Science.gov

Sample records for potato waste drying

  1. Fluidized-bed potato waste drying experiments at the Raft River Geothermal Test Site

    SciTech Connect

    Cole, L.T.; Schmitt, R.C.

    1980-06-01

    A fluidized-bed dryer was built and operated at the Raft River Geothermal Test Site in south central Idaho to test the feasibility of using low-temperature (145/sup 0/C or lower) geothermal fluids as an energy source for drying operations. The dryer performed successfully on two potato industry waste products that had a solid content of 5 to 13%. The dried product was removed as a sand-like granular material or as fines with a flour-like texture. Test results, observations, and design recommendations are presented. Also presented is an economic evaluation for commercial-scale drying plants using either geothermal low-temperature water or oil as a heat source.

  2. 21 CFR 102.41 - Potato chips made from dried potatoes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Potato chips made from dried potatoes. 102.41... Specific Nonstandardized Foods § 102.41 Potato chips made from dried potatoes. (a) The common or usual name of the food product that resembles and is of the same composition as potato chips, except that it...

  3. 21 CFR 102.41 - Potato chips made from dried potatoes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Potato chips made from dried potatoes. 102.41... Specific Nonstandardized Foods § 102.41 Potato chips made from dried potatoes. (a) The common or usual name of the food product that resembles and is of the same composition as potato chips, except that it...

  4. 21 CFR 102.41 - Potato chips made from dried potatoes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Potato chips made from dried potatoes. 102.41... Specific Nonstandardized Foods § 102.41 Potato chips made from dried potatoes. (a) The common or usual name of the food product that resembles and is of the same composition as potato chips, except that it...

  5. 21 CFR 102.41 - Potato chips made from dried potatoes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Potato chips made from dried potatoes. 102.41... Specific Nonstandardized Foods § 102.41 Potato chips made from dried potatoes. (a) The common or usual name of the food product that resembles and is of the same composition as potato chips, except that it...

  6. 21 CFR 102.41 - Potato chips made from dried potatoes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Potato chips made from dried potatoes. 102.41... Specific Nonstandardized Foods § 102.41 Potato chips made from dried potatoes. (a) The common or usual name of the food product that resembles and is of the same composition as potato chips, except that it...

  7. Effect of Blanching on Structural Quality of Dried Potato Slices.

    PubMed

    Maté; Quartaert; Meerdink; van't Riet K

    1998-02-16

    Mechanical properties of potato slices were monitored during blanching, as indicators of structural changes. As expected, blanching resulted in weakening of potato structure. Gelatinization, which occurred during the first 2 min, did not promote an immediate weakening of the potato tissue. More than 80% of the changes in mechanical properties occurred during the first 30 min of blanching. Potato slices blanched for 2 and 30 min as well as unblanched ones were dried in a convective air drier at 48 degrees C. Bulk and true density, porosity, and shrinkage were monitored with time. Blanched potatoes resulted in a significantly more compact, less porous product with lower effective water diffusivity than unblanched potatoes. The results indicated that changes that occurred during the first 2 min of blanching had a much greater influence on structural quality of dried potatoes than changes that occurred from 2 to 30 min of blanching.

  8. Ultrasonic extraction of steroidal alkaloids from potato peel waste.

    PubMed

    Hossain, Mohammad B; Tiwari, Brijesh K; Gangopadhyay, Nirupama; O'Donnell, Colm P; Brunton, Nigel P; Rai, Dilip K

    2014-07-01

    Potato processors produce large volumes of waste in the form of potato peel which is either discarded or sold at a low price. Potato peel waste is a potential source of steroidal alkaloids which are biologically active secondary metabolites which could serve as precursors to agents with apoptotic, chemopreventive and anti-inflammatory properties. The present study investigated the relative efficacy of ultrasound assisted extraction (UAE) and solid liquid extraction (SLE) both using methanol, to extract steroidal alkaloids from potato peel waste and identified optimal conditions for UAE of α-solanine, α-chaconine, solanidine and demissidine. Using response surface methodology optimal UAE conditions were identified as an amplitude of 61 μm and an extraction time of 17 min which resulted the recovery of 1102 μg steroidal alkaloids/g dried potato peel (DPP). In contrast, SLE yielded 710.51 glycoalkaloid μg/g DPP. Recoveries of individual glycoalkoids using UAE yielded 273, 542.7, 231 and 55.3 μg/g DPP for α-solanine, α-chaconine, solanidine and demissidine respectively. Whereas for SLE yields were 180.3, 337.6, 160.2 and 32.4 μg/g DPP for α-solanine, α-chaconine, solanidine and demissidine respectively. The predicted values from the developed second order quadratic polynomial equation were in close agreement with the experimental values with low average mean deviation (E<5%) values. Predicted models were highly significant (p<0.05) for all parameters studied. This study indicates that UAE has strong potential as an extraction method for steroidal alkaloids from potato peel waste.

  9. Kinetics of potato drying using fluidized bed dryer.

    PubMed

    Bakal, Sushant Balasaheb; Sharma, Gyanendra Prasad; Sonawane, Somnath P; Verma, Radhachran C

    2012-10-01

    The effect of air temperature and two different shapes (cuboidal and cylindrical) with 3 aspect ratio of each shape on the drying kinetics of potato (Solanum tuberosum) in fluidized bed dryer was investigated. Drying was carried out at 50, 60 and 70°C at 7 m/s air velocity. Drying data were analysed to obtain effective diffusivity of moisture transfer. During drying moisture transfer from potato were described by Fick's diffusion model. Two mathematical models were fitted to experimental data. The Page model gave better fit than simple exponential model. The Arrehnious activation energy value expresses the effect of temperature on diffusivity. PMID:24082273

  10. Application of high voltage electric field (HVEF) drying technology in potato chips

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Yaxiang; Shi, Hua; Yang, Yaxin

    2013-03-01

    In order to improve the drying efficiency and qualities of vegetable by high voltage electric field (HVEF), potato chips as a representative of vegetable was dried using a high voltage electric drying systems at 20°C. The shrinkage rate, water absorption and rehydration ratio of dried potato chips were measured. The results indicated that the drying rate of potato chips was significantly improved in the high voltage electric drying systems. The shrinkage rate of potato chips dried by high voltage electric field was 1.1% lower than that by oven drying method. And the rehydration rate of high voltage electric field was 24.6% higher than that by oven drying method. High voltage electric field drying is very advantageous and can be used as a substitute for traditional drying method.

  11. Towards on-line prediction of dry matter content in whole unpeeled potatoes using near-infrared spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Helgerud, Trygve; Wold, Jens P; Pedersen, Morten B; Liland, Kristian H; Ballance, Simon; Knutsen, Svein H; Rukke, Elling O; Afseth, Nils K

    2015-10-01

    Prediction of dry matter content in whole potatoes is a desired capability in the processing industry. Accurate prediction of dry matter content may greatly reduce waste quantities and improve utilization of the raw material through sorting, hence also reducing the processing cost. The following study demonstrates the use of a low resolution, high speed NIR interactance instrument combined with partial least square regression for prediction of dry matter content in whole unpeeled potatoes. Three different measuring configurations were investigated: (1) off-line measurements with contact between the potato and the light collection tube; (2) off-line measurements without contact between the potato and the light collection tube; and (3) on-line measurements of the potatoes. The offline contact measurements gave a prediction performance of R(2)=0.89 and RMSECV=1.19. Similar prediction performance were obtained from the off-line non-contact measurements (R(2)=0.89, RMSECV=1.23). Significantly better (p=0.038) prediction performance (R(2)=0.92, RMSECV=1.06) was obtained with the on-line measuring configuration, thus showing the possibilities of using the instrument for on-line measurements. In addition it was shown that the dry matter distribution across the individual tuber could be predicted by the model obtained.

  12. Microbial products from sweet potato wastes

    SciTech Connect

    Nghiem, N.P.

    1982-01-01

    Microbial production of methane from alkaline sweet potato wastes was studied. Assessment of methane production potential was based on total COD of the wastes. A single-stage and a two-stage system were studied. In both systems, to ensure stable operation and high performance, methane fermenters had to be initially seeded with large quantities of methane formers. A 50% inoculum (based on total fermenter volume) was found to be most effective. Methane formers tended to aggregate to form spherical particles which had extremely high settling rates, this eliminated the requirement of cell recycle. In both single-stage and two-stage systems the rates of gas production was sufficiently fast to induce thorough mixing of the fermenter contents. At low residence times of two and four days the two-stage system achieved significantly higher conversions. Gas production started almost immediately after feeding the methane fermenter of the two-stage system. The conversions in the methane fermenter of a two-stage system could be predicted by a model based on Contois' kinetics. The composition of the gas produced in this fermenter could also be predicted from the distribution of the organic acids in the effluent from the acid fermenter. The acid formation stage was studied in a chemostat operated at a fixed residence time of 5.5 hours. The highest yield of 0.09 g protein/g glucose consumed was obtained at pH 5.5 and 37/sup 0/C.

  13. Production of Microbial Biomass Protein from Potato Processing Wastes by Cephalosporium eichhorniae

    PubMed Central

    Stevens, Coleen A.; Gregory, Kenneth F.

    1987-01-01

    The use of Cephalosporium eichhorniae 152 (ATCC 38255) (reclassified as Acremonium alabamense; see Addendum in Proof), a thermophilic, acidophilic, amylolytic fungus, for the conversion of potato processing wastes into microbial protein for use as animal feed was studied. The fungus was not inhibited by α-solanine or β-2-chaconine, antimicrobial compounds in potatoes, or by morpholine or cyclohexylamine (additives to steam used in the peeling process) at levels likely to be encountered in this substrate. Mixed effluent from holding tanks at a potato-processing plant contained about 109 bacteria per ml and inhibited fungal growth. The fungus grew well on fresh potato wastes containing up to 5% total carbohydrate and utilized both starch and protein at 45°C and pH 3.75. On potato homogenate medium containing 2% carbohydrate (about 14% fresh potato) supplemented with monoammonium phosphate (0.506 g/liter) and ferric iron (0.1 g/liter), with pH control (at 3.75) and additional nitrogen supplied by the automatic addition of ammonium hydroxide, typical yields were 0.61 g (dry weight) of product and 0.3 g of crude protein per g of carbohydrate supplied. An aerobic, spore-forming bacterium, related to Bacillus brevis, commonly contaminated nonsterilized batch cultures but was destroyed by heating for 15 min at 100°C. PMID:16347277

  14. Integrated bioethanol and biomanure production from potato waste.

    PubMed

    Chintagunta, Anjani Devi; Jacob, Samuel; Banerjee, Rintu

    2016-03-01

    Disposal of potato processing waste and the problem of pollution associated with it is a vital issue that is being faced by the potato processing plants. The conventional peeling methods presently followed in the processing plants for removing the potato peel, also result in the loss of some portion of the mash which is rich in starch. Indiscriminate discharge of the waste causes detrimental effects in the environment, so this problem can be resolved by successful utilization of the waste for the generation of value added products. Hence, the present work focuses on integrated production of bioethanol and biomanure to utilize the waste completely leading to zero waste generation. The first part of the work describes a comparative study of ethanol production from potato peel and mash wastes by employing co-culture of Aspergillus niger and Saccharomyces cerevisiae at various incubation time (24-120 h) instead of application of enzymes. The solid state fermentation of potato peel and mash inoculated with co-culture, resulted in bioethanol production of 6.18% (v/v) and 9.30% (v/v) respectively. In the second part of the work, the residue obtained after ethanol production was inoculated with seven different microorganisms (Nostoc muscorum, Fischerella muscicola, Anabaena variabilis, Aulosira fertilissima, Cylindrospermum muscicola, Azospirillium lipoferum, Azotobacter chroococcum) and mixture of all the organisms in equal ratio for nitrogen (N), phosphorous (P) and potassium (K) enrichment. Among them, A. variabilis was found to enrich N, P and K content of the residue by nearly 7.66, 21.66 and 15 fold than that of the initial content, ultimately leading to improved N:P:K ratio of approximately 2:1:1. The application of simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF) for the conversion of potato waste to ethanol and enrichment of residue obtained after ethanol production with microorganisms to be used as manure envisages environmental sustainability. PMID:26316099

  15. Integrated bioethanol and biomanure production from potato waste.

    PubMed

    Chintagunta, Anjani Devi; Jacob, Samuel; Banerjee, Rintu

    2016-03-01

    Disposal of potato processing waste and the problem of pollution associated with it is a vital issue that is being faced by the potato processing plants. The conventional peeling methods presently followed in the processing plants for removing the potato peel, also result in the loss of some portion of the mash which is rich in starch. Indiscriminate discharge of the waste causes detrimental effects in the environment, so this problem can be resolved by successful utilization of the waste for the generation of value added products. Hence, the present work focuses on integrated production of bioethanol and biomanure to utilize the waste completely leading to zero waste generation. The first part of the work describes a comparative study of ethanol production from potato peel and mash wastes by employing co-culture of Aspergillus niger and Saccharomyces cerevisiae at various incubation time (24-120 h) instead of application of enzymes. The solid state fermentation of potato peel and mash inoculated with co-culture, resulted in bioethanol production of 6.18% (v/v) and 9.30% (v/v) respectively. In the second part of the work, the residue obtained after ethanol production was inoculated with seven different microorganisms (Nostoc muscorum, Fischerella muscicola, Anabaena variabilis, Aulosira fertilissima, Cylindrospermum muscicola, Azospirillium lipoferum, Azotobacter chroococcum) and mixture of all the organisms in equal ratio for nitrogen (N), phosphorous (P) and potassium (K) enrichment. Among them, A. variabilis was found to enrich N, P and K content of the residue by nearly 7.66, 21.66 and 15 fold than that of the initial content, ultimately leading to improved N:P:K ratio of approximately 2:1:1. The application of simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF) for the conversion of potato waste to ethanol and enrichment of residue obtained after ethanol production with microorganisms to be used as manure envisages environmental sustainability.

  16. Enhanced Bio-Ethanol Production from Industrial Potato Waste by Statistical Medium Optimization

    PubMed Central

    Izmirlioglu, Gulten; Demirci, Ali

    2015-01-01

    Industrial wastes are of great interest as a substrate in production of value-added products to reduce cost, while managing the waste economically and environmentally. Bio-ethanol production from industrial wastes has gained attention because of its abundance, availability, and rich carbon and nitrogen content. In this study, industrial potato waste was used as a carbon source and a medium was optimized for ethanol production by using statistical designs. The effect of various medium components on ethanol production was evaluated. Yeast extract, malt extract, and MgSO4·7H2O showed significantly positive effects, whereas KH2PO4 and CaCl2·2H2O had a significantly negative effect (p-value < 0.05). Using response surface methodology, a medium consisting of 40.4 g/L (dry basis) industrial waste potato, 50 g/L malt extract, and 4.84 g/L MgSO4·7H2O was found optimal and yielded 24.6 g/L ethanol at 30 °C, 150 rpm, and 48 h of fermentation. In conclusion, this study demonstrated that industrial potato waste can be used effectively to enhance bioethanol production. PMID:26501261

  17. Enhanced Bio-Ethanol Production from Industrial Potato Waste by Statistical Medium Optimization.

    PubMed

    Izmirlioglu, Gulten; Demirci, Ali

    2015-10-15

    Industrial wastes are of great interest as a substrate in production of value-added products to reduce cost, while managing the waste economically and environmentally. Bio-ethanol production from industrial wastes has gained attention because of its abundance, availability, and rich carbon and nitrogen content. In this study, industrial potato waste was used as a carbon source and a medium was optimized for ethanol production by using statistical designs. The effect of various medium components on ethanol production was evaluated. Yeast extract, malt extract, and MgSO₄·7H₂O showed significantly positive effects, whereas KH₂PO₄ and CaCl₂·2H₂O had a significantly negative effect (p-value<0.05). Using response surface methodology, a medium consisting of 40.4 g/L (dry basis) industrial waste potato, 50 g/L malt extract, and 4.84 g/L MgSO₄·7H₂O was found optimal and yielded 24.6 g/L ethanol at 30 °C, 150 rpm, and 48 h of fermentation. In conclusion, this study demonstrated that industrial potato waste can be used effectively to enhance bioethanol production.

  18. Enhanced Bio-Ethanol Production from Industrial Potato Waste by Statistical Medium Optimization.

    PubMed

    Izmirlioglu, Gulten; Demirci, Ali

    2015-01-01

    Industrial wastes are of great interest as a substrate in production of value-added products to reduce cost, while managing the waste economically and environmentally. Bio-ethanol production from industrial wastes has gained attention because of its abundance, availability, and rich carbon and nitrogen content. In this study, industrial potato waste was used as a carbon source and a medium was optimized for ethanol production by using statistical designs. The effect of various medium components on ethanol production was evaluated. Yeast extract, malt extract, and MgSO₄·7H₂O showed significantly positive effects, whereas KH₂PO₄ and CaCl₂·2H₂O had a significantly negative effect (p-value<0.05). Using response surface methodology, a medium consisting of 40.4 g/L (dry basis) industrial waste potato, 50 g/L malt extract, and 4.84 g/L MgSO₄·7H₂O was found optimal and yielded 24.6 g/L ethanol at 30 °C, 150 rpm, and 48 h of fermentation. In conclusion, this study demonstrated that industrial potato waste can be used effectively to enhance bioethanol production. PMID:26501261

  19. Evaluation of hyperspectral reflectance for estimating dry matter and sugar concentration in processing potatoes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The measurement of sugar concentration and dry matter in processing potatoes is a time and resource intensive activity, cannot be performed in the field, and does not easily measure within tuber variation. A proposed method to improve the phenotyping of processing potatoes is to employ hyperspectral...

  20. Biodegradable plastics from potato waste double savings to environment

    SciTech Connect

    Coleman, R. )

    1990-11-01

    Plastics can be made from starchy food waste. This article describes a method by which these plastics break down into harmless chemicals when exposed to sunlight, water or bacteria. Degradable trash bags and agricultural mulch films can replace some of the millions of pounds of nondegradable plastics used each year. Researchers at Argonne National Laboratory developed that involves enzymatically converting potato waste into glucose, fermenting the glucose to lactic acid using bacteria, and then using the lactic acid to construct fully degradable plastics.

  1. Mathematical model for solar drying of potato cylinders with thermal conductivity radially modulated

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trujillo Arredondo, Mariana

    2014-05-01

    A mathematical model for drying potato cylinders using solar radiation is proposed and solved analytically. The model incorporates the energy balance for the heat capacity of the potato, the radiation heat transfer from the potato toward the drying chamber and the solar radiation absorbed by the potato during the drying process. Potato cylinders are assumed to exhibit a thermal conductivity which is radially modulated. The method of the Laplace transform, with integral Bromwich and residue theorem will be applied and the analytic solutions for the temperature profiles in the potato cylinder will be derived in the form of an infinite series of Bessel functions, when the thermal conductivity is constant; and in the form of an infinite series of Heun functions, when the thermal conductivity has a linear radial modulation. All computations are performed using computer algebra, specifically Maple. It is expected that the analytical results obtained will be useful in food engineering and industry. Our results suggest some lines for future investigations such as the adoption of more general forms of radial modulation for the thermal conductivity of potato cylinders; and possible applications of other computer algebra software such as Maxima and Mathematica.

  2. Trichothecene mycotoxins associated with potato dry rot caused by Fusarium graminearum.

    PubMed

    Delgado, Javier A; Schwarz, Paul B; Gillespie, James; Rivera-Varas, Viviana V; Secor, Gary A

    2010-03-01

    Fusarium graminearum, a known producer of trichothecene mycotoxins in cereal hosts, has been recently documented as a cause of dry rot of potato tubers in the United States. Due to the uncertainty of trichothecene production in these tubers, a study was conducted to determine the accumulation and diffusion of trichothecenes in potato tubers affected with dry rot caused by F. graminearum. Potato tubers of cv. Russet Burbank were inoculated with 14 F. graminearum isolates from potato, sugar beet, and wheat and incubated at 10 to 12 degrees C for 5 weeks to determine accumulation of trichothecenes in potato tubers during storage. Twelve of the isolates were classified as deoxynivalenol (DON) genotype and two isolates were as nivalenol (NIV) genotype. Trichothecenes were detected only in rotted tissue. DON was detected in all F. graminearum DON genotype isolates up to 39.68 microg/ml in rotted potato tissue. Similarly, both NIV genotype isolates accumulated NIV in rotted potato tissue up to 18.28 microg/ml. Interestingly, isolates classified as genotype DON accumulated both DON and NIV in the dry rot lesion. Potato tubers were then inoculated with two isolates of F. graminearum chemotype DON and incubated up to 7 weeks at 10 to 12 degrees C and assayed for DON diffusion. F. graminearum was recovered from >53% of the isolations from inoculated tubers at 3 cm distal to the rotted tissue after 7 weeks of incubation but DON was not detected in the surrounding tissue. Based in this data, the accumulation of trichothecenes in the asymptomatic tissue surrounding dry rot lesions caused by F. graminearum is minimal in cv. Russet Burbank potato tubers stored for 7 weeks at customary processing storage temperatures.

  3. Effects of varying the ratio of cooked to uncooked potato on the microbial fuel cell treatment of common potato waste.

    PubMed

    Du, Haixia; Li, Fusheng

    2016-11-01

    The effect of varying the ratio of cooked to uncooked potato in the performance of microbial fuel cell (MFC) treating common potato waste was investigated. Four MFCs were fed with a ratio of cooked (boiled) to uncooked (i.e. waste) potato of 0, 48.7, 67.3 and 85.6%. Respectively, the columbic efficiency was estimated as 53.5, 70.5, 92.7 and 71.1%, indicating significantly enhanced electricity generation and waste degradation at an initial feedstock mixing ratio of 2/3 cooked to 1/3 uncooked potato. The hydrolysis rate parameter (estimated using a first-order sequential hydrolysis and degradation model) increased from 0.061 to 0.191day(-1) as cooked potato was added which increased electricity generation efficiency from 24.6 to 278.9mA/m(2)/d and shortened the startup time for maximum current density from 25 to 5days. The potato slurries' chemical oxygen demand (COD) decreased by 86.6, 83.9, 84.1 and 86.3%, respectively, indicating no relationship exists between the fraction of boiled potato and the amount of COD reduction. PMID:27399871

  4. Effects of varying the ratio of cooked to uncooked potato on the microbial fuel cell treatment of common potato waste.

    PubMed

    Du, Haixia; Li, Fusheng

    2016-11-01

    The effect of varying the ratio of cooked to uncooked potato in the performance of microbial fuel cell (MFC) treating common potato waste was investigated. Four MFCs were fed with a ratio of cooked (boiled) to uncooked (i.e. waste) potato of 0, 48.7, 67.3 and 85.6%. Respectively, the columbic efficiency was estimated as 53.5, 70.5, 92.7 and 71.1%, indicating significantly enhanced electricity generation and waste degradation at an initial feedstock mixing ratio of 2/3 cooked to 1/3 uncooked potato. The hydrolysis rate parameter (estimated using a first-order sequential hydrolysis and degradation model) increased from 0.061 to 0.191day(-1) as cooked potato was added which increased electricity generation efficiency from 24.6 to 278.9mA/m(2)/d and shortened the startup time for maximum current density from 25 to 5days. The potato slurries' chemical oxygen demand (COD) decreased by 86.6, 83.9, 84.1 and 86.3%, respectively, indicating no relationship exists between the fraction of boiled potato and the amount of COD reduction.

  5. Biocomposites reinforced with cellulose nanocrystals derived from potato peel waste.

    PubMed

    Chen, D; Lawton, D; Thompson, M R; Liu, Q

    2012-09-01

    This study investigated the effectiveness of cellulose nanocrystals derived from potato peel waste as a reinforcement and vapor barrier additive. The nanocrystals were derived from cellulosic material in the potato peel by alkali treatment and subsequently acid hydrolysis. TEM images revealed the average fiber length of the nanocrystals was 410 nm with an aspect ratio of 41; its aspect ratio being considerably larger than cotton-derived nanocrystals prepared using similar reaction conditions. Cellulose nanocrystals (CNC)-filled polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) and thermoplastic starch (TPS) films were prepared by solution casting method to maintain uniform dispersion of the 1-2% (w/w) filler content. An increase of 19% and 33% (starch composite) and 38% and 49% (PVA composite) in tensile modulus was observed for the 1% and 2% CNC-reinforced composites, respectively. Water vapor transmission measurements showed a marginal reduction of water permeability for the PVA composite, whereas no effect was observed for the thermoplastic starch composite.

  6. Investigation into solar drying of potato: effect of sample geometry on drying kinetics and CO2 emissions mitigation.

    PubMed

    Tripathy, P P

    2015-03-01

    Drying experiments have been performed with potato cylinders and slices using a laboratory scale designed natural convection mixed-mode solar dryer. The drying data were fitted to eight different mathematical models to predict the drying kinetics, and the validity of these models were evaluated statistically through coefficient of determination (R(2)), root mean square error (RMSE) and reduced chi-square (χ (2)). The present investigation showed that amongst all the mathematical models studied, the Modified Page model was in good agreement with the experimental drying data for both potato cylinders and slices. A mathematical framework has been proposed to estimate the performance of the food dryer in terms of net CO2 emissions mitigation potential along with unit cost of CO2 mitigation arising because of replacement of different fossil fuels by renewable solar energy. For each fossil fuel replaced, the gross annual amount of CO2 as well as net amount of annual CO2 emissions mitigation potential considering CO2 emissions embodied in the manufacture of mixed-mode solar dryer has been estimated. The CO2 mitigation potential and amount of fossil fuels saved while drying potato samples were found to be the maximum for coal followed by light diesel oil and natural gas. It was inferred from the present study that by the year 2020, 23 % of CO2 emissions can be mitigated by the use of mixed-mode solar dryer for drying of agricultural products.

  7. Investigation into solar drying of potato: effect of sample geometry on drying kinetics and CO2 emissions mitigation.

    PubMed

    Tripathy, P P

    2015-03-01

    Drying experiments have been performed with potato cylinders and slices using a laboratory scale designed natural convection mixed-mode solar dryer. The drying data were fitted to eight different mathematical models to predict the drying kinetics, and the validity of these models were evaluated statistically through coefficient of determination (R(2)), root mean square error (RMSE) and reduced chi-square (χ (2)). The present investigation showed that amongst all the mathematical models studied, the Modified Page model was in good agreement with the experimental drying data for both potato cylinders and slices. A mathematical framework has been proposed to estimate the performance of the food dryer in terms of net CO2 emissions mitigation potential along with unit cost of CO2 mitigation arising because of replacement of different fossil fuels by renewable solar energy. For each fossil fuel replaced, the gross annual amount of CO2 as well as net amount of annual CO2 emissions mitigation potential considering CO2 emissions embodied in the manufacture of mixed-mode solar dryer has been estimated. The CO2 mitigation potential and amount of fossil fuels saved while drying potato samples were found to be the maximum for coal followed by light diesel oil and natural gas. It was inferred from the present study that by the year 2020, 23 % of CO2 emissions can be mitigated by the use of mixed-mode solar dryer for drying of agricultural products. PMID:25745206

  8. Thin-layer drying characteristics of sweet potato slices and mathematical modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doymaz, Ibrahim

    2011-03-01

    The effect of blanching and drying temperature (50, 60 and 70°C) on drying kinetics and rehydration ratio of sweet potatoes was investigated. It was observed that both the drying temperature and blanching affected the drying time and rehydration ratio. The logarithmic model showed the best fit to experimental drying data. The values of effective moisture diffusivity and activation energy ranged from 9.32 × 10-11 to 1.75 × 10-10 m2/s, and 22.7-23.2 kJ/mol, respectively.

  9. Microbial growth and sensory quality of dried potato slices irradiated by electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hyun-Jin; Song, Hyeon-Jeong; Song, Kyung-Bin

    2011-06-01

    Electron beam irradiation was applied to secure the microbial safety of dried purple sweet potato. After purple sweet potato slices had been dehydrated with 20% (w/w) maltodextrin solution, the samples were irradiated at doses 2, 4, 6, 8, and 10 kGy and then stored at 20 °C for 60 days. Microbiological data indicated that the populations of total aerobic bacteria and of yeast and molds significantly decreased with increase in irradiation dosage. Specifically, microbial load was reduced by about three log cycles at 6 kGy compared to those of the control. Based on the color measurement of the potato slices, electron beam irradiation treatment did not affect the color quality. Sensory evaluation results also showed that electron beam irradiation did not affect overall sensory scores during storage. These results suggest that electron beam irradiation could be useful for improving microbial safety without impairing the quality of the potato slices during storage.

  10. Mathematical modeling of drying of potato slices in a forced convective dryer based on important parameters.

    PubMed

    Naderinezhad, Samira; Etesami, Nasrin; Poormalek Najafabady, Arefe; Ghasemi Falavarjani, Majid

    2016-01-01

    The effect of air temperature, air velocity, and sample shapes (circle and square with the same cross-sectional area) on kinetic drying of potato slices in a tunnel dryer was investigated experimentally and a suitable drying model was developed. The experiments of drying of potato slices were conducted at an air temperature of 45-70°C with an air velocity 1.60 and 1.81 m sec(-1). Results showed that drying temperature was the most effective parameter in the drying rate. The influence of air velocity was more profound in low temperature. The time for drying square slices was lower compared to the circle ones. Furthermore, drying data were fitted to different empirical models. Among the models, Midilli-Kucuk was the best to explain the single layer drying of potato slices. The parameters of this model were determined as functions of air velocity and temperature by multiple regression analysis for circle and square slices. Various statistical parameters were examined for evaluating the model.

  11. Rapid high throughput amylose determination in freeze dried potato tuber samples

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Approximately 80% of the fresh weight of a potato tuber is water; nearly all of the remaining dry matter is starch. Most of the starch (70%) is composed of amylopectin, while the remainder is amylose. The ratio between amylose and amylopectin is the most important property influencing the physical p...

  12. Anaerobic co-digestion of dairy manure and potato waste

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yadanaparthi, Sai Krishna Reddy

    Dairy and potato are two important agricultural commodities in Idaho. Both the dairy and potato processing industries produce a huge amount of waste which could cause environmental pollution. To minimize the impact of potential pollution associated with dairy manure (DM) and potato waste (PW), anaerobic co-digestion has been considered as one of the best treatment process. The purpose of this research is to evaluate the anaerobic co-digestion of dairy manure and potato waste in terms of process stability, biogas generation, construction and operating costs, and potential revenue. For this purpose, I conducted 1) a literature review, 2) a lab study on anaerobic co-digestion of dairy manure and potato waste at three different temperature ranges (ambient (20-25°C), mesophilic (35-37°C) and thermophilic (55-57°C) with five mixing ratios (DM:PW-100:0, 90:10, 80:20, 60:40, 40:60), and 3) a financial analysis for anaerobic digesters based on assumed different capital costs and the results from the lab co-digestion study. The literature review indicates that several types of organic waste were co-digested with DM. Dairy manure is a suitable base matter for the co-digestion process in terms of digestion process stability and methane (CH4) production (Chapter 2). The lab tests showed that co-digestion of DM with PW was better than digestion of DM alone in terms of biogas and CH4 productions (Chapter 3). The financial analysis reveals DM and PW can be used as substrate for full size anaerobic digesters to generate positive cash flow within a ten year time period. Based on this research, the following conclusions and recommendations were made: ▸ The ratio of DM:PW-80:20 is recommended at thermophilic temperatures and the ratio of DM:PW-90:10 was recommended at mesophilic temperatures for optimum biogas and CH4 productions. ▸ In cases of anaerobic digesters operated with electricity generation equipment (generators), low cost plug flow digesters (capital cost of 600/cow

  13. Potato pulp: microbiological characterization, physical modification, and application of this agricultural waste product.

    PubMed

    Mayer, F; Hillebrandt, J O

    1997-10-01

    Potato pulp, one of the agricultural waste products obtained in high quantities during starch production, contains starch, cellulose, hemicelluloses, pectin, proteins, free amino acids and salts. It exhibits physical and physicochemical properties of a typical colloid. It is mainly used, in a dried and pelleted form, as cattle feed. Its autochthonic microbial flora (bacteria, fungi) was identified and studied with a view towards the degradative potential of the microorganisms and ways of conserving the pulp for subsequent technical applications; 33 isolates (28 bacteria, 4 fungi, 1 yeast), belonging to 15 genera were characterized. Biological conservation was possible at very low oxygen pressure, brought about by the autochthonic anaerobic microorganisms causing acidification. Chemical conservation was achieved with sorbic acid. By treatment with hot water vapour under pressure (autoclaving), followed by a pressure release procedure, intact cells in the pulp (both potato cells and microorganisms, not spores) were destroyed, and their contents and wall fragments were set free. This process resulted in low drying costs and was a prerequisite for the production of a powder that can be used as glue or as animal feed.

  14. RELEASE OF DRIED RADIOACTIVE WASTE MATERIALS TECHNICAL BASIS DOCUMENT

    SciTech Connect

    KUMMERER, M.

    2005-03-02

    This document analyzed three scenarios involving failures of the Demonstration Bulk Vitrification System (DBVS) dried waste transfer system and the high-efficiency particulate air (filter) (HEPA) filtration systems leading to releases of dried tank waste. The scenarios are failure of the Dried Waste Transfer System (DWTS) downstream of the vacuum pump during pneumatic transport, failure of the waste dryer producing spill of dried waste from a height less than 3 m, and filtration failure due to high temperature.

  15. Solid and Liquid Waste Drying Bag

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Litwiller, Eric (Inventor); Hogan, John A. (Inventor); Fisher, John W. (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    Method and system for processing waste from human activities, including solids, liquids and vapors. A fluid-impermeable bag, lined with a liquid-impermeable but vapor-permeable membrane, defining an inner bag, is provided. A vacuum force is provided to extract vapors so that the waste is moved toward a selected region in the inner bag, extracted vapors, including the waste vapors and vaporized portions of the waste liquids are transported across the membrane, and most or all of the solids remain within the liner. Extracted vapors are filtered, and sanitized components thereof are isolated and optionally stored. The solids remaining within the liner are optionally dried and isolated for ultimate disposal.

  16. Quality attributes of sweet potato flour as influenced by variety, pretreatment and drying method.

    PubMed

    Olatunde, Ganiyat O; Henshaw, Folake O; Idowu, Michael A; Tomlins, Keith

    2016-07-01

    The effect of pretreatment methods (soaking in water, potassium metabisulphite solution, and blanching) and drying methods (sun and oven) on some quality attributes of flour from ten varieties of sweet potato roots were investigated. The quality attributes determined were chemical composition and functional properties. Data obtained were subjected to descriptive statistics, multivariate analysis of variance, and Pearson's correlation. The range of values for properties of sweet potato flour were: moisture (8.06-12.86 ± 1.13%), starch (55.76-83.65 ± 6.82%), amylose (10.06-21.26 ± 3.92%), total sugar (22.39-125.46 ± 24.68 μg/mg), water absorption capacity (140-280 ± 26), water solubility (6.89-26.18 ± 3.80), swelling power (1.66-5.00 ± 0.50), peak viscosity (24.50-260.92 ± 52.61 RVU), trough (7.08-145.83 ± 34.48 RVU), breakdown viscosity (11.00-125.33 RVU), final viscosity (10.21-225.50 ± 60.55 RVU), setback viscosity (3.04-92.21 RVU), peak time (6.07-9.06 min) and pasting temperature (69.8-81.3°C). Variety had a significant (P < 0.001) effect on all the attributes of sweet potato flour. Pretreatment did not significantly (P > 0.05) affect moisture, fat and lightness (L*). Drying method did not significantly (P > 0.05) affect fiber and L*. The interactive effect of variety, pretreatment and drying method had a significant (P < 0.001) effect on all the attributes except fat and fiber. Total sugar correlated significantly (P < 0.01) with water solubility (r = 0.88) of the flour samples. Variety was a dominant factor influencing attributes of sweet potato flour and so should be targeted at specific end uses.

  17. Quality attributes of sweet potato flour as influenced by variety, pretreatment and drying method.

    PubMed

    Olatunde, Ganiyat O; Henshaw, Folake O; Idowu, Michael A; Tomlins, Keith

    2016-07-01

    The effect of pretreatment methods (soaking in water, potassium metabisulphite solution, and blanching) and drying methods (sun and oven) on some quality attributes of flour from ten varieties of sweet potato roots were investigated. The quality attributes determined were chemical composition and functional properties. Data obtained were subjected to descriptive statistics, multivariate analysis of variance, and Pearson's correlation. The range of values for properties of sweet potato flour were: moisture (8.06-12.86 ± 1.13%), starch (55.76-83.65 ± 6.82%), amylose (10.06-21.26 ± 3.92%), total sugar (22.39-125.46 ± 24.68 μg/mg), water absorption capacity (140-280 ± 26), water solubility (6.89-26.18 ± 3.80), swelling power (1.66-5.00 ± 0.50), peak viscosity (24.50-260.92 ± 52.61 RVU), trough (7.08-145.83 ± 34.48 RVU), breakdown viscosity (11.00-125.33 RVU), final viscosity (10.21-225.50 ± 60.55 RVU), setback viscosity (3.04-92.21 RVU), peak time (6.07-9.06 min) and pasting temperature (69.8-81.3°C). Variety had a significant (P < 0.001) effect on all the attributes of sweet potato flour. Pretreatment did not significantly (P > 0.05) affect moisture, fat and lightness (L*). Drying method did not significantly (P > 0.05) affect fiber and L*. The interactive effect of variety, pretreatment and drying method had a significant (P < 0.001) effect on all the attributes except fat and fiber. Total sugar correlated significantly (P < 0.01) with water solubility (r = 0.88) of the flour samples. Variety was a dominant factor influencing attributes of sweet potato flour and so should be targeted at specific end uses. PMID:27386111

  18. Optimisation of antioxidant extraction from Solanum tuberosum potato peel waste by surface response methodology.

    PubMed

    Amado, Isabel Rodríguez; Franco, Daniel; Sánchez, Marivel; Zapata, Carlos; Vázquez, José Antonio

    2014-12-15

    This study reports the optimised conditions (temperature, ethanol concentration and processing-time) for antioxidant extraction from potato peel (Agria variety) waste. At short extraction times (34 min), optimal yields of phenolic (TP) and flavonoid (Fv) compounds were reached at 89.9°C and ethanol concentrations of 71.2% and 38.6%, respectively. The main phenolic compounds identified in the extracts were chlorogenic (Cl) and ferulic (Fer) acids. A significant positive correlation was found between antioxidant activity and TP, Fv, Fer and Cl responses. Potato peel extracts were able to stabilize soybean oil under accelerated oxidation conditions, minimising peroxide, totox and p-anisidine indices. The production of hexanal and 2-hexenal in soybean oil samples was maximal for extracts obtained at intermediate temperatures and ethanol concentrations. Our results demonstrate potato peel waste is a good source of antioxidants able to effectively limit oil oxidation, while contributing to the revalorisation of these agrifood by-products.

  19. Use of starch and potato peel waste for perchlorate bioreduction in water.

    PubMed

    Okeke, Benedict C; Frankenberger, William T

    2005-07-15

    The cost of carbon substrates for microbial reduction of perchlorate (ClO(4)(-)) is central to the success and competitiveness of a sustainable bioremediation strategy for ClO(4)(-). This study explored the potential application of starch in combination with an amylolytic bacterial consortia and potato peel waste for ClO(4)(-) bioreduction. We obtained a potent amylolytic bacterial consortium that consisted of a Citrobacter sp. S4, Streptomyces sp. S2, Flavobacterium sp. S6, Pseudoxanthomonas sp. S5, Streptomyces sp. S7, and an Aeromonas sp. S8 identified by 16S rDNA sequencing. ClO(4)(-) concentration substantially decreased in purified starch medium inoculated with the amylolytic bacterial consortium and Dechlorosoma sp. perclace. Potato peel waste supported ClO(4)(-) reduction by perclace with the rate of ClO(4)(-) reduction being dependent on the amount of potato peels. Over 90% ClO(4)(-) removal was achieved in 4 days in a single time point experiment with 2% (w/v) potato peels waste. ClO(4)(-) reduction in a non-sterile 0.5% potato peel media inoculated with perclace occurred with an initial concentration of 10.14+/-0.04 mg L(-1) to 2.87+/-0.4 mg L(-1) (71.7% reduction) within 5 days. ClO(4)(-) was not detected in the cultures in 6 days. In a non-sterile 0.5% potato media without perclace, ClO(4)(-) depletion occurred slowly from an initial value of 9.99+/-0.15 mg L(-1) to 6.33+/-0.43 mg L(-1) (36.63% reduction) in 5 days. Thereafter, ClO(4)(-) was rapidly degraded achieving 77.1% reduction in 7 days and not detected in 9 days. No susbstantial reduction of ClO(4)(-) was observed in the sterile potato peel media without perclace in 7 days. Redox potential of the potato peel cultures was favorable for ClO(4)(-) reduction, decreasing to as low as -294 mV in 24 h. Sugar levels remained very low in cultures effectively reducing ClO(4)(-) and was substantially higher in sterilized controls. Our results indicate that potato peel waste in combination with amylolytic

  20. Research on the drying kinetics of household food waste for the development and optimization of domestic waste drying technique.

    PubMed

    Sotiropoulos, A; Malamis, D; Michailidis, P; Krokida, M; Loizidou, M

    2016-01-01

    Domestic food waste drying foresees the significant reduction of household food waste mass through the hygienic removal of its moisture content at source. In this manuscript, a new approach for the development and optimization of an innovative household waste dryer for the effective dehydration of food waste at source is presented. Food waste samples were dehydrated with the use of the heated air-drying technique under different air-drying conditions, namely air temperature and air velocity, in order to investigate their drying kinetics. Different thin-layer drying models have been applied, in which the drying constant is a function of the process variables. The Midilli model demonstrated the best performance in fitting the experimental data in all tested samples, whereas it was found that food waste drying is greatly affected by temperature and to a smaller scale by air velocity. Due to the increased moisture content of food waste, an appropriate configuration of the drying process variables can lead to a total reduction of its mass by 87% w/w, thus achieving a sustainable residence time and energy consumption level. Thus, the development of a domestic waste dryer can be proved to be economically and environmentally viable in the future. PMID:26507489

  1. Research on the drying kinetics of household food waste for the development and optimization of domestic waste drying technique.

    PubMed

    Sotiropoulos, A; Malamis, D; Michailidis, P; Krokida, M; Loizidou, M

    2016-01-01

    Domestic food waste drying foresees the significant reduction of household food waste mass through the hygienic removal of its moisture content at source. In this manuscript, a new approach for the development and optimization of an innovative household waste dryer for the effective dehydration of food waste at source is presented. Food waste samples were dehydrated with the use of the heated air-drying technique under different air-drying conditions, namely air temperature and air velocity, in order to investigate their drying kinetics. Different thin-layer drying models have been applied, in which the drying constant is a function of the process variables. The Midilli model demonstrated the best performance in fitting the experimental data in all tested samples, whereas it was found that food waste drying is greatly affected by temperature and to a smaller scale by air velocity. Due to the increased moisture content of food waste, an appropriate configuration of the drying process variables can lead to a total reduction of its mass by 87% w/w, thus achieving a sustainable residence time and energy consumption level. Thus, the development of a domestic waste dryer can be proved to be economically and environmentally viable in the future.

  2. The effect of packaging material and storage period on microwave-dried potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) cubes.

    PubMed

    Shakouri, Shahrzad; Ziaolhagh, Hamid Reza; Sharifi-Rad, Javad; Heydari-Majd, Mojtaba; Tajali, Rohallah; Nezarat, Somayeh; Teixeira da Silva, Jaime A

    2015-06-01

    The effect of three packaging materials (transparent biaxially oriented polypropylene laminate (BOPP); semi-transparent BOPP; polyethylene-polyamide (PE-PA) laminate) in three packaging conditions (vacuum, N2, natural atmosphere) and in two temperature treatments (blanching in hot water; steam) on microwave-dried potato (Solanum tuberosum L.; Solanaceae) cubes was studied. After storage for 60 and 120 days, the amount of ascorbic acid (AA), shrinkage and rehydration were determined. Dried potato cubes packaged under N2 atmosphere had the highest rehydration value (3.142 %). Since there is a direct relationship between the amount of water loss and shrinkage, samples packaged in PE-PA laminate packages under vacuum showed 4.947 % less shrinkage than transparent BOPP or semi-transparent BOPP due to low permeability of these packages. Potatoes stored for 120 days resulted in 7.89 % more shrinkage than those stored for 60 days. The least loss in AA occurred in PE-PA laminate packaging. The shelf-life of potato cubes can be increased and their quantitative and qualitative characteristics can be best preserved by package-drying in PE-PA laminate under vacuum conditions. PMID:26028775

  3. The effect of packaging material and storage period on microwave-dried potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) cubes.

    PubMed

    Shakouri, Shahrzad; Ziaolhagh, Hamid Reza; Sharifi-Rad, Javad; Heydari-Majd, Mojtaba; Tajali, Rohallah; Nezarat, Somayeh; Teixeira da Silva, Jaime A

    2015-06-01

    The effect of three packaging materials (transparent biaxially oriented polypropylene laminate (BOPP); semi-transparent BOPP; polyethylene-polyamide (PE-PA) laminate) in three packaging conditions (vacuum, N2, natural atmosphere) and in two temperature treatments (blanching in hot water; steam) on microwave-dried potato (Solanum tuberosum L.; Solanaceae) cubes was studied. After storage for 60 and 120 days, the amount of ascorbic acid (AA), shrinkage and rehydration were determined. Dried potato cubes packaged under N2 atmosphere had the highest rehydration value (3.142 %). Since there is a direct relationship between the amount of water loss and shrinkage, samples packaged in PE-PA laminate packages under vacuum showed 4.947 % less shrinkage than transparent BOPP or semi-transparent BOPP due to low permeability of these packages. Potatoes stored for 120 days resulted in 7.89 % more shrinkage than those stored for 60 days. The least loss in AA occurred in PE-PA laminate packaging. The shelf-life of potato cubes can be increased and their quantitative and qualitative characteristics can be best preserved by package-drying in PE-PA laminate under vacuum conditions.

  4. Colored potatoes (Solanum tuberosum L.) dried into antioxidant-rich value-added foods

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Colored potatoes (Solanum tuberosum L.) are a significant source of antioxidants from polyphenols, carotenoids, tocopherol and ascorbic acid. In this study, retention of total antioxidants in fresh colored potatoes and processed potato flakes prepared as potential ingredients for snack foods was stu...

  5. Determination of thiabendazole residues in white and sweet potatoes by liquid chromatography with fluorescence detection.

    PubMed

    Arenas, R V; Rahman, H; Johnson, N A

    1995-01-01

    A liquid chromatographic (LC) method was developed for determination of thiabendazole (TBZ) residues in or on whole, unwashed white potatoes (Solanum tuberosum) and sweet potatoes (Ipomoea batatas). TBZ is extracted from the potato homogenate with ethyl acetate and the extract purified and concentrated on a cation-exchange, solid-phase extraction column. The extract is analyzed for TBZ residues by column LC with a cation-exchange column and fluorescence detection. Recoveries of TBZ from whole white potatoes fortified with TBZ at 0.05-20 ppm and from whole sweet potatoes fortified with TBZ at 0.005-0.1 ppm averaged 100 and 94%, respectively. The method is also applicable for quantitation of TBZ residues in white potato waste (dried peel) used as an animal feed additive. The present method for monitoring TBZ residues in white and sweet potatoes and white potato waste (dried peel) is simple, rapid, and sensitive.

  6. Molecular phylogenetic and pathogenetic characterization of Fusarium solani species complex (FSSC), the cause of dry rot on potato in Iran.

    PubMed

    Chehri, Khosrow; Ghasempour, Hamid Reza; Karimi, Naser

    2014-01-01

    Members of Fusarium solani species complex (FSSC) are common pathogens of potato, causing dry rot in the west of Iran which involved Hamedan, Kermanshah, Eilam and Kurdistan provinces. Therefore, the objectives in this study were to isolate and identify disease-causing FSSC from infected potato tubers based on the morphological and molecular characteristics. Forty-five isolates of Fusarium were obtained from potato tubers collected from the wet market in different regions of the west of Iran and identified as FSSC through morphological characters. All of the isolates were evaluated for their pathogenicity on healthy potato tubers in the planthouse. The tubers rot symptoms were observed on the 21st day after inoculation of Fusarium isolates on the tubers tested. In the tubers inoculation tests, lesion sizes were quite variable; therefore, the measurement was done to compare the depth and width of lesion expansion among the isolates. Based on the sequence data from translation elongation factor (EF-lα) gene and internal transcript spacer (ITS) regions analysis, all of the selected FSSC isolates were divided into two major groups. This is the first report on molecular identification of FSSC strains isolated from potato tubers in Iran and Fusarium falciforme was reported for the first time in Iran.

  7. Macroscopic modelling of bioethanol production from potato peel wastes in batch cultures supplemented with inorganic nitrogen.

    PubMed

    Richelle, A; Ben Tahar, I; Hassouna, M; Bogaerts, Ph

    2015-09-01

    Inorganic nitrogen supplementation is commonly used to boost fermentation metabolism in yeast cultures. However, an excessive addition can induce an opposite effect. Hence, it is important to ensure that the ammonia supplemented to the culture leads to an improvement of the ethanol production while avoiding undesirable inhibition effects. To this end, a macroscopic model describing the influence of ammonia addition on Saccharomyces cerevisiae metabolism during bioethanol production from potato peel wastes has been developed. The model parameters are obtained by a simplified identification methodology in five steps. It is validated with experimental data and successfully predicts the dynamics of growth, substrate consumption (ammonia and fermentable sugar sources) and bioethanol production, even in cross validation. The model is used to determine the optimal quantity of supplemented ammonia required for maximizing bioethanol production from potato peel wastes in batch cultures. PMID:26059818

  8. Large Scale Magnetic Separation of Solanum tuberosum Tuber Lectin from Potato Starch Waste Water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Safarik, Ivo; Horska, Katerina; Martinez, Lluis M.; Safarikova, Mirka

    2010-12-01

    A simple procedure for large scale isolation of Solanum tuberosum tuber lectin from potato starch industry waste water has been developed. The procedure employed magnetic chitosan microparticles as an affinity adsorbent. Magnetic separation was performed in a flow-through magnetic separation system. The adsorbed lectin was eluted with glycine/HCl buffer, pH 2.2. The specific activity of separated lectin increased approximately 27 times during the isolation process.

  9. Purification and characterization of polyphenol oxidase from waste potato peel by aqueous two-phase extraction.

    PubMed

    Niphadkar, Sonali S; Vetal, Mangesh D; Rathod, Virendra K

    2015-01-01

    Potato peel from food industrial waste is a good source of polyphenol oxidase (PPO). This work illustrates the application of an aqueous two-phase system (ATPS) for the extraction and purification of PPO from potato peel. ATPS was composed of polyethylene glycol (PEG) and potassium phosphate buffer. Effect of different process parameters, namely, PEG, potassium phosphate buffer, NaCl concentration, and pH of the system, on partition coefficient, purification factor, and yield of PPO enzyme were evaluated. Response surface methodology (RSM) was utilized as a statistical tool for the optimization of ATPS. Optimized experimental conditions were found to be PEG1500 17.62% (w/w), potassium phosphate buffer 15.11% (w/w), and NaCl 2.08 mM at pH 7. At optimized condition, maximum partition coefficient, purification factor, and yield were found to be 3.7, 4.5, and 77.8%, respectively. After partial purification of PPO from ATPS, further purification was done by gel chromatography where its purity was increased up to 12.6-fold. The purified PPO enzyme was characterized by sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE), followed by Km value 3.3 mM, and Vmax value 3333 U/mL, and enzyme stable ranges for temperature and pH of PPO were determined. These results revealed that ATPS would be an attractive option for obtaining purified PPO from waste potato peel.

  10. Purification and characterization of polyphenol oxidase from waste potato peel by aqueous two-phase extraction.

    PubMed

    Niphadkar, Sonali S; Vetal, Mangesh D; Rathod, Virendra K

    2015-01-01

    Potato peel from food industrial waste is a good source of polyphenol oxidase (PPO). This work illustrates the application of an aqueous two-phase system (ATPS) for the extraction and purification of PPO from potato peel. ATPS was composed of polyethylene glycol (PEG) and potassium phosphate buffer. Effect of different process parameters, namely, PEG, potassium phosphate buffer, NaCl concentration, and pH of the system, on partition coefficient, purification factor, and yield of PPO enzyme were evaluated. Response surface methodology (RSM) was utilized as a statistical tool for the optimization of ATPS. Optimized experimental conditions were found to be PEG1500 17.62% (w/w), potassium phosphate buffer 15.11% (w/w), and NaCl 2.08 mM at pH 7. At optimized condition, maximum partition coefficient, purification factor, and yield were found to be 3.7, 4.5, and 77.8%, respectively. After partial purification of PPO from ATPS, further purification was done by gel chromatography where its purity was increased up to 12.6-fold. The purified PPO enzyme was characterized by sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE), followed by Km value 3.3 mM, and Vmax value 3333 U/mL, and enzyme stable ranges for temperature and pH of PPO were determined. These results revealed that ATPS would be an attractive option for obtaining purified PPO from waste potato peel. PMID:25036474

  11. Ethanol distillation from waste potato starch. Final report, October 1, 1982-September 30, 1983

    SciTech Connect

    Shull, H.E.

    1983-10-17

    The objective of the project was to investigate the economic feasibility of converting potato waste to fuel alcohol. The source of potato starch was Troyer Farms Potato Chips. Experimental work was carried out at both the laboratory scale and the larger pilot scale batch operation at a decommissioned waste water treatment building on campus. The laboratory scale work was considerably more extensive than originally planned, resulting in a much improved scientific work. The pilot scale facility has been completed and operated successfully. In contrast, the analysis of the economic feasibility of commercial production has not yet been completed. The project was brought to a close with the successful demonstration of the fermentation and distillation using the large scale facilities described previously. Two batches of mash were cooked using the procedures established in support of the laboratory scale work. One of the batches was fermented using the optimum values of the seven controlled factors as predicted by the laboratory scale application of the Box-Wilson design. The other batch was fermented under conditions derived out of Mr. Rouse's interpretation of his long sequence of laboratory results. He was gratified to find that his commitment to the Box-Wilson experiments was justified. The productivity of the Box-Wilson design was greater. The difference between the performance of the two fermentors (one stirred, one not) has not been established yet. Both batches were then distilled together, demonstrating the satisfactory performance of the column still. 4 references.

  12. Utilization of potato starch processing wastes to produce animal feed with high lysine content.

    PubMed

    Li, Ying; Liu, Bingnan; Song, Jinzhu; Jiang, Cheng; Yang, Qian

    2015-02-01

    This work aims to utilize wastes from the potato starch industry to produce single-cell protein (SCP) with high lysine content as animal feed. In this work, S-(2-aminoethyl)-L-cysteine hydrochloride-resistant Bacillus pumilus E1 was used to produce SCP with high lysine content, whereas Aspergillus niger was used to degrade cellulose biomass and Candida utilis was used to improve the smell and palatability of the feed. An orthogonal design was used to optimize the process of fermentation for maximal lysine content. The optimum fermentation conditions were as follows: temperature of 40°C, substrate concentration of 3%, and natural pH of about 7.0. For unsterilized potato starch wastes, the microbial communities in the fermentation process were determined by terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis of bacterial 16S rRNA genes. Results showed that the dominant population was Bacillus sp. The protein quality as well as the amino acid profile of the final product was found to be significantly higher compared with the untreated waste product at day 0. Additionally, acute toxicity test showed that the SCP product was non-toxic, indicating that it can be used for commercial processing.

  13. Guidelines for the segregation characterization management of dry waste at Berkeley Lab

    SciTech Connect

    1997-05-01

    Managing and disposing of dry low level radioactive waste at Berkeley Lab. is problematic. The Waste Management Group must assure off site treatment, storage, and disposal facilities that dry waste from Berkeley Lab. is free of liquids and regulated metals (such as lead and mercury). RTR (Real Time Radioagraphy) used for waste to be rejected. This pamphlet helps to clarify dry waste management requirements that will ensure that Berkeley Lab. dry waste will be accepted for off site shipment. These issues are critical if we are to have an off site disposal option for your dry radioactive waste.

  14. Evaluation of dry solid waste recycling from municipal solid waste: case of Mashhad city, Iran.

    PubMed

    Farzadkia, Mahdi; Jorfi, Sahand; Akbari, Hamideh; Ghasemi, Mehdi

    2012-01-01

    The recycling for recovery and reuse of material and energy resources undoubtedly provides a substantial alternative supply of raw materials and reduces the dependence on virgin feedstock. The main objective of this study was to assess the potential of dry municipal solid waste recycling in Mashhad city, Iran. Several questionnaires were prepared and distributed among various branches of the municipality, related organizations and people. The total amount of solid waste generated in Mashhad in 2008 was 594, 800  tons with per capita solid waste generation rate of 0.609  kg  person(-1) day(-1). Environmental educational programmes via mass media and direct education of civilians were implemented to publicize the advantages and necessity of recycling. The amount of recycled dry solid waste was increased from 2.42% of total dry solid waste (2588.36  ton  year(-1)) in 1999 to 7.22% (10, 165  ton  year(-1)) in 2008. The most important fractions of recycled dry solid waste in Mashhad included paper and board (51.33%), stale bread (14.59%), glass (9.73%), ferrous metals (9.73%), plastic (9.73%), polyethylene terephthalate (2.62%) and non-ferrous metals (0.97%). It can be concluded that unfortunately the potential of dry solid waste recycling in Mashhad has not been considered properly and there is a great effort to be made in order to achieve the desired conditions of recycling.

  15. Effect of irradiation for recovery of organic wastes from potato starch wastewater with chitosan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kume, Tamikazu; Takehisa, Masaaki

    The irradiation effect on recovery of organic substances from potato starch wastewater with aid of chitosan and disinfection were investigated for recycling the organic wastes into animal feeds. Chitosan was effective as a coagulant for suspended solids in the wastewater and the optimum concentration was 8-10 x 10 -30/0. The irradiation promotes the coagulation of the organic wastes. Especially, the coagulation of the proteins with chitosan increased by irradiation since the soluble proteins became insoluble by irradiation. The numbers of total aerobic bacteria in the wastewater and in the coagulum with chitosan were 8.0 x 10 7 and 3.5 x 10 8counts/ ml, respectively, and decreased to 11 and 45 counts/ml by 1.0 Mrad irradiation.

  16. Antifungal activity of sodium silicate on Fusarium sulphureum and its effect on dry rot of potato tubers.

    PubMed

    Li, Y C; Bi, Y; Ge, Y H; Sun, X J; Wang, Y

    2009-06-01

    The antifungal activity of sodium silicate on Fusarium sulphureum and its inhibitory effect on dry rot of potato tubers were investigated. Sodium silicate strongly inhibited spore germination and mycelial growth. Morphological changes in sodium silicate-treated hyphae such as mycelium sparsity and asymmetry, hyphal swelling, curling, and cupped shape were observed by scanning electron microscopy. Ultrastructural alterations were also observed using transmission electron microscopy, including thickening of the hyphal cell walls, cell distortion, cavity, or electron-dense material in hyphal cells. Daughter hyphae and new daughter hyphae inside of the collapsed hyphal cells were often detected in the cytoplasm of sodium silicate-treated hyphae, although the septa of treated hyphae remained uniform. In vivo testing showed that sodium silicate at 100 and 200 mM effectively controlled dry rot of tubers that were challenged by inoculation with a F. sulphureum spore suspension. These findings suggest that sodium silicate has direct fungitoxic activity against the pathogen.

  17. Controlled waste-oil biodegradation at existing drying beds

    SciTech Connect

    Hary, L.F.

    1982-01-01

    A feasibility study at the Portsmouth Uranium Enrichment Facility to determine if sludge drying beds at a sewage treatment plant could be used as controlled waste oil biodegradation plots has been completed. A greenhouse-like enclosure would be constructed over three 9.1 meter by 21.3 meter beds to allow for year-round use, and any waste oil runoff would be collected by existing leachate piping. It has been determined that this proposed facility could dispose of existing radioactive waste oil generation (7200 liters/year) from the Gaseous Diffusion Plant (GDP); however, it would be inadequate to handle radioactive waste oils from the new Gas Centrifuge Enrichment Plant (GCEP) as well. The study reviewed nuclear criticality constraints, biodegradation technology, and the capital cost for an enclosed biodegradation facility.

  18. The hydro nuclear services dry active waste processing system

    SciTech Connect

    Bunker, A.S.

    1985-04-01

    There is a real need for a dry active waste processing system that can separate clean trash and recoverable items from radwaste safely and efficiently. This paper reports that Hydro Nuclear Services has produced just such a system and is marketing it as a DAW Segregation/Volume Reduction Process. The system is a unique, semi-automated package of sensitive monitoring instruments of volume reduction equipment that separates clean trash from contaminated and recoverable items in the waste stream and prepares the clean trash for unrestricted release. What makes the HNS system truly unique is its end product - clean trash.

