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Sample records for potencial cliente real

  1. Developing Professionals: Student Experiences of a Real-Client Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fitch, Kate

    2011-01-01

    This study investigated the learning potential of the student experience of working with real clients in a final-year undergraduate unit that aims to develop professional skills. Students, working in consultancy teams, developed communication strategies for a not-for-profit organisation. A teaching intervention was trialled late in semester to…

  2. Developing Professionals: Student Experiences of a Real-Client Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fitch, Kate

    2011-01-01

    This study investigated the learning potential of the student experience of working with real clients in a final-year undergraduate unit that aims to develop professional skills. Students, working in consultancy teams, developed communication strategies for a not-for-profit organisation. A teaching intervention was trialled late in semester to…

  3. Correspondence of Motivational Interviewing Adherence and Competence Ratings in Real and Role-Played Client Sessions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Decker, Suzanne E.; Carroll, Kathleen M.; Nich, Charla; Canning-Ball, Monica; Martino, Steve

    2013-01-01

    Treatment integrity ratings (adherence and competence) are frequently used as outcome measures in clinician training studies, drawn from recorded real client or role-played client sessions. However, it is unknown whether clinician adherence and competence are similar in real client and role-played sessions or whether real and role-play clients…

  4. Working alliance, real relationship, session quality, and client improvement in psychodynamic psychotherapy: A longitudinal actor partner interdependence model.

    PubMed

    Kivlighan, Dennis M; Hill, Clara E; Gelso, Charles J; Baumann, Ellen

    2016-03-01

    We used the Actor Partner Interdependence Model (APIM; Kashy & Kenny, 2000) to examine the dyadic associations of 74 clients and 23 therapists in their evaluations of working alliance, real relationship, session quality, and client improvement over time in ongoing psychodynamic or interpersonal psychotherapy. There were significant actor effects for both therapists and clients, with the participant's own ratings of working alliance and real relationship independently predicting their own evaluations of session quality. There were significant client partner effects, with clients' working alliance and real relationship independently predicting their therapists' evaluations of session quality. The client partner real relationship effect was stronger in later sessions than in earlier sessions. Therapists' real relationship ratings (partner effect) were a stronger predictor of clients' session quality ratings in later sessions than in earlier sessions. Therapists' working alliance ratings (partner effect) were a stronger predictor of clients' session quality ratings when clients made greater improvement than when clients made lesser improvement. For clients' session outcome ratings, there were complex three-way interactions, such that both Client real relationship and working alliance interacted with client improvement and time in treatment to predict clients' session quality. These findings strongly suggest both individual and partner effects when clients and therapists evaluate psychotherapy process and outcome. Implications for research and practice are discussed.

  5. Real Clients, Real Management, Real Failure: The Risks and Rewards of Service Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cyphert, Dale

    2006-01-01

    There are multiple advantages to service-learning projects across the business curriculum, but in communication classes the author has found their biggest value to be authenticity. A "real-world" assignment requires the flexible, creative integration of communication skills in an environment where, "unlike exams and other typical university…

  6. FRIEND Engine Framework: a real time neurofeedback client-server system for neuroimaging studies

    PubMed Central

    Basilio, Rodrigo; Garrido, Griselda J.; Sato, João R.; Hoefle, Sebastian; Melo, Bruno R. P.; Pamplona, Fabricio A.; Zahn, Roland; Moll, Jorge

    2015-01-01

    In this methods article, we present a new implementation of a recently reported FSL-integrated neurofeedback tool, the standalone version of “Functional Real-time Interactive Endogenous Neuromodulation and Decoding” (FRIEND). We will refer to this new implementation as the FRIEND Engine Framework. The framework comprises a client-server cross-platform solution for real time fMRI and fMRI/EEG neurofeedback studies, enabling flexible customization or integration of graphical interfaces, devices, and data processing. This implementation allows a fast setup of novel plug-ins and frontends, which can be shared with the user community at large. The FRIEND Engine Framework is freely distributed for non-commercial, research purposes. PMID:25688193

  7. Clinician Perspectives of Diagnosis and Perceived Client Change in "Real World" Psychotherapy for Youth Emotional and Behavioral Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haine, Rachel A.; Brookman-Frazee, Lauren; Tsai, Katherine H.; Roesch, Scott C.; Garland, Ann F.

    2007-01-01

    We investigated the extent to which clinician-assigned diagnoses of emotional and behavioral disorders and clinicians' perceptions of client change are consistent with structured measures of youth clinical functioning and parent/family characteristics within the context of usual care or "real world" psychotherapy. A total of 54 therapists from two…

  8. Evaluating health worker performance in Benin using the simulated client method with real children

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The simulated client (SC) method for evaluating health worker performance utilizes surveyors who pose as patients to make surreptitious observations during consultations. Compared to conspicuous observation (CO) by surveyors, which is commonly done in developing countries, SC data better reflect usual health worker practices. This information is important because CO can cause performance to be better than usual. Despite this advantage of SCs, the method’s full potential has not been realized for evaluating performance for pediatric illnesses because real children have not been utilized as SCs. Previous SC studies used scenarios of ill children that were not actually brought to health workers. During a trial that evaluated a quality improvement intervention in Benin (the Integrated Management of Childhood Illness [IMCI] strategy), we conducted an SC survey with adult caretakers as surveyors and real children to evaluate the feasibility of this approach and used the results to assess the validity of CO. Methods We conducted an SC survey and a CO survey (one right after the other) of health workers in the same 55 health facilities. A detailed description of the SC survey process was produced. Results of the two surveys were compared for 27 performance indicators using logistic regression modeling. Results SC and CO surveyors observed 54 and 185 consultations, respectively. No serious problems occurred during the SC survey. Performance levels measured by CO were moderately higher than those measured by SCs (median CO – SC difference = 16.4 percentage-points). Survey differences were sometimes much greater for IMCI-trained health workers (median difference = 29.7 percentage-points) than for workers without IMCI training (median difference = 3.1 percentage-points). Conclusion SC surveys can be done safely with real children if appropriate precautions are taken. CO can introduce moderately large positive biases, and these biases might be greater for health

  9. Reusable Client-Side JavaScript Modules for Immersive Web-Based Real-Time Collaborative Neuroimage Visualization.

    PubMed

    Bernal-Rusiel, Jorge L; Rannou, Nicolas; Gollub, Randy L; Pieper, Steve; Murphy, Shawn; Robertson, Richard; Grant, Patricia E; Pienaar, Rudolph

    2017-01-01

    In this paper we present a web-based software solution to the problem of implementing real-time collaborative neuroimage visualization. In both clinical and research settings, simple and powerful access to imaging technologies across multiple devices is becoming increasingly useful. Prior technical solutions have used a server-side rendering and push-to-client model wherein only the server has the full image dataset. We propose a rich client solution in which each client has all the data and uses the Google Drive Realtime API for state synchronization. We have developed a small set of reusable client-side object-oriented JavaScript modules that make use of the XTK toolkit, a popular open-source JavaScript library also developed by our team, for the in-browser rendering and visualization of brain image volumes. Efficient realtime communication among the remote instances is achieved by using just a small JSON object, comprising a representation of the XTK image renderers' state, as the Google Drive Realtime collaborative data model. The developed open-source JavaScript modules have already been instantiated in a web-app called MedView, a distributed collaborative neuroimage visualization application that is delivered to the users over the web without requiring the installation of any extra software or browser plugin. This responsive application allows multiple physically distant physicians or researchers to cooperate in real time to reach a diagnosis or scientific conclusion. It also serves as a proof of concept for the capabilities of the presented technological solution.

  10. Understanding integrated mental health care in "real-world" primary care settings: What matters to health care providers and clients for evaluation and improvement?

    PubMed

    Ion, Allyson; Sunderji, Nadiya; Jansz, Gwen; Ghavam-Rassoul, Abbas

    2017-09-01

    The integration of mental health specialists into primary care has been widely advocated to deliver evidence-based mental health care to a defined population while improving access, clinical outcomes, and cost efficiency. Integrated care has been infrequently and inconsistently translated into real-world settings; as a result, the key individual components of effective integrated care remain unclear. This article reports findings from a qualitative study that explored provider and client experiences of integrated care. We conducted in-depth interviews with integrated care providers (n = 13) and clients (n = 9) to understand their perspectives and experiences of integrated care including recommended areas for quality measurement and improvement. The authors used qualitative content and reflexive thematic analytic approaches to synthesize the interview data. Clients and integrated care providers agreed regarding the overarching concepts of the what, how, and why of integrated care including co-location of care; continuity of care; team composition and functioning; client centeredness; and comprehensive care for individuals and populations. Providers and clients proposed a number of dimensions that could be the focus for quality measurement and evaluation, illuminating what is needed for successful context-sensitive spreading and scaling of integrated care interventions. With a mounting gap between the empirical support for integrated care approaches and the implementation of these models, there is a need to clarify the aims of integrated care and the key ingredients required for widespread implementation outside of research settings. This study has important implications for future integrated care research, and health care provider and client engagement in the quality movement. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  11. Effects of recent Leptospira vaccination on whole blood real-time PCR testing in healthy client-owned dogs.

    PubMed

    Midence, J N; Leutenegger, C M; Chandler, A M; Goldstein, R E

    2012-01-01

    Bacterin-based canine Leptospira vaccines could present a challenge for the use of whole blood real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) as a diagnostic tool. Recent vaccination could induce positive results if the targeted DNA fragment is present within the vaccine and in the blood of the recently vaccinated dog. The objective of this study was to assess whether 2 available 4-serovar vaccines induce a positive real-time PCR reaction in the blood of healthy recently vaccinated dogs. Twenty healthy dogs. This was a prospective study. Dogs were assigned to 1 of 2 vaccine groups. Both vaccines were culture-based and include Leptospira interrogans serovars Pomona, Canicola, and Icterohaemorrhagiae and Leptospira kirschneri serovar Grippotyphosa. Whole blood for real-time PCR and serum for the microscopic agglutination test (MAT) were collected prior to and 3 and 7 days after vaccination and weekly thereafter for 8 weeks. Two real-time PCR tests targeting 2 different genes were performed independently in a blinded fashion. Both Leptospira vaccines produced positive real-time PCR reactions when assayed undiluted or diluted 1 : 100 in canine blood. However, blood samples drawn from all dogs at all time points after vaccination were negative on PCR. All dogs developed MAT titers. Recent vaccination with 2 commercially available vaccines does not interfere with the use of real-time PCR for the identification of acute Leptospira infection in dogs. Copyright © 2011 by the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine.

  12. Building I.S. Professionals through a Real-World Client Project in a Database Application Development Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Podeschi, R. J.

    2016-01-01

    Information systems curricula are increasingly using active learning methodologies to help students learn "through" technology rather than just "about" technology. While one way to achieve this is through the assignment of semester-long projects, previous research suggests that real-world projects provide more meaningful…

  13. Clients' perceptions of their psychotherapists' multicultural orientation.

    PubMed

    Owen, Jesse J; Tao, Karen; Leach, Mark M; Rodolfa, Emil

    2011-09-01

    The current retrospective study examined whether clients' (N = 176) perceptions of their psychotherapists' multicultural orientation (MCO) were associated with their psychological functioning, working alliance, and real relationship scores. Moreover, we tested whether clients' perceptions of the working alliance and the real relationship mediated the relationship between clients' perceptions of their psychotherapists' MCO and psychological functioning. The results showed that clients' perceptions of their psychotherapists' MCO were positively related to working alliance, real relationship, and psychological functioning. Only clients' ratings of the working alliance mediated the relationship between clients' perceptions of their psychotherapists' MCO and psychological functioning. Thus, because clients perceive their psychotherapists as being more oriented toward cultural issues, they may view the therapist as being more credible and may gain a sense of comfort in the therapeutic process. In turn, clients' strong alliance facilitates improvement in psychological well-being.

  14. "Pa.N.D.A". A revolutionary client/server scientific application for network paleo-metadata analysis and visualization in real time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pozzi, M.

    2003-04-01

    Pa.N.D.A. client/server application was developed as a tool for a complete comparison and cross-correlation of different “paleo” proxies within and between sites in real time. However, as the project developed the paleodatabase performed a number of other important roles. In particular, the system has facilitated: - quality control, ensuring consistency and compatibility among (meta)data produced by different researchers and laboratories; - data sharing, by providing a means of rapidly distributing datasets to all users as the project developed; - basic (meta)data manipulation, such as age depth modelling and core correlation, harmonization of microfossil data recorded at different taxonomic resolutions, calibration of the various proxy records, paleogeographycal maps and paleoecological reconstructions; - data exploration and hypothesis-prediction generation, by allowing rapid visualization of multiple proxies on various age or depth scales; - hypothesis-prediction testing, by preparing the data for numerical analyses to test the significance of observed relationships and the creation of a long-term archive for all paleodata. The scientific objectives are to create a management system for paleoenvironmental climatic data, paleoecological investigations and paleogeographycal reconstructions, to develop analytical methods for quantitative and qualitative study of the dynamical and statistical characteristics of paleo-metadata, and to make these data readily available to the international scientific research community in order also to make some prediction maps for future climate. Moreover the structure of the plan will be in a position to producing output graphical dynamic with connection database continuously up-to-date and therefore in one condition to you of numerical and graphical analysis in real time.

  15. CPS: client violence and client victims.

    PubMed

    Ringstad, Robin

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes a study that explored the extent and nature of workplace violence in child protective services (CPS). A total of 68 workers and clients reported on their experiences. Of workers, 70% reported being the victim of client violence, and 22% reported they had perpetrated a violent act toward a client. Of clients, 55% reported being a victim of assault by a CPS worker, while 42% acknowledged perpetrating violence. Future research needs and recommendations for practice including training, reporting, and policy development are discussed.

  16. Underestimation of homeless clients.

    PubMed

    Maddox, Sarah; Segan, Catherine

    2016-06-09

    Issue addressed: In Australia smoking rates among the homeless are extremely high; however, little is known about their interest in quitting and few homeless services offer cessation assistance. In an Australian homeless service, this research examined the clients' smoking from the client, staff and organisational perspectives in order to assess the need for cessation assistance for clients and identify opportunities to increase access to it.Methods: Twenty-six nurses completed an anonymous survey describing their attitudes to providing smoking-cessation support, current practices and estimates of client smoking and interest in quitting. Subsequently, nurses administered a survey to 104 clients to determine their smoking prevalence and interest in quitting. Organisation-wide tobacco-related policy and practices were audited.Results: Most clients (82%) smoked, half of these (52%) reported wanting to quit and 64% reported trying to quit or reduce their smoking in the previous 3 months. Nurses approximated clients' smoking prevalence (88% vs 82% reported by clients), but underestimated interest in quitting (33% vs 52% reported by clients). Among nurses 93% agreed that cessation support should be part of normal client care. The organisation's client-assessment form contained fields for 'respiratory issues' and 'drug issues', but no specific field for smoking status. The organisation's smoking policy focused on providing a smoke-free work environment.Conclusions: Many smokers using homeless services want to quit and are actively trying to reduce and quit smoking. Smoking-cessation assistance that meets the needs of people experiencing homelessness is clearly warranted.So what?: Homeless services should develop, and include in their smoking policy and intake processes, a practice of routinely assessing tobacco use, offering brief interventions and referral to appropriately tailored services.

  17. Client Suicide: What Now?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ellis, Thomas E.; Patel, Amee B.

    2012-01-01

    The loss of a client to suicide is a painful personal and professional experience for mental health providers. Whether trainee or experienced professional, the affected clinician often reports feeling overwhelmed and unprepared for the experience of client suicide, together with significant emotional distress and diminished work performance. In…

  18. Counseling the Involuntary Client.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ritchie, Martin H.

    1986-01-01

    Involuntary clients resist efforts to help them because they do not admit having a problem, they do not want to change, or they do not know how to change. Specific techniques to help these clients overcome various kinds of reluctance and resistance are discussed. (Author/BL)

  19. Lessons about Clients' Expectations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Braskamp, Larry A.; And Others

    1987-01-01

    Evaluation client characteristics are outlined, based on experiences of the Office of Instructional and Management Services, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, and contract evaluators for industry and other higher education institutions. Objectivity, expertise, sensitivity to client needs, standardized data presentation,…

  20. Methadone maintenance: some client opinions.

    PubMed

    Brown, B S; Benn, G J; Jansen, D R

    1975-06-01

    The authors found similar attitudes toward methadone and methadone treatment programs in 75 detoxification and 115 methadone maintenance clients. Both groups expressed considerable ambivalence--although they viewed methadone as capable of helping them end their herioin addiction, they were concerned about possible methadone dependence and about side effects, both real and imagined. The authors stress the societal context of such concern and suggest that, althought they are not easily allayed, limiting the duration of methadone maintenace from the outset of treatment may be an ameliorative factor.

  1. Clients as conversational agents.

    PubMed

    Massfeller, Helen F; Strong, Tom

    2012-08-01

    Conversational agency is our invented term that orients us to ways in which clients participate in therapeutic dialogues. In this study we examined how clients' conversational correctives and initiatives influenced collaborative therapeutic consultations. Thirty-five single-session lifestyle consultations were videotaped in which adult clients volunteered to discuss concerns of non-clinical severity with a counselor. We discursively microanalyzed excerpts where clients initiated topic shifts or corrected counselor misunderstandings and how counselors responded to them. Clients were actively involved in co-managing conversational developments during the consultations. They influenced the content and course of the conversations with the counselors by correcting, interrupting, or speaking from positions contrary or unrelated to those of the counselors. Clients observably influenced the conversational agenda through their correctives and initiatives if counselors were responsive during face-to-face consultations. Clinicians should demonstrate increased sensitivity and relational responsivity by intentionally engaging with clients' agentive contributions to consultative dialogues. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. 37 CFR 11.703 - Direct contact with prospective clients.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 37 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Direct contact with... contact with prospective clients. (a) A practitioner shall not by in-person, live telephone or real-time electronic contact solicit professional employment from a prospective client when a significant motive...

  3. 37 CFR 11.703 - Direct contact with prospective clients.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 37 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Direct contact with... contact with prospective clients. (a) A practitioner shall not by in-person, live telephone or real-time electronic contact solicit professional employment from a prospective client when a significant motive...

  4. Telematics-based online client-server/client collaborative environment for radiotherapy planning simulations.

    PubMed

    Kum, Oyeon

    2007-11-01

    Customized cancer radiation treatment planning for each patient is very useful for both a patient and a doctor because it provides the ability to deliver higher doses to a more accurately defined tumor and at the same time lower doses to organs at risk and normal tissues. This can be realized by building an accurate planning simulation system to provide better treatment strategies based on each patient's tomographic data such as CT, MRI, PET, or SPECT. In this study, we develop a real-time online client-server/client collaborative environment between the client (health care professionals or hospitals) and the server/client under a secure network using telematics (the integrated use of telecommunications and medical informatics). The implementation is based on a point-to-point communication scheme between client and server/client following the WYSIWIS (what you see is what I see) paradigm. After uploading the patient tomographic data, the client is able to collaborate with the server/client for treatment planning. Consequently, the level of health care services can be improved, specifically for small radiotherapy clinics in rural/remote-country areas that do not possess much experience or equipment such as a treatment planning simulator. The telematics service of the system can also be used to provide continued medical education in radiotherapy. Moreover, the system is easy to use. A client can use the system if s/he is familiar with the Windows(TM) operating system because it is designed and built based on a user-friendly concept. This system does not require the client to continue hardware and software maintenance and updates. These are performed automatically by the server.

  5. Sophia Client Version 12

    SciTech Connect

    2012-08-09

    Sophia Client Version 12 offers command line access to the Sophia Daemon and the Sophia database files. It provides print, fingerprint, acknowledge, color coding and status access to these other resources.

  6. On the Use of Client-Driven Projects in the Mathematics Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maki, Dan; Winston, Wayne; Shafii-Mousavi, Morteza; Kochanowski, Paul; Lang, Chris; Ernstberger, Kathy; Hodgson, Ted

    2006-01-01

    In this article, we discuss the use of client-driven projects--projects that are posed by business, government, and non-profit organizations and based upon real problems facing the organization. Although client-driven projects have long been used in business and engineering education, their use in the mathematics classroom is rare. Client-driven…

  7. Superpowers and client states

    SciTech Connect

    Efrat, M.; Bercovitch, J.

    1987-01-01

    Throughout the world the two superpowers often conduct their global conflict by proxy, taking different sides in regional disputes. An important question of international relations is where the balance of power lies in the superpower client state relationship-how far are the interests of the superpower subordinated to those of the client state or vice versa. Taking the two case studies of the US-Israel relationship and the Soviet-Syrian relationship, this book explores the perceptions by each side of the relationship and the reality. It goes on to make general conclusions about superpower-client state relationships. Contents: Introduction; In Search of a Theoretical Framework; Client-States in Superpower Perception; Superpowers in Client States' Perception; The Case of US-Israel Relations; Israel in US Perspective; The USA in Israeli Perspective; Flows of US Civilian and Military Resources to Israel; The Case of Soviet-Syrian Relations; Syria in Soviet Perspective; The USSR in Syrian Perspective; Flows of Soviet Civilian and Military Resources to Syria; Comparative Analysis and Conclusions; Overview of the two cases studies and conclusions.

  8. Psychotherapy for Suicidal Clients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lester, David

    1994-01-01

    Reviews various systems of psychotherapy for suitability for suicidal clients. Discusses psychoanalysis, cognitive therapy, primal therapy, transactional analysis, Gestalt therapy, reality therapy, person-centered therapy, existential analysis, and Jungian analysis in light of available treatment options. Includes 36 citations. (Author/CRR)

  9. Detecting Alcoholism in Clients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Connors, John K.

    1979-01-01

    Presents a systematic approach, using the most reliable and valid instruments available, allowing a clinician to quickly and accurately diagnose or rule out the presence of alcoholism in a client. Accurate diagnosis allows proper treatment of this disorder, affecting about 6.7 percent of all people. (Author)

  10. Training Evaluation: Clients' Roles.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hashim, Junaidah

    2001-01-01

    A study was conducted of 262 training providers in Malaysia, where providers must be government approved. Government regulation, client demands for high quality, and an economic downturn that focused attention on training costs have all influenced evaluation in a positive direction. (SK)

  11. Psychotherapy for Suicidal Clients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lester, David

    1994-01-01

    Reviews various systems of psychotherapy for suitability for suicidal clients. Discusses psychoanalysis, cognitive therapy, primal therapy, transactional analysis, Gestalt therapy, reality therapy, person-centered therapy, existential analysis, and Jungian analysis in light of available treatment options. Includes 36 citations. (Author/CRR)

  12. Early Attrition among Suicidal Clients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Surgenor, P. W. G.; Meehan, V.; Moore, A.

    2016-01-01

    The study aimed to identify the level of suicidal ideation in early attrition clients and their reasons for the early termination of their therapy. The cross-sectional design involved early attrition clients (C[subscript A]) who withdrew from therapy before their second session (n = 61), and continuing clients who (C[subscript C]) progressed…

  13. Treating the disconfirmed psychiatric client.

    PubMed

    Heineken, J

    1983-01-01

    Frequent disconfirmation behaviors have been documented in psychiatric clients. Individuals who demonstrate maladaptive patterns of disconfirmation can learn to understand and modify this dysfunctional sequence. Through one to one interactions and group discussions, psychiatric nurses can help clients learn more positive communication behaviors. This accomplishment will positively affect the client's interpersonal responsiveness and self-esteem.

  14. Early Attrition among Suicidal Clients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Surgenor, P. W. G.; Meehan, V.; Moore, A.

    2016-01-01

    The study aimed to identify the level of suicidal ideation in early attrition clients and their reasons for the early termination of their therapy. The cross-sectional design involved early attrition clients (C[subscript A]) who withdrew from therapy before their second session (n = 61), and continuing clients who (C[subscript C]) progressed…

  15. The Competitive Advantage: Client Service.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leffel, Linda G.; DeBord, Karen B.

    The adult education literature contains a considerable amount of research on and discussion of client service in the marketing process, management and staff roles in service- and product-oriented businesses, and the importance of client service and service quality to survival in the marketplace. By applying the principles of client-oriented…

  16. The ISMARA client

    PubMed Central

    Ioannidis, Vassilios; van Nimwegen, Erik; Stockinger, Heinz

    2016-01-01

    ISMARA ( ismara.unibas.ch) automatically infers the key regulators and regulatory interactions from high-throughput gene expression or chromatin state data. However, given the large sizes of current next generation sequencing (NGS) datasets, data uploading times are a major bottleneck. Additionally, for proprietary data, users may be uncomfortable with uploading entire raw datasets to an external server. Both these problems could be alleviated by providing a means by which users could pre-process their raw data locally, transferring only a small summary file to the ISMARA server. We developed a stand-alone client application that pre-processes large input files (RNA-seq or ChIP-seq data) on the user's computer for performing ISMARA analysis in a completely automated manner, including uploading of small processed summary files to the ISMARA server. This reduces file sizes by up to a factor of 1000, and upload times from many hours to mere seconds. The client application is available from ismara.unibas.ch/ISMARA/client. PMID:28232860

  17. [Client centered psychotherapy].

    PubMed

    Werthmann, H V

    1979-01-01

    In the discussion concerning which psychotherapeutic methods should come under the auspices of the medical health system in West Germany, the question is raised regarding the client-centered therapy of Carl Rogers. Can it be considered a distinct psychotherapeutic method? A review of the scientific literature dealing with this method shows that it provides neither a theory of mental illness nor a theory of clinical application based on individual cases or specific neurotic disturbances, Therefore it should be categorized as a useful method of communication in the field of psychology and not as a therapeutic method for treating mental illness.

  18. A Small-Scale Client Project for Business Writing Students: Developing a Guide for First-Time Home Buyers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kreth, Melinda L.

    2005-01-01

    This assignment reflects a client-based pedagogy, which is often used in technical and professional communication courses. Unlike service learning pedagogy, which emphasizes social activism, client-based pedagogy focuses on helping students to understand and respond effectively to "real-world" clients and their organizational contexts. Also,…

  19. A Small-Scale Client Project for Business Writing Students: Developing a Guide for First-Time Home Buyers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kreth, Melinda L.

    2005-01-01

    This assignment reflects a client-based pedagogy, which is often used in technical and professional communication courses. Unlike service learning pedagogy, which emphasizes social activism, client-based pedagogy focuses on helping students to understand and respond effectively to "real-world" clients and their organizational contexts. Also,…

  20. Client engagement in drug treatment.

    PubMed

    Fiorentine, R; Nakashima, J; Anglin, M D

    1999-10-01

    Client engagement in drug abuse treatment is associated with favorable treatment outcomes, but it is not completely understood why some clients are more likely to engage in treatment. This study examines a wide array of client characteristics and treatment experiences potentially associated with engagement. Findings from the Los Angeles Target Cities Project, funded by the Center for Substance Abuse Treatment, indicate that the predictors of treatment engagement are generally confined to current treatment experiences. For both women and men, the perceived utility of treatment, ancillary services, and the client-counselor relationship are the strongest predictors of client engagement in treatment. Client characteristics are generally not strong predictors of treatment engagement. Concerning the client-counselor relationship, the findings suggest that women may respond more favorably to an empathic counseling style, whereas men may respond to a more utilitarian style. The findings contradict popular stereotypes about the treatment-"receptive" client, identify possible directions for treatment improvement, and highlight the need for more research examining the treatment experience of the client. Other research, clinical, and policy implications are discussed.

  1. Client Common Factors Represented by Client Motivation and Autonomy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scheel, Michael J.

    2011-01-01

    Ryan and colleagues are applauded for elevating client factors in the form of motivation and autonomy to equal status with the alliance as common factors in psychotherapy. Next, client motivation and autonomy are explained to be inextricably linked with one promoting the other. Motivational methods are summarized for the major approaches, making…

  2. The Therapeutic Alliance: Clients' Categorization of Client-Identified Factors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simpson, Arlene J.; Bedi, Robinder P.

    2012-01-01

    Clients' perspectives on the therapeutic alliance were examined using written descriptions of factors that clients believed to be helpful in developing a strong alliance. Fifty participants sorted previously collected statements into thematically similar piles and then gave each set of statements a title. Multivariate concept mapping statistical…

  3. The Therapeutic Alliance: Clients' Categorization of Client-Identified Factors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simpson, Arlene J.; Bedi, Robinder P.

    2012-01-01

    Clients' perspectives on the therapeutic alliance were examined using written descriptions of factors that clients believed to be helpful in developing a strong alliance. Fifty participants sorted previously collected statements into thematically similar piles and then gave each set of statements a title. Multivariate concept mapping statistical…

  4. Client-server technology meets operational-planning challenges

    SciTech Connect

    Cole, L.A.; Stansberry, C.J. Jr.; Le, K.D.; Ma, H.

    1996-07-01

    Utilities are starting to find that it is rather difficult to upgrade their proprietary energy management system, which was designed for real-time operations, fast enough to keep pace with rapidly changing business needs. To solve this problem, many utilities are building a data warehouse to store real-time data and using the data warehouse to launch client-server applications to meet their pressing business requirements. This article describes a client-server implementation launched at Tennessee Valley Authority in 1994 to meet the utility`s operational-planning needs. The article summarizes some of the lessons learned and outlines future development plans.

  5. Differential Client Attractiveness in a Counseling Analogue

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Carl S.; And Others

    1977-01-01

    Investigated variations in conceptual complexity level of counselor and client on counselor attraction to the client. Counselor trainees rated attractiveness of clients following two counseling analogue tasks in which the client was depicted as exhibiting high or low conceptual level. More complex clients are more attractive across both levels.…

  6. Career Counseling the Experienced Client.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Washington, Tom

    1993-01-01

    Experienced counselor describes how older client's work and life experience can be used to advantage in new job search. Notes that older clients already know what they do not want; they must identify their work content skills; they may find that traditional resources offer little help; and they do not want to start at the bottom. (NB)

  7. Group Work with Transgender Clients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dickey, Lore M.; Loewy, Michael I.

    2010-01-01

    Drawing on the existing literature, the authors' research and clinical experiences, and the first author's personal journey as a member and leader of the transgender community, this article offers a brief history of group work with transgender clients followed by suggestions for group work with transgender clients from a social justice…

  8. Group Work with Transgender Clients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dickey, Lore M.; Loewy, Michael I.

    2010-01-01

    Drawing on the existing literature, the authors' research and clinical experiences, and the first author's personal journey as a member and leader of the transgender community, this article offers a brief history of group work with transgender clients followed by suggestions for group work with transgender clients from a social justice…

  9. Using Clients to Monitor Performance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Molnar, Jack; Stup, Brenda

    1994-01-01

    This article describes an ongoing survey that illustrates how evaluators, working with program managers, have effectively used client-based data to monitor performance in the Social Security Administration. The value of client-based data outweighs the limitations and problems collecting it. Customer perceptions are a critical barometer of quality.…

  10. Prohibiting lawyer-client sex.

    PubMed

    Gutheil, T; Jorgenson, L; Sutherland, P

    1992-01-01

    Psychotherapists' and physicians' sexual contact with their patients has been long held as unethical conduct. However, lawyers' sexual contact with clients has been largely ignored in the professional literature. This article uniquely anatomizes the similarities in the vulnerabilities and power imbalances that exist between psychotherapists' and lawyers' relationships with patients/clients. These characteristics enable the professional to exert undue influence over the less-powerful party, and for these reasons lawyers should be held to fiduciary standards in their personal dealings with clients. The authors propose a rebuttable presumption that sexual contact between an attorney and client was obtained through the attorney's exercise of undue influence and was therefore a breach of the attorney's fiduciary duties to the client.

  11. Measuring client and carer perspectives.

    PubMed

    John, A

    1998-01-01

    Speech and language therapists (SLTs) seek to meet the needs of the clients/patients and carers attending therapy. Part of the process of providing appropriate interventions is understanding the areas which the client/patient and their carers perceive as important issues. There is a need to know their views, expectations and desired outcomes if intervention is to be effective. Since the 1980s the National Health Service has placed emphasis on the need to include the views of users of health care in assessing service delivery and the outcomes of care. This paper explores the issues concerning measuring client perceptions, existing approaches to capturing client and carer views and summarises initial work from a pilot project to develop a Client Outcome Measure.

  12. Clients of SSA Net-Ready Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richmond, D.; Bicker, S.; Malloy, B.

    2014-09-01

    Multiple Net-Centric approaches have been developed to expose optical and radar sensor data. Client applications have been developed to ingest and process this data by NASIC and JMS. Data flows and formats used that integrate these Net-Centric approaches with JMS and NASIC will be presented. Example data collected and examples of improved SSA benefits will be discussed. Potential future improvements to increase the precision of the SOI processing algorithm will be addressed. Specifics regarding the process to gain access to the N-CSDS GEODSS sensor data in near real time will be identified.

  13. Students as Clients in a Professional/Client Relationship.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bailey, Jeffrey J.

    2000-01-01

    Proposes the metaphor of professional/client rather than student-as-customer to characterize the relationship between professors and students. Uses examples of fitness trainer, management consultant, accounting service, and mountain guide to illustrate faculty and student roles. (SK)

  14. Spirituality and mental health clients.

    PubMed

    O'Reilly, Mary Linda

    2004-07-01

    Spirituality is an important part of human existence but is often overlooked in the conceptualization of the person as a biopsychosocial entity. This article examines spirituality as a concept, relates it to the experience of mental health clients, proposes spiritual assessments and interventions within the role of advanced practice mental health nurses, and discusses the necessity of including spiritual interventions to support healing and wholeness for mental health clients.

  15. Clinical management of "entitled" clients.

    PubMed

    Kerr, Norine

    2002-12-01

    As this process occurs, the painful affects become toned down for the clients. By exploring the source of clients' painful affects, wounded self-esteem, fearful projections, and dysfunctional defenses, misguided entitlement can be undermined. Much of this work will occur in a formal psychotherapy process, but nurses can create healthy object relatedness. To do so, they must see beyond the provocative and offensive behaviors to the vulnerable individual within who desperately needs compassionate and intelligent nursing care.

  16. Measurement of Client Preferences for Therapist Behavior.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richert, Alphons J.

    While past research has found conflicting results on the place for client role preferences in psychotherapy, none of this research has examined the client role preferences in an actual client population seeking outpatient therapy. This study involved the development of a measure of client role preferences which attempted to survey a wider range of…

  17. Client training vital for NFP.

    PubMed

    Keller, S; Finger, W R

    1996-01-01

    Clients need both skill and motivation to effectively use natural family planning (NFP). Thus, NFP services must provide adequate counseling and training to clients. A good teacher of NFP does not need formal health care training but she/must have good communication skills. A teacher usually needs to meet with a client four times over a period of several months to teach NFP. Fertility awareness comprises the first step in NFP training. This involves helping couples to understand the reproductive system, menstrual cycles, and fertile periods. The NFP Training and Medical Services Center in Nairobi, Kenya, provides clients, many of whom live in slums and are illiterate, with an exercise book with small squares that they color so they can track their fertility signs. They tend to use the cervical mucus method rather than the basal temperature method which requires a thermometer. In Los Angeles, California, clients of one NFP program attend group sessions and individual counseling sessions to learn about the menstrual cycle, fertile period, and rules of NFP and how to apply them. The Twin Cities NFP Center in Minnesota found that individual counseling was 50% more expensive than group sessions and it affected changes in neither the pregnancy nor NFP continuation rates. Group training here involved more men. Catholic groups in Bangladesh, India, Kenya, South Korea, and the US conducted a study of NFP programs and found that client's willingness or ability to discuss NFP were not associated with socioeconomic status, previous family planning experiences, and education. Another study of the same users did find an association between higher education and lower unplanned pregnancy rate. The same was true for previous family planning use. Since limited resources prevent some family planning programs from training staff in NFP, the programs can refer clients to existing NFP services, sending one staff member to be trained in NFP, or having one staff member providing NFP

  18. A hybrid brain-computer interface-based mail client.

    PubMed

    Yu, Tianyou; Li, Yuanqing; Long, Jinyi; Li, Feng

    2013-01-01

    Brain-computer interface-based communication plays an important role in brain-computer interface (BCI) applications; electronic mail is one of the most common communication tools. In this study, we propose a hybrid BCI-based mail client that implements electronic mail communication by means of real-time classification of multimodal features extracted from scalp electroencephalography (EEG). With this BCI mail client, users can receive, read, write, and attach files to their mail. Using a BCI mouse that utilizes hybrid brain signals, that is, motor imagery and P300 potential, the user can select and activate the function keys and links on the mail client graphical user interface (GUI). An adaptive P300 speller is employed for text input. The system has been tested with 6 subjects, and the experimental results validate the efficacy of the proposed method.

  19. A Hybrid Brain-Computer Interface-Based Mail Client

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Tianyou; Li, Yuanqing; Long, Jinyi; Li, Feng

    2013-01-01

    Brain-computer interface-based communication plays an important role in brain-computer interface (BCI) applications; electronic mail is one of the most common communication tools. In this study, we propose a hybrid BCI-based mail client that implements electronic mail communication by means of real-time classification of multimodal features extracted from scalp electroencephalography (EEG). With this BCI mail client, users can receive, read, write, and attach files to their mail. Using a BCI mouse that utilizes hybrid brain signals, that is, motor imagery and P300 potential, the user can select and activate the function keys and links on the mail client graphical user interface (GUI). An adaptive P300 speller is employed for text input. The system has been tested with 6 subjects, and the experimental results validate the efficacy of the proposed method. PMID:23690880

  20. Nutrition Education Needs Pantry Clients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wood, Dolores K.; Shultz, Jill Armstrong; Edlefsen, Miriam; Butkus, Sue N.

    2007-01-01

    Two food pantries were surveyed for nutrition education (NE) interests and experiences. One site provided nutrition education classes; the comparison site was utilized to assess client interest in class topics. "Fixing low cost meals," "fixing quick and easy recipes," and "stretching food and food dollars" were topics…

  1. Nutrition Education Needs Pantry Clients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wood, Dolores K.; Shultz, Jill Armstrong; Edlefsen, Miriam; Butkus, Sue N.

