around them. This results in lack of confidence, avoidance of non-standard thought processes, weakness in problem solving strategies, and other negative consequences. This study offers an alternative approach: presenting…

  18. Wake Vortex Avoidance System and Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shams, Qamar A. (Inventor); Zuckerwar, Allan J. (Inventor); Knight, Howard K. (Inventor)

    2017-01-01

    A wake vortex avoidance system includes a microphone array configured to detect low frequency sounds. A signal processor determines a geometric mean coherence based on the detected low frequency sounds. A display displays wake vortices based on the determined geometric mean coherence.

  19. Affordable MMW aircraft collision avoidance system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almsted, Larry D.; Becker, Robert C.; Zelenka, Richard E.

    1997-06-01

    Collision avoidance is of concern to all aircraft, requiring the detection and identification of hazardous terrain or obstacles in sufficient time for clearance maneuvers. The collision avoidance requirement is even more demanding for helicopters, as their unique capabilities result in extensive operations at low-altitude, near to terrain and other hazardous obstacles. TO augment the pilot's visual collision avoidance abilities, some aircraft are equipped with 'enhanced-vision' systems or terrain collision warning systems. Enhanced-vision systems are typically very large and costly systems that are not very covert and are also difficult to install in a helicopter. The display is typically raw images from infrared or radar sensors, and can require a high degree of pilot interpretation and attention. Terrain collision warning system that rely on stored terrain maps are often of low resolution and accuracy and do not represent hazards to the aircraft placed after map sampling. Such hazards could include aircraft parked on runway, man- made towers or buildings and hills. In this paper, a low cost dual-function scanning pencil-beam, millimeter-wave radar forward sensor is used to determine whether an aircraft's flight path is clear of obstructions. Due to the limited space and weight budget in helicopters, the system is a dual function system that is substituted in place of the existing radar altimeter. The system combines a 35 GHz forward looking obstacle avoidance radar and a 4.3 GHz radar altimeter. The forward looking 35 GHz 3D radar's returns are used to construct a terrain and obstruction database surrounding an aircraft, which is presented to the pilot as a synthetic perspective display. The 35 GHz forward looking radar and the associated display was evaluated in a joint NASA Honeywell flight test program in 1996. The tests were conducted on a NASA/Army test helicopter. The test program clearly demonstrated the systems potential usefulness for collision avoidance.

  20. [Avoidance of patient-prosthesis mismatch].

    PubMed

    Sakamoto, Y; Hashimoto, K

    2006-04-01

    To minimize the incidence of patient-prosthesis mismatch (PPM), we have routinely adopted aortic root enlargement to avoid PPM for patients with small aortic annulus. The aim of this study was to review our strategy of avoiding PPM. The Carpentier-Edwards Perimount (CEP) valves were implanted in 53 patients who were mostly aged over 65 and the St. Jude Medical (SJM) mechanical valves were used in 128 patients aged under 65. A standard 21-mm SJM valve was used in only 3 patients and no 19-mm valves were employed. However, 19-mm CEP valves were used in 12 patients with a small body surface area (1.43 +/- 0.14 m2). Of these, 26 patients (14.4%) who had a small aortic annulus and 24 patients aged under 65 underwent aortic root enlargement. No patient receiving an SJM valve had an projected indexed effective orifice area (EOAI) < or = 0.85 cm2/m2 because of performing aortic valve replacement (AVR) with annular enlargement and only 2 (3.8%) out of 53 patients receiving CEP valves developed PPM. Consequently, the prevalence of PPM was 1.1% in this series. The prevalence of PPM was low in patients over 65 years old with a relatively small body size who received bioprosthetic valves. A pericardial bioprosthesis was considered to be an appropriate valve in older population with regard to avoiding PPM. In patients under 65 years old with a small annulus, the first choice for avoiding PPM is aortic annular enlargement, which may be avoided by high performance mechanical valves with larger EOA.

  1. RAID: a comprehensive resource for human RNA-associated (RNA-RNA/RNA-protein) interaction.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaomeng; Wu, Deng; Chen, Liqun; Li, Xiang; Yang, Jinxurong; Fan, Dandan; Dong, Tingting; Liu, Mingyue; Tan, Puwen; Xu, Jintian; Yi, Ying; Wang, Yuting; Zou, Hua; Hu, Yongfei; Fan, Kaili; Kang, Juanjuan; Huang, Yan; Miao, Zhengqiang; Bi, Miaoman; Jin, Nana; Li, Kongning; Li, Xia; Xu, Jianzhen; Wang, Dong

    2014-07-01

    Transcriptomic analyses have revealed an unexpected complexity in the eukaryote transcriptome, which includes not only protein-coding transcripts but also an expanding catalog of noncoding RNAs (ncRNAs). Diverse coding and noncoding RNAs (ncRNAs) perform functions through interaction with each other in various cellular processes. In this project, we have developed RAID (http://www.rna-society.org/raid), an RNA-associated (RNA-RNA/RNA-protein) interaction database. RAID intends to provide the scientific community with all-in-one resources for efficient browsing and extraction of the RNA-associated interactions in human. This version of RAID contains more than 6100 RNA-associated interactions obtained by manually reviewing more than 2100 published papers, including 4493 RNA-RNA interactions and 1619 RNA-protein interactions. Each entry contains detailed information on an RNA-associated interaction, including RAID ID, RNA/protein symbol, RNA/protein categories, validated method, expressing tissue, literature references (Pubmed IDs), and detailed functional description. Users can query, browse, analyze, and manipulate RNA-associated (RNA-RNA/RNA-protein) interaction. RAID provides a comprehensive resource of human RNA-associated (RNA-RNA/RNA-protein) interaction network. Furthermore, this resource will help in uncovering the generic organizing principles of cellular function network. © 2014 Zhang et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press for the RNA Society.

  2. GEO Collision Avoidance using a Service Vehicle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duncan, M.; Concha, M.

    2013-09-01

    Space Situational Awareness (SSA) is defined as the knowledge and characterization of all aspects of space. SSA is now a fundamental and critical component of space operations. The increased dependence on our space assets has in turn lead to a greater need for accurate, near real-time knowledge of all space activities. Key areas of SSA include improved tracking of small objects, determining the intent of maneuvering spacecraft, identifying all potential high risk conjunction events, and leveraging non-traditional sensors in support of the SSA mission. As the size of the space object population grows, the number of collision avoidance maneuvers grows. Moreover, as the SSA mission evolves to near real-time assessment and analysis, the need for new, more sophisticated collision avoidance methods are required. This paper demonstrates the utility of using a service vehicle to perform collision avoidance maneuver for GEO satellites. We present the planning and execution details required to successfully execute a maneuver; given the traditional conjunction analysis timelines. Various operational constraints and scenarios are considered as part of the demonstration. Development of the collision avoidance strategy is created using SpaceNav's collision risk management tool suite. This study aims to determine the agility required of any proposed servicing capability to provide collision avoidance within traditional conjunction analysis and collision avoidance operations timelines. Key trades and analysis items are given to be: 1. How do we fuse the spacecraft state data with the tracking data collected from the proximity sensor that resides on the servicing spacecraft? 2. How do we deal with the possibility that the collision threat for the event may change as the time to close approach is reduced? 3. Perform trade space of maneuver/thrust time versus achievable change in the spacecraft's orbit. 4. Perform trade space of proximity of service vehicle to spacecraft versus time

  3. Tomographic patient registration and conformal avoidance tomotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aldridge, Jennifer Stacy

    Development of tomotherapy has led to the emergence of several processes, providing the basis for many unique investigative opportunities. These processes include setup verification, tomographic verification, megavoltage dose reconstruction, and conformal avoidance tomotherapy. Setup verification and conformal avoidance tomotherapy, in particular, are two closely intertwined matters. In order to avoid critical structures located within or adjacent to indistinct tumor regions, accurate patient positioning from fraction to fraction must be ensured. With tomographic patient registration, a higher level of assurance is offered than with traditional positioning methods. Translational and rotational offsets are calculated directly from projection data using cross- correlation or fast Fourier transforms. Experiments assessing the algorithm's ability to calculate individual offsets were conducted using the University of Wisconsin's Tomotherapy Benchtop. These experiments indicate statistical errors within +/-1 mm for offsets up to approximately 20 mm, with maximum offset errors of about +/-2 mm for displacements up to 35 mm. The angular offset component is within +/-2°. To evaluate the registration process as a whole, experimental results from a few multi-parameter examples are also analyzed. With the development of tomographic patient registration in projection space, efforts to promote further sparing of critical structures are justified. Conformal avoidance tomotherapy has as its objective to treat an indistinct tumor region while conformally avoiding any normal critical structures in that region. To demonstrate the advantages of conformal avoidance tomotherapy, conventional and tomotherapy treatments are contrasted for both nasopharyngeal and breast carcinoma cases. For initial research efforts, computed tomography data sets of a human male and female were obtained via the ``Visible Human Project''. Since these data sets are on the order of hundreds of megabytes, both

  4. Diabetes-related avoidable hospitalizations in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Kornelius, Edy; Huang, Chien-Ning; Yang, Yi-Sun; Lu, Ying-Li; Peng, Chiung-Huei; Chiou, Jeng-Yuan

    2014-12-01

    An avoidable hospitalization (AH) is a condition that could have been prevented through effective treatment in outpatient care. Diabetes is often referred to as an ambulatory care-sensitive condition, and its associated hospitalizations are often referred to as avoidable hospitalizations. There are limited data on avoidable hospitalizations for individuals with diabetes in Taiwan. We used the National Health Interview Survey (NHIS) dataset to obtain diabetes-related avoidable hospitalizations for subjects aged above 12 years. We included data from 20,826 subjects who had completed the interview between 2004 and 2005. Data were collected from a total of 15,574 people, who had agreed to link their health information to the Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database, including basic demographic variables, inpatient or outpatient medical events, admission date, discharge date, and diagnosis. The 1005 individuals who self-reported having diabetes or had at least 1 hospitalization or 2 physician service claims for diabetes mellitus with an ICD-9 diagnosis of 250 were included in the analysis. We divided those with diagnosis of diabetes into two groups: never hospitalized and hospitalized. The never hospitalized group served as the control group. We further identified hospitalized subjects with long-term complications due to diabetes (PQI-3) that included ICD-CM codes 250.4-250.9. The mean ages of patients with diabetes-related long-term complications in the hospitalized and never hospitalized groups were 65 years and 58 years, respectively (p-value<0.01). More than half (52%) of the patients with diabetes-related long-term complications had a body mass index (BMI) lower than 24. The hospitalized group also had lower educational status compared with that of patients in the never hospitalized group (equal to or lower than elementary school, 63% vs. 50%; junior high school, 23% vs. 14%; equal or higher than senior high school, 14% vs. 36%). Furthermore, hospitalized

  5. Converging evidence of social avoidant behavior in schizophrenia from two approach-avoidance tasks.

    PubMed

    de la Asuncion, Javier; Docx, Lise; Sabbe, Bernard; Morrens, Manuel; de Bruijn, Ellen R A

    2015-10-01

    Many people with schizophrenia suffer from social impairments characterized by active social avoidance, which is related to social phobia common in schizophrenia, while motivational impairments can also result in passive social withdrawal. Although social avoidance is frequently reported in this population, this is the first study to directly compare approach-avoidance tendencies in schizophrenia patients (N = 37) and healthy controls (N = 29). Participants performed two tasks: a computerized approach-avoidance task (AAT) to assess response tendencies toward images of happy and angry faces with direct or averted gaze and a one-to-one personal space test (PST) to gauge more naturalistic approach-avoidance behaviors toward a real person bearing a neutral expression. The AAT results showed that both groups showed faster avoidance responses to angry faces and faster approach responses to happy faces with a direct gaze. Happy faces with averted gaze, however, resulted in faster avoidance responses in the patient group only. On the PST, the patients approached the experimenter less than healthy controls did. This measure of interpersonal distance was positively related to positive symptom severity. Delusions of reference and increased sensitivity to social rejection may explain the patients' avoidance tendencies in response to pictures of happy faces with averted gaze and in the presence of an actual person. The current findings demonstrate the importance of others adopting positive and unambiguous attitudes when interacting with schizophrenia patients to minimize behavioral avoidance patterns, which is particularly relevant for relatives and clinicians whose interactions with the patients are crucial to facilitating treatment and promoting healthy social relationships.

  6. The Feasibility of Avoiding Future Climate Impacts: Results from the AVOID Programmes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lowe, J. A.; Warren, R.; Arnell, N.; Buckle, S.

    2014-12-01

    The AVOID programme and its successor, AVOID2, have focused on answering three core questions: how do we characterise potentially dangerous climate change and impacts, which emissions pathways can avoid at least some of these impacts, and how feasible are the future reductions needed to significantly deviate from a business-as-usual future emissions pathway. The first AVOID project succeeded in providing the UK Government with evidence to inform its position on climate change. A key part of the work involved developing a range of global emissions pathways and estimating and understanding the corresponding global impacts. This made use of a combination of complex general circulation models, simple climate models, pattern-scaling and state-of-the art impacts models. The results characterise the range of avoidable impacts across the globe in several key sectors including river and coastal flooding, cooling and heating energy demand, crop productivity and aspects of biodiversity. The avoided impacts between a scenario compatible with a 4ºC global warming and one with a 2ºC global warming were found to be highly sector dependent and avoided fractions typically ranged between 20% and 70%. A further key aspect was characterising the magnitude of the uncertainty involved, which is found to be very large in some impact sectors although the avoided fraction appears a more robust metric. The AVOID2 programme began in 2014 and will provide results in the run up to the Paris CoP in 2015. This includes new post-IPCC 5th assessment evidence to inform the long-term climate goal, a more comprehensive assessment of the uncertainty ranges of feasible emission pathways compatible with the long-term goal and enhanced estimates of global impacts using the latest generation of impact models and scenarios.

  7. UV impacts avoided by the Montreal Protocol.

    PubMed

    Newman, Paul A; McKenzie, Richard

    2011-07-01

    Temporal and geographical variabilities in the future "world expected" UV environment are compared with the "world avoided", which would have occurred without the Montreal Protocol on Substances That Deplete the Ozone Layer and its subsequent amendments and adjustments. Based on calculations of clear-sky UV irradiances, the effects of the Montreal Protocol have been hugely beneficial to avoid the health risks, such as skin cancer, which are associated with high UV, while there is only a small increase in health risks, such as vitamin D deficiency, that are associated with low UV. However, interactions with climate change may lead to changes in cloud and albedo, and possibly behavioural changes that could also be important.

  8. Avoiding the money saving rate increase

    SciTech Connect

    Streiter, S.H.

    1982-06-24

    This is the last in a series of three articles discussing problems for utilities that arise in connection with inflation-swollen capital-investment costs. The first dealt with the problem of front-end loading of charges on capital projects and proposed a way of appreciating new plant at the rate of inflation and earning on the appreciated rate base in later years. The second examined methods of arranging the financing of new plant projects to avoid the incurrence of losses in their early years if the rate base is trended as recommended. This article addresses the question of how to avoid the necessity of a rate increase when placing into service new capital equipment whose purpose was to save ratepayers money. The outcome should be a new regulation on accounting. 2 tables.

  9. UV Impacts Avoided by the Montreal Protocol

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, Paul; McKenzie, Richard

    2010-01-01

    Temporal and geographical variabilities in the future "World Expected" UV environment are compared with the "World Avoided", which would have occurred without the Montreal Protocol on protection of the ozone layer and its subsequent amendments and adjustments. Based on calculations of clear-sky UV irradiances, the effects of the Montreal Protocol have been hugely beneficial to avoid the health risks, such as skin cancer, which are associated with high UV, while there is only a small increase in health risks, such as vitamin D deficiency, that are associated with low UV. However, interactions with climate change may lead to changes in cloud and albedo, and possibly behavioural changes which could also be important.

  10. Threat detection system for intersection collision avoidance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jocoy, Edward H.; Pierowicz, John A.

    1998-01-01

    Calspan SRL Corporation is currently developing an on- vehicle threat detection system for intersection collision avoidance (ICA) as part of its ICA program with the National Highway Transportation Safety Administration. Crash scenarios were previously defined and an on-board radar sensor was designed. This paper describes recent efforts that include the development of a simulation of a multitarget tracker and collision avoidance algorithm used to predict system performance in a variety of target configurations in the various ICA crash scenarios. In addition, a current headway radar was mounted on the Calspan Instrumented Vehicle and in-traffic data were recorded for two limited crash scenarios. Warning functions were developed through the simulation and applied to the recorded data.

  11. Avoidant attachment and the experience of parenting.

    PubMed

    Rholes, W Steven; Simpson, Jeffry A; Friedman, Mike

    2006-03-01

    Guided by attachment theory, this research investigated connections between avoidant attachment styles and the experience of parenting after the birth of a couple's first child. One hundred and six couples completed a battery of measures approximately 6 weeks before and 6 months after the birth of their first child. As anticipated, parents with more avoidant attachment styles experienced greater stress after the birth of their child and perceived parenting as less satisfying and personally meaningful. Attachment theory maintains that adult attachment styles should affect relationships with adults and with one's children. The present findings provide some of the first evidence that self-reported adult romantic attachment styles, which have been the focus of attachment research by social and personality psychologists, are systematically associated with parent-child relationships. They also provide insight into the processes through which secure and insecure attachment styles might be transmitted from one generation to the next.

  12. How to avoid deferred-compensation troubles.

    PubMed

    Freeman, Todd I

    2005-06-01

    Executive compensation packages have long included stock options and deferred compensation plans in order to compete for talent. Last year, Congress passed a law in response to the Enron debacle, in which executives were perceived to be protecting their deferred compensation at the expense of employees, creditors, and investors. The new law is designed to protect companies and their shareholders from being raided by the very executives that guided the company to financial ruin. Physicians who are part owners of medical practices need to know about the changes in the law regarding deferred compensation and how to avoid costly tax penalties. This article discusses how the changes affect medical practices as well as steps physician-owned clinics can take to avoid the risk of penalty, such as freezing deferred compensation and creating a new deferred compensation plan.

  13. Shaping avoidance behavior in restrained monkeys.

    PubMed

    Lockard, J S

    1969-07-01

    Lever-pulling avoidance behavior of 24 monkeys was actively shaped with a manual shock-control box and a closed-circuit TV system. A negative reinforcement procedure was used wherein a periodically occurring body shock was postponed each time the subject moved toward the lever. All subjects were trainable with this method, two-thirds of them in fewer than five, 1- to 2-hr sessions. Negative reinforcement was more effective than a punishment procedure.

  14. [Mortality by avoidable causes in preschool children].

    PubMed

    Lurán, Albenia; López, Elizabeth; Pinilla, Consuelo; Sierra, Pedro

    2009-03-01

    The infant-mortality rate in children aged less than five is an indicator of the general state of health of a population and directly reflects the quality of life and the level of socio-economic development of a country. Avoidable mortality was assessed in preschool children as a reflection of Colombia quality of life and socio-economic development. Mortality trends were analyzed in preschool children aged less than five throughout Colombia during a 20-year period from 1985-2004, and focused on mortality causes that were considered avoidable. This was a descriptive, retrospective study; the sources of information were Departamento Administrativo Nacional de Estadística records of deaths and population projections 1985-2004. Mortality rate due to avoidable causes was the statistical indicator. In children aged less than one, the reducible mortality due to "early diagnosis and medical treatment" occupied the first place amongst causes for every year of the study period and accounted for more than 50% of recorded deaths. In children aged 1 to 4, the category "other important reducible causes" was associated with 40% of recorded deaths-deaths due mainly to respiratory diseases. Over the 20-year period, the avoidable mortality rate decreased by 34% in children aged less than one, in children 1-4, it decreased by 23%. Although the infant-mortality rate in preschool children was reduced, the decrease was small, from 80% to 77%. The situation requires more analysis with respect to strategies in public health, particularly concerning preventable diseases of the infancy.

  15. ALHAT: Autonomous Landing and Hazard Avoidance Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robertson, Edward A.; Carson, John M., III

    2015-01-01

    The ALHAT project was chartered by NASA HQ in 2006 to develop and mature to TRL 6 an autonomous lunar landing GN&C and sensing system for crewed, cargo, and robotic planetary landing vehicles. The multi-center ALHAT team was tasked with providing a system capable of identifying and avoiding surface hazards in real time to enable safe precision landing to within tens of meters of a designated planetary landing site under any lighting conditions.

  16. Functional neuroimaging of avoidance habits in OCD

    PubMed Central

    Gillan, Claire M; Apergis-Schoute, Annemieke M; Morein-Zamir, Sharon; Urcelay, Gonzalo P; Sule, Akeem; Fineberg, Naomi A; Sahakian, Barbara J; Robbins, Trevor W

    2016-01-01

    Objective The goal of this study was to determine the neural correlates of excessive habit formation in obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). We aimed to (i) test for neurobiological convergence with the known pathophysiology of OCD and (ii) infer, based on abnormalities in brain activation, whether these habits arise from dysfunction in the goal-directed or habit system. Method Thirty-seven OCD patients and 33 controls learned to avoid shocks while undergoing a functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) scan. Following 4 blocks of training, we tested if the avoidance response had become a habit by removing the threat of shock and measuring continued avoidance. We tested for task-related differences in brain activity in 3 ROIs, the caudate, putamen and medial orbitofrontal cortex at a statistical threshold of p<.05, family-wise error (FWE) corrected. Results We observed excessive habit formation in OCD patients, which was associated with hyper-activation in the caudate. Activation in this region was also associated with subjective ratings of increased urge to perform habits. The OCD group, as a whole, showed hyper-activation in the medial orbitofrontal cortex (mOFC) during the acquisition of avoidance, however this did not relate directly to habit formation. Conclusions OCD patients exhibited excessive habits that were associated with hyper-activation in a key region implicated in the pathophysiology of OCD, the caudate nucleus. Prior studies suggest that this region is important for goal-directed behavior, suggesting that habit-forming biases in OCD may be a result of impairments in this system, rather than differences in the build up of stimulus-response habits themselves. PMID:25526600

  17. Airborne Collision Detection and Avoidance for Small UAS Sense and Avoid Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahawneh, Laith Rasmi

    The increasing demand to integrate unmanned aircraft systems (UAS) into the national airspace is motivated by the rapid growth of the UAS industry, especially small UAS weighing less than 55 pounds. Their use however has been limited by the Federal Aviation Administration regulations due to collision risk they pose, safety and regulatory concerns. Therefore, before civil aviation authorities can approve routine UAS flight operations, UAS must be equipped with sense-and-avoid technology comparable to the see-and-avoid requirements for manned aircraft. The sense-and-avoid problem includes several important aspects including regulatory and system-level requirements, design specifications and performance standards, intruder detecting and tracking, collision risk assessment, and finally path planning and collision avoidance. In this dissertation, our primary focus is on developing an collision detection, risk assessment and avoidance framework that is computationally affordable and suitable to run on-board small UAS. To begin with, we address the minimum sensing range for the sense-and-avoid (SAA) system. We present an approximate close form analytical solution to compute the minimum sensing range to safely avoid an imminent collision. The approach is then demonstrated using a radar sensor prototype that achieves the required minimum sensing range. In the area of collision risk assessment and collision prediction, we present two approaches to estimate the collision risk of an encounter scenario. The first is a deterministic approach similar to those been developed for Traffic Alert and Collision Avoidance (TCAS) in manned aviation. We extend the approach to account for uncertainties of state estimates by deriving an analytic expression to propagate the error variance using Taylor series approximation. To address unanticipated intruders maneuvers, we propose an innovative probabilistic approach to quantify likely intruder trajectories and estimate the probability of

  18. Prevention and avoidance of congenital malformations.

    PubMed

    Nevin, N C

    1988-06-15

    Many congenital abnormalities do not have either a Mendelian pattern of inheritance or an identifiable chromosome abnormality and are described as 'multifactorial' as it is assumed they are determined by several genes, each with added effects and modified to a greater or lesser extent by environmental factors. They include spina bifida and anencephaly, cleft lip or cleft palate or both, congenital heart defect and congenital dislocation of the hip, and they constitute a major community health problem. Developments in genetics, biochemistry and cytogenetics have presented new approaches to the prevention and avoidance of congenital abnormalities. The approaches available for the avoidance of congenital malformations include the avoidance of harmful environmental factors, the screening of the newborn and early treatment, genetic counselling and antenatal monitoring with selective termination. The prevention of neural-tube defects in 'high risk' mothers can be achieved by periconceptional vitamin supplementation. In Northern Ireland, of 438 fully supplemented women, only 4 (0.98%) infants or fetuses among 407 infants and fetuses examined had a neural-tube defect, whereas of 356 unsupplemented women, 16 (4.7%) infants or fetuses among 337 infants or fetuses examined had a neural-tube defect.

  19. Urban water restrictions: Attitudes and avoidance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooper, Bethany; Burton, Michael; Crase, Lin

    2011-12-01

    In most urban cities across Australia, water restrictions remain the dominant policy mechanism to restrict urban water consumption. The extensive adoption of water restrictions as a means to limit demand, over several years, means that Australian urban water prices have consistently not reflected the opportunity cost of water. Given the generally strong political support for water restrictions and the likelihood that they will persist for some time, there is value in understanding households' attitudes in this context. More specifically, identifying the welfare gains associated with avoiding urban water restrictions entirely would be a nontrivial contribution to our knowledge and offer insights into the benefits of alternative policy responses. This paper describes the results from a contingent valuation study that investigates consumers' willingness to pay to avoid urban water restrictions. Importantly, the research also investigates the influence of cognitive and exogenous dimensions on the utility gain associated with avoiding water restrictions. The results provide insights into the impact of the current policy mechanism on economic welfare.

  20. Knowing and Avoiding Plagiarism During Scientific Writing

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, P Mohan; Priya, N Swapna; Musalaiah, SVVS; Nagasree, M

    2014-01-01

    Plagiarism has become more common in both dental and medical communities. Most of the writers do not know that plagiarism is a serious problem. Plagiarism can range from simple dishonesty (minor copy paste/any discrepancy) to a more serious problem (major discrepancy/duplication of manuscript) when the authors do cut-copy-paste from the original source without giving adequate credit to the main source. When we search databases like PubMed/MedLine there is a lot of information regarding plagiarism. However, it is still a current topic of interest to all the researchers to know how to avoid plagiarism. It's time to every young researcher to know ethical guidelines while writing any scientific publications. By using one's own ideas, we can write the paper completely without looking at the original source. Specific words from the source can be added by using quotations and citing them which can help in not only supporting your work and amplifying ideas but also avoids plagiarism. It is compulsory to all the authors, reviewers and editors of all the scientific journals to know about the plagiarism and how to avoid it by following ethical guidelines and use of plagiarism detection software while scientific writing. PMID:25364588

  1. Traffic jam driving with NMV avoidance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milanés, Vicente; Alonso, Luciano; Villagrá, Jorge; Godoy, Jorge; de Pedro, Teresa; Oria, Juan P.

    2012-08-01

    In recent years, the development of advanced driver assistance systems (ADAS) - mainly based on lidar and cameras - has considerably improved the safety of driving in urban environments. These systems provide warning signals for the driver in the case that any unexpected traffic circumstance is detected. The next step is to develop systems capable not only of warning the driver but also of taking over control of the car to avoid a potential collision. In the present communication, a system capable of autonomously avoiding collisions in traffic jam situations is presented. First, a perception system was developed for urban situations—in which not only vehicles have to be considered, but also pedestrians and other non-motor-vehicles (NMV). It comprises a differential global positioning system (DGPS) and wireless communication for vehicle detection, and an ultrasound sensor for NMV detection. Then, the vehicle's actuators - brake and throttle pedals - were modified to permit autonomous control. Finally, a fuzzy logic controller was implemented capable of analyzing the information provided by the perception system and of sending control commands to the vehicle's actuators so as to avoid accidents. The feasibility of the integrated system was tested by mounting it in a commercial vehicle, with the results being encouraging.

  2. How does a cyclist avoid obstacles?

    PubMed

    Miyadait, Masayuki; Uetake, Teruo; Shimoda, Masahiro

    2012-12-01

    The purpose of this research is to examine the ways bicycles swerve off sidewalks onto roads under various conditions. Seven students, five males and two females participated in an experiment on a road with a 100-cm wide sidewalk. Footage of each participant on a bicycle evading obstacles such as a utility pole and pedestrian were taken with a video camera, while a front-wheel view of the path taken by the bicycle was recorded simultaneously with a digital camera. Twelve experimental conditions were used for each participant, consisting of all the combinations of (1) three obstacle types, (2) the side (left or right) to which the bicycle went to avoid the obstacle, and (3) two weather conditions. Based on the two recorded scenes, the path was then analyzed from the viewpoint of how the bicycle swerved to avoid hitting the obstacle. We found that the conditions of riding a bicycle with an umbrella caused a larger swerve to avoid the obstacle than those conditions when the rider did not have an umbrella. In particular, the condition in which the obstacle was a pedestrian who also had an umbrella caused the largest swerve. Furthermore, the distance required to become aligned with the sidewalk when the obstacle was a pedestrian walking toward the cyclist was longer than that for other obstacles. The swerve width data showed interesting results, including a tendency for swerve width to be wider when the obstacle was a utility pole compared with other obstacles.

  3. Acute carbon dioxide avoidance in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Hallem, Elissa A.; Sternberg, Paul W.

    2008-01-01

    Carbon dioxide is produced as a by-product of cellular respiration by all aerobic organisms and thus serves for many animals as an important indicator of food, mates, and predators. However, whether free-living terrestrial nematodes such as Caenorhabditis elegans respond to CO2 was unclear. We have demonstrated that adult C. elegans display an acute avoidance response upon exposure to CO2 that is characterized by the cessation of forward movement and the rapid initiation of backward movement. This response is mediated by a cGMP signaling pathway that includes the cGMP-gated heteromeric channel TAX-2/TAX-4. CO2 avoidance is modulated by multiple signaling molecules, including the neuropeptide Y receptor NPR-1 and the calcineurin subunits TAX-6 and CNB-1. Nutritional status also modulates CO2 responsiveness via the insulin and TGFβ signaling pathways. CO2 response is mediated by a neural circuit that includes the BAG neurons, a pair of sensory neurons of previously unknown function. TAX-2/TAX-4 function in the BAG neurons to mediate acute CO2 avoidance. Our results demonstrate that C. elegans senses and responds to CO2 using multiple signaling pathways and a neural network that includes the BAG neurons and that this response is modulated by the physiological state of the worm. PMID:18524955

  4. Acute carbon dioxide avoidance in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Hallem, Elissa A; Sternberg, Paul W

    2008-06-10

    Carbon dioxide is produced as a by-product of cellular respiration by all aerobic organisms and thus serves for many animals as an important indicator of food, mates, and predators. However, whether free-living terrestrial nematodes such as Caenorhabditis elegans respond to CO2 was unclear. We have demonstrated that adult C. elegans display an acute avoidance response upon exposure to CO2 that is characterized by the cessation of forward movement and the rapid initiation of backward movement. This response is mediated by a cGMP signaling pathway that includes the cGMP-gated heteromeric channel TAX-2/TAX-4. CO2 avoidance is modulated by multiple signaling molecules, including the neuropeptide Y receptor NPR-1 and the calcineurin subunits TAX-6 and CNB-1. Nutritional status also modulates CO2 responsiveness via the insulin and TGFbeta signaling pathways. CO2 response is mediated by a neural circuit that includes the BAG neurons, a pair of sensory neurons of previously unknown function. TAX-2/TAX-4 function in the BAG neurons to mediate acute CO2 avoidance. Our results demonstrate that C. elegans senses and responds to CO2 using multiple signaling pathways and a neural network that includes the BAG neurons and that this response is modulated by the physiological state of the worm.

  5. A Cross-chiral RNA Polymerase Ribozyme

    PubMed Central

    Sczepanski, Jonathan T.; Joyce, Gerald F.

