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Sample records for potassium channels revealed

  1. Renal outer medullary potassium channel knockout models reveal thick ascending limb function and dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tong

    2012-02-01

    The renal outer medullary potassium channel (ROMK) is an adenosine triphosphate-sensitive inward-rectifier potassium channel (Kir1.1 or KCNJ1) highly expressed in the cortical and medullary thick ascending limbs (TAL), connecting segment (CNT) and cortical collecting duct (CCD) in the mammalian kidney, where it serves to recycle potassium (K(+)) across the apical membrane in TAL and to secrete K(+) in the CNT and CCD. ROMK channel mutations cause type II Bartter's syndrome with salt wasting and dehydration, and ROMK knockout mice display a similar phenotype of Bartter's syndrome in humans. Studies from ROMK null mice indicate that ROMK is required to form both the small-conductance (30pS, SK) K channels and the 70pS (IK) K channels in the TAL. The availability of ROMK(-/-) mice has made it possible to study electrolyte transport along the nephron in order to understand the TAL function under physiological conditions and the compensatory mechanisms of salt and water transport under the conditions of TAL dysfunction. This review summarizes previous progress in the study of K(+) channel activity in the TAL and CCD, ion transporter expression and activities along the nephron, and renal functions under physiological and pathophysiological conditions using ROMK(-/-) mice. PMID:22038261

  2. A hyperprostaglandin E syndrome mutation in Kir1.1 (renal outer medullary potassium) channels reveals a crucial residue for channel function in Kir1.3 channels.

    PubMed

    Derst, C; Wischmeyer, E; Preisig-Müller, R; Spauschus, A; Konrad, M; Hensen, P; Jeck, N; Seyberth, H W; Daut, J; Karschin, A

    1998-09-11

    Loss of function mutations in kidney Kir1.1 (renal outer medullary potassium channel, KCNJ1) inwardly rectifying potassium channels can be found in patients suffering from hyperprostaglandin E syndrome (HPS), the antenatal form of Bartter syndrome. A novel mutation found in a sporadic case substitutes an asparagine by a positively charged lysine residue at amino acid position 124 in the extracellular M1-H5 linker region. When heterologously expressed in Xenopus oocytes and mammalian cells, current amplitudes from mutant Kir1.1a[N124K] channels were reduced by a factor of approximately 12 as compared with wild type. A lysine at the equivalent position is present in only one of the known Kir subunits, the newly identified Kir1.3, which is also poorly expressed in the recombinant system. When the lysine residue in guinea pig Kir1.3 (gpKir1.3) isolated from a genomic library was changed to an asparagine (reverse HPS mutation), mutant channels yielded macroscopic currents with amplitudes increased 6-fold. From single channel analysis it became apparent that the decrease in mutant Kir1.1 channels and the increase in mutant gpKir1.3 macroscopic currents were mainly due to the number of expressed functional channels. Coexpression experiments revealed a dominant-negative effect of Kir1.1a[N124K] and gpKir1.3 on macroscopic current amplitudes when coexpressed with wild type Kir1.1a and gpKir[K110N], respectively. Thus we postulate that in Kir1.3 channels the extracellular positively charged lysine is of crucial functional importance. The HPS phenotype in man can be explained by the lower expression of functional channels by the Kir1. 1a[N124K] mutant. PMID:9727001

  3. Toxin-induced conformational changes in a potassium channel revealed by solid-state NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lange, Adam; Giller, Karin; Hornig, Sönke; Martin-Eauclaire, Marie-France; Pongs, Olaf; Becker, Stefan; Baldus, Marc

    2006-04-01

    The active site of potassium (K+) channels catalyses the transport of K+ ions across the plasma membrane-similar to the catalytic function of the active site of an enzyme-and is inhibited by toxins from scorpion venom. On the basis of the conserved structures of K+ pore regions and scorpion toxins, detailed structures for the K+ channel-scorpion toxin binding interface have been proposed. In these models and in previous solution-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) studies using detergent-solubilized membrane proteins, scorpion toxins were docked to the extracellular entrance of the K+ channel pore assuming rigid, preformed binding sites. Using high-resolution solid-state NMR spectroscopy, here we show that high-affinity binding of the scorpion toxin kaliotoxin to a chimaeric K+ channel (KcsA-Kv1.3) is associated with significant structural rearrangements in both molecules. Our approach involves a combined analysis of chemical shifts and proton-proton distances and demonstrates that solid-state NMR is a sensitive method for analysing the structure of a membrane protein-inhibitor complex. We propose that structural flexibility of the K+ channel and the toxin represents an important determinant for the high specificity of toxin-K+ channel interactions.

  4. Ion channel profile of TRPM8 cold receptors reveals a role of TASK-3 potassium channels in thermosensation.

    PubMed

    Morenilla-Palao, Cruz; Luis, Enoch; Fernández-Peña, Carlos; Quintero, Eva; Weaver, Janelle L; Bayliss, Douglas A; Viana, Félix

    2014-09-11

    Animals sense cold ambient temperatures through the activation of peripheral thermoreceptors that express TRPM8, a cold- and menthol-activated ion channel. These receptors can discriminate a very wide range of temperatures from innocuous to noxious. The molecular mechanism responsible for the variable sensitivity of individual cold receptors to temperature is unclear. To address this question, we performed a detailed ion channel expression analysis of cold-sensitive neurons, combining bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) transgenesis with a molecular-profiling approach in fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS)-purified TRPM8 neurons. We found that TASK-3 leak potassium channels are highly enriched in a subpopulation of these sensory neurons. The thermal threshold of TRPM8 cold neurons is decreased during TASK-3 blockade and in mice lacking TASK-3, and, most importantly, these mice display hypersensitivity to cold. Our results demonstrate a role of TASK-3 channels in thermosensation, showing that a channel-based combinatorial strategy in TRPM8 cold thermoreceptors leads to molecular specialization and functional diversity. PMID:25199828

  5. Targeting potassium channels in cancer

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Potassium channels are pore-forming transmembrane proteins that regulate a multitude of biological processes by controlling potassium flow across cell membranes. Aberrant potassium channel functions contribute to diseases such as epilepsy, cardiac arrhythmia, and neuromuscular symptoms collectively known as channelopathies. Increasing evidence suggests that cancer constitutes another category of channelopathies associated with dysregulated channel expression. Indeed, potassium channel–modulating agents have demonstrated antitumor efficacy. Potassium channels regulate cancer cell behaviors such as proliferation and migration through both canonical ion permeation–dependent and noncanonical ion permeation–independent functions. Given their cell surface localization and well-known pharmacology, pharmacological strategies to target potassium channel could prove to be promising cancer therapeutics. PMID:25049269

  6. Functional evolution of Erg potassium channel gating reveals an ancient origin for IKr

    PubMed Central

    Martinson, Alexandra S.; van Rossum, Damian B.; Diatta, Fortunay H.; Layden, Michael J.; Rhodes, Sarah A.; Martindale, Mark Q.; Jegla, Timothy

    2014-01-01

    Mammalian Ether-a-go-go related gene (Erg) family voltage-gated K+ channels possess an unusual gating phenotype that specializes them for a role in delayed repolarization. Mammalian Erg currents rectify during depolarization due to rapid, voltage-dependent inactivation, but rebound during repolarization due to a combination of rapid recovery from inactivation and slow deactivation. This is exemplified by the mammalian Erg1 channel, which is responsible for IKr, a current that repolarizes cardiac action potential plateaus. The Drosophila Erg channel does not inactivate and closes rapidly upon repolarization. The dramatically different properties observed in mammalian and Drosophila Erg homologs bring into question the evolutionary origins of distinct Erg K+ channel functions. Erg channels are highly conserved in eumetazoans and first evolved in a common ancestor of the placozoans, cnidarians, and bilaterians. To address the ancestral function of Erg channels, we identified and characterized Erg channel paralogs in the sea anemone Nematostella vectensis. N. vectensis Erg1 (NvErg1) is highly conserved with respect to bilaterian homologs and shares the IKr-like gating phenotype with mammalian Erg channels. Thus, the IKr phenotype predates the divergence of cnidarians and bilaterians. NvErg4 and Caenorhabditis elegans Erg (unc-103) share the divergent Drosophila Erg gating phenotype. Phylogenetic and sequence analysis surprisingly indicates that this alternate gating phenotype arose independently in protosomes and cnidarians. Conversion from an ancestral IKr-like gating phenotype to a Drosophila Erg-like phenotype correlates with loss of the cytoplasmic Ether-a-go-go domain. This domain is required for slow deactivation in mammalian Erg1 channels, and thus its loss may partially explain the change in gating phenotype. PMID:24706772

  7. Vascular potassium channels in NVC.

    PubMed

    Yamada, K

    2016-01-01

    It has long been proposed that the external potassium ion ([K(+)]0) works as a potent vasodilator in the dynamic regulation of local cerebral blood flow. Astrocytes may play a central role for producing K(+) outflow possibly through calcium-activated potassium channels on the end feet, responding to a rise in the intracellular Ca(2+) concentration, which might well reflect local neuronal activity. A mild elevation of [K(+)]0 in the end feet/vascular smooth muscle space could activate Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase concomitant with inwardly rectifying potassium (Kir) channels in vascular smooth muscle cells, leading to a hyperpolarization of vascular smooth muscle and relaxation of smooth muscle actin-positive vessels. Also proposed notion is endothelial calcium-activated potassium channels and/or inwardly rectifying potassium channel-mediated hyperpolarization of vascular smooth muscle. A larger elevation of [K(+)]0, which may occur pathophysiologically in such as spreading depression or stroke, can trigger a depolarization of vascular smooth muscle cells and vasoconstriction instead. PMID:27130411

  8. Clofilium inhibits Slick and Slack potassium channels

    PubMed Central

    de los Angeles Tejada, Maria; Stolpe, Kathleen; Meinild, Anne-Kristine; Klaerke, Dan A

    2012-01-01

    Slick and Slack high-conductance potassium channels have been recently discovered, and are found in the central nervous system and in the heart. Both channels are activated by Na+ and Cl−, and Slick channels are also inhibited by adenosine triphospate (ATP). An important role of setting the resting membrane potential and controlling the basal excitability of neurons has been suggested for these channels. In addition, no specific blockers for these channels are known up to the present. With the purpose of studying the pharmacological characteristics of Slick and Slack channels, the effects of exposure to the antiarrhythmic compound clofilium were evaluated. Clofilium was able to modulate the activity of Slick and Slack channels effectively, with a stronger effect on Slack than Slick channels. In order to evaluate the pharmacological behavior of Slick and Slack channels further, 38 commonly used potassium channel blockers were tested. Screening of these compounds did not reveal any modulators of Slick and Slack channels, except for clofilium. The present study provides a first approach towards elucidating the pharmacological characteristics of Slick and Slack channels and could be the basis for future studies aimed at developing potent and specific blockers and activators for these channels. PMID:23271893

  9. KCNE variants reveal a critical role of the β subunit carboxyl terminus in PKA-dependent regulation of the IKs potassium channel

    PubMed Central

    Kurokawa, Junko; Bankston, John R.; Kaihara, Asami; Chen, Lei; Furukawa, Tetsushi; Kass, Robert S.

    2009-01-01

    Co-assembly of KCNQ1 with different accessory, or beta, subunits that are members of the KCNE family results in potassium (K+) channels that conduct functionally distinct currents. The alpha subunit KCNQ1 conducts a slowly activated delayed rectifier K+ current (IKs), a major contributor to cardiac repolarization, when co-assembled with KCNE1 and channels that favor the open state when co-assembled with either KCNE2 or KCNE3. In the heart, stimulation of the sympathetic nervous system enhances IKs. A macromolecular signaling complex of the IKs channel including the targeting protein Yotiao coordinates up or downregulation of channel activity by protein kinase A (PKA) phosphorylation and dephosphorylation of molecules in the complex. β-adrenergic receptor mediated IKs upregulation, a functional consequence of PKA phosphorylation of the KCNQ1 amino terminus (N-T), requires co-expression of KCNQ1/Yotiao with KCNE1. Here, we report that co-expression of KCNE2, like KCNE1, confers a functional channel response to KCNQ1 phosphorylation, but co-expression of KCNE3 does not. Amino acid sequence comparison among the KCNE peptides, and KCNE1 truncation experiments, reveal a segment of the predicted intracellular KCNE1 carboxyl terminus (C-T) that is necessary for functional transduction of PKA phosphorylated KCNQ1. Moreover, chimera analysis reveals a region of KCNE1 sufficient to confer cAMP-dependent functional regulation upon the KCNQ1_ KCNE3_Yotiao channel. The property of specific beta subunits to transduce post-translational regulation of alpha subunits of ion channels adds another dimension to our understanding molecular mechanisms underlying the diversity of regulation of native K+ channels. PMID:19077539

  10. Sea Anemone Toxins Affecting Potassium Channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diochot, Sylvie; Lazdunski, Michel

    The great diversity of K+ channels and their wide distribution in many tissues are associated with important functions in cardiac and neuronal excitability that are now better understood thanks to the discovery of animal toxins. During the past few decades, sea anemones have provided a variety of toxins acting on voltage-sensitive sodium and, more recently, potassium channels. Currently there are three major structural groups of sea anemone K+ channel (SAK) toxins that have been characterized. Radioligand binding and electrophysiological experiments revealed that each group contains peptides displaying selective activities for different subfamilies of K+ channels. Short (35-37 amino acids) peptides in the group I display pore blocking effects on Kv1 channels. Molecular interactions of SAK-I toxins, important for activity and binding on Kv1 channels, implicate a spot of three conserved amino acid residues (Ser, Lys, Tyr) surrounded by other less conserved residues. Long (58-59 amino acids) SAK-II peptides display both enzymatic and K+ channel inhibitory activities. Medium size (42-43 amino acid) SAK-III peptides are gating modifiers which interact either with cardiac HERG or Kv3 channels by altering their voltage-dependent properties. SAK-III toxins bind to the S3C region in the outer vestibule of Kv channels. Sea anemones have proven to be a rich source of pharmacological tools, and some of the SAK toxins are now useful drugs for the diagnosis and treatment of autoimmune diseases.

  11. Characterization of Kbot21 Reveals Novel Side Chain Interactions of Scorpion Toxins Inhibiting Voltage-Gated Potassium Channels

    PubMed Central

    ElFessi-Magouri, Rym; Peigneur, Steve; Othman, Houcemeddine; Srairi-Abid, Najet; ElAyeb, Mohamed; Tytgat, Jan; Kharrat, Riadh

    2015-01-01

    Scorpion toxins are important pharmacological tools for probing the physiological roles of ion channels which are involved in many physiological processes and as such have significant therapeutic potential. The discovery of new scorpion toxins with different specificities and affinities is needed to further characterize the physiology of ion channels. In this regard, a new short polypeptide called Kbot21 has been purified to homogeneity from the venom of Buthus occitanus tunetanus scorpion. Kbot21 is structurally related to BmBKTx1 from the venom of the Asian scorpion Buthus martensii Karsch. These two toxins differ by only two residues at position 13 (R /V) and 24 (D/N).Despite their very similar sequences, Kbot21 and BmBKTx1 differ in their electrophysiological activities. Kbot21 targets KV channel subtypes whereas BmBKTx1 is active on both big conductance (BK) and small conductance (SK) Ca2+-activated K+ channel subtypes, but has no effects on Kv channel subtypes. The docking model of Kbot21 with the Kv1.2 channel shows that the D24 and R13 side-chain of Kbot21 are critical for its interaction with KV channels. PMID:26398235

  12. Characterization of Kbot21 Reveals Novel Side Chain Interactions of Scorpion Toxins Inhibiting Voltage-Gated Potassium Channels.

    PubMed

    ElFessi-Magouri, Rym; Peigneur, Steve; Othman, Houcemeddine; Srairi-Abid, Najet; ElAyeb, Mohamed; Tytgat, Jan; Kharrat, Riadh

    2015-01-01

    Scorpion toxins are important pharmacological tools for probing the physiological roles of ion channels which are involved in many physiological processes and as such have significant therapeutic potential. The discovery of new scorpion toxins with different specificities and affinities is needed to further characterize the physiology of ion channels. In this regard, a new short polypeptide called Kbot21 has been purified to homogeneity from the venom of Buthus occitanus tunetanus scorpion. Kbot21 is structurally related to BmBKTx1 from the venom of the Asian scorpion Buthus martensii Karsch. These two toxins differ by only two residues at position 13 (R /V) and 24 (D/N).Despite their very similar sequences, Kbot21 and BmBKTx1 differ in their electrophysiological activities. Kbot21 targets KV channel subtypes whereas BmBKTx1 is active on both big conductance (BK) and small conductance (SK) Ca2+-activated K+ channel subtypes, but has no effects on Kv channel subtypes. The docking model of Kbot21 with the Kv1.2 channel shows that the D24 and R13 side-chain of Kbot21 are critical for its interaction with KV channels. PMID:26398235

  13. Genomics analysis of potassium channel genes in songbirds reveals molecular specializations of brain circuits for the maintenance and production of learned vocalizations

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background A fundamental question in molecular neurobiology is how genes that determine basic neuronal properties shape the functional organization of brain circuits underlying complex learned behaviors. Given the growing availability of complete vertebrate genomes, comparative genomics represents a promising approach to address this question. Here we used genomics and molecular approaches to study how ion channel genes influence the properties of the brain circuitry that regulates birdsong, a learned vocal behavior with important similarities to human speech acquisition. We focused on potassium (K-)Channels, which are major determinants of neuronal cell excitability. Starting with the human gene set of K-Channels, we used cross-species mRNA/protein alignments, and syntenic analysis to define the full complement of orthologs, paralogs, allelic variants, as well as novel loci not previously predicted in the genome of zebra finch (Taeniopygia guttata). We also compared protein coding domains in chicken and zebra finch orthologs to identify genes under positive selective pressure, and those that contained lineage-specific insertions/deletions in functional domains. Finally, we conducted comprehensive in situ hybridizations to determine the extent of brain expression, and identify K-Channel gene enrichments in nuclei of the avian song system. Results We identified 107 K-Channel finch genes, including 6 novel genes common to non-mammalian vertebrate lineages. Twenty human genes are absent in songbirds, birds, or sauropsids, or unique to mammals, suggesting K-Channel properties may be lineage-specific. We also identified specific family members with insertions/deletions and/or high dN/dS ratios compared to chicken, a non-vocal learner. In situ hybridization revealed that while most K-Channel genes are broadly expressed in the brain, a subset is selectively expressed in song nuclei, representing molecular specializations of the vocal circuitry. Conclusions Together

  14. Cumulative Activation of Voltage-Dependent KVS-1 Potassium Channels

    PubMed Central

    Rojas, Patricio; Garst-Orozco, Jonathan; Baban, Beravan; de Santiago-Castillo, Jose Antonio; Covarrubias, Manuel; Salkoff, Lawrence

    2008-01-01

    In this study, we reveal the existence of a novel use-dependent phenomenon in potassium channels, which we refer to as cumulative activation (CA). CA consists of an increase in current amplitude in response to repetitive depolarizing step pulses to the same potential. CA persists for up to 20 s and is similar to a phenomenon called “voltage-dependent facilitation” observed in some calcium channels. The KVS-1 K+ channel, which exhibits CA, is a rapidly activating and inactivating voltage-dependent potassium channel expressed in chemosensory and other neurons of Caenorhabditis elegans. It is unusual in being most closely related to the Shab (Kv2) family of potassium channels, which typically behave like delayed rectifier K+ channels in other species. The magnitude of CA depends on the frequency, voltage, and duration of the depolarizing step pulse. CA also radically changes the activation and inactivation kinetics of the channel, suggesting that the channel may undergo a physical modification in a use-dependent manner; thus, a model that closely simulates the behavior of the channel postulates the existence of two populations of channels, unmodified and modified. Use-dependent changes in the behavior of potassium channels, such as CA observed in KVS-1, could be involved in functional mechanisms of cellular plasticity such as synaptic depression that represent the cellular basis of learning and memory. PMID:18199775

  15. Permeation in potassium channels: implications for channel structure.

    PubMed

    Yellen, G

    1987-01-01

    The SR K+ channel is a single-ion channel with a tunnel that is not very selective, while the DR and CaK channels are both more selective, multi-ion channels. The permeation mechanisms of the three channels are probably most systematically distinguished by the length of their tunnels; the SR has the shortest and the DR the longest. Although different in their mechanisms of activation, the DR and CaK channels have very similar permeation characteristics, down to the details of selectivity and blockade. The longer tunnel and reduced conductance (perhaps a result of the extra tunnel length) of the DR K+ channel are the main differences. The selectivity of the rate-limiting barriers and the binding sites within the channels, however, are strikingly similar. A successful potassium channel must satisfy two criteria: It must let potassium ions through and not much else, and it must let many potassium ions through. To be selective the channel must have a narrow selectivity filter, so that an ion must shed some of its waters of hydration to pass through. Sodium ions are excluded because they are more reluctant to lose their water, and they are not adequately compensated for this loss by interaction with the selectivity filter. To carry a large current the narrow region must be short, with wide antechambers to reduce the diffusional access resistance (48). Energetically, the channel must strike a balance. There must be enough binding energy to compensate the ions for their lost hydration energy, so that the energy barrier to permeation is small. If the channel binds the ion too tightly, however, the ion will not be able to exit, and the current will be small. Some of the shared properties of different potassium channels are probably consequences of these requirements; others may be incidental to function, suggesting a common origin. Barium ions have almost exactly the same radius as potassium ions but twice the charge, so it is perhaps not surprising that barium can block

  16. Researches toward potassium channels on tumor progressions.

    PubMed

    Shen, Zheng; Yang, Qian; You, Qidong

    2009-01-01

    As trans-membrane proteins located in cytoplasm and organelle membrane, potassium (K(+)) channels are generally divided into four super-families: voltage-gated K(+) channels (K(v)), Ca(2+)-activated K(+) channels (K(Ca)), inwardly rectifying K(+) channels (K(ir)) and two-pore domain K(+) channels (K(2P)). Since dysfunctions of K(+) channels would induce many diseases, various studies toward their functions in physiologic and pathologic process have been extensively launched. This review focuses on the recent advances of K(+) channels in tumor progression, including the brief introduction of K(+) channels, the role of K(+) channels in tumor cells, the possible mechanism of action at cellular level, and the possible application of K(+) channel modulators in cancer chemotherapy.

  17. Potassium channels in pulmonary arterial hypertension.

    PubMed

    Boucherat, Olivier; Chabot, Sophie; Antigny, Fabrice; Perros, Frédéric; Provencher, Steeve; Bonnet, Sébastien

    2015-10-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a devastating cardiopulmonary disorder with various origins. All forms of PAH share a common pulmonary arteriopathy characterised by vasoconstriction, remodelling of the pre-capillary pulmonary vessel wall, and in situ thrombosis. Although the pathogenesis of PAH is recognised as a complex and multifactorial process, there is growing evidence that potassium channels dysfunction in pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells is a hallmark of PAH. Besides regulating many physiological functions, reduced potassium channels expression and/or activity have significant effects on PAH establishment and progression. This review describes the molecular mechanisms and physiological consequences of potassium channel modulation. Special emphasis is placed on KCNA5 (Kv1.5) and KCNK3 (TASK1), which are considered to play a central role in determining pulmonary vascular tone and may represent attractive therapeutic targets in the treatment of PAH. PMID:26341985

  18. Selective Loss of Presynaptic Potassium Channel Clusters at the Cerebellar Basket Cell Terminal Pinceau in Adam11 Mutants Reveals Their Role in Ephaptic Control of Purkinje Cell Firing

    PubMed Central

    Kole, Matthew J.; Qian, Jing; Waase, Marc P.; Klassen, Tara L.; Chen, Tim T.; Augustine, George J.

    2015-01-01

    A specialized axonal ending, the basket cell “pinceau,” encapsulates the Purkinje cell axon initial segment (AIS), exerting final inhibitory control over the integrated outflow of the cerebellar cortex. This nonconventional axo-axonic contact extends beyond the perisomatic chemical GABAergic synaptic boutons to the distal AIS, lacks both sodium channels and local exocytotic machinery, and yet contains a dense cluster of voltage-gated potassium channels whose functional contribution is unknown. Here, we show that ADAM11, a transmembrane noncatalytic disintegrin, is the first reported Kv1-interacting protein essential for localizing Kv1.1 and Kv1.2 subunit complexes to the distal terminal. Selective absence of these channels at the pinceau due to mutation of ADAM11 spares spontaneous GABA release from basket cells at the perisomatic synapse yet eliminates ultrarapid ephaptic inhibitory synchronization of Purkinje cell firing. Our findings identify a critical role for presynaptic K+ channels at the pinceau in ephaptic control over the speed and stability of spike rate coding at the Purkinje cell AIS in mice. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT This study identifies ADAM11 as the first essential molecule for the proper localization of potassium ion channels at presynaptic nerve terminals, where they modulate excitability and the release of neural transmitters. Genetic truncation of the transmembrane disintegrin and metalloproteinase protein ADAM11 resulted in the absence of Kv1 channels that are normally densely clustered at the terminals of basket cell axons in the cerebellar cortex. These specialized terminals are responsible for the release of the neurotransmitter GABA onto Purkinje cells and also display electrical signaling. In the ADAM11 mutant, GABAergic release was not altered, but the ultrarapid electrical signal was absent, demonstrating that the dense presynaptic cluster of Kv1 ion channels at these terminals mediate electrical transmission. Therefore, ADAM11 plays a

  19. Rapid outer pore movements after opening in a KV1 potassium channel are revealed by TMRM fluorescence from the S3-S4 linker, and modulated by extracellular potassium.

    PubMed

    Vaid, Moninder; Horne, Andrew; Claydon, Thomas; Fedida, David

    2009-01-01

    Fluorescence-based approaches provide powerful techniques to directly report structural dynamics underlying gating processes in Shaker KV channels. Here, following on from work carried out in Shaker channels, we have used voltage clamp fluorimetry for the first time to study voltage sensor motions in mammalian KV1.5 channels, by attaching TMRM fluorescent probes to substituted cysteine residues in the S3-S4 linker of KV1.5 (A397C). Compared with the Shaker channel, there are significant differences in the fluorescence signals that occur on activation of the channel. In addition to a well-understood fluorescence quenching signal associated with S4 movement, we have recorded a unique partial recovery of fluorescence after the quenching that is attributable to gating events at the outer pore mouth, that is not seen in Shaker despite significant homology between it and KV1.5 channels in the S5-P loop-S6 region. Extracellular potassium is known to modulate C-type inactivation in Shaker and KV channels at sites in the outer pore mouth, and so here we have measured the concentration-dependence of potassium effects on the fluorescence recovery signals from A397C. Elevation of extracellular K+ inhibits the rapid fluorescence recovery, with complete abolition at 99 mM K+, and an IC50 of 29 mM K+o. These experiments suggest that the rapid fluorescence recovery reflects early gating movements associated with inactivation, modulated by extracellular K+, and further support the idea that outer pore motions occur rapidly after KV1.5 channel opening and can be observed by fluorophores attached to the S3-S4 linker. PMID:19077547

  20. Cardiac Strong Inward Rectifier Potassium Channels

    PubMed Central

    Anumonwo, Justus MB; Lopatin, Anatoli N

    2009-01-01

    Cardiac IK1 and IKACh are the major potassium currents displaying classical strong inward rectification, a unique property that is critical for their roles in cardiac excitability. In the last fifteen years, research on IK1 and IKACh has been propelled by the cloning of the underlying inwardly rectifying potassium (Kir) channels, the discovery of the molecular mechanism of strong rectification and the linking of a number of disorders of cardiac excitability to defects in genes encoding Kir channels. Disease-causing mutations in Kir genes have been shown experimentally to affect one or more of the following channel properties: structure, assembly, trafficking and regulation, with the ultimate effect of a gain-, or a loss-of-function of the channel. It is now established that IK1 and IKACh channels are heterotetramers of Kir2 and Kir3 subunits, respectively. Each homomeric Kir channel has distinct biophysical and regulatory properties, and individual Kir subunits often display different patterns of regional, cellular and membrane distribution. These differences are thought to underlie important variations in the physiological properties of IK1 and IKACh. It has become increasingly clear that the contribution of IK1 and IKACh channels to cardiac electrical activity goes beyond their long recognized role in the stabilization of resting membrane potential and shaping the late phase of action potential repolarization in individual myocytes, but extends to being critical elements determining the overall electrical stability of the heart. PMID:19703462

  1. A new pH-sensitive rectifying potassium channel in mitochondria from the embryonic rat hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Kajma, Anna; Szewczyk, Adam

    2012-10-01

    Patch-clamp single-channel studies on mitochondria isolated from embryonic rat hippocampus revealed the presence of two different potassium ion channels: a large-conductance (288±4pS) calcium-activated potassium channel and second potassium channel with outwardly rectifying activity under symmetric conditions (150/150mM KCl). At positive voltages, this channel displayed a conductance of 67.84pS and a strong voltage dependence at holding potentials from -80mV to +80mV. The open probability was higher at positive than at negative voltages. Patch-clamp studies at the mitoplast-attached mode showed that the channel was not sensitive to activators and inhibitors of mitochondrial potassium channels but was regulated by pH. Moreover, we demonstrated that the channel activity was not affected by the application of lidocaine, an inhibitor of two-pore domain potassium channels, or by tertiapin, an inhibitor of inwardly rectifying potassium channels. In summary, based on the single-channel recordings, we characterised for the first time mitochondrial pH-sensitive ion channel that is selective for cations, permeable to potassium ions, displays voltage sensitivity and does not correspond to any previously described potassium ion channels in the inner mitochondrial membrane. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: 17th European Bioenergetics Conference (EBEC 2012).

  2. The potassium channel: Structure, selectivity and diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, T. W.; Bliznyuk, A.; Rendell, A. P.; Kuyucak, S.; Chung, S.-H.

    2000-05-01

    We employ the entire experimentally determined protein structure for the KcsA potassium channel from Streptomyces lividans in molecular dynamics calculations to observe hydrated channel protein structure, ion solvation, selectivity, multiple ion configurations, and diffusion. Free energy perturbation calculations display a significant ion discrimination of ˜9 kT in favor of the larger K+ ion. The protein forming the channel is very flexible yet is unable to fully solvate the Na+ ion because of its smaller size and large solvation energy. There is evidence that acidic and basic sidechains may dissociate in the presence of multiple K+ ions to explain experimental ion density maps. K+ diffusion is found to vary from approximately 10%-90% of bulk, supporting the high channel currents observed experimentally.

  3. Modulation of Potassium Channels Inhibits Bunyavirus Infection*

    PubMed Central

    Hover, Samantha; King, Barnabas; Hall, Bradley; Loundras, Eleni-Anna; Taqi, Hussah; Daly, Janet; Dallas, Mark; Peers, Chris; Schnettler, Esther; McKimmie, Clive; Kohl, Alain; Barr, John N.; Mankouri, Jamel

    2016-01-01

    Bunyaviruses are considered to be emerging pathogens facilitated by the segmented nature of their genome that allows reassortment between different species to generate novel viruses with altered pathogenicity. Bunyaviruses are transmitted via a diverse range of arthropod vectors, as well as rodents, and have established a global disease range with massive importance in healthcare, animal welfare, and economics. There are no vaccines or anti-viral therapies available to treat human bunyavirus infections and so development of new anti-viral strategies is urgently required. Bunyamwera virus (BUNV; genus Orthobunyavirus) is the model bunyavirus, sharing aspects of its molecular and cellular biology with all Bunyaviridae family members. Here, we show for the first time that BUNV activates and requires cellular potassium (K+) channels to infect cells. Time of addition assays using K+ channel modulating agents demonstrated that K+ channel function is critical to events shortly after virus entry but prior to viral RNA synthesis/replication. A similar K+ channel dependence was identified for other bunyaviruses namely Schmallenberg virus (Orthobunyavirus) as well as the more distantly related Hazara virus (Nairovirus). Using a rational pharmacological screening regimen, two-pore domain K+ channels (K2P) were identified as the K+ channel family mediating BUNV K+ channel dependence. As several K2P channel modulators are currently in clinical use, our work suggests they may represent a new and safe drug class for the treatment of potentially lethal bunyavirus disease. PMID:26677217

  4. Modulation of Potassium Channels Inhibits Bunyavirus Infection.

    PubMed

    Hover, Samantha; King, Barnabas; Hall, Bradley; Loundras, Eleni-Anna; Taqi, Hussah; Daly, Janet; Dallas, Mark; Peers, Chris; Schnettler, Esther; McKimmie, Clive; Kohl, Alain; Barr, John N; Mankouri, Jamel

    2016-02-12

    Bunyaviruses are considered to be emerging pathogens facilitated by the segmented nature of their genome that allows reassortment between different species to generate novel viruses with altered pathogenicity. Bunyaviruses are transmitted via a diverse range of arthropod vectors, as well as rodents, and have established a global disease range with massive importance in healthcare, animal welfare, and economics. There are no vaccines or anti-viral therapies available to treat human bunyavirus infections and so development of new anti-viral strategies is urgently required. Bunyamwera virus (BUNV; genus Orthobunyavirus) is the model bunyavirus, sharing aspects of its molecular and cellular biology with all Bunyaviridae family members. Here, we show for the first time that BUNV activates and requires cellular potassium (K(+)) channels to infect cells. Time of addition assays using K(+) channel modulating agents demonstrated that K(+) channel function is critical to events shortly after virus entry but prior to viral RNA synthesis/replication. A similar K(+) channel dependence was identified for other bunyaviruses namely Schmallenberg virus (Orthobunyavirus) as well as the more distantly related Hazara virus (Nairovirus). Using a rational pharmacological screening regimen, two-pore domain K(+) channels (K2P) were identified as the K(+) channel family mediating BUNV K(+) channel dependence. As several K2P channel modulators are currently in clinical use, our work suggests they may represent a new and safe drug class for the treatment of potentially lethal bunyavirus disease.

  5. Potassium channels as multi-ion single-file pores

    PubMed Central

    1978-01-01

    A literature review reveals many lines of evidence that both delayed rectifier and inward rectifier potassium channels are multi-ion pores. These include unidirectional flux ratios given by the 2--2.5 power of the electrochemical activity ratio, very steeply voltage-dependent block with monovalent blocking ions, relief of block by permeant ions added to the side opposite from the blocking ion, rectification depending on E--EK, and a minimum in the reversal potential or conductance as external K+ ions are replaced by an equivalent concentration of T1+ ions. We consider a channel with a linear sequence of energy barriers and binding sites. The channel can be occupied by more than one ion at a time, and ions hop in single file into vacant sites with rate constants that depend on barrier heights, membrane potential, and interionic repulsion. Such multi-ion models reproduce qualitatively the special flux properties of potassium channels when the barriers for hopping out of the pore are larger than for hopping between sites within the pore and when there is repulsion between ions. These conditions also produce multiple maxima in the conductance-ion activity relationship. In agreement with Armstrong's hypothesis (1969. J. Gen. Physiol. 54:553--575), inward rectification may be understood in terms of block by an internal blocking cation. Potassium channels must have at least three sites and often contain at least two ions at a time. PMID:722275

  6. What do we not know about mitochondrial potassium channels?

    PubMed

    Laskowski, Michał; Augustynek, Bartłomiej; Kulawiak, Bogusz; Koprowski, Piotr; Bednarczyk, Piotr; Jarmuszkiewicz, Wieslawa; Szewczyk, Adam

    2016-08-01

    In this review, we summarize our knowledge about mitochondrial potassium channels, with a special focus on unanswered questions in this field. The following potassium channels have been well described in the inner mitochondrial membrane: ATP-regulated potassium channel, Ca(2+)-activated potassium channel, the voltage-gated Kv1.3 potassium channel, and the two-pore domain TASK-3 potassium channel. The primary functional roles of these channels include regulation of mitochondrial respiration and the alteration of membrane potential. Additionally, they modulate the mitochondrial matrix volume and the synthesis of reactive oxygen species by mitochondria. Mitochondrial potassium channels are believed to contribute to cytoprotection and cell death. In this paper, we discuss fundamental issues concerning mitochondrial potassium channels: their molecular identity, channel pharmacology and functional properties. Attention will be given to the current problems present in our understanding of the nature of mitochondrial potassium channels. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled 'EBEC 2016: 19th European Bioenergetics Conference, Riva del Garda, Italy, July 2-6, 2016', edited by Prof. Paolo Bernardi.

  7. Extracellular potassium inhibits Kv7.1 potassium channels by stabilizing an inactivated state.

    PubMed

    Larsen, Anders Peter; Steffensen, Annette Buur; Grunnet, Morten; Olesen, Søren-Peter

    2011-08-17

    Kv7.1 (KCNQ1) channels are regulators of several physiological processes including vasodilatation, repolarization of cardiomyocytes, and control of secretory processes. A number of Kv7.1 pore mutants are sensitive to extracellular potassium. We hypothesized that extracellular potassium also modulates wild-type Kv7.1 channels. The Kv7.1 currents were measured in Xenopus laevis oocytes at different concentrations of extracellular potassium (1-50 mM). As extracellular potassium was elevated, Kv7.1 currents were reduced significantly more than expected from theoretical calculations based on the Goldman-Hodgkin-Katz flux equation. Potassium inhibited the steady-state current with an IC(50) of 6.0 ± 0.2 mM. Analysis of tail-currents showed that potassium increased the fraction of channels in the inactivated state. Similarly, the recovery from inactivation was slowed by potassium, suggesting that extracellular potassium stabilizes an inactivated state in Kv7.1 channels. The effect of extracellular potassium was absent in noninactivating Kv7.1/KCNE1 and Kv7.1/KCNE3 channels, further supporting a stabilized inactivated state as the underlying mechanism. Interestingly, coexpression of Kv7.1 with KCNE2 did not attenuate the inhibition by potassium. In a number of other Kv channels, including Kv1.5, Kv4.3, and Kv7.2-5 channels, currents were only minimally reduced by an increase in extracellular potassium as expected. These results show that extracellular potassium modulates Kv7.1 channels and suggests that physiological changes in potassium concentrations may directly control the function of Kv7.1 channels. This may represent a novel regulatory mechanism of excitability and of potassium transport in tissues expressing Kv7.1 channels. PMID:21843472

  8. Bioinspired Artificial Sodium and Potassium Ion Channels.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Vázquez, Nuria; Fuertes, Alberto; Amorín, Manuel; Granja, Juan R

    2016-01-01

    In Nature, all biological systems present a high level of compartmentalization in order to carry out a wide variety of functions in a very specific way. Hence, they need ways to be connected with the environment for communication, homeostasis equilibrium, nutrition, waste elimination, etc. The biological membranes carry out these functions; they consist of physical insulating barriers constituted mainly by phospholipids. These amphipathic molecules spontaneously aggregate in water to form bilayers in which the polar groups are exposed to the aqueous media while the non-polar chains self-organize by aggregating to each other to stay away from the aqueous media. The insulating properties of membranes are due to the formation of a hydrophobic bilayer covered at both sides by the hydrophilic phosphate groups. Thus, lipophilic molecules can permeate the membrane freely, while the small charged or very hydrophilic molecules require the assistance of other membrane components in order to overcome the energetic cost implied in crossing the non-polar region of the bilayer. Most of the large polar species (such as oligosaccharides, polypeptides or nucleic acids) cross into and out of the cell via endocytosis and exocytosis, respectively. Nature has created a series of systems (carriers and pores) in order to control the balance of small hydrophilic molecules and ions. The most important structures to achieve these goals are the ionophoric proteins that include the channel proteins, such as the sodium and potassium channels, and ionic transporters, including the sodium/potassium pumps or calcium/sodium exchangers among others. Inspired by these, scientists have created non-natural synthetic transporting structures to mimic the natural systems. The progress in the last years has been remarkable regarding the efficient transport of Na(+) and K(+) ions, despite the fact that the selectivity and the ON/OFF state of the non-natural systems remain a present and future challenge

  9. Bioinspired Artificial Sodium and Potassium Ion Channels.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Vázquez, Nuria; Fuertes, Alberto; Amorín, Manuel; Granja, Juan R

    2016-01-01

    In Nature, all biological systems present a high level of compartmentalization in order to carry out a wide variety of functions in a very specific way. Hence, they need ways to be connected with the environment for communication, homeostasis equilibrium, nutrition, waste elimination, etc. The biological membranes carry out these functions; they consist of physical insulating barriers constituted mainly by phospholipids. These amphipathic molecules spontaneously aggregate in water to form bilayers in which the polar groups are exposed to the aqueous media while the non-polar chains self-organize by aggregating to each other to stay away from the aqueous media. The insulating properties of membranes are due to the formation of a hydrophobic bilayer covered at both sides by the hydrophilic phosphate groups. Thus, lipophilic molecules can permeate the membrane freely, while the small charged or very hydrophilic molecules require the assistance of other membrane components in order to overcome the energetic cost implied in crossing the non-polar region of the bilayer. Most of the large polar species (such as oligosaccharides, polypeptides or nucleic acids) cross into and out of the cell via endocytosis and exocytosis, respectively. Nature has created a series of systems (carriers and pores) in order to control the balance of small hydrophilic molecules and ions. The most important structures to achieve these goals are the ionophoric proteins that include the channel proteins, such as the sodium and potassium channels, and ionic transporters, including the sodium/potassium pumps or calcium/sodium exchangers among others. Inspired by these, scientists have created non-natural synthetic transporting structures to mimic the natural systems. The progress in the last years has been remarkable regarding the efficient transport of Na(+) and K(+) ions, despite the fact that the selectivity and the ON/OFF state of the non-natural systems remain a present and future challenge.

  10. Intractable hyperkalemia due to nicorandil induced potassium channel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Chowdhry, Vivek; Mohanty, B B

    2015-01-01

    Nicorandil is a commonly used antianginal agent, which has both nitrate-like and ATP-sensitive potassium (K ATP ) channel activator properties. Activation of potassium channels by nicorandil causes expulsion of potassium ions into the extracellular space leading to membrane hyperpolarization, closure of voltage-gated calcium channels and finally vasodilatation. However, on the other hand, being an activator of K ATP channel, it can expel K + ions out of the cells and can cause hyperkalemia. Here, we report a case of nicorandil induced hyperkalemia unresponsive to medical treatment in a patient with diabetic nephropathy.

  11. Potassium channel conductance as a control mechanism in hair follicles.

    PubMed

    Buhl, A E; Conrad, S J; Waldon, D J; Brunden, M N

    1993-07-01

    The opening of intracellular potassium channels is a common mechanism of action for a set of anti-hypertensive drugs that includes the hair-growth-inducing agent minoxidil. Recent work suggests potassium channel openers (PCOs) also influence hair growth. Correlative studies demonstrate that a series of PCOs including minoxidil, pinacidil, P-1075, an active pinacidil analog, RP-49,356, cromakalim, and nicorandil maintain hair growth in cultured vibrissa follicles. Studies using balding stumptail macaques verify that minoxidil, P-1075, and cromakalim but not RP-49,356 stimulate hair growth. The definition of potassium channels and documentation of drug effects on these channels is classically done using electrophysiologic techniques. Such studies require the identification and isolation of target cells. Both these are among the unsolved problems in the area of hair biology. Estimating K+ flux using 86Rb+ as a K+ tracer is an accepted method of assessing potassium channel conductance in other organ systems. Both pinacidil and RP-49,356 induce measurable Rb+ flux in isolated vibrissa follicles and a hair epithelial cell line whereas neither minoxidil nor minoxidil sulfate had measurable effects. Potassium channels have been studied successfully in other organ systems using specific pharmacologic blockers for the various channel subtypes. Blockers including glyburide, tetraethylammonium, and procaine failed to inhibit minoxidil stimulation of cultured follicles. The current explosion of knowledge on potassium channel biology, cloning of channels, and continued progress in hair biology promise to clarify the role of K+ ions in the control of hair follicles.

  12. TRESK potassium channel in human T lymphoblasts

    SciTech Connect

    Sánchez-Miguel, Dénison Selene; García-Dolores, Fernando; Rosa Flores-Márquez, María; Delgado-Enciso, Iván; Pottosin, Igor; Dobrovinskaya, Oxana

    2013-05-03

    Highlights: • TRESK (KCNK18) mRNA is present in different T lymphoblastic cell lines. • KCNK18 mRNA was not found in resting peripheral blood lymphocytes. • Clinical samples of T lymphoblastic leukemias and lymphomas were positive for TRESK. • TRESK in T lymphoblasts has dual localization, in plasma membrane and intracellular. -- Abstract: TRESK (TWIK-related spinal cord K{sup +}) channel, encoded by KCNK18 gene, belongs to the double-pore domain K{sup +} channel family and in normal conditions is expressed predominantly in the central nervous system. In our previous patch-clamp study on Jurkat T lymphoblasts we have characterized highly selective K{sup +} channel with pharmacological profile identical to TRESK. In the present work, the presence of KCNK18 mRNA was confirmed in T lymphoblastic cell lines (Jurkat, JCaM, H9) but not in resting peripheral blood lymphocytes of healthy donors. Positive immunostaining for TRESK was demonstrated in lymphoblastic cell lines, in germinal centers of non-tumoral lymph nodes, and in clinical samples of T acute lymphoblastic leukemias/lymphomas. Besides detection in the plasma membrane, intracellular TRESK localization was also revealed. Possible involvement of TRESK channel in lymphocyte proliferation and tumorigenesis is discussed.

  13. A novel potassium channel in skeletal muscle mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Skalska, Jolanta; Piwońska, Marta; Wyroba, Elzbieta; Surmacz, Liliana; Wieczorek, Rafal; Koszela-Piotrowska, Izabela; Zielińska, Joanna; Bednarczyk, Piotr; Dołowy, Krzysztof; Wilczynski, Grzegorz M; Szewczyk, Adam; Kunz, Wolfram S

    2008-01-01

    In this work we provide evidence for the potential presence of a potassium channel in skeletal muscle mitochondria. In isolated rat skeletal muscle mitochondria, Ca(2+) was able to depolarize the mitochondrial inner membrane and stimulate respiration in a strictly potassium-dependent manner. These potassium-specific effects of Ca(2+) were completely abolished by 200 nM charybdotoxin or 50 nM iberiotoxin, which are well-known inhibitors of large conductance, calcium-activated potassium channels (BK(Ca) channel). Furthermore, NS1619, a BK(Ca)-channel opener, mimicked the potassium-specific effects of calcium on respiration and mitochondrial membrane potential. In agreement with these functional data, light and electron microscopy, planar lipid bilayer reconstruction and immunological studies identified the BK(Ca) channel to be preferentially located in the inner mitochondrial membrane of rat skeletal muscle fibers. We propose that activation of mitochondrial K(+) transport by opening of the BK(Ca) channel may be important for myoprotection since the channel opener NS1619 protected the myoblast cell line C2C12 against oxidative injury.

  14. Substrate Regulation of Single Potassium and Chloride Ion Channels in Arabidopsis Plasma Membrane

    PubMed Central

    Lew, Roger R.

    1991-01-01

    Patch clamp measurements of excised inside-out patches of Arabidopsis thaliana plasma membrane reveal at least two ion channels which conduct either potassium or chloride. The conductance of the potassium channel ranged from 5 to 70 picosiemens depending on KCl concentration. The conductance increased linearly with increasing cytoplasmic-side [KCl]; the extent of this dependence declined as extracytoplasmic-side [KCl] was increased. This indicates that substrate regulation of the potassium channel is a consequence of the molecular architecture of the channel: in particular, multi-ion binding sites within the channel pore. The chloride channel conductance (ranging from 5-40 picosiemens) was independent of cytoplasmic-side [KCl] until a threshold concentration of about 300 millimolar was reached. Such behavior is expected only if the channel is allosterically regulated by cytoplasmic-side K+ and/or Cl−. The median open times of either channel (about 200 milliseconds for the potassium channel and 20 milliseconds for the chloride channel) were unaffected by substrate concentrations. PMID:16668031

  15. Photochromic potassium channel blockers: design and electrophysiological characterization.

    PubMed

    Mourot, Alexandre; Fehrentz, Timm; Kramer, Richard H

    2013-01-01

    Voltage-gated potassium (K v) channels are membrane proteins that open a selective pore upon membrane depolarization, allowing K(+) ions to flow down their electrochemical gradient. In neurons, K v channels play a key role in repolarizing the membrane potential during the falling phase of the action potential, often resulting in an after hyperpolarization. Opening of K v channels results in a decrease of cellular excitability, whereas closing (or pharmacological block) has the opposite effect, increased excitability. We have developed a series of photosensitive blockers for K v channels that enable reversible, optical regulation of potassium ion flow. Such molecules can be used for remote control of neuronal excitability using light as an on/off switch. Here we describe the design and electrophysiological characterization of photochromic blockers of ion channels. Our focus is on K v channels but in principle, the techniques described here can be applied to other ion channels and signaling proteins.

  16. Photochromic Potassium Channel Blockers: Design and Electrophysiological Characterization

    PubMed Central

    Mourot, Alexandre; Fehrentz, Timm; Kramer, Richard H.

    2016-01-01

    Voltage-gated potassium (Kv) channels are membrane proteins that open a selective pore upon membrane depolarization, allowing K+ ions to flow down their electrochemical gradient. In neurons, Kv channels play a key role in repolarizing the membrane potential during the falling phase of the action potential, often resulting in an after hyperpolarization. Opening of Kv channels results in a decrease of cellular excitability, whereas closing (or pharmacological block) has the opposite effect, increased excitability. We have developed a series of photosensitive blockers for Kv channels that enable reversible, optical regulation of potassium ion flow. Such molecules can be used for remote control of neuronal excitability using light as an on/off switch. Here we describe the design and electrophysiological characterization of photochromic blockers of ion channels. Our focus is on Kv channels but in principle, the techniques described here can be applied to other ion channels and signaling proteins. PMID:23494374

  17. Cardiac Delayed Rectifier Potassium Channels in Health and Disease.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lei; Sampson, Kevin J; Kass, Robert S

    2016-06-01

    Cardiac delayed rectifier potassium channels conduct outward potassium currents during the plateau phase of action potentials and play pivotal roles in cardiac repolarization. These include IKs, IKr and the atrial specific IKur channels. In this article, we will review their molecular identities and biophysical properties. Mutations in the genes encoding delayed rectifiers lead to loss- or gain-of-function phenotypes, disrupt normal cardiac repolarization and result in various cardiac rhythm disorders, including congenital Long QT Syndrome, Short QT Syndrome and familial atrial fibrillation. We will also discuss the prospect of using delayed rectifier channels as therapeutic targets to manage cardiac arrhythmia. PMID:27261823

  18. Potassium channels of pig articular chondrocytes are blocked by propofol.

    PubMed

    Mozrzymas, J W; Visintin, M; Vittur, F; Ruzzier, F

    1994-07-15

    The effect of propofol on the voltage-activated potassium channels in pig articular chondrocytes was investigated. Propofol was found to reversibly block the potassium channels in a dose-dependent manner. The blocking effect was voltage-independent and the Hill coefficient was 1.85 +/- 0.18. No changes either in the slope conductance or in the single channel kinetics were observed. The half-blocking concentration (Ec50) was 6.0 +/- 0.49 microM which is much lower than the concentrations used to observe the scavenging effect of the drug in an artificial synovial fluid. Interestingly, Ec50 found in our experiments is also smaller than the blood concentration of propofol used in anaesthesia. These results show that propofol may strongly affect the potassium channels in some non-excitable cells.

  19. Distinct abscisic acid signaling pathways for modulation of guard cell versus mesophyll cell potassium channels revealed by expression studies in Xenopus laevis oocytes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sutton, F.; Paul, S. S.; Wang, X. Q.; Assmann, S. M.; Evans, M. L. (Principal Investigator)

    2000-01-01

    Regulation of guard cell ion transport by abscisic acid (ABA) and in particular ABA inhibition of a guard cell inward K(+) current (I(Kin)) is well documented. However, little is known concerning ABA effects on ion transport in other plant cell types. Here we applied patch clamp techniques to mesophyll cell protoplasts of fava bean (Vicia faba cv Long Pod) plants and demonstrated ABA inhibition of an outward K(+) current (I(Kout)). When mesophyll cell protoplast mRNA (mesophyll mRNA) was expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes, I(Kout) was generated that displayed similar properties to I(Kout) observed from direct analysis of mesophyll cell protoplasts. I(Kout) expressed by mesophyll mRNA-injected oocytes was inhibited by ABA, indicating that the ABA signal transduction pathway observed in mesophyll cells was preserved in the frog oocytes. Co-injection of oocytes with guard cell protoplast mRNA and cRNA for KAT1, an inward K(+) channel expressed in guard cells, resulted in I(Kin) that was similarly inhibited by ABA. However, oocytes co-injected with mesophyll mRNA and KAT1 cRNA produced I(Kin) that was not inhibited by ABA. These results demonstrate that the mesophyll-encoded signaling mechanism could not substitute for the guard cell pathway. These findings indicate that mesophyll cells and guard cells use distinct and different receptor types and/or signal transduction pathways in ABA regulation of K(+) channels.

  20. Distinct abscisic acid signaling pathways for modulation of guard cell versus mesophyll cell potassium channels revealed by expression studies in Xenopus laevis oocytes.

    PubMed

    Sutton, F; Paul, S S; Wang, X Q; Assmann, S M

    2000-09-01

    Regulation of guard cell ion transport by abscisic acid (ABA) and in particular ABA inhibition of a guard cell inward K(+) current (I(Kin)) is well documented. However, little is known concerning ABA effects on ion transport in other plant cell types. Here we applied patch clamp techniques to mesophyll cell protoplasts of fava bean (Vicia faba cv Long Pod) plants and demonstrated ABA inhibition of an outward K(+) current (I(Kout)). When mesophyll cell protoplast mRNA (mesophyll mRNA) was expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes, I(Kout) was generated that displayed similar properties to I(Kout) observed from direct analysis of mesophyll cell protoplasts. I(Kout) expressed by mesophyll mRNA-injected oocytes was inhibited by ABA, indicating that the ABA signal transduction pathway observed in mesophyll cells was preserved in the frog oocytes. Co-injection of oocytes with guard cell protoplast mRNA and cRNA for KAT1, an inward K(+) channel expressed in guard cells, resulted in I(Kin) that was similarly inhibited by ABA. However, oocytes co-injected with mesophyll mRNA and KAT1 cRNA produced I(Kin) that was not inhibited by ABA. These results demonstrate that the mesophyll-encoded signaling mechanism could not substitute for the guard cell pathway. These findings indicate that mesophyll cells and guard cells use distinct and different receptor types and/or signal transduction pathways in ABA regulation of K(+) channels. PMID:10982437

  1. Effects of cytokines on potassium channels in renal tubular epithelia.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Kazuyoshi; Komagiri, You; Kubokawa, Manabu

    2012-02-01

    Renal tubular potassium (K(+)) channels play important roles in the formation of cell-negative potential, K(+) recycling, K(+) secretion, and cell volume regulation. In addition to these physiological roles, it was reported that changes in the activity of renal tubular K(+) channels were involved in exacerbation of renal cell injury during ischemia and endotoxemia. Because ischemia and endotoxemia stimulate production of cytokines in immune cells and renal tubular cells, it is possible that cytokines would affect K(+) channel activity. Although the regulatory mechanisms of renal tubular K(+) channels have extensively been studied, little information is available about the effects of cytokines on these K(+) channels. The first report was that tumor necrosis factor acutely stimulated the single channel activity of the 70 pS K(+) channel in the rat thick ascending limb through activation of tyrosine phosphatase. Recently, it was also reported that interferon-γ (IFN-γ) and interleukin-1β (IL-1β) modulated the activity of the 40 pS K(+) channel in cultured human proximal tubule cells. IFN-γ exhibited a delayed suppression and an acute stimulation of K(+) channel activity, whereas IL-1β acutely suppressed the channel activity. Furthermore, these cytokines suppressed gene expression of the renal outer medullary potassium channel. The renal tubular K(+) channels are functionally coupled to the coexisting transporters. Therefore, the effects of cytokines on renal tubular transporter activity should also be taken into account, when interpreting their effects on K(+) channel activity. PMID:22042037

  2. Genomic organization and chromosomal localization of the murine 2 P domain potassium channel gene Kcnk8: conservation of gene structure in 2 P domain potassium channels.

    PubMed

    Bockenhauer, D; Nimmakayalu, M A; Ward, D C; Goldstein, S A; Gallagher, P G

    2000-12-31

    A 2 P domain potassium channel expressed in eye, lung, and stomach, Kcnk8, has recently been identified. To initiate further biochemical and genetic studies of this channel, we assembled the murine Kcnk8 cDNA sequence, characterized the genomic structure of the Kcnk8 gene, determined its chromosomal localization, and analyzed its activity in a Xenopus laevis oocyte expression system. The composite cDNA has an open reading frame of 1029 bp and encodes a protein of 343 amino acids with a predicted molecular mass of 36 kDa. Structure analyses predict 2 P domains and four potential transmembrane helices with a potential single EF-hand motif and four potential SH3-binding motifs in the COOH-terminus. Cloning of the Kcnk8 chromosomal gene revealed that it is composed of three exons distributed over 4 kb of genomic DNA. Genome database searching revealed that one of the intron/exon boundaries identified in Kcnk8 is present in other mammalian 2 P domain potassium channels genes and many C. elegans 2P domain potassium channel genes, revealing evolutionary conservation of gene structure. Using fluorescence in situ hybridization, the murine Kcnk8 gene was mapped to chromosome 19, 2B, the locus of the murine dancer phenotype, and syntenic to 11q11-11q13, the location of the human homologue. No significant currents were generated in a Xenopus laevis oocyte expression system using the composite Kcnk8 cDNA sequence, suggesting, like many potassium channels, additional channel subunits, modulator substances, or cellular chaperones are required for channel function.

  3. A family of putative potassium channel genes in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Butler, A; Wei, A G; Baker, K; Salkoff, L

    1989-02-17

    Mutant flies in which the gene coding for the Shaker potassium channel is deleted still have potassium currents similar to those coded by the Shaker gene. This suggests the presence of a family of Shaker-like genes in Drosophila. By using a Shaker complementary DNA probe and low-stringency hybridization, three additional family members have now been isolated, Shab, Shaw, and Shal. The Shaker family genes are not clustered in the genome. The deduced proteins of Shab, Shaw, and Shal have high homology to the Shaker protein; the sequence identity of the integral membrane portions is greater than 50 percent. These genes are organized similarly to Shaker in that only a single homology domain containing six presumed membrane-spanning segments common to all voltage-gated ion channels is coded by each messenger RNA. Thus, potassium channel diversity could result from an extended gene family, as well as from alternate splicing of the Shaker primary transcript.

  4. Pore size matters for potassium channel conductance.

    PubMed

    Naranjo, David; Moldenhauer, Hans; Pincuntureo, Matías; Díaz-Franulic, Ignacio

    2016-10-01

    Ion channels are membrane proteins that mediate efficient ion transport across the hydrophobic core of cell membranes, an unlikely process in their absence. K(+) channels discriminate K(+) over cations with similar radii with extraordinary selectivity and display a wide diversity of ion transport rates, covering differences of two orders of magnitude in unitary conductance. The pore domains of large- and small-conductance K(+) channels share a general architectural design comprising a conserved narrow selectivity filter, which forms intimate interactions with permeant ions, flanked by two wider vestibules toward the internal and external openings. In large-conductance K(+) channels, the inner vestibule is wide, whereas in small-conductance channels it is narrow. Here we raise the idea that the physical dimensions of the hydrophobic internal vestibule limit ion transport in K(+) channels, accounting for their diversity in unitary conductance.

  5. Slack, Slick, and Sodium-Activated Potassium Channels

    PubMed Central

    Kaczmarek, Leonard K.

    2013-01-01

    The Slack and Slick genes encode potassium channels that are very widely expressed in the central nervous system. These channels are activated by elevations in intracellular sodium, such as those that occur during trains of one or more action potentials, or following activation of nonselective cationic neurotransmitter receptors such as AMPA receptors. This review covers the cellular and molecular properties of Slack and Slick channels and compares them with findings on the properties of sodium-activated potassium currents (termed KNa currents) in native neurons. Human mutations in Slack channels produce extremely severe defects in learning and development, suggesting that KNa channels play a central role in neuronal plasticity and intellectual function. PMID:24319675

  6. State-dependent inactivation of the Kv3 potassium channel.

    PubMed Central

    Marom, S; Levitan, I B

    1994-01-01

    Inactivation of Kv3 (Kv1.3) delayed rectifier potassium channels was studied in the Xenopus oocyte expression system. These channels inactivate slowly during a long depolarizing pulse. In addition, inactivation accumulates in response to a series of short depolarizing pulses (cumulative inactivation), although no significant inactivation occurs within each short pulse. The extent of cumulative inactivation does not depend on the voltage during the depolarizing pulse, but it does vary in a biphasic manner as a function of the interpulse duration. Furthermore, the rate of cumulative inactivation is influenced by changing the rate of deactivation. These data are consistent with a model in which Kv3 channel inactivation is a state-dependent and voltage-independent process. Macroscopic and single channel experiments indicate that inactivation can occur from a closed (silent) state before channel opening. That is, channels need not open to inactivate. The transition that leads to the inactivated state from the silent state is, in fact, severalfold faster then the observed inactivation of current during long depolarizing pulses. Long pulse-induced inactivation appears to be slow, because its rate is limited by the probability that channels are in the open state, rather than in the silent state from which they can inactivate. External potassium and external calcium ions alter the rates of cumulative and long pulse-induced inactivation, suggesting that antagonistic potassium and calcium binding steps are involved in the normal gating of the channel. PMID:7948675

  7. Effects of fractal gating of potassium channels on neuronal behaviours

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, De-Jiang; Zeng, Shang-You; Zhang, Zheng-Zhen

    2010-10-01

    The classical model of voltage-gated ion channels assumes that according to a Markov process ion channels switch among a small number of states without memory, but a bunch of experimental papers show that some ion channels exhibit significant memory effects, and this memory effects can take the form of kinetic rate constant that is fractal. Obviously the gating character of ion channels will affect generation and propagation of action potentials, furthermore, affect generation, coding and propagation of neural information. However, there is little previous research on this series of interesting issues. This paper investigates effects of fractal gating of potassium channel subunits switching from closed state to open state on neuronal behaviours. The obtained results show that fractal gating of potassium channel subunits switching from closed state to open state has important effects on neuronal behaviours, increases excitability, rest potential and spiking frequency of the neuronal membrane, and decreases threshold voltage and threshold injected current of the neuronal membrane. So fractal gating of potassium channel subunits switching from closed state to open state can improve the sensitivity of the neuronal membrane, and enlarge the encoded strength of neural information.

  8. Ion permeation mechanism of the potassium channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Åqvist, Johan; Luzhkov, Victor

    2000-04-01

    Ion-selective channels enable the specific permeation of ions through cell membranes and provide the basis of several important biological functions; for example, electric signalling in the nervous system. Although a large amount of electrophysiological data is available, the molecular mechanisms by which these channels can mediate ion transport remain a significant unsolved problem. With the recently determined crystal structure of the representative K+ channel (KcsA) from Streptomyces lividans, it becomes possible to examine ion conduction pathways on a microscopic level. K+ channels utilize multi-ion conduction mechanisms, and the three-dimensional structure also shows several ions present in the channel. Here we report results from molecular dynamics free energy perturbation calculations that both establish the nature of the multiple ion conduction mechanism and yield the correct ion selectivity of the channel. By evaluating the energetics of all relevant occupancy states of the selectivity filter, we find that the favoured conduction pathway involves transitions only between two main states with a free difference of about 5 kcal mol-1. Other putative permeation pathways can be excluded because they would involve states that are too high in energy.

  9. Magnetic and electric fields across sodium and potassium channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soares, Marília A. G.; Cruz, Frederico A. O.; Silva, Dilson

    2015-12-01

    We determined the magnetic field around sodium and potassium ionic channels based on a physico-mathematical model that took into account charges in the surface bilayer. For the numerical simulation, we applied the finite element method. Results show that each channel produces its specific and individual response to the ion transport, according to its individual intrinsic properties. The existence of a number of active Na+-channels in a given membrane region seems not to interfere directly in the functioning of K+-channel located among them, and vice-versa.

  10. Potassium channels in cell cycle and cell proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Urrego, Diana; Tomczak, Adam P.; Zahed, Farrah; Stühmer, Walter; Pardo, Luis A.

    2014-01-01

    Normal cell-cycle progression is a crucial task for every multicellular organism, as it determines body size and shape, tissue renewal and senescence, and is also crucial for reproduction. On the other hand, dysregulation of the cell-cycle progression leading to uncontrolled cell proliferation is the hallmark of cancer. Therefore, it is not surprising that it is a tightly regulated process, with multifaceted and very complex control mechanisms. It is now well established that one of those mechanisms relies on ion channels, and in many cases specifically on potassium channels. Here, we summarize the possible mechanisms underlying the importance of potassium channels in cell-cycle control and briefly review some of the identified channels that illustrate the multiple ways in which this group of proteins can influence cell proliferation and modulate cell-cycle progression. PMID:24493742

  11. Potassium Channels and Human Epileptic Phenotypes: An Updated Overview

    PubMed Central

    Villa, Chiara; Combi, Romina

    2016-01-01

    Potassium (K+) channels are expressed in almost every cells and are ubiquitous in neuronal and glial cell membranes. These channels have been implicated in different disorders, in particular in epilepsy. K+ channel diversity depends on the presence in the human genome of a large number of genes either encoding pore-forming or accessory subunits. More than 80 genes encoding the K+ channels were cloned and they represent the largest group of ion channels regulating the electrical activity of cells in different tissues, including the brain. It is therefore not surprising that mutations in these genes lead to K+ channels dysfunctions linked to inherited epilepsy in humans and non-human model animals. This article reviews genetic and molecular progresses in exploring the pathogenesis of different human epilepsies, with special emphasis on the role of K+ channels in monogenic forms. PMID:27064559

  12. EXPRESSION AND DISTRIBUTION OF Kv4 POTASSIUM CHANNEL SUBUNITS AND POTASSIUM CHANNEL INTERACTING PROTEINS IN SUBPOPULATIONS OF INTERNEURONS IN THE BASOLATERAL AMYGDALA

    PubMed Central

    DABROWSKA, J.; RAINNIE, D. G.

    2010-01-01

    Kv4 potassium channel α subunits, Kv4.1, Kv4.2, and Kv4.3, determine some of the fundamental physiological properties of neurons in the CNS. Kv4 subunits are associated with auxiliary β-subunits, such as the potassium channel interacting proteins (KChIP1 – 4), which are thought to regulate the trafficking and gating of native Kv4 potassium channels. Intriguingly, KChIP1 is thought to show cell type-selective expression in GABA-ergic inhibitory interneurons, while other β-subunits (KChIP2–4) are associated with principal glutamatergic neurons. However, nothing is known about the expression of Kv4 family α- and β-subunits in specific interneurons populations in the BLA. Here, we have used immunofluorescence, co-immunoprecipitation, and Western Blotting to determine the relative expression of KChIP1 in the different interneuron subtypes within the BLA, and its co-localization with one or more of the Kv4 α subunits. We show that all three α-subunits of Kv4 potassium channel are found in rat BLA neurons, and that the immuno-reactivity of KChIP1 closely resembles that of Kv4.3. Indeed, Kv4.3 showed almost complete co-localization with KChIP1 in the soma and dendrites of a distinct subpopulation of BLA neurons. Dual-immunofluorescence studies revealed this to be in BLA interneurons immunoreactive for parvalbumin, cholecystokin-8, and somatostatin. Finally, co-immunoprecipitation studies showed that KChIP1 was associated with all three Kv4 α subunits. Together our results suggest that KChIP1 is selectively expressed in BLA interneurons where it may function to regulate the activity of A-type potassium channels. Hence, KChIP1 might be considered as a cell type-specific regulator of GABAergic inhibitory circuits in the BLA. PMID:20849929

  13. SUMOylation and Potassium Channels: Links to Epilepsy and Sudden Death.

    PubMed

    Wu, Hongmei; Chen, Xu; Cheng, Jinke; Qi, Yitao

    2016-01-01

    Neuronal potassium ion channels play an essential role in the generation of the action potential and excitability of neurons. The dysfunction of ion channel subunits can cause channelopathies, which are associated in some cases with sudden unexplained death in epilepsy SUDEP. The physiological roles of neuronal ion channels have been largely determined, but little is known about the molecular mechanisms underlying neurological channelopathies, especially the determinants of the channels' regulation. SUMO (small ubiquitin-like modifier) proteins covalently conjugate lysine residues in a large number of target proteins and modify their functions. SUMO modification (SUMOylation) has emerged as an important regulatory mechanism for protein stability, function, subcellular localization, and protein-protein interactions. Since SUMO was discovered almost 20 years ago, the biological contribution of SUMOylation has not fully understood. It is until recently that the physiological impacts of SUMOylation on the regulation of neuronal potassium ion channels have been investigated. It is well established that SUMOylation controls many aspects of nuclear function, but it is now clear that it is also a key determinant in the function of potassium channels, and SUMOylation has also been implicated in a wide range of channelopathies, including epilepsy and sudden death. PMID:26920693

  14. Mechanisms of Activation of Voltage-Gated Potassium Channels

    PubMed Central

    Grizel, A. V.; Glukhov, G. S.; Sokolova, O. S.

    2014-01-01

    Voltage-gated potassium ion channels (Kv) play an important role in a variety of cellular processes, including the functioning of excitable cells, regulation of apoptosis, cell growth and differentiation, the release of neurotransmitters and hormones, maintenance of cardiac activity, etc. Failure in the functioning of Kv channels leads to severe genetic disorders and the development of tumors, including malignant ones. Understanding the mechanisms underlying Kv channels functioning is a key factor in determining the cause of the diseases associated with mutations in the channels, and in the search for new drugs. The mechanism of activation of the channels is a topic of ongoing debate, and a consensus on the issue has not yet been reached. This review discusses the key stages in studying the mechanisms of functioning of Kv channels and describes the basic models of their activation known to date. PMID:25558391

  15. Oxidative Stress and Maxi Calcium-Activated Potassium (BK) Channels

    PubMed Central

    Hermann, Anton; Sitdikova, Guzel F.; Weiger, Thomas M.

    2015-01-01

    All cells contain ion channels in their outer (plasma) and inner (organelle) membranes. Ion channels, similar to other proteins, are targets of oxidative impact, which modulates ion fluxes across membranes. Subsequently, these ion currents affect electrical excitability, such as action potential discharge (in neurons, muscle, and receptor cells), alteration of the membrane resting potential, synaptic transmission, hormone secretion, muscle contraction or coordination of the cell cycle. In this chapter we summarize effects of oxidative stress and redox mechanisms on some ion channels, in particular on maxi calcium-activated potassium (BK) channels which play an outstanding role in a plethora of physiological and pathophysiological functions in almost all cells and tissues. We first elaborate on some general features of ion channel structure and function and then summarize effects of oxidative alterations of ion channels and their functional consequences. PMID:26287261

  16. Neuronal and Cardiovascular Potassium Channels as Therapeutic Drug Targets

    PubMed Central

    Humphries, Edward S. A.

    2015-01-01

    Potassium (K+) channels, with their diversity, often tissue-defined distribution, and critical role in controlling cellular excitability, have long held promise of being important drug targets for the treatment of dysrhythmias in the heart and abnormal neuronal activity within the brain. With the exception of drugs that target one particular class, ATP-sensitive K+ (KATP) channels, very few selective K+ channel activators or inhibitors are currently licensed for clinical use in cardiovascular and neurological disease. Here we review what a range of human genetic disorders have told us about the role of specific K+ channel subunits, explore the potential of activators and inhibitors of specific channel populations as a therapeutic strategy, and discuss possible reasons for the difficulty in designing clinically relevant K+ channel modulators. PMID:26303307

  17. Hydrogen Sulfide as Endothelial Derived Hyperpolarizing Factor Sulfhydrates Potassium Channels

    PubMed Central

    Mustafa, Asif K.; Sikka, Gautam; Gazi, Sadia K.; Steppan, Jochen; Jung, Sung M.; Bhunia, Anil K.; Barodka, Viachaslau M.; Gazi, Farah K.; Barrow, Roxanne K.; Wang, Rui; Amzel, L. Mario; Berkowitz, Dan E.; Snyder, Solomon H.

    2011-01-01

    Rationale Nitric oxide, the classic endothelial derived relaxing factor (EDRF), acts via cyclic GMP and calcium without notably affecting membrane potential. A major component of EDRF activity derives from hyperpolarization and is termed endothelial derived hyperpolarizing factor (EDHF). Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is a prominent EDRF, since mice lacking its biosynthetic enzyme, cystathionine γ-lyase (CSE), display pronounced hypertension with deficient vasorelaxant responses to acetylcholine. Objective The purpose of this study is to determine if H2S is a major physiologic EDHF. Methods and Results We now show that H2S is a major EDHF, as in blood vessels of CSE deleted mice hyperpolarization is virtually abolished. H2S acts by covalently modifying (sulfhydrating) the ATP-sensitive potassium channel, as mutating the site of sulfhydration prevents H2S-elicited hyperpolarization. The endothelial intermediate conductance (IKCa) and small conductance (SKCa) potassium channels mediate in part the effects of H2S, as selective IKCa and SKCa channel inhibitors, charybdotoxin and apamin, inhibit glibenclamide insensitive H2S induced vasorelaxation. Conclusions H2S is a major EDHF that causes vascular endothelial and smooth muscle cell hyperpolarization and vasorelaxation by activating the ATP-sensitive, intermediate conductance and small conductance potassium channels through cysteine S-sulfhydration. As EDHF activity is a principal determinant of vasorelaxation in numerous vascular beds, drugs influencing H2S biosynthesis offer therapeutic potential. PMID:21980127

  18. Targeting a mitochondrial potassium channel to fight cancer.

    PubMed

    Leanza, Luigi; Venturini, Elisa; Kadow, Stephanie; Carpinteiro, Alexander; Gulbins, Erich; Becker, Katrin Anne

    2015-07-01

    Although chemotherapy is able to cure many patients with malignancies, it still also often fails. Therefore, novel approaches and targets for chemotherapeutic treatment of malignancies are urgently required. Recent studies demonstrated the expression of several potassium channels in the inner mitochondrial membrane. Among them the voltage gated potassium channel Kv1.3 and the big-potassium (BK) channel were shown to directly function in cell death by serving as target for pro-apoptotic Bax and Bak proteins. Here, we discuss the role of mitochondrial potassium channel Kv1.3 (mitoKv1.3) in cell death and its potential function in treatment of solid tumors, leukemia and lymphoma. Bax and Bak inhibit mitoKv1.3 by directly binding into the pore of the channel, by a toxin-like mechanism. Inhibition of mitoKv1.3 results in an initial hyperpolarization of the inner mitochondrial membrane that triggers the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). ROS in turn induce a release of cytochrome c from the cristae of the inner mitochondrial membrane and an activation of the permeability transition pore, resulting in opening of the intrinsic apoptotic cell death. Since mitoKv1.3 functions downstream of pro-apoptotic Bax and Bak, compounds that directly inhibit mitoKv1.3 may serve as a new class of drugs for treatment of tumors, even with an altered expression of either pro- or anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 protein family members. This was successfully proven by the in vivo treatment of mouse melanoma and ex vivo human chronic leukemia B cells with inhibitors of mitoKv1.3.

  19. Optogenetics. Engineering of a light-gated potassium channel.

    PubMed

    Cosentino, Cristian; Alberio, Laura; Gazzarrini, Sabrina; Aquila, Marco; Romano, Edoardo; Cermenati, Solei; Zuccolini, Paolo; Petersen, Jan; Beltrame, Monica; Van Etten, James L; Christie, John M; Thiel, Gerhard; Moroni, Anna

    2015-05-01

    The present palette of opsin-based optogenetic tools lacks a light-gated potassium (K(+)) channel desirable for silencing of excitable cells. Here, we describe the construction of a blue-light-induced K(+) channel 1 (BLINK1) engineered by fusing the plant LOV2-Jα photosensory module to the small viral K(+) channel Kcv. BLINK1 exhibits biophysical features of Kcv, including K(+) selectivity and high single-channel conductance but reversibly photoactivates in blue light. Opening of BLINK1 channels hyperpolarizes the cell to the K(+) equilibrium potential. Ectopic expression of BLINK1 reversibly inhibits the escape response in light-exposed zebrafish larvae. BLINK1 therefore provides a single-component optogenetic tool that can establish prolonged, physiological hyperpolarization of cells at low light intensities.

  20. Plasmodium falciparum: growth response to potassium channel blocking compounds.

    PubMed

    Waller, Karena L; Kim, Kami; McDonald, Thomas V

    2008-11-01

    Potassium channels are essential for cell survival and regulate the cell membrane potential and electrochemical gradient. During its lifecycle, Plasmodium falciparum parasites must rapidly adapt to dramatically variant ionic conditions within the mosquito mid-gut, the hepatocyte and red blood cell (RBC) cytosols, and the human circulatory system. To probe the participation of K(+) channels in parasite viability, growth response assays were performed in which asexual stage P. falciparum parasites were cultured in the presence of various Ca(2+)-activated K(+) channel blocking compounds. These data describe the novel anti-malarial effects of bicuculline methiodide and tubocurarine chloride and the novel lack of effect of apamine and verruculogen. Taken together, the data herein imply the presence of K(+) channels, or other parasite-specific targets, in P. falciparum-infected RBCs that are sensitive to blockade with Ca(2+)-activated K(+) channel blocking compounds. PMID:18703053

  1. Pharmacodynamics of potassium channel openers in cultured neuronal networks.

    PubMed

    Wu, Calvin; V Gopal, Kamakshi; Lukas, Thomas J; Gross, Guenter W; Moore, Ernest J

    2014-06-01

    A novel class of drugs - potassium (K(+)) channel openers or activators - has recently been shown to cause anticonvulsive and neuroprotective effects by activating hyperpolarizing K(+) currents, and therefore, may show efficacy for treating tinnitus. This study presents measurements of the modulatory effects of four K(+) channel openers on the spontaneous activity and action potential waveforms of neuronal networks. The networks were derived from mouse embryonic auditory cortices and grown on microelectrode arrays. Pentylenetetrazol was used to create hyperactivity states in the neuronal networks as a first approximation for mimicking tinnitus or tinnitus-like activity. We then compared the pharmacodynamics of the four channel activators, retigabine and flupirtine (voltage-gated K(+) channel KV7 activators), NS1619 and isopimaric acid ("big potassium" BK channel activators). The EC50 of retigabine, flupirtine, NS1619, and isopimaric acid were 8.0, 4.0, 5.8, and 7.8µM, respectively. The reduction of hyperactivity compared to the reference activity was significant. The present results highlight the notion of re-purposing the K(+) channel activators for reducing hyperactivity of spontaneously active auditory networks, serving as a platform for these drugs to show efficacy toward target identification, prevention, as well as treatment of tinnitus.

