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Sample records for potencial cliente real

  1. Developing Professionals: Student Experiences of a Real-Client Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fitch, Kate

    2011-01-01

    This study investigated the learning potential of the student experience of working with real clients in a final-year undergraduate unit that aims to develop professional skills. Students, working in consultancy teams, developed communication strategies for a not-for-profit organisation. A teaching intervention was trialled late in semester to…

  2. Working alliance, real relationship, session quality, and client improvement in psychodynamic psychotherapy: A longitudinal actor partner interdependence model.

    PubMed

    Kivlighan, Dennis M; Hill, Clara E; Gelso, Charles J; Baumann, Ellen

    2016-03-01

    We used the Actor Partner Interdependence Model (APIM; Kashy & Kenny, 2000) to examine the dyadic associations of 74 clients and 23 therapists in their evaluations of working alliance, real relationship, session quality, and client improvement over time in ongoing psychodynamic or interpersonal psychotherapy. There were significant actor effects for both therapists and clients, with the participant's own ratings of working alliance and real relationship independently predicting their own evaluations of session quality. There were significant client partner effects, with clients' working alliance and real relationship independently predicting their therapists' evaluations of session quality. The client partner real relationship effect was stronger in later sessions than in earlier sessions. Therapists' real relationship ratings (partner effect) were a stronger predictor of clients' session quality ratings in later sessions than in earlier sessions. Therapists' working alliance ratings (partner effect) were a stronger predictor of clients' session quality ratings when clients made greater improvement than when clients made lesser improvement. For clients' session outcome ratings, there were complex three-way interactions, such that both Client real relationship and working alliance interacted with client improvement and time in treatment to predict clients' session quality. These findings strongly suggest both individual and partner effects when clients and therapists evaluate psychotherapy process and outcome. Implications for research and practice are discussed.

  3. FRIEND Engine Framework: a real time neurofeedback client-server system for neuroimaging studies

    PubMed Central

    Basilio, Rodrigo; Garrido, Griselda J.; Sato, João R.; Hoefle, Sebastian; Melo, Bruno R. P.; Pamplona, Fabricio A.; Zahn, Roland; Moll, Jorge

    2015-01-01

    In this methods article, we present a new implementation of a recently reported FSL-integrated neurofeedback tool, the standalone version of “Functional Real-time Interactive Endogenous Neuromodulation and Decoding” (FRIEND). We will refer to this new implementation as the FRIEND Engine Framework. The framework comprises a client-server cross-platform solution for real time fMRI and fMRI/EEG neurofeedback studies, enabling flexible customization or integration of graphical interfaces, devices, and data processing. This implementation allows a fast setup of novel plug-ins and frontends, which can be shared with the user community at large. The FRIEND Engine Framework is freely distributed for non-commercial, research purposes. PMID:25688193

  4. Clients' perceptions of their psychotherapists' multicultural orientation.

    PubMed

    Owen, Jesse J; Tao, Karen; Leach, Mark M; Rodolfa, Emil

    2011-09-01

    The current retrospective study examined whether clients' (N = 176) perceptions of their psychotherapists' multicultural orientation (MCO) were associated with their psychological functioning, working alliance, and real relationship scores. Moreover, we tested whether clients' perceptions of the working alliance and the real relationship mediated the relationship between clients' perceptions of their psychotherapists' MCO and psychological functioning. The results showed that clients' perceptions of their psychotherapists' MCO were positively related to working alliance, real relationship, and psychological functioning. Only clients' ratings of the working alliance mediated the relationship between clients' perceptions of their psychotherapists' MCO and psychological functioning. Thus, because clients perceive their psychotherapists as being more oriented toward cultural issues, they may view the therapist as being more credible and may gain a sense of comfort in the therapeutic process. In turn, clients' strong alliance facilitates improvement in psychological well-being.

  5. CPS: client violence and client victims.

    PubMed

    Ringstad, Robin

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes a study that explored the extent and nature of workplace violence in child protective services (CPS). A total of 68 workers and clients reported on their experiences. Of workers, 70% reported being the victim of client violence, and 22% reported they had perpetrated a violent act toward a client. Of clients, 55% reported being a victim of assault by a CPS worker, while 42% acknowledged perpetrating violence. Future research needs and recommendations for practice including training, reporting, and policy development are discussed.

  6. Client Suicide: What Now?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ellis, Thomas E.; Patel, Amee B.

    2012-01-01

    The loss of a client to suicide is a painful personal and professional experience for mental health providers. Whether trainee or experienced professional, the affected clinician often reports feeling overwhelmed and unprepared for the experience of client suicide, together with significant emotional distress and diminished work performance. In…

  7. Methadone maintenance: some client opinions.

    PubMed

    Brown, B S; Benn, G J; Jansen, D R

    1975-06-01

    The authors found similar attitudes toward methadone and methadone treatment programs in 75 detoxification and 115 methadone maintenance clients. Both groups expressed considerable ambivalence--although they viewed methadone as capable of helping them end their herioin addiction, they were concerned about possible methadone dependence and about side effects, both real and imagined. The authors stress the societal context of such concern and suggest that, althought they are not easily allayed, limiting the duration of methadone maintenace from the outset of treatment may be an ameliorative factor.

  8. 37 CFR 11.703 - Direct contact with prospective clients.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 37 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Direct contact with... contact with prospective clients. (a) A practitioner shall not by in-person, live telephone or real-time electronic contact solicit professional employment from a prospective client when a significant motive...

  9. 37 CFR 11.703 - Direct contact with prospective clients.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 37 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Direct contact with... contact with prospective clients. (a) A practitioner shall not by in-person, live telephone or real-time electronic contact solicit professional employment from a prospective client when a significant motive...

  10. Sophia Client Version 12

    SciTech Connect

    2012-08-09

    Sophia Client Version 12 offers command line access to the Sophia Daemon and the Sophia database files. It provides print, fingerprint, acknowledge, color coding and status access to these other resources.

  11. Telematics-based online client-server/client collaborative environment for radiotherapy planning simulations.

    PubMed

    Kum, Oyeon

    2007-11-01

    Customized cancer radiation treatment planning for each patient is very useful for both a patient and a doctor because it provides the ability to deliver higher doses to a more accurately defined tumor and at the same time lower doses to organs at risk and normal tissues. This can be realized by building an accurate planning simulation system to provide better treatment strategies based on each patient's tomographic data such as CT, MRI, PET, or SPECT. In this study, we develop a real-time online client-server/client collaborative environment between the client (health care professionals or hospitals) and the server/client under a secure network using telematics (the integrated use of telecommunications and medical informatics). The implementation is based on a point-to-point communication scheme between client and server/client following the WYSIWIS (what you see is what I see) paradigm. After uploading the patient tomographic data, the client is able to collaborate with the server/client for treatment planning. Consequently, the level of health care services can be improved, specifically for small radiotherapy clinics in rural/remote-country areas that do not possess much experience or equipment such as a treatment planning simulator. The telematics service of the system can also be used to provide continued medical education in radiotherapy. Moreover, the system is easy to use. A client can use the system if s/he is familiar with the Windows(TM) operating system because it is designed and built based on a user-friendly concept. This system does not require the client to continue hardware and software maintenance and updates. These are performed automatically by the server.

  12. Superpowers and client states

    SciTech Connect

    Efrat, M.; Bercovitch, J.

    1987-01-01

    Throughout the world the two superpowers often conduct their global conflict by proxy, taking different sides in regional disputes. An important question of international relations is where the balance of power lies in the superpower client state relationship-how far are the interests of the superpower subordinated to those of the client state or vice versa. Taking the two case studies of the US-Israel relationship and the Soviet-Syrian relationship, this book explores the perceptions by each side of the relationship and the reality. It goes on to make general conclusions about superpower-client state relationships. Contents: Introduction; In Search of a Theoretical Framework; Client-States in Superpower Perception; Superpowers in Client States' Perception; The Case of US-Israel Relations; Israel in US Perspective; The USA in Israeli Perspective; Flows of US Civilian and Military Resources to Israel; The Case of Soviet-Syrian Relations; Syria in Soviet Perspective; The USSR in Syrian Perspective; Flows of Soviet Civilian and Military Resources to Syria; Comparative Analysis and Conclusions; Overview of the two cases studies and conclusions.

  13. Psychotherapy for Suicidal Clients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lester, David

    1994-01-01

    Reviews various systems of psychotherapy for suitability for suicidal clients. Discusses psychoanalysis, cognitive therapy, primal therapy, transactional analysis, Gestalt therapy, reality therapy, person-centered therapy, existential analysis, and Jungian analysis in light of available treatment options. Includes 36 citations. (Author/CRR)

  14. Training Evaluation: Clients' Roles.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hashim, Junaidah

    2001-01-01

    A study was conducted of 262 training providers in Malaysia, where providers must be government approved. Government regulation, client demands for high quality, and an economic downturn that focused attention on training costs have all influenced evaluation in a positive direction. (SK)

  15. Working with Potentially Assaultive Clients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murdach, Allison D.

    1993-01-01

    Examines potentially assaultive or preassaultive client and suggests some ways to minimize the risk of assault by such clients. Data for the article are from author's 10-year experience in providing social work services on acute psychiatric ward in large public medical center. Reviews potentially assaultive client conditions of panic, rage,…

  16. Early Attrition among Suicidal Clients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Surgenor, P. W. G.; Meehan, V.; Moore, A.

    2016-01-01

    The study aimed to identify the level of suicidal ideation in early attrition clients and their reasons for the early termination of their therapy. The cross-sectional design involved early attrition clients (C[subscript A]) who withdrew from therapy before their second session (n = 61), and continuing clients who (C[subscript C]) progressed…

  17. The Competitive Advantage: Client Service.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leffel, Linda G.; DeBord, Karen B.

    The adult education literature contains a considerable amount of research on and discussion of client service in the marketing process, management and staff roles in service- and product-oriented businesses, and the importance of client service and service quality to survival in the marketplace. By applying the principles of client-oriented…

  18. The ISMARA client

    PubMed Central

    Ioannidis, Vassilios; van Nimwegen, Erik; Stockinger, Heinz

    2016-01-01

    ISMARA ( ismara.unibas.ch) automatically infers the key regulators and regulatory interactions from high-throughput gene expression or chromatin state data. However, given the large sizes of current next generation sequencing (NGS) datasets, data uploading times are a major bottleneck. Additionally, for proprietary data, users may be uncomfortable with uploading entire raw datasets to an external server. Both these problems could be alleviated by providing a means by which users could pre-process their raw data locally, transferring only a small summary file to the ISMARA server. We developed a stand-alone client application that pre-processes large input files (RNA-seq or ChIP-seq data) on the user's computer for performing ISMARA analysis in a completely automated manner, including uploading of small processed summary files to the ISMARA server. This reduces file sizes by up to a factor of 1000, and upload times from many hours to mere seconds. The client application is available from ismara.unibas.ch/ISMARA/client. PMID:28232860

  19. [Client centered psychotherapy].

    PubMed

    Werthmann, H V

    1979-01-01

    In the discussion concerning which psychotherapeutic methods should come under the auspices of the medical health system in West Germany, the question is raised regarding the client-centered therapy of Carl Rogers. Can it be considered a distinct psychotherapeutic method? A review of the scientific literature dealing with this method shows that it provides neither a theory of mental illness nor a theory of clinical application based on individual cases or specific neurotic disturbances, Therefore it should be categorized as a useful method of communication in the field of psychology and not as a therapeutic method for treating mental illness.

  20. A Small-Scale Client Project for Business Writing Students: Developing a Guide for First-Time Home Buyers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kreth, Melinda L.

    2005-01-01

    This assignment reflects a client-based pedagogy, which is often used in technical and professional communication courses. Unlike service learning pedagogy, which emphasizes social activism, client-based pedagogy focuses on helping students to understand and respond effectively to "real-world" clients and their organizational contexts. Also,…

  1. Client Common Factors Represented by Client Motivation and Autonomy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scheel, Michael J.

    2011-01-01

    Ryan and colleagues are applauded for elevating client factors in the form of motivation and autonomy to equal status with the alliance as common factors in psychotherapy. Next, client motivation and autonomy are explained to be inextricably linked with one promoting the other. Motivational methods are summarized for the major approaches, making…

  2. The Therapeutic Alliance: Clients' Categorization of Client-Identified Factors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simpson, Arlene J.; Bedi, Robinder P.

    2012-01-01

    Clients' perspectives on the therapeutic alliance were examined using written descriptions of factors that clients believed to be helpful in developing a strong alliance. Fifty participants sorted previously collected statements into thematically similar piles and then gave each set of statements a title. Multivariate concept mapping statistical…

  3. Group Work with Transgender Clients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dickey, Lore M.; Loewy, Michael I.

    2010-01-01

    Drawing on the existing literature, the authors' research and clinical experiences, and the first author's personal journey as a member and leader of the transgender community, this article offers a brief history of group work with transgender clients followed by suggestions for group work with transgender clients from a social justice…

  4. Using Clients to Monitor Performance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Molnar, Jack; Stup, Brenda

    1994-01-01

    This article describes an ongoing survey that illustrates how evaluators, working with program managers, have effectively used client-based data to monitor performance in the Social Security Administration. The value of client-based data outweighs the limitations and problems collecting it. Customer perceptions are a critical barometer of quality.…

  5. Clients of SSA Net-Ready Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richmond, D.; Bicker, S.; Malloy, B.

    2014-09-01

    Multiple Net-Centric approaches have been developed to expose optical and radar sensor data. Client applications have been developed to ingest and process this data by NASIC and JMS. Data flows and formats used that integrate these Net-Centric approaches with JMS and NASIC will be presented. Example data collected and examples of improved SSA benefits will be discussed. Potential future improvements to increase the precision of the SOI processing algorithm will be addressed. Specifics regarding the process to gain access to the N-CSDS GEODSS sensor data in near real time will be identified.

  6. Students as Clients in a Professional/Client Relationship.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bailey, Jeffrey J.

    2000-01-01

    Proposes the metaphor of professional/client rather than student-as-customer to characterize the relationship between professors and students. Uses examples of fitness trainer, management consultant, accounting service, and mountain guide to illustrate faculty and student roles. (SK)

  7. Spirituality and mental health clients.

    PubMed

    O'Reilly, Mary Linda

    2004-07-01

    Spirituality is an important part of human existence but is often overlooked in the conceptualization of the person as a biopsychosocial entity. This article examines spirituality as a concept, relates it to the experience of mental health clients, proposes spiritual assessments and interventions within the role of advanced practice mental health nurses, and discusses the necessity of including spiritual interventions to support healing and wholeness for mental health clients.

  8. Measurement of Client Preferences for Therapist Behavior.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richert, Alphons J.

    While past research has found conflicting results on the place for client role preferences in psychotherapy, none of this research has examined the client role preferences in an actual client population seeking outpatient therapy. This study involved the development of a measure of client role preferences which attempted to survey a wider range of…

  9. Client training vital for NFP.

    PubMed

    Keller, S; Finger, W R

    1996-01-01

    Clients need both skill and motivation to effectively use natural family planning (NFP). Thus, NFP services must provide adequate counseling and training to clients. A good teacher of NFP does not need formal health care training but she/must have good communication skills. A teacher usually needs to meet with a client four times over a period of several months to teach NFP. Fertility awareness comprises the first step in NFP training. This involves helping couples to understand the reproductive system, menstrual cycles, and fertile periods. The NFP Training and Medical Services Center in Nairobi, Kenya, provides clients, many of whom live in slums and are illiterate, with an exercise book with small squares that they color so they can track their fertility signs. They tend to use the cervical mucus method rather than the basal temperature method which requires a thermometer. In Los Angeles, California, clients of one NFP program attend group sessions and individual counseling sessions to learn about the menstrual cycle, fertile period, and rules of NFP and how to apply them. The Twin Cities NFP Center in Minnesota found that individual counseling was 50% more expensive than group sessions and it affected changes in neither the pregnancy nor NFP continuation rates. Group training here involved more men. Catholic groups in Bangladesh, India, Kenya, South Korea, and the US conducted a study of NFP programs and found that client's willingness or ability to discuss NFP were not associated with socioeconomic status, previous family planning experiences, and education. Another study of the same users did find an association between higher education and lower unplanned pregnancy rate. The same was true for previous family planning use. Since limited resources prevent some family planning programs from training staff in NFP, the programs can refer clients to existing NFP services, sending one staff member to be trained in NFP, or having one staff member providing NFP

  10. Rehabilitation Counseling with Deaf Clients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Danek, Marita

    1983-01-01

    The nature and impact on educational and vocational functioning of prelingual deafness are reviewed, stereotypes are exposed, and the special needs of deaf clients in rehabilitation assessment, goal setting, service delivery, and placement are discussed. Trends in deafness rehabilitation are considered in terms of legislation, professional…

  11. Nutrition Education Needs Pantry Clients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wood, Dolores K.; Shultz, Jill Armstrong; Edlefsen, Miriam; Butkus, Sue N.

    2007-01-01

    Two food pantries were surveyed for nutrition education (NE) interests and experiences. One site provided nutrition education classes; the comparison site was utilized to assess client interest in class topics. "Fixing low cost meals," "fixing quick and easy recipes," and "stretching food and food dollars" were topics…

  12. Do you know your equine practice clients?

    PubMed

    Moreau, Philippe

    2012-04-01

    A healthy group of loyal clients is of the utmost importance for a healthy practice.Knowing the clients’ expectations and making every effort to exceed them when clients meet with the veterinarian or visit the clinic will result in continued client satisfaction. Clients will show loyalty to a veterinarian when they perceive that the care provided to them suits them and their animal and exceeds their expectations.

  13. Client-Side Monitoring for Web Mining.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fenstermacher, Kurt D.; Ginsburg, Mark

    2003-01-01

    Discusses mining Web data to draw conclusions about Web users and proposes a client-side monitoring system that supports flexible data collection and encompasses client-side applications beyond the Web browser to incorporate standard office productivity tools. Highlights include goals for client-side monitoring; framework for user monitoring,…

  14. Client Self-Disclosure in Psychotherapy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stiles, William B.

    Psychotherapists of different theoretical persuasions use systematically different profiles of verbal response modes. However, clients tend to use very similar profiles, regardless of what their therapist does. Disclosure comprises the largest part of this common client profile, and it distinguishes the client role from other roles. Higher levels…

  15. Client-Therapist Complementarity and Therapeutic Outcome.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dietzel, C. S.; Abeles, Norman

    One hundred twenty tape recorded psychotherapy sessions representing early, middle, and late interviews with 20 clients were studied. Clients were divided into successful (N-10) and unsuccessful outcome (N-10) groups on the basis of clinicians' ratings of pre- and post-MMPI data. Raters scored the response units of clients and therapists and…

  16. Improving Services to Gay and Lesbian Clients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dulaney, Diana D.; Kelly, James

    1982-01-01

    Examines the gap in the theoretical and clinical training of social workers in helping the homosexual client. Proposes specific approaches for improving services to clients who are gay or lesbian. Discusses other neglected clients including heterosexual spouses, children of a homosexual parent, and aging homosexuals. (Author/RC)

  17. [On the clients of public health organizations].

    PubMed

    Duran, Júlia; Villalbí, Joan R; Guix, Joan

    2004-01-01

    Public services must satisfy a variety of agents: users of these services, the citizens who pay the taxes that finance them, politicians, and those that work in them. To obtain public services that give priority to the citizen-user, knowledge of clients, their expectations, preferences, complaints and degree of satisfaction is essential. This article presents the process of internal discussion in our agency about its clients, who differ from those of an industrial or commercial organization. A proposal for the classification of clients, as well as the process that has led to a client portfolio, are presented and steps to improve services from the perspective of the client are suggested.

  18. Strategies for Optimal Implementation of Simulated Clients for Measuring Quality of Care in Low- and Middle-Income Countries.

    PubMed

    Fitzpatrick, Anne; Tumlinson, Katherine

    2017-01-26

    The use of simulated clients or "mystery clients" is a data collection approach in which a study team member presents at a health care facility or outlet pretending to be a real customer, patient, or client. Following the visit, the shopper records her observations. The use of mystery clients can overcome challenges of obtaining accurate measures of health care quality and improve the validity of quality assessments, particularly in low- and middle-income countries. However, mystery client studies should be carefully designed and monitored to avoid problems inherent to this data collection approach. In this article, we discuss our experiences with the mystery client methodology in studies conducted in public- and private-sector health facilities in Kenya and in private-sector facilities in Uganda. We identify both the benefits and the challenges in using this methodology to guide other researchers interested in using this technique. Recruitment of appropriate mystery clients who accurately represent the facility's clientele, have strong recall of recent events, and are comfortable in their role as undercover data collectors are key to successful implementation of this methodology. Additionally, developing detailed training protocols can help ensure mystery clients behave identically and mimic real patrons accurately while short checklists can help ensure mystery client responses are standardized. Strict confidentiality and protocols to avoid unnecessary exams or procedures should also be stressed during training and monitored carefully throughout the study. Despite these challenges, researchers should consider mystery client designs to measure actual provider behavior and to supplement self-reported provider behavior. Data from mystery client studies can provide critical insight into the quality of service provision unavailable from other data collection methods. The unique information available from the mystery client approach far outweighs the cost.

  19. Do client fees help or hurt?

    PubMed

    Barnett, B

    1998-01-01

    This article discusses the impact of client fees for family planning (FP) services on cost recovery and level of user services in developing countries. The UN Population Fund reports that developing country governments currently pay 75% of the costs of FP programs. Donors contribute 15%, and clients pay 10%. Current pressures are on FP services to broaden and improve their scope, while user demand is increasing. Program managers should consider the program's need for funds and the clients' willingness to pay. Clients are willing to pay about 1% of their income for contraception. A study of sterilization acceptance in Mexico finds that the average monthly case load declined by 10% after the 1st price increase from $43 to $55 and declined by 58% after the 2nd price increase to $60. Fewer low-income clients requested sterilization. A CEMOPLAF study in Ecuador finds that in three price increase situations the number of clients seeking services declined, but the economic mix of clients remained about the same. The decline was 20% in the group with a 20% price increase and 26% in the 40% increase group. In setting fees, the first need is to determine unit costs. The Futures Group International recommends considering political, regulatory, and institutional constraints for charging fees; priorities for revenue use; protection for poor clients; and monitoring of money collection and expenditure. Management Sciences for Health emphasizes consideration of the reasons for collection of fees, client affordability, and client perception of quality issues. Sliding scales can be used to protect poor clients. Charging fees for laboratory services can subsidize poor clients. A Bangladesh program operated a restaurant and catering service in order to subsidize FP services. Colombia's PROFAMILIA sells medical and surgical services and a social marketing program in order to expand clinics.

  20. Increasing hope by addressing clients' outcome expectations.

    PubMed

    Swift, Joshua K; Derthick, Annie O

    2013-09-01

    Addressing clients' outcome expectations is an important clinical process that can lead to a strong therapeutic alliance, more positive treatment outcomes, and decreased rates of premature termination from psychotherapy. Five interventions designed to foster appropriate outcome expectations are discussed, including presenting a convincing treatment rationale, increasing clients' faith in their therapists, expressing faith in clients, providing outcome education, and comparing progress with expectations. Clinical examples and research support are provided for each.

  1. Facades of suffering: clients' photo stories about mental illness.

    PubMed

    Sitvast, Jan E; Abma, Tineke A; Widdershoven, Guy A M

    2010-10-01

    In this article, photo stories are examined that were the result of working with photography as a therapeutic instrument dealing with suffering in mental health care settings. The purpose is to describe the role of facades in the process of suffering and acceptance. Clients took photographs, talked about them in group meetings, and exhibited them to a broader audience. Their photo stories were analyzed using a mixed-methods model. Data from two narrative approaches (semiotics and hermeneutics) were compared with information from other informants and official records to find discrepancies between the photo story and the real life context. Although facades are usually perceived as an obstacle for personal growth, the visual narratives revealed that facades can function as an alternative to common acceptance strategies, such as facing one's losses and reconciliation. Facades can create a distance between the person and the suffering. We conclude that visual narratives can reveal and foster agency in clients.

  2. Analyses of Client Variables in a Series of Psychotherapy Sessions with Two Child Clients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mook, Bertha

    1982-01-01

    Studied the process of child psychotherapy by means of analyses of client verbal behaviors. Analyses of variables demonstrated the nature of each client's verbal responding as well as their pattern of change. Summarized the overall verbal response behavior of each client best through the factor analyses. (Author)

  3. 49 CFR 1103.23 - Confidences of a client.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 8 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Confidences of a client. 1103.23 Section 1103.23... Responsibilities Toward A Client § 1103.23 Confidences of a client. (a) The practitioner's duty to preserve his client's confidence outlasts the practitioner's employment by the client, and this duty extends to...

  4. Counselors' Accounts of Their Clients' Spiritual Experiences.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holden, Janice Miner

    2000-01-01

    Introduces a special section within this issue of Counseling and Values that focuses on counselors' accounts of their clients' transpersonal experiences. The eight articles in this special section discuss ten types of transpersonal experiences. Clients range in age from early 20s to early 80s. Experiences occurred in various settings and were…

  5. Cut Costs with Thin Client Computing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hartley, Patrick H.

    2001-01-01

    Discusses how school districts can considerably increase the number of administrative computers in their districts without a corresponding increase in costs by using the "Thin Client" component of the Total Cost of Ownership (TCC) model. TCC and Thin Client are described, including its software and hardware components. An example of a…

  6. Organizational and Client Commitment among Contracted Employees

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coyle-Shapiro, Jacqueline A-M.; Morrow, Paula C.

    2006-01-01

    This study examines affective commitment to employing and client organizations among long-term contracted employees, a new and growing employment classification. Drawing on organizational commitment and social exchange literatures, we propose two categories of antecedents of employee commitment to client organizations. We tested our hypotheses…

  7. Predicting Improvement among University Counseling Center Clients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lichtenberg, James W.; Hummel, Thomas J.

    The fundamental question to which most clients want and deserve an answer is, "Am I going to get better (as a result of counseling)?" Although meta-analyses provide strong evidence supporting the efficacy of counseling in general, if one wants to make probabilistic statements about individual client outcomes--rather than about the more generalized…

  8. Employment Patterns of Methadone Maintenance Clients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bloch, Harriet I.; And Others

    1977-01-01

    Analysis of employment patterns of methadone maintenance clients had indicated that the majority were not employed at time of program admission. At time of evaluation, 70 percent of the sample were employed; 88 percent of these clients had previous work histories and brought marketable skills with them. (Author)

  9. Experience-Seeking Characteristics of Methadone Clients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kohn, Paul M.; And Others

    1979-01-01

    Methadone clients scored higher than controls on measures reflecting boredom, desire for change and attraction to physically thrilling activities. Correlations of these measures with length of most recent dependency before treatment, time on program, and time since initial dependency suggest peculiarities of methadone clients antedated involvement…

  10. Experiential Interventions for Clients with Genital Herpes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cummings, Anne L.

    1999-01-01

    Explores potential benefits of incorporating concepts and interventions from experimental therapy to help clients with psychosocial difficulties in learning to live with genital herpes. Recommends experimental counseling of two-chair dialog, empty chair, and metaphor for helping clients with emotional sequelae of genital herpes. Presents case…

  11. Effectiveness of a Client Pretherapy Orientation Videotape.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zwick, Rebecca; Attkisson, C. Clifford

    1985-01-01

    Psychotherapy clients (N=62) were randomly assigned to view a pretherapy orientation videotape at admission or to a control group. Oriented clients understood and recalled the information in the videotape, showed a greater decrease in self-reported symptoms than the control group after one month, and gave favorable feedback regarding the…

  12. Client-Preferred Therapist Sex Role Orientations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKinnon, Dean G.

    1990-01-01

    Analyzed clients' (N=210) questionnaires rating willingness to see and disclose to androgynous, masculine, or feminine therapist on basis of written description. Clients rated androgynous- and masculine-oriented therapists significantly more favorably than feminine-oriented therapists. Masculine men received highest ratings and feminine men…

  13. Client Outcome Evaluation in Mental Health Centers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Southern Regional Education Board, Atlanta, GA.

    Outcome evaluation assesses the results or benefits of mental health services received by clients or communities by comparing descriptive data on the mental health status of clients at different points in time. It aids clinicians and managers in planning programs and managing clinical services. A mental health center should establish goal-oriented…

  14. Client satisfaction in a health maintenance organization: providers' perceptions compared to clients' reports.

    PubMed

    Freeborn, D K; Pope, C R

    1981-09-01

    This study seeks to compare clients' reports of satisfaction/dissatisfaction with an HMO and its medical care program to providers' perceptions of client satisfaction. The main conclusion is that providers are fairly aware of medical care system attributes with which clients are highly satisfied and dissatisfied. Those with direct patient contact, especially physicians and nurses, are most accurate in their perceptions. Personnel without direct patient contact are about equally accurate in their perceptions of client satisfaction, though personnel without patient contact perceive relatively more dissatisfaction than clients report. Most approaches to medical care evaluation examine costs and efficiency and, more recently, the technical quality of care. Less attention has been given to the assessment of client satisfaction, and almost no attention has been given to what providers perceive as the assessment of clients. Clearly, HMOs' viability is determined largely by their ability to identify and correct major problems affecting their enrollments.

  15. 42 CFR 485.910 - Condition of participation: Client rights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... appropriate) or surrogate with verbal and written notice of the client's rights and responsibilities. The verbal notice must be in a language and manner that the client or client's representative or...

  16. Uniform guidelines improve client care.

    PubMed

    Barnett, B

    1994-12-01

    Uniform national guidelines on the delivery of family planning methods and services improve client care, assuming these guidelines are based on current scientific information. Compliance with these guidelines yields safe and efficient delivery of family planning services. Service providers need information, training, supplies, and guidelines to deliver quality services. Guidelines contribute to consistency among family planning programs in different settings. Even though clinics may not provide the same services, the guidelines allow them to provide the same standards of care. Specifically, eligibility criteria, contraindications, and follow-up schedules are the same regardless of the service delivery point. Various international health organizations (such as World Health Organization, USAID, Program for International Training in Health, International Planned Parenthood Federation, and Association for Voluntary Surgical Contraception) have developed guidelines for family planning service delivery. Governments can use these documents to develop national family planning guidelines and policies. They should adapt the guidelines to local needs and consider program resources. After development of the national guidelines, training, workshops, and dissemination of written materials should be provided for policymakers, physicians, nurses, and other health providers. Countries that have either developed or are working to draft their own national guidelines are Cameroon, Ghana, Mexico, and Nepal.

  17. Client and therapist variability in clients' perceptions of their therapists' multicultural competencies.

    PubMed

    Owen, Jesse; Leach, Mark M; Wampold, Bruce; Rodolfa, Emil

    2011-01-01

    This study examined therapist differences in their clients' ratings of their therapists' multicultural competencies (MCCs) as well as tested whether therapists' who were rated as exhibiting more MCCs also had clients who had better therapy outcomes (N = 143 clients and 31 therapists). All clients completed at least 3 sessions. Results demonstrated that therapists accounted for less than 1% of the variance in their clients' Cross-Cultural Counseling Inventory–Revised (CCCI-R; T. D. LaFromboise, H. L. K. Coleman, & A. Hernandez, 1991) scores, suggesting that therapists did not differ in terms of how clients rated their MCCs. Therapists accounted for approximately 8.5% of the variance in therapy outcomes. For each therapist, their clients' CCCI-R scores were aggregated to provide an estimate of therapists' MCCs. Therapists' MCCs, based on aggregate CCCI-R scores, did not account for the variability in therapy outcomes that were attributed to them. Additionally, clients' race/ethnicity, therapists' race/ethnicity, or the interaction of clients'–therapists' race/ethnicity were not significantly associated with clients' perceptions of their therapists' MCCs.

  18. Clients' ratings of counselor multicultural competency.

    PubMed

    Fuertes, Jairo N; Brobst, Karen

    2002-08-01

    Differences in perceptions between Euro American and ethnic minority respondents were examined to compare the role of counselor multicultural competency in multicultural versus traditional counseling. Results showed a strong positive correlation between clients' ratings of counselors' multicultural competencies and clients' ratings of counselors' general competency and empathy. However, when comparisons were made between Euro American and ethnic minority clients' on satisfaction, counselor multicultural competency explained a large and significant amount of variance for the ethnic minority sample only, above and beyond counselor general competency and empathy. Results are discussed in the context of relevant literature and suggestions for future research.

  19. The Unfolding of the Real Relationship and the Outcome of Brief Psychotherapy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gelso, Charles J.; Kivlighan, Dennis M., Jr.; Busa-Knepp, Johnna; Spiegel, Eric B.; Ain, Stacie; Hummel, Ann M.; Ma, Yueher Emilie; Markin, Rayna D.

    2012-01-01

    This study sought to assess the association of client- and therapist-rated real relationship with each other and with the outcome of brief psychotherapy. It also aimed to determine whether changes over time in perceptions of the real relationship and increasing convergence between clients' and therapists' ratings of the real relationship were…

  20. Client Information in Counseling: An Existential View

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pine, Gerald J.

    1975-01-01

    An emphasis on existentialism as a dynamic philosophical force with significant implications for vocational guidance in the use of information to help clients, followed by a Comment by Lee Isaacson. (Author)

  1. Counselor Values and the Pregnant Adolescent Client.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kennedy, Bebe C.; And Others

    1984-01-01

    Reviews options counselors can suggest to pregnant adolescents, including abortion, adoption, marriage, and single parenthood. Discusses the need for counselors to be aware of their own values and help the client explore her values. (JAC)

  2. Family Therapy for Lesbian and Gay Clients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shernoff, Michael J.

    1984-01-01

    Suggests that social workers develop a professional approach that includes the treatment of lesbian and gay clients within the context of the family. Discusses self disclosure, legal issues, family relationships, and friendship networks. (JAC)

  3. Clients Who Frequent Madam Barnett's Emporium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Russell, Scott

    1999-01-01

    Develops a comparison between writing tutors and prostitutes. Suggests that the intimate arrangement of people that places one in the position of professional and the other in the position of client works against collaboration. (NH)

  4. Participation and power in care: exploring the "client" in client engagement.

    PubMed

    Petriwskyj, Andrea; Gibson, Alexandra; Webby, Glenys

    2014-12-01

    Despite growing recognition in health and care services of the necessity for client engagement, it is still not easily put into practice. This is owing to a range of factors relating to participating staff and clients, as well as the broader institutional context. One of the central factors affecting client engagement is the challenge it poses to traditional power relations inherent in care relationships and contexts. This is particularly the case in aged care services, which have traditionally positioned older adults in passive roles as "recipients" of care, or as lacking capacity to participate in care decision making. This paper presents an exploration of client engagement practices within a large aged care service provider in Australia. Interviews and focus group discussions with clients and staff were analysed for the ways in which clients were positioned - by both themselves and by staff - in terms of the roles that they hold within engagement practices. Four positions were identified: "Passivity, disempowerment and bestowal of power", "Role of expert/consumer", "Resistance, compliance and manageability", and "Complexity, diversity and uniqueness". While clients were positioned at times in empowering roles, they were simultaneously limited by personal, relational, or organisational constraints, making opportunities for client engagement provisional. This reflects a tension between passive and empowered client roles in the context of aged care provision.

  5. Clinical Aspects of Assessment and Intervention with Resistant Clients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burr, Helen Turner

    Elderly clients resistant to help present an ethical dilemma for professionals. This dilemma may climax when assumption of authority over the client for his safety is necessary. Social workers need to work for decisions closest to the wishes of the client. The at-risk client should be informed about changes that will occur and how these changes…

  6. Client Engagement Characteristics Associated with Problem Gambling Treatment Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dowling, Nicki A.; Cosic, Sanja

    2011-01-01

    Previous research examining the factors associated with problem gambling treatment outcomes has examined client factors and to date, treatment characteristics, therapist factors, and client-therapist interactions have essentially remained unexplored. This study aimed to investigate how client engagement variables (client-rated therapeutic…

  7. 42 CFR 483.420 - Condition of participation: Client protections.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) STANDARDS AND CERTIFICATION REQUIREMENTS FOR STATES AND LONG TERM CARE...' rights. The facility must ensure the rights of all clients. Therefore, the facility must— (1) Inform each client, parent (if the client is a minor), or legal guardian, of the client's rights and the rules of...

  8. 42 CFR 483.420 - Condition of participation: Client protections.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) STANDARDS AND CERTIFICATION REQUIREMENTS FOR STATES AND LONG TERM CARE...' rights. The facility must ensure the rights of all clients. Therefore, the facility must— (1) Inform each client, parent (if the client is a minor), or legal guardian, of the client's rights and the rules of...

  9. 42 CFR 483.420 - Condition of participation: Client protections.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) STANDARDS AND CERTIFICATION REQUIREMENTS FOR STATES AND LONG TERM CARE...' rights. The facility must ensure the rights of all clients. Therefore, the facility must— (1) Inform each client, parent (if the client is a minor), or legal guardian, of the client's rights and the rules of...

  10. 32 CFR 776.33 - Client with diminished capacity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Client with diminished capacity. 776.33 Section... Rules of Professional Conduct § 776.33 Client with diminished capacity. (a) Client with diminished capacity: (1) When a client's ability to make adequately considered decisions in connection with...