    2014-01-01

    Thirty years ago it was shown that the non-enzymatic, template-directed polymerization of activated mononucleotides proceeds readily in a homochiral system, but is severely inhibited by the presence of the opposing enantiomer.1 This finding poses a severe challenge for the spontaneous emergence of RNA-based life, and has led to the suggestion that either RNA was preceded by some other genetic polymer that is not subject to chiral inhibition2 or chiral symmetry was broken through chemical processes prior to the origin of RNA-based life.3,4 Once an RNA enzyme arose that could catalyze the polymerization of RNA, it would have been possible to distinguish among the two enantiomers, enabling RNA replication and RNA-based evolution to occur. It is commonly thought that the earliest RNA polymerase and its substrates would have been of the same handedness, but this is not necessarily the case. Replicating D-and L-RNA molecules may have emerged together, based on the ability of structured RNAs of one handedness to catalyze the templated polymerization of activated mononucleotides of the opposite handedness. Such a cross-chiral RNA polymerase has now been developed using in vitro evolution. The D-RNA enzyme, consisting of 83 nucleotides, catalyzes the joining of L-mono- or oligonucleotide substrates on a complementary L-RNA template, and similarly for the L-enzyme with D-substrates and a D-template. Chiral inhibition is avoided because the 106-fold rate acceleration of the enzyme only pertains to cross-chiral substrates. The enzyme's activity is sufficient to generate full-length copies of its enantiomer through the templated joining of 11 component oligonucleotides. PMID:25363769

  6. Predicting RNA pseudoknot folding thermodynamics

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Song; Chen, Shi-Jie

    2006-01-01

    Based on the experimentally determined atomic coordinates for RNA helices and the self-avoiding walks of the P (phosphate) and C4 (carbon) atoms in the diamond lattice for the polynucleotide loop conformations, we derive a set of conformational entropy parameters for RNA pseudoknots. Based on the entropy parameters, we develop a folding thermodynamics model that enables us to compute the sequence-specific RNA pseudoknot folding free energy landscape and thermodynamics. The model is validated through extensive experimental tests both for the native structures and for the folding thermodynamics. The model predicts strong sequence-dependent helix-loop competitions in the pseudoknot stability and the resultant conformational switches between different hairpin and pseudoknot structures. For instance, for the pseudoknot domain of human telomerase RNA, a native-like and a misfolded hairpin intermediates are found to coexist on the (equilibrium) folding pathways, and the interplay between the stabilities of these intermediates causes the conformational switch that may underlie a human telomerase disease. PMID:16709732

  7. Messenger RNA Decay.

    PubMed

    Kushner, Sidney R

    2007-04-01

    This chapter discusses several topics relating to the mechanisms of mRNA decay. These topics include the following: important physical properties of mRNA molecules that can alter their stability; methods for determining mRNA half-lives; the genetics and biochemistry of proteins and enzymes involved in mRNA decay; posttranscriptional modification of mRNAs; the cellular location of the mRNA decay apparatus; regulation of mRNA decay; the relationships among mRNA decay, tRNA maturation, and ribosomal RNA processing; and biochemical models for mRNA decay. Escherichia coli has multiple pathways for ensuring the effective decay of mRNAs and mRNA decay is closely linked to the cell's overall RNA metabolism. Finally, the chapter highlights important unanswered questions regarding both the mechanism and importance of mRNA decay.

  8. Avoiding Negative Outcomes: Tracking the Mechanisms of Avoidance Learning in Humans During Fear Conditioning

    PubMed Central

    Delgado, Mauricio R.; Jou, Rita L.; LeDoux, Joseph E.; Phelps, Elizabeth A.

    2009-01-01

    Previous research across species has shown that the amygdala is critical for learning about aversive outcomes, while the striatum is involved in reward-related processing. Less is known, however, about the role of the amygdala and the striatum in learning how to exert control over emotions and avoid negative outcomes. One potential mechanism for active avoidance of stressful situations is postulated to involve amygdala–striatal interactions. The goal of this study was to investigate the physiological and neural correlates underlying avoidance learning in humans. Specifically, we used a classical conditioning paradigm where three different conditioned stimuli (CS) were presented. One stimulus predicted the delivery of a shock upon stimulus offset (CS+), while another predicted no negative consequences (CS−). A third conditioned cue also predicted delivery of a shock, but participants were instructed that upon seeing this stimulus, they could avoid the shock if they chose the correct action (AV+). After successful learning, participants could then easily terminate the shock during subsequent stimulus presentations (AV−). Physiological responses (as measured by skin conductance responses) confirmed a main effect of conditioning, particularly showing higher arousal responses during pre (AV+) compared to post (AV−) learning of an avoidance response. Consistent with animal models, amygdala–striatal interactions were observed to underlie the acquisition of an avoidance response. These results support a mechanism of active coping with conditioned fear that allows for the control over emotional responses such as fears that can become maladaptive and influence our decision-making. PMID:19847311

  9. Avoiding negative outcomes: tracking the mechanisms of avoidance learning in humans during fear conditioning.

    PubMed

    Delgado, Mauricio R; Jou, Rita L; Ledoux, Joseph E; Phelps, Elizabeth A

    2009-01-01

    Previous research across species has shown that the amygdala is critical for learning about aversive outcomes, while the striatum is involved in reward-related processing. Less is known, however, about the role of the amygdala and the striatum in learning how to exert control over emotions and avoid negative outcomes. One potential mechanism for active avoidance of stressful situations is postulated to involve amygdala-striatal interactions. The goal of this study was to investigate the physiological and neural correlates underlying avoidance learning in humans. Specifically, we used a classical conditioning paradigm where three different conditioned stimuli (CS) were presented. One stimulus predicted the delivery of a shock upon stimulus offset (CS+), while another predicted no negative consequences (CS-). A third conditioned cue also predicted delivery of a shock, but participants were instructed that upon seeing this stimulus, they could avoid the shock if they chose the correct action (AV+). After successful learning, participants could then easily terminate the shock during subsequent stimulus presentations (AV-). Physiological responses (as measured by skin conductance responses) confirmed a main effect of conditioning, particularly showing higher arousal responses during pre (AV+) compared to post (AV-) learning of an avoidance response. Consistent with animal models, amygdala-striatal interactions were observed to underlie the acquisition of an avoidance response. These results support a mechanism of active coping with conditioned fear that allows for the control over emotional responses such as fears that can become maladaptive and influence our decision-making.

  10. Avoiding unseen obstacles: Subcortical vision is not sufficient to maintain normal obstacle avoidance behaviour during reaching.

    PubMed

    Ross, Alasdair I; Schenk, Thomas; Billino, Jutta; Macleod, Mary J; Hesse, Constanze

    2016-10-03

    Previous research found that a patient with cortical blindness (homonymous hemianopia) was able to successfully avoid an obstacle placed in his blind field, despite reporting no conscious awareness of it [Striemer, C. L., Chapman, C. S., & Goodale, M. A., 2009, PNAS, 106(37), 15996-16001]. This finding led to the suggestion that dorsal stream areas, that are assumed to mediate obstacle avoidance behaviour, may obtain their visual input primarily from subcortical pathways. Hence, it was suggested that normal obstacle avoidance behaviour can proceed without input from the primary visual cortex. Here we tried to replicate this finding in a group of patients (N = 6) that suffered from highly circumscribed lesions in the occipital lobe (including V1) that spared the subcortical structures that have been associated with action-blindsight. We also tested if obstacle avoidance behaviour differs depending on whether obstacles are placed only in the blind field or in both the blind and intact visual field of the patients simultaneously. As expected, all patients successfully avoided obstacles placed in their intact visual field. However, none of them showed reliable avoidance behaviour - as indicated by adjustments in the hand trajectory in response to obstacle position - for obstacles placed in their blind visual field. The effects were not dependent on whether one or two obstacles were present. These findings suggest that behaviour in complex visuomotor tasks relies on visual input from occipital areas.

  11. A Viral RNA Structural Element Alters Host Recognition of Nonself RNA

    SciTech Connect

    Hyde, J. L.; Gardner, C. L.; Kimura, T.; White, J. P.; Liu, G.; Trobaugh, D. W.; Huang, C.; Tonelli, M.; Paessler, S.; Takeda, K.; Klimstra, W. B.; Amarasinghe, G. K.; Diamond, M. S.

    2014-01-30

    Although interferon (IFN) signaling induces genes that limit viral infection, many pathogenic viruses overcome this host response. As an example, 2'-O methylation of the 5' cap of viral RNA subverts mammalian antiviral responses by evading restriction of Ifit1, an IFN-stimulated gene that regulates protein synthesis. However, alphaviruses replicate efficiently in cells expressing Ifit1 even though their genomic RNA has a 5' cap lacking 2'-O methylation. We show that pathogenic alphaviruses use secondary structural motifs within the 5' untranslated region (UTR) of their RNA to alter Ifit1 binding and function. Mutations within the 5'-UTR affecting RNA structural elements enabled restriction by or antagonism of Ifit1 in vitro and in vivo. These results identify an evasion mechanism by which viruses use RNA structural motifs to avoid immune restriction.

  12. RNA as an Enzyme.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cech, Thomas R.

    1986-01-01

    Reviews current findings that explain RNA's function as an enzyme in addition to being an informational molecule. Highlights recent research efforts and notes changes in the information base on RNA activity. Includes models and diagrams of RNA activity. (ML)

  13. RNA as an Enzyme.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cech, Thomas R.

    1986-01-01

    Reviews current findings that explain RNA's function as an enzyme in addition to being an informational molecule. Highlights recent research efforts and notes changes in the information base on RNA activity. Includes models and diagrams of RNA activity. (ML)

  14. Convective Weather Avoidance with Uncertain Weather Forecasts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karahan, Sinan; Windhorst, Robert D.

    2009-01-01

    Convective weather events have a disruptive impact on air traffic both in terminal area and in en-route airspaces. In order to make sure that the national air transportation system is safe and efficient, it is essential to respond to convective weather events effectively. Traffic flow control initiatives in response to convective weather include ground delay, airborne delay, miles-in-trail restrictions as well as tactical and strategic rerouting. The rerouting initiatives can potentially increase traffic density and complexity in regions neighboring the convective weather activity. There is a need to perform rerouting in an intelligent and efficient way such that the disruptive effects of rerouting are minimized. An important area of research is to study the interaction of in-flight rerouting with traffic congestion or complexity and developing methods that quantitatively measure this interaction. Furthermore, it is necessary to find rerouting solutions that account for uncertainties in weather forecasts. These are important steps toward managing complexity during rerouting operations, and the paper is motivated by these research questions. An automated system is developed for rerouting air traffic in order to avoid convective weather regions during the 20- minute - 2-hour time horizon. Such a system is envisioned to work in concert with separation assurance (0 - 20-minute time horizon), and longer term air traffic management (2-hours and beyond) to provide a more comprehensive solution to complexity and safety management. In this study, weather is dynamic and uncertain; it is represented as regions of airspace that pilots are likely to avoid. Algorithms are implemented in an air traffic simulation environment to support the research study. The algorithms used are deterministic but periodically revise reroutes to account for weather forecast updates. In contrast to previous studies, in this study convective weather is represented as regions of airspace that pilots

  15. Precision Landing and Hazard Avoidance Doman

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robertson, Edward A.; Carson, John M., III

    2016-01-01

    The Precision Landing and Hazard Avoidance (PL&HA) domain addresses the development, integration, testing, and spaceflight infusion of sensing, processing, and GN&C functions critical to the success and safety of future human and robotic exploration missions. PL&HA sensors also have applications to other mission events, such as rendezvous and docking. Autonomous PL&HA builds upon the core GN&C capabilities developed to enable soft, controlled landings on the Moon, Mars, and other solar system bodies. Through the addition of a Terrain Relative Navigation (TRN) function, precision landing within tens of meters of a map-based target is possible. The addition of a 3-D terrain mapping lidar sensor improves the probability of a safe landing via autonomous, real-time Hazard Detection and Avoidance (HDA). PL&HA significantly improves the probability of mission success and enhances access to sites of scientific interest located in challenging terrain. PL&HA can also utilize external navigation aids, such as navigation satellites and surface beacons. Advanced Lidar Sensors High precision ranging, velocimetry, and 3-D terrain mapping Terrain Relative Navigation (TRN) TRN compares onboard reconnaissance data with real-time terrain imaging data to update the S/C position estimate Hazard Detection and Avoidance (HDA) Generates a high-resolution, 3-D terrain map in real-time during the approach trajectory to identify safe landing targets Inertial Navigation During Terminal Descent High precision surface relative sensors enable accurate inertial navigation during terminal descent and a tightly controlled touchdown within meters of the selected safe landing target.

  16. Carnivore carcasses are avoided by carnivores.

    PubMed

    Moleón, Marcos; Martínez-Carrasco, Carlos; Muellerklein, Oliver C; Getz, Wayne M; Muñoz-Lozano, Carlos; Sánchez-Zapata, José A

    2017-09-01

    Ecologists have traditionally focused on herbivore carcasses as study models in scavenging research. However, some observations of scavengers avoiding feeding on carnivore carrion suggest that different types of carrion may lead to differential pressures. Untested assumptions about carrion produced at different trophic levels could therefore lead ecologists to overlook important evolutionary processes and their ecological consequences. Our general goal was to investigate the use of mammalian carnivore carrion by vertebrate scavengers. In particular, we aimed to test the hypothesis that carnivore carcasses are avoided by other carnivores, especially at the intraspecific level, most likely to reduce exposure to parasitism. We take a three-pronged approach to study this principle by: (i) providing data from field experiments, (ii) carrying out evolutionary simulations of carnivore scavenging strategies under risks of parasitic infection, and (iii) conducting a literature-review to test two predictions regarding parasite life-history strategies. First, our field experiments showed that the mean number of species observed feeding at carcasses and the percentage of consumed carrion biomass were substantially higher at herbivore carcasses than at carnivore carcasses. This occurred even though the number of scavenger species visiting carcasses and the time needed by scavengers to detect carcasses were similar between both types of carcasses. In addition, we did not observe cannibalism. Second, our evolutionary simulations demonstrated that a risk of parasite transmission leads to the evolution of scavengers with generally low cannibalistic tendencies, and that the emergence of cannibalism-avoidance behaviour depends strongly on assumptions about parasite-based mortality rates. Third, our literature review indicated that parasite species potentially able to follow a carnivore-carnivore indirect cycle, as well as those transmitted via meat consumption, are rare in our study

  17. Avoidance learning: a review of theoretical models and recent developments

    PubMed Central

    Krypotos, Angelos-Miltiadis; Effting, Marieke; Kindt, Merel; Beckers, Tom

    2015-01-01

    Avoidance is a key characteristic of adaptive and maladaptive fear. Here, we review past and contemporary theories of avoidance learning. Based on the theories, experimental findings and clinical observations reviewed, we distill key principles of how adaptive and maladaptive avoidance behavior is acquired and maintained. We highlight clinical implications of avoidance learning theories and describe intervention strategies that could reduce maladaptive avoidance and prevent its return. We end with a brief overview of recent developments and avenues for further research. PMID:26257618

  18. Identifying and Avoiding Bias in Research

    PubMed Central

    Pannucci, Christopher J.; Wilkins, Edwin G.

    2010-01-01

    This narrative review provides an overview on the topic of bias as part of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery's series of articles on evidence-based medicine. Bias can occur in the planning, data collection, analysis, and publication phases of research. Understanding research bias allows readers to critically and independently review the scientific literature and avoid treatments which are suboptimal or potentially harmful. A thorough understanding of bias and how it affects study results is essential for the practice of evidence-based medicine. PMID:20679844

  19. Avoiding plagiarism: guidance for nursing students.

    PubMed

    Price, Bob

    The pressures of study, diversity of source materials, past assumptions relating to good writing practice, ambiguous writing guidance on best practice and students' insecurity about their reasoning ability, can lead to plagiarism. With the use of source checking software, there is an increased chance that plagiarised work will be identified and investigated, and penalties given. In extreme cases, plagiarised work may be reported to the Nursing and Midwifery Council and professional as well as academic penalties may apply. This article provides information on how students can avoid plagiarism when preparing their coursework for submission.

  20. Collision Avoidance for Airport Traffic Simulation Evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Denise R.; Prinzel, Lawrence J., III; Shelton, Kevin J.; Bailey, Randall E.; Otero, Sharon D.; Barker, Glover D.

    2010-01-01

    A Collision Avoidance for Airport Traffic (CAAT) concept for the airport Terminal Maneuvering Area (TMA) was evaluated in a simulation study at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Langley Research Center. CAAT is being designed to enhance surface situation awareness and provide cockpit alerts of potential conflicts during runway, taxi, and low altitude air-to-air operations. The purpose of the study was to evaluate pilot reaction to conflict events in the TMA near the airport, different alert timings for various scenarios, alerting display concepts, and directive alerting concepts. This paper gives an overview of the conflict detection and resolution (CD&R) concept, simulation study, and test results

  1. Debate: Albumin administration should not be avoided

    PubMed Central

    Allison, Simon P; Lobo, Dileep N

    2000-01-01

    The recent Cochrane report on albumin administration is analysed and criticised on the grounds of clinical methodology, content and interpretation. Although it is naïve and illogical to treat hypoalbuminaemia with albumin infusions, a more balanced view on the use of albumin for resuscitation in acute hypovolaemia is necessary. Once the acute phase of critical illness is past, interstitial volume is often expanded causing oedema, with a low plasma volume. We argue for the use of salt-poor albumin solutions in this situation and conclude that, on current evidence, the assertion that albumin should be avoided in all situations is irrational and untenable. PMID:11211855

  2. Avoiding harm in peritoneal dialysis patients.

    PubMed

    Bender, Filitsa H

    2012-05-01

    This review is focused on minimizing complications and avoiding harm in peritoneal dialysis (PD) patients. Issues related to planning for PD are covered first, with emphasis on PD versus hemodialysis outcomes. Catheter types and insertion techniques are described next, including relevant recommendations by the International Society for Peritoneal Dialysis. A brief review of both noninfectious and infectious complications follows, with emphasis on cardiovascular and metabolic complications. Finally, recommendations for preventing PD-related infections are provided. In conclusion, with proper catheter insertion technique, good training, and attention to detail during the tenure in PD, excellent outcomes can be obtained in a well-informed motivated patient.

  3. Living with Nuclear Weapons - Avoiding Nuclear War

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-06-01

    00 LIVING ’V1I4. NUCL EAR WEAPONS -AVOIDING NUCLEAR W~AR C. Pr~ston Niblack ..une -8 P-75-7 The RAND ",rporation Papers are issued by The RAND...necessarily shared by RAND or its research sponsors. The RAND Corporation. 1700 Main Street, P ) Bix 213t8, Santa Monica, CA 90406- � LIVING WITH NUCLEAR...is p"etty impressive. Still, nuclear weapons exist . and that alone is very womsome to many people. including to all of us here, because as long as they

  4. Collision Avoidance for Airport Traffic Concept Evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Denise R.; Prinzel, Lawrence J., III; Otero, Sharon D.; Barker, Glover D.

    2009-01-01

    An initial Collision Avoidance for Airport Traffic (CAAT) concept for the Terminal Maneuvering Area (TMA) was evaluated in a simulation study at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Langley Research Center. CAAT is being designed to enhance surface situation awareness and provide cockpit alerts of potential conflicts during runway, taxi, and low altitude air-to-air operations. The purpose of the study was to evaluate the initial concept for an aircraft-based method of conflict detection and resolution (CD&R) in the TMA focusing on conflict detection algorithms and alerting display concepts. This paper gives an overview of the CD&R concept, simulation study, and test results.

  5. Avoiding Lawsuits for Wage and Hour Violations.

    PubMed

    Silberman, Cherie L

    2016-01-01

    Due to the highly technical language in the wage and hour laws and regulations, employers often find that they have unknowingly violated the Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA). This can occur because employers have improperly classified an employee as exempt or because employers do not realize that certain time should be paid in full. Improperly classifying employees as exempt or failing to compensate nonexempt employees for all time worked can lead to costly lawsuits, audits, or enforcement actions by the Wage and Hour Division of the Department of Labor. This article discusses the most common FLSA exemptions and provides best practices to avoid liability under the FLSA.

  6. Avoiding multiple pregnancies: sailing uncharted seas.

    PubMed

    Hernandez, E R

    2001-04-01

    Single embryo transfer is being proposed as the solution to avoid multiple pregnancies in IVF. Nevertheless, in my opinion, although this is the right solution, it is still not the correct one at the present time. Mainly, it is unfair to the majority of infertile couples and it will also severely limit the physician's capacity to resolve unfavourable IVF cases. Furthermore, current IVF technology is far from perfect and the impact of single embryo transfer needs to be evaluated in patients over 38 years of age, poor responders, and also in regard to blastocyst transfer and the development of pre-implantation genetic diagnosis.

  7. Disrupted avoidance learning in functional neurological disorder: Implications for harm avoidance theories.

    PubMed

    Morris, Laurel S; To, Benjaman; Baek, Kwangyeol; Chang-Webb, Yee-Chien; Mitchell, Simon; Strelchuk, Daniela; Mikheenko, Yevheniia; Phillips, Wendy; Zandi, Michael; Jenaway, Allison; Walsh, Cathy; Voon, Valerie

    2017-01-01

    Functional neurological disorder (FND) is an elusive disorder characterized by unexplained neurological symptoms alongside aberrant cognitive processing and negative affect, often associated with amygdala reactivity. We examined the effect of negative conditioning on cognitive function and amygdala reactivity in 25 FND patients and 20 healthy volunteers (HV). Participants were first conditioned to stimuli paired with negative affective or neutral (CS +/CS -) information. During functional MRI, subjects then performed an instrumental associative learning task to avoid monetary losses in the context of the previously conditioned stimuli. We expected that FND patients would be better at learning to avoid losses when faced with negatively conditioned stimuli (increased harm avoidance). Multi-echo resting state fMRI was also collected from the same subjects and a robust denoising method was employed, important for removing motion and physiological artifacts. FND subjects were more sensitive to the negative CS + compared to HV, demonstrated by a reinforcement learning model. Contrary to expectation, FND patients were generally more impaired at learning to avoid losses under both contexts (CS +/CS -), persisting to choose the option that resulted in a negative outcome demonstrated by both behavioural and computational analyses. FND patients showed enhanced amygdala but reduced dorsolateral prefrontal cortex responses when they received negative feedback. Patients also had increased resting state functional connectivity between these two regions. FND patients had impaired instrumental avoidance learning, findings that parallel previous observations of impaired action-outcome binding. FND patients further show enhanced behavioural and neural sensitivity to negative information. However, this did not translate to improved avoidance learning. Put together, our findings do not support the theory of harm avoidance in FND. We highlight a potential mechanism by which

  8. Honey bees selectively avoid difficult choices.

    PubMed

    Perry, Clint J; Barron, Andrew B

    2013-11-19

    Human decision-making strategies are strongly influenced by an awareness of certainty or uncertainty (a form of metacognition) to increase the chances of making a right choice. Humans seek more information and defer choosing when they realize they have insufficient information to make an accurate decision, but whether animals are aware of uncertainty is currently highly contentious. To explore this issue, we examined how honey bees (Apis mellifera) responded to a visual discrimination task that varied in difficulty between trials. Free-flying bees were rewarded for a correct choice, punished for an incorrect choice, or could avoid choosing by exiting the trial (opting out). Bees opted out more often on difficult trials, and opting out improved their proportion of successful trials. Bees could also transfer the concept of opting out to a novel task. Our data show that bees selectively avoid difficult tasks they lack the information to solve. This finding has been considered as evidence that nonhuman animals can assess the certainty of a predicted outcome, and bees' performance was comparable to that of primates in a similar paradigm. We discuss whether these behavioral results prove bees react to uncertainty or whether associative mechanisms can explain such findings. To better frame metacognition as an issue for neurobiological investigation, we propose a neurobiological hypothesis of uncertainty monitoring based on the known circuitry of the honey bee brain.

  9. An Algorithm for Autonomous Formation Obstacle Avoidance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cruz, Yunior I.

    The level of human interaction with Unmanned Aerial Systems varies greatly from remotely piloted aircraft to fully autonomous systems. In the latter end of the spectrum, the challenge lies in designing effective algorithms to dictate the behavior of the autonomous agents. A swarm of autonomous Unmanned Aerial Vehicles requires collision avoidance and formation flight algorithms to negotiate environmental challenges it may encounter during the execution of its mission, which may include obstacles and chokepoints. In this work, a simple algorithm is developed to allow a formation of autonomous vehicles to perform point to point navigation while avoiding obstacles and navigating through chokepoints. Emphasis is placed on maintaining formation structures. Rather than breaking formation and individually navigating around the obstacle or through the chokepoint, vehicles are required to assemble into appropriately sized/shaped sub-formations, bifurcate around the obstacle or negotiate the chokepoint, and reassemble into the original formation at the far side of the obstruction. The algorithm receives vehicle and environmental properties as inputs and outputs trajectories for each vehicle from start to the desired ending location. Simulation results show that the algorithm safely routes all vehicles past the obstruction while adhering to the aforementioned requirements. The formation adapts and successfully negotiates the obstacles and chokepoints in its path while maintaining proper vehicle separation.

  10. Underactuated spacecraft formation reconfiguration with collision avoidance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Xu; Yan, Ye; Zhou, Yang

    2017-02-01

    Underactuated collision-free controllers are proposed in this paper for multiple spacecraft formation reconfiguration in circular orbits with the loss of either the radial or in-track thrust. A nonlinear dynamical model of underactuated formation flying is introduced, which is then linearized about circular orbits for controllability and feasibility analyses on underactuated formation reconfiguration. By using the inherent dynamics coupling of system states, reduced-order sliding mode controllers are then designed for either case to indirectly stabilize the system trajectories to the desired formations. In consideration of the collision-avoidance requirement, the artificial potential function method is then employed to design novel underactuated collision-avoidance maneuvers. Rigorous proof substantiates the capabilities of such maneuvers in preventing collisions even in the absence of radial or in-track thrust. Furthermore, a Lyapunov-based analysis ensures the asymptotic stability of the overall closed-loop system. Numerical simulations are performed in a J2-perturbed environment to verify the validity of the proposed underactuated control schemes for collision-free reconfiguration.

  11. Collision avoidance for CTV: Requirements and capabilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nosek, Thomas P.

    1991-01-01

    Cargo transfer vehicle (CTV) operations near Space Station Freedom will require positive collision avoidance maneuver (CAM) capability to preclude any change of collision, even in the event of CTV failures. The requirements for CAM are discussed, and the CAM design approach and design of the Orbiting Maneuvering Vehicle (OMV) are reviewed; this design met requirements for OMV operation near the Space Station, provided a redundant collision avoidance maneuver capability. Significant portions of the OMV CAM design should be applicable to CTV. The key features of the OMV design are summarized and related to the CTV mission design to that of OMV's. CAM is a defined sequence of events executed by the CTV to place the vehicle in a safe position relative to a target such as the Space Station. CAM can be performed through software commands to the propulsion system, or through commands pre-stored in hardware. Various techniques for triggering CAM are considered, and the risks associated with CAM enable and execution in phases are considered. OMV CAM design features both hardware and software CAM capability, with analyses conducted to assess the ability to meet the collision-free requirement during all phases of the mission.

  12. Collision avoidance for CTV: Requirements and capabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nosek, Thomas P.

    Cargo transfer vehicle (CTV) operations near Space Station Freedom will require positive collision avoidance maneuver (CAM) capability to preclude any change of collision, even in the event of CTV failures. The requirements for CAM are discussed, and the CAM design approach and design of the Orbiting Maneuvering Vehicle (OMV) are reviewed; this design met requirements for OMV operation near the Space Station, provided a redundant collision avoidance maneuver capability. Significant portions of the OMV CAM design should be applicable to CTV. The key features of the OMV design are summarized and related to the CTV mission design to that of OMV's. CAM is a defined sequence of events executed by the CTV to place the vehicle in a safe position relative to a target such as the Space Station. CAM can be performed through software commands to the propulsion system, or through commands pre-stored in hardware. Various techniques for triggering CAM are considered, and the risks associated with CAM enable and execution in phases are considered. OMV CAM design features both hardware and software CAM capability, with analyses conducted to assess the ability to meet the collision-free requirement during all phases of the mission.

  13. Spectrum of self-avoiding walk exponents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Douglas, Jack; Guttman, Charles M.; Mah, Alex; Ishinabe, Takao

    1997-01-01

    A short range interaction is incorporated into the self-avoiding walk (SAW) model of polymer chains by partitioning SAW's into equivalence classes of chain configurations having m nearest-neighbor contacts, and performing an energetically weighted averaging over these restricted SAW configurations. Surprisingly, there have been limited studies of the geometrical properties of 'contact-constrained' SAW configurations, which contrasts with the well studied unrestricted SAW"s. Accordingly, we generate Monte Carlo data for the total number of SAW configurations Cn,m having a fixed number of contacts m for chains of length n on square and cubic lattices. Applications of the standard ratio method to the Cn,m data shows a unique connectivity constant μ (NAW), corresponding to neighbor-avoiding walks (m=0), and a 'spectrum' of γ exponents which depend on the contact number m. The asymptotic scaling of the number of contact-constrained SAW's is found to be similar to the number of lattice animals and random plaquette surfaces having a fixed cyclomatic index c and genus g, respectively. The existence of this common structure is promising for the development of an analytic theory of interacting polymers and surfaces.

  14. Bleeding Avoidance Strategies: Consensus and Controversy

    PubMed Central

    Dauerman, Harold L.; Rao, Sunil V.; Resnic, Frederic S.; Applegate, Robert J.

    2011-01-01

    Bleeding complications after coronary intervention are associated with prolonged hospitalization, increased hospital costs, patient dissatisfaction, morbidity and one year mortality. Bleeding Avoidance Strategies represent a term incorporating multiple modalities that aim to reduce bleeding and vascular complications after cardiovascular catheterization. Recent improvements in the rates of bleeding complications after invasive cardiovascular procedures suggests that the clinical community has successfully embraced specific strategies and improved patient care in this area. There remains controversy regarding the efficacy, safety and/or practicality of 3 key bleeding avoidance strategies for cardiac catheterization and coronary intervention: procedural (radial artery approach, safezone arteriotomy), pharmacologic (multiple agents) and technological (vascular closure devices) approaches to improved access. In this article, we address areas of consensus with respect to selected modalities in order to define the role of each strategy in current practice. Furthermore, we focus on areas of controversy for selected modalities in order to define key areas warranting cautious clinical approaches and the need for future randomized clinical trials in this area. PMID:21700085

  15. Bleeding avoidance strategies. Consensus and controversy.

    PubMed

    Dauerman, Harold L; Rao, Sunil V; Resnic, Frederic S; Applegate, Robert J

    2011-06-28

    Bleeding complications after coronary intervention are associated with prolonged hospitalization, increased hospital costs, patient dissatisfaction, morbidity, and 1-year mortality. Bleeding avoidance strategies is a term incorporating multiple modalities that aim to reduce bleeding and vascular complications after cardiovascular catheterization. Recent improvements in the rates of bleeding complications after invasive cardiovascular procedures suggest that the clinical community has successfully embraced specific strategies and improved patient care in this area. There remains controversy regarding the efficacy, safety, and/or practicality of 3 key bleeding avoidance strategies for cardiac catheterization and coronary intervention: procedural (radial artery approach, safezone arteriotomy), pharmacological (multiple agents), and technological (vascular closure devices) approaches to improved access. In this paper, we address areas of consensus with respect to selected modalities in order to define the role of each strategy in current practice. Furthermore, we focus on areas of controversy for selected modalities in order to define key areas warranting cautious clinical approaches and the need for future randomized clinical trials in this area.

  16. Avoidance of strobe lights by zooplankton

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hamel, Martin J.; Richards, Nathan S.; Brown, Michael L.; Chipps, Steven R.

    2010-01-01

    Underwater strobe lights can influence the behavior and distribution of fishes and are increasingly used as a technique to divert fish away from water intake structures on dams. However, few studies examine how strobe lights may affect organisms other than targeted species. To gain insight on strobe lighting effects on nontarget invertebrates, we investigated whether underwater strobe lights influence zooplankton distributions and abundance in Lake Oahe, South Dakota. Zooplankton were collected using vertical tows at 3 discrete distances from an underwater strobe light to quantify the influence of light intensity on zooplankton density. Samples were collected from 3 different depth ranges (0–10 m, 10–20 m and 20–30 m) at <1 m, 15 m and ⩾100 m distance intervals away from the strobe light. Copepods represented 67.2% and Daphnia spp. represented 23.3% of all zooplankton sampled from 17 August to 15 September 2004. Night time zooplankton densities significantly decreased in surface waters when strobe lights were activated. Copepods exhibited the greatest avoidance patterns, while Daphnia avoidance varied throughout sampling depths. These results indicate that zooplankton display negative phototaxic behavior to strobe lights and that researchers must be cognizant of potential effects to the ecosystem such as altering predator–prey interactions or affecting zooplankton distribution and growth.

