Science.gov

Sample records for potency regulate subsets

  1. Regulation of Human Helper T Cell Subset Differentiation by Cytokines

    PubMed Central

    Schmitt, Nathalie; Ueno, Hideki

    2015-01-01

    Since the discovery of Th1 and Th2 cells in the late 80’s, the family of effector CD4+ helper T (Th) cell subsets has expanded. The differentiation of naïve CD4+ T cells is largely determined when they interact with dendritic cells in lymphoid organs, and cytokines play a major role in the regulation of Th differentiation in the early stages. Recent studies show that the developmental mechanism of certain Th subsets is not fully shared between mice and humans. Here we will review recent discoveries on the roles of cytokines in the regulation of Th differentiation in humans, and discuss the differences between mice and humans in the developmental mechanisms of several Th subsets, including Th17 cells and T follicular helper (Tfh) cells. We propose that the differentiation of human Th subsets is largely regulated by the three cytokines, IL-12, IL-23, and TGF-β. PMID:25879814

  2. Myostatin Regulates Tissue Potency and Cardiac Calcium-Handling Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, Melissa F.; Li, Naisi

    2014-01-01

    Attenuating myostatin enhances striated muscle growth, reduces adiposity, and improves cardiac contractility. To determine whether myostatin influences tissue potency in a manner that could control such pleiotropic actions, we generated label-retaining mice with wild-type and mstn−/− (Jekyll) backgrounds in which slow-cycling stem, transit-amplifying, and progenitor cells are preferentially labeled by histone 2B/green fluorescent protein. Jekyll mice were born with fewer label-retaining cells (LRCs) in muscle and heart, consistent with increased stem/progenitor cell contributions to embryonic growth of both tissues. Cardiac LRC recruitment from noncardiac sources occurred in both groups, but lasted longer in Jekyll hearts, whereas heightened β-adrenergic sensitivity of mstn−/− hearts was explained by elevated SERCA2a, phospholamban, and β2-adrenergic receptor levels. Jekyll mice were also born with more adipose LRCs despite significantly smaller tissue weights. Reduced adiposity in mstn−/− animals is therefore due to reduced lipid deposition as adipoprogenitor pools appear to be enhanced. By contrast, increased bone densities of mstn−/− mice are likely compensatory to hypermuscularity because LRC counts were similar in Jekyll and wild-type tibia. Myostatin therefore significantly influences the potency of different tissues, not just muscle, as well as cardiac Ca2+-handling proteins. Thus, the pleiotropic phenotype of mstn−/− animals may not be due to enhanced muscle development per se, but also to altered stem/progenitor cell pools that ultimately influence tissue potency. PMID:24517228

  3. Glycolysis determines dichotomous regulation of T cell subsets in hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yang; Chaudhury, Arindam; Zhang, Ming; Savoldo, Barbara; Metelitsa, Leonid S; Rodgers, John; Yustein, Jason T; Neilson, Joel R; Dotti, Gianpietro

    2016-07-01

    Hypoxia occurs in many pathological conditions, including chronic inflammation and tumors, and is considered to be an inhibitor of T cell function. However, robust T cell responses occur at many hypoxic inflammatory sites, suggesting that functions of some subsets are stimulated under low oxygen conditions. Here, we investigated how hypoxic conditions influence human T cell functions and found that, in contrast to naive and central memory T cells (TN and TCM), hypoxia enhances the proliferation, viability, and cytotoxic action of effector memory T cells (TEM). Enhanced TEM expansion in hypoxia corresponded to high hypoxia-inducible factor 1α (HIF1α) expression and glycolytic activity compared with that observed in TN and TCM. We determined that the glycolytic enzyme GAPDH negatively regulates HIF1A expression by binding to adenylate-uridylate-rich elements in the 3'-UTR region of HIF1A mRNA in glycolytically inactive TN and TCM. Conversely, active glycolysis with decreased GAPDH availability in TEM resulted in elevated HIF1α expression. Furthermore, GAPDH overexpression reduced HIF1α expression and impaired proliferation and survival of T cells in hypoxia, indicating that high glycolytic metabolism drives increases in HIF1α to enhance TEM function during hypoxia. This work demonstrates that glycolytic metabolism regulates the translation of HIF1A to determine T cell responses to hypoxia and implicates GAPDH as a potential mechanism for controlling T cell function in peripheral tissue.

  4. Glycolysis determines dichotomous regulation of T cell subsets in hypoxia

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Yang; Zhang, Ming; Savoldo, Barbara; Metelitsa, Leonid S.; Rodgers, John; Yustein, Jason T.; Neilson, Joel R.

    2016-01-01

    Hypoxia occurs in many pathological conditions, including chronic inflammation and tumors, and is considered to be an inhibitor of T cell function. However, robust T cell responses occur at many hypoxic inflammatory sites, suggesting that functions of some subsets are stimulated under low oxygen conditions. Here, we investigated how hypoxic conditions influence human T cell functions and found that, in contrast to naive and central memory T cells (TN and TCM), hypoxia enhances the proliferation, viability, and cytotoxic action of effector memory T cells (TEM). Enhanced TEM expansion in hypoxia corresponded to high hypoxia-inducible factor 1α (HIF1α) expression and glycolytic activity compared with that observed in TN and TCM. We determined that the glycolytic enzyme GAPDH negatively regulates HIF1A expression by binding to adenylate-uridylate–rich elements in the 3′-UTR region of HIF1A mRNA in glycolytically inactive TN and TCM. Conversely, active glycolysis with decreased GAPDH availability in TEM resulted in elevated HIF1α expression. Furthermore, GAPDH overexpression reduced HIF1α expression and impaired proliferation and survival of T cells in hypoxia, indicating that high glycolytic metabolism drives increases in HIF1α to enhance TEM function during hypoxia. This work demonstrates that glycolytic metabolism regulates the translation of HIF1A to determine T cell responses to hypoxia and implicates GAPDH as a potential mechanism for controlling T cell function in peripheral tissue. PMID:27294526

  5. Peripheral blood-derived virus-specific memory stem T cells mature to functional effector memory subsets with self-renewal potency.

    PubMed

    Schmueck-Henneresse, Michael; Sharaf, Radwa; Vogt, Katrin; Weist, Benjamin J D; Landwehr-Kenzel, Sybille; Fuehrer, Henrike; Jurisch, Anke; Babel, Nina; Rooney, Cliona M; Reinke, Petra; Volk, Hans-Dieter

    2015-06-01

    Memory T cells expressing stem cell-like properties have been described recently. The capacity of self-renewal and differentiation into various memory/effector subsets make them attractive for adoptive T cell therapy to combat severe virus infections and tumors. The very few reports on human memory stem T cells (T(SCM)) are restricted to analyses on polyclonal T cells, but extensive data on Ag-specific T(SCM )are missing. This might be due to their very low frequency limiting their enrichment and characterization. In this article, we provide functional and phenotypic data on human viral-specific T(SCM), defined as CD8(+)CD45RA(+)CCR7(+)CD127(+)CD95(+). Whereas <1% of total T cells express the T(SCM) phenotype, human CMV-specific T(SCM) can be detected at frequencies similar to those seen in other subsets, resulting in ∼ 1 /10,000 human CMV-specific T(SCM). A new virus-specific expansion protocol of sort-purified T(SCM) reveals both upregulation of various T cell subset markers and preservation of their stem cell phenotype in a significant proportion, indicating both self-renewal and differentiation potency of virus-specific T cells sharing their TCR repertoire. Furthermore, we describe a simplified culture protocol that allows fast expansion of virus-specific T(SCM) starting from a mixed naive T/T(SCM) pool of PBLs. Due to the clinical-grade compatibility, this might be the basis for novel cell therapeutic options in life-threatening courses of viral and tumor disease.

  6. Skin sensitizers differentially regulate signaling pathways in MUTZ-3 cells in relation to their individual potency

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Due to the recent European legislations posing a ban of animal tests for safety assessment within the cosmetic industry, development of in vitro alternatives for assessment of skin sensitization is highly prioritized. To date, proposed in vitro assays are mainly based on single biomarkers, which so far have not been able to classify and stratify chemicals into subgroups, related to risk or potency. Methods Recently, we presented the Genomic Allergen Rapid Detection (GARD) assay for assessment of chemical sensitizers. In this paper, we show how the genome wide readout of GARD can be expanded and used to identify differentially regulated pathways relating to individual chemical sensitizers. In this study, we investigated the mechanisms of action of a range of skin sensitizers through pathway identification, pathway classification and transcription factor analysis and related this to the reactive mechanisms and potency of the sensitizing agents. Results By transcriptional profiling of chemically stimulated MUTZ-3 cells, 33 canonical pathways intimately involved in sensitization to chemical substances were identified. The results showed that metabolic processes, cell cycling and oxidative stress responses are the key events activated during skin sensitization, and that these functions are engaged differently depending on the reactivity mechanisms of the sensitizing agent. Furthermore, the results indicate that the chemical reactivity groups seem to gradually engage more pathways and more molecules in each pathway with increasing sensitizing potency of the chemical used for stimulation. Also, a switch in gene regulation from up to down regulation, with increasing potency, was seen both in genes involved in metabolic functions and cell cycling. These observed pathway patterns were clearly reflected in the regulatory elements identified to drive these processes, where 33 regulatory elements have been proposed for further analysis. Conclusions This study

  7. Bifidobacterium infantis attenuates colitis by regulating T cell subset responses

    PubMed Central

    Zuo, Li; Yuan, Kai-Tao; Yu, Li; Meng, Qing-Hong; Chung, Peter Chee-Keung; Yang, Ding-Hua

    2014-01-01

    AIM: to investigate the effect of Bifidobacterium infantis (B. infantis) on the T cell subsets and in attenuating the severity of experimental colitis in mice. METHODS: Normal BALB/c mice were fed different doses of B. infantis for 3 wk, and T cell subsets and related cytokine profiles in mesenteric lymph nodes (MLNs) were detected by flow cytometry and real-time RT-PCR. Colitis was induced by administration of trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid (TNBS) in mice. Before colitis induction, mice were fed high dose B. infantis for 3 wk. Cytokine profiles in MLNs and histological changes of colonic tissue were examined 6 d after colitis induction. RESULTS: No significant change in cytokine profiles was observed in normal mice fed low dose B. infantis. However, Th1-related cytokines (IL-2, IFN-γ, IL-12p40), Th17-related transcription factor and cytokines (RORγt, IL-21, IL-23), regulatory T cell (Treg)-related transcription factor and cytokines (Foxp3, IL-10) were increased in normal mice fed high dose B. infantis. Furthermore, flow cytometry assay showed B. infantis increased the numbers of CD4+Foxp3+ Tregs and Th17 cells in MLNs. Colitis was successfully induced by TNBS in mice, characterized by colonic inflammation and aberrant Th1 and Th17 responses. Feeding high dose B. infantis for 3 wk before colitis induction decreased the inflammatory cell infiltration and goblet cell depletion and restored the intestinal epithelium. In addition, B. infantis feeding reduced Th1-related cytokines (T-bet, IL-2 and IFN-γ) and Th17-related cytokines (IL-12p40, RORγt, IL-17A, IL-21 and IL-23), and increased Treg-related molecules (Foxp3, IL-10 and TGF-β) in colitis mice. CONCLUSION: B. infantis effectively attenuates TNBS-induced colitis by decreasing Th1 and Th17 responses and increasing Foxp3+ Treg response in the colonic mucosa. PMID:25561798

  8. Characterization of the myeloid-derived suppressor cell subset regulated by NK cells in malignant lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Sato, Yusuke; Shimizu, Kanako; Shinga, Jun; Hidaka, Michihiro; Kawano, Fumio; Kakimi, Kazuhiro; Yamasaki, Satoru; Asakura, Miki; Fujii, Shin-Ichiro

    2015-03-01

    Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) are a heterogeneous population with the ability to suppress immune responses and are currently classified into three distinct MDSC subsets: monocytic, granulocytic and non-monocytic, and non-granulocytic MDSCs. Although NK cells provide an important first-line defense against newly transformed cancer cells, it is unknown whether NK cells can regulate MDSC populations in the context of cancer. In this study, we initially found that the frequency of MDSCs in non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) patients was increased and inversely correlated with that of NK cells, but not that of T cells. To investigate the regulation of MDSC subsets by NK cells, we used an EL4 murine lymphoma model and found the non-monocytic and non-granulocytic MDSC subset, i.e., Gr1(+)CD11b(+)Ly6G(med)Ly6C(med) MDSC, is increased after NK cell depletion. The MDSC population that expresses MHC class II, CD80, CD124, and CCR2 is regulated mainly by CD27(+)CD11b(+)NK cells. In addition, this MDSC subset produces some immunosuppressive cytokines, including IL-10 but not nitric oxide (NO) or arginase. We also examined two subsets of MDSCs (CD14(+)HLA-DR(-) and CD14(-) HLA-DR(-) MDSC) in NHL patients and found that higher IL-10-producing CD14(+)HLA-DR(-)MDSC subset can be seen in lymphoma patients with reduced NK cell frequency in peripheral blood. Our analyses of MDSCs in this study may enable a better understanding of how MDSCs manipulate the tumor microenvironment and are regulated by NK cells in patients with lymphoma.

  9. Characterization of the myeloid-derived suppressor cell subset regulated by NK cells in malignant lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Sato, Yusuke; Shimizu, Kanako; Shinga, Jun; Hidaka, Michihiro; Kawano, Fumio; Kakimi, Kazuhiro; Yamasaki, Satoru; Asakura, Miki; Fujii, Shin-ichiro

    2015-01-01

    Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) are a heterogeneous population with the ability to suppress immune responses and are currently classified into three distinct MDSC subsets: monocytic, granulocytic and non-monocytic, and non-granulocytic MDSCs. Although NK cells provide an important first-line defense against newly transformed cancer cells, it is unknown whether NK cells can regulate MDSC populations in the context of cancer. In this study, we initially found that the frequency of MDSCs in non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) patients was increased and inversely correlated with that of NK cells, but not that of T cells. To investigate the regulation of MDSC subsets by NK cells, we used an EL4 murine lymphoma model and found the non-monocytic and non-granulocytic MDSC subset, i.e., Gr1+CD11b+Ly6GmedLy6Cmed MDSC, is increased after NK cell depletion. The MDSC population that expresses MHC class II, CD80, CD124, and CCR2 is regulated mainly by CD27+CD11b+NK cells. In addition, this MDSC subset produces some immunosuppressive cytokines, including IL-10 but not nitric oxide (NO) or arginase. We also examined two subsets of MDSCs (CD14+HLA-DR− and CD14− HLA-DR− MDSC) in NHL patients and found that higher IL-10-producing CD14+HLA-DR−MDSC subset can be seen in lymphoma patients with reduced NK cell frequency in peripheral blood. Our analyses of MDSCs in this study may enable a better understanding of how MDSCs manipulate the tumor microenvironment and are regulated by NK cells in patients with lymphoma. PMID:25949922

  10. Regulation of T Helper Cell Subsets by Cyclooxygenases and Their Metabolites

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hong; Edin, Matthew L.; Gruzdev, Artiom; Cheng, Jennifer; Bradbury, J. Alyce; Graves, Joan P.; DeGraff, Laura M.; Zeldin, Darryl C.

    2013-01-01

    Cyclooxygenases and their metabolites are important regulators of inflammatory responses and play critical roles in regulating the differentiation of T helper cell subsets in inflammatory diseases. In this review, we highlight new information on regulation of T helper cell subsets by cyclooxygenases and their metabolites. Prostanoids influence cytokine production on both antigen presenting cells and T cells to regulate the differentiation of naïve CD4+ T cells to Th1, Th2 and Th17 cell phenotypes. Cyclooxygenases and PGE2 generally exacerbate Th2 and Th17 phenotypes, while suppressing Th1 differentiation. Thus, cycloxygenases may play a critical role in diseases that involve immune cell dysfunction. Targeting of cyclooxygenases and their eicosanoid products may represent a new approach for treatment of inflammatory diseases, tumors and autoimmune disorders. PMID:23201570

  11. Major Membrane Protein TDE2508 Regulates Adhesive Potency in Treponema denticola

    PubMed Central

    Abiko, Yuki; Nagano, Keiji; Yoshida, Yasuo; Yoshimura, Fuminobu

    2014-01-01

    The cultivation and genetic manipulation of Treponema denticola, a Gram-negative oral spirochaeta associated with periodontal diseases, is still challenging. In this study, we formulated a simple medium based on a commercially available one, and established a transformation method with high efficiency. We then analyzed proteins in a membrane fraction in T. denticola and identified 16 major membrane-associated proteins, and characterized one of them, TDE2508, whose biological function was not yet known. Although this protein, which exhibited a complex conformation, was presumably localized in the outer membrane, we did not find conclusive evidence that it was exposed on the cell surface. Intriguingly, a TDE2508-deficient mutant exhibited significantly increased biofilm formation and adherent activity on human gingival epithelial cells. However, the protein deficiency did not alter autoaggregation, coaggregation with Porphyromonas gingivalis, hemagglutination, cell surface hydrophobicity, motility, or expression of Msp which was reported to be an adherent molecule in this bacteria. In conclusion, the major membrane protein TDE2508 regulates biofilm formation and the adhesive potency of T. denticola, although the underlying mechanism remains unclear. PMID:24586498

  12. CD16 regulates TRIF-dependent TLR4 response in human monocytes and their subsets.

    PubMed

    Shalova, Irina N; Kajiji, Tasneem; Lim, Jyue Yuan; Gómez-Piña, Vanesa; Fernández-Ruíz, Irene; Arnalich, Francisco; Iau, Philip Tsau Choong; López-Collazo, Eduardo; Wong, Siew-Cheng; Biswas, Subhra K

    2012-04-15

    Blood monocytes recognize Gram-negative bacteria through the TLR4, which signal via MyD88- and TRIF-dependent pathway to trigger an immune-inflammatory response. However, a dysregulated inflammatory response by these cells often leads to severe pathologies such as sepsis. We investigated the role of CD16 in the regulation of human monocyte response to Gram-negative endotoxin and sepsis. Blood monocytes from sepsis patients demonstrated an upregulation of several TRIF-dependent genes as well as a selective expansion of CD16-expressing (CD16(+)) monocytes. Gene expression and biochemical studies revealed CD16 to regulate the TRIF-dependent TLR4 pathway in monocytes by activating Syk, IFN regulatory factor 3, and STAT1, which resulted in enhanced expression of IFNB, CCL5, and CXCL10. CD16 also upregulated the expression of IL-1R-associated kinase M and IL-1 receptor antagonist, which are negative regulators of the MyD88-dependent pathway. CD16 overexpression or small interfering RNA knockdown in monocytes confirmed the above findings. Interestingly, these results were mirrored in the CD16(+) monocyte subset isolated from sepsis patients, providing an in vivo confirmation to our findings. Collectively, the results from the current study demonstrate CD16 as a key regulator of the TRIF-dependent TLR4 pathway in human monocytes and their CD16-expressing subset, with implications in sepsis.

  13. Basonuclin Regulates a Subset of Ribosomal RNA Genes in HaCaT Cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Shengliang; Wang, Junwen; Tseng, Hung

    2007-01-01

    Basonuclin (Bnc1), a cell-type-specific ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene regulator, is expressed mainly in keratinocytes of stratified epithelium and gametogenic cells of testis and ovary. Previously, basonuclin was shown in vitro to interact with rRNA gene (rDNA) promoter at three highly conserved sites. Basonuclin's high affinity binding site overlaps with the binding site of a dedicated and ubiquitous Pol I transcription regulator, UBF, suggesting that their binding might interfere with each other if they bind to the same promoter. Knocking-down basonuclin in mouse oocytes eliminated approximately one quarter of RNA polymerase I (Pol I) transcription foci, without affecting the BrU incorporation of the remaining ones, suggesting that basonuclin might regulate a subset of rDNA. Here we show, via chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP), that basonuclin is associated with rDNA promoters in HaCaT cells, a spontaneously established human keratinocyte line. Immunoprecipitation data suggest that basonuclin is in a complex that also contains the subunits of Pol I (RPA194, RPA116), but not UBF. Knocking-down basonuclin in HaCaT cells partially impairs the association of RPA194 to rDNA promoter, but not that of UBF. Basonuclin-deficiency also reduces the amount of 47S pre-rRNA, but this effect can be seen only after cell-proliferation related rRNA synthesis has subsided at a higher cell density. DNA sequence of basonuclin-bound rDNA promoters shows single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that differ from those associated with UBF-bound promoters, suggesting that basonuclin and UBF interact with different subsets of promoters. In conclusion, our results demonstrate basonuclin's functional association with rDNA promoters and its interaction with Pol I in vivo. Our data also suggest that basonuclin-Pol I complex transcribes a subset of rDNA. PMID:17878937

  14. A developmentally regulated Myb domain protein regulates expression of a subset of stage-specific genes in Entamoeba histolytica

    PubMed Central

    Ehrenkaufer, Gretchen M.; Hackney, Jason A.; Singh, Upinder

    2012-01-01

    Summary Conversion between a cyst and trophozoite stage is essential to disease transmission and pathogenesis in the parasitic protist Entamoeba histolytica. A transcriptomic analysis of E. histolytica cysts and trophozoites has recently been accomplished, but the molecular basis of the regulation of encystation is not known. We have now identified a developmentally regulated Myb protein (belonging to the SHAQKY family of Myb proteins), which controls expression of a subset of amebic stage-specific genes. Overexpression of the nuclear localized Myb protein resulted in a transcriptome that overlapped significantly with the expression profile of amebic cysts. Analysis of promoters from genes regulated by the Myb protein identified a CCCCCC promoter motif to which amebic nuclear protein(s) bind in a sequence-specific manner. Chromatin immunoprecipitation demonstrated that the E. histolytica Myb protein binds directly to promoters of genes which contain the CCCCCC motif and which are regulated by the Myb protein. This work is the first identification of a transcription factor, which regulates expression of a subset of stage-specific genes in E. histolytica. Identification of transcriptional regulatory networks that control developmental pathways will provide novel insights into the biology of this important human pathogen. PMID:19239479

  15. A developmentally regulated Myb domain protein regulates expression of a subset of stage-specific genes in Entamoeba histolytica.

    PubMed

    Ehrenkaufer, Gretchen M; Hackney, Jason A; Singh, Upinder

    2009-06-01

    Conversion between a cyst and trophozoite stage is essential to disease transmission and pathogenesis in the parasitic protist Entamoeba histolytica. A transcriptomic analysis of E. histolytica cysts and trophozoites has recently been accomplished, but the molecular basis of the regulation of encystation is not known. We have now identified a developmentally regulated Myb protein (belonging to the SHAQKY family of Myb proteins), which controls expression of a subset of amoebic stage-specific genes. Overexpression of the nuclear localized Myb protein resulted in a transcriptome that overlapped significantly with the expression profile of amoebic cysts. Analysis of promoters from genes regulated by the Myb protein identified a CCCCCC promoter motif to which amoebic nuclear protein(s) bind in a sequence-specific manner. Chromatin immunoprecipitation demonstrated that the E. histolytica Myb protein binds to promoters of genes which contain the CCCCCC motif and which are regulated by the Myb protein. This work is the first identification of a transcription factor, which regulates expression of a subset of stage-specific genes in E. histolytica. Identification of transcriptional regulatory networks that control developmental pathways will provide novel insights into the biology of this important human pathogen.

  16. Human dendritic cell expression of HLA-DO is subset specific and regulated by maturation.

    PubMed

    Hornell, Tara M C; Burster, Timo; Jahnsen, Frode L; Pashine, Achal; Ochoa, Maria T; Harding, James J; Macaubas, Claudia; Lee, Andrew W; Modlin, Robert L; Mellins, Elizabeth D

    2006-03-15

    Expression of HLA-DO (DO) in cells that express HLA-DM (DM) results in an altered repertoire of MHC class II/peptide complexes, indicating that DO modulates DM function. Human and murine B cells and thymic epithelial cells express DO, while monocytes/macrophages do not. Monocyte-derived dendritic cells (DC) also have been found to be DO-negative, leading to the assumption that DC do not express DO. In this study, we report that, in fact, certain types of human primary DC express DO. These include Langerhans cells (LC) and some subtypes of circulating blood DC. Specifically, the majority of BDCA-3(+) DC, a small subset of uncertain function, are DO(+), while smaller proportions of CD11c(+), BDCA-1(+) (myeloid) DC, at most a minority of CD123(+)/BDCA-2(+) (plasmacytoid) DC, and no detectable CD16(+) (myeloid) DC, express DO. Immunohistochemistry of human tonsil sections demonstrates that tonsillar interdigitating DC are also DO(+). In a subset of immature LC with higher DO expression, an increased fraction of surface DR molecules carry CLIP peptides, indicating that DO functions as a DM inhibitor in these cells. LC expression of DO is down-regulated by maturation stimuli. DM levels also decrease under these conditions, but the DM:DO ratio generally increases. In the myeloid cell types tested, DO expression correlates with levels of DObeta, but not DOalpha, implying that modulation of DObeta regulates DO dimer abundance in these cells. The range of APC types shown to express DO suggests a broader role for DO in immune function than previously appreciated.

  17. Retinoic acid differentially regulates the migration of innate lymphoid cell subsets to the gut

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Myung H.; Taparowsky, Elizabeth J.; Kim, Chang H.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Distinct groups of innate lymphoid cells (ILCs) such as ILC1, ILC2 and ILC3 populate the intestine, but how these ILCs develop tissue tropism for this organ is unclear. We report that prior to migration to the intestine ILCs first undergo a `switch' in their expression of homing receptors from lymphoid to gut homing receptors. This process is regulated by mucosal dendritic cells and the gut-specific tissue factor retinoic acid (RA). This change in homing receptors is required for long-term population and effector function of ILCs in the intestine. Only ILC1 and ILC3, but not ILC2, undergo the RA-dependent homing receptor switch in gut-associated lymphoid tissues. In contrast, ILC2 acquire gut homing receptors in a largely RA-independent manner during their development in the bone marrow and can migrate directly to the intestine. Thus, distinct programs regulate the migration of ILC subsets to the intestine for regulation of innate immunity. PMID:26141583

  18. Identification of mouse cathepsin K structural elements that regulate the potency of odanacatib.

    PubMed

    Law, Simon; Andrault, Pierre-Marie; Aguda, Adeleke H; Nguyen, Nham T; Kruglyak, Natasha; Brayer, Gary D; Brömme, Dieter

    2017-02-20

    Cathepsin K (CatK) is the predominant mammalian bone-degrading protease and thus an ideal target for antiosteoporotic drug development. Rodent models of osteoporosis are preferred due to their close reflection of the human disease and their ease of handling, genetic manipulation and economic affordability. However, large differences in the potency of CatK inhibitors for the mouse/rat vs. the human protease orthologs have made it impossible to use rodent models. This is even more of a problem considering that the most advanced CatK inhibitors, including odanacatib (ODN) and balicatib, failed in human clinical trials due to side effects and rodent models are not available to investigate the mechanism of these failures. Here, we elucidated the structural elements of the potency differences between mouse and human CatK (hCatK) using ODN. We determined and compared the structures of inhibitor-free mouse CatK (mCatK), hCatK and ODN bound to hCatK. Two structural differences were identified and investigated by mutational analysis. Humanizing subsite 2 in mCatK led to a 5-fold improvement of ODN binding, whereas the replacement of Tyr61 in mCatK with Asp resulted in an hCatK with comparable ODN potency. Combining both sites further improved the inhibition of the mCatK variant. Similar results were obtained for balicatib. These findings will allow the generation of transgenic CatK mice that will facilitate the evaluation of CatK inhibitor adverse effects and to explore routes to avoid them.

  19. Sumoylation of the THO complex regulates the biogenesis of a subset of mRNPs

    PubMed Central

    Bretes, Hugo; Rouviere, Jérôme O.; Leger, Thibaut; Oeffinger, Marlene; Devaux, Frédéric; Doye, Valérie; Palancade, Benoit

    2014-01-01

    Assembly of messenger ribonucleoparticles (mRNPs) is a pivotal step in gene expression, but only a few molecular mechanisms contributing to its regulation have been described. Here, through a comprehensive proteomic survey of mRNP assembly, we demonstrate that the SUMO pathway specifically controls the association of the THO complex with mRNPs. We further show that the THO complex, a key player in the interplay between gene expression, mRNA export and genetic stability, is sumoylated on its Hpr1 subunit and that this modification regulates its association with mRNPs. Altered recruitment of the THO complex onto mRNPs in sumoylation-defective mutants does not affect bulk mRNA export or genetic stability, but impairs the expression of acidic stress-induced genes and, consistently, compromises viability in acidic stress conditions. Importantly, inactivation of the nuclear exosome suppresses the phenotypes of the hpr1 non-sumoylatable mutant, showing that SUMO-dependent mRNP assembly is critical to allow a specific subset of mRNPs to escape degradation. This article thus provides the first example of a SUMO-dependent mRNP-assembly event allowing a refined tuning of gene expression, in particular under specific stress conditions. PMID:24500206

  20. A Subset of Cholinergic Mushroom Body Neurons Requires Go Signaling to Regulate Sleep in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Yi, Wei; Zhang, Yunpeng; Tian, Yinjun; Guo, Jing; Li, Yan; Guo, Aike

    2013-01-01

    Study Objectives: Identifying the neurochemistry and neural circuitry of sleep regulation is critical for understanding sleep and various sleep disorders. Fruit flies display sleep-like behavior, sharing essential features with sleep of vertebrate. In the fruit fly's central brain, the mushroom body (MB) has been highlighted as a sleep center; however, its neurochemical nature remains unclear, and whether it promotes sleep or wake is still a topic of controversy. Design: We used a video recording system to accurately monitor the locomotor activity and sleep status. Gene expression was temporally and regionally manipulated by heat induction and the Gal4/UAS system. Measurements and Results: We found that expressing pertussis toxin (PTX) in the MB by c309-Gal4 to block Go activity led to unique sleep defects as dramatic sleep increase in daytime and fragmented sleep in nighttime. We narrowed down the c309-Gal4 expressing brain regions to the MB α/β core neurons that are responsible for the Go-mediated sleep effects. Using genetic tools of neurotransmitter-specific Gal80 and RNA interference approach to suppress acetylcholine signal, we demonstrated that these MB α/β core neurons were cholinergic and sleep-promoting neurons, supporting that Go mediates an inhibitory signal. Interestingly, we found that adjacent MB α/β neurons were also cholinergic but wake-promoting neurons, in which Go signal was also required. Conclusion: Our findings in fruit flies characterized a group of sleep-promoting neurons surrounded by a group of wake-promoting neurons. The two groups of neurons are both cholinergic and use Go inhibitory signal to regulate sleep. Citation: Yi W; Zhang Y; Tian Y; Guo J; Li Y; Guo A. A subset of cholinergic mushroom body neurons requires go signaling to regulate sleep in Drosophila. SLEEP 2013;36(12):1809-1821. PMID:24293755

  1. TASK-1 Regulates Apoptosis and Proliferation in a Subset of Non-Small Cell Lung Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Leithner, Katharina; Hirschmugl, Birgit; Li, Yingji; Tang, Bi; Papp, Rita; Nagaraj, Chandran; Stacher, Elvira; Stiegler, Philipp; Lindenmann, Jörg; Olschewski, Andrea; Olschewski, Horst; Hrzenjak, Andelko

    2016-01-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer deaths worldwide; survival times are poor despite therapy. The role of the two-pore domain K+ (K2P) channel TASK-1 (KCNK3) in lung cancer is at present unknown. We found that TASK-1 is expressed in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cell lines at variable levels. In a highly TASK-1 expressing NSCLC cell line, A549, a characteristic pH- and hypoxia-sensitive non-inactivating K+ current was measured, indicating the presence of functional TASK-1 channels. Inhibition of TASK-1 led to significant depolarization in these cells. Knockdown of TASK-1 by siRNA significantly enhanced apoptosis and reduced proliferation in A549 cells, but not in weakly TASK-1 expressing NCI-H358 cells. Na+-coupled nutrient transport across the cell membrane is functionally coupled to the efflux of K+ via K+ channels, thus TASK-1 may potentially influence Na+-coupled nutrient transport. In contrast to TASK-1, which was not differentially expressed in lung cancer vs. normal lung tissue, we found the Na+-coupled nutrient transporters, SLC5A3, SLC5A6, and SLC38A1, transporters for myo-inositol, biotin and glutamine, respectively, to be significantly overexpressed in lung adenocarcinomas. In summary, we show for the first time that the TASK-1 channel regulates apoptosis and proliferation in a subset of NSCLC. PMID:27294516

  2. TASK-1 Regulates Apoptosis and Proliferation in a Subset of Non-Small Cell Lung Cancers.

    PubMed

    Leithner, Katharina; Hirschmugl, Birgit; Li, Yingji; Tang, Bi; Papp, Rita; Nagaraj, Chandran; Stacher, Elvira; Stiegler, Philipp; Lindenmann, Jörg; Olschewski, Andrea; Olschewski, Horst; Hrzenjak, Andelko

    2016-01-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer deaths worldwide; survival times are poor despite therapy. The role of the two-pore domain K+ (K2P) channel TASK-1 (KCNK3) in lung cancer is at present unknown. We found that TASK-1 is expressed in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cell lines at variable levels. In a highly TASK-1 expressing NSCLC cell line, A549, a characteristic pH- and hypoxia-sensitive non-inactivating K+ current was measured, indicating the presence of functional TASK-1 channels. Inhibition of TASK-1 led to significant depolarization in these cells. Knockdown of TASK-1 by siRNA significantly enhanced apoptosis and reduced proliferation in A549 cells, but not in weakly TASK-1 expressing NCI-H358 cells. Na+-coupled nutrient transport across the cell membrane is functionally coupled to the efflux of K+ via K+ channels, thus TASK-1 may potentially influence Na+-coupled nutrient transport. In contrast to TASK-1, which was not differentially expressed in lung cancer vs. normal lung tissue, we found the Na+-coupled nutrient transporters, SLC5A3, SLC5A6, and SLC38A1, transporters for myo-inositol, biotin and glutamine, respectively, to be significantly overexpressed in lung adenocarcinomas. In summary, we show for the first time that the TASK-1 channel regulates apoptosis and proliferation in a subset of NSCLC.

  3. Differential IL-1β secretion by monocyte subsets is regulated by Hsp27 through modulating mRNA stability

    PubMed Central

    Hadadi, Eva; Zhang, Biyan; Baidžajevas, Kajus; Yusof, Nurhashikin; Puan, Kia Joo; Ong, Siew Min; Yeap, Wei Hseun; Rotzschke, Olaf; Kiss-Toth, Endre; Wilson, Heather; Wong, Siew Cheng

    2016-01-01

    Monocytes play a central role in regulating inflammation in response to infection or injury, and during auto-inflammatory diseases. Human blood contains classical, intermediate and non-classical monocyte subsets that each express characteristic patterns of cell surface CD16 and CD14; each subset also has specific functional properties, but the mechanisms underlying many of their distinctive features are undefined. Of particular interest is how monocyte subsets regulate secretion of the apical pro-inflammatory cytokine IL-1β, which is central to the initiation of immune responses but is also implicated in the pathology of various auto-immune/auto-inflammatory conditions. Here we show that primary human non-classical monocytes, exposed to LPS or LPS + BzATP (3’-O-(4-benzoyl)benzyl-ATP, a P2X7R agonist), produce approx. 80% less IL-1β than intermediate or classical monocytes. Despite their low CD14 expression, LPS-sensing, caspase-1 activation and P2X7R activity were comparable in non-classical monocytes to other subsets: their diminished ability to produce IL-1β instead arose from 50% increased IL-1β mRNA decay rates, mediated by Hsp27. These findings identify the Hsp27 pathway as a novel therapeutic target for the management of conditions featuring dysregulated IL-1β production, and represent an advancement in understanding of both physiological inflammatory responses and the pathogenesis of inflammatory diseases involving monocyte-derived IL-1β. PMID:27976724

  4. Differential IL-1β secretion by monocyte subsets is regulated by Hsp27 through modulating mRNA stability.

    PubMed

    Hadadi, Eva; Zhang, Biyan; Baidžajevas, Kajus; Yusof, Nurhashikin; Puan, Kia Joo; Ong, Siew Min; Yeap, Wei Hseun; Rotzschke, Olaf; Kiss-Toth, Endre; Wilson, Heather; Wong, Siew Cheng

    2016-12-15

    Monocytes play a central role in regulating inflammation in response to infection or injury, and during auto-inflammatory diseases. Human blood contains classical, intermediate and non-classical monocyte subsets that each express characteristic patterns of cell surface CD16 and CD14; each subset also has specific functional properties, but the mechanisms underlying many of their distinctive features are undefined. Of particular interest is how monocyte subsets regulate secretion of the apical pro-inflammatory cytokine IL-1β, which is central to the initiation of immune responses but is also implicated in the pathology of various auto-immune/auto-inflammatory conditions. Here we show that primary human non-classical monocytes, exposed to LPS or LPS + BzATP (3'-O-(4-benzoyl)benzyl-ATP, a P2X7R agonist), produce approx. 80% less IL-1β than intermediate or classical monocytes. Despite their low CD14 expression, LPS-sensing, caspase-1 activation and P2X7R activity were comparable in non-classical monocytes to other subsets: their diminished ability to produce IL-1β instead arose from 50% increased IL-1β mRNA decay rates, mediated by Hsp27. These findings identify the Hsp27 pathway as a novel therapeutic target for the management of conditions featuring dysregulated IL-1β production, and represent an advancement in understanding of both physiological inflammatory responses and the pathogenesis of inflammatory diseases involving monocyte-derived IL-1β.

  5. Pbx and Prdm1a transcription factors differentially regulate subsets of the fast skeletal muscle program in zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Zizhen; Farr,, Gist H.; Tapscott, Stephen J.; Maves, Lisa

    2013-01-01

    Summary The basic helix–loop–helix factor Myod initiates skeletal muscle differentiation by directly and sequentially activating sets of muscle differentiation genes, including those encoding muscle contractile proteins. We hypothesize that Pbx homeodomain proteins direct Myod to a subset of its transcriptional targets, in particular fast-twitch muscle differentiation genes, thereby regulating the competence of muscle precursor cells to differentiate. We have previously shown that Pbx proteins bind with Myod on the promoter of the zebrafish fast muscle gene mylpfa and that Pbx proteins are required for Myod to activate mylpfa expression and the fast-twitch muscle-specific differentiation program in zebrafish embryos. Here we have investigated the interactions of Pbx with another muscle fiber-type regulator, Prdm1a, a SET-domain DNA-binding factor that directly represses mylpfa expression and fast muscle differentiation. The prdm1a mutant phenotype, early and increased fast muscle differentiation, is the opposite of the Pbx-null phenotype, delayed and reduced fast muscle differentiation. To determine whether Pbx and Prdm1a have opposing activities on a common set of genes, we used RNA-seq analysis to globally assess gene expression in zebrafish embryos with single- and double-losses-of-function for Pbx and Prdm1a. We find that the levels of expression of certain fast muscle genes are increased or approximately wild type in pbx2/4-MO;prdm1a−/− embryos, suggesting that Pbx activity normally counters the repressive action of Prdm1a for a subset of the fast muscle program. However, other fast muscle genes require Pbx but are not regulated by Prdm1a. Thus, our findings reveal that subsets of the fast muscle program are differentially regulated by Pbx and Prdm1a. Our findings provide an example of how Pbx homeodomain proteins act in a balance with other transcription factors to regulate subsets of a cellular differentiation program. PMID:23789105

  6. Pbx and Prdm1a transcription factors differentially regulate subsets of the fast skeletal muscle program in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Yao, Zizhen; Farr, Gist H; Tapscott, Stephen J; Maves, Lisa

    2013-06-15

    The basic helix-loop-helix factor Myod initiates skeletal muscle differentiation by directly and sequentially activating sets of muscle differentiation genes, including those encoding muscle contractile proteins. We hypothesize that Pbx homeodomain proteins direct Myod to a subset of its transcriptional targets, in particular fast-twitch muscle differentiation genes, thereby regulating the competence of muscle precursor cells to differentiate. We have previously shown that Pbx proteins bind with Myod on the promoter of the zebrafish fast muscle gene mylpfa and that Pbx proteins are required for Myod to activate mylpfa expression and the fast-twitch muscle-specific differentiation program in zebrafish embryos. Here we have investigated the interactions of Pbx with another muscle fiber-type regulator, Prdm1a, a SET-domain DNA-binding factor that directly represses mylpfa expression and fast muscle differentiation. The prdm1a mutant phenotype, early and increased fast muscle differentiation, is the opposite of the Pbx-null phenotype, delayed and reduced fast muscle differentiation. To determine whether Pbx and Prdm1a have opposing activities on a common set of genes, we used RNA-seq analysis to globally assess gene expression in zebrafish embryos with single- and double-losses-of-function for Pbx and Prdm1a. We find that the levels of expression of certain fast muscle genes are increased or approximately wild type in pbx2/4-MO;prdm1a-/- embryos, suggesting that Pbx activity normally counters the repressive action of Prdm1a for a subset of the fast muscle program. However, other fast muscle genes require Pbx but are not regulated by Prdm1a. Thus, our findings reveal that subsets of the fast muscle program are differentially regulated by Pbx and Prdm1a. Our findings provide an example of how Pbx homeodomain proteins act in a balance with other transcription factors to regulate subsets of a cellular differentiation program.

  7. Rationale for Determining the Functional Potency of Mesenchymal Stem Cells in Preventing Regulated Cell Death for Therapeutic Use.

    PubMed

    Naji, Abderrahim; Suganuma, Narufumi; Espagnolle, Nicolas; Yagyu, Ken-Ichi; Baba, Nobuyasu; Sensebé, Luc; Deschaseaux, Frédéric

    2016-10-11

    : Mesenchymal stem (stromal) cells (MSCs) are being investigated for treating degenerative and inflammatory disorders because of their reparative and immunomodulatory properties. Intricate mechanisms relate cell death processes with immune responses, which have implications for degenerative and inflammatory conditions. We review the therapeutic value of MSCs in terms of preventing regulated cell death (RCD). When cells identify an insult, specific intracellular pathways are elicited for execution of RCD processes, such as apoptosis, necroptosis, and pyroptosis. To some extent, exacerbated RCD can provoke an intense inflammatory response and vice versa. Emerging studies are focusing on the molecular mechanisms deployed by MSCs to ameliorate the survival, bioenergetics, and functions of unfit immune or nonimmune cells. Given these aspects, and in light of MSC actions in modulating cell death processes, we suggest the use of novel functional in vitro assays to ensure the potency of MSCs for preventing RCD. Such analyses should be associated with existing functional assays measuring the anti-inflammatory capabilities of MSCs in vitro. MSCs selected on the basis of two in vitro functional criteria (i.e., prevention of inflammation and RCD) could possess optimal therapeutic efficacy in vivo. In addition, we underline the implications of these perspectives in clinical studies of MSC therapy, with particular focus on acute respiratory distress syndrome. Most studies of mesenchymal stem (stromal) cells (MSCs) focus on their anti-inflammatory, trophic and differentiation abilities, but their ability to prevent regulated cell death (RCD) remains undefined. However, this last function could explain both the regenerative and anti-inflammatory therapeutic effect of MSCs observed in preclinical and clinical studies. The present report reviews the role of MSCs in preventing RCD, with implications for enhancing their therapeutic efficacy in the clinic. Development of in vitro

  8. Investigation of the component in Artemisia annua L. leading to enhanced antiplasmodial potency of artemisinin via regulation of its metabolism.

    PubMed

    Cai, Tian-Yu; Zhang, Yun-Rui; Ji, Jian-Bo; Xing, Jie

    2017-07-31

    The chemical matrix of the herb Artemisia annua L. (A. annua), from which artemisinin (QHS) is isolated, can enhance both the bioavailability and efficacy of QHS. However, the exact mechanism of this synergism remains unknown. The biotransformation of QHS and potential "enzyme inhibitors" in plant matrix could be of great importance in understanding the improved efficacy of QHS in A. annua, which has been limited to the synergism with flavonoid components. To investigate the component in A. annua extracts (MAE) leading to enhanced antiplasmodial potency of QHS via regulation of its metabolism. The efficacy of QHS in combination with the synergistic component was also evaluated. The total MAE extract and its three MAE fractions (MAE-I eluted using 3% methanol, MAE-II eluted using 50% methanol and MAE-III eluted using 85% methanol) were obtained from dry plant materials and prepared after lyophilization. The pharmacokinetic profiles of QHS and its major phase I metabolite monohydroxylated artemisinin (QHS-M) were investigated in healthy rats after a single oral administration of QHS in each MAE extract. Major components isolated from the target MAE fraction were evaluated for their enzyme inhibition. The antimalarial activity of QHS in combination with the potential synergistic component against Plasmodium falciparum was studied in vivo (murine Plasmodium yoelii). The recrudescence and survival time of infected mice were also recorded after drug treatment. Compared to pure QHS, a 2-fold increase in QHS exposure (AUC and Cmax) was found in healthy rats after a single oral dose of QHS in the total MAE extract or its fraction MAE-III. In addition, metabolic biotransformation of QHS to the metabolite QHS-M (mediated by CYP3A) was inhibited by MAE or MAE-III. Among nine major components isolated from MAE-III (five sesquiterpenenes, three flavonoids and one phenolic acid), only arteannuin B (AB) showed an inhibition of CYP3A4 (IC50 1.2μM). The synergism between QHS and AB

  9. Rationale for Determining the Functional Potency of Mesenchymal Stem Cells in Preventing Regulated Cell Death for Therapeutic Use.

    PubMed

    Naji, Abderrahim; Suganuma, Narufumi; Espagnolle, Nicolas; Yagyu, Ken-Ichi; Baba, Nobuyasu; Sensebé, Luc; Deschaseaux, Frédéric

    2017-03-01

    Mesenchymal stem (stromal) cells (MSCs) are being investigated for treating degenerative and inflammatory disorders because of their reparative and immunomodulatory properties. Intricate mechanisms relate cell death processes with immune responses, which have implications for degenerative and inflammatory conditions. We review the therapeutic value of MSCs in terms of preventing regulated cell death (RCD). When cells identify an insult, specific intracellular pathways are elicited for execution of RCD processes, such as apoptosis, necroptosis, and pyroptosis. To some extent, exacerbated RCD can provoke an intense inflammatory response and vice versa. Emerging studies are focusing on the molecular mechanisms deployed by MSCs to ameliorate the survival, bioenergetics, and functions of unfit immune or nonimmune cells. Given these aspects, and in light of MSC actions in modulating cell death processes, we suggest the use of novel functional in vitro assays to ensure the potency of MSCs for preventing RCD. Such analyses should be associated with existing functional assays measuring the anti-inflammatory capabilities of MSCs in vitro. MSCs selected on the basis of two in vitro functional criteria (i.e., prevention of inflammation and RCD) could possess optimal therapeutic efficacy in vivo. In addition, we underline the implications of these perspectives in clinical studies of MSC therapy, with particular focus on acute respiratory distress syndrome. Stem Cells Translational Medicine 2017;6:713-719.

  10. Rationale for Determining the Functional Potency of Mesenchymal Stem Cells in Preventing Regulated Cell Death for Therapeutic Use

    PubMed Central

    Suganuma, Narufumi; Espagnolle, Nicolas; Yagyu, Ken‐ichi; Baba, Nobuyasu; Sensebé, Luc; Deschaseaux, Frédéric

    2016-01-01

    Summary Mesenchymal stem (stromal) cells (MSCs) are being investigated for treating degenerative and inflammatory disorders because of their reparative and immunomodulatory properties. Intricate mechanisms relate cell death processes with immune responses, which have implications for degenerative and inflammatory conditions. We review the therapeutic value of MSCs in terms of preventing regulated cell death (RCD). When cells identify an insult, specific intracellular pathways are elicited for execution of RCD processes, such as apoptosis, necroptosis, and pyroptosis. To some extent, exacerbated RCD can provoke an intense inflammatory response and vice versa. Emerging studies are focusing on the molecular mechanisms deployed by MSCs to ameliorate the survival, bioenergetics, and functions of unfit immune or nonimmune cells. Given these aspects, and in light of MSC actions in modulating cell death processes, we suggest the use of novel functional in vitro assays to ensure the potency of MSCs for preventing RCD. Such analyses should be associated with existing functional assays measuring the anti‐inflammatory capabilities of MSCs in vitro. MSCs selected on the basis of two in vitro functional criteria (i.e., prevention of inflammation and RCD) could possess optimal therapeutic efficacy in vivo. In addition, we underline the implications of these perspectives in clinical studies of MSC therapy, with particular focus on acute respiratory distress syndrome. Stem Cells Translational Medicine 2017;6:713–719 PMID:28297565

  11. Identification of a human intestinal myeloid cell subset that regulates gut homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Barman, Soumik; Kayama, Hisako; Okuzaki, Daisuke; Ogino, Takayuki; Osawa, Hideki; Matsuno, Hiroshi; Mizushima, Tsunekazu; Mori, Masaki; Nishimura, Junichi; Takeda, Kiyoshi

    2016-11-01

    Inappropriate activation of T helper (Th) cells, such as Th1 and Th17 cells, is implicated in the pathogenesis of chronic inflammatory disorders including ulcerative colitis (UC). CX3CR1(high) macrophages contribute to intestinal homeostasis through various mechanisms in mice. However, whether mononuclear phagocytes with regulatory functions are present in the human colon is not clearly defined. We investigated whether innate myeloid cells that suppress activation of effector T cells exist in the human intestinal mucosa. Among intestinal lamina propria cells, Lin(-) HLA-DR(high) CD14(+) CD163(high) cells were subdivided into CD160(low) and CD160(high) cells. Both subsets produced high levels of IL-10. CD163(high) CD160(high) cells suppressed effector T cell proliferation, whereas CD163(high) CD160(low) cells induced Th17 differentiation. Patients with UC exhibited increased numbers of CD163(high) CD160(low) cells, while showing profoundly decreased numbers of CD163(high) CD160(high) cells. In this context, CD163(high) CD160(high) cells had higher CD80/CD86 expression and lower IL10RB expression, and these cells did not suppress effector T cell proliferation. The CD163(high) CD160(high) subset in normal intestinal mucosa inhibits inappropriate Th1/Th17 responses through suppression of their proliferation, and its number and suppressive activity are impaired in patients with UC. These findings indicate how human innate immune cells might prevent UC development.

  12. TNF regulates thymocyte production by apoptosis and proliferation of the triple negative (CD3-CD4-CD8-) subset.

    PubMed

    Baseta, J G; Stutman, O

    2000-11-15

    TNF is a proinflammatory cytokine with opposing death/no-death effects in vivo and in vitro. Our studies showed that TNF regulates mouse thymocyte production, inducing both apoptosis and proliferation of the most immature CD3(-)CD4(-)CD8(-) triple negative (TN) subset within a broad range of dosages (10(1)-10(5) pg/ml) in the presence of IL-7. TNF apoptosis affected only the TN3 (CD44(-)CD25(+)) and TN4 (CD44(-)CD25(-)) subsets that expressed both TNFR-p55 and -p75. Although each TNFR alone could mediate TNF apoptosis, maximal apoptosis was seen in C57BL/6J wild type, which expressed both TNFRs. TNF also induced proliferation of TN3 cells at higher doses (10(4)-10(5) pg/ml) mediated only by TNFR-p75. Both anti-TNFR-p55 and -TNFR-p75 mAb inhibited apoptosis but only anti-p75 inhibited proliferation. TNF also regulated TN proliferation to IL-7 because TNFR knockout (KO), TNF KO, and TNF/lymphotoxin alpha and beta triple KO mice showed 2- to 3-fold increased responses not seen in C57BL/6J wild type. In vivo, TNFR KO mice showed thymic hypertrophy with a 60% increase in total thymocytes, with no effect on the CD4/CD8 subsets. We conclude that TNF maintains homeostatic control of total thymocyte production by negative selection of TN3 and TN4 prothymocytes and down-regulation of their proliferation to endogenous IL-7.

  13. IFN-γ differentially regulates subsets of Gr-1(+)CD11b(+) myeloid cells in chronic inflammation.

    PubMed

    Zhan, Xiaoxia; Fang, Yimin; Hu, Shengfeng; Wu, Yongjian; Yang, Kun; Liao, Chunxin; Zhang, Yuanqing; Huang, Xi; Wu, Minhao

    2015-08-01

    During chronic inflammation, prolonged over-reactive immune response may lead to tissue destruction, while immune suppression hinders tissue repair and pathogen elimination. Therefore, precise regulation of the immune response is needed to avoid immuno-pathology. Interferon-gamma (IFN-γ) is widely used in clinical treatment of inflammatory diseases. However, the underlying mechanism remains unclear. Here, we evaluated the role of IFN-γ on CD11b(+)Gr-1(+) myeloid cell differentiation and function, using a heat-killed Mycobacterium bovis BCG-induced chronic inflammation model. After challenge with heat-killed BCG, two subpopulations of CD11b(+)Gr-1(+) myeloid cells were generated in the mouse spleen. Phenotypical, morphological and functional analysis indicated that the CD11b(+)Gr-1(high) Ly6G(high) Ly6C(low) subset was neutrophil-like myeloid-derived inducer cells (N-MDICs), which promoted T cell activation, while the other subset was CD11b(+)Gr-1(low) Ly6G(neg) Ly6C(high) monocyte-like myeloid-derived suppressor cells (M-MDSCs) that displayed extensive suppressor function. IFN-γ treatment dampened N-MDICs-mediated T cell activation through up-regulating T cell suppressive mediators, reactive oxygen species (ROS) and arginase I. While for M-MDSCs, IFN-γ reduced their suppressing activity by decreasing the arginase activity. Our study provides evidence that IFN-γ balances the over-reactive vs compromised immune response through different regulation of distinct myeloid subsets, and therefore displays significant therapeutic potential for effective immuno-therapy of chronic inflammatory diseases.

  14. Modulation of Glucagon-like Peptide-1 (GLP-1) Potency by Endocannabinoid-like Lipids Represents a Novel Mode of Regulating GLP-1 Receptor Signaling.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Yu-Hong; Ho, Mei-Shang; Huang, Wei-Ting; Chou, Ying-Ting; King, Klim

    2015-06-05

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) analogs are approved for treatment of type 2 diabetes and are in clinical trials for disorders including neurodegenerative diseases. GLP-1 receptor (GLP-1R) is expressed in many peripheral and neuronal tissues and is activated by circulating GLP-1. Other than food intake, little is known about factors regulating GLP-1 secretion. Given a normally basal circulating level of GLP-1, knowledge of mechanisms regulating GLP-1R signaling, which has diverse functions in extrapancreatic tissues, remains elusive. In this study, we found that the potency of GLP-1, not exendin 4, is specifically enhanced by the endocannabinoid-like lipids oleoylethanolamide (OEA) and 2-oleoylglycerol but not by stearoylethanolamide (SEA) or palmitoylethanolamide. 9.2 μM OEA enhances the potency of GLP-1 in stimulating cAMP production by 10-fold but does not affect its receptor binding affinity. OEA and 2-oleoylglycerol, but not SEA, bind to GLP-1 in a dose-dependent and saturable manner. OEA but not SEA promoted GLP-1(7-36) amide to trypsin inactivation in a dose-dependent and saturable manner. Susceptibility of GLP-1(7-36) amide to trypsin inactivation is increased 40-fold upon binding to OEA but not to SEA. Our findings indicate that OEA binds to GLP-1(7-36) amide and enhances the potency that may result from a conformational change of the peptide. In conclusion, modulating potency of GLP-1 by physiologically regulated endocannabinoid-like lipids allows GLP-1R signaling to be regulated spatiotemporally at a constant basal GLP-1 level. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  15. Modulation of Glucagon-like Peptide-1 (GLP-1) Potency by Endocannabinoid-like Lipids Represents a Novel Mode of Regulating GLP-1 Receptor Signaling*

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Yu-Hong; Ho, Mei-Shang; Huang, Wei-Ting; Chou, Ying-Ting; King, Klim

    2015-01-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) analogs are approved for treatment of type 2 diabetes and are in clinical trials for disorders including neurodegenerative diseases. GLP-1 receptor (GLP-1R) is expressed in many peripheral and neuronal tissues and is activated by circulating GLP-1. Other than food intake, little is known about factors regulating GLP-1 secretion. Given a normally basal circulating level of GLP-1, knowledge of mechanisms regulating GLP-1R signaling, which has diverse functions in extrapancreatic tissues, remains elusive. In this study, we found that the potency of GLP-1, not exendin 4, is specifically enhanced by the endocannabinoid-like lipids oleoylethanolamide (OEA) and 2-oleoylglycerol but not by stearoylethanolamide (SEA) or palmitoylethanolamide. 9.2 μm OEA enhances the potency of GLP-1 in stimulating cAMP production by 10-fold but does not affect its receptor binding affinity. OEA and 2-oleoylglycerol, but not SEA, bind to GLP-1 in a dose-dependent and saturable manner. OEA but not SEA promoted GLP-1(7–36) amide to trypsin inactivation in a dose-dependent and saturable manner. Susceptibility of GLP-1(7–36) amide to trypsin inactivation is increased 40-fold upon binding to OEA but not to SEA. Our findings indicate that OEA binds to GLP-1(7–36) amide and enhances the potency that may result from a conformational change of the peptide. In conclusion, modulating potency of GLP-1 by physiologically regulated endocannabinoid-like lipids allows GLP-1R signaling to be regulated spatiotemporally at a constant basal GLP-1 level. PMID:25903129

  16. Phosphoproteomics reveals that Parkinson's disease kinase LRRK2 regulates a subset of Rab GTPases

    PubMed Central

    Steger, Martin; Tonelli, Francesca; Ito, Genta; Davies, Paul; Trost, Matthias; Vetter, Melanie; Wachter, Stefanie; Lorentzen, Esben; Duddy, Graham; Wilson, Stephen; Baptista, Marco AS; Fiske, Brian K; Fell, Matthew J; Morrow, John A; Reith, Alastair D; Alessi, Dario R; Mann, Matthias

    2016-01-01

    Mutations in Park8, encoding for the multidomain Leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 (LRRK2) protein, comprise the predominant genetic cause of Parkinson's disease (PD). G2019S, the most common amino acid substitution activates the kinase two- to threefold. This has motivated the development of LRRK2 kinase inhibitors; however, poor consensus on physiological LRRK2 substrates has hampered clinical development of such therapeutics. We employ a combination of phosphoproteomics, genetics, and pharmacology to unambiguously identify a subset of Rab GTPases as key LRRK2 substrates. LRRK2 directly phosphorylates these both in vivo and in vitro on an evolutionary conserved residue in the switch II domain. Pathogenic LRRK2 variants mapping to different functional domains increase phosphorylation of Rabs and this strongly decreases their affinity to regulatory proteins including Rab GDP dissociation inhibitors (GDIs). Our findings uncover a key class of bona-fide LRRK2 substrates and a novel regulatory mechanism of Rabs that connects them to PD. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.12813.001 PMID:26824392

  17. Regulation of Carotenoid Biosynthesis by Shade Relies on Specific Subsets of Antagonistic Transcription Factors and Cofactors.

    PubMed

    Bou-Torrent, Jordi; Toledo-Ortiz, Gabriela; Ortiz-Alcaide, Miriam; Cifuentes-Esquivel, Nicolas; Halliday, Karen J; Martinez-García, Jaime F; Rodriguez-Concepcion, Manuel

    2015-11-01

    Carotenoids are photosynthetic pigments essential for the protection against excess light. During deetiolation, their production is regulated by a dynamic repression-activation module formed by PHYTOCHROME-INTERACTING FACTOR1 (PIF1) and LONG HYPOCOTYL5 (HY5). These transcription factors directly and oppositely control the expression of the gene encoding PHYTOENE SYNTHASE (PSY), the first and main rate-determining enzyme of the carotenoid pathway. Antagonistic modules also regulate the responses of deetiolated plants to vegetation proximity and shade (i.e. to the perception of far-red light-enriched light filtered through or reflected from neighboring plants). These responses, aimed to adapt to eventual shading from plant competitors, include a reduced accumulation of carotenoids. Here, we show that PIF1 and related photolabile PIFs (but not photostable PIF7) promote the shade-triggered decrease in carotenoid accumulation. While HY5 does not appear to be required for this process, other known PIF antagonists were found to modulate the expression of the Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) PSY gene and the biosynthesis of carotenoids early after exposure to shade. In particular, PHYTOCHROME-RAPIDLY REGULATED1, a transcriptional cofactor that prevents the binding of true transcription factors to their target promoters, was found to interact with PIF1 and hence directly induce PSY expression. By contrast, a change in the levels of the transcriptional cofactor LONG HYPOCOTYL IN FAR RED1, which also binds to PIF1 and other PIFs to regulate shade-related elongation responses, did not impact PSY expression or carotenoid accumulation. Our data suggest that the fine-regulation of carotenoid biosynthesis in response to shade relies on specific modules of antagonistic transcriptional factors and cofactors.

  18. Tumor-derived exosomes regulate expression of immune function-related genes in human T cell subsets

    PubMed Central

    Muller, Laurent; Mitsuhashi, Masato; Simms, Patricia; Gooding, William E.; Whiteside, Theresa L.

    2016-01-01

    Tumor cell-derived exosomes (TEX) suppress functions of immune cells. Here, changes in the gene profiles of primary human T lymphocytes exposed in vitro to exosomes were evaluated. CD4+ Tconv, CD8+ T or CD4+ CD39+ Treg were isolated from normal donors’ peripheral blood and co-incubated with TEX or exosomes isolated from supernatants of cultured dendritic cells (DEX). Expression levels of 24–27 immune response-related genes in these T cells were quantified by qRT-PCR. In activated T cells, TEX and DEX up-regulated mRNA expression levels of multiple genes. Multifactorial data analysis of ΔCt values identified T cell activation and the immune cell type, but not exosome source, as factors regulating gene expression by exosomes. Treg were more sensitive to TEX-mediated effects than other T cell subsets. In Treg, TEX-mediated down-regulation of genes regulating the adenosine pathway translated into high expression of CD39 and increased adenosine production. TEX also induced up-regulation of inhibitory genes in CD4+ Tconv, which translated into a loss of CD69 on their surface and a functional decline. Exosomes are not internalized by T cells, but signals they carry and deliver to cell surface receptors modulate gene expression and functions of human T lymphocytes. PMID:26842680

  19. Tumor-derived exosomes regulate expression of immune function-related genes in human T cell subsets.

    PubMed

    Muller, Laurent; Mitsuhashi, Masato; Simms, Patricia; Gooding, William E; Whiteside, Theresa L

    2016-02-04

    Tumor cell-derived exosomes (TEX) suppress functions of immune cells. Here, changes in the gene profiles of primary human T lymphocytes exposed in vitro to exosomes were evaluated. CD4(+) Tconv, CD8(+) T or CD4(+) CD39(+) Treg were isolated from normal donors' peripheral blood and co-incubated with TEX or exosomes isolated from supernatants of cultured dendritic cells (DEX). Expression levels of 24-27 immune response-related genes in these T cells were quantified by qRT-PCR. In activated T cells, TEX and DEX up-regulated mRNA expression levels of multiple genes. Multifactorial data analysis of ΔCt values identified T cell activation and the immune cell type, but not exosome source, as factors regulating gene expression by exosomes. Treg were more sensitive to TEX-mediated effects than other T cell subsets. In Treg, TEX-mediated down-regulation of genes regulating the adenosine pathway translated into high expression of CD39 and increased adenosine production. TEX also induced up-regulation of inhibitory genes in CD4(+) Tconv, which translated into a loss of CD69 on their surface and a functional decline. Exosomes are not internalized by T cells, but signals they carry and deliver to cell surface receptors modulate gene expression and functions of human T lymphocytes.

  20. A Subset of Autism-Associated Genes Regulate the Structural Stability of Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Yu-Chih; Frei, Jeannine A.; Kilander, Michaela B. C.; Shen, Wenjuan; Blatt, Gene J.

    2016-01-01

    Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) comprises a range of neurological conditions that affect individuals’ ability to communicate and interact with others. People with ASD often exhibit marked qualitative difficulties in social interaction, communication, and behavior. Alterations in neurite arborization and dendritic spine morphology, including size, shape, and number, are hallmarks of almost all neurological conditions, including ASD. As experimental evidence emerges in recent years, it becomes clear that although there is broad heterogeneity of identified autism risk genes, many of them converge into similar cellular pathways, including those regulating neurite outgrowth, synapse formation and spine stability, and synaptic plasticity. These mechanisms together regulate the structural stability of neurons and are vulnerable targets in ASD. In this review, we discuss the current understanding of those autism risk genes that affect the structural connectivity of neurons. We sub-categorize them into (1) cytoskeletal regulators, e.g., motors and small RhoGTPase regulators; (2) adhesion molecules, e.g., cadherins, NCAM, and neurexin superfamily; (3) cell surface receptors, e.g., glutamatergic receptors and receptor tyrosine kinases; (4) signaling molecules, e.g., protein kinases and phosphatases; and (5) synaptic proteins, e.g., vesicle and scaffolding proteins. Although the roles of some of these genes in maintaining neuronal structural stability are well studied, how mutations contribute to the autism phenotype is still largely unknown. Investigating whether and how the neuronal structure and function are affected when these genes are mutated will provide insights toward developing effective interventions aimed at improving the lives of people with autism and their families. PMID:27909399

  1. DELLA proteins regulate expression of a subset of AM symbiosis-induced genes in Medicago truncatula.

    PubMed

    Floss, Daniela S; Lévesque-Tremblay, Véronique; Park, Hee-Jin; Harrison, Maria J

    2016-01-01

    The majority of the vascular flowering plants form symbiotic associations with fungi from the phylum Glomeromycota through which both partners gain access to nutrients, either mineral nutrients in the case of the plant, or carbon, in the case of the fungus. (1) The association develops in the roots and requires substantial remodeling of the root cortical cells where branched fungal hyphae, called arbuscules, are housed in a new membrane-bound apoplastic compartment. (2) Nutrient exchange between the symbionts occurs over this interface and its development and maintenance is critical for symbiosis. Previously, we showed that DELLA proteins, which are well known as repressors of gibberellic acid signaling, also regulate development of AM symbiosis and are necessary to enable arbuscule development. (3) Furthermore, constitutive overexpression of a dominant DELLA protein (della1-Δ18) is sufficient to induce transcripts of several AM symbiosis-induced genes, even in the absence of the fungal symbiont. (4) Here we further extend this approach and identify AM symbiosis genes that respond transcriptionally to constitutive expression of a dominant DELLA protein and also genes that do respond to this treatment. Additionally, we demonstrate that DELLAs interact with REQUIRED FOR ARBUSCULE DEVELOPMENT 1 (RAD1) which further extends our knowledge of GRAS factor complexes that have the potential to regulate gene expression during AM symbiosis.

  2. DELLA proteins regulate expression of a subset of AM symbiosis-induced genes in Medicago truncatula

    PubMed Central

    Floss, Daniela S.; Lévesque-Tremblay, Véronique; Park, Hee-Jin; Harrison, Maria J.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The majority of the vascular flowering plants form symbiotic associations with fungi from the phylum Glomeromycota through which both partners gain access to nutrients, either mineral nutrients in the case of the plant, or carbon, in the case of the fungus.1 The association develops in the roots and requires substantial remodeling of the root cortical cells where branched fungal hyphae, called arbuscules, are housed in a new membrane-bound apoplastic compartment.2 Nutrient exchange between the symbionts occurs over this interface and its development and maintenance is critical for symbiosis. Previously, we showed that DELLA proteins, which are well known as repressors of gibberellic acid signaling, also regulate development of AM symbiosis and are necessary to enable arbuscule development.3 Furthermore, constitutive overexpression of a dominant DELLA protein (della1-Δ18) is sufficient to induce transcripts of several AM symbiosis-induced genes, even in the absence of the fungal symbiont.4 Here we further extend this approach and identify AM symbiosis genes that respond transcriptionally to constitutive expression of a dominant DELLA protein and also genes that do respond to this treatment. Additionally, we demonstrate that DELLAs interact with REQUIRED FOR ARBUSCULE DEVELOPMENT 1 (RAD1) which further extends our knowledge of GRAS factor complexes that have the potential to regulate gene expression during AM symbiosis. PMID:26984507

  3. Auxin Is Rapidly Induced by Herbivore Attack and Regulates a Subset of Systemic, Jasmonate-Dependent Defenses1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Machado, Ricardo A. R.; Robert, Christelle A. M.; Arce, Carla C. M.; Ferrieri, Abigail P.; Jimenez-Aleman, Guillermo H.