  19. Long-term thermophilic mono-digestion of rendering wastes and co-digestion with potato pulp

    SciTech Connect

    Bayr, S. Ojanperä, M.; Kaparaju, P.; Rintala, J.

    2014-10-15

    Highlights: • Rendering wastes’ mono-digestion and co-digestion with potato pulp were studied. • CSTR process with OLR of 1.5 kg VS/m{sup 3} d, HRT of 50 d was unstable in mono-digestion. • Free NH{sub 3} inhibited mono-digestion of rendering wastes. • CSTR process with OLR of 1.5 kg VS/m{sup 3} d, HRT of 50 d was stable in co-digestion. • Co-digestion increased methane yield somewhat compared to mono-digestion. - Abstract: In this study, mono-digestion of rendering wastes and co-digestion of rendering wastes with potato pulp were studied for the first time in continuous stirred tank reactor (CSTR) experiments at 55 °C. Rendering wastes have high protein and lipid contents and are considered good substrates for methane production. However, accumulation of digestion intermediate products viz., volatile fatty acids (VFAs), long chain fatty acids (LCFAs) and ammonia nitrogen (NH{sub 4}-N and/or free NH{sub 3}) can cause process imbalance during the digestion. Mono-digestion of rendering wastes at an organic loading rate (OLR) of 1.5 kg volatile solids (VS)/m{sup 3} d and hydraulic retention time (HRT) of 50 d was unstable and resulted in methane yields of 450 dm{sup 3}/kg VS{sub fed}. On the other hand, co-digestion of rendering wastes with potato pulp (60% wet weight, WW) at the same OLR and HRT improved the process stability and increased methane yields (500–680 dm{sup 3}/kg VS{sub fed}). Thus, it can be concluded that co-digestion of rendering wastes with potato pulp could improve the process stability and methane yields from these difficult to treat industrial waste materials.

  20. Osmoprotectants and carriers for formulating co-cultures of Gram-negative biocontrol agents active against potato dry rot in storage

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pseudomonas fluorescens strains S11:P:12, P22:Y:05, and S22:T:04 suppress four important storage potato maladies; dry rot, late blight, pink rot, and sprouting. When grown as a three-strain co-culture, the efficacy and consistency of the strains are enhanced over blends of individually cultured str...

  1. Polysaccharide benefits dry storage survival of the biocontrol agent Pseudomonas fluorescens S11:P:12 effective against several maladies of stored potatoes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pseudomonas fluorescens S11:P:12 (NRRL B-21133) is a biological control agent able to suppress several storage maladies of potatoes including sprouting, Fusarium dry rot incited by Gibberella pulicaris, pink rot incited by Phytophthora erythroseptica, and late blight incited by Phytophthora infestan...

  2. Combustion parameters of spark ignition engine using waste potato bioethanol and gasoline blended fuels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghobadian, B.; Najafi, G.; Abasian, M.; Mamat, R.

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the combustion parameters of a SI engine operating on bioethanol-gasoline blends (E0-E20: 20% bioethanol and 80% gasoline by volume). A reactor was designed, fabricated and evaluated for bioethanol production from potato wastes. The results showed that increasing the bioethanol content in the blend fuel will decrease the heating value of the blended fuel and increase the octane number. Combustion parameters were evaluated and analyzed at different engine speeds and loads (1000-5000 rpm). The results revealed that using bioethanol-gasoline blended fuels will increase the cylinder pressure and its 1st and 2nd derivatives (P(θ), P•(θ) and P••(θ)). Moreover, using bioethanol- gasoline blends will increase the heat release (Q•(θ)) and worked of the cycle. This improvement was due to the high oxygen percentage in the ethanol.

  3. Anaerobic digestion of pre-fermented potato peel wastes for methane production.

    PubMed

    Liang, Shaobo; McDonald, Armando G

    2015-12-01

    This study investigated the feasibility of anaerobic digestion (AD) of potato peel waste (PPW) and its lactic acid fermentation residue (PPW-FR) for methane (CH4) production. The experimental results showed that about 60-70% CH4 content was obtained. The digester using PPW-FR as feedstock exhibited better performance and produced a highest cumulative CH4 production of 273 L/kg VS fed, followed by 239 L/kg VS fed using PPW under the same conditions. However, with increasing solid loadings of PPW-FR feedstock from 6.4% to 9.1%, the CH4 production was inhibited. The generation, accumulation, and degradation of volatile fatty acids (VFAs) in digesters were also investigated in this research.

  4. Modification of potato peel waste with base hydrolysis and subsequent cationization.

    PubMed

    Lappalainen, Katja; Kärkkäinen, Johanna; Joensuu, Päivi; Lajunen, Marja

    2015-11-01

    Potato peel waste (PW) is a starch containing biomaterial produced in large amounts by food processing industry. In this work, the treatment of PW by alkaline hydrolysis and cationization in the water phase is reported. In order to improve the cationization of starch, PW was hydrolyzed by heating with alkaline (NaOH) ethanol solution (80%) in a water bath. The impact of variable molar ratios of anhydroglucose unit (AGU):NaOH, heating temperatures and times was studied on the degradation of starch and the molecular size distribution of the product. The hydrolyzed PW was cationized subsequently in water by using glycidyltrimethylammonium chloride and catalyzed by NaOH under microwave irradiation or in an oil bath. The impact of the various reaction conditions on the cationization and degree of substitution of starch was studied. The degree of substitution of the cationized starch varied in the range of 0-0.35. PMID:26256329

  5. Modification of potato peel waste with base hydrolysis and subsequent cationization.

    PubMed

    Lappalainen, Katja; Kärkkäinen, Johanna; Joensuu, Päivi; Lajunen, Marja

    2015-11-01

    Potato peel waste (PW) is a starch containing biomaterial produced in large amounts by food processing industry. In this work, the treatment of PW by alkaline hydrolysis and cationization in the water phase is reported. In order to improve the cationization of starch, PW was hydrolyzed by heating with alkaline (NaOH) ethanol solution (80%) in a water bath. The impact of variable molar ratios of anhydroglucose unit (AGU):NaOH, heating temperatures and times was studied on the degradation of starch and the molecular size distribution of the product. The hydrolyzed PW was cationized subsequently in water by using glycidyltrimethylammonium chloride and catalyzed by NaOH under microwave irradiation or in an oil bath. The impact of the various reaction conditions on the cationization and degree of substitution of starch was studied. The degree of substitution of the cationized starch varied in the range of 0-0.35.

  6. Anaerobic digestion of pre-fermented potato peel wastes for methane production.

    PubMed

    Liang, Shaobo; McDonald, Armando G

    2015-12-01

    This study investigated the feasibility of anaerobic digestion (AD) of potato peel waste (PPW) and its lactic acid fermentation residue (PPW-FR) for methane (CH4) production. The experimental results showed that about 60-70% CH4 content was obtained. The digester using PPW-FR as feedstock exhibited better performance and produced a highest cumulative CH4 production of 273 L/kg VS fed, followed by 239 L/kg VS fed using PPW under the same conditions. However, with increasing solid loadings of PPW-FR feedstock from 6.4% to 9.1%, the CH4 production was inhibited. The generation, accumulation, and degradation of volatile fatty acids (VFAs) in digesters were also investigated in this research. PMID:26421481

  7. Efficient ethanol production from potato and corn processing industry waste using E. coli engineered to express Vitreoscilla haemoglobin.

    PubMed

    Sumer, Fatma; Stark, Benjamin C; Yesilcimen Akbas, Meltem

    2015-01-01

    Engineering of ethanologenic E. coli to express the haemoglobin (VHb) from the bacterium Vitreoscilla has been shown to enhance ethanol production by fermentation of pure sugars, sugars from hydrolysis of lignocellulose, components of whey, and sugars from wastewater produced during potato processing. Here, these studies were extended to see whether the same effect could be seen when a mixture of waste materials from processing of potatoes and corn into potato and corn chips were used as sugar sources. Consistent increases in ethanol production coincident with VHb expression were seen in shake flasks at both low aeration and high aeration conditions. The ethanol increases were due almost entirely to increases in the amount of ethanol produced per unit of cell mass. The VHb strategy for increasing fermentation to ethanol (and perhaps other valuable fermentation products) may be of general use, particularly regarding conversion of otherwise discarded materials into valuable commodities.

  8. Efficient ethanol production from potato and corn processing industry waste using E. coli engineered to express Vitreoscilla haemoglobin.

    PubMed

    Sumer, Fatma; Stark, Benjamin C; Yesilcimen Akbas, Meltem

    2015-01-01

    Engineering of ethanologenic E. coli to express the haemoglobin (VHb) from the bacterium Vitreoscilla has been shown to enhance ethanol production by fermentation of pure sugars, sugars from hydrolysis of lignocellulose, components of whey, and sugars from wastewater produced during potato processing. Here, these studies were extended to see whether the same effect could be seen when a mixture of waste materials from processing of potatoes and corn into potato and corn chips were used as sugar sources. Consistent increases in ethanol production coincident with VHb expression were seen in shake flasks at both low aeration and high aeration conditions. The ethanol increases were due almost entirely to increases in the amount of ethanol produced per unit of cell mass. The VHb strategy for increasing fermentation to ethanol (and perhaps other valuable fermentation products) may be of general use, particularly regarding conversion of otherwise discarded materials into valuable commodities. PMID:25766084

  9. Impact of Ni(II), Zn(II) and Cd(II) on biogassification of potato waste.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Anuj; Miglani, P; Gupta, R K; Bhattacharya, T K

    2006-01-01

    A study was conducted on anaerobic digestion of potato waste and cattle manure mixture, inoculated with 12% inoculum and diluted to 1:1 substrate water ratio at 37 +/- 1 degrees C. Initially pH of substrate was found to be 4.5 to 5.0. Lime and sodium bicarbonate solutions were employed to adjust the pH to 7.5. Biogas production continued up to 10 and 7 days, when lime and sodium bicarbonate solutions were used to adjust the pH, respectively. Biogassification potential was studied in response to different ratio of waste and cattle manure. Biogas production rate was higher when potato waste and cattle manure were used in 50:50 ratio. Effect of two different concentrations (2.5 and 5.0 ppm) of three heavy metals viz. (Ni (II), Zn (II) and Cd (II)) on anaerobic digestion of substrate (potato waste--cattle manure, 50:50) was studied. At 2.5 ppm, all the three heavy metals increased biogas production rate over the control value. The percentage increase in biogas production over the control was highest by Cd, followed by Ni and Zn. In all the treatments, methane content of biogas increased with increase in time after feeding. Various physico-chemical parameters viz. total solids, total volatile solids, total organic carbon and chemical oxygen demand considerably declined after 7 days of digestion and decline was greater in presence of heavy metals as compared to control. The physico-chemical parameters revealed maximum decrease in the presence of 2.5-ppm concentrations of heavy metals with the substrate. Among all the three heavy metals employed in the study, Cd++ at 2.5 ppm was found to produce maximum biogas production rate. The use of three heavy metals to enhance biogas production from potato and other horticultural waste is discussed.

  10. Papaya drying and waste conversion system. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-02-12

    This project, performed under United States Department of Energy Small-scale Appropriate Energy Technology Grant, involves demonstration of an integrated system using solar energy to process off-grade or reject fruit into marketable food products. The integrated system consists of three phases: (1) solar dehydration of usable fruit; (2) solar vacuum distillation of fermented wastes (peelings, rinds, skins, and seeds) to produce an ethanol fuel to use as a backup source of heat for dehydration; and (3) land reclamation by mixing stillage and compost with volcanic cinder and ash to produce on marginal land a rich soil suitable for growing more crops to dry. Although the system is not 100% complete the investigators have demonstrated that a small business can efficiently use solar energies in an integrated fashion to process waste into food, improve the quality of the land, and provide meaningful jobs in a region of very high unemployment.

  11. RELEASE OF DRIED RADIOACTIVE WASTE MATERIALS TECHNICAL BASIS DOCUMENT

    SciTech Connect

    KOZLOWSKI, S.D.

    2007-05-30

    This technical basis document was developed to support RPP-23429, Preliminary Documented Safety Analysis for the Demonstration Bulk Vitrification System (PDSA) and RPP-23479, Preliminary Documented Safety Analysis for the Contact-Handled Transuranic Mixed (CH-TRUM) Waste Facility. The main document describes the risk binning process and the technical basis for assigning risk bins to the representative accidents involving the release of dried radioactive waste materials from the Demonstration Bulk Vitrification System (DBVS) and to the associated represented hazardous conditions. Appendices D through F provide the technical basis for assigning risk bins to the representative dried waste release accident and associated represented hazardous conditions for the Contact-Handled Transuranic Mixed (CH-TRUM) Waste Packaging Unit (WPU). The risk binning process uses an evaluation of the frequency and consequence of a given representative accident or represented hazardous condition to determine the need for safety structures, systems, and components (SSC) and technical safety requirement (TSR)-level controls. A representative accident or a represented hazardous condition is assigned to a risk bin based on the potential radiological and toxicological consequences to the public and the collocated worker. Note that the risk binning process is not applied to facility workers because credible hazardous conditions with the potential for significant facility worker consequences are considered for safety-significant SSCs and/or TSR-level controls regardless of their estimated frequency. The controls for protection of the facility workers are described in RPP-23429 and RPP-23479. Determination of the need for safety-class SSCs was performed in accordance with DOE-STD-3009-94, Preparation Guide for US. Department of Energy Nonreactor Nuclear Facility Documented Safety Analyses, as described below.

  12. Response surface models to predict potato tuber infection by Fusarium sambucinum from duration of wetness and temperature, and dry rot lesion expansion from storage time and temperature.

    PubMed

    Lui, L H; Kushalappa, A C

    2002-06-01

    Dry rot (Fusarium sambucinum) of potatoes causes significant yield loss in storage and may also produce mycotoxins. Disease dynamics of dry rot development in potato tubers after harvest was studied and modeled. Potato tubers were surface sterilized, wounded, inoculated with a spore suspension of F. sambucinum and incubated in mist chambers placed in growth chambers at 4, 8, 12, 16 or 20 degrees C. After 0, 3, 6, 12, 24 and 48 h of incubation five tubers from each treatment were removed, dried and stored at 16 degrees C and 95% RH for 15 days. Inoculated tubers were also maintained in mist chambers for 24 h at 16 degrees C for the establishment of initial infections, dried, and stored at 4, 8, 12, or 16 degrees C for up to 90 days at 95% RH. At 15 days intervals, tubers were sliced, diameters and depths of diseased area measured, and data transformed to proportion of maximum volume diseased (PVD). The amount of infection was least at the lowest temperature tested and at the end of a 3-h wet period, but infection increased with an increase in wetness duration and temperature. At a storage temperature of 16 degrees C, lesions expanded rapidly reaching maxima in about 45 days of storage. A cubic regression model to predict infection potential from incubation temperature and duration of wetness explained 94.2% of the variation in PVD. A cubic regression model to predict lesion expansion potential as a function of storage temperature and duration explained 99.7% of the variation in PVD. These models could be used to manage potato dry rot, after validation under commercial conditions.

  13. Dry Co-Digestion of Poultry Manure with Agriculture Wastes.

    PubMed

    Abouelenien, Fatma; Namba, Yuzaburo; Nishio, Naomichi; Nakashimada, Yutaka

    2016-03-01

    This study tested the effect on thermophilic and mesophilic digestion of poultry manure (PM) or treated poultry manure (TPM) by the addition of agriculture wastes (AWS) as a co-substrate under dry conditions. PM was co-digested with a mixture of AWS consisting of coconut waste, cassava waste, and coffee grounds. Results were increased methane content in biogas, with decreased ammonia accumulation and volatile acids. The highest performance occurred under mesophilic conditions, with a 63 and 41.3 % increase in methane production from addition of AWS to TPM (562 vs. 344 mL g VS(-1) from control) and PM (406 vs. 287 mL g VS(-1) from control), respectively. Thermophilic conditions showed lower performance than mesophilic conditions. Addition of AWS increased methane production by 150 and 69.6 % from PM (323.4 vs. 129 mL g VS(-1) from control) and TPM (297.6 vs. 175.5 mL g VS(-1) from control), respectively. In all experiments, 100 % acetate produced was degraded to methane. Maximum ammonia accumulation was lowered to 43.7 % by mixing of AWS (range 5.35-8.55 vs. 7.81-12.28 g N kg(-1) bed). The pH was held at 7.3-8.8, a range suitable for methanogenesis. PMID:26560702

  14. Lactic acid production from potato peel waste by anaerobic sequencing batch fermentation using undefined mixed culture.

    PubMed

    Liang, Shaobo; McDonald, Armando G; Coats, Erik R

    2015-11-01

    Lactic acid (LA) is a necessary industrial feedstock for producing the bioplastic, polylactic acid (PLA), which is currently produced by pure culture fermentation of food carbohydrates. This work presents an alternative to produce LA from potato peel waste (PPW) by anaerobic fermentation in a sequencing batch reactor (SBR) inoculated with undefined mixed culture from a municipal wastewater treatment plant. A statistical design of experiments approach was employed using set of 0.8L SBRs using gelatinized PPW at a solids content range from 30 to 50 g L(-1), solids retention time of 2-4 days for yield and productivity optimization. The maximum LA production yield of 0.25 g g(-1) PPW and highest productivity of 125 mg g(-1) d(-1) were achieved. A scale-up SBR trial using neat gelatinized PPW (at 80 g L(-1) solids content) at the 3 L scale was employed and the highest LA yield of 0.14 g g(-1) PPW and a productivity of 138 mg g(-1) d(-1) were achieved with a 1 d SRT.

  15. Lactic acid production from potato peel waste by anaerobic sequencing batch fermentation using undefined mixed culture.

    PubMed

    Liang, Shaobo; McDonald, Armando G; Coats, Erik R

    2015-11-01

    Lactic acid (LA) is a necessary industrial feedstock for producing the bioplastic, polylactic acid (PLA), which is currently produced by pure culture fermentation of food carbohydrates. This work presents an alternative to produce LA from potato peel waste (PPW) by anaerobic fermentation in a sequencing batch reactor (SBR) inoculated with undefined mixed culture from a municipal wastewater treatment plant. A statistical design of experiments approach was employed using set of 0.8L SBRs using gelatinized PPW at a solids content range from 30 to 50 g L(-1), solids retention time of 2-4 days for yield and productivity optimization. The maximum LA production yield of 0.25 g g(-1) PPW and highest productivity of 125 mg g(-1) d(-1) were achieved. A scale-up SBR trial using neat gelatinized PPW (at 80 g L(-1) solids content) at the 3 L scale was employed and the highest LA yield of 0.14 g g(-1) PPW and a productivity of 138 mg g(-1) d(-1) were achieved with a 1 d SRT. PMID:25708409

  16. Superior molasses assimilation, stress tolerance, and trehalose accumulation of baker's yeast isolated from dried sweet potatoes (hoshi-imo).

    PubMed

    Nishida, Osamu; Kuwazaki, Seigo; Suzuki, Chise; Shima, Jun

    2004-07-01

    Yeast strains were isolated from dried sweet potatoes (hoshi-imo), a traditional preserved food in Japan. Dough fermentation ability, freeze tolerance, and growth rates in molasses, which are important characteristics of commercial baker's yeast, were compared between these yeast strains and a commercial yeast derivative that had typical characteristics of commercial strains. Classification tests including pulse-field gel electrophoresis and fermentation/assimilation ability of sugars showed that almost the stains isolated belonged to Saccharomyces cerevisiae. One strain, ONY1, accumulated intracellular trehalose at a higher level than commercial strain T128. Correlated with intracellular trehalose contents, the fermentation ability of high-sugar dough containing ONY1 was higher. ONY1 also showed higher freeze tolerance in both low-sugar and high-sugar doughs. The growth rate of ONY1 was significantly higher under batch and fed-batch cultivation conditions using either molasses or synthetic medium than that of strain T128. These results suggest that ONY1 has potential commercial use as baker's yeast for frozen dough and high-sugar dough.

  17. Superior molasses assimilation, stress tolerance, and trehalose accumulation of baker's yeast isolated from dried sweet potatoes (hoshi-imo).

    PubMed

    Nishida, Osamu; Kuwazaki, Seigo; Suzuki, Chise; Shima, Jun

    2004-07-01

    Yeast strains were isolated from dried sweet potatoes (hoshi-imo), a traditional preserved food in Japan. Dough fermentation ability, freeze tolerance, and growth rates in molasses, which are important characteristics of commercial baker's yeast, were compared between these yeast strains and a commercial yeast derivative that had typical characteristics of commercial strains. Classification tests including pulse-field gel electrophoresis and fermentation/assimilation ability of sugars showed that almost the stains isolated belonged to Saccharomyces cerevisiae. One strain, ONY1, accumulated intracellular trehalose at a higher level than commercial strain T128. Correlated with intracellular trehalose contents, the fermentation ability of high-sugar dough containing ONY1 was higher. ONY1 also showed higher freeze tolerance in both low-sugar and high-sugar doughs. The growth rate of ONY1 was significantly higher under batch and fed-batch cultivation conditions using either molasses or synthetic medium than that of strain T128. These results suggest that ONY1 has potential commercial use as baker's yeast for frozen dough and high-sugar dough. PMID:15277748

  18. Anaerobic digestion of municipal solid wastes: dry thermophilic performance.

    PubMed

    Forster-Carneiro, T; Pérez, M; Romero, L I

    2008-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze the performance of two laboratory-scale reactors (5.0L) treating organic fraction of municipal solid waste (OFMSW): source sorted OFMSW (SS_OFMSW) obtained from a university restaurant and mechanically selected municipal fraction (MS_OFMSW) obtained from a Municipal Treatment Plant placed in Cadiz-Spain. Discontinuous reactors operated at thermophilic (55 degrees C) and dry (20% total solid) conditions. Different decomposition patterns were observed: (1) the SS_OFMSW exhibited the classical waste decomposition pattern with a fast start up phase beginning within 0-5 days and 20-30 and a subsequent stabilization phase. The VS removal was 45% with a cumulative biogas of 120L in approx. 60 days; (2) the MS_OFMSW showed a methanogenic pattern throughout the whole experimental period (60 days) and this gave higher levels of organic biodegradation (56%VSr) and biogas production (82L). Both processes were completed and a high level of cumulative methane production was achieved in less than 60 days, proximally 25-30L. PMID:18434139

  19. Size effects of potato waste on its treatment by microbial fuel cell.

    PubMed

    Du, Haixia; Li, Fusheng

    2016-01-01

    The performance of microbial fuel cell (MFC) in treating potato cubes with different sizes (the edge size of 3, 5 and 7 mm) was investigated. Current density was found lower as the size of potato cubes increased, even if the differences in their removal were less apparent. At the end of MFC operation for 81 days, both total and soluble chemical oxygen demand reached nearly identical values, irrespective of the potato sizes; and citrate and isobutyrate were two major organic acids remaining in the solutions. Bacterial community analysis using polymerase chain reaction, denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis and sequencing indicated that bacterial species on the anode and in the anodic solution were similar and did not change obviously with potato sizes, and that, in similarity with previous studies on potato-processing wastewater treatment, Proteobacteria and Firmicutes were two dominating phyla. Geobacter was found richer on the anode than in the anodic solutions. PMID:26583755

  20. Fire testing of 55 gallon metal waste drums for dry waste storage

    SciTech Connect

    Hasegawa, H.K.; Staggs, K.J.; Doughty, S.M.

    1993-07-01

    The primary goal of this test program was to conduct a series of fire test to provide information on the fire performance of 55 gallon metal waste drums used for solid waste disposal at Department Of Energy (DOE) facilities. This program was limited in focus to three different types of 55 gallon drums, one radiant heat source, and one specific fire size. The initial test was a single empty 55 gallon drum exposed to a standard ASTME-119 time temperature curve for over 10 minutes. The full scale tests involved metal drums exposed to a 6{prime} diameter flammable liquid fire for a prescribed period of time. The drums contained simulated dry waste materials of primarily class A combustibles. The test results showed that a conventional 55 gallon drum with a 1in. bung would blow its lid consistently.

  1. Effect of shrinkage on isothermal drying behavior of 2-phase olive mill waste

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective of this study was to determine the drying behavior of 2-phase olive mill waste (2POMW) under isothermal microwave-convection drying conditions. 2POMW samples were dried in a thin layer in a variable-power pilot microwave oven with impinging air, using a feedback controller to maintain...

  2. Effect of drying conditions on properties, pigments and antioxidant activity retentions of pretreated orange and purple-fleshed sweet potato flours.

    PubMed

    Ruttarattanamongkol, Khanitta; Chittrakorn, Sasivimon; Weerawatanakorn, Monthana; Dangpium, Narong

    2016-04-01

    Pigmented sweet potatoes (SPs) are outstanding sources of anthocyanin, β-carotene and other color-related phytonutrients. However, fresh SP roots are highly perishable and difficult to store. To reduce losses and extend their uses, fresh SP could be converted into flour. SP cultivars with deep purple (Phichit 65-3) and orange-fleshed (T101) colors newly developed in Thailand were studied. The influence of drying methods on physico-chemical properties, anthocyanin, β-carotene and antioxidant activity retentions of purple and orange-fleshed SP flours (SPFs) was investigated. Peeled purple and orange SPs were pretreated by blanching (100 °C, 5 sec) and soaking in 0.5 % (w/v) sodium metabisulphite, then dried in either hot air oven at 50-80 °C or steamed for 10 min and placed to the drum dryer at 80-110 °C and 3-7 rpm drum speed. The drying processes significantly enhanced anthocyanin contents of SPFs by 1.8 to 3.8 times; however, there was a significant loss of β-carotene occurred during drying processes. Drum drying yielded SPFs with better color, higher total phenolic contents and antioxidant activity than the hot air drying. Pasting temperatures of hot air dried orange-fleshed SPFs (84-85 °C) were slightly higher than those of purple-fleshed SPFs (80-83 °C). Drum drying process produced pre-gelatinized (instant) SPFs as indicated by RVA and DSC results. The optimal conditions for drum dried and hot air dried SPF manufactured were 95 °C at 5 rpm and 70 °C, respectively, based on anthocyanin, β-carotene, total phenolic, antioxidant activity, color retentions, and pasting properties.

  3. Effect of drying conditions on properties, pigments and antioxidant activity retentions of pretreated orange and purple-fleshed sweet potato flours.

    PubMed

    Ruttarattanamongkol, Khanitta; Chittrakorn, Sasivimon; Weerawatanakorn, Monthana; Dangpium, Narong

    2016-04-01

    Pigmented sweet potatoes (SPs) are outstanding sources of anthocyanin, β-carotene and other color-related phytonutrients. However, fresh SP roots are highly perishable and difficult to store. To reduce losses and extend their uses, fresh SP could be converted into flour. SP cultivars with deep purple (Phichit 65-3) and orange-fleshed (T101) colors newly developed in Thailand were studied. The influence of drying methods on physico-chemical properties, anthocyanin, β-carotene and antioxidant activity retentions of purple and orange-fleshed SP flours (SPFs) was investigated. Peeled purple and orange SPs were pretreated by blanching (100 °C, 5 sec) and soaking in 0.5 % (w/v) sodium metabisulphite, then dried in either hot air oven at 50-80 °C or steamed for 10 min and placed to the drum dryer at 80-110 °C and 3-7 rpm drum speed. The drying processes significantly enhanced anthocyanin contents of SPFs by 1.8 to 3.8 times; however, there was a significant loss of β-carotene occurred during drying processes. Drum drying yielded SPFs with better color, higher total phenolic contents and antioxidant activity than the hot air drying. Pasting temperatures of hot air dried orange-fleshed SPFs (84-85 °C) were slightly higher than those of purple-fleshed SPFs (80-83 °C). Drum drying process produced pre-gelatinized (instant) SPFs as indicated by RVA and DSC results. The optimal conditions for drum dried and hot air dried SPF manufactured were 95 °C at 5 rpm and 70 °C, respectively, based on anthocyanin, β-carotene, total phenolic, antioxidant activity, color retentions, and pasting properties. PMID:27413208

  4. Pathogenic effects of Fusarium sulphureum, Fusarium solani Var. coeruleum and dry rot affected potatoes on the internal organs of rats.

    PubMed

    Rotkiewicz, T; Szarek, J; Tarkowian, S

    1993-01-01

    Rats of the Wistar race were used in toxicological experiments involving Fusarium sulphureum Schl., F. solani var. coeruleum (Sacc.) Booth and potatoes damaged by these fungi. The in vivo and postmortem studies revealed that both fungi and effected tubers had hepatotoxic and nephrotoxic effects on the animals. Morphological changes in the internal organs were mainly manifested by disturbances in blood circulation and regressive metamorphosis. These changes intensified proportionally to the dose of fungi and diseased potatoes in the feed used. Fusarium solani was more pathogenic than F. sulphureum. No teratogenic effect was observed, although addition of the fungi and infested potatoes into the feeds decreased the reproductive ability of rats and caused a decrease in foetal body weight as well as haematomae in foetuses.

  5. Local root abscisic acid (ABA) accumulation depends on the spatial distribution of soil moisture in potato: implications for ABA signalling under heterogeneous soil drying.

    PubMed

    Puértolas, Jaime; Conesa, María R; Ballester, Carlos; Dodd, Ian C

    2015-04-01

    Patterns of root abscisic acid (ABA) accumulation ([ABA]root), root water potential (Ψroot), and root water uptake (RWU), and their impact on xylem sap ABA concentration ([X-ABA]) were measured under vertical partial root-zone drying (VPRD, upper compartment dry, lower compartment wet) and horizontal partial root-zone drying (HPRD, two lateral compartments: one dry, the other wet) of potato (Solanum tuberosum L.). When water was withheld from the dry compartment for 0-10 d, RWU and Ψroot were similarly lower in the dry compartment when soil volumetric water content dropped below 0.22cm(3) cm(-3) for both spatial distributions of soil moisture. However, [ABA]root increased in response to decreasing Ψroot in the dry compartment only for HPRD, resulting in much higher ABA accumulation than in VPRD. The position of the sampled roots (~4cm closer to the surface in the dry compartment of VPRD than in HPRD) might account for this difference, since older (upper) roots may accumulate less ABA in response to decreased Ψroot than younger (deeper) roots. This would explain differences in root ABA accumulation patterns under vertical and horizontal soil moisture gradients reported in the literature. In our experiment, these differences in root ABA accumulation did not influence [X-ABA], since the RWU fraction (and thus ABA export to shoots) from the dry compartment dramatically decreased simultaneously with any increase in [ABA]root. Thus, HPRD might better trigger a long-distance ABA signal than VPRD under conditions allowing simultaneous high [ABA]root and relatively high RWU fraction. PMID:25547916

  6. Local root abscisic acid (ABA) accumulation depends on the spatial distribution of soil moisture in potato: implications for ABA signalling under heterogeneous soil drying

    PubMed Central

    Puértolas, Jaime; Conesa, María R.; Ballester, Carlos; Dodd, Ian C.

    2015-01-01

    Patterns of root abscisic acid (ABA) accumulation ([ABA]root), root water potential (Ψroot), and root water uptake (RWU), and their impact on xylem sap ABA concentration ([X-ABA]) were measured under vertical partial root-zone drying (VPRD, upper compartment dry, lower compartment wet) and horizontal partial root-zone drying (HPRD, two lateral compartments: one dry, the other wet) of potato (Solanum tuberosum L.). When water was withheld from the dry compartment for 0–10 d, RWU and Ψroot were similarly lower in the dry compartment when soil volumetric water content dropped below 0.22cm3 cm–3 for both spatial distributions of soil moisture. However, [ABA]root increased in response to decreasing Ψroot in the dry compartment only for HPRD, resulting in much higher ABA accumulation than in VPRD. The position of the sampled roots (~4cm closer to the surface in the dry compartment of VPRD than in HPRD) might account for this difference, since older (upper) roots may accumulate less ABA in response to decreased Ψroot than younger (deeper) roots. This would explain differences in root ABA accumulation patterns under vertical and horizontal soil moisture gradients reported in the literature. In our experiment, these differences in root ABA accumulation did not influence [X-ABA], since the RWU fraction (and thus ABA export to shoots) from the dry compartment dramatically decreased simultaneously with any increase in [ABA]root. Thus, HPRD might better trigger a long-distance ABA signal than VPRD under conditions allowing simultaneous high [ABA]root and relatively high RWU fraction. PMID:25547916

  7. Local root abscisic acid (ABA) accumulation depends on the spatial distribution of soil moisture in potato: implications for ABA signalling under heterogeneous soil drying.

    PubMed

    Puértolas, Jaime; Conesa, María R; Ballester, Carlos; Dodd, Ian C

    2015-04-01

    Patterns of root abscisic acid (ABA) accumulation ([ABA]root), root water potential (Ψroot), and root water uptake (RWU), and their impact on xylem sap ABA concentration ([X-ABA]) were measured under vertical partial root-zone drying (VPRD, upper compartment dry, lower compartment wet) and horizontal partial root-zone drying (HPRD, two lateral compartments: one dry, the other wet) of potato (Solanum tuberosum L.). When water was withheld from the dry compartment for 0-10 d, RWU and Ψroot were similarly lower in the dry compartment when soil volumetric water content dropped below 0.22cm(3) cm(-3) for both spatial distributions of soil moisture. However, [ABA]root increased in response to decreasing Ψroot in the dry compartment only for HPRD, resulting in much higher ABA accumulation than in VPRD. The position of the sampled roots (~4cm closer to the surface in the dry compartment of VPRD than in HPRD) might account for this difference, since older (upper) roots may accumulate less ABA in response to decreased Ψroot than younger (deeper) roots. This would explain differences in root ABA accumulation patterns under vertical and horizontal soil moisture gradients reported in the literature. In our experiment, these differences in root ABA accumulation did not influence [X-ABA], since the RWU fraction (and thus ABA export to shoots) from the dry compartment dramatically decreased simultaneously with any increase in [ABA]root. Thus, HPRD might better trigger a long-distance ABA signal than VPRD under conditions allowing simultaneous high [ABA]root and relatively high RWU fraction.

  8. Evaluating the biogas potential of the dry fraction from pretreatment of food waste from households

    SciTech Connect

    Murto, Marika; Björnsson, Lovisa; Rosqvist, Håkan; Bohn, Irene

    2013-05-15

    Highlights: ► A novel approach for biogas production from a waste fraction that today is incinerated. ► Biogas production is possible in spite of the impurities of the waste. ► Tracer studies are applied in a novel way. ► Structural material is needed to improve the flow pattern of the waste. ► We provide a solution to biological treatment for the complex waste fraction. - Abstract: At the waste handling company NSR, Helsingborg, Sweden, the food waste fraction of source separated municipal solid waste is pretreated to obtain a liquid fraction, which is used for biogas production, and a dry fraction, which is at present incinerated. This pretreatment and separation is performed to remove impurities, however also some of the organic material is removed. The possibility of realising the methane potential of the dry fraction through batch-wise dry anaerobic digestion was investigated. The anaerobic digestion technique used was a two-stage process consisting of a static leach bed reactor and a methane reactor. Treatment of the dry fraction alone and in a mixture with structural material was tested to investigate the effect on the porosity of the leach bed. A tracer experiment was carried out to investigate the liquid flow through the leach beds, and this method proved useful in demonstrating a more homogenous flow through the leach bed when structural material was added. Addition of structural material to the dry fraction was needed to achieve a functional digestion process. A methane yield of 98 m{sup 3}/ton was obtained from the dry fraction mixed with structural material after 76 days of digestion. This was in the same range as obtained in the laboratory scale biochemical methane potential test, showing that it was possible to extract the organic content in the dry fraction in this type of dry digestion system for the production of methane.

  9. Steam drying of industrial and agricultural products and wastes

    SciTech Connect

    Frame, G.B.; Galland, K.V.; Svensson, C.

    1983-03-01

    A new drying technique has been developed by MoDo-Chemetics and Chalmers of Technology in Sweden. Steam drying utilizes the drying capacity of superheated steam to remove moisture from porous material such as pulp or hog fuel. The first commercial dryer based on this technique was installed at Rockhammar Bruk in Sweden, where wood pulp is dried from 60% to 12% moisture content. Two commercial-size units are presently under construction, one for drying of hog fuel from 50% to 35% moisture content for on-the-grate firing in the power boiler and one for drying of sugar-beet pulp from 80% to 10% moisture content. This new technique can be applied in the drying of materials used in the production of waterboard, fiberboard, and hardboard, drying of peat, distillers grain residue, orange and pineapple pulp, grape and apple pomace, and cotton linters, for various end uses including cattlefeed and the use of residues as combustible material in small boilers. The energy-recovery aspects of the steam dryer are very important. Energy recovery in a useful form of more than 85% of the input to the dryer is feasible. 4 figures, 2 tables. (DP)

  10. Effect of drying on leaching testing of treated municipal solid waste incineration APC-residues.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yuyan; Hyks, Jiri; Astrup, Thomas; Christensen, Thomas H

    2008-08-01

    Air-pollution-control (APC) residues from waste incinerators are hazardous waste according to European legislation and must be treated prior to landfilling. Batch and column leaching data determine which type of landfill can receive the treated APC-residues. CEN standards are prescribed for the batch and column leaching test; however, these standards do not specify whether or not the residue samples should be dried prior to the leaching testing. Laboratory tests were performed in parallel (dried/non-dried) on treated APC-residue samples and evaluated with respect to Cr, Cd, Cu, Pb and Zn leaching. The effect of drying of the wet APC-residue samples was particularly dramatic regarding the leaching of Cr. Drying resulted in 10-100 times more Cr leaching in both batch and columns test. Drying also affected the leaching of Cd, Cu and Pb. Initial Cd leaching was up to 100 times higher in column tests with dried APC-residue than in tests with wet residues. The effect of drying appeared to be a combination of decreasing the reduction capacity of the sample (Cr), decreasing pH (Cd, Cu) and in column tests also a wash-out of salts (probably affecting Cd and Pb). If the leaching tests are intended to mimic landfill conditions, the results of this paper suggest that the tests should be done on wet, non-dried residue samples, although this may be less practical than testing dried samples.

  11. Evaluation of biochar-anaerobic potato digestate mixtures as renewable components of horticultural potting media

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Various formulations are used in horticultural potting media, with sphagnum peat moss, vermiculite and perlite currently among the most common components. We are examining a dried anaerobic digestate remaining after the fermentation of potato processing wastes to replace organic components such as p...

  12. Fenton peroxidation improves the drying performance of waste activated sludge.

    PubMed

    Dewil, Raf; Baeyens, Jan; Neyens, Elisabeth

    2005-01-31

    Advanced sludge treatment processes (AST) reduce the amount of sludge produced and improve the dewaterability, thus probably also affecting the heat transfer properties and the drying characteristics of the sludge. This paper studies the influence of the Fenton peroxidation on the thermal conductivity of the sludge. Results demonstrate that the Fenton's peroxidation positively influences the sludge cake consistency and hence enhances the mechanical dewaterability and the drying characteristics of the dewatered sludge. For the two sludges used in this study, i.e. obtained from the wastewater treatment plants (WWTP) of Tienen and Sint-Niklaas--the dry solids content of the mechanically dewatered sludge increased from 22.5% to 40.3% and from 18.7% to 35.2%, respectively. The effective thermal conductivity k(e) of the untreated and the peroxidized sludges is measured and used to determine the heat transfer coefficient h(s). An average improvement for k(e) of 16.7% (Tienen) and 5.8% (Sint-Niklaas) was observed. Consequently the value of h(s) increased with 15.6% (Tienen) and 5.0% (Sint-Niklaas). This increased heat transfer coefficient in combination with the increased dewaterability has direct implications on the design of sludge dryers. A plate-to-plate calculation of a multiple hearth dryer illustrates that the number of plates required to dry the peroxidized sludge to 90% DS is less than half the number of plates needed to dry untreated sludge. This results in reduced dryer dimensions or a higher capacity for an existing dryer of given dimensions.

  13. Upcycling potato peel waste - Data of the pre-screening of the acid-catalyzed liquefaction.

    PubMed

    Ventura, Patrícia; Bordado, João Carlos Moura; Mateus, Maria Margarida; Galhano Dos Santos, Rui

    2016-06-01

    Herein, the data acquired regarding the preliminary and exploratory experiments conducted with potato peel as a biomass source for the direct thermochemical liquefaction is disclosed. The procedure was carried out in a 2-ethylhexanol/DEG solvent mixture at 160 °C in the presence of p-Toluenesulfonic acid. The adopted procedure afforded a bio-oil in high yield (up to 93%) after only 30 min. For longer reaction times, higher amounts of solid residues were obtained leading, consequently, to lower yields. PMID:27182538

  14. Chemical and thermal characterization of potato peel waste and its fermentation residue as potential resources for biofuel and bioproducts production.

    PubMed

    Liang, Shaobo; McDonald, Armando G

    2014-08-20

    The growing demand for renewable fuels has driven the interest in the utilization of alternative waste materials such as potato peel waste (PPW) which contains fermentable carbohydrate. Fermentation of PPW using a mixed microbial consortium yielded about 60% unreacted PPW fermentation residue (PPW-FR). The PPW and PPW-FR were characterized by a combination of Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopies, gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS), and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) to quantify changes after fermentation. Fermentation of PPW resulted in fermentation of starch and concentrating lignin plus suberin and lipids in PPW-FR. TGA analysis showed that decomposition peaks differed for PPW (423 °C) and PPW-FR (457 °C). Pyrolysis-GC/MS showed an increase in phenolic and long chain fatty acid compounds with a concomitant decrease in carbohydrate derived compounds in the PPW after fermentation. Both the PPW and PPW-FR have shown potential based on properties to be converted into crude biofuel via thermochemical processes.

  15. Bread enriched in lycopene and other bioactive compounds by addition of dry tomato waste.

    PubMed

    Nour, Violeta; Ionica, Mira Elena; Trandafir, Ion

    2015-12-01

    The tomato processing industry generates high amounts of waste, mainly tomato skins and seeds, which create environmental problems. These residues are attractive sources of valuable bioactive components and pigments. A relatively simple recovery technology could consist of production of powders to be directly incorporated into foods. Tomato waste coming from a Romanian tomato processing unit were analyzed for the content of several bioactive compounds like ascorbic acid, β-carotene, lycopene, total phenolics, mineral and trace elements. In addition, its antioxidant capacity was assayed. Results revealed that tomato waste (skins and seeds) could be successfully utilized as functional ingredient for the formulation of antioxidant rich functional foods. Dry tomato processing waste were used to supplement wheat flour at 6 and 10 % levels (w/w flour basis) and the effects on the bread's physicochemical, baking and sensorial characteristics were studied. The following changes were observed: increase in moisture content, titratable acidity and bread crumb elasticity, reduction in specific volume and bread crumb porosity. The addition of dry tomato waste at 6 % resulted in bread with good sensory characteristics and overall acceptability but as the amount of dry tomato waste increased to 10 %, bread was less acceptable.

  16. Bread enriched in lycopene and other bioactive compounds by addition of dry tomato waste.

    PubMed

    Nour, Violeta; Ionica, Mira Elena; Trandafir, Ion

    2015-12-01

    The tomato processing industry generates high amounts of waste, mainly tomato skins and seeds, which create environmental problems. These residues are attractive sources of valuable bioactive components and pigments. A relatively simple recovery technology could consist of production of powders to be directly incorporated into foods. Tomato waste coming from a Romanian tomato processing unit were analyzed for the content of several bioactive compounds like ascorbic acid, β-carotene, lycopene, total phenolics, mineral and trace elements. In addition, its antioxidant capacity was assayed. Results revealed that tomato waste (skins and seeds) could be successfully utilized as functional ingredient for the formulation of antioxidant rich functional foods. Dry tomato processing waste were used to supplement wheat flour at 6 and 10 % levels (w/w flour basis) and the effects on the bread's physicochemical, baking and sensorial characteristics were studied. The following changes were observed: increase in moisture content, titratable acidity and bread crumb elasticity, reduction in specific volume and bread crumb porosity. The addition of dry tomato waste at 6 % resulted in bread with good sensory characteristics and overall acceptability but as the amount of dry tomato waste increased to 10 %, bread was less acceptable. PMID:26604402

  17. Extractable and Non-Extractable Phenolics and Antioxidant Capacity of Mandarin Waste Dried at Different Temperatures.

    PubMed

    Esparza-Martínez, Francisco J; Miranda-López, Rita; Mata-Sánchez, Sara M; Guzmán-Maldonado, Salvador H

    2016-09-01

    The mandarin industry is generating more waste due to the increasing demand for juice. In this study, extractable and non-extractable phenolics as well as 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH), 2,2'-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulphonic acid) (ABTS), ferric reducing ability of plasma (FRAP), and oxygen radical absorbance capacity (ORAC) antioxidant activities in Satsuma mandarin waste dried at different temperatures were determined. The amounts of non-extractable total phenols, total flavonoids, and condensed tannins measured in mandarin waste dried at 120 °C were 39.4, 44.3, and 45.6 %, respectively, which were higher than those of fresh-mandarin waste. Dried mandarin waste is rich in extractable and non-extractable hesperidin (259.86 and 182.52 mg/g, respectively) and eriocitrin (85.12 and 197.24 mg/g, respectively), as well as non-extractable gallic acid (36.08 μg/g). The antioxidant capacities of extractable and non-extractable phenolics, from the highest to the lowest, were ABTS > ORAC > DPPH > FRAP and ORAC > ABTS > DPPH > FRAP, respectively. The information reported here may encourage mandarin industry operators to re-evaluate their by-products, extending the application of mandarin fruits and reducing waste. PMID:27368409

  18. Extractable and Non-Extractable Phenolics and Antioxidant Capacity of Mandarin Waste Dried at Different Temperatures.

    PubMed

    Esparza-Martínez, Francisco J; Miranda-López, Rita; Mata-Sánchez, Sara M; Guzmán-Maldonado, Salvador H

    2016-09-01

    The mandarin industry is generating more waste due to the increasing demand for juice. In this study, extractable and non-extractable phenolics as well as 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH), 2,2'-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulphonic acid) (ABTS), ferric reducing ability of plasma (FRAP), and oxygen radical absorbance capacity (ORAC) antioxidant activities in Satsuma mandarin waste dried at different temperatures were determined. The amounts of non-extractable total phenols, total flavonoids, and condensed tannins measured in mandarin waste dried at 120 °C were 39.4, 44.3, and 45.6 %, respectively, which were higher than those of fresh-mandarin waste. Dried mandarin waste is rich in extractable and non-extractable hesperidin (259.86 and 182.52 mg/g, respectively) and eriocitrin (85.12 and 197.24 mg/g, respectively), as well as non-extractable gallic acid (36.08 μg/g). The antioxidant capacities of extractable and non-extractable phenolics, from the highest to the lowest, were ABTS > ORAC > DPPH > FRAP and ORAC > ABTS > DPPH > FRAP, respectively. The information reported here may encourage mandarin industry operators to re-evaluate their by-products, extending the application of mandarin fruits and reducing waste.

  19. Dry anaerobic digestion of food waste under mesophilic conditions: performance and methanogenic community analysis.

    PubMed

    Cho, Si-Kyung; Im, Wan-Taek; Kim, Dong-Hoon; Kim, Moon-Hwan; Shin, Hang-Sik; Oh, Sae-Eun

    2013-03-01

    The performance of dry anaerobic digestion (AD) of food waste was investigated under mesophilic conditions and the methanogenic community was investigated using 454 pyrosequencing. Stable dry AD was achieved by hydraulic retention time (HRT) control without the addition of alkali agents. The average CH4 production rate, CH4 content, and volatile solid reduction rate were 2.51±0.17m(3)/m(3)/d, 66±2.1%, and 65.8±1.22%, respectively, at an HRT of 40d. The methanogenic community of the seed sludge experienced a significant reduction in genus diversity from 18 to 4 and a dominant methanogenic shift from hydrogenotrophic to acetoclastic groups after the acclimation under dry condition. Almost all sequences of the dry anaerobic digester were closely related with those of Methanosarcina thermophila with similarity of 96.4-99.1%. The experimental results would serve as useful information to understand the dry AD system.

  20. A study on the dewatering of industrial waste sludge by fry-drying technology.

    PubMed

    Ohm, Tae-In; Chae, Jong-Seong; Kim, Jeong-Eun; Kim, Hee-Kyum; Moon, Seung-Hyun

    2009-08-30

    In sludge treatment, drying sludge using typical technology with high water content to a water content of approximately 10% is always difficult because of adhesive characteristics of sludge. Many methods have been applied, including direct and indirect heat drying, but these approaches of reducing water content to below 40% after drying is very inefficient in energy utilization of drying sludge. In this study, fry-drying technology with a high heat transfer coefficient of approximately 500 W/m(2) degrees C was used to dry industrial wastewater sludge. Also waste oil was used in the fry-drying process, and because the oil's boiling point is between 240 and 340 degrees C and the specific heat is approximately 60% of that of water. In the fry-drying system, the sludge is input by molding it into a designated form after heating the waste oil at temperatures between 120 and 170 degrees C. At these temperatures, the heated oil rapidly evaporates the water contained in the sludge, leaving the oil itself. After approximately 10 min, the water content of the sludge was less than 10%, and its heating value surpassed 5300 kcal/kg. Indeed, this makes the organic sludge appropriate for use as a solid fuel. The wastewater sludge used in this study was the designated waste discharged from chemical, leather and plating plants. These samples varied in characteristics, especially with regard to heavy metal concentration. After drying the three kinds of wastewater sludge at oil temperatures 160 degrees C for 10 min, it was found that the water content in the sludge from the chemical, leather, and plating plants reduced from 80.0 to 5.5%, 81.6 to 1.0%, and 65.4 to 0.8%, respectively. Furthermore, the heat values of the sludge from the chemical, leather, and plating plants prior to fry-drying were 217, 264, and 428 kcal/kg, respectively. After drying, these values of sludge increased to 5317, 5983 and 6031 kcal/kg, respectively. The heavy metals detected in the sludge after drying were

  1. Sewage sludge drying process integration with a waste-to-energy power plant.

    PubMed

    Bianchini, A; Bonfiglioli, L; Pellegrini, M; Saccani, C

    2015-08-01

    Dewatered sewage sludge from Waste Water Treatment Plants (WWTPs) is encountering increasing problems associated with its disposal. Several solutions have been proposed in the last years regarding energy and materials recovery from sewage sludge. Current technological solutions have relevant limits as dewatered sewage sludge is characterized by a high water content (70-75% by weight), even if mechanically treated. A Refuse Derived Fuel (RDF) with good thermal characteristics in terms of Lower Heating Value (LHV) can be obtained if dewatered sludge is further processed, for example by a thermal drying stage. Sewage sludge thermal drying is not sustainable if the power is fed by primary energy sources, but can be appealing if waste heat, recovered from other processes, is used. A suitable integration can be realized between a WWTP and a waste-to-energy (WTE) power plant through the recovery of WTE waste heat as energy source for sewage sludge drying. In this paper, the properties of sewage sludge from three different WWTPs are studied. On the basis of the results obtained, a facility for the integration of sewage sludge drying within a WTE power plant is developed. Furthermore, energy and mass balances are set up in order to evaluate the benefits brought by the described integration.

  2. Differences between the Bud End and Stem End of Potatoes in Dry Matter Content, Starch Granule Size, and Carbohydrate Metabolic Gene Expression at the Growing and Sprouting Stages.

    PubMed

    Liu, Bailin; Zhang, Guodong; Murphy, Agnes; De Koeyer, David; Tai, Helen; Bizimungu, Benoit; Si, Huaijun; Li, Xiu-Qing

    2016-02-10

    Potatoes usually have the tuber bud end dominance in growth during tuber bulking and in tuber sprouting, likely using carbohydrates from the tuber stem end. We hypothesized that the tuber bud end and tuber stem end coordination in carbohydrate metabolism gene expression is different between the bulking dominance and sprouting dominance of the tuber bud end. After comparing the growing tubers at harvest from a green vine and the stage that sprouts just started to emerge after storage of tubers at room temperature, we found the following: (1) Dry matter content was higher in the tuber stem end than the tuber bud end at both stages. (2) The starch granule size was larger in the tuber bud end than in the tuber stem end. (3) The tuber bud end had higher gene expression for starch synthesis but a lower gene expression of sucrose transporters than the tuber stem end during tuber growing. (4) The tuber stem end at the sprouting stage showed more active gene expression in both starch degradation and resynthesis, suggesting more active export of carbohydrates, than the tuber bud end. The results indicate that the starch accumulation mechanism in the tuber bud end was different between field growing and post-harvest sprouting tubers and that tubers already increased dry matter and average starch granule sizes in the tuber bud end prior to the rapid growth of sprouts.

  3. Physiological responses of potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) to partial root-zone drying: ABA signalling, leaf gas exchange, and water use efficiency.

    PubMed

    Liu, Fulai; Shahnazari, Ali; Andersen, Mathias N; Jacobsen, Sven-Erik; Jensen, Christian R

    2006-01-01

    The physiological responses of potato (Solanum tuberosum L. cv. Folva) to partial root-zone drying (PRD) were investigated in potted plants in a greenhouse (GH) and in plants grown in the field under an automatic rain-out-shelter. In the GH, irrigation was applied daily to the whole root system (FI), or to one-half of the root system while the other half was dried, for 9 d. In the field, the plants were drip irrigated either to the whole root system near field capacity (FI) or using 70% water of FI to one side of the roots, and shifted to the other side every 5-10 d (PRD). PRD plants had a similar midday leaf water potential to that of FI, whereas in the GH their root water potential (Psi(r)) was significantly lowered after 5 d. Stomatal conductance (g(s)) was more sensitive to PRD than photosynthesis (A) particularly in the field, leading to greater intrinsic water use efficiency (WUE) (i.e. A/g(s)) in PRD than in FI plants on several days. In PRD, the xylem sap abscisic acid concentration ([ABA](xylem)) increased exponentially with decreasing Psi(r); and the relative [ABA](xylem) (PRD/FI) increased exponentially as the fraction of transpirable soil water (FTSW) in the drying side decreased. In the field, the leaf area index was slightly less in PRD than in FI treatment, while tuber biomass was similar for the two treatments. Compared with FI, PRD treatment saved 30% water and increased crop water use efficiency (WUE) by 59%. Restrictions on leaf area expansion and g(s) by PRD-induced ABA signals might have contributed to reduced water use and increased WUE.

  4. Evaluation of dry-solids-blend material source for grouts containing 106-AN waste: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Spence, R.D.; Gilliam, T.M.; Osborne, S.C.; Francis, C.L.; Trotter, D.R.

    1993-09-01

    Stabilization/solidification technology is one of the most widely used techniques for the treatment and ultimate disposal of both radioactive and chemically hazardous wastes. Cement-based products, commonly referred to as grouts, are the predominant materials of choice because of their low associated processing costs, compatibility with a wide variety of disposal scenarios, and ability to meet stringent processing and performance requirements. Such technology is being utilized in a Grout Treatment Facility (GTF) by the Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) for the disposal of various wastes, including 106-AN wastes, located on the Hanford Reservation. The WHC personnel have developed a grout formula for 106-AN disposal that is designed to meet stringent performance requirements. This formula consists of a dry-solids blend containing 40 wt % limestone, 28 wt % granulated blast furnace slag (BFS), 28 wt % American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) Class F fly ash, and 4 wt % Type I-II-LA Portland cement. This blend is mixed with 106-AN at a mix ratio of 9 lb of dry-solids blend per gallon of waste. This report documents the final results of efforts at Oak Ridge National Laboratory in support of WHC`s Grout Technology Program to assess the effects of the source of the dry-solids-blend materials on the resulting grout formula.

  5. Utilization of household food waste for the production of ethanol at high dry material content

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Environmental issues and shortage of fossil fuels have turned the public interest to the utilization of renewable, environmentally friendly fuels, such as ethanol. In order to minimize the competition between fuels and food production, researchers are focusing their efforts to the utilization of wastes and by-products as raw materials for the production of ethanol. household food wastes are being produced in great quantities in European Union and their handling can be a challenge. Moreover, their disposal can cause severe environmental issues (for example emission of greenhouse gasses). On the other hand, they contain significant amounts of sugars (both soluble and insoluble) and they can be used as raw material for the production of ethanol. Results Household food wastes were utilized as raw material for the production of ethanol at high dry material consistencies. A distinct liquefaction/saccharification step has been included to the process, which rapidly reduced the viscosity of the high solid content substrate, resulting in better mixing of the fermenting microorganism. This step had a positive effect in both ethanol production and productivity, leading to a significant increase in both values, which was up to 40.81% and 4.46 fold, respectively. Remaining solids (residue) after fermentation at 45% w/v dry material (which contained also the unhydrolyzed fraction of cellulose), were subjected to a hydrothermal pretreatment in order to be utilized as raw material for a subsequent ethanol fermentation. This led to an increase of 13.16% in the ethanol production levels achieving a final ethanol yield of 107.58 g/kg dry material. Conclusions In conclusion, the ability of utilizing household food waste for the production of ethanol at elevated dry material content has been demonstrated. A separate liquefaction/saccharification process can increase both ethanol production and productivity. Finally, subsequent fermentation of the remaining solids could

  6. Modeling of sorption isotherms of dried vegetable wastes from wholesale market

    SciTech Connect

    Lopez, A.; Iguaz, A.; Esnoz, A.; Virseda, P.

    2000-05-01

    The moisture sorption isotherms of dried vegetable wastes (based on green leaves and fruits) from wholesale market were determined at 25, 40, 60 and 90 C by the static gravimetric method. Experimental data were fit by using several mathematical models. The G.A.B. and the Halsey model gave the minimum mean square error. G.A.B. parameters were related with temperature by Arrhenius expressions.

  7. Laboratory-lysimeter studies of dry FGD wastes from tests of the Coolside technology

    SciTech Connect

    Taulbee, D.N.; Schram, W.H.; Thomas, G.A.; Rathbone, R.F.; Robl, T.L.

    1996-12-31

    Twenty two laboratory lysimeters were monitored for 12 months in an effort to characterize the leaching behavior of dry flue-gas desulfurization wastes generated during tests of the Coolside duct-injection Technology. Included were samples from Ohio Edison`s 1990 demonstration runs conducted at its Edgewater power plant and materials derived from runs conducted in CONSOL`s Coolside pilot plant. The primary objective of the study was to generate predictive information on leaching behavior of Coolside wastes. In addition, the test matrix was designed to examine the impact of various parameters including (1)lysimeter packing density, (2) use of a constant vs rain simulation method of water addition, (3) variation in the extent of prehydration of the wastes prior to loading, and (4) exposure to elevated levels of CO{sub 2} during the study. The relationships between these latter parameters and leachate characteristics are discussed.

  8. Use of Drying Technologies for Resource Recovery from Solid Wastes and Brines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wignarajah, Kanapathipillai; Alba, Ric; Fisher, John W.; Hogan, John A.; Polonsky, Alex

    2010-01-01

    Long term storage of unprocessed biological wastes and human wastes can present major health issues and a loss of potential resources. Space vehicles and planetary habitats are typically resource-scarce or resource-limited environments for long-term human habitation. To-date, most of the resources will need to be supplied from Earth, but this may not be possible for long duration human exploration. Based on present knowledge, there is only very limited in-situ resources on planetary habitats. Hence, the opportunity to "live off the land" in a planetary habitat is limited. However, if we assume that wastes generated by human explorers are viewed as resources, there is great potential to utilize and recycle them, thereby reducing the requirements for supply Earth and enabling the "live off the land" exploration scenario. Technologies used for the recovery of resources from wastes should be reliable, safe, easy to operate, fail-proof, modular, automated and preferably multifunctional in being capable of handling mixed solid and liquid wastes. For a lunar habitat, energy does not appear to be the major driving factor amongst the technologies studied. Instead, reliability appears to be more important[1] . This paper reports studies to date on drying technologies to remove water from solid wastes and brines. Experimental performance data obtained for recovery water from wastes and brine are presented. Simplicity of operation of hardware and energy efficiency are discussed. Some improvements and modifications to hardware were performed. Hopefully, this information will assist in future efforts in the "downselection" of technologies for recovery of water and resources from solid wastes and brines.

  9. Use of dried waste of cassava starch extraction for feeding lactating cows.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, Tatiane; Zambom, Maximiliane A; Castagnara, Deise D; Souza, Leiliane C; Damasceno, Daiane O; Schmidt, Emerson L

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the best level of utilization of dried waste of cassava starch extraction (WCSEd) as a substitute for corn for lactating cows. Four lactating cows were fed diets with increasing levels (0%, 33%, 66% and 100%) of WCSEd as a substitute for corn. The intake and digestibility of dry matter and nutrients, milk production and composition, blood parameters of glucose and urea and microbial synthesis of the diets were evaluated. There was a reduction in dry matter intake, organic matter, ether extract and total carbohydrate, and increased intake of acid detergent fiber. Nutrient digestibility was not affected while the synthesis of microbial protein increased. These changes resulted in reduced milk production, without altering the efficiency of production or the constituents of milk, with a decreasing effect on daily production of lactose, solids and minerals. Metabolic parameters, glucose and urea nitrogen in plasma, remained within appropriate levels. The dried residue from the extraction of cassava starch can be used as feed for dairy cows to replace up to 100% of the corn ration. However, its use promotes a reduction in intake of dry matter and nutrients as well as a reduction in the production of milk, with impacts on the profitability of the product.