  17. Avoiding humiliations in the clinical encounter

    PubMed Central

    Malterud, Kirsti; Hollnagel, Hanne

    2007-01-01

    Objectives To explore potentials for avoiding humiliations in clinical encounters, especially those that are unintended and unrecognized by the doctor. Furthermore, to examine theoretical foundations of degrading behaviour and identify some concepts that can be used to understand such behaviour in the cultural context of medicine. Finally, these concepts are used to build a model for the clinician in order to prevent humiliation of the patient. Theoretical frame of reference Empirical studies document experiences of humiliation among patients when they see their doctor. Philosophical and sociological analysis can be used to explain the dynamics of unintended degrading behaviour between human beings. Skjervheim, Vetlesen, and Bauman have identified the role of objectivism, distantiation, and indifference in the dynamics of evil acts, pointing to the rules of the cultural system, rather than accusing the individual of bad behaviour. Examining the professional role of the doctor, parallel traits embedded in the medical culture are demonstrated. According to Vetlesen, emotional awareness is necessary for moral perception, which again is necessary for moral performance. Conclusion A better balance between emotions and rationality is needed to avoid humiliations in the clinical encounter. The Awareness Model is presented as a strategy for clinical practice and education, emphasizing the role of the doctor's own emotions. Potentials and pitfalls are discussed. PMID:17497482

  18. Lobeline produces conditioned taste avoidance in rats.

    PubMed

    Harrod, S B; Dwoskin, L P; Bardo, M T

    2004-05-01

    Previous results indicate that pretreatment with lobeline attenuates methamphetamine (METH) self-administration in rats, but not by acting as a substitute reinforcer. Given these findings, it has been suggested that lobeline may serve as a useful pharmacotherapy for psychostimulant abuse. However, because lobeline produces emesis and nausea in humans, the present study examined whether lobeline has direct effects on taste avoidance behavior in rats within the same dose range shown previously to decrease METH self-administration. Two experiments utilized a Pavlovian conditioning procedure to determine if lobeline produces conditioned taste avoidance (CTA) in rats. In Experiments 1 and 2, rats consumed either novel milk or salt solutions, respectively, and within 10 min, were injected with lobeline (0.3-3.0 mg/kg) or METH (0.3-3.0 mg/kg). A single-bottle test conducted 48 h after flavor-drug pairings indicated that the dose of lobeline that reduced METH self-administration in a previous study (i.e., 3.0 mg/kg) also produced reliable CTA for milk and salt solution. These findings suggest a need to develop lobeline analogs that reduce METH self-administration, but do not produce CTA following the consumption of a novel solution.

  19. Avoiding versus seeking: the relationship of information seeking to avoidance, blunting, coping, dissonance, and related concepts.

    PubMed

    Case, Donald O; Andrews, James E; Johnson, J David; Allard, Suzanne L

    2005-07-01

    How have theorists and empirical researchers treated the human tendency to avoid discomforting information? A historical review (1890-2004) of theory literature in communication and information studies, coupled with searches of recent studies on uptake of genetic testing and on coping strategies of cancer patients, was performed. The authors' review of the recent literature included searches of the MEDLINE, PsychInfo, and CINAHL databases between 1992 and summer of 2004 and selective, manual searches of earlier literature. Search strategies included the following subject headings and key words: MeSH headings: Genetic Screening/psychology, Decision Making, Neoplasms/diagnosis/genetics/psychology; CINAHL headings: Genetic Screening, Genetic Counseling, Anxiety, Decision Making, Decision Making/Patient; additional key words: avoidance, worry, monitoring, blunting, cancer. The "Related Articles" function in MEDLINE was used to perform additional "citation pearl" searching. The assumption that individuals actively seek information underlies much of psychological theory and communication practice, as well as most models of the information-seeking process. However, much research has also noted that sometimes people avoid information, if paying attention to it will cause mental discomfort or dissonance. Cancer information in general and genetic screening for cancer in particular are discussed as examples to illustrate this pattern. That some patients avoid knowledge of imminent disease makes avoidance behavior an important area for social and psychological research, particularly with regard to genetic testing.

  20. Rumination and implicit avoidance following bereavement: an approach avoidance task investigation.

    PubMed

    Eisma, Maarten C; Rinck, Mike; Stroebe, Margaret S; Schut, Henk A W; Boelen, Paul A; Stroebe, Wolfgang; van den Bout, Jan

    2015-06-01

    Rumination, a risk factor in adjustment to bereavement, has often been considered a confrontation process. However, building on research on worry in generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) and rumination in post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), researchers recently developed the Rumination as Avoidance Hypothesis (RAH), which states that rumination after bereavement serves to avoid the reality of the loss. In the present study, RAH was tested by investigating if rumination is associated with implicit loss avoidance. An Approach Avoidance Task (AAT) was used to assess automatic behavior tendencies. Using a joystick, 71 persons who recently lost a first-degree relative (90.1% women), pulled stimuli toward themselves or pushed them away from themselves. Stimuli represented the loss (picture deceased + loss word), were loss-related but ambiguous (picture deceased + neutral word; picture stranger + loss word), or were non-loss-related (picture stranger + neutral word; puzzle picture + X's). Participants who ruminated more were relatively faster in pushing loss stimuli away from themselves and slower in pulling loss stimuli towards themselves, implying more rumination was associated with stronger implicit loss avoidance. Effects were maintained after controlling for depressive or post-traumatic stress symptom levels, but not when controlling for prolonged grief symptom levels. Conjugally bereaved women were overrepresented in the sample, which limits generalizability of results. The study was correlational, precluding causal inferences. In line with RAH, rumination was positively associated with loss avoidance. This may indicate that the application of exposure-based techniques can reduce rumination and loss-related psychopathology. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Avoiding microRNA Function Through Alternative Polyadenylation in Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-04-01

    recombinant nucleo - somes have demonstrated that ASH1L is a dimethy- lase that is specific for H3K36 (REFS 41,48). However, ASH1L has also been reported...factors10. However, it remains possible that this pheno type may arise from indirect effects on nucleo - tide metabolism. Nevertheless, Set2 associates...been reported. Yeast Set2 represses transcription from a lacZ reporter and, in Set2-deletion mutants, the basal levels of GAL4 transcription are

  2. Colostomy closure: how to avoid complications

    PubMed Central

    Levitt, Marc A.; Lawal, Taiwo A.; Peña, Alberto

    2010-01-01

    Purpose Colostomy is an operation frequently performed in pediatric surgery. Despite its benefits, it can produce significant morbidity. In a previous publication we presented our experience with the errors and complications that occurred during cases of colostomy creation. We now have focused in the morbidity related to the colostomy closure. The technical details that might have contributed to the minimal morbidity we experienced are described. Methods The medical records of 649 patients who underwent colostomy closure over a 28-year period were retrospectively reviewed looking for complications following these procedures. Our perioperative protocol for colostomy closure consisted in: clear fluids by mouth and repeated proximal stoma irrigations 24 h prior to the operation. Administration of IV antibiotics during anesthesia induction and continued for 48 h. Meticulous surgical technique that included: packing of the proximal stoma, plastic drape to immobilize the surgical field, careful hemostasis, emphasis in avoiding contamination, cleaning the edge of the stomas to allow a good 2-layer, end-to-end anastomosis with separated long-term absorbable sutures, generous irrigation of the peritoneal cavity and subsequent layers with saline solution, closure by layers to avoid dead space, and avoidance of hematomas. No drains and no nasogastric tubes were used. Oral fluids were started the day after surgery and patients were discharged 48–72 h after the operation. Results The original diagnoses of the patients were: anorectal malformation (583), Hirschsprung’s disease (53), and others (13). 10 patients (1.5%) had complications: 6 had intestinal obstruction (5 due to small bowel adhesions, 1 had temporary delay of the function of the anastomosis due to a severe size discrepancy between proximal and distal stoma with a distal microcolon) and 4 incisional hernias. There were no anastomotic dehiscences or wound infection. There was no bleeding, no anastomotic

  3. Avoiding the death risk of avoiding a dread risk: the aftermath of March 11 in Spain.

    PubMed

    López-Rousseau, Alejandro

    2005-06-01

    Abstract-After the airplane attacks of September 11, 2001, in the United States, many Americans drove instead of flying, to avoid the risk of terrorism. As a result, there were extra car accidents in which many people died. This study tested whether a similar effect occurred in Spain after the train bombings of March 11, 2004, in Madrid. Data on train travel, highway traffic, and fatal highway accidents were analyzed for the months immediately following March 11. Results show that, like Americans, Spaniards avoided the dread risk of terror attacks, but unlike Americans, they did not confront the death risk of fatal accidents instead. A sociopolitical interpretation for these findings is offered.

  4. Life stressors, emotional avoidance and breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Cardenal, Violeta; Ortiz-Tallo, Margarita; Martín Frías, Isabel; Martínez Lozano, Joaquina

    2008-11-01

    Two groups of women were assessed in psychological aspects considered by some authors of interest for personal well-being. The sample consisted of 118 women, 58 diagnosed with breast cancer and 60 healthy women, of similar ages and personal circumstances. The purpose of the study was: (a) to explore the existence of stressful life events in the women's history and their degree of subjective distress and (b) to determine whether or not there is an emotional avoidance style in the group of women with breast cancer. The following assessment instruments were employed: the "Cuestionario de Formas de Afrontamiento" (CEA), the Five-Factor Inventory NEO-PI-R, and the State-Trait Anger Inventory (STAXI). The results revealed more stressful vital events in the last two years in the group of women with breast cancer and significant differences in the degree of current distress. They also obtained higher scores in current anger, resignation, and neuroticism.

  5. Unstable avoided crossing in coupled spinor condensates.

    PubMed

    Bernier, Nathan R; Dalla Torre, Emanuele G; Demler, Eugene

    2014-08-08

    We consider the dynamics of a Bose-Einstein condensate with two internal states, coupled through a coherent drive. We focus on a specific quench protocol, in which the sign of the coupling field is suddenly changed. At a mean-field level, the system is transferred from a minimum to a maximum of the coupling energy and can remain dynamically stable, in spite of the development of negative-frequency modes. In the presence of a nonzero detuning between the two states, the "charge" and "spin" modes couple, giving rise to an unstable avoided crossing. This phenomenon is generic to systems with two dispersing modes away from equilibrium and constitutes an example of class-I(o) nonequilibrium pattern formation in quantum systems.

  6. NASA satellite helps airliners avoid ozone concentrations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    Results from a test to determine the effectiveness of satellite data for helping airlines avoid heavy concentrations of ozone are reported. Information from the Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer, aboard the Nimbus-7 was transmitted, for use in meteorological forecast activities. The results show: (1) Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer profile of total ozone in the atmosphere accurately represents upper air patterns and can be used to locate meteorological activity; (2) route forecasting of highly concentrated ozone is feasible; (3) five research aircraft flights were flown in jet stream regions located by the Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer to determine winds, temperatures, and air composition. It is shown that the jet stream is coincides with the area of highest total ozone gradient, and low total ozone amounts are found where tropospheric air has been carried along above the tropopause on the anticyclonic side of the subtropical jet stream.

  7. Avoiding potential problems when selling accounts receivable.

    PubMed

    Ayers, D H; Kincaid, T J

    1996-05-01

    Accounts receivable financing is a potential tool for managing a provider organization's working capital needs. But before entering into a financing agreement, organizations need to consider and take steps to avoid serious problems that can arise from participation in an accounts receivable financing program. For example, the purchaser may cease purchasing the receivables, leaving the organization without funding needed for operations. Or, the financing program may be inordinately complex and unnecessarily costly to the organization. Sometimes the organization itself may fail to comply with the terms of the agreement under which the accounts receivable were sold, thus necessitating that restitution be made to the purchaser or provoking charges of fraud. These potential problems should be addressed as early as possible--before an organization enters into an accounts receivable financing program--in order to minimize time, effort, and expanse and maximize the benefits of the financing agreement.

  8. [UNESCO's bioethical norms to avoid eugenic practices].

    PubMed

    Cruz-Coke, R

    2000-06-01

    The author, member of the UNESCO Bioethics Committee, participated in the preparation of the Universal Declaration about Human Genome and Human Rights, in 1997. The aim of this work is to analyze the initial articles of such Declaration, defining the bioethical principles that defend human dignity, freedom and rights, against the madness of the present biotechnological revolution. The development of genetics for the benefit of mankind will be guaranteed if these principles are honored. Genetic discrimination, reductionism and determinism, are identified by the author as perversions that, if used by biotechnologists, can lead to the rebirth of eugenism and racism, that were condemned by the Code of Nuremberg, in 1947. Investigators must assume their responsibility, respecting the principles of human dignity, the real freedom of research and solidarity among people. This attitude will avoid the use of genetics for purposes other than the welfare of mankind.

  9. Communication-avoiding symmetric-indefinite factorization

    SciTech Connect

    Ballard, Grey Malone; Becker, Dulcenia; Demmel, James; Dongarra, Jack; Druinsky, Alex; Peled, Inon; Schwartz, Oded; Toledo, Sivan; Yamazaki, Ichitaro

    2014-11-13

    We describe and analyze a novel symmetric triangular factorization algorithm. The algorithm is essentially a block version of Aasen's triangular tridiagonalization. It factors a dense symmetric matrix A as the product A=PLTLTPT where P is a permutation matrix, L is lower triangular, and T is block tridiagonal and banded. The algorithm is the first symmetric-indefinite communication-avoiding factorization: it performs an asymptotically optimal amount of communication in a two-level memory hierarchy for almost any cache-line size. Adaptations of the algorithm to parallel computers are likely to be communication efficient as well; one such adaptation has been recently published. As a result, the current paper describes the algorithm, proves that it is numerically stable, and proves that it is communication optimal.

  10. Communication-avoiding symmetric-indefinite factorization

    DOE PAGES

    Ballard, Grey Malone; Becker, Dulcenia; Demmel, James; ...

    2014-11-13

    We describe and analyze a novel symmetric triangular factorization algorithm. The algorithm is essentially a block version of Aasen's triangular tridiagonalization. It factors a dense symmetric matrix A as the product A=PLTLTPT where P is a permutation matrix, L is lower triangular, and T is block tridiagonal and banded. The algorithm is the first symmetric-indefinite communication-avoiding factorization: it performs an asymptotically optimal amount of communication in a two-level memory hierarchy for almost any cache-line size. Adaptations of the algorithm to parallel computers are likely to be communication efficient as well; one such adaptation has been recently published. As a result,more » the current paper describes the algorithm, proves that it is numerically stable, and proves that it is communication optimal.« less

  11. Avoiding accidental exposure to intravenous cytotoxic drugs.

    PubMed

    Meade, Elizabeth

    Many cytotoxic drugs have been shown to be mutagenic, teratogenic and carcinogenic with second malignancies known to be associated with several specific cancer drugs. Occupational exposure to cytotoxic drugs presents a signification danger to healthcare staff and unwarranted handling of these drugs should be avoided. Guidelines have been established for the safe handling of hazardous drugs but not all professionals are adhering to these recommendations. Recent environmental studies have demonstrated measurable drug contamination on surfaces even when recommended guidelines are followed. It is therefore imperative that healthcare workers are aware of the potential hazards of antineoplastic agents and employ the recommended precautions to minimise exposure. This article outlines the potential risks associated with exposure to cytotoxic drugs for healthcare staff. The safe-handling precautions required in the storage, preparation, transport, administration and waste disposal of cytotoxic drugs are presented.

  12. Mars rover local navigation and hazard avoidance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilcox, B. H.; Gennery, D. B.; Mishkin, A. H.

    1989-01-01

    A Mars rover sample return mission has been proposed for the late 1990's. Due to the long speed-of-light delays between earth and Mars, some autonomy on the rover is highly desirable. JPL has been conducting research in two possible modes of rover operation, Computer-Aided Remote Driving and Semiautonomous Navigation. A recently-completed research program used a half-scale testbed vehicle to explore several of the concepts in semiautonomous navigation. A new, full-scale vehicle with all computational and power resources on-board will be used in the coming year to demonstrate relatively fast semiautonomous navigation. The computational and power requirements for Mars rover local navigation and hazard avoidance are discussed.

  13. Environment - avoiding destructive remediation at DOE sites.

    SciTech Connect

    Whicker, F. W.; MacDonell, M. M.; Hinton, T. G.; Pinder, J. E., III; Habegger, L. J.; Environmental Assessment; usdoe

    2004-03-12

    Public perceptions and regulatory agreements have forced the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to spend tens of billions of dollars for environmental cleanup of relatively low levels of contamination of soil and water within the nuclear weapons complex. Much of this costly remediation has caused significant ecological damage, but has not resulted in corresponding reductions in public health risks. This Policy Forum offers a potential remedy involving continued federal control of the larger DOE lands and cleanup criteria based on long-term protection of ecosystems and public health, rather than criteria based on the protection of hypothetical future site residents. Recent DOE policy to avoid unnecessary environmental damage using a risk-based strategy is briefly described.

  14. Geriatric gynecology: promoting health and avoiding harm.

    PubMed

    Miller, Karen L; Baraldi, Carole A

    2012-11-01

    Age increases vulnerability, commonly accompanied by greater reliance on others and susceptibility to maltreatment. Physiologic processes become less resilient; the potential for harm from medical care increases. Awareness of frailty, functional, social, and potential maltreatment issues enables early referrals to help the patient maintain her independence. Health issues that may impede both gynecologic care and self-sufficiency include sensory deficits, physical disability, and cognitive impairment. Speaking slowly and providing contextual information enhance patient comprehension. Cancer screening depends on life expectancy. Osteoporosis treatment requires managing fall risk. Gynecologic symptoms more likely have multiple contributing factors than one etiology. Incontinence is a particularly complex issue, but invariably includes bladder diary assessment and pelvic floor muscle training. Function and frailty measures best predict perioperative morbidity. Communication with the patient, her family, other providers, and health care organizations is an important frontier in avoiding errors and adverse outcomes.

  15. Avoiding sexual harassment liability in veterinary practices.

    PubMed

    Lacroix, C A; Wilson, J F

    1996-05-15

    Harassment based on gender violates the rule of workplace equality established by Title VII of the Civil Rights Act and enforced by the EEOC. In 1986, the US Supreme Court, in Meritor Savings Bank v Vinson, established the criteria that must be met for a claim of hostile environment sexual harassment to be considered valid. Plaintiffs must show that they were subjected to conduct based on their gender, that it was unwelcome, and that it was severe and pervasive enough to alter their condition of employment, resulting in an abusive working environment. There have been few sexual harassment cases involving veterinary professionals, and it is our goal to help keep the number of filed actions to a minimum. The most effective way to avoid hostile environment sexual harassment claims is to confront the issue openly and to adopt a sexual harassment policy for the practice. When it comes to sexual harassment, an ounce of prevention is unquestionably worth a pound of cure.

  16. Avoiding potholes on the information highway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pagano, Ralph V.

    1996-03-01

    This paper addresses the underlying legal issues that must be considered prior to engaging in the development of multimedia and Internet applications. The often overlooked topics presented in this paper will show the audience, both developers and end users alike, what is required to help pave the information highway. Topics that are covered are: who owns the software, the developer or the party that commissioned the work; whether the current intellectual property laws create a gap in protection of multimedia software; what are the rights and obligations of the software developer and the commissioner; what is one's exposure to liability and how it can be minimized; and, whether one can be held legally responsible for merely selling multimedia software. Multimedia law is a burgeoning area, and in many ways, our laws have not kept pace with technology. Therefore, those involved with developing multimedia applications must be extremely careful to protect their rights, and to avoid liability.

  17. School Nurses Avoid Addressing Child Sexual Abuse.

    PubMed

    Engh Kraft, Lisbet; Rahm, GullBritt; Eriksson, Ulla-Britt

    2017-04-01

    Child sexual abuse (CSA) is a global public health problem with major consequences for the individual child and society. An earlier Swedish study showed that the school nurses did not initially talk about nor mention CSA as one form of child abuse. For the child to receive adequate support, the disclosure is a precondition and is dependent on an available person prepared to listen. The aim of the study was to explore the ability of the school nurses to detect and support sexually abused children. It is a secondary analysis of focus group interviews with school nurses. Thematic analysis was performed. Results showed that the school nurses avoided addressing CSA due to arousal of strong emotions, ambivalence, and a complicated disclosure process. In order to detect CSA and support abused children, attentiveness of sexual abuse as a possible cause of physical and mental ill-health is crucial.

  18. T7-RNA Polymerase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    T7-RNA Polymerase grown on STS-81. Structure-Function Relationships of RNA Polymerase: DNA-dependent RNA polymerase is the key enzyme responsible for the biosynthesis of RNA, a process known as transcription. Principal Investigator's include Dr. Dan Carter, Dr. B.C. Wang, and Dr. John Rose of New Century Pharmaceuticals.

  19. T7-RNA Polymerase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    T7-RNA Polymerase grown on STS-81. Structure-Function Relationships of RNA Polymerase: DNA-dependent RNA polymerase is the key enzyme responsible for the biosynthesis of RNA, a process known as transcription. Principal Investigator's include Dr. Dan Carter, Dr. B.C. Wang, and Dr. John Rose of New Century Pharmaceuticals.

  20. Experiential Avoidance and Technological Addictions in Adolescents.

    PubMed

    García-Oliva, Carlos; Piqueras, José A

    2016-06-01

    Background and aims This study focuses on the use of popular information and communication technologies (ICTs) by adolescents: the Internet, mobile phones, and video games. The relationship of ICT use and experiential avoidance (EA), a construct that has emerged as underlying and transdiagnostic to a wide variety of psychological problems, including behavioral addictions, is examined. EA refers to a self-regulatory strategy involving efforts to control or escape from negative stimuli such as thoughts, feelings, or sensations that generate strong distress. This strategy, which may be adaptive in the short term, is problematic if it becomes an inflexible pattern. Thus, the aim of this study was to explore whether EA patterns were associated with addictive or problematic use of ICT in adolescents. Methods A total of 317 students of the Spanish southeast between 12 and 18 years old were recruited to complete a questionnaire that included questions about general use of each ICTs, an experiential avoidance questionnaire, a brief inventory of the Big Five personality traits, and specific questionnaires on problematic use of the Internet, mobile phones, and video games. Results Correlation analysis and linear regression showed that EA largely explained results regarding the addictive use of the Internet, mobile phones, and video games, but not in the same way. As regards gender, boys showed a more problematic use of video games than girls. Concerning personality factors, conscientiousness was related to all addictive behaviors. Discussion and conclusions We conclude that EA is an important construct that should be considered in future models that attempt to explain addictive behaviors.

  1. Experiential Avoidance and Technological Addictions in Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    García-Oliva, Carlos; Piqueras, José A.

    2016-01-01

    Background and aims This study focuses on the use of popular information and communication technologies (ICTs) by adolescents: the Internet, mobile phones, and video games. The relationship of ICT use and experiential avoidance (EA), a construct that has emerged as underlying and transdiagnostic to a wide variety of psychological problems, including behavioral addictions, is examined. EA refers to a self-regulatory strategy involving efforts to control or escape from negative stimuli such as thoughts, feelings, or sensations that generate strong distress. This strategy, which may be adaptive in the short term, is problematic if it becomes an inflexible pattern. Thus, the aim of this study was to explore whether EA patterns were associated with addictive or problematic use of ICT in adolescents. Methods A total of 317 students of the Spanish southeast between 12 and 18 years old were recruited to complete a questionnaire that included questions about general use of each ICTs, an experiential avoidance questionnaire, a brief inventory of the Big Five personality traits, and specific questionnaires on problematic use of the Internet, mobile phones, and video games. Results Correlation analysis and linear regression showed that EA largely explained results regarding the addictive use of the Internet, mobile phones, and video games, but not in the same way. As regards gender, boys showed a more problematic use of video games than girls. Concerning personality factors, conscientiousness was related to all addictive behaviors. Discussion and conclusions We conclude that EA is an important construct that should be considered in future models that attempt to explain addictive behaviors. PMID:27363463

  2. Avoiding Braess' Paradox Through Collective Intelligence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolpert , David H.; Tumer, Kagan

    1999-01-01

    In an Ideal Shortest Path Algorithm (ISPA), at each moment each router in a network sends all of its traffic down the path that will incur the lowest cost to that traffic. In the limit of an infinitesimally small amount of traffic for a particular router, its routing that traffic via an ISPA is optimal, as far as cost incurred by that traffic is concerned. We demonstrate though that in many cases, due to the side-effects of one router's actions on another routers performance, having routers use ISPA's is suboptimal as far as global aggregate cost is concerned, even when only used to route infinitesimally small amounts of traffic. As a particular example of this we present an instance of Braess' paradox for ISPA'S, in which adding new links to a network decreases overall throughput. We also demonstrate that load-balancing, in which the routing decisions are made to optimize the global cost incurred by all traffic currently being routed, is suboptimal as far as global cost averaged across time is concerned. This is also due to "side-effects", in this case of current routing decision on future traffic. The theory of COllective INtelligence (COIN) is concerned precisely with the issue of avoiding such deleterious side-effects. We present key concepts from that theory and use them to derive an idealized algorithm whose performance is better than that of the ISPA, even in the infinitesimal limit. We present experiments verifying this, and also showing that a machine-learning-based version of this COIN algorithm in which costs are only imprecisely estimated (a version potentially applicable in the real world) also outperforms the ISPA, despite having access to less information than does the ISPA. In particular, this COIN algorithm avoids Braess' paradox.

  3. "Watch out!": Effects of instructed threat and avoidance on human free-operant approach-avoidance behavior.

    PubMed

    Schlund, Michael W; Treacher, Kay; Preston, Oli; Magee, Sandy K; Richman, David M; Brewer, Adam T; Cameron, Gemma; Dymond, Simon

    2017-01-01

    Approach-avoidance paradigms create a competition between appetitive and aversive contingencies and are widely used in nonhuman research on anxiety. Here, we examined how instructions about threat and avoidance impact control by competing contingencies over human approach-avoidance behavior. Additionally, Experiment 1 examined the effects of threat magnitude (money loss amount) and avoidance cost (fixed ratio requirements), whereas Experiment 2 examined the effects of threat information (available, unavailable and inaccurate) on approach-avoidance. During the task, approach responding was modeled by reinforcing responding with money on a FR schedule. By performing an observing response, participants produced an escalating "threat meter". Instructions stated that the threat meter levels displayed the current probability of losing money, when in fact loss only occurred when the level reached the maximum. Instructions also stated pressing an avoidance button lowered the threat level. Overall, instructions produced cycles of approach and avoidance responding with transitions from approach to avoidance when threat was high and transitions back to approach after avoidance reduced threat. Experiment 1 revealed increasing avoidance cost, but not threat magnitude, shifted approach-avoidance transitions to higher threat levels and increased anxiety ratings, but did not influence the frequency of approach-avoidance cycles. Experiment 2 revealed when threat level information was available or absent earnings were high, but earnings decreased when inaccurate threat information was incompatible with contingencies. Our findings build on prior nonhuman and human approach-avoidance research by highlighting how instructed threat and avoidance can impact human AA behavior and self-reported anxiety.

  4. Avoidance and rheotropic responses in phycomyces. Evidence for an 'avoidance gas" mechanism

    PubMed Central

    1982-01-01

    If a mature sporangiophore is placed next to a barrier that is moving in a clockwise direction, it grows both away from the barrier and into the wind; the wind is generated by the moving barrier itself. When the barrier is moving in a counterclockwise direction, the sporangiophore grows towards both the barrier and the wind. The net direction of growth appears to be the vector sum of the rheotropic response and the avoidance aiming error and does not involve the classic stationary- barrier avoidance response. Our experiments all support the suggestion that the avoidance response, the rheotropic response and the variety of reported wind responses can be explained by the presence of a self- emitted, growth-simulating avoidance gas. We present data that suggest that it is the direction of the net flux (mass transfer) of this gas that determines both the direction and the magnitude of the sporangiophore growth. We further suggest that the region of the cell wall showing maximum mass transfer will show a minimum growth rate, i.e., the direction of growth will always be in the direction of maximum transfer. If water is the avoidance gas, then it would follow that the total hydration of the cell wall in an aqueous salt solution should result in cell wall softening; cell wall softening has been correlated directly to cell wall growth. Using the Instron technique, we now show that submerging the entire sporangiophore in an aqueous salt solution for 4 min causes an increase in cell wall extensibility. PMID:7097245

  5. Real-Time Collision Avoidance for Dexterous 7-DOF Arms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bon, Bruce; Seraji, Homayoun

    1996-01-01

    A new approach to real-time collison avoidance for dexterous 7-DOF arms and supportive simulation and experimental results are presented. The collision avoidance problem is formulated and solved as a force control problem.

  6. An empirical study of defensive avoidance in paranoia.

    PubMed

    Moutoussis, Michael; El-Deredy, Wael; Bentall, Richard P

    2015-03-01

    There is controversy as to whether psychological defensive avoidance is associated with paranoia. To elucidate whether "Poor-me" paranoid patients, who believe that the persecution they perceive is undeserved, show more prominent avoidance of negative thoughts about themselves than healthy and clinical controls. The act of avoidance of aversive mental contents was assessed in 27 healthy controls and 48 patients with poor-me, bad-me (perceived to be deserved) or no paranoia. Defensive avoidance was assessed via established questionnaires, a novel task based on self-discrepancy theory and research-clinician ratings. Participants in all groups showed substantial levels of verbal defensive avoidance. Paranoia was associated with reduced self-reported tolerance of negative mental contents (high Experiential Avoidance, EA). Contrary to our hypotheses, poor-me and bad-me patients showed similar EA. All participant groups showed similar levels of verbal defensive avoidance. The findings do not support an association of psychological avoidance with paranoia.

  7. Genes May Explain Why Kids with Autism Avoid Eye Contact

    MedlinePlus

    ... May Explain Why Kids With Autism Avoid Eye Contact More research could shed light on how these ... with autism spectrum disorders tend to avoid eye contact and look away from other people's mouths, behaviors ...

  8. [What type of avoidance for peanut allergic children?].

    PubMed

    Feuillet-Dassonval, C; Agne, P-S-A; Rancé, F; Bidat, E

    2006-09-01

    We analyzed, from the literature, the balance benefit/risk of a strict avoidance of peanut in children with peanut allergy. The benefits of a strict avoidance diet seem limited: reactions to the low doses and to the peanut oil refined are rare and most often slight. It is not proven that a strict avoidance facilitates the cure of allergy. On the other hand, strict avoidance could induce a worsening of allergy, with deterioration of quality of life, creation of food neophobia. In case of cure of allergy, it is difficult to normalize the diet after a strict avoidance. Outside of the rare sensitive patients to a very low dose of peanut, for which a strict avoidance is counseled, the report benefits risk is in favor of the prescription of adapted avoidance to the eliciting dose. For the majority of the peanut allergic children, it seems to us that the avoidance can and must be limited to the non hidden peanut.

  9. You Have Diabetes. How Can You Avoid Serious Eye Diseases?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Rehabilitation World Sight Day You have diabetes. How can you avoid serious eye diseases? Did you know ... cure for diabetes. But careful monitoring and control can help you avoid unnecessary vision loss and other ...

  10. Analysis RNA-seq and Noncoding RNA.

    PubMed

    Arrigoni, Alberto; Ranzani, Valeria; Rossetti, Grazisa; Panzeri, Ilaria; Abrignani, Sergio; Bonnal, Raoul J P; Pagani, Massimiliano

    2016-01-01

    RNA-Seq is an approach to transcriptome profiling that uses deep-sequencing technologies to detect and accurately quantify RNA molecules originating from a genome at a given moment in time. In recent years, the advent of RNA-Seq has facilitated genome-wide expression profiling, including the identification of novel and rare transcripts like noncoding RNAs and novel alternative splicing isoforms.Here, we describe the analytical steps required for the identification and characterization of noncoding RNAs starting from RNA-Seq raw samples, with a particular emphasis on long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs).

  11. Adaptive limit margin detection and limit avoidance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yavrucuk, Ilkay

    This thesis concerns the development of methods, algorithms, and control laws for the development of an adaptive flight envelope protection system to be used for both manned and unmanned aircraft. The proposed method lifts the requirement for detailed a priori information of aircraft dynamics by enabling adaptation to system uncertainty. The system can be used for limits that can be either measured or related to selected measurable quantities. Specifically, an adaptive technique for predicting limit margins and calculating the corresponding allowable control or controller command margins of an aircraft is described in an effort to enable true carefree maneuvering. This new approach utilizes adaptive neural network based loops for the approximation of required aircraft dynamics. For limits that reach their maximum value in steady state, a constructed estimator model is used to predict the maneuvering quasi-steady response behavior---the so called dynamic trim---of the limit parameters and the corresponding control or command margins. Linearly Parameterized Neural Networks as well as Single Hidden Layer Neural Networks are used for on-line adaptation. The approach does not require any off-line training of the neural networks, instead all learning is achieved during flight. Lyapunov based weight update laws are derived. The method is extended for multi-channelled control limiting for aircraft subject to multiple limits, and for automatic control and command limiting for UAV's. Simulation evaluations of the method using a linear helicopter model and a nonlinear Generalized Tiltrotor Simulation (GTRSIM) model are presented. Limit avoidance methods are integrated and tested through the implementation of an artificial pilot model and an active-stick controller model for tactile cueing in the tiltrotor simulation, GTRSIM. Load factor, angle-of-attack, and torque limits are considered as examples. Similarly, the method is applied to the Georgia Tech's Yamaha R-Max (GTMax

  12. Conjunctions and Collision Avoidance with Electrodynamic Tethers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levin, E.