  2. Role of Calcium-activated Potassium Channels in Atrial Fibrillation Pathophysiology and Therapy.

    PubMed

    Diness, Jonas G; Bentzen, Bo H; Sørensen, Ulrik S; Grunnet, Morten

    2015-11-01

    Small-conductance Ca(2+)-activated potassium (SK) channels are relative newcomers within the field of cardiac electrophysiology. In recent years, an increased focus has been given to these channels because they might constitute a relatively atrial-selective target. This review will give a general introduction to SK channels followed by their proposed function in the heart under normal and pathophysiological conditions. It is revealed how antiarrhythmic effects can be obtained by SK channel inhibition in a number of species in situations of atrial fibrillation. On the contrary, the beneficial effects of SK channel inhibition in situations of heart failure are questionable and still needs investigation. The understanding of cardiac SK channels is rapidly increasing these years, and it is hoped that this will clarify whether SK channel inhibition has potential as a new anti-atrial fibrillation principle. PMID:25830485

  3. Role of Calcium-activated Potassium Channels in Atrial Fibrillation Pathophysiology and Therapy.

    PubMed

    Diness, Jonas G; Bentzen, Bo H; Sørensen, Ulrik S; Grunnet, Morten

    2015-11-01

    Small-conductance Ca(2+)-activated potassium (SK) channels are relative newcomers within the field of cardiac electrophysiology. In recent years, an increased focus has been given to these channels because they might constitute a relatively atrial-selective target. This review will give a general introduction to SK channels followed by their proposed function in the heart under normal and pathophysiological conditions. It is revealed how antiarrhythmic effects can be obtained by SK channel inhibition in a number of species in situations of atrial fibrillation. On the contrary, the beneficial effects of SK channel inhibition in situations of heart failure are questionable and still needs investigation. The understanding of cardiac SK channels is rapidly increasing these years, and it is hoped that this will clarify whether SK channel inhibition has potential as a new anti-atrial fibrillation principle.

  4. Two-pore Domain Potassium Channels in Astrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Ryoo, Kanghyun

    2016-01-01

    Two-pore domain potassium (K2P) channels have a distinct structure and channel properties, and are involved in a background K+ current. The 15 members of the K2P channels are identified and classified into six subfamilies on the basis of their sequence similarities. The activity of the channels is dynamically regulated by various physical, chemical, and biological effectors. The channels are expressed in a wide variety of tissues in mammals in an isoform specific manner, and play various roles in many physiological and pathophysiological conditions. To function as channels, the K2P channels form dimers, and some isoforms form heterodimers that provide diversity in channel properties. In the brain, TWIK1, TREK1, TREK2, TRAAK, TASK1, and TASK3 are predominantly expressed in various regions, including the cerebral cortex, dentate gyrus, CA1-CA3, and granular layer of the cerebellum. TWIK1, TREK1, and TASK1 are highly expressed in astrocytes, where they play specific cellular roles. Astrocytes keep leak K+ conductance, called the passive conductance, which mainly involves TWIK1-TREK1 heterodimeric channel. TWIK1 and TREK1 also mediate glutamate release from astrocytes in an exocytosis-independent manner. The expression of TREK1 and TREK2 in astrocytes increases under ischemic conditions, that enhance neuroprotection from ischemia. Accumulated evidence has indicated that astrocytes, together with neurons, are involved in brain function, with the K2P channels playing critical role in these astrocytes. PMID:27790056

  5. Proinflammatory Cytokines and Potassium Channels in the Kidney

    PubMed Central

    Nakamura, Kazuyoshi; Hayashi, Hikaru; Kubokawa, Manabu

    2015-01-01

    Proinflammatory cytokines affect several cell functions via receptor-mediated processes. In the kidney, functions of transporters and ion channels along the nephron are also affected by some cytokines. Among these, alteration of activity of potassium ion (K+) channels induces changes in transepithelial transport of solutes and water in the kidney, since K+ channels in tubule cells are indispensable for formation of membrane potential which serves as a driving force for the transepithelial transport. Altered K+ channel activity may be involved in renal cell dysfunction during inflammation. Although little information was available regarding the effects of proinflammatory cytokines on renal K+ channels, reports have emerged during the last decade. In human proximal tubule cells, interferon-γ showed a time-dependent biphasic effect on a 40 pS K+ channel, that is, delayed suppression and acute stimulation, and interleukin-1β acutely suppressed the channel activity. Transforming growth factor-β1 activated KCa3.1 K+ channel in immortalized human proximal tubule cells, which would be involved in the pathogenesis of renal fibrosis. This review discusses the effects of proinflammatory cytokines on renal K+ channels and the causal relationship between the cytokine-induced changes in K+ channel activity and renal dysfunction. PMID:26508816

  6. Voltage-gated Potassium Channels as Therapeutic Drug Targets

    PubMed Central

    Wulff, Heike; Castle, Neil A.; Pardo, Luis A.

    2009-01-01

    The human genome contains 40 voltage-gated potassium channels (KV) which are involved in diverse physiological processes ranging from repolarization of neuronal or cardiac action potentials, over regulating calcium signaling and cell volume, to driving cellular proliferation and migration. KV channels offer tremendous opportunities for the development of new drugs for cancer, autoimmune diseases and metabolic, neurological and cardiovascular disorders. This review first discusses pharmacological strategies for targeting KV channels with venom peptides, antibodies and small molecules and then highlights recent progress in the preclinical and clinical development of drugs targeting KV1.x, KV7.x (KCNQ), KV10.1 (EAG1) and KV11.1 (hERG) channels. PMID:19949402

  7. Differential distribution of the sodium‐activated potassium channels slick and slack in mouse brain

    PubMed Central

    Knaus, Hans‐Günther; Schwarzer, Christoph

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The sodium‐activated potassium channels Slick (Slo2.1, KCNT2) and Slack (Slo2.2, KCNT1) are high‐conductance potassium channels of the Slo family. In neurons, Slick and Slack channels are involved in the generation of slow afterhyperpolarization, in the regulation of firing patterns, and in setting and stabilizing the resting membrane potential. The distribution and subcellular localization of Slick and Slack channels in the mouse brain have not yet been established in detail. The present study addresses this issue through in situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry. Both channels were widely distributed and exhibited distinct distribution patterns. However, in some brain regions, their expression overlapped. Intense Slick channel immunoreactivity was observed in processes, varicosities, and neuronal cell bodies of the olfactory bulb, granular zones of cortical regions, hippocampus, amygdala, lateral septal nuclei, certain hypothalamic and midbrain nuclei, and several regions of the brainstem. The Slack channel showed primarily a diffuse immunostaining pattern, and labeling of cell somata and processes was observed only occasionally. The highest Slack channel expression was detected in the olfactory bulb, lateral septal nuclei, basal ganglia, and distinct areas of the midbrain, brainstem, and cerebellar cortex. In addition, comparing our data obtained from mouse brain with a previously published study on rat brain revealed some differences in the expression and distribution of Slick and Slack channels in these species. J. Comp. Neurol. 524:2093–2116, 2016. © 2015 The Authors The Journal of Comparative Neurology Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26587966

  8. Potassium Versus Sodium Selectivity in Monovalent Ion Channel Selectivity Filters.

    PubMed

    Lim, Carmay; Dudev, Todor

    2016-01-01

    Transport of Na(+) and K(+) ions across the cell membrane is carried out by specialized pore-forming ion channel proteins, which exert tight control on electrical signals in cells by regulating the inward/outward flow of the respective cation. As Na(+) and K(+) ions are both present in the body fluids, their respective ion channels should discriminate with high fidelity between the two competing metal ions, conducting the native cation while rejecting its monovalent contender (and other ions present in the cellular/extracellular milieu). Indeed, monovalent ion channels are characterized by remarkable metal selectivity. This striking ion selectivity of monovalent ion channels is astonishing in view of the close similarity between Na(+) and K(+): both are spherical alkali cations with the same charge, analogous chemical and physical properties, and similar ionic radii. The monovalent ion channel selectivity filters (SFs), which dictate the selectivity of the channel, differ in oligomericity, composition, overall charge, pore size, and solvent accessibility. This diversity of SFs raises the following intriguing questions: (1) What factors govern the metal competition in these SFs? (2) Which of these factors are exploited in achieving K(+) or Na(+) selectivity in the different types of monovalent channel SFs? These questions are addressed herein by summarizing results from recent studies. The results show that over billions of years of evolution, the SFs of potassium and sodium ion channels have adapted to the specific physicochemical properties of the cognate ion, using various strategies to enable them to efficiently select the native ion among its contenders.

  9. Chloride and potassium channels in cystic fibrosis airway epithelia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welsh, Michael J.; Liedtke, Carole M.

    1986-07-01

    Cystic fibrosis, the most common lethal genetic disease in Caucasians, is characterized by a decreased permeability in sweat gland duct and airway epithelia. In sweat duct epithelium, a decreased Cl- permeability accounts for the abnormally increased salt content of sweat1. In airway epithelia a decreased Cl- permeability, and possibly increased sodium absorption, may account for the abnormal respiratory tract fluid2,3. The Cl- impermeability has been localized to the apical membrane of cystic fibrosis airway epithelial cells4. The finding that hormonally regulated Cl- channels make the apical membrane Cl- permeable in normal airway epithelial cells5 suggested abnormal Cl- channel function in cystic fibrosis. Here we report that excised, cell-free patches of membrane from cystic fibrosis epithelial cells contain Cl- channels that have the same conductive properties as Cl- channels from normal cells. However, Cl- channels from cystic fibrosis cells did not open when they were attached to the cell. These findings suggest defective regulation of Cl- channels in cystic fibrosis epithelia; to begin to address this issue, we performed two studies. First, we found that isoprenaline, which stimulates Cl- secretion, increases cellular levels of cyclic AMP in a similar manner in cystic fibrosis and non-cystic fibrosis epithelial cells. Second, we show that adrenergic agonists open calcium-activated potassium channels, indirectly suggesting that calcium-dependent stimulus-response coupling is intact in cystic fibrosis. These data suggest defective regulation of Cl- channels at a site distal to cAMP accumulation.

  10. Analysis and functional implications of phosphorylation of neuronal voltage-gated potassium channels

    PubMed Central

    Cerda, Oscar; Trimmer, James S.

    2012-01-01

    Phosphorylation is the most common and abundant posttranslational modification to eukaryotic proteins, regulating a plethora of dynamic cellular processes. Here, we review and discuss recent advances in our knowledge of the breadth and importance of reversible phosphorylation in regulating the expression, localization and function of mammalian neuronal voltage-gated potassium (Kv) channels, key regulators of neuronal function. We highlight the role of modern mass spectrometric techniques and phosphospecific antibodies that reveal the extent and nature of phosphorylation at specific sites in Kv channels. We also emphasize the role of reversible phosphorylation in dynamically regulating diverse aspects of Kv channel biology. Finally, we discuss as important future directions the determination of the mechanistic basis for how altering phosphorylation state affects Kv channel expression, localization and function, the nature of macromolecular signaling complexes containing Kv channels and enzymes regulating their phosphorylation state, and the specific role of Kv channel phosphorylation in regulating neuronal function during physiological and pathophysiological events. PMID:20600597

  11. Mechanism of Electromechanical Coupling in Voltage-Gated Potassium Channels

    PubMed Central

    Blunck, Rikard; Batulan, Zarah

    2012-01-01

    Voltage-gated ion channels play a central role in the generation of action potentials in the nervous system. They are selective for one type of ion – sodium, calcium, or potassium. Voltage-gated ion channels are composed of a central pore that allows ions to pass through the membrane and four peripheral voltage sensing domains that respond to changes in the membrane potential. Upon depolarization, voltage sensors in voltage-gated potassium channels (Kv) undergo conformational changes driven by positive charges in the S4 segment and aided by pairwise electrostatic interactions with the surrounding voltage sensor. Structure-function relations of Kv channels have been investigated in detail, and the resulting models on the movement of the voltage sensors now converge to a consensus; the S4 segment undergoes a combined movement of rotation, tilt, and vertical displacement in order to bring 3–4e+ each through the electric field focused in this region. Nevertheless, the mechanism by which the voltage sensor movement leads to pore opening, the electromechanical coupling, is still not fully understood. Thus, recently, electromechanical coupling in different Kv channels has been investigated with a multitude of techniques including electrophysiology, 3D crystal structures, fluorescence spectroscopy, and molecular dynamics simulations. Evidently, the S4–S5 linker, the covalent link between the voltage sensor and pore, plays a crucial role. The linker transfers the energy from the voltage sensor movement to the pore domain via an interaction with the S6 C-termini, which are pulled open during gating. In addition, other contact regions have been proposed. This review aims to provide (i) an in-depth comparison of the molecular mechanisms of electromechanical coupling in different Kv channels; (ii) insight as to how the voltage sensor and pore domain influence one another; and (iii) theoretical predictions on the movement of the cytosolic face of the Kv channels during

  12. Chaotic dynamics in cardiac aggregates induced by potassium channel block

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quail, Thomas; McVicar, Nevin; Aguilar, Martin; Kim, Min-Young; Hodge, Alex; Glass, Leon; Shrier, Alvin

    2012-09-01

    Chaotic rhythms in deterministic models can arise as a consequence of changes in model parameters. We carried out experimental studies in which we induced a variety of complex rhythms in aggregates of embryonic chick cardiac cells using E-4031 (1.0-2.5 μM), a drug that blocks the hERG potassium channel. Following the addition of the drug, the regular rhythm evolved to display a spectrum of complex dynamics: irregular rhythms, bursting oscillations, doublets, and accelerated rhythms. The interbeat intervals of the irregular rhythms can be described by one-dimensional return maps consistent with chaotic dynamics. A Hodgkin-Huxley-style cardiac ionic model captured the different types of complex dynamics following blockage of the hERG mediated potassium current.

  13. Solution structure of the potassium channel inhibitor agitoxin 2: caliper for probing channel geometry.

    PubMed Central

    Krezel, A. M.; Kasibhatla, C.; Hidalgo, P.; MacKinnon, R.; Wagner, G.

    1995-01-01

    The structure of the potassium channel blocker agitoxin 2 was solved by solution NMR methods. The structure consists of a triple-stranded antiparallel beta-sheet and a single helix covering one face of the beta-sheet. The cysteine side chains connecting the beta-sheet and the helix form the core of the molecule. One edge of the beta-sheet and the adjacent face of the helix form the interface with the Shaker K+ channel. The fold of agitoxin is homologous to the previously determined folds of scorpion venom toxins. However, agitoxin 2 differs significantly from the other channel blockers in the specificity of its interactions. This study was thus focused on a precise characterization of the surface residues at the face of the protein interacting with the Shaker K+ channel. The rigid toxin molecule can be used to estimate dimensions of the potassium channel. Surface-exposed residues, Arg24, Lys27, and Arg31 of the beta-sheet, have been identified from mutagenesis studies as functionally important for blocking the Shaker K+ channel. The sequential and spatial locations of Arg24 and Arg31 are not conserved among the homologous toxins. Knowledge on the details of the channel-binding sites of agitoxin 2 formed a basis for site-directed mutagenesis studies of the toxin and the K+ channel sequences. Observed interactions between mutated toxin and channel are being used to elucidate the channel structure and mechanisms of channel-toxin interactions. PMID:8520473

  14. Voltage-Dependent Gating of hERG Potassium Channels

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Yen May; Claydon, Tom W.

    2012-01-01

    The mechanisms by which voltage-gated channels sense changes in membrane voltage and energetically couple this with opening of the ion conducting pore has been the source of significant interest. In voltage-gated potassium (Kv) channels, much of our knowledge in this area comes from Shaker-type channels, for which voltage-dependent gating is quite rapid. In these channels, activation and deactivation are associated with rapid reconfiguration of the voltage-sensing domain unit that is electromechanically coupled, via the S4–S5 linker helix, to the rate-limiting opening of an intracellular pore gate. However, fast voltage-dependent gating kinetics are not typical of all Kv channels, such as Kv11.1 (human ether-à-go-go related gene, hERG), which activates and deactivates very slowly. Compared to Shaker channels, our understanding of the mechanisms underlying slow hERG gating is much poorer. Here, we present a comparative review of the structure–function relationships underlying activation and deactivation gating in Shaker and hERG channels, with a focus on the roles of the voltage-sensing domain and the S4–S5 linker that couples voltage sensor movements to the pore. Measurements of gating current kinetics and fluorimetric analysis of voltage sensor movement are consistent with models suggesting that the hERG activation pathway contains a voltage independent step, which limits voltage sensor transitions. Constraints upon hERG voltage sensor movement may result from loose packing of the S4 helices and additional intra-voltage sensor counter-charge interactions. More recent data suggest that key amino acid differences in the hERG voltage-sensing unit and S4–S5 linker, relative to fast activating Shaker-type Kv channels, may also contribute to the increased stability of the resting state of the voltage sensor. PMID:22586397

  15. Potassium channels keep mobile cells on the go.

    PubMed

    Schwab, Albrecht; Hanley, Peter; Fabian, Anke; Stock, Christian

    2008-08-01

    Cell motility is a prerequisite for the creation of new life, and it is required for maintaining the integrity of an organism. Under pathological conditions, "too much" motility may cause premature death. Studies over the past few years have revealed that ion channels are essential for cell motility. This review highlights the importance of K+ channels in regulating cell motility. PMID:18697995

  16. Potassium channels mediate killing by human natural killer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Schlichter, L.; Sidell N.; Hagiwara, S.

    1986-01-01

    Human natural killer (NK) cells in peripheral blood spontaneously recognize and kill a wide variety of target cells. It has been suggested that ion channels are involved in the killing process because there is a Ca-dependent stage and because killing by presensitized cytotoxic T lymphocytes, which in many respects resembles NK killing, is associated with changes in K and Na transport in the target cell. Using the whole-cell variation of the patch-clamp technique, the authors found a voltage-dependent potassium (K/sup +/) current in NK cells. The K/sup +/ current was reduced in a dose-dependent manner by the K-channel blockers 4-aminopyridine and quinidine and by the traditional Ca-channel blockers verapamil and Cd/sup 2 +/. They tested the effects of ion-channel blockers on killing of two commonly used target cell lines: K562, which is derived from a human myeloid leukemia, and U937, which is derived from a human histiocytic leukemia. Killing of K562 target cells, determined in a standard /sup 51/Cr-release assay, was inhibited in a dose-dependent manner by verapamil, quinidine, Cd/sup 2 +/, and 4-aminopyridine at concentrations comparable to those that blocked the K/sup +/ current in NK cells. In K562 target cells only a voltage-dependent Na= current was found and it was blocked by concentrations of tetrodotoxin that had no effect on killing. Killing of U937 target cells was also inhibited by the two ion-channel blockers tested, quinidine and verapamil. In this cell line only a small K/sup +/ current was found that was similar to the one in NK cells. The findings show that there are K channels in NK cells and that these channels play a necessary role in the killing process.

  17. Open-state models of a potassium channel.

    PubMed Central

    Biggin, Philip C; Sansom, Mark S P

    2002-01-01

    The structure of the bacterial potassium channel, KcsA, corresponds to the channel in a closed state. Two lines of evidence suggest that the channel must widen its intracellular mouth when in an open state: 1) internal block by a series of tetraalkylammonium ions and 2) spin labeling experiments. Thus it is known that the protein moves in this region, but it is unclear by how much and the mechanisms that are involved. To address this issue we have applied a novel approach to generate plausible open-state models of KcsA. The approach can be thought of as placing a balloon inside the channel and gradually inflating it. Only the protein sees the balloon, and so water is free to move in and out of the channel. The balloon is a van der Waals sphere whose parameters change by a small amount at each time step, an approach similar to methods used in free energy perturbation calculations. We show that positioning of this balloon at various positions along the pore axis generates similar open-state models, thus indicating that there may be a preferred pathway to an open state. We also show that the resulting structures from this process are conformationally unstable and need to undergo a relaxation process for up to 4 ns. We show that the channel can relax into a new state that has a larger pore radius at the region of the intracellular mouth. The resulting models may be useful in exploring models of the channel in the context of ion permeation and blocking agents. PMID:12324408

  18. Potential use of potassium efflux-deficient yeast for studying trafficking signals and potassium channel functions.

    PubMed

    Bernstein, Joshua D; Okamoto, Yukari; Kim, Minjee; Shikano, Sojin

    2013-01-01

    The activity of potassium (K(+)) channels critically depends on their density on the cell surface membrane, which is regulated by dynamic protein-protein interactions that often involve distinct trafficking signals on the cargo proteins. In this paper we explored the possibility of utilizing the Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain B31 for identification of the signal motifs that regulate surface expression of membrane proteins and for studying structure-function relationships of K(+) channels. B31 cells lack the K(+) efflux system and were reported to show overloaded K(+)-mediated growth inhibition in high K(+) media upon heterologous expression of a mammalian inwardly rectifying K(+) channel (Kir2.1). We show that while the expression of wild-type Kir2.1 channel inhibits the growth of B31 cells in high K(+) media, the human disease-causing mutations of Kir2.1 that abolish K(+) conduction (V302M) or surface trafficking (Δ314/315) fully restores the growth. The expression of two-pore-domain K(+) channel KCNK3 or KCNK9 also inhibited the growth of B31 in high K(+) media while C-terminal mutations that reduce their 14-3-3 protein-dependent cell surface trafficking restored the growth of B31. Finally, the expression of Kir2.1 channels that were C-terminally fused with known sequence motifs including ER retention/retrieval signals and an endocytosis signal allowed the growth of B31 in high K(+) media. These results demonstrate the potential of B31 yeast strain as a unique biological tool to screen the random peptide libraries for novel sequence signals that down-regulate surface expression of membrane proteins, as well as to systematically identify the structural determinants for cell surface trafficking and/or ion conductance of K(+) channels.

  19. Trypsin-Sensitive, Rapid Inactivation of a Calcium-Activated Potassium Channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solaro, Christopher R.; Lingle, Christopher J.

    1992-09-01

    Most calcium-activated potassium channels couple changes in intracellular calcium to membrane excitability by conducting a current with a probability that depends directly on submembrane calcium concentration. In rat adrenal chromaffin cells, however, a large conductance, voltage- and calcium-activated potassium channel (BK) undergoes rapid inactivation, suggesting that this channel has a physiological role different than that of other BK channels. The inactivation of the BK channel, like that of the voltage-gated Shaker B potassium channel, is removed by trypsin digestion and channels are blocked by the Shaker B amino-terminal inactivating domain. Thus, this BK channel shares functional and possibly structural homologies with other inactivating voltage-gated potassium channels.

  20. Vascular KCNQ (Kv7) potassium channels as common signaling intermediates and therapeutic targets in cerebral vasospasm.

    PubMed

    Mani, Bharath K; O'Dowd, James; Kumar, Lalit; Brueggemann, Lioubov I; Ross, Masey; Byron, Kenneth L

    2013-01-01

    Cerebral vasospasm after subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) is characterized by prolonged severe constriction of the basilar artery, which often leads to ischemic brain damage. Locally elevated concentrations of spasmogenic substances induce persistent depolarization of myocytes in the basilar artery, leading to continuous influx of calcium (Ca) through voltage-sensitive Ca channels and myocyte contraction. Potassium (K) channel openers may have therapeutic utility to oppose membrane depolarization, dilate the arteries, and reduce ischemia. Here, we examined the involvement of vascular Kv7 K channels in the pathogenesis of cerebral vasospasm and tested whether Kv7 channel openers are effective therapeutic agents in a rat model of SAH. Patch-clamp experiments revealed that 3 different spasmogens (serotonin, endothelin, and vasopressin) suppressed Kv7 currents and depolarized freshly isolated rat basilar artery myocytes. These effects were significantly reduced in the presence of a Kv7 channel opener, retigabine. Retigabine (10 μM) also significantly blocked L-type Ca channels, reducing peak inward currents by >50%. In the presence of a selective Kv7 channel blocker, XE991, the spasmogens did not produce additive constriction responses measured using pressure myography. Kv7 channel openers (retigabine or celecoxib) significantly attenuated basilar artery spasm in rats with experimentally induced SAH. In conclusion, we identify Kv7 channels as common targets of vasoconstrictor spasmogens and as candidates for therapeutic intervention for cerebral vasospasm.

  1. Vascular KCNQ (Kv7) potassium channels as common signaling intermediates and therapeutic targets in cerebral vasospasm

    PubMed Central

    Mani, Bharath K.; O'Dowd, James; Kumar, Lalit; Brueggemann, Lioubov I.; Ross, Masey; Byron, Kenneth L.

    2012-01-01

    Cerebral vasospasm following subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) is characterized by prolonged severe constriction of the basilar artery, which often leads to ischemic brain damage. Locally elevated concentrations of spasmogenic substances induce persistent depolarization of myocytes in the basilar artery, leading to continuous influx of calcium (Ca2+) through voltage-sensitive Ca2+ channels and myocyte contraction. Potassium (K+) channel openers may have therapeutic utility to oppose membrane depolarization, dilate the arteries, and reduce ischemia. Here, we examined the involvement of vascular Kv7 K+ channels in the pathogenesis of cerebral vasospasm and tested whether Kv7 channel openers are effective therapeutic agents in a rat model of SAH. Patch-clamp experiments revealed that three different spasmogens (serotonin, endothelin and vasopressin) suppressed Kv7 currents and depolarized freshly isolated rat basilar artery myocytes. These effects were significantly reduced in the presence of a Kv7 channel opener, retigabine. Retigabine (10 μmol/L) also significantly blocked L-type Ca2+ channels, reducing peak inward currents by >50%. In the presence of a selective Kv7 channel blocker, XE991, the spasmogens did not produce additive constriction responses measured using pressure myography. Kv7 channel openers (retigabine or celecoxib) significantly attenuated basilar artery spasm in rats with experimentally-induced SAH. In conclusion, we identify Kv7 channels as common targets of vasoconstrictor spasmogens and as candidates for therapeutic intervention for cerebral vasospasm. PMID:23107868

  2. Fear conditioning suppresses large-conductance calcium-activated potassium channels in lateral amygdala neurons.

    PubMed

    Sun, P; Zhang, Q; Zhang, Y; Wang, F; Wang, L; Yamamoto, R; Sugai, T; Kato, N

    2015-01-01

    It was previously shown that depression-like behavior is accompanied with suppression of the large-conductance calcium activated potassium (BK) channel in cingulate cortex pyramidal cells. To test whether BK channels are also involved in fear conditioning, we studied neuronal properties of amygdala principal cells in fear conditioned mice. After behavior, we made brain slices containing the amygdala, the structure critically relevant to fear memory. The resting membrane potential in lateral amygdala (LA) neurons obtained from fear conditioned mice (FC group) was more depolarized than in neurons from naïve controls. The frequencies of spikes evoked by current injections were higher in neurons from FC mice, demonstrating that excitability of LA neurons was elevated by fear conditioning. The depolarization in neurons from FC mice was shown to depend on BK channels by using the BK channel blocker charybdotoxin. Suppression of BK channels in LA neurons from the FC group was further confirmed on the basis of the spike width, since BK channels affect the descending phase of spikes. Spikes were broader in the FC group than those in the naïve control in a manner dependent on BK channels. Consistently, quantitative real-time PCR revealed a decreased expression of BK channel mRNA. The present findings suggest that emotional disorder manifested in the forms of fear conditioning is accompanied with BK channel suppression in the amygdala, the brain structure critical to this emotional disorder.

  3. Oxidative Modulation of Voltage-Gated Potassium Channels

    PubMed Central

    Sahoo, Nirakar; Hoshi, Toshinori

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Significance: Voltage-gated K+ channels are a large family of K+-selective ion channel protein complexes that open on membrane depolarization. These K+ channels are expressed in diverse tissues and their function is vital for numerous physiological processes, in particular of neurons and muscle cells. Potentially reversible oxidative regulation of voltage-gated K+ channels by reactive species such as reactive oxygen species (ROS) represents a contributing mechanism of normal cellular plasticity and may play important roles in diverse pathologies including neurodegenerative diseases. Recent Advances: Studies using various protocols of oxidative modification, site-directed mutagenesis, and structural and kinetic modeling provide a broader phenomenology and emerging mechanistic insights. Critical Issues: Physicochemical mechanisms of the functional consequences of oxidative modifications of voltage-gated K+ channels are only beginning to be revealed. In vivo documentation of oxidative modifications of specific amino-acid residues of various voltage-gated K+ channel proteins, including the target specificity issue, is largely absent. Future Directions: High-resolution chemical and proteomic analysis of ion channel proteins with respect to oxidative modification combined with ongoing studies on channel structure and function will provide a better understanding of how the function of voltage-gated K+ channels is tuned by ROS and the corresponding reducing enzymes to meet cellular needs. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 21, 933–952. PMID:24040918

  4. Potassium Channels Mediate Killing by Human Natural Killer Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlichter, Lyanne; Sidell, Neil; Hagiwara, Susumu

    1986-01-01

    Human natural killer (NK) cells in peripheral blood spontaneously recognize and kill a wide variety of target cells. It has been suggested that ion channels are involved in the killing process because there is a Ca-dependent stage and because killing by presensitized cytotoxic T lymphocytes, which in many respects resembles NK killing, is associated with changes in K and Na transport in the target cell. However, no direct evidence exists for ion channels in NK cells or in their target cells. Using the whole-cell variation of the patch-clamp technique, we found a voltage-dependent potassium (K+) current in NK cells. The K+ current was reduced in a dose-dependent manner by the K-channel blockers 4-aminopyridine and quinidine and by the traditional Ca-channel blockers verapamil and Cd2+. We tested the effects of ion-channel blockers on killing of two commonly used target cell lines: K562, which is derived from a human myeloid leukemia, and U937, which is derived from a human histiocytic leukemia. Killing of K562 target cells, determined in a standard 51Cr-release assay, was inhibited in a dose-dependent manner by verapamil, quinidine, Cd2+, and 4-aminopyridine at concentrations comparable to those that blocked the K+ current in NK cells. In K562 target cells only a voltage-dependent Na+ current was found and it was blocked by concentrations of tetrodotoxin that had no effect on killing. Killing of U937 target cells was also inhibited by the two ion-channel blockers tested, quinidine and verapamil. In this cell line only a small K+ current was found that was similar to the one in NK cells. We could not find any evidence of a Ca2+ current in target cells or in NK cells; therefore, our results cannot explain the Ca dependence of killing. Our findings show that there are K channels in NK cells and that these channels play a necessary role in the killing process. In contrast, the endogenous channel type in the target cell is probably not a factor in determining target cell

  5. Histidine phosphorylation relieves copper inhibition in the mammalian potassium channel KCa3.1.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Shekhar; Panda, Saswati; Li, Zhai; Fuhs, Stephen R; Hunter, Tony; Thiele, Dennis J; Hubbard, Stevan R; Skolnik, Edward Y

    2016-01-01

    KCa2.1, KCa2.2, KCa2.3 and KCa3.1 constitute a family of mammalian small- to intermediate-conductance potassium channels that are activated by calcium-calmodulin. KCa3.1 is unique among these four channels in that activation requires, in addition to calcium, phosphorylation of a single histidine residue (His358) in the cytoplasmic region, by nucleoside diphosphate kinase-B (NDPK-B). The mechanism by which KCa3.1 is activated by histidine phosphorylation is unknown. Histidine phosphorylation is well characterized in prokaryotes but poorly understood in eukaryotes. Here, we demonstrate that phosphorylation of His358 activates KCa3.1 by antagonizing copper-mediated inhibition of the channel. Furthermore, we show that activated CD4(+) T cells deficient in intracellular copper exhibit increased KCa3.1 histidine phosphorylation and channel activity, leading to increased calcium flux and cytokine production. These findings reveal a novel regulatory mechanism for a mammalian potassium channel and for T-cell activation, and highlight a unique feature of histidine versus serine/threonine and tyrosine as a regulatory phosphorylation site. PMID:27542194

  6. Histidine phosphorylation relieves copper inhibition in the mammalian potassium channel KCa3.1

    PubMed Central

    Srivastava, Shekhar; Panda, Saswati; Li, Zhai; Fuhs, Stephen R; Hunter, Tony; Thiele, Dennis J; Hubbard, Stevan R; Skolnik, Edward Y

    2016-01-01

    KCa2.1, KCa2.2, KCa2.3 and KCa3.1 constitute a family of mammalian small- to intermediate-conductance potassium channels that are activated by calcium-calmodulin. KCa3.1 is unique among these four channels in that activation requires, in addition to calcium, phosphorylation of a single histidine residue (His358) in the cytoplasmic region, by nucleoside diphosphate kinase-B (NDPK-B). The mechanism by which KCa3.1 is activated by histidine phosphorylation is unknown. Histidine phosphorylation is well characterized in prokaryotes but poorly understood in eukaryotes. Here, we demonstrate that phosphorylation of His358 activates KCa3.1 by antagonizing copper-mediated inhibition of the channel. Furthermore, we show that activated CD4+ T cells deficient in intracellular copper exhibit increased KCa3.1 histidine phosphorylation and channel activity, leading to increased calcium flux and cytokine production. These findings reveal a novel regulatory mechanism for a mammalian potassium channel and for T-cell activation, and highlight a unique feature of histidine versus serine/threonine and tyrosine as a regulatory phosphorylation site. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.16093.001 PMID:27542194

  7. Slo1 is the principal potassium channel of human spermatozoa

    PubMed Central

    Mannowetz, Nadja; Naidoo, Natasha M; Choo, Seung-A Sara; Smith, James F; Lishko, Polina V

    2013-01-01

    Mammalian spermatozoa gain competence to fertilize an oocyte as they travel through the female reproductive tract. This process is accompanied by an elevation of sperm intracellular calcium and a membrane hyperpolarization. The latter is evoked by K+ efflux; however, the molecular identity of the potassium channel of human spermatozoa (hKSper) is unknown. Here, we characterize hKSper, reporting that it is regulated by intracellular calcium but is insensitive to intracellular alkalinization. We also show that human KSper is inhibited by charybdotoxin, iberiotoxin, and paxilline, while mouse KSper is insensitive to these compounds. Such unique properties suggest that the Slo1 ion channel is the molecular determinant for hKSper. We show that Slo1 is localized to the sperm flagellum and is inhibited by progesterone. Inhibition of hKSper by progesterone may depolarize the spermatozoon to open the calcium channel CatSper, thus raising [Ca2+] to produce hyperactivation and allowing sperm to fertilize an oocyte. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.01009.001 PMID:24137539

  8. Sleep disturbances in voltage-gated potassium channel antibody syndrome.

    PubMed

    Barone, Daniel A; Krieger, Ana C

    2016-05-01

    Voltage-gated potassium channels (VGKCs) are a family of membrane proteins responsible for controlling cell membrane potential. The presence of antibodies (Ab) against neuronal VGKC complexes aids in the diagnosis of idiopathic and paraneoplastic autoimmune neurologic disorders. The diagnosis of VGKC Ab-associated encephalopathy (VCKC Ab syndrome) should be suspected in patients with subacute onset of disorientation, confusion, and memory loss in the presence of seizures or a movement disorder. VGKC Ab syndrome may present with sleep-related symptoms, and the purpose of this communication is to alert sleep and neurology clinicians of this still-under-recognized condition. In this case, we are presenting the VGKC Ab syndrome which improved after treatment with solumedrol. The prompt recognition and treatment of this condition may prevent the morbidity associated with cerebral atrophy and the mortality associated with intractable seizures and electrolyte disturbances.

  9. Apical potassium channels in the rat connecting tubule.

    PubMed

    Frindt, Gustavo; Palmer, Lawrence G

    2004-11-01

    Apical membrane K channels in the rat connecting tubule (CNT) were studied using the patch-clamp technique. Tubules were isolated from the cortical labyrinth of the kidney and split open to provide access to the apical membrane. Cell-attached patches were formed on presumed principal and/or connecting tubule cells. The major channel type observed had a single-channel conductance of 52 pS, high open probability and kinetics that were only weakly dependent on voltage. These correspond closely to the "SK"-type channels in the cortical collecting duct, identified with the ROMK (Kir1.1) gene product. A second channel type, which was less frequently observed, mediated larger currents and was strongly activated by depolarization of the apical membrane voltage. These were identified as BK or maxi-K channels. The density of active SK channels revealed a high degree of clustering. Although heterogeneity of tubules or of cell types within a tubule could not be excluded, the major factor underlying the distribution appeared to be the presence of channel clusters on the membrane of individual cells. The overall density of channels was higher than that previously found in the cortical collecting tubule (CCT). In contrast to results in the CCT, we did not detect an increase in the overall density of SK channels in the apical membrane after feeding the animals a high-K diet. However, the activity of amiloride-sensitive Na channels was undetectable under control conditions but was increased after both 1 day (90 +/- 24 pA/cell) or 7 days (385 +/- 82 pA/cell) of K loading. Thus one important factor leading to an increased K secretion in the CNT in response to increased dietary K is an increased apical Na conductance, leading to depolarization of the apical membrane voltage and an increased driving force for K movement out into the tubular lumen. PMID:15280155

  10. Pandinus imperator scorpion venom blocks voltage-gated potassium channels in GH3 cells.

    PubMed

    Pappone, P A; Lucero, M T

    1988-06-01

    We examined the effects of Pandinus imperator scorpion venom on voltage-gated potassium channels in cultured clonal rat anterior pituitary cells (GH3 cells) using the gigohm-seal voltage-clamp method in the whole-cell configuration. We found that Pandinus venom blocks the voltage-gated potassium channels of GH3 cells in a voltage-dependent and dose-dependent manner. Crude venom in concentrations of 50-500 micrograms/ml produced 50-70% block of potassium currents measured at -20 mV, compared with 25-60% block measured at +50 mV. The venom both decreased the peak potassium current and shifted the voltage dependence of potassium current activation to more positive potentials. Pandinus venom affected potassium channel kinetics by slowing channel opening, speeding deactivation slightly, and increasing inactivation rates. Potassium currents in cells exposed to Pandinus venom did not recover control amplitudes or kinetics even after 20-40 min of washing with venom-free solution. The concentration dependence of crude venom block indicates that the toxins it contains are effective in the nanomolar range of concentrations. The effects of Pandinus venom were mimicked by zinc at concentrations less than or equal to 0.2 mM. Block of potassium current by zinc was voltage dependent and resembled Pandinus venom block, except that block by zinc was rapidly reversible. Since zinc is found in crude Pandinus venom, it could be important in the interaction of the venom with the potassium channel. We conclude that Pandinus venom contains toxins that bind tightly to voltage-dependent potassium channels in GH3 cells. Because of its high affinity for voltage-gated potassium channels and its irreversibility, Pandinus venom may be useful in the isolation, mapping, and characterization of voltage-gated potassium channels.

  11. Free RCK arrangement in Kch, a putative escherichia coli potassium channel, as suggested by electron crystallography.

    PubMed

    Kuang, Qie; Purhonen, Pasi; Jegerschöld, Caroline; Koeck, Philip J B; Hebert, Hans

    2015-01-01

    The ligand-gated potassium channels are stimulated by various kinds of messengers. Previous studies showed that ligand-gated potassium channels containing RCK domains (the regulator of the conductance of potassium ion) form a dimer of tetramer structure through the RCK octameric gating ring in the presence of detergent. Here, we have analyzed the structure of Kch, a channel of this type from Escherichia coli, in a lipid environment using electron crystallography. By combining information from the 3D map of the transmembrane part of the protein and docking of an atomic model of a potassium channel, we conclude that the RCK domains face the solution and that an RCK octameric gating ring arrangement does not form under our crystallization condition. Our findings may be applied to other potassium channels that have an RCK gating ring arrangement.

  12. Molecular Basis of Cardiac Delayed Rectifier Potassium Channel Function and Pharmacology.

    PubMed

    Wu, Wei; Sanguinetti, Michael C

    2016-06-01

    Human cardiomyocytes express 3 distinct types of delayed rectifier potassium channels. Human ether-a-go-go-related gene (hERG) channels conduct the rapidly activating current IKr; KCNQ1/KCNE1 channels conduct the slowly activating current IKs; and Kv1.5 channels conduct an ultrarapid activating current IKur. Here the authors provide a general overview of the mechanistic and structural basis of ion selectivity, gating, and pharmacology of the 3 types of cardiac delayed rectifier potassium ion channels. Most blockers bind to S6 residues that line the central cavity of the channel, whereas activators interact with the channel at 4 symmetric binding sites outside the cavity. PMID:27261821

  13. Interfacial gating triad is crucial for electromechanical transduction in voltage-activated potassium channels

    PubMed Central

    Chowdhury, Sandipan; Haehnel, Benjamin M.

    2014-01-01

    Voltage-dependent potassium channels play a crucial role in electrical excitability and cellular signaling by regulating potassium ion flux across membranes. Movement of charged residues in the voltage-sensing domain leads to a series of conformational changes that culminate in channel opening in response to changes in membrane potential. However, the molecular machinery that relays these conformational changes from voltage sensor to the pore is not well understood. Here we use generalized interaction-energy analysis (GIA) to estimate the strength of site-specific interactions between amino acid residues putatively involved in the electromechanical coupling of the voltage sensor and pore in the outwardly rectifying KV channel. We identified candidate interactors at the interface between the S4–S5 linker and the pore domain using a structure-guided graph theoretical approach that revealed clusters of conserved and closely packed residues. One such cluster, located at the intracellular intersubunit interface, comprises three residues (arginine 394, glutamate 395, and tyrosine 485) that interact with each other. The calculated interaction energies were 3–5 kcal, which is especially notable given that the net free-energy change during activation of the Shaker KV channel is ∼14 kcal. We find that this triad is delicately maintained by balance of interactions that are responsible for structural integrity of the intersubunit interface while maintaining sufficient flexibility at a critical gating hinge for optimal transmission of force to the pore gate. PMID:25311635

  14. Interfacial gating triad is crucial for electromechanical transduction in voltage-activated potassium channels.

    PubMed

    Chowdhury, Sandipan; Haehnel, Benjamin M; Chanda, Baron

    2014-11-01

    Voltage-dependent potassium channels play a crucial role in electrical excitability and cellular signaling by regulating potassium ion flux across membranes. Movement of charged residues in the voltage-sensing domain leads to a series of conformational changes that culminate in channel opening in response to changes in membrane potential. However, the molecular machinery that relays these conformational changes from voltage sensor to the pore is not well understood. Here we use generalized interaction-energy analysis (GIA) to estimate the strength of site-specific interactions between amino acid residues putatively involved in the electromechanical coupling of the voltage sensor and pore in the outwardly rectifying KV channel. We identified candidate interactors at the interface between the S4-S5 linker and the pore domain using a structure-guided graph theoretical approach that revealed clusters of conserved and closely packed residues. One such cluster, located at the intracellular intersubunit interface, comprises three residues (arginine 394, glutamate 395, and tyrosine 485) that interact with each other. The calculated interaction energies were 3-5 kcal, which is especially notable given that the net free-energy change during activation of the Shaker KV channel is ∼14 kcal. We find that this triad is delicately maintained by balance of interactions that are responsible for structural integrity of the intersubunit interface while maintaining sufficient flexibility at a critical gating hinge for optimal transmission of force to the pore gate.

  15. Characterization of single potassium channels in mouse pancreatic acinar cells.

    PubMed Central

    Schmid, A; Schulz, I

    1995-01-01

    1. Single K(+)-selective channels with a conductance of about 48 pS (pipette, 145 mM KCl; bath, 140 mM NaCl + 4.7 mM KCl) were recorded in the patch-clamp whole-cell configuration in isolated mouse pancreatic acinar cells. 2. Neither application of the secretagogues acetylcholine (second messenger, inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate) or secretin (second messenger, cAMP), nor addition of the catalytic subunit of protein kinase A to the pipette solution changed the activity of the 48 pS K+ channel. 3. Intracellular acidification with sodium propionate (20 mM) diminished activity of the 48 pS channel, whereas channel open probability was increased by cytosolic alkalization with 20 mM NH4Cl. 4. BaCl2 (5 mM), TEA (10 mM) or apamin (1 microM) added to the bath solution had no obvious effect on the kinetics of the 48 pS channel. Similarly, glibenclamide and diazoxide failed to influence the channel activity. 5. When extracellular NaCl was replaced by KCl, whole-cell recordings revealed an inwardly rectifying K+ current carried by a 17 pS K+ channel. 6. The inwardly rectifying K+ current was not pH dependent and could largely be blocked by Ba2+ but not by TEA. 7. Since the 48 pS K+ channel is neither Ca2+ nor cAMP regulated, we suggest that this channel could play a role in the maintenance of the negative cell resting potential. PMID:7623283

  16. Characterization of apical potassium channels induced in rat distal colon during potassium adaptation.

    PubMed Central

    Butterfield, I; Warhurst, G; Jones, M N; Sandle, G I

    1997-01-01

    1. Chronic dietary K+ loading stimulates an active K+ secretory process in rat distal colon, which involves an increase in the macroscopic apical K+ conductance of surface epithelial cells. In the present study, the abundance and characteristics of K+ channels constituting this enhanced apical K+ conductance were evaluated using patch clamp recording techniques. 2. In isolated non-polarized surface cells, K+ channels were seen in 9 of 90 (10%) cell-attached patches in cells from control animals, and in 247 of 437 (57%) cell-attached patches in cells from K(+)-loaded animals, with a significant (P < 0.001) shift in distribution density. Similarly, recordings from cell-attached patches of the apical membrane of surface cells surrounding the openings of distal colonic crypts revealed identical K+ channels in 1 of 11 (9%) patches in control animals, and in 9 of 13 (69%) patches in K(+)-loaded animals. 3. In isolated surface cells and surface cells in situ, K+ channels had mean slope conductances of 209 +/- 6 and 233 +/- 14 pS, respectively, when inside-out patches were bathed symmetrically in K2SO4 solution. The channels were sensitive to 'cytosolic' Ca2+ concentration, were voltage sensitive at 'cytosolic' Ca2+ concentrations encountered in colonic epithelial cells, and were inhibited by 1 mM quinidine, 20 mM TEA or 5 mM Ba2+ ions. 4. The data show that dietary K+ loading increases the abundance of Ca(2+)- and voltage-sensitive large-conductance K+ channels in the apical membrane of surface cells in rat distal colon. These channels constitute the enhanced macroscopic apical K+ conductance previously identified in these cells, and are likely to play a critical role in the active K+ secretory process that typifies this model of colonic K+ adaptation. PMID:9218214

  17. Novel potassium channels encoded by the Shaker locus in Drosophila photoreceptors.

    PubMed

    Hardie, R C; Voss, D; Pongs, O; Laughlin, S B

    1991-03-01

    The Shaker gene, responsible for A-type potassium channels in Drosophila muscle, encodes a large family of transcripts capable of generating a variety of kinetically distinct A channels when expressed in oocytes. We describe a distinct class of A channel encoded by the Shaker gene in a novel preparation of dissociated Drosophila photoreceptors. Whole-cell recordings reveal a rapidly inactivating A current that is absent in Shaker mutants and that can be readily isolated in cell-attached patches. Although very similar to their muscle counterparts, the photoreceptor A channels show a striking 40-50 mV negative shift in their voltage-operating range. Two mutations (ShE62 and T(1;Y)W32), which exclude only certain classes of Shaker transcripts, were used to show that photoreceptor A channels are encoded by multiple transcripts distinct from those encoding muscle A channels, while PCR techniques identified four transcripts (ShA1, ShA2, ShG1, and ShG2) in mRNA from dissected retina. PMID:2001287

  18. Kalium: a database of potassium channel toxins from scorpion venom.

    PubMed

    Kuzmenkov, Alexey I; Krylov, Nikolay A; Chugunov, Anton O; Grishin, Eugene V; Vassilevski, Alexander A

    2016-01-01

    Kalium (http://kaliumdb.org/) is a manually curated database that accumulates data on potassium channel toxins purified from scorpion venom (KTx). This database is an open-access resource, and provides easy access to pages of other databases of interest, such as UniProt, PDB, NCBI Taxonomy Browser, and PubMed. General achievements of Kalium are a strict and easy regulation of KTx classification based on the unified nomenclature supported by researchers in the field, removal of peptides with partial sequence and entries supported by transcriptomic information only, classification of β-family toxins, and addition of a novel λ-family. Molecules presented in the database can be processed by the Clustal Omega server using a one-click option. Molecular masses of mature peptides are calculated and available activity data are compiled for all KTx. We believe that Kalium is not only of high interest to professional toxinologists, but also of general utility to the scientific community.Database URL:http://kaliumdb.org/. PMID:27087309

  19. Kalium: a database of potassium channel toxins from scorpion venom

    PubMed Central

    Kuzmenkov, Alexey I.; Krylov, Nikolay A.; Chugunov, Anton O.; Grishin, Eugene V.; Vassilevski, Alexander A.

    2016-01-01

    Kalium (http://kaliumdb.org/) is a manually curated database that accumulates data on potassium channel toxins purified from scorpion venom (KTx). This database is an open-access resource, and provides easy access to pages of other databases of interest, such as UniProt, PDB, NCBI Taxonomy Browser, and PubMed. General achievements of Kalium are a strict and easy regulation of KTx classification based on the unified nomenclature supported by researchers in the field, removal of peptides with partial sequence and entries supported by transcriptomic information only, classification of β-family toxins, and addition of a novel λ-family. Molecules presented in the database can be processed by the Clustal Omega server using a one-click option. Molecular masses of mature peptides are calculated and available activity data are compiled for all KTx. We believe that Kalium is not only of high interest to professional toxinologists, but also of general utility to the scientific community. Database URL: http://kaliumdb.org/ PMID:27087309

  20. Overexpression of the rice AKT1 potassium channel affects potassium nutrition and rice drought tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Ahmad, Izhar; Mian, Afaq; Maathuis, Frans J. M.

    2016-01-01

    Potassium (K+) is the most important cationic nutrient for all living organisms and has roles in most aspects of plant physiology. To assess the impact of one of the main K+ uptake components, the K+ inward rectifying channel AKT1, we characterized both loss of function and overexpression of OsAKT1 in rice. In many conditions, AKT1 expression correlated with K+ uptake and tissue K+ levels. No salinity-related growth phenotype was observed for either loss or gain of function mutants. However, a correlation between AKT1 expression and root Na+ when the external Na/K ratio was high suggests that there may be a role for AKT1 in Na+ uptake in such conditions. In contrast to findings with Arabidopsis thaliana, we did not detect any change in growth of AKT1 loss of function mutants in the presence of NH4 +. Nevertheless, NH4 +-dependent inhibition was detected during K+ uptake assays in loss of function and wild type plants, depending on pre-growth conditions. The most prominent result of OsAKT1 overexpression was a reduction in sensitivity to osmotic/drought stress in transgenic plants: the data suggest that AKT1 overexpression improved rice osmotic and drought stress tolerance by increasing tissue levels of K+, especially in the root. PMID:26969743

  1. G-protein-coupled inward rectifier potassium channels involved in corticostriatal presynaptic modulation.

    PubMed

    Meneses, David; Mateos, Verónica; Islas, Gustavo; Barral, Jaime

    2015-09-01

    Presynaptic modulation has been associated mainly with calcium channels but recent data suggests that inward rectifier potassium channels (K(IR)) also play a role. In this work we set to characterize the role of presynaptic K(IR) channels in corticostriatal synaptic transmission. We elicited synaptic potentials in striatum by stimulating cortical areas and then determined the synaptic responses of corticostriatal synapsis by using paired pulse ratio (PPR) in the presence and absence of several potassium channel blockers. Unspecific potassium channels blockers Ba(2+) and Cs(+) reduced the PPR, suggesting that these channels are presynaptically located. Further pharmacological characterization showed that application of tertiapin-Q, a specific K(IR)3 channel family blocker, also induced a reduction of PPR, suggesting that K(IR)3 channels are present at corticostriatal terminals. In contrast, exposure to Lq2, a specific K(IR)1.1 inward rectifier potassium channel, did not induce any change in PPR suggesting the absence of these channels in the presynaptic corticostriatal terminals. Our results indicate that K(IR)3 channels are functionally expressed at the corticostriatal synapses, since blockage of these channels result in PPR decrease. Our results also help to explain how synaptic activity may become sensitive to extracellular signals mediated by G-protein coupled receptors. A vast repertoire of receptors may influence neurotransmitter release in an indirect manner through regulation of K(IR)3 channels.

  2. EAG2 potassium channel with evolutionarily conserved function as a brain tumor target

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Xi; He, Ye; Dubuc, Adrian M.; Hashizume, Rintaro; Zhang, Wei; Reimand, Jüri; Yang, Huanghe; Wang, Tongfei A.; Stehbens, Samantha J.; Younger, Susan; Barshow, Suzanne; Zhu, Sijun; Cooper, Michael K.; Peacock, John; Ramaswamy, Vijay; Garzia, Livia; Wu, Xiaochong; Remke, Marc; Forester, Craig M.; Kim, Charles C.; Weiss, William A.; James, C. David; Shuman, Marc A.; Bader, Gary D.; Mueller, Sabine; Taylor, Michael D.; Jan, Yuh Nung; Jan, Lily Yeh

    2015-01-01

    Over 20% of the drugs for treating human diseases target ion channels, however, no cancer drug approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is intended to target an ion channel. Here, we demonstrate the evolutionarily conserved function of EAG2 potassium channel in promoting brain tumor growth and metastasis, delineate downstream pathways and uncover a mechanism for different potassium channels to functionally corporate and regulate mitotic cell volume and tumor progression. We show that EAG2 potassium channel is enriched at the trailing edge of migrating MB cells to regulate local cell volume dynamics, thereby facilitating cell motility. We identify the FDA-approved antipsychotic drug thioridazine as an EAG2 channel blocker that reduces xenografted MB growth and metastasis, and present a case report of repurposing thioridazine for treating a human patient. Our findings thus illustrate the potential of targeting ion channels in cancer treatment. PMID:26258683

  3. Atomic basis for therapeutic activation of neuronal potassium channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Robin Y.; Yau, Michael C.; Galpin, Jason D.; Seebohm, Guiscard; Ahern, Christopher A.; Pless, Stephan A.; Kurata, Harley T.

    2015-09-01

    Retigabine is a recently approved anticonvulsant that acts by potentiating neuronal M-current generated by KCNQ2-5 channels, interacting with a conserved Trp residue in the channel pore domain. Using unnatural amino-acid mutagenesis, we subtly altered the properties of this Trp to reveal specific chemical interactions required for retigabine action. Introduction of a non-natural isosteric H-bond-deficient Trp analogue abolishes channel potentiation, indicating that retigabine effects rely strongly on formation of a H-bond with the conserved pore Trp. Supporting this model, substitution with fluorinated Trp analogues, with increased H-bonding propensity, strengthens retigabine potency. In addition, potency of numerous retigabine analogues correlates with the negative electrostatic surface potential of a carbonyl/carbamate oxygen atom present in most KCNQ activators. These findings functionally pinpoint an atomic-scale interaction essential for effects of retigabine and provide stringent constraints that may guide rational improvement of the emerging drug class of KCNQ channel activators.

  4. Atomic basis for therapeutic activation of neuronal potassium channels

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Robin Y.; Yau, Michael C.; Galpin, Jason D.; Seebohm, Guiscard; Ahern, Christopher A.; Pless, Stephan A.; Kurata, Harley T.

    2015-01-01

    Retigabine is a recently approved anticonvulsant that acts by potentiating neuronal M-current generated by KCNQ2–5 channels, interacting with a conserved Trp residue in the channel pore domain. Using unnatural amino-acid mutagenesis, we subtly altered the properties of this Trp to reveal specific chemical interactions required for retigabine action. Introduction of a non-natural isosteric H-bond-deficient Trp analogue abolishes channel potentiation, indicating that retigabine effects rely strongly on formation of a H-bond with the conserved pore Trp. Supporting this model, substitution with fluorinated Trp analogues, with increased H-bonding propensity, strengthens retigabine potency. In addition, potency of numerous retigabine analogues correlates with the negative electrostatic surface potential of a carbonyl/carbamate oxygen atom present in most KCNQ activators. These findings functionally pinpoint an atomic-scale interaction essential for effects of retigabine and provide stringent constraints that may guide rational improvement of the emerging drug class of KCNQ channel activators. PMID:26333338

  5. Magnesium modulates ROMK channel-mediated potassium secretion.

    PubMed

    Yang, Lei; Frindt, Gustavo; Palmer, Lawrence G

    2010-12-01

    The ability of intracellular and extracellular Mg(2+) to block secretory K(+) currents through ROMK channels under physiologic conditions is incompletely understood. We expressed ROMK2 channels in Xenopus oocytes and measured unitary currents in the inside-out and cell-attached modes of the patch-clamp technique. With 110 mM K(+) on both sides of the membrane, 0.2 to 5 mM Mg(2+) on the cytoplasmic side reduced outward currents, but not inward currents, at V(m) > 0. With 11 or 1.1 mM extracellular K(+) ([K(+)](o)), ≥0.2 mM Mg(2+) blocked outward currents in the physiologic V(m) range (0 to -60 mV). With decreasing [K(+)](o), the apparent dissociation constant of the blocker decreased, but the voltage dependence of block did not significantly change. Whole-cell recordings from principal cells of rat cortical collecting ducts revealed similar inhibitory effects of intracellular Mg(2+). Mg(2+) added to the extracellular solution also reduced single-channel currents with an affinity that increased as [K(+)](o) decreased. In conclusion, physiologic concentrations of intracellular and extracellular Mg(2+) can influence secretory K(+) currents through ROMK channels. These effects could play a role in the modulation of K(+) transport under conditions of K(+) and/or Mg(2+) depletion. PMID:21030597

  6. Involvements of calcium channel and potassium channel in Danshen and Gegen decoction induced vasodilation in porcine coronary LAD artery.

    PubMed

    Hu, Fan; Koon, Chi Man; Chan, Judy Yuet Wa; Lau, Kit Man; Kwan, Y W; Fung, Kwok Pui

    2012-09-15

    Danshen (Salviae Miltiorrhizae Radix) and Gegen (Puerariae Lobatae Radix) have been widely used in treating cardiovascular diseases for thousands of years in China. The present study was carried out to evaluate the effects of a Danshen and Gegen decoction (DG) on the vascular reactivity of a porcine isolated coronary artery and the underlying mechanisms involved. Porcine coronary rings were precontracted with 15 nM U46619. The involvement of endothelium-dependent mechanisms was explored by removing the endothelium; the involvement of potassium channels was investigated by the pretreatment of the artery rings with various blockers, and the involvement of the calcium channels was investigated by incubating the artery rings with Ca²⁺-free buffer and priming them with high [K⁺] prior to adding CaCl₂ to elicit contraction. The involvement of Ca²⁺ sensitization was explored by evaluating the Rho-activity expression. The results revealed that DG elicited a concentration-dependent relaxation on a U46619-precontracted coronary artery ring. These relaxation responses were not altered by the pretreatment of inhibitors of endothelium-related dilator synthases, cGMP and cAMP pathway inhibitors, potassium channel (BK(Ca), SK(Ca), K(V) and K(ATP)) blockers and endothelium removal. The K(IR) channel blocker BaCl₂ only slightly attenuated the DG-induced relaxation. However, the Ca²⁺-induced artery contraction was inhibited by DG. Additionally, the expression of the phosphorylated myosin light chain was inhibited by DG whereas the activity of RhoA was not affected. Therefore, DG could be a useful cardioprotective agent for vasodilation in patients who have hypertension.

  7. The Sodium-Activated Potassium Channel Slack Is Required for Optimal Cognitive Flexibility in Mice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bausch, Anne E.; Dieter, Rebekka; Nann, Yvette; Hausmann, Mario; Meyerdierks, Nora; Kaczmarek, Leonard K.; Ruth, Peter; Lukowski, Robert

    2015-01-01

    "Kcnt1" encoded sodium-activated potassium channels (Slack channels) are highly expressed throughout the brain where they modulate the firing patterns and general excitability of many types of neurons. Increasing evidence suggests that Slack channels may be important for higher brain functions such as cognition and normal intellectual…

  8. Genetic Variation in Genes Encoding Airway Epithelial Potassium Channels Is Associated with Chronic Rhinosinusitis in a Pediatric Population

    PubMed Central

    Mentch, Frank; Grant, Struan F. A.; Desrosiers, Martin; Hakonarson, Hakon; Toskala, Elina

    2014-01-01

    Background Apical potassium channels regulate ion transport in airway epithelial cells and influence air surface liquid (ASL) hydration and mucociliary clearance (MCC). We sought to identify whether genetic variation within genes encoding airway potassium channels is associated with chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS). Methods Single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) genotypes for selected potassium channels were derived from data generated on the Illumnia HumanHap550 BeadChip or Illumina Human610-Quad BeadChip for 828 unrelated individuals diagnosed with CRS and 5,083 unrelated healthy controls from the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP). Statistical analysis was performed with set-based tests using PLINK, and corrected for multiple testing. Results Set-based case control analysis revealed the gene KCNMA1 was associated with CRS in our Caucasian subset of the cohort (598 CRS cases and 3,489 controls; p = 0.022, based on 10,000 permutations). In addition there was borderline evidence that the gene KCNQ5 (p = 0.0704) was associated with the trait in our African American subset of the cohort (230 CRS cases and 1,594 controls). In addition to the top significant SNPs rs2917454 and rs6907229, imputation analysis uncovered additional genetic variants in KCNMA1 and in KCNQ5 that were associated with CRS. Conclusions We have implicated two airway epithelial potassium channels as novel susceptibility loci in contributing to the pathogenesis of CRS. PMID:24595210

  9. K2P potassium channels, mysterious and paradoxically exciting.

    PubMed

    Goldstein, Steve A N

    2011-08-01

    New evidence reveals that the common electrolyte disorder hypokalemia can induce K2P1 channels that are normally selective for K+ to break the rules and conduct Na+. This defiant behavior leads to paradoxical depolarization of many cells in the heart, increasing the risk for lethal arrhythmia. The new research resolves a mystery uncovered 50 years ago and bestows an array of new riddles. Here, I discuss how K2P1 might achieve this alchemy--through stable residence of the K+ selectivity filter in a Na+-conductive state between its open and C-inactive configurations--and predict that other K+ channels and environmental stimuli will be discovered to produce the same excitatory misconduct. PMID:21868351

  10. Identification of two-pore domain potassium channels as potent modulators of osmotic volume regulation in human T lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Andronic, Joseph; Bobak, Nicole; Bittner, Stefan; Ehling, Petra; Kleinschnitz, Christoph; Herrmann, Alexander M; Zimmermann, Heiko; Sauer, Markus; Wiendl, Heinz; Budde, Thomas; Meuth, Sven G; Sukhorukov, Vladimir L

    2013-02-01

    Many functions of T lymphocytes are closely related to cell volume homeostasis and regulation, which utilize a complex network of membrane channels for anions and cations. Among the various potassium channels, the voltage-gated K(V)1.3 is well known to contribute greatly to the osmoregulation and particularly to the potassium release during the regulatory volume decrease (RVD) of T cells faced with hypotonic environment. Here we address a putative role of the newly identified two-pore domain (K(2P)) channels in the RVD of human CD4(+) T lymphocytes, using a series of potent well known channel blockers. In the present study, the pharmacological profiles of RVD inhibition revealed K(2P)5.1 and K(2P)18.1 as the most important K(2P) channels involved in the RVD of both naïve and stimulated T cells. The impact of chemical inhibition of K(2P)5.1 and K(2P)18.1 on the RVD was comparable to that of K(V)1.3. K(2P)9.1 also notably contributed to the RVD of T cells but the extent of this contribution and its dependence on the activation status could not be unambiguously resolved. In summary, our data provide first evidence that the RVD-related potassium efflux from human T lymphocytes relies on K(2P) channels. PMID:23041580

  11. Probing the energy landscape of activation gating of the bacterial potassium channel KcsA.

    PubMed

    Linder, Tobias; de Groot, Bert L; Stary-Weinzinger, Anna

    2013-01-01

    The bacterial potassium channel KcsA, which has been crystallized in several conformations, offers an ideal model to investigate activation gating of ion channels. In this study, essential dynamics simulations are applied to obtain insights into the transition pathways and the energy profile of KcsA pore gating. In agreement with previous hypotheses, our simulations reveal a two phasic activation gating process. In the first phase, local structural rearrangements in TM2 are observed leading to an intermediate channel conformation, followed by large structural rearrangements leading to full opening of KcsA. Conformational changes of a highly conserved phenylalanine, F114, at the bundle crossing region are crucial for the transition from a closed to an intermediate state. 3.9 µs umbrella sampling calculations reveal that there are two well-defined energy barriers dividing closed, intermediate, and open channel states. In agreement with mutational studies, the closed state was found to be energetically more favorable compared to the open state. Further, the simulations provide new insights into the dynamical coupling effects of F103 between the activation gate and the selectivity filter. Investigations on individual subunits support cooperativity of subunits during activation gating.

  12. Developmental expression of Kv1 voltage-gated potassium channels in the avian hypothalamus.

    PubMed

    Doczi, Megan A; Vitzthum, Carl M; Forehand, Cynthia J

    2016-03-11

    Specialized hypothalamic neurons integrate the homeostatic balance between food intake and energy expenditure, processes that may become dysregulated during the development of diabetes, obesity, and other metabolic disorders. Shaker family voltage-gated potassium channels (Kv1) contribute to the maintenance of resting membrane potential, action potential characteristics, and neurotransmitter release in many populations of neurons, although hypothalamic Kv1 channel expression has been largely unexplored. Whole-cell patch clamp recordings from avian hypothalamic brain slices demonstrate a developmental shift in the electrophysiological properties of avian arcuate nucleus neurons, identifying an increase in outward ionic current that corresponds with action potential maturation. Additionally, RT-PCR experiments identified the early expression of Kv1.2, Kv1.3, and Kv1.5 mRNA in the embryonic avian hypothalamus, suggesting that these channels may underlie the electrophysiological changes observed in these neurons. Real-time quantitative PCR analysis on intact microdissections of embryonic hypothalamic tissue revealed a concomitant increase in Kv1.2 and Kv1.5 gene expression at key electrophysiological time points during development. This study is the first to demonstrate hypothalamic mRNA expression of Kv1 channels in developing avian embryos and may suggest a role for voltage-gated ion channel regulation in the physiological patterning of embryonic hypothalamic circuits governing energy homeostasis.

  13. Interactions of phospholipids with the potassium channel KcsA.

    PubMed

    Williamson, Ian M; Alvis, Simon J; East, J Malcolm; Lee, Anthony G

    2002-10-01

    The potassium channel KcsA from Streptomyces lividans has been reconstituted into bilayers of phosphatidylcholines and fluorescence spectroscopy has been used to characterize the response of KcsA to changes in bilayer thickness. The Trp residues in KcsA form two bands, one on each side of the membrane. Trp fluorescence emission spectra and the proportion of the Trp fluorescence intensity quenchable by I(-) hardly vary in the lipid chain length range C10 to C24, suggesting efficient hydrophobic matching between KcsA and the lipid bilayer over this range. Measurements of fluorescence quenching for KcsA reconstituted into mixtures of brominated and nonbrominated phospholipids have been analyzed to give binding constants of lipids for KcsA, relative to that for dioleoylphosphatidylcholine (di(C18:1)PC). Relative lipid binding constants increase by only a factor of three with increasing chain length from C10 to C22 with a decrease from C22 to C24. Strongest binding to di(C22:1)PC corresponds to a state in which the side chains of the lipid-exposed Trp residues are likely to be located within the hydrocarbon core of the lipid bilayer. It is suggested that matching of KcsA to thinner bilayers than di(C24:1)PC is achieved by tilting of the transmembrane alpha-helices in KcsA. Measurements of fluorescence quenching of KcsA in bilayers of brominated phospholipids as a function of phospholipid chain length suggest that in the chain length range C14 to C18 the Trp residues move further away from the center of the lipid bilayer with increasing chain length, which can be partly explained by a decrease in helix tilt angle with increasing bilayer thickness. In the chain length range C18 to C24 it is suggested that the Trp residues become more buried within the hydrocarbon core of the bilayer. PMID:12324421

  14. Differential blockage of two types of potassium channels in the crab giant axon.

    PubMed

    Soria, B; Arispe, N; Quinta-Ferreira, M E; Rojas, E

    1985-01-01

    Measurements were made of the kinetic and steady-state characteristics of the potassium conductance in the giant axon of the crabs Carcinus maenas and Cancer pagirus. The conductance increase during depolarizing voltage-clamp pulses was analyzed assuming that two separate types of potassium channels exist in these axons (M.E. Quinta-Ferreira, E. Rojas and N. Arispe, J. Membrane Biol. 66:171-181, 1982). It is shown here that, with small concentrations of conventional K+-channel blockers, it is possible to differentially inhibit these channels. The potassium channels with activation and fast inactivation gating (m3h, Hodgkin-Huxley kinetics) were blocked by external application of 4 amino-pyridine (4-AP). The potassium channels with standard gating (n4, Hodgkin-Huxley kinetics) were preferentially inhibited by externally applied tetraethylammonium (TEA). The differential blockage of the two types of potassium conductance changes suggests that they represent two different populations of potassium channels. It is further shown here that blocking the early transient conductance increase leads to the inhibition of the repetitive electrical activity induced by constant depolarizing current injection in fibers from Cardisoma guanhumi.

  15. Potassium

    MedlinePlus

    Potassium is essential for the proper functioning of the heart, kidneys, muscles, nerves, and digestive system. Usually the food you eat supplies all of the potassium you need. However, certain diseases (e.g., kidney ...

  16. Comparison of Single Channel Potassium Current in Biological and Synthetic Systems --- Dependence on Voltage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siwy, Zuzanna; Mercik, Szymon; Weron, Karina; Spohr, Reimar; Wolf, Alexander; Grzywna, Zbigniew

    2000-05-01

    The influence of an external field on an ion current pattern in biological and synthetic systems was investigated. The patch clamp recordings of potassium current through a big conductance locust potassium channel (BK-channel) and a track-etched polyethylene terephthalate membrane were examined by the power spectrum, fractal analysis and relative dispersion analysis. A similar dependence of potassium current behaviour on the external voltage in both systems was found. The generalized dimension formalism is redefined to make it applicable to the analysis of time series.

  17. Involvement of a membrane potassium channel in heparan sulphate-induced activation of macrophages.

    PubMed

    Ren, Jian-Dong; Fan, Li; Tian, Fu-Zhou; Fan, Kai-Hua; Yu, Bo-Tao; Jin, Wei-Hua; Tan, Yong-Hong; Cheng, Long

    2014-03-01

    Increasing evidence has demonstrated that Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) -mediated systemic inflammatory response syndrome accompanied by multiple organ failure, is one of the most common causes of death in patients with severe acute pancreatitis. Recent reports have revealed that heparan sulphate (HS) proteoglycan, a component of extracellular matrices, potentiates the activation of intracellular pro-inflammatory responses via TLR4, contributing to the aggravation of acute pancreatitis. However, little is known about the participants in the HS/TLR4-mediated inflammatory cascades. Our previous work provided a clue that a membrane potassium channel (MaxiK) is responsible for HS-induced production of inflammatory cytokines. Therefore, in this report we attempted to reveal the roles of MaxiK in the activation of macrophages stimulated by HS. Our results showed that incubation of RAW264.7 cells with HS up-regulated MaxiK and TLR4 expression levels. HS could also activate MaxiK channels to promote the efflux of potassium ions from cells, as measured by the elevated activity of caspase-1, whereas this was significantly abolished by treatment with paxilline, a specific blocker of the MaxiK channel. Moreover, it was found that paxilline substantially inhibited HS-induced activation of several different transcription factors in macrophages, including nuclear factor-κB, p38 and interferon regulatory factor-3, followed by decreased production of tumour necrosis factor-α and interferon-β. Taken together, our investigation provides evidence that the HS/TLR4-mediated intracellular inflammatory cascade depends on the activation of MaxiK, which may offer an important opportunity for a new approach in therapeutic strategies of severe acute pancreatitis.

  18. Modulation of hERG potassium channel gating normalizes action potential duration prolonged by dysfunctional KCNQ1 potassium channel

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hongkang; Zou, Beiyan; Yu, Haibo; Moretti, Alessandra; Wang, Xiaoying; Yan, Wei; Babcock, Joseph J.; Bellin, Milena; McManus, Owen B.; Tomaselli, Gordon; Nan, Fajun; Laugwitz, Karl-Ludwig; Li, Min

    2012-01-01

    Long QT syndrome (LQTS) is a genetic disease characterized by a prolonged QT interval in an electrocardiogram (ECG), leading to higher risk of sudden cardiac death. Among the 12 identified genes causal to heritable LQTS, ∼90% of affected individuals harbor mutations in either KCNQ1 or human ether-a-go-go related genes (hERG), which encode two repolarizing potassium currents known as IKs and IKr. The ability to quantitatively assess contributions of different current components is therefore important for investigating disease phenotypes and testing effectiveness of pharmacological modulation. Here we report a quantitative analysis by simulating cardiac action potentials of cultured human cardiomyocytes to match the experimental waveforms of both healthy control and LQT syndrome type 1 (LQT1) action potentials. The quantitative evaluation suggests that elevation of IKr by reducing voltage sensitivity of inactivation, not via slowing of deactivation, could more effectively restore normal QT duration if IKs is reduced. Using a unique specific chemical activator for IKr that has a primary effect of causing a right shift of V1/2 for inactivation, we then examined the duration changes of autonomous action potentials from differentiated human cardiomyocytes. Indeed, this activator causes dose-dependent shortening of the action potential durations and is able to normalize action potentials of cells of patients with LQT1. In contrast, an IKr chemical activator of primary effects in slowing channel deactivation was not effective in modulating action potential durations. Our studies provide both the theoretical basis and experimental support for compensatory normalization of action potential duration by a pharmacological agent. PMID:22745159

  19. Modeling of the Binding of Peptide Blockers to Voltage-Gated Potassium Channels: Approaches and Evidence

    PubMed Central

    Novoseletsky, V. N.; Volyntseva, A. D.; Shaitan, K. V.; Kirpichnikov, M. P.; Feofanov, A. V.

    2016-01-01

    Modeling of the structure of voltage-gated potassium (KV) channels bound to peptide blockers aims to identify the key amino acid residues dictating affinity and provide insights into the toxin-channel interface. Computational approaches open up possibilities for in silico rational design of selective blockers, new molecular tools to study the cellular distribution and functional roles of potassium channels. It is anticipated that optimized blockers will advance the development of drugs that reduce over activation of potassium channels and attenuate the associated malfunction. Starting with an overview of the recent advances in computational simulation strategies to predict the bound state orientations of peptide pore blockers relative to KV-channels, we go on to review algorithms for the analysis of intermolecular interactions, and then take a look at the results of their application. PMID:27437138

  20. Regulation of Arterial Tone by Activation of Calcium-Dependent Potassium Channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brayden, Joseph E.; Nelson, Mark T.

    1992-04-01

    Blood pressure and tissue perfusion are controlled in part by the level of intrinsic (myogenic) vascular tone. However, many of the molecular determinants of this response are unknown. Evidence is now presented that the degree of myogenic tone is regulated in part by the activation of large-conductance calcium-activated potassium channels in arterial smooth muscle. Tetraethylammonium ion (TEA^+) and charybdotoxin (CTX), at concentrations that block calcium-activated potassium channels in smooth muscle cells isolated from cerebral arteries, depolarized and constricted pressurized cerebral arteries with myogenic tone. Both TEA^+ and CTX had little effect on arteries when intracellular calcium was reduced by lowering intravascular pressure or by blocking calcium channels. Elevation of intravascular pressure through membrane depolarization and an increase in intracellular calcium may activate calcium-activated potassium channels. Thus, these channels may serve as a negative feedback pathway to control the degree of membrane depolarization and vasoconstriction.

  1. Allosteric coupling of the inner activation gate to the outer pore of a potassium channel.

    PubMed

    Peters, Christian J; Fedida, David; Accili, Eric A

    2013-10-23

    In potassium channels, functional coupling of the inner and outer pore gates may result from energetic interactions between residues and conformational rearrangements that occur along a structural path between them. Here, we show that conservative mutations of a residue near the inner activation gate of the Shaker potassium channel (I470) modify the rate of C-type inactivation at the outer pore, pointing to this residue as part of a pathway that couples inner gate opening to changes in outer pore structure and reduction of ion flow. Because they remain equally sensitive to rises in extracellular potassium, altered inactivation rates of the mutant channels are not secondary to modified binding of potassium to the outer pore. Conservative mutations of I470 also influence the interaction of the Shaker N-terminus with the inner gate, which separately affects the outer pore.

  2. Calcium channels responsible for potassium-induced transmitter release at rat cerebellar synapses.

    PubMed

    Momiyama, A; Takahashi, T

    1994-04-15

    The effects of calcium channel blockers on potassium-induced transmitter release were studied in thin slices of cerebellum from neonatal rats using whole-cell patch clamp methods. Miniature inhibitory postsynaptic currents (mIPSCs) mediated by gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) were recorded from deep cerebellar nuclear neurones in the presence of tetrodotoxin. The frequency of mIPSCs was reproducibly increased by a brief application of high-potassium solution. In the presence of the L-type Ca2+ channel blocker nicardipine (10 microM), the potassium-induced increase in mIPSC frequency was suppressed by 49%. Neither the mean amplitude nor the time course of mIPSCs was affected by the blocker. The N-type Ca2+ channel blocker omega-conotoxin GVIA (omega-CgTX, 3 microM) had no effect on the frequency of potassium-induced mIPSCs. The P-type Ca2+ channel blocker omega-Aga-IVA (200 nM) suppressed the potassium-induced increase in mIPSC frequency by 83% without affecting the mean amplitude or time course of mIPSCs. Comparing these data with previous studies of neurally evoked transmission, it is concluded that the Ca2+ channel subtypes responsible for potassium-induced transmitter release may be different from those mediating fast synaptic transmission.

  3. Calcium-Activated Potassium Channels: Potential Target for Cardiovascular Diseases.

    PubMed

    Dong, De-Li; Bai, Yun-Long; Cai, Ben-Zhi

    2016-01-01

    Ca(2+)-activated K(+) channels (KCa) are classified into three subtypes: big conductance (BKCa), intermediate conductance (IKCa), and small conductance (SKCa) KCa channels. The three types of KCa channels have distinct physiological or pathological functions in cardiovascular system. BKCa channels are mainly expressed in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) and inner mitochondrial membrane of cardiomyocytes, activation of BKCa channels in these locations results in vasodilation and cardioprotection against cardiac ischemia. IKCa channels are expressed in VSMCs, endothelial cells, and cardiac fibroblasts and involved in vascular smooth muscle proliferation, migration, vessel dilation, and cardiac fibrosis. SKCa channels are widely expressed in nervous and cardiovascular system, and activation of SKCa channels mainly contributes membrane hyperpolarization. In this chapter, we summarize the physiological and pathological roles of the three types of KCa channels in cardiovascular system and put forward the possibility of KCa channels as potential target for cardiovascular diseases.

  4. Involvement of potassium channels in the progression of cancer to a more malignant phenotype.

    PubMed

    Comes, Nuria; Serrano-Albarrás, Antonio; Capera, Jesusa; Serrano-Novillo, Clara; Condom, Enric; Ramón Y Cajal, Santiago; Ferreres, Joan Carles; Felipe, Antonio

    2015-10-01

    Potassium channels are a diverse group of pore-forming transmembrane proteins that selectively facilitate potassium flow through an electrochemical gradient. They participate in the control of the membrane potential and cell excitability in addition to different cell functions such as cell volume regulation, proliferation, cell migration, angiogenesis as well as apoptosis. Because these physiological processes are essential for the correct cell function, K+ channels have been associated with a growing number of diseases including cancer. In fact, different K+ channel families such as the voltage-gated K+ channels, the ether à-go-go K+ channels, the two pore domain K+ channels and the Ca2+-activated K+ channels have been associated to tumor biology. Potassium channels have a role in neoplastic cell-cycle progression and their expression has been found abnormal in many types of tumors and cancer cells. In addition, the expression and activity of specific K+ channels have shown a significant correlation with the tumor malignancy grade. The aim of this overview is to summarize published data on K+ channels that exhibit oncogenic properties and have been linked to a more malignant cancer phenotype. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Membrane channels and transporters in cancers.