    2016-01-01

    Plant responses to herbivore attack are regulated by phytohormonal networks. To date, the role of the auxin indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) in this context is not well understood. We quantified and manipulated the spatiotemporal patterns of IAA accumulation in herbivore-attacked Nicotiana attenuata plants to unravel its role in the regulation of plant secondary metabolism. We found that IAA is strongly, rapidly, and specifically induced by herbivore attack. IAA is elicited by herbivore oral secretions and fatty acid conjugate elicitors and is accompanied by a rapid transcriptional increase of auxin biosynthetic YUCCA-like genes. IAA accumulation starts 30 to 60 s after local induction and peaks within 5 min after induction, thereby preceding the jasmonate (JA) burst. IAA accumulation does not require JA signaling and spreads rapidly from the wound site to systemic tissues. Complementation and transport inhibition experiments reveal that IAA is required for the herbivore-specific, JA-dependent accumulation of anthocyanins and phenolamides in the stems. In contrast, IAA does not affect the accumulation of nicotine or 7-hydroxygeranyllinalool diterpene glycosides in the same tissue. Taken together, our results uncover IAA as a rapid and specific signal that regulates a subset of systemic, JA-dependent secondary metabolites in herbivore-attacked plants. PMID:27485882

  4. The Evolutionarily Conserved C-terminal Domains in the Mammalian Retinoblastoma Tumor Suppressor Family Serve as Dual Regulators of Protein Stability and Transcriptional Potency*

    PubMed Central

    Sengupta, Satyaki; Lingnurkar, Raj; Carey, Timothy S.; Pomaville, Monica; Kar, Parimal; Feig, Michael; Wilson, Catherine A.; Knott, Jason G.; Arnosti, David N.; Henry, R. William

    2015-01-01

    The retinoblastoma (RB) tumor suppressor and related family of proteins play critical roles in development through their regulation of genes involved in cell fate. Multiple regulatory pathways impact RB function, including the ubiquitin-proteasome system with deregulated RB destruction frequently associated with pathogenesis. With the current study we explored the mechanisms connecting proteasome-mediated turnover of the RB family to the regulation of repressor activity. We find that steady state levels of all RB family members, RB, p107, and p130, were diminished during embryonic stem cell differentiation concomitant with their target gene acquisition. Proteasome-dependent turnover of the RB family is mediated by distinct and autonomously acting instability elements (IE) located in their C-terminal regulatory domains in a process that is sensitive to cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK4) perturbation. The IE regions include motifs that contribute to E2F-DP transcription factor interaction, and consistently, p107 and p130 repressor potency was reduced by IE deletion. The juxtaposition of degron sequences and E2F interaction motifs appears to be a conserved feature across the RB family, suggesting the potential for repressor ubiquitination and specific target gene regulation. These findings establish a mechanistic link between regulation of RB family repressor potency and the ubiquitin-proteasome system. PMID:25903125

  5. DDX5 regulates DNA replication and is required for cell proliferation in a subset of breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Mazurek, Anthony; Luo, Weijun; Krasnitz, Alexander; Hicks, James; Powers, R Scott; Stillman, Bruce

    2012-09-01

    Understanding factors required for DNA replication will enrich our knowledge of this important process and potentially identify vulnerabilities that can be exploited in cancer therapy. We applied an assay that measures the stability of maintenance of an episomal plasmid in human tissue culture cells to screen for new DNA replication factors. We identify an important role for DDX5 in G(1)-S-phase progression where it directly regulates DNA replication factor expression by promoting the recruitment of RNA polymerase II to E2F-regulated gene promoters. We find that the DDX5 locus is frequently amplified in breast cancer and that breast cancer-derived cells with amplification of DDX5 are much more sensitive to its depletion than breast cancer cells and a breast epithelial cell line that lacks DDX5 amplification. Our results show a novel role for DDX5 in cancer cell proliferation and suggest DDX5 as a therapeutic target in breast cancer treatment. DDX5 is required for cell proliferation by controlling the transcription of genes expressing DNA replication proteins in cancer cells in which the DDX5 locus is amplified, and this has uncovered a dependence on DDX5 for cell proliferation. Given the high frequency of DDX5 amplification in breast cancer, our results highlight DDX5 as a promising candidate for targeted therapy of breast tumors with DDX5 amplification, and indeed we show that DDX5 inhibition sensitizes a subset of breast cancer cells to trastuzumab.

  6. Transcriptional profiling of olfactory system development identifies distal antenna as a regulator of subset of neuronal fates

    PubMed Central

    Barish, Scott; Li, Qingyun; Pan, Jia W.; Soeder, Charlie; Jones, Corbin; Volkan, Pelin C.

    2017-01-01

    Drosophila uses 50 different olfactory receptor neuron (ORN) classes that are clustered within distinct sensilla subtypes to decipher their chemical environment. Each sensilla subtype houses 1–4 ORN identities that arise through asymmetric divisions of a single sensory organ precursor (SOP). Despite a number of mutational studies investigating the regulation of ORN development, a majority of the transcriptional programs that lead to the different ORN classes in the developing olfactory system are unknown. Here we use transcriptional profiling across the time series of antennal development to identify novel transcriptional programs governing the differentiation of ORNs. We surveyed four critical developmental stages of the olfactory system: 3rd instar larval (prepatterning), 8 hours after puparium formation (APF, SOP selection), 40 hrs APF (neurogenesis), and adult antennae. We focused on the expression profiles of olfactory receptor genes and transcription factors—the two main classes of genes that regulate the sensory identity of ORNs. We identify distinct clusters of genes that have overlapping temporal expression profiles suggesting they have a key role during olfactory system development. We show that the expression of the transcription factor distal antenna (dan) is highly similar to other prepatterning factors and is required for the expression of a subset of ORs. PMID:28102318

  7. SAZ, a new SUPERMAN-like protein, negatively regulates a subset of ABA-responsive genes in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Chang-Jie; Aono, Mitsuko; Tamaoki, Masanori; Maeda, Satoru; Sugano, Shoji; Mori, Masaki; Takatsuji, Hiroshi

    2008-02-01

    Arabidopsis SUPERMAN (SUP) and members of its family are plant-unique C(2)H(2)-type zinc finger genes that have been implicated in plant growth and development. In this paper, we report that a new SUP-family gene, designated as S A- and A BA-downregulated z inc finger gene (SAZ), is involved in the negative regulation of ABA-mediated signaling. SAZ-GUS fusion proteins were predominantly localized in the nuclei when they were transiently expressed in onion epidermal cells. SAZ transcripts were expressed in the leaves and pistils of very young flower buds. In young seedlings, SAZ expression was downregulated in response to environmental stresses such as drought, salt, ozone and ultraviolet-B irradiation. This downregulation was also observed in response to the phytohormones salicylic acid (SA) and abscisic acid (ABA). SA-responsive downregulation of SAZ was not observed in the npr1-1 mutant, indicating that this regulation is NPR1 dependent. RNAi-mediated knockdown of SAZ (SAZ-kd) resulted in elevated expression of the drought- and ABA-responsive genes rd29B and rab18 under unstressed conditions, and it enhanced the response of these genes to drought and ABA treatment. The expression of several other drought- and/or ABA-responsive genes was not affected by SAZ-kd. Based on these results, we propose that SAZ plays a role in repressing a subset of the ABA-mediated stress-responsive genes in unstressed conditions.

  8. Cloning of mid-G1 serum response genes and identification of a subset regulated by conditional myc expression.

    PubMed Central

    Tavtigian, S V; Zabludoff, S D; Wold, B J

    1994-01-01

    The emergence of cells from a quiescent G0 arrested state into the cell cycle is a multistep process that begins with the immediate early response to mitogens and extends into a specialized G1 phase. Many immediate early serum response genes including c-fos, c-myc, and c-jun are transcriptional regulators. To understand their roles in regulating cell cycle entry and progression, the identities of their regulatory targets must be determined. In this work we have cloned cDNA copies of messenger RNAs that are either up- or down-regulated at a mid-G1 point in the serum response (midserum-response [mid-SR]). The mid-SR panel is expected to include both direct and indirect targets of immediate early regulators. This expectation was confirmed by the identification of several transcriptional targets of conditional c-myc activity. In terms of cellular function, the mid-SR class is also expected to include execution genes needed for progression through G1 and into S-phase. DNA sequence data showed that the mid-SR panel included several genes already known to be involved in cell cycle progression or growth transformation, suggesting that previously unknown cDNAs in the same group are good candidates for other G1 execution functions. In functional assays of G0-->S-phase progression, c-myc expression can bypass the requirement for serum mitogens and drive a large fraction of G0 arrested cells through G1 into S-phase. However, beyond this general similarity, little is known about the relation of a serum-driven progression to a myc-driven progression. Using the mid-SR collection as molecular reporters, we found that the myc driven G1 differs qualitatively from the serum driven case. Instead of simply activating a subset of serum response genes, as might be expected, myc regulated some genes inversely relative to serum stimulation. This suggests that a myc driven progression from G0 may have novel properties with implications for its action in oncogenesis. Images PMID:8049528

  9. Unique and shared signaling pathways cooperate to regulate the differentiation of human CD4+ T cells into distinct effector subsets.

    PubMed

    Ma, Cindy S; Wong, Natalie; Rao, Geetha; Nguyen, Akira; Avery, Danielle T; Payne, Kathryn; Torpy, James; O'Young, Patrick; Deenick, Elissa; Bustamante, Jacinta; Puel, Anne; Okada, Satoshi; Kobayashi, Masao; Martinez-Barricarte, Ruben; Elliott, Michael; Sebnem Kilic, Sara; El Baghdadi, Jamila; Minegishi, Yoshiyuki; Bousfiha, Aziz; Robertson, Nic; Hambleton, Sophie; Arkwright, Peter D; French, Martyn; Blincoe, Annaliesse K; Hsu, Peter; Campbell, Dianne E; Stormon, Michael O; Wong, Melanie; Adelstein, Stephen; Fulcher, David A; Cook, Matthew C; Stepensky, Polina; Boztug, Kaan; Beier, Rita; Ikincioğullari, Aydan; Ziegler, John B; Gray, Paul; Picard, Capucine; Boisson-Dupuis, Stéphanie; Phan, Tri Giang; Grimbacher, Bodo; Warnatz, Klaus; Holland, Steven M; Uzel, Gulbu; Casanova, Jean-Laurent; Tangye, Stuart G

    2016-07-25

    Naive CD4(+) T cells differentiate into specific effector subsets-Th1, Th2, Th17, and T follicular helper (Tfh)-that provide immunity against pathogen infection. The signaling pathways involved in generating these effector cells are partially known. However, the effects of mutations underlying human primary immunodeficiencies on these processes, and how they compromise specific immune responses, remain unresolved. By studying individuals with mutations in key signaling pathways, we identified nonredundant pathways regulating human CD4(+) T cell differentiation in vitro. IL12Rβ1/TYK2 and IFN-γR/STAT1 function in a feed-forward loop to induce Th1 cells, whereas IL-21/IL-21R/STAT3 signaling is required for Th17, Tfh, and IL-10-secreting cells. IL12Rβ1/TYK2 and NEMO are also required for Th17 induction. Strikingly, gain-of-function STAT1 mutations recapitulated the impact of dominant-negative STAT3 mutations on Tfh and Th17 cells, revealing a putative inhibitory effect of hypermorphic STAT1 over STAT3. These findings provide mechanistic insight into the requirements for human T cell effector function, and explain clinical manifestations of these immunodeficient conditions. Furthermore, they identify molecules that could be targeted to modulate CD4(+) T cell effector function in the settings of infection, vaccination, or immune dysregulation. © 2016 Ma et al.

  10. Self-Renewal of the Long-Term Reconstituting Subset of Hematopoietic Stem Cells is Regulated by Ikaros

    PubMed Central

    Papathanasiou, Peter; Attema, Joanne L.; Karsunky, Holger; Hosen, Naoki; Sontani, Yovina; Hoyne, Gerard F.; Tunningley, Robert; Smale, Stephen T.; Weissman, Irving L.

    2009-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) are rare, ancestral cells that underlie the development, homeostasis, aging, and regeneration of the blood. Here we show the chromatin-associated protein Ikaros is a crucial self-renewal regulator of the long-term (LT) reconstituting subset of HSCs. Ikaros, and associated family member proteins, are highly expressed in self-renewing populations of stem cells. Ikaros point mutant mice initially develop LT-HSCs with the surface phenotype cKit+Thy1.1(lo)Lin(-/lo)Sca1+Flk2−CD150+ during fetal ontogeny but are unable to maintain this pool, rapidly losing it within two days of embryonic development. A synchronous loss of megakaryocyte/erythrocyte progenitors results, along with a fatal, fetal anemia. At this time, mutation of Ikaros exerts a differentiation defect upon common lymphoid progenitors which cannot be rescued with an ectopic Notch signal in vitro, with hematopoietic cells preferentially committing to the NK lineage. Whilst dispensable for the initial embryonic development of blood, Ikaros is clearly needed for maintenance of this tissue. Achieving successful clinical tissue regeneration necessitates understanding degeneration, and these data provide a striking example by a discrete genetic lesion in the cells underpinning tissue integrity during a pivotal timeframe of organogenesis. PMID:19816952

  11. IL-1β regulates a novel myeloid-derived suppressor cell subset that impairs NK cell development and function

    PubMed Central

    Elkabets, Moshe; Ribeiro, Vera S.G.; Dinarello, Charles A.; Ostrand-Rosenberg, Suzanne; Di Santo, James P.; Apte, Ron N.; Vosshenrich, Christian A. J.

    2012-01-01

    Chronic inflammation is associated with promotion of malignancy and tumor progression. Many tumors enhance the accumulation of myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC), which contribute to tumor progression and growth by suppressing anti-tumor immune responses. Tumor-derived IL-1β secreted into the tumor microenvironment has been shown to induce the accumulation of MDSC possessing an enhanced capacity to suppress T cells. In this study, we found that the enhanced suppressive potential of IL-1β-induced MDSC was due to the activity of a novel subset of MDSC lacking Ly6C expression. This subset was present at low frequency in tumor-bearing mice in the absence of IL-1β-induced inflammation; however, under inflammatory conditions Ly6Cneg MDSC were predominant. Ly6Cneg MDSC impaired NK cell development and functions in vitro and in vivo. These results identify a novel IL-1β-induced subset of MDSC with unique functional properties. Ly6Cneg MDSC mediating NK cell suppression may thus represent useful targets for therapeutic interventions. PMID:21110318

  12. Regulation of Mouse Retroelement MuERV-L/MERVL Expression by REX1 and Epigenetic Control of Stem Cell Potency

    PubMed Central

    Schoorlemmer, Jon; Pérez-Palacios, Raquel; Climent, María; Guallar, Diana; Muniesa, Pedro

    2014-01-01

    About half of the mammalian genome is occupied by DNA sequences that originate from transposable elements. Retrotransposons can modulate gene expression in different ways and, particularly retrotransposon-derived long terminal repeats, profoundly shape expression of both surrounding and distant genomic loci. This is especially important in pre-implantation development, during which extensive reprograming of the genome takes place and cells pass through totipotent and pluripotent states. At this stage, the main mechanism responsible for retrotransposon silencing, i.e., DNA methylation, is inoperative. A particular retrotransposon called muERV-L/MERVL is expressed during pre-implantation stages and contributes to the plasticity of mouse embryonic stem cells. This review will focus on the role of MERVL-derived sequences as controlling elements of gene expression specific for pre-implantation development, two-cell stage-specific gene expression, and stem cell pluripotency, the epigenetic mechanisms that control their expression, and the contributions of the pluripotency marker REX1 and the related Yin Yang 1 family of transcription factors to this regulation process. PMID:24567914

  13. Potencies of oral contraceptives.

    PubMed

    Chihal, H J; Peppler, R D; Dickey, R P

    1978-02-01

    This letter is a response to the discussion by Edgren and Sturtevant (125:1029, 1976) on potencies of oral contraceptives (OCs). It is agreed that the results of studies in animal models on OC potencies may not necessarily reflect true potencies in human subjects, however, these animal models do allow the evaluation of the biological effects and interactions of the components of OCs. Data obtained in animal studies are acknowledged to be valuable aids in the study of human diseases. Likewise, mouse uterine response to contraceptive steroids is 1 criterion to be used in evaluating steroid potency. As previously reported, the importance of the mouse uterine response is that the contribution of the progestin component to the total estrogenic potency of the OC is demonstrated.

  14. In vivo photolabeling of tumor-infiltrating cells reveals highly regulated egress of T-cell subsets from tumors.

    PubMed

    Torcellan, Tommaso; Hampton, Henry R; Bailey, Jacqueline; Tomura, Michio; Brink, Robert; Chtanova, Tatyana

    2017-05-30

    Immune therapy is rapidly gaining prominence in the clinic as a major weapon against cancer. Whereas much attention has been focused on the infiltration of tumors by immune cells, the subsequent fate of these infiltrates remains largely unexplored. We therefore established a photoconversion-based model that allowed us to label tumor-infiltrating immune cells and follow their migration. Using this system, we identified a population of tumor-experienced cells that emigrate from primary tumors to draining lymph nodes via afferent lymphatic vessels. Although the majority of tumor-infiltrating cells were myeloid, T cells made up the largest population of tumor-egressing leukocytes. Strikingly, the subset composition of tumor-egressing T cells was greatly skewed compared with those that had infiltrated the tumor and those resident in the draining lymph node. Some T-cell subsets such as CD8(+) T cells emigrated more readily; others including CD4(-)CD8(-) T cells were preferentially retained, suggesting that specific mechanisms guide immune cell egress from tumors. Furthermore, tumor-egressing T cells were more activated and displayed enhanced effector function in comparison with their lymph node counterparts. Finally, we demonstrated that tumor-infiltrating T cells migrate to distant secondary tumors and draining lymph nodes, highlighting a mechanism whereby tumor-experienced effector T cells may mediate antitumor immunity at metastatic sites. Thus, our results provide insights into migration and function of tumor-infiltrating immune cells and the role of these cells in tumor immunity outside of primary tumor deposits.

  15. In vivo photolabeling of tumor-infiltrating cells reveals highly regulated egress of T-cell subsets from tumors

    PubMed Central

    Torcellan, Tommaso; Hampton, Henry R.; Bailey, Jacqueline; Tomura, Michio; Brink, Robert

    2017-01-01

    Immune therapy is rapidly gaining prominence in the clinic as a major weapon against cancer. Whereas much attention has been focused on the infiltration of tumors by immune cells, the subsequent fate of these infiltrates remains largely unexplored. We therefore established a photoconversion-based model that allowed us to label tumor-infiltrating immune cells and follow their migration. Using this system, we identified a population of tumor-experienced cells that emigrate from primary tumors to draining lymph nodes via afferent lymphatic vessels. Although the majority of tumor-infiltrating cells were myeloid, T cells made up the largest population of tumor-egressing leukocytes. Strikingly, the subset composition of tumor-egressing T cells was greatly skewed compared with those that had infiltrated the tumor and those resident in the draining lymph node. Some T-cell subsets such as CD8+ T cells emigrated more readily; others including CD4−CD8− T cells were preferentially retained, suggesting that specific mechanisms guide immune cell egress from tumors. Furthermore, tumor-egressing T cells were more activated and displayed enhanced effector function in comparison with their lymph node counterparts. Finally, we demonstrated that tumor-infiltrating T cells migrate to distant secondary tumors and draining lymph nodes, highlighting a mechanism whereby tumor-experienced effector T cells may mediate antitumor immunity at metastatic sites. Thus, our results provide insights into migration and function of tumor-infiltrating immune cells and the role of these cells in tumor immunity outside of primary tumor deposits. PMID:28507145

  16. MLL fusion proteins preferentially regulate a subset of wild-type MLL target genes in the leukemic genome

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Qian-fei; Wu, George; Mi, Shuangli; He, Fuhong; Wu, Jun; Dong, Jingfang; Luo, Roger T.; Mattison, Ryan; Kaberlein, Joseph J.; Prabhakar, Shyam; Ji, Hongkai

    2011-01-01

    MLL encodes a histone methyltransferase that is critical in maintaining gene expression during embryonic development and hematopoiesis. 11q23 translocations result in the formation of chimeric MLL fusion proteins that act as potent drivers of acute leukemia. However, it remains unclear what portion of the leukemic genome is under the direct control of MLL fusions. By comparing patient-derived leukemic cell lines, we find that MLL fusion-bound genes are a small subset of that recognized by wild-type MLL. In an inducible MLL-ENL model, MLL fusion protein binding and changes in H3K79 methylation are limited to a specific portion of the genome, whereas wild-type MLL distributes to a much larger set of gene loci. Surprisingly, among 223 MLL-ENL–bound genes, only 12 demonstrate a significant increase in mRNA expression on induction of the fusion protein. In addition to Hoxa9 and Meis1, this includes Eya1 and Six1, which comprise a heterodimeric transcription factor important in several developmental pathways. We show that Eya1 has the capacity to immortalize hematopoietic progenitor cells in vitro and collaborates with Six1 in hematopoietic transformation assays. Altogether, our data suggest that MLL fusions contribute to the development of acute leukemia through direct activation of a small set of target genes. PMID:21518926

  17. Huntingtin differentially regulates the axonal transport of a sub-set of Rab-containing vesicles in vivo

    PubMed Central

    White, Joseph A.; Anderson, Eric; Zimmerman, Katherine; Zheng, Kan Hong; Rouhani, Roza; Gunawardena, Shermali

    2015-01-01

    Loss of huntingtin (HTT), the Huntington's disease (HD) protein, was previously shown to cause axonal transport defects. Within axons, HTT can associate with kinesin-1 and dynein motors either directly or via accessory proteins for bi-directional movement. However, the composition of the vesicle-motor complex that contains HTT during axonal transport is unknown. Here we analyze the in vivo movement of 16 Rab GTPases within Drosophila larval axons and show that HTT differentially influences the movement of a particular sub-set of these Rab-containing vesicles. While reduction of HTT perturbed the bi-directional motility of Rab3 and Rab19-containing vesicles, only the retrograde motility of Rab7-containing vesicles was disrupted with reduction of HTT. Interestingly, reduction of HTT stimulated the anterograde motility of Rab2-containing vesicles. Simultaneous dual-view imaging revealed that HTT and Rab2, 7 or 19 move together during axonal transport. Collectively, our findings indicate that HTT likely influences the motility of different Rab-containing vesicles and Rab-mediated functions. These findings have important implications for our understanding of the complex role HTT plays within neurons normally, which when disrupted may lead to neuronal death and disease. PMID:26450517

  18. Huntingtin differentially regulates the axonal transport of a sub-set of Rab-containing vesicles in vivo.

    PubMed

    White, Joseph A; Anderson, Eric; Zimmerman, Katherine; Zheng, Kan Hong; Rouhani, Roza; Gunawardena, Shermali

    2015-12-20

    Loss of huntingtin (HTT), the Huntington's disease (HD) protein, was previously shown to cause axonal transport defects. Within axons, HTT can associate with kinesin-1 and dynein motors either directly or via accessory proteins for bi-directional movement. However, the composition of the vesicle-motor complex that contains HTT during axonal transport is unknown. Here we analyze the in vivo movement of 16 Rab GTPases within Drosophila larval axons and show that HTT differentially influences the movement of a particular sub-set of these Rab-containing vesicles. While reduction of HTT perturbed the bi-directional motility of Rab3 and Rab19-containing vesicles, only the retrograde motility of Rab7-containing vesicles was disrupted with reduction of HTT. Interestingly, reduction of HTT stimulated the anterograde motility of Rab2-containing vesicles. Simultaneous dual-view imaging revealed that HTT and Rab2, 7 or 19 move together during axonal transport. Collectively, our findings indicate that HTT likely influences the motility of different Rab-containing vesicles and Rab-mediated functions. These findings have important implications for our understanding of the complex role HTT plays within neurons normally, which when disrupted may lead to neuronal death and disease. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  19. A subset of myofibroblastic cancer-associated fibroblasts regulate collagen fiber elongation, which is prognostic in multiple cancers.

    PubMed

    Hanley, Christopher J; Noble, Fergus; Ward, Matthew; Bullock, Marc; Drifka, Cole; Mellone, Massimiliano; Manousopoulou, Antigoni; Johnston, Harvey E; Hayden, Annette; Thirdborough, Steve; Liu, Yuming; Smith, David M; Mellows, Toby; Kao, W John; Garbis, Spiros D; Mirnezami, Alex; Underwood, Tim J; Eliceiri, Kevin W; Thomas, Gareth J

    2016-02-02

    Collagen structure has been shown to influence tumor cell invasion, metastasis and clinical outcome in breast cancer. However, it remains unclear how it affects other solid cancers. Here we utilized multi-photon laser scanning microscopy and Second Harmonic Generation to identify alterations to collagen fiber structure within the tumor stroma of head & neck, esophageal and colorectal cancers. Image segmentation algorithms were then applied to quantitatively characterize these morphological changes, showing that elongated collagen fibers significantly correlated with poor clinical outcome (Log Rank p < 0.05). We used TGF-β treatment to model fibroblast conversion to smooth muscle actin SMA-positive cancer associated fibroblasts (CAFs) and found that these cells induce the formation of elongated collagen fibers in vivo. However, proteomic/transcriptomic analysis of SMA-positive CAFs cultured ex-vivo showed significant heterogeneity in the expression of genes with collagen fibril organizing gene ontology. Notably, stratifying patients according to stromal SMA-positivity and collagen fiber elongation was found to provide a highly significant correlation with poor survival in all 3 cancer types (Log Rank p ≤ 0.003). In summary, we show that increased collagen fiber length correlates with poor patient survival in multiple tumor types and that only a sub-set of SMA-positive CAFs can mediate the formation of this collagen structure.

  20. A subset of myofibroblastic cancer-associated fibroblasts regulate collagen fiber elongation, which is prognostic in multiple cancers

    PubMed Central

    Hanley, Christopher J.; Noble, Fergus; Ward, Matthew; Bullock, Marc; Drifka, Cole; Mellone, Massimiliano; Manousopoulou, Antigoni; Johnston, Harvey E.; Hayden, Annette; Thirdborough, Steve; Liu, Yuming; Smith, David M.; Mellows, Toby; Kao, W. John; Garbis, Spiros D.; Mirnezami, Alex; Underwood, Tim J.

    2016-01-01

    Collagen structure has been shown to influence tumor cell invasion, metastasis and clinical outcome in breast cancer. However, it remains unclear how it affects other solid cancers. Here we utilized multi-photon laser scanning microscopy and Second Harmonic Generation to identify alterations to collagen fiber structure within the tumor stroma of head & neck, esophageal and colorectal cancers. Image segmentation algorithms were then applied to quantitatively characterize these morphological changes, showing that elongated collagen fibers significantly correlated with poor clinical outcome (Log Rank p < 0.05). We used TGF-β treatment to model fibroblast conversion to smooth muscle actin SMA-positive cancer associated fibroblasts (CAFs) and found that these cells induce the formation of elongated collagen fibers in vivo. However, proteomic/transcriptomic analysis of SMA-positive CAFs cultured ex-vivo showed significant heterogeneity in the expression of genes with collagen fibril organizing gene ontology. Notably, stratifying patients according to stromal SMA-positivity and collagen fiber elongation was found to provide a highly significant correlation with poor survival in all 3 cancer types (Log Rank p ≤ 0.003). In summary, we show that increased collagen fiber length correlates with poor patient survival in multiple tumor types and that only a sub-set of SMA-positive CAFs can mediate the formation of this collagen structure. PMID:26716418

  1. HP1a Targets the Drosophila KDM4A Demethylase to a Subset of Heterochromatic Genes to Regulate H3K36me3 Levels

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Chia-Hui; Paulson, Ariel; Abmayr, Susan M.; Workman, Jerry L.

    2012-01-01

    The KDM4 subfamily of JmjC domain-containing demethylases mediates demethylation of histone H3K36me3/me2 and H3K9me3/me2. Several studies have shown that human and yeast KDM4 proteins bind to specific gene promoters and regulate gene expression. However, the genome-wide distribution of KDM4 proteins and the mechanism of genomic-targeting remain elusive. We have previously identified Drosophila KDM4A (dKDM4A) as a histone H3K36me3 demethylase that directly interacts with HP1a. Here, we performed H3K36me3 ChIP-chip analysis in wild type and dkdm4a mutant embryos to identify genes regulated by dKDM4A demethylase activity in vivo. A subset of heterochromatic genes that show increased H3K36me3 levels in dkdm4a mutant embryos overlap with HP1a target genes. More importantly, binding to HP1a is required for dKDM4A-mediated H3K36me3 demethylation at a subset of heterochromatic genes. Collectively, these results show that HP1a functions to target the H3K36 demethylase dKDM4A to heterochromatic genes in Drosophila. PMID:22761891

  2. Repeated Exposure to D-Amphetamine Decreases Global Protein Synthesis and Regulates the Translation of a Subset of mRNAs in the Striatum

    PubMed Central

    Biever, Anne; Boubaker-Vitre, Jihane; Cutando, Laura; Gracia-Rubio, Irene; Costa-Mattioli, Mauro; Puighermanal, Emma; Valjent, Emmanuel

    2017-01-01

    Repeated psychostimulant exposure induces persistent gene expression modifications that contribute to enduring changes in striatal GABAergic spiny projecting neurons (SPNs). However, it remains unclear whether changes in the control of mRNA translation are required for the establishment of these durable modifications. Here we report that repeated exposure to D-amphetamine decreases global striatal mRNA translation. This effect is paralleled by an enhanced phosphorylation of the translation factors, eIF2α and eEF2, and by the concomitant increased translation of a subset of mRNAs, among which the mRNA encoding for the activity regulated cytoskeleton-associated protein, also known as activity regulated gene 3.1 (Arc/Arg3.1). The enrichment of Arc/Arg3.1 mRNA in the polysomal fraction is accompanied by a robust increase of Arc/Arg3.1 protein levels within the striatum. Immunofluorescence analysis revealed that this increase occurred preferentially in D1R-expressing SPNs localized in striosome compartments. Our results suggest that the decreased global protein synthesis following repeated exposure to D-amphetamine favors the translation of a specific subset of mRNAs in the striatum. PMID:28119566

  3. Selenium status highly-regulates selenoprotein mRNA levels for only a subset of the selenoproteins in the selenoproteome

    PubMed Central

    SUNDE, Roger A.; RAINES, Anna M.; BARNES, Kimberly M.; EVENSON, Jacqueline K.

    2011-01-01

    Synopsis Gpx (glutathione peroxidase)-1 enzyme activity and mRNA levels decrease dramatically in selenium (Se) deficiency, whereas other selenoproteins are less affected by Se deficiency. This hierarchy of Se regulation is not understood, but the position of the UGA selenocysteine codon is thought to play a major role in making selenoprotein mRNAs susceptible to nonsense-mediated decay. Thus in the present paper we studied the complete selenoproteome in the mouse to uncover additional selenoprotein mRNAs that are highly-regulated by Se status. Mice were fed Se-deficient, Se-marginal, and Se-adequate diets (0, 0.05 and 0.2 μg Se/g, respectively) for 35 days, and selenoprotein mRNA levels in liver and kidney were determined using microarray analysis and quantitative real-time PCR analysis. Se-deficient mice had liver Se concentrations and liver Gpx1 and thioredoxin reductase activities that were 4, 3 and 3%, respectively, of the levels in Se-adequate mice, indicating that the mice were Se-deficient. mRNAs for Selh (selenoprotein H) and Sepw1 (selenoprotein W) as well as Gpx1 were decreased by Se deficiency to <40% of Se-adequate levels. Five and two additional mRNAs were moderately down-regulated in Se-deficient liver and kidney, respectively. Importantly, nine selenoprotein mRNAs in liver and fifteen selenoprotein mRNAs in kidney were not significantly regulated by Se deficiency, clearly demonstrating that Se regulation of selenoprotein mRNAs is not a general phenomenon. The similarity of the response to Se deficiency suggests that there is one underlying mechanism responsible. Importantly, the position of the UGA codon did not predict susceptibility to Se regulation, clearly indicating that additional features are involved in causing selenoprotein mRNAs to be sensitive to Se status. PMID:19076066

  4. Regulation of Carotenoid Biosynthesis by Shade Relies on Specific Subsets of Antagonistic Transcription Factors and Cofactors1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Bou-Torrent, Jordi; Toledo-Ortiz, Gabriela; Ortiz-Alcaide, Miriam; Cifuentes-Esquivel, Nicolas; Halliday, Karen J.; Martinez-García, Jaime F.; Rodriguez-Concepcion, Manuel

    2015-01-01

    Carotenoids are photosynthetic pigments essential for the protection against excess light. During deetiolation, their production is regulated by a dynamic repression-activation module formed by PHYTOCHROME-INTERACTING FACTOR1 (PIF1) and LONG HYPOCOTYL5 (HY5). These transcription factors directly and oppositely control the expression of the gene encoding PHYTOENE SYNTHASE (PSY), the first and main rate-determining enzyme of the carotenoid pathway. Antagonistic modules also regulate the responses of deetiolated plants to vegetation proximity and shade (i.e. to the perception of far-red light-enriched light filtered through or reflected from neighboring plants). These responses, aimed to adapt to eventual shading from plant competitors, include a reduced accumulation of carotenoids. Here, we show that PIF1 and related photolabile PIFs (but not photostable PIF7) promote the shade-triggered decrease in carotenoid accumulation. While HY5 does not appear to be required for this process, other known PIF antagonists were found to modulate the expression of the Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) PSY gene and the biosynthesis of carotenoids early after exposure to shade. In particular, PHYTOCHROME-RAPIDLY REGULATED1, a transcriptional cofactor that prevents the binding of true transcription factors to their target promoters, was found to interact with PIF1 and hence directly induce PSY expression. By contrast, a change in the levels of the transcriptional cofactor LONG HYPOCOTYL IN FAR RED1, which also binds to PIF1 and other PIFs to regulate shade-related elongation responses, did not impact PSY expression or carotenoid accumulation. Our data suggest that the fine-regulation of carotenoid biosynthesis in response to shade relies on specific modules of antagonistic transcriptional factors and cofactors. PMID:26082398

  5. Expression and regulation of two idiotype families and subsets within an idiotype family among BALB/c antibodies against p-azophenylarsonate

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, A.R.

    1984-06-01

    The expression and regulation of the two different iodiotype (id) families associated with the anti-p-azophenylarsonate (Ar) antibodies of BALB/c mice examined. Both families (5AF6 and 3C6) represented cross-reactive idiotypes (CRI) expressed in the anti-Ar of most individual BALB/c mice. In response to keyhole limpet hemocyanin-Ar, an average of about 28% of BALB/c anti-Ar had 5AF6 family idiotopes, while 3C6 family was expressed on about 16% of BALBc anti-Ar antibodies. Suppression induced by anti-idiotype treatment against one family did not suppress the expression of the other family suggesting that the two families were regulated independently. However, the relative expression of one family could influence the expression of the other, because depression of the 5AF6 family tended to increase the expression of the 3C6 family of anti-Ar. Analysis of the 5AF6 family showed that a majority of BALB/c mice produced antibodies heating most or all of the idiotopes associated with the family, but that a subset of about 35% of the antibodies synthesized lacked idiotopes associated with a monoclonal anti-Ar member of this family, 2.4. Treatment of mice with anti-idiotypes prepared against two different monoclonal anti-Ar of the 5AF6 family produced different effects: one enhanced while the other suppressed idiotype expression, suggesting that there are differences in the idiotopes associated with these two regulatory pathways. Additionally, results indicated that subsets of antibodies within the 5AF6 idiotype family could be regulated independently of each other.

  6. Stress-mediated Sin3B activation leads to negative regulation of subset of p53 target genes

    PubMed Central

    Kadamb, Rama; Mittal, Shilpi; Bansal, Nidhi; Saluja, Daman

    2015-01-01

    The multiprotein SWI-independent 3 (Sin3)–HDAC (histone deacetylase) corepressor complex mediates gene repression through its interaction with DNA-binding factors and recruitment of chromatin-modifying proteins on to the promoters of target gene. Previously, an increased expression of Sin3B and tumour suppressor protein, p53 has been established upon adriamycin treatment. We, now provide evidence that Sin3B expression is significantly up-regulated under variety of stress conditions and this response is not stress-type specific. We observed that Sin3B expression is significantly up-regulated both at transcript and at protein level upon DNA damage induced by bleomycin drug, a radiomimetic agent. This increase in Sin3B expression upon stress is found to be p53-dependent and is associated with enhanced interaction of Sin3B with Ser15 phosphorylated p53. Binding of Sin3–HDAC repressor complex on to the promoters of p53 target genes influences gene regulation by altering histone modifications (H3K9me3 and H3K27me3) at target genes. Furthermore, knockdown of Sin3B by shRNA severely compromises p53-mediated gene repression under stress conditions. Taken together, these results suggest that stress-induced Sin3B activation is p53-dependent and is essential for p53-mediated repression of its selective target genes. The present study has an implication in understanding the transrepression mechanism of p53 under DNA damaging conditions. PMID:26181367

  7. Characterization of a subset of bone marrow-derived natural killer cells that regulates T cell activation in rats.

    PubMed

    Kheradmand, Taba; Trivedi, Prachi P; Wolf, Norbert A; Roberts, Paul C; Swanborg, Robert H

    2008-05-01

    We report that bone marrow-derived natural killer (BMNK) cells from DA or F344 rats inhibit PMA/ionomycin-induced T cell proliferation. These NK-regulatory cells are NKR-P1A(dim), whereas a minor subpopulation is NKR-P1A(bright). Only the NKR-P1A(dim) BMNK cells inhibit T cell proliferation. If activated with rat Con A supernatant, the NKR-P1A(dim) cells become NKR-P1A(bright) and lose the ability to inhibit T cell proliferation. In contrast to BMNK cells, all DA and F344 rat NK cells isolated from the blood, spleen, cervical, or mesenteric lymph nodes or Peyer's patches are NKR-P1A(bright) and lack the ability to inhibit T cell proliferation. Inhibition of T cell proliferation correlates with significant down-regulation of CD3, suggesting that this may be the mechanism through which the NKR-P1A(dim) cells mediate suppression. The nitric oxide synthase inhibitor N(G)-monomethyl-arginine acetate-abrogated NKR-P1A(dim) cell inhibition of T cell proliferation. We conclude that rat bone marrow NKR-P1A(dim) cells represent a unique population that may play a role in maintaining immune homeostasis by regulating the clonal expansion of activated T cells.

  8. The E-protein Tcf4 interacts with Math1 to regulate differentiation of a specific subset of neuronal progenitors

    PubMed Central

    Flora, Adriano; Garcia, Jesus J.; Thaller, Christina; Zoghbi, Huda Y.

    2007-01-01

    Proneural factors represent <10 transcriptional regulators required for specifying all of the different neurons of the mammalian nervous system. The mechanisms by which such a small number of factors creates this diversity are still unknown. We propose that proteins interacting with proneural factors confer such specificity. To test this hypothesis we isolated proteins that interact with Math1, a proneural transcription factor essential for the establishment of a neural progenitor population (rhombic lip) that gives rise to multiple hindbrain structures and identified the E-protein Tcf4. Interestingly, haploinsufficiency of TCF4 causes the Pitt–Hopkins mental retardation syndrome, underscoring the important role for this protein in neural development. To investigate the functional relevance of the Math1/Tcf4 interaction in vivo, we studied Tcf4−/− mice and found that they have disrupted pontine nucleus development. Surprisingly, this selective deficit occurs without affecting other rhombic lip-derived nuclei, despite expression of Math1 and Tcf4 throughout the rhombic lip. Importantly, deletion of any of the other E-protein-encoding genes does not have detectable effects on Math1-dependent neurons, suggesting a specialized role for Tcf4 in distinct neural progenitors. Our findings provide the first in vivo evidence for an exclusive function of dimers formed between a proneural basic helix–loop–helix factor and a specific E-protein, offering insight about the mechanisms underlying transcriptional programs that regulate development of the mammalian nervous system. PMID:17878293

  9. NaJAZh regulates a subset of defense responses against herbivores and spontaneous leaf necrosis in Nicotiana attenuata plants.

    PubMed

    Oh, Youngjoo; Baldwin, Ian T; Gális, Ivan

    2012-06-01

    The JASMONATE ZIM DOMAIN (JAZ) proteins function as negative regulators of jasmonic acid signaling in plants. We cloned 12 JAZ genes from native tobacco (Nicotiana attenuata), including nine novel JAZs in tobacco, and examined their expression in plants that had leaves elicited by wounding or simulated herbivory. Most JAZ genes showed strong expression in the elicited leaves, but NaJAZg was mainly expressed in roots. Another novel herbivory-elicited gene, NaJAZh, was analyzed in detail. RNA interference suppression of this gene in inverted-repeat (ir)JAZh plants deregulated a specific branch of jasmonic acid-dependent direct and indirect defenses: irJAZh plants showed greater trypsin protease inhibitor activity, 17-hydroxygeranyllinalool diterpene glycosides accumulation, and emission of volatile organic compounds from leaves. Silencing of NaJAZh also revealed a novel cross talk in JAZ-regulated secondary metabolism, as irJAZh plants had significantly reduced nicotine levels. In addition, irJAZh spontaneously developed leaf necrosis during the transition to flowering. Because the lesions closely correlated with the elevated expression of programmed cell death genes and the accumulations of salicylic acid and hydrogen peroxide in the leaves, we propose a novel role of the NaJAZh protein as a repressor of necrosis and/or programmed cell death during plant development.

  10. Transcription of a subset of human class II major histocompatibility complex genes is regulated by a nucleoprotein complex that contains c-fos or an antigenically related protein.

    PubMed Central

    Ono, S J; Bazil, V; Levi, B Z; Ozato, K; Strominger, J L

    1991-01-01

    Transcriptional regulation of the human major histocompatibility complex class II genes requires at least two upstream elements, the X and Y boxes, located in the -50- to -150-base-pair region of all class II promoters. The DRA and DPB promoters contain phorbol ester-responsive elements overlapping the 3' side of their X boxes. Mutation of this sequence down-regulates the efficiency of the DRA promoter, suggesting that a positive regulator(s) binds to this site. In this report, anti-sense c-fos RNA and an anti-c-fos antibody were used to show that the product of the protooncogene c-fos or an antigenically related protein is a component of a complex that binds to the X box and is required for maximal transcription from the DRA and DPB promoters. As c-fos (or its related proteins) cannot bind alone to DNA, these results suggest that it may dimerize with other members of the JUN/AP-1 family, such as hXBP1, to participate in the activation of a subset of class II major histocompatibility complex genes. Images PMID:1709740

  11. B Cell-Activating Factor Regulates Different Aspects of B Cell Functionality and Is Produced by a Subset of Splenic B Cells in Teleost Fish

    PubMed Central

    Tafalla, Carolina; González, Lucia; Castro, Rosario; Granja, Aitor G.

    2017-01-01

    In mammals, B cell functionality is greatly influenced by cytokines released by innate cells, such as macrophages or dendritic cells, upon the early recognition of common pathogen patterns through invariant receptors. B cell-activating factor (BAFF) is one of these innate B cell-helper signals and plays a key role in the survival and differentiation of B cells. Although, evolutionarily, teleost fish constitute the first animal group in which adaptive immunity based on Ig receptors is present, fish still rely greatly on innate responses. In this context, we hypothesized that BAFF would play a key role in the control of B cell responses in fish. Supporting this, our results show that teleost BAFF recapitulates mammalian BAFF stimulating actions on B cells, upregulating the expression of membrane MHC II, improving the survival of fish naïve B cells and antibody-secreting cells, and increasing the secretion of IgM. Surprisingly, we also demonstrate that BAFF is not only produced in fish by myeloid cells but is also produced by a subset of splenic B cells. Thus, if this B cell-produced BAFF proves to be actively regulating this same B cell subset, our findings point to an ancient mechanism to control B cell differentiation and survival in lower vertebrates, which has been silenced in mammals in physiological conditions, but reemerges under pathological conditions, such as B cell lymphomas and autoimmune diseases. PMID:28360916

  12. A snoRNA modulates mRNA 3′ end processing and regulates the expression of a subset of mRNAs

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Chunliu; Shi, Junjie; Guo, Yibin; Huang, Weijun; Huang, Shanshan; Ming, Siqi; Wu, Xingui; Zhang, Rui; Ding, Junjun; Zhao, Wei; Jia, Jie; Huang, Xi; Xiang, Andy Peng

    2017-01-01

    Abstract mRNA 3′ end processing is an essential step in gene expression. It is well established that canonical eukaryotic pre-mRNA 3′ processing is carried out within a macromolecular machinery consisting of dozens of trans-acting proteins. However, it is unknown whether RNAs play any role in this process. Unexpectedly, we found that a subset of small nucleolar RNAs (snoRNAs) are associated with the mammalian mRNA 3′ processing complex. These snoRNAs primarily interact with Fip1, a component of cleavage and polyadenylation specificity factor (CPSF). We have functionally characterized one of these snoRNAs and our results demonstrated that the U/A-rich SNORD50A inhibits mRNA 3′ processing by blocking the Fip1-poly(A) site (PAS) interaction. Consistently, SNORD50A depletion altered the Fip1–RNA interaction landscape and changed the alternative polyadenylation (APA) profiles and/or transcript levels of a subset of genes. Taken together, our data revealed a novel function for snoRNAs and provided the first evidence that non-coding RNAs may play an important role in regulating mRNA 3′ processing.

  13. B Cell-Activating Factor Regulates Different Aspects of B Cell Functionality and Is Produced by a Subset of Splenic B Cells in Teleost Fish.

    PubMed

    Tafalla, Carolina; González, Lucia; Castro, Rosario; Granja, Aitor G

    2017-01-01

    In mammals, B cell functionality is greatly influenced by cytokines released by innate cells, such as macrophages or dendritic cells, upon the early recognition of common pathogen patterns through invariant receptors. B cell-activating factor (BAFF) is one of these innate B cell-helper signals and plays a key role in the survival and differentiation of B cells. Although, evolutionarily, teleost fish constitute the first animal group in which adaptive immunity based on Ig receptors is present, fish still rely greatly on innate responses. In this context, we hypothesized that BAFF would play a key role in the control of B cell responses in fish. Supporting this, our results show that teleost BAFF recapitulates mammalian BAFF stimulating actions on B cells, upregulating the expression of membrane MHC II, improving the survival of fish naïve B cells and antibody-secreting cells, and increasing the secretion of IgM. Surprisingly, we also demonstrate that BAFF is not only produced in fish by myeloid cells but is also produced by a subset of splenic B cells. Thus, if this B cell-produced BAFF proves to be actively regulating this same B cell subset, our findings point to an ancient mechanism to control B cell differentiation and survival in lower vertebrates, which has been silenced in mammals in physiological conditions, but reemerges under pathological conditions, such as B cell lymphomas and autoimmune diseases.

  14. The transcriptional regulators Id2 and Id3 control the formation of distinct memory CD8+ T cell subsets

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Cliff Y.; Best, J. Adam; Knell, Jamie; Yang, Edward; Sheridan, Alison D.; Jesionek, Adam K.; Li, Haiyan S.; Rivera, Richard R.; Lind, Kristin Camfield; D’Cruz, Louise M.; Watowich, Stephanie S.; Murre, Cornelis; Goldrath, Ananda W.

    2013-01-01

    During infection, naive CD8+ T cells differentiate into effector cells, which are armed to eliminate pathogens, and memory cells, which are poised to protect against reinfection. The transcriptional program that regulates terminal differentiation into short-lived effector-memory versus long-lived memory cells is not clearly defined. Through the use of mice expressing reporters for the DNA-binding inhibitors Id2 and Id3, we identified Id3hi precursors of long-lived memory cells before the peak of T cell population expansion or upregulation of cell-surface receptors that indicate memory potential. Deficiency in Id2 or Id3 resulted in loss of distinct CD8+ effector and memory populations, which demonstrated unique roles for these inhibitors of E-protein transcription factors. Furthermore, cytokines altered the expression of Id2 and Id3 differently, which provides insight into how external cues influence gene expression. PMID:22057289

  15. The transcriptional regulators Id2 and Id3 control the formation of distinct memory CD8+ T cell subsets.

    PubMed

    Yang, Cliff Y; Best, J Adam; Knell, Jamie; Yang, Edward; Sheridan, Alison D; Jesionek, Adam K; Li, Haiyan S; Rivera, Richard R; Lind, Kristin Camfield; D'Cruz, Louise M; Watowich, Stephanie S; Murre, Cornelis; Goldrath, Ananda W

    2011-11-06

    During infection, naive CD8(+) T cells differentiate into effector cells, which are armed to eliminate pathogens, and memory cells, which are poised to protect against reinfection. The transcriptional program that regulates terminal differentiation into short-lived effector-memory versus long-lived memory cells is not clearly defined. Through the use of mice expressing reporters for the DNA-binding inhibitors Id2 and Id3, we identified Id3(hi) precursors of long-lived memory cells before the peak of T cell population expansion or upregulation of cell-surface receptors that indicate memory potential. Deficiency in Id2 or Id3 resulted in loss of distinct CD8(+) effector and memory populations, which demonstrated unique roles for these inhibitors of E-protein transcription factors. Furthermore, cytokines altered the expression of Id2 and Id3 differently, which provides insight into how external cues influence gene expression.

  16. Remainder Subset Awareness for Feature Subset Selection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prat-Masramon, Gabriel; Belanche-Muñoz, Lluís A.

    Feature subset selection has become more and more a common topic of research. This popularity is partly due to the growth in the number of features and application domains. It is of the greatest importance to take themost of every evaluation of the inducer, which is normally the more costly part. In this paper, a technique is proposed that takes into account the inducer evaluation both in the current subset and in the remainder subset (its complementary set) and is applicable to any sequential subset selection algorithm at a reasonable overhead in cost. Its feasibility is demonstrated on a series of benchmark data sets.

  17. Identification of KCa3.1 Channel as a Novel Regulator of Oxidative Phosphorylation in a Subset of Pancreatic Carcinoma Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Kovalenko, Ilya; Glasauer, Andrea; Schöckel, Laura; Sauter, Daniel R. P.; Ehrmann, Alexander; Sohler, Florian; Hägebarth, Andrea; Novak, Ivana; Christian, Sven

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) represents the most common form of pancreatic cancer with rising incidence in developing countries and overall 5-year survival rates of less than 5%. The most frequent mutations in PDAC are gain-of-function mutations in KRAS as well as loss-of-function mutations in p53. Both mutations have severe impacts on the metabolism of tumor cells. Many of these metabolic changes are mediated by transporters or channels that regulate the exchange of metabolites and ions between the intracellular compartment and the tumor microenvironment. In the study presented here, our goal was to identify novel transporters or channels that regulate oxidative phosphorylation (OxPhos) in PDAC in order to characterize novel potential drug targets for the treatment of these cancers. We set up a Seahorse Analyzer XF based siRNA screen and identified previously described as well as novel regulators of OxPhos. The siRNA that resulted in the greatest change in cellular oxygen consumption was targeting the KCNN4 gene, which encodes for the Ca2+-sensitive K+ channel KCa3.1. This channel has not previously been reported to regulate OxPhos. Knock-down experiments as well as the use of a small molecule inhibitor confirmed its role in regulating oxygen consumption, ATP production and cellular proliferation. Furthermore, PDAC cell lines sensitive to KCa3.1 inhibition were shown to express the channel protein in the plasma membrane as well as in the mitochondria. These differences in the localization of KCa3.1 channels as well as differences in the regulation of cellular metabolism might offer opportunities for targeted therapy in subsets of PDAC. PMID:27494181

  18. Caffeine induces tumor cytotoxicity via the regulation of alternative splicing in subsets of cancer-associated genes.

    PubMed

    Lu, Guan-Yu; Huang, Shih-Ming; Liu, Shu-Ting; Liu, Pei-Yao; Chou, Wei-Yuan; Lin, Wei-Shiang

    2014-02-01

    Caffeine causes a diverse range of pharmacological effects that are time- and concentration-dependent and reversible. The detailed mechanisms of caffeine in tumor suppression via tumor suppressor protein p53 remain unclear. The isoforms of p53 are physiological proteins that are expressed in normal cells and generated via alternative promoters, splicing sites and/or translational initiation sites. In this study, we investigated how caffeine modulated cell cycle arrest and apoptosis via the expression of various alternatively spliced p53 isoforms. Caffeine reduced p53α expression and induced the expression of p53β, which contains an alternatively spliced p53 C-terminus. In HeLa cells, the expression levels of many serine/arginine-rich splicing factors, including serine/arginine-rich splicing factors 2 and 3, were altered by caffeine. Serine/arginine-rich splicing factor 3 was a promising candidate for the serine/arginine-rich splicing factors responsible for the alternative splicing of p53 in response to caffeine treatment. In addition to p53-dependent functions, multiple target genes of serine/arginine-rich splicing factor 3 suggest that caffeine can regulate epithelial-mesenchymal-transition and hypoxic conditions to inhibit the survival of tumor cells. In summary, our data provide a new pathway of caffeine-modulated tumor suppression via the alternative splicing of the target genes of serine/arginine-rich splicing factor 3.

  19. Regulation of adipose tissue T cell subsets by Stat3 is crucial for diet-induced obesity and insulin resistance.

    PubMed

    Priceman, Saul J; Kujawski, Maciej; Shen, Shudan; Cherryholmes, Gregory A; Lee, Heehyoung; Zhang, Chunyan; Kruper, Laura; Mortimer, Joanne; Jove, Richard; Riggs, Arthur D; Yu, Hua

    2013-08-06

    Dysregulated inflammation in adipose tissue, marked by increased proinflammatory T-cell accumulation and reduced regulatory T cells (Tregs), contributes to obesity-associated insulin resistance. The molecular mechanisms underlying T-cell-mediated inflammation in adipose tissue remain largely unknown, however. Here we show a crucial role for signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (Stat3) in T cells in skewing adaptive immunity in visceral adipose tissue (VAT), thereby contributing to diet-induced obesity (DIO) and insulin resistance. Stat3 activity is elevated in obese VAT and in VAT-resident T cells. Functional ablation of Stat3 in T cells reduces DIO, improves insulin sensitivity and glucose tolerance, and suppresses VAT inflammation. Importantly, Stat3 ablation reverses the high Th1/Treg ratio in VAT of DIO mice that is likely secondary to elevated IL-6 production, leading in turn to suppression of Tregs. In addition, Stat3 in T cells in DIO mice affects adipose tissue macrophage accumulation and M2 phenotype. Our study identifies Stat3 in VAT-resident T cells as an important mediator and direct target for regulating adipose tissue inflammation, DIO, and its associated metabolic dysfunctions.

  20. Nitrated Alpha Synuclein Induced Alterations in Microglial Immunity is Regulated by CD4+ T Cell Subsets1

    PubMed Central

    Reynolds, Ashley D.; Stone, David K.; Mosley, R. Lee; Gendelman, Howard E.

    2009-01-01

    Microglial inflammatory neuroregulatory activities affect the tempo of nigrostriatal degeneration during Parkinson's disease (PD). Such activities are induced, in part, by misfolded, nitrated alpha-synuclein (N-α-syn) within Lewy bodies released from dying or dead dopaminergic neurons. Such pathobiologic events initiate innate and adaptive immune responses affecting neurodegeneration. We posit that the neurobiological activities of activated microglia are affected by cell-protein and cell-cell contacts, in that microglial interactions with N-α-syn and CD4+ T cells substantively alter the microglial proteome. This leads to alterations in cell homeostatic functions and disease. CD4+CD25+ regulatory T cells (Treg) suppress N-α-syn microglial induced reactive oxygen species and nuclear factor kappa B activation by modulating redox-active enzymes, cell migration, phagocytosis, and bioenergetic protein expression and cell function. In contrast, CD4+CD25− effector T cells exacerbate microglial inflammation and induce “putative” neurotoxic responses. These data support the importance of adaptive immunity in the regulation of PD-associated microglial inflammation. PMID:19299711

  1. Unique and shared signaling pathways cooperate to regulate the differentiation of human CD4+ T cells into distinct effector subsets

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Natalie; Rao, Geetha; Nguyen, Akira; Avery, Danielle T.; Payne, Kathryn; Torpy, James; O’Young, Patrick; Deenick, Elissa; Bustamante, Jacinta; Puel, Anne; Okada, Satoshi; Kobayashi, Masao; Martinez-Barricarte, Ruben; Elliott, Michael; Sebnem Kilic, Sara; El Baghdadi, Jamila; Minegishi, Yoshiyuki; Bousfiha, Aziz; Robertson, Nic; Hambleton, Sophie; Arkwright, Peter D.; French, Martyn; Blincoe, Annaliesse K.; Hsu, Peter; Campbell, Dianne E.; Stormon, Michael O.; Wong, Melanie; Adelstein, Stephen; Fulcher, David A.; Cook, Matthew C.; Stepensky, Polina; Boztug, Kaan; Beier, Rita; Ikincioğullari, Aydan; Ziegler, John B.; Gray, Paul; Picard, Capucine; Boisson-Dupuis, Stéphanie; Phan, Tri Giang; Grimbacher, Bodo; Warnatz, Klaus; Holland, Steven M.; Uzel, Gulbu; Casanova, Jean-Laurent; Tangye, Stuart G.

    2016-01-01

    Naive CD4+ T cells differentiate into specific effector subsets—Th1, Th2, Th17, and T follicular helper (Tfh)—that provide immunity against pathogen infection. The signaling pathways involved in generating these effector cells are partially known. However, the effects of mutations underlying human primary immunodeficiencies on these processes, and how they compromise specific immune responses, remain unresolved. By studying individuals with mutations in key signaling pathways, we identified nonredundant pathways regulating human CD4+ T cell differentiation in vitro. IL12Rβ1/TYK2 and IFN-γR/STAT1 function in a feed-forward loop to induce Th1 cells, whereas IL-21/IL-21R/STAT3 signaling is required for Th17, Tfh, and IL-10–secreting cells. IL12Rβ1/TYK2 and NEMO are also required for Th17 induction. Strikingly, gain-of-function STAT1 mutations recapitulated the impact of dominant-negative STAT3 mutations on Tfh and Th17 cells, revealing a putative inhibitory effect of hypermorphic STAT1 over STAT3. These findings provide mechanistic insight into the requirements for human T cell effector function, and explain clinical manifestations of these immunodeficient conditions. Furthermore, they identify molecules that could be targeted to modulate CD4+ T cell effector function in the settings of infection, vaccination, or immune dysregulation. PMID:27401342

  2. C-terminal phosphorylation regulates the kinetics of a subset of melanopsin-mediated behaviors in mice.

    PubMed

    Somasundaram, Preethi; Wyrick, Glenn R; Fernandez, Diego Carlos; Ghahari, Alireza; Pinhal, Cindy M; Simmonds Richardson, Melissa; Rupp, Alan C; Cui, Lihong; Wu, Zhijian; Brown, R Lane; Badea, Tudor Constantin; Hattar, Samer; Robinson, Phyllis R

    2017-03-07

    Intrinsically photosensitive retinal ganglion cells (ipRGCs) express the photopigment melanopsin and mediate several non-image-forming visual functions, including circadian photoentrainment and the pupillary light reflex (PLR). ipRGCs act as autonomous photoreceptors via the intrinsic melanopsin-based phototransduction pathway and as a relay for rod/cone input via synaptically driven responses. Under low light intensities, where only synaptically driven rod/cone input activates ipRGCs, the duration of the ipRGC response will be determined by the termination kinetics of the rod/cone circuits. Little is known, however, about the termination kinetics of the intrinsic melanopsin-based phototransduction pathway and its contribution to several melanopsin-mediated behaviors. Here, we show that C-terminal phosphorylation of melanopsin determines the recovery kinetics of the intrinsic melanopsin-based photoresponse in ipRGCs, the duration of the PLR, and the speed of reentrainment. In contrast, circadian phase alignment and direct effects of light on activity (masking) are not influenced by C-terminal phosphorylation of melanopsin. Electrophysiological measurements demonstrate that expression of a virally encoded melanopsin lacking all C-terminal phosphorylation sites (C terminus phosphonull) leads to a prolonged intrinsic light response. In addition, mice expressing the C terminus phosphonull in ipRGCs reentrain faster to a delayed light/dark cycle compared with mice expressing virally encoded WT melanopsin; however, the phase angle of entrainment and masking were indistinguishable. Importantly, a sustained PLR in the phosphonull animals is only observed at brighter light intensities that activate melanopsin phototransduction, but not at dimmer light intensities that activate only the rod/cone pathway. Taken together, our results highlight how the kinetics of the melanopsin photoresponse differentially regulate distinct light-mediated behaviors.

  3. Potencies of oral contraceptives.

    PubMed

    Edgren, R A; Sturtevant, F M

    1976-08-15

    Oral contraceptives are combinations of estrogens and progestogens or, in the case of the mini-pills, progestogens alone. With specific test procedures in laboratory animals or human subjects, it is possible to assign potency evaluations to the components relative to the progestational, estrogenic, or antiestrogenic activities of the progestogen or to the estrogenic potencies of the estrogenic component. It might even be possible to quantify the synergistic effects of the estrogen on the progestational agent. Unfortunately, however, it is impossible now to amalgamate such assay results into single estimates of the potencies of the combinations (either the combination products per se or the combination tablets of sequential products). For example, an over-all estrogenic potency of a combination preparation would involve the integration of contributions form the estrogen itself plus the estrogenic products of metabolism of the progestogen minus the antagonistic effect of the progestational agent, if any. These factors cannot now be quantified independently, much less merged into a single figure of clinical significance. Further, even if it were possible to produce such an estimate, it is unlikely that the evaluation would be meaningful in relation to any putative side effect or adverse reaction, i.e., the alleged thrombogenic effects of oral contraceptives cannot currently be related directly to any measure of potency that will allow prediction of these clinical conditions from laboratory models. Any evaluation of the potential of a given contraceptive to produce a specific side effect will depend upon data generated with specific regard to that adverse reaction and the individual product in question.

  4. The role of suppressor of cytokine signaling 1 as a negative regulator for aberrant expansion of CD8alpha+ dendritic cell subset.

    PubMed

    Tsukada, Jun; Ozaki, Akemi; Hanada, Toshikatsu; Chinen, Takatoshi; Abe, Ryo; Yoshimura, Akihiko; Kubo, Masato

    2005-09-01

    The suppressor of cytokine signaling (SOCS) 1 is a negative regulator in multiple cytokine-related aspects to maintain immunological homeostasis. Here, we studied a role of SOCS1 on dendritic cell (DC) maturation in the mice lacking either TCRalpha chain or CD28 in SOCS1-deficient background, and found that the SOCS1 could restore acute phase of inflammatory response in SOCS1-deficient mice. The CD11c+ CD8- DC population in freshly isolated splenic DCs from normal mice highly expressed SOCS1. However, in SOCS1-deficient environment, the proportion of CD8alpha+ DCs (CD8 DCs) noticeably increased without affecting the cell number of conventional and plasmacytoid DC populations. This population revealed the CD11cdull CD8alpha+ CD11b- CD45RA- B220- phenotype, which is a minor population in normal mice. Localization of the abnormal CD8 DCs in splenic microenvironments was mainly restricted to deep within red pulp. The CD8 DCs secrete a large amount of IFN-gamma, IL-12 and B lymphocyte stimulator/B cell activation factor of the tumor necrosis factor family in response to LPS and CpG stimulation. This is responsible for the development of DC-mediated systemic autoimmunity in the old age of SOCS1-deficient mice. Moreover, the CD8 DC subsets expressed more indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase and IL-10, and hence inhibit the allogeneic proliferative T cell response and antigen-induced Th1 responses. Therefore, SOCS1 expression during DC maturation plays a role in surveillance in controlling the aberrant expansion of abnormal DC subset to maintain homeostasis of immune system.

  5. Prosurvival long noncoding RNA PINCR regulates a subset of p53 targets in human colorectal cancer cells by binding to Matrin 3

    PubMed Central

    Chaudhary, Ritu; Gryder, Berkley; Woods, Wendy S; Subramanian, Murugan; Jones, Matthew F; Li, Xiao Ling; Jenkins, Lisa M; Shabalina, Svetlana A; Mo, Min; Dasso, Mary; Yang, Yuan; Wakefield, Lalage M; Zhu, Yuelin; Frier, Susan M; Moriarity, Branden S; Prasanth, Kannanganattu V; Perez-Pinera, Pablo; Lal, Ashish

    2017-01-01

    Thousands of long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) have been discovered, yet the function of the vast majority remains unclear. Here, we show that a p53-regulated lncRNA which we named PINCR (p53-induced noncoding RNA), is induced ~100-fold after DNA damage and exerts a prosurvival function in human colorectal cancer cells (CRC) in vitro and tumor growth in vivo. Targeted deletion of PINCR in CRC cells significantly impaired G1 arrest and induced hypersensitivity to chemotherapeutic drugs. PINCR regulates the induction of a subset of p53 targets involved in G1 arrest and apoptosis, including BTG2, RRM2B and GPX1. Using a novel RNA pulldown approach that utilized endogenous S1-tagged PINCR, we show that PINCR associates with the enhancer region of these genes by binding to RNA-binding protein Matrin 3 that, in turn, associates with p53. Our findings uncover a critical prosurvival function of a p53/PINCR/Matrin 3 axis in response to DNA damage in CRC cells. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.23244.001 PMID:28580901

  6. Prosurvival long noncoding RNA PINCR regulates a subset of p53 targets in human colorectal cancer cells by binding to Matrin 3.

    PubMed

    Chaudhary, Ritu; Gryder, Berkley; Woods, Wendy S; Subramanian, Murugan; Jones, Matthew F; Li, Xiao Ling; Jenkins, Lisa M; Shabalina, Svetlana A; Mo, Min; Dasso, Mary; Yang, Yuan; Wakefield, Lalage M; Zhu, Yuelin; Frier, Susan M; Moriarity, Branden S; Prasanth, Kannanganattu V; Perez-Pinera, Pablo; Lal, Ashish

    2017-06-05

    Thousands of long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) have been discovered, yet the function of the vast majority remains unclear. Here, we show that a p53-regulated lncRNA which we named PINCR (p53-induced noncoding RNA), is induced ~100-fold after DNA damage and exerts a prosurvival function in human colorectal cancer cells (CRC) in vitro and tumor growth in vivo. Targeted deletion of PINCR in CRC cells significantly impaired G1 arrest and induced hypersensitivity to chemotherapeutic drugs. PINCR regulates the induction of a subset of p53 targets involved in G1 arrest and apoptosis, including BTG2, RRM2B and GPX1. Using a novel RNA pulldown approach that utilized endogenous S1-tagged PINCR, we show that PINCR associates with the enhancer region of these genes by binding to RNA-binding protein Matrin 3 that, in turn, associates with p53. Our findings uncover a critical prosurvival function of a p53/PINCR/Matrin 3 axis in response to DNA damage in CRC cells.

  7. NeuroD1 mediates nicotine-induced migration and invasion via regulation of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor subunits in a subset of neural and neuroendocrine carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Osborne, Jihan K; Guerra, Marcy L; Gonzales, Joshua X; McMillan, Elizabeth A; Minna, John D; Cobb, Melanie H

    2014-06-01

    Cigarette smoking is a major risk factor for acquisition of small cell lung cancer (SCLC). A role has been demonstrated for the basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor NeuroD1 in the pathogenesis of neural and neuroendocrine lung cancer, including SCLC. In the present study we investigate the possible function of NeuroD1 in established tumors, as well as actions early on in pathogenesis, in response to nicotine. We demonstrate that nicotine up-regulates NeuroD1 in immortalized normal bronchial epithelial cells and a subset of undifferentiated carcinomas. Increased expression of NeuroD1 subsequently leads to regulation of expression and function of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor subunit cluster of α3, α5, and β4. In addition, we find that coordinated expression of these subunits by NeuroD1 leads to enhanced nicotine-induced migration and invasion, likely through changes in intracellular calcium. These findings suggest that aspects of the pathogenesis of neural and neuroendocrine lung cancers may be affected by a nicotine- and NeuroD1-induced positive feedback loop.

  8. NeuroD1 mediates nicotine-induced migration and invasion via regulation of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor subunits in a subset of neural and neuroendocrine carcinomas

    PubMed Central

    Osborne, Jihan K.; Guerra, Marcy L.; Gonzales, Joshua X.; McMillan, Elizabeth A.; Minna, John D.; Cobb, Melanie H.