    2013-09-01

    Electrodynamic propulsion technology is currently in development by NASA, ESA, and JAXA for the purpose of affordable removal of large debris objects from LEO. At the same time, the Naval Research Laboratory is preparing a 3U CubeSat with a 1-km electrodynamic tether for a flight demonstration of electrodynamic propulsion. This type of propulsion does not require fuel. The electrodynamic thrust is the Lorentz force acting on the electric current in a long conductor (tether) in the geomagnetic field. Electrons are collected from the ambient plasma on one end and emitted back into the plasma from the other end. The electric current loop is closed through the ionosphere, as demonstrated in two previous flights. The vehicle is solar powered. To support safe navigation of electrodynamic tethers, proper conjunction analysis and collision avoidance strategies are needed. The typical lengths of electrodynamic tethers for near-term applications are measured in kilometers, and the conjunction geometry is very different from the geometry of conjunctions between compact objects. It is commonly thought that the collision cross-section in a conjunction between a tether and a compact object is represented by the product of the tether length and the size of the object. However, rigorous analysis shows that this is not the case, and that the above assumption leads to grossly overestimated collision probabilities. The paper will present the results of a detailed mathematical analysis of the conjunction geometry and collision probabilities in close approaches between electrodynamic tethers and compact objects, such as satellites, rocket bodies, and debris fragments. Electrodynamic spacecraft will not require fuel, and therefore, can thrust constantly. Their orbit transfers can take many days, but can result in major orbit changes, including large rotations of the orbital plane, both in the inclination and the node. During these orbit transfers, the electrodynamic spacecraft will

  13. Landslide disaster avoidance: learning from Leyte

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davies, T. R.

    2006-12-01

    On 17 February 2006 a gigantic rockslide triggered a debris avalanche that overran the barangay Guinsaugon, St. Bernard in Southern Leyte Province, Philippines, burying 154 victims, with 990 missing including 246 school children. Even with satellite imagery, GIS-based landslide susceptibility modelling and real-time meteorological and seismic data analysis, scientific prediction of every potentially fatal landslide is not possible in most parts of the world. This is particular the case in steep, unstable, densely-populated country in which heavy rain is common. So how can further events of this type be prevented from turning into disasters? A number of precursory phenomena were noted by local inhabitants at Guinsaugon: a crack around the slope that failed was noticed in May 2005; coconut trees near the northern foot of the landslide scarp began to lean increasingly in the down-slope direction in December 2005; a slope around the northern edge of the 17 February 2006 landslide scarp failed on December 17, 2005; in the 9 days prior to the rockslide, 640 mm of rain fell; 450 mm in a 3-day period. Such phenomena are commonly reported by local inhabitants before large landslides (e.g. Elm, Mayunmarca, and many others). In many cases, therefore, it is in principle possible for local people to avoid the consequences of the landslide if they know enough to act appropriately in response to the precursory phenomena. For this possibility to be realized, appropriate information must be provided to and assimilated by the local population. Useful ways of achieving this include pamphlets, video, TV and radio programs and visits from civil defence personnel. The information must be properly presented; scientific language will be ineffective. A communication pyramid, leading from government agencies to local leaders, can facilitate the rapid availability of the information to all potentially susceptible communities. If science can determine those areas not vulnerable to landslide

  14. 50 CFR 600.510 - Gear avoidance and disposal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 10 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Gear avoidance and disposal. 600.510... Gear avoidance and disposal. (a) Vessel and gear avoidance. (1) FFV's arriving on fishing grounds where fishing vessels are already fishing or have set their gear for that purpose must ascertain the...

  15. 50 CFR 600.510 - Gear avoidance and disposal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 12 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Gear avoidance and disposal. 600.510... Gear avoidance and disposal. (a) Vessel and gear avoidance. (1) FFV's arriving on fishing grounds where fishing vessels are already fishing or have set their gear for that purpose must ascertain the...

  16. 50 CFR 600.510 - Gear avoidance and disposal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 12 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Gear avoidance and disposal. 600.510... Gear avoidance and disposal. (a) Vessel and gear avoidance. (1) FFV's arriving on fishing grounds where fishing vessels are already fishing or have set their gear for that purpose must ascertain the...

  17. 47 CFR 51.609 - Determination of avoided retail costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Determination of avoided retail costs. 51.609... (CONTINUED) INTERCONNECTION Resale § 51.609 Determination of avoided retail costs. (a) Except as provided in § 51.611, the amount of avoided retail costs shall be determined on the basis of a cost study that...

  18. 47 CFR 74.403 - Frequency selection to avoid interference.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Frequency selection to avoid interference. 74... Pickup Broadcast Stations § 74.403 Frequency selection to avoid interference. (a) Where two or more... select frequencies or schedule operation in such manner as to avoid mutual interference. If mutual...

  19. 34 CFR 75.611 - Avoidance of flood hazards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Avoidance of flood hazards. 75.611 Section 75.611... by a Grantee? Construction § 75.611 Avoidance of flood hazards. In planning the construction, a...) Evaluate flood hazards in connection with the construction; and (b) As far as practicable, avoid uneconomic...

  20. 14 CFR 121.356 - Collision avoidance system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Collision avoidance system. 121.356 Section... Collision avoidance system. Effective January 1, 2005, any airplane you operate under this part must be equipped and operated according to the following table: Collision Avoidance Systems If you operate...

  1. 50 CFR 600.510 - Gear avoidance and disposal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 8 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Gear avoidance and disposal. 600.510... Gear avoidance and disposal. (a) Vessel and gear avoidance. (1) FFV's arriving on fishing grounds where... safety of the ship or crew, or as specifically authorized by communication from the appropriate...

  2. 14 CFR 417.231 - Collision avoidance analysis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Collision avoidance analysis. 417.231..., DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION LICENSING LAUNCH SAFETY Flight Safety Analysis § 417.231 Collision avoidance analysis. (a) General. A flight safety analysis must include a collision avoidance analysis...

  3. 20 CFR 606.24 - Application for avoidance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Application for avoidance. 606.24 Section 606... Credit Reduction § 606.24 Application for avoidance. (a) Application. (1) The Governor of the State shall... respect to which a State requests avoidance of tax credit reduction. The Governor is required to...

  4. 14 CFR 129.18 - Collision avoidance system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Collision avoidance system. 129.18 Section... § 129.18 Collision avoidance system. Effective January 1, 2005, any airplane you, as a foreign air... Avoidance Systems If you operate in the United States any . . . Then you must operate that airplane with:...

  5. 20 CFR 606.23 - Avoidance of tax credit reduction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Avoidance of tax credit reduction. 606.23... Tax Credit Reduction § 606.23 Avoidance of tax credit reduction. (a) Applicability. Subsection (g) of... receipts and benefit outlays under the law in effect for the year for which avoidance is requested, as...

  6. 14 CFR 437.65 - Collision avoidance analysis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Collision avoidance analysis. 437.65..., DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION LICENSING EXPERIMENTAL PERMITS Safety Requirements § 437.65 Collision avoidance... permittee must obtain a collision avoidance analysis from United States Strategic Command. (b) The...

  7. 47 CFR 51.609 - Determination of avoided retail costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Determination of avoided retail costs. 51.609... (CONTINUED) INTERCONNECTION Resale § 51.609 Determination of avoided retail costs. (a) Except as provided in § 51.611, the amount of avoided retail costs shall be determined on the basis of a cost study that...

  8. 47 CFR 51.609 - Determination of avoided retail costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Determination of avoided retail costs. 51.609... (CONTINUED) INTERCONNECTION Resale § 51.609 Determination of avoided retail costs. (a) Except as provided in § 51.611, the amount of avoided retail costs shall be determined on the basis of a cost study that...

  9. 47 CFR 51.609 - Determination of avoided retail costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Determination of avoided retail costs. 51.609... (CONTINUED) INTERCONNECTION Resale § 51.609 Determination of avoided retail costs. (a) Except as provided in § 51.611, the amount of avoided retail costs shall be determined on the basis of a cost study that...

  10. 47 CFR 51.609 - Determination of avoided retail costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Determination of avoided retail costs. 51.609... (CONTINUED) INTERCONNECTION Resale § 51.609 Determination of avoided retail costs. (a) Except as provided in § 51.611, the amount of avoided retail costs shall be determined on the basis of a cost study that...

  11. 34 CFR 75.611 - Avoidance of flood hazards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Avoidance of flood hazards. 75.611 Section 75.611... by a Grantee? Construction § 75.611 Avoidance of flood hazards. In planning the construction, a...) Evaluate flood hazards in connection with the construction; and (b) As far as practicable, avoid uneconomic...

  12. 34 CFR 75.611 - Avoidance of flood hazards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Avoidance of flood hazards. 75.611 Section 75.611... by a Grantee? Construction § 75.611 Avoidance of flood hazards. In planning the construction, a...) Evaluate flood hazards in connection with the construction; and (b) As far as practicable, avoid uneconomic...

  13. 34 CFR 75.611 - Avoidance of flood hazards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Avoidance of flood hazards. 75.611 Section 75.611... by a Grantee? Construction § 75.611 Avoidance of flood hazards. In planning the construction, a...) Evaluate flood hazards in connection with the construction; and (b) As far as practicable, avoid uneconomic...

  14. 34 CFR 75.611 - Avoidance of flood hazards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Avoidance of flood hazards. 75.611 Section 75.611... by a Grantee? Construction § 75.611 Avoidance of flood hazards. In planning the construction, a...) Evaluate flood hazards in connection with the construction; and (b) As far as practicable, avoid uneconomic...

  15. A Contemporary Behavior Analysis of Anxiety and Avoidance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dymond, Simon; Roche, Bryan

    2009-01-01

    Despite the central status of avoidance in explaining the etiology and maintenance of anxiety disorders, surprisingly little behavioral research has been conducted on human avoidance. In the present paper, first we provide a brief review of the empirical literature on avoidance. Next, we describe the implications of research on derived relational…

  16. Evidence against an Occasion Setting Account of Avoidance Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Declercq, Mieke; De Houwer, Jan

    2011-01-01

    Earlier studies on human avoidance learning showed that an avoidance response reduces the expectancy that a warning stimulus (WS) will be followed by an unconditioned stimulus (US). This modulation can transfer to WSs with which the avoidance response did not occur in the past. Recent studies suggest that transfer of modulation is selective in…

  17. Neuroimaging the temporal dynamics of human avoidance to sustained threat.

    PubMed

    Schlund, Michael W; Hudgins, Caleb D; Magee, Sandy; Dymond, Simon

    2013-11-15

    Many forms of human psychopathology are characterized by sustained negative emotional responses to threat and chronic behavioral avoidance, implicating avoidance as a potential transdiagnostic factor. Evidence from both nonhuman neurophysiological and human neuroimaging studies suggests a distributed frontal-limbic-striatal brain network supports avoidance. However, our understanding of the temporal dynamics of the network to sustained threat that prompts sustained avoidance is limited. To address this issue, 17 adults were given extensive training on a modified free-operant avoidance task in which button pressing avoided money loss during a sustained threat period. Subsequently, subjects underwent functional magnetic resonance imaging while completing the avoidance task. In our regions of interest, we observed phasic, rather than sustained, activation during sustained threat in dorsolateral and inferior frontal regions, anterior and dorsal cingulate, ventral striatum and regions associated with emotion, including the amygdala, insula, substantia nigra and bed nucleus of the stria terminalis complex. Moreover, trait levels of experiential avoidance were negatively correlated with insula, hippocampal and amygdala activation. These findings suggest knowledge that one can consistently avoid aversive outcomes is not associated with decreased threat-related responses and that individuals with greater experiential avoidance exhibit reduced reactivity to initial threat. Implications for understanding brain mechanisms supporting human avoidance and psychological theories of avoidance are discussed.

  18. Replication of Tobamovirus RNA.

    PubMed

    Ishibashi, Kazuhiro; Ishikawa, Masayuki

    2016-08-04

    Tobacco mosaic virus and other tobamoviruses have served as models for studying the mechanisms of viral RNA replication. In tobamoviruses, genomic RNA replication occurs via several steps: (a) synthesis of viral replication proteins by translation of the genomic RNA; (b) translation-coupled binding of the replication proteins to a 5'-terminal region of the genomic RNA; (c) recruitment of the genomic RNA by replication proteins onto membranes and formation of a complex with host proteins TOM1 and ARL8; (d) synthesis of complementary (negative-strand) RNA in the complex; and (e) synthesis of progeny genomic RNA. This article reviews current knowledge on tobamovirus RNA replication, particularly regarding how the genomic RNA is specifically selected as a replication template and how the replication proteins are activated. We also focus on the roles of the replication proteins in evading or suppressing host defense systems.

  19. Extracellular RNA in aging.

    PubMed

    Dluzen, Douglas F; Noren Hooten, Nicole; Evans, Michele K

    2017-03-01

    Since the discovery of extracellular RNA (exRNA) in circulation and other bodily fluids, there has been considerable effort to catalog and assess whether exRNAs can be used as markers for health and disease. A variety of exRNA species have been identified including messenger RNA and noncoding RNA such as microRNA (miRNA), small nucleolar RNA, transfer RNA, and long noncoding RNA. Age-related changes in exRNA abundance have been observed, and it is likely that some of these transcripts play a role in aging. In this review, we summarize the current state of exRNA profiling in various body fluids and discuss age-related changes in exRNA abundance that have been identified in humans and other model organisms. miRNAs, in particular, are a major focus of current research and we will highlight and discuss the potential role that specific miRNAs might play in age-related phenotypes and disease. We will also review challenges facing this emerging field and various strategies that can be used for the validation and future use of exRNAs as markers of aging and age-related disease. WIREs RNA 2017, 8:e1385. doi: 10.1002/wrna.1385 For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website.

  20. Transcription and translation in an RNA world

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, William R

    2006-01-01

    The RNA world hypothesis requires a ribozyme that was an RNA-directed RNA polymerase (ribopolymerase). If such a replicase makes a reverse complementary copy of any sequence (including itself), in a simple RNA world, there is no mechanism to prevent self-hybridization. It is proposed that this can be avoided through the synthesis of a parallel complementary copy. The logical consequences of this are pursued and developed in a computer simulation, where the behaviour of the parallel copy is compared to the conventional reverse complementary copy. It is found that the parallel copy is more efficient at higher temperatures (up to 90°C). A model for the ribopolymerase, based on the core of the large subunit (LSU) of the ribosome, is described. The geometry of a potential active site for this ribopolymerase suggests that it contained a cavity (now occupied by the aminoacyl-tRNA) and that an amino acid binding in this might have ‘poisoned’ the ribopolymerase by cross-reacting with the nucleoside-triphosphate before polymerization could occur. Based on a similarity to the active site components of the class-I tRNA synthetase enzymes, it is proposed that the amino acid could become attached to the nascent RNA transcript producing a variety of aminoacylated tRNA-like products. Using base-pairing interactions, some of these molecules might cross-link two ribopolymerases, giving rise to a precursor of the modern ribosome. A hybrid dimer, half polymerase and half proto-ribosome, could account for mRNA translocation before the advent of protein elongation factors. PMID:17008216

  1. Aerial vehicles collision avoidance using monocular vision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balashov, Oleg; Muraviev, Vadim; Strotov, Valery

    2016-10-01

    In this paper image-based collision avoidance algorithm that provides detection of nearby aircraft and distance estimation is presented. The approach requires a vision system with a single moving camera and additional information about carrier's speed and orientation from onboard sensors. The main idea is to create a multi-step approach based on a preliminary detection, regions of interest (ROI) selection, contour segmentation, object matching and localization. The proposed algorithm is able to detect small targets but unlike many other approaches is designed to work with large-scale objects as well. To localize aerial vehicle position the system of equations relating object coordinates in space and observed image is solved. The system solution gives the current position and speed of the detected object in space. Using this information distance and time to collision can be estimated. Experimental research on real video sequences and modeled data is performed. Video database contained different types of aerial vehicles: aircrafts, helicopters, and UAVs. The presented algorithm is able to detect aerial vehicles from several kilometers under regular daylight conditions.

  2. Nanospray 'taxation' and how to avoid it.

    PubMed

    Chernushevich, I V; Bahr, U; Karas, M

    2004-01-01

    In mass spectrometric analysis with nanospray ionization, some analytes were found to appear in spectra with a delay of tens of minutes, while a few others could not be detected at all. The effect was found to be related to cation-exchange chromatography with negative charge on the glass surface, and with the most affected peptide or protein ions having strong localization of positive charge in blocks of two or more adjacent basic amino acid residues (e.g. melittin). The 'affinity' to the glass surface was studied with a peptide mixture and bovine serum albumin (BSA) tryptic digest solutions at sub-micromolar concentration. About 20% fewer tryptic peptides could be identified from spectra recorded with a glass nanospray capillary compared to those acquired with either conventional 1 microL/min electrospray or a quartz nanospray capillary. Protein identification studies are not likely to be seriously affected by this loss, but other protein applications, such as investigations of mutations or post-translational modifications, may suffer due to reduced sequence coverage. Ways to avoid losses of useful ions are discussed.

  3. Zone of Avoidance Tully-Fisher Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Wendy; Woudt, Patrick; Kraan-Korteweg, Renee

    2009-10-01

    We propose to use the Parkes telescope to obtain narrowband HI spectra of a sample of galaxies in the Galactic Zone of Avoidance (ZOA). These observations, combined with high-quality near infrared photometry, will provide both the uniform coverage and accurate distance determinations (via the Tully-Fisher relation) required to map the peculiar velocity flow fields in the ZOA. The mass distribution in this region has a significant effect on the motion of the Local Group. Dynamically important structures, including the Great Attractor and the Local Void, are partially hidden behind our Galaxy. Even the most recent systematic all-sky surveys, such as the 2MASS Redshift Survey (2MRS; Huchra et al. 2005), undersample the ZOA due to stellar crowding and high dust extinction. While statistical reconstruction methods have been used to extrapolate the density field in the ZOA, they are unlikely to truely re?ect the velocity field (Loeb & Narayan 2008). Our project aims for the ?rst time to directly determine the velocity flow fields in this part of the sky. Our sample is taken from the Parkes HIZOA survey (Henning et al. 2005) and is unbiased with respect to extinction and star density.

  4. Approach and avoidance motivation in eating disorders.

    PubMed

    Harrison, Amy; Treasure, Janet; Smillie, Luke D

    2011-08-15

    It has been proposed that approach and avoidance processes may be critically involved in the development and maintenance of eating disorders (EDs), including anorexia nervosa (AN) and bulimia nervosa (BN). The Behavioural Inhibition System and Behavioural Activation System Scales (BIS/BAS) and Appetitive Motivation Scale (AMS) questionnaires were administered to 286 participants: 91 healthy controls (HCs), 121 participants with a current ED, either AN (restrictive and binge purge subtypes), or BN and 74 participants recovered from an ED. Individuals with EDs had higher levels of sensitivity to punishment and lower levels of reward reactivity than controls. Individuals in recovery from an ED scored the same as those in the acute group, with the exception of BAS fun seeking, for which they scored significantly higher than those with restricting AN. Discriminant analysis revealed that HCs were maximally separated from those in the acute and recovered ED groups along a dimension reflecting high punishment sensitivity and low reward sensitivity. Classification analysis demonstrated that ED and HC group membership was predicted from reward and punishment sensitivity measures; however recovered participants tended to be misclassified as ED. This study suggests high punishment sensitivity and low reward reactivity/sensitivity might form a personality cluster associated with the risk of developing an ED.

  5. Whole arm obstacle avoidance for teleoperated robots

    SciTech Connect

    Feddema, J.T.; Novak, J.L.

    1993-10-01

    This paper describes a collision avoidance system using Whole Arm Proximity (WHAP) sensors on a PUMA 560 robot arm. The capacitance-based sensors generate electric fields which can completely encompass the robot arm and detect obstacles as they approach from any direction. The directional obstacle information gathered by the WHAP sensors together with the sensor geometry and robot configuration is used to scale the commanded joint velocities of the robot. A linearized relationship between the WHAP sensor reading and the distance from the obstacle allows direct transformation of perturbations in VHAP readings to perturbations in joint velocities. The VHAP reading is used to directly reduce the component of the command input velocity along the normal axis of the sensor, allowing graceful reductions in speed as the arm approaches the obstacle. By scaling only the component of the velocity vector in the,direction of the nearest obstacles, the control system restricts motion in the direction of obstacles while permitting unconstrained motion in other directions.

  6. Avoided valence transition in a plutonium superconductor.

    PubMed

    Ramshaw, B J; Shekhter, Arkady; McDonald, Ross D; Betts, Jon B; Mitchell, J N; Tobash, P H; Mielke, C H; Bauer, E D; Migliori, Albert

    2015-03-17

    The d and f electrons in correlated metals are often neither fully localized around their host nuclei nor fully itinerant. This localized/itinerant duality underlies the correlated electronic states of the high-Tc cuprate superconductors and the heavy-fermion intermetallics and is nowhere more apparent than in the 5f valence electrons of plutonium. Here, we report the full set of symmetry-resolved elastic moduli of PuCoGa5--the highest Tc superconductor of the heavy fermions (Tc = 18.5 K)--and find that the bulk modulus softens anomalously over a wide range in temperature above Tc. The elastic symmetry channel in which this softening occurs is characteristic of a valence instability--therefore, we identify the elastic softening with fluctuations of the plutonium 5f mixed-valence state. These valence fluctuations disappear when the superconducting gap opens at Tc, suggesting that electrons near the Fermi surface play an essential role in the mixed-valence physics of this system and that PuCoGa5 avoids a valence transition by entering the superconducting state. The lack of magnetism in PuCoGa5 has made it difficult to reconcile with most other heavy-fermion superconductors, where superconductivity is generally believed to be mediated by magnetic fluctuations. Our observations suggest that valence fluctuations play a critical role in the unusually high Tc of PuCoGa5.

  7. Cooperative organic mine avoidance path planning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCubbin, Christopher B.; Piatko, Christine D.; Peterson, Adam V.; Donnald, Creighton R.; Cohen, David

    2005-06-01

    The JHU/APL Path Planning team has developed path planning techniques to look for paths that balance the utility and risk associated with different routes through a minefield. Extending on previous years' efforts, we investigated real-world Naval mine avoidance requirements and developed a tactical decision aid (TDA) that satisfies those requirements. APL has developed new mine path planning techniques using graph based and genetic algorithms which quickly produce near-minimum risk paths for complicated fitness functions incorporating risk, path length, ship kinematics, and naval doctrine. The TDA user interface, a Java Swing application that obtains data via Corba interfaces to path planning databases, allows the operator to explore a fusion of historic and in situ mine field data, control the path planner, and display the planning results. To provide a context for the minefield data, the user interface also renders data from the Digital Nautical Chart database, a database created by the National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency containing charts of the world's ports and coastal regions. This TDA has been developed in conjunction with the COMID (Cooperative Organic Mine Defense) system. This paper presents a description of the algorithms, architecture, and application produced.

  8. The amygdala: securing pleasure and avoiding pain

    PubMed Central

    Fernando, Anushka B. P.; Murray, Jennifer E.; Milton, Amy L.

    2013-01-01

    The amygdala has traditionally been associated with fear, mediating the impact of negative emotions on memory. However, this view does not fully encapsulate the function of the amygdala, nor the impact that processing in this structure has on the motivational limbic corticostriatal circuitry of which it is an important structure. Here we discuss the interactions between different amygdala nuclei with cortical and striatal regions involved in motivation; interconnections and parallel circuitries that have become increasingly understood in recent years. We review the evidence that the amygdala stores memories that allow initially motivationally neutral stimuli to become associated through pavlovian conditioning with motivationally relevant outcomes which, importantly, can be either appetitive (e.g. food) or aversive (e.g. electric shock). We also consider how different psychological processes supported by the amygdala such as conditioned reinforcement and punishment, conditioned motivation and suppression, and conditioned approach and avoidance behavior, are not only psychologically but also neurobiologically dissociable, being mediated by distinct yet overlapping neural circuits within the limbic corticostriatal circuitry. Clearly the role of the amygdala goes beyond encoding aversive stimuli to also encode the appetitive, requiring an appreciation of the amygdala's mediation of both appetitive and fearful behavior through diverse psychological processes. PMID:24367307

  9. Avoidance of unhealthy fattening: a longstanding proposal.

    PubMed

    Booth, David A; Treharne, Gareth J; Kitas, George D; Kumar, Sudhesh

    2007-03-01

    Diverse customary patterns of eating, drinking or movement are hypothesised to be effective in weight control based on laboratory experiments or theoretical calculations, in some cases supported by ecologically valid evidence. This method is applicable to healthy members of the public and to patients at high risk of and from obesity such as those having type-2 diabetes or chronic arthritis. Weight-reducing behaviour not adequately identified in current best practice educational messages includes: integration of exercise into desk-based employment; uses of stairs; uncompensated vigorous activity or reduction in amount eaten at a meal; protein level and carbohydrate timing in meals; having a "snack". This paper presents the scientific parts of a request for funds to integrate a suite of research methods based on theoretical models that can be applied to identify further, culturally and locally specific eating customs that avoid overweight and reduce obesity and can be iterated in a continuous (re)development of evidence-based expert advice and self-care practices in health and chronic disease.

  10. See and avoidance behaviors for autonomous navigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Dah-Jye; Beard, Randal W.; Merrell, Paul C.; Zhan, Pengcheng

    2004-12-01

    Recent advances in many multi-discipline technologies have allowed small, low-cost fixed wing unmanned air vehicles (UAV) or more complicated unmanned ground vehicles (UGV) to be a feasible solution in many scientific, civil and military applications. Cameras can be mounted on-board of the unmanned vehicles for the purpose of scientific data gathering, surveillance for law enforcement and homeland security, as well as to provide visual information to detect and avoid imminent collisions for autonomous navigation. However, most current computer vision algorithms are highly complex computationally and usually constitute the bottleneck of the guidance and control loop. In this paper, we present a novel computer vision algorithm for collision detection and time-to-impact calculation based on feature density distribution (FDD) analysis. It does not require accurate feature extraction, tracking, or estimation of focus of expansion (FOE). Under a few reasonable assumptions, by calculating the expansion rate of the FDD in space, time-to-impact can be accurately estimated. A sequence of monocular images is studied, and different features are used simultaneously in FDD analysis to show that our algorithm can achieve a fairly good accuracy in collision detection. In this paper we also discuss reactive path planning and trajectory generation techniques that can be accomplished without violating the velocity and heading rate constraints of the UAV.

  11. SAMPEX science pointing with velocity avoidance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frakes, Joseph P.; Henretty, Debra A.; Flatley, Thomas W.; Markley, F. L.; San, Josephine K.; Lightsey, E. G.

    The Solar, Anomalous, and Magnetospheric Particle Explorer (SAMPEX) science pointing mode is presented with the additional constraint of velocity avoidance. This constraint has been added in light of the orbital debris and micrometeoroid fluxes that have been revealed by the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) recovered in January 1990. These fluxes are 50-100 times higher than the flux tables that were used in the September 1988 proposal to NASA for the SAMPEX mission. The SAMPEX Heavey Ion Large Telescope (HILT) sensor includes a flow-through isobutane proportional counter that is susceptible to penetration by orbital debris and micrometeoroids. Thus, keeping the HILT sensor pointed away from the velocity vector, the direction of maximum flux, will compensate for the higher than expected fluxes. Using an orbital debris model and a micrometeoroid model developed at the Johnson Space Center (JSC), and a SAMPEX dynamic simulator developed by the Guidance and Control Branch at the Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC), an 'optimal' minimum ram angle (the angle between the HILT boresight and the velocity vector) of 90 degrees has been determined. It is optimal in the sense of minimizing the science pointing performance degradation while providing approximately an 89 percent chance of survival for the HILT sensor over a three year period.

  12. Avoiding conflicts over Africa's water resources.

    PubMed

    Ashton, Peter J

    2002-05-01

    Some 85% of Africa's water resources are comprised of large river basins that are shared between several countries. High rates of population growth accompanied by continued increases in the demand for water have resulted in several countries passing the point where the scarcity of water supplies effectively limits further development. Present population trends and patterns of water use suggest that more African countries will exceed the limits of their economically usable, land-based water resources before 2025. Normally, water allocation and distribution priorities within a country are aligned with national development objectives. While this may achieve national "water security" objectives, greater emphasis needs to be placed on regional efforts to ensure that the available water resources are used to derive sustainable long-term benefits for the peoples of Africa as a whole. Ideally, each country's water-resource management strategy needs to be aligned with that of its neighbors if peace and prosperity are to be maintained and conflict is to be avoided in the region.

  13. Thunderstorm classification for airport lightning avoidance system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Y.; Yoshikawa, E.; Stock, M.; Shimamura, S.; Ushio, T.

    2016-12-01

    Aircraft initiated or intercepted lightning is a significant issue for civilian flight operation in Japan. Lightning strikes seldom cause fatal aircraft accidents thanks to both certifications of aircraft designs for lightning resilience and extensive weather support during aircraft operation. However, hundreds of lightning strikes to aircrafts are still reported each year in Japan, which can cause flights to be delayed or cancelled, and causes several hundred millions of yen each year in damagesTherefore, our research group, consisting of MRI, JAXA, and Osaka University, has started developing a new tactical weather support for airport operation aiming at lightning avoidance. Although lightning location systems are already utilized in airports, it is slow to detect thunderstorms because these systems only identify lightning hazards after the associated thunderstorm is mature. Our group is combining the data from a lightning mapping system called the Broadband Observation network for Lightning and Thunderstorms (BOLT) with a high time resolution phased array weather radar (PAWR). The PAWR can complete a full volume scan in as little as 10 or 30 seconds. In order to estimate the potential for lightning, we will operate a campaign to collect high resolution data from BOLT and the PAWR until 2018. At the same time, we are developing algorithms which can identify storm cells, and tabulating measurements such as reflectivity, wind, and temperature. In this presentation, details of the observation campaign and the progress of the analyses will be presented.

  14. Visually guided collision avoidance and collision achievement.

    PubMed

    Regan; Gray

    2000-03-01

    To survive on today's highways, a driver must have highly developed skills in visually guided collision avoidance. To play such games as cricket, tennis or baseball demands accurate, precise and reliable collision achievement. This review discusses evidence that some of these tasks are performed by predicting where an object will be at some sharply defined instant, several hundred milliseconds in the future, while other tasks are performed by utilizing the fact that some of our motor actions change what we see in ways that obey lawful relationships, and can therefore be learned. Several monocular and binocular visual correlates of the direction of an object's motion relative to the observer's head have been derived theoretically, along with visual correlates of the time to collision with an approaching object. Although laboratory psychophysics can identify putative neural mechanisms by showing which of the known correlates are processed by the human visual system independently of other visual information, it is only field research on, for example, driving, aviation and sport that can show which visual cues are actually used in these activities. This article reviews this research and describes a general psychophysically based rational approach to the design of such field studies.