  5. Large-Conductance Calcium-Activated Potassium Channels in Glomerulus: From Cell Signal Integration to Disease

    PubMed Central

    Tao, Jie; Lan, Zhen; Wang, Yunman; Hei, Hongya; Tian, Lulu; Pan, Wanma; Zhang, Xuemei; Peng, Wen

    2016-01-01

    Large-conductance calcium-activated potassium (BK) channels are currently considered as vital players in a variety of renal physiological processes. In podocytes, BK channels become active in response to stimuli that increase local cytosolic Ca2+, possibly secondary to activation of slit diaphragm TRPC6 channels by chemical or mechanical stimuli. Insulin increases filtration barrier permeability through mobilization of BK channels. In mesangial cells, BK channels co-expressed with β1 subunits act as a major component of the counteractive response to contraction in order to regulate glomerular filtration. This review aims to highlight recent discoveries on the localization, physiological and pathological roles of BK channels in glomerulus. PMID:27445840

  6. Large-Conductance Calcium-Activated Potassium Channels in Glomerulus: From Cell Signal Integration to Disease.

    PubMed

    Tao, Jie; Lan, Zhen; Wang, Yunman; Hei, Hongya; Tian, Lulu; Pan, Wanma; Zhang, Xuemei; Peng, Wen

    2016-01-01

    Large-conductance calcium-activated potassium (BK) channels are currently considered as vital players in a variety of renal physiological processes. In podocytes, BK channels become active in response to stimuli that increase local cytosolic Ca(2+), possibly secondary to activation of slit diaphragm TRPC6 channels by chemical or mechanical stimuli. Insulin increases filtration barrier permeability through mobilization of BK channels. In mesangial cells, BK channels co-expressed with β1 subunits act as a major component of the counteractive response to contraction in order to regulate glomerular filtration. This review aims to highlight recent discoveries on the localization, physiological and pathological roles of BK channels in glomerulus. PMID:27445840

  7. Energetics of Multi-Ion Conduction Pathways in Potassium Ion Channels

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Potassium ion channels form pores in cell membranes, allowing potassium ions through while preventing the passage of sodium ions. Despite numerous high-resolution structures, it is not yet possible to relate their structure to their single molecule function other than at a qualitative level. Over the past decade, there has been a concerted effort using molecular dynamics to capture the thermodynamics and kinetics of conduction by calculating potentials of mean force (PMF). These can be used, in conjunction with the electro-diffusion theory, to predict the conductance of a specific ion channel. Here, we calculate seven independent PMFs, thereby studying the differences between two potassium ion channels, the effect of the CHARMM CMAP forcefield correction, and the sensitivity and reproducibility of the method. Thermodynamically stable ion–water configurations of the selectivity filter can be identified from all the free energy landscapes, but the heights of the kinetic barriers for potassium ions to move through the selectivity filter are, in nearly all cases, too high to predict conductances in line with experiment. This implies it is not currently feasible to predict the conductance of potassium ion channels, but other simpler channels may be more tractable. PMID:24353479

  8. Mechanisms contributing to myocardial potassium channel diversity, regulation and remodeling.

    PubMed

    Yang, Kai-Chien; Nerbonne, Jeanne M

    2016-04-01

    In the mammalian heart, multiple types of K(+) channels contribute to the control of cardiac electrical and mechanical functioning through the regulation of resting membrane potentials, action potential waveforms and refractoriness. There are similarly vast arrays of K(+) channel pore-forming and accessory subunits that contribute to the generation of functional myocardial K(+) channel diversity. Maladaptive remodeling of K(+) channels associated with cardiac and systemic diseases results in impaired repolarization and increased propensity for arrhythmias. Here, we review the diverse transcriptional, post-transcriptional, post-translational, and epigenetic mechanisms contributing to regulating the expression, distribution, and remodeling of cardiac K(+) channels under physiological and pathological conditions. PMID:26391345

  9. The antifungal plant defensin AtPDF2.3 from Arabidopsis thaliana blocks potassium channels.

    PubMed

    Vriens, Kim; Peigneur, Steve; De Coninck, Barbara; Tytgat, Jan; Cammue, Bruno P A; Thevissen, Karin

    2016-01-01

    Scorpion toxins that block potassium channels and antimicrobial plant defensins share a common structural CSαβ-motif. These toxins contain a toxin signature (K-C4-X-N) in their amino acid sequence, and based on in silico analysis of 18 plant defensin sequences, we noted the presence of a toxin signature (K-C5-R-G) in the amino acid sequence of the Arabidopsis thaliana defensin AtPDF2.3. We found that recombinant (r)AtPDF2.3 blocks Kv1.2 and Kv1.6 potassium channels, akin to the interaction between scorpion toxins and potassium channels. Moreover, rAtPDF2.3[G36N], a variant with a KCXN toxin signature (K-C5-R-N), is more potent in blocking Kv1.2 and Kv1.6 channels than rAtPDF2.3, whereas rAtPDF2.3[K33A], devoid of the toxin signature, is characterized by reduced Kv channel blocking activity. These findings highlight the importance of the KCXN scorpion toxin signature in the plant defensin sequence for blocking potassium channels. In addition, we found that rAtPDF2.3 inhibits the growth of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and that pathways regulating potassium transport and/or homeostasis confer tolerance of this yeast to rAtPDF2.3, indicating a role for potassium homeostasis in the fungal defence response towards rAtPDF2.3. Nevertheless, no differences in antifungal potency were observed between the rAtPDF2.3 variants, suggesting that antifungal activity and Kv channel inhibitory function are not linked. PMID:27573545

  10. The antifungal plant defensin AtPDF2.3 from Arabidopsis thaliana blocks potassium channels

    PubMed Central

    Vriens, Kim; Peigneur, Steve; De Coninck, Barbara; Tytgat, Jan; Cammue, Bruno P. A.; Thevissen, Karin

    2016-01-01

    Scorpion toxins that block potassium channels and antimicrobial plant defensins share a common structural CSαβ-motif. These toxins contain a toxin signature (K-C4-X-N) in their amino acid sequence, and based on in silico analysis of 18 plant defensin sequences, we noted the presence of a toxin signature (K-C5-R-G) in the amino acid sequence of the Arabidopsis thaliana defensin AtPDF2.3. We found that recombinant (r)AtPDF2.3 blocks Kv1.2 and Kv1.6 potassium channels, akin to the interaction between scorpion toxins and potassium channels. Moreover, rAtPDF2.3[G36N], a variant with a KCXN toxin signature (K-C5-R-N), is more potent in blocking Kv1.2 and Kv1.6 channels than rAtPDF2.3, whereas rAtPDF2.3[K33A], devoid of the toxin signature, is characterized by reduced Kv channel blocking activity. These findings highlight the importance of the KCXN scorpion toxin signature in the plant defensin sequence for blocking potassium channels. In addition, we found that rAtPDF2.3 inhibits the growth of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and that pathways regulating potassium transport and/or homeostasis confer tolerance of this yeast to rAtPDF2.3, indicating a role for potassium homeostasis in the fungal defence response towards rAtPDF2.3. Nevertheless, no differences in antifungal potency were observed between the rAtPDF2.3 variants, suggesting that antifungal activity and Kv channel inhibitory function are not linked. PMID:27573545

  11. Molecular Diversity and Regulation of Renal Potassium Channels

    PubMed Central

    HEBERT, STEVEN C.; DESIR, GARY; GIEBISCH, GERHARD; WANG, WENHUI

    2010-01-01

    K+ channels are widely distributed in both plant and animal cells where they serve many distinct functions. K+ channels set the membrane potential, generate electrical signals in excitable cells, and regulate cell volume and cell movement. In renal tubule epithelial cells, K+ channels are not only involved in basic functions such as the generation of the cell-negative potential and the control of cell volume, but also play a uniquely important role in K+ secretion. Moreover, K+ channels participate in the regulation of vascular tone in the glomerular circulation, and they are involved in the mechanisms mediating tubuloglomerular feedback. Significant progress has been made in defining the properties of renal K+ channels, including their location within tubule cells, their biophysical properties, regulation, and molecular structure. Such progress has been made possible by the application of single-channel analysis and the successful cloning of K+ channels of renal origin. PMID:15618483

  12. Potassium

    MedlinePlus

    ... blackberries Root vegetables, such as carrots and potatoes Citrus fruits, such as oranges and grapefruit Your kidneys help to keep the right amount of potassium in your body. If you have chronic kidney disease, your kidneys may not remove extra potassium from ...

  13. Scorpion Potassium Channel-blocking Defensin Highlights a Functional Link with Neurotoxin.

    PubMed

    Meng, Lanxia; Xie, Zili; Zhang, Qian; Li, Yang; Yang, Fan; Chen, Zongyun; Li, Wenxin; Cao, Zhijian; Wu, Yingliang

    2016-03-25

    The structural similarity between defensins and scorpion neurotoxins suggests that they might have evolved from a common ancestor. However, there is no direct experimental evidence demonstrating a functional link between scorpion neurotoxins and defensins. The scorpion defensin BmKDfsin4 from Mesobuthus martensiiKarsch contains 37 amino acid residues and a conserved cystine-stabilized α/β structural fold. The recombinant BmKDfsin4, a classical defensin, has been found to have inhibitory activity against Gram-positive bacteria such as Staphylococcus aureus, Bacillus subtilis, and Micrococcus luteusas well as methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus Interestingly, electrophysiological experiments showed that BmKDfsin4,like scorpion potassium channel neurotoxins, could effectively inhibit Kv1.1, Kv1.2, and Kv1.3 channel currents, and its IC50value for the Kv1.3 channel was 510.2 nm Similar to the structure-function relationships of classical scorpion potassium channel-blocking toxins, basic residues (Lys-13 and Arg-19) of BmKDfsin4 play critical roles in peptide-Kv1.3 channel interactions. Furthermore, mutagenesis and electrophysiological experiments demonstrated that the channel extracellular pore region is the binding site of BmKDfsin4, indicating that BmKDfsin4 adopts the same mechanism for blocking potassium channel currents as classical scorpion toxins. Taken together, our work identifies scorpion BmKDfsin4 as the first invertebrate defensin to block potassium channels. These findings not only demonstrate that defensins from invertebrate animals are a novel type of potassium channel blockers but also provide evidence of a functional link between defensins and neurotoxins.

  14. Novel treatment strategies for smooth muscle disorders: Targeting Kv7 potassium channels.

    PubMed

    Haick, Jennifer M; Byron, Kenneth L

    2016-09-01

    Smooth muscle cells provide crucial contractile functions in visceral, vascular, and lung tissues. The contractile state of smooth muscle is largely determined by their electrical excitability, which is in turn influenced by the activity of potassium channels. The activity of potassium channels sustains smooth muscle cell membrane hyperpolarization, reducing cellular excitability and thereby promoting smooth muscle relaxation. Research over the past decade has indicated an important role for Kv7 (KCNQ) voltage-gated potassium channels in the regulation of the excitability of smooth muscle cells. Expression of multiple Kv7 channel subtypes has been demonstrated in smooth muscle cells from viscera (gastrointestinal, bladder, myometrial), from the systemic and pulmonary vasculature, and from the airways of the lung, from multiple species, including humans. A number of clinically used drugs, some of which were developed to target Kv7 channels in other tissues, have been found to exert robust effects on smooth muscle Kv7 channels. Functional studies have indicated that Kv7 channel activators and inhibitors have the ability to relax and contact smooth muscle preparations, respectively, suggesting a wide range of novel applications for the pharmacological tool set. This review summarizes recent findings regarding the physiological functions of Kv7 channels in smooth muscle, and highlights potential therapeutic applications based on pharmacological targeting of smooth muscle Kv7 channels throughout the body.

  15. Flow activates an endothelial potassium channel to release an endogenous nitrovasodilator.

    PubMed Central

    Cooke, J P; Rossitch, E; Andon, N A; Loscalzo, J; Dzau, V J

    1991-01-01

    Flow-mediated vasodilation is endothelium dependent. We hypothesized that flow activates a potassium channel on the endothelium, and that activation of this channel leads to the release of the endogenous nitrovasodilator, nitric oxide. To test this hypothesis, rabbit iliac arteries were perfused at varying flow rates, at a constant pressure of 60 mm Hg. Increments in flow induced proportional increases in vessel diameter, which were abolished by L,N-mono-methylarginine (the antagonist of nitric-oxide synthesis). Barium chloride, depolarizing solutions of potassium, verapamil, calcium-free medium, and antagonists of the KCa channel (charybdotoxin, iberiotoxin) also blocked flow-mediated vasodilation. Conversely, responses to other agonists of endothelium-dependent and independent vasodilation were unaffected by charybdotoxin or iberiotoxin. To confirm that flow activated a specific potassium channel to induce the release of nitric oxide, endothelial cells cultured on micro-carrier beads were added to a flow chamber containing a vascular ring without endothelium. Flow-stimulated endothelial cells released a diffusible vasodilator; the degree of vasorelaxation was dependent upon the flow rate. Relaxation was abrogated by barium, tetraethylammonium ion, or charybdotoxin, but was not affected by apamin, glybenclamide, tetrodotoxin, or ouabain. The data suggest that transmission of a hyperpolarizing current from endothelium to the vascular smooth muscle is not necessary for flow-mediated vasodilation. Flow activates a potassium channel (possibly the KCa channel) on the endothelial cell membrane that leads to the release of nitric oxide. Images PMID:1719029

  16. Activation of Mitochondrial Uncoupling Protein 4 and ATP-Sensitive Potassium Channel Cumulatively Decreases Superoxide Production in Insect Mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Slocińska, Malgorzata; Rosinski, Grzegorz; Jarmuszkiewicz, Wieslawa

    2016-01-01

    It has been evidenced that mitochondrial uncoupling protein 4 (UCP4) and ATP-regulated potassium channel (mKATP channel) of insect Gromphadorhina coqereliana mitochondria decrease superoxide anion production. We elucidated whether the two energy-dissipating systems work together on a modulation of superoxide level in cockroach mitochondria. Our data show that the simultaneous activation of UCP4 by palmitic acid and mKATP channel by pinacidil revealed a cumulative effect on weakening mitochondrial superoxide formation. The inhibition of UCP4 by GTP (and/or ATP) and mKATP channel by ATP elevated superoxide production. These results suggest a functional cooperation of both energy-dissipating systems in protection against oxidative stress in insects.

  17. hERG Potassium Channel Blockade by the HCN Channel Inhibitor Bradycardic Agent Ivabradine

    PubMed Central

    Melgari, Dario; Brack, Kieran E.; Zhang, Chuan; Zhang, Yihong; El Harchi, Aziza; Mitcheson, John S.; Dempsey, Christopher E.; Ng, G. André; Hancox, Jules C.

    2015-01-01

    Background Ivabradine is a specific bradycardic agent used in coronary artery disease and heart failure, lowering heart rate through inhibition of sinoatrial nodal HCN‐channels. This study investigated the propensity of ivabradine to interact with KCNH2‐encoded human Ether‐à‐go‐go–Related Gene (hERG) potassium channels, which strongly influence ventricular repolarization and susceptibility to torsades de pointes arrhythmia. Methods and Results Patch clamp recordings of hERG current (IhERG) were made from hERG expressing cells at 37°C. IhERG was inhibited with an IC50 of 2.07 μmol/L for the hERG 1a isoform and 3.31 μmol/L for coexpressed hERG 1a/1b. The voltage and time‐dependent characteristics of IhERG block were consistent with preferential gated‐state‐dependent channel block. Inhibition was partially attenuated by the N588K inactivation‐mutant and the S624A pore‐helix mutant and was strongly reduced by the Y652A and F656A S6 helix mutants. In docking simulations to a MthK‐based homology model of hERG, the 2 aromatic rings of the drug could form multiple π‐π interactions with the aromatic side chains of both Y652 and F656. In monophasic action potential (MAP) recordings from guinea‐pig Langendorff‐perfused hearts, ivabradine delayed ventricular repolarization and produced a steepening of the MAPD90 restitution curve. Conclusions Ivabradine prolongs ventricular repolarization and alters electrical restitution properties at concentrations relevant to the upper therapeutic range. In absolute terms ivabradine does not discriminate between hERG and HCN channels: it inhibits IhERG with similar potency to that reported for native If and HCN channels, with S6 binding determinants resembling those observed for HCN4. These findings may have important implications both clinically and for future bradycardic drug design. PMID:25911606

  18. Hemin inhibits the large conductance potassium channel in brain mitochondria: a putative novel mechanism of neurodegeneration.

    PubMed

    Augustynek, Bartłomiej; Kudin, Alexei P; Bednarczyk, Piotr; Szewczyk, Adam; Kunz, Wolfram S

    2014-07-01

    Intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) is a pathological condition that accompanies certain neurological diseases like hemorrhagic stroke or brain trauma. Its effects are severely destructive to the brain and can be fatal. There is an entire spectrum of harmful factors which are associated with the pathogenesis of ICH. One of them is a massive release of hemin from the decomposed erythrocytes. It has been previously shown, that hemin can inhibit the large-conductance Ca(2+)-regulated potassium channel in the plasma membrane. However, it remained unclear whether this phenomenon applies also to the mitochondrial large-conductance Ca(2+)-regulated potassium channel. The aim of the present study was to determine the impact of hemin on the activity of the large conductance Ca(2+)-regulated potassium channel in the brain mitochondria (mitoBKCa). In order to do so, we have used a patch-clamp technique and shown that hemin inhibits mitoBKCa in human astrocytoma U-87 MG cell line mitochondria. Since opening of the mitochondrial potassium channels is known to be cytoprotective, we have elucidated whether hemin can attenuate some of the beneficiary effects of potassium channel opening. We have studied the effect of hemin on reactive oxygen species synthesis, and mild mitochondrial uncoupling in isolated rat brain mitochondria. Taken together, our data show that hemin inhibits mitoBKCa and partially abolishes some of the cytoprotective properties of potassium channel opening. Considering the role of the mitoBKCa in cytoprotection, it can be presumed that its inhibition by hemin may be a novel mechanism contributing to the severity of the ICH symptoms. However, the validity of the presented results shall be further verified in an experimental model of ICH.

  19. Sequence of a probable potassium channel component encoded at shaker locus of drosophila

    SciTech Connect

    Tempel, B.L.; Papazian, D.M.; Schwarz, T.L.; Jan, Y.N.; Jan, L.Y.

    1987-08-24

    Potassium currents are crucial for the repolarization of electrically excitable membranes, a role that makes potassium channels a target for physiological modifications that alter synaptic efficacy. The Shaker locus of Drosophila is thought to encode a K/sup +/ channel. The sequence of two complementary DNA clones from the Shaker locus is reported here. The sequence predicts an integral membrane protein of 70,200 daltons containing seven potential membrane-spanning sequences. In addition, the predicted protein is homologous to the vertebrate sodium channel in a region previously proposed to be involved in the voltage-dependent activation of the Na/sup +/ channel. These results support the hypothesis that Shaker encodes a structural component of a voltage-dependent K/sup +/ channel and suggest a conserved mechanism for voltage activation.

  20. Recessive Mutations in KCNJ13, Encoding an Inwardly Rectifying Potassium Channel Subunit, Cause Leber Congenital Amaurosis

    PubMed Central

    Sergouniotis, Panagiotis I.; Davidson, Alice E.; Mackay, Donna S.; Li, Zheng; Yang, Xu; Plagnol, Vincent; Moore, Anthony T.; Webster, Andrew R.

    2011-01-01

    Inherited retinal degenerations, including retinitis pigmentosa (RP) and Leber congenital amaurosis (LCA), comprise a group of disorders showing high genetic and allelic heterogeneity. The determination of a full catalog of genes that can, when mutated, cause human retinal disease is a powerful means to understand the molecular physiology and pathology of the human retina. As more genes are found, remaining ones are likely to be rarer and/or unexpected candidates. Here, we identify a family in which all known RP/LCA-related genes are unlikely to be associated with their disorder. A combination of homozygosity mapping and exome sequencing identifies a homozygous nonsense mutation, c.496C>T (p.Arg166X), in a gene, KCNJ13, encoding a potassium channel subunit Kir7.1. A screen of a further 333 unrelated individuals with recessive retinal degeneration identified an additional proband, homozygous for a missense mutation, c.722T>C (p.Leu241Pro), in the same gene. The three affected members of the two families have been diagnosed with LCA. All have a distinct and unusual retinal appearance and a similar early onset of visual loss, suggesting both impaired retinal development and progressive retinal degeneration, involving both rod and cone pathways. Examination of heterozygotes revealed no ocular disease. This finding implicates Kir7.1 as having an important role in human retinal development and maintenance. This disorder adds to a small diverse group of diseases consequent upon loss or reduced function of inwardly rectifying potassium channels affecting various organs. The distinct retinal phenotype that results from biallelic mutations in KCNJ13 should facilitate the molecular diagnosis in further families. PMID:21763485

  1. Divalent ion trapping inside potassium channels of human T lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    1989-01-01

    Using the patch-clamp whole-cell recording technique, we investigated the influence of external Ca2+, Ba2+, K+, Rb+, and internal Ca2+ on the rate of K+ channel inactivation in the human T lymphocyte-derived cell line, Jurkat E6-1. Raising external Ca2+ or Ba2+, or reducing external K+, accelerated the rate of the K+ current decay during a depolarizing voltage pulse. External Ba2+ also produced a use-dependent block of the K+ channels by entering the open channel and becoming trapped inside. Raising internal Ca2+ accelerated inactivation at lower concentrations than external Ca2+, but increasing the Ca2+ buffering with BAPTA did not affect inactivation. Raising [K+]o or adding Rb+ slowed inactivation by competing with divalent ions. External Rb+ also produced a use-dependent removal of block of K+ channels loaded with Ba2+ or Ca2+. From the removal of this block we found that under normal conditions approximately 25% of the channels were loaded with Ca2+, whereas under conditions with 10 microM internal Ca2+ the proportion of channels loaded with Ca2+ increased to approximately 50%. Removing all the divalent cations from the external and internal solution resulted in the induction of a non-selective, voltage-independent conductance. We conclude that Ca2+ ions from the outside or the inside can bind to a site at the K+ channel and thereby block the channel or accelerate inactivation. PMID:2786551

  2. Mechanisms of maurotoxin action on Shaker potassium channels.

    PubMed Central

    Avdonin, V; Nolan, B; Sabatier, J M; De Waard, M; Hoshi, T

    2000-01-01

    Maurotoxin (alpha-KTx6.2) is a toxin derived from the Tunisian chactoid scorpion Scorpio maurus palmatus, and it is a member of a new family of toxins that contain four disulfide bridges (, Eur. J. Biochem. 254:468-479). We investigated the mechanism of the maurotoxin action on voltage-gated K(+) channels expressed in Xenopus oocytes. Maurotoxin blocks the channels in a voltage-dependent manner, with its efficacy increasing with greater hyperpolarization. We show that an amino acid residue in the external mouth of the channel pore segment that is known to be involved in the actions of other peptide toxins is also involved in maurotoxin's interaction with the channel. We conclude that, despite the unusual disulfide bridge pattern, the mechanism of the maurotoxin action is similar to those of other K(+) channel toxins with only three disulfide bridges. PMID:10920011

  3. Differential role of IK and BK potassium channels as mediators of intrinsic and extrinsic apoptotic cell death.

    PubMed

    McFerrin, Michael B; Turner, Kathryn L; Cuddapah, Vishnu Anand; Sontheimer, Harald

    2012-11-15

    An important event during apoptosis is regulated cell condensation known as apoptotic volume decrease (AVD). Ion channels have emerged as essential regulators of this process mediating the release of K(+) and Cl(-), which together with osmotically obliged water, results in the condensation of cell volume. Using a Grade IV human glioblastoma cell line, we examined the contribution of calcium-activated K(+) channels (K(Ca) channels) to AVD after the addition of either staurosporine (Stsp) or TNF-α-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) to activate the intrinsic or extrinsic pathway of apoptosis, respectively. We show that AVD can be inhibited in both pathways by high extracellular K(+) or the removal of calcium. However, BAPTA-AM was only able to inhibit Stsp-initiated AVD, whereas TRAIL-induced AVD was unaffected. Specific K(Ca) channel inhibitors revealed that Stsp-induced AVD was dependent on K(+) efflux through intermediate-conductance calcium-activated potassium (IK) channels, while TRAIL-induced AVD was mediated by large-conductance calcium-activated potassium (BK) channels. Fura-2 imaging demonstrated that Stsp induced a rapid and modest rise in calcium that was sustained over the course of AVD, while TRAIL produced no detectable rise in global intracellular calcium. Inhibition of IK channels with clotrimazole or 1-[(2-chlorophenyl) diphenylmethyl]-1H-pyrazole (TRAM-34) blocked downstream caspase-3 activation after Stsp addition, while paxilline, a specific BK channel inhibitor, had no effect. Treatment with ionomycin also induced an IK-dependent cell volume decrease. Together these results show that calcium is both necessary and sufficient to achieve volume decrease and that the two major pathways of apoptosis use unique calcium signaling to efflux K(+) through different K(Ca) channels.

  4. Cytoplasmic Domains and Voltage-Dependent Potassium Channel Gating

    PubMed Central

    Barros, Francisco; Domínguez, Pedro; de la Peña, Pilar

    2012-01-01

    The basic architecture of the voltage-dependent K+ channels (Kv channels) corresponds to a transmembrane protein core in which the permeation pore, the voltage-sensing components and the gating machinery (cytoplasmic facing gate and sensor–gate coupler) reside. Usually, large protein tails are attached to this core, hanging toward the inside of the cell. These cytoplasmic regions are essential for normal channel function and, due to their accessibility to the cytoplasmic environment, constitute obvious targets for cell-physiological control of channel behavior. Here we review the present knowledge about the molecular organization of these intracellular channel regions and their role in both setting and controlling Kv voltage-dependent gating properties. This includes the influence that they exert on Kv rapid/N-type inactivation and on activation/deactivation gating of Shaker-like and eag-type Kv channels. Some illustrative examples about the relevance of these cytoplasmic domains determining the possibilities for modulation of Kv channel gating by cellular components are also considered. PMID:22470342

  5. Computational Studies of Venom Peptides Targeting Potassium Channels.

    PubMed

    Chen, Rong; Chung, Shin-Ho

    2015-12-01

    Small peptides isolated from the venom of animals are potential scaffolds for ion channel drug discovery. This review article mainly focuses on the computational studies that have advanced our understanding of how various toxins interfere with the function of K⁺ channels. We introduce the computational tools available for the study of toxin-channel interactions. We then discuss how these computational tools have been fruitfully applied to elucidate the mechanisms of action of a wide range of venom peptides from scorpions, spiders, and sea anemone. PMID:26633507

  6. Computational Studies of Venom Peptides Targeting Potassium Channels

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Rong; Chung, Shin-Ho

    2015-01-01

    Small peptides isolated from the venom of animals are potential scaffolds for ion channel drug discovery. This review article mainly focuses on the computational studies that have advanced our understanding of how various toxins interfere with the function of K+ channels. We introduce the computational tools available for the study of toxin-channel interactions. We then discuss how these computational tools have been fruitfully applied to elucidate the mechanisms of action of a wide range of venom peptides from scorpions, spiders, and sea anemone. PMID:26633507

  7. Characterization of Voltage-Gated Potassium Channels in Human Neural Progenitor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Schaarschmidt, Grit; Wegner, Florian; Schwarz, Sigrid C.; Schmidt, Hartmut; Schwarz, Johannes

    2009-01-01

    Background Voltage-gated potassium (Kv) channels are among the earliest ion channels to appear during brain development, suggesting a functional requirement for progenitor cell proliferation and/or differentiation. We tested this hypothesis, using human neural progenitor cells (hNPCs) as a model system. Methodology/Principal Findings In proliferating hNPCs a broad spectrum of Kv channel subtypes was identified using quantitative real-time PCR with a predominant expression of the A-type channel Kv4.2. In whole-cell patch-clamp recordings Kv currents were separated into a large transient component characteristic for fast-inactivating A-type potassium channels (IA) and a small, sustained component produced by delayed-rectifying channels (IK). During differentiation the expression of IA as well as A-type channel transcripts dramatically decreased, while IK producing delayed-rectifiers were upregulated. Both Kv currents were differentially inhibited by selective neurotoxins like phrixotoxin-1 and α-dendrotoxin as well as by antagonists like 4-aminopyridine, ammoniumchloride, tetraethylammonium chloride and quinidine. In viability and proliferation assays chronic inhibition of the A-type currents severely disturbed the cell cycle and precluded proper hNPC proliferation, while the blockade of delayed-rectifiers by α-dendrotoxin increased proliferation. Conclusions/Significance These findings suggest that A-type potassium currents are essential for proper proliferation of immature multipotent hNPCs. PMID:19584922

  8. Adrenergic modulation of the delayed rectifier potassium channel in calf cardiac Purkinje fibers.

    PubMed Central

    Bennett, P; McKinney, L; Begenisich, T; Kass, R S

    1986-01-01

    We have investigated the modulation of the delayed rectifier potassium channel in calf cardiac Purkinje fibers by the neurohormone norepinephrine. We find that 0.5 microM norepinephrine increases this K channel current by a factor of 2.7. A maximal increase of about four was found for concentrations of 1 microM and above. Norepinephrine produced a small (less than 5 mV) and variable shift of the K channel reversal potential toward more negative values. The kinetics of the potassium channel are well described by a two-exponential process, both in the absence and presence of norepinephrine. However, norepinephrine substantially decreases the slower time constant with no significant effect on the fast time constant. Potassium channel activation curves in the presence of norepinephrine are very similar to control curves except at large positive potentials. A simple sequential three-state model for this channel can reproduce these data both with and without norepinephrine. The logarithms of the rate constants derived from this model are quadratic functions of voltage, suggesting the involvement of electric field-induced dipoles in the gating of this channel. Most of the kinetic effects of norepinephrine appear to be on a single rate constant. PMID:2424513

  9. Non-Michaelis-Menten kinetics model for conductance of low-conductance potassium ion channels.

    PubMed

    Tolokh, Igor S; Tolokh, Illya I; Cho, Hee Cheol; D'Avanzo, Nazzareno; Backx, Peter H; Goldman, Saul; Gray, C G

    2005-02-01

    A reduced kinetics model is proposed for ion permeation in low-conductance potassium ion channels with zero net electrical charge in the selectivity filter region. The selectivity filter is assumed to be the only conductance-determining part of the channel. Ion entry and exit rate constants depend on the occupancy of the filter due to ion-ion interactions. The corresponding rates are assumed slow relative to the rates of ion motion between binding sites inside the filter, allowing a reduction of the kinetics model of the filter by averaging the entry and exit rate constants over the states with a particular occupancy number. The reduced kinetics model for low-conductance channels is described by only three states and two sets of effective rate constants characterizing transitions between these states. An explicit expression for the channel conductance as a function of symmetrical external ion concentration is derived under the assumption that the average electrical mobility of ions in the selectivity filter region in a limited range of ion concentrations does not depend on these concentrations. The simplified conductance model is shown to provide a good description of the experimentally observed conductance-concentration curve for the low-conductance potassium channel Kir2.1, and also predicts the mean occupancy of the selectivity filter of this channel. We find that at physiological external ion concentrations this occupancy is much lower than the value of two ions observed for one of the high-conductance potassium channels, KcsA.

  10. Combinatorial augmentation of voltage-gated KCNQ potassium channels by chemical openers

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Qiaojie; Sun, Haiyan; Zhang, Yangming; Nan, Fajun; Li, Min

    2008-01-01

    Noninactivating potassium current formed by KCNQ2 (Kv7.2) and KCNQ3 (Kv7.3) subunits resembles neuronal M-currents which are activated by voltage and play a critical role in controlling membrane excitability. Activation of voltage-gated potassium channels by a chemical opener is uncommon. Therefore, the mechanisms of action are worthy further investigation. Retigabine and zinc pyrithione are two activators for KCNQ channels but their molecular interactions with KCNQ channel remain largely elusive. Here we report that retigabine and zinc pyrithione recognize two different sites of KCNQ2 channels. Their agonistic actions are noncompetitive and allow for simultaneous binding of two different activators on the same channel complex, hence giving rise to combinatorial potentiation with characteristic properties of both openers. Examining their effects on mutant channels, we showed zinc pyrithione is capable of opening nonconductive channels and coapplication of zinc pyrithione and retigabine could restore a disease mutant channel similar to wild type. Our results indicate two independent activator binding sites present in KCNQ channels. The resultant combinatorial potentiation by multiple synthetic chemical openers indicates that KCNQ channels are accessible to various types and combinations of pharmacological regulation. PMID:18272489

  11. Astemizole Derivatives as Fluorescent Probes for hERG Potassium Channel Imaging.

    PubMed

    Wang, Beilei; Liu, Zhenzhen; Ma, Zhao; Li, Minyong; Du, Lupei

    2016-03-10

    The detection and imaging of hERG potassium channels in living cells can provide useful information for hERG-correlation studies. Herein, three small-molecule fluorescent probes, based on the potent hERG channel inhibitor astemizole, for the imaging of hERG channels in hERG-transfected HEK293 cells (hERG-HEK293) and human colorectal cancer cells (HT-29), are described. These probes are expected to be applied in the physiological and pathological studies of hERG channels. PMID:26985309

  12. OsKAT2 is the prevailing functional inward rectifier potassium channels in rice guard cell.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Hyunsik; Yoon, Jin-Young; Cho, Hana; Kim, Beom-Gi

    2013-01-01

    AtKAT1 plays roles as a major channel to uptake K(+) in guard cell when stomata open in dicot model plant Arabidopsis. In a recent publication, we isolated 3 KAT-like potassium channels in rice. We expressed them in CHO cell to identify electrophysiological characteristics of the channels. OsKAT2 showed much bigger inwardly rectifying potassium channel activities among them. The histochemical X-glu staining of transgenic rice leaf blades expressing β-glucuronidase fused with OsKAT2 promoter showed that the OsKAT2 is dominantly expressed in rice guard cell. These findings indicate that OsKAT2 may be a functional ortholog of AtKAT1 in rice. Thus this gene will be the prime target for engineering the guard cell movement to improve drought tolerance in monocot plants, including most major crops.

  13. Regulation of Aldosterone Biosynthesis by the Kir3.4 (KCNJ5) Potassium Channel

    PubMed Central

    Velarde-Miranda, Carolina; Gomez-Sanchez, Elise P.; Gomez-Sanchez, Celso E.

    2013-01-01

    Summary The G-protein-activated inwardly rectifying potassium channel Kir3.4 is expressed in the zona glomerulosa cell membrane and transports potassium out of the cell. Angiotensin II stimulation of aldosterone secretion is mediated in part by suppression of the transcription of KCNJ5, the gene coding for Kir3.4, and blocking channel activity. This results in membrane depolarization, mobilization of intracellular calcium, activation of the calcium-calmodulin pathway, and increasing gene transcription of steroidogenic enzymes required for aldosterone secretion. In 40–60% of aldosterone-producing adenomas there is a somatic mutation in the region of the KCNJ5 gene that codes for the selectivity filter that decreases potassium selectivity, allowing sodium to leak into the cells, thus depolarizing the membrane and initiating events that result in increased aldosterone synthesis. The mechanism by which mutated KCNJ5 induces cell proliferation and adenoma formation remains unclear. PMID:23829355

  14. Distinct potassium channels on pain-sensing neurons.

    PubMed

    Rasband, M N; Park, E W; Vanderah, T W; Lai, J; Porreca, F; Trimmer, J S

    2001-11-01

    Differential expression of ion channels contributes functional diversity to sensory neuron signaling. We find nerve injury induced by the Chung model of neuropathic pain leads to striking reductions in voltage-gated K(+) (Kv) channel subunit expression in dorsal root ganglia (DRG) neurons, suggesting a potential molecular mechanism for hyperexcitability of injured nerves. Moreover, specific classes of DRG neurons express distinct Kv channel subunit combinations. Importantly, Kv1.4 is the sole Kv1 alpha subunit expressed in smaller diameter neurons, suggesting that homomeric Kv1.4 channels predominate in A delta and C fibers arising from these cells. These neurons are presumably nociceptors, because they also express the VR-1 capsaicin receptor, calcitonin gene-related peptide, and/or Na(+) channel SNS/PN3/Nav1.8. In contrast, larger diameter neurons associated with mechanoreception and proprioception express high levels of Kv1.1 and Kv1.2 without Kv1.4 or other Kv1 alpha subunits, suggesting that heteromers of these subunits predominate on large, myelinated afferent axons that extend from these cells. PMID:11698689

  15. A Conserved Residue Cluster That Governs Kinetics of ATP-dependent Gating of Kir6.2 Potassium Channels*

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Roger S.; Wright, Jordan D.; Pless, Stephan A.; Nunez, John-Jose; Kim, Robin Y.; Li, Jenny B. W.; Yang, Runying; Ahern, Christopher A.; Kurata, Harley T.

    2015-01-01

    ATP-sensitive potassium (KATP) channels are heteromultimeric complexes of an inwardly rectifying Kir channel (Kir6.x) and sulfonylurea receptors. Their regulation by intracellular ATP and ADP generates electrical signals in response to changes in cellular metabolism. We investigated channel elements that control the kinetics of ATP-dependent regulation of KATP (Kir6.2 + SUR1) channels using rapid concentration jumps. WT Kir6.2 channels re-open after rapid washout of ATP with a time constant of ∼60 ms. Extending similar kinetic measurements to numerous mutants revealed fairly modest effects on gating kinetics despite significant changes in ATP sensitivity and open probability. However, we identified a pair of highly conserved neighboring amino acids (Trp-68 and Lys-170) that control the rate of channel opening and inhibition in response to ATP. Paradoxically, mutations of Trp-68 or Lys-170 markedly slow the kinetics of channel opening (500 and 700 ms for W68L and K170N, respectively), while increasing channel open probability. Examining the functional effects of these residues using φ value analysis revealed a steep negative slope. This finding implies that these residues play a role in lowering the transition state energy barrier between open and closed channel states. Using unnatural amino acid incorporation, we demonstrate the requirement for a planar amino acid at Kir6.2 position 68 for normal channel gating, which is potentially necessary to localize the ϵ-amine of Lys-170 in the phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate-binding site. Overall, our findings identify a discrete pair of highly conserved residues with an essential role for controlling gating kinetics of Kir channels. PMID:25934393

  16. A Conserved Residue Cluster That Governs Kinetics of ATP-dependent Gating of Kir6.2 Potassium Channels.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Roger S; Wright, Jordan D; Pless, Stephan A; Nunez, John-Jose; Kim, Robin Y; Li, Jenny B W; Yang, Runying; Ahern, Christopher A; Kurata, Harley T

    2015-06-19

    ATP-sensitive potassium (KATP) channels are heteromultimeric complexes of an inwardly rectifying Kir channel (Kir6.x) and sulfonylurea receptors. Their regulation by intracellular ATP and ADP generates electrical signals in response to changes in cellular metabolism. We investigated channel elements that control the kinetics of ATP-dependent regulation of KATP (Kir6.2 + SUR1) channels using rapid concentration jumps. WT Kir6.2 channels re-open after rapid washout of ATP with a time constant of ∼60 ms. Extending similar kinetic measurements to numerous mutants revealed fairly modest effects on gating kinetics despite significant changes in ATP sensitivity and open probability. However, we identified a pair of highly conserved neighboring amino acids (Trp-68 and Lys-170) that control the rate of channel opening and inhibition in response to ATP. Paradoxically, mutations of Trp-68 or Lys-170 markedly slow the kinetics of channel opening (500 and 700 ms for W68L and K170N, respectively), while increasing channel open probability. Examining the functional effects of these residues using φ value analysis revealed a steep negative slope. This finding implies that these residues play a role in lowering the transition state energy barrier between open and closed channel states. Using unnatural amino acid incorporation, we demonstrate the requirement for a planar amino acid at Kir6.2 position 68 for normal channel gating, which is potentially necessary to localize the ϵ-amine of Lys-170 in the phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate-binding site. Overall, our findings identify a discrete pair of highly conserved residues with an essential role for controlling gating kinetics of Kir channels.

  17. The effect of copper sulfate, potassium permanganate, and peracetic acid on Ichthyobodo necator in channel catfish

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ichthyobodo necator is a single celled biflagellate that can cause significant mortalities in fish, particularly young, tank-reared fish. Copper sulfate (CuSO4), potassium permanganate (KMnO4) and peracetic acid (PAA) were evaluated for effectiveness against Ichthybodosis in juvenile channel catfis...

  18. Modification of sodium and potassium channel gating kinetics by ether and halothane

    SciTech Connect

    Bean, B.P.; Shrager, P.; Goldstein, D.A.

    1981-03-01

    The effects of ether and halothane on the kinetics of sodium and potassium currents were investigated in the crayfish giant axon. Both general anesthetics produced a reversible, dose-dependent speeding up of sodium current inactivation at all membrane potentials, with no change in the rising phase of the currents. Double-pulse inactivation experiments with ether also showed faster inactivation, but the rate of recovery from inactivation at negative potentials was not affected. Ether shifted the midpoint of the steady-state fast inactivation curve in the hyperpolarizing direction and made the curve steeper. The activation of potassium currents was faster with ether present, with no change in the voltage dependence of steady-state potassium currents. Ether and halothane are known to perturb the structure of lipid bilayer membranes; the alterations in sodium and potassium channel gating kinetics are consistent with the hypothesis that the rats of the gating processes of the channels can be affected by the state of the lipids surrounding the channels, but a direct effect of ether and halothane on the protein part of the channels cannot be ruled out.

  19. Altered potassium ATP channel signaling in mesenteric arteries of old high salt-fed rats

    PubMed Central

    Whidden, Melissa A.; Basgut, Bilgen; Kirichenko, Nataliya; Erdos, Benedek; Tümer, Nihal

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] Both aging and the consumption of a high salt diet are associated with clear changes in the vascular system that can lead to the development of cardiovascular disease; however the mechanisms are not clearly understood. Therefore, we examined whether aging and the consumption of excess salt alters the function of potassium ATP-dependent channel signaling in mesenteric arteries [Methods] Young (7 months) and old (29 months) Fischer 344 x Brown Norway rats were fed a control or a high salt diet (8% NaCl) for 12 days and mesenteric arteries were utilized for vascular reactivity measurements. [Results] Acetylcholine-induced endothelium relaxation was significantly reduced in old arteries (81 ± 4%) when compared with young arteries (92 ± 2%). Pretreatment with the potassium-ATP channel blocker glibenclamide reduced relaxation to acetylcholine in young arteries but did not alter dilation in old arteries. On a high salt diet, endothelium dilation to acetylcholine was significantly reduced in old salt arteries (60 ± 3%) when compared with old control arteries (81 ± 4%). Glibenclamide reduced acetylcholine-induced dilation in young salt arteries but had no effect on old salt arteries. Dilation to cromakalim, a potassium-ATP channel opener, was reduced in old salt arteries when compared with old control arteries. [Conclusion] These findings demonstrate that aging impairs endothelium-dependent relaxation in mesenteric arteries. Furthermore, a high salt diet alters the function of potassium-ATP-dependent channel signaling in old isolated mesenteric arteries and affects the mediation of relaxation stimuli. PMID:27508155

  20. Ligand action on sodium, potassium, and calcium channels: role of permeant ions.

    PubMed

    Zhorov, Boris S; Tikhonov, Denis B

    2013-03-01

    Ion channels are targets for many naturally occurring toxins and small-molecule drugs. Despite great progress in the X-ray crystallography of ion channels, we still do not have a complete understanding of the atomistic mechanisms of channel modulation by ligands. In particular, the importance of the simultaneous interaction of permeant ions with the ligand and the channel protein has not been the focus of much attention. Considering these interactions often allows one to rationalize the highly diverse experimental data within the framework of relatively simple structural models. This has been illustrated in earlier studies on the action of local anesthetics, sodium channel activators, as well as blockers of potassium and calcium channels. Here, we discuss the available data with a view to understanding the use-, voltage-, and current carrying cation-dependence of the ligand action, paradoxes in structure--activity relationships, and effects of mutations in these ion channels.

  1. Effects of donepezil on hERG potassium channels.

    PubMed

    Chae, Yun Ju; Lee, Hong Joon; Jeon, Ji Hyun; Kim, In-Beom; Choi, Jin-Sung; Sung, Ki-Wug; Hahn, Sang June

    2015-02-01

    Donepezil is a potent, selective inhibitor of acetylcholinesterase, which is used for the treatment of Alzheimer's disease. Whole-cell patch-clamp technique and Western blot analyses were used to study the effects of donepezil on the human ether-a-go-go-related gene (hERG) channel. Donepezil inhibited the tail current of the hERG in a concentration-dependent manner with an IC50 of 1.3 μM. The metabolites of donepezil, 6-ODD and 5-ODD, inhibited the hERG currents in a similar concentration-dependent manner; the IC50 values were 1.0 and 1.5 μM, respectively. A fast drug perfusion system demonstrated that donepezil interacted with both the open and inactivated states of the hERG. A fast application of donepezil during the tail currents inhibited the open state of the hERG in a concentration-dependent manner with an IC50 of 2.7 μM. Kinetic analysis of donepezil in an open state of the hERG yielded blocking and unblocking rate constants of 0.54 µM(-1)s(-1) and 1.82 s(-1), respectively. The block of the hERG by donepezil was voltage-dependent with a steep increase across the voltage range of channel activation. Donepezil caused a reduction in the hERG channel protein trafficking to the plasma membrane at low concentration, but decreased the channel protein expression at higher concentrations. These results suggest that donepezil inhibited the hERG at a supratherapeutic concentration, and that it did so by preferentially binding to the activated (open and/or inactivated) states of the channels and by inhibiting the trafficking and expression of the hERG channel protein in the plasma membrane.

  2. Functional Reconstitution of a Voltage-Gated Potassium Channel in Giant Unilamellar Vesicles

    PubMed Central

    Aimon, Sophie; Manzi, John; Schmidt, Daniel; Poveda Larrosa, Jose Antonio; Bassereau, Patricia; Toombes, Gilman E. S.

    2011-01-01

    Voltage-gated ion channels are key players in cellular excitability. Recent studies suggest that their behavior can depend strongly on the membrane lipid composition and physical state. In vivo studies of membrane/channel and channel/channel interactions are challenging as membrane properties are actively regulated in living cells, and are difficult to control in experimental settings. We developed a method to reconstitute functional voltage-gated ion channels into cell-sized Giant Unilamellar Vesicles (GUVs) in which membrane composition, tension and geometry can be controlled. First, a voltage-gated potassium channel, KvAP, was purified, fluorescently labeled and reconstituted into small proteoliposomes. Small proteoliposomes were then converted into GUVs via electroformation. GUVs could be formed using different lipid compositions and buffers containing low (5 mM) or near-physiological (100 mM) salt concentrations. Protein incorporation into GUVs was characterized with quantitative confocal microscopy, and the protein density of GUVs was comparable to the small proteoliposomes from which they were formed. Furthermore, patch-clamp measurements confirmed that the reconstituted channels retained potassium selectivity and voltage-gated activation. GUVs containing functional voltage-gated ion channels will allow the study of channel activity, distribution and diffusion while controlling membrane state, and should prove a powerful tool for understanding how the membrane modulates cellular excitability. PMID:21998666

  3. Active Sites of Spinoxin, a Potassium Channel Scorpion Toxin, Elucidated by Systematic Alanine Scanning.

    PubMed

    Peigneur, Steve; Yamaguchi, Yoko; Kawano, Chihiro; Nose, Takeru; Nirthanan, Selvanayagam; Gopalakrishnakone, Ponnampalam; Tytgat, Jan; Sato, Kazuki

    2016-05-31

    Peptide toxins from scorpion venoms constitute the largest group of toxins that target the voltage-gated potassium channel (Kv). Spinoxin (SPX) isolated from the venom of scorpion Heterometrus spinifer is a 34-residue peptide neurotoxin cross-linked by four disulfide bridges. SPX is a potent inhibitor of Kv1.3 potassium channels (IC50 = 63 nM), which are considered to be valid molecular targets in the diagnostics and therapy of various autoimmune disorders and cancers. Here we synthesized 25 analogues of SPX and analyzed the role of each amino acid in SPX using alanine scanning to study its structure-function relationships. All synthetic analogues showed similar disulfide bond pairings and secondary structures as native SPX. Alanine replacements at Lys(23), Asn(26), and Lys(30) resulted in loss of activity against Kv1.3 potassium channels, whereas replacements at Arg(7), Met(14), Lys(27), and Tyr(32) also largely reduced inhibitory activity. These results suggest that the side chains of these amino acids in SPX play an important role in its interaction with Kv1.3 channels. In particular, Lys(23) appears to be a key residue that underpins Kv1.3 channel inhibition. Of these seven amino acid residues, four are basic amino acids, suggesting that the positive electrostatic potential on the surface of SPX is likely required for high affinity interaction with Kv1.3 channels. This study provides insight into the structure-function relationships of SPX with implications for the rational design of new lead compounds targeting potassium channels with high potency. PMID:27159046

  4. Suppression of the Eag1 potassium channel sensitizes glioblastoma cells to injury caused by temozolomide

    PubMed Central

    Sales, Thais Torquato; Resende, Fernando Francisco Borges; Chaves, Natália Lemos; Titze-De-Almeida, Simoneide Souza; Báo, Sônia Nair; Brettas, Marcella Lemos; Titze-De-Almeida, Ricardo

    2016-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most aggressive type of human primary brain tumor. The standard treatment protocol includes radiotherapy in combination with temozolomide (TMZ). Despite advances in GBM treatment, the survival time of patients diagnosed with glioma is 14.5 months. Regarding tumor biology, various types of cancer cell overexpress the ether à go-go 1 (Eag1) potassium channel. Therefore, the present study examined the role of Eag1 in the cell damage caused by TMZ on the U87MG glioblastoma cell line. Eag1 was inhibited using a channel blocker (astemizole) or silenced by a short-hairpin RNA expression vector (pKv10.1-3). pKv10.1-3 (0.2 µg) improved the Eag1 silencing caused by 250 µM TMZ, as determined by reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction and immunocytochemistry. Additionally, inhibiting Eag1 with the vector or astemizole (5 µM) reduced glioblastoma cell viability and sensitized cells to TMZ. Cell viability decreased by 63% for pKv10.1-3 + TMZ compared with 34% for TMZ alone, and by 77% for astemizole + TMZ compared with 46% for TMZ alone, as determined by MTT assay. In addition, both the vector and astemizole increased the apoptosis rate of glioblastoma cells triggered by TMZ, as determined by an Annexin V apoptosis assay. Collectively, the current data reveal that Eag1 has a role in the damage caused to glioblastoma by TMZ. Furthermore, suppression of this channel can improve the action of TMZ on U87MG glioblastoma cells. Thus, silencing Eag1 is a promising strategy to improve GBM treatment and merits additional studies in animal models of glioma. PMID:27698831

  5. Suppression of the Eag1 potassium channel sensitizes glioblastoma cells to injury caused by temozolomide

    PubMed Central

    Sales, Thais Torquato; Resende, Fernando Francisco Borges; Chaves, Natália Lemos; Titze-De-Almeida, Simoneide Souza; Báo, Sônia Nair; Brettas, Marcella Lemos; Titze-De-Almeida, Ricardo

    2016-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most aggressive type of human primary brain tumor. The standard treatment protocol includes radiotherapy in combination with temozolomide (TMZ). Despite advances in GBM treatment, the survival time of patients diagnosed with glioma is 14.5 months. Regarding tumor biology, various types of cancer cell overexpress the ether à go-go 1 (Eag1) potassium channel. Therefore, the present study examined the role of Eag1 in the cell damage caused by TMZ on the U87MG glioblastoma cell line. Eag1 was inhibited using a channel blocker (astemizole) or silenced by a short-hairpin RNA expression vector (pKv10.1-3). pKv10.1-3 (0.2 µg) improved the Eag1 silencing caused by 250 µM TMZ, as determined by reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction and immunocytochemistry. Additionally, inhibiting Eag1 with the vector or astemizole (5 µM) reduced glioblastoma cell viability and sensitized cells to TMZ. Cell viability decreased by 63% for pKv10.1-3 + TMZ compared with 34% for TMZ alone, and by 77% for astemizole + TMZ compared with 46% for TMZ alone, as determined by MTT assay. In addition, both the vector and astemizole increased the apoptosis rate of glioblastoma cells triggered by TMZ, as determined by an Annexin V apoptosis assay. Collectively, the current data reveal that Eag1 has a role in the damage caused to glioblastoma by TMZ. Furthermore, suppression of this channel can improve the action of TMZ on U87MG glioblastoma cells. Thus, silencing Eag1 is a promising strategy to improve GBM treatment and merits additional studies in animal models of glioma.

  6. Down-state model of the voltage-sensing domain of a potassium channel.

    PubMed

    Schow, Eric V; Freites, J Alfredo; Gogna, Karun; White, Stephen H; Tobias, Douglas J

    2010-06-16

    Voltage-sensing domains (VSDs) of voltage-gated potassium (Kv) channels undergo a series of conformational changes upon membrane depolarization, from a down state when the channel is at rest to an up state, all of which lead to the opening of the channel pore. The crystal structures reported to date reveal the pore in an open state and the VSDs in an up state. To gain insights into the structure of the down state, we used a set of experiment-based restraints to generate a model of the down state of the KvAP VSD using molecular-dynamics simulations of the VSD in a lipid bilayer in excess water. The equilibrated VSD configuration is consistent with the biotin-avidin accessibility and internal salt-bridge data used to generate it, and with additional biotin-avidin accessibility data. In the model, both the S3b and S4 segments are displaced approximately 10 A toward the intracellular side with respect to the up-state configuration, but they do not move as a rigid body. Arginine side chains that carry the majority of the gating charge also make large excursions between the up and down states. In both states, arginines interact with water and participate in salt bridges with acidic residues and lipid phosphate groups. An important feature that emerges from the down-state model is that the N-terminal half of the S4 segment adopts a 3(10)-helical conformation, which appears to be necessary to satisfy a complex salt-bridge network.

  7. Designer and natural peptide toxin blockers of the KcsA potassium channel identified by phage display.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Ruiming; Dai, Hui; Mendelman, Netanel; Cuello, Luis G; Chill, Jordan H; Goldstein, Steve A N

    2015-12-15

    Peptide neurotoxins are powerful tools for research, diagnosis, and treatment of disease. Limiting broader use, most receptors lack an identified toxin that binds with high affinity and specificity. This paper describes isolation of toxins for one such orphan target, KcsA, a potassium channel that has been fundamental to delineating the structural basis for ion channel function. A phage-display strategy is presented whereby ∼1.5 million novel and natural peptides are fabricated on the scaffold present in ShK, a sea anemone type I (SAK1) toxin stabilized by three disulfide bonds. We describe two toxins selected by sorting on purified KcsA, one novel (Hui1, 34 residues) and one natural (HmK, 35 residues). Hui1 is potent, blocking single KcsA channels in planar lipid bilayers half-maximally (Ki) at 1 nM. Hui1 is also specific, inhibiting KcsA-Shaker channels in Xenopus oocytes with a Ki of 0.5 nM whereas Shaker, Kv1.2, and Kv1.3 channels are blocked over 200-fold less well. HmK is potent but promiscuous, blocking KcsA-Shaker, Shaker, Kv1.2, and Kv1.3 channels with Ki of 1-4 nM. As anticipated, one Hui1 blocks the KcsA pore and two conserved toxin residues, Lys21 and Tyr22, are essential for high-affinity binding. Unexpectedly, potassium ions traversing the channel from the inside confer voltage sensitivity to the Hui1 off-rate via Arg23, indicating that Lys21 is not in the pore. The 3D structure of Hui1 reveals a SAK1 fold, rationalizes KcsA inhibition, and validates the scaffold-based approach for isolation of high-affinity toxins for orphan receptors. PMID:26627718

  8. Designer and natural peptide toxin blockers of the KcsA potassium channel identified by phage display

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Ruiming; Dai, Hui; Mendelman, Netanel; Cuello, Luis G.; Chill, Jordan H.; Goldstein, Steve A. N.

    2015-01-01

    Peptide neurotoxins are powerful tools for research, diagnosis, and treatment of disease. Limiting broader use, most receptors lack an identified toxin that binds with high affinity and specificity. This paper describes isolation of toxins for one such orphan target, KcsA, a potassium channel that has been fundamental to delineating the structural basis for ion channel function. A phage-display strategy is presented whereby ∼1.5 million novel and natural peptides are fabricated on the scaffold present in ShK, a sea anemone type I (SAK1) toxin stabilized by three disulfide bonds. We describe two toxins selected by sorting on purified KcsA, one novel (Hui1, 34 residues) and one natural (HmK, 35 residues). Hui1 is potent, blocking single KcsA channels in planar lipid bilayers half-maximally (Ki) at 1 nM. Hui1 is also specific, inhibiting KcsA-Shaker channels in Xenopus oocytes with a Ki of 0.5 nM whereas Shaker, Kv1.2, and Kv1.3 channels are blocked over 200-fold less well. HmK is potent but promiscuous, blocking KcsA-Shaker, Shaker, Kv1.2, and Kv1.3 channels with Ki of 1–4 nM. As anticipated, one Hui1 blocks the KcsA pore and two conserved toxin residues, Lys21 and Tyr22, are essential for high-affinity binding. Unexpectedly, potassium ions traversing the channel from the inside confer voltage sensitivity to the Hui1 off-rate via Arg23, indicating that Lys21 is not in the pore. The 3D structure of Hui1 reveals a SAK1 fold, rationalizes KcsA inhibition, and validates the scaffold-based approach for isolation of high-affinity toxins for orphan receptors. PMID:26627718

  9. Voltage-sensitive potassium channels in Limulus ventral photoreceptors

    PubMed Central

    1978-01-01

    The steady-state slope conductance of Limulus ventral photoreceptors increases markedly when the membrane is depolarized from rest. The ionic basis of this rectification has been examined with a voltage- clamp technique. Tail currents that occur when membrane potential is repolarized after having been depolarized have been identified. The tail currents reverse direction at a voltage that becomes more positive when Ko is increased. Rectification is reduced by extracellular 4- aminopyridine and by intracellular injection of tetra-ethyl-ammonium (TEA). These results indicate that the membrane rectification around resting potential is due primarily to voltage-sensitive K+ channels. The increase in gK caused by depolarization is not mediated by a voltage-dependent rise in in Cai++, since intracellular injection of Ca++ causes a decrease rather than an increase in slope conductance. TEA can be used to examine the functional role of the K+ channels because it blocks them without substantially affecting the light- activated Na+ conductance. The effect of TEA on response-intensity curves shows that the K+ channels serve to compress the voltage range of receptor potentials. PMID:621492

  10. A paradox concerning ion permeation of the delayed rectifier potassium ion channel in squid giant axons.

    PubMed Central

    Clay, J R

    1991-01-01

    1. The fully activated current-voltage relation (I-V) of the delayed rectifier potassium ion channel in squid giant axons has a non-linear dependence upon the driving force, V-EK, as I have previously demonstrated, where V is membrane potential and EK is the equilibrium potential for potassium ions. 2. The non-linearity of the I-V relation and its dependence upon external potassium ion concentration are both well described, phenomenologically, by the Goldman-Hodgkin-Katz (GHK) flux equation, as I have also previously demonstrated. As illustrated below, this result can be modelled using the Eyring rate theory of single-file diffusion of ions through a channel in the low-occupancy limit of the theory. 3. The GHK equation analysis and the low-occupancy limit of the Eyring rate theory are both consistent with the independence principle for movement of ions through the channel, which is at odds with tracer flux ratio results from the delayed rectifier, published elsewhere. Those results suggest that the channel is multiply occupied by two, or perhaps three, ions. 4. The resolution of this paradox is provided by a triple-binding site, multiple-occupancy model in which only one vacancy, at most, is allowed in the channel. This model predicts current-voltage relations which are consistent with the data (and with the phenomenological prediction of the GHK flux equation). The model is also consistent, approximately, with the tracer flux ratio results. PMID:1822560

  11. Voltage-gated potassium+ channel expression in coronary artery smooth muscle cells of SHR and WKY.

    PubMed

    Hu, Zhi; Ma, Aiqun; Zhang, Yushun; Xi, Yutao; Fan, Lihong; Wang, Tingzhong; Zhang, Tingting

    2014-12-01

    This study aims to compare the expression of genes and the molecular characteristic of voltage-gated K(+) channels, which make great effort in maintaining and controlling smooth muscle contraction, cellular membrane potential, and intracellular calcium ion currents in artery smooth muscle cells of SHR and WKY. Expression of potassium ions family in coronary artery was detected through reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction quantitatively. Significant levels of voltage-gated K(+) channels α1.2, α1.5, and β1.1 expression were all proved to be significantly higher in smooth muscles of SHR than WKY. Whole-cell voltage-gated K(+) channel currents were larger in SHR artery smooth muscles than the ones of WKY. Moreover, the voltage dependence of voltage-gated potassium channel activation was more negative in artery smooth muscle of SHR than that of WKY, while voltage dependence of availability was not different. The above diversity of voltage-gated potassium channel detected in gene expression and electrical character in coronary artery smooth muscle of SHR than that of WKY might be an underling mechanism associated with the membrane potential depolarization in artery smooth muscle of SHR.

  12. KV1 and KV3 Potassium Channels Identified at Presynaptic Terminals of the Corticostriatal Synapses in Rat

    PubMed Central

    Meneses, David; Vega, Ana V.; Torres-Cruz, Francisco Miguel; Barral, Jaime

    2016-01-01

    In the last years it has been increasingly clear that KV-channel activity modulates neurotransmitter release. The subcellular localization and composition of potassium channels are crucial to understanding its influence on neurotransmitter release. To investigate the role of KV in corticostriatal synapses modulation, we combined extracellular recording of population-spike and pharmacological blockage with specific and nonspecific blockers to identify several families of KV channels. We induced paired-pulse facilitation (PPF) and studied the changes in paired-pulse ratio (PPR) before and after the addition of specific KV blockers to determine whether particular KV subtypes were located pre- or postsynaptically. Initially, the presence of KV channels was tested by exposing brain slices to tetraethylammonium or 4-aminopyridine; in both cases we observed a decrease in PPR that was dose dependent. Further experiments with tityustoxin, margatoxin, hongotoxin, agitoxin, dendrotoxin, and BDS-I toxins all rendered a reduction in PPR. In contrast heteropodatoxin and phrixotoxin had no effect. Our results reveal that corticostriatal presynaptic KV channels have a complex stoichiometry, including heterologous combinations KV1.1, KV1.2, KV1.3, and KV1.6 isoforms, as well as KV3.4, but not KV4 channels. The variety of KV channels offers a wide spectrum of possibilities to regulate neurotransmitter release, providing fine-tuning mechanisms to modulate synaptic strength. PMID:27379187

  13. KV1 and KV3 Potassium Channels Identified at Presynaptic Terminals of the Corticostriatal Synapses in Rat.

    PubMed

    Meneses, David; Vega, Ana V; Torres-Cruz, Francisco Miguel; Barral, Jaime

    2016-01-01

    In the last years it has been increasingly clear that KV-channel activity modulates neurotransmitter release. The subcellular localization and composition of potassium channels are crucial to understanding its influence on neurotransmitter release. To investigate the role of KV in corticostriatal synapses modulation, we combined extracellular recording of population-spike and pharmacological blockage with specific and nonspecific blockers to identify several families of KV channels. We induced paired-pulse facilitation (PPF) and studied the changes in paired-pulse ratio (PPR) before and after the addition of specific KV blockers to determine whether particular KV subtypes were located pre- or postsynaptically. Initially, the presence of KV channels was tested by exposing brain slices to tetraethylammonium or 4-aminopyridine; in both cases we observed a decrease in PPR that was dose dependent. Further experiments with tityustoxin, margatoxin, hongotoxin, agitoxin, dendrotoxin, and BDS-I toxins all rendered a reduction in PPR. In contrast heteropodatoxin and phrixotoxin had no effect. Our results reveal that corticostriatal presynaptic KV channels have a complex stoichiometry, including heterologous combinations KV1.1, KV1.2, KV1.3, and KV1.6 isoforms, as well as KV3.4, but not KV4 channels. The variety of KV channels offers a wide spectrum of possibilities to regulate neurotransmitter release, providing fine-tuning mechanisms to modulate synaptic strength. PMID:27379187

  14. Electrical pumping of potassium ions against an external concentration gradient in a biological ion channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Queralt-Martín, María; García-Giménez, Elena; Aguilella, Vicente M.; Ramirez, Patricio; Mafe, Salvador; Alcaraz, Antonio

    2013-07-01

    We show experimentally and theoretically that significant currents can be obtained with a biological ion channel, the OmpF porin of Escherichia coli, using zero-average potentials as driving forces. The channel rectifying properties can be used to pump potassium ions against an external concentration gradient under asymmetric pH conditions. The results are discussed in terms of the ionic selectivity and rectification ratio of the channel. The physical concepts involved may be applied to separation processes with synthetic nanopores and to bioelectrical phenomena.

  15. Fluorogenic Probe for the Human Ether-a-Go-Go-Related Gene Potassium Channel Imaging

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The first small-molecule fluorogenic probe A1 for imaging the human Ether-a-go-go-Related Gene (hERG) potassium channel based on the photoinduced electron transfer (PET) off–on mechanism was described herein. After careful biological evaluation, this probe had the potential of detecting and imaging the hERG channel at the molecular and cellular level. Moreover, the competitive binding mechanism of this probe would presumably minimize the effects on the electrophysiological properties of the hERG channel. Therefore, this probe may serve as a powerful toolkit to the hERG-associated study. PMID:25665091

  16. Two-pore domain potassium channels: potential therapeutic targets for the treatment of pain.

    PubMed

    Mathie, Alistair; Veale, Emma L

    2015-05-01

    Recent evidence points to a pivotal contribution of a variety of different potassium channels, including two-pore domain potassium (K2P) channels, in chronic pain processing. Expression of several different K2P channel subunits has been detected in nociceptive dorsal root ganglion neurons and trigeminal ganglion neurons, in particular, TREK1, TREK2, TRESK, TRAAK, TASK3 and TWIK1 channels. Of these, the strongest body of evidence from functional studies highlights the importance of TREK1, TRESK and, recently, TREK2 channels. For example, TREK1 knockout mice are more sensitive than wild-type mice to a number of painful stimuli but less sensitive to morphine-induced analgesia. TRESK knockdown mice show behavioural evidence of increased pain and increased sensitivity to painful pressure. Importantly, familial migraine with aura is associated with a dominant-negative mutation in human TRESK channels. Thus, the functional up-regulation of K2P channel activity may be a useful strategy in the development of new therapies for the treatment of pain. Whilst there are few currently available compounds that selectively and directly enhance the activity of TRESK and TREK2 channels, recent advances have been made in terms of identifying compounds that activate TREK1 channels and in understanding how they might act on the channel. Large-scale bio-informatic approaches and the further development of databases of putative ligands, channel structures and putative ligand binding sites on these structures may form the basis for future experimental strategies to detect novel molecules acting to enhance K2P channel activity that would be useful in the treatment of pain.

  17. Modeling the binding modes of Kv1.5 potassium channel and blockers.

    PubMed

    Yang, Qian; Du, Lupei; Wang, Xiaojian; Li, Minyong; You, Qidong

    2008-09-01

    The ultra-rapid delayed rectifier potassium current (I(Kur)), encoded by Kv1.5 gene, is the critical determinant of Phase I repolarization of action potential duration (APD). The evidences that Kv1.5 gene expresses more extensively in human atrial myocytes than in ventricle and the I(Kur) currents has not been recorded in the human ventricle, suggest Kv1.5 potassium channel as a selective target for the treatment of atrial fibrillation (AF). Recent mutagenesis studies have provided us some evidences that are useful in designing Kv1.5 blockers. In order to further evaluate these molecular biological information, the homology model of Kv1.5 potassium channel was established based on the Kv1.2 crystal structure (PDB entry: 2A79) using MODELLER 9v2 program. After the molecular dynamics refinement, the optimized homology model was assessed as a reliable structure by PROCHECK, ERRAT, WHAT-IF, PROSA2003 and DOPE graph. The results of molecular docking studies on different Kv1.5 inhibitors are in agreement with the published mutagenesis data. Based on the docking conformations, a pharmacophore model was developed by HipHop algorithm in order to probe the common features of blockers. By analyzing the results, active site architecture, certain key residues and pharmacophore common-features that are responsible for substrate specificity were identified on the Kv1.5 potassium channel, which would be very helpful in understanding the blockade mechanism of Kv1.5 potassium channel and providing insights into rational design of novel Kv1.5 blockers. PMID:18485768

  18. Modeling the binding modes of Kv1.5 potassium channel and blockers.

    PubMed

    Yang, Qian; Du, Lupei; Wang, Xiaojian; Li, Minyong; You, Qidong

    2008-09-01

    The ultra-rapid delayed rectifier potassium current (I(Kur)), encoded by Kv1.5 gene, is the critical determinant of Phase I repolarization of action potential duration (APD). The evidences that Kv1.5 gene expresses more extensively in human atrial myocytes than in ventricle and the I(Kur) currents has not been recorded in the human ventricle, suggest Kv1.5 potassium channel as a selective target for the treatment of atrial fibrillation (AF). Recent mutagenesis studies have provided us some evidences that are useful in designing Kv1.5 blockers. In order to further evaluate these molecular biological information, the homology model of Kv1.5 potassium channel was established based on the Kv1.2 crystal structure (PDB entry: 2A79) using MODELLER 9v2 program. After the molecular dynamics refinement, the optimized homology model was assessed as a reliable structure by PROCHECK, ERRAT, WHAT-IF, PROSA2003 and DOPE graph. The results of molecular docking studies on different Kv1.5 inhibitors are in agreement with the published mutagenesis data. Based on the docking conformations, a pharmacophore model was developed by HipHop algorithm in order to probe the common features of blockers. By analyzing the results, active site architecture, certain key residues and pharmacophore common-features that are responsible for substrate specificity were identified on the Kv1.5 potassium channel, which would be very helpful in understanding the blockade mechanism of Kv1.5 potassium channel and providing insights into rational design of novel Kv1.5 blockers.

  19. Trafficking of an endogenous potassium channel in adult ventricular myocytes

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Tiantian; Cheng, Yvonne; Dou, Ying; Goonesekara, Charitha; David, Jens-Peter; Steele, David F.; Huang, Chen

    2012-01-01

    The roles of several small GTPases in the expression of an endogenous potassium current, Ito,f, in adult rat ventricular myocytes have been investigated. The results indicate that forward trafficking of newly synthesized Kv4.2, which underlies Ito,f in these cells, requires both Rab1 and Sar1 function. Expression of a Rab1 dominant negative (DN) reduced Ito,f current density by roughly one-half relative to control, mCherry-transfected myocytes. Similarly, expression of a Sar1DN nearly halved Ito,f current density. Rab11 is not essential to trafficking of Kv4.2, as expression of a Rab11DN had no effect on Ito,f over the time frames investigated here. In a process dependent on intact endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-to-Golgi transport, however, overexpression of wild-type Rab11 resulted in a doubling of Ito,f density; block of ER-to-Golgi traffic by Brefeldin A completely abrogated the effect. Also implicated in the trafficking of Kv4.2 are Rab5 and Rab4. Rab5DN expression increased endogenous Ito,f by two- to threefold, nonadditively with inhibition of dynamin-dependent endocytosis. And, in a phenomenon similar to that previously reported for myoblast-expressed Kv1.5, Rab4DN expression roughly doubled endogenous peak transient currents. Colocalization experiments confirmed the involvement of Rab4 in postinternalization trafficking of Kv4.2. There was little role evident for the lysosome in the degradation of internalized Kv4.2, as overexpression of neither wild-type nor DN isoforms of Rab7 had any effect on Ito,f. Instead, degradation may depend largely on the proteasome; the proteasome inhibitor MG132 significantly increased Ito,f density. PMID:22914645

  20. Diversity of Potassium Channels in Human Umbilical Artery Smooth Muscle Cells

    PubMed Central

    Martín, Pedro; Rebolledo, Alejandro; Palomo, Ana Rocio Roldán; Moncada, Melisa; Piccinini, Luciano

    2014-01-01

    Through their control of cell membrane potential, potassium (K+) channels are among the best known regulators of vascular tone. This article discusses the expression and function of K+ channels in human umbilical artery smooth muscle cells (HUASMCs). We review the bibliographic reports and also present single-channel data recorded in freshly isolated cells. Electrophysiological properties of big conductance, voltage- and Ca2+-sensitive K+ channel and voltage-dependent K+ channels are clearly established in this vessel, where they are involved in contractile state regulation. Their role in the maintenance of membrane potential is an important control mechanism in the determination of the vessel diameter. Additionally, small conductance Ca2+-sensitive K+ channels, 2-pore domains K+ channels and inward rectifier K+ channels also appear to be present in HUASMCs, while intermediate conductance Ca2+-sensitive K+ channels and ATP-sensitive K+ channels could not be identified. In both cases, additional investigation is necessary to reach conclusive evidence of their expression and/or functional role in HUASMCs. Finally, we discuss the role of K+ channels in pregnancy-related pathologies like gestational diabetes and preeclampsia. PMID:24084522

  1. Chronic ethanol-induced changes in cardiac and neuronal ATP-sensitive potassium channels

    SciTech Connect

    Bangalore, R.; Hawthorn, M.; Triggle, D.J. )

    1992-02-26

    The present study was designed to investigate the effect of chronic ethanol consumption on cardiac and neuronal ATP-sensitive potassium channels. These channels have been shown to be regulated under diseased conditions such as congestive heart failure. Rats were chronically fed with a liquid diet containing ethanol or equicaloric amount of dextrin for the three weeks. This diet induced tolerance to ethanol as assessed by the longer time the ethanol fed rats could stay on a rotorod compared to control rats when challenged with an i.p. injection of ethanol, ATP-sensitive potassium channels were characterized using ({sup 3}H)glibenclamide binding to membrane preparations from heart, olfactory bulb, hippocampus, striatum, cerebellum, cortex, brain stem and spinal cord. Chronic ethanol consumption caused a significant increase in the K{sub D} value in the hippocampus and cerebellum, and a significant decrease in the K{sub D} value in the cortex. The K{sub D} value did not change in other brain areas and heart with chronic ethanol consumption. In contrast, chronic ethanol caused a significant decrease in the B{sub max} value in the heart, and a slight but significant increase in the B{sub max} value in the spinal cord. Chronic ethanol did not affect the B{sub max} value in other brain areas. ATP-sensitive potassium channels are differently regulated by ethanol in cardiac and neuronal preparations.

  2. Potassium channel-mediated relaxation to acetylcholine in rabbit arteries.

    PubMed

    Cowan, C L; Palacino, J J; Najibi, S; Cohen, R A

    1993-09-01

    Endothelium-dependent relaxation is associated with smooth muscle hyperpolarization in many arteries which may account for relaxation that persists in the presence of nitric oxide inhibitors such as NG-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME). Acetylcholine (ACh)-induced relaxations of the rabbit thoracic and abdominal aorta and iliac and carotid arteries were studied for the relative contribution of nitric oxide-dependent and -independent mechanisms in rings suspended for measurement of isometric tension. Although relaxation of the thoracic aorta to ACh (10(-6) M) was almost blocked completely by L-NAME (3 x 10(-5) M), the maximal relaxation in the abdominal aorta, carotid and iliac arteries was only reduced by 28, 26 and 62%, respectively. In rings of abdominal aorta, L-NAME blocked the ACh-stimulated (10(-6) M) rise in cyclic GMP verifying that relaxation which persists in L-NAME-treated rings is not mediated by nitric oxide. The L-NAME resistant response was nearly abolished by elevated external K+ in rings of abdominal aorta and carotid artery, suggesting this relaxation may be mediated by a membrane potential sensitive mechanism. Furthermore, tetraethylammonium (10(-3) M) partially and charybdotoxin (5 x 10(-8) M) completely inhibited the remaining L-NAME-resistant relaxation in both abdominal aorta and carotid artery, suggesting a role for Ca(++)-activated K(+)-channels. Blockers of ATP-sensitive K+ channels also inhibited the L-NAME resistant relaxation in the abdominal aorta only.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8396636

  3. Eucalyptol induces hyperexcitability and epileptiform activity in snail neurons by inhibiting potassium channels.

    PubMed

    Zeraatpisheh, Zahra; Vatanparast, Jafar

    2015-10-01

    The effects of eucalyptol (1,8-cineole) were studied on the activity of central neurons of land snail Caucasotachea atrolabiata. Eucalyptol (3 mM) depolarized the membrane potential and increased the frequency of spontaneous activity in a time dependent and reversible manner. These effects were associated with suppression of afterhyperpolarization and significant reduction of amplitude and slope of rising and falling phases of action potentials. While the eucalyptol-induced suppression of action potential amplitude and rising slope were essentially dependent on membrane depolarization, its actions on repolarization slope and afterhyperpolarization were not affected by resetting the membrane potential close to the control value. These findings suggest an inhibitory action on the potassium channels that underlie repolarization and afterhyperpolarization. Eucalyptol also increased the frequency of driven action potentials but suppressed the post stimulus inhibitory period, indicating an inhibitory action on calcium-activated potassium channels. A higher concentration of eucalyptol, 5mM, reversibly changed the pattern of activity to burst firing associated with paroxysmal depolarization shift (PDS). Low doses of eucalyptol and potassium channel blockers, tetraethylammonium and 4-aminopyridine, synergistically acted to induce burst firing. At high concentration (30 mM), tetraethylammonium was able to induce burst firing and PDS. The sodium currents and ion channel phosphorylation by protein kinases A and C were not required for the eucalyptol-induced epileptiform activity, but calcium currents were essential for this action. Our findings show the excitatory and epileptogenic action of eucalyptol, which is most likely mediated through direct inhibitory action on potassium channels.

  4. Contribution of the Kv3.1 potassium channel to high-frequency firing in mouse auditory neurones

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lu-Yang; Gan, Li; Forsythe, Ian D; Kaczmarek, Leonard K

    1998-01-01

    Using a combination of patch-clamp, in situ hybridization and computer simulation techniques, we have analysed the contribution of potassium channels to the ability of a subset of mouse auditory neurones to fire at high frequencies.Voltage-clamp recordings from the principal neurones of the medial nucleus of the trapezoid body (MNTB) revealed a low-threshold dendrotoxin (DTX)-sensitive current (ILT) and a high-threshold DTX-insensitive current (IHT).IHT displayed rapid activation and deactivation kinetics, and was selectively blocked by a low concentration of tetraethylammonium (TEA; 1 mm).The physiological and pharmacological properties of IHT very closely matched those of the Shaw family potassium channel Kv3.1 stably expressed in a CHO cell line.An mRNA probe corresponding to the C-terminus of the Kv3.1 channel strongly labelled MNTB neurones, suggesting that this channel is expressed in these neurones.TEA did not alter the ability of MNTB neurones to follow stimulation up to 200 Hz, but specifically reduced their ability to follow higher frequency impulses.A computer simulation, using a model cell in which an outward current with the kinetics and voltage dependence of the Kv3.1 channel was incorporated, also confirmed that the Kv3.1- like current is essential for cells to respond to a sustained train of high-frequency stimuli.We conclude that in mouse MNTB neurones the Kv3.1 channel contributes to the ability of these cells to lock their firing to high-frequency inputs. PMID:9547392

  5. Molecular bases for the asynchronous activation of sodium and potassium channels required for nerve impulse generation.