  10. Comparison of alternative flue gas dry treatment technologies in waste-to-energy processes.

    PubMed

    Dal Pozzo, Alessandro; Antonioni, Giacomo; Guglielmi, Daniele; Stramigioli, Carlo; Cozzani, Valerio

    2016-05-01

    Acid gases such as HCl and SO2 are harmful both for human health and ecosystem integrity, hence their removal is a key step of the flue gas treatment of Waste-to-Energy (WtE) plants. Methods based on the injection of dry sorbents are among the Best Available Techniques for acid gas removal. In particular, systems based on double reaction and filtration stages represent nowadays an effective technology for emission control. The aim of the present study is the simulation of a reference two-stage (2S) dry treatment system performance and its comparison to three benchmarking alternatives based on single stage sodium bicarbonate injection. A modelling procedure was applied in order to identify the optimal operating configuration of the 2S system for different reference waste compositions, and to determine the total annual cost of operation. Taking into account both operating and capital costs, the 2S system appears the most cost-effective solution for medium to high chlorine content wastes. A Monte Carlo sensitivity analysis was carried out to assess the robustness of the results.

  11. Comparison of alternative flue gas dry treatment technologies in waste-to-energy processes.

    PubMed

    Dal Pozzo, Alessandro; Antonioni, Giacomo; Guglielmi, Daniele; Stramigioli, Carlo; Cozzani, Valerio

    2016-05-01

    Acid gases such as HCl and SO2 are harmful both for human health and ecosystem integrity, hence their removal is a key step of the flue gas treatment of Waste-to-Energy (WtE) plants. Methods based on the injection of dry sorbents are among the Best Available Techniques for acid gas removal. In particular, systems based on double reaction and filtration stages represent nowadays an effective technology for emission control. The aim of the present study is the simulation of a reference two-stage (2S) dry treatment system performance and its comparison to three benchmarking alternatives based on single stage sodium bicarbonate injection. A modelling procedure was applied in order to identify the optimal operating configuration of the 2S system for different reference waste compositions, and to determine the total annual cost of operation. Taking into account both operating and capital costs, the 2S system appears the most cost-effective solution for medium to high chlorine content wastes. A Monte Carlo sensitivity analysis was carried out to assess the robustness of the results. PMID:26951719

  12. Thin-layer drying behavior of vegetable wastes from wholesale market

    SciTech Connect

    Lopez, A.; Iguaz, A.; Esnoz, A.; Virseda, P.

    2000-05-01

    The thin-layer drying behavior of vegetable wastes (as a mix of lettuce and cauliflower leaves) from wholesale market for a temperature range of 50--150 C was determined. Drying of this material was found to take part only in the falling-rate period. The experimental data were fitted to the simple exponential model and the Page model. Both models have good prediction capability. Effective diffusion coefficient varied from 6.03 x 10{sup {minus}9} to 3.15 x 10{sup {minus}8} m{sup 2}/s with an activation energy of diffusion of 19.82 kJ/mol. The temperature dependence of the effective diffusion coefficient was expressed by an Arrhenius-type relationship.

  13. Hazardous Waste Water Remediation by Ecoresin-Dry Cow Dung Powder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagla, Hemlata; Barot, Nisha

    2013-04-01

    Water, the matter, matrix, medium and the mother of our life, is indeed one of the drivers of Nature. Through water cycle only the intra and inter equilibrium is maintained constantly between entire 'green' and 'blue'. Unfortunately, with each successive epoch of industrialization and urbanization, human societies have produced non-biodegradable waste hulk with far beyond handling capacities of mankind. At this juncture the very need is to appreciate and move towards the cost as well as time effective scientific alternatives for the removal of aqueous heavy metal pollutants. Green chemistry advocates the utilization of naturally available bio-resins which are environmentally benign alternative to current synthetic materials and technologies employed for waste water treatment. This explicit investigation aims to explore Dry Cow dung powder, DCP, a natural biosorbent as a green and clean alternative for the aqueous waste water treatment. It is naturally available bio-organic, complex, polymorphic humified fecal matter of cow and is enriched with minerals, carbohydrates, fats, proteins, bile pigments, aliphatic - aromatic species such as 'Humic acid'(HA). The HA has been successfully extracted by authors from DCP and this piece of work has been published in the International Journal [1]. We have developed simple, efficient and eco-friendly method for the removal of aqueous heavy metal pollutant such as Cr(VI) [2], Cd(II), Cr(III) [3] and Hg(II) as well radiotoxic 90Sr(II) [4], employing DCP. DCP is employed without any pre or post treatment. Being freely and easily available DCP has an edge over processed natural adsorbent considering their cost, time and energy efficiency. In nutshell we have to remember that prevention is better than the cure. If we fail to meet this, the situation will surely augment which will drain our water, our life, to slaughters knife..! Reference: 1. H.K.Bagla, N.S.Barot, Soil Amendement by Green Supplement: Dry Cowdung powder, EGUGA - 11

  14. Hydrophilicity Characteristics of Thermal Sprayed Coating Produced Using Calcination Powder Recovered from Waste Dry Batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Futamata, Masami; Nakanishi, Kimio; Hoshino, Yasutaka; Itoh, Hidenobu

    The exhaust amount of the waste dry batteries in our country tends to increase every year. However, most of the recycled calcinations powder gained from the disposal process of these waste dry batteries is still unutilized. ZnO and MnO are the main consists of the calcinations powder, they are expected to be used as thermal spraying materials. This paper describes a study result of the hydrophilicity on the sprayed coating formatted by the calcinations powder. When a water drop spread on the coating surface, the diameter of the droplet is considered as an indicator to evaluate the hydrophilicity in this study. The influences of the coating thickness, temperature and existence of grinding on the droplet diameter are clarified. Furthermore, the infiltration speed of the water drop in the capillary of coating, and the ionic property of combination between the elements, which constitute the coating are discussed. From the results of these general investigations, it is clarified that the sprayed coating formatted by the calcinations powder has a remarkable hydrophilicity. It is shown that the application to a heat exchanger, etc. is expectable.

  15. Combination of decentralized waste drying and SSF techniques for household biowaste minimization and ethanol production.

    PubMed

    Sotiropoulos, A; Vourka, I; Erotokritou, A; Novakovic, J; Panaretou, V; Vakalis, S; Thanos, T; Moustakas, K; Malamis, D

    2016-06-01

    The results of the demonstration of an innovative household biowaste management and treatment scheme established in two Greek Municipalities for the production of lignocellulosic ethanol using dehydrated household biowaste as a substrate, are presented within this research. This is the first time that biowaste drying was tested at a decentralized level for the production of ethanol using the Simultaneous Saccharification and Fermentation (SSF) process, at a pilot scale in Greece. The decentralized biowaste drying method proved that the household biowaste mass and volume reduction may reach 80% through the dehydration process used. The chemical characteristics related to lignocellulosic ethanol production have proved to differ substantially between seasons thus; special attention should be given to the process applied for ethanol production mainly regarding the enzyme quality and quantity used during the pretreatment stage. The maximum ethanol production achieved was 29.12g/L, approximately 60% of the maximum theoretical yield based on the substrate's sugar content. The use of the decentralized waste drying as an alternative approach for household biowaste minimization and the production of second generation ethanol is considered to be a promising approach for efficient biowaste management and treatment in the future. PMID:27084105

  16. Evaluation of potato anaerobic digestate as a renewable alternative to peat moss in horticultural substrates

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Potato peels and other low-value wastes from potato processing are currently being used as cattle feed or fermented to produce fuel-grade ethanol. The anaerobic fermentation of food wastes, including potato processing wastes, produces biogas (principally methane), which can be used directly for heat...

  17. Below Regulatory Concern Owners Group: Evaluation of dry active waste monitoring instruments and techniques: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, V.W.; Endres, G.W.R.; Merwin, S.E.; Moeller, M.P.; Robertson, D.E.; Young, J.A.

    1989-03-01

    The disposal of low-level radioactive waste (LLRW) is costly, so most nuclear power stations have found or will find that it is cost-effective to dispose of dry active waste (DAW) with activity levels that are Below Regulatory Concern (BRC) at a sanitary landfill or incinerator. It appears that substantial volumes of DAW can be exempted from disposal as LLRW if the maximum exposure to an individual member of the public from BRC waste does not exceed a few mrem per year effective dose equivalent. The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) has requested that Battelle, Pacific Northwest Laboratories (BNW) evaluate instruments and methods that could be used to measure surface contamination (activity per unit area) and radioactivity concentrations (activity per unit mass or volume) in BRC waste. Instrumentation utilized in a DAW BRC monitoring program must be capable of satisfying performance objectives. This instrumentations must measure bulk concentrations of radioactivity in DAW to assure that annual inventory disposal limits are not exceeded at each disposal site; measure radionuclide concentrations in disposal containers (e.g., bags, boxes, etc.) to assure that maximum allowable concentration limits in the DAW are not exceeded; assure that discrete radioactive particles (DRPs), if present in DAW, do not exceed maximum permissible activity limits; and possess detection capability to allow utilities to set operational limits between the detection limit and the disposal limit at their option. Our evaluations indicate that bag monitors and barrel counters have the necessary sensitivity to meet all of these objectives. 20 refs., 7 figs., 11 tabs.

  18. Thermo gravimetric and kinetic studies on dried solid waste of post-methanated distillery effluent under oxygen and nitrogen atmosphere.

    PubMed

    Naveen, C; Premalatha, M

    2014-12-01

    This work seeks for the possibility of using solid waste generated by drying the post-methanated distillery effluent, as fuel. TGA has been employed to analyse the kinetics of thermal degradation of the solid waste at different heating rates of 10, 20, 30, and 40°Cmin(-1) in pyrolysis and combustion modes. In combustion mode, the activation energy changes from 253.58 to 87.91kJmol(-1), corresponding to the changes in heating rates of 10°Cmin(-1) to 40°Cmin(-1), whereas, there is no significant change of activation energy in pyrolysis mode. The Arrhenius equation based kinetic model with regression analysis using LINEST function is able to predict the kinetic variables of dried solid waste in both the modes. Solid waste almost completely degrades at the end of isothermal condition in pyrolysis mode.

  19. Polysaccharide Production Benefits Dry Storage Survival of the Biocontrol Agent Pseudomonas fluorescens S11:P:12 Effective Against Several Maladies of Stored Potatoes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pseudomonas fluorescens S11:P:12 (NRRL B-21133) is a biological control agent able to suppress several potato diseases and sprouting. Notably, it produces a polysaccharide during liquid cultivation; and the objective of this work was to determine the role of this material in the bio-control process...

  20. Recycling of Organic Waste Sludge by Hydrothermal Dry Steam Aiming for Adsorbent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoshikawa, Hisahiro; Hayakawa, Tomoki; Yamasaki, Nakamichi

    2006-05-01

    Global warming becomes more serious problem today. We have to develop new technology for new energy or fixation of carbon dioxide. Biomass is considered to be one of new energies. Methane fermentation is a method to make methane from biomass, such as garbage and fecal of farm animals, by methane fermentation bacteria. It has a problem, however, that bacteria are deactivated due to ammonia, which is made by itself. And much methane fermentation residue is incinerated. Therefore recycling methane fermentation residue is important for effective use of biomass. We research hydrothermal process. Dry steam means unsaturated vapor, we call. It demands a temperature less than 400 °C. And it is expected to accelerate dehydration effect, decompose and extract the organic matter, and make porous material. Thus, we try to apply the dry steam to recycling of organic waste sludge aiming for absorbent. Experiments were conducted at 250-350 °C in nitrogen atmosphere. The carbon products are analyzed by CHNS elemental analysis, and Thermogravimetry. The extractives are analyzed by gas chromatograph.

  1. Feasibility of drying system using waste heat as the heating source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, M. N.; Shi, Y. L.; Chen, L. X.

    2016-08-01

    In this study, a wastewater heat pump system was proposed and its thermal performance was analyzed. The proposed system includes two evaporators: an air-source evaporator and a water-source evaporator. The air-source evaporator absorbs heat from the moist hot air which exhaust from the drying oven. The water-source evaporator absorbs heat from the waste water, while the waste water recovers heat from the mechanical energy, which was produced by cutting and polishing in stone production. The thermodynamic model was developed to evaluate the performance of the proposed system. The energetic analysis was carried out to investigate the influences of the temperature of fresh air. The results show significantly higher energy efficiency, compact-sized and energy-saving compared with the system which uses air as the heat source. Among the seven of alternative refrigerants (R152a, R123, R1234yf, R1234ze, R600a, R22 and R600) investigated, R123 was suggested to be used in this heat pump for its high heating efficiency, inflammable, very low ODP(Ozone Depletion Potential) and GWP(Global warming potential).

  2. Management of solid wastes from the Limestone Injection Dry Scrubbing (LIDS) clean coal technology. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Musiol, W.F. Jr.; Czuczwa, J.M.

    1993-03-01

    The objectives of this project were to characterize by-products from a pilot Limestone Injection Dry Scrubbing (LIDS) process and to develop processes directed toward the safe and economic use or disposal of these wastes. Because LIDS is a developing Clean Coal technology, a database of chemical and physical characteristics of the by-product was first developed. During the course of this project, it was found that the waste alone did not form high-strength products sufficient for use in construction and engineering applications. Therefore, the project was redirected to evaluate the by-product as a soil-cement and Portland cement raw material, agricultural liming agent, backfill/landfill material component, and mine reclamation/neutralizing agent. Based on these evaluations, the most viable uses for the LIDS byproduct include use in mine reclamation or as a neutralization agent. If soluble sulfites can be minimized by avoiding a dolomitic LIDS reagent, use as an agricultural liming agent has promise. Interest from an Ohio utility in the LIDS process suggests possible application of results at the demonstration or commercial stages.

  3. Dry-thermophilic anaerobic digestion of organic fraction of municipal solid waste: Methane production modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Fdez-Gueelfo, L.A.; Alvarez-Gallego, C.; Sales, D.; Romero Garcia, L.I.

    2012-03-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Methane generation may be modeled by means of modified product generation model of Romero Garcia (1991). Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Organic matter content and particle size influence the kinetic parameters. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Higher organic matter content and lower particle size enhance the biomethanization. - Abstract: The influence of particle size and organic matter content of organic fraction of municipal solid waste (OFMSW) in the overall kinetics of dry (30% total solids) thermophilic (55 Degree-Sign C) anaerobic digestion have been studied in a semi-continuous stirred tank reactor (SSTR). Two types of wastes were used: synthetic OFMSW (average particle size of 1 mm; 0.71 g Volatile Solids/g waste), and OFMSW coming from a composting full scale plant (average particle size of 30 mm; 0.16 g Volatile Solids/g waste). A modification of a widely-validated product-generation kinetic model has been proposed. Results obtained from the modified-model parameterization at steady-state (that include new kinetic parameters as K, Y{sub pMAX} and {theta}{sub MIN}) indicate that the features of the feedstock strongly influence the kinetics of the process. The overall specific growth rate of microorganisms ({mu}{sub max}) with synthetic OFMSW is 43% higher compared to OFMSW coming from a composting full scale plant: 0.238 d{sup -1} (K = 1.391 d{sup -1}; Y{sub pMAX} = 1.167 L CH{sub 4}/gDOC{sub c}; {theta}{sub MIN} = 7.924 days) vs. 0.135 d{sup -1} (K = 1.282 d{sup -1}; Y{sub pMAX} = 1.150 L CH{sub 4}/gDOC{sub c}; {theta}{sub MIN} = 9.997 days) respectively. Finally, it could be emphasized that the validation of proposed modified-model has been performed successfully by means of the simulation of non-steady state data for the different SRTs tested with each waste.

  4. Energy consumption evaluation of fuel bioethanol production from sweet potato.

    PubMed

    Ferrari, Mario Daniel; Guigou, Mairan; Lareo, Claudia

    2013-05-01

    The energy consumption for different operative conditions and configurations of the bioethanol production industrial process from an experimental variety of sweet potato (Ipomea batatas) K 9807.1 was evaluated. A process simulation model was developed using SuperPro Designer® software. The model was based on experimental data gathered from our laboratory experiments and technology and equipment suppliers. The effects of the dry matter ratio of sweet potato to water, the fermentation efficiency, and sweet potato sugar content, on the energy consumption (steam and electricity) were respectively evaluated. All factors were significant. The best ratio of dry matter to total water to work with fresh sweet potato was 0.2 kg dry sweet potato/kg water, as for greater ratios was not found a significant reduction in energy consumption. Also, the drying of the sweet potato previous its processing was studied. It presented an energy consumption greater than the energetic content of the bioethanol produced.

  5. Energy consumption evaluation of fuel bioethanol production from sweet potato.

    PubMed

    Ferrari, Mario Daniel; Guigou, Mairan; Lareo, Claudia

    2013-05-01

    The energy consumption for different operative conditions and configurations of the bioethanol production industrial process from an experimental variety of sweet potato (Ipomea batatas) K 9807.1 was evaluated. A process simulation model was developed using SuperPro Designer® software. The model was based on experimental data gathered from our laboratory experiments and technology and equipment suppliers. The effects of the dry matter ratio of sweet potato to water, the fermentation efficiency, and sweet potato sugar content, on the energy consumption (steam and electricity) were respectively evaluated. All factors were significant. The best ratio of dry matter to total water to work with fresh sweet potato was 0.2 kg dry sweet potato/kg water, as for greater ratios was not found a significant reduction in energy consumption. Also, the drying of the sweet potato previous its processing was studied. It presented an energy consumption greater than the energetic content of the bioethanol produced. PMID:23567705

  6. Possibilities of mercury removal in the dry flue gas cleaning lines of solid waste incineration units.

    PubMed

    Svoboda, Karel; Hartman, Miloslav; Šyc, Michal; Pohořelý, Michael; Kameníková, Petra; Jeremiáš, Michal; Durda, Tomáš

    2016-01-15

    Dry methods of the flue gas cleaning (for HCl and SO2 removal) are useful particularly in smaller solid waste incineration units. The amount and forms of mercury emissions depend on waste (fuel) composition, content of mercury and chlorine and on the entire process of the flue gas cleaning. In the case of high HCl/total Hg molar ratio in the flue gas, the majority (usually 70-90%) of mercury is present in the form of HgCl2 and a smaller amount in the form of mercury vapors at higher temperatures. Removal of both main forms of mercury from the flue gas is dependent on chemical reactions and sorption processes at the temperatures below approx. 340 °C. Significant part of HgCl2 and a small part of elemental Hg vapors can be adsorbed on fly ash and solid particle in the air pollution control (APC) processes, which are removed in dust filters. Injection of non-impregnated active carbon (AC) or activated lignite coke particles is able to remove mainly the oxidized Hg(2+) compounds. Vapors of metallic Hg(o) are adsorbed relatively weakly. Much better chemisorption of Hg(o) together with higher sorbent capacity is achieved by AC-based sorbents impregnated with sulfur, alkali poly-sulfides, ferric chloride, etc. Inorganic sorbents with the same or similar chemical impregnation are also applicable for deeper Hg(o) removal (over 85%). SCR catalysts convert part of Hg(o) into oxidized compounds (HgO, HgCl2, etc.) contributing to more efficient Hg removal, but excess of NH3 has a negative effect. Both forms, elemental Hg(o) and HgCl2, can be converted into HgS particles by reacting with droplets/aerosol of poly-sulfides solutions/solids in flue gas. Mercury captured in the form of water insoluble HgS is more advantageous in the disposal of solid waste from APC processes. Four selected options of the dry flue gas cleaning with mercury removal are analyzed, assessed and compared (in terms of efficiency of Hg-emission reduction and costs) with wet methods and retrofits for more

  7. Possibilities of mercury removal in the dry flue gas cleaning lines of solid waste incineration units.

    PubMed

    Svoboda, Karel; Hartman, Miloslav; Šyc, Michal; Pohořelý, Michael; Kameníková, Petra; Jeremiáš, Michal; Durda, Tomáš

    2016-01-15

    Dry methods of the flue gas cleaning (for HCl and SO2 removal) are useful particularly in smaller solid waste incineration units. The amount and forms of mercury emissions depend on waste (fuel) composition, content of mercury and chlorine and on the entire process of the flue gas cleaning. In the case of high HCl/total Hg molar ratio in the flue gas, the majority (usually 70-90%) of mercury is present in the form of HgCl2 and a smaller amount in the form of mercury vapors at higher temperatures. Removal of both main forms of mercury from the flue gas is dependent on chemical reactions and sorption processes at the temperatures below approx. 340 °C. Significant part of HgCl2 and a small part of elemental Hg vapors can be adsorbed on fly ash and solid particle in the air pollution control (APC) processes, which are removed in dust filters. Injection of non-impregnated active carbon (AC) or activated lignite coke particles is able to remove mainly the oxidized Hg(2+) compounds. Vapors of metallic Hg(o) are adsorbed relatively weakly. Much better chemisorption of Hg(o) together with higher sorbent capacity is achieved by AC-based sorbents impregnated with sulfur, alkali poly-sulfides, ferric chloride, etc. Inorganic sorbents with the same or similar chemical impregnation are also applicable for deeper Hg(o) removal (over 85%). SCR catalysts convert part of Hg(o) into oxidized compounds (HgO, HgCl2, etc.) contributing to more efficient Hg removal, but excess of NH3 has a negative effect. Both forms, elemental Hg(o) and HgCl2, can be converted into HgS particles by reacting with droplets/aerosol of poly-sulfides solutions/solids in flue gas. Mercury captured in the form of water insoluble HgS is more advantageous in the disposal of solid waste from APC processes. Four selected options of the dry flue gas cleaning with mercury removal are analyzed, assessed and compared (in terms of efficiency of Hg-emission reduction and costs) with wet methods and retrofits for more

  8. Upcycling potato peel waste – Data of the pre-screening of the acid-catalyzed liquefaction

    PubMed Central

    Ventura, Patrícia; Bordado, João Carlos Moura; Mateus, Maria Margarida; Galhano dos Santos, Rui

    2016-01-01

    Herein, the data acquired regarding the preliminary and exploratory experiments conducted with potato peel as a biomass source for the direct thermochemical liquefaction is disclosed. The procedure was carried out in a 2-ethylhexanol/DEG solvent mixture at 160 °C in the presence of p-Toluenesulfonic acid. The adopted procedure afforded a bio-oil in high yield (up to 93%) after only 30 min. For longer reaction times, higher amounts of solid residues were obtained leading, consequently, to lower yields. PMID:27182538

  9. Evaluation of dry-solids-blend material source for grouts containing 106-AN waste: September 1990 progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Gilliam, T.M.; Osborne, S.C.; Francis, C.L.; Scott, T.C.

    1993-09-01

    Stabilization/solidification (S/S) is the most widely used technology for the treatment and ultimate disposal of both radioactive and chemically hazardous wastes. Such technology is being utilized in a Grout Treatment Facility (GTF) by the Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) for the disposal of various wastes, including 106-AN wastes, located on the Hanford Reservation. The WHC personnel have developed a grout formula for 106-AN disposal that is designed to meet stringent performance requirements. This formula consists of a dry-solids blend containing 40 wt % limestone, 28 wt % granulated blast furnace slag (BFS), 28 wt % ASTM Class F fly ash, and 4 wt % Type I-II-LA Portland cement. The blend is mixed with 106-AN waste at a ratio of 9 lb of dry-solids blend per gallon of waste. This report documents progress made to date on efforts at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in support of WHC`s Grout Technology Program to assess the effects of the source of the dry-solids-blend materials on the resulting grout formula.

  10. An Evaluation of the Functionality of Advanced Fuel Research Prototype Dry Pyrolyzer for Destruction of Solid Wastes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fisher, John; Wignarajah, K.; Howard, Kevin; Serio, Mike; Kroo, Eric

    2004-01-01

    The prototype dry pyrolyser delivered to Ames Research Center is the end-product of a Phase I1 Small Business Initiative Research (SBIR) project. Some of the major advantages of pyrolysis for processing solid wastes are that it can process solid wastes, it permits elemental recycling while conserving oxygen use, and it can function as a pretreatment for combustion processes. One of the disadvantages of pyrolysis is the formation of tars. By controlling the rate of heating, tar formation can be minimized. This paper presents data on the pyrolysis of various space station wastes. The performance of the pyrolyser is also discussed and appropriate modifications suggested to improve the performance of the dry pyrolyzer.

  11. Appraisal of selected osmoprotectants and carriers for formulating Gram-negative biocontrol agents active against Fusarium dry rot on potatoes in storage

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The production of a dry formulation containing a high titer of viable cells of a Gram-negative biological control agent is a challenging and critically important step in developing the agent into a commercial product. Producing a dry formulation using methods based on air-drying is especially attrac...

  12. The influence of dehydrated potatoes processing on the glycoalkaloids content in coloured-fleshed potato.

    PubMed

    Rytel, Elżbieta; Tajner-Czopek, Agnieszka; Aniołowska, Magda; Hamouz, Karel

    2013-12-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the effect of different temperatures of blanching and pre-drying used in the laboratory production of dried potato dice on the content of glycoalkaloids in red and blue fleshed potato varieties. Studied potatoes of coloured fleshed varieties were characterised by a low glycoalkaloids content at 5.47 mg 100 g(-1). The production of dehydrated potato dice influenced on the decrease in glycoalkaloids content in potato products. The majority of these compounds were removed during the peeling (70%) and blanching process (29%). Potato dice blanched at the highest temperature (85 °C) and pre-dried at 120 °C was characterised by the lowest quantity of glycoalkaloids content, whereas the highest content of these compounds was found in dice blanched potato at the lowest temperature (65 °C) and pre-dried at 120 °C. The blanching process much influenced on the decrease in glycoalkaloids content than pre-drying process. PMID:23870986

  13. Evolution of heavy metals in municipal solid waste during bio-drying and implications of their subsequent transfer during combustion.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Dong-Qing; Zhang, Hua; Wu, Chang-Lin; Shao, Li-Ming; He, Pin-Jing

    2011-08-01

    Bio-drying has been applied to improve the heating value of municipal solid waste (MSW) prior to combustion. In the present study, evolution of heavy metals in MSW during bio-drying and subsequent combustion was studied using one aerobic and two combined hydrolytic-aerobic scenarios. Heavy metals were concentrated during bio-drying and transformed between different metal fractions, namely the exchangeable, carbonate-bound, iron- and manganese-oxides-bound, organic-matter-bound and residual fractions. The amounts of heavy metals per kg of bio-dried MSW transferred into combustion flue gas increased with bio-drying time, primarily due to metals enrichment from organics degradation. Because of their volatility, the partitioning ratios of As and Hg in flue gas remained stable so that bio-drying and heavy metal speciation had little effect on their transfer and partitioning during combustion. In contrast, the partitioning ratios of Pb, Zn and Cu tended to increase after bio-drying, which likely enhanced their release potential during combustion.

  14. Evolution of heavy metals in municipal solid waste during bio-drying and implications of their subsequent transfer during combustion

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Dongqing; Zhang Hua; Wu Changlin; Shao Liming; He Pinjing

    2011-08-15

    Bio-drying has been applied to improve the heating value of municipal solid waste (MSW) prior to combustion. In the present study, evolution of heavy metals in MSW during bio-drying and subsequent combustion was studied using one aerobic and two combined hydrolytic-aerobic scenarios. Heavy metals were concentrated during bio-drying and transformed between different metal fractions, namely the exchangeable, carbonate-bound, iron- and manganese-oxides-bound, organic-matter-bound and residual fractions. The amounts of heavy metals per kg of bio-dried MSW transferred into combustion flue gas increased with bio-drying time, primarily due to metals enrichment from organics degradation. Because of their volatility, the partitioning ratios of As and Hg in flue gas remained stable so that bio-drying and heavy metal speciation had little effect on their transfer and partitioning during combustion. In contrast, the partitioning ratios of Pb, Zn and Cu tended to increase after bio-drying, which likely enhanced their release potential during combustion.

  15. Intake, growth and carcass yield of indigenous goats fed market wastes of sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas) vines and scarlet eggplant (Solanum aethiopicum).

    PubMed

    Katongole, C B; Bareeba, F B; Sabiiti, E N; Ledin, I

    2009-12-01

    Intake, growth and carcass yield of indigenous goats fed basal diets of market wastes of sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas) vines (SPV) and scarlet eggplant (Solanum aethiopicum) (SEP) were examined in two experiments. In experiment I, the effect of presentation method (chopping, hanging or adding molasses) on the intake of SEP and SPV was evaluated. Presentation method did not influence the intake of SPV while hanging resulted in the highest (P < 0.05) intake of SEP. In experiment II, 24 male growing goats were supplemented with a concentrate (25% cottonseed cake +75% maize bran) in four dietary groups: SEPD, SPVD, SEP+SPV and Control where elephant grass (Pennisetum purpureum) was offered as the roughage. SEP were offered by hanging, while SPV were chopped. The goats were slaughtered after 12 weeks of feeding. Goats in the SEPD group constantly lost weight, hence were not followed to the end. Average daily gain and hot carcass weight were highest (P < 0.05) in the SPVD group (44 g/d and 8.4 kg, respectively), but similar between the SEP+SPV (19 and 6.8) and Control (21 and 6.9) groups. In conclusion, SPV can support goat meat production where standard feed resources are scarce when fed with an energy-protein concentrate. SEP are poorly consumed by goats, hence cannot be used as their sole basal feed.

  16. Leucaena and dried poultry waste improve the performance of West African Dwarf sheep on a grass diet.

    PubMed

    Agbor, Euphresia Besongtakor; Ndamukong, Kenneth Jacob Ngoh; Pamo, Etienne Tendonkeng

    2013-04-01

    This study investigated the effects on digestibility and growth when West African Dwarf (WAD) sheep were fed a basal diet of Tripsacum laxum with Leucaena leucocephala or dried poultry waste as supplement. Fifteen WAD sheep (12 rams and 3 ewes) were randomly allocated to three dietary treatments of 5 animals each, namely T1-basal diet of chopped T. laxum (control), T2-basal diet plus dried poultry waste, and T3-basal diet plus L. leucocephala. Animals had access to drinking water and a mineral mix ad libitum. They were weighed weekly after a 2-week adaptation period, for a duration of 12 weeks. At the end of the feeding trial, three rams randomly selected from each treatment group were used for the digestibility study. Results revealed that average daily intake of L. leucocephala (350.0 ± 0.3 g/animal) was higher than that of dried poultry waste (260.0 ± 0.1 g/animal). The supplemented groups, T2 and T3, gained 21.4 and 31.0 g daily respectively, while animals of the control group (T1) lost 6.0 g daily. There was a significant difference (P<0.01) in dry matter intake between the control and supplemented groups, with T2 recording the highest intake. Organic matter intake of treatment 3 was significantly (P<0.01) higher than that of T1 and T2. The differences in crude fibre (CF) ingestion between T2 and T1 as well as T3 and T1 were significant (P<0.01), with the highest ingestion of CF occurring in T1. The dry matter digestibility of the supplemented groups was significantly higher (P<0.05) than that of the control. The organic matter digestibility of T2 and T3, as well as T1 and T3 were significantly different (P<0.05), being highest in T3 (77.0 ± 2.1 %) and lowest in T2 (58.1 ± 1.0 %) It was concluded from the study that T. laxum can be better utilized in West African Dwarf sheep when supplemented with dried poultry waste or L. leucocephala.

  17. Leucaena and dried poultry waste improve the performance of West African Dwarf sheep on a grass diet.

    PubMed

    Agbor, Euphresia Besongtakor; Ndamukong, Kenneth Jacob Ngoh; Pamo, Etienne Tendonkeng

    2013-04-01

    This study investigated the effects on digestibility and growth when West African Dwarf (WAD) sheep were fed a basal diet of Tripsacum laxum with Leucaena leucocephala or dried poultry waste as supplement. Fifteen WAD sheep (12 rams and 3 ewes) were randomly allocated to three dietary treatments of 5 animals each, namely T1-basal diet of chopped T. laxum (control), T2-basal diet plus dried poultry waste, and T3-basal diet plus L. leucocephala. Animals had access to drinking water and a mineral mix ad libitum. They were weighed weekly after a 2-week adaptation period, for a duration of 12 weeks. At the end of the feeding trial, three rams randomly selected from each treatment group were used for the digestibility study. Results revealed that average daily intake of L. leucocephala (350.0 ± 0.3 g/animal) was higher than that of dried poultry waste (260.0 ± 0.1 g/animal). The supplemented groups, T2 and T3, gained 21.4 and 31.0 g daily respectively, while animals of the control group (T1) lost 6.0 g daily. There was a significant difference (P<0.01) in dry matter intake between the control and supplemented groups, with T2 recording the highest intake. Organic matter intake of treatment 3 was significantly (P<0.01) higher than that of T1 and T2. The differences in crude fibre (CF) ingestion between T2 and T1 as well as T3 and T1 were significant (P<0.01), with the highest ingestion of CF occurring in T1. The dry matter digestibility of the supplemented groups was significantly higher (P<0.05) than that of the control. The organic matter digestibility of T2 and T3, as well as T1 and T3 were significantly different (P<0.05), being highest in T3 (77.0 ± 2.1 %) and lowest in T2 (58.1 ± 1.0 %) It was concluded from the study that T. laxum can be better utilized in West African Dwarf sheep when supplemented with dried poultry waste or L. leucocephala. PMID:23224820

  18. Cultural systems for growing potatoes in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tibbitts, T.; Bula, R.; Corey, R.; Morrow, R.

    1988-01-01

    Higher plants are being evaluated for life support to provide needed food, oxygen and water as well as removal of carbon dioxide from the atmosphere. The successful utilization of plants in space will require the development of not only highly productive growing systems but also highly efficient bioregenerative systems. It will be necessary to recycle all inedible plant parts and all human wastes so that the entire complement of elemental compounds can be reused. Potatoes have been proposed as one of the desirable crops because they are 1) extremely productive, yielding more than 100 metric tons per hectare from field plantings, 2) the edible tubers are high in digestible starch (70%) and protein (10%) on a dry weight basis, 3) up to 80% of the total plant production is in tubers and thus edible, 4) the plants are easily propagated either from tubers or from tissue culture plantlets, 5) the tubers can be utilized with a minimum of processing, and 6) potatoes can be prepared in a variety of different forms for the human diet (Tibbitts et al., 1982). However potatoes have a growth pattern that complicates the development of growing the plants in controlled systems. Tubers are borne on underground stems that are botanically termed 'rhizomes', but in common usage termed 'stolons'. The stolons must be maintained in a dark, moist area with sufficient provision for enlargement of tubers. Stems rapidly terminate in flowers forcing extensive branching and spreading of plants so that individual plants will cover 0.2 m2 or more area. Thus the growing system must be developed to provide an area that is darkened for tuber and root growth and of sufficient size for plant spread. A system developed for growing potatoes, or any plants, in space will have certain requirements that must be met to make them a useful part of a life support system. The system must 1) be constructed of materials, and involve media, that can be reused for many successive cycles of plant growth, 2

  19. Emissions from small-scale energy production using co-combustion of biofuel and the dry fraction of household waste

    SciTech Connect

    Hedman, Bjoern . E-mail: bjorn.hedman@chem.umu.se; Burvall, Jan; Nilsson, Calle; Marklund, Stellan

    2005-07-01

    In sparsely populated rural areas, recycling of household waste might not always be the most environmentally advantageous solution due to the total amount of transport involved. In this study, an alternative approach to recycling has been tested using efficient small-scale biofuel boilers for co-combustion of biofuel and high-energy waste. The dry combustible fraction of source-sorted household waste was mixed with the energy crop reed canary-grass (Phalaris Arundinacea L.), and combusted in both a 5-kW pilot scale reactor and a biofuel boiler with 140-180 kW output capacity, in the form of pellets and briquettes, respectively. The chlorine content of the waste fraction was 0.2%, most of which originated from plastics. The HCl emissions exceeded levels stipulated in new EU-directives, but levels of equal magnitude were also generated from combustion of the pure biofuel. Addition of waste to the biofuel did not give any apparent increase in emissions of organic compounds. Dioxin levels were close to stipulated limits. With further refinement of combustion equipment, small-scale co-combustion systems have the potential to comply with emission regulations.

  20. Absorption of CO{sub 2}, H{sub 2}, S, and NO using dry FGD wastes

    SciTech Connect

    Taulbee, D.N.; Graham, U.M.; Rathbone, R.F.

    1996-10-01

    Limestone-based sorbents are used extensively in utility boilers and tail-gas desulfurization units to remove sulfur oxides formed during the combustion of fossil fuels. Such units generate {approximately}20 million tons of flue-gas desulfurization (FGD) wastes in the U.S. annually, the bulk of which ({approximately}95%) are discarded in landfills or holding ponds. However, a significant portion of the Ca in these materials is not sulfated (remains as CaO or Ca(OH){sub 2}), particularly in units that generate dry wastes. When hydrated, such wastes exhibit a strong affinity to absorb acid gases at ambient temperature. This study represents a continuation of previously reported CO{sub 2}-absorption studies and includes more recent work on the absorption of H{sub 2}S and NO. Ten FGD-waste samples along with a control fly ash were examined. Absorption capacities, the role of available calcium and particle size, and mineralogic changes in the wastes following exposure are discussed.

  1. The effect of Dry matter content on the simultaneous saccharification and fermentation of citrus processing waste

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Citrus processing waste (CPW) is an attractive feedstock for making fuel ethanol. In order to make ethanol production from citrus waste economically viable, it is desirable to obtain a high ethanol yield and concentration with a small amount of enzymes. In this study, we investigated the effects of ...

  2. Potato stem density effects on canopy development and production

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Controlled environment studies with potato frequently assume responses from single-stem potato plants can be extrapolated to the field where multiple-stem plants are common. Two controlled environment studies were conducted in order to characterize differences in canopy growth, development, and dry...

  3. Viruses of potato.

    PubMed

    Loebenstein, Gad; Gaba, Victor

    2012-01-01

    Potatoes are an important crop in Mediterranean countries both for local consumption and for export to other countries, mainly during the winter. Many Mediterranean countries import certified seed potato in addition to their own seed production. The local seeds are mainly used for planting in the autumn and winter, while the imported seed are used for early and late spring plantings. Potato virus Y is the most important virus in Mediterranean countries, present mainly in the autumn plantings. The second important virus is Potato leafroll virus, though in recent years its importance seems to be decreasing. Potato virus X, Potato virus A, Potato virus S, Potato virus M, and the viroid, Potato spindle tuber viroid, were also recorded in several Mediterranean countries. For each virus the main strains, transmission, characterization of the virus particle, its genome organization, detection, and control methods including transgenic approaches will be discussed. PMID:22682169

  4. Potato guard cells respond to drying soil by a complex change in the expression of genes related to carbon metabolism and turgor regulation.

    PubMed

    Kopka, J; Provart, N J; Müller-Röber, B

    1997-04-01

    Altering stomatal function by a guard cell-targeted transgenic approach with the aim of increased stress tolerance and crop yield requires knowledge of the natural fluctuations of stomatal gene expression under stress conditions. We developed a fast method for the isolation of RNA from epidermal fragments of potato leaves (Solanum tuberosum L. cv. Désirée), demonstrated that this RNA preparation is highly enriched in guard cell transcripts and used this method to investigate the response of gene expression in guard cells to mild drought stress. Drought was applied in planta by withholding water over a period of 2-4 days. In the following work responses observed under these conditions are called 'long-term' in contrast to immediate (short-term) stomatal opening and closing responses to environmental stress. We observed both gene-specific increases and decreases of steady-state transcript levels. In particular, the mRNA levels of sucrose synthase and sucrose-phosphate synthase were elevated 5.5-fold and 1.4-fold, respectively. In contrast, expression of an inwardly rectifying K+ channel from guard cells (kst1) and of a plasma membrane H(+)-ATPase (pha2) was reduced to 26% and 36%, respectively, of the expression in watered controls. In addition, expression of vacuolar invertase, UDP-glucose pyrophosphorylase, ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase (large subunit), cytosolic glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, a sucrose/H+ cotransporter, and a novel isoform of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase were also reduced. Other genes exhibited unaltered expression. Compared with the response in whole leaves, the transcript levels of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase, vacuolar invertase, and cytosolic glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase were regulated guard cell specifically. Most importantly, changes in steady-state transcript levels were complete before the onset of a decrease in leaf water potential, when drought-induced stomatal closure was already obvious. These data

  5. A comparison of costs associated with utility management options for dry active waste

    SciTech Connect

    Hornibrook, C.

    1995-12-31

    The economics of low level waste management is receiving more attention today than ever before. This is due to four factors: (1) the increases in the cost of processing of these wastes; (2) increases in the cost of disposal; (3) the addition of storage costs for those without access to disposal; and (4) the increasing competitive nature of the electric generation industry. These pressures are forcing the industry to update it`s evaluation of the mix of processing that will afford it the best long term economics and minimize it`s risks for unforeseen costs. Whether disposal is available or not, all utilities face the same challenge of minimizing the costs associated with the management of these wastes. There are a number of variables that will impact how a utility manages their wastes but the problem is the uncertainty of what will actually happen, i.e., will disposal be available, when and at what cost. Using the EPRI-developed WASTECOST: DAW code, this paper explores a variety of LLW management options available to utilities. Along with providing the costs and benefits, other technical considerations which play an important part in the management of these wastes are also addressed.

  6. Performance and kinetic study of semi-dry thermophilic anaerobic digestion of organic fraction of municipal solid waste

    SciTech Connect

    Sajeena Beevi, B.; Madhu, G.; Sahoo, Deepak Kumar

    2015-02-15

    Highlights: • Performance of the reactor was evaluated by the degradation of volatile solids. • Biogas yield at the end of the digestion was 52.9 L/kg VS. • Value of reaction rate constant, k, obtained was 0.0249 day{sup −1}. • During the digestion 66.7% of the volatile solid degradation was obtained. - Abstract: Anaerobic digestion (AD) of the organic fraction of municipal solid waste (OFMSW) is promoted as an energy source and waste disposal. In this study semi dry anaerobic digestion of organic solid wastes was conducted for 45 days in a lab-scale batch experiment for total solid concentration of 100 g/L for investigating the start-up performances under thermophilic condition (50 °C). The performance of the reactor was evaluated by measuring the daily biogas production and calculating the degradation of total solids and the total volatile solids. The biogas yield at the end of the digestion was 52.9 L/kg VS (volatile solid) for the total solid (TS) concentration of 100 g/L. About 66.7% of the volatile solid degradation was obtained during the digestion. A first order model based on the availability of substrate as the limiting factor was used to perform the kinetic studies of batch anaerobic digestion system. The value of reaction rate constant, k, obtained was 0.0249 day{sup −1}.

  7. ENVIRONMENTAL RESEARCH BRIEF: WASTE REDUCTION ACTIVITIES AND OPTIONS FOR A MANUFACTURER OF COMMERCIAL DRY CLEANING EQUIPMENT.

    EPA Science Inventory

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) funded a project with the New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection and Energy (NJDEPE) to assist in conducting waste minimization assessments at thirty small- to medium-sized businesses in the state of New Jersey. One of th...

  8. Addition of polyaluminiumchloride (PACl) to waste activated sludge to mitigate the negative effects of its sticky phase in dewatering-drying operations.

    PubMed

    Peeters, Bart; Dewil, Raf; Vernimmen, Luc; Van den Bogaert, Benno; Smets, Ilse Y

    2013-07-01

    This paper presents a new application of polyaluminiumchloride (PACl) as a conditioner for waste activated sludge prior its dewatering and drying. It is demonstrated at lab scale with a shear test-based protocol that a dose ranging from 50 to 150 g PACl/kg MLSS (mixed liquor suspended solids) mitigates the stickiness of partially dried sludge with a dry solids content between 25 and 60 %DS (dry solids). E.g., at a solids dryness of 46% DS the shear stress required to have the pre-consolidated sludge slip over a steel surface is reduced with 35%. The salient feature of PACl is further supported by torque data from a full scale decanter centrifuge used to dewater waste sludge. The maximal torque developed by the screw conveyor inside the decanter centrifuge is substantially reduced with 20% in the case the sludge feed is conditioned with PACl. The beneficial effect of waste sludge conditioning with PACl is proposed to be the result of the bound water associated with the aluminium polymers in PACl solutions which act as a type of lubrication for the intrinsically sticky sludge solids during the course of drying. It can be anticipated that PACl addition to waste sludge will become a technically feasible and very effective method to avoid worldwide fouling problems in direct sludge dryers, and to reduce torque issues in indirect sludge dryers as well as in sludge decanter centrifuges.

  9. Potato Types and Characteristics: Laboratory Exercises.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pavlista, Alexander D.

    1997-01-01

    Presents a number of simple exercises that demonstrate potato tuber characteristics and are designed for high school biology students and teachers. Exercises include Typing, Grading, Shape, Eye Characteristics, Defects, Specific Gravity, Dry Matter Content, Glucose Content, Baking, Frying/Chipping, and Taste Testing. (JRH)

  10. Potato production in Thailand

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Potato production has increased dramatically in recent years in Thailand. Consumer demand for fresh and processed potatoes has driven this trend. Most potatoes are produced in northern Thailand in either double cropping highland zones or as a single winter crop following rice in lowland regions. Maj...

  11. Conversion of dried Aspergillus candidus mycelia grown on waste whey to biodiesel by in situ acid transesterification.

    PubMed

    Kakkad, Hardik; Khot, Mahesh; Zinjarde, Smita; RaviKumar, Ameeta; Ravi Kumar, V; Kulkarni, B D

    2015-12-01

    This study reports optimization of the transesterification reaction step on dried biomass of an oleaginous fungus Aspergillus candidus grown on agro-dairy waste, whey. Acid catalyzed transesterification was performed and variables affecting esterification, viz., catalyst methanol and chloroform concentrations, temperature, time, and biomass were investigated. Statistical optimization of the transesterification reaction using Plackett-Burman Design showed biomass to be the predominant factor with a 12.5-fold increase in total FAME from 25.6 to 320mg. Studies indicate that the transesterification efficiency in terms of conversion is favored by employing lower biomass loadings. A. candidus exhibited FAME profiles containing desirable saturated (30.2%), monounsaturated (31.5%) and polyunsaturated methyl esters (38.3%). The predicted and experimentally determined biodiesel properties (density, kinematic viscosity, iodine value, cetane number, TAN, water content, total and free glycerol) were in accordance with international (ASTM D6751, EN 14214) and national (IS 15607) standards.

  12. Conversion of dried Aspergillus candidus mycelia grown on waste whey to biodiesel by in situ acid transesterification.

    PubMed

    Kakkad, Hardik; Khot, Mahesh; Zinjarde, Smita; RaviKumar, Ameeta; Ravi Kumar, V; Kulkarni, B D

    2015-12-01

    This study reports optimization of the transesterification reaction step on dried biomass of an oleaginous fungus Aspergillus candidus grown on agro-dairy waste, whey. Acid catalyzed transesterification was performed and variables affecting esterification, viz., catalyst methanol and chloroform concentrations, temperature, time, and biomass were investigated. Statistical optimization of the transesterification reaction using Plackett-Burman Design showed biomass to be the predominant factor with a 12.5-fold increase in total FAME from 25.6 to 320mg. Studies indicate that the transesterification efficiency in terms of conversion is favored by employing lower biomass loadings. A. candidus exhibited FAME profiles containing desirable saturated (30.2%), monounsaturated (31.5%) and polyunsaturated methyl esters (38.3%). The predicted and experimentally determined biodiesel properties (density, kinematic viscosity, iodine value, cetane number, TAN, water content, total and free glycerol) were in accordance with international (ASTM D6751, EN 14214) and national (IS 15607) standards. PMID:26362462

  13. Dry anaerobic co-digestion of organic fraction of municipal waste with paperboard mill sludge and gelatin solid waste for enhancement of hydrogen production.

    PubMed

    Elsamadony, M; Tawfik, A

    2015-09-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the bio-H2 production via dry anaerobic co-fermentation of organic fraction of municipal solid waste (OFMSW) with protein and calcium-rich substrates such as gelatin solid waste (GSW) and paperboard mill sludge (PMS). Co-fermentation of OFMSW/GSW/PMS significantly enhanced the H2 production (HP) and H2 yield (HY). The maximum HP of 1082.5±91.4 mL and HY of 144.9±9.8 mL/gVSremoved were achieved at a volumetric ratio of 70% OFMSW:20% GSW:10% PMS. COD, carbohydrate, protein and lipids conversion efficiencies were 60.9±4.4%, 71.4±3.5%, 22.6±2.3% and 20.5±1.8% respectively. Co-fermentation process reduced the particle size distribution which is favorably utilized by hydrogen producing bacteria. The mean particle size diameters for feedstock and the digestate were 939.3 and 115.2μm, respectively with reduction value of 8.15-fold in the mixtures. The volumetric H2 production increased from 4.5±0.3 to 7.2±0.6 L(H2)/L(substrate) at increasing Ca(+2) concentrations from 1.8±0.1 to 6.3±0.5 g/L respectively. PMID:25989091

  14. Dry anaerobic co-digestion of organic fraction of municipal waste with paperboard mill sludge and gelatin solid waste for enhancement of hydrogen production.

    PubMed

    Elsamadony, M; Tawfik, A

    2015-09-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the bio-H2 production via dry anaerobic co-fermentation of organic fraction of municipal solid waste (OFMSW) with protein and calcium-rich substrates such as gelatin solid waste (GSW) and paperboard mill sludge (PMS). Co-fermentation of OFMSW/GSW/PMS significantly enhanced the H2 production (HP) and H2 yield (HY). The maximum HP of 1082.5±91.4 mL and HY of 144.9±9.8 mL/gVSremoved were achieved at a volumetric ratio of 70% OFMSW:20% GSW:10% PMS. COD, carbohydrate, protein and lipids conversion efficiencies were 60.9±4.4%, 71.4±3.5%, 22.6±2.3% and 20.5±1.8% respectively. Co-fermentation process reduced the particle size distribution which is favorably utilized by hydrogen producing bacteria. The mean particle size diameters for feedstock and the digestate were 939.3 and 115.2μm, respectively with reduction value of 8.15-fold in the mixtures. The volumetric H2 production increased from 4.5±0.3 to 7.2±0.6 L(H2)/L(substrate) at increasing Ca(+2) concentrations from 1.8±0.1 to 6.3±0.5 g/L respectively.

  15. Grower price effects of Innate™ potato

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The revival of biotechnology applications for potato raises interesting economic questions that we examine here. Technologies of this sort increase supply by decreasing waste and reducing percentage of off-grade product. Increased supply leads, eventually, to reductions in the market price, so that ...

  16. Properties of ceramics prepared using dry discharged waste to energy bottom ash dust.

    PubMed

    Bourtsalas, Athanasios; Vandeperre, Luc; Grimes, Sue; Themelis, Nicolas; Koralewska, Ralf; Cheeseman, Chris

    2015-09-01

    The fine dust of incinerator bottom ash generated from dry discharge systems can be transformed into an inert material suitable for the production of hard, dense ceramics. Processing involves the addition of glass, ball milling and calcining to remove volatile components from the incinerator bottom ash. This transforms the major crystalline phases present in fine incinerator bottom ash dust from quartz (SiO(2)), calcite (CaCO(3)), gehlenite (Ca(2)Al(2)SiO(7)) and hematite (Fe(2)O(3)), to the pyroxene group minerals diopside (CaMgSi(2)O(6)), clinoenstatite (MgSi(2)O(6)), wollastonite (CaSiO(3)) together with some albite (NaAlSi(3)O(8)) and andradite (Ca(3)Fe(2)Si(3)O(12)). Processed powders show minimal leaching and can be pressed and sintered to form dense (>2.5 g cm(-3)), hard ceramics that exhibit low firing shrinkage (<7%) and zero water absorption. The research demonstrates the potential to beneficially up-cycle the fine incinerator bottom ash dust from dry discharge technology into a raw material suitable for the production of ceramic tiles that have potential for use in a range of industrial applications.

  17. Properties of ceramics prepared using dry discharged waste to energy bottom ash dust.

    PubMed

    Bourtsalas, Athanasios; Vandeperre, Luc; Grimes, Sue; Themelis, Nicolas; Koralewska, Ralf; Cheeseman, Chris

    2015-09-01

    The fine dust of incinerator bottom ash generated from dry discharge systems can be transformed into an inert material suitable for the production of hard, dense ceramics. Processing involves the addition of glass, ball milling and calcining to remove volatile components from the incinerator bottom ash. This transforms the major crystalline phases present in fine incinerator bottom ash dust from quartz (SiO(2)), calcite (CaCO(3)), gehlenite (Ca(2)Al(2)SiO(7)) and hematite (Fe(2)O(3)), to the pyroxene group minerals diopside (CaMgSi(2)O(6)), clinoenstatite (MgSi(2)O(6)), wollastonite (CaSiO(3)) together with some albite (NaAlSi(3)O(8)) and andradite (Ca(3)Fe(2)Si(3)O(12)). Processed powders show minimal leaching and can be pressed and sintered to form dense (>2.5 g cm(-3)), hard ceramics that exhibit low firing shrinkage (<7%) and zero water absorption. The research demonstrates the potential to beneficially up-cycle the fine incinerator bottom ash dust from dry discharge technology into a raw material suitable for the production of ceramic tiles that have potential for use in a range of industrial applications. PMID:26060195

  18. Composition of sulfited potatoes: comparison with fresh and frozen potatoes.

    PubMed

    Chalom, S; Elrezzi, E; Peña, P; Astiarsarán, I; Bello, J

    1995-02-01

    The content in moisture, fat, protein, carbohydrate, fibre and vitamin C was analyzed in three commercial types of potatoes: sulfited (treated with E223), frozen potatoes (pre-fried) and fresh potatoes (not processed). The composition of sulfited potatoes does not usually appear in food composition tables. Our results showed significant differences in the content of carbohydrates and fibre between sulfited and fresh potatoes. The content of vitamin C in sulfited potatoes, which is similar to that of frozen potatoes, was shown to be approximately half of that found in fresh potatoes. PMID:7792261

  19. Study on the preparation of Mn-Zn soft magnetic ferrite powders from waste Zn-Mn dry batteries.

    PubMed

    Peng, Chang-hong; Bai, Ben-shuai; Chen, Yi-feng

    2008-01-01

    Using waste Zn-Mn dry batteries, waste scrap iron and pyrolusite as raw materials, Mn-Zn soft magnetic ferrite powders were prepared through the process of simultaneous leaching, purification and co-precipitation. The experimental results indicated that the leached yields of Fe, Mn and Zn were 92.02%, 96.14% and 98.34%, respectively. The leached liquor was purified through these processes of sulfuration precipitation, fluorination precipitation and double salt precipitation deep purification process. Therefore, high removal yields of impurities could be achieved. Removal yields were as follows: Ca 99.7%, Mg 92.33%, Al 96.48%, Si 63.64%, Cu 99.86%, Pb 98.51%, Cd 53.0% and Ni 78.72%. Among these co-precipitation powders, the average mass content of the main components were Fe 41.41%, Mn 13.92% and Zn 4.49%, and the mass ratio of Fe:Zn:Mn was 69.2:23.3:7.5. Compared with the theoretical prescription (Fe:Mn:Zn=67.3:24.4:8.3), the absolute errors of main components were Fe +1.9%, Mn -1.1% and Zn -0.8%. Because of content impurities in co-precipitation powders (Ca<0.0028%, Mg<0.0053%, Al<0.0084%, SiO(2)<0.0023%, Pb<0.0031% and Cu<0.0010%), the qualities of these gained co-precipitation powders could compete with the demand for the preparation of soft magnetic ferrite. The magnetic properties also demonstrated that the soft magnetic ferrite samples, which were made from the co-precipitation powders prepared by used batteries, had the same qualities as PC30 made by the TDK Company.

  20. Potato (Solanum tuberosum L.).

    PubMed

    Chetty, Venkateswari J; Narváez-Vásquez, Javier; Orozco-Cárdenas, Martha L

    2015-01-01

    Agrobacterium-mediated transformation is the most common method for the incorporation of foreign genes into the genome of potato as well as many other species in the Solanaceae family. This chapter describes protocols for the genetic transformation of three species of potato: Solanum tuberosum subsp. tuberosum (Desiréé), S. tuberosum subsp. andigenum (Blue potato), and S. tuberosum subsp. andigena using internodal segments as explants. PMID:25416251

  1. Potato (Solanum tuberosum L.).

    PubMed

    Chetty, Venkateswari J; Narváez-Vásquez, Javier; Orozco-Cárdenas, Martha L

    2015-01-01

    Agrobacterium-mediated transformation is the most common method for the incorporation of foreign genes into the genome of potato as well as many other species in the Solanaceae family. This chapter describes protocols for the genetic transformation of three species of potato: Solanum tuberosum subsp. tuberosum (Desiréé), S. tuberosum subsp. andigenum (Blue potato), and S. tuberosum subsp. andigena using internodal segments as explants.

  2. Removal of Co(II) from waste water using dry cow dung powder : a green ambrosia to soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagla, Hemlata; Khilnani, Roshan

    2015-04-01

    Co(II) is one of the hazardous products found in the waste streams. The anthropogenic activities are major sources of Co(II) in our environment. Some of the well-established processes such as chemical precipitation, membrane process, liquid extraction and ion exchange have been applied as a tool for the removal of this metal ion [1]. All the above methods are not considered to be greener due to some of their shortcomings such as incomplete metal ion removal, high requirement of energy and reagents, generation of toxic sludge or other waste materials which in turn require further treatments for their cautious disposal. The present investigation entails the application of dry cow dung powder (DCP) as an indigenous, inexpensive and eco-friendly material for the removal of Co(II) from aqueous medium. DCP, is naturally available bio-organic, complex, polymorphic humified fecal matter of cow and is enriched with minerals, carbohydrates, fats, proteins, bile pigments, aliphatic-aromatic species such as 'Humic acid' (HA), Fulvic acid, Ulmic acid [2,3]. Batch biosorption experiments were conducted employing 60Co(II) as a tracer and effect of various process parameters such as pH (1-8), temperature (283-363K), amount of biosorbent (5-40 g/L), time of equilibration (0-30 min), agitation speed (0-4000 rpm), concentration of initial metal ions (0.5-20 mg/mL) and interfering effect of different organic as well as inorganic salts were studied. The Kinetic studies were carried out employing various models but the best fitting was given by Lagergren Pseudo-second order model [4] with high correlation coefficient R2 value of 0.999 and adsorption capacity of 2.31 mg/g. The thermodynamic parameters for biosorption were also evaluated which indicated spontaneous and exothermic process with high affinity of DCP for Co(II). Many naturally available materials are used for biosorption of hazardous metal pollutants, where most of them are physically or chemically modified. In this research

  3. Effect of the dates of extraction on the quality of potato pulp.

    PubMed

    Saito, Katsuichi; Noda, Takahiro; Tsuda, Shogo; Mori, Motoyuki; Hasa, Yasuhiro; Kito, Hideki; Oda, Yuji

    2006-12-01

    The objectives of this study were to evaluate the fundamental properties of potato pulp and to explore its potential uses. Lactic acid bacteria were the dominant microbes in potato pulp over the season (maximum being 10(8)/g). The water content in potato pulp was approximately 80% in all season. Starch and fiber were the main components of potato pulp, amounting to 80% of the dried matter regardless of the season. The fermentation of potato pulp by Rhizopus oryzae progressed only in the potato pulp extracted at the end of the season. This indicated that the fermentation of potato pulp was influenced by the dates of extraction, and it was assumed that the quality of the components, such as pectin, varied with such dates.

  4. Phenolic Compounds in the Potato and Its Byproducts: An Overview.

    PubMed

    Akyol, Hazal; Riciputi, Ylenia; Capanoglu, Esra; Caboni, Maria Fiorenza; Verardo, Vito

    2016-01-01

    The potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) is a tuber that is largely used for food and is a source of different bioactive compounds such as starch, dietary fiber, amino acids, minerals, vitamins, and phenolic compounds. Phenolic compounds are synthetized by the potato plant as a protection response from bacteria, fungi, viruses, and insects. Several works showed that these potato compounds exhibited health-promoting effects in humans. However, the use of the potato in the food industry submits this vegetable to different processes that can alter the phenolic content. Moreover, many of these compounds with high bioactivity are located in the potato's skin, and so are eliminated as waste. In this review the most recent articles dealing with phenolic compounds in the potato and potato byproducts, along with the effects of harvesting, post-harvest, and technological processes, have been reviewed. Briefly, the phenolic composition, main extraction, and determination methods have been described. In addition, the "alternative" food uses and healthy properties of potato phenolic compounds have been addressed. PMID:27240356

  5. Phenolic Compounds in the Potato and Its Byproducts: An Overview.

    PubMed

    Akyol, Hazal; Riciputi, Ylenia; Capanoglu, Esra; Caboni, Maria Fiorenza; Verardo, Vito

    2016-05-27

    The potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) is a tuber that is largely used for food and is a source of different bioactive compounds such as starch, dietary fiber, amino acids, minerals, vitamins, and phenolic compounds. Phenolic compounds are synthetized by the potato plant as a protection response from bacteria, fungi, viruses, and insects. Several works showed that these potato compounds exhibited health-promoting effects in humans. However, the use of the potato in the food industry submits this vegetable to different processes that can alter the phenolic content. Moreover, many of these compounds with high bioactivity are located in the potato's skin, and so are eliminated as waste. In this review the most recent articles dealing with phenolic compounds in the potato and potato byproducts, along with the effects of harvesting, post-harvest, and technological processes, have been reviewed. Briefly, the phenolic composition, main extraction, and determination methods have been described. In addition, the "alternative" food uses and healthy properties of potato phenolic compounds have been addressed.