  15. Avoided valence transition in a plutonium superconductor

    PubMed Central

    Ramshaw, B. J.; Shekhter, Arkady; McDonald, Ross D.; Betts, Jon B.; Mitchell, J. N.; Tobash, P. H.; Mielke, C. H.; Bauer, E. D.; Migliori, Albert

    2015-01-01

    The d and f electrons in correlated metals are often neither fully localized around their host nuclei nor fully itinerant. This localized/itinerant duality underlies the correlated electronic states of the high-Tc cuprate superconductors and the heavy-fermion intermetallics and is nowhere more apparent than in the 5f valence electrons of plutonium. Here, we report the full set of symmetry-resolved elastic moduli of PuCoGa5—the highest Tc superconductor of the heavy fermions (Tc = 18.5 K)—and find that the bulk modulus softens anomalously over a wide range in temperature above Tc. The elastic symmetry channel in which this softening occurs is characteristic of a valence instability—therefore, we identify the elastic softening with fluctuations of the plutonium 5f mixed-valence state. These valence fluctuations disappear when the superconducting gap opens at Tc, suggesting that electrons near the Fermi surface play an essential role in the mixed-valence physics of this system and that PuCoGa5 avoids a valence transition by entering the superconducting state. The lack of magnetism in PuCoGa5 has made it difficult to reconcile with most other heavy-fermion superconductors, where superconductivity is generally believed to be mediated by magnetic fluctuations. Our observations suggest that valence fluctuations play a critical role in the unusually high Tc of PuCoGa5. PMID:25737548

  16. An expert system for wind shear avoidance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stengel, Robert F.; Stratton, D. Alexander

    1990-01-01

    A study of intelligent guidance and control concepts for protecting against the adverse effects of wind shear during aircraft takeoffs and landings is being conducted, with current emphasis on developing an expert system for wind shear avoidance. Principal objectives are to develop methods for assessing the likelihood of wind shear encounter (based on real-time information in the cockpit), for deciding what flight path to pursue (e.g., takeoff abort, landing go-around, or normal climbout or glide slope), and for using the aircraft's full potential for combating wind shear. This study requires the definition of both deterministic and statistical techniques for fusing internal and external information , for making go/no-go decisions, and for generating commands to the manually controlled flight. The program has begun with the development of the WindShear Safety Advisor, an expert system for pilot aiding that is based on the FAA Windshear Training Aid; a two-volume manual that presents an overview , pilot guide, training program, and substantiating data provides guidelines for this initial development. The WindShear Safety Advisor expert system currently contains over 200 rules and is coded in the LISP programming language.

  17. Avoiding DEET through insect gustatory receptors.

    PubMed

    Lee, Youngseok; Kim, Sang Hoon; Montell, Craig

    2010-08-26

    DEET is the most widely used insect repellent worldwide. In Drosophila olfactory receptor neurons (ORNs), DEET is detected through a mechanism employing the olfactory receptor, OR83b. However, it is controversial as to whether ORNs respond directly to DEET or whether DEET blocks the response to attractive odors. Here, we showed that DEET suppressed feeding behavior in Drosophila, and this effect was mediated by gustatory receptor neurons (GRNs). DEET was potent in suppressing feeding as <0.1% DEET elicited aversive behavior. Inhibition of feeding required multiple gustatory receptors (GRs) expressed in inhibitory GRNs. DEET stimulated action potentials in GRNs that respond to aversive compounds, and this response was lost in the Gr32a, Gr33a, and Gr66a mutants. Since 0.02% DEET elicited action potentials, we conclude that DEET directly activates of GRNs. We suggest that the effectiveness of DEET in pest control owes to its dual action in inducing avoidance simultaneously via GRNs and ORNs. 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Allergen avoidance approaches in food allergy management.

    PubMed

    Koletzko, Sibylle; Koletzko, Berthold

    2009-01-01

    Dietary elimination of causative food ingredients, usually food proteins, is the basis of treating food hypersensitivity. Proper diagnostic assessment is essential to avoid burdening children with unnecessary dietary restrictions with potential adverse effects. Diagnosis requires a detailed history, allergen elimination, and re-challenge with suspected foods. Complete elimination of causative food components depends on professional counseling and training of the patient and family, and transparent labeling of food products. Elimination diets carry the risk of inducing insufficient supplies of critical nutrients with adverse effects on health and wellbeing, particularly in children with exclusion of foods that provide a major part of dietary supply and patients with multiple food allergies. Infants and young children with cow's milk allergy, who have not been fully breastfed, require milk substitutes based on extensively hydrolyzed protein or amino acids. Elimination diets must be supervised and monitored to a similar degree as drug treatments, and the need for continued dietary elimination should be reviewed on a regular basis and re-challenges considered.

  19. Laying hens learn to avoid feathers.

    PubMed

    Harlander-Matauschek, A; Wassermann, F; Zentek, J; Bessei, W

    2008-09-01

    Previous work demonstrated an association between feather pecking and feather eating in laying hens. This raised the question if digestive feedback affects feather eating or feather pecking in laying hens. We hypothesized that feathers enriched with sugar form a positive feedback and feathers enriched with quinine sulfate form a negative feedback. Forty-eight laying hens were kept in individual cages and fed a pelleted diet ad libitum. Twenty-four birds were offered feathers on a daily basis; 12 of these birds were offered feathers soaked in 4% quinine sulfate solution (Q), and the other 12 were offered feathers soaked in 4% sucrose solution (S). The other 24 birds were kept as a control (C) without access to feathers. After a 10-d feather feeding period, 3 groups of 4 S and 4 C birds each and 3 groups of 4 Q and 4 C birds each were assembled. Feather-pecking behavior was recorded over a period of 8 d. The number of Q feathers eaten was significantly lower than the number of S feathers. Birds that were offered Q feathers in the feather feeding phase showed significantly less severe feather pecking than S and C birds. The results clearly show that Q as an unpalatable substance was the signal the animal used to avoid damaging the feather cover in laying hens.

  20. The effects of environmental enrichment and age-related differences on inhibitory avoidance in zebrafish (Danio rerio Hamilton).

    PubMed

    Manuel, Remy; Gorissen, Marnix; Stokkermans, Mitchel; Zethof, Jan; Ebbesson, Lars O E; van de Vis, Hans; Flik, Gert; van den Bos, Ruud

    2015-04-01

    The inhibitory avoidance paradigm allows the study of mechanisms underlying learning and memory formation in zebrafish (Danio rerio Hamilton). For zebrafish, the physiology and behavior associated with this paradigm are as yet poorly understood. We therefore assessed the effects of environmental enrichment and fish age on inhibitory avoidance learning. Fish raised in an environmentally enriched tank showed decreased anxiety-like behavior and increased exploration. Enrichment greatly reduced inhibitory avoidance in 6-month (6M)- and 12-month (12 M)-old fish. Following inhibitory avoidance, telencephalic mRNA levels of proliferating cell nuclear antigen (pcna), neurogenic differentiation (neurod), cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript 4 (cart4), and cannabinoid receptor 1 (cnr1) were lower in enriched-housed fish, while the ratios of mineralocorticoid receptor (nr3c2)/glucocorticoid receptor α [nr3c1(α)] and glucocorticoid receptor β [nr3c1(β)]/glucocorticoid receptor α [nr3c1(α)] were higher. This was observed for 6M-old fish only, not for 24-month (24 M) old fish. Instead, 24 M-old fish showed delayed inhibitory avoidance, no effects of enrichment, and reduced expression of neuroplasticity genes. Overall, our data show strong differences in inhibitory avoidance behavior between zebrafish of different ages and a clear reduction in avoidance behavior following housing under environmental enrichment.

  1. Antibodies against RNA hydrolyze RNA and DNA.

    PubMed

    Krasnorutskii, Michael A; Buneva, Valentina N; Nevinsky, Georgy A

    2008-01-01

    Immunization of animals with DNA leads to the production of anti-DNA antibodies (Abs) demonstrating both DNase and RNase activities. It is currently not known whether anti-RNA Abs can possess nuclease activities. In an attempt to address this question, we have shown that immunization of three rabbits with complex of RNA with methylated BSA (mBSA) stimulates production of IgGs with RNase and DNase activities belonging to IgGs, while polyclonal Abs from three non-immunized rabbits and three animals immunized with mBSA are catalytically inactive. Affinity chromatography of IgGs from the sera of autoimmune (AI) patients on DNA-cellulose usually demonstrates a number of fractions, all of which effectively hydrolyze both DNA and RNA, while rabbit catalytic IgGs were separated into Ab subfractions, some of which demonstrated only DNase activity, while others hydrolyzed RNA faster than DNA. The enzymic properties of the RNase and DNase IgGs from rabbits immunized with RNA distinguish them from all known canonical RNases and DNases and DNA- and RNA-hydrolyzing abzymes (Abzs) from patients with different AI diseases. In contrast to RNases and AI RNA-hydrolyzing Abs, rabbit RNase IgGs catalyze only the first step of the hydrolysis reaction but cannot hydrolyze the formed terminal 2',3'-cyclophosphate. The data indicate that Abzs of AI patients hydrolyzing nucleic acids in part may be Abs against RNA and its complexes with proteins.

  2. RNA-Catalyzed RNA Ligation on an External RNA Template

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McGinness, Kathleen E.; Joyce, Gerald F.

    2002-01-01

    Variants of the hc ligase ribozyme, which catalyzes ligation of the 3' end of an RNA substrate to the 5' end of the ribozyme, were utilized to evolve a ribozyme that catalyzes ligation reactions on an external RNA template. The evolved ribozyme catalyzes the joining of an oligonucleotide 3'-hydroxyl to the 5'-triphosphate of an RNA hairpin molecule. The ribozyme can also utilize various substrate sequences, demonstrating a largely sequence-independent mechanism for substrate recognition. The ribozyme also carries out the ligation of two oligonucleotides that are bound at adjacent positions on a complementary template. Finally, it catalyzes addition of mononucleoside '5-triphosphates onto the '3 end of an oligonucleotide primer in a template-dependent manner. The development of ribozymes that catalyze polymerase-type reactions contributes to the notion that an RNA world could have existed during the early history of life on Earth.

  3. Infection-avoidance behaviour in humans and other animals.

    PubMed

    Curtis, Valerie A

    2014-10-01

    Compared with living free, the parasitic way of life has many attractions. Parasites create problems for all animals. Potential hosts can respond by learning to live with parasites (tolerance), actively fighting them (resistance), or they can avoid becoming infected in the first place (avoidance). I propose here a new classification of avoidance behaviour according to the epidemiology of infection risk, where animals must avoid (i) conspecifics, (ii) parasites and their vectors, (iii) parasite-rich environments, and (iv) niche infestation. I further explore how the disgust adaptive system, which coordinates avoidance behaviour, may form a continuum with the immune system through the sharing of signalling pathways, sites of action, and evolutionary history.

  4. Velocity of chloroplast avoidance movement is fluence rate dependent.

    PubMed

    Kagawa, Takatoshi; Wada, Masamitsu

    2004-06-01

    In Arabidopsis leaves, chloroplast movement is fluence rate dependent. At optimal, lower light fluences, chloroplasts accumulate at the cell surface to maximize photosynthetic potential. Under high fluence rates, chloroplasts avoid incident light to escape photodamage. In this paper, we examine the phenomenon of chloroplast avoidance movement in greater detail and demonstrate a proportional relationship between fluence rate and the velocity of chloroplast avoidance. In addition we show that the amount of light-activated phototropin2, the photoreceptor for the avoidance response, likely plays a role in this phenomenon, as heterozygous mutant plants show a reduced avoidance velocity compared to that of homozygous wild type plants.

  5. Faecal avoidance and selective foraging: do wild mice have the luxury to avoid faeces?

    PubMed

    Walsh, Patrick T; McCreless, Erin; Pedersen, Amy B

    2013-09-01

    Host-parasite interactions are a key determinant of the population dynamics of wild animals, and behaviours that reduce parasite transmission and infection may be important for improving host fitness. While antiparasite behaviours have been demonstrated in laboratory animals and domesticated ungulates, whether these behaviours operate in the wild is poorly understood. Therefore, examining antiparasite behaviours in natural populations is crucial for understanding their ecological significance. In this study, we examined whether two wild rodents (white-footed mice, Peromyscus leucopus, and deer mice, Peromyscus maniculatus), selectively foraged away from conspecific faeces or avoided faeces altogether, and whether faecal gastrointestinal parasite status affected their behaviour. We also tested whether wild mice, when nesting, avoided using material that had previously been used by healthy or parasite-infected conspecifics. Our results, in contrast to laboratory mouse studies, suggest that wild mice do not demonstrate faecal avoidance, selective foraging or selective use of nesting material; they preferred being near faeces and did not differentiate between faeces from parasitized and uninfected conspecifics. Behavioural avoidance to reduce parasite infection may still represent an important strategy; however, mice in our study population appeared to favour the opportunity to feed and nest over the risks of coming into contact with faecal-transmitted parasites. Furthermore, the presence of conspecific faeces may actually provide a positive cue of a good foraging or nesting location. Ultimately, balancing the trade-off of performing antiparasite behaviours to reduce infection with missing an important feeding or nesting opportunity may be very different for animals in the wild facing complex and stochastic environments.

  6. An alternative telomerase RNA in Arabidopsis modulates enzyme activity in response to DNA damage

    PubMed Central

    Cifuentes-Rojas, Catherine; Nelson, Andrew D.L.; Boltz, Kara A.; Kannan, Kalpana; She, Xintao; Shippen, Dorothy E.

    2012-01-01

    Telomerase replenishes telomere tracts by reiteratively copying its RNA template, TER. Unlike other model organisms, Arabidopsis thaliana harbors two divergent TER genes. However, only TER1 is required for telomere maintenance. Here we examine the function of TER2. We show that TER2 is spliced and its 3′ end is truncated in vivo to generate a third TER isoform, TER2S. TERT preferentially associates with TER2 > TER1 > TER2S. Moreover, TER2 and TER2S assemble with Ku and POT1b (protection of telomeres), forming RNP (ribonucleoprotein) complexes distinct from TER1 RNP. Plants null for TER2 display increased telomerase enzyme activity, while TER2 overexpression inhibits telomere synthesis from TER1 and leads to telomere shortening. These findings argue that TER2 negatively regulates telomerase by sequestering TERT in a nonproductive RNP complex. Introduction of DNA double-strand breaks by zeocin leads to an immediate and specific spike in TER2 and a concomitant decrease in telomerase enzyme activity. This response is not triggered by replication stress or telomere dysfunction and is abrogated in ter2 mutants. We conclude that Arabidopsis telomerase is modulated by TER2, a novel DNA damage-induced noncoding RNA that works in concert with the canonical TER to promote genome integrity. PMID:23109676

  7. A new paradigm for evaluating avoidance/escape motivation.

    PubMed

    Tsutsui-Kimura, Iku; Bouchekioua, Youcef; Mimura, Masaru; Tanaka, Kenji F

    2017-05-06

    Organisms have evolved to approach pleasurable opportunities and to avoid or escape from aversive experiences. These two distinct motivations are referred to as approach and avoidance/escape motivations and are both considered vital for survival. Despite several recent advances in understanding the neurobiology of motivation, most studies addressed approach but not avoidance/escape motivation. Here we develop a new experimental paradigm to quantify avoidance/escape motivation and examine the pharmacological validity. We set up an avoidance variable ratio 5 (VR-5) task in which mice were required to press a lever for variable times to avoid an upcoming aversive stimulus (foot shock) or to escape the ongoing aversive event if mice failed to avoid it. We intraperitoneally injected ketamine (0, 1, or 5 mg/kg) or buspirone (0, 5, or 10 mg/kg) 20 or 30 minutes before the behavioral task in order to see if ketamine enhanced avoidance/escape behavior and buspirone diminished it as previously reported. We found that the performance on the avoidance VR-5 task was sensitive to the intensity of the aversive stimulus. Treatment with ketamine increased, while that with buspirone decreased, the probability of avoidance from an aversive stimulus in the VR-5 task, being consistent with previous reports. Our new paradigm will prove usefulness for quantifying avoidance/escape motivation and will contribute to a more comprehensive understanding of motivation.

  8. Body checking and avoidance in ethnically diverse female college students.

    PubMed

    White, Emily K; Warren, Cortney S

    2013-09-01

    Although body checking and avoidance behaviors are common in women with eating disorders, minimal research has examined the nature or correlates of these behaviors in ethnically diverse female college students without eating disorders. Self-identified European American (n=268), Asian American (n=163), Latina (n=146), and African American (n=73) women completed self-report measures of body checking and avoidance, thin-ideal internalization, eating pathology, and clinical impairment. Results indicated that European and Asian American women reported significantly more body checking and avoidance than African American and Latina women. Generally, correlates of body checking and avoidance were consistent across ethnic groups: Regression analyses indicated that type of ethnicity predicted body checking and avoidance; and ethnicity, body checking, and body avoidance predicted eating pathology and clinical impairment. These associations suggest that body checking and avoidance are not benign behaviors in diverse nonclinical women.

  9. AVOID BECOMING A VICTIM OF COUNTERFEIT ITEMS

    SciTech Connect

    WARRINER RD

    2011-07-13

    In today's globalized economy, we cannot live without imported products. Most people do not realize how thin the safety net of regulation and inspection really is. Less than three percent of imported products receive any form of government inspection prior to sale. Avoid flea markets, street vendors and deep discount stores. The sellers of counterfeit wares know where to market their products. They look for individuals who are hungry for a brand name item but do not want to pay a brand name price for it. The internet provides anonymity to the sellers of counterfeit products. Unlike Europe, U.S. law does not hold internet-marketing organizations, responsible for the quality of the products sold on their websites. These organizations will remove an individual vendor when a sufficient number of complaints are lodged, but they will not take responsibility for the counterfeit products you may have purchased. EBay has a number of counterfeit product guides to help you avoid being a victim of the sellers of these products. Ten percent of all medications taken worldwide are counterfeit. If you do buy medications on-line, be sure that the National Association of Boards of Pharmacy Verified Internet Pharmacy Practice Sites (VIPPS) recommends the pharmacy you choose to use. Inspect all medication purchases and report any change in color, shape, imprinting or odor to your pharmacist. If you take generic medications these attributes may change from one manufacturer to another. Your pharmacist should inform you of any changes when you refill your prescription. If they do not, get clarification prior to taking the medication. Please note that the Federal Drug Administration (FDA) does not regulate supplements. The FDA only steps in when a specific supplement proves to cause physical harm or contains a regulated ingredient. Due to counterfeiting, Underwriters Laboratories (UL) changed their label design three times since 1996. The new gold label should be attached to the cord or

  10. Avoiding Spurious Breaks in Binned Luminosity Functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cara, M.; Lister, M. L.

    2008-10-01

    We show that using either the method of Page & Carrera or the well-known 1/Va method to construct the binned luminosity function (LF) of a flux limited sample of active galactic nuclei (AGNs) can produce an artificial flattening (or steepening in the case of negative evolution) of the binned LF for bins intersected by the flux cutoff of the sample. This effect is more pronounced for samples with steep and strongly evolving parent LFs but is still present even for non-evolving LFs. As a result of this distortion of the true LF, fitting a model LF to binned data may lead to errors in the estimation of the parameters and may even prompt the erroneous use of broken power-law functions. We compute the expected positions of apparent breaks in the binned LF. We show that these spurious breaks in the binned LFs can be avoided if the binning is done in the flux-redshift plane instead of the typically used luminosity-redshift plane. Binning in the flux-redshift plane can be used in conjunction with the binning in the luminosity-redshift plane to test for real breaks in the binned LFs and to identify the features that are the result of binning biases. We illustrate this effect for most typical forms of luminosity dependence and redshift evolution and show how the proposed method helps address this problem. We also apply this method to the MOJAVE AGN sample and show that it eliminates an apparent break in the binned LF.

  11. Collision avoidance in computer optimized treatment planning.

    PubMed

    Humm, J L

    1994-07-01

    Of major concern in fully automated computerized treatment delivery is the possibility of gantry/couch or gantry/patient collisions. In this work, software has been developed to detect collisions between gantry and couch or patient for both transaxial and noncoplanar treatment fields during the treatment planning process. The code uses the gantry angles, turntable angles, and position of the couch surface relative to the isocenter supplied by the planner for the prescribed radiation fields. In addition, the maximum patient anterior-posterior and lateral separations are entered in order to model the patient outline by a conservative cylindrical ellipse. By accessing a database containing the precise mechanical dimensions of the therapy equipment, 3D analytical geometry is used to test for collisions between gantry/patient and gantry/couch for each treatment field. When collisions are detected, the software inspects the use of an extended distance treatment, by recalculating and testing for collisions, with the couch at a greater distance from the collimator along the direction of the central axis. If a collision is avoided at extended distance, the lateral, longitudinal, and vertical motions of the couch are recorded for entry into the treatment plan, or else a warning message is printed, together with the nearest permissible collision-free gantry angle. Upon inspection, the planner can either elect to use the calculated closest permissible gantry angle or reject the plan. The software verifies that each proposed treatment field is safe, but also that the transition between fields is collision-free. This requires that the sequence of the treatment fields be ordered, preferably into a sequence which minimizes the delivery time compatible with patient safety.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  12. Avoiding unfavorable results in postburn contracture hand

    PubMed Central

    Bhattacharya, Sameek

    2013-01-01

    Deformities of the hands are a fairly common sequel of burn especially in the developing world. This is because of high incidence of burns, limited access to standard treatment and rehabilitation. The best outcome of a burnt hand is when deformities are prevented from developing. A good functional result is possible when due consideration is paid to hands during resuscitation, excisional surgery, reconstructive surgery and physiotherapy. The post-burns deformities of hand develop due direct thermal damage or secondary to intrinsic minus position due to oedema or vascular insufficiency. During the acute phase the concerns are, maintenance circulation minimize oedema prevent unphysiological positioning and wound closure with autogenous tissue as soon as possible. The rehabilitation program during the acute phase starts from day one and goes on till the hand has healed and has regained full range of motion. Full blown hand contractures are challenging to correct and become more difficult as time passes. Long-standing cases often land up with attenuation of extensor apparatus leading to swan neck and boutonniere deformity, muscle shortening and bony ankylosis. The major and most common pitfall after contracture release is relapse. The treatment protocol of contracture is solely directed towards countering this tendency. This article aims to guide a surgeon in obtaining optimal hand function and avoid pit falls at different stages of management of hand burns. The reasons of an unfavourable outcome of a burnt hand are possible lack of optimal care in the acute phase, while planning and performing reconstructive procedure and during aftercare and rehabilitation. PMID:24501479

  13. [Avoidable Hospital Admissions for Heart Failure, Spain].

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Romero, Victoria; Lorusso, Nicola; Expósito García, Sebastián; Páez-Pinto, José María; Palmero-Palmero, César; Caballero-Delgado, Gema; Zapico Moreno, María José; Fernández-Moyano, Antonio

    2016-04-25

    The avoidable hospital admissions for heart failure are a problem for health systems worldwide, as they waste resources, generate additional morbidities and high mortality. The objective of this study was to determine the risk factors in patients hospitalized for heart failure. A group of medical from Hospital and Primary Care was established. We realized an audit of a sample of 110 patients from Aljarafe towns with highest hospital admissions for heart failure. The analysis used Student T test and Mann Whitney for quantitative variables; Chi-square test and Fisher exact test for qualitative variables. Patients admitted for HF had a mean age of 78.1 years (SD: 9.56); 73 (66.4%) were women; Barthel Index was 45.0 on average; 53.5% had New York Health Association (NYHA) class III and 17 (15.5%) were institutionalized, 70% had between 3 and 5 comorbidities, mainly hypertension (87.3%), dyslipidemia (60.0%), diabetes (57.3%), chronic kidney disease (56.4%), anemia (53.2% ) or atrial fibrillation (52.7%). During hospitalization, 23 patients (20.9%) died. They were mostly women, elderly, had a previous admission and without beta-blockers treatment. The admission in the last 12 months was associated with identification of the primary caregiver; ischemic HF; re-vascularization; inclusion in the COMPARTE Program; treatment change decompensation. The hospital admissions were more frequently an aging population with multiple diseases (hypertension, diabetes, COPD, renal disease) and low capacity for basic activities of daily life. The hospital mortality associated with elderly, women, less use of beta-blockers and the non-inclusion of the patient in the care process.

  14. Green light induces shade avoidance symptoms.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Tingting; Maruhnich, Stefanie A; Folta, Kevin M

    2011-11-01

    Light quality and quantity affect plant adaptation to changing light conditions. Certain wavelengths in the visible and near-visible spectrum are known to have discrete effects on plant growth and development, and the effects of red, far-red, blue, and ultraviolet light have been well described. In this report, an effect of green light on Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) rosette architecture is demonstrated using a narrow-bandwidth light-emitting diode-based lighting system. When green light was added to a background of constant red and blue light, plants exhibited elongation of petioles and upward leaf reorientation, symptoms consistent with those observed in a shaded light environment. The same green light-induced phenotypes were also observed in phytochrome (phy) and cryptochrome (cry) mutant backgrounds. To explore the molecular mechanism underlying the green light-induced response, the accumulation of shade-induced transcripts was measured in response to enriched green light environments. Transcripts that have been demonstrated to increase in abundance under far-red-induced shade avoidance conditions either decrease or exhibit no change when green light is added. However, normal far-red light-associated transcript accumulation patterns are observed in cryptochrome mutants grown with supplemental green light, indicating that the green-absorbing form of cryptochrome is the photoreceptor active in limiting the green light induction of shade-associated transcripts. These results indicate that shade symptoms can be induced by the addition of green light and that cryptochrome receptors and an unknown light sensor participate in acclimation to the enriched green environment.

  15. Geoengineering to Avoid Overshoot: An Uncertainty Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, K.

    2009-04-01

    Geoengineering (or climate engineering) using stratospheric sulfur injections (Crutzen, 2006) has been called for research in case of an urgent need for stopping global warming when other mitigation efforts were exhausted. Although there are a number of concerns over this idea (e.g. Robock, 2008), it is still useful to consider geoengineering as a possible method to limit warming caused by overshoot. Overshoot is a feature accompanied by low stabilizations scenarios aiming for a stringent target (Rao et al., 2008) in which total radiative forcing temporarily exceeds the target before reaching there. Scenarios achieving a 50% emission reduction by 2050 produces overshoot. Overshoot could cause sustained warming for decades due to the inertia of the climate system. If stratospheric sulfur injections were to be used as a "last resort" to avoid overshoot, what would be the suitable start-year and injection profile of such an intervention? Wigley (2006) examined climate response to combined mitigation/geoengineering scenarios with the intent to avert overshoot. Wigley's analysis demonstrated a basic potential of such a combined mitigation/geoengineering approach to avoid temperature overshoot - however it considered only simplistic sulfur injection profiles (all started in 2010), just one mitigation scenario, and did not examine the sensitivity of the climate response to any underlying uncertainties. This study builds upon Wigley's premise of the combined mitigation/geoengineering approach and brings associated uncertainty into the analysis. First, this study addresses the question as to how much geoengineering intervention would be needed to avoid overshoot by considering associated uncertainty? Then, would a geoengineering intervention of such a magnitude including uncertainty be permissible in considering all the other side effects? This study begins from the supposition that geoengineering could be employed to cap warming at 2.0°C since preindustrial. A few

  16. Assessment of avoidance behaviors in mouse models of muscle pain

    PubMed Central

    Pratt, Dane; Fuchs, Perry N.; Sluka, Kathleen A.

    2014-01-01

    Pain encompasses both a sensory as well as an affective dimension and these are differentially processed in the cortex. Animal models typically use reflexive behaviors to test nociceptive responses; these are thought to reflect the sensory dimension of pain. While several behavioral tests are available for examining the affective dimension of pain it is unclear if these are appropriate in animal models of muscle pain. We therefore tested the utility of existing paradigms as well as new avoidance paradigms in animal models of muscle pain in mice. Specifically we used an escape-avoidance test to noxious mechanical stimuli, a learned avoidance test to noxious mechanical stimuli, and avoidance of physical activity. We used three animal models of muscle pain: carrageenan-induced inflammation, non-inflammatory muscle pain, and exercise-enhanced pain. In the carrageenan model of inflammation mice developed escape-avoidance behaviors to mechanical stimuli, learned avoidance to mechanical stimulation and avoidance of physical activity – these models are associated with unilateral hyperalgesia. When both muscles were inflamed, escape-avoidance behaviors did not develop suggesting equivalent bilateral pain-behaviors cannot be tested with an escape-avoidance test. In the non-inflammatory muscle pain model mice did not show significant changes in escape-avoidance behaviors or learned avoidance, but did avoid physical activity. In the exercise-enhanced pain model, there were no changes in escape avoidance, learned avoidance of noxious or physical activity In conclusion, we developed several testing protocols that assess supraspinal processing of pain-behaviors in models of muscle pain and that are most sensitive in animals with unilateral hyperalgesia. PMID:23747349

  17. Characterizing exogenous mRNA delivery, trafficking, cytoplasmic release and RNA-protein correlations at the level of single cells.

    PubMed

    Kirschman, Jonathan L; Bhosle, Sushma; Vanover, Daryll; Blanchard, Emmeline L; Loomis, Kristin H; Zurla, Chiara; Murray, Kathryn; Lam, Blaine C; Santangelo, Philip J

    2017-07-07

    The use of synthetic messenger ribonucleic acid (mRNA) to express specific proteins is a highly promising therapeutic and vaccine approach that avoids many safety issues associated with viral or DNA-based systems. However, in order to optimize mRNA designs and delivery, technology advancements are required to study fundamental mechanisms of mRNA uptake and localization at the single-cell and tissue level. Here, we present a single RNA sensitive fluorescent labeling method which allows us to label and visualize synthetic mRNA without significantly affecting function. This approach enabled single cell characterization of mRNA uptake and release kinetics from endocytic compartments, the measurement of mRNA/protein correlations, and motivated the investigation of mRNA induced cellular stress, all important mechanisms influencing protein production. In addition, we demonstrated this approach can facilitate near-infrared imaging of mRNA localization in vivo and in ex-vivo tissue sections, which will facilitate mRNA trafficking studies in pre-clinical models. Overall, we demonstrate the ability to study fundamental mechanisms necessary to optimize delivery and therapeutic strategies, in order to design the next generation of novel mRNA therapeutics and vaccines. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  18. Decoding the RNA structurome

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Zhipeng; Chang, Howard Y

    2016-01-01

    Structures of RNA molecules are essential for their architectural, regulatory, and catalytic functions. Recent advances in high throughput sequencing enabled the development of methods for probing RNA structures on a transcriptome-wide scale – termed the RNA structurome. Here we review the state-of-the-art technologies for probing the RNA structurome, and highlight insights gained from these studies. We also point out the limits of current methods and discuss potential directions for future improvements. PMID:26923056

  19. Messenger RNA transcripts

    Treesearch

    Dan Cullen

    2004-01-01

    In contrast to DNA, messenger RNA (mRNA) in complex substrata is rarely analyzed, in large part because labile RNA molecules are difficult to purify. Nucleic acid extractions from fungi that colonize soil are particularly difficult and plagued by humic substances that interfere with Taq polymerase (Tebbe and Vahjen 1993 and references therein). Magnetic capture...

  20. Adenylylation of small RNA sequencing adapters using the TS2126 RNA ligase I.

    PubMed

    Lama, Lodoe; Ryan, Kevin

    2016-01-01

    Many high-throughput small RNA next-generation sequencing protocols use 5' preadenylylated DNA oligonucleotide adapters during cDNA library preparation. Preadenylylation of the DNA adapter's 5' end frees from ATP-dependence the ligation of the adapter to RNA collections, thereby avoiding ATP-dependent side reactions. However, preadenylylation of the DNA adapters can be costly and difficult. The currently available method for chemical adenylylation of DNA adapters is inefficient and uses techniques not typically practiced in laboratories profiling cellular RNA expression. An alternative enzymatic method using a commercial RNA ligase was recently introduced, but this enzyme works best as a stoichiometric adenylylating reagent rather than a catalyst and can therefore prove costly when several variant adapters are needed or during scale-up or high-throughput adenylylation procedures. Here, we describe a simple, scalable, and highly efficient method for the 5' adenylylation of DNA oligonucleotides using the thermostable RNA ligase 1 from bacteriophage TS2126. Adapters with 3' blocking groups are adenylylated at >95% yield at catalytic enzyme-to-adapter ratios and need not be gel purified before ligation to RNA acceptors. Experimental conditions are also reported that enable DNA adapters with free 3' ends to be 5' adenylylated at >90% efficiency. © 2015 Lama and Ryan; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press for the RNA Society.

  1. Evaluation and control of miRNA-like off-target repression for RNA interference.

    PubMed

    Seok, Heeyoung; Lee, Haejeong; Jang, Eun-Sook; Chi, Sung Wook

    2017-09-13

    RNA interference (RNAi) has been widely adopted to repress specific gene expression and is easily achieved by designing small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) with perfect sequence complementarity to the intended target mRNAs. Although siRNAs direct Argonaute (Ago), a core component of the RNA-induced silencing complex (RISC), to recognize and silence target mRNAs, they also inevitably function as microRNAs (miRNAs) and suppress hundreds of off-targets. Such miRNA-like off-target repression is potentially detrimental, resulting in unwanted toxicity and phenotypes. Despite early recognition of the severity of miRNA-like off-target repression, this effect has often been overlooked because of difficulties in recognizing and avoiding off-targets. However, recent advances in genome-wide methods and knowledge of Ago-miRNA target interactions have set the stage for properly evaluating and controlling miRNA-like off-target repression. Here, we describe the intrinsic problems of miRNA-like off-target effects caused by canonical and noncanonical interactions. We particularly focus on various genome-wide approaches and chemical modifications for the evaluation and prevention of off-target repression to facilitate the use of RNAi with secured specificity.