    PubMed

    Lacroix, Jérôme J; Campos, Fabiana V; Frezza, Ludivine; Bezanilla, Francisco

    2013-08-21

    Most action potentials are produced by the sequential activation of voltage-gated sodium (Nav) and potassium (Kv) channels. This is mainly achieved by the rapid conformational rearrangement of voltage-sensor (VS) modules in Nav channels, with activation kinetics up to 6-fold faster than Shaker-type Kv channels. Here, using mutagenesis and gating current measurements, we show that a 3-fold acceleration of the VS kinetics in Nav versus Shaker Kv channels is produced by the hydrophilicity of two "speed-control" residues located in the S2 and S4 segments in Nav domains I-III. An additional 2-fold acceleration of the Nav VS kinetics is provided by the coexpression of the β1 subunit, ubiquitously found in mammal tissues. This study uncovers the molecular bases responsible for the differential activation of Nav versus Kv channels, a fundamental prerequisite for the genesis of action potentials.

  6. A bursting potassium channel in isolated cholinergic synaptosomes of Torpedo electric organ.

    PubMed Central

    Edry-Schiller, J; Ginsburg, S; Rahamimoff, R

    1991-01-01

    1. Pinched-off cholinergic nerve terminals (synaptosomes) prepared from the electric organ of Torpedo ocelata were fused into large structures (greater than 20 microns) using dimethyl sulphoxide and polyethylene glycol 1500, as previously described for synaptic vesicles from the same organ. 2. The giant fused synaptosomes were easily amenable to the patch clamp technique and 293 seals with a resistance greater than 4 G omega were obtained in the 'cell-attached' configuration. In a large fraction of the experiments, an 'inside-out' patch configuration was achieved. 3. Several types of unitary ionic currents were observed. This study describes the most frequently observed single-channel activity which was found in 247 out of the 293 membrane patches (84.3%). 4. The single-channel current-voltage relation was linear between -60 and 20 mV and showed a slope conductance of 23.8 +/- 1.3 pS when the pipette contained 350-390 mM-Na+ and the bath facing the inside of the synaptosomal membrane contained 390 mM-K+. 5. From extrapolated reversal potential measurements, it was concluded that this channel has a large selectivity for K+ over Na+ (70.4 +/- 11.5, mean +/- S.E.M.). Chloride ions are not transported significantly through this potassium channel. 6. This potassium channel has a low probability of opening. The probability of being in the open state increases upon depolarization and reaches about 1% when the inside of the patch is 20 mV positive compared to the pipette side. 7. The mean channel open time increases with depolarization; thus the product current x time (= charge) also increases upon depolarization, showing properties of an outward rectifier. 8. The potassium channel in the giant synaptosome membrane has a bursting behaviour. Open-time distribution, closed-time distribution and a Poisson analysis indicate that the minimal kinetic scheme requires one open state and three closed states. PMID:1654418

  7. Enhanced role of potassium channels in relaxations to acetylcholine in hypercholesterolemic rabbit carotid artery.

    PubMed

    Najibi, S; Cowan, C L; Palacino, J J; Cohen, R A

    1994-05-01

    The effect of hypercholesterolemia for 10 wk on endothelium-dependent relaxations to acetylcholine was studied in isolated rings of rabbit carotid artery and abdominal aorta contracted with phenylephrine or elevated potassium. In these arteries obtained from hypercholesterolemic rabbits, endothelium-dependent relaxations to acetylcholine were not significantly different from those of normal rabbits. In normal and hypercholesterolemic arteries, partial relaxation persisted in the presence of NG-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME), which blocked acetylcholine-induced increases in arterial guanosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (cGMP). Combined treatment with L-NAME and the calcium-dependent potassium-channel inhibitor, charybdotoxin, blocked relaxations in both groups, suggesting that L-NAME-resistant relaxations are mediated by an endothelium-derived hyperpolarizing factor. Charybdotoxin alone or depolarizing potassium had no significant effect on normal carotid artery or normal and hypercholesterolemic abdominal aorta but significantly inhibited relaxations of the carotid artery from cholesterol-fed rabbits. The enhanced role of calcium-dependent potassium channels and the hyperpolarizing factor in relaxation of the hypercholesterolemic carotid artery suggested by these results was likely related to the fact that acetylcholine failed to stimulate cGMP only in that artery. These data suggest that endothelium-dependent relaxation in these rabbit arteries is mediated by nitric oxide-cGMP-dependent and -independent mechanisms. In hypercholesterolemia, the contribution of nitric oxide-cGMP in the carotid artery is reduced, but a hyperpolarizing factor and calcium-dependent potassium channels maintain normal acetylcholine-induced relaxation. PMID:7515589

  8. Fluorescent protein-scorpion toxin chimera is a convenient molecular tool for studies of potassium channels

    PubMed Central

    Kuzmenkov, Alexey I.; Nekrasova, Oksana V.; Kudryashova, Kseniya S.; Peigneur, Steve; Tytgat, Jan; Stepanov, Alexey V.; Kirpichnikov, Mikhail P.; Grishin, Eugene V.; Feofanov, Alexey V.; Vassilevski, Alexander A.

    2016-01-01

    Ion channels play a central role in a host of physiological and pathological processes and are the second largest target for existing drugs. There is an increasing need for reliable tools to detect and visualize particular ion channels, but existing solutions suffer from a number of limitations such as high price, poor specificity, and complicated protocols. As an alternative, we produced recombinant chimeric constructs (FP-Tx) consisting of fluorescent proteins (FP) fused with potassium channel toxins from scorpion venom (Tx). In particular, we used two FP, eGFP and TagRFP, and two Tx, OSK1 and AgTx2, to create eGFP-OSK1 and RFP-AgTx2. We show that these chimeras largely retain the high affinity of natural toxins and display selectivity to particular ion channel subtypes. FP-Tx are displaced by other potassium channel blockers and can be used as an imaging tool in ion channel ligand screening setups. We believe FP-Tx chimeras represent a new efficient molecular tool for neurobiology. PMID:27650866

  9. Fluorescent protein-scorpion toxin chimera is a convenient molecular tool for studies of potassium channels.

    PubMed

    Kuzmenkov, Alexey I; Nekrasova, Oksana V; Kudryashova, Kseniya S; Peigneur, Steve; Tytgat, Jan; Stepanov, Alexey V; Kirpichnikov, Mikhail P; Grishin, Eugene V; Feofanov, Alexey V; Vassilevski, Alexander A

    2016-01-01

    Ion channels play a central role in a host of physiological and pathological processes and are the second largest target for existing drugs. There is an increasing need for reliable tools to detect and visualize particular ion channels, but existing solutions suffer from a number of limitations such as high price, poor specificity, and complicated protocols. As an alternative, we produced recombinant chimeric constructs (FP-Tx) consisting of fluorescent proteins (FP) fused with potassium channel toxins from scorpion venom (Tx). In particular, we used two FP, eGFP and TagRFP, and two Tx, OSK1 and AgTx2, to create eGFP-OSK1 and RFP-AgTx2. We show that these chimeras largely retain the high affinity of natural toxins and display selectivity to particular ion channel subtypes. FP-Tx are displaced by other potassium channel blockers and can be used as an imaging tool in ion channel ligand screening setups. We believe FP-Tx chimeras represent a new efficient molecular tool for neurobiology. PMID:27650866

  10. VOLTAGE-GATED POTASSIUM CHANNELS AT THE CROSSROADS OF NEURONAL FUNCTION, ISCHEMIC TOLERANCE, AND NEURODEGENERATION

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Niyathi Hegde; Aizenman, Elias

    2013-01-01

    Voltage-gated potassium (Kv) channels are widely expressed in the central and peripheral nervous system, and are crucial mediators of neuronal excitability. Importantly, these channels also actively participate in cellular and molecular signaling pathways that regulate the life and death of neurons. Injury-mediated increased K+ efflux through Kv2.1 channels promotes neuronal apoptosis, contributing to widespread neuronal loss in neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer’s disease and stroke. In contrast, some forms of neuronal activity can dramatically alter Kv2.1 channel phosphorylation levels and influence their localization. These changes are normally accompanied by modifications in channel voltage-dependence, which may be neuroprotective within the context of ischemic injury. Kv1 and Kv7 channel dysfunction leads to neuronal hyperexcitability that critically contributes to the pathophysiology of human clinical disorders such as episodic ataxia and epilepsy. This review summarizes the neurotoxic, neuroprotective, and neuroregulatory roles of Kv channels, and highlights the consequences of Kv channel dysfunction on neuronal physiology. The studies described in this review thus underscore the importance of normal Kv channel function in neurons, and emphasize the therapeutic potential of targeting Kv channels in the treatment of a wide range of neurological diseases. PMID:24323720

  11. Potassium channel activator attenuates salicylate-induced cochlear hearing loss potentially ameliorating tinnitus.

    PubMed

    Sun, Wei; Liu, Jun; Zhang, Chao; Zhou, Na; Manohar, Senthilvelan; Winchester, Wendy; Miranda, Jason A; Salvi, Richard J

    2015-01-01

    High dose sodium salicylate causes moderate, reversible hearing loss and tinnitus. Salicylate-induced hearing loss is believed to arise from a reduction in the electromotile response of outer hair cells (OHCs) and/or reduction of KCNQ4 potassium currents in OHCs, which decreases the driving force for the transduction current. Therefore, enhancing OHC potassium currents could potentially prevent salicylate-induced temporary hearing loss. In this study, we tested whether opening voltage-gated potassium channels using ICA-105665, a novel small molecule that opens KCNQ2/3 and KCNQ3/5 channels, can reduce salicylate-induced hearing loss. We found that systemic application of ICA-105665 at 10 mg/kg prevented the salicylate-induced amplitude reduction and threshold shift in the compound action potentials recorded at the round window of the cochlea. ICA-105665 also prevented the salicylate-induced reduction of distortion-product otoacoustic emission. These results suggest that ICA-105665 partially compensates for salicylate-induced cochlear hearing loss by enhancing KCNQ2/3 and KCNQ3/5 potassium currents and the motility of OHCs. PMID:25904892

  12. Cultured giant fiber lobe of squid expresses three distinct potassium channel activities in selective combinations.

    PubMed

    Griggs, W D; Hanyu, Y; Matsumoto, G

    1996-07-01

    Neurons from the giant fiber lobe (GFL) of squid Loligo bleekeri were dissociated and cultured. The ionic currents were recorded using whole-cell patch clamp methods. The sodium current and the noninactivating potassium current like those elicited by the giant axon were among the currents expressed in axonal bulbs and bulblike structures upon dissociation. Meanwhile axonless cell bodies did not elicit such currents. Axonless cell bodies and some bulblike structures elicited two kinds of inactivating potassium currents, the slow- and the fast-inactivating current, which differed in their inactivation kinetics and pharmacology. Within 24 hr of plating, the current composition remained the same. While the noninactivating current was not sensitive to 4-aminopyridine, the two inactivating currents were sensitive, the slow-inactivating current being more sensitive. Selective combinations of the sodium current and the three potassium currents expressed in different structures of the acutely dissociated GFL could have resulted from cellular control of synthesis and transportation of the channel proteins to the somatic and the axonal membrane. The sodium current and the noninactivating potassium current could be recorded from some axonless cell bodies maintained in culture for over three days, indicating that the separation of the giant axon from its somata could result in the transportation of the channels normally expressed on the giant axon membrane to the somatic membrane.

  13. Detailed Examination of a Single Conduction Event in a Potassium Channel

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Although extensively studied, it has proved difficult to describe in detail how potassium ion channels conduct cations and water. We present a computational study that, by using stratified umbrella sampling, examines nearly an entire conduction event of the Kv1.2/2.1 paddle chimera and thereby identifies the expected stable configurations of ions and waters in the selectivity filter of the channel. We describe in detail the motions of the ions and waters during a conduction event, focusing on how waters and ions enter the filter, the rotation of water molecules inside the filter, and how potassium ions are coordinated as they move from a water to a protein environment. Finally, we analyze the small conformational changes undergone by the protein, showing that the stable configurations are most similar to the experimental crystal structure. PMID:24143269

  14. Identification of genes from pattern formation, tyrosine kinase, and potassium channel families by DNA amplification

    SciTech Connect

    Kamb, A.; Weir, M.; Rudy, B.; Varmus, H.; Kenyon, C. )

    1989-06-01

    The study of gene family members has been aided by the isolation of related genes on the basis of DNA homology. The authors have adapted the polymerase chain reaction to screen animal genomes very rapidly and reliably for likely gene family members. Using conserved amino acid sequences to design degenerate oligonucleotide primers, they have shown that the genome of the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans contains sequences homologous to many Drosophila genes involved in pattern formation, including the segment polarity gene wingless (vertebrate int-1), and homeobox sequences characteristic of the Antennapedia, engrailed, and paired families. In addition, they have used this method to show that C. elegans contains at least five different sequences homologous to genes in the tyrosine kinase family. Lastly, they have isolated six potassium channel sequences from humans, a result that validates the utility of the method with large genomes and suggests that human potassium channel gene diversity may be extensive.

  15. Expression of delayed rectifier potassium channels and their possible roles in proliferation of human gastric cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Lan, Mei; Shi, Yongquan; Han, Zheyi; Hao, Zhiming; Pan, Yanglin; Liu, Na; Guo, Changcun; Hong, Liu; Wang, Jun; Qiao, Taidong; Fan, Daiming

    2005-12-01

    Voltage-gated potassium (Kv) channels have been reported to be involved in the proliferation of many types of cells, including tumor cells. The overexpression of the Kv channels and related channel activity are involved in the neoplastic process. Our previous study has shown the existence of delayed rectifier potassium (I(K)) current in gastric cancer cells SGC7901. However, the expression and function of most delayed rectifier potassium (K(D)) channel subunits in gastric cancer cells are not completely resolved. Here we examine expression of K(D) channel subunits in Kv1-Kv3 families in immortalized gastric epithelial cells GES and various gastric cancer cells (including AGS, KATOIII, MKN28, MKN45, MGC803, SGC7901, SGC7901/ADR and SGC7901/VCR), and their roles in cell proliferation. RT-PCR analysis reveals that all cell lines examined express Kv1.3, Kv1.5, Kv1.6, Kv2.1 and Kv2.2. However, Kv1.2 and Kv3.2 genes are barely detectable in any given cancer cell lines. Kv1.5 protein, high mRNA levels in all cell lines examined, is also expressed in some cancer cells lines and more frequently detected in gastric cancer tissues. Downregulation of the expression of Kv1.5 in SGC7901 with RNA interference significantly inhibited the proliferation and tumorigenicity of SGC7901 cells. Moreover, in Ca(2+)-containing rather than Ca(2+)-free medium, KCl (50mM) stimulated a rapid increase in the concentration of cytosolic calcium in empty vector transfected cells that was blocked by verapamil. Likewise, decrease the expression of Kv1.5 with short interfering RNA also blocked the depolarization-induced influx of Ca(2+). This finding suggests that more than one kind of K(D) channel subunits are expressed in various gastric cancer cell lines. Kv1.5 may be involved in tumor cells proliferation by controlling Ca(2+) entry, and the interference of K(D) channels expression and/or activity could provide a novel strategy to reverse the malignant phenotype of gastric cancer cells. PMID

  16. Encephalitis due to antibodies to voltage gated potassium channel (VGKC) with cerebellar involvement in a teenager.

    PubMed

    Langille, Megan M; Desai, Jay

    2015-01-01

    Encephalitis due to antibodies to voltage gated potassium channel (VGKC) typically presents with limbic encephalitis and medial temporal lobe involvement on neuroimaging. We describe a case of 13 year girl female with encephalitis due to antibodies to VGKC with signal changes in the cerebellar dentate nuclei bilaterally and clinical features that suggested predominant cerebellar involvement. These have never been reported previously in the literature. Our case expands the phenotypic spectrum of this rare condition.

  17. Targeting solid tumours with potassium channel activators. A return to fundamentals?

    PubMed

    Trechot, Philippe

    2014-01-01

    From a pharmacological point of view nicotinamide and minoxidil are potassium channel activators. Nicotinamide is used as a radiosensitizer in ARCON (accelerated radiotherapy combined with carbogen breathing and nicotinamide) therapeutic strategy with promising results but not confirmed so far. Minoxidil has never been considered by radiotherapists. Based from recent pathophysiological considerations we suggest a new perspective for the use of these two "old" molecules in order to target solid tumours. PMID:25371295

  18. Breaking the silence: functional expression of the two-pore-domain potassium channel THIK-2.

    PubMed

    Renigunta, Vijay; Zou, Xinle; Kling, Stefan; Schlichthörl, Günter; Daut, Jürgen

    2014-09-01

    THIK-2 belongs to the 'silent' channels of the two-pore-domain potassium channel family. It is highly expressed in many nuclei of the brain but has so far resisted all attempts at functional expression. THIK-2 has a highly conserved 19-amino-acid region in its N terminus (residues 6-24 in the rat orthologue) that is missing in the closely related channel THIK-1. After deletion of this region (THIK-2(Δ6-24) mutant), functional expression of the channel was observed in Xenopus oocytes and in mammalian cell lines. The resulting potassium current showed outward rectification under physiological conditions and slight inward rectification with symmetrical high-K(+) solutions and could be inhibited by application of halothane or quinidine. Another THIK-2 mutant, in which the putative retention/retrieval signal RRR at positions 14-16 was replaced by AAA, produced a similar potassium current. Both mutants showed a distinct localisation to the surface membrane when tagged with green fluorescent protein and expressed in a mammalian cell line, whereas wild-type THIK-2 was mainly localised to the endoplasmic reticulum. These findings suggest that deletion of the retention/retrieval signal RRR enabled transport of THIK-2 channels to the surface membrane. Combining the mutation THIK-2(Δ6-24) with a mutation in the pore cavity (rat THIK-2(I158G)) gave rise to a 12-fold increase in current amplitude, most likely due to an increase in open probability. In conclusion, the characteristics of THIK-2 channels can be analysed in heterologous expression systems by using trafficking and/or gating mutants. The possible mechanisms that enable THIK-2 expression at the surface membrane in vivo remain to be determined. PMID:24297522

  19. Disruption of the potassium channel regulatory subunit KCNE2 causes iron-deficient anemia.

    PubMed

    Salsbury, Grace; Cambridge, Emma L; McIntyre, Zoe; Arends, Mark J; Karp, Natasha A; Isherwood, Christopher; Shannon, Carl; Hooks, Yvette; Ramirez-Solis, Ramiro; Adams, David J; White, Jacqueline K; Speak, Anneliese O

    2014-12-01

    Iron homeostasis is a dynamic process that is tightly controlled to balance iron uptake, storage, and export. Reduction of dietary iron from the ferric to the ferrous form is required for uptake by solute carrier family 11 (proton-coupled divalent metal ion transporters), member 2 (Slc11a2) into the enterocytes. Both processes are proton dependent and have led to the suggestion of the importance of acidic gastric pH for the absorption of dietary iron. Potassium voltage-gated channel subfamily E, member 2 (KCNE2), in combination with potassium voltage-gated channel, KQT-like subfamily, member 1 (KCNQ1), form a gastric potassium channel essential for gastric acidification. Deficiency of either Kcne2 or Kcnq1 results in achlorhydia, gastric hyperplasia, and neoplasia, but the impact on iron absorption has not, to our knowledge, been investigated. Here we report that Kcne2-deficient mice, in addition to the previously reported phenotypes, also present with iron-deficient anemia. Interestingly, impaired function of KCNQ1 results in iron-deficient anemia in Jervell and Lange-Nielsen syndrome patients. We speculate that impaired function of KCNE2 could result in the same clinical phenotype.

  20. Screening and cDNA Cloning of Kv1 Potassium Channel Toxins in Sea Anemones

    PubMed Central

    Yamaguchi, Yoshikazu; Hasegawa, Yuichi; Honma, Tomohiro; Nagashima, Yuji; Shiomi, Kazuo

    2010-01-01

    When 21 species of sea anemones were screened for Kv1 potassium channel toxins by competitive inhibition of the binding of 125I-α-dendrotoxin to rat synaptosomal membranes, 11 species (two species of Actiniidae, one species of Hormathiidae, five species of Stichodactylidae and three species of Thalassianthidae) were found to be positive. Furthermore, full-length cDNAs encoding type 1 potassium channel toxins from three species of Stichodactylidae and three species of Thalassianthidae were cloned by a combination of RT-PCR, 3′RACE and 5′RACE. The precursors of these six toxins are commonly composed of signal peptide, propart and mature peptide portions. As for the mature peptide (35 amino acid residues), the six toxins share more than 90% sequence identities with one another and with κ1.3-SHTX-She1a (Shk) from Stichodactyla helianthus but only 34–63% identities with the other type 1 potassium channel toxins. PMID:21339955

  1. Crystal structure of the PAS domain of the hEAG potassium channel

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Xue; Shao, Juan; Qin, Xiaohong

    2016-01-01

    KCNH voltage-gated potassium channels play critical roles in regulating cellular functions. The channel is composed of four subunits, each of which contains six transmembrane helices forming the central pore. The cytoplasmic parts of the subunits present a Per–Arnt–Sim (PAS) domain at the N-terminus and a cyclic nucleotide-binding homology domain at the C-terminus. PAS domains are conserved from prokaryotes to eukaryotes and are involved in sensing signals and cellular responses. To better understand the functional roles of PAS domains in KCNH channels, the structure of this domain from the human ether-à-go-go channel (hEAG channel) was determined. By comparing it with the structures of the Homo sapiens EAG-related gene (hERG) channel and the Drosophila EAG-like K+ (dELK) channel and analyzing the structural features of the hEAG channel, it was identified that a hydrophobic patch on the β-sheet may mediate interaction between the PAS domain and other regions of the channel to regulate its functions. PMID:27487920

  2. Transient potassium channels augment degeneracy in hippocampal active dendritic spectral tuning

    PubMed Central

    Rathour, Rahul Kumar; Malik, Ruchi; Narayanan, Rishikesh

    2016-01-01

    Hippocampal pyramidal neurons express an intraneuronal map of spectral tuning mediated by hyperpolarization-activated cyclic-nucleotide-gated nonspecific-cation channels. Modeling studies have predicted a critical regulatory role for A-type potassium (KA) channels towards augmenting functional robustness of this map. To test this, we performed patch-clamp recordings from soma and dendrites of rat hippocampal pyramidal neurons, and measured spectral tuning before and after blocking KA channels using two structurally distinct pharmacological agents. Consistent with computational predictions, we found that blocking KA channels resulted in a significant reduction in resonance frequency and significant increases in input resistance, impedance amplitude and action-potential firing frequency across the somato-apical trunk. Furthermore, across all measured locations, blocking KA channels enhanced temporal summation of postsynaptic potentials and critically altered the impedance phase profile, resulting in a significant reduction in total inductive phase. Finally, pair-wise correlations between intraneuronal percentage changes (after blocking KA channels) in different measurements were mostly weak, suggesting differential regulation of different physiological properties by KA channels. Our results unveil a pivotal role for fast transient channels in regulating theta-frequency spectral tuning and intrinsic phase response, and suggest that degeneracy with reference to several coexisting functional maps is mediated by cross-channel interactions across the active dendritic arbor. PMID:27094086

  3. Crystal structure of the PAS domain of the hEAG potassium channel.

    PubMed

    Tang, Xue; Shao, Juan; Qin, Xiaohong

    2016-08-01

    KCNH voltage-gated potassium channels play critical roles in regulating cellular functions. The channel is composed of four subunits, each of which contains six transmembrane helices forming the central pore. The cytoplasmic parts of the subunits present a Per-Arnt-Sim (PAS) domain at the N-terminus and a cyclic nucleotide-binding homology domain at the C-terminus. PAS domains are conserved from prokaryotes to eukaryotes and are involved in sensing signals and cellular responses. To better understand the functional roles of PAS domains in KCNH channels, the structure of this domain from the human ether-à-go-go channel (hEAG channel) was determined. By comparing it with the structures of the Homo sapiens EAG-related gene (hERG) channel and the Drosophila EAG-like K(+) (dELK) channel and analyzing the structural features of the hEAG channel, it was identified that a hydrophobic patch on the β-sheet may mediate interaction between the PAS domain and other regions of the channel to regulate its functions. PMID:27487920

  4. Transient potassium channels augment degeneracy in hippocampal active dendritic spectral tuning.

    PubMed

    Rathour, Rahul Kumar; Malik, Ruchi; Narayanan, Rishikesh

    2016-01-01

    Hippocampal pyramidal neurons express an intraneuronal map of spectral tuning mediated by hyperpolarization-activated cyclic-nucleotide-gated nonspecific-cation channels. Modeling studies have predicted a critical regulatory role for A-type potassium (KA) channels towards augmenting functional robustness of this map. To test this, we performed patch-clamp recordings from soma and dendrites of rat hippocampal pyramidal neurons, and measured spectral tuning before and after blocking KA channels using two structurally distinct pharmacological agents. Consistent with computational predictions, we found that blocking KA channels resulted in a significant reduction in resonance frequency and significant increases in input resistance, impedance amplitude and action-potential firing frequency across the somato-apical trunk. Furthermore, across all measured locations, blocking KA channels enhanced temporal summation of postsynaptic potentials and critically altered the impedance phase profile, resulting in a significant reduction in total inductive phase. Finally, pair-wise correlations between intraneuronal percentage changes (after blocking KA channels) in different measurements were mostly weak, suggesting differential regulation of different physiological properties by KA channels. Our results unveil a pivotal role for fast transient channels in regulating theta-frequency spectral tuning and intrinsic phase response, and suggest that degeneracy with reference to several coexisting functional maps is mediated by cross-channel interactions across the active dendritic arbor.

  5. [Comparative assessment of nephroprotective properties of potassium and calcium channel modulators in experimental renal injury].

    PubMed

    Filipets, N D; Gozhenko, A I

    2014-01-01

    The experiments in white laboratory rats have shown that a single intragasrtric administration of the new fluorine-containing potassium channel opener flocalin in a dose of 5 mg/kg in the initial stage of sublimate nephropathy increased the glomerular filtration rate, reduced creatininemia, increased urinary creatinine excretion, and decreased proteinuria. Under similar conditions, the administration of the calcium channel blocker diltiazem in a dose of 5 mg/kg (intragasrtric) showed a less pronounced antiproteinuric effect as compared to that of flocalin. A comparative assessment of the influence of flocalin and diltiazem on the basic renal function markers demonstrated predominant nephroprotective effect of flocalin in the treatment of acute toxic nephropathy.

  6. Ion conduction in the KcsA potassium channel analyzed with a minimal kinetic model.

    PubMed

    Mafé, Salvador; Pellicer, Julio

    2005-02-01

    We use a model by Nelson to study the current-voltage and conductance-concentration curves of bacterial potassium channel KcsA without assuming rapid ion translocation. Ion association to the channel filter is rate controlling at low concentrations, but dissociation and transport in the filter can limit conduction at high concentration for ions other than K+. The absolute values of the effective rate constants are tentative but the relative changes in these constants needed to qualitatively explain the experiments should be of significance. PMID:15783362

  7. Ion conduction in the KcsA potassium channel analyzed with a minimal kinetic model.

    PubMed

    Mafé, Salvador; Pellicer, Julio

    2005-02-01

    We use a model by Nelson to study the current-voltage and conductance-concentration curves of bacterial potassium channel KcsA without assuming rapid ion translocation. Ion association to the channel filter is rate controlling at low concentrations, but dissociation and transport in the filter can limit conduction at high concentration for ions other than K+. The absolute values of the effective rate constants are tentative but the relative changes in these constants needed to qualitatively explain the experiments should be of significance.

  8. Structural insight into the transmembrane segments 3 and 4 of the hERG potassium channel.

    PubMed

    Li, Qingxin; Wong, Ying Lei; Ng, Hui Qi; Gayen, Shovanlal; Kang, CongBao

    2014-12-01

    The hERG (human ether-a-go-go related gene) potassium channel is a voltage-gated potassium channel containing an N-terminal domain, a voltage-sensor domain, a pore domain and a C-terminal domain. The transmembrane segment 4 (S4) is important for sensing changes of membrane potentials through positively charge residues. A construct containing partial S2-S3 linker, S3, S4 and the S4-S5 linker of the hERG channel was purified into detergent micelles. This construct exhibits good quality NMR spectrum when it was purified in lyso-myristoyl phosphatidylglycerol (LMPG) micelles. Structural study showed that S3 contains two short helices with a negatively charged surface. The S4 and S4-S5 linker adopt helical structures. The six positively charged residues in S4 localize at different sides, suggesting that they may have different functions in channel gating. Relaxation studies indicated that S3 is more flexible than S4. The boundaries of S3-S4 and S4-S4-S5 linker were identified. Our results provided structural information of the S3 and S4, which will be helpful to understand their roles in channel gating.

  9. Potassium channel blockers from the venom of the Brazilian scorpion Tityus serrulatus ().

    PubMed

    Martin-Eauclaire, Marie-France; Pimenta, Adriano M C; Bougis, Pierre E; De Lima, Maria-Elena

    2016-09-01

    Potassium (K(+)) channels are trans-membrane proteins, which play a key role in cellular excitability and signal transduction pathways. Scorpion toxins blocking the ion-conducting pore from the external side have been invaluable probes to elucidate the structural, functional, and physio-pathological characteristics of these ion channels. This review will focus on the interaction between K(+) channels and their peptide blockers isolated from the venom of the scorpion Tityus serrulatus, which is considered as the most dangerous scorpion in Brazil, in particular in Minas-Gerais State, where many casualties are described each year. The primary mechanisms of action of these K(+) blockers will be discussed in correlation with their structure, very often non-canonical compared to those of other well known K(+) channels blockers purified from other scorpion venoms. Also, special attention will be brought to the most recent data obtained by proteomic and transcriptomic analyses on Tityus serrulatus venoms and venom glands. PMID:27349167

  10. Potassium channel blockers from the venom of the Brazilian scorpion Tityus serrulatus ().

    PubMed

    Martin-Eauclaire, Marie-France; Pimenta, Adriano M C; Bougis, Pierre E; De Lima, Maria-Elena

    2016-09-01

    Potassium (K(+)) channels are trans-membrane proteins, which play a key role in cellular excitability and signal transduction pathways. Scorpion toxins blocking the ion-conducting pore from the external side have been invaluable probes to elucidate the structural, functional, and physio-pathological characteristics of these ion channels. This review will focus on the interaction between K(+) channels and their peptide blockers isolated from the venom of the scorpion Tityus serrulatus, which is considered as the most dangerous scorpion in Brazil, in particular in Minas-Gerais State, where many casualties are described each year. The primary mechanisms of action of these K(+) blockers will be discussed in correlation with their structure, very often non-canonical compared to those of other well known K(+) channels blockers purified from other scorpion venoms. Also, special attention will be brought to the most recent data obtained by proteomic and transcriptomic analyses on Tityus serrulatus venoms and venom glands.

  11. Nitric oxide directly activates calcium-dependent potassium channels in vascular smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Bolotina, V M; Najibi, S; Palacino, J J; Pagano, P J; Cohen, R A

    1994-04-28

    Nitric oxide is the major endothelium-derived relaxing factor (EDRF), and it is thought to relax smooth muscle cells by stimulation of guanylate cyclase, accumulation of its product cyclic GMP, and cGMP-dependent modification of several intracellular processes, including activation of potassium channels through cGMP-dependent protein kinase. Here we present evidence that both exogenous nitric oxide and native EDRF can directly activate single Ca(2+)-dependent K+ channels (K+Ca) in cell-free membrane patches without requiring cGMP. Under conditions when guanylate cyclase was inhibited by methylene blue, considerable relaxation of rabbit aorta to nitric oxide persisted which was blocked by charybdotoxin, a specific inhibitor of K+Ca channels. These studies demonstrate a novel direct action of nitric oxide on K+Ca channels. PMID:7512692

  12. The inwardly rectifying potassium channel Kir1.1: development of functional assays to identify and characterize channel inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Felix, John P; Priest, Birgit T; Solly, Kelli; Bailey, Timothy; Brochu, Richard M; Liu, Chou J; Kohler, Martin G; Kiss, Laszlo; Alonso-Galicia, Magdalena; Tang, Haifeng; Pasternak, Alexander; Kaczorowski, Gregory J; Garcia, Maria L

    2012-10-01

    The renal outer medullary potassium (ROMK) channel is a member of the inwardly rectifying family of potassium (Kir) channels. ROMK (Kir1.1) is predominantly expressed in kidney where it plays a major role in the salt reabsorption process. Loss-of-function mutations in the human Kir1.1 channel are associated with antenatal Bartter's syndrome type II, a life-threatening salt and water balance disorder. Heterozygous carriers of Kir1.1 mutations associated with antenatal Bartter's syndrome have reduced blood pressure and a decreased risk of developing hypertension by age 60. These data suggest that Kir1.1 inhibitors could represent novel diuretics for the treatment of hypertension. Because little is known about the molecular pharmacology of Kir1.1 channels, assays that provide a robust, reliable readout of channel activity-while operating in high-capacity mode-are needed. In the present study, we describe high-capacity, 384- and 1,536-well plate, functional thallium flux, and IonWorks electrophysiology assays for the Kir1.1 channel that fulfill these criteria. In addition, 96-well (86)Rb(+) flux assays were established that can operate in the presence of 100% serum, and can provide an indication of the effect of a serum shift on compound potencies. The ability to grow Madin-Darby canine kidney cells expressing Kir1.1 in Transwell supports provides a polarized cell system that can be used to study the mechanism of Kir1.1 inhibition by different agents. All these functional Kir1.1 assays together can play an important role in supporting different aspects of drug development efforts during lead identification and/or optimization. PMID:22881347

  13. Molecular and functional characterization of Anopheles gambiae inward rectifier potassium (Kir1) channels: A novel role in egg production

    PubMed Central

    Raphemot, Rene; Estévez-Lao, Tania Y.; Rouhier, Matthew F.; Piermarini, Peter M.; Denton, Jerod S.; Hillyer, Julián F.

    2014-01-01

    Inward rectifier potassium (Kir) channels play essential roles in regulating diverse physiological processes. Although Kir channels are encoded in mosquito genomes, their functions remain largely unknown. In this study, we identified the members of the Anopheles gambiae Kir gene family and began to investigate their function. Notably, we sequenced the A. gambiae Kir1 (AgKir1) gene and showed that it encodes all the canonical RIP features of a Kir channel: an ion pore that is composed of a pore helix and a selectivity filter, two transmembrane domains that flank the ion pore, and the so-called G-loop. Heterologous expression of AgKir1 in Xenopus oocytes revealed that this gene encodes a functional, barium-sensitive Kir channel. Quantitative RT-PCR experiments then showed that relative AgKir1 mRNA levels are highest in the pupal stage, and that AgKir1 mRNA is enriched in the adult ovaries. Gene silencing of AgKir1 by RNA interference did not affect the survival of female mosquitoes following a blood in mosquito fecundity, and further validates them as promising molecular targets for the meal, but decreased their egg output. These data provide evidence for a new role of Kir channels development of a new class of mosquitocides to be used in vector control. PMID:24855023

  14. hERG potassium channels and the structural basis of drug-induced arrhythmias.

    PubMed

    Mitcheson, John S

    2008-05-01

    hERG potassium channels have a critical role in the normal electrical activity of the heart. The block of hERG channels can cause the drug-induced form of long QT syndrome, a cardiac disorder that carries an increased risk of cardiac arrhythmias and sudden death. hERG channels are extraordinarily sensitive to block by large numbers of structurally diverse drugs. In previous years, the risk of compounds causing this cardiotoxic side effect has been a common reason for the failure of compounds in preclinical safety trials. Pharmaceutical companies have successfully utilized and developed higher throughput techniques for the early detection of compounds that block hERG, and this has helped reduce the number of compounds that fail in the late stages of development. Nevertheless, this screening-based approach is expensive, consumes chemistry resources, and bypasses the problem rather than shedding light on it. Crystal structures of potassium channels have facilitated studies into the structural basis for the gating and block of hERG channels. Most drugs bind within the inner cavity, and the individual amino acids that form the drug binding site have been identified by site-directed mutagenesis approaches. Gating processes have an important influence on the drug-binding site. Recent advances in our understanding of channel activation and inactivation are providing insight into why hERG channels are more susceptible to block than other K (+) channels. Knowledge of the structure of the drug-binding site and precise nature of interactions with drug molecules should assist efforts to develop drugs without the propensity to cause cardiac arrhythmias. PMID:18447395

  15. Dynamic subunit stoichiometry confers a progressive continuum of pharmacological sensitivity by KCNQ potassium channels.

    PubMed

    Yu, Haibo; Lin, Zhihong; Mattmann, Margrith E; Zou, Beiyan; Terrenoire, Cecile; Zhang, Hongkang; Wu, Meng; McManus, Owen B; Kass, Robert S; Lindsley, Craig W; Hopkins, Corey R; Li, Min

    2013-05-21

    Voltage-gated KCNQ1 (Kv7.1) potassium channels are expressed abundantly in heart but they are also found in multiple other tissues. Differential coassembly with single transmembrane KCNE beta subunits in different cell types gives rise to a variety of biophysical properties, hence endowing distinct physiological roles for KCNQ1-KCNEx complexes. Mutations in either KCNQ1 or KCNE1 genes result in diseases in brain, heart, and the respiratory system. In addition to complexities arising from existence of five KCNE subunits, KCNE1 to KCNE5, recent studies in heterologous systems suggest unorthodox stoichiometric dynamics in subunit assembly is dependent on KCNE expression levels. The resultant KCNQ1-KCNE channel complexes may have a range of zero to two or even up to four KCNE subunits coassembling per KCNQ1 tetramer. These findings underscore the need to assess the selectivity of small-molecule KCNQ1 modulators on these different assemblies. Here we report a unique small-molecule gating modulator, ML277, that potentiates both homomultimeric KCNQ1 channels and unsaturated heteromultimeric (KCNQ1)4(KCNE1)n (n < 4) channels. Progressive increase of KCNE1 or KCNE3 expression reduces efficacy of ML277 and eventually abolishes ML277-mediated augmentation. In cardiomyocytes, the slowly activating delayed rectifier potassium current, or IKs, is believed to be a heteromultimeric combination of KCNQ1 and KCNE1, but it is not entirely clear whether IKs is mediated by KCNE-saturated KCNQ1 channels or by channels with intermediate stoichiometries. We found ML277 effectively augments IKs current of cultured human cardiomyocytes and shortens action potential duration. These data indicate that unsaturated heteromultimeric (KCNQ1)4(KCNE1)n channels are present as components of IKs and are pharmacologically distinct from KCNE-saturated KCNQ1-KCNE1 channels. PMID:23650380

  16. Differential effects of ethanol on electrical properties of various potassium channels expressed in oocytes.

    PubMed

    Anantharam, V; Bayley, H; Wilson, A; Treistman, S N

    1992-09-01

    The effects of ethanol on a number of electrophysiological parameters were examined in 10 different voltage-gated potassium channels expressed in Xenopus oocytes. None of the channels examined was highly sensitive to ethanol, but there was significant variability among the channels tested at concentrations of ethanol of 200 mM and greater. The response to ethanol was not determined exclusively by membership in a genetic subfamily. In addition, the relative sensitivity among different channels could vary independently for different electrical parameters. For example, current amplitude in DRK1 was insensitive to ethanol, even at concentrations as high as 600 mM, whereas this was one of the more sensitive channels with respect to the kinetics of current inactivation. The opposite situation was true for ShA1. Therefore, ethanol at high concentrations may selectively perturb discrete regions of channel proteins. This is supported by the finding that removal of 318 amino acids from the cytoplasmic carboxyl terminus of DRK1 results in a channel whose current amplitude shows greater sensitivity to ethanol than does DRK1. Thus, the effects of ethanol on the channel may not be limited to interactions at the lipid-protein interface. PMID:1406600

  17. Urinary bladder instability induced by selective suppression of the murine small conductance calcium-activated potassium (SK3) channel

    PubMed Central

    Herrera, Gerald M; Pozo, Maria J; Zvara, Peter; Petkov, Georgi V; Bond, Chris T; Adelman, John P; Nelson, Mark T

    2003-01-01

    Small conductance, calcium-activated potassium (SK) channels have an important role in determining the excitability and contractility of urinary bladder smooth muscle. Here, the role of the SK isoform SK3 was examined by altering expression levels of the SK3 gene using a mouse model that conditionally overexpresses SK3 channels (SK3T/T). Prominent SK3 immunostaining was found in both the smooth muscle (detrusor) and urothelium layers of the urinary bladder. SK currents were elevated 2.4-fold in isolated myocytes from SK3T/T mice. Selective suppression of SK3 expression by dietary doxycycline (DOX) decreased SK current density in isolated myocytes, increased phasic contractions of isolated urinary bladder smooth muscle strips and exposed high affinity effects of the blocker apamin of the SK isoforms (SK1–3), suggesting an additional participation from SK2 channels. The role of SK3 channels in urinary bladder function was assessed using cystometry in conscious, freely moving mice. The urinary bladders of SK3T/T had significantly greater bladder capacity, and urine output exceeded the infused saline volume. Suppression of SK3 channel expression did not alter filling pressure, threshold pressure or bladder capacity, but micturition pressure was elevated compared to control mice. However, SK3 suppression did eliminate excess urine production and caused a marked increase in non-voiding contractions. The ability to examine bladder function in mice in which SK3 channel expression is selectively altered reveals that these channels have a significant role in the control of non-voiding contractions in vivo. Activation of these channels may be a therapeutic approach for management of non-voiding contractions, a condition which characterizes many types of urinary bladder dysfunctions including urinary incontinence. PMID:12813145

  18. KCNQ (Kv7) potassium channel activators as bronchodilators: combination with a β2-adrenergic agonist enhances relaxation of rat airways.

    PubMed

    Brueggemann, Lioubov I; Haick, Jennifer M; Neuburg, Samantha; Tate, Shawn; Randhawa, Devjit; Cribbs, Leanne L; Byron, Kenneth L

    2014-03-15

    KCNQ (Kv7 family) potassium (K(+)) channels were recently found in airway smooth muscle cells (ASMCs) from rodent and human bronchioles. In the present study, we evaluated expression of KCNQ channels and their role in constriction/relaxation of rat airways. Real-time RT-PCR analysis revealed expression of KCNQ4 > KCNQ5 > KCNQ1 > KCNQ2 > KCNQ3, and patch-clamp electrophysiology detected KCNQ currents in rat ASMCs. In precision-cut lung slices, the KCNQ channel activator retigabine induced a concentration-dependent relaxation of small bronchioles preconstricted with methacholine (MeCh; EC50 = 3.6 ± 0.3 μM). Bronchoconstriction was also attenuated in the presence of two other structurally unrelated KCNQ channel activators: zinc pyrithione (ZnPyr; 1 μM; 22 ± 7%) and 2,5-dimethylcelecoxib (10 μM; 24 ± 8%). The same three KCNQ channel activators increased KCNQ currents in ASMCs by two- to threefold. The bronchorelaxant effects of retigabine and ZnPyr were prevented by inclusion of the KCNQ channel blocker XE991. A long-acting β2-adrenergic receptor agonist, formoterol (10 nM), did not increase KCNQ current amplitude in ASMCs, but formoterol (1-1,000 nM) did induce a time- and concentration-dependent relaxation of rat airways, with a notable desensitization during a 30-min treatment or with repetitive treatments. Coadministration of retigabine (10 μM) with formoterol produced a greater peak and sustained reduction of MeCh-induced bronchoconstriction and reduced the apparent desensitization observed with formoterol alone. Our findings support a role for KCNQ K(+) channels in the regulation of airway diameter. A combination of a β2-adrenergic receptor agonist with a KCNQ channel activator may improve bronchodilator therapy. PMID:24441871

  19. Identification of quaternary ammonium compounds as potent inhibitors of hERG potassium channels

    SciTech Connect

    Xia Menghang; Shahane, Sampada A.; Huang, Ruili; Titus, Steven A.; Shum, Enoch; Zhao Yong; Southall, Noel; Zheng, Wei; Witt, Kristine L.; Tice, Raymond R.; Austin, Christopher P.

    2011-05-01

    The human ether-a-go-go-related gene (hERG) channel, a member of a family of voltage-gated potassium (K{sup +}) channels, plays a critical role in the repolarization of the cardiac action potential. The reduction of hERG channel activity as a result of adverse drug effects or genetic mutations may cause QT interval prolongation and potentially leads to acquired long QT syndrome. Thus, screening for hERG channel activity is important in drug development. Cardiotoxicity associated with the inhibition of hERG channels by environmental chemicals is also a public health concern. To assess the inhibitory effects of environmental chemicals on hERG channel function, we screened the National Toxicology Program (NTP) collection of 1408 compounds by measuring thallium influx into cells through hERG channels. Seventeen compounds with hERG channel inhibition were identified with IC{sub 50} potencies ranging from 0.26 to 22 {mu}M. Twelve of these compounds were confirmed as hERG channel blockers in an automated whole cell patch clamp experiment. In addition, we investigated the structure-activity relationship of seven compounds belonging to the quaternary ammonium compound (QAC) series on hERG channel inhibition. Among four active QAC compounds, tetra-n-octylammonium bromide was the most potent with an IC{sub 50} value of 260 nM in the thallium influx assay and 80 nM in the patch clamp assay. The potency of this class of hERG channel inhibitors appears to depend on the number and length of their aliphatic side-chains surrounding the charged nitrogen. Profiling environmental compound libraries for hERG channel inhibition provides information useful in prioritizing these compounds for cardiotoxicity assessment in vivo.

  20. Regulation of renal potassium secretion: molecular mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Welling, Paul A

    2013-05-01

    A new understanding of renal potassium balance has emerged as the molecular underpinnings of potassium secretion have become illuminated, highlighting the key roles of apical potassium channels, renal outer medullary potassium channel (ROMK) and Big Potassium (BK), in the aldosterone-sensitive distal nephron and collecting duct. These channels act as the final-regulated components of the renal potassium secretory machinery. Their activity, number, and driving forces are precisely modulated to ensure potassium excretion matches dietary potassium intake. Recent identification of the underlying regulatory mechanisms at the molecular level provides a new appreciation of the physiology and reveals a molecular insight to explain the paradoxic actions of aldosterone on potassium secretion. Here, we review the current state of knowledge in the field.

  1. A case study of voltage-gated potassium channel antibody-related limbic encephalitis with PET/MRI findings

    PubMed Central

    Day, Brian K.; Eisenman, Lawrence; Black, Joseph; Maccotta, Luigi; Hogan, R. Edward

    2015-01-01

    Preclinical and clinical studies have demonstrated the significance of inflammation and autoantibodies in epilepsy, and the use of immunotherapies in certain situations has become an established practice. Temporal lobe epilepsy can follow paraneoplastic or nonparaneoplastic limbic encephalitis associated with antibodies directed against brain antigens. Here, we focus on a patient with worsening confusion and temporal lobe seizures despite treatment with antiepileptic medications. Serial brain MRIs did not conclusively reveal structural abnormalities, so the patient underwent brain PET/MRI to simultaneously evaluate brain structure and function, revealing bitemporal abnormalities. The patient was diagnosed with voltage-gated potassium channel antibody-related limbic encephalitis based on clinical presentation, imaging findings, and antibody testing. Treatment included the addition of a second antiepileptic agent and oral steroids. His seizures and cognitive deficits improved and stabilized. PMID:26106579

  2. Cooperative endocytosis of the endosomal SNARE protein syntaxin-8 and the potassium channel TASK-1

    PubMed Central

    Renigunta, Vijay; Fischer, Thomas; Zuzarte, Marylou; Kling, Stefan; Zou, Xinle; Siebert, Kai; Limberg, Maren M.; Rinné, Susanne; Decher, Niels; Schlichthörl, Günter; Daut, Jürgen

    2014-01-01

    The endosomal SNARE protein syntaxin-8 interacts with the acid-sensitive potassium channel TASK-1. The functional relevance of this interaction was studied by heterologous expression of these proteins (and mutants thereof) in Xenopus oocytes and in mammalian cell lines. Coexpression of syntaxin-8 caused a fourfold reduction in TASK-1 current, a corresponding reduction in the expression of TASK-1 at the cell surface, and a marked increase in the rate of endocytosis of the channel. TASK-1 and syntaxin-8 colocalized in the early endosomal compartment, as indicated by the endosomal markers 2xFYVE and rab5. The stimulatory effect of the SNARE protein on the endocytosis of the channel was abolished when both an endocytosis signal in TASK-1 and an endocytosis signal in syntaxin-8 were mutated. A syntaxin-8 mutant that cannot assemble with other SNARE proteins had virtually the same effect as wild-type syntaxin-8. Total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy showed formation and endocytosis of vesicles containing fluorescence-tagged clathrin, TASK-1, and/or syntaxin-8. Our results suggest that the unassembled form of syntaxin-8 and the potassium channel TASK-1 are internalized via clathrin-mediated endocytosis in a cooperative manner. This implies that syntaxin-8 regulates the endocytosis of TASK-1. Our study supports the idea that endosomal SNARE proteins can have functions unrelated to membrane fusion. PMID:24743596

  3. The Vasorelaxant Effect of p-Cymene in Rat Aorta Involves Potassium Channels

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Martapolyana T. M.; Ribeiro, Fernanda P. R. A.; Medeiros, Maria Alice M. B.; Sampaio, Pedrita A.; Silva, Yonara M. S.; Silva, Morganna T. A.; Quintans, Jullyana S. S.; Quintans-Júnior, Lucindo J.; Ribeiro, Luciano A. A.

    2015-01-01

    The monoterpenes are the main constituents of most essential oils and p-cymene is a monoterpene commonly found in various species of aromatic herbs, which has been reported for anti-inflammatory, antinociceptive, and antimicrobial activities. However, there is no report concerning its pharmacological activity on the vascular smooth muscle. The aim of current work was to investigate the effects of p-cymene in isolated rat aorta and also study its mechanism of action. In this work, we show that p-cymene has a relaxant effect, in a dose-dependent way, on the vascular smooth muscle, regardless of the presence of the endothelium. Using a nonselective potassium channel blocker, the CsCl, the relaxant effect of p-cymene was attenuated. In the presence of more selective potassium channels blockers, such as TEA or 4-AP, no change in the relaxant effect of p-cymene was evidenced, indicating that BKCa and KV channels are not involved in that relaxant effect. However, in the presence of glibenclamide or BaCl2, KATP and Kir blockers, respectively, the relaxant effect of p-cymene was attenuated. The data presented indicate that p-cymene has a relaxing effect on rat aorta, regardless of the endothelium, but with the participation of the KATP and Kir channels. PMID:25667938

  4. Cooperative endocytosis of the endosomal SNARE protein syntaxin-8 and the potassium channel TASK-1.

    PubMed

    Renigunta, Vijay; Fischer, Thomas; Zuzarte, Marylou; Kling, Stefan; Zou, Xinle; Siebert, Kai; Limberg, Maren M; Rinné, Susanne; Decher, Niels; Schlichthörl, Günter; Daut, Jürgen

    2014-06-15

    The endosomal SNARE protein syntaxin-8 interacts with the acid-sensitive potassium channel TASK-1. The functional relevance of this interaction was studied by heterologous expression of these proteins (and mutants thereof) in Xenopus oocytes and in mammalian cell lines. Coexpression of syntaxin-8 caused a fourfold reduction in TASK-1 current, a corresponding reduction in the expression of TASK-1 at the cell surface, and a marked increase in the rate of endocytosis of the channel. TASK-1 and syntaxin-8 colocalized in the early endosomal compartment, as indicated by the endosomal markers 2xFYVE and rab5. The stimulatory effect of the SNARE protein on the endocytosis of the channel was abolished when both an endocytosis signal in TASK-1 and an endocytosis signal in syntaxin-8 were mutated. A syntaxin-8 mutant that cannot assemble with other SNARE proteins had virtually the same effect as wild-type syntaxin-8. Total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy showed formation and endocytosis of vesicles containing fluorescence-tagged clathrin, TASK-1, and/or syntaxin-8. Our results suggest that the unassembled form of syntaxin-8 and the potassium channel TASK-1 are internalized via clathrin-mediated endocytosis in a cooperative manner. This implies that syntaxin-8 regulates the endocytosis of TASK-1. Our study supports the idea that endosomal SNARE proteins can have functions unrelated to membrane fusion.

  5. Breathing Stimulant Compounds Inhibit TASK-3 Potassium Channel Function Likely by Binding at a Common Site in the Channel Pore

    PubMed Central

    Chokshi, Rikki H.; Larsen, Aaron T.; Bhayana, Brijesh

    2015-01-01

    Compounds PKTHPP (1-{1-[6-(biphenyl-4-ylcarbonyl)-5,6,7,8-tetrahydropyrido[4,3-d]-pyrimidin-4-yl]piperidin-4-yl}propan-1-one), A1899 (2ʹ′-[(4-methoxybenzoylamino)methyl]biphenyl-2-carboxylic acid 2,4-difluorobenzylamide), and doxapram inhibit TASK-1 (KCNK3) and TASK-3 (KCNK9) tandem pore (K2P) potassium channel function and stimulate breathing. To better understand the molecular mechanism(s) of action of these drugs, we undertook studies to identify amino acid residues in the TASK-3 protein that mediate this inhibition. Guided by homology modeling and molecular docking, we hypothesized that PKTHPP and A1899 bind in the TASK-3 intracellular pore. To test our hypothesis, we mutated each residue in or near the predicted PKTHPP and A1899 binding site (residues 118–128 and 228–248), individually, to a negatively charged aspartate. We quantified each mutation's effect on TASK-3 potassium channel concentration response to PKTHPP. Studies were conducted on TASK-3 transiently expressed in Fischer rat thyroid epithelial monolayers; channel function was measured in an Ussing chamber. TASK-3 pore mutations at residues 122 (L122D, E, or K) and 236 (G236D) caused the IC50 of PKTHPP to increase more than 1000-fold. TASK-3 mutants L122D, G236D, L239D, and V242D were resistant to block by PKTHPP, A1899, and doxapram. Our data are consistent with a model in which breathing stimulant compounds PKTHPP, A1899, and doxapram inhibit TASK-3 function by binding at a common site within the channel intracellular pore region, although binding outside the channel pore cannot yet be excluded. PMID:26268529

  6. Expression and Stress-Dependent Induction of Potassium Channel Transcripts in the Common Ice Plant1

    PubMed Central

    Su, Hua; Golldack, Dortje; Katsuhara, Maki; Zhao, Chengsong; Bohnert, Hans J.

    2001-01-01

    We have characterized transcripts for three potassium channel homologs in the AKT/KAT subfamily (Shaker type) from the common ice plant (Mesembryanthemum crystallinum), with a focus on their expression during salt stress (up to 500 mm NaCl). Mkt1 and 2, Arabidopsis AKT homologs, and Kmt1, a KAT homolog, are members of small gene families with two to three isoforms each. Mkt1 is root specific; Mkt2 is found in leaves, flowers, and seed capsules; and Kmt1 is expressed in leaves and seed capsules. Mkt1 is present in all cells of the root, and in leaves a highly conserved isoform is detected present in all cells with highest abundance in the vasculature. MKT1 for which antibodies were made is localized to the plasma membrane. Following salt stress, MKT1 (transcripts and protein) is drastically down-regulated, Mkt2 transcripts do not change significantly, and Kmt1 is strongly and transiently (maximum at 6 h) up-regulated in leaves and stems. The detection and stress-dependent behavior of abundant transcripts representing subfamilies of potassium channels provides information about tissue specificity and the complex regulation of genes encoding potassium uptake systems in a halophytic plant. PMID:11161018

  7. Kv1.3 potassium channel mediates macrophage migration in atherosclerosis by regulating ERK activity.

    PubMed

    Kan, Xiao-Hong; Gao, Hai-Qing; Ma, Zhi-Yong; Liu, Lin; Ling, Ming-Ying; Wang, Yuan-Yuan

    2016-02-01

    Ion channels expressed in macrophages have been tightly related to atherosclerosis by coupling cellular function. How the voltage-gated potassium channels (Kv) affect macrophage migration remain unknown. The aim of our study is to investigate whether Kv1.3-ERK signaling pathway plays an important role in the process. We explored the expression of Kv1.3 in coronary atherosclerotic heart disease and found Kv1.3 channel was increased in acute coronary syndrome patients. Treatment of RAW264.7 cells with Kv1.3 small interfering RNA, suppressed cell migration. The expression of phosphorylated ERK1/2 also decreased after knockdown of Kv1.3. On the other hand, overexpression of Kv1.3 channel promoted cell migration and ERK1/2 phosphorylation. U-0126, the mitogen-activated protein kinase inhibitors, could reverse macrophage migration induced by Kv1.3 channel overexpression. Downregulation of Kv1.3 channel by siRNA could not further inhibit cell migration when cells were treated with U-0126. It means that ERK is downstream signal of Kv1.3 channel. We concluded that Kv1.3 may stimulate macrophage migration through the activation of ERK.

  8. Involvement of Potassium Channels and Calcium-Independent Mechanisms in Hydrogen Sulfide-Induced Relaxation of Rat Mesenteric Small Arteries.

    PubMed

    Hedegaard, Elise R; Gouliaev, Anja; Winther, Anna K; Arcanjo, Daniel D R; Aalling, Mathilde; Renaltan, Nirthika S; Wood, Mark E; Whiteman, Matthew; Skovgaard, Nini; Simonsen, Ulf

    2016-01-01

    Endogenous hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is involved in the regulation of vascular tone. We hypothesized that the lowering of calcium and opening of potassium (K) channels as well as calcium-independent mechanisms are involved in H2S-induced relaxation in rat mesenteric small arteries. Amperometric recordings revealed that free [H2S] after addition to closed tubes of sodium hydrosulfide (NaHS), Na2S, and GYY4137 [P-(4-methoxyphenyl)-P-4-morpholinyl-phosphinodithioic acid] were, respectively, 14%, 17%, and 1% of added amount. The compounds caused equipotent relaxations in isometric myographs, but based on the measured free [H2S], GYY4137 caused more relaxation in relation to released free H2S than NaHS and Na2S in rat mesenteric small arteries. Simultaneous measurements of [H2S] and tension showed that 15 µM of free H2S caused 61% relaxation in superior mesenteric arteries. Simultaneous measurements of smooth muscle calcium and tension revealed that NaHS lowered calcium and caused relaxation of NE-contracted arteries, while high extracellular potassium reduced NaHS relaxation without corresponding calcium changes. In NE-contracted arteries, NaHS (1 mM) lowered the phosphorylation of myosin light chain, while phosphorylation of myosin phosphatase target subunit 1 remained unchanged. Protein kinase A and G, inhibitors of guanylate cyclase, failed to reduce NaHS relaxation, whereas blockers of voltage-gated KV7 channels inhibited NaHS relaxation, and blockers of mitochondrial complex I and III abolished NaHS relaxation. Our findings suggest that low micromolar concentrations of free H2S open K channels followed by lowering of smooth muscle calcium, and by another mechanism involving mitochondrial complex I and III leads to uncoupling of force, and hence vasodilation. PMID:26493746

  9. Involvement of Potassium Channels and Calcium-Independent Mechanisms in Hydrogen Sulfide-Induced Relaxation of Rat Mesenteric Small Arteries.

    PubMed

    Hedegaard, Elise R; Gouliaev, Anja; Winther, Anna K; Arcanjo, Daniel D R; Aalling, Mathilde; Renaltan, Nirthika S; Wood, Mark E; Whiteman, Matthew; Skovgaard, Nini; Simonsen, Ulf

    2016-01-01

    Endogenous hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is involved in the regulation of vascular tone. We hypothesized that the lowering of calcium and opening of potassium (K) channels as well as calcium-independent mechanisms are involved in H2S-induced relaxation in rat mesenteric small arteries. Amperometric recordings revealed that free [H2S] after addition to closed tubes of sodium hydrosulfide (NaHS), Na2S, and GYY4137 [P-(4-methoxyphenyl)-P-4-morpholinyl-phosphinodithioic acid] were, respectively, 14%, 17%, and 1% of added amount. The compounds caused equipotent relaxations in isometric myographs, but based on the measured free [H2S], GYY4137 caused more relaxation in relation to released free H2S than NaHS and Na2S in rat mesenteric small arteries. Simultaneous measurements of [H2S] and tension showed that 15 µM of free H2S caused 61% relaxation in superior mesenteric arteries. Simultaneous measurements of smooth muscle calcium and tension revealed that NaHS lowered calcium and caused relaxation of NE-contracted arteries, while high extracellular potassium reduced NaHS relaxation without corresponding calcium changes. In NE-contracted arteries, NaHS (1 mM) lowered the phosphorylation of myosin light chain, while phosphorylation of myosin phosphatase target subunit 1 remained unchanged. Protein kinase A and G, inhibitors of guanylate cyclase, failed to reduce NaHS relaxation, whereas blockers of voltage-gated KV7 channels inhibited NaHS relaxation, and blockers of mitochondrial complex I and III abolished NaHS relaxation. Our findings suggest that low micromolar concentrations of free H2S open K channels followed by lowering of smooth muscle calcium, and by another mechanism involving mitochondrial complex I and III leads to uncoupling of force, and hence vasodilation.

  10. Discovery and characterisation of a novel toxin from Dendroaspis angusticeps, named Tx7335, that activates the potassium channel KcsA.

    PubMed

    Rivera-Torres, Iván O; Jin, Tony B; Cadene, Martine; Chait, Brian T; Poget, Sébastien F

    2016-01-01

    Due to their central role in essential physiological processes, potassium channels are common targets for animal toxins. These toxins in turn are of great value as tools for studying channel function and as lead compounds for drug development. Here, we used a direct toxin pull-down assay with immobilised KcsA potassium channel to isolate a novel KcsA-binding toxin (called Tx7335) from eastern green mamba snake (Dendroaspis angusticeps) venom. Sequencing of the toxin by Edman degradation and mass spectrometry revealed a 63 amino acid residue peptide with 4 disulphide bonds that belongs to the three-finger toxin family, but with a unique modification of its disulphide-bridge scaffold. The toxin induces a dose-dependent increase in both open probabilities and mean open times on KcsA in artificial bilayers. Thus, it unexpectedly behaves as a channel activator rather than an inhibitor. A charybdotoxin-sensitive mutant of KcsA exhibits similar susceptibility to Tx7335 as wild-type, indicating that the binding site for Tx7335 is distinct from that of canonical pore-blocker toxins. Based on the extracellular location of the toxin binding site (far away from the intracellular pH gate), we propose that Tx7335 increases potassium flow through KcsA by allosterically reducing inactivation of the channel.

  11. Discovery and characterisation of a novel toxin from Dendroaspis angusticeps, named Tx7335, that activates the potassium channel KcsA

    PubMed Central

    Rivera-Torres, Iván O.; Jin, Tony B.; Cadene, Martine; Chait, Brian T.; Poget, Sébastien F.

    2016-01-01

    Due to their central role in essential physiological processes, potassium channels are common targets for animal toxins. These toxins in turn are of great value as tools for studying channel function and as lead compounds for drug development. Here, we used a direct toxin pull-down assay with immobilised KcsA potassium channel to isolate a novel KcsA-binding toxin (called Tx7335) from eastern green mamba snake (Dendroaspis angusticeps) venom. Sequencing of the toxin by Edman degradation and mass spectrometry revealed a 63 amino acid residue peptide with 4 disulphide bonds that belongs to the three-finger toxin family, but with a unique modification of its disulphide-bridge scaffold. The toxin induces a dose-dependent increase in both open probabilities and mean open times on KcsA in artificial bilayers. Thus, it unexpectedly behaves as a channel activator rather than an inhibitor. A charybdotoxin-sensitive mutant of KcsA exhibits similar susceptibility to Tx7335 as wild-type, indicating that the binding site for Tx7335 is distinct from that of canonical pore-blocker toxins. Based on the extracellular location of the toxin binding site (far away from the intracellular pH gate), we propose that Tx7335 increases potassium flow through KcsA by allosterically reducing inactivation of the channel. PMID:27044983

  12. Discovery and characterisation of a novel toxin from Dendroaspis angusticeps, named Tx7335, that activates the potassium channel KcsA.

    PubMed

    Rivera-Torres, Iván O; Jin, Tony B; Cadene, Martine; Chait, Brian T; Poget, Sébastien F

    2016-01-01

    Due to their central role in essential physiological processes, potassium channels are common targets for animal toxins. These toxins in turn are of great value as tools for studying channel function and as lead compounds for drug development. Here, we used a direct toxin pull-down assay with immobilised KcsA potassium channel to isolate a novel KcsA-binding toxin (called Tx7335) from eastern green mamba snake (Dendroaspis angusticeps) venom. Sequencing of the toxin by Edman degradation and mass spectrometry revealed a 63 amino acid residue peptide with 4 disulphide bonds that belongs to the three-finger toxin family, but with a unique modification of its disulphide-bridge scaffold. The toxin induces a dose-dependent increase in both open probabilities and mean open times on KcsA in artificial bilayers. Thus, it unexpectedly behaves as a channel activator rather than an inhibitor. A charybdotoxin-sensitive mutant of KcsA exhibits similar susceptibility to Tx7335 as wild-type, indicating that the binding site for Tx7335 is distinct from that of canonical pore-blocker toxins. Based on the extracellular location of the toxin binding site (far away from the intracellular pH gate), we propose that Tx7335 increases potassium flow through KcsA by allosterically reducing inactivation of the channel. PMID:27044983

  13. PKC and AMPK regulation of Kv1.5 potassium channels

    PubMed Central

    Andersen, Martin Nybo; Skibsbye, Lasse; Tang, Chuyi; Petersen, Frederic; MacAulay, Nanna; Rasmussen, Hanne Borger; Jespersen, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    The voltage-gated Kv1.5 potassium channel, conducting the ultra-rapid rectifier K+ current (IKur), is regulated through several pathways. Here we investigate if Kv1.5 surface expression is controlled by the 2 kinases PKC and AMPK, using Xenopus oocytes, MDCK cells and atrial derived HL-1 cells. By confocal microscopy combined with electrophysiology we demonstrate that PKC activation reduces Kv1.5 current, through a decrease in membrane expressed channels. AMPK activation was found to decrease the membrane expression in MDCK cells, but not in HL-1 cells and was furthermore shown to be dependent on co-expression of Nedd4–2 in Xenopus oocytes. These results indicate that Kv1.5 channels are regulated by both kinases, although through different molecular mechanisms in different cell systems. PMID:26043299

  14. PKC and AMPK regulation of Kv1.5 potassium channels.

    PubMed

    Andersen, Martin Nybo; Skibsbye, Lasse; Tang, Chuyi; Petersen, Frederic; MacAulay, Nanna; Rasmussen, Hanne Borger; Jespersen, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    The voltage-gated Kv1.5 potassium channel, conducting the ultra-rapid rectifier K(+) current (IKur), is regulated through several pathways. Here we investigate if Kv1.5 surface expression is controlled by the 2 kinases PKC and AMPK, using Xenopus oocytes, MDCK cells and atrial derived HL-1 cells. By confocal microscopy combined with electrophysiology we demonstrate that PKC activation reduces Kv1.5 current, through a decrease in membrane expressed channels. AMPK activation was found to decrease the membrane expression in MDCK cells, but not in HL-1 cells and was furthermore shown to be dependent on co-expression of Nedd4-2 in Xenopus oocytes. These results indicate that Kv1.5 channels are regulated by both kinases, although through different molecular mechanisms in different cell systems. PMID:26043299

  15. The role of voltage-gated potassium channels in the regulation of mouse uterine contractility

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Ryan C; McClure, Marisa C; Smith, Margaret A; Abel, Peter W; Bradley, Michael E

    2007-01-01

    Background Uterine smooth muscle cells exhibit ionic currents that appear to be important in the control of uterine contractility, but how these currents might produce the changes in contractile activity seen in pregnant myometrium has not been established. There are conflicting reports concerning the role of voltage-gated potassium (Kv) channels and large-conductance, calcium-activated potassium (BK) channels in the regulation of uterine contractility. In this study we provide molecular and functional evidence for a role for Kv channels in the regulation of spontaneous contractile activity in mouse myometrium, and also demonstrate a change in Kv channel regulation of contractility in pregnant mouse myometrium. Methods Functional assays which evaluated the effects of channel blockers and various contractile agonists were accomplished by quantifying contractility of isolated uterine smooth muscle obtained from nonpregnant mice as well as mice at various stages of pregnancy. Expression of Kv channel proteins in isolated uterine smooth muscle was evaluated by Western blots. Results The Kv channel blocker 4-aminopyridine (4-AP) caused contractions in nonpregnant mouse myometrium (EC50 = 54 micromolar, maximal effect at 300 micromolar) but this effect disappeared in pregnant mice; similarly, the Kv4.2/Kv4.3 blocker phrixotoxin-2 caused contractions in nonpregnant, but not pregnant, myometrium. Contractile responses to 4-AP were not dependent upon nerves, as neither tetrodotoxin nor storage of tissues at room temperature significantly altered these responses, nor were responses dependent upon the presence of the endometrium. Spontaneous contractions and contractions in response to 4-AP did not appear to be mediated by BK, as the BK channel-selective blockers iberiotoxin, verruculogen, or tetraethylammonium failed to affect either spontaneous contractions or 4-AP-elicited responses. A number of different Kv channel alpha subunit proteins were found in isolated myometrium

  16. Effects of Resibufogenin and Cinobufagin on voltage-gated potassium channels in primary cultures of rat hippocampal neurons.

    PubMed

    Hao, Shuang; Bao, Yong-Ming; An, Li-Jia; Cheng, Wei; Zhao, Rong-Guo; Bi, Jing; Wang, He-Shuang; Sun, Chang-Sen; Liu, Ji-Wen; Jiang, Bo

    2011-12-01

    Outward delayed rectifier potassium channel and outward transient potassium channel have multiple important roles in maintaining the excitability of hippocampal neurons. The present study investigated the effects of two bufadienolides, Resibufogenin (RBG) and Cinobufagin (CBG), on the outward delayed rectifier potassium current (IK) and outward transient potassium current (IA) in rat hippocampal neurons. RBG and CBG have similar structures and both were isolated from the venom gland of toad skin. RBG inhibited both IK and IA, whereas CBG inhibited IK without noticeable effect on IA. Moreover, at 1 μM concentration both RBG and CBG could alter some channel kinetics and gating properties of IK, such as steady-state activation and inactivation curves, open probability and time constants. These findings suggested that IK is probably a target of bufadienolides, which may explain the mechanisms of bufadienolides' pathological effects on central nervous system. PMID:21798339

  17. Calcium activated potassium channel expression during human iPS cell-derived neurogenesis.

    PubMed

    Linta, Leonhard; Boeckers, Tobias M; Kleger, Alexander; Liebau, Stefan

    2013-07-01

    The family of calcium activated potassium channels of low and intermediate conductance, known as SK channels, consists of four members (SK1-4). These channels are widely expressed throughout the organism and involved in various cellular processes, such as the afterhyperpolarization in excitable cells but also in differentiation processes of various tissues. To date, the role of SK channels in developmental processes has been merely a marginal focus of investigation, although it is well accepted that cell differentiation and maturation affect the expression patterns of certain ion channels. Recently, several studies from our laboratory delineated the influence of SK channel expression and their respective activity on cytoskeletal reorganization in neural and pluripotent stem cells and regulation of cell fate determination toward the cardiac lineage in human and mouse pluripotent stem cells. Herein, we have now analyzed SK channel expression patterns and distribution at various stages of human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived neurogenesis particularly focusing on undifferentiated iPS cells, neural progenitors and mature neurons. All family members could be detected starting at the iPS cell level and were differentially expressed during the subsequent maturation process. Intriguingly, we found obvious discrepancies between mRNA and protein expression pointing toward a complex regulatory mechanism. Inhibition of SK channels with either apamin or clotrimazol did not have any significant effects on the speed or amount of neurogenesis in vitro. The abundance and specific regulation of SK channel expression during iPS cell differentiation indicates distinct roles of these ion channels not only for the cardiac but also for neuronal cell differentiation and in vitro neurogenesis.

  18. Alteration in rectification of potassium channels in perinatal hypoxia ischemia brain damage.

    PubMed

    Chen, Penghui; Wang, Liyan; Deng, Qiyue; Ruan, Huaizhen; Cai, Wenqin

    2015-01-15

    Oligodendrocyte progenitor cells (OPCs) are susceptible to perinatal hypoxia ischemia brain damage (HIBD), which results in infant cerebral palsy due to the effects on myelination. The origin of OPC vulnerability in HIBD, however, remains controversial. In this study, we defined the HIBD punctate lesions by MRI diffuse excessive high signal intensity (DEHSI) in postnatal 7-day-old rats. The electrophysiological functional properties of OPCs in HIBD were recorded by patch-clamp in acute cerebral cortex slices. The slices were intracellularly injected with Lucifer yellow and immunohistochemically labeled with NG2 antibody to identify local OPCs. Passive membrane properties and K(+) channel functions in OPCs were analyzed to estimate the onset of vulnerability in HIBD. The resting membrane potential, membrane resistance, and membrane capacitance of OPCs were increased in both the gray and white matter of the cerebral cortex. OPCs in both the gray and white matter exhibited voltage-dependent K(+) currents, which consisted of the initiated rectified potassium currents (IA) and the sustained rectified currents (IK). The significant alternation in membrane resistance was influenced by the diversity of potassium channel kinetics. These findings suggest that the rectification of IA and IK channels may play a significant role in OPC vulnerability in HIBD.

  19. Reciprocal voltage sensor-to-pore coupling leads to potassium channel C-type inactivation

    PubMed Central

    Conti, Luca; Renhorn, Jakob; Gabrielsson, Anders; Turesson, Fredrik; Liin, Sara I; Lindahl, Erik; Elinder, Fredrik

    2016-01-01

    Voltage-gated potassium channels open at depolarized membrane voltages. A prolonged depolarization causes a rearrangement of the selectivity filter which terminates the conduction of ions – a process called slow or C-type inactivation. How structural rearrangements in the voltage-sensor domain (VSD) cause alteration in the selectivity filter, and vice versa, are not fully understood. We show that pulling the pore domain of the Shaker potassium channel towards the VSD by a Cd2+ bridge accelerates C-type inactivation. Molecular dynamics simulations show that such pulling widens the selectivity filter and disrupts the K+ coordination, a hallmark for C-type inactivation. An engineered Cd2+ bridge within the VSD also affect C-type inactivation. Conversely, a pore domain mutation affects VSD gating-charge movement. Finally, C-type inactivation is caused by the concerted action of distant amino acid residues in the pore domain. All together, these data suggest a reciprocal communication between the pore domain and the VSD in the extracellular portion of the channel. PMID:27278891

  20. Remote and reversible inhibition of neurons and circuits by small molecule induced potassium channel stabilization

    PubMed Central

    Auffenberg, Eva; Jurik, Angela; Mattusch, Corinna; Stoffel, Rainer; Genewsky, Andreas; Namendorf, Christian; Schmid, Roland M.; Rammes, Gerhard; Biel, Martin; Uhr, Manfred; Moosmang, Sven; Michalakis, Stylianos; Wotjak, Carsten T.; Thoeringer, Christoph K.

    2016-01-01

    Manipulating the function of neurons and circuits that translate electrical and chemical signals into behavior represents a major challenges in neuroscience. In addition to optogenetic methods using light-activatable channels, pharmacogenetic methods with ligand induced modulation of cell signaling and excitability have been developed. However, they are largely based on ectopic expression of exogenous or chimera proteins. Now, we describe the remote and reversible expression of a Kir2.1 type potassium channel using the chemogenetic technique of small molecule induced protein stabilization. Based on shield1-mediated shedding of a destabilizing domain fused to a protein of interest and inhibition of protein degradation, this principle has been adopted for biomedicine, but not in neuroscience so far. Here, we apply this chemogenetic approach in brain research for the first time in order to control a potassium channel in a remote and reversible manner. We could show that shield1-mediated ectopic Kir2.1 stabilization induces neuronal silencing in vitro and in vivo in the mouse brain. We also validated this novel pharmacogenetic method in different neurobehavioral paradigms.The DD-Kir2.1 may complement the existing portfolio of pharmaco- and optogenetic techniques for specific neuron manipulation, but it may also provide an example for future applications of this principle in neuroscience research. PMID:26757616

  1. Reciprocal voltage sensor-to-pore coupling leads to potassium channel C-type inactivation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conti, Luca; Renhorn, Jakob; Gabrielsson, Anders; Turesson, Fredrik; Liin, Sara I.; Lindahl, Erik; Elinder, Fredrik

    2016-06-01

    Voltage-gated potassium channels open at depolarized membrane voltages. A prolonged depolarization causes a rearrangement of the selectivity filter which terminates the conduction of ions - a process called slow or C-type inactivation. How structural rearrangements in the voltage-sensor domain (VSD) cause alteration in the selectivity filter, and vice versa, are not fully understood. We show that pulling the pore domain of the Shaker potassium channel towards the VSD by a Cd2+ bridge accelerates C-type inactivation. Molecular dynamics simulations show that such pulling widens the selectivity filter and disrupts the K+ coordination, a hallmark for C-type inactivation. An engineered Cd2+ bridge within the VSD also affect C-type inactivation. Conversely, a pore domain mutation affects VSD gating-charge movement. Finally, C-type inactivation is caused by the concerted action of distant amino acid residues in the pore domain. All together, these data suggest a reciprocal communication between the pore domain and the VSD in the extracellular portion of the channel.

  2. Reciprocal voltage sensor-to-pore coupling leads to potassium channel C-type inactivation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conti, Luca; Renhorn, Jakob; Gabrielsson, Anders; Turesson, Fredrik; Liin, Sara I.; Lindahl, Erik; Elinder, Fredrik

    2016-06-01

    Voltage-gated potassium channels open at depolarized membrane voltages. A prolonged depolarization causes a rearrangement of the selectivity filter which terminates the conduction of ions – a process called slow or C-type inactivation. How structural rearrangements in the voltage-sensor domain (VSD) cause alteration in the selectivity filter, and vice versa, are not fully understood. We show that pulling the pore domain of the Shaker potassium channel towards the VSD by a Cd2+ bridge accelerates C-type inactivation. Molecular dynamics simulations show that such pulling widens the selectivity filter and disrupts the K+ coordination, a hallmark for C-type inactivation. An engineered Cd2+ bridge within the VSD also affect C-type inactivation. Conversely, a pore domain mutation affects VSD gating-charge movement. Finally, C-type inactivation is caused by the concerted action of distant amino acid residues in the pore domain. All together, these data suggest a reciprocal communication between the pore domain and the VSD in the extracellular portion of the channel.