  6. Solanum tuberosum (Potato)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Potato is the fourth most important food crop worldwide, with high value as a balanced and nutritious food. It is one of the world’s most productive crops. Wild potatoes are native from the southwestern United States to south-central Chile, with centers of species diversity in central Mexico and in ...

  7. DATA SHARING REPORT CHARACTERIZATION OF POPULATION 7: PERSONAL PROTECTIVE EQUIPMENT, DRY ACTIVE WASTE, AND MISCELLANEOUS DEBRIS, SURVEILLANCE AND MAINTENANCE PROJECT OAK RIDGE NATIONAL LABORATORY OAK RIDGE, TENNESSEE

    SciTech Connect

    Harpenau, Evan M

    2013-10-10

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Oak Ridge Office of Environmental Management (EM-OR) requested that Oak Ridge Associated Universities (ORAU), working under the Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) contract, provide technical and independent waste management planning support under the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA). Specifically, DOE EM-OR requested that ORAU plan and implement a sampling and analysis campaign targeting certain URS|CH2M Oak Ridge, LLC (UCOR) surveillance and maintenance (S&M) process inventory waste. Eight populations of historical and reoccurring S&M waste at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) have been identified in the Waste Handling Plan for Surveillance and Maintenance Activities at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, DOE/OR/01-2565&D2 (WHP) (DOE 2012) for evaluation and processing to determine a final pathway for disposal. Population 7 (POP 7) consists of 56 containers of aged, low-level and potentially mixed S&M waste that has been staged in various locations around ORNL. Several of these POP 7 containers primarily contain personal protective equipment (PPE) and dry active waste (DAW), but may contain other miscellaneous debris. This data sharing report addresses the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA) specified waste in a 13-container subpopulation (including eight steel boxes, three 55-gal drums, one sealand, and one intermodal) that lacked sufficient characterization data for possible disposal at the Environmental Management Waste Management Facility (EMWMF) using the approved Waste Lot (WL) 108.1 profile.

  8. Pasta Fortified with Potato Juice: Structure, Quality, and Consumer Acceptance.

    PubMed

    Kowalczewski, Przemysław; Lewandowicz, Grażyna; Makowska, Agnieszka; Knoll, Ismena; Błaszczak, Wioletta; Białas, Wojciech; Kubiak, Piotr

    2015-06-01

    The potential of potato juice in relieving gastrointestinal disorders has already been proven. Work continues on implementation of this active component into products that are widely consumed. In this article, results of an attempt to fortify pasta with potato juice are presented and discussed. Fortification is performed using fresh and dried juice. The influence of the addition on culinary properties of the final product, such as cooking weight and cooking loss, as well as microstructure, color, texture, and consumer acceptance were evaluated. It was found that potato juice can be used for fortification of pasta both in its fresh and dried forms, however the effects on different responses depend on the potato juice form used. The addition of potato juice influenced the color of the product reducing its lightness and shifting color balances from green to red, yellow color saturation was decreased as well. Changes in color were more significant in the case of fresh juice addition. The firmness and microstructure of pasta was also influenced. The surface microstructure of pasta containing fresh potato juice was different from that of the other 2 products being a likely explanation of the lower cooking loss observed in its case. In contrast, the consistency of dough was strengthened by addition of dried potato juice. Principal components analysis indicated that the color change had the most pronounced effect on consumer acceptance. Other physicochemical changes were slightly less significant. Nevertheless, sensory evaluation proved that functional pasta produced with fresh potato juice finds consumer acceptance comparable with that of classic pasta. PMID:25982048

  9. Potato growth in response to relative humidity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wheeler, R. M.; Tibbitts, T. W.; Fitzpatrick, A. H.

    1989-01-01

    Potato plants (Solanum tuberosum L. cvs. Russet Burbank, Norland, and Denali) were grown for 56 days in controlled-environment rooms under continuous light at 20C and 50% or 85% RH. No significant differences in total plant dry weight were measured between the humidity treatments, but plants grown under 85% RH produced higher tuber yields. Leaf areas were greater under 50% RH and leaves tended to be larger and darker green than at 85% RH.

  10. Bioactive Compounds in Potato Tubers: Effects of Farming System, Cooking Method, and Flesh Color.

    PubMed

    Grudzińska, Magdalena; Czerko, Zbigniew; Zarzyńska, Krystyna; Borowska-Komenda, Monika

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the effect of cultivation system (conventional or organic), cooking method, and flesh color on the contents of ascorbic acid (AA) and total phenolics (TPs), and on total antioxidant activity (Trolox equivalents, TE) in Solanum tuberosum (potato) tubers. The research material, consisting of 4 potato cultivars, was grown in experimental fields, using organic and conventional systems, at the experimental station in 2012 and 2013. The analysis showed that organically grown potatoes with creamy, light yellow, and yellow flesh had significantly higher TPs than did potatoes grown conventionally. Flesh color and cooking method also affected AA. The greatest losses of AA occurred in yellow-fleshed potatoes grown conventionally and cooked in the microwave; such losses were not observed in potatoes grown organically. A dry cooking method (baking in a microwave) increased the TP contents in potatoes by about 30%, regardless of the flesh color and the production system. TE was significantly higher in organically grown potatoes (raw and cooked in a steamer) than in conventionally grown potatoes. TE and AA contents showed a significant positive correlation, but only in potatoes from the organic system [R2 = 0.686]. By contrast, the positive correlation between TE and TPs was observed regardless of the production system. Therefore, we have identified the effects of farming system, cooking method, and flesh color on the contents of bioactive compounds in potato tubers. PMID:27139188

  11. Bioactive Compounds in Potato Tubers: Effects of Farming System, Cooking Method, and Flesh Color

    PubMed Central

    Czerko, Zbigniew; Zarzyńska, Krystyna; Borowska-Komenda, Monika

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the effect of cultivation system (conventional or organic), cooking method, and flesh color on the contents of ascorbic acid (AA) and total phenolics (TPs), and on total antioxidant activity (Trolox equivalents, TE) in Solanum tuberosum (potato) tubers. The research material, consisting of 4 potato cultivars, was grown in experimental fields, using organic and conventional systems, at the experimental station in 2012 and 2013. The analysis showed that organically grown potatoes with creamy, light yellow, and yellow flesh had significantly higher TPs than did potatoes grown conventionally. Flesh color and cooking method also affected AA. The greatest losses of AA occurred in yellow-fleshed potatoes grown conventionally and cooked in the microwave; such losses were not observed in potatoes grown organically. A dry cooking method (baking in a microwave) increased the TP contents in potatoes by about 30%, regardless of the flesh color and the production system. TE was significantly higher in organically grown potatoes (raw and cooked in a steamer) than in conventionally grown potatoes. TE and AA contents showed a significant positive correlation, but only in potatoes from the organic system [R2 = 0.686]. By contrast, the positive correlation between TE and TPs was observed regardless of the production system. Therefore, we have identified the effects of farming system, cooking method, and flesh color on the contents of bioactive compounds in potato tubers. PMID:27139188

  12. Fate of toxic potato glycoalkaloids in a potato field.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Pia H; Strobel, Bjarne W; Hansen, Hans Christian B; Jacobsen, Ole Stig

    2009-04-01

    The toxic glycoalkaloids, alpha-solanine and alpha-chaconine, are present in all parts of the potato plant and are possibly transferred to the terrestrial environment. The amounts of glycoalkaloids in plant, soil, and groundwater were followed in a potato field to investigate their distribution and fate during the season. The amount of glycoalkaloids in the plants was up to 25 kg/ha during maturity and decreased to below 0.63 kg/ha during plant senescence. The glycoalkaloids were detected in the upper soil (up to 0.6 kg/ha); this amount accounted only for a minor fraction of the amount present in the plants. Maximum glycoalkaloid concentration of 2.8 mg/kg dry weight soil was detected in September. Dissipation during winter appeared to be slow because glycoalkaloids were still present in the soil in March. No traces of glycoalkaloids were detected in the groundwater (detection limit 0.2 microg/L). From these results, the leaching potential of the glycoalkaloids is evaluated to be small.

  13. Optimization of extraction of phenolic acids from a vegetable waste product using a pressurized liquid extractor

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Potato tubers are eaten worldwide for their nutritional value, but potato peels are often disposed as waste. This study identified the phenolic acids content in potato peels, tuber, and developed an optimized method for extraction of phenolic acids from potato peels using a pressurized liquid extrac...

  14. Potato Operation: automatic detection of potato diseases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lefebvre, Marc; Zimmerman, Thierry; Baur, Charles; Guegerli, Paul; Pun, Thierry

    1995-01-01

    The Potato Operation is a collaborative, multidisciplinary project in the domain of destructive testing of agricultural products. It aims at automatizing pulp sampling of potatoes in order to detect possible viral diseases. Such viruses can decrease fields productivity by a factor of up to ten. A machine, composed of three conveyor belts, a vision system, a robotic arm and controlled by a PC has been built. Potatoes are brought one by one from a bulk to the vision system, where they are seized by a rotating holding device. The sprouts, where the viral activity is maximum, are then detected by an active vision process operating on multiple views. The 3D coordinates of the sampling point are communicated to the robot arm holding a drill. Some flesh is then sampled by the drill, then deposited into an Elisa plate. After sampling, the robot arm washes the drill in order to prevent any contamination. The PC computer simultaneously controls these processes, the conveying of the potatoes, the vision algorithms and the sampling procedure. The master process, that is the vision procedure, makes use of three methods to achieve the sprouts detection. A profile analysis first locates the sprouts as protuberances. Two frontal analyses, respectively based on fluorescence and local variance, confirm the previous detection and provide the 3D coordinate of the sampling zone. The other two processes work by interruption of the master process.

  15. Phenolic Compounds in the Potato and Its Byproducts: An Overview

    PubMed Central

    Akyol, Hazal; Riciputi, Ylenia; Capanoglu, Esra; Caboni, Maria Fiorenza; Verardo, Vito

    2016-01-01

    The potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) is a tuber that is largely used for food and is a source of different bioactive compounds such as starch, dietary fiber, amino acids, minerals, vitamins, and phenolic compounds. Phenolic compounds are synthetized by the potato plant as a protection response from bacteria, fungi, viruses, and insects. Several works showed that these potato compounds exhibited health-promoting effects in humans. However, the use of the potato in the food industry submits this vegetable to different processes that can alter the phenolic content. Moreover, many of these compounds with high bioactivity are located in the potato’s skin, and so are eliminated as waste. In this review the most recent articles dealing with phenolic compounds in the potato and potato byproducts, along with the effects of harvesting, post-harvest, and technological processes, have been reviewed. Briefly, the phenolic composition, main extraction, and determination methods have been described. In addition, the “alternative” food uses and healthy properties of potato phenolic compounds have been addressed. PMID:27240356

  16. Leaf wetness distribution within a potato crop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heusinkveld, B. G.

    2010-07-01

    The Netherlands has a mild maritime climate and therefore the major interest in leaf wetness is associated with foliar plant diseases. During moist micrometeorological conditions (i.e. dew, fog, rain), foliar fungal diseases may develop quickly and thereby destroy a crop quickly. Potato crop monocultures covering several hectares are especially vulnerable to such diseases. Therefore understanding and predicting leaf wetness in potato crops is crucial in crop disease control strategies. A field experiment was carried out in a large homogeneous potato crop in the Netherlands during the growing season of 2008. Two innovative sensor networks were installed as a 3 by 3 grid at 3 heights covering an area of about 2 hectares within two larger potato crops. One crop was located on a sandy soil and one crop on a sandy peat soil. In most cases leaf wetting starts in the top layer and then progresses downward. Leaf drying takes place in the same order after sunrise. A canopy dew simulation model was applied to simulate spatial leaf wetness distribution. The dew model is based on an energy balance model. The model can be run using information on the above-canopy wind speed, air temperature, humidity, net radiation and within canopy air temperature, humidity and soil moisture content and temperature conditions. Rainfall was accounted for by applying an interception model. The results of the dew model agreed well with the leaf wetness sensors if all local conditions were considered. The measurements show that the spatial correlation of leaf wetness decreases downward.

  17. Inactivation of trypsin inhibitors in sweet potato and taro tubers during processing.

    PubMed

    Kiran, K Sasi; Padmaja, G

    2003-01-01

    In order to understand the extent of elimination of trypsin inhibitors during processing of sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas) and taro (Colocasia esculenta) tubers, a detailed study was conducted using tubers processed by oven drying, cooking, and microwave baking. Between 80 and 90% trypsin inhibitor (TI) activity was retained in sweet potato chips up to 2h at 70 degrees C. Among the four cultivars of sweet potatoes, RS-III-2 trypsin inhibitors were more heat labile. Heating at 100 degrees C led to rapid inactivation of TI of sweet potatoes. Varietal differences in thermal stability were more pronounced for the trypsin inhibitors of taro than sweet potatoes. Taro inhibitors were also more rapidly inactivated than sweet potato TI. Between 17 and 31% TI activity was retained in cooked tuber pieces of sweet potatoes, while only 3-10% were retained in taro cultivars. Very effective inactivation of trypsin inhibitors of sweet potatoes and taro could be obtained through microwave baking. Flour prepared from taro was devoid of TI activity, while 5-12% TI activity was retained in the flour prepared from sweet potatoes. The study clearly established that among the four techniques used, microwave baking and flour preparation were the best methods to eliminate TI from sweet potatoes and taro.

  18. Material and energy recovery in integrated waste management systems: an innovative approach for the characterization of the gaseous emissions from residual MSW bio-drying.

    PubMed

    Ragazzi, M; Rada, E C; Antolini, D

    2011-01-01

    In the sector of residual municipal solid waste management an increasing attention is put towards the role of biological treatments like bio-drying and bio-stabilization in order to decrease the need of landfilling volumes. The literature shows a lack of information concerning the emission factor of pollutants released from these processes. The available data are generally spot characterizations of concentration and air flow-rate that are used together in order to assess the emission factors. This approach caused significant differences among the available data as the release of pollutants is not steady. This paper belongs to a group of six papers concerning a research on material and energy recovery in integrated waste management systems, developed by a network of five universities. The contribution of the University of Trento, focuses on the bio-drying process with the following targets: (a) developing an innovative low cost method of sampling/measurement able to take into account the dynamics of release of pollutants; (b) checking the efficiency of a bio-filter; (c) verifying the variability of generation of some pollutants; (d) generating emission factors. The research was developed using a bio-drying pilot plant. As a treatment of the process air, the bio-reactor was coupled with a bio-filter. The emissions were characterized using an original approach based on the adoption of two measurement chambers suitable for hosting passive samplers. The passive samplers allowed the characterization of VOCs, N(2)O, NH(3) and H(2)S. A bio-chemical model, useful for energy and mass balances, supported the interpretation of the presented bio-drying run.

  19. Material and energy recovery in integrated waste management systems: An innovative approach for the characterization of the gaseous emissions from residual MSW bio-drying

    SciTech Connect

    Ragazzi, M.; Rada, E.C.; Antolini, D.

    2011-09-15

    In the sector of residual municipal solid waste management an increasing attention is put towards the role of biological treatments like bio-drying and bio-stabilization in order to decrease the need of landfilling volumes. The literature shows a lack of information concerning the emission factor of pollutants released from these processes. The available data are generally spot characterizations of concentration and air flow-rate that are used together in order to assess the emission factors. This approach caused significant differences among the available data as the release of pollutants is not steady. This paper belongs to a group of six papers concerning a research on material and energy recovery in integrated waste management systems, developed by a network of five universities. The contribution of the University of Trento, focuses on the bio-drying process with the following targets: (a) developing an innovative low cost method of sampling/measurement able to take into account the dynamics of release of pollutants; (b) checking the efficiency of a bio-filter; (c) verifying the variability of generation of some pollutants; (d) generating emission factors. The research was developed using a bio-drying pilot plant. As a treatment of the process air, the bio-reactor was coupled with a bio-filter. The emissions were characterized using an original approach based on the adoption of two measurement chambers suitable for hosting passive samplers. The passive samplers allowed the characterization of VOCs, N{sub 2}O, NH{sub 3} and H{sub 2}S. A bio-chemical model, useful for energy and mass balances, supported the interpretation of the presented bio-drying run.

  20. Evaluation of sweet potato for fuel bioethanol production: hydrolysis and fermentation.

    PubMed

    Lareo, Claudia; Ferrari, Mario Daniel; Guigou, Mairan; Fajardo, Lucía; Larnaudie, Valeria; Ramírez, María Belén; Martínez-Garreiro, Jorge

    2013-01-01

    The enzymatic starch hydrolysis and bioethanol production from a variety of sweet potato developed for bioenergy purposes (K 9807.1) on the basis of its high starch yields, was studied. Drying at 55°C and 95°C of sweet potato neither affected the sugar content nor the starch enzymatic hydrolysis efficiency. Simultaneous saccharification and ethanol fermentations for dry matter ratio of sweet potato to water from 1:8 to 1:2 (w/v) were studied. Fresh sweet potato and dried at 55°C (flour) were assayed. At ratios of 1:8, similar results for fresh sweet potato and flour in terms of ethanol concentration (38-45 g/L), fermentation time (16 h) and sugar conversion (~ 100%) were found. At higher dry matter content, faster full conversion were observed using flour. A higher ratio than that for fresh sweet potato (1:2.2) did not improve the final ethanol concentration (100 g/L) and yields. High ethanol yields were found for VHG (very high gravity) conditions. The sweet potato used is an attractive raw matter for fuel ethanol, since up to 4800 L ethanol per hectare can be obtained.

  1. Evaluation of sweet potato for fuel bioethanol production: hydrolysis and fermentation.

    PubMed

    Lareo, Claudia; Ferrari, Mario Daniel; Guigou, Mairan; Fajardo, Lucía; Larnaudie, Valeria; Ramírez, María Belén; Martínez-Garreiro, Jorge

    2013-01-01

    The enzymatic starch hydrolysis and bioethanol production from a variety of sweet potato developed for bioenergy purposes (K 9807.1) on the basis of its high starch yields, was studied. Drying at 55°C and 95°C of sweet potato neither affected the sugar content nor the starch enzymatic hydrolysis efficiency. Simultaneous saccharification and ethanol fermentations for dry matter ratio of sweet potato to water from 1:8 to 1:2 (w/v) were studied. Fresh sweet potato and dried at 55°C (flour) were assayed. At ratios of 1:8, similar results for fresh sweet potato and flour in terms of ethanol concentration (38-45 g/L), fermentation time (16 h) and sugar conversion (~ 100%) were found. At higher dry matter content, faster full conversion were observed using flour. A higher ratio than that for fresh sweet potato (1:2.2) did not improve the final ethanol concentration (100 g/L) and yields. High ethanol yields were found for VHG (very high gravity) conditions. The sweet potato used is an attractive raw matter for fuel ethanol, since up to 4800 L ethanol per hectare can be obtained. PMID:24130960

  2. Achieving sustainable cultivation of potatoes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Every phase of the production cycle impacts the sustainability of potato. Potato physiology determines how genetically encoded developmental attributes interact with local environmental conditions as modified through agricultural practice to produce a perishable crop. In this chapter we highlight ho...

  3. Effective moisture diffusivity determination and mathematical modelling of the drying curves of the olive-waste cake.

    PubMed

    Vega-Gálvez, Antonio; Miranda, Margarita; Díaz, Luis Puente; Lopez, Lorena; Rodriguez, Katia; Di Scala, Karina

    2010-10-01

    Olive cake is an important agro industrial by-product with the dried cake being the input material of many applications areas. In this research, the drying kinetics of olive cake during convective dehydration at five temperatures (50, 60, 70, 80 and 90 degrees C) was investigated. Several empirical mathematical models were selected to describe experimental drying kinetics data, namely, Page, Modified Page, Henderson and Pabis, Modified Henderson and Pabis, Two-Terms, Logarithmic and Weibull. Air temperature showed a significant effect on drying rates. Based on the statistical tests results (sum squared errors, chi-square and correlation coefficients), the Modified Henderson and Pabis equation is the most suitable model to describe the experimental drying curves. Effective moisture diffusivity of olive cake was in the range of 2.03x10(-9)-1.71x10(-9) m(2) s(-1). An activation energy value of 12.43 kJ mol(-1) was determined. The findings allow the successful simulation of olive cake drying between 50 and 90 degrees C. PMID:20452204

  4. Biological control of post-harvest late blight of potatoes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Introduction of US-8 genotypes of Phytophthora infestans has coincided with an increase in severity of potato late blight in North America. As alternatives to chemical fungicides, 18 bacterial strains patented as biological control agents (BCA) of both sprouting and Fusarium dry rot were cultivated...

  5. The potato psyllid genome project

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The potato psyllid (Bactericera cockerelli) is a Hemipteran pest of solanaceous plants and limits potato and tomato production by the transmission of Candidatus Liberibacter solanacearum. Genomic information on the potato psyllid is limited but is vital in developing appropriate management strategi...

  6. Dry Mouth

    MedlinePlus

    ... of this page please turn Javascript on. Dry Mouth What Is Dry Mouth? Dry mouth is the feeling that there is ... when a person has dry mouth. How Dry Mouth Feels Dry mouth can be uncomfortable. Some people ...

  7. Recovery of steroidal alkaloids from potato peels using pressurized liquid extraction.

    PubMed

    Hossain, Mohammad B; Rawson, Ashish; Aguiló-Aguayo, Ingrid; Brunton, Nigel P; Rai, Dilip K

    2015-01-01

    A higher yield of glycoalkaloids was recovered from potato peels using pressurized liquid extraction (1.92 mg/g dried potato peels) compared to conventional solid-liquid extraction (0.981 mg/g dried potato peels). Response surface methodology deduced the optimal temperature and extracting solvent (methanol) for the pressurized liquid extraction (PLE) of glycoalkaloids as 80 °C in 89% methanol. Using these two optimum PLE conditions, levels of individual steroidal alkaloids obtained were of 597, 873, 374 and 75 µg/g dried potato peel for α-solanine, α-chaconine, solanidine and demissidine respectively. Corresponding values for solid liquid extraction were 59%, 46%, 40% and 52% lower for α-solanine, α-chaconine, solanidine and demissidine respectively. PMID:25985357

  8. Recovery of steroidal alkaloids from potato peels using pressurized liquid extraction.

    PubMed

    Hossain, Mohammad B; Rawson, Ashish; Aguiló-Aguayo, Ingrid; Brunton, Nigel P; Rai, Dilip K

    2015-05-13

    A higher yield of glycoalkaloids was recovered from potato peels using pressurized liquid extraction (1.92 mg/g dried potato peels) compared to conventional solid-liquid extraction (0.981 mg/g dried potato peels). Response surface methodology deduced the optimal temperature and extracting solvent (methanol) for the pressurized liquid extraction (PLE) of glycoalkaloids as 80 °C in 89% methanol. Using these two optimum PLE conditions, levels of individual steroidal alkaloids obtained were of 597, 873, 374 and 75 µg/g dried potato peel for α-solanine, α-chaconine, solanidine and demissidine respectively. Corresponding values for solid liquid extraction were 59%, 46%, 40% and 52% lower for α-solanine, α-chaconine, solanidine and demissidine respectively.

  9. [Nutritional evaluation of sweet potato cultivars Ipomea batata (L.) Lam used in bread as partial substitute of wheat flour].

    PubMed

    Cárdenas, H; Kalinowski, J; Huaman, Z; Scott, G

    1993-12-01

    Four hundred and forty entries of sweet potato tubers from the International Potato Center were evaluated for chemical characteristics related to nutritional value. Dry matter range in the group was 15 to 45g/100g. The native entries DLP 2393, DLP 1120, DLP 2312, DLP 1908 and the foreign RCB 361F were selected for use in bread manufacture. Their average dry matter and crude protein was 38.5 and 9.2% respectively. Sweet potato bread was made replacing 30% of wheat flour with grinded sweet potato tubers. This bread had 11.0% crude protein in dry matter basis which were the same for bread made of wheat flour. There were no differences in organoleptic characteristics or protein quality (Apparent biological value: 37 vs 42%; apparent digestibility: 81 vs 80%; net protein utilization: 33 vs 39%) between sweet potato or full wheat flour breads respectively.

  10. Potato transformation and potato cyst nematode infection on potato plantlets in tissue culture

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    These two protocols describe the methods for generating transgenic potato plants and for evaluating potato cyst nematode (Globodera rostochiensis and G. pallida) infection on potato plantlets in tissue culture. These methods are useful tools that can be used in the study of the interactions between ...

  11. Recommending soil copper thresholds for potato production in Idaho

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A rising concern with the application of dairy wastes to agricultural fields is the accumulation of copper in the soil. Copper sulfate from cattle footbaths is washed out of dairy barns and into wastewater lagoons. Potato growers are concerned about this issue, as many of the predominant dairy produ...

  12. Active thermography for potato characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsieh, Sheng-Jen; Sun, Chih-Chen

    2008-03-01

    This paper describes the design of a semi-automated heating and scanning system and analytic method for potato characterization. Potatoes are heated using lamps in a heating chamber and then transferred on a movable fixture to an imaging chamber. A non-linear model was designed to predict which potatoes have excessive sugar defects and the model was evaluated with good results. Results from this research will benefit potato growers and manufacturers/producers of potato-based products such as chips and fries.

  13. Effect of dry heating with ionic gums on physicochemical properties of starch.

    PubMed

    Sun, Qingjie; Si, Fumei; Xiong, Liu; Chu, Lijun

    2013-02-15

    Corn starch, potato starch, pea starch were impregnated with ionic gums (sodium alginate, CMC, and xanthan, 1% based on starch solids) and heat-treated in a dry state for 0, 2, or 4 h at 130°C. Effects of the dry heating on paste viscosity (RVA), microstructure and thermal properties were examined. Dry heat treatment with ionic gums reduced the pasting temperature of the three starches. Heating with xanthan increased the paste viscosity of corn and potato starch. With heat treatment, the paste viscosity of all the starch-sodium alginate mixtures decreased. Heating with CMC increased the paste viscosity of potato starch, but decreased that of corn and pea starch. After dry-heating, To, Tp and Tc of potato starch with ionic gums decreased significantly. SEM of potato starch with CMC showed that the gel structure got compacter after drying-heating. Heat treatment obviously improved the functional properties of the three starches. PMID:23194543

  14. In Situ Prebiotics for Weaning Piglets: In Vitro Production and Fermentation of Potato Galacto-Rhamnogalacturonan

    PubMed Central

    Strube, Mikael Lenz; Ravn, Helle Christine; Ingerslev, Hans-Christian; Meyer, Anne Strunge

    2014-01-01

    Postweaning diarrhea (PWD) in pigs is a leading cause of economic loss in pork production worldwide. The current practice of using antibiotics and zinc to treat PWD is unsustainable due to the potential of antibiotic resistance and ecological disturbance, and novel methods are required. In this study, an in vitro model was used to test the possibility of producing prebiotic fiber in situ in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract of the piglet and the prebiotic activity of the resulting fiber in the terminal ileum. Soluble fiber was successfully produced from potato pulp, an industrial waste product, with the minimal enzyme dose in a simulated upper GI tract model extracting 26.9% of the initial dry matter. The fiber was rich in galactose and galacturonic acid and was fermented at 2.5, 5, or 10 g/liter in a glucose-free medium inoculated with the gut contents of piglet terminal ileum. Fermentations of 5 g/liter inulin or 5 g/liter of a purified potato fiber were used as controls. The fibers showed high fermentability, evident by a dose-dependent drop in pH and an increase in the organic acid content, with lactate in particular being increased. Deep sequencing showed a significant increase in the numbers of Lactobacillus and Veillonella organisms and an insignificant increase in the numbers of Clostridium organisms as well as a decrease in the numbers of Streptococcus organisms. Multivariate analysis showed clustering of the treatment groups, with the group treated with purified potato fiber being clearly separated from the other groups, as the microbiota composition was 60% Lactobacillus and almost free of Clostridium. For animal studies, a dosage corresponding to the 5-g/liter treatment is suggested. PMID:25527557

  15. In situ prebiotics for weaning piglets: in vitro production and fermentation of potato galacto-rhamnogalacturonan.

    PubMed

    Strube, Mikael Lenz; Ravn, Helle Christine; Ingerslev, Hans-Christian; Meyer, Anne Strunge; Boye, Mette

    2015-03-01

    Postweaning diarrhea (PWD) in pigs is a leading cause of economic loss in pork production worldwide. The current practice of using antibiotics and zinc to treat PWD is unsustainable due to the potential of antibiotic resistance and ecological disturbance, and novel methods are required. In this study, an in vitro model was used to test the possibility of producing prebiotic fiber in situ in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract of the piglet and the prebiotic activity of the resulting fiber in the terminal ileum. Soluble fiber was successfully produced from potato pulp, an industrial waste product, with the minimal enzyme dose in a simulated upper GI tract model extracting 26.9% of the initial dry matter. The fiber was rich in galactose and galacturonic acid and was fermented at 2.5, 5, or 10 g/liter in a glucose-free medium inoculated with the gut contents of piglet terminal ileum. Fermentations of 5 g/liter inulin or 5 g/liter of a purified potato fiber were used as controls. The fibers showed high fermentability, evident by a dose-dependent drop in pH and an increase in the organic acid content, with lactate in particular being increased. Deep sequencing showed a significant increase in the numbers of Lactobacillus and Veillonella organisms and an insignificant increase in the numbers of Clostridium organisms as well as a decrease in the numbers of Streptococcus organisms. Multivariate analysis showed clustering of the treatment groups, with the group treated with purified potato fiber being clearly separated from the other groups, as the microbiota composition was 60% Lactobacillus and almost free of Clostridium. For animal studies, a dosage corresponding to the 5-g/liter treatment is suggested. PMID:25527557

  16. Potato genetics, genomics, and applications

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Kazuo

    2015-01-01

    Potato has a variety of reproductive uniquenesses besides its clonal propagation by tubers. These traits are controlled by a different kind of genetic control. The reproductive information has been applied to enable interspecific hybridization to enhance valuable traits, such as disease and pest resistances, from the tuber-bearing Solanum gene pool. While progress has been made in potato breeding, many resources have been invested due to the requirements of large populations and long time frame. This is not only due to the general pitfalls in plant breeding, but also due to the complexity of polyploid genetics. Tetraploid genetics is the most prominent aspect associated with potato breeding. Genetic maps and markers have contributed to potato breeding, and genome information further elucidates questions in potato evolution and supports comprehensive potato breeding. Challenges yet remain on recognizing intellectual property rights to breeding and germplasm, and also on regulatory aspects to incorporate modern biotechnology for increasing genetic variation in potato breeding. PMID:25931980

  17. Development of dry gram-negative bacteria biocontrol products and small pilot tests against dry rot

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pseudomonas fluorescens strains S11:P:12, P22:Y:05, and S22:T:04 suppress four important storage potato maladies; dry rot, late blight, pink rot, and sprouting. Studies were designed to identify methods for producing a dried, efficacious biological control product. The strains were evaluated individ...

  18. Biological control of potato insect pest

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A variety of pest insects attack the potato crop and reduce yields. This book chapter reviews the known insect natural enemies for major potato pests around the world: Coleoptera (beetles) including Colorado potato beetle, 28-spotted lady beetle, and Andean potato weevil complex; potato tuber moths,...

  19. 7 CFR 947.5 - Potatoes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Potatoes. 947.5 Section 947.5 Agriculture Regulations... ORDERS; FRUITS, VEGETABLES, NUTS), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE IRISH POTATOES GROWN IN MODOC AND SISKIYOU... Definitions § 947.5 Potatoes. Potatoes means all varieties of Irish potatoes grown within the...

  20. 7 CFR 1207.306 - Potatoes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Potatoes. 1207.306 Section 1207.306 Agriculture... AND ORDERS; MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE POTATO RESEARCH AND PROMOTION PLAN Potato Research and Promotion Plan Definitions § 1207.306 Potatoes. Potatoes means any or all...

  1. 7 CFR 946.5 - Potatoes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Potatoes. 946.5 Section 946.5 Agriculture Regulations... Orders; Fruits, Vegetables, Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE IRISH POTATOES GROWN IN WASHINGTON Order Regulating Handling Definitions § 946.5 Potatoes. Potatoes means all varieties of Irish potatoes grown...

  2. 7 CFR 947.12 - Seed potatoes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Seed potatoes. 947.12 Section 947.12 Agriculture... AND ORDERS; FRUITS, VEGETABLES, NUTS), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE IRISH POTATOES GROWN IN MODOC AND... Definitions § 947.12 Seed potatoes. Seed potatoes means and includes all potatoes officially certified...

  3. 7 CFR 947.12 - Seed potatoes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Seed potatoes. 947.12 Section 947.12 Agriculture... and Orders; Fruits, Vegetables, Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE IRISH POTATOES GROWN IN MODOC AND... Definitions § 947.12 Seed potatoes. Seed potatoes means and includes all potatoes officially certified...

  4. 7 CFR 947.12 - Seed potatoes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Seed potatoes. 947.12 Section 947.12 Agriculture... AND ORDERS; FRUITS, VEGETABLES, NUTS), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE IRISH POTATOES GROWN IN MODOC AND... Definitions § 947.12 Seed potatoes. Seed potatoes means and includes all potatoes officially certified...

  5. 7 CFR 1207.306 - Potatoes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Potatoes. 1207.306 Section 1207.306 Agriculture... AND ORDERS; MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE POTATO RESEARCH AND PROMOTION PLAN Potato Research and Promotion Plan Definitions § 1207.306 Potatoes. Potatoes means any or all...

  6. 7 CFR 947.12 - Seed potatoes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Seed potatoes. 947.12 Section 947.12 Agriculture... and Orders; Fruits, Vegetables, Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE IRISH POTATOES GROWN IN MODOC AND... Definitions § 947.12 Seed potatoes. Seed potatoes means and includes all potatoes officially certified...

  7. 7 CFR 946.5 - Potatoes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Potatoes. 946.5 Section 946.5 Agriculture Regulations... Orders; Fruits, Vegetables, Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE IRISH POTATOES GROWN IN WASHINGTON Order Regulating Handling Definitions § 946.5 Potatoes. Potatoes means all varieties of Irish potatoes grown...

  8. 7 CFR 946.5 - Potatoes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Potatoes. 946.5 Section 946.5 Agriculture Regulations... ORDERS; FRUITS, VEGETABLES, NUTS), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE IRISH POTATOES GROWN IN WASHINGTON Order Regulating Handling Definitions § 946.5 Potatoes. Potatoes means all varieties of Irish potatoes grown...

  9. 7 CFR 947.5 - Potatoes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Potatoes. 947.5 Section 947.5 Agriculture Regulations... Orders; Fruits, Vegetables, Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE IRISH POTATOES GROWN IN MODOC AND SISKIYOU... Definitions § 947.5 Potatoes. Potatoes means all varieties of Irish potatoes grown within the...

  10. 7 CFR 946.5 - Potatoes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Potatoes. 946.5 Section 946.5 Agriculture Regulations... Orders; Fruits, Vegetables, Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE IRISH POTATOES GROWN IN WASHINGTON Order Regulating Handling Definitions § 946.5 Potatoes. Potatoes means all varieties of Irish potatoes grown...

  11. 7 CFR 1207.306 - Potatoes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Potatoes. 1207.306 Section 1207.306 Agriculture... AND ORDERS; MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE POTATO RESEARCH AND PROMOTION PLAN Potato Research and Promotion Plan Definitions § 1207.306 Potatoes. Potatoes means any or all...

  12. 7 CFR 947.12 - Seed potatoes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Seed potatoes. 947.12 Section 947.12 Agriculture... and Orders; Fruits, Vegetables, Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE IRISH POTATOES GROWN IN MODOC AND... Definitions § 947.12 Seed potatoes. Seed potatoes means and includes all potatoes officially certified...

  13. 7 CFR 1207.306 - Potatoes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Potatoes. 1207.306 Section 1207.306 Agriculture... AND ORDERS; MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE POTATO RESEARCH AND PROMOTION PLAN Potato Research and Promotion Plan Definitions § 1207.306 Potatoes. Potatoes means any or all...

  14. 7 CFR 946.5 - Potatoes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Potatoes. 946.5 Section 946.5 Agriculture Regulations... ORDERS; FRUITS, VEGETABLES, NUTS), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE IRISH POTATOES GROWN IN WASHINGTON Order Regulating Handling Definitions § 946.5 Potatoes. Potatoes means all varieties of Irish potatoes grown...

  15. 7 CFR 947.5 - Potatoes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Potatoes. 947.5 Section 947.5 Agriculture Regulations... Orders; Fruits, Vegetables, Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE IRISH POTATOES GROWN IN MODOC AND SISKIYOU... Definitions § 947.5 Potatoes. Potatoes means all varieties of Irish potatoes grown within the...

  16. 7 CFR 947.5 - Potatoes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Potatoes. 947.5 Section 947.5 Agriculture Regulations... ORDERS; FRUITS, VEGETABLES, NUTS), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE IRISH POTATOES GROWN IN MODOC AND SISKIYOU... Definitions § 947.5 Potatoes. Potatoes means all varieties of Irish potatoes grown within the...

  17. 7 CFR 1207.306 - Potatoes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Potatoes. 1207.306 Section 1207.306 Agriculture... AND ORDERS; MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE POTATO RESEARCH AND PROMOTION PLAN Potato Research and Promotion Plan Definitions § 1207.306 Potatoes. Potatoes means any or all...

  18. 7 CFR 947.5 - Potatoes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Potatoes. 947.5 Section 947.5 Agriculture Regulations... Orders; Fruits, Vegetables, Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE IRISH POTATOES GROWN IN MODOC AND SISKIYOU... Definitions § 947.5 Potatoes. Potatoes means all varieties of Irish potatoes grown within the...

  19. Glycoalkaloid and calystegine contents of eight potato cultivars.

    PubMed

    Friedman, Mendel; Roitman, James N; Kozukue, Nobuyuki

    2003-05-01

    Diverse procedures have been reported for the separation and analysis by HPLC of the two major glycoalkaloids present in potatoes, alpha-chaconine and alpha-solanine. To further improve the usefulness of the HPLC method, studies were carried out on the influence of several salient parameters on the analysis of the two potato glycoalkaloids. Effects on retention (elution, separation) times of the (a) composition and pH of the mobile phase (acetonitrile and phosphate buffer), (b) concentration of the phosphate buffer, (c) capacity values of column packing of four commercial HPLC amino columns, (d) column temperature were studied. Except for pH, all of the variables significantly influenced the retention times. The results make it possible to select analysis conditions that produce well-separated as well as symmetrical peaks of the two glycoalkaloids. This improved HPLC method (limit of detection of approximately 150 ng) was evaluated with extracts from the cortex of one whole potato variety (May Queen) grown in Japan and the freeze-dried peel and flesh from the following eight cultivars grown in the United States: Atlantic, Dark Red Norland, Ranger Russet, Red Lasoda, Russet Burbank, Russet Norkota, Shepody, and Snowden. In addition, the same samples were analyzed by GC-MS for the presence of two water-soluble nortropane alkaloids, calystegine A(3) and calystegine B(2), reported to be potent glycosidase inhibitors. The following ranges for the eight varieties of total glycoalkaloid and calystegine levels were observed: dry flesh, 5-592 and 6-316 mg/kg; dry peel, 84-2226 and 218-2581 mg/kg; dry whole potatoes, 40-883 and 34-326 mg/kg; wet flesh, 1-148 and 1-68 mg/kg; wet peel, 12-429 and 35-467 mg/kg; wet whole potatoes, 7-187 and 5-68 mg/kg. The possible significance of the results to plant and food sciences is discussed.

  20. Novel value-added uses for sweet potato juice and flour in polyphenol- and protein-enriched functional food ingredients

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Blackcurrant, blueberry, and muscadine grape juices were efficiently sorbed, concentrated, and stabilized into dry granular ingredient matrices which combined anti-inflammatory and antioxidant fruit polyphenols with sweet potato functional constituents (carotenoids, vitamins, polyphenols, fibers). T...

  1. Dark fermentation of complex waste biomass for biohydrogen production by pretreated thermophilic anaerobic digestate.

    PubMed

    Ghimire, Anish; Frunzo, Luigi; Pontoni, Ludovico; d'Antonio, Giuseppe; Lens, Piet N L; Esposito, Giovanni; Pirozzi, Francesco

    2015-04-01

    The Biohydrogen Potential (BHP) of six different types of waste biomass typical for the Campania Region (Italy) was investigated. Anaerobic sludge pre-treated with the specific methanogenic inhibitor sodium 2-bromoethanesulfonic acid (BESA) was used as seed inoculum. The BESA pre-treatment yielded the highest BHP in BHP tests carried out with pre-treated anaerobic sludge using potato and pumpkin waste as the substrates, in comparison with aeration or heat shock pre-treatment. The BHP tests carried out with different complex waste biomass showed average BHP values in a decreasing order from potato and pumpkin wastes (171.1 ± 7.3 ml H2/g VS) to buffalo manure (135.6 ± 4.1 ml H2/g VS), dried blood (slaughter house waste, 87.6 ± 4.1 ml H2/g VS), fennel waste (58.1 ± 29.8 ml H2/g VS), olive pomace (54.9 ± 5.4 ml H2/g VS) and olive mill wastewater (46.0 ± 15.6 ml H2/g VS). The digestate was analyzed for major soluble metabolites to elucidate the different biochemical pathways in the BHP tests. These showed the H2 was produced via mixed type fermentation pathways. PMID:25617867

  2. Dark fermentation of complex waste biomass for biohydrogen production by pretreated thermophilic anaerobic digestate.

    PubMed

    Ghimire, Anish; Frunzo, Luigi; Pontoni, Ludovico; d'Antonio, Giuseppe; Lens, Piet N L; Esposito, Giovanni; Pirozzi, Francesco

    2015-04-01

    The Biohydrogen Potential (BHP) of six different types of waste biomass typical for the Campania Region (Italy) was investigated. Anaerobic sludge pre-treated with the specific methanogenic inhibitor sodium 2-bromoethanesulfonic acid (BESA) was used as seed inoculum. The BESA pre-treatment yielded the highest BHP in BHP tests carried out with pre-treated anaerobic sludge using potato and pumpkin waste as the substrates, in comparison with aeration or heat shock pre-treatment. The BHP tests carried out with different complex waste biomass showed average BHP values in a decreasing order from potato and pumpkin wastes (171.1 ± 7.3 ml H2/g VS) to buffalo manure (135.6 ± 4.1 ml H2/g VS), dried blood (slaughter house waste, 87.6 ± 4.1 ml H2/g VS), fennel waste (58.1 ± 29.8 ml H2/g VS), olive pomace (54.9 ± 5.4 ml H2/g VS) and olive mill wastewater (46.0 ± 15.6 ml H2/g VS). The digestate was analyzed for major soluble metabolites to elucidate the different biochemical pathways in the BHP tests. These showed the H2 was produced via mixed type fermentation pathways.

  3. Industrial-type sweet potatoes: a renewable energy source for Georgia

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, M.R.; Smittle, D.A.

    1983-06-01

    Screening sweet potato breeding lines and cultivars for high content of fermentables was more easily accomplished when percent dry weight, rather than percent sugar and starch, was used as the measurement criterion. A regression equation was established to estimate the percent fermentables from dry weight determinations. Percent fermentables and biomass yield can then be used to estimate alcohol-production potential. Considerable variations in alcohol-production potential and biomass yield occurred among genotypes. High biomass yield should be combined with high fermentable carbohydrate content to maximize alcohol-production potential. Many of the high starch-containing industrial-type sweet potatoes meet these requirement better than the table types which were developed for human consumption. Industrial-type sweet potatoes may also be better suited than some other crops for biomass farming if alcohol production becomes a part of Georgia agriculture and if sweet potato production costs can be reduced.

  4. Comparison between conventional biofilters and biotrickling filters applied to waste bio-drying in terms of atmospheric dispersion and air quality.

    PubMed

    Schiavon, Marco; Ragazzi, Marco; Torretta, Vincenzo; Rada, Elena Cristina

    2016-01-01

    Biofiltration has been widely applied to remove odours and volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from industrial off-gas and mechanical-biological waste treatments. However, conventional open biofilters cannot guarantee an efficient dispersion of air pollutants emitted into the atmosphere. The aim of this paper is to compare conventional open biofilters with biotrickling filters (BTFs) in terms of VOC dispersion in the atmosphere and air quality in the vicinity of a hypothetical municipal solid waste bio-drying plant. Simulations of dispersion were carried out regarding two VOCs of interest due to their impact in terms of odours and cancer risk: dimethyl disulphide and benzene, respectively. The use of BTFs, instead of conventional biofilters, led to significant improvements in the odour impact and the cancer risk: when adopting BTFs instead of an open biofilter, the area with an odour concentration > 1 OU m(-3) and a cancer risk > 10(-6) was reduced by 91.6% and 95.2%, respectively. When replacing the biofilter with BTFs, the annual mean concentrations of odorants and benzene decreased by more than 90% in the vicinity of the plant. These improvements are achieved above all because of the higher release height of BTFs and the higher velocity of the outgoing air flow. PMID:26406537

  5. Comparison between conventional biofilters and biotrickling filters applied to waste bio-drying in terms of atmospheric dispersion and air quality.

    PubMed

    Schiavon, Marco; Ragazzi, Marco; Torretta, Vincenzo; Rada, Elena Cristina

    2016-01-01

    Biofiltration has been widely applied to remove odours and volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from industrial off-gas and mechanical-biological waste treatments. However, conventional open biofilters cannot guarantee an efficient dispersion of air pollutants emitted into the atmosphere. The aim of this paper is to compare conventional open biofilters with biotrickling filters (BTFs) in terms of VOC dispersion in the atmosphere and air quality in the vicinity of a hypothetical municipal solid waste bio-drying plant. Simulations of dispersion were carried out regarding two VOCs of interest due to their impact in terms of odours and cancer risk: dimethyl disulphide and benzene, respectively. The use of BTFs, instead of conventional biofilters, led to significant improvements in the odour impact and the cancer risk: when adopting BTFs instead of an open biofilter, the area with an odour concentration > 1 OU m(-3) and a cancer risk > 10(-6) was reduced by 91.6% and 95.2%, respectively. When replacing the biofilter with BTFs, the annual mean concentrations of odorants and benzene decreased by more than 90% in the vicinity of the plant. These improvements are achieved above all because of the higher release height of BTFs and the higher velocity of the outgoing air flow.

  6. Biological activated carbon process for treatment of potato processing wastewater for in-plant reuse. Technical completion report

    SciTech Connect

    Hung, Y.T.; Priebe, B.D.

    1981-10-01

    Like many other food processing industries, potato processing could create a serious pollution problem. An average-sized processing plant, producing french fries and dehydrated potatoes, can generate a waste load equivalent to a city of 200,000 people. Any discharge of wastes into these waters would immediately result in detrimental effects to the environment. In a plant processing 15,000 tons of potatoes per year, 60 million gallons of water are required. With proper treatment, a large percentage of the wastewater could be reclaimed and reused in the potato processing plant. The scope of the study includes the operation of completely mixed activated sludge (CMAS) reactors as secondary treatment, and anaerobic upflow continuous biological activated carbon (BAC) and biological sand columns as tertiary treatment for potato processing wastewaters.

  7. Direct fermentation of potato starch and potato residues to lactic acid by Geobacillus stearothermophilus under non-sterile conditions

    PubMed Central

    Smerilli, Marina; Neureiter, Markus; Wurz, Stefan; Haas, Cornelia; Frühauf, Sabine; Fuchs, Werner

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Lactic acid is an important biorefinery platform chemical. The use of thermophilic amylolytic microorganisms to produce lactic acid by fermentation constitutes an efficient strategy to reduce operating costs, including raw materials and sterilization costs. RESULTS A process for the thermophilic production of lactic acid by Geobacillus stearothermophilus directly from potato starch was characterized and optimized. Geobacillus stearothermophilus DSM 494 was selected out of 12 strains screened for amylolytic activity and the ability to form lactic acid as the major product of the anaerobic metabolism. In total more than 30 batches at 3–l scale were run at 60 °C under non-sterile conditions. The process developed produced 37 g L−1 optically pure (98%) L-lactic acid in 20 h from 50 g L−1 raw potato starch. As co-metabolites smaller amounts (<7% w/v) of acetate, formate and ethanol were formed. Yields of lactic acid increased from 66% to 81% when potato residues from food processing were used as a starchy substrate in place of raw potato starch. CONCLUSIONS Potato starch and residues were successfully converted to lactic acid by G. stearothermophilus. The process described in this study provides major benefits in industrial applications and for the valorization of starch-rich waste streams. © 2015 The Authors.Journal of Chemical Technology & Biotechnology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Society of Chemical Industry. PMID:25937690

  8. Chemical Engineering Division fuel cycle programs. Quarterly progress report, April-June 1979. [Pyrochemical/dry processing; waste encapsulation in metal; transport in geologic media

    SciTech Connect

    Steindler, M.J.; Ader, M.; Barletta, R.E.

    1980-09-01

    For pyrochemical and dry processing materials development included exposure to molten metal and salt of Mo-0.5% Ti-0.07% Ti-0.01% C, Mo-30% W, SiC, Si/sub 2/ON/sub 2/, ZrB/sub 2/-SiC, MgAl/sub 2/O/sub 4/, Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/, AlN, HfB/sub 2/, Y/sub 2/O/sub 3/, BeO, Si/sub 3/N/sub 4/, nickel nitrate-infiltrated W, W-coated Mo, and W-metallized alumina-yttria. Work on Th-U salt transport processing included solubility of Th in liquid Cd, defining the Cd-Th and Cd-Mg-Th phase diagrams, ThO/sub 2/ reduction experiments, and electrolysis of CaO in molten salt. Work on pyrochemical processes and associated hardware for coprocessing U and Pu in spent FBR fuels included a second-generation computer model of the transport process, turntable transport process design, work on the U-Cu-Mg system, and U and Pu distribution coefficients between molten salt and metal. Refractory metal vessels are being service-life tested. The chloride volatility processing of Th-based fuel was evaluated for its proliferation resistance, and a preliminary ternary phase diagram for the Zn-U-Pu system was computed. Material characterization and process analysis were conducted on the Exportable Pyrochemical process (Pyro-Civex process). Literature data on oxidation of fissile metals to oxides were reviewed. Work was done on chemical bases for the reprocessing of actinide oxides in molten salts. Flowsheets are being developed for the processing of fuel in molten tin. Work on encapsulation of solidified radioactive waste in metal matrix included studies of leach rate of crystalline waste materials and of the impact resistance of metal-matrix waste forms. In work on the transport properties of nuclear waste in geologic media, adsorption of Sr on oolitic limestone was studied, as well as the migration of Cs in basalt. Fitting of data on the adsorption of iodate by hematite to a mathematical model was attempted.

  9. Potato Phytonutrient Analysis and Engineering

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Potatoes have the highest per capita consumption of any vegetable, a fact which emphasizes their potential to be a key dietary source of health-promoting compounds. Only a fraction of the genetic diversity available in potato wild-species has been incorporated into modern cultivars. LCMS analysis of...

  10. Bioethanol production from sweet potato using Saccharomyces diastaticus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdullah, Suryani, Irma; Pradia Paundradewa, J.

    2015-12-01

    Sweet potato contains about 16 to 40% dry matter and about 70-90% of the dry matter is a carbohydrate made up of starch, sugar, cellulose, hemicellulose and pectin so suitable for used as raw material for bioethanol. In this study focused on the manufacture of bioethanol with changes in temperature and concentration variations of yeast with sweet potato raw materials used yeast Saccharomyces diastaticus. Operating variables used are at a temperature of 30°C; 31,475°C; 35°C; 38,525°C; and 40°C with a yeast concentration of 25.9%; 30%; 40%; 50% and 54.1%. The experimental results obtained, the optimum conditions of ethanol fermentation with yeast Saccharomyces diastaticus on 36,67 °C temperature and yeast concentration of 43,43 % v / v.

  11. 7 CFR 948.6 - Seed potatoes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Seed potatoes. 948.6 Section 948.6 Agriculture... and Orders; Fruits, Vegetables, Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE IRISH POTATOES GROWN IN COLORADO Order Regulating Handling Definitions § 948.6 Seed potatoes. Seed potatoes or seed means any...

  12. 7 CFR 953.5 - Potatoes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Potatoes. 953.5 Section 953.5 Agriculture Regulations... ORDERS; FRUITS, VEGETABLES, NUTS), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE IRISH POTATOES GROWN IN SOUTHEASTERN STATES Order Regulating Handling Definitions § 953.5 Potatoes. Potatoes means all varieties of Irish...

  13. 7 CFR 953.5 - Potatoes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Potatoes. 953.5 Section 953.5 Agriculture Regulations... ORDERS; FRUITS, VEGETABLES, NUTS), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE IRISH POTATOES GROWN IN SOUTHEASTERN STATES Order Regulating Handling Definitions § 953.5 Potatoes. Potatoes means all varieties of Irish...

  14. 7 CFR 948.5 - Potatoes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Potatoes. 948.5 Section 948.5 Agriculture Regulations... ORDERS; FRUITS, VEGETABLES, NUTS), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE IRISH POTATOES GROWN IN COLORADO Order Regulating Handling Definitions § 948.5 Potatoes. Potatoes means and includes all varieties of Irish...

  15. 7 CFR 948.6 - Seed potatoes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Seed potatoes. 948.6 Section 948.6 Agriculture... and Orders; Fruits, Vegetables, Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE IRISH POTATOES GROWN IN COLORADO Order Regulating Handling Definitions § 948.6 Seed potatoes. Seed potatoes or seed means any...

  16. 7 CFR 948.6 - Seed potatoes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Seed potatoes. 948.6 Section 948.6 Agriculture... and Orders; Fruits, Vegetables, Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE IRISH POTATOES GROWN IN COLORADO Order Regulating Handling Definitions § 948.6 Seed potatoes. Seed potatoes or seed means any...

  17. 7 CFR 953.5 - Potatoes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Potatoes. 953.5 Section 953.5 Agriculture Regulations... Orders; Fruits, Vegetables, Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE IRISH POTATOES GROWN IN SOUTHEASTERN STATES Order Regulating Handling Definitions § 953.5 Potatoes. Potatoes means all varieties of Irish...

  18. 7 CFR 946.12 - Seed potatoes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Seed potatoes. 946.12 Section 946.12 Agriculture... and Orders; Fruits, Vegetables, Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE IRISH POTATOES GROWN IN WASHINGTON Order Regulating Handling Definitions § 946.12 Seed potatoes. Seed potatoes means and includes...

  19. 7 CFR 953.5 - Potatoes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Potatoes. 953.5 Section 953.5 Agriculture Regulations... Orders; Fruits, Vegetables, Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE IRISH POTATOES GROWN IN SOUTHEASTERN STATES Order Regulating Handling Definitions § 953.5 Potatoes. Potatoes means all varieties of Irish...

  20. 7 CFR 948.5 - Potatoes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Potatoes. 948.5 Section 948.5 Agriculture Regulations... Orders; Fruits, Vegetables, Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE IRISH POTATOES GROWN IN COLORADO Order Regulating Handling Definitions § 948.5 Potatoes. Potatoes means and includes all varieties of Irish...

  1. 7 CFR 946.12 - Seed potatoes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Seed potatoes. 946.12 Section 946.12 Agriculture... and Orders; Fruits, Vegetables, Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE IRISH POTATOES GROWN IN WASHINGTON Order Regulating Handling Definitions § 946.12 Seed potatoes. Seed potatoes means and includes...

  2. 7 CFR 948.5 - Potatoes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Potatoes. 948.5 Section 948.5 Agriculture Regulations... ORDERS; FRUITS, VEGETABLES, NUTS), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE IRISH POTATOES GROWN IN COLORADO Order Regulating Handling Definitions § 948.5 Potatoes. Potatoes means and includes all varieties of Irish...

  3. 7 CFR 948.5 - Potatoes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Potatoes. 948.5 Section 948.5 Agriculture Regulations... Orders; Fruits, Vegetables, Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE IRISH POTATOES GROWN IN COLORADO Order Regulating Handling Definitions § 948.5 Potatoes. Potatoes means and includes all varieties of Irish...

  4. 7 CFR 953.5 - Potatoes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Potatoes. 953.5 Section 953.5 Agriculture Regulations... Orders; Fruits, Vegetables, Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE IRISH POTATOES GROWN IN SOUTHEASTERN STATES Order Regulating Handling Definitions § 953.5 Potatoes. Potatoes means all varieties of Irish...

  5. 7 CFR 948.5 - Potatoes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Potatoes. 948.5 Section 948.5 Agriculture Regulations... Orders; Fruits, Vegetables, Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE IRISH POTATOES GROWN IN COLORADO Order Regulating Handling Definitions § 948.5 Potatoes. Potatoes means and includes all varieties of Irish...

  6. 7 CFR 946.12 - Seed potatoes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Seed potatoes. 946.12 Section 946.12 Agriculture... AND ORDERS; FRUITS, VEGETABLES, NUTS), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE IRISH POTATOES GROWN IN WASHINGTON Order Regulating Handling Definitions § 946.12 Seed potatoes. Seed potatoes means and includes...

  7. 7 CFR 948.6 - Seed potatoes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Seed potatoes. 948.6 Section 948.6 Agriculture... AND ORDERS; FRUITS, VEGETABLES, NUTS), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE IRISH POTATOES GROWN IN COLORADO Order Regulating Handling Definitions § 948.6 Seed potatoes. Seed potatoes or seed means any...

  8. 7 CFR 946.12 - Seed potatoes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Seed potatoes. 946.12 Section 946.12 Agriculture... and Orders; Fruits, Vegetables, Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE IRISH POTATOES GROWN IN WASHINGTON Order Regulating Handling Definitions § 946.12 Seed potatoes. Seed potatoes means and includes...

  9. 7 CFR 946.12 - Seed potatoes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Seed potatoes. 946.12 Section 946.12 Agriculture... AND ORDERS; FRUITS, VEGETABLES, NUTS), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE IRISH POTATOES GROWN IN WASHINGTON Order Regulating Handling Definitions § 946.12 Seed potatoes. Seed potatoes means and includes...

  10. 7 CFR 948.6 - Seed potatoes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Seed potatoes. 948.6 Section 948.6 Agriculture... AND ORDERS; FRUITS, VEGETABLES, NUTS), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE IRISH POTATOES GROWN IN COLORADO Order Regulating Handling Definitions § 948.6 Seed potatoes. Seed potatoes or seed means any...

  11. Dry-out and low temperature calcination of DST/SST waste blend high temperature melter feed

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, H.D.; Tracey, E.M.

    1996-02-01

    The FY1994 DST/SST blend was prepared in accordance with the DST/SST blend feed specification. The laboratory preparation steps and observations were compared with an existing experience base to verify the acceptability of the feed specification for simulant make-up. The most significant test results included a variety of features. Ferrocyanide breaks down to NH{sub 3} plus formate, during the low-temperature calcining phase of the tests. Ferrocyanide displayed no redox reactivity with the nitrates and nitrites contained in the slurry in the absence of sugar. Sugar displays a redox reaction with the nitrates and nitrites in the blend similar to the redox. reaction observed in the LLW feed simulant. Boiling of a free flowing slurry occurs at temperatures below about 120{degrees}C. When about 45% of the total water loss has occurred, the feed slurry congeals and continues to lose water, shrinking and developing shrinkage cracks. Water stops coming off between 350{degrees}C and 400{degrees}C. Slurry shear strength and viscosity strongly increase as the weight percent solids increases from 20 wt% to 45 wt%. The 45 wt% solids corresponds to approximately a 40 % water loss. The principle beat sensitivity for this material is the exothermic reaction which is activated when the temperature exceeds about 250{degrees}C. The breakdown of ferrocyanide to ammonia and formate under strongly basic conditions may begin at temperatures less than 100{degrees}C, but the rate increased strongly with increasing temperature and appeared to be completed in the time of our tests. Differential thermal analysis (DTA) results on feed slurry without and with ferrocyanide showed only endothermic behavior. This is consistent with the dry out and low temperature calcine studies which did not indicate any exothermic behavior for the feed slurry with and without ferrocyanide.

  12. Continuous and emerging challenges of Potato virus Y in potato.

    PubMed

    Karasev, Alexander V; Gray, Stewart M

    2013-01-01

    Potato virus Y (PVY) is one of the oldest known plant viruses, and yet in the past 20 years it emerged in the United States as a relatively new and very serious problem in potato. The virus exists as a complex of strains that induce a wide variety of foliar and tuber symptoms in potato, leading to yield reduction and loss of tuber quality. PVY has displayed a distinct ability to evolve through accumulation of mutations and more rapidly through recombination between different strains, adapting to new potato cultivars across different environments. Factors behind PVY emergence as a serious potato threat are not clear at the moment, and here an attempt is made to analyze various properties of the virus and its interactions with potato resistance genes and with aphid vectors to explain this recent PVY spread in potato production areas. Recent advances in PVY resistance identification and mapping of corresponding genes are described. An updated classification is proposed for PVY strains that takes into account the most current information on virus molecular genetics, serology, and host reactivity.