    2007-01-01

    Two food pantries were surveyed for nutrition education (NE) interests and experiences. One site provided nutrition education classes; the comparison site was utilized to assess client interest in class topics. "Fixing low cost meals," "fixing quick and easy recipes," and "stretching food and food dollars" were topics…

  2. Rehabilitation Counseling with Deaf Clients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Danek, Marita

    1983-01-01

    The nature and impact on educational and vocational functioning of prelingual deafness are reviewed, stereotypes are exposed, and the special needs of deaf clients in rehabilitation assessment, goal setting, service delivery, and placement are discussed. Trends in deafness rehabilitation are considered in terms of legislation, professional…

  3. Client services for geriatric pets.

    PubMed

    Hancock, G; Yates, J

    1989-01-01

    Some veterinarians have been reluctant to discuss the prospect of the death of a pet because of a sense of discomfort and a lack of understanding about how to respond to the client's grief reaction. It is essential to take the time for this important communication and help clients deal with fears about the process, any feelings of guilt and helplessness, and judgments about the medical aspects of a case. Clients must be encouraged to express grief over the loss of a pet, particularly a geriatric pet that has lived with them many years and to which they are deeply bonded. Veterinarians need to counsel clients about obtaining additional pets or another pet. The phrase "replacement pet" must be stricken from the veterinarian's vocabulary. One does not "replace" a deceased spouse, mother, father, or child. It is possible to have another child or find another spouse, but it is not possible to replace a person. Neither can a pet be "replaced," because each pet is a unique living being. It is disrespectful to the memory of deceased pets to belittle their uniqueness by suggesting that they can be replaced. Instead, the veterinarian has the capability and responsibility to help pet owners maintain fond and happy memories of an irreplacable pet, while finding room in their hearts for another new pet to create happiness for the future. Once the grief is resolved, clients will be thankful for having had the privilege of sharing their life with an animal and experiencing the joy of the bond between two unique individuals.

  4. Do you know your equine practice clients?

    PubMed

    Moreau, Philippe

    2012-04-01

    A healthy group of loyal clients is of the utmost importance for a healthy practice.Knowing the clients’ expectations and making every effort to exceed them when clients meet with the veterinarian or visit the clinic will result in continued client satisfaction. Clients will show loyalty to a veterinarian when they perceive that the care provided to them suits them and their animal and exceeds their expectations.

  5. Client-Therapist Complementarity and Therapeutic Outcome.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dietzel, C. S.; Abeles, Norman

    One hundred twenty tape recorded psychotherapy sessions representing early, middle, and late interviews with 20 clients were studied. Clients were divided into successful (N-10) and unsuccessful outcome (N-10) groups on the basis of clinicians' ratings of pre- and post-MMPI data. Raters scored the response units of clients and therapists and…

  6. Client Self-Disclosure in Psychotherapy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stiles, William B.

    Psychotherapists of different theoretical persuasions use systematically different profiles of verbal response modes. However, clients tend to use very similar profiles, regardless of what their therapist does. Disclosure comprises the largest part of this common client profile, and it distinguishes the client role from other roles. Higher levels…

  7. Client-Side Monitoring for Web Mining.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fenstermacher, Kurt D.; Ginsburg, Mark

    2003-01-01

    Discusses mining Web data to draw conclusions about Web users and proposes a client-side monitoring system that supports flexible data collection and encompasses client-side applications beyond the Web browser to incorporate standard office productivity tools. Highlights include goals for client-side monitoring; framework for user monitoring,…

  8. Improving Services to Gay and Lesbian Clients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dulaney, Diana D.; Kelly, James

    1982-01-01

    Examines the gap in the theoretical and clinical training of social workers in helping the homosexual client. Proposes specific approaches for improving services to clients who are gay or lesbian. Discusses other neglected clients including heterosexual spouses, children of a homosexual parent, and aging homosexuals. (Author/RC)

  9. Improving Services to Gay and Lesbian Clients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dulaney, Diana D.; Kelly, James

    1982-01-01

    Examines the gap in the theoretical and clinical training of social workers in helping the homosexual client. Proposes specific approaches for improving services to clients who are gay or lesbian. Discusses other neglected clients including heterosexual spouses, children of a homosexual parent, and aging homosexuals. (Author/RC)

  10. A Model of Client Impression Formation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bodden, Jack L.; Winer, Jane L.

    1978-01-01

    The model describes the clients' impression-formation process, describes changes in client impressions as therapy progresses, and suggests the relevance of client impressions for therapy outcome. An attempt at empirical validation by using a clinical population lent some support to certain aspects of the proposed model. (Author)

  11. Client-Side Monitoring for Web Mining.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fenstermacher, Kurt D.; Ginsburg, Mark

    2003-01-01

    Discusses mining Web data to draw conclusions about Web users and proposes a client-side monitoring system that supports flexible data collection and encompasses client-side applications beyond the Web browser to incorporate standard office productivity tools. Highlights include goals for client-side monitoring; framework for user monitoring,…

  12. Dimensions of Client Change: A Replication.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bolton, Brian

    1978-01-01

    A group of 31 clients completed the Human Service Scale and were evaluated by their counselors, who used the Client Outcome Measure at the time of the clients' acceptance for rehabilitation services and again at closure. Results were generally consistent with those of previous investigations. (Author)

  13. Client Use of Impression Management in Counseling.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lawson, Ward M.; And Others

    Analogue studies have demonstrated that clients who have been instructed to try to deliberately produce certain impressions in their counselors are able to create those impressions reliably and to affect the counselors' evaluations of the clients. It has not been demonstrated, however, that actual clients engage in strategic self-presentation with…

  14. [On the clients of public health organizations].

    PubMed

    Duran, Júlia; Villalbí, Joan R; Guix, Joan

    2004-01-01

    Public services must satisfy a variety of agents: users of these services, the citizens who pay the taxes that finance them, politicians, and those that work in them. To obtain public services that give priority to the citizen-user, knowledge of clients, their expectations, preferences, complaints and degree of satisfaction is essential. This article presents the process of internal discussion in our agency about its clients, who differ from those of an industrial or commercial organization. A proposal for the classification of clients, as well as the process that has led to a client portfolio, are presented and steps to improve services from the perspective of the client are suggested.

  15. The Google Online Marketing Challenge: Real Clients, Real Money, Real Ads and Authentic Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miko, John S.

    2014-01-01

    Search marketing is the process of utilizing search engines to drive traffic to a Web site through both paid and unpaid efforts. One potential paid component of a search marketing strategy is the use of a pay-per-click (PPC) advertising campaign in which advertisers pay search engine hosts only when their advertisement is clicked. This paper…

  16. When consultants and clients clash.

    PubMed

    Kesner, I F; Fowler, S

    1997-01-01

    This fictitious case study explores the issues that surround the relationships between consultants and their clients, as well as the dynamics of a newly merged organization. Susan Barlow, a senior consultant with the Statler Group, dreaded her upcoming status meeting. She had thought it a lucky break when she got assigned to the Kellogg-Champion project. Royce Kellogg, the CEO of the newly merged firm, had engaged the Statler Group for what seemed a simple project: to reconcile the policies and practices of the two former firms now that they had become one. But once on the job, Barlow realized that the issues were much more complex than they had seemed. The new firm needed help badly-but not the kind of help that the client had led Barlow to believe it needed. What would she and Jim Roussos, her partner on the assignment, tell Kellogg at the meeting? Kellogg, for his part, was not looking forward to the status meeting, either. From his point of view, the consultants had caused more problems than they had solved. What's more, he wasn't even dealing with the consultants he had hired. Where was George Gray, the senior partner he had met with originally? Maybe Barlow and Roussos were just too young and inexperienced. Kellogg felt he was getting a raw deal. How would he approach them in the morning? Should he fire them or make an attempt at damage control? Two experts advise the consultants and two advise the client on how to handle the status meeting.

  17. CLIENT NARRATIVES: A THEORETICAL PERSPECTIVE

    PubMed Central

    Gale, Deborah Dysart; Mitchell, Ann M.; Garand, Linda; Wesner, Susan

    2010-01-01

    The role of subjective client narratives in health care represents a clinical and therapeutic tool, useful in complementing objective, scientific data. Of particular interest to mental health practitioners is the role narratives play as a therapeutic tool to guide clinical practice. This paper lays a foundation for understanding the importance of narrative in the psychotherapeutic process. It provides a brief overview of narrative theory and methods of structural analysis in order to provide a theoretical approach that can be utilized by nurses to address clients’ needs. PMID:12735076

  18. Strategies for Optimal Implementation of Simulated Clients for Measuring Quality of Care in Low- and Middle-Income Countries.

    PubMed

    Fitzpatrick, Anne; Tumlinson, Katherine

    2017-01-26

    The use of simulated clients or "mystery clients" is a data collection approach in which a study team member presents at a health care facility or outlet pretending to be a real customer, patient, or client. Following the visit, the shopper records her observations. The use of mystery clients can overcome challenges of obtaining accurate measures of health care quality and improve the validity of quality assessments, particularly in low- and middle-income countries. However, mystery client studies should be carefully designed and monitored to avoid problems inherent to this data collection approach. In this article, we discuss our experiences with the mystery client methodology in studies conducted in public- and private-sector health facilities in Kenya and in private-sector facilities in Uganda. We identify both the benefits and the challenges in using this methodology to guide other researchers interested in using this technique. Recruitment of appropriate mystery clients who accurately represent the facility's clientele, have strong recall of recent events, and are comfortable in their role as undercover data collectors are key to successful implementation of this methodology. Additionally, developing detailed training protocols can help ensure mystery clients behave identically and mimic real patrons accurately while short checklists can help ensure mystery client responses are standardized. Strict confidentiality and protocols to avoid unnecessary exams or procedures should also be stressed during training and monitored carefully throughout the study. Despite these challenges, researchers should consider mystery client designs to measure actual provider behavior and to supplement self-reported provider behavior. Data from mystery client studies can provide critical insight into the quality of service provision unavailable from other data collection methods. The unique information available from the mystery client approach far outweighs the cost.

  19. Earthdata Search Client Usability Study: Improving Client Usability to Increase Data Discoverability and Accessibility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siarto, J.; Reese, M.; Berrick, S. W.; Baynes, K.; Shum, D.; Plofchan, P.

    2016-12-01

    User experience and visual design are greatly improved when usability testing is performed on a periodic basis. Design decisions should be tested by real users so that application owners can understand the effectiveness of each decision and identify areas for improvement. It is important that applications be tested not just once, but as a part of a continuing process that looks to build upon previous tests. NASA's Earthdata Search Client has undergone a usability study to ensure its users' needs are being met and that users understand how to use the tool efficiently and effectively. This poster will highlight the process followed for usability study, the results of the study, and what has been implemented in light of the results to improve the application's interface.

  20. Facades of suffering: clients' photo stories about mental illness.

    PubMed

    Sitvast, Jan E; Abma, Tineke A; Widdershoven, Guy A M

    2010-10-01

    In this article, photo stories are examined that were the result of working with photography as a therapeutic instrument dealing with suffering in mental health care settings. The purpose is to describe the role of facades in the process of suffering and acceptance. Clients took photographs, talked about them in group meetings, and exhibited them to a broader audience. Their photo stories were analyzed using a mixed-methods model. Data from two narrative approaches (semiotics and hermeneutics) were compared with information from other informants and official records to find discrepancies between the photo story and the real life context. Although facades are usually perceived as an obstacle for personal growth, the visual narratives revealed that facades can function as an alternative to common acceptance strategies, such as facing one's losses and reconciliation. Facades can create a distance between the person and the suffering. We conclude that visual narratives can reveal and foster agency in clients.

  1. A Software Engineering Project Course with a Real Client

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-07-01

    Programming environments I Reading: Brooks-75 Ch 12: software developers’ tools Kernighan 81: UNIX (you should know this already) Dart87: survey of... Kernighan et-al., The UNIX programming environment. Selected Reprints, p.-287 Lampson84 B. W. Lampson, Hints for computer system design. IEEE Software...18- 161 14 12 Andrew Unix 0.her Conn DOS VMS Mac OS ViA RSTO Tops2O 0&~2 CP.M w-:ndows Protocol FzFan.5ar M Epernced 4 CINUISEI-91-ENT-4 Two-thirds

  2. Do client fees help or hurt?

    PubMed

    Barnett, B

    1998-01-01

    This article discusses the impact of client fees for family planning (FP) services on cost recovery and level of user services in developing countries. The UN Population Fund reports that developing country governments currently pay 75% of the costs of FP programs. Donors contribute 15%, and clients pay 10%. Current pressures are on FP services to broaden and improve their scope, while user demand is increasing. Program managers should consider the program's need for funds and the clients' willingness to pay. Clients are willing to pay about 1% of their income for contraception. A study of sterilization acceptance in Mexico finds that the average monthly case load declined by 10% after the 1st price increase from $43 to $55 and declined by 58% after the 2nd price increase to $60. Fewer low-income clients requested sterilization. A CEMOPLAF study in Ecuador finds that in three price increase situations the number of clients seeking services declined, but the economic mix of clients remained about the same. The decline was 20% in the group with a 20% price increase and 26% in the 40% increase group. In setting fees, the first need is to determine unit costs. The Futures Group International recommends considering political, regulatory, and institutional constraints for charging fees; priorities for revenue use; protection for poor clients; and monitoring of money collection and expenditure. Management Sciences for Health emphasizes consideration of the reasons for collection of fees, client affordability, and client perception of quality issues. Sliding scales can be used to protect poor clients. Charging fees for laboratory services can subsidize poor clients. A Bangladesh program operated a restaurant and catering service in order to subsidize FP services. Colombia's PROFAMILIA sells medical and surgical services and a social marketing program in order to expand clinics.

  3. Increasing hope by addressing clients' outcome expectations.

    PubMed

    Swift, Joshua K; Derthick, Annie O

    2013-09-01

    Addressing clients' outcome expectations is an important clinical process that can lead to a strong therapeutic alliance, more positive treatment outcomes, and decreased rates of premature termination from psychotherapy. Five interventions designed to foster appropriate outcome expectations are discussed, including presenting a convincing treatment rationale, increasing clients' faith in their therapists, expressing faith in clients, providing outcome education, and comparing progress with expectations. Clinical examples and research support are provided for each.

  4. The language of change among criminal justice clients: Counselor language, client language, and client substance use outcomes.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, Mayra; Walters, Scott T; Houck, Jon M; Ortiz, J Alexis; Taxman, Faye S

    2017-09-22

    Counselor and client language have been identified as mechanisms of change in motivational interviewing (MI) counseling sessions. This study evaluated whether language patterns exhibited during MI sessions with substance users in the community would also be found during MI sessions with substance users in the criminal justice system. Forty audio recordings of MI sessions with substance-using probationers were coded and analyzed sequentially using the Motivational Interviewing Skills Code (MISC) 2.5. Analyses examined the relationship between counselor and client language, and the relationship between client language and client substance use after 2 months. Counselor MI inconsistent language was associated with decreased change talk (lnOR = - 0.76, p < .05) though not with increased sustain talk. Both sustain talk (b = - 4.591, t = - 18.634 p < .001) and MI inconsistent language MIIN (b = - 4.419, t = - 19.886, p < .001) were positively associated with substance use at 2 months. Sustain talk early in the session (i.e., during deciles 1 and 2) was significantly greater among clients who reported using substances at 2 months, compared to clients who did not use substances. These findings are broadly consistent with previous literature documenting the association between counselor language, client language, and client outcome. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. The Influence of Client Fees on Evaluations By Clients of Counseling Outcome.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shipton, Brian; Spain, Armelle

    1980-01-01

    Psychoanalytic theory and cognitive dissonance theory predict that clients who pay a fee for counseling benefit more than clients who do not pay. Results of this study suggest that paying a fee does not significantly influence counseling outcome as measured by client evaluations of counselors. (Author)

  6. Collecting Multidimensional Client Data Using Repeated Measures: Experiences of Clients and Counselors Using the CCAPS-34

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Jessica L.; Hess, Timothy R.; Ain, Stacie C.; Nelson, Dana L.; Locke, Benjamin D.

    2012-01-01

    Many college counseling centers do not collect client data at each session because of perceived burdens. This study explored 55 clients' and 16 doctoral counselor trainees' experiences collecting and using data on client distress at each session over the course of counseling at a large public university's counseling center. Results indicated that…

  7. The Language of Motivational Interviewing and Feedback: Counselor Language, Client Language, and Client Drinking Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Vader, Amanda M.; Walters, Scott T.; Prabhu, Gangamma Chenenda; Houck, Jon M.; Field, Craig A.

    2010-01-01

    Previous research has suggested that motivational interviewing (MI) may affect client language, which in turn predicts client drinking outcome. This study examined the relationship between counselor language and client language, personalized feedback and client language, and client language and client drinking outcome, in a sample of heavy drinking college students. MI was delivered in a single session with or without a personalized feedback report (MI with Feedback (MIF); MI Only (MIO)). Sessions were coded using the Motivational Interviewing Skill Code 2.1. A composite drinking outcome score was used, consisting of drinks per week, peak blood alcohol concentration, and protective drinking strategies. We found three main results. First, in the MIF group, MI consistent counselor language was positively associated with client change talk. Second, after receiving feedback, MIF clients showed lower levels of sustain talk, relative to MIO clients. Finally, in the MIF group, clients with greater change talk showed improved drinking outcomes at 3 months, while clients with greater sustain talk showed poorer drinking outcomes. These results highlight the relationship between counselor MI skill and client change talk, and suggest an important role for feedback in the change process. PMID:20565145

  8. Analyses of Client Variables in a Series of Psychotherapy Sessions with Two Child Clients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mook, Bertha

    1982-01-01

    Studied the process of child psychotherapy by means of analyses of client verbal behaviors. Analyses of variables demonstrated the nature of each client's verbal responding as well as their pattern of change. Summarized the overall verbal response behavior of each client best through the factor analyses. (Author)

  9. Strategies for Optimal Implementation of Simulated Clients for Measuring Quality of Care in Low- and Middle-Income Countries

    PubMed Central

    Fitzpatrick, Anne; Tumlinson, Katherine

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT The use of simulated clients or “mystery clients” is a data collection approach in which a study team member presents at a health care facility or outlet pretending to be a real customer, patient, or client. Following the visit, the shopper records her observations. The use of mystery clients can overcome challenges of obtaining accurate measures of health care quality and improve the validity of quality assessments, particularly in low- and middle-income countries. However, mystery client studies should be carefully designed and monitored to avoid problems inherent to this data collection approach. In this article, we discuss our experiences with the mystery client methodology in studies conducted in public- and private-sector health facilities in Kenya and in private-sector facilities in Uganda. We identify both the benefits and the challenges in using this methodology to guide other researchers interested in using this technique. Recruitment of appropriate mystery clients who accurately represent the facility's clientele, have strong recall of recent events, and are comfortable in their role as undercover data collectors are key to successful implementation of this methodology. Additionally, developing detailed training protocols can help ensure mystery clients behave identically and mimic real patrons accurately while short checklists can help ensure mystery client responses are standardized. Strict confidentiality and protocols to avoid unnecessary exams or procedures should also be stressed during training and monitored carefully throughout the study. Despite these challenges, researchers should consider mystery client designs to measure actual provider behavior and to supplement self-reported provider behavior. Data from mystery client studies can provide critical insight into the quality of service provision unavailable from other data collection methods. The unique information available from the mystery client approach far outweighs the cost

  10. 31 CFR 10.28 - Return of client's records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Return of client's records. 10.28... § 10.28 Return of client's records. (a) In general, a practitioner must, at the request of a client, promptly return any and all records of the client that are necessary for the client to comply with his or...

  11. Counselor-Client Congruity and Vocational Counseling of Psychiatric Rehabilitees

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Menapace, Robert H.

    1977-01-01

    Ex-psychiatric clients attending a psychosocial rehabilitation center and their counselors rated the client on 18 job-related attributes and made judgments of the client's probability of employment. The best predictor of client self-ratings of employability was nervousness, while counselors focused on work skills and client's feelings of…

  12. Attractive versus Unattractive Clients: Mediating Influences on Counselors' Perceptions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewis, Kathleen N; And Others

    1981-01-01

    Investigated the effects of clients' age, physical attractiveness, and behavior on subjects' attraction to the clients. Results indicated that "counselor" subjects were significantly more attracted to child than to adult clients and to clients demonstrating good in-session behaviors. Physically attractive clients were not rated significantly more…

  13. 49 CFR 1103.23 - Confidences of a client.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 8 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Confidences of a client. 1103.23 Section 1103.23... Responsibilities Toward A Client § 1103.23 Confidences of a client. (a) The practitioner's duty to preserve his client's confidence outlasts the practitioner's employment by the client, and this duty extends to...

  14. The Applicability of Holland's Typology to Clients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wigington, John H.

    1983-01-01

    Evaluated Holland's theory of vocational choice using data from clients (college students seeking career counseling) who took the Strong Campbell Interest Inventory. Findings suggested clients are less consistent and less differentiated than nonclient controls but can be expected to have General Occupational Theme (SCII) scores similar to…

  15. Employment Patterns of Methadone Maintenance Clients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bloch, Harriet I.; And Others

    1977-01-01

    Analysis of employment patterns of methadone maintenance clients had indicated that the majority were not employed at time of program admission. At time of evaluation, 70 percent of the sample were employed; 88 percent of these clients had previous work histories and brought marketable skills with them. (Author)

  16. Experience-Seeking Characteristics of Methadone Clients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kohn, Paul M.; And Others

    1979-01-01

    Methadone clients scored higher than controls on measures reflecting boredom, desire for change and attraction to physically thrilling activities. Correlations of these measures with length of most recent dependency before treatment, time on program, and time since initial dependency suggest peculiarities of methadone clients antedated involvement…

  17. Effectiveness of a Client Pretherapy Orientation Videotape.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zwick, Rebecca; Attkisson, C. Clifford

    1985-01-01

    Psychotherapy clients (N=62) were randomly assigned to view a pretherapy orientation videotape at admission or to a control group. Oriented clients understood and recalled the information in the videotape, showed a greater decrease in self-reported symptoms than the control group after one month, and gave favorable feedback regarding the…

  18. Experiential Interventions for Clients with Genital Herpes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cummings, Anne L.

    1999-01-01

    Explores potential benefits of incorporating concepts and interventions from experimental therapy to help clients with psychosocial difficulties in learning to live with genital herpes. Recommends experimental counseling of two-chair dialog, empty chair, and metaphor for helping clients with emotional sequelae of genital herpes. Presents case…

  19. Counselors' Accounts of Their Clients' Spiritual Experiences.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holden, Janice Miner

    2000-01-01

    Introduces a special section within this issue of Counseling and Values that focuses on counselors' accounts of their clients' transpersonal experiences. The eight articles in this special section discuss ten types of transpersonal experiences. Clients range in age from early 20s to early 80s. Experiences occurred in various settings and were…

  20. Impact of psychotherapist expectations on client outcomes.

    PubMed

    Connor, Dana R; Callahan, Jennifer L

    2015-09-01

    Recent investigations have implicated client expectations of psychotherapy as a strong predictor of premature termination; however, there is reason to believe psychotherapist expectations may also impact client outcomes. This study sought to address this gap in the literature by examining the association of psychotherapists' expectations to clients' psychotherapy outcomes, including termination status. Participants were 54 current and recent trainee psychotherapists at a Southern public university, who completed delay discounting measures to assess their expectations of the effectiveness of psychotherapy. Data were also drawn from 300 adult clients who had received at least 2 sessions of individual psychotherapy from the participating psychotherapists of this study, and had previously completed the Outcome Questionnaire 45.2 prior to each individual therapy session. Psychotherapists were found to hold significantly higher expectations for client improvement than anticipated, based on existing literature, and these high expectations were found to be positively correlated with clinically significant change in clients. Moreover, psychotherapists' expectations were found to explain 7.3% of the explainable variance in whether or not clients experienced clinically significant change during psychotherapy. Implications for improving client retention and treatment outcome are discussed. (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  1. Predicting Improvement among University Counseling Center Clients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lichtenberg, James W.; Hummel, Thomas J.

    The fundamental question to which most clients want and deserve an answer is, "Am I going to get better (as a result of counseling)?" Although meta-analyses provide strong evidence supporting the efficacy of counseling in general, if one wants to make probabilistic statements about individual client outcomes--rather than about the more generalized…

  2. Writing about Clients: Ethical Considerations and Options

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sperry, Len; Pies, Ronald

    2010-01-01

    Today, the decision to prepare clinical case material for publication is a decision that cannot be taken lightly. The decision involves reviewing ethical considerations and choosing among various options to safeguard client privacy. Such options include seeking the client's permission, disguising case material, and developing composite case…

  3. Counselors' Accounts of Their Clients' Spiritual Experiences.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holden, Janice Miner

    2000-01-01

    Introduces a special section within this issue of Counseling and Values that focuses on counselors' accounts of their clients' transpersonal experiences. The eight articles in this special section discuss ten types of transpersonal experiences. Clients range in age from early 20s to early 80s. Experiences occurred in various settings and were…

  4. Cut Costs with Thin Client Computing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hartley, Patrick H.

    2001-01-01

    Discusses how school districts can considerably increase the number of administrative computers in their districts without a corresponding increase in costs by using the "Thin Client" component of the Total Cost of Ownership (TCC) model. TCC and Thin Client are described, including its software and hardware components. An example of a…

  5. Organizational and Client Commitment among Contracted Employees

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coyle-Shapiro, Jacqueline A-M.; Morrow, Paula C.

    2006-01-01

    This study examines affective commitment to employing and client organizations among long-term contracted employees, a new and growing employment classification. Drawing on organizational commitment and social exchange literatures, we propose two categories of antecedents of employee commitment to client organizations. We tested our hypotheses…

  6. A Seven Year Study of Client Characteristics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sharf, Richard S.

    Counselors have speculated about changes in their clientele from year to year. From 1977 through 1984 between 1,175 and 1,575 students annually have used the counseling services at the University of Delaware. For each client, counselors conducted intake interviews and then completed forms with information on client characteristics. The infomation…

  7. Client Outcome Evaluation in Mental Health Centers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Southern Regional Education Board, Atlanta, GA.

    Outcome evaluation assesses the results or benefits of mental health services received by clients or communities by comparing descriptive data on the mental health status of clients at different points in time. It aids clinicians and managers in planning programs and managing clinical services. A mental health center should establish goal-oriented…

  8. Client-Preferred Therapist Sex Role Orientations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKinnon, Dean G.

    1990-01-01

    Analyzed clients' (N=210) questionnaires rating willingness to see and disclose to androgynous, masculine, or feminine therapist on basis of written description. Clients rated androgynous- and masculine-oriented therapists significantly more favorably than feminine-oriented therapists. Masculine men received highest ratings and feminine men…

  9. Cut Costs with Thin Client Computing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hartley, Patrick H.

    2001-01-01

    Discusses how school districts can considerably increase the number of administrative computers in their districts without a corresponding increase in costs by using the "Thin Client" component of the Total Cost of Ownership (TCC) model. TCC and Thin Client are described, including its software and hardware components. An example of a…

  10. The Unfolding of the Real Relationship and the Outcome of Brief Psychotherapy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gelso, Charles J.; Kivlighan, Dennis M., Jr.; Busa-Knepp, Johnna; Spiegel, Eric B.; Ain, Stacie; Hummel, Ann M.; Ma, Yueher Emilie; Markin, Rayna D.

    2012-01-01

    This study sought to assess the association of client- and therapist-rated real relationship with each other and with the outcome of brief psychotherapy. It also aimed to determine whether changes over time in perceptions of the real relationship and increasing convergence between clients' and therapists' ratings of the real relationship were…

  11. The Unfolding of the Real Relationship and the Outcome of Brief Psychotherapy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gelso, Charles J.; Kivlighan, Dennis M., Jr.; Busa-Knepp, Johnna; Spiegel, Eric B.; Ain, Stacie; Hummel, Ann M.; Ma, Yueher Emilie; Markin, Rayna D.

    2012-01-01

    This study sought to assess the association of client- and therapist-rated real relationship with each other and with the outcome of brief psychotherapy. It also aimed to determine whether changes over time in perceptions of the real relationship and increasing convergence between clients' and therapists' ratings of the real relationship were…

  12. Client satisfaction in a health maintenance organization: providers' perceptions compared to clients' reports.

    PubMed

    Freeborn, D K; Pope, C R

    1981-09-01

    This study seeks to compare clients' reports of satisfaction/dissatisfaction with an HMO and its medical care program to providers' perceptions of client satisfaction. The main conclusion is that providers are fairly aware of medical care system attributes with which clients are highly satisfied and dissatisfied. Those with direct patient contact, especially physicians and nurses, are most accurate in their perceptions. Personnel without direct patient contact are about equally accurate in their perceptions of client satisfaction, though personnel without patient contact perceive relatively more dissatisfaction than clients report. Most approaches to medical care evaluation examine costs and efficiency and, more recently, the technical quality of care. Less attention has been given to the assessment of client satisfaction, and almost no attention has been given to what providers perceive as the assessment of clients. Clearly, HMOs' viability is determined largely by their ability to identify and correct major problems affecting their enrollments.

  13. 42 CFR 485.910 - Condition of participation: Client rights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... appropriate) or surrogate with verbal and written notice of the client's rights and responsibilities. The verbal notice must be in a language and manner that the client or client's representative or...

  14. Profile of Clients Attending a Methadone Clinic

    PubMed Central

    JACOB, Sabrina Anne; MOHAMMED, Fauziah; HASSALI, Mohamed Azmi Ahmad

    2015-01-01

    Background: Client characteristics provide useful information for designing programs that target individuals with risk factors for substance use and for determining client retention. Therefore, this study examined the profiles of clients attending a methadone clinic. Methods: A cross-sectional analysis of clients of a methadone clinic was conducted through a survey to obtain a profile of methadone clients. Results: Of the 51 patients who responded (response rate: 66.2%), the mean (SD) age at which they started substance use was 19.8 (5.1) years. Friends were cited as the most regular source of drugs (82.4%), and heroin was the most commonly used drug (98%). Daily substance use was reported by 72.5% of the respondents; 23.5% admitted to having stolen money to purchase drugs; 92.2% tried quitting substance use on their own and 98% stated that the main reason for registering at the clinic was that they wanted to stop their drug dependence. Approximately 60% of clients were receiving methadone doses of less than 60 mg/day. Conclusion: Heroin is still the most popular drug of abuse and most clients still receive methadone doses below the recommended level, despite evidence of poor patient retention rates associated with these low doses. PMID:25892951

  15. [Aggressive clients in Dutch veterinary practice].

    PubMed

    Barbonis, T S A E; Endenburg, N

    2007-05-15

    Aggressive clients seem to be becoming more common. This article describes a study in which questionnaires on client behaviour were sent to veterinary assistants and veterinarians in randomly selected practices in the Netherlands. Results showed that 26.4% of the veterinarians and 29.3% of the assistants had experienced aggressive clients in the last year. Age, experience, and sex of the veterinarian or assistant did not influence the frequency with which aggressive clients were encountered. The same was true for the type of veterinary practice (companion animals, farm animals, horses, etc). The risk of encountering aggressive clients was higher among practices in large towns and in practices with a small turnover Of the veterinarians who had encountered aggressive clients at least once in their career, 31% has taken some kind of action after the aggressive encounter Nearly a quarter (24.9%) of veterinary practices have adopted a Risk Inventarization and Evaluation (RI&E) approach to preventing client aggression and 26.6% of practices have adopted another approach. While veterinarians tend not to consider aggression a big problem, they are often open to the suggestion that more attention should be paid to aggression in veterinary practice.

  16. Uniform guidelines improve client care.

    PubMed

    Barnett, B

    1994-12-01

    Uniform national guidelines on the delivery of family planning methods and services improve client care, assuming these guidelines are based on current scientific information. Compliance with these guidelines yields safe and efficient delivery of family planning services. Service providers need information, training, supplies, and guidelines to deliver quality services. Guidelines contribute to consistency among family planning programs in different settings. Even though clinics may not provide the same services, the guidelines allow them to provide the same standards of care. Specifically, eligibility criteria, contraindications, and follow-up schedules are the same regardless of the service delivery point. Various international health organizations (such as World Health Organization, USAID, Program for International Training in Health, International Planned Parenthood Federation, and Association for Voluntary Surgical Contraception) have developed guidelines for family planning service delivery. Governments can use these documents to develop national family planning guidelines and policies. They should adapt the guidelines to local needs and consider program resources. After development of the national guidelines, training, workshops, and dissemination of written materials should be provided for policymakers, physicians, nurses, and other health providers. Countries that have either developed or are working to draft their own national guidelines are Cameroon, Ghana, Mexico, and Nepal.

  17. Client-centred empowering partnering in nursing.

    PubMed

    Brown, Darlene; McWilliam, Carol; Ward-Griffin, Catherine

    2006-01-01

    This paper explores nurses' experiences 1 year after an organization's commitment to providing a client-centred and client-empowering partnering approach to care. Historically, nurses' approach to providing care in all nursing contexts has been one of doing for clients, and previous studies have focused more on in-hospital care than on home care. However, the isolation inherent in in-home nursing and nurses' limited professional autonomy and power associated with physician control over patients in home care have been reported, as has their difficulty in finding the meaning and satisfaction of human connectedness and mutuality in nurse-client relationships. Overall, research to date does not inform us about how nurses might make a change toward a more client-centred and client-empowering approach to nursing. An interpretive phenomenological design was used to elicit in-depth understanding about Registered Nurses' experiences of providing care using this innovative empowerment model. A purposefully selected sample of eight Registered Nurses participated in in-depth interviews. Data were generated during 2002. Hermeneutic analysis was used to elicit themes and patterns emerging from the data. Caring, client-centredness and the context of in-home care were important in implementing the new partnering approach. Barriers encountered at system, organizational and personal levels distracted nurses from fully comprehending and enacting the approach. After a year, they had begun to contemplate potential strategies for partnering with clients, but had not yet explored the power of their professional autonomy. Nurses are inclined to practise within the expert model of service delivery. They need to work through issues of professional autonomy and rise to the challenge of exercising their autonomy within the current healthcare context if they are to attend more consistently to client-centred empowering partnering. The home care setting offers an excellent environment for

  18. Client and therapist variability in clients' perceptions of their therapists' multicultural competencies.

    PubMed

    Owen, Jesse; Leach, Mark M; Wampold, Bruce; Rodolfa, Emil

    2011-01-01

    This study examined therapist differences in their clients' ratings of their therapists' multicultural competencies (MCCs) as well as tested whether therapists' who were rated as exhibiting more MCCs also had clients who had better therapy outcomes (N = 143 clients and 31 therapists). All clients completed at least 3 sessions. Results demonstrated that therapists accounted for less than 1% of the variance in their clients' Cross-Cultural Counseling Inventory–Revised (CCCI-R; T. D. LaFromboise, H. L. K. Coleman, & A. Hernandez, 1991) scores, suggesting that therapists did not differ in terms of how clients rated their MCCs. Therapists accounted for approximately 8.5% of the variance in therapy outcomes. For each therapist, their clients' CCCI-R scores were aggregated to provide an estimate of therapists' MCCs. Therapists' MCCs, based on aggregate CCCI-R scores, did not account for the variability in therapy outcomes that were attributed to them. Additionally, clients' race/ethnicity, therapists' race/ethnicity, or the interaction of clients'–therapists' race/ethnicity were not significantly associated with clients' perceptions of their therapists' MCCs.

  19. Clients' ratings of counselor multicultural competency.

    PubMed

    Fuertes, Jairo N; Brobst, Karen

    2002-08-01

    Differences in perceptions between Euro American and ethnic minority respondents were examined to compare the role of counselor multicultural competency in multicultural versus traditional counseling. Results showed a strong positive correlation between clients' ratings of counselors' multicultural competencies and clients' ratings of counselors' general competency and empathy. However, when comparisons were made between Euro American and ethnic minority clients' on satisfaction, counselor multicultural competency explained a large and significant amount of variance for the ethnic minority sample only, above and beyond counselor general competency and empathy. Results are discussed in the context of relevant literature and suggestions for future research.

  20. Ethnic matching of clients and clinicians and use of mental health services by ethnic minority clients.

    PubMed

    Ziguras, Stephen; Klimidis, Steven; Lewis, James; Stuart, Geoff

    2003-04-01

    Research in the United States has indicated that matching clients from a minority group with clinicians from the same ethnic background increases use of community mental health services and reduces use of emergency services. This study assessed the effects of matching clients from a non-English-speaking background with bilingual, bicultural clinicians in a mental health system in Australia that emphasizes community-based psychiatric case management. In an overall sample of 2,935 clients served in the western region of Melbourne from 1997 to 1999, ethnic minority clients from a non-English-speaking background who received services from a bilingual, bicultural case manager were compared with ethnic minority clients who did not receive such services and with clients from an English-speaking background. The clients' engagement with three types of services-community care teams, psychiatric crisis teams, and psychiatric inpatient services-was assessed. Compared with ethnic minority clients who were not matched with a bilingual clinician, those who were matched generally had a longer duration and greater frequency of contact with community care teams and a shorter duration and lower frequency of contact with crisis teams. Clients born in Vietnam who were matched with a bilingual clinician had a shorter annual mean length of hospital stay and a lower annual mean frequency of hospital admission than Australian-born clients. The benefits of matching clients with psychiatric case managers on the basis of ethnic background include a lower level of need for crisis intervention and, for clients from some ethnic groups, fewer inpatient interventions. These Australian results support findings of the effectiveness of client-clinician ethnic matching in the United States.

  1. Innovations in Social Work Training: A Pilot Study of Interprofessional Collaboration Using Standardized Clients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olson, Mark D.; Lewis, Melinda; Rappe, Paula; Hartley, Sandra

    2015-01-01

    A pilot study depicting a collaborative learning experience involving students in the helping professions (i.e., social work and paramedic) is presented, whereby students put discipline-specific practice behaviors into action in a training exercise using standardized clients (SCs). Real world scenarios commonly encountered in emergency response…

  2. The Schemagram: Mapping Your Client's Thought Processes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldberg, Adam N.

    1999-01-01

    This article presents the Schemagram, a conceptual model counselor and client can use to map behavior through narrative. The model weaves Piagetian developmental theory with narrative techniques to create a visual flow chart depicting past, present, and future development. (Author)

  3. Client Information in Counseling: An Existential View

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pine, Gerald J.

    1975-01-01

    An emphasis on existentialism as a dynamic philosophical force with significant implications for vocational guidance in the use of information to help clients, followed by a Comment by Lee Isaacson. (Author)

  4. Family Therapy for Lesbian and Gay Clients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shernoff, Michael J.

    1984-01-01

    Suggests that social workers develop a professional approach that includes the treatment of lesbian and gay clients within the context of the family. Discusses self disclosure, legal issues, family relationships, and friendship networks. (JAC)

  5. Counselor Values and the Pregnant Adolescent Client.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kennedy, Bebe C.; And Others

    1984-01-01

    Reviews options counselors can suggest to pregnant adolescents, including abortion, adoption, marriage, and single parenthood. Discusses the need for counselors to be aware of their own values and help the client explore her values. (JAC)

  6. Client Information in Counseling: An Existential View

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pine, Gerald J.