  2. RNA self-assembly and RNA nanotechnology.

    PubMed

    Grabow, Wade W; Jaeger, Luc

    2014-06-17

    CONSPECTUS: Nanotechnology's central goal involves the direct control of matter at the molecular nanometer scale to build nanofactories, nanomachines, and other devices for potential applications including electronics, alternative fuels, and medicine. In this regard, the nascent use of nucleic acids as a material to coordinate the precise arrangements of specific molecules marked an important milestone in the relatively recent history of nanotechnology. While DNA served as the pioneer building material in nucleic acid nanotechnology, RNA continues to emerge as viable alternative material with its own distinct advantages for nanoconstruction. Several complementary assembly strategies have been used to build a diverse set of RNA nanostructures having unique structural attributes and the ability to self-assemble in a highly programmable and controlled manner. Of the different strategies, the architectonics approach uniquely endeavors to understand integrated structural RNA architectures through the arrangement of their characteristic structural building blocks. Viewed through this lens, it becomes apparent that nature routinely uses thermodynamically stable, recurrent modular motifs from natural RNA molecules to generate unique and more complex programmable structures. With the design principles found in natural structures, a number of synthetic RNAs have been constructed. The synthetic nanostructures constructed to date have provided, in addition to affording essential insights into RNA design, important platforms to characterize and validate the structural self-folding and assembly properties of RNA modules or building blocks. Furthermore, RNA nanoparticles have shown great promise for applications in nanomedicine and RNA-based therapeutics. Nevertheless, the synthetic RNA architectures achieved thus far consist largely of static, rigid particles that are still far from matching the structural and functional complexity of natural responsive structural elements such

  3. Towards better patient care: drugs to avoid.

    PubMed

    2013-04-01

    Common sense dictates that one should choose tried and tested drugs with proven, concrete benefits that outweigh their adverse effects. Many new drugs are approved each year, often despite a lack of solid evidence that they are any better than existing treatments. Worse, some are approved despite being less effective or more harmful than current options. Massive promotion is used to ensure that such drugs achieve a positive image in the eyes of healthcare professionals and patients. Renowned "opinion leaders" intervene in their favour at conferences and in specialist media, and their opinions are further propagated by specialists in the field. Finally, campaigns in the lay media are used to highlight the target illness, encouraging patients to request a prescription. New data sometimes show that older, initially promising drugs are less effective or more harmful than first thought. For all these reasons, many drugs that are now present on the market are more harmful than beneficial and should be avoided. Unfortunately, negative assessment data and warnings are often drowned in the flood of promotion and advertising. Front-line healthcare professionals who are determined to act in their patients' best interests can find themselves swimming against a tide of specialist opinion, marketing authorisation, and reimbursement decisions. By leaving drugs that are more harmful than beneficial on the market and contenting themselves with simple half-measures, healthcare authorities are failing in their duty to protect patients. Prescrire, a journal funded solely by its subscribers, does not seek to do the work of health authorities, and does not have the means to do so. Prescrire's goal is simply to help healthcare professionals provide better care. The following text lists the principal drugs that we consider more harmful than beneficial, based on our reviews published between 2010 and 2012 in our French edition. These drugs should not be used. Patients and healthcare

  4. Adolescents' approach-avoidance behaviour in the context of pain.

    PubMed

    Fisher, Emma; Keogh, Edmund; Eccleston, Christopher

    2016-02-01

    Adolescents who experience pain often face competing goals and have to choose whether to approach (confront) or avoid pain. This study investigates the decisions adolescents make when their pain conflicts with a valued goal. Adolescents between the ages of 15 and 18 years (N = 170) completed questionnaires on general and pain-specific anxiety, courage, and dispositional avoidance. Adolescents were presented with 16 vignettes (8 high pain intensity, 8 low pain intensity), which described pain conflicting with a goal (eg, doing well at school, seeing friends). Adolescents rated goals for importance and reported how likely they would be to approach or avoid each pain. Adolescents were more likely to avoid and were more fearful of high pain intensity than low pain intensity vignettes. Pain anxiety predicted higher levels of avoidance for both pain intensities. General anxiety was not a significant predictor of avoidance for either pain intensity. Goal importance promoted approach of goals, but only when pain was described as intense. However, pain anxiety predicted avoidance beyond the importance of goals for high pain intensity vignettes. In addition, we compared approach-avoidance of adolescents with and without chronic pain; analyses revealed no differences in approach-avoidance behaviour. We also found that behavioural endurance was predictive of approach and dispositional avoidance predicted higher avoidance, but courage was not predictive of behaviour in this task. We adopt a motivational perspective when interpreting the findings and consider whether the fear-avoidance model should be extended to include the function of avoidance or approach in the pursuit of a desired goal.

  5. miARma-Seq: a comprehensive tool for miRNA, mRNA and circRNA analysis

    PubMed Central

    Andrés-León, Eduardo; Núñez-Torres, Rocío; Rojas, Ana M.

    2016-01-01

    Large-scale RNAseq has substantially changed the transcriptomics field, as it enables an unprecedented amount of high resolution data to be acquired. However, the analysis of these data still poses a challenge to the research community. Many tools have been developed to overcome this problem, and to facilitate the study of miRNA expression profiles and those of their target genes. While a few of these enable both kinds of analysis to be performed, they also present certain limitations in terms of their requirements and/or the restrictions on data uploading. To avoid these restraints, we have developed a suite that offers the identification of miRNA, mRNA and circRNAs that can be applied to any sequenced organism. Additionally, it enables differential expression, miRNA-mRNA target prediction and/or functional analysis. The miARma-Seq pipeline is presented as a stand-alone tool that is both easy to install and flexible in terms of its use, and that brings together well-established software in a single bundle. Our suite can analyze a large number of samples due to its multithread design. By testing miARma-Seq in validated datasets, we demonstrate here the benefits that can be gained from this tool by making it readily accessible to the research community. PMID:27167008

  6. Cytoplasmic Z-RNA

    SciTech Connect

    Zarling, D.A.; Calhoun, C.J.; Hardin, C.C.; Zarling, A.H.

    1987-09-01

    Specific immunochemical probes for Z-RNA were generated and characterized to search for possible Z-RNA-like double helices in cells. Z-RNA was detected in the cytoplasm of fixed protozoan cells by immunofluorescence microscopy using these anti-Z-RNA IgCs. In contrast, autoimmune or experimentally elicited anti-DNA antibodies, specifically reactive with B-DNA or Z-DNA, stained the nuclei. Pre-or nonimmune IgGs did not bind to the cells. RNase A or T1 digestion eliminated anti-Z-RNA IgG binding to cytoplasmic determinants; however, DNase I or mung bean nuclease had no effect. Doxorubicin and ethidium bromide prevented anti-Z-RNA antibody binding; however, actinomycin D, which does not bind double-stranded RNA, did not. Anti-Z-RNA immunofluorescence was specifically blocked in competition assays by synthetic Z-RNA but not Z-DNA, A-RNA, or single-stranded RNAs. Thus, some cytoplasmic sequences in fixed cells exist in the left-handed Z-RNA conformation.

  7. Anxiety sensitivity moderates behavioral avoidance in anxious youth

    PubMed Central

    Lebowitz, Eli R.; Shic, Frederick; Campbell, Daniel; Basile, Krista; Silverman, Wendy K.

    2016-01-01

    Individuals who are high in anxiety sensitivity (AS) are motivated to avoid sensations of anxiety. Consequently, AS is hypothesized to contribute to overall avoidance of any feared stimuli. No studies have yet examined whether fear of a stimulus is a stronger predictor of behavioral avoidance in individuals who are high in AS compared to individuals who are low in AS. We examined whether AS moderates the association between fear of spiders and behavioral avoidance of spider stimuli in 50 clinically anxious youth. Fear of spiders significantly predicted avoidance of spider stimuli in youth high in AS but not in youth low in AS. These results provide support for the role of AS in avoidant behavior and help to explain the link between AS and the anxiety disorders. The results have implications for exposure-based anxiety treatments and highlight the importance of increasing anxious patients’ ability to tolerate sensations of anxiety. PMID:26348546

  8. Excise Tax Avoidance: The Case of State Cigarette Taxes

    PubMed Central

    DeCicca, Philip; Kenkel, Donald; Liu, Feng

    2013-01-01

    We conduct an applied welfare economics analysis of cigarette tax avoidance. We develop an extension of the standard formula for the optimal Pigouvian corrective tax to incorporate the possibility that consumers avoid the tax by making purchases in nearby lower-tax jurisdictions. To provide a key parameter for our formula, we estimate a structural endogenous switching regression model of border-crossing and cigarette prices. In illustrative calculations, we find that for many states, after taking into account tax avoidance the optimal tax is at least 20 percent smaller than the standard Pigouvian tax that simply internalizes external costs. Our empirical estimate that tax avoidance strongly responds to the price differential is the main reason for this result. We also use our results to examine the benefits of replacing avoidable state excise taxes with a harder-to-avoid federal excise tax on cigarettes. PMID:24140760

  9. Generalisation of fear and avoidance along a semantic continuum.

    PubMed

    Boyle, Sean; Roche, Bryan; Dymond, Simon; Hermans, Dirk

    2016-01-01

    Directly conditioned fear and avoidance readily generalises to dissimilar but conceptually related stimuli. Here, for the first time, we examined the conceptual/semantic generalisation of both fear and avoidance using real words (synonyms). Participants were first exposed to a differential fear conditioning procedure in which one word (e.g., "broth"; CS+) was followed with brief electric shock [unconditioned stimulus (US)] and another was not (e.g., "assist"; CS-). Next, an instrumental conditioning phase taught avoidance in the presence the CS+ but not the CS-. During generalisation testing, synonyms of the CS+ (e.g., "soup"; GCS+) and CS- (e.g., "help"; GCS-) were presented in the absence of shock. Conditioned fear and avoidance, measured via skin conductance responses, behavioural avoidance and US expectancy ratings, generalised to the semantically related, but not to the semantically unrelated, synonyms. Findings have implications for how natural language categories and concepts mediate the expansion of fear and avoidance repertoires in clinical contexts.

  10. Anxiety sensitivity moderates behavioral avoidance in anxious youth.

    PubMed

    Lebowitz, Eli R; Shic, Frederick; Campbell, Daniel; Basile, Krista; Silverman, Wendy K

    2015-11-01

    Individuals who are high in anxiety sensitivity (AS) are motivated to avoid sensations of anxiety. Consequently, AS is hypothesized to contribute to overall avoidance of any feared stimuli. No studies have yet examined whether fear of a stimulus is a stronger predictor of behavioral avoidance in individuals who are high in AS compared to individuals who are low in AS. We examined whether AS moderates the association between fear of spiders and behavioral avoidance of spider stimuli in 50 clinically anxious youth. Fear of spiders significantly predicted avoidance of spider stimuli in youth high in AS but not in youth low in AS. These results provide support for the role of AS in avoidant behavior and help to explain the link between AS and the anxiety disorders. The results have implications for exposure-based anxiety treatments and highlight the importance of increasing anxious patients' ability to tolerate sensations of anxiety.

  11. Excise tax avoidance: the case of state cigarette taxes.

    PubMed

    DeCicca, Philip; Kenkel, Donald; Liu, Feng

    2013-12-01

    We conduct an applied welfare economics analysis of cigarette tax avoidance. We develop an extension of the standard formula for the optimal Pigouvian corrective tax to incorporate the possibility that consumers avoid the tax by making purchases in nearby lower tax jurisdictions. To provide a key parameter for our formula, we estimate a structural endogenous switching regression model of border-crossing and cigarette prices. In illustrative calculations, we find that for many states, after taking into account tax avoidance the optimal tax is at least 20% smaller than the standard Pigouvian tax that simply internalizes external costs. Our empirical estimate that tax avoidance strongly responds to the price differential is the main reason for this result. We also use our results to examine the benefits of replacing avoidable state excise taxes with a harder-to-avoid federal excise tax on cigarettes. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Nurse practitioner private practice: three legal pitfalls to avoid.

    PubMed

    Buppert, C

    1996-04-01

    Private practice is now a viable option for nurse practitioners. NPs who open their own practice will be wise if they anticipate, consider, and act to prevent certain potential legal problems. Awareness and avoidance of these problems--risk avoidance--is the legal equivalent of preventive medicine. This article gives NPs an attorney's perspective on setting up a practice and some of the legal pitfalls to avoid.

  13. A Mobile Robot Sonar System with Obstacle Avoidance.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-03-01

    vehicle, robot, obstacle avoidance, sonar sensing 102 17. SECURITY CLASSWIFCATION 1S. SECURITY CLASINFICATION I& SECURITY CLASSIFICATION 20. UMITATION...WITH OBSTACLE - AVOIDANCE __ by __ Patrick Gerard Byrne March 1994 Thesis Advisor: Yutaka Kanayama Approved for public release; distribution is...SEOLY(Lae anO r Iff TDT, Master’s Thesis _____________ 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE L FUMNING NUMBR A Mobile Robot Sonar System With Obstacle Avoidance (U

  14. Translating Ribosomes Inhibit Poliovirus Negative-Strand RNA Synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Barton, David J.; Morasco, B. Joan; Flanegan, James B.

    1999-01-01

    Poliovirus has a single-stranded RNA genome of positive polarity that serves two essential functions at the start of the viral replication cycle in infected cells. First, it is translated to synthesize viral proteins and, second, it is copied by the viral polymerase to synthesize negative-strand RNA. We investigated these two reactions by using HeLa S10 in vitro translation-RNA replication reactions. Preinitiation RNA replication complexes were isolated from these reactions and then used to measure the sequential synthesis of negative- and positive-strand RNAs in the presence of different protein synthesis inhibitors. Puromycin was found to stimulate RNA replication overall. In contrast, RNA replication was inhibited by diphtheria toxin, cycloheximide, anisomycin, and ricin A chain. Dose-response experiments showed that precisely the same concentration of a specific drug was required to inhibit protein synthesis and to either stimulate or inhibit RNA replication. This suggested that the ability of these drugs to affect RNA replication was linked to their ability to alter the normal clearance of translating ribosomes from the input viral RNA. Consistent with this idea was the finding that the protein synthesis inhibitors had no measurable effect on positive-strand synthesis in normal RNA replication complexes. In marked contrast, negative-strand synthesis was stimulated by puromycin and was inhibited by cycloheximide. Puromycin causes polypeptide chain termination and induces the dissociation of polyribosomes from mRNA. Cycloheximide and other inhibitors of polypeptide chain elongation “freeze” ribosomes on mRNA and prevent the normal clearance of ribosomes from viral RNA templates. Therefore, it appears that the poliovirus polymerase was not able to dislodge translating ribosomes from viral RNA templates and mediate the switch from translation to negative-strand synthesis. Instead, the initiation of negative-strand synthesis appears to be coordinately regulated

  15. Enhancement of single guide RNA transcription for efficient CRISPR/Cas-based genomic engineering.

    PubMed

    Ui-Tei, Kumiko; Maruyama, Shohei; Nakano, Yuko

    2017-01-26

    Genomic engineering using clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR) and CRISPR-associated (Cas) protein is a promising approach for targeting the genomic DNA of virtually any organism in a sequence-specific manner. Recent remarkable advances in CRISPR/Cas technology have made it a feasible system for use in therapeutic applications and biotechnology. In the CRISPR/Cas system, a guide RNA (gRNA), interacting with the Cas protein, recognizes a genomic region with sequence complementarity, and the double-stranded DNA at the target site is cleaved by the Cas protein. A widely used gRNA is an RNA polymerase III (pol III)-driven single gRNA (sgRNA), which is produced by artificial fusion of CRISPR RNA (crRNA) and trans-activation crRNA (tracrRNA). However, we identified a TTTT stretch, known as a termination signal of RNA pol III, in the scaffold region of the sgRNA. Here, we revealed that sgRNA carrying a TTTT stretch reduces the efficiency of sgRNA transcription due to premature transcriptional termination, and decreases the efficiency of genome editing. Unexpectedly, it was also shown that the premature terminated sgRNA may have an adverse effect of inducing RNA interference. Such disadvantageous effects were avoided by substituting one base in the TTTT stretch.

  16. Evidence for an expectancy-based theory of avoidance behaviour.

    PubMed

    Declercq, Mieke; De Houwer, Jan; Baeyens, Frank

    2008-01-01

    In most studies on avoidance learning, participants receive an aversive unconditioned stimulus after a warning signal is presented, unless the participant performs a particular response. Lovibond (2006) recently proposed a cognitive theory of avoidance learning, according to which avoidance behaviour is a function of both Pavlovian and instrumental conditioning. In line with this theory, we found that avoidance behaviour was based on an integration of acquired knowledge about, on the one hand, the relation between stimuli and, on the other hand, the relation between behaviour and stimuli.

  17. Effects of optimism on creativity under approach and avoidance motivation

    PubMed Central

    Icekson, Tamar; Roskes, Marieke; Moran, Simone

    2014-01-01

    Focusing on avoiding failure or negative outcomes (avoidance motivation) can undermine creativity, due to cognitive (e.g., threat appraisals), affective (e.g., anxiety), and volitional processes (e.g., low intrinsic motivation). This can be problematic for people who are avoidance motivated by nature and in situations in which threats or potential losses are salient. Here, we review the relation between avoidance motivation and creativity, and the processes underlying this relation. We highlight the role of optimism as a potential remedy for the creativity undermining effects of avoidance motivation, due to its impact on the underlying processes. Optimism, expecting to succeed in achieving success or avoiding failure, may reduce negative effects of avoidance motivation, as it eases threat appraisals, anxiety, and disengagement—barriers playing a key role in undermining creativity. People experience these barriers more under avoidance than under approach motivation, and beneficial effects of optimism should therefore be more pronounced under avoidance than approach motivation. Moreover, due to their eagerness, approach motivated people may even be more prone to unrealistic over-optimism and its negative consequences. PMID:24616690

  18. Avoiding DWI Among Bar-room Drinkers: Strategies and Predictors

    PubMed Central

    Caudill, Barry D.; Rogers, John W.; Howard, Jan; Frissell, Kevin C.; Harding, Wayne M.

    2010-01-01

    We examined the prevalence and predictors of 11strategies to avoid driving when feeling intoxicated among 561 bar-room patrons in two medium-sized Maryland communities. Logistic regression analyses identified demographic, behavioral, and attitudinal predictors of avoidance strategies and interactions among predictors. Overall, 89% reported one or more DWI avoidance actions in the past year, and 38% reported driving intoxicated during that time. Average frequencies of avoidance behavior and intoxicated driving increased significantly as drinking level increased. However, the higher the drinking level, the smaller the ratio of avoidance actions to DWI experiences, highlighting the vulnerability of heavy drinkers who had driven intoxicated. Using a sober driver or one who allegedly drank less than the respondent were the most popular and frequent strategies, but paying for a cab, walking, and using a bus or free cab were relatively unpopular. Higher drinking levels predicted significantly higher odds of using avoidance approaches, as did intoxicated driving. Confidence in driving safely when intoxicated was positively related to drinking level and intoxicated driving, but it tended to predict lower odds of avoidance actions. Similarly, marital status, age, gender, and location influenced the odds of avoidance behaviors. Interventions should be strategically tailored to exploit or counter drinker predilections among avoidance options. PMID:22879742

  19. Effects of optimism on creativity under approach and avoidance motivation.

    PubMed

    Icekson, Tamar; Roskes, Marieke; Moran, Simone

    2014-01-01

    Focusing on avoiding failure or negative outcomes (avoidance motivation) can undermine creativity, due to cognitive (e.g., threat appraisals), affective (e.g., anxiety), and volitional processes (e.g., low intrinsic motivation). This can be problematic for people who are avoidance motivated by nature and in situations in which threats or potential losses are salient. Here, we review the relation between avoidance motivation and creativity, and the processes underlying this relation. We highlight the role of optimism as a potential remedy for the creativity undermining effects of avoidance motivation, due to its impact on the underlying processes. Optimism, expecting to succeed in achieving success or avoiding failure, may reduce negative effects of avoidance motivation, as it eases threat appraisals, anxiety, and disengagement-barriers playing a key role in undermining creativity. People experience these barriers more under avoidance than under approach motivation, and beneficial effects of optimism should therefore be more pronounced under avoidance than approach motivation. Moreover, due to their eagerness, approach motivated people may even be more prone to unrealistic over-optimism and its negative consequences.

  20. Obstacle Avoidance Control on Omnidirectional Vehicle Robots Using Range Sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimada, Akira; Kiddee, Prasarn; Nishi, Yujiro

    Generally, intelligent vehicle robots are strongly needed in many fields. They are expected to assist our daily lives. In order to implement them in practice, we should mount useful functions including path planning, navigation, and obstacle avoidance, etc. on the robots. This paper focuses on obstacle avoidance control technique to multiple obstacles. The used vehicle as a platform is the mecanum wheel omnidirectional vehicle which is driven on floors and mounts a scanner range sensor. The presented algorithm has the feature that multiple obstacle avoidance control is simply come down to the mono-obstacle avoidance control scheme. Finally, the experimental results are shown in order to evaluate the presented algorithms.

  1. Greater avoidance behavior in individuals with posttraumatic stress disorder symptoms.

    PubMed

    Sheynin, Jony; Shind, Christine; Radell, Milen; Ebanks-Williams, Yasheca; Gilbertson, Mark W; Beck, Kevin D; Myers, Catherine E

    2017-05-01

    While avoidance is a core symptom of PTSD, little is known about whether individuals with PTSD show a general cognitive bias to acquire and express avoidance, in situations not related to trauma or fear. Here, we used a computer-based task to examine operant acquisition and extinction of avoidance in participants with and without severe self-reported PTSD symptoms. A total of 119 participants (77 male, 42 female; 74 veteran, 45 civilian) with symptoms (PTSS; n = 63) or with few/no symptoms (noPTSS; n = 56) performed a task, in which they controlled a spaceship and could shoot a target to gain points or hide in "safe areas" to escape or avoid on-screen aversive events. Results show that participants with PTSS exhibited more avoidance across trials than noPTSS participants, particularly due to more avoidance behavior in PTSS females compared to noPTSS females. Avoidance behavior decreased across extinction trials but interactions with PTSS and gender fell short of significance. Overall, PTSD symptoms were associated with propensity to acquire and express avoidance behavior, in both civilians and veterans, and even in a cognitive task that does not explicitly involve trauma or fear. This effect was more pronounced in females, highlighting the role of gender differences in PTSD symptomatology. Importantly, this study also demonstrates the potential of an objective assessment of avoidance behavior, which could be used to supplement the common but limited self-report tools.

  2. Who Avoids Cancer Information? Examining a Psychological Process Leading to Cancer Information Avoidance.

    PubMed

    Chae, Jiyoung

    2016-07-01

    Although cancer information avoidance (CIA) is detrimental to public health, predictors of CIA have not been fully investigated. Based on uncertainty management theory, this study viewed CIA as a response to uncertainty related to the distress associated with cancer information and illustrated the psychological process leading to CIA. Given the current information context, it was hypothesized that cancer information overload (CIO), accompanied by confusion and stress about cancer information, causes CIA. As trait anxiety is a strong predictor of CIO, it was also hypothesized that trait anxiety has an indirect effect on CIA through CIO. Study 1 tested this relationship in a U.S. sample (N = 384); the results showed that CIO was positively associated with CIA and that trait anxiety indirectly influenced CIA through CIO. Whereas Study 1 tested the relationship with cross-sectional data in the general cancer context, Study 2 replicated Study 1 with 3-wave longitudinal data in the context of a specific cancer (i.e., stomach cancer) in South Korea (N = 1,130 at Wave 1, 813 at Wave 2, and 582 at Wave 3). Trait anxiety at Wave 1 predicted CIO at Wave 2, which in turn increased CIA at Wave 3, suggesting that some people are inherently inclined to avoid cancer information due to their trait anxiety, which results in confusion about cancer information.

  3. Exponents of intrachain correlation for self-avoiding walks and knotted self-avoiding polygons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uehara, Erica; Deguchi, Tetsuo

    2013-08-01

    We show numerically that critical exponents for two-point intrachain correlation of an infinite chain characterize those of finite chains in self-avoiding walk (SAW) and self-avoiding polygon (SAP) under a topological constraint. We evaluate short-distance exponents θ(i, j) through the probability distribution functions of the distance between the ith and jth vertices of N-step SAW (or SAP with a knot) for all pairs (1 ⩽ i, j ⩽ N). We construct the contour plot of θ(i, j), and express it as a function of i and j. We suggest that it has quite a simple structure. Here exponents θ(i, j) generalize des Cloizeaux’s three critical exponents for short-distance intrachain correlation of SAW, and we show the crossover among them. We also evaluate the diffusion coefficient of knotted SAP for a few knot types, which can be calculated with the probability distribution functions of the distance between two nodes.

  4. Host membrane proteins involved in the replication of tobamovirus RNA.

    PubMed

    Ishibashi, Kazuhiro; Miyashita, Shuhei; Katoh, Etsuko; Ishikawa, Masayuki

    2012-12-01

    Eukaryotic positive-strand RNA viruses replicate their genomes in membrane-bound replication complexes composed of viral replication proteins and negative-strand RNA templates. These replication proteins are programmed to exhibit RNA polymerase and other replication-related activities only in replication complexes to avoid inducing double-stranded RNA-mediated host defenses. Host membrane components (e.g. proteins and lipids) should play important roles in the activation of replication proteins. Two host membrane proteins are components of the replication complex and activate the replication proteins of tobamoviruses. Interaction analyses using deletion mutants constructed based on structural information suggest a conformational change in replication proteins during the formation of a protein complex with RNA 5'-capping activity.

  5. Repetitive RNA unwinding by RNA helicase A facilitates RNA annealing.

    PubMed

    Koh, Hye Ran; Xing, Li; Kleiman, Lawrence; Myong, Sua

    2014-07-01

    Helicases contribute to diverse biological processes including replication, transcription and translation. Recent reports suggest that unwinding of some helicases display repetitive activity, yet the functional role of the repetitiveness requires further investigation. Using single-molecule fluorescence assays, we elucidated a unique unwinding mechanism of RNA helicase A (RHA) that entails discrete substeps consisting of binding, activation, unwinding, stalling and reactivation stages. This multi-step process is repeated many times by a single RHA molecule without dissociation, resulting in repetitive unwinding/rewinding cycles. Our kinetic and mutational analysis indicates that the two double stand RNA binding domains at the N-terminus of RHA are responsible for such repetitive unwinding behavior in addition to providing an increased binding affinity to RNA. Further, the repetitive unwinding induces an efficient annealing of a complementary RNA by making the unwound strand more accessible. The complex and unusual mechanism displayed by RHA may help in explaining how the repetitive unwinding of helicases contributes to their biological functions.

  6. RNA Viruses Infecting Pest Insects

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    RNA viruses are viruses whose genetic material is ribonucleic acid (RNA). RNA viruses may be double or single-stranded based on the type of RNA they contain. Single-stranded RNA viruses can be further grouped into negative sense or positive-sense viruses according to the polarity of their RNA. Fur...

  7. Neural substrates of approach-avoidance conflict decision-making.

    PubMed

    Aupperle, Robin L; Melrose, Andrew J; Francisco, Alex; Paulus, Martin P; Stein, Murray B

    2015-02-01

    Animal approach-avoidance conflict paradigms have been used extensively to operationalize anxiety, quantify the effects of anxiolytic agents, and probe the neural basis of fear and anxiety. Results from human neuroimaging studies support that a frontal-striatal-amygdala neural circuitry is important for approach-avoidance learning. However, the neural basis of decision-making is much less clear in this context. Thus, we combined a recently developed human approach-avoidance paradigm with functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to identify neural substrates underlying approach-avoidance conflict decision-making. Fifteen healthy adults completed the approach-avoidance conflict (AAC) paradigm during fMRI. Analyses of variance were used to compare conflict to nonconflict (avoid-threat and approach-reward) conditions and to compare level of reward points offered during the decision phase. Trial-by-trial amplitude modulation analyses were used to delineate brain areas underlying decision-making in the context of approach/avoidance behavior. Conflict trials as compared to the nonconflict trials elicited greater activation within bilateral anterior cingulate cortex, anterior insula, and caudate, as well as right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (PFC). Right caudate and lateral PFC activation was modulated by level of reward offered. Individuals who showed greater caudate activation exhibited less approach behavior. On a trial-by-trial basis, greater right lateral PFC activation related to less approach behavior. Taken together, results suggest that the degree of activation within prefrontal-striatal-insula circuitry determines the degree of approach versus avoidance decision-making. Moreover, the degree of caudate and lateral PFC activation related to individual differences in approach-avoidance decision-making. Therefore, the approach-avoidance conflict paradigm is ideally suited to probe anxiety-related processing differences during approach-avoidance decision

  8. Rapid avoidance acquisition in Wistar-Kyoto rats.

    PubMed

    Servatius, R J; Jiao, X; Beck, K D; Pang, K C H; Minor, T R

    2008-10-10

    The relationship between trait stress-sensitivity, avoidance acquisition and perseveration of avoidance was examined using male Wistar-Kyoto (WKY) and Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats. Behavior in an open field was measured prior to escape/avoidance (E/A) acquisition and extinction. E/A was assessed in a discrete trial lever-press protocol. The signal-shock interval was 60s with subsequent shocks delivered every 3s until a lever-press occurred. A 3-min flashing light safety signal was delivered contingent upon a lever-press (or failure to respond in 5 min). WKY rats displayed phenotypic low open field activity, but were clearly superior to SD rats in E/A performance. As avoidance responses were acquired and reached asymptotic performance, SD rats exhibited "warm up", that is, SD rats rarely made avoidance responses on the initial trial of a session, even though later trials were consistently accompanied with avoidance responses. In contrast, WKY rats did not show the "warm up" pattern and avoided on nearly all trials of a session including the initial trial. In addition to the superior acquisition of E/A, WKY rats demonstrated several other avoidance features that were different from SD rats. Although the rates of nonreinforced intertrial responses (ITRs) were relatively low and selective to the early safety period, WKY displayed more ITRs than SD rats. With removal of the shocks extinction was delayed in WKY rats, likely reflecting their nearly perfect avoidance performance. Even after extensive extinction, first trial avoidance and ITRs were evident in WKY rats. Thus, WKY rats have a unique combination of trait behavioral inhibition (low open field activity and stress sensitivity) and superior avoidance acquisition and response perseveration making this strain a good model to understand anxiety disorders.

  9. The eukaryotic RNA exosome.

    PubMed

    Januszyk, Kurt; Lima, Christopher D

    2014-02-01

    The eukaryotic RNA exosome is an essential multi-subunit ribonuclease complex that contributes to the degradation or processing of nearly every class of RNA in both the nucleus and cytoplasm. Its nine-subunit core shares structural similarity to phosphorolytic exoribonucleases such as bacterial PNPase. PNPase and the RNA exosome core feature a central channel that can accommodate single stranded RNA although unlike PNPase, the RNA exosome core is devoid of ribonuclease activity. Instead, the core associates with Rrp44, an endoribonuclease and processive 3'→5' exoribonuclease, and Rrp6, a distributive 3'→5' exoribonuclease. Recent biochemical and structural studies suggest that the exosome core is essential because it coordinates Rrp44 and Rrp6 recruitment, RNA can pass through the central channel, and the association with the core modulates Rrp44 and Rrp6 activities.

  10. A collision avoidance system for a spaceplane manipulator arm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sciomachen, Anna; Magnani, Piergiovanni

    1989-01-01

    Part of the activity in the area of collision avoidance related to the Hermes spaceplane is reported. A collision avoidance software system which was defined, developed and implemented in this project is presented. It computes the intersection between the solids representing the arm, the payload, and the objects. It is feasible with respect to the resources available on board, considering its performance.

  11. 14 CFR 417.231 - Collision avoidance analysis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Collision avoidance analysis. 417.231 Section 417.231 Aeronautics and Space COMMERCIAL SPACE TRANSPORTATION, FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION LICENSING LAUNCH SAFETY Flight Safety Analysis § 417.231 Collision avoidance...

  12. 14 CFR 417.231 - Collision avoidance analysis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Collision avoidance analysis. 417.231 Section 417.231 Aeronautics and Space COMMERCIAL SPACE TRANSPORTATION, FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION LICENSING LAUNCH SAFETY Flight Safety Analysis § 417.231 Collision avoidance...