    2014-01-01

    Cigarette smoking is a major risk factor for acquisition of small cell lung cancer (SCLC). A role has been demonstrated for the basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor NeuroD1 in the pathogenesis of neural and neuroendocrine lung cancer, including SCLC. In the present study we investigate the possible function of NeuroD1 in established tumors, as well as actions early on in pathogenesis, in response to nicotine. We demonstrate that nicotine up-regulates NeuroD1 in immortalized normal bronchial epithelial cells and a subset of undifferentiated carcinomas. Increased expression of NeuroD1 subsequently leads to regulation of expression and function of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor subunit cluster of α3, α5, and β4. In addition, we find that coordinated expression of these subunits by NeuroD1 leads to enhanced nicotine-induced migration and invasion, likely through changes in intracellular calcium. These findings suggest that aspects of the pathogenesis of neural and neuroendocrine lung cancers may be affected by a nicotine- and NeuroD1-induced positive feedback loop. PMID:24719457

  9. Evidence that the familial adenomatous polyposis gene is involved in a subset of colon cancers with a complementable defect in c-myc regulation

    SciTech Connect

    Erisman, M.D.; Scott, J.K.; Astrin, S.M. )

    1989-06-01

    Human colorectal carcinomas frequently express elevated levels of c-myc mRNA in the absence of a gross genetic change at the c-myc locus. To test the hypothesis that these tumors are defective in a gene function necessary for the regulation of c-myc expression, the authors fused an osteosarcoma cell line that exhibits normal c-myc regulation with two colon carcinoma cell lines that express deregulated levels of c-myc mRNA. Since rates of c-myc mRNA turnover in the colon carcinoma cells were found to be comparable to those in normal cells, increased message stability cannot account for the increased steady-state levels of transcripts. These finding suggest that loss of function of a trans-acting regulator is responsible for the deregulation of c-myc expression in a major fraction of colorectal carcinomas. Analysis of restriction fragment length polymorphisms in tumor/normal tissue pairs from patients with primary colorectal lesions indicated that deregulation of c-myc expression in the tumors is correlated with frequent loss of alleles of syntenic markers on chromosome 5q. Chromosome 5q is the region known to contain the gene for familial adenomatous polyposis, an inherited predisposition to colon cancer. These findings, together with the arlier finding that the colonic distribution of tumors exhibiting deregulated c-myc expression is similar to that reported for familial polyposis, provide evidence that loss of function of the familial adenomatous polyposis gene is involved in a subset of colorectal cancers in which c-myc expression is deregulated.

  10. Identification of a subset of patients with acute myeloid leukemia characterized by long-term in vitro proliferation and altered cell cycle regulation of the leukemic cells.

    PubMed

    Hatfield, Kimberley Joanne; Reikvam, Håkon; Bruserud, Øystein

    2014-11-01

    The malignant cell population of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) includes a small population of stem/progenitor cells with long-term in vitro proliferation. We wanted to compare long-term AML cell proliferation for unselected patients, investigate the influence of endothelial cells on AML cell proliferation and identify biological characteristics associated with clonogenic capacity. Cells were cultured in medium supplemented with recombinant growth factors FMS-like tyrosine kinase-3 ligand, stem cell factor, IL-3, G-CSF and thrombopoietin. The colony-forming unit assay was used to estimate the number of progenitors in AML cell populations after 35 days of culture, and microarray was used to study global gene expression profiles between AML patients. Long-term cell proliferation was observed in 7 of 31 patients, whereas 3 additional patients showed long-term proliferation after endothelial cell coculture. Patient-specific differences in constitutive cytokine release were maintained during cell culture. Patients with long-term proliferation showed altered expression in six cell cycle-related genes (HMMR, BUB1, NUSAP1, AURKB, CCNF, DLGAP5), two genes involved in DNA replication (TOP2A, RFC3) and one gene with unknown function (LHFPL2). We identified a subset of AML patients characterized by long-term in vitro cell proliferation and altered expression of cell cycle regulators that may be potential candidates for treatment of AML.

  11. BRG1 and BRM chromatin-remodeling complexes regulate the hypoxia response by acting as coactivators for a subset of hypoxia-inducible transcription factor target genes.

    PubMed

    Sena, Johnny A; Wang, Liyi; Hu, Cheng-Jun

    2013-10-01

    Chromatin remodeling is an active process, which represses or enables the access of transcription machinery to genes in response to external stimuli, including hypoxia. However, in hypoxia, the specific requirement, as well as the molecular mechanism by which the chromatin-remodeling complexes regulate gene expression, remains unclear. In this study, we report that the Brahma (BRM) and Brahma-related gene 1 (BRG1) ATPase-containing SWI/SNF chromatin-remodeling complexes promote the expression of the hypoxia-inducible transcription factor 1α (HIF1α) and HIF2α genes and also promote hypoxic induction of a subset of HIF1 and HIF2 target genes. We show that BRG1 or BRM knockdown in Hep3B and RCC4T cells reduces hypoxic induction of HIF target genes, while reexpression of BRG1 or BRM in BRG1/BRM-deficient SW13 cells increases HIF target gene activation. Mechanistically, HIF1 and HIF2 increase the hypoxic induction of HIF target genes by recruiting BRG1 complexes to HIF target gene promoters, which promotes nucleosome remodeling of HIF target gene promoters in a BRG1 ATPase-dependent manner. Importantly, we found that the function of BRG1 complexes in hypoxic SW13 and RCC4T cells is dictated by the HIF-mediated hypoxia response and could be opposite from their function in normoxic SW13 and RCC4T cells.

  12. P-TEFb, the Super Elongation Complex and Mediator Regulate a Subset of Non-paused Genes during Early Drosophila Embryo Development

    PubMed Central

    Dahlberg, Olle; Shilkova, Olga; Tang, Min; Holmqvist, Per-Henrik; Mannervik, Mattias

    2015-01-01

    Positive Transcription Elongation Factor b (P-TEFb) is a kinase consisting of Cdk9 and Cyclin T that releases RNA Polymerase II (Pol II) into active elongation. It can assemble into a larger Super Elongation Complex (SEC) consisting of additional elongation factors. Here, we use a miRNA-based approach to knock down the maternal contribution of P-TEFb and SEC components in early Drosophila embryos. P-TEFb or SEC depletion results in loss of cells from the embryo posterior and in cellularization defects. Interestingly, the expression of many patterning genes containing promoter-proximal paused Pol II is relatively normal in P-TEFb embryos. Instead, P-TEFb and SEC are required for expression of some non-paused, rapidly transcribed genes in pre-cellular embryos, including the cellularization gene Serendipity-α. We also demonstrate that another P-TEFb regulated gene, terminus, has an essential function in embryo development. Similar morphological and gene expression phenotypes were observed upon knock down of Mediator subunits, providing in vivo evidence that P-TEFb, the SEC and Mediator collaborate in transcription control. Surprisingly, P-TEFb depletion does not affect the ratio of Pol II at the promoter versus the 3’ end, despite affecting global Pol II Ser2 phosphorylation levels. Instead, Pol II occupancy is reduced at P-TEFb down-regulated genes. We conclude that a subset of non-paused, pre-cellular genes are among the most susceptible to reduced P-TEFb, SEC and Mediator levels in Drosophila embryos. PMID:25679530

  13. Increased Hyaluronan Levels in HABP1/p32/gC1qR Overexpressing HepG2 Cells Inhibit Autophagic Vacuolation Regulating Tumor Potency

    PubMed Central

    Saha, Paramita; Ghosh, Ilora; Datta, Kasturi

    2014-01-01

    Tumor growth and development is influenced by its microenvironment. A major extracellular matrix molecule involved in cancer progression is hyaluronan (HA). Hyaluronan and expression of a number of hyaladherin family proteins are dramatically increased in many cancer malignancies. One such hyaladherin, hyaluronan-binding protein 1 (HABP1/p32/gC1qR) has been considered to be a biomarker for tumor progression. Interestingly, overexpression of HABP1 in fibroblast has been shown to increase autophagy via generation of excess reactive oxygen species (ROS) and depletion of HA leading to apoptosis. Cancerous cells are often found to exhibit decreased rate of proteolysis/autophagy in comparison to their normal counterparts. To determine if HABP1 levels alter tumorigenicity of cancerous cells, HepR21, the stable transfectant overexpressing HABP1 in HepG2 cell line was derived. HepR21 has been shown to have increased proliferation rate than HepG2, intracellular HA cable formation and enhanced tumor potency without any significant alteration of intracellular ROS. In this paper we have observed that HepR21 cells containing higher endogenous HA levels, have downregulated expression of the autophagic marker, MAP-LC3, consistent with unaltered levels of endogenous ROS. In fact, HepR21 cells seem to have significant resistance to exogenous ROS stimuli and glutathione depletion. HepR21 cells were also found to be more resilient to nutrient starvation in comparison to its parent cell line. Decline in intracellular HA levels and HA cables in HepR21 cells upon treatment with HAS inhibitor (4-MU), induced a surge in ROS levels leading to increased expression of MAP-LC3 and tumor suppressors Beclin 1 and PTEN. This suggests the importance of HABP1 induced HA cable formation in enhancing tumor potency by maintaining the oxidant levels and subsequent autophagic vacuolation. PMID:25061661

  14. Probabilistic Subset Conjunction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kohli, Rajeev; Jedidi, Kamel

    2005-01-01

    The authors introduce subset conjunction as a classification rule by which an acceptable alternative must satisfy some minimum number of criteria. The rule subsumes conjunctive and disjunctive decision strategies as special cases. Subset conjunction can be represented in a binary-response model, for example, in a logistic regression, using only…

  15. Ratcheting up cancer potency estimates

    PubMed Central

    Crouch, Edmund A.C.; Omenn, Gilbert S

    2014-01-01

    Summary The current paradigm for cancer risk assessment in the United States (U.S.) typically requires selection of representative rodent bioassay dose-response data for extrapolation to a single cancer potency estimate for humans. In the absence of extensive further information, the chosen bioassay result generally is taken to be that which gives the highest extrapolated result from the “most sensitive” species or strain. The estimated human cancer potency is thus derived from an upper-bound value on animal cancer potency that is technically similar to an extreme value statistic. Thus additional information from further bioassays can only lead to equal or larger cancer potency estimates. We here calculate the size of this effect using the collected results of a large number of bioassays. Since many standards are predicated on the value of the cancer potency, this effect is undesirable in producing a strong counter-incentive to performing further bioassays. PMID:22296526

  16. Opioid analgesics: does potency matter?

    PubMed

    Passik, Steven D; Webster, Lynn

    2014-01-01

    Prescription opioid analgesics with a wide range of potencies are currently used for the treatment of chronic pain. Yet understanding the clinical relevance and therapeutic consequences of opioid potency remains ill defined. Both patients and clinicians alike have misperceptions about opioid potency, expecting that less-potent opioids will be less effective or fearing that more-potent opioids are more dangerous or more likely to be abused. In this review, common myths about the potency of opioid analgesics will be discussed. Clinicians should understand that pharmacologic potency per se does not necessarily imply more effective analgesia or higher abuse liability. Published dose conversion tables may not accurately calculate the dose for effective and safe rotation from one opioid to another in patients receiving long-term opioid therapy because they are based on limited data that may not apply to chronic pain. Differences in pharmacologic potency are largely accounted for by the actual doses prescribed, according to individualized patient need. Factors for achieving effective analgesia and reducing the risks involved with opioid use include careful medication selection based on patient characteristics, appropriate dosing titration and opioid rotation practices, knowledge of product formulation characteristics (eg, extended release, immediate release, and tamper-resistant features), and an awareness of differences in opioid pharmacokinetics and metabolism. Clinicians should remain vigilant in monitoring patients on any opioid medication, regardless of classification along the opioid potency continuum.

  17. Shen-Qi-Jie-Yu-Fang has antidepressant effects in a rodent model of postpartum depression by regulating the immune organs and subsets of T lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    Qu, Miao; Tang, Qisheng; Li, Xiaoli; Zhao, Ruizhen; Li, Jingya; Xu, Hong; Gao, Yushan; Mao, Yingqiu

    2015-01-01

    Background Shen-Qi-Jie-Yu-Fang (SJ Fang) is a herbal preparation used in traditional Chinese medicine, and is a potentially important new therapeutic agent in postpartum depression (PPD). Previously, we have elucidated the effects of SJ Fang on hormone receptors and monoamine neurotransmitters involved in the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal and hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axes in PPD rats. However, the immune-modulating effects of SJ Fang in PPD are still unknown. In this study, we explored the effects of SJ Fang on the immune organs and subsets of T lymphocytes in PPD rats. Methods PPD was created in Sprague-Dawley rats by inducing hormone-simulated pregnancy followed by hormone withdrawal. After hormone withdrawal, the PPD rats were then treated with fluoxetine at 1, 2, and 4 weeks, and the SJ Fang rats were also treated at 1, 2, and 4 weeks. Depressive behavior in the rats was evaluated by the forced swim test, sucrose consumption test, and open field test. The thymus index and spleen index were calculated. Hematoxylin-eosin staining was used to identify pathological features in the thymus and spleen. CD3, CD4, and CD8 lymphocyte subsets were analyzed by flow cytometry. Results Both fluoxetine and SJ Fang decreased immobility time, increased sucrose consumption, an horizontal and vertical movement. After 4 weeks of treatment with fluoxetine or SJ Fang, the thymus index and spleen index were significantly higher than at baseline, and the morphology of the thymus and spleen were returning to normal. Two weeks after hormone withdrawal, subsets of T lymphocytes indicated a shift from immune activation to immune suppression, which was reversed by 4 weeks of treatment with fluoxetine or SJ Fang. Conclusion It is suggested that T-cell mediate immune responses which may play a role in the etiopathology of postpartum depression. SJ Fang had an antidepressant effect on the immune system in rats with PPD. PMID:26203247

  18. A homologue of snail is expressed transiently in subsets of mesenchyme cells in the sea urchin embryo and is down-regulated in axis-deficient embryos.

    PubMed

    Hardin, Jeff; Illingworth, Charles A

    2006-11-01

    Vertebrate members of the zinc finger transcription factor family related to Drosophila snail are expressed in neural crest and paraxial mesoderm along the left-right axis of the embryo. As simple deuterostomes, echinoderms are an important sister phylum for the chordates. We have identified populations of patterned, nonskeletogenic mesenchyme in the sea urchin Lytechinus variegatus by their expression of a sea urchin member of the snail family (Lv-snail). Lv-snail mRNA and protein are detectable at the midgastrula stage within the archenteron. At the late gastrula stage, a contiguous cluster of cells on the left side of the tip of the archenteron is Lv-snail-positive. At the early prism stage, two small clusters of mesenchyme cells near the presumptive arm buds are also Lv-snail-positive. At the pluteus stage, staining is detectable in isolated mesenchyme cells and the ciliated band. Based on fate mapping of secondary mesenchyme cells (SMCs) and double-label immunostaining, these patterns are consistent with expression of SNAIL by novel subsets of SMCs that are largely distinct from skeletogenic mesenchyme. In radialized embryos lacking normal bilateral symmetry, mesenchymal expression of Lv-SNAIL is abolished. These results suggest that transient expression of Lv-snail may be important for the differentiation of a subset of axially patterned nonskeletogenic mesenchyme cells and suggest conserved functions for snail family members in deuterostome development.

  19. Protective potency of clove oil and its transcriptional down-regulation of Aeromonas sobria virulence genes in African catfish (Clarias gariepinus L.).

    PubMed

    Abd El-Hamid, M I; Abd El-Aziz, N K; Ali, H A

    2016-08-31

    Disease episodes of fish caused by Aeromonas species are moved to the top list of limiting problems worldwide. The present study was planned to verify the in vitro antibacterial activities as well as the in vivo potential values of clove oil and ciprofloxacin against Aeromonas sobria in African catfish (Clarias gariepinus). The in vitro phenotypic virulence activities and the successful amplification of aerolysin and hemolysin genes in the precisely identified A. sobria strain were predictive for its virulence. In the in vivo assay, virulence of A. sobria strain was fully demonstrated based on constituent mRNA expression profile of tested virulence genes and typical septicemia associated with high mortalities of infected fish. Apparent lower mortality rates were correlated well with both decrescent bacterial burden and significant down-regulated transcripts of representative genes in the treated groups with clove oil, followed by ciprofloxacin as a prophylactic use for 15 days (P < 0.0001); however, the essential oil apart from ciprofloxacin significantly enhanced different hematological parameters (P < 0.05). In addition, administration of antibiotic may be considered as a pronounced stress factor in the fish even when it used in the prophylactic dose. In conclusion, medicinal plants-derived essential oils provide a virtually safer alternative to chemotherapeutics on fish, consumers and ecosystems.

  20. Human dendritic cell subsets

    PubMed Central

    Collin, Matthew; McGovern, Naomi; Haniffa, Muzlifah

    2013-01-01

    Summary Dendritic cells are highly adapted to their role of presenting antigen and directing immune responses. Developmental studies indicate that DCs originate independently from monocytes and tissue macrophages. Emerging evidence also suggests that distinct subsets of DCs have intrinsic differences that lead to functional specialisation in the generation of immunity. Comparative studies are now allowing many of these properties to be more fully understood in the context of human immunology. PMID:23621371

  1. CALIPSO Search and Subset Tool

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2017-03-10

    Description:  Search and subset CALIPSO Level 1 and select Level 2 Lidar data Customization Options Search and subset by date, time, and geolocation Subset by parameter and ... 2 V4.10 datasets Details:  CALIPSO Search and Subset Tool Screenshot:  ...

  2. KIT Signaling Promotes Growth of Colon Xenograft Tumors in Mice and Is Up-Regulated in a Subset of Human Colon Cancers.

    PubMed

    Chen, Evan C; Karl, Taylor A; Kalisky, Tomer; Gupta, Santosh K; O'Brien, Catherine A; Longacre, Teri A; van de Rijn, Matt; Quake, Stephen R; Clarke, Michael F; Rothenberg, Michael E

    2015-09-01

    Receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) inhibitors have advanced colon cancer treatment. We investigated the role of the RTK KIT in development of human colon cancer. An array of 137 patient-derived colon tumors and their associated xenografts were analyzed by immunohistochemistry to measure levels of KIT and its ligand KITLG. KIT and/or KITLG was stably knocked down by expression of small hairpin RNAs from lentiviral vectors in DLD1, HT29, LS174T, and COLO320 DM colon cancer cell lines, and in UM-COLON#8 and POP77 xenografts; cells transduced with only vector were used as controls. Cells were analyzed by real-time quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction, single-cell gene expression analysis, flow cytometry, and immunohistochemical, immunoblot, and functional assays. Xenograft tumors were grown from control and KIT-knockdown DLD1 and UM-COLON#8 cells in immunocompromised mice and compared. Some mice were given the RTK inhibitor imatinib after injection of cancer cells; tumor growth was measured based on bioluminescence. We assessed tumorigenicity using limiting dilution analysis. KIT and KITLG were expressed heterogeneously by a subset of human colon tumors. Knockdown of KIT decreased proliferation of colon cancer cell lines and growth of xenograft tumors in mice compared with control cells. KIT knockdown cells had increased expression of enterocyte markers, decreased expression of cycling genes, and, unexpectedly, increased expression of LGR5 associated genes. No activating mutations in KIT were detected in DLD1, POP77, or UM-COLON#8 cells. However, KITLG-knockdown DLD1 cells formed smaller xenograft tumors than control cells. Gene expression analysis of single CD44(+) cells indicated that KIT can promote growth via KITLG autocrine and/or paracrine signaling. Imatinib inhibited growth of KIT(+) colon cancer organoids in culture and growth of xenograft tumors in mice. Cancer cells with endogenous KIT expression were more tumorigenic in mice. KIT and

  3. Regulation of cannabinoid receptor gene expression and endocannabinoid levels in lymphocyte subsets by interferon-β: a longitudinal study in multiple sclerosis patients.

    PubMed

    Sánchez López, A J; Román-Vega, L; Ramil Tojeiro, E; Giuffrida, A; García-Merino, A

    2015-01-01

    Evidence suggests the involvement of the cannabinoid system in the pathogenesis of multiple sclerosis (MS). We studied cannabinoid receptor (CB)1 and CB2 receptor gene expression in B, natural killer (NK) and T cells from MS patients before and after 1 year of interferon beta therapy, and compared these levels to those of healthy controls. We also measured the production of the endocannabinoids anandamide (AEA) and 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG) and the gene expression of the endocannabinoid-degrading enzyme fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) in these cells. Prior to interferon therapy, MS patients showed significantly elevated CB2 expression in B cells, but not in T or NK cells. These levels decreased gradually within 6 months to 1 year of interferon treatment. CB1 expression was elevated in all cell subsets, but only reached statistical significance in T cells; all levels decreased progressively over time. Before treatment, AEA but not 2-AG levels were significantly elevated in the three cell populations; after 1 year of treatment, all values decreased to control levels. The expression of FAAH was unchanged. The different expression of cannabinoid receptor genes and the increased level of AEA in lymphocytes point to a possible role of the cannabinoid system in MS immune response and its modulation by interferon.

  4. Regulation of cannabinoid receptor gene expression and endocannabinoid levels in lymphocyte subsets by interferon-β: a longitudinal study in multiple sclerosis patients

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez López, A J; Román-Vega, L; Ramil Tojeiro, E; Giuffrida, A; García-Merino, A

    2015-01-01

    Evidence suggests the involvement of the cannabinoid system in the pathogenesis of multiple sclerosis (MS). We studied cannabinoid receptor (CB)1 and CB2 receptor gene expression in B, natural killer (NK) and T cells from MS patients before and after 1 year of interferon beta therapy, and compared these levels to those of healthy controls. We also measured the production of the endocannabinoids anandamide (AEA) and 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG) and the gene expression of the endocannabinoid-degrading enzyme fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) in these cells. Prior to interferon therapy, MS patients showed significantly elevated CB2 expression in B cells, but not in T or NK cells. These levels decreased gradually within 6 months to 1 year of interferon treatment. CB1 expression was elevated in all cell subsets, but only reached statistical significance in T cells; all levels decreased progressively over time. Before treatment, AEA but not 2-AG levels were significantly elevated in the three cell populations; after 1 year of treatment, all values decreased to control levels. The expression of FAAH was unchanged. The different expression of cannabinoid receptor genes and the increased level of AEA in lymphocytes point to a possible role of the cannabinoid system in MS immune response and its modulation by interferon. PMID:25169051

  5. Redefining Myeloid Cell Subsets in Murine Spleen.

    PubMed

    Hey, Ying-Ying; Tan, Jonathan K H; O'Neill, Helen C

    2015-01-01

    Spleen is known to contain multiple dendritic and myeloid cell subsets, distinguishable on the basis of phenotype, function and anatomical location. As a result of recent intensive flow cytometric analyses, splenic dendritic cell (DC) subsets are now better characterized than other myeloid subsets. In order to identify and fully characterize a novel splenic subset termed "L-DC" in relation to other myeloid cells, it was necessary to investigate myeloid subsets in more detail. In terms of cell surface phenotype, L-DC were initially characterized as a CD11b(hi)CD11c(lo)MHCII(-)Ly6C(-)Ly6G(-) subset in murine spleen. Their expression of CD43, lack of MHCII, and a low level of CD11c was shown to best differentiate L-DC by phenotype from conventional DC subsets. A complete analysis of all subsets in spleen led to the classification of CD11b(hi)CD11c(lo)MHCII(-)Ly6C(lo)Ly6G(-) cells as monocytes expressing CX3CR1, CD43 and CD115. Siglec-F expression was used to identify a specific eosinophil population, distinguishable from both Ly6C(lo) and Ly6C(hi) monocytes, and other DC subsets. L-DC were characterized as a clear subset of CD11b(hi)CD11c(lo)MHCII(-)Ly6C(-)Ly6G(-) cells, which are CD43(+), Siglec-F(-) and CD115(-). Changes in the prevalence of L-DC compared to other subsets in spleens of mutant mice confirmed the phenotypic distinction between L-DC, cDC and monocyte subsets. L-DC development in vivo was shown to occur independently of the BATF3 transcription factor that regulates cDC development, and also independently of the FLT3L and GM-CSF growth factors which drive cDC and monocyte development, so distinguishing L-DC from these commonly defined cell types.

  6. CERES Search and Subset Tool

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2016-06-24

    ... data granules using a high resolution spatial metadata database and directly accessing the archived data granules. Subset results are ... data granules using a high resolution spatial metadata database and directly accessing the archived data granules. Subset results are ...

  7. Histone deacetylase inhibitor MS-275 augments expression of a subset of IFN-γ-regulated genes in Toxoplasma gondii-infected macrophages but does not improve parasite control.

    PubMed

    Sumpf, Kristina; Nast, Roswitha; Downie, Bryan; Salinas, Gabriela; Lüder, Carsten G K

    2017-09-01

    Toxoplasma gondii is a ubiquitous apicomplexan parasite of mammals and birds and an important pathogen of humans. IFN-γ is the major mediator of host resistance against T. gondii but intriguingly, parasite-infected host cells including macrophages are severely impaired to respond to IFN-γ due to defective transcriptional activation of target genes. Here, we tested the possibility that the impaired responsiveness of T. gondii-infected macrophages to IFN-γ can be restored by inhibiting histone deacetylases (HDACs) using the class I-specific inhibitor MS-275. Treatment of RAW264.7 cells with MS-275 indeed increased MHC class II surface expression in infected and non-infected cells and largely abolished the inhibition of IFN-γ-regulated MHC class II expression exerted by T. gondii. Genome-wide transcriptome profiling revealed that MS-275 increased mean mRNA levels of IFN-γ-regulated genes particularly in non-infected macrophages. Transcript levels of 33% of IFN-γ secondary response genes but only those of a few primary response genes were also increased by MS-275 in T. gondii-infected cells. Importantly, the unresponsiveness of parasite-infected cells to IFN-γ was however not abolished by MS-275. Furthermore, MS-275 also up-regulated several anti-inflammatory cytokines or signaling molecules in T. gondii-infected macrophages. It additionally regulated expression of more than 2500 genes in non-infected macrophages expression of which was surprisingly counteracted by prior infection with T. gondii. FACS analysis and immunofluorescence microscopy revealed that MS-275 did not considerably diminish the number of parasite-positive cells or the intracellular replication in macrophages stimulated or not with IFN-γ. Thus, a supportive therapy using MS-275 appears inappropriate for treatment of toxoplasmosis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. 21 CFR 610.10 - Potency.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Potency. 610.10 Section 610.10 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) BIOLOGICS GENERAL BIOLOGICAL PRODUCTS STANDARDS General Provisions § 610.10 Potency. Tests for potency shall consist of either...

  9. 21 CFR 610.10 - Potency.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2011-04-01 2010-04-01 true Potency. 610.10 Section 610.10 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) BIOLOGICS GENERAL BIOLOGICAL PRODUCTS STANDARDS General Provisions § 610.10 Potency. Tests for potency shall consist of either...

  10. 21 CFR 610.10 - Potency.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Potency. 610.10 Section 610.10 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) BIOLOGICS GENERAL BIOLOGICAL PRODUCTS STANDARDS General Provisions § 610.10 Potency. Tests for potency shall consist of either...

  11. 21 CFR 610.10 - Potency.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Potency. 610.10 Section 610.10 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) BIOLOGICS GENERAL BIOLOGICAL PRODUCTS STANDARDS General Provisions § 610.10 Potency. Tests for potency shall consist of either...

  12. NaJAZh Regulates a Subset of Defense Responses against Herbivores and Spontaneous Leaf Necrosis in Nicotiana attenuata Plants[C][W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Youngjoo; Baldwin, Ian T.; Gális, Ivan

    2012-01-01

    The JASMONATE ZIM DOMAIN (JAZ) proteins function as negative regulators of jasmonic acid signaling in plants. We cloned 12 JAZ genes from native tobacco (Nicotiana attenuata), including nine novel JAZs in tobacco, and examined their expression in plants that had leaves elicited by wounding or simulated herbivory. Most JAZ genes showed strong expression in the elicited leaves, but NaJAZg was mainly expressed in roots. Another novel herbivory-elicited gene, NaJAZh, was analyzed in detail. RNA interference suppression of this gene in inverted-repeat (ir)JAZh plants deregulated a specific branch of jasmonic acid-dependent direct and indirect defenses: irJAZh plants showed greater trypsin protease inhibitor activity, 17-hydroxygeranyllinalool diterpene glycosides accumulation, and emission of volatile organic compounds from leaves. Silencing of NaJAZh also revealed a novel cross talk in JAZ-regulated secondary metabolism, as irJAZh plants had significantly reduced nicotine levels. In addition, irJAZh spontaneously developed leaf necrosis during the transition to flowering. Because the lesions closely correlated with the elevated expression of programmed cell death genes and the accumulations of salicylic acid and hydrogen peroxide in the leaves, we propose a novel role of the NaJAZh protein as a repressor of necrosis and/or programmed cell death during plant development. PMID:22496510

  13. Cdk12 Is A Gene-Selective RNA Polymerase II Kinase That Regulates a Subset of the Transcriptome, Including Nrf2 Target Genes

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xuan; Chatterjee, Nirmalya; Spirohn, Kerstin; Boutros, Michael; Bohmann, Dirk

    2016-01-01

    The Nrf2 transcription factor is well conserved throughout metazoan evolution and serves as a central regulator of adaptive cellular responses to oxidative stress. We carried out an RNAi screen in Drosophila S2 cells to better understand the regulatory mechanisms governing Nrf2 target gene expression. This paper describes the identification and characterization of the RNA polymerase II (Pol II) kinase Cdk12 as a factor that is required for Nrf2 target gene expression in cell culture and in vivo. Cdk12 is, however, not essential for bulk mRNA transcription and cells lacking CDK12 function are viable and able to proliferate. Consistent with previous findings on the DNA damage and heat shock responses, it emerges that Cdk12 may be specifically required for stress activated gene expression. Transcriptome analysis revealed that antioxidant gene expression is compromised in flies with reduced Cdk12 function, which makes them oxidative stress sensitive. In addition to supporting Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS) induced gene activation, Cdk12 suppresses genes that support metabolic functions in stressed conditions. We suggest that Cdk12 acts as a gene-selective Pol II kinase that engages a global shift in gene expression to switch cells from a metabolically active state to “stress-defence mode” when challenged by external stress. PMID:26911346

  14. Cdk12 Is A Gene-Selective RNA Polymerase II Kinase That Regulates a Subset of the Transcriptome, Including Nrf2 Target Genes.

    PubMed

    Li, Xuan; Chatterjee, Nirmalya; Spirohn, Kerstin; Boutros, Michael; Bohmann, Dirk

    2016-02-25

    The Nrf2 transcription factor is well conserved throughout metazoan evolution and serves as a central regulator of adaptive cellular responses to oxidative stress. We carried out an RNAi screen in Drosophila S2 cells to better understand the regulatory mechanisms governing Nrf2 target gene expression. This paper describes the identification and characterization of the RNA polymerase II (Pol II) kinase Cdk12 as a factor that is required for Nrf2 target gene expression in cell culture and in vivo. Cdk12 is, however, not essential for bulk mRNA transcription and cells lacking CDK12 function are viable and able to proliferate. Consistent with previous findings on the DNA damage and heat shock responses, it emerges that Cdk12 may be specifically required for stress activated gene expression. Transcriptome analysis revealed that antioxidant gene expression is compromised in flies with reduced Cdk12 function, which makes them oxidative stress sensitive. In addition to supporting Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS) induced gene activation, Cdk12 suppresses genes that support metabolic functions in stressed conditions. We suggest that Cdk12 acts as a gene-selective Pol II kinase that engages a global shift in gene expression to switch cells from a metabolically active state to "stress-defence mode" when challenged by external stress.

  15. Programmed Death 1 Regulates Memory Phenotype CD4 T Cell Accumulation, Inhibits Expansion of the Effector Memory Phenotype Subset and Modulates Production of Effector Cytokines

    PubMed Central

    Charlton, Joanna J.; Tsoukatou, Debbie; Mamalaki, Clio; Chatzidakis, Ioannis

    2015-01-01

    Memory phenotype CD4 T cells are found in normal mice and arise through response to environmental antigens or homeostatic mechanisms. The factors that regulate the homeostasis of memory phenotype CD4 cells are not clear. In the present study we demonstrate that there is a marked accumulation of memory phenotype CD4 cells, specifically of the effector memory (TEM) phenotype, in lymphoid organs and tissues of mice deficient for the negative co-stimulatory receptor programmed death 1 (PD-1). This can be correlated with decreased apoptosis but not with enhanced homeostatic turnover potential of these cells. PD-1 ablation increased the frequency of memory phenotype CD4 IFN-γ producers but decreased the respective frequency of IL-17A-producing cells. In particular, IFN-γ producers were more abundant but IL-17A producing cells were more scarce among PD-1 KO TEM-phenotype cells relative to WT. Transfer of peripheral naïve CD4 T cells suggested that accumulated PD-1 KO TEM-phenotype cells are of peripheral and not of thymic origin. This accumulation effect was mediated by CD4 cell-intrinsic mechanisms as shown by mixed bone marrow chimera experiments. Naïve PD-1 KO CD4 T cells gave rise to higher numbers of TEM-phenotype lymphopenia-induced proliferation memory cells. In conclusion, we provide evidence that PD-1 has an important role in determining the composition and functional aspects of memory phenotype CD4 T cell pool. PMID:25803808

  16. Quantitative structure - mesothelioma potency model ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Cancer potencies of mineral and synthetic elongated particle (EP) mixtures, including asbestos fibers, are influenced by changes in fiber dose composition, bioavailability, and biodurability in combination with relevant cytotoxic dose-response relationships. A unique and comprehensive rat intra-pleural (IP) dose characterization data set with a wide variety of EP size, shape, crystallographic, chemical, and bio-durability properties facilitated extensive statistical analyses of 50 rat IP exposure test results for evaluation of alternative dose pleural mesothelioma response models. Utilizing logistic regression, maximum likelihood evaluations of thousands of alternative dose metrics based on hundreds of individual EP dimensional variations within each test sample, four major findings emerged: (1) data for simulations of short-term EP dose changes in vivo (mild acid leaching) provide superior predictions of tumor incidence compared to non-acid leached data; (2) sum of the EP surface areas (ÓSA) from these mildly acid-leached samples provides the optimum holistic dose response model; (3) progressive removal of dose associated with very short and/or thin EPs significantly degrades resultant ÓEP or ÓSA dose-based predictive model fits, as judged by Akaike’s Information Criterion (AIC); and (4) alternative, biologically plausible model adjustments provide evidence for reduced potency of EPs with length/width (aspect) ratios 80 µm. Regar

  17. Basics of compounding: potency and stability testing.

    PubMed

    Allen, Loyd V

    2013-01-01

    Potency (strength) tests are designed to determine how much of an active drug is in a sample. Stability tests are used to determine an expiration date of a product or a beyond-use date of a preparation. Being able to employ the proper method to determine potency or stability is the key to understanding the difference between potency testing versus stability testing. In order to determine potency, a method may or may not be stability indicating. When determining stability, the method must be stability indicating. When using a stability-indicating method, both potency and stability can be determined. Quality-assurance programs are essential to establishing standards for compounded preparations. It is important that compounding pharmacists understand the differences between potency and stability tests and that these tests are made an integral part of the quality-assurance program.

  18. MOPITT Search and Subset Tool

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2017-05-11

    ... and improved version of the ASDC MOPITT Search and Subset Web Application has been released. New features include: Versions 6 and 7 ... and improved version of the ASDC MOPITT Search and Subset Web Application has been released. New features include: Versions 6 and 7 ...

  19. 21 CFR 660.4 - Potency test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Potency test. 660.4 Section 660.4 Food and Drugs... STANDARDS FOR DIAGNOSTIC SUBSTANCES FOR LABORATORY TESTS Antibody to Hepatitis B Surface Antigen § 660.4 Potency test. To be satisfactory for release, each filling of Antibody to Hepatitis B Surface...

  20. 21 CFR 660.43 - Potency test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Potency test. 660.43 Section 660.43 Food and Drugs... STANDARDS FOR DIAGNOSTIC SUBSTANCES FOR LABORATORY TESTS Hepatitis B Surface Antigen § 660.43 Potency test... antibody in the appropriate sera of the reference panel by all test methods recommended by the...

  1. CERES Search and Subset Application

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2016-02-18

    ... locating and subsetting CERES Level 2 SSF and FLASHFlux data granules using a high resolution spatial metadata database and directly accessing the archived data granules for the following select products:   SSF Edition 3A: ...

  2. Estrogen potency of oral contraceptive pills.

    PubMed

    Chihal, H J; Peppler, R D; Dickey, R P

    1975-01-01

    The estrogen potencies of 9 oral contraceptive pills, Enovid-E, Enovid-5, Ovulen, Demulen, Norinyl+80, Norinyl+50, Ovral, Norlestrin 1 mg. and Norlestrin 2.5 mg., were determined by bioassay. Relative estrogen potency was determined by analysis of variance. Enovid-5, the most estrogenic compound, had a potency of 4.88 compared to ethinyl estradiol, 50 mcg. equal 1.00; Ovral, the least estrogenic compound, had a potency of 0.81, a sixfold difference. Estrogen potencies at a fractional dose of 0.00155 correlate with reports of the incidence of minor side effects and thromboembolic disease. The effect of progestins on estrogen potency was purely additive (norgestrel and norethynodrel), purely antagonistic, or additive at low concentrations and antagonistic at high concentrations (norethindrone, norethindrone acetate, and ethynodiol diacetate). These results suggest that pills with a greater margin of safety might be developed by utilizing greater ratios of progestin to estrogen. In addition, differences in relative estrogen potency of oral contraceptive pills may be used as a basis for better clinical selection.

  3. What determines skin sensitization potency: Myths, maybes ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    It is widely considered to be a self-evident truth that substances must have a molecular weight (MW) less than 500 to effectively penetrate through the skin in order to induce sensitisation. However, Roberts et al. 2010, evaluated a data set of 699 substances taken from the TIMES-SS expert system and identified that of the 13 substances with a MW above 500, 5 were reported as skin sensitisers. This provided good evidence to refute such a MW threshold. The present study set about compiling a larger and more diverse set of substances such as those evaluated for their skin sensitisation potential under the EU REACH regulation. A dataset of 2575 substances that had been tested for skin sensitisation, using guinea pigs and/or mice was collected. The dataset contained 197 substances with a MW>500: 33 of these were categorised as skin sensitisers. Each of the 33 substances were then evaluated in turn – metal containing complexes, reaction products and mixtures were excluded from further consideration. The final set of 14 sensitisers with a MW>500 were considered on the basis of their reaction chemistry to propose likely mechanistic explanations for their sensitisation behaviour. Penetration ability is correlated with MW (and LogKow): if the MW threshold is shown to be inapplicable for skin sensitisation potency, in turn it also indicates that penetration is not a relevant parameter for skin sensitisation. Exercise to search and extract REACH data for the skin se

  4. What determines skin sensitization potency: Myths, maybes ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    It is widely considered to be a self-evident truth that substances must have a molecular weight (MW) less than 500 to effectively penetrate through the skin in order to induce sensitisation. However, Roberts et al. 2010, evaluated a data set of 699 substances taken from the TIMES-SS expert system and identified that of the 13 substances with a MW above 500, 5 were reported as skin sensitisers. This provided good evidence to refute such a MW threshold. The present study set about compiling a larger and more diverse set of substances such as those evaluated for their skin sensitisation potential under the EU REACH regulation. A dataset of 2575 substances that had been tested for skin sensitisation, using guinea pigs and/or mice was collected. The dataset contained 197 substances with a MW>500: 33 of these were categorised as skin sensitisers. Each of the 33 substances were then evaluated in turn – metal containing complexes, reaction products and mixtures were excluded from further consideration. The final set of 14 sensitisers with a MW>500 were considered on the basis of their reaction chemistry to propose likely mechanistic explanations for their sensitisation behaviour. Penetration ability is correlated with MW (and LogKow): if the MW threshold is shown to be inapplicable for skin sensitisation potency, in turn it also indicates that penetration is not a relevant parameter for skin sensitisation. Exercise to search and extract REACH data for the skin se

  5. Prion potency in stem cells biology.

    PubMed

    Lopes, Marilene H; Santos, Tiago G

    2012-01-01

    Prion protein (PrP) can be considered a pivotal molecule because it interacts with several partners to perform a diverse range of critical biological functions that might differ in embryonic and adult cells. In recent years, there have been major advances in elucidating the putative role of PrP in the basic biology of stem cells in many different systems. Here, we review the evidence indicating that PrP is a key molecule involved in driving different aspects of the potency of embryonic and tissue-specific stem cells in self-perpetuation and differentiation in many cell types. It has been shown that PrP is involved in stem cell self-renewal, controlling pluripotency gene expression, proliferation, and neural and cardiomyocyte differentiation. PrP also has essential roles in distinct processes that regulate tissue-specific stem cell biology in nervous and hematopoietic systems and during muscle regeneration. Results from our own investigations have shown that PrP is able to modulate self-renewal and proliferation in neural stem cells, processes that are enhanced by PrP interactions with stress inducible protein 1 (STI1). Thus, the available data reveal the influence of PrP in acting upon the maintenance of pluripotent status or the differentiation of stem cells from the early embryogenesis through adulthood.

  6. Loss of post-transcriptional regulation of DNMT3b by microRNAs: a possible molecular mechanism for the hypermethylation defect observed in a subset of breast cancer cell lines.

    PubMed

    Sandhu, Rupninder; Rivenbark, Ashley G; Coleman, William B

    2012-08-01

    A hypermethylation defect associated with DNMT hyperactivity and DNMT3b overexpression characterizes a subset of breast cancers and breast cancer cell lines. We analyzed breast cancer cell lines for differential expression of regulatory miRs to determine if loss of miR-mediated post-transcriptional regulation of DNMT3b represents the molecular mechanism that governs the overexpression of DNMT3b that drives the hypermethylation defect in breast cancer. MicroRNAs (miRs) that regulate (miR-29a, miR-29b, miR-29c, miR-148a, miR-148b) or are predicted (miR-26a, miR-26b, miR-203, miR-222) to regulate DNMT3b were examined among 10 hypermethylator and 6 non-hypermethylator breast cancer cell lines. Hypermethylator cell lines express diminished levels of miR-29c, miR-148a, miR-148b, miR-26a, miR-26b, and miR-203 compared to non-hypermethylator cell lines. miR expression patterns correlate inversely with methylation-sensitive gene expression (r=-0.66, p=0.0056) and directly with the methylation status of these genes (r=0.72, p=0.002). To determine the mechanistic role of specific miRs in the dysregulation of DNMT3b among breast cancer cell lines, miR levels were modulated by transfection of pre-miR precursors for miR-148b, miR-26b, and miR-29c into hypermethylator cell lines (Hs578T, HCC1937, SUM185) and transfection of antagomirs directed against miR-148b, miR-26b, and miR-29c into non-hypermethylator cell lines (BT20, MDA-MB-415, MDA-MB-468). Antagomir-mediated knock-down of miR-148b, miR-29c, and miR-26b significantly increased DNMT3b mRNA in non-hypermethylator cell lines, and re-expression of miR-148b, miR-29c, and miR-26b following transfection of pre-miR precursors significantly reduced DNMT3b mRNA in hypermethylator cell lines. These findings strongly suggest that: i) post-transcriptional regulation of DNMT3b is combinatorial, ii) diminished expression of regulatory miRs contributes to DNMT3b overexpression, iii) re-expression of regulatory miRs reduces DNMT3b m

  7. A Subset of Tumor-Derived Mutant Forms of p53 Down-Regulate p63 and p73 through a Direct Interaction with the p53 Core Domain

    PubMed Central

    Gaiddon, C.; Lokshin, M.; Ahn, J.; Zhang, T.; Prives, C.

    2001-01-01

    The p53 protein is related by sequence homology and function to the products of two other genes, p63 and p73, that each encode several isoforms. We and others have discovered previously that certain tumor-derived mutants of p53 can associate and inhibit transcriptional activation by the α and β isoforms of p73. In this study we have extended these observations to show that in transfected cells a number of mutant p53 proteins could bind and down-regulate several isoforms not only of p73 (p73α, -β, -γ, and -δ) but also of p63 (p63α and -γ; ΔNp63α and -γ). Moreover, a correlation existed between the efficiency of p53 binding and the inhibition of p63 or p73 function. We also found that wild-type p63 and p73 interact efficiently with each other when coexpressed in mammalian cells. The interaction between p53 mutants and p63 or p73 was confirmed in a physiological setting by examining tumor cell lines that endogenously express these proteins. We also demonstrated that purified p53 and p73 proteins interact directly and that the p53 core domain, but not the tetramerization domain, mediates this interaction. Using a monoclonal antibody (PAb240) that recognizes an epitope within the core domain of a subset of p53 mutants, we found a correlation between the ability of p53 proteins to be immunoprecipitated by this antibody and their ability to interact with p73 or p63 in vitro and in transfected cells. Based on these results and those of others, we propose that interactions between the members of the p53 family are likely to be widespread and may account in some cases for the ability of tumor-derived p53 mutants to promote tumorigenesis. PMID:11238924

  8. SH2B1beta (SH2-Bbeta) enhances expression of a subset of nerve growth factor-regulated genes important for neuronal differentiation including genes encoding urokinase plasminogen activator receptor and matrix metalloproteinase 3/10.

    PubMed

    Chen, Linyi; Maures, Travis J; Jin, Hui; Huo, Jeffrey S; Rabbani, Shafaat A; Schwartz, Jessica; Carter-Su, Christin

    2008-02-01

    Previous work showed that the adapter protein SH2B adapter protein 1beta (SH2B1) (SH2-B) binds to the activated form of the nerve growth factor (NGF) receptor TrkA and is critical for both NGF-dependent neurite outgrowth and maintenance. To identify SH2B1beta-regulated genes critical for neurite outgrowth, we performed microarray analysis of control PC12 cells and PC12 cells stably overexpressing SH2B1beta (PC12-SH2B1beta) or the dominant-negative SH2B1beta(R555E) [PC12-SH2B1beta(R555E)]. NGF-induced microarray expression of Plaur and Mmp10 genes was greatly enhanced in PC12-SH2B1beta cells, whereas NGF-induced Plaur and Mmp3 expression was substantially depressed in PC12-SH2B1beta(R555E) cells. Plaur, Mmp3, and Mmp10 are among the 12 genes most highly up-regulated after 6 h of NGF. Their protein products [urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR), matrix metalloproteinase 3 (MMP3), and MMP10] lie in the same pathway of extracellular matrix degradation; uPAR has been shown previously to be critical for NGF-induced neurite outgrowth. Quantitative real-time PCR analysis revealed SH2B1beta enhancement of NGF induction of all three genes and the suppression of NGF induction of all three when endogenous SH2B1 was reduced using short hairpin RNA against SH2B1 and in PC12-SH2B1beta(R555E) cells. NGF-induced levels of uPAR and MMP3/10 and neurite outgrowth through Matrigel (MMP3-dependent) were also increased in PC12-SH2B1beta cells. These results suggest that SH2B1beta stimulates NGF-induced neuronal differentiation at least in part by enhancing expression of a specific subset of NGF-sensitive genes, including Plaur, Mmp3, and/or Mmp10, required for neurite outgrowth.

  9. Identification of novel dendritic cell subset markers in human blood.

    PubMed

    Schütz, Fabian; Hackstein, Holger

    2014-01-10

    Human dendritic cells (DC) are key regulators of innate and adaptive immunity that can be divided in at least three major subpopulations: plasmacytoid DC (pDC), myeloid type 1 DC (mDC1) and myeloid type 2 DC (mDC2) exhibiting different functions. However, research, diagnostic and cell therapeutic studies on human DC subsets are limited because only few DC subset markers have been identified so far. Especially mDC2 representing the rarest blood DC subset are difficult to be separated from mDC1 and pDC due to a paucity of mDC2 markers. We have combined multiparameter flow cytometry analysis of human blood DC subsets with systematic expression analysis of 332 surface antigens in magnetic bead-enriched blood DC samples. The initial analysis revealed eight novel putative DC subset markers CD26, CD85a, CD109, CD172a, CD200, CD200R, CD275 and CD301 that were subsequently tested in bulk peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) samples from healthy blood donors. Secondary analysis of PBMC samples confirmed three novel DC subset markers CD26 (dipeptidyl peptidase IV), CD85a (Leukocyte immunoglobulin-like receptor B3) and CD275 (inducible costimulator ligand). CD85a is specifically expressed in mDC1 and CD26 and CD275 represent novel mDC2 markers. These markers will facilitate human DC subset discrimination and additionally provide insight into potentially novel DC subset-specific functions.

  10. FcμR in human B cell subsets in primary selective IgM deficiency, and regulation of FcμR and production of natural IgM antibodies by IGIV.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Sudhir; Agrawal, Sudhanshu; Gollapudi, Sastry; Kubagawa, Hiromi

    2016-12-01

    IgMFcR (FcμR) are expressed on B cell and B cell subsets. Mice deficient in secreted IgM and FcμR share properties of impaired specific antibody response and autoimmunity with patient with selective IgM deficiency (SIGMD). Intravenous immunoglobulin (IGIV) regulates immune response, including modulation of IgGFc receptors. However, there are no data on the expression of FcμR in patients with SIGMD, and the effects of IGIV on FcμR. In this study, we investigated FcμR expression in naïve marginal zone (MZ), IgM memory, and class-switched memory B cells in patients with selective IgM deficiency and healthy controls. Furthermore, we examined the direct effect of IGIV on FcμR expression and on the upregulation of FcμR by TLR2 agonist (Pam3). Finally, we examined the effect of IVIG on spontaneously produced IgM and natural IgM anti-phosphorylcholine (PC) antibodies by B cells and B1 cells. FcμR expression is significantly decreased in MZ B cells in patients with SIGMD as compared to control. IGIV, at immunomodulatory concentrations, inhibited FcμR upregulation by Pam3 in MZ B cells, and IgM-depleted IGIV inhibited spontaneous secretion of natural IgM anti-PC antibodies and not total IgM by B1 cells. These data suggest that decreased FcμR expression on MZ B cells may play a role in the pathogenesis of SIGMD, and an inhibition of TLR-2-induced upregulation of FcμR by IGIV may be one of the mechanisms of its anti-inflammatory action. IGIV-induced inhibition of natural IgM antibodies may be one of the mechanisms of IGIV-induced immunoregulation. Copyright © 2016 American Society for Histocompatibility and Immunogenetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. B Cell Subsets in Atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Perry, Heather M.; Bender, Timothy P.; McNamara, Coleen A.

    2012-01-01

    Atherosclerosis, the underlying cause of heart attacks and strokes, is a chronic inflammatory disease of the artery wall. Immune cells, including lymphocytes modulate atherosclerotic lesion development through interconnected mechanisms. Elegant studies over the past decades have begun to unravel a role for B cells in atherosclerosis. Recent findings provide evidence that B cell effects on atherosclerosis may be subset-dependent. B-1a B cells have been reported to protect from atherosclerosis by secretion of natural IgM antibodies. Conventional B-2 B cells can promote atherosclerosis through less clearly defined mechanism that may involve CD4 T cells. Yet, there may be other populations of B cells within these subsets with different phenotypes altering their impact on atherosclerosis. Additionally, the role of B cell subsets in atherosclerosis may depend on their environmental niche and/or the stage of atherogenesis. This review will highlight key findings in the evolving field of B cells and atherosclerosis and touch on the potential and importance of translating these findings to human disease. PMID:23248624

  12. Lower bounds for identifying subset members with subset queries

    SciTech Connect

    Knill, E.

    1994-04-01

    An instance of a group testing problem is a set of objects {Omicron}and an unknown subset P of {Omicron}.The task is to determine P by using queries of the type ``does P intersect ``Q``, where Q is a subset of {Omicron}. This problem occurs in areas such as fault detection, multiaccess communications, optimal search, blood testing and chromosome mapping. Consider the two stage algorithm for solving a group testing problem where in the first stage, a predetermined set of queries, are asked in parallel, and in the second stage, P is determined by testing individual objects. Let n = {vert_bar}{Omicron}{vert_bar}. Suppose that P is generated by independently adding each {chi} {element_of}{Omicron} to P with probability p/n. Let q{sub 1} (q{sub 2}) be the number of queries asked in the first (second) stage of this algorithm. We show that if q{sub 1} = o(log(n) log(n)/log log(n)), then Exp(q{sub 2}) = n{sup l{minus}0(1)}, while there exist algorithms with q{sub 1} = O(log(n)log(n)/loglog(n)) and Exp(q{sub 2}) = o(l). The proof involves a relaxation technique which can be used with arbitrary distributions. The best previously known bound is q{sub 1} + Exp(q{sub 2}) = {Omega}(p log(n)). For general group testing algorithms, our results imply that if the average number of queries over the course of n{sup {gamma}} ({gamma} > 0) independent experiments is O n{sup l{minus}{element_of}}, then with high probability {Omega}(log(n)log(n)/loglog(n)) non-singleton subsets are queried. This settles a conjecture of Bill Bruno and David Torney and has important consequences for the use of group testing in screening DNA libraries and other applications where its is more cost effective to use non-adaptive algorithms and/or expensive to prepare a subset Q for its first test.

  13. 21 CFR 660.43 - Potency test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... STANDARDS FOR DIAGNOSTIC SUBSTANCES FOR LABORATORY TESTS Hepatitis B Surface Antigen § 660.43 Potency test. To be satisfactory for release, each filling of Hepatitis B Surface Antigen shall be tested against the Reference Hepatitis B Antiserum Panel and shall be sufficiently potent to be able to detect...

  14. 21 CFR 660.43 - Potency test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... STANDARDS FOR DIAGNOSTIC SUBSTANCES FOR LABORATORY TESTS Hepatitis B Surface Antigen § 660.43 Potency test. To be satisfactory for release, each filling of Hepatitis B Surface Antigen shall be tested against the Reference Hepatitis B Antiserum Panel and shall be sufficiently potent to be able to detect...

  15. 21 CFR 660.43 - Potency test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... STANDARDS FOR DIAGNOSTIC SUBSTANCES FOR LABORATORY TESTS Hepatitis B Surface Antigen § 660.43 Potency test. To be satisfactory for release, each filling of Hepatitis B Surface Antigen shall be tested against the Reference Hepatitis B Antiserum Panel and shall be sufficiently potent to be able to detect...

  16. 21 CFR 660.4 - Potency test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... STANDARDS FOR DIAGNOSTIC SUBSTANCES FOR LABORATORY TESTS Antibody to Hepatitis B Surface Antigen § 660.4 Potency test. To be satisfactory for release, each filling of Antibody to Hepatitis B Surface Antigen shall be tested against the Reference Hepatitis B Surface Antigen Panel and shall be sufficiently...

  17. 21 CFR 660.4 - Potency test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... STANDARDS FOR DIAGNOSTIC SUBSTANCES FOR LABORATORY TESTS Antibody to Hepatitis B Surface Antigen § 660.4 Potency test. To be satisfactory for release, each filling of Antibody to Hepatitis B Surface Antigen shall be tested against the Reference Hepatitis B Surface Antigen Panel and shall be sufficiently...

  18. 21 CFR 660.4 - Potency test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... STANDARDS FOR DIAGNOSTIC SUBSTANCES FOR LABORATORY TESTS Antibody to Hepatitis B Surface Antigen § 660.4 Potency test. To be satisfactory for release, each filling of Antibody to Hepatitis B Surface Antigen shall be tested against the Reference Hepatitis B Surface Antigen Panel and shall be sufficiently...

  19. 21 CFR 660.43 - Potency test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... STANDARDS FOR DIAGNOSTIC SUBSTANCES FOR LABORATORY TESTS Hepatitis B Surface Antigen § 660.43 Potency test. To be satisfactory for release, each filling of Hepatitis B Surface Antigen shall be tested against the Reference Hepatitis B Antiserum Panel and shall be sufficiently potent to be able to detect the...

  20. 21 CFR 660.4 - Potency test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... STANDARDS FOR DIAGNOSTIC SUBSTANCES FOR LABORATORY TESTS Antibody to Hepatitis B Surface Antigen § 660.4 Potency test. To be satisfactory for release, each filling of Antibody to Hepatitis B Surface Antigen shall be tested against the Reference Hepatitis B Surface Antigen Panel and shall be sufficiently potent...

  1. 21 CFR 640.104 - Potency.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... STANDARDS FOR HUMAN BLOOD AND BLOOD PRODUCTS Immune Globulin (Human) § 640.104 Potency. (a) Antibody levels and tests. Each lot of final product shall contain at least the minimum levels of antibodies for... stored at a temperature above 5 °C the antibody level tests shall be performed after such storage with a...

  2. 21 CFR 640.104 - Potency.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... STANDARDS FOR HUMAN BLOOD AND BLOOD PRODUCTS Immune Globulin (Human) § 640.104 Potency. (a) Antibody levels and tests. Each lot of final product shall contain at least the minimum levels of antibodies for... stored at a temperature above 5 °C the antibody level tests shall be performed after such storage with a...

  3. RELATIVE POTENCIES OF MINERAL AND SYNTHETIC FIBERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper presents a summary of the present need for the NHEERL data set, how the data are being recovered and entered into spreadsheets for analysis and modeling, and the potential for improved risk models that include consideration of differences in relative potencies based on...

  4. Potency tests of diphtheria, tetanus and combined vaccines. Suggestion for a simplified potency assay.

    PubMed

    Aggerbeck, H; Heron, I

    1996-01-01

    Two diphtheria-tetanus vaccines (DT), adsorbed to either aluminium hydroxide or calcium phosphate but identical with respect to toxoid origin and amounts, were compared in full potency assays in mice according to the European Pharmacopoeia (EP) and in a reduced potency assay in guinea-pigs using a double dose immunization schedule. The efficacy of the vaccines was compared in a clinical trial with revaccination of 313 military recruits. The reduced potency assay gave a better reflection of the efficacy of the two vaccines in humans than the required assays of the EP. For release of combined, final vaccine formulations the reduced potency assay suggested will reduce the number of animals in quality control.

  5. New TES Search and Subset Application

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2017-08-23

    ... The Atmospheric Science Data Center (ASDC) at NASA Langley Research Center in collaboration with the Tropospheric Emission ... Search and Subset Web Application URL: https://subset.larc.nasa.gov/tes/login.php   Read more ...

  6. Voltage-gated sodium channel Nav1.7 maintains the membrane potential and regulates the activation and chemokine-induced migration of a monocyte-derived dendritic cell subset.

    PubMed

    Kis-Toth, Katalin; Hajdu, Peter; Bacskai, Ildiko; Szilagyi, Orsolya; Papp, Ferenc; Szanto, Attila; Posta, Edit; Gogolak, Peter; Panyi, Gyorgy; Rajnavolgyi, Eva

    2011-08-01

    Expression of CD1a protein defines a human dendritic cell (DC) subset with unique functional activities. We aimed to study the expression of the Nav1.7 sodium channel and the functional consequences of its activity in CD1a(-) and CD1a(+) DC. Single-cell electrophysiology (patch-clamp) and quantitative PCR experiments performed on sorted CD1a(-) and CD1a(+) immature DC (IDC) showed that the frequency of cells expressing Na(+) current, current density, and the relative expression of the SCN9A gene encoding Nav1.7 were significantly higher in CD1a(+) cells than in their CD1a(-) counterparts. The activity of Nav1.7 results in a depolarized resting membrane potential (-8.7 ± 1.5 mV) in CD1a(+) IDC as compared with CD1a(-) cells lacking Nav1.7 (-47 ± 6.2 mV). Stimulation of DC by inflammatory signals or by increased intracellular Ca(2+) levels resulted in reduced Nav1.7 expression. Silencing of the SCN9A gene shifted the membrane potential to a hyperpolarizing direction in CD1a(+) IDC, resulting in decreased cell migration, whereas pharmacological inhibition of Nav1.7 by tetrodotoxin sensitized the cells for activation signals. Fine-tuning of IDC functions by a voltage-gated sodium channel emerges as a new regulatory mechanism modulating the migration and cytokine responses of these DC subsets.

  7. Transrepression and transactivation potencies of inhaled glucocorticoids.

    PubMed

    Dirks, N L; Li, S; Huth, B; Hochhaus, G; Yates, C R; Meibohm, B

    2008-12-01

    The anti-inflammatory activity of inhaled glucocorticoids is primarily mediated through transrepression of pro-inflammatory transcription factors such as AP-1 and NF-kappaB, while systemic side effects are largely attributed to transactivation via glucocorticoid response elements (GRE) in the promoter region of responsive genes. The objective of this study is to investigate whether inhaled corticosteroids exhibit differences in their transactivation and transrepression potencies. A549 human alveolar epithelial type II like cells, stably transfected with a reporter plasmid containing an AP-1, NF-kappaB or GRE induced secreted alkaline phosphatase reporter gene (SEAP), were exposed to a panel of concentrations of the six inhaled and three systemic glucocorticoids. Glucocorticoid-induced changes in SEAP expression were quantified by chemiluminescence. For eight glucocorticoids (budesonide, desisobutyryl-cicle-sonide, dexamethasone, flunisolide, fluocortolone, fluticasone propionate, mometasone furoate, prednisolone) the EC50 for NF-kappaB mediated transrepression was significantly larger than that for both transactivation and transrepression via AP-1. For the remaining glucocorticoid (triamcinolone acetonide), it was greater than that for transactivation. It is concluded that, within the studied cell system, inhaled corticosteroids did not exhibit preferential transrepression, but had higher potencies for transactivation than for transrepression via NF-kappaB and had differential potencies for the two transrepression pathways.

  8. 21 CFR 640.56 - Quality control test for potency.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...) BIOLOGICS ADDITIONAL STANDARDS FOR HUMAN BLOOD AND BLOOD PRODUCTS Cryoprecipitate § 640.56 Quality control test for potency. (a) Quality control tests for potency of antihemophilic factor shall be conducted... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2011-04-01 2010-04-01 true Quality control test for potency. 640.56 Section...

  9. 21 CFR 640.56 - Quality control test for potency.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Quality control test for potency. 640.56 Section...) BIOLOGICS ADDITIONAL STANDARDS FOR HUMAN BLOOD AND BLOOD PRODUCTS Cryoprecipitate § 640.56 Quality control test for potency. (a) Quality control tests for potency of antihemophilic factor shall be...

  10. 21 CFR 640.56 - Quality control test for potency.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Quality control test for potency. 640.56 Section...) BIOLOGICS ADDITIONAL STANDARDS FOR HUMAN BLOOD AND BLOOD PRODUCTS Cryoprecipitate § 640.56 Quality control test for potency. (a) Quality control tests for potency of antihemophilic factor shall be...

  11. 9 CFR 113.9 - New potency test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false New potency test. 113.9 Section 113.9 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE VIRUSES... New potency test. A potency test written into the filed Outline of Production for a product shall be...

  12. 21 CFR 640.56 - Quality control test for potency.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Quality control test for potency. 640.56 Section...) BIOLOGICS ADDITIONAL STANDARDS FOR HUMAN BLOOD AND BLOOD PRODUCTS Cryoprecipitate § 640.56 Quality control test for potency. (a) Quality control tests for potency of antihemophilic factor shall be conducted...

  13. Covalent EGFR inhibitor analysis reveals importance of reversible interactions to potency and mechanisms of drug resistance.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, Phillip A; Kuzmic, Petr; Solowiej, James; Bergqvist, Simon; Bolanos, Ben; Almaden, Chau; Nagata, Asako; Ryan, Kevin; Feng, Junli; Dalvie, Deepak; Kath, John C; Xu, Meirong; Wani, Revati; Murray, Brion William

    2014-01-07

    Covalent inhibition is a reemerging paradigm in kinase drug design, but the roles of inhibitor binding affinity and chemical reactivity in overall potency are not well-understood. To characterize the underlying molecular processes at a microscopic level and determine the appropriate kinetic constants, specialized experimental design and advanced numerical integration of differential equations are developed. Previously uncharacterized investigational covalent drugs reported here are shown to be extremely effective epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) inhibitors (kinact/Ki in the range 10(5)-10(7) M(-1)s(-1)), despite their low specific reactivity (kinact ≤ 2.1 × 10(-3) s(-1)), which is compensated for by high binding affinities (Ki < 1 nM). For inhibitors relying on reactivity to achieve potency, noncovalent enzyme-inhibitor complex partitioning between inhibitor dissociation and bond formation is central. Interestingly, reversible binding affinity of EGFR covalent inhibitors is highly correlated with antitumor cell potency. Furthermore, cellular potency for a subset of covalent inhibitors can be accounted for solely through reversible interactions. One reversible interaction is between EGFR-Cys797 nucleophile and the inhibitor's reactive group, which may also contribute to drug resistance. Because covalent inhibitors target a cysteine residue, the effects of its oxidation on enzyme catalysis and inhibitor pharmacology are characterized. Oxidation of the EGFR cysteine nucleophile does not alter catalysis but has widely varied effects on inhibitor potency depending on the EGFR context (e.g., oncogenic mutations), type of oxidation (sulfinylation or glutathiolation), and inhibitor architecture. These methods, parameters, and insights provide a rational framework for assessing and designing effective covalent inhibitors.

  14. Covalent EGFR inhibitor analysis reveals importance of reversible interactions to potency and mechanisms of drug resistance

    PubMed Central

    Schwartz, Phillip A.; Kuzmic, Petr; Solowiej, James; Bergqvist, Simon; Bolanos, Ben; Almaden, Chau; Nagata, Asako; Ryan, Kevin; Feng, Junli; Dalvie, Deepak; Kath, John C.; Xu, Meirong; Wani, Revati; Murray, Brion William

    2014-01-01

    Covalent inhibition is a reemerging paradigm in kinase drug design, but the roles of inhibitor binding affinity and chemical reactivity in overall potency are not well-understood. To characterize the underlying molecular processes at a microscopic level and determine the appropriate kinetic constants, specialized experimental design and advanced numerical integration of differential equations are developed. Previously uncharacterized investigational covalent drugs reported here are shown to be extremely effective epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) inhibitors (kinact/Ki in the range 105–107 M−1s−1), despite their low specific reactivity (kinact ≤ 2.1 × 10−3 s−1), which is compensated for by high binding affinities (Ki < 1 nM). For inhibitors relying on reactivity to achieve potency, noncovalent enzyme–inhibitor complex partitioning between inhibitor dissociation and bond formation is central. Interestingly, reversible binding affinity of EGFR covalent inhibitors is highly correlated with antitumor cell potency. Furthermore, cellular potency for a subset of covalent inhibitors can be accounted for solely through reversible interactions. One reversible interaction is between EGFR-Cys797 nucleophile and the inhibitor’s reactive group, which may also contribute to drug resistance. Because covalent inhibitors target a cysteine residue, the effects of its oxidation on enzyme catalysis and inhibitor pharmacology are characterized. Oxidation of the EGFR cysteine nucleophile does not alter catalysis but has widely varied effects on inhibitor potency depending on the EGFR context (e.g., oncogenic mutations), type of oxidation (sulfinylation or glutathiolation), and inhibitor architecture. These methods, parameters, and insights provide a rational framework for assessing and designing effective covalent inhibitors. PMID:24347635

  15. Rationale for Further Medical and Health Research on High-Potency Sweeteners

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    High-potency or artificial sweeteners have historically been considered inert compounds without physiological consequences other than taste sensations. However, recent data suggest that some of these sweeteners have biological effects that may impact human health. Furthermore, there are significant gaps in our current knowledge of the pharmacokinetics of these sweeteners, their potential for “sweetener–drug interactions” and their impact on appetite and body weight regulation. Nine research needs are described that address some of the major unknown issues associated with ingestion of high-potency sweeteners. PMID:22539626

  16. Rationale for further medical and health research on high-potency sweeteners.

    PubMed

    Schiffman, Susan S

    2012-10-01

    High-potency or artificial sweeteners have historically been considered inert compounds without physiological consequences other than taste sensations. However, recent data suggest that some of these sweeteners have biological effects that may impact human health. Furthermore, there are significant gaps in our current knowledge of the pharmacokinetics of these sweeteners, their potential for "sweetener-drug interactions" and their impact on appetite and body weight regulation. Nine research needs are described that address some of the major unknown issues associated with ingestion of high-potency sweeteners.

  17. Macrophage subsets and microglia in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Bogie, Jeroen F J; Stinissen, Piet; Hendriks, Jerome J A

    2014-08-01

    Along with microglia and monocyte-derived macrophages, macrophages in the perivascular space, choroid plexus, and meninges are the principal effector cells in neuroinflammatory and neurodegenerative disorders. These phagocytes are highly heterogeneous cells displaying spatial- and temporal-dependent identities in the healthy, injured, and inflamed CNS. In the last decade, researchers have debated on whether phagocytes subtypes and phenotypes are pathogenic or protective in CNS pathologies. In the context of this dichotomy, we summarize and discuss the current knowledge on the spatiotemporal physiology of macrophage subsets and microglia in the healthy and diseased CNS, and elaborate on factors regulating their behavior. In addition, the impact of macrophages present in lymphoid organs on CNS pathologies is defined. The prime focus of this review is on multiple sclerosis (MS), which is characterized by inflammation, demyelination, neurodegeneration, and CNS repair, and in which microglia and macrophages have been extensively scrutinized. On one hand, microglia and macrophages promote neuroinflammatory and neurodegenerative events in MS by releasing inflammatory mediators and stimulating leukocyte activity and infiltration into the CNS. On the other hand, microglia and macrophages assist in CNS repair through the production of neurotrophic factors and clearance of inhibitory myelin debris. Finally, we define how microglia and macrophage physiology can be harnessed for new therapeutics aimed at suppressing neuroinflammatory and cytodegenerative events, as well as promoting CNS repair. We conclude that microglia and macrophages are highly dynamic cells displaying disease stage and location-specific fates in neurological disorders. Changing the physiology of divergent phagocyte subsets at particular disease stages holds promise for future therapeutics for CNS pathologies.