  3. Reciprocal voltage sensor-to-pore coupling leads to potassium channel C-type inactivation.

    PubMed

    Conti, Luca; Renhorn, Jakob; Gabrielsson, Anders; Turesson, Fredrik; Liin, Sara I; Lindahl, Erik; Elinder, Fredrik

    2016-01-01

    Voltage-gated potassium channels open at depolarized membrane voltages. A prolonged depolarization causes a rearrangement of the selectivity filter which terminates the conduction of ions - a process called slow or C-type inactivation. How structural rearrangements in the voltage-sensor domain (VSD) cause alteration in the selectivity filter, and vice versa, are not fully understood. We show that pulling the pore domain of the Shaker potassium channel towards the VSD by a Cd(2+) bridge accelerates C-type inactivation. Molecular dynamics simulations show that such pulling widens the selectivity filter and disrupts the K(+) coordination, a hallmark for C-type inactivation. An engineered Cd(2+) bridge within the VSD also affect C-type inactivation. Conversely, a pore domain mutation affects VSD gating-charge movement. Finally, C-type inactivation is caused by the concerted action of distant amino acid residues in the pore domain. All together, these data suggest a reciprocal communication between the pore domain and the VSD in the extracellular portion of the channel. PMID:27278891

  4. ATP-sensitive potassium channels: uncovering novel targets for treating depression.

    PubMed

    Fan, Yi; Kong, Hui; Ye, Xinhai; Ding, Jianhua; Hu, Gang

    2016-07-01

    ATP-sensitive potassium (K-ATP) channels have been shown to couple membrane electrical activity to energy metabolism in a variety of cells and are important in several physiological systems. In the brain, K-ATP channels are strongly expressed in the neuronal circuitry. The distributional profile and functional significance of K-ATP channels suggest that they may be involved in stress-induced depression. First, we showed that chronic mild stress (CMS) significantly increased the expression of hippocampal Kir6.2 and Kir6.1 subunits of K-ATP channels. Next, using Kir6.2 knockout (Kir6.2(-/-)) mice, we presented that Kir6.2 deficiency resulted in antidepressant-like behaviors under non-stress conditions, but aggravated depressive behaviors accompanied by the loss of CA3 neuron and the reduction of brain-derived neurotrophic factor in hippocampus under chronic stress. Finally, we demonstrated that the K-ATP channel opener iptakalim, as well as a classical antidepressant fluoxetine, can reverse CMS-induced depression-related behaviors and counteract the deleterious effects of stress on hippocampus in wild-type mice, but only partially alleviate these symptoms in Kir6.2(-/-) mice. Collectively, our findings demonstrate that K-ATP channels are involved in the pathogenesis of depression and may be a promising target for the therapy of depression.

  5. The Molecular Basis of Polyunsaturated Fatty Acid Interactions with the Shaker Voltage-Gated Potassium Channel

    PubMed Central

    Yazdi, Samira; Stein, Matthias; Elinder, Fredrik; Andersson, Magnus; Lindahl, Erik

    2016-01-01

    Voltage-gated potassium (KV) channels are membrane proteins that respond to changes in membrane potential by enabling K+ ion flux across the membrane. Polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) induce channel opening by modulating the voltage-sensitivity, which can provide effective treatment against refractory epilepsy by means of a ketogenic diet. While PUFAs have been reported to influence the gating mechanism by electrostatic interactions to the voltage-sensor domain (VSD), the exact PUFA-protein interactions are still elusive. In this study, we report on the interactions between the Shaker KV channel in open and closed states and a PUFA-enriched lipid bilayer using microsecond molecular dynamics simulations. We determined a putative PUFA binding site in the open state of the channel located at the protein-lipid interface in the vicinity of the extracellular halves of the S3 and S4 helices of the VSD. In particular, the lipophilic PUFA tail covered a wide range of non-specific hydrophobic interactions in the hydrophobic central core of the protein-lipid interface, while the carboxylic head group displayed more specific interactions to polar/charged residues at the extracellular regions of the S3 and S4 helices, encompassing the S3-S4 linker. Moreover, by studying the interactions between saturated fatty acids (SFA) and the Shaker KV channel, our study confirmed an increased conformational flexibility in the polyunsaturated carbon tails compared to saturated carbon chains, which may explain the specificity of PUFA action on channel proteins. PMID:26751683

  6. SLO BK Potassium Channels Couple Gap Junctions to Inhibition of Calcium Signaling in Olfactory Neuron Diversification.

    PubMed

    Alqadah, Amel; Hsieh, Yi-Wen; Schumacher, Jennifer A; Wang, Xiaohong; Merrill, Sean A; Millington, Grethel; Bayne, Brittany; Jorgensen, Erik M; Chuang, Chiou-Fen

    2016-01-01

    The C. elegans AWC olfactory neuron pair communicates to specify asymmetric subtypes AWCOFF and AWCON in a stochastic manner. Intercellular communication between AWC and other neurons in a transient NSY-5 gap junction network antagonizes voltage-activated calcium channels, UNC-2 (CaV2) and EGL-19 (CaV1), in the AWCON cell, but how calcium signaling is downregulated by NSY-5 is only partly understood. Here, we show that voltage- and calcium-activated SLO BK potassium channels mediate gap junction signaling to inhibit calcium pathways for asymmetric AWC differentiation. Activation of vertebrate SLO-1 channels causes transient membrane hyperpolarization, which makes it an important negative feedback system for calcium entry through voltage-activated calcium channels. Consistent with the physiological roles of SLO-1, our genetic results suggest that slo-1 BK channels act downstream of NSY-5 gap junctions to inhibit calcium channel-mediated signaling in the specification of AWCON. We also show for the first time that slo-2 BK channels are important for AWC asymmetry and act redundantly with slo-1 to inhibit calcium signaling. In addition, nsy-5-dependent asymmetric expression of slo-1 and slo-2 in the AWCON neuron is necessary and sufficient for AWC asymmetry. SLO-1 and SLO-2 localize close to UNC-2 and EGL-19 in AWC, suggesting a role of possible functional coupling between SLO BK channels and voltage-activated calcium channels in AWC asymmetry. Furthermore, slo-1 and slo-2 regulate the localization of synaptic markers, UNC-2 and RAB-3, in AWC neurons to control AWC asymmetry. We also identify the requirement of bkip-1, which encodes a previously identified auxiliary subunit of SLO-1, for slo-1 and slo-2 function in AWC asymmetry. Together, these results provide an unprecedented molecular link between gap junctions and calcium pathways for terminal differentiation of olfactory neurons.

  7. SLO BK Potassium Channels Couple Gap Junctions to Inhibition of Calcium Signaling in Olfactory Neuron Diversification

    PubMed Central

    Schumacher, Jennifer A.; Wang, Xiaohong; Merrill, Sean A.; Millington, Grethel; Bayne, Brittany; Jorgensen, Erik M.; Chuang, Chiou-Fen

    2016-01-01

    The C. elegans AWC olfactory neuron pair communicates to specify asymmetric subtypes AWCOFF and AWCON in a stochastic manner. Intercellular communication between AWC and other neurons in a transient NSY-5 gap junction network antagonizes voltage-activated calcium channels, UNC-2 (CaV2) and EGL-19 (CaV1), in the AWCON cell, but how calcium signaling is downregulated by NSY-5 is only partly understood. Here, we show that voltage- and calcium-activated SLO BK potassium channels mediate gap junction signaling to inhibit calcium pathways for asymmetric AWC differentiation. Activation of vertebrate SLO-1 channels causes transient membrane hyperpolarization, which makes it an important negative feedback system for calcium entry through voltage-activated calcium channels. Consistent with the physiological roles of SLO-1, our genetic results suggest that slo-1 BK channels act downstream of NSY-5 gap junctions to inhibit calcium channel-mediated signaling in the specification of AWCON. We also show for the first time that slo-2 BK channels are important for AWC asymmetry and act redundantly with slo-1 to inhibit calcium signaling. In addition, nsy-5-dependent asymmetric expression of slo-1 and slo-2 in the AWCON neuron is necessary and sufficient for AWC asymmetry. SLO-1 and SLO-2 localize close to UNC-2 and EGL-19 in AWC, suggesting a role of possible functional coupling between SLO BK channels and voltage-activated calcium channels in AWC asymmetry. Furthermore, slo-1 and slo-2 regulate the localization of synaptic markers, UNC-2 and RAB-3, in AWC neurons to control AWC asymmetry. We also identify the requirement of bkip-1, which encodes a previously identified auxiliary subunit of SLO-1, for slo-1 and slo-2 function in AWC asymmetry. Together, these results provide an unprecedented molecular link between gap junctions and calcium pathways for terminal differentiation of olfactory neurons. PMID:26771544

  8. Single-channel basis for the slow activation of the repolarizing cardiac potassium current, I(Ks).

    PubMed

    Werry, Daniel; Eldstrom, Jodene; Wang, Zhuren; Fedida, David

    2013-03-12

    Coassembly of potassium voltage-gated channel, KQT-like subfamily, member 1 (KCNQ1) with potassium voltage-gated channel, Isk-related family, member 1 (KCNE1) the delayed rectifier potassium channel I(Ks). Its slow activation is critically important for membrane repolarization and for abbreviating the cardiac action potential, especially during sympathetic activation and at high heart rates. Mutations in either gene can cause long QT syndrome, which can lead to fatal arrhythmias. To understand better the elementary behavior of this slowly activating channel complex, we quantitatively analyzed direct measurements of single-channel I(Ks). Single-channel recordings from transiently transfected mouse ltk(-) cells confirm a channel that has long latency periods to opening (1.67 ± 0.073 s at +60 mV) but that flickers rapidly between multiple open and closed states in non-deactivating bursts at positive membrane potentials. Channel activity is cyclic with periods of high activity followed by quiescence, leading to an overall open probability of only ∼0.15 after 4 s under our recording conditions. The mean single-channel conductance was determined to be 3.2 pS, but unlike any other known wild-type human potassium channel, long-lived subconductance levels coupled to activation are a key feature of both the activation and deactivation time courses of the conducting channel complex. Up to five conducting levels ranging from 0.13 to 0.66 pA could be identified in single-channel recordings at 60 mV. Fast closings and overt subconductance behavior of the wild-type I(Ks) channel required modification of existing Markov models to include these features of channel behavior. PMID:23431135

  9. Uncoupling Charge Movement from Channel Opening in Voltage-gated Potassium Channels by Ruthenium Complexes*

    PubMed Central

    Jara-Oseguera, Andrés; Ishida, Itzel G.; Rangel-Yescas, Gisela E.; Espinosa-Jalapa, Noel; Pérez-Guzmán, José A.; Elías-Viñas, David; Le Lagadec, Ronan; Rosenbaum, Tamara; Islas, León D.

    2011-01-01

    The Kv2.1 channel generates a delayed-rectifier current in neurons and is responsible for modulation of neuronal spike frequency and membrane repolarization in pancreatic β-cells and cardiomyocytes. As with other tetrameric voltage-activated K+-channels, it has been proposed that each of the four Kv2.1 voltage-sensing domains activates independently upon depolarization, leading to a final concerted transition that causes channel opening. The mechanism by which voltage-sensor activation is coupled to the gating of the pore is still not understood. Here we show that the carbon-monoxide releasing molecule 2 (CORM-2) is an allosteric inhibitor of the Kv2.1 channel and that its inhibitory properties derive from the CORM-2 ability to largely reduce the voltage dependence of the opening transition, uncoupling voltage-sensor activation from the concerted opening transition. We additionally demonstrate that CORM-2 modulates Shaker K+-channels in a similar manner. Our data suggest that the mechanism of inhibition by CORM-2 may be common to voltage-activated channels and that this compound should be a useful tool for understanding the mechanisms of electromechanical coupling. PMID:21454671

  10. 18F-FDG PET/CT findings in voltage-gated potassium channel limbic encephalitis.

    PubMed

    Kamaleshwaran, Koramadai Karuppuswamy; Iyer, Rajesh Shankar; Antony, Joppy; Radhakrishnan, Edathuruthy Kalarickal; Shinto, Ajit

    2013-05-01

    Limbic encephalitis (LE) can be associated with cancer, viral infection, or be idiopathic. One such rare but treatable form is associated with voltage-gated potassium channel (VGKC) antibodies. Typical abnormalities are seen in FDG PET/CT. We report a 39-year-old female patient who presented with 3 months of progressive faciobrachial dystonic seizures and limbic encephalitis. Her serum and cerebrospinal fluid Lgi1 antibody titers were elevated. FDG PET/CT showed basal ganglial hypermetabolism and associated abnormalities. Serial MRI demonstrated atrophic changes predominantly involving the temporal lobes. She is on immunosuppressive therapy and shows clinical improvement with lowering of antibody titers.

  11. Large-conductance Ca²⁺-activated potassium channel in mitochondria of endothelial EA.hy926 cells.

    PubMed

    Bednarczyk, Piotr; Koziel, Agnieszka; Jarmuszkiewicz, Wieslawa; Szewczyk, Adam

    2013-06-01

    In the present study, we describe the existence of a large-conductance Ca²⁺-activated potassium (BKCa) channel in the mitochondria of the human endothelial cell line EA.hy926. A single-channel current was recorded from endothelial mitoplasts (i.e., inner mitochondrial membrane) using the patch-clamp technique in the mitoplast-attached mode. A potassium-selective current was recorded with a mean conductance equal to 270 ± 10 pS in a symmetrical 150/150 mM KCl isotonic solution. The channel activity, which was determined as the open probability, increased with the addition of calcium ions and the potassium channel opener NS1619. Conversely, the activity of the channel was irreversibly blocked by paxilline and iberiotoxin, BKCa channel inhibitors. The open-state probability was found to be voltage dependent. The substances known to modulate BKCa channel activity influenced the bioenergetics of mitochondria isolated from human endothelial EA.hy926 cells. In isolated mitochondria, 100 μM Ca²⁺, 10 μM NS1619, and 0.5 μM NS11021 depolarized the mitochondrial membrane potential and stimulated nonphosphorylating respiration. These effects were blocked by iberiotoxin and paxilline in a potassium-dependent manner. Under phosphorylating conditions, NS1619-induced, iberiotoxin-sensitive uncoupling diverted energy from ATP synthesis during the phosphorylating respiration of the endothelial mitochondria. Immunological analysis with antibodies raised against proteins of the plasma membrane BKCa channel identified a pore-forming α-subunit and an auxiliary β₂-subunit of the channel in the endothelial mitochondrial inner membrane. In conclusion, we show for the first time that the inner mitochondrial membrane in human endothelial EA.hy926 cells contains a large-conductance calcium-dependent potassium channel with properties similar to those of the surface membrane BKCa channel.

  12. Beta-adrenergic modulation of cardiac ion channels. Differential temperature sensitivity of potassium and calcium currents

    PubMed Central

    1989-01-01

    beta-Adrenergic stimulation of ventricular heart cells results in the enhancement of two important ion currents that regulate the plateau phase of the action potential: the delayed rectifier potassium channel current (IK) and L-type calcium channel current (ICa). The temperature dependence of beta-adrenergic modulation of these two currents was examined in patch-clamped guinea pig ventricular myocytes at various steps in the beta-receptor/cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase pathway. External applications of isoproterenol and forskolin were used to activate the beta-receptor and the enzyme adenylate cyclase, respectively. Internal dialysis of cyclic 3',5'-adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) or the catalytic subunit of cAMP-dependent protein kinase (CS), as well as the external addition of 8-chlorphenylthio cAMP (CPT-cAMP) was applied to increase intracellular levels of cAMP and CS. Isoproterenol-mediated increases in IK, but not ICa, were found to be very temperature dependent over the range of 20-37 degrees C. At room temperature (20-22 degrees C) isoproterenol produced a large (threefold) enhancement of ICa but had no effect on IK. In contrast, at warmer temperatures (30-37 degrees C) both currents increased in the presence of this agonist and the kinetics of IK were slowed at -30 mV. A similar temperature sensitivity also existed after exposure to forskolin, CPT-cAMP, cAMP, and CS, suggesting that this temperature sensitivity of IK may arise at the channel protein level. Modulation of IK during each of these interventions was accompanied by a slowing in IK kinetics. Thus, regulation of cardiac potassium channels but not calcium channels involves a temperature-dependent step that occurs after activation of the catalytic subunit of cAMP-dependent protein kinase. PMID:2472462

  13. Regulation of voltage-gated potassium channels by PI(4,5)P2

    PubMed Central

    Kruse, Martin; Hammond, Gerald R.V.

    2012-01-01

    Phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PI(4,5)P2) regulates activities of numerous ion channels including inwardly rectifying potassium (Kir) channels, KCNQ, TRP, and voltage-gated calcium channels. Several studies suggest that voltage-gated potassium (KV) channels might be regulated by PI(4,5)P2. Wide expression of KV channels in different cells suggests that such regulation could have broad physiological consequences. To study regulation of KV channels by PI(4,5)P2, we have coexpressed several of them in tsA-201 cells with a G protein–coupled receptor (M1R), a voltage-sensitive lipid 5-phosphatase (Dr-VSP), or an engineered fusion protein carrying both lipid 4-phosphatase and 5-phosphatase activity (pseudojanin). These tools deplete PI(4,5)P2 with application of muscarinic agonists, depolarization, or rapamycin, respectively. PI(4,5)P2 at the plasma membrane was monitored by Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) from PH probes of PLCδ1 simultaneously with whole-cell recordings. Activation of Dr-VSP or recruitment of pseudojanin inhibited KV7.1, KV7.2/7.3, and Kir2.1 channel current by 90–95%. Activation of M1R inhibited KV7.2/7.3 current similarly. With these tools, we tested for potential PI(4,5)P2 regulation of activity of KV1.1/KVβ1.1, KV1.3, KV1.4, and KV1.5/KVβ1.3, KV2.1, KV3.4, KV4.2, KV4.3 (with different KChIPs and DPP6-s), and hERG/KCNE2. Interestingly, we found a substantial removal of inactivation for KV1.1/KVβ1.1 and KV3.4, resulting in up-regulation of current density upon activation of M1R but no changes in activity upon activating only VSP or pseudojanin. The other channels tested except possibly hERG showed no alteration in activity in any of the assays we used. In conclusion, a depletion of PI(4,5)P2 at the plasma membrane by enzymes does not seem to influence activity of most tested KV channels, whereas it does strongly inhibit members of the KV7 and Kir families. PMID:22851677

  14. Role of hydrophobic and ionic forces in the movement of S4 of the Shaker potassium channel.

    PubMed

    Elliott, David J S; Neale, Edward J; Munsey, Tim S; Bannister, John P; Sivaprasadarao, Asipu

    2012-12-01

    Voltage-gated ion (K(+), Na(+), Ca(2+)) channels contain a pore domain (PD) surrounded by four voltage sensing domains (VSD). Each VSD is made up of four transmembrane helices, S1-S4. S4 contains 6-7 positively charged residues (arginine/lysine) separated two hydrophobic residues, whereas S1-S3 contribute to two negatively charged clusters. These structures are conserved among all members of the voltage-gated ion channel family and play essential roles in voltage gating. The role of S4 charged residues in voltage gating is well established: During depolarization, they move out of the membrane electric field, exerting a mechanical force on channel gates, causing them to open. However, the role of the intervening hydrophobic residues in voltage sensing is unclear. Here we studied the role of these residues in the prototypical Shaker potassium channel. We have altered the physicochemical properties of both charged and hydrophobic positions of S4 and examined the effect of these modifications on the gating properties of the channel. For this, we have introduced cysteines at each of these positions, expressed the mutants in Xenopus oocytes, and examined the effect of in situ addition of charge, via Cd(2+), on channel gating by two-electrode voltage clamp. Our results reveal a face of the S4 helix (comprising residues L358, L361, R365 and R368) where introduction of charge at hydrophobic positions destabilises the closed state and removal of charges from charged positions has an opposite effect. We propose that hydrophobic residues play a crucial role in limiting gating to a physiological voltage range.

  15. Surface-enhanced IR absorption spectroscopy of the KcsA potassium channel upon application of an electric field.

    PubMed

    Yamakata, Akira; Shimizu, Hirofumi; Oiki, Shigetoshi

    2015-09-01

    Surface-enhanced IR absorption spectroscopy (SEIRAS) is a powerful tool for studying the structure of molecules adsorbed on an electrode surface (ATR-SEIRA). Coupled with an electrochemical system, structural changes induced by changes in the electric field can be detected. All the membrane proteins are subjected to the effect of membrane electric field, but conformational changes at different membrane potentials and their functional relevance have not been studied extensively except for channel proteins. In this contribution, background information of potential-dependent functional and structural changes of a prototypical channel, the KcsA channel, is summarized, and SEIRAS applied to the KcsA channel under the application of the potential is shown. The potassium channels allow K(+) to permeate selectively through the structural part called the selectivity filter, in which dehydrated K(+) ions interact with backbone carbonyls. In the absence of K(+), the selectivity filter undergoes conformational changes to the non-conductive collapsed conformation. To apply the electric field, the KcsA channels were fixed on the gold surface in either upside or reverse orientation. The SEIRA spectrum in K(+) or Na(+) solution revealed both backbone structural changes and local changes in the OCO-carboxylate groups. Upon application of the negative electric field, the spectrum of OCO was enhanced only in the K(+) solution. These results indicate that the negative electric field accumulates local K(+) concentration, which turned the collapsed filter to the conductive conformation. ATR-SEIRA serves as an unprecedented experimental system for examining membrane proteins under an electric field.

  16. Heterozygous disruption of renal outer medullary potassium channel in rats is associated with reduced blood pressure.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xiaoyan; Zhang, Zuo; Shin, Myung Kyun; Horwitz, Sarah Beth; Levorse, John M; Zhu, Lei; Sharif-Rodriguez, Wanda; Streltsov, Denis Y; Dajee, Maya; Hernandez, Melba; Pan, Yi; Urosevic-Price, Olga; Wang, Li; Forrest, Gail; Szeto, Daphne; Zhu, Yonghua; Cui, Yan; Michael, Bindhu; Balogh, Leslie Ann; Welling, Paul A; Wade, James B; Roy, Sophie; Sullivan, Kathleen A

    2013-08-01

    The renal outer medullary potassium channel (ROMK, KCNJ1) mediates potassium recycling and facilitates sodium reabsorption through the Na(+)/K(+)/2Cl(-) cotransporter in the loop of Henle and potassium secretion at the cortical collecting duct. Human genetic studies indicate that ROMK homozygous loss-of-function mutations cause type II Bartter syndrome, featuring polyuria, renal salt wasting, and hypotension; humans heterozygous for ROMK mutations identified in the Framingham Heart Study have reduced blood pressure. ROMK null mice recapitulate many of the features of type II Bartter syndrome. We have generated an ROMK knockout rat model in Dahl salt-sensitive background by using zinc finger nuclease technology and investigated the effects of knocking out ROMK on systemic and renal hemodynamics and kidney histology in the Dahl salt-sensitive rats. The ROMK(-/-) pups recapitulated features identified in the ROMK null mice. The ROMK(+/-) rats, when challenged with a 4% salt diet, exhibited a reduced blood pressure compared with their ROMK(+/+) littermates. More importantly, when challenged with an 8% salt diet, the Dahl salt-sensitive rats with 50% less ROMK expression showed increased protection from salt-induced blood pressure elevation and signs of protection from renal injury. Our findings in ROMK knockout Dahl salt-sensitive rats, together with the previous reports in humans and mice, underscore a critical role of ROMK in blood pressure regulation. PMID:23753405

  17. Heterozygous disruption of renal outer medullary potassium channel in rats is associated with reduced blood pressure.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xiaoyan; Zhang, Zuo; Shin, Myung Kyun; Horwitz, Sarah Beth; Levorse, John M; Zhu, Lei; Sharif-Rodriguez, Wanda; Streltsov, Denis Y; Dajee, Maya; Hernandez, Melba; Pan, Yi; Urosevic-Price, Olga; Wang, Li; Forrest, Gail; Szeto, Daphne; Zhu, Yonghua; Cui, Yan; Michael, Bindhu; Balogh, Leslie Ann; Welling, Paul A; Wade, James B; Roy, Sophie; Sullivan, Kathleen A

    2013-08-01

    The renal outer medullary potassium channel (ROMK, KCNJ1) mediates potassium recycling and facilitates sodium reabsorption through the Na(+)/K(+)/2Cl(-) cotransporter in the loop of Henle and potassium secretion at the cortical collecting duct. Human genetic studies indicate that ROMK homozygous loss-of-function mutations cause type II Bartter syndrome, featuring polyuria, renal salt wasting, and hypotension; humans heterozygous for ROMK mutations identified in the Framingham Heart Study have reduced blood pressure. ROMK null mice recapitulate many of the features of type II Bartter syndrome. We have generated an ROMK knockout rat model in Dahl salt-sensitive background by using zinc finger nuclease technology and investigated the effects of knocking out ROMK on systemic and renal hemodynamics and kidney histology in the Dahl salt-sensitive rats. The ROMK(-/-) pups recapitulated features identified in the ROMK null mice. The ROMK(+/-) rats, when challenged with a 4% salt diet, exhibited a reduced blood pressure compared with their ROMK(+/+) littermates. More importantly, when challenged with an 8% salt diet, the Dahl salt-sensitive rats with 50% less ROMK expression showed increased protection from salt-induced blood pressure elevation and signs of protection from renal injury. Our findings in ROMK knockout Dahl salt-sensitive rats, together with the previous reports in humans and mice, underscore a critical role of ROMK in blood pressure regulation.

  18. Voltage-dependent gating and gating charge measurements in the Kv1.2 potassium channel

    PubMed Central

    Ishida, Itzel G.; Rangel-Yescas, Gisela E.; Carrasco-Zanini, Julia

    2015-01-01

    Much has been learned about the voltage sensors of ion channels since the x-ray structure of the mammalian voltage-gated potassium channel Kv1.2 was published in 2005. High resolution structural data of a Kv channel enabled the structural interpretation of numerous electrophysiological findings collected in various ion channels, most notably Shaker, and permitted the development of meticulous computational simulations of the activation mechanism. The fundamental premise for the structural interpretation of functional measurements from Shaker is that this channel and Kv1.2 have the same characteristics, such that correlation of data from both channels would be a trivial task. We tested these assumptions by measuring Kv1.2 voltage-dependent gating and charge per channel. We found that the Kv1.2 gating charge is near 10 elementary charges (eo), ∼25% less than the well-established 13–14 eo in Shaker. Next, we neutralized positive residues in the Kv1.2 S4 transmembrane segment to investigate the cause of the reduction of the gating charge and found that, whereas replacing R1 with glutamine decreased voltage sensitivity to ∼50% of the wild-type channel value, mutation of the subsequent arginines had a much smaller effect. These data are in marked contrast to the effects of charge neutralization in Shaker, where removal of the first four basic residues reduces the gating charge by roughly the same amount. In light of these differences, we propose that the voltage-sensing domains (VSDs) of Kv1.2 and Shaker might undergo the same physical movement, but the septum that separates the aqueous crevices in the VSD of Kv1.2 might be thicker than Shaker’s, accounting for the smaller Kv1.2 gating charge. PMID:25779871

  19. Altered potassium channel distribution and composition in myelinated axons suppresses hyperexcitability following injury

    PubMed Central

    Calvo, Margarita; Richards, Natalie; Schmid, Annina B; Barroso, Alejandro; Zhu, Lan; Ivulic, Dinka; Zhu, Ning; Anwandter, Philipp; Bhat, Manzoor A; Court, Felipe A; McMahon, Stephen B; Bennett, David LH

    2016-01-01

    Neuropathic pain following peripheral nerve injury is associated with hyperexcitability in damaged myelinated sensory axons, which begins to normalise over time. We investigated the composition and distribution of shaker-type-potassium channels (Kv1 channels) within the nodal complex of myelinated axons following injury. At the neuroma that forms after damage, expression of Kv1.1 and 1.2 (normally localised to the juxtaparanode) was markedly decreased. In contrast Kv1.4 and 1.6, which were hardly detectable in the naïve state, showed increased expression within juxtaparanodes and paranodes following injury, both in rats and humans. Within the dorsal root (a site remote from injury) we noted a redistribution of Kv1-channels towards the paranode. Blockade of Kv1 channels with α-DTX after injury reinstated hyperexcitability of A-fibre axons and enhanced mechanosensitivity. Changes in the molecular composition and distribution of axonal Kv1 channels, therefore represents a protective mechanism to suppress the hyperexcitability of myelinated sensory axons that follows nerve injury. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.12661.001 PMID:27033551

  20. Altered potassium channel distribution and composition in myelinated axons suppresses hyperexcitability following injury.

    PubMed

    Calvo, Margarita; Richards, Natalie; Schmid, Annina B; Barroso, Alejandro; Zhu, Lan; Ivulic, Dinka; Zhu, Ning; Anwandter, Philipp; Bhat, Manzoor A; Court, Felipe A; McMahon, Stephen B; Bennett, David L H

    2016-04-19

    Neuropathic pain following peripheral nerve injury is associated with hyperexcitability in damaged myelinated sensory axons, which begins to normalise over time. We investigated the composition and distribution of shaker-type-potassium channels (Kv1 channels) within the nodal complex of myelinated axons following injury. At the neuroma that forms after damage, expression of Kv1.1 and 1.2 (normally localised to the juxtaparanode) was markedly decreased. In contrast Kv1.4 and 1.6, which were hardly detectable in the naïve state, showed increased expression within juxtaparanodes and paranodes following injury, both in rats and humans. Within the dorsal root (a site remote from injury) we noted a redistribution of Kv1-channels towards the paranode. Blockade of Kv1 channels with α-DTX after injury reinstated hyperexcitability of A-fibre axons and enhanced mechanosensitivity. Changes in the molecular composition and distribution of axonal Kv1 channels, therefore represents a protective mechanism to suppress the hyperexcitability of myelinated sensory axons that follows nerve injury.

  1. Altered potassium channel distribution and composition in myelinated axons suppresses hyperexcitability following injury.

    PubMed

    Calvo, Margarita; Richards, Natalie; Schmid, Annina B; Barroso, Alejandro; Zhu, Lan; Ivulic, Dinka; Zhu, Ning; Anwandter, Philipp; Bhat, Manzoor A; Court, Felipe A; McMahon, Stephen B; Bennett, David L H

    2016-01-01

    Neuropathic pain following peripheral nerve injury is associated with hyperexcitability in damaged myelinated sensory axons, which begins to normalise over time. We investigated the composition and distribution of shaker-type-potassium channels (Kv1 channels) within the nodal complex of myelinated axons following injury. At the neuroma that forms after damage, expression of Kv1.1 and 1.2 (normally localised to the juxtaparanode) was markedly decreased. In contrast Kv1.4 and 1.6, which were hardly detectable in the naïve state, showed increased expression within juxtaparanodes and paranodes following injury, both in rats and humans. Within the dorsal root (a site remote from injury) we noted a redistribution of Kv1-channels towards the paranode. Blockade of Kv1 channels with α-DTX after injury reinstated hyperexcitability of A-fibre axons and enhanced mechanosensitivity. Changes in the molecular composition and distribution of axonal Kv1 channels, therefore represents a protective mechanism to suppress the hyperexcitability of myelinated sensory axons that follows nerve injury. PMID:27033551

  2. Initial isolation and analysis of the human Kv1.7 (KCNA7) gene, a member of the voltage-gated potassium channel gene family.

    PubMed

    Kashuba, V I; Kvasha, S M; Protopopov, A I; Gizatullin, R Z; Rynditch, A V; Wahlestedt, C; Wasserman, W W; Zabarovsky, E R

    2001-05-01

    A novel human potassium channel gene was identified and isolated. The maximal open reading frame encodes a protein of 456 amino acids. The predicted product exhibits 91% amino acid identity to the murine voltage-gated potassium channel protein Kv1.7 (Kcna7), which plays an important role in the repolarization of cell membranes. Based on the high similarity, the human gene has been classified as the ortholog of the mouse Kcna7 and given the name Kv1.7 (KCNA7). A structural prediction identified a pore region characteristic of potassium channels and six membrane-spanning domains. Northern expression analysis revealed the gene is expressed preferentially in skeletal muscle, heart and kidney. However, it is expressed at lower level in other tissues, including liver. A single mRNA isoform was observed, with a size of approximately 4.5 kb. Using fluorescence in situ hybridization, the gene was mapped to chromosomal band 19q13.4 (269.13 cR(3000)). A genomic sequence was identified in the database from this region, and the KCNA7 gene structure determined. Computational analysis of the genomic sequence reveals the location of a putative promoter and a likely muscle-specific regulatory region. Initial comparison to the published murine Kcna7 cDNA suggested a different N-terminal sequence for the human protein, however, further analysis suggests that the original mouse sequence contained an error or an unusual polymorphism.

  3. Structural analysis of the S4-S5 linker of the human KCNQ1 potassium channel.

    PubMed

    Gayen, Shovanlal; Li, Qingxin; Kang, CongBao

    2015-01-01

    KCNQ1 plays important roles in the cardiac action potential and consists of an N-terminal domain, a voltage-sensor domain, a pore domain and a C-terminal domain. KCNQ1 is a voltage-gated potassium channel and its channel activity is regulated by membrane potentials. The linker between transmembrane helices 4 and 5 (S4-S5 linker) is important for transferring the conformational changes from the voltage-sensor domain to the pore domain. In this study, the structure of the S4-S5 linker of KCNQ1 was investigated by solution NMR, circular dichroism and fluorescence spectroscopic studies. The S4-S5 linker adopted a helical structure in detergent micelles. The W248 may interact with the cell membrane.

  4. Residues in a jellyfish shaker-like channel involved in modulation by external potassium.

    PubMed

    Grigoriev, N G; Spafford, J D; Spencer, A N

    1999-10-01

    The jellyfish gene, jShak2, coded for a potassium channel that showed increased conductance and a decreased inactivation rate as [K(+)](out) was increased. The relative modulatory effectiveness of K(+), Rb(+), Cs(+), and Na(+) indicated that a weak-field-strength site is present. Cysteine substituted mutants (L369C and F370C) of an N-terminal truncated construct, (jShak2Delta2-38) which only showed C-type inactivation, were used to establish the position and nature of this site(s). In comparison with jShak2Delta2-38 and F370C, L369C showed a greater relative increase in peak current when [K(+)](out) was increased from 1 to 100 mM because the affinity of this site was reduced at low [K(+)](out). Increasing [K(+)](out) had little effect on the rate of inactivation of L369C; however, the appearance of a second, hyperbolic component to the inactivation curve for F370C indicated that this mutation had increased the affinity of the low-affinity site by bringing the backbone oxygens closer together. Methanethiosulphonate reagents were used to form positively (MTSET), negatively (MTSES), and neutrally (MTSM) charged side groups on the cysteine-substituted residues at the purported K(+) binding site(s) in the channel mouth and conductance and inactivation kinetic measurements made. The reduced affinity of the site produced by the mutation L369C was probably due to the increased hydrophobicity of cysteine, which changed the relative positions of carbonyl oxygens since MTSES modification did not form a high-field-strength site as might be expected if the cysteine residues project into the pore. Addition of the side chain -CH(2)-S-S-CH(3), which is similar to the side chain of methionine, a conserved residue in many potassium channels, resulted in an increased peak current and reduced inactivation rate, hence a higher affinity binding site. Modification of cysteine substituted mutants occurred more readily from the inactivated state confirming that side chains probably rotate

  5. Adenosine Triphosphate-Sensitive Potassium Channel Kir Subunits Implicated in Cardioprotection by Diazoxide

    PubMed Central

    Henn, Matthew C; Janjua, M Burhan; Kanter, Evelyn M; Makepeace, Carol M; Schuessler, Richard B; Nichols, Colin G; Lawton, Jennifer S

    2015-01-01

    Background ATP-sensitive potassium (KATP) channel openers provide cardioprotection in multiple models. Ion flux at an unidentified mitochondrial KATP channel has been proposed as the mechanism. The renal outer medullary kidney potassium channel subunit, potassium inward rectifying (Kir)1.1, has been implicated as a mitochondrial channel pore-forming subunit. We hypothesized that subunit Kir1.1 is involved in cardioprotection (maintenance of volume homeostasis and contractility) of the KATP channel opener diazoxide (DZX) during stress (exposure to hyperkalemic cardioplegia [CPG]) at the myocyte and mitochondrial levels. Methods and Results Kir subunit inhibitor Tertiapin Q (TPN-Q) was utilized to evaluate response to stress. Mouse ventricular mitochondrial volume was measured in the following groups: isolation buffer; 200 μmol/L of ATP; 100 μmol/L of DZX+200 μmol/L of ATP; or 100 μmol/L of DZX+200 μmol/L of ATP+TPN-Q (500 or 100 nmol/L). Myocytes were exposed to Tyrode’s solution (5 minutes), test solution (Tyrode’s, cardioplegia [CPG], CPG+DZX, CPG+DZX+TPN-Q, Tyrode’s+TPN-Q, or CPG+TPN-Q), N=12 for all (10 minutes); followed by Tyrode’s (5 minutes). Volumes were compared. TPN-Q, with or without DZX, did not alter mitochondrial or myocyte volume. Stress (CPG) resulted in myocyte swelling and reduced contractility that was prevented by DZX. TPN-Q prevented the cardioprotection afforded by DZX (volume homeostasis and maintenance of contractility). Conclusions TPN-Q inhibited myocyte cardioprotection provided by DZX during stress; however, it did not alter mitochondrial volume. Because TPN-Q inhibits Kir1.1, Kir3.1, and Kir3.4, these data support that any of these Kir subunits could be involved in the cardioprotection afforded by diazoxide. However, these data suggest that mitochondrial swelling by diazoxide does not involve Kir1.1, 3.1, or 3.4. PMID:26304939

  6. Different calcium influx characteristics upon Kv1.3 and IKCa1 potassium channel inhibition in T helper subsets.

    PubMed

    Orbán, Csaba; Bajnok, Anna; Vásárhelyi, Barna; Tulassay, Tivadar; Toldi, Gergely

    2014-07-01

    Functional imbalance between T helper subsets plays important role in the pathogenesis of autoimmune disorders. Transient increase of cytoplasmic calcium level, and sustention of negative membrane potential by voltage sensitive Kv1.3 and calcium-dependent IKCa1 potassium channels are essential for short-term lymphocyte activation, thus present possible target for selective immunomodulation. We aimed to investigate calcium influx sensitivity to the inhibition of potassium channels in the main T helper subsets. Peripheral blood from 11 healthy individuals was drawn and calcium influx kinetics following activation with phytohemagglutinin in Th1, Th2, Th17, and Treg cells were evaluated. Alteration of calcium influx induced by specific inhibitors of Kv1.3 and IKCa1 potassium channels, and the expression of Kv1.3 channels were also assessed. Highest cytoplasmic calcium concentration was observed in stimulated Th1 cells, while the lowest level was measured in Treg cells. In Th1 and Th17 cells, inhibition of both investigated potassium channels decreased calcium influx. In Th2 cells only the inhibitor of Kv1.3 channels, while in Treg cells none of the inhibitors had significant effect. Upon the inhibition of IKCa1 channels, short-term activation of proinflammatory cells was specifically decreased without affecting anti-inflammatory subsets, indicating that selective immunomodulation is possible in healthy individuals.

  7. Calcium-activated potassium channels mask vascular dysfunction associated with oxidized LDL exposure in rabbit aorta.

    PubMed

    Bocker, J M; Miller, F J; Oltman, C L; Chappell, D A; Gutterman, D D

    2001-05-01

    Endothelium-dependent vasodilation is impaired in atherosclerosis. Oxidized low density lipoprotein (ox-LDL) plays an important role, possibly through alterations in G-protein activation. We examined the effect of acute exposure to ox-LDL on the dilator responses of isolated rabbit aorta segments. We sought also to evaluate the specificity of this dysfunction for dilator stimuli that traditionally operate through a Gi-protein mechanism. Aortic segments were prepared for measurement of isometric tension. After contraction with prostaglandin F2alpha, relaxation to thrombin, adenosine diphosphate (ADP), or the endothelium-independent agonists, sodium nitroprusside (SNP) or papaverine was examined. Maximal relaxation to thrombin was impaired in the presence of ox-LDL (17.7+/-3.7% p<0.05) compared to control (no LDL) (52.6+/-4.0%). Ox-LDL did not affect maximal relaxation to ADP or SNP. However, in the presence of charybdotoxin (CHTX: calcium-activated potassium channel inhibitor) ox-LDL impaired relaxation to ADP (17.4+/-3.2%). CHTX did not affect control (no LDL) responses to ADP (69.6+/-5.0%) or relaxation to thrombin or papaverine. In conclusion, ox-LDL impairs relaxation to thrombin, but in the case of ADP, calcium-activated potassium channels compensate to maintain this relaxation. PMID:11605770

  8. Huntington disease skeletal muscle is hyperexcitable owing to chloride and potassium channel dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Waters, Christopher W; Varuzhanyan, Grigor; Talmadge, Robert J; Voss, Andrew A

    2013-05-28

    Huntington disease is a progressive and fatal genetic disorder with debilitating motor and cognitive defects. Chorea, rigidity, dystonia, and muscle weakness are characteristic motor defects of the disease that are commonly attributed to central neurodegeneration. However, no previous study has examined the membrane properties that control contraction in Huntington disease muscle. We show primary defects in ex vivo adult skeletal muscle from the R6/2 transgenic mouse model of Huntington disease. Action potentials in diseased fibers are more easily triggered and prolonged than in fibers from WT littermates. Furthermore, some action potentials in the diseased fibers self-trigger. These defects occur because of decreases in the resting chloride and potassium conductances. Consistent with this, the expression of the muscle chloride channel, ClC-1, in Huntington disease muscle was compromised by improper splicing and a corresponding reduction in total Clcn1 (gene for ClC-1) mRNA. Additionally, the total Kcnj2 (gene for the Kir2.1 potassium channel) mRNA was reduced in disease muscle. The resulting muscle hyperexcitability causes involuntary and prolonged contractions that may contribute to the chorea, rigidity, and dystonia that characterize Huntington disease.

  9. Genetic variants in potassium channels are associated with type 2 diabetes in Mongolian population

    PubMed Central

    Odgerel, Zagaa; Lee, Hee S; Erdenebileg, Narnygerel; Gandbold, Suren; Luvsanjamba, Munkhjargal; Sambuughin, Nyamkhishig; Sonomtseren, Sainbileg; Sharavdorj, Purevdulam; Jodov, Erdenezul; Altaisaikhan, Khasag; Goldfarb, Lev G

    2011-01-01

    Objectives Recent genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified more than 40 common sequence variants associated with type 2 diabetes (T2D). However, the results are not always the same in populations with differing genetic backgrounds. We evaluated a hypothesis that a North Asian population living in a geographic area with unusually harsh environmental conditions developed unique genetic risks. Methods We performed a population-based association study with 21 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 9 genes selected according to the results of GWAS conducted in other populations. The study participants included 393 full-heritage Mongolian individuals, 177 diagnosed with T2D and 216 matched controls. Genotyping was performed by TaqMan methodology. Results The strongest association was detected with SNPs located within the potassium-channel coding KCNQ1 (highest OR=1.92; P=3.4×10−5) and ABCC8 (OR=1.79; P=5×10−4) genes. Genetic variants identified as strongly influencing the risk of T2D in other populations such as those in KCNJ11 or TCF7L2 genes did not show statistically significant association in Mongolia. Conclusions The strongest T2D risk-associated SNPs in Mongolians are located within 2 of 3 tested potassium-channel coding genes; accumulated variations in these genes may be related to environmental exposure to extreme cold. PMID:22151254

  10. Sensory Neuron Downregulation of the Kv9.1 Potassium Channel Subunit Mediates Neuropathic Pain following Nerve Injury

    PubMed Central

    Tsantoulas, Christoforos; Zhu, Lan; Shaifta, Yasin; Grist, John; Ward, Jeremy P. T.; Raouf, Ramin; Michael, Gregory J.; McMahon, Stephen B.

    2013-01-01

    Chronic neuropathic pain affects millions of individuals worldwide, is typically long-lasting, and remains poorly treated with existing therapies. Neuropathic pain arising from peripheral nerve lesions is known to be dependent on the emergence of spontaneous and evoked hyperexcitability in damaged nerves. Here, we report that the potassium channel subunit Kv9.1 is expressed in myelinated sensory neurons, but is absent from small unmyelinated neurons. Kv9.1 expression was strongly and rapidly downregulated following axotomy, with a time course that matches the development of spontaneous activity and pain hypersensitivity in animal models. Interestingly, siRNA-mediated knock-down of Kv9.1 in naive rats led to neuropathic pain behaviors. Diminished Kv9.1 function also augmented myelinated sensory neuron excitability, manifested as spontaneous firing, hyper-responsiveness to stimulation, and persistent after-discharge. Intracellular recordings from ex vivo dorsal root ganglion preparations revealed that Kv9.1 knock-down was linked to lowered firing thresholds and increased firing rates under physiologically relevant conditions of extracellular potassium accumulation during prolonged activity. Similar neurophysiological changes were detected in animals subjected to traumatic nerve injury and provide an explanation for neuropathic pain symptoms, including poorly understood conditions such as hyperpathia and paresthesias. In summary, our results demonstrate that Kv9.1 dysfunction leads to spontaneous and evoked neuronal hyperexcitability in myelinated fibers, coupled with development of neuropathic pain behaviors. PMID:23197740

  11. Opening of the inward rectifier potassium channel alleviates maladaptive tissue repair following myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chengfang; Liu, Enli; Luo, Tiane; Zhang, Weifang; He, Rongli

    2016-08-01

    Activation of the inward rectifier potassium current (IK1) channel has been reported to be associated with suppression of ventricular arrhythmias. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that opening of the IK1 channel with zacopride (ZAC) was involved in the modulation of tissue repair after myocardial infarction. Sprague-Dawley rats were subject to coronary artery ligation and ZAC was administered intraperitoneally (15 µg/kg/day) for 28 days. Compared with the ischemia group, treatment with ZAC significantly reduced the ratio of heart/body weight and the cross-sectional area of cardiomyocytes, suggesting less cardiac hypertrophy. ZAC reduced the accumulation of collagen types I and III, accompanied with decrease of collagen area, which were associated with a reduction of collagen deposition in the fibrotic myocardium. Echocardiography showed improved cardiac function, evidenced by the reduced left ventricular end-diastolic dimension and left ventricular end-systolic dimension, and the increased ejection fraction and fractional shortening in ZAC-treated animals (all P < 0.05 vs. ischemia group). In coincidence with these changes, ZAC up-regulated the protein level of the IK1 channel and down-regulated the phosphorylation of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) and 70-kDa ribosomal protein S6 (p70S6) kinase. Administration of chloroquine alone, an IK1 channel antagonist, had no effect on all the parameters measured, but significantly blocked the beneficial effects of ZAC on cardiac repair. In conclusion, opening of the IK1 channel with ZAC inhibits maladaptive tissue repair and improves cardiac function, potentially mediated by the inhibition of ischemia-activated mTOR-p70S6 signaling pathway via the IK1 channel. So the development of pharmacological agents specifically targeting the activation of the IK1 channel may protect the heart against myocardial ischemia-induced cardiac dysfunction. PMID:27486024

  12. ML418: The First Selective, Sub-Micromolar Pore Blocker of Kir7.1 Potassium Channels.

    PubMed

    Swale, Daniel R; Kurata, Haruto; Kharade, Sujay V; Sheehan, Jonathan; Raphemot, Rene; Voigtritter, Karl R; Figueroa, Eric E; Meiler, Jens; Blobaum, Anna L; Lindsley, Craig W; Hopkins, Corey R; Denton, Jerod S

    2016-07-20

    The inward rectifier potassium (Kir) channel Kir7.1 (KCNJ13) has recently emerged as a key regulator of melanocortin signaling in the brain, electrolyte homeostasis in the eye, and uterine muscle contractility during pregnancy. The pharmacological tools available for exploring the physiology and therapeutic potential of Kir7.1 have been limited to relatively weak and nonselective small-molecule inhibitors. Here, we report the discovery in a fluorescence-based high-throughput screen of a novel Kir7.1 channel inhibitor, VU714. Site-directed mutagenesis of pore-lining amino acid residues identified glutamate 149 and alanine 150 as essential determinants of VU714 activity. Lead optimization with medicinal chemistry generated ML418, which exhibits sub-micromolar activity (IC50 = 310 nM) and superior selectivity over other Kir channels (at least 17-fold selective over Kir1.1, Kir2.1, Kir2.2, Kir2.3, Kir3.1/3.2, and Kir4.1) except for Kir6.2/SUR1 (equally potent). Evaluation in the EuroFins Lead Profiling panel of 64 GPCRs, ion-channels, and transporters for off-target activity of ML418 revealed a relatively clean ancillary pharmacology. While ML418 exhibited low CLHEP in human microsomes which could be modulated with lipophilicity adjustments, it showed high CLHEP in rat microsomes regardless of lipophilicity. A subsequent in vivo PK study of ML418 by intraperitoneal (IP) administration (30 mg/kg dosage) revealed a suitable PK profile (Cmax = 0.20 μM and Tmax = 3 h) and favorable CNS distribution (mouse brain/plasma Kp of 10.9 to support in vivo studies. ML418, which represents the current state-of-the-art in Kir7.1 inhibitors, should be useful for exploring the physiology of Kir7.1 in vitro and in vivo. PMID:27184474

  13. Channeling your inner ear potassium: K(+) channels in vestibular hair cells.

    PubMed

    Meredith, Frances L; Rennie, Katherine J

    2016-08-01

    During development of vestibular hair cells, K(+) conductances are acquired in a specific pattern. Functionally mature vestibular hair cells express different complements of K(+) channels which uniquely shape the hair cell receptor potential and filtering properties. In amniote species, type I hair cells (HCI) have a large input conductance due to a ubiquitous low-voltage-activated K(+) current that activates with slow sigmoidal kinetics at voltages negative to the membrane resting potential. In contrast type II hair cells (HCII) from mammalian and non-mammalian species have voltage-dependent outward K(+) currents that activate rapidly at or above the resting membrane potential and show significant inactivation. A-type, delayed rectifier and calcium-activated K(+) channels contribute to the outward K(+) conductance and are present in varying proportions in HCII. In many species, K(+) currents in HCII in peripheral locations of vestibular epithelia inactivate more than HCII in more central locations. Two types of inward rectifier currents have been described in both HCI and HCII. A rapidly activating K(+)-selective inward rectifier current (IK1, mediated by Kir2.1 channels) predominates in HCII in peripheral zones, whereas a slower mixed cation inward rectifier current (Ih), shows greater expression in HCII in central zones of vestibular epithelia. The implications for sensory coding of vestibular signals by different types of hair cells are discussed. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled .

  14. The distribution of intermediate-conductance, calcium-activated, potassium (IK) channels in epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Thompson-Vest, Nichola; Shimizu, Yasutake; Hunne, Billie; Furness, John B

    2006-02-01

    Intermediate-conductance, calcium-activated, potassium (IK) channels were first identified by their roles in cell volume regulation, and were later shown to be involved in control of proliferation of lymphocytes and to provide a K+ current for epithelial secretory activity. Until now, there has been no systematic investigation of IK channel localization within different epithelia. IK channel immunoreactivity was present in most epithelia, where it occurred in surface membranes of epithelial cells. It was found in all stratified epithelia, including skin, cornea, oral mucosa, vaginal mucosa, urothelium and the oesophageal lining. It occurred in the ducts of fluid-secreting glands, the salivary glands, lacrimal glands and pancreas, and in the respiratory epithelium. A low level of expression was seen in serous acinar cells. It was also found in other epithelia with fluid-exchange properties, the choroid plexus epithelium, the ependyma, visceral pleura and peritoneum, bile ducts and intestinal lining epithelium. However, there was little or no expression in vascular endothelial cells, kidney tubules or collecting ducts, lung alveoli, or in sebaceous glands. It is concluded that the channel is present in surface epithelia (e.g. skin) where it has a cell-protective role against osmotic challenge, and in epithelia where there is anion secretion that is facilitated by a K+ current-dependent hyperpolarization. It was also in some epithelial cells where its roles are as yet unknown. PMID:16441566

  15. Coupling between the voltage-sensing and pore domains in a voltage-gated potassium channel.

    PubMed

    Schow, Eric V; Freites, J Alfredo; Nizkorodov, Alex; White, Stephen H; Tobias, Douglas J

    2012-07-01

    Voltage-dependent potassium (Kv), sodium (Nav), and calcium channels open and close in response to changes in transmembrane (TM) potential, thus regulating cell excitability by controlling ion flow across the membrane. An outstanding question concerning voltage gating is how voltage-induced conformational changes of the channel voltage-sensing domains (VSDs) are coupled through the S4-S5 interfacial linking helices to the opening and closing of the pore domain (PD). To investigate the coupling between the VSDs and the PD, we generated a closed Kv channel configuration from Aeropyrum pernix (KvAP) using atomistic simulations with experiment-based restraints on the VSDs. Full closure of the channel required, in addition to the experimentally determined TM displacement, that the VSDs be displaced both inwardly and laterally around the PD. This twisting motion generates a tight hydrophobic interface between the S4-S5 linkers and the C-terminal ends of the pore domain S6 helices in agreement with available experimental evidence.

  16. Molecular mechanism underlying β1 regulation in voltage- and calcium-activated potassium (BK) channels.

    PubMed

    Castillo, Karen; Contreras, Gustavo F; Pupo, Amaury; Torres, Yolima P; Neely, Alan; González, Carlos; Latorre, Ramon

    2015-04-14

    Being activated by depolarizing voltages and increases in cytoplasmic Ca(2+), voltage- and calcium-activated potassium (BK) channels and their modulatory β-subunits are able to dampen or stop excitatory stimuli in a wide range of cellular types, including both neuronal and nonneuronal tissues. Minimal alterations in BK channel function may contribute to the pathophysiology of several diseases, including hypertension, asthma, cancer, epilepsy, and diabetes. Several gating processes, allosterically coupled to each other, control BK channel activity and are potential targets for regulation by auxiliary β-subunits that are expressed together with the α (BK)-subunit in almost every tissue type where they are found. By measuring gating currents in BK channels coexpressed with chimeras between β1 and β3 or β2 auxiliary subunits, we were able to identify that the cytoplasmic regions of β1 are responsible for the modulation of the voltage sensors. In addition, we narrowed down the structural determinants to the N terminus of β1, which contains two lysine residues (i.e., K3 and K4), which upon substitution virtually abolished the effects of β1 on charge movement. The mechanism by which K3 and K4 stabilize the voltage sensor is not electrostatic but specific, and the α (BK)-residues involved remain to be identified. This is the first report, to our knowledge, where the regulatory effects of the β1-subunit have been clearly assigned to a particular segment, with two pivotal amino acids being responsible for this modulation.

  17. ATP-sensitive potassium channel modulation of the guinea pig ventricular action potential and contraction.

    PubMed

    Nichols, C G; Ripoll, C; Lederer, W J

    1991-01-01

    The role of ATP-sensitive potassium (KATP) channels in modulating the action potential and contraction of guinea pig ventricular myocytes was investigated. Under voltage clamp, the maximum whole-cell KATP channel conductance was estimated (195 +/- 10 nS, n = 6) by exposing the cells to complete metabolic blockade (2 mM cyanide in the presence of 10 mM 2-deoxy-glucose). In isolated inside-out membrane patches, the ATP dependence of KATP channel activity under relevant conditions was measured (half-maximal inhibition at 114 microM). Under current clamp (with intracellular ATP concentration = 5 mM), the effect of graded KATP channel activation on the action potential and the twitch was estimated by injection of a current (proportional to voltage) that simulated the KATP conductance. As this "conductance" was increased, the action potential was shortened, and contractile amplitude declined, as expected. From the results of these experiments, the quantitative dependence of the action potential duration on intracellular ATP concentration was estimated, without relying on a mathematical model of the cell membrane. The results imply that KATP-dependent action potential shortening is likely to occur if ATP concentration falls below normal levels (approximately 5 mM), as may happen regionally, or globally, during myocardial ischemia.

  18. Solute inaccessible aqueous volume changes during opening of the potassium channel of the squid giant axon.

    PubMed Central

    Zimmerberg, J; Bezanilla, F; Parsegian, V A

    1990-01-01

    We have applied solutions with varying osmotic pressures symmetrically to the inside and outside of perfused, TTX-treated, giant axons. The potassium conductance G decreased with increasing osmotic stress, but there was no effect on either the shape or the position of the voltage-current curve. One must distinguish three possible actions of the osmotic agent: osmotic stress, channel blocking, and lowered solution conductivity. To do so, we compared results obtained working with pairs of internal and external solutions of either (a) equal osmotic stress, (b) equal conductivity, or (c) the same blocking agent. There was the same change in G irrespective of the type of stressing species (sorbitol or sucrose); this provides some evidence against a blocking mechanism. The conductivity of the external solution had a small effect on K currents; internal solution conductivity had none. A change in series resistance of the Schwann cell layer could account for the small effect of external solution conductivity. The primary cause of G depression appears, then, to be the applied osmotic stress. Using this result, we have developed models in which the channel has a transition between closed states under voltage control but osmotically insensitive and a closed/open step that is voltage-independent but osmotically sensitive. We have assumed that the conductance of this open state does not change with osmotic stress. In this way, we estimate that an additional 1,350 +/- 200 A3 or 40-50 molecules of solute-inaccessible water appear to associate with the average delayed rectifier potassium channel of the squid axon when it opens. PMID:2340341

  19. ATP-sensitive potassium channel activation induces angiogenesis in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Umaru, Bukar; Pyriochou, Anastasia; Kotsikoris, Vasileios; Papapetropoulos, Andreas; Topouzis, Stavros

    2015-07-01

    Intense research is conducted to identify new molecular mechanisms of angiogenesis. Previous studies have shown that the angiogenic effects of hydrogen sulfide (H2S) depend on the activation of ATP-sensitive potassium channels (KATP) and that C-type natriuretic peptide (CNP), which can act through KATP, promotes endothelial cell growth. We therefore investigated whether direct KATP activation induces angiogenic responses and whether it is required for the endothelial responses to CNP or vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). Chick chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) angiogenesis was similarly enhanced by the direct KATP channel activator 2-nicotinamidoethyl acetate (SG-209) and by CNP or VEGF. The KATP inhibitors glibenclamide and 5-hydroxydecanoate (5-HD) reduced basal and abolished CNP-induced CAM angiogenesis. In vitro, the direct KATP openers nicorandil and SG-209 and the polypeptides VEGF and CNP increased proliferation and migration in bEnd.3 mouse endothelial cells. In addition, VEGF and CNP induced cord-like formation on Matrigel by human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). All these in vitro endothelial responses were effectively abrogated by glibenclamide or 5-HD. In HUVECs, a small-interfering RNA-mediated decrease in the expression of the inwardly rectifying potassium channel (Kir) 6.1 subunit impaired cell migration and network morphogenesis in response to either SG-209 or CNP. We conclude that 1) direct pharmacologic activation of KATP induces angiogenic effects in vitro and in vivo, 2) angiogenic responses to CNP and VEGF depend on KATP activation and require the expression of the Kir6.1 KATP subunit, and 3) KATP activation may underpin angiogenesis to a variety of vasoactive stimuli, including H2S, VEGF, and CNP. PMID:25977483

  20. Distribution of High-Conductance Calcium-Activated Potassium Channels in Rat Vestibular Epithelia

    PubMed Central

    Schweizer, Felix E.; Savin, David; Luu, Cindy; Sultemeier, David R.; Hoffman, Larry F.

    2011-01-01

    Voltage- and calcium-activated potassium channels (BK) are important regulators of neuronal excitability. BK channels seem to be crucial for frequency tuning in nonmammalian vestibular and auditory hair cells. However, there are a paucity of data concerning BK expression in mammalian vestibular hair cells. We therefore investigated the localization of BK channels in mammalian vestibular hair cells, specifically in rat vestibular neuroepithelia. We find that only a subset of hair cells in the utricle and the crista ampullaris express BK channels. BK-positive hair cells are located mainly in the medial striolar region of the utricle, where they constitute at most 12% of hair cells, and in the central zone of the horizontal crista. A majority of BK-positive hair cells are encapsulated by a calretinin-positive calyx defining them as type I cells. The remainder are either type I cells encapsulated by a calretinin-negative calyx or type II hair cells. Surprisingly, the number of BK-positive hair cells in the utricle peaks in juvenile rats and declines in early adulthood. BK channels were not found in vestibular afferent dendrites or somata. Our data indicate that BK channel expression in the mammalian vestibular system differs from the expression pattern in the mammalian auditory and the nonmammalian vestibular system. The molecular diversity of vestibular hair cells indicates a functional diversity that has not yet been fully characterized. The predominance of BK-positive hair cells within the medial striola of juvenile animals suggests that they contribute to a scheme of highly lateralized coding of linear head movements during late development. PMID:19731297

  1. Oxygen causes fetal pulmonary vasodilation through activation of a calcium-dependent potassium channel.

    PubMed

    Cornfield, D N; Reeve, H L; Tolarova, S; Weir, E K; Archer, S

    1996-07-23

    At birth, pulmonary vasodilation occurs as air-breathing life begins. The mechanism of O2-induced pulmonary vasodilation is unknown. We proposed that O2 causes fetal pulmonary vasodilation through activation of a calcium-dependent potassium channel (KCa) via a cyclic nucleotide-dependent kinase. We tested this hypothesis in hemodynamic studies in acutely prepared fetal lambs and in patch-clamp studies on resistance fetal pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells. Fetal O2 tension (PaO2) was increased by ventilating the ewe with 100% O2, causing fetal total pulmonary resistance to decrease from 1.18 +/- 0.14 to 0.41 +/- 0.03 mmHg per ml per min. Tetraethylammonium and iberiotoxin, preferential KCa-channel inhibitors, attenuated O2-induced fetal pulmonary vasodilation, while glibenclamide, an ATP-sensitive K+-channel antagonist, had no effect. Treatment with either a guanylate cyclase antagonist (LY83583) or cyclic nucleotide-dependent kinase inhibitors (H-89 and KT 5823) significantly attenuated O2-induced fetal pulmonary vasodilation. Under hypoxic conditions (PaO2 = 25 mmHg), whole-cell K+-channel currents (Ik) were small and were inhibited by 1 mM tetraethylammonium or 100 nM charybdotoxin (CTX; a specific KCa-channel blocker). Normoxia (PaO2 = 120 mmHg) increased Ik by more than 300%, and this was reversed by 100 nM CTX. Nitric oxide also increased Ik. Resting membrane potential was -37.2 +/- 1.9 mV and cells depolarized on exposure to CTX, while hyperpolarizing in normoxia. We conclude that O2 causes fetal pulmonary vasodilation by stimulating a cyclic nucleotide-dependent kinase, resulting in KCa-channel activation, membrane hyperpolarization, and vasodilation. PMID:8755608

  2. Potassium channels cloned from neuroblastoma cells display slowly inactivating outward currents in Xenopus oocytes.

    PubMed

    Ito, Y; Yokoyama, S; Higashida, H

    1992-05-22

    Messenger RNAs (mRNAs) specific for NGK1 and NGK2 potassium channels were synthesized from complementary DNAs (cDNAs) that had been cloned from mouse neuroblastoma x rat glioma hybrid NG108-15 cells. Outward pottasium currents were evoked by 5 s depolarizing voltage commands in Xenopus oocytes injected with NGK1- or NGK2-specific mRNAs. The NGK1 or NGK2 currents showed different activation and inactivation kinetics, and different pharmacological sensitivities. The threshold potential for activation of the NGK2 current (-14 mV) was more positive than that for the NGK1 (-36 mV). The NGK2 current showed faster inactivation during a 5 s depolarizing pulse than did the NGK1 current. Inactivation was best fit by time constants of 0.37, 1.5 and 19 s for the NGK2 current and 4.4 and 19 s for NGK1. Extracellularly applied tetraethylammonium chloride (TEA) was 1000 times more potent on the NGK2 current than the NGK1 current. Furthermore we examined outward current following co-injection of an equal amount of mRNAs for NGK1 and NGK2. The timecourse of inactivation differed from either alone or from a simple sum of the two individual currents. TEA sensitivity could not be explained by summation of the two homomultimeric channels. These findings suggest that both NGK1 and NGK2 proteins assemble to form heteromultimeric K+ channels in addition to homomultimeric K+ channels. NGK2 channels and the heteromultimeric channels may be responsible for the native transient outward current with slow inactivation in NG108-15 hybrid cells.

  3. New inhibitors of the Kvβ2 subunit from mammalian Kv1 potassium channels.

    PubMed

    Alka, Kumari; Dolly, J Oliver; Ryan, Barry J; Henehan, Gary T M

    2014-10-01

    The role of the redox state of Kvβ subunits in the modulation of Kv1 potassium channels has been well documented over the past few years. It has been suggested that a molecule that binds to or inhibits the aldo-keto reductase activity of Kvβ might affect the modulation of channel properties. Previous studies of possible modulators of channel activity have shown that cortisone and some related compounds are able to physically dissociate the channel components by binding to a site at the interface between α and β subunits. Herein, we describe some new inhibitors of rat brain Kvβ2, identified using an assay based on multiple substrate turnover. This approach allows one to focus on molecules that specifically block NADPH oxidation. These studies showed that, at 0.5mM, 3,4-dihydroxphenylacetic acid (DOPAC) was an inhibitor of Kvβ2 turnover yielding a ∼ 40-50% reduction in the aldehyde reductase activity of this subunit. Other significant inhibitors include the bioflavinoid, rutin and the polyphenol resveratrol; some of the known cardioprotective effects of these molecules may be attributable to Kv1 channel modulation. Cortisone or catechol caused moderate inhibition of Kvβ2 turnover, and the aldo-keto reductases inhibitor valproate had an even smaller effect. Despite the importance of the Kv1 channels in a number of disease states, there have been few Kvβ2 inhibitors reported. While the ones identified in this study are only effective at high concentrations, they could serve as tools to decipher the role of Kvβ2 in vivo and, eventually, inform the development of novel therapeutics.

  4. Modeling the concentration-dependent permeation modes of the KcsA potassium ion channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, Peter Hugo

    2003-12-01

    The potassium channel from Streptomyces lividans (KcsA) is an integral membrane protein with sequence similarity to all known potassium channels, particularly in the selectivity filter region. A recently proposed model for ion channels containing either n or (n-1) single-file ions in their selectivity filters [P. H. Nelson, J. Chem. Phys. 177, 11396 (2002)] is applied to published KcsA channel K+ permeation data that exhibit a high-affinity process at low concentrations and a low-affinity process at high concentrations [M. LeMasurier et al., J. Gen. Physiol. 118, 303 (2001)]. The kinetic model is shown to provide a reasonable first-order explanation for both the high- and low-concentration permeation modes observed experimentally. The low-concentration mode ([K+]<200 mM) has a 200-mV dissociation constant of 56 mM and a conductance of 88 pS. The high-concentration mode ([K+]>200 mM) has a 200-mV dissociation constant of 1100 mM and a conductance of 500 pS. Based on the permeation model, and x-ray analysis [J. H. Morais-Cabral et al., Nature (London) 414, 37 (2001)], it is suggested that the experimentally observed K+ permeation modes correspond to an n=3 mechanism at high concentrations and an n=2 mechanism at low concentrations. The ratio of the electrical dissociation distances for the high- and low-concentration modes is 3:2, also consistent with the proposed n=3 and n=2 modes. Model predictions for K+ channels that exhibit asymmetric current-voltage (I-V) curves are presented, and further validation of the kinetic model via molecular simulation and experiment is discussed. The qualitatively distinct I-V characteristics exhibited experimentally by Tl+, NH+4, and Rb+ ions at 100 mM concentration can also be explained using the model, but more extensive experimental tests are required for quantitative validation of the model predictions.

  5. Kv1.3 potassium channels are localized in the immunological synapse formed between cytotoxic and target cells

    PubMed Central

    Panyi, G.; Vámosi, G.; Bacsó, Z.; Bagdány, M.; Bodnár, A.; Varga, Z.; Gáspár, R.; Mátyus, L.; Damjanovich, S.

    2004-01-01

    Membrane proteins of cytotoxic T cells specifically reorganize to form an immunological synapse (IS) on interaction with their specific target. In this paper, we investigated the redistribution of Kv1.3 channels, which are the dominant voltage-gated potassium channels, in the plasma membrane of allogen-activated human cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) on interacting with their specific target cells. Kv1.3 channels bearing a FLAG epitope were expressed in the CTLs and the cell-surface distribution of fluorescently labeled ion channels was determined from confocal laser-scanning microscopy images. FLAG epitope-tagged Kv1.3 channels showed a patchy distribution in CTLs not engaged with target cells, whereas the channels were accumulated in the IS formed between CTLs and specific target lymphocytes. Localization of Kv1.3 channels in the IS might open an unrevealed possibility in the regulation of ion channel activity by signaling molecules accumulated in the IS. PMID:14745040

  6. Angiotensin II inhibits the ROMK-like small conductance K channel in renal cortical collecting duct during dietary potassium restriction.

    PubMed

    Wei, Yuan; Zavilowitz, Beth; Satlin, Lisa M; Wang, Wen-Hui

    2007-03-01

    Base-line urinary potassium secretion in the distal nephron is mediated by small conductance rat outer medullary K (ROMK)-like channels. We used the patch clamp technique applied to split-open cortical collecting ducts (CCDs) isolated from rats fed a normal potassium (NK) or low potassium (LK) diet to test the hypothesis that AngII directly inhibits ROMK channel activity. We found that AngII inhibited ROMK channel activity in LK but not NK rats in a dose-dependent manner. The AngII-induced reduction in channel activity was mediated by AT1 receptor (AT1R) binding, because pretreatment of CCDs with losartan but not PD123319 AT1 and AT2 receptor antagonists, respectively, blocked the response. Pretreatment of CCDs with U73122 and calphostin C, inhibitors of phospholipase C (PLC) and protein kinase C (PKC), respectively, abolished the AngII-induced decrease in ROMK channel activity, confirming a role of the PLC-PKC pathway in this response. Studies by others suggest that AngII stimulates an Src family protein-tyrosine kinase (PTK) via PKC-NADPH oxidase. PTK has been shown to regulate the ROMK channel. Inhibition of NADPH oxidase with diphenyliodonium abolished the inhibitory effect of AngII or the PKC activator phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate on ROMK channels. Suppression of PTK by herbimycin A significantly attenuated the inhibitory effect of AngII on ROMK channel activity. We conclude that AngII inhibits ROMK channel activity through PKC-, NADPH oxidase-, and PTK-dependent pathways under conditions of dietary potassium restriction.

  7. Effects of common antitussive drugs on the hERG potassium channel current.

    PubMed

    Deisemann, Heike; Ahrens, Nadine; Schlobohm, Irene; Kirchhoff, Christian; Netzer, Rainer; Möller, Clemens

    2008-12-01

    A common over-the-counter (OTC) non-opioid antitussive drug, clobutinol, was recently withdrawn from the market due to its potential to induce cardiac arrhythmias by a blockade of the potassium channel coded by the human ether-à-go-go-related gene (hERG). In this study, we investigated the effects of a number of antitussive compounds on the hERG ion channel current using patch-clamp electrophysiology, and compared the effects to that of clobutinol. The compounds clobutinol, pentoxyverine, dextromethorphan, and codeine inhibited the outward current in hERG transfected cells with half-maximal inhibition concentrations (IC50) of 1.9 microM, 3.0 microM, 5.1 microM, and 97 microM, respectively. For theobromine, no significant effect on the hERG current at a concentration up to 100 microM was detected. Safety margins between the effects of the drugs on the hERG ion channel current and their calculated maximal free therapeutic plasma concentration were calculated. These results were compared to assess potential risks of the compounds to induce torsade de pointes-type arrhythmias.

  8. Effects of common antitussive drugs on the hERG potassium channel current.

    PubMed

    Deisemann, Heike; Ahrens, Nadine; Schlobohm, Irene; Kirchhoff, Christian; Netzer, Rainer; Möller, Clemens

    2008-12-01

    A common over-the-counter (OTC) non-opioid antitussive drug, clobutinol, was recently withdrawn from the market due to its potential to induce cardiac arrhythmias by a blockade of the potassium channel coded by the human ether-à-go-go-related gene (hERG). In this study, we investigated the effects of a number of antitussive compounds on the hERG ion channel current using patch-clamp electrophysiology, and compared the effects to that of clobutinol. The compounds clobutinol, pentoxyverine, dextromethorphan, and codeine inhibited the outward current in hERG transfected cells with half-maximal inhibition concentrations (IC50) of 1.9 microM, 3.0 microM, 5.1 microM, and 97 microM, respectively. For theobromine, no significant effect on the hERG current at a concentration up to 100 microM was detected. Safety margins between the effects of the drugs on the hERG ion channel current and their calculated maximal free therapeutic plasma concentration were calculated. These results were compared to assess potential risks of the compounds to induce torsade de pointes-type arrhythmias. PMID:19034038

  9. Mouth breathing increases the pentylenetetrazole-induced seizure threshold in mice: a role for ATP-sensitive potassium channels.

    PubMed

    Niaki, Seyed Esfandiar Akhavan; Shafaroodi, Hamed; Ghasemi, Mehdi; Shakiba, Bijan; Fakhimi, Ali; Dehpour, Ahamd Reza

    2008-08-01

    Nasal obstruction and consequent mouth breathing have been shown to change the acid-base balance, producing respiratory acidosis. Additionally, there exists a large body of evidence maintaining that acidosis affects the activity of ATP-sensitive potassium (K(ATP)) channels, which play a crucial role in the function of the central nervous system (CNS), for example, in modulating seizure threshold. Thus, in the study described here, we examined whether mouth breathing, induced by surgical ligation of nostrils, could affect the seizure threshold induced by pentylenetetrazole in male NMRI mice. Using the selective K(ATP) channel opener (diazoxide) and blocker (glibenclamide), we also evaluated the possible role of K(ATP) channels in this process. Our data revealed that seizure threshold was increased 6 to 72 hours after nasal obstruction, reaching a peak 48 hours afterward, compared with either control or sham-operated mice (P<0.01). There was a significant decrease in pH of arterial blood samples and increase in CO(2) partial pressure (PCO(2)) during this time. Systemic injection of glibenclamide (1 and 2mg/kg, ip, daily) significantly prevented the increase in seizure threshold in 48-hour bilaterally nasally obstructed mice, whereas it had no effect on seizure threshold in sham-operated mice. Systemic injection of diazoxide (25mg/kg, ip, daily) had no effect on seizure threshold in all groups, whereas higher doses (50 and 100mg/kg, ip, daily) significantly increased seizure threshold in both 48-hour-obstructed and sham-operated mice. The decrease in seizure threshold induced by glibenclamide (2mg/kg, ip, daily) was prevented by diazoxide (25mg/kg, ip, daily). These results demonstrate for the first time that mouth breathing, which could result in respiratory acidosis, increases seizure threshold in mice and K(ATP) channels may play a role in this effect.

  10. Assignment of the human hippocampal inward rectifier potassium channel (HIR) gene to 22q13.1

    SciTech Connect

    Budarf, M.L.; Barnoski, B.L.; Bell, C.J.

    1995-04-10

    The HIR gene encodes a small-conductance inward rectifier potassium channel (HIR or K{sub IR}2.3) that is found in heart and brain. Inward rectifiers are a specialized class of potassium channels that produce large inward currents at potentials negative to the potassium equilibrium potential and only small outward currents at more positive potentials. This asymmetry in K{sup +} conductance plays a key role in the excitability of muscle cells and neurons. Inward rectifier potassium channels are the major contributors to the basal potassium conductance in cardiac muscle, where their role is to modulate cell excitability and heart beat frequency, maintain the resting potential, and terminate the long-duration cardiac action potentials. In the central nervous system, inward rectifiers are involved in similar aspects of the modulation of cell excitability. The central role of inward rectifiers in cardiac and neuronal function suggest that they might be involved in the etiology of human cardiovascular and neurological diseases. 11 refs., 2 figs.

  11. Presence of voltage-gated potassium channel complex antibody in a case of genetic prion disease

    PubMed Central

    Jammoul, Adham; Lederman, Richard J; Tavee, Jinny; Li, Yuebing

    2014-01-01

    Voltage-gated potassium channel (VGKC) complex antibody-mediated encephalitis is a recently recognised entity which has been reported to mimic the clinical presentation of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD). Testing for the presence of this neuronal surface autoantibody in patients presenting with subacute encephalopathy is therefore crucial as it may both revoke the bleak diagnosis of prion disease and allow institution of potentially life-saving immunotherapy. Tempering this optimistic view is the rare instance when a positive VGKC complex antibody titre occurs in a definite case of prion disease. We present a pathologically and genetically confirmed case of CJD with elevated serum VGKC complex antibody titres. This case highlights the importance of interpreting the result of a positive VGKC complex antibody with caution and in the context of the overall clinical manifestation. PMID:24903967

  12. High grade glioma mimicking voltage gated potassium channel complex associated antibody limbic encephalitis.

    PubMed

    Athauda, Dilan; Delamont, R S; Pablo-Fernandez, E De

    2014-01-01

    Though raised titres of voltage gated potassium channel (VGKC) complex antibodies have been occasionally associated with extracranial tumours, mainly presenting as Morvan's Syndrome or neuromyotonia, they have not yet been reported to be associated with an intracranial malignancy. This is especially important as misdiagnosis of these conditions and delay of the appropriate treatment can have important prognostic implications. We describe a patient with a high grade glioma presenting with clinical, radiological, and serological features consistent with the diagnosis of VGKC antibody associated limbic encephalitis (LE). This is the first association between a primary brain tumour and high titre of VGKC complex antibodies. Clinicoradiological progression despite effective immunosuppressive treatment should prompt clinicians to look for alternative diagnoses. Further studies to elucidate a possible association between VGKC complex and other surface antigen antibodies with primary brain tumours should be carried out.

  13. Presence of voltage-gated potassium channel complex antibody in a case of genetic prion disease.

    PubMed

    Jammoul, Adham; Lederman, Richard J; Tavee, Jinny; Li, Yuebing

    2014-06-05

    Voltage-gated potassium channel (VGKC) complex antibody-mediated encephalitis is a recently recognised entity which has been reported to mimic the clinical presentation of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD). Testing for the presence of this neuronal surface autoantibody in patients presenting with subacute encephalopathy is therefore crucial as it may both revoke the bleak diagnosis of prion disease and allow institution of potentially life-saving immunotherapy. Tempering this optimistic view is the rare instance when a positive VGKC complex antibody titre occurs in a definite case of prion disease. We present a pathologically and genetically confirmed case of CJD with elevated serum VGKC complex antibody titres. This case highlights the importance of interpreting the result of a positive VGKC complex antibody with caution and in the context of the overall clinical manifestation.

  14. Localization of two potassium channel {beta} subunit genes, KCNA1B and KCNA2B

    SciTech Connect

    Schultz, D.; Smith, L.; Thayer, M.

    1996-02-01

    The gating properties and current amplitudes of mammalian voltage-activated Shaker potassium channels are modulated by at least two associated {beta} subunits (Kv{beta}1.1 and Kv{beta}1.2). The human Kv{beta}1.1 gene (KCNA1B) resides on chromosome 3, as indicated by somatic cell hybrid mapping. More precise localization of KCNA1B to 3q26.1 was obtained with fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and was corroborated by PCR screening of the CEPH YAC library. The human Kv{beta}1.2 gene (KCNA2B) resides on chromosome 1, as indicated by somatic cell hybrid mapping, and has been localized by FISH to 1p36.3. 20 refs., 2 figs.

  15. Presence of voltage-gated potassium channel complex antibody in a case of genetic prion disease.

    PubMed

    Jammoul, Adham; Lederman, Richard J; Tavee, Jinny; Li, Yuebing

    2014-01-01

    Voltage-gated potassium channel (VGKC) complex antibody-mediated encephalitis is a recently recognised entity which has been reported to mimic the clinical presentation of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD). Testing for the presence of this neuronal surface autoantibody in patients presenting with subacute encephalopathy is therefore crucial as it may both revoke the bleak diagnosis of prion disease and allow institution of potentially life-saving immunotherapy. Tempering this optimistic view is the rare instance when a positive VGKC complex antibody titre occurs in a definite case of prion disease. We present a pathologically and genetically confirmed case of CJD with elevated serum VGKC complex antibody titres. This case highlights the importance of interpreting the result of a positive VGKC complex antibody with caution and in the context of the overall clinical manifestation. PMID:24903967

  16. Mass spectrometry study of N-alkylbenzenesulfonamides with potential antagonist activity to potassium channels.

    PubMed

    Martins, Carina C; Bassetto, Carlos A Zanutto; Santos, Jandyson M; Eberlin, Marcos N; Magalhães, Alvicler; Varanda, Wamberto; Gonzalez, Eduardo R Perez

    2016-02-01

    Herein, we report the synthesis and mass spectrometry studies of several N-alkylbenzenesulfonamides structurally related to sulfanilic acid. The compounds were synthesized using a modified Schotten-Baumann reaction coupled with Meisenheimer arylation. Sequential mass spectrometry by negative mode electrospray ionization (ESI(-)-MS/MS) showed the formation of sulfoxylate anion (m/z 65) observed in the mass spectrum of p-chloro-N-alkylbenzenesulfonamides. Investigation of the unexpected loss of two water molecules, as observed by electron ionization mass spectrometry (EI-MS) analysis of p-(N-alkyl)lactam sulfonamides, led to the proposal of corresponding fragmentation pathways. These compounds showed loss of neutral iminosulfane dioxide molecule (M-79) with formation of ions observed at m/z 344 and 377. These ions were formed by rearrangement on ESI(+)-MS/MS analysis. Some of the molecules showed antagonistic activity against Kv3.1 voltage-gated potassium channels.