  13. Potatoes in Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    Astroculture is a suite of technologies used to produce and maintain a closed controlled environment for plant growth. The two most recent missions supported growth of potato, dwarf wheat, and mustard plants and provided scientists with the first opportunity to conduct true plant research in space. Light emitting diodes have particular usefulness for plant growth lighting because they emit a much smaller amount of radiant heat than do conventional lighting sources and because they have potential of directing a higher percentage of the emitted light onto plants surfaces. Furthermore, the high output LED's have emissions in the 600-700 nm waveband, which is of highest efficiency for photosynthesis by plants.

  14. Consumer acceptance of vegetarian sweet potato products intended for space missions.

    PubMed

    Wilson, C D; Pace, R D; Bromfield, E; Jones, G; Lu, J Y

    1998-01-01

    Sweet potato is one of the crops selected for NASA's Advanced Life Support Program for potential long-duration lunar/Mars missions. This article presents recipes of products made from sweet potato and determines the consumer acceptability of products containing from 6% to 20% sweet potato on a dry weight basis. These products were developed for use in nutritious and palatable meals for future space explorers. Sensory evaluation (appearance/color, aroma, texture, flavor/taste, and overall acceptability) studies were conducted to determine the consumer acceptability of vegetarian products made with sweet potato using panelists at NASA/Johnson Space Center in Houston, TX. None of these products including the controls, contained any ingredient of animal origin with the exception of sweet potato pie. A 9-point hedonic scale (9 being like extremely and 1 being dislike extremely) was used to evaluate 10 products and compare them to similar commercially available products used as controls. The products tested were pancakes, waffles, tortillas, bread, pie, pound cake, pasta, vegetable patties, doughnuts, and pretzels. All of the products were either liked moderately or liked slightly with the exception of the sweet potato vegetable patties, which were neither liked nor disliked. Mean comparisons of sensory scores of sweet potato recipes and their controls were accomplished by using the Student t-test. Because of their nutritional adequacy and consumer acceptability, these products are being recommended to NASA's Advanced Life Support Program for inclusion in a vegetarian menu plan designed for lunar/Mars space missions.

  15. Consumer acceptance of vegetarian sweet potato products intended for space missions.

    PubMed

    Wilson, C D; Pace, R D; Bromfield, E; Jones, G; Lu, J Y

    1998-01-01

    Sweet potato is one of the crops selected for NASA's Advanced Life Support Program for potential long-duration lunar/Mars missions. This article presents recipes of products made from sweet potato and determines the consumer acceptability of products containing from 6% to 20% sweet potato on a dry weight basis. These products were developed for use in nutritious and palatable meals for future space explorers. Sensory evaluation (appearance/color, aroma, texture, flavor/taste, and overall acceptability) studies were conducted to determine the consumer acceptability of vegetarian products made with sweet potato using panelists at NASA/Johnson Space Center in Houston, TX. None of these products including the controls, contained any ingredient of animal origin with the exception of sweet potato pie. A 9-point hedonic scale (9 being like extremely and 1 being dislike extremely) was used to evaluate 10 products and compare them to similar commercially available products used as controls. The products tested were pancakes, waffles, tortillas, bread, pie, pound cake, pasta, vegetable patties, doughnuts, and pretzels. All of the products were either liked moderately or liked slightly with the exception of the sweet potato vegetable patties, which were neither liked nor disliked. Mean comparisons of sensory scores of sweet potato recipes and their controls were accomplished by using the Student t-test. Because of their nutritional adequacy and consumer acceptability, these products are being recommended to NASA's Advanced Life Support Program for inclusion in a vegetarian menu plan designed for lunar/Mars space missions. PMID:11876201

  16. Dry hair

    MedlinePlus

    Some causes of dry hair are: Anorexia nervosa Excessive hair washing, or using harsh soaps or alcohols Excessive blow-drying Dry air Menkes kinky hair syndrome Malnutrition Underactive parathyroid ( ...

  17. Alpha-amylase inhibitor changes during processing of sweet potato and taro tubers.

    PubMed

    Rekha, M R; Padmaja, G

    2002-01-01

    Alpha-amylase inhibitor changes during processing of sweet potatoes (Ipomoea batatas) and taro (Colocasia esculenta) indicated that varietal differences profoundly influence the thermal inactivation profile. The alpha-amylase inhibitors of taro were almost totally inactivated during oven drying of the chips at 90 degrees C and 100 degrees C for 24 h, while 0.8-10% activity was retained in sweet potato chips under the same conditions. Relatively better thermal stability was exhibited by the sweet potato amylase inhibitors at lower temperatures (70 and 80 degrees C) as well. Cooking by boiling the tuber pieces in water resulted in retention of 29-59% amylase inhibitor in sweet potato and 11-16% in taro. Microwave baking was a better method for inactivation of amylase inhibitors in these tubers. Flour prepared from the tubers retained only trivial amounts of the inhibitor.

  18. Production of Surfactant from Bacillus subtilis ATCC 21332 using Potato substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Fox, Sandra Lynn; Bala, Greg Alan

    2000-12-01

    Surfactin, a lipopeptide biosurfactant, produced by Bacillus subtilis is known to reduce the surface tension of water from 72 to 27 mN/m. Potato substrates were evaluated as a carbon source for surfactant production by B. subtilis ATCC 21332. An established potato medium, simulated liquid and solid potato waste media, and a commercially prepared potato starch in a mineral salts medium were evaluated in shake flask experiments to verify growth, surface tension reduction, and carbohydrate reduction capabilities. Total carbohydrate assays and glucose monitoring indicated that B. subtilis was able to degrade potato substrates to produce surfactant. Surface tensions dropped from 71.3±0.1 to 28.3±0.3 mN/m (simulated solid potato medium) and to 27.5±0.3 mN/m (mineral salts medium). A critical micelle concentration (CMC) of 0.10 g/l was obtained from a methylene chloride extract of the simulated solid potato medium.

  19. Botanicals to control soft rot bacteria of potato.

    PubMed

    Rahman, M M; Khan, A A; Ali, M E; Mian, I H; Akanda, A M; Abd Hamid, S B

    2012-01-01

    Extracts from eleven different plant species such as jute (Corchorus capsularis L.), cheerota (Swertia chiraita Ham.), chatim (Alstonia scholaris L.), mander (Erythrina variegata), bael (Aegle marmelos L.), marigold (Tagetes erecta), onion (Allium cepa), garlic (Allium sativum L.), neem (Azadiracta indica), lime (Citrus aurantifolia), and turmeric (Curcuma longa L.) were tested for antibacterial activity against potato soft rot bacteria, E. carotovora subsp. carotovora (Ecc) P-138, under in vitro and storage conditions. Previously, Ecc P-138 was identified as the most aggressive soft rot bacterium in Bangladeshi potatoes. Of the 11 different plant extracts, only extracts from dried jute leaves and cheerota significantly inhibited growth of Ecc P-138 in vitro. Finally, both plant extracts were tested to control the soft rot disease of potato tuber under storage conditions. In a 22-week storage condition, the treated potatoes were significantly more protected against the soft rot infection than those of untreated samples in terms of infection rate and weight loss. The jute leaf extracts showed more pronounced inhibitory effects on Ecc-138 growth both in in vitro and storage experiments. PMID:22701096

  20. Recovery of protein-rich byproducts from sweet potato stillage following alcohol distillation

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Y.V.; Baghy, M.O.

    1987-01-01

    Sweet potato can yield 1000 gallons of ethanol/acre compared with 250-300 gal/acre for corn. Sweet potatoes of normal, relatively high, and very high dry-matter contents were fermented to ethanol. Pectinase was necessary to decrease viscosity before fermentation for economic processing, especially for varieties of normal and relatively high dry-matter contents. Attained yield of ethanol was 90% of theoretical value. After ethanol was distilled, residual stillage was separated by screening and centrifugation into filter cake, centrifuged solids, and stillage solubles. Filter cake and centrifuged solids had crude protein contents (nitrogen x 6.25, dry basis) of 22-32% and 42-57%, respectively, and accounted for 44-85% and 0-17% of total sweet potato nitrogen. Sweet potatoes and their fermented products had 4.3-7.6 g of lysine/16 g of N and are expected to have good nutritional value. This practical method to ferment sweet potato for ethanol and to recover valuable protein-rich byproducts may have commercial potential. (Refs. 19).

  1. Potato Tuber Callus

    PubMed Central

    Shaw, Roy; Varns, Jerry L.; Miller, Karon A.; Talley, Eugene A.

    1976-01-01

    Callus was initiated from explants of tubers of the Norchip cultivar of Solanum tuberosum L. and grown on medium with a single carbon source and without addition of coconut milk, protein hydrolysate, or amino acid. Callus samples were harvested at intervals and compared to mature tubers for which there was good biochemical knowledge. The amino acid spectrum, the glycoalkaloid content, and the properties of the isolated invertase and sucrose synthetase were similar in callus and in tuber. Significantly the level of sucrose synthetase varied with the age of the developing callus just as it did with the age of the developing tuber. Of greater significance, levels of reducing sugars and invertase varied with the age of developing callus and also with time and temperature of storage after the callus has ceased growth. Similar changes occur in intact tubers. Callus and tuber biochemistry differed in the amount of deposited starch and in the absence of potato invertase inhibitor. PMID:16659698

  2. Remote automatic plasma arc-closure welding of a dry-storage canister for spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste

    SciTech Connect

    Sprecace, R.P.; Blankenship, W.P.

    1982-12-31

    A carbon steel storage canister has been designed for the dry encapsulation of spent nuclear fuel assemblies or of logs of vitrified high level radioactive waste. The canister design is in conformance with the requirements of the ASME Code, Section III, Division 1 for a Class 3 vessel. The canisters will be loaded and sealed as part of a completely remote process sequence to be performed in the hot bay of an experimental encapsulation facility at the Nevada Test Site. The final closure to be made is a full penetration butt weld between the canister body, a 12.75-in O.D. x 0.25-in wall pipe, and a mating semiellipsoidal closure lid. Due to a combination of design, application and facility constraints, the closure weld must be made in the 2G position (canister vertical). The plasma arc welding system is described, and the final welding procedure is described and discussed in detail. Several aspects and results of the procedure development activity, which are of both specific and general interest, are highlighted; these include: The critical welding torch features which must be exactly controlled to permit reproducible energy input to, and gas stream interaction with, the weld puddle. A comparison of results using automatic arc voltage control with those obtained using a mechanically fixed initial arc gap. The optimization of a keyhole initiation procedure. A comparison of results using an autogenous keyhole closure procedure with those obtained using a filler metal addition. The sensitivity of the welding process and procedure to variations in joint configuration and dimensions and to variations in base metal chemistry. Finally, the advantages and disadvantages of the plasma arc process for this application are summarized from the current viewpoint, and the applicability of this process to other similar applications is briefly indicated.

  3. University of Idaho tests engines with biodiesel from waste oil

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, C.; Fleischman, G.

    1995-12-31

    This article reports on preliminary work at the University of Idaho that investigates the possibilities of capitalizing on Idaho`s large volumes of waste oil and potatoes-generated ethanol to produce biodiesel fuel. This fuel would be hydrogenated soy ethyl ester, MySEE for short, made through a reaction between waste oil and ethanol made from potato waste. Address for full report is given.

  4. Inhibitory effect of chlorogenic acid on digestion of potato starch.

    PubMed

    Karim, Zida; Holmes, Melvin; Orfila, Caroline

    2017-02-15

    The effect of the chlorogenic acid isomer 5-O-caffeoylquinic acid (5-CQA) on digestion of potato starch by porcine pancreatic alpha amylase (PPAA) was investigated using isolated starch and cooked potato tuber as substrates. In vitro digestion was performed on five varieties of potato with varying phenolic content. Co- and pre-incubation of PPAA with 5-CQA significantly reduced PPAA activity in a dose dependent manner with an IC50 value of about 2mgmL(-1). Lineweaver-Burk plots indicated that 5-CQA exerts a mixed type inhibition as km increased and Vmax decreased. The total polyphenol content (TPC) of peeled tuber tissue ranged from 320.59 to 528.94mg 100g(-1)dry weight (DW) in raw tubers and 282.03-543.96mg 100g(-1)DW in cooked tubers. With the exception of Désirée, TPC and 5-CQA levels decreased after cooking. Principle component analysis indicated that digestibility is affected by multiple factors including phenolic, dry matter and starch content. PMID:27664664

  5. Utilization of potatoes for life support systems in space. IV - Effect of CO2 enrichment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wheeler, Raymond M.; Tibbitts, Theodore W.

    1989-01-01

    To assess the response of potato to elevated carbon dioxide levels in life support farms for space colonies, Norland and Russet Burbank were grown in solid stands in separate controlled environment rooms at two CO2 levels, 365 micromol/mol and 1000 micromol/mol. It is found that potatoes show only marginal growth gains from elevated CO2: tuber dry weight increased by 2 percent for Norland, and 12 percent for Russet Burbank. CO2 assimilation rates of Norland leaves increased by about 24 percent, but assimilation rates of Russet Burbank leaves decreased by about 12 percent. It is concluded that the best productivity obtained in the study (21.9 g tuber dry weight/sq m/day from Norland at 1000 micromol/mol of CO2) indicates that the dietary energy needs of one human in space could be supplied from 34 sq m of potatoes.

  6. Quality and safety evaluation of genetically modified potatoes spunta with Cry V gene: compositional analysis, determination of some toxins, antinutrients compounds and feeding study in rats.

    PubMed

    El Sanhoty, Rafaat; El-Rahman, Ahamed Ali Abd; Bögl, Klaus Werner

    2004-02-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the composition, nutritional and toxicology safety of GM potato Spunta lines compared to that of conventional potato Spunta. Compositional analyses were conducted to measure the proximate chemical composition with references to 14 components, total solid, protein, lipid, crude fibre, ash, carbohydrate, starch, reducing sugar, nonreducing sugar, sodium, calcium, potassium, phosphorus, and ascorbic acid. Some toxins and anti-nutrients compounds were determined. Feeding study of GM potatoes line (G2 and G3) in rats were done for 30 days. Four groups of albino rats were used for studying the effect and the safety assessment of GM potatoes Spunta G2 and G3. Group (I) was fed on control basal diet, group (II) was fed on control diet plus 30% freeze-dried nongenetically modified potato Spunta, group (III) was fed on control diet plus 30% freeze-dried genetically modified potato Spunta, and group (IV) was fed on control diet plus 30% freeze-dried genetically modified potato Spunta GMO G3. There were no significant differences between GM potatoes G2, G3, and Spunta control potato line in the proximate chemical composition. The levels of glycoalkaloids in transgenic potato tubers and nontransgenic were determined and there were also no significant differences between the GM potatoes and conventional potato line, the levels were in agreement with a safety level recommended by FAO/WHO (200 mg/ kg) for acute toxicity. Protease inhibitor activity and total phenol were estimated and no significant differences between the GM potatoes line and conventional potato Spunta line were found. During the period tested, rats in each group (I, II, III, IV) grew well without marked differences in appearance. No statistical difference were found in food intake, daily body weight gain and feed efficiency. But there is a slightly significant difference in finally body weight between the control group and experimental groups. No significant difference were

  7. Effects of baking and boiling on the nutritional and antioxidant properties of sweet potato [Ipomoea batatas (L.) Lam.] cultivars.

    PubMed

    Dincer, Cuneyt; Karaoglan, Mert; Erden, Fidan; Tetik, Nedim; Topuz, Ayhan; Ozdemir, Feramuz

    2011-11-01

    The effects of baking and boiling on the nutritional and antioxidant properties of three sweet potato cultivars (Beniazuma, Koganesengan, Kotobuki) cultivated in Turkey were investigated. The samples were analyzed for proximate composition, total phenolic content, ascorbic acid, β-carotene, antiradical activity, and free sugars. The dry matter, protein, and starch contents of the sweet potatoes were significantly changed by the treatments while the ash and crude fiber contents did not differ as significantly. The β-carotene contents of baked and boiled sweet potatoes were lower than those of fresh sweet potatoes; however, the total phenolic and ascorbic acid contents of the baked and boiled sweet potatoes were higher than those of the fresh samples. Generally, the antiradical activity of the sweet potatoes increased with the treatments. Sucrose, glucose, and fructose were quantified as free sugars in all fresh sweet potatoes; however, maltose was determined in the treated samples. In terms of the analyzed parameters, there were no explicit differences among the sweet potato cultivars.

  8. Effects of baking and boiling on the nutritional and antioxidant properties of sweet potato [Ipomoea batatas (L.) Lam.] cultivars.

    PubMed

    Dincer, Cuneyt; Karaoglan, Mert; Erden, Fidan; Tetik, Nedim; Topuz, Ayhan; Ozdemir, Feramuz

    2011-11-01

    The effects of baking and boiling on the nutritional and antioxidant properties of three sweet potato cultivars (Beniazuma, Koganesengan, Kotobuki) cultivated in Turkey were investigated. The samples were analyzed for proximate composition, total phenolic content, ascorbic acid, β-carotene, antiradical activity, and free sugars. The dry matter, protein, and starch contents of the sweet potatoes were significantly changed by the treatments while the ash and crude fiber contents did not differ as significantly. The β-carotene contents of baked and boiled sweet potatoes were lower than those of fresh sweet potatoes; however, the total phenolic and ascorbic acid contents of the baked and boiled sweet potatoes were higher than those of the fresh samples. Generally, the antiradical activity of the sweet potatoes increased with the treatments. Sucrose, glucose, and fructose were quantified as free sugars in all fresh sweet potatoes; however, maltose was determined in the treated samples. In terms of the analyzed parameters, there were no explicit differences among the sweet potato cultivars. PMID:22101780

  9. Glycoalkaloid responses of potato to Colorado potato beetle defoliation.

    PubMed

    Pariera Dinkins, Courtney L; Peterson, Robert K D; Gibson, James E; Hu, Qing; Weaver, David K

    2008-08-01

    Two experiments were conducted to measure the glycoalkaloid concentrations of potato tubers in response to Colorado potato beetle and manual defoliation. For plants defoliated by Colorado potato beetles, there was a significantly greater production of glycoalkaloids than in control plants and manually defoliated plants for both skin and inner tissue of tubers in experiment 1. In experiment 1, there was a 58.1% and 48.3% increase in glycoalkaloids in skin and inner tissue of tubers, respectively, from plants defoliated at high levels by Colorado potato beetles compared to control plants. In experiment 2, although a significant difference in glycoalkaloid concentration was not observed among the treatments, the skin and inner tissue of tubers from plants defoliated at high levels by Colorado potato beetles increased glycoalkaloid concentration by 23.4% and 14.5%, respectively, compared to tubers from control plants. In experiment 1, the concentration of tuber extract required to reduce Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cellular proliferation by 50% was 10-fold less for the skin versus the inner tissue, indicating that skin tissue was more toxic under the in vitro conditions of this assay.

  10. The three-dimensional distribution of minerals in potato tubers

    PubMed Central

    Subramanian, Nithya K.; White, Philip J.; Broadley, Martin R.; Ramsay, Gavin

    2011-01-01

    Background and Aims The three-dimensional distributions of mineral elements in potato tubers provide insight into their mechanisms of transport and deposition. Many of these minerals are essential to a healthy human diet, and characterizing their distribution within the potato tuber will guide the effective utilization of this staple foodstuff. Methods The variation in mineral composition within the tuber was determined in three dimensions, after determining the orientation of the harvested tuber in the soil. The freeze-dried tuber samples were analysed for minerals using inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). Minerals measured included those of nutritional significance to the plant and to human consumers, such as iron, zinc, copper, calcium, magnesium, manganese, phosphorus, potassium and sulphur. Key Results The concentrations of most minerals were higher in the skin than in the flesh of tubers. The potato skin contained about 17 % of total tuber zinc, 34 % of calcium and 55 % of iron. On a fresh weight basis, most minerals were higher in tuber flesh at the stem end than the bud end of the tuber. Potassium, however, displayed a gradient in the opposite direction. The concentrations of phosphorus, copper and calcium decreased from the periphery towards the centre of the tuber. Conclusions The distribution of minerals varies greatly within the potato tuber. Low concentrations of some minerals relative to those in leaves may be due to their low mobility in phloem, whereas high concentrations in the skin may reflect direct uptake from the soil across the periderm. In tuber flesh, different minerals show distinct patterns of distribution in the tuber, several being consistent with phloem unloading in the tuber and limited onward movement. These findings have implications both for understanding directed transport of minerals in plants to stem-derived storage organs and for the dietary implications of different food preparation methods for potato tubers

  11. Whey drying on porous carriers

    SciTech Connect

    Mitura, E.; Kaminski, W.

    1996-05-01

    Whey is treated very often as a waste which pollutes the natural environment. Whey which is a valuable source of protein, lacrose, vitamins and mineral salts should be utilized completely. The present paper is a proposal of whey drying on porous carriers. It is proved experimentally that the proposed drying method guarantees good product quality.

  12. Potato production in the United States

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Potatoes have been a staple in the American diet for almost 250 years. The United States is the world's fifth biggest producer, behind China, India, the Russian Federation, and the Ukraine. Potatoes in the United States are grown in nearly every state. Idaho produces approximately 1/3 of all potatoe...

  13. Acoustic Measurement of Potato Cannon Velocity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Courtney, Michael; Courtney, Amy

    2007-01-01

    Potato cannon velocity can be measured with a digitized microphone signal. A microphone is attached to the potato cannon muzzle, and a potato is fired at an aluminum target about 10 m away. Flight time can be determined from the acoustic waveform by subtracting the time in the barrel and time for sound to return from the target. The potato…

  14. Liberibacter transmission efficiency among potato psyllid haplotypes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The potato psyllid, Bactericera cockerelli (Šulc) (Hemiptera: Triozidae), is a vector of the phloem-limited bacterium ‘Candidatus Liberibacter solanacearum’ (Lso), the putative causal agent of zebra chip disease of potato. Little is known on the mechanisms by which the potato psyllid transmits Lso t...

  15. Effects of plastic mulch on potato growth

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Northern China is a major potato production region, and water-saving measures that can enhance both potato yield and quality play an important role in this region due to general water shortages. Plastic mulch has been used as an effective water-saving measure for potato cultivation in China. This ch...

  16. Potato Types: Their Characteristics and Uses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pavlista, Alexander D.

    1997-01-01

    Presents material for a talk and demonstration about the relationship of potato types to their different uses by consumers and processors. Includes background information for the instructor and discussions to accompany classroom exercises. Discusses the history of the potato, potato types and external characteristics, and internal characteristics…

  17. Potato psyllid genome and metagenome project

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The potato psyllid (Bactericera cockerelli) is a Hemipteran pest of solanaceous plants and limits potato and tomato production by the transmission of Candidatus Liberibacter solanacearum. Genomic information on the potato psyllid is limited but is vital in developing appropriate management strategi...

  18. Diversity of potato genetic resources

    PubMed Central

    Machida-Hirano, Ryoko

    2015-01-01

    A considerable number of highly diverse species exist in genus Solanum. Because they can adapt to a broad range of habitats, potato wild relatives are promising sources of desirable agricultural traits. Potato taxonomy is quite complex because of introgression, interspecific hybridization, auto- and allopolyploidy, sexual compatibility among many species, a mixture of sexual and asexual reproduction, possible recent species divergence, phenotypic plasticity, and the consequent high morphological similarity among species. Recent researchers using molecular tools have contributed to the identification of genes controlling several types of resistance as well as to the revision of taxonomical relationships among potato species. Historically, primitive forms of cultivated potato and its wild relatives have been used in breeding programs and there is still an enormous and unimaginable potential for discovering desirable characteristics, particularly in wild species Different methods have been developed to incorporate useful alleles from these wild species into the improved cultivars. Potato germplasm comprising of useful alleles for different breeding objectives is preserved in various gene banks worldwide. These materials, with their invaluable information, are accessible for research and breeding purposes. Precise identification of species base on the new taxonomy is essential for effective use of the germplasm collection. PMID:25931978

  19. Studies of sugar composition and starch morphology of baked sweet potatoes (Ipomoea batatas (L.) Lam).

    PubMed

    Lai, Yung-Chang; Huang, Che-Lun; Chan, Chin-Feng; Lien, Ching-Yi; Liao, Wayne C

    2013-12-01

    Sugar composition of seven sweet potato cultivars was successfully analyzed. Fresh CYY95-26 sweet potatoes had the highest (8.41%) total sugar content while TNG73 had the lowest (4.5%). For these fresh sweet potatoes, maltose content was very low (0 ~ 0.39%). Because 49.92 ~ 92.43% of total sugars were sucrose, sucrose was the major sugar composition of fresh sweet potatoes. After the baking treatment, the total sugar content of baked sweet potatoes was dramatically increased due to the formation of maltose. The maltose content significantly increased from 0 ~ 0.39% to 8.81 ~ 13.97% on dry weight basis. Therefore, maltose should be included in calculating the total sugar content. Electronic micrographs of fresh sweet potato samples showed that the size of starch granules was generally less than 20 μm. After the baking treatment, starch granules completely gelatinized.

  20. Studies of sugar composition and starch morphology of baked sweet potatoes (Ipomoea batatas (L.) Lam).

    PubMed

    Lai, Yung-Chang; Huang, Che-Lun; Chan, Chin-Feng; Lien, Ching-Yi; Liao, Wayne C

    2013-12-01

    Sugar composition of seven sweet potato cultivars was successfully analyzed. Fresh CYY95-26 sweet potatoes had the highest (8.41%) total sugar content while TNG73 had the lowest (4.5%). For these fresh sweet potatoes, maltose content was very low (0 ~ 0.39%). Because 49.92 ~ 92.43% of total sugars were sucrose, sucrose was the major sugar composition of fresh sweet potatoes. After the baking treatment, the total sugar content of baked sweet potatoes was dramatically increased due to the formation of maltose. The maltose content significantly increased from 0 ~ 0.39% to 8.81 ~ 13.97% on dry weight basis. Therefore, maltose should be included in calculating the total sugar content. Electronic micrographs of fresh sweet potato samples showed that the size of starch granules was generally less than 20 μm. After the baking treatment, starch granules completely gelatinized. PMID:24426034

  1. Effect of ultrasound on the extraction of total anthocyanins from Purple Majesty potato.

    PubMed

    Mane, Shon; Bremner, David H; Tziboula-Clarke, Athina; Lemos, M Adília

    2015-11-01

    This study examined anthocyanin extraction using the application of ultrasound to raw freeze dried, microwaved and raw sliced Purple Majesty potato, a new pigmented potato variety rich in anthocyanins. A 20 kHz probe was used for the sonication at 3 different amplitudes (30%, 50% and 70%) and ethanol in water at different ratios (50:50 and 70:30 v/v) was used for the extraction. Anthocyanin extraction from raw freeze dried purple potato was optimal at an ethanol:water ratio (70:30; v/v) after 5 min of ultrasonication, while the least amount of anthocyanins was extracted from raw sliced potatoes. The application of microwaves (as a pre-treatment) before the UAE resulted in an increase in the amount of anthocyanins extracted and a decrease in the amount of solvent used. Analysis of variance showed that potato form, ultrasonication time, ultrasonication amplitude and solvent ratio as well as two and three way interactions between some of these factors had a very significant effect (p<0.000) on the amount of anthocyanins extracted.

  2. Antioxidative components of sweet potatoes.

    PubMed

    Hayase, F; Kato, H

    1984-02-01

    The antioxidative activity of a 70% methanol extract of sweet potatoes was estimated in a linoleic acid-aqueous system. The extract had a markedly strong antioxidative activity. Major phenolic components contained in the 70% methanol extract were identified as chlorogenic acid and isochlorogenic acid-1, -2 and -3 by using high-performance liquid chromatography. The other minor free phenolics were identified, or tentatively identified, as caffeic acid and 4-o-caffeoylquinic acid. Chlorogenic acid and/or isochlorogenic acids, however, had only slight antioxidative activity. From the results of the addition of chlorogenic acid, isochlorogenic acids and the other coexisting components contained in the sweet potato extract, the effective antioxidant activity of the sweet potato extract was proposed to be mainly based on the synergistic effect of phenolic compounds with amino acids. PMID:6737096

  3. Antioxidative components of sweet potatoes.

    PubMed

    Hayase, F; Kato, H

    1984-02-01

    The antioxidative activity of a 70% methanol extract of sweet potatoes was estimated in a linoleic acid-aqueous system. The extract had a markedly strong antioxidative activity. Major phenolic components contained in the 70% methanol extract were identified as chlorogenic acid and isochlorogenic acid-1, -2 and -3 by using high-performance liquid chromatography. The other minor free phenolics were identified, or tentatively identified, as caffeic acid and 4-o-caffeoylquinic acid. Chlorogenic acid and/or isochlorogenic acids, however, had only slight antioxidative activity. From the results of the addition of chlorogenic acid, isochlorogenic acids and the other coexisting components contained in the sweet potato extract, the effective antioxidant activity of the sweet potato extract was proposed to be mainly based on the synergistic effect of phenolic compounds with amino acids.

  4. Dry Mouth

    MedlinePlus

    Dry mouth is the feeling that there is not enough saliva in your mouth. Everyone has a dry mouth once in a while - if they are nervous, ... under stress. But if you have a dry mouth all or most of the time, it can ...

  5. Dry ice blasting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lonergan, Jeffrey M.

    1992-04-01

    As legal and societal pressures against the use of hazardous waste generating materials has increased, so has the motivation to find safe, effective, and permanent replacements. Dry ice blasting is a technology which uses CO2 pellets as a blasting medium. The use of CO2 for cleaning and stripping operations offers potential for significant environmental, safety, and productivity improvements over grit blasting, plastic media blasting, and chemical solvent cleaning. Because CO2 pellets break up and sublime upon impact, there is no expended media to dispose of. Unlike grit or plastic media blasting which produce large quantities of expended media, the only waste produced by CO2 blasting is the material removed. The quantity of hazardous waste produced, and thus the cost of hazardous waste disposal is significantly reduced.

  6. Seed potato production system in Japan, starting from foundation seed of potato

    PubMed Central

    Kawakami, Tsukasa; Oohori, Hidemiki; Tajima, Kazuyuki

    2015-01-01

    Potato is one of the staple crops cultivated in upland farming in Japan and is propagated vegetatively by means of tubers. However once infected with diseases, potato yield decreases significantly. And one seed potato can produce approximately only 10 potato tubers. To improve the production system of seed potatoes in Japan, Japanese government established a three-stage propagation system for the production and distribution of healthy and disease-free seed potatoes. The National Center for Seeds and Seedlings (NCSS) has a role for the production of foundation seed potatoes and strictly manages the production in isolated fields that are treated thoroughly to control pests and diseases. Recently though the distribution of foundation seed potatoes is decreasing, the number of varieties of foundation seed potatoes has increased steadily. And new varieties of potato adapted various requirements, including resistance of the golden potato cyst nematode, have been increasing. Therefore, NCSS is introducing a new method of producing minitubers (MnTs) by using hydroponic cultivation greenhouse to increase the efficiency of propagation and to rapidly disseminate these new potato varieties. In this review, we describe a seed potato production system in Japan and the production of foundation seed potatoes as an important role of NCSS. PMID:25931977

  7. Degradation of pentachlorophenol by potato polyphenol oxidase.

    PubMed

    Hou, Mei-Fang; Tang, Xiao-Yan; Zhang, Wei-De; Liao, Lin; Wan, Hong-Fu

    2011-11-01

    In this study, polyphenol oxidase (PPO) was extracted from commercial potatoes. Degradation of pentachlorophenol by potato PPO was investigated. The experimental results show that potato PPO is more active in weak acid than in basic condition and that the optimum pH for the reaction is 5.0. The degradation of pentachlorophenol by potato PPO reaches a maximum at 298 K. After reaction for 1 h, the removal of both pentachlorophenol and total organic carbon is >70% with 6.0 units/mL potato PPO at pH 5.0 and 298 K. Pentachlorophenol can be degraded through dechlorination and ring-opening by potato PPO. The work demonstrates that pentachlorophenol can be effectively eliminated by crude potato PPO. PMID:21967325

  8. Flavouring compounds in Indian potato snacks.

    PubMed

    Raigond, Pinky; Singh, Brajesh; Dhulia, Akshita; Chopra, Shelly; Dutt, Som

    2015-12-01

    Market for processed potato products is rising day by day. Flavour plays important role in decision making by consumers due to their preferences for better tasting food. In potato and potato products, glutamic acid, aspartic acid, guanosine 5'-monophosphate (GMP) and adenosine 5'-monophosphate (AMP) are the major umami compounds which contribute towards flavour. Therefore, umami 5' nucleotides (AMP+GMP) were estimated from local potato products available as common fried products in the Indian markets and processed potato products being sold by the retailers. The analysis was also carried in raw, microwaved and pressure cooked tubers of forty seven Indian potato cultivars. Umami 5' nucleotide content ranged from 2.63 (Aloo seekh) to 8.26 μg/g FW (fried lachcha) in local potato products. In processed potato products, the content ranged from 2.72 μg/g FW (Smiles) to 14.75 μg/g FW (Aloo Bhujia). Along with aloo bhujia, umami 5' nucleotides were also high in dehydrated aloo lachcha (11.14 μg/g FW) and dehydrated potato chips (10.13 μg/g FW) and low in Smiles (2.72 μg/g FW) and Potato Shortz (3.40 μg/g FW). The study suggests that the potato products prepared solely from potato contained higher levels of umami 5' nucleotides compared to other products prepared by mixing potato with other cereals and vegetables. In Indian potato cultivars overall there was 14 % increase on microwave cooking and 31 % increase in flavouring compounds on pressure cooking. This type of study enabled in identifying better tasting cultivars for further product development and also to develop products with less addition of salt. PMID:26604408

  9. 7 CFR 945.7 - Certified seed potatoes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Certified seed potatoes. 945.7 Section 945.7... Agreements and Orders; Fruits, Vegetables, Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE IRISH POTATOES GROWN IN CERTAIN... Certified seed potatoes. Certified seed potatoes means and includes all potatoes officially certified...

  10. 7 CFR 945.7 - Certified seed potatoes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Certified seed potatoes. 945.7 Section 945.7... AGREEMENTS AND ORDERS; FRUITS, VEGETABLES, NUTS), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE IRISH POTATOES GROWN IN CERTAIN... Certified seed potatoes. Certified seed potatoes means and includes all potatoes officially certified...

  11. 7 CFR 945.7 - Certified seed potatoes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Certified seed potatoes. 945.7 Section 945.7... AGREEMENTS AND ORDERS; FRUITS, VEGETABLES, NUTS), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE IRISH POTATOES GROWN IN CERTAIN... Certified seed potatoes. Certified seed potatoes means and includes all potatoes officially certified...

  12. 7 CFR 945.7 - Certified seed potatoes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Certified seed potatoes. 945.7 Section 945.7... Agreements and Orders; Fruits, Vegetables, Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE IRISH POTATOES GROWN IN CERTAIN... Certified seed potatoes. Certified seed potatoes means and includes all potatoes officially certified...

  13. 7 CFR 945.7 - Certified seed potatoes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Certified seed potatoes. 945.7 Section 945.7... Agreements and Orders; Fruits, Vegetables, Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE IRISH POTATOES GROWN IN CERTAIN... Certified seed potatoes. Certified seed potatoes means and includes all potatoes officially certified...

  14. Production of ω-3 Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids From Cull Potato Using an Algae Culture Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chi, Zhanyou; Hu, Bo; Liu, Yan; Frear, Craig; Wen, Zhiyou; Chen, Shulin

    Algal cultivation for converting cull potato to docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) was studied. Schizochytrium limacinum SR21 was selected as the better producing strain, compared with Thraustochytrium aureum because of higher cell density and DHA content. Used as both carbon and nitrogen source, an optimal ratio of hydrolyzed potato broth in the culture medium was determined as 50%, with which the highest production of 21.7 g/L dry algae biomass and 5.35 g/L DHA was obtained, with extra glucose supplemented. Repeat culture further improved the cell density but not fed batch culture, suggesting limited growth was most likely caused by metabolites inhibition.

  15. Effect of biweekly shoot tip harvests on the growth and yield of Georgia Jet sweet potato grown hydroponically

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ogbuehi, Cyriacus R.; Loretan, Phil A.; Bonsi, C. K.; Hill, Walter A.; Morris, Carlton E.; Biswas, P. K.; Mortley, Desmond G.

    1989-01-01

    Sweet potato shoot tips have been shown to be a nutritious green vegetable. A study was conducted to determine the effect of biweekly shoot tip harvests on the growth and yield of Georgia Jet sweet potato grown in the greenhouse using the nutrient film technique (NFT). The nutrient solution consisted of a modified half Hoagland solution. Biweekly shoot tip harvests, beginning 42 days after planting, provided substantial amounts of vegetable greens and did not affect the fresh and dry foliage weights or the storage root number and fresh and dry storage root weights at final harvest. The rates of anion and cation uptake were not affected by tip harvests.

  16. Potato Nitrogen and Water Management

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Potato tuber yields and quality are extremely sensitive to adequate availability of water and nitrogen, particularly at some growth stages. Irrigation to replenish 70% of evapotranspiration (ET) as compared to that of full ET, resulted in about 18% reduction in tuber yield. However, 20% deficit irri...

  17. Storage Management of Alturas Potatoes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Alturas is a multi-purpose potato variety released by the Agricultural Research Service and the agricultural experiment stations of Idaho, Oregon, and Washington in 2002. Originally developed for use by the dehydration industry, Alturas has since been adopted for use in the production of frozen pot...

  18. Growth of potatoes for CELSS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tibbitts, T. W.; Cao, W.; Wheeler, R. M.

    1994-01-01

    This report summarizes research on the utilization of white potatoes (Solanum tuberosum L.) for space life support systems at the University of Wisconsin-Madison over the period of 1984 to 1993. At full maturity the tuber productivity was 37.5 gm(exp -2) d(exp -1), equating to a growing area requirement for one human (2800 kcal d(exp -1)) of 10.1 m(exp -2). A recirculating nutrient system using slanted trays produced best potato growth and tuber yields when a 2-3 cm layer of gravel or arcillite media was utilized. Potato production was close to maximum under lighting levels of 400 micromol m(exp -2) s(exp -1) of photosynthetic photo flux (PPF) for 24 hours or 800 micromol m(exp -2) s(exp -1) for 12 hours, alternating diurnal temperatures of 22 C and 14 C, relative humidity of 85 percent, and a carbon dioxide level of 1000 micromol m(exp -1). The range of effective concentrations of each separate nutrient is reported. The extensive studies with potatoes in this project have demonstrated that this crop has high productivity of nutritous tubers with a high harvest index in controlled environments, and can fulfill a significant portion of the energy and protein requirements for humans in space.

  19. The evolution of potato breeding

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Potato cultivars in most regions of the world are tetraploid and clonally propagated. For over a century, the breeding strategy has been phenotypic recurrent selection. However, the polyploid nature of the crop prevents breeders from eliminating deleterious alleles and assembling positive alleles fo...

  20. Neurocomputing approaches to modelling of drying process dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Kaminski, W.; Strumillo, P.; Tomczak, E.

    1998-07-01

    The application of artificial neural networks to mathematical modeling of drying kinetics, degradation kinetics and smoothing of experimental data is discussed in the paper. A theoretical foundation of drying process description by means of artificial neural networks is presented. Two network types are proposed for drying process modelling, namely the multilayer perceptron network and the radial basis functions network. These were validated experimentally for fresh green peals and diced potatoes which represent diverse food products. Network training procedures based on experimental data are explained. Additionally, the proposed neural network modelling approach is tested on drying experiments of silica gel saturated with ascorbic acid solution.

  1. Flight take-off performance of Colorado potato beetle in relation to potato phenology.

    PubMed

    Mbungu, Nsitu T; Boiteau, Gilles

    2008-02-01

    The flight take-off frequency of adult Colorado potato beetles, Leptinotarsa decemlineata (Say), from potato plants, Solanum tuberosum L. 'Red Pontiac' at the bloom stage of development was 2.2-2.5-fold that of Colorado potato beetle from plants at the vegetative stage. Tests were conducted in a flight chamber over a period of 3 h. Prefeeding Colorado potato beetles for 48 h on potato plants at the bloom or at the vegetative stage before placing them into the flight chamber resulted in the same significantly higher flight take-off frequency from potato plants at the bloom stage than from plants at the vegetative stage. These results demonstrate that the factor in potato plants in bloom that stimulates the flight take-off of the Colorado potato beetle is independent of the feeding history of the beetles and begins acting only when the beetles are in the presence of the plant. According to these results, the dispersal of adult Colorado potato beetles from potato fields in bloom to younger potato fields with plants at the vegetative stage, previously reported in the literature, is at least partly explained by the effect of plant phenology on the frequency of flight take-off. Results confirm the value of planting potato fields of similar phenology over as wide an area as possible to reduce Colorado potato beetle dispersal between fields. Results also imply that staggering the planting dates of conventional potato refuge areas near Colorado potato beetle transgenic or conventionally resistant potato fields is a sound management practice, because it promotes the movement of wild beetles over to the adjacent younger resistant crops.

  2. What is the source of potato psyllids colonizing Washington, Oregon, and Idaho potato fields?

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Managing zebra chip disease in the potato growing regions of Washington, Oregon, and Idaho is complicated by confusion about the geographic source of the insect vector (potato psyllid) as it colonizes potato fields in these growing regions. Not knowing the source of the vector makes it difficult fo...

  3. 78 FR 9629 - Irish Potatoes Grown in Colorado; Reestablishment of Membership on the Colorado Potato...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-11

    ...; ] DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Agricultural Marketing Service 7 CFR Part 948 Irish Potatoes Grown in Colorado; Reestablishment of Membership on the Colorado Potato Administrative Committee, Area No. 2 AGENCY: Agricultural... membership on the Colorado Potato Administrative Committee, Area No. 2 (Committee). The Committee...

  4. Fortification of dark chocolate with spray dried black mulberry (Morus nigra) waste extract encapsulated in chitosan-coated liposomes and bioaccessability studies.

    PubMed

    Gültekin-Özgüven, Mine; Karadağ, Ayşe; Duman, Şeyma; Özkal, Burak; Özçelik, Beraat

    2016-06-15

    Fine-disperse anionic liposomes containing black mulberry (Morus nigra) extract (BME) were prepared by high pressure homogenization at 25,000 psi. Primary liposomes were coated with cationic chitosan (0.4, w/v%) using the layer-by-layer depositing method and mixed with maltodextrin (MD) (20, w/v%) prior to spray drying. After that, spray dried liposomal powders containing BME were added to chocolates with alkalization degrees (pH 4.5, 6, 7.5) at conching temperatures of 40 °C, 60 °C, and 80 °C. The results showed that, compared to spray dried extract, chitosan coated liposomal powders provided better protection of anthocyanin content in both increased temperature and pH. In addition, encapsulation in liposomes enhanced in vitro bioaccessability of anthocyanins. Chocolate was fortified with encapsulated anthocyanins maximum 76.8% depending on conching temperature and pH.

  5. Fortification of dark chocolate with spray dried black mulberry (Morus nigra) waste extract encapsulated in chitosan-coated liposomes and bioaccessability studies.

    PubMed

    Gültekin-Özgüven, Mine; Karadağ, Ayşe; Duman, Şeyma; Özkal, Burak; Özçelik, Beraat

    2016-06-15

    Fine-disperse anionic liposomes containing black mulberry (Morus nigra) extract (BME) were prepared by high pressure homogenization at 25,000 psi. Primary liposomes were coated with cationic chitosan (0.4, w/v%) using the layer-by-layer depositing method and mixed with maltodextrin (MD) (20, w/v%) prior to spray drying. After that, spray dried liposomal powders containing BME were added to chocolates with alkalization degrees (pH 4.5, 6, 7.5) at conching temperatures of 40 °C, 60 °C, and 80 °C. The results showed that, compared to spray dried extract, chitosan coated liposomal powders provided better protection of anthocyanin content in both increased temperature and pH. In addition, encapsulation in liposomes enhanced in vitro bioaccessability of anthocyanins. Chocolate was fortified with encapsulated anthocyanins maximum 76.8% depending on conching temperature and pH. PMID:26868567

  6. Effect of processing techniques on color and active components amount of sweet potato (Ipomoea Batatas l) flakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahmawati, Y.; Mahmudatussa'adah, A.; Yogha, S.

    2016-04-01

    Sweet potato processing is limited, such as flour, snacks, cystic, or chips. Flakes as pre-cooked meals are made through the stages of making pasta and drying. The purpose of this study was to optimize the production of sweet potato flakes at the stage of making pasta and drying. Making the pasta is done through techniques steamed or baked. Pasta drying using tools a drum dryer or cabinet dryer. As an indicator of optimization is the total of monomeric anthocyanins, β-carotene and color the resulting flakes. The results showed that the amount of anthocyanin monomeric flakes by using steam, and drum dryer (3.83 ± 0.03 mg CYE/g db), flakes by the technique of steam, and cabinet dryer (3.03 ± 0.02 mg CYE/g db), flakes with techniques bake, drum dryer (2.49 ± 0.05 CYE mg/g db), flakes with bake technique, cabinet dryer (1.98 ± 0.03 mg CYE/g db). The Color of purple sweet potato flakes produced through steamed techniques bright purple, while the color purple sweet potato flakes produced through techniques roast give a brownish purple color. The amount of β-carotene yellow flakes sweet potato with stages of cooking steamed, drum dryer (152±0.5 mg/Kg db), grilled drum dryer (136±0.4 mg/Kg db), flakes of yellow sweet potato with stages of roasted and cabinet dryer (140±0.8 mg/Kg db), and grilled stage with cabinet dryer (122±0.3 mg/Kg db). In conclusion sweet potato flakes production techniques through the stages of steam process, and used drum dryers have a number of anthocyanins or β-carotene bigger and brighter colors than the baked flakes techniques and used cabinet dryer.

  7. Physicochemical comparison of chitin and chitosan obtained from larvae and adult Colorado potato beetle (Leptinotarsa decemlineata).

    PubMed

    Kaya, Murat; Baran, Talat; Erdoğan, Sevil; Menteş, Ayfer; Özüsağlam, Meltem Aşan; Çakmak, Yavuz Selim

    2014-12-01

    Chitins and chitosans obtained from larva and adult Colorado potato beetles (Leptinotarsa decemlineata) were physico-chemically characterized and differences between adults and larvae were identified. The dry weight chitin contents of the adult Colorado potato beetles and larvae were determined as 20% and 7%, respectively. The chitin produced chitosan yields of 72% from the adult Colorado potato beetles and 67% from the larvae. FTIR analysis showed that the isolated chitins were in the alpha form. Crystalline index values, determined by XRD, were 72% for larvae and 76% for adults. The degradation temperatures of the isolated chitin structures were measured by TGA, and this showed that the chitin from adult Colorado potato beetles had a more stable structure than that from the larvae. The surface morphologies of the isolated chitin and chitosan structures were analysed with SEM and it was revealed that these structures consisted of nanofibres. According to elemental analysis, the purity of chitin and chitosan from adults was greater than that from the larvae. The results of molecular analysis showed that the chitosans from adults (2.722 kDa) and larvae (2.676 kDa) of the Colorado potato beetle have low molecular weights. Antimicrobial and antioxidant activities of both adult and larval chitosans were determined. The adult potato beetle is more appropriate than the larvae as an alternative chitin source because of the fact that its dry weight chitin content, chitosan yield and purity of chitin are higher than those from the larvae, and its antimicrobial and antioxidant activities are also higher than those from the larvae. PMID:25491803

  8. Physicochemical comparison of chitin and chitosan obtained from larvae and adult Colorado potato beetle (Leptinotarsa decemlineata).

    PubMed

    Kaya, Murat; Baran, Talat; Erdoğan, Sevil; Menteş, Ayfer; Özüsağlam, Meltem Aşan; Çakmak, Yavuz Selim

    2014-12-01

    Chitins and chitosans obtained from larva and adult Colorado potato beetles (Leptinotarsa decemlineata) were physico-chemically characterized and differences between adults and larvae were identified. The dry weight chitin contents of the adult Colorado potato beetles and larvae were determined as 20% and 7%, respectively. The chitin produced chitosan yields of 72% from the adult Colorado potato beetles and 67% from the larvae. FTIR analysis showed that the isolated chitins were in the alpha form. Crystalline index values, determined by XRD, were 72% for larvae and 76% for adults. The degradation temperatures of the isolated chitin structures were measured by TGA, and this showed that the chitin from adult Colorado potato beetles had a more stable structure than that from the larvae. The surface morphologies of the isolated chitin and chitosan structures were analysed with SEM and it was revealed that these structures consisted of nanofibres. According to elemental analysis, the purity of chitin and chitosan from adults was greater than that from the larvae. The results of molecular analysis showed that the chitosans from adults (2.722 kDa) and larvae (2.676 kDa) of the Colorado potato beetle have low molecular weights. Antimicrobial and antioxidant activities of both adult and larval chitosans were determined. The adult potato beetle is more appropriate than the larvae as an alternative chitin source because of the fact that its dry weight chitin content, chitosan yield and purity of chitin are higher than those from the larvae, and its antimicrobial and antioxidant activities are also higher than those from the larvae.

  9. Carbon dioxide interactions with irradiance and temperature in potatoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, W.; Tibbitts, T. W.; Wheeler, R. M.

    1994-11-01

    Separate controlled environment studies were conducted to determine the interaction of CO2 with irradiance and interaction of CO2 with temperature on growth of three potato cultivars. In the first study, an elevated CO2 concentration of 1000 μmol mol-1 and an ambient CO2 of 350 μmol mol-1 were maintained at the photosynthetic photon fluxes (PPF) of 17 and 34 mol m-2 d-1 with 12 h photoperiod, and at the PPF of 34 and 68 mol m-2 d-1 with 24 h photoperiod (400 and 800 μmol m-2 s-1 PPF at each photoperiod). Tuber and total dry weights of 90-day old potatoes were significantly increased with CO2 enrichment, but the CO2 stimulation was less with higher PPF and longer photoperiod. Shoot dry weight was affected more by photoperiod than by PPF and CO2 concentrations. The elevated CO2 concentration increased leaf CO2 assimilation rates and decreased stomatal conductance with 12 h photoperiod, but had only a marginal effect with 24 h photoperiod. In the second study, four CO2 concentrations of 500, 1000, 1500 and 2000 μmol mol-1 were combined with two air temperature regimes of 16 and 20°C under a 12 h photoperiod. At harvest, 35 days after transplanting, tuber and total dry weights of potatoes reached a maximum with 1000 μmol mol-1 CO2 at 16°C, but continued to increase up to 2000 μmol mol-1 CO2 at 20°C. Plant growth was greater at 20°C than at 16°C under all CO2 concentrations. At 16°C specific leaf weight increased substantially with increasing CO2 concentrations as compared to 500 μmol mol-1 CO2, but increased only slightly at 20°C. This suggests a carbohydrate build-up in the leaves at 16°C temperature that reduces plant response to increased CO2 concentrations. The data in the two studies indicate that a PPF of 34 mol m-2 d-1, 20°C temperature, and 1000-2000 μmol mol-1 CO2 produces optimal tuber yield in potatoes. Current address: MD-RES, Kennedy Space Center, FL 32899.

  10. Differential Response of Potato Toward Inoculation with Taxonomically Diverse Plant Growth Promoting Rhizobacteria.

    PubMed

    Naqqash, Tahir; Hameed, Sohail; Imran, Asma; Hanif, Muhammad Kashif; Majeed, Afshan; van Elsas, Jan Dirk

    2016-01-01

    Rhizosphere engineering with beneficial plant growth promoting bacteria offers great promise for sustainable crop yield. Potato is an important food commodity that needs large inputs of nitrogen and phosphorus fertilizers. To overcome high fertilizer demand (especially nitrogen), five bacteria, i.e., Azospirillum sp. TN10, Agrobacterium sp. TN14, Pseudomonas sp. TN36, Enterobacter sp. TN38 and Rhizobium sp. TN42 were isolated from the potato rhizosphere on nitrogen-free malate medium and identified based on their 16S rRNA gene sequences. Three strains, i.e., TN10, TN38, and TN42 showed nitrogen fixation (92.67-134.54 nmol h(-1)mg(-1) protein), while all showed the production of indole-3-acetic acid (IAA), which was significantly increased by the addition of L-tryptophan. Azospirillum sp. TN10 produced the highest amount of IAA, as measured by spectrophotometry (312.14 μg mL(-1)) and HPLC (18.3 μg mL(-1)). Inoculation with these bacteria under axenic conditions resulted in differential growth responses of potato. Azospirillum sp. TN10 incited the highest increase in potato fresh and dry weight over control plants, along with increased N contents of shoot and roots. All strains were able to colonize and maintain their population densities in the potato rhizosphere for up to 60 days, with Azospirillum sp. and Rhizobium sp. showing the highest survival. Plant root colonization potential was analyzed by transmission electron microscopy of root sections inoculated with Azospirillum sp. TN10. Of the five test strains, Azospirillum sp. TN10 has the greatest potential to increase the growth and nitrogen uptake of potato. Hence, it is suggested as a good candidate for the production of potato biofertilizer for integrated nutrient management. PMID:26925072

  11. Differential Response of Potato Toward Inoculation with Taxonomically Diverse Plant Growth Promoting Rhizobacteria

    PubMed Central

    Naqqash, Tahir; Hameed, Sohail; Imran, Asma; Hanif, Muhammad Kashif; Majeed, Afshan; van Elsas, Jan Dirk

    2016-01-01

    Rhizosphere engineering with beneficial plant growth promoting bacteria offers great promise for sustainable crop yield. Potato is an important food commodity that needs large inputs of nitrogen and phosphorus fertilizers. To overcome high fertilizer demand (especially nitrogen), five bacteria, i.e., Azospirillum sp. TN10, Agrobacterium sp. TN14, Pseudomonas sp. TN36, Enterobacter sp. TN38 and Rhizobium sp. TN42 were isolated from the potato rhizosphere on nitrogen-free malate medium and identified based on their 16S rRNA gene sequences. Three strains, i.e., TN10, TN38, and TN42 showed nitrogen fixation (92.67–134.54 nmol h-1mg-1 protein), while all showed the production of indole-3-acetic acid (IAA), which was significantly increased by the addition of L-tryptophan. Azospirillum sp. TN10 produced the highest amount of IAA, as measured by spectrophotometry (312.14 μg mL-1) and HPLC (18.3 μg mL-1). Inoculation with these bacteria under axenic conditions resulted in differential growth responses of potato. Azospirillum sp. TN10 incited the highest increase in potato fresh and dry weight over control plants, along with increased N contents of shoot and roots. All strains were able to colonize and maintain their population densities in the potato rhizosphere for up to 60 days, with Azospirillum sp. and Rhizobium sp. showing the highest survival. Plant root colonization potential was analyzed by transmission electron microscopy of root sections inoculated with Azospirillum sp. TN10. Of the five test strains, Azospirillum sp. TN10 has the greatest potential to increase the growth and nitrogen uptake of potato. Hence, it is suggested as a good candidate for the production of potato biofertilizer for integrated nutrient management. PMID:26925072

  12. The uptake of plutonium-238, 239, 240, americium-241, strontium-90 and caesium-137 into potatoes.

    PubMed

    Popplewell, D S; Ham, G J; Johnson, T E; Stather, J W; Sumner, S A

    1984-09-01

    Transfer factors have been measured for 239 Pu + 240 Pu, 241 Am, 90 Sr and 137 Cs into potatoes grown in a blend of soil which included silt polluted with radioactive waste discharged into the Irish Sea. The experiment has been carried out over four seasons and attempts to assess the radiological consequences to the consumer which would arise if potatoes were to be grown in land heavily contaminated with the silt. During the course of the experiment plutonium and americium became less available for uptake, 90 Sr became slightly more available and 137 Cs remained nearly constant in its availability. The values of the transfer factors are among the lowest reported for these radionuclides into potatoes.

  13. The canon of potato science. . . 50 topics in potato science that every potato scientist should know: 1) Genetic diversity and gene banks

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This is a compilation of invited reviews on 50 key potato science topics to celebrate the 50 anniversary of the journal Potato Research published by the European Potato Association. The article in question reviews potato genetic diversity and gene banks. It presents basic aspects of the mission an...

  14. An unexpected cause of anaphylaxis: potato.

    PubMed

    Eke Gungor, H; Uytun, S; Murat Sahiner, U; Altuner Torun, Y

    2016-07-01

    Immediate reactions against contact to raw potato has been reported in adults with generally being in the form of an oral contact dermatitis or contact urticaria, but it may also manifest as rhinitis symptoms, wheezing or even anaphylaxis. Cooked or raw potato allergy has been rarely reported in children as some is being immediate and others being late reactions, and it usually results from ingestion. Herein, we report two cases with a background of allergic diseases developed anaphylaxis one with cooked potato and the other one with raw potato. PMID:27425172

  15. Changes in caffeic acid derivatives in sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas L.) during cooking and processing.

    PubMed

    Takenaka, Makiko; Nanayama, Kazuko; Isobe, Seiichiro; Murata, Masatsune

    2006-01-01

    There was an obvious decrease in caffeic acid derivatives during the boiling of cube-shaped blocks of sweet potatoes. They also decreased in a mixture of freeze-dried sweet-potato powder and water maintained at room temperature. Ascorbic acid prevented the decrease, supporting the occurrence of an enzyme reaction with polyphenol oxidase (PPO). 5-O-Caffeoylquinic acid (5-CQA, "3-O-caffeoylquinic acid" as a trivial name) and 3,5-di-O-caffeoylquinic acid (3,5-CQA), major phenolic compounds of sweet potato, did not change when they were separately heated in boiling water. When the mixture of powdered sweet potato and water was heated at 100 degrees C, there was only a negligible decrease in the total amount of phenolic compounds, and portions of 5-CQA and 3,5-CQA were found to be isomerized to 3-CQA, 4-CQA, 3,4-CQA, and 4,5-CQA. The content and composition of the phenolic compounds in sweet potatoes differed between fresh and long-stored ones, as did their response to heating.

  16. In vitro bioaccessibility of lutein and zeaxanthin of yellow fleshed boiled potatoes.

    PubMed

    Burgos, Gabriela; Muñoa, Lupita; Sosa, Paola; Bonierbale, Merideth; zum Felde, Thomas; Díaz, Carlos

    2013-12-01

    Yellow fleshed potatoes contain significant amounts of lutein and zeaxanthin but the bioaccessibility of potato carotenoids has not yet been investigated. The purpose of this study was to estimate the in vitro bioaccessibility of carotenoids provided by potato. Lutein and zeaxanthin concentrations of boiled, freeze dried and milled samples of seven yellow fleshed potato accessions were determined by HPLC before and after different steps (gastric, duodenal and micellar phase) of in vitro digestion. The gastric and duodenal digestive stability of lutein and zeaxanthin in boiled tubers of the different accessions ranged from 70 to 95 % while the efficiency of micellarization ranged from 33 to 71 % for lutein and from 51 to 71 % for zeaxanthin. For all accessions, amounts of lutein and zeaxanthin after micellarization were significantly lower than the original amount found in the boiled samples. The accession 701862 showed the highest bioaccessible lutein concentration (280 μg/100 g, FW) and the accessions 703566 and 704218 showed the highest bioaccessible zeaxanthin concentration (above 600 μg/100 g, FW). Considering the mean potato intake in the Andes (500 g per day), the accession 701862 provides 14 % of the lutein intake suggested for health benefits and the accessions 703566 and 704218 provide 50 % more than the suggested zeaxanthin intake.

  17. Regulation of potato tuber sprouting.

    PubMed

    Sonnewald, Sophia; Sonnewald, Uwe

    2014-01-01

    Following tuber induction, potato tubers undergo a period of dormancy during which visible bud growth is inhibited. The length of the dormancy period is under environmental, physiological and hormonal control. Sucrose availability is one prerequisite for bud break. In the absence of sucrose, no bud break occurs. Thus, sucrose is likely to serve as nutrient and signal molecule at the same time. The mode of sucrose sensing is only vaguely understood, but most likely involves trehalose-6-phosphate and SnRK1 signalling networks. This conclusion is supported by the observation that ectopically manipulation of trehalose-6-phosphate levels influences the length of the dormancy period. Once physiological competence is achieved, sprouting is controlled by the level of phytohormones. Two phytohormones, ABA and ethylene, are supposed to suppress tuber sprouting; however, the exact role of ethylene remains to be elucidated. Cytokinins and gibberellins are required for bud break and sprout growth, respectively. The fifth classical phytohormone, auxin, seems to play a role in vascular development. During the dormancy period, buds are symplastically isolated, which changes during bud break. In parallel to the establishment of symplastic connectivity, vascular tissue develops below the growing bud most likely to support the outgrowing sprout with assimilates mobilised in parenchyma cells. Sprouting leads to major quality losses of stored potato tubers. Therefore, control of tuber sprouting is a major objective in potato breeding. Although comparative transcriptome analysis revealed a large number of genes differentially expressed in growing versus dormant buds, no master-regulator of potato tuber sprouting has been identified so far.