  18. Negative feedback regulation of noradrenaline release by nerve stimulation in the perfused cat's spleen: differences in potency of phenoxybenzamine in blocking the pre- and post-synaptic adrenergic receptors

    PubMed Central

    Dubocovich, Margarita L.; Langer, S. Z.

    1974-01-01

    1. The effects of low concentrations of phenoxybenzamine (8·8 × 10-10 to 2·9 × 10-7 M) on responses and on noradrenaline overflow elicited by nerve stimulation were studied in the perfused cat's spleen. 2. In the presence of 8·8 × 10-10 M or 2·9 × 10-9 M phenoxybenzamine there was a significant reduction in responses to nerve stimulation while the overflow of the transmitter did not increase at the two frequencies of stimulation employed: 5 and 30 Hz. 3. In the presence of 2·9 × 10-8 M or 2·9 × 10-7 M phenoxybenzamine the responses to nerve stimulation were practically abolished and a significant increase in transmitter overflow was obtained at both frequencies of stimulation. The drug was more effective in increasing transmitter overflow at 5 Hz when compared with 30 Hz. 4. The higher effectiveness of phenoxybenzamine in blocking the post-synaptic α-receptor when compared with the blockade of the presynaptic α-receptor that regulates transmitter release is compatible with the view that these two receptors are not identical. 5. A second alternative for the difference in effectiveness of phenoxybenzamine is that both types of α receptors are identical, but the spare receptor capacity for the presynaptic adrenergic receptors is higher than that of the post-synaptic receptors. PMID:4363457

  19. CUDA Enabled Graph Subset Examiner

    SciTech Connect

    Johnston, Jeremy T.

    2016-12-22

    Finding Godsil-McKay switching sets in graphs is one way to demonstrate that a specific graph is not determined by its spectrum--the eigenvalues of its adjacency matrix. An important area of active research in pure mathematics is determining which graphs are determined by their spectra, i.e. when the spectrum of the adjacency matrix uniquely determines the underlying graph. We are interested in exploring the spectra of graphs in the Johnson scheme and specifically seek to determine which of these graphs are determined by their spectra. Given a graph G, a Godsil-McKay switching set is an induced subgraph H on 2k vertices with the following properties: I) H is regular, ii) every vertex in G/H is adjacent to either 0, k, or 2k vertices of H, and iii) at least one vertex in G/H is adjacent to k vertices in H. The software package examines each subset of a user specified size to determine whether or not it satisfies those 3 conditions. The software makes use of the massive parallel processing power of CUDA enabled GPUs. It also exploits the vertex transitivity of graphs in the Johnson scheme by reasoning that if G has a Godsil-McKay switching set, then it has a switching set which includes vertex 1. While the code (in its current state) is tuned to this specific problem, the method of examining each induced subgraph of G can be easily re-written to check for any user specified conditions on the subgraphs and can therefore be used much more broadly.

  20. Summary of carcinogenic potency and positivity for 492 rodent carcinogens in the carcinogenic potency database.

    PubMed Central

    Gold, L S; Slone, T H; Bernstein, L

    1989-01-01

    A tabulation of carcinogenic potency (TD50) by species for 492 chemicals that induce tumors in rats or mice is presented. With the use of the Carcinogenic Potency Database, experimental results are summarized by indicating in which sex-species groups the chemical was tested and the respective evaluations of carcinogenicity. A comparison of three summary measures of TD50 for chemicals with more than one positive experiment per species shows that the most potent TD50 value is similar to measures that average values or functions of values. This tabulation can be used to investigate associations between rodent potency and other factors such as mutagenicity, teratogenicity, chemical structure, and human exposure. PMID:2707207

  1. Potency of Animal Models in KANSEI Engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozaki, Shigeru; Hisano, Setsuji; Iwamoto, Yoshiki

    Various species of animals have been used as animal models for neuroscience and provided critical information about the brain functions. Although it seems difficult to elucidate a highly advanced function of the human brain, animal models have potency to clarify the fundamental mechanisms of emotion, decision-making and social behavior. In this review, we will pick up common animal models and point to both the merits and demerits caused by the characteristics. We will also mention that wide-ranging approaches from animal models are advantageous to understand KANSEI as well as mind in humans.

  2. Antecedents of team potency and team effectiveness: an examination of goal and process clarity and servant leadership.

    PubMed

    Hu, Jia; Liden, Robert C

    2011-07-01

    Integrating theories of self-regulation with team and leadership literatures, this study investigated goal and process clarity and servant leadership as 3 antecedents of team potency and subsequent team effectiveness, operationalized as team performance and organizational citizenship behavior. Our sample of 304 employees represented 71 teams in 5 banks. Results showed that team-level goal and process clarity as well as team servant leadership served as 3 antecedents of team potency and subsequent team performance and team organizational citizenship behavior. Furthermore, we found that servant leadership moderated the relationships between both goal and process clarity and team potency, such that the positive relationships between both goal and process clarity and team potency were stronger in the presence of servant leadership.

  3. Targeting macrophage subsets for infarct repair.

    PubMed

    Ben-Mordechai, Tamar; Palevski, Dahlia; Glucksam-Galnoy, Yifat; Elron-Gross, Inbar; Margalit, Rimona; Leor, Jonathan

    2015-01-01

    Macrophages are involved in every cardiovascular disease and are an attractive therapeutic target. Macrophage activation is complex and can be either beneficial or deleterious, depending upon its mode of action, its timing, and its duration. An important macrophage characteristic is its plasticity, which enables it to switch from one subset to another. Macrophages, which regulate healing and repair after myocardial infarction, have become a major target for both treatment and diagnosis (theranostic). The aim of the present review is to describe the recent discoveries related to targeting and modulating of macrophage function to improve infarct repair. We will briefly review macrophage polarization, plasticity, heterogeneity, their role in infarct repair, regeneration, and cross talk with mesenchymal cells. Particularly, we will focus on the potential of macrophage targeting in situ by liposomes. The ability to modulate macrophage function could delineate pathways to reactivate the endogenous programs of myocardial regeneration. This will eventually lead to development of small molecules or biologics to enhance the endogenous programs of regeneration and repair. © The Author(s) 2014.

  4. Digital Image Correlation with Dynamic Subset Selection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassan, Ghulam Mubashar; MacNish, Cara; Dyskin, Arcady; Shufrin, Igor

    2016-09-01

    The quality of the surface pattern and selection of subset size play a critical role in achieving high accuracy in Digital Image Correlation (DIC). The subset size in DIC is normally selected by testing different subset sizes across the entire image, which is a laborious procedure. This also leads to the problem that the worst region of the surface pattern influences the performance of DIC across the entire image. In order to avoid these limitations, a Dynamic Subset Selection (DSS) algorithm is proposed in this paper to optimize the subset size for each point in an image before optimizing the correlation parameters. The proposed DSS algorithm uses the local pattern around the point of interest to calculate a parameter called the Intensity Variation Ratio (Λ), which is used to optimize the subset size. The performance of the DSS algorithm is analyzed using numerically generated images and is compared with the results of traditional DIC. Images obtained from laboratory experiments are also used to demonstrate the utility of the DSS algorithm. Results illustrate that the DSS algorithm provides a better alternative to subset size "guessing" and finds an appropriate subset size for each point of interest according to the local pattern.

  5. A subset of high-grade pulmonary neuroendocrine carcinomas shows up-regulation of matrix metalloproteinase-7 associated with nuclear beta-catenin immunoreactivity, independent of EGFR and HER-2 gene amplification or expression.

    PubMed

    Pelosi, Giuseppe; Scarpa, Aldo; Veronesi, Giulia; Spaggiari, Lorenzo; Del Curto, Barbara; Moore, Patrick S; Maisonneuve, Patrick; Sonzogni, Angelica; Masullo, Michele; Viale, Giuseppe

    2005-12-01

    Nuclear translocation of beta-catenin has been correlated with epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) overexpression/activation in non-small cell lung cancer. Less is known on beta-catenin transactivation in high-grade pulmonary neuroendocrine tumors and on the status of beta-catenin activating EGFR and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER-2) or beta-catenin target genes cyclin D1 and matrix metalloproteinase-7 (MMP-7). beta-catenin immunoreactivity was evaluated in 51 large-cell neuroendocrine carcinomas (LCNEC) and 45 small-cell lung carcinomas (SCLC). Nineteen cases were assessed for beta-catenin gene exon 3 mutations, expression of MMP-7, and expression/gene amplification of EGFR, HER-2, and cyclin D1. beta-catenin was expressed in all 96 high-grade neuroendocrine tumors, the vast majority (94%) showing >50% immunopositive cells. A disarrayed immunoreactivity, however, was commonly encountered consisting in variably altered membrane-associated patterns of staining along with progressive accumulation of cytoplasmic immunoreactivity. In LCNEC, but not in SCLC, the disarrayed patterns correlated with EGFR and HER-2 protein expression. beta-catenin nuclear accumulation was found in nine tumors, including seven LCNEC and two SCLC, and was always associated with disarrayed immunoreactivity and increased MMP-7, but not cyclin D1 expression. These cases, however, did not show beta-catenin gene mutations or EGFR and HER-2 gene amplification or expression. No association was found between nuclear beta-catenin and any clinicopathological variable including patients' survival. The subcellular compartmentalization of beta-catenin is profoundly altered in high-grade pulmonary neuroendocrine tumors. A minor subset of these tumors shows beta-catenin nuclear accumulation in association with increased expression of MMP-7, but not of cyclin D1, independent of EGFR and HER-2 gene amplification or expression.

  6. Active Learning With Optimal Instance Subset Selection.

    PubMed

    Fu, Yifan; Zhu, Xingquan; Elmagarmid, A K

    2013-04-01

    Active learning (AL) traditionally relies on some instance-based utility measures (such as uncertainty) to assess individual instances and label the ones with the maximum values for training. In this paper, we argue that such approaches cannot produce good labeling subsets mainly because instances are evaluated independently without considering their interactions, and individuals with maximal ability do not necessarily form an optimal instance subset for learning. Alternatively, we propose to achieve AL with optimal subset selection (ALOSS), where the key is to find an instance subset with a maximum utility value. To achieve the goal, ALOSS simultaneously considers the following: 1) the importance of individual instances and 2) the disparity between instances, to build an instance-correlation matrix. As a result, AL is transformed to a semidefinite programming problem to select a k-instance subset with a maximum utility value. Experimental results demonstrate that ALOSS outperforms state-of-the-art approaches for AL.

  7. Investigating Evolutionary Conservation of Dendritic Cell Subset Identity and Functions

    PubMed Central

    Vu Manh, Thien-Phong; Bertho, Nicolas; Hosmalin, Anne; Schwartz-Cornil, Isabelle; Dalod, Marc

    2015-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) were initially defined as mononuclear phagocytes with a dendritic morphology and an exquisite efficiency for naïve T-cell activation. DC encompass several subsets initially identified by their expression of specific cell surface molecules and later shown to excel in distinct functions and to develop under the instruction of different transcription factors or cytokines. Very few cell surface molecules are expressed in a specific manner on any immune cell type. Hence, to identify cell types, the sole use of a small number of cell surface markers in classical flow cytometry can be deceiving. Moreover, the markers currently used to define mononuclear phagocyte subsets vary depending on the tissue and animal species studied and even between laboratories. This has led to confusion in the definition of DC subset identity and in their attribution of specific functions. There is a strong need to identify a rigorous and consensus way to define mononuclear phagocyte subsets, with precise guidelines potentially applicable throughout tissues and species. We will discuss the advantages, drawbacks, and complementarities of different methodologies: cell surface phenotyping, ontogeny, functional characterization, and molecular profiling. We will advocate that gene expression profiling is a very rigorous, largely unbiased and accessible method to define the identity of mononuclear phagocyte subsets, which strengthens and refines surface phenotyping. It is uniquely powerful to yield new, experimentally testable, hypotheses on the ontogeny or functions of mononuclear phagocyte subsets, their molecular regulation, and their evolutionary conservation. We propose defining cell populations based on a combination of cell surface phenotyping, expression analysis of hallmark genes, and robust functional assays, in order to reach a consensus and integrate faster the huge but scattered knowledge accumulated by different laboratories on different cell types, organs, and

  8. The dual transcriptional regulator CysR in Corynebacterium glutamicum ATCC 13032 controls a subset of genes of the McbR regulon in response to the availability of sulphide acceptor molecules

    PubMed Central

    Rückert, Christian; Milse, Johanna; Albersmeier, Andreas; Koch, Daniel J; Pühler, Alfred; Kalinowski, Jörn

    2008-01-01

    Background Regulation of sulphur metabolism in Corynebacterium glutamicum ATCC 13032 has been studied intensively in the last few years, due to its industrial as well as scientific importance. Previously, the gene cg0156 was shown to belong to the regulon of McbR, a global transcriptional repressor of sulphur metabolism in C. glutamicum. This gene encodes a putative ROK-type regulator, a paralogue of the activator of sulphonate utilisation, SsuR. Therefore, it is an interesting candidate for study to further the understanding of the regulation of sulphur metabolism in C. glutamicum. Results Deletion of cg0156, now designated cysR, results in the inability of the mutant to utilise sulphate and aliphatic sulphonates. DNA microarray hybridisations revealed 49 genes with significantly increased and 48 with decreased transcript levels in presence of the native CysR compared to a cysR deletion mutant. Among the genes positively controlled by CysR were the gene cluster involved in sulphate reduction, fpr2 cysIXHDNYZ, and ssuR. Gel retardation experiments demonstrated that binding of CysR to DNA depends in vitro on the presence of either O-acetyl-L-serine or O-acetyl-L-homoserine. Mapping of the transcription start points of five transcription units helped to identify a 10 bp inverted repeat as the possible CysR binding site. Subsequent in vivo tests proved this motif to be necessary for CysR-dependent transcriptional regulation. Conclusion CysR acts as the functional analogue of the unrelated LysR-type regulator CysB from Escherichia coli, controlling sulphide production in response to acceptor availability. In both bacteria, gene duplication events seem to have taken place which resulted in the evolution of dedicated regulators for the control of sulphonate utilisation. The striking convergent evolution of network topology indicates the strong selective pressure to control the metabolism of the essential but often toxic sulphur-containing (bio-)molecules. PMID:18854009

  9. Potency control of modified live viral vaccines for veterinary use.

    PubMed

    Terpstra, C; Kroese, A H

    1996-04-01

    This paper reviews various aspects of efficacy, and methods for assaying the potency of modified live viral vaccines. The pros and cons of parametric versus non-parametric methods for analysis of potency assays are discussed and critical levels of protection, as determined by the target(s) of vaccination, are exemplified. Recommendations are presented for designing potency assays on master virus seeds and vaccine batches.

  10. Potency control of modified live viral vaccines for veterinary use.

    PubMed

    Terpstra, C; Kroese, A H

    1996-01-01

    This paper reviews various aspects of efficacy, and methods for assaying the potency of modified live viral vaccines. The pros and cons of parametric versus non-parametric methods for analysis of potency assays are discussed and critical levels of protection, as determined by the target(s) of vaccination, are exemplified. Recommendations are presented for designing potency assays on master virus seeds and vaccine batches.

  11. Subset selection circumvents the square root law

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Craver, Scott; Yu, Jun

    2010-01-01

    The square root law holds that acceptable embedding rate is sublinear in the cover size, specifically O(square root of n), in order to prevent detection as the warden's data and thus detector power increases. One way to transcend this law, at least in the i.i.d.case, is to restrict the cover to a chosen subset whose distribution is close to that of altered data. Embedding is then performed on this subset; this replaces the problem of finding a small enough subset to evade detection with the problem of finding a large enough subset that possesses a desired type distribution. We show that one can find such a subset of size asymptotically proportional to n rather than the square root of n. This works in the case of both replacement and tampering: Even if the distribution of tampered data depends on the distribution of cover data, one can find a fixed point in the probability simplex such that cover data of that distribution yields stego data of the same distribution. While the transmission of a subset is not allowed, this is no impediment: wet paper codes can be used, else in the worst case a maximal desirable subset can be computed from the cover by both sender and receiver without communication of side information.

  12. How do I subset MISR data?

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2014-12-08

    ... of the swath that cover their region of interest. The MISR Order and Customization Tool enables users to order and customize data in a single interface. Customization options are subsetting by ...

  13. Potency Biomarker Signature Genes from Multiparametric Osteogenesis Assays: Will cGMP Human Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stromal Cells Make Bone?

    PubMed Central

    Murgia, Alba; Veronesi, Elena; Candini, Olivia; Caselli, Anna; D’souza, Naomi; Rasini, Valeria; Giorgini, Andrea; Catani, Fabio; Iughetti, Lorenzo

    2016-01-01

    In skeletal regeneration approaches using human bone marrow derived mesenchymal stromal cells (hBM-MSC), functional evaluation before implantation has traditionally used biomarkers identified using fetal bovine serum-based osteogenic induction media and time courses of at least two weeks. However, emerging pre-clinical evidence indicates donor-dependent discrepancies between these ex vivo measurements and the ability to form bone, calling for improved tests. Therefore, we adopted a multiparametric approach aiming to generate an osteogenic potency assay with improved correlation. hBM-MSC populations from six donors, each expanded under clinical-grade (cGMP) conditions, showed heterogeneity for ex vivo growth response, mineralization and bone-forming ability in a murine xenograft assay. A subset of literature-based biomarker genes was reproducibly upregulated to a significant extent across all populations as cells responded to two different osteogenic induction media. These 12 biomarkers were also measurable in a one-week assay, befitting clinical cell expansion time frames and cGMP growth conditions. They were selected for further challenge using a combinatorial approach aimed at determining ex vivo and in vivo consistency. We identified five globally relevant osteogenic signature genes, notably TGF-ß1 pathway interactors; ALPL, COL1A2, DCN, ELN and RUNX2. Used in agglomerative cluster analysis, they correctly grouped the bone-forming cell populations as distinct. Although donor #6 cells were correlation slope outliers, they contrastingly formed bone without showing ex vivo mineralization. Mathematical expression level normalization of the most discrepantly upregulated signature gene COL1A2, sufficed to cluster donor #6 with the bone-forming classification. Moreover, attenuating factors causing genuine COL1A2 gene down-regulation, restored ex vivo mineralization. This suggested that the signature gene had an osteogenically influential role; nonetheless no single

  14. Single-cell entropy for accurate estimation of differentiation potency from a cell's transcriptome

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teschendorff, Andrew E.; Enver, Tariq

    2017-06-01

    The ability to quantify differentiation potential of single cells is a task of critical importance. Here we demonstrate, using over 7,000 single-cell RNA-Seq profiles, that differentiation potency of a single cell can be approximated by computing the signalling promiscuity, or entropy, of a cell's transcriptome in the context of an interaction network, without the need for feature selection. We show that signalling entropy provides a more accurate and robust potency estimate than other entropy-based measures, driven in part by a subtle positive correlation between the transcriptome and connectome. Signalling entropy identifies known cell subpopulations of varying potency and drug resistant cancer stem-cell phenotypes, including those derived from circulating tumour cells. It further reveals that expression heterogeneity within single-cell populations is regulated. In summary, signalling entropy allows in silico estimation of the differentiation potency and plasticity of single cells and bulk samples, providing a means to identify normal and cancer stem-cell phenotypes.

  15. Opportunities and strategies to further reduce animal use for Leptospira vaccine potency testing.

    PubMed

    Walker, A; Srinivas, G B

    2013-09-01

    Hamsters are routinely infected with virulent Leptospira for two purposes in the regulation of biologics: the performance of Codified potency tests and maintenance of challenge culture for the Codified potency tests. Options for reducing animal use in these processes were explored in a plenary lecture at the "International Workshop on Alternative Methods for Leptospira Vaccine Potency Testing: State of the Science and the Way Forward" held at the Center for Veterinary Biologics in September 2012. The use of validated in vitro potency assays such as those developed by the U.S. Department of Agriculture for Leptospira (L.) canicola, Leptospira grippotyphosa, Leptospira pomona, and Leptospira icterohaemorrhagiae rather than the Codified hamster vaccination-challenge assay was encouraged. Alternatives such as reduced animal numbers in the hamster vaccination-challenge testing were considered for problematic situations. Specifically, the merits of sharing challenge controls, reducing group sizes, and eliminating animals for concurrent challenge dose titration were assessed. Options for maintaining virulent, stable cultures without serial passage through hamsters or with decreased hamster use were also discussed. The maintenance of virulent Leptospira without the use of live animals is especially difficult since a reliable means to maintain virulence after multiple in vitro passages has not yet been identified. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  16. Single-cell entropy for accurate estimation of differentiation potency from a cell's transcriptome

    PubMed Central

    Teschendorff, Andrew E.; Enver, Tariq

    2017-01-01

    The ability to quantify differentiation potential of single cells is a task of critical importance. Here we demonstrate, using over 7,000 single-cell RNA-Seq profiles, that differentiation potency of a single cell can be approximated by computing the signalling promiscuity, or entropy, of a cell's transcriptome in the context of an interaction network, without the need for feature selection. We show that signalling entropy provides a more accurate and robust potency estimate than other entropy-based measures, driven in part by a subtle positive correlation between the transcriptome and connectome. Signalling entropy identifies known cell subpopulations of varying potency and drug resistant cancer stem-cell phenotypes, including those derived from circulating tumour cells. It further reveals that expression heterogeneity within single-cell populations is regulated. In summary, signalling entropy allows in silico estimation of the differentiation potency and plasticity of single cells and bulk samples, providing a means to identify normal and cancer stem-cell phenotypes. PMID:28569836

  17. The influence of donor characteristics and preparation methods on the potency of human cryoprecipitate.

    PubMed

    Burka, E R; Puffer, T; Martinez, J

    1975-01-01

    An investigation of the influence of donor characteristics and preparative procedural variation on the potency of human cryoprecipitate was carried out on 30 whole blood and 139 plasmapheresis donors. Recovery of plasma Factor VIII in cryoprecipitate ranged from 11.2 to 89.4 per cent (average, 38 +/- 18%). The Factor VIII content of bags of cryoprecipitate ranged from 29 to 379 units (average, 111 +/- 77 units). No difference existed between whole blood donors and regular plasmapheresis donors. The only donor characteristic which was related to the potency of cryoprecipitate was the plasma concentration of Factor VIII which varied as much as sixfold on repeated visits of the same donor. The findings indicate that, within the limitations imposed by the regulations of the American Association of Blood Banks and the practicalities of an ordinary blood bank workload, no donor characteristic or variation in preparative procedures was of predictive value in obtaining cryoprecipitate of high potency. The potency of cryoprecipitate from individual donors appears to be related to factors inherent in the donor plasma itself.

  18. Cross-species comparison of relative potencies and relative sensitivities of fishes to dibenzo-p-dioxins, dibenzofurans, and polychlorinated biphenyls in vitro.

    PubMed

    Eisner, Bryanna K; Doering, Jon A; Beitel, Shawn C; Wiseman, Steve; Raine, Jason C; Hecker, Markus

    2016-01-01

    Dioxin-like compounds of varying toxicities are found in complex mixtures. The toxic equivalency factor (TEF) approach was developed based on the potency of a dioxin-like compound relative to the potency of 2,3,7,8-tetrachloro-dibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) to streamline risk assessment. One limitation of the TEF approach is uncertainty regarding differences in the relative potency of dioxin-like compounds among different species. Relative potencies among fishes are limited, relative to relative potencies among birds and mammals, and TEFs for fishes are based entirely on the model species, rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss). An in vitro liver explant assay was used to characterize species-specific responses with regard to up-regulation of CYP1A transcript after exposure to 6 dioxin-like compounds in rainbow trout, white sturgeon (Acipenser transmontanus), lake sturgeon (Acipenser fulvescens), and northern pike (Esox lucius). Differences in sensitivities were observed among species after exposure to dioxin-like compounds. The relative potencies developed from liver explants of rainbow trout were comparable to relative potencies developed from embryo toxicity assays. Differences in relative potencies between species with the least and greatest relative potencies were up to 40-fold. To compare relative potencies among species, concentrations of dioxin-like compounds in fish eggs in the Fraser River and in Lake Ontario were used to calculate toxic equivalency quotients (TEQs) determined from TEFs or TCDD equivalents determined from relative potencies. The TEQs underestimated TCDD equivalents for white sturgeon, lake sturgeon, and northern pike, indicating uncertainty in application of TEFs to diverse fishes. © 2015 SETAC.

  19. Minimum Bayesian error probability-based gene subset selection.

    PubMed

    Li, Jian; Yu, Tian; Wei, Jin-Mao

    2015-01-01

    Sifting functional genes is crucial to the new strategies for drug discovery and prospective patient-tailored therapy. Generally, simply generating gene subset by selecting the top k individually superior genes may obtain an inferior gene combination, for some selected genes may be redundant with respect to some others. In this paper, we propose to select gene subset based on the criterion of minimum Bayesian error probability. The method dynamically evaluates all available genes and sifts only one gene at a time. A gene is selected if its combination with the other selected genes can gain better classification information. Within the generated gene subset, each individual gene is the most discriminative one in comparison with those that classify cancers in the same way as this gene does and different genes are more discriminative in combination than in individual. The genes selected in this way are likely to be functional ones from the system biology perspective, for genes tend to co-regulate rather than regulate individually. Experimental results show that the classifiers induced based on this method are capable of classifying cancers with high accuracy, while only a small number of genes are involved.

  20. Effect of high-potency cannabis on corpus callosum microstructure.

    PubMed

    Rigucci, S; Marques, T R; Di Forti, M; Taylor, H; Dell'Acqua, F; Mondelli, V; Bonaccorso, S; Simmons, A; David, A S; Girardi, P; Pariante, C M; Murray, R M; Dazzan, P

    2016-03-01

    The use of cannabis with higher Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol content has been associated with greater risk, and earlier onset, of psychosis. However, the effect of cannabis potency on brain morphology has never been explored. Here, we investigated whether cannabis potency and pattern of use are associated with changes in corpus callosum (CC) microstructural organization, in patients with first-episode psychosis (FEP) and individuals without psychosis, cannabis users and non-users. The CC of 56 FEP (37 cannabis users) and 43 individuals without psychosis (22 cannabis users) was virtually dissected and segmented using diffusion tensor imaging tractography. The diffusion index of fractional anisotropy, mean diffusivity (MD), axial diffusivity (AD) and radial diffusivity was calculated for each segment. Across the whole sample, users of high-potency cannabis had higher total CC MD and higher total CC AD than both low-potency users and those who never used (p = 0.005 and p = 0.004, respectively). Daily users also had higher total CC MD and higher total CC AD than both occasional users and those who never used (p = 0.001 and p < 0.001, respectively). However, there was no effect of group (patient/individuals without psychosis) or group x potency interaction for either potency or frequency of use. The within-group analysis showed in fact that the effects of potency and frequency were similar in FEP users and in users without psychosis. Frequent use of high-potency cannabis is associated with disturbed callosal microstructural organization in individuals with and without psychosis. Since high-potency preparations are now replacing traditional herbal drugs in many European countries, raising awareness about the risks of high-potency cannabis is crucial.

  1. Potency matters: thresholds govern endocrine activity.

    PubMed

    Borgert, Christopher J; Baker, Stephen P; Matthews, John C

    2013-10-01

    Whether thresholds exist for endocrine active substances and for endocrine disrupting effects of exogenous chemicals has been posed as a question for regulatory policy by the European Union. This question arises from a concern that the endocrine system is too complex to allow estimations of safe levels of exposure to any chemical with potential endocrine activity, and a belief that any such chemical can augment, retard, or disrupt the normal background activity of endogenous hormones. However, vital signaling functions of the endocrine system require it to continuously discriminate the biological information conveyed by potent endogenous hormones from a more concentrated background of structurally similar, endogenous molecules with low hormonal potential. This obligatory ability to discriminate important hormonal signals from background noise can be used to define thresholds for induction of hormonal effects, without which normal physiological functions would be impossible. From such thresholds, safe levels of exposure can be estimated. This brief review highlights how the fundamental principles governing hormonal effects - affinity, efficacy, potency, and mass action - dictate the existence of thresholds and why these principles also define the potential that exogenous chemicals might have to interfere with normal endocrine functioning.

  2. Engineering High-Potency R-spondin Adult Stem Cell Growth Factors

    PubMed Central

    Warner, Margaret L.; Bell, Tufica

    2015-01-01

    Secreted R-spondin proteins (RSPOs1–4) function as adult stem cell growth factors by potentiating Wnt signaling. Simultaneous binding of distinct regions of the RSPO Fu1–Fu2 domain module to the extracellular domains (ECDs) of the LGR4 G protein–coupled receptor and the ZNRF3 transmembrane E3 ubiquitin ligase regulates Wnt receptor availability. Here, we examine the molecular basis for the differing signaling strengths of RSPOs1–4 using purified RSPO Fu1–Fu2, LGR4 ECD, and ZNRF3 ECD proteins in Wnt signaling and receptor binding assays, and we engineer novel high-potency RSPOs. RSPO2/3/4 had similar signaling potencies that were stronger than that of RSPO1, whereas RSPO1/2/3 had similar efficacies that were greater than that of RSPO4. The RSPOs bound LGR4 with affinity rank order RSPO4 > RSPO2/3 > RSPO1 and ZNRF3 with affinity rank order RSPO2/3 > > RSPO1 > RSPO4. An RSPO2–4 chimera combining RSPO2 ZNRF3 binding with RSPO4 LGR4 binding was a “Superspondin” that exhibited enhanced ternary complex formation and 10-fold stronger signaling potency than RSPO2 and efficacy equivalent to RSPO2. An RSPO4–1 chimera combining RSPO4 ZNRF3 binding with RSPO1 LGR4 binding was a “Poorspondin” that exhibited signaling potency similar to RSPO1 and efficacy equivalent to RSPO4. Conferring increased ZNRF3 binding upon RSPO4 with amino acid substitutions L56F, I58L, and I63M enhanced its signaling potency and efficacy. Our results reveal the molecular basis for RSPOs1–4 activity differences and suggest that signaling potency is determined by ternary complex formation ability, whereas efficacy depends on ZNRF3 recruitment. High-potency RSPOs may be of value for regenerative medicine and/or therapeutic applications. PMID:25504990

  3. Potency of Fish Collagen as a Scaffold for Regenerative Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, Kohei; Yanagiguchi, Kajiro

    2014-01-01

    Cells, growth factors, and scaffold are the crucial factors for tissue engineering. Recently, scaffolds consisting of natural polymers, such as collagen and gelatin, bioabsorbable synthetic polymers, such as polylactic acid and polyglycolic acid, and inorganic materials, such as hydroxyapatite, as well as composite materials have been rapidly developed. In particular, collagen is the most promising material for tissue engineering due to its biocompatibility and biodegradability. Collagen contains specific cell adhesion domains, including the arginine-glycine-aspartic acid (RGD) motif. After the integrin receptor on the cell surface binds to the RGD motif on the collagen molecule, cell adhesion is actively induced. This interaction contributes to the promotion of cell growth and differentiation and the regulation of various cell functions. However, it is difficult to use a pure collagen scaffold as a tissue engineering material due to its low mechanical strength. In order to make up for this disadvantage, collagen scaffolds are often modified using a cross-linker, such as gamma irradiation and carbodiimide. Taking into account the possibility of zoonosis, a variety of recent reports have been documented using fish collagen scaffolds. We herein review the potency of fish collagen scaffolds as well as associated problems to be addressed for use in regenerative medicine. PMID:24982861

  4. RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN TOXIGENICITY AND SPORULATING POTENCY OF CLOSTRIDIUM NOVYI.

    PubMed

    NISHIDA, S; NAKAGAWARA, G

    1965-04-01

    Nishida, Shoki (Kanazawa University, Kanazawa, Japan), and Gizo Nakagawara. Relationship between toxigenicity and sporulating potency of Clostridium novyi. J. Bacteriol. 89:993-995. 1965.-The less toxigenic the strains, the stronger was the sporulating potency of Clostridium novyi strains isolated. This was confirmed by investigation of the toxigenicity of substrains of C. novyi 140 possessing different degrees of sporulating potency. Atoxic strains or type C strains could be obtained from the parent type A strain (no. 140) by heat selection. This phenomenon was also observed in the other five strains. Prolonged storage of C. novyi strains also resulted in selection of cells with stronger sporulating ability and lower toxigenicity.

  5. Expansion of the in vitro assay for Leptospira potency testing to other Serovars: Case study with Leptospira hardjo

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The Code for Federal Regulations (9 CFR 113:101-104) specifies how vaccine potency is evaluated in a hamster model for evaluation of leptospiral vaccines against pomona, icterohaemorrhagiae, canicola, and grippotyphosa serotypes of Leptospira interrogans. There are several issues which complicate th...

  6. Role of Distinct Natural Killer Cell Subsets in Anticancer Response

    PubMed Central

    Stabile, Helena; Fionda, Cinzia; Gismondi, Angela; Santoni, Angela

    2017-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells, the prototypic member of innate lymphoid cells, are important effectors of anticancer immune response. These cells can survey and control tumor initiation due to their capability to recognize and kill malignant cells and to regulate the adaptive immune response via cytokines and chemokines release. However, several studies have shown that tumor-infiltrating NK cells associated with advanced disease can have profound functional defects and display protumor activity. This evidence indicates that NK cell behavior undergoes crucial alterations during cancer progression. Moreover, a further level of complexity is due to the extensive heterogeneity and plasticity of these lymphocytes, implying that different NK cell subsets, endowed with specific phenotypic and functional features, may be involved and play distinct roles in the tumor context. Accordingly, many studies reported the enrichment of selective NK cell subsets within tumor tissue, whereas the underlying mechanisms are not fully elucidated. A malignant microenvironment can significantly impact NK cell activity, by recruiting specific subpopulations and/or influencing their developmental programming or the acquisition of a mature phenotype; in particular, neoplastic, stroma and immune cells, or tumor-derived factors take part in these processes. In this review, we will summarize and discuss the recently acquired knowledge on the possible contribution of distinct NK cell subsets in the control and/or progression of solid and hematological malignancies. Moreover, we will address emerging evidence regarding the role of different components of tumor microenvironment on shaping NK cell response. PMID:28360915

  7. Bayesian integrated testing strategy to assess skin sensitization potency: from theory to practice.

    PubMed

    Jaworska, Joanna; Dancik, Yuri; Kern, Petra; Gerberick, Frank; Natsch, Andreas

    2013-11-01

    Frameworks to predict in vivo effects by integration of in vitro, in silico and in chemico information using mechanistic insight are needed to meet the challenges of 21(st) century toxicology. Expert-based approaches that qualitatively integrate multifaceted data are practiced under the term 'weight of evidence', whereas quantitative approaches remain rare. To address this gap we previously developed a methodology to design an Integrated Testing Strategy (ITS) in the form of a Bayesian Network (BN). This study follows up on our proof of concept work and presents an updated ITS to assess skin sensitization potency expressed as local lymph node assay (LLNA) potency classes. Modifications to the ITS structure were introduced to include better mechanistic information. The parameters of the updated ITS were calculated from an extended data set of 124 chemicals. A detailed validation analysis and a case study were carried out to demonstrate the utility of the ITS for practical application. The improved BN ITS predicted correctly 95% and 86% of chemicals in a test set (n = 21) for hazard and LLNA potency classes, respectively. The practical value of using the BN ITS is far more than a prediction framework when all data are available. The BN ITS can develop a hypothesis using subsets of data as small as one data point and can be queried on the value of adding additional tests before testing is commenced. The ITS represents key steps of the skin sensitization process and a mechanistically interpretable testing strategy can be developed. These features are illustrated in the manuscript via practical examples.

  8. Discovery of tankyrase inhibiting flavones with increased potency and isoenzyme selectivity.

    PubMed

    Narwal, Mohit; Koivunen, Jarkko; Haikarainen, Teemu; Obaji, Ezeogo; Legala, Ongey E; Venkannagari, Harikanth; Joensuu, Päivi; Pihlajaniemi, Taina; Lehtiö, Lari

    2013-10-24

    Tankyrases are ADP-ribosyltransferases that play key roles in various cellular pathways, including the regulation of cell proliferation, and thus, they are promising drug targets for the treatment of cancer. Flavones have been shown to inhibit tankyrases and we report here the discovery of more potent and selective flavone derivatives. Commercially available flavones with single substitutions were used for structure-activity relationship studies, and cocrystal structures of the 18 hit compounds were analyzed to explain their potency and selectivity. The most potent inhibitors were also tested in a cell-based assay, which demonstrated that they effectively antagonize Wnt signaling. To assess selectivity, they were further tested against a panel of homologous human ADP-ribosyltransferases. The most effective compound, 22 (MN-64), showed 6 nM potency against tankyrase 1, isoenzyme selectivity, and Wnt signaling inhibition. This work forms a basis for rational development of flavones as tankyrase inhibitors and guides the development of other structurally related inhibitors.

  9. Feature subset selection based on relevance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hui; Bell, David; Murtagh, Fionn

    In this paper an axiomatic characterisation of feature subset selection is presented. Two axioms are presented: sufficiency axiom—preservation of learning information, and necessity axiom—minimising encoding length. The sufficiency axiom concerns the existing dataset and is derived based on the following understanding: any selected feature subset should be able to describe the training dataset without losing information, i.e. it is consistent with the training dataset. The necessity axiom concerns the predictability and is derived from Occam's razor, which states that the simplest among different alternatives is preferred for prediction. The two axioms are then restated in terms of relevance in a concise form: maximising both the r( X; Y) and r( Y; X) relevance. Based on the relevance characterisation, four feature subset selection algorithms are presented and analysed: one is exhaustive and the remaining three are heuristic. Experimentation is also presented and the results are encouraging. Comparison is also made with some well-known feature subset selection algorithms, in particular, with the built-in feature selection mechanism in C4.5.

  10. Nfil3 is required for the development of all innate lymphoid cell subsets

    PubMed Central

    Seillet, Cyril; Rankin, Lucille C.; Groom, Joanna R.; Mielke, Lisa A.; Tellier, Julie; Chopin, Michael; Huntington, Nicholas D.

    2014-01-01

    Innate lymphoid cell (ILC) populations protect against infection and are essential for lymphoid tissue formation and tissue remodeling after damage. Nfil3 is implicated in the function of adaptive immune lineages and NK cell development, but it is not yet known if Nfil3 regulates other innate lymphoid lineages. Here, we identify that Nfil3 is essential for the development of Peyer’s patches and ILC2 and ILC3 subsets. Loss of Nfil3 selectively reduced Peyer’s patch formation and was accompanied by impaired recruitment and distribution of lymphocytes within the patches. ILC subsets exhibited high Nfil3 expression and genetic deletion of Nfil3 severely compromised the development of all subsets. Subsequently, Nfil3−/− mice were highly susceptible to disease when challenged with inflammatory or infectious agents. Thus, we demonstrate that Nfil3 is a key regulator of the development of ILC subsets essential for immune protection in the lung and gut. PMID:25092873

  11. Correlation between carcinogenic potency of chemicals in animals and humans

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, B.C.; Crump, K.S.; Shipp, A.M.

    1988-12-01

    Twenty-three chemicals were selected for comparison of the carcinogenic potencies estimated from epidemiological data to those estimated from animal carcinogenesis bioassays. The chemicals were all those for which reasonably strong evidence of carcinogenicity could be found in humans or animals and for which suitable data could be obtained for quantifying carcinogenic potencies in both humans and animals. Many alternative methods of analyzing the bioassay data were investigated. Almost all of the methods yielded potency estimates that were highly correlated with potencies estimated from epidemiological data; correlations were highly statistically significant (p < 0.001), with the corresponding correlation coefficients ranging as high as 0.9. These findings provide support for the general use of animal data to evaluate carcinogenic potential in humans and also for the use of animal data to quantify human risk.

  12. The effects of medical marijuana laws on potency.

    PubMed

    Sevigny, Eric L; Pacula, Rosalie Liccardo; Heaton, Paul

    2014-03-01

    Marijuana potency has risen dramatically over the past two decades. In the United States, it is unclear whether state medical marijuana policies have contributed to this increase. Employing a differences-in-differences model within a mediation framework, we analyzed data on n=39,157 marijuana samples seized by law enforcement in 51 U.S. jurisdictions between 1990 and 2010, producing estimates of the direct and indirect effects of state medical marijuana laws on potency, as measured by Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol content. We found evidence that potency increased by a half percentage point on average after legalization of medical marijuana, although this result was not significant. When we examined specific medical marijuana supply provisions, results suggest that legal allowances for retail dispensaries had the strongest influence, significantly increasing potency by about one percentage point on average. Our mediation analyses examining the mechanisms through which medical marijuana laws influence potency found no evidence of direct regulatory impact. Rather, the results suggest that the impact of these laws occurs predominantly through a compositional shift in the share of the market captured by high-potency sinsemilla. Our findings have important implications for policymakers and those in the scientific community trying to understand the extent to which greater availability of higher potency marijuana increases the risk of negative public health outcomes, such as drugged driving and drug-induced psychoses. Future work should reconsider the impact of medical marijuana laws on health outcomes in light of dramatic and ongoing shifts in both marijuana potency and the medical marijuana policy environment. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. The Effects of Medical Marijuana Laws on Potency

    PubMed Central

    Pacula, Rosalie Liccardo; Heaton, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Background Marijuana potency has risen dramatically over the past two decades. In the United States, it is unclear whether state medical marijuana policies have contributed to this increase. Methods Employing a differences-in-differences model within a mediation framework, we analyzed data on n = 39,157 marijuana samples seized by law enforcement in 51 U.S. jurisdictions between 1990-2010, producing estimates of the direct and indirect effects of state medical marijuana laws on potency, as measured by Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol content. Results We found evidence that potency increased by a half percentage point on average after legalization of medical marijuana, although this result was not significant. When we examined specific medical marijuana supply provisions, results suggest that legal allowances for retail dispensaries had the strongest influence, significantly increasing potency by about one percentage point on average. Our mediation analyses examining the mechanisms through which medical marijuana laws influence potency found no evidence of direct regulatory impact. Rather, the results suggest that the impact of these laws occurs predominantly through a compositional shift in the share of the market captured by high-potency sinsemilla. Conclusion Our findings have important implications for policymakers and those in the scientific community trying to understand the extent to which greater availability of higher potency marijuana increases the risk of negative public health outcomes, such as drugged driving and drug-induced psychoses. Future work should reconsider the impact of medical marijuana laws on health outcomes in light of dramatic and ongoing shifts in both marijuana potency and the medical marijuana policy environment. PMID:24502887

  14. The Role of Microglial Subsets in Regulating Traumatic Brain Injury

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-07-01

    CCR)2. J. Exp. Med. 2000. 192: 1075–1080. 9 Mahad, D. J. and Ransohoff, R. M., The role of MCP-1 (CCL2) and CCR2 in multiple sclerosis and...at multiple timepoints in vivo and establish the function of these microglial subtypes ex vivo. 2. Skew the microglial response to TBI towards... multiple aspects, most notably in their chemokine repertoires. Thus, the macrophage response to TBI ini- tially involves heterogeneous polarization

  15. The Role of Microglial Subsets in Regulating Brain Injury

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-07-01

    staurosporine (sts) or MPP+. The median fluores- cence intensity of TREM2-Fc or TREM1-Fc binding of each gate is shown. Apoptotic Neuro2A cells (Annexin Vhi ...boosts TREM2-Fc binding to Annexin Vhi cells by 7- to 10- fold (n = 3). (c) Neuronal cells activate TREM2/DAP12 signal trans- duction as assessed by...TREM2-L expression on the Annexin Vhi cells (Fig. 2a). These data indicate that apoptosis increases the expression of TREM2-L on neurons, presenting a

  16. The Role of Microglial Subsets in Regulating Traumatic Brain Injury

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-07-01

    22 Ccr7 Ccr7 ~ <u ~ ’ log2 FC .M2 Ill anti-inflammatory -3 0 3 .M1 ~ infla to mma ry 0 M2andM1 • chemotaxis I1IJ wound healing Figure 3...Representative Macs Macs Genes ’"’-::n -1 0 1 log2 FC Cc/7, Cxc/1, Ppap2b, Mt2, Sema3c, C1cn7 Cd83, Cybb, Ciita, Nfkb1, Cc/5 11111ra1, l/1rl2... Barcelona , October 26-30, 2010. CONCLUSIONS Our studies have shown that resting microglia do not express markers for an M1 or an M2 phenotype, as

  17. The expanding universe of T-cell subsets: Th1, Th2 and more.

    PubMed

    Mosmann, T R; Sad, S

    1996-03-01

    Since their discovery nearly ten years ago, T helper 1 (Th1) and Th2 subsets have been implicated in the regulation of many immune responses. In this article, Tim Mosmann and Subash Sad discuss the increasing number of T-cell subsets defined by cytokine patterns; the differentiation pathways of CD4+ and CD8+ T cells; the contribution of other cell types to these patterns; and the cytokine interactions during infection and pregnancy.

  18. Inhaled corticosteroids: potency, dose equivalence and therapeutic index

    PubMed Central

    Daley-Yates, Peter T

    2015-01-01

    Glucocorticosteroids are a group of structurally related molecules that includes natural hormones and synthetic drugs with a wide range of anti-inflammatory potencies. For synthetic corticosteroid analogues it is commonly assumed that the therapeutic index cannot be improved by increasing their glucocorticoid receptor binding affinity. The validity of this assumption, particularly for inhaled corticosteroids, has not been fully explored. Inhaled corticosteroids exert their anti-inflammatory activity locally in the airways, and hence this can be dissociated from their potential to cause systemic adverse effects. The molecular structural features that increase glucocorticoid receptor binding affinity and selectivity drive topical anti-inflammatory activity. However, in addition, these structural modifications also result in physicochemical and pharmacokinetic changes that can enhance targeting to the airways and reduce systemic exposure. As a consequence, potency and therapeutic index can be correlated. However, this consideration is not reflected in asthma treatment guidelines that classify inhaled corticosteroid formulations as low-, mid- and high dose, and imbed a simple dose equivalence approach where potency is not considered to affect the therapeutic index. This article describes the relationship between potency and therapeutic index, and concludes that higher potency can potentially improve the therapeutic index. Therefore, both efficacy and safety should be considered when classifying inhaled corticosteroid regimens in terms of dose equivalence. The historical approach to dose equivalence in asthma treatment guidelines is not appropriate for the wider range of molecules, potencies and device/formulations now available. A more robust method is needed that incorporates pharmacological principles. PMID:25808113

  19. Identifying subset errors in multiple sequence alignments.

    PubMed

    Roy, Aparna; Taddese, Bruck; Vohra, Shabana; Thimmaraju, Phani K; Illingworth, Christopher J R; Simpson, Lisa M; Mukherjee, Keya; Reynolds, Christopher A; Chintapalli, Sree V

    2014-01-01

    Multiple sequence alignment (MSA) accuracy is important, but there is no widely accepted method of judging the accuracy that different alignment algorithms give. We present a simple approach to detecting two types of error, namely block shifts and the misplacement of residues within a gap. Given a MSA, subsets of very similar sequences are generated through the use of a redundancy filter, typically using a 70-90% sequence identity cut-off. Subsets thus produced are typically small and degenerate, and errors can be easily detected even by manual examination. The errors, albeit minor, are inevitably associated with gaps in the alignment, and so the procedure is particularly relevant to homology modelling of protein loop regions. The usefulness of the approach is illustrated in the context of the universal but little known [K/R]KLH motif that occurs in intracellular loop 1 of G protein coupled receptors (GPCR); other issues relevant to GPCR modelling are also discussed.

  20. Nonequivalent periodic subsets of the lattice.

    PubMed

    Cocke, W

    2013-07-01

    The use of Pólya's theorem in crystallography and other applications has greatly simplified many counting and coloring problems. Given a group of equivalences acting on a set, Pólya's theorem equates the number of unique subsets with the orbits of the group action. For a lattice and a given group of periodic equivalences, the number of nonequivalent subsets of the lattice can be solved using Pólya's counting on the group of relevant symmetries acting on the lattice. When equivalence is defined via a sublattice, the use of Pólya's theorem is equivalent to knowing the cycle index of the action of the group elements on a related finite group structure. A simple algebraic method is presented to determine the cycle index for a group element acting on a lattice subject to certain periodicity arguments.

  1. Homeostasis of IL-15 dependent lymphocyte subsets in the liver

    PubMed Central

    Cepero-Donates, Yuneivy; Rakotoarivelo, Volatiana; Mayhue, Marian; Ma, Averil; Chen, Yi-Guang; Ramanathan, Sheela

    2017-01-01

    IL-15 is a member of the gamma chain family of cytokines (γc – CD132). The IL-15 receptor (IL-15R) complex consists of 3 subunits: the ligand-binding IL-15Rα chain (CD215), the β chain (CD122; also used by IL-2), and the common γ chain. The biological activities of IL-15 are mostly mediated by the IL-15:IL-15Rα complex, produced by the same cell and ‘trans-presented’ to responder cells expressing the IL-15Rβγc. The peculiar and almost unique requirement for IL-15 to be trans-presented by IL-15Rα suggests that the biological effects of IL-15 signaling are tightly regulated even at the level of availability of IL-15. Tissue-specific deletion of IL-15Rα has shown macrophage-and dendritic cell-derived IL-15Rα mediate the homeostasis of different CD8+ T cell subsets. Here we show that hepatocyte and macrophage- specific expression of IL-15Rα is required to maintain the homeostasis of NK and NKT cells in the liver. Thus, homeostasis of IL-15-dependent lymphocyte subsets is also regulated by trans-presentation of IL-15 by non-hematopoietic cells in the tissue environment. PMID:26778709

  2. Improving Neutralization Potency and Breadth by Combining Broadly Reactive HIV-1 Antibodies Targeting Major Neutralization Epitopes

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Rui; Louder, Mark K.; Wagh, Kshitij; Bailer, Robert T.; deCamp, Allan; Greene, Kelli; Gao, Hongmei; Taft, Justin D.; Gazumyan, Anna; Liu, Cassie; Nussenzweig, Michel C.; Korber, Bette

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT The isolation of broadly neutralizing HIV-1 monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) to distinct epitopes on the viral envelope glycoprotein (Env) provides the potential to use combinations of MAbs for prevention and treatment of HIV-1 infection. Since many of these MAbs have been isolated in the last few years, the potency and breadth of MAb combinations have not been well characterized. In two parallel experiments, we examined the in vitro neutralizing activities of double-, triple-, and quadruple-MAb combinations targeting four distinct epitopes, including the CD4-binding site, the V1V2-glycan region, the V3-glycan supersite, and the gp41 membrane-proximal external region (MPER), using a panel of 125 Env-pseudotyped viruses. All MAb combinations showed substantially improved neutralization breadth compared to the corresponding single MAbs, while the neutralization potency of individual MAbs was maintained. At a 50% inhibitory concentration (IC50) cutoff of 1 μg/ml per antibody, double-MAb combinations neutralized 89 to 98% of viruses, and triple combinations neutralized 98 to 100%. Overall, the improvement of neutralization breadth was closely predicted by an additive-effect model and explained by complementary neutralization profiles of antibodies recognizing distinct epitopes. Subtle but consistent favorable interactions were observed in some MAb combinations, whereas less favorable interactions were observed on a small subset of viruses that are highly sensitive to V3-glycan MAbs. These data demonstrate favorable in vitro combinations of broadly neutralizing HIV-1 MAbs and suggest that such combinations could have utility for HIV-1 prevention and treatment. IMPORTANCE Over the last 5 years, numerous broadly reactive HIV-1-neutralizing MAbs have been isolated from B cells of HIV-1-infected donors. Each of these MAbs binds to one of the major vulnerable sites (epitopes) on the surface of the viral envelope glycoprotein. Since antibodies to distinct viral epitopes

  3. Improving neutralization potency and breadth by combining broadly reactive HIV-1 antibodies targeting major neutralization epitopes.

    PubMed

    Kong, Rui; Louder, Mark K; Wagh, Kshitij; Bailer, Robert T; deCamp, Allan; Greene, Kelli; Gao, Hongmei; Taft, Justin D; Gazumyan, Anna; Liu, Cassie; Nussenzweig, Michel C; Korber, Bette; Montefiori, David C; Mascola, John R

    2015-03-01

    The isolation of broadly neutralizing HIV-1 monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) to distinct epitopes on the viral envelope glycoprotein (Env) provides the potential to use combinations of MAbs for prevention and treatment of HIV-1 infection. Since many of these MAbs have been isolated in the last few years, the potency and breadth of MAb combinations have not been well characterized. In two parallel experiments, we examined the in vitro neutralizing activities of double-, triple-, and quadruple-MAb combinations targeting four distinct epitopes, including the CD4-binding site, the V1V2-glycan region, the V3-glycan supersite, and the gp41 membrane-proximal external region (MPER), using a panel of 125 Env-pseudotyped viruses. All MAb combinations showed substantially improved neutralization breadth compared to the corresponding single MAbs, while the neutralization potency of individual MAbs was maintained. At a 50% inhibitory concentration (IC50) cutoff of 1 μg/ml per antibody, double-MAb combinations neutralized 89 to 98% of viruses, and triple combinations neutralized 98 to 100%. Overall, the improvement of neutralization breadth was closely predicted by an additive-effect model and explained by complementary neutralization profiles of antibodies recognizing distinct epitopes. Subtle but consistent favorable interactions were observed in some MAb combinations, whereas less favorable interactions were observed on a small subset of viruses that are highly sensitive to V3-glycan MAbs. These data demonstrate favorable in vitro combinations of broadly neutralizing HIV-1 MAbs and suggest that such combinations could have utility for HIV-1 prevention and treatment. Over the last 5 years, numerous broadly reactive HIV-1-neutralizing MAbs have been isolated from B cells of HIV-1-infected donors. Each of these MAbs binds to one of the major vulnerable sites (epitopes) on the surface of the viral envelope glycoprotein. Since antibodies to distinct viral epitopes could theoretically

  4. Ultrametric subsets with large Hausdorff dimension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendel, Manor; Naor, Assaf

    2013-04-01

    It is shown that for every $\\e\\in (0,1)$, every compact metric space $(X,d)$ has a compact subset $S\\subseteq X$ that embeds into an ultrametric space with distortion $O(1/\\e)$, and $$\\dim_H(S)\\ge (1-\\e)\\dim_H(X),$$ where $\\dim_H(\\cdot)$ denotes Hausdorff dimension. The above $O(1/\\e)$ distortion estimate is shown to be sharp via a construction based on sequences of expander graphs.

  5. Fizzy. Feature subset selection for metagenomics

    SciTech Connect

    Ditzler, Gregory; Morrison, J. Calvin; Lan, Yemin; Rosen, Gail L.

    2015-11-04

    Background: Some of the current software tools for comparative metagenomics provide ecologists with the ability to investigate and explore bacterial communities using α– & β–diversity. Feature subset selection – a sub-field of machine learning – can also provide a unique insight into the differences between metagenomic or 16S phenotypes. In particular, feature subset selection methods can obtain the operational taxonomic units (OTUs), or functional features, that have a high-level of influence on the condition being studied. For example, in a previous study we have used information-theoretic feature selection to understand the differences between protein family abundances that best discriminate between age groups in the human gut microbiome. Results: We have developed a new Python command line tool, which is compatible with the widely adopted BIOM format, for microbial ecologists that implements information-theoretic subset selection methods for biological data formats. We demonstrate the software tools capabilities on publicly available datasets. Conclusions: We have made the software implementation of Fizzy available to the public under the GNU GPL license. The standalone implementation can be found at http://github.com/EESI/Fizzy.

  6. Fizzy. Feature subset selection for metagenomics

    DOE PAGES

    Ditzler, Gregory; Morrison, J. Calvin; Lan, Yemin; ...

    2015-11-04

    Background: Some of the current software tools for comparative metagenomics provide ecologists with the ability to investigate and explore bacterial communities using α– & β–diversity. Feature subset selection – a sub-field of machine learning – can also provide a unique insight into the differences between metagenomic or 16S phenotypes. In particular, feature subset selection methods can obtain the operational taxonomic units (OTUs), or functional features, that have a high-level of influence on the condition being studied. For example, in a previous study we have used information-theoretic feature selection to understand the differences between protein family abundances that best discriminate betweenmore » age groups in the human gut microbiome. Results: We have developed a new Python command line tool, which is compatible with the widely adopted BIOM format, for microbial ecologists that implements information-theoretic subset selection methods for biological data formats. We demonstrate the software tools capabilities on publicly available datasets. Conclusions: We have made the software implementation of Fizzy available to the public under the GNU GPL license. The standalone implementation can be found at http://github.com/EESI/Fizzy.« less

  7. Fizzy: feature subset selection for metagenomics.

    PubMed

    Ditzler, Gregory; Morrison, J Calvin; Lan, Yemin; Rosen, Gail L

    2015-11-04

    Some of the current software tools for comparative metagenomics provide ecologists with the ability to investigate and explore bacterial communities using α- & β-diversity. Feature subset selection--a sub-field of machine learning--can also provide a unique insight into the differences between metagenomic or 16S phenotypes. In particular, feature subset selection methods can obtain the operational taxonomic units (OTUs), or functional features, that have a high-level of influence on the condition being studied. For example, in a previous study we have used information-theoretic feature selection to understand the differences between protein family abundances that best discriminate between age groups in the human gut microbiome. We have developed a new Python command line tool, which is compatible with the widely adopted BIOM format, for microbial ecologists that implements information-theoretic subset selection methods for biological data formats. We demonstrate the software tools capabilities on publicly available datasets. We have made the software implementation of Fizzy available to the public under the GNU GPL license. The standalone implementation can be found at http://github.com/EESI/Fizzy.

  8. B7-H1-expressing antigen-presenting cells mediate polarization of protumorigenic Th22 subsets.

    PubMed

    Kuang, Dong-Ming; Xiao, Xiao; Zhao, Qiyi; Chen, Min-Min; Li, Xue-Feng; Liu, Rui-Xian; Wei, Yuan; Ouyang, Fang-Zhu; Chen, Dong-Ping; Wu, Yan; Lao, Xiang-Ming; Deng, Hong; Zheng, Limin

    2014-10-01

    Classical IL-22-producing T helper cells (Th22 cells) mediate inflammatory responses independently of IFN-γ and IL-17; however, nonclassical Th22 cells have been recently identified and coexpress IFN-γ and/or IL-17 along with IL-22. Little is known about how classical and nonclassical Th22 subsets in human diseases are regulated. Here, we used samples of human blood, normal and peritumoral liver, and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) to delineate the phenotype, distribution, generation, and functional relevance of various Th22 subsets. Three nonclassical Th22 subsets constituted the majority of all Th22 cells in human liver and HCC tissues, although the classical Th22 subset was predominant in blood. Monocytes activated by TLR2 and TLR4 agonists served as the antigen-presenting cells (APCs) that most efficiently triggered the expansion of nonclassical Th22 subsets from memory T cells and classical Th22 subsets from naive T cells. Moreover, B7-H1-expressing monocytes skewed Th22 polarization away from IFN-γ and toward IL-17 through interaction with programmed death 1 (PD-1), an effect that can create favorable conditions for in vivo aggressive cancer growth and angiogenesis. Our results provide insight into the selective modulation of Th22 subsets and suggest that strategies to influence functional activities of inflammatory cells may benefit anticancer therapy.

  9. Lipid droplet subset targeting of the Drosophila protein CG2254/dmLdsdh1.

    PubMed

    Thul, Peter J; Tschapalda, Kirsten; Kolkhof, Petra; Thiam, Abdou Rachid; Oberer, Monika; Beller, Mathias

    2017-08-03

    Lipid droplets (LDs) are the principal organelles of lipid storage. They consist of a hydrophobic core of storage lipids, surrounded by a phospholipid monolayer with proteins attached. While some of these proteins are essential to regulate cellular and organismic lipid metabolism, key questions concerning LD protein function, such as their targeting to LDs, are still unanswered. Intriguingly, some proteins are restricted to LD subsets by an as yet unknown mechanism. This finding makes LD targeting even more complex.Here, we characterize the Drosophila protein CG2254 which targets LD subsets in cultured cells and different larval Drosophila tissues, where the prevalence of LD subsets appears highly dynamic. We find that an amphipathic amino acid stretch mediates CG2254 LD localization. Additionally, we identified a juxtaposed sequence stretch limiting CG2254 localization to LD subsets. This sequence is sufficient to restrict a chimeric protein - consisting of the subset targeting sequence introduced to an otherwise pan LD localized protein sequence - to LD subsets. Based on its subcellular localization and annotated function, we suggest to rename CG2254 to Lipid droplet subset dehydrogenase 1 (Ldsdh1). © 2017. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  10. Potency Determination of Antidandruff Shampoos in Nystatin International Unit Equivalents

    PubMed Central

    Anusha Hewage, D. B. G.; Pathirana, W.; Pinnawela, Amara

    2008-01-01

    A convenient standard microbiological potency determination test for the antidandruff shampoos was developed by adopting the pharmacopoeial microbiological assay procedure of the drug nystatin. A standard curve was drawn consisting of the inhibition zone diameters vs. logarithm of nystatin concentrations in international units using the fungus Saccharomyces cerevisiae (yeast) strain National Collection of Type Culture (NCTC) 1071606 as the test organism. From the standard curve the yeast inhibitory potencies of the shampoos in nystatin international unit equivalents were determined from the respective inhibition zones of the test samples of the shampoos. Under test conditions four shampoo samples showed remarkable fungal inhibitory potencies of 10227, 10731, 12396 and 18211 nystatin international unit equivalents/ml while two shampoo samples had extremely feeble inhibitory potencies 4.07 and 4.37 nystatin international unit equivalents/ml although the latter two products claimed antifungal activity. The potency determination method could be applied to any antidandruff shampoo with any one or a combination of active ingredients. PMID:21394271

  11. Solvatochromic dyes detect the presence of homeopathic potencies.

    PubMed

    Cartwright, Steven J

    2016-02-01

    A systematic approach to the design of simple, chemical systems for investigating the nature of homeopathic medicines has led to the development of an experimental protocol in which solvatochromic dyes are used as molecular probes of serially diluted and agitated solutions. Electronic spectroscopy has been used to follow changes in the absorbance of this class of dyes across the visible spectrum in the presence of homeopathic potencies. Evidence is presented using six different solvatochromic dyes in three different solvent systems. In all cases homeopathic potencies produce consistent and reproducible changes in the spectra of the dyes. Results suggest that potencies influence the supramolecular chemistry of solvatochromic dyes, enhancing either dye aggregation or disaggregation, depending upon dye structure. Comparable dyes lacking the intramolecular charge transfer feature of solvatochromic dyes are unaffected by homeopathic potencies, suggesting potencies require the oscillating dipole of solvatochromic dyes for effective interaction. The implications of the results presented, both for an eventual understanding of the nature of homeopathic medicines and their mode of action, together with future directions for research in this area, are discussed. Copyright © 2015 The Author. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  12. Stimulative influence of germination and growth of maize seedlings originating from aged seeds by 2,4-D potencies.

    PubMed

    Dragicevic, Vesna; Spasic, Mihajlo; Simic, Milena; Dumanovic, Zoran; Nikolic, Bogdan

    2013-07-01

    The 2,4-D (2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid) is using as a growth regulator in tissue culture media. Maize seeds have poor ability to maintain germination rate in the long term. To examine the possible restorative effect of homeopathic 2,4-D potencies on maize seedlings originating from seeds damaged by accelerated aging. Seeds of four maize lines were subjected to accelerated aging stress treatment. Seed samples were treated with distilled water (control) and a range of potencies of 2,4-D: 3C, 3.75C, 4.5C, 5.25C and 6C. The germination capacity, fresh substance (FS) and length of root and shoot were determined. Hydrolysis and biosynthesis, GSH/GSSG ratio and redox capacity were calculated. Induced seed aging decreased germination rate and growth of seedlings. 2,4-D potencies did not have a statistically significant effect on germination. However, there were statistically significant effects on FS production, root and shoot length and redox capacity. The 3C potency had the largest effect on the FS accumulation, 4.5C increased root and shoot length, compared to control (statistically significant). The GSH/GSSG ratio and the redox capacity were decreased by aging. The 3C and 4.5C potencies tended to reverse the GSH/GSSG ratio (statistically significant) in the root and shoot, (i.e., shifted the redox balance to the reduced state). Homeopathic potencies of 2,4-D appear to have a beneficial effect on artificially aged maize seeds: they stimulate growth through better substance conversion from seed rest, and shift the redox capacity towards a reduced environment. Further work is required to determine if this is an useful means of improving maize seed germination and growth. Copyright © 2013 The Faculty of Homeopathy. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. High Aldehyde Dehydrogenase Activity Identifies a Subset of Human Mesenchymal Stromal Cells with Vascular Regenerative Potential.

    PubMed

    Sherman, Stephen E; Kuljanin, Miljan; Cooper, Tyler T; Putman, David M; Lajoie, Gilles A; Hess, David A

    2017-03-15

    During culture expansion, multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) differentially express aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH), an intracellular detoxification enzyme that protects long-lived cells against oxidative stress. Thus, MSC selection based on ALDH-activity may be used to reduce heterogeneity and distinguish MSC subsets with improved regenerative potency. After expansion of human bone marrow-derived MSCs, cell progeny was purified based on low versus high ALDH-activity (ALDH(hi) ) by fluorescence-activated cell sorting, and each subset was compared for multipotent stromal and provascular regenerative functions. Both ALDH(l) ° and ALDH(hi) MSC subsets demonstrated similar expression of stromal cell (>95% CD73(+) , CD90(+) , CD105(+) ) and pericyte (>95% CD146(+) ) surface markers and showed multipotent differentiation into bone, cartilage, and adipose cells in vitro. Conditioned media (CDM) generated by ALDH(hi) MSCs demonstrated a potent proliferative and prosurvival effect on human microvascular endothelial cells (HMVECs) under serum-free conditions and augmented HMVEC tube-forming capacity in growth factor-reduced matrices. After subcutaneous transplantation within directed in vivo angiogenesis assay implants into immunodeficient mice, ALDH(hi) MSC or CDM produced by ALDH(hi) MSC significantly augmented murine vascular cell recruitment and perfused vessel infiltration compared with ALDH(l) ° MSC. Although both subsets demonstrated strikingly similar mRNA expression patterns, quantitative proteomic analyses performed on subset-specific CDM revealed the ALDH(hi) MSC subset uniquely secreted multiple proangiogenic cytokines (vascular endothelial growth factor beta, platelet derived growth factor alpha, and angiogenin) and actively produced multiple factors with chemoattractant (transforming growth factor-β, C-X-C motif chemokine ligand 1, 2, and 3 (GRO), C-C motif chemokine ligand 5 (RANTES), monocyte chemotactic protein 1 (MCP-1), interleukin [IL]-6, IL-8

  14. Roles of participation and feedback in group potency.

    PubMed

    Gamero, Nuria; Peiró, José M; Zornoza, Ana; Picazo, Carmen

    2009-08-01

    The roles of group participation and group performance feedback were examined as antecedents of group potency, i.e., beliefs shared among a work group's members about the general effectiveness of the work group. Also examined were how group participation and the congruence of the feedback received from different sources about performance predicted convergence in members' beliefs about group effectiveness. The sample comprised 61 work groups of professionals involved in Master in Business Administration (MBA) programs (284 participants). Mean group size was 4.6 members (SD = .58). 65% of participants were male, and 51% were between 30 and 40 years of age. Data were gathered at two measurement times. Increases in group participation were positively related to increases in group potency and the convergence in beliefs about group effectiveness among group members over time. Results supported the premise that group performance feedback is an antecedent of changes in group potency over time.

  15. Relationship Between Toxigenicity and Sporulating Potency of Clostridium novyi

    PubMed Central

    Nishida, Shoki; Nakagawara, Gizo

    1965-01-01

    Nishida, Shoki (Kanazawa University, Kanazawa, Japan), and Gizo Nakagawara. Relationship between toxigenicity and sporulating potency of Clostridium novyi. J. Bacteriol. 89:993–995. 1965.—The less toxigenic the strains, the stronger was the sporulating potency of Clostridium novyi strains isolated. This was confirmed by investigation of the toxigenicity of substrains of C. novyi 140 possessing different degrees of sporulating potency. Atoxic strains or type C strains could be obtained from the parent type A strain (no. 140) by heat selection. This phenomenon was also observed in the other five strains. Prolonged storage of C. novyi strains also resulted in selection of cells with stronger sporulating ability and lower toxigenicity. PMID:14279120

  16. Standard Preparations, Limits of Potency, and Dating Period Limitations for Biological Products. Direct final rule.

    PubMed

    2016-05-04

    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA or Agency or we) is amending the general biological products standards relating to dating periods and also removing certain standards relating to standard preparations and limits of potency. FDA is taking this action to update outdated requirements, and accommodate new and evolving technology and testing capabilities, without diminishing public health protections. This action is part of FDA's retrospective review of its regulations in response to an Executive order. FDA is issuing these amendments directly as a final rule because the Agency believes they are noncontroversial and FDA anticipates no significant adverse comments.