  17. The BTB domains of the potassium channel tetramerization domain proteins prevalently assume pentameric states.

    PubMed

    Smaldone, Giovanni; Pirone, Luciano; Pedone, Emilia; Marlovits, Thomas; Vitagliano, Luigi; Ciccarelli, Luciano

    2016-06-01

    Potassium channel tetramerization domain-containing (KCTD) proteins are involved in fundamental physio-pathological processes. Here, we report an analysis of the oligomeric state of the Bric-à-brack, Tram-track, Broad complex (BTB) domains of seven distinct KCTDs belonging to five major clades of the family evolution tree. Despite their functional and sequence variability, present electron microscopy data highlight the occurrence of well-defined pentameric states for all domains. Our data also show that these states coexist with alternative forms which include open pentamers. Thermal denaturation analyses conducted using KCTD1 as a model suggest that, in these proteins, different domains cooperate to their overall stability. Finally, negative-stain electron micrographs of KCTD6(BTB) in complex with Cullin3 show the presence of assemblies with a five-pointed pinwheel shape. PMID:27152988

  18. Regulation of voltage-gated potassium channels by PI(4,5)P2.

    PubMed

    Kruse, Martin; Hammond, Gerald R V; Hille, Bertil

    2012-08-01

    Phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PI(4,5)P(2)) regulates activities of numerous ion channels including inwardly rectifying potassium (K(ir)) channels, KCNQ, TRP, and voltage-gated calcium channels. Several studies suggest that voltage-gated potassium (K(V)) channels might be regulated by PI(4,5)P(2). Wide expression of K(V) channels in different cells suggests that such regulation could have broad physiological consequences. To study regulation of K(V) channels by PI(4,5)P(2), we have coexpressed several of them in tsA-201 cells with a G protein-coupled receptor (M(1)R), a voltage-sensitive lipid 5-phosphatase (Dr-VSP), or an engineered fusion protein carrying both lipid 4-phosphatase and 5-phosphatase activity (pseudojanin). These tools deplete PI(4,5)P(2) with application of muscarinic agonists, depolarization, or rapamycin, respectively. PI(4,5)P(2) at the plasma membrane was monitored by Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) from PH probes of PLCδ1 simultaneously with whole-cell recordings. Activation of Dr-VSP or recruitment of pseudojanin inhibited K(V)7.1, K(V)7.2/7.3, and K(ir)2.1 channel current by 90-95%. Activation of M(1)R inhibited K(V)7.2/7.3 current similarly. With these tools, we tested for potential PI(4,5)P(2) regulation of activity of K(V)1.1/K(V)β1.1, K(V)1.3, K(V)1.4, and K(V)1.5/K(V)β1.3, K(V)2.1, K(V)3.4, K(V)4.2, K(V)4.3 (with different KChIPs and DPP6-s), and hERG/KCNE2. Interestingly, we found a substantial removal of inactivation for K(V)1.1/K(V)β1.1 and K(V)3.4, resulting in up-regulation of current density upon activation of M(1)R but no changes in activity upon activating only VSP or pseudojanin. The other channels tested except possibly hERG showed no alteration in activity in any of the assays we used. In conclusion, a depletion of PI(4,5)P(2) at the plasma membrane by enzymes does not seem to influence activity of most tested K(V) channels, whereas it does strongly inhibit members of the K(V)7 and K(ir) families. PMID

  19. Silencing of Kv4.1 potassium channels inhibits cell proliferation of tumorigenic human mammary epithelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Jang, Soo Hwa; Choi, Changsun; Hong, Seong-Geun; Yarishkin, Oleg V.; Bae, Young Min; Kim, Jae Gon; O'Grady, Scott M.; Kang, Kyung-Sun; Ryu, Pan Dong; Lee, So Yeong

    2009-06-26

    Potassium channel activity has been shown to facilitate cell proliferation in cancer cells. In the present study, the role of Kv4.1 channels in immortal and tumorigenic human mammary epithelial cells was investigated. Kv4.1 protein expression was positively correlated with tumorigenicity. Moreover, transfection with siRNAs targeting Kv4.1 mRNA suppressed proliferation of tumorigenic mammary epithelial cells. Experiments using mRNA isolated from human breast cancer tissues revealed that the level of Kv4.1 mRNA expression varied depending on the stage of the tumor. Kv4.1 protein expression increased during stages T2 and T3 compared to normal tissue. These results demonstrated that Kv4.1 plays a role in proliferation of tumorigenic human mammary epithelial cells. In addition, elevated Kv4.1 expression may be useful as a diagnostic marker for staging mammary tumors and selective blockers of Kv4.1 may serve to suppress tumor cell proliferation.

  20. Encephalitis and antibodies to DPPX, a subunit of Kv4.2 potassium channels

    PubMed Central

    Boronat, Anna; Gelfand, Jeffrey M.; Gresa-Arribas, Nuria; Jeong, Hyo-Young; Walsh, Michael; Roberts, Kirk; Martinez-Hernandez, Eugenia; Rosenfeld, Myrna R.; Balice-Gordon, Rita; Graus, Francesc; Rudy, Bernardo; Dalmau, Josep

    2012-01-01

    Objective To report a novel cell-surface autoantigen of encephalitis that is a critical regulatory subunit of the Kv4.2 potassium channels. Methods Four patients with encephalitis of unclear etiology and antibodies with a similar pattern of neuropil brain immunostaining were selected for autoantigen characterization. Techniques included immunoprecipitation, mass spectrometry, cell-base experiments with Kv4.2 and several dipeptidyl-peptidase-like protein-6 (DPPX) plasmid constructs, and comparative brain immunostaining of wild-type and DPPX-null mice. Results Immunoprecipitation studies identified DPPX as the target autoantigen. A cell based assay confirmed that all 4 patients, but not 210 controls, had DPPX antibodies. Symptoms included agitation, confusion, myoclonus, tremor, and seizures (one case with prominent startle response). All patients had pleocytosis, and three had severe prodromal diarrhea of unknown etiology. Given that DPPX “tunes up” the Kv4.2 potassium channels (involved in somatodendritic signal integration and attenuation of dendritic backpropagation of action potentials), we determined the epitope distribution in DPPX, DPP10 (a protein homologous to DPPX) and Kv4.2. Patients’ antibodies were found specific for DPPX, without reacting with DPP10 or Kv4.2. The unexplained diarrhea led to demonstrate a robust expression of DPPX in the myenteric plexus, which strongly reacted with patients’ antibodies. The course of neuropsychiatric symptoms was prolonged and often associated with relapses while decreasing immunotherapy. Long-term follow-up showed substantial improvement in 3 patients (1 is lost to follow-up). Interpretation Antibodies to DPPX associate with a protracted encephalitis characterized by CNS hyperexcitability (agitation, myoclonus, tremor, seizures), pleocytosis, and frequent diarrhea at symptom onset. The disorder is potentially treatable with immunotherapy. PMID:23225603

  1. Voltage-gated potassium channel-complex autoimmunity and associated clinical syndromes.

    PubMed

    Irani, Sarosh R; Vincent, Angela

    2016-01-01

    Voltage-gated potassium channel (VGKC)-complex antibodies are defined by the radioimmunoprecipitation of Kv1 potassium channel subunits from brain tissue extracts and were initially discovered in patients with peripheral nerve hyperexcitability (PNH). Subsequently, they were found in patients with PNH plus psychosis, insomnia, and dysautonomia, collectively termed Morvan's syndrome (MoS), and in a limbic encephalopathy (LE) with prominent amnesia and frequent seizures. Most recently, they have been described in patients with pure epilepsies, especially in patients with the novel and distinctive semiology termed faciobrachial dystonic seizures (FBDS). In each of these conditions, there is a close correlation between clinical measures and antibody levels. The VGKC-complex is a group of proteins that are strongly associated in situ and after extraction in mild detergent. Two major targets of the autoantibodies are leucine-rich glioma-inactivated 1 (LGI1) and contactin-associated protein 2 (CASPR2). The patients with PNH or MoS are most likely to have CASPR2 antibodies, whereas LGI1 antibodies are found characteristically in patients with FBDS and LE. Crucially, each of these conditions has a good response to immunotherapies, often corticosteroids and plasma exchange, although optimal regimes require further study. VGKC-complex antibodies have also been described in neuropathic pain syndromes, chronic epilepsies, a polyradiculopathy in porcine abattoir workers, and some children with status epilepticus. Increasingly, however, the antigenic targets in these patients are not defined and in some cases the antibodies may be secondary rather than the primary cause. Future serologic studies should define all the antigenic components of the VGKC-complex, and further inform mechanisms of antibody pathogenicity and related inflammation.

  2. High-throughput screening for small-molecule modulators of inward rectifier potassium channels.

    PubMed

    Raphemot, Rene; Weaver, C David; Denton, Jerod S

    2013-01-01

    Specific members of the inward rectifier potassium (Kir) channel family are postulated drug targets for a variety of disorders, including hypertension, atrial fibrillation, and pain. For the most part, however, progress toward understanding their therapeutic potential or even basic physiological functions has been slowed by the lack of good pharmacological tools. Indeed, the molecular pharmacology of the inward rectifier family has lagged far behind that of the S4 superfamily of voltage-gated potassium (Kv) channels, for which a number of nanomolar-affinity and highly selective peptide toxin modulators have been discovered. The bee venom toxin tertiapin and its derivatives are potent inhibitors of Kir1.1 and Kir3 channels, but peptides are of limited use therapeutically as well as experimentally due to their antigenic properties and poor bioavailability, metabolic stability and tissue penetrance. The development of potent and selective small-molecule probes with improved pharmacological properties will be a key to fully understanding the physiology and therapeutic potential of Kir channels. The Molecular Libraries Probes Production Center Network (MLPCN) supported by the National Institutes of Health (NIH) Common Fund has created opportunities for academic scientists to initiate probe discovery campaigns for molecular targets and signaling pathways in need of better pharmacology. The MLPCN provides researchers access to industry-scale screening centers and medicinal chemistry and informatics support to develop small-molecule probes to elucidate the function of genes and gene networks. The critical step in gaining entry to the MLPCN is the development of a robust target- or pathway-specific assay that is amenable for high-throughput screening (HTS). Here, we describe how to develop a fluorescence-based thallium (Tl(+)) flux assay of Kir channel function for high-throughput compound screening. The assay is based on the permeability of the K(+) channel pore to the K

  3. Students' Understanding of External Representations of the Potassium Ion Channel Protein Part II: Structure-Function Relationships and Fragmented Knowledge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harle, Marissa; Towns, Marcy H.

    2012-01-01

    Research that has focused on external representations in biochemistry has uncovered student difficulties in comprehending and interpreting external representations. This study focuses on students' understanding of three external representations (ribbon diagram, wireframe, and hydrophobic/hydrophilic) of the potassium ion channel protein. Analysis…

  4. Evaluation of potassium permanganate against an experimental subacute infection of Flavobacterium columnare in channel catfish, Icatlurus punctatus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The efficacy of potassium permanganate (KMnO4) as a prophylactic and therapeutic treatment for subacute infection of Flavobacterium columnare was demonstrated in experimentally infected channel catfish, Ictalurus punctatus. Catfish experimentally infected with F. columnare to mimic a subacute infec...

  5. Evaluation of potassium permanganate against an experimental subacute infection of Flavobacterium columnare in channel catfish, Icatlurus punctatus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    An experiment was performed to evaluate the efficacy of potassium permanganate (KMnO4) as a prophylactic and therapeutic treatment of an experimental subacute infection of Flavobacterium columnare in channel catfish, Ictalurus punctatus. Fish were cutaneously abraded and divided into five treatment...

  6. Comparative effects of copper sulfate or potassium permanganate on channel catfish concurrently infected with Flavobacterium columnare and Ichthyobodo necator

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    An opportunistic study was conducted to determine the effects of two chemical therapeutants on channel catfish (CCF) Ictalurus punctatus concurrently infected Flavobacterium columnare and Ichthyobodo necator. Copper sulfate (CuSO4) and potassium permanganate (KMnO4) were investigated for their abil...

  7. The cardioprotective effect of naringenin against ischemia-reperfusion injury through activation of ATP-sensitive potassium channel in rat.

    PubMed

    Meng, Li-Min; Ma, Hui-Jie; Guo, Hui; Kong, Qian-Qian; Zhang, Yi

    2016-09-01

    Naringenin (Nari) has antioxidative and anti-atherosclerosis effects, and activation of ATP-sensitive potassium channel (KATP) can offer cardiac protection. We hypothesized that Nari protects the heart against ischemia-reperfusion (I-R) injury through activation of KATP. Isolated hearts from adult male Sprague-Dawley rats experienced a 30-min global ischemia followed by 60-min reperfusion (120 min for the infarct size determination). The hearts were treated with Nari (NARI); Nari plus glibenclamide (GLI), a non-specific ATP-sensitive potassium channel blocker (NARI+GLI); and Nari plus 5-hydroxy decanoic acid (5-HD), a mitochondrial membrane ATP-sensitive potassium channel blocker (NARI+5-HD). The left ventricular pressure, lactate dehydrogenates (LDH) in coronary effluent, superoxide dismutase (SOD) and malondialdehyde (MDA) in myocardium, and myocardial infarct area were measured. Nari above 2.5 μmol/L improved the recovery of left ventricular function, decreased LDH in coronary effluent, and reduced myocardial infarct area. The SOD activity was increased and MDA was decreased in Nari-treated myocardium. The cardioprotective effect of Nari was canceled by GLI and 5-HD. In conclusion, Nari has a cardioprotective effect against I-R injury, which may be carried out through activating ATP-sensitive potassium channels in both cell and mitochondrial membrane, and enhancing myocardial antioxidant capacity. PMID:27408985

  8. Molecular mechanism underlying β1 regulation in voltage- and calcium-activated potassium (BK) channels.

    PubMed

    Castillo, Karen; Contreras, Gustavo F; Pupo, Amaury; Torres, Yolima P; Neely, Alan; González, Carlos; Latorre, Ramon

    2015-04-14

    Being activated by depolarizing voltages and increases in cytoplasmic Ca(2+), voltage- and calcium-activated potassium (BK) channels and their modulatory β-subunits are able to dampen or stop excitatory stimuli in a wide range of cellular types, including both neuronal and nonneuronal tissues. Minimal alterations in BK channel function may contribute to the pathophysiology of several diseases, including hypertension, asthma, cancer, epilepsy, and diabetes. Several gating processes, allosterically coupled to each other, control BK channel activity and are potential targets for regulation by auxiliary β-subunits that are expressed together with the α (BK)-subunit in almost every tissue type where they are found. By measuring gating currents in BK channels coexpressed with chimeras between β1 and β3 or β2 auxiliary subunits, we were able to identify that the cytoplasmic regions of β1 are responsible for the modulation of the voltage sensors. In addition, we narrowed down the structural determinants to the N terminus of β1, which contains two lysine residues (i.e., K3 and K4), which upon substitution virtually abolished the effects of β1 on charge movement. The mechanism by which K3 and K4 stabilize the voltage sensor is not electrostatic but specific, and the α (BK)-residues involved remain to be identified. This is the first report, to our knowledge, where the regulatory effects of the β1-subunit have been clearly assigned to a particular segment, with two pivotal amino acids being responsible for this modulation. PMID:25825713

  9. Molecular basis of hERG potassium channel blockade by the class Ic antiarrhythmic flecainide

    PubMed Central

    Melgari, Dario; Zhang, Yihong; El Harchi, Aziza; Dempsey, Christopher E.; Hancox, Jules C.

    2015-01-01

    The class Ic antiarrhythmic drug flecainide inhibits KCNH2-encoded “hERG” potassium channels at clinically relevant concentrations. The aim of this study was to elucidate the underlying molecular basis of this action. Patch clamp recordings of hERG current (IhERG) were made from hERG expressing cells at 37 °C. Wild-type (WT) IhERG was inhibited with an IC50 of 1.49 μM and this was not significantly altered by reversing the direction of K+ flux or raising external [K+]. The use of charged and uncharged flecainide analogues showed that the charged form of the drug accesses the channel from the cell interior to produce block. Promotion of WT IhERG inactivation slowed recovery from inhibition, whilst the N588K and S631A attenuated-inactivation mutants exhibited IC50 values 4–5 fold that of WT IhERG. The use of pore-helix/selectivity filter (T623A, S624A V625A) and S6 helix (G648A, Y652A, F656A) mutations showed < 10-fold shifts in IC50 for all but V625A and F656A, which respectively exhibited IC50s 27-fold and 142-fold their WT controls. Docking simulations using a MthK-based homology model suggested an allosteric effect of V625A, since in low energy conformations flecainide lay too low in the pore to interact directly with that residue. On the other hand, the molecule could readily form π–π stacking interactions with aromatic residues and particularly with F656. We conclude that flecainide accesses the hERG channel from the cell interior on channel gating, binding low in the inner cavity, with the S6 F656 residue acting as a principal binding determinant. PMID:26159617

  10. Molecular mechanism underlying β1 regulation in voltage- and calcium-activated potassium (BK) channels

    PubMed Central

    Castillo, Karen; Contreras, Gustavo F.; Pupo, Amaury; Torres, Yolima P.; Neely, Alan; González, Carlos; Latorre, Ramon

    2015-01-01

    Being activated by depolarizing voltages and increases in cytoplasmic Ca2+, voltage- and calcium-activated potassium (BK) channels and their modulatory β-subunits are able to dampen or stop excitatory stimuli in a wide range of cellular types, including both neuronal and nonneuronal tissues. Minimal alterations in BK channel function may contribute to the pathophysiology of several diseases, including hypertension, asthma, cancer, epilepsy, and diabetes. Several gating processes, allosterically coupled to each other, control BK channel activity and are potential targets for regulation by auxiliary β-subunits that are expressed together with the α (BK)-subunit in almost every tissue type where they are found. By measuring gating currents in BK channels coexpressed with chimeras between β1 and β3 or β2 auxiliary subunits, we were able to identify that the cytoplasmic regions of β1 are responsible for the modulation of the voltage sensors. In addition, we narrowed down the structural determinants to the N terminus of β1, which contains two lysine residues (i.e., K3 and K4), which upon substitution virtually abolished the effects of β1 on charge movement. The mechanism by which K3 and K4 stabilize the voltage sensor is not electrostatic but specific, and the α (BK)-residues involved remain to be identified. This is the first report, to our knowledge, where the regulatory effects of the β1-subunit have been clearly assigned to a particular segment, with two pivotal amino acids being responsible for this modulation. PMID:25825713

  11. Kcnq1-5 (Kv7.1-5) potassium channel expression in the adult zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background KCNQx genes encode slowly activating-inactivating K+ channels, are linked to physiological signal transduction pathways, and mutations in them underlie diseases such as long QT syndrome (KCNQ1), epilepsy in adults (KCNQ2/3), benign familial neonatal convulsions in children (KCNQ3), and hearing loss or tinnitus in humans (KCNQ4, but not KCNQ5). Identification of kcnqx potassium channel transcripts in zebrafish (Danio rerio) remains to be fully characterized although some genes have been mapped to the genome. Using zebrafish genome resources as the source of putative kcnq sequences, we investigated the expression of kcnq1-5 in heart, brain and ear tissues. Results Overall expression of the kcnqx channel transcripts is similar to that found in mammals. We found that kcnq1 expression was highest in the heart, and also present in the ear and brain. kcnq2 was lowest in the heart, while kcnq3 was highly expressed in the brain, heart and ear. kcnq5 expression was highest in the ear. We analyzed zebrafish genomic clones containing putative kcnq4 sequences to identify transcripts and protein for this highly conserved member of the Kcnq channel family. The zebrafish appears to have two kcnq4 genes that produce distinct mRNA species in brain, ear, and heart tissues. Conclusions We conclude that the zebrafish is an attractive model for the study of the KCNQ (Kv7) superfamily of genes, and are important to processes involved in neuronal excitability, cardiac anomalies, epileptic seizures, and hearing loss or tinnitus. PMID:24555524

  12. Behavioral motor dysfunction in Kv3-type potassium channel-deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Joho, R H; Street, C; Matsushita, S; Knöpfel, T

    2006-08-01

    The voltage-gated potassium channels Kv3.1 and Kv3.3 are expressed in several distinct neuronal subpopulations in brain areas known to be involved in motor control such as cortex, basal ganglia and cerebellum. Depending on the lack of Kv3.1 or Kv3.3 channel subunits, mutant mice show different Kv3-null allele-dependent behavioral alterations that include constitutive hyperactivity, sleep loss, impaired motor performance and, in the case of the Kv3.1/Kv3.3 double mutant, also severe ataxia, tremor and myoclonus (Espinosa et al. 2001, J Neurosci 21, 6657-6665, Genes, Brain Behav 3, 90-100). The lack of Kv3.1 channel subunits is mainly responsible for the constitutively increased locomotor activity and for sleep loss, whereas the absence of Kv3.3 subunits affects cerebellar function, in particular Purkinje cell discharges and olivocerebellar system properties (McMahon et al. 2004, Eur J Neurosci 19, 3317-3327). Here, we describe two sensitive and non-invasive tests to reliably quantify normal and abnormal motor functions, and we apply these tests to characterize motor dysfunction in Kv3-mutant mice. In contrast to wildtype and Kv3.1-single mutants, Kv3.3-single mutants and Kv3 mutants lacking three and four Kv3 alleles display Kv3-null allele-dependent gait alterations. Although the Kv3-null allele-dependent gait changes correlate with reduced motor performance, they appear to not affect the training-induced improvement of motor performance. These findings suggest that altered cerebellar physiology in the absence of Kv3.3 channels is responsible for impaired motor task execution but not motor task learning.

  13. Classification of 2-pore domain potassium channels based on rectification under quasi-physiological ionic conditions.

    PubMed

    Chen, Haijun; Zuo, Dongchuan; Zhang, Jianing; Zhou, Min; Ma, Liqun

    2014-01-01

    It is generally expected that 2-pore domain K(+) (K2P) channels are open or outward rectifiers in asymmetric physiological K(+) gradients, following the Goldman-Hodgkin-Katz (GHK) current equation. Although cloned K2P channels have been extensively studied, their current-voltage (I-V) relationships are not precisely characterized and previous definitions are contradictory. Here we study all the functional channels from 6 mammalian K2P subfamilies in transfected Chinese hamster ovary cells with patch-clamp technique, and examine whether their I-V relationships are described by the GHK current equation. K2P channels display 2 distinct types of I-V curves in asymmetric physiological K(+) gradients. Two K2P isoforms in the TWIK subfamily conduct large inward K(+) currents and have a nearly linear I-V curve. Ten isoforms from 5 other K2P subfamilies conduct small inward K(+) currents and exhibit open rectification, but fits with the GHK current equation cannot precisely reveal the differences in rectification among K2P channels. The Rectification Index, a ratio of limiting I-V slopes for outward and inward currents, is used to quantitatively describe open rectification of each K2P isoform, which is previously qualitatively defined as strong or weak open rectification. These results systematically and precisely classify K2P channels and suggest that TWIK K(+) channels have a unique feature in regulating cellular function.

  14. Gambierol, a toxin produced by the dinoflagellate Gambierdiscus toxicus, is a potent blocker of voltage-gated potassium channels.

    PubMed

    Cuypers, Eva; Abdel-Mottaleb, Yousra; Kopljar, Ivan; Rainier, Jon D; Raes, Adam L; Snyders, Dirk J; Tytgat, Jan

    2008-05-01

    In this study, we pharmacologically characterized gambierol, a marine polycyclic ether toxin which is produced by the dinoflagellate Gambierdiscus toxicus. Besides several other polycyclic ether toxins like ciguatoxins, this scarcely studied toxin is one of the compounds that may be responsible for ciguatera fish poisoning (CFP). Unfortunately, the biological target(s) that underlies CFP is still partly unknown. Today, ciguatoxins are described to specifically activate voltage-gated sodium channels by interacting with their receptor site 5. But some dispute about the role of gambierol in the CFP story shows up: some describe voltage-gated sodium channels as the target, while others pinpoint voltage-gated potassium channels as targets. Since gambierol was never tested on isolated ion channels before, it was subjected in this work to extensive screening on a panel of 17 ion channels: nine cloned voltage-gated ion channels (mammalian Na(v)1.1-Na(v)1.8 and insect Para) and eight cloned voltage-gated potassium channels (mammalian K(v)1.1-K(v)1.6, hERG and insect ShakerIR) expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes using two-electrode voltage-clamp technique. All tested sodium channel subtypes are insensitive to gambierol concentrations up to 10 microM. In contrast, K(v)1.2 is the most sensitive voltage-gated potassium channel subtype with almost full block (>97%) and an half maximal inhibitory concentration (IC(50)) of 34.5 nM. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study where the selectivity of gambierol is tested on isolated voltage-gated ion channels. Therefore, these results lead to a better understanding of gambierol and its possible role in CFP and they may also be useful in the development of more effective treatments. PMID:18313714

  15. In vivo monitoring of the potassium channel KcsA in Streptomyces lividans hyphae using immuno-electron microscopy and energy-filtering transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Hegermann, Jan; Overbeck, Jens; Schrempf, Hildgund

    2006-09-01

    The previous discovery of the Streptomyces lividans kcsA gene and its overexpression followed by the functional reconstitution of the purified gene product has resulted in new strategies to explore this channel protein in vitro. KcsA has evolved as a general model to investigate the structure/function relationship of ion channel proteins. Using specific antibodies raised against a domain of KcsA lacking membrane-spanning regions, KcsA has now been localized within numerous separated clusters between the outer face of the cytoplasm and the cell envelope in substrate hyphae of the S. lividans wild-type strain but not in a designed chromosomal disruption mutant DeltaK, lacking a functional kcsA gene. Previous findings had revealed that caesium ions led to a block of KcsA channel activity within S. lividans protoplasts fused to giant vesicles. As caesium can be scored by electron energy loss spectroscopy better than potassium, this technique was applied to hyphae that had been briefly exposed to caesium instead of potassium ions. Caesium was found preferentially at the cell envelope. Compared to the DeltaK mutant, the relative level of caesium was approximately 30 % enhanced in the wild-type. This is attributed to the presence of KcsA channels. Additional visualization by electron spectroscopic imaging supported this conclusion. The data presented are believed to represent the first demonstration of in vivo monitoring of KcsA in its original host.

  16. Discrete change in volatile anesthetic sensitivity in mice with inactivated tandem pore potassium channel TRESK

    PubMed Central

    Chae, Yun Jeong; Zhang, Jianan; Au, Paul; Sabbadini, Marta; Xie, Guo-Xi; Yost, C. Spencer

    2010-01-01

    Backgrcound We investigated the role of tandem pore domain potassium channel (K2P) TRESK in neurobehavioral function and volatile anesthetic sensitivity in genetically modified mice. Methods Exon III of the mouse TRESK gene locus was deleted by homologous recombination using a targeting vector. The genotype of bred mice (wildtype, knockout or heterozygote) was determined using the polymerase chain reaction. Morphologic and behavioral evaluations of TRESK knockout mice were compared to wildtype littermates. Sensitivity of bred mice to isoflurane, halothane, sevoflurane and desflurane were studied by determining the minimum alveolar concentration preventing movement to tail clamping in 50% of each genotype. Results TRESK knockout mice had normal development and behavior except for decreased number of inactive periods and increased thermal pain sensitivity (20% decrease in latency with hot plate test). TRESK knockout mice showed a statistically significant 8% increase in isoflurane minimum alveolar concentration compared to wildtype littermates; sensitivity to other volatile anesthetics was not significantly different. Spontaneous mortality of TRESK knockout mice following initial anesthesia testing was nearly threefold higher than that of wildtype littermates. Conclusions TRESK alone is not critical for baseline central nervous system function but may contribute to the action of volatile anesthetics. The inhomogenous change in anesthetic sensitivity corroborates findings in other K2P knockout mice and supports the idea that the mechanism of volatile anesthetic action involves multiple targets. Although it was not shown in this study, a compensatory effect by other K2P channels may also contribute to these observations. PMID:21042202

  17. AMIGO is an auxiliary subunit of the Kv2.1 potassium channel

    PubMed Central

    Peltola, Marjaana A; Kuja-Panula, Juha; Lauri, Sari E; Taira, Tomi; Rauvala, Heikki

    2011-01-01

    Kv2.1 is a potassium channel α-subunit abundantly expressed throughout the brain. It is a main component of delayed rectifier current (IK) in several neuronal types and a regulator of excitability during high-frequency firing. Here we identify AMIGO (amphoterin-induced gene and ORF), a neuronal adhesion protein with leucine-rich repeat and immunoglobin domains, as an integral part of the Kv2.1 channel complex. AMIGO shows extensive spatial and temporal colocalization and association with Kv2.1 in the mouse brain. The colocalization of AMIGO and Kv2.1 is retained even during stimulus-induced changes in Kv2.1 localization. AMIGO increases Kv2.1 conductance in a voltage-dependent manner in HEK cells. Accordingly, inhibition of endogenous AMIGO suppresses neuronal IK at negative membrane voltages. In conclusion, our data indicate AMIGO as a function-modulating auxiliary subunit for Kv2.1 and thus provide new insights into regulation of neuronal excitability. PMID:22056818

  18. Biogenesis of the pore architecture of a voltage-gated potassium channel.

    PubMed

    Gajewski, Christine; Dagcan, Alper; Roux, Benoit; Deutsch, Carol

    2011-02-22

    The pore domain of voltage-gated potassium (Kv) channels consists of transmembrane helices S5 and S6, the turret, the pore helix, the selectivity filter, and the loop preceding S6, with a tertiary reentrant structure between S5 and S6. Using biogenic intermediates, mass tagging (pegylation), and a molecular tape measure, we explored the possibility that the first stages of pore formation occur prior to oligomerization of the transmembrane core. Pegylation of introduced cysteines shows that the pore helix, but not the turret, forms a compact secondary structure in the terminal 20 Å of the ribosomal tunnel. We assessed the tertiary fold of the pore loop in monomeric constructs by determining the relative accessibilities of select cysteines using the kinetics of pegylation. Turret residues are accessible at the extracellular surface. In contrast, pore helix residues are less accessible. All-atom molecular dynamics simulations of a single Kv monomer in a solvated lipid membrane indicate that secondary and tertiary folds are stable over 650 ns. These results are consistent with acquisition of a tertiary reentrant pore architecture at the monomer stage of Kv biogenesis and begin to define a plausible sequence of folding events in the formation of Kv channels.

  19. The ethylene bis-dithiocarbamate fungicide Mancozeb activates voltage-gated KCNQ2 potassium channel.

    PubMed

    Li, Ping; Zhu, Jin; Kong, Qingya; Jiang, Baifeng; Wan, Xia; Yue, Jinfeng; Li, Min; Jiang, Hualiang; Li, Jian; Gao, Zhaobing

    2013-06-01

    Mancozeb (manganese/zinc ethylene bis-dithiocarbamate) is an organometallic fungicide that has been associated with human neurotoxicity and neurodegeneration. In a high-throughput screen for modulators of KCNQ2 channel, a fundamental player modulating neuronal excitability, Mancozeb, was found to significantly potentiate KCNQ2 activity. Mancozeb was validated electrophysiologically as a KCNQ2 activator with an EC50 value of 0.92±0.23μM. Further examination showed that manganese but not zinc ethylene bis-dithiocarbamate is the active component for the positive modulation effects. In addition, the compounds are effective when the metal ions are substituted by iron but lack potentiation activity when the metal ions are substituted by sodium, signifying the importance of the metal ion. However, the iron (Fe(3+)) alone, organic ligands alone or the mixture of iron with the organic ligand did not show any potentiation effect, suggesting as the active ingredient is a specific complex rather than two separate additive or synergistic components. Our study suggests that potentiation on KCNQ2 potassium channels might be the possible mechanism of Mancozeb toxicity in the nervous system. PMID:23542819

  20. Dynamic memory of a single voltage-gated potassium ion channel: A stochastic nonequilibrium thermodynamic analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Banerjee, Kinshuk

    2015-05-14

    In this work, we have studied the stochastic response of a single voltage-gated potassium ion channel to a periodic external voltage that keeps the system out-of-equilibrium. The system exhibits memory, resulting from time-dependent driving, that is reflected in terms of dynamic hysteresis in the current-voltage characteristics. The hysteresis loop area has a maximum at some intermediate voltage frequency and disappears in the limits of low and high frequencies. However, the (average) dissipation at long-time limit increases and finally goes to saturation with rising frequency. This raises the question: how diminishing hysteresis can be associated with growing dissipation? To answer this, we have studied the nonequilibrium thermodynamics of the system and analyzed different thermodynamic functions which also exhibit hysteresis. Interestingly, by applying a temporal symmetry analysis in the high-frequency limit, we have analytically shown that hysteresis in some of the periodic responses of the system does not vanish. On the contrary, the rates of free energy and internal energy change of the system as well as the rate of dissipative work done on the system show growing hysteresis with frequency. Hence, although the current-voltage hysteresis disappears in the high-frequency limit, the memory of the ion channel is manifested through its specific nonequilibrium thermodynamic responses.

  1. Phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate alters pharmacological selectivity for epilepsy-causing KCNQ potassium channels.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Pingzheng; Yu, Haibo; Gu, Min; Nan, Fa-jun; Gao, Zhaobing; Li, Min

    2013-05-21

    Pharmacological augmentation of neuronal KCNQ muscarinic (M) currents by drugs such as retigabine (RTG) represents a first-in-class therapeutic to treat certain hyperexcitatory diseases by dampening neuronal firing. Whereas all five potassium channel subtypes (KCNQ1-KCNQ5) are found in the nervous system, KCNQ2 and KCNQ3 are the primary players that mediate M currents. We investigated the plasticity of subtype selectivity by two M current effective drugs, retigabine and zinc pyrithione (ZnPy). Retigabine is more effective on KCNQ3 than KCNQ2, whereas ZnPy is more effective on KCNQ2 with no detectable effect on KCNQ3. In neurons, activation of muscarinic receptor signaling desensitizes effects by retigabine but not ZnPy. Importantly, reduction of phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2) causes KCNQ3 to become sensitive to ZnPy but lose sensitivity to retigabine. The dynamic shift of pharmacological selectivity caused by PIP2 may be induced orthogonally by voltage-sensitive phosphatase, or conversely, abolished by mutating a PIP2 site within the S4-S5 linker of KCNQ3. Therefore, whereas drug-channel binding is a prerequisite, the drug selectivity on M current is dynamic and may be regulated by receptor signaling pathways via PIP2. PMID:23650395

  2. Determinants of ligand selectivity in a cyclic nucleotide-regulated potassium channel.

    PubMed

    Pessoa, João; Fonseca, Fátima; Furini, Simone; Morais-Cabral, João H

    2014-07-01

    Cyclic nucleotide-binding (CNB) domains regulate the activity of channels, kinases, exchange factors, and transcription factors. These proteins are highly variable in their ligand selectivity; some are highly selective for either cAMP or cGMP, whereas others are not. Several molecular determinants of ligand selectivity in CNB domains have been defined, but these do not provide a complete view of the selectivity mechanism. We performed a thorough analysis of the ligand-binding properties of mutants of the CNB domain from the MlotiK1 potassium channel. In particular, we defined which residues specifically favor cGMP or cAMP. Inversion of ligand selectivity, from favoring cAMP to favoring cGMP, was only achieved through a combination of three mutations in the ligand-binding pocket. We determined the x-ray structure of the triple mutant bound to cGMP and performed molecular dynamics simulations and a biochemical analysis of the effect of the mutations. We concluded that the increase in cGMP affinity and selectivity does not result simply from direct interactions between the nucleotide base and the amino acids introduced in the ligand-binding pocket residues. Rather, tighter cGMP binding over cAMP results from the polar chemical character of the mutations, from greater accessibility of water molecules to the ligand in the bound state, and from an increase in the structural flexibility of the mutated binding pocket.

  3. Complex N-Glycans Influence the Spatial Arrangement of Voltage Gated Potassium Channels in Membranes of Neuronal-Derived Cells.

    PubMed

    Hall, M Kristen; Weidner, Douglas A; Edwards, Michael A J; Schwalbe, Ruth A

    2015-01-01

    The intrinsic electrical properties of a neuron depend on expression of voltage gated potassium (Kv) channel isoforms, as well as their distribution and density in the plasma membrane. Recently, we showed that N-glycosylation site occupancy of Kv3.1b modulated its placement in the cell body and neurites of a neuronal-derived cell line, B35 neuroblastoma cells. To extrapolate this mechanism to other N-glycosylated Kv channels, we evaluated the impact of N-glycosylation occupancy of Kv3.1a and Kv1.1 channels. Western blots revealed that wild type Kv3.1a and Kv1.1 α-subunits had complex and oligomannose N-glycans, respectively, and that abolishment of the N-glycosylation site(s) generated Kv proteins without N-glycans. Total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy images revealed that N-glycans of Kv3.1a contributed to its placement in the cell membrane while N-glycans had no effect on the distribution of Kv1.1. Based on particle analysis of EGFP-Kv proteins in the adhered membrane, glycosylated forms of Kv3.1a, Kv1.1, and Kv3.1b had differences in the number, size or density of Kv protein clusters in the cell membrane of neurites and cell body of B35 cells. Differences were also observed between the unglycosylated forms of the Kv proteins. Cell dissociation assays revealed that cell-cell adhesion was increased by the presence of complex N-glycans of Kv3.1a, like Kv3.1b, whereas cell adhesion was similar in the oligomannose and unglycosylated Kv1.1 subunit containing B35 cells. Our findings provide direct evidence that N-glycans of Kv3.1 splice variants contribute to the placement of these glycoproteins in the plasma membrane of neuronal-derived cells while those of Kv1.1 were absent. Further when the cell membrane distribution of the Kv channel was modified by N-glycans then the cell-cell adhesion properties were altered. Our study demonstrates that N-glycosylation of Kv3.1a, like Kv3.1b, provides a mechanism for the distribution of these proteins to the cell

  4. Palmitoylation of the β4-subunit regulates surface expression of large conductance calcium-activated potassium channel splice variants.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lie; Bi, Danlei; Tian, Lijun; McClafferty, Heather; Steeb, Franziska; Ruth, Peter; Knaus, Hans Guenther; Shipston, Michael J

    2013-05-01

    Regulatory β-subunits of large conductance calcium- and voltage-activated potassium (BK) channels play an important role in generating functional diversity and control of cell surface expression of the pore forming α-subunits. However, in contrast to α-subunits, the role of reversible post-translational modification of intracellular residues on β-subunit function is largely unknown. Here we demonstrate that the human β4-subunit is S-acylated (palmitoylated) on a juxtamembrane cysteine residue (Cys-193) in the intracellular C terminus of the regulatory β-subunit. β4-Subunit palmitoylation is important for cell surface expression and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) exit of the β4-subunit alone. Importantly, palmitoylated β4-subunits promote the ER exit and surface expression of the pore-forming α-subunit, whereas β4-subunits that cannot be palmitoylated do not increase ER exit or surface expression of α-subunits. Strikingly, however, this palmitoylation- and β4-dependent enhancement of α-subunit surface expression was only observed in α-subunits that contain a putative trafficking motif (… REVEDEC) at the very C terminus of the α-subunit. Engineering this trafficking motif to other C-terminal α-subunit splice variants results in α-subunits with reduced surface expression that can be rescued by palmitoylated, but not depalmitoylated, β4-subunits. Our data reveal a novel mechanism by which palmitoylated β4-subunit controls surface expression of BK channels through masking of a trafficking motif in the C terminus of the α-subunit. As palmitoylation is dynamic, this mechanism would allow precise control of specific splice variants to the cell surface. Our data provide new insights into how complex interplay between the repertoire of post-transcriptional and post-translational mechanisms controls cell surface expression of BK channels.

  5. A whole-genome RNAi screen uncovers a novel role for human potassium channels in cell killing by the parasite Entamoeba histolytica

    PubMed Central

    Marie, Chelsea; Verkerke, Hans P.; Theodorescu, Dan; Petri, William A.

    2015-01-01

    The parasite Entamoeba histolytica kills human cells resulting in ulceration, inflammation and invasion of the colonic epithelium. We used the cytotoxic properties of ameba to select a genome-wide RNAi library to reveal novel host factors that control susceptibility to amebic killing. We identified 281 candidate susceptibility genes and bioinformatics analyses revealed that ion transporters were significantly enriched among susceptibility genes. Potassium (K+) channels were the most common transporter identified. Their importance was further supported by colon biopsy of humans with amebiasis that demonstrated suppressed K+ channel expression. Inhibition of human K+ channels by genetic silencing, pharmacologic inhibitors and with excess K+ protected diverse cell types from E. histolytica-induced death. Contact with E. histolytica parasites triggered K+ channel activation and K+ efflux by intestinal epithelial cells, which preceded cell killing. Specific inhibition of Ca2+-dependent K+ channels was highly effective in preventing amebic cytotoxicity in intestinal epithelial cells and macrophages. Blockade of K+ efflux also inhibited caspase-1 activation, IL-1β secretion and pyroptotic death in THP-1 macrophages. We concluded that K+ channels are host mediators of amebic cytotoxicity in multiple cells types and of inflammasome activation in macrophages. PMID:26346926

  6. A whole-genome RNAi screen uncovers a novel role for human potassium channels in cell killing by the parasite Entamoeba histolytica.

    PubMed

    Marie, Chelsea; Verkerke, Hans P; Theodorescu, Dan; Petri, William A

    2015-01-01

    The parasite Entamoeba histolytica kills human cells resulting in ulceration, inflammation and invasion of the colonic epithelium. We used the cytotoxic properties of ameba to select a genome-wide RNAi library to reveal novel host factors that control susceptibility to amebic killing. We identified 281 candidate susceptibility genes and bioinformatics analyses revealed that ion transporters were significantly enriched among susceptibility genes. Potassium (K(+)) channels were the most common transporter identified. Their importance was further supported by colon biopsy of humans with amebiasis that demonstrated suppressed K(+) channel expression. Inhibition of human K(+) channels by genetic silencing, pharmacologic inhibitors and with excess K(+) protected diverse cell types from E. histolytica-induced death. Contact with E. histolytica parasites triggered K(+) channel activation and K(+) efflux by intestinal epithelial cells, which preceded cell killing. Specific inhibition of Ca(2+)-dependent K(+) channels was highly effective in preventing amebic cytotoxicity in intestinal epithelial cells and macrophages. Blockade of K(+) efflux also inhibited caspase-1 activation, IL-1β secretion and pyroptotic death in THP-1 macrophages. We concluded that K(+) channels are host mediators of amebic cytotoxicity in multiple cells types and of inflammasome activation in macrophages. PMID:26346926

  7. A whole-genome RNAi screen uncovers a novel role for human potassium channels in cell killing by the parasite Entamoeba histolytica.

    PubMed

    Marie, Chelsea; Verkerke, Hans P; Theodorescu, Dan; Petri, William A

    2015-09-08

    The parasite Entamoeba histolytica kills human cells resulting in ulceration, inflammation and invasion of the colonic epithelium. We used the cytotoxic properties of ameba to select a genome-wide RNAi library to reveal novel host factors that control susceptibility to amebic killing. We identified 281 candidate susceptibility genes and bioinformatics analyses revealed that ion transporters were significantly enriched among susceptibility genes. Potassium (K(+)) channels were the most common transporter identified. Their importance was further supported by colon biopsy of humans with amebiasis that demonstrated suppressed K(+) channel expression. Inhibition of human K(+) channels by genetic silencing, pharmacologic inhibitors and with excess K(+) protected diverse cell types from E. histolytica-induced death. Contact with E. histolytica parasites triggered K(+) channel activation and K(+) efflux by intestinal epithelial cells, which preceded cell killing. Specific inhibition of Ca(2+)-dependent K(+) channels was highly effective in preventing amebic cytotoxicity in intestinal epithelial cells and macrophages. Blockade of K(+) efflux also inhibited caspase-1 activation, IL-1β secretion and pyroptotic death in THP-1 macrophages. We concluded that K(+) channels are host mediators of amebic cytotoxicity in multiple cells types and of inflammasome activation in macrophages.

  8. Calcium-activated potassium channels in insect pacemaker neurons as unexpected target site for the novel fumigant dimethyl disulfide.

    PubMed

    Gautier, Hélène; Auger, Jacques; Legros, Christian; Lapied, Bruno

    2008-01-01

    Dimethyl disulfide (DMDS), a plant-derived insecticide, is a promising fumigant as a substitute for methyl bromide. To further understand the mode of action of DMDS, we examined its effect on cockroach octopaminergic neurosecretory cells, called dorsal unpaired median (DUM) neurons, using whole-cell patch-clamp technique, calcium imaging and antisense oligonucleotide strategy. At low concentration (1 microM), DMDS modified spontaneous regular spike discharge into clear bursting activity associated with a decrease of the amplitude of the afterhyperpolarization. This effect led us to suspect alterations of calcium-activated potassium currents (IKCa) and [Ca(2+)](i) changes. We showed that DMDS reduced amplitudes of both peak transient and sustained components of the total potassium current. IKCa was confirmed as a target of DMDS by using iberiotoxin, cadmium chloride, and pSlo antisense oligonucleotide. In addition, we showed that DMDS induced [Ca(2+)](i) rise in Fura-2-loaded DUM neurons. Using calcium-free solution, and (R,S)-(3,4-dihydro-6,7-dimethoxy-isoquinoline-1-yl)-2-phenyl-N,N-di-[2-(2,3,4-trimethoxy-phenyl)ethyl]-acetamide (LOE 908) [an inhibitor of transient receptor potential (TRP)gamma], we demonstrated that TRPgamma initiated calcium influx. By contrast, omega-conotoxin GVIA (an inhibitor of N-type high-voltage-activated calcium channels), did not affect the DMDS-induced [Ca(2+)](i) rise. Finally, the participation of the calcium-induced calcium release mechanism was investigated using thapsigargin, caffeine, and ryanodine. Our study revealed that DMDS-induced elevation in [Ca(2+)](i) modulated IKCa in an unexpected bell-shaped manner via intracellular calcium. In conclusion, DMDS affects multiple targets, which could be an effective way to improve pest control efficacy of fumigation. PMID:17942746

  9. The conserved potassium channel filter can have distinct ion binding profiles: structural analysis of rubidium, cesium, and barium binding in NaK2K.

    PubMed

    Lam, Yee Ling; Zeng, Weizhong; Sauer, David Bryant; Jiang, Youxing

    2014-08-01

    Potassium channels are highly selective for K(+) over the smaller Na(+). Intriguingly, they are permeable to larger monovalent cations such as Rb(+) and Cs(+) but are specifically blocked by the similarly sized Ba(2+). In this study, we used structural analysis to determine the binding profiles for these permeant and blocking ions in the selectivity filter of the potassium-selective NaK channel mutant NaK2K and also performed permeation experiments using single-channel recordings. Our data revealed that some ion binding properties of NaK2K are distinct from those of the canonical K(+) channels KcsA and MthK. Rb(+) bound at sites 1, 3, and 4 in NaK2K, as it does in KcsA. Cs(+), however, bound predominantly at sites 1 and 3 in NaK2K, whereas it binds at sites 1, 3, and 4 in KcsA. Moreover, Ba(2+) binding in NaK2K was distinct from that which has been observed in KcsA and MthK, even though all of these channels show similar Ba(2+) block. In the presence of K(+), Ba(2+) bound to the NaK2K channel at site 3 in conjunction with a K(+) at site 1; this led to a prolonged block of the channel (the external K(+)-dependent Ba(2+) lock-in state). In the absence of K(+), however, Ba(2+) acts as a permeating blocker. We found that, under these conditions, Ba(2+) bound at sites 1 or 0 as well as site 3, allowing it to enter the filter from the intracellular side and exit from the extracellular side. The difference in the Ba(2+) binding profile in the presence and absence of K(+) thus provides a structural explanation for the short and prolonged Ba(2+) block observed in NaK2K.

  10. Cloxyquin (5-chloroquinolin-8-ol) is an activator of the two-pore domain potassium channel TRESK.

    PubMed

    Wright, Paul D; Weir, Gregory; Cartland, Jamie; Tickle, David; Kettleborough, Catherine; Cader, M Zameel; Jerman, Jeff

    2013-11-15

    TRESK is a two-pore domain potassium channel. Loss of function mutations have been linked to typical migraine with aura and due to TRESK’s expression pattern and role in neuronal excitability it represents a promising therapeutic target. We developed a cell based assay using baculovirus transduced U20S cells to screen for activators of TRESK. Using a thallium flux system to measure TRESK channel activity we identified Cloxyquin as a novel activator. Cloxyquin was shown to have an EC50 of 3.8 μM in the thallium assay and displayed good selectivity against other potassium channels tested. Activity was confirmed using whole cell patch electrophysiology, with Cloxyquin causing a near two fold increase in outward current. The strategy presented here will be used to screen larger compound libraries with the aim of identifying novel chemical series which may be developed into new migraine prophylactics.

  11. Cloxyquin (5-Chloroquinolin-8-ol) is an activator of the two-pore domain potassium channel TRESK.

    PubMed

    Wright, Paul D; Weir, Gregory; Cartland, Jamie; Tickle, David; Kettleborough, Catherine; Cader, Zameel; Jerman, Jeff

    2013-10-25

    TRESK is a two-pore domain potassium channel. Loss of function mutations have been linked to typical migraine with aura and due to TRESK's expression pattern and role in neuronal excitability it represents a promising therapeutic target. We developed a cell based assay using baculovirus transduced U20S cells to screen for activators of TRESK. Using a thallium flux system to measure TRESK channel activity we identified Cloxyquin as a novel activator. Cloxyquin was shown to have an EC50 of 3.8μM in the thallium assay and displayed good selectivity against other potassium channels tested. Activity was confirmed using whole cell patch electrophysiology, with Cloxyquin causing a near two fold increase in outward current. The strategy presented here will be used to screen larger compound libraries with the aim of identifying novel chemical series which may be developed into new migraine prophylactics.

  12. Glucose sensitivity of mouse olfactory bulb neurons is conveyed by a voltage-gated potassium channel

    PubMed Central

    Tucker, Kristal; Cho, Sukhee; Thiebaud, Nicolas; Henderson, Michael X; Fadool, Debra Ann

    2013-01-01

    The olfactory bulb has recently been proposed to serve as a metabolic sensor of internal chemistry, particularly that modified by metabolism. Because the voltage-dependent potassium channel Kv1.3 regulates a large proportion of the outward current in olfactory bulb neurons and gene-targeted deletion of the protein produces a phenotype of resistance to diet-induced obesity in mice, we hypothesized that this channel may play a role in translating energy availability into a metabolic signal. Here we explored the ability of extracellular glucose concentration to modify evoked excitability of the mitral neurons that principally regulate olfactory coding and processing of olfactory information. Using voltage-clamp electrophysiology of heterologously expressed Kv1.3 channels in HEK 293 cells, we found that Kv1.3 macroscopic currents responded to metabolically active (d-) rather than inactive (l-) glucose with a response profile that followed a bell-shaped curve. Olfactory bulb slices stimulated with varying glucose concentrations showed glucose-dependent mitral cell excitability as evaluated by current-clamp electrophysiology. While glucose could be either excitatory or inhibitory, the majority of the sampled neurons displayed a decreased firing frequency in response to elevated glucose concentration that was linked to increased latency to first spike and decreased action potential cluster length. Unlike modulation attributed to phosphorylation, glucose modulation of mitral cells was rapid, less than one minute, and was reversible within the time course of a patch recording. Moreover, we report that modulation targets properties of spike firing rather than action potential shape, involves synaptic activity of glutamate or GABA signalling circuits, and is dependent upon Kv1.3 expression. Given the rising incidence of metabolic disorders attributed to weight gain, changes in neuronal excitability in brain regions regulating sensory perception of food are of consequence

  13. ATP-mediated vasodilatation occurs via activation of inwardly rectifying potassium channels in humans.

    PubMed

    Crecelius, Anne R; Kirby, Brett S; Luckasen, Gary J; Larson, Dennis G; Dinenno, Frank A

    2012-11-01

    Circulating ATP possesses unique vasomotor properties in humans and has been hypothesized to play a role in vascular control under a variety of physiological conditions. However, the primary downstream signalling mechanisms underlying ATP-mediated vasodilatation remain unclear. The purpose of the present experiment was to determine whether ATP-mediated vasodilatation is independent of nitric oxide (NO) and prostaglandin (PG) synthesis and occurs primarily via the activation of Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase and inwardly rectifying potassium (K(IR)) channels in humans. In all protocols, young healthy adults were studied and forearm vascular conductance (FVC) was calculated from forearm blood flow (measured via venous occlusion plethysmography) and intra-arterial blood pressure to quantify local vasodilatation. Vasodilator responses (%FVC) during intra-arterial ATP infusions were unchanged following combined inhibition of NO and PGs (n = 8; P > 0.05) whereas the responses to KCl were greater (P < 0.05). Combined infusion of ouabain (to inhibit Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase) and barium chloride (BaCl(2); to inhibit K(IR) channels) abolished KCl-mediated vasodilatation (n = 6; %FVC = 134 ± 13 vs. 4 ± 5%; P < 0.05), demonstrating effective blockade of direct vascular hyperpolarization. The vasodilator responses to three different doses of ATP were inhibited on average 56 ± 5% (n = 16) following combined ouabain plus BaCl(2) infusion. In follow-up studies, BaCl(2) alone inhibited the vasodilator responses to ATP on average 51 ± 3% (n = 6), which was not different than that observed for combined ouabain plus BaCl(2) administration. Our novel results indicate that the primary mechanism of ATP-mediated vasodilatation is vascular hyperpolarization via activation of K(IR) channels. These observations translate in vitro findings to humans in vivo and may help explain the unique vasomotor properties of intravascular ATP in the human circulation.

  14. PIST (GOPC) modulates the oncogenic voltage-gated potassium channel KV10.1

    PubMed Central

    Herrmann, Solveig; Ninkovic, Milena; Kohl, Tobias; Pardo, Luis A.

    2013-01-01

    Although crucial for their correct function, the mechanisms controlling surface expression of ion channels are poorly understood. In the case of the voltage-gated potassium channel KV10.1, this is determinant not only for its physiological function in brain, but also for its pathophysiology in tumors and possible use as a therapeutic target. The Golgi resident protein PIST binds several membrane proteins, thereby modulating their expression. Here we describe a PDZ domain-mediated interaction of KV10.1 and PIST, which enhances surface levels of KV10.1. The functional, but not the physical interaction of both proteins is dependent on the coiled-coil and PDZ domains of PIST; insertion of eight amino acids in the coiled-coil domain to render the neural form of PIST (nPIST) and the corresponding short isoform in an as-of-yet unknown form abolishes the effect. In addition, two new isoforms of PIST (sPIST and nsPIST) lacking nearly the complete PDZ domain were cloned and shown to be ubiquitously expressed. PIST and KV10.1 co-precipitate from native and expression systems. nPIST also showed interaction, but did not alter the functional expression of the channel. We could not document physical interaction between KV10.1 and sPIST, but it reduced KV10.1 functional expression in a dominant-negative manner. nsPIST showed weak physical interaction and no functional effect on KV10.1. We propose these isoforms to work as modulators of PIST function via regulating the binding on interaction partners. PMID:23966943

  15. ATP-mediated vasodilatation occurs via activation of inwardly rectifying potassium channels in humans

    PubMed Central

    Crecelius, Anne R; Kirby, Brett S; Luckasen, Gary J; Larson, Dennis G; Dinenno, Frank A

    2012-01-01

    Circulating ATP possesses unique vasomotor properties in humans and has been hypothesized to play a role in vascular control under a variety of physiological conditions. However, the primary downstream signalling mechanisms underlying ATP-mediated vasodilatation remain unclear. The purpose of the present experiment was to determine whether ATP-mediated vasodilatation is independent of nitric oxide (NO) and prostaglandin (PG) synthesis and occurs primarily via the activation of Na+/K+-ATPase and inwardly rectifying potassium (KIR) channels in humans. In all protocols, young healthy adults were studied and forearm vascular conductance (FVC) was calculated from forearm blood flow (measured via venous occlusion plethysmography) and intra-arterial blood pressure to quantify local vasodilatation. Vasodilator responses (%ΔFVC) during intra-arterial ATP infusions were unchanged following combined inhibition of NO and PGs (n= 8; P > 0.05) whereas the responses to KCl were greater (P < 0.05). Combined infusion of ouabain (to inhibit Na+/K+-ATPase) and barium chloride (BaCl2; to inhibit KIR channels) abolished KCl-mediated vasodilatation (n= 6; %ΔFVC = 134 ± 13 vs. 4 ± 5%; P < 0.05), demonstrating effective blockade of direct vascular hyperpolarization. The vasodilator responses to three different doses of ATP were inhibited on average 56 ± 5% (n= 16) following combined ouabain plus BaCl2 infusion. In follow-up studies, BaCl2 alone inhibited the vasodilator responses to ATP on average 51 ± 3% (n= 6), which was not different than that observed for combined ouabain plus BaCl2 administration. Our novel results indicate that the primary mechanism of ATP-mediated vasodilatation is vascular hyperpolarization via activation of KIR channels. These observations translate in vitro findings to humans in vivo and may help explain the unique vasomotor properties of intravascular ATP in the human circulation. PMID:22777673

  16. Gold nanoparticle-spermidine complex blocks the inward rectifier potassium channel

    PubMed Central

    Chin, Chur

    2014-01-01

    A previous study showed that negatively charged gold nanoparticles block ion pores by binding to the sulfur group of the cysteine loop of the ion channel when small molecules like amine lead the nanoparticles inside the ion pore. Cells were voltage clamped at -100 mV. Subsequently a bath application of 30 μM Ach produced a current followed by the extracellular application of 100 mM spermidine and 50 nM of nanoparticle complex. Peak amplitude was then recorded. The addition of Ach (30 uM) reversed the effect, and we recorded inhibition of the peak amplitude. We also recorded electrocardiogram (EKG) and the atria effective refractory period (AERP) after treatment with the complex in the atrium of a rabbit heart in a Langendorff apparatus. Upon external application of the complex, the Ach-activated current was blocked by 48.8% ± 3.1% with 82.7% ± 3.1% reversal. In recording the EKG and the AERP after the addition of the complex including 30 mM spermidine with 50 nM nanoparticles, the complete resolution of atrial fibrillation at 50 s and the elongation of AERP from 46 to 52 was observed, which unveils a new class 3 anti arrythmic agent using gold nanoparticles with spermidine. Negatively charged gold nanoparticles (0.8 nm) block ion pores after penetrating the cell membrane with spermidine, thus entering the cells with a polyamine transporter and acting at the intracellular face of the channel via binding to the sulfur group of the human inward rectifying potassium channel- I(KAch). PMID:25006531

  17. Tracking single Kv2.1 channels in live cells reveals anomalous subdiffusion and ergodicity breaking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weigel, Aubrey; Simon, Blair; Tamkun, Michael; Krapf, Diego

    2011-03-01

    The dynamic organization of the plasma membrane is responsible for essential cellular processes, such as receptor trafficking and signaling. By studying the dynamics of transmembrane proteins a greater understanding of these processes as a whole can be achieved. It is broadly observed that the diffusion pattern of membrane protein displays anomalous subdiffusion. However, the mechanisms responsible for this behavior are not yet established. We explore the dynamics of the voltage gated potassium channel Kv2.1 by using single-particle tracking. We analyze Kv2.1 channel trajectories in terms of the time and ensemble distributions of square displacements. Our results reveal that all Kv2.1 channels experience anomalous subdiffusion and we observe that the Kv2.1 diffusion pattern is non-ergodic. We further investigated the role of the actin cytoskeleton in these channel dynamics by applying actin depolymerizing drugs. It is seen that with the breakdown of the actin cytoskeleton the Kv2.1 channel trajectories recover ergodicity.

  18. Sequence and functional expression in Xenopus oocytes of a human insulinoma and islet potassium channel.

    PubMed Central

    Philipson, L H; Hice, R E; Schaefer, K; LaMendola, J; Bell, G I; Nelson, D J; Steiner, D F

    1991-01-01

    Regulation of insulin secretion involves the coordinated control of ion channels in the beta-cell membrane. We have isolated and characterized cDNA and genomic clones encoding a voltage-dependent K+ channel isoform expressed in human islets and in a human insulinoma. This K+ channel isoform, designated hPCN1, with a deduced amino acid sequence of 613 residues (Mr = 67,097), is related to the Shaker family of Drosophila K+ channels. hPCN1 is homologous to two other human K+ channel isoforms we have isolated, hPCN2 and hPCN3, with 55% and 65% amino acid sequence identity, respectively. The electrophysiological characteristics of hPCN1 were determined after microinjection of synthetic RNA into Xenopus oocytes. Two-microelectrode voltage-clamp recordings of oocytes injected with hPCN1 RNA revealed a voltage-dependent outward K+ current that inactivated slowly with time. Outward currents were inhibited by 4-aminopyridine with a Ki less than 0.10 mM and were relatively insensitive to tetraethylammonium ion or Ba2+. A delayed rectifier K+ channel such as hPCN1 could restore the resting membrane potential of beta cells after depolarization and thereby contribute to the regulation of insulin secretion. PMID:1986382

  19. Sequence and functional expression in Xenopus oocytes of a human insulinoma and islet potassium channel

    SciTech Connect

    Philipson, L.H.; Hice, R.E.; Schaefer, K.; LaMendola, J.; Bell, G.I.; Nelson, D.J.; Steiner, D.F. )

    1991-01-01

    Regulation of insulin secretion involves the coordinated control of ion channels in the {beta}-cell membrane. The authors have isolated and characterized cDNA and genomic clones encoding a voltage-dependent K{sup +} channel isoform expressed in human islets and in a human insulinoma. This K{sup +} channel isoform, designated hPCN1, with a deduced amino acid sequence of 613 residues is related to the Shaker family of Drosophila K{sup +} channels. hPCN1 is homologous to two other human K{sup +} channel isoforms. They have isolated, hPCN2 and hPCN3, with 55% and 65% amino acid sequence identity, respectively. The electrophysiological characteristics of hPCN1 were determined after microinjuection of synthetic RNA into Xenopus oocytes. Two-microelectrode voltage-clamp recordings of oocytes injected with hPCN1 RNA revealed a voltage-dependent outward K{sup +} current that inactivated slowly with time. Outward currents were inhibited by 4-aminopyridine with a K{sub i} less that 0.01 mM and were relatively insensitive to tetraethylammonium ion or Ba{sup 2+}. A delayed rectifier K{sup +} channel such as hPCN1 could restore the resting membrane potential of {beta} cells after depolarization and thereby contribute to the regulation of insulin secretion.

  20. The inhibitory effect of propofol on Kv2.1 potassium channel in rat parietal cortical neurons.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yan-Zhuo; Zhang, Rui; Zeng, Xian-Zhang; Song, Chun-Yu

    2016-03-11

    Excessive K(+) efflux via activated voltage-gated K(+) channels can deplete intracellular K(+) and lead to long-lasting membrane depolarization which will promote neuronal apoptosis during ischemia/hypoxia injury. The Kv2.1 potassium channel was the major component of delayed rectifier potassium current (Ik) in pyramidal neurons in cortex and hippocampus. The neuronal protective effect of propofol has been proved. Delayed rectifier potassium current (Ik) has been shown to have close relationship with neuronal damage. The study was designed to test the inhibitory effect of propofol on Kv2.1 potassium channel in rat parietal cortical neurons. Whole-cell patch clamp recordings and Western blot analysis were used to investigate the electrophysiological function and protein expression of Kv2.1 in rat parietal cortical neurons after propofol treatment. We found that propofol concentration-dependently inhibited Ik in pyramidal neurons. Propofol also caused a downward shift of the I-V curve of Ik at 30μM concentration. Propofol significantly inhibited the expression of Kv2.1 protein level at 30μM, 50μM, 100μM concentration. In conclusion, our data showed that propofol could inhibit Ik, probably via depressing the expression of Kv2.1 protein in rat cerebral parietal cortical neurons.

  1. Inhibition by acrolein of light-induced stomatal opening through inhibition of inward-rectifying potassium channels in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Islam, Md Moshiul; Ye, Wenxiu; Matsushima, Daiki; Khokon, Md Atiqur Rahman; Munemasa, Shintaro; Nakamura, Yoshimasa; Murata, Yoshiyuki

    2015-01-01

    Acrolein is a reactive α,β-unsaturated aldehyde derived from lipid peroxides, which are produced in plants under a variety of stress. We investigated effects of acrolein on light-induced stomatal opening using Arabidopsis thaliana. Acrolein inhibited light-induced stomatal opening in a dose-dependent manner. Acrolein at 100 μM inhibited plasma membrane inward-rectifying potassium (Kin) channels in guard cells. Acrolein at 100 μM inhibited Kin channel KAT1 expressed in a heterologous system using Xenopus leaves oocytes. These results suggest that acrolein inhibits light-induced stomatal opening through inhibition of Kin channels in guard cells.

  2. Two conserved arginine residues from the SK3 potassium channel outer vestibule control selectivity of recognition by scorpion toxins.

    PubMed

    Feng, Jing; Hu, Youtian; Yi, Hong; Yin, Shijin; Han, Song; Hu, Jun; Chen, Zongyun; Yang, Weishan; Cao, Zhijian; De Waard, Michel; Sabatier, Jean-Marc; Li, Wenxin; Wu, Yingliang

    2013-05-01

    Potassium channel functions are often deciphered by using selective and potent scorpion toxins. Among these toxins, only a limited subset is capable of selectively blocking small conductance Ca(2+)-activated K(+) (SK) channels. The structural bases of this selective SK channel recognition remain unclear. In this work, we demonstrate the key role of the electric charges of two conserved arginine residues (Arg-485 and Arg-489) from the SK3 channel outer vestibule in the selective recognition by the SK3-blocking BmP05 toxin. Indeed, individually substituting these residues with histidyl or lysyl (maintaining the positive electric charge partially or fully), although decreasing BmP05 affinity, still preserved the toxin sensitivity profile of the SK3 channel (as evidenced by the lack of recognition by many other types of potassium channel-sensitive charybdotoxin). In contrast, when Arg-485 or Arg-489 of the SK3 channel was mutated to an acidic (Glu) or alcoholic (Ser) amino acid residue, the channel lost its sensitivity to BmP05 and became susceptible to the "new" blocking activity by charybdotoxin. In addition to these SK3 channel basic residues important for sensitivity, two acidic residues, Asp-492 and Asp-518, also located in the SK3 channel outer vestibule, were identified as being critical for toxin affinity. Furthermore, molecular modeling data indicate the existence of a compact SK3 channel turret conformation (like a peptide screener), where the basic rings of Arg-485 and Arg-489 are stabilized by strong ionic interactions with Asp-492 and Asp-518. In conclusion, the unique properties of Arg-485 and Arg-489 (spatial orientations and molecular interactions) in the SK3 channel account for its toxin sensitivity profile. PMID:23511633

  3. Apical SK potassium channels and Ca2+-dependent anion secretion in endometrial epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Palmer, Melissa L; Schiller, Katherine R; O'Grady, Scott M

    2008-01-01

    Apical uridine triphosphate (UTP) stimulation was shown to increase short circuit current (Isc) in immortalized porcine endometrial gland epithelial monolayers. Pretreatment with the bee venom toxin apamin enhanced this response. Voltage-clamp experiments using amphotericin B-permeablized monolayers revealed that the apamin-sensitive current increased immediately after UTP stimulation and was K+ dependent. The current–voltage relationship was slightly inwardly rectifying with a reversal potential of −52 ± 2 mV, and the PK/PNa ratio was 14, indicating high selectivity for K+. Concentration–response relationships for apamin and dequalinium had IC50 values of 0.5 nm and 1.8 μm, respectively, consistent with data previously reported for SK3 channels in excitable cells and hepatocytes. Treatment of monolayers with 50 μm BAPTA-AM completely blocked the effects of UTP on K+ channel activation, indicating that the apamin-sensitive current was also Ca2+ dependent. Moreover, channel activation was blocked by calmidazolium (IC50= 5 μm), suggesting a role for calmodulin in Ca2+-dependent regulation of channel activity. RT-PCR experiments demonstrated expression of mRNA for the SK1 and SK3 channels, but not SK2 channels. Treatment of monolayers with 20 nm oestradiol-17β produced a 2-fold increase in SK3 mRNA, a 2-fold decrease in SK1 mRNA, but no change in GAPDH mRNA expression. This result correlated with a 2.5-fold increase in apamin-sensitive K+ channel activity in the apical membrane. We speculate that SK channels provide a mechanism for rapidly sensing changes in intracellular Ca2+ near the apical membrane, evoking immediate hyperpolarization necessary for increasing the driving force for anion efflux following P2Y receptor activation. PMID:18048454

  4. Correlation between potassium channel expression and sensitivity to drug-induced cell death in tumor cell lines.

    PubMed

    Leanza, Luigi; O'Reilly, Paul; Doyle, Anne; Venturini, Elisa; Zoratti, Mario; Szegezdi, Eva; Szabo, Ildiko

    2014-01-01

    Plasma membrane (PM) and mitochondrial (mt) ion channels - particularly potassium channels - became oncological targets soon after the discovery that they are involved both in the regulation of proliferation and apoptosis. Some members of the Kv Shaker family, namely Kv1.1, Kv1.3, Kv1.5 and Kv11.1 (Herg), and the intermediate-conductance calcium-activated potassium KCa3.1 (IK) channels have been shown to contribute to apoptosis in various cell lines. Kv1.3, Kv1.5 and IK are located in the plasma membrane but also in the mitochondrial inner membrane, where they participate in apoptotic signalling. Interestingly, an altered protein expression of some of the channels mentioned above has been reported in neoplastic cell lines/tissues, but a systematic quantification addressing the protein expression of the above potassium channels in tumor cell lines of different origin has not been carried out yet. In the present study we investigated whether expression of specific potassium channels, at the mRNA and protein level, can be correlated with cell sensitivity to various apoptotic stimuli, including chemotherapeutic drugs, in a panel of cancer cell lines. The results show correlation between the protein expression of the Kv1.1 and Kv1.3 channels and susceptibility to death upon treatment with staurosporine, C2-ceramide and cisplatin. Furthermore, we investigated the correlation between Kv channel expression and sensitivity to three distinct membrane-permeant Kv1.3 inhibitors, since these drugs have recently been shown to be able to induce apoptosis and also reduce tumor volume in an in vivo model. Higher protein expression of Kv1.3 significantly correlated with lower cell survival upon treatment with clofazimine, one of the Kv1.3 inhibitors. These results suggest that expression of Kv1.1 and Kv1.3 sensitizes tumour cells of various origins to cytotoxins. Data reported in this work regarding potassium channel protein expression in different cancer cell lines may be exploited

  5. Involvement of Potassium and Cation Channels in Hippocampal Abnormalities of Embryonic Ts65Dn and Tc1 Trisomic Mice.

    PubMed

    Stern, Shani; Segal, Menahem; Moses, Elisha

    2015-09-01

    Down syndrome (DS) mouse models exhibit cognitive deficits, and are used for studying the neuronal basis of DS pathology. To understand the differences in the physiology of DS model neurons, we used dissociated neuronal cultures from the hippocampi of Ts65Dn and Tc1 DS mice. Imaging of [Ca(2+)]i and whole cell patch clamp recordings were used to analyze network activity and single neuron properties, respectively. We found a decrease of ~ 30% in both fast (A-type) and slow (delayed rectifier) outward potassium currents. Depolarization of Ts65Dn and Tc1 cells produced fewer spikes than diploid cells. Their network bursts were smaller and slower than diploids, displaying a 40% reduction in Δf / f0 of the calcium signals, and a 30% reduction in propagation velocity. Additionally, Ts65Dn and Tc1 neurons exhibited changes in the action potential shape compared to diploid neurons, with an increase in the amplitude of the action potential, a lower threshold for spiking, and a sharp decrease of about 65% in the after-hyperpolarization amplitude. Numerical simulations reproduced the DS measured phenotype by variations in the conductance of the delayed rectifier and A-type, but necessitated also changes in inward rectifying and M-type potassium channels and in the hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated (HCN) channels. We therefore conducted whole cell patch clamp measurements of M-type potassium currents, which showed a ~ 90% decrease in Ts65Dn neurons, while HCN measurements displayed an increase of ~ 65% in Ts65Dn cells. Quantitative real-time PCR analysis indicates overexpression of 40% of KCNJ15, an inward rectifying potassium channel, contributing to the increased inhibition. We thus find that changes in several types of potassium channels dominate the observed DS model phenotype. PMID:26501103

  6. Involvement of Potassium and Cation Channels in Hippocampal Abnormalities of Embryonic Ts65Dn and Tc1 Trisomic Mice

    PubMed Central

    Stern, Shani; Segal, Menahem; Moses, Elisha

    2015-01-01

    Down syndrome (DS) mouse models exhibit cognitive deficits, and are used for studying the neuronal basis of DS pathology. To understand the differences in the physiology of DS model neurons, we used dissociated neuronal cultures from the hippocampi of Ts65Dn and Tc1 DS mice. Imaging of [Ca2+]i and whole cell patch clamp recordings were used to analyze network activity and single neuron properties, respectively. We found a decrease of ~ 30% in both fast (A-type) and slow (delayed rectifier) outward potassium currents. Depolarization of Ts65Dn and Tc1 cells produced fewer spikes than diploid cells. Their network bursts were smaller and slower than diploids, displaying a 40% reduction in Δf / f0 of the calcium signals, and a 30% reduction in propagation velocity. Additionally, Ts65Dn and Tc1 neurons exhibited changes in the action potential shape compared to diploid neurons, with an increase in the amplitude of the action potential, a lower threshold for spiking, and a sharp decrease of about 65% in the after-hyperpolarization amplitude. Numerical simulations reproduced the DS measured phenotype by variations in the conductance of the delayed rectifier and A-type, but necessitated also changes in inward rectifying and M-type potassium channels and in the hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated (HCN) channels. We therefore conducted whole cell patch clamp measurements of M-type potassium currents, which showed a ~ 90% decrease in Ts65Dn neurons, while HCN measurements displayed an increase of ~ 65% in Ts65Dn cells. Quantitative real-time PCR analysis indicates overexpression of 40% of KCNJ15, an inward rectifying potassium channel, contributing to the increased inhibition. We thus find that changes in several types of potassium channels dominate the observed DS model phenotype. PMID:26501103

  7. Exome sequencing identifies de novo gain of function missense mutation in KCND2 in identical twins with autism and seizures that slows potassium channel inactivation.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hane; Lin, Meng-chin A; Kornblum, Harley I; Papazian, Diane M; Nelson, Stanley F

    2014-07-01

    Numerous studies and case reports show comorbidity of autism and epilepsy, suggesting some common molecular underpinnings of the two phenotypes. However, the relationship between the two, on the molecular level, remains unclear. Here, whole exome sequencing was performed on a family with identical twins affected with autism and severe, intractable seizures. A de novo variant was identified in the KCND2 gene, which encodes the Kv4.2 potassium channel. Kv4.2 is a major pore-forming subunit in somatodendritic subthreshold A-type potassium current (ISA) channels. The de novo mutation p.Val404Met is novel and occurs at a highly conserved residue within the C-terminal end of the transmembrane helix S6 region of the ion permeation pathway. Functional analysis revealed the likely pathogenicity of the variant in that the p.Val404Met mutant construct showed significantly slowed inactivation, either by itself or after equimolar coexpression with the wild-type Kv4.2 channel construct consistent with a dominant effect. Further, the effect of the mutation on closed-state inactivation was evident in the presence of auxiliary subunits that associate with Kv4 subunits to form ISA channels in vivo. Discovery of a functionally relevant novel de novo variant, coupled with physiological evidence that the mutant protein disrupts potassium current inactivation, strongly supports KCND2 as the causal gene for epilepsy in this family. Interaction of KCND2 with other genes implicated in autism and the role of KCND2 in synaptic plasticity provide suggestive evidence of an etiological role in autism. PMID:24501278

  8. Large conductance calcium-activated potassium channels: their expression and modulation of glutamate release from nerve terminals isolated from rat trigeminal caudal nucleus and cerebral cortex.

    PubMed

    Samengo, Irene; Currò, Diego; Barrese, Vincenzo; Taglialatela, Maurizio; Martire, Maria

    2014-05-01

    Large conductance, calcium-activated potassium channels [big potassium (BK) channel] consist of a tetramer of pore-forming α-subunit and distinct accessory β-subunits (β1-4) that modify the channel's properties. In this study, we analyzed the effects of BK channel activators and blockers on glutamate and γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) release from synaptosomes isolated from the cerebral cortices or trigeminal caudal nuclei (TCN) of rats. Real-time polymerase chain reaction was used to characterize BK channel α and β(1-4) subunit expression in the cortex and in the trigeminal ganglia (TG), whose neurons project primary terminal afferents into the TCN. Immunocytochemistry was used to localize these subunits on cortical and TCN synaptosomes. The BK channels regulating [(3)H]D-aspartate release from primary afferent nerve terminals projecting into the TCN displayed limited sensitivity to iberiotoxin, whereas those expressed on cortical synaptosomes were highly sensitive to this toxin. BK channels did not appear to be present on GABAergic nerve terminals from the TCN since [(3)H]-γ-aminobutyric acid release in this model was unaffected by BK channel activators or blockers. Gene expression studies revealed expression levels of the α subunit in the TG that were only 31.2 ± 2.1% of those found in cortical tissues. The β4 subunit was the accessory subunit expressed most abundantly in both the cortex and TG. Levels of β1 and β2 were low in both these areas although β2 expression in the TG was higher than that found in the cortex. Immunocytochemistry experiments showed that co-localization of α and β4 subunits (the accessory subunit most abundantly expressed in both brain areas) was more common in TCN synaptosomes than in cortical synaptosomes. On the basis of these findings, it is reasonable to hypothesize that BK channels expressed on glutamatergic terminals in the TCN and cortex have distinct pharmacological profiles, which probably reflect different α and

  9. Structure of the voltage-gated K⁺ channel Eag1 reveals an alternative voltage sensing mechanism.

    PubMed

    Whicher, Jonathan R; MacKinnon, Roderick

    2016-08-12

    Voltage-gated potassium (K(v)) channels are gated by the movement of the transmembrane voltage sensor, which is coupled, through the helical S4-S5 linker, to the potassium pore. We determined the single-particle cryo-electron microscopy structure of mammalian K(v)10.1, or Eag1, bound to the channel inhibitor calmodulin, at 3.78 angstrom resolution. Unlike previous K(v) structures, the S4-S5 linker of Eag1 is a five-residue loop and the transmembrane segments are not domain swapped, which suggest an alternative mechanism of voltage-dependent gating. Additionally, the structure and position of the S4-S5 linker allow calmodulin to bind to the intracellular domains and to close the potassium pore, independent of voltage-sensor position. The structure reveals an alternative gating mechanism for K(v) channels and provides a template to further understand the gating properties of Eag1 and related channels. PMID:27516594

  10. Conformational heterogeneity in closed and open states of the KcsA potassium channel in lipid bicelles.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dorothy M; Dikiy, Igor; Upadhyay, Vikrant; Posson, David J; Eliezer, David; Nimigean, Crina M

    2016-08-01

    The process of ion channel gating-opening and closing-involves local and global structural changes in the channel in response to external stimuli. Conformational changes depend on the energetic landscape that underlies the transition between closed and open states, which plays a key role in ion channel gating. For the prokaryotic, pH-gated potassium channel KcsA, closed and open states have been extensively studied using structural and functional methods, but the dynamics within each of these functional states as well as the transition between them is not as well understood. In this study, we used solution nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy to investigate the conformational transitions within specific functional states of KcsA. We incorporated KcsA channels into lipid bicelles and stabilized them into a closed state by using either phosphatidylcholine lipids, known to favor the closed channel, or mutations designed to trap the channel shut by disulfide cross-linking. A distinct state, consistent with an open channel, was uncovered by the addition of cardiolipin lipids. Using selective amino acid labeling at locations within the channel that are known to move during gating, we observed at least two different slowly interconverting conformational states for both closed and open channels. The pH dependence of these conformations and the predictable disruptions to this dependence observed in mutant channels with altered pH sensing highlight the importance of conformational heterogeneity for KcsA gating. PMID:27432996

  11. Inward rectifying potassium channels facilitate cell-to-cell communication in hamster retractor muscle feed arteries.