  11. 32 CFR 776.33 - Client with diminished capacity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Client with diminished capacity. 776.33 Section... Rules of Professional Conduct § 776.33 Client with diminished capacity. (a) Client with diminished capacity: (1) When a client's ability to make adequately considered decisions in connection with...

  12. 32 CFR 776.33 - Client with diminished capacity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Client with diminished capacity. 776.33 Section... Rules of Professional Conduct § 776.33 Client with diminished capacity. (a) Client with diminished capacity: (1) When a client's ability to make adequately considered decisions in connection with...

  13. 32 CFR 776.33 - Client with diminished capacity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Client with diminished capacity. 776.33 Section... Rules of Professional Conduct § 776.33 Client with diminished capacity. (a) Client with diminished capacity: (1) When a client's ability to make adequately considered decisions in connection with...

  14. Moving beyond Consultation and into Action with a Client Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ewing, Sara; Dover, Howard F.

    2012-01-01

    Attempting to implement client-based projects within a single semester often overwhelms students and underwhelms the client and grading professor. In this paper, we share results from a two-year pilot project in which the components of a client project were split between several classes. We discuss the client project model as a valuable teaching…

  15. The Relationship between Client Attachment and Therapist Interventions in Client-Nominated Relationship-Building Incidents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Janzen, Jennifer I.; Fitzpatrick, Marilyn R.; Drapeau, Martin; Blake, Emily

    2010-01-01

    Twenty-four clients were asked to nominate an incident that was critical to the development of their therapeutic relationship with a trainee therapist. Therapist interventions within each client relationship building incident (RBI) were identified. The results of multiple regression indicated that attachment anxiety moderated the relationship…

  16. Counselor Trainees' Self-Statement Responses to Sexually and Physically Abused Clients, and Client Role Conflict.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parisien, Lynne S.; Long, Bonita C.

    1994-01-01

    Assessed 63 female counselor trainees after viewing videotape of client reporting sexual abuse, physical abuse, or role conflict. Results indicated that trainees who expected to counsel sexually abused client increased their positive self-statements. Applied Schwartz's States-of-Mind model to self-statement ratios, and, according to model,…

  17. Clinical Writing about Clients: Seeking Consent and Negotiating the Impact on Clients and Their Treatments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bridges, Nancy A.

    2010-01-01

    The author discusses her experiences seeking consent from 16 clients to use clinical material for publication. Sharing case examples from her practice, she elucidates her process with clients and focuses on the beneficial and detrimental effects on the therapeutic relationship. Seeking consent raises issues of confidentiality and stimulates…

  18. ANDES TOOLS: Promotional slides for Industrial Clients

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-09-03

    Briefing Charts 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) 10 August 2015 – 3 September 2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE ANDES TOOLS: Promotional slides for Industrial ...Clients 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER FA9300-13-C-2014 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Tim Holmes, D.Sc. 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 5e. TASK... Industrial Clients PA Case Number: #15479; Clearance Date: 9/3/2015 14. ABSTRACT Briefing Charts/Viewgraphs 15. SUBJECT TERMS N/A 16. SECURITY

  19. Neurobiological response to EMDR therapy in clients with different psychological traumas

    PubMed Central

    Pagani, Marco; Di Lorenzo, Giorgio; Monaco, Leonardo; Daverio, Andrea; Giannoudas, Ioannis; La Porta, Patrizia; Verardo, Anna R.; Niolu, Cinzia; Fernandez, Isabel; Siracusano, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    We assessed cortical activation differences in real-time upon exposure to traumatic memory between two distinct groups of psychologically traumatized clients also in comparison with healthy controls. We used electroencephalography (EEG) to compare neuronal activation throughout the bilateral stimulation phase of Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing (EMDR) sessions. We compared activation between the first (T0) and the last (T1) session, the latter performed after processing the index trauma. The group including all clients showed significantly higher cortical activity in orbito-frontal cortex at T0 shifting at T1 toward posterior associative regions. However, the subgroup of clients with chronic exposure to the traumatic event showed a cortical firing at both stages which was closer to that of controls. For the first time EEG monitoring enabled to disclose neurobiological differences between groups of clients with different trauma histories during the reliving of the traumatic event. Cortical activations in clients chronically exposed to traumatic memories were moderate, suggesting an association between social and environmental contexts with the neurobiological response to trauma exposure and psychotherapy. PMID:26579006

  20. Family Therapy: A Client-Centered Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levant, Ronald F.

    1978-01-01

    This article critiques therapist-directed approaches to family therapy in light of research findings on therapist variables associated with positive outcomes in psychotherapy. An alternative, phenomenological view of the family is developed, which assumes the family to be motivated for enhancement and growth. A client-centered approach is…

  1. Borderline Clients: Practice Implications of Recent Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Harriette C.

    1991-01-01

    Reviews current research on treatment of borderline clients with medication, individual counseling, and family interventions. Notes that recent studies indicate that borderline personality is heterogeneous condition in which different underlying disorders (affective, schizotypal, and neurological) may be present. Reviews effectiveness of various…

  2. Brain Damage in Deaf Vocational Rehabilitation Clients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Getz, Marc; Vernon, McCay

    1986-01-01

    Screening of 54 deaf vocational clients by the Bender-Gestalt and other tests indicated the likely presence of significantly more brain damage than among the hearing population with a particularly high correlation between low IQ and brain damage in the deaf population. (DB)

  3. Trust and the Client-Consultant Relationship

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Solomonson, William L.

    2012-01-01

    This study seeks to improve the contributions of performance consultants, instructional design consultants, and training consultants by explaining the effect that several variables have on trust as a mediator to relationship commitment within the context of the client-consultant relationship. The participants were 228 college students from two…

  4. Client-Centered Employee Assistance Services.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bayer, Darryl Lee

    This paper addresses delivery aspects and benefits of client-centered Employee Assistance Program (EAP) services through a review of the literature and research. EAP services are described as educational and mental health services utilized to assist employees and their families to respond constructively to job, personal, interpersonal or…

  5. Congenitally Blind Counselor, Adventitiously Blind Client.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roberts, A. H.

    1994-01-01

    A counselor blind from birth describes personal difficulties in fully understanding the experience of clients who are adventitiously blind. Congenitally blind counselors are urged to recognize that adaptive methods cannot compensate for the panoramic view of the environment provided by vision and that recently blinded individuals need to deal with…

  6. Finding Happiness for Ourselves and Our Clients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Geri

    2001-01-01

    Reviews D. G. Myers' (2000) examination of the contributing factors of happiness: money, relationships, and religion. Discusses the implications of these factors for counseling with specific recommendations made for counselors regarding their own self-care and their work with their clients. (GCP)

  7. A Guide to the Client Assessment Package.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    NTS Research Corp., Durham, NC.

    This guide provides users of the Client Assessment Package (CAP)--a system of forms for recording the process of seeking and using information and assistance for educational improvement--with definitions, operational procedures, and instructions necessary to complete the forms accurately. The purposes of CAP are threefold: to help develop an…

  8. Three-Dimensional Audio Client Library

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rizzi, Stephen A.

    2005-01-01

    The Three-Dimensional Audio Client Library (3DAudio library) is a group of software routines written to facilitate development of both stand-alone (audio only) and immersive virtual-reality application programs that utilize three-dimensional audio displays. The library is intended to enable the development of three-dimensional audio client application programs by use of a code base common to multiple audio server computers. The 3DAudio library calls vendor-specific audio client libraries and currently supports the AuSIM Gold-Server and Lake Huron audio servers. 3DAudio library routines contain common functions for (1) initiation and termination of a client/audio server session, (2) configuration-file input, (3) positioning functions, (4) coordinate transformations, (5) audio transport functions, (6) rendering functions, (7) debugging functions, and (8) event-list-sequencing functions. The 3DAudio software is written in the C++ programming language and currently operates under the Linux, IRIX, and Windows operating systems.

  9. Perception of voice in the transgender client.

    PubMed

    McNeill, Emma J M; Wilson, Janet A; Clark, Susan; Deakin, Jayne

    2008-11-01

    Fundamental frequency (F(0)) of speech is used to measure the success of voice therapy in male-to-female transgender clients. This study evaluates the relationship between F(0) and patients' happiness with their voice. The study design used was a cross-sectional evaluation of client satisfaction questionnaires and voice recordings from transgender clients. This study was a comparative evaluation of voice recordings by voice professionals and lay observers. Twelve male-to-female transgender participants completed visual analogue scales (VASs), rating happiness with self-perceived femininity of their voice. Fifteen speech and language therapists (SLTs) and 40 naïve observers evaluated the anonymized recordings, using the same rating system. The correlation between mean F(0) and participant happiness was established. Relationships between participant happiness and rater opinions were explored. A significant relationship between F(0) and participant happiness could not be demonstrated (r=0.32, P=0.32). There was a moderately strong positive correlation between self-perception of vocal femininity and perception of femininity by SLTs and naïve observers (r=0.76 and 0.68, P=0.003 and P=0.01, respectively). This study demonstrates that happiness with voice in male-to-female transgender clients is not directly related to F(0). Clients can assess femininity of their voice in the form of perceived pitch. This may not affect happiness scores. Voice satisfaction may not correlate with perceptions of supervising voice professionals. However, professionals can reliably evaluate how the voice will be received by the lay public. Subjective measures of patient satisfaction, including VASs, are reliable and valid tools in evaluating therapeutic success.

  10. Asymmetry of Responsiveness in Client-Centered Therapy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shapiro, David A.

    1977-01-01

    Each utterance of a psychotherapy session conducted by Carl Rogers was transcribed on a separate card. Fifteen undergraduate subjects reconstituted client-therapist sequences more accurately than therapist-client sequences. (Author)

  11. Gender Dysphoria: The Therapist's Dilemma--The Client's Choice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sherebrin, Hannah

    1996-01-01

    Therapist's role and dilemmas faced in treating a gender dysphoric client are discussed. Examines ethical and moral issues relating to transsexualism and discusses the appropriateness of art therapy as a treatment for transsexual clients. (SNR)

  12. 31 CFR 10.28 - Return of client's records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... documents or written or electronic materials provided to the practitioner, or obtained by the practitioner... the practitioner by the client. The term also includes materials that were prepared by the client or...

  13. 42 CFR 483.420 - Condition of participation: Client protections.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... treatment; (3) Allow and encourage individual clients to exercise their rights as clients of the facility... food or hydration that contributes to a nutritionally adequate diet. (iii) The facility must...

  14. Earthdata Search Client: Usability Review Process, Results, and Implemented Changes, Using Earthdata Search Client as a Case Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siarto, Jeff; Reese, Mark; Shum, Dana; Baynes, Katie

    2016-01-01

    User experience and visual design are greatly improved when usability testing is performed on a periodic basis. Design decisions should be tested by real users so that application owners can understand the effectiveness of each decision and identify areas for improvement. It is important that applications be tested not just once, but as a part of a continuing process that looks to build upon previous tests. NASA's Earthdata Search Client has undergone a usability study to ensure its users' needs are being met and that users understand how to use the tool efficiently and effectively. This poster will highlight the process followed for usability study, the results of the study, and what has been implemented in light of the results to improve the application's interface.

  15. A Program Evaluation Using Client Records and Census Data.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bachrach, Kenneth M.; Zautra, Alex

    Use of client records and census data as a research methodology can provide mental health planners with information on community needs as well as the adequacy of existing programs. Three ways of analyzing client records in conjunction with census data are: (1) tract by tract, comparing client geographic distribution with census characteristics;…

  16. Health Promotion through the Use of Nurse-Client Contracts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Dover, Leslie J.

    Much of the practice of community health nurses is focused on health promotion. Nurse-client contracting has been used with clients experiencing hypertension, diabetes, or arthritis. A study was conducted to determine whether nurse-client contracting would be useful as a method for providing nursing care to assist sexually active young women to…

  17. Barbershop Prostate Cancer Education: Factors Associated with Client Knowledge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hill, Barry C.; Black, David R.; Shields, Cleveland G.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to identify characteristics of Black barbershop clients and barbers in an urban Midwestern city participating in a health promotion program called Affecting Cancer Together (ACT) that are associated with client knowledge about prostate cancer. Statistical analyses examined client and barber characteristics for their…

  18. Clients with MMPI High D-PD: Therapy Implications.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Wayne; Bauer, Barbara

    1985-01-01

    Compared personal characteristics of 80 counseling clients with elevated 2-4 (Depression-Psychiatric Deviate) scales on their Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory and 109 clients without elevations. Results indicated that clients with 2-4 elevations were significantly more depressed, had lower self-esteem, and were more likely to come from…

  19. Ambiguity Tolerance of Therapists and Process Changes of Their Clients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tucker, Robin C.; Snyder, William U.

    1974-01-01

    The study investigated the relationships between student-therapists' tolerance for ambiguity in visual perception tasks and (a)the positive affect displayed toward them by their clients, (b)measures of improvement in clients' self self-reference statements, and (c)measures of improvement in clients'"adjustment". (Author)

  20. What Business Students Should Know about Attorney-Client Privilege

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Draba, Robert; Marshall, Brent

    2012-01-01

    The case law on attorney-client privilege is extensive and can be somewhat complex. Over seven hundred articles in Westlaw, for example, have the phrase "attorney-client privilege" in the title; in the last three years alone, there have been over 3700 federal cases in which the phrase "attorney-client privilege" appears at least once. However,…

  1. 19 CFR 111.39 - Advice to client.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... false information. A broker must not withhold information relative to any customs business from a client... false information relative to any customs business. (b) Error or omission by client. If a broker knows that a client has not complied with the law or has made an error in, or omission from, any...

  2. Predicting Categories of Improvement among Counseling Center Clients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hummel, Thomas J.; Lichtenberg, James W.

    In looking at whether clients will improve with counseling, counselors must first determine what kinds of outcomes are likely with certain clients. In order to make probabilistic statements about individual client outcomes, rather than about the more generalized outcome of counseling, a different approach is needed. Using data from counseling…

  3. 32 CFR 776.33 - Client under a disability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Client under a disability. 776.33 Section 776.33... of Professional Conduct § 776.33 Client under a disability. (a) Client under a disability: (1) When a... impaired, whether because of minority, mental disability, or for some other reason, the covered...

  4. 32 CFR 776.4 - Attorney-client relationships.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Attorney-client relationships. 776.4 Section 776... General § 776.4 Attorney-client relationships. (a) The executive agency to which assigned (DON in most... will not establish attorney-client relationships with any individual unless detailed, assigned,...

  5. 32 CFR 776.4 - Attorney-client relationships.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Attorney-client relationships. 776.4 Section 776... General § 776.4 Attorney-client relationships. (a) The executive agency to which assigned (DON in most... will not establish attorney-client relationships with any individual unless detailed, assigned,...

  6. Negotiating Post-Consultation "Homework" Tasks between Counselors and Clients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strong, Tom; Massfeller, Helen F.

    2010-01-01

    Counselors frequently conclude consultations with clients with suggestions or prescriptions for clients to follow up on, post-consultation. In this paper, we conceptualize the discussion regarding such post-consultation tasks as negotiations between counselor and client, focusing in particular on what observably occurs and is "talked into being"…

  7. Successful Vocational Rehabilitation of Clients with Retinitis Pigmentosa.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taheri-Araghi, M.; Hendren, G.

    1994-01-01

    Statistical analysis of 10 personal (client) variables and four program variables related to 76 people who became blind from retinitis pigmentosa revealed that 6 variables predicted clients' rehabilitation outcomes: age, gender, race, work status, amount of case-service money spent on the client's behalf, and number of changes in career objectives…

  8. 37 CFR 11.113 - Organization as client.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 37 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Organization as client. 11... Rules of Professional Conduct Client-Practitioner Relationship § 11.113 Organization as client. (a) A practitioner employed or retained by an organization represents the organization acting through its...

  9. Can Knowledge of Client Birth Order Bias Clinical Judgment?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stewart, Allan E.

    2004-01-01

    Clinicians (N = 308) responded to identical counseling vignettes of a male client that differed only in the client's stated birth order. Clinicians developed different impressions about the client and his family experiences that corresponded with the prototypical descriptions of persons from 1 of 4 birth orders (i.e., first, middle, youngest, and…

  10. Accommodating Extension Clients Who Face Language, Vision, or Hearing Challenges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Angima, Sam; Etuk, Lena; Maddy, Deborah

    2016-01-01

    A survey-based study explored approaches used by one land-grant university to meet the needs of Extension clients who face language, vision, or hearing challenges. In attempts to serve such clients, the greatest gaps existed for clients whose main language was Spanish, followed by those who had vision impairments and then those who had hearing…

  11. 31 CFR 10.21 - Knowledge of client's omission.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Knowledge of client's omission. 10.21 Section 10.21 Money and Finance: Treasury Office of the Secretary of the Treasury PRACTICE BEFORE THE... § 10.21 Knowledge of client's omission. A practitioner who, having been retained by a client...

  12. Counselor Beliefs and Perceived Knowledge Regarding Clients with Learning Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bell, Tamekia R.

    2012-01-01

    Clients with learning disabilities constitute a cultural group that has not been extensively studied. The professional literature has found that counselors have reported the need for additional training in working with clients with disabilities. This study explored counselors' beliefs and perceived knowledge regarding counseling clients with…

  13. Incorporating Perceived Importance of Service Elements into Client Satisfaction Measures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hsieh, Chang-Ming

    2012-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to assess the need for incorporating perceived importance of service elements into client satisfaction measures. Method: A secondary analysis of client satisfaction data from 112 clients of an elderly case management setting was conducted. Results: This study found that the relationship between global…

  14. Educating Therapists in Training about Clients' Expectations of Treatment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reynolds, Kathleen; Ogiba, Shawn; Chambliss, Catherine

    Training therapists effectively requires familiarizing them with the modal expectations that clients bring to the therapeutic encounter. Ways in which therapists can be apprised of clients' expectations of therapy are discussed. Accurate understanding of clients' attitudes permits development of appropriately focused therapy goals and is generally…

  15. Brief Therapy with Difficult Clients. Hatherleigh Professional Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Loar, Lynn

    1995-01-01

    Brief therapy is an effective, time-limited approach that invokes clients values, appreciates their strengths, and is based on mutual respect. Counseling nonvoluntary clients can be extremely difficult because of the intense degree of denial, minimization, or rationalization of problems such clients typically bring to therapy. Therapists must…

  16. Client satisfaction. Operations research activities and results.

    PubMed

    1998-06-01

    Operations research (OR) is a major component of the Quality Assurance Project's (QAP) strategy for improving the quality of health care delivery worldwide. QAP's Operations Research Program aims to improve the feasibility, utility, and cost-effectiveness of quality assurance strategies in developing countries. QAP and its field partners work to maximize the utility of each field study's findings. As such, the project hopes to disseminate information on all aspects of important OR projects, from the initial design to implementation and results. Over the course of the project, QAP's staff and their partners will develop studies in 16 technical areas. One key area of interest is the study of client satisfaction with health care delivery. The project currently has two major studies on client satisfaction underway in Niger and Peru. Phase one results from the Niger research and QAP and the Max Salud Institute in Peru are discussed.

  17. Channel Access Client Toolbox for Matlab

    SciTech Connect

    Terebilo, Andrei

    2002-08-07

    This paper reports on MATLAB Channel Access (MCA) Toolbox--MATLAB [1] interface to EPICS Channel Access (CA) client library. We are developing the toolbox for SPEAR3 accelerator controls, but it is of general use for accelerator and experimental physics applications programming. It is packaged as a MATLAB toolbox to allow easy development of complex CA client applications entirely in MATLAB. The benefits include: the ability to calculate and display parameters that use EPICS process variables as inputs, availability of MATLAB graphics tools for user interface design, and integration with the MATLAB-based accelerator modeling software--Accelerator Toolbox [2-4]. Another purpose of this paper is to propose a feasible path to a synergy between accelerator control systems and accelerator simulation codes, the idea known as on-line accelerator model.

  18. Illegal abortion in Mexico: client perceptions.

    PubMed Central

    de Weiss, S P; David, H P

    1990-01-01

    An exploratory study of the perceptions of 156 abortion clients in Mexico suggests that perceived quality of service was the main reason for choosing physicians while cost and anonymity were the major reasons for choosing nonphysicians. "Too young" was the most often cited reason for pregnancy termination, followed by economic situation and having too many children already. Cost was, on average, equivalent to three to four weeks minimum wage; physicians' charges were about three times higher than those of nonphysicians. PMID:2343958

  19. Client-side Skype forensics: an overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meißner, Tina; Kröger, Knut; Creutzburg, Reiner

    2013-03-01

    IT security and computer forensics are important components in the information technology. In the present study, a client-side Skype forensics is performed. It is designed to explain which kind of user data are stored on a computer and which tools allow the extraction of those data for a forensic investigation. There are described both methods - a manual analysis and an analysis with (mainly) open source tools, respectively.

  20. Client preferences for HIV inpatient care delivery.

    PubMed

    McDonald, R; Free, D; Ross, F; Mitchell, P

    1998-06-01

    This study was concerned with preferences for inpatient models of care by the HIV/AIDS client group, in particular the difference between gay white men (European) and black heterosexuals of African/Caribbean origin. Satisfaction with the care currently provided was also an area of interest. Thirteen per cent (n = 79) of the were surveyed. Seventy per cent (n = 56) of the HIV/AIDS client group indicated a preference for a dedicated care model. Significant results were obtained demonstrating differences in the care model preferred by gay white men and black heterosexuals (p < 0.01). Gay white men were much more likely to state they would leave the trust to receive dedicated care (p < 0.01). Black heterosexuals were more likely to state that they would change treatment areas to avoid dedicated care (p < 0.01) Differences in concern about confidentiality were noted between the two groups. Confidentiality may be one of a number of factors influencing preference of care for African/Caribbeans and this needs to be studied further. The clients surveyed were not universally satisfied with the care they had been receiving. Following the results of the survey radical changes in the management of HIV inpatient care were made.

  1. Evaluating the Influence of the Client Behavior in Cloud Computing

    PubMed Central

    Centurion, Adriana Molina; Franco Eustáquio, Paulo Sérgio; Carlucci Santana, Regina Helena; Bruschi, Sarita Mazzini; Santana, Marcos José

    2016-01-01

    This paper proposes a novel approach for the implementation of simulation scenarios, providing a client entity for cloud computing systems. The client entity allows the creation of scenarios in which the client behavior has an influence on the simulation, making the results more realistic. The proposed client entity is based on several characteristics that affect the performance of a cloud computing system, including different modes of submission and their behavior when the waiting time between requests (think time) is considered. The proposed characterization of the client enables the sending of either individual requests or group of Web services to scenarios where the workload takes the form of bursts. The client entity is included in the CloudSim, a framework for modelling and simulation of cloud computing. Experimental results show the influence of the client behavior on the performance of the services executed in a cloud computing system. PMID:27441559

  2. A molecular mechanism of chaperone-client recognition

    PubMed Central

    He, Lichun; Sharpe, Timothy; Mazur, Adam; Hiller, Sebastian

    2016-01-01

    Molecular chaperones are essential in aiding client proteins to fold into their native structure and in maintaining cellular protein homeostasis. However, mechanistic aspects of chaperone function are still not well understood at the atomic level. We use nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy to elucidate the mechanism underlying client recognition by the adenosine triphosphate-independent chaperone Spy at the atomic level and derive a structural model for the chaperone-client complex. Spy interacts with its partially folded client Im7 by selective recognition of flexible, locally frustrated regions in a dynamic fashion. The interaction with Spy destabilizes a partially folded client but spatially compacts an unfolded client conformational ensemble. By increasing client backbone dynamics, the chaperone facilitates the search for the native structure. A comparison of the interaction of Im7 with two other chaperones suggests that the underlying principle of recognizing frustrated segments is of a fundamental nature. PMID:28138538

  3. Evaluating the Influence of the Client Behavior in Cloud Computing.

    PubMed

    Souza Pardo, Mário Henrique; Centurion, Adriana Molina; Franco Eustáquio, Paulo Sérgio; Carlucci Santana, Regina Helena; Bruschi, Sarita Mazzini; Santana, Marcos José

    2016-01-01

    This paper proposes a novel approach for the implementation of simulation scenarios, providing a client entity for cloud computing systems. The client entity allows the creation of scenarios in which the client behavior has an influence on the simulation, making the results more realistic. The proposed client entity is based on several characteristics that affect the performance of a cloud computing system, including different modes of submission and their behavior when the waiting time between requests (think time) is considered. The proposed characterization of the client enables the sending of either individual requests or group of Web services to scenarios where the workload takes the form of bursts. The client entity is included in the CloudSim, a framework for modelling and simulation of cloud computing. Experimental results show the influence of the client behavior on the performance of the services executed in a cloud computing system.

  4. Neurofeedback outcomes in clients with Asperger's syndrome.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Lynda; Thompson, Michael; Reid, Andrea

    2010-03-01

    This paper summarizes data from a review of neurofeedback (NFB) training with 150 clients with Asperger's Syndrome (AS) and 9 clients with Autistic Spectrum Disorder (ASD) seen over a 15 year period (1993-2008) in a clinical setting. The main objective was to investigate whether electroncephalographic (EEG) biofeedback, also called neurofeedback (NFB), made a significant difference in clients diagnosed with AS. An earlier paper (Thompson et al. 2009) reviews the symptoms of AS, highlights research findings and theories concerning this disorder, discusses QEEG patterns in AS (both single and 19-channel), and details a hypothesis, based on functional neuroanatomy, concerning how NFB, often paired with biofeedback (BFB), might produce a change in symptoms. A further aim of the current report is to provide practitioners with a detailed description of the method used to address some of the key symptoms of AS in order to encourage further research and clinical work to refine the use of NFB plus BFB in the treatment of AS. All charts were included for review where there was a diagnosis of AS or ASD and pre- and post-training testing results were available for one or more of the standardized tests used. Clients received 40-60 sessions of NFB, which was combined with training in metacognitive strategies and, for most older adolescent and adult clients, with BFB of respiration, electrodermal response, and, more recently, heart rate variability. For the majority of clients, feedback was contingent on decreasing slow wave activity (usually 3-7 Hz), decreasing beta spindling if it was present (usually between 23 and 35 Hz), and increasing fast wave activity termed sensorimotor rhythm (SMR) (12-15 or 13-15 Hz depending on assessment findings). The most common initial montage was referential placement at the vertex (CZ) for children and at FCz (midway between FZ and CZ) for adults, referenced to the right ear. Metacognitive strategies relevant to social understanding, spatial

  5. Attaching client processors to the NSL with HIPPI IPI-3

    SciTech Connect

    1996-02-08

    The National Storage Laboratory (NSL) is currently implementing a prototype storage system that utilizes network attached high performance storage devices to transfer data directly between storage devices and client processors using HIPPI IPI-3. The client processors in use at the NSL include Cray YMP-C90 supercomputers, IBM RISC System 6000 workstations, Silicon Graphics workstations, SUN workstations, and a PsiTech frame buffer. This paper describes the HIPPI IPI-3 interface between the client processors and the storage devices. It is intended to serve as a guide for vendors who desire to connect their products to the NSL. Clients direct their requests to a distributed storage system. A typical storage system will contain multiple storage devices. The storage system map client`s files onto regions on the storage devices. At the NSL, the data transfers are performed directly between the client processors and the storage devices, bypassing any processors in the storage system. The protocol used between the client processors and the storage devices is HIPPI IPI-3 third party copy. When a client processor wants to read or write data to or from the storage system, the client processor sends a request to the storage system across a control connection. The control path to the storage system is logically separated from the data path. When the storage system is ready to perform a data transfer, a third-party IPI-3 read or write command is sent to one of the IPI-3 slave devices in the storage system. The slave device then transfers the data directly to or from the client processor across the HIPPI data network. Using third party copy simplifies the implementation of the client processor`s interface to the storage system by isolating the client processors from the specific characteristics of the storage devices.

  6. A client/server approach to telemedicine.

    PubMed Central

    Vaughan, B. J.; Torok, K. E.; Kelly, L. M.; Ewing, D. J.; Andrews, L. T.

    1995-01-01

    This paper describes the Medical College of Ohio's efforts in developing a client/server telemedicine system. Telemedicine vastly improves the ability of a medical center physician or specialist to interactively consult with a physician at a remote health care facility. The patient receives attention more quickly, he and his family do not need to travel long distances to obtain specialists' services, and the primary care physician can be involved in diagnosis and developing a treatment program [1, 2]. Telemedicine consultations are designed to improve access to health services in underserved urban and rural communities and reduce isolation of rural practitioners [3]. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:8563396

  7. Client outcomes and the working alliance in the client-case manager relationship: a causal analysis.

    PubMed

    Cunningham, Jennifer; Calsyn, Robert J; Burger, Gary K; Morse, Gary A; Klinkenberg, W Dean

    2007-01-01

    This study investigated the causal relationship between the working alliance and client outcomes in the client-case manager relationship. All 162 study participants received services fiom a case manager who worked as a member of an assertive community treatment team. All participants had both a substance use disorder and a diagnosis of severe mental illness and were homeless at baseline. A brief form of the Working Alliance Inventory (WAI) was used to measure the working alliance after 3 and 15 months of treatment. The Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale was used to measure psychiatric symptoms at baseline, 9, and 18 months. Days per month that clients used alcohol or illegal drugs was also assessed at baseline, 9, and 18 months. The data were analyzed using structural equation modeling (SEM). The correlations between the working alliance and the outcome measures were lower than similar correlations obtained in studies investigating the psychotherapy relationship. The SEM analyses revealed little or no causal relationship between the working alliance and client outcome in this sample.

  8. Spiritual interventions in psychotherapy: evaluations by highly religious clients.

    PubMed

    Martinez, Jennifer S; Smith, Timothy B; Barlow, Sally H

    2007-10-01

    Spiritual and religious interventions in psychotherapy have increasingly received research attention, particularly with highly religious clients. This study examined client opinions about and experiences with religious interventions in psychotherapy. A sample of 152 clients at a counseling center of a university sponsored by the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints (LDS) completed a survey with ratings of specific religious interventions concerning appropriateness, helpfulness, and prevalence. Out-of-session religious interventions were considered more appropriate by clients than in-session religious interventions, but in-session interventions were rated as more helpful. Specific interventions considered both appropriate and helpful by the LDS participants included referencing scriptural passages, teaching spiritual concepts, encouraging forgiveness, involving religious community resources, and conducting assessments of client spirituality. Some religious interventions were perceived as inappropriate or not helpful, and clients provided explanations for why religious interventions can be either effective or ineffective in psychotherapy.

  9. Use of an anecdotal client feedback note in family therapy.

    PubMed

    Haber, Russell; Carlson, Ryan G; Braga, Cristina

    2014-06-01

    To attain information about divergent agendas in family therapy, as well as incorporate client feedback, we present the Client Feedback Note (CFN). The CFN elicits information about each family member's feelings, learning, dislikes, and wishes for each session. Anecdotal feedback after each session may help the therapist have better insight into the clients' perceptions and experience of the therapy and the therapist. Sensitivity to information generated by the CFN can help both therapist and client work to coconstruct a therapeutic process that is relevant to the diverse needs of the client system. This manuscript will (a) discuss literature supporting the use of client feedback in therapy; (b) present the CFN and rationale for its development; (c) discuss our experiences utilizing the CFN along with case examples that illustrate its use; and (d) identify practical applications, limitations, and potential research with using the CFN in systemic therapy.

  10. Therapist influence on client language during motivational interviewing sessions.

    PubMed

    Moyers, Theresa B; Martin, Tim

    2006-04-01

    Client language in favor of change is hypothesized to be a causal mechanism for motivational interviewing (MI), and specific therapist behaviors are prescribed to elicit such speech. This project examined 38 motivational enhancement therapy sessions from Project MATCH (Matching Alcoholism Treatments to Client Heterogeneity), using a sequential behavioral coding system to investigate the relationship between therapist behaviors and client speech. Conditional probabilities were calculated between MI-consistent (MICO) therapist behaviors, MI-inconsistent (MIIN) therapist behaviors, and immediately subsequent client speech. MICO behaviors were more likely to be followed by self-motivational statements, whereas MIIN behaviors were more likely to be followed by client resistance. These results lend support to the importance of therapist behaviors in shaping client speech during MI sessions.

  11. Spiritual Pain in Meals on Wheels’ Clients

    PubMed Central

    Boss, Lisa; Branson, Sandy; Cron, Stanley; Kang, Duck-Hee

    2015-01-01

    Background: Meals on Wheels’ clients are at risk for spiritual pain due to advanced age, social isolation, and failing health. They are also prone to stress, depression, and loneliness, placing them at risk for adverse biological disruptions and health outcomes. The purpose of the study was to examine associations of spiritual pain with psychosocial factors (stress, depression, loneliness, religious coping) and salivary biomarkers of stress and inflammation (cortisol, IL-1β) in Meals on Wheels’ clients. Methods: Data were collected cross-sectionally from 88 elderly (mean age 75.4). Spiritual pain, stress, depression, loneliness, and religious coping were measured with standardized instruments, and salivary biomarkers were assessed with enzyme immunoassays. Results: Spiritual pain was significantly and positively correlated with stress (r = 0.35, p ≤ 0.001), depression (r = 0.27, p = 0.01), and negative religious coping (r = 0.27, p = 0.01). Correlations with loneliness, positive religious coping, and salivary biomarkers were non-significant. Conclusion: Spiritual pain is an important concept in this population. Research should be expanded to understand the significance of spiritual pain in conjunction with psychosocial and biological variables and its potential impact on physical, mental, and cognitive health outcomes in the elderly. PMID:27417804

  12. Hardened Client Platforms for Secure Internet Banking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ronchi, C.; Zakhidov, S.

    We review the security of e-banking platforms with particular attention to the exploitable attack vectors of three main attack categories: Man-in-the-Middle, Man-in-the-PC and Man-in-the-Browser. It will be shown that the most serious threats come from combination attacks capable of hacking any transaction without the need to control the authentication process. Using this approach, the security of any authentication system can be bypassed, including those using SecureID Tokens, OTP Tokens, Biometric Sensors and Smart Cards. We will describe and compare two recently proposed e-banking platforms, the ZTIC and the USPD, both of which are based on the use of dedicated client devices, but with diverging approaches with respect to the need of hardening the Web client application. It will be shown that the use of a Hardened Browser (or H-Browser) component is critical to force attackers to employ complex and expensive techniques and to reduce the strength and variety of social engineering attacks down to physiological fraud levels.

  13. Fetishistic Preferences of Clients as Ranked by a Sex Worker.

    PubMed

    Cernovsky, Zack Zdenek

    2016-08-17

    A former escort girl and stripper, now retired and in her forties, of intelligence at the level comparable to that of university graduates, was interviewed about unusual sexual requests of her former clients. She reported that most frequent requests were (1) those involving a foot or shoe fetish, (2) those to sell to the male client her underwear, and (3) those to urinate into her underwear before selling it to the client.

  14. Client relations in South Asia: programmatic and societal determinants.

    PubMed

    Simmons, R; Koblinsky, M A; Phillips, J F

    1986-01-01

    Client relations constitute a neglected area of research in family planning. Findings from studies in northern India and Bangladesh reveal considerable variation in both the quantity and quality of contacts in programs that function under roughly comparable socioeconomic conditions. Client relations are determined by a complex set of forces in which both programmatic factors and conditions pertaining to the societal environment play a key role. Worker-client exchanges have a net, incremental effect on contraceptive use.

  15. Strategies for designing culturally relevant client education materials.

    PubMed

    Murphy, J L; Giger, J N; Davidhizar, R

    1994-01-01

    This article addresses strategies for designing and implementing a culturally significant and appropriate client education tool for use with non-English-speaking clients or for any client in a culture different from the mainstream. These strategies include: (1) understanding the relationship between culture and behavior, (2) developing a strategic plan, (3) gathering demographic data about the setting, (4) evaluating the characteristics of the learner, and (5) developing culturally specific, unique education learning materials.

  16. Fresh Wounds: Metadata and Usability Lessons from building the Earthdata Search Client

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pilone, D.; Quinn, P.; Murphy, K. J.; Baynes, K.

    2014-12-01

    Data discovery and accessibility are frequent topics in science conferences but are usually discussed in an abstract XML schema kind-of way. In the course of designing and building the NASA Earthdata Search Client, a "concept-car" discovery client for the new Common Metadata Repository (CMR) and NASA Earthdata, we learned important lessons about usability from user studies and our actual use of science metadata. In this talk we challenge the community with the issues we ran into: the critical usability stumbling blocks for even seasoned researchers, "bug reports" from users that were ultimately usability problems in metadata, the challenges and questions that arise from incorporating "visual metadata", and the state of data access services. We intend to show that high quality metadata and real human usability factors are essential to making critical data accessible.