  18. Introduction of the carrot HSP17.7 into potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) enhances cellular membrane stability and tuberization in vitro.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Yeh-Jin; Zimmerman, J Lynn

    2006-01-01

    We have examined the ability of a carrot (Daucus carota L.) heat shock protein gene encoding HSP17.7 (DcHSP17.7) to confer enhanced heat tolerance to potato (Solanum tuberosum L.), a cool-season crop. The DcHSP17.7 gene was fused to a 6XHistidine (His) tag to distinguish the engineered protein from endogenous potato proteins and was introduced into the potato cultivar 'Désirée' under the control of the cauliflower mosaic virus (CaMV) 35S promoter. Western analysis showed that engineered DcHSP17.7 was constitutively, but not abundantly, expressed in transgenic potato lines before heat stress. Leaves from multiple regenerated potato lines that contain the transgene exhibited significantly improved cellular membrane stability at high temperatures, compared with wild-type and vector control plants. Transgenic potato lines also exhibited enhanced tuberization in vitro: under a condition of constant heat stress, at 29 degrees C, nodal sections of the transgenic lines produced larger and heavier microtubers at higher rates, compared to the wild type and vector controls. The dry weight and percentages of microtubers that were longer than 5 mm were up to three times higher in the transgenic lines. Our results suggest that constitutive expression of carrot HSP17.7 can enhance thermotolerance in transgenic potato plants. To our knowledge, this is the first study that shows that the thermotolerance of potato can be enhanced through gene transfer.

  19. Effect of microwave- and microwave-convection drying conditions on the total soluble phenolic content of 2-phase olive mill waste

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The California olive oil industry produces tons of 2-phase olive mill waste (2POMW) every year as a byproduct of the olive oil milling process. 2POMW is rich in health-promoting phenolic compounds, but it is greater than 60% moisture (wet basis) in its native form and thus expensive to store and tr...

  20. Detection of Multiple Potato Viruses in the Field Suggests Synergistic Interactions among Potato Viruses in Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Hameed, Amir; Iqbal, Zafar; Asad, Shaheen; Mansoor, Shahid

    2014-12-01

    Viral diseases have been a major limiting factor threating sustainable potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) production in Pakistan. Surveys were conducted to serologically quantify the incidence of RNA viruses infecting potato; Potato virus X (PVX), Potato virus Y (PVY), Potato virus S (PVS), Potato virus A (PVA), Potato virus M (PVM) and Potato leaf roll virus (PLRV) in two major potato cultivars (Desiree and Cardinal). The results suggest the prevalence of multiple viruses in all surveyed areas with PVY, PVS and PVX dominantly widespread with infection levels of up to 50% in some regions. Co-infections were detected with the highest incidence (15.5%) for PVX and PVS. Additionally the data showed a positive correlation between co-infecting viruses with significant increase in absorbance value (virus titre) for at least one of the virus in an infected plant and suggested a synergistic interaction. To test this hypothesis, glasshouse grown potato plants were challenged with multiple viruses and analyzed for systemic infections and symptomology studies. The results obtained conclude that multiple viral infections dramatically increase disease epidemics as compared to single infection and an effective resistance strategy in targeting multiple RNA viruses is required to save potato crop. PMID:25506305

  1. Multi-Strain Co-Cultures Surpass Blends for Broad Spectrum Biological Control of Maladies of Potatoes in Storage

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pseudomonas fluorescens strains S11:P:12, P22:Y:05, and S22:T:04 and Enterobacter cloacae strain S11:T:07 have been documented to suppress four important storage potato maladies: dry rot, late blight, pink rot, and sprouting. This research investigates the efficacy and consistency of strain mixture...

  2. Multi-strain co-cultures surpass blends for broad spectrum biological control of maladies of potatoes in storage

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pseudomonas fluorescens strains S11:P:12, P22:Y:05, and S22:T:04 have been documented to suppress four important problems in potato storages — dry rot, late blight, pink rot, and sprouting. This research investigates the efficacy and consistency of strain mixtures produced by co-culturing strains t...

  3. century drying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cook, Benjamin I.; Smerdon, Jason E.; Seager, Richard; Coats, Sloan

    2014-11-01

    Global warming is expected to increase the frequency and intensity of droughts in the twenty-first century, but the relative contributions from changes in moisture supply (precipitation) versus evaporative demand (potential evapotranspiration; PET) have not been comprehensively assessed. Using output from a suite of general circulation model (GCM) simulations from phase 5 of the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project, projected twenty-first century drying and wetting trends are investigated using two offline indices of surface moisture balance: the Palmer Drought Severity Index (PDSI) and the Standardized Precipitation Evapotranspiration Index (SPEI). PDSI and SPEI projections using precipitation and Penman-Monteith based PET changes from the GCMs generally agree, showing robust cross-model drying in western North America, Central America, the Mediterranean, southern Africa, and the Amazon and robust wetting occurring in the Northern Hemisphere high latitudes and east Africa (PDSI only). The SPEI is more sensitive to PET changes than the PDSI, especially in arid regions such as the Sahara and Middle East. Regional drying and wetting patterns largely mirror the spatially heterogeneous response of precipitation in the models, although drying in the PDSI and SPEI calculations extends beyond the regions of reduced precipitation. This expansion of drying areas is attributed to globally widespread increases in PET, caused by increases in surface net radiation and the vapor pressure deficit. Increased PET not only intensifies drying in areas where precipitation is already reduced, it also drives areas into drought that would otherwise experience little drying or even wetting from precipitation trends alone. This PET amplification effect is largest in the Northern Hemisphere mid-latitudes, and is especially pronounced in western North America, Europe, and southeast China. Compared to PDSI projections using precipitation changes only, the projections incorporating both

  4. Potato operation: computer vision for agricultural robotics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pun, Thierry; Lefebvre, Marc; Gil, Sylvia; Brunet, Denis; Dessimoz, Jean-Daniel; Guegerli, Paul

    1992-03-01

    Each year at harvest time millions of seed potatoes are checked for the presence of viruses by means of an Elisa test. The Potato Operation aims at automatizing the potato manipulation and pulp sampling procedure, starting from bunches of harvested potatoes and ending with the deposit of potato pulp into Elisa containers. Automatizing these manipulations addresses several issues, linking robotic and computer vision. The paper reports on the current status of this project. It first summarizes the robotic aspects, which consist of locating a potato in a bunch, grasping it, positioning it into the camera field of view, pumping the pulp sample and depositing it into a container. The computer vision aspects are then detailed. They concern locating particular potatoes in a bunch and finding the position of the best germ where the drill has to sample the pulp. The emphasis is put on the germ location problem. A general overview of the approach is given, which combines the processing of both frontal and silhouette views of the potato, together with movements of the robot arm (active vision). Frontal and silhouette analysis algorithms are then presented. Results are shown that confirm the feasibility of the approach.

  5. Potato cyst nematodes: pests of national importance

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Potato cyst nematodes (PCN; G. rostochiensis and G. pallida) are internationally-recognized quarantine pests and considered the most devastating pests of potatoes due to annual worldwide yield losses estimated at 12.2%. PCNs continue to spread throughout North America and were recently detected in I...

  6. Potato poisoning - green tubers and sprouts

    MedlinePlus

    ... sprouts URL of this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/002875.htm Potato plant poisoning - green tubers and sprouts To use the ... green tubers or new sprouts of the potato plant. This article is for information only. DO NOT use it ...

  7. Reinventing potato at the diploid level

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The outcrossing polyploidy nature of cultivated potato has hindered the use of genomics resources to dissect the genetic basis of agronomically important traits. Reversion to the diploid level allows us to apply powerful tools toward this effort. Parthenogenesis generates diploid cultivated potato, ...

  8. Potato tuber dormancy and postharvest sprout control

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    For an indeterminate period of time following harvest, potatoes will not sprout and are physiologically dormant. Dormancy is gradually lost during postharvest storage and the resultant sprouting is detrimental to the nutritional and processing qualities of potatoes. Because of this, sprouting resu...

  9. Assessing reproduction of potato psyllid haplotypes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Potato psyllid, Bactericera cockerelli (Šulc) (Hemiptera: Triozidae), is a serious pest of solanaceous crops in North and Central America and New Zealand. This insect vectors the bacterium “Candidatus Liberibacter solanacearum” that causes zebra chip disease of potato. So far, four distinct genetic ...

  10. Improved genetic disease resistance solutions for potato

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Halterman Lab research program is focused on understanding the genetic basis of disease resistance in potato. Several diseases, such as late blight, early blight, potato virus Y, and verticillium wilt, are particularly problematic in Wisconsin. With the exception of early blight, major genes hav...

  11. Sweet potato in gluten-free pancakes.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Gluten-free pancakes were prepared using rice flour, and rice flour replaced with various amounts, at 10, 20, and 40% of sweet potato flour. At 40% sweet potato, the apparent viscosity became comparable to that of the traditional wheat pancake batter. Texture properties of the cooked pancakes, such...

  12. 7 CFR 945.5 - Potatoes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Potatoes. 945.5 Section 945.5 Agriculture Regulations... ORDERS; FRUITS, VEGETABLES, NUTS), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE IRISH POTATOES GROWN IN CERTAIN DESIGNATED COUNTIES IN IDAHO, AND MALHEUR COUNTY, OREGON Order Regulating Handling Definitions § 945.5...

  13. 7 CFR 945.5 - Potatoes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Potatoes. 945.5 Section 945.5 Agriculture Regulations... Orders; Fruits, Vegetables, Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE IRISH POTATOES GROWN IN CERTAIN DESIGNATED COUNTIES IN IDAHO, AND MALHEUR COUNTY, OREGON Order Regulating Handling Definitions § 945.5...

  14. 7 CFR 945.5 - Potatoes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Potatoes. 945.5 Section 945.5 Agriculture Regulations... ORDERS; FRUITS, VEGETABLES, NUTS), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE IRISH POTATOES GROWN IN CERTAIN DESIGNATED COUNTIES IN IDAHO, AND MALHEUR COUNTY, OREGON Order Regulating Handling Definitions § 945.5...

  15. 7 CFR 945.5 - Potatoes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Potatoes. 945.5 Section 945.5 Agriculture Regulations... Orders; Fruits, Vegetables, Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE IRISH POTATOES GROWN IN CERTAIN DESIGNATED COUNTIES IN IDAHO, AND MALHEUR COUNTY, OREGON Order Regulating Handling Definitions § 945.5...

  16. 7 CFR 945.5 - Potatoes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Potatoes. 945.5 Section 945.5 Agriculture Regulations... Orders; Fruits, Vegetables, Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE IRISH POTATOES GROWN IN CERTAIN DESIGNATED COUNTIES IN IDAHO, AND MALHEUR COUNTY, OREGON Order Regulating Handling Definitions § 945.5...

  17. Convective drying of sludge cake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jianbo; Peng, Xiaofeng; Xue, Yuan; Lee, Duujong; Chu, Chingping

    2002-08-01

    This paper presented an experimental study on convective drying of waste water sludge collected from Beijing GaoBeiDian Sewage Treatment Plant, particularly on the correlation between the observed shrinkage dynamics of sludge cake and the drying curve. During the initial stage of drying the process resembles to that of a particulate bed, in which moisture diffuses and evaporates at the upper surface. Conventional drying theory assuming a diffusion-evaporating front interprets this period of drying. Consequently, owing to the very large shrinkage ratio of the dried cake, cracks emerges and propagates on and within the cake body, whence inducing evaporating channel that facilitates the water removal. This occurrence compensates the reduction of surface area for evaporation, whence extending the constant-rate period during the test. Afterwards, the cracks meet with each other and form isolated cake piles, while the subsequent drying occur mainly within these piles and the conventional theory fails. The transition between the drying on a plain cake layer and that on the isolated piles demonstrates the need to adopt distinct descriptions on these two regimes of drying for the sludge cake.

  18. Environmental impact of rejected materials generated in organic fraction of municipal solid waste anaerobic digestion plants: Comparison of wet and dry process layout.

    PubMed

    Colazo, Ana-Belén; Sánchez, Antoni; Font, Xavier; Colón, Joan

    2015-09-01

    Anaerobic digestion of source separated organic fraction of municipal solid waste is an increasing waste valorization alternative instead of incineration or landfilling of untreated biodegradable wastes. Nevertheless, a significant portion of biodegradable wastes entering the plant is lost in pre-treatments and post-treatments of anaerobic digestion facilities together with other improper materials such as plastics, paper, textile materials and metals. The rejected materials lost in these stages have two main implications: (i) less organic material enters to digesters and, as a consequence, there is a loss of biogas production and (ii) the rejected materials end up in landfills or incinerators contributing to environmental impacts such as global warming or eutrophication. The main goals of this study are (i) to estimate potential losses of biogas in the rejected solid materials generated during the pre- and post-treatments of two full-scale anaerobic digestion facilities and (ii) to evaluate the environmental burdens associated to the final disposal (landfill or incineration) of these rejected materials by means of Life Cycle Assessment. This study shows that there is a lost of potential biogas production, ranging from 8% to 15%, due to the loss of organic matter during pre-treatment stages in anaerobic digestion facilities. From an environmental point of view, the Life Cycle Assessment shows that the incineration scenario is the most favorable alternative for eight out of nine impact categories compared with the landfill scenario. The studied impact categories are Climate Change, Fossil depletion, Freshwater eutrophication, Marine eutrophication, Ozone depletion, Particulate matter formation, Photochemical oxidant formation, Terrestrial acidification and Water depletion.

  19. Environmental impact of rejected materials generated in organic fraction of municipal solid waste anaerobic digestion plants: Comparison of wet and dry process layout.

    PubMed

    Colazo, Ana-Belén; Sánchez, Antoni; Font, Xavier; Colón, Joan

    2015-09-01

    Anaerobic digestion of source separated organic fraction of municipal solid waste is an increasing waste valorization alternative instead of incineration or landfilling of untreated biodegradable wastes. Nevertheless, a significant portion of biodegradable wastes entering the plant is lost in pre-treatments and post-treatments of anaerobic digestion facilities together with other improper materials such as plastics, paper, textile materials and metals. The rejected materials lost in these stages have two main implications: (i) less organic material enters to digesters and, as a consequence, there is a loss of biogas production and (ii) the rejected materials end up in landfills or incinerators contributing to environmental impacts such as global warming or eutrophication. The main goals of this study are (i) to estimate potential losses of biogas in the rejected solid materials generated during the pre- and post-treatments of two full-scale anaerobic digestion facilities and (ii) to evaluate the environmental burdens associated to the final disposal (landfill or incineration) of these rejected materials by means of Life Cycle Assessment. This study shows that there is a lost of potential biogas production, ranging from 8% to 15%, due to the loss of organic matter during pre-treatment stages in anaerobic digestion facilities. From an environmental point of view, the Life Cycle Assessment shows that the incineration scenario is the most favorable alternative for eight out of nine impact categories compared with the landfill scenario. The studied impact categories are Climate Change, Fossil depletion, Freshwater eutrophication, Marine eutrophication, Ozone depletion, Particulate matter formation, Photochemical oxidant formation, Terrestrial acidification and Water depletion. PMID:26123979

  20. Dry cell battery poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    Batteries - dry cell ... Acidic dry cell batteries contain: Manganese dioxide Ammonium chloride Alkaline dry cell batteries contain: Sodium hydroxide Potassium hydroxide Lithium dioxide dry cell batteries ...

  1. 7 CFR 51.1578 - Off-Grade potatoes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Off-Grade potatoes. 51.1578 Section 51.1578... (INSPECTION, CERTIFICATION, AND STANDARDS) United States Consumer Standards for Potatoes Off-Grade § 51.1578 Off-Grade potatoes. Potatoes which fail to meet the requirements of any of the foregoing grades...

  2. 7 CFR 948.151 - Colorado Potato Committee membership.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Colorado Potato Committee membership. 948.151 Section... POTATOES GROWN IN COLORADO Rules and Regulations Modification of Inspection Requirements § 948.151 Colorado Potato Committee membership. The Colorado Potato Committee shall be comprised of six members...

  3. 7 CFR 51.1578 - Off-Grade potatoes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Off-Grade potatoes. 51.1578 Section 51.1578... STANDARDS) United States Consumer Standards for Potatoes Off-Grade § 51.1578 Off-Grade potatoes. Potatoes which fail to meet the requirements of any of the foregoing grades shall be Off-Grade...

  4. 7 CFR 51.1578 - Off-Grade potatoes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Off-Grade potatoes. 51.1578 Section 51.1578... STANDARDS) United States Consumer Standards for Potatoes Off-Grade § 51.1578 Off-Grade potatoes. Potatoes which fail to meet the requirements of any of the foregoing grades shall be Off-Grade...

  5. 7 CFR 948.51 - Colorado Potato Committee.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Colorado Potato Committee. 948.51 Section 948.51... AGREEMENTS AND ORDERS; FRUITS, VEGETABLES, NUTS), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE IRISH POTATOES GROWN IN COLORADO Order Regulating Handling Committees § 948.51 Colorado Potato Committee. The Colorado Potato...

  6. 7 CFR 948.151 - Colorado Potato Committee membership.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Colorado Potato Committee membership. 948.151 Section... POTATOES GROWN IN COLORADO Rules and Regulations Modification of Inspection Requirements § 948.151 Colorado Potato Committee membership. The Colorado Potato Committee shall be comprised of six members...

  7. 7 CFR 948.151 - Colorado Potato Committee membership.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Colorado Potato Committee membership. 948.151 Section... POTATOES GROWN IN COLORADO Rules and Regulations Modification of Inspection Requirements § 948.151 Colorado Potato Committee membership. The Colorado Potato Committee shall be comprised of six members...

  8. 7 CFR 948.151 - Colorado Potato Committee membership.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Colorado Potato Committee membership. 948.151 Section... POTATOES GROWN IN COLORADO Rules and Regulations Modification of Inspection Requirements § 948.151 Colorado Potato Committee membership. The Colorado Potato Committee shall be comprised of six members...

  9. A Brief History of the Potato in Ireland.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Social Education, 2000

    2000-01-01

    Provides historical information on the potato in Ireland focusing on how the potato arrived in Ireland and the advantages and disadvantages of the potato as a food crop. Discusses the Irish potato famine in Ireland, effects of the famine, and the government's laissez-faire response. Includes a list of questions. (CMK)

  10. 7 CFR 51.1578 - Off-Grade potatoes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Off-Grade potatoes. 51.1578 Section 51.1578... STANDARDS) United States Consumer Standards for Potatoes Off-Grade § 51.1578 Off-Grade potatoes. Potatoes which fail to meet the requirements of any of the foregoing grades shall be Off-Grade...

  11. 7 CFR 948.51 - Colorado Potato Committee.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Colorado Potato Committee. 948.51 Section 948.51... Agreements and Orders; Fruits, Vegetables, Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE IRISH POTATOES GROWN IN COLORADO Order Regulating Handling Committees § 948.51 Colorado Potato Committee. The Colorado Potato...

  12. 7 CFR 51.1578 - Off-Grade potatoes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Off-Grade potatoes. 51.1578 Section 51.1578... (INSPECTION, CERTIFICATION, AND STANDARDS) United States Consumer Standards for Potatoes Off-Grade § 51.1578 Off-Grade potatoes. Potatoes which fail to meet the requirements of any of the foregoing grades...

  13. 7 CFR 948.151 - Colorado Potato Committee membership.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Colorado Potato Committee membership. 948.151 Section... POTATOES GROWN IN COLORADO Rules and Regulations Modification of Inspection Requirements § 948.151 Colorado Potato Committee membership. The Colorado Potato Committee shall be comprised of six members...

  14. Storage performance of Taiwanese sweet potato cultivars.

    PubMed

    Huang, Che-Lun; Liao, Wayne C; Chan, Chin-Feng; Lai, Yung-Chang

    2014-12-01

    Three sweet potato cultivars (TNG57, TNG66, and TNG73), provided by the Taiwanese Agricultural Research Institute (TARI), were stored at either 15 °C or under ambient conditions (23.8 ~ 28.4 °C and 77.1 ~ 81.0 % of relative humidity). Sweet potato roots were randomly chosen from each replicate and evaluated for measurement of weight loss, sugar content analysis, and sprouting after 0, 14, 24, 48, 56, 70, 84, and 98 days of storage. Fresh sweet potato roots were baked at 200 °C for 60 min then samples were taken for sugar analysis. After 14 days of ambient condition storage, the sprouting percentages for TNG57, TNG66, and TNG73 were 100, 85, and 95 % respectively. When sweet potatoes were stored at 15 °C, the weight loss became less and no sweet potato root sprouted after 14 days of storage. Because manufacturers can store sweet potatoes at 15 °C for almost 2 month without other treatments, the supply capacity shortage in July and September can be reduced. The total sugar content slowly increased along with increasing the storage time. After baking, the total sugar content of sweet potatoes significantly increased due to the formation of maltose. Maltose became the major sugar of baked sweet potatoes. Raw sweet potatoes stored at 15 °C had higher total sugar contents after baking than those stored under ambient conditions. Raw sweet potatoes were recommended to be stored at 15 °C before baking.

  15. Storage performance of Taiwanese sweet potato cultivars.

    PubMed

    Huang, Che-Lun; Liao, Wayne C; Chan, Chin-Feng; Lai, Yung-Chang

    2014-12-01

    Three sweet potato cultivars (TNG57, TNG66, and TNG73), provided by the Taiwanese Agricultural Research Institute (TARI), were stored at either 15 °C or under ambient conditions (23.8 ~ 28.4 °C and 77.1 ~ 81.0 % of relative humidity). Sweet potato roots were randomly chosen from each replicate and evaluated for measurement of weight loss, sugar content analysis, and sprouting after 0, 14, 24, 48, 56, 70, 84, and 98 days of storage. Fresh sweet potato roots were baked at 200 °C for 60 min then samples were taken for sugar analysis. After 14 days of ambient condition storage, the sprouting percentages for TNG57, TNG66, and TNG73 were 100, 85, and 95 % respectively. When sweet potatoes were stored at 15 °C, the weight loss became less and no sweet potato root sprouted after 14 days of storage. Because manufacturers can store sweet potatoes at 15 °C for almost 2 month without other treatments, the supply capacity shortage in July and September can be reduced. The total sugar content slowly increased along with increasing the storage time. After baking, the total sugar content of sweet potatoes significantly increased due to the formation of maltose. Maltose became the major sugar of baked sweet potatoes. Raw sweet potatoes stored at 15 °C had higher total sugar contents after baking than those stored under ambient conditions. Raw sweet potatoes were recommended to be stored at 15 °C before baking. PMID:25477675

  16. [Effects of potato/soybean intercropping on photosynthetic characteristics and yield of three soybean varieties].

    PubMed

    Chen, Guang-rong; Yang, Wen-yu; Zhang, Guo-hong; Wang, Li-ming; Yang, Ru-ping; Yong, Tai-wen; Liu, Wei-guo

    2015-11-01

    The potato/soybean intercropping trials using three soybean varieties including Zhonghuang 30 (early-maturing variety) , Jidou 17 (mid maturing variety) and Qihuang 34 (late maturing variety) with the sole cropping potato as control were carried out to determine the dynamic changes of leaf area index (LAI) of soybean, accumulation of dry matter, photosynthetic characteristics, yield and yield components. The results showed that the LAI, dry matter accumulation, net photosynthesis (Pn), transpiration rate (Tr) and stomatal conduction (g(s)) of soybean in all intercropping systems were lower than in monoculture because of the influence of intensified lower light during earlier growing stage, and the duration from planting to flowering was extended. When the potato was harvested, the LAI, dry matter accumulation, Pn, Tr and g(s) of soybean in all intercropping systems increased, especially for mid-maturing and late-maturing varieties, which became much closer to those in the monoculture. Compared with sole cropping, the pods per plant, seeds per plant and seeds per pod in intercropping system significantly decreased by 22.0%, 36.0% and 17.6% for early-maturing soybean, 5.1%, 13.1% and 8.9% for mid-maturing soybean, 5.7%, 7.6% and 2.1% for late-maturing soybean, respectively. The yields of mid-maturing and late-maturing varieties in intercropping systems were higher than that of the early-maturing, which increased by 92.4% and 163.4%, with the land equivalent ratio (LER) of 1.81 and 1.84, respectively. This suggested that mid-maturing and late-maturing soybean varieties were suitable for intercropping with the potato to improve photosynthetic efficiency, dry matter accumulation and yield of intercropping soybean. PMID:26915189

  17. [Effects of potato/soybean intercropping on photosynthetic characteristics and yield of three soybean varieties].

    PubMed

    Chen, Guang-rong; Yang, Wen-yu; Zhang, Guo-hong; Wang, Li-ming; Yang, Ru-ping; Yong, Tai-wen; Liu, Wei-guo

    2015-11-01

    The potato/soybean intercropping trials using three soybean varieties including Zhonghuang 30 (early-maturing variety) , Jidou 17 (mid maturing variety) and Qihuang 34 (late maturing variety) with the sole cropping potato as control were carried out to determine the dynamic changes of leaf area index (LAI) of soybean, accumulation of dry matter, photosynthetic characteristics, yield and yield components. The results showed that the LAI, dry matter accumulation, net photosynthesis (Pn), transpiration rate (Tr) and stomatal conduction (g(s)) of soybean in all intercropping systems were lower than in monoculture because of the influence of intensified lower light during earlier growing stage, and the duration from planting to flowering was extended. When the potato was harvested, the LAI, dry matter accumulation, Pn, Tr and g(s) of soybean in all intercropping systems increased, especially for mid-maturing and late-maturing varieties, which became much closer to those in the monoculture. Compared with sole cropping, the pods per plant, seeds per plant and seeds per pod in intercropping system significantly decreased by 22.0%, 36.0% and 17.6% for early-maturing soybean, 5.1%, 13.1% and 8.9% for mid-maturing soybean, 5.7%, 7.6% and 2.1% for late-maturing soybean, respectively. The yields of mid-maturing and late-maturing varieties in intercropping systems were higher than that of the early-maturing, which increased by 92.4% and 163.4%, with the land equivalent ratio (LER) of 1.81 and 1.84, respectively. This suggested that mid-maturing and late-maturing soybean varieties were suitable for intercropping with the potato to improve photosynthetic efficiency, dry matter accumulation and yield of intercropping soybean.

  18. Detection of sweet potato virus C, sweet potato virus 2 and sweet potato feathery mottle virus in Portugal.

    PubMed

    Varanda, Carla M R; Santos, Susana J; Oliveira, Mônica D M; Clara, Maria Ivone E; Félix, Maria Rosário F

    2015-06-01

    Field sweet potato plants showing virus-like symptoms, as stunting, leaf distortion, mosaic and chlorosis, were collected in southwest Portugal and tested for the presence of four potyviruses, sweet potato virus C (SPVC), sweet potato virus 2 (SPV2), sweet potato feathery mottle virus (SPFMV), sweet potato virus G (SPVG), and the crinivirus sweet potato chlorotic stunt virus (SPCSV). DsRNA fractions were extracted from symptomatic leaves and used as templates in single and multiplex RT-PCR assays using previously described specific primers for each analyzed virus. The amplified reaction products for SPVC, SPV2 and SPFMV were of expected size, and direct sequencing of PCR products revealed that they correspond to the coat protein gene (CP) and showed 98%, 99% and 99% identity, respectively, to those viruses. Comparison of the CP genomic and amino acid sequences of the Portuguese viral isolates recovered here with those of ten other sequences of isolates obtained in different countries retrieved from the GenBank showed very few differences. The application of the RT-PCR assays revealed for the first time the presence of SPVC and SPFMV in the sweet potato crop in Portugal, the absence of SPVG and SPCSV in tested plants, as well as the occurrence of triple virus infections under field conditions.

  19. Detection of sweet potato virus C, sweet potato virus 2 and sweet potato feathery mottle virus in Portugal.

    PubMed

    Varanda, Carla M R; Santos, Susana J; Oliveira, Mônica D M; Clara, Maria Ivone E; Félix, Maria Rosário F

    2015-06-01

    Field sweet potato plants showing virus-like symptoms, as stunting, leaf distortion, mosaic and chlorosis, were collected in southwest Portugal and tested for the presence of four potyviruses, sweet potato virus C (SPVC), sweet potato virus 2 (SPV2), sweet potato feathery mottle virus (SPFMV), sweet potato virus G (SPVG), and the crinivirus sweet potato chlorotic stunt virus (SPCSV). DsRNA fractions were extracted from symptomatic leaves and used as templates in single and multiplex RT-PCR assays using previously described specific primers for each analyzed virus. The amplified reaction products for SPVC, SPV2 and SPFMV were of expected size, and direct sequencing of PCR products revealed that they correspond to the coat protein gene (CP) and showed 98%, 99% and 99% identity, respectively, to those viruses. Comparison of the CP genomic and amino acid sequences of the Portuguese viral isolates recovered here with those of ten other sequences of isolates obtained in different countries retrieved from the GenBank showed very few differences. The application of the RT-PCR assays revealed for the first time the presence of SPVC and SPFMV in the sweet potato crop in Portugal, the absence of SPVG and SPCSV in tested plants, as well as the occurrence of triple virus infections under field conditions. PMID:26104336

  20. Non-potato host plants of potato psyllid in the Pacific Northwest: a year-round complication?

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Managing zebra chip disease in the potato growing regions of Washington, Oregon, and Idaho is complicated by confusion about the source of the insect vector (potato psyllid) as it colonizes potato fields in these growing regions. Not knowing where the psyllid is before arriving in Washington potato...

  1. Glycoalkaloids in potato tubers grown under controlled environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nitithamyong, A.; Vonelbe, J. H.; Wheeler, R. M.; Tibbitts, T. W.

    1999-01-01

    Tuber content of alpha-solanine, alpha-chaconine, and total glycoalkaloids (TGA) was determined for the potato cultivars, Norland, Russet Burbank, and Denali grown under different environmental conditions in growth chambers. The lowest TGA concentrations (0.30 to 0.35 mg g-1 dry tissue) were found in the cv. Norland with 400 micromoles m-2 s-1 photosynthetic photon flux (PPF), 12 h day length, 16 C temperature, and 350 micromoles mol-1 carbon dioxide. The ratio of alpha-chaconine to alpha-solanine was close to 60:40 under all growing conditions, except that it was 50:50 under the low temperature of 12 C. Cultivars responded similarly to environmental conditions although TGA was about 20% greater in cv. Russet Burbank and about 30% greater in Denali compared to Norland. The largest changes in TGA occurred with changes in temperature. In comparison to 16 C, TGA were 40% greater at 12 C, 80% greater at 20 C, and 125% greater at 24 C (0.70 mg g-1 dry weight). The TGA concentration increased from 10 to 25% with an increase in light from 400 to 800 micromoles m-2 s-1 PPF for all three cultivars. TGA increased 20% with extension of the day length from 12 to 24 hr and also increased 20% when carbon dioxide was increased from 350 to 1000 micromoles mol-1. TGA concentrations were not influenced by changes in relative humidity from 50 to 80%. TGA concentrations decreased only slightly in harvests made from 9 to 21 weeks after planting. Variations in TGA among the different growing conditions and cultivars were below 20 mg/100 g fresh weight (approximately 1.0 mg g-1 dry weight) recognized as the upper concentration for food safety. However the results suggest that TGA should be considered when potatoes are grown at temperatures above 20 C.

  2. Insecticidal activity of the granulosis virus in combination with neem products and talc powder against the potato tuberworm Phthorimaea operculella (Zeller) (Lepidoptera: Gelechiidae).

    PubMed

    Mascarin, G M; Delalibera, I

    2012-06-01

    The potato tuberworm Phthorimaea operculella (Zeller) is an important agricultural pest that causes significant economic losses to potato growers worldwide. The addition of an effective method of biological control for the potato tuberworm is greatly needed, and is currently unavailable in Brazil. The granulosis virus (Baculoviridae) is a promising biological control agent to protect post-harvest potatoes and in storage from the potato tuberworm. However, the control measure must be economically feasible. Liquid suspensions of a granulosis virus applied alone or in mixture with two commercial neem oil-based products (DalNeem™ and NeemAzal™), and a dry powder formulation of viral granules were evaluated for control of potato tuberworm larvae by treating potato tubers under laboratory conditions. High larval mortality (86.7%) was achieved when DalNeem and virus were applied together at 4 mg of azadirachtin/L and 10(4) occlusion bodies (OBs)/mL, respectively. This combination resulted in ≥50% efficacy in relation to their counterparts alone. Conversely, NeemAzal did not enhance virus effectiveness against larvae of the potato tuberworm. The talc-based virus formulation was used for dusting seed tubers at different concentrations and resulted in 100% larval mortality at 5 × 10(8) OBs/g. Formulated and unformulated virus provided 50% mortality at 166 OBs/g and at 5.0 × 10(5) OBs/mL, respectively. As a result, talc-based virus formulation had a better control efficiency on potato tuberworm than the aqueous virus suspension. The granulosis virus combined with DalNeem at low rates or formulated with talc powder is a viable option to control the potato tuberworm under storage conditions. PMID:23950047

  3. Central waste processing system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kester, F. L.

    1973-01-01

    A new concept for processing spacecraft type wastes has been evaluated. The feasibility of reacting various waste materials with steam at temperatures of 538 - 760 C in both a continuous and batch reactor with residence times from 3 to 60 seconds has been established. Essentially complete gasification is achieved. Product gases are primarily hydrogen, carbon dioxide, methane, and carbon monoxide. Water soluble synthetic wastes are readily processed in a continuous tubular reactor at concentrations up to 20 weight percent. The batch reactor is able to process wet and dry wastes at steam to waste weight ratios from 2 to 20. Feces, urine, and synthetic wastes have been successfully processed in the batch reactor.

  4. Control of sweet potato virus diseases.

    PubMed

    Loebenstein, Gad

    2015-01-01

    Sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas) is ranked seventh in global food crop production and is the third most important root crop after potato and cassava. Sweet potatoes are vegetative propagated from vines, root slips (sprouts), or tubers. Therefore, virus diseases can be a major constrain, reducing yields markedly, often more than 50%. The main viruses worldwide are Sweet potato feathery mottle virus (SPFMV) and Sweet potato chlorotic stunt virus (SPCSV). Effects on yields by SPFMV or SPCSV alone are minor, or but in complex infection by the two or other viruses yield losses of 50%. The orthodox way of controlling viruses in vegetative propagated crops is by supplying the growers with virus-tested planting material. High-yielding plants are tested for freedom of viruses by PCR, serology, and grafting to sweet potato virus indicator plants. After this, meristem tips are taken from those plants that reacted negative. The meristems were grown into plants which were kept under insect-proof conditions and away from other sweet potato material for distribution to farmers after another cycle of reproduction.

  5. Control of sweet potato virus diseases.

    PubMed

    Loebenstein, Gad

    2015-01-01

    Sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas) is ranked seventh in global food crop production and is the third most important root crop after potato and cassava. Sweet potatoes are vegetative propagated from vines, root slips (sprouts), or tubers. Therefore, virus diseases can be a major constrain, reducing yields markedly, often more than 50%. The main viruses worldwide are Sweet potato feathery mottle virus (SPFMV) and Sweet potato chlorotic stunt virus (SPCSV). Effects on yields by SPFMV or SPCSV alone are minor, or but in complex infection by the two or other viruses yield losses of 50%. The orthodox way of controlling viruses in vegetative propagated crops is by supplying the growers with virus-tested planting material. High-yielding plants are tested for freedom of viruses by PCR, serology, and grafting to sweet potato virus indicator plants. After this, meristem tips are taken from those plants that reacted negative. The meristems were grown into plants which were kept under insect-proof conditions and away from other sweet potato material for distribution to farmers after another cycle of reproduction. PMID:25591876

  6. A combination of vermiculite and paper pulp supporting material for the photoautotrophic micropropagation of sweet potato.

    PubMed

    Afreen-Zobayed; Zobayed; Kubota; Kozai; Hasegawa

    2000-08-22

    A mixture of vermiculite (hydrous silicates) and paper pulp (waste product of paper industry) was used as a supporting material for the in vitro photoautotrophic micropropagation of plantlets. Sweet potato was used as a model plant to find out the appropriate proportion of vermiculite and paper pulp for the optimum growth of the plantlets. The plantlets grown in the conventional supporting material, agar, were used as the control. The study revealed that in all aspects, the plantlets grown in vermiculite mixed with 30% (w/w) paper pulp exhibited the highest growth performance. The shoot and root fresh mass were x2.7 greater than those in agar (control); the leaf, stem and root dry mass were also greater and at least two fold in this treatment compared with those in the control. The net photosynthetic rate per plantlet was highest in this treatment, and on day 20 it was 15.3 µmol CO(2) h(-1) as compared with 9.8 µmol CO(2) h(-1) in the control. The growth of both shoots and roots decreased gradually with the increase or decrease of percentage of paper pulp in the supporting material. In general, the growth was significantly poorer in the plantlets grown in 100% vermiculite than that in vermiculite mixed with 30% paper pulp but still greater than in the control. The porosity of the supporting materials increased with the increase in the percentage of paper pulp in the supporting material. After transplanting to the ex vitro condition the survival percentage did not vary significantly (90-100%) among the treatments, except in control where it was only 73%. The number of unfolded leaves and the stem height were similar among the treatments except those in the control. PMID:10960736

  7. Utilization of white potatoes in CELSS.

    PubMed

    Tibbitts, T W; Bennett, S M; Morrow, R C; Bula, R J

    1989-01-01

    Potatoes (Solanum tuberosum) have a strong potential as a useful crop species in a functioning CELSS. The cultivar Denali has produced 37.5 g m-2 d-1 when grown for 132 days with the first 40 days under a 12-h photoperiod and a light:dark temperature cycle of 20 degrees C:16 degrees C, and then 92 days under continuous irradiance and a temperature of 16 degrees C. Irradiance was at 725 micromoles m-2 s-1 PPF and carbon dioxide at 1000 micromoles mol-1. The dried tubers had 82% carbohydrates, 9% protein and 0.6% fat. Other studies have shown that carbon dioxide supplementation (1000 micromoles mol-1) is of significant benefit under 12-h irradiance but less benefit under 24 h irradiance. Irradiance cycles of 60 minutes light and 30 minutes dark caused a reduction of more than 50% in tuber weight compared to cycles of 16 h light and 8 h dark. A diurnal temperature change of 22 degrees C for the 12-h light period to 14 degrees C during the 12-h dark period gave increased yields of 30% and 10% for two separate cultivars, compared with plants grown under a constant 18 degrees C temperature. Cultivar screening under continuous irradiance and elevated temperatures (28 degrees C) for 8 weeks of growth indicated that the cvs Haig, Denali, Atlantic, Desiree and Rutt had the best potential for tolerance to these conditions. Harvesting of tubers from plants at weekly intervals, beginning at 8 weeks after planting, did not increase yield over a single final harvest. Spacing of plants on 0.055 centers produced greater yield per m2 than spacing at 0.11 or 0.22 m2. Plants maintained 0.33 meters apart (0.111 m2 per plant) in beds produced the same yields when separated by dividers in the root matrix as when no separation was made.

  8. Compositional and toxicological analysis of a GM potato line with reduced α-solanine content--a 90-day feeding study in the Syrian Golden hamster.

    PubMed

    Langkilde, Søren; Schrøder, Malene; Frank, Thomas; Shepherd, Louise V T; Conner, Sean; Davies, Howard V; Meyer, Otto; Danier, Jürgen; Rychlik, Michael; Belknap, William R; McCue, Kent F; Engel, Karl-Heinz; Stewart, Derek; Knudsen, Ib; Poulsen, Morten

    2012-10-01

    Steroidal glycoalkaloids (GAs) are toxins, produced by plants of the Solanaceae family. The potato plant (Solanum tuberosum L.) and its tubers predominantly contain the two GAs α-chaconine and α-solanine. These compounds are believed to act in synergy, and the degree of toxicity may therefore depend on their ratio in the potato. To determine the influence of α-solanine: α-chaconine ratio in potatoes on toxicity, a GM potato line (SGT 9-2) with reduced α-solanine content, and the parental control line (Desirée wild-type) having a traditional α-solanine: α-chaconine ratio were (1) studied for compositional similarity by analysing for a range of potato constituents, and (2) used in a 90-day feeding trial with the Syrian Golden hamster to study differential toxicity. The animal feeding study used diets with up to 60% freeze-dried potato powder from either line. Whilst data indicated some compositional differences between the GM line and its wildtype control these did not raise concerns related to nutritional value or safety. Results of the feeding trials showed a low number of significant differences between potato lines with different α-solanine: α-chaconine ratio but none were considered to raise safety concerns with regard to human (or animal) consumption.

  9. Development and Validation of a Near-Infrared Spectroscopy Method for the Prediction of Acrylamide Content in French-Fried Potato.

    PubMed

    Adedipe, Oluwatosin E; Johanningsmeier, Suzanne D; Truong, Van-Den; Yencho, G Craig

    2016-03-01

    This study investigated the ability of near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) to predict acrylamide content in French-fried potato. Potato flour spiked with acrylamide (50-8000 μg/kg) was used to determine if acrylamide could be accurately predicted in a potato matrix. French fries produced with various pretreatments and cook times (n = 84) and obtained from quick-service restaurants (n = 64) were used for model development and validation. Acrylamide was quantified using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, and reflectance spectra (400-2500 nm) of each freeze-dried sample were captured on a Foss XDS Rapid Content Analyzer-NIR spectrometer. Partial least-squares (PLS) discriminant analysis and PLS regression modeling demonstrated that NIRS could accurately detect acrylamide content as low as 50 μg/kg in the model potato matrix. Prediction errors of 135 μg/kg (R(2) = 0.98) and 255 μg/kg (R(2) = 0.93) were achieved with the best PLS models for acrylamide prediction in Russet Norkotah French-fried potato and multiple samples of unknown varieties, respectively. The findings indicate that NIRS can be used as a screening tool in potato breeding and potato processing research to reduce acrylamide in the food supply.

  10. In vitro screening of potato lines for drought tolerance.

    PubMed

    Albiski, Fahed; Najla, Safaa; Sanoubar, Rabab; Alkabani, Nour; Murshed, Ramzi

    2012-10-01

    Fresh water resources are limited and their use in agricultural production is expected to come under increasing constraints. Eighteen Syrian lines of potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) were screened for drought tolerance by measuring aerial and root growth in vitro. Drought stress was evaluated by adding 2, 4, 6, 8 and 10 % (w:v) of sorbitol to Murashige- Skoog medium and compared to 0 % for the control. Water potential of media ranged from -0.58 MPa to -2.5 MPa. Water-stress in culture adversely affected plant growth, and genotypes differed for their responses. Plant length and stem thickness, leaf area, root number length and thickness, and plant fresh and dry weights and plant water content were measured and all decreased due to drought. Grouping lines by cluster analysis for response to drought resulted in: (1) a tolerant group of six lines, (2) a moderately tolerant group of seven lines, and (3) a susceptible group of five lines. The variation in germplasm indicated that potato varieties can be developed for production under some levels of drought.

  11. Polyphenol and glycoalkaloid contents in potato cultivars grown in Luxembourg.

    PubMed

    Deusser, Hannah; Guignard, Cédric; Hoffmann, Lucien; Evers, Danièle

    2012-12-15

    The polyphenol (phenolic acids, flavanols and flavonols) and glycoalkaloid (α-chaconine and α-solanine) contents of potato tubers grown in Luxembourg were analyzed by UPLC-DAD and HPLC-MS/MS separately in peel (approx. 2mm), outer (approx. 1cm) and inner flesh. Polyphenol contents decreased from the peel via the outer to the inner flesh and differed among the cultivars. The cultivars Vitelotte and Luminella had the highest polyphenol contents (5202 and 572 μg/g dry weight (DW) in the outer flesh), whereas Charlotte and Bintje had the lowest contents (19.5 and 48.0 μg/g DW). Chlorogenic acid and its isomers (neo- and cryptochlorogenic acid) were the major polyphenols. Glycoalkaloid contents were highest in the peel and lowest in the inner flesh, values in the flesh were below guideline limits in all cultivars. In conclusion, potatoes contribute to the daily intake of polyphenols and their consumption, thereby, may have positive effects on health.

  12. Modification of Cilembu sweet potato starch with ethanoic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahmudatussa'adah, A.; Rahmawati, Y.; Sudewi

    2016-04-01

    Cilembu sweet potato harvest was abundant, its use was still limited. Starch was required by various industries. Starch is generally beige, and requires a long time for the drying process. The purpose of this research was to produce a modified starch with ethanoic acid. The method used in this study was the experimental method. The results showed acid modified starch yield was 18%, with the color characteristics of L*: 96.38 ± 0.82; a*: -0.70±0.02 b*: 2.70±0.03 C: 2.79±0.02. Native starch yield was 16%, with the color characteristics of L*: 93.55 ± 0.91; a*: -0.86±0.06 b*: 2.93±0.04 C: 3.05±0.03. The conclusion of this study was modified starch of Cilembu sweet potato using ethanoic acid have higher yield and more white bright than native starch.

  13. Investigation of the effect of soil herbicides on the growth and nutrient uptake of potato.

    PubMed

    Dobozi, M; Lehoczky, E; Horváth, S

    2003-01-01

    In our experiments the effect of three preemergent herbicides was examined on potato varieties. The experiments were carried out under greenhouse conditions in pots with six Hungarian potato varieties. The following herbicides were applied: PATORAN 50 WP (metobromuron), SENCOR 70 WG (metribuzin) and COMMAND 48 EC (chlomazon). The results indicate that the variety Góliát showed the slowest growth. In the case of Lilla fresh and dry shoot weight was decreased by the application of PATORAN 50 WP and SENCOR 70 WG. Tuber weight showed a decrease with the application of SENCOR 70 WG in all varieties. The least tuber weight appeared with the varieties Kánkán and Szózszorszép. Nutrient concentration of potato and N, P and K uptake by potato were examined. In the case of White Lady, Százszorszép and Kánkán N concentration and uptake increase significantly because of SENCOR 70 WG. There was a significant increase in phosphorus concentration and uptake in White Lady, Hópehely and Kánkán varieties in all herbicide treatments. Potassium concentration increased in the case of all the six varieties because of herbicide treatments. Based on these experiments all varieties showed susceptibility against the used herbicides. The results show that important differences occur in the sensitivity and tolerance of varieties against herbicides, which are consequently significant for practical crop protection.

  14. Copper oxychloride fungicide and its effect on growth and oxidative stress of potato plants.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Leonardo Cesar; Scavroni, Joseane; da Silva, João Renato Vaz; Cataneo, Ana Catarina; Martins, Dagoberto; Boaro, Carmen Sílvia Fernandes

    2014-06-01

    Excess copper in plants causes physiological alterations that lead to crop productivity losses. However, cupric fungicides have been utilized in the control of Alternaria solani and Phytophthora infestans fungi, which cause early blight and late blight in potato, respectively. Thus, this study aimed to investigate the effect of different copper oxychloride levels on potato plants through some biochemical and physiological parameters. The fungicide was applied at the recommended level (2.50gL(-1)), at a reduced level (1.25gL(-1)), and at 5.00gL(-1), to simulate spraying in the field twice during the same period with the recommended level. The results revealed that superoxide dismutase (SOD, EC 1.15.1.1) protected plants against oxidative stress at the beginning of the cycle since lipoperoxide levels were low in that period. In addition, increased SOD activity positively correlated with increased usable leaf area for photosynthesis (leaf area ratio, LAR), photosynthetic effectiveness (net assimilation rate, NAR), and growth relative to pre-existing dry matter (relative growth rate, RGR). Concomitantly, there was a negative correlation between lipoperoxide levels and LAR and RGR. Plants randomly sprayed twice in the same period with the level recommended for potato crop protection in the field do not present damage regarding their development. However, additional studies are needed in order to reduce the use of copper fungicides in the control of early and late blight in potato crop production, then decreasing the release of copper in the environment. PMID:24974119

  15. Mathematical modeling to study influence of porosity on apple and potato during dehydration.

    PubMed

    Singh, Fateh; Katiyar, V K; Singh, B P

    2015-09-01

    Several structural and physical changes in foodstuffs are the consequence of water removal during the drying process. Porosity (volume fraction of pores) is one of the key parameter that affects the quality and other properties of foods (such as apple and potato). To understand the effect of dehydration in apple and potato, in the present study an arbitrary small cubic volume element is considered which contains pores (intracellular spaces) distributed in it. Further, it is assumed that each pore in the cubic volume element is spherical. A mathematical relation is developed between porosity (volume fraction of pores) and pressure generated (due to contraction of cells during water removal) in outward direction on the surface of spherical elements containing pore. The developed relation is satisfactory in respect of experimental observations given in the literature. For the given pressure range, acquired porosity range is 0.1 to 0.92 for apple and 0.03 to 0.89 for potato which is matched with the existing experimental values. The results showed that the porosity is increasing with the increasing values of pressure, as expected, during moisture removal. Further, it is observed that the current porosity is depended on the initial porosity for both apple and potato. PMID:26344960

  16. Copper oxychloride fungicide and its effect on growth and oxidative stress of potato plants.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Leonardo Cesar; Scavroni, Joseane; da Silva, João Renato Vaz; Cataneo, Ana Catarina; Martins, Dagoberto; Boaro, Carmen Sílvia Fernandes

    2014-06-01

    Excess copper in plants causes physiological alterations that lead to crop productivity losses. However, cupric fungicides have been utilized in the control of Alternaria solani and Phytophthora infestans fungi, which cause early blight and late blight in potato, respectively. Thus, this study aimed to investigate the effect of different copper oxychloride levels on potato plants through some biochemical and physiological parameters. The fungicide was applied at the recommended level (2.50gL(-1)), at a reduced level (1.25gL(-1)), and at 5.00gL(-1), to simulate spraying in the field twice during the same period with the recommended level. The results revealed that superoxide dismutase (SOD, EC 1.15.1.1) protected plants against oxidative stress at the beginning of the cycle since lipoperoxide levels were low in that period. In addition, increased SOD activity positively correlated with increased usable leaf area for photosynthesis (leaf area ratio, LAR), photosynthetic effectiveness (net assimilation rate, NAR), and growth relative to pre-existing dry matter (relative growth rate, RGR). Concomitantly, there was a negative correlation between lipoperoxide levels and LAR and RGR. Plants randomly sprayed twice in the same period with the level recommended for potato crop protection in the field do not present damage regarding their development. However, additional studies are needed in order to reduce the use of copper fungicides in the control of early and late blight in potato crop production, then decreasing the release of copper in the environment.

  17. Drought tolerance in potato (S. tuberosum L.): Can we learn from drought tolerance research in cereals?

    PubMed

    Monneveux, Philippe; Ramírez, David A; Pino, María-Teresa

    2013-05-01

    Drought tolerance is a complex trait of increasing importance in potato. Our knowledge is summarized concerning drought tolerance and water use efficiency in this crop. We describe the effects of water restriction on physiological characteristics, examine the main traits involved, report the attempts to improve drought tolerance through in vitro screening and marker assisted selection, list the main genes involved and analyze the potential interest of native and wild potatoes to improve drought tolerance. Drought tolerance has received more attention in cereals than in potato. The review compares these crops for indirect selection methods available for assessment of drought tolerance related traits, use of genetic resources, progress in genomics, application of water saving techniques and availability of models to anticipate the effects of climate change on yield. It is concluded that drought tolerance improvement in potato could greatly benefit from the transfer of research achievements in cereals. Several promising research directions are presented, such as the use of fluorescence, reflectance, color and thermal imaging and stable isotope techniques to assess drought tolerance related traits, the application of the partial root-zone drying technique to improve efficiency of water supply and the exploitation of stressful memory to enhance hardiness. PMID:23498865

  18. Drought tolerance in potato (S. tuberosum L.): Can we learn from drought tolerance research in cereals?

    PubMed

    Monneveux, Philippe; Ramírez, David A; Pino, María-Teresa

    2013-05-01

    Drought tolerance is a complex trait of increasing importance in potato. Our knowledge is summarized concerning drought tolerance and water use efficiency in this crop. We describe the effects of water restriction on physiological characteristics, examine the main traits involved, report the attempts to improve drought tolerance through in vitro screening and marker assisted selection, list the main genes involved and analyze the potential interest of native and wild potatoes to improve drought tolerance. Drought tolerance has received more attention in cereals than in potato. The review compares these crops for indirect selection methods available for assessment of drought tolerance related traits, use of genetic resources, progress in genomics, application of water saving techniques and availability of models to anticipate the effects of climate change on yield. It is concluded that drought tolerance improvement in potato could greatly benefit from the transfer of research achievements in cereals. Several promising research directions are presented, such as the use of fluorescence, reflectance, color and thermal imaging and stable isotope techniques to assess drought tolerance related traits, the application of the partial root-zone drying technique to improve efficiency of water supply and the exploitation of stressful memory to enhance hardiness.

  19. Cooking Potatoes: Experimentation and Mathematical Modeling.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Xiao Dong

    2002-01-01

    Describes a laboratory activity involving a mathematical model of cooking potatoes that can be solved analytically. Highlights the microstructure aspects of the experiment. Provides the key aspects of the results, detailed background readings, laboratory procedures and data analyses. (MM)

  20. Climate risks on potato yield in Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Xun; Lall, Upmanu

    2016-04-01

    The yield of potatoes is affected by water and temperature during the growing season. We study the impact of a suite of climate variables on potato yield at country level. More than ten climate variables related to the growth of potato are considered, including the seasonal rainfall and temperature, but also extreme conditions at different averaging periods from daily to monthly. A Bayesian hierarchical model is developed to jointly consider the risk of heat stress, cold stress, wet and drought. Future climate risks are investigated through the projection of future climate data. This study contributes to assess the risks of present and future climate risks on potatoes yield, especially the risks of extreme events, which could be used to guide better sourcing strategy and ensure food security in the future.

  1. Changes in potato phenylpropanoids during tuber development

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Phenylpropanoid metabolite and transcript expression during different developmental stages were examined in field grown potatoes. Carbohydrate and shikimic acid metabolism was assessed to determine how tuber primary metabolism influences phenylpropanoid metabolism. Phenylpropanoid concentrations wer...

  2. Development of molecular resistance in potato against potato leaf roll virus and potato virus Y through Agrobacterium-mediated double transgenesis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Potato leafroll virus (PLRV) and potato virus Y (PVY) are the two major viral problems for the potato production all over the world. Transgenic approaches involving the expression of viral genes are being developed to provide protection for plants against viral diseases. The purpose of this study w...

  3. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy as an alternative to determine dielectric constant of potatoes at various moisture contents.

    PubMed

    Chee, Grace; Rungraeng, Natthakan; Han, Jung H; Jun, Soojin

    2014-02-01

    The dielectric (DE) properties, specifically the DE constant (ε') and loss factor (ε''), were measured for vacuum-dried and freeze-dried potato samples at a microwave frequency of 2.45 GHz over a range of different moisture contents (MCs) using a DE probe and also a 2-probe electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). Third-order polynomial models (ε' = f₁(MC); and ε'' = f₂(MC)) at room temperature were developed for regression analysis. Additionally, at various temperatures (T), biphasic 3rd-order polynomial models (ε' = f₁(MC, T); and ε'' = f₂(MC, T)) were obtained to determine ε' and ε'' as a function of MC and T using measured data. The vacuum-dried potato sample showed a good fitness of ε' and ε'' (R² = 0.95 and 0.96, respectively) to the regression model with the range of MCs from 18% to 80% (w/w), while the freeze-dried potato sample showed a good fitness of ε' and ε'' to the 1st-phase regression model with MC < 50% w/w (R² = 0.95 and 0.96, respectively) and the 2nd-phase regression model with MC > 50% w/w (R² = 0.94 to 0.96). EIS measurements were also used to obtain correlation impedances for ε' and ε'' determined by the DE probe method. The resulted regression analysis meets the demands for simple, rapid, and accurate assessment for transient values of ε' and ε'' of food products during dehydration/drying processes. The EIS method was verified to be a successful alternative to direct measurements of ε' and ε''.

  4. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy as an alternative to determine dielectric constant of potatoes at various moisture contents.

    PubMed

    Chee, Grace; Rungraeng, Natthakan; Han, Jung H; Jun, Soojin

    2014-02-01

    The dielectric (DE) properties, specifically the DE constant (ε') and loss factor (ε''), were measured for vacuum-dried and freeze-dried potato samples at a microwave frequency of 2.45 GHz over a range of different moisture contents (MCs) using a DE probe and also a 2-probe electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). Third-order polynomial models (ε' = f₁(MC); and ε'' = f₂(MC)) at room temperature were developed for regression analysis. Additionally, at various temperatures (T), biphasic 3rd-order polynomial models (ε' = f₁(MC, T); and ε'' = f₂(MC, T)) were obtained to determine ε' and ε'' as a function of MC and T using measured data. The vacuum-dried potato sample showed a good fitness of ε' and ε'' (R² = 0.95 and 0.96, respectively) to the regression model with the range of MCs from 18% to 80% (w/w), while the freeze-dried potato sample showed a good fitness of ε' and ε'' to the 1st-phase regression model with MC < 50% w/w (R² = 0.95 and 0.96, respectively) and the 2nd-phase regression model with MC > 50% w/w (R² = 0.94 to 0.96). EIS measurements were also used to obtain correlation impedances for ε' and ε'' determined by the DE probe method. The resulted regression analysis meets the demands for simple, rapid, and accurate assessment for transient values of ε' and ε'' of food products during dehydration/drying processes. The EIS method was verified to be a successful alternative to direct measurements of ε' and ε''. PMID:24446887

  5. Herbicide tolerant regenerates of potato.

    PubMed

    Wersuhn, G; Kirsch, K; Gienapp, R

    1987-08-01

    Culture-derived plants and cell cultures of potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) respond to the application of the herbicides SYS 67 ME (MCPA) and OMNIDEL (Na-2,2-dichloropropionate) in a comparable fashion. By gradually increasing the herbicide concentration, cell lines were developed which tolerated 50 mg/l of ME or 300 mg/l of OMNIDEL. Any further increase in concentration resulted in the death of all cell cultures. From cell cultures that had been able to grow on media supplemented with 30 mg/l of ME, regenerate plants were obtained that were also tolerant to this concentration. This new trait was retained even after repeated vegetative propagation of the plants.

  6. Freezing injury in potato leaves.

    PubMed

    Sukumaran, N P; Weiser, C J

    1972-11-01

    Time-temperature profiles of freezing leaves from frost-resistant (Solanum acaule Bitt.) and frost-susceptible (Solanum tuberosum L. subsp. tuberosum Hawkes) types of potatoes did not reveal any major differences. The pattern of change in resistance of leaves to low voltage, low frequency current during freezing was different in the frost-resistant and susceptible leaves. In tissue sections from both types of leaves, cells freeze extracellularly at cooling velocities lower than 5 C per minute. Cells from leaves of resistant plants showed a higher osmotic pressure but not a higher water permeability than those from susceptible plants. The extent of injury caused by even very slow freezing was greater than that caused by equivalent isopiestic desiccation, particularly in susceptible leaves. The higher osmotic pressure in cells of leaves from resistant plants can account for the greater desiccation resistance but not for the frost resistance observed. PMID:16658217

  7. Monitoring of volatile compound emissions during dry anaerobic digestion of the Organic Fraction of Municipal Solid Waste by Proton Transfer Reaction Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Papurello, Davide; Soukoulis, Christos; Schuhfried, Erna; Cappellin, Luca; Gasperi, Flavia; Silvestri, Silvia; Santarelli, Massimo; Biasioli, Franco

    2012-12-01

    Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) formed during anaerobic digestion of aerobically pre-treated Organic Fraction of Municipal Solid Waste (OFMSW), have been monitored over a 30 day period by a direct injection mass spectrometric technique: Proton Transfer Reaction Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry (PTR-ToF-MS). Most of the tentatively identified compounds exhibited a double-peaked emission pattern which is probably the combined result from the volatilization or oxidation of the biomass-inherited organic compounds and the microbial degradation of organic substrates. Of the sulfur compounds, hydrogen sulfide had the highest accumulative production. Alkylthiols were the predominant sulfur organic compounds, reaching their maximum levels during the last stage of the process. H(2)S formation seems to be influenced by the metabolic reactions that the sulfur organic compounds undergo, such as a methanogenesis induced mechanism i.e. an amino acid degradation/sulfate reduction. Comparison of different batches indicates that PTR-ToF-MS is a suitable tool providing information for rapid in situ bioprocess monitoring. PMID:23079412

  8. Drying Thermoplastics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    In searching for an improved method of removing water from polyester type resins without damaging the materials, Conair Inc. turned to the NASA Center at the University of Pittsburgh for assistance. Taking an organized, thorough look at existing technology before beginning research has helped many companies save significant time and money. They searched the NASA and other computerized files for microwave drying of thermoplastics. About 300 relevant citations were retrieved - eight of which were identified as directly applicable to the problem. Company estimates it saved a minimum of a full year in compiling research results assembled by the information center.