  13. 14 CFR 417.231 - Collision avoidance analysis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Collision avoidance analysis. 417.231 Section 417.231 Aeronautics and Space COMMERCIAL SPACE TRANSPORTATION, FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION LICENSING LAUNCH SAFETY Flight Safety Analysis § 417.231 Collision avoidance...

  14. 14 CFR 417.231 - Collision avoidance analysis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Collision avoidance analysis. 417.231 Section 417.231 Aeronautics and Space COMMERCIAL SPACE TRANSPORTATION, FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION LICENSING LAUNCH SAFETY Flight Safety Analysis § 417.231 Collision avoidance...

  15. Quantum walks with tuneable self-avoidance in one dimension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camilleri, Elizabeth; Rohde, Peter P.; Twamley, Jason

    2014-04-01

    Quantum walks exhibit many unique characteristics compared to classical random walks. In the classical setting, self-avoiding random walks have been studied as a variation on the usual classical random walk. Here the walker has memory of its previous locations and preferentially avoids stepping back to locations where it has previously resided. Classical self-avoiding random walks have found numerous algorithmic applications, most notably in the modelling of protein folding. We consider the analogous problem in the quantum setting - a quantum walk in one dimension with tunable levels of self-avoidance. We complement a quantum walk with a memory register that records where the walker has previously resided. The walker is then able to avoid returning back to previously visited sites or apply more general memory conditioned operations to control the walk. We characterise this walk by examining the variance of the walker's distribution against time, the standard metric for quantifying how quantum or classical a walk is. We parameterise the strength of the memory recording and the strength of the memory back-action on the walker, and investigate their effect on the dynamics of the walk. We find that by manipulating these parameters, which dictate the degree of self-avoidance, the walk can be made to reproduce ideal quantum or classical random walk statistics, or a plethora of more elaborate diffusive phenomena. In some parameter regimes we observe a close correspondence between classical self-avoiding random walks and the quantum self-avoiding walk.

  16. Teacher Distress and the Role of Experiential Avoidance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hinds, Erika; Jones, Laura Backen; Gau, Jeffrey M.; Forrester, Kathleen K.; Biglan, Anthony

    2015-01-01

    Teachers' psychological well-being is important for teachers and students, but teaching is highly stressful, particularly in special education. We examined the role of experiential avoidance (EA) in the well-being of 529 middle and elementary school teachers. EA involves the tendency to avoid thoughts, feelings, and other internal experiences,…

  17. Geographic variation in potentially avoidable hospitalizations in France.

    PubMed

    Mercier, Gregoire; Georgescu, Vera; Bousquet, Jean

    2015-05-01

    Potentially avoidable hospitalizations are studied as an indirect measure of access to primary care. Understanding the determinants of these hospitalizations can help improve the quality, efficiency, and equity of health care delivery. Few studies have tackled the issue of potentially avoidable hospitalizations in France, and none has done so at the national level. We assessed disparities in potentially avoidable hospitalizations in France in 2012 and analyzed their determinants. The standardized rate of potentially avoidable hospitalizations ranged from 0.1 to 44.4 cases per 1,000 inhabitants, at the ZIP code level. Increased potentially avoidable hospitalizations were associated with higher mortality, lower density of acute care beds and ambulatory care nurses, lower median income, and lower education levels. This study unveils considerable variation in the rate of potentially avoidable hospitalizations in spite of France's mandatory, publicly funded health insurance system. In addition to epidemiological and sociodemographic factors, this study suggests that primary care organization plays a role in geographic disparities in potentially avoidable hospitalizations that might be addressed by increasing the number of nurses and enhancing team work in primary care. Policy makers should consider measuring potentially avoidable hospitalizations in France as an indicator of primary care organization.

  18. Fear avoidance and pain catastrophizing among women with sexual pain.

    PubMed

    Thomtén, Johanna; Lundahl, Rebecka; Stigenberg, Karin; Linton, Steven

    2014-11-01

    Among women under 30 years of age, around 20% report recurrent sexual pain. Although the amount of studies investigating sexual pain has increased, little is known about the role of psychosocial factors. The present study used the fear-avoidance model from musculoskeletal pain as a theoretical frame of reference, and examined fear-avoidance beliefs, avoidance behaviors, pain catastrophizing and symptoms of anxiety and depression among women (18-35 years) reporting sexual pain. The study was cross-sectional, based on a sample of 133 women, where 37 women (27.8%) reported sexual pain often or always. Women with pain reported higher levels of fear avoidance and pain catastrophizing as well as depression and anxiety, with fear avoidance and pain catastrophizing reaching similar levels as has been reported in other long-term pain populations. The level of anxiety and depression did not reach clinical levels. Fear-avoidance beliefs and pain catastrophizing were related to sexual pain and to pain intensity in the regression analysis. The data are in line with, and give further support to, a fear-avoidance perspective in female sexual pain, emphasizing the role of fear and avoidance of pain/sex.

  19. Quantum walks with tuneable self-avoidance in one dimension

    PubMed Central

    Camilleri, Elizabeth; Rohde, Peter P.; Twamley, Jason

    2014-01-01

    Quantum walks exhibit many unique characteristics compared to classical random walks. In the classical setting, self-avoiding random walks have been studied as a variation on the usual classical random walk. Here the walker has memory of its previous locations and preferentially avoids stepping back to locations where it has previously resided. Classical self-avoiding random walks have found numerous algorithmic applications, most notably in the modelling of protein folding. We consider the analogous problem in the quantum setting – a quantum walk in one dimension with tunable levels of self-avoidance. We complement a quantum walk with a memory register that records where the walker has previously resided. The walker is then able to avoid returning back to previously visited sites or apply more general memory conditioned operations to control the walk. We characterise this walk by examining the variance of the walker's distribution against time, the standard metric for quantifying how quantum or classical a walk is. We parameterise the strength of the memory recording and the strength of the memory back-action on the walker, and investigate their effect on the dynamics of the walk. We find that by manipulating these parameters, which dictate the degree of self-avoidance, the walk can be made to reproduce ideal quantum or classical random walk statistics, or a plethora of more elaborate diffusive phenomena. In some parameter regimes we observe a close correspondence between classical self-avoiding random walks and the quantum self-avoiding walk. PMID:24762398

  20. Twenty Common Testing Mistakes for EFL Teachers to Avoid

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henning, Grant

    2012-01-01

    To some extent, good testing procedure, like good language use, can be achieved through avoidance of errors. Almost any language-instruction program requires the preparation and administration of tests, and it is only to the extent that certain common testing mistakes have been avoided that such tests can be said to be worthwhile selection,…

  1. 16 CFR 301.28 - Labels to be avoided.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Labels to be avoided. 301.28 Section 301.28 Commercial Practices FEDERAL TRADE COMMISSION REGULATIONS UNDER SPECIFIC ACTS OF CONGRESS RULES AND REGULATIONS UNDER FUR PRODUCTS LABELING ACT Regulations § 301.28 Labels to be avoided. Labels which are...

  2. 16 CFR 300.6 - Labels to be avoided.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Labels to be avoided. 300.6 Section 300.6 Commercial Practices FEDERAL TRADE COMMISSION REGULATIONS UNDER SPECIFIC ACTS OF CONGRESS RULES AND REGULATIONS UNDER THE WOOL PRODUCTS LABELING ACT OF 1939 Labeling § 300.6 Labels to be avoided. Stamps, tags...

  3. 46 CFR 5.203 - Voluntary surrender to avoid hearing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Voluntary surrender to avoid hearing. 5.203 Section 5.203 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY PROCEDURES APPLICABLE TO THE PUBLIC MARINE... Voluntary surrender to avoid hearing. (a) Any holder may surrender a credential or endorsement to the Coast...

  4. Avoidance behavior of young black ducks treated with chromium

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Heinz, G.H.; Haseltine, S.D.

    1981-01-01

    Pairs of adult black ducks (Anas rubripes) were fed a diet containing 0, 20, or 200 ppm chromium in the form of chromium potassium sulfate. Ducklings from these pairs were fed the same diets as adults and were tested for their avoidance responses to a fright stimulus. Neither level of chromium had a significant effect on avoidance behavior.

  5. Educational Demands to Reduce Avoidance of Vocational Education in Jordan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alsa'aideh, Monim

    2016-01-01

    This study aims to identify the educational demands to reduce students' avoidance of vocational education in Jordan. Results of a previous study addressing reasons for avoidance of vocational education, distributed these reasons into personal, social, economic, educational and vocational domains. Focus-groups method was used to identify the…

  6. 38 CFR 4.14 - Avoidance of pyramiding.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Avoidance of pyramiding. 4.14 Section 4.14 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS SCHEDULE FOR RATING DISABILITIES General Policy in Rating § 4.14 Avoidance of pyramiding. The evaluation of...

  7. 14 CFR 125.224 - Collision avoidance system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Collision avoidance system. 125.224 Section... Requirements § 125.224 Collision avoidance system. Effective January 1, 2005, any airplane you operate under this part 125 must be equipped and operated according to the following table: Collision...

  8. 5 CFR 950.109 - Avoidance of conflict of interest.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Avoidance of conflict of interest. 950.109 Section 950.109 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT (CONTINUED) CIVIL SERVICE... PRIVATE VOLUNTARY ORGANIZATIONS General Provisions § 950.109 Avoidance of conflict of interest....

  9. 31 CFR 800.104 - Transactions or devices for avoidance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Transactions or devices for avoidance. 800.104 Section 800.104 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance..., ACQUISITIONS, AND TAKEOVERS BY FOREIGN PERSONS General § 800.104 Transactions or devices for avoidance....

  10. 29 CFR 1912.4 - Avoidance of duplication.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Avoidance of duplication. 1912.4 Section 1912.4 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR (CONTINUED) ADVISORY COMMITTEES ON STANDARDS Organizational Matters § 1912.4 Avoidance of duplication....

  11. 78 FR 35262 - Detection and Avoidance of Counterfeit Electronic Parts

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-12

    ... Defense Acquisition Regulations System Detection and Avoidance of Counterfeit Electronic Parts AGENCY... and the private sector regarding the electronic parts detection and avoidance coverage proposed to be... main floor of the building. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Ms. Meredith Murphy, DPAP/DARS, at...

  12. 16 CFR 801.90 - Transactions or devices for avoidance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Transactions or devices for avoidance. 801.90 Section 801.90 Commercial Practices FEDERAL TRADE COMMISSION RULES, REGULATIONS, STATEMENTS AND... Transactions or devices for avoidance. Any transaction(s) or other device(s) entered into or employed for...

  13. Passive Avoidance Is Linked to Impaired Fear Extinction in Humans

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cornwell, Brian R.; Overstreet, Cassie; Krimsky, Marissa; Grillon, Christian

    2013-01-01

    Conventional wisdom dictates we must face our fears to conquer them. This idea is embodied in exposure-based treatments for anxiety disorders, where the intent of exposure is to reverse a history of avoidant behavior that is thought to fuel a patient's irrational fears. We tested in humans the relationship between fear and avoidance by combining…

  14. Experiential Avoidance and Problem Behavior: A Mediational Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kingston, Jessica; Clarke, Sue; Remington, Bob

    2010-01-01

    Despite their formal dissimilarity, problem behaviors (e.g., substance misuse, binge eating, self-harm) may share a common function. According to Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT), this shared function is "Experiential Avoidance," the process of avoiding, escaping or otherwise altering unwanted private events (e.g., thoughts, feelings,…

  15. Passive Avoidance Is Linked to Impaired Fear Extinction in Humans

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cornwell, Brian R.; Overstreet, Cassie; Krimsky, Marissa; Grillon, Christian

    2013-01-01

    Conventional wisdom dictates we must face our fears to conquer them. This idea is embodied in exposure-based treatments for anxiety disorders, where the intent of exposure is to reverse a history of avoidant behavior that is thought to fuel a patient's irrational fears. We tested in humans the relationship between fear and avoidance by combining…

  16. Passive avoidance is linked to impaired fear extinction in humans

    PubMed Central

    Cornwell, Brian R.; Overstreet, Cassie; Krimsky, Marissa; Grillon, Christian

    2013-01-01

    Conventional wisdom dictates we must face our fears to conquer them. This idea is embodied in exposure-based treatments for anxiety disorders, where the intent of exposure is to reverse a history of avoidant behavior that is thought to fuel a patient’s irrational fears. We tested in humans the relationship between fear and avoidance by combining Pavlovian differential fear conditioning with a novel task for quantifying spontaneous passive avoidant behavior. During self-guided navigation in virtual reality following de novo fear conditioning, we observed participants keeping their distance from the feared object. At the individual level, passive avoidant behavior was highly associated with maladaptive fear expression (fear-potentiated startle) during late extinction training, indicating that extinction learning was impaired following a brief episode of avoidance. Avoidant behavior, however, was not related to initial acquired fear, raising doubt about a straightforward link between physiological fear and behavioral avoidance. We conclude that a deeper understanding of what motivates avoidance may offer a target for early intervention, before fears transition from the rational to the irrational. PMID:23427168

  17. Design study of general aviation collision avoidance system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bates, M. R.; Moore, L. D.; Scott, W. V.

    1972-01-01

    The selection and design of a time/frequency collision avoidance system for use in general aviation aircraft is discussed. The modifications to airline transport collision avoidance equipment which were made to produce the simpler general aviation system are described. The threat determination capabilities and operating principles of the general aviation system are illustrated.

  18. Safety Signals as Instrumental Reinforcers during Free-Operant Avoidance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fernando, Anushka B. P.; Urcelay, Gonzalo P.; Mar, Adam C.; Dickinson, Anthony; Robbins, Trevor W.

    2014-01-01

    Safety signals provide "relief" through predicting the absence of an aversive event. At issue is whether these signals also act as instrumental reinforcers. Four experiments were conducted using a free-operant lever-press avoidance paradigm in which each press avoided shock and was followed by the presentation of a 5-sec auditory safety…

  19. Experiential Avoidance and Problem Behavior: A Mediational Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kingston, Jessica; Clarke, Sue; Remington, Bob

    2010-01-01

    Despite their formal dissimilarity, problem behaviors (e.g., substance misuse, binge eating, self-harm) may share a common function. According to Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT), this shared function is "Experiential Avoidance," the process of avoiding, escaping or otherwise altering unwanted private events (e.g., thoughts, feelings,…

  20. Passive avoidance is linked to impaired fear extinction in humans.

    PubMed

    Cornwell, Brian R; Overstreet, Cassie; Krimsky, Marissa; Grillon, Christian

    2013-02-20

    Conventional wisdom dictates we must face our fears to conquer them. This idea is embodied in exposure-based treatments for anxiety disorders, where the intent of exposure is to reverse a history of avoidant behavior that is thought to fuel a patient's irrational fears. We tested in humans the relationship between fear and avoidance by combining Pavlovian differential fear conditioning with a novel task for quantifying spontaneous passive avoidant behavior. During self-guided navigation in virtual reality following de novo fear conditioning, we observed participants keeping their distance from the feared object. At the individual level, passive avoidant behavior was highly associated with maladaptive fear expression (fear-potentiated startle) during late extinction training, indicating that extinction learning was impaired following a brief episode of avoidance. Avoidant behavior, however, was not related to initial acquired fear, raising doubt about a straightforward link between physiological fear and behavioral avoidance. We conclude that a deeper understanding of what motivates avoidance may offer a target for early intervention, before fears transition from the rational to the irrational.

  1. Body-Image, Physiological Reactivity and Avoidance Behavior.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    The utility of the Barrier index of body image in predicting conductance and heart rate reactivity, exploratory behavior, and avoidance behavior was...investigated. Results indicated how the body image schema operated in predicting exploratory behavior and avoidance responding. High Barrier Ss

  2. Steering Clear: Avoidance in the Production of Idioms.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Irujo, Suzanne

    A study of advanced English learners' use or avoidance of English idioms is described. The investigation looked at whether the subjects would attempt to use English idioms in a translation task containing idioms, or would instead use non-idiomatic synonyms or paraphrase. It also looked at which idioms are used and which are avoided: those that are…

  3. 47 CFR 74.803 - Frequency selection to avoid interference.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... SERVICES EXPERIMENTAL RADIO, AUXILIARY, SPECIAL BROADCAST AND OTHER PROGRAM DISTRIBUTIONAL SERVICES Low Power Auxiliary Stations § 74.803 Frequency selection to avoid interference. (a) Where two or more low... 47 Telecommunication 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Frequency selection to avoid interference....

  4. Client Articulated Avoidance Goals in the Therapy Context

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elliot, Andrew J.; Church, Marcy A.

    2002-01-01

    This research investigated the relationship between clients' pursuit of avoidance (relative to approach) therapy goals and change in subjective well-being (SWB) from the beginning to the end of therapy. Results indicated that clients with more avoidance therapy goals evidenced a smaller increase in SWB over the course of therapy than those with…

  5. Temporal pattern shifts to avoid acoustic interference in singing birds.

    PubMed

    Ficken, R W; Ficken, M S; Hailman, J P

    1974-02-22

    Two species of forest birds, the least flycatcher and the red-eyed vireo, when breeding in the same season in the same habitat, adjust their temporal pattern of singing to avoid the overlapping of songs. The avoidance of acoustic interference is more marked in the flycatcher, which has a briefer song than the vireo.

  6. Teacher Distress and the Role of Experiential Avoidance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hinds, Erika; Jones, Laura Backen; Gau, Jeffrey M.; Forrester, Kathleen K.; Biglan, Anthony

    2015-01-01

    Teachers' psychological well-being is important for teachers and students, but teaching is highly stressful, particularly in special education. We examined the role of experiential avoidance (EA) in the well-being of 529 middle and elementary school teachers. EA involves the tendency to avoid thoughts, feelings, and other internal experiences,…

  7. Verbal Avoidance and Dissatisfaction in Intimate Conflict Situations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Afifi, Tamara D.; McManus, Tara; Steuber, Keli; Coho, Amanda

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to more closely examine the association between avoidance and satisfaction during a potentially conflict-inducing conversation with one's dating partner. The results suggest that the way people respond to their own and their partner's conflict avoidance depends upon whether they are male or female. The perception of…

  8. Design and Analysis of Hydraulic Chassis with Obstacle Avoidance Function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Yingjie; Zhang, Xiang

    2017-07-01

    This article mainly expounds the design of hydraulic system for the hydraulic chassis with obstacle avoidance function. Including the selection of hydraulic motor wheels, hydraulic pump, digital hydraulic cylinder and the matching of engine power. And briefly introduces the principle of obstacle avoidance.

  9. 49 CFR 1152.32 - Calculation of avoidable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... application will be used based on its geographical location. The railroad's total estimated system variable... to the branch on an actual expense basis. The avoidable costs of providing freight service on a... avoidable costs of providing freight service on a branch shall be just and reasonable, and shall not...

  10. Verbal Avoidance and Dissatisfaction in Intimate Conflict Situations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Afifi, Tamara D.; McManus, Tara; Steuber, Keli; Coho, Amanda

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to more closely examine the association between avoidance and satisfaction during a potentially conflict-inducing conversation with one's dating partner. The results suggest that the way people respond to their own and their partner's conflict avoidance depends upon whether they are male or female. The perception of…

  11. Safety Signals as Instrumental Reinforcers during Free-Operant Avoidance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fernando, Anushka B. P.; Urcelay, Gonzalo P.; Mar, Adam C.; Dickinson, Anthony; Robbins, Trevor W.

    2014-01-01

    Safety signals provide "relief" through predicting the absence of an aversive event. At issue is whether these signals also act as instrumental reinforcers. Four experiments were conducted using a free-operant lever-press avoidance paradigm in which each press avoided shock and was followed by the presentation of a 5-sec auditory safety…

  12. 16 CFR 300.6 - Labels to be avoided.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Labels to be avoided. 300.6 Section 300.6 Commercial Practices FEDERAL TRADE COMMISSION REGULATIONS UNDER SPECIFIC ACTS OF CONGRESS RULES AND REGULATIONS UNDER THE WOOL PRODUCTS LABELING ACT OF 1939 Labeling § 300.6 Labels to be avoided. Stamps,...

  13. The pineal complex in Roman high avoidance and Roman low avoidance rats.

    PubMed

    Seidel, A; Sousa Neto, J A; Huesgen, A; Vollrath, L; Manz, B; Gentsch, C; Lichtsteiner, M

    1990-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that the pineal gland of Roman high avoidance (RHA/Verh) rats is larger than that of Roman low avoidance rats (RLA/Verh). In the present study measurement of enzyme activities (serotonin-N-acetyl-transferase, hydroxyindole-O-methyltransferase) revealed that pineals of RHA/Verh rats are twice as active in melatonin production than pineals of RLA/Verh rats. Indoleamine content was also higher in RHA/Verh rats, whereas noradrenaline content was the same in both lines. When values were expressed per mg protein, these differences disappeared except for N-acetyl-serotonin and noradrenaline which were higher or lower in RHA/Verh rats, respectively. Both lines had higher serum levels of melatonin during the dark phase than during the light phase. However, RHA/Verh rats had increased serum levels as compared to RLA/Verh rats during both day and night. Morphometric analysis of the deep and superficial part of the pineal complex revealed, that the volumes of both parts are enlarged in RHA/Verh rats. Electron microscopic studies of pineals collected during day- and nighttime showed higher numbers of synaptic ribbons per unit area in pineals of RHA/Verh rats. In pineals collected during June synaptic ribbons displayed a day/night rhythm in RHA/Verh rats only, whereas in glands of both lines collected during November no daily changes were found. These results show that closely related but divergently selected rat lines may differ in pineal ultrastructure and pineal function.

  14. Internet addiction symptoms, disordered eating, and body image avoidance.

    PubMed

    Rodgers, Rachel F; Melioli, Tiffany; Laconi, Stéphanie; Bui, Eric; Chabrol, Henri

    2013-01-01

    Internet addiction is an increasing concern among young adults. Self-presentational theory posits that the Internet offers a context in which individuals are able to control their image. Little is known about body image and eating concerns among pathological Internet users. The aim of this study was to explore the association between Internet addiction symptoms, body image esteem, body image avoidance, and disordered eating. A sample of 392 French young adults (68 percent women) completed an online questionnaire assessing time spent online, Internet addiction symptoms, disordered eating, and body image avoidance. Fourteen men (11 percent) and 26 women (9.7 percent) reported Internet addiction. Body image avoidance was associated with Internet addiction symptoms among both genders. Controlling for body-mass index, Internet addiction symptoms, and body image avoidance were both significant predictors of disordered eating among women. These findings support the self-presentational theory of Internet addiction and suggest that body image avoidance is an important factor.

  15. Vine tendrils use contact chemoreception to avoid conspecific leaves.

    PubMed

    Fukano, Yuya

    2017-03-15

    Movement and growth habit of climbing plants have attracted attention since the time of Charles Darwin; however, there are no reports on whether plants can choose suitable hosts or avoid unsuitable ones based on chemoreception. Here, I show that the tendrils of Cayratia japonica (Vitaceae) appear to avoid conspecific leaves using contact chemoreception for oxalates, which are highly concentrated in C. japonica leaves. The coiling experiments show that C. japonica has a flexible plastic response to avoid coiling around conspecific leaves. The coiling response is negatively correlated with the oxalate content in the contacted leaves. Experiments using laboratory chemicals indicate that the tendrils avoid oxalate-coated plastic sticks. These results indicate that the tendrils of C. japonica avoid coiling around a conspecific leaf based on contact chemoreception for oxalate compounds. The tendrils of climbing plants may function as a chemoreceptor system to detect the chemical cues of a contacted plant.

  16. How do walkers avoid a mobile robot crossing their way?

    PubMed

    Vassallo, Christian; Olivier, Anne-Hélène; Souères, Philippe; Crétual, Armel; Stasse, Olivier; Pettré, Julien

    2017-01-01

    Robots and Humans have to share the same environment more and more often. In the aim of steering robots in a safe and convenient manner among humans it is required to understand how humans interact with them. This work focuses on collision avoidance between a human and a robot during locomotion. Having in mind previous results on human obstacle avoidance, as well as the description of the main principles which guide collision avoidance strategies, we observe how humans adapt a goal-directed locomotion task when they have to interfere with a mobile robot. Our results show differences in the strategy set by humans to avoid a robot in comparison with avoiding another human. Humans prefer to give the way to the robot even when they are likely to pass first at the beginning of the interaction.

  17. Use of behavioral avoidance testing in natural resource damage assessment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lipton, J.; Little, E.E.; Marr, J.C.A.; DeLonay, A.J.; Bengston, David A.; Henshel, Diane S.

    1996-01-01

    Natural Resource Damage Assessment (NRDA) provisions established under federal and state statutes enable natural resource trustees to recover compensation from responsible parties to restore injured natural resources. Behavioral avoidance testing with fish has been used in NRDAs to determine injuries to natural resources and to establish restoration thresholds. In this manuscript we evaluate the use of avoidance testing to NRDA. Specifically, we discuss potential “acceptance criteria” to evaluate the applicability and relevance of avoidance testing. These acceptance criteria include: (1) regulatory relevance, (2) reproducibility of testing, (3) ecological significance, (4) quality assurance/quality control, and (5) relevance to restoration. We discuss each of these criteria with respect to avoidance testing. Overall, we conclude that avoidance testing can be an appropriate, defensible, and desirable aspect of an NRDA.

  18. Disgust as a motivator of avoidance of spiders.

    PubMed

    Woody, Sheila R; McLean, Carmen; Klassen, Tammy

    2005-01-01

    Individuals with small animal phobias show elevated general disgust sensitivity, and spider phobics often endorse both fear and disgust in response to a spider. Some researchers have argued that the link between disgust and fear of small animals is spurious. On the other hand, disgust may play a functional role, as might any negative emotion that is strongly stimulus-bound, in which escape or avoidance is negatively reinforced. It is therefore important to clarify whether disgust has a functional or epiphenomenal role in avoidance of feared stimuli. The present study examined the degree to which disgust motivates avoidance of spider-related stimuli using a series of behavioral avoidance tests comparing a harmless tarantula, a pen that had come in contact with the spider, and a clean pen. Peak disgust was a stronger predictor than anxiety of avoidance of both the spider and the "contaminated" pen.

  19. Single nucleotide RNA choreography.

    PubMed

    Hsiao, Chiaolong; Mohan, Srividya; Hershkovitz, Eli; Tannenbaum, Allen; Williams, Loren Dean

    2006-01-01

    New structural analysis methods, and a tree formalism re-define and expand the RNA motif concept, unifying what previously appeared to be disparate groups of structures. We find RNA tetraloops at high frequencies, in new contexts, with unexpected lengths, and in novel topologies. The results, with broad implications for RNA structure in general, show that even at this most elementary level of organization, RNA tolerates astounding variation in conformation, length, sequence and context. However the variation is not random; it is well-described by four distinct modes, which are 3-2 switches (backbone topology variations), insertions, deletions and strand clips.

  20. RNA in evolution.

    PubMed

    Lehman, Niles

    2010-01-01

    RNA has played a variety of roles in the evolutionary history of life on the Earth. While this molecule was once considered a poor cousin of the more influential polymers in the cell, namely DNA and proteins, a string of important discoveries over the last 50 years has revealed that RNA may in fact be the cornerstone of biological function. In particular, the finding that RNA can be catalytic, and thus possess both a genotype and a phenotype, has forced us to consider the possibility that life's origins began with RNA, and that the subsequent diversification of life is aptly described as a string of innovations by RNA to adapt to a changing environment. Some of these adaptations include riboswitches, ribonucleoproteins (RNPs), RNA editing, and RNA interference (RNAi). Although many of these functions may seem at first glance to be recent evolutionary developments, it may be the case that all of their catalytic activities trace their roots back to a primordial 'RNA World' some four billion years ago, and that RNA's diversity has a continuous thread that pervades life from its very origins. Copyright © 2010 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  1. Probing RNA Folding Pathways by RNA Fingerprinting.

    PubMed

    Woodson, Sarah A

    2017-09-18

    This unit provides protocols for using native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis to distinguish folding and unfolding conformers of RNA. It is useful for studying conformers that can exchange in a period of minutes or seconds, and that are thus difficult to study by solution-based methods. Conformers that have been separated and immobilized in the gel matrix can be used to study catalytic activity with or without being eluted from the gel. The method can be applied to a wide variety of catalytic RNAs and RNA-protein complexes. © 2017 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  2. Neural substrates of approach-avoidance conflict decision-making

    PubMed Central

    Aupperle, Robin L.; Melrose, Andrew J.; Francisco, Alex; Paulus, Martin P.; Stein, Murray B.

    2014-01-01

    Animal approach-avoidance conflict paradigms have been used extensively to operationalize anxiety, quantify the effects of anxiolytic agents, and probe the neural basis of fear and anxiety. Results from human neuroimaging studies support that a frontal-striatal-amygdala neural circuitry is important for approach-avoidance learning. However, the neural basis of decision-making is much less clear in this context. Thus, we combined a recently developed human approach-avoidance paradigm with functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to identify neural substrates underlying approach-avoidance conflict decision-making. Fifteen healthy adults completed the approach-avoidance conflict (AAC) paradigm during fMRI. Analyses of variance were used to compare conflict to non-conflict (avoid-threat and approach-reward) conditions and to compare level of reward points offered during the decision phase. Trial-by-trial amplitude modulation analyses were used to delineate brain areas underlying decision-making in the context of approach/avoidance behavior. Conflict trials as compared to the non-conflict trials elicited greater activation within bilateral anterior cingulate cortex (ACC), anterior insula, and caudate, as well as right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex. Right caudate and lateral PFC activation was modulated by level of reward offered. Individuals who showed greater caudate activation exhibited less approach behavior. On a trial-by-trial basis, greater right lateral PFC activation related to less approach behavior. Taken together, results suggest that the degree of activation within prefrontal-striatal-insula circuitry determines the degree of approach versus avoidance decision-making. Moreover, the degree of caudate and lateral PFC activation is related to individual differences in approach-avoidance decision-making. Therefore, the AAC paradigm is ideally suited to probe anxiety-related processing differences during approach-avoidance decision-making. PMID:25224633

  3. Systemic Delivery of Anti-miRNA for Suppression of Triple Negative Breast Cancer Utilizing RNA Nanotechnology.

    PubMed

    Shu, Dan; Li, Hui; Shu, Yi; Xiong, Gaofeng; Carson, William E; Haque, Farzin; Xu, Ren; Guo, Peixuan

    2015-10-27

    MicroRNAs play important roles in regulating the gene expression and life cycle of cancer cells. In particular, miR-21, an oncogenic miRNA is a major player involved in tumor initiation, progression, invasion and metastasis in several cancers, including triple negative breast cancer (TNBC). However, delivery of therapeutic miRNA or anti-miRNA specifically into cancer cells in vivo without collateral damage to healthy cells remains challenging. We report here the application of RNA nanotechnology for specific and efficient delivery of anti-miR-21 to block the growth of TNBC in orthotopic mouse models. The 15 nm therapeutic RNA nanoparticles contains the 58-nucleotide (nt) phi29 pRNA-3WJ as a core, a 8-nt sequence complementary to the seed region of miR-21, and a 39-nt epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) targeting aptamer for internalizing RNA nanoparticles into cancer cells via receptor mediated endocytosis. The RNase resistant and thermodynamically stable RNA nanoparticles remained intact after systemic injection into mice and strongly bound to tumors with little or no accumulation in healthy organs 8 h postinjection, and subsequently repressed tumor growth at low doses. The observed specific cancer targeting and tumor regression is a result of several key attributes of RNA nanoparticles: anionic charge which disallows nonspecific passage across negatively charged cell membrane; "active" targeting using RNA aptamers which increases the homing of RNA nanoparticles to cancer cells; nanoscale size and shape which avoids rapid renal clearance and engulfment by lung macrophages and liver Kupffer cells; favorable biodistribution profiles with little accumulation in healthy organs, which minimizes nonspecific side effects; and favorable pharmacokinetic profiles with extended in vivo half-life. The results demonstrate the clinical potentials of RNA nanotechnology based platform to deliver miRNA based therapeutics for cancer treatment.