  17. Multi-client quantum key distribution using wavelength division multiplexing

    SciTech Connect

    Grice, Warren P; Bennink, Ryan S; Earl, Dennis Duncan; Evans, Philip G; Humble, Travis S; Pooser, Raphael C; Schaake, Jason; Williams, Brian P

    2011-01-01

    Quantum Key Distribution (QKD) exploits the rules of quantum mechanics to generate and securely distribute a random sequence of bits to two spatially separated clients. Typically a QKD system can support only a single pair of clients at a time, and so a separate quantum link is required for every pair of users. We overcome this limitation with the design and characterization of a multi-client entangled-photon QKD system with the capacity for up to 100 clients simultaneously. The time-bin entangled QKD system includes a broadband down-conversion source with two unique features that enable the multi-user capability. First, the photons are emitted across a very large portion of the telecom spectrum. Second, and more importantly, the photons are strongly correlated in their energy degree of freedom. Using standard wavelength division multiplexing (WDM) hardware, the photons can be routed to different parties on a quantum communication network, while the strong spectral correlations ensure that each client is linked only to the client receiving the conjugate wavelength. In this way, a single down-conversion source can support dozens of channels simultaneously--and to the extent that the WDM hardware can send different spectral channels to different clients, the system can support multiple client pairings. We will describe the design and characterization of the down-conversion source, as well as the client stations, which must be tunable across the emission spectrum.

  18. Client satisfaction and quality of health care in rural Bangladesh.

    PubMed Central

    Mendoza Aldana, J.; Piechulek, H.; al-Sabir, A.

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess user expectations and degree of client satisfaction and quality of health care provided in rural Bangladesh. METHODS: A total of 1913 persons chosen by systematic random sampling were successfully interviewed immediately after having received care in government health facilities. FINDINGS: The most powerful predictor for client satisfaction with the government services was provider behaviour, especially respect and politeness. For patients this aspect was much more important than the technical competence of the provider. Furthermore, a reduction in waiting time (on average to 30 min) was more important to clients than a prolongation of the quite short (from a medical standpoint) consultation time (on average 2 min, 22 sec), with 75% of clients being satisfied. Waiting time, which was about double at outreach services than that at fixed services, was the only element with which users of outreach services were dissatisfied. CONCLUSIONS: This study underscores that client satisfaction is determined by the cultural background of the people. It shows the dilemma that, though optimally care should be capable of meeting both medical and psychosocial needs, in reality care that meets all medical needs may fail to meet the client's emotional or social needs. Conversely, care that meets psychosocial needs may leave the clients medically at risk. It seems important that developing countries promoting client-oriented health services should carry out more in-depth research on the determinants of client satisfaction in the respective culture. PMID:11436472

  19. JMS Proxy and C/C++ Client SDK

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolgast, Paul; Pechkam, Paul

    2007-01-01

    JMS Proxy and C/C++ Client SDK (JMS signifies "Java messaging service" and "SDK" signifies "software development kit") is a software package for developing interfaces that enable legacy programs (here denoted "clients") written in the C and C++ languages to communicate with each other via a JMS broker. This package consists of two main components: the JMS proxy server component and the client C library SDK component. The JMS proxy server component implements a native Java process that receives and responds to requests from clients. This component can run on any computer that supports Java and a JMS client. The client C library SDK component is used to develop a JMS client program running in each affected C or C++ environment, without need for running a Java virtual machine in the affected computer. A C client program developed by use of this SDK has most of the quality-of-service characteristics of standard Java-based client programs, including the following: Durable subscriptions; Asynchronous message receipt; Such standard JMS message qualities as "TimeToLive," "Message Properties," and "DeliveryMode" (as the quoted terms are defined in previously published JMS documentation); and Automatic reconnection of a JMS proxy to a restarted JMS broker.

  20. Real Earthquakes, Real Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schomburg, Aaron

    2003-01-01

    One teacher took her class on a year long earthquake expedition. The goal was to monitor the occurrences of real earthquakes during the year and mark their locations with push pins on a wall-sized world map in the hallway outside the science room. The purpose of the project was to create a detailed picture of the earthquakes that occurred…

  1. Client and therapist therapeutic alliance, session evaluation, and client reliable change: a moderated actor-partner interdependence model.

    PubMed

    Kivlighan, Dennis M; Marmarosh, Cheri L; Hilsenroth, Mark J

    2014-01-01

    Actor-partner interdependence modeling (APIM; Kashy & Kenny, 2000) was used to study the early therapeutic alliance in 74 clients being treated by 29 therapists to explore the relationship between the alliance and treatment progress, while prioritizing the dyadic nature of the alliance. The APIM examines collaboration/influence by modeling the impact of one dyad member's alliance ratings on the other member's session impact rating (partner effects). In terms of the alliance, the results revealed significant client-actor effects for client ratings of session depth and positivity as well as significant therapist-actor effects for therapist ratings of session smoothness and positivity. For client-rated alliance, there were also significant client-partner effects for therapist ratings of session depth. For clients who made a reliable change in treatment, an increase in client-reported alliance was related to therapist reporting more arousal in the 3rd session. For clients who did not make a reliable change in treatment, client-reported alliance was not related to therapist arousal. Limitations of the study and implications of the findings are discussed. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved).

  2. Qualitative Assessment of the Feasibility, Usability, and Acceptability of a Mobile Client Data App for Community-Based Maternal, Neonatal, and Child Care in Rural Ghana

    PubMed Central

    Jennings, Larissa; Moorthy, Anitha; Yang, Fan; Gee, Lisa; Romano, Karen; Hutchful, David; Labrique, Alain B.; LeFevre, Amnesty E.

    2016-01-01

    Mobile phone applications may enhance the delivery of critical health services and the accuracy of health service data. Yet, the opinions and experiences of frontline health workers on using mobile apps to track pregnant and recently delivered women are underreported. This evaluation qualitatively assessed the feasibility, usability, and acceptability of a mobile Client Data App for maternal, neonatal, and child client data management by community health nurses (CHNs) in rural Ghana. The mobile app enabled CHNs to enter, summarize, and query client data. It also sent visit reminders for clients and provided a mechanism to report level of care to district officers. Fourteen interviews and two focus groups with CHNs, midwives, and district health officers were conducted, coded, and thematically analyzed. Results indicated that the app was easily integrated into care, improved CHN productivity, and was acceptable due to its capacity to facilitate client follow-up, data reporting, and decision-making. However, the feasibility and usability of the app were hindered by high client volumes, staff shortages, and software and device challenges. Successful integration of mobile client data apps for frontline health workers in rural and resource-poor settings requires real-time monitoring, program investments, and targeted changes in human resources. PMID:28070186

  3. Qualitative Assessment of the Feasibility, Usability, and Acceptability of a Mobile Client Data App for Community-Based Maternal, Neonatal, and Child Care in Rural Ghana.

    PubMed

    Rothstein, Jessica D; Jennings, Larissa; Moorthy, Anitha; Yang, Fan; Gee, Lisa; Romano, Karen; Hutchful, David; Labrique, Alain B; LeFevre, Amnesty E

    2016-01-01

    Mobile phone applications may enhance the delivery of critical health services and the accuracy of health service data. Yet, the opinions and experiences of frontline health workers on using mobile apps to track pregnant and recently delivered women are underreported. This evaluation qualitatively assessed the feasibility, usability, and acceptability of a mobile Client Data App for maternal, neonatal, and child client data management by community health nurses (CHNs) in rural Ghana. The mobile app enabled CHNs to enter, summarize, and query client data. It also sent visit reminders for clients and provided a mechanism to report level of care to district officers. Fourteen interviews and two focus groups with CHNs, midwives, and district health officers were conducted, coded, and thematically analyzed. Results indicated that the app was easily integrated into care, improved CHN productivity, and was acceptable due to its capacity to facilitate client follow-up, data reporting, and decision-making. However, the feasibility and usability of the app were hindered by high client volumes, staff shortages, and software and device challenges. Successful integration of mobile client data apps for frontline health workers in rural and resource-poor settings requires real-time monitoring, program investments, and targeted changes in human resources.

  4. Client outcomes from rural substance abuse treatment.

    PubMed

    Hiller, Matthew L; Leukefeld, Carl G; Garrity, Thomas F; Godlaski, Theodore; Schoeneberger, Marlies; Townsend, Michael; Hascal, Karyn

    2007-03-01

    Several national evaluations have been conducted since the late 1960s that have assessed the effectiveness of publicly-funded substance abuse treatment in the United States. These studies, however, have focused principally on urban-based treatment programs, and it is unclear whether findings from urban programs can be replicated in outcome studies of programs in rural areas. The current study, therefore, examined the treatment outcomes of clients admitted to one of several short-term inpatient or outpatient drug-free treatment agencies in rural Kentucky. Findings showed that treatment was associated with reductions in drug use and criminality during a six-month follow-up interval. Employment status also improved significantly, and health services utilization was reduced. The similarity between the current findings and findings from national outcome studies of urban-based treatment programs is discussed.

  5. Client interfaces to the Virtual Observatory Registry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demleitner, M.; Harrison, P.; Taylor, M.; Normand, J.

    2015-04-01

    The Virtual Observatory Registry is a distributed directory of information systems and other resources relevant to astronomy. To make it useful, facilities to query that directory must be provided to humans and machines alike. This article reviews the development and status of such facilities, also considering the lessons learnt from about a decade of experience with Registry interfaces. After a brief outline of the history of the standards development, it describes the use of Registry interfaces in some popular clients as well as dedicated UIs for interrogating the Registry. It continues with a thorough discussion of the design of the two most recent Registry interface standards, RegTAP on the one hand and a full-text-based interface on the other hand. The article finally lays out some of the less obvious conventions that emerged in the interaction between providers of registry records and Registry users as well as remaining challenges and current developments.

  6. Treating clients with Asperger's syndrome and autism.

    PubMed

    Woods, Alisa G; Mahdavi, Esmaeil; Ryan, Jeanne P

    2013-09-11

    Asperger's syndrome (AS) is a form of autism spectrum disorder (ASD) affecting many individuals today. Although neurobiological correlates for AS have been identified, like many ASDs, AS is not completely understood. AS as a distinct disorder is also not universally accepted and in the DSM-5 AS is not considered a separate nosological entity. In contrast to some other ASDs, individuals with AS are commonly characterized by having standard or higher than average intelligence, yet difficulties in social skills and communication can present challenges for these individuals in everyday functioning. Counseling a person with AS or autism presents a unique challenge for the mental health care provider. We have compiled this review consisting of some recent ideas regarding counseling the client with AS with the goal of providing some clinical insights and practical clues. Although the focus of the present paper is largely on AS, many of these strategies could also apply to individuals with high-functioning autism (HFA).

  7. Investigating bias in psychotherapy with BDSM clients.

    PubMed

    Kolmes, Keely; Stock, Wendy; Moser, Charles

    2006-01-01

    There is a concern among consensual BDSM participants that they will receive biased care from mental health professionals. Results are presented of an anonymous Internet-based survey administered to both BDSM-identified individuals who have received psychological care and to mental health professionals. The survey included socio-demographic data and invited participants to write narrative accounts of biased or culturally sensitive care, from which common themes were identified. Mental health providers (N=17) responded in fewer numbers than those who identified as BDSM-identified participants (N=175). Descriptive characteristics of the sample will be discussed. Themes from the qualitative data may be useful in informing the future development of guidelines for practitioners to work more responsibly with clients who identify as members of this sexual minority group.

  8. The Real Relationship in Psychotherapy: Relationships to Adult Attachments, Working Alliance, Transference, and Therapy Outcome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marmarosh, Cheri L.; Gelso, Charles J.; Markin, Rayna D.; Mallery, Coretta; Choi, Jaehwa; Majors, Rebekah

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to understand how the real relationship (RR) relates to important process and outcome variables from both the clients' and therapists' perspectives. Using a sample of 31 therapist/client dyads at a university counseling center, the authors examined the RR at the 3rd session of therapy and at termination. The results…

  9. Beyond Values Clarification: Addressing Client Values in Clinical Behavior Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bonow, Jordan T.; Follette, William C.

    2009-01-01

    Ethical principles of psychology, as exemplified in the American Psychological Association (APA) Code of Ethics (2002), provide impractical advice for addressing client values during psychotherapy. These principles seem to argue that each client's values should be respected and protected at all times, except in cases in which this would result in…

  10. A Client-Centered Review of Rogers with Gloria

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moon, Kathryn A.

    2007-01-01

    Carl Rogers's nondirective theory and his response style with Gloria (E. L. Shostrom, 1965) are discussed in reply to S. A. Wickman and C. Campbell's (2003) "An Analysis of How Carl Rogers Enacted Client-Centered Conversation With Gloria." Client-centered studies of C. Rogers's transcripts give context for reformulating S. A. Wickman and C.…

  11. Lawyer-Client Confidentiality in the Campus Setting.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drinan, Robert F.

    1993-01-01

    It is proposed that the attorney-client privilege of confidentiality may be more important in the case of the university attorney than in the situation of the attorney representing the client as a law firm member. The principle is illustrated in a hypothetical case concerning research fraud. (MSE)

  12. Do Organizational Culture and Climate Matter for Successful Client Outcomes?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Silver Wolf, David A. Patterson; Dulmus, Catherine N.; Maguin, Eugene; Cristalli, Maria

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: The existing literature on the impact of workplace conditions on client care suggests that good cultures and climates provide the best outcomes for clients. The primary purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between organizational culture and climate and the proportion of children and youth successfully discharged…

  13. 49 CFR 1103.23 - Confidences of a client.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... Responsibilities Toward A Client § 1103.23 Confidences of a client. (a) The practitioner's duty to preserve his... such disclosures to prevent the act or protect those against whom that is threatened. The Practitioner's Duties and Responsibilities Regarding Witnesses, Other Litigants and the Public...

  14. 49 CFR 1103.23 - Confidences of a client.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... Responsibilities Toward A Client § 1103.23 Confidences of a client. (a) The practitioner's duty to preserve his... such disclosures to prevent the act or protect those against whom that is threatened. The Practitioner's Duties and Responsibilities Regarding Witnesses, Other Litigants and the Public...

  15. A Treatment Matching Model for Substance Abuse Rehabilitation Clients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lam, Chow S.; And Others

    1996-01-01

    Rehabilitation clients enter treatment for alcohol and other drug abuse at various stages of readiness to change. It is important that treatment should be congruent with clients' readiness for change. Describes a substance abuse treatment matching model based on the Prochaska and DiClemente's Stages of Change Theory. (Author)

  16. Client Articulated Avoidance Goals in the Therapy Context

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elliot, Andrew J.; Church, Marcy A.

    2002-01-01

    This research investigated the relationship between clients' pursuit of avoidance (relative to approach) therapy goals and change in subjective well-being (SWB) from the beginning to the end of therapy. Results indicated that clients with more avoidance therapy goals evidenced a smaller increase in SWB over the course of therapy than those with…

  17. 29 CFR 404.5 - Attorney-client communications exempted.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Attorney-client communications exempted. 404.5 Section 404... LABOR-MANAGEMENT STANDARDS LABOR ORGANIZATION OFFICER AND EMPLOYEE REPORTS § 404.5 Attorney-client communications exempted. Nothing contained in this part shall be construed to require an attorney who is a...

  18. 29 CFR 403.9 - Attorney-client communications exempted.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Attorney-client communications exempted. 403.9 Section 403... LABOR-MANAGEMENT STANDARDS LABOR ORGANIZATION ANNUAL FINANCIAL REPORTS § 403.9 Attorney-client communications exempted. Nothing contained in this part shall be construed to require an attorney who is a...

  19. 29 CFR 402.11 - Attorney-client communications exempted.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Attorney-client communications exempted. 402.11 Section 402... LABOR-MANAGEMENT STANDARDS LABOR ORGANIZATION INFORMATION REPORTS § 402.11 Attorney-client communications exempted. Nothing contained in this part shall be construed to require an attorney who is a...

  20. 14 CFR 1261.317 - Attorney-client privilege.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Attorney-client privilege. 1261.317 Section... Injury or Death-Accruing On or After January 18, 1967 § 1261.317 Attorney-client privilege. (a) Attorneys..., and attorneys employed by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration provide assistance...

  1. Integrating Social and Traditional Media in the Client Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Melton, James; Hicks, Nancy

    2011-01-01

    Based on a client project assigned to students in two undergraduate business classes, this article argues that social media learning is best done in a context that mixes social media with more traditional kinds of media. Ideally, this approach will involve teams of students who are working on different aspects of a larger client project. This…

  2. Training Leisure Centre Instructors: Client Motivational Profiles Examined

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kniveton, Bromley H.

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the motivations of clients attending leisure centres/clubs. It is noted that training programmes for instructors tend to neglect this, particularly in relation to the gender and age of clients. Design/methodology/approach: In this study 460 recreational athletes including equal numbers of males and females in the two age…

  3. Young Clients' Narratives of the Purpose and Outcome of Counselling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gibson, Kerry; Cartwright, Claire

    2014-01-01

    This study explores how adolescent clients construct the purpose and outcome of counselling. A narrative analysis was performed on interviews with 22 clients (aged 16--18) who had used a school-based counselling service. The aim was to identify the purpose and outcomes that participants attributed to their counselling experience. The analysis…

  4. Communicating Social Support to Grieving Clients: The Veterinarians' View

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pilgram, Mary D.

    2010-01-01

    This exploratory study examines veterinarians' perceptions of how they offer social support to grieving clients. Because many clients cannot find the social support they would like from other sources when grieving the death of a pet, the role of the vet in offering support becomes increasingly important. The results indicate that vets perceive…

  5. Effects of Systematic Group Counseling on Work Adjustment Clients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roessler, Richard; And Others

    1977-01-01

    When compared with a group of clients who had received work adjustment services and a placebo treatment (personal hygiene training), experimental clients given Personal Achievement Skills (PAS) and work adjustment services reported greater gains on self-ratings of life perspective (optimism), work-related attitudes, and goal attainment. (Author)

  6. 45 CFR 1608.7 - Attorney-client relationship.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Attorney-client relationship. 1608.7 Section 1608.7 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) LEGAL SERVICES CORPORATION PROHIBITED POLITICAL ACTIVITIES § 1608.7 Attorney-client relationship. Nothing in this part is intended...

  7. An Exploration of Supervisory and Therapeutic Relationships and Client Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bell, Hope; Hagedorn, W. Bryce; Robinson, E. H. Mike

    2016-01-01

    The authors explored the connection between the facilitative conditions present within the supervisory relationship, the therapeutic relationship, and client outcomes. A correlational research design was used with a sample of 55 counselors-in-training and 88 clients. Results indicated a significant positive relationship between the therapeutic…

  8. 45 CFR 1608.7 - Attorney-client relationship.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Attorney-client relationship. 1608.7 Section 1608.7 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) LEGAL SERVICES CORPORATION PROHIBITED POLITICAL ACTIVITIES § 1608.7 Attorney-client relationship. Nothing in this part is intended...

  9. Making a Case for Client Insistence in Social Work Interaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matarese, Maureen T.; van Nijnatten, Carolus

    2015-01-01

    It has been argued that the goals of the institution can shape the talk therein. What happens when a client consistently invokes topics and role identities that are outside the parameters of the institution, insisting on his or her own goals and gaining and maintaining a control of the floor usually expected of practitioners? Client power is often…

  10. 42 CFR 483.420 - Condition of participation: Client protections.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... and meet privately with individuals of their choice, and to send and receive unopened mail; (10... must establish and maintain a system that— (i) Assures a full and complete accounting of clients... treatment of clients. (1) The facility must develop and implement written policies and procedures...

  11. Family Therapist Comfort with and Willingness to Discuss Client Sexuality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harris, Steven M.; Hays, Kelli Wenner

    2008-01-01

    Limited empirical information exists on whether or not marriage and family therapists are having sexuality-related discussions with their clients. When helping professionals ignore client sexuality, the potential for unintended negative outcomes increases. The researchers surveyed 175 clinical members of the American Association for Marriage and…

  12. Third Thursday Thing: A Success Story for Reaching Underserved Clients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andries, Kenneth M.; Simon, Marion; Rivers, Louie

    2016-01-01

    Kentucky State University has been conducting a monthly field day known as the Third Thursday Thing for many years. This program has been successful in reaching limited-resource, minority, and underserved clients. The success of the program has indicated that a nontraditional approach can be successful when working with nontraditional clients. The…

  13. Learning Creativity in the Client-Agency Relationship

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Suh, Taewon; Jung, Jae C.; Smith, Bruce L.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: This study aims to investigate creativity-related determinants of learning in the context of business-to-business services and client-agency relationships. Design/methodology/approach: The research model includes client encouragement, agency creativity, campaign creativity, and perceived performance. The study involved conducting a…

  14. Perspectives on barriers to eating healthy among food pantry clients

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective of this study was to explore perspectives on barriers of eating healthy among food pantry clients. Food pantry clients participated in focus groups/interviews. Qualitative data were coded and analyzed using content analyses and grounded theory approach. Themes were then identified. Qua...

  15. Effects of Client Resistance on Counselor Verbal Responses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stout, Elizabeth

    2014-01-01

    The primary focus of this study was to examine whether counselor verbal responses incrementally varied in response to client verbal responses. A Motivational Interviewing framework was used for measuring verbal responses of both counselor and client. The study employed an AB counterbalanced design, exposing 40 licensed counselors to both resistant…

  16. Individual Counseling with the Rehabilitation Client: A Point of View.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matheny, Kenneth B.

    A model for individual counseling with the rehabilitation client is presented. The model consists of five stages: (1) exploration, (2) contract, (3) action, (4) evaluation, and (5) termination. The counselor assumes three roles: (1) alter ego, to help the client understand his needs; (2) interventionist, to procure services and employment for the…

  17. Women Empower Women: Volunteers and Their Clients in Community Service

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kulik, Liat; Megidna, Hofit

    2011-01-01

    The study is aimed at examining the relationship between psychological empowerment of women volunteers and their clients in community volunteer projects in Israel. Based on an ecological approach, the study also aimed at examining whether the variables that explain empowerment of women who volunteer also explain empowerment of their clients. The…

  18. Effects of Counselor Reassignments and Reassignment Procedures on Client Anxiety.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hutchinson, Roger L.; And Others

    Although the effects of counselor reassignment on counseling are of concern, research has not examined whether anticipated reassignment to another counselor or the reassignment procedure produces substantial anxiety for clients. Two exploratory investigations were conducted to examine these issues. In the first study, clients of a university-based…

  19. Alienation: A Concept for Understanding Low-Income, Urban Clients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holcomb-McCoy, Cheryl

    2004-01-01

    The author examines the concept of alienation and how it can be used to understand low-income, urban clients. A description is presented of 4 dimensions of alienation: powerlessness, meaninglessness, normlessness, and social isolation. Case illustrations are provided, and recommendations are made for counseling alienated clients. This article…

  20. Client Perspectives of Multicultural Counseling Competence: A Qualitative Examination

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pope-Davis, Donald B.; Toporek, Rebecca L.; Ortega-Villalobos, Lideth; Ligiero, Daniela P.; Brittan-Powell, Christopher S.; Liu, William M.; Bashshur, Michael R.; Codrington, Jamila N.; Liang, Christopher T. H.

    2002-01-01

    Multicultural competence is a burgeoning area of research in counseling psychology. However, there has been little focus on understanding multicultural competence from the perspective of clients. This study used qualitative interviews and grounded theory to develop a model of clients' perspectives of multicultural counseling. The resulting model…

  1. Guidelines for Psychological Practice With Lesbian, Gay, and Bisexual Clients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Psychologist, 2012

    2012-01-01

    The "Guidelines for Psychological Practice With Lesbian, Gay, and Bisexual Clients" provide psychologists with (a) a frame of reference for the treatment of lesbian, gay, and bisexual clients and (b) basic information and further references in the areas of assessment, intervention, identity, relationships, diversity, education, training, and…

  2. Factors Associated with Illegal Drug Use among Older Methadone Clients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosen, Daniel

    2004-01-01

    Purpose. The overall aims of this study are to describe the life stressors of, exposure to illegal drug use of, and illegal drug use by older methadone clients. Design and Methods. The current study focuses on a sub-sample of the larger administrative data of a methadone clinic that is limited to African American and White clients over the age of…

  3. Counseling with Methadone Clients: A Review of Recent Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Powers, Robert J.; Powers, Henrietta B.

    1978-01-01

    A review of studies on counseling with methadone clients affirmed the importance of counseling services. Support was found for analytic therapy, T-group therapy, behavioral training, reality therapy, and family therapy. There was evidence of client resistance to group therapy. (Author)

  4. Development of a nutrition education intervention for food bank clients

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The focus of this article is the development of a nutrition education intervention for food bank clients. Formative research using mixed-methods (qualitative and quantitative) and community-based participatory research principles was conducted to assess the nutrition education needs of clients obtai...

  5. The Challenge of Prejudice: Counsellors' Talk about Challenging Clients' Prejudices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spong, Sheila J.

    2012-01-01

    This paper considers the implications for training and practice of counsellors' responses to the notion of challenging clients' prejudices. It explores tensions in counselling discourse between social responsibility, responsibility to the client and responsibility for one's self as counsellor. Three focus groups of counsellors were asked whether a…

  6. Sexuality Counseling with Clients Who Have Spinal Cord Injuries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farrow, Jeff

    1990-01-01

    Examines effects of spinal cord injury on sexuality. Discusses areas of sexual concern. Provides suggestions for treating clients with spinal cord injuries experiencing sexual difficulties. Concludes that major goal in working with clients with spinal cord injuries who have sexual difficulties should be the facilitation of a creative and…

  7. The Use of Reception Checks in Client Pretherapy Orientation Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zwick, Rebecca; Attkisson, C. Clifford

    1984-01-01

    Developed and tested the Psychotherapy Questionnaire to determine whether clients (N=62) had attended to and understood a pretherapy videotape presentation and whether they recalled the information one month later. Results indicated that the clients were able to understand the presentation. (LLL)

  8. Navigating the Internet: Evaluating Gopher Clients for Windows.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lonardo, Angela; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Identifies and discusses the criteria that end users might employ when evaluating a gopher client, particularly for the Windows environment. Topics include cost and availability, help features, functionality, viewing, searching, navigating, bookmarks, retrieving and displaying files, robustness, and gopher clients available via FTP (file transfer…

  9. Client and service characteristics associated with addiction treatment completion of clients with co-occurring disorders.

    PubMed

    Mangrum, Laurel F

    2009-10-01

    The study examines client and service characteristics of addiction treatment completers and non-completers with co-occurring disorders (COD). On demographic variables, completers were more likely to be male and homeless. In the psychiatric domain, a greater proportion of completers received diagnoses of depression and generalized anxiety disorder, whereas non-completers were more often diagnosed with bipolar disorder and posttraumatic stress disorder. No group differences were found in client-reported psychiatric symptom severity; however, non-completers were rated by clinicians as having more severe symptoms in the areas of interpersonal sensitivity, depression, and hostility. In the area of substance use patterns, no differences were found in primary substance of abuse but completers reported more days of use during the month prior to treatment. Completers also had a greater history of both prior detox and non-detox treatment. At discharge, completers achieved higher rates of past month abstinence and AA attendance, but no differences were found in length of stay in treatment. Examination of recovery support services utilization revealed that completers more often received peer mentoring services. Greater proportions of the non-completer group received educational support, clothing, medical care, and employment assistance. These results suggest that future studies are needed in examining possible differential treatment response by diagnostic category and the potential role of peer mentoring in enhancing addiction treatment completion of COD clients.

  10. A Comparison Between Publish-and-Subscribe and Client-Server Models in Distributed Control System Networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boulanger, Richard P., Jr.; Kwauk, Xian-Min; Stagnaro, Mike; Kliss, Mark (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    The BIO-Plex control system requires real-time, flexible, and reliable data delivery. There is no simple "off-the-shelf 'solution. However, several commercial packages will be evaluated using a testbed at ARC for publish- and-subscribe and client-server communication architectures. Point-to-point communication architecture is not suitable for real-time BIO-Plex control system. Client-server architecture provides more flexible data delivery. However, it does not provide direct communication among nodes on the network. Publish-and-subscribe implementation allows direct information exchange among nodes on the net, providing the best time-critical communication. In this work Network Data Delivery Service (NDDS) from Real-Time Innovations, Inc. ARTIE will be used to implement publish-and subscribe architecture. It offers update guarantees and deadlines for real-time data delivery. Bridgestone, a data acquisition and control software package from National Instruments, will be tested for client-server arrangement. A microwave incinerator located at ARC will be instrumented with a fieldbus network of control devices. BridgeVIEW will be used to implement an enterprise server. An enterprise network consisting of several nodes at ARC and a WAN connecting ARC and RISC will then be setup to evaluate proposed control system architectures. Several network configurations will be evaluated for fault tolerance, quality of service, reliability and efficiency. Data acquired from these network evaluation tests will then be used to determine preliminary design criteria for the BIO-Plex distributed control system.

  11. Subjective Experiences of Clients in a Voluntary Money Management Program.

    PubMed

    Serowik, Kristin L; Bellamy, Chyrell D; Rowe, Michael; Rosen, Marc I

    2013-01-01

    A large proportion of people diagnosed with mental illnesses have difficulty managing their money, and therefore many psychiatric treatments involve providing money management assistance. However, little is known about the subjective experience of having a money manager, and extant literature is restricted to people forced to work with a representative payee or conservator. In this study, fifteen people were interviewed about their experience receiving a voluntary money management intervention designed to minimize substance use. Clients emphasized the importance of trusting the money manager, financial mindfulness (an enhanced awareness of the financial transactions in clients' day-to-day lives), agency over their own affairs, and addiction. In contrast to evaluations of people assigned representative payees and/or conservators, there was little mention of feeling coerced. These findings suggest that money management programs can address client concerns by building trust, relating budgeting to clients' day-to-day lives, and encouraging clients' control over their own affairs.

  12. The impact of organizational stress and burnout on client engagement.

    PubMed

    Landrum, Brittany; Knight, Danica K; Flynn, Patrick M

    2012-03-01

    This article explores the impact of organizational attributes on client engagement within substance abuse treatment. Previous research has identified organizational features, including small size, accreditation, and workplace practices, that impact client engagement (K. M. Broome, P. M. Flynn, D. K. Knight, & D. D. Simpson, 2007). This study sought to explore how aspects of the work environment impact client engagement. The sample included 89 programs located in 9 states across the United States. Work environment measures included counselor perceptions of stress, burnout, and work satisfaction at each program, whereas engagement measures included client ratings of participation, counseling rapport, and treatment satisfaction. Using multiple regression, tests of moderation and mediation revealed that staff stress negatively predicted client participation in treatment. Burnout was related to stress but was not related to participation. Two additional organizational measures--workload and influence--moderated the positive relationship between staff stress and burnout. Implications for drug treatment programs are discussed.

  13. Beyond Values Clarification: Addressing Client Values in Clinical Behavior Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Bonow, Jordan T; Follette, William C

    2009-01-01

    Ethical principles of psychology, as exemplified in the American Psychological Association (APA) Code of Ethics (2002), provide impractical advice for addressing client values during psychotherapy. These principles seem to argue that each client's values should be respected and protected at all times, except in cases in which this would result in harm to the client or the general public. Although the code is appropriately designed as a defense against potential and actual abuses of professional power, this general proscription against directly targeting client values for change is based on an understanding of values that grants them special ontological status and has resulted in limited clinical interventions focusing solely on “values clarification.” With its strong foundation in a unified philosophical system, clinical behavior analysis offers a sophisticated alternative approach to values that both defines what they are and identifies when they can be ethically targeted to improve the lives of clients. PMID:22478514

  14. Realizing the Potential of Information Resources: Information, Technology, and Services. Track 3: Serving Clients with Client/Server.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    CAUSE, Boulder, CO.

    Eight papers are presented from the 1995 CAUSE conference track on client/server issues faced by managers of information technology at colleges and universities. The papers include: (1) "The Realities of Client/Server Development and Implementation" (Mary Ann Carr and Alan Hartwig), which examines Carnegie Mellon University's transition…

  15. Over-the-counter hearing aids: electroacoustic characteristics and possible target client groups.

    PubMed

    Cheng, C M; McPherson, B

    2000-01-01

    Over-the-counter hearing aids (OTCs) are those directly purchased from retail outlets, without the benefit of prior professional hearing health care. They are particularly common in developing countries. This study examined the amplification characteristics of a selected sample of OTCs to determine if any target client group or groups were suitable for the OTCs. The electroacoustical performance of 10 OTCs was measured. The measurements included saturated sound pressure level curve, high-frequency average full-on gain, frequency response, total harmonic distortion, equivalent input noise level, and input-output curve. The full-on gain curve of each hearing aid was used to estimate the hypothetical hearing loss of target clients for each aid as it would be calculated by four hearing aid prescription formulae. Real-ear probe tube measurements were also performed on 10 adult subjects to determine the amplification that could be achieved by the OTCs before audible feedback occurred. The OTC hearing aids were not able to meet the prescription gain requirements of the majority of elderly clients who usually purchased them.

  16. Client/server approach to image capturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuijn, Chris; Stokes, Earle

    1998-01-01

    The diversity of the digital image capturing devices on the market today is quite astonishing and ranges from low-cost CCD scanners to digital cameras (for both action and stand-still scenes), mid-end CCD scanners for desktop publishing and pre- press applications and high-end CCD flatbed scanners and drum- scanners with photo multiplier technology. Each device and market segment has its own specific needs which explains the diversity of the associated scanner applications. What all those applications have in common is the need to communicate with a particular device to import the digital images; after the import, additional image processing might be needed as well as color management operations. Although the specific requirements for all of these applications might differ considerably, a number of image capturing and color management facilities as well as other services are needed which can be shared. In this paper, we propose a client/server architecture for scanning and image editing applications which can be used as a common component for all these applications. One of the principal components of the scan server is the input capturing module. The specification of the input jobs is based on a generic input device model. Through this model we make abstraction of the specific scanner parameters and define the scan job definitions by a number of absolute parameters. As a result, scan job definitions will be less dependent on a particular scanner and have a more universal meaning. In this context, we also elaborate on the interaction of the generic parameters and the color characterization (i.e., the ICC profile). Other topics that are covered are the scheduling and parallel processing capabilities of the server, the image processing facilities, the interaction with the ICC engine, the communication facilities (both in-memory and over the network) and the different client architectures (stand-alone applications, TWAIN servers, plug-ins, OLE or Apple-event driven

  17. Negotiating: experiences of community nurses when contracting with clients.

    PubMed

    Duiveman, Trudie; Bonner, Ann

    2012-04-01

    A community nurse is required to have excellent interpersonal, teaching, collaborative and clinical skills in order to develop effective individualised client care contracts. Using a descriptive qualitative design data was collected from two focus groups of fourteen community nurses to explore the issues surrounding negotiating and contracting client care contracts from the perspective of community nurses. Thematic analysis revealed three themes: 'assessment of needs', 'education towards enablement', and 'negotiation'. 'Assessment of needs' identified that community nurses assess both the client's requirements for health care as well as the ability of the nurse to provide that care. 'Education towards enablement' described that education of the client is a common strategy used by community nurses to establish realistic goals of health care as part of developing an ongoing care plan. The final theme, 'negotiation', involved an informed agreement between the client and the community nurse which forms the origin of the care contract that will direct the partnership between the client and the nurse. Of importance for community nurses is that development of successful person-centred care contracts requires skillful negotiation of care that strikes the balance between the needs of the client and the ability of the nurse to meet those needs.

  18. Guidelines for client selection in the home birth midwifery practice.

    PubMed

    Vedam, S; Kolodji, Y

    1995-01-01

    Numerous studies have documented the safety of planned home birth; yet, few have identified specific criteria for selection of the home birth candidate. Home birth midwifery practice achieves successful outcomes by appropriate evaluation of medical and obstetric risk factors, as well as an ongoing evaluation and development of the client's psychosocial resources and the midwife-client relationship. Relevant medical and obstetric factors include significant medical illnesses, antenatal course, smoking history, commitment to breastfeeding, and the woman's nutritional profile. Social and environmental factors include the need for a stable birthing environment, practical means for hospital transfer, and the presence of loving support for the client during and after delivery. The client's psychological preparedness is a critical variable that may affect the ability to deliver in the home setting without analgesia or labor augmentation. Active participation in prenatal care, preparation of the home and family members, and a realistic attitude regarding the risks, benefits, and potential complications of planned home delivery are all components of this preparedness. Because midwifery practice promotes midwife-client rapport by careful attention to both medical and psychosocial issues during prenatal care, this relationship is itself an important predictor of the client's suitability for home birth. The quality of midwife-client interactions may influence not only the decision to plan a home birth but the indications for hospital transfer should problems arise. In this article, existing literature is reviewed and criteria are proposed for selecting home birth candidates within the American midwifery practice setting.

  19. Protecting mental health clients' dignity - the importance of legal control.

    PubMed

    Kogstad, Ragnfrid Eline

    2009-01-01

    Protecting human beings' dignity is a fundamental value underlying the UN's Universal Declaration of Human Rights as well as several recommendations and conventions derived from this, among them the European Convention of Human Rights (ECHR), a declaration that also takes precedence over Norwegian legislation. Still, clients' stories inform us that their dignity is not always protected in the mental health service systems. The aim of the study has been to investigate violations of dignity considered from the clients' points of view, and to suggest actions that may ensure that practice is brought in line with human rights values. The method used has been a qualitative content analysis of 335 client narratives. The conclusion is that mental health clients experience infringements that cannot be explained without reference to their status as clients in a system which, based on judgments from medical experts, has a legitimate right to ignore clients' voices as well as their fundamental human rights. The main focus of this discussion is the role of the ECHR and the European Court of Human Rights as instruments for protecting mental health clients' human rights. To bring about changes, recommendations and practices should be harmonized with the new UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (2006). Under this convention, the European Court of Human Rights has support for the application of the ECHR without exemptions for special groups of people.