  17. Toward a Refined Definition of Monocyte Subsets

    PubMed Central

    Ziegler-Heitbrock, Loems; Hofer, Thomas P. J.

    2013-01-01

    In a nomenclature proposal published in 2010 monocytes were subdivided into classical and non-classical cells and in addition an intermediate monocyte subset was proposed. Over the last couple of years many studies have analyzed these intermediate cells, their characteristics have been described, and their expansion has been documented in many clinical settings. While these cells appear to be in transition from classical to non-classical monocytes and hence may not form a distinct cell population in a strict sense, their separate analysis and enumeration is warranted in health and disease. PMID:23382732

  18. 'In-Format' screening of a novel bispecific antibody format reveals significant potency improvements relative to unformatted molecules.

    PubMed

    Scott, Martin J; Lee, Jennifer A; Wake, Matthew S; Batt, Kelly V; Wattam, Trevor A; Hiles, Ian D; Batuwangala, Thil D; Ashman, Claire I; Steward, Michael

    2017-01-01

    Bispecific antibodies (BsAbs) are emerging as an important class of biopharmaceutical. The majority of BsAbs are created from conventional antibodies or fragments engineered into more complex configurations. A recurring challenge in their development, however, is the identification of components that are optimised for inclusion in the final format in order to deliver both efficacy and robust biophysical properties. Using a modular BsAb format, the mAb-dAb, we assessed whether an 'in-format' screening approach, designed to select format-compatible domain antibodies, could expedite lead discovery. Human nerve growth factor (NGF) was selected as an antigen to validate the approach; domain antibody (dAb) libraries were screened, panels of binders identified, and binding affinities and potencies compared for selected dAbs and corresponding mAb-dAbs. A number of dAbs that exhibited high potency (IC50) when assessed in-format were identified. In contrast, the corresponding dAb monomers had ∼1000-fold lower potency than the formatted dAbs; such dAb monomers would therefore have been omitted from further characterization. Subsequent stoichiometric analyses of mAb-dAbs bound to NGF, or an additional target antigen (vascular endothelial growth factor), suggested different target binding modes; this indicates that the observed potency improvements cannot be attributed simply to an avidity effect offered by the mAb-dAb format. We conclude that, for certain antigens, screening naïve selection outputs directly in-format enables the identification of a subset of format-compatible dAbs, and that this offers substantial benefits in terms of molecular properties and development time.

  19. Carcinogenic potency of alkylating agents in rodents and humans.

    PubMed

    Dedrick, R L; Morrison, P F

    1992-05-01

    Alkylating agents are known to produce second tumors in cancer patients treated for their primary cancer. Since therapeutic doses are high and the pharmacokinetics of the drugs are thoroughly studied, these agents provide a unique opportunity to compare intrinsic carcinogenic potency between experimental animals and humans. We have examined the carcinogenicity of melphalan, chlorambucil, and cyclophosphamide in causing leukemia in patients treated for cancer or polycythemia vera and lymphosarcoma in rats and mice. A good correlation among species is observed when the carcinogenic potency is based on the total lifetime exposure to active species derived from these drugs.

  20. Both Lymantria dispar Nucleopolyhedrovirus Enhancin Genes Contribute to Viral Potency

    PubMed Central

    Popham, Holly J. R.; Bischoff, David S.; Slavicek, James M.

    2001-01-01

    Enhancins are a group of proteins first identified in granuloviruses (GV) that have the ability to enhance nuclear polyhedrosis virus potency. We had previously identified an enhancin gene (E1) in the Lymantria dispar multinucleocapsid nucleopolyhedrovirus (LdMNPV) (D. S. Bischoff and J. M. Slavicek, J. Virol. 71:8133–8140, 1997). Inactivation of the E1 gene product within the viral genome lowered viral potency by an average of 2.9-fold. A second enhancin gene (E2) was identified when the entire genome of LdMNPV was sequenced (Kuzio et al., Virology 253:17–34, 1999). The E2 protein exhibits approximately 30% amino acid identity to the LdMNPV E1 protein as well as the enhancins from Trichoplusia ni GV, Pseudaletia unipuncta GV, Helicoverpa armigera GV, and Xestia c-nigrum GV. Northern analysis of viral RNA indicated that the E2 gene transcripts are expressed at late times postinfection from a consensus baculovirus late promoter. The effect of the enhancin proteins on viral potency was investigated through bioassay using two recombinant viruses, one with a deletion in the E2 gene (E2del) and a second with deletion mutations in both enhancin genes (E1delE2del). The enhancin gene viral constructs were verified by Southern analysis and shown not to produce enhancin gene transcripts by Northern analysis. The E2del virus exhibited an average decrease in viral potency of 1.8-fold compared to wild-type virus. In the same bioassays, the recombinant virus E1cat, which does not produce an E1 gene transcript, exhibited an average decrease in viral potency of 2.3-fold compared to control virus. The E1delE2del virus exhibited an average decrease in viral potency of 12-fold compared to wild-type virus. Collectively, these results suggest that both LdMNPV enhancin genes contribute to viral potency, that each enhancin protein can partially compensate for the lack of the other protein, and that both enhancin genes are necessary for wild-type viral potency. PMID:11507209

  1. Greedy Hypervolume Subset Selection in Low Dimensions.

    PubMed

    Guerreiro, Andreia P; Fonseca, Carlos M; Paquete, Luís

    2016-01-01

    Given a nondominated point set [Formula: see text] of size [Formula: see text] and a suitable reference point [Formula: see text], the Hypervolume Subset Selection Problem (HSSP) consists of finding a subset of size [Formula: see text] that maximizes the hypervolume indicator. It arises in connection with multiobjective selection and archiving strategies, as well as Pareto-front approximation postprocessing for visualization and/or interaction with a decision maker. Efficient algorithms to solve the HSSP are available only for the 2-dimensional case, achieving a time complexity of [Formula: see text]. In contrast, the best upper bound available for [Formula: see text] is [Formula: see text]. Since the hypervolume indicator is a monotone submodular function, the HSSP can be approximated to a factor of [Formula: see text] using a greedy strategy. In this article, greedy [Formula: see text]-time algorithms for the HSSP in 2 and 3 dimensions are proposed, matching the complexity of current exact algorithms for the 2-dimensional case, and considerably improving upon recent complexity results for this approximation problem.

  2. Monocyte subsets in myocardial infarction: A review.

    PubMed

    Arfvidsson, John; Ahlin, Fredrik; Vargas, Kris G; Thaler, Barbara; Wojta, Johann; Huber, Kurt

    2017-03-15

    Monocytes form an important part of the human innate immune system by taking part in inflammatory reactions. With time, monocytes have gained interest in the role they may play during the event of myocardial infarction (MI). The current paradigm suggests that monocytes consist of three subdivisions which differ in phenotypic and dynamic patterns after an MI. In the inflammation that ensues, the different subsets have been shown to have an impact on reparative processes and patient recovery. We searched Medline and Embase until April 5, 2016, for observational studies or clinical trials regarding monocyte functions and dynamics in MI. Apart from studies in humans, extensive work has been done in mice in an effort to understand the complex nature of monocyte dynamics. Animal models might add useful information on mapping these processes. The question still remains whether animal data can, to a certain degree, be extrapolated to monocyte functions during human MI. This review aims to summarize current available evidence on both mice and men with particular focus on the understanding of monocyte subsets dynamics and effects in human MI. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. NK cell subsets in autoimmune diseases.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Cai; Tian, Zhigang

    2017-03-09

    Natural killer (NK) cells are lymphocytes of the innate immune system. They not only exert cell-mediated cytotoxicity against tumor cells or infected cells, but also play regulatory role through promoting or suppressing functions of other immune cells by secretion of cytokines and chemokines. However, overactivation or dysfunction of NK cells may be associated with pathogenesis of some diseases. NK cells are found to act as a two edged weapon and play opposite roles with both regulatory and inducer activity in autoimmune diseases. Though the precise mechanisms for the opposite effects of NK cells has not been fully elucidated, the importance of NK cells in autoimmune diseases might be associated with different NK cell subsets, different tissue microenvironment and different stages of corresponding diseases. The local tissue microenvironment, unique cellular interactions and different stages of corresponding diseases shape the properties and function of NK cells. In this review, we focus on recent research on the features and function of different NK cell subsets, particularly tissue-resident NK cells in different tissues, and their potential role in autoimmune diseases.

  4. Pathophysiological relevance of macrophage subsets in atherogenesis.

    PubMed

    Liberale, Luca; Dallegri, Franco; Montecucco, Fabrizio; Carbone, Federico

    2017-01-05

    Macrophages are highly heterogeneous and plastic cells. They were shown to play a critical role in all stages of atherogenesis, from the initiation to the necrotic core formation and plaque rupture. Lesional macrophages primarily derive from blood monocyte, but local macrophage proliferation as well as differentiation from smooth muscle cells have also been described. Within atherosclerotic plaques, macrophages rapidly respond to changes in the microenvironment, shifting between pro- (M1) or anti-inflammatory (M2) functional phenotypes. Furthermore, different stimuli have been associated with differentiation of newly discovered M2 subtypes: IL-4/IL-13 (M2a), immune-complex (M2b), IL-10/glucocorticoids (M2c), and adenosine receptor agonist (M2d). More recently, additional intraplaque macrophage phenotypes were also recognized in response to CXCL4 (M4), oxidized phospholipids (Mox), haemoglobin/haptoglobin complexes (HA-mac/M(Hb)), and heme (Mhem). Such macrophage polarization was described as a progression among multiple phenotypes, which reflect the activity of different transcriptional factors and the cross-talk between intracellular signalling. Finally, the distribution of macrophage subsets within different plaque areas was markedly associated with cardiovascular (CV) vulnerability. The aim of this review is to update the current knowledge on the role of macrophage subsets in atherogenesis. In addition, the molecular mechanisms underlying macrophage phenotypic shift will be summarised and discussed. Finally, the role of intraplaque macrophages as predictors of CV events and the therapeutic potential of these cells will be discussed.

  5. Do Mesenchymal Stem Cells Derived From Atypical Lipomatous Tumors Have Greater Differentiation Potency Than Cells From Normal Adipose Tissues?

    PubMed

    Inatani, Hiroyuki; Yamamoto, Norio; Hayashi, Katsuhiro; Kimura, Hiroaki; Takeuchi, Akihiko; Miwa, Shinji; Higuchi, Takashi; Abe, Kensaku; Taniguchi, Yuta; Yamada, Satoshi; Asai, Kiyofumi; Otsuka, Takanobu; Tsuchiya, Hiroyuki

    2017-06-01

    The p53 protein in mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) regulates differentiation to osteogenic or adipogenic lineage. Because p53 function is depressed in most malignancies, if MSCs in malignancy also have p53 hypofunction, differentiation therapy to osteogenic or adipogenic lineage may be an effective treatment. We therefore wished to begin to explore this idea by evaluating atypical lipomatous tumor/well-differentiated liposarcoma (ALT/WDL) cells, because murine double minute 2 (MDM2) gene amplification, which leads to p53 hypofunction, is found in almost all ALT/WDLs. We compared osteogenic and adipogenic differentiation potency between MSCs isolated and cultured from normal adipose tissues and ALT/WDLs from the same patients. During tumor resections in six patients with ALT/WDL, we analyzed 3 mL of tumor, and for comparison, we harvested a similar amount of normal-appearing subcutaneous adipose tissue from an area remote from the tumor for comparison. Adipogenic differentiation potency was quantitatively assessed using spectrometry after oil red O staining. Osteogenic differentiation potency was semiquantitatively assessed by measuring a specific colored area after alkaline phosphatase (ALP) and alizarin red S staining. ALP is related to preosseous cellular metabolism, and alizarin red is related to calcium deposits in cell culture. There were three observers for each assessment, and each assessment (including induced-differentiation and histologic analysis) was performed in duplicate. We then analyzed the mechanism of the difference of osteogenic differentiation potency using the MDM2-specific inhibitor Nutlin-3 at various concentrations. In terms of adipogenic differentiation potency, contrary to our expectations, more fatty acid droplets were observed in MSCs derived from normal fat than in MSCs derived from ALT/WDL, although we found no significant difference between MSCs derived from ALT/WDL and MSCs derived from normal fat; the mean differentiation potency

  6. Development of parallel line analysis criteria for recombinant adenovirus potency assay and definition of a unit of potency.

    PubMed

    Ogawa, Yasushi; Fawaz, Farah; Reyes, Candice; Lai, Julie; Pungor, Erno

    2007-01-01

    Parameter settings of a parallel line analysis procedure were defined by applying statistical analysis procedures to the absorbance data from a cell-based potency bioassay for a recombinant adenovirus, Adenovirus 5 Fibroblast Growth Factor-4 (Ad5FGF-4). The parallel line analysis was performed with a commercially available software, PLA 1.2. The software performs Dixon outlier test on replicates of the absorbance data, performs linear regression analysis to define linear region of the absorbance data, and tests parallelism between the linear regions of standard and sample. Width of Fiducial limit, expressed as a percent of the measured potency, was developed as a criterion for rejection of the assay data and to significantly improve the reliability of the assay results. With the linear range-finding criteria of the software set to a minimum of 5 consecutive dilutions and best statistical outcome, and in combination with the Fiducial limit width acceptance criterion of <135%, 13% of the assay results were rejected. With these criteria applied, the assay was found to be linear over the range of 0.25 to 4 relative potency units, defined as the potency of the sample normalized to the potency of Ad5FGF-4 standard containing 6 x 10(6) adenovirus particles/mL. The overall precision of the assay was estimated to be 52%. Without the application of Fiducial limit width criterion, the assay results were not linear over the range, and an overall precision of 76% was calculated from the data. An absolute unit of potency for the assay was defined by using the parallel line analysis procedure as the amount of Ad5FGF-4 that results in an absorbance value that is 121% of the average absorbance readings of the wells containing cells not infected with the adenovirus.

  7. Dendritic Cell Subsets in Type 1 Diabetes: Friend or Foe?

    PubMed Central

    Morel, Penelope A.

    2013-01-01

    Type 1 diabetes (T1D) is a T cell mediated autoimmune disease characterized by immune mediated destruction of the insulin-producing β cells in the islets of Langerhans. Dendritic cells (DC) have been implicated in the pathogenesis of T1D and are also used as immunotherapeutic agents. Plasmacytoid (p)DC have been shown to have both protective and pathogenic effects and a newly described merocytic DC population has been shown to break tolerance in the mouse model of T1D, the non-obese diabetic (NOD) mouse. We have used DC populations to prevent the onset of T1D in NOD mice and clinical trials of DC therapy in T1D diabetes have been initiated. In this review we will critically examine the recent published literature on the role of DC subsets in the induction and regulation of the autoimmune response in T1D. PMID:24367363

  8. Building on Dendritic Cell Subsets to Improve Cancer Vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Palucka, Karolina; Ueno, Hideki; Zurawski, Gerard; Fay, Joseph; Banchereau, Jacques

    2010-01-01

    SUMMARY T cells can reject established tumors when adoptively transferred into patients, thereby demonstrating that the immune system can be harnessed for cancer therapy. However, such passive immunotherapy is unlikely to maintain memory T cells that might control tumor outgrowth on the long term. Active immunotherapy with vaccines has the potential to induce tumor-specific effector and memory T cells. Vaccines act through dendritic cells (DCs) which induce, regulate and maintain T cell immunity. Clinical trials testing first generation DC vaccines pulsed with tumor antigens provided a proof-of-principle that therapeutic immunity can be elicited. The increased knowledge of the DC system, including the existence of distinct DC subsets is leading to new trials which aim at improved immune and clinical outcomes. PMID:20226644

  9. 9 CFR 113.9 - New potency test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false New potency test. 113.9 Section 113.9 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE VIRUSES, SERUMS, TOXINS, AND ANALOGOUS PRODUCTS; ORGANISMS AND VECTORS STANDARD REQUIREMENTS Applicability §...

  10. Concepts of Potency and Resistance in Causal Prediction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zelazo, Philip David; Shultz, Thomas R.

    1989-01-01

    Used physical systems with effects of continuous magnitude to examine development of causal prediction in 30 children of 5 and 9 years and adults. There were clear age differences in the ability to integrate information about potency and resistance into sophisticated causal predictions of the magnitude of an effect. (RJC)

  11. Both Lymantria dispar nucleopolyhedrovirus enhancin genes contribute to viral potency

    Treesearch

    Holly J.R. Popham; David S. Bischoff; James M. Slavicek

    2001-01-01

    Enhancins are a group of proteins first identified in granuloviruses (GV) that have the ability to enhance nuclear polyhedrosis virus potency. We had previously identified an enhancin gene (E1) in the Lymantria dispar multinucleocapsid nucleopolyhedrovirus (LdMNPV) (D.S. Bischoff and J.M. Slavicek, J. Virol. 71:...

  12. 21 CFR 660.25 - Potency tests without reference preparations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... manufacturer's package insert using red blood cells showing heterozygous or diminished expression of the... SERVICES (CONTINUED) BIOLOGICS ADDITIONAL STANDARDS FOR DIAGNOSTIC SUBSTANCES FOR LABORATORY TESTS Blood Grouping Reagent § 660.25 Potency tests without reference preparations. Products for which Reference...

  13. Mutagenic Potency of Food-Derived Heterocyclic Amines

    SciTech Connect

    Felton, J S; Knize, M G; Wu, R W; Colvin, M E; Hatch, F T; Malfatti, M A

    2006-10-26

    The understanding of mutagenic potency has been primarily approached using ''quantitative structure activity relationships'' (QSAR). Often this method allows the prediction of mutagenic potency of the compound based on its structure. But it does not give the underlying reason why the mutagenic activities differ. We have taken a set of heterocyclic amine structures and used molecular dynamic calculations to dock these molecules into the active site of a computational model of the cytochrome P-450 1A1 enzyme. The calculated binding strength using Boltzman distribution constants was then compared to the QSAR value (HF/6-31G* optimized structures) and the Ames/Salmonella mutagenic potency. Further understanding will only come from knowing the complete set of mutagenic determinants. These include the nitrenium ion half-life, DNA adduct half-life, efficiency of repair of the adduct, and ultimately fixation of the mutation through cellular processes. For two isomers, PhIP and 3-Me-PhIP, we showed that for the 100-fold difference in the mutagenic potency a 5-fold difference can be accounted for by differences in the P450 oxidation. The other factor of 20 is not clearly understood but is downstream from the oxidation step. The application of QSAR (chemical characteristics) to biological principles related to mutagenesis is explored in this report.

  14. High Potency and Other Alcoholic Beverage Consumption among Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jobli, Edessa C.; Dore, Heather S.; Werch, Chudley E.; Moore, Michele J.

    2005-01-01

    This study examined the prevalence of high potency (liquor, malt liquor, fortified wine) and other alcoholic beverage consumption (beer, wine/wine coolers) among adolescents, the impact of gender and ethnicity, and the risk and protective factors that predicted consumption. A confidential survey revealed that, among eighth grade students,…

  15. High-potency cannabis and the risk of psychosis

    PubMed Central

    Di Forti, Marta; Morgan, Craig; Dazzan, Paola; Pariante, Carmine; Mondelli, Valeria; Marques, Tiago Reis; Handley, Rowena; Luzi, Sonija; Russo, Manuela; Paparelli, Alessandra; Butt, Alexander; Stilo, Simona A.; Wiffen, Ben; Powell, John; Murray, Robin M.

    2009-01-01

    Background People who use cannabis have an increased risk of psychosis, an effect attributed to the active ingredient Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (Δ9-THC). There has recently been concern over an increase in the concentration of Δ9-THC in the cannabis available in many countries. Aims To investigate whether people with a first episode of psychosis were particularly likely to use high-potency cannabis. Method We collected information on cannabis use from 280 cases presenting with a first episode of psychosis to the South London & Maudsley National Health Service (NHS) Foundation Trust, and from 174 healthy controls recruited from the local population. Results There was no significant difference between cases and controls in whether they had ever taken cannabis, or age at first use. However, those in the cases group were more likely to be current daily users (OR = 6.4) and to have smoked cannabis for more than 5 years (OR = 2.1). Among those who used cannabis, 78% of the cases group used high-potency cannabis (sinsemilla, ‘skunk’) compared with 37% of the control group (OR 6.8). Conclusions The finding that people with a first episode of psychosis had smoked higher-potency cannabis, for longer and with greater frequency, than a healthy control group is consistent with the hypothesis that Δ9-THC is the active ingredient increasing risk of psychosis. This has important public health implications, given the increased availability and use of high-potency cannabis. PMID:19949195

  16. High Potency and Other Alcoholic Beverage Consumption among Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jobli, Edessa C.; Dore, Heather S.; Werch, Chudley E.; Moore, Michele J.

    2005-01-01

    This study examined the prevalence of high potency (liquor, malt liquor, fortified wine) and other alcoholic beverage consumption (beer, wine/wine coolers) among adolescents, the impact of gender and ethnicity, and the risk and protective factors that predicted consumption. A confidential survey revealed that, among eighth grade students,…

  17. 9 CFR 113.9 - New potency test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false New potency test. 113.9 Section 113.9 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE VIRUSES, SERUMS, TOXINS, AND ANALOGOUS PRODUCTS; ORGANISMS AND VECTORS STANDARD REQUIREMENTS Applicability §...

  18. 21 CFR 660.25 - Potency tests without reference preparations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... manufacturer's package insert using red blood cells showing heterozygous or diminished expression of the... SERVICES (CONTINUED) BIOLOGICS ADDITIONAL STANDARDS FOR DIAGNOSTIC SUBSTANCES FOR LABORATORY TESTS Blood Grouping Reagent § 660.25 Potency tests without reference preparations. Products for which Reference...

  19. 21 CFR 660.25 - Potency tests without reference preparations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... manufacturer's package insert using red blood cells showing heterozygous or diminished expression of the... SERVICES (CONTINUED) BIOLOGICS ADDITIONAL STANDARDS FOR DIAGNOSTIC SUBSTANCES FOR LABORATORY TESTS Blood Grouping Reagent § 660.25 Potency tests without reference preparations. Products for which Reference...

  20. 21 CFR 660.25 - Potency tests without reference preparations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... manufacturer's package insert using red blood cells showing heterozygous or diminished expression of the... SERVICES (CONTINUED) BIOLOGICS ADDITIONAL STANDARDS FOR DIAGNOSTIC SUBSTANCES FOR LABORATORY TESTS Blood Grouping Reagent § 660.25 Potency tests without reference preparations. Products for which Reference...

  1. 9 CFR 113.9 - New potency test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false New potency test. 113.9 Section 113.9 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE VIRUSES, SERUMS, TOXINS, AND ANALOGOUS PRODUCTS; ORGANISMS AND VECTORS STANDARD REQUIREMENTS Applicability §...

  2. 21 CFR 640.56 - Quality control test for potency.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Quality control test for potency. 640.56 Section 640.56 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) BIOLOGICS ADDITIONAL STANDARDS FOR HUMAN BLOOD AND BLOOD PRODUCTS Cryoprecipitate § 640.56 Quality control...

  3. Harnessing Human Dendritic Cell Subsets for Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Ueno, Hideki; Schmitt, Nathalie; Klechevsky, Eynav; Pedroza-Gonzales, Alexander; Matsui, Toshimichi; Zurawski, Gerard; Oh, SangKon; Fay, Joseph; Pascual, Virginia; Banchereau, Jacques; Palucka, Karolina

    2010-01-01

    Summary Immunity results from a complex interplay between the antigen-nonspecific innate immune system and the antigen-specific adaptive immune system. The cells and molecules of the innate system employ non-clonal recognition receptors including lectins, Toll-like receptors, NOD-like receptors and helicases. B and T lymphocytes of the adaptive immune system employ clonal receptors recognizing antigens or their derived peptides in a highly specific manner. An essential link between innate and adaptive immunity is provided by dendritic cells (DCs). DCs can induce such contrasting states as immunity and tolerance. The recent years have brought a wealth of information on the biology of DCs revealing the complexity of this cell system. Indeed, DC plasticity and subsets are prominent determinants of the type and quality of elicited immune responses. Here we summarize our recent studies aimed at a better understanding of the DC system to unravel the pathophysiology of human diseases and design novel human vaccines. PMID:20193020

  4. Dissimilarity-Based Sparse Subset Selection.

    PubMed

    Elhamifar, Ehsan; Sapiro, Guillermo; Sastry, S Shankar

    2016-11-01

    Finding an informative subset of a large collection of data points or models is at the center of many problems in computer vision, recommender systems, bio/health informatics as well as image and natural language processing. Given pairwise dissimilarities between the elements of a 'source set' and a 'target set,' we consider the problem of finding a subset of the source set, called representatives or exemplars, that can efficiently describe the target set. We formulate the problem as a row-sparsity regularized trace minimization problem. Since the proposed formulation is, in general, NP-hard, we consider a convex relaxation. The solution of our optimization finds representatives and the assignment of each element of the target set to each representative, hence, obtaining a clustering. We analyze the solution of our proposed optimization as a function of the regularization parameter. We show that when the two sets jointly partition into multiple groups, our algorithm finds representatives from all groups and reveals clustering of the sets. In addition, we show that the proposed framework can effectively deal with outliers. Our algorithm works with arbitrary dissimilarities, which can be asymmetric or violate the triangle inequality. To efficiently implement our algorithm, we consider an Alternating Direction Method of Multipliers (ADMM) framework, which results in quadratic complexity in the problem size. We show that the ADMM implementation allows to parallelize the algorithm, hence further reducing the computational time. Finally, by experiments on real-world datasets, we show that our proposed algorithm improves the state of the art on the two problems of scene categorization using representative images and time-series modeling and segmentation using representative models.

  5. Dissimilarity-based Sparse Subset Selection.

    PubMed

    Elhamifar, Ehsan; Sapiro, Guillermo; Sastry, Shankar

    2015-12-23

    Finding an informative subset of a large collection of data points or models is at the center of many problems in computer vision, recommender systems, bio/health informatics as well as image and natural language processing. Given pairwise dissimilarities between the elements of a 'source set' and a 'target set,' we consider the problem of finding a subset of the source set, called representatives or exemplars, that can efficiently describe the target set. We formulate the problem as a row-sparsity regularized trace minimization problem. Since the proposed formulation is, in general, NP-hard, we consider a convex relaxation. The solution of our optimization finds representatives and the assignment of each element of the target set to each representative, hence, obtaining a clustering. We analyze the solution of our proposed optimization as a function of the regularization parameter. We show that when the two sets jointly partition into multiple groups, our algorithm finds representatives from all groups and reveals clustering of the sets. In addition, we show that the proposed framework can effectively deal with outliers. Our algorithm works with arbitrary dissimilarities, which can be asymmetric or violate the triangle inequality. To efficiently implement our algorithm, we consider an Alternating Direction Method of Multipliers (ADMM) framework, which results in quadratic complexity in the problem size. We show that the ADMM implementation allows to parallelize the algorithm, hence further reducing the computational time. Finally, by experiments on real-world datasets, we show that our proposed algorithm improves the state of the art on the two problems of scene categorization using representative images and time-series modeling and segmentation using representative models.

  6. Role of distinct CD4(+) T helper subset in pathogenesis of oral lichen planus.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hui; Zhang, Dunfang; Han, Qi; Zhao, Xin; Zeng, Xin; Xu, Yi; Sun, Zheng; Chen, Qianming

    2016-07-01

    Oral lichen planus (OLP) is one of the most common chronic inflammatory oral mucosal diseases with T-cell-mediated immune pathogenesis. In subepithelial and lamina propria of OLP local lesions, the presence of CD4(+) T helper (CD4(+) Th) cells appeared as the major lymphocytes. These CD4(+) T lymphocytes can differentiate into distinct Th cell types such as Th1, Th2, Treg, Th17, Th22, Th9, and Tfh within the context of certain cytokines environment. Growing evidence indicated that Th1/Th2 imbalance may greatly participate into the cytokine network of OLP immunopathology. In addition, Th1/Th2 imbalance can be regulated by the Treg subset and also greatly influenced by the emerging novel CD4(+) Th subset Th17. Furthermore, the presence of novel subsets Th22, Th9 and Tfh in OLP patients is yet to be clarified. All these Th subsets and their specific cytokines may play a critical role in determining the character, extent and duration of immune responses in OLP pathogenesis. Therefore, we review the roles of distinct CD4(+) Th subsets and their signature cytokines in determining disease severity and susceptibility of OLP and also reveal the novel therapeutic strategies based on T lymphocytes subsets in OLP treatment. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Immunosuppressive potency of mechanistic target of rapamycin inhibitors in solid-organ transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Baroja-Mazo, Alberto; Revilla-Nuin, Beatriz; Ramírez, Pablo; Pons, José A

    2016-01-01

    Mammalian target of rapamycin, also known as mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) is a protein kinase that belongs to the PI3K/AKT/mTOR signaling pathway, which is involved in several fundamental cellular functions such as cell growth, proliferation, and survival. This protein and its associated pathway have been implicated in cancer development and the regulation of immune responses, including the rejection response generated following allograft transplantation. Inhibitors of mTOR (mTORi) such as rapamycin and its derivative everolimus are potent immunosuppressive drugs that both maintain similar rates of efficacy and could optimize the renal function and diminish the side effects compared with calcineurin inhibitors. These drugs are used in solid-organ transplantationtoinduceimmunosuppression while also promoting the expansion of CD4+CD25+FOXP3+ regulatory T-cells that could favor a scenery of immunological tolerance. In this review, we describe the mechanisms by which inhibitors of mTOR induce suppression by regulation of these pathways at different levels of the immune response. In addition, we particularly emphasize about the main methods that are used to assess the potency of immunosuppressive drugs, highlighting the studies carried out about immunosuppressive potency of inhibitors of mTOR. PMID:27011916

  8. BLyS-mediated modulation of naïve B cell subsets impacts HIV Env-induced antibody responses1

    PubMed Central

    Dosenovic, Pia; Soldemo, Martina; Scholz, Jean L.; O’Dell, Sijy; Grasset, Emilie K.; Pelletier, Nadège; Karlsson, Mikael C. I.; Mascola, John R.; Wyatt, Richard T.; Cancro, Michael P.; Karlsson Hedestam, Gunilla B.

    2012-01-01

    Neutralizing Abs provide the protective effect of the majority of existing human vaccines. For a prophylactic vaccine against HIV-1, broadly neutralizing Abs (bNAbs) targeting conserved epitopes of the viral envelope glycoproteins (Env) are likely required, as the pool of circulating HIV-1 variants is extremely diverse. The failure to efficiently induce bNAbs by vaccination may be due to the use of sub-optimal immunogens or immunization regimens, or it may indicate that B cells specific for broadly neutralizing Env determinants are selected against during peripheral checkpoints, either before or after antigen encounter. To investigate if perturbation of B cell subsets prior to immunization with recombinant Env protein affects the vaccine-induced Ab response in mice, we used B Lymphocyte Stimulator (BLyS), a cytokine that regulates survival and selection of peripheral B cells. We show that the transient BLyS treatment used here substantially affected naïve B cell populations; in particular, it resulted in an increased number of B cells surviving counter-selection at the transitional stages. We also observed an increased number of mature naïve B cells, especially marginal zone B cells, in BLyS-treated mice. Intriguingly, provision of excess BLyS prior to immunization led to a consistent improvement in the frequency and potency of HIV-1 Env vaccine-induced neutralizing Ab responses, without increasing the number of Env-specific Ab-secreting cells or the Ab binding titers measured after boosting. The results presented here suggest that an increased understanding of BLyS-regulated processes may help the design of vaccine regimens aimed at eliciting improved neutralizing Ab responses against HIV-1. PMID:22561155

  9. Collaborative study for the validation of serological methods for potency testing of diphtheria toxoid vaccines-part 1.

    PubMed

    Winsnes, R; Sesardic, D; Daas, A; Behr-Gross, M-E

    2004-01-01

    A collaborative study on the evaluation of an alternative functional assay, the Vero cell method, to the Ph. Eur. in vivo challenge procedures for potency determination of diphtheria toxoid in 6 different combined vaccines was initiated in January 2001. The study was an extension of a previous study for the validation of serological methods for potency testing of tetanus toxoid vaccines for human use. To allow interim evaluation of test results and to monitor study progress, the project was divided into three consecutive phases. The results of Phase I and II studies are presented in this report. Pre-validation (Phase I) study, performed in two laboratories, indicated that comparable diphtheria potency estimates were obtained in the Ph. Eur. direct intradermal challenge assay in guinea pigs, in Vero cell assay and in indirect ELISA for five vaccines of different potencies (range of estimates: ca. 20-200 IU/ml). The correlation coefficients between the challenge assay and the Vero cell assay corresponded to those between the challenge assay and ELISA, confirming that the antibodies play an important role in protection and that predominantly protective/neutralising antibodies are present in guinea pigs, at the time point investigated. It was observed, for Vero cell assays, that about 16-35 (9-28 in Phase II study) fold lower titre of individual serum samples were obtained when using equine, rather than guinea pig reference serum. The study also provided preliminary information that sera from the same guinea pigs may be used for potency determination of both diphtheria and tetanus toxoid components of vaccines. In Phase II, another five laboratories analysed a subset of the vaccines included in Phase I study plus an additional vaccine. Four laboratories performed the lethal challenge assay and one laboratory carried out the intradermal challenge assay. All laboratories also performed the Vero cell assay and both ELISA for diphtheria antitoxin and ELISA for tetanus

  10. Generalized Subset Designs in Analytical Chemistry.

    PubMed

    Surowiec, Izabella; Vikström, Ludvig; Hector, Gustaf; Johansson, Erik; Vikström, Conny; Trygg, Johan

    2017-06-20

    Design of experiments (DOE) is an established methodology in research, development, manufacturing, and production for screening, optimization, and robustness testing. Two-level fractional factorial designs remain the preferred approach due to high information content while keeping the number of experiments low. These types of designs, however, have never been extended to a generalized multilevel reduced design type that would be capable to include both qualitative and quantitative factors. In this Article we describe a novel generalized fractional factorial design. In addition, it also provides complementary and balanced subdesigns analogous to a fold-over in two-level reduced factorial designs. We demonstrate how this design type can be applied with good results in three different applications in analytical chemistry including (a) multivariate calibration using microwave resonance spectroscopy for the determination of water in tablets, (b) stability study in drug product development, and (c) representative sample selection in clinical studies. This demonstrates the potential of generalized fractional factorial designs to be applied in many other areas of analytical chemistry where representative, balanced, and complementary subsets are required, especially when a combination of quantitative and qualitative factors at multiple levels exists.

  11. Heterogeneity of gangliosides among T cell subsets.

    PubMed

    Inokuchi, Jin-ichi; Nagafuku, Masakazu; Ohno, Isao; Suzuki, Akemi

    2013-09-01

    Gangliosides are major components of highly organized membrane microdomains or rafts, yet little is known about the role of gangliosides in raft organization. This is also the case of gangliosides in TCR-mediated activation. Comprehensive structural analysis of gangliosides in the primary thymocytes and CD4(+) T and CD8(+) T cells was not achieved due to technical difficulties. We have found that CD8(+) T cells express very high levels of o-series gangliosides, but on the other hand, CD4(+) T cells preferably express a-series gangliosides. In the TCR-dependent activation, CD4(+) T cells selectively require a-series gangliosides, but CD8(+) T cells do require only o-series gangliosides but not a-series gangliosides. Ganglioside GM3 synthase-deficient mice lacking a-series gangliosides neither exhibited the TCR-dependent activation of CD4(+) T nor developed ovalbumin-induced allergic airway inflammation. These findings imply that the distinct expression pattern of ganglioside species in CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells define the immune function of each T cell subset.

  12. Identification of polarized macrophage subsets in zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen-Chi, Mai; Laplace-Builhe, Béryl; Travnickova, Jana; Luz-Crawford, Patricia; Tejedor, Gautier; Phan, Quang Tien; Duroux-Richard, Isabelle; Levraud, Jean-Pierre; Kissa, Karima; Lutfalla, Georges

    2015-01-01

    While the mammalian macrophage phenotypes have been intensively studied in vitro, the dynamic of their phenotypic polarization has never been investigated in live vertebrates. We used the zebrafish as a live model to identify and trail macrophage subtypes. We generated a transgenic line whose macrophages expressing tumour necrosis factor alpha (tnfa), a key feature of classically activated (M1) macrophages, express fluorescent proteins Tg(mpeg1:mCherryF/tnfa:eGFP-F). Using 4D-confocal microscopy, we showed that both aseptic wounding and Escherichia coli inoculation triggered macrophage recruitment, some of which started to express tnfa. RT-qPCR on Fluorescence Activated Cell Sorting (FACS)-sorted tnfa+ and tnfa− macrophages showed that they, respectively, expressed M1 and alternatively activated (M2) mammalian markers. Fate tracing of tnfa+ macrophages during the time-course of inflammation demonstrated that pro-inflammatory macrophages converted into M2-like phenotype during the resolution step. Our results reveal the diversity and plasticity of zebrafish macrophage subsets and underline the similarities with mammalian macrophages proposing a new system to study macrophage functional dynamic. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.07288.001 PMID:26154973

  13. Identification of polarized macrophage subsets in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Nguyen-Chi, Mai; Laplace-Builhe, Béryl; Travnickova, Jana; Luz-Crawford, Patricia; Tejedor, Gautier; Phan, Quang Tien; Duroux-Richard, Isabelle; Levraud, Jean-Pierre; Kissa, Karima; Lutfalla, Georges; Jorgensen, Christian; Djouad, Farida

    2015-07-08

    While the mammalian macrophage phenotypes have been intensively studied in vitro, the dynamic of their phenotypic polarization has never been investigated in live vertebrates. We used the zebrafish as a live model to identify and trail macrophage subtypes. We generated a transgenic line whose macrophages expressing tumour necrosis factor alpha (tnfa), a key feature of classically activated (M1) macrophages, express fluorescent proteins Tg(mpeg1:mCherryF/tnfa:eGFP-F). Using 4D-confocal microscopy, we showed that both aseptic wounding and Escherichia coli inoculation triggered macrophage recruitment, some of which started to express tnfa. RT-qPCR on Fluorescence Activated Cell Sorting (FACS)-sorted tnfa(+) and tnfa(-) macrophages showed that they, respectively, expressed M1 and alternatively activated (M2) mammalian markers. Fate tracing of tnfa(+) macrophages during the time-course of inflammation demonstrated that pro-inflammatory macrophages converted into M2-like phenotype during the resolution step. Our results reveal the diversity and plasticity of zebrafish macrophage subsets and underline the similarities with mammalian macrophages proposing a new system to study macrophage functional dynamic.

  14. Can biochemistry drive drug discovery beyond simple potency measurements?

    PubMed

    Chène, Patrick

    2012-04-01

    Among the fields of expertise required to develop drugs successfully, biochemistry holds a key position in drug discovery at the interface between chemistry, structural biology and cell biology. However, taking the example of protein kinases, it appears that biochemical assays are mostly used in the pharmaceutical industry to measure compound potency and/or selectivity. This limited use of biochemistry is surprising, given that detailed biochemical analyses are commonly used in academia to unravel molecular recognition processes. In this article, I show that biochemistry can provide invaluable information on the dynamics and energetics of compound-target interactions that cannot be obtained on the basis of potency measurements and structural data. Therefore, an extensive use of biochemistry in drug discovery could facilitate the identification and/or development of new drugs.

  15. Ileocolic neobladder post-cystectomy: continence and potency.

    PubMed

    Marshall, F F; Mostwin, J L; Radebaugh, L C; Walsh, P C; Brendler, C B

    1991-03-01

    Incontinence and impotence are 2 of the primary complications associated with total bladder reconstruction after cystectomy for carcinoma. These and other features are addressed in 25 patients who underwent total neobladder reconstruction following cystectomy for transitional cell carcinoma. Of these patients 20 had a urethral anastomosis. No patient had to wear a pad or device. Enuresis was rare. When the radical cystoprostatectomy population was contrasted with a radical prostatectomy patient population, continence was achieved more rapidly in the neobladder group. Potency was maintained in 15 of 21 (71%) evaluable patients. This ileocolic neobladder produces a large volume and low pressure, and provides excellent day and night continence. With preservation of the neurovascular bundle potency can be maintained in the majority of patients.

  16. Potency and stability of compounded cyclophosphamide: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Robat, C; Budde, J

    2017-09-01

    Compounding of drugs for use in veterinary oncology is becoming increasingly common. We obtained 15 mg cyclophosphamide capsules from five different compounding pharmacies and performed potency analyses at two time points, as well as stability at 60 days. Potency results for four out of five and zero out of five (4/10) samples analysed were inadequate. Stability at 60 days was acceptable for all but one sample. This pilot study raises several important points of concern when compounding chemotherapy in dogs and cats. Further studies are necessary to solidify this data. Collaboration between pharmacists, veterinarians and regulatory bodies is needed to ensure safe and accurate delivery of compounded drugs to client-owned animals. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Potency of killed plague vaccines prepared from avirulent Yersinia pestis*

    PubMed Central

    Williams, James E.; Altieri, Patricia L.; Berman, Sanford; Lowenthal, Joseph P.; Cavanaugh, Dan C.

    1980-01-01

    Killed plague vaccines prepared from avirulent strains A1122 and EV76S of Yersinia pestis were more effective in mouse potency tests than samples of Plague Vaccine, USP, prepared from killed Y. pestis of the virulent strain 195/P. Manufacture of vaccine from avirulent Y. pestis would obviate requirements for the large containment facilities that are currently needed for producing Plague Vaccine, USP. PMID:6975184

  18. Incorporating potency into EU classification for carcinogenicity and reproductive toxicity.

    PubMed

    Hennes, C; Batke, M; Bomann, W; Duhayon, S; Kosemund, K; Politano, V; Stinchcombe, S; Doe, J

    2014-11-01

    Although risk assessment, assessing the potential harm of each particular exposure of a substance, is desirable, it is not feasible in many situations. Risk assessment uses a process of hazard identification, hazard characterisation, and exposure assessment as its components. In the absence of risk assessment, the purpose of classification is to give broad guidance (through the label) on the suitability of a chemical in a range of use situations. Hazard classification in the EU is a process involving identification of the hazards of a substance, followed by comparison of those hazards (including degree of hazard) with defined criteria. Classification should therefore give guidance on degree of hazard as well as hazard identification. Potency is the most important indicator of degree of hazard and should therefore be included in classification. This is done for acute lethality and general toxicity by classifying on dose required to cause the effect. The classification in the EU for carcinogenicity and reproductive toxicity does not discriminate across the wide range of potencies seen (6 orders of magnitude) for carcinogenicity and for developmental toxicity and fertility. Therefore potency should be included in the classification process. The methodology in the EU guidelines for classification for deriving specific concentration limits is a rigorous process for assigning substances which cause tumours or developmental toxicity and infertility in experimental animals to high, medium or low degree of hazard categories by incorporating potency. Methods are suggested on how the degree of hazard so derived could be used in the EU classification process to improve hazard communication and in downstream risk management.

  19. Characterization of mesenchymal stromal cells: potency assay development.

    PubMed

    Hematti, Peiman

    2016-04-01

    Based on their many different mechanisms of action, presumed immune-privileged status, and relative ease of production, mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) are under intensive clinical investigation for treating a wide range of degenerative, inflammatory, and immunologic disorders. Identification of relevant and robust potency assays is not only a regulatory requirement, but it is also the basis for producing and delivering a product that is consistent, safe, and ultimately an effective therapy. Although development of an appropriate potency assay is one of the most challenging issues in cell-based therapies, it is of paramount importance in the process of developing and testing cellular products. Regardless of the many different tissue sources and methods used in culture expansion of MSCs, they possess many of the same morphologic, cell surface markers, and differentiation characteristics. However, MSC products with similar phenotypic characteristics could still have major differences in their biologic and functional attributes. Understanding the different mechanisms of action and establishment of relevant potency assays is of pivotal importance in allowing investigators and regulatory agencies to compare MSCs used in different clinical trials.

  20. Traditional and high potency probiotic preparations for oral bacteriotherapy.

    PubMed

    Famularo, G; De Simone, C; Matteuzzi, D; Pirovano, F

    1999-12-01

    Current research continues to improve the treatment options available to clinicians for oral bacteriotherapy. Recently, a greater understanding of the role of endogenous digestive microflora has generated renewed interest in the potential of oral bacteriotherapy for the management of a wide spectrum of gastrointestinal and systemic disorders. Several treatment strategies for oral bacteriotherapy have already entered clinical trials and it is hoped that some of these strategies will become widely available in the near future. This review summarises the current status of oral probiotic preparations for bacteriotherapy and discusses any obstacles to their successful clinical development. Newer probiotic preparations include high potency preparations that are greatly enriched in lactic acid bacteria, both in terms of bacterial concentrations and the number of bacterial strains. These preparations have a greater potential for clinical effectiveness than traditional preparations and are entering clinical evaluation especially in patients with inflammatory bowel disease and pouchitis, irritable bowel syndrome, or cryptosporidiosis. The pitfalls of previous clinical investigations of traditional probiotic preparations and the perils of future clinical trials with high potency preparations are discussed in the context of unmet needs and realistic expectations of success. Although considerable progress has been made in oral bacteriotherapy, focused efforts by basic scientists and clinical investigators and continued support from pharmaceutical companies is required to successfully develop probiotics for use in clinical medicine. Newer high potency probiotic preparations appear to have a great advantage over traditional preparations and should be the area of most active biomedical research in the field.

  1. Comparative sensitizing potencies of fragrances, preservatives, and hair dyes.

    PubMed

    Lidén, Carola; Yazar, Kerem; Johansen, Jeanne D; Karlberg, Ann-Therese; Uter, Wolfgang; White, Ian R

    2016-11-01

    The local lymph node assay (LLNA) is used for assessing sensitizing potential in hazard identification and risk assessment for regulatory purposes. Sensitizing potency on the basis of the LLNA is categorized into extreme (EC3 value of ≤0.2%), strong (>0.2% to ≤2%), and moderate (>2%). To compare the sensitizing potencies of fragrance substances, preservatives, and hair dye substances, which are skin sensitizers that frequently come into contact with the skin of consumers and workers, LLNA results and EC3 values for 72 fragrance substances, 25 preservatives and 107 hair dye substances were obtained from two published compilations of LLNA data and opinions by the Scientific Committee on Consumer Safety and its predecessors. The median EC3 values of fragrances (n = 61), preservatives (n = 19) and hair dyes (n = 59) were 5.9%, 0.9%, and 1.3%, respectively. The majority of sensitizing preservatives and hair dyes are thus strong or extreme sensitizers (EC3 value of ≤2%), and fragrances are mostly moderate sensitizers. Although fragrances are typically moderate sensitizers, they are among the most frequent causes of contact allergy. This indicates that factors other than potency need to be addressed more rigorously in risk assessment and risk management. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Rapid infrared determination of the potency of chlorinated bactericides.

    PubMed

    Spagnolo, F; Cestaro, J P

    1971-06-01

    A rapid infrared reflectance method for evaluating the germicidal potency of synthetic materials containing various amounts of two chlorinated bactericides was developed. The dimeric product 2,2'-methylenebis (4,6-dichlorophenol) exhibited a characteristic C=C skeletal inplane stretching infrared absorption band at 1,640 cm(-1). The monomeric 2,4-dichlorophenol precursor showed a characteristic absorption band at 1,579 cm(-1). These characteristic infrared absorptions may be used for analysis of the potency of the manufactured chlorinated bactericide. For a series of samples known to vary in dimer content, the micrograms per milliliter required for a 100% bacterial kill is first determined by a standard American Petroleum Institute method. Then the area ratio of the infrared absorption bands characteristic of the chlorinated bactericides is measured for each sample and plotted versus the microgram per milliliter required for 100% bacterial kill. The potency of subsequent samples is simply and rapidly determined by measuring this ratio from the infrared absorption curve and calculating micrograms per milliliter required for 100% kill from the calibration curve. Analysis time is approximately 1 hr compared to biocidal tests in current use requiring approximately a 1-month incubation period.

  3. Epoxy resin monomers with reduced skin sensitizing potency.

    PubMed

    O'Boyle, Niamh M; Niklasson, Ida B; Tehrani-Bagha, Ali R; Delaine, Tamara; Holmberg, Krister; Luthman, Kristina; Karlberg, Ann-Therese

    2014-06-16

    Epoxy resin monomers (ERMs), especially diglycidyl ethers of bisphenol A and F (DGEBA and DGEBF), are extensively used as building blocks for thermosetting polymers. However, they are known to commonly cause skin allergy. This research describes a number of alternative ERMs, designed with the aim of reducing the skin sensitizing potency while maintaining the ability to form thermosetting polymers. The compounds were designed, synthesized, and assessed for sensitizing potency using the in vivo murine local lymph node assay (LLNA). All six epoxy resin monomers had decreased sensitizing potencies compared to those of DGEBA and DGEBF. With respect to the LLNA EC3 value, the best of the alternative monomers had a value approximately 2.5 times higher than those of DGEBA and DGEBF. The diepoxides were reacted with triethylenetetramine, and the polymers formed were tested for technical applicability using thermogravimetric analysis and differential scanning calorimetry. Four out of the six alternative ERMs gave polymers with a thermal stability comparable to that obtained with DGEBA and DGEBF. The use of improved epoxy resin monomers with less skin sensitizing effects is a direct way to tackle the problem of contact allergy to epoxy resin systems, particularly in occupational settings, resulting in a reduction in the incidence of allergic contact dermatitis.

  4. Distinct transcriptional control in major immunogenetic subsets of chronic lymphocytic leukemia exhibiting subset-biased global DNA methylation profiles

    PubMed Central

    Kanduri, Meena; Marincevic, Millaray; Halldórsdóttir, Anna M.; Mansouri, Larry; Junevik, Katarina; Ntoufa, Stavroula; Kultima, Hanna Göransson; Isaksson, Anders; Juliusson, Gunnar; Andersson, Per-Ola; Ehrencrona, Hans; Stamatopoulos, Kostas; Rosenquist, Richard

    2012-01-01

    Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) can be divided into prognostic subgroups based on the IGHV gene mutational status, and is further characterized by multiple subsets of cases with quasi-identical or stereotyped B cell receptors that also share clinical and biological features. We recently reported differential DNA methylation profiles in IGHV-mutated and IGHV-unmutated CLL subgroups. For the first time, we here explore the global methylation profiles of stereotyped subsets with different prognosis, by applying high-resolution methylation arrays on CLL samples from three major stereotyped subsets: the poor-prognostic subsets #1 (n = 15) and #2 (n = 9) and the favorable-prognostic subset #4 (n = 15). Overall, the three subsets exhibited significantly different methylation profiles, which only partially overlapped with those observed in our previous study according to IGHV gene mutational status. Specifically, gene ontology analysis of the differentially methylated genes revealed a clear enrichment of genes involved in immune response, such as B cell activation (e.g., CD80, CD86 and IL10), with higher methylation levels in subset #1 than subsets #2 and #4. Accordingly, higher expression of the co-stimulatory molecules CD80 and CD86 was demonstrated in subset #4 vs. subset #1, pointing to a key role for these molecules in the crosstalk of CLL subset #4 cells with the microenvironment. In summary, investigation of three prototypic, stereotyped CLL subsets revealed distinct DNA methylation profiles for each subset, which suggests subset-biased patterns of transcriptional control and highlights a key role for epigenetics during leukemogenesis. PMID:23154584

  5. Distinct transcriptional control in major immunogenetic subsets of chronic lymphocytic leukemia exhibiting subset-biased global DNA methylation profiles.

    PubMed

    Kanduri, Meena; Marincevic, Millaray; Halldórsdóttir, Anna M; Mansouri, Larry; Junevik, Katarina; Ntoufa, Stavroula; Kultima, Hanna Göransson; Isaksson, Anders; Juliusson, Gunnar; Andersson, Per-Ola; Ehrencrona, Hans; Stamatopoulos, Kostas; Rosenquist, Richard

    2012-12-01

    Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) can be divided into prognostic subgroups based on the IGHV gene mutational status, and is further characterized by multiple subsets of cases with quasi-identical or stereotyped B cell receptors that also share clinical and biological features. We recently reported differential DNA methylation profiles in IGHV-mutated and IGHV-unmutated CLL subgroups. For the first time, we here explore the global methylation profiles of stereotyped subsets with different prognosis, by applying high-resolution methylation arrays on CLL samples from three major stereotyped subsets: the poor-prognostic subsets #1 (n = 15) and #2 (n = 9) and the favorable-prognostic subset #4 (n = 15). Overall, the three subsets exhibited significantly different methylation profiles, which only partially overlapped with those observed in our previous study according to IGHV gene mutational status. Specifically, gene ontology analysis of the differentially methylated genes revealed a clear enrichment of genes involved in immune response, such as B cell activation (e.g., CD80, CD86 and IL10), with higher methylation levels in subset #1 than subsets #2 and #4. Accordingly, higher expression of the co-stimulatory molecules CD80 and CD86 was demonstrated in subset #4 vs. subset #1, pointing to a key role for these molecules in the crosstalk of CLL subset #4 cells with the microenvironment. In summary, investigation of three prototypic, stereotyped CLL subsets revealed distinct DNA methylation profiles for each subset, which suggests subset-biased patterns of transcriptional control and highlights a key role for epigenetics during leukemogenesis.

  6. Bridging the Gap Between Validation and Implementation of Non-Animal Veterinary Vaccine Potency Testing Methods.

    PubMed

    Dozier, Samantha; Brown, Jeffrey; Currie, Alistair

    2011-11-29

    In recent years, technologically advanced high-throughput techniques have been developed that replace, reduce or refine animal use in vaccine quality control tests. Following validation, these tests are slowly being accepted for use by international regulatory authorities. Because regulatory acceptance itself has not guaranteed that approved humane methods are adopted by manufacturers, various organizations have sought to foster the preferential use of validated non-animal methods by interfacing with industry and regulatory authorities. After noticing this gap between regulation and uptake by industry, we began developing a paradigm that seeks to narrow the gap and quicken implementation of new replacement, refinement or reduction guidance. A systematic analysis of our experience in promoting the transparent implementation of validated non-animal vaccine potency assays has led to the refinement of our paradigmatic process, presented here, by which interested parties can assess the local regulatory acceptance of methods that reduce animal use and integrate them into quality control testing protocols, or ensure the elimination of peripheral barriers to their use, particularly for potency and other tests carried out on production batches.

  7. Astaxanthin Improves Stem Cell Potency via an Increase in the Proliferation of Neural Progenitor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jeong-Hwan; Nam, Soo-Wan; Kim, Byung-Woo; Choi, Woobong; Lee, Jong-Hwan; Kim, Wun-Jae; Choi, Yung-Hyun

    2010-01-01

    The present study was designed to investigate the question of whether or not astaxanthin improves stem cell potency via an increase in proliferation of neural progenitor cells (NPCs). Treatment with astaxanthin significantly increased proliferation and colony formation of NPCs. For identification of possible activated signaling molecules involved in active cell proliferation occurring after astaxanthin treatment, total protein levels of several proliferation-related proteins, and expression levels of proliferation-related transcription factors, were assessed in NPCs. In Western blot analysis, astaxanthin induced significant activation of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) and its downstream mediators in a time-dependent manner. Results of RT-PCR analysis showed upregulation of proliferation-related transcription factors and stemness genes. To estimate the relevance of PI3K and mitogen-activated protein, or extracellular signal-regulated kinase kinase (MEK) signaling pathways in cell growth of astaxanthin-treated NPCs, inhibition assays were performed with LY294002, a specific inhibitor of PI3K, and PD98059, a specific inhibitor of MEK, respectively. These results clearly showed that astaxanthin induces proliferation of NPCs via activation of the PI3K and MEK signaling pathways and improves stem cell potency via stemness acting signals. PMID:21614195

  8. International regulatory requirements for Leptospira vaccine potency testing. Roundtable: current requirements and opportunity for harmonization.

    PubMed

    Draayer, Hans A; Bruckner, Lukas; Peña-Moctezuma, Alejandro de la; Srinivas, Geetha

    2013-09-01

    Progress continues to be made in the ongoing efforts to replace, reduce, or refine the use of laboratory animals for Leptospira vaccine potency testing in certain markets/regions. Leptospira-containing vaccines, as with many veterinary vaccines, are manufactured and distributed both on a regional basis by local manufacturers and internationally by large multinational firms. Three general scenarios exist for the international testing and distribution of veterinary vaccines including: 1) the importing country recognizes the country of origin's testing and batch release data with no additional testing; 2) the importing country requires the manufacturer to conduct a specific potency assay based on the current importing market's regulations for the importing country or 3) the importing country requires retesting of the product in country prior to distribution. Scenarios 2 and 3 both have the potential to significantly increase the usage of laboratory animals for what may be considered redundant testing. Specific requirements for the importation of Leptospira vaccines in the United States, Europe, and Mexico were presented as well as efforts to reduce the use of laboratory animal testing through the availability of internationally recognized tests. Copyright © 2013 The International Alliance for Biological Standardization. All rights reserved.

  9. MrgX2 is a high potency cortistatin receptor expressed in dorsal root ganglion.

    PubMed

    Robas, Nicola; Mead, Emma; Fidock, Mark

    2003-11-07

    MrgX2 is a recently identified orphan G-protein-coupled receptor whose ligand and physiological function were unknown. Here we describe cortistatin, a neuropeptide for which no specific receptor has been identified previously, as a high potency ligand at MrgX2. Cortistatin has several biological functions including roles in sleep regulation, locomotor activity, and cortical function. Using a "reverse pharmacology" approach, we have identified a number of additional cyclic peptide agonists for MrgX2, determined their rank order of potency, and demonstrated that this receptor has a pharmacological profile distinct from the other characterized members of the Mrg (Mas-related genes) family. In MrgX2-expressing cells, cortistatin-stimulated increases in intracellular Ca2+ but had no effect on basal or forskolin-stimulated cAMP levels, suggesting that this receptor is Gq-coupled. Immunohistochemical and quantitative PCR studies show MrgX2 to have a limited expression profile, both peripheral and within the central nervous system, with highest levels in dorsal root ganglion.

  10. Ca(2+)-loading modulates potencies of cyclosporin A, Mg2+ and ADP to recouple permeabilized rat liver mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Andreyev AYu; Mikhaylova, L M; Starkov, A A; Kushnareva YuE

    1994-09-01

    We studied the relative potencies of cyclosporin A and endogenous effectors (Mg2+ and ADP) to recouple rat liver mitochondria permeabilized by different Ca(2+)-loading in a P(i)-containing medium. Recoupling efficiency of cyclosporin A dramatically decreased at high Ca(2+)-loading (approx. 100 nM of Ca2+/mg protein and more). Mitochondria permeabilized by high Ca2+ were recoupled with approximately equal efficiency by higher cyclosporin A concentrations or by adding 1-5 mM Mg2+ together with low concentrations of cyclosporin A while potentiating effect of ADP on the cyclosporin A recoupling potency was insignificant. Mg2+ ions at concentrations of 3 mM and higher also prevented the carboxyatractylate-induced reversion of cyclosporin A recoupling effect. The data point to competitive relationships between cyclosporin A and/or Mg2+ ions and Ca2+ ions for the site(s) regulating permeability state of the pore.

  11. Divergent fibroblast growth factor signaling pathways in lung fibroblast subsets: where do we go from here?

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Camp, Jordi; Morty, Rory E

    2015-10-15

    Lung fibroblasts play a key role in postnatal lung development, namely, the formation of the alveolar gas exchange units, through the process of secondary septation. Although evidence initially highlighted roles for fibroblasts in the production and remodeling of the lung extracellular matrix, more recent studies have described the presence of different fibroblast subsets in the developing lung. These subsets include myofibroblasts and lipofibroblasts and their precursors. These cells are believed to play different roles in alveologenesis and are localized to different regions of the developing septa. The precise roles played by these different fibroblast subsets remain unclear. Understanding the signaling pathways that control the discrete functions of these fibroblast subsets would help to clarify the roles and the regulation of lung fibroblasts during lung development. Here, we critically evaluate a recent report that described divergent fibroblast growth factor (FGF) signaling pathways in two different subsets of lung fibroblasts that express different levels of green fluorescent protein (GFP) driven by the platelet-derived growth factor receptor-α promoter. The GFP expression was used as a surrogate for lipofibroblasts (GFP(low)) and myofibroblasts (GFP(high)). It was suggested that Fgf10/Fgf1 and Fgf18/Fgfr3 autocrine pathways may be operative in GFP(low) and GFP(high) cells, respectively, and that these pathways might regulate the proliferation and migration of different fibroblast subsets during alveologenesis. These observations lay important groundwork for the further exploration of FGF function during normal lung development, as well as in aberrant lung development associated with bronchopulmonary dysplasia.

  12. Aging effects on T-bet expression in human B cell subsets.

    PubMed

    Frasca, Daniela; Diaz, Alain; Romero, Maria; D'Eramo, Francesca; Blomberg, Bonnie B

    2017-04-24

    In order to compare human and mouse B cell subset markers, we evaluated T-bet expression in human B cell subsets from individuals of different ages. We found T-bet expressed in unstimulated memory more than naïve B cells, and more in young individuals. TLR7 stimulation up-regulated T-bet in all B cell subsets from young and elderly individuals, and more in the elderly. By fold-increase the best effect was seen in subsets of the elderly and especially in those that undergo class switch (naïve and IgM). We also evaluated CD11c expression, as T-bet+CD11c+ B cells are expanded in healthy elderly individuals and also in patients with autoimmunity. Similar to T-bet, CD11c expression was higher in memory than in naïve B cells, but no differences were observed between young and elderly individuals. After TLR7 stimulation, CD11c increases in all B cell subsets (especially in naïve and IgM) from the elderly. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Algorithm For Solution Of Subset-Regression Problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Verhaegen, Michel

    1991-01-01

    Reliable and flexible algorithm for solution of subset-regression problem performs QR decomposition with new column-pivoting strategy, enables selection of subset directly from originally defined regression parameters. This feature, in combination with number of extensions, makes algorithm very flexible for use in analysis of subset-regression problems in which parameters have physical meanings. Also extended to enable joint processing of columns contaminated by noise with those free of noise, without using scaling techniques.

  14. Distribution of B lymphocyte subsets in normal lymphoid tissue.

    PubMed Central

    Murray, L J; Swerdlow, S H; Habeshaw, J A

    1984-01-01

    Using the ABC avidin-biotin peroxidase techniques and a series of monoclonal antibodies against B cell associated antigens, the anatomical distribution of B lymphocyte subsets was studied in reactive lymph node, tonsil and spleen. Evidence is presented for at least five major phenotypically distinct B cell subsets, each localized to specific compartments of peripheral lymphoid tissue. The possible relationship of these subsets of B lymphocytes to activation, maturation and function in the B cell lineage is discussed. Images Fig. 2 PMID:6375918

  15. Structure-Potency Relationships for Epoxides in Allergic Contact Dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Roberts, David W; Aptula, Aynur; Api, Anne Marie

    2017-02-20

    Epoxides are known or proposed to be involved in skin sensitization in various ways. Some are encountered directly, and others have been shown to be formed abiotically and metabolically from various unsaturated chemicals. They can react as SN2 electrophiles. To date no quantitative mechanistic models (QMMs) are known for skin sensitization potency of this subcategory of SN2 electrophiles. Here we have considered the reaction mechanistic chemistry of epoxides and combined published experimental kinetic data (rate constants k for reaction with a cysteine-based peptide) together with calculated hydrophobicity data (logP) to derive a QMM correlating potency in the local lymph node assay (LLNA), expressed as EC3, with a relative alkylation index (RAI, calculated as logk + 0.4 logP). The QMM equation, pEC3 = 2.42(±0.26) RAI + 4.04 (±0.25), n = 9, R(2) = 0.928, R(2)(adj) = 0.917, F = 90, s = 0.18, fits the data well, with one positive outlier. The outlier can be rationalized by its exhibiting an alert for oxidation of an amine moiety to give, in this case, the highly reactive glycidaldehyde. The epoxide QMM predicts the potency of a nonepoxide SN2 electrophile (predicted EC3, 0.48%; observed EC3, 0.5%), which suggests that it could form the basis for a more general H-polar SN2 QMM that could be a valuable tool in skin sensitization risk assessment for this quite extensive and structurally diverse reaction mechanistic domain.

  16. Establishing Criteria for Human Mesenchymal Stem Cell Potency

    PubMed Central

    Samsonraj, Rebekah M.; Rai, Bina; Sathiyanathan, Padmapriya; Puan, Kia Joo; Rötzschke, Olaf; Hui, James H.; Raghunath, Michael; Stanton, Lawrence W.; Nurcombe, Victor

    2015-01-01

    Abstract This study sought to identify critical determinants of mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) potency using in vitro and in vivo attributes of cells isolated from the bone marrow of age‐ and sex‐matched donors. Adherence to plastic was not indicative of potency, yet capacity for long‐term expansion in vitro varied considerably between donors, allowing the grouping of MSCs from the donors into either those with high‐growth capacity or low‐growth capacity. Using this grouping strategy, high‐growth capacity MSCs were smaller in size, had greater colony‐forming efficiency, and had longer telomeres. Cell‐surface biomarker analysis revealed that the International Society for Cellular Therapy (ISCT) criteria did not distinguish between high‐growth capacity and low‐growth capacity MSCs, whereas STRO‐1 and platelet‐derived growth factor receptor alpha were preferentially expressed on high‐growth capacity MSCs. These cells also had the highest mean expression of the mRNA transcripts TWIST‐1 and DERMO‐1. Irrespective of these differences, both groups of donor MSCs produced similar levels of key growth factors and cytokines involved in tissue regeneration and were capable of multilineage differentiation. However, high‐growth capacity MSCs produced approximately double the volume of mineralized tissue compared to low‐growth capacity MSCs when assessed for ectopic bone‐forming ability. The additional phenotypic criteria presented in this study when combined with the existing ISCT minimum criteria and working proposal will permit an improved assessment of MSC potency and provide a basis for establishing the quality of MSCs prior to their therapeutic application. Stem Cells 2015;33:1878–1891 PMID:25752682

  17. Cannabis-induced psychosis associated with high potency "wax dabs".

    PubMed

    Pierre, Joseph M; Gandal, Michael; Son, Maya

    2016-04-01

    With mounting evidence that the risk of cannabis-induced psychosis may be related to both dose and potency of tetrahydrocannbinol (THC), increasing reports of psychosis associated with cannabinoids containing greater amounts of THC are anticipated. We report two cases of emergent psychosis after using a concentrated THC extract known as cannabis "wax," "oil," or "dabs" raising serious concerns about its psychotic liability. Although "dabbing" with cannabis wax is becoming increasingly popular in the US for both recreational and "medicinal" intentions, our cases raise serious concerns about its psychotic liability and highlight the importance of understanding this risk by physicians recommending cannabinoids for purported medicinal purposes.

  18. Active conformations of neotame and other high-potency sweeteners.

    PubMed

    Walters, D E; Prakash, I; Desai, N

    2000-03-23

    We carried out extensive conformational analysis of three high-potency sweeteners: neotame, superaspartame, and SC-45647. We then identified six possible pharmacophore features (carboxylate, two hydrophobic groups, and three NH groups) and wrote a computer program to exhaustively compare intramolecular distances among all possible sets of five-point pharmacophores (carboxylate + two hydrophobic groups + two NH groups) for the three compounds. The best pharmacophore model superimposes low-energy conformers of the three compounds in such a way that the five pharmacophore points match well both sterically and with respect to orientation of hydrogen bond donors and acceptors.

  19. Moral status revisited: the challenge of reversed potency.

    PubMed

    Baertschi, Bernard; Mauron, Alexandre

    2010-02-01

    Moral status is a vexing topic. Linked for so long to the unending debates about ensoulment and the morality of abortion, it has recently resurfaced in the embryonic stem cell controversy. In this new context, it should benefit from new insights originating in recent scientific advances. We believe that the recently observed capability of somatic cells to return to a pluripotential state (a capability we propose to name 'reversed potency') in a controlled manner requires us to modify the traditional concept of moral status and to consider it as referring not only to intrinsic properties (like 'to possess reason' or 'to be a person'), but also to extrinsic or relational ones.

  20. Dendritic cell subsets digested: RNA sensing makes the difference!

    PubMed

    Buschow, Sonja I; Figdor, Carl G

    2010-02-26

    In this issue of Immunity, Luber et al. (2010) report a comprehensive quantitative proteome of in vivo mouse spleen dendritic cell (DC) subsets: a data set of encyclopedic value already revealing that DC subsets exploit different RNA sensors for virus recognition. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. ';Best' Practices for Aggregating Subset Results from Archived Datasets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baskin, W. E.; Perez, J.