    1975-01-01

    An emphasis on existentialism as a dynamic philosophical force with significant implications for vocational guidance in the use of information to help clients, followed by a Comment by Lee Isaacson. (Author)

  7. Counselor Values and the Pregnant Adolescent Client.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kennedy, Bebe C.; And Others

    1984-01-01

    Reviews options counselors can suggest to pregnant adolescents, including abortion, adoption, marriage, and single parenthood. Discusses the need for counselors to be aware of their own values and help the client explore her values. (JAC)

  8. Family Therapy for Lesbian and Gay Clients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shernoff, Michael J.

    1984-01-01

    Suggests that social workers develop a professional approach that includes the treatment of lesbian and gay clients within the context of the family. Discusses self disclosure, legal issues, family relationships, and friendship networks. (JAC)

  9. The Pregnant Client: Understanding and Counseling Her.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bassoff, Evelyn Silten

    1983-01-01

    Discusses counseling techniques for pregnant clients, emphasizing the need to understand the normal psychological changes of pregnancy, i.e., issues of oneness and separation, restructuring relationships, and fantasies. Suggests counseling goals of facilitating personal reorganization and decreasing stress. (WAS)

  10. Clients Who Frequent Madam Barnett's Emporium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Russell, Scott

    1999-01-01

    Develops a comparison between writing tutors and prostitutes. Suggests that the intimate arrangement of people that places one in the position of professional and the other in the position of client works against collaboration. (NH)

  11. Participation and power in care: exploring the "client" in client engagement.

    PubMed

    Petriwskyj, Andrea; Gibson, Alexandra; Webby, Glenys

    2014-12-01

    Despite growing recognition in health and care services of the necessity for client engagement, it is still not easily put into practice. This is owing to a range of factors relating to participating staff and clients, as well as the broader institutional context. One of the central factors affecting client engagement is the challenge it poses to traditional power relations inherent in care relationships and contexts. This is particularly the case in aged care services, which have traditionally positioned older adults in passive roles as "recipients" of care, or as lacking capacity to participate in care decision making. This paper presents an exploration of client engagement practices within a large aged care service provider in Australia. Interviews and focus group discussions with clients and staff were analysed for the ways in which clients were positioned - by both themselves and by staff - in terms of the roles that they hold within engagement practices. Four positions were identified: "Passivity, disempowerment and bestowal of power", "Role of expert/consumer", "Resistance, compliance and manageability", and "Complexity, diversity and uniqueness". While clients were positioned at times in empowering roles, they were simultaneously limited by personal, relational, or organisational constraints, making opportunities for client engagement provisional. This reflects a tension between passive and empowered client roles in the context of aged care provision.

  12. Client Engagement Characteristics Associated with Problem Gambling Treatment Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dowling, Nicki A.; Cosic, Sanja

    2011-01-01

    Previous research examining the factors associated with problem gambling treatment outcomes has examined client factors and to date, treatment characteristics, therapist factors, and client-therapist interactions have essentially remained unexplored. This study aimed to investigate how client engagement variables (client-rated therapeutic…

  13. 32 CFR 776.33 - Client with diminished capacity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Client with diminished capacity. 776.33 Section... Rules of Professional Conduct § 776.33 Client with diminished capacity. (a) Client with diminished capacity: (1) When a client's ability to make adequately considered decisions in connection with...

  14. 32 CFR 776.33 - Client with diminished capacity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Client with diminished capacity. 776.33 Section... Rules of Professional Conduct § 776.33 Client with diminished capacity. (a) Client with diminished capacity: (1) When a client's ability to make adequately considered decisions in connection with...

  15. 32 CFR 776.33 - Client with diminished capacity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Client with diminished capacity. 776.33 Section... Rules of Professional Conduct § 776.33 Client with diminished capacity. (a) Client with diminished capacity: (1) When a client's ability to make adequately considered decisions in connection with...

  16. 32 CFR 776.33 - Client with diminished capacity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Client with diminished capacity. 776.33 Section... Rules of Professional Conduct § 776.33 Client with diminished capacity. (a) Client with diminished capacity: (1) When a client's ability to make adequately considered decisions in connection with...

  17. Client Engagement Characteristics Associated with Problem Gambling Treatment Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dowling, Nicki A.; Cosic, Sanja

    2011-01-01

    Previous research examining the factors associated with problem gambling treatment outcomes has examined client factors and to date, treatment characteristics, therapist factors, and client-therapist interactions have essentially remained unexplored. This study aimed to investigate how client engagement variables (client-rated therapeutic…

  18. 29 CFR 404.5 - Attorney-client communications exempted.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Attorney-client communications exempted. 404.5 Section 404... LABOR-MANAGEMENT STANDARDS LABOR ORGANIZATION OFFICER AND EMPLOYEE REPORTS § 404.5 Attorney-client... communicated to such attorney by any of his clients in the course of a legitimate attorney-client relationship. ...

  19. 29 CFR 402.11 - Attorney-client communications exempted.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Attorney-client communications exempted. 402.11 Section 402... LABOR-MANAGEMENT STANDARDS LABOR ORGANIZATION INFORMATION REPORTS § 402.11 Attorney-client... communicated to such attorney by any of his clients in the course of a legitimate attorney-client relationship. ...

  20. 29 CFR 403.9 - Attorney-client communications exempted.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Attorney-client communications exempted. 403.9 Section 403... LABOR-MANAGEMENT STANDARDS LABOR ORGANIZATION ANNUAL FINANCIAL REPORTS § 403.9 Attorney-client... communicated to such attorney by any of his clients in the course of a legitimate attorney-client relationship. ...

  1. 14 CFR 1261.317 - Attorney-client privilege.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Attorney-client privilege. 1261.317 Section... Injury or Death-Accruing On or After January 18, 1967 § 1261.317 Attorney-client privilege. (a) Attorneys... traditional attorney-client relationship with the employee with respect to application of the attorney-client...

  2. 32 CFR 776.28 - Conflict of interest: Former client.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Conflict of interest: Former client. 776.28... ADVOCATE GENERAL Rules of Professional Conduct § 776.28 Conflict of interest: Former client. (a) Conflict of interest: Former client. A covered attorney who has represented a client in a matter shall not...

  3. Moving beyond Consultation and into Action with a Client Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ewing, Sara; Dover, Howard F.

    2012-01-01

    Attempting to implement client-based projects within a single semester often overwhelms students and underwhelms the client and grading professor. In this paper, we share results from a two-year pilot project in which the components of a client project were split between several classes. We discuss the client project model as a valuable teaching…

  4. Clinical Aspects of Assessment and Intervention with Resistant Clients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burr, Helen Turner

    Elderly clients resistant to help present an ethical dilemma for professionals. This dilemma may climax when assumption of authority over the client for his safety is necessary. Social workers need to work for decisions closest to the wishes of the client. The at-risk client should be informed about changes that will occur and how these changes…

  5. Clinical Writing about Clients: Seeking Consent and Negotiating the Impact on Clients and Their Treatments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bridges, Nancy A.

    2010-01-01

    The author discusses her experiences seeking consent from 16 clients to use clinical material for publication. Sharing case examples from her practice, she elucidates her process with clients and focuses on the beneficial and detrimental effects on the therapeutic relationship. Seeking consent raises issues of confidentiality and stimulates…

  6. The Relationship between Client Attachment and Therapist Interventions in Client-Nominated Relationship-Building Incidents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Janzen, Jennifer I.; Fitzpatrick, Marilyn R.; Drapeau, Martin; Blake, Emily

    2010-01-01

    Twenty-four clients were asked to nominate an incident that was critical to the development of their therapeutic relationship with a trainee therapist. Therapist interventions within each client relationship building incident (RBI) were identified. The results of multiple regression indicated that attachment anxiety moderated the relationship…

  7. Counselor Trainees' Self-Statement Responses to Sexually and Physically Abused Clients, and Client Role Conflict.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parisien, Lynne S.; Long, Bonita C.

    1994-01-01

    Assessed 63 female counselor trainees after viewing videotape of client reporting sexual abuse, physical abuse, or role conflict. Results indicated that trainees who expected to counsel sexually abused client increased their positive self-statements. Applied Schwartz's States-of-Mind model to self-statement ratios, and, according to model,…

  8. Clinical Writing about Clients: Seeking Consent and Negotiating the Impact on Clients and Their Treatments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bridges, Nancy A.

    2010-01-01

    The author discusses her experiences seeking consent from 16 clients to use clinical material for publication. Sharing case examples from her practice, she elucidates her process with clients and focuses on the beneficial and detrimental effects on the therapeutic relationship. Seeking consent raises issues of confidentiality and stimulates…

  9. Neurobiological response to EMDR therapy in clients with different psychological traumas.

    PubMed

    Pagani, Marco; Di Lorenzo, Giorgio; Monaco, Leonardo; Daverio, Andrea; Giannoudas, Ioannis; La Porta, Patrizia; Verardo, Anna R; Niolu, Cinzia; Fernandez, Isabel; Siracusano, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    We assessed cortical activation differences in real-time upon exposure to traumatic memory between two distinct groups of psychologically traumatized clients also in comparison with healthy controls. We used electroencephalography (EEG) to compare neuronal activation throughout the bilateral stimulation phase of Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing (EMDR) sessions. We compared activation between the first (T0) and the last (T1) session, the latter performed after processing the index trauma. The group including all clients showed significantly higher cortical activity in orbito-frontal cortex at T0 shifting at T1 toward posterior associative regions. However, the subgroup of clients with chronic exposure to the traumatic event showed a cortical firing at both stages which was closer to that of controls. For the first time EEG monitoring enabled to disclose neurobiological differences between groups of clients with different trauma histories during the reliving of the traumatic event. Cortical activations in clients chronically exposed to traumatic memories were moderate, suggesting an association between social and environmental contexts with the neurobiological response to trauma exposure and psychotherapy.

  10. Neurobiological response to EMDR therapy in clients with different psychological traumas

    PubMed Central

    Pagani, Marco; Di Lorenzo, Giorgio; Monaco, Leonardo; Daverio, Andrea; Giannoudas, Ioannis; La Porta, Patrizia; Verardo, Anna R.; Niolu, Cinzia; Fernandez, Isabel; Siracusano, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    We assessed cortical activation differences in real-time upon exposure to traumatic memory between two distinct groups of psychologically traumatized clients also in comparison with healthy controls. We used electroencephalography (EEG) to compare neuronal activation throughout the bilateral stimulation phase of Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing (EMDR) sessions. We compared activation between the first (T0) and the last (T1) session, the latter performed after processing the index trauma. The group including all clients showed significantly higher cortical activity in orbito-frontal cortex at T0 shifting at T1 toward posterior associative regions. However, the subgroup of clients with chronic exposure to the traumatic event showed a cortical firing at both stages which was closer to that of controls. For the first time EEG monitoring enabled to disclose neurobiological differences between groups of clients with different trauma histories during the reliving of the traumatic event. Cortical activations in clients chronically exposed to traumatic memories were moderate, suggesting an association between social and environmental contexts with the neurobiological response to trauma exposure and psychotherapy. PMID:26579006

  11. Development of the client-centred care questionnaire.

    PubMed

    de Witte, Luc; Schoot, Tineke; Proot, Ireen

    2006-10-01

    This paper reports the development and testing of the Client-Centred Care Questionnaire, aimed at evaluating the client-centredness of professional home nursing care from a client perspective. Client-centred care has become an important theme in health care. To evaluate the client-centredness of care and services from a client's perspective, there is a need for measurement instruments. The questionnaire was developed on the basis of a qualitative study into client perspectives on home nursing care. Items were formulated that closely followed the aspects clients mentioned as central to client-centred home care. A pilot study was conducted with a sample of 107 clients in three home care organizations in 2003 and 2004. These clients had chronic diseases and were expected to receive care for at least another 6 months. The questionnaire comprises 15 items. Principal components analysis and internal consistency analysis show strong internal consistency of the items. All items had strong factor loadings on one dimension, and Cronbach's alpha was 0.94. Clients tended to be most critical about their say in the practical arrangements and organization of care: which person came, how often and when? Clients of the three organizations differed in their perceptions of client-centredness, which may indicate that the questionnaire is capable of differentiating between respondents. The results of this pilot study are promising. The validity of the questionnaire needs further testing.

  12. Towards a multimedia remote viewer for mobile thin clients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joveski, B.; Simoens, P.; Gardenghi, L.; Marshall, J.; Mitrea, M.; Vankeirsbilck, B.; Pr"teux, F.; Dhoed, B.

    2011-02-01

    Be there a traditional mobile user wanting to connect to a remote multimedia server. In order to allow them to enjoy the same user experience remotely (play, interact, edit, store and share capabilities) as in a traditional fixed LAN environment, several dead-locks are to be dealt with: (1) a heavy and heterogeneous content should be sent through a bandwidth constrained network; (2) the displayed content should be of good quality; (3) user interaction should be processed in real-time and (4) the complexity of the practical solution should not exceed the features of the mobile client in terms of CPU, memory and battery. The present paper takes this challenge and presents a fully operational MPEG-4 BiFS solution.

  13. Counselors' Feelings toward Clients as Related to Intake Judgments and Outcome Variables.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sharf, Richard S.; Bishop, John B.

    1979-01-01

    Subjects were clients of a university counseling center. Intake counselors' liking of clients was related to their rating of the realism of clients' stated goals, clients' motivation for counseling, and clients' physical appearance. Low correlation was found between liking for clients and clients' positive ratings of experience and counselor.…

  14. The impact of counselor self-disclosure on clients: a meta-analytic review of experimental and quasi-experimental research.

    PubMed

    Henretty, Jennifer R; Currier, Joseph M; Berman, Jeffrey S; Levitt, Heidi M

    2014-04-01

    In an attempt to make sense of contradictory findings, meta-analysis was used to review 53 studies that examined counselor self-disclosure (CSD) vs. nondisclosure. CSD, overall, was found to have a favorable impact on clients/participants, with clients/participants having favorable perceptions of disclosing counselors and rating themselves more likely to disclose to counselors who had self-disclosed. Specifically, CSD that (a) revealed similarity between client and counselor; (b) was of negative content valence; or (c) was related to intra- or, especially, extratherapy experiences, had favorable impacts on clients/participants compared with nondisclosure. These types of disclosure resulted in more favorable perceptions of the counselor, especially in the area of professional attractiveness. CSD that revealed similarity between client and counselor also had a favorable impact on clients'/participants' allegiance-specifically, on their willingness to return-to disclosing counselors. Significant moderators of the impact of CSD on clients included researcher bias for or against CSD, type of "session" (e.g., written transcript, interview, real session), timing of CSD (whether before or after client self-disclosure), verb tense of extratherapy CSD, experimental setting, type of control group, and the number of CSDs in the experiment. Clinical implications include that CSD may be beneficial for building rapport, strengthening alliance, and eliciting client disclosure, with similar CSD being especially beneficial. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved).

  15. Congenitally Blind Counselor, Adventitiously Blind Client.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roberts, A. H.

    1994-01-01

    A counselor blind from birth describes personal difficulties in fully understanding the experience of clients who are adventitiously blind. Congenitally blind counselors are urged to recognize that adaptive methods cannot compensate for the panoramic view of the environment provided by vision and that recently blinded individuals need to deal with…

  16. The Existential Mode and Client Anxiety.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yoder, James D.

    1981-01-01

    Reviews and clarifies counseling from an existential perspective, with emphasis on the distinction between neurotic and ontological anxiety. The existentially oriented counselor insists that clients face themselves as referents in a phenomenological context by experiencing existential "anxiety" when confronted with the pain of finitude,…

  17. Architect-School Client Conflicts: Project Construction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Day, C. William

    1985-01-01

    Five major sources of construction disputes between architects and school clients are (1) errors, defects, or omissions in the contract documents; (2) cost-related problems; (3) changed conditions; (4) consumer reaction; and (5) interpersonal relationships. A clear understanding of each party's role is necessary to eliminate these conflicts. (MLF)

  18. Prediagnostic Commentary in Veterinarian-Client Interaction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stivers, Tanya

    1998-01-01

    A study investigated the form of diagnostic talk occurring between veterinarian and client before or during the physical examination and before the clinical diagnosis. Data are from six cases from a corpus of veterinary consultations. Analysis focuses on use of qualifiers, hedges, and evidential mitigators in communicating both good news and bad…

  19. Client-Centered Employee Assistance Services.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bayer, Darryl Lee

    This paper addresses delivery aspects and benefits of client-centered Employee Assistance Program (EAP) services through a review of the literature and research. EAP services are described as educational and mental health services utilized to assist employees and their families to respond constructively to job, personal, interpersonal or…

  20. Three-Dimensional Audio Client Library

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rizzi, Stephen A.

    2005-01-01

    The Three-Dimensional Audio Client Library (3DAudio library) is a group of software routines written to facilitate development of both stand-alone (audio only) and immersive virtual-reality application programs that utilize three-dimensional audio displays. The library is intended to enable the development of three-dimensional audio client application programs by use of a code base common to multiple audio server computers. The 3DAudio library calls vendor-specific audio client libraries and currently supports the AuSIM Gold-Server and Lake Huron audio servers. 3DAudio library routines contain common functions for (1) initiation and termination of a client/audio server session, (2) configuration-file input, (3) positioning functions, (4) coordinate transformations, (5) audio transport functions, (6) rendering functions, (7) debugging functions, and (8) event-list-sequencing functions. The 3DAudio software is written in the C++ programming language and currently operates under the Linux, IRIX, and Windows operating systems.

  1. Finding Happiness for Ourselves and Our Clients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Geri

    2001-01-01

    Reviews D. G. Myers' (2000) examination of the contributing factors of happiness: money, relationships, and religion. Discusses the implications of these factors for counseling with specific recommendations made for counselors regarding their own self-care and their work with their clients. (GCP)

  2. Trust and the Client-Consultant Relationship

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Solomonson, William L.

    2012-01-01

    This study seeks to improve the contributions of performance consultants, instructional design consultants, and training consultants by explaining the effect that several variables have on trust as a mediator to relationship commitment within the context of the client-consultant relationship. The participants were 228 college students from two…

  3. Consequences of Psychotherapy Clients' Mental Health Ideology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Milling, Len; Kirsch, Irving

    Current theoretical approaches to understanding emotional difficulties are dominated by the medical model of mental illness, which assumes that emotional dysfunction can be viewed the same way as physical dysfunction. To examine the relationship between psychotherapy clients' beliefs about the medical model of psychotherapy and their behavior…

  4. Borderline Clients: Practice Implications of Recent Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Harriette C.

    1991-01-01

    Reviews current research on treatment of borderline clients with medication, individual counseling, and family interventions. Notes that recent studies indicate that borderline personality is heterogeneous condition in which different underlying disorders (affective, schizotypal, and neurological) may be present. Reviews effectiveness of various…

  5. Trust and the Client-Consultant Relationship

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Solomonson, William L.

    2012-01-01

    This study seeks to improve the contributions of performance consultants, instructional design consultants, and training consultants by explaining the effect that several variables have on trust as a mediator to relationship commitment within the context of the client-consultant relationship. The participants were 228 college students from two…

  6. Cognitive Strategies for Mentally Handicapped Clients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hiebert, Bryan; Malcolm, Doreen

    There is a need when working with mentally handicapped people to develop interventions that can be used within a self-control framework. One intervention that has demonstrated success in a self-control context with normally intelligent people is Cognitive Stress Inoculation Training (CSIT). In CSIT clients are taught to recognize current self-talk…

  7. Finding Happiness for Ourselves and Our Clients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Geri

    2001-01-01

    Reviews D. G. Myers' (2000) examination of the contributing factors of happiness: money, relationships, and religion. Discusses the implications of these factors for counseling with specific recommendations made for counselors regarding their own self-care and their work with their clients. (GCP)

  8. A Guide to the Client Assessment Package.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    NTS Research Corp., Durham, NC.

    This guide provides users of the Client Assessment Package (CAP)--a system of forms for recording the process of seeking and using information and assistance for educational improvement--with definitions, operational procedures, and instructions necessary to complete the forms accurately. The purposes of CAP are threefold: to help develop an…

  9. Enhancing Student Learning through Scaffolded Client Projects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tomlinson, Elizabeth

    2017-01-01

    This article reports on the current status of client projects (CPs) in business communication courses, provides a scaffolded model for implementing CP, and assesses student learning in CPs. Using a longitudinal mixed method research design, survey data and qualitative materials from six semesters are presented. The instructor survey indicated need…

  10. Brain Damage in Deaf Vocational Rehabilitation Clients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Getz, Marc; Vernon, McCay

    1986-01-01

    Screening of 54 deaf vocational clients by the Bender-Gestalt and other tests indicated the likely presence of significantly more brain damage than among the hearing population with a particularly high correlation between low IQ and brain damage in the deaf population. (DB)

  11. ANDES TOOLS: Promotional slides for Industrial Clients

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-09-03

    Briefing Charts 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) 10 August 2015 – 3 September 2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE ANDES TOOLS: Promotional slides for Industrial...Industrial Clients PA Case Number: #15479; Clearance Date: 9/3/2015 14. ABSTRACT Briefing Charts/Viewgraphs 15. SUBJECT TERMS N/A 16. SECURITY

  12. Considering Thin Client Computing for Higher Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sheehan, Mark

    1998-01-01

    In response to concerns about the cost of keeping up with individual desktop computing technology, several new solutions have emerged. Referred to as "thin clients," or network-centric computers, they include two types of desktop device: the network computer and the Windows terminal. Purchase cost, life span, support costs, and overall total cost…

  13. Family Therapy: A Client-Centered Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levant, Ronald F.

    1978-01-01

    This article critiques therapist-directed approaches to family therapy in light of research findings on therapist variables associated with positive outcomes in psychotherapy. An alternative, phenomenological view of the family is developed, which assumes the family to be motivated for enhancement and growth. A client-centered approach is…

  14. Effect of veterinarian-client-patient interactions on client adherence to dentistry and surgery recommendations in companion-animal practice.

    PubMed

    Kanji, Noureen; Coe, Jason B; Adams, Cindy L; Shaw, Jane R

    2012-02-15

    To explore the relationship between veterinarian-client-patient interactions and client adherence to dental and surgery recommendations and to test the a priori hypotheses that appointment-specific client satisfaction and relationship-centered care are positively associated with client adherence. Cross-sectional study. A subsample of 19 companion-animal veterinarians and 83 clients from a larger observational study consisting of 20 randomly recruited veterinarians and a convenience sample of 350 clients from eastern Ontario. Videotaped veterinarian-client-patient interactions containing a dentistry recommendation, surgery recommendation, or both were selected for inclusion from the larger sample of interactions coded with the Roter interaction analysis system. Client adherence was measured by evaluating each patient's medical record approximately 6 months after the videotaped interaction. The clarity of the recommendation, appointment-specific client-satisfaction score, and relationship-centered care score were compared between adhering and nonadhering clients. Among the 83 veterinarian-client-patient interactions, 25 (30%) clients adhered to a dentistry recommendation, surgery recommendation, or both. The odds for adherence were 7 times as great for clients who received a clear recommendation, compared with clients who received an ambiguous recommendation from their veterinarian. Moreover, adhering clients were significantly more satisfied as measured after the interview. Interactions resulting in client adherence also had higher scores for relationship-centered care than did interactions leading to nonadherence. Veterinarian use of a relationship-centered care approach, characterized as a collaborative partnership between a veterinarian and a client with provision of clear recommendations and effective communication of the rationale for the recommendations, has positive implications for client adherence.

  15. Evaluating healing for cancer in a community setting from the perspective of clients and healers: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Vaghela, C; Robinson, N; Gore, J; Peace, B; Lorenc, A

    2007-11-01

    The real-life practice of 'healing' for cancer in the community as perceived by clients and healers was investigated in a multi-method pilot study. Fifteen clients received six weekly healing sessions. Pre- and post-changes in perception towards well-being and client experience were assessed by EuroQol (EQ-5D), measure yourself concerns and well-being (MYCaW) and a client satisfaction tool. Qualitative methods, including focus groups, explored the perceived effects of healing in more depth and the participants' experience of taking part in research. The study was not designed to test the effect of healing on disease. Quantitative data showed perceived significant improvements in 'concerns/problems' for which clients wanted help (p<0.01), well-being (p<0.01) and anxiety/depression (p<0.05) over the course of healing. Significant effects were not seen in all areas of quality of life. Qualitative analysis showed clients mainly sought help for psychological and emotional concerns and reported only beneficial effects of healing. Clients attributed many of the quantitative improvements to healing itself. Despite some concerns, healers and clients engaged fully with the research process, and were enthusiastic about the importance of research into healing. Our study suggests that, while there are some confounding issues and study limitations to address, clients and healers perceive healing to have a range of benefits, particularly in terms of coping with cancer, and regard it as a useful approach that can be applied in a community setting alongside conventional medicine.

  16. Mutual powerlessness in client participation practices in mental health care.

    PubMed

    Broer, Tineke; Nieboer, Anna P; Bal, Roland

    2014-04-01

    Client participation has become a dominant policy goal in many countries including the Netherlands and is a topic much discussed in the literature. The success of client participation is usually measured in terms of the extent to which clients have a say in the participation process. Many articles have concluded that client participation is limited; professionals often still control the participation process and outcomes. The objective of this study is to gain insight into (i) the practice of client participation within a quality improvement collaborative in mental health care and (ii) the consequences of a Foucauldian conceptualization of power in analysing practices of client participation. We used an ethnographic design consisting of observations of national events and improvement team meetings and interviews with the collaborative's team members and programme managers. Contrary to many studies on client participation, we found both clients and service providers frequently felt powerless in its practice. Professionals and clients alike struggled with the contributions clients could make to the improvement processes and what functions they should fulfil. Moreover, professionals did not want to exert power upon clients, but ironically just for that reason sometimes struggled with shaping practices of client participation. This mutual powerlessness (partly) disappeared when clients helped to determine and execute specific improvement actions instead of participating in improvement teams. Recognizing that power is inescapable might allow for a more substantive discussion concerning the consequences that power arrangements produce, rather than looking at who is exerting how much power. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Mutual powerlessness in client participation practices in mental health care

    PubMed Central

    Broer, Tineke; Nieboer, Anna P.; Bal, Roland

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background  Client participation has become a dominant policy goal in many countries including the Netherlands and is a topic much discussed in the literature. The success of client participation is usually measured in terms of the extent to which clients have a say in the participation process. Many articles have concluded that client participation is limited; professionals often still control the participation process and outcomes. Objective  The objective of this study is to gain insight into (i) the practice of client participation within a quality improvement collaborative in mental health care and (ii) the consequences of a Foucauldian conceptualization of power in analysing practices of client participation. Design  We used an ethnographic design consisting of observations of national events and improvement team meetings and interviews with the collaborative’s team members and programme managers. Results  Contrary to many studies on client participation, we found both clients and service providers frequently felt powerless in its practice. Professionals and clients alike struggled with the contributions clients could make to the improvement processes and what functions they should fulfil. Moreover, professionals did not want to exert power upon clients, but ironically just for that reason sometimes struggled with shaping practices of client participation. This mutual powerlessness (partly) disappeared when clients helped to determine and execute specific improvement actions instead of participating in improvement teams. Conclusion  Recognizing that power is inescapable might allow for a more substantive discussion concerning the consequences that power arrangements produce, rather than looking at who is exerting how much power. PMID:22390793

  18. Ethical foundations of client-centered care in family planning.

    PubMed

    Kols, A J; Sherman, J E; Piotrow, P T

    1999-04-01

    Biomedical ethics provides the foundation for a model of client-centered care that can assure the good quality of family planning and other reproductive health services in developed and developing countries. Client concerns mirror the four ethical principles of autonomy, justice, beneficence, and nonmaleficence. Autonomy reflects clients' desire for full information and respect from providers so that they can exercise their right to make their own informed decisions. Justice, for clients, means fair treatment and ready access to services, regardless of one's socioeconomic status, education, ethnic group, or residence. Beneficence means that providers possess the technical competence and understanding needed to act in the best interest of their clients, as clients expect. Nonmaleficence translates into client concerns about safety--that no harm will come to them as a result of seeking services. Putting these ethical principles into practice requires changing providers' attitudes from paternalistic to client centered. Assessments of client satisfaction can help family planning programs identify and respond to client values and even raise client expectations about the care they should receive. Managers also can contribute to good quality care by meeting providers' professional needs for training, supervision, supplies, record keeping, and so on. Family planning programs around the world are focusing on these ethical concerns to emphasize respect for client values, appropriate decision making, broader access to services, and basic safety issues. Although they use a variety of techniques, all these quality assurance and improvement initiatives share an ethically based, client-centered philosophy.

  19. Perception of voice in the transgender client.

    PubMed

    McNeill, Emma J M; Wilson, Janet A; Clark, Susan; Deakin, Jayne

    2008-11-01

    Fundamental frequency (F(0)) of speech is used to measure the success of voice therapy in male-to-female transgender clients. This study evaluates the relationship between F(0) and patients' happiness with their voice. The study design used was a cross-sectional evaluation of client satisfaction questionnaires and voice recordings from transgender clients. This study was a comparative evaluation of voice recordings by voice professionals and lay observers. Twelve male-to-female transgender participants completed visual analogue scales (VASs), rating happiness with self-perceived femininity of their voice. Fifteen speech and language therapists (SLTs) and 40 naïve observers evaluated the anonymized recordings, using the same rating system. The correlation between mean F(0) and participant happiness was established. Relationships between participant happiness and rater opinions were explored. A significant relationship between F(0) and participant happiness could not be demonstrated (r=0.32, P=0.32). There was a moderately strong positive correlation between self-perception of vocal femininity and perception of femininity by SLTs and naïve observers (r=0.76 and 0.68, P=0.003 and P=0.01, respectively). This study demonstrates that happiness with voice in male-to-female transgender clients is not directly related to F(0). Clients can assess femininity of their voice in the form of perceived pitch. This may not affect happiness scores. Voice satisfaction may not correlate with perceptions of supervising voice professionals. However, professionals can reliably evaluate how the voice will be received by the lay public. Subjective measures of patient satisfaction, including VASs, are reliable and valid tools in evaluating therapeutic success.

  20. Earthdata Search Client: Usability Review Process, Results, and Implemented Changes, Using Earthdata Search Client as a Case Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siarto, Jeff; Reese, Mark; Shum, Dana; Baynes, Katie

    2016-01-01

    User experience and visual design are greatly improved when usability testing is performed on a periodic basis. Design decisions should be tested by real users so that application owners can understand the effectiveness of each decision and identify areas for improvement. It is important that applications be tested not just once, but as a part of a continuing process that looks to build upon previous tests. NASA's Earthdata Search Client has undergone a usability study to ensure its users' needs are being met and that users understand how to use the tool efficiently and effectively. This poster will highlight the process followed for usability study, the results of the study, and what has been implemented in light of the results to improve the application's interface.

  1. Asymmetry of Responsiveness in Client-Centered Therapy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shapiro, David A.

    1977-01-01

    Each utterance of a psychotherapy session conducted by Carl Rogers was transcribed on a separate card. Fifteen undergraduate subjects reconstituted client-therapist sequences more accurately than therapist-client sequences. (Author)

  2. 42 CFR 483.420 - Condition of participation: Client protections.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... treatment; (3) Allow and encourage individual clients to exercise their rights as clients of the facility... food or hydration that contributes to a nutritionally adequate diet. (iii) The facility must...

  3. 49 CFR 1103.22 - Restraining clients from improprieties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... TRANSPORTATION BOARD, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION RULES OF PRACTICE PRACTITIONERS Canons of Ethics The Practitioner's Duties and Responsibilities Toward A Client § 1103.22 Restraining clients from improprieties. A...

  4. Counseling Older Japanese American Clients: An Overview and Observations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Itai, Goro; McRae, Cynthia

    1994-01-01

    Discusses important aspects of providing counseling to older Japanese American clients, including ethical issues based on cultural differences and nontraditional approaches to counseling. Examines unique historical and cultural characteristics of these clients. Includes 26 citations. (Author/CRR)

  5. Gender Dysphoria: The Therapist's Dilemma--The Client's Choice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sherebrin, Hannah

    1996-01-01

    Therapist's role and dilemmas faced in treating a gender dysphoric client are discussed. Examines ethical and moral issues relating to transsexualism and discusses the appropriateness of art therapy as a treatment for transsexual clients. (SNR)

  6. Asymmetry of Responsiveness in Client-Centered Therapy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shapiro, David A.

    1977-01-01

    Each utterance of a psychotherapy session conducted by Carl Rogers was transcribed on a separate card. Fifteen undergraduate subjects reconstituted client-therapist sequences more accurately than therapist-client sequences. (Author)

  7. A Responsive Client for Distributed Visualization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bollig, E. F.; Jensen, P. A.; Erlebacher, G.; Yuen, D. A.; Momsen, A. R.

    2006-12-01

    As grids, web services and distributed computing continue to gain popularity in the scientific community, demand for virtual laboratories likewise increases. Today organizations such as the Virtual Laboratory for Earth and Planetary Sciences (VLab) are dedicated to developing web-based portals to perform various simulations remotely while abstracting away details of the underlying computation. Two of the biggest challenges in portal- based computing are fast visualization and smooth interrogation without over taxing clients resources. In response to this challenge, we have expanded on our previous data storage strategy and thick client visualization scheme [1] to develop a client-centric distributed application that utilizes remote visualization of large datasets and makes use of the local graphics processor for improved interactivity. Rather than waste precious client resources for visualization, a combination of 3D graphics and 2D server bitmaps are used to simulate the look and feel of local rendering. Java Web Start and Java Bindings for OpenGL enable install-on- demand functionality as well as low level access to client graphics for all platforms. Powerful visualization services based on VTK and auto-generated by the WATT compiler [2] are accessible through a standard web API. Data is permanently stored on compute nodes while separate visualization nodes fetch data requested by clients, caching it locally to prevent unnecessary transfers. We will demonstrate application capabilities in the context of simulated charge density visualization within the VLab portal. In addition, we will address generalizations of our application to interact with a wider number of WATT services and performance bottlenecks. [1] Ananthuni, R., Karki, B.B., Bollig, E.F., da Silva, C.R.S., Erlebacher, G., "A Web-Based Visualization and Reposition Scheme for Scientific Data," In Press, Proceedings of the 2006 International Conference on Modeling Simulation and Visualization Methods (MSV

  8. Predicting Categories of Improvement among Counseling Center Clients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hummel, Thomas J.; Lichtenberg, James W.

    In looking at whether clients will improve with counseling, counselors must first determine what kinds of outcomes are likely with certain clients. In order to make probabilistic statements about individual client outcomes, rather than about the more generalized outcome of counseling, a different approach is needed. Using data from counseling…

  9. Client Retention in Residential Drug Treatment for Latinos

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Amodeo, Maryann; Chassler, Deborah; Oettinger, Catherine; Labiosa, Wilfred; Lundgren, Lena M.

    2008-01-01

    Client drop out from treatment is of great concern to the substance abuse field. Completion rates across modalities vary from low to moderate, not ideal since length of stay has been positively and consistently associated with better client outcomes. The study explored whether client characteristics shown to be related to retention were associated…

  10. A Program Evaluation Using Client Records and Census Data.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bachrach, Kenneth M.; Zautra, Alex

    Use of client records and census data as a research methodology can provide mental health planners with information on community needs as well as the adequacy of existing programs. Three ways of analyzing client records in conjunction with census data are: (1) tract by tract, comparing client geographic distribution with census characteristics;…

  11. Counselor Beliefs and Perceived Knowledge Regarding Clients with Learning Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bell, Tamekia R.

    2012-01-01

    Clients with learning disabilities constitute a cultural group that has not been extensively studied. The professional literature has found that counselors have reported the need for additional training in working with clients with disabilities. This study explored counselors' beliefs and perceived knowledge regarding counseling clients with…

  12. Can Knowledge of Client Birth Order Bias Clinical Judgment?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stewart, Allan E.

    2004-01-01

    Clinicians (N = 308) responded to identical counseling vignettes of a male client that differed only in the client's stated birth order. Clinicians developed different impressions about the client and his family experiences that corresponded with the prototypical descriptions of persons from 1 of 4 birth orders (i.e., first, middle, youngest, and…

  13. 42 CFR 483.420 - Condition of participation: Client protections.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ..., verbal, sexual or psychological abuse or punishment. (ii) Staff must not punish a client by withholding... extent of their capabilities; (5) Ensure that clients are not subjected to physical, verbal, sexual or psychological abuse or punishment; (6) Ensure that clients are free from unnecessary drugs and physical...

  14. Client Good Moments: An Intensive Analysis of a Single Session.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stalikas, Anastassios; Fitzpatrick, Marilyn

    1995-01-01

    An intensive analysis of a single counseling session conducted by Fritz Perls was carried out to examine relationships among client experiencing level, client strength of feeling, counselor interventions, and client good moments. The possibility that positive therapeutic outcome is related to the accretion of good moments is discussed. (JBJ)

  15. 31 CFR 10.21 - Knowledge of client's omission.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Knowledge of client's omission. 10.21 Section 10.21 Money and Finance: Treasury Office of the Secretary of the Treasury PRACTICE BEFORE THE... § 10.21 Knowledge of client's omission. A practitioner who, having been retained by a client...

  16. Impact of Client Suicide on Practitioner Posttraumatic Growth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Munson, Joseph Simon

    2009-01-01

    Our purpose was to examine posttraumatic growth in clinicians after the suicide death of a client. An experience such as a client suicide could be an opportunity for growth or a danger for the practitioner to become traumatized. Thus, the clinician who works with clients who complete suicide may either suffer or experience a positive change from…

  17. 32 CFR 776.33 - Client under a disability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Client under a disability. 776.33 Section 776.33... of Professional Conduct § 776.33 Client under a disability. (a) Client under a disability: (1) When a... impaired, whether because of minority, mental disability, or for some other reason, the covered attorney...

  18. Accommodating Extension Clients Who Face Language, Vision, or Hearing Challenges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Angima, Sam; Etuk, Lena; Maddy, Deborah

    2016-01-01

    A survey-based study explored approaches used by one land-grant university to meet the needs of Extension clients who face language, vision, or hearing challenges. In attempts to serve such clients, the greatest gaps existed for clients whose main language was Spanish, followed by those who had vision impairments and then those who had hearing…

  19. 37 CFR 10.78 - Limiting liability to client.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 37 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Limiting liability to client... Office Code of Professional Responsibility § 10.78 Limiting liability to client. A practitioner shall not attempt to exonerate himself or herself from, or limit his or her liability to, a client for his or her...