  9. Glycoalkaloids (α-chaconine and α-solanine) contents of selected Pakistani potato cultivars and their dietary intake assessment.

    PubMed

    Aziz, Abdul; Randhawa, Muhammad Atif; Butt, Masood Sadiq; Asghar, Ali; Yasin, Muhammad; Shibamoto, Takayuki

    2012-03-01

    Glycoalkaloids (α-solanine and α-chaconine) are naturally occurring toxic compounds in potato tuber (Solanum tuberosum L.) that cause acute intoxication in humans after their consumption. Present research was conducted to evaluate α-chaconine, α-solanine, and total glycoalkaloids (TGAs) contents in the peel and flesh portions by high-performance liquid chromatography method in selected Pakistani potato cultivars. The α-solanine content varies 45.98 ± 1.63 to 2742.60 ± 92.97 mg/100 g of dry weight (DW) in peel and from 4.01 ± 0.14 to 2466.56 ± 87.21 mg/100 g of DW in flesh. Similarly, α-chaconine content varied from 4.42 ± 0.16 to 6818.40 ± 211.07 mg/100 g of DW in potato peel and from 3.94 ± 0.14 to 475.33 ± 16.81 mg/100 g DW in flesh portion. The TGA concentration varied from 177.20 ± 6.26 to 5449.90 ± 192.68 mg/100 g of DW in peel and from 3.08 ± 0.11 to 14.69 ± 0.52 mg/100 g of DW in flesh portion of all the potato cultivars tested. All the potato cultivars contained lower concentration of TGA than the limits recommended as safe, except 2 cultivars, that is FD8-3 (2539.18 ± 89.77 mg/100 g of DW) and Cardinal (506.16 ± 17.90 mg/kg). The dietary intake assessment of potato cultivars revealed that Cardinal, FD 35-36, FD 8-3, and FD 3-9 contained higher amount of TGA in whole potato, although FD 8-3 only possessed higher content of TGA (154.93 ± 7.75) in its flesh portion rendering it unfit for human consumption. Practical Application:  This paper was based on the research conducted on toxic compounds present in all possible potato cultivars in Pakistan. Actually, we quantify the toxic compounds (glycoalkaloids) of potato cultivars through HPLC and their dietary assessment. This paper revealed safety assessment and their application in food industries especially potato processing.

  10. Breeding for improved potato nutrition: High amylose starch potatoes show promise as fiber source

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Potato starch is composed of approximately 75% amylopectin and 25% amylose. We are interested in breeding for higher amylose content, which would increase the fiber content of potato and decrease glycemic index. In order to make progress in a breeding program, we have developed a high throughput ass...

  11. Recovery of four novel Potato spindle tuber viroid sequence variants from Russian seed potatoes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Symptoms of potato “gothic” disease resemble those of Potato spindle tuber viroid (PSTVd), but its limited distribution in European Russia made the disease of little economic significance in European Russia until the early 1970’s when meristem tip culture was widely adopted throughout the former USS...

  12. Pymetrozine causes a nontarget pest, the Colorado potato beetle (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae), to leave potato plants.

    PubMed

    Chang, G C; Snyder, W E

    2008-02-01

    Pymetrozine is a selective insecticide that targets aphids. Published assessments of the effects of pymetrozine on nontarget organisms focus mainly on predatory insects, and they rarely indicate toxicity. In a laboratory bioassay, survival of Colorado potato beetle, Leptinotarsa decemlineata (Say) (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae), larvae was not affected by pymetrozine exposure. We subsequently used pymetrozine to implement low-aphid-density treatments in a field experiment that involved separate manipulations of Colorado potato beetle density. Unexpectedly, the addition of Colorado potato beetle adults and eggs did not increase the densities of Colorado potato beetle larvae in plots that were sprayed with pymetrozine (applied with water and an adjuvant). In control plots sprayed with water and adjuvant (without pymetrozine), addition of Colorado potato beetles increased densities of their larvae. Data collected on a smaller scale suggest that a behavioral mechanism underlies the population-level pattern: Colorado potato beetle larvae become more active and are less likely to remain on a host plant after exposure to pymetrozine. Thus, potato, Solanum tuberosum L., growers who use pymetrozine against aphids also might benefit in terms of Colorado potato beetle control.

  13. Biotech potatoes in the 21st century: 20 years since the first biotech potato

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Potato is the world's most important vegetable crop, with nearly 400 million tons produced worldwide every year, lending to stability in food supply and socioeconomics. In general, potato is an intensively managed crop, requiring irrigation, fertilization, and frequent pesticide applications in orde...

  14. Solid matrix and liquid culture procedures for growth of potatoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tibbitts, T. W.; Cao, W.

    1994-11-01

    This report discusses the advantages and limitations of several different procedures for growth of potatoes for CELSS. Solution culture, in which roots and stolons are submerged, and aeroponic culture were not found useful for potatoes because stolons did not produce tubers unless a severe stress was applied to the plants. In detailed comparison studies, three selected culture systems were compared, nutrient film technique (NFT), NFT with shallow media, and pot culture with deep media. For the NFT and NFT plus shallow media, plants were grown in 0.3 m2 trays and for the deep medium culture, in 20 liter pots. A 1 cm depth of arcillite, a baked montmorillonite clay, was used as shallow media (NFT-arc). Peatvermiculite mixture was used to fill the pots for the deep media. Nutrient solution, modified half-strength Hoagland's was recirculated among the tray culture plants with pH automatically controlled at 5.5, and conductivity maintained ~ 1100 μS cm-1 by adding stock nutrients or renewing the solution. A separate nutrient solution was used to water the pot plants four times daily to excess and the excess was discarded. Plants of Norland cv. were utilized and transplanted from sterile-propagated stem cutting plantlets. The plants were grown for 66 days under 12 h photoperiod in a first study and grown for 54 days under 24 h photoperiod in a second study. Under both photoperiods, total plant growth was greater in NFT-arc than in either NFT or pot culture. Under 12 h photoperiod, tuber dry weight was 30% higher with NFT-arc, but 50% lower with NFT, than with pot culture. Under 24 h photoperiod, however, tuber dry weight in both NFT and NFT-arc was only 20% of that in pot culture. The NFT and NFT-arc produced a greater shoot growth and larger number of small tubers than pot culture, especially with 24 h photoperiod. It is concluded that there are serious limitations to the use of NFT alone for growth of potatoes in a CELSS system. These limitations can be minimized by

  15. Solid matrix and liquid culture procedures for growth of potatoes.

    PubMed

    Tibbitts, T W; Cao, W

    1994-11-01

    This report discusses the advantages and limitations of several different procedures for growth of potatoes for CELSS. Solution culture, in which roots and stolons are submerged, and aeroponic culture were not found useful for potatoes because stolons did not produce tubers unless a severe stress was applied to the plants. In detailed comparison studies, three selected culture systems were compared, nutrient film technique (NFT), NFT with shallow media, and pot culture with deep media. For the NFT and NFT plus shallow media, plants were grown in 0.3 m2 trays and for the deep medium culture, in 20 liter pots. A 1 cm depth of arcillite, a baked montmorillonite clay, was used as shallow media (NFT-arc). Peat-vermiculite mixture was used to fill the pots for the deep media. Nutrient solution, modified half-strength Hoagland's, was recirculated among the tray culture plants with pH automatically controlled at 5.5, and conductivity maintained at approximately 1100 microS cm-1 by adding stock nutrients or renewing the solution. A separate nutrient solution was used to water the pot plants four times daily to excess and the excess was discarded. Plants of Norland cv. were utilized and transplanted from sterile-propagated stem cutting plantlets. The plants were grown for 66 days under 12 h photoperiod in a first study and grown for 54 days under 24 h photoperiod in a second study. Under both photoperiods, total plant growth was greater in NFT-arc than in either NFT or pot culture. Under 12 h photoperiod, tuber dry weight was 30% higher with NFT-arc, but 50% lower with NFT, than with pot culture. Under 24 h photoperiod, however, tuber dry weight in both NFT and NFT-arc was only 20% of that in pot culture. The NFT and NFT-arc produced a greater shoot growth and larger number of small tubers than pot culture, especially with 24 h photoperiod. It is concluded that there are serious limitations to the use of NFT alone for growth of potatoes in a CELSS system. These limitations

  16. Fruit, vegetable, and grain processing wastes

    SciTech Connect

    Andrews, R.M.; Soderquist, M.R.

    1980-06-01

    This is a literature review of fruit, vegetable and grain processing wastes. The factors affecting water usage and methods of conservation were examined. Various processes were investigated which included the pulp recovery from caustic peeled tomato skin, the dewatering of citrus, washing leafy vegetables with recycled process water and the potato processing industry.

  17. Assessing temporal flux of plant hormones in stored processing potatoes using high definition accurate mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Ordaz-Ortiz, José Juan; Foukaraki, Sofia; Terry, Leon Alexander

    2015-01-01

    Plant hormones are important molecules which at low concentration can regulate various physiological processes. Mass spectrometry has become a powerful technique for the quantification of multiple classes of plant hormones because of its high sensitivity and selectivity. We developed a new ultrahigh pressure liquid chromatography–full-scan high-definition accurate mass spectrometry method, for simultaneous determination of abscisic acid and four metabolites phaseic acid, dihydrophaseic acid, 7′-hydroxy-abscisic acid and abscisic acid glucose ester, cytokinins zeatin, zeatin riboside, gibberellins (GA1, GA3, GA4 and GA7) and indole-3-acetyl-L-aspartic acid. We measured the amount of plant hormones in the flesh and skin of two processing potato cvs. Sylvana and Russet Burbank stored for up to 30 weeks at 6 °C under ambient air conditions. Herein, we report for the first time that abscisic acid glucose ester seems to accumulate in the skin of potato tubers throughout storage time. The method achieved a lowest limit of detection of 0.22 ng g−1 of dry weight and a limit of quantification of 0.74 ng g−1 dry weight (zeatin riboside), and was able to recover, detect and quantify a total of 12 plant hormones spiked on flesh and skin of potato tubers. In addition, the mass accuracy for all compounds (<5 ppm) was evaluated. PMID:26504563

  18. Novel value-added uses for sweet potato juice and flour in polyphenol- and protein-enriched functional food ingredients.

    PubMed

    Grace, Mary H; Truong, An N; Truong, Van-Den; Raskin, Ilya; Lila, Mary Ann

    2015-09-01

    Blackcurrant, blueberry, and muscadine grape juices were efficiently sorbed, concentrated, and stabilized into dry granular ingredient matrices which combined anti-inflammatory and antioxidant fruit polyphenols with sweet potato functional constituents (carotenoids, vitamins, polyphenols, fibers). Total phenolics were highest in blackcurrant-orange sweet potato ingredient matrices (34.03 mg/g), and lowest in muscadine grape-yellow sweet potato matrices (10.56 mg/g). Similarly, anthocyanins were most concentrated in blackcurrant-fortified orange and yellow sweet potato matrices (5.40 and 6.54 mg/g, respectively). Alternatively, other protein-rich edible matrices (defatted soy flour, light roasted peanut flour, and rice protein concentrate) efficiently captured polyphenols (6.09-9.46 mg/g) and anthocyanins (0.77-1.27 mg/g) from purple-fleshed sweet potato juice, with comparable efficiency. Antioxidant activity correlated well with total phenolic content. All formulated ingredient matrices stabilized and preserved polyphenols for up to 24 weeks, even when stored at 37°C. Complexation with juice-derived polyphenols did not significantly alter protein or carbohydrate profiles of the matrices. Sensory evaluation of the ingredient matrices suggested potential uses for a wide range of functional food products.

  19. Study of soil-plant (potato and beetroot)-animal cycle of nutritive and hazardous minerals in a rabbit model.

    PubMed

    Fekete, S G; Bersényi, A; Kádár, I; Glávits, R; Koncz, J; Zöldág, L

    2001-01-01

    Potato and beetroot were grown on soils previously treated with heavy metal salts. Each particular microelement had a high concentration in both potato and beetroot [cadmium (Cd) 3.7 and 55.4, lead (Pb) 8.1 and 3.0, and mercury (Hg) 5.8 and 6.8 mg/kg dry matter, respectively]. In a metabolic balance trial 16 New Zealand White rabbits were fed 50 grams of basal diet and potato or beetroot ad libitum. The apparent digestibility of major nutrients and the accumulation of the microelements in different organs were investigated. Both potato and beetroot samples of high Pb and Hg content had the significantly (p < 0.05) lowest digestibility of organic matter and nitrogen-free extract. The Cd ingested from both potato and beetroot accumulated in the kidneys and liver (2.85 and 1.48 as well as 0.459 and 0.265 mg/kg, respectively). All the microelements (Cd, Pb and Hg) accumulated in the testicles (0.196, 0.32 and 0.199 mg/kg, respectively), reducing the rate of spermatogenesis. The tissue retention of heavy metals depends not only on the element itself, but also upon the 'carrier' feedstuff. PMID:11702342

  20. Novel value-added uses for sweet potato juice and flour in polyphenol- and protein-enriched functional food ingredients.

    PubMed

    Grace, Mary H; Truong, An N; Truong, Van-Den; Raskin, Ilya; Lila, Mary Ann

    2015-09-01

    Blackcurrant, blueberry, and muscadine grape juices were efficiently sorbed, concentrated, and stabilized into dry granular ingredient matrices which combined anti-inflammatory and antioxidant fruit polyphenols with sweet potato functional constituents (carotenoids, vitamins, polyphenols, fibers). Total phenolics were highest in blackcurrant-orange sweet potato ingredient matrices (34.03 mg/g), and lowest in muscadine grape-yellow sweet potato matrices (10.56 mg/g). Similarly, anthocyanins were most concentrated in blackcurrant-fortified orange and yellow sweet potato matrices (5.40 and 6.54 mg/g, respectively). Alternatively, other protein-rich edible matrices (defatted soy flour, light roasted peanut flour, and rice protein concentrate) efficiently captured polyphenols (6.09-9.46 mg/g) and anthocyanins (0.77-1.27 mg/g) from purple-fleshed sweet potato juice, with comparable efficiency. Antioxidant activity correlated well with total phenolic content. All formulated ingredient matrices stabilized and preserved polyphenols for up to 24 weeks, even when stored at 37°C. Complexation with juice-derived polyphenols did not significantly alter protein or carbohydrate profiles of the matrices. Sensory evaluation of the ingredient matrices suggested potential uses for a wide range of functional food products. PMID:26405527

  1. Novel value-added uses for sweet potato juice and flour in polyphenol- and protein-enriched functional food ingredients

    PubMed Central

    Grace, Mary H; Truong, An N; Truong, Van-Den; Raskin, Ilya; Lila, Mary Ann

    2015-01-01

    Blackcurrant, blueberry, and muscadine grape juices were efficiently sorbed, concentrated, and stabilized into dry granular ingredient matrices which combined anti-inflammatory and antioxidant fruit polyphenols with sweet potato functional constituents (carotenoids, vitamins, polyphenols, fibers). Total phenolics were highest in blackcurrant-orange sweet potato ingredient matrices (34.03 mg/g), and lowest in muscadine grape-yellow sweet potato matrices (10.56 mg/g). Similarly, anthocyanins were most concentrated in blackcurrant-fortified orange and yellow sweet potato matrices (5.40 and 6.54 mg/g, respectively). Alternatively, other protein-rich edible matrices (defatted soy flour, light roasted peanut flour, and rice protein concentrate) efficiently captured polyphenols (6.09–9.46 mg/g) and anthocyanins (0.77–1.27 mg/g) from purple-fleshed sweet potato juice, with comparable efficiency. Antioxidant activity correlated well with total phenolic content. All formulated ingredient matrices stabilized and preserved polyphenols for up to 24 weeks, even when stored at 37°C. Complexation with juice-derived polyphenols did not significantly alter protein or carbohydrate profiles of the matrices. Sensory evaluation of the ingredient matrices suggested potential uses for a wide range of functional food products. PMID:26405527

  2. Effect of farming systems on the yield, quality parameters and sensory properties of conventionally and organically grown potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) tubers.

    PubMed

    Brazinskiene, V; Asakaviciute, R; Miezeliene, A; Alencikiene, G; Ivanauskas, L; Jakstas, V; Viskelis, P; Razukas, A

    2014-02-15

    The objectives of this two-year research were to study the impact of two different farming types, conventional and organic, on the yield and sensory properties of five Lithuanian varieties of potato tuber. The parameters and properties examined were: phenolic acids; dry matter and starch content; and the spread and intensity of Phytophthora infestans growth. It was determined that potato yield fluctuates with the variety, but for conventional farming it is significantly (p<0.05) higher than that obtained by organic farming. The farming type has no significant effect (p>0.05) on the content of phenolic acids. No significant effect (p>0.05) of farming type on dry matter and starch content, or sensory properties was found. No significant relation (p>0.05) was found between the content of phenolic acids and P. infestans spread. The spread of P. infestans was faster and infection was heavier in organically grown potatoes.

  3. Municipal waste processing apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Mayberry, J.L.

    1988-04-13

    This invention relates to apparatus for processing municipal waste, and more particularly to vibrating mesh screen conveyor systems for removing grit, glass, and other noncombustible materials from dry municipal waste. Municipal waste must be properly processed and disposed of so that it does not create health risks to the community. Generally, municipal waste, which may be collected in garbage trucks, dumpsters, or the like, is deposited in processing areas such as landfills. Land and environmental controls imposed on landfill operators by governmental bodies have increased in recent years, however, making landfill disposal of solid waste materials more expensive. 6 figs.

  4. Characterization of In-Drum Drying Products

    SciTech Connect

    Kroselj, V.; Jankovic, M.; Skanata, D.; Medakovic, S.; Harapin, D.; Hertl, B.

    2006-07-01

    A few years ago Krsko NPP decided to introduce In-Drum Drying technology for treatment and conditioning of evaporator concentrates and spent ion resins. The main reason to employ this technology was the need for waste volume reduction and experience with vermiculite-cement solidification that proved inadequate for Krsko NPP. Use of In-Drum Drying technology was encouraged by good experience in the field at some German and Spanish NPP's. In the paper, solidification techniques in vermiculite-cement matrix and In-Drum Drying System are described briefly. The resulting waste forms (so called solidification and dryer products) and containers that are used for interim storage of these wastes are described as well. A comparison of the drying versus solidification technology is performed and advantages as well as disadvantages are underlined. Experience gained during seven years of system operation has shown that crying technology resulted in volume reduction by factor of 20 for evaporator concentrates, and by factor of 5 for spent ion resin. Special consideration is paid to the characterization of dryer products. For evaporator concentrates the resulting waste form is a solid salt block with up to 5% bound water. It is packaged in stainless steel drums (net volume of 200 l) with bolted lids and lifting rings. The fluidized spent ion resins (primary and blow-down) are sluiced into the spent resin drying tank. The resin is dewatered and dried by electrical jacket heaters. The resulting waste (i.e. fine granulates) is directly discharged into a shielded stainless steel drum with bolted lid and lifting rings. Characterization of both waste forms has been performed in accordance with recommendations given in Characterization of Radioactive Waste Forms and Packages issued by International Atomic Energy Agency, 1997. This means that radiological, chemical, physical, mechanical, biological and thermal properties of the waste form has been taken into consideration. In the paper

  5. Phasic temperature change patterns affect growth and tuberization in potatoes

    SciTech Connect

    Cao, W.; Tibbitts, T.W. . Dept. of Horticulture)

    1994-07-01

    This study determined the response of potato (Solanum tuberosum L., cv. Norland) plants to various patterns of air temperature changes over different growth periods. In each of two experiments under controlled environments, eight treatments of temperature changes were carried out in two growth rooms maintained at 17 and 22 C and a constant vapor pressure deficit of 0.60 kPa and 14-hour photoperiod. Plants were grown for 63 days after transplanting of tissue culture plantlets in 20-liter pots containing peat-vermiculite mix. Temperature changes were imposed on days 21 and 42, which were essentially at the beginning of tuber initiation and tuber enlargement, respectively, for this cultivar. Plants were moved between two temperature rooms to obtain eight temperature change patterns: 17-17-17, 17-17-22, 17-22-17, 22-17-17, 17-22-22, 22-17-22, 22-22-17, and 22-22-22C over three 21-day growth periods. At harvest on day 63, total plant dry weight was higher for the treatments beginning with 22 C than for those beginning with 17C, with highest biomass obtained at 22-22-17 and 22-17-17C. Shoot dry weight increased with temperature increased from 17-17-17 to 22-22-22C during the three growth periods. Tuber dry weight was highest with 22-17-17C, and lowest with 17-17-22 and 17-22-22C. With 22-17-17C, both dry weights of stolons and roots were lowest. Total tuber number and number of small tubers were highest with 17-17-17 and 17-17-22C, and lowest with 17-22-22 and 22-22-22C, whereas number of medium tubers was highest with 22-17-22C, and number of large tubers was highest with 22-17-17C. This study indicates that tuber development of potatoes is optimized with a phasic pattern of high temperature during early growth and low temperature during later growth.

  6. Use of several waste substrates for carotenoid-rich yeast biomass production.

    PubMed

    Marova, I; Carnecka, M; Halienova, A; Certik, M; Dvorakova, T; Haronikova, A

    2012-03-01

    Carotenoids are industrially significant pigments produced in many bacteria, fungi, and plants. Carotenoid biosynthesis in yeasts is involved in stress response mechanisms. Thus, controlled physiological and nutrition stress can be used for enhanced pigment production. Huge commercial demand for natural carotenoids has focused attention on developing of suitable biotechnological techniques including use of liquid waste substrates as carbon and/or nitrogen source. In this work several red yeast strains (Sporobolomyces roseus, Rhodotorula glutinis, Rhodotorula mucilaginosa) were enrolled into a comparative screening study. To increase the yield of these pigments at improved biomass production, several types of exogenous as well as nutrition stress were tested. Each strain was cultivated at optimal growth conditions and in medium with modified carbon and nitrogen sources. Synthetic media with addition of complex substrates (e.g. yeast extract) and vitamin mixtures as well as some waste materials (whey, potato extract) were used as nutrient sources. Peroxide and salt stress were applied too. The production of carotene enriched biomass was carried out in flasks as well as in laboratory fermentor. The best production of biomass was obtained in inorganic medium with yeast extract. In optimal conditions tested strains differ only slightly in biomass production. All strains were able to use most of waste substrates. Biomass and pigment production was more different according to substrate type. In laboratory fermentor better producers of enriched biomass were both Rhodotorula strains. The highest yields were obtained in R. glutinis CCY 20-2-26 cells cultivated on whey medium (cca 45 g per liter of biomass enriched by 46 mg/L of beta-carotene) and in R. mucilaginosa CCY 20-7-31 grown on potato medium and 5% salt (cca 30 g per liter of biomass enriched by 56 mg/L of beta-carotene). Such dried carotenoid-enriched red yeast biomass could be directly used in feed industry as

  7. 7 CFR 980.1 - Import regulations; Irish potatoes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ..., diced, or treated to prevent oxidation, or made into fresh potato salad. Effective Date Note: At 74 FR..., diced, or treated to prevent oxidation, or made into fresh potato salad. (2) There shall be no...

  8. White Potatoes, Human Health, and Dietary Guidance12

    PubMed Central

    King, Janet C.; Slavin, Joanne L.

    2013-01-01

    The white potato is a concentrated source of carbohydrate, dietary fiber, and resistant starch and continues to be the staple food of choice for many cultures. The white potato is also a concentrated source of vitamin C and potassium. Two of the nutrients in white potatoes, dietary fiber and potassium, have been designated as nutrients of concern in the 2010 Dietary Guidelines for Americans. Potatoes are often maligned in nutrition circles because of their suspected link to obesity, and popular potato foods often contain more fat calories than carbohydrate calories. Some food guides do not include potatoes in the vegetable group because of their association with high-fat diets. However, potatoes should be included in the vegetable group because they contribute critical nutrients. All white vegetables, including white potatoes, provide nutrients needed in the diet and deserve a prominent position in food guides. PMID:23674809

  9. Dry Mouth or Xerostomia

    MedlinePlus

    ... or Xerostomia Request Permissions Print to PDF Dry Mouth or Xerostomia Approved by the Cancer.Net Editorial ... a dry mouth. Signs and symptoms of dry mouth The signs and symptoms of dry mouth include ...

  10. Comparison of ethanol production performance in 10 varieties of sweet potato at different growth stages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Yanling; Fang, Yang; Zhang, Guohua; Zhou, Lingling; Zhao, Hai

    2012-10-01

    The performance in the ethanol production of 10 varieties of sweet potato was evaluated, and the consumption in raw materials, land occupation and fermentation waste residue in producing 1 ton of anhydrous ethanol were investigated. The comparative results between 10 varieties of sweet potato at 3 growth stages indicated that NS 007 and SS 19 were better feedstocks for ethanol production, exhibiting less feedstock consumption (6.19 and 7.59 tons/ton ethanol, respectively), the least land occupation (0.24 and 0.24 ha/ton ethanol, respectively), less fermentation waste residue (0.56 and 0.55 tons/ton ethanol, respectively), the highest level of ethanol output per unit area (4.17 and 4.17 ton/ha, respectively), and a lower viscosity of the fermentation culture (591 and 612 mPa S, respectively). The data above are average data. In most varieties, the ethanol output speed at day 130 was the highest. Therefore, NS 007 and SS 19 could be used for ethanol production and harvested after 130 days of growth from an economic point of view. In addition, the high content of fermentable sugars and low content of fiber in sweet potatoes are criteria for achieving low viscosity in ethanol fermentation cultures.

  11. Application of the PCR technique to detect Phytophthora infestans in potato tubers and leaves.

    PubMed

    Niepold, F; Schöber-Butin, B

    1995-11-01

    A characterized repetitive sequence from Phytophthora infestans (P. infestans) was used to perform a PCR with the DNA from the four races 1, 3, 4, and 1-11. To obtain amplifiable DNA, all extractions had to be purified by DNA adsorbing spin columns. Only two out of four tested primers were well suited and gave an DNA amplificate of the same size for all four races. After optimization the detection limit of the PCR corresponded to 100 ng of freeze-dried mycelia per ml, specificity was established when testing a collection of the most important potato pathogenic fungi and bacteria. Using P. infestans zoospores to infect tuber slices, the detection threshold was determined to be two days post infection when 3 to 6 zoospores were applied. After infiltrating the tenfold concentration into potato leaves a visible PCR signal was obtained one day post infection. Further improvements of the sensitivity threshold in detecting P. infestans for breeding and prognosis purposes are discussed.

  12. Structural features and water holding capacities of pressed potato fibre polysaccharides.

    PubMed

    Ramaswamy, Urmila R; Kabel, Mirjam A; Schols, Henk A; Gruppen, Harry

    2013-04-01

    Pressed potato fibre (PPF) has a high water holding capacity (WHC) affecting its processing as an animal feed. The aim of this study was to characterize cell wall polysaccharides (CWPs) in PPF and investigate their WHC. This was done via sequential extractions. Half of all CWPs were recovered in the hot buffer soluble solids extract as pectins (uronic acid and rhamnose) and galactans wherein most pectins (76%) from PPF were water soluble. Most likely, the network of CWPs is loosened during processing of potatoes. PPF showed a WHC of 7.4 expressed as the amount of water held per g of dry matter (mL/g). Reconstituting hot buffer soluble solids with buffer insoluble solids in water gave a WHC comparable to that of PPF. Removal of alkali soluble solids, which mainly comprised xyloglucans, lowered the WHC of the final residue. The results indicated that interactions between CWPs could affect the WHC of PPF. PMID:23499100

  13. Energy-saving drying and its application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovbasyuk, V. I.

    2015-09-01

    Superheated steam is efficiently applied as a coolant for the intensification of drying, which is an important component of many up-to-date technologies. However, traditional drying is extremely energy consuming, and many drying apparatus are environmentally unfriendly. Thus, it is important to implement the proposed drying technique using superheated steam under pressure significantly higher than the atmospheric one with subsequent steam transfer for use in a turbine for electric power generation as a compensation of energy costs for drying. This paper includes a brief thermodynamic analysis of such a technique, its environmental advantages, and possible benefits of the use of wet wastes and obtaining high-quality fuels from wet raw materials. A scheme is developed for the turbine protection from impurities that can occur in the steam at drying. Potential advantage of the technique are also the absence of heating surfaces that are in contact with wet media, the absence of the emissions to the atmosphere, and the use of low potential heat for desalination and the purification of water. The new drying technique can play an extremely important part in the implementation in the field of thermal destruction of anthropogenic wastes. In spite of the promotion of waste sorting to obtain valuable secondary raw materials, the main problem of big cities is nonutilizable waste, which makes not less than 85% of the starting quantity of waste. This can only be totally solved by combustion, which even more relates to the sewage sludge utilization. The wastes can be safely and efficiently combusted only provided that they are free of moisture. Combustion temperature optimization makes possible full destruction of dioxins and their toxic analogues.

  14. Definition and characterization of enzymes for maximal biocatalytic solubilization of prebiotic polysaccharides from potato pulp.

    PubMed

    Thomassen, Lise V; Larsen, Dorte M; Mikkelsen, Jørn D; Meyer, Anne S

    2011-08-10

    Potato pulp is a high-volume co-processing product resulting from industrial potato starch manufacturing. Potato pulp is particularly rich in pectin, notably galactan branched rhamnogalacturonan I polysaccharides, which are highly bifidogenic when solubilized. The objective of the present study was to characterize and compare four homogalacturonan degrading enzymes capable of catalyzing the required solubilization of these pectinaceous polysaccharides from potato pulp in a 1 min reaction. An additional purpose was to assess the influence of the pH and the potential buffer chelating effects on the release of these polysaccharides from the potato pulp. The pH and temperature optima of two selected pectin lyases from Emericella nidulans (formerly known as Aspergillus nidulans) and Aspergillus niger were determined to 8.6 and 4.0, respectively, at ≥100 °C within 1 min of reaction. The optima for the two selected polygalacturonases from E. nidulans and Aspergillus aculeatus were determined to pH 4.4 and 46 °C, and pH 3.7 and ≥80 °C, respectively. The polygalacturonase from A. aculeatus was 4-42 times more heat-resistant at 50 °C than the other enzymes. The difference in pH optima of the pectin lyases and the exceptional thermal stabilities of some of the enzymes are proposed to be related to specific amino acid substitutions, stabilizing hydrogen bonding and structural traits of the enzymes. The K(M) and V(max) values ranged from 0.3-0.6g/L and 0.5-250.5 U/mg protein, respectively. Phosphate buffer induced release of a higher amount of dry matter than Tris-acetate buffer at pH 6, indicating a chelating effect of the phosphate. Moreover, the phosphate had a higher chelating effect at pH 6 than at pH 4. The optimal conditions for a high yield of polysaccharides from potato pulp were therefore: 1% (w/w) potato pulp treated with 1% (w/w) enzyme/substrate (E/S) pectin lyase from E. nidulans and 1% (w/w) E/S polygalacturonase from A. aculeatus at pH 6.0 and 60 °C for

  15. Analysis of open sun drying experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Mulet, A. . Dept. of Food Technology); Berna, A. . Dept. of Chemical Engineering); Rossell, C.; Canellas, J. . Dept. of Chemistry)

    1993-01-01

    Open sun drying has lost its previous importance due to the fact that different factors affect its reliability and the quality of the products obtained. One of the set-backs for the analysis of solar drying experiments is their dependence on a non-controlled source of energy, i.e. solar radiation depends on climatic conditions and experiments are difficult to compare. It is thus necessary to investigate the advantages of a particular set up as well as the climatic influences. Open sun drying could constitute the natural reference, allowing the comparison of different drying strategies. A new way of standardizing drying times, based on solar radiation input, is proposed, to allow better evaluation of the experiments. An equivalent time is defined, allowing comparison of experiments carried out under different circumstances. Carrots and potatoes were used in these experiments. The use of the average daily solar radiation 15.28 MJ m[sup [minus]2][center dot]d[sup [minus]1] in Palma de Mallorca (39.33 N, 2.37 E), is proposed for comparison purposes. An improvement of more than 12% in the explained variance was observed, the unexplained variance being lower than 1%.

  16. Amylose content decreases during tuber development in potato

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Potato starch is composed of amylopectin and amylose in an approximately three to one ratio. Amylose is considered to be nutritionally desirable, so there is interest in finding strategies to increase the amylose content of potatoes. There is also interest in marketing “baby” potatoes, which are har...

  17. Economic assessments of potato production systems in Maine

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Using an integrated enterprise and whole-farm budget model for a 324-ha medium-sized potato farm, the profitability of potatoes grown in combination with fifteen common potato rotation crops in Maine are evaluated. Enterprise budgets for all sixteen crops are calculated while a whole-farm budget syn...

  18. Supplemental irrigation and cultivar effects on potato tuber diseases

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Supplemental irrigation can improve potato growth and tuber yield under deficit rainfall conditions, but may also impact potato tuber diseases. The comparative effects of irrigation on tuber disease incidence were quantified on four cultivars, in long-term potato cropping systems experiments. Surfac...

  19. 7 CFR 948.51 - Colorado Potato Committee.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Colorado Potato Committee. 948.51 Section 948.51... Order Regulating Handling Committees § 948.51 Colorado Potato Committee. The Colorado Potato Committee... selected from each area committee. Committeemen shall be selected by the Secretary from nominations of...

  20. 7 CFR 948.51 - Colorado Potato Committee.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Colorado Potato Committee. 948.51 Section 948.51... Order Regulating Handling Committees § 948.51 Colorado Potato Committee. The Colorado Potato Committee... selected from each area committee. Committeemen shall be selected by the Secretary from nominations of...

  1. 7 CFR 948.51 - Colorado Potato Committee.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Colorado Potato Committee. 948.51 Section 948.51... Order Regulating Handling Committees § 948.51 Colorado Potato Committee. The Colorado Potato Committee... selected from each area committee. Committeemen shall be selected by the Secretary from nominations of...

  2. 7 CFR 980.1 - Import regulations; Irish potatoes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Import regulations; Irish potatoes. 980.1 Section 980...; IMPORT REGULATIONS § 980.1 Import regulations; Irish potatoes. (a) Findings and determinations with respect to imports of Irish potatoes. (1) Pursuant to section 8e of the Agricultural Marketing...

  3. 75 FR 14491 - Potato Research and Promotion Plan

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-26

    ... Service 7 CFR Part 1207 Potato Research and Promotion Plan AGENCY: Agricultural Marketing Service, USDA... Potato Research and Promotion plan regulations to reflect the modification of the Harmonized Tariff Schedule for imported potatoes by U.S. Customs and Border Protection (Customs). This document also...

  4. 7 CFR 980.1 - Import regulations; Irish potatoes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Import regulations; Irish potatoes. 980.1 Section 980...; IMPORT REGULATIONS § 980.1 Import regulations; Irish potatoes. (a) Findings and determinations with respect to imports of Irish potatoes. (1) Pursuant to section 8e of the Agricultural Marketing...

  5. 7 CFR 980.1 - Import regulations; Irish potatoes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Import regulations; Irish potatoes. 980.1 Section 980...; IMPORT REGULATIONS § 980.1 Import regulations; Irish potatoes. (a) Findings and determinations with respect to imports of Irish potatoes. (1) Pursuant to section 8e of the Agricultural Marketing...

  6. 7 CFR 980.1 - Import regulations; Irish potatoes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Import regulations; Irish potatoes. 980.1 Section 980...; IMPORT REGULATIONS § 980.1 Import regulations; Irish potatoes. (a) Findings and determinations with respect to imports of Irish potatoes. (1) Pursuant to section 8e of the Agricultural Marketing...

  7. Memristors: Memory elements in potato tubers

    PubMed Central

    Volkov, Alexander G; Nyasani, Eunice K; Blockmon, Avery L; Volkova, Maya I

    2015-01-01

    A memristor is a nonlinear element because its current-voltage characteristic is similar to that of a Lissajous pattern for nonlinear systems. This element was postulated recently and researchers are looking for it in different biosystems. We investigated electrical circuitry of red Irish potato tubers (Solanum tuberosum L.). The goal was to discover if potato tubers might have a new electrical component - a resistor with memory. The analysis was based on a cyclic current-voltage characteristic where the resistor with memory should manifest itself. We found that the electrostimulation by bipolar sinusoidal or triangle periodic waves induces electrical responses in the potato tubers with fingerprints of memristors. Tetraethylammonium chloride, an inhibitor of voltage gated K+ channels, transforms a memristor to a resistor in potato tubers. Our results demonstrate that a voltage gated K+ channel in the excitable tissue of potato tubers has properties of a memristor. Uncoupler carbonylcyanide-4-trifluoromethoxy-phenyl hydrazone decreases the amplitude of electrical responses at low and high frequencies of bipolar periodic sinusoidal or triangle electrostimulating waves. The discovery of memristors in plants creates a new direction in the understanding of electrical phenomena in plants. PMID:26237427

  8. Memristors: Memory elements in potato tubers.

    PubMed

    Volkov, Alexander G; Nyasani, Eunice K; Blockmon, Avery L; Volkova, Maya I

    2015-01-01

    A memristor is a nonlinear element because its current-voltage characteristic is similar to that of a Lissajous pattern for nonlinear systems. This element was postulated recently and researchers are looking for it in different biosystems. We investigated electrical circuitry of red Irish potato tubers (Solanum tuberosum L.). The goal was to discover if potato tubers might have a new electrical component - a resistor with memory. The analysis was based on a cyclic current-voltage characteristic where the resistor with memory should manifest itself. We found that the electrostimulation by bipolar sinusoidal or triangle periodic waves induces electrical responses in the potato tubers with fingerprints of memristors. Tetraethylammonium chloride, an inhibitor of voltage gated K(+) channels, transforms a memristor to a resistor in potato tubers. Our results demonstrate that a voltage gated K(+) channel in the excitable tissue of potato tubers has properties of a memristor. Uncoupler carbonylcyanide-4-trifluoromethoxy-phenyl hydrazone decreases the amplitude of electrical responses at low and high frequencies of bipolar periodic sinusoidal or triangle electrostimulating waves. The discovery of memristors in plants creates a new direction in the understanding of electrical phenomena in plants.

  9. Memristors: Memory elements in potato tubers.

    PubMed

    Volkov, Alexander G; Nyasani, Eunice K; Blockmon, Avery L; Volkova, Maya I

    2015-01-01

    A memristor is a nonlinear element because its current-voltage characteristic is similar to that of a Lissajous pattern for nonlinear systems. This element was postulated recently and researchers are looking for it in different biosystems. We investigated electrical circuitry of red Irish potato tubers (Solanum tuberosum L.). The goal was to discover if potato tubers might have a new electrical component - a resistor with memory. The analysis was based on a cyclic current-voltage characteristic where the resistor with memory should manifest itself. We found that the electrostimulation by bipolar sinusoidal or triangle periodic waves induces electrical responses in the potato tubers with fingerprints of memristors. Tetraethylammonium chloride, an inhibitor of voltage gated K(+) channels, transforms a memristor to a resistor in potato tubers. Our results demonstrate that a voltage gated K(+) channel in the excitable tissue of potato tubers has properties of a memristor. Uncoupler carbonylcyanide-4-trifluoromethoxy-phenyl hydrazone decreases the amplitude of electrical responses at low and high frequencies of bipolar periodic sinusoidal or triangle electrostimulating waves. The discovery of memristors in plants creates a new direction in the understanding of electrical phenomena in plants. PMID:26237427

  10. Isolation and characterization of antagonistic fungi against potato scab pathogens from potato field soils.

    PubMed

    Tagawa, Masahiro; Tamaki, Hideyuki; Manome, Akira; Koyama, Osamu; Kamagata, Yoichi

    2010-04-01

    Potato scab is a serious plant disease caused by several Streptomyces sp., and effective control methods remain unavailable. Although antagonistic bacteria and phages against potato scab pathogens have been reported, to the best of our knowledge, there is no information about fungi that are antagonistic to the pathogens. The aim of this study was to isolate fungal antagonists, characterize their phylogenetic positions, determine their antagonistic activities against potato scab pathogens, and highlight their potential use as control agents under lower pH conditions. Fifteen fungal stains isolated from potato field soils were found to have antagonistic activity against three well-known potato scab pathogens: Streptomyces scabiei, Streptomyces acidiscabiei, and Streptomyces turgidiscabiei. These 15 fungal strains were phylogenetically classified into at least six orders and nine genera based on 18S rRNA gene sequencing analysis. These fungal isolates were related to members of the genera Penicillium, Eupenicillium, Chaetomium, Fusarium, Cladosporium, Mortierella, Kionochaeta, Pseudogymnoascus, and Lecythophora. The antagonistic activities of most of the fungal isolates were highly strengthened under the lower pH conditions, suggesting the advantage of combining their use with a traditional method such as soil acidification. This is the first report to demonstrate that phylogenetically diverse fungi show antagonistic activity against major potato scab pathogens. These fungal strains could be used as potential agents to control potato scab disease.

  11. Utilization of white potatoes in CELSS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tibbitts, Theodore W.; Bennett, Susan M.; Morrow, Robert C.; Bula, Raymond J.

    Potatoes (Solanum tuberosum) have a strong potential as a useful crop species in a functioning CELSS. The cultivar Denali has produced 37.5 g m-2 d-1 when grown for 132 days with the first 40 days under a 12-h photoperiod and a light:dark temperature cycle of 20°C: 16°C, and then 92 days under continuous irradiance and a temperature of 16°C. Irradiance was at 725 μmol m-2 s-1 PPF and carbon dioxide at 1000 μmol mol-1. The dried tubers had 82% carbohydrates, 9% protein and 0.6% fat. Other studies have shown that carbon dioxide supplementation (1000 μmol mol-1) is of significant benefit under 12-h irradiance but less benefit under 24 h irradiance. Irradiance cycles of 60 minutes light and 30 minutes dark caused a reduction of more than 50% in tuber weight compared to cycles of 16 h light and 8 h dark. A diurnal temperature change of 22°C for the 12-h light period to 14°C during the 12-h dark period gave increased yields of 30% and 10% for two separate cultivars, compared with plants grown under a constant 18°C temperature. Cultivar screening under continuous irradiance and elevated temperatures (28°C) for 8 weeks of grown indicated that the cvs Haig, Denali, Atlantic, Desiree and Rutt had the best potential for tolerance to these conditions. Harvesting of tubers from plants at weekly intervals, beginning at 8 weeks after planting, did not increase yield over a single final harvest. Spacing of plants on 0.055 centers produced greater yield per m2 than spacing at 0.11 or 0.22 m2. Plants maintained 0.33 meters apart (0.111 m2 per plant) in beds produced the same yields when separated by dividers in the root matrix as when no separation was made.

  12. Potato virus Y infection hinders potato defence response and renders plants more vulnerable to Colorado potato beetle attack.

    PubMed

    Petek, Marko; Rotter, Ana; Kogovšek, Polona; Baebler, Spela; Mithöfer, Axel; Gruden, Kristina

    2014-11-01

    In the field, plants are challenged by more than one biotic stressor at the same time. In this study, the molecular interactions between potato (Solanum tuberosum L.), Colorado potato beetle (Leptinotarsa decemlineata Say; CPB) and Potato virus Y(NTN) (PVY(NTN) ) were investigated through analyses of gene expression in the potato leaves and the gut of the CPB larvae, and of the release of potato volatile compounds. CPB larval growth was enhanced when reared on secondary PVY(NTN) -infected plants, which was linked to decreased accumulation of transcripts associated with the antinutritional properties of potato. In PVY(NTN) -infected plants, ethylene signalling pathway induction and induction of auxin response transcription factors were attenuated, while no differences were observed in jasmonic acid (JA) signalling pathway. Similarly to rearing on virus-infected plants, CPB larvae gained more weight when reared on plants silenced in JA receptor gene (coi1). Although herbivore-induced defence mechanism is regulated predominantly by JA, response in coi1-silenced plants only partially corresponded to the one observed in PVY(NTN) -infected plants, confirming the role of other plant hormones in modulating this response. The release of β-barbatene and benzyl alcohol was different in healthy and PVY(NTN) -infected plants before CPB larvae infestation, implicating the importance of PVY(NTN) infection in plant communication with its environment. This was reflected in gene expression profiles of neighbouring plants showing different degree of defence response. This study thus contributes to our understanding of plant responses in agro-ecosystems. PMID:25251011

  13. Potato virus Y infection hinders potato defence response and renders plants more vulnerable to Colorado potato beetle attack.

    PubMed

    Petek, Marko; Rotter, Ana; Kogovšek, Polona; Baebler, Spela; Mithöfer, Axel; Gruden, Kristina

    2014-11-01

    In the field, plants are challenged by more than one biotic stressor at the same time. In this study, the molecular interactions between potato (Solanum tuberosum L.), Colorado potato beetle (Leptinotarsa decemlineata Say; CPB) and Potato virus Y(NTN) (PVY(NTN) ) were investigated through analyses of gene expression in the potato leaves and the gut of the CPB larvae, and of the release of potato volatile compounds. CPB larval growth was enhanced when reared on secondary PVY(NTN) -infected plants, which was linked to decreased accumulation of transcripts associated with the antinutritional properties of potato. In PVY(NTN) -infected plants, ethylene signalling pathway induction and induction of auxin response transcription factors were attenuated, while no differences were observed in jasmonic acid (JA) signalling pathway. Similarly to rearing on virus-infected plants, CPB larvae gained more weight when reared on plants silenced in JA receptor gene (coi1). Although herbivore-induced defence mechanism is regulated predominantly by JA, response in coi1-silenced plants only partially corresponded to the one observed in PVY(NTN) -infected plants, confirming the role of other plant hormones in modulating this response. The release of β-barbatene and benzyl alcohol was different in healthy and PVY(NTN) -infected plants before CPB larvae infestation, implicating the importance of PVY(NTN) infection in plant communication with its environment. This was reflected in gene expression profiles of neighbouring plants showing different degree of defence response. This study thus contributes to our understanding of plant responses in agro-ecosystems.

  14. Involvement of potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) MKK6 in response to potato virus Y.

    PubMed

    Lazar, Ana; Coll, Anna; Dobnik, David; Baebler, Spela; Bedina-Zavec, Apolonija; Zel, Jana; Gruden, Kristina

    2014-01-01

    Mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) cascades have crucial roles in the regulation of plant development and in plant responses to stress. Plant recognition of pathogen-associated molecular patterns or pathogen-derived effector proteins has been shown to trigger activation of several MAPKs. This then controls defence responses, including synthesis and/or signalling of defence hormones and activation of defence related genes. The MAPK cascade genes are highly complex and interconnected, and thus the precise signalling mechanisms in specific plant-pathogen interactions are still not known. Here we investigated the MAPK signalling network involved in immune responses of potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) to Potato virus Y, an important potato pathogen worldwide. Sequence analysis was performed to identify the complete MAPK kinase (MKK) family in potato, and to identify those regulated in the hypersensitive resistance response to Potato virus Y infection. Arabidopsis has 10 MKK family members, of which we identified five in potato and tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L.), and eight in Nicotiana benthamiana. Among these, StMKK6 is the most strongly regulated gene in response to Potato virus Y. The salicylic acid treatment revealed that StMKK6 is regulated by the hormone that is in agreement with the salicylic acid-regulated domains found in the StMKK6 promoter. The involvement of StMKK6 in potato defence response was confirmed by localisation studies, where StMKK6 accumulated strongly only in Potato-virus-Y-infected plants, and predominantly in the cell nucleus. Using a yeast two-hybrid method, we identified three StMKK6 targets downstream in the MAPK cascade: StMAPK4_2, StMAPK6 and StMAPK13. These data together provide further insight into the StMKK6 signalling module and its involvement in plant defence.

  15. Performance of growing indigenous goats fed diets based on urban market crop wastes.

    PubMed

    Katongole, C B; Sabiiti, E N; Bareeba, F B; Ledin, I

    2009-03-01

    The effect of feeding diets including market crop wastes (sweet potato vines (Ipomoea batatas) and scarlet eggplant (Solanum aethiopicum)) on growth and digestibility was studied using 32 indigenous intact growing male goats. Adding elephant grass (Pennisetum purpureum), maize bran and Leucaena leucocephala leaves, four isocaloric and isonitrogenous diets (Sweet potato vines, Solanum, Mixed and Control) were formulated. After the growth trial, 12 goats were randomly selected for a digestibility trial with the same diets, and 8 goats for a feed preference test comparing the market wastes and elephant grass. Crude protein (CP) intake was highest (P<0.05) for the Control (48 g/day) and lowest for the Sweet potato vines diet (23 g/day). Average daily gain was between 11.0 and 14.2 g/day, and similar between diets. The DM and CP digestibilities of the diets were 0.56 and 0.56 (Control), 0.62 and 0.56 (Mixed), 0.59 and 0.49 (Sweet potato vines), and 0.54 and 0.45 (Solanum), respectively. Faecal and urinary N excretions were highest in goats fed the Sweet potato vines and Solanum diets. Eggplant wastes were the least (P<0.05) preferred. On average the goats spent 5% of their 8-hour time eating eggplant wastes, 34% on sweet potato vines and 36% on elephant grass. Growth performance and N retention were low due to the low intake of feed, especially eggplant wastes.

  16. A diffusion model for drying of a heat sensitive solid under multiple heat input modes.

    PubMed

    Sun, Lan; Islam, Md Raisul; Ho, J C; Mujumdar, A S

    2005-09-01

    To obtain optimal drying kinetics as well as quality of the dried product in a batch dryer, the energy required may be supplied by combining different modes of heat transfer. In this work, using potato slice as a model heat sensitive drying object, experimental studies were conducted using a batch heat pump dryer designed to permit simultaneous application of conduction and radiation heat. Four heat input schemes were compared: pure convection, radiation-coupled convection, conduction-coupled convection and radiation-conduction-coupled convection. A two-dimensional drying model was developed assuming the drying rate to be controlled by liquid water diffusion. Both drying rates and temperatures within the slab during drying under all these four heat input schemes showed good accord with measurements. Radiation-coupled convection is the recommended heat transfer scheme from the viewpoint of high drying rate and low energy consumption.

  17. Physical quality and carotene content of solar-dried green leafy and yellow succulent vegetables.

    PubMed

    Mdziniso, Phumzile; Hinds, Margaret J; Bellmer, Danielle D; Brown, Barbara; Payton, Mark E

    2006-03-01

    The effects of vegetable type, vegetable dimensions, and solar drier load on dehydration rate; and texture, color, water activity, and carotene content of solar-dried carrots, sweet potatoes, and collard greens were studied. Mean dehydration rates (moisture loss,%/hr) for solar dried loads of 430 g/m2 and 715 g/m2 were 3.3 +/- 0.30% and 3.8 +/- 0.20% for carrots and sweet potatoes, respectively. Loads of 360 g/m2 and 465 g/m2 of collard greens had dehydration rates of 6.3 +/- 0.10% moisture loss per hr. The results showed that vegetable type accounted for significant differences (p < 0.01) in dehydration rate, and beta-carotene content. Vegetable dimensions affected (p < 0.05) water activity. Solar drier load affected water activity (p < 0.01), and hue angle (p < 0.05). Beta-carotene contents (dry basis) of dehydrated carrot, sweet potato, and collard treatments were 10.9-17.4%, 7.6-9.8%, and 11.9-21.5%, respectively. Among the carrot treatments, the 5-mm thick slices packed at a load of 715 g/m2 contained the highest beta-carotene (17.4%, dry basis) and vitamin A activity (362 IU/g, dry basis), and good physical properties. For collard greens, the 2-cm and 3-cm wide strips packed at 360 g/m2 loads had the best combinations of high beta-carotene (21.5% and 17.2%, dry basis, respectively), vitamin A activity (357.2 and 293.1 IU/g, dry basis, respectively), and optimal color, texture, and water activity. Beta-carotene losses due to solar dehydration were 48.9-67.5%, 4.0-5.8%, and 1.9-19.8% (dry basis) in carrots, sweet potato and collard greens, respectively.

  18. Plastid transformation in potato: Solanum tuberosum.

    PubMed

    Valkov, Vladimir T; Gargano, Daniela; Scotti, Nunzia; Cardi, Teodoro

    2014-01-01

    Although plastid transformation has attractive advantages and potential applications in plant biotechnology, for long time it has been highly efficient only in tobacco. The lack of efficient selection and regeneration protocols and, for some species, the inefficient recombination using heterologous flanking regions in transformation vectors prevented the extension of the technology to major crops. However, the availability of this technology for species other than tobacco could offer new possibilities in plant breeding, such as resistance management or improvement of nutritional value, with no or limited environmental concerns. Herein we describe an efficient plastid transformation protocol for potato (Solanum tuberosum subsp. tuberosum). By optimizing the tissue culture system and using transformation vectors carrying homologous potato flanking sequences, we obtained up to one transplastomic shoot per bombardment. Such efficiency is comparable to that usually achieved in tobacco. The method described in this chapter can be used to regenerate potato transplastomic plants expressing recombinant proteins in chloroplasts as well as in amyloplasts.

  19. Protein synthesis inhibitor from potato tuber

    SciTech Connect

    Romaen, R. )

    1989-04-01

    A protein fraction capable of inhibit in vitro protein synthesis was found in potato tubers in fresh and wounded tissue. Inhibitor activity from fresh tissue decays with wounding. Inhibition activity was detected absorbed to ribsomal fraction and cytosol of potato tuber tissue by a partially reconstituted in vitro system from potato tuber and wheat germ. Adsorbed ribosomal fraction was more suitable of purification. This fraction was washed from ribosomes with 0.3M KCl, concentrated with ammonium sulfate precipitation and purified through sephadex G100 and sephadex G-75 columns chromatography. After 61 fold purification adsorbed protein fraction can inhibit germination of maize, wheat and sesame seeds, as well as {sup 3}H-leucine incorporation into protein by imbibed maize embryos. Inhibition activity was lost by temperature, alkali and protease-K hydrolysis. Preliminar analysis could not show presence of reductor sugars. Physiological role of this inhibitor in relation to rest and active tissue remains to be studied.

  20. Physiological responses in potato plants under continuous irradiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cao, W.; Tibbitts, T. W.

    1991-01-01

    The physiological responses of four potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) cultivars to continuous irradiation were determined in a controlled environment. Under a constant 18C and a constant photoperiod of 470 micromoles s-1 m-2 of photosynthetic photon flux, 'Denali' and 'Haig' grew well and produced large plant and tuber dry weights when harvested 56 days after transplanting. 'Kennebec' and 'Superior' were severely stunted, producing only 10% of the plant dry matter produced by 'Denali' and 'Haig'. The differences in leaf chlorophyll concentration and stomatal conductance were not consistent between these two groups of cultivars. The leaf net CO2 assimilation rates in 'Kennebec' and 'Superior' were lower, and intercellular CO2 partial pressures were higher than in 'Denali' and 'Haig'. These results indicate that inhibition of net CO2 assimilation in 'Kennebec' and 'Superior' was not due to a limiting amount of chlorophyll or to CO2 in the leaf tissues. Concentrations of starch in leaflets of 'Kennebec' and 'Superior' plants were only 10% of those in 'Denali' and 'Haig' plants, although soluble sugar concentrations were similar in the four cultivars. Therefore, the lower net CO2 assimilation rates in stunted 'Kennebec' and 'Superior' plants were not associated with an excess carbohydrate accumulation in the leaves.

  1. Studies on potato irradiation in the G.D.R.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luther, Th.; Hübner, G.; Grahn, Ch.; Döllstädt, R.

    The studies of potato irradiation have been conducted in the framework of the National Food Irradiation Research Project for 4 years. Although in the G.D.R. the use of chemical sprout inhibitors is allowed, potato irradiation can be an alternative technique for potato processing. Before irradiation a wound healing period of approx. 2 weeks is absolutely necessary to protect the potatoes from Fusarium. The method that presents the minimum risk of damage is irradiation in containers. Economic evaluations for the irradiation of potatoes are also made.

  2. Wind tunnel tests of biodegradable fugitive dust suppressants being considered to reduce soil erosion by wind at radioactive waste construction sites

    SciTech Connect

    Ligotke, M.W.; Dennis, G.W.; Bushaw, L.L.

    1993-10-01

    Wind tunnel tests were performed of three fugitive dust control agents derived from potato and sugar beet products. These materials are being considered for use as dust suppressants to reduce the potential for transport of radioactive materials by wind from radioactive waste construction and remediation sites. Soil and dust control agent type, solution concentrations, application quantities, aging (or drying) conditions, surface disturbance, and wind and saltating sand eolian erosive stresses were selected and controlled to simulate application and exposure of excavated soil surfaces in the field. A description of the tests, results, conclusions, and recommendations are presented in this report. The results of this study indicate that all three dust control agents can protect exposed soil surfaces from extreme eolian stresses. It is also clear that the interaction and performance of each agent with various soil types may differ dramatically. Thus, soils similar to that received from ML should be best protected by high concentration ({approximately}2.5%) solutions of potato starch at low water application levels ({approximately}1 to 2 L/m{sup 2}). Because the effectiveness of PS on this soil type is degraded after a moderate amount of simulated rainfall, other options or additives should be considered if surfaces are to be protected for long intervals or during periods of intermittent rainfall and hot, windy conditions. On the other hand, XDCA should be considered when excavating sandy soils. It should be noted, however, that because the Hanford soil test results are based on a small number of tests, it would be prudent to perform additional tests prior to selecting a fugitive dust control agent for use at the Hanford Site. While fermented potato waste was not the best fixative used on either soil, it did perform reasonably well on both soil types (better than XDCA on Idaho soil and better than PS on Hanford soil).

  3. Structure, processing, and properties of potatoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lloyd, Isabel K.; Kolos, Kimberly R.; Menegaux, Edmond C.; Luo, Huy; McCuen, Richard H.; Regan, Thomas M.

    1992-06-01

    The objective of this experiment and lesson intended for high school students in an engineering or materials science course or college freshmen is to demonstrate the relation between processing, structure, and thermodynamic and physical properties. The specific objectives are to show the effect of structure and structural changes on thermodynamic properties (specific heat) and physical properties (compressive strength); to illustrate the first law of thermodynamics; to compare boiling a potato in water with cooking it in a microwave in terms of the rate of structural change and the energy consumed to 'process' the potato; and to demonstrate compression testing.

  4. Structure, processing, and properties of potatoes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lloyd, Isabel K.; Kolos, Kimberly R.; Menegaux, Edmond C.; Luo, Huy; Mccuen, Richard H.; Regan, Thomas M.

    1992-01-01

    The objective of this experiment and lesson intended for high school students in an engineering or materials science course or college freshmen is to demonstrate the relation between processing, structure, and thermodynamic and physical properties. The specific objectives are to show the effect of structure and structural changes on thermodynamic properties (specific heat) and physical properties (compressive strength); to illustrate the first law of thermodynamics; to compare boiling a potato in water with cooking it in a microwave in terms of the rate of structural change and the energy consumed to 'process' the potato; and to demonstrate compression testing.

  5. Digoxigenin-labelled molecular probe for the simultaneous detection of three potato pathogens: potato spindle tuber viroid (PSTVd), potato virus Y (PVY), and potato leafroll virus (PLRV).

    PubMed

    Wełnicki, M; Zekanowski, C; Zagórski, W

    1994-01-01

    A molecular probe, p3POT, was constructed of PSTVd, PVY, PLRV cDNA fragments introduced into pUC18 vector. Sequencing of the inserts revealed that cloned fragments covered conservative parts of pathogenic genomes. Dot-blot hybridization of digoxigenin-labelled construct to crude extracts from plants infected with different potato viruses proved high sensitivity and specificity of the p3POT probe. This makes p3POT probe an useful tool for the routine testing, and selection of virus-free potatoes. PMID:7732766

  6. Growth of Staphylococcus aureus in Cooked Potato and Potato Salad--A One-Step Kinetic Analysis.

    PubMed

    Huang, Lihan

    2015-12-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a Gram-positive spherically-shaped bacterium capable of producing heat-stable enterotoxins that cause acute gastrointestinal diseases. The growth of this pathogen in food is a major threat to public health worldwide. Potato salad is a frequent vehicle for infection and food poisoning caused by S. aureus. Therefore, the objective of this study was to investigate the growth kinetics of S. aureus in cooked potato and potato salad. Samples of potato cubes and potato salad inoculated with S. aureus were incubated at temperatures between 8 and 43 °C to observe its growth for developing growth models. No growth was observed at 8 °C. The experimental results showed that the growth curves did not exhibit lag phases, and can be described by a 3-parameter logistic model. A one-step kinetic analysis approach was used to simultaneously analyze all growth curves by direct construction of both the primary and secondary (Ratkowsky square root) models using nonlinear regression to minimize the global residual error. The estimated nominal minimum growth temperature of S. aureus was 6.12 °C in potato cubes and 8.80 °C in potato salad. The estimated maximum growth temperatures of S. aureus in potato cubes and potato salad were very close to each other (46.3 and 46.8 °C, respectively). On the average, the specific growth rates of S. aureus in potato cubes were approximately 70% higher than those in potato salad. This study suggests that cooked potato and potato salad should be stored below 6 °C or above 47 °C to prevent the growth of S. aureus. The mathematical models and kinetic parameters can be used to accurately evaluate the effect of temperature abuse on the growth of S. aureus and conduct risk assessments of S. aureus in cooked potato and potato salad. PMID:26539902

  7. Growth of Staphylococcus aureus in Cooked Potato and Potato Salad--A One-Step Kinetic Analysis.

    PubMed

    Huang, Lihan

    2015-12-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a Gram-positive spherically-shaped bacterium capable of producing heat-stable enterotoxins that cause acute gastrointestinal diseases. The growth of this pathogen in food is a major threat to public health worldwide. Potato salad is a frequent vehicle for infection and food poisoning caused by S. aureus. Therefore, the objective of this study was to investigate the growth kinetics of S. aureus in cooked potato and potato salad. Samples of potato cubes and potato salad inoculated with S. aureus were incubated at temperatures between 8 and 43 °C to observe its growth for developing growth models. No growth was observed at 8 °C. The experimental results showed that the growth curves did not exhibit lag phases, and can be described by a 3-parameter logistic model. A one-step kinetic analysis approach was used to simultaneously analyze all growth curves by direct construction of both the primary and secondary (Ratkowsky square root) models using nonlinear regression to minimize the global residual error. The estimated nominal minimum growth temperature of S. aureus was 6.12 °C in potato cubes and 8.80 °C in potato salad. The estimated maximum growth temperatures of S. aureus in potato cubes and potato salad were very close to each other (46.3 and 46.8 °C, respectively). On the average, the specific growth rates of S. aureus in potato cubes were approximately 70% higher than those in potato salad. This study suggests that cooked potato and potato salad should be stored below 6 °C or above 47 °C to prevent the growth of S. aureus. The mathematical models and kinetic parameters can be used to accurately evaluate the effect of temperature abuse on the growth of S. aureus and conduct risk assessments of S. aureus in cooked potato and potato salad.