    2013-12-01

    In response to the exponential growth in science data analysis and visualization capabilities Data Centers have been developing new delivery mechanisms to package and deliver large volumes of aggregated subsets of archived data. New standards are evolving to help data providers and application programmers deal with growing needs of the science community. These standards evolve from the best practices gleaned from new products and capabilities. The NASA Atmospheric Sciences Data Center (ASDC) has developed and deployed production provider-specific search and subset web applications for the CALIPSO, CERES, TES, and MOPITT missions. This presentation explores several use cases that leverage aggregated subset results and examines the standards and formats ASDC developers applied to the delivered files as well as the implementation strategies for subsetting and processing the aggregated products. The following topics will be addressed: - Applications of NetCDF CF conventions to aggregated level 2 satellite subsets - Data-Provider-Specific format requirements vs. generalized standards - Organization of the file structure of aggregated NetCDF subset output - Global Attributes of individual subsetted files vs. aggregated results - Specific applications and framework used for subsetting and delivering derivative data files

  2. Indirect Positive Evidence in the Acquisition of a Subset Grammar

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schwartz, Misha; Goad, Heather

    2017-01-01

    This article proposes that second language learners can use indirect positive evidence (IPE) to acquire a phonological grammar that is a subset of their L1 grammar. IPE is evidence from errors in the learner's L1 made by native speakers of the learner's L2. It has been assumed that subset grammars may be acquired using direct or indirect negative…

  3. Bridging the Gap Between Validation and Implementation of Non-Animal Veterinary Vaccine Potency Testing Methods

    PubMed Central

    Dozier, Samantha; Brown, Jeffrey; Currie, Alistair

    2011-01-01

    Simple Summary Many vaccines are tested for quality in experiments that require the use of large numbers of animals in procedures that often cause significant pain and distress. Newer technologies have fostered the development of vaccine quality control tests that reduce or eliminate the use of animals, but the availability of these newer methods has not guaranteed their acceptance by regulators or use by manufacturers. We discuss a strategic approach that has been used to assess and ultimately increase the use of non-animal vaccine quality tests in the U.S. and U.K. Abstract In recent years, technologically advanced high-throughput techniques have been developed that replace, reduce or refine animal use in vaccine quality control tests. Following validation, these tests are slowly being accepted for use by international regulatory authorities. Because regulatory acceptance itself has not guaranteed that approved humane methods are adopted by manufacturers, various organizations have sought to foster the preferential use of validated non-animal methods by interfacing with industry and regulatory authorities. After noticing this gap between regulation and uptake by industry, we began developing a paradigm that seeks to narrow the gap and quicken implementation of new replacement, refinement or reduction guidance. A systematic analysis of our experience in promoting the transparent implementation of validated non-animal vaccine potency assays has led to the refinement of our paradigmatic process, presented here, by which interested parties can assess the local regulatory acceptance of methods that reduce animal use and integrate them into quality control testing protocols, or ensure the elimination of peripheral barriers to their use, particularly for potency and other tests carried out on production batches. PMID:26486625

  4. Comparison of potency of inhaled beclomethasone and budesonide in New Zealand: retrospective study of computerised general practice records

    PubMed Central

    Pethica, B D; Penrose, A; MacKenzie, D; Hall, J; Beasley, R; Tilyard, M

    1998-01-01

    Objective To determine whether inhaled budesonide and beclomethasone are equipotent in the treatment of asthma in primary care. Design Retrospective study of computerised clinical records from 28 general practices in New Zealand. Subjects 5930 patients who received 16 725 prescriptions for inhaled budesonide or beclomethasone from 1 July 1994 to 30 June 1995. Setting General practices on the database of the Royal New Zealand College of General Practitioners Research Unit. Linked information from secondary care was available for a subset of the practices. Main outcome measure Mean prescribed daily inhaled corticosteroid dose. Results The daily prescribed dose was higher for patients receiving inhaled budesonide (mean 979 μg) than beclomethasone (mean 635 μg), a difference of 344 μg (95% confidence interval 313 to 376 μg). This difference was consistent in all age bands and with different types of inhalation device. Evidence of systematic prescribing of higher doses of budesonide to patients with more severe asthma was not found. Conclusions In primary care in New Zealand evidence suggests that budesonide is less potent than beclomethasone. Consideration of validated, established, and other possible markers of asthma severity did not support confounding by severity as a reason for the higher prescribed doses of budesonide. Pending further epidemiological evaluation, international asthma guidelines may need to be modified on the equivalence of inhaled corticosteroid doses. Furthermore, the comparative potency of newly developed inhaled steroids in clinical trials will need to be confirmed in appropriately designed epidemiological studies based in general practice. Key messagesImportant limitations of the randomised clinical trials comparing beclomethasone and budesonide have usually resulted in failure to detect differences in potencyIn this study using a computerised database in primary care inhaled budesonide had about two thirds of the potency of inhaled

  5. Stromal Cell Subsets Directing Neonatal Spleen Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Jonathan K. H.; Watanabe, Takeshi

    2017-01-01

    Development of lymphoid tissue is determined by interactions between stromal lymphoid tissue organiser (LTo) and hematopoietic lymphoid tissue inducer (LTi) cells. A failure for LTo to receive appropriate activating signals during embryogenesis through lymphotoxin engagement leads to a complete cessation of lymph node (LN) and Peyer’s patch development, identifying LTo as a key stromal population for lymphoid tissue organogenesis. However, little is known about the equivalent stromal cells that induce spleen development. Here, by dissociating neonatal murine spleen stromal tissue for re-aggregation and transplant into adult mouse recipients, we have identified a MAdCAM-1+CD31+CD201+ spleen stromal organizer cell-type critical for new tissue formation. This finding provides an insight into the regulation of post-natal spleen tissue organogenesis, and could be exploited in the development of spleen regenerative therapies. PMID:28067323

  6. B7-H1–expressing antigen-presenting cells mediate polarization of protumorigenic Th22 subsets

    PubMed Central

    Kuang, Dong-Ming; Xiao, Xiao; Zhao, Qiyi; Chen, Min-Min; Li, Xue-Feng; Liu, Rui-Xian; Wei, Yuan; Ouyang, Fang-Zhu; Chen, Dong-Ping; Wu, Yan; Lao, Xiang-Ming; Deng, Hong; Zheng, Limin

    2014-01-01

    Classical IL-22–producing T helper cells (Th22 cells) mediate inflammatory responses independently of IFN-γ and IL-17; however, nonclassical Th22 cells have been recently identified and coexpress IFN-γ and/or IL-17 along with IL-22. Little is known about how classical and nonclassical Th22 subsets in human diseases are regulated. Here, we used samples of human blood, normal and peritumoral liver, and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) to delineate the phenotype, distribution, generation, and functional relevance of various Th22 subsets. Three nonclassical Th22 subsets constituted the majority of all Th22 cells in human liver and HCC tissues, although the classical Th22 subset was predominant in blood. Monocytes activated by TLR2 and TLR4 agonists served as the antigen-presenting cells (APCs) that most efficiently triggered the expansion of nonclassical Th22 subsets from memory T cells and classical Th22 subsets from naive T cells. Moreover, B7-H1–expressing monocytes skewed Th22 polarization away from IFN-γ and toward IL-17 through interaction with programmed death 1 (PD-1), an effect that can create favorable conditions for in vivo aggressive cancer growth and angiogenesis. Our results provide insight into the selective modulation of Th22 subsets and suggest that strategies to influence functional activities of inflammatory cells may benefit anticancer therapy. PMID:25244097

  7. Selective Recruitment of T-Cell Subsets to the Udder during Staphylococcal and Streptococcal Mastitis: Analysis of Lymphocyte Subsets and Adhesion Molecule Expression

    PubMed Central

    Soltys, Jindrich; Quinn, Mark T.

    1999-01-01

    During bacterial infection of the bovine mammary gland, large numbers of leukocytes migrate into the udder, resulting in the establishment of a host response against the pathogen. Currently, the specific leukocyte populations mediating this immune response are not well defined. In the studies described here, we analyzed blood and milk from healthy cows and cows with naturally occurring mastitis to determine if distinct αβ and γδ T-lymphocyte subsets were involved in the response of the udder to a mastitis pathogen and if the type of mastitis pathogen influenced the subset composition of these responding leukocytes. Although blood samples from cows with confirmed staphylococcal and streptococcal mastitis were characterized by increased numbers of γδ T cells, the most dramatic changes in leukocyte distributions occurred in milk samples from these cows, with a 75% increase in αβ T-cell levels and a 100% increase in γδ T-cell levels relative to the levels in milk samples from healthy animals. Interestingly, the increase in αβ T-cell numbers observed in milk from cows with staphylococcal mastitis was primarily due to increased numbers of CD4+ T cells, while the increase in αβ T-cell numbers observed in cows with streptococcal mastitis was due to a parallel increase in both CD4+ and CD8+ T-cell numbers. The increased numbers of γδ T cells in milk from cows with staphylococcal and streptococcal mastitis were due to a selective recruitment of a distinct γδ T-cell subset (GD3.1+), while no change in the numbers of GD197+ γδ T cells was observed. We also analyzed adhesion protein expression on blood and milk leukocytes and found that, in comparison to the situation for healthy cows, L-selectin was down-regulated and CD18 was up-regulated on leukocytes from cows with mastitis. Thus, shedding of L-selectin and up-regulation of CD18 by neutrophils may provide a sensitive indicator of early inflammatory responses during bovine mastitis. Overall, these studies

  8. Geohydrology, geochemistry, geothermal potency of Rianiate Toba Lake North Sumatera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nainggolan, Juliper; Sitepu, Cristin; Pardede, Sanggam; Diantoro, Markus

    2017-09-01

    This research was performed to determine the potency of Rianiate’s geothermal an alternative of energy source and determine the types of geothermal that was begun with the position’s measurement by using GPS (Global Position System), and then the direct observation of chemical and physical properties such as pH, surface’s temperature, color etc. The following steps were taking sample in four different springs indicated by spring 1, spring 2, spring 3, and spring 4. The chemical nature was measured by titrimetry method by using AAS, XRD, and gas Chromathology. The calculating of temperature of subsurface has done by using geothermometer and sequentially followed by geothermal potency’s calculation. The position of four springs are located about N: 02° 31,852’ and E: 098° 44. 021’ where were average height from sea’s level is 958 m. The highest surface’s temperature is 80 °C and the temperature under soil is about 130.5 °C described the average of geothermal. The calculation of content of chloride, sulfate, bicarbonations revealed that the water can be categorized as chloride type. The trilateral diagram Na/1000 – K/100 - √Mg of hot water is in the regime of immature water. From the calculation of Indonesia’s Standardized Geotherm, it was obtained that the estimated reservoir potency of Rianiate geotherm is 2,68 MWe.

  9. Antibody engineering for increased potency, breadth and half-life

    PubMed Central

    Sievers, Stuart A.; Scharf, Louise; West, Anthony P.; Bjorkman, Pamela J.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose of review This review highlights recent developments in HIV-1 antibody engineering and discusses the effects of increased polyreactivity on serum half-lives of engineered antibodies. Recent findings Recent studies have uncovered a wealth of information about the relationship between the sequences and efficacies of anti-HIV-1 antibodies through a combination of bioinformatics, structural characterization and in vivo studies. This knowledge has stimulated efforts to enhance antibody breadth and potency for therapeutic use. Although some engineered antibodies have shown increased polyreactivity and short half-lives, promising efforts are circumventing these problems. Summary Antibodies are desirable as therapeutics due to their ability to recognize targets with both specificity and high affinity. Furthermore, the ability of antibodies to stimulate Fc-mediated effector functions can increase their utility. Thus, mAbs have become central to strategies for the treatment of various diseases. Using both targeted and library-based approaches, antibodies can be engineered to improve their therapeutic properties. This article will discuss recent antibody engineering efforts to improve the breadth and potency of anti-HIV-1 antibodies. The polyreactivity of engineered HIV-1 bNAbs and the effect on serum half-life will be explored along with strategies to overcome problems introduced by engineering antibodies. Finally, advances in creating bispecific anti-HIV-1 reagents are discussed. PMID:25760931

  10. Conformationally selective biophysical assay for influenza vaccine potency determination.

    PubMed

    Wen, Yingxia; Han, Liqun; Palladino, Giuseppe; Ferrari, Annette; Xie, Yuhong; Carfi, Andrea; Dormitzer, Philip R; Settembre, Ethan C

    2015-10-05

    Influenza vaccines are the primary intervention for reducing the substantial health burden from pandemic and seasonal influenza. Hemagglutinin (HA) is the most important influenza vaccine antigen. Subunit and split influenza vaccines are formulated, released for clinical use, and tested for stability based on an in vitro potency assay, single-radial immunodiffusion (SRID), which selectively detects HA that is immunologically active (capable of eliciting neutralizing or hemagglutination inhibiting antibodies in an immunized subject). The time consuming generation of strain-specific sheep antisera and calibrated antigen standards for SRID can delay vaccine release. The limitation in generating SRID reagents was evident during the early days of the 2009 pandemic, prompting efforts to develop more practical, alternative, quantitative assays for immunologically active HA. Here we demonstrate that, under native conditions, trypsin selectively digests HA produced from egg or mammalian cell in monovalent vaccines that is altered by stress conditions such as reduced pH, elevated temperature, or deamidation, leaving native, pre-fusion HA, intact. Subsequent reverse-phase high pressure liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC) can separate trypsin-resistant HA from the digested HA. Integration of the resulting RP-HPLC peak yields HA quantities that match well the values obtained by SRID. Therefore, trypsin digestion, to pre-select immunologically active HA, followed by quantification by RP-HPLC is a promising alternative in vitro potency assay for influenza vaccines.

  11. Relationship between T-lymphocyte Subsets and Suppressor Cell Activity in Patients with Chronic Active Hepatitis B

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Tae Won; Koo, Ja Young; Park, Byung Chae

    1989-01-01

    Thirty-nine patients with chronic HBV infection and 38 normal persons were investigated by simultaneous assay of T suppressor cell function and enumeration of T-lymphocyte subsets by monoclonal antibodies. In patients with chronic active hepatitis B (CAH-B), T suppressor cell activity (17.8±8.8%) was significantly lower than in healthy HBsAg carriers (35.4 ± 12.3%) and normal control persons (38.3±16.3%). The proportions of T-lymphocyte subsets in patients with CAH-B were not different from those of healthy HBsAg carriers and control persons. No correlation was observed in between percentage suppression and proportions of T-lymphocyte subsets. These findings suggest that in the absence of a simultaneous assay of function, enumeration of T-lymphocyte subsets by using monoclonal antibodies is an inadequate assessment of immune regulation. PMID:2535041

  12. Evidence for the opposing roles of different gamma delta T cell subsets in macrophage homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Tramonti, Daniela; Andrew, Elizabeth M; Rhodes, Kate; Newton, Darren J; Carding, Simon R

    2006-07-01

    To ensure invading pathogens are eliminated with minimal damage to host tissues it is essential that macrophage activation be tightly regulated. Previously we demonstrated that a subset of gammadelta T cells (Vgamma1(+)) contributes to resolving pathogen-induced immune responses by killing activated macrophages. However, the exaggerated macrophage response seen in infected Vgamma1(+) T cell-deficient mice suggests that gammadelta T cells play a broader role in macrophage homeostasis and other subsets might promote macrophage activation. Using a macrophage:gammadelta T cell co-culture system we have shown that gammadelta T cells increase the activity of macrophages activated in vivo by Listeria monocytogenes infection. In a dose-dependent manner, gammadelta T cells up-regulated production of cytokines (TNF-alpha, IL-6, IL-10) and chemokines (MIP-1alpha, MIP-1beta) by Listeria-elicited macrophages. The ability to increase macrophage cytokine production was prominent among Vgamma4(+) gammadelta T cells. Reciprocally, Vgamma4(+) gammadelta T cells were activated by Listeria-elicited macrophages, resulting in production of the anti-inflammatory cytokine, IL-10. gammadelta T cell adoptive transfer experiments showed that Vgamma4(+) T cells protected TCRdelta(-/-) mice against Listeria-induced liver injury and necrosis. These findings identify distinct and non-overlapping roles for gammadelta T cell subsets in regulating macrophage function during pathogen-induced immune responses.

  13. A statistical approach towards the derivation of predictive gene sets for potency ranking of chemicals in the mouse embryonic stem cell test.

    PubMed

    Schulpen, Sjors H W; Pennings, Jeroen L A; Tonk, Elisa C M; Piersma, Aldert H

    2014-03-21

    The embryonic stem cell test (EST) is applied as a model system for detection of embryotoxicants. The application of transcriptomics allows a more detailed effect assessment compared to the morphological endpoint. Genes involved in cell differentiation, modulated by chemical exposures, may be useful as biomarkers of developmental toxicity. We describe a statistical approach to obtain a predictive gene set for toxicity potency ranking of compounds within one class. This resulted in a gene set based on differential gene expression across concentration-response series of phthalatic monoesters. We determined the concentration at which gene expression was changed at least 1.5-fold. Genes responding with the same potency ranking in vitro and in vivo embryotoxicity were selected. A leave-one-out cross-validation showed that the relative potency of each phthalate was always predicted correctly. The classical morphological 50% effect level (ID50) in EST was similar to the predicted concentration using gene set expression responses. A general down-regulation of development-related genes and up-regulation of cell-cycle related genes was observed, reminiscent of the differentiation inhibition in EST. This study illustrates the feasibility of applying dedicated gene set selections as biomarkers for developmental toxicity potency ranking on the basis of in vitro testing in the EST.

  14. Feature Subset Selection for Cancer Classification Using Weight Local Modularity

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Guodong; Wu, Yan

    2016-01-01

    Microarray is recently becoming an important tool for profiling the global gene expression patterns of tissues. Gene selection is a popular technology for cancer classification that aims to identify a small number of informative genes from thousands of genes that may contribute to the occurrence of cancers to obtain a high predictive accuracy. This technique has been extensively studied in recent years. This study develops a novel feature selection (FS) method for gene subset selection by utilizing the Weight Local Modularity (WLM) in a complex network, called the WLMGS. In the proposed method, the discriminative power of gene subset is evaluated by using the weight local modularity of a weighted sample graph in the gene subset where the intra-class distance is small and the inter-class distance is large. A higher local modularity of the gene subset corresponds to a greater discriminative of the gene subset. With the use of forward search strategy, a more informative gene subset as a group can be selected for the classification process. Computational experiments show that the proposed algorithm can select a small subset of the predictive gene as a group while preserving classification accuracy. PMID:27703256

  15. Feature Subset Selection for Cancer Classification Using Weight Local Modularity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Guodong; Wu, Yan

    2016-10-01

    Microarray is recently becoming an important tool for profiling the global gene expression patterns of tissues. Gene selection is a popular technology for cancer classification that aims to identify a small number of informative genes from thousands of genes that may contribute to the occurrence of cancers to obtain a high predictive accuracy. This technique has been extensively studied in recent years. This study develops a novel feature selection (FS) method for gene subset selection by utilizing the Weight Local Modularity (WLM) in a complex network, called the WLMGS. In the proposed method, the discriminative power of gene subset is evaluated by using the weight local modularity of a weighted sample graph in the gene subset where the intra-class distance is small and the inter-class distance is large. A higher local modularity of the gene subset corresponds to a greater discriminative of the gene subset. With the use of forward search strategy, a more informative gene subset as a group can be selected for the classification process. Computational experiments show that the proposed algorithm can select a small subset of the predictive gene as a group while preserving classification accuracy.

  16. Role of memory T cell subsets for adoptive immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Busch, Dirk H; Fräßle, Simon P; Sommermeyer, Daniel; Buchholz, Veit R; Riddell, Stanley R

    2016-02-01

    Adoptive transfer of primary (unmodified) or genetically engineered antigen-specific T cells has demonstrated astonishing clinical results in the treatment of infections and some malignancies. Besides the definition of optimal targets and antigen receptors, the differentiation status of transferred T cells is emerging as a crucial parameter for generating cell products with optimal efficacy and safety profiles. Long-living memory T cells subdivide into phenotypically as well as functionally different subsets (e.g. central memory, effector memory, tissue-resident memory T cells). This diversification process is crucial for effective immune protection, with probably distinct dependencies on the presence of individual subsets dependent on the disease to which the immune response is directed as well as its organ location. Adoptive T cell therapy intends to therapeutically transfer defined T cell immunity into patients. Efficacy of this approach often requires long-term maintenance of transferred cells, which depends on the presence and persistence of memory T cells. However, engraftment and survival of highly differentiated memory T cell subsets upon adoptive transfer is still difficult to achieve. Therefore, the recent observation that a distinct subset of weakly differentiated memory T cells shows all characteristics of adult tissue stem cells and can reconstitute all types of effector and memory T cell subsets, became highly relevant. We here review our current understanding of memory subset formation and T cell subset purification, and its implications for adoptive immunotherapy.

  17. Phenotypic Characterization of Five Dendritic Cell Subsets in Human Tonsils

    PubMed Central

    Summers, Kelly L.; Hock, Barry D.; McKenzie, Judith L.; Hart, Derek N. J.

    2001-01-01

    Heterogeneous expression of several antigens on the three currently defined tonsil dendritic cell (DC) subsets encouraged us to re-examine tonsil DCs using a new method that minimized DC differentiation and activation during their preparation. Three-color flow cytometry and dual-color immunohistology was used in conjunction with an extensive panel of antibodies to relevant DC-related antigens to analyze lin− HLA-DR+ tonsil DCs. Here we identify, quantify, and locate five tonsil DC subsets based on their relative expression of the HLA-DR, CD11c, CD13, and CD123 antigens. In situ localization identified four of these DC subsets as distinct interdigitating DC populations. These included three new interdigitating DC subsets defined as HLA-DRhi CD11c+ DCs, HLA-DRmod CD11c+ CD13+ DCs, and HLA-DRmod CD11c− CD123− DCs, as well as the plasmacytoid DCs (HLA-DRmod CD11c− CD123+). These subsets differed in their expression of DC-associated differentiation/activation antigens and co-stimulator molecules including CD83, CMRF-44, CMRF-56, 2-7, CD86, and 4-1BB ligand. The fifth HLA-DRmod CD11c+ DC subset was identified as germinal center DCs, but contrary to previous reports they are redefined as lacking the CD13 antigen. The definition and extensive phenotypic analysis of these five DC subsets in human tonsil extends our understanding of the complexity of DC biology. PMID:11438475

  18. Extracellular Ionic Locks Determine Variation in Constitutive Activity and Ligand Potency between Species Orthologs of the Free Fatty Acid Receptors FFA2 and FFA3*

    PubMed Central

    Hudson, Brian D.; Tikhonova, Irina G.; Pandey, Sunil K.; Ulven, Trond; Milligan, Graeme

    2012-01-01

    Free fatty acid receptors 2 and 3 (FFA2 and FFA3) are G protein-coupled receptors for short chain free fatty acids (SCFAs). They respond to the same set of endogenous ligands but with distinct rank-order of potency such that acetate (C2) has been described as FFA2-selective, whereas propionate (C3) is non-selective. Although C2 was confirmed to be selective for human FFA2 over FFA3, this ligand was not selective between the mouse orthologs. Moreover, although C3 was indeed not selective between the human orthologs, it displayed clear selectivity for mouse FFA3 over mouse FFA2. This altered selectivity to C2 and C3 resulted from broad differences in SCFAs potency at the mouse orthologs. In studies to define the molecular basis for these observations, marked variation in ligand-independent constitutive activity was identified using a [35S]GTPγS assay. The orthologs with higher potency for the SCFAs, human FFA2 and mouse FFA3, displayed high constitutive activity in this assay, whereas the orthologs with lower potency for the agonist ligands, mouse FFA2 and human FFA3, did not. Sequence alignments of the second extracellular loop identified single negatively charged residues in FFA2 and FFA3 not conserved between species and predicted to form ionic lock interactions with arginine residues within the FFA2 or FFA3 agonist binding pocket to regulate constitutive activity and SCFA potency. Reciprocal mutation of these residues between species orthologs resulted in the induction (or repression) of constitutive activity and in most cases also yielded corresponding changes in SCFA potency. PMID:23066016

  19. Blood B Cell and Regulatory Subset Content in Multiple Sclerosis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Habib, Jakob; Deng, Jiusheng; Lava, Neil; Tyor, William; Galipeau, Jacques

    2015-01-01

    Objective B cell targeted therapies have been effective in slowing multiple sclerosis (MS) disease progression suggesting a direct causal link for this lymphoid subset. A small subset of B cells with regulative properties (Bregs) exists in peripheral blood, and induction of Bregs ameliorates experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), the murine model for MS. Therefore the frequency of B cell subsets and regulatory B cells in particular in peripheral blood of MS patients is of interest. Methods The phenotype and frequency of B cell subsets in peripheral blood from 32 MS patients and 34 healthy controls (HC) were examined using flow cytometry. Results We found that there is an increase in CD19+ cell number in MS 1347 ± 159 cells/μL, (average ± SEM) compared to HC, 935 ± 129 cells/μL and no apparent deficiency in B-cells with a regulatory phenotype. In addition, we observed a loss of correlation between CD19+ B cells and total lymphocyte count in MS. Conclusion These findings suggest altered blood B-cell homeostasis in MS patients. PMID:26137596

  20. Relative potencies and combination effects of steroidal estrogens in fish.

    PubMed

    Thorpe, Karen L; Cummings, Rob I; Hutchinson, Thomas H; Scholze, Martin; Brighty, Geoff; Sumpter, John P; Tyler, Charles R

    2003-03-15

    The natural steroids estradiol-17beta (E2) and estrone (E1) and the synthetic steroid ethynylestradiol-17alpha (EE2) have frequently been measured in waters receiving domestic effluents. All of these steroids bind to the estrogen receptor(s) and have been shown to elicit a range of estrogenic responses in fish at environmentally relevant concentrations. At present, however, no relative potency estimates have been derived for either the individual steroidal estrogens or their mixtures in vivo. In this study the estrogenic activity of E2, E1, and EE2, and the combination effects of a mixture of E2 and EE2 (equi-potent fixed-ratio mixture), were assessed using vitellogenin induction in a 14-day in vivo juvenile rainbow trout screening assay. Median effective concentrations, relative to E2, for induction of vitellogenin were determined from the concentration-response curves and the relative estrogenic potencies of each of the test chemicals calculated. Median effective concentrations were between 19 and 26 ng L(-1) for E2, 60 ng L(-1) for E1, and between 0.95 and 1.8 ng L(-1) for EE2, implying that EE2 was approximately 11 to 27 times more potent than E2, while E2 was 2.3 to 3.2 times more potent than E1. The median effective concentration, relative to E2, for the binary mixture of E2 and EE2 was 15 ng L(-1) (comprising 14.4 ng L(-1) E2 and 0.6 ng L(-1) EE2). Using the model of concentration addition it was shown that this activity of the binary mixture could be predicted from the activity of the individual chemicals. The ability of each individual steroid to contribute to the overall effect of a mixture, even at individual no-effect concentrations, combined with the high estrogenic potency of the steroids, particularly the synthetic steroid EE2, emphasizes the need to consider the total estrogenic load of these chemicals in our waterways.

  1. LM potencies: one of the hidden treasures of the sixth edition of the Organon.

    PubMed

    De Schepper, L

    1999-07-01

    50 millesimal (LM) potencies have great advantages for all patients, not just those who are hypersensitive because of their great power to heal without major aggravations. Before discussing their advantages this paper describes what LM potencies are, and how they are administered, then addresses two questions: why do we want to avoid aggravations if most homeopaths look for aggravation to know if the remedy is working? And if LM potencies are indeed superior, why are they still relatively unknown and unused?

  2. New analogs of the CART peptide with anorexigenic potency: the importance of individual disulfide bridges.

    PubMed

    Blechová, Miroslava; Nagelová, Veronika; Záková, Lenka; Demianová, Zuzana; Zelezná, Blanka; Maletínská, Lenka

    2013-01-01

    The CART (cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript) peptide is an anorexigenic neuropeptide that acts in the hypothalamus. The receptor and the mechanism of action of this peptide are still unknown. In our previous study, we showed that the CART peptide binds specifically to PC12 rat pheochromocytoma cells in both the native and differentiated into neuronal phenotype. Two biologically active forms, CART(55-102) and CART(61-102), with equal biological activity, contain three disulfide bridges. To clarify the importance of each of these disulfide bridges in maintaining the biological activity of CART(61-102), an Ala scan at particular S-S bridges forming cysteines was performed, and analogs with only one or two disulfide bridges were synthesized. In this study, a stabilized CART(61-102) analog with norleucine instead of methionine at position 67 was also prepared and was found to bind to PC12 cells with an anorexigenic potency similar to that of CART(61-102). The binding study revealed that out of all analogs tested, [Ala(68,86)]CART(61-102), which contains two disulfide bridges (positions 74-94 and 88-101), preserved a high affinity to both native PC12 cells and those that had been differentiated into neurons. In food intake and behavioral tests with mice after intracerebroventricular administration, this analog showed strong and long-lasting anorexigenic potency. Therefore, the disulfide bridge between cysteines 68 and 86 in CART(61-102) can be omitted without a loss of biological activity, but the preservation of two other disulfide bridges and the full-length peptide are essential for biological activity. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Social isolation rearing increases dopamine uptake and psychostimulant potency in the striatum.

    PubMed

    Yorgason, Jordan T; Calipari, Erin S; Ferris, Mark J; Karkhanis, Anushree N; Fordahl, Steven C; Weiner, Jeffrey L; Jones, Sara R

    2016-02-01

    Social isolation rearing (SI) is a model of early life stress that results in neurobiological alterations leading to increased anxiety-like behaviors. These animals also exhibit an increased propensity to administer psychostimulants, such as cocaine; however, the mechanisms governing this increased addiction vulnerability remain to be elucidated. Long-term stressors have been shown to produce important alterations in nucleus accumbens core (NAc) function. The NAc regulates motivated and goal-directed behaviors, and individual differences in NAc function have been shown to be predictive of addiction vulnerability. Rats were reared in group (GH; 4/cage) or SI (1/cage) conditions from weaning (PD 28) into early adulthood (PD 77) and dopamine release was assessed using voltammetry in brain slices containing the NAc and dorsomedial striatum. SI rats exhibited enhanced dopamine release and uptake in both regions compared to GH rats. In regard to psychostimulant effects directly at the dopamine transporter (DAT), methylphenidate and amphetamine, but not cocaine, inhibited uptake more in SI than GH rats. The increased potencies were positively correlated with uptake rates, suggesting that increased potencies of amphetamine-like compounds are due to changes in DAT function. Cocaine's effects on uptake were similar between rearing conditions, however, cocaine enhanced evoked dopamine release greater in SI than GH rats, suggesting that the enhanced cocaine reinforcement in SI animals involves a DAT independent mechanism. Together, the results provide the first evidence that greater psychostimulant effects in SI compared to GH rats are due to effects on dopamine terminals related to uptake dependent and independent mechanisms.

  4. Social Isolation Rearing Increases Dopamine Uptake and Psychostimulant Potency in the Striatum

    PubMed Central

    Yorgason, Jordan T.; Calipari, Erin S.; Ferris, Mark J.; Karkhanis, Annushree N.; Fordahl, Steven C.; Weiner, Jeffrey L.; Jones, Sara R.

    2015-01-01

    Social isolation rearing (SI) is a model of early life stress that results in neurobiological alterations leading to increased anxiety-like behaviors. These animals also exhibit an increased propensity to administer psychostimulants, such as cocaine; however, the mechanisms governing this increased addiction vulnerability remains to be elucidated. Long-term stressors have been shown to produce important alterations in nucleus accumbens core (NAc) function. The NAc regulates motivated and goal-directed behaviors, and individual differences in NAc function have been shown to be predictive of addiction vulnerability. Rats were reared in group (GH; 4/cage) or SI (1/cage) conditions from weaning (PD 28) into early adulthood (PD 77) and dopamine release was assessed using voltammetry in brain slices containing the NAc and dorsomedial striatum. SI rats exhibited enhanced dopamine release and uptake in both regions compared to GH rats. In regard to psychostimulant effects directly at the dopamine transporter (DAT), methylphenidate and amphetamine, but not cocaine, inhibited uptake more in SI than GH rats. The increased potencies were positively correlated with uptake rates, suggesting that increased potencies of amphetamine-like compounds are due to changes in DAT function. Cocaine’s effects on uptake were similar between rearing conditions, however, cocaine enhanced evoked dopamine release greater in SI than GH rats, suggesting that the enhanced cocaine reinforcement in SI animals involves a DAT independent mechanism. Together, the results provide the first evidence that greater psychostimulant effects in SI compared to GH rats are due to effects on dopamine terminals related to uptake dependent and independent mechanisms. PMID:26525189

  5. Enantiomers of a nonylphenol isomer: absolute configurations and estrogenic potencies.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Haifeng; Oppel, Iris M; Spiteller, Michael; Guenther, Klaus; Boehmler, Gabriele; Zuehlke, Sebastian

    2009-02-01

    Enantiomers of 4-(1,1,2-trimethylhexyl)phenol, a chiral isomer of the endocrine disrupting chemical nonylphenol, have been resolved and isolated by preparative chiral HPLC. The absolute configurations of the enantiomers were then determined by an X-ray crystallographic study of the (-)-camphanoyl derivative of the first eluted enantiomer NP(35)E1. The first enantiomer (NP(35)E1) and the second enantiomer (NP(35)E2) eluted were found to have the S and R absolute configurations, respectively. The estrogenic potencies of the S and R enantiomers were tested by the E-screen assay. A slight difference was observed in the relative proliferative effect between the S enantiomer and R enantiomer in the E-screen assay.

  6. Biosorption potency of Aspergillus niger for removal of chromium (VI).

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Shaili; Thakur, Indu Shekhar

    2006-09-01

    Aspergillus niger isolated from soil and effluent of leather tanning mills had higher activity to remove chromium. The potency of Aspergillus niger was evaluated in shake flask culture by absorption of chromium at pH 6 and temperature 30 degrees C. The results of the study indicated removal of more than 75% chromium by Aspergillus niger determined by diphenylcarbazide colorimetric assay and atomic absorption spectrophotometry after 7 days. Study of microbial Cr(VI) reduction and identification of reduction intermediates has been hindered by the lack of analytical techniques that can identify the oxidation state with subcellular spatial resolution. Therefore, removal of chromium was further substantiated by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX), which indicated an accumulation of chromium in the fungal mycelium.

  7. Relative analgesic potencies of morphine and hydromorphone in postoperative pain.

    PubMed

    Mahler, D L; Forrest, W H

    1975-05-01

    Because of discrepancies in the estimates of the relative analgesic potencies of hydromorphone and morphine, the drugs were compared in two four-point, double-blind bioassays. In the first study, hydromorphone, 1 and 2 mg, was compared with morphine, 5 and 10 mg, in 31 postoperative patients; in the second, hydromorphone, 0.5 and 1 mg, was compared with morphine, 5 and 10 mg, in 112 postoperative patients. Subjective responses to nurse-observer questions were used to quantitate analgesia for postoperative pain. Hydromorphone is more potent than commonly believed: approximately 0.9 to 1.2 mg is equianalgesic with 10 mg of morphine, with a similar incidence of side effects.

  8. Stochastic subset selection for learning with kernel machines.

    PubMed

    Rhinelander, Jason; Liu, Xiaoping P

    2012-06-01

    Kernel machines have gained much popularity in applications of machine learning. Support vector machines (SVMs) are a subset of kernel machines and generalize well for classification, regression, and anomaly detection tasks. The training procedure for traditional SVMs involves solving a quadratic programming (QP) problem. The QP problem scales super linearly in computational effort with the number of training samples and is often used for the offline batch processing of data. Kernel machines operate by retaining a subset of observed data during training. The data vectors contained within this subset are referred to as support vectors (SVs). The work presented in this paper introduces a subset selection method for the use of kernel machines in online, changing environments. Our algorithm works by using a stochastic indexing technique when selecting a subset of SVs when computing the kernel expansion. The work described here is novel because it separates the selection of kernel basis functions from the training algorithm used. The subset selection algorithm presented here can be used in conjunction with any online training technique. It is important for online kernel machines to be computationally efficient due to the real-time requirements of online environments. Our algorithm is an important contribution because it scales linearly with the number of training samples and is compatible with current training techniques. Our algorithm outperforms standard techniques in terms of computational efficiency and provides increased recognition accuracy in our experiments. We provide results from experiments using both simulated and real-world data sets to verify our algorithm.

  9. Heterogeneous in vivo behavior of monocyte subsets in atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Swirski, Filip K; Weissleder, Ralph; Pittet, Mikael J

    2009-10-01

    Monocytes and macrophages play active roles in atherosclerosis, a chronic inflammatory disease that is a leading cause of death in the developed world. The prevailing paradigm states that, during human atherogenesis, monocytes accumulate in the arterial intima and differentiate into macrophages, which then ingest oxidized lipoproteins, secrete a diverse array of proinflammatory mediators, and eventually become foam cells, the key constituents of a vulnerable plaque. Yet monocytes are heterogeneous. In the mouse, one subset (Ly-6C(hi)) promotes inflammation, expands in hypercholesterolemic conditions, and selectively gives rise to macrophages in atheromata. A different subset (Ly-6C(lo)) attenuates inflammation and promotes angiogenesis and granulation tissue formation in models of tissue injury, but its role in atherosclerosis is largely unknown. In the human, monocyte heterogeneity is preserved but it is still unresolved how subsets correspond functionally. The contradistinctive properties of these cells suggest commitment for specific function before infiltrating tissue. Such commitment argues for discriminate targeting of deleterious subsets while sparing host defense and repair mechanisms. In addition to advancing our understanding of atherosclerosis, the ability to target and image monocyte subsets would allow us to evaluate drugs designed to selectively inhibit monocyte subset recruitment or function, and to stratify patients at risk for developing complications such as myocardial infarction or stroke. In this review we summarize recent advances of our understanding of the behavioral heterogeneity of monocytes during disease progression and outline emerging molecular imaging approaches to address key questions in the field.

  10. Domino: Extracting, Comparing, and Manipulating Subsets across Multiple Tabular Datasets

    PubMed Central

    Gratzl, Samuel; Gehlenborg, Nils; Lex, Alexander; Pfister, Hanspeter; Streit, Marc

    2016-01-01

    Answering questions about complex issues often requires analysts to take into account information contained in multiple interconnected datasets. A common strategy in analyzing and visualizing large and heterogeneous data is dividing it into meaningful subsets. Interesting subsets can then be selected and the associated data and the relationships between the subsets visualized. However, neither the extraction and manipulation nor the comparison of subsets is well supported by state-of-the-art techniques. In this paper we present Domino, a novel multiform visualization technique for effectively representing subsets and the relationships between them. By providing comprehensive tools to arrange, combine, and extract subsets, Domino allows users to create both common visualization techniques and advanced visualizations tailored to specific use cases. In addition to the novel technique, we present an implementation that enables analysts to manage the wide range of options that our approach offers. Innovative interactive features such as placeholders and live previews support rapid creation of complex analysis setups. We introduce the technique and the implementation using a simple example and demonstrate scalability and effectiveness in a use case from the field of cancer genomics. PMID:26356916

  11. SWAP-70 identifies a transitional subset of actin filaments in motile cells.

    PubMed

    Hilpelä, Pirta; Oberbanscheidt, Pia; Hahne, Penelope; Hund, Martin; Kalhammer, Georg; Small, J Victor; Bähler, Martin

    2003-08-01

    Functionally different subsets of actin filament arrays contribute to cellular organization and motility. We report the identification of a novel subset of loose actin filament arrays through regulated association with the widely expressed protein SWAP-70. These loose actin filament arrays were commonly located behind protruding lamellipodia and membrane ruffles. Visualization of these loose actin filament arrays was dependent on lamellipodial protrusion and the binding of the SWAP-70 PH-domain to a 3'-phosphoinositide. SWAP-70 with a functional pleckstrin homology-domain lacking the C-terminal 60 residues was targeted to the area of the loose actin filament arrays, but it did not associate with actin filaments. The C-terminal 60 residues were sufficient for actin filament association, but they provided no specificity for the subset of loose actin filament arrays. These results identify SWAP-70 as a phosphoinositide 3-kinase signaling-dependent marker for a distinct, hitherto unrecognized, array of actin filaments. Overexpression of SWAP-70 altered the actin organization and lamellipodial morphology. These alterations were dependent on a proper subcellular targeting of SWAP-70. We propose that SWAP-70 regulates the actin cytoskeleton as an effector or adaptor protein in response to agonist stimulated phosphatidylinositol (3,4)-bisphosphate production and cell protrusion.

  12. Dendritic cell subsets in the intestinal lamina propria: ontogeny and function.

    PubMed

    Persson, Emma K; Scott, Charlotte L; Mowat, Allan McI; Agace, William W

    2013-12-01

    The intestinal mucosa is exposed to large amounts of foreign antigen (Ag) derived from commensal bacteria, dietary Ags, and intestinal pathogens. Dendritic cells (DCs) are believed to be involved in the induction of tolerance to harmless Ags and in mounting protective immune responses to pathogens and, as such, to play key roles in regulating intestinal immune homeostasis. The characterization of classical DCs (cDCs) in the intestinal lamina propria has been under intense investigation in recent years but the use of markers (including CD11c, CD11b, MHC class II), which are also expressed by intestinal MΦs, has led to some controversy regarding their definition. Here we review recent studies that help to distinguish cDCs subsets from monocyte-derived cells in the intestinal mucosa. We address the phenotype and ontogeny of these cDC subsets and highlight recent findings indicating that these subsets play distinct roles in the regulation of mucosal immune responses in vivo.

  13. Sexual Function and the Use of Medical Devices or Drugs to Optimize Potency After Prostate Brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Whaley, J. Taylor; Levy, Lawrence B.; Swanson, David A.; Pugh, Thomas J.; Kudchadker, Rajat J.; Bruno, Teresa L.; Frank, Steven J.

    2012-04-01

    Purpose: Prospective evaluation of sexual outcomes after prostate brachytherapy with iodine-125 seeds as monotherapy at a tertiary cancer care center. Methods and Materials: Subjects were 129 men with prostate cancer with I-125 seed implants (prescribed dose, 145 Gy) without supplemental hormonal or external beam radiation therapy. Sexual function, potency, and bother were prospectively assessed at baseline and at 1, 4, 8, and 12 months using validated quality-of-life self-assessment surveys. Postimplant dosimetry values, including dose to 10% of the penile bulb (D10), D20, D33, D50, D75, D90, and penile volume receiving 100% of the prescribed dose (V100) were calculated. Results: At baseline, 56% of patients recorded having optimal erections; at 1 year, 62% of patients with baseline erectile function maintained optimal potency, 58% of whom with medically prescribed sexual aids or drugs. Variables associated with pretreatment-to-posttreatment decline in potency were time after implant (p = 0.04) and age (p = 0.01). Decline in urinary function may have been related to decline in potency. At 1 year, 69% of potent patients younger than 70 years maintained optimal potency, whereas 31% of patients older than 70 maintained optimal potency (p = 0.02). Diabetes was related to a decline in potency (p = 0.05), but neither smoking nor hypertension were. For patients with optimal potency at baseline, mean sexual bother scores had declined significantly at 1 year (p < 0.01). Sexual potency, sexual function, and sexual bother scores failed to correlate with any dosimetric variable tested. Conclusions: Erections firm enough for intercourse can be achieved at 1 year after treatment, but most men will require medical aids to optimize potency. Although younger men were better able to maintain erections firm enough for intercourse than older men, there was no correlation between potency, sexual function, or sexual bother and penile bulb dosimetry.

  14. The Role of Dendritic Cell Subsets and Innate Immunity in the Pathogenesis of Type 1 Diabetes and Other Autoimmune Diseases.

    PubMed

    Price, Jeffrey D; Tarbell, Kristin V

    2015-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are key antigen-presenting cells that have an important role in autoimmune pathogenesis. DCs control both steady-state T cell tolerance and activation of pathogenic responses. The balance between these two outcomes depends on several factors, including genetic susceptibility, environmental signals that stimulate varied innate responses, and which DC subset is presenting antigen. Although the specific DC phenotype can diverge depending on the tissue location and context, there are four main subsets identified in both mouse and human: conventional cDC1 and cDC2, plasmacytoid DCs, and monocyte-derived DCs. In this review, we will discuss the role of these subsets in autoimmune pathogenesis and regulation, as well as the genetic and environmental signals that influence their function. Specific topics to be addressed include impact of susceptibility loci on DC subsets, alterations in DC subset development, the role of infection- and host-derived innate inflammatory signals, and the role of the intestinal microbiota on DC phenotype. The effects of these various signals on disease progression and the relative effects of DC subset composition and maturation level of DCs will be examined. These areas will be explored using examples from several autoimmune diseases but will focus mainly on type 1 diabetes.

  15. Comparison of the Functional microRNA Expression in Immune Cell Subsets of Neonates and Adults

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Hong-Ren; Hsu, Te-Yao; Huang, Hsin-Chun; Kuo, Ho-Chang; Li, Sung-Chou; Yang, Kuender D.; Hsieh, Kai-Sheng

    2016-01-01

    Diversity of biological molecules in newborn and adult immune cells contributes to differences in cell function and atopic properties. Micro RNAs (miRNAs) are reported to involve in the regulation of immune system. Therefore, determining the miRNA expression profile of leukocyte subpopulations is important for understanding immune system regulation. In order to explore the unique miRNA profiling that contribute to altered immune in neonates, we comprehensively analyzed the functional miRNA signatures of eight leukocyte subsets (polymorphonuclear cells, monocytes, CD4+ T cells, CD8+ T cells, natural killer cells, B cells, plasmacytoid dendritic cells, and myeloid dendritic cells) from both neonatal and adult umbilical cord and peripheral blood samples, respectively. We observed distinct miRNA profiles between adult and neonatal blood leukocyte subsets, including unique miRNA signatures for each cell lineage. Leukocyte miRNA signatures were altered after stimulation. Adult peripheral leukocytes had higher let-7b-5p expression levels compared to neonatal cord leukocytes across multiple subsets, irrespective of stimulation. Transfecting neonatal monocytes with a let-7b-5p mimic resulted in a reduction of LPS-induced interleukin (IL)-6 and TNF-α production, while transfection of a let-7b-5p inhibitor into adult monocytes enhanced IL-6 and TNF-α production. With this functional approach, we provide intact differential miRNA expression profiling of specific immune cell subsets between neonates and adults. These studies serve as a basis to further understand the altered immune response observed in neonates and advance the development of therapeutic strategies. PMID:28066425

  16. Growth stimulation of dwarf peas (Pisum sativum L.) through homeopathic potencies of plant growth substances.

    PubMed

    Baumgartner, S; Thurneysen, A; Heusser, P

    2004-10-01

    Efficacy of higher homeopathic potencies is controversial. Universally accepted specific detection assays for homeopathic dilutions do not exist. Basic research has to develop a spectrum of standardized tools to investigate the mode of action and nature of homeopathic potencies. Can the shoot growth reaction of dwarf peas (gibberellin- deficient mutants) be regarded as evidence of treatment with homeopathic potencies of plant growth substances? Pea seed (Pisum sativum L. cv. Fruher Zwerg) is immersed for 24 hours in homeopathic potency or control solutions for soaking. Plants germinate and grow in a standard cultivation substrate under controlled environmental conditions. Shoot length is measured 14 days after planting. A screening of homeopathic potencies (12x-30x) of four different plant growth substances revealed biological activity of certain potency levels of gibberellin and kinetin (p < 0.05). Growth stimulation through gibberellin 17x (5 x 10(-18 M)) was assessed in six independent replications; results confirmed those of the screening (p < 0.05). The effect of gibberellin 17x seemed to weaken during the course of the experiments. The results back the hypothesis that homeopathic potencies of plant growth substances affect pea shoot growth. Dwarf peas might thus be an interesting system model for studying the action of homeopathic potencies. Further work is required to identify all boundary conditions modulating the reactivity of this system.

  17. 76 FR 9028 - Guidance for Industry: Potency Tests for Cellular and Gene Therapy Products; Availability

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-16

    ... Industry: Potency Tests for Cellular and Gene Therapy Products'' dated January 2011. The guidance document provides manufacturers of cellular and gene therapy (CGT) products with recommendations for developing... document entitled ``Guidance for Industry: Potency Tests for Cellular and Gene Therapy Products'' dated...

  18. Chimeric antigen receptor-modified T cells derived from defined CD8+ and CD4+ subsets confer superior antitumor reactivity in vivo.

    PubMed

    Sommermeyer, D; Hudecek, M; Kosasih, P L; Gogishvili, T; Maloney, D G; Turtle, C J; Riddell, S R

    2016-02-01

    Adoptive T-cell therapy with gene-modified T cells expressing a tumor-reactive T-cell receptor or chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) is a rapidly growing field of translational medicine and has shown success in the treatment of B-cell malignancies and solid tumors. In all reported trials, patients have received T-cell products comprising random compositions of CD4(+) and CD8(+) naive and memory T cells, meaning that each patient received a different therapeutic agent. This variation may have influenced the efficacy of T-cell therapy, and complicates comparison of outcomes between different patients and across trials. We analyzed CD19 CAR-expressing effector T cells derived from different subsets (CD4(+)/CD8(+) naive, central memory, effector memory). T cells derived from each of the subsets were efficiently transduced and expanded, but showed clear differences in effector function and proliferation in vitro and in vivo. Combining the most potent CD4(+) and CD8(+) CAR-expressing subsets, resulted in synergistic antitumor effects in vivo. We show that CAR-T-cell products generated from defined T-cell subsets can provide uniform potency compared with products derived from unselected T cells that vary in phenotypic composition. These findings have important implications for the formulation of T-cell products for adoptive therapies.

  19. Chimeric antigen receptor-modified T cells derived from defined CD8+ and CD4+ subsets confer superior antitumor reactivity in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Sommermeyer, Daniel; Hudecek, Michael; Kosasih, Paula L.; Gogishvili, Tea; Maloney, David G.; Turtle, Cameron J.; Riddell, Stanley R.

    2016-01-01

    Adoptive T-cell therapy with gene-modified T-cells expressing a tumor-reactive T-cell receptor (TCR) or chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) is a rapidly growing field of translational medicine and has shown success in the treatment of B-cell malignancies and solid tumors. In all reported trials, patients have received T-cell products comprised of random compositions of CD4+ and CD8+ naïve and memory T-cells, meaning that each patient received a different therapeutic agent. This variation might have influenced the efficacy of T-cell therapy, and complicates comparison of outcomes between different patients and across trials. We analyzed CD19 CAR-expressing effector T-cells derived from different subsets (CD4+/CD8+ naïve, central memory, effector memory). T-cells derived from each of the subsets were efficiently transduced and expanded, but showed clear differences in effector function and proliferation in vitro and in vivo. Combining the most potent CD4+ and CD8+ CAR-expressing subsets resulted in synergistic antitumor effects in vivo. We show that CAR-T-cell products generated from defined T-cell subsets can provide uniform potency compared with products derived from unselected T-cells that vary in phenotypic composition. These findings have important implications for the formulation of T-cell products for adoptive therapies. PMID:26369987

  20. Subsetting and Formatting Landsat-7 LOR ETM+ and Data Products

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reid, Michael R.

    2000-01-01

    The Landsat-7 Processing System (LPS) processes Landsat-7 Enhanced Thematic Mapper (ETM+) instrument data into large, contiguous segments called "subintervals" and stores them in Level OR (LOR) data files. The LPS processed subinterval products must be subsetted and reformatted before the Level I processing systems can ingest them. The initial full subintervals produced by the LPS are stored mainly in HDF Earth Observing System (HDF-EOS) format which is an extension to the Hierarchical Data Format (HDF). The final LOR products are stored in native HDF format. Primarily the EOS Core System (ECS) and alternately the DAAC Emergency System (DES) subset the subinterval data for the operational Landsat-7 data processing systems. The HDF and HDF-EOS application programming interfaces (APIs) can be used for extensive data subsetting and data reorganization. A stand-alone subsetter tool has been developed which is based on some of the DES code. This tool makes use of the HDF and HDFEOS APIs to perform Landsat-7 LOR product subsetting and demonstrates how HDF and HDFEOS can be used for creating various configurations of full LOR products. How these APIs can be used to efficiently subset, format, and organize Landsat-7 LOR data as demonstrated by the subsetter tool and the DES is discussed.

  1. Correlation between myometrial receptor affinity, lipophilicity and antagonistic potency of oxytocin analogues in the rat.

    PubMed

    Atke, A; Vilhardt, H; Melin, P

    1988-08-01

    Purified myometrial plasma membrane fractions were prepared from rats treated with oestradiol to induce oestrus. The binding affinities of 11 antagonistic oxytocin analogues to the oxytocin receptor of the plasma membranes were measured. Furthermore, lipophilicity of the peptides was assessed by reversed-phase high pressure liquid chromatography. No significant correlation was found between lipophilicity of the analogues and values for antagonistic potencies or binding affinities. Also, receptor-binding affinity did not correlate with in-vitro antagonistic activity whereas a significant correlation was obtained between binding affinities and in-vivo antagonistic potency for analogues void of partial agonist properties. It is concluded that neither receptor affinity nor lipophilicity in the analogues can predict the potency of the antagonists in vitro. However, receptor affinity was found to be a relatively good predictor of the in-vivo potency, while the usefulness of measuring antagonistic potency in vitro is questioned.

  2. Antigenotoxic potencies of a lichen species, Evernia prunastri.

    PubMed

    Alpsoy, Lokman; Orhan, Furkan; Nardemir, Gokce; Agar, Guleray; Gulluce, Medine; Aslan, Ali

    2015-02-01

    In this article, the genotoxic and antigenotoxic effects of methanol extract of Evernia prunastri (Huds.) Willd. (MEP) were studied using WP2, Ames (TA1535 and TA1537) and sister chromatid exchange (SCE) test systems. The results obtained from bacterial test systems demonstrated that MEP has strong antimutagenic potencies on TA1537 and WP2 strains. The highest inhibition rates for MEP on TA1537 and WP2 strains were 37.70% and 69.70%, respectively. According to the SCE test system, MEP reduced the genotoxic effects of aflatoxin. In order to clarify the mechanism underlying the antigenotoxic effects of MEP, the antioxidants were determined. Cotreatments of 5, 10 and 20 µg/mL concentrations of MEP with aflatoxin B1 decreased the frequencies of SCE and the malondialdehyde level and increased amount of superoxide dismutase, glutathione and glutathione peroxidase which were decreased by aflatoxin. The data obtained from this work have clearly shown that MEP has significant antigenotoxic effects which are thought to be partly due to the antioxidant activities and antioxidant inducing capability of MEP. This is the first report indicating the antigenotoxic activities of MEP against several mutagen agents such as N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine, acridin and aflatoxin. © The Author(s) 2012.

  3. Radioiodination of chicken luteinizing hormone without affecting receptor binding potency

    SciTech Connect

    Kikuchi, M.; Ishii, S. )

    1989-12-01

    By improving the currently used lactoperoxidase method, we were able to obtain radioiodinated chicken luteinizing hormone (LH) that shows high specific binding and low nonspecific binding to a crude plasma membrane fraction of testicular cells of the domestic fowl and the Japanese quail, and to the ovarian granulosa cells of the Japanese quail. The change we made from the original method consisted of (1) using chicken LH for radioiodination that was not only highly purified but also retained a high receptor binding potency; (2) controlling the level of incorporation of radioiodine into chicken LH molecules by employing a short reaction time and low temperature; and (3) fractionating radioiodinated chicken LH further by gel filtration using high-performance liquid chromatography. Specific radioactivity of the final {sup 125}I-labeled chicken LH preparation was 14 microCi/micrograms. When specific binding was 12-16%, nonspecific binding was as low as 2-4% in the gonadal receptors. {sup 125}I-Labeled chicken LH was displaced by chicken LH and ovine LH but not by chicken follicle-stimulating hormone. The equilibrium association constant of quail testicular receptor was 3.6 x 10(9) M-1. We concluded that chicken LH radioiodinated by the present method is useful for studies of avian LH receptors.

  4. A new ELISA for determination of potency in snake antivenoms.

    PubMed

    Rial, A; Morais, V; Rossi, S; Massaldi, H

    2006-09-15

    A competitive ELISA for potency determination of bothropic equine antivenom was developed and compared to the conventional in vivo ED(50) assay, with the aim of partially substituting the in vivo assay in the monitoring of antivenom immunoglobulin levels. On this purpose, blood samples were taken at different times during and after the immunization protocol of the lot of horses used for production of snake antivenom at the Instituto de Higiene, Uruguay. Both the competitive ELISA and the ED(50) assay were performed on those samples. In addition, a group of five commercial pepsin-digested antivenoms were tested by both methods. A significant (P<0.001) correlation (Pearson's r=0.957) was found between the ELISA titres and the corresponding ED(50) values, indicating that the in vitro test can estimate the neutralizing antibody capacity of the sera as well as the in vivo assay. By means of this new ELISA, it was found that the immunized animals maintained good venom antibody titres, in the order of 20-50% of the maximum achieved, even 10 month after the end of the immunization schedule. The main advantage of our ELISA design is its ability to correctly estimate the neutralization capacity of crude hyperimmune plasma and antivenom sera independently of their antibody composition in terms of whole IgG or F(ab')(2) fragment.

  5. Gilvocarcin V, a Photodynamic DNA Damaging Agent Of Unusual Potency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elespuru, Rosalie K.; Look, Sally A.

    1988-02-01

    Gilvocarcin V (GV) is a planar, aromatic DNA-intercalating C-glycoside isolated as a natural product antibiotic. In the presence of UVA or visible radiation, it becomes a DNA damaging agent at low doses in both bacterial and mammalian cells. In mice treated without regard to light exposure, GV exhibited antitumor activity at high doses, with little accompanying toxicity. Wavelength-dependence studies showed that lambda prophage induction profiles were similar to (part of) the absorption spectrum of GV, with a peak near 400 nm. However, significant induction at a higher wavelength (546 nm), was observed at relatively high (e.g. 1 μg/m1) concentrations of GV. The DNA damaging activity of GV was dependent on both the concentration of antibiotic and the fluence of radiation in a reciprocal manner. Mutagenesis and DNA binding experiments suggest a preference for interaction with AT-rich regions of DNA, but multiple modes of interaction seem likely. The presence of different C-glycosides on the gilvocarcin V chromophore may alter the pharmacological properties of the molecule, but photoactivation appears to be independent of these groups. The therapeutic possibilities of gilvocarcins remain largely unexplored; the demonstrated potency of these compounds when activated, the reciprocity effect, possibility of structural variation, and apparent lack of toxicity in mammalian systems are properties which could be exploited in therapeutic development.

  6. Structure and Relative Potency of Several Karlotoxins from Karlodinium veneficum

    PubMed Central

    Van Wagoner, Ryan M.; Deeds, Jonathan R.; Tatters, Avery O.; Place, Allen R.; Tomas, Carmelo R.; Wright, Jeffrey L. C.

    2010-01-01

    The karlotoxins are a family of amphidinol-like compounds that play roles in avoiding predation and in prey capture for the toxic dinoflagellate Karlodinium veneficum. The first member of the toxin group to be reported was KmTx 1 (1), and here we report an additional five new members of this family (3–7) from the same strain. Of these additional compounds, KmTx 3 (3) differs from KmTx 1 (1) in having one less methylene group in the saturated portion of its lipophilic arm. In addition, 64-E-chloro-KmTx 3 (4) and 10-O-sulfo-KmTx 3 (5) were identified. Likewise, 65-E-chloro-KmTx 1 (6) and 10-O-sulfo-KmTx 1 (7) were also isolated. Comparison of the hemolytic activities of the newly isolated compounds to that of KmTx 1 shows that potency correlates positively with the length of the lipophilic arm and is disrupted by sulfonation of the polyol arm. PMID:20795740

  7. Selectivity and potency of cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Sridhar, Jayalakshmi; Akula, Nagaraju; Pattabiraman, Nagarajan

    2006-03-24

    Members of the cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) family play key roles in various cellular processes. There are 11 members of the CDK family known till now. CDKs are activated by forming noncovalent complexes with cyclins such as A-, B-, C-, D- (D1, D2, and D3), and E-type cyclins. Each isozyme of this family is responsible for particular aspects (cell signaling, transcription, etc) of the cell cycle, and some of the CDK isozymes are specific to certain kinds of tissues. Aberrant expression and overexpression of these kinases are evidenced in many disease conditions. Inhibition of isozymes of CDKs specifically can yield beneficiary treatment modalities with minimum side effects. More than 80 3-dimensional structures of CDK2, CDK5, and CDK6 complexed with inhibitors have been published. This review provides an understanding of the structural aspects of CDK isozymes and binding modes of various known CDK inhibitors so that these kinases can be better targeted for drug discovery and design. The amino acid residues that constitute the cyclin binding region, the substrate binding region, and the area around the adenosine triphosphate (ATP) binding site have been compared for CDK isozymes. Those amino acids at the ATP binding site that could be used to improve the potency and subtype specificity have been described.

  8. Control Lymphocyte Subsets: Can one country's values serve for another's?

    PubMed Central

    Mandala, Wilson L.; Ananworanich, Jintanat; Apornpong, Tanakorn; Kerr, Stephen J; MacLennan, Jenny M.; Hanson, Celine; Jaimulwong, Tanyathip; Gondwe, Esther N.; Rosenblatt, Howard M.; Bunupuradah, Torsak; Molyneux, Malcolm E.; Spector, Stephen A.; Pancharoen, Chitsanu; Gelman, Rebecca S; MacLennan, Calman A.; Shearer, William T

    2014-01-01

    Lymphocyte subsets can be affected by host and environmental factors, yet direct comparisons of their patterns across continents are lacking. This work compares proportions and counts of lymphocyte subsets between healthy children from Thailand, Malawi and the USA. We analyzed subsets of 1,399 healthy children aged between 0 and 15 years: 281 Thai, 397 Malawian and 721American children. Existing data for five subsets were available for all three cohorts (Total T, CD4+ T, CD8+ T, natural killer (NK) and B cells), with data for another six subsets from the Thai and American cohorts (naïve, memory and activated CD4+ and CD8+ T cells). Cellular patterns between cohorts differed mainly in children under two years. Compared to American children, Thai children had higher median numbers of total T cells, CD8+ T cells and NK cells while Malawian children under 18 months, on average, had more CD8+ T cells and B cells. Both Thai and Malawian children had lower median CD4+ T cell percentages and CD4/CD8 ratios than American children. Thai children had more memory and activated CD8+ T cells than American children. Approximately one-fifth of Thai and Malawian HIV-uninfected healthy children aged 0-3 years met WHO-defined CD4+ count criteria for immune-deficiency in HIV-infected children. Healthy children from Thailand, Malawi and the USA have differences in lymphocyte subsets that are likely to be due to differences in ethnicity, exposure to infectious diseases and environmental factors. These results indicate the need for country-specific reference ranges for diagnosis and management of immunologic disorders. PMID:25171870

  9. Development and validation of a quantitative competitive ELISA for potency testing of equine anti rabies sera with other potential use.

    PubMed

    Korimbocus, Jehanara; Dehay, Nicolas; Tordo, Noël; Cano, François; Morgeaux, Sylvie

    2016-06-14

    In case of a bite by a rabies infected animal, the World Health Organisation recommends a prophylactic treatment including the administration of Human Rabies Immunoglobulins (HRIGs) or highly purified F(ab')2 fragments produced from Equine Rabies Immunoglobulin (F(ab')2 - ERIGs). According to international regulation, quality control of F(ab')2 - ERIGs lots requires potency testing by the in vivo Mouse Neutralisation Test (MNT) prior marketing. However, the strategy of the 3Rs (Reduce, Refine, Replace) for animal testing required by the European Directive encourages the replacement of the in vivo potency test by an in vitro assay. In this context, a competitive ELISA method (c-ELISA) has been developed by the Agence Nationale de Sécurité du Médicament et des Produits de Santé where F(ab')2 - ERIGs are in competition with a monoclonal antibody recognizing the trimeric native form of the rabies glycoprotein. After a full validation study, the c-ELISA has been applied to commercial batches of F(ab')2 - ERIGs. A correlation study with the MNT demonstrated a similarity between the two methods (r=0.751). Moreover, the c-ELISA method which does not need any species specific reagent has been applied to HRIGs potency testing as an alternative method to Rapid Fluorescent Focus Inhibition Test (RFFIT), thus avoiding the handling of live rabies virus in BSL3 containment. In conclusion, the c-ELISA has shown its potential to replace MNT and possibly RFFIT for the quantification of rabies immunoglobulin. After optimisation it may be used for the quantification of rabies immunoglobulin in any animal species, notably for rabies immunogenicity assay in mice. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Identifying developmental toxicity pathways for a subset of ToxCast chemicals using human embryonic stem cells and metabolomics

    SciTech Connect

    Kleinstreuer, N.C.; Smith, A.M.; West, P.R.; Conard, K.R.; Fontaine, B.R.; Weir-Hauptman, A.M.; Palmer, J.A.; Knudsen, T.B.; Dix, D.J.; Donley, E.L.R.; Cezar, G.G.

    2011-11-15

    Metabolomics analysis was performed on the supernatant of human embryonic stem (hES) cell cultures exposed to a blinded subset of 11 chemicals selected from the chemical library of EPA's ToxCast Trade-Mark-Sign chemical screening and prioritization research project. Metabolites from hES cultures were evaluated for known and novel signatures that may be indicative of developmental toxicity. Significant fold changes in endogenous metabolites were detected for 83 putatively annotated mass features in response to the subset of ToxCast chemicals. The annotations were mapped to specific human metabolic pathways. This revealed strong effects on pathways for nicotinate and nicotinamide metabolism, pantothenate and CoA biosynthesis, glutathione metabolism, and arginine and proline metabolism pathways. Predictivity for adverse outcomes in mammalian prenatal developmental toxicity studies used ToxRefDB and other sources of information, including Stemina Biomarker Discovery's predictive DevTox Registered-Sign model trained on 23 pharmaceutical agents of known developmental toxicity and differing potency. The model initially predicted developmental toxicity from the blinded ToxCast compounds in concordance with animal data with 73% accuracy. Retraining the model with data from the unblinded test compounds at one concentration level increased the predictive accuracy for the remaining concentrations to 83%. These preliminary results on a 11-chemical subset of the ToxCast chemical library indicate that metabolomics analysis of the hES secretome provides information valuable for predictive modeling and mechanistic understanding of mammalian developmental toxicity. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We tested 11 environmental compounds in a hESC metabolomics platform. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Significant changes in secreted small molecule metabolites were observed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Perturbed mass features map to pathways critical for normal development and

  11. Refinement of breast cancer risk prediction with concordant leading edge subsets from prognostic gene signatures.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chi-Cheng; Tu, Shih-Hsin; Lien, Heng-Hui; Huang, Ching-Shui; Huang, Chi-Jung; Lai, Liang-Chuan; Tsai, Mon-Hsun; Chuang, Eric Y

    2014-09-01

    Several prognostic signatures have been identified for breast cancer. However, these signatures vary extensively in their gene compositions, and the poor concordance of the risk groups defined by the prognostic signatures hinders their clinical applicability. Breast cancer risk prediction was refined with a novel approach to finding concordant genes from leading edge analysis of prognostic signatures. Each signature was split into two gene sets, which contained either up-regulated or down-regulated genes, and leading edge analysis was performed within each array study for all up-/down-regulated gene sets of the same signature from all training datasets. Consensus of leading edge subsets among all training microarrays was used to synthesize a predictive model, which was then tested in independent studies by partial least squares regression. Only a small portion of six prognostic signatures (Amsterdam, Rotterdam, Genomic Grade Index, Recurrence Score, and Hu306 and PAM50 of intrinsic subtypes) was significantly enriched in the leading edge analysis in five training datasets (n = 2,380), and that the concordant leading edge subsets (43 genes) could identify the core signature genes that account for the enrichment signals providing prognostic power across all assayed samples. The proposed concordant leading edge algorithm was able to discriminate high-risk from low-risk patients in terms of relapse-free or distant metastasis-free survival in all training samples (hazard ratios: 1.84-2.20) and in three out of four independent studies (hazard ratios: 3.91-8.31). In some studies, the concordant leading edge subset remained a significant prognostic factor independent of clinical ER, HER2, and lymph node status. The present study provides a statistical framework for identifying core consensus across microarray studies with leading edge analysis, and a breast cancer risk predictive model was established.