  20. 37 CFR 10.67 - Settling similar claims of clients.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... clients. 10.67 Section 10.67 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights UNITED STATES PATENT AND TRADEMARK OFFICE... Office Code of Professional Responsibility § 10.67 Settling similar claims of clients. A practitioner who represents two or more clients shall not make or participate in the making of an aggregate settlement of the...

  1. 19 CFR 111.39 - Advice to client.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Advice to client. 111.39 Section 111.39 Customs... CUSTOMS BROKERS Duties and Responsibilities of Customs Brokers § 111.39 Advice to client. (a) Withheld or false information. A broker must not withhold information relative to any customs business from a client...

  2. Clients Place Unique Functional Constraints on Hsp90.

    PubMed

    Zuehlke, Abbey D; Neckers, Len

    2016-07-01

    Heat shock protein 90 kDa (Hsp90) is required for the activation and stabilization of numerous client proteins, but the functional requirements of individual clients remain poorly understood. Utilizing yeast growth assays and mutational analysis, Mishra and colleagues explore the constraints placed on Hsp90 by distinct clients and the relationship between these constraints and overall yeast fitness. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  3. Barbershop Prostate Cancer Education: Factors Associated with Client Knowledge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hill, Barry C.; Black, David R.; Shields, Cleveland G.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to identify characteristics of Black barbershop clients and barbers in an urban Midwestern city participating in a health promotion program called Affecting Cancer Together (ACT) that are associated with client knowledge about prostate cancer. Statistical analyses examined client and barber characteristics for their…

  4. Successful Vocational Rehabilitation of Clients with Retinitis Pigmentosa.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taheri-Araghi, M.; Hendren, G.

    1994-01-01

    Statistical analysis of 10 personal (client) variables and four program variables related to 76 people who became blind from retinitis pigmentosa revealed that 6 variables predicted clients' rehabilitation outcomes: age, gender, race, work status, amount of case-service money spent on the client's behalf, and number of changes in career objectives…

  5. Negotiating Post-Consultation "Homework" Tasks between Counselors and Clients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strong, Tom; Massfeller, Helen F.

    2010-01-01

    Counselors frequently conclude consultations with clients with suggestions or prescriptions for clients to follow up on, post-consultation. In this paper, we conceptualize the discussion regarding such post-consultation tasks as negotiations between counselor and client, focusing in particular on what observably occurs and is "talked into being"…

  6. Incorporating Perceived Importance of Service Elements into Client Satisfaction Measures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hsieh, Chang-Ming

    2012-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to assess the need for incorporating perceived importance of service elements into client satisfaction measures. Method: A secondary analysis of client satisfaction data from 112 clients of an elderly case management setting was conducted. Results: This study found that the relationship between global…

  7. Accommodating Extension Clients Who Face Language, Vision, or Hearing Challenges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Angima, Sam; Etuk, Lena; Maddy, Deborah

    2016-01-01

    A survey-based study explored approaches used by one land-grant university to meet the needs of Extension clients who face language, vision, or hearing challenges. In attempts to serve such clients, the greatest gaps existed for clients whose main language was Spanish, followed by those who had vision impairments and then those who had hearing…

  8. 37 CFR 11.113 - Organization as client.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 37 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Organization as client. 11... Rules of Professional Conduct Client-Practitioner Relationship § 11.113 Organization as client. (a) A practitioner employed or retained by an organization represents the organization acting through its...

  9. Incorporating Perceived Importance of Service Elements into Client Satisfaction Measures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hsieh, Chang-Ming

    2012-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to assess the need for incorporating perceived importance of service elements into client satisfaction measures. Method: A secondary analysis of client satisfaction data from 112 clients of an elderly case management setting was conducted. Results: This study found that the relationship between global…

  10. Successful Vocational Rehabilitation of Clients with Retinitis Pigmentosa.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taheri-Araghi, M.; Hendren, G.

    1994-01-01

    Statistical analysis of 10 personal (client) variables and four program variables related to 76 people who became blind from retinitis pigmentosa revealed that 6 variables predicted clients' rehabilitation outcomes: age, gender, race, work status, amount of case-service money spent on the client's behalf, and number of changes in career objectives…

  11. Ambiguity Tolerance of Therapists and Process Changes of Their Clients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tucker, Robin C.; Snyder, William U.

    1974-01-01

    The study investigated the relationships between student-therapists' tolerance for ambiguity in visual perception tasks and (a)the positive affect displayed toward them by their clients, (b)measures of improvement in clients' self self-reference statements, and (c)measures of improvement in clients'"adjustment". (Author)

  12. Clients with MMPI High D-PD: Therapy Implications.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Wayne; Bauer, Barbara

    1985-01-01

    Compared personal characteristics of 80 counseling clients with elevated 2-4 (Depression-Psychiatric Deviate) scales on their Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory and 109 clients without elevations. Results indicated that clients with 2-4 elevations were significantly more depressed, had lower self-esteem, and were more likely to come from…

  13. A Program Evaluation Using Client Records and Census Data.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bachrach, Kenneth M.; Zautra, Alex

    Use of client records and census data as a research methodology can provide mental health planners with information on community needs as well as the adequacy of existing programs. Three ways of analyzing client records in conjunction with census data are: (1) tract by tract, comparing client geographic distribution with census characteristics;…

  14. 32 CFR 776.4 - Attorney-client relationships.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Attorney-client relationships. 776.4 Section 776... General § 776.4 Attorney-client relationships. (a) The executive agency to which assigned (DON in most... will not establish attorney-client relationships with any individual unless detailed, assigned, or...

  15. 32 CFR 776.4 - Attorney-client relationships.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Attorney-client relationships. 776.4 Section 776... General § 776.4 Attorney-client relationships. (a) The executive agency to which assigned (DON in most... will not establish attorney-client relationships with any individual unless detailed, assigned, or...

  16. 32 CFR 776.4 - Attorney-client relationships.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Attorney-client relationships. 776.4 Section 776... General § 776.4 Attorney-client relationships. (a) The executive agency to which assigned (DON in most... will not establish attorney-client relationships with any individual unless detailed, assigned, or...

  17. 32 CFR 776.4 - Attorney-client relationships.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Attorney-client relationships. 776.4 Section 776... General § 776.4 Attorney-client relationships. (a) The executive agency to which assigned (DON in most... will not establish attorney-client relationships with any individual unless detailed, assigned, or...

  18. 32 CFR 776.4 - Attorney-client relationships.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Attorney-client relationships. 776.4 Section 776... General § 776.4 Attorney-client relationships. (a) The executive agency to which assigned (DON in most... will not establish attorney-client relationships with any individual unless detailed, assigned, or...

  19. What Business Students Should Know about Attorney-Client Privilege

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Draba, Robert; Marshall, Brent

    2012-01-01

    The case law on attorney-client privilege is extensive and can be somewhat complex. Over seven hundred articles in Westlaw, for example, have the phrase "attorney-client privilege" in the title; in the last three years alone, there have been over 3700 federal cases in which the phrase "attorney-client privilege" appears at least once. However,…

  20. Counselor Beliefs and Perceived Knowledge Regarding Clients with Learning Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bell, Tamekia R.

    2012-01-01

    Clients with learning disabilities constitute a cultural group that has not been extensively studied. The professional literature has found that counselors have reported the need for additional training in working with clients with disabilities. This study explored counselors' beliefs and perceived knowledge regarding counseling clients with…

  1. Health Promotion through the Use of Nurse-Client Contracts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Dover, Leslie J.

    Much of the practice of community health nurses is focused on health promotion. Nurse-client contracting has been used with clients experiencing hypertension, diabetes, or arthritis. A study was conducted to determine whether nurse-client contracting would be useful as a method for providing nursing care to assist sexually active young women to…

  2. What Business Students Should Know about Attorney-Client Privilege

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Draba, Robert; Marshall, Brent

    2012-01-01

    The case law on attorney-client privilege is extensive and can be somewhat complex. Over seven hundred articles in Westlaw, for example, have the phrase "attorney-client privilege" in the title; in the last three years alone, there have been over 3700 federal cases in which the phrase "attorney-client privilege" appears at least once. However,…

  3. Barbershop Prostate Cancer Education: Factors Associated with Client Knowledge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hill, Barry C.; Black, David R.; Shields, Cleveland G.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to identify characteristics of Black barbershop clients and barbers in an urban Midwestern city participating in a health promotion program called Affecting Cancer Together (ACT) that are associated with client knowledge about prostate cancer. Statistical analyses examined client and barber characteristics for their…

  4. Can Knowledge of Client Birth Order Bias Clinical Judgment?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stewart, Allan E.

    2004-01-01

    Clinicians (N = 308) responded to identical counseling vignettes of a male client that differed only in the client's stated birth order. Clinicians developed different impressions about the client and his family experiences that corresponded with the prototypical descriptions of persons from 1 of 4 birth orders (i.e., first, middle, youngest, and…

  5. Working with Resistant Clients in Career Counseling. ERIC Digest.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gysbers, Norman C.

    This Digest identifies and describes ways that clients' resistance may be exhibited during career counseling. It states that whenever clients are involved in change, client resistance should be expected. Some examples of types of resistance that may be exhibited include fear of counseling, fear of taking responsibility, making excuses, and overt…

  6. Educating Therapists in Training about Clients' Expectations of Treatment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reynolds, Kathleen; Ogiba, Shawn; Chambliss, Catherine

    Training therapists effectively requires familiarizing them with the modal expectations that clients bring to the therapeutic encounter. Ways in which therapists can be apprised of clients' expectations of therapy are discussed. Accurate understanding of clients' attitudes permits development of appropriately focused therapy goals and is generally…

  7. Brief Therapy with Difficult Clients. Hatherleigh Professional Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Loar, Lynn

    1995-01-01

    Brief therapy is an effective, time-limited approach that invokes clients values, appreciates their strengths, and is based on mutual respect. Counseling nonvoluntary clients can be extremely difficult because of the intense degree of denial, minimization, or rationalization of problems such clients typically bring to therapy. Therapists must…

  8. Channel Access Client Toolbox for Matlab

    SciTech Connect

    Terebilo, Andrei

    2002-08-07

    This paper reports on MATLAB Channel Access (MCA) Toolbox--MATLAB [1] interface to EPICS Channel Access (CA) client library. We are developing the toolbox for SPEAR3 accelerator controls, but it is of general use for accelerator and experimental physics applications programming. It is packaged as a MATLAB toolbox to allow easy development of complex CA client applications entirely in MATLAB. The benefits include: the ability to calculate and display parameters that use EPICS process variables as inputs, availability of MATLAB graphics tools for user interface design, and integration with the MATLAB-based accelerator modeling software--Accelerator Toolbox [2-4]. Another purpose of this paper is to propose a feasible path to a synergy between accelerator control systems and accelerator simulation codes, the idea known as on-line accelerator model.

  9. Client satisfaction. Operations research activities and results.

    PubMed

    1998-06-01

    Operations research (OR) is a major component of the Quality Assurance Project's (QAP) strategy for improving the quality of health care delivery worldwide. QAP's Operations Research Program aims to improve the feasibility, utility, and cost-effectiveness of quality assurance strategies in developing countries. QAP and its field partners work to maximize the utility of each field study's findings. As such, the project hopes to disseminate information on all aspects of important OR projects, from the initial design to implementation and results. Over the course of the project, QAP's staff and their partners will develop studies in 16 technical areas. One key area of interest is the study of client satisfaction with health care delivery. The project currently has two major studies on client satisfaction underway in Niger and Peru. Phase one results from the Niger research and QAP and the Max Salud Institute in Peru are discussed.

  10. Client-side Skype forensics: an overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meißner, Tina; Kröger, Knut; Creutzburg, Reiner

    2013-03-01

    IT security and computer forensics are important components in the information technology. In the present study, a client-side Skype forensics is performed. It is designed to explain which kind of user data are stored on a computer and which tools allow the extraction of those data for a forensic investigation. There are described both methods - a manual analysis and an analysis with (mainly) open source tools, respectively.

  11. Illegal abortion in Mexico: client perceptions.

    PubMed Central

    de Weiss, S P; David, H P

    1990-01-01

    An exploratory study of the perceptions of 156 abortion clients in Mexico suggests that perceived quality of service was the main reason for choosing physicians while cost and anonymity were the major reasons for choosing nonphysicians. "Too young" was the most often cited reason for pregnancy termination, followed by economic situation and having too many children already. Cost was, on average, equivalent to three to four weeks minimum wage; physicians' charges were about three times higher than those of nonphysicians. PMID:2343958

  12. Hsp90: Friends, clients and natural foes.

    PubMed

    Verma, Sharad; Goyal, Sukriti; Jamal, Salma; Singh, Aditi; Grover, Abhinav

    2016-08-01

    Hsp90, a homodimeric ATPase, is responsible for the correct folding of a number of newly synthesized polypeptides in addition to the correct folding of denatured/misfolded client proteins. It requires several co-chaperones and other partner proteins for chaperone activity. Due to the involvement of Hsp90-dependent client proteins in a variety of oncogenic signaling pathways, Hsp90 inhibition has emerged as one of the leading strategies for anticancer chemotherapeutics. Most of Hsp90 inhibitors blocks the N terminal ATP binding pocket and prevents the conformational changes which are essential for the loading of co-chaperones and client proteins. Several other inhibitors have also been reported which disrupt chaperone cycle in ways other than binding to N terminal ATP binding pocket. The Hsp90 inhibition is associated with heat shock response, mediated by HSF-1, to overcome the loss of Hsp90 and sustain cell survival. This review is an attempt to give an over view of all the important players of chaperone cycle. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. and Société Française de Biochimie et Biologie Moléculaire (SFBBM). All rights reserved.

  13. Client preferences for HIV inpatient care delivery.

    PubMed

    McDonald, R; Free, D; Ross, F; Mitchell, P

    1998-06-01

    This study was concerned with preferences for inpatient models of care by the HIV/AIDS client group, in particular the difference between gay white men (European) and black heterosexuals of African/Caribbean origin. Satisfaction with the care currently provided was also an area of interest. Thirteen per cent (n = 79) of the were surveyed. Seventy per cent (n = 56) of the HIV/AIDS client group indicated a preference for a dedicated care model. Significant results were obtained demonstrating differences in the care model preferred by gay white men and black heterosexuals (p < 0.01). Gay white men were much more likely to state they would leave the trust to receive dedicated care (p < 0.01). Black heterosexuals were more likely to state that they would change treatment areas to avoid dedicated care (p < 0.01) Differences in concern about confidentiality were noted between the two groups. Confidentiality may be one of a number of factors influencing preference of care for African/Caribbeans and this needs to be studied further. The clients surveyed were not universally satisfied with the care they had been receiving. Following the results of the survey radical changes in the management of HIV inpatient care were made.

  14. Public health nurses' supervision of clients in Norway.

    PubMed

    Tveiten, S; Severinsson, E

    2005-09-01

    The aim of this study was to explore and describe what public health nurses (PHNs) understand by client supervision and how they perform it. The main principles of the health promotion discourse initiated by the World Health Organization (WHO) over the last 20-30 years are client participation and the view of the client as expert. Supervision is one relevant intervention strategy in the empowerment process, in which these principles play a central role. There is a lack of research pertaining to the intervention models employed by PHNs. Twenty-three transcribed audiotaped dialogues between PHNs and their clients were analysed by means of qualitative content analysis. What the PHNs understand by supervision and how they perform it can be described by three themes: continuity in relationships and reflexivity in the supervision approach, communicating with the client about his/her needs, problems and worries; and the organization of client supervision. The PHNs in this study understand client supervision as communication and relationships with clients on the subject of a healthy lifestyle, child development and coping with everyday life. The PHNs' approach to client supervision seemed to include aspects of empowerment by means of client participation and the view of the client as expert. However, the PHNs themselves had an expert role.

  15. Real Earthquakes, Real Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schomburg, Aaron

    2003-01-01

    One teacher took her class on a year long earthquake expedition. The goal was to monitor the occurrences of real earthquakes during the year and mark their locations with push pins on a wall-sized world map in the hallway outside the science room. The purpose of the project was to create a detailed picture of the earthquakes that occurred…

  16. Real Earthquakes, Real Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schomburg, Aaron

    2003-01-01

    One teacher took her class on a year long earthquake expedition. The goal was to monitor the occurrences of real earthquakes during the year and mark their locations with push pins on a wall-sized world map in the hallway outside the science room. The purpose of the project was to create a detailed picture of the earthquakes that occurred…

  17. Client Education: Communicative Interaction between Physiotherapists and Clients with Subacute Low Back Pain in Private Practice

    PubMed Central

    Bassett, Raewyn; Fenety, Anne; Hoens, Alison M.

    2011-01-01

    ABSTRACT Purpose: To explore, through focus-group interviews, client education provided by physiotherapists in private practice who treat injured workers with subacute low back pain (SA-LBP). Methods: Six focus-group interviews were held in the fall of 2006 to explore treatment practices of physiotherapists for this population. Each of the 44 physiotherapists who volunteered attended one of six regional sessions. Results: Three overarching themes emerged: the critical importance of education; education: a multidimensional concept; and the physiotherapist–client relationship. In this study, we found that education provides continuity by tying together the separate tasks occurring during one treatment session. Our participants said that time is of the essence in private practice and described how they provide education seamlessly, making this type of delivery efficient. Conclusions: Education is a highly valued aspect of practice for physiotherapists. Verbal, tactile, and visual information obtained from the client as assessment and treatment progress is explored, expanded, and contextualized in conversation with the client. In a communicative, interactive process, client fears, other contextual information, and physiotherapist information about procedures and techniques, exercises, and anatomy are collaboratively interrelated. PMID:22379262

  18. A molecular mechanism of chaperone-client recognition

    PubMed Central

    He, Lichun; Sharpe, Timothy; Mazur, Adam; Hiller, Sebastian

    2016-01-01

    Molecular chaperones are essential in aiding client proteins to fold into their native structure and in maintaining cellular protein homeostasis. However, mechanistic aspects of chaperone function are still not well understood at the atomic level. We use nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy to elucidate the mechanism underlying client recognition by the adenosine triphosphate-independent chaperone Spy at the atomic level and derive a structural model for the chaperone-client complex. Spy interacts with its partially folded client Im7 by selective recognition of flexible, locally frustrated regions in a dynamic fashion. The interaction with Spy destabilizes a partially folded client but spatially compacts an unfolded client conformational ensemble. By increasing client backbone dynamics, the chaperone facilitates the search for the native structure. A comparison of the interaction of Im7 with two other chaperones suggests that the underlying principle of recognizing frustrated segments is of a fundamental nature. PMID:28138538

  19. Evaluating the Influence of the Client Behavior in Cloud Computing

    PubMed Central

    Centurion, Adriana Molina; Franco Eustáquio, Paulo Sérgio; Carlucci Santana, Regina Helena; Bruschi, Sarita Mazzini; Santana, Marcos José

    2016-01-01

    This paper proposes a novel approach for the implementation of simulation scenarios, providing a client entity for cloud computing systems. The client entity allows the creation of scenarios in which the client behavior has an influence on the simulation, making the results more realistic. The proposed client entity is based on several characteristics that affect the performance of a cloud computing system, including different modes of submission and their behavior when the waiting time between requests (think time) is considered. The proposed characterization of the client enables the sending of either individual requests or group of Web services to scenarios where the workload takes the form of bursts. The client entity is included in the CloudSim, a framework for modelling and simulation of cloud computing. Experimental results show the influence of the client behavior on the performance of the services executed in a cloud computing system. PMID:27441559

  20. Evaluating the Influence of the Client Behavior in Cloud Computing.

    PubMed

    Souza Pardo, Mário Henrique; Centurion, Adriana Molina; Franco Eustáquio, Paulo Sérgio; Carlucci Santana, Regina Helena; Bruschi, Sarita Mazzini; Santana, Marcos José

    2016-01-01

    This paper proposes a novel approach for the implementation of simulation scenarios, providing a client entity for cloud computing systems. The client entity allows the creation of scenarios in which the client behavior has an influence on the simulation, making the results more realistic. The proposed client entity is based on several characteristics that affect the performance of a cloud computing system, including different modes of submission and their behavior when the waiting time between requests (think time) is considered. The proposed characterization of the client enables the sending of either individual requests or group of Web services to scenarios where the workload takes the form of bursts. The client entity is included in the CloudSim, a framework for modelling and simulation of cloud computing. Experimental results show the influence of the client behavior on the performance of the services executed in a cloud computing system.

  1. Neurofeedback outcomes in clients with Asperger's syndrome.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Lynda; Thompson, Michael; Reid, Andrea

    2010-03-01

    This paper summarizes data from a review of neurofeedback (NFB) training with 150 clients with Asperger's Syndrome (AS) and 9 clients with Autistic Spectrum Disorder (ASD) seen over a 15 year period (1993-2008) in a clinical setting. The main objective was to investigate whether electroncephalographic (EEG) biofeedback, also called neurofeedback (NFB), made a significant difference in clients diagnosed with AS. An earlier paper (Thompson et al. 2009) reviews the symptoms of AS, highlights research findings and theories concerning this disorder, discusses QEEG patterns in AS (both single and 19-channel), and details a hypothesis, based on functional neuroanatomy, concerning how NFB, often paired with biofeedback (BFB), might produce a change in symptoms. A further aim of the current report is to provide practitioners with a detailed description of the method used to address some of the key symptoms of AS in order to encourage further research and clinical work to refine the use of NFB plus BFB in the treatment of AS. All charts were included for review where there was a diagnosis of AS or ASD and pre- and post-training testing results were available for one or more of the standardized tests used. Clients received 40-60 sessions of NFB, which was combined with training in metacognitive strategies and, for most older adolescent and adult clients, with BFB of respiration, electrodermal response, and, more recently, heart rate variability. For the majority of clients, feedback was contingent on decreasing slow wave activity (usually 3-7 Hz), decreasing beta spindling if it was present (usually between 23 and 35 Hz), and increasing fast wave activity termed sensorimotor rhythm (SMR) (12-15 or 13-15 Hz depending on assessment findings). The most common initial montage was referential placement at the vertex (CZ) for children and at FCz (midway between FZ and CZ) for adults, referenced to the right ear. Metacognitive strategies relevant to social understanding, spatial

  2. Attaching client processors to the NSL with HIPPI IPI-3

    SciTech Connect

    1996-02-08

    The National Storage Laboratory (NSL) is currently implementing a prototype storage system that utilizes network attached high performance storage devices to transfer data directly between storage devices and client processors using HIPPI IPI-3. The client processors in use at the NSL include Cray YMP-C90 supercomputers, IBM RISC System 6000 workstations, Silicon Graphics workstations, SUN workstations, and a PsiTech frame buffer. This paper describes the HIPPI IPI-3 interface between the client processors and the storage devices. It is intended to serve as a guide for vendors who desire to connect their products to the NSL. Clients direct their requests to a distributed storage system. A typical storage system will contain multiple storage devices. The storage system map client`s files onto regions on the storage devices. At the NSL, the data transfers are performed directly between the client processors and the storage devices, bypassing any processors in the storage system. The protocol used between the client processors and the storage devices is HIPPI IPI-3 third party copy. When a client processor wants to read or write data to or from the storage system, the client processor sends a request to the storage system across a control connection. The control path to the storage system is logically separated from the data path. When the storage system is ready to perform a data transfer, a third-party IPI-3 read or write command is sent to one of the IPI-3 slave devices in the storage system. The slave device then transfers the data directly to or from the client processor across the HIPPI data network. Using third party copy simplifies the implementation of the client processor`s interface to the storage system by isolating the client processors from the specific characteristics of the storage devices.

  3. Quality of life of clients with schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Chan, Sally; Yu, Iu Wai

    2004-01-01

    Because of the deinstitutionalization of mental health care in Hong Kong that has taken place since the 1980s, many people with mental health problems are being cared for in the community. The majority of clients have a diagnosis of schizophrenia, and many have a long duration of illness and multiple readmissions. There is concern about their quality of life. To investigate quality of life and related factors in clients with a diagnosis of schizophrenia in Hong Kong. A convenience sample was recruited from a psychiatric outpatient department. Structured face-to-face interviews were conducted using the Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale and the Hong Kong Chinese World Health Organization Quality of Life Scale-Brief Version. A total of 172 people participated in the study. Most of them were single and unemployed. They were least satisfied with their psychological health, financial situation, life enjoyment and sexual activity. Women (n = 91) reported less satisfaction with quality of life than men (n = 86). Unemployed people (n = 100) were less satisfied with their quality of life than the employed (n = 76). Higher levels of mental health problems and higher numbers of previous hospitalizations were associated with negative perceptions of quality of life. People with mental health problems had significantly less satisfaction with their quality of life than a sample from the general population in Hong Kong surveyed in a previous study. As well as experiencing distressing mental symptoms, they had many difficulties, such as financial problems, unemployment and lack of opportunities to participate in social activities, that resulted from stigma and discrimination. These had a great impact on their quality of life. Because of the small sample size and its convenience nature, the findings may not be generalizable to all clients in Hong Kong. A generic instrument was used to measure quality of life, and this may not have been sensitive to certain aspects of mental health

  4. Dealing Bandwidth to Mobile Clients Using Games

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sofokleous, Anastasis A.; Angelides, Marios C.

    This chapter exploits a gaming approach to bandwidth sharing in a network of non-cooperative clients whose aim is to satisfy their selfish objectives and be served in the shortest time and who share limited knowledge of one another. The chapter models this problem as a game in which players consume the bandwidth of a video streaming server. The rest of this chapter is organized in four sections: the proceeding section presents resource allocation taxonomies, following that is a section on game theory, where our approach is sourced from, and its application to resource allocation. The penultimate section presents our gaming approach to resource allocation. The final section concludes.

  5. A client/server approach to telemedicine.

    PubMed Central

    Vaughan, B. J.; Torok, K. E.; Kelly, L. M.; Ewing, D. J.; Andrews, L. T.

    1995-01-01

    This paper describes the Medical College of Ohio's efforts in developing a client/server telemedicine system. Telemedicine vastly improves the ability of a medical center physician or specialist to interactively consult with a physician at a remote health care facility. The patient receives attention more quickly, he and his family do not need to travel long distances to obtain specialists' services, and the primary care physician can be involved in diagnosis and developing a treatment program [1, 2]. Telemedicine consultations are designed to improve access to health services in underserved urban and rural communities and reduce isolation of rural practitioners [3]. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:8563396

  6. Effects of Cognitive Style and Counselor-Client Compatibility on Client Growth.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fry, P.S.; Charron, P.A.

    1980-01-01

    Findings suggest that clients' evaluations of their improvement in self-exploration skills and their perceptions of ease of relating and learning from their counselor-partners may benefit considerably from cognitive style matching. These effects may be applicable only to extreme scorers on the field dependence-independence dimension. (Author)

  7. Client outcomes and the working alliance in the client-case manager relationship: a causal analysis.

    PubMed

    Cunningham, Jennifer; Calsyn, Robert J; Burger, Gary K; Morse, Gary A; Klinkenberg, W Dean

    2007-01-01

    This study investigated the causal relationship between the working alliance and client outcomes in the client-case manager relationship. All 162 study participants received services fiom a case manager who worked as a member of an assertive community treatment team. All participants had both a substance use disorder and a diagnosis of severe mental illness and were homeless at baseline. A brief form of the Working Alliance Inventory (WAI) was used to measure the working alliance after 3 and 15 months of treatment. The Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale was used to measure psychiatric symptoms at baseline, 9, and 18 months. Days per month that clients used alcohol or illegal drugs was also assessed at baseline, 9, and 18 months. The data were analyzed using structural equation modeling (SEM). The correlations between the working alliance and the outcome measures were lower than similar correlations obtained in studies investigating the psychotherapy relationship. The SEM analyses revealed little or no causal relationship between the working alliance and client outcome in this sample.

  8. The Real Relationship in Psychotherapy: Relationships to Adult Attachments, Working Alliance, Transference, and Therapy Outcome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marmarosh, Cheri L.; Gelso, Charles J.; Markin, Rayna D.; Mallery, Coretta; Choi, Jaehwa; Majors, Rebekah

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to understand how the real relationship (RR) relates to important process and outcome variables from both the clients' and therapists' perspectives. Using a sample of 31 therapist/client dyads at a university counseling center, the authors examined the RR at the 3rd session of therapy and at termination. The results…

  9. Use of an anecdotal client feedback note in family therapy.

    PubMed

    Haber, Russell; Carlson, Ryan G; Braga, Cristina

    2014-06-01

    To attain information about divergent agendas in family therapy, as well as incorporate client feedback, we present the Client Feedback Note (CFN). The CFN elicits information about each family member's feelings, learning, dislikes, and wishes for each session. Anecdotal feedback after each session may help the therapist have better insight into the clients' perceptions and experience of the therapy and the therapist. Sensitivity to information generated by the CFN can help both therapist and client work to coconstruct a therapeutic process that is relevant to the diverse needs of the client system. This manuscript will (a) discuss literature supporting the use of client feedback in therapy; (b) present the CFN and rationale for its development; (c) discuss our experiences utilizing the CFN along with case examples that illustrate its use; and (d) identify practical applications, limitations, and potential research with using the CFN in systemic therapy. © 2014 FPI, Inc.

  10. How Social Workers Demonstrate Respect for Elderly Clients

    PubMed Central

    Sung, Kyu-taik; Dunkle, Ruth E.

    2011-01-01

    Although respect is a crucial aspect of social work practice, few studies have examined how social workers convey their respect for elderly clients. This study explored the various forms of respect demonstrated by social workers when they were with older clients. Fifty social workers serving elderly clients were surveyed by a questionnaire with closed- and open-ended questions. Based on data on the way the social workers respected their elderly clients, the study identified seven forms most frequently practiced and considered most important. They are linguistic respect, care respect, acquiescent respect, salutatory respect, presentational respect, spatial respect, and consultative respect. The key expressions of these forms are introduced in quantitative data and a narrative form. This finding provides insights as to how social workers exhibit respect for elderly clients in their practice. The results of this exploration may be useful in developing a more comprehensive typology of the forms signifying respect for elderly clients. PMID:19308830

  11. Therapist influence on client language during motivational interviewing sessions.

    PubMed

    Moyers, Theresa B; Martin, Tim

    2006-04-01

    Client language in favor of change is hypothesized to be a causal mechanism for motivational interviewing (MI), and specific therapist behaviors are prescribed to elicit such speech. This project examined 38 motivational enhancement therapy sessions from Project MATCH (Matching Alcoholism Treatments to Client Heterogeneity), using a sequential behavioral coding system to investigate the relationship between therapist behaviors and client speech. Conditional probabilities were calculated between MI-consistent (MICO) therapist behaviors, MI-inconsistent (MIIN) therapist behaviors, and immediately subsequent client speech. MICO behaviors were more likely to be followed by self-motivational statements, whereas MIIN behaviors were more likely to be followed by client resistance. These results lend support to the importance of therapist behaviors in shaping client speech during MI sessions.

  12. Spiritual interventions in psychotherapy: evaluations by highly religious clients.

    PubMed

    Martinez, Jennifer S; Smith, Timothy B; Barlow, Sally H

    2007-10-01

    Spiritual and religious interventions in psychotherapy have increasingly received research attention, particularly with highly religious clients. This study examined client opinions about and experiences with religious interventions in psychotherapy. A sample of 152 clients at a counseling center of a university sponsored by the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints (LDS) completed a survey with ratings of specific religious interventions concerning appropriateness, helpfulness, and prevalence. Out-of-session religious interventions were considered more appropriate by clients than in-session religious interventions, but in-session interventions were rated as more helpful. Specific interventions considered both appropriate and helpful by the LDS participants included referencing scriptural passages, teaching spiritual concepts, encouraging forgiveness, involving religious community resources, and conducting assessments of client spirituality. Some religious interventions were perceived as inappropriate or not helpful, and clients provided explanations for why religious interventions can be either effective or ineffective in psychotherapy. (c) 2007 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Fresh Wounds: Metadata and Usability Lessons from building the Earthdata Search Client

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pilone, D.; Quinn, P.; Murphy, K. J.; Baynes, K.

    2014-12-01

    Data discovery and accessibility are frequent topics in science conferences but are usually discussed in an abstract XML schema kind-of way. In the course of designing and building the NASA Earthdata Search Client, a "concept-car" discovery client for the new Common Metadata Repository (CMR) and NASA Earthdata, we learned important lessons about usability from user studies and our actual use of science metadata. In this talk we challenge the community with the issues we ran into: the critical usability stumbling blocks for even seasoned researchers, "bug reports" from users that were ultimately usability problems in metadata, the challenges and questions that arise from incorporating "visual metadata", and the state of data access services. We intend to show that high quality metadata and real human usability factors are essential to making critical data accessible.

  14. Hardened Client Platforms for Secure Internet Banking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ronchi, C.; Zakhidov, S.

    We review the security of e-banking platforms with particular attention to the exploitable attack vectors of three main attack categories: Man-in-the-Middle, Man-in-the-PC and Man-in-the-Browser. It will be shown that the most serious threats come from combination attacks capable of hacking any transaction without the need to control the authentication process. Using this approach, the security of any authentication system can be bypassed, including those using SecureID Tokens, OTP Tokens, Biometric Sensors and Smart Cards. We will describe and compare two recently proposed e-banking platforms, the ZTIC and the USPD, both of which are based on the use of dedicated client devices, but with diverging approaches with respect to the need of hardening the Web client application. It will be shown that the use of a Hardened Browser (or H-Browser) component is critical to force attackers to employ complex and expensive techniques and to reduce the strength and variety of social engineering attacks down to physiological fraud levels.

  15. Spiritual Pain in Meals on Wheels’ Clients

    PubMed Central

    Boss, Lisa; Branson, Sandy; Cron, Stanley; Kang, Duck-Hee

    2015-01-01

    Background: Meals on Wheels’ clients are at risk for spiritual pain due to advanced age, social isolation, and failing health. They are also prone to stress, depression, and loneliness, placing them at risk for adverse biological disruptions and health outcomes. The purpose of the study was to examine associations of spiritual pain with psychosocial factors (stress, depression, loneliness, religious coping) and salivary biomarkers of stress and inflammation (cortisol, IL-1β) in Meals on Wheels’ clients. Methods: Data were collected cross-sectionally from 88 elderly (mean age 75.4). Spiritual pain, stress, depression, loneliness, and religious coping were measured with standardized instruments, and salivary biomarkers were assessed with enzyme immunoassays. Results: Spiritual pain was significantly and positively correlated with stress (r = 0.35, p ≤ 0.001), depression (r = 0.27, p = 0.01), and negative religious coping (r = 0.27, p = 0.01). Correlations with loneliness, positive religious coping, and salivary biomarkers were non-significant. Conclusion: Spiritual pain is an important concept in this population. Research should be expanded to understand the significance of spiritual pain in conjunction with psychosocial and biological variables and its potential impact on physical, mental, and cognitive health outcomes in the elderly. PMID:27417804

  16. A concept analysis of partnership with clients.

    PubMed

    Bidmead, Christine; Cowley, Sarah

    2005-06-01

    The aim of this first paper of two about partnership working with clients is to define and clarify partnership as it is practised within health visiting, by identifying the central notions of partnership working in practice. The aim of the second paper will be to describe an evaluation of a training course in partnership working for health visitors. Partnership is a word in common usage within the health professions but its meaning is ill-defined. A literature search was undertaken to identify ways in which previous authors have used the concept within nursing, counselling and health visiting. Rodgers' approach to concept analysis was undertaken to seek clarity for the concept. This revealed the ways in which various authors have used the word, an analysis of its defining attributes, surrogate terms, antecedents, consequences and a concluding definition. The results showed that partnership with clients in health visiting can be defined as a respectful, negotiated way of working together that enables choice, participation and equity, within an honest, trusting relationship that is based in empathy, support and reciprocity. It is best established within a model of health visiting that recognises partnership as a central tenet. It requires a high level of interpersonal qualities and communication skills in staff who are, themselves, supported through a system of clinical supervision that operates within the same partnership framework.

  17. Client-centered counseling improves client satisfaction with family planning visits: evidence from Irbid, Jordan.

    PubMed

    Kamhawi, Sarah; Underwood, Carol; Murad, Huda; Jabre, Bushra

    2013-08-01

    High levels of unmet need for family planning and high contraceptive discontinuation rates persist in Jordan, prompting the Jordan Health Communication Partnership (JHCP) to initiate a client-centered family planning service program called "Consult and Choose" (CC), together with community-based activities to encourage women with unmet need to visit health centers. We held exit interviews with 461 family planning clients between November-December 2011 to assess, from the clients' perspective, whether trained providers followed the CC protocol and used the CC tools, as well as to measure client satisfaction. We also tracked referral card information from community-based activities to health centers and examined service statistics to explore trends in family planning use. On average, clients reported that providers performed 5.6 of the 7 steps outlined in the CC protocol. Nearly 83% of respondents were very satisfied with their clinic visits. Logistic regression analysis found that the odds of being "very satisfied" increases by 20% with each additional counseling protocol step performed and by 70% with each increase in the number of CC materials used. Between June 2011 and August 2012, 14,490 referral cards from community-based activities were collected in health centers, 59% of which were for family planning services. Service statistic trends indicate an increase in the number of new family planning users and in couple-years of protection after starting the CC program. Implementation of the CC program at health centers nationally, in tandem with community-based interventions, could play a key role in attaining Jordan's goal of reducing its total fertility rate to 2.1 by 2030. Although this initiative would likely be replicated most readily in other middle-income countries, lower-resource countries could also adapt the tested CC approach.

  18. Educational assessment and teaching of older clients with pressure ulcers.

    PubMed

    Ayello, E A; Mezey, M; Amella, E J

    1997-08-01

    The importance of education in preventing and treating patients with pressure ulcers is evident by the inclusion of recommendations for educational objectives in the clinical guidelines by the Agency for Health Care Policy and Research. Both caregiver and client should be assessed for knowledge of pressure ulcers. Physical changes in vision, hearing, and cognition that might affect educating older clients are described. Strategies suitable for teaching older clients about the prevention and treatment of pressure ulcers are given.

  19. Implications of client-centred counselling for nursing practice.

    PubMed

    Burnard, P

    The idea that counselling should be incorporated into nursing has been discussed widely in nursing literature. The type of counselling that is most often recommended is 'client-centred'. This term refers to a specific style of counselling based on a particular view of people. This paper explores the concept of client-centred counselling and argues that the client-centred approach to counselling is both limited and limiting.