  4. Systemic Delivery of Anti-miRNA for Suppression of Triple Negative Breast Cancer Utilizing RNA Nanotechnology

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    MicroRNAs play important roles in regulating the gene expression and life cycle of cancer cells. In particular, miR-21, an oncogenic miRNA is a major player involved in tumor initiation, progression, invasion and metastasis in several cancers, including triple negative breast cancer (TNBC). However, delivery of therapeutic miRNA or anti-miRNA specifically into cancer cells in vivo without collateral damage to healthy cells remains challenging. We report here the application of RNA nanotechnology for specific and efficient delivery of anti-miR-21 to block the growth of TNBC in orthotopic mouse models. The 15 nm therapeutic RNA nanoparticles contains the 58-nucleotide (nt) phi29 pRNA-3WJ as a core, a 8-nt sequence complementary to the seed region of miR-21, and a 39-nt epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) targeting aptamer for internalizing RNA nanoparticles into cancer cells via receptor mediated endocytosis. The RNase resistant and thermodynamically stable RNA nanoparticles remained intact after systemic injection into mice and strongly bound to tumors with little or no accumulation in healthy organs 8 h postinjection, and subsequently repressed tumor growth at low doses. The observed specific cancer targeting and tumor regression is a result of several key attributes of RNA nanoparticles: anionic charge which disallows nonspecific passage across negatively charged cell membrane; “active” targeting using RNA aptamers which increases the homing of RNA nanoparticles to cancer cells; nanoscale size and shape which avoids rapid renal clearance and engulfment by lung macrophages and liver Kupffer cells; favorable biodistribution profiles with little accumulation in healthy organs, which minimizes nonspecific side effects; and favorable pharmacokinetic profiles with extended in vivo half-life. The results demonstrate the clinical potentials of RNA nanotechnology based platform to deliver miRNA based therapeutics for cancer treatment. PMID:26387848

  5. Reduction in Memory Specificity Following an Approach/Avoidance Scrambled Sentences Task Relates to Cognitive Avoidant Coping

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Debeer, Elise; Raes, Filip; Williams, J. Mark G.; Hermans, Dirk

    2013-01-01

    "Overgeneral autobiographical memory" (OGM) refers to the tendency to retrieve less specific personal memories. According to the functional avoidance hypothesis, OGM might act as a cognitive strategy to avoid emotionally distressing details of negative memories. In the present study, we investigated the effect of an experimentally…

  6. Reduction in Memory Specificity Following an Approach/Avoidance Scrambled Sentences Task Relates to Cognitive Avoidant Coping

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Debeer, Elise; Raes, Filip; Williams, J. Mark G.; Hermans, Dirk

    2013-01-01

    "Overgeneral autobiographical memory" (OGM) refers to the tendency to retrieve less specific personal memories. According to the functional avoidance hypothesis, OGM might act as a cognitive strategy to avoid emotionally distressing details of negative memories. In the present study, we investigated the effect of an experimentally…

  7. The viral RNA capping machinery as a target for antiviral drugs.

    PubMed

    Ferron, François; Decroly, Etienne; Selisko, Barbara; Canard, Bruno

    2012-10-01

    Most viruses modify their genomic and mRNA 5'-ends with the addition of an RNA cap, allowing efficient mRNA translation, limiting degradation by cellular 5'-3' exonucleases, and avoiding its recognition as foreign RNA by the host cell. Viral RNA caps can be synthesized or acquired through the use of a capping machinery which exhibits a significant diversity in organization, structure and mechanism relative to that of their cellular host. Therefore, viral RNA capping has emerged as an interesting field for antiviral drug design. Here, we review the different pathways and mechanisms used to produce viral mRNA 5'-caps, and present current structures, mechanisms, and inhibitors known to act on viral RNA capping. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Tomato phyE Is Required for Shade Avoidance in the Absence of phyB1 and phyB2.

    PubMed

    Schrager-Lavelle, Amanda; Herrera, Leslie A; Maloof, Julin N

    2016-01-01

    The phytochrome (phy) family of red and far-red photoreceptors provides plants with critical information about their surrounding environment and can signal downstream developmental and physiological changes. Neighboring plants compete for limited light resources, and their presence is detected by the phytochrome photoreceptors as a reduced ratio of red: far-red light. One common response to shade is increased elongation of petioles and internodes to compete with their neighbors. While the phytochrome family, phyB in particular, has been well studied in Arabidopsis, information about the other phytochrome family members is limited, especially in sympodial crop plants such as tomato, that have a very different architecture from that of the model plant. To study the tomato phytochrome family we took advantage of several existing mutants and generated an artificial miRNA (amiRNA) line to target SlPHYE, the remaining phytochrome B subfamily member with no currently available mutant line. Here, we characterize internode elongation and shade avoidance phenotypes of the SlPHYE amiRNA line (PHYE amiRNA). In addition, higher order phytochrome subfamily B mutants were generated with the PHYE amiRNA line to investigate the role of SlphyE within the phyB subfamily. We find that the PHYE amiRNA line has no detectable phenotype on its own, however in higher order combinations with SlphyB1 and/or SlphyB2 there are notable defects in shade avoidance. Most notably, we find that the triple mutant combination of SlPHYE amiRNA, SlphyB1, and SlphyB2 has a phenotype that is much stronger than the SlphyB1 SlphyB2 double, showing constitutive shade avoidance and little to no response to shade. This indicates that SlphyE is required for the shade avoidance response in the absence of SlphyB1 and SlphyB2.

  9. Tomato phyE Is Required for Shade Avoidance in the Absence of phyB1 and phyB2

    PubMed Central

    Schrager-Lavelle, Amanda; Herrera, Leslie A.; Maloof, Julin N.

    2016-01-01

    The phytochrome (phy) family of red and far-red photoreceptors provides plants with critical information about their surrounding environment and can signal downstream developmental and physiological changes. Neighboring plants compete for limited light resources, and their presence is detected by the phytochrome photoreceptors as a reduced ratio of red: far-red light. One common response to shade is increased elongation of petioles and internodes to compete with their neighbors. While the phytochrome family, phyB in particular, has been well studied in Arabidopsis, information about the other phytochrome family members is limited, especially in sympodial crop plants such as tomato, that have a very different architecture from that of the model plant. To study the tomato phytochrome family we took advantage of several existing mutants and generated an artificial miRNA (amiRNA) line to target SlPHYE, the remaining phytochrome B subfamily member with no currently available mutant line. Here, we characterize internode elongation and shade avoidance phenotypes of the SlPHYE amiRNA line (PHYE amiRNA). In addition, higher order phytochrome subfamily B mutants were generated with the PHYE amiRNA line to investigate the role of SlphyE within the phyB subfamily. We find that the PHYE amiRNA line has no detectable phenotype on its own, however in higher order combinations with SlphyB1 and/or SlphyB2 there are notable defects in shade avoidance. Most notably, we find that the triple mutant combination of SlPHYE amiRNA, SlphyB1, and SlphyB2 has a phenotype that is much stronger than the SlphyB1 SlphyB2 double, showing constitutive shade avoidance and little to no response to shade. This indicates that SlphyE is required for the shade avoidance response in the absence of SlphyB1 and SlphyB2. PMID:27695458

  10. Urinary RNA-based biomarkers for prostate cancer detection.

    PubMed

    Martignano, Filippo; Rossi, Lorena; Maugeri, Antonio; Gallà, Valentina; Conteduca, Vincenza; De Giorgi, Ugo; Casadio, Valentina; Schepisi, Giuseppe

    2017-10-01

    Prostate cancer (PCa) is the commonest malignancy in the male population worldwide. Serum prostate specific antigen (PSA) test is the most important biomarker for the detection, follow-up and therapeutic monitoring of PCa. Defects in PSA specificity have elicited research for new biomarkers to improve early diagnosis and avoid false-positive results. This review evaluates urinary RNA-based biomarkers. Urine is a versatile body fluid for non-invasive biomarker detection in case of urological malignancies. The importance of RNA-based biomarkers has been demonstrated by the current use of PCA3, a long non coding RNA biomarker already approved by the Food and Drugs Administration. Through the years, other urinary RNA biomarkers have been evaluated, including the well-known TMPRSS2:ERG transcript, as well as many messenger RNAs, long non coding RNAs and micro-RNA. Validation of a specific urinary RNA-based marker or an algorithm of different biomarkers levels as diagnostic markers for PCa could be useful to avoid unnecessary prostate biopsies. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Fabrication of Polyvalent Therapeutic RNA Nanoparticles for Specific Delivery of siRNA, Ribozyme and Drugs to Targeted Cells for Cancer Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Shu, Yi; Shu, Dan; Diao, Zhijuan; Shen, Guanxin; Guo, Peixuan

    2010-01-01

    Bacteriophage phi29 DNA packaging motor is geared by a six-pRNA ring. pRNA is able to form a multimeric complex and patterned superstructures via the interaction of two reengineered interlocking loops. This unique feature makes it an ideal polyvalent vehicle for nanomachine fabrication, pathogen detection, and the delivery of therapeutics. This report describes novel approaches for the fabrication of polyvalent therapeutic pRNA nanoparticles, especially tetramers for specific siRNA delivery to cancer cells and for the silencing of targeted genes. RNA 3-D design, circular permutation, folding energy alteration, and nucleotide modification were applied to generate stable RNA nanoparticles with low toxicity. Animal trials demonstrated the high efficiency of the polyvalent RNA nanoparticles in the prevention and treatment of cancer. Using such protein-free nanoparticles as therapeutic reagents would allow for long-term administration to avoid the induction of antibody due to repeated treatment for chronic diseases. PMID:21243099

  12. Drug Cost Avoidance in Prostate Cancer Clinical Trials.

    PubMed

    Calvin-Lamas, M; Portela-Pereira, P; Rabuñal-Alvarez, M T; Martinez-Breijo, S; Martín-Herranz, M I; Gómez-Veiga, F

    2015-11-01

    Economic impact of prostate cancer is increasing in relation to its increased incidence and increased patient survival. Clinical trials are essential to evaluate the efficacy and safety of new treatments but may also result in economic benefits by avoiding the cost of the drug. Our objective is to determine the avoided cost in investigational drugs in clinical trials of prostate cancer conducted in a period of 18 years in a tertiary center. We carried out an observational of prevalence study with retrospective collected data of clinical trials involving currently marketed drugs and cost avoidance during the study period (1996-2013) was calculated. We include in this review five clinical trials on prostate cancer that met selection criteria of 18 performed. All of them were phase III, multicenter, international and with current marketed drugs. 136 patients were included. Total cost avoidance of 696,002€ and an average cost avoidance by clinical trial of 139,200€ were obtained. Average cost avoidance per patient was 5,118€. Cost avoidance in investigational drugs is a tangible benefit of clinical trials, whose realization is a source of economic benefits for the hospital, not only by directly generated by each trial. Clinical trials are an exceptional framework for progress in clinical research and real savings for the health system. Copyright © 2015 AEU. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  13. Low back pain patients' responses to videos of avoided movements.

    PubMed

    Pincus, T; Henderson, J

    2013-02-01

    Fear avoidance (FA) has been identified as a risk factor for poor prognosis and a target for intervention in patients with low back pain (LBP), but the mechanisms involved need clarification. Experimental studies would benefit from the use of carefully developed and controlled stimuli representing avoided movements in back pain, and matched stimuli of movements to provide a credible control stimuli. Existing stimuli depicting avoided movements in LBP are static, do not include a set of control stimuli and do not control for possible systematic observer biases. Two studies were carried out aiming to develop and test LBP patients' responses to videos of models depicting commonly avoided movements associated with back pain, and those associated with a control condition, wrist pain. Two samples of LBP patients rated how much pain and harm each movement would cause them. They also reported how often they avoided the movement. The findings from the first study (n = 99) indicate that using videos of commonly avoided movements in low back pain is viable, and that movements associated with wrist pain provide an acceptable control stimuli. Participants in the second study (n = 85) consistently rated movements depicted by females as causing more harm, and more frequently avoided than the same movements depicted by males. The use of video stimuli could advance research into the processes associated with FA through experimental paradigms. However, although small, the model gender effects should be carefully considered. © 2012 European Federation of International Association for the Study of Pain Chapters.

  14. On the role of subsecond dopamine release in conditioned avoidance

    PubMed Central

    Oleson, Erik B.; Cheer, Joseph F.

    2013-01-01

    Using shock avoidance procedures to study conditioned behavioral responses has a rich history within the field of experimental psychology. Such experiments led to the formulation of the general concept of negative reinforcement and specific theories attempting to explain escape and avoidance behavior, or why animals choose to either terminate or prevent the presentation of an aversive event. For example, the two-factor theory of avoidance holds that cues preceding an aversive event begin to evoke conditioned fear responses, and these conditioned fear responses reinforce the instrumental avoidance response. Current neuroscientific advances are providing new perspectives into this historical literature. Due to its well-established role in reinforcement processes and behavioral control, the mesolimbic dopamine system presented itself as a logical starting point in the search for neural correlates of avoidance and escape behavior. We recently demonstrated that phasic dopamine release events are inhibited by stimuli associated with aversive events but increased by stimuli preceding the successful avoidance of the aversive event. The latter observation is inconsistent with the second component of the two-factor theory of avoidance and; therefore, led us propose a new theoretical explanation of conditioned avoidance: (1) fear is initially conditioned to the warning signal and dopamine computes this fear association as a decrease in release, (2) the warning signal, now capable of producing a negative emotional state, suppresses dopamine release and behavior, (3) over repeated trials the warning signal becomes associated with safety rather than fear; dopaminergic neurons already compute safety as an increase in release and begin to encode the warning signal as the earliest predictor of safety (4) the warning signal now promotes conditioned avoidance via dopaminergic modulation of the brain's incentive-motivational circuitry. PMID:23759871

  15. Development and Validation of the Athlete Fear Avoidance Questionnaire.

    PubMed

    Dover, Geoffrey; Amar, Vanessa

    2015-06-01

    The fear-avoidance model was developed in an attempt to explain the process by which "pain experience" and "pain behavior" become dissociated from the actual pain sensation in individuals who manifest the phenomenon of exaggerated pain perception. High levels of fear avoidance can lead to chronic pain and disability and have successfully predicted rehabilitation time in the work-related-injury population. Existing fear-avoidance questionnaires have all been developed for the general population, but these questionnaires may not be specific enough to fully assess fear avoidance in an athletic population that copes with pain differently than the general population. To develop and validate the Athlete Fear Avoidance Questionnaire (AFAQ). Qualitative research to develop the AFAQ and a cross-sectional study to validate the scale. For questionnaire development, a total of 8 experts in the fields of athletic therapy, sport psychology, and fear avoidance were called upon to generate and rate items for the AFAQ. For determining concurrent validity, 99 varsity athletes from various sports participated. A total of 99 varsity athletes completed the AFAQ, the Fear-Avoidance Beliefs Questionnaire, and the Pain Catastrophizing Scale. We used Pearson correlations to establish concurrent validity. Concurrent validity was established with significant correlations between the AFAQ and the Fear Avoidance Beliefs Questionnaire-Physical Activity (r = 0.352, P > .001) as well as with the Pain Catastrophizing Scale (r = 0.587, P > .001). High internal consistency of our questionnaire was established with a Cronbach α coefficient of 0.805. The final version of the questionnaire includes 10 items with good internal validity (P < .05). We developed a questionnaire with good internal and external validity. The AFAQ is a scale that measures sport-injury-related fear avoidance in athletes and could be used to identify potential psychological barriers to rehabilitation.

  16. Effectiveness of a Mine-Avoidance Sensor in Minefield Transit

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-03-01

    tNPS VWS-fANTLA PER SC1ENTL4M• NAVAL POSTGRADUATE SCHOOL MONTEREY, CALIFORNIA THESIS EFFECTIVENESS OF A MINE AVOIDANCE SENSOR IN MINEFIELD TRANSIT by...Master’s Thesis 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE: 5. FUNDING NUMBERS Effectiveness of a Mine- Avoidance Sensor in Minefield Transit 6. AUTHOR(S) ENG YEE TOH 7...to study the effectiveness of mine avoidance sonar (MAS) use on safe minefield transit by a ship. A MAS is able to detect mine-like objects but

  17. Benzodiazepines and amphetamine on avoidance behaviour in mice.

    PubMed

    Sansone, M

    1975-11-01

    Six benzodiazepine derivatives, given alone or in combination with amphetamine, were tested in mice subjected to five 100-trial avoidance sessions in the shuttle-box. All derivatives, execpt bromazepam, showed some facilitating effects on avoidance responding when given alone. Facilitation was particularly evident following the administration of chlordiazepoxide (2.5 mg/kg), medazepam (10 mg/kg) and nitrazepam (0.25, 0.5 and 1 mg/kg). Favourable effects were obtained by combining each benzodiazepine compound with amphetamine. The levels of avoidance respinses were usually higher under benzodiazepine-amphetamine combinations than under benzodiazepines alone.

  18. Avoided-level-crossing statistics in open chaotic billiards.

    PubMed

    Poli, Charles; Dietz, Barbara; Legrand, Olivier; Mortessagne, Fabrice; Richter, Achim

    2009-09-01

    We investigate a two-level model with a large number of open decay channels in order to describe avoided level crossing statistics in open chaotic billiards. This model allows us to describe the fundamental changes in the probability distribution of the avoided level crossings compared with the closed case. Explicit expressions are derived for systems with preserved and broken time-reversal symmetry. We find that the decay process induces a modification at small spacings of the probability distribution of the avoided level crossings due to an attraction of the resonances. The theoretical predictions are in complete agreement with the recent experimental results of Dietz [Phys. Rev. E 73, 035201 (2006)].

  19. The Role of Allergen Exposure and Avoidance in Asthma

    PubMed Central

    Baxi, Sachin N.; Phipatanakul, Wanda

    2010-01-01

    Allergy testing and avoidance of allergens plays an important role in asthma control. Increased allergen exposure, in genetically susceptible individuals, can lead to allergic sensitization. Continued allergen exposure can increase the risk of asthma and other allergic diseases. In a patient with persistent asthma, identification of indoor and outdoor allergens and subsequent avoidance can improve symptoms. Often times, a patient will have multiple allergies and the avoidance plan should target all positive allergens. Several studies have shown that successful allergen remediation includes a comprehensive approach including education, cleaning, physical barriers and maintaining these practices. PMID:20568555

  20. Systems and Techniques for Identifying and Avoiding Ice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hansman, R. John

    1995-01-01

    In-flight icing is one of the most difficult aviation weather hazards facing general aviation. Because most aircraft in the general aviation category are not certified for flight into known icing conditions, techniques for identifying and avoiding in-flight ice are important to maintain safety while increasing the utility and dispatch capability which is part of the AGATE vision. This report summarizes a brief study effort which: (1) Reviewed current ice identification, forecasting, and avoidance techniques; (2) Assessed feasibility of improved forecasting and ice avoidance procedures; and (3) Identified key issues for the development of improved capability with regard to in-flight icing.

  1. Structural basis for microRNA targeting

    SciTech Connect

    Schirle, Nicole T.; Sheu-Gruttadauria, Jessica; MacRae, Ian J.

    2014-10-31

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) control expression of thousands of genes in plants and animals. miRNAs function by guiding Argonaute proteins to complementary sites in messenger RNAs (mRNAs) targeted for repression. In this paper, we determined crystal structures of human Argonaute-2 (Ago2) bound to a defined guide RNA with and without target RNAs representing miRNA recognition sites. These structures suggest a stepwise mechanism, in which Ago2 primarily exposes guide nucleotides (nt) 2 to 5 for initial target pairing. Pairing to nt 2 to 5 promotes conformational changes that expose nt 2 to 8 and 13 to 16 for further target recognition. Interactions with the guide-target minor groove allow Ago2 to interrogate target RNAs in a sequence-independent manner, whereas an adenosine binding-pocket opposite guide nt 1 further facilitates target recognition. Spurious slicing of miRNA targets is avoided through an inhibitory coordination of one catalytic magnesium ion. Finally, these results explain the conserved nucleotide-pairing patterns in animal miRNA target sites first observed over two decades ago.

  2. Structural basis for microRNA targeting

    DOE PAGES

    Schirle, Nicole T.; Sheu-Gruttadauria, Jessica; MacRae, Ian J.

    2014-10-31

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) control expression of thousands of genes in plants and animals. miRNAs function by guiding Argonaute proteins to complementary sites in messenger RNAs (mRNAs) targeted for repression. In this paper, we determined crystal structures of human Argonaute-2 (Ago2) bound to a defined guide RNA with and without target RNAs representing miRNA recognition sites. These structures suggest a stepwise mechanism, in which Ago2 primarily exposes guide nucleotides (nt) 2 to 5 for initial target pairing. Pairing to nt 2 to 5 promotes conformational changes that expose nt 2 to 8 and 13 to 16 for further target recognition. Interactions withmore » the guide-target minor groove allow Ago2 to interrogate target RNAs in a sequence-independent manner, whereas an adenosine binding-pocket opposite guide nt 1 further facilitates target recognition. Spurious slicing of miRNA targets is avoided through an inhibitory coordination of one catalytic magnesium ion. Finally, these results explain the conserved nucleotide-pairing patterns in animal miRNA target sites first observed over two decades ago.« less

  3. Determination of RNA degradation by capillary electrophoresis with cyan light-emitted diode-induced fluorescence.

    PubMed

    Yang, Tzu-Hsueh; Chang, Po-Ling

    2012-05-25

    RNA integrity plays an important role in RNA studies because poor RNA quality may have a great impact on downstream methodologies. This study proposes a cost-effective, rapid, and sensitive method for determining RNA integrity based on capillary electrophoresis that utilizes a cyan light-emitted diode-induced fluorescence as a separation tool. The capillary was initially coated with 0.1% Poly(vinylpyrrolidone) (M(ave) 1,300,000 Da) to reduce electroosmotic flow and avoid RNA adsorption. When the capillary was filled with 0.4% poly(ethylene) oxide (M(ave) 4,000,000) and a nucleic acid-specific fluorescent dye, SYTO 9, the baseline separation of the 18S and 28S ribosomal RNAs (rRNAs) in total RNA was accomplished within 15 min. The lowest detectable concentration for the 18S and 28S rRNAs was estimated to be 50 pg/μL. Some peaks longer than the 28S rRNA that migrated slowly were observed as long as the initial total RNA concentration was optimized. The temperature-induced degradation of the large RNA fragments (longer than the 28S rRNA) was faster than that of 18S rRNA and 28S rRNA. These large RNA fragments may serve as a promising marker for testing RNA integrity compared to the traditional method. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Assessing integrity of insect RNA

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Assessing total RNA integrity is important for the success of downstream RNA applications. The 2100 Bioanalyzer system with the RNA Integrity Number (RIN) provides a quantitative measure of RNA degradation. Although RINs may not be ascertained for RNA from all organisms, namely those with unusual or...

  5. RNA based evolutionary optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schuster, Peter

    1993-12-01

    The notion of an RNA world has been introduced for a prebiotic scenario that is dominated by RNA molecules and their properties, in particular their capabilities to act as templates for reproduction and as catalysts for several cleavage and ligation reactions of polynucleotides and polypeptides. This notion is used here also for simple experimental assays which are well suited to study evolution in the test tube. In molecular evolution experiments fitness is determined in essence by the molecular structures of RNA molecules. Evidence is presented for adaptation to environment in cell-free media. RNA based molecular evolution experiments have led to interesting spin-offs in biotechnology, commonly called ‘applied molecular evolution’, which make use of Darwinian trial-and-error strategies in order to synthesize new pharmacological compounds and other advanced materials on a biological basis. Error-propagation in RNA replication leads to formation of mutant spectra called ‘quasispecies’. An increase in the error rate broadens the mutant spectrum. There exists a sharply defined threshold beyond which heredity breaks down and evolutionary adaptation becomes impossible. Almost all RNA viruses studied so far operate at conditions close to this error threshold. Quasispecies and error thresholds are important for an understanding of RNA virus evolution, and they may help to develop novel antiviral strategies. Evolution of RNA molecules can be studied and interpreted by considering secondary structures. The notion of sequence space introduces a distance between pairs of RNA sequences which is tantamount to counting the minimal number of point mutations required to convert the sequences into each other. The mean sensitivity of RNA secondary structures to mutation depends strongly on the base pairing alphabet: structures from sequences which contain only one base pair (GC or AU are much less stable against mutation than those derived from the natural (AUGC) sequences

  6. Attentional avoidant biases as mediators in the association between experiential avoidance and blood pressure in dementia family caregivers.

    PubMed

    Márquez-González, María; Cabrera, Isabel; Losada, Andrés; Knight, Bob G

    2017-03-02

    Experiential avoidance in caregiving (EAC) has been found to be related with dementia family caregivers´ distress and blood pressure (BP). The association between EAC and avoidant attentional biases to emotional stimuli in dementia caregivers, and the potential mediating role of these attentional biases in the association between EAC and increased BP are explored. Seventy nine dementia family caregivers performed a dot-probe task with emotional pictures (distressing and positive) varying in content (general vs. caregiving-related (CR)) and time of exposure (100 vs. 500 ms). They also completed measures of EAC, anxiety, depression, alexithymia and rumination, and their BP was measured. EAC was associated with avoidant attentional biases to CR emotional pictures and negative pictures in general at 100 ms. Experiential Avoidance in Caregiving Questionnaire (EACQ) 'avoidant behaviors' and EACQ 'intolerance of negativity' factors were associated with diastolic and systolic BP, respectively, with attentional avoidance of CR emotional pictures (distressing and positive, respectively) mediating this association. Attentional avoidance of CR emotional stimuli may be the link between EAC and increased BP, as it prevents emotional processing and facilitates the maintenance of physiological activation. EAC may pose a risk for cardiovascular disease in dementia caregivers.

  7. Avoid Counterfeit Pesticide Products for Dogs and Cats

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    EPA is aware of counterfeit pet pesticides designed to look like legitimately registered pesticide products. The information on this page is intended to help consumers avoid unregistered pet products.

  8. Avoidance maneuevers selected while viewing cockpit traffic displays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, J. D.; Ellis, S. R.; Lee, E.

    1982-01-01

    Ten airline pilots rates the collision danger of air traffic presented on cockpit displays of traffic information while they monitored simulated departures from Denver. They selected avoidance maneuvers when necessary for separation. Most evasive maneuvers were turns rather than vertical maneuvers. Evasive maneuvers chosen for encounters with low or moderate collision danger were generally toward the intruding aircraft. This tendency lessened as the perceived threat level increased. In the highest threst situations pilots turned toward the intruder only at chance levels. Intruders coming from positions in front of the pilot's own ship were more frequently avoided by turns toward than when intruders approached laterally or from behind. Some of the implications of the pilots' turning-toward tendencies are discussed with respect to automatic collision avoidance systems and coordination of avoidance maneuvers of conflicting aircraft.

  9. NONCONSCIOUS EFFECTS OF POWER ON BASIC APPROACH AND AVOIDANCE TENDENCIES.

    PubMed

    Smith, Pamela K; Bargh, John A

    2008-02-01

    According to the approach/inhibition theory of power (Keltner, Gruenfeld, & Anderson, 2003), having power should be associated with the approach system, and lacking power with the avoidance system. However, to this point research has focused solely on whether power leads to more action, particularly approach-related action, or not. In three experiments, we extend this research by exploring the direct, unintentional relation between power and both approach and avoidance tendencies. Priming high power led to greater relative BAS strength than priming low power, but did not affect the BIS (Exp. 1). High-power priming also facilitated both simple and complex approach behavior, but did not affect avoidance behavior (Exp. 2-3). These effects of power occurred even in power-irrelevant situations. They also cannot be explained by priming of general positive versus negative constructs, nor by changes in positive, negative, approach-related, or avoidance-related affect.

  10. Summary of avoidable cancers in the Nordic countries.

    PubMed

    Olsen, J H; Andersen, A; Dreyer, L; Pukkala, E; Tryggvadottir, L; Gerhardsson de Verdier, M; Winther, J F

    1997-01-01

    An overview is given of the most important known causes of cancer in the five Nordic countries and the resulting number of cancers that are potentially avoidable. The main causes include active and passive smoking, alcohol consumption, exposure to asbestos and other occupational carcinogens, solar and ionizing radiation, obesity, human papillomavirus infection in the female genital tract and infection with Helicobacter pylori. The organs most commonly affected are those of the respiratory system, the upper digestive tract and stomach, skin, the lower urinary tract and the uterine cervix. Annually, more than 18,000 cancers in men and 11,000 in women in the Nordic populations could be avoided by eliminating exposure to known carcinogens which is equivalent to 33% and 20% of all cancers arising in men and women, respectively, around the year 2000. Smoking habits account for a little more than half of these avoidable cases. Estimates of avoidable cancers are given for each Nordic country, separately.

  11. Effects of Stimulation Intensity on Sociopathic Avoidance Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chesno, Frank A.; Kilmann, Peter R.

    1975-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to propose an alternative explanation of defective sociopathic avoidance conditioning based on the model of sensory reinforcement (Duffy, 1962) and the principle of optimal stimulation (Leuba, 1955). (Author)

  12. 28 CFR 552.23 - Confrontation avoidance procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... shift Lieutenant), a designated mental health professional, and others shall confer and gather pertinent... MANAGEMENT CUSTODY Use of Force and Application of Restraints on Inmates § 552.23 Confrontation avoidance...

  13. 28 CFR 552.23 - Confrontation avoidance procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... shift Lieutenant), a designated mental health professional, and others shall confer and gather pertinent... MANAGEMENT CUSTODY Use of Force and Application of Restraints on Inmates § 552.23 Confrontation avoidance...

  14. 28 CFR 552.23 - Confrontation avoidance procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... shift Lieutenant), a designated mental health professional, and others shall confer and gather pertinent... MANAGEMENT CUSTODY Use of Force and Application of Restraints on Inmates § 552.23 Confrontation avoidance...

  15. The brief experiential avoidance questionnaire: development and initial validation.

    PubMed

    Gámez, Wakiza; Chmielewski, Michael; Kotov, Roman; Ruggero, Camilo; Suzuki, Nadia; Watson, David

    2014-03-01

    The 62-item Multidimensional Experiential Avoidance Questionnaire (MEAQ) was recently developed to assess a broad range of experiential avoidance (EA) content. However, practical clinical and research considerations made a briefer measure of EA desirable. Using items from the original 62-item MEAQ, a 15-item scale was created that tapped content from each of the MEAQ's six dimensions. Items were selected on the basis of their performance in 3 samples: undergraduates (n = 363), psychiatric outpatients (n = 265), and community adults (n = 215). These items were then evaluated using 2 additional samples (314 undergraduates and 201 psychiatric outpatients) and cross-validated in 2 new, independent samples (283 undergraduates and 295 community adults). The resulting measure (Brief Experiential Avoidance Questionnaire; BEAQ) demonstrated good internal consistency. It also exhibited strong convergence with respect to each of the MEAQ's 6 dimensions. The BEAQ demonstrated expected associations with measures of avoidance, psychopathology, and quality of life and was distinguishable from negative affectivity and neuroticism.

  16. How You Can Help Your Child Avoid & Address Bullying

    MedlinePlus

    ... How You Can Help Your Child Avoid & Address Bullying Page Content Article Body Whether on the school ... other ways. Getting that response usually makes the bullying behavior continue. Your child should try to keep ...

  17. Gene-culture translation in the avoidance of sibling incest

    PubMed Central

    Lumsden, Charles J.; Wilson, Edward O.

    1980-01-01

    A preliminary analysis is made of the relation between the epigenetic rules of brother-sister incest avoidance, which operate during individual development, and the frequency of occurrence of this form of incest among cultures. PMID:16592898

  18. Does the Organized Sexual Murderer Better Delay and Avoid Detection?

    PubMed

    Beauregard, Eric; Martineau, Melissa

    2016-01-01

    According to the organized-disorganized model, organized sexual murderers adopt specific behaviors during the commission of their crimes that contribute to avoiding police detection. The current study examines the effect of sexual murderers' organized behaviors on their ability to both delay and/or avoid police detection. Using a combination of negative binomial and logistic regression analyses on a sample of 350 sexual murder cases, findings showed that although both measures of delaying and avoiding detection are positively correlated, different behavioral patterns were observed. For instance, offenders who moved the victim's body were more likely to avoid detection but the victim's body was likely to be recovered faster. Moreover, victim characteristics have an impact on both measures; however, this effect disappears for the measure of delaying detection once the organized behaviors are introduced. Implications of the findings are discussed.

  19. 16 CFR 301.28 - Labels to be avoided.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... REGULATIONS UNDER FUR PRODUCTS LABELING ACT Regulations § 301.28 Labels to be avoided. Labels which are insecurely or inconspicuously attached, or which in the course of offering the fur product for sale,...

  20. 16 CFR 301.28 - Labels to be avoided.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... REGULATIONS UNDER FUR PRODUCTS LABELING ACT Regulations § 301.28 Labels to be avoided. Labels which are insecurely or inconspicuously attached, or which in the course of offering the fur product for sale,...