  8. Effects of ozone and sulfur dioxide on tuber yield and quality of potatoes

    SciTech Connect

    Foster, K.W.; Timm, H.; Labanauskas, C.K.; Oshima, R.J.

    1983-01-01

    Air pollution injury of the potato plant (Solanum tuberosum L.) has been documented previously, but potato yield losses have not been estimated in replicated experiments having controlled exposures to ozone (O/sub 3/) and sulfur dioxide (SO/sub 2/). A controlled-environment study involving the speckle-leaf-sensitive cultivar 'Centennial Russet' was conducted to examine the effects of chronic exposure to O/sub 3/ and SO/sub 2/ on plant growth and tuber yield and quality. Ozone, at the highest seasonal dose (44.2 ppm-h), reduced leaf dry weight 48%, root dry weight 58%, tuber number 38%, and total tuber yield 45%. Lower exposures affected these parameters in linear proportion to the O/sub 3/ dose. Mean stem (minus leaves) dry weight, tuber dry weight, tuber dry matter percentage, partitioning of dry matter to tubers, and tuber sugar concentrations were not affected. Tuber N concentration increased linearly by up to 21% as the O/sub 3/ dose increased. Plants grown outside of chambers in ambient air showed effects consistent with results obtained within the chambers. The plants grown outside received a total seasonal O/sub 3/ dose of 50.4 ppm-h and produced 58% less tuber yield than filtered air control plants.Plant responses to SO/sub 2/ exposure were much less pronounced than their responses to exposure to O/sub 3/. However, leaf symptom development in O/sub 3/-treated plants was markedly intensified by the presence of SO/sub 2/. Small reductions in tuber yield and mean tuber size, but not in tuber number, were observed in SO/sub 2/-treated plants. Tuber N concentration increased slightly in SO/sub 2/-treated plants. A significant O/sub 3/ X SO/sub 2/ interaction was observed in the case of tuber N concentration only; SO/sub 2/ accentuated the O/sub 3/-induced increase in N content.

  9. Response of potatoes to nitrogen concentrations differ with nitrogen forms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cao, W.; Tibbitts, T. W.

    1998-01-01

    Two separate experiments were conducted to investigate plant growth and mineral composition of potatoes (Solanum tuberosum L.) at varied solution concentrations of nitrate (NO3-) and ammonium (NH4+). Each experiment evaluated five nitrogen (N) concentrations of 0.5, 2, 4, 8, and 12 mM, which were maintained with a non-recirculating nutrient film system in controlled environment. Plants were harvested on day 42 with NO3-; and day 35 with NH4+ after transplanting of tissue culture plantlets, and growth measurements were taken as leaf area, tuber number, and dry weights of different parts. With NO3-, plant growth was greatest and similar at 2, 4, and 8 mM of N whereas with NH4+, plant growth was best only at 2 and 4 mM of N. At 12 mM of N, plants exhibited interveinal ammonium toxicity with NH4+ nutrition, but healthy growth appearance with NO3- nutrition. With either N form, total N concentrations in tissues tended to increase with increased N concentrations, and tissue phosphorus (P) concentrations were reduced at 0.5 and 2 mM of N. Tissue concentrations of calcium (Ca), magnesium (Mg), and sulfur (S) changed only slightly at particular N concentrations, yet changed substantially with different N forms. The data indicate that the optimal ranges of N concentrations in both solution and tissues are wider and higher with NO3- than with NH4+ nutrition, and thus a careful control of NH4+ concentrations is necessary to minimize possible ammonium toxicity to potato plants.

  10. Medicinal use of potato-derived products: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Vlachojannis, J E; Cameron, M; Chrubasik, S

    2010-02-01

    In the traditional medicine of Europe, raw potatoes are used for gastrointestinal disorders, and topical potato preparations as a hot pack for pain or for softening furuncles. The aim of this study was to review the literature and summarize the data on the medicinal use of potato-derived products. Several databases and other sources were searched to identify clinical trials investigating potato-derived preparations. The trials were analysed for quality. Five trials were identified; two open uncontrolled studies, two open controlled studies and one double-blind study. These results stimulate further investigation of oral potato juice concentrate in patients with dyspeptic complaints, of potato proteinase inhibitor II for weight reduction, and of topical potato proteins for preventing protease-induced perianal dermatitis. We recommend that future studies have a confirmatory design.

  11. Effect of tuber skin on the thermal properties of whole tubers of potato and sweet potato

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oluwo, A. A.; Khan, R. M.; Salami, M. J. E.

    2013-12-01

    Temperature-dependent thermal coefficients of mathematical models of the postharvest storage process play an important role in determining the models accuracy. Thermal properties of tubers under storage available in literature are generally of those in semi processed form (skinless) such as those having undergone peeling, dicing and cutting actions. This study investigates the effect of tuber skin on the thermal properties of whole tubers of potato and sweet potato. A direct approach was used to measure the tubers' density and thermal conductivity and thermal diffusivity by the transient heat transfer method. Indirect approach was used to measure the tubers' specific heat. Experimental data were used to develop empirical models of the thermal coefficients as a function of temperature. Results of the study should find great use in the modeling of potato and sweet potato storage process.

  12. R and D needs -- Drying of sludges

    SciTech Connect

    Kasakura, T.; Hasatani, M.

    1996-10-01

    Sludge management is a very important environmental issue in many industrialized countries, because its generated volume is the largest in all generated wastes. In the sludge management field, the role of drying is becoming more important as sludge disposal becomes more difficult. In this paper, the present status of drying of construction sludge, food industry sludge and municipal sludge are mentioned as concrete examples. To respond to these needs, it is necessary to advance further R and D.

  13. Temperature cycling periods affect growth and tuberization in potatoes under continuous irradiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cao, W.; Tibbitts, T. W.

    1992-01-01

    Plants of the potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) cultivars Denali, Norland, Haig and Kennebec were grown for 42 days under three temperature cycling periods (thermoperiods) with continuous irradiation in two repeated experiments to help determine if temperature cycling might be varied to optimize tuber development of potatoes in controlled environments. Thermoperiods of 6/6 hours, 12/12 hours and 24/24 hours were established with the same temperature change of 22/14C and same controlled vapor pressure deficit of 0.60 kPa. The thermoperiod of 24/24 hours significantly promoted tuber initiation but slowed tuber enlargement in all four cultivars, compared to the thermoperiods of 6/6 hours and 12/12 hours. Denali' produced the highest tuber and total dry weights under the 6/6 hours thermoperiod. Kennebec' produced the highest tuber dry weight under the 12/12 hours thermoperiod. Thermoperiods had no significant effect on shoot and root dry weights of any cultivars. The major effect of thermoperiods was on initiation and enlargement of tubers.

  14. Concentration levels of selected essential and toxic metals in potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) of West Gojjam, Amhara Region, Ethiopia.

    PubMed

    Tadesse, Berhe; Atlabachew, Minaleshewa; Mekonnen, Kebede Nigussie

    2015-01-01

    Potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) is one of the most widely used as a staple food crop for human diets. It is an excellent source of minerals. In this study, contents of Ca, Mg, Fe, Zn, Cd and Pb in potato cultivars cultivated in Yilmana Densa, and Mecha districts of the West Gojjam zone, Ethiopia were determined by flame atomic absorption spectrometry. A 0.50 g oven-dried potato sample was digested using a mixture of 10 mL HNO3:HClO4 (4:1 v/v) at 120 °C for 3 h. The concentration ranges in dry weight basis in decreasing order were: Mg (420-438 mg/kg) > Ca (176-254 mg/kg) > Fe (27.3-90.4 mg/kg) > Zn (20.6-77.7 mg/kg) > (2.00-17.4 mg/kg) for Pb. The toxic heavy metal Cd was below the limit of detection in all the analyzed samples (<0.1 mg/kg). The Mg found in highest contents while Fe was the most abundant microelement. The Cd was found below the provisional maximum tolerable daily intake of WHO/FAO and European Commission (EC) while Pb was above the limit. A wide range of variations was observed in the metal contents of potato cultivars collected from the two districts. Potato cultivars grown in West Gojam zone of Ethiopian could contribute a substantial amount of Fe and Zn together with the major elements, Ca and Mg to the individual's daily dietary needs if consumed on a regular basis.

  15. Effects of Drying Condition and Binding Agent on the Quality Characteristics of Ground Dried-Pork Meat Products.

    PubMed

    Choi, Yun-Sang; Ku, Su-Kyung; Park, Jong-Dae; Kim, Hee-Ju; Jang, Aera; Kim, Young-Boong

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the influence of processing conditions (temperature and time) and binding agent types (glutinous rice flour, potato starch, bean flour, and acorn flour) on the physicochemical and sensory characteristics of ground dried-pork meat product. For this purpose, ground dried-pork meat product was produced by adding several binding agents at different drying temperatures and times. The drying time affected moisture content and water activity in all drying temperature. However, under the similar drying conditions, the extent of drying varied depending on the type of binding agents. The results of sensory evaluation for texture degree and overall acceptability indicated the following: overall, higher drying temperatures and longer drying time heightened the degree of texture, and the overall acceptability varied depending on binding agent type. Physicochemical and sensory characteristics were analyzed to determine any possible correlation. The results revealed a high correlation between moisture content, water activity, shear forces, and sensory evaluation (p<0.01). However, there was no correlation with respect to overall acceptability. PMID:26761886

  16. Effects of Drying Condition and Binding Agent on the Quality Characteristics of Ground Dried-Pork Meat Products

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hee-Ju; Jang, Aera

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the influence of processing conditions (temperature and time) and binding agent types (glutinous rice flour, potato starch, bean flour, and acorn flour) on the physicochemical and sensory characteristics of ground dried-pork meat product. For this purpose, ground dried-pork meat product was produced by adding several binding agents at different drying temperatures and times. The drying time affected moisture content and water activity in all drying temperature. However, under the similar drying conditions, the extent of drying varied depending on the type of binding agents. The results of sensory evaluation for texture degree and overall acceptability indicated the following: overall, higher drying temperatures and longer drying time heightened the degree of texture, and the overall acceptability varied depending on binding agent type. Physicochemical and sensory characteristics were analyzed to determine any possible correlation. The results revealed a high correlation between moisture content, water activity, shear forces, and sensory evaluation (p<0.01). However, there was no correlation with respect to overall acceptability. PMID:26761886

  17. Expressing the sweet potato orange gene in transgenic potato improves drought tolerance and marketable tuber production.

    PubMed

    Cho, Kwang-Soo; Han, Eun-Heui; Kwak, Sang-Soo; Cho, Ji-Hong; Im, Ju-Seong; Hong, Su-Young; Sohn, Hwang-Bae; Kim, Yun-Hee; Lee, Shin-Woo

    2016-01-01

    Potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) is generally considered to be sensitive to drought stress. Even short periods of water shortage can result in reduced tuber production and quality. We previously reported that transgenic potato plants expressing the sweet potato orange gene (IbOr) under the control of the stress-inducible SWPA2 promoter (referred to as SOR plants) showed increased tolerance to methyl viologen-mediated oxidative stress and high salinity, along with increased carotenoid contents. In this study, in an effort to improve the productivity and environmental stress tolerance of potato, we subjected transgenic potato plants expressing IbOr to water-deficient conditions in the greenhouse. The SOR plants exhibited increased tolerance to drought stress under greenhouse conditions. IbOr expression was associated with slightly negative phenotypes, including reduced tuber production. Controlling IbOr expression imparted the same degree of drought tolerance while ameliorating these negative phenotypic effects, leading to levels of tuber production similar to or better than those of wild-type plants under drought stress conditions. In particular, under drought stress, drought tolerance and the production of marketable tubers (over 80g) were improved in transgenic plants compared with non-transgenic plants. These results suggest that expressing the IbOr transgene can lead to significant gains in drought tolerance and tuber production in potato, thereby improving these agronomically important traits.

  18. Distinct cavemoviruses interact synergistically with sweet potato chlorotic stunt virus (genus Crinivirus) in cultivated sweet potato.

    PubMed

    Cuellar, Wilmer J; De Souza, Joao; Barrantes, Israel; Fuentes, Segundo; Kreuze, Jan F

    2011-05-01

    Two serologically unrelated sweet potato viruses causing symptoms of vein clearing in the indicator plant Ipomoea setosa were isolated and their genomes have been sequenced. They are associated with symptomless infections in sweet potato but distinct vein-clearing symptoms and higher virus titres were observed when these viruses co-infected with sweet potato chlorotic stunt virus (SPCSV), a virus that is distributed worldwide and is a mediator of severe virus diseases in this crop. Molecular characterization and phylogenetic analysis revealed an overall nucleotide identity of 47.6 % and an arrangement of the movement protein and coat protein domains characteristic of members of the genus Cavemovirus, in the family Caulimoviridae. We detected both cavemoviruses in cultivated sweet potato from East Africa, Central America and the Caribbean islands, but not in samples from South America. One of the viruses characterized showed a similar genome organization as, and formed a phylogenetic sublineage with, tobacco vein clearing virus (TVCV), giving further support to the previously suggested separation of TVCV, and related viral sequences, into a new caulimovirid genus. Given their geographical distribution and previous reports of similar but yet unidentified viruses, sweet potato cavemoviruses may co-occur with SPCSV more often than previously thought and they could therefore contribute to the extensive yield losses and cultivar decline caused by mixed viral infections in sweet potato.

  19. Expressing the sweet potato orange gene in transgenic potato improves drought tolerance and marketable tuber production.

    PubMed

    Cho, Kwang-Soo; Han, Eun-Heui; Kwak, Sang-Soo; Cho, Ji-Hong; Im, Ju-Seong; Hong, Su-Young; Sohn, Hwang-Bae; Kim, Yun-Hee; Lee, Shin-Woo

    2016-01-01

    Potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) is generally considered to be sensitive to drought stress. Even short periods of water shortage can result in reduced tuber production and quality. We previously reported that transgenic potato plants expressing the sweet potato orange gene (IbOr) under the control of the stress-inducible SWPA2 promoter (referred to as SOR plants) showed increased tolerance to methyl viologen-mediated oxidative stress and high salinity, along with increased carotenoid contents. In this study, in an effort to improve the productivity and environmental stress tolerance of potato, we subjected transgenic potato plants expressing IbOr to water-deficient conditions in the greenhouse. The SOR plants exhibited increased tolerance to drought stress under greenhouse conditions. IbOr expression was associated with slightly negative phenotypes, including reduced tuber production. Controlling IbOr expression imparted the same degree of drought tolerance while ameliorating these negative phenotypic effects, leading to levels of tuber production similar to or better than those of wild-type plants under drought stress conditions. In particular, under drought stress, drought tolerance and the production of marketable tubers (over 80g) were improved in transgenic plants compared with non-transgenic plants. These results suggest that expressing the IbOr transgene can lead to significant gains in drought tolerance and tuber production in potato, thereby improving these agronomically important traits. PMID:27212605

  20. Influence of blanching treatments on Salmonella during home-type dehydration and storage of potato slices.

    PubMed

    DiPersio, Patricia A; Kendall, Patricia A; Yoon, Yohan; Sofos, John N

    2005-12-01

    Recommended drying treatments may not enhance destruction of pathogens that could be present on home-dried foods. In this study, the effects of traditional and modified treatments on Salmonella were evaluated during preparation, home-type dehydration (60 degrees C for 6 h), and storage of potato slices. Potato slices inoculated with five strains of Salmonella (8.4 log CFU/ g) were left untreated or were treated by steam blanching (88 degrees C for 10 min), water blanching (88 degrees C for 4 min), 0.105% citric acid blanching (88 degrees C for 4 min), or 0.210% citric acid blanching (88 degrees C for 4 min). Slices were then dried (6 h for 60 degrees C) and aerobically stored for up to 30 days at 25 +/- 3 degrees C. Cells were enumerated on tryptic soy agar with 0.1% pyruvate (TSAP) and on xylose lysine deoxycholate agar. Salmonella populations were reduced by 4.5 to 4.8 CFU/g and by >5.4 log CFU/g immediately following steam and water blanching, respectively. Populations were below the detection limit (0.80 log CFU/g) immediately following acid blanching, except for samples blanched in 0.105% citric acid and recovered on TSAP. After dehydration (6 h for 60 degrees C), Salmonella reductions on blanched potato slices (5.3 to 5.6 log CFU/g) were significantly greater (P < 0.05) than those on untreated samples (1.9 to 2.7 log CFU/g). Populations on all samples continued to decrease throughout 30 days of storage but still were 3.1 to 3.9 log CFU/g on untreated samples. In comparison, bacterial populations on blanched samples were undetectable by direct plating following 30 days of storage (regardless of blanching method). Blanching treatments used in this study improved the effectiveness of drying for inactivating Salmonella inoculated onto potato slices and, therefore, may enhance the safety of the product.

  1. Alcohol production from fermentation of sweet potatoes

    SciTech Connect

    Egg, R.P.; Coble, C.G.; O'Neal, H.P.; Sweeten, J.M.

    1982-12-01

    A study was conducted to determine the ethanol production characteristics of sweet potatoes. Ethanol yields were as high as 137 liters per tonne of feedstock using procedures developed for grain. Major problems encountered were low ethanol concentrations in the beer and poor stillage dewatering properties.

  2. Sources of Federal Funding for Potato Research

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Starting in the mid-eighties, pressure for Federal Funding of potato research resulted in special appropriations available nationwide from two sources. The Cooperative State Resesarch Education and Extension System (CSREES) is a branch of the USDA that funds Land Grant State Universities to do rese...

  3. Potato Response to Tillage and Nitrogen Management

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Potato responses to different rates of pre-plant and in-season N management are evaluated under reduced and conventional tillage under center pivot irrigation. Tuber yield, tuber size distribution, and tuber specific gravity were largely similar across different tillage and N management practices. P...

  4. Resistance to Black Dot in Potato

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Black dot fungus can colonize tubers on the surface, in the stolon end, or in a combination of both.On the surface the fungus is prevalent as sclerotia, and in the stolon end the fungus colonizes the vascular tissuesas hyphae. The fungus is introduced to non-infested soils mostly by infected potato ...

  5. Studies of Amylose Content in Potato Starch

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Potato starch is typically low in amylose (~20-25%), but high amylose starch has superior nutritional qualities. The ratio between amylose and amylopectin is the most important property influencing the physical properties of starch. There is a strong case to be made for the development of food crops...

  6. Internal Ballistics of a Pneumatic Potato Cannon

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mungan, Carl E.

    2009-01-01

    Basic laws of thermodynamics and mechanics are used to analyse an air gun. Such devices are often employed in outdoor physics demonstrations to launch potatoes using compressed gas that is here assumed to expand reversibly and adiabatically. Reasonable agreement is found with reported muzzle speeds for such homebuilt cannons. The treatment is…

  7. Light-colored, Low Acrylamide Potato Chips

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Potato tubers are stored at cold temperatures to prevent sprouting, minimize disease losses and increase the marketing window. Cold storage also causes an accumulation of reducing sugars, a phenomenon referred to as cold-induced sweetening. Unacceptable, dark colored chips and fries are formed durin...

  8. The impact of SO/sub 2/ on potatoes chronically stressed with ozone. Final report April 1978-August 1979

    SciTech Connect

    Foster, K.W.

    1980-11-01

    Potato crops in the San Joaquin Valley of California may be damaged by air pollution, specifically ozone and/or sulfur dioxide. Experiments at the University of California, Riverside, were conducted to examine the effects of four levels of ambient oxidant treatment in factorial combination with two levels of sulfur dioxide treatment on yield and quality of 'Centennial', a russet-skinned cultivar. Root and shoot dry weights and tuber yield were linearly reduced by oxidant treatments. Sulfur dioxide effects were less marked but of possible importance. No treatment effects on dry matter or sugar contents of tubers were observed.

  9. Preparation and characterization of bionanocomposite films based on potato starch/halloysite nanoclay.

    PubMed

    Sadegh-Hassani, Fatemeh; Mohammadi Nafchi, Abdorreza

    2014-06-01

    In this research casting method was used to prepare potato starch based bio-nanocomposite films with halloysite nanoclay as the reinforcing materials. The composition included potato starch with 40% (w/w) of a mixture of sorbitol/glycerol (weight ratio of 3 to 1as plasticizer) with nanoclay (0-5% w/w). The films were dried under controlled conditions. Physicochemical properties such as solubility in water, water absorption capacity (WAC), water vapour permeability (WVP), oxygen permeability, and mechanical properties of the films were measured. Results showed that by increasing the concentration of nanoclay, mechanical properties of films were improved. Tensile strength was increased from 7.33 to 9.82MPa, and elongation at break decreased from 68.0 to 44.0%. Solubility in water decreased from 35 to 23%, and heat seal strength increased from 375 to 580N/m. Also incorporation of clay nanoparticles in the structure of biopolymer decreased permeability of the gaseous molecules. In summary, addition of halloysite nanoclay, improve the barrier and mechanical properties of potato starch films and this bionanocomposites have high potential to be used for food packaging purposes. PMID:24747380

  10. Characterization of a bioflocculant from potato starch wastewater and its application in sludge dewatering.

    PubMed

    Guo, Junyuan; Zhang, Yuzhe; Zhao, Jing; Zhang, Yu; Xiao, Xiao; Wang, Bin; Shu, Bi

    2015-07-01

    A bioflocculant was produced by using potato starch wastewater; its potential in sludge dewatering and potato starch wastewater treatment was investigated. Production of this bioflocculant was positively associated with cell growth, and a highest value of 0.81 g/L was obtained. When incubated with this bioflocculant, dry solids (DS) and specific resistance to filtration (SRF) of typical wastewater activated sludge reached 20.8% and 3.9 × 10(12) m/kg, respectively, which were much better than the ones obtained with conventional chemical flocculants. Sludge dewatering was further improved when both the bioflocculant and conventional polyacrylamide (PAM) were used simultaneously. With potato starch wastewater, chemical oxygen demand (COD) and turbidity removal rates could reach 52.4 and 81.7%, respectively, at pH value of 7.5 when the bioflocculant dose was adjusted to 30 mg/L; from a practical standpoint, the removal of COD and turbidity reached 48.3 and 72.5%, respectively, without pH value adjustment.

  11. Preparation and characterization of bionanocomposite films based on potato starch/halloysite nanoclay.

    PubMed

    Sadegh-Hassani, Fatemeh; Mohammadi Nafchi, Abdorreza

    2014-06-01

    In this research casting method was used to prepare potato starch based bio-nanocomposite films with halloysite nanoclay as the reinforcing materials. The composition included potato starch with 40% (w/w) of a mixture of sorbitol/glycerol (weight ratio of 3 to 1as plasticizer) with nanoclay (0-5% w/w). The films were dried under controlled conditions. Physicochemical properties such as solubility in water, water absorption capacity (WAC), water vapour permeability (WVP), oxygen permeability, and mechanical properties of the films were measured. Results showed that by increasing the concentration of nanoclay, mechanical properties of films were improved. Tensile strength was increased from 7.33 to 9.82MPa, and elongation at break decreased from 68.0 to 44.0%. Solubility in water decreased from 35 to 23%, and heat seal strength increased from 375 to 580N/m. Also incorporation of clay nanoparticles in the structure of biopolymer decreased permeability of the gaseous molecules. In summary, addition of halloysite nanoclay, improve the barrier and mechanical properties of potato starch films and this bionanocomposites have high potential to be used for food packaging purposes.

  12. Use of Electrical Penetration Graph Technology to Examine Transmission of ‘Candidatus Liberibacter solanacearum’ to Potato by Three Haplotypes of Potato Psyllid (Bactericera cockerelli; Hemiptera: Triozidae)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The potato psyllid, Bactericera cockerelli (Šulc) (Hemiptera: Triozidae), is a vector of the phloem-limited bacterium ‘Candidatus Liberibacter solanacearum’ (Lso), the putative causal agent of zebra chip disease of potato. Little is known about how potato psyllid transmits Lso to potato. We used ele...

  13. Groundwater contamination by nitrates associated with intensive potato culture in Québec.

    PubMed

    Levallois, P; Thériault, M; Rouffignat, J; Tessier, S; Landry, R; Ayotte, P; Girard, M; Gingras, S; Gauvin, D; Chiasson, C

    1998-06-30

    In rural areas, groundwater contamination by nitrates is a problem related to the spreading of organic and chemical fertilizers by farmers and, to some extent, to effluents from domestic sewage systems. Health effects of groundwater contamination by nitrates have been assessed several times and may lead to important consequences for infants. Following pressures from citizens in 1990, a survey of well water quality around potato fields of the Portneuf county (Québec) found that nitrate contamination was frequently above the 10 mg-N/1 standard. Because this first survey was limited to areas of intensive potato culture, it was not possible to evaluate the real impact on the groundwater quality for the whole county and the subsequent public health intervention was spread over the entire region. A second survey was carried out in 1995 to reevaluate the situation using random sampling methods. This latter study took into account drinking water habits of the population, the relative importance of potato culture as a source of nitrogen loading, the effects of soil types, and waste-water disposal systems as well as land use on nitrate concentration in private well water. The data analysis was carried out by combining GIS and statistical methods to test hypotheses about the spatial relationship linking measured nitrate concentrations with their immediate environment. This paper presents the major findings from this second study which confirm the impact of intensive potato culture on groundwater nitrate concentrations, mainly localized in sandy soil areas within 2 km of fields. Finally, it illustrates the usefulness of GIS to focus public health interventions.

  14. Simultaneous detection and differentiation of four closely related sweet potato potyviruses by a multiplex one-step RT-PCR

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Four closely related potyviruses, Sweet potato feathery mottle virus (SPFMV), Sweet potato virus C (SPVC), Sweet potato virus G (SPVG) and/or Sweet potato virus 2 (SPV2), are involved in Sweet Potato Viral Disease, the most devastating disease of sweet potato worldwide. Identification and detection ...

  15. [Efficient approach for potato viral pathogen sensitive diagnostic and identification].

    PubMed

    Riazantsev, D Iu; Zavriev, S K

    2009-01-01

    Potato, one of the most widespread agricultural plants in Russia, is strongly affected by various pathogens of viral, bacterial, and fungal origin as well as by pests. Their simple and accurate diagnostics and identification sound rather important both for production of virus free planting material and to perform monitoring of the phytosanitary state of planting areas. Based on qualitative Fluorescent Amplification--based Specific Hybridization Polymerase Chain Reaction (FLASH-PCR) we have developed the diagnostic systems, which provided fast, careful, and with the minimum risk of contamination in the working zone by amplification products, detection of the major potato pathogens, i. e. A, Y, X, M, S potato viruses, potato leafroll virus, potato mop top virus, as well as potato spindle tuber viroids. PMID:19548542

  16. BIOMASS DRYING TECHNOLOGIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report examines the technologies used for drying of biomass and the energy requirements of biomass dryers. Biomass drying processes, drying methods, and the conventional types of dryers are surveyed generally. Drying methods and dryer studies using superheated steam as the d...

  17. Lyophilization -Solid Waste Treatment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Litwiller, Eric; Flynn, Michael; Fisher, John; Reinhard, Martin

    2004-01-01

    This paper discusses the development of a solid waste treatment system that has been designed for a Mars transit exploration mission. The technology described is an energy-efficient lyophilization technique that is designed to recover water from spacecraft solid wastes. Candidate wastes include feces, concentrated brines from water processors, and other solid wastes that contain free water. The system is designed to operate as a stand-alone process or to be integrated into the International Space Station Waste Collection System. In the lyophilization process, water in an aqueous waste is frozen and then sublimed, separating the waste into a dried solid material and liquid water. The sublimed water is then condensed in a solid ice phase and then melted to generate a liquid product. In the subject system the waste solids are contained within a 0.2 micron bio-guard bag and after drying are removed from the system and stored in a secondary container. This technology is ideally suited to applications such as the Mars Reference Mission, where water recovery rates approaching 100% are desirable but production of CO2 is not. The system is designed to minimize power consumption through the use of thermoelectric heat pumps. The results of preliminary testing of a prototype system and testing of the final configuration are provided. A mathematical model of the system is also described.

  18. Effect of selenate supplementation on glycoalkaloid content of potato (Solanum tuberosum L.).

    PubMed

    Turakainen, Marja; Väänänen, Tiina; Anttila, Katja; Ollilainen, Velimatti; Hartikainen, Helinä; Seppänen, Mervi

    2004-11-17

    Potatoes (Solanum tuberosum L.) supplemented with increasing amounts of sodium selenate were analyzed for glycoalkaloid (GA) content. GAs were extracted with 5% acetic acid from freeze-dried tubers of two potato cultivars, Satu and Sini, harvested 10 weeks after planting as immature. The GAs alpha-solanine and alpha-chaconine were quantified by reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC) with diode array detection. Two independent experiments were performed. In the first experiment, the total GA concentration +/- standard error of the tubers ranged between 105 +/- 9 and 124 +/- 10 mg kg(-1) fresh weight in Satu and between 194 +/- 26 and 228 +/- 10 mg kg(-1) fresh weight in Sini. The ratio of alpha-solanine to alpha-chaconine was 0.2 in Satu and 0.5-0.6 in Sini. In the second experiment, the total GA concentration +/- standard error was 75 +/- 4 to 96 +/- 11 mg kg(-1) fresh weight, and the ratio of alpha-solanine to alpha-chaconine was 0.3-0.4 in Satu. A high sodium selenate supplementation (0.9 mg of Se kg(-1) quartz sand) slightly decreased the GA content in Satu, but this decrease was not statistically significant. Furthermore, at this addition level the Se concentration increased to a very high level of 20 microg g(-1) dry weight, which cannot be recommended for human consumption. In both experiments, the Se concentration in tubers increased with increasing sodium selenate application levels. Our results show that acceptable application levels of selenate did not have an effect on the GA concentration in immature potato tubers.

  19. Effects of sulfur dioxide and ozone on yield and quality of potatoes: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Pell, E.J.; Pearson, N.S.; Vinten-Johansen, C.; McGruer, G.; Yang, Y.

    1989-01-01

    The objectives of this project were to develop an outdoor fumigation facility designed to expose plants to ozone (O3) and sulfur dioxide (SO2) and to conduct experiments that would examine the impact of the two gases alone and in combination on field grown potato plants. Two systems of dispensing and monitoring pollutants were contrasted, one using miniature solenoid valves and the other using critical orifices. Both systems provided excellent pollutant control. The orifices were relatively inexpensive and required less maintenance than did the solenoid valve system. Two field experiments were conducted, one in 1985 and and the other in 1986. Potato plants were exposed to charcoal filtered air, nonfiltered air, nonfiltered air supplemented with O3 at levels which resulted in 1.33, 1.66 or 1.99 times ambient O3 concentrations or charcoal filtered air plus 0.14, 0.28 or 0.56 ppM SO2. There were additional treatments combining the two pollutant regimes. Ozone induced a linear reduction in yield reflected by decreases in weight and number of tubers > 6.35 cm in diameter. In general effects on number and weight of smaller tubers were not detected. Ozone also induced a decrease in the percent dry matter and reducing sugar content of potato tubers. Sulfur dioxide affected number of Grade One tubers in both years and percent dry matter and sucrose content in 1986 only. While dose-response curves for all SO2 effects fit quadratic curves the impact of SO2 doses used in these experiments were stimulatory. No important interactions were observed between O3 and SO2. 36 refs., 5 figs., 31 tabs.

  20. Potato (Solanum tuberosum) greenhouse tuber production as an assay for asexual reproduction effects from herbicides.

    PubMed

    Olszyk, David; Pfleeger, Thomas; Lee, E Henry; Plocher, Milton

    2010-01-01

    The present study determined whether young potato plants can be used as an assay to indicate potential effects of pesticides on asexual reproduction. Solanum tuberosum (Russet Burbank) plants were grown from seed pieces in a mineral soil in pots under greenhouse conditions. Plants were treated with herbicides (cloransulam, dicamba, glyphosate, imazapyr, primsulfuron, sulfometuron, or tribenuron) at simulated drift levels [dry weight were determined at approximately 28 DAT. Imazapyr, sulfometuron, and tribenuron caused significant reductions in tuber fresh weight, with the effective concentrations producing a 25% potato tuber fresh weight (EC25) of 0.00038, 0.0016, and 0.0021 x f.a.r. of 1,124, 52, and 9 g active ingredient hectare(-1) (g a.i. HA(-1)), respectively. Primisulfuron, dicamba, and cloransulam also significantly reduced tuber fresh weight, but with higher EC25 values of 0.011, 0.07, and 0.010 to 0.2 x f.a.r. of 40, 558, and 18 g a.i. HA(-1), respectively. Glyphosate had little effect on tuber fresh weight, with a significant reduction in only one experiment. Sulfometuron reduced tuber fresh weight at an EC25 value lower than the EC25 values for shoot dry weight or plant height. For other herbicides, the reduction in tuber fresh weight occurred within the range of EC25 values for other responses. Although additional experiments are required to develop further a phytotoxicity test, these results indicated that tuber production in young potato plants (harvested approximately 42 DAE) may be an effective assay for below-ground asexual reproductive responses to herbicides, especially acetolactate synthase inhibitors.

  1. Applications of biotechnology and genomics in potato improvement.

    PubMed

    Barrell, Philippa J; Meiyalaghan, Sathiyamoorthy; Jacobs, Jeanne M E; Conner, Anthony J

    2013-10-01

    Potato is the third most important global food crop and the most widely grown noncereal crop. As a species highly amenable to cell culture, it has a long history of biotechnology applications for crop improvement. This review begins with a historical perspective on potato improvement using biotechnology encompassing pathogen elimination, wide hybridization, ploidy manipulation and applications of cell culture. We describe the past developments and new approaches for gene transfer to potato. Transformation is highly effective for adding single genes to existing elite potato clones with no, or minimal, disturbances to their genetic background and represents the only effective way to produce isogenic lines of specific genotypes/cultivars. This is virtually impossible via traditional breeding as, due to the high heterozygosity in the tetraploid potato genome, the genetic integrity of potato clones is lost upon sexual reproduction as a result of allele segregation. These genetic attributes have also provided challenges for the development of genetic maps and applications of molecular markers and genomics in potato breeding. Various molecular approaches used to characterize loci, (candidate) genes and alleles in potato, and associating phenotype with genotype are also described. The recent determination of the potato genome sequence has presented new opportunities for genomewide assays to provide tools for gene discovery and enabling the development of robustly unique marker haplotypes spanning QTL regions. The latter will be useful in introgression breeding and whole-genome approaches such as genomic selection to improve the efficiency of selecting elite clones and enhancing genetic gain over time.

  2. New qualitative detection methods of genetically modified potatoes.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Takahiro; Kuribara, Hideo; Mishima, Takashi; Kikuchi, Hiroyuki; Kodama, Takashi; Futo, Satoshi; Kasama, Kikuko; Toyota, Akie; Nouno, Masanori; Saita, Ayako; Takahashi, Kunihiko; Hino, Akihiro; Akiyama, Hiroshi; Maitani, Tamio; Kubo, Misao

    2004-09-01

    In Japan, 8 lines of genetically modified (GM) potato (2 lines of NewLeaf potato; NL, 3 lines of NewLeaf Plus potato; NLP, and 3 lines of NewLeaf Y potato; NLY) have already been authorized as safe for use in foods and feeds. We have developed polymerase chain reaction (PCR) methods for the qualitative detection of the GM potatoes for the screening and the identification of NL, NLP and NLY. The gene encoding uridine diphosphate (UDP)-glucose pyrophosphorylase (UGPase) was used as a taxon specific gene. We designed the primer pair to detect the cryIIIA genes as a screening method for GM potatoes because the gene should be inserted in all 8 lines of the GM potatoes. For identification of NL, NLP and NLY, we further designed three specific primer pairs for the different recombinant DNAs (r-DNA) specifically introduced into NL, NLP, or NLY. In addition, to identify the 3 lines of NLY that have been introduced with the same r-DNA, the three line-specific primer pairs for the border sequence between the r-DNA and genomic DNA of NLY 3 lines were designed. Six lines of GM potato used as the test material were specifically identified using the each primer pair under the same PCR condition. The detection limits of all the GM potatoes should be approximately 0.1%. Furthermore, the specificity and reproducibility of the methods were confirmed in a six-laboratory collaborative study. PMID:15340215

  3. Cryopreservation for preservation of potato genetic resources

    PubMed Central

    Niino, Takao; Arizaga, Miriam Valle

    2015-01-01

    Cryopreservation is becoming a very important tool for the long-term storage of plant genetic resources and efficient cryopreservation protocols have been developed for a large number of plant species. Practical procedures, developed using in vitro tissue culture, can be a simple and reliable preservation option of potato genetic resources rather than maintaining by vegetative propagation in genebanks due their allogamous nature. Cryopreserved materials insure a long-term backup of field collections against loss of plant germplasm. Occurrence of genetic variation, in tissue culture cells during prolonged subcultures, can be avoided with suitable cryopreservation protocols that provide high regrowth, leading and facilitating a systematic and strategic cryo-banking of plant genetic resources. Cryopreservation protocols for potato reviewed here, can efficiently complement field and in vitro conservation, providing for preservation of genotypes difficult to preserve by other methods, wild types and other species decided as priority collections. PMID:25931979

  4. In vitro screening of potato against water-stress mediated through sorbitol and polyethylene glycol.

    PubMed

    Gopal, Jai; Iwama, Kazuto

    2007-05-01

    With the objective to develop a practical and effective method of screening potato for drought tolerance, shoot and root growth in microtuber-derived plantlets was studied in vitro in three genotypes with known root mass production under field conditions. Different levels of water-stress were induced using five concentrations of either sorbitol or polyethylene glycol (PEG) in MS medium. Water potential of various media ranged from -0.80 MPa to -2.05 MPa. Water-stress in culture adversely affected plantlet growth, and genotypes differed for their responses. Genotype IWA-1 was less affected than IWA-3 and IWA-5. At the same level of water potential, sorbitol had lower adverse effect than PEG; the latter being sticky. Genotype x sorbitol and genotype x PEG interactions were significant. At 0.2 M sorbitol and 0.003 M PEG, IWA-1 had significantly more roots with higher total root length, root volume, as well as root-dry weight than those of IWA-3 and IWA-5, whereas the latter two genotypes were at par for all these characters. This pattern was similar to the reported pattern of these genotypes for root-dry weight under field conditions. It is concluded that in vitro screening of potato under specific and limited water-stress conditions may provide a system for effectively differentiating the genotypes for their expected root mass production under field conditions.

  5. Biological control of Rhizoctonia solani on potato by using indigenous Trichoderma spp.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durak, Emre Demirer

    2016-04-01

    At this study, it was aimed to determine the effect of Trichoderma isolates that was isolated from the soil samples taken from the different regions on black scurf and stem canker disease caused by Rhizoctonia solani Kühn that has been one of the biggest problems of the potato cultivation. At the end of the soil isolations, totally 81 Trichoderma isolates were obtained and their species were identified. Of these isolates, T. harzianum (42%), T. virens (31%), T. asperellum (15%) and T. viride (12%). All of the isolates were tested in vitro for their antagonistic activity against the R. solani isolate. The isolates that show high inhibition rate was selected and tested against R. solani in vitro. Potato plants were grown in a greenhouse for about 10 weeks. Then the plants were evaluated according to the scale, plant height, shoot fresh and dry weights, root fresh and dry weights were noted. The experiment was conducted two times in three replications. At the in vitro tests, generally, it was determined that Trichoderma isolates have inhibited to R. solani and in vivo, they were reduced the effects of the disease and they were raised the development of the plant. In particular, it was determined that some isolates of the T. harzianum and T. virens have reduced the severity of the disease. It was determined that both in vitro and in vivo isolates have shown different efficiency against R. solani.

  6. Variation in biochemical parameters in different parts of potato tubers for processing purposes.

    PubMed

    Bandana; Sharma, Vineet; Kaushik, S K; Singh, Brajesh; Raigond, Pinky

    2016-04-01

    The present study was conducted to estimate the variation in bio-chemical parameters among eight different parts viz. bud end cortex, bud end medulla, central cortex, central medulla, pith, stem end cortex, stem end medulla and peel of potato tuber of processing varieties. Concentration of dry matter, reducing sugar, sucrose and starch content were higher in cortical region than in medullar region of stem end, bud end and central portion. Variety Kufri Chipsona-1 had maximum dry matter content in stem end cortex (SEC 30.34 %), followed by Kufri Frysona (SEC 27.71 %). Mean reducing sugar values were comparatively more in bud end cortex (BEC 111.3 mg/100 g Fresh Weight) and lowest in stem end medulla (SEM 44.05 mg/100 g FW). Bio-chemical contents varied considerably within different parts of tuber as well as in different genotypes. The information generated in this study can help processors for effective utilization of potato for various types of processing products viz., chips and French fries. PMID:27413232

  7. Diurnal temperature fluctuation effects on potatoes grown with 12 hr photoperiods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bennett, S. M.; Tibbitts, T. W.; Cao, W.

    1991-01-01

    This study was designed to characterize the growth responses of potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) to diurnal temperature fluctuations. Potato plants of two cultivars, Norland and Denali, were grown for 90 days under 12 hr photoperiod in walk-in growth rooms at the University of Wisconsin Biotron. The alternating temperature was 22 C light/14 C dark and compared to a constant 18 C as control. At all temperature regimes vapor pressure deficit was maintained at 0.62 kPa (70% relative humidity [correction of humdidity] at 18 C). Plant height, plant dry weight, tuber dry weight, and harvest index were overall greater under the warm light/cool dark alternating temperatures than under the constant temperature. The differences between temperature treatments were greater for Denali than for Norland. Alternating temperatures increased Denali tuber weights by 25%, but no significant increase was found with Norland. Also the total plant weight was increased over 20% with Denali, but increased with Norland in only one of the two replications of the experiment. This study documents that alternating temperatures are a benefit to some cultivars but may not be of benefit to all cultivars.

  8. Variation in biochemical parameters in different parts of potato tubers for processing purposes.

    PubMed

    Bandana; Sharma, Vineet; Kaushik, S K; Singh, Brajesh; Raigond, Pinky

    2016-04-01

    The present study was conducted to estimate the variation in bio-chemical parameters among eight different parts viz. bud end cortex, bud end medulla, central cortex, central medulla, pith, stem end cortex, stem end medulla and peel of potato tuber of processing varieties. Concentration of dry matter, reducing sugar, sucrose and starch content were higher in cortical region than in medullar region of stem end, bud end and central portion. Variety Kufri Chipsona-1 had maximum dry matter content in stem end cortex (SEC 30.34 %), followed by Kufri Frysona (SEC 27.71 %). Mean reducing sugar values were comparatively more in bud end cortex (BEC 111.3 mg/100 g Fresh Weight) and lowest in stem end medulla (SEM 44.05 mg/100 g FW). Bio-chemical contents varied considerably within different parts of tuber as well as in different genotypes. The information generated in this study can help processors for effective utilization of potato for various types of processing products viz., chips and French fries.

  9. Potato, Solanum tuberosum, defense against Colorado potato beetle, Leptinotarsa decemlineata (Say): microarray gene expression profiling of potato by Colorado potato beetle regurgitant treatment of wounded leaves.

    PubMed

    Lawrence, Susan D; Novak, Nicole G; Ju, Chelsea J-T; Cooke, Janice E K

    2008-08-01

    Colorado potato beetle (CPB) is a leading pest of solanaceous plants. Despite the economic importance of this pest, surprisingly few studies have been carried out to characterize its molecular interaction with the potato plant. In particular, little is known about the effect of CPB elicitors on gene expression associated with the plant's defense response. In order to discover putative CPB elicitor-responsive genes, the TIGR 11,421 EST Solanaceae microarray was used to identify genes that are differentially expressed in response to the addition of CPB regurgitant to wounded potato leaves. By applying a cutoff corresponding to an adjusted P-value of <0.01 and a fold change of >1.5 or <0.67, we found that 73 of these genes are induced by regurgitant treatment of wounded leaves when compared to wounding alone, whereas 54 genes are repressed by this treatment. This gene set likely includes regurgitant-responsive genes as well as wounding-responsive genes whose expression patterns are further enhanced by the presence of regurgitant. Real-time polymerase chain reaction was used to validate differential expression by regurgitant treatment for five of these genes. In general, genes that encoded proteins involved in secondary metabolism and stress were induced by regurgitant; genes associated with photosynthesis were repressed. One induced gene that encodes aromatic amino acid decarboxylase is responsible for synthesis of the precursor of 2-phenylethanol. This is significant because 2-phenylethanol is recognized by the CPB predator Perillus bioculatis. In addition, three of the 16 type 1 and type 2 proteinase inhibitor clones present on the potato microarray were repressed by application of CPB regurgitant to wounded leaves. Given that proteinase inhibitors are known to interfere with digestion of proteins in the insect midgut, repression of these proteinase inhibitors by CPB may inhibit this component of the plant's defense arsenal. These data suggest that beyond the wound

  10. Electron transport fluxes in potato plateau regime

    SciTech Connect

    Shaing, K.C.; Hazeltine, R.D.

    1997-12-01

    Electron transport fluxes in the potato plateau regime are calculated from the solutions of the drift kinetic equation and fluid equations. It is found that the bootstrap current density remains finite in the region close to the magnetic axis, although it decreases with increasing collision frequency. This finite amount of the bootstrap current in the relatively collisional regime is important in modeling tokamak startup with 100{percent} bootstrap current. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  11. A human dietary risk assessment associated with glycoalkaloid responses of potato to Colorado potato beetle defoliation.

    PubMed

    Dinkins, Courtney L Pariera; Peterson, Robert K D

    2008-08-01

    A quantitative human dietary risk assessment was conducted using the glycoalkaloid concentrations measured from tubers of plants defoliated by Colorado potato beetles and undefoliated (control). There was a significantly greater production of glycoalkaloids for defoliated plants compared to control plants for both skin and inner tissue of tubers. The dietary risk posed to different human subgroups associated with the consumption of potatoes was estimated for the 50th, 95th, and 99.9th percentile US national consumption values. Exposures were compared to a toxic threshold of 1.0mg/kg body weight. Defoliation by Colorado potato beetles increased dietary risk by approximately 48%. Glycoalkaloid concentrations within the inner tissue of tubers, including undefoliated controls, exceeded the toxic threshold for all human subgroups at less than the 99.9th percentile of exposure, but not the 95th percentile.

  12. Evidence for heterologous encapsidation of potato spindle tuber viroid in particles of potato leafroll virus.

    PubMed

    Querci, M; Owens, R A; Bartolini, I; Lazarte, V; Salazar, L F

    1997-06-01

    The aphid Myzus persicae (Sulz.) was shown to transmit potato spindle tuber viroid (PSTVd) to potato clone DTO-33 from source plants doubly infected with potato leafroll virus (PLRV) and PSTVd. Transmission was of the persistent type and did not occur when the insects were allowed to feed on singly infected plants. Only low levels of PSTVd were associated with purified PLRV virions, but its resistance to digestion with micrococcal nuclease indicates that the viroid RNA is encapsidated within the PLRV particles. Epidemiological surveys carried out at three locations in China revealed a strong correlation between PSTVd infection and the presence of PLRV, suggesting that PLRV can facilitate PSTVd spread under field conditions. PMID:9191909

  13. Studies for Somatic Embryogenesis in Sweet Potato

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bennett, J. Rasheed; Prakash, C. S.

    1997-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to improve the somatic embryo (SE) system for plant production of sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas L(Lam)). Explants isolated from SE-derived sweet potato plants were compared with control (non SE-derived) plants for their competency for SE production. Leaf explants were cultured on Murashige-Skoog (MS) medium with 2,4-dichlorophenoxy acetic acid (0.2 mg/L) and 6-benzylaminopurine (2.5 mg/L) for 2 weeks in darkness and transferred to MS medium with abscisic acid (2.5 mg/L). Explants isolated from those plants developed through somatic embryogenesis produced new somatic embryos rapidly and in higher frequency than those isolated from control plants They also appeared to grow faster in tissue culture than the control plants. Current studies in the laboratory are examining whether plants derived from a cyclical embryogenesis system (five cycles) would have any further positive impact on the rapidity and frequency of somatic embryo development. More detailed studies using electron microscopy are expected to show the point of origin of the embryos and to allow determination of their quality throughout the cyclical process. This study may facilitate improved plant micropropagation, gene transfer and germplasm conservation in sweet potato.

  14. Plant Pathogen Population Dynamics in Potato Fields

    PubMed Central

    Morgan, G. D.; Stevenson, W. R.; MacGuidwin, A. E.; Kelling, K. A.; Binning, L. K.; Zhu, J.

    2002-01-01

    Modern technologies incorporating Geographic Information Systems (GIS), Global Positioning Systems (GPS), remote sensing, and geostatistics provide unique opportunities to advance ecological understanding of pests across a landscape. Increased knowledge of the population dynamics of plant pathogens will promote management strategies, such as site-specific management, and cultural practices minimizing the introduction and impact of plant pathogens. The population dynamics of Alternaria solani, Verticillium dahliae, and Pratylenchus penetrans were investigated in commercial potato fields. A 0.5-ha diamond grid-sampling scheme was georeferenced, and all disease ratings and nematode samples were taken at these grid points. Percent disease severity was rated weekly, and P. penetrans densities were quantified 4 weeks after potato emergence. Spatial statistics and interpolation methods were used to identify the spatial distribution and population dynamics of each pathogen. Interpolated maps and aerial imagery identified A. solani intra-season progression across the fields as the potato crop matured. Late-season nitrogen application reduced A. solani severity. The spatial distributions of V. dahliae and P. penetrans were spatially correlated. PMID:19265932

  15. Guatemalan potato moth Tecia solanivora distinguish odour profiles from qualitatively different potatoes Solanum tuberosum L.

    PubMed

    Karlsson, Miriam Frida; Birgersson, Göran; Witzgall, Peter; Lekfeldt, Jonas Duus Stevens; Nimal Punyasiri, P A; Bengtsson, Marie

    2013-01-01

    Guatemalan potato moth, Tecia solanivora, lay eggs in the soil nearby potato Solanum spp. and larvae feed on the tubers. We investigated the oviposition behaviour of T. solanivora females and the survival of larval offspring on healthy vs. stressed, i.e. light exposed and/or damaged potato tubers. In choice tests, females laid significantly more eggs in response to potato odour of healthy tubers and female oviposition preference correlated with higher larval survival. Survival of larvae was negatively correlated with the tuber content of the steroid glycoalkaloids α-solanine and α-chaconine: healthy potatoes contained lower amounts than stressed tubers, ranging from 25 to 500 μg g⁻¹ and from 30 to 600 μg g⁻¹, respectively. Analysis of volatile compounds emitted by potato tubers revealed that stressed tubers could clearly be distinguished from healthy tubers by the composition of their volatile profiles. Compounds that contributed to this difference were e.g. decanal, nonanal, isopropyl myristate, phenylacetaldehyde, benzothiazole, heptadecane, octadecane, myristicin, E,E-α-farnesene and verbenone. Oviposition assays, when female moths were not in contact with the tubers, clearly demonstrated that volatiles guide the females to lay fewer eggs on stressed tubers that are of inferior quality for the larvae. We propose that volatiles, such as sesquiterpenes and aldehydes, mediate oviposition behaviour and are correlated with biosynthetically related, non-volatile compounds, such as steroidal glycoalkaloids, which influence larval survival. We conclude that the oviposition response and larval survival of T. solanivora on healthy vs. stressed tubers supports the preference performance hypothesis for insect herbivores.

  16. Induction mechanism of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase in potato tuber and sweet potato root tissues.

    PubMed

    Kondo, Katsuyoshi; Uritani, Ikuzo; Oba, Kazuko

    2003-05-01

    3-Hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase (HMGR, EC1.1.1.34), the key enzyme in isoprenoid biosynthesis, was purified from microsomes of potato tuber tissue, and a polyclonal antibody and two monoclonal antibodies against the purified enzyme were prepared. HMGR protein content was measured by immunotitration and radioimmunoassay using these antibodies. HMGR activity was very low in the fresh tissues of both potato tuber and sweet potato root. The activity in potato tuber was increased by cutting and further by additional fungal infection of the cut tissues. In sweet potato root tissue, the activity was scarcely increased after cutting alone, but was markedly increased by additional fungal infection or chemical treatment. The HMGR protein contents in both fresh potato tuber and sweet potato root tissues were also very low, and increased markedly in response to cutting and fungal infection. From these results, we proposed a hypothesis on the induction mechanism of HMGR after cutting and fungal infection in potato tuber and sweet potato root tissues.

  17. The potato amylase inhibitor gene SbAI regulates cold-induced sweetening in potato tubers by modulating amylase activity.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Huiling; Liu, Jun; Hou, Juan; Yao, Ying; Lin, Yuan; Ou, Yongbin; Song, Botao; Xie, Conghua

    2014-09-01

    Potato cold-induced sweetening (CIS) is critical for the postharvest quality of potato tubers. Starch degradation is considered to be one of the key pathways in the CIS process. However, the functions of the genes that encode enzymes related to starch degradation in CIS and the activity regulation of these enzymes have received less attention. A potato amylase inhibitor gene known as SbAI was cloned from the wild potato species Solanum berthaultii. This genetic transformation confirmed that in contrast to the SbAI suppression in CIS-resistant potatoes, overexpressing SbAI in CIS-sensitive potatoes resulted in less amylase activity and a lower rate of starch degradation accompanied by a lower reducing sugar (RS) content in cold-stored tubers. This finding suggested that the SbAI gene may play crucial roles in potato CIS by modulating the amylase activity. Further investigations indicated that pairwise protein-protein interactions occurred between SbAI and α-amylase StAmy23, β-amylases StBAM1 and StBAM9. SbAI could inhibit the activities of both α-amylase and β-amylase in potato tubers primarily by repressing StAmy23 and StBAM1, respectively. These findings provide the first evidence that SbAI is a key regulator of the amylases that confer starch degradation and RS accumulation in cold-stored potato tubers.

  18. Activation of phenylpropanoid pathway and PR of potato tuber against Fusarium sulphureum by fungal elicitor from Trichothecium roseum.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xiao-Yan; Bi, Yang; Yan, Lu; Liu, Xiao; Wang, Yi; Shen, Ke-Ping; Li, Yong-Cai

    2016-09-01

    The induced resistance of potato tuber (Solanum tuberosum cv. Xindaping) tissue against Fusarium sulphureum by a fungal elicitor from the incompatible pathogen Trichothecium roseum and its possible mechanism were studied. The results showed that the lesion development of the wound-inoculated potato tuber was significantly reduced by treatment with the fungal elicitor from T. roseum (P < 0.05). Inoculation with F. sulphureum on the 16th day after treatment with the fungal elicitor80 at 15.0 μg/ml had the best resistant effect in the potato tuber, with the diameter being only reduced by 47 % that of the control. In addition, the results also showed that the potato tuber treated with the fungal elicitor80 could systemically induce lignin deposition, total phenolic content, flavonoid content and defense enzymes, including three keys phenylpropanoid pathway (PAL, 4CL and C4H) and pathogenesis-related (GLU and CHT) enzymes. The fungal elicitor80 also enhanced the up-regulation of the transcription and expression of PAL, C4H, 4CL, GLU and CHT genes. The treatment with the fungal elicitor80 + F. sulphureum caused the marked and/or prompt enhancement of all indexes when compared to treatment with the fungal elicitor80 or inoculation with the pathogen alone. The results suggested that the fungal elicitor of T. roseum could significantly enhance defense responses in potato tuber against dry rot mainly due to the up-regulation of the transcription and expression of resistance-related genes as well as increasing the activity of resistance-related enzymes and antifungal compounds. PMID:27430509

  19. Activation of phenylpropanoid pathway and PR of potato tuber against Fusarium sulphureum by fungal elicitor from Trichothecium roseum.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xiao-Yan; Bi, Yang; Yan, Lu; Liu, Xiao; Wang, Yi; Shen, Ke-Ping; Li, Yong-Cai

    2016-09-01

    The induced resistance of potato tuber (Solanum tuberosum cv. Xindaping) tissue against Fusarium sulphureum by a fungal elicitor from the incompatible pathogen Trichothecium roseum and its possible mechanism were studied. The results showed that the lesion development of the wound-inoculated potato tuber was significantly reduced by treatment with the fungal elicitor from T. roseum (P < 0.05). Inoculation with F. sulphureum on the 16th day after treatment with the fungal elicitor80 at 15.0 μg/ml had the best resistant effect in the potato tuber, with the diameter being only reduced by 47 % that of the control. In addition, the results also showed that the potato tuber treated with the fungal elicitor80 could systemically induce lignin deposition, total phenolic content, flavonoid content and defense enzymes, including three keys phenylpropanoid pathway (PAL, 4CL and C4H) and pathogenesis-related (GLU and CHT) enzymes. The fungal elicitor80 also enhanced the up-regulation of the transcription and expression of PAL, C4H, 4CL, GLU and CHT genes. The treatment with the fungal elicitor80 + F. sulphureum caused the marked and/or prompt enhancement of all indexes when compared to treatment with the fungal elicitor80 or inoculation with the pathogen alone. The results suggested that the fungal elicitor of T. roseum could significantly enhance defense responses in potato tuber against dry rot mainly due to the up-regulation of the transcription and expression of resistance-related genes as well as increasing the activity of resistance-related enzymes and antifungal compounds.

  20. Distribution of ascorbic acid in potato tubers and in home-processed and commercial potato foods.

    PubMed

    Han, Jae-Sook; Kozukue, Nobuyuki; Young, Kyung-Soon; Lee, Kap-Rang; Friedman, Mendel

    2004-10-20

    HPLC was used to analyze the content of ascorbic acid (AA) in tubers of four Korean potato cultivars (Chaju, Sumi, Deso, and Dejima), in a series of baked, boiled, braised, fried, microwaved, pressure-cooked, and sauteed potato slices from the Dejima cultivar and in 14 commercial Korean and 14 processed potato foods sold in the United States (chips, snacks, mashed potatoes, fries). The AA content for the four cultivars ranged from 16 to 46 mg/100 g of fresh weight. The distribution of AA in each of the eight potato slices (sticks, plugs) cut horizontally from the stem end of the Dejima potato ranged from 6.8 to 19.3% of the total. The corresponding distribution in seven sticks cut vertically was much narrower, ranging from 11.7 to 17.5% of the total. Losses of AA in water (pH 5.2) were significantly greater than in 5% metaphosphoric acid (pH 1.0). Less degradation occurred in water solutions of the vitamin stored at 1 degree C than at 25 degrees C. Losses of AA observed during home-processing of three varieties with low (Dejima, 16 mg/100 g), intermediate (Sumi, 32 mg/100 g), and high (Chaju, 42 mg/100 g) AA contents were as follows: boiling in water, 77-88%; boiling in water containing 1-3% NaCl, 61-79%; frying in oil, 55-79%; sauteing, 61-67%; pressure-cooking in water, 56-60%; braising, 50-63%; baking, 33-51%; and microwaving, 21-33%. The content of the Korean foods ranged from trace amounts to 25 mg/100 g and that of the U.S. foods from 0.4 to 46 mg/100 g. These results permit optimization of the vitamin C content of the diet by (a) using high-vitamin C potato varieties such as Chaju, (b) selecting sticks cut horizontally for frying, (c) baking or microwaving rather than boiling or frying, and (d) selecting commercial potato foods with a high vitamin C content.