  20. Client relations in South Asia: programmatic and societal determinants.

    PubMed

    Simmons, R; Koblinsky, M A; Phillips, J F

    1986-01-01

    Client relations constitute a neglected area of research in family planning. Findings from studies in northern India and Bangladesh reveal considerable variation in both the quantity and quality of contacts in programs that function under roughly comparable socioeconomic conditions. Client relations are determined by a complex set of forces in which both programmatic factors and conditions pertaining to the societal environment play a key role. Worker-client exchanges have a net, incremental effect on contraceptive use.

  1. Strategies for designing culturally relevant client education materials.

    PubMed

    Murphy, J L; Giger, J N; Davidhizar, R

    1994-01-01

    This article addresses strategies for designing and implementing a culturally significant and appropriate client education tool for use with non-English-speaking clients or for any client in a culture different from the mainstream. These strategies include: (1) understanding the relationship between culture and behavior, (2) developing a strategic plan, (3) gathering demographic data about the setting, (4) evaluating the characteristics of the learner, and (5) developing culturally specific, unique education learning materials.

  2. Fetishistic Preferences of Clients as Ranked by a Sex Worker.

    PubMed

    Cernovsky, Zack Zdenek

    2016-08-17

    A former escort girl and stripper, now retired and in her forties, of intelligence at the level comparable to that of university graduates, was interviewed about unusual sexual requests of her former clients. She reported that most frequent requests were (1) those involving a foot or shoe fetish, (2) those to sell to the male client her underwear, and (3) those to urinate into her underwear before selling it to the client.

  3. Multi-client quantum key distribution using wavelength division multiplexing

    SciTech Connect

    Grice, Warren P; Bennink, Ryan S; Earl, Dennis Duncan; Evans, Philip G; Humble, Travis S; Pooser, Raphael C; Schaake, Jason; Williams, Brian P

    2011-01-01

    Quantum Key Distribution (QKD) exploits the rules of quantum mechanics to generate and securely distribute a random sequence of bits to two spatially separated clients. Typically a QKD system can support only a single pair of clients at a time, and so a separate quantum link is required for every pair of users. We overcome this limitation with the design and characterization of a multi-client entangled-photon QKD system with the capacity for up to 100 clients simultaneously. The time-bin entangled QKD system includes a broadband down-conversion source with two unique features that enable the multi-user capability. First, the photons are emitted across a very large portion of the telecom spectrum. Second, and more importantly, the photons are strongly correlated in their energy degree of freedom. Using standard wavelength division multiplexing (WDM) hardware, the photons can be routed to different parties on a quantum communication network, while the strong spectral correlations ensure that each client is linked only to the client receiving the conjugate wavelength. In this way, a single down-conversion source can support dozens of channels simultaneously--and to the extent that the WDM hardware can send different spectral channels to different clients, the system can support multiple client pairings. We will describe the design and characterization of the down-conversion source, as well as the client stations, which must be tunable across the emission spectrum.

  4. Experimental Blind Quantum Computing for a Classical Client

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, He-Liang; Zhao, Qi; Ma, Xiongfeng; Liu, Chang; Su, Zu-En; Wang, Xi-Lin; Li, Li; Liu, Nai-Le; Sanders, Barry C.; Lu, Chao-Yang; Pan, Jian-Wei

    2017-08-01

    To date, blind quantum computing demonstrations require clients to have weak quantum devices. Here we implement a proof-of-principle experiment for completely classical clients. Via classically interacting with two quantum servers that share entanglement, the client accomplishes the task of having the number 15 factorized by servers who are denied information about the computation itself. This concealment is accompanied by a verification protocol that tests servers' honesty and correctness. Our demonstration shows the feasibility of completely classical clients and thus is a key milestone towards secure cloud quantum computing.

  5. JMS Proxy and C/C++ Client SDK

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolgast, Paul; Pechkam, Paul

    2007-01-01

    JMS Proxy and C/C++ Client SDK (JMS signifies "Java messaging service" and "SDK" signifies "software development kit") is a software package for developing interfaces that enable legacy programs (here denoted "clients") written in the C and C++ languages to communicate with each other via a JMS broker. This package consists of two main components: the JMS proxy server component and the client C library SDK component. The JMS proxy server component implements a native Java process that receives and responds to requests from clients. This component can run on any computer that supports Java and a JMS client. The client C library SDK component is used to develop a JMS client program running in each affected C or C++ environment, without need for running a Java virtual machine in the affected computer. A C client program developed by use of this SDK has most of the quality-of-service characteristics of standard Java-based client programs, including the following: Durable subscriptions; Asynchronous message receipt; Such standard JMS message qualities as "TimeToLive," "Message Properties," and "DeliveryMode" (as the quoted terms are defined in previously published JMS documentation); and Automatic reconnection of a JMS proxy to a restarted JMS broker.

  6. 42 CFR 483.420 - Condition of participation: Client protections.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... FACILITIES Conditions of Participation for Intermediate Care Facilities for Individuals with Intellectual Disabilities § 483.420 Condition of participation: Client protections. (a) Standard: Protection of...

  7. 42 CFR 483.420 - Condition of participation: Client protections.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... FACILITIES Conditions of Participation for Intermediate Care Facilities for Individuals with Intellectual Disabilities § 483.420 Condition of participation: Client protections. (a) Standard: Protection of...

  8. 42 CFR 483.420 - Condition of participation: Client protections.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... FACILITIES Conditions of Participation for Intermediate Care Facilities for Individuals with Intellectual Disabilities § 483.420 Condition of participation: Client protections. (a) Standard: Protection of...

  9. Client satisfaction and quality of health care in rural Bangladesh.

    PubMed Central

    Mendoza Aldana, J.; Piechulek, H.; al-Sabir, A.

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess user expectations and degree of client satisfaction and quality of health care provided in rural Bangladesh. METHODS: A total of 1913 persons chosen by systematic random sampling were successfully interviewed immediately after having received care in government health facilities. FINDINGS: The most powerful predictor for client satisfaction with the government services was provider behaviour, especially respect and politeness. For patients this aspect was much more important than the technical competence of the provider. Furthermore, a reduction in waiting time (on average to 30 min) was more important to clients than a prolongation of the quite short (from a medical standpoint) consultation time (on average 2 min, 22 sec), with 75% of clients being satisfied. Waiting time, which was about double at outreach services than that at fixed services, was the only element with which users of outreach services were dissatisfied. CONCLUSIONS: This study underscores that client satisfaction is determined by the cultural background of the people. It shows the dilemma that, though optimally care should be capable of meeting both medical and psychosocial needs, in reality care that meets all medical needs may fail to meet the client's emotional or social needs. Conversely, care that meets psychosocial needs may leave the clients medically at risk. It seems important that developing countries promoting client-oriented health services should carry out more in-depth research on the determinants of client satisfaction in the respective culture. PMID:11436472

  10. Dual diagnosis clients' treatment satisfaction - a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The aim of this systematic review is to synthesize existing evidence about treatment satisfaction among clients with substance misuse and mental health co-morbidity (dual diagnoses, DD). Methods We examined satisfaction with treatment received, variations in satisfaction levels by type of treatment intervention and by diagnosis (i.e. DD clients vs. single diagnosis clients), and the influence of factors other than treatment type on satisfaction. Peer-reviewed studies published in English since 1970 were identified by searching electronic databases using pre-defined search strings. Results Across the 27 studies that met inclusion criteria, high average satisfaction scores were found. In most studies, integrated DD treatment yielded greater client satisfaction than standard treatment without explicit DD focus. In standard treatment without DD focus, DD clients tended to be less satisfied than single diagnosis clients. Whilst the evidence base on client and treatment variables related to satisfaction is small, it suggested client demographics and symptom severity to be unrelated to treatment satisfaction. However, satisfaction tended to be linked to other treatment process and outcome variables. Findings are limited in that many studies had very small sample sizes, did not use validated satisfaction instruments and may not have controlled for potential confounders. A framework for further research in this important area is discussed. Conclusions High satisfaction levels with current treatment provision, especially among those in integrated treatment, should enhance therapeutic optimism among practitioners dealing with DD clients. PMID:21501510

  11. Developing a Client Base for Career Counseling Services.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Werbel, James D.

    1988-01-01

    The author discusses how to attract clients to a career counseling practice. Topics covered include establishing referral networks with other human resources professionals and using direct marketing. (CH)

  12. Occupational therapists' use and perceptions of written client education materials.

    PubMed

    Sharry, Renee; McKenna, Kryss; Tooth, Leigh

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine occupational therapists' use and perceptions of written education materials for clients and the factors that therapists consider before distributing written materials to clients. This study also aimed to determine whether use and perceptions of these materials differed for older clients. A random sample of 50 occupational therapists from Queensland, Australia, working in adult physical disabilities settings was surveyed with a structured questionnaire. Data were analyzed descriptively and with nonparametric statistics. Of 49 participants who used written materials, 54% had given them to more than half of their last 10 clients, regardless of the clients' age. Written materials, most often information sheets developed by the participants themselves; handwritten notes; and pamphlets were principally used to reinforce verbal information. Clients' cognitive abilities, primary language, communication skills, vision, and level of education most often were considered before distributing written materials. Although participants generally were positive about the content and effectiveness of materials, ratings were significantly less positive related to older clients. Client education was a core treatment modality for participants in this study, with written media most commonly being used to supplement verbal education. Because participants were least positive about the effectiveness of written materials for older clients, further development of materials for this audience may be indicated.

  13. Qualitative Assessment of the Feasibility, Usability, and Acceptability of a Mobile Client Data App for Community-Based Maternal, Neonatal, and Child Care in Rural Ghana.

    PubMed

    Rothstein, Jessica D; Jennings, Larissa; Moorthy, Anitha; Yang, Fan; Gee, Lisa; Romano, Karen; Hutchful, David; Labrique, Alain B; LeFevre, Amnesty E

    2016-01-01

    Mobile phone applications may enhance the delivery of critical health services and the accuracy of health service data. Yet, the opinions and experiences of frontline health workers on using mobile apps to track pregnant and recently delivered women are underreported. This evaluation qualitatively assessed the feasibility, usability, and acceptability of a mobile Client Data App for maternal, neonatal, and child client data management by community health nurses (CHNs) in rural Ghana. The mobile app enabled CHNs to enter, summarize, and query client data. It also sent visit reminders for clients and provided a mechanism to report level of care to district officers. Fourteen interviews and two focus groups with CHNs, midwives, and district health officers were conducted, coded, and thematically analyzed. Results indicated that the app was easily integrated into care, improved CHN productivity, and was acceptable due to its capacity to facilitate client follow-up, data reporting, and decision-making. However, the feasibility and usability of the app were hindered by high client volumes, staff shortages, and software and device challenges. Successful integration of mobile client data apps for frontline health workers in rural and resource-poor settings requires real-time monitoring, program investments, and targeted changes in human resources.

  14. Qualitative Assessment of the Feasibility, Usability, and Acceptability of a Mobile Client Data App for Community-Based Maternal, Neonatal, and Child Care in Rural Ghana

    PubMed Central

    Jennings, Larissa; Moorthy, Anitha; Yang, Fan; Gee, Lisa; Romano, Karen; Hutchful, David; Labrique, Alain B.; LeFevre, Amnesty E.

    2016-01-01

    Mobile phone applications may enhance the delivery of critical health services and the accuracy of health service data. Yet, the opinions and experiences of frontline health workers on using mobile apps to track pregnant and recently delivered women are underreported. This evaluation qualitatively assessed the feasibility, usability, and acceptability of a mobile Client Data App for maternal, neonatal, and child client data management by community health nurses (CHNs) in rural Ghana. The mobile app enabled CHNs to enter, summarize, and query client data. It also sent visit reminders for clients and provided a mechanism to report level of care to district officers. Fourteen interviews and two focus groups with CHNs, midwives, and district health officers were conducted, coded, and thematically analyzed. Results indicated that the app was easily integrated into care, improved CHN productivity, and was acceptable due to its capacity to facilitate client follow-up, data reporting, and decision-making. However, the feasibility and usability of the app were hindered by high client volumes, staff shortages, and software and device challenges. Successful integration of mobile client data apps for frontline health workers in rural and resource-poor settings requires real-time monitoring, program investments, and targeted changes in human resources. PMID:28070186

  15. Client and therapist therapeutic alliance, session evaluation, and client reliable change: a moderated actor-partner interdependence model.

    PubMed

    Kivlighan, Dennis M; Marmarosh, Cheri L; Hilsenroth, Mark J

    2014-01-01

    Actor-partner interdependence modeling (APIM; Kashy & Kenny, 2000) was used to study the early therapeutic alliance in 74 clients being treated by 29 therapists to explore the relationship between the alliance and treatment progress, while prioritizing the dyadic nature of the alliance. The APIM examines collaboration/influence by modeling the impact of one dyad member's alliance ratings on the other member's session impact rating (partner effects). In terms of the alliance, the results revealed significant client-actor effects for client ratings of session depth and positivity as well as significant therapist-actor effects for therapist ratings of session smoothness and positivity. For client-rated alliance, there were also significant client-partner effects for therapist ratings of session depth. For clients who made a reliable change in treatment, an increase in client-reported alliance was related to therapist reporting more arousal in the 3rd session. For clients who did not make a reliable change in treatment, client-reported alliance was not related to therapist arousal. Limitations of the study and implications of the findings are discussed. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved).

  16. Client outcomes from rural substance abuse treatment.

    PubMed

    Hiller, Matthew L; Leukefeld, Carl G; Garrity, Thomas F; Godlaski, Theodore; Schoeneberger, Marlies; Townsend, Michael; Hascal, Karyn

    2007-03-01

    Several national evaluations have been conducted since the late 1960s that have assessed the effectiveness of publicly-funded substance abuse treatment in the United States. These studies, however, have focused principally on urban-based treatment programs, and it is unclear whether findings from urban programs can be replicated in outcome studies of programs in rural areas. The current study, therefore, examined the treatment outcomes of clients admitted to one of several short-term inpatient or outpatient drug-free treatment agencies in rural Kentucky. Findings showed that treatment was associated with reductions in drug use and criminality during a six-month follow-up interval. Employment status also improved significantly, and health services utilization was reduced. The similarity between the current findings and findings from national outcome studies of urban-based treatment programs is discussed.

  17. Treating clients with Asperger's syndrome and autism.

    PubMed

    Woods, Alisa G; Mahdavi, Esmaeil; Ryan, Jeanne P

    2013-09-11

    Asperger's syndrome (AS) is a form of autism spectrum disorder (ASD) affecting many individuals today. Although neurobiological correlates for AS have been identified, like many ASDs, AS is not completely understood. AS as a distinct disorder is also not universally accepted and in the DSM-5 AS is not considered a separate nosological entity. In contrast to some other ASDs, individuals with AS are commonly characterized by having standard or higher than average intelligence, yet difficulties in social skills and communication can present challenges for these individuals in everyday functioning. Counseling a person with AS or autism presents a unique challenge for the mental health care provider. We have compiled this review consisting of some recent ideas regarding counseling the client with AS with the goal of providing some clinical insights and practical clues. Although the focus of the present paper is largely on AS, many of these strategies could also apply to individuals with high-functioning autism (HFA).

  18. Client interfaces to the Virtual Observatory Registry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demleitner, M.; Harrison, P.; Taylor, M.; Normand, J.

    2015-04-01

    The Virtual Observatory Registry is a distributed directory of information systems and other resources relevant to astronomy. To make it useful, facilities to query that directory must be provided to humans and machines alike. This article reviews the development and status of such facilities, also considering the lessons learnt from about a decade of experience with Registry interfaces. After a brief outline of the history of the standards development, it describes the use of Registry interfaces in some popular clients as well as dedicated UIs for interrogating the Registry. It continues with a thorough discussion of the design of the two most recent Registry interface standards, RegTAP on the one hand and a full-text-based interface on the other hand. The article finally lays out some of the less obvious conventions that emerged in the interaction between providers of registry records and Registry users as well as remaining challenges and current developments.

  19. Investigating bias in psychotherapy with BDSM clients.

    PubMed

    Kolmes, Keely; Stock, Wendy; Moser, Charles

    2006-01-01

    There is a concern among consensual BDSM participants that they will receive biased care from mental health professionals. Results are presented of an anonymous Internet-based survey administered to both BDSM-identified individuals who have received psychological care and to mental health professionals. The survey included socio-demographic data and invited participants to write narrative accounts of biased or culturally sensitive care, from which common themes were identified. Mental health providers (N=17) responded in fewer numbers than those who identified as BDSM-identified participants (N=175). Descriptive characteristics of the sample will be discussed. Themes from the qualitative data may be useful in informing the future development of guidelines for practitioners to work more responsibly with clients who identify as members of this sexual minority group.

  20. Nursing protocol for telephonic supervision of clients.

    PubMed

    Martin, Elisabeth Moy; Coyle, Mary Kathleen

    2006-01-01

    Access to care, client vulnerabilities, technology, and health costs affect not only the delivery of health care but also the roles, responsibilities, and opportunities for nurses. Patients are often managed in the home or discharged from hospitals before they or their families are ready. To address some of these needs, nurses are utilizing telehealth opportunities. For many nurses, telehealth translates to telephonic nursing. This article provides an algorithm that nurses can utilize in order to safely monitor patients in their homes. This can be a cost-effective program, particularly for those who are homebound or for persons, such as the elderly or those with chronic illness, who have long-term needs that vary between relative health and acute illness. This algorithm serves as a guide in our nursing practice for the telephonic supervision of patients in the home environment.

  1. A Comparison Between Publish-and-Subscribe and Client-Server Models in Distributed Control System Networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boulanger, Richard P., Jr.; Kwauk, Xian-Min; Stagnaro, Mike; Kliss, Mark (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    The BIO-Plex control system requires real-time, flexible, and reliable data delivery. There is no simple "off-the-shelf 'solution. However, several commercial packages will be evaluated using a testbed at ARC for publish- and-subscribe and client-server communication architectures. Point-to-point communication architecture is not suitable for real-time BIO-Plex control system. Client-server architecture provides more flexible data delivery. However, it does not provide direct communication among nodes on the network. Publish-and-subscribe implementation allows direct information exchange among nodes on the net, providing the best time-critical communication. In this work Network Data Delivery Service (NDDS) from Real-Time Innovations, Inc. ARTIE will be used to implement publish-and subscribe architecture. It offers update guarantees and deadlines for real-time data delivery. Bridgestone, a data acquisition and control software package from National Instruments, will be tested for client-server arrangement. A microwave incinerator located at ARC will be instrumented with a fieldbus network of control devices. BridgeVIEW will be used to implement an enterprise server. An enterprise network consisting of several nodes at ARC and a WAN connecting ARC and RISC will then be setup to evaluate proposed control system architectures. Several network configurations will be evaluated for fault tolerance, quality of service, reliability and efficiency. Data acquired from these network evaluation tests will then be used to determine preliminary design criteria for the BIO-Plex distributed control system.

  2. A Comparison Between Publish-and-Subscribe and Client-Server Models in Distributed Control System Networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boulanger, Richard P., Jr.; Kwauk, Xian-Min; Stagnaro, Mike; Kliss, Mark (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    The BIO-Plex control system requires real-time, flexible, and reliable data delivery. There is no simple "off-the-shelf 'solution. However, several commercial packages will be evaluated using a testbed at ARC for publish- and-subscribe and client-server communication architectures. Point-to-point communication architecture is not suitable for real-time BIO-Plex control system. Client-server architecture provides more flexible data delivery. However, it does not provide direct communication among nodes on the network. Publish-and-subscribe implementation allows direct information exchange among nodes on the net, providing the best time-critical communication. In this work Network Data Delivery Service (NDDS) from Real-Time Innovations, Inc. ARTIE will be used to implement publish-and subscribe architecture. It offers update guarantees and deadlines for real-time data delivery. Bridgestone, a data acquisition and control software package from National Instruments, will be tested for client-server arrangement. A microwave incinerator located at ARC will be instrumented with a fieldbus network of control devices. BridgeVIEW will be used to implement an enterprise server. An enterprise network consisting of several nodes at ARC and a WAN connecting ARC and RISC will then be setup to evaluate proposed control system architectures. Several network configurations will be evaluated for fault tolerance, quality of service, reliability and efficiency. Data acquired from these network evaluation tests will then be used to determine preliminary design criteria for the BIO-Plex distributed control system.

  3. H3+: superficies de energía potencial, estados y transiciones rovibracionales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aguado, M. Paniagua Y. A.

    Hemos calculado varias superficies globales de energía potencial para el estado fundamental y excitados del sistema H3+ en más de ocho mil geometrías diferentes usando una base (9s 3p 1d)/[4s 3p 1d] en cada átomo de Hidrógeno y mediante un método de cálculo de interacción de configuraciones completa (FCI). Hemos ajustado las superficies a formas analíticas del tipo Aguado y Paniagua con un error promedio menor de 50 cm-1 y menor en el pozo de potencial del estado fundamental. Finalmente hemos calculado y analizado los niveles vibracionales para los dos estados electrónicos más bajos, siendo la desviación respecto de los mejores valores publicados, tanto experimentales como teóricos, de unos pocos números de onda.

  4. Sexuality Counseling with Clients Who Have Spinal Cord Injuries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farrow, Jeff

    1990-01-01

    Examines effects of spinal cord injury on sexuality. Discusses areas of sexual concern. Provides suggestions for treating clients with spinal cord injuries experiencing sexual difficulties. Concludes that major goal in working with clients with spinal cord injuries who have sexual difficulties should be the facilitation of a creative and…

  5. A Client-Centered Review of Rogers with Gloria

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moon, Kathryn A.

    2007-01-01

    Carl Rogers's nondirective theory and his response style with Gloria (E. L. Shostrom, 1965) are discussed in reply to S. A. Wickman and C. Campbell's (2003) "An Analysis of How Carl Rogers Enacted Client-Centered Conversation With Gloria." Client-centered studies of C. Rogers's transcripts give context for reformulating S. A. Wickman and C.…

  6. Counseling with Methadone Clients: A Review of Recent Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Powers, Robert J.; Powers, Henrietta B.

    1978-01-01

    A review of studies on counseling with methadone clients affirmed the importance of counseling services. Support was found for analytic therapy, T-group therapy, behavioral training, reality therapy, and family therapy. There was evidence of client resistance to group therapy. (Author)

  7. Communicating Social Support to Grieving Clients: The Veterinarians' View

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pilgram, Mary D.

    2010-01-01

    This exploratory study examines veterinarians' perceptions of how they offer social support to grieving clients. Because many clients cannot find the social support they would like from other sources when grieving the death of a pet, the role of the vet in offering support becomes increasingly important. The results indicate that vets perceive…

  8. Family Therapist Comfort with and Willingness to Discuss Client Sexuality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harris, Steven M.; Hays, Kelli Wenner

    2008-01-01

    Limited empirical information exists on whether or not marriage and family therapists are having sexuality-related discussions with their clients. When helping professionals ignore client sexuality, the potential for unintended negative outcomes increases. The researchers surveyed 175 clinical members of the American Association for Marriage and…

  9. A Client-Centered Review of Rogers with Gloria

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moon, Kathryn A.

    2007-01-01

    Carl Rogers's nondirective theory and his response style with Gloria (E. L. Shostrom, 1965) are discussed in reply to S. A. Wickman and C. Campbell's (2003) "An Analysis of How Carl Rogers Enacted Client-Centered Conversation With Gloria." Client-centered studies of C. Rogers's transcripts give context for reformulating S. A. Wickman and C.…

  10. Factors Associated with Illegal Drug Use among Older Methadone Clients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosen, Daniel

    2004-01-01

    Purpose. The overall aims of this study are to describe the life stressors of, exposure to illegal drug use of, and illegal drug use by older methadone clients. Design and Methods. The current study focuses on a sub-sample of the larger administrative data of a methadone clinic that is limited to African American and White clients over the age of…

  11. Counseling Clients Who Self-Injure: Ethical Considerations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Victoria E.; McCormick, Laura J.; Kelly, Brandy L.

    2003-01-01

    Provides an overview of ethical considerations related to counseling clients who engage in self-injurious behaviors. Ethical issues concerning client welfare, counselor competence, countertransference, referral and consultation, informed consent, and duty to protect are discussed in relation to the American Counseling Association's (1995)…

  12. Young Clients' Narratives of the Purpose and Outcome of Counselling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gibson, Kerry; Cartwright, Claire

    2014-01-01

    This study explores how adolescent clients construct the purpose and outcome of counselling. A narrative analysis was performed on interviews with 22 clients (aged 16--18) who had used a school-based counselling service. The aim was to identify the purpose and outcomes that participants attributed to their counselling experience. The analysis…

  13. The Challenge of Prejudice: Counsellors' Talk about Challenging Clients' Prejudices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spong, Sheila J.

    2012-01-01

    This paper considers the implications for training and practice of counsellors' responses to the notion of challenging clients' prejudices. It explores tensions in counselling discourse between social responsibility, responsibility to the client and responsibility for one's self as counsellor. Three focus groups of counsellors were asked whether a…

  14. The Use of Reception Checks in Client Pretherapy Orientation Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zwick, Rebecca; Attkisson, C. Clifford

    1984-01-01

    Developed and tested the Psychotherapy Questionnaire to determine whether clients (N=62) had attended to and understood a pretherapy videotape presentation and whether they recalled the information one month later. Results indicated that the clients were able to understand the presentation. (LLL)

  15. Perspectives on barriers to eating healthy among food pantry clients

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The objective of this study was to explore perspectives on barriers of eating healthy among food pantry clients. Food pantry clients participated in focus groups/interviews. Qualitative data were coded and analyzed using content analyses and grounded theory approach. Themes were then identified. Qua...

  16. Third Thursday Thing: A Success Story for Reaching Underserved Clients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andries, Kenneth M.; Simon, Marion; Rivers, Louie

    2016-01-01

    Kentucky State University has been conducting a monthly field day known as the Third Thursday Thing for many years. This program has been successful in reaching limited-resource, minority, and underserved clients. The success of the program has indicated that a nontraditional approach can be successful when working with nontraditional clients. The…

  17. Integrating Social and Traditional Media in the Client Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Melton, James; Hicks, Nancy

    2011-01-01

    Based on a client project assigned to students in two undergraduate business classes, this article argues that social media learning is best done in a context that mixes social media with more traditional kinds of media. Ideally, this approach will involve teams of students who are working on different aspects of a larger client project. This…

  18. An Exploration of Supervisory and Therapeutic Relationships and Client Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bell, Hope; Hagedorn, W. Bryce; Robinson, E. H. Mike

    2016-01-01

    The authors explored the connection between the facilitative conditions present within the supervisory relationship, the therapeutic relationship, and client outcomes. A correlational research design was used with a sample of 55 counselors-in-training and 88 clients. Results indicated a significant positive relationship between the therapeutic…

  19. Making a Case for Client Insistence in Social Work Interaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matarese, Maureen T.; van Nijnatten, Carolus

    2015-01-01

    It has been argued that the goals of the institution can shape the talk therein. What happens when a client consistently invokes topics and role identities that are outside the parameters of the institution, insisting on his or her own goals and gaining and maintaining a control of the floor usually expected of practitioners? Client power is often…

  20. Client Perspectives of Multicultural Counseling Competence: A Qualitative Examination

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pope-Davis, Donald B.; Toporek, Rebecca L.; Ortega-Villalobos, Lideth; Ligiero, Daniela P.; Brittan-Powell, Christopher S.; Liu, William M.; Bashshur, Michael R.; Codrington, Jamila N.; Liang, Christopher T. H.

    2002-01-01

    Multicultural competence is a burgeoning area of research in counseling psychology. However, there has been little focus on understanding multicultural competence from the perspective of clients. This study used qualitative interviews and grounded theory to develop a model of clients' perspectives of multicultural counseling. The resulting model…

  1. Effects of Systematic Group Counseling on Work Adjustment Clients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roessler, Richard; And Others

    1977-01-01

    When compared with a group of clients who had received work adjustment services and a placebo treatment (personal hygiene training), experimental clients given Personal Achievement Skills (PAS) and work adjustment services reported greater gains on self-ratings of life perspective (optimism), work-related attitudes, and goal attainment. (Author)

  2. Communicating Social Support to Grieving Clients: The Veterinarians' View

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pilgram, Mary D.

    2010-01-01

    This exploratory study examines veterinarians' perceptions of how they offer social support to grieving clients. Because many clients cannot find the social support they would like from other sources when grieving the death of a pet, the role of the vet in offering support becomes increasingly important. The results indicate that vets perceive…

  3. Do Organizational Culture and Climate Matter for Successful Client Outcomes?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Silver Wolf, David A. Patterson; Dulmus, Catherine N.; Maguin, Eugene; Cristalli, Maria

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: The existing literature on the impact of workplace conditions on client care suggests that good cultures and climates provide the best outcomes for clients. The primary purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between organizational culture and climate and the proportion of children and youth successfully discharged…

  4. Guidelines for Psychological Practice With Lesbian, Gay, and Bisexual Clients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Psychologist, 2012

    2012-01-01

    The "Guidelines for Psychological Practice With Lesbian, Gay, and Bisexual Clients" provide psychologists with (a) a frame of reference for the treatment of lesbian, gay, and bisexual clients and (b) basic information and further references in the areas of assessment, intervention, identity, relationships, diversity, education, training, and…

  5. Development of a nutrition education intervention for food bank clients

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The focus of this article is the development of a nutrition education intervention for food bank clients. Formative research using mixed-methods (qualitative and quantitative) and community-based participatory research principles was conducted to assess the nutrition education needs of clients obtai...

  6. Integrating Social and Traditional Media in the Client Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Melton, James; Hicks, Nancy

    2011-01-01

    Based on a client project assigned to students in two undergraduate business classes, this article argues that social media learning is best done in a context that mixes social media with more traditional kinds of media. Ideally, this approach will involve teams of students who are working on different aspects of a larger client project. This…

  7. 45 CFR 1639.4 - Permissible representation of eligible clients.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Permissible representation of eligible clients. 1639.4 Section 1639.4 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) LEGAL SERVICES CORPORATION WELFARE REFORM § 1639.4 Permissible representation of eligible clients. Recipients may represent...

  8. 45 CFR 1639.4 - Permissible representation of eligible clients.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Permissible representation of eligible clients. 1639.4 Section 1639.4 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) LEGAL SERVICES CORPORATION WELFARE REFORM § 1639.4 Permissible representation of eligible clients. Recipients may represent...

  9. 45 CFR 1639.4 - Permissible representation of eligible clients.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Permissible representation of eligible clients. 1639.4 Section 1639.4 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) LEGAL SERVICES CORPORATION WELFARE REFORM § 1639.4 Permissible representation of eligible clients. Recipients may represent...

  10. 45 CFR 1639.4 - Permissible representation of eligible clients.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Permissible representation of eligible clients. 1639.4 Section 1639.4 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) LEGAL SERVICES CORPORATION WELFARE REFORM § 1639.4 Permissible representation of eligible clients. Recipients may represent...

  11. Effects of Counselor Reassignments and Reassignment Procedures on Client Anxiety.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hutchinson, Roger L.; And Others

    Although the effects of counselor reassignment on counseling are of concern, research has not examined whether anticipated reassignment to another counselor or the reassignment procedure produces substantial anxiety for clients. Two exploratory investigations were conducted to examine these issues. In the first study, clients of a university-based…

  12. Alienation: A Concept for Understanding Low-Income, Urban Clients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holcomb-McCoy, Cheryl

    2004-01-01

    The author examines the concept of alienation and how it can be used to understand low-income, urban clients. A description is presented of 4 dimensions of alienation: powerlessness, meaninglessness, normlessness, and social isolation. Case illustrations are provided, and recommendations are made for counseling alienated clients. This article…

  13. Client Perspectives of Multicultural Counseling Competence: A Qualitative Examination

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pope-Davis, Donald B.; Toporek, Rebecca L.; Ortega-Villalobos, Lideth; Ligiero, Daniela P.; Brittan-Powell, Christopher S.; Liu, William M.; Bashshur, Michael R.; Codrington, Jamila N.; Liang, Christopher T. H.

    2002-01-01

    Multicultural competence is a burgeoning area of research in counseling psychology. However, there has been little focus on understanding multicultural competence from the perspective of clients. This study used qualitative interviews and grounded theory to develop a model of clients' perspectives of multicultural counseling. The resulting model…

  14. 45 CFR 1608.7 - Attorney-client relationship.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Attorney-client relationship. 1608.7 Section 1608.7 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) LEGAL SERVICES CORPORATION PROHIBITED POLITICAL ACTIVITIES § 1608.7 Attorney-client relationship. Nothing in this part is intended to...

  15. 45 CFR 1608.7 - Attorney-client relationship.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Attorney-client relationship. 1608.7 Section 1608.7 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) LEGAL SERVICES CORPORATION PROHIBITED POLITICAL ACTIVITIES § 1608.7 Attorney-client relationship. Nothing in this part is intended to...

  16. 45 CFR 1608.7 - Attorney-client relationship.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Attorney-client relationship. 1608.7 Section 1608.7 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) LEGAL SERVICES CORPORATION PROHIBITED POLITICAL ACTIVITIES § 1608.7 Attorney-client relationship. Nothing in this part is intended to...

  17. 45 CFR 1608.7 - Attorney-client relationship.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Attorney-client relationship. 1608.7 Section 1608.7 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) LEGAL SERVICES CORPORATION PROHIBITED POLITICAL ACTIVITIES § 1608.7 Attorney-client relationship. Nothing in this part is intended to...

  18. 45 CFR 1608.7 - Attorney-client relationship.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Attorney-client relationship. 1608.7 Section 1608.7 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) LEGAL SERVICES CORPORATION PROHIBITED POLITICAL ACTIVITIES § 1608.7 Attorney-client relationship. Nothing in this part is intended to...

  19. Women Empower Women: Volunteers and Their Clients in Community Service

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kulik, Liat; Megidna, Hofit

    2011-01-01

    The study is aimed at examining the relationship between psychological empowerment of women volunteers and their clients in community volunteer projects in Israel. Based on an ecological approach, the study also aimed at examining whether the variables that explain empowerment of women who volunteer also explain empowerment of their clients. The…

  20. Factors Assisting Female Clients' Disclosure of Incest during Counseling.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Josephson, Gilda S.; Fong-Beyette, Margaret L.

    1987-01-01

    Explored specific behaviors and characteristics of counselors that relate to adult, female clients' disclosure of incest during counseling. Suggests that factors related to initial disclosure and exploration of incest are client readiness, direct questioning by the counselor, specific counselor characteristics, and positive counselor reactions to…

  1. Training Leisure Centre Instructors: Client Motivational Profiles Examined

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kniveton, Bromley H.

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the motivations of clients attending leisure centres/clubs. It is noted that training programmes for instructors tend to neglect this, particularly in relation to the gender and age of clients. Design/methodology/approach: In this study 460 recreational athletes including equal numbers of males and females in the two age…

  2. A Call for Feminist Research: A Limited Client Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murray, Kirsten

    2006-01-01

    Feminist approaches embrace a counselor stance that is both collaborative and supportive, seeking client empowerment. On review of feminist family and couple counseling literature of the past 20 years using several academic databases, no research was found that explored a clients experience of feminist-informed family and couple counseling. The…

  3. Clinical Judgments of Easy vs. Difficult Clients by Counselor Trainees.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berger, Allen; Morrison, Thomas L.

    1984-01-01

    Investigated responses of counselor trainees (N=31) to easy versus difficult clients in terms of clinical judgments. Results indicated that clients with a difficult interpersonal style were not regarded as more psychologically disturbed, but were rated as having less potential for change and less ego strength. (LLL)

  4. Beyond Values Clarification: Addressing Client Values in Clinical Behavior Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bonow, Jordan T.; Follette, William C.

    2009-01-01

    Ethical principles of psychology, as exemplified in the American Psychological Association (APA) Code of Ethics (2002), provide impractical advice for addressing client values during psychotherapy. These principles seem to argue that each client's values should be respected and protected at all times, except in cases in which this would result in…

  5. 37 CFR 10.33 - Direct contact with prospective clients.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Patent and Trademark Office Code of Professional Responsibility § 10.33 Direct contact with prospective clients. A practitioner may not solicit professional employment from a prospective client with whom the practitioner has no family or prior professional relationship, by mail, in-person or otherwise, when a...

  6. Barriers to healthy eating among food pantry clients

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    This study explored perspectives on barriers of eating healthy among food pantry clients. Food pantry clients participated in focus groups/interviews. Qualitative data were coded and analyzed using content analyses and grounded theory approach. Themes were then identified. Quantitative data were ana...

  7. Effects of Client Resistance on Counselor Verbal Responses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stout, Elizabeth

    2014-01-01

    The primary focus of this study was to examine whether counselor verbal responses incrementally varied in response to client verbal responses. A Motivational Interviewing framework was used for measuring verbal responses of both counselor and client. The study employed an AB counterbalanced design, exposing 40 licensed counselors to both resistant…

  8. Guidelines for Psychological Practice With Lesbian, Gay, and Bisexual Clients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Psychologist, 2012

    2012-01-01

    The "Guidelines for Psychological Practice With Lesbian, Gay, and Bisexual Clients" provide psychologists with (a) a frame of reference for the treatment of lesbian, gay, and bisexual clients and (b) basic information and further references in the areas of assessment, intervention, identity, relationships, diversity, education, training, and…

  9. Sexuality Counseling with Clients Who Have Spinal Cord Injuries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farrow, Jeff

    1990-01-01

    Examines effects of spinal cord injury on sexuality. Discusses areas of sexual concern. Provides suggestions for treating clients with spinal cord injuries experiencing sexual difficulties. Concludes that major goal in working with clients with spinal cord injuries who have sexual difficulties should be the facilitation of a creative and…

  10. Individual Counseling with the Rehabilitation Client: A Point of View.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matheny, Kenneth B.