  20. Client involvement in home care practice: a relational sociological perspective.

    PubMed

    Glasdam, Stinne; Henriksen, Nina; Kjær, Lone; Praestegaard, Jeanette

    2013-12-01

    'Client involvement' has been a mantra within health policies, education curricula and healthcare institutions over many years, yet very little is known about how 'client involvement' is practised in home-care services. The aim of this article is to analyse 'client involvement' in practise seen from the positions of healthcare professionals, an elderly person and his relative in a home-care setting. A sociologically inspired single case study was conducted, consisting of three weeks of observations and interviews. The study has a focus on the relational aspects of home care and the structural, political and administrative frames that rule home- care practice. Client involvement is shown within four constructed analytical categories: 'Structural conditions of providing and receiving home care'; 'Client involvement inside the home: performing a professional task and living an everyday life'; 'Client involvement outside the home: liberal business and mutual goal setting'; and 'Converting a home to a working place: refurnishing a life'. The meaning of involvement is depending on which position it is viewed from. On the basis of this analysis, we raise the question of the extent to which involvement of the client in public home-care practice remains limited.

  1. When hearing clients work with a deaf therapist.

    PubMed

    Jampel, Julie B

    2010-06-01

    Not being able to hear can present significant challenges for the therapist and for the deaf therapist/hearing client dyad. It can also create opportunities. Although the literature indicates that most culturally Deaf therapists work with Deaf clients due to their mutual use of American Sign Language, I describe (a) the background of an audiologically deaf therapist who relies on speech reading rather than sign language, and (b) this therapist's clinical work with hearing clients. Some of the relational dynamics of these treatments are identified, and I conclude by noting how attention to communication can benefit the work of all psychotherapists.

  2. Secure thin client architecture for DICOM image analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mogatala, Harsha V. R.; Gallet, Jacqueline

    2005-04-01

    This paper presents a concept of Secure Thin Client (STC) Architecture for Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine (DICOM) image analysis over Internet. STC Architecture provides in-depth analysis and design of customized reports for DICOM images using drag-and-drop and data warehouse technology. Using a personal computer and a common set of browsing software, STC can be used for analyzing and reporting detailed patient information, type of examinations, date, Computer Tomography (CT) dose index, and other relevant information stored within the images header files as well as in the hospital databases. STC Architecture is three-tier architecture. The First-Tier consists of drag-and-drop web based interface and web server, which provides customized analysis and reporting ability to the users. The Second-Tier consists of an online analytical processing (OLAP) server and database system, which serves fast, real-time, aggregated multi-dimensional data using OLAP technology. The Third-Tier consists of a smart algorithm based software program which extracts DICOM tags from CT images in this particular application, irrespective of CT vendor's, and transfers these tags into a secure database system. This architecture provides Winnipeg Regional Health Authorities (WRHA) with quality indicators for CT examinations in the hospitals. It also provides health care professionals with analytical tool to optimize radiation dose and image quality parameters. The information is provided to the user by way of a secure socket layer (SSL) and role based security criteria over Internet. Although this particular application has been developed for WRHA, this paper also discusses the effort to extend the Architecture to other hospitals in the region. Any DICOM tag from any imaging modality could be tracked with this software.

  3. Reflections on the Development of Patron-Client Relationships.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Melick-Barthelmess, Karin

    1985-01-01

    The development of the institution of clientage is traced from ancient Rome to modern times. The patron-client relationships in the hierarchical nature of society and institutions in Spain and Latin America are specifically examined. (RM)

  4. Voice and Communication Therapy for Transgender/Transsexual Clients

    MedlinePlus

    ... Language and Swallowing / Disorders and Diseases Voice and Communication Therapy for Clients Who Are Transgender [ en Español ] ... are transgender may elect to have voice and communication therapy to help them use their voice in ...

  5. Investigation of Social Influence Theory's Conception of Client Resistance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ruppel, George; Kaul, Theodore J.

    1982-01-01

    Investigated the predictions of social influence theory with respect to client resistance to counselor influence. Data offered support for the social influence theory in that subjects' expectations of others' instrumental behavior were lower for those who viewed illegitimate counselors. (Author)

  6. Provider-Client Interaction in Methadone Treatment Clinics in China.

    PubMed

    Li, Li; Wu, Zunyou; Cao, Xiaobin; Zhang, Linglin

    2012-04-01

    This study examines provider-client interactions in the context of methadone maintenance treatment (MMT) in China. Service providers were recruited from six methadone clinics. A total of 41 providers were enrolled in the study and participated in an assessment from February to March 2010. Descriptive and multiple regression analyses were performed. Providers with a higher level of negative attitude toward drug users were less likely than others to interact with clients. Female providers were less likely to have negative attitudes toward drug users as compared with their male counterparts. Doctors were more likely than others to have negative attitudes toward drug users. Knowledge of MMT was not related to either negative attitude toward drug users or to provider-client interaction. The findings indicate an urgent need to address the issue of provider attitudes, which can impact interactions with clients and influence efforts to maintain treatment retention and outcomes for drug users.

  7. Client Centeredness and Health Reform: Key Issues for Occupational Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Pitonyak, Jennifer S.; Fogelberg, Donald; Leland, Natalie E.

    2015-01-01

    Health reform promotes the delivery of patient-centered care. Occupational therapy’s rich history of client-centered theory and practice provides an opportunity for the profession to participate in the evolving discussion about how best to provide care that is truly patient centered. However, the growing emphasis on patient-centered care also poses challenges to occupational therapy’s perspectives on client-centered care. We compare the conceptualizations of client-centered and patient-centered care and describe the current state of measurement of client-centered and patient-centered care. We then discuss implications for occupational therapy’s research agenda, practice, and education within the context of patient-centered care, and propose next steps for the profession. PMID:26356651

  8. Client and worker satisfaction in a child protection agency.

    PubMed

    Winefield, H R; Barlow, J A

    1995-08-01

    Client and staff satisfaction with the workings of a multidisciplinary child protection agency were investigated using interviews and standard questionnaires. The goal was to discover the nature and strength of the helping relationship between service-recipients and providers. Current clients (N = 24) expressed a great deal of satisfaction with the staff and services. The agency staff (N = 21, with 11 employed at least half-time to work directly with families) were relatively satisfied with their jobs, and showed little evidence of the burnout which has been recognized as a risk for child protection workers. They were able to relate empathically to clients and felt enthusiasm for the work. Taking account of possible bias in both sets of answers, there is still evidence that the agency is succeeding in creating a necessary precondition for therapeutic change: the development of accepting and positive worker-client relationships.

  9. Violence or discipline? Working with multicultural court-ordered clients.

    PubMed

    Waldman, F

    1999-10-01

    Therapists working with court-ordered clients from cultures differing from the mainstream face challenging issues of compulsory therapy in the context of cultural diversity. This article reviews the literature on court-ordered and multicultural counseling, highlighting central elements of both. It then suggests guidelines that blend these elements. The author illustrates how using these guidelines can enable therapists to engage these clients in the therapeutic process and focus on culture as the context for change.

  10. Web Applications and Thin Clients in the Navy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-09-01

    such as information retrieval from the World Wide Web is an example of client-server computing. However, the term is generally applied to systems in...developed and built a prototype capable of retrieving information considered pertinent for reported terrorist incidents worldwide in support of this...and Sons Ltd. Clouse, S. (n.d.). Web-based applications vs . client-server software. Fcny.org. Retrieved August 29, 2011, from http://metrix.fcny.org

  11. Using art to empower clients during a facility move.

    PubMed

    Osborn, Lawrence A; Tate, Frederic B

    2011-06-01

    Eastern State Hospital, a state psychiatric facility in Williamsburg, Virginia, moved from its old campus into a single new building in 2010. Adult clients were given the opportunity to decorate a portion of the new facility with ceramic tiles they designed using permanent markers. The purpose of this project was to empower the clients so they felt involved in the transition. This article describes the project from inception to fruition and is accented with images and descriptions of some of the tiles.

  12. Identifying clients who might benefit from genetic services and information.

    PubMed

    Gaff, Clara L

    This article is the first in a series of seven which examine competence standards for nurses, midwives and health visitors in relation to genetics. The author indicates who might benefit from a genetic consultation and describes the use of a family history--in the form of a family tree--to identify these clients. Client expectations of a genetic consultation and managing these are also discussed.

  13. Clinical writing about clients: is informed consent sufficient?

    PubMed

    Barnett, Jeffrey E

    2012-03-01

    The use of client information in clinical writings or presentations may be very helpful in advancing the knowledge base of the profession. Yet, the very act of asking a client for permission to use their treatment information in this way may be detrimental to the therapeutic alliance and treatment process. As such, great care must be taken in how such issues are considered and acted upon. Sieck's article (2011, Obtaining clinical writing informed consent versus using client disguise and recommendations for practice. Psychotherapy, 49, pp. 3-11.) on the use of informed consent for obtaining permission to use a client's treatment information for professional writing and presentations is examined and discussed. The nature and role of the informed consent process is accentuated; psychotherapist needs and goals and client vulnerabilities are each addressed in the context of the relevant sections of the APA Ethics Code and each psychotherapist's obligation to act only in ways consistent with each client's best interests. Recommendations for a thoughtful consideration of these issues are presented, consistent with Sieck's proposed decision-making process for use in these situations.

  14. Neuroscience exposure and perceptions of client responsibility among addictions counselors.

    PubMed

    Steenbergh, Timothy A; Runyan, Jason D; Daugherty, Douglas A; Winger, Joseph G

    2012-06-01

    Members of the National Association of Alcoholism and Drug Abuse Counselors (n = 231) participated in a survey concerning their view of the role of personal responsibility in addictions treatment and its relation to their exposure to neuroscience (i.e., the amount to which members considered themselves familiar with current neuroscience research). We used the two-dimensional model of responsibility (Responsible/not responsible for development × Responsible/not responsible for recovery) proposed by P. Brickman et al. (1982) to guide our assessment of responsibility, thus inquiring about counselors' views of clients' responsibility for both the development of a substance-related addiction and its resolution. Findings suggest that counselors rate biological factors as most influential in the development of an addiction and assign clients less personal responsibility for the development of an addiction than for recovery from an addiction. Counselors' level of neuroscience exposure was negatively correlated with their ratings of client responsibility for the development of an addiction but positively correlated to ratings of client responsibility for recovery. This suggests that counselors are integrating neuroscientific findings with what is learned from other modes of enquiry in a way that diminishes the view that clients are responsible for addiction development but accentuates the view that clients are responsible for recovery. We explore reasons for why this is and why this approach may be beneficial.

  15. Clients' understanding of the role of nurse practitioners.

    PubMed

    Allnutt, Jane; Allnutt, Nissa; McMaster, Rose; O'Connell, Jane; Middleton, Sandy; Hillege, Sharon; Della, Phillip R; Gardner, Glenn E; Gardner, Anne

    2010-03-01

    Nurse practitioners (NPs) have an emerging role in the Australian health care system. However, there remains a dearth of data about public understanding of the NP role. The aim of this study was to evaluate clients' understanding of the role of the NP and their satisfaction with education received, quality of care and NP knowledge and skill. All authorised NPs working in a designated NP position in Western Australia and those working in three area health services in New South Wales were invited to recruit five consecutive clients to complete the self-administered survey. Thirty-two NPs (NP response rate 93%) recruited 129 clients (client response rate 90%). Two-thirds of clients (63%) were aware they were consulting an NP. The majority rated the following NP-related outcomes as 'excellent' or 'very good': education provided (89%); quality of care (95%); and knowledge and skill (93%). Less than half reported an understanding that NPs could prescribe medications (40.5%) or interpret X-rays (33.6%). Clients of NPs practising in a rural or remote setting were more likely than those in an urban setting to have previously consulted an NP (P = 0.005), and where applicable would to prefer to see an NP rather than a doctor (P = 0.022). Successful implementation and expansion of the NP role requires NP visibility in the community. Despite high levels of satisfaction, more awareness of the scope of the NP role is required.

  16. NSLS-II HIGH LEVEL APPLICATION INFRASTRUCTURE AND CLIENT API DESIGN

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, G.; Yang; L.; Shroff; K.

    2011-03-28

    developers of APIs and how to use them to form a physics application to the users. For example, how the channels are related to magnet and what the current real-time setting of a magnet is in physics unit are the internals of APIs. Measuring chromaticities are the users of APIs. All the users of APIs are working with magnet and instrument names in a physics unit. The low level communications in current or voltage unit are minimized. In this paper, we discussed our recent progress of our infrastructure development, and client API.

  17. The Contribution of the Counselor-Client Working Alliance to Career Exploration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elad-Strenger, Julia; Littman-Ovadia, Hadassah

    2012-01-01

    This longitudinal study examines the effects of Israeli counselors' and clients' ratings of their working alliance on clients' career exploration (CE), using a sample of 94 three-session career counseling processes. Results reveal that both clients' and counselors' working alliance ratings increased over time; yet, clients' ratings remained…

  18. 37 CFR 10.57 - Preservation of confidences and secrets of a client.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... and secrets of a client. 10.57 Section 10.57 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights UNITED STATES PATENT... confidences and secrets of a client. (a) “Confidence” refers to information protected by the attorney-client or agent-client privilege under applicable law. “Secret” refers to other information gained in...

  19. 37 CFR 10.57 - Preservation of confidences and secrets of a client.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... and secrets of a client. 10.57 Section 10.57 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights UNITED STATES PATENT... confidences and secrets of a client. (a) “Confidence” refers to information protected by the attorney-client or agent-client privilege under applicable law. “Secret” refers to other information gained in...

  20. 37 CFR 10.57 - Preservation of confidences and secrets of a client.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... and secrets of a client. 10.57 Section 10.57 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights UNITED STATES PATENT... confidences and secrets of a client. (a) “Confidence” refers to information protected by the attorney-client or agent-client privilege under applicable law. “Secret” refers to other information gained in...

  1. Using Client Satisfaction to Improve Case Management Services for the Elderly

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hsieh, Chang-Ming

    2006-01-01

    Although client satisfaction has long been an important form of program evaluation, one of the major limitations regarding client satisfaction studies has been the inability to provide concrete feedback for service providers. This study describes the use of a client-centered approach to developing a client satisfaction measure for a case…

  2. Meeting the Needs of Clients with Dissociative Identity Disorder: Considerations for Psychotherapy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ringrose, Jo L.

    2011-01-01

    Psychotherapy for clients with Dissociative Identity Disorder (DID) is different to therapy with most clients because these clients are multiple, comprising one or more host, and one or more alter personalities. The necessary components to be addressed in order that clients can live successfully either as a multiple or as an integrated person are…

  3. Request queues for interactive clients in a shared file system of a parallel computing system

    DOEpatents

    Bent, John M.; Faibish, Sorin

    2015-08-18

    Interactive requests are processed from users of log-in nodes. A metadata server node is provided for use in a file system shared by one or more interactive nodes and one or more batch nodes. The interactive nodes comprise interactive clients to execute interactive tasks and the batch nodes execute batch jobs for one or more batch clients. The metadata server node comprises a virtual machine monitor; an interactive client proxy to store metadata requests from the interactive clients in an interactive client queue; a batch client proxy to store metadata requests from the batch clients in a batch client queue; and a metadata server to store the metadata requests from the interactive client queue and the batch client queue in a metadata queue based on an allocation of resources by the virtual machine monitor. The metadata requests can be prioritized, for example, based on one or more of a predefined policy and predefined rules.

  4. The young chronic client in mental health today.

    PubMed

    Brunger, J B

    1986-09-01

    Due to the nature of the work with this demanding population, who, in spite of all efforts, demonstrates only minimal changes at best, nurses need aggressive management of their own lives. Burnout is rampant. Work with this type of client is not for everyone. Programs need to offer staff the opportunity to work with these clients only if the staff is capable and desires the challenge. It is necessary to set realistic goals and expectations with clients and to learn to accept tiny changes. Nurses must help the client become more realistic in their expectations of what will be achieved. It is important to note that the therapist may scare the client into regressed behavior by being too hopeful, by pushing them too far too fast, and by allowing them to go too fast. Caution should be taken with respect to encouragement and expectations of normalcy. If goals are too high and the client "fails," the therapist perceives that he/she is the one who failed. The patient who manages to achieve a level of functioning that enables him to interface with the outside often finds a world that is cold, demanding, and cruel--one that is easier to escape from than to deal with. One must be flexible and accessible to the client--involved with honest detachment. For the nurse therapist to serve this population requires sophistication in the theories of child and adolescent suicide, crisis intervention, aggression management, chemical abuse and use, and the ability to negotiate housing, money, food, services--things which have previously been the domain of others.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  5. Real Language Meets Real Business

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Muirhead, Muirhead; Schechter, Sarah

    2016-01-01

    The Real Business Language Challenge was a collaborative pilot project between Coca-Cola Enterprises (CCE) and Routes into Languages East for Year 9 and 10 pupils. It was based on CCE's award-winning Real Business Challenge, part of its highly acclaimed education programme. The Real Business Language Challenge transformed the project into a…

  6. Lightweight Tactical Client: A Capability-Based Approach to Command Post Computing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-12-01

    definition of a thin client and propose a new term that is not bound to the thin client terminology. This report opens with two definitions of a thin...extracted from these definitions . These capabilities are paired with tactical capabilities incompatible with thin client architecture. A new term that...CONTENTS Page Introduction 1 Thin Client Definitions 1 U.S. Army Definition of Thick and Thin Clients (ref. 3) 1 Industry Definition of Thin

  7. Examining Challenging Behaviors of Clients with Borderline Personality Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Chalker, Samantha A.; Carmel, Adam; Atkins, David C.; Landes, Sara J.; Kerbrat, Amanda H.; Comtois, Katherine Anne

    2015-01-01

    Few studies have examined effects of challenging behaviors of clients with borderline personality disorder (BPD) on psychotherapy outcomes. Dialectical behavior therapy (DBT) is an evidence-based treatment designed to treat chronic suicidality, self-directed violence (SDV), and emotion dysregulation, while targeting challenging behaviors. DBT has been shown to be effective with clients with BPD. We evaluated whether therapist reported challenging behaviors, such as high volume phone contacts or violating the therapist’s limits, during DBT would be associated with dropping out of DBT, severity and frequency of SDV, emotion regulation deficits, and client’s and therapist’s satisfaction of treatment. The current study examined challenging behaviors reported by therapists in a sample of 63 psychiatrically disabled outpatient DBT clients diagnosed with BPD (73% women, average age 37 years). More frequent phone contacts were associated with a decrease in dropout and psychological symptoms, and an increase in client and therapist satisfaction. More avoidance/disengagement behavior was associated with more than twice the risk of SDV and a decrease in therapist satisfaction. Findings suggest that the phone coaching might serve to maximize client satisfaction and reduce the likelihood of dropout. PMID:26496225

  8. Scalable TCP-friendly Video Distribution for Heterogeneous Clients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zink, Michael; Griwodz, Carsten; Schmitt, Jens; Steinmetz, Ralf

    2003-01-01

    This paper investigates an architecture and implementation for the use of a TCP-friendly protocol in a scalable video distribution system for hierarchically encoded layered video. The design supports a variety of heterogeneous clients, because recent developments have shown that access network and client capabilities differ widely in today's Internet. The distribution system presented here consists of videos servers, proxy caches and clients that make use of a TCP-friendly rate control (TFRC) to perform congestion controlled streaming of layer encoded video. The data transfer protocol of the system is RTP compliant, yet it integrates protocol elements for congestion control with protocols elements for retransmission that is necessary for lossless transfer of contents into proxy caches. The control protocol RTSP is used to negotiate capabilities, such as support for congestion control or retransmission. By tests performed with our experimental platform in a lab test and over the Internet, we show that congestion controlled streaming of layer encoded video through proxy caches is a valid means of supporting heterogeneous clients. We show that filtering of layers depending on a TFRC-controlled permissible bandwidth allows the preferred delivery of the most relevant layers to end-systems while additional layers can be delivered to the cache server. We experiment with uncontrolled delivery from the proxy cache to the client as well, which may result in random loss and bandwidth waste but also a higher goodput, and compare these two approaches.

  9. Being empathetic: benefits and challenges for the clinician and client.

    PubMed

    Abbott Moore, Lisa

    2010-01-01

    This article explores the meaning of empathy and how it influences clinicians in their personal and professional lives. Empathy may benefit client and clinician by improving patient satisfaction and pain management, reducing medical errors, and helping to keep clinicians grounded in the priorities of patient care. The cultural and developmental origins and neural basis of empathy are reviewed to provide insight into how a clinician's and client's emotions can interact and influence each other. Methods for cultivating and communicating empathetic responses in the clinical setting are provided, including ways of identifying and dealing with difficult clients. Concepts such as attunement, emotional labor, and parallel emotions are explained. The limitations to empathy and potential challenges or difficulties for the clinician are also explored, along with possible solutions. Narratives from the author's personal and professional life are included to illustrate how a clinician's emotions can play a significant part in interactions with clients. This discussion shows that clinicians must combine both evidenced-based practice and empathy in their interactions with clients to achieve the professional goal of high-quality care.

  10. H3+: superficies de energía potencial, estados y transiciones rovibracionales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aguado, M. Paniagua Y. A.

    Hemos calculado varias superficies globales de energía potencial para el estado fundamental y excitados del sistema H3+ en más de ocho mil geometrías diferentes usando una base (9s 3p 1d)/[4s 3p 1d] en cada átomo de Hidrógeno y mediante un método de cálculo de interacción de configuraciones completa (FCI). Hemos ajustado las superficies a formas analíticas del tipo Aguado y Paniagua con un error promedio menor de 50 cm-1 y menor en el pozo de potencial del estado fundamental. Finalmente hemos calculado y analizado los niveles vibracionales para los dos estados electrónicos más bajos, siendo la desviación respecto de los mejores valores publicados, tanto experimentales como teóricos, de unos pocos números de onda.

  11. Does Motivational Interviewing (MI) Work with Nonaddicted Clients? A Controlled Study Measuring the Effects of a Brief Training in MI on Client Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Tabitha L.; Gutierrez, Daniel; Hagedorn, W. Bryce

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated the relationships between motivational interviewing (MI) and client symptoms, attendance, and satisfaction. Seventy-nine clients attending a university-based counseling center were purposefully assigned to treatment or control conditions. Statistical analyses revealed client symptoms in both groups improved. However,…

  12. A client/server database system for project evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Brule, M.R.; Fair, W.B.; Jiang, J.; Sanvido, R.D.

    1994-12-31

    PETS (Project Evaluation Tool Set) is a networked client/server system that provides a full set of decision-support tools for evaluating the business potential of onshore and offshore development projects. This distributed workgroup computing system combines and streamlines preliminary design, routine cost estimation, economic evaluation, and risk analysis for conceptual developments as well as for ongoing projects and operations. A flexible and extendible client/server integration framework links in-house and third-party software applications with a database and an expert-system knowledgebase, and, where appropriate, links the applications among themselves. The capability and richness of inexpensive commercial operating systems and off-the-shelf applications have made building a client/server system like PETS possible in a relatively short time and at low cost. We will discuss the object-oriented design of the PETS system, detail its capabilities, and outline the methods used to integrate applications from other domains.

  13. Client retention and health among sex workers in Nairobi, Kenya.

    PubMed

    Izugbara, Chimaraoke O

    2012-12-01

    It is still a small body of research that directly addresses female sex workers' relationships with their regular commercial male partners. I used ethnographic data from Nairobi, Kenya to interrogate motivations and strategies for recruiting and retaining regular male clients among female sex workers (FSWs). Regular commercial male partners, popularly called customer care, wera or wesh by Nairobi's FSWs, played diverse roles in their lives. Client retention enabled sex workers to manage the risk of reduced marriage prospects, guaranteed them steady work, livelihoods, and incomes, and prevented their victimization and harassment. To retain clients, sex workers obliged them a great deal, pretended they had quit prostitution, and sometimes resorted to magical practices. However, these strategies were also accompanied by risks that reinforced the vulnerability of sex workers. Lack of critical attention to sex workers' practices for managing perceived risks in their particular type of work may hamper current programmatic efforts to make their job safer.

  14. Web-client based distributed generalization and geoprocessing

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wolf, E.B.; Howe, K.

    2009-01-01

    Generalization and geoprocessing operations on geospatial information were once the domain of complex software running on high-performance workstations. Currently, these computationally intensive processes are the domain of desktop applications. Recent efforts have been made to move geoprocessing operations server-side in a distributed, web accessible environment. This paper initiates research into portable client-side generalization and geoprocessing operations as part of a larger effort in user-centered design for the US Geological Survey's The National Map. An implementation of the Ramer-Douglas-Peucker (RDP) line simplification algorithm was created in the open source OpenLayers geoweb client. This algorithm implementation was benchmarked using differing data structures and browser platforms. The implementation and results of the benchmarks are discussed in the general context of client-side geoprocessing. (Abstract).

  15. Helpful and unhelpful therapy experiences of LGBT clients.

    PubMed

    Israel, Tania; Gorcheva, Raya; Burnes, Theodore R; Walther, William A

    2008-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify a broad range of variables that characterize the helpful and unhelpful therapy experiences of lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) individuals. Interviews were completed with a diverse sample of 42 LGBT individuals who have been in therapy, and a content analysis was conducted. Results indicated that basic counseling skills and relationships were key determinants of the quality of LGBT clients' therapy experiences. Also important to the helpfulness of the therapy experience were therapist variables such as professional background and attitudes toward client sexual orientation/gender identity; client variables such as stage of identity development, health status, and social support; and environmental factors such as confidentiality of the therapy setting.

  16. High-Yield Secretion of Multiple Client Proteins in Aspergillus

    SciTech Connect

    Segato, F.; Damasio, A. R. L.; Goncalves, T. A.; de Lucas, R. C.; Squina, F. M.; Decker, S. R.; Prade, R. A.

    2012-07-15

    Production of pure and high-yield client proteins is an important technology that addresses the need for industrial applications of enzymes as well as scientific experiments in protein chemistry and crystallization. Fungi are utilized in industrial protein production because of their ability to secrete large quantities of proteins. In this study, we engineered a high-expression-secretion vector, pEXPYR that directs proteins towards the extracellular medium in two Aspergillii host strains, examine the effect of maltose-induced over-expression and protein secretion as well as time and pH-dependent protein stability in the medium. We describe five client proteins representing a core set of hemicellulose degrading enzymes that accumulated up to 50-100 mg/L of protein. Using a recyclable genetic marker that allows serial insertion of multiple genes, simultaneous hyper-secretion of three client proteins in a single host strain was accomplished.

  17. Privacy preserving, real-time and location secured biometrics for mCommerce authentication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuseler, Torben; Al-Assam, Hisham; Jassim, Sabah; Lami, Ihsan A.

    2011-06-01

    Secure wireless connectivity between mobile devices and financial/commercial establishments is mature, and so is the security of remote authentication for mCommerce. However, the current techniques are open for hacking, false misrepresentation, replay and other attacks. This is because of the lack of real-time and current-precise-location in the authentication process. This paper proposes a new technique that includes freshly-generated real-time personal biometric data of the client and present-position of the mobile device used by the client to perform the mCommerce so to form a real-time biometric representation to authenticate any remote transaction. A fresh GPS fix generates the "time and location" to stamp the biometric data freshly captured to produce a single, real-time biometric representation on the mobile device. A trusted Certification Authority (CA) acts as an independent authenticator of such client's claimed realtime location and his/her provided fresh biometric data. Thus eliminates the necessity of user enrolment with many mCommerce services and application providers. This CA can also "independently from the client" and "at that instant of time" collect the client's mobile device "time and location" from the cellular network operator so to compare with the received information, together with the client's stored biometric information. Finally, to preserve the client's location privacy and to eliminate the possibility of cross-application client tracking, this paper proposes shielding the real location of the mobile device used prior to submission to the CA or authenticators.

  18. Real-World Problem Solving in Freshman-Sophomore Engineering.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pavelich, Michael J.; And Others

    1995-01-01

    In an integrated four-course sequence, Colorado School of Mines engineering and science students work on open-ended, real-world problems prepared by government agencies and private companies that interact as clients with student teams. The program fosters intellectual development, teamwork, and communication skills. (Author/MSE)

  19. Understanding, eliciting and negotiating clients' multicultural health beliefs.

    PubMed

    Jackson, L E

    1993-04-01

    People of many cultures explain and treat illness in ways that are different from and that may conflict with the biomedical beliefs and practices on which the American health care system is based. Eliciting clients' health beliefs and negotiating treatment plans with them can help avoid problems caused by discrepancies in belief systems. This article presents three major categories of belief systems commonly found in the United States as well as other countries. Questions designed to discover clients' health beliefs are included, along with guidelines for arriving at plans of care that accommodate those beliefs. Case studies are provided that illustrate this process of negotiation.

  20. Treatment of Deaf Clients: Ethical Considerations for Professionals in Psychology

    PubMed Central

    Boness, Cassandra L.

    2016-01-01

    Providing therapy to deaf clients raises important ethical considerations for psychologists related to competence; multiple relationships and boundary issues; confidentiality; assessment, diagnosis, and evaluation; and communication and using interpreters. In evaluating and addressing these, psychologists must consider the APA’s Ethics Code and other relevant issues (e.g., ADA) necessary to provide ethical treatment. The current article provides background, ethical considerations, principles and standards relevant to the treatment of deaf clients, and recommendations to support psychologists, training programs, and the field. Psychologists have the responsibility to guarantee that the benefits of mental health treatment are fairly and justly provided to this traditionally underserved population. PMID:27917030

  1. Clients' relational conceptions of conjoint couple and family therapy quality: a grounded formal theory.

    PubMed

    Chenail, Ronald J; George, Sally St; Wulff, Dan; Duffy, Maureen; Scott, Karen Wilson; Tomm, Karl

    2012-01-01

    Based upon a qualitative metasynthesis of 49 articles centered on clients' experiences of their conjoint couple and family therapy, the investigators constructed a grounded formal theory of Clients' Relational Conceptions of Conjoint Couple and Family Therapy Quality. The theory suggests from pretherapy conceptions to posttherapy reflections, clients' perceptions of conjoint couple and family therapy quality appear to consist of clients' constructed meanings regarding a series of interrelated relationships between clients and their therapists and therapy environments, between clients and themselves, between clients and other family members, and between process and outcome both inside and outside therapy. Within and across these relationships, clients appear to focus on expectations, connections, balance, and change when evaluating the quality of their clinical experiences. Based upon this theory, the investigators recommend that researchers continue to explore this clinical phenomenon and that therapists regularly seek clients' conceptions of quality in therapy.

  2. Real-time flight test data distribution and display

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nesel, Michael C.; Hammons, Kevin R.

    1988-01-01

    Enhancements to the real-time processing and display systems of the NASA Western Aeronautical Test Range are described. Display processing has been moved out of the telemetry and radar acquisition processing systems super-minicomputers into user/client interactive graphic workstations. Real-time data is provided to the workstations by way of Ethernet. Future enhancement plans include use of fiber optic cable to replace the Ethernet.

  3. Effective Strategies for Nurses Empowering Clients With Schizophrenia: Medication Use as a Tool in Recovery

    PubMed Central

    Mahone, Irma H.; Maphis, Chris Fasching; Snow, Diane E.

    2016-01-01

    Clients with schizophrenia require maintenance treatment with antipsychotic medication and psychosocial therapy to maintain symptom control. Rates of medication adherence or follow-through are low in clients with schizophrenia. This increases the risk of relapse and contributes to poor quality of life. As educators and advisers, psychiatric nurses can collaborate with clients to improve adherence and other outcomes using shared decision-making techniques and tools that engage and empower clients to actively participate in decisions about their treatment. This article outlines effective strategies used by psychiatric nurses to improve outcomes in clients with schizophrenia and uses a case example for demonstrating this strategy in a client with schizophrenia. PMID:27111300

  4. The influence of client socioeconomic status on psychotherapists' attributional biases and countertransference reactions.

    PubMed

    Dougall, Jennifer L; Schwartz, Robert C

    2011-01-01

    Clinical reaction related to client socioeconomic status has not been adequately researched, yet socioeconomic status can profoundly affect psychotherapist perceptions of a client's presenting concerns, symptom severity, and prognosis. Using an online national survey, this study examined the influence of client socioeconomic status on psychotherapist cognitive attributions and countertransference reactions (N = 141). Results revealed no significant differences in cognitive attributions based on socioeconomic status. However, significantly stronger countertransference reactions of being dominated by the client with a higher socioeconomic status were found. In addition, the clients with higher socioeconomic status were ascribed with mild problems compared with the client of lower socioeconomic status. Psychotherapeutic implications are discussed.

  5. Real Forestry for Real Estate

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gagnon, Jennifer; Fisher, Jason

    2013-01-01

    Virginia is poised to see an unprecedented change in forest land ownership. To provide new landowners with information on sustainable forest management, we developed a two-part program, Real Forestry for Real Estate. First, we assembled New Landowner Packets, which contain a variety of sustainable forest management resources. Second, two…

  6. The network of corporate clients: customer attrition at commercial banks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lublóy, Á.; Szenes, M.

    2008-12-01

    Commercial banks might profit from the adoption of methods widely used in network theory. A decision making process might become biased if one disregards network effects within the corporate client portfolio. This paper models the phenomenon of customer attrition by generating a weighted and directed network of corporate clients linked by financial transactions. During the numerical study of the agent-based toy model we demonstrate that multiple steady states may exist. The statistical properties of the distinct steady states show similarities. We show that most companies of the same community choose the same bank in the steady state. In contrast to the case for the steady state of the Barabási-Albert network, market shares in this model equalize by network size. When modeling customer attrition in the network of 3 × 105 corporate clients, none of the companies followed the behavior of the initial switcher in three quarters of the simulations. The number of switchers exceeded 20 in 1% of the cases. In the worst-case scenario a total of 688 companies chose a competitor bank. Significant network effects have been discovered; high correlation prevailed between the degree of the initial switcher and the severity of the avalanche effect. This suggests that the position of the corporate client in the network might be much more important than the underlying properties (industry, size, profitability, etc) of the company.

  7. Beyond Multiplication: Incorporating Importance into Client Satisfaction Measures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hsieh, Chang-Ming

    2014-01-01

    Objective: This article brings the discussions on incorporating perceived importance across study areas into the study of client satisfaction and cautions the use of multiplicative scores (multiplying satisfaction and importance scores) as a weighting method. An alternative weighting method is provided. Method: Analyze data from a client…

  8. The Clinical and Client-Centered Approach to Counseling.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rivas, Richard G.

    This review analyzes the clinical and client-centered approaches to counseling. Clinical counseling separated from vocational counseling in the third decade of this century. A split took place between guidance and discipline. The mental hygiene movement facilitated this split. In 1942 Carl Rogers made an impact on counseling theory with the…

  9. Client-Centered Supervision and Evaluation of Teachers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schwartz, Libby Zinman

    1978-01-01

    Client-centered supervision is a personal participatory, and developmental approach, which finds its roots in the "third force" psychology of Carl Rogers. It requires a supervisor of sensitivity and humanistic orientation. Teacher evaluation criteria under this system focus on three areas: learning climate, program content, and…

  10. Culturally Relevant Psychiatric Care: The West Indian as a Client.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brent, June Elaine; Callwood, Gloria B.

    1993-01-01

    Describes West Indian culture, including belief systems, family patterns, child-rearing practices, racial mixtures, and geography; and explains the importance of culturally relevant approaches to mental health services. The effective clinician must approach clients with an attitude of cultural relativity. (SLD)

  11. Why "Who Is the Client?" Is the Wrong Ethical Question

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fisher, Mary Alice

    2014-01-01

    The familiar question "Who is the client?" elicits a singular answer. This may be appropriate as a clinical question, and it is sometimes necessary as a legal question or reimbursement question, but on ethical questions, the National Association of School Psychologists Ethics Code requires school psychologists to "think plural"…

  12. Legal and Ethical Implications of Refusing to Counsel Homosexual Clients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hermann, Mary A.; Herlihy, Barbara Richter

    2006-01-01

    In 2001, a federal appeals court upheld the job termination of a counselor who requested being excused from counseling a lesbian client on relationship issues because homosexuality conflicted with the counselor's religious beliefs ("Bruff v. North Mississippi Health Services, Inc.," 2001). This article provides the facts of the case and the legal…

  13. Client-Server Connection Status Monitoring Using Ajax Push Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lamongie, Julien R.

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes how simple client-server connection status monitoring can be implemented using Ajax (Asynchronous JavaScript and XML), JSF (Java Server Faces) and ICEfaces technologies. This functionality is required for NASA LCS (Launch Control System) displays used in the firing room for the Constellation project. Two separate implementations based on two distinct approaches are detailed and analyzed.

  14. Client-Based Staff Development: Building Programs That Work.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parkay, Forrest W.; Hoover, Nora

    A description is given of a client-based approach to staff development that emphasizes ongoing professional growth and learning for teachers. The underlying assumptions of the program are that teachers possess important clinical expertise, and that professional learning is an adaptive, heuristic process that is long-term and nonlinear. The program…

  15. Working With Suicidal Clients: "Not" Business as Usual

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ellis, Thomas E.; Goldston, David B.