    PubMed

    Jantzi, Micaela C; Brett, Suzanne E; Jackson, William F; Corteling, Randolph; Vigmond, Edward J; Welsh, Donald G

    2006-09-01

    This study examined whether inward rectifying K+ (KIR) channels facilitate cell-to-cell communication along skeletal muscle resistance arteries. With the use of feed arteries from the hamster retractor muscle, experiments examined whether KIR channels were functionally expressed and whether channel blockade attenuated the conduction of acetylcholine-induced vasodilation, an index of cell-to-cell communication. Consistent with KIR channel expression, this study observed the following: 1) a sustained Ba2+-sensitive, K+-induced dilation in preconstricted arteries; 2) a Ba2+-sensitive inwardly rectifying K+ current in arterial smooth muscle cells; and 3) KIR2.1 and KIR2.2 expression in the smooth muscle layer of these arteries. It was subsequently shown that the discrete application of acetylcholine elicits a vasodilation that conducts with limited decay along the feed artery wall. In the presence of 100 microM Ba2+, the local and conducted response to acetylcholine was attenuated, a finding consistent with a role for KIR in facilitating cell-to-cell communication. A computational model of vascular communication accurately predicted these observations. Control experiments revealed that in contrast to Ba2+, ATP-sensitive- and large-conductance Ca2+ activated-K+ channel inhibitors had no effect on the local or conducted vasodilatory response to acetylcholine. We conclude that smooth muscle KIR channels play a key role in facilitating cell-to-cell communication along skeletal muscle resistance arteries. We attribute this facilitation to the intrinsic property of negative slope conductance, a biophysical feature common to KIR2.1- and 2.2-containing channels, which enables them to increase their activity as a cell hyperpolarizes. PMID:16617135

  12. Plant adaptation to fluctuating environment and biomass production are strongly dependent on guard cell potassium channels

    PubMed Central

    Lebaudy, Anne; Vavasseur, Alain; Hosy, Eric; Dreyer, Ingo; Leonhardt, Nathalie; Thibaud, Jean-Baptiste; Véry, Anne-Aliénor; Simonneau, Thierry; Sentenac, Hervé

    2008-01-01

    At least four genes encoding plasma membrane inward K+ channels (Kin channels) are expressed in Arabidopsis guard cells. A double mutant plant was engineered by disruption of a major Kin channel gene and expression of a dominant negative channel construct. Using the patch-clamp technique revealed that this mutant was totally deprived of guard cell Kin channel (GCKin) activity, providing a model to investigate the roles of this activity in the plant. GCKin activity was found to be an essential effector of stomatal opening triggered by membrane hyperpolarization and thereby of blue light-induced stomatal opening at dawn. It improved stomatal reactivity to external or internal signals (light, CO2 availability, and evaporative demand). It protected stomatal function against detrimental effects of Na+ when plants were grown in the presence of physiological concentrations of this cation, probably by enabling guard cells to selectively and rapidly take up K+ instead of Na+ during stomatal opening, thereby preventing deleterious effects of Na+ on stomatal closure. It was also shown to be a key component of the mechanisms that underlie the circadian rhythm of stomatal opening, which is known to gate stomatal responses to extracellular and intracellular signals. Finally, in a meteorological scenario with higher light intensity during the first hours of the photophase, GCKin activity was found to allow a strong increase (35%) in plant biomass production. Thus, a large diversity of approaches indicates that GCKin activity plays pleiotropic roles that crucially contribute to plant adaptation to fluctuating and stressing natural environments. PMID:18367672

  13. Kinetic modeling of ion conduction in KcsA potassium channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mafé, Salvador; Pellicer, Julio; Cervera, Javier

    2005-05-01

    KcsA constitutes a potassium channel of known structure that shows both high conduction rates and selectivity among monovalent cations. A kinetic model for ion conduction through this channel that assumes rapid ion transport within the filter has recently been presented by Nelson. In a recent, brief communication, we used the model to provide preliminary explanations to the experimental current-voltage J-V and conductance-concentration g-S curves obtained for a series of monovalent ions (K+,Tl+, and Rb+). We did not assume rapid ion transport in the calculations, since ion transport within the selectivity filter could be rate limiting for ions other than native K+. This previous work is now significantly extended to the following experimental problems. First, the outward rectification of the J-V curves in K+ symmetrical solutions is analyzed using a generalized kinetic model. Second, the J-V and g-S curves for NH4+ are obtained and compared with those of other ions (the NH4+ J-V curve is qualitatively different from those of Rb+ and Tl+). Third, the effects of Na+ block on K+ and Rb+ currents through single KcsA channels are studied and the different blocking behavior is related to the values of the translocation rate constants characteristic of ion transport within the filter. Finally, the significantly decreased K+ conductance caused by mutation of the wild-type channel is also explained in terms of this rate constant. In order to keep the number of model parameters to a minimum, we do not allow the electrical distance (an empirical parameter of kinetic models that controls the exponential voltage dependence of the dissociation rate) to vary with the ionic species. Without introducing the relatively high number of adjustable parameters of more comprehensive site-based models, we show that ion association to the filter is rate controlling at low concentrations, but ion dissociation from the filter and ion transport within the filter could limit conduction at high

  14. Kinetic modeling of ion conduction in KcsA potassium channel.

    PubMed

    Mafé, Salvador; Pellicer, Julio; Cervera, Javier

    2005-05-22

    KcsA constitutes a potassium channel of known structure that shows both high conduction rates and selectivity among monovalent cations. A kinetic model for ion conduction through this channel that assumes rapid ion transport within the filter has recently been presented by Nelson. In a recent, brief communication, we used the model to provide preliminary explanations to the experimental current-voltage J-V and conductance-concentration g-S curves obtained for a series of monovalent ions (K(+),Tl(+), and Rb(+)). We did not assume rapid ion transport in the calculations, since ion transport within the selectivity filter could be rate limiting for ions other than native K(+). This previous work is now significantly extended to the following experimental problems. First, the outward rectification of the J-V curves in K(+) symmetrical solutions is analyzed using a generalized kinetic model. Second, the J-V and g-S curves for NH(4) (+) are obtained and compared with those of other ions (the NH(4) (+) J-V curve is qualitatively different from those of Rb(+) and Tl(+)). Third, the effects of Na(+) block on K(+) and Rb(+) currents through single KcsA channels are studied and the different blocking behavior is related to the values of the translocation rate constants characteristic of ion transport within the filter. Finally, the significantly decreased K(+) conductance caused by mutation of the wild-type channel is also explained in terms of this rate constant. In order to keep the number of model parameters to a minimum, we do not allow the electrical distance (an empirical parameter of kinetic models that controls the exponential voltage dependence of the dissociation rate) to vary with the ionic species. Without introducing the relatively high number of adjustable parameters of more comprehensive site-based models, we show that ion association to the filter is rate controlling at low concentrations, but ion dissociation from the filter and ion transport within the filter

  15. Kinetic modeling of ion conduction in KcsA potassium channel.

    PubMed

    Mafé, Salvador; Pellicer, Julio; Cervera, Javier

    2005-05-22

    KcsA constitutes a potassium channel of known structure that shows both high conduction rates and selectivity among monovalent cations. A kinetic model for ion conduction through this channel that assumes rapid ion transport within the filter has recently been presented by Nelson. In a recent, brief communication, we used the model to provide preliminary explanations to the experimental current-voltage J-V and conductance-concentration g-S curves obtained for a series of monovalent ions (K(+),Tl(+), and Rb(+)). We did not assume rapid ion transport in the calculations, since ion transport within the selectivity filter could be rate limiting for ions other than native K(+). This previous work is now significantly extended to the following experimental problems. First, the outward rectification of the J-V curves in K(+) symmetrical solutions is analyzed using a generalized kinetic model. Second, the J-V and g-S curves for NH(4) (+) are obtained and compared with those of other ions (the NH(4) (+) J-V curve is qualitatively different from those of Rb(+) and Tl(+)). Third, the effects of Na(+) block on K(+) and Rb(+) currents through single KcsA channels are studied and the different blocking behavior is related to the values of the translocation rate constants characteristic of ion transport within the filter. Finally, the significantly decreased K(+) conductance caused by mutation of the wild-type channel is also explained in terms of this rate constant. In order to keep the number of model parameters to a minimum, we do not allow the electrical distance (an empirical parameter of kinetic models that controls the exponential voltage dependence of the dissociation rate) to vary with the ionic species. Without introducing the relatively high number of adjustable parameters of more comprehensive site-based models, we show that ion association to the filter is rate controlling at low concentrations, but ion dissociation from the filter and ion transport within the filter

  16. Characterization of the potassium channels involved in EDHF-mediated relaxation in cerebral arteries

    PubMed Central

    Petersson, Jesper; Zygmunt, Peter M; Högestätt, Edward D

    1997-01-01

    In the presence of NG-nitro-L-arginine (L-NOARG, 0.3 mM) and indomethacin (10 μM), the relaxations induced by acetylcholine and the calcium (Ca) ionophore A23187 are considered to be mediated by endothelium-derived hyperpolarizing factor (EDHF) in the guinea-pig basilar artery.Inhibitors of adenosine 5′-triphosphate (ATP)-sensitive potassium (K)-channels (KATP; glibenclamide, 10 μM), voltage-sensitive K-channels (KV; dendrotoxin-I, 0.1 μM or 4-aminopyridine, 1 mM), small (SKCa; apamin, 0.1 μM) and large (BKCa; iberiotoxin, 0.1 μM) conductance Ca-sensitive K-channels did not affect the L-NOARG/indomethacin-resistant relaxation induced by acetylcholine.Synthetic charybdotoxin (0.1 μM), an inhibitor of BKCa and KV, caused a rightward shift of the concentration-response curve for acetylcholine and reduced the maximal relaxation in the presence of L-NOARG and indomethacin, whereas the relaxation induced by A23187 was not significantly inhibited.A combination of charybdotoxin (0.1 μM) and apamin (0.1 μM) abolished the L-NOARG/indomethacin-resistant relaxations induced by acetylcholine and A23187. However, the acetylcholine-induced relaxation was not affected by a combination of iberiotoxin (0.1 μM) and apamin (0.1 μM).Ciclazindol (10 μM), an inhibitor of KV in rat portal vein smooth muscle, inhibited the L-NOARG/indomethacin-resistant relaxations induced by acetylcholine and A23187, and the relaxations were abolished when ciclazindol (10 μM) was combined with apamin (0.1 μM).Human pial arteries from two out of four patients displayed an L-NOARG/indomethacin-resistant relaxation in response to substance P. This relaxation was abolished in both cases by pretreatment with the combination of charybdotoxin (0.1 μM) and apamin (0.1 μM), whereas each toxin had little effect alone.The results suggest that KV, but not KATP and BKCa, is involved in the EDHF-mediated relaxation in the guinea-pig basilar artery. The synergistic

  17. MicroRNA-Mediated Downregulation of the Potassium Channel Kv4.2 Contributes to Seizure Onset.

    PubMed

    Gross, Christina; Yao, Xiaodi; Engel, Tobias; Tiwari, Durgesh; Xing, Lei; Rowley, Shane; Danielson, Scott W; Thomas, Kristen T; Jimenez-Mateos, Eva M; Schroeder, Lindsay M; Pun, Raymund Y K; Danzer, Steve C; Henshall, David C; Bassell, Gary J

    2016-09-27

    Seizures are bursts of excessive synchronized neuronal activity, suggesting that mechanisms controlling brain excitability are compromised. The voltage-gated potassium channel Kv4.2, a major mediator of hyperpolarizing A-type currents in the brain, is a crucial regulator of neuronal excitability. Kv4.2 expression levels are reduced following seizures and in epilepsy, but the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. Here, we report that Kv4.2 mRNA is recruited to the RNA-induced silencing complex shortly after status epilepticus in mice and after kainic acid treatment of hippocampal neurons, coincident with reduction of Kv4.2 protein. We show that the microRNA miR-324-5p inhibits Kv4.2 protein expression and that antagonizing miR-324-5p is neuroprotective and seizure suppressive. MiR-324-5p inhibition also blocks kainic-acid-induced reduction of Kv4.2 protein in vitro and in vivo and delays kainic-acid-induced seizure onset in wild-type but not in Kcnd2 knockout mice. These results reveal an important role for miR-324-5p-mediated silencing of Kv4.2 in seizure onset. PMID:27681419

  18. Atypical antipsychotics: from potassium channels to torsade de pointes and sudden death.

    PubMed

    Titier, Karine; Girodet, Pierre-Olivier; Verdoux, Hélène; Molimard, Mathieu; Bégaud, Bernard; Haverkamp, Wilhelm; Lader, Malcolm; Moore, Nicholas

    2005-01-01

    Syncope and sudden death are features of schizophrenia that can be attributed to ischaemic heart disease, the use of antipsychotics (because of proarrhythmia or other reasons such as pharyngeal dyskinesia) or the psychiatric disease itself. Cases have been described with most antipsychotics and have led to the withdrawal, temporary suspension from the market or restricted use of antipsychotics, such as sultopride, droperidol, sertindole or thioridazine. Reviewing the available data shows that all antipsychotics tested affect the cardiac potassium channel, with the concentration that produces 50% inhibition (IC50) ranging from 1 nmol/L (haloperidol) to 6 micromol/L (olanzapine). Experimental in vitro or in vivo electrophysiological studies have shown a dose-dependent increase in the duration of the action potential with various degrees of indicators of serious arrhythmogenicity. However, this does not always translate clinically into an increased duration of the QT interval or increased risk of torsade de pointes or sudden death in clinical trials or pharmacoepidemiological studies. In turn, QT prolongation in clinical trials does not always translate to an increased risk of torsade de pointes or sudden death. The reasons for these apparent discrepancies are unclear and could be related to insufficiently powered field studies, low plasma and tissue drug concentrations with reference to in vitro data or drug effects on other receptors or ion channels that have a protective effect. Alternatively, risks that were not apparent from preclinical or clinical data could be related to the use of the drug in high-risk patients, metabolic interactions or other factors that would only be encountered in large postmarketing populations. The assessment of cardiovascular safety, both preclinical and during premarketing clinical trials, needs to be supported by appropriately powered pharmacoepidemiology studies.

  19. hERG1 Potassium Channels: Novel Biomarkers in Human Solid Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Lastraioli, Elena; Lottini, Tiziano; Bencini, Lapo; Bernini, Marco; Arcangeli, Annarosa

    2015-01-01

    Because of their high incidence and mortality solid cancers are a major health problem worldwide. Although several new biomarkers and potential targets for therapy have been identified through biomolecular research in the last years, the effects on patients' outcome are still unsatisfactory. Increasing evidence indicates that hERG1 potassium channels are overexpressed in human primary cancers of different origin and several associations between hERG1 expression and clinicopathological features and/or outcome are emerging. Aberrant hERG1 expression may be exploited either for early diagnosis (especially in those cancers where it is expressed in the initial steps of tumor progression) or for therapy purposes. Indeed, hERG1 blockage impairs tumor cell growth both in vitro and in vivo in preclinical mouse model. hERG1-based tumor therapy in humans, however, encounters the major hindrance of the potential cardiotoxicity that many hERG1 blockers exert. In this review we focus on recent advances in translational research in some of the most frequent human solid cancers (breast, endometrium, ovary, pancreas, esophagus, stomach, and colorectum) that have been shown to express hERG1 and that are a major health problem. PMID:26339650

  20. Voltage-gated potassium channels autoantibodies in a child with rasmussen encephalitis.

    PubMed

    Spitz, Marie-Aude; Dubois-Teklali, Fanny; Vercueil, Laurent; Sabourdy, Cécile; Nugues, Frédérique; Vincent, Angela; Oliver, Viviana; Bulteau, Christine

    2014-10-01

    Rasmussen encephalitis (RE) is a severe epileptic and inflammatory encephalopathy of unknown etiology, responsible for focal neurological signs and cognitive decline. The current leading hypothesis suggests a sequence of immune reactions induced by an indeterminate factor. This sequence is thought to be responsible for the production of autoantibody-mediated central nervous system degeneration. However, these autoantibodies are not specific to the disease and not all patients present with them. We report the case of a 4-year-old girl suffering from RE displaying some atypical features such as fast evolution and seizures of left parietal onset refractory to several antiepileptics, intravenous immunoglobulins, and corticosteroids. Serum autoantibodies directed against voltage-gated potassium channels (VGKC) were evidenced at 739 pM, a finding never previously reported in children. This screening was performed because of an increased signal in the temporolimbic areas on brain magnetic resonance imaging, which was similar to what is observed during limbic encephalitis. The patient experienced epilepsia partialis continua with progressive right hemiplegia and aphasia. She underwent left hemispherotomy at the age of 5.5 years after which she became seizure free with great cognitive improvement. First described in adults, VGKC autoantibodies have been recently described in children with various neurological manifestations. The implication of VGKC autoantibodies in RE is a new observation and opens up new physiopathological and therapeutic avenues of investigation.

  1. Molecular characterization of a gene affecting potassium channels in Drosophila melanogaster

    SciTech Connect

    Drysdale, R.A.

    1988-01-01

    This study describes the molecular isolation and characterization of the ether-a-go-go (eag) gene of Drosophila melanogaster. Electrophysiological and genetic evidence suggest that the product of the eag locus is intimately involved in the normal functioning of voltage-gated potassium channels. A molecular analysis of eag was undertaken in order to elucidate the contribution of eag{sup +} to the proper operation of the nervous system. An inverted chromosome, In(1)sc{sup 29}, broken in the scute complex and in the eag locus, was used to isolate DNA from the eag region. 85kb of DNA around this starting point were isolated by chromosome waling. Analysis of the corresponding genomic DNA identified the molecular lesions associated with three additional eag allels: two dysgeneis-induced insertion mutations and a lambda-ray-induced insertional translocation. The molecular defects associated with these alleles are spread throughout 27kb within the chromosome walk. Several cDNAs have been isolated on the basis of homology to parts of the chromosome walk. One of these is multiply spliced over 32kb of genomic DNA in a pattern that strongly suggests that it represents at least part of the eag message.

  2. Pungent agents from Szechuan peppers excite sensory neurons by inhibiting two-pore potassium channels.

    PubMed

    Bautista, Diana M; Sigal, Yaron M; Milstein, Aaron D; Garrison, Jennifer L; Zorn, Julie A; Tsuruda, Pamela R; Nicoll, Roger A; Julius, David

    2008-07-01

    In traditional folk medicine, Xanthoxylum plants are referred to as 'toothache trees' because their anesthetic or counter-irritant properties render them useful in the treatment of pain. Psychophysical studies have identified hydroxy-alpha-sanshool as the compound most responsible for the unique tingling and buzzing sensations produced by Szechuan peppercorns or other Xanthoxylum preparations. Although it is generally agreed that sanshool elicits its effects by activating somatosensory neurons, the underlying cellular and molecular mechanisms remain a matter of debate. Here we show that hydroxy-alpha-sanshool excites two types of sensory neurons, including small-diameter unmyelinated cells that respond to capsaicin (but not mustard oil) as well as large-diameter myelinated neurons that express the neurotrophin receptor TrkC. We found that hydroxy-alpha-sanshool excites neurons through a unique mechanism involving inhibition of pH- and anesthetic-sensitive two-pore potassium channels (KCNK3, KCNK9 and KCNK18), providing a framework for understanding the unique and complex psychophysical sensations associated with the Szechuan pepper experience.

  3. ATP-sensitive potassium channel modulators and cardiac arrhythmias: an update.

    PubMed

    Muntean, Danina M; Kiss, Loránd; Jost, Norbert; Baczko, István

    2015-01-01

    Ischemia and heart failure-related cardiac arrhythmias, both atrial (e.g., atrial fibrillation) and ventricular (e.g., malignant tachyarrhythmias) represent a leading cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Despite the progress made in the last decade in understanding their pathophysiological mechanisms there is still an unmet need for safer and more efficacious pharmacological treatment, especially when considering the drawbacks and complications of implantable devices. Cardiac ATP-sensitive potassium channels located in the sarcolemmal membrane (sarcKATP) and the inner mitochondrial membrane (mitoKATP) have emerged as crucial controllers of several key cellular functions. In the past three decades a tremendous amount of research led to their structural and functional characterization unveiling both a protective role in cardiac adaptive responses to metabolic stress and a seemingly paradoxical role in promoting as well as protecting against atrial and ventricular arrhythmias. On the other hand, several KATP inhibitors have emerged as potential ischemia selective antiarrhythmic drugs. In this respect, cardioselective, chamber specific and combined sarcKATP and mitoKATP modulators currently represent a promising field for drug development.

  4. A geometric understanding of how fast activating potassium channels promote bursting in pituitary cells.

    PubMed

    Vo, Theodore; Tabak, Joël; Bertram, Richard; Wechselberger, Martin

    2014-04-01

    The electrical activity of endocrine pituitary cells is mediated by a plethora of ionic currents and establishing the role of a single channel type is difficult. Experimental observations have shown however that fast-activating voltage- and calcium-dependent potassium (BK) current tends to promote bursting in pituitary cells. This burst promoting effect requires fast activation of the BK current, otherwise it is inhibitory to bursting. In this work, we analyze a pituitary cell model in order to answer the question of why the BK activation must be fast to promote bursting. We also examine how the interplay between the activation rate and conductance of the BK current shapes the bursting activity. We use the multiple timescale structure of the model to our advantage and employ geometric singular perturbation theory to demonstrate the origin of the bursting behaviour. In particular, we show that the bursting can arise from either canard dynamics or slow passage through a dynamic Hopf bifurcation. We then compare our theoretical predictions with experimental data using the dynamic clamp technique and find that the data is consistent with a burst mechanism due to a slow passage through a Hopf. PMID:23820858

  5. SKF-96365 blocks human ether-à-go-go-related gene potassium channels stably expressed in HEK 293 cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hui; Yang, Lei; Chen, Kui-Hao; Sun, Hai-Ying; Jin, Man-Wen; Xiao, Guo-Sheng; Wang, Yan; Li, Gui-Rong

    2016-02-01

    SKF-96365 is a TRPC channel antagonist commonly used to characterize the potential functions of TRPC channels in different systems, which was recently reported to induce QTc prolongation on ECG by inhibiting TRPC channels. The present study investigates whether the blockade of cardiac repolarization currents would be involved in the increase of QTc interval. Cardiac repolarization currents were recorded in HEK 293 cells stably expressing human ether-à-go-go-related gene potassium (hERG or hKv11.1) channels, hKCNQ1/hKCNE1 channels (IKs) or hKir2.1 channels and cardiac action potentials were recorded in guinea pig ventricular myocytes using a whole-cell patch technique. The potential effect of SKF-96365 on QT interval was evaluated in ex vivo guinea pig hearts. It was found that SKF-96365 inhibited hERG current in a concentration-dependent manner (IC50, 3.4μM). The hERG mutants S631A in the pore helix and F656V of the S6 region reduced the inhibitory sensitivity with IC50s of 27.4μM and 11.0μM, suggesting a channel pore blocker. In addition, this compound inhibited IKs and hKir2.1currents with IC50s of 10.8 and 8.7μM. SKF-96365 (10μM) significantly prolonged ventricular APD90 in guinea pig ventricular myocytes and QTc interval in ex vivo guinea pig hearts. These results indicate that the TRPC channel antagonist SKF-96365 exerts blocking effects on hERG, IKs, and hKir2.1 channels. Prolongation of ventricular APD and QT interval is related to the inhibition of multiple repolarization potassium currents, especially hERG channels. PMID:26689773

  6. Mechanism of inhibition of mouse Slo3 (KCa5.1) potassium channels by quinine, quinidine and barium

    PubMed Central

    Wrighton, David C; Muench, Stephen P; Lippiat, Jonathan D

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose The Slo3 (KCa5.1) channel is a major component of mammalian KSper (sperm potassium conductance) channels and inhibition of these channels by quinine and barium alters sperm motility. The aim of this investigation was to determine the mechanism by which these drugs inhibit Slo3 channels. Experimental Approach Mouse (m) Slo3 (KCa5.1) channels or mutant forms were expressed in Xenopus oocytes and currents recorded with 2-electrode voltage-clamp. Gain-of-function mSlo3 mutations were used to explore the state-dependence of the inhibition. The interaction between quinidine and mSlo3 channels was modelled by in silico docking. Key Results Several drugs known to block KSper also affected mSlo3 channels with similar levels of inhibition. The inhibition induced by extracellular barium was prevented by increasing the extracellular potassium concentration. R196Q and F304Y mutations in the mSlo3 voltage sensor and pore, respectively, both increased channel activity. The F304Y mutation did not alter the effects of barium, but increased the potency of inhibition by both quinine and quinidine approximately 10-fold; this effect was not observed with the R196Q mutation. Conclusions and Implications Block of mSlo3 channels by quinine, quinidine and barium is not state-dependent. Barium inhibits mSlo3 outside the cell by interacting with the selectivity filter, whereas quinine and quinidine act from the inside, by binding in a hydrophobic pocket formed by the S6 segment of each subunit. Furthermore, we propose that the Slo3 channel activation gate lies deep within the pore between F304 in the S6 segment and the selectivity filter. PMID:26045093

  7. Delineation of the clotrimazole/TRAM-34 binding site on the intermediate conductance calcium-activated potassium channel, IKCa1.

    PubMed

    Wulff, H; Gutman, G A; Cahalan, M D; Chandy, K G

    2001-08-24

    Selective and potent triarylmethane blockers of the intermediate conductance calcium-activated potassium channel, IKCa1, have therapeutic use in sickle cell disease and secretory diarrhea and as immunosuppressants. Clotrimazole, a membrane-permeant triarylmethane, blocked IKCa1 with equal affinity when applied externally or internally, whereas a membrane-impermeant derivative TRAM-30 blocked the channel only when applied to the cytoplasmic side, indicating an internal drug-binding site. Introduction of the S5-P-S6 region of the triarylmethane-insensitive small conductance calcium-activated potassium channel SKCa3 into IKCa1 rendered the channel resistant to triarylmethanes. Replacement of Thr(250) or Val(275) in IKCa1 with the corresponding SKCa3 residues selectively abolished triarylmethane sensitivity without affecting the affinity of the channel for tetraethylammonium, charybdotoxin, and nifedipine. Introduction of these two residues into SKCa3 rendered the channel sensitive to triarylmethanes. In a molecular model of IKCa1, Thr(250) and Val(275) line a water-filled cavity just below the selectivity filter. Structure-activity studies suggest that the side chain methyl groups of Thr(250) and Val(275) may lock the triarylmethanes in place via hydrophobic interactions with the pi-electron clouds of the phenyl rings. The heterocyclic moiety may project into the selectivity filter and obstruct the ion-conducting pathway from the inside.

  8. [Effects of beta-cypermethrin on voltage-gated potassium channels in rat hippocampal CA3 neurons].

    PubMed

    Fu, Zhi-Yan; DU, Chun-Yun; Yao, Yang; Liu, Chao-Wei; Tian, Yu-Tao; He, Bing-Jun; Zhang, Tao; Yang, Zhuo

    2007-02-25

    The effects of beta-cypermethrin (consisting of alpha-cypermethrin and theta-cypermethrin) on the transient outward potassium current (I(A)) and delayed rectifier potassium current (I(K)) in freshly dissociated hippocampal CA3 neurons of rats were studied using whole-cell patch-clamp technique. The results indicated that alpha-cypermethrin increased the value of I(A) and theta-cypermethrin decreased the value of I(A), though both of them shifted steady activation curve of I(A) towards negative potential. theta-cypermethrin contributed to the inactivation of I(A). The results also showed that alpha-cypermethrin and theta-cypermethrin decreased the value of I(K), and shifted the steady state activation curve of I(K) towards negative potential. Both alpha-cypermethrin and theta-cypermethrin had no obvious effects on the inactivation of I(K). theta-cypermethrin prolonged recovery process of I(K). These results imply that both transient outward potassium channels and delayed rectified potassium channels are the targets of beta-cypermethrin, which may explain the mechanism of toxical effects of beta-cypermethrin on mammalian neurons.

  9. Inhibition of human ether-a-go-go-related gene potassium channels by alpha 1-adrenoceptor antagonists prazosin, doxazosin, and terazosin.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Dierk; Wimmer, Anna-Britt; Wu, Kezhong; Hammerling, Bettina C; Ficker, Eckhard K; Kuryshev, Yuri A; Kiehn, Johann; Katus, Hugo A; Schoels, Wolfgang; Karle, Christoph A

    2004-05-01

    Human ether-a-go-go-related gene (HERG) potassium channels are expressed in multiple tissues including the heart and adenocarcinomas. In cardiomyocytes, HERG encodes the alpha-subunit underlying the rapid component of the delayed rectifier potassium current, I(Kr), and pharmacological reduction of HERG currents may cause acquired long QT syndrome. In addition, HERG currents have been shown to be involved in the regulation of cell proliferation and apoptosis. Selective alpha 1-adrenoceptor antagonists are commonly used in the treatment of hypertension and benign prostatic hyperplasia. Recently, doxazosin has been associated with an increased risk of heart failure. Moreover, quinazoline-derived alpha 1-inhibitors induce apoptosis in cardiomyocytes and prostate tumor cells independently of alpha1-adrenoceptor blockade. To assess the action of the effects of prazosin, doxazosin, and terazosin on HERG currents, we investigated their acute electrophysiological effects on cloned HERG potassium channels heterologously expressed in Xenopus oocytes and HEK 293 cells.Prazosin, doxazosin, and terazosin blocked HERG currents in Xenopus oocytes with IC(50) values of 10.1, 18.2, and 113.2 microM respectively, whereas the IC(50) values for HERG channel inhibition in human HEK 293 cells were 1.57 microM, 585.1 nM, and 17.7 microM. Detailed biophysical studies revealed that inhibition by the prototype alpha 1-blocker prazosin occurred in closed, open, and inactivated channels. Analysis of the voltage-dependence of block displayed a reduction of inhibition at positive membrane potentials. Frequency-dependence was not observed. Prazosin caused a negative shift in the voltage-dependence of both activation (-3.8 mV) and inactivation (-9.4 mV). The S6 mutations Y652A and F656A partially attenuated (Y652A) or abolished (F656A) HERG current blockade, indicating that prazosin binds to a common drug receptor within the pore-S6 region. In conclusion, this study demonstrates that HERG

  10. Substrate Channel in Nitrogenase Revealed by a Molecular Dynamics Approach

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Dayle; Danyal, Karamatullah; Raugei, Simone; Seefeldt, Lance C.

    2014-03-22

    Mo-dependent nitrogenase catalyzes the biological reduction of N2 to 2NH3 at the FeMo-cofactor buried deep inside the MoFe protein. Access of substrates, such as N2, to the active site is likely restricted by the surrounding protein, requiring substrate channels that lead from the surface to the active site. Earlier studies on crystallographic structures of the MoFe protein have suggested three putative substrate channels. Here, we have utilized sub-microsecond atomistic molecular dynamics simulations to allow the nitrogenase MoFe protein to explore its conformational space in an aqueous solution at physiological ionic strength, revealing a putative substrate channel not previously reported. The viability of the proposed channel was tested by examining the free energy of passage of N2 from the surface through the channel to FeMo-cofactor, with discovery of a very low energy barrier. These studies point to a viable substrate channel in nitrogenase that appears during thermal motions of the protein in an aqueous environment that approaches a face of FeMo-cofactor earlier implicated in substrate binding.

  11. Solid-state NMR study and assignments of the KcsA potassium ion channel of S. lividans.

    PubMed

    Varga, Krisztina; Tian, Lin; McDermott, Ann E

    2007-12-01

    The extraordinary efficiency and selectivity of potassium channels have made them ideal systems for biophysical and functional studies of ion conduction. We carried out solid-state NMR studies of the selectivity filter region of the protein. Partial site-specific assignments of the NMR signals were obtained based on high field multidimensional solid-state NMR spectra of uniformly (13)C, (15)N enriched KcsA potassium channel from Streptomyces lividans. Both backbone and sidechain atoms were assigned for residues V76-D80 and P83-L90, in and near the selectivity filter region of the protein; this region exhibits good dispersion and useful chemical shift fingerprints. This study will enable structure, dynamic and mechanistic studies of ion conduction by NMR.

  12. Phosphorylation of the mitochondrial ATP-sensitive potassium channel occurs independently of PKCε in turtle brain.

    PubMed

    Hawrysh, Peter John; Miles, Ashley Rebecca; Buck, Leslie Thomas

    2016-10-01

    Neurons from the western painted turtle (Chrysemys picta bellii) are remarkably resilient to anoxia. This is partly due to a reduction in the permeability of excitatory glutamatergic ion channels, initiated by mitochondrial ATP-sensitive K(+) (mK(+)ATP) channel activation. The aim of this study was to determine if: 1) PKCε, a kinase associated with hypoxic stress tolerance, is more highly expressed in turtle brain than the anoxia-intolerant rat brain; 2) PKCε translocates to the mitochondrial membrane during anoxia; 3) PKCε modulates mK(+)ATP channels at the Thr-224 phosphorylation site on the Kir6.2 subunit; and 4) Thr-224 phosphorylation sensitises mK(+)ATP channels to anoxia. Soluble and mitochondrial-rich particulate fractions of turtle and rat cerebral cortex were isolated and PKCε expression was determined by Western blot, which revealed that turtle cortical PKCε expression was half that of the rat. Following the transition to anoxia, no changes in PKCε expression in either the soluble or particulate fraction of the turtle cortex were observed. Furthermore, incubation of tissue with tat-conjugated activator or inhibitor peptides had no effect on the amount of PKCε in either fraction. However, we observed a 2-fold increase in Thr-224 phosphorylation following 1h of anoxia. The increased Thr-224 phosphorylation was blocked by the general kinase inhibitor staurosporine but this did not affect the latency or magnitude of mK(+)ATP channel-mediated mitochondrial depolarization following anoxia, as indicated by rhodamine-123. We conclude that PKCε does not play a role in the onset of mitochondrial depolarization and therefore glutamatergic channel arrest in turtle cerebral cortex.

  13. Phosphorylation of the mitochondrial ATP-sensitive potassium channel occurs independently of PKCε in turtle brain.

    PubMed

    Hawrysh, Peter John; Miles, Ashley Rebecca; Buck, Leslie Thomas

    2016-10-01

    Neurons from the western painted turtle (Chrysemys picta bellii) are remarkably resilient to anoxia. This is partly due to a reduction in the permeability of excitatory glutamatergic ion channels, initiated by mitochondrial ATP-sensitive K(+) (mK(+)ATP) channel activation. The aim of this study was to determine if: 1) PKCε, a kinase associated with hypoxic stress tolerance, is more highly expressed in turtle brain than the anoxia-intolerant rat brain; 2) PKCε translocates to the mitochondrial membrane during anoxia; 3) PKCε modulates mK(+)ATP channels at the Thr-224 phosphorylation site on the Kir6.2 subunit; and 4) Thr-224 phosphorylation sensitises mK(+)ATP channels to anoxia. Soluble and mitochondrial-rich particulate fractions of turtle and rat cerebral cortex were isolated and PKCε expression was determined by Western blot, which revealed that turtle cortical PKCε expression was half that of the rat. Following the transition to anoxia, no changes in PKCε expression in either the soluble or particulate fraction of the turtle cortex were observed. Furthermore, incubation of tissue with tat-conjugated activator or inhibitor peptides had no effect on the amount of PKCε in either fraction. However, we observed a 2-fold increase in Thr-224 phosphorylation following 1h of anoxia. The increased Thr-224 phosphorylation was blocked by the general kinase inhibitor staurosporine but this did not affect the latency or magnitude of mK(+)ATP channel-mediated mitochondrial depolarization following anoxia, as indicated by rhodamine-123. We conclude that PKCε does not play a role in the onset of mitochondrial depolarization and therefore glutamatergic channel arrest in turtle cerebral cortex. PMID:27280321

  14. The effect of the potassium channel activator, cromakalim, on antidepressant drugs in the forced swimming test in mice.

    PubMed

    Redrobe, J P; Pinot, P; Bourin, M

    1996-01-01

    The forced swimming test (FST) is a widely used behavioural model to predict potential antidepressant (AD) action of compounds in humans. It has been previously shown that pretreatment with lithium, quinine and clonidine had additive effects on AD drugs in the FST, an effect proposed to be a result of potassium channel blockade. It is possible that pretreatment with potassium channel openers may induce opposite effects to those seen following pretreatment with potassium channel blockers in the FST. Pretreatment with cromakalim (CROM) (1 mg/kg, intraperitoneally [i.p.]) antagonized the anti-immobility effect of the mixed noradrenaline (NA)/5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) reuptake inhibitors imipramine and amitriptyline (P < 0.05). CROM administration (0.06 and 1 mg/kg, i.p.) also blocked the AD-like effects of the specific NA reuptake inhibitor, desipramine, and the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor, paroxetine (P < 0.05 and P < 0.01, respectively). Pretreatment with CROM via gavage (1 mg/kg) antagonized the AD-like effects of imipramine, amitiptyline, desipramine and paroxetine. CROM treatment (via i.p. route or gavage) did not have any significant effect on the anti-immobility activity of the atypical AD mianserin at any of the doses employed. Another potassium channel opener, minoxidil (MINOX), which does not cross the blood-brain barrier, was also tested to eliminate the possibility that CROM may be acting via peripheral/local mechanisms. MINOX (32 mg/kg) failed to antagonize anti-immobility effects of any of the AD tested. In conclusion, the results of the present study suggest that CROM is only acting on drugs involved with neurotransmitter uptake inhibition.

  15. Potassium channel openers increase aortic elastic fiber formation and reverse the genetically determined elastin deficit in the BN rat.

    PubMed

    Slove, Séverin; Lannoy, Morgane; Behmoaras, Jacques; Pezet, Mylène; Sloboda, Natacha; Lacolley, Patrick; Escoubet, Brigitte; Buján, Julia; Jacob, Marie-Paule

    2013-10-01

    Hypertension is a cardiovascular disorder that appears in more than half of the patients with Williams-Beuren syndrome, hemizygous for the elastin gene among 26 to 28 other genes. It was shown that the antihypertensive drug minoxidil, an ATP-dependent potassium channel opener, enhances elastic fiber formation; however, no wide clinical application was developed because of its adverse side effects. The Brown Norway rat was used here as an arterial elastin-deficient model. We tested 3 different potassium channel openers, minoxidil, diazoxide, and pinacidil, and 1 potassium channel blocker, glibenclamide, on cultured smooth muscle cells from Brown Norway rat aorta. All tested potassium channel openers increased mRNAs encoding proteins and enzymes involved in elastic fiber formation, whereas glibenclamide had the opposite effect. The higher steady-state level of tropoelastin mRNA in minoxidil-treated cells was attributable to an increase in both transcription and mRNA stability. Treatment of Brown Norway rats for 10 weeks with minoxidil or diazoxide increased elastic fiber content and decreased cell number in the aortic media, without changing collagen content. The minoxidil-induced cardiac hypertrophy was reduced when animals simultaneously received irbesartan, an angiotensin II-receptor antagonist. This side effect of minoxidil was not observed in diazoxide-treated animals. In conclusion, diazoxide, causing less undesirable side effects than minoxidil, or coadministration of minoxidil and irbesartan, increases elastic fiber content, decreases cell number in the aorta and, thus, could be suitable for treating vascular pathologies characterized by diminished arterial elastin content and simultaneous hypertension. PMID:23918751

  16. Integrin-mediated neurite outgrowth in neuroblastoma cells depends on the activation of potassium channels

    PubMed Central

    1993-01-01

    Electrical signals elicited by integrin interaction with ECM components and their role in neurite outgrowth were studied in two clones (N1 and N7) isolated from 41A3 murine neuroblastoma cell line. Although the two clones similarly adhered to fibronectin (FN) and vitronectin (VN), this adhesion induced neurite outgrowth in N1 but not in N7 cells. Patch clamp recordings in whole cell configuration showed that, upon adhesion to FN or VN but not to platelet factor 4 (PF4), N1 cells undergo a marked (approximately equal to 20 mV) hyperpolarization of the resting potential (Vrest) that occurred within the first 20 min after cell contact with ECM, and persisted for approximately 1 h before reverting to the time zero values. This hyperpolarization was totally absent in N7 cells. A detailed analysis of the molecular mechanisms involved in N1 and N7 cell adhesion to ECM substrata was performed by using antibodies raised against the FN receptor and synthetic peptides variously competing with the FN or VN binding to integrin receptor (GRGDSP and GRGESP). Antibodies, as well as GRGDSP, abolished adhesion of N1 and N7 clones to FN and VN, revealing a similar implication of integrins in the adhesion of these clones to the ECM proteins. However, these anti-adhesive treatments, while ineffective on Vrest of N7 cells, abolished in N1 cells the FN- or VN-induced hyperpolarization and neurite outgrowth, that appeared therefore strictly associated and integrin-mediated phenomena. The nature of this association was deepened through a comparative analysis of the integrin profiles and the ion channels of N1 and N7 cells. The integrin immunoprecipitation profile resulted very similarly in the two clones, with only minor differences concerning the alpha V containing complexes. Both clones possessed Ca2+ and K+ delayed rectifier (KDR) channels, while only N1 cells were endowed with inward rectifier K+ (KIR) channels. The latter governed the Vrest, and, unlike KDR channels, were blocked by

  17. Activation of human ether-a-go-go related gene (hERG) potassium channels by small molecules

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Ping-zheng; Babcock, Joseph; Liu, Lian-qing; Li, Min; Gao, Zhao-bing

    2011-01-01

    Human ether-a-go-go related gene (hERG) potassium (K+) channels play a critical role in cardiac action potential repolarization. Mutations that reduce hERG conductance or surface expression may cause congenital long QT syndrome (LQTS). However, the channels can be inhibited by structurally diverse small molecules, resulting in an acquired form of LQTS. Consequently, small molecules that increase the hERG current may be of value for treatment for LQTS. So far, nine hERG activators have been reported. The aim of this review is to discuss recent advances concerning the identification and action mechanism of hERG activators. PMID:21623390

  18. The role of ATP-sensitive potassium channels in cellular function and protection in the cardiovascular system.

    PubMed

    Tinker, Andrew; Aziz, Qadeer; Thomas, Alison

    2014-01-01

    ATP-sensitive potassium channels (K(ATP)) are widely distributed and present in a number of tissues including muscle, pancreatic beta cells and the brain. Their activity is regulated by adenine nucleotides, characteristically being activated by falling ATP and rising ADP levels. Thus, they link cellular metabolism with membrane excitability. Recent studies using genetically modified mice and genomic studies in patients have implicated K(ATP) channels in a number of physiological and pathological processes. In this review, we focus on their role in cellular function and protection particularly in the cardiovascular system.

  19. Solution structure of Phrixotoxin 1, a specific peptide inhibitor of Kv4 potassium channels from the venom of the theraphosid spider Phrixotrichus auratus

    PubMed Central

    Chagot, Benjamin; Escoubas, Pierre; Villegas, Elba; Bernard, Cédric; Ferrat, Gilles; Corzo, Gerardo; Lazdunski, Michel; Darbon, Hervé

    2004-01-01

    Animal toxins block voltage-dependent potassium channels (Kv) either by occluding the conduction pore (pore blockers) or by modifying the channel gating properties (gating modifiers). Gating modifiers of Kv channels bind to four equivalent extracellular sites near the S3 and S4 segments, close to the voltage sensor. Phrixotoxins are gating modifiers that bind preferentially to the closed state of the channel and fold into the Inhibitory Cystine Knot structural motif. We have solved the solution structure of Phrixotoxin 1, a gating modifier of Kv4 potassium channels. Analysis of the molecular surface and the electrostatic anisotropy of Phrixotoxin 1 and of other toxins acting on voltage-dependent potassium channels allowed us to propose a toxin interacting surface that encompasses both the surface from which the dipole moment emerges and a neighboring hydrophobic surface rich in aromatic residues. PMID:15096626

  20. Interactions of anionic phospholipids and phosphatidylethanolamine with the potassium channel KcsA.

    PubMed

    Alvis, Simon J; Williamson, Ian M; East, J Malcolm; Lee, Anthony G

    2003-12-01

    Fluorescence quenching methods have been used to study interactions of anionic phospholipids with the potassium channel KcsA from Streptomyces lividans. Quenching of the Trp fluorescence of KcsA reconstituted into mixtures of dioleoylphosphatidylcholine (DOPC) and an anionic phospholipid with dibromostearoyl chains is more marked at low mole fractions of the brominated anionic phospholipid than is quenching in mixtures of dibromostearoylphosphatidylcholine and nonbrominated anionic lipid. The quenching data are consistent with two classes of binding site for lipid on KcsA, one set corresponding to annular binding sites around KcsA to which DOPC and two-chain anionic phospholipids bind with similar affinities, the other set (non-annular sites) corresponding to sites at which anionic phospholipids can bind but from which DOPC is either excluded or binds with very low affinity. The binding constant for tetraoleoylcardiolipin at the annular sites is significantly less than that for DOPC, being comparable to that for dioleoylphosphatidylethanolamine. Tetraoleoylcardiolipin binds with highest affinity to the non-annular sites, the affinity for dioleoylphosphatidylglycerol being the lowest. The affinity for dioleoylphosphatidylserine decreases at high ionic strength, suggesting that electrostatic interactions between the anionic phospholipid headgroup and positively charged residues on KcsA are important for binding at the non-annular site. The effect of ionic strength on the binding of phosphatidic acid is less marked than on phosphatidylserine. The value of the binding constant for the non-annular site depends on the extent of Trp fluorescence quenching following from binding at the non-annular site. It is suggested that the non-annular site to which binding is detected in the fluorescence quenching experiments corresponds to the binding site for phosphatidylglycerol detected at monomer-monomer interfaces in x-ray diffraction studies. PMID:14645072

  1. Functional coupling between sodium-activated potassium channels and voltage-dependent persistent sodium currents in cricket Kenyon cells

    PubMed Central

    Takahashi, Izumi

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we examined the functional coupling between Na+-activated potassium (KNa) channels and Na+ influx through voltage-dependent Na+ channels in Kenyon cells isolated from the mushroom body of the cricket Gryllus bimaculatus. Single-channel activity of KNa channels was recorded with the cell-attached patch configuration. The open probability (Po) of KNa channels increased with increasing Na+ concentration in a bath solution, whereas it decreased by the substitution of Na+ with an equimolar concentration of Li+. The Po of KNa channels was also found to be reduced by bath application of a high concentration of TTX (1 μM) and riluzole (100 μM), which inhibits both fast (INaf) and persistent (INaP) Na+ currents, whereas it was unaffected by a low concentration of TTX (10 nM), which selectively blocks INaf. Bath application of Cd2+ at a low concentration (50 μM), as an inhibitor of INaP, also decreased the Po of KNa channels. Conversely, bath application of the inorganic Ca2+-channel blockers Co2+ and Ni2+ at high concentrations (500 μM) had little effect on the Po of KNa channels, although Cd2+ (500 μM) reduced the Po of KNa channels. Perforated whole cell clamp analysis further indicated the presence of sustained outward currents for which amplitude was dependent on the amount of Na+ influx. Taken together, these results indicate that KNa channels could be activated by Na+ influx passing through voltage-dependent persistent Na+ channels. The functional significance of this coupling mechanism was discussed in relation to the membrane excitability of Kenyon cells and its possible role in the formation of long-term memory. PMID:26269549

  2. Evidence for glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor signaling to activate ATP-sensitive potassium channels in pancreatic beta cells.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Hye-Jung; Park, Hyun-Sun; Park, Sung-Hee; Park, Jae-Hyung; Shin, Su-Kyung; Song, Seung Eun; Hwang, Meeyul; Cho, Ho-Chan; Song, Dae-Kyu

    2016-01-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) is a gut peptide that promotes insulin release from pancreatic beta cells. GLP-1 has been shown to confer glucose-insensitive beta cells with glucose sensitivity by modulation of the activity of the ATP-sensitive potassium (KATP) channel. The channel closing effect of GLP-1, interacting with corresponding G-protein-coupled receptors, has been well established; however, to our knowledge, no study has shown whether GLP-1 directly induces activation of beta-cell KATP channels. Here, we aimed to evaluate whether the activation of beta-cell KATP channels by GLP-1 exists and affects intracellular Ca(2+) levels ([Ca(2+)]i). KATP channel activity was measured in isolated rat pancreatic beta cells by whole-cell perforated patch-clamp recordings with a diazoxide-containing pipette solution. Changes in [Ca(2+)]i and the subcellular localization of KATP channels were observed using the calcium-sensitive dye fura-4/AM and anti-Kir6.2 antibodies in INS-1 beta cells, respectively. To eliminate the well-known inhibitory effects of GLP-1 on KATP channel activity, channels were fully inhibited by pretreatment with methyl pyruvate and epigallocatechin-3-gallate. In the pretreated beta cells, GLP-1 and exendin-4 promptly activated the channels, reducing [Ca(2+)]i. The phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) inhibitor LY294002 blocked the effects of GLP-1 on channel activity. Moreover, phosphatidylinositol-3,4,5-trisphosphate mimicked the effects of GLP-1. These results suggested that beta-cell GLP-1 receptor signaling involved activation of KATP channels via a PI3K-dependent pathway. This alternative mechanism of GLP-1 function may act as a negative feedback pathway, modulating the glucose-dependent GLP-1 inhibition on KATP channel activity. PMID:26655814

  3. The min K channel underlies the cardiac potassium current IKs and mediates species-specific responses to protein kinase C.

    PubMed Central

    Varnum, M D; Busch, A E; Bond, C T; Maylie, J; Adelman, J P

    1993-01-01

    A clone encoding the guinea pig (gp) min K potassium channel was isolated and expressed in Xenopus oocytes. The currents, gpIsK, exhibit many of the electrophysiological and pharmacological properties characteristic of gpIKs, the slow component of the delayed rectifier potassium conductance in guinea pig cardiac myocytes. Depolarizing commands evoke outward potassium currents that activate slowly, with time constants on the order of seconds. The currents are blocked by the class III antiarrhythmic compound clofilium but not by the sotalol derivative E4031 or low concentrations of lanthanum. Like IKs in guinea pig myocytes, gpIsK is modulated by stimulation of protein kinase A and protein kinase C (PKC). In contrast to rat and mouse IsK, which are decreased upon stimulation of PKC, myocyte IK and gpIsK in oocytes are increased after PKC stimulation. Substitution of an asparagine residue at position 102 by serine (N102S), the residue found in the analogous position of the mouse and rat min K proteins, results in decreased gpIsK in response to PKC stimulation. These results support the hypothesis that the min K protein underlies the slow component of the delayed rectifier potassium current in ventricular myocytes and account for the species-specific responses to stimulation of PKC. Images Fig. 1 PMID:8265583

  4. Permeant ion effects on the gating kinetics of the type L potassium channel in mouse lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    1991-01-01

    Permeant ion species was found to profoundly affect the gating kinetics of type l K+ currents in mouse T lymphocytes studied with the whole- cell or on-cell patch gigaohm-seal techniques. Replacing external K+ with Rb+ (as the sole monovalent cation, at 160 mM) shifted the peak conductance voltage (g-V) relation by approximately 20 mV to more negative potentials, while NH4+ shifted the g-V curve by 15 mV to more positive potentials. Deactivation (the tail current time constant, tau tail) was slowed by an average of 14-fold at -70 mV in external Rb+, by approximately 8-fold in Cs+, and by a factor of two to three in NH4+. Changing the external K+ concentration, [K+]o, from 4.5 to 160 mM or [Rb+]o from 10 to 160 mM had no effect on tau tail. With all the internal K+ replaced by Rb+ or Cs+ and either isotonic Rb+ or K+ in the bath, tau tail was indistinguishable from that with K+ in the cell. With the exception of NH4+, activation time constants were insensitive to permeant ion species. These results indicate that external permeant ions have stronger effects than internal permeant ions, suggesting an external modulatory site that influences K+ channel gating. However, in bi-ionic experiments with reduced external permeant ion concentrations, tau tail was sensitive to the direction of current flow, indicating that the modulatory site is either within the permeation pathway or in the outer vestibule of the channel. The latter interpretation implies that outward current through an open type l K+ channel significantly alters local ion concentrations at the modulatory site in the outer vestibule, and consequently at the mouth of the channel. Experiments with mixtures of K+ and Rb+ in the external solution reveal that deactivation kinetics are minimally affected by addition of Rb+ until the Rb+ mole fraction approaches unity. This relationship between mole fraction and tau tail, together with the concentration independence of tau tail, was hard to reconcile with simple

  5. Molecular determinants for the tarantula toxin jingzhaotoxin-I interacting with potassium channel Kv2.1.

    PubMed

    Tao, Huai; Wu, Yuanyuan; Deng, Meichun; He, Juan; Wang, Meichi; Xiao, Yucheng; Liang, Songping

    2013-03-01

    With high binding affinity and distinct pharmacological functions, animal toxins are powerful ligands to investigate the structure-function relationships of voltage-gated ion channels. Jingzhaotoxin-I (JZTX-I) is an important neurotoxin from the tarantula Chilobrachys jingzhao venom that inhibits both sodium and potassium channels. In our previous work, JZTX-I, as a gating modifier, is able to inhibit activation of the potassium channel subtype Kv2.1. However, its binding site on Kv2.1 remains unknown. In this study, using Ala-scanning mutagenesis strategy, we demonstrated that four residues (I273, F274, E277, and K280) in S3b-S4 motif contributed to the formation of JZTX-I binding site. The mutations I273A, F274A, E277A, and K280A reduced toxin binding affinity by 6-, 10-, 8-, and 7-fold, respectively. Taken together with our previous data that JZTX-I accelerated channel deactivation, these results suggest that JZTX-I inhibits Kv2.1 activation by docking onto the voltage sensor paddle and trapping the voltage sensor in the closed state. PMID:23246579

  6. Domain organization of the ATP-sensitive potassium channel complex examined by fluorescence resonance energy transfer.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shizhen; Makhina, Elena N; Masia, Ricard; Hyrc, Krzysztof L; Formanack, Mary Lynn; Nichols, Colin G

    2013-02-01

    K(ATP) channels link cell metabolism to excitability in many cells. They are formed as tetramers of Kir6.2 subunits, each associated with a SUR1 subunit. We used mutant GFP-based FRET to assess domain organization in channel complexes. Full-length Kir6.2 subunits were linked to YFP or cyan fluorescent protein (CFP) at N or C termini, and all such constructs, including double-tagged YFP-Kir6.2-CFP (Y6.2C), formed functional K(ATP) channels. In intact COSm6 cells, background emission of YFP excited by 430-nm light was ∼6%, but the Y6.2C construct expressed alone exhibited an apparent FRET efficiency of ∼25%, confirmed by trypsin digestion, with or without SUR1 co-expression. Similar FRET efficiency was detected in mixtures of CFP- and YFP-tagged full-length Kir6.2 subunits and transmembrane domain only constructs, when tagged at the C termini but not at the N termini. The FRET-reported Kir6.2 tetramer domain organization was qualitatively consistent with Kir channel crystal structures: C termini and M2 domains are centrally located relative to N termini and M1 domains, respectively. Additional FRET analyses were performed on cells in which tagged full-length Kir6.2 and tagged SUR1 constructs were co-expressed. These analyses further revealed that 1) NBD1 of SUR1 is closer to the C terminus of Kir6.2 than to the N terminus; 2) the Kir6.2 cytoplasmic domain is not essential for complexation with SUR1; and 3) the N-terminal half of SUR1 can complex with itself in the absence of either the C-terminal half or Kir6.2.

  7. Expression and localization of Kv1 potassium channels in rat dorsal and ventral spinal roots.

    PubMed

    Utsunomiya, Iku; Yoshihashi, Eikichi; Tanabe, Shinya; Nakatani, Yoshihiko; Ikejima, Hideaki; Miyatake, Tadashi; Hoshi, Keiko; Taguchi, Kyoji

    2008-03-01

    We investigated the expression and localization of Kv1 channels in dorsal spinal roots (DRs) and ventral spinal roots (VRs) in rats. Among Kv1.1-1.6 tested by RT-PCR, mRNAs of Kv1.1, 1.2, and 1.5 were moderately expressed, those of Kv1.3 and Kv1.6 were weakly expressed, and that of Kv1.4 was hardly expressed at all in both DRs and VRs, whereas all six mRNAs were detected in spinal cord. Western blotting revealed that the major immunoreactive proteins were Kv1.1 and Kv1.2 in both DRs and VRs. Quantitative analysis indicated that levels of Kv1.1 and Kv1.2 protein were significantly higher in DRs than VRs. Immunohistochemical examination showed that Kv1.1 and Kv1.2 were colocalized in juxtaparanodal regions of axons in both DRs and VRs. Finally, immunoprecipitation experiments revealed that Kv1.1 and Kv1.2 were coassembled. These findings indicate that Kv1 subtypes in DRs and VRs are somewhat different from those in spinal cord, and that the numbers of Kv1.1 and Kv1.2 channels are higher in DRs than VRs. PMID:18053989

  8. Analogs of the sea anemone potassium channel blocker ShK for the treatment of autoimmune diseases.

    PubMed

    Beeton, Christine; Pennington, Michael W; Norton, Raymond S

    2011-10-01

    CCR7- effector memory T (TEM) lymphocytes are involved in autoimmune diseases such as multiple sclerosis, type 1 diabetes mellitus and rheumatoid arthritis. These cells express Kv1.3 potassium channels that play a major role in their activation. Blocking these channels preferentially inhibits the activation of CCR7- TEM cells, with little or no effects on CCR7+ naïve and central memory T cells. Blockers of lymphocyte Kv1.3 channels therefore show considerable potential as therapeutics for autoimmune diseases. ShK, a 35-residue polypeptide isolated from the Caribbean sea anemone Stichodactyla helianthus, blocks Kv1.3 channels at picomolar concentrations. Although ShK was effective in treating rats with delayed type hypersensitivity and a model of multiple sclerosis, it lacks selectivity for Kv1.3 channels over closely-related Kv1 channels. Extensive mutagenesis studies combined with elucidation of the structure of ShK led to models of ShK docked with the channel. This knowledge was valuable in the development of new ShK analogs with improved selectivity and increasing stability, which have proven efficacious in preventing and/or treating animal models of delayed type hypersensitivity, type 1 diabetes, rheumatoid arthritis, and multiple sclerosis without inducing generalized immunosuppression. They are currently undergoing further evaluation as potential immunomodulators for the treatment of autoimmune diseases. PMID:21824083

  9. Calcium-activated potassium channels in cultured human endothelial cells are not directly modulated by nitric oxide.

    PubMed

    Haburcák, M; Wei, L; Viana, F; Prenen, J; Droogmans, G; Nilius, B

    1997-04-01

    Nitric oxide has been proposed to directly activated large conductance Ca(2+)-dependent K+ channels (BKCa) [Bolotina V.M., Najibi S., Palacino J.J., Pagano P.J., Cohen R.A. Nitric oxide directly activates calcium-dependent potassium channels in vascular smooth muscle. Nature 1994; 368: 850-853]. The nitric oxide (NO) donor S-nitrosocysteine (SNOC) was used to evaluate a possible direct modulation of BKCa by NO in EAhy926 (EA cells), a cultured human umbilical vein derived endothelial cell line, using the whole-cell, cell-attached and inside-out configuration of the patch-clamp technique, together with simultaneous amperometric measurement of NO and the concentration of free intracellular calcium [Ca2+]i. BKCa channels with a large conductance of approximately 190 pS, voltage-dependent activation and a reversal potential close to -80 mV have been identified in EA cells. Exposure of EA cells in the experimental chamber to 1 mM SNOC delivered approximately 5 microM NO, as recorded by an amperometric probe in situ. SNOC produced a modest increases in [Ca2+]i that was insufficient to activate BKCa channels. NO alone neither activated BKCa channels directly nor modulated preactivated BKCa channels in EA cells. These results do not support a direct modulatory effect of NO on large conductance BKCa channels in cultured endothelial cells. PMID:9160165

  10. Influence of Thromboxane A2 on the Regulation of Adenosine Triphosphate-Sensitive Potassium Channels in Mouse Ventricular Myocytes

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, In Seok; Cho, Hwa Jin; Cho, Jeong Gwan; Kim, Sang Hyung; Na, Kook Joo

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives Adenosine triphosphate (ATP)-sensitive potassium (KATP) channels play an important role in myocardial protection. We examined the effects of thromboxane A2 on the regulation of KATP channel activity in single ventricular myocytes. Subjects and Methods Single ventricular myocytes were isolated from the hearts of adult Institute of Cancer Research (ICR) mice by enzymatic digestion. Single channel activity was recorded by excised inside-out and cell-attached patch clamp configurations at −60 mV holding potential during the perfusion of an ATP-free K-5 solution. Results In the excised inside-out patches, the thromboxane A2 analog, U46619, decreased the KATP channel activity in a dose-dependent manner; however, the thromboxane A2 receptor antagonist, SQ29548, did not significantly attenuate the inhibitory effect of U46619. In the cell-attached patches, U46619 inhibited dinitrophenol (DNP)-induced KATP channel activity in a dose-dependent manner, and SQ29548 attenuated the inhibitory effects of U46619 on DNP-induced KATP channel activity. Conclusion Thromboxane A2 may inhibit KATP channel activity, and may have a harmful effect on ischemic myocardium. PMID:27482267

  11. Students' understanding of external representations of the potassium ion channel protein part II: structure-function relationships and fragmented knowledge.

    PubMed

    Harle, Marissa; Towns, Marcy H

    2012-01-01

    Research that has focused on external representations in biochemistry has uncovered student difficulties in comprehending and interpreting external representations. This study focuses on students' understanding of three external representations (ribbon diagram, wireframe, and hydrophobic/hydrophilic) of the potassium ion channel protein. Analysis of the interview data demonstrates that students were able to use the ribbon structures and polarity of the cell membrane to help support claims about the protein's orientation and interactions within the cell membrane. Students expressed fragmented understandings of the interactions between the potassium ion and the aqueous solution outside/inside of the cell membrane. Suggestions for instruction are to probe student understanding to help students activate prior knowledge and to help them build a more connected set of concepts pertaining to protein structure and function.

  12. An Ankyrin-G N-terminal Gate and Protein Kinase CK2 Dually Regulate Binding of Voltage-gated Sodium and KCNQ2/3 Potassium Channels*

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Mingxuan; Cooper, Edward C.

    2015-01-01

    In many mammalian neurons, fidelity and robustness of action potential generation and conduction depends on the co-localization of voltage-gated sodium (Nav) and KCNQ2/3 potassium channel conductance at the distal axon initial segment (AIS) and nodes of Ranvier in a ratio of ∼40 to 1. Analogous “anchor” peptides within intracellular domains of vertebrate KCNQ2, KCNQ3, and Nav channel α-subunits bind Ankyrin-G (AnkG), thereby mediating concentration of those channels at AISs and nodes of Ranvier. Here, we show that the channel anchors bind at overlapping but distinct sites near the AnkG N terminus. In pulldown assays, the rank order of AnkG binding strength is Nav1.2 ≫ KCNQ3 > KCNQ2. Phosphorylation of KCNQ2 and KCNQ3 anchor domains by protein kinase CK2 (CK2) augments binding, as previously shown for Nav1.2. An AnkG fragment comprising ankyrin repeats 1 through 7 (R1–7) binds phosphorylated Nav or KCNQ anchors robustly. However, mutational analysis of R1–7 reveals differences in binding mechanisms. A smaller fragment, R1–6, exhibits much-diminished KCNQ3 binding but binds Nav1.2 well. Two lysine residues at the tip of repeat 2–3 β-hairpin (residues 105–106) are critical for Nav1.2 but not KCNQ3 channel binding. Another dibasic motif (residues Arg-47, Arg-50) in the repeat 1 front α-helix is crucial for KCNQ2/3 but not Nav1.2 binding. AnkG's alternatively spliced N terminus selectively gates access to those sites, blocking KCNQ but not Nav channel binding. These findings suggest that the 40:1 Nav:KCNQ channel conductance ratio at the distal AIS and nodes arises from the relative strength of binding to AnkG. PMID:25998125

  13. Potassium starvation in yeast: mechanisms of homeostasis revealed by mathematical modeling.

    PubMed

    Kahm, Matthias; Navarrete, Clara; Llopis-Torregrosa, Vicent; Herrera, Rito; Barreto, Lina; Yenush, Lynne; Ariño, Joaquin; Ramos, Jose; Kschischo, Maik

    2012-01-01

    The intrinsic ability of cells to adapt to a wide range of environmental conditions is a fundamental process required for survival. Potassium is the most abundant cation in living cells and is required for essential cellular processes, including the regulation of cell volume, pH and protein synthesis. Yeast cells can grow from low micromolar to molar potassium concentrations and utilize sophisticated control mechanisms to keep the internal potassium concentration in a viable range. We developed a mathematical model for Saccharomyces cerevisiae to explore the complex interplay between biophysical forces and molecular regulation facilitating potassium homeostasis. By using a novel inference method ("the reverse tracking algorithm") we predicted and then verified experimentally that the main regulators under conditions of potassium starvation are proton fluxes responding to changes of potassium concentrations. In contrast to the prevailing view, we show that regulation of the main potassium transport systems (Trk1,2 and Nha1) in the plasma membrane is not sufficient to achieve homeostasis.

  14. Determining Favorable Binding Configurations of the Anti-Cancer Drug Ellipticine to the KV11.1 Potassium Channel V-VI Transmembrane Domain Through Autodock Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lipscomb, Dawn; Gentile, Saverio; Brancaleon, Lorenzo

    2011-10-01

    Ellipticines such as 9-methoxy-N-2-methylellipticinium acetate (MMEA) and 9-hydroxy-N-2-methylellipticinium acetate (NMEA, Celiptium ) are antineoplastic drugs that exert their selective cytotoxicity against leukemia and endometrial carcinoma. Ellipticine's action is also related to severe physical side effects, but the link between undesired effects and pharmacological application is not well understood. We investigated the binding of Ellipticine derivatives with the Kv11.1 potassium ion channel using Autodock and revealed that hydroxyellipticinium derivatives provide binding configurations with Kv11.1, but the energy, location and estimated dissociation constant varied. The binding energy is as follows: Chloroceliptium (-6.60 kcal/mol) > Celiptium (- 6.37 kcal/mol) > Methoxyceliptium (- 6.20 kcal/mol) > Datelliptium (-6.08 kcal/mol). Autodock simulations demonstrate that binding affinity is high at opposing ends of the channel and low within the channel interior. These favorable binding configurations suggest that Ellipticine derivatives may bridge among end subunits of the channel and potentially inhibit the flow of ions.

  15. Single Channel Recordings Reveal Differential β2 Subunit Modulations Between Mammalian and Drosophila BKCa(β2) Channels

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Ling; Guo, Xiying; Weng, Anxi; Xiao, Feng; Zeng, Wenping; Zhang, Yan; Ding, Jiuping; Hou, Panpan

    2016-01-01

    Large-conductance Ca2+- and voltage-activated potassium (BK) channels are widely expressed in tissues. As a voltage and calcium sensor, BK channels play significant roles in regulating the action potential frequency, neurotransmitter release, and smooth muscle contraction. After associating with the auxiliary β2 subunit, mammalian BK(β2) channels (mouse or human Slo1/β2) exhibit enhanced activation and complete inactivation. However, how the β2 subunit modulates the Drosophila Slo1 channel remains elusive. In this study, by comparing the different functional effects on heterogeneous BK(β2) channel, we found that Drosophila Slo1/β2 channel exhibits “paralyzed”-like and incomplete inactivation as well as slow activation. Further, we determined three different modulations between mammalian and Drosophila BK(β2) channels: 1) dSlo1/β2 doesn’t have complete inactivation. 2) β2(K33,R34,K35) delays the dSlo1/Δ3-β2 channel activation. 3) dSlo1/β2 channel has enhanced pre-inactivation than mSlo1/β2 channel. The results in our study provide insights into the different modulations of β2 subunit between mammalian and Drosophila Slo1/β2 channels and structural basis underlie the activation and pre-inactivation of other BK(β) complexes. PMID:27755549

  16. Potassium channels in the Cx43 gap junction perinexus modulate ephaptic coupling: an experimental and modeling study.

    PubMed

    Veeraraghavan, Rengasayee; Lin, Joyce; Keener, James P; Gourdie, Robert; Poelzing, Steven

    2016-10-01

    It was recently demonstrated that cardiac sodium channels (Nav1.5) localized at the perinexus, an intercalated disc (ID) nanodomain associated with gap junctions (GJ), may contribute to electrical coupling between cardiac myocytes via an ephaptic mechanism. Impairment of ephaptic coupling by acute interstitial edema (AIE)-induced swelling of the perinexus was associated with arrhythmogenic, anisotropic conduction slowing. Given that Kir2.1 has also recently been reported to localize at intercalated discs, we hypothesized that Kir2.1 channels may reside within the perinexus and that inhibiting them may mitigate arrhythmogenic conduction slowing observed during AIE. Using gated stimulated emission depletion (gSTED) and stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy (STORM) super-resolution microscopy, we indeed find that a significant proportion of Kir2.1 channels resides within the perinexus. Moreover, whereas Nav1.5 inhibition during AIE exacerbated arrhythmogenic conduction slowing, inhibiting Kir2.1 channels during AIE preferentially increased transverse conduction velocity-decreasing anisotropy and ameliorating arrhythmia risk compared to AIE alone. Comparison of our results with a nanodomain computer model identified enrichment of both Nav1.5 and Kir2.1 at intercalated discs as key factors underlying the experimental observations. We demonstrate that Kir2.1 channels are localized within the perinexus alongside Nav1.5 channels. Further, targeting Kir2.1 modulates intercellular coupling between cardiac myocytes, anisotropy of conduction, and arrhythmia propensity in a manner consistent with a role for ephaptic coupling in cardiac conduction. For over half a century, electrical excitation in the heart has been thought to occur exclusively via gap junction-mediated ionic current flow between cells. Further, excitation was thought to depend almost exclusively on sodium channels with potassium channels being involved mainly in returning the cell to rest. Here, we

  17. Fine-tuning of voltage sensitivity of the Kv1.2 potassium channel by interhelix loop dynamics.

    PubMed

    Sand, Rheanna; Sharmin, Nazlee; Morgan, Carla; Gallin, Warren J

    2013-04-01

    Many proteins function by changing conformation in response to ligand binding or changes in other factors in their environment. Any change in the sequence of a protein, for example during evolution, which alters the relative free energies of the different functional conformations changes the conditions under which the protein will function. Voltage-gated ion channels are membrane proteins that open and close an ion-selective pore in response to changes in transmembrane voltage. The charged S4 transmembrane helix transduces changes in transmembrane voltage into a change in protein internal energy by interacting with the rest of the channel protein through a combination of non-covalent interactions between adjacent helices and covalent interactions along the peptide backbone. However, the structural basis for the wide variation in the V50 value between different voltage-gated potassium channels is not well defined. To test the role of the loop linking the S3 helix and the S4 helix in voltage sensitivity, we have constructed a set of mutants of the rat Kv1.2 channel that vary solely in the length and composition of the extracellular loop that connects S4 to S3. We evaluated the effect of these different loop substitutions on the voltage sensitivity of the channel and compared these experimental results with molecular dynamics simulations of the loop structures. Here, we show that this loop has a significant role in setting the precise V50 of activation in Kv1 family channels.

  18. A specific two-pore domain potassium channel blocker defines the structure of the TASK-1 open pore.

    PubMed

    Streit, Anne K; Netter, Michael F; Kempf, Franca; Walecki, Magdalena; Rinné, Susanne; Bollepalli, Murali K; Preisig-Müller, Regina; Renigunta, Vijay; Daut, Jürgen; Baukrowitz, Thomas; Sansom, Mark S P; Stansfeld, Phillip J; Decher, Niels

    2011-04-22

    Two-pore domain potassium (K(2P)) channels play a key role in setting the membrane potential of excitable cells. Despite their role as putative targets for drugs and general anesthetics, little is known about the structure and the drug binding site of K(2P) channels. We describe A1899 as a potent and highly selective blocker of the K(2P) channel TASK-1. As A1899 acts as an open-channel blocker and binds to residues forming the wall of the central cavity, the drug was used to further our understanding of the channel pore. Using alanine mutagenesis screens, we have identified residues in both pore loops, the M2 and M4 segments, and the halothane response element to form the drug binding site of TASK-1. Our experimental data were used to validate a K(2P) open-pore homology model of TASK-1, providing structural insights for future rational design of drugs targeting K(2P) channels.

  19. A Drosophila behavioral mutant, down and out (dao), is defective in an essential regulator of Erg potassium channels

    PubMed Central

    Fergestad, Tim; Sale, Harinath; Bostwick, Bret; Schaffer, Ashleigh; Ho, Lingling; Robertson, Gail A.; Ganetzky, Barry

    2010-01-01

    To signal properly, excitable cells must establish and maintain the correct balance of various types of ion channels that increase or decrease membrane excitability. The mechanisms by which this balance is regulated remain largely unknown. Here, we describe a regulatory mechanism uncovered by a Drosophila behavioral mutant, down and out (dao). At elevated temperatures, dao loss-of-function mutants exhibit seizures associated with spontaneous bursts of neural activity. This phenotype closely resembles that of seizure mutations, which impair activity of ether-a-go-go-related gene (Erg)-type potassium channels. Conversely, neural over-expression of wild-type Dao confers dominant temperature-sensitive paralysis with kinetics reminiscent of paralytic sodium-channel mutants. The over-expression phenotype of dao is suppressed in a seizure mutant background, suggesting that Dao acts by an effect on Erg channels. In support of this hypothesis, functional expression of Erg channels in a heterologous system is dependent on the presence of Dao. These results indicate that Dao has an important role in establishing the proper level of neuronal membrane excitability by regulating functional expression of Erg channels. PMID:20212103

  20. A Drosophila behavioral mutant, down and out (dao), is defective in an essential regulator of Erg potassium channels.

    PubMed

    Fergestad, Tim; Sale, Harinath; Bostwick, Bret; Schaffer, Ashleigh; Ho, Lingling; Robertson, Gail A; Ganetzky, Barry

    2010-03-23

    To signal properly, excitable cells must establish and maintain the correct balance of various types of ion channels that increase or decrease membrane excitability. The mechanisms by which this balance is regulated remain largely unknown. Here, we describe a regulatory mechanism uncovered by a Drosophila behavioral mutant, down and out (dao). At elevated temperatures, dao loss-of-function mutants exhibit seizures associated with spontaneous bursts of neural activity. This phenotype closely resembles that of seizure mutations, which impair activity of ether-a-go-go-related gene (Erg)-type potassium channels. Conversely, neural over-expression of wild-type Dao confers dominant temperature-sensitive paralysis with kinetics reminiscent of paralytic sodium-channel mutants. The over-expression phenotype of dao is suppressed in a seizure mutant background, suggesting that Dao acts by an effect on Erg channels. In support of this hypothesis, functional expression of Erg channels in a heterologous system is dependent on the presence of Dao. These results indicate that Dao has an important role in establishing the proper level of neuronal membrane excitability by regulating functional expression of Erg channels. PMID:20212103

  1. The potassium ion channel opener NS1619 inhibits proliferation and induces apoptosis in A2780 ovarian cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Han Xiaobing; Xi Ling; Wang Hui; Huang Xiaoyuan; Ma Xiangyi; Han Zhiqiang; Wu Peng; Ma Xiaoli; Lu Yunping; Wang, Gang Zhou Jianfeng; Ma Ding

    2008-10-17

    Diverse types of voltage-gated potassium (K{sup +}) channels have been shown to be involved in regulation of cell proliferation. The maxi-conductance Ca{sup 2+}-activated K{sup +} channels (BK channels) may play an important role in the progression of human cancer. To explore the role of BK channels in regulation of apoptosis in human ovarian cancer cells, the effects of the specific BK channel activator NS1619 on induction of apoptosis in A2780 cells were observed. Following treatment with NS1619, cell proliferation was measured by MTT assay. Apoptosis of A2780 cells pretreated with NS1619 was detected by agarose gel electrophoresis of cellular DNA and flow cytometry. Our data demonstrate that NS1619 inhibits the proliferation of A2780 cells in a dosage and time dependent manner IC{sub 50} = 31.1 {mu}M, for 48 h pretreatment and induces apoptosis. Western blot analyses showed that the anti-proliferation effect of NS1619 was associated with increased expression of p53, p21, and Bax. These results indicate that BK channels play an important role in regulating proliferation of human ovarian cancer cells and may induce apoptosis through induction of p21{sup Cip1} expression in a p53-dependent manner.

  2. A virus-encoded potassium ion channel is a structural protein in the chlorovirus Paramecium bursaria chlorella virus 1 virion

    PubMed Central

    Romani, Giulia; Piotrowski, Adrianna; Hillmer, Stefan; Gurnon, James; Van Etten, James L.; Moroni, Anna; Thiel, Gerhard

    2013-01-01

    Most chloroviruses encode small K+ channels, which are functional in electrophysiological assays. The experimental finding that initial steps in viral infection exhibit the same sensitivity to channel inhibitors as the viral K+ channels has led to the hypothesis that the channels are structural proteins located in the internal membrane of the virus particles. This hypothesis was questioned recently because proteomic studies failed to detect the channel protein in virions of the prototype chlorovirus Paramecium bursaria chlorella virus 1 (PBCV-1). Here, we used a mAb raised against the functional K+ channel from chlorovirus MA-1D to search for the viral K+ channel in the virus particle. The results showed that the antibody was specific and bound to the tetrameric channel on the extracellular side. The antibody reacted in a virus-specific manner with protein extracts from chloroviruses that encoded channels similar to that from MA-1D. There was no cross-reactivity with chloroviruses that encoded more diverse channels or with a chlorovirus that lacked a K+ channel gene. Together with electron microscopic imaging, which revealed labelling of individual virus particles with the channel antibody, these results establish that the viral particles contain an active K+ channel, presumably located in the lipid membrane that surrounds the DNA in the mature virions. PMID:23918407

  3. A virus-encoded potassium ion channel is a structural protein in the chlorovirus Paramecium bursaria chlorella virus 1 virion.