    A model for individual counseling with the rehabilitation client is presented. The model consists of five stages: (1) exploration, (2) contract, (3) action, (4) evaluation, and (5) termination. The counselor assumes three roles: (1) alter ego, to help the client understand his needs; (2) interventionist, to procure services and employment for the…

  11. Learning Creativity in the Client-Agency Relationship

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Suh, Taewon; Jung, Jae C.; Smith, Bruce L.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: This study aims to investigate creativity-related determinants of learning in the context of business-to-business services and client-agency relationships. Design/methodology/approach: The research model includes client encouragement, agency creativity, campaign creativity, and perceived performance. The study involved conducting a…

  12. Making a Case for Client Insistence in Social Work Interaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matarese, Maureen T.; van Nijnatten, Carolus

    2015-01-01

    It has been argued that the goals of the institution can shape the talk therein. What happens when a client consistently invokes topics and role identities that are outside the parameters of the institution, insisting on his or her own goals and gaining and maintaining a control of the floor usually expected of practitioners? Client power is often…

  13. Third Thursday Thing: A Success Story for Reaching Underserved Clients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andries, Kenneth M.; Simon, Marion; Rivers, Louie

    2016-01-01

    Kentucky State University has been conducting a monthly field day known as the Third Thursday Thing for many years. This program has been successful in reaching limited-resource, minority, and underserved clients. The success of the program has indicated that a nontraditional approach can be successful when working with nontraditional clients. The…

  14. Client Articulated Avoidance Goals in the Therapy Context

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elliot, Andrew J.; Church, Marcy A.

    2002-01-01

    This research investigated the relationship between clients' pursuit of avoidance (relative to approach) therapy goals and change in subjective well-being (SWB) from the beginning to the end of therapy. Results indicated that clients with more avoidance therapy goals evidenced a smaller increase in SWB over the course of therapy than those with…

  15. A Treatment Matching Model for Substance Abuse Rehabilitation Clients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lam, Chow S.; And Others

    1996-01-01

    Rehabilitation clients enter treatment for alcohol and other drug abuse at various stages of readiness to change. It is important that treatment should be congruent with clients' readiness for change. Describes a substance abuse treatment matching model based on the Prochaska and DiClemente's Stages of Change Theory. (Author)

  16. Young Clients' Narratives of the Purpose and Outcome of Counselling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gibson, Kerry; Cartwright, Claire

    2014-01-01

    This study explores how adolescent clients construct the purpose and outcome of counselling. A narrative analysis was performed on interviews with 22 clients (aged 16--18) who had used a school-based counselling service. The aim was to identify the purpose and outcomes that participants attributed to their counselling experience. The analysis…

  17. The Challenge of Prejudice: Counsellors' Talk about Challenging Clients' Prejudices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spong, Sheila J.

    2012-01-01

    This paper considers the implications for training and practice of counsellors' responses to the notion of challenging clients' prejudices. It explores tensions in counselling discourse between social responsibility, responsibility to the client and responsibility for one's self as counsellor. Three focus groups of counsellors were asked whether a…

  18. An Exploration of Supervisory and Therapeutic Relationships and Client Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bell, Hope; Hagedorn, W. Bryce; Robinson, E. H. Mike

    2016-01-01

    The authors explored the connection between the facilitative conditions present within the supervisory relationship, the therapeutic relationship, and client outcomes. A correlational research design was used with a sample of 55 counselors-in-training and 88 clients. Results indicated a significant positive relationship between the therapeutic…

  19. Do Organizational Culture and Climate Matter for Successful Client Outcomes?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Silver Wolf, David A. Patterson; Dulmus, Catherine N.; Maguin, Eugene; Cristalli, Maria

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: The existing literature on the impact of workplace conditions on client care suggests that good cultures and climates provide the best outcomes for clients. The primary purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between organizational culture and climate and the proportion of children and youth successfully discharged…

  20. 49 CFR 1103.23 - Confidences of a client.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... Responsibilities Toward A Client § 1103.23 Confidences of a client. (a) The practitioner's duty to preserve his... such disclosures to prevent the act or protect those against whom that is threatened. The Practitioner's Duties and Responsibilities Regarding Witnesses, Other Litigants and the Public...

  1. 49 CFR 1103.23 - Confidences of a client.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... Responsibilities Toward A Client § 1103.23 Confidences of a client. (a) The practitioner's duty to preserve his... such disclosures to prevent the act or protect those against whom that is threatened. The Practitioner's Duties and Responsibilities Regarding Witnesses, Other Litigants and the Public...

  2. Working In-Vivo with Client Sense of Unlovability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tsai, Mavis; Reed, Richard

    2012-01-01

    Clients sometimes react negatively when their in-session problem behavior is simply blocked. This article illustrates how a FAP (Functional Analytic Psychotherapy) therapist can work effectively in session with a client's problem feeling of unlovability by: 1) understanding its antecedents and functions, 2) using therapeutic love to reinforce…

  3. Counseling with Methadone Clients: A Review of Recent Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Powers, Robert J.; Powers, Henrietta B.

    1978-01-01

    A review of studies on counseling with methadone clients affirmed the importance of counseling services. Support was found for analytic therapy, T-group therapy, behavioral training, reality therapy, and family therapy. There was evidence of client resistance to group therapy. (Author)

  4. Effects of Client Resistance on Counselor Verbal Responses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stout, Elizabeth

    2014-01-01

    The primary focus of this study was to examine whether counselor verbal responses incrementally varied in response to client verbal responses. A Motivational Interviewing framework was used for measuring verbal responses of both counselor and client. The study employed an AB counterbalanced design, exposing 40 licensed counselors to both resistant…

  5. Client-Reported Psychological Status and Rehabilitation Success

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krauft, Conrad; Bolton, Brian

    1976-01-01

    Three self-report personality inventories were administered to a sample of 148 rehabilitation clients. Seven factor-analysis-derived dimensions of personality functioning were correlated with the criterion of successful case closure. Only one of the correlations approached statistical significance, leading to the conclusion that client-reported…

  6. Vocational Counselor Success Rate as a Criterion for Client Assignment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooper, Paul G.; Rubin, Stanford E.

    1977-01-01

    Provides insight into the desirability of assigning clients to counselors with a high proportion of successful closures with members of the clients' disability group. The criterion of desirability was the Cooper-Rubin suitability-of-placement index. Results indicated no positive relationship between counselors' proportion of successful closures…

  7. Lawyer-Client Confidentiality in the Campus Setting.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drinan, Robert F.

    1993-01-01

    It is proposed that the attorney-client privilege of confidentiality may be more important in the case of the university attorney than in the situation of the attorney representing the client as a law firm member. The principle is illustrated in a hypothetical case concerning research fraud. (MSE)

  8. 37 CFR 11.118 - Duties to prospective client.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    .... 11.118 Section 11.118 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights UNITED STATES PATENT AND TRADEMARK OFFICE, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE REPRESENTATION OF OTHERS BEFORE THE UNITED STATES PATENT AND TRADEMARK OFFICE USPTO... relationship with respect to a matter is a prospective client. (b) Even when no client-practitioner...

  9. Navigating the Internet: Evaluating Gopher Clients for Windows.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lonardo, Angela; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Identifies and discusses the criteria that end users might employ when evaluating a gopher client, particularly for the Windows environment. Topics include cost and availability, help features, functionality, viewing, searching, navigating, bookmarks, retrieving and displaying files, robustness, and gopher clients available via FTP (file transfer…

  10. Differences between Counseling Center Clients and Nonclients on Three Measures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Palladino, Joseph; Domino, George

    1978-01-01

    The results of the California Psychological Inventory, the Survey of Study Habits and Attitudes, and the Mooney Problem Check List for short-term clients, long-term clients, and nonclients were compared. Results supported the usefulness of the Mooney in a relatively normal setting. (Author)

  11. Client Anticipations about Computer-Assisted Career Guidance System Outcomes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Osborn, Debra S.; Peterson, Gary W.; Sampson, James P., Jr.; Reardon, Robert C.

    2003-01-01

    This study describes how 55 clients from a career center at a large, southeastern university anticipated using computer-assisted career guidance (CACG) systems to help in their career decision making and problem solving. Responses to a cued and a free response survey indicated that clients' most frequent anticipations included increased career…

  12. 37 CFR 11.107 - Conflict of interest; Current clients.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 37 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Conflict of interest; Current clients. 11.107 Section 11.107 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights UNITED STATES PATENT AND TRADEMARK...; Current clients. (a) Except as provided in paragraph (b) of this section, a practitioner shall not...

  13. 37 CFR 11.107 - Conflict of interest; Current clients.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 37 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Conflict of interest; Current clients. 11.107 Section 11.107 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights UNITED STATES PATENT AND TRADEMARK...; Current clients. (a) Except as provided in paragraph (b) of this section, a practitioner shall not...

  14. Clients' Pretreatment Counseling Expectations as Predictors of the Working Alliance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Patterson, Candace L.; Uhlin, Brian; Anderson, Timothy

    2008-01-01

    Because research suggests that counseling expectations are malleable and that alliance ratings predict clinical outcomes, the relationship between this pretreatment client characteristic (expectations) and the quality of the alliance early in treatment deserves further attention. This study examined the relationships between 57 clients'…

  15. Learning Creativity in the Client-Agency Relationship

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Suh, Taewon; Jung, Jae C.; Smith, Bruce L.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: This study aims to investigate creativity-related determinants of learning in the context of business-to-business services and client-agency relationships. Design/methodology/approach: The research model includes client encouragement, agency creativity, campaign creativity, and perceived performance. The study involved conducting a…

  16. Client and service characteristics associated with addiction treatment completion of clients with co-occurring disorders.

    PubMed

    Mangrum, Laurel F

    2009-10-01

    The study examines client and service characteristics of addiction treatment completers and non-completers with co-occurring disorders (COD). On demographic variables, completers were more likely to be male and homeless. In the psychiatric domain, a greater proportion of completers received diagnoses of depression and generalized anxiety disorder, whereas non-completers were more often diagnosed with bipolar disorder and posttraumatic stress disorder. No group differences were found in client-reported psychiatric symptom severity; however, non-completers were rated by clinicians as having more severe symptoms in the areas of interpersonal sensitivity, depression, and hostility. In the area of substance use patterns, no differences were found in primary substance of abuse but completers reported more days of use during the month prior to treatment. Completers also had a greater history of both prior detox and non-detox treatment. At discharge, completers achieved higher rates of past month abstinence and AA attendance, but no differences were found in length of stay in treatment. Examination of recovery support services utilization revealed that completers more often received peer mentoring services. Greater proportions of the non-completer group received educational support, clothing, medical care, and employment assistance. These results suggest that future studies are needed in examining possible differential treatment response by diagnostic category and the potential role of peer mentoring in enhancing addiction treatment completion of COD clients.

  17. The Impact of Organizational Stress and Burnout on Client Engagement

    PubMed Central

    Landrum, Brittany; Knight, Danica K.; Flynn, Patrick M.

    2011-01-01

    This paper explores the impact of organizational attributes on client engagement within substance abuse treatment. Previous research has identified organizational features, including small size, accreditation, and workplace practices that impact client engagement (Broome, Flynn, Knight, & Simpson, 2007). The current study sought to explore how aspects of the work environment impact client engagement. The sample included 89 programs located in 9 states across the U.S. Work environment measures included counselor perceptions of stress, burnout, and work satisfaction at each program, while engagement measures included client ratings of participation, counseling rapport, and treatment satisfaction. Using multiple regression, tests of moderation and mediation revealed that staff stress negatively predicted client participation in treatment. Burnout was related to stress, but was not related to participation. Two additional organizational measures – workload and influence – moderated the positive relationship between staff stress and burnout. Implications for drug treatment programs are discussed. PMID:22154029

  18. The impact of organizational stress and burnout on client engagement.

    PubMed

    Landrum, Brittany; Knight, Danica K; Flynn, Patrick M

    2012-03-01

    This article explores the impact of organizational attributes on client engagement within substance abuse treatment. Previous research has identified organizational features, including small size, accreditation, and workplace practices, that impact client engagement (K. M. Broome, P. M. Flynn, D. K. Knight, & D. D. Simpson, 2007). This study sought to explore how aspects of the work environment impact client engagement. The sample included 89 programs located in 9 states across the United States. Work environment measures included counselor perceptions of stress, burnout, and work satisfaction at each program, whereas engagement measures included client ratings of participation, counseling rapport, and treatment satisfaction. Using multiple regression, tests of moderation and mediation revealed that staff stress negatively predicted client participation in treatment. Burnout was related to stress but was not related to participation. Two additional organizational measures--workload and influence--moderated the positive relationship between staff stress and burnout. Implications for drug treatment programs are discussed.

  19. Altering the home care agency/client relationship: notice requirements.

    PubMed

    Kapp, Marshall B

    2004-01-01

    Many older and disabled individuals regularly receive valuable services from home health agencies (HHAs). The unilateral termination or reduction of such services by an HHA may exert a significant impact on the life of a client who has come to depend on those services. The prerogatives of Medicare-certified HHAs to terminate their relationships with clients are constrained today not only by contract and tort law principles, but also by federal statutes and regulations establishing Conditions of Participation, including provisions concerning clients' rights. A recent important federal judicial decision interpreted and expanded the legal responsibilities of HHAs to provide formal notice to their Medicare clients before terminating or reducing home health care services to those clients, regardless of the reason for ending or altering the relationship. This article critically discusses the background, holding, and practice implications of the 2004 Lutwin v. Thomson decision, which imposes these notice requirements on HHAs.

  20. Subjective Experiences of Clients in a Voluntary Money Management Program.

    PubMed

    Serowik, Kristin L; Bellamy, Chyrell D; Rowe, Michael; Rosen, Marc I

    2013-01-01

    A large proportion of people diagnosed with mental illnesses have difficulty managing their money, and therefore many psychiatric treatments involve providing money management assistance. However, little is known about the subjective experience of having a money manager, and extant literature is restricted to people forced to work with a representative payee or conservator. In this study, fifteen people were interviewed about their experience receiving a voluntary money management intervention designed to minimize substance use. Clients emphasized the importance of trusting the money manager, financial mindfulness (an enhanced awareness of the financial transactions in clients' day-to-day lives), agency over their own affairs, and addiction. In contrast to evaluations of people assigned representative payees and/or conservators, there was little mention of feeling coerced. These findings suggest that money management programs can address client concerns by building trust, relating budgeting to clients' day-to-day lives, and encouraging clients' control over their own affairs.

  1. Beyond Values Clarification: Addressing Client Values in Clinical Behavior Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Bonow, Jordan T; Follette, William C

    2009-01-01

    Ethical principles of psychology, as exemplified in the American Psychological Association (APA) Code of Ethics (2002), provide impractical advice for addressing client values during psychotherapy. These principles seem to argue that each client's values should be respected and protected at all times, except in cases in which this would result in harm to the client or the general public. Although the code is appropriately designed as a defense against potential and actual abuses of professional power, this general proscription against directly targeting client values for change is based on an understanding of values that grants them special ontological status and has resulted in limited clinical interventions focusing solely on “values clarification.” With its strong foundation in a unified philosophical system, clinical behavior analysis offers a sophisticated alternative approach to values that both defines what they are and identifies when they can be ethically targeted to improve the lives of clients. PMID:22478514

  2. Over-the-counter hearing aids: electroacoustic characteristics and possible target client groups.

    PubMed

    Cheng, C M; McPherson, B

    2000-01-01

    Over-the-counter hearing aids (OTCs) are those directly purchased from retail outlets, without the benefit of prior professional hearing health care. They are particularly common in developing countries. This study examined the amplification characteristics of a selected sample of OTCs to determine if any target client group or groups were suitable for the OTCs. The electroacoustical performance of 10 OTCs was measured. The measurements included saturated sound pressure level curve, high-frequency average full-on gain, frequency response, total harmonic distortion, equivalent input noise level, and input-output curve. The full-on gain curve of each hearing aid was used to estimate the hypothetical hearing loss of target clients for each aid as it would be calculated by four hearing aid prescription formulae. Real-ear probe tube measurements were also performed on 10 adult subjects to determine the amplification that could be achieved by the OTCs before audible feedback occurred. The OTC hearing aids were not able to meet the prescription gain requirements of the majority of elderly clients who usually purchased them.

  3. Realizing the Potential of Information Resources: Information, Technology, and Services. Track 3: Serving Clients with Client/Server.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    CAUSE, Boulder, CO.

    Eight papers are presented from the 1995 CAUSE conference track on client/server issues faced by managers of information technology at colleges and universities. The papers include: (1) "The Realities of Client/Server Development and Implementation" (Mary Ann Carr and Alan Hartwig), which examines Carnegie Mellon University's transition…

  4. Client/server approach to image capturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuijn, Chris; Stokes, Earle

    1998-01-01

    The diversity of the digital image capturing devices on the market today is quite astonishing and ranges from low-cost CCD scanners to digital cameras (for both action and stand-still scenes), mid-end CCD scanners for desktop publishing and pre- press applications and high-end CCD flatbed scanners and drum- scanners with photo multiplier technology. Each device and market segment has its own specific needs which explains the diversity of the associated scanner applications. What all those applications have in common is the need to communicate with a particular device to import the digital images; after the import, additional image processing might be needed as well as color management operations. Although the specific requirements for all of these applications might differ considerably, a number of image capturing and color management facilities as well as other services are needed which can be shared. In this paper, we propose a client/server architecture for scanning and image editing applications which can be used as a common component for all these applications. One of the principal components of the scan server is the input capturing module. The specification of the input jobs is based on a generic input device model. Through this model we make abstraction of the specific scanner parameters and define the scan job definitions by a number of absolute parameters. As a result, scan job definitions will be less dependent on a particular scanner and have a more universal meaning. In this context, we also elaborate on the interaction of the generic parameters and the color characterization (i.e., the ICC profile). Other topics that are covered are the scheduling and parallel processing capabilities of the server, the image processing facilities, the interaction with the ICC engine, the communication facilities (both in-memory and over the network) and the different client architectures (stand-alone applications, TWAIN servers, plug-ins, OLE or Apple-event driven

  5. A Review and Critical Analysis of Humanistic Approaches to Treating Disturbed Clients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hansen, James T.

    1999-01-01

    Humanistic psychotherapies for disturbed clients, including client-centered and existential-phenomenological treatments, are reviewed. It is concluded that humanistic treatments are effective and provide a good conceptual framework for working with disturbed clients. (Author/MKA)

  6. Benchmark of Client and Server-Side Catchment Delineation Approaches on Web-Based Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demir, I.; Sermet, M. Y.; Sit, M. A.

    2016-12-01

    Recent advances in internet and cyberinfrastructure technologies have provided the capability to acquire large scale spatial data from various gauges and sensor networks. The collection of environmental data increased demand for applications which are capable of managing and processing large-scale and high-resolution data sets. With the amount and resolution of data sets provided, one of the challenging tasks for organizing and customizing hydrological data sets is delineation of watersheds on demand. Watershed delineation is a process for creating a boundary that represents the contributing area for a specific control point or water outlet, with intent of characterization and analysis of portions of a study area. Although many GIS tools and software for watershed analysis are available on desktop systems, there is a need for web-based and client-side techniques for creating a dynamic and interactive environment for exploring hydrological data. In this project, we demonstrated several watershed delineation techniques on the web with various techniques implemented on the client-side using JavaScript and WebGL, and on the server-side using Python and C++. We also developed a client-side GPGPU (General Purpose Graphical Processing Unit) algorithm to analyze high-resolution terrain data for watershed delineation which allows parallelization using GPU. The web-based real-time analysis of watershed segmentation can be helpful for decision-makers and interested stakeholders while eliminating the need of installing complex software packages and dealing with large-scale data sets. Utilization of the client-side hardware resources also eliminates the need of servers due its crowdsourcing nature. Our goal for future work is to improve other hydrologic analysis methods such as rain flow tracking by adapting presented approaches.

  7. Real Language Meets Real Business

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Muirhead, Muirhead; Schechter, Sarah

    2016-01-01

    The Real Business Language Challenge was a collaborative pilot project between Coca-Cola Enterprises (CCE) and Routes into Languages East for Year 9 and 10 pupils. It was based on CCE's award-winning Real Business Challenge, part of its highly acclaimed education programme. The Real Business Language Challenge transformed the project into a…

  8. Client involvement in home care practice: a relational sociological perspective.

    PubMed

    Glasdam, Stinne; Henriksen, Nina; Kjær, Lone; Praestegaard, Jeanette

    2013-12-01

    'Client involvement' has been a mantra within health policies, education curricula and healthcare institutions over many years, yet very little is known about how 'client involvement' is practised in home-care services. The aim of this article is to analyse 'client involvement' in practise seen from the positions of healthcare professionals, an elderly person and his relative in a home-care setting. A sociologically inspired single case study was conducted, consisting of three weeks of observations and interviews. The study has a focus on the relational aspects of home care and the structural, political and administrative frames that rule home- care practice. Client involvement is shown within four constructed analytical categories: 'Structural conditions of providing and receiving home care'; 'Client involvement inside the home: performing a professional task and living an everyday life'; 'Client involvement outside the home: liberal business and mutual goal setting'; and 'Converting a home to a working place: refurnishing a life'. The meaning of involvement is depending on which position it is viewed from. On the basis of this analysis, we raise the question of the extent to which involvement of the client in public home-care practice remains limited. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Protecting mental health clients' dignity - the importance of legal control.

    PubMed

    Kogstad, Ragnfrid Eline

    2009-01-01

    Protecting human beings' dignity is a fundamental value underlying the UN's Universal Declaration of Human Rights as well as several recommendations and conventions derived from this, among them the European Convention of Human Rights (ECHR), a declaration that also takes precedence over Norwegian legislation. Still, clients' stories inform us that their dignity is not always protected in the mental health service systems. The aim of the study has been to investigate violations of dignity considered from the clients' points of view, and to suggest actions that may ensure that practice is brought in line with human rights values. The method used has been a qualitative content analysis of 335 client narratives. The conclusion is that mental health clients experience infringements that cannot be explained without reference to their status as clients in a system which, based on judgments from medical experts, has a legitimate right to ignore clients' voices as well as their fundamental human rights. The main focus of this discussion is the role of the ECHR and the European Court of Human Rights as instruments for protecting mental health clients' human rights. To bring about changes, recommendations and practices should be harmonized with the new UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (2006). Under this convention, the European Court of Human Rights has support for the application of the ECHR without exemptions for special groups of people.

  10. Evaluation of a liaison librarian program: client and liaison perspectives.

    PubMed

    Tennant, Michele R; Cataldo, Tara Tobin; Sherwill-Navarro, Pamela; Jesano, Rae

    2006-10-01

    This paper describes a survey-based evaluation of the five-year old Liaison Librarian Program at the University of Florida. Liaison librarians, faculty, students, staff, residents, and post-doctoral associates were queried via Web-based surveys. Questions addressed client and liaison perspectives on a variety of issues, including program and service awareness and usage, client-library relations and communication, client support for the program, and liaison workload. Approximately 43% of the 323 client respondents were aware of liaison services; 72% (n = 163) of these clients had had contact with their liaison. Ninety-five percent (n = 101) of faculty and students who reported contact with their liaison supported the continuation of the program. Liaison services were used by a greater percentage of faculty than students, although they had similar patterns of usage and reported the same "traditional" services to be most important. Liaisons indicated that communications with clients had increased, the reputation of the library was enhanced, and their workloads had increased as a result of the Liaison Librarian Program. Survey results suggest that the Liaison Librarian Program has a core set of clients who use and highly value the services provided by liaisons. Recommendations addressing workload, training, marketing, and administrative support are provided.

  11. Factors affecting client response to HIV outreach efforts.

    PubMed

    Tinsman, P D; Bullman, S; Chen, X; Burgdorf, K; Herrell, J M

    2001-01-01

    This article describes 12 HIV Outreach Demonstration Projects funded by the Center for Substance Abuse Treatment in 1995, and the clients these projects served. The article also summarizes the findings of multivariate statistical analyses aimed at identifying important project and client characteristics that influenced project success in achieving two key outcomes: persuading at-risk clients to obtain HIV tests, and facilitating entry by substance-abusing clients into structured substance abuse treatment (SAT). Hierarchical linear modeling (HLM) analysis was used to conduct the analyses. The findings support the hypothesis that HIV Outreach, as an integrated approach to addressing the multiple problems clients have due to substance abuse and related problems, can be an effective model for reaching clients who have not been reached through traditional means. By implementing a complement of comprehensive HIV Outreach interventions, many of the HIV Outreach projects were successful in addressing the various needs of their clients. However, as detailed in this article, some services and service delivery procedures, were more effective than others in achieving project objectives.

  12. Negotiating: experiences of community nurses when contracting with clients.

    PubMed

    Duiveman, Trudie; Bonner, Ann

    2012-04-01

    A community nurse is required to have excellent interpersonal, teaching, collaborative and clinical skills in order to develop effective individualised client care contracts. Using a descriptive qualitative design data was collected from two focus groups of fourteen community nurses to explore the issues surrounding negotiating and contracting client care contracts from the perspective of community nurses. Thematic analysis revealed three themes: 'assessment of needs', 'education towards enablement', and 'negotiation'. 'Assessment of needs' identified that community nurses assess both the client's requirements for health care as well as the ability of the nurse to provide that care. 'Education towards enablement' described that education of the client is a common strategy used by community nurses to establish realistic goals of health care as part of developing an ongoing care plan. The final theme, 'negotiation', involved an informed agreement between the client and the community nurse which forms the origin of the care contract that will direct the partnership between the client and the nurse. Of importance for community nurses is that development of successful person-centred care contracts requires skillful negotiation of care that strikes the balance between the needs of the client and the ability of the nurse to meet those needs.

  13. Enhancing student occupational therapists' client-centred counselling skills.

    PubMed

    Wener, Pamela F; Bergen, Carolyn O; Diamond-Burchuk, Lisa G; Yamamoto, Cynthia M; Hosegood, Alana E; Staley, James D

    2015-12-01

    Client-centred practice is the cornerstone of the occupational therapy profession. However, there has been little focus on how to teach students to be client-centred practitioners while engaged in counselling. The purpose of this study was to examine the impact of the use of a client-completed rating scale on student occupational therapists' client-centred counselling skills. A time-series design was used to measure the changes in students' counselling skills over time. Demographic information was collected prior to time one. An online questionnaire was administered after study completion to explore students' experiences of using the Session Rating Scale. The impact of using the Session Rating Scale as a measure of students' client-centred counselling skills performance significantly improved over time. Most students valued using the rating scale and would recommend its use for future students. The process of supporting students to learn how to engage clients in providing timely feedback and using this feedback to design treatment sets the stage for integration and application of client-centred practice. © CAOT 2015.

  14. Guidelines for client selection in the home birth midwifery practice.

    PubMed

    Vedam, S; Kolodji, Y

    1995-01-01

    Numerous studies have documented the safety of planned home birth; yet, few have identified specific criteria for selection of the home birth candidate. Home birth midwifery practice achieves successful outcomes by appropriate evaluation of medical and obstetric risk factors, as well as an ongoing evaluation and development of the client's psychosocial resources and the midwife-client relationship. Relevant medical and obstetric factors include significant medical illnesses, antenatal course, smoking history, commitment to breastfeeding, and the woman's nutritional profile. Social and environmental factors include the need for a stable birthing environment, practical means for hospital transfer, and the presence of loving support for the client during and after delivery. The client's psychological preparedness is a critical variable that may affect the ability to deliver in the home setting without analgesia or labor augmentation. Active participation in prenatal care, preparation of the home and family members, and a realistic attitude regarding the risks, benefits, and potential complications of planned home delivery are all components of this preparedness. Because midwifery practice promotes midwife-client rapport by careful attention to both medical and psychosocial issues during prenatal care, this relationship is itself an important predictor of the client's suitability for home birth. The quality of midwife-client interactions may influence not only the decision to plan a home birth but the indications for hospital transfer should problems arise. In this article, existing literature is reviewed and criteria are proposed for selecting home birth candidates within the American midwifery practice setting.

  15. Laser Surgeon, Client Education, and Satisfaction with Tattoo Removal.

    PubMed

    Hutton Carlsen, Katrina; Esmann, Jørgen; Serup, Jørgen

    2017-01-01

    Studies of satisfaction with tattoo removal outcomes by laser, rated by clients themselves, including qualitative aspects, are sparse. We studied long-term results and client satisfaction with tattoo removal by Q-switched YAG laser. Client satisfaction is influenced by numerous factors: pretreatment expectations, objective observations, pretreatment information, laser treatment procedures, and outcome, including subjective experiences such as pain. Client-surgeon interaction during the full laser treatment course is a major determinant of client satisfaction. The client is in a dynamic state of mind and undergoes a change of opinion during a laser treatment course as a result of his/her experiences. In this continuous process of learning, expectations are changed from a state of high expectation before treatment to a more realistic state with acceptance of outcome. The laser surgeon shall be aware of his/her role as a tutor and prepare the client for a situation, where outcomes can be acceptable albeit not ideal. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  16. The AROW Health Link experience with client-based system design.

    PubMed

    Hambleton, Joshua

    2016-09-01

    This article outlines the experience of the Arnprior Region & Ottawa West (AROW) Health Link using a multi-dimensional engagement framework in the co-development of systems change with client representatives. The article outlines patient, organizational, and societal factors influencing client engagement. The key learning that has allowed the joint Client Engagement Committee to evolve has been the core of client leadership. Client-led tables and workgroups have fueled client-to-client engagement, which has shifted clients from being a part of the change to driving the change. © 2016 The Canadian College of Health Leaders.

  17. When hearing clients work with a deaf therapist.

    PubMed

    Jampel, Julie B

    2010-06-01

    Not being able to hear can present significant challenges for the therapist and for the deaf therapist/hearing client dyad. It can also create opportunities. Although the literature indicates that most culturally Deaf therapists work with Deaf clients due to their mutual use of American Sign Language, I describe (a) the background of an audiologically deaf therapist who relies on speech reading rather than sign language, and (b) this therapist's clinical work with hearing clients. Some of the relational dynamics of these treatments are identified, and I conclude by noting how attention to communication can benefit the work of all psychotherapists.

  18. Mortality Risk Among Heroin Abusers: Clients and Non-clients of Public Treatment Centers for Drug Addiction.

    PubMed

    Pavarin, Raimondo Maria

    2015-01-01

    In Europe, the prevalence of problematic heroin consumption is declining but, in spite of the constant rise in the number of treated patients, many of them do not turn to a public treatment center (PTC) for their drug addiction. The aim of this study is to study the mortality risk separately for heroin abusers PTC clients and non-PTC clients (i.e., those never treated at a PTC). Cohort study on 959 subjects resident in the metropolitan area of Bologna who went to a health service (i.e., hospital, emergency unit) or to a PTC following problems due to heroin abuse for the first time between 01/01/2004 and 31/12/2009. Standardized mortality ratios (SMRs) were calculated, and regression analysis using the Poisson method was used. Elevated and statistically significant SMRs were found in both genders, irrespective of the contact facility, being higher for PTC clients. Among non-PTC clients 28% of deaths overall were from AIDS or infectious diseases (6% PTC clients), 17% from opiate overdose (6% PTC clients) and 14% from violent causes (6% PTC clients). Multivariate analysis showed a higher mortality risk for patients who used both heroin and cocaine and for concomitant abuse of benzodiazepines. The characteristics of patients never before treated for addiction prompts a reflection on the presence of a hidden group of patients who are hard to reach, who have a high mortality risk and who turn to health care treatment facilities only in the event of an emergency.

  19. Secure thin client architecture for DICOM image analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mogatala, Harsha V. R.; Gallet, Jacqueline

    2005-04-01

    This paper presents a concept of Secure Thin Client (STC) Architecture for Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine (DICOM) image analysis over Internet. STC Architecture provides in-depth analysis and design of customized reports for DICOM images using drag-and-drop and data warehouse technology. Using a personal computer and a common set of browsing software, STC can be used for analyzing and reporting detailed patient information, type of examinations, date, Computer Tomography (CT) dose index, and other relevant information stored within the images header files as well as in the hospital databases. STC Architecture is three-tier architecture. The First-Tier consists of drag-and-drop web based interface and web server, which provides customized analysis and reporting ability to the users. The Second-Tier consists of an online analytical processing (OLAP) server and database system, which serves fast, real-time, aggregated multi-dimensional data using OLAP technology. The Third-Tier consists of a smart algorithm based software program which extracts DICOM tags from CT images in this particular application, irrespective of CT vendor's, and transfers these tags into a secure database system. This architecture provides Winnipeg Regional Health Authorities (WRHA) with quality indicators for CT examinations in the hospitals. It also provides health care professionals with analytical tool to optimize radiation dose and image quality parameters. The information is provided to the user by way of a secure socket layer (SSL) and role based security criteria over Internet. Although this particular application has been developed for WRHA, this paper also discusses the effort to extend the Architecture to other hospitals in the region. Any DICOM tag from any imaging modality could be tracked with this software.

  20. GenExp: An Interactive Web-Based Genomic DAS Client with Client-Side Data Rendering

    PubMed Central

    Gel Moreno, Bernat; Messeguer Peypoch, Xavier

    2011-01-01

    Background The Distributed Annotation System (DAS) offers a standard protocol for sharing and integrating annotations on biological sequences. There are more than 1000 DAS sources available and the number is steadily increasing. Clients are an essential part of the DAS system and integrate data from several independent sources in order to create a useful representation to the user. While web-based DAS clients exist, most of them do not have direct interaction capabilities such as dragging and zooming with the mouse. Results Here we present GenExp, a web based and fully interactive visual DAS client. GenExp is a genome oriented DAS client capable of creating informative representations of genomic data zooming out from base level to complete chromosomes. It proposes a novel approach to genomic data rendering and uses the latest HTML5 web technologies to create the data representation inside the client browser. Thanks to client-side rendering most position changes do not need a network request to the server and so responses to zooming and panning are almost immediate. In GenExp it is possible to explore the genome intuitively moving it with the mouse just like geographical map applications. Additionally, in GenExp it is possible to have more than one data viewer at the same time and to save the current state of the application to revisit it later on. Conclusions GenExp is a new interactive web-based client for DAS and addresses some of the short-comings of the existing clients. It uses client-side data rendering techniques resulting in easier genome browsing and exploration. GenExp is open source under the GPL license and it is freely available at http://gralggen.lsi.upc.edu/recerca/genexp. PMID:21750706

  1. Reviews of computing technology: Client-server technology

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, S.M.

    1990-09-01

    One of the most frequently heard terms in the computer industry these days is client-server.'' There is much misinformation available on the topic, and competitive pressures on software vendors have led to a great deal of hype with little in the way of supporting products. The purpose of this document is to explain what is meant by client-server applications, why the Advanced Technology and Architecture (ATA) section of the Information Resources Management (IRM) Department sees this emerging technology as key for computer applications during the next ten years, and what ATA sees as the existing standards and products available today. Because of the relative immaturity of existing client-server products, IRM is not yet guidelining any specific client-server products, except those that are components of guidelined data communications products or database management systems.

  2. Reviews of computing technology: Client-server technology

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, S.M.

    1990-09-01

    One of the most frequently heard terms in the computer industry these days is ``client-server.`` There is much misinformation available on the topic, and competitive pressures on software vendors have led to a great deal of hype with little in the way of supporting products. The purpose of this document is to explain what is meant by client-server applications, why the Advanced Technology and Architecture (ATA) section of the Information Resources Management (IRM) Department sees this emerging technology as key for computer applications during the next ten years, and what ATA sees as the existing standards and products available today. Because of the relative immaturity of existing client-server products, IRM is not yet guidelining any specific client-server products, except those that are components of guidelined data communications products or database management systems.

  3. Influence of organizational functioning on client engagement in treatment.

    PubMed

    Greener, Jack M; Joe, George W; Simpson, D Dwayne; Rowan-Szal, Grace A; Lehman, Wayne E K

    2007-09-01

    This study focused on the relationship between organizational functioning factors measured in a staff survey using the Texas Christian University (TCU) Organizational Readiness for Change assessment and client-level engagement measured by the TCU Client Evaluation of Self and Treatment in drug treatment programs. The sample consisted of 531 clinical and counseling staff and 3,475 clients from 163 substance abuse treatment programs located in nine states from three regional Addiction Technology Transfer Centers. Measures of client engagement in treatment (rapport, satisfaction, and participation) were shown to be higher in programs with more positive staff ratings of organizational functioning. In particular, these programs had fewer agency needs and more favorable ratings for their resources, staff attributes, and climate. These findings help establish the importance of addressing organizational factors as part of an overall strategy for improving treatment effectiveness.

  4. Voice and Communication Therapy for Transgender/Transsexual Clients

    MedlinePlus

    ... Language and Swallowing / Disorders and Diseases Voice and Communication Therapy for Clients Who Are Transgender [ en Español ] ... are transgender may elect to have voice and communication therapy to help them use their voice in ...

  5. Client - server programs analysis in the EPOCA environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donatelli, Susanna; Mazzocca, Nicola; Russo, Stefano

    1996-09-01

    Client - server processing is a popular paradigm for distributed computing. In the development of client - server programs, the designer has first to ensure that the implementation behaves correctly, in particular that it is deadlock free. Second, he has to guarantee that the program meets predefined performance requirements. This paper addresses the issues in the analysis of client - server programs in EPOCA. EPOCA is a computer-aided software engeneering (CASE) support system that allows the automated construction and analysis of generalized stochastic Petri net (GSPN) models of concurrent applications. The paper describes, on the basis of a realistic case study, how client - server systems are modelled in EPOCA, and the kind of qualitative and quantitative analysis supported by its tools.

  6. Provider-Client Interaction in Methadone Treatment Clinics in China.

    PubMed

    Li, Li; Wu, Zunyou; Cao, Xiaobin; Zhang, Linglin

    2012-04-01

    This study examines provider-client interactions in the context of methadone maintenance treatment (MMT) in China. Service providers were recruited from six methadone clinics. A total of 41 providers were enrolled in the study and participated in an assessment from February to March 2010. Descriptive and multiple regression analyses were performed. Providers with a higher level of negative attitude toward drug users were less likely than others to interact with clients. Female providers were less likely to have negative attitudes toward drug users as compared with their male counterparts. Doctors were more likely than others to have negative attitudes toward drug users. Knowledge of MMT was not related to either negative attitude toward drug users or to provider-client interaction. The findings indicate an urgent need to address the issue of provider attitudes, which can impact interactions with clients and influence efforts to maintain treatment retention and outcomes for drug users.

  7. Investigation of Social Influence Theory's Conception of Client Resistance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ruppel, George; Kaul, Theodore J.