    2012-01-01

    In this introduction to a special series of articles on working with suicidal clients, we note that much of the recent growth in theory and research pertaining to suicidal individuals has been contributed by cognitive-behavioral theorists and researchers. This work has established that suicidal people manifest important cognitive vulnerabilities…

  16. Investigation of Borderline Personality Disorder among Nonpsychotic, Involuntarily Hospitalized Clients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sansone, Randy A.; Gage, Mark D.; Wiederman, Michael W.

    1998-01-01

    Clients (N=32) who were involuntarily hospitalized in a psychiatric facility were assessed for borderline personality disorder (BPD) using an interview and two self-report questionnaires. The majority (53.1%) met criteria for BPD on all three measures, 18.8% on two measures, and 18.8% on only one measure. Implications of these findings are…

  17. Use of Drama Students as "Clients" in Teaching Abnormal Psychology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilliland, Kirby

    1982-01-01

    Describes the use of drama students to role play subjects of case studies in simulations of standard interviews in a college-level abnormal psychology class. Graduate drama students role-played clients in interviews with instructors or student panels. After the interviews, class discussion covered alternative possible diagnoses and possible…

  18. Undergraduate Role Players as "Clients" for Graduate Counseling Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Dana D.; And Others

    1989-01-01

    Describes two exercises in which undergraduates from abnormal psychology courses act as role-play clients for graduate counselor-trainees. Finds that the exercises seem to be educationally beneficial and may also help decrease undergraduates' negative stereotyping of persons with psychological problems. (KO)

  19. Measuring Client Experiences of Motivational Interviewing during a Lifestyle Intervention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Madson, Michael B.; Mohn, Richard S.; Schumacher, Julie A.; Landry, Alicia S.

    2015-01-01

    The Client Evaluation of Motivational Interviewing was used to assess motivational interviewing experiences in a predominantly female, African American sample from the Southeastern United States who received motivational interviewing-based feedback during a multicomponent lifestyle intervention. Motivational interviewing was experienced…

  20. Documentation of Client Dangerousness in a Managed Care Environment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Callahan, Jay

    1996-01-01

    Previously used for process notations, global assessment, and treatment planning, the clinical record is increasingly used to demonstrate accountability to third-party payers and to the legal system. This article discusses the documentation of accountability in the case of potential client suicide or violence toward others. (Author/RB)

  1. Designing Lives and Empowering Clients: The Case of Sue.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Porfeli, Erik, J.

    2003-01-01

    This case response centers on the client Sue, a professional mediator who seeks counseling to resolve a conflict with her employer (M. C. Rehfuss, 2003). The Selective Optimization with Compensation model of human development and Life-Span Theory of Control are used to frame Sue's career development and assist her in making the transition from…

  2. Breaking the Silence: School Counsellors' Experiences of Client Suicide

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Christianson, Carley L.; Everall, Robin D.

    2009-01-01

    School counselling is a unique discipline involving the provision of personal, social, and educational counselling to youth in schools. Since school counsellors work closely with at-risk children and adolescents they frequently encounter suicidal youth as clients. In this study, a qualitative grounded theory method was used to explore school…

  3. Competent Counseling for Middle Eastern American Clients: Implications for Trainees

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Soheilian, Sepideh S.; Inman, Arpana G.

    2015-01-01

    The authors used a factorial multivariate analysis of variance (MANOVA) to determine whether counselor trainees' group differences on measures of multicultural competence, empathy, and multicultural counseling self-efficacy (CSE) when working with Middle Eastern American (MEA) clients were moderated by trainee race. Two hundred and fifty-six…

  4. Descriptive Characteristics of Long-Term Private Practice Psychotherapy Clients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koss, Mary P.

    Data from public and private sectors reveal that few persons stay in psychotherapy long enough to be classified as "long-term" clients. Those who do remain in psychotherapy for a long time are rarely studied because attention has generally been focused on terminators. Demographic, treatment, and psychometric characteristics of 64 long-term…

  5. Ethical Reasoning and Mental Health Services with Deaf Clients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gutman, Virginia

    2005-01-01

    Ethical problems encountered by mental health practitioners working with deaf clients are often complex and involve issues not fully addressed in professional codes of ethics. A principles-based ethical reasoning process can assist in resolving many of these ethical concerns. Principles such as beneficence, nonmaleficence, autonomy, fairness,…

  6. Suggested Perspectives in Counseling the American Indian Client.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paisano-Suazo, Aleta

    The standard western theoretical approach to mental health counseling is not applicable to the views held by Native American clients. Consideration must be given to their unique differences, if the therapist is to provide maximum effectiveness. Several perspectives offer alternative counseling procedures. For instance, Indians place great…

  7. Teaching Accountability: Using Client Feedback to Train Effective Family Therapists

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sparks, Jacqueline A.; Kisler, Tiffani S.; Adams, Jerome F.; Blumen, Dale G.

    2011-01-01

    The AAMFT Task Force on Core Competencies (Nelson et al., 2007) proposed that marriage and family therapy (MFT) educators teach and provide evidence of trainee competence beyond coursework and accrued clinical hours. This article describes the integration of a systematic client feedback protocol into an MFT-accredited program's curricula to…

  8. Development of a Nutrition Education Intervention for Food Bank Clients.

    PubMed

    Dave, Jayna M; Thompson, Deborah I; Svendsen-Sanchez, Ann; McNeill, Lorna Haughton; Jibaja-Weiss, Maria

    2017-03-01

    The focus of this article is the development of a nutrition education intervention for food bank clients. Formative research using mixed-methods (qualitative and quantitative) and community-based participatory research principles was conducted to assess the nutrition education needs of clients obtaining service from the Houston Food Bank (HFB). Participants were HFB and pantry staff and clients. Interview data were coded and analyzed using grounded theory approach. Themes were then identified. Quantitative data were analyzed for frequencies and descriptives. Data were used to tailor the curriculum to the target population. Six HFB staff, 49 pantry staff from 17 pantries, and 54 clients from 10 pantries participated in interviews and focus groups and completed questionnaires. The participants provided opinion on the current nutrition education provided via the food bank and made suggestions on strategies for development of an intervention. Their feedback was used to develop the six-session intervention curriculum to be delivered over 6 months. This research provides evidence that it is critical for members of the target audience be included in formative research to develop behavior change programs that are relevant and appealing and target their needs and interests.

  9. Collaborating with Your Clients Using Social Media & Mobile Communications

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Typhina, Eli; Bardon, Robert E.; Gharis, Laurie W.

    2015-01-01

    Many Extension educators are still learning how to effectively integrate social media into their programs. By using the right social media platforms and mobile applications to create engaged, online communities, Extension educators can collaborate with clients to produce and to share information expanding and enhancing their social media and…

  10. Conversation Skills Training for Rehabilitation Clients. Trainer's Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewis, Frank D.; Roessler, Richard T.

    This training package consists of materials for use in helping vocational rehabilitation clients develop conversational skills. The first item in the package is a trainer's manual that includes 11 lessons dealing with the following topics: when to start a conversation, the components of a conversation, greetings and opening remarks, techniques for…

  11. Perceptions of Clients and Counseling Professionals regarding Spirituality in Counseling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morrison, Julie Q.; Clutter, Stacy M.; Pritchett, Elaine M.; Demmitt, Alan

    2009-01-01

    Although current research indicates that psychotherapeutic change both affects and is affected by spiritual concerns, relatively little is known about the degree to which spirituality is used as an intervention in counseling and how it is perceived by clients and mental health professionals. The purpose of this study was to examine the perceptions…

  12. Improving the Complaint Process for Sexuality Exploited Clients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spitalny, Gloria

    Four sexually exploited clients shared their experiences in invoking the complaint process against their former therapists. They wanted to stop the therapist from practicing and harming others, to receive some acknowledgement that they had been harmed, and to obtain some kind of recompense. If the therapist was unable to admit his or her error,…

  13. How Professionals (Including Legal Educators) "Treat" Their Clients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenebaum, Edwin H.

    1987-01-01

    A discussion of legal education looks at the law school as a clinic in which the student as client comes for treatment (education). It examines the ways in which the law school changes the professional through cognitive learning, skills training, and the adjustment of roles and relationships. (MSE)

  14. Art Therapy with Hispanic Clients: Results of a Survey Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bermudez, Diana; ter Maat, Mercedes

    2006-01-01

    Despite the growing number of Hispanics in the US and in caseloads of art therapists, previous literature on this topic is scarce and predominantly based on case studies. This survey assessed the perceptions of 27 art therapists from large metropolitan areas regarding the use of art therapy with Hispanic clients. These perceptions included client…

  15. A Client-Side Web Agent for Document Categorization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boley, Daniel; Gini, Maria; Hastings, Kyle; Mobasher, Bamshad; Moore, Jerry

    1998-01-01

    Describes WebACE, the architecture of a client-side agent that explores and classifies Web documents in clusters automatically and discusses the details of the algorithms within its key components. Highlights principal direction divisive partitioning (PDDP), a scalable hierarchical clustering algorithm; compares it to other clustering methods; and…

  16. Thin Client Architecture: The Promise and the Problems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Machovec, George S.

    1997-01-01

    Describes thin clients, a networking technology that allows organizations to provide software applications over networked workstations connected to a central server. Topics include corporate settings; major advantages, including cost effectiveness and increased computer security; problems; and possible applications for large public and academic…

  17. The Use of Music in Counseling Addictive Clients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gallant, Wilfred; Siegel, Sammi; Holosko, Michael

    1997-01-01

    Explores a broad range of music interventions appropriate for addictive clients so as to fill a void in the music therapy and addictions counseling literature. Presents a rationale for the use of music intervention and presents case examples. Describes a social work intervention approach tested over a 10-year period. (RJM)

  18. Postemployment Needs of the Rehabilitated Client: A Skilled Assessment Approach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shrey, Donald E.

    1980-01-01

    Offers a step-by-step guide to help rehabilitation counselors design activities to ensure client's job maintenance. Describes initial assessment process that identifies physical, emotional, and intellectual barriers to job maintenance. Discusses development of a systematic postemployment service plan. (Author)

  19. Langfristige Performance mit Thin Clients bei HSBC Trinkaus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    HSBC Trinkaus nutzt Thin Clients als grafikstarke Desktops einer Citrix-basierenden Server Based Computing-Umgebung. Die neuen Dualview-Arbeitsplätze sind zuverlässiger, pflegeleichter und stromsparender als die bisherigen Terminal-PCs. Selbst die Administration erfolgt im Zweibildschirmbetrieb.

  20. Clinical Assessment of Dissociative Identity Disorder among College Counseling Clients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levy, Benjamin; Swanson, Janine E.

    2008-01-01

    College counseling professionals address a wide range of complex student mental health concerns. Among these, accurately identifying client presentations of dissociative identity disorder (DID) can be especially challenging because students with DID sometimes present as if they are experiencing another problem, such as a mood, anxiety, or…

  1. Demographic and Clinical Correlates of Client Motivation among Substance Abusers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rapp, Richard C.; Li, Li; Siegal, Harvey A.; DeLiberty, Richard N.

    2003-01-01

    Examines the role of motivation in substance abusers' acceptance of treatment and its relation to treatment outcomes. Better motivation was consistently associated with severity of substance use. Motivation was not related to alcohol and drug use severity six months later. Severity associated with motivation at entry was not related to clients'…

  2. Counselling the (Self?) Diagnosed Client: Generative and Reflective Conversations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strong, Tom; Ross, Karen H.; Sesma-Vazquez, Monica

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we address the phenomenon of clients who present their concerns in the medicalised discourse of the "Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders-Fifth Edition" ("DSM-5"). We contextualise this phenomenon, highlighting how a "diagnose-and-treat" logic increasingly pervades everyday…

  3. 37 CFR 11.114 - Client with diminished capacity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... capacity. 11.114 Section 11.114 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights UNITED STATES PATENT AND TRADEMARK... diminished capacity. (a) When a client's capacity to make adequately considered decisions in connection with... capacity, is at risk of substantial physical, financial or other harm unless action is taken and...

  4. 37 CFR 11.114 - Client with diminished capacity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... capacity. 11.114 Section 11.114 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights UNITED STATES PATENT AND TRADEMARK... diminished capacity. (a) When a client's capacity to make adequately considered decisions in connection with... capacity, is at risk of substantial physical, financial or other harm unless action is taken and...

  5. Ethical Considerations in Maintaining Confidentiality with Dangerous Clients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yost, J. Kelley

    This paper discusses ethical considerations involved in breach of confidentiality in counseling dangerous clients, i.e., those who have the potential to inflict bodily harm on others. The ethical basis for confidentiality is presented in a model for decision making in ethical dilemmas which encompasses three evaluative levels or tiers: ethical…

  6. Client Preferences for STD/HIV Prevention Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hennessy, Michael; Mercier, Michele M.; Williams, Samantha P.; Arno, Janet N.

    2002-01-01

    Conducted a formative research study designed to elicit preferences for sexually transmitted disease (STD)/HIV prevention programs from clients at a midwestern STD clinic. Responses of 126 participants show preferences for mixed group or individual meetings with counselors, with extensive intervention less favored than single sessions. Discusses…

  7. Nonverbal Communication and Client Satisfaction in Computer-Assisted Transactions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ketrow, Sandra M.

    1991-01-01

    Tests the arousal-valence model of nonverbal communication by examining the effect of selected immediate nonverbal communication cues exhibited by bank tellers on the satisfaction of their clients in banking transactions. Finds that immediacy in brief impersonal transactions is not a significant predictor of satisfaction. (SR)

  8. Client and Birth Record Linkage: A Method, Biases, and Lessons.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holian, John

    1996-01-01

    Describes record linkage as a data-generating technique, and presents a method for linking client records to live and stillbirth records, using 32,974 births in the Cleveland (Ohio) area. Biases that can enter the linkage process and general research issues related to record linkage are discussed. (SLD)

  9. 31 CFR 8.34 - Knowledge of client's omission.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Knowledge of client's omission. 8.34 Section 8.34 Money and Finance: Treasury Office of the Secretary of the Treasury PRACTICE BEFORE THE BUREAU OF ALCOHOL, TOBACCO AND FIREARMS Duties and Restrictions Relating to Practice § 8.34 Knowledge...

  10. Using heat to reduce blood collection time in pediatric clients.

    PubMed

    Becht, D K; Anderson, M A

    1996-11-01

    Several states now require that all children attending day care, nursery schools, and kindergarten have evidence of a blood lead screening. Obtaining the requisite blood sample can be difficult because of inherent problems with pediatric clients. The purpose of this research was to explore if the application of heat to promote vasodilation affected finger stick collection time in pediatric clients. Subjects, ages 2 through 6 years, were randomly assigned to a control or intervention group (N = 63). For the intervention group, heat was applied for 1 min by placement of an infant heel warmer on the hand selected for the finger stick. A stopwatch was used to measure the time of blood collection in both the control and intervention groups. A two-tailed t test revealed statistical significance between the two groups (p = .008). Findings suggest the application of heat to promote vasodilation does reduce collection time in pediatric clients. Nurse practitioners may use this intervention to facilitate collection of blood samples in pediatric clients.

  11. Migrating from Mainframes to Client-Server Systems.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1995-09-01

    The prevailing trend within the computer industry is to downsize information systems. This quite often entails migrating an application from a...centralized mainframe environment to a distributed client-server system. Navy IS managers are often given the mandate to downsize all information systems

  12. Training Counselors to Write Behavior-Based Client Objectives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hinman, Suki; Marr, John N.

    1984-01-01

    Evaluated the effect of individual training of rehabilitation counselors (N=12) on their ability to write specific behaviorally stated, client-centered objectives. Results showed the number of behavioral objectives counselors wrote consistently increased as a function of training by a behavioral consultant. (JAC)

  13. CLIENT (Communication Law Information: Edited Notes by Topic), Autumn 1975.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LeDuc, Don R., Ed.; Krasnow, Erwin G., Ed.

    This issue of CLIENT (Communication Law Information: Edited Notes by Topic) contains the following features: a recent listing of topics related to telecommunications studies in legal journals; an article by Stuart Brotman on financial self-sufficiency for the public interest communication law movement; a selected annotated bibliography of 1974-75…

  14. Nutrition education program for food bank clients: A pilot study

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Many low income families depend on foods from food banks. The objective of the study was to determine program content and examine feasibility of a pilot nutrition education program for food bank clients. Formative research was conducted with staff at a local food bank and its pantries and adult clie...

  15. Evaluation of a Continuing Education Training on Client Financial Capability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frey, Jodi Jacobson; Svoboda, Deborah; Sander, Rebecca L.; Osteen, Philip J.; Callahan, Christine; Elkinson, Audrey

    2015-01-01

    The researchers conducted an evaluation study assessing outcomes among 37 social workers who completed a continuing education course on financial capability and working with clients. Key constructs assessed included participants' attitudes about financial capability, self-efficacy to provide services, organizational barriers, and basic financial…

  16. A Profile of Clients Entering Treatment for Alcohol Problems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Finkbiner, Richard

    Large numbers of clients entering publicly-funded substance abuse treatment facilities cite problems with alcohol as one reason for seeking treatment. This report presents the results of a secondary analysis of the National Treatment Improvement Evaluation Study (NTIES) data set. It profiles the treatment experiences of three study groups that…

  17. Confidentiality Limits with Clients Who Have the AIDS Virus.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gray, Lizbeth A.; Harding, Anna K.

    1988-01-01

    Addresses the issue of defining limits of confidentiality for the life-threatening dilemma of a client who has the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) virus and who continues to be sexually active without informing his or her partners. Reviews the medical background of AIDS, legal limits, and ethical issues of confidentiality. Supports…

  18. Writing about Clients: Developing Composite Case Material and Its Rationale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duffy, Maureen

    2010-01-01

    Ethical guidelines of the 4 major professional associations representing counselors and psychotherapists are reviewed. To help clarify thinking about writing up clinical cases, 3 kinds of cases are described. The author concludes that the current guidelines for clinician authors in writing about clients for publication or presentation are…

  19. Trying differently: A relationship-centered approach to representing clients with cognitive challenges.

    PubMed

    Boulding, David M; Brooks, Susan L

    2010-01-01

    This article demonstrates the usefulness of an innovative framework called "Relationship-Centered Lawyering" to enhancing real world legal practice. It uses the example of lawyers, particularly criminal defense lawyers, who often deal with clients with cognitive challenges. The article developed out of a series of workshops conducted jointly by the co-authors, an American law professor with a social work background, and a Canadian criminal defense lawyer and family mediator who is an international expert on Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder and other Neuro-Behavioral Disorders (FA/NB). The paper describes the relational theory Brooks developed (along with Robert Madden), along with the science of cognitive impairments, with a specific focus on FA/NB. The paper provides two illustrations of the relational framework by explaining Boulding's strategy of creating what is called the "external brain" and his techniques of relational interviewing.

  20. Use of Deception to Improve Client Honeypot Detection of Drive-by-Download Attacks

    SciTech Connect

    Popovsky, Barbara; Narvaez Suarez, Julia F.; Seifert, Christian; Frincke, Deborah A.; O'Neil, Lori R.; Aval, Chiraag U.

    2009-07-24

    This paper presents the application of deception theory to improve the success of client honeypots at detecting malicious web page attacks from infected servers programmed by online criminals to launch drive-by-download attacks. The design of honeypots faces three main challenges: deception, how to design honeypots that seem real systems; counter-deception, techniques used to identify honeypots and hence defeating their deceiving nature; and counter counter-deception, how to design honeypots that deceive attackers. The authors propose the application of a deception model known as the deception planning loop to identify the current status on honeypot research, development and deployment. The analysis leads to a proposal to formulate a landscape of the honeypot research and planning of steps ahead.

  1. Community as client: environmental issues in the real world. A SimCity computer simulation.

    PubMed

    Bareford, C G

    2001-01-01

    The ability to think critically has become a crucial part of professional practice and education. SimCity, a popular computer simulation game, provides an opportunity to practice community assessment and interventions using a systems approach. SimCity is an interactive computer simulation game in which the player takes an active part in community planning. SimCity is supported on either a Windows 95/98 or a Macintosh platform and is available on CD-ROM at retail stores or at www.simcity.com. Students complete a tutorial and then apply a selected scenario in SimCity. Scenarios consist of hypothetical communities that have varying types and degrees of environmental problems, e.g., traffic, crime, nuclear meltdown, flooding, fire, and earthquakes. In problem solving with the simulated scenarios, students (a) identify systems and subsystems within the community that are critical factors impacting the environmental health of the community, (b) create changes in the systems and subsystems in an effort to solve the environmental health problem, and (c) evaluate the effectiveness of interventions based on the game score, demographic and fiscal data, and amount of community support. Because the consequences of planned intervention are part of the simulation, nursing students are able to develop critical-thinking skills. The simulation provides essential content in community planning in an interesting and interactive format.

  2. Assessment of client satisfaction in labor and delivery services at a maternity referral hospital in Ethiopia

    PubMed Central

    Melese, Tadele; Gebrehiwot, Yirgu; Bisetegne, Daniel; Habte, Dereje

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Patients perception about service quality shapes their confidence with regard to use of the available health care facility. This study is aimed to assess the client`s satisfaction in a maternal health care setting. Methods This is an institution based cross sectional descriptive study. A total of 423 postpartum women were interviewed. Data was analyzed using SPSS version 20 statistical package. Results The proportion of mothers who are completely satisfied with health care ranges between 2.4 to 21%. Pain control was the poorest source of satisfaction with 82% reporting dissatisfaction. Provider's communication with clients yielded complete satisfaction rates ranging between 0.7 to 26%. Inadequate information about the drug prescribed and explanation of procedures to be done to the client were found to be major causes of dissatisfaction. The complete satisfaction rate with environmental factor of the hospital was between 3.3 to 40.2%. Age of the client, educational status, income of the client and client's address away from Addis Ababa were found to be the predictors of client satisfaction. Provider's attitude and communication, as well as longer duration of stay in the ward were independent predictors of client satisfaction. Conclusion Pain management, client privacy and client provider communication need to be addressed to ensure the satisfaction of maternity clients. The clients need to be involved in the management of their own health problems. PMID:25018826

  3. Using Kollar's solution-focused pastoral counseling for bereaved clients: the process of empowerment from clients' perception.

    PubMed

    Pan, Peter Jen Der; Deng, F Liang-Yu; Tsai, Shio-Ling; Yuan, S S Jenny

    2015-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate how bereaved clients recovered from grief and loss after receiving Kollar's solution-focused pastoral counseling (KSFPC) from a perspective of empowerment. Ten Taiwanese Christian clients (3 men, 7 women; M age = 42.5 yr., SD = 8.5), who had experienced a significant loss of a loved one within the past two years, were recruited from churches in northern Taiwan, forming a convenience sample. The clients, based on their time availability, were randomly assigned to one of the two pastoral counselors and had four KSFPC sessions. The grounded theory procedure was adopted for qualitative data analysis. Four prominent categories emerged from the open-ended questions, in-depth interviews, and interactive counseling notes, including First Encounter with Solution-focused Pastoral Counseling (SFPC), Transitional Life Re-Decision-Making Process, Reflections and Changes, and New Participatory Competencies, within which 12 axial categories and 42 meaning units were identified. The results support the use of KSFPC to empower clients' competence in recovery from grief and loss. Implications for future research and KSFPC practice are suggested.

  4. Engaging with Clients and Personalising Services at UTS Library: Measuring the Value for Libraries and Their Clients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tiffen, Belinda; England, Ashley

    2011-01-01

    Libraries have found themselves overtaken by commercial entities providing open, unmediated information services, causing debate about the future of libraries. It has been argued that in order to stay relevant, libraries must undertake a fundamental shift towards a new focus on engaging with clients. At University of Technology, Sydney (UTS)…

  5. Teaching Client Relations and Communication Skills: Part II--A Systematic Approach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horvatich, P. K.; Meyer, K. B.

    1979-01-01

    A veterinarian-client relations course at Purdue University is described. It is designed to assist students in developing, applying, and adopting comfortable interpersonal communication and interviewing skills for interaction with clients in the practice of veterinary medicine. (BH)

  6. Differential Effects of Self-Disclosing versus Self-Involving Counselor Statements across Counselor-Client Gender Pairings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCarthy, Patricia R.

    1979-01-01

    Clients rated self-involving counselors as more expert, attractive, and trustworthy than self-disclosing counselors. Client responses to self-involving counselor statements contained significantly more client self-referents. (Author)

  7. Factors Associated with Recent Suicide Attempts in Clients Presenting for Addiction Treatment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Penney, Alexander; Mazmanian, Dwight; Jamieson, John; Black, Nancy

    2012-01-01

    Factors associated with recent suicide attempts were examined in clients who sought treatment at an addictions facility between 2001 and 2008. Clients who reported being hospitalized for attempting suicide in the past year (n = 76) were compared to all other clients (n = 5914) on demographic, mental health, substance use, and problem gambling…

  8. Are Client-Counselor Ethnic/Racial Matches Associated with Successful Rehabilitation Outcomes?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whitfield, Harold Wayne; Venable, Riley; Broussard, Shanna

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine if client-counselor ethnic/racial matches were associated with successful vocational rehabilitation (VR) outcomes. There was no significant difference in acceptance rates for VR services. Client-counselor ethnic/racial matches had a significantly higher rehabilitation rate than client-counselor…

  9. Challenging the Courtesy Bias Interpretation of Favorable Clients' Perceptions of Family Planning Delivery

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Len, Federico R.; Lundgren, Rebecka; Huapaya, Ana; Sinai, Irit; Jennings, Victoria

    2007-01-01

    Favorable client perceptions of provider's interpersonal behavior in contraceptive delivery, documented in clinic exit questionnaires, appear to contradict results from qualitative evaluations and are attributed to clients' courtesy bias. In this study, trained simulated clients requested services from Ministry of Health providers in three…

  10. The Overruled Dust Mite: Preparing Technical Communication Students To Interact with Clients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kastman Breuch, Lee-Ann M.

    2001-01-01

    Notes that while many technical communication instructors declare the benefits of client projects, too often instructors do not prepare students to interact with clients. Reviews a qualitative case study that demonstrates the difficulty students can have interacting with clients. Relates how students may not always be prepared to listen or respond…

  11. Day Hospital and Residential Addiction Treatment: Randomized and Nonrandomized Managed Care Clients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Witbrodt, Jane; Bond, Jason; Kaskutas, Lee Ann; Weisner, Constance; Jaeger, Gary; Pating, David; Moore, Charles

    2007-01-01

    Male and female managed care clients randomized to day hospital (n=154) or community residential treatment (n=139) were compared on substance use outcomes at 6 and 12 months. To address possible bias in naturalistic studies, outcomes were also examined for clients who self-selected day hospital (n=321) and for clients excluded from randomization…

  12. An Analysis of the Opinions of Thirteen Client Groups Concerning the Harrison County Teacher Education Center.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Curran, John

    This study is an analysis of the opinions of 13 client groups concerning the Harrison County Teacher Education Center (HCTEC) and is a sequel to a previous study. This study concentrated on two major questions: (1) what are the opinions of 13 client groups about the perceived needs for the HCTEC; and (2) how do these client groups differ in their…

  13. Dimensions and Correlates of Client Satisfaction: An Evaluation of a Shelter for Runaway and Homeless Youth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spiro, Shimon E.; Dekel, Rachel; Peled, Einat

    2009-01-01

    Client satisfaction surveys give clients a voice in the planning and management of services. While their use is quite widespread, they have hardly at all been used in the evaluation of shelters for homeless youths. In this article, the authors present findings of a client satisfaction survey conducted among residents of a shelter for homeless…

  14. Judgments of Elderly and Young Clients as Functions of Gender and Interview Behaviors: Implications for Counselors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matyi, Cindy L.; Drevenstedt, Jean

    1989-01-01

    College students (N=375) listened to taped segments of a counseling interview concerning a spouse's drinking problem with tapes varying client's age, gender, and cognitive behaviors. Found no main or interaction effects of age on subjects' ratings of client behaviors; female clients were perceived as having better memory and greater alertness than…

  15. Breaking through with Thin-Client Technologies: A Cost Effective Approach for Academic Libraries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elbaz, Sohair W.; Stewart, Christofer

    This paper provides an overview of thin-client/server computing in higher education. Thin-clients are like PCs in appearance, but they do not house hard drives or localized operating systems and cannot function without being connected to a server. Two types of thin-clients are described: the Network Computer (NC) and the Windows Terminal (WT).…

  16. Experiences of Rural Vocational Rehabilitation Clients Who Leave the System Prematurely: A Qualitative Exploration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rigles, Bethany; Ipsen, Catherine; Arnold, Nancy; Seekins, Tom

    2011-01-01

    Vocational rehabilitation (VR) clients who leave the system prematurely experience worse employment outcomes than clients who stay in services. The authors conducted this study to learn about factors leading to premature exit by rural VR clients. Results will inform survey development for a large longitudinal study on this topic. The authors…

  17. Physical Attractiveness: Interactive Effects of Counselor and Client on Counseling Processes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vargas, Alice M.; Borkowski, John G.

    1983-01-01

    Assessed how the physical attractiveness of counselors and clients interacted to build rapport in two experiments involving college students (N=128 and N=64). Results showed the counselor's physical attractiveness had a major impact on her perceived effectiveness and the client's expectation of success irrespective of the client's attractiveness…

  18. Difficult Clients: Who Are They and How Do We Help Them?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seligman, Linda; Gaaserud, Lynn

    1994-01-01

    Reviewed literature on dealing with resistant clients and, based on review, developed survey to elicit counselors' reactions to and experiences with resistant clients. Responses from 215 American Mental Health Counselors Association members suggest that nearly all counselors have encountered resistant clients, but counselors' reactions to and…

  19. Measurement of Loneliness Among Clients Representing Four Stages of Cancer: An Exploratory Study.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-03-01

    UCLA Loneliness Scale was admizistered to’measure...degree of loneliness experienced by clients in these four stages was measured by the Revised UCLA Loneliness Scale developed by Russell, Peplau, and...Problem Will clients, representing four stages of cancer, manifest loneliness as measured by the Revised UCLA Loneliness Scale ? How will these clients

  20. Client Assistance Program: A Rehabilitation Resource. Institute on Rehabilitation Issues (15th, Tampa, Florida, December 1988).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pankowski, Joe; Rice, B. Douglas

    This report provides guidelines for Client Assistance Programs (CAPs), established to assist applicants and clients of programs and facilities funded under the Rehabilitation Act of 1973. This report developed out of a study to provide information to increase cooperative approaches of benefit to both programs and clients and to create training…

  1. Predicting Change for Individual Psychotherapy Clients on the Basis of their Nearest Neighbors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lutz, Wolfgang; Leach, Chris; Barkham, Michael; Lucock, Mike; Stiles, William B.; Evans, Chris; Noble, Rachael; Iveson, Steve

    2005-01-01

    This study extended client-focused research by using the nearest neighbor (NN) approach, a client-specific sampling and prediction strategy derived from research on alpine avalanches. Psychotherapy clients (N = 203) seen in routine practice settings in the United Kingdom completed a battery of intake measures and then completed symptom intensity…

  2. Better versus Worse Family Therapy Sessions as Reflected in Clients' Alliance-Related Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Friedlander, Myrna L.; Bernardi, Shaina; Lee, Hsin-Hua

    2010-01-01

    To be responsive to clients' evaluations of the unfolding therapy process, therapists must first accurately "read" client behavior, a particularly challenging task in conjoint family therapy. In this study, the authors compared client behavior in 28 sessions that one family member and the therapist concurred, on the Session Evaluation…

  3. Use of CALAS in a Study of Counselor Empathy and Client Verbal Behavior.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kidder, David W.

    Accurate communication of empathy by a counselor may facilitate client self-exploration which, in turn, is necessary for positive outcome. To study the effects of counselor empathic response on client self-exploration, two doctoral level counseling psychology students had one 45-minute interview with each of two college student clients. Counselors…

  4. A Client Reaction Analysis: Final Report for the Lifelong Learning Center, Reading, Pa.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Toombs, William; Croyle, Guy E., Jr.

    The Lifelong Learning Center at the Reading Public Library conducted a study to determine how the clients perceived various aspects of the center's activities in terms of their needs and expectations. A survey was mailed to 329 clients; the response rate was 51%. Survey questions asked about (1) clients' satisfaction with access conditions, staff…

  5. Is the Client-Worker Relationship Associated with Better Outcomes in Mandated Child Abuse Cases?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Cheryl D.; Ayon, Cecilia

    2004-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this research was to (a) find if there were associations between child welfare outcomes and the client-worker relationship and (b) learn what are the predictors of a positive client-worker relationship. Method: 100 (55 Family Maintenance [FM] and 45 Family Preservation [FP]) clients were interviewed in English and…

  6. Clients' Emotional Processing in Psychotherapy: A Comparison between Cognitive-Behavioral and Process-Experiential Therapies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watson, Jeanne C.; Bedard, Danielle L.

    2006-01-01

    The authors compared clients' emotional processing in good and bad outcome cases in cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) and process-experiential therapy (PET) and investigated whether clients' emotional processing increases over the course of therapy. Twenty minutes from each of 3 sessions from 40 clients were rated on the Experiencing Scale. A 2 *…

  7. Television public service announcements as outreach for potential clients.

    PubMed

    McAbee, T A; Cafferty, T P

    1982-12-01

    Public service announcements (PSAs) aired by local radio or television stations may be useful to human service agencies as a mechanism to reach potential clients during periods of low service demand. To examine the usefulness of PSAs for this purpose, a series of PSAs were videotaped for three aging-service agencies and aired by a television station during a 6-week period. The three agencies recorded the incoming demand for services received each day before and during the intervention period. The data were tested by a multiple-group interrupted time-series analysis. The results of the analysis indicated that for all three agencies the PSAs were effective for increasing the number of service inquiries received from nonclients over the telephone numbers publicized in the PSAs. At one of the agencies, the number of new clients increased significantly when the PSAs were broadcasted.

  8. Matching Judicial Supervision to Clients' Risk Status in Drug Court.

    PubMed

    Marlowe, Douglas B; Festinger, David S; Lee, Patricia A; Dugosh, Karen L; Benasutti, Kathleen M

    2006-01-01

    This article reports outcomes from a program of experimental research evaluating the risk principle in drug courts. Prior studies revealed that participants who were high risk and had (a) antisocial personality disorder or (b) a prior history of drug abuse treatment performed better in drug court when scheduled to attend biweekly judicial status hearings in court. In contrast, participants who were low risk performed equivalently regardless of the court hearings schedule. This study prospectively matches drug court clients to the optimal schedule of court hearings based on an assessment of their risk status and compares outcomes to clients randomly assigned to the standard hearings schedule. Results confirmed that participants who were high risk and matched to biweekly hearings had better during-treatment outcomes than participants assigned to status hearings as usual. These findings provide confirmation of the risk principle in drug courts and yield practical information for enhancing the efficacy and cost-efficiency of drug courts.

  9. Implementing groupwork in primary care to meet client need.

    PubMed

    Newcombe, Teresa; Gledstone, Pam

    Hertsmere health visitors are successfully using groupwork to target patient groups who may not traditionally access services. This includes working with clients in environments such as a homeless family hostel and an English as a second language group. The health visitors have incorporated national service framework targets and important health promotion advice into sessions, and work with a range of other professionals. The result is a modernised, family-centred public health role.

  10. Animal-assisted therapy for clients with dementia.

    PubMed

    Buettner, Linda L; Fitzsimmons, Suzanne; Barba, Beth

    2011-05-01

    The purpose of this article is to increase nurses' awareness of animal-assisted therapy as a treatment option for older adults with dementia. We describe the differences between animal visitation programs and goal-directed therapy. We also address credentials of human-animal teams and provide an overview of possible therapeutic outcomes for older adults with dementia. Step-by-step methods are outlined for nurses to advocate for clients with dementia to receive these services.

  11. Writing for professional publication. Part 9: using client case studies.

    PubMed

    Fowler, John

    The previous articles in this series of writing for professional publication focused on the preparation you need to do before starting to write an article, the practicalities of writing the abstract, creating interest in the reader's mind, and how an article for publication differs from an academic essay. Recently we considered the importance of selecting the correct journal for submission. In this article, John Fowler, an experienced nursing lecturer and author, discusses how client case studies can be used within your article.

  12. LLNL XDIR. Network File Manager; Graphical FTP Client

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Neale

    1995-10-01

    LLNL XDIR is an OSF/Motif-based FTP client that provides a graphical user interface for drag-and-drop file transfer. LLNL XDIR simultaneously displays any number of directories for any number of hosts, with each directory being displayed in its own window. LLNL XDIR supports powerful directory browsing capability, including iconic and hierarchical views. LLNL XDIR is able to search directory structures (even across multiple hosts) for entry names that match a specified pattern.