    PubMed

    Romani, Giulia; Piotrowski, Adrianna; Hillmer, Stefan; Gurnon, James; Van Etten, James L; Moroni, Anna; Thiel, Gerhard; Hertel, Brigitte

    2013-11-01

    Most chloroviruses encode small K(+) channels, which are functional in electrophysiological assays. The experimental finding that initial steps in viral infection exhibit the same sensitivity to channel inhibitors as the viral K(+) channels has led to the hypothesis that the channels are structural proteins located in the internal membrane of the virus particles. This hypothesis was questioned recently because proteomic studies failed to detect the channel protein in virions of the prototype chlorovirus Paramecium bursaria chlorella virus 1 (PBCV-1). Here, we used a mAb raised against the functional K(+) channel from chlorovirus MA-1D to search for the viral K(+) channel in the virus particle. The results showed that the antibody was specific and bound to the tetrameric channel on the extracellular side. The antibody reacted in a virus-specific manner with protein extracts from chloroviruses that encoded channels similar to that from MA-1D. There was no cross-reactivity with chloroviruses that encoded more diverse channels or with a chlorovirus that lacked a K(+) channel gene. Together with electron microscopic imaging, which revealed labelling of individual virus particles with the channel antibody, these results establish that the viral particles contain an active K(+) channel, presumably located in the lipid membrane that surrounds the DNA in the mature virions.

  4. Topography of native SK channels revealed by force nanoscopy in living neurons.

    PubMed

    Maciaszek, Jamie L; Soh, Heun; Walikonis, Randall S; Tzingounis, Anastasios V; Lykotrafitis, George

    2012-08-15

    The spatial distribution of ion channels is an important determinant of neuronal excitability. However, there are currently no quantitative techniques to map endogenous ion channels with single-channel resolution in living cells. Here, we demonstrate that integration of pharmacology with single-molecule atomic force microscopy (AFM) allows for the high-resolution mapping of native potassium channels in living neurons. We focus on calcium-activated small conductance (SK) potassium channels, which play a critical role in brain physiology. By linking apamin, a toxin that specifically binds to SK channels, to the tip of an AFM cantilever, we are able to detect binding events between the apamin and SK channels. We find that native SK channels from rat hippocampal neurons reside primarily in dendrites as single entities and in pairs. We also show that SK channel dendritic distribution is dynamic and under the control of protein kinase A. Our study demonstrates that integration of toxin pharmacology with single-molecule AFM can be used to quantitatively map individual native ion channels in living cells, and thus provides a new tool for the study of ion channels in cellular physiology. PMID:22895725

  5. Dopamine midbrain neurons in health and Parkinson's disease: emerging roles of voltage-gated calcium channels and ATP-sensitive potassium channels.

    PubMed

    Dragicevic, E; Schiemann, J; Liss, B

    2015-01-22

    Dopamine (DA) releasing midbrain neurons are essential for multiple brain functions, such as voluntary movement, working memory, emotion and cognition. DA midbrain neurons within the substantia nigra (SN) and the ventral tegmental area (VTA) exhibit a variety of distinct axonal projections and cellular properties, and are differentially affected in diseases like schizophrenia, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, and Parkinson's disease (PD). Apart from having diverse functions in health and disease states, DA midbrain neurons display distinct electrical activity patterns, crucial for DA release. These activity patterns are generated and modulated by specific sets of ion channels. Recently, two ion channels have been identified, not only contributing to these activity patterns and to functional properties of DA midbrain neurons, but also seem to render SN DA neurons particularly vulnerable to degeneration in PD and its animal models: L-type calcium channels (LTCCs) and ATP-sensitive potassium channels (K-ATPs). In this review, we focus on the emerging physiological and pathophysiological roles of these two ion channels (and their complex interplay with other ion channels), particularly in highly vulnerable SN DA neurons, as selective degeneration of these neurons causes the major motor symptoms of PD. PMID:25450964

  6. Dopamine midbrain neurons in health and Parkinson's disease: emerging roles of voltage-gated calcium channels and ATP-sensitive potassium channels.

    PubMed

    Dragicevic, E; Schiemann, J; Liss, B

    2015-01-22

    Dopamine (DA) releasing midbrain neurons are essential for multiple brain functions, such as voluntary movement, working memory, emotion and cognition. DA midbrain neurons within the substantia nigra (SN) and the ventral tegmental area (VTA) exhibit a variety of distinct axonal projections and cellular properties, and are differentially affected in diseases like schizophrenia, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, and Parkinson's disease (PD). Apart from having diverse functions in health and disease states, DA midbrain neurons display distinct electrical activity patterns, crucial for DA release. These activity patterns are generated and modulated by specific sets of ion channels. Recently, two ion channels have been identified, not only contributing to these activity patterns and to functional properties of DA midbrain neurons, but also seem to render SN DA neurons particularly vulnerable to degeneration in PD and its animal models: L-type calcium channels (LTCCs) and ATP-sensitive potassium channels (K-ATPs). In this review, we focus on the emerging physiological and pathophysiological roles of these two ion channels (and their complex interplay with other ion channels), particularly in highly vulnerable SN DA neurons, as selective degeneration of these neurons causes the major motor symptoms of PD.

  7. Discovery and Characterization of a Potent and Selective Inhibitor of Aedes aegypti Inward Rectifier Potassium Channels

    PubMed Central

    Raphemot, Rene; Rouhier, Matthew F.; Swale, Daniel R.; Days, Emily; Weaver, C. David; Lovell, Kimberly M.; Konkel, Leah C.; Engers, Darren W.; Bollinger, Sean F.; Hopkins, Corey; Piermarini, Peter M.; Denton, Jerod S.

    2014-01-01

    Vector-borne diseases such as dengue fever and malaria, which are transmitted by infected female mosquitoes, affect nearly half of the world's population. The emergence of insecticide-resistant mosquito populations is reducing the effectiveness of conventional insecticides and threatening current vector control strategies, which has created an urgent need to identify new molecular targets against which novel classes of insecticides can be developed. We previously demonstrated that small molecule inhibitors of mammalian Kir channels represent promising chemicals for new mosquitocide development. In this study, high-throughput screening of approximately 30,000 chemically diverse small-molecules was employed to discover potent and selective inhibitors of Aedes aegypti Kir1 (AeKir1) channels heterologously expressed in HEK293 cells. Of 283 confirmed screening ‘hits’, the small-molecule inhibitor VU625 was selected for lead optimization and in vivo studies based on its potency and selectivity toward AeKir1, and tractability for medicinal chemistry. In patch clamp electrophysiology experiments of HEK293 cells, VU625 inhibits AeKir1 with an IC50 value of 96.8 nM, making VU625 the most potent inhibitor of AeKir1 described to date. Furthermore, electrophysiology experiments in Xenopus oocytes revealed that VU625 is a weak inhibitor of AeKir2B. Surprisingly, injection of VU625 failed to elicit significant effects on mosquito behavior, urine excretion, or survival. However, when co-injected with probenecid, VU625 inhibited the excretory capacity of mosquitoes and was toxic, suggesting that the compound is a substrate of organic anion and/or ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters. The dose-toxicity relationship of VU625 (when co-injected with probenecid) is biphasic, which is consistent with the molecule inhibiting both AeKir1 and AeKir2B with different potencies. This study demonstrates proof-of-concept that potent and highly selective inhibitors of mosquito Kir channels

  8. Discovery and characterization of a potent and selective inhibitor of Aedes aegypti inward rectifier potassium channels.

    PubMed

    Raphemot, Rene; Rouhier, Matthew F; Swale, Daniel R; Days, Emily; Weaver, C David; Lovell, Kimberly M; Konkel, Leah C; Engers, Darren W; Bollinger, Sean R; Bollinger, Sean F; Hopkins, Corey; Piermarini, Peter M; Denton, Jerod S

    2014-01-01

    Vector-borne diseases such as dengue fever and malaria, which are transmitted by infected female mosquitoes, affect nearly half of the world's population. The emergence of insecticide-resistant mosquito populations is reducing the effectiveness of conventional insecticides and threatening current vector control strategies, which has created an urgent need to identify new molecular targets against which novel classes of insecticides can be developed. We previously demonstrated that small molecule inhibitors of mammalian Kir channels represent promising chemicals for new mosquitocide development. In this study, high-throughput screening of approximately 30,000 chemically diverse small-molecules was employed to discover potent and selective inhibitors of Aedes aegypti Kir1 (AeKir1) channels heterologously expressed in HEK293 cells. Of 283 confirmed screening 'hits', the small-molecule inhibitor VU625 was selected for lead optimization and in vivo studies based on its potency and selectivity toward AeKir1, and tractability for medicinal chemistry. In patch clamp electrophysiology experiments of HEK293 cells, VU625 inhibits AeKir1 with an IC50 value of 96.8 nM, making VU625 the most potent inhibitor of AeKir1 described to date. Furthermore, electrophysiology experiments in Xenopus oocytes revealed that VU625 is a weak inhibitor of AeKir2B. Surprisingly, injection of VU625 failed to elicit significant effects on mosquito behavior, urine excretion, or survival. However, when co-injected with probenecid, VU625 inhibited the excretory capacity of mosquitoes and was toxic, suggesting that the compound is a substrate of organic anion and/or ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters. The dose-toxicity relationship of VU625 (when co-injected with probenecid) is biphasic, which is consistent with the molecule inhibiting both AeKir1 and AeKir2B with different potencies. This study demonstrates proof-of-concept that potent and highly selective inhibitors of mosquito Kir channels can

  9. Reversible dementia: two nursing home patients with voltage-gated potassium channel antibody-associated limbic encephalitis.

    PubMed

    Reintjes, Wesley; Romijn, Marloes D M; Hollander, Daan; Ter Bruggen, Jan P; van Marum, Rob J

    2015-09-01

    Voltage-gated potassium channel antibody-associated limbic encephalitis (VGKC-LE) is a rare disease that is a diagnostic and therapeutic challenge for medical practitioners. Two patients with VGKC-LE, both developing dementia are presented. Following treatment, both patients showed remarkable cognitive and functional improvement enabling them to leave the psychogeriatric nursing homes they both were admitted to. Patients with VGKC-LE can have a major cognitive and functional improvement even after a diagnostic delay of more than 1 year. Medical practitioners who treat patients with unexplained cognitive decline, epileptic seizures, or psychiatric symptoms should be aware of LE as an underlying rare cause.

  10. α-Synuclein forms non-selective cation channels and stimulates ATP-sensitive potassium channels in hippocampal neurons

    PubMed Central

    Mironov, Sergej L

    2015-01-01

    In Parkinson's disease and several other neurodegenerative diseases, the protein α-synuclein (αS) is produced within neurons and accumulates in the extracellular fluid. Several mechanisms of αS action are proposed, one of which is the formation of cation-permeable pores that may mediate toxicity. αS induces non-selective cation channels in lipid bilayers, but whether this occurs in living neurons and which properties the channels possess have not yet been examined. In this study the properties of αS channels in dissociated hippocampal neurons are documented. In cell-attached recordings the incorporation of αS into membranes was driven by applied negative potentials. These channels exhibited multiple levels of conductance (30, 70 and 120 pS at −100 mV) and inward rectification. The persistent activity of αS channels induced local changes in intracellular Na+ and Ca2+, depolarized neurons and augmented bursting activity. αS channels formed by adding αS to the intracellular membrane in inside-out patches exhibited outward rectification. αS channels were equally permeable to Na+, K+ and Ca2+. These channels were also observed in neurons transfected with wild-type or mutant A53T αS, and after extracellular application of wild-type or mutant A53T αS proteins. Opening of αS channels stimulated opening of ATP-sensitive K+ (KATP ) channels and did not interfere with the activity of delayed rectifier K+ channels. The properties of αS channels in neuronal membranes suggest stronger toxicity of extracellularly applied αS than intracellular αS. Enhancement of neuronal excitability and distortions in ion homeostasis may underlie the toxic effects of αS that can be dampened by KATP channels. PMID:25556793

  11. The Kunitz-Type Protein ShPI-1 Inhibits Serine Proteases and Voltage-Gated Potassium Channels.

    PubMed

    García-Fernández, Rossana; Peigneur, Steve; Pons, Tirso; Alvarez, Carlos; González, Lidice; Chávez, María A; Tytgat, Jan

    2016-04-01

    The bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitor (BPTI)-Kunitz-type protein ShPI-1 (UniProt: P31713) is the major protease inhibitor from the sea anemone Stichodactyla helianthus. This molecule is used in biotechnology and has biomedical potential related to its anti-parasitic effect. A pseudo wild-type variant, rShPI-1A, with additional residues at the N- and C-terminal, has a similar three-dimensional structure and comparable trypsin inhibition strength. Further insights into the structure-function relationship of rShPI-1A are required in order to obtain a better understanding of the mechanism of action of this sea anemone peptide. Using enzyme kinetics, we now investigated its activity against other serine proteases. Considering previous reports of bifunctional Kunitz-type proteins from anemones, we also studied the effect of rShPI-1A on voltage-gated potassium (Kv) channels. rShPI-1A binds Kv1.1, Kv1.2, and Kv1.6 channels with IC50 values in the nM range. Hence, ShPI-1 is the first member of the sea anemone type 2 potassium channel toxins family with tight-binding potency against several proteases and different Kv1 channels. In depth sequence analysis and structural comparison of ShPI-1 with similar protease inhibitors and Kv channel toxins showed apparent non-sequence conservation for known key residues. However, we detected two subtle patterns of coordinated amino acid substitutions flanking the conserved cysteine residues at the N- and C-terminal ends. PMID:27089366

  12. The Kunitz-Type Protein ShPI-1 Inhibits Serine Proteases and Voltage-Gated Potassium Channels

    PubMed Central

    García-Fernández, Rossana; Peigneur, Steve; Pons, Tirso; Alvarez, Carlos; González, Lidice; Chávez, María A.; Tytgat, Jan

    2016-01-01

    The bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitor (BPTI)-Kunitz-type protein ShPI-1 (UniProt: P31713) is the major protease inhibitor from the sea anemone Stichodactyla helianthus. This molecule is used in biotechnology and has biomedical potential related to its anti-parasitic effect. A pseudo wild-type variant, rShPI-1A, with additional residues at the N- and C-terminal, has a similar three-dimensional structure and comparable trypsin inhibition strength. Further insights into the structure-function relationship of rShPI-1A are required in order to obtain a better understanding of the mechanism of action of this sea anemone peptide. Using enzyme kinetics, we now investigated its activity against other serine proteases. Considering previous reports of bifunctional Kunitz-type proteins from anemones, we also studied the effect of rShPI-1A on voltage-gated potassium (Kv) channels. rShPI-1A binds Kv1.1, Kv1.2, and Kv1.6 channels with IC50 values in the nM range. Hence, ShPI-1 is the first member of the sea anemone type 2 potassium channel toxins family with tight-binding potency against several proteases and different Kv1 channels. In depth sequence analysis and structural comparison of ShPI-1 with similar protease inhibitors and Kv channel toxins showed apparent non-sequence conservation for known key residues. However, we detected two subtle patterns of coordinated amino acid substitutions flanking the conserved cysteine residues at the N- and C-terminal ends. PMID:27089366

  13. An interactive two-state model for cell membrane potassium and sodium ion channels in electric fields using the pair approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erdem, Rıza; Ekiz, Cesur

    2005-06-01

    An interactive two-state model for cell membrane potassium and sodium ion channels in the presence of electric fields is proposed and studied using the pair approximation. In the model, ion channels which can either be in an open or closed states are regarded as residing on a two-dimensional surface with a regular array of sites and the interactions between the neighbouring channels and the external electric field are incorporated. The minimization of the free energy is performed with respect to the pair or bond variables and maximum fractions of open potassium and sodium channels are obtained. Using known parameters for the squid giant axon the model gives qualitative agreement with the mean-field results and experimental measurements for potassium and sodium trans-membrane conductance.

  14. Regulation of Shaker-type potassium channels by hypoxia. Oxygen-sensitive K+ channels in PC12 cells.

    PubMed

    Conforti, L; Millhorn, D E

    2000-01-01

    Little is known about the molecular composition of the O2-sensitive K+ (Ko2) channels. The possibility that these channels belong to the Shaker subfamily (Kv1) of voltage-dependent K+ (Kv) channels has been raised in pulmonary artery (PA) smooth muscle cells. Numerous findings suggest that the Ko2 channel in PC12 cells is a Kv1 channel, formed by the Kv1.2 alpha subunit. The Ko2 channel in PC12 cells is a slow-inactivating voltage-dependent K+ channel of 20 pS conductance. Other Kv channels, also expressed in PC12 cells, are not inhibited by hypoxia. Selective up-regulation by chronic hypoxia of the Kv1.2 alpha subunit expression correlates with an increase O2-sensitivity of the K+ current. Other Kv1 alpha subunit genes encoding slow-inactivating Kv channels, such as Kv1.3, Kv2.1, Kv3.1 and Kv3.2 are not modulated by chronic hypoxia. The Ko2 current in PC12 cells is blocked by 5 mM externally applied tetraethylammonium chloride (TEA) and by charydbotoxin (CTX). The responses of the Kv1.2 K+ channel to hypoxia have been studied in the Xenopus oocytes and compared to those of Kv2.1, also proposed as Ko2 channel in PA smooth muscle cells. Two-electrode voltage clamp experiments show that hypoxia induces inhibition of K+ current amplitude only in oocytes injected with Kv1.2 cRNA. These data indicate that Kv1.2 K+ channels are inhibited by hypoxia. PMID:10849667

  15. Potassium channel modulation in rat portal vein by ATP depletion: a comparison with the effects of levcromakalim (BRL 38227).

    PubMed Central

    Noack, T.; Edwards, G.; Deitmer, P.; Weston, A. H.

    1992-01-01

    1. The effects of levcromakalim and of adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP) depletion on membrane potential and ionic currents were studied in freshly-dispersed smooth muscle cells of rat portal vein by use of combined voltage- and current-clamp techniques. 2. Levcromakalim (1 microM) induced a glibenclamide-sensitive, non-inactivating K-current (IKCO) and simultaneously inhibited the slow, transient outward, delayed rectifier K-current (ITO). Levcromakalim also hyperpolarized the portal vein cells by approximately 20 mV. 3. Reduction of intracellular ATP by removal of glucose and carboxylic acids from the recording pipette and of glucose from the bath fluid, induced a slowly-developing, non-inactivating and glibenclamide-sensitive K-current (Imet) within 60-300 s after breaking the membrane patch. Imet reached peak amplitude after 300-900 s, remained at a plateau for 200-800 s and then slowly ran down. At the peak of Imet, the cells were hyperpolarized by approximately 20 mV and their input conductance was increased by 42%. 4. At the time of maximum development of Imet, the delayed rectifier current, ITO, was reduced by 48%. 5. In the absence of glucose and carboxylic acids, addition of 1 microM free ATP to the recording pipette almost doubled the magnitude of Imet. At a holding potential of -10 mV, Imet was increased from 124 +/- 11 pA to 228 +/- 54 pA whereas the time-course of development and run-down of Imet was unaffected. 6. During the development and after the run-down of Imet, levcromakalim (1-10 microM) failed to induce IKCO. 7. Stationary fluctuation analysis of the current noise associated with Imet revealed a unitary conductance of between 10-20 pS in a physiological potassium gradient. A second contaminating current with an underlying unitary conductance of approximately 150 pS remained after Imet had run down. 8. It is concluded that IKCO induced by levcromakalim and Imet are carried by the same population of relatively small conductance, glibenclamide

  16. Effect of adenosine and adenosine receptor antagonist on Müller cell potassium channel in Rat chronic ocular hypertension models.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zijian; Huang, Ping; Liu, Xiaohong; Huang, Shouyue; Deng, Lianfu; Jin, Zhe; Xu, Shuo; Shen, Xi; Luo, Xunda; Zhong, Yisheng

    2015-01-01

    Müller cells are principal glial cells in rat retina and have attracted much attention in glaucoma studies. However, it is not clear whether adenosine and adenosine receptor (AR) antagonists play any roles in the regulation of potassium channels in Müller cells and subsequently in the promotion of glutamine synthetase (GS) and L-Glutamate/L-Aspartate Transporter (GLAST) functions. We found that chronic ocular hypertension (COH) in rat down-regulated Müller cells Kir2.1, Kir4.1, TASK-1, GS and GLAST expressions and attenuated the peak of inward potassium current. Retinal ganglion cells (RGC) count was lower in the COH rats than that in the sham operation animals. Intravitreal injection of selective A2A AR antagonist SCH442416 up-regulated Müller cell Kir4.1, TASK-1, GS and GLAST expressions and enhanced inward potassium currents compared with those in the COH rats with vehicle control. Meanwhile, the RGC count was higher following intravitreal injection of SCH442416 in the COH rats than that after vehicle injection. The fact that PKA inhibitor H-89 blocked these SCH442416 effects suggested that the PKA signaling pathway was involved in the observed ocular responses following the intravitreal SCH442416 injection. PMID:26063641

  17. Quantised transistor response to ion channels revealed by nonstationary noise analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker-Freyseng, C.; Fromherz, P.

    2011-11-01

    We report on the quantised response of a field-effect transistor to molecular ion channels in a biomembrane. HEK293-type cells overexpressing the Shaker B potassium channel were cultured on a silicon chip. An enhanced noise of the transistor is observed when the ion channels are activated. The analysis of the fluctuations in terms of binomial statistics identifies voltage quanta of about 1 μV on the gate. They are attributed to the channel currents that affect the gate voltage according to the Green's function of the cell-chip junction.

  18. Voltage-dependent Gating of Single Wild-Type and S4 Mutant KAT1 Inward Rectifier Potassium Channels

    PubMed Central

    Zei, Paul C.; Aldrich, Richard W.

    1998-01-01

    The voltage-dependent gating mechanism of KAT1 inward rectifier potassium channels was studied using single channel current recordings from Xenopus oocytes injected with KAT1 mRNA. The inward rectification properties of KAT1 result from an intrinsic gating mechanism in the KAT1 channel protein, not from pore block by an extrinsic cation species. KAT1 channels activate with hyperpolarizing potentials from −110 through −190 mV with a slow voltage-dependent time course. Transitions before first opening are voltage dependent and account for much of the voltage dependence of activation, while transitions after first opening are only slightly voltage dependent. Using burst analysis, transitions near the open state were analyzed in detail. A kinetic model with multiple closed states before first opening, a single open state, a single closed state after first opening, and a closed-state inactivation pathway accurately describes the single channel and macroscopic data. Two mutations neutralizing charged residues in the S4 region (R177Q and R176L) were introduced, and their effects on single channel gating properties were examined. Both mutations resulted in depolarizing shifts in the steady state conductance–voltage relationship, shortened first latencies to opening, decreased probability of terminating bursts, and increased burst durations. These effects on gating were well described by changes in the rate constants in the kinetic model describing KAT1 channel gating. All transitions before the open state were affected by the mutations, while the transitions after the open state were unaffected, implying that the S4 region contributes to the early steps in gating for KAT1 channels. PMID:9834140

  19. SUMO modification of cell surface Kv2.1 potassium channels regulates the activity of rat hippocampal neurons

    PubMed Central

    Plant, Leigh D.; Dowdell, Evan J.; Dementieva, Irina S.; Marks, Jeremy D.

    2011-01-01

    Voltage-gated Kv2.1 potassium channels are important in the brain for determining activity-dependent excitability. Small ubiquitin-like modifier proteins (SUMOs) regulate function through reversible, enzyme-mediated conjugation to target lysine(s). Here, sumoylation of Kv2.1 in hippocampal neurons is shown to regulate firing by shifting the half-maximal activation voltage (V1/2) of channels up to 35 mV. Native SUMO and Kv2.1 are shown to interact within and outside channel clusters at the neuronal surface. Studies of single, heterologously expressed Kv2.1 channels show that only K470 is sumoylated. The channels have four subunits, but no more than two non-adjacent subunits carry SUMO concurrently. SUMO on one site shifts V1/2 by 15 mV, whereas sumoylation of two sites produces a full response. Thus, the SUMO pathway regulates neuronal excitability via Kv2.1 in a direct and graded manner. PMID:21518833

  20. Exercise-induced expression of cardiac ATP-sensitive potassium channels promotes action potential shortening and energy conservation.

    PubMed

    Zingman, Leonid V; Zhu, Zhiyong; Sierra, Ana; Stepniak, Elizabeth; Burnett, Colin M-L; Maksymov, Gennadiy; Anderson, Mark E; Coetzee, William A; Hodgson-Zingman, Denice M

    2011-07-01

    Physical activity is one of the most important determinants of cardiac function. The ability of the heart to increase delivery of oxygen and metabolic fuels relies on an array of adaptive responses necessary to match bodily demand while avoiding exhaustion of cardiac resources. The ATP-sensitive potassium (K(ATP)) channel has the unique ability to adjust cardiac membrane excitability in accordance with ATP and ADP levels, and up-regulation of its expression that occurs in response to exercise could represent a critical element of this adaption. However, the mechanism by which K(ATP) channel expression changes result in a beneficial effect on cardiac excitability and function remains to be established. Here, we demonstrate that an exercise-induced rise in K(ATP) channel expression enhanced the rate and magnitude of action potential shortening in response to heart rate acceleration. This adaptation in membrane excitability promoted significant reduction in cardiac energy consumption under escalating workloads. Genetic disruption of normal K(ATP) channel pore function abolished the exercise-related changes in action potential duration adjustment and caused increased cardiac energy consumption. Thus, an expression-driven enhancement in the K(ATP) channel-dependent membrane response to alterations in cardiac workload represents a previously unrecognized mechanism for adaptation to physical activity and a potential target for cardioprotection.

  1. Identification of the functional binding pocket for compounds targeting small-conductance Ca2+-activated potassium channels

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Miao; Pascal, John M.; Schumann, Marcel; Armen, Roger S.; Zhang, Ji-fang

    2012-01-01

    Small- and intermediate-conductance Ca2+-activated potassium channels, activated by Ca2+-bound calmodulin, play an important role in regulating membrane excitability. These channels are also linked to clinical abnormalities. A tremendous amount of effort has been devoted to developing small molecule compounds targeting these channels. However, these compounds often suffer from low potency and lack of selectivity, hindering their potentials for clinical use. A key contributing factor is the lack of knowledge of the binding site(s) for these compounds. Here we demonstrate by X-ray crystallography that the binding pocket for the compounds of the 1-EBIO class is located at the calmodulin-channel interface. We show that, based on structure data and molecular docking, mutations of the channel can effectively change the potency of these compounds. Our results provide insight into the molecular nature of the binding pocket and its contribution to the potency and selectivity of the compounds of the 1-EBIO class. PMID:22929778

  2. Voltage-dependent gating of KCNH potassium channels lacking a covalent link between voltage-sensing and pore domains

    PubMed Central

    Lörinczi, Éva; Gómez-Posada, Juan Camilo; de la Peña, Pilar; Tomczak, Adam P.; Fernández-Trillo, Jorge; Leipscher, Ulrike; Stühmer, Walter; Barros, Francisco; Pardo, Luis A.

    2015-01-01

    Voltage-gated channels open paths for ion permeation upon changes in membrane potential, but how voltage changes are coupled to gating is not entirely understood. Two modules can be recognized in voltage-gated potassium channels, one responsible for voltage sensing (transmembrane segments S1 to S4), the other for permeation (S5 and S6). It is generally assumed that the conversion of a conformational change in the voltage sensor into channel gating occurs through the intracellular S4–S5 linker that provides physical continuity between the two regions. Using the pathophysiologically relevant KCNH family, we show that truncated proteins interrupted at, or lacking the S4–S5 linker produce voltage-gated channels in a heterologous model that recapitulate both the voltage-sensing and permeation properties of the complete protein. These observations indicate that voltage sensing by the S4 segment is transduced to the channel gate in the absence of physical continuity between the modules. PMID:25818916

  3. Hyper-SUMOylation of the Kv7 potassium channel diminishes the M-current leading to seizures and sudden death.

    PubMed

    Qi, Yitao; Wang, Jingxiong; Bomben, Valerie C; Li, De-Pei; Chen, Shao-Rui; Sun, Hao; Xi, Yutao; Reed, John G; Cheng, Jinke; Pan, Hui-Lin; Noebels, Jeffrey L; Yeh, Edward T H

    2014-09-01

    Sudden unexplained death in epilepsy (SUDEP) is the most common cause of premature mortality in epilepsy and was linked to mutations in ion channels; however, genes within the channel protein interactome might also represent pathogenic candidates. Here we show that mice with partial deficiency of Sentrin/SUMO-specific protease 2 (SENP2) develop spontaneous seizures and sudden death. SENP2 is highly enriched in the hippocampus, often the focus of epileptic seizures. SENP2 deficiency results in hyper-SUMOylation of multiple potassium channels known to regulate neuronal excitability. We demonstrate that the depolarizing M-current conducted by Kv7 channel is significantly diminished in SENP2-deficient hippocampal CA3 neurons, primarily responsible for neuronal hyperexcitability. Following seizures, SENP2-deficient mice develop atrioventricular conduction blocks and cardiac asystole. Both seizures and cardiac conduction blocks can be prevented by retigabine, a Kv7 channel opener. Thus, we uncover a disease-causing role for hyper-SUMOylation in the nervous system and establish an animal model for SUDEP. PMID:25189211

  4. Calcium ions open a selectivity filter gate during activation of the MthK potassium channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Posson, David J.; Rusinova, Radda; Andersen, Olaf S.; Nimigean, Crina M.

    2015-09-01

    Ion channel opening and closing are fundamental to cellular signalling and homeostasis. Gates that control K+ channel activity were found both at an intracellular pore constriction and within the selectivity filter near the extracellular side but the specific location of the gate that opens Ca2+-activated K+ channels has remained elusive. Using the Methanobacterium thermoautotrophicum homologue (MthK) and a stopped-flow fluorometric assay for fast channel activation, we show that intracellular quaternary ammonium blockers bind to closed MthK channels. Since the blockers are known to bind inside a central channel cavity, past the intracellular entryway, the gate must be within the selectivity filter. Furthermore, the blockers access the closed channel slower than the open channel, suggesting that the intracellular entryway narrows upon pore closure, without preventing access of either the blockers or the smaller K+. Thus, Ca2+-dependent gating in MthK occurs at the selectivity filter with coupled movement of the intracellular helices.

  5. Calcium ions open a selectivity filter gate during activation of the MthK potassium channel.

    PubMed

    Posson, David J; Rusinova, Radda; Andersen, Olaf S; Nimigean, Crina M

    2015-01-01

    Ion channel opening and closing are fundamental to cellular signalling and homeostasis. Gates that control K(+) channel activity were found both at an intracellular pore constriction and within the selectivity filter near the extracellular side but the specific location of the gate that opens Ca(2+)-activated K(+) channels has remained elusive. Using the Methanobacterium thermoautotrophicum homologue (MthK) and a stopped-flow fluorometric assay for fast channel activation, we show that intracellular quaternary ammonium blockers bind to closed MthK channels. Since the blockers are known to bind inside a central channel cavity, past the intracellular entryway, the gate must be within the selectivity filter. Furthermore, the blockers access the closed channel slower than the open channel, suggesting that the intracellular entryway narrows upon pore closure, without preventing access of either the blockers or the smaller K(+). Thus, Ca(2+)-dependent gating in MthK occurs at the selectivity filter with coupled movement of the intracellular helices.

  6. Alternatively Spliced Isoforms of KV10.1 Potassium Channels Modulate Channel Properties and Can Activate Cyclin-dependent Kinase in Xenopus Oocytes*

    PubMed Central

    Ramos Gomes, Fernanda; Romaniello, Vincenzo; Sánchez, Araceli; Weber, Claudia; Narayanan, Pratibha; Psol, Maryna; Pardo, Luis A.

    2015-01-01

    KV10.1 is a voltage-gated potassium channel expressed selectively in the mammalian brain but also aberrantly in cancer cells. In this study we identified short splice variants of KV10.1 resulting from exon-skipping events (E65 and E70) in human brain and cancer cell lines. The presence of the variants was confirmed by Northern blot and RNase protection assays. Both variants completely lacked the transmembrane domains of the channel and produced cytoplasmic proteins without channel function. In a reconstituted system, both variants co-precipitated with the full-length channel and induced a robust down-regulation of KV10.1 current when co-expressed with the full-length form, but their effect was mechanistically different. E65 required a tetramerization domain and induced a reduction in the overall expression of full-length KV10.1, whereas E70 mainly affected its glycosylation pattern. E65 triggered the activation of cyclin-dependent kinases in Xenopus laevis oocytes, suggesting a role in cell cycle control. Our observations highlight the relevance of noncanonical functions for the oncogenicity of KV10.1, which need to be considered when ion channels are targeted for cancer therapy. PMID:26518875

  7. Alternatively Spliced Isoforms of KV10.1 Potassium Channels Modulate Channel Properties and Can Activate Cyclin-dependent Kinase in Xenopus Oocytes.

    PubMed

    Ramos Gomes, Fernanda; Romaniello, Vincenzo; Sánchez, Araceli; Weber, Claudia; Narayanan, Pratibha; Psol, Maryna; Pardo, Luis A

    2015-12-18

    KV10.1 is a voltage-gated potassium channel expressed selectively in the mammalian brain but also aberrantly in cancer cells. In this study we identified short splice variants of KV10.1 resulting from exon-skipping events (E65 and E70) in human brain and cancer cell lines. The presence of the variants was confirmed by Northern blot and RNase protection assays. Both variants completely lacked the transmembrane domains of the channel and produced cytoplasmic proteins without channel function. In a reconstituted system, both variants co-precipitated with the full-length channel and induced a robust down-regulation of KV10.1 current when co-expressed with the full-length form, but their effect was mechanistically different. E65 required a tetramerization domain and induced a reduction in the overall expression of full-length KV10.1, whereas E70 mainly affected its glycosylation pattern. E65 triggered the activation of cyclin-dependent kinases in Xenopus laevis oocytes, suggesting a role in cell cycle control. Our observations highlight the relevance of noncanonical functions for the oncogenicity of KV10.1, which need to be considered when ion channels are targeted for cancer therapy. PMID:26518875

  8. The AKT2 potassium channel mediates NaCl induced depolarization in the root of Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Salvador-Recatalà, Vicenta

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Soil salinization is a major cause of plant stress, partly due to the physicochemical similarities between Na+ and K+. Na+ ions compete with K+ ions for their transport into root cells. However, the point of Na+ entry remains unidentified. Here, I have applied the Electrical Penetration Graph as a method for whole plant electrophysiology in order to test if (a) root exposure to NaCl induces depolarization waves that propagate from root to shoot via the phloem, and if (b) the electrophysiological effects of root exposure to NaCl require expression of the potassium channels AKT1 and/or AKT2. The data suggest that AKT2 subunit containing K+ channels mediate NaCl-induced depolarization of root cells, and that this depolarization does not propagate to leaves via the phloem. PMID:27043750

  9. Functional and developmental expression of a zebrafish Kir1.1 (ROMK) potassium channel homologue Kcnj1.

    PubMed

    Abbas, Leila; Hajihashemi, Saeed; Stead, Lucy F; Cooper, Gordon J; Ware, Tracy L; Munsey, Tim S; Whitfield, Tanya T; White, Stanley J

    2011-03-15

    The zebrafish, Danio rerio, is emerging as an important model organism for the pathophysiological study of some human kidney diseases, but the sites of expression and physiological roles of a number of protein orthologues in the zebrafish nephron remain mostly undefined. Here we show that a zebrafish potassium channel is orthologous to the mammalian kidney potassium channel, ROMK. The cDNA (kcnj1) encodes a protein (Kcnj1) that when expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes displayed pH- and Ba2+-sensitive K+-selective currents, but unlike the mammalian channel, was completely insensitive to the peptide inhibitor tertiapin-Q. In the pronephros, kcnj1 transcript expression was restricted to a distal region and overlapped with that of sodium–chloride cotransporter Nkcc, chloride channel ClC-Ka, and ClC-Ka/b accessory subunit Barttin, indicating the location of the diluting segment. In a subpopulation of surface cells, kcnj1 was coexpressed with the a1a.4 isoform of the Na+/K+-ATPase, identifying these cells as potential K+ secretory cells in this epithelium. At later stages of development, kcnj1 appeared in cells of the developing gill that also expressed the a1a.4 subunit.Morpholino antisense-mediated knockdown of kcnj1 was accompanied by transient tachycardia followed by bradycardia, effects consistent with alterations in extracellular K+ concentration in the embryo.Our findings indicate that Kcnj1 is expressed in cells associated with osmoregulation and acts as a K+ efflux pathway that is important in maintaining extracellular levels of K+ in the developing embryo. PMID:21262879

  10. Block of voltage-gated potassium channels by Pacific ciguatoxin-1 contributes to increased neuronal excitability in rat sensory neurons

    SciTech Connect

    Birinyi-Strachan, Liesl C.; Gunning, Simon J.; Lewis, Richard J.; Nicholson, Graham M. . E-mail: Graham.Nicholson@uts.edu.au

    2005-04-15

    The present study investigated the actions of the polyether marine toxin Pacific ciguatoxin-1 (P-CTX-1) on neuronal excitability in rat dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons using patch-clamp recording techniques. Under current-clamp conditions, bath application of 2-20 nM P-CTX-1 caused a rapid, concentration-dependent depolarization of the resting membrane potential in neurons expressing tetrodotoxin (TTX)-sensitive voltage-gated sodium (Na{sub v}) channels. This action was completely suppressed by the addition of 200 nM TTX to the external solution, indicating that this effect was mediated through TTX-sensitive Na{sub v} channels. In addition, P-CTX-1 also prolonged action potential and afterhyperpolarization (AHP) duration. In a subpopulation of neurons, P-CTX-1 also produced tonic action potential firing, an effect that was not accompanied by significant oscillation of the resting membrane potential. Conversely, in neurons expressing TTX-resistant Na{sub v} currents, P-CTX-1 failed to alter any parameter of neuronal excitability examined in this study. Under voltage-clamp conditions in rat DRG neurons, P-CTX-1 inhibited both delayed-rectifier and 'A-type' potassium currents in a dose-dependent manner, actions that occurred in the absence of alterations to the voltage dependence of activation. These actions appear to underlie the prolongation of the action potential and AHP, and contribute to repetitive firing. These data indicate that a block of potassium channels contributes to the increase in neuronal excitability, associated with a modulation of Na{sub v} channel gating, observed clinically in response to ciguatera poisoning.

  11. Hyperexcitability and reduced low threshold potassium currents in auditory neurons of mice lacking the channel subunit Kv1.1

    PubMed Central

    Brew, Helen M; Hallows, Janice L; Tempel, Bruce L

    2003-01-01

    A low voltage-activated potassium current, IKL, is found in auditory neuron types that have low excitability and precisely preserve the temporal pattern of activity present in their presynaptic inputs. The gene Kcnal codes for Kv1.1 potassium channel subunits, which combine in expression systems to produce channel tetramers with properties similar to those of IKL, including sensitivity to dendrotoxin (DTX). Kv1.1 is strongly expressed in neurons with IKL, including auditory neurons of the medial nucleus of the trapezoid body (MNTB). We therefore decided to investigate how the absence of Kv1.1 affected channel properties and function in MNTB neurons from mice lacking Kcnal. We used the whole cell version of the patch clamp technique to record from MNTB neurons in brainstem slices from Kcnal-null (−/−) mice and their wild-type (+/+) and heterozygous (+/−) littermates. There was an IKL in voltage-clamped −/− MNTB neurons, but it was about half the amplitude of the IKL in +/+ neurons, with otherwise similar properties. Consistent with this, −/− MNTB neurons were more excitable than their +/+ counterparts; they fired more than twice as many action potentials (APs) during current steps, and the threshold current amplitude required to generate an AP was roughly halved. +/− MNTB neurons had excitability and IKL amplitudes identical to the +/+ neurons. The IKL remaining in −/− neurons was blocked by DTX, suggesting the underlying channels contained subunits Kv1.2 and/or Kv1.6 (also DTX-sensitive). DTX increased excitability further in the already hyperexcitable −/− MNTB neurons, suggesting that −/−IKL limited excitability despite its reduced amplitude in the absence of Kv1.1 subunits. PMID:12611922

  12. Functional role of the KCa3.1 potassium channel in synovial fibroblasts from rheumatoid arthritis patients.

    PubMed

    Friebel, Kristin; Schönherr, Roland; Kinne, Raimund W; Kunisch, Elke

    2015-07-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis synovial fibroblasts (RA-SFs) show an aggressive phenotype and support joint inflammation and tissue destruction. New druggable targets in RA-SFs would therefore be of high therapeutic interest. The present study shows that the intermediate-conductance, calcium-activated potassium channel KCa3.1 (KCNN4) is expressed at the mRNA and protein level in RA-SFs, is functionally active, and has a regulatory impact on cell proliferation and secretion of pro-inflammatory and pro-destructive mediators. Whole-cell patch-clamp recordings identified KCa3.1 as the dominant potassium channel in the physiologically relevant membrane voltage range below 0 mV. Stimulation with transforming growth factor β1 (TGF-β1) significantly increased transcription, translation, and channel function of KCa3.1. Inhibition of KCa3.1 by the selective, pore-blocking inhibitor TRAM-34, (and, in part, by siRNA) significantly reduced cell proliferation, as well as expression and secretion of pro-inflammatory factors (IL-6, IL-8, and MCP1) and the tissue-destructive protease MMP3. These effects were observed in non-stimulated and/or TGF-β1-stimulated RA-SFs. Since small molecule-based interference with KCa3.1 is principally well tolerated in clinical settings, further evaluation of channel blockers in models of rheumatoid arthritis may be a promising approach to identify new pharmacological targets and develop new therapeutic strategies for this debilitating disease.

  13. Molecular cloning and stress-dependent regulation of potassium channel gene in Chinese cabbage (Brassica rapa ssp. Pekinensis).

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yidong; Wang, Zeyun; Zhang, Lida; Cao, Youfang; Huang, Danfeng; Tang, Kexuan

    2006-09-01

    Potassium channels are important for many physiological functions in plants, one of which is to regulate plant adaption to stress conditions. In this study, KCT2, the gene encoding a membrane-bound protein potassium channel (GenBank accession number: ), was isolated from Chinese cabbage (Brassica rapa ssp. Pekinensis) by RACE-PCR technique. Bioinformatics methods were performed for the gene structure and molecular similarity analysis. The KCT2 expression patterns under various stress conditions were studied by semi-quantitative RT-PCR. DNA gel blot was used to analyze genomic organization. The putative KCT2 was found to contain five membrane-spanning segments, a pore-forming domain (P-domain) between the last two transmembrane spans, a TxxTxGYGD motif in the P-domain and a putative cyclic nucleotide-binding-like domain within a long C-terminal region. KCT2 is closest to KAT2 in Arabidopsis. KCT2 could be a one-copy gene with different isoforms or belong to a small gene family with four or five members. KCT2 was expressed more strongly in leaves than in shoots and roots. KCT2 transcription products were up-regulated by a 4-h-incubation in abscisic acid (ABA) and various stress treatment including cold stress (4 degrees C) for 24 h, drought stress for 1h, and salt stress for 12 h. KCT2 transcription was not affected by anoxia stress for 8h and was down-regulated with cold stress for 48 h. KCT2 was cloned for the first time from the genus Brassica. Expression analysis indicated that in the early stage of plant adaption to stress conditions KCT2 is up-regulated, which results in a stimulation of potassium transport.

  14. A High-Throughput Electrophysiology Assay Identifies Inhibitors of the Inwardly Rectifying Potassium Channel Kir7.1.

    PubMed

    Wright, Paul D; Kanumilli, Srinivasan; Tickle, David; Cartland, Jamie; Bouloc, Nathalie; Dale, Timothy; Tresize, Derek J; McCloskey, Conor; McCavera, Samantha; Blanks, Andrew M; Kettleborough, Catherine; Jerman, Jeffrey C

    2015-07-01

    Kir7.1 is an inwardly rectifying potassium channel that has been implicated in controlling the resting membrane potential of the myometrium. Abnormal uterine activity in pregnancy plays an important role in postpartum hemorrhage, and novel therapies for this condition may lie in manipulation of membrane potential. This work presents an assay development and screening strategy for identifying novel inhibitors of Kir7.1. A cell-based automated patch-clamp electrophysiology assay was developed using the IonWorks Quattro (Molecular Devices, Sunnyvale, CA) system, and the iterative optimization is described. In total, 7087 compounds were tested, with a hit rate (>40% inhibition) of 3.09%. During screening, average Z' values of 0.63 ± 0.09 were observed. After chemistry triage, lead compounds were resynthesized and activity confirmed by IC50 determinations. The most potent compound identified (MRT00200769) gave rise to an IC50 of 1.3 µM at Kir7.1. Compounds were assessed for selectivity using the inwardly rectifying potassium channel Kir1.1 (ROMK) and hERG (human Ether-à-go-go Related Gene). Pharmacological characterization of known Kir7.1 inhibitors was also carried out and analogues of VU590 tested to assess selectivity at Kir7.1.

  15. Limbic encephalitis associated with anti-voltage-gated potassium channel complex antibodies as a cause of adult-onset mesial temporal lobe epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Toyota, Tomoko; Akamatsu, Naoki; Tsuji, Sadatoshi; Nishizawa, Shigeru

    2014-06-01

    Recently, some reports have indicated that limbic encephalitis associated with anti-voltage-gated potassium channel complex antibodies (VGKC-Ab) is a cause of adult-onset mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (MTLE). We report a 53-year-old woman who had her first epileptic seizure at the age of 50 years old. Examination by 3-Tesla brain MRI revealed left hippocampal high signal intensity and swelling on fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) and T2-weighted imaging at 2 months after her first seizure. The patient received intravenous methylprednisolone and carbamazepine 300 mg/day. One month later, MRI revealed improvement of her left hippocampal abnormalities. Thereafter, she had no seizures, however, three years after her first seizure, EEG revealed a seizure pattern in the left temporal region. Brain MRI revealed left hippocampal high signal intensity and brain fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography revealed hypermetabolism. Her serum VGKC-Ab levels were 118 pM(normal < 100 pM). Intravenous methylprednisolone therapy was reinitiated. Two months later, her hippocampal abnormalities had improved and 3 months later her VGKC-Ab levels decreased to 4.4 pM. Remission of the epileptic seizures was also observed. This MTLE in the middle age was considered as limbic encephalitis associated with anti- VGKC-Ab. In cases of unexplained adult-onset MTLE, limbic encephalitis associated with anti-VGKC-Ab, which responds well to immunotherapy, should be considered in the differential diagnosis.

  16. Use of Label-free Optical Biosensors to Detect Modulation of Potassium Channels by G-protein Coupled Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Fleming, Matthew R.; Shamah, Steven M.; Kaczmarek, Leonard K.

    2014-01-01

    Ion channels control the electrical properties of neurons and other excitable cell types by selectively allowing ions to flow through the plasma membrane1. To regulate neuronal excitability, the biophysical properties of ion channels are modified by signaling proteins and molecules, which often bind to the channels themselves to form a heteromeric channel complex2,3. Traditional assays examining the interaction between channels and regulatory proteins require exogenous labels that can potentially alter the protein's behavior and decrease the physiological relevance of the target, while providing little information on the time course of interactions in living cells. Optical biosensors, such as the X-BODY Biosciences BIND Scanner system, use a novel label-free technology, resonance wavelength grating (RWG) optical biosensors, to detect changes in resonant reflected light near the biosensor. This assay allows the detection of the relative change in mass within the bottom portion of living cells adherent to the biosensor surface resulting from ligand induced changes in cell adhesion and spreading, toxicity, proliferation, and changes in protein-protein interactions near the plasma membrane. RWG optical biosensors have been used to detect changes in mass near the plasma membrane of cells following activation of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), receptor tyrosine kinases, and other cell surface receptors. Ligand-induced changes in ion channel-protein interactions can also be studied using this assay. In this paper, we will describe the experimental procedure used to detect the modulation of Slack-B sodium-activated potassium (KNa) channels by GPCRs. PMID:24562095

  17. Viral potassium channels as a robust model system for studies of membrane-protein interaction.

    PubMed

    Braun, Christian J; Lachnit, Christine; Becker, Patrick; Henkes, Leonhard M; Arrigoni, Cristina; Kast, Stefan M; Moroni, Anna; Thiel, Gerhard; Schroeder, Indra

    2014-04-01

    The viral channel KcvNTS belongs to the smallest K(+) channels known so far. A monomer of a functional homotetramer contains only 82 amino acids. As a consequence of the small size the protein is almost fully submerged into the membrane. This suggests that the channel is presumably sensitive to its lipid environment. Here we perform a comparative analysis for the function of the channel protein embedded in three different membrane environments. 1. Single-channel currents of KcvNTS were recorded with the patch clamp method on the plasma membrane of HEK293 cells. 2. They were also measured after reconstitution of recombinant channel protein into classical planar lipid bilayers and 3. into horizontal bilayers derived from giant unilamellar vesicles (GUVs). The recombinant channel protein was either expressed and purified from Pichia pastoris or from a cell-free expression system; for the latter a new approach with nanolipoprotein particles was used. The data show that single-channel activity can be recorded under all experimental conditions. The main functional features of the channel like a large single-channel conductance (80pS), high open-probability (>50%) and the approximate duration of open and closed dwell times are maintained in all experimental systems. An apparent difference between the approaches was only observed with respect to the unitary conductance, which was ca. 35% lower in HEK293 cells than in the other systems. The reason for this might be explained by the fact that the channel is tagged by GFP when expressed in HEK293 cells. Collectively the data demonstrate that the small viral channel exhibits a robust function in different experimental systems. This justifies an extrapolation of functional data from these systems to the potential performance of the channel in the virus/host interaction. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Viral Membrane Proteins-Channels for Cellular Networking. PMID:23791706

  18. Mechanism of HERG potassium channel inhibition by tetra-n-octylammonium bromide and benzethonium chloride

    SciTech Connect

    Long, Yan; Lin, Zuoxian; Xia, Menghang; Zheng, Wei; Li, Zhiyuan

    2013-03-01

    Tetra-n-octylammonium bromide and benzethonium chloride are synthetic quaternary ammonium salts that are widely used in hospitals and industries for the disinfection and surface treatment and as the preservative agent. Recently, the activities of HERG channel inhibition by these compounds have been found to have potential risks to induce the long QT syndrome and cardiac arrhythmia, although the mechanism of action is still elusive. This study was conducted to investigate the mechanism of HERG channel inhibition by these compounds by using whole-cell patch clamp experiments in a CHO cell line stably expressing HERG channels. Tetra-n-octylammonium bromide and benzethonium chloride exhibited concentration-dependent inhibitions of HERG channel currents with IC{sub 50} values of 4 nM and 17 nM, respectively, which were also voltage-dependent and use-dependent. Both compounds shifted the channel activation I–V curves in a hyperpolarized direction for 10–15 mV and accelerated channel activation and inactivation processes by 2-fold. In addition, tetra-n-octylammonium bromide shifted the inactivation I–V curve in a hyperpolarized direction for 24.4 mV and slowed the rate of channel deactivation by 2-fold, whereas benzethonium chloride did not. The results indicate that tetra-n-octylammonium bromide and benzethonium chloride are open-channel blockers that inhibit HERG channels in the voltage-dependent, use-dependent and state-dependent manners. - Highlights: ► Tetra-n-octylammonium and benzethonium are potent HERG channel inhibitors. ► Channel activation and inactivation processes are accelerated by the two compounds. ► Both compounds are the open-channel blockers to HERG channels. ► HERG channel inhibition by both compounds is use-, voltage- and state dependent. ► The in vivo risk of QT prolongation needs to be studied for the two compounds.

  19. The Inhibitory Effects of Ca2+ Channel Blocker Nifedipine on Rat Kv2.1 Potassium Channels.

    PubMed

    Li, Xian-Tao; Li, Xiao-Qing; Hu, Xi-Mu; Qiu, Xiao-Yue

    2015-01-01

    It is well documented that nifedipine, a commonly used dihydropyridine Ca2+ channel blocker, has also significant interactions with voltage-gated K+ (Kv) channels. But to date, little is known whether nifedipine exerted an action on Kv2.1 channels, a member of the Shab subfamily with slow inactivation. In the present study, we explored the effects of nifedipine on rat Kv2.1 channels expressed in HEK293 cells. Data from whole-cell recording showed that nifedipine substantially reduced Kv2.1 currents with the IC50 value of 37.5 ± 5.7 μM and delayed the time course of activation without effects on the activation curve. Moreover, this drug also significantly shortened the duration of inactivation and deactivation of Kv2.1 currents in a voltage-dependent manner. Interestingly, the half-maximum inactivation potential (V1/2) of Kv2.1 currents was -11.4 ± 0.9 mV in control and became -38.5 ± 0.4 mV after application of 50 μM nifedipine. The large hyperpolarizing shift (27 mV) of the inactivation curve has not been reported previously and may result in more inactivation for outward delayed rectifier K+ currents mediated by Kv2.1 channels at repolarization phases. The Y380R mutant significantly increased the binding affinity of nifedipine to Kv2.1 channels, suggesting an interaction of nifedipine with the outer mouth region of this channel. The data present here will be helpful to understand the diverse effects exerted by nifedipine on various Kv channels.

  20. Potassium conductance of the squid giant axon. Single-channel studies

    PubMed Central

    1988-01-01

    The patch-clamp technique was implemented in the cut-open squid giant axon and used to record single K channels. We present evidence for the existence of three distinct types of channel activities. In patches that contained three to eight channels, ensemble fluctuation analysis was performed to obtain an estimate of 17.4 pS for the single-channel conductance. Averaged currents obtained from these multichannel patches had a time course of activation similar to that of macroscopic K currents recorded from perfused squid giant axons. In patches where single events could be recorded, it was possible to find channels with conductances of 10, 20, and 40 pS. The channel most frequently encountered was the 20-pS channel; for a pulse to 50 mV, this channel had a probability of being open of 0.9. In other single-channel patches, a channel with a conductance of 40 pS was present. The activity of this channel varied from patch to patch. In some patches, it showed a very low probability of being open (0.16 for a pulse to 50 mV) and had a pronounced lag in its activation time course. In other patches, the 40-pS channel had a much higher probability of being open (0.75 at a holding potential of 50 mV). The 40-pS channel was found to be quite selective for K over Na. In some experiments, the cut-open axon was exposed to a solution containing no K for several minutes. A channel with a conductance of 10 pS was more frequently observed after this treatment. Our study shows that the macroscopic K conductance is a composite of several K channel types, but the relative contribution of each type is not yet clear. The time course of activation of the 20-pS channel and the ability to render it refractory to activation only by holding the membrane potential at a positive potential for several seconds makes it likely that it is the predominant channel contributing to the delayed rectifier conductance. PMID:3171538

  1. Ligand-induced structural changes in the cyclic nucleotide-modulated potassium channel MloK1

    PubMed Central

    Kowal, Julia; Chami, Mohamed; Baumgartner, Paul; Arheit, Marcel; Chiu, Po-Lin; Rangl, Martina; Scheuring, Simon; Schröder, Gunnar F.; Nimigean, Crina M.; Stahlberg, Henning

    2014-01-01

    Cyclic nucleotide-modulated ion channels are important for signal transduction and pacemaking in eukaryotes. The molecular determinants of ligand gating in these channels are still unknown, mainly because of a lack of direct structural information. Here we report ligand-induced conformational changes in full-length MloK1, a cyclic nucleotide-modulated potassium channel from the bacterium Mesorhizobium loti, analysed by electron crystallography and atomic force microscopy. Upon cAMP binding, the cyclic nucleotide-binding domains move vertically towards the membrane, and directly contact the S1–S4 voltage sensor domains. This is accompanied by a significant shift and tilt of the voltage sensor domain helices. In both states, the inner pore-lining helices are in an ‘open’ conformation. We propose a mechanism in which ligand binding can favour pore opening via a direct interaction between the cyclic nucleotide-binding domains and voltage sensors. This offers a simple mechanistic hypothesis for the coupling between ligand gating and voltage sensing in eukaryotic HCN channels. PMID:24469021

  2. Potassium Channel Kv1.3 Is Highly Expressed by Microglia in Human Alzheimer’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Rangaraju, Srikant; Gearing, Marla; Jin, Lee-Way; Levey, Allan

    2015-01-01

    Recent genetic studies suggest a central role for innate immunity in Alzheimer’s disease (AD) pathogenesis, wherein microglia orchestrate neuroinflammation. Kv1.3, a voltage-gated potassium channel of therapeutic relevance in autoimmunity, is upregulated by activated microglia and mediates amyloid-mediated microglial priming and reactive oxygen species production in vitro. We hypothesized that Kv1.3 channel expression is increased in human AD brain tissue. In a blinded postmortem immunohistochemical semi-quantitative analysis performed on ten AD patients and ten non-disease controls, we observed a significantly higher Kv1.3 staining intensity (p = 0.03) and Kv1.3-positive cell density (p = 0.03) in the frontal cortex of AD brains, compared to controls. This paralleled an increased number of Iba1-positive microglia in AD brains. Kv1.3-positive cells had microglial morphology and were associated with amyloid-β plaques. In immunofluorescence studies, Kv1.3 channels co-localized primarily with Iba1 but not with astrocyte marker GFAP, confirming that elevated Kv1.3 expression is limited to microglia. Higher Kv1.3 expression in AD brains was also confirmed by western blot analysis. Our findings support that Kv1.3 channels are biologically relevant and microglia-specific targets in human AD. PMID:25362031

  3. An unusual fold for potassium channel blockers: NMR structure of three toxins from the scorpion Opisthacanthus madagascariensis

    PubMed Central

    Chagot, Benjamin; Pimentel, Cyril; Dai, Li; Pil, Joost; Tytgat, Jan; Nakajima, Terumi; Corzo, Gerardo; Darbon, Hervé; Ferrat, Gilles

    2005-01-01

    The Om-toxins are short peptides (23–27 amino acids) purified from the venom of the scorpion Opisthacanthus madagascariensis. Their pharmacological targets are thought to be potassium channels. Like Csα/β (cystine-stabilized α/β) toxins, the Om-toxins alter the electrophysiological properties of these channels; however, they do not share any sequence similarity with other scorpion toxins. We herein demonstrate by electrophysiological experiments that Om-toxins decrease the amplitude of the K+ current of the rat channels Kv1.1 and Kv1.2, as well as human Kv1.3. We also determine the solution structure of three of the toxins by use of two-dimensional proton NMR techniques followed by distance geometry and molecular dynamics. The structures of these three peptides display an uncommon fold for ion-channel blockers, Csα/α (cystine-stabilized α-helix–loop–helix), i.e. two α-helices connected by a loop and stabilized by two disulphide bridges. We compare the structures obtained and the dipole moments resulting from the electrostatic anisotropy of these peptides with those of the only other toxin known to share the same fold, namely κ-hefutoxin1. PMID:15631621

  4. Involvement of ATP-sensitive potassium channels and the opioid system in the anticonvulsive effect of zolpidem in mice.

    PubMed

    Sheikhi, Mehdi; Shirzadian, Armin; Dehdashtian, Amir; Amiri, Shayan; Ostadhadi, Sattar; Ghasemi, Mehdi; Dehpour, Ahmad Reza

    2016-09-01

    Zolpidem is a hypnotic medication that mainly exerts its function through activating γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA)A receptors. There is some evidence that zolpidem may have anticonvulsive effects. However, the mechanisms underlying this effect have not been elucidated yet. In the present study, we used the pentylentetrazole (PTZ)-induced generalized seizure model in mice to investigate whether zolpidem can affect seizure threshold. We also further evaluated the roles of ATP-sensitive potassium (KATP) channels as well as μ-opioid receptors in the effects of zolpidem on seizure threshold. Our data showed that zolpidem in a dose-dependent manner increased the PTZ-induced seizure threshold. The noneffective (i.e., did not significantly alter the PTZ-induced seizure threshold by itself) doses of KATP channel blocker (glibenclamide) and nonselective opioid receptor antagonist (naloxone) were able to inhibit the anticonvulsive effect of zolpidem. Additionally, noneffective doses of either KATP channel opener (cromakalim) or nonselective μ-opioid receptor agonist (morphine) in combination with a noneffective dose of zolpidem exerted a significant anticonvulsive effect on PTZ-induced seizures in mice. A combination of noneffective doses of naloxone and glibenclamide, which separately did not affect zolpidem effect on seizure threshold, inhibited the anticonvulsive effects of zolpidem. These results suggest a role for KATP channels and the opioid system, alone or in combination, in the anticonvulsive effects of zolpidem. PMID:27521722

  5. Intermediate-conductance calcium-activated potassium channel KCa3.1 and chloride channel modulate chemokine ligand (CCL19/CCL21)-induced migration of dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Shao, Zhifei; Gaurav, Rohit; Agrawal, Devendra K

    2015-07-01

    The role of ion channels is largely unknown in chemokine-induced migration in nonexcitable cells such as dendritic cells (DCs). Here, we examined the role of intermediate-conductance calcium-activated potassium channel (KCa3.1) and chloride channel (CLC3) in lymphatic chemokine-induced migration of DCs. The amplitude and kinetics of chemokine ligand (CCL19/CCL21)-induced Ca(2+) influx were associated with chemokine receptor 7 expression levels, extracellular-free Ca(2+) and Cl(-), and independent of extracellular K(+). Chemokines (CCL19 and CCL21) and KCa3.1 activator (1-ethyl-1,3-dihydro-2H-benzimidazol-2-one) induced plasma membrane hyperpolarization and K(+) efflux, which was blocked by 1-[(2-chlorophenyl)diphenylmethyl]-1H-pyrazole, suggesting that KCa3.1 carried larger conductance than the inward calcium release-activated calcium channel. Blockade of KCa3.1, low Cl(-) in the medium, and low dose of 4,4'-diisothiocyano-2,2'-stilbenedisulfonic acid (DIDS) impaired CCL19/CCL21-induced Ca(2+) influx, cell volume change, and DC migration. High doses of DIDS completely blocked DC migration possibly by significantly disrupting mitochondrial membrane potential. In conclusion, KCa3.1 and CLC3 are critical in human DC migration by synergistically regulating membrane potential, chemokine-induced Ca(2+) influx, and cell volume.

  6. Phycodnavirus Potassium Ion Channel Proteins Question the Virus Molecular Piracy Hypothesis

    PubMed Central

    Hamacher, Kay; Greiner, Timo; Ogata, Hiroyuki; Van Etten, James L.; Gebhardt, Manuela; Villarreal, Luis P.; Cosentino, Cristian; Moroni, Anna; Thiel, Gerhard

    2012-01-01

    Phycodnaviruses are large dsDNA, algal-infecting viruses that encode many genes with homologs in prokaryotes and eukaryotes. Among the viral gene products are the smallest proteins known to form functional K+ channels. To determine if these viral K+ channels are the product of molecular piracy from their hosts, we compared the sequences of the K+ channel pore modules from seven phycodnaviruses to the K+ channels from Chlorella variabilis and Ectocarpus siliculosus, whose genomes have recently been sequenced. C. variabilis is the host for two of the viruses PBCV-1 and NY-2A and E. siliculosus is the host for the virus EsV-1. Systematic phylogenetic analyses consistently indicate that the viral K+ channels are not related to any lineage of the host channel homologs and that they are more closely related to each other than to their host homologs. A consensus sequence of the viral channels resembles a protein of unknown function from a proteobacterium. However, the bacterial protein lacks the consensus motif of all K+ channels and it does not form a functional channel in yeast, suggesting that the viral channels did not come from a proteobacterium. Collectively, our results indicate that the viruses did not acquire their K+ channel-encoding genes from their current algal hosts by gene transfer; thus alternative explanations are required. One possibility is that the viral genes arose from ancient organisms, which served as their hosts before the viruses developed their current host specificity. Alternatively the viral proteins could be the origin of K+ channels in algae and perhaps even all cellular organisms. PMID:22685610

  7. Large conductance, calcium- and voltage-gated potassium (BK) channels: regulation by cholesterol

    PubMed Central

    Dopico, Alejandro M.; Bukiya, Anna N.; Singh, Aditya K.

    2012-01-01

    Cholesterol (CLR) is an essential component of eukaryotic plasma membranes. CLR regulates the membrane physical state, microdomain formation and the activity of membrane-spanning proteins, including ion channels. Large conductance, voltage- and Ca2+-gated K+ (BK) channels link membrane potential to cell Ca2+ homeostasis. Thus, they control many physiological processes and participate in pathophysiological mechanisms leading to human disease. Because plasmalemma BK channels cluster in CLR-rich membrane microdomains, a major driving force for studying BK channel-CLR interactions is determining how membrane CLR controls the BK current phenotype, including its pharmacology, channel sorting, distribution, and role in cell physiology. Since both BK channels and CLR tissue levels play a pathophysiological role in human disease, identifying functional and structural aspects of the CLR-BK channel interaction may open new avenues for therapeutic intervention. Here, we review the studies documenting membrane CLR-BK channel interactions, dissecting out the many factors that determine the final BK current response to changes in membrane CLR content. We also summarize work in reductionist systems where recombinant BK protein is studied in artificial lipid bilayers, which documents a direct inhibition of BK channel activity by CLR and builds a strong case for a direct interaction between CLR and the BK channel-forming protein. Bilayer lipid-mediated mechanisms in CLR action are also discussed. Finally, we review studies of BK channel function during hypercholesterolemia, and underscore the many consequences that the CLR-BK channel interaction brings to cell physiology and human disease. PMID:22584144

  8. Arecoline inhibits intermediate-conductance calcium-activated potassium channels in human glioblastoma cell lines.

    PubMed

    So, Edmund Cheung; Huang, Yan-Ming; Hsing, Chung-Hsi; Liao, Yu-Kai; Wu, Sheng-Nan

    2015-07-01

    Arecoline (ARE) is an alkaloid-type natural product from areca nut. This compound has numerous pharmacological and toxicological effects. Whether this agent interacts with ion channels to perturb functional activity of cells remains unknown. The effects of ARE on ionic currents were studied in glioma cell lines (U373 and U87MG) using patch-clamp technique. Like TRAM-34(1-[(2-chlorophenyl)-diphenylmethyl]pyrazole), ARE suppressed the amplitude of whole-cell voltage-gated K(+) currents in U373 cells elicited by a ramp voltage clamp. In cell-attached configuration, ARE did not modify the single-channel conductance of intermediate-conductance Ca(2+)-activated K(+) (IKCa) channels; however, it did reduce channel activity. Its inhibition of IKCa channels was accompanied by a significant lengthening in the slow component of mean closed time of IKCa channels. Based on minimal kinetic scheme, the dissociation constant (KD) required for ARE-mediated prolongation of mean closed time was 11.2µM. ARE-induced inhibition of IKCa channels was voltage-dependent. Inability of ARE to perturb the activity of large-conductance Ca(2+)-activated K(+) (BKCa) channels was seen. Under current-clamp recordings, ARE depolarized the membrane of U373 cells and DCEBIO reversed ARE-induced depolarization. Similarly, ARE suppressed IKCa-channel activities in oral keratinocytes. This study provides the evidence that ARE block IKCa channels in a concentration, voltage and state-dependent manner. ARE-induced block of IKCa channels is unrelated to the binding of muscarinic receptors. The effects of ARE on these channels may partially be responsible for the underlying cellular mechanisms by which it influences the functional activities of glioma cells or oral keratinocytes, if similar findings occur in vivo.

  9. Tremorgenic indole alkaloids potently inhibit smooth muscle high-conductance calcium-activated potassium channels.

    PubMed

    Knaus, H G; McManus, O B; Lee, S H; Schmalhofer, W A; Garcia-Calvo, M; Helms, L M; Sanchez, M; Giangiacomo, K; Reuben, J P; Smith, A B

    1994-05-17

    Tremorgenic indole alkaloids produce neurological disorders (e.g., staggers syndromes) in ruminants. The mode of action of these fungal mycotoxins is not understood but may be related to their known effects on neurotransmitter release. To determine whether these effects could be due to inhibition of K+ channels, the interaction of various indole diterpenes with high-conductance Ca(2+)-activated K+ (maxi-K) channels was examined. Paspalitrem A, paspalitrem C, aflatrem, penitrem A, and paspalinine inhibit binding of [125I]charybdotoxin (ChTX) to maxi-K channels in bovine aortic smooth muscle sarcolemmal membranes. In contrast, three structurally related compounds, paxilline, verruculogen, and paspalicine, enhanced toxin binding. As predicted from the binding studies, covalent incorporation of [125I]ChTX into the 31-kDa subunit of the maxi-K channel was blocked by compounds that inhibit [125I]ChTX binding and enhanced by compounds that stimulate [125I]ChTX binding. Modulation of [125I]ChTX binding was due to allosteric mechanisms. Despite their different effects on binding of [125I]ChTX to maxi-K channels, all compounds potently inhibited maxi-K channels in electrophysiological experiments. Other types of voltage-dependent or Ca(2+)-activated K+ channels examined were not affected. Chemical modifications of paxilline indicate a defined structure-activity relationship for channel inhibition. Paspalicine, a deshydroxy analog of paspalinine lacking tremorgenic activity, also potently blocked maxi-K channels. Taken together, these data suggest that indole diterpenes are the most potent nonpeptidyl inhibitors of maxi-K channels identified to date. Some of their pharmacological properties could be explained by inhibition of maxi-K channels, although tremorgenicity may be unrelated to channel block. PMID:7514038

  10. Role of potassium ion channels in detrusor smooth muscle function and dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Petkov, Georgi V.

    2013-01-01

    Contraction and relaxation of the detrusor smooth muscle (DSM), which makes up the wall of the urinary bladder, facilitates the storage and voiding of urine. Several families of K+ channels, including voltage-gated K+ (KV) channels, Ca2+-activated K+ (KCa) channels, inward-rectifying ATP-sensitive K+ (Kir, KATP) channels, and two-pore-domain K+ (K2P) channels, are expressed and functional in DSM. They control DSM excitability and contractility by maintaining the resting membrane potential and shaping the action potentials that determine the phasic nature of contractility in this tissue. Defects in DSM K+ channel proteins or in the molecules involved in their regulatory pathways may underlie certain forms of bladder dysfunction, such as overactive bladder. K+ channels represent an opportunity for novel pharmacological manipulation and therapeutic intervention in human DSM. Modulation of DSM K+ channels directly or indirectly by targeting their regulatory mechanisms has the potential to control urinary bladder function. This Review summarizes our current state of knowledge of the functional role of K+ channels in DSM in health and disease, with special emphasis on current advancements in the field. PMID:22158596

  11. Role of the TREK2 potassium channel in cold and warm thermosensation and in pain perception.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Vanessa; Busserolles, Jérôme; Christin, Marine; Devilliers, Maïly; Poupon, Laura; Legha, Wassim; Alloui, Abdelkrim; Aissouni, Youssef; Bourinet, Emmanuel; Lesage, Florian; Eschalier, Alain; Lazdunski, Michel; Noël, Jacques

    2014-12-01

    Two-pore domain background K(+) channels (K2p or KCNK) produce hyperpolarizing currents that control cell membrane polarity and neuronal excitability throughout the nervous system. The TREK2 channel as well as the related TREK1 and TRAAK channels are mechanical-, thermal- and lipid-gated channels that share many regulatory properties. TREK2 is one of the major background channels expressed in rodent nociceptive neurons of the dorsal root ganglia that innervate the skin and deep body tissues, but its role in somatosensory perception and nociception has remained poorly understood. We now report that TREK2 is a regulatory channel that controls the perception of non aversive warm, between 40°C and 46°C, and moderate ambient cool temperatures, between 20°C and 25°C, in mice. TREK2 controls the firing activity of peripheral sensory C-fibers in response to changes in temperature. The role of TREK2 in thermosensation is different from that of TREK1 and TRAAK channels; rather, TREK2, TREK1, and TRAAK channels appear to have complementary roles in thermosensation. TREK2 is also involved in mechanical pain perception and in osmotic pain after sensitization by prostaglandin E2. TREK2 is involved in the cold allodynia that characterizes the neuropathy commonly associated with treatments with the anticancer drug oxaliplatin. These results suggest that positive modulation of the TREK2 channel may have beneficial analgesic effects in these neuropathic conditions. PMID:25239074

  12. Therapeutic targeting of two-pore-domain potassium (K(2P)) channels in the cardiovascular system.

    PubMed

    Wiedmann, Felix; Schmidt, Constanze; Lugenbiel, Patrick; Staudacher, Ingo; Rahm, Ann-Kathrin; Seyler, Claudia; Schweizer, Patrick A; Katus, Hugo A; Thomas, Dierk

    2016-05-01

    The improvement of treatment strategies in cardiovascular medicine is an ongoing process that requires constant optimization. The ability of a therapeutic intervention to prevent cardiovascular pathology largely depends on its capacity to suppress the underlying mechanisms. Attenuation or reversal of disease-specific pathways has emerged as a promising paradigm, providing a mechanistic rationale for patient-tailored therapy. Two-pore-domain K(+) (K(2P)) channels conduct outward K(+) currents that stabilize the resting membrane potential and facilitate action potential repolarization. K(2P) expression in the cardiovascular system and polymodal K2P current regulation suggest functional significance and potential therapeutic roles of the channels. Recent work has focused primarily on K(2P)1.1 [tandem of pore domains in a weak inwardly rectifying K(+) channel (TWIK)-1], K(2P)2.1 [TWIK-related K(+) channel (TREK)-1], and K(2P)3.1 [TWIK-related acid-sensitive K(+) channel (TASK)-1] channels and their role in heart and vessels. K(2P) currents have been implicated in atrial and ventricular arrhythmogenesis and in setting the vascular tone. Furthermore, the association of genetic alterations in K(2P)3.1 channels with atrial fibrillation, cardiac conduction disorders and pulmonary arterial hypertension demonstrates the relevance of the channels in cardiovascular disease. The function, regulation and clinical significance of cardiovascular K(2P) channels are summarized in the present review, and therapeutic options are emphasized.

  13. Potassium Channels and Uterine Vascular Adaptation to Pregnancy and Chronic Hypoxia

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Ronghui; Xiao, DaLiao; Zhang, Lubo

    2014-01-01

    During a normal course of pregnancy, uterine vascular tone is significantly decreased resulting in a striking increase in uterine blood flow, which is essential for fetal development and fetal growth. Chronic hypoxia during gestation may adversely affect the normal adaptation of uterine vascular tone and increase the risk of preeclampsia and fetal intrauterine growth restriction. In this review, we present evidence that the regulation of K+ channels is an important mechanism in the adaptation of uterine vascular tone to pregnancy and hypoxia. There are four types of K+ channels identified in arterial smooth muscle cells: 1) voltage-dependent K+ (Kv) channels, 2) Ca2+-activated K+ (KCa) channels, 3) inward rectifier K+ (KIR) channels, and 4) ATP-sensitive K+ (KATP) channels. Pregnancy differentially augments the expression and activity of K+ channels via downregulation of protein kinase C signaling in uterine and other vascular beds, leading to decreased uterine vascular tone and increased uterine blood flow. Sex steroid hormones play an important role in the pregnancy-mediated alteration of K+ channels in the uterine vasculature. In addition, chronic hypoxia alters uterine vascular K+ channels expression and activities via modulation of steroid hormones/receptors-mediated signaling, resulting in increased uterine vascular tone during pregnancy. PMID:24063385

  14. Structural and functional consequences of the presence of a fourth disulfide bridge in the scorpion short toxins: solution structure of the potassium channel inhibitor HsTX1.

    PubMed Central

    Savarin, P.; Romi-Lebrun, R.; Zinn-Justin, S.; Lebrun, B.; Nakajima, T.; Gilquin, B.; Menez, A.

    1999-01-01

    We have determined the three-dimensional structure of the potassium channel inhibitor HsTX1, using nuclear magnetic resonance and molecular modeling. This protein belongs to the scorpion short toxin family, which essentially contains potassium channel blockers of 29 to 39 amino acids and three disulfide bridges. It is highly active on voltage-gated Kv1.3 potassium channels. Furthermore, it has the particularity to possess a fourth disulfide bridge. We show that HsTX1 has a fold similar to that of the three-disulfide-bridged toxins and conserves the hydrophobic core found in the scorpion short toxins. Thus, the fourth bridge has no influence on the global conformation of HsTX1. Most residues spatially analogous to those interacting with voltage-gated potassium channels in the three-disulfide-bridged toxins are conserved in HsTX1. Thus, we propose that Tyr21, Lys23, Met25, and Asn26 are involved in the biological activity of HsTX1. As an additional positively charged residue is always spatially close to the aromatic residue in toxins blocking the voltage-gated potassium channels, and as previous mutagenesis experiments have shown the critical role played by the C-terminus in HsTX1, we suggest that Arg33 is also important for the activity of the four disulfide-bridged toxin. Docking calculations confirm that, if Lys23 and Met25 interact with the GYGDMH motif of Kv1.3, Arg33 can contact Asp386 and, thus, play the role of the additional positively charged residue of the toxin functional site. This original configuration of the binding site of HsTX1 for Kv1.3, if confirmed experimentally, offers new structural possibilities for the construction of a molecule blocking the voltage-gated potassium channels. PMID:10631983

  15. Pharmacologic inhibition of the renal outer medullary potassium channel causes diuresis and natriuresis in the absence of kaliuresis.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Maria L; Priest, Birgit T; Alonso-Galicia, Magdalena; Zhou, Xiaoyan; Felix, John P; Brochu, Richard M; Bailey, Timothy; Thomas-Fowlkes, Brande; Liu, Jessica; Swensen, Andrew; Pai, Lee-Yuh; Xiao, Jianying; Hernandez, Melba; Hoagland, Kimberly; Owens, Karen; Tang, Haifeng; de Jesus, Reynalda K; Roy, Sophie; Kaczorowski, Gregory J; Pasternak, Alexander

    2014-01-01

    The renal outer medullary potassium (ROMK) channel, which is located at the apical membrane of epithelial cells lining the thick ascending loop of Henle and cortical collecting duct, plays an important role in kidney physiology by regulating salt reabsorption. Loss-of-function mutations in the human ROMK channel are associated with antenatal type II Bartter's syndrome, an autosomal recessive life-threatening salt-wasting disorder with mild hypokalemia. Similar observations have been reported from studies with ROMK knockout mice and rats. It is noteworthy that heterozygous carriers of Kir1.1 mutations associated with antenatal Bartter's syndrome have reduced blood pressure and a decreased risk of developing hypertension by age 60. Although selective ROMK inhibitors would be expected to represent a new class of diuretics, this hypothesis has not been pharmacologically tested. Compound A [5-(2-(4-(2-(4-(1H-tetrazol-1-yl)phenyl)acetyl)piperazin-1-yl)ethyl)isobenzofuran-1(3H)-one)], a potent ROMK inhibitor with appropriate selectivity and characteristics for in vivo testing, has been identified. Compound A accesses the channel through the cytoplasmic side and binds to residues lining the pore within the transmembrane region below the selectivity filter. In normotensive rats and dogs, short-term oral administration of compound A caused concentration-dependent diuresis and natriuresis that were comparable to hydrochlorothiazide. Unlike hydrochlorothiazide, however, compound A did not cause any significant urinary potassium losses or changes in plasma electrolyte levels. These data indicate that pharmacologic inhibition of ROMK has the potential for affording diuretic/natriuretic efficacy