    1982-01-01

    Investigated the predictions of social influence theory with respect to client resistance to counselor influence. Data offered support for the social influence theory in that subjects' expectations of others' instrumental behavior were lower for those who viewed illegitimate counselors. (Author)

  8. Couple VCT clients in Ethiopia: a heterogeneous HIV risk group.

    PubMed

    Bonnenfant, Yung-Ting; Hindin, Michelle J; Gillespie, Duff

    2012-01-01

    Studies show reduced HIV risk behaviors after couple voluntary counseling and testing (VCT), either resulting from the couple counseling process or the type of people it attracts. A total of 1858 sexually active individual VCT clients in partnerships were compared to 866 sexually experienced couple VCT participants with multilevel logistic regression. Sexually experienced couple VCT clients were also compared to those couple VCT clients who never had sex. Among sexually experienced participants in partnerships, women, non-premarital testers, and those who felt at risk for HIV were less likely to attend couple VCT than individual VCT. Among couple VCT clients, sexually inexperienced individuals were more likely to be: testing for the first time, premarital testers, and more educated than those who were sexually experienced. Couple VCT’s effectiveness might partly result from who it attracts. Addressing the diverse needs of a heterogeneous testing population is a programmatic challenge for couple VCT in Ethiopia.

  9. Program Structure, Staff Perceptions, and Client Engagement in Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Broome, Kirk M.; Flynn, Patrick M.; Knight, Danica K.; Simpson, D. Dwayne

    2007-01-01

    A key goal for drug abuse treatment providers is to get their clients engaged and participating in therapeutic activities, as a first step toward deriving longer-term benefits. Much research has focused on personal characteristics that relate to client engagement, but characteristics of the program have received less attention. This study explores client and program differences in engagement ratings, using data from a nationwide set of 94 outpatient drug free (ODF) treatment programs in a hierarchical linear model (HLM) analysis. Results show that elements of program context, including both structural features (e.g., smaller size and JCAHO/CARF accreditation) and staff perceptions of personal efficacy, organizational climate, and communal workplace practices, relate to better overall client engagement. These findings add further evidence that treatment providers should also address the workplace environment for staff as part of quality-improvement efforts. PMID:17434709

  10. Ulysses directives in The Netherlands: opinions of psychiatrists and clients.

    PubMed

    Varekamp, I

    2004-12-01

    In this article we present a study on the opinions of Dutch psychiatrists and clients on Ulysses directives. In-depth interviews were conducted with 18 clients and 17 psychiatrists. Most respondents were proponents of Ulysses directives. The most frequently mentioned objective of these directives was to secure timely admission to hospital, although a large minority was mainly interested in giving patients influence on treatment decisions. Psychiatrists differed on how much autonomy they preferred with regard to decisions about the moment of admission and kind of treatment. Clients also differed in this respect. Pressure from others to execute a Ulysses directive, and premature admission to the hospital were mentioned as risks of Ulysses directives. Crisis cards were seen as an alternative by many psychiatrists and some clients. Recommendations are made for a good functioning of Ulysses directives, and the appropriateness of crisis cards as an alternative for a number of patients is discussed.

  11. Health education: the family health teams' perspective and clients' participation.

    PubMed

    de Fátima Antero Sousa Machado, Maria; Vieira, Neiva Francenely Cunha

    2009-01-01

    This study aimed to understand the conception and performance of health education developed by the Family Health Team with a view to clients' participation. Qualitative study carried out with clients and professionals at the Family Health Program (FHP) in Crato, CE, Brazil. Data were collected through semi-structured interviews and observation between May and September, 2005. Data were organized according to content analysis and literature. Findings indicate that professionals view health education as guidance and teaching focused on disease prevention and the participation of clients is perceived as listening and attention. Thus, FHP professionals need to broaden their understanding of health education and educative strategies, which should be culturally meaningful, so that clients freely and consciously decide on their participation and behavioral change in health.

  12. Reflections on the Development of Patron-Client Relationships.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Melick-Barthelmess, Karin

    1985-01-01

    The development of the institution of clientage is traced from ancient Rome to modern times. The patron-client relationships in the hierarchical nature of society and institutions in Spain and Latin America are specifically examined. (RM)

  13. Client Centeredness and Health Reform: Key Issues for Occupational Therapy.

    PubMed

    Mroz, Tracy M; Pitonyak, Jennifer S; Fogelberg, Donald; Leland, Natalie E

    2015-01-01

    Health reform promotes the delivery of patient-centered care. Occupational therapy's rich history of client-centered theory and practice provides an opportunity for the profession to participate in the evolving discussion about how best to provide care that is truly patient centered. However, the growing emphasis on patient-centered care also poses challenges to occupational therapy's perspectives on client-centered care. We compare the conceptualizations of client-centered and patient-centered care and describe the current state of measurement of client-centered and patient-centered care. We then discuss implications for occupational therapy's research agenda, practice, and education within the context of patient-centered care, and propose next steps for the profession. Copyright © 2015 by the American Occupational Therapy Association, Inc.

  14. Influence of Organizational Functioning on Client Engagement in Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Greener, Jack M.; Joe, George W.; Simpson, D. Dwayne; Rowan-Szal, Grace A.; Lehman, Wayne E. K.

    2007-01-01

    The present study focused on the relationship between organizational functioning factors measured in a staff survey using the TCU Organizational Readiness for Change (ORC) assessment and client-level engagement measured by the TCU Client Evaluation of Self and Treatment (CEST) in drug treatment programs. The sample consisted of 531 clinical and counseling staff and 3475 clients from 163 substance abuse treatment programs located in 9 states from three regional Addiction Technology Transfer Centers (ATTC). Measures of client engagement in treatment (rapport, satisfaction, and participation) were shown to be higher in programs with more positive staff ratings of organizational functioning. In particular, these programs had fewer agency needs and more favorable ratings for their resources, staff attributes, and climate. These findings help establish the importance of addressing organizational factors as part of an overall strategy for improving treatment effectiveness. PMID:17433863

  15. Connection Termination Method by Clients in Web Service

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Akihiro; Satake, Shinsuke; Inai, Hiroshi

    In web service, the server is normally responsible for the connection termination. That would produce useless connections. In this paper, to improve quality of web service, we propose two methods in which a client terminates the connection, and evaluate their performance via simulation. One method is to terminate a persistent connection under HTTP/1.1 by the client. As the simulation result, we confirmed the effectiveness of this method by comparing with the existing one. The other method is that, by using a TCP reset packet, a client terminates the suspended connection which is revealed when the client quits the browse. As the simulation result, we confirmed that this method reduces a connection loss probability when the listenbacklog parameter value is large.

  16. Client Centeredness and Health Reform: Key Issues for Occupational Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Pitonyak, Jennifer S.; Fogelberg, Donald; Leland, Natalie E.

    2015-01-01

    Health reform promotes the delivery of patient-centered care. Occupational therapy’s rich history of client-centered theory and practice provides an opportunity for the profession to participate in the evolving discussion about how best to provide care that is truly patient centered. However, the growing emphasis on patient-centered care also poses challenges to occupational therapy’s perspectives on client-centered care. We compare the conceptualizations of client-centered and patient-centered care and describe the current state of measurement of client-centered and patient-centered care. We then discuss implications for occupational therapy’s research agenda, practice, and education within the context of patient-centered care, and propose next steps for the profession. PMID:26356651

  17. Client and worker satisfaction in a child protection agency.

    PubMed

    Winefield, H R; Barlow, J A

    1995-08-01

    Client and staff satisfaction with the workings of a multidisciplinary child protection agency were investigated using interviews and standard questionnaires. The goal was to discover the nature and strength of the helping relationship between service-recipients and providers. Current clients (N = 24) expressed a great deal of satisfaction with the staff and services. The agency staff (N = 21, with 11 employed at least half-time to work directly with families) were relatively satisfied with their jobs, and showed little evidence of the burnout which has been recognized as a risk for child protection workers. They were able to relate empathically to clients and felt enthusiasm for the work. Taking account of possible bias in both sets of answers, there is still evidence that the agency is succeeding in creating a necessary precondition for therapeutic change: the development of accepting and positive worker-client relationships.

  18. Real Time Monitor of Grid job executions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colling, D. J.; Martyniak, J.; McGough, A. S.; Křenek, A.; Sitera, J.; Mulač, M.; Dvořák, F.

    2010-04-01

    In this paper we describe the architecture and operation of the Real Time Monitor (RTM), developed by the Grid team in the HEP group at Imperial College London. This is arguably the most popular dissemination tool within the EGEE [1] Grid. Having been used, on many occasions including GridFest and LHC inauguration events held at CERN in October 2008. The RTM gathers information from EGEE sites hosting Logging and Bookkeeping (LB) services. Information is cached locally at a dedicated server at Imperial College London and made available for clients to use in near real time. The system consists of three main components: the RTM server, enquirer and an apache Web Server which is queried by clients. The RTM server queries the LB servers at fixed time intervals, collecting job related information and storing this in a local database. Job related data includes not only job state (i.e. Scheduled, Waiting, Running or Done) along with timing information but also other attributes such as Virtual Organization and Computing Element (CE) queue - if known. The job data stored in the RTM database is read by the enquirer every minute and converted to an XML format which is stored on a Web Server. This decouples the RTM server database from the client removing the bottleneck problem caused by many clients simultaneously accessing the database. This information can be visualized through either a 2D or 3D Java based client with live job data either being overlaid on to a 2 dimensional map of the world or rendered in 3 dimensions over a globe map using OpenGL.

  19. Using art to empower clients during a facility move.

    PubMed

    Osborn, Lawrence A; Tate, Frederic B

    2011-06-01

    Eastern State Hospital, a state psychiatric facility in Williamsburg, Virginia, moved from its old campus into a single new building in 2010. Adult clients were given the opportunity to decorate a portion of the new facility with ceramic tiles they designed using permanent markers. The purpose of this project was to empower the clients so they felt involved in the transition. This article describes the project from inception to fruition and is accented with images and descriptions of some of the tiles.

  20. Visualization Software for VisIT Java Client

    SciTech Connect

    Billings, Jay Jay; Smith, Robert W

    2017-01-01

    The VisIT Java Client (JVC) library is a lightweight thin client that is designed and written purely in the native language of Java (the Python & JavaScript versions of the library use the same concept) and communicates with any new unmodified standalone version of VisIT, a high performance computing parallel visualization toolkit, over traditional or web sockets and dynamically determines capabilities of the running VisIT instance whether local or remote.

  1. Web Applications and Thin Clients in the Navy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-09-01

    such as information retrieval from the World Wide Web is an example of client-server computing. However, the term is generally applied to systems in...developed and built a prototype capable of retrieving information considered pertinent for reported terrorist incidents worldwide in support of this...and Sons Ltd. Clouse, S. (n.d.). Web-based applications vs . client-server software. Fcny.org. Retrieved August 29, 2011, from http://metrix.fcny.org

  2. Violence or discipline? Working with multicultural court-ordered clients.

    PubMed

    Waldman, F

    1999-10-01

    Therapists working with court-ordered clients from cultures differing from the mainstream face challenging issues of compulsory therapy in the context of cultural diversity. This article reviews the literature on court-ordered and multicultural counseling, highlighting central elements of both. It then suggests guidelines that blend these elements. The author illustrates how using these guidelines can enable therapists to engage these clients in the therapeutic process and focus on culture as the context for change.

  3. Identifying clients who might benefit from genetic services and information.

    PubMed

    Gaff, Clara L

    This article is the first in a series of seven which examine competence standards for nurses, midwives and health visitors in relation to genetics. The author indicates who might benefit from a genetic consultation and describes the use of a family history--in the form of a family tree--to identify these clients. Client expectations of a genetic consultation and managing these are also discussed.

  4. Male nurses' experiences of providing intimate care for women clients.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Madoka; Chapman, Rose; Wynaden, Dianne

    2006-09-01

    This paper reports a study of male nurses' experiences of providing intimate care for women clients. The number of men entering the nursing profession has increased worldwide. As a consequence of the move to a more gender-balanced profession, debate has ensued over how intimate care should be performed when this requires male nurses to be physically close to women clients. As there was little previous work on this topic, we wished to provide nurses, clients and other healthcare professionals with a better understanding of male nurses' experiences of working with women clients and within a healthcare system where they often feel excluded. Semi-structured, open-ended interviews were conducted with male nurses working in various clinical settings in Western Australia. Latent content analysis was used to analyse the interviews, which were carried out between June and July 2004. Three themes were identified: the definition of intimate care, the emotional experience associated with providing intimate care and strategies used to assist in the delivery of intimate care for women clients. Providing intimate care for women clients was a challenging experience for male nurses. Participants described how it required them to invade these clients' personal space. Consequently, they often experienced various negative feelings and used several strategies to assist them during care delivery. Nurse educators should assist male nurses to be better prepared to interact with women clients in various settings. Furthermore, workplace environments need to provide additional support and guidance for male nurses to enable them to develop effective coping strategies to manage challenging situations.

  5. Clients' understanding of the role of nurse practitioners.

    PubMed

    Allnutt, Jane; Allnutt, Nissa; McMaster, Rose; O'Connell, Jane; Middleton, Sandy; Hillege, Sharon; Della, Phillip R; Gardner, Glenn E; Gardner, Anne

    2010-03-01

    Nurse practitioners (NPs) have an emerging role in the Australian health care system. However, there remains a dearth of data about public understanding of the NP role. The aim of this study was to evaluate clients' understanding of the role of the NP and their satisfaction with education received, quality of care and NP knowledge and skill. All authorised NPs working in a designated NP position in Western Australia and those working in three area health services in New South Wales were invited to recruit five consecutive clients to complete the self-administered survey. Thirty-two NPs (NP response rate 93%) recruited 129 clients (client response rate 90%). Two-thirds of clients (63%) were aware they were consulting an NP. The majority rated the following NP-related outcomes as 'excellent' or 'very good': education provided (89%); quality of care (95%); and knowledge and skill (93%). Less than half reported an understanding that NPs could prescribe medications (40.5%) or interpret X-rays (33.6%). Clients of NPs practising in a rural or remote setting were more likely than those in an urban setting to have previously consulted an NP (P = 0.005), and where applicable would to prefer to see an NP rather than a doctor (P = 0.022). Successful implementation and expansion of the NP role requires NP visibility in the community. Despite high levels of satisfaction, more awareness of the scope of the NP role is required.

  6. Characteristics of clients who receive home health aide service.

    PubMed

    Hays, B J; Willborn, E H

    1996-02-01

    Nurses who plan and supervise home health aide service must have a good understanding of the amount and intensity of nursing care and the amount of home health aide service that individual clients will need. However, there is little in the nursing literature that describes how clients who receive both RN and home health aide services differ from clients who receive only RN care. Indeed, there have been few reports on how need for home health aide service relates to the amount of nursing care received. Secondary analysis of data from a study on resource consumption in home care revealed that clients who receive home health aide service: 1) are older; 2) are more likely to be women; 3) have a higher rating using the Community Health Intensity Rating Scale; and 4) are discharged from the caseload due to death or institutionalization at a higher rate than those who receive only RN care. Clients who received both home health aide services and RN care needed assistance with activities of daily living, but they also required more RN care than did clients who received only RN care. These data hold implications for nurses in addressing agency staffing, focusing home health aide training, and advocating for resources to address service needs of this segment of their care population.

  7. Clinical writing about clients: is informed consent sufficient?

    PubMed

    Barnett, Jeffrey E

    2012-03-01

    The use of client information in clinical writings or presentations may be very helpful in advancing the knowledge base of the profession. Yet, the very act of asking a client for permission to use their treatment information in this way may be detrimental to the therapeutic alliance and treatment process. As such, great care must be taken in how such issues are considered and acted upon. Sieck's article (2011, Obtaining clinical writing informed consent versus using client disguise and recommendations for practice. Psychotherapy, 49, pp. 3-11.) on the use of informed consent for obtaining permission to use a client's treatment information for professional writing and presentations is examined and discussed. The nature and role of the informed consent process is accentuated; psychotherapist needs and goals and client vulnerabilities are each addressed in the context of the relevant sections of the APA Ethics Code and each psychotherapist's obligation to act only in ways consistent with each client's best interests. Recommendations for a thoughtful consideration of these issues are presented, consistent with Sieck's proposed decision-making process for use in these situations.

  8. Neuroscience exposure and perceptions of client responsibility among addictions counselors.

    PubMed

    Steenbergh, Timothy A; Runyan, Jason D; Daugherty, Douglas A; Winger, Joseph G

    2012-06-01

    Members of the National Association of Alcoholism and Drug Abuse Counselors (n = 231) participated in a survey concerning their view of the role of personal responsibility in addictions treatment and its relation to their exposure to neuroscience (i.e., the amount to which members considered themselves familiar with current neuroscience research). We used the two-dimensional model of responsibility (Responsible/not responsible for development × Responsible/not responsible for recovery) proposed by P. Brickman et al. (1982) to guide our assessment of responsibility, thus inquiring about counselors' views of clients' responsibility for both the development of a substance-related addiction and its resolution. Findings suggest that counselors rate biological factors as most influential in the development of an addiction and assign clients less personal responsibility for the development of an addiction than for recovery from an addiction. Counselors' level of neuroscience exposure was negatively correlated with their ratings of client responsibility for the development of an addiction but positively correlated to ratings of client responsibility for recovery. This suggests that counselors are integrating neuroscientific findings with what is learned from other modes of enquiry in a way that diminishes the view that clients are responsible for addiction development but accentuates the view that clients are responsible for recovery. We explore reasons for why this is and why this approach may be beneficial.

  9. Client knowledge, attitudes and practices regarding zoonoses: a metropolitan experience.

    PubMed

    Steele, S G; Mor, S M

    2015-12-01

    To assess knowledge, attitudes and practices in relation to zoonoses among pet owners. Questionnaire completed by 81 clients attending a small animal practice in Sydney, Australia. Most (64.5%) clients reported that they were not concerned about contracting a disease from their pet, but 7.9% and 3.9% of clients were a little or very concerned, respectively; 23.7% of clients stated that they had not considered the possibility. Although respondents indicated that they had heard of a number of zoonoses, knowledge of animal sources and exposure pathways was generally low, particularly for the more important zoonoses in Australia such as toxoplasmosis, psittacosis and Q fever. Only 37.0%, 12.3% and 11.1%, respectively, of clients had heard of these diseases. Most respondents (84.1%) indicated that they viewed veterinarians as having the primary responsibility for providing information about zoonoses, yet less than half (48.1%) recalled ever getting information from their veterinarian. Likewise, many respondents (48.1%) indicated that medical professionals played a role in providing information about zoonoses, yet less than one-quarter (23.5%) recalled ever getting information from their doctor. The low level of knowledge among pet owners about sources and exposure pathways indicates a need to strengthen communication between veterinarians, doctors and their clients around the possible risks of zoonoses and appropriate prevention strategies. © 2015 Australian Veterinary Association.

  10. NSLS-II HIGH LEVEL APPLICATION INFRASTRUCTURE AND CLIENT API DESIGN

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, G.; Yang; L.; Shroff; K.

    2011-03-28

    developers of APIs and how to use them to form a physics application to the users. For example, how the channels are related to magnet and what the current real-time setting of a magnet is in physics unit are the internals of APIs. Measuring chromaticities are the users of APIs. All the users of APIs are working with magnet and instrument names in a physics unit. The low level communications in current or voltage unit are minimized. In this paper, we discussed our recent progress of our infrastructure development, and client API.

  11. Real Forestry for Real Estate

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gagnon, Jennifer; Fisher, Jason

    2013-01-01

    Virginia is poised to see an unprecedented change in forest land ownership. To provide new landowners with information on sustainable forest management, we developed a two-part program, Real Forestry for Real Estate. First, we assembled New Landowner Packets, which contain a variety of sustainable forest management resources. Second, two…

  12. Real Forestry for Real Estate

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gagnon, Jennifer; Fisher, Jason

    2013-01-01

    Virginia is poised to see an unprecedented change in forest land ownership. To provide new landowners with information on sustainable forest management, we developed a two-part program, Real Forestry for Real Estate. First, we assembled New Landowner Packets, which contain a variety of sustainable forest management resources. Second, two…

  13. Maximising health literacy and client recall of clinical information: an exploratory study of clients and speech-language pathologists.

    PubMed

    von Wühlisch, Friderike Schmidt; Pascoe, Michelle

    2010-12-01

    Limited research has been carried out in the field of speech-language pathology with regard to ways of maximising health literacy and client recall. However, speech-language pathologists (SLPs) frequently provide vast amounts of information that clients need to understand, apply and review in order to manage their (or their child's) health. This exploratory study aimed to contribute information about ways in which SLPs can overcome low health literacy and poor client recall so that treatment effectiveness is improved. A case-study design was used with specific focus on four clients receiving treatment for dysphagia, voice disorders (including laryngectomies) and cleft lip and/or palate management in Cape Town. Strategies which may be able to maximise health literacy and client recall of clinical information were trialled and evaluated by clients and their SLPs, using semi-structured interviews. The researchers proposed a combination of high-tech strategies which assisted in all the cases. No single solution or universal tool was found that would be appropriate for all. There is a need to evaluate the long-term effectiveness of the combined strategies across a wider population, at different stages of rehabilitation and in diverse contexts. Implications and suggestions for future related research are presented.

  14. Clients' perspective on quality of audiology care: Development of the Consumer Quality Index (CQI) 'Audiology Care' for measuring client experiences.

    PubMed

    Hendriks, Michelle; Dahlhaus-Booij, Judith; Plass, Anne Marie

    2017-01-01

    Clients' perspective on the quality of audiology care has not been investigated thoroughly. Research has focused primarily on satisfaction with, and limitations of hearing aids. We developed a Consumer Quality Index (CQI) questionnaire 'Audiology Care' to systematically assess client experiences with audiology care. The CQI Audiology Care was developed in three steps: (1) posing open-ended questions through e-mail (n = 14), (2) two small-scale surveys assessing psychometric properties of the questionnaire (n = 188) and importance of quality aspects (n = 118), and (3) a large-scale survey (n = 1793) assessing psychometric properties and discriminatory power of the questionnaire. People with complex hearing impairments and/or balance and communicative disorders who visited an audiology care centre during the past year. Important quality aspects were translated into seven reliable scales: accommodation and facilities, employees' conduct and expertise, arrangement of appointments, waiting times, client participation and effectiveness of treatment. Client experiences differed among the participating centres concerning accommodation and facilities, arrangement of appointments, waiting times and client participation. The CQI Audiology Care is a valid and reliable instrument to assess clients' experiences with audiology care. Future implementation will reveal whether results can be used to monitor and improve the quality of audiology care.

  15. 34 CFR 377.1 - What is the Demonstration Projects to Increase Client Choice Program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What is the Demonstration Projects to Increase Client... PROJECTS TO INCREASE CLIENT CHOICE PROGRAM General § 377.1 What is the Demonstration Projects to Increase Client Choice Program? The Demonstration Projects to Increase Client Choice Program is designed to...

  16. 37 CFR 10.112 - Preserving identity of funds and property of client.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... and property of client. 10.112 Section 10.112 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights UNITED STATES PATENT... funds and property of client. (a) All funds of clients paid to a practitioner or a practitioner's firm... therein. (2) Funds belonging in part to a client and in part presently or potentially to the practitioner...

  17. 34 CFR 377.31 - What information must a grantee provide to eligible clients?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... clients? 377.31 Section 377.31 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education... PROJECTS TO INCREASE CLIENT CHOICE PROGRAM What Post-Award Conditions Must Be Met by a Grantee? § 377.31 What information must a grantee provide to eligible clients? Each grantee shall advise all clients and...

  18. 45 CFR 1621.4 - Complaints by clients about manner or quality of legal assistance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Complaints by clients about manner or quality of...) LEGAL SERVICES CORPORATION CLIENT GRIEVANCE PROCEDURES § 1621.4 Complaints by clients about manner or... clients about the manner or quality of legal assistance that has been rendered by the recipient to the...

  19. Meeting the Needs of Clients with Dissociative Identity Disorder: Considerations for Psychotherapy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ringrose, Jo L.

    2011-01-01

    Psychotherapy for clients with Dissociative Identity Disorder (DID) is different to therapy with most clients because these clients are multiple, comprising one or more host, and one or more alter personalities. The necessary components to be addressed in order that clients can live successfully either as a multiple or as an integrated person are…

  20. 37 CFR 10.57 - Preservation of confidences and secrets of a client.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... and secrets of a client. 10.57 Section 10.57 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights UNITED STATES PATENT... confidences and secrets of a client. (a) “Confidence” refers to information protected by the attorney-client or agent-client privilege under applicable law. “Secret” refers to other information gained in...

  1. 37 CFR 10.57 - Preservation of confidences and secrets of a client.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... and secrets of a client. 10.57 Section 10.57 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights UNITED STATES PATENT... confidences and secrets of a client. (a) “Confidence” refers to information protected by the attorney-client or agent-client privilege under applicable law. “Secret” refers to other information gained in...

  2. 37 CFR 10.57 - Preservation of confidences and secrets of a client.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... and secrets of a client. 10.57 Section 10.57 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights UNITED STATES PATENT... confidences and secrets of a client. (a) “Confidence” refers to information protected by the attorney-client or agent-client privilege under applicable law. “Secret” refers to other information gained in...

  3. Male Therapists' Clinical Bias: Influence of Client Gender Roles and Therapist Gender Role Conflict.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wisch, Andrew F.; Mahalik, James R.

    1999-01-01

    Examines male therapists' gender-role conflict, client sexual orientation, and client emotional expression as they interrelate with clinical judgments about male clients. Results indicate that therapist gender-role-conflict factors, in combination with client sexual orientation and emotional expression, were associated with therapists' ratings of…

  4. The Contribution of the Counselor-Client Working Alliance to Career Exploration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elad-Strenger, Julia; Littman-Ovadia, Hadassah

    2012-01-01

    This longitudinal study examines the effects of Israeli counselors' and clients' ratings of their working alliance on clients' career exploration (CE), using a sample of 94 three-session career counseling processes. Results reveal that both clients' and counselors' working alliance ratings increased over time; yet, clients' ratings remained…

  5. Meeting the Needs of Clients with Dissociative Identity Disorder: Considerations for Psychotherapy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ringrose, Jo L.

    2011-01-01

    Psychotherapy for clients with Dissociative Identity Disorder (DID) is different to therapy with most clients because these clients are multiple, comprising one or more host, and one or more alter personalities. The necessary components to be addressed in order that clients can live successfully either as a multiple or as an integrated person are…

  6. Counseling the HIV-Infected Client: A Psychosocial Model for Assessment and Intervention.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoffman, Mary Ann

    1991-01-01

    Presents model providing conceptual framework to help counselors assess client's resources for addressing psychosocial issues resulting from human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. Hypothesizes that four client resources (special characteristics, social supports, situation, and client characteristics) predict or moderate client's response to…

  7. The Contribution of the Counselor-Client Working Alliance to Career Exploration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elad-Strenger, Julia; Littman-Ovadia, Hadassah

    2012-01-01

    This longitudinal study examines the effects of Israeli counselors' and clients' ratings of their working alliance on clients' career exploration (CE), using a sample of 94 three-session career counseling processes. Results reveal that both clients' and counselors' working alliance ratings increased over time; yet, clients' ratings remained…

  8. Using Client Satisfaction to Improve Case Management Services for the Elderly

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hsieh, Chang-Ming

    2006-01-01

    Although client satisfaction has long been an important form of program evaluation, one of the major limitations regarding client satisfaction studies has been the inability to provide concrete feedback for service providers. This study describes the use of a client-centered approach to developing a client satisfaction measure for a case…

  9. Real-World Problem Solving in Freshman-Sophomore Engineering.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pavelich, Michael J.; And Others

    1995-01-01

    In an integrated four-course sequence, Colorado School of Mines engineering and science students work on open-ended, real-world problems prepared by government agencies and private companies that interact as clients with student teams. The program fosters intellectual development, teamwork, and communication skills. (Author/MSE)

  10. GET REAL!

    EPA Science Inventory

    Combined sewer overflow (CSO) is a significant source of pollution in receiving waters. However, implementing a real-time control scheme operates automatic regulators more efficiently to maximize a collection system's storage, treatment, and transport capacities, reducing the vol...

  11. Privacy preserving, real-time and location secured biometrics for mCommerce authentication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuseler, Torben; Al-Assam, Hisham; Jassim, Sabah; Lami, Ihsan A.

    2011-06-01

    Secure wireless connectivity between mobile devices and financial/commercial establishments is mature, and so is the security of remote authentication for mCommerce. However, the current techniques are open for hacking, false misrepresentation, replay and other attacks. This is because of the lack of real-time and current-precise-location in the authentication process. This paper proposes a new technique that includes freshly-generated real-time personal biometric data of the client and present-position of the mobile device used by the client to perform the mCommerce so to form a real-time biometric representation to authenticate any remote transaction. A fresh GPS fix generates the "time and location" to stamp the biometric data freshly captured to produce a single, real-time biometric representation on the mobile device. A trusted Certification Authority (CA) acts as an independent authenticator of such client's claimed realtime location and his/her provided fresh biometric data. Thus eliminates the necessity of user enrolment with many mCommerce services and application providers. This CA can also "independently from the client" and "at that instant of time" collect the client's mobile device "time and location" from the cellular network operator so to compare with the received information, together with the client's stored biometric information. Finally, to preserve the client's location privacy and to eliminate the possibility of cross-application client tracking, this paper proposes shielding the real location of the mobile device used prior to submission to the CA or authenticators.

  12. Request queues for interactive clients in a shared file system of a parallel computing system

    SciTech Connect

    Bent, John M.; Faibish, Sorin

    2015-08-18

    Interactive requests are processed from users of log-in nodes. A metadata server node is provided for use in a file system shared by one or more interactive nodes and one or more batch nodes. The interactive nodes comprise interactive clients to execute interactive tasks and the batch nodes execute batch jobs for one or more batch clients. The metadata server node comprises a virtual machine monitor; an interactive client proxy to store metadata requests from the interactive clients in an interactive client queue; a batch client proxy to store metadata requests from the batch clients in a batch client queue; and a metadata server to store the metadata requests from the interactive client queue and the batch client queue in a metadata queue based on an allocation of resources by the virtual machine monitor. The metadata requests can be prioritized, for example, based on one or more of a predefined policy and predefined rules.

  13. The young chronic client in mental health today.

    PubMed

    Brunger, J B

    1986-09-01

    Due to the nature of the work with this demanding population, who, in spite of all efforts, demonstrates only minimal changes at best, nurses need aggressive management of their own lives. Burnout is rampant. Work with this type of client is not for everyone. Programs need to offer staff the opportunity to work with these clients only if the staff is capable and desires the challenge. It is necessary to set realistic goals and expectations with clients and to learn to accept tiny changes. Nurses must help the client become more realistic in their expectations of what will be achieved. It is important to note that the therapist may scare the client into regressed behavior by being too hopeful, by pushing them too far too fast, and by allowing them to go too fast. Caution should be taken with respect to encouragement and expectations of normalcy. If goals are too high and the client "fails," the therapist perceives that he/she is the one who failed. The patient who manages to achieve a level of functioning that enables him to interface with the outside often finds a world that is cold, demanding, and cruel--one that is easier to escape from than to deal with. One must be flexible and accessible to the client--involved with honest detachment. For the nurse therapist to serve this population requires sophistication in the theories of child and adolescent suicide, crisis intervention, aggression management, chemical abuse and use, and the ability to negotiate housing, money, food, services--things which have previously been the domain of others.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  14. Real-time flight test data distribution and display

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nesel, Michael C.; Hammons, Kevin R.

    1988-01-01

    Enhancements to the real-time processing and display systems of the NASA Western Aeronautical Test Range are described. Display processing has been moved out of the telemetry and radar acquisition processing systems super-minicomputers into user/client interactive graphic workstations. Real-time data is provided to the workstations by way of Ethernet. Future enhancement plans include use of fiber optic cable to replace the Ethernet.

  15. Participatory citizenship: Critical perspectives on client-centred occupational therapy.

    PubMed

    Fransen, Hetty; Pollard, Nick; Kantartzis, Sarah; Viana-Moldes, Inés

    2015-07-01

    This article aims to discuss client-centred practice, the current dominant approach within occupational therapy, in relation to participatory citizenship. Occupational therapists work within structures and policies that set boundaries on their engagement with clients, while working with complex, multidimensional social realities. The authors present a critical discussion shaped by their research, including a survey, discussions at workshops at international conferences, and critical engagement with the literature on occupational therapy, occupation, and citizenship. A focus on citizenship suggests reframing professional development based on the participation in public life of people as citizens of their society. While occupational therapists often refer to clients in the context of communities, groups, families, and wider society, the term client-centred practice typically represents a particular view of the individual and may sometimes be too limited in application for a more systemic and societal approach. The authors question the individual focus which has, until recently, been typical of client-centred occupational therapy. Placing citizenship at the core of intervention is a transformative process that assumes all people are citizens and conceives of health as a collective issue, influencing the way we educate, do research, and practise.

  16. Client-centred occupational therapy: the importance of critical perspectives.

    PubMed

    Whalley Hammell, Karen R

    2015-07-01

    The occupational therapy profession has proclaimed itself to be client-centred for over 30 years, but until recently this assertion remained largely unchallenged. Critical thinkers, who have begun to explore client-centred practice in occupational therapy, highlight the necessity for further critical reflection. This paper aims to define what constitutes "critical" thinking; and to persuade occupational therapists of the importance of employing critical perspectives towards the profession's assumptions and assertions regarding occupational therapy's "client-centred" practices. Critical thinking is not solely a process of carefully and thoughtfully weighing various arguments or evidence, but of additionally appraising the ideological and structural contexts in which these positions or evidence have arisen. Critical perspectives towards occupational therapy's client-centred practices identify the ways in which power is exercised by the profession, and culturally specific and disabling ideologies are perpetuated. Critical thinking enables occupational therapists to reflect on their own inequitable access to privilege and power, and reduces the potential for the profession to re-inscribe dominant ideologies that devalue disabled people and justify their inequitable opportunities. Because critical thinking demands a readiness to restructure one's thinking, and decreases the risk of acting on faulty assumptions, it is an essential component of client-centred practice.

  17. Determining client cognitive status following mild traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Hobson, Elizabeth; Lannin, Natasha A; Taylor, Amelia; Farquhar, Michelle; Morarty, Jacqui; Unsworth, Carolyn

    2016-01-01

    People with mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) commonly experience cognitive impairments. Occupational therapists working in acute general hospitals in Australia routinely access client Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) scores, and assess cognitive status using standardized tools and by observing basic activity of daily living (ADL) performance. However, limited evidence exists to identify the best assessment(s) to determine client cognitive status. To determine whether cognitive status assessed by GCS score and the Cognistat are predictive of basic ADL performance among clients with mTBI in an acute general hospital and make inferences concerning the clinical utility of these assessment tools. Retrospective analysis of medical record data on demographics, Cognistat, GCS, and modified Barthel Index (MBI) using descriptive statistics, chi-square tests and linear regression. Data analysis of 166 participants demonstrated that no associations exist between GCS and Cognistat scores, or Cognistat scores and MBI dependency level. The presence of co-morbid multi-trauma injuries and length of stay were the only variables that significantly predicted MBI dependency level. While the MBI scores are of value in identifying clients with difficulty in basic ADLs, Cognistat and GCS scores are of limited use in differentiating client levels of cognitive impairment and the authors caution against the routine administration of the Cognistat following mTBI. Further research is required to identify more suitable assessments for use with a mTBI population.

  18. Scalable TCP-friendly Video Distribution for Heterogeneous Clients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zink, Michael; Griwodz, Carsten; Schmitt, Jens; Steinmetz, Ralf

    2003-01-01

    This paper investigates an architecture and implementation for the use of a TCP-friendly protocol in a scalable video distribution system for hierarchically encoded layered video. The design supports a variety of heterogeneous clients, because recent developments have shown that access network and client capabilities differ widely in today's Internet. The distribution system presented here consists of videos servers, proxy caches and clients that make use of a TCP-friendly rate control (TFRC) to perform congestion controlled streaming of layer encoded video. The data transfer protocol of the system is RTP compliant, yet it integrates protocol elements for congestion control with protocols elements for retransmission that is necessary for lossless transfer of contents into proxy caches. The control protocol RTSP is used to negotiate capabilities, such as support for congestion control or retransmission. By tests performed with our experimental platform in a lab test and over the Internet, we show that congestion controlled streaming of layer encoded video through proxy caches is a valid means of supporting heterogeneous clients. We show that filtering of layers depending on a TFRC-controlled permissible bandwidth allows the preferred delivery of the most relevant layers to end-systems while additional layers can be delivered to the cache server. We experiment with uncontrolled delivery from the proxy cache to the client as well, which may result in random loss and bandwidth waste but also a higher goodput, and compare these two approaches.

  19. Examining Challenging Behaviors of Clients with Borderline Personality Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Chalker, Samantha A.; Carmel, Adam; Atkins, David C.; Landes, Sara J.; Kerbrat, Amanda H.; Comtois, Katherine Anne

    2015-01-01

    Few studies have examined effects of challenging behaviors of clients with borderline personality disorder (BPD) on psychotherapy outcomes. Dialectical behavior therapy (DBT) is an evidence-based treatment designed to treat chronic suicidality, self-directed violence (SDV), and emotion dysregulation, while targeting challenging behaviors. DBT has been shown to be effective with clients with BPD. We evaluated whether therapist reported challenging behaviors, such as high volume phone contacts or violating the therapist’s limits, during DBT would be associated with dropping out of DBT, severity and frequency of SDV, emotion regulation deficits, and client’s and therapist’s satisfaction of treatment. The current study examined challenging behaviors reported by therapists in a sample of 63 psychiatrically disabled outpatient DBT clients diagnosed with BPD (73% women, average age 37 years). More frequent phone contacts were associated with a decrease in dropout and psychological symptoms, and an increase in client and therapist satisfaction. More avoidance/disengagement behavior was associated with more than twice the risk of SDV and a decrease in therapist satisfaction. Findings suggest that the phone coaching might serve to maximize client satisfaction and reduce the likelihood of dropout. PMID:26496225

  20. Client/server models for transparent, distributed computational resources

    SciTech Connect

    Hammer, K.E.; Gilman, T.L.

    1991-01-01

    Client/server models are proposed to address issues of shared resources in a distributed, heterogeneous UNIX environment. Recent development of automated Remote Procedure Call (RPC) interface generator has simplified the development of client/server models. Previously, implementation of the models was only possible at the UNIX socket level. An overview of RPCs and the interface generator will be presented and will include a discussion of generation and installation of remote services, the RPC paradigm, and the three levels of RPC programming. Two applications, the Nuclear Plant Analyzer (NPA) and a fluids simulation using molecular modelling, will be presented to demonstrate how client/server models using RPCs and External Data Representations (XDR) have been used production/computation situations. The NPA incorporates a client/server interface for transferring/translation of TRAC or RELAP results from the UNICOS Cray to a UNIX workstation. The fluids simulation program utilizes the client/server model to access the Cray via a single function allowing it to become a shared co-processor to the workstation application. 5 refs., 6 figs.