  13. Real Heroes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Denenberg, Dennis

    2001-01-01

    Presents stories taken from the book, "50 American Heroes Every Kid Should Meet," explaining that children need to learn about the value of real-life human accomplishments (versus those of athletes, television personalities, and rock stars). The heroes include Elizabeth Blackwell, first American woman doctor; George C. Marshall,…

  14. Boundary work in inter-agency and interprofessional client transitions.

    PubMed

    Saario, Sirpa; Juhila, Kirsi; Raitakari, Suvi

    2015-01-01

    This article analyses the accomplishment of boundary work performed by professionals engaged in inter-agency collaboration. As a means of building authority within a particular field, boundary work is found to be a common feature of most professional practices. By analysing the talk of Finnish professionals who work in the field of supported housing in mental health, the article investigates the ways professionals--as collective representatives of their service--talk about doing boundary work when transferring their clients to another agency. The study drew on the principles of exploratory case study design and ethnomethodology. A key finding from the analysis of professionals' focus groups and team meetings indicated that boundary work is employed when disputes arise between supported housing and collaborating agencies. The article goes on to suggest that professionals accomplish boundary work by rhetorically presenting themselves as holders of "day-to-day evidence" of clients' mundane living skills and serious ill-health. The paper concludes by arguing that in inter-agency collaboration, boundary work building on day-to-day evidence is used to influence the decision on the most appropriate living arrangement for the client. Boundary work is also used for boosting the authority of professionals as representatives of a relatively new and fixed-term agency in the service system.

  15. The Concerns about Counseling Racial Minority Clients scale.

    PubMed

    Wei, Meifen; Chao, Ruth Chu-Lien; Tsai, Pei-Chun; Botello-Zamarron, Raquel

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop and validate the Concerns about Counseling Racial Minority Clients (CCRMC) scale among counselor trainees. Sample 1 was used for an exploratory factor analysis and confirmatory factor analysis. Four factors were identified, Managing Cultural Differences (α = .82), Offending or Hurting Clients (α = .87), Biased Thoughts and Behaviors (α = .81), and Client Perceptions (α = .77). The coefficient alpha for the CCRMC was .90. The results support the validity of the scale. The scores on the CCRMC and its subscales have positive associations with fear of negative evaluation from others (r = .19 to .40) and negative associations with general counseling self-efficacy (r = -.30 to -.46) and multicultural intervention self-efficacy (r = -.30 to -.64). The CCRMC significantly predicted fear of negative evaluation, session management self-efficacy, and multicultural intervention self-efficacy over and above multicultural social desirability. The validity evidence was not different between White and minority graduate trainees. In Sample 2, the estimated 1-week test-retest reliabilities ranged from .75 to .96 for the CCRMC and its four subscales.

  16. Rural-urban differences in psychiatric status and functioning among clients with severe mental illness.

    PubMed

    Dottl, S L; Greenley, J R

    1997-08-01

    Studies of clients with severe mental illness (SMI) typically focus on individuals in larger urban areas. Less is known about clients in rural and smaller urban areas. Here we compare the psychiatric status, home and community activities of daily living, and social and vocational functioning of 1600 adult clients with SMI from 18 small-city and rural Wisconsin counties. Rural clients are less likely to have a diagnosis of schizophrenia or organic brain syndrome; have higher levels of general pathology, including more belligerent, bizarre, nervous, and depressive behaviors; and engage in fewer vocational activities than urban clients.

  17. The new version 2.12 of BKG Ntrip Client (BNC)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stürze, Andrea; Mervart, Leos; Weber, Georg; Rülke, Axel; Wiesensarter, Erwin; Neumaier, Peter

    2016-04-01

    A new version of the BKG Ntrip Client (BNC) has been released. Originally developed in cooperation of the Federal Agency for Cartography and Geodesy (BKG) and the Czech Technical University (CTU) with a focus on multi-stream real-time access to GPS observations, the software has once again been substantially extended. Promoting Open Standards as recommended by the Radio Technical Commission for Maritime Services (RTCM) remains the prime subject. Beside its Graphical User Interface (GUI), the real-time software for Windows, Linux, Mac, and Linux platforms now comes with complete Command Line Interface (CLI) and considerable post processing functionality. RINEX Version 3 file editing & Quality Check (QC) with full support of Galileo, BeiDou, and SBAS - besides GPS and GLONASS - is part of the new features. Comparison of satellite orbit/clock files in SP3 format is another fresh ability of BNC. Simultaneous multi-station Precise Point Positioning (PPP) for real-time displacement-monitoring of entire reference station networks is one more recent addition to BNC. Implemented RTCM messages for PPP (under development) comprise satellite orbit and clock corrections, code and phase observation biases, and the Vertical Total Electron Content (VTEC) of the ionosphere. The well established, mature codebase is mostly written in C++ language. Its publication under GNU GPL is thought to be well-suited for test, validation and demonstration of new approaches in precise real-time satellite navigation when IP streaming is involved. The poster highlights BNC features which are new in version 2.12 and beneficial to IAG institutions and services such as IGS/RT-IGS and to the interested public in general.

  18. Clients' secret keeping and the working alliance in adult outpatient therapy.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Anita E; Yuan, Ke-Hai

    2009-06-01

    This research investigated the relations among clients' keeping relevant secrets in therapy, the working alliance, and symptom change. Clients (N = 83) in outpatient therapy and their therapists (N = 22) at a mental health hospital completed confidential surveys after a session of ongoing therapy. The clients who reported keeping a relevant secret (27.7%) scored significantly lower on the Working Alliance Inventory (WAI) than did clients who said that they were not, even when the analyses controlled for clients' social desirability scores and for therapist effects. Therapists of these clients also reported a weaker working alliance, even though the therapists typically did not know that the clients were keeping a relevant secret. However, keeping a relevant secret was not related to symptom change. The findings support the long-standing belief that secret keeping in therapy either hurts the therapeutic relationship or happens when the relationship is relatively weak. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2010 APA, all rights reserved).

  19. Perspectives of Treatment Providers and Clients with Serious Mental Illness Regarding Effective Therapeutic Relationships.

    PubMed

    Easter, Alison; Pollock, Michele; Pope, Leah Gogel; Wisdom, Jennifer P; Smith, Thomas E

    2016-07-01

    This study explores the nature of clinical therapeutic relationships between mental health treatment providers and high-need clients with serious mental illness who had recently discontinued treatment. Semi-structured qualitative interviews of 56 clients with serious mental illness who had recently discontinued care and 25 mental health treatment providers were completed. Both clients with serious mental illness and treatment providers emphasized the importance of client-focused goal setting, time and availability of treatment providers, a caring approach, and trust and honesty in the relationship. However, clients with serious mental illness placed greater emphasis on goals involving tangible services, a notable area of discord between the two groups. Individuals with serious mental illness and treatment providers agreed regarding several key elements to a positive clinical relationship. Further attention to client goals related to tangible services may serve to improve relationships between treatment providers and high-need clients with serious mental illness.

  20. A Theory Led Narrative Review of One-to-One Health Interventions: The Influence of Attachment Style and Client-Provider Relationship on Client Adherence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nanjappa, S.; Chambers, S.; Marcenes, W.; Richards, D.; Freeman, R.

    2014-01-01

    A theory-led narrative approach was used to unpack the complexities of the factors that enable successful client adherence following one-to-one health interventions. Understanding this could prepare the provider to anticipate different adherence behaviours by clients, allowing them to tailor their interventions to increase the likelihood of…

  1. "The Weight of Class": Clients' Experiences of How Perceived Differences in Social Class between Counsellor and Client Affect the Therapeutic Relationship

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Balmforth, Jane

    2009-01-01

    The impact of a difference in social class on the therapeutic relationship has received less attention than other differences between counsellor and client, such as gender, race and sexual orientation. In this qualitative research study six clients who identified as working class were interviewed about their experience of a therapeutic…

  2. The Trouble with the Short-Term Therapist-Client Relationship and What Can Be Done about It

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vandenberghe, Luc; Martins da Silveira, Jocelaine

    2012-01-01

    When problems from the client's daily life show up in the therapist-client relationship, crucial learning opportunities may become available. Occurrence of the client's problems during the therapy hour turns the relationship into a psychological space where they can be worked on in-vivo. But sometimes the client's daily life problems are specific…

  3. Client Perspectives on Desirable Attributes and Skills of Veterinary Technologists in Australia: Considerations for Curriculum Design.

    PubMed

    Clarke, Patricia M; Al-Alawneh, John; Pitt, Rachael E; Schull, Daniel N; Coleman, Glen T

    2015-01-01

    Client or service user perspectives are important when designing curricula for professional programs. In the case of veterinary technology, an emerging profession in the veterinary field in Australasia, client views on desirable graduate attributes, skills, and knowledge have not yet been explored. This study reports on a survey of 441 veterinary clients (with 104 responses) from four veterinary practices in Brisbane, Queensland, conducted between October 2008 and February 2009. The included veterinary practices provided clinical placements for veterinary technology undergraduates and employment for veterinary technology graduates (2003-2007). Client socio-demographic data along with ratings of the importance of a range of technical (veterinary nursing) skills, emotional intelligence, and professional attributes for veterinary technology graduates were collected and analyzed. Overall, the majority of clients viewed technical skills, emotional intelligence, and professional attributes as important in the clinical practice of veterinary technology graduates with whom they interacted in the veterinary practice. Client interviews (n=3) contextualized the survey data and also showed that clients attached importance to graduates demonstrating professional competence. Agglomerative hierarchical cluster analysis revealed four distinct groupings of clients within the data based on their differing perceptions. Using a multivariable proportional-odds regression model, it was also found that some client differences were influenced by demographic factors such as gender, age, and number of visits annually. For example, the odds of female clients valuing emotionality and sociability were greater than males. These findings provide useful data for the design of a professionalizing and market-driven veterinary technology curriculum.

  4. The Development and Validation of the Client Expectations of Massage Scale

    PubMed Central

    Boulanger, Karen T.; Campo, Shelly; Glanville, Jennifer L.; Lowe, John B; Yang, Jingzhen

    2012-01-01

    Background: Although there is evidence that client expectations influence client outcomes, a valid and reliable scale for measuring the range of client expectations for both massage therapy and the behaviors of their massage therapists does not exist. Understanding how client expectations influence client outcomes would provide insight into how massage achieves its reported effects. Purpose: To develop and validate the Client Expectations of Massage Scale (CEMS), a measure of clients’ clinical, educational, interpersonal, and outcome expectations. Setting: Offices of licensed massage therapists in Iowa. Research Design: A practice-based research methodology was used to collect data from two samples of massage therapy clients. For Sample 1, 21 volunteer massage therapists collected data from their clients before the massage. Factor analysis was conducted to test construct validity and coefficient alpha was used to assess reliability. Correlational analyses with the CEMS, previous measures of client expectations, and the Life Orientation Test–Revised were examined to test the convergent and discriminant validity of the CEMS. For Sample 2, 24 massage therapists distributed study materials for clients to complete before and after a massage therapy session. Structural equation modeling was used to assess the construct, discriminant, and predictive validity of the CEMS. Participants: Sample 1 involved 320 and Sample 2 involved 321 adult massage clients. Intervention: Standard care provided by licensed massage therapists. Main Outcomes: Numeric Rating Scale for pain and Positive and Negative Affect Schedule–Revised (including the Serenity subscale). Results: The CEMS demonstrated good construct, convergent, discriminant and predictive validity, and adequate reliability. Client expectations were generally positive toward massage and their massage therapists. Positive outcome expectations had a positive effect on clients’ changes in pain and serenity. High

  5. Psychoanalytic psychotherapy with a client with bulimia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Lunn, Susanne; Daniel, Sarah I F; Poulsen, Stig

    2016-06-01

    This case study presents the progress of one patient with bulimia nervosa who was originally very compromised in psychological domains that are the focus of analytic treatment, and includes in-session therapeutic process and a range of outcomes, for example, eating disorder symptoms, attachment status, and reflective functioning. Nested in a study showing more rapid behavioral improvement in subjects receiving cognitive behavior therapy than in subjects receiving psychoanalytic psychotherapy, the case highlights the importance of supplementing RCTs with single case studies and the need of adapting the therapeutic approach as well as the current therapeutic dialogue to the individual client. (PsycINFO Database Record

  6. Using Reflective Practice to Understand LGBTQ Client Needs.

    PubMed

    Summers, Michele L

    2016-12-19

    Nurse practitioners as well as all nurses need to assess their values, be knowledgeable of Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, and Queer issues and current guidelines of care, and communicate with clients and their families in such a way as to create trusting and safe environments, free from barriers for quality healthcare. Nursing literature supports reflective practice as a means of reducing bias, as well as improving patient-provider trust and quality care. Understanding the primary care needs of specific populations is necessary to fulfill the nursing code of ethics.

  7. [Nursing care to the client with hypertension: a bibliographic review].

    PubMed

    Moura, Denizielle de Jesus Moreira; Bezerra, Sara Taciana Firmino; Moreira, Thereza Maria Magalhães; Fialho, Ana Virgínia de Melo

    2011-01-01

    This study aimed to identify the nursing care practices to the client with hypertension in the scientific production in the last ten years. It was carried out a bibliographic study, using in the BIREME, the LILACS, SciELO and BDENF's data basis, selecting thirty articles. The results were exposed in charts, tables and graphics, where prevails, in the literature analyzed, the nursing consultation as the more used practice, through the nursing attendance systematization and the Health Education with individual approaches, besides the realization of home visits with family approach. One believes that the systematization of nursing care will contribute in an expressive manner to the adhesion to the antihypertensive treatment.

  8. Client attachment and therapist feelings in the treatment of bulimia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Daniel, Sarah Ingrid Franksdatter; Lunn, Susanne; Poulsen, Stig

    2015-06-01

    The relationship between client attachment and therapist postsession feelings was investigated in a randomized clinical trial of psychoanalytic psychotherapy (PPT) and cognitive behavior therapy (CBT) for bulimia nervosa. Therapists completed feeling word checklists after each session, and client attachment was assessed with the Adult Attachment Interview. A factor analysis identified 3 feeling factors, Happy/Enthusiastic, Overwhelmed/Moved, and Indifferent/Bored. Positive feelings were predominant, but PPT therapists reported more negative and fewer positive feelings than CBT therapists did. Client improvement in terms of frequency of bulimic episodes and general psychiatric distress was related to an increase in Happy/Enthusiastic feelings. Multilevel analyses indicated significant interactions between therapy type and client dismissing versus preoccupied attachment in predicting therapist negative emotional reactions. PPT therapist felt more Indifferent/Bored the more dismissing clients were, whereas CBT therapists felt more Overwhelmed/Moved the more preoccupied clients were.

  9. Identifying Fallers among Home Care Clients with Dementia and Parkinson’s Disease*

    PubMed Central

    Bansal, Symron; Hirdes, John P.; Maxwell, Colleen J.; Papaioannou, Alexandra; Giangregorio, Lora M.

    2016-01-01

    Few studies have focused on falls among home care (HC) clients with neurological conditions. This study identified factors that increase risk of falling among HC clients with no recent history of falls, and explored whether risk profiles varied among those with dementia or parkinsonism compared to those without selected neurological conditions. A retrospective cohort design was used and analysis of data from community-based HC clients across Ontario was conducted on a sample of ambulatory clients with dementia, parkinsonism, or none of the selected neurological conditions. Data were obtained from the Resident Assessment Instrument for HC (RAI-HC) assessment. The outcome used in multivariable analyses was whether clients fell during follow-up. Unsteady gait was a strong predictor of falls across all three groups. Co-morbid parkinsonism most strongly predicted falls in the dementia group. Clients with borderline intact to mild cognitive impairment had higher odds of falling within the parkinsonism and comparison groups. PMID:27426223

  10. Identifying Fallers among Home Care Clients with Dementia and Parkinson's Disease.

    PubMed

    Bansal, Symron; Hirdes, John P; Maxwell, Colleen J; Papaioannou, Alexandra; Giangregorio, Lora M

    2016-09-01

    Few studies have focused on falls among home care (HC) clients with neurological conditions. This study identified factors that increase risk of falling among HC clients with no recent history of falls, and explored whether risk profiles varied among those with dementia or parkinsonism compared to those without selected neurological conditions. A retrospective cohort design was used and analysis of data from community-based HC clients across Ontario was conducted on a sample of ambulatory clients with dementia, parkinsonism, or none of the selected neurological conditions. Data were obtained from the Resident Assessment Instrument for HC (RAI-HC) assessment. The outcome used in multivariable analyses was whether clients fell during follow-up. Unsteady gait was a strong predictor of falls across all three groups. Co-morbid parkinsonism most strongly predicted falls in the dementia group. Clients with borderline intact to mild cognitive impairment had higher odds of falling within the parkinsonism and comparison groups.

  11. Delivering results to clients: a question of satisfying needs or desires?

    PubMed

    Patel, H; Heng, E L; Aleem, A; Chung, N; Tang, O; John, M; Patel, M; Green, L; Theobald, N

    2006-02-01

    Demand for genitourinary (GU) medicine services is outstripping supply. Improving efficiency can modulate the supply side of the equation, e.g. decreasing the number of clients having to return for their results. This survey explored how clients at two central London GU medicine clinics would like to receive their results and their views were reflected against what was offered by London GU medicine clinics. There was a significant difference between the result delivery services that the clients wanted and what the clinics provided (P <0.0001, chi(2)). Of the clients, 92% wanted to know their results regardless of outcome whereas 22% of London clinics would only inform clients of positive results. This study questions the importance and feasibility of patient choice, an important aspect of the National Strategy for Sexual Health and HIV. Clinics may not individually be able to provide choice but between them, they do provide a wide range of alternatives for the client.

  12. Design and optimisation of a (FA)Q-learning-based HTTP adaptive streaming client

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Claeys, Maxim; Latré, Steven; Famaey, Jeroen; Wu, Tingyao; Van Leekwijck, Werner; De Turck, Filip

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, HTTP (Hypertext Transfer Protocol) adaptive streaming (HAS) has become the de facto standard for adaptive video streaming services. A HAS video consists of multiple segments, encoded at multiple quality levels. State-of-the-art HAS clients employ deterministic heuristics to dynamically adapt the requested quality level based on the perceived network conditions. Current HAS client heuristics are, however, hardwired to fit specific network configurations, making them less flexible to fit a vast range of settings. In this article, a (frequency adjusted) Q-learning HAS client is proposed. In contrast to existing heuristics, the proposed HAS client dynamically learns the optimal behaviour corresponding to the current network environment in order to optimise the quality of experience. Furthermore, the client has been optimised both in terms of global performance and convergence speed. Thorough evaluations show that the proposed client can outperform deterministic algorithms by 11-18% in terms of mean opinion score in a wide range of network configurations.

  13. From discharge planner to "concierge": recommendations for hospital social work by clients with intracerebral hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Linton, Kristen F; Ing, Marissa M; Vento, Megan A; Nakagawa, Kazuma

    2015-01-01

    The Affordable Care Act and budget cuts have changed the role of hospital social workers by placing pressure on them to conduct speedy discharges and decrease readmission rates. This qualitative study aimed to assess if hospital social work is meeting the needs of clients in the hospital and postdischarge. Semistructured interviews with 10 clients with intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) and 11 caregivers were conducted. Participants reported that social work services were not meeting their needs. Clients with ICH and their caregivers expressed needs from social workers that surpassed their roles as discharge planners, including counseling, help with finances and insurance, and advocacy. Participants wanted social work services to begin early in acute treatment with continuity postdischarge. Social workers should conduct ethical social work by meeting clients where they are, addressing needs as prioritized by the client, and advocating individually and organizationally for clients.

  14. A Qualitative Study of Client-Clinician Text Exchanges in a Mobile Health Intervention for Individuals with Psychotic Disorders and Substance Use

    PubMed Central

    Aschbrenner, Kelly A.; Naslund, John A.; Gill, Lydia E.; Bartels, Stephen J.; Ben-Zeev, Dror

    2016-01-01

    Objective Mobile health (mHealth) approaches have the potential to transform prevention, wellness, and illness management for people with dual diagnosis consisting of co-occurring mental illness and substance use disorders by providing timely and cost-effective interventions in clients’ natural environments. However, little is known about how clients interact with mHealth interventions to manage their illness. This qualitative study explored the content of mobile phone text messages between clients with dual diagnosis and a clinician who engaged them in daily assessment and intervention text exchanges. Methods Seventeen participants with psychotic disorders and substance use were enrolled in a 12-week single-arm trial of an mHealth intervention focusing on illness management. The clinician (i.e., mobile interventionist) sent daily text messages to participants’ privately-owned mobile phones to assess their medication adherence and clinical status. The clinician provided other illness management and wellness suggestions flexibly, in response to participants’ needs and preferences. In this qualitative study we conducted a thematic analysis of the client-clinician text exchanges that occurred over the course of the intervention. Results Seven major content themes in client-clinician text message exchanges were identified: mental health symptoms; mental health coping strategies; mental health treatment and management; lifestyle behaviors; social relationships and leisure activities; motivation and personal goal setting; and independent living. Participants were interested in discussing strategies for coping with mental health symptoms (e.g., cognitive restructuring, social support) and health behavior change (e.g., increased physical activity, dietary changes). Conclusions Our findings suggest that client-centered text messaging has the potential to be an important component of illness management for people with dual diagnosis. This approach is able to offer

  15. IPME and External Clients: Enhancing Performance by Offloading Simulation Workload to External Clients; Explaining and Simplifying the Process

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-12-01

    Right of Canada, as represented by the Minister of National Defence, 2007 © Sa Majesté la Reine (en droit du Canada), telle que représentée par le...clients aide à la réalisation de cette activité. Perspectives : La version 4 de l’EIMP est en cours de développement et elle devrait être plus puissante...dispositif améliorant les performances ira en diminuant, ils continueront d’aider à assurer la modularité des modèles de l’EIMP. La démarche qui fait

  16. Addressing the repressed needs of the Arabic client.

    PubMed

    Dwairy, M

    1997-01-01

    In comparison to families in Western society, the traditional Arabic family plays a relatively greater role in providing support for adult progeny. This serves to condition adult offspring to continue to comply with the will and values of the family. Therefore, in exchange for familial support, Arabic individuals learn to repress authentic needs and emotions, and within that process they relinquish the need for self-actualization. Arabic society discourages individualism and opposes self-actualization by means of simultaneous punishment and moralization. Thus, there is a relatively greater development of the social value system (or superego) and comparatively less development of the self (or ego). In comparison to Western society, Arabic individuals continue to experience greater oppression during adulthood. Given these cultural differences, the processes of reliving and activating repressed needs and emotions, which ultimately serves to promote self-actualization, will transform intrapsychic conflicts into interpersonal and social ones. Thus, personal actions typically encouraged during Western psychotherapy are likely to produce significant social oppression. Indeed, promoting awareness of repressed needs and emotions often leads the Arabic client to become more helpless, because such wishes will rarely be socially sanctioned or satisfactorily fulfilled. Therefore, when addressing repressed needs and emotions in psychotherapy, ego strength, cultural identity, and degree of strictness of the client's family of origin must be considered.

  17. Nursing students' perceptions of clients undergoing elective cosmetic surgery.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Leah Beth

    2007-01-01

    Aesthetic obsession is commonplace in current society. Supermarket a isles dedicated to beauty products, makeup, and anti-aging creams seem to expand daily. Television and publications flood the public with messages of what constitutes beauty and how to achieve the ideal. Surgical alteration of the body is swiftly becoming a form of self-care technique along with other heath-promoting behavior. Since 2003, the general acceptance of plastic surgery among all Americans surpassed 50% (American Society for Aesthetic Plastic Surgery, 2003). Elective cosmetic surgical procedures have increased by an astounding 444% since 1997 (American Society of Plastic Surgeons, 2006). This quest for body satisfaction based on modern cultural norms increases the public's need for accurate information and understanding from those in the healthcare profession. Despite a transformation in the general population's conception of cosmetic surgery and its clients, stigma still lies in many individuals, including those in the healthcare profession. As this progressively growing patient population emerges, many in healthcare question their attitudes toward plastic surgery and the patients receiving aesthetic operations. With clients undergoing plastic surgery becoming increasingly visible within the healthcare system, some unique aspects of patient care must be addressed.

  18. Client-Side Event Processing for Personalized Web Advertisement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stühmer, Roland; Anicic, Darko; Sen, Sinan; Ma, Jun; Schmidt, Kay-Uwe; Stojanovic, Nenad

    The market for Web advertisement is continuously growing and correspondingly, the number of approaches that can be used for realizing Web advertisement are increasing. However, current approaches fail to generate very personalized ads for a current Web user that is visiting a particular Web content. They mainly try to develop a profile based on the content of that Web page or on a long-term user's profile, by not taking into account current user's preferences. We argue that by discovering a user's interest from his current Web behavior we can support the process of ad generation, especially the relevance of an ad for the user. In this paper we present the conceptual architecture and implementation of such an approach. The approach is based on the extraction of simple events from the user interaction with a Web page and their combination in order to discover the user's interests. We use semantic technologies in order to build such an interpretation out of many simple events. We present results from preliminary evaluation studies. The main contribution of the paper is a very efficient, semantic-based client-side architecture for generating and combining Web events. The architecture ensures the agility of the whole advertisement system, by complexly processing events on the client. In general, this work contributes to the realization of new, event-driven applications for the (Semantic) Web.

  19. Suicidal behavior among delinquent former child welfare clients.

    PubMed

    Björkenstam, C; Björkenstam, E; Ljung, R; Vinnerljung, B; Tuvblad, C

    2013-06-01

    Child welfare clients represent a high-risk group for delinquency and adult criminality, but also for future suicidal behavior. We examine associations between delinquency and suicidal behavior in a national child welfare population. This register-based cohort study is based on data for all Swedish former child welfare clients born between 1972 and 1981 that experienced interventions before their adolescent years. We followed 27,228 individuals from age 20 years until 31 December 2006. Juvenile delinquency was defined as being convicted of at least one crime between age 15 and 19. The risk of suicidal behavior was calculated as incidence rate ratios (IRRs). Fifteen percent of the women and 40% of the men had at least one conviction between the age 15 and 19. The adjusted risk of suicidal behavior among women with five or more convictions was 3.5 (95% CI 2.0-6.2); corresponding IRR for men was 3.9 (95% CI 3.1-4.9). Child welfare experience-specifically of out-of-home care-in combination with delinquency is a potent risk factor for suicidal behavior among young adults. However, we cannot exclude that some of this association is an epiphenomenon of uncontrolled confounders, such as impulsivity or severity of psychiatric disease. Despite this caveat, results should be disseminated to practitioners in the health and correction services.

  20. HIV and family planning service integration and voluntary HIV counselling and testing client composition in Ethiopia.

    PubMed

    Bradley, H; Bedada, A; Tsui, A; Brahmbhatt, H; Gillespie, D; Kidanu, A

    2008-01-01

    Integrating voluntary HIV counselling and testing (VCT) with family planning and other reproductive health services may be one effective strategy for expanding VCT service delivery in resource poor settings. Using 30,257 VCT client records with linked facility characteristics from Ethiopian non-governmental, non-profit, reproductive health clinics, we constructed multi-level logistic regression models to examine associations between HIV and family planning service integration modality and three outcomes: VCT client composition, client-initiated HIV testing and client HIV status. Associations between facility HIV and family planning integration level and the likelihood of VCT clients being atypical family planning client-types, versus older (at least 25 years old), ever-married women were assessed. Relative to facilities co-locating services in the same compound, those offering family planning and HIV services in the same rooms were 2-13 times more likely to serve atypical family planning client-types than older, ever-married women. Facilities where counsellors jointly offered HIV and family planning services and served many repeat family planning clients were significantly less likely to serve single clients relative to older, married women. Younger, single men and older, married women were most likely to self-initiate HIV testing (78.2 and 80.6% respectively), while the highest HIV prevalence was seen among older, married men and women (20.5 and 34.2% respectively). Compared with facilities offering co-located services, those integrating services at room- and counsellor-levels were 1.9-7.2 times more likely to serve clients initiating HIV testing. These health facilities attract both standard material and child health (MCH) clients, who are at high risk for HIV in these data, and young, single people to VCT. This analysis suggests that client types may be differentially attracted to these facilities depending on service integration modality and other facility

  1. Healing Relationships: A Qualitative Study of Healers and Their Clients in Germany

    PubMed Central

    Stöckigt, B. M. H.; Besch, F.; Jeserich, F.; Holmberg, C.; Witt, C. M.; Teut, M.

    2015-01-01

    Background. The aim of this study was to investigate the nature of the relationships between healers and their clients in Germany. Methods. An interdisciplinary research team performed semistructured interviews with healers and clients and participatory observation of healing sessions. All interviews were digitally recorded, transcribed, and analyzed using content analysis. Results. Fifteen healers and sixteen clients were included. The healer-client relationship was described as a profound and unique experience, which brought forth interpersonal and spiritual connections. The healers were seen as role models for healing to occur and support for being connected spiritually. The clients had to be open-minded and responsible. The importance of the healers' empathy was emphasized. Discussion. The relationship between healer and client can be seen as a triangular connection between client, healer, and a transcendent source which is not the case in typical patient-doctor relationships. The spiritual connection is also said to enhance the empathetic understanding of the healer. The personality and a partner-like attitude of the healer supported the client in giving a more positive meaning to his life, in reconnecting to his spirituality, and in taking responsibility. Future studies should address the role of spirituality in health care and the development of enduring healer-client relationships. PMID:26136806

  2. Psychotherapists' outcomes with White and racial/ethnic minority clients: First, the good news.

    PubMed

    Hayes, Jeffrey A; McAleavey, Andrew A; Castonguay, Louis G; Locke, Benjamin D

    2016-04-01

    The purposes of this study were to (a) investigate whether psychotherapists differ in their effectiveness with clients, (b) determine whether disparities exist within therapists' caseloads in their outcomes with White and racial and ethnic minority (REM) clients, (c) explore therapist factors that might contribute to observed therapist effects, and (d) identify whether treatment outcomes varied for REM and White clients. A sample of 3,825 clients seen by 251 therapists at 45 college counseling centers completed the Counseling Center Assessment of Psychological Symptoms at the beginning and end of individual psychotherapy. Therapists differed in their effectiveness at reducing general distress across clients, and evidence was found for disparities within therapists' caseloads in their effectiveness with REM and White clients. Effect sizes were small. Disparities within therapists' caseloads were not a function of any therapist variable that was studied. Therapy outcomes were similar for White and REM clients. Therapist multicultural competence can, and should, be considered in terms of measurable outcomes across client racial/ethnic groups. It is possible to identify multiculturally expert therapists who evidence competence with both REM and White clients and who might serve as models from whom the field could learn.

  3. Therapist empathy and client anxiety reduction in motivational interviewing: "She carries with me, the experience".

    PubMed

    Angus, Lynne E; Kagan, Fern

    2009-11-01

    In this article, we examine the use of motivational interviewing (MI) to treat generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) by means of case illustration that focuses on four categories drawn from the client's experience of the key ingredients in MI therapy. The case illustration, drawn from the York study on combining MI and cognitive behavior therapy in the treatment of GAD (uses the client's pre- and post-therapy narrative interviews) to arrive at categories representative of the client's experience of MI therapy. The results of the qualitative analysis highlight the key contributions to positive client outcomes and readiness for change in brief MI therapy for GAD.

  4. Client experiences in work rehabilitation in Sweden: a one-year follow-up study.

    PubMed

    Wallstedt-Paulsson, Eva; Erlandsson, Lena-Karin; Eklund, Mona

    2007-01-01

    This study, carried out in a work rehabilitation unit in Sweden, investigated how clients perceived their work experiences after a one-year follow up. A semi-structured interview was administered to 14 former clients and a content analysis was applied. Seven categories were derived from the results: 'Expectations of the rehabilitation process'; 'Social relationships'; 'Client influences on the rehabilitation process'; 'Occupations engaged in during the rehabilitation programme'; 'Perceived outcome'; 'Current occupations'; and 'Future aspirations'. The dominating expectations were to find a job, with an overall desire for change. The social relationships with the staff and other clients were of great importance. The positive outcome of the rehabilitation was described as feeling better or having new skills. The perceived negative outcome was that the rehabilitation programme had not turned out as the client expected. The clients reported varying daily occupations after the rehabilitation experience and a majority were contented and optimistic about their future. The main conclusions of the study are that when planning a work rehabilitation programme, efforts have to be made to examine clients' interests and skills, and to develop a dialogue between clients and staff. Further research is needed to evaluate the work rehabilitation experience from the clients' perspective.

  5. Client Preferences Affect Treatment Satisfaction, Completion, and Clinical Outcome: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Lindhiem, Oliver; Bennett, Charles B.; Trentacosta, Christopher J.; McLear, Caitlin

    2014-01-01

    We conducted a meta-analysis on the effects of client preferences on treatment satisfaction, completion, and clinical outcome. Our search of the literature resulted in 34 empirical articles describing 32 unique clinical trials that either randomized some clients to an active choice condition (shared decision making condition or choice of treatment) or assessed client preferences. Clients who were involved in shared decision making, chose a treatment condition, or otherwise received their preferred treatment evidenced higher treatment satisfaction (ESd = .34; p < .001), increased completion rates (ESOR = 1.37; ESd = .17; p < .001), and superior clinical outcome (ESd = .15; p < .0001), compared to clients who were not involved in shared decision making, did not choose a treatment condition, or otherwise did not receive their preferred treatment. Although the effect sizes are modest in magnitude, they were generally consistent across several potential moderating variables including study design (preference versus active choice), psychoeducation (informed versus uninformed), setting (inpatient versus outpatient), client diagnosis (mental health versus other), and unit of randomization (client versus provider). Our findings highlight the clinical benefit of assessing client preferences, providing treatment choices when two or more efficacious options are available, and involving clients in treatment-related decisions when treatment options are not available. PMID:25189522

  6. Cleaner shrimp use a rocking dance to advertise cleaning service to clients.

    PubMed

    Becker, Justine H A; Curtis, Lynda M; Grutter, Alexandra S

    2005-04-26

    Signals transmit information to receivers about sender attributes, increase the fitness of both parties, and are selected for in cooperative interactions between species to reduce conflict [1, 2]. Marine cleaning interactions are known for stereotyped behaviors [3-6] that likely serve as signals. For example, "dancing" and "tactile dancing" in cleaner fish may serve to advertise cleaning services to client fish [7] and manipulate client behavior [8], respectively. Cleaner shrimp clean fish [9], yet are cryptic in comparison to cleaner fish. Signals, therefore, are likely essential for cleaner shrimp to attract clients. Here, we show that the yellow-beaked cleaner shrimp [10] Urocaridella sp. c [11] uses a stereotypical side-to-side movement, or "rocking dance," while approaching potential client fish in the water column. This dance was followed by a cleaning interaction with the client 100% of the time. Hungry cleaner shrimp, which are more willing to clean than satiated ones [12], spent more time rocking and in closer proximity to clients Cephalopholis cyanostigma than satiated ones, and when given a choice, clients preferred hungry, rocking shrimp. The rocking dance therefore influenced client behavior and, thus, appears to function as a signal to advertise the presence of cleaner shrimp to potential clients.

  7. Montessori-based training makes a difference for home health workers & their clients.

    PubMed

    Gorzelle, Gregg J; Kaiser, Kathy; Camp, Cameron J

    2003-01-01

    Home care visits can last several hours. Home care workers are often at a loss on how to fill time spent in homes of clients. The challenge is how to use this time in ways that are productive and engaging for both clients and home health workers. The authors trained home health aides to implement Montessori-based activities while interacting with clients who have dementia. The results were amazing. Among other positive results, the authors found a statistically significant increase in the amount of pleasure displayed by clients after health workers received training.

  8. Psychotherapists' experience with clients who engage in consensual sadomasochism: a qualitative study.

    PubMed

    Lawrence, Anne A; Love-Crowell, Jennifer

    2008-01-01

    Consensual sadomasochism (Bondage and Discipline, Dominance and Submission, Sadism and Masochism; BDSM) is relatively common, but the experience of psychotherapists who work with clients who engage in BDSM has received little study. We conducted semistructured interviews with 14 therapists experienced in working with BDSM clients. Interviews were recorded, transcribed, and analyzed for thematic content. Therapists emphasized the importance of cultural competence, including a nonjudgmental attitude and knowledge of BDSM practices and cultural values. BDSM was rarely a central issue in therapy, relationship issues were clients' most common presenting concerns. Therapists who practiced BDSM themselves often encountered boundary issues with clients.

  9. Factors associated with client-collateral agreement in substance abuse post-treatment self-reports.

    PubMed

    Kedia, Satish; Perry, Stephanie W

    2005-07-01

    This study examined levels of agreement and directionality of disagreement between the post-treatment self-reports of substance abuse clients and their collaterals. The study population comprised 1252 clients with a primary or secondary diagnosis of substance abuse or dependence whose treatment was publicly funded in Tennessee. Client and collateral responses to 13 questions were analyzed for levels of agreement, revealing the following: (a) levels of client-collateral agreement were high, at least 75% agreement on all 13 questions and at least 88% agreement on 10 variables; (b) a Simple Kappa Test confirmed that 11 out of 13 items had moderate to excellent nonchance agreement; (c) there was no consistent trend in directionality, that is, clients neither reported information more positively nor more negatively than their collaterals did; (d) on average, those collaterals who were spouses, parents, and children agreed more with clients compared to other types of collaterals; and (e) those collaterals who saw the clients more frequently and more recently had higher agreement than those who saw the clients less frequently. This research reaffirms that collaterals are a valuable source for verifying the accuracy of clients' self-reports and that this approach continues to hold considerable promise for substance abuse post-treatment assessment.