  12. Distinct germline progenitor subsets defined through Tsc2–mTORC1 signaling

    PubMed Central

    Hobbs, Robin M; La, Hue M; Mäkelä, Juho-Antti; Kobayashi, Toshiyuki; Noda, Tetsuo; Pandolfi, Pier Paolo

    2015-01-01

    Adult tissue maintenance is often dependent on resident stem cells; however, the phenotypic and functional heterogeneity existing within this self-renewing population is poorly understood. Here, we define distinct subsets of undifferentiated spermatogonia (spermatogonial progenitor cells; SPCs) by differential response to hyperactivation of mTORC1, a key growth-promoting pathway. We find that conditional deletion of the mTORC1 inhibitor Tsc2 throughout the SPC pool using Vasa-Cre promotes differentiation at the expense of self-renewal and leads to germline degeneration. Surprisingly, Tsc2 ablation within a subset of SPCs using Stra8-Cre did not compromise SPC function. SPC activity also appeared unaffected by Amh-Cre-mediated Tsc2 deletion within somatic cells of the niche. Importantly, we find that differentiation-prone SPCs have elevated mTORC1 activity when compared to SPCs with high self-renewal potential. Moreover, SPCs insensitive to Tsc2 deletion are preferentially associated with mTORC1-active committed progenitor fractions. We therefore delineate SPC subsets based on differential mTORC1 activity and correlated sensitivity to Tsc2 deletion. We propose that mTORC1 is a key regulator of SPC fate and defines phenotypically distinct SPC subpopulations with varying propensities for self-renewal and differentiation. PMID:25700280

  13. Defining Mononuclear Phagocyte Subset Homology Across Several Distant Warm-Blooded Vertebrates Through Comparative Transcriptomics.

    PubMed

    Vu Manh, Thien-Phong; Elhmouzi-Younes, Jamila; Urien, Céline; Ruscanu, Suzana; Jouneau, Luc; Bourge, Mickaël; Moroldo, Marco; Foucras, Gilles; Salmon, Henri; Marty, Hélène; Quéré, Pascale; Bertho, Nicolas; Boudinot, Pierre; Dalod, Marc; Schwartz-Cornil, Isabelle

    2015-01-01

    Mononuclear phagocytes are organized in a complex system of ontogenetically and functionally distinct subsets, that has been best described in mouse and to some extent in human. Identification of homologous mononuclear phagocyte subsets in other vertebrate species of biomedical, economic, and environmental interest is needed to improve our knowledge in physiologic and physio-pathologic processes, and to design intervention strategies against a variety of diseases, including zoonotic infections. We developed a streamlined approach combining refined cell sorting and integrated comparative transcriptomics analyses which revealed conservation of the mononuclear phagocyte organization across human, mouse, sheep, pigs and, in some respect, chicken. This strategy should help democratizing the use of omics analyses for the identification and study of cell types across tissues and species. Moreover, we identified conserved gene signatures that enable robust identification and universal definition of these cell types. We identified new evolutionarily conserved gene candidates and gene interaction networks for the molecular regulation of the development or functions of these cell types, as well as conserved surface candidates for refined subset phenotyping throughout species. A phylogenetic analysis revealed that orthologous genes of the conserved signatures exist in teleost fishes and apparently not in Lamprey.

  14. NKT Cell Subsets Can Exert Opposing Effects in Autoimmunity, Tumor Surveillance and Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Viale, Rachael; Ware, Randle; Maricic, Igor; Chaturvedi, Varun; Kumar, Vipin

    2014-01-01

    The innate-like natural killer T (NKT) cells are essential regulators of immunity. These cells comprise at least two distinct subsets and recognize different lipid antigens presented by the MHC class I like molecules CD1d. The CD1d-dependent recognition pathway of NKT cells is highly conserved from mouse to humans. While most type I NKT cells can recognize αGalCer and express a semi-invariant T cell receptor (TCR), a major population of type II NKT cells reactive to sulfatide utilizes an oligoclonal TCR. Furthermore TCR recognition features of NKT subsets are also distinctive with almost parallel as opposed to perpendicular footprints on the CD1d molecules for the type I and type II NKT cells respectively. Here we present a view based upon the recent studies in different clinical and experimental settings that while type I NKT cells are more often pathogenic, they may also be regulatory. On the other hand, sulfatide-reactive type II NKT cells mostly play an inhibitory role in the control of autoimmune and inflammatory diseases. Since the activity and cytokine secretion profiles of NKT cell subsets can be modulated differently by lipid ligands or their analogs, novel immunotherapeutic strategies are being developed for their differential activation for potential intervention in inflammatory diseases. PMID:25288922

  15. Fluphenazine versus low-potency first-generation antipsychotic drugs for schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Tardy, Magdolna; Huhn, Maximilian; Engel, Rolf R; Leucht, Stefan

    2014-08-03

    Antipsychotic drugs are the core treatment for schizophrenia. Treatment guidelines state that there is no difference in efficacy between any other antipsychotic compounds, however, low-potency antipsychotic drugs are often perceived as less efficacious than high-potency compounds by clinicians, and they also seem to differ in their side effects. This review examined the effects of the high-potency antipsychotic fluphenazine compared to those of low-potency antipsychotics. To review the effects of fluphenazine and low-potency antipsychotics for people with schizophrenia. We searched the Cochrane Schizophrenia Group Trials Register (November 2010). We included all randomised controlled trials (RCTs) comparing fluphenazine with first-generation low-potency antipsychotic drugs for people with schizophrenia or schizophrenia-like psychosis. We extracted data independently. For dichotomous data we calculated risk ratios (RR) and their 95% confidence intervals (CI) on an intention-to-treat basis based on a random-effects model. The review currently includes seven randomised trials and 1567 participants that compared fluphenazine with low-potency antipsychotic drugs. The size of the included studies was between 40 and 438 participants. Overall, sequence generation, allocation procedures and blinding were poorly reported. Fluphenazine was not significantly different from low-potency antipsychotic drugs in terms of response to treatment (fluphenazine 55%, low-potency drug 55%, 2 RCTs, n = 105, RR 1.06 CI 0.75 to 1.50, moderate quality evidence). There was also no significant difference in acceptability of treatment with equivocal numbers of participants leaving the studies early due to any reason (fluphenazine 36%, low-potency antipsychotics 36%, 6 RCTs, n = 1532, RR 1.00 CI 0.88 to 1.14, moderate quality evidence). There was no significant difference between fluphenazine and low-potency antipsychotics for numbers experiencing at least one adverse effect (fluphenazine 70

  16. Comparative neurotransmitter reuptake and anticholinergic potencies of the 8-hydroxy metabolites of clomipramine.

    PubMed

    Núñez, R; Perel, J M

    1995-01-01

    We hypothesize that 8-hydroxy-clomipramine (8-OH-CMI), the major hydroxy metabolite of clomipramine (CMI), may have antidepressant properties with less anticholinergic potency than CMI. We compared the potencies of 8-OH-CMI and CMI for inhibition of serotonin and norepinephrine reuptake and the potencies of these compounds for blockade of muscarinic receptors. We also compared the antimuscarinic potencies of desmethylclomipramine (DCMI) and 8-hydroxy-desmethylclomipramine (8-OH-DCMI). We found that 8-OH-CMI inhibits the uptake of serotonin and norepinephrine to the same extent as CMI and that 8-OH-CMI has far less antimuscarinic potency than CMI. We also found that 8-OH-DCMI has about one-tenth the antimuscarinic potency of DCMI. Since the therapeutic efficacy of CMI may be related to its effect on the reuptake of neurotransmitters, and since the extent of clinical anticholinergic effects of tricyclic antidepressants has been shown to be related to their in vitro antimuscarinic potencies, these results raise the possibility that 8-OH-CMI may be an analogue of CMI with fewer anticholinergic side effects than the parent compound.

  17. Potency testing for the experimental Na-GST-1 hookworm vaccine.

    PubMed

    Jariwala, Amar R; Oliveira, Luciana M; Diemert, David J; Keegan, Brian; Plieskatt, Jordan L; Periago, Maria V; Bottazzi, Maria E; Hotez, Peter J; Bethony, Jeffrey M

    2010-10-01

    Over the next decade, a new generation of vaccines will target the neglected tropical diseases (NTDs). The goal of most NTD vaccines will be to reduce the morbidity and decrease the chronic debilitating nature of these often-forgotten infections – outcomes that are hard to measure in the traditional potency testing paradigm. The absence of measurable correlates of protection, a lack of permissive animal models for lethal infection, and a lack of clinical indications that do not include the induction of sterilizing immunity required us to reconsider the traditional bioassay methods for determining vaccine potency. Owing to these limitations, potency assay design for NTD vaccines will increasingly rely on a paradigm where potency testing is one among many tools to ensure that a manufacturing process yields a product of consistent quality. Herein, we discuss the evolution of our thinking regarding the design of a potency assay along these newly defined lines and its application to the release of the experimental Necator americanus-glutathione-S- transferase-1 (Na-GST-1) vaccine to prevent human hookworm infection. We discuss the necessary steps to accomplish the design and implementation of such a new potency assay as a resource for the burgeoning NTD vaccine community. Our experience is that much of the existing information is proprietary and needs to be pulled together in a single source to aid in our overall understanding of potency testing.

  18. Altered distribution of natural killer cell subsets identified by CD56, CD27 and CD70 in primary and chronic human immunodeficiency virus-1 infection

    PubMed Central

    Titanji, Kehmia; Sammicheli, Stefano; De Milito, Angelo; Mantegani, Paola; Fortis, Claudio; Berg, Louise; Kärre, Klas; Travi, Giovanna; Tassandin, Chiara; Lopalco, Lucia; Rethi, Bence; Tambussi, Giuseppe; Chiodi, Francesca

    2008-01-01

    Human natural killer (NK) (CD3− CD56+) cells can be divided into two functionally distinct subsets, CD3− CD56dim and CD3− CD56bright. We analysed the distribution of NK cell subsets in primary and chronic human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1) infection, to determine if HIV infection stage may influence the subset distribution. In primary infection, contrary to chronic infection, the CD3− CD56dim subset was expanded compared to healthy controls. We also studied the effect of antiretroviral therapy administered early in infection and found that NK cell subset distribution was partially restored after 6 months of antiretroviral therapy in primary infection, but not normalized. Recently, NK cells have been divided into CD27− and CD27+ subsets with different migratory and functional capacity and CD27-mediated NK cell activation has been described in mice. We therefore investigated whether CD27 and/or CD70 (CD27 ligand) expression on NK cells, and thus the distribution of these novel NK subsets, was altered in HIV-1-infected patients. We found up-regulated expression of both CD27 and CD70 on NK cells of patients, resulting in higher proportions of CD27high and CD70high NK cells, and this phenomenon was more pronounced in chronic infection. Experiments conducted in vitro suggest that the high interleukin-7 levels found during HIV-1 infection may participate in up-regulation of CD70 on NK cell subsets. Imbalance of NK cell subsets and up-regulated expression of CD27 and CD70 initiated early in HIV-1 infection may indicate NK cell activation and intrinsic defects initiated by HIV-1 to disarm the innate immune response to the virus. PMID:17627773

  19. Holistic systems biology approaches to molecular mechanisms of human helper T cell differentiation to functionally distinct subsets.

    PubMed

    Chen, Z; Lönnberg, T; Lahesmaa, R

    2013-08-01

    Current knowledge of helper T cell differentiation largely relies on data generated from mouse studies. To develop therapeutical strategies combating human diseases, understanding the molecular mechanisms how human naïve T cells differentiate to functionally distinct T helper (Th) subsets as well as studies on human differentiated Th cell subsets is particularly valuable. Systems biology approaches provide a holistic view of the processes of T helper differentiation, enable discovery of new factors and pathways involved and generation of new hypotheses to be tested to improve our understanding of human Th cell differentiation and immune-mediated diseases. Here, we summarize studies where high-throughput systems biology approaches have been exploited to human primary T cells. These studies reveal new factors and signalling pathways influencing T cell differentiation towards distinct subsets, important for immune regulation. Such information provides new insights into T cell biology and into targeting immune system for therapeutic interventions.

  20. Effects of a Simulated Tennis Match on Lymphocyte Subset Measurements

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schafer, Mark; Kell, Holly; Navalta, James; Tibana, Ramires; Lyons, Scott; Arnett, Scott

    2014-01-01

    Tennis is an activity requiring both endurance and anaerobic components, which could have immunosuppressive effects postexercise. Purpose: The purpose of this investigation was to determine the effect of a simulated tennis match on apoptotic and migratory markers on lymphocyte subsets. Method: Male high school (n = 5) and college (n = 3) tennis…

  1. A SOAP Web Service for accessing MODIS land product subsets

    SciTech Connect

    SanthanaVannan, Suresh K; Cook, Robert B; Pan, Jerry Yun; Wilson, Bruce E

    2011-01-01

    Remote sensing data from satellites have provided valuable information on the state of the earth for several decades. Since March 2000, the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) sensor on board NASA s Terra and Aqua satellites have been providing estimates of several land parameters useful in understanding earth system processes at global, continental, and regional scales. However, the HDF-EOS file format, specialized software needed to process the HDF-EOS files, data volume, and the high spatial and temporal resolution of MODIS data make it difficult for users wanting to extract small but valuable amounts of information from the MODIS record. To overcome this usability issue, the NASA-funded Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC) for Biogeochemical Dynamics at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) developed a Web service that provides subsets of MODIS land products using Simple Object Access Protocol (SOAP). The ORNL DAAC MODIS subsetting Web service is a unique way of serving satellite data that exploits a fairly established and popular Internet protocol to allow users access to massive amounts of remote sensing data. The Web service provides MODIS land product subsets up to 201 x 201 km in a non-proprietary comma delimited text file format. Users can programmatically query the Web service to extract MODIS land parameters for real time data integration into models, decision support tools or connect to workflow software. Information regarding the MODIS SOAP subsetting Web service is available on the World Wide Web (WWW) at http://daac.ornl.gov/modiswebservice.

  2. Feature Subset Selection, Class Separability, and Genetic Algorithms

    SciTech Connect

    Cantu-Paz, E

    2004-01-21

    The performance of classification algorithms in machine learning is affected by the features used to describe the labeled examples presented to the inducers. Therefore, the problem of feature subset selection has received considerable attention. Genetic approaches to this problem usually follow the wrapper approach: treat the inducer as a black box that is used to evaluate candidate feature subsets. The evaluations might take a considerable time and the traditional approach might be unpractical for large data sets. This paper describes a hybrid of a simple genetic algorithm and a method based on class separability applied to the selection of feature subsets for classification problems. The proposed hybrid was compared against each of its components and two other feature selection wrappers that are used widely. The objective of this paper is to determine if the proposed hybrid presents advantages over the other methods in terms of accuracy or speed in this problem. The experiments used a Naive Bayes classifier and public-domain and artificial data sets. The experiments suggest that the hybrid usually finds compact feature subsets that give the most accurate results, while beating the execution time of the other wrappers.

  3. Codes With Parity Conditions on Subsets of Coordinates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Posner, E.; Reichstein, Z.

    1986-01-01

    New theorems aid search for efficient code alphabets. Paper discusses theory of finding largest binary codes 2k bits in length, in which all words differ from each other in at least d places and in which words truncated by ignoring certain subsets of bit positions belong to shorter linear codes.

  4. Clustering, Seriation, and Subset Extraction of Confusion Data

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brusco, Michael J.; Steinley, Douglas

    2006-01-01

    The study of confusion data is a well established practice in psychology. Although many types of analytical approaches for confusion data are available, among the most common methods are the extraction of 1 or more subsets of stimuli, the partitioning of the complete stimulus set into distinct groups, and the ordering of the stimulus set. Although…

  5. Effects of a Simulated Tennis Match on Lymphocyte Subset Measurements

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schafer, Mark; Kell, Holly; Navalta, James; Tibana, Ramires; Lyons, Scott; Arnett, Scott

    2014-01-01

    Tennis is an activity requiring both endurance and anaerobic components, which could have immunosuppressive effects postexercise. Purpose: The purpose of this investigation was to determine the effect of a simulated tennis match on apoptotic and migratory markers on lymphocyte subsets. Method: Male high school (n = 5) and college (n = 3) tennis…

  6. Clustering, Seriation, and Subset Extraction of Confusion Data

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brusco, Michael J.; Steinley, Douglas

    2006-01-01

    The study of confusion data is a well established practice in psychology. Although many types of analytical approaches for confusion data are available, among the most common methods are the extraction of 1 or more subsets of stimuli, the partitioning of the complete stimulus set into distinct groups, and the ordering of the stimulus set. Although…

  7. Subset selective search on the basis of color and preview.

    PubMed

    Donk, Mieke

    2017-01-01

    In the preview paradigm observers are presented with one set of elements (the irrelevant set) followed by the addition of a second set among which the target is presented (the relevant set). Search efficiency in such a preview condition has been demonstrated to be higher than that in a full-baseline condition in which both sets are simultaneously presented, suggesting that a preview of the irrelevant set reduces its influence on the search process. However, numbers of irrelevant and relevant elements are typically not independently manipulated. Moreover, subset selective search also occurs when both sets are presented simultaneously but differ in color. The aim of the present study was to investigate how numbers of irrelevant and relevant elements contribute to preview search in the absence and presence of a color difference between subsets. In two experiments it was demonstrated that a preview reduced the influence of the number of irrelevant elements in the absence but not in the presence of a color difference between subsets. In the presence of a color difference, a preview lowered the effect of the number of relevant elements but only when the target was defined by a unique feature within the relevant set (Experiment 1); when the target was defined by a conjunction of features (Experiment 2), search efficiency as a function of the number of relevant elements was not modulated by a preview. Together the results are in line with the idea that subset selective search is based on different simultaneously operating mechanisms.

  8. SAGE II v6.20 Binary File Subset Tool

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-04-01

    ... files. The tool is written in Exelis Visual Information Solutions IDL programming language. It can be run either with a licensed ... with IDL and is available from  Exelis Visual Information Solutions . The subset may be specified by latitude and longitude regions ...

  9. Histone Deacetylation Critically Determines T-cell Subset Radiosensitivity1

    PubMed Central

    Pugh, Jason L.; Sukhina, Alona S.; Seed, Thomas M.; Manley, Nancy R.; Sempowski, Gregory A.; van den Brink, Marcel R.M.; Smithey, Megan J.; Nikolich-Zugich, Janko

    2014-01-01

    Lymphocytes are sensitive to ionizing radiation and naïve lymphocytes are more radiosensitive than their memory counterparts. Less is known about radiosensitivity of memory cell subsets. We examined the radiosensitivity of naïve (TN), effector memory (TEM), and central memory (TCM) T cell subsets in C57BL/6 mice, and found TEM to be more resistant to radiation-induced apoptosis than either TN or TCM. Surprisingly, we found no correlation between the extent of radiation-induced apoptosis in T cell subsets and : (i) levels of pro- and anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 family members; or (ii) the H2-AX content and maximal γH2-AX fold change. Rather, TEM cell survival correlated with higher levels of immediate γH2-AX marking, immediate break binding and genome-wide open chromatin structure. T cells were able to mark DNA damage seemingly instantly (30 s), even if kept on ice. Relaxing chromatin with the histone deacetylase inhibitor valproic acid following radiation or etoposide treatment, improved the survival of TCM and TN cells up to levels seen in the resistant TEM cells, but did not improve survival from caspase-mediated apoptosis. We conclude that an open genome-wide chromatin state is the key determinant of efficient immediate repair of DNA damage in T cells, explaining the observed T cell subset radiosensitivity differences. PMID:24990082

  10. Osteogenic potency of nacre on human mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Green, David W; Kwon, Hyuk-Jae; Jung, Han-Sung

    2015-03-01

    Nacre seashell is a natural osteoinductive biomaterial with strong effects on osteoprogenitors, osteoblasts, and osteoclasts during bone tissue formation and morphogenesis. Although nacre has shown, in one study, to induce bridging of new bone across large non-union bone defects in 8 individual human patients, there have been no succeeding human surgical studies to confirm this outstanding potency. But the molecular mechanisms associated with nacre osteoinduction and the influence on bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BMSC's), skeletal stem cells or bone marrow stromal cells remain elusive. In this study we highlight the phenotypic and biochemical effects of Pinctada maxima nacre chips and the global nacre soluble protein matrix (SPM) on primary human bone marrow-derived stromal cells (hBMSCs) in vitro. In static co-culture with nacre chips, the hBMSCs secreted Alkaline phosphatase (ALP) at levels that exceeded bone morphogenetic protein (rhBMP-2) treatment. Concentrated preparation of SPM applied to Stro-1 selected hBMSC's led to rapid ALP secretions, at concentrations exceeding the untreated controls even in osteogenic conditions. Within 21 days the same population of Stro-1 selected hBMSCs proliferated and secreted collagens I-IV, indicating the premature onset of an osteoblast phenotype. The same SPM was found to promote unselected hBMSC differentiation with osteocalcin detected at 7 days, and proliferation increased at 7 days in a dose-dependent manner. In conclusion, nacre particles and nacre SPM induced the early stages of human bone cell differentiation, indicating that they may be promising soluble factors with osteoinductive capacity in primary human bone cell progenitors such as, hBMSC's.

  11. Antimicrobial potency and selectivity of simplified symmetric-end peptides.

    PubMed

    Dong, Na; Zhu, Xin; Chou, Shuli; Shan, Anshan; Li, Weizhong; Jiang, Junguang

    2014-09-01

    Because antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are potentially useful for the treatment of multidrug-resistant infections, more attention is being paid to the structural modification and structure-function relationship of both naturally occurring and synthetic AMPs. Previous studies indicated that Protegrin-1 (PG-1), isolated from porcine leukocytes, exhibited considerable antimicrobial activity and cytotoxicity. The β-turn of PG-1 floated on the surface of bacterial membrane, while its β-strand inserted into the bacterial membrane and formed pores that were dedicated to producing cytotoxicity. For reducing cytotoxicity and improving cells selectivity, we designed a series of simplified symmetric-end peptides by combining the β-turn of PG-1 with simple amino acid repeat sequences. The sequence of designed symmetric-end peptides is (XR)nH(RX)n, (n = 1,2; X represents I, F, W and P; H represents CRRRFC). The symmetric-end peptides displayed antimicrobial activity against both gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria. In particular, (XR)2H(RX)2 (X here is I, F and W) showed greater antimicrobial potency than PG-1. Hemolysis activity and cytotoxicity, detected by using human red blood cells (RBCs) and human embryonic lung fibroblasts MRC-5 cells, were observably lower than the native peptide PG-1. (IR)2H(RI)2 (IR2), folded into β-sheet structures, displayed the highest therapeutic index, suggesting its great cell selectivity. The fluorescence spectroscopy, flow cytometry, and electron microscopy observation indicated that IR2 exhibited great membrane penetration potential by inducing membrane blebbing, disruption and lysis. Collectively, generating symmetric-end β-sheet peptides is a promising strategy for designing effective AMPs with great antimicrobial activities and cell selectivity.

  12. Emergency planning and the acute toxic potency of inhaled ammonia.

    PubMed Central

    Michaels, R A

    1999-01-01

    Ammonia is present in agriculture and commerce in many if not most communities. This report evaluates the toxic potency of ammonia, based on three types of data: anecdotal data, in some cases predating World War 1, reconstructions of contemporary industrial accidents, and animal bioassays. Standards and guidelines for human exposure have been driven largely by the anecdotal data, suggesting that ammonia at 5,000-10,000 parts per million, volume/volume (ppm-v), might be lethal within 5-10 min. However, contemporary accident reconstructions suggest that ammonia lethality requires higher concentrations. For example, 33,737 ppm-v was a 5-min zero-mortality value in a major ammonia release in 1973 in South Africa. Comparisons of secondary reports of ammonia lethality with original sources revealed discrepancies in contemporary sources, apparently resulting from failure to examine old documents or accurately translate foreign documents. The present investigation revealed that contemporary accident reconstructions yield ammonia lethality levels comparable to those in dozens of reports of animal bioassays, after adjustment of concentrations to human equivalent concentrations via U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) procedures. Ammonia levels potentially causing irreversible injury or impairing the ability of exposed people to escape from further exposure or from coincident perils similarly have been biased downwardly in contemporary sources. The EPA has identified ammonia as one of 366 extremely hazardous substances subject to community right-to-know provisions of the Superfund Act and emergency planning provisions of the Clean Air Act. The Clean Air Act defines emergency planning zones (EPZs) around industrial facilities exceeding a threshold quantity of ammonia on-site. This study suggests that EPZ areas around ammonia facilities can be reduced, thereby also reducing emergency planning costs, which will vary roughly with the EPZ radius squared. Images Figure 1

  13. Examining the profile of high-potency cannabis and its association with severity of cannabis dependence.

    PubMed

    Freeman, T P; Winstock, A R

    2015-11-01

    Cannabis use is decreasing in England and Wales, while demand for cannabis treatment in addiction services continues to rise. This could be partly due to an increased availability of high-potency cannabis. Adults residing in the UK were questioned about their drug use, including three types of cannabis (high potency: skunk; low potency: other grass, resin). Cannabis types were profiled and examined for possible associations between frequency of use and (i) cannabis dependence, (ii) cannabis-related concerns. Frequent use of high-potency cannabis predicted a greater severity of dependence [days of skunk use per month: b = 0.254, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.161-0.357, p < 0.001] and this effect became stronger as age decreased (b = -0.006, 95% CI -0.010 to -0.002, p = 0.004). By contrast, use of low-potency cannabis was not associated with dependence (days of other grass use per month: b = 0.020, 95% CI -0.029 to 0.070, p = 0.436; days of resin use per month: b = 0.025, 95% CI -0.019 to 0.067, p = 0.245). Frequency of cannabis use (all types) did not predict severity of cannabis-related concerns. High-potency cannabis was clearly distinct from low-potency varieties by its marked effects on memory and paranoia. It also produced the best high, was preferred, and most available. High-potency cannabis use is associated with an increased severity of dependence, especially in young people. Its profile is strongly defined by negative effects (memory, paranoia), but also positive characteristics (best high, preferred type), which may be important when considering clinical or public health interventions focusing on cannabis potency.

  14. Systematic Evaluation of the Metabolic to Mitogenic Potency Ratio for B10-Substituted Insulin Analogues

    PubMed Central

    Glendorf, Tine; Knudsen, Louise; Stidsen, Carsten E.; Hansen, Bo F.; Hegelund, Anne Charlotte; Sørensen, Anders R.; Nishimura, Erica; Kjeldsen, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Background Insulin analogues comprising acidic amino acid substitutions at position B10 have previously been shown to display increased mitogenic potencies compared to human insulin and the underlying molecular mechanisms have been subject to much scrutiny and debate. However, B10 is still an attractive position for amino acid substitutions given its important role in hexamer formation. The aim of this study was to investigate the relationships between the receptor binding properties as well as the metabolic and mitogenic potencies of a series of insulin analogues with different amino acid substitutions at position B10 and to identify a B10-substituted insulin analogue without an increased mitogenic to metabolic potency ratio. Methodology/Principal Findings A panel of ten singly-substituted B10 insulin analogues with different amino acid side chain characteristics were prepared and insulin receptor (both isoforms) and IGF-I receptor binding affinities using purified receptors, insulin receptor dissociation rates using BHK cells over-expressing the human insulin receptor, metabolic potencies by lipogenesis in isolated rat adipocytes, and mitogenic potencies using two different cell types predominantly expressing either the insulin or the IGF-I receptor were systematically investigated. Only analogues B10D and B10E with significantly increased insulin and IGF-I receptor affinities as well as decreased insulin receptor dissociation rates displayed enhanced mitogenic potencies in both cell types employed. For the remaining analogues with less pronounced changes in receptor affinities and insulin receptor dissociation rates, no apparent correlation between insulin receptor occupancy time and mitogenicity was observed. Conclusions/Significance Several B10-substituted insulin analogues devoid of disproportionate increases in mitogenic compared to metabolic potencies were identified. In the present study, receptor binding affinity rather than insulin receptor off

  15. Correlation of liquid chromatographic and biological assay for potency assessment of filgrastim and related impurities.

    PubMed

    Skrlin, Ana; Kosor Krnic, Ela; Gosak, Darko; Prester, Berislav; Mrsa, Vladimir; Vuletic, Marko; Runac, Domagoj

    2010-11-02

    In vivo and in vitro potency assays have always been a critical tool for confirmation of protein activity. However, due to their complexity and time consuming procedures, it remains a challenge to find an alternative analytical approach that would enable their replacement with no impact on the quality of provided information. The goal of this research was to determine if a correlation between liquid chromatography assays and in vitro biological assay could be established for filgrastim (recombinant human granulocyte-colony stimulating factor, rhG-CSF) samples containing various amounts of related impurities. For that purpose, relevant filgrastim related impurities were purified to homogeneity and characterized by liquid chromatography and mass spectrometry. A significant correlation (R(2)>0.90) between the two types of assays was revealed. Potency of oxidized filgrastim was determined to be approximately 25% of filgrastim stated potency (1 x 10(8)IU/mg of protein). Formyl-methionine filgrastim had potency of 89% of the filgrastim stated potency, while filgrastim dimer had 67% of filgrastim stated potency. A mathematical model for the estimation of biological activity of filgrastim samples from chromatography data was established and a significant correlation between experimental potency values and potency values estimated by the mathematical model was obtained (R(2)=0.92). Based on these results a conclusion was made that reversed phase high performance liquid chromatography could be used as an alternative for the in vitro biological assay for potency assessment of filgrastim samples. Such an alternative model would enable substitution of a complex and time consuming biological assay with a robust and precise instrumental method in many practical cases. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. The selective expression of distinct fucosylated glycoproteins on murine T and B lymphocyte subsets.

    PubMed

    Abdul-Salam, Fatma; Mansour, Mohamed H; Al-Shemary, Tahany

    2005-01-01

    The putative expression of distinct terminally fucosylated glycoconjugates among murine lymphocyte subpopulations was sought using Ulex europaeus agglutinin-I (UEA-I) and Anguilla anguilla agglutinin (AAA), each with a distinctive primary binding preference to type II and type I blood group H oligosaccharide determinants, respectively. In newly born and adult mice, direct labeling of isolated lymphocyte subsets in suspension, as well as immunohistochemical assays were indicative of the age-regulated co-expression of the UEA-I-reactive ligand among thymic epithelial cells and a subset of the mature (PNA-), medullary thymocytes. In the spleen, UEA-I-ligand expression was selectively confined to a subset of the CD4+ T lymphocytes scattered around red pulp sinuses in newly born mice, but distinctively localized within the T cell-dependent periarteriolar lymphoid sheath compartment in adult mice. Among thymocytes of adult mice, two-dimensional Western blots demonstrated the expression of the UEA-I-reactive ligand among multiple isoforms of three major 50, 114 and 180kDa acidic glycoproteins, of which, heterogeneous weight and charge variants of the 114kDa component were also evident among splenocytes. The expression of the AAA-reactive ligand was, on the other hand, restricted to a single major 120 kDa acidic glycoprotein, in addition to a minor molecular weight variant of 115kDa, associated with a subset of immature IgM+ B lymphocytes localized within the red pulp, in both newly born and adult mice. The significance of these findings is discussed in relation to mechanisms that govern lymphocyte maturation, selection and migration.

  17. Thymic Dendritic Cell Subsets Display Distinct Efficiencies and Mechanisms of Intercellular MHC Transfer.

    PubMed

    Kroger, Charles J; Spidale, Nicholas A; Wang, Bo; Tisch, Roland

    2017-01-01

    Thymic dendritic cells (DC) delete self-antigen-specific thymocytes, and drive development of Foxp3-expressing immunoregulatory T cells. Unlike medullary thymic epithelial cells, which express and present peripheral self-antigen, DC must acquire self-antigen to mediate thymic negative selection. One such mechanism entails the transfer of surface MHC-self peptide complexes from medullary thymic epithelial cells to thymic DC. Despite the importance of thymic DC cross-dressing in negative selection, the factors that regulate the process and the capacity of different thymic DC subsets to acquire MHC and stimulate thymocytes are poorly understood. In this study intercellular MHC transfer by thymic DC subsets was investigated using an MHC-mismatch-based in vitro system. Thymic conventional DC (cDC) subsets signal regulatory protein α (SIRPα(+)) and CD8α(+) readily acquired MHC class I and II from thymic epithelial cells but plasmacytoid DC were less efficient. Intercellular MHC transfer was donor-cell specific; thymic DC readily acquired MHC from TEC plus thymic or splenic DC, whereas thymic or splenic B cells were poor donors. Furthermore DC origin influenced cross-dressing; thymic versus splenic DC exhibited an increased capacity to capture TEC-derived MHC, which correlated with direct expression of EpCAM by DC. Despite similar capacities to acquire MHC-peptide complexes, thymic CD8α(+) cDC elicited increased T cell stimulation relative to SIRPα(+) cDC. DC cross-dressing was cell-contact dependent and unaffected by lipid raft disruption of donor TEC. Furthermore, blocking PI3K signaling reduced MHC acquisition by thymic CD8α(+) cDC and plasmacytoid DC but not SIRPα(+) cDC. These findings demonstrate that multiple parameters influence the efficiency of and distinct mechanisms drive intercellular MHC transfer by thymic DC subsets. Copyright © 2016 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  18. Differential in radiosensitizing potency of enantiomers of the fatty acid synthase inhibitor C75

    PubMed Central

    Babich, John W.; Mairs, Robert J.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The elevated activity of fatty acid synthase has been reported in a number of cancer types. Inhibition of this enzyme has been demonstrated to induce cancer cell death and reduce tumor growth. In addition, the fatty acid synthase inhibitor drug C75 has been reported to synergistically enhance the cancer‐killing ability of ionizing radiation. However, clinical use of C75 has been limited due to its producing weight loss, believed to be caused by alterations in the activity of carnitine palmitoyltransferase‐1. C75 is administered in the form of a racemic mixture of (−) and (+) enantiomers that may differ in their regulation of fatty acid synthase and carnitine palmitoyltransferase‐1. Therefore, we assessed the relative cancer‐killing potency of different enantiomeric forms of C75 in prostate cancer cells. These results suggest that (−)‐C75 is the more cytotoxic enantiomer and has greater radiosensitizing capacity than (+)‐C75. These observations will stimulate the development of fatty acid synthase inhibitors that are selective for cancer cells and enhance the tumor‐killing activity of ionizing radiation, while minimizing weight loss in cancer patients. PMID:27901292

  19. Differential in radiosensitizing potency of enantiomers of the fatty acid synthase inhibitor C75.

    PubMed

    Rae, Colin; Babich, John W; Mairs, Robert J

    2017-01-01

    The elevated activity of fatty acid synthase has been reported in a number of cancer types. Inhibition of this enzyme has been demonstrated to induce cancer cell death and reduce tumor growth. In addition, the fatty acid synthase inhibitor drug C75 has been reported to synergistically enhance the cancer-killing ability of ionizing radiation. However, clinical use of C75 has been limited due to its producing weight loss, believed to be caused by alterations in the activity of carnitine palmitoyltransferase-1. C75 is administered in the form of a racemic mixture of (-) and (+) enantiomers that may differ in their regulation of fatty acid synthase and carnitine palmitoyltransferase-1. Therefore, we assessed the relative cancer-killing potency of different enantiomeric forms of C75 in prostate cancer cells. These results suggest that (-)-C75 is the more cytotoxic enantiomer and has greater radiosensitizing capacity than (+)-C75. These observations will stimulate the development of fatty acid synthase inhibitors that are selective for cancer cells and enhance the tumor-killing activity of ionizing radiation, while minimizing weight loss in cancer patients.

  20. Modeling the emetic potencies of food-borne trichothecenes by benchmark dose methodology

    PubMed Central

    Male, Denis; Wu, Wenda; Mitchell, Nicole J.; Bursian, Steven; Pestka, James J.; Wu, Felicia

    2016-01-01

    Trichothecene mycotoxins commonly co-contaminate cereal products. They cause immunosuppression, anorexia, and emesis in multiple species. Dietary exposure to such toxins often occurs in mixtures. Hence, if it were possible to determine their relative toxicities and assign toxic equivalency factors (TEFs) to each trichothecene, risk management and regulation of these mycotoxins could become more comprehensive and simple. We used a mink emesis model to compare the toxicities of deoxynivalenol, 3-acetyldeoxynivalenol, 15-acetyldeoxynivalenol, nivalenol, fusarenon-X, HT-2 toxin, and T-2 toxin. These toxins were administered to mink via gavage and intraperitoneal injection. The United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) benchmark dose software was used to determine benchmark doses for each trichothecene. The relative potencies of each of these toxins were calculated as the ratios of their benchmark doses to that of DON. Our results showed that mink were more sensitive to orally administered toxins than to toxins administered by IP. T-2 and HT-2 toxins caused the greatest emetic responses, followed by FX, and then by DON, its acetylated derivatives, and NIV. Although these results provide key information on comparative toxicities, there is still a need for more animal based studies focusing on various endpoints and combined effects of trichothecenes before TEFs can be established. PMID:27292944

  1. Operating a motor vehicle after marijuana use: Perspectives from people who use high potency marijuana.

    PubMed

    Cavazos-Rehg, Patricia A; Krauss, Melissa J; Sowles, Shaina J; Zewdie, Kidist; Bierut, Laura

    2017-08-11

    With advancing marijuana legalization in the United States, a primary concern is the possible increase in consequences relating to marijuana driving impairment, especially among people who use high potency marijuana (i.e., extracts). In this study we assessed the risk perception and experiences of driving under the influence of marijuana by investigating people who use extracts. Participants from two studies were queried about driving after using marijuana. In Study 1, phone interviews (n = 19) were conducted with people who use extracts. In Study 2, we conducted a nationwide survey of people who use extracts (n = 174) recruited via an online existing panel. Responses to marijuana and driving-related questions were qualitatively coded for themes (e.g. riskiness, engagement in behavior) developed by the research team. Prominent themes identified in Study #1 suggested a belief that driving risk following marijuana use is dependent on the individual (i.e., response/tolerance) or the amount/type of marijuana consumed. This theme was corroborated by Study #2 participants. Those who perceived no or minimal risk from driving following marijuana use were more likely to report, engagement in driving following extracts use. More research is needed to understand how marijuana, especially in its concentrated form, impacts driving ability in order to develop appropriate and scientifically sound regulations. Such research could subsequently fill the need to improve and more widely disseminate prevention messages on marijuana use and driving risks.

  2. Analysis of the In Vivo Turnover of CD4+ T-Cell Subsets in Chronically SIV-Infected Sooty Mangabeys.

    PubMed

    Ortiz, Alexandra M; Carnathan, Diane G; Yu, Joana; Sheehan, Katherine M; Kim, Peter; Reynaldi, Arnold; Vanderford, Thomas H; Klatt, Nichole R; Brenchley, Jason M; Davenport, Miles P; Silvestri, Guido

    2016-01-01

    Aberrant turnover of memory CD4+ T-cells is central to Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome (AIDS) progression. Understanding the relationship between the turnover of CD4+ subsets and immunological homeostasis during simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) infection in natural hosts may provide insight into mechanisms of immune regulation that may serve as models for therapeutic intervention in Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV)-infected persons. Sooty mangabeys (SMs) have naturally evolved with SIV to avoid AIDS progression while maintaining healthy peripheral CD4+ T-cell counts and thus represent a model by which therapeutic interventions for AIDS progression might be elucidated. To assess the relationship between the turnover of CD4+ subsets and immunological homeostasis during SIV infection in non-progressive hosts, we treated 6 SIV-uninfected and 9 SIV-infected SMs with 2'-bromo-5'-deoxyuridine (BrdU) for 14 days and longitudinally assessed CD4+ T-cell subset turnover by polychromatic flow cytometry. We observed that, in SIV-infected SMs, turnover of CD4+ T-cell naïve and central, transitional, and effector memory subsets is comparable to that in uninfected animals. Comparable turnover of CD4+ T-cell subsets irrespective of SIV-infection status likely contributes to the lack of aberrant immune activation and disease progression observed after infection in non-progressive hosts.

  3. Analysis of the In Vivo Turnover of CD4+ T-Cell Subsets in Chronically SIV-Infected Sooty Mangabeys

    PubMed Central

    Ortiz, Alexandra M.; Carnathan, Diane G.; Yu, Joana; Sheehan, Katherine M.; Kim, Peter; Reynaldi, Arnold; Vanderford, Thomas H.; Klatt, Nichole R.; Brenchley, Jason M.; Davenport, Miles P.; Silvestri, Guido

    2016-01-01

    Aberrant turnover of memory CD4+ T-cells is central to Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome (AIDS) progression. Understanding the relationship between the turnover of CD4+ subsets and immunological homeostasis during simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) infection in natural hosts may provide insight into mechanisms of immune regulation that may serve as models for therapeutic intervention in Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV)-infected persons. Sooty mangabeys (SMs) have naturally evolved with SIV to avoid AIDS progression while maintaining healthy peripheral CD4+ T-cell counts and thus represent a model by which therapeutic interventions for AIDS progression might be elucidated. To assess the relationship between the turnover of CD4+ subsets and immunological homeostasis during SIV infection in non-progressive hosts, we treated 6 SIV-uninfected and 9 SIV-infected SMs with 2’-bromo-5’-deoxyuridine (BrdU) for 14 days and longitudinally assessed CD4+ T-cell subset turnover by polychromatic flow cytometry. We observed that, in SIV-infected SMs, turnover of CD4+ T-cell naïve and central, transitional, and effector memory subsets is comparable to that in uninfected animals. Comparable turnover of CD4+ T-cell subsets irrespective of SIV-infection status likely contributes to the lack of aberrant immune activation and disease progression observed after infection in non-progressive hosts. PMID:27227993

  4. Nucleophilic selectivity of alkylating agents and their hypermutability in Drosophila as predictors of carcinogenic potency in rodents.

    PubMed

    Vogel, E W; Barbin, A; Nivard, M J; Bartsch, H

    1990-12-01

    The nucleophilic selectivity (Swain-Scott s constant or initial 7-alkylguanine/O6-alkylguanine ratio in DNA) of 60 alkylating agents, mostly monofunctional or cross-linking was compared to their carcinogenic potency in rodents (median TD50 estimates) and to two genotoxicity indices in Drosophila: (i) hypermutability, measured by the increased frequency of induced sex-linked recessive lethal mutations (SLRL) in a strain defective in DNA excision repair (exr-), as compared to the wild-type (exr+); (ii) relative clastogenic efficiency, expressed by the ratio of chromosomal aberrations (ring-X loss) to SLRL determined in the exr+ strain. For a subset of direct-acting, monofunctional alkylating agents, nucleophilic selectivity and TD50 values or hypermutability indices were linearly correlated. In addition, the hypermutability indices in Drosophila by methylating or ethylating procarcinogens were similar to the corresponding values of their ultimate metabolites. In contrast, cross-linking agents, including antitumour drugs, did not show these positive correlations. The relative clastogenic efficiencies in Drosophila of 26 direct-acting, alkylating carcinogens increased with both their cross-linking activity and nucleophilic selectivity. By analyzing mutational spectra in Drosophila induced in the vermilion gene by four monofunctional alkylating agents with contrasting s values, critical DNA lesions, i.e. type of base pair substitution mutations, deletions, insertions, involved in genotoxicity were pinpointed. Thus, these multi-endpoint analyses should, as a new approach, assist in the quantitative risk evaluation of genotoxic agents.

  5. Classification of HIV protease inhibitors on the basis of their antiviral potency using radial basis function neural networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patankar, S. J.; Jurs, P. C.

    2003-02-01

    HIV protease inhibitors are being used as frontline therapy in the treatment of HIV patients. Multi-drug-resistant HIV mutant strains are emerging with the initial aggressive multi-drug treatment of HIV patients. This necessitates continued search for novel inhibitors of viral replication. These protease inhibitors may further be useful as pharmacological agents for inhibition of other viral replication. Classification models of HIV Protease inhibitors are developed using a data set of 123 compounds containing several heterocycles. Their inhibitory concentrations expressed as log (IC50) ranged from -1.52 to 2.12 log units. The dataset was divided into active and inactive classes on the basis of their antiviral potency. Initially a two-class problem (active, inactive) is explored using k-nearest neighbor approach. In order to introduce non-linearity in the classifier different approaches were investigated. This led to the goal of a fast, simple, minimum user input, radial basis function neural network (RBFNN) classifier development. Then the same two-class problem was resolved using the (RBFNN) classifier. A genetic algorithm with RBFNN fitness evaluator was used to search for the optimum descriptor subsets. The application of majority rules was also tested for the RBFNN classification. The best six descriptor model found by the new cost function showed predictive ability in the high 80% range for an external prediction set.

  6. The incidence of kidney injury for patients treated with a high-potency versus moderate-potency statin regimen after an acute coronary syndrome.

    PubMed

    Sarma, Amy; Cannon, Christopher P; de Lemos, James; Rouleau, Jean L; Lewis, Eldrin F; Guo, Jianping; Mega, Jessica L; Sabatine, Marc S; O'Donoghue, Michelle L

    2014-05-01

    Observational studies have raised concerns that high-potency statins increase the risk of acute kidney injury. We therefore examined the incidence of kidney injury across 2 randomized trials of statin therapy. PROVE IT-TIMI 22 enrolled 4162 subjects after an acute coronary syndrome (ACS) and randomized them to atorvastatin 80 mg/day versus pravastatin 40 mg/day. A-to-Z enrolled 4497 subjects after ACS and randomized them to a high-potency (simvastatin 40 mg/day × 1 months, then simvastatin 80 mg/day) versus a delayed moderate-potency statin strategy (placebo × 4 months, then simvastatin 20 mg/day). Serum creatinine was assessed centrally at serial time points. Adverse events (AEs) relating to kidney injury were identified through database review. Across both trials, mean serum creatinine was similar between treatment arms at baseline and throughout follow-up. In A-to-Z, the incidence of a 1.5-fold or ≥ 0.3 mg/dL rise in serum creatinine was 11.4% for subjects randomized to a high-potency statin regimen versus 12.4% for those on a delayed moderate-potency regimen (odds ratio [OR], 0.91; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.76 to 1.10; P=0.33). In PROVE IT-TIMI 22, the incidence was 9.4% for subjects randomized to atorvastatin 80 mg/day and 10.6% for subjects randomized to pravastatin 40 mg/day (OR, 0.88; 95% CI, 0.71 to 1.09; P=0.25). Consistent results were observed for different kidney injury thresholds and in individuals with diabetes mellitus or with moderate renal dysfunction. The incidence of kidney injury-related adverse events (AEs) was not statistically different for patients on a high-potency versus moderate-potency statin regimen (OR, 1.06; 95% CI, 0.68 to 1.67; P=0.78). For patients enrolled in 2 large randomized trials of statin therapy after ACS, the use of a high-potency statin regimen did not increase the risk of kidney injury.

  7. A Reassessment of IgM Memory Subsets in Humans.

    PubMed

    Bagnara, Davide; Squillario, Margherita; Kipling, David; Mora, Thierry; Walczak, Aleksandra M; Da Silva, Lucie; Weller, Sandra; Dunn-Walters, Deborah K; Weill, Jean-Claude; Reynaud, Claude-Agnès

    2015-10-15

    From paired blood and spleen samples from three adult donors, we performed high-throughput VH sequencing of human B cell subsets defined by IgD and CD27 expression: IgD(+)CD27(+) ("marginal zone [MZ]"), IgD(-)CD27(+) ("memory," including IgM ["IgM-only"], IgG and IgA) and IgD(-)CD27(-) cells ("double-negative," including IgM, IgG, and IgA). A total of 91,294 unique sequences clustered in 42,670 clones, revealing major clonal expansions in each of these subsets. Among these clones, we further analyzed those shared sequences from different subsets or tissues for VH gene mutation, H-CDR3-length, and VH/JH usage, comparing these different characteristics with all sequences from their subset of origin for which these parameters constitute a distinct signature. The IgM-only repertoire profile differed notably from that of MZ B cells by a higher mutation frequency and lower VH4 and higher JH6 gene usage. Strikingly, IgM sequences from clones shared between the MZ and the memory IgG/IgA compartments showed a mutation and repertoire profile of IgM-only and not of MZ B cells. Similarly, all IgM clonal relationships (among MZ, IgM-only, and double-negative compartments) involved sequences with the characteristics of IgM-only B cells. Finally, clonal relationships between tissues suggested distinct recirculation characteristics between MZ and switched B cells. The "IgM-only" subset (including cells with its repertoire signature but higher IgD or lower CD27 expression levels) thus appear as the only subset showing precursor-product relationships with CD27(+) switched memory B cells, indicating that they represent germinal center-derived IgM memory B cells and that IgM memory and MZ B cells constitute two distinct entities. Copyright © 2015 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  8. A reassessment of IgM memory subsets in humans

    PubMed Central

    Bagnara, Davide; Squillario, Margherita; Kipling, David; Mora, Thierry; Walczak, Aleksandra M.; Da Silva, Lucie; Weller, Sandra; Dunn-Walters, Deborah K.; Weill, Jean-Claude; Reynaud, Claude-Agnès

    2015-01-01

    From paired blood and spleen samples from three adult donors we performed high-throughput V-h sequencing of human B-cell subsets defined by IgD and CD27 expression: IgD+CD27+ (“MZ”), IgD−CD27+(“memory”, including IgM (“IgM-only”), IgG and IgA) and IgD−CD27− cells (“double-negative”, including IgM, IgG and IgA). 91,294 unique sequences clustered in 42,670 clones, revealing major clonal expansions in each of these subsets. Among these clones, we further analyzed those shared sequences from different subsets or tissues for Vh-gene mutation, H-CDR3-length, and Vh/Jh usage, comparing these different characteristics with all sequences from their subset of origin, for which these parameters constitute a distinct signature. The IgM-only repertoire profile differed notably from that of MZ B cells by a higher mutation frequency, and lower Vh4 and higher Jh6 gene usage. Strikingly, IgM sequences from clones shared between the MZ and the memory IgG/IgA compartments showed a mutation and repertoire profile of IgM-only and not of MZ B cells. Similarly, all IgM clonal relationships (between MZ, IgM-only, and double-negative compartments) involved sequences with the characteristics of IgM-only B cells. Finally, clonal relationships between tissues suggested distinct recirculation characteristics between MZ and switched B cells. The “IgM-only” subset (including cells with its repertoire signature but higher IgD or lower CD27 expression levels) thus appear as the only subset showing precursor-product relationships with CD27+ switched memory B cells, indicating that they represent germinal center-derived IgM memory B cells, and that IgM memory and MZ B cells constitute two distinct entities. PMID:26355154

  9. Boosting oncolytic adenovirus potency with magnetic nanoparticles and magnetic force.

    PubMed

    Tresilwised, Nittaya; Pithayanukul, Pimolpan; Mykhaylyk, Olga; Holm, Per Sonne; Holzmüller, Regina; Anton, Martina; Thalhammer, Stefan; Adigüzel, Denis; Döblinger, Markus; Plank, Christian

    2010-08-02

    Oncolytic adenoviruses rank among the most promising innovative agents in cancer therapy. We examined the potential of boosting the efficacy of the oncolytic adenovirus dl520 by associating it with magnetic nanoparticles and magnetic-field-guided infection in multidrug-resistant (MDR) cancer cells in vitro and upon intratumoral injection in vivo. The virus was complexed by self-assembly with core-shell nanoparticles having a magnetite core of about 10 nm and stabilized by a shell containing 68 mass % lithium 3-[2-(perfluoroalkyl)ethylthio]propionate) and 32 mass % 25 kDa branched polyethylenimine. Optimized virus binding, sufficiently stable in 50% fetal calf serum, was found at nanoparticle-to-virus ratios of 5 fg of Fe per physical virus particle (VP) and above. As estimated from magnetophoretic mobility measurements, 3,600 to 4,500 magnetite nanocrystallites were associated per virus particle. Ultrastructural analysis by electron and atomic force microscopy showed structurally intact viruses surrounded by magnetic particles that occasionally bridged several virus particles. Viral uptake into cells at a given virus dose was enhanced 10-fold compared to nonmagnetic virus when infections were carried out under the influence of a magnetic field. Increased virus internalization resulted in a 10-fold enhancement of the oncolytic potency in terms of the dose required for killing 50% of the target cells (IC(50) value) and an enhancement of 4 orders of magnitude in virus progeny formation at equal input virus doses compared to nonmagnetic viruses. Furthermore, the full oncolytic effect developed within two days postinfection compared with six days in a nonmagnetic virus as a reference. Plotting target cell viability versus internalized virus particles for magnetic and nonmagnetic virus showed that the inherent oncolytic productivity of the virus remained unchanged upon association with magnetic nanoparticles. Hence, we conclude that the mechanism of boosting the

  10. Potency of Massoia Bark in Combating Immunosuppressed-related Infection

    PubMed Central

    Hertiani, Triana; Pratiwi, Sylvia Utami Tunjung; Yuswanto, Agustinus; Permanasari, Prisci

    2016-01-01

    Background: As part of our search for new potential natural resources to eradicate infection, we have revealed the prominent potency of massoia bark (Massoia aromatica Becc, Lauraceae) in combating immunosuppressed-related infection. Materials and Methods: The extract was prepared by macerating the pulverized dried bark in ethanol 95%, followed by solvent evaporation. The oil was extracted from the dried bark by steam-hydrodistillation of which preparative thin-layer chromatography was performed on the oil to isolate the active constituent, C-10 massoia lactone (ML). Anti-biofilm assay against Candida albicans was conducted on polystyrene 96 wells microtiter plates, followed by a confocal laser scanning microscope observation to get three-dimensional profiles of the affected biofilms. Effects on the hyphae development inoculated on RPMI-1640 agar plates were observed for 7 days. Influences of samples on mice macrophage phagocytosis were examined by an in vitro technique. Samples concentration tested were in the range of 2.0–0.0625 mg/mL and done in triplicate. Results: Massoia bark extracts (oil and solid phase) and ML exhibited promising activities as anti-biofilm against C. albicans at IC50 0.074% v/v, 271 μg/mL and 0.026 μg/mL, respectively. The ML did not inhibit the hyphae development at the concentration tested; however, the extracts showed inhibition at 62.5 μg/mL. Macrophage phagocytosis stimulation was correlated to the ML content. Conclusion: Massoia bark is potential to be developed as anti-infective in immunosuppressed condition of which the C10 ML (C10H16O2) plays a major role in exerting activity. SUMMARY Massoia bark extracts (oily and solid phase) and C-10 Massoia lactone exhibited promising activities as antibiofilm against Candida albicans at IC50 are 0.074 %v/v, 271 μg/mL and 0.026 μg/mL respectively. The major constituent, C-10 Massoia lactone (C10H16O2) plays major role in exerting anticandida activity and potentially acts as an

  11. Haloperidol versus low-potency first-generation antipsychotic drugs for schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Tardy, Magdolna; Huhn, Maximilian; Kissling, Werner; Engel, Rolf R; Leucht, Stefan

    2014-07-09

    Antipsychotic drugs are the core treatment for schizophrenia. Treatment guidelines state that there is no difference in efficacy between antipsychotic compounds, however, low-potency antipsychotic drugs are often clinically perceived as less efficacious than high-potency compounds, and they also seem to differ in their side-effects. To review the effects in clinical response of haloperidol and low-potency antipsychotics for people with schizophrenia. We searched the Cochrane Schizophrenia Group Trials Register (July 2010). We included all randomised trials comparing haloperidol with first-generation low-potency antipsychotic drugs for people with schizophrenia or schizophrenia-like psychosis. We extracted data independently. For dichotomous data, we calculated risk ratios (RR) and their 95% confidence intervals (CI) on an intention-to-treat basis based on a random-effects model. For continuous data, we calculated mean differences (MD), again based on a random-effects model. The review currently includes 17 randomised trials and 877 participants. The size of the included studies was between 16 and 109 participants. All studies were short-term with a study length between two and 12 weeks. Overall, sequence generation, allocation procedures and blinding were poorly reported. We found no clear evidence that haloperidol was superior to low-potency antipsychotic drugs in terms of clinical response (haloperidol 40%, low-potency drug 36%, 14 RCTs, n = 574, RR 1.11, CI 0.86 to 1.44 lowquality evidence). There was also no clear evidence of benefit for either group in acceptability of treatment with equivocal difference in the number of participants leaving the studies early due to any reason (haloperidol 13%, low-potency antipsychotics 17%, 11 RCTs, n = 408, RR 0.82, CI 0.38 to 1.77, low quality evidence). Similar equivocal results were found between groups for experiencing at least one adverse effect (haloperidol 70%, low-potency antipsychotics 35%, 5 RCTs n = 158, RR 1

  12. Comptational comparison of asbestos fibers: Dosimetry model simulations to characterize variabilty and potency (Presentation poster)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Inhaled asbestos fibers result in respiratory diseases such as asbestosis, lung cancer and mesothelioma, but different asbestos fibers exhibit different potency. We applied a recently developed dosimetry model (Asgharian et al., Poster # 104) that describes th...

  13. Quantitative structure - mesothelioma Potency Model Optimization for Complex Mixtures of Elongated Particles in Rat Pleura

    EPA Science Inventory

    Cancer potencies of mineral and synthetic elongated particle (EP) mixtures, including fibers from asbestos, are influenced by changes in fiber dose composition, bioavailability and biodurability in combination with relevant cytotoxic dose-response relationships. A unique and com...

  14. Comptational comparison of asbestos fibers: Dosimetry model simulations to characterize variabilty and potency (Presentation poster)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Inhaled asbestos fibers result in respiratory diseases such as asbestosis, lung cancer and mesothelioma, but different asbestos fibers exhibit different potency. We applied a recently developed dosimetry model (Asgharian et al., Poster # 104) that describes th...

  15. Quantitative structure - mesothelioma Potency Model Optimization for Complex Mixtures of Elongated Particles in Rat Pleura

    EPA Science Inventory

    Cancer potencies of mineral and synthetic elongated particle (EP) mixtures, including fibers from asbestos, are influenced by changes in fiber dose composition, bioavailability and biodurability in combination with relevant cytotoxic dose-response relationships. A unique and com...

  16. Toxico-Cheminformatics and QSPR Modeling of the Carcinogenic Potency Database

    EPA Science Inventory

    Report on the development of a tiered, confirmatory scheme for prediction of chemical carcinogenicity based on QSAR studies of compounds with available mutagenic and carcinogenic data. For 693 such compounds from the Carcinogenic Potency Database characterized molecular topologic...

  17. THE VALENCE AND METHYLATION STATE OF ARSENIC DETERMINES ITS POTENCY IN INTERACTION WITH THE MITOTIC APPARATUS

    EPA Science Inventory

    We have previously shown that the cytotoxic and genotoxic potency of arsenicals is dependent upon their valence and methylation state. Trivalent methylated arsenicals are much more potent DNA damaging agents than are their inorganic and pentavalent counterparts. Furthermore, thei...

  18. THE VALENCE AND METHYLATION STATE OF ARSENIC DETERMINES ITS POTENCY IN INTERACTION WITH THE MITOTIC APPARATUS

    EPA Science Inventory

    We have previously shown that the cytotoxic and genotoxic potency of arsenicals is dependent upon their valence and methylation state. Trivalent methylated arsenicals are much more potent DNA damaging agents than are their inorganic and pentavalent counterparts. Furthermore, thei...

  19. CD4 CTL, a Cytotoxic Subset of CD4+ T Cells, Their Differentiation and Function

    PubMed Central

    Takeuchi, Arata; Saito, Takashi

    2017-01-01

    CD4+ T cells with cytotoxic activity (CD4 CTL) have been observed in various immune responses. These cells are characterized by their ability to secrete granzyme B and perforin and to kill the target cells in an MHC class II-restricted fashion. Although CD4 CTLs were once thought to be an in vitro artifact associated with long-term culturing, they have since been identified in vivo and shown to play important roles in antiviral and antitumor immunity, as well as in inflammation. Functional characterization of CD4 CTL suggests their potential significance for therapeutic purposes. However, in order to develop effective CD4 CTL therapy it is necessary to understand the differentiation and generation of these cells. Although the mechanisms regulating development of various CD4+ Th subsets have been clarified in terms of the cytokine and transcription factor requirement, the CD4 CTL differentiation mechanism remains elusive. These cells are thought to be most closely related to Th1 cells secreting IFNγ and regulated by eomesodermin and/or T-bet transcription factors for their differentiation. However, our studies and those of others have identified CD4 CTLs within other CD4+ T cell subsets, including naïve T cells. We have identified class I-restricted T cell-associated molecule as a marker of CD4 CTL and, by using this marker, we detected a subset of naïve T cells that have the potential to differentiate into CD4 CTL. CD4 CTL develops at sites of infections as well as inflammation. In this review, we summarize recent findings about the generation of CD4 CTL and propose a model with several differentiation pathways. PMID:28280496

  20. An inherently bi-functional subset of Foxp3+ T helper cells is controlled by the transcription factor Eos

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Madhav D.; Huang, Lei; Choi, Jeong-Hyeon; Lee, Eun-Joon; Wilson, James M.; Lemos, Henrique; Pan, Fan; Blazar, Bruce R.; Pardoll, Drew M.; Mellor, Andrew L; Shi, Huidong; Munn, David H.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY At sites of inflammation, certain regulatory T cells (Treg cells) can undergo rapid reprogramming into helper-like cells, without loss of the transcription factor Foxp3. We show that reprogramming is controlled by down-regulation of the transcription factor Eos (Ikzf4), an obligate co-repressor for Foxp3. Reprogramming was restricted to a specific subset of “Eoslabile” Treg cells which were present in the thymus and identifiable by characteristic surface markers and DNA methylation. Mice made deficient in this subset became impaired in their ability to provide help for presentation of new antigens to naive T cells. Down-regulation of Eos required the pro-inflammatory cytokine IL-6, and mice lacking IL-6 had impaired development and function of the Eos-labile subset. Conversely, the immunoregulatory enzyme IDO blocked loss of Eos, and prevented the Eos-labile Treg cells from reprogramming. Thus, the Foxp3+ lineage contains a committed subset of Treg cells capable of rapid conversion into biologically important helper cells. PMID:23684987

  1. Assessment of the skin sensitising potency of the lower alkyl methacrylate esters.

    PubMed

    Kimber, Ian; Pemberton, Mark A

    2014-10-01

    There is continued interest in, and imperatives for, the classification of contact allergens according to their relative skin sensitising potency. However, achieving that end can prove problematic, not least when there is an apparent lack of concordance between experimental assessments of potency and the prevalence allergic contact dermatitis as judged by clinical experience. For the purpose of exploring this issue, and illustrating the important considerations that are required to reach sound judgements about potency categorisation, the lower alkyl methacrylate esters (LAM) have been employed here as a case study. Although the sensitising potential of methyl methacrylate (MMA) has been reviewed previously, there is available new information that is relevant for assessment of skin sensitising potency. Moreover, for the purposes of this article, analyses have been extended to include also other LAM for which relevant data are available: ethyl methacrylate (EMA), n-butyl methacrylate (nBMA), isobutyl methacrylate (iBMA), and 2-ethylhexyl methacrylate (EHMA). In addressing the skin sensitising activity of these chemicals and in drawing conclusions regarding relative potency, a number of sources of information has been considered, including estimates of potency derived from local lymph node assay (LLNA) data, the results of guinea pig assays, and data derived from in silico methods and from recently developed in vitro approaches. Moreover, clinical experience of skin sensitisation of humans by LAM has also been evaluated. The conclusion drawn is that MMA and other LAM are contact allergens, but that none of these chemicals has any more than weak skin sensitising potency. We have also explored here the possible bases for this modest sensitising activity. Finally, the nature of exposure to LAM has been reviewed briefly and on the basis of that information, together with an understanding of skin sensitising potency, a risk assessment has been prepared.

  2. A compilation of ab-initio calculations of embrittling potencies in binary metallic alloys

    PubMed Central

    Gibson, Michael A.; Schuh, Christopher A.

    2015-01-01

    Segregation-induced changes in interfacial cohesion often control the mechanical properties of metals. The change in the work of separation of an interface upon segregation of a solute to the interface, termed the embrittling potency, is an atomic-level quantity used to predict and understand embrittlement phenomena. We present a compilation of calculations of embrittling potencies, along with references for these calculations. A discussion of this data is made in a separate article (Gibson and Schuh, 2016 [1]). PMID:26858979

  3. The relative potencies of thiopentone, ketamine, propanidid, alphaxalone and diazepam. A statistical study in man.

    PubMed

    Stella, L; Torri, G; Castiglioni, C L

    1979-02-01

    The potency of five i.v. anaesthetics (thiopentone, ketamine, alphaxalone (Althesin), propanidid and diazepam) was studied by determining the dose required to produce unconsciousness in 50% (UD50) and 95% (UD95) of patients. UD50 and UD95 were determined using the probit method. The effect of age on the anaesthetic requirement has been studied also. Relative to thiopentone, the potency was alphaxalone 9.22, diazepam 5.24, ketamine 4.37 and propanidid 1.006.

  4. Liver natural killer cells: subsets and roles in liver immunity

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Hui; Wisse, Eddie; Tian, Zhigang

    2016-01-01

    The liver represents a frontline immune organ that is constantly exposed to a variety of gut-derived antigens as a result of its unique location and blood supply. With a predominant role in innate immunity, the liver is enriched with various innate immune cells, among which natural killer (NK) cells play important roles in host defense and in maintaining immune balance. Hepatic NK cells were first described as ‘pit cells' in the rat liver in the 1970s. Recent studies of NK cells in mouse and human livers have shown that two distinct NK cell subsets, liver-resident NK cells and conventional NK (cNK) cells, are present in this organ. Here, we review liver NK cell subsets in different species, revisiting rat hepatic pit cells and highlighting recent progress related to resident NK cells in mouse and human livers, and also discuss the dual roles of NK cells in liver immunity. PMID:26639736

  5. Myeloid-derived suppressor cell heterogeneity and subset definition.

    PubMed

    Peranzoni, Elisa; Zilio, Serena; Marigo, Ilaria; Dolcetti, Luigi; Zanovello, Paola; Mandruzzato, Susanna; Bronte, Vincenzo

    2010-04-01

    Myeloid derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) are defined in mice on the basis of CD11b and Gr-1 marker expression and the functional ability to inhibit T lymphocyte activation. Nevertheless the term 'heterogeneous' remains the first, informal feature commonly attributed to this population. It is clear that CD11b(+)Gr-1(+) cells are part of a myeloid macropopulation, which comprises at least two subsets of polymorphonuclear and monocytic cells with different immunosuppressive properties. While recent literature shows substantial agreement on the immunoregulatory property of the monocytic MDSC subset, there is still contrasting evidence on the role of the granulocytic fraction. Moreover, this dichotomy holds true for human MDSCs. We attempt here to summarize conflicting findings in the field and provide some possible, unifying explanations.

  6. Design of a verifiable subset for HAL/S

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Browne, J. C.; Good, D. I.; Tripathi, A. R.; Young, W. D.

    1979-01-01

    An attempt to evaluate the applicability of program verification techniques to the existing programming language, HAL/S is discussed. HAL/S is a general purpose high level language designed to accommodate the software needs of the NASA Space Shuttle project. A diversity of features for scientific computing, concurrent and real-time programming, and error handling are discussed. The criteria by which features were evaluated for inclusion into the verifiable subset are described. Individual features of HAL/S with respect to these criteria are examined and justification for the omission of various features from the subset is provided. Conclusions drawn from the research are presented along with recommendations made for the use of HAL/S with respect to the area of program verification.

  7. Subsets of human natural killer cells and their regulatory effects

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Binqing; Tian, Zhigang; Wei, Haiming

    2014-01-01

    Human natural killer (NK) cells have distinct functions as NKtolerant, NKcytotoxic and NKregulatory cells and can be divided into different subsets based on the relative expression of the surface markers CD27 and CD11b. CD27+ NK cells, which are abundant cytokine producers, are numerically in the minority in human peripheral blood but constitute the large population of NK cells in cord blood, spleen, tonsil and decidua tissues. Recent data suggest that these NK cells may have immunoregulatory properties under certain conditions. In this review, we will focus on these new NK cell subsets and discuss how regulatory NK cells may serve as rheostats or sentinels in controlling inflammation and maintaining immune homeostasis in various organs. PMID:24303897

  8. Liver natural killer cells: subsets and roles in liver immunity.

    PubMed

    Peng, Hui; Wisse, Eddie; Tian, Zhigang

    2016-05-01

    The liver represents a frontline immune organ that is constantly exposed to a variety of gut-derived antigens as a result of its unique location and blood supply. With a predominant role in innate immunity, the liver is enriched with various innate immune cells, among which natural killer (NK) cells play important roles in host defense and in maintaining immune balance. Hepatic NK cells were first described as 'pit cells' in the rat liver in the 1970s. Recent studies of NK cells in mouse and human livers have shown that two distinct NK cell subsets, liver-resident NK cells and conventional NK (cNK) cells, are present in this organ. Here, we review liver NK cell subsets in different species, revisiting rat hepatic pit cells and highlighting recent progress related to resident NK cells in mouse and human livers, and also discuss the dual roles of NK cells in liver immunity.