  1. Being empathetic: benefits and challenges for the clinician and client.

    PubMed

    Abbott Moore, Lisa

    2010-01-01

    This article explores the meaning of empathy and how it influences clinicians in their personal and professional lives. Empathy may benefit client and clinician by improving patient satisfaction and pain management, reducing medical errors, and helping to keep clinicians grounded in the priorities of patient care. The cultural and developmental origins and neural basis of empathy are reviewed to provide insight into how a clinician's and client's emotions can interact and influence each other. Methods for cultivating and communicating empathetic responses in the clinical setting are provided, including ways of identifying and dealing with difficult clients. Concepts such as attunement, emotional labor, and parallel emotions are explained. The limitations to empathy and potential challenges or difficulties for the clinician are also explored, along with possible solutions. Narratives from the author's personal and professional life are included to illustrate how a clinician's emotions can play a significant part in interactions with clients. This discussion shows that clinicians must combine both evidenced-based practice and empathy in their interactions with clients to achieve the professional goal of high-quality care.

  2. Maximizing health literacy and client recall in a developing context: speech-language therapist and client perspectives.

    PubMed

    von Wühlisch, Friderike Schmidt; Pascoe, Michelle

    2011-01-01

    In the field of speech-language therapy, limited research has been conducted with regards to health literacy and client recall. However, speech-language therapists frequently provide a considerable amount of information for clients to understand, apply and review in order to manage their (or their child's) health. This study aimed to investigate (1) issues around clients' health literacy and recall of information; and (2) how these issues can be overcome in speech-language therapy in a developing context. An exploratory study was undertaken with specific focus on speech-language therapists and their clients who had previously received treatment for dysphagia, voice disorders (including laryngectomies), and cleft lip and/or palate management. They were recruited at public tertiary hospitals and primary healthcare clinics in Cape Town, South Africa. Data were gathered through focus group discussions and qualitatively analysed using a content-driven immersion/crystallization style. Five themes and 13 subthemes were identified. Speech-language therapists currently use mostly low-technology strategies to manage issues of health literacy and client recall, and frequently view poor outcomes as being related to clients themselves and a lack of compliance. An understanding of context, intercultural health literacy and client-provider concordance are important factors that should inform the clinical practice of speech-language therapy. There is a need to develop effective strategies for information provision and review post-consultation. Speech-language therapists have an important mediating role in cross-cultural communication. © 2011 Royal College of Speech & Language Therapists.

  3. Does Motivational Interviewing (MI) Work with Nonaddicted Clients? A Controlled Study Measuring the Effects of a Brief Training in MI on Client Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Tabitha L.; Gutierrez, Daniel; Hagedorn, W. Bryce

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated the relationships between motivational interviewing (MI) and client symptoms, attendance, and satisfaction. Seventy-nine clients attending a university-based counseling center were purposefully assigned to treatment or control conditions. Statistical analyses revealed client symptoms in both groups improved. However,…

  4. Does Motivational Interviewing (MI) Work with Nonaddicted Clients? A Controlled Study Measuring the Effects of a Brief Training in MI on Client Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Tabitha L.; Gutierrez, Daniel; Hagedorn, W. Bryce

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated the relationships between motivational interviewing (MI) and client symptoms, attendance, and satisfaction. Seventy-nine clients attending a university-based counseling center were purposefully assigned to treatment or control conditions. Statistical analyses revealed client symptoms in both groups improved. However,…

  5. A client/server database system for project evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Brule, M.R.; Fair, W.B.; Jiang, J.; Sanvido, R.D.

    1994-12-31

    PETS (Project Evaluation Tool Set) is a networked client/server system that provides a full set of decision-support tools for evaluating the business potential of onshore and offshore development projects. This distributed workgroup computing system combines and streamlines preliminary design, routine cost estimation, economic evaluation, and risk analysis for conceptual developments as well as for ongoing projects and operations. A flexible and extendible client/server integration framework links in-house and third-party software applications with a database and an expert-system knowledgebase, and, where appropriate, links the applications among themselves. The capability and richness of inexpensive commercial operating systems and off-the-shelf applications have made building a client/server system like PETS possible in a relatively short time and at low cost. We will discuss the object-oriented design of the PETS system, detail its capabilities, and outline the methods used to integrate applications from other domains.

  6. Web-client based distributed generalization and geoprocessing

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wolf, E.B.; Howe, K.

    2009-01-01

    Generalization and geoprocessing operations on geospatial information were once the domain of complex software running on high-performance workstations. Currently, these computationally intensive processes are the domain of desktop applications. Recent efforts have been made to move geoprocessing operations server-side in a distributed, web accessible environment. This paper initiates research into portable client-side generalization and geoprocessing operations as part of a larger effort in user-centered design for the US Geological Survey's The National Map. An implementation of the Ramer-Douglas-Peucker (RDP) line simplification algorithm was created in the open source OpenLayers geoweb client. This algorithm implementation was benchmarked using differing data structures and browser platforms. The implementation and results of the benchmarks are discussed in the general context of client-side geoprocessing. (Abstract).

  7. Helpful and unhelpful therapy experiences of LGBT clients.

    PubMed

    Israel, Tania; Gorcheva, Raya; Burnes, Theodore R; Walther, William A

    2008-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify a broad range of variables that characterize the helpful and unhelpful therapy experiences of lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) individuals. Interviews were completed with a diverse sample of 42 LGBT individuals who have been in therapy, and a content analysis was conducted. Results indicated that basic counseling skills and relationships were key determinants of the quality of LGBT clients' therapy experiences. Also important to the helpfulness of the therapy experience were therapist variables such as professional background and attitudes toward client sexual orientation/gender identity; client variables such as stage of identity development, health status, and social support; and environmental factors such as confidentiality of the therapy setting.

  8. High-Yield Secretion of Multiple Client Proteins in Aspergillus

    SciTech Connect

    Segato, F.; Damasio, A. R. L.; Goncalves, T. A.; de Lucas, R. C.; Squina, F. M.; Decker, S. R.; Prade, R. A.

    2012-07-15

    Production of pure and high-yield client proteins is an important technology that addresses the need for industrial applications of enzymes as well as scientific experiments in protein chemistry and crystallization. Fungi are utilized in industrial protein production because of their ability to secrete large quantities of proteins. In this study, we engineered a high-expression-secretion vector, pEXPYR that directs proteins towards the extracellular medium in two Aspergillii host strains, examine the effect of maltose-induced over-expression and protein secretion as well as time and pH-dependent protein stability in the medium. We describe five client proteins representing a core set of hemicellulose degrading enzymes that accumulated up to 50-100 mg/L of protein. Using a recyclable genetic marker that allows serial insertion of multiple genes, simultaneous hyper-secretion of three client proteins in a single host strain was accomplished.

  9. Client retention and health among sex workers in Nairobi, Kenya.

    PubMed

    Izugbara, Chimaraoke O

    2012-12-01

    It is still a small body of research that directly addresses female sex workers' relationships with their regular commercial male partners. I used ethnographic data from Nairobi, Kenya to interrogate motivations and strategies for recruiting and retaining regular male clients among female sex workers (FSWs). Regular commercial male partners, popularly called customer care, wera or wesh by Nairobi's FSWs, played diverse roles in their lives. Client retention enabled sex workers to manage the risk of reduced marriage prospects, guaranteed them steady work, livelihoods, and incomes, and prevented their victimization and harassment. To retain clients, sex workers obliged them a great deal, pretended they had quit prostitution, and sometimes resorted to magical practices. However, these strategies were also accompanied by risks that reinforced the vulnerability of sex workers. Lack of critical attention to sex workers' practices for managing perceived risks in their particular type of work may hamper current programmatic efforts to make their job safer.

  10. High-yield secretion of multiple client proteins in Aspergillus.

    PubMed

    Segato, Fernando; Damásio, André R L; Gonçalves, Thiago A; de Lucas, Rosymar C; Squina, Fabio M; Decker, Stephen R; Prade, Rolf A

    2012-07-15

    Production of pure and high-yield client proteins is an important technology that addresses the need for industrial applications of enzymes as well as scientific experiments in protein chemistry and crystallization. Fungi are utilized in industrial protein production because of their ability to secrete large quantities of proteins. In this study, we engineered a high-expression-secretion vector, pEXPYR that directs proteins towards the extracellular medium in two Aspergillii host strains, examine the effect of maltose-induced over-expression and protein secretion as well as time and pH-dependent protein stability in the medium. We describe five client proteins representing a core set of hemicellulose degrading enzymes that accumulated up to 50-100 mg/L of protein. Using a recyclable genetic marker that allows serial insertion of multiple genes, simultaneous hyper-secretion of three client proteins in a single host strain was accomplished. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Control in chronic condition self-care management: how it occurs in the health worker-client relationship and implications for client empowerment.

    PubMed

    Lawn, Sharon; Delany, Toni; Sweet, Linda; Battersby, Malcolm; Skinner, Timothy C

    2014-02-01

    To examine health worker-client interactions during care planning to understand processes that foster client empowerment and disempowerment. It is unclear how health worker-client exchanges and information sharing through chronic condition care planning currently operate in primary health care. Moreover, it is unclear how control in these exchanges either enhances collaborative decision-making, partnership and client empowerment, or works to create client disempowerment and dependency on workers and health services. Critical discourse analysis of qualitative data from ethnographic observations and audio-taped worker-client consultations. Multidisciplinary teams in two Australian community-based primary healthcare sites participated. This included nurses, general practitioners and allied health workers and their clients who had a chronic condition care plan. Nineteen worker-client consultations were observed/recorded in 2011. Control was expressed through multiple processes inherent in the worker role and in their interactions with clients. When workers exercised disproportionate control and clients relinquished their own control, client disempowerment and dependency were evident. Clients' attempts to gain control and workers' attempts to relinquish control alleviated clients' disempowerment and dependency. However, structural features of information sharing systems and workers' care planning behaviours diminished such efforts. Worker awareness of their communication style and the power of their role must improve for client chronic condition self-care management to be achieved. Training on the impacts of control in worker communication and systems where they work must be provided if unbeneficial forms of client dependency are to be overcome and true self-care management is to be realized. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Indigenous clients intersecting with mainstream nursing: a reflection.

    PubMed

    Trueman, Scott

    2017-01-01

    Mental health care for Australian Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people living in rural and remote locations is delivered primarily by nurses. Culturally safe therapeutic interventions can promote understanding and improve care. Reflective knowledge thinking, writing and practice can support nurses to practice cultural safety. Two instances of mental health care for Australian Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander clients are described in this reflective piece of writing. The care provided in both instances was culturally inappropriate and/or inadequate. I was an agent or observer in both cases, which happened during my employment as a mental health nurse in Australia. The first story, 'the traumatisation of Client A' describes an instance where I, from a place of ignorance, acted without cultural sensitivity and knowledge. I restrained and observed a client in a way that accorded with workplace policy but, at the same time, failed to take into account the circumstances and cultural safety of my client. The second story, 'the misunderstandings about Client B', occurred much later in my career. This time, I engaged with the client, acted with cultural safety, listened to his story and was able to clear up misunderstandings surrounding his presentation to hospital. The two events described in this article led me to discover the nurse I was then and the nurse I have become now. In comparing the two events and my level of awareness and understanding of Aboriginal peoples, along with my own actions, I reflect on my own journey of discovery, which has informed and shaped my awareness as a culturally safe and more sensitive nurse.

  13. Visual functioning in nursing home residents: information in client records.

    PubMed

    Sinoo, Marianne M; Kort, Helianthe S M; Duijnstee, Mia S H

    2012-07-01

    To improve (eye)care in nursing homes by reporting and assessing visual functioning to enhance professional caregivers' awareness of visual problems. Older adults experience visual problems owing to biological ageing or eye disease. In the Netherlands, the prevalence of visual impairments is the highest in the subgroup of nursing home residents (41.3%). These impairments influence quality of life in terms of limiting daily activities and participation in social activities. Furthermore, 63% of visual problems are defined as 'avoidable blindness'. For this reason, screening of visual functioning in the nursing home is of major importance. Moreover, visual functioning should also be taken into account to prevent the incidence of falls. A field study on recorded information of visual functioning and visual assessment in nursing homes. Assessment of visual functioning of 259 residents in nursing homes. Subsequently, recorded information in client files is related to the assessment outcome. Only in 101 (39%) of the 259 client records was some information on visual functioning found in client files. Whether a prescription for new glasses was dispensed made no difference in reporting on visual functioning in the client record. In more than half of the cases assessed as 'low vision or blindness', no information about visual functioning was found. Furthermore, no information was found in 31% (80/259) cases of suspected visual problems (referrals). A significant proportion of client records (p < 0.05) showed no recorded information in cases of referral for further check-up. In this study, one-third of nursing homes residents have visual problems, needing examination by an ophthalmologist. Problems with visual functioning should be assessed and captured in client records. Awareness of residents' visual functioning is a prerequisite for adapting basic daily care to the residents' needs. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  14. Accessing patient assistance programs to meet clients' medication needs.

    PubMed

    Williams, K

    2000-06-01

    The high cost of medication is a barrier to patient compliance. Nurse practitioners can access patient assistance programs to assist low-income clients to obtain medications, empowering them to take action to improve their health. At Health Care Access, a primary care clinic serving low-income, uninsured persons, approximately $150,000 worth of medications were obtained through patient assistance programs in 1997, compared to the total clinic budget of $189,000. Processes for obtaining prescription drugs vary between pharmaceutical companies. An understanding of these types of programs provides nurse practitioners access to these resources for their clients.

  15. A brain-computer interface controlled mail client.

    PubMed

    Yu, Tianyou; Li, Yuanqing; Long, Jinyi; Wang, Cong

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a brain-computer interface (BCI) based mail client. This system is controlled by hybrid features extracted from scalp-recorded electroencephalographic (EEG). We emulate the computer mouse by the motor imagery-based mu rhythm and the P300 potential. Furthermore, an adaptive P300 speller is included to provide text input function. With this BCI mail client, users can receive, read, write mails, as well as attach files in mail writing. The system has been tested on 3 subjects. Experimental results show that mail communication with this system is feasible.

  16. Treatment of Deaf Clients: Ethical Considerations for Professionals in Psychology

    PubMed Central

    Boness, Cassandra L.

    2016-01-01

    Providing therapy to deaf clients raises important ethical considerations for psychologists related to competence; multiple relationships and boundary issues; confidentiality; assessment, diagnosis, and evaluation; and communication and using interpreters. In evaluating and addressing these, psychologists must consider the APA’s Ethics Code and other relevant issues (e.g., ADA) necessary to provide ethical treatment. The current article provides background, ethical considerations, principles and standards relevant to the treatment of deaf clients, and recommendations to support psychologists, training programs, and the field. Psychologists have the responsibility to guarantee that the benefits of mental health treatment are fairly and justly provided to this traditionally underserved population. PMID:27917030

  17. Clients or citizens? Some considerations for primary care organisations.

    PubMed Central

    Cawston, Peter G; Barbour, Rosaline S

    2003-01-01

    Health services policy in the United Kingdom has given prominence to patient and public participation within a 'modernization' agenda. The superficial consensus in support of lay participation masks a conflicting array of ideologies and theoretical perspectives that colour how this is interpreted. Both client-oriented perspectives and citizenship-oriented approaches are limited by the dynamics of power relationships and decision-making processes within National Health Service structures. Primary care organisations offer the possibility of developing structures for providing closer collaboration between citizens and services. In order to achieve this, however, vague processes of client representation need to be replaced by robust community-based participatory action research models. PMID:15103881

  18. Clients or citizens? Some considerations for primary care organisations.

    PubMed

    Cawston, Peter G; Barbour, Rosaline S

    2003-09-01

    Health services policy in the United Kingdom has given prominence to patient and public participation within a 'modernization' agenda. The superficial consensus in support of lay participation masks a conflicting array of ideologies and theoretical perspectives that colour how this is interpreted. Both client-oriented perspectives and citizenship-oriented approaches are limited by the dynamics of power relationships and decision-making processes within National Health Service structures. Primary care organisations offer the possibility of developing structures for providing closer collaboration between citizens and services. In order to achieve this, however, vague processes of client representation need to be replaced by robust community-based participatory action research models.

  19. Understanding, eliciting and negotiating clients' multicultural health beliefs.

    PubMed

    Jackson, L E

    1993-04-01

    People of many cultures explain and treat illness in ways that are different from and that may conflict with the biomedical beliefs and practices on which the American health care system is based. Eliciting clients' health beliefs and negotiating treatment plans with them can help avoid problems caused by discrepancies in belief systems. This article presents three major categories of belief systems commonly found in the United States as well as other countries. Questions designed to discover clients' health beliefs are included, along with guidelines for arriving at plans of care that accommodate those beliefs. Case studies are provided that illustrate this process of negotiation.

  20. Clients' relational conceptions of conjoint couple and family therapy quality: a grounded formal theory.

    PubMed

    Chenail, Ronald J; George, Sally St; Wulff, Dan; Duffy, Maureen; Scott, Karen Wilson; Tomm, Karl

    2012-01-01

    Based upon a qualitative metasynthesis of 49 articles centered on clients' experiences of their conjoint couple and family therapy, the investigators constructed a grounded formal theory of Clients' Relational Conceptions of Conjoint Couple and Family Therapy Quality. The theory suggests from pretherapy conceptions to posttherapy reflections, clients' perceptions of conjoint couple and family therapy quality appear to consist of clients' constructed meanings regarding a series of interrelated relationships between clients and their therapists and therapy environments, between clients and themselves, between clients and other family members, and between process and outcome both inside and outside therapy. Within and across these relationships, clients appear to focus on expectations, connections, balance, and change when evaluating the quality of their clinical experiences. Based upon this theory, the investigators recommend that researchers continue to explore this clinical phenomenon and that therapists regularly seek clients' conceptions of quality in therapy. © 2011 American Association for Marriage and Family Therapy.

  1. Community as client: environmental issues in the real world. A SimCity computer simulation.

    PubMed

    Bareford, C G

    2001-01-01

    The ability to think critically has become a crucial part of professional practice and education. SimCity, a popular computer simulation game, provides an opportunity to practice community assessment and interventions using a systems approach. SimCity is an interactive computer simulation game in which the player takes an active part in community planning. SimCity is supported on either a Windows 95/98 or a Macintosh platform and is available on CD-ROM at retail stores or at www.simcity.com. Students complete a tutorial and then apply a selected scenario in SimCity. Scenarios consist of hypothetical communities that have varying types and degrees of environmental problems, e.g., traffic, crime, nuclear meltdown, flooding, fire, and earthquakes. In problem solving with the simulated scenarios, students (a) identify systems and subsystems within the community that are critical factors impacting the environmental health of the community, (b) create changes in the systems and subsystems in an effort to solve the environmental health problem, and (c) evaluate the effectiveness of interventions based on the game score, demographic and fiscal data, and amount of community support. Because the consequences of planned intervention are part of the simulation, nursing students are able to develop critical-thinking skills. The simulation provides essential content in community planning in an interesting and interactive format.

  2. Real Heroes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Denenberg, Dennis

    2001-01-01

    Presents stories taken from the book, "50 American Heroes Every Kid Should Meet," explaining that children need to learn about the value of real-life human accomplishments (versus those of athletes, television personalities, and rock stars). The heroes include Elizabeth Blackwell, first American woman doctor; George C. Marshall,…

  3. Real Heroes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Denenberg, Dennis

    2001-01-01

    Presents stories taken from the book, "50 American Heroes Every Kid Should Meet," explaining that children need to learn about the value of real-life human accomplishments (versus those of athletes, television personalities, and rock stars). The heroes include Elizabeth Blackwell, first American woman doctor; George C. Marshall,…

  4. Effective Strategies for Nurses Empowering Clients With Schizophrenia: Medication Use as a Tool in Recovery

    PubMed Central

    Mahone, Irma H.; Maphis, Chris Fasching; Snow, Diane E.

    2016-01-01

    Clients with schizophrenia require maintenance treatment with antipsychotic medication and psychosocial therapy to maintain symptom control. Rates of medication adherence or follow-through are low in clients with schizophrenia. This increases the risk of relapse and contributes to poor quality of life. As educators and advisers, psychiatric nurses can collaborate with clients to improve adherence and other outcomes using shared decision-making techniques and tools that engage and empower clients to actively participate in decisions about their treatment. This article outlines effective strategies used by psychiatric nurses to improve outcomes in clients with schizophrenia and uses a case example for demonstrating this strategy in a client with schizophrenia. PMID:27111300

  5. Effective Strategies for Nurses Empowering Clients With Schizophrenia: Medication Use as a Tool in Recovery.

    PubMed

    Mahone, Irma H; Maphis, Chris Fasching; Snow, Diane E

    2016-05-01

    Clients with schizophrenia require maintenance treatment with antipsychotic medication and psychosocial therapy to maintain symptom control. Rates of medication adherence or follow-through are low in clients with schizophrenia. This increases the risk of relapse and contributes to poor quality of life. As educators and advisers, psychiatric nurses can collaborate with clients to improve adherence and other outcomes using shared decision-making techniques and tools that engage and empower clients to actively participate in decisions about their treatment. This article outlines effective strategies used by psychiatric nurses to improve outcomes in clients with schizophrenia and uses a case example for demonstrating this strategy in a client with schizophrenia.

  6. The influence of client socioeconomic status on psychotherapists' attributional biases and countertransference reactions.

    PubMed

    Dougall, Jennifer L; Schwartz, Robert C

    2011-01-01

    Clinical reaction related to client socioeconomic status has not been adequately researched, yet socioeconomic status can profoundly affect psychotherapist perceptions of a client's presenting concerns, symptom severity, and prognosis. Using an online national survey, this study examined the influence of client socioeconomic status on psychotherapist cognitive attributions and countertransference reactions (N = 141). Results revealed no significant differences in cognitive attributions based on socioeconomic status. However, significantly stronger countertransference reactions of being dominated by the client with a higher socioeconomic status were found. In addition, the clients with higher socioeconomic status were ascribed with mild problems compared with the client of lower socioeconomic status. Psychotherapeutic implications are discussed.

  7. Promoting participation in organizational decision making by clients with severe mental illness.

    PubMed

    Linhorst, Donald M; Eckert, Anne; Hamilton, Gary

    2005-01-01

    This qualitative study assessed clients' participation in organizational decision making in a public long-term psychiatric hospital. Numerous examples were found in which clients meaningfully participated in the decision-making process and achieved favorable policy changes. Three means of involving clients were found to be especially useful: (1) using a consumer council, (2) involving clients in the formal policy review process, and (3) including clients in the hospital's performance improvement system. The authors offer guidelines for mental health organizations wishing to promote client participation in organizational decision making. Implications for social work are discussed.

  8. The client-centred approach as experienced by male neurological rehabilitation clients in occupational therapy. A qualitative study based on a grounded theory tradition.

    PubMed

    Van de Velde, Dominique; Devisch, Ignaas; De Vriendt, Patricia

    2016-08-01

    Purpose To explore the perspectives of male clients in a neurological rehabilitation setting with regard to the occupational therapy they have received and the client-centred approach. Method This study involved a qualitative research design based on the grounded theory tradition. Individual in-depth interviews were used to collect data. Data were analysed using a constant comparative method. Seven male participants from an inpatient neurological setting were included using a theoretical sampling technique. Results Three themes emerged to describe the approach of the therapists to client-centred practice: (a) a shared biomedical focus as the start of the rehabilitation process, (b) the un-simultaneous shift from a biomedical towards a psycho-social focus and (c) formal versus informal nature of gathering client information. Conclusion A client-centred approach entails a shift from the therapist focussing on recovery from the short-term neurological issues towards the long-term consequences of the disease. According to the client, this shift in reasoning must occur at a specific and highly subjective moment during the rehabilitation process. Identifying this moment could strengthen the client-centred approach. Implications for Rehabilitation Client-centred practice entails a shift from recovering the short-term neurological issues towards the long-term psycho-social consequences of the disease. To be effective in client-centred practice, the clients expect from the professional to be an authority with regard to biomedical issues and to be partner with regard to psycho-social issues. Client-centred practice is most likely to be successful when client is susceptible to discuss his psycho-social issues and finding this moment is a challenge for the professional. Using formal methods for goal setting do not necessarily cover all the information needed for a client-centred therapy programme. Rather, using informal methods could lead to a more valid image of the client.

  9. Trying differently: A relationship-centered approach to representing clients with cognitive challenges.

    PubMed

    Boulding, David M; Brooks, Susan L

    2010-01-01

    This article demonstrates the usefulness of an innovative framework called "Relationship-Centered Lawyering" to enhancing real world legal practice. It uses the example of lawyers, particularly criminal defense lawyers, who often deal with clients with cognitive challenges. The article developed out of a series of workshops conducted jointly by the co-authors, an American law professor with a social work background, and a Canadian criminal defense lawyer and family mediator who is an international expert on Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder and other Neuro-Behavioral Disorders (FA/NB). The paper describes the relational theory Brooks developed (along with Robert Madden), along with the science of cognitive impairments, with a specific focus on FA/NB. The paper provides two illustrations of the relational framework by explaining Boulding's strategy of creating what is called the "external brain" and his techniques of relational interviewing.

  10. Use of Deception to Improve Client Honeypot Detection of Drive-by-Download Attacks

    SciTech Connect

    Popovsky, Barbara; Narvaez Suarez, Julia F.; Seifert, Christian; Frincke, Deborah A.; O'Neil, Lori R.; Aval, Chiraag U.

    2009-07-24

    This paper presents the application of deception theory to improve the success of client honeypots at detecting malicious web page attacks from infected servers programmed by online criminals to launch drive-by-download attacks. The design of honeypots faces three main challenges: deception, how to design honeypots that seem real systems; counter-deception, techniques used to identify honeypots and hence defeating their deceiving nature; and counter counter-deception, how to design honeypots that deceive attackers. The authors propose the application of a deception model known as the deception planning loop to identify the current status on honeypot research, development and deployment. The analysis leads to a proposal to formulate a landscape of the honeypot research and planning of steps ahead.

  11. The Clinical and Client-Centered Approach to Counseling.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rivas, Richard G.

    This review analyzes the clinical and client-centered approaches to counseling. Clinical counseling separated from vocational counseling in the third decade of this century. A split took place between guidance and discipline. The mental hygiene movement facilitated this split. In 1942 Carl Rogers made an impact on counseling theory with the…

  12. Client-Centered Supervision and Evaluation of Teachers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schwartz, Libby Zinman

    1978-01-01

    Client-centered supervision is a personal participatory, and developmental approach, which finds its roots in the "third force" psychology of Carl Rogers. It requires a supervisor of sensitivity and humanistic orientation. Teacher evaluation criteria under this system focus on three areas: learning climate, program content, and…

  13. Collaborating with Your Clients Using Social Media & Mobile Communications

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Typhina, Eli; Bardon, Robert E.; Gharis, Laurie W.

    2015-01-01

    Many Extension educators are still learning how to effectively integrate social media into their programs. By using the right social media platforms and mobile applications to create engaged, online communities, Extension educators can collaborate with clients to produce and to share information expanding and enhancing their social media and…

  14. 37 CFR 11.114 - Client with diminished capacity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... capacity. 11.114 Section 11.114 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights UNITED STATES PATENT AND TRADEMARK... diminished capacity. (a) When a client's capacity to make adequately considered decisions in connection with... capacity, is at risk of substantial physical, financial or other harm unless action is taken and...

  15. 37 CFR 11.114 - Client with diminished capacity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... capacity. 11.114 Section 11.114 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights UNITED STATES PATENT AND TRADEMARK... diminished capacity. (a) When a client's capacity to make adequately considered decisions in connection with... capacity, is at risk of substantial physical, financial or other harm unless action is taken and...

  16. The Concerns about Counseling Racial Minority Clients Scale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wei, Meifen; Chao, Ruth Chu-Lien; Tsai, Pei-Chun; Botello-Zamarron, Raquel

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop and validate the Concerns about Counseling Racial Minority Clients (CCRMC) scale among counselor trainees. Sample 1 was used for an exploratory factor analysis and confirmatory factor analysis. Four factors were identified, Managing Cultural Differences ([alpha] = 0.82), Offending or Hurting Clients…

  17. Measuring Client Experiences of Motivational Interviewing during a Lifestyle Intervention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Madson, Michael B.; Mohn, Richard S.; Schumacher, Julie A.; Landry, Alicia S.

    2015-01-01

    The Client Evaluation of Motivational Interviewing was used to assess motivational interviewing experiences in a predominantly female, African American sample from the Southeastern United States who received motivational interviewing-based feedback during a multicomponent lifestyle intervention. Motivational interviewing was experienced…

  18. Two Approaches to Using Client Projects in the College Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooke, Lynne; Williams, Sean

    2004-01-01

    Client projects are an opportunity for universities to create long-lasting, mutually beneficial relationships with businesses through an academic consultancy service. This article discusses the rationale and logistics of two models for conducting such projects. One model, used at Clemson University, is a formal academic consultancy service in…

  19. Postemployment Needs of the Rehabilitated Client: A Skilled Assessment Approach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shrey, Donald E.

    1980-01-01

    Offers a step-by-step guide to help rehabilitation counselors design activities to ensure client's job maintenance. Describes initial assessment process that identifies physical, emotional, and intellectual barriers to job maintenance. Discusses development of a systematic postemployment service plan. (Author)

  20. Architecture: client/server moves into managed healthcare.

    PubMed

    Worthington, R

    1997-01-01

    The healthcare industry is in transition from indemnity-based products to managed care during a period marked by consolidation, competitiveness and increasingly demanding consumers. This powerful combination of industry change and customer interest requires more efficient operations and flexible information systems. Host-based managed care systems are running into limitations meeting business needs, creating a demand for client/server architectures.

  1. The Use of Music in Counseling Addictive Clients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gallant, Wilfred; Siegel, Sammi; Holosko, Michael

    1997-01-01

    Explores a broad range of music interventions appropriate for addictive clients so as to fill a void in the music therapy and addictions counseling literature. Presents a rationale for the use of music intervention and presents case examples. Describes a social work intervention approach tested over a 10-year period. (RJM)

  2. Experiences of Counselors-as-Clients in Counselor Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Osborn, Cynthia J.; West, Erin M.; Nance, William Z.

    2017-01-01

    Eight professional counselors who routinely role-play as clients in 1 counselor education program participated in a focus group investigating their portrayal experiences. Data were analyzed using interpretative phenomenological analysis, which resulted in 3 superordinate themes: missions, influential factors, and repercussions. Findings reinforce…

  3. Thin Client Architecture: The Promise and the Problems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Machovec, George S.

    1997-01-01

    Describes thin clients, a networking technology that allows organizations to provide software applications over networked workstations connected to a central server. Topics include corporate settings; major advantages, including cost effectiveness and increased computer security; problems; and possible applications for large public and academic…

  4. Client Preferences for STD/HIV Prevention Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hennessy, Michael; Mercier, Michele M.; Williams, Samantha P.; Arno, Janet N.

    2002-01-01

    Conducted a formative research study designed to elicit preferences for sexually transmitted disease (STD)/HIV prevention programs from clients at a midwestern STD clinic. Responses of 126 participants show preferences for mixed group or individual meetings with counselors, with extensive intervention less favored than single sessions. Discusses…

  5. 31 CFR 8.34 - Knowledge of client's omission.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Knowledge of client's omission. 8.34 Section 8.34 Money and Finance: Treasury Office of the Secretary of the Treasury PRACTICE BEFORE THE BUREAU OF ALCOHOL, TOBACCO AND FIREARMS Duties and Restrictions Relating to Practice § 8.34 Knowledge...

  6. Migrating from Mainframes to Client-Server Systems.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1995-09-01

    The prevailing trend within the computer industry is to downsize information systems. This quite often entails migrating an application from a...centralized mainframe environment to a distributed client-server system. Navy IS managers are often given the mandate to downsize all information systems

  7. 17 CFR 205.3 - Issuer as client.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... the Commission in the representation of an issuer owes his or her professional and ethical duties to...'s clients. (b) Duty to report evidence of a material violation. (1) If an attorney, appearing and... duty to respond to the reporting attorney. (6) An attorney shall not have any obligation to report...

  8. Counselling the (Self?) Diagnosed Client: Generative and Reflective Conversations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strong, Tom; Ross, Karen H.; Sesma-Vazquez, Monica

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we address the phenomenon of clients who present their concerns in the medicalised discourse of the "Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders-Fifth Edition" ("DSM-5"). We contextualise this phenomenon, highlighting how a "diagnose-and-treat" logic increasingly pervades everyday…

  9. Client and Birth Record Linkage: A Method, Biases, and Lessons.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holian, John

    1996-01-01

    Describes record linkage as a data-generating technique, and presents a method for linking client records to live and stillbirth records, using 32,974 births in the Cleveland (Ohio) area. Biases that can enter the linkage process and general research issues related to record linkage are discussed. (SLD)

  10. Using heat to reduce blood collection time in pediatric clients.

    PubMed

    Becht, D K; Anderson, M A

    1996-11-01

    Several states now require that all children attending day care, nursery schools, and kindergarten have evidence of a blood lead screening. Obtaining the requisite blood sample can be difficult because of inherent problems with pediatric clients. The purpose of this research was to explore if the application of heat to promote vasodilation affected finger stick collection time in pediatric clients. Subjects, ages 2 through 6 years, were randomly assigned to a control or intervention group (N = 63). For the intervention group, heat was applied for 1 min by placement of an infant heel warmer on the hand selected for the finger stick. A stopwatch was used to measure the time of blood collection in both the control and intervention groups. A two-tailed t test revealed statistical significance between the two groups (p = .008). Findings suggest the application of heat to promote vasodilation does reduce collection time in pediatric clients. Nurse practitioners may use this intervention to facilitate collection of blood samples in pediatric clients.

  11. Clinical Assessment of Dissociative Identity Disorder among College Counseling Clients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levy, Benjamin; Swanson, Janine E.

    2008-01-01

    College counseling professionals address a wide range of complex student mental health concerns. Among these, accurately identifying client presentations of dissociative identity disorder (DID) can be especially challenging because students with DID sometimes present as if they are experiencing another problem, such as a mood, anxiety, or…

  12. Beyond Multiplication: Incorporating Importance into Client Satisfaction Measures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hsieh, Chang-Ming

    2014-01-01

    Objective: This article brings the discussions on incorporating perceived importance across study areas into the study of client satisfaction and cautions the use of multiplicative scores (multiplying satisfaction and importance scores) as a weighting method. An alternative weighting method is provided. Method: Analyze data from a client…

  13. The network of corporate clients: customer attrition at commercial banks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lublóy, Á.; Szenes, M.

    2008-12-01

    Commercial banks might profit from the adoption of methods widely used in network theory. A decision making process might become biased if one disregards network effects within the corporate client portfolio. This paper models the phenomenon of customer attrition by generating a weighted and directed network of corporate clients linked by financial transactions. During the numerical study of the agent-based toy model we demonstrate that multiple steady states may exist. The statistical properties of the distinct steady states show similarities. We show that most companies of the same community choose the same bank in the steady state. In contrast to the case for the steady state of the Barabási-Albert network, market shares in this model equalize by network size. When modeling customer attrition in the network of 3 × 105 corporate clients, none of the companies followed the behavior of the initial switcher in three quarters of the simulations. The number of switchers exceeded 20 in 1% of the cases. In the worst-case scenario a total of 688 companies chose a competitor bank. Significant network effects have been discovered; high correlation prevailed between the degree of the initial switcher and the severity of the avalanche effect. This suggests that the position of the corporate client in the network might be much more important than the underlying properties (industry, size, profitability, etc) of the company.

  14. Improving the Complaint Process for Sexuality Exploited Clients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spitalny, Gloria

    Four sexually exploited clients shared their experiences in invoking the complaint process against their former therapists. They wanted to stop the therapist from practicing and harming others, to receive some acknowledgement that they had been harmed, and to obtain some kind of recompense. If the therapist was unable to admit his or her error,…

  15. How Professionals (Including Legal Educators) "Treat" Their Clients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenebaum, Edwin H.

    1987-01-01

    A discussion of legal education looks at the law school as a clinic in which the student as client comes for treatment (education). It examines the ways in which the law school changes the professional through cognitive learning, skills training, and the adjustment of roles and relationships. (MSE)

  16. Writing about Clients: Developing Composite Case Material and Its Rationale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duffy, Maureen

    2010-01-01

    Ethical guidelines of the 4 major professional associations representing counselors and psychotherapists are reviewed. To help clarify thinking about writing up clinical cases, 3 kinds of cases are described. The author concludes that the current guidelines for clinician authors in writing about clients for publication or presentation are…

  17. Beyond Multiplication: Incorporating Importance into Client Satisfaction Measures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hsieh, Chang-Ming

    2014-01-01

    Objective: This article brings the discussions on incorporating perceived importance across study areas into the study of client satisfaction and cautions the use of multiplicative scores (multiplying satisfaction and importance scores) as a weighting method. An alternative weighting method is provided. Method: Analyze data from a client…

  18. Relating Ethnic Identity, Acculturation, and Attitudes toward Treating Minority Clients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gurung, Regan A. R.; Mehta, Vivek

    2001-01-01

    The attitudes of medical students of Indian decent (N=150) toward treating minority clients and using alternative therapies were assessed in relationship to the students' ethnic identity, acculturation, and self-concept. Students with strong ethnic identity and acculturation were more likely to treat minority patients and use alternative…

  19. Perceptions of Clients and Counseling Professionals regarding Spirituality in Counseling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morrison, Julie Q.; Clutter, Stacy M.; Pritchett, Elaine M.; Demmitt, Alan

    2009-01-01

    Although current research indicates that psychotherapeutic change both affects and is affected by spiritual concerns, relatively little is known about the degree to which spirituality is used as an intervention in counseling and how it is perceived by clients and mental health professionals. The purpose of this study was to examine the perceptions…

  20. Nonverbal Communication and Client Satisfaction in Computer-Assisted Transactions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ketrow, Sandra M.

    1991-01-01

    Tests the arousal-valence model of nonverbal communication by examining the effect of selected immediate nonverbal communication cues exhibited by bank tellers on the satisfaction of their clients in banking transactions. Finds that immediacy in brief impersonal transactions is not a significant predictor of satisfaction. (SR)