  10. Sexual safety practices of massage parlor-based sex workers and their clients.

    PubMed

    Kolar, Kat; Atchison, Chris; Bungay, Vicky

    2014-01-01

    The Outreach and Research in Community Health Initiatives and Development (ORCHID) project examines social and structural factors that contribute to HIV/AIDS risk among women working in Vancouver's indoor sex industry and their clients. From 2006 to 2009, two mixed method studies were undertaken in ORCHID: one exploring experiences of women working in the indoor sex industry, mainly in massage parlors, and the other exploring experiences of men as sex "buyers." Both studies emphasize sexual health and safety, risk and protective behaviors, and related contextual factors. No analyses examining the sexual health and safety practices of massage parlor-based sex workers and clients exist in the Canadian context. To address this gap, we analyze two survey datasets - with 118 sex workers and 116 clients. Upon comparing demographics of sex workers and clients, we discuss their condom use and sexually transmitted infections (STI) and HIV testing practices. Sex workers and clients reported high rates of condom use for vaginal/anal intercourse. While both groups reported lower rates of condom use for oral sex during sex transactions, clients did so to a greater extent (p < 0.001). Condom use with noncommercial sex partners was reported to be less consistent by both groups. STI testing was higher among sex workers than clients (p < 0.001). Initiatives targeting clients of massage parlor-based sex workers for STI education and testing are needed. Future research should investigate how different types of relationships between sex workers and clients impact their sexual safety practices.

  11. Development of two measures of client engagement for use in home aged care.

    PubMed

    Baker, Jess Rose; Harrison, Fleur; Low, Lee-Fay

    2016-05-01

    The aim of the study was to develop and validate measures of client engagement in aged homecare. The Homecare Measure of Engagement-Staff questionnaire (HoME-S) is a self-complete measure of six dimensions of client engagement: client acceptance, attention, attitude, appropriateness, engagement duration and passivity. The Homecare Measure of Engagement-Client/Family report (HoME-CF) is a researcher-rated interview which obtains client and/or family perspectives regarding frequency and valence of conversational and recreational engagement during care worker visits. Care workers (n = 84) completed the HoME-S and a measure of relationship bond with client. Researchers interviewed clients (n = 164) and/or their family (n = 117) and completed the HoME-CF, and measures of agitation, dysphoria, apathy and cognitive functioning. The HoME-S and HoME-CF demonstrated good test-retest and inter-rater reliability, and showed significant negative correlations with apathy, agitation and non-English-speaking background. Controlling for client and care service characteristics, a stronger care worker-client relationship bond and English-speaking background were independently associated with higher HoME-S scores, and apathy was independently associated with higher HoME-CF scores. In conclusion, the HoME-S and HoME-CF are psychometrically sound engagement measures for use in homecare. Clients who are apathetic or from non-English-speaking backgrounds may be less responsive to traditional care worker engagement strategies. Engagement may be augmented in clients who have stronger relationships with their care workers.

  12. Temporal variation in facilitator and client behavior during group motivational interviewing sessions

    PubMed Central

    Houck, Jon M.; Hunter, Sarah B.; Benson, Jennifer G.; Cochrum, Linda L.; Rowell, Lauren N.; D’Amico, Elizabeth J.

    2015-01-01

    There is considerable evidence for Motivational interviewing (MI) in changing problematic behaviors. Research on the causal chain for MI suggests influence of facilitator speech on client speech. This association has been examined using macro (session-level) and micro (utterance-level) measures; however, effects across sessions have largely been unexplored, particularly with groups. We evaluated a sample of 129 adolescent group MI sessions, using a behavioral coding system and timing information to generate information on facilitator and client speech (CT: change talk) within 5 successive segments (quintiles) of each group session. We hypothesized that facilitator speech (open-ended questions and reflections of CT) would be related to subsequent CT. Repeated measures analysis indicated significant quadratic and cubic trends for facilitator and client speech across quintiles. Across quintiles, cross-lagged panel analysis using a zero-inflated negative binomial model showed minimal evidence of facilitator speech on client CT, but did indicate several effects of client CT on facilitator speech, and of client CT on subsequent client CT. Results suggest that session-level effects of facilitator speech on client speech do not arise from long-duration effects of facilitator speech; instead, we detected effects of facilitator speech on client speech only at the beginning and end of sessions, when open questions respectively suppressed and enhanced client expressions of CT. Findings suggest that clinicians must remain vigilant to client CT throughout the group session, reinforcing it when it arises spontaneously and selectively employing open-ended questions to elicit it when it does not, particularly towards the end of the session. PMID:26415055

  13. Reprint of: Client interfaces to the Virtual Observatory Registry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demleitner, M.; Harrison, P.; Taylor, M.; Normand, J.

    2015-06-01

    The Virtual Observatory Registry is a distributed directory of information systems and other resources relevant to astronomy. To make it useful, facilities to query that directory must be provided to humans and machines alike. This article reviews the development and status of such facilities, also considering the lessons learnt from about a decade of experience with Registry interfaces. After a brief outline of the history of the standards development, it describes the use of Registry interfaces in some popular clients as well as dedicated UIs for interrogating the Registry. It continues with a thorough discussion of the design of the two most recent Registry interface standards, RegTAP on the one hand and a full-text-based interface on the other hand. The article finally lays out some of the less obvious conventions that emerged in the interaction between providers of registry records and Registry users as well as remaining challenges and current developments.

  14. [Academic procrastination in clients of a psychotherapeutic student counselling center].

    PubMed

    Jamrozinski, Katja; Kuda, Manfred; Mangholz, Astrid

    2009-01-01

    The start of university education is the beginning of a new phase of life for young adults, which requires significant psychosocial adjustments. Sociobiographical data, clinical symptoms, characteristics of education, work attitude, and career perspectives were gathered from 152 clients by a psychotherapeutic student counselling center to evaluate characteristics of students with and without academic procrastination. The procrastination group comprised heightened numbers of students who had changed universities, and people with suboptimal career prospects and career targets. These subjects were more often male and showed increased incidences of drug- and alcohol problems, as well as a lack of planning of the future. Furthermore, they had larger amounts of their study self-financed. On the basis of these results, concrete recommendations for preventive measures to improve on-time completion of study, and to prevent student drop-out are presented.

  15. b.i.t. Bremerhaven: Thin Clients entlasten Schulen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das Schulamt Bremerhaven zentralisiert die Verwaltungs-IT und schafft dadurch Freiräume für pädagogische und organisatorische Herausforderungen. Pflege und Support der neuen Infrastruktur übernimmt der Dienstleister b.i.t. Bremerhaven, die Thin Clients kommen vom Bremer Hersteller IGEL Technology. Ganztagsschulen, das 12-jährige Abitur, PISA, der Wegfall der Orientierungsstufe - deutsche Schulen müssen derzeit zahlreiche organisatorische und pädagogische Herausforderungen bewältigen. Um die neuen Strukturen umsetzen zu können, werden zusätzliche Ressourcen benötigt. Das Schulamt Bremerhaven hat gemeinsam mit dem Dienstleister b.i.t. Bremerhaven (Betrieb für Informationstechnologie) eine intelligente Lösung gefunden, wie sich die benötigten finanziellen Freiräume schaffen lassen.

  16. Overcoming decommissioning challenges through client/laboratory co-operation

    SciTech Connect

    Wharton, Mike; Gray, Lesley

    2007-07-01

    Available in abstract form only. Full text of publication follows: Accelerated decommissioning projects of the type underway at the former gaseous diffusion plant at BNG Capenhurst, UK, involve characterisation and radiochemical fingerprinting of a variety of unusual materials derived from legacy wastes. The project management and technical challenges that can occur during such a program can be successfully surmounted if a close working relationship between the client and the analytical laboratory is achieved. The Capenhurst Integrated Decommissioning Program (IDP) is an example of how such co-operation can reduce costs and time scales by providing the analytical laboratory with key sample and technical information prior to the shipping of the samples to the lab. This ensures that challenges associated with unusual sample matrices can be anticipated and dealt with at an early stage in the project. Gamma spectrometry is the most common analytical technique when analysing samples for radioactive content as it is non-destructive, relatively inexpensive and fast. However, accurate measurement generally requires samples of a known density to be counted in calibrated geometries. This becomes a challenge as many legacy wastes comprise materials of uneven geometry and/or varying density, as has been the case during the Capenhurst IDP. Liaising with the client to ensure a representative sub-sample of the material is taken on-site, and a series of additional checks when analysing the sample ensure that accurate results are obtained even for non-routine materials. Often it is only one or two radionuclides that dominate the radioactive inventory for legacy wastes. (authors)

  17. Real-time medical collaboration services over the web.

    PubMed

    Andrikos, Christos; Rassias, Georgios; Tsanakas, Panayiotis; Maglogiannis, Ilias

    2015-08-01

    The gradual shift in modern medical practice, from working alone clinical doctors to MDTs (Multi-Disciplinary Teams), raises the need of online real-time collaboration among geographically distributed medical personnel. The paper presents a Web-based platform, featuring an efficient medical data management and exchange, for hosting real-time collaborative services. The presented work leverages state-of-the-art features of the web (technologies and APIs) to support client-side medical data processing. Moreover, to address the typical bandwidth bottleneck and known scalability issues of centralized data sharing, an indirect RPC (Remote Process Call) scheme is introduced through object synchronization over the WebRTC paradigm.

  18. Viewing ISS Data in Real Time via the Internet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Myers, Gerry; Chamberlain, Jim

    2004-01-01

    EZStream is a computer program that enables authorized users at diverse terrestrial locations to view, in real time, data generated by scientific payloads aboard the International Space Station (ISS). The only computation/communication resource needed for use of EZStream is a computer equipped with standard Web-browser software and a connection to the Internet. EZStream runs in conjunction with the TReK software, described in a prior NASA Tech Briefs article, that coordinates multiple streams of data for the ground communication system of the ISS. EZStream includes server components that interact with TReK within the ISS ground communication system and client components that reside in the users' remote computers. Once an authorized client has logged in, a server component of EZStream pulls the requested data from a TReK application-program interface and sends the data to the client. Future EZStream enhancements will include (1) extensions that enable the server to receive and process arbitrary data streams on its own and (2) a Web-based graphical-user-interface-building subprogram that enables a client who lacks programming expertise to create customized display Web pages.

  19. Post-abortion care services for youth and adult clients in Kenya: a comparison of services, client satisfaction and provider attitudes.

    PubMed

    Evens, Emily; Otieno-Masaba, Rose; Eichleay, Margaret; McCarraher, Donna; Hainsworth, Gwyn; Lane, Cate; Makumi, Margaret; Onduso, Pamela

    2014-01-01

    Unsafe abortion accounts for 35% of maternal mortality in Kenya. Post-abortion care (PAC) reduces maternal death and provides an opportunity to prevent unwanted pregnancies. Few studies have documented how the receipt of PAC services varies by client age. In this study, descriptive data were collected from clients, providers and eight health facilities in Kenya's Central and Nairobi provinces to examine receipt of PAC services by client age, client satisfaction and provider attitudes. Delivery of PAC treatment, pain management, HIV and STI services and violence screening did not vary by age. However, fewer youth between the ages of 15 and 24 received a contraceptive method compared with adult clients (35% versus 48%; p=0.02). Forty-nine per cent of youth reported not using a family planning method due to fears of infertility, side-effects or lack of knowledge compared with 22% of adults. Additional efforts are needed in Kenya to bolster the family planning services that young PAC clients receive and increase the uptake of contraception.

  20. Practical Model and Protocol for Interpreting MCMI-III Results to Clients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Staley, Joy D.; Brown, Nathan C.

    One ethical dilemma for psychologists is finding methods to share test results with their clients in such a way that the client is not deleteriously labeled, but is encouraged by the knowledge of assessed strength and growth areas. This paper offers one answer by presenting a structured protocol that draws on an iceberg metaphor for categorizing…

  1. 77 FR 24685 - Proposed Information Collection; Comment Request; Client Focus Groups and Qualitative Interviews

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-25

    ... to make improvements to the agency's business processes in order to provide better and more effective... mandated by Congress to help U.S. businesses, particularly small and medium-sized companies, export their...'' to collect feedback from the U.S. business clients it serves. These surveys ask the client...

  2. Dissecting the Wilderness Therapy Client: Examining Clinical Trends, Findings, and Patterns

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoag, Matthew J.; Massey, Katie E.; Roberts, Sean D.

    2014-01-01

    Over the last decade, wilderness therapy research has increased substantially in both quality and quantity and has begun to establish a base of evidence and literature. However, there is still much to be learned about the clients served and their clinical profile. The authors examined diagnostic data from discharge summaries of 929 clients (192…

  3. Working with Clients Who Have Religious/Spiritual Issues: A Survey of University Counseling Center Therapists

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kellems, Ian S.; Hill, Clara E.; Crook-Lyon, Rachel E.; Freitas, Gary

    2010-01-01

    University counseling center therapists (N = 220) completed an Internet survey about religion/spirituality in therapy, with 200 of these therapists describing therapy with a recent client whose issues involved religion/spirituality. Common client religion/spirituality issues were questioning one's childhood religion, exploring…

  4. DUI/DWAI Offenders Compared to Clients Seen in an Outpatient Alcohol-Treatment Facility.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Packard, Michele A.

    1987-01-01

    Examined client records to compare 50 subjects admitted to a drinking-driver program and 50 subjects admitted to an outpatient alcohol treatment clinic. Highly significant differences were found between groups on 10 of 12 drinking indices, suggesting that clients referred for alcohol-related traffic offenses represent a population different from…

  5. Predictors of Client Satisfaction in Executive Outplacement: Implications for Service Delivery.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wooten, Kevin C.

    1996-01-01

    Examined program components of professional outplacement relative to client satisfaction using a sample (N=68) of former executives seeking jobs. Survey results suggest outplacement content components and process components were better predictors of client satisfaction when compared with contextual components. Self-efficacy may make a key…

  6. Multiple Codes, Multiple Impressions: An Analysis of Doctor-Client Encounters in Nigeria

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Odebunmi, Akin

    2013-01-01

    Existing studies on doctor-client interactions have largely focused on monolingual encounters and the interactional effects and functions of the languages used in the communication between doctors and their clients. They have neither, to a large extent, examined the several codes employed in single encounters and their pragmatic roles nor given…

  7. Willingness of Graduate Students in Rehabilitation Counseling to Discuss Sexuality with Clients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Juergens, Maria Helena; Smedema, Susan Miller; Berven, Norman L.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to obtain a greater understanding of the willingness of graduate students in rehabilitation counseling to discuss sexuality with clients. This was done by testing a model of factors predicted to influence the willingness of rehabilitation counseling master's students to discuss sexuality with clients, using path…

  8. Client-Server: What Is It and Are We There Yet?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gershenfeld, Nancy

    1995-01-01

    Discusses client-server architecture in dumb terminals, personal computers, local area networks, and graphical user interfaces. Focuses on functions offered by client personal computers: individualized environments; flexibility in running operating systems; advanced operating system features; multiuser environments; and centralized data…

  9. The Effect of a Client's Age upon the Employment Preferences of Therapeutic Recreation Majors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MacNeil, Richard D.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Examined the attitudes of 95 therapeutic recreation (TR) majors toward older adults regarding expressed job preferences. Subjects completed the TR Work Preference Survey. Findings indicated that TR majors preferred to work with younger clients. No matter what disability any hypothetical client had, subjects still preferred to work with younger…

  10. How Counselors Are Trained to Work with Bisexual Clients in CACREP-Accredited Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bonjo, Laurie Anne

    2013-01-01

    In spite of recent progress toward addressing the need for cultural competence with lesbian and gay-identified clients, bisexual-identified clients continue to be marginalized in the principles, theories, and methods of studying sexuality as well as in the training provided by counselor educators. A descriptive content analysis was conducted to…

  11. An Interpretative Phenomenological Analysis of Adult Clients' Experience of "My Career Chapter"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McIlveen, Peter; Patton, Wendy; Hoare, P. Nancey

    2008-01-01

    This paper reports a study of adult clients' experience of "My Career Chapter," which is a theoretically-informed, qualitative career assessment and counselling procedure. "My Career Chapter" engenders personal exploration through a client's writing and reading aloud a career-related autobiography, which is formulated on the…

  12. Staff Variables Associated with the Challenging Behaviour of Clients with Severe or Profound Intellectual Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lambrechts, G.; Kuppens, S.; Maes, B.

    2009-01-01

    Background: Previous research has identified that staff-client interactions play an important role in the origin and maintenance of challenging behaviour. Particularly, the reciprocity between staff behaviour and client behaviour has been considered a key issue. Furthermore, severe challenging behaviour has been found to elicit negative emotional…

  13. The Analysis of Challenging Relations: Influences on Interactive Behaviour of Staff towards Clients with Intellectual Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Willems, A. P. A. M.; Embregts, P. J. C. M.; Bosman, A. M. T.; Hendriks, A. H. C.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Relationships between support staff and clients with intellectual disability (ID) are important for quality of care, especially when dealing with challenging behaviour. Building upon an interpersonal model, this study investigates the influence of client challenging behaviour, staff attitude and staff emotional intelligence on…

  14. Keeping the Client: JTPA Retention Made (Much!) Easier. Issues in Training and Employment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelly, Jodie Sue; Elsman, Max

    This paper, meant to stimulate discussion within the employment and training community, offers a wide range of strategies for keeping clients enrolled in Job Training Partnership Act (JTPA) programs. Issues discussed include the following: (1) why retention is important; (2) gathering and analyzing information; (3) links between client recruitment…

  15. 42 CFR 483.450 - Condition of participation: Client behavior and facility practices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... inappropriate client behavior must be employed with sufficient safeguards and supervision to ensure that the safety, welfare and civil and human rights of clients are adequately protected. (3) Techniques to manage... supervision of designated staff. (iii) The door to the room is held shut by staff or by a mechanism...

  16. Reconciling Spiritual Values Conflicts for Counselors and Lesbian and Gay Clients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fallon, Kathleen M.; Dobmeier, Robert A.; Reiner, Summer M.; Casquarelli, Elaine J.; Giglia, Lauren A.; Goodwin, Eric

    2013-01-01

    Counselors and lesbian and gay clients experience parallel values conflicts between religious beliefs/spirituality and sexual orientation. This article uses critical thinking to assist counselors to integrate religious/spiritual beliefs with professional ethical codes. Clients are assisted to integrate religious/spiritual beliefs with sexual…

  17. Effects of Client Violence on Social Work Students: A National Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Criss, Pam

    2010-01-01

    This study uses a work stress theoretical framework to examine the effects of direct and indirect client violence on a randomly selected national sample of MSW and BSW social work students from the National Association of Social Workers (N=595). Client violence variables were analyzed in relationship to fear of future violence and occupational…

  18. Spiritual and Nonspiritual Approaches to Dream Work: Effects on Clients' Well-Being

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Timothy L.; Hill, Clara E.

    2005-01-01

    In this study, the authors compared two versions of the C. E. Hill (1996) Cognitive-Experimental Dream Interpretation Model, one using waking life interpretation in the insight stage and the other using clients' spirituality as an aid in the interpretation process during the insight stage. Spiritually oriented volunteer clients completed either…

  19. Validation of a Brief PTSD Scale for Clients with Severe Mental Illnesses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Hare, Thomas; Shen, Ce; Sherrer, Margaret

    2012-01-01

    Trauma and Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) are more common in severe mental illnesses (SMI) clients than in the general population, yet brief screens for detecting probable PTSD in SMI clients are nonexistent. In a two-part study, the authors used correlation analysis and receiver operating characteristics (ROC) analysis to develop and…

  20. 34 CFR 370.1 - What is the Client Assistance Program (CAP)?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 34 Education 2 2014-07-01 2013-07-01 true What is the Client Assistance Program (CAP)? 370.1 Section 370.1 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF SPECIAL EDUCATION AND REHABILITATIVE SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION CLIENT ASSISTANCE PROGRAM...

  1. 34 CFR 370.1 - What is the Client Assistance Program (CAP)?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 34 Education 2 2011-07-01 2010-07-01 true What is the Client Assistance Program (CAP)? 370.1 Section 370.1 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF SPECIAL EDUCATION AND REHABILITATIVE SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION CLIENT ASSISTANCE PROGRAM...

  2. 34 CFR 370.1 - What is the Client Assistance Program (CAP)?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What is the Client Assistance Program (CAP)? 370.1 Section 370.1 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF SPECIAL EDUCATION AND REHABILITATIVE SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION CLIENT ASSISTANCE PROGRAM...

  3. 34 CFR 370.1 - What is the Client Assistance Program (CAP)?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 34 Education 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false What is the Client Assistance Program (CAP)? 370.1 Section 370.1 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF SPECIAL EDUCATION AND REHABILITATIVE SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION CLIENT ASSISTANCE PROGRAM...

  4. 34 CFR 370.1 - What is the Client Assistance Program (CAP)?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 34 Education 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false What is the Client Assistance Program (CAP)? 370.1 Section 370.1 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF SPECIAL EDUCATION AND REHABILITATIVE SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION CLIENT ASSISTANCE PROGRAM...

  5. 75 FR 33766 - Manufacturing Extension Partnership (MEP) Availability of Funds for Projects To Develop Client...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-15

    ... Funds for Projects To Develop Client Engagement or Business Models and Deployment Strategies That... productivity, technological performance, and strengthen the global competitiveness of small- and medium-sized U... develop client engagement or business models and deployment strategies that integrate two or more of...

  6. Effect of Sex of Therapist and Client on Therapists' Attitudes toward Assertiveness Problems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mintzer, Elaine; Halpern, James

    1980-01-01

    The effect of sex of therapist and client on therapists' attitudes toward assertiveness problems varies from case to case. There is little evidence for sexism in counseling for assertiveness problems, except for the existence of a double standard with regard to sexually assertive clients. (Author)

  7. Suicide Attempts and Severe Psychiatric Morbidity among Former Child Welfare Clients--A National Cohort Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vinnerljung, Bo; Hjern, Anders; Lindblad, Frank

    2006-01-01

    Background: Few large sample studies have examined psychiatric morbidity among former child welfare/protection clients. In this study, risks for suicide attempts and severe psychiatric morbidity in younger years were assessed for former child welfare clients in ten national birth cohorts, comparing them with general population peers and…

  8. Investigation of Clinically Significant Change by Severity Level in College Counseling Center Clients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wolgast, Brad M.; Rader, Jill; Roche, Deborah; Thompson, C. Patricia; von Zuben, F. Christian; Goldberg, Allan

    2005-01-01

    The authors investigated the number of sessions necessary for college counseling center clients of different levels of severity of distress at intake to achieve clinically significant change (CS) in therapy. The Outcome Questionnaire-45 (M. J. Lambert, N. B. Hansen, et al., 1996) was used to categorize 914 clients by severity of distress. Analyses…

  9. Integrating Attachment Theory to Support a Client Coming to Terms with Infidelity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Claire, Carolyn A.

    2010-01-01

    Finding it difficult to overcome the emotional distress experienced when considering her husband's infidelity, a client seeks counselling support. The client's goal was to learn about herself and to use the experience as an opportunity for self transformation. The case study utilizes Attachment Theory and Cognitive Behavioural Therapy to help the…

  10. The Views of Clients with Mild Intellectual Disabilities regarding Their Working Relationships with Caregivers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roeden, John M.; Maaskant, Marian A.; Curfs, Leopold M. G.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Research studies into the effect of therapies have shown that a good relationship between the client and his caregiver is a key factor in a positive treatment outcome. Methods: The nominal group technique (NGT) has been used in this study to discover what clients with intellectual disabilities feel contributes to a successful working…

  11. Jewish Israeli Social Work Students' Attitudes to the Prospect of Being Assigned an Israeli Arab Client

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baum, Nehami

    2010-01-01

    This study attempts to examine implications of political conflicts in social work with clients from the rival group. Using an anonymous, open-ended questionnaire, this study examines responses of 78 Jewish Israeli social work students to the hypothetical prospect of treating an Israeli Arab client. The vast majority expected cultural and political…

  12. Serving Clients with Hearing Loss: Best Practices in Mental Health Counseling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fusick, Lisa

    2008-01-01

    This article examines the risk factors and characteristics of clients with hearing loss, including inequitable access to education and mental health care services, financial barriers, communication problems, and societal discrimination. Culturally specific counseling approaches and techniques for mental health counselors serving clients with…

  13. Fostering Experiential Learning and Service through Client Projects in Graduate Business Courses Offered Online

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hagan, Linda M.

    2012-01-01

    Undergraduate marketing and public relations capstone courses utilize client projects to allow students to apply their knowledge and encourage collaboration. Yet, at the graduate level, especially with courses offered in an online modality, experiential service learning in the form of client project assignments presents unique challenges. However,…

  14. Interaction of counseling rapport and topics discussed in sessions with methadone treatment clients.

    PubMed

    Joe, George W; Simpson, D Dwayne; Rowan-Szal, Grace A

    2009-01-01

    Therapeutic rapport between counselors and clients in drug user treatment has been shown to be an important predictor of follow-up outcomes. This naturalistic study investigated the relationship of counseling rapport to drug-related topics discussed in counseling sessions in a sample of 330 clients and nine counselors. These voluntary clients had been admitted to a private, for-profit outpatient methadone treatment in Texas between September 1995 and August 1997 and received no-fee services for a year for participation in this study. The data were gathered using forms in the TCU community treatment assessments (www.ibr.tcu.edu) that measured intake information, counseling session topics, and counselor evaluation of the client. A majority were males, Hispanic, had a pending legal status and the average age was 39. Co-occurring drug dependence for these heroin users included cocaine (38%) and alcohol (31%). The results supported the hypothesis that higher rapport would be associated with addressing clients in a more "supportive approach" that emphasized relapse prevention and strengths-building while lower rapport would be associated with a punitive counseling style that stressed program rules and compliance. The influences of client background, counselor differences, and during-treatment positive urines were also examined. Although counselors differed in their general manner of dealing with clients, each also showed flexibility determined in part by client behavior (such as continued cocaine use). The findings indicate that focusing on constructive solutions is the preferred counseling approach.

  15. Coming out through Art: A Review of Art Therapy with LGBT Clients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pelton-Sweet, Laura M.; Sherry, Alissa

    2008-01-01

    This paper examines sexual identity development and the integration of art therapy in counseling with lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgendered (LGBT) clients. Especially during the coming out process for LGBT clients, research has shown that levels of emotional and physical well-being decrease considerably. However, there is growing evidence in…

  16. Clients' Perceptions of the Process and Consequences of Self-Disclosure in Psychotherapy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farber, Barry A.; Berano, Kathryn C.; Capobianco, Joseph A.

    2004-01-01

    The primary aim of this multimethod study was to investigate client perceptions of the process, benefits, difficulties, and consequences of disclosing and withholding material in psychotherapy sessions. Twenty-one clients in psychotherapy, most engaged in long-term psychodynamically oriented treatment, participated in semistructured interviews and…

  17. Empowering High-Risk Clients to Attain a Better Quality of Life: A Career Resiliency Framework

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rickwood, Rory R.; Roberts, Jillian; Batten, Suzanne; Marshall, Anne; Massie, Kendra

    2004-01-01

    Career counselors frequently encounter clients who are at high risk for career and life development difficulties. Research suggests there is a connection between resiliency and successful career development in high-risk clients. Many high-risk individuals have poor decision-making skills and lack motivation to succeed in life and career…

  18. Skill Formation among Vocational Rehabilitation Clients--Public Policy vs Private Incentives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aakvik, Arild; Kjerstad, Egil

    2003-01-01

    In this paper we analyse individual vocational rehabilitation clients' decisions to enter active training or not. Although the Government pays the direct costs of training, the composition of the total costs of training may be decisive for individual choices. Based on labour market theory, we relate background characteristics of the clients to…

  19. The Experience of Therapists and Rural Clients Using Internet Therapy Services

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ash, Shannon Christine

    2010-01-01

    This qualitative study explored the experiences of therapists and clients who were involved with online therapeutic interventions. Specifically, this study looked at the experiences of clients who live in rural areas and who struggle with substance use issues as previous research has indicated a need for creative ways of reaching these…

  20. Social-Cognitive Factors Affecting Clients' Career and Life Satisfaction after Counseling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Verbruggen, Marijke; Sels, Luc

    2010-01-01

    This study examines factors affecting clients' career and life satisfaction in the first 6 months after having participated in career counseling. In particular, we tested a large subset of the recent social-cognitive model of work satisfaction of Lent and Brown using a longitudinal data set of 195 former counseling clients. Our results showed that…

  1. Access to, Use of, and Attitudes toward Telecommunication among Rural VR Clients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ipsen, Catherine; Rigles, Bethany; Arnold, Nancy; Seekins, Tom

    2013-01-01

    Telecommunication offers rural vocational rehabilitation (VR) clients a method of communicating with their VR counselor between face-to-face visits. Unfortunately, certain telecommunication methods may not be available to many rural VR clients or may pose barriers in the rehabilitation process. This article describes findings from an exploratory…

  2. Using Web-Based Peer Benchmarking to Manage the Client-Based Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raska, David; Keller, Eileen Weisenbach; Shaw, Doris

    2013-01-01

    The complexities of integrating client-based projects into marketing courses provide challenges for the instructor but produce richness of context and active learning for the student. This paper explains the integration of Web-based peer benchmarking as a means of improving student performance on client-based projects within a single semester in…

  3. Client Participation in Managing Social Work Service--An Unfinished Quest

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leung, Terry T. F.

    2011-01-01

    "Client participation" is a popular ideal and object of rhetorical commitment in social work service. But the much-touted potential of this concept requires careful and critical scrutiny. This article reports on a study of client-participation initiatives in the Hong Kong welfare sector. The study identified significant differences in…

  4. Improving the Health of Professional Staff Members: Implications for Employee Productivity and Client Health.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fetherolf, Jeni; Vincent, Murray L.

    1982-01-01

    In a pilot project, professional employees working with visually handicapped persons benefitted through participation in a worksite fitness program while serving as role models for clients. The lunch hour program used the worksite's facilities, providing exercise and advice on nutrition. Possible effects on client perception, employee productivity…

  5. Client Aggression toward Rehabilitation Counselors Employed by State Vocational Rehabilitation Agencies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trice, April Lynette

    2011-01-01

    Through a series of interviews this transcendental phenomenological study explored how rehabilitation counselors employed by state vocational rehabilitation agencies experienced client aggression. More specifically, it examined the circumstances involved when client aggression manifested in the work lives of rehabilitation counselors. This study…

  6. Counselors' Stress Appraisals as Predictors of Countertransference Behavior with Male Clients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fauth, James; Hayes, Jeffrey A.

    2006-01-01

    The authors investigated the applicability of a transactional theory of stress to the understanding of countertransference with male clients. Counselors responded to either a traditional or nontraditional videotaped male client vignette. As expected, counselors' stress appraisals predicted their countertransference behavior. Specifically,…

  7. Characteristics of the Culturally Different Client: A Guide for the Rehabilitation Counselor. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phelps, William R.

    The material focuses on the following areas: definition and purpose, some of the more common characteristics of the culturally different, counselor attitudes in serving the culturally different, counselor's knowledge of client's background, communication in the counseling relationship, and client attitudes toward helping services. Some…

  8. 77 FR 17367 - Permissible Sharing of Client Records by Customs Brokers

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-26

    ... SECURITY U.S. Customs and Border Protection 19 CFR Part 111 RIN 1651-AA80 Permissible Sharing of Client Records by Customs Brokers AGENCY: U.S. Customs and Border Protection, Department of Homeland Security... Customs and Border Protection (CBP) regulations that would allow brokers, upon the client's consent in...

  9. A Client-Server Architecture for an Instructional Environment Based on Computer Networks and the Internet.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guidon, Jacques; Pierre, Samuel

    1996-01-01

    Discusses the use of computers in education and training and proposes a client-server architecture for an experimental computer environment as an approach to a virtual classroom. Highlights include the World Wide Web and client software, document delivery, hardware architecture, and Internet resources and services. (Author/LRW)

  10. Working with Clients Who Engage in Self-Harming Behaviour: Experiences of a Group of Counsellors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fox, Claudine

    2011-01-01

    This study aimed to explore the experiences of a group of counsellors regarding working with clients who engage in self-harming behaviour, in order to gain an understanding of what it is like to work with this client group. A series of six individual, semi-structured qualitative interviews were carried out, which were then transcribed and analysed…

  11. Usage of Thin-Client/Server Architecture in Computer Aided Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cimen, Caghan; Kavurucu, Yusuf; Aydin, Halit

    2014-01-01

    With the advances of technology, thin-client/server architecture has become popular in multi-user/single network environments. Thin-client is a user terminal in which the user can login to a domain and run programs by connecting to a remote server. Recent developments in network and hardware technologies (cloud computing, virtualization, etc.)…

  12. Lawyers and Clients: Putting Professional Service on the Agenda of Legal Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sarat, Austin

    1991-01-01

    An empirical study of lawyer-client interactions in one practice context illustrates the way lawyers respond to client problems and raises questions about the exercise of professional authority. It is concluded that law schools' failure to train lawyers to be sensitive and responsive has important consequences for the legal profession. (MSE)

  13. Exploring Outcomes and Initial Self-Report of Client Motivation in a College Counseling Center

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ilagan, Guy; Vinson, Michael L.; Sharp, Julia L.; Ilagan, Jill; Oberman, Aaron

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To explore the association between college counseling center clients' initial self-report of motivation and counseling outcome. Participants: The sample was composed of 331 student clients who utilized a college counseling center from August 2007 to August 2009. The college is a public, mid-size, urban university in the Southeast.…

  14. The National Treatment Improvement Evaluation Study (NTIES): Profile of Clients Age 45 and Over.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Caliber Associates, Fairfax, VA.

    This paper summarizes similarities and differences between two cohorts of the National Treatment Improvement Evaluation Study (NTIES) clients, those age 45 or older and those younger than 45. Results reveal the following: Clients in the 45+ cohort were considerably more likely to be treated for problems with alcohol or with heroin, and they were…

  15. Psychological Counseling Processes of Prospective Psychological Counsellors: An Investigation of Client-Counsellor Interactions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sanberk, Ismail; Akbas, Turan

    2015-01-01

    The general purpose of this study is to investigate the client-counsellor interaction in the psychological counseling process at the verbal behavior level. The study also aims to analyze the relationship between the behaviors observed in the process with both clients and counsellors' evaluations of sessions and whether changes were observed in…

  16. 75 FR 1455 - Custody of Funds or Securities of Clients by Investment Advisers

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-11

    ... send account statements directly to the advisory clients; and unless client assets are maintained by an... Management, U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission, 100 F Street, NE., Washington, DC 20549-8549... similar types of misconduct. See, e.g., In re Stratum Wealth Management, LLC and Charles B. Ganz,...

  17. Development of a Procedure for Allowing Mental Health Clients to Choose Their Therapists.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Manthei, R. J.

    Literature on client rights and preferences for therapy and therapy styles has suggested that allowing clients to choose their own therapists should have positive effects on the process and outcome of therapy as well as the chosen therapists' performance and attitudes. A slide/tape presentation containing information about each therapist at an…

  18. The Use of Narrative Therapy with Clients Diagnosed with Bipolar Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ngazimbi, Evadne E.; Lambie, Glenn W.; Shillingford, M. Ann

    2008-01-01

    Clients diagnosed with bipolar disorder often suffer from mood instability, and research suggests that these clients need both counseling services and pharmacotherapy. Narrative therapy is a social constructionist approach grounded on the premise that there is no single "truth"; individuals may create new meanings and retell their stories to…

  19. A Critical Appraisal of the Use of Standardized Client Simulations in Social Work Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Logie, Carmen; Bogo, Marion; Regehr, Cheryl; Regehr, Glenn

    2013-01-01

    Reliable and valid methods to evaluate student competence are needed in social work education, and practice examinations with standardized clients may hold promise for social work. The authors conducted a critical appraisal of standardized client simulations used in social work education to assess their effectiveness for teaching and for…

  20. Medical Education Again Provides a Model for Law Schools: The Standardized Patient becomes the Standardized Client.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grosberg, Lawrence M.

    2001-01-01

    Describes how medical schools have successfully used the "standardized patient" teaching technique, and the use of "standardized clients" at New York Law School. Proposes establishing consortiums among small groups of law schools to implement the standardized client technique, and using the technique in high stakes testing. (EV)

  1. Initial Levels of Differentiation and Reduction in Psychological Symptoms for Clients in Marriage and Family Therapy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bartle-Haring, Suzanne; Glade, Aaron C.; Vira, Rohini

    2005-01-01

    Using Bowen Family Systems Theory as a theoretical underpinning, in this study, we investigated the hypothesis that clients with higher levels of differentiation would improve more quickly in therapy than clients with lower levels of differentiation. Hierarchical Linear Modeling was used to analyze the data over nine sessions of therapy in a…

  2. 49 CFR 1103.21 - How far a practitioner may go in supporting a client's cause.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 8 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false How far a practitioner may go in supporting a client's cause. 1103.21 Section 1103.21 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation... practitioner may go in supporting a client's cause. A practitioner shall put forth his best effort to...

  3. 49 CFR 1103.21 - How far a practitioner may go in supporting a client's cause.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 8 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false How far a practitioner may go in supporting a client's cause. 1103.21 Section 1103.21 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation... practitioner may go in supporting a client's cause. A practitioner shall put forth his best effort to...

  4. 49 CFR 1103.21 - How far a practitioner may go in supporting a client's cause.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 8 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false How far a practitioner may go in supporting a client's cause. 1103.21 Section 1103.21 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation... practitioner may go in supporting a client's cause. A practitioner shall put forth his best effort to...

  5. 49 CFR 1103.21 - How far a practitioner may go in supporting a client's cause.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 8 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false How far a practitioner may go in supporting a client's cause. 1103.21 Section 1103.21 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation... practitioner may go in supporting a client's cause. A practitioner shall put forth his best effort to...

  6. 49 CFR 1103.21 - How far a practitioner may go in supporting a client's cause.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 8 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false How far a practitioner may go in supporting a client's cause. 1103.21 Section 1103.21 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation... practitioner may go in supporting a client's cause. A practitioner shall put forth his best effort to...

  7. Shared Decision Making for Clients with Mental Illness: A Randomized Factorial Survey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lukens, Jonathan M.; Solomon, Phyllis; Sorenson, Susan B.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: The goal of this study was to test the degree to which client clinical characteristics and environmental context and social workers' practice values and experience influenced support for client's autonomy and willingness to engage in shared decision making (SDM), and whether willingness to engage in SDM was mediated by support for…

  8. Diet Quality Is Low among Female Food Pantry Clients in Eastern Alabama

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duffy, Patricia; Zizza, Claire; Jacoby, Jocelynn; Tayie, Francis A.

    2009-01-01

    Objective: Examine diet quality, food security, and obesity among female food pantry clients. Design: Cross-sectional study. Setting: A food pantry in Lee County, Alabama. Participants: Fifty-five female food pantry clients between 19 and 50 years of age. Main Outcome Measure(s): Diet quality using United States (US) Department of Agriculture…

  9. The Value of Client Perceptions in University Strategic Planning: An Empirical Research Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    del Barrio-Garcia, Salvador; Luque-Martinez, Teodoro

    2009-01-01

    Given the normative changes in higher education at European, national and regional levels, together with social, economic, demographic and technological developments, universities need to adopt a client-oriented approach and to make this client orientation an integral component of their strategic planning process. The university's…

  10. ERDDAP - An Easier Way for Diverse Clients to Access Scientific Data From Diverse Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendelssohn, R.; Simons, R. A.

    2008-12-01

    ERDDAP is a new open-source, web-based service that aggregates data from other web services: OPeNDAP grid servers (THREDDS), OPeNDAP sequence servers (Dapper), NOS SOAP service, SOS (IOOS, OOStethys), microWFS, DiGIR (OBIS, BMDE). Regardless of the data source, ERDDAP makes all datasets available to clients via standard (and enhanced) DAP requests and makes some datasets accessible via WMS. A client's request also specifies the desired format for the results, e.g., .asc, .csv, .das, .dds, .dods, htmlTable, XHTML, .mat, netCDF, .kml, .png, or .pdf (formats more directly useful to clients). ERDDAP interprets a client request, requests the data from the data source (in the appropriate way), reformats the data source's response, and sends the result to the client. Thus ERDDAP makes data from diverse sources available to diverse clients via standardized interfaces. Clients don't have to install libraries to get data from ERDDAP because ERDDAP is RESTful and resource-oriented: a URL completely defines a data request and the URL can be used in any application that can send a URL and receive a file. This also makes it easy to use ERDDAP in mashups with other web services. ERDDAP could be extended to support other protocols. ERDDAP's hub and spoke architecture simplifies adding support for new types of data sources and new types of clients. ERDDAP includes metadata management support, catalog services, and services to make graphs and maps.

  11. The Lived Experience of Psychotherapists Working with Older Clients: An Heuristic Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Atkins, Dianne; Loewenthal, Del

    2004-01-01

    This paper presents the results of an heuristic study based on the research question: 'How do psychotherapists experience working with older clients?' The question came from the researchers' experience and interest in working with older clients in general practice. It started from the researchers' desire to examine more closely feelings and…

  12. Addict Descriptions of Therapeutic Community, Multimodality, and Methadone Maintenance Treatment Clients and Staff.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stuker, Patricia B.; And Others

    1978-01-01

    Compared the Adjective Check List descriptions of addicts in treatment toward methadone maintenance, multimodality, and therapeutic community clients and program staff. Results indicate client pessimism regarding methadone maintenance. Results suggest addict opinions represent a valuable source for evaluating treatment approaches and identifying…

  13. Developing Training and Employment Programs to Meet the Needs of Methadone Treatment Clients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dennis, Michael L.; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Research on vocational services for methadone clients is reviewed, and preliminary results of an evaluation of a training and employment program for 249 methadone treatment clients in 3 community-based programs are presented. Results suggest the usefulness of vocational services in increasing training access and use. (SLD)

  14. "Here's a Little Something for You": How Therapists Respond to Client Gifts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knox, Sarah; Hess, Shirley A.; Williams, Elizabeth Nutt; Hill, Clara E.

    2003-01-01

    Descriptions by 12 therapists of their experiences receiving tangible gifts from clients are examined. Using consensual qualitative research (C. E. Hill, B. J. Thompson, & E. N. Williams, 1997) therapists' overall gift encounters and specifically identified gift events were explored. Results indicated that although clients rarely gave gifts, all…

  15. Secondary Prevention Services for Clients Who Are Low Risk in Drug Court: A Conceptual Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeMatteo, David S.; Marlowe, Douglas B.; Festinger, David S.

    2006-01-01

    The drug court model assumes that most drug offenders are addicts, and that drug use fuels other criminal activity. As a result, drug court clients must satisfy an intensive regimen of treatment and supervisory obligations. However, research suggests that roughly one third of drug court clients do not have a clinically significant substance use…

  16. Sexual Orientation Microaggressions: The Experience of Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Queer Clients in Psychotherapy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shelton, Kimber; Delgado-Romero, Edward A.

    2011-01-01

    Psychological research has shown the detrimental effects that overt heterosexism have on lesbian, gay, bisexual, and queer (LGBQ) clients and on the psychotherapeutic relationship. However, the effects of subtle forms of discrimination, specifically sexual orientation microaggressions, have on LGBQ clients and the therapeutic relationship have not…

  17. Effects of Client Bisexuality on Clinical Judgment: When Is Bias Most Likely to Occur?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mohr, Jonathan J.; Weiner, Jennifer L.; Chopp, Regina M.; Wong, Stephanie J.

    2009-01-01

    In this study, the authors investigated whether psychotherapist bias related to client bisexuality is most likely to occur with respect to judgments about stereotype-relevant clinical issues. Participants were 108 psychotherapists who read a fictitious intake report about a male client who was portrayed as heterosexual, gay, or bisexual. Client…

  18. Risk-Coping through Sexual Networks: Evidence from Client Transfers in Kenya

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robinson, Jonathan; Yeh, Ethan

    2012-01-01

    Why do women engage in transactional sex? While much of the explanation is that sex-for-money pays more than other jobs, we use a unique panel data set constructed from 192 self-reported diaries of sex workers in Western Kenya to show that women who supply transactional sex develop relationships with regular clients, and that these clients send…

  19. Staff and Client Perspectives on the Journey Mapping Online Evaluation Tool in a Drug Court Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crunkilton, Dhira D.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess staff and client perspectives on the Internet-based Journey Mapping program evaluation tool. A drug court program was chosen for a case study research design. Six staff and 10 clients participated in interviews and observations, and also responded to a questionnaire. A staff survey provided additional data.…

  20. Teenage Parenthood among Child Welfare Clients: A Swedish National Cohort Study of Prevalence and Odds

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vinnerljung, Bo; Franzen, Eva; Danielsson, Maria

    2007-01-01

    To assess prevalence and odds for teenage parenthood among former child welfare clients, we used national register data for all children born in Sweden 1972-1983 (n = 1,178,207), including 49,582 former child welfare clients with varying intervention experiences. Logistic regression models, adjusted for demographic, socio-economic and familial…

  1. Managing Mental Health Problems in Everyday Life: Drug Treatment Client's Self-Care Strategies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holt, Martin; Treloar, Carla

    2008-01-01

    Little is understood about the self-care activities undertaken by drug treatment clients. Using data from a qualitative study of drug treatment and mental health we identify the self-care practices of drug treatment clients diagnosed with anxiety and depression. Seventy-seven participants were interviewed in four sites across Australia.…

  2. A Case Study of Teaching Marketing Research Using Client-Sponsored Projects: Method, Challenges, and Benefits

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bove, Liliana L.; Davies, W. Martin

    2009-01-01

    This case study outlines the use of client-sponsored research projects in a quantitative postgraduate marketing research subject conducted in a 12-week semester in a research-intensive Australian university. The case study attempts to address the dearth of recent literature on client-sponsored research projects in the discipline of marketing.…

  3. The Prevalence of Undiagnosed Geriatric Health Conditions among Adult Protective Service Clients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heath, John M.; Brown, Merle; Kobylarz, Fred A.; Castano, Susan

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: We sought to determine the prevalence of remediable health conditions from in-home geriatric assessments of referred adult protective service (APS) clients suffering elder mistreatment. Design and Methods: We used a retrospective cohort study of 211 APS clients (74% female; age, M = 77 years) in two central New Jersey counties. Results:…

  4. Considering the Use of Standardized Clients in Professional Social Work Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carter, Irene; Bornais, Judy; Bilodeau, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    Counselling professionals seek to preserve their success by demonstrating excellent communication skills. Prior to contact with clients, students become familiar with counselling skills that reflect the needs of vulnerable populations. This involves creating a therapeutic relationship with the client using counselling skills. One way to promote…

  5. The Client-Centered Approach as a Foundation for Teaching the Introductory Course in Public Relations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Najor, Michele A.; Motschall, Melissa

    2001-01-01

    Describes how the authors use a broad-based, client-centered model to teach an introductory course in public relations, integrating writing assignments for "clients" into course topics, which include history, ethics, theory, research, program planning, publicity, crisis management, and evaluation methods. Discusses course objectives, and notes…

  6. The Use of Gestalt Interventions in the Treatment of the Resistant Alcohol-Dependent Client.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ramey, Luellen

    1998-01-01

    Reviews ethical and practical dilemmas associated with clients who have hidden alcohol dependencies, and proposes an approach rooted in Gestalt counseling theory which confronts these issues and is compatible with a current emerging alcohol-treatment model. Suggests specific activities for addressing client resistance to revealing a hidden alcohol…

  7. An Assessment of Resources for Counselor Coping and Recovery in the Aftermath of Client Suicide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McAdams, Charles R., III; Foster, Victoria A.

    2002-01-01

    The authors report on interviews with counselors who had faced the crisis of client suicide about accessibility and utility of resources for coping and recovery. All identified resources were rated as potentially useful, but their utility was sometimes impaired by limited access. Recommendations for promoting recovery from client suicide are…

  8. Coorientation Theory and Assessment of the RFP Solution to Client/Service Learner Matchmaking

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rogers, Cathy; Andrews, Valerie

    2013-01-01

    Tensions that result from varying expectations of service learners and clients/community partners are as common as the pedagogical practice of service learning in public relations courses. The matchmaking process between instructors and clients can influence expectations; however, the literature includes little guidance about the process of client…

  9. Organizational and Client Commitment among Contracted Employees: A Replication and Extension with Temporary Workers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Connelly, Catherine E.; Gallagher, Daniel G.; Gilley, K. Matthew

    2007-01-01

    This study replicates and extends Coyle-Shapiro and Morrow's study (Coyle-Shapiro, J.A.-M., & Morrow, P.C. 2006. Organizational and client commitment among contracted employees. "Journal of Vocational Behavior, 28," 416-431) of organizational and client commitment among contracted employees. Our study focuses on temporary workers rather than…

  10. Therapist-Worldview Matching: Not as Important as Matching to Clients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blow, Adrian J.; Davis, Sean D.; Sprenkle, Douglas H.

    2012-01-01

    In this essay, we respond to Simon's article (2012). We discuss our view that therapy works best when therapists can match therapeutic interventions to the worldview of clients. We see this matching to client worldview as rooted in research evidence, and we suggest that therapists can practice authentically and effectively using more than one…

  11. Outdoor Behavioral Health Care: Client and Treatment Characteristics Effects on Young Adult Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roberts, Sean D.; Stroud, Daniel; Hoag, Matthew J.; Combs, Katie M.

    2016-01-01

    A lack of clarity exists regarding how different clients respond to outdoor behavioral health care (OBH). In this study, specific client and treatment characteristics were assessed for 186 young adults completing an OBH therapeutic wilderness program. Clinical outcomes were measured with the Outcome Questionnaire-45.2. Hierarchical linear modeling…

  12. Client Accounts of Hope in Early Counseling Sessions: A Qualitative Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Larsen, Denise J.; Stege, Rachel

    2012-01-01

    Hope enables individuals to envision a future in which they wish to participate (Jevne, 1994) and is foundational to counseling practice. However, there has been little research examining client accounts of hope in session. Using basic interpretive inquiry, this case study examines clients' accounts of hope during counseling using video-assisted…

  13. "You've Gotta Keep the Customer Satisfied": Assessing Client Satisfaction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andert, Jeffery N.; And Others

    To better understand factors contributing to an identified early attrition rate for families referred to a child guidance clinic, a procedure was developed for assessing their satisfaction with clinic services. Brief Client Satisfaction Questionnaires (N=3) were developed to assess clients' attitudes and reactions to an initial screening and…

  14. A Public-Key Based Authentication and Key Establishment Protocol Coupled with a Client Puzzle.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, M. C.; Fung, Chun-Kan

    2003-01-01

    Discusses network denial-of-service attacks which have become a security threat to the Internet community and suggests the need for reliable authentication protocols in client-server applications. Presents a public-key based authentication and key establishment protocol coupled with a client puzzle protocol and validates it through formal logic…

  15. Negotiation-centred versus client-centred: which approach should be used?

    PubMed

    Falardeau, Marlène; Durand, Marie José

    2002-06-01

    For nearly 20 years, Canadian occupational therapists have attached great importance to the client-centred approach within their practice. Professionals have agreed to define this approach through a philosophy built around the concepts of respect, power and partnership. But no reported work has really clarified what is meant by these three fundamental concepts. This article attempts to define the concepts of respect and power in the therapist-client relationship through a review of occupational therapy and related health and social sciences literature. It raises the question: "In the professional-client relationship, should the power reside with the client or is a more balanced approach needed?" This paper also proposes using the term negotiation instead of partnership, since negotiation seems to offer more applications for occupational therapy practice. The objective of the authors who advocate for greater negotiation between client and therapist is to stimulate analysis.

  16. Protein unfolding as a switch from self-recognition to high-affinity client binding

    PubMed Central

    Groitl, Bastian; Horowitz, Scott; Makepeace, Karl A. T.; Petrotchenko, Evgeniy V.; Borchers, Christoph H.; Reichmann, Dana; Bardwell, James C. A.; Jakob, Ursula

    2016-01-01

    Stress-specific activation of the chaperone Hsp33 requires the unfolding of a central linker region. This activation mechanism suggests an intriguing functional relationship between the chaperone's own partial unfolding and its ability to bind other partially folded client proteins. However, identifying where Hsp33 binds its clients has remained a major gap in our understanding of Hsp33's working mechanism. By using site-specific Fluorine-19 nuclear magnetic resonance experiments guided by in vivo crosslinking studies, we now reveal that the partial unfolding of Hsp33's linker region facilitates client binding to an amphipathic docking surface on Hsp33. Furthermore, our results provide experimental evidence for the direct involvement of conditionally disordered regions in unfolded protein binding. The observed structural similarities between Hsp33's own metastable linker region and client proteins present a possible model for how Hsp33 uses protein unfolding as a switch from self-recognition to high-affinity client binding. PMID:26787517

  17. Differences among trainees in client outcomes associated with the phase model of change.

    PubMed

    Budge, Stephanie L; Owen, Jesse J; Kopta, S Mark; Minami, Takuya; Hanson, Matthew R; Hirsch, Glenn

    2013-06-01

    This study investigated psychotherapy trainees' ability to facilitate change in outcomes (e.g., well-being, symptom reduction, and life functioning) specifically related to the phase model. Four different psychotherapist experience levels (beginning practicum, advanced practicum, intern/postdoc, and psychologist) were compared to determine whether there are training differences related to significant change for psychotherapy outcomes according to the phase model. A total of 1,318 clients from a university counseling center, treated by 64 psychotherapists, were included in the analysis for this study. Results indicate that interns/postdocs' clients achieve more significant change than psychologists' and advanced practicum students' clients related to life functioning. In addition, interns/postdocs' clients achieve more significant change related to symptom reduction, when compared with the clients of psychologists. Implications for these results, given the hypotheses of both the phase model and competency models, are discussed.

  18. Relationships among client-therapist personality congruence, working alliance, and therapeutic outcome.

    PubMed

    Taber, Brian J; Leibert, Todd W; Agaskar, Vaibhavee R

    2011-12-01

    Despite the importance of the working alliance in therapeutic outcome, little is known about the factors associated with its formation. We advance that personality similarity between client and therapist is one such factor pertinent to the working alliance. In this study, personality similarity in 32 client-therapist dyads was examined for its relations to the bond, task, and goal elements of the working alliance (Bordin, 1979, Psychotherapy: Theory, Research, and Practice, 16, 252-260) and therapeutic outcome. Personality similarity was conceptualized using Holland's (1997, Making vocational choices [3rd ed.]) congruence construct. Therapists completed the Self-Directed Search pretreatment and clients completed the Working Alliance Inventory-Short Revised and Self-Directed Search after the third session. Results indicated that (a) client-therapist personality congruence was associated with the bond, (b) bond was associated with task and goal, and (c) task and goal were associated with therapeutic outcome. Congruence was not associated with task, goal, or therapeutic outcome. Holland's theory provides a framework for adapting to clients of varying personality types. By understanding how client-therapist personalities relate to each other in therapy, client-therapist bonds may be more efficiently realized.

  19. Multicultural web-based motivational interviewing for clients with a first-time DUI offense.

    PubMed

    Osilla, Karen Chan; D'Amico, Elizabeth J; Díaz-Fuentes, Claudia M; Lara, Marielena; Watkins, Katherine E

    2012-04-01

    Culturally and linguistically appropriate interventions are needed to reduce the risk of driving under the influence (DUI) recidivism among diverse populations. Using core elements of Motivational Interviewing, we developed a culturally relevant web-MI intervention (web-MI) in English and Spanish to serve as a standalone or adjunctive program in DUI educational settings and evaluated its feasibility and acceptability among clients with first-time DUI offenses. We conducted an iterative formative assessment using focus groups with staff (n = 8) and clients (n = 27), and usability interviews with clients (n = 21). Adapting MI for the web was widely accepted by staff and clients. Clients stated the web-MI was engaging, interactive and personal, and felt more comfortable than past classes and programs. Spanish-speaking clients felt less shame, embarrassment, and discomfort with the web-MI compared to other in-person groups. Results support the viability of web-MI for DUI clients at risk for recidivism and highlight the importance of adapting the intervention for diverse populations. Key decisions used to develop the web-MI are discussed.

  20. Forgotten resources of older home care clients: focus group study in Finland.

    PubMed

    Turjamaa, Riitta; Hartikainen, Sirpa; Pietilä, Anna-Maija

    2013-09-01

    In this qualitative focus group study, the resources available to older home-dwelling people, particularly incoming and existing home care clients, are described from the viewpoint of home care professionals (n = 32). The data were analyzed using inductive content analysis. There were three categories of older people requiring resources from the viewpoint of interviewers: home-dwelling people, incoming home care clients, and existing home care clients. Based on the analysis, the resources of older home-dwelling people were categorized in terms of support, meaningful life, everyday activities, and environment. Incoming home care client resources were support, out-of-home activities, in-home activities, and environment. Existing client resources were described in terms of support, everyday activities, and environment. Home care professionals described the resources of the older home-dwelling people in diverse ways, but those of the perspective of existing clients were reduced. The biggest difference was in everyday activities. Psychological and social resources, including meaningful life and social relationships, seemed to be forgotten. All available resources must be taken into account, especially in the everyday home care services for existing home care clients.

  1. Psychometrics of the Personal Questionnaire: A client-generated outcome measure.

    PubMed

    Elliott, Robert; Wagner, John; Sales, Célia M D; Rodgers, Brian; Alves, Paula; Café, Maria J

    2016-03-01

    We present a range of evidence for the reliability and validity of data generated by the Personal Questionnaire (PQ), a client-generated individualized outcome measure, using 5 data sets from 3 countries. Overall pretherapy mean internal consistency (alpha) across clients was .80, and within-client alphas averaged .77; clients typically had 1 or 2 items that did not vary with the other items. Analyses of temporal structure indicated high levels of between-clients variance (58%), moderate pretherapy test-retest correlation (r = .57), and high session-to-session Lag-1 autocorrelation (.82). Scores on the PQ provided clear evidence of convergence with a range of outcome measures (within-client r = .41). Mean pre-post effects were large (d = 1.25). The results support a revised caseness cutoff of 3.25 and a reliable change index interval of 1.67. We conclude that PQ data meet criteria for evidence-based, norm-referenced measurement of client psychological distress for supporting psychotherapy practice and research.

  2. Farnesylation of Ydj1 is required for in vivo interaction with Hsp90 client proteins.

    PubMed

    Flom, Gary A; Lemieszek, Marta; Fortunato, Elizabeth A; Johnson, Jill L

    2008-12-01

    Ydj1 of Saccharomyces cerevisiae is an abundant cytosolic Hsp40, or J-type, molecular chaperone. Ydj1 cooperates with Hsp70 of the Ssa family in the translocation of preproteins to the ER and mitochondria and in the maturation of Hsp90 client proteins. The substrate-binding domain of Ydj1 directly interacts with steroid receptors and is required for the activity of diverse Hsp90-dependent client proteins. However, the effect of Ydj1 alteration on client interaction was unknown. We analyzed the in vivo interaction of Ydj1 with the protein kinase Ste11 and the glucocorticoid receptor. Amino acid alterations in the proposed client-binding domain or zinc-binding domain had minor effects on the physical interaction of Ydj1 with both clients. However, alteration of the carboxy-terminal farnesylation signal disrupted the functional and physical interaction of Ydj1 and Hsp90 with both clients. Similar effects were observed upon deletion of RAM1, which encodes one of the subunits of yeast farnesyltransferase. Our results indicate that farnesylation is a major factor contributing to the specific requirement for Ydj1 in promoting proper regulation and activation of diverse Hsp90 clients.

  3. The Relationship Between Client Characteristics and Wraparound Services in Substance Use Disorder Treatment Centers

    PubMed Central

    Paino, Maria; Aletraris, Lydia; Roman, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) recommends a comprehensive treatment program for individuals with substance use disorder (SUD) in order to treat needs they often have in addition to their SUD. Specifically, NIDA suggests providing services related to the following issues: medical care, mental health care, HIV/AIDS, child care, educational, vocational, family counseling, housing, transportation, financial, and legal. By providing a comprehensive model that combines core and wraparound services, treatment centers can deliver a higher quality of treatment. In this article, we assessed the relationship between client characteristics and the availability of wraparound services in SUD treatment centers. Method: We combined two nationally representative samples of treatment centers and used a negative binomial regression and a series of logistic regressions to analyze the relationship between client characteristics and wraparound services. Results: On average, centers offered fewer than half of the wraparound services endorsed by NIDA. Our results indicated that client characteristics were significantly related to the provision of wraparound services. Most notably, the proportion of adolescent clients was positively related to educational services, the proportion of female clients was positively related to child care, but the proportion of clients referred from the criminal justice system was negatively associated with the provision of multiple wraparound services. Conclusions: Our findings have important implications for SUD clients and suggest that, although centers are somewhat responsive to their clients’ ancillary needs, most centers do not offer the majority of wraparound services. PMID:26751366

  4. Multicultural Web–Based Motivational Interviewing for Clients with a first-time DUI Offense

    PubMed Central

    Osilla, Karen Chan; D’Amico, Elizabeth J.; Díaz-Fuentes, Claudia M.; Lara, Marielena; Watkins, Katherine

    2012-01-01

    Culturally and linguistically appropriate interventions are needed to reduce the risk of DUI recidivism among diverse populations. Using core elements of Motivational Interviewing, we developed a culturally-relevant web-MI intervention (web-MI) in English and Spanish to serve as a standalone or adjunctive program in DUI educational settings and evaluated its feasibility and acceptability among clients with first-time DUI offenses. We conducted an iterative formative assessment using focus groups with staff (n = 8) and clients (n = 27), and usability interviews with clients (n = 21). Adapting MI for the web was widely accepted by staff and clients. Clients stated the web-MI was engaging, interactive and personal, and felt more comfortable than past classes and programs. Spanish-speaking clients felt less shame, embarrassment, and discomfort with the web-MI compared to other in-person groups. Results support the viability of web-MI for DUI clients at risk for recidivism and highlight the importance of adapting the intervention for diverse populations. Key decisions used to develop the web-MI are discussed. PMID:22506822

  5. Typology of injection profiles of clients of a supervised drug consumption facility in Geneva, Switzerland.

    PubMed

    Dubois-Arber, Françoise; Benninghoff, Fabienne; Jeannin, André

    2008-01-01

    The use of a supervised drug consumption room (DCR) in a newly established low threshold facility in Geneva, Switzerland, in 2002 is analyzed. Two sources of routine data were used: data collected at the first visit by any new client (entry questionnaire) which included some personal details, and data collected on the substances injected at each visit to the DCR. A typology of injection profiles was constructed. Overall, the mean number of injections and days of visits per client over the year was low and cocaine was the main substance injected. However, an important heterogeneity in the use of the DCR was found and five types of clients identified: 1-day clients; standard clients; heroin-oriented clients; high cocaine consumption clients, and newcomers. Typology was associated with some characteristics at the first visit and the drug consumption pattern in the month preceding the first visit was in accordance with the subsequent use of the DCR. This heterogeneity in the use of the DCR highlights the diverse roles of the DCRs in harm reduction.

  6. Biting cleaner fish use altruism to deceive image-scoring client reef fish.

    PubMed Central

    Bshary, Redouan

    2002-01-01

    Humans are more likely to help those who they have observed helping others previously. Individuals may thus benefit from being altruistic without direct reciprocity of recipients but due to gains in 'image' and associated indirect reciprocity. I suggest, however, that image-scoring individuals may be exploitable by cheaters if pay-offs vary between interactions. I illustrate this point with data on cleaner-client reef fish interactions. I show the following: (i) there is strong variation between cleaners with respect to cheating of clients (i.e. feeding on client tissue instead of parasites); (ii) clients approach cleaners, that they observe cooperating with their current client and avoid cleaners that they observe cheating; (iii) cleaners that cheat frequently are avoided more frequently than more cooperative cleaners (iv) cleaners that cheat frequently behave altruistically towards their smallest client species; (v) altruistic acts are followed by exploitative interactions. Thus, it appears that cleaners indeed have an image score, which selects for cooperative cleaners. However, cheating cleaners use altruism in potentially low-pay-off interactions to deceive and attract image-scoring clients that will be exploited. PMID:12396482

  7. Report on Provider-Client Interaction From 68 Methadone Maintenance Clinics in China.

    PubMed

    Li, Li; Comulada, W Scott; Lin, Chunqing; Lan, Chiao-Wen; Cao, Xiaobin; Wu, Zunyou

    2016-10-06

    Provider-client interaction is an integral of clinical practice and central to the delivery of high-quality medical care. This article examines factors related to the provider-client interaction in the context of methadone maintenance treatment (MMT). Data were collected from 68 MMT clinics in China. In total, 418 service providers participated in the survey. Linear mixed effects regression models were performed to identify factors associated with provider-client interaction. It was observed that negative attitude toward drug users was associated with lower level of provider-client interaction and less time spent with each client. Other factors associated with lower level of interaction included being female, being younger, being a nurse, and fewer years in medical field. Higher provider-client interaction was associated with provider reported job satisfaction. The findings of this study call for a need to address provider negative attitudes that can impact provider-client interaction and the effectiveness of MMT. Future intervention efforts targeting MMT providers should be tailored by gender, provider type, and medical experiences.

  8. The Change Grid and the Active Client: Challenging the Assumptions of Change Agentry in the Penal Process.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klofas, John; Duffee, David E.

    1981-01-01

    Reexamines the assumptions of the change grid regarding the channeling of masses of clients into change strategies programs. Penal organizations specifically select and place clients so that programs remain stable, rather than sequence programs to meet the needs of clients. (Author)

  9. Attrition after Intake at a University Counseling Center: Relationship among Client Race, Problem Type, and Time on a Waiting List

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levy, Jacob J.; Thompson-Leonardelli, Kenya; Smith, Nathan Grant; Coleman, M. Nicole

    2005-01-01

    The present study examined the relationship between attrition after intake and the length of time that clients spent on a waiting list by client race and problem type. Participants were 1,461 clients who completed an initial intake evaluation at a large, Mid-Atlantic counseling center over a 6-year period. Fullfactorial hierarchical logistic…

  10. Working Alliance as a Mediator and Moderator between Expectations for Counseling Success and Counseling Outcome among Korean Clients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yoo, Sung-Kyung; Hong, Sehee; Sohn, Nanhee; O'Brien, Karen M.

    2014-01-01

    The study examined client's perceptions of working alliance as a mediator and moderator between client expectations of counseling success and counseling outcome. Participants were 284 adult clients in counseling in university or community counseling centers or private practices in South Korea. Level of functioning at the start of counseling was…

  11. Cognitive Behavioural Therapy from the Perspective of Clients with Mild Intellectual Disabilities: A Qualitative Investigation of Process Issues

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pert, C.; Jahoda, A.; Stenfert Kroese, B.; Trower, P.; Dagnan, D.; Selkirk, M.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Clinicians working with clients who have mild intellectual disabilities (IDs) have shown growing enthusiasm for using a cognitive behavioural approach, amid increasing evidence of good treatment outcomes for this client group. However, very little is known about the views and experiences of clients with IDs who have undergone cognitive…

  12. Relation of Masculinity to Self-Esteem and Self-Acceptance in Male Professionals, College Students, and Clients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Long, Vonda Olson

    1989-01-01

    Investigated relation of masculinity to self-esteem and self-acceptance in male professionals, clients, and college students (N=224). Found masculinity best predictor of male professional and client self-esteem as well as best predictor of client self-acceptance. Found no correlation between femininity and self-esteem or self-acceptance in any…

  13. Community engagement: outcomes for occupational therapy students, faculty and clients.

    PubMed

    Schindler, Victoria P

    2014-06-01

    Students in health care professions, including occupational therapy, are required to develop knowledge, skills and attitudes in mental health and research. Persons diagnosed with a mental illness, a learning disability or an autism-spectrum disorder desire to achieve goals in higher education and employment. Faculty in health care programmes strives to meet professional goals and accreditation and institution requirements for teaching, service and scholarship. The Bridge Program, a programme based on principles of community engagement, was developed to meet the needs of these three stakeholders. The objective of this paper is to provide programme description and outcomes of the effectiveness of the Bridge Program for all three stakeholders. This uses mixed methods research design including descriptive and quantitative and qualitative one-group pre-test-post-test designs. Instruments consisted of the Occupational Therapy Student and Mental Health Population Scale and the Canadian Occupational Performance Measure. Quantitative results support that graduate occupational therapy students gained research and clinical skills (n = 100; p = .000); clients increased performance and satisfaction toward goals (n = 113; p = .000) and faculty (n = 1) achieved goals related to teaching, service and scholarship. Programmes based on principles of community engagement can address the needs of the community, can provide outcomes that advance knowledge about community practice and can result in benefits for all stakeholders. This paper is limited to generalization and instrumentation and recommends an ongoing evaluation of other community engagement programmes involving all stakeholders in the future research.

  14. Social networks for mental health clients: resources and solution.

    PubMed

    Kogstad, Ragnfrid Eline; Mönness, Erik; Sörensen, Tom

    2013-02-01

    Several studies have illustrated the importance of social support and social networks for persons with mental health problems. Social networks may mean a reduced need for professional services, but also help to facilitate access to professional help. The interplay between social networks and professional services is complicated and invites further investigation. Compare aspects of clients' experiences with social networks to experiences with professional services and learn about the relationship between network resources and help from the public health service system. Quantitative analyses of a sample of 850 informants. Supportive networks exist for a majority of the informants and can also be a substitute for public/professional services in many respects. Regarding help to recover, social networks may offer qualities equal to those of professional services. Furthermore, there is a positive relationship between trust in a social network and trust in public professional services. Trust in a social network also increases the probability of achieving positive experiences with professional services. Our finding simply that more network qualities should be included in professional services, and also that professionals should assist vulnerable groups in building networks.

  15. Treating clients with Asperger’s syndrome and autism

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Asperger’s syndrome (AS) is a form of autism spectrum disorder (ASD) affecting many individuals today. Although neurobiological correlates for AS have been identified, like many ASDs, AS is not completely understood. AS as a distinct disorder is also not universally accepted and in the DSM-5 AS is not considered a separate nosological entity. In contrast to some other ASDs, individuals with AS are commonly characterized by having standard or higher than average intelligence, yet difficulties in social skills and communication can present challenges for these individuals in everyday functioning. Counseling a person with AS or autism presents a unique challenge for the mental health care provider. We have compiled this review consisting of some recent ideas regarding counseling the client with AS with the goal of providing some clinical insights and practical clues. Although the focus of the present paper is largely on AS, many of these strategies could also apply to individuals with high-functioning autism (HFA). PMID:24020859

  16. Joint source-channel rate allocation and client clustering for scalable multistream IPTV.

    PubMed

    Chakareski, Jacob

    2015-08-01

    We design a system framework for streaming scalable internet protocol television (IPTV) content to heterogenous clients. The backbone bandwidth is optimally allocated between source and parity data layers that are delivered to the client population. The assignment of stream layers to clients is done based on their access link data rate and packet loss characteristics, and is part of the optimization. We design three techniques for jointly computing the optimal number of multicast sessions, their respective source and parity rates, and client membership, either exactly or approximatively, at lower complexity. The latter is achieved via an iterative coordinate descent algorithm that only marginally underperforms relative to the exact analytic solution. Through experiments, we study the advantages of our framework over common IPTV systems that deliver the same source and parity streams to every client. We observe substantial gains in video quality in terms of both its average value and standard deviation over the client population. In addition, for energy efficiency, we propose to move the parity data generation part to the edge of the backbone network, where each client connects to its IPTV stream. We analytically study the conditions under which such an approach delivers energy savings relative to the conventional case of source and parity data generation at the IPTV streaming server. Finally, we demonstrate that our system enables more consistent streaming performance, when the clients' access link packet loss distribution is varied, relative to the two baseline methods used in our investigation, and maintains the same performance as an ideal system that serves each client independently.

  17. A means to an end: a web-based client management system in palliative care.

    PubMed

    O'Connor, Margaret; Erwin, Trudy; Dawson, Linda

    2009-03-01

    Home-based palliative care (hospice) services require comprehensive and fully integrated information systems to develop and manage the various aspects of their business, incorporating client data and management information. These systems assist in maintaining the quality of client care as well as improved management efficiencies. This article reports on a large not-for-profit home-based palliative care service in Australia, which embarked on a project to develop an electronic data management system specifically designed to meet the needs of the palliative care sector. This web-based client information management system represents a joint venture between the organization and a commercial company and has been a very successful project.

  18. Membrane proteins as 14-3-3 clients in functional regulation and intracellular transport.

    PubMed

    Smith, Andrew J; Daut, Jürgen; Schwappach, Blanche

    2011-06-01

    14-3-3 proteins regulate the function and subcellular sorting of membrane proteins. Often, 14-3-3 binding to client proteins requires phosphorylation of the client, but the relevant kinase is unknown in most cases. We summarize current progress in identifying kinases that target membrane proteins with 14-3-3 binding sites and discuss the molecular mechanisms of 14-3-3 action. One of the kinases involved is Akt/PKB, which has recently been shown to activate the 14-3-3-dependent switch in a number of client membrane proteins.

  19. Acculturation and adherence: issues for health care providers working with clients of Mexican origin.

    PubMed

    Barron, Florencia; Hunter, Anita; Mayo, Rachel; Willoughby, Deborah

    2004-10-01

    Providing care to clients who come from different countries is a challenge for the American health care providers as they traverse the issues of cultural health beliefs and practices and language and knowledge deficits. It is just as difficult for the clients as they face new cultural customs, language barriers, and unfamiliar health care systems and medical management plans. Both parties face acculturation and adherence challenges. This article intends to address these issues as they pertain to clients of Mexican origin and to identify key points to be considered by providers when working with this population.

  20. Group-oriented coordination models for distributed client-server computing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adler, Richard M.; Hughes, Craig S.

    1994-01-01

    This paper describes group-oriented control models for distributed client-server interactions. These models transparently coordinate requests for services that involve multiple servers, such as queries across distributed databases. Specific capabilities include: decomposing and replicating client requests; dispatching request subtasks or copies to independent, networked servers; and combining server results into a single response for the client. The control models were implemented by combining request broker and process group technologies with an object-oriented communication middleware tool. The models are illustrated in the context of a distributed operations support application for space-based systems.