  9. Auditing Complex Concepts in Overlapping Subsets of SNOMED

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yue; Wei, Duo; Xu, Junchuan; Elhanan, Gai; Perl, Yehoshua; Halper, Michael; Chen, Yan; Spackman, Kent A.; Hripcsak, George

    2008-01-01

    Limited resources and the sheer volume of concepts make auditing a large terminology, such as SNOMED CT, a daunting task. It is essential to devise techniques that can aid an auditor by automatically identifying concepts that deserve attention. A methodology for this purpose based on a previously introduced abstraction network (called the p-area taxonomy) for a SNOMED CT hierarchy is presented. The methodology algorithmically gathers concepts appearing in certain overlapping subsets, defined exclusively with respect to the p-area taxonomy, for review. The results of applying the methodology to SNOMED’s Specimen hierarchy are presented. These results are compared against a control sample composed of concepts residing in subsets without the overlaps. With the use of the double bootstrap, the concept group produced by our methodology is shown to yield a statistically significant higher proportion of error discoveries. PMID:18998838

  10. Variable selection with stepwise and best subset approaches.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhongheng

    2016-04-01

    While purposeful selection is performed partly by software and partly by hand, the stepwise and best subset approaches are automatically performed by software. Two R functions stepAIC() and bestglm() are well designed for stepwise and best subset regression, respectively. The stepAIC() function begins with a full or null model, and methods for stepwise regression can be specified in the direction argument with character values "forward", "backward" and "both". The bestglm() function begins with a data frame containing explanatory variables and response variables. The response variable should be in the last column. Varieties of goodness-of-fit criteria can be specified in the IC argument. The Bayesian information criterion (BIC) usually results in more parsimonious model than the Akaike information criterion.

  11. Molecular Mechanisms of Differentiation of Murine Pro-Inflammatory γδ T Cell Subsets

    PubMed Central

    Serre, Karine; Silva-Santos, Bruno

    2013-01-01

    γδ T cells are unconventional innate-like lymphocytes that actively participate in protective immunity against tumors and infectious organisms including bacteria, viruses, and parasites. However, γδ T cells are also involved in the development of inflammatory and autoimmune diseases. γδ T cells are functionally characterized by very rapid production of pro-inflammatory cytokines, while also impacting on (slower but long-lasting) adaptive immune responses. This makes it crucial to understand the molecular mechanisms that regulate γδ T cell effector functions. Although they share many similarities with αβ T cells, our knowledge of the molecular pathways that control effector functions in γδ T cells still lags significantly behind. In this review, we focus on the segregation of interferon-γ versus interleukin-17 production in murine thymic-derived γδ T cell subsets defined by CD27 and CCR6 expression levels. We summarize the most recent studies that disclose the specific epigenetic and transcriptional mechanisms that govern the stability or plasticity of discrete pro-inflammatory γδ T cell subsets, whose manipulation may be valuable for regulating (auto)immune responses. PMID:24367369

  12. Monocyte and macrophage subsets along the continuum to heart failure: Misguided heroes or targetable villains?

    PubMed

    Glezeva, Nadezhda; Horgan, Stephen; Baugh, John A

    2015-12-01

    The important contribution of monocytes and macrophages to cardiovascular disease and heart failure pathophysiology has attracted significant attention in the past several years. Moreover, subsets of these cells have been shown to partake in the initiation and exacerbation of several cardiovascular pathologies including atherosclerosis, myocardial infarction, pressure overload, cardiac ischemia and fibrosis. This review focuses on the role of monocytes and macrophages along the continuum to heart failure and the contribution of different cell subsets in promoting or inhibiting cardiac injury or repair. It outlines a primary role for the monocyte/macrophage system as an important regulator of cardiac inflammation and extracellular matrix remodelling in early and late stage heart disease with particular focus on phenotypic plasticity and the inflammatory and fibrotic functions of these cells. It also summarizes evidence from pre-clinical and clinical studies evaluating monocyte type regulation and its functional significance for development of cardiovascular disease and heart failure. Finally, current and prospective therapeutic approaches based on monocyte and macrophage manipulation for the treatment of cardiovascular disease and heart failure are discussed. Based on these data, future work in this fertile research area may aid in identifying potential diagnostic biomarkers and novel therapies for chronic heart failure. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Molecular Mechanisms of Differentiation of Murine Pro-Inflammatory γδ T Cell Subsets.

    PubMed

    Serre, Karine; Silva-Santos, Bruno

    2013-12-05

    γδ T cells are unconventional innate-like lymphocytes that actively participate in protective immunity against tumors and infectious organisms including bacteria, viruses, and parasites. However, γδ T cells are also involved in the development of inflammatory and autoimmune diseases. γδ T cells are functionally characterized by very rapid production of pro-inflammatory cytokines, while also impacting on (slower but long-lasting) adaptive immune responses. This makes it crucial to understand the molecular mechanisms that regulate γδ T cell effector functions. Although they share many similarities with αβ T cells, our knowledge of the molecular pathways that control effector functions in γδ T cells still lags significantly behind. In this review, we focus on the segregation of interferon-γ versus interleukin-17 production in murine thymic-derived γδ T cell subsets defined by CD27 and CCR6 expression levels. We summarize the most recent studies that disclose the specific epigenetic and transcriptional mechanisms that govern the stability or plasticity of discrete pro-inflammatory γδ T cell subsets, whose manipulation may be valuable for regulating (auto)immune responses.

  14. Subsets of CD4+ T cells and their roles in autoimmunity.

    PubMed

    Mason, D W

    1993-10-29

    The CD4 molecule has a very restricted tissue distribution being found at high levels only on subpopulations of thymocytes and peripheral T cells. This finding implicated the molecule in the specialized actions of these cells and provided the impetus for studies directed at determining the function of the CD4 molecule itself and of those T cells that expressed it. The first part of this paper reviews briefly some of the earlier work in this field in which Alan Williams played such a major role. The paper concludes with an account of more recent findings which reveal that CD4+ T cells are themselves phenotypically heterogeneous and that the different subsets that can be identified mediate markedly different immunological functions. In particular studies with laboratory rats have shown that one subset plays an essential role in the prevention of autoimmunity. This finding indicates that self tolerance cannot be accounted for entirely in terms of the deletion or irreversible inactivation of autoreactive T cells and raises a number of questions about how the immune response to self antigens is actively regulated and how possible deficiencies in this regulation may give rise to autoimmune disease.

  15. Parameterizing dose-response models to estimate relative potency functions directly.

    PubMed

    Dinse, Gregg E; Umbach, David M

    2012-10-01

    Many comparative analyses of toxicity assume that the potency of a test chemical relative to a reference chemical is constant, but employing such a restrictive assumption uncritically may generate misleading conclusions. Recent efforts to characterize non-constant relative potency rely on relative potency functions and estimate them secondarily after fitting dose-response models for the test and reference chemicals. We study an alternative approach of specifying a relative potency model a priori and estimating it directly using the dose-response data from both chemicals. We consider a power function in dose as a relative potency model and find that it keeps the two chemicals' dose-response functions within the same family of models for families typically used in toxicology. When differences in the response limits for the test and reference chemicals are attributable to the chemicals themselves, the older two-stage approach is the more convenient. When differences in response limits are attributable to other features of the experimental protocol or when response limits do not differ, the direct approach is straightforward to apply with nonlinear regression methods and simplifies calculation of simultaneous confidence bands. We illustrate the proposed approach using Hill models with dose-response data from U.S. National Toxicology Program bioassays. Though not universally applicable, this method of estimating relative potency functions directly can be profitably applied to a broad family of dose-response models commonly used in toxicology.

  16. The octave potencies convention: a mathematical model of dilution and succussion.

    PubMed

    Anick, David J

    2007-07-01

    Several hypothesized explanations for homeopathy posit that remedies contain a concentration of discrete information-carrying units, such as water clusters, nano-bubbles, or silicates. For any such explanation to be sustainable, dilution must reduce and succussion must restore the concentration of these units. Succussion can be modeled by a logistic equation, which leads to mathematical relationships involving the maximum concentration, the average growth of information-carrying units rate per succussion stroke, the number of succussion strokes, and the dilution factor (x, c, or LM). When multiple species of information-carrying units are present, the fastest-growing species will eventually come to dominate, as the potency is increased. An analogy is explored between iterated cycles dilution and succussion, in making homeopathic remedies, and iterated cycles of reseeding and growth, in bacterial cultures. Drawing on this analogy, the active ingredients in low and medium potency remedies may be present at early dilutions but only gradually come to 'dominate', while high potencies may develop from the occurrence of low-probability but faster-growing 'mutations.' Conclusions from this model include: 'x' and 'c' potencies are best compared by the amount of dilution, not the amount of succussion; the minimum number of succussion strokes needed per cycle is proportional to the logarithm of the dilution factor; and a plausible interpretation of why potencies at approximately regular ratios are traditionally used (the octave potencies convention).

  17. Plasticity of Human CD4 T Cell Subsets

    PubMed Central

    Geginat, Jens; Paroni, Moira; Maglie, Stefano; Alfen, Johanna Sophie; Kastirr, Ilko; Gruarin, Paola; De Simone, Marco; Pagani, Massimiliano; Abrignani, Sergio

    2014-01-01

    Human beings are exposed to a variety of different pathogens, which induce tailored immune responses and consequently generate highly diverse populations of pathogen-specific T cells. CD4+ T cells have a central role in adaptive immunity, since they provide essential help for both cytotoxic T cell- and antibody-mediated responses. In addition, CD4+ regulatory T cells are required to maintain self-tolerance and to inhibit immune responses that could damage the host. Initially, two subsets of CD4+ helper T cells were identified that secrete characteristic effector cytokines and mediate responses against different types of pathogens, i.e., IFN-γ secreting Th1 cells that fight intracellular pathogens, and IL-4 producing Th2 cells that target extracellular parasites. It is now well established that this dichotomy is insufficient to describe the complexity of CD4+ T cell differentiation, and in particular the human CD4 compartment contains a myriad of T cell subsets with characteristic capacities to produce cytokines and to home to involved tissues. Moreover, it has become increasingly clear that these T cell subsets are not all terminally differentiated cells, but that the majority is plastic and that in particular central memory T cells can acquire different properties and functions in secondary immune responses. In addition, there is compelling evidence that helper T cells can acquire regulatory functions upon chronic stimulation in inflamed tissues. The plasticity of antigen-experienced human T cell subsets is highly relevant for translational medicine, since it opens new perspectives for immune-modulatory therapies for chronic infections, autoimmune diseases, and cancer. PMID:25566245

  18. Studies on T cell subsets and functions in leprosy.

    PubMed Central

    Bach, M A; Chatenoud, L; Wallach, D; Phan Dinh Tuy, F; Cottenot, F

    1981-01-01

    T cell subsets and T cell functions were explored in 31 leprosy patients with the following methods: determination of the percentages of the different T cell subpopulations defined by monoclonal antibodies directed at total T cells, helper T cells and suppressor/cytotoxic T cells; measurement of the in vitro proliferative responses to mitogens; study of the concanavalin A-induced suppressive activity, assessed on MLC; measurement of delayed-type hypersensitivity by skin testing. The confrontation between immunological lepromatous patients without type-2 reaction (erythema nodosum leprosum), (2) lepromatous patients without ENL (erythema nodosum leprosum), (2) lepromatous patients was recent ENL and (3) tuberculoid patients. Unexpectedly, groups 1 and 3, although differing strongly in their clinical status and their sensitivity to lepromin (absent in group 1 and strong in group 3), showed a similar immunological profile with a normal percentage of T cells and a normal distribution of T cells among the major T cell subset contrasting with a moderate decrease of proliferative responses to mitogens and impaired delayed-type hypersensitivity reactions. Concanavalin A-induced suppressive activity was type-2 reaction) strongly differed from both other groups, showing striking abnormalities other groups, showing striking abnormalities of the repartition of the T cell subsets, with increased percentages of helper T cells and decreased percentages of suppressor T cells, and elevated proliferative responses to mitogens. Concanavalin A-induced suppressive activity was reduced in most patients of this group. It is suggested that this imbalance between T cell subsets contributes to the occurrence of ENL reactions in lepromatous patients. PMID:6459897

  19. Occupational exposure to formaldehyde and alterations in lymphocyte subsets

    PubMed Central

    Hosgood, H. Dean; Zhang, Luoping; Tang, Xiaojiang; Vermeulen, Roel; Hao, Zhenyue; Shen, Min; Qiu, Chuangyi; Ge, Yichen; Hua, Ming; Ji, Zhiying; Li, Senhua; Xiong, Jun; Reiss, Boris; Liu, Songwang; Xin, Kerry X.; Azuma, Mariko; Xie, Yuxuan; Freeman, Laura Beane; Ruan, Xiaolin; Guo, Weihong; Galvan, Noe; Blair, Aaron; Li, Laiyu; Huang, Hanlin; Smith, Martyn T.; Rothman, Nathaniel; Lan, Qing

    2012-01-01

    Background Formaldehyde is used in many occupational settings, most notably in manufacturing, health care, and embalming. Formaldehyde has been classified as a human carcinogen, but its mechanism of action remains uncertain. Methods We carried out a cross-sectional study of 43 formaldehyde exposed-workers and 51 unexposed age and sex-matched controls in Guangdong, China to study formaldehyde’s early biologic effects. To follow-up our previous report that the total lymphocyte count was decreased in formaldehyde-exposed workers compared to controls, we evaluated each major lymphocyte subset (i.e., CD4+ T cells, CD8+ T cells, natural killer (NK) cells, and B cells) and T cell lymphocyte subset (CD4+ naïve and memory T cells, CD8+ naïve and memory T cells, and regulatory T cells). Linear regression of each subset was used to test for differences between exposed workers and controls, adjusting for potential confounders. Results Total NK cell and T cell counts were about 24% (p=0.037) and 16% (p=0.0042) lower, respectively, among exposed workers. Among certain T cell subsets, decreased counts among exposed workers were observed for CD8+ T cells (p=0.026), CD8+ effector memory T cells (p=0.018), and regulatory T cells (CD4+FoxP3+: p=0.04; CD25+FoxP3+: p=0.008). Conclusions Formaldehyde exposed-workers experienced decreased counts of NK cells, regulatory T cells, and CD8+ effector memory T cells; however, due to the small sample size these findings need to be confirmed in larger studies. PMID:22767408

  20. Data Mining Feature Subset Weighting and Selection Using Genetic Algorithms

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-03-01

    material on data mining, classification, feature subset selection and weighting problem and genetic algorithms. 1.1.1 What is Data Mining? Data...to find the individual from the search space with the best “genetic material ” . A wide range of genetic representations (e.g., bit vectors, LISP...of non-coding material makes crossover less active within building block boundaries, but does not affect mutation’s constructive and destructive

  1. An evaluation of randomization models for nested species subsets analysis.

    PubMed

    Cook, Rosamonde R; Quinn, James F

    1998-02-01

    Randomization models, often termed "null" models, have been widely used since the 1970s in studies of species community and biogeographic patterns. More recently they have been used to test for nested species subset patterns (or nestedness) among assemblages of species occupying spatially subdivided habitats, such as island archipelagoes and terrestrial habitat patches. Nestedness occurs when the species occupying small or species-poor sites have a strong tendency to form proper subsets of richer species assemblages. In this paper, we examine the ability of several published simulation models to detect, in an unbiased way, nested subset patterns from a simple matrix of site-by-species presence-absence data. Each approach attempts to build in biological realism by following the assumption that the ecological processes that generated the patterns observed in nature would, if they could be repeated many times over using the same species and landscape configuration, produce islands with the same number of species and species present on the same number of islands as observed. In mathematical terms, the mean marginal totals (column and row sums) of many simulated matrices would match those of the observed matrix. Results of model simulations suggest that the true probability of a species occupying any given site cannot be estimated unambiguously. Nearly all of the models tested were shown to bias simulation matrices toward low levels of nestedness, increasing the probability of a Type I statistical error. Further, desired marginal totals could be obtained only through ad-hoc manipulation of the calculated probabilities. Paradoxically, when such results are achieved, the model is shown to have little statistical power to detect nestedness. This is because nestedness is determined largely by the marginal totals of the matrix themselves, as suggested earlier by Wright and Reeves. We conclude that at the present time, the best null model for nested subset patterns may be one

  2. The dynamic lives of macrophage and dendritic cell subsets in atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Taghavie-Moghadam, Paresa L.; Butcher, Matthew J.; Galkina, Elena V.

    2014-01-01

    Atherosclerosis, the major pathological process through which arterial plaques are formed, is a dynamic chronic inflammatory disease of large and medium sized arteries in which the vasculature, lipid metabolism, and the immune system all play integral roles. Both the innate and adaptive immune systems are involved in the development and progression of atherosclerosis but myeloid cells represent the major component of the burgeoning atherosclerotic plaque. Various myeloid cells, including monocytes, macrophages, and dendritic cells can be found within the healthy and atherosclerotic arterial wall, where they can contribute to or regulate inflammation. However, the precise behaviors and functions of these cells in situ are still active areas of investigation that continue to yield exciting and surprising new data. Here, we review recent progress in understanding of the complex biology of macrophages and dendritic cells, focusing particularly on the dynamic regulation of these subsets in the arterial wall and novel, emerging functions of these cells during atherogenesis. PMID:24628328

  3. Canonical information flow decomposition among neural structure subsets.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Daniel Y; Baccalá, Luiz A; Sameshima, Koichi

    2014-01-01

    Partial directed coherence (PDC) and directed coherence (DC) which describe complementary aspects of the directed information flow between pairs of univariate components that belong to a vector of simultaneously observed time series have recently been generalized as bPDC/bDC, respectively, to portray the relationship between subsets of component vectors (Takahashi, 2009; Faes and Nollo, 2013). This generalization is specially important for neuroscience applications as one often wishes to address the link between the set of time series from an observed ROI (region of interest) with respect to series from some other physiologically relevant ROI. bPDC/bDC are limited, however, in that several time series within a given subset may be irrelevant or may even interact opposingly with respect to one another leading to interpretation difficulties. To address this, we propose an alternative measure, termed cPDC/cDC, employing canonical decomposition to reveal the main frequency domain modes of interaction between the vector subsets. We also show bPDC/bDC and cPDC/cDC are related and possess mutual information rate interpretations. Numerical examples and a real data set illustrate the concepts. The present contribution provides what is seemingly the first canonical decomposition of information flow in the frequency domain.

  4. COMPASS identifies T-cell subsets correlated with clinical outcomes.

    PubMed

    Lin, Lin; Finak, Greg; Ushey, Kevin; Seshadri, Chetan; Hawn, Thomas R; Frahm, Nicole; Scriba, Thomas J; Mahomed, Hassan; Hanekom, Willem; Bart, Pierre-Alexandre; Pantaleo, Giuseppe; Tomaras, Georgia D; Rerks-Ngarm, Supachai; Kaewkungwal, Jaranit; Nitayaphan, Sorachai; Pitisuttithum, Punnee; Michael, Nelson L; Kim, Jerome H; Robb, Merlin L; O'Connell, Robert J; Karasavvas, Nicos; Gilbert, Peter; C De Rosa, Stephen; McElrath, M Juliana; Gottardo, Raphael

    2015-06-01

    Advances in flow cytometry and other single-cell technologies have enabled high-dimensional, high-throughput measurements of individual cells as well as the interrogation of cell population heterogeneity. However, in many instances, computational tools to analyze the wealth of data generated by these technologies are lacking. Here, we present a computational framework for unbiased combinatorial polyfunctionality analysis of antigen-specific T-cell subsets (COMPASS). COMPASS uses a Bayesian hierarchical framework to model all observed cell subsets and select those most likely to have antigen-specific responses. Cell-subset responses are quantified by posterior probabilities, and human subject-level responses are quantified by two summary statistics that describe the quality of an individual's polyfunctional response and can be correlated directly with clinical outcome. Using three clinical data sets of cytokine production, we demonstrate how COMPASS improves characterization of antigen-specific T cells and reveals cellular 'correlates of protection/immunity' in the RV144 HIV vaccine efficacy trial that are missed by other methods. COMPASS is available as open-source software.

  5. COMPASS identifies T-cell subsets correlated with clinical outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Lin; Finak, Greg; Ushey, Kevin; Seshadri, Chetan; Hawn, Thomas R.; Frahm, Nicole; Scriba, Thomas J.; Mahomed, Hassan; Hanekom, Willem; Bart, Pierre-Alexandre; Pantaleo, Giuseppe; Tomaras, Georgia D.; Rerks-Ngarm, Supachai; Kaewkungwal, Jaranit; Nitayaphan, Sorachai; Pitisuttithum, Punnee; Michael, Nelson L.; Kim, Jerome H.; Robb, Merlin L.; O’Connell, Robert J.; Karasavvas, Nicos; Gilbert, Peter; DeRosa, Stephen; McElrath, M. Juliana

    2015-01-01

    Advances in flow cytometry and other single-cell technologies have enabled high-dimensional, high-throughput measurements of individual cells and allowed interrogation of cell population heterogeneity. Computational tools to take full advantage of these technologies are lacking. Here, we present COMPASS, a computational framework for unbiased polyfunctionality analysis of antigen-specific T-cell subsets. COMPASS uses a Bayesian hierarchical framework to model all observed functional cell subsets and select those most likely to exhibit antigen-specific responses. Cell-subset responses are quantified by posterior probabilities, while subject-level responses are quantified by two novel summary statistics that can be correlated directly with clinical outcome, and describe the quality of an individual’s (poly)functional response. Using three clinical datasets of cytokine production we demonstrate how COMPASS improves characterization of antigen-specific T cells and reveals novel cellular correlates of protection in the RV144 HIV vaccine efficacy trial that are missed by other methods. COMPASS is available as open-source software. PMID:26006008

  6. Preparation of Internal Quality Control Material for Lymphocyte Subset Analysis.

    PubMed

    Roh, Eun Youn; Shin, Sue; Yoon, Jong Hyun; Oh, Sohee; Park, Kyoung Un; Lee, Nuri; Song, Eun Young

    2016-07-01

    Lymphocyte subset analysis is widely used in clinical laboratories, and more than two levels of daily QC materials are required for reliable results. Commercially available, expensive QC materials have short shelf lives and may not be suitable in resource-poor settings. We compared different methods for preparing homemade QC material, including fixation with 1%, 2%, or 4% paraformaldehyde (PFA); freezing with 10% dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO), 0.1% bovine serum albumin-phosphate buffered saline, or after ethanolic dehydration; and using cryopreservation temperatures of -20°C, -80°C, or -196°C. We found an optimal experimental condition, which is 'fixation with 4% PFA, freezing with 10% DMSO, and storage at 80°C'. To evaluate long-term stability of QC materials prepared in this optimal condition, two levels of QC materials (QM1 and QM2) were thawed after 30, 33, 35, 37, 60, 62, 64, and 67 days of cryopreservation. Lymphocyte subset was analyzed with BD Multitest IMK kit (BD Biosciences, USA). QM1 and QM2 were stable after 1-2 months of cryopreservation (CV <3% for CD3, CD4, and CD8 and 5-7% for CD16/56 and CD19). We propose this method as an alternative cost-effective protocol for preparing homemade internal QC materials for lymphocyte subset analysis in resource-poor settings.

  7. Circadian changes of T lymphocyte subsets in human peripheral blood.

    PubMed Central

    Miyawaki, T; Taga, K; Nagaoki, T; Seki, H; Suzuki, Y; Taniguchi, N

    1984-01-01

    The circadian variations in circulating T cell subsets defined by monoclonal antibodies in eight healthy male volunteers were evaluated in whole blood using a flow cytometry. In all subjects, the number of lymphocytes showed a clear rhythmicity with high values at night and low values during the day. This circadian variation in circulating lymphocytes appeared to reflect largely a change in the number of T cells rather than B cells. The percentage of OKT3+ and OKT11+ cells showed a similar fluctuation with a peak at night and a depression during the day. It was found that the percentage of OKT4+ cells varied in parallel with that of T cells, particularly of OKT3+ cells, but the OKT8+ subset was not appreciably altered over a 24 h period. Thus, a circadian variation of T cells could be largely accounted for by a circadian change of OKT4+ cells. Plasma cortisol levels showed an expected circadian variation. It was also shown that there might be an intimate relationship between these circadian changes of T cell subsets and plasma cortisol levels. PMID:6608426

  8. Cytokines and effector T cell subsets causing autoimmune CNS disease.

    PubMed

    Petermann, Franziska; Korn, Thomas

    2011-12-01

    Although experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) is limited in its potency to reproduce the entirety of clinical and histopathologic features of multiple sclerosis (MS), this model has been successfully used to prove that MS like autoimmunity in the CNS is orchestrated by autoantigen specific T cells. EAE was also very useful to refute the idea that IFN-γ producing T helper type 1 (Th1) cells were the sole players within the pathogenic T cell response. Rather, "new" T cell lineages such as IL-17 producing Th17 cells or IL-9 producing Th9 cells have been first discovered in the context of EAE. Here, we will summarize new concepts of early and late T cell plasticity and the cytokine network that shapes T helper cell responses and lesion development in CNS specific autoimmunity.

  9. Prazosin has low potency at α1A-adrenoceptors and high potency at α1D -adrenoceptors in rat vas deferens.

    PubMed

    Docherty, J R

    2013-10-01

    (1) We have investigated α1 -adrenoceptor subtypes mediating contractions to noradrenaline in epididymal portions of rat vas deferens. (2) Contractions to noradrenaline were investigated in the absence or presence of the noradrenaline transporter blocker cocaine. (3) In the absence of cocaine, contractions to noradrenaline were potently antagonized by RS100329, but not by BMY7378, and so are mediated mainly by α1A -adrenoceptors. (4) In the presence of cocaine, noradrenaline potency was increased, particularly in terms of low concentrations and phasic contractions. Contractions to low concentrations of noradrenaline in the presence of cocaine were resistant to RS100329 but potently antagonized by BMY7378, demonstrating that α1D-adrenoceptors are additionally involved in contractions amplified by cocaine. (5) In the absence of cocaine, prazosin exhibited relatively low potency as an antagonist against the α1A-adrenoceptor-mediated component to the response. In the presence of cocaine, prazosin exhibited higher potency against the α1D-adrenoceptor-mediated component. (6) In conclusion, prazosin has previously unreported selectivity for α1D-over α1A -adrenoceptors in functional studies of rat vas deferens. Contractions of rat vas deferens are mediated by α1A-and α1D -adrenoceptors. The range of prazosin potencies and of receptor subtypes previously reported in rat vas deferens may be explained by the presence of these two subtypes.

  10. High Potency Zinc Modulation of Human P2X2 Receptors and Low Potency Zinc Modulation of Rat P2X2 Receptors Share a Common Molecular Mechanism*

    PubMed Central

    Punthambaker, Sukanya; Blum, Jacob A.; Hume, Richard I.

    2012-01-01

    Human P2X2 receptors (hP2X2) are strongly inhibited by zinc over the range of 2–100 μm, whereas rat P2X2 receptors (rP2X2) are strongly potentiated over the same range, and then inhibited by zinc over 100 μm. However, the biological role of zinc modulation is unknown in either species. To identify candidate regions controlling zinc inhibition in hP2X2 a homology model based on the crystal structure of zebrafish P2X4.1 was made. In this model, His-204 and His-209 of one subunit were near His-330 of the adjacent subunit. Cross-linking studies confirmed that these residues are within 8 Å of each other. Simultaneous mutation of these three histidines to alanines decreased the zinc potency of hP2X2 nearly 100-fold. In rP2X2, one of these histidines is replaced by a lysine, and in a background in which zinc potentiation was eliminated, mutation of Lys-197 to histidine converted rP2X2 from low potency to high potency inhibition. We explored whether the zinc-binding site lies within the vestibules running down the central axis of the receptor. Elimination of all negatively charged residues from the upper vestibule had no effect on zinc inhibition. In contrast, mutation of several residues in the hP2X2 middle vestibule resulted in dramatic changes in the potency of zinc inhibition. In particular, the zinc potency of P206C could be reversibly shifted from extremely high (∼10 nm) to very low (>100 μm) by binding and unbinding MTSET. These results suggest that the cluster of histidines at the subunit interface controls access of zinc to its binding site. PMID:22556417

  11. A Single-Cell Gene-Expression Profile Reveals Inter-Cellular Heterogeneity within Human Monocyte Subsets

    PubMed Central

    Gren, Susanne T.; Rasmussen, Thomas B.; Janciauskiene, Sabina; Håkansson, Katarina; Gerwien, Jens G.; Grip, Olof

    2015-01-01

    Human monocytes are a heterogeneous cell population classified into three different subsets: Classical CD14++CD16-, intermediate CD14++CD16+, and non-classical CD14+CD16++ monocytes. These subsets are distinguished by their differential expression of CD14 and CD16, and unique gene expression profile. So far, the variation in inter-cellular gene expression within the monocyte subsets is largely unknown. In this study, the cellular variation within each human monocyte subset from a single healthy donor was described by using a novel single-cell PCR gene-expression analysis tool. We investigated 86 different genes mainly encoding cell surface markers, and proteins involved in immune regulation. Within the three human monocyte subsets, our descriptive findings show multimodal expression of key immune response genes, such as CD40, NFⱪB1, RELA, TLR4, TLR8 and TLR9. Furthermore, we discovered one subgroup of cells within the classical monocytes, which showed alterations of 22 genes e.g. IRF8, CD40, CSF1R, NFⱪB1, RELA and TNF. Additionally one subgroup within the intermediate and non-classical monocytes also displayed distinct gene signatures by altered expression of 8 and 6 genes, respectively. Hence the three monocyte subsets can be further subdivided according to activation status and differentiation, independently of the traditional classification based on cell surface markers. Demonstrating the use and the ability to discover cell heterogeneity within defined populations of human monocytes is of great importance, and can be useful in unravelling inter-cellular variation in leukocyte populations, identifying subpopulations involved in disease pathogenesis and help tailor new therapies. PMID:26650546

  12. Characterization of a chromosome-specific chimpanzee alpha satellite subset: Evolutionary relationship to subsets on human chromosomes

    SciTech Connect

    Warburton, P.E.; Gosden, J.; Lawson, D.

    1996-04-15

    Alpha satellite DNA is a tandemly repeated DNA family found at the centromeres of all primate chromosomes examined. The fundamental repeat units of alpha satellite DNA are diverged 169- to 172-bp monomers, often found to be organized in chromosome-specific higher-order repeat units. The chromosomes of human (Homo sapiens (HSA)), chimpanzee (Pan troglodytes (PTR) and Pan paniscus), and gorilla (Gorilla gorilla) share a remarkable similarity and synteny. It is of interest to ask if alpha satellite arrays at centromeres of homologous chromosomes between these species are closely related (evolving in an orthologous manner) or if the evolutionary processes that homogenize and spread these arrays within and between chromosomes result in nonorthologous evolution of arrays. By using PCR primers specific for human chromosome 17-specific alpha satellite DNA, we have amplified, cloned, and characterized a chromosome-specific subset from the PTR chimpanzee genome. Hybridization both on Southern blots and in situ as well as sequence analysis show that this subset is most closely related, as expected, to sequences on HSA 17. However, in situ hybridization reveals that this subset is not found on the homologous chromosome in chimpanzee (PTR 19), but instead on PTR 12, which is homologous to HSA 2p. 40 refs., 3 figs.

  13. Embryonic mammary signature subsets are activated in Brca1-/- and basal-like breast cancers

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Cancer is often suggested to result from development gone awry. Links between normal embryonic development and cancer biology have been postulated, but no defined genetic basis has been established. We recently published the first transcriptomic analysis of embryonic mammary cell populations. Embryonic mammary epithelial cells are an immature progenitor cell population, lacking differentiation markers, which is reflected in their very distinct genetic profiles when compared with those of their postnatal descendents. Methods We defined an embryonic mammary epithelial signature that incorporates the most highly expressed genes from embryonic mammary epithelium when compared with the postnatal mammary epithelial cells. We looked for activation of the embryonic mammary epithelial signature in mouse mammary tumors that formed in mice in which Brca1 had been conditionally deleted from the mammary epithelium and in human breast cancers to determine whether any genetic links exist between embryonic mammary cells and breast cancers. Results Small subsets of the embryonic mammary epithelial signature were consistently activated in mouse Brca1-/- tumors and human basal-like breast cancers, which encoded predominantly transcriptional regulators, cell-cycle, and actin cytoskeleton components. Other embryonic gene subsets were found activated in non-basal-like tumor subtypes and repressed in basal-like tumors, including regulators of neuronal differentiation, transcription, and cell biosynthesis. Several embryonic genes showed significant upregulation in estrogen receptor (ER)-negative, progesterone receptor (PR)-negative, and/or grade 3 breast cancers. Among them, the transcription factor, SOX11, a progenitor cell and lineage regulator of nonmammary cell types, is found highly expressed in some Brca1-/- mammary tumors. By using RNA interference to silence SOX11 expression in breast cancer cells, we found evidence that SOX11 regulates breast cancer cell

  14. Development of quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) models to predict the carcinogenic potency of chemicals

    SciTech Connect

    Venkatapathy, Raghuraman Wang Chingyi; Bruce, Robert Mark; Moudgal, Chandrika

    2009-01-15

    Determining the carcinogenicity and carcinogenic potency of new chemicals is both a labor-intensive and time-consuming process. In order to expedite the screening process, there is a need to identify alternative toxicity measures that may be used as surrogates for carcinogenic potency. Alternative toxicity measures for carcinogenic potency currently being used in the literature include lethal dose (dose that kills 50% of a study population [LD{sub 50}]), lowest-observed-adverse-effect-level (LOAEL) and maximum tolerated dose (MTD). The purpose of this study was to investigate the correlation between tumor dose (TD{sub 50}) and three alternative toxicity measures as an estimator of carcinogenic potency. A second aim of this study was to develop a Classification and Regression Tree (CART) between TD{sub 50} and estimated/experimental predictor variables to predict the carcinogenic potency of new chemicals. Rat TD{sub 50}s of 590 structurally diverse chemicals were obtained from the Cancer Potency Database, and the three alternative toxicity measures considered in this study were estimated using TOPKAT, a toxicity estimation software. Though poor correlations were obtained between carcinogenic potency and the three alternative toxicity (both experimental and TOPKAT) measures for the CPDB chemicals, a CART developed using experimental data with no missing values as predictor variables provided reasonable estimates of TD{sub 50} for nine chemicals that were part of an external validation set. However, if experimental values for the three alternative measures, mutagenicity and logP are not available in the literature, then either the CART developed using missing experimental values or estimated values may be used for making a prediction.

  15. Incipient cytotoxicity: A time-independent measure of cytotoxic potency in vitro.

    PubMed

    Gülden, Michael; Kähler, Daria; Seibert, Hasso

    2015-09-01

    Time is an important determinant of toxicity but largely ignored in in vitro toxicity assays where exposure times chosen are rather arbitrary. To investigate the impact of time on the cytotoxic potency of chemicals in vitro, the concentration dependent cytotoxic action of selected chemicals (surfactants, metals, oxidative stressors, a mitochondrial poison) was determined after various exposure times (1-72 h) in cultures of Balb/c 3T3 cells. Time affected the cytotoxic potency as well as the cytotoxic efficacy. The median cytotoxic concentrations, EC50, decreased and in most cases approached an "incipient" value, EC50,∞, within 72 h. Cytotoxicity due to mitochondrial insult occurred after a threshold time which was dependent on the medium glucose concentration. Within the chemicals studied the extent of potency change with time ranged from 3- to >1000-fold and the "time to incipient cytotoxicity", tic, from 4 to >72 h. Hence, also the relative cytotoxic potencies depend on exposure time. Ignoring this may lead to severe bias in toxicological hazard and risk assessment. Therefore it is recommended to determine the incipient cytotoxic potency of chemical compounds, represented by, e.g., the incipient median effect (EC50,∞), no effect (NEC∞) or lowest effect concentrations (LEC∞) instead of measures obtained after arbitrary exposure times. If this is not possible, the 72 h-potency measurements appear to be useful surrogates. These time-independent incipient potency values can be reasonably compared between substances, endpoints, cells and biological test systems and may serve to define points of departure for quantitative in vitro-in vivo extrapolations.

  16. Prescription of high-potency corticosteroid agents and clotrimazole-betamethasone dipropionate by pediatricians.

    PubMed

    Fleischer, A B; Feldman, S R

    1999-10-01

    Family physicians, internists, and pediatricians are more likely to prescribe combination topical antifungal-topical corticosteroid preparations than are dermatologists. One such preparation, clotrimazole-betamethasone dipropionate, can cause atrophy because it has a high-potency corticosteroid component. We analyzed data from the National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey for visits to pediatricians from 1990 to 1994 and isolated visits at which a topical corticosteroid agent or clotrimazole-betamethasone dipropionate was prescribed. Pediatricians rarely prescribed single-agent, high-potency topical corticosteroid agents in managing patients with skin disorders. High-potency corticosteroid agents accounted for 5.0% of topical corticosteroid prescriptions, whereas 56.3% were low-potency and 38.7% were medium-potency agents. Of the 696,285 mentions of clotrimazole-betamethasone dipropionate, 56.4% (389,920) were for children aged newborn to 4 years; diagnoses were erythematodesquamatous dermatoses, diaper rash, tinea, well-baby visit, and candidiasis. In contrast, for dermatologists nationwide, no drug mention existed for this combination agent for children aged newborn to 4 years over the 5-year study period. Our results show that clotrimazole-betamethasone dipropionate is prescribed inappropriately by pediatricians, especially in the treatment of young children. Pediatricians rarely use high-potency topical corticosteroid agents, but most of their use of clotrimazole-betamethasone dipropionate is in the youngest children, in whom such corticosteroid use is least appropriate. This prescription pattern suggests that some pediatricians may be unaware that clotrimazole-betamethasone dipropionate has a high-potency cortico steroid component.

  17. Extracellular Ca(2+)-dependent enhancement of cytocidal potency of zoledronic acid in human oral cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Sayaka; Arai, Naoya; Tomihara, Kei; Takashina, Michinori; Hattori, Yuichi; Noguchi, Makoto

    2015-08-15

    Direct antitumor effects of bisphosphonates (BPs) have been demonstrated in various cancer cells in vitro. However, the effective concentrations of BPs are typically much higher than their clinically relevant concentrations. Oral cancers frequently invade jawbone and may lead to the release of Ca(2+) in primary lesions. We investigated the effects of the combined application of zoledronic acid (ZA) and Ca(2+) on proliferation and apoptosis of oral cancer cells. Human oral cancer cells, breast cancer cells, and colon cancer cells were treated with ZA at a wide range of concentrations in different Ca(2+) concentration environments. Under a standard Ca(2+) concentration (0.6mM), micromolar concentrations of ZA were required to inhibit oral cancer cell proliferation. Increasing extracellular Ca(2+) concentrations greatly enhanced the potency of the ZA cytocidal effect. The ability of Ca(2+) to enhance the cytocidal effects of ZA was negated by the Ca(2+)-selective chelator EGTA. In contrast, the cytocidal effect of ZA was less pronounced in breast and colon cancer cells regardless of whether extracellular Ca(2+) was elevated. In oral cancer cells incubated with 1.6mM Ca(2+), ZA up-regulated mitochondrial Bax expression and increased mitochondrial Ca(2+) uptake. This was associated with decreased mitochondrial membrane potential and increased release of cytochrome c. We suggest that ZA can specifically produce potent cytocidal activity in oral cancer cells in an extracellular Ca(2+)-dependent manner, implying that BPs may be useful for treatment of oral squamous cell carcinoma with jawbone invasion leading to the hypercalcemic state. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Cytokine profile and lymphocyte subsets in type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Francisco, C O; Catai, A M; Moura-Tonello, S C G; Arruda, L C M; Lopes, S L B; Benze, B G; Del Vale, A M; Malmegrim, K C R; Leal, A M O

    2016-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2D) is a metabolic disease with inflammation as an important pathogenic background. However, the pattern of immune cell subsets and the cytokine profile associated with development of T2D are unclear. The objective of this study was to evaluate different components of the immune system in T2D patients' peripheral blood by quantifying the frequency of lymphocyte subsets and intracellular pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokine production by T cells. Clinical data and blood samples were collected from 22 men (51.6±6.3 years old) with T2D and 20 nonsmoking men (49.4±7.6 years old) who were matched for age and sex as control subjects. Glycated hemoglobin, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein concentrations, and the lipid profile were measured by a commercially available automated system. Frequencies of lymphocyte subsets in peripheral blood and intracellular production of interleukin (IL)-4, IL-10, IL-17, tumor necrosis factor-α, and interferon-γ cytokines by CD3+ T cells were assessed by flow cytometry. No differences were observed in the frequency of CD19+ B cells, CD3+CD8+ and CD3+CD4+ T cells, CD16+56+ NK cells, and CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ T regulatory cells in patients with T2D compared with controls. The numbers of IL-10- and IL-17-producing CD3+ T cells were significantly higher in patients with T2D than in controls (P<0.05). The frequency of interferon-γ-producing CD3+ T cells was positively correlated with body mass index (r=0.59; P=0.01). In conclusion, this study shows increased numbers of circulating IL-10- and IL-17-producing CD3+ T cells in patients with T2D, suggesting that these cytokines are involved in the immune pathology of this disease.

  19. Cytokine profile and lymphocyte subsets in type 2 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Francisco, C.O.; Catai, A.M.; Moura-Tonello, S.C.G.; Arruda, L.C.M.; Lopes, S.L.B.; Benze, B.G.; Del Vale, A.M.; Malmegrim, K.C.R.; Leal, A.M.O.

    2016-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2D) is a metabolic disease with inflammation as an important pathogenic background. However, the pattern of immune cell subsets and the cytokine profile associated with development of T2D are unclear. The objective of this study was to evaluate different components of the immune system in T2D patients' peripheral blood by quantifying the frequency of lymphocyte subsets and intracellular pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokine production by T cells. Clinical data and blood samples were collected from 22 men (51.6±6.3 years old) with T2D and 20 nonsmoking men (49.4±7.6 years old) who were matched for age and sex as control subjects. Glycated hemoglobin, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein concentrations, and the lipid profile were measured by a commercially available automated system. Frequencies of lymphocyte subsets in peripheral blood and intracellular production of interleukin (IL)-4, IL-10, IL-17, tumor necrosis factor-α, and interferon-γ cytokines by CD3+ T cells were assessed by flow cytometry. No differences were observed in the frequency of CD19+ B cells, CD3+CD8+ and CD3+CD4+ T cells, CD16+56+ NK cells, and CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ T regulatory cells in patients with T2D compared with controls. The numbers of IL-10- and IL-17-producing CD3+ T cells were significantly higher in patients with T2D than in controls (P<0.05). The frequency of interferon-γ-producing CD3+ T cells was positively correlated with body mass index (r=0.59; P=0.01). In conclusion, this study shows increased numbers of circulating IL-10- and IL-17-producing CD3+ T cells in patients with T2D, suggesting that these cytokines are involved in the immune pathology of this disease. PMID:27007651

  20. Lymphocyte Subsets in a Population of Nonfrail Elderly Individuals.

    PubMed

    Valdiglesias, Vanessa; Sánchez-Flores, María; Maseda, Ana; Marcos-Pérez, Diego; Millán-Calenti, José C; Pásaro, Eduardo; Lorenzo-López, Laura; Laffon, Blanca

    2015-01-01

    Age-related frailty is characterized by increased vulnerability to stress due to decline in homeostatic reserve, which results in increased risk of adverse health outcomes including disability, hospitalization, and death. The relationship between frailty and immunological system alterations is well established. Thus, analysis of immunological changes, such as alterations in lymphocyte subsets, during senescence may provide useful markers for frailty and associated pathologies. Since reference ranges currently used for lymphocyte subsets do not specifically differentiate the elderly group, the aim of this study was to (1) establish reference ranges in nonfrail elderly individuals and (2) assess the evolution of these parameters with age. Further, the influence of other physiological and lifestyle factors was also evaluated. The study was performed on 144 elderly individuals (aged 65-95) from Galicia (in northwestern Spain). Percentages of lymphocyte subpopulations (CD3(+) T lymphocytes, CD4(+) T-helper lymphocytes, CD8(+) T-cytotoxic lymphocytes, CD19(+) B lymphocytes, and CD56(+)16(+) natural killer cells) were analyzed in peripheral blood by flow cytometry, and reference ranges were calculated. The individual status as nonfrail or prefrail did not markedly affect the immunological parameters, but an apparent influence of age was obtained for %CD3(+), %CD4(+), and %CD19(+) cells, all of which fell with increasing age. Women showed higher levels of %CD19(+) lymphocytes. No significant influence of smoking habits, physical activity, or drinking alcohol or caffeine beverages was observed. The results obtained may serve as a basis to establish comparisons between frail and nonfrail elderly individuals, in order to determine the usefulness of lymphocyte subsets as immunological biomarkers of frailty.

  1. T lymphocyte subset imbalances in patients contribute to ankylosing spondylitis

    PubMed Central

    WANG, CHENGGONG; LIAO, QIANDE; HU, YIHE; ZHONG, DA

    2015-01-01

    Ankylosing spondylitis is a chronic inflammatory rheumatic disease, which is characterized by inflammation of the spine and the sacroiliac joints. To date, the disease etiology remains unclear. In the present study, the correlation of T lymphocyte subset changes with the progression of ankylosing spondylitis was investigated. A total of 55 patients with ankylosing spondylitis (22 severe and 23 mild cases) and 20 healthy individuals were selected. Firstly, the punctured cells in the lesions and the serum were collected, and the lymphocytes and the peripheral blood mononuclear cells were prepared. Secondly, quantitative PCR, ELISA and flow cytometry analyses were carried out to detect the levels of a series of immunoglobulins, complements, helper T cells, cytotoxic T cells, regulatory cells and cytokines. The expression levels of α-globulin, γ-globulin, immunoglobulin (Ig)G, IgA, IgM, serum complement C3, and complement C4 were found to be significantly increased in ankylosing spondylitis patients. In addition, the percentage of Th1 and Th17 cells was found to be significantly higher in the ankylosing spondylitis groups (mild and severe) compared with the healthy individuals. As a result, the Th1/Th2 and Th17/Treg ratios were significantly higher in patients with ankylosing spondylitis. In addition, T lymphocyte subset ratio imbalances contributed to an increased expression of immune mediators, including interferon (IFN)-γ and interleukin (IL)-17A. The mRNA and protein expression levels of IFN-γ and IL-17A were found to be higher in the ankylosing spondylitis groups compared with the control group. The present study provided further evidence on the function and underlying mechanism of T lymphocyte subsets, which may be useful in the diagnosis and treatment of ankylosing spondylitis. PMID:25452811

  2. T lymphocyte subset imbalances in patients contribute to ankylosing spondylitis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chenggong; Liao, Qiande; Hu, Yihe; Zhong, DA

    2015-01-01

    Ankylosing spondylitis is a chronic inflammatory rheumatic disease, which is characterized by inflammation of the spine and the sacroiliac joints. To date, the disease etiology remains unclear. In the present study, the correlation of T lymphocyte subset changes with the progression of ankylosing spondylitis was investigated. A total of 55 patients with ankylosing spondylitis (22 severe and 23 mild cases) and 20 healthy individuals were selected. Firstly, the punctured cells in the lesions and the serum were collected, and the lymphocytes and the peripheral blood mononuclear cells were prepared. Secondly, quantitative PCR, ELISA and flow cytometry analyses were carried out to detect the levels of a series of immunoglobulins, complements, helper T cells, cytotoxic T cells, regulatory cells and cytokines. The expression levels of α-globulin, γ-globulin, immunoglobulin (Ig)G, IgA, IgM, serum complement C3, and complement C4 were found to be significantly increased in ankylosing spondylitis patients. In addition, the percentage of Th1 and Th17 cells was found to be significantly higher in the ankylosing spondylitis groups (mild and severe) compared with the healthy individuals. As a result, the Th1/Th2 and Th17/Treg ratios were significantly higher in patients with ankylosing spondylitis. In addition, T lymphocyte subset ratio imbalances contributed to an increased expression of immune mediators, including interferon (IFN)-γ and interleukin (IL)-17A. The mRNA and protein expression levels of IFN-γ and IL-17A were found to be higher in the ankylosing spondylitis groups compared with the control group. The present study provided further evidence on the function and underlying mechanism of T lymphocyte subsets, which may be useful in the diagnosis and treatment of ankylosing spondylitis.

  3. Profiling leucocyte subsets in tuberculosis-diabetes co-morbidity.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Nathella Pavan; Moideen, Kadar; Dhakshinraj, Sharmila D; Banurekha, Vaithilingam V; Nair, Dina; Dolla, Chandrakumar; Kumaran, Paul; Babu, Subash

    2015-10-01

    The immune system plays an important role in the pathogenesis of pulmonary tuberculosis-type 2 diabetes mellitus (PTB-DM) co-morbidity. However, the phenotypic profile of leucocyte subsets at homeostasis in individuals with active or latent tuberculosis (LTB) with coincident diabetes is not known. To characterize the influence of diabetes on leucocyte phenotypes in PTB or LTB, we examined the frequency (Fo ) of leucocyte subsets in individuals with TB with (PTB-DM) or without (PTB) diabetes; individuals with latent TB with (LTB-DM) or without (LTB) diabetes and non-TB-infected individuals with (NTB-DM) or without (NTB) diabetes. Coincident DM is characterized by significantly lower Fo of effector memory CD4(+) T cells in LTB individuals. In contrast, DM is characterized by significantly lower Fo of effector memory CD8(+) T cells and significantly higher Fo of central memory CD8(+) T cells in PTB individuals. Coincident DM resulted in significantly higher Fo of classical memory B cells in PTB and significantly higher Fo of activated memory and atypical B cells in LTB individuals. Coincident DM resulted in significantly lower Fo of classical and intermediate monocytes in PTB, LTB and NTB individuals. Finally, DM resulted in significantly lower Fo of myeloid and plasmacytoid dendritic cells in PTB, LTB and NTB individuals. Our data reveal that coincident diabetes alters the cellular subset distribution of T cells, B cells, dendritic cells and monocytes in both individuals with active TB and those with latent TB, thus potentially impacting the pathogenesis of this co-morbid condition. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Characterization of the interaction of African swine fever virus with monocytes and derived macrophage subsets.

    PubMed

    Franzoni, Giulia; Graham, Simon P; Giudici, Silvia Dei; Bonelli, Piero; Pilo, Giovannantonio; Anfossi, Antonio G; Pittau, Marco; Nicolussi, Paola S; Laddomada, Alberto; Oggiano, Annalisa

    2017-01-01

    African swine fever (ASF) is a devastating disease for which there is no vaccine available. The ASF virus (ASFV) primarily infects cells of the myeloid lineage and this tropism is thought to be crucial for disease pathogenesis. A detailed in vitro characterization of the interactions of a virulent Sardinian isolate (22653/14) and a tissue culture adapted avirulent strain (BA71V) of ASFV with porcine monocytes, un-activated (moMΦ), classically (moM1) and alternatively (moM2) activated monocyte-derived macrophages was conducted in an attempt to better understand this relationship. Using a multiplicity-of-infection (MOI) of 1, both viruses were able to infect monocytes and macrophage subsets, but BA71V presented a reduced ability to infect moM1 compared to 22653/14, with higher expression of early compared to late proteins. Using an MOI of 0.01, only 22653/14 was able to replicate in all the macrophage subsets, with initially lowest in moM1 and moM2. No differences were observed in the expression of CD163 between ASFV infected and uninfected bystander cells. ASFV down-regulated CD16 expression but did not modulate MHC class II levels in monocytes and macrophage subsets. BA71V-infected but not 22653/14-infected moMΦ and moM2 presented with a reduced expression of MHC class I compared to the mock-infected controls. Higher levels of IL-18, IL1-β and IL-1α were released from moM1 after infection with BA71V compared to 22653/14 or mock-infected control. These results revealed differences between these ASFV strains, suggesting that virulent isolates have evolved mechanisms to counteract activated macrophages responses, promoting their survival, dissemination in the host and so ASF pathogenesis.

  5. Diallyl disulfide reduced dose-dependently the number of lymphocyte subsets and monocytes in rats.

    PubMed

    Hashizume, Yoko; Shirato, Ken; Abe, Ikumi; Kobayashi, Ayumu; Mitsuhashi, Ryosuke; Shiono, Chikako; Sato, Shogo; Tachiyashiki, Kaoru; Imaizumi, Kazuhiko

    2012-01-01

    Diallyl disulfide (DADS) is a major sulfur compound of garlic, and exerts anti-inflammatory, immune-modulatory, and enhancing sympathetic activity effects. However, it still remains unclear how DADS affects the distribution of white blood cell subsets, which is essential to execute effective immune responses and partially regulated by adrenal glucocorticoids. Therefore, we examined the dose-dependent effects of DADS administration on the circulating number of white blood cells (WBCs) and lymphocyte subsets, and plasma corticosterone concentration in rats. Male 10-wk-old Sprague Dawley rats were divided into the DADS-free and DADS-orally administered (dose=10, 20, and 40 mg/kg BW) groups. Blood samples were collected from the tail vein at 0, 1, 2, 4, and 6 h after the administration. DADS administration decreased dose- and time-dependently the circulating number of total WBCs, total lymphocytes, and monocytes. Within the lymphocyte subsets, the circulating number of T-lymphocytes and B-lymphocytes was significantly reduced 4 h after DADS administration in a dose-dependent manner, although that of natural killer (NK) cells was not affected. On the other hand, although DADS administration did not significantly change the circulating number of neutrophils, the circulating number of eosinophils and basophils showed a decreasing tendency after DADS administration. In contrast, plasma corticosterone concentration was increased 2 h after DADS administration in a dose-dependent manner. These results suggest that DADS administration reduces the circulating number of monocytes and lymphocytes, including especially acquired immune cells, via the action of corticosterone, and the effects are induced in a dose-dependent manner.

  6. Dendritic cell subsets and immunological milieu in inflammatory human papilloma virus-related skin lesions.

    PubMed

    Nakayama, Yumi; Asagoe, Kenji; Yamauchi, Akiko; Yamamoto, Takenobu; Shirafuji, Yoshinori; Morizane, Shin; Nakanishi, Gen; Iwatsuki, Keiji

    2011-09-01

    Human papilloma virus (HPV)-related warts persist, evading host immune surveillance, but sometimes disappear with inflammation. To elucidate the immune evasion mechanisms of HPV, we have examined the density, dynamics, and subsets of dendritic cell (DC) types in non-inflammatory or inflammatory HPV-related skin lesions such as warts and Bowen's disease (HPV-Bowen), and compared the epidermal expression levels of macrophage inflammatory protein (MIP)-3α and E-cadherin. The expression of various DC markers, MIP-3α, and E-cadherin in the tissue samples obtained from patients with warts, HPV-Bowen and HPV-unrelated skin diseases was evaluated by immunohistochemistry. MIP-3α gene expression levels were examined in warts and HPV-Bowen by in situ hybridization (ISH) and real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR). The numbers of Langerhans cells (LCs) and the expression levels of MIP-3α and E-cadherin were decreased in non-inflammatory warts and HPV-Bowen, as compared with normal skin. Both epidermal LCs and MIP-3α expression reappeared in inflammatory warts, associated with dermal infiltrates composed of many cytotoxic T cells and various subsets of DCs, while cellular infiltrates in HPV-Bowen contained many B cells and plasma cells with sparse infiltration of DCs. The upregulation of MIP-3α gene expression was confirmed in the inflammatory warts and HPV-Bowen by ISH and RT-qPCR. The depletion of LCs in the non-inflammatory warts and HPV-Bowen is associated with a down-regulation of expression levels of MIP-3α and E-cadherin in the lesional keratinocytes. MIP-3α expression is upregulated in lesional keratinocytes of inflammatory warts, with the subsequent recruitment of various DC subsets and cytotoxic T cells, whereas plasma cell-rich infiltration was induced in HPV-Bowen. Copyright © 2011 Japanese Society for Investigative Dermatology. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. A subset polynomial neural networks approach for breast cancer diagnosis.

    PubMed

    O'Neill, T J; Penm, Jack; Penm, Jonathan

    2007-01-01

    Breast cancer is a very common and serious cancer for women that is diagnosed in one of every eight Australian women before the age of 85. The conventional method of breast cancer diagnosis is mammography. However, mammography has been reported to have poor diagnostic capability. In this paper we have used subset polynomial neural network techniques in conjunction with fine needle aspiration cytology to undertake this difficult task of predicting breast cancer. The successful findings indicate that adoption of NNs is likely to lead to increased survival of women with breast cancer, improved electronic healthcare, and enhanced quality of life.

  8. Efficient feature subset selection with probabilistic distance criteria. [pattern recognition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chittineni, C. B.

    1979-01-01

    Recursive expressions are derived for efficiently computing the commonly used probabilistic distance measures as a change in the criteria both when a feature is added to and when a feature is deleted from the current feature subset. A combinatorial algorithm for generating all possible r feature combinations from a given set of s features in (s/r) steps with a change of a single feature at each step is presented. These expressions can also be used for both forward and backward sequential feature selection.

  9. Intrinsic features of the CD8α(-) dendritic cell subset in inducing functional T follicular helper cells.

    PubMed

    Shin, Changsik; Han, Jae-A; Choi, Bongseo; Cho, Yoon-Kyoung; Do, Yoonkyung; Ryu, Seongho

    2016-04-01

    T follicular helper (Tfh) cells, a true B cell helper, have a critical role in enhancing humoral immune responses. However, the initial differentiation of Tfh cells by dendritic cells (DCs), the most potent antigen presenting cells, has not been clearly understood, particularly in the knowledge of the two major conventional dendritic cell subsets, CD8α(+) DCs or CD8α(-) DCs. Here we demonstrated that the localization of CD8α(-) DCs in the marginal zone (MZ) bridging channels is closely associated with the induction of CXCR5(+)CCR7(low) Tfh cells. We also showed that the major source of IL-6 for inducing Tfh cells is provided from the activated CD4(+) T cells induced by CD8α(-) DCs, and IL-6 directly secreted from the DC subsets seems minor. CD8α(-) DCs were superior in inducing functional Tfh cells over other antigen presenting cells including B cells. We here observed the unknown intrinsic features of the DC subsets, suggesting the potential of utilizing the CD8α(-) DC subset as therapeutic vaccine for the regulation of humoral immune responses.

  10. Chronic Low-Grade Inflammation in Childhood Obesity Is Associated with Decreased IL-10 Expression by Monocyte Subsets.

    PubMed

    Mattos, Rafael T; Medeiros, Nayara I; Menezes, Carlos A; Fares, Rafaelle C G; Franco, Eliza P; Dutra, Walderez O; Rios-Santos, Fabrício; Correa-Oliveira, Rodrigo; Gomes, Juliana A S

    2016-01-01

    Chronic low-grade inflammation is related to the development of comorbidities and poor prognosis in obesity. Monocytes are main sources of cytokines and play a pivotal role in inflammation. We evaluated monocyte frequency, phenotype and cytokine profile of monocyte subsets, to determine their association with the pathogenesis of childhood obesity. Children with obesity were evaluated for biochemical and anthropometric parameters. Monocyte subsets were characterized by flow cytometry, considering cytokine production and activation/recognition molecules. Correlation analysis between clinical parameters and immunological data delineated the monocytes contribution for low-grade inflammation. We observed a higher frequency of non-classical monocytes in the childhood obesity group (CO) than normal-weight group (NW). All subsets displayed higher TLR4 expression in CO, but their recognition and antigen presentation functions seem to be diminished due to lower expression of CD40, CD80/86 and HLA-DR. All subsets showed a lower expression of IL-10 in CO and correlation analyses showed changes in IL-10 expression profile. The lower expression of IL-10 may be decisive for the maintenance of the low-grade inflammation status in CO, especially for alterations in non-classical monocytes profile. These cells may contribute to supporting inflammation and loss of regulation in the immune response of children with obesity.

  11. Chronic Low-Grade Inflammation in Childhood Obesity Is Associated with Decreased IL-10 Expression by Monocyte Subsets

    PubMed Central

    Mattos, Rafael T.; Medeiros, Nayara I.; Menezes, Carlos A.; Fares, Rafaelle C. G.; Franco, Eliza P.; Dutra, Walderez O.; Rios-Santos, Fabrício; Correa-Oliveira, Rodrigo; Gomes, Juliana A. S.

    2016-01-01

    Chronic low-grade inflammation is related to the development of comorbidities and poor prognosis in obesity. Monocytes are main sources of cytokines and play a pivotal role in inflammation. We evaluated monocyte frequency, phenotype and cytokine profile of monocyte subsets, to determine their association with the pathogenesis of childhood obesity. Children with obesity were evaluated for biochemical and anthropometric parameters. Monocyte subsets were characterized by flow cytometry, considering cytokine production and activation/recognition molecules. Correlation analysis between clinical parameters and immunological data delineated the monocytes contribution for low-grade inflammation. We observed a higher frequency of non-classical monocytes in the childhood obesity group (CO) than normal-weight group (NW). All subsets displayed higher TLR4 expression in CO, but their recognition and antigen presentation functions seem to be diminished due to lower expression of CD40, CD80/86 and HLA-DR. All subsets showed a lower expression of IL-10 in CO and correlation analyses showed changes in IL-10 expression profile. The lower expression of IL-10 may be decisive for the maintenance of the low-grade inflammation status in CO, especially for alterations in non-classical monocytes profile. These cells may contribute to supporting inflammation and loss of regulation in the immune response of children with obesity. PMID:27977792

  12. Development of an Innovative in Vitro Potency Assay for Anti-Botulinum Antitoxins

    PubMed Central

    Rosen, Osnat; Ozeri, Eyal; Barnea, Ada; David, Alon Ben; Zichel, Ran

    2016-01-01

    Botulinum neurotoxins are bacterial proteins that cause botulism, a life-threatening disease. Therapy relies mostly on post-intoxication antibody treatment. The only accepted method to measure the potency of, and to approve, antitoxin preparations is the mouse lethality neutralization bioassay. However, this assay is time-consuming, labor-intensive, costly, and raises ethical issues related to the large numbers of laboratory animals needed. Until now, all efforts to develop an alternative in vitro assay have not provided a valid replacement to the mouse potency assay. In the present study, we report the development of an innovative in vitro assay for determining botulinum antitoxin potency, using botulinum type B as a model. The concept of the assay is to mimic two fundamental steps in botulinum intoxication: receptor binding and catalytic activity. By simulating these steps in vitro we were able to accurately determine the potency of antitoxin preparations. The reproducibility of the assay was high with a CV < 13%. Most importantly, the antitoxin potency measured by the in vitro assay highly correlated with that measured by the standard in vivo mouse assay (r = 0.9842, p < 0.0001). Thus, this new in vitro assay has the potential to be considered, after validation, as a replacement to the mouse assay for quantitating neutralizing antibody concentrations in pharmaceutical botulinum antitoxin preparations. Future adoption of this in vitro assay would minimize the use of laboratory animals, speed up the time, and reduce the cost of botulinum antitoxin approval. PMID:27669303

  13. A new lymphocyte proliferation assay for potency determination of bovine tuberculin PPDs.

    PubMed

    Spohr, Christina; Kaufmann, Eva; Battenfeld, Sibylle; Duchow, Karin; Cussler, Klaus; Balks, Elisabeth; Bastian, Max

    2015-01-01

    The tuberculin skin test is the method of choice for tuberculosis surveillance in livestock ruminants. The exact definition of the biological activity of bovine tuberculin purified protein derivatives (bovine tuberculin PPDs) is essential for the reliability of a test system. PPDs consist of heterogeneous mixtures of mycobacterial antigens, making it difficult to determine their potency in vitro. The commonly used batch potency test is therefore based on the evaluation of skin reactions in mycobacteria-sensitized guinea pigs. Aim of the present study was to test an alternative in vitro method that reliably quantifies tuberculin PPD potency. This novel approach may prevent animal distress in the future. To this end a flow cytometry-based lymphocyte proliferation assay using peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from sensitized guinea pigs was established. Potency estimates for individual PPD preparations were calculated in comparison to an international standard. The comparison with results obtained from the guinea pig skin test revealed that the lymphocyte proliferation assay is more precise but results in systematically higher potency estimates. However, with a manufacturer specific correction factor a correlation of over 85% was achieved, highlighting the potential of this in vitro method to replace the current guinea pig skin test.

  14. Modulating the potency of an activator in a yeast in vitro transcription system.

    PubMed Central

    Ohashi, Y; Brickman, J M; Furman, E; Middleton, B; Carey, M

    1994-01-01

    The intrinsic stimulatory potential or potency of a eukaryotic gene activator is controlled by the interaction between the activation domain and the transcriptional machinery. To further understand this interaction, we undertook a biochemical study to identify parameters that could be used to modulate activator potency. We considered how varying the number of activation domains, their flexibility, and the number of promoter sites affects potency in a yeast nuclear extract. The effects of GAL4 derivatives bearing either one, two, or four herpes simplex virus VP16 activation domains (amino acids 413 to 454) were measured on DNA templates containing one or two GAL4 sites in a Saccharomyces cerevisiae nuclear extract. We found that multimerized VP16 activation domains acted synergistically to increase the potency of the activators. The spacing between the activation domains was critical, such that the increased flexibility imparted by a protein linker contributed to increased activator potency. With highly potent activators, the levels of transcription stimulated on a single site were saturating, whereas the stimulatory effect of weaker activators increased with the number of sites. We discuss how these biochemical studies relate to the mechanism of gene activation and synergy in a yeast in vitro system. Images PMID:8139572

  15. Rbfox3 Controls the Biogenesis of a Subset of MicroRNAs

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kee K.; Yang, Yanqin; Zhu, Jun; Adelstein, Robert S.; Kawamoto, Sachiyo

    2014-01-01

    RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) regulate numerous aspects of gene expression, thus identification of endogenous targets of RBPs is important for understanding their functions in cells. Here we identified transcriptome-wide targets of Rbfox3 in neuronally differentiated P19 cells and mouse brain using Photoactivatable-Ribonucleoside-Enhanced Crosslinking and Immunoprecipitation (PAR-CLIP). Although Rbfox3 is known to regulate pre-mRNA splicing through binding to the UGCAUG motif, PAR-CLIP analysis revealed diverse Rbfox3 targets including primary-microRNAs (pri-miRNAs) which lack the UGCAUG motif. Induced expression and depletion of Rbfox3 led to changes in the expression levels of a subset of PAR-CLIP-detected miRNAs. In vitro analyses revealed that Rbfox3 functions as a positive and a negative regulator at the stage of pri-miRNA processing to precursor-miRNA. Rbfox3 binds directly to pri-miRNAs and regulates the recruitment of the microprocessor complex to pri-miRNAs. Our study proposes a novel function for Rbfox3 in miRNA biogenesis. PMID:25240799

  16. Different subsets of natural killer T cells may vary in their roles in health and disease

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Vipin; Delovitch, Terry L

    2014-01-01

    Natural killer T cells (NKT) can regulate innate and adaptive immune responses. Type I and type II NKT cell subsets recognize different lipid antigens presented by CD1d, an MHC class-I-like molecule. Most type I NKT cells express a semi-invariant T-cell receptor (TCR), but a major subset of type II NKT cells reactive to a self antigen sulphatide use an oligoclonal TCR. Whereas TCR-α dominates CD1d-lipid recognition by type I NKT cells, TCR-α and TCR-β contribute equally to CD1d-lipid recognition by type II NKT cells. These variable modes of NKT cell recognition of lipid–CD1d complexes activate a host of cytokine-dependent responses that can either exacerbate or protect from disease. Recent studies of chronic inflammatory and autoimmune diseases have led to a hypothesis that: (i) although type I NKT cells can promote pathogenic and regulatory responses, they are more frequently pathogenic, and (ii) type II NKT cells are predominantly inhibitory and protective from such responses and diseases. This review focuses on a further test of this hypothesis by the use of recently developed techniques, intravital imaging and mass cytometry, to analyse the molecular and cellular dynamics of type I and type II NKT cell antigen-presenting cell motility, interaction, activation and immunoregulation that promote immune responses leading to health versus disease outcomes. PMID:24428389

  17. Turning the heterogeneous into homogeneous: studies on selectively isolated GABAergic interneuron subsets.

    PubMed

    Berghuis, Paul; Dobszay, Marton B; Ibanez, Raquel Martin; Ernfors, Patrik; Harkany, Tibor

    2004-11-01

    The amazing morphological and electrophysiological diversity of cortical GABAergic interneurons subserves the broad diversity of processes these cells modulate in neuronal networks. Until recently, interneuron development and functions have been extensively studied in heterogeneous in vitro and in vivo systems containing both excitatory and inhibitory components. However, mechanisms of interneuron specification during development, key signaling mechanisms controlling the establishment of particular inhibitory neuron subsets, and the spatial and temporal regulation of their integration in neuronal microcircuits remain poorly understood. Selective isolation of particular interneuron subsets may significantly extend our knowledge on the scenario of neurochemical and electrophysiological specification of developing interneurons, identification of signaling cues directing their axon growth, and principles of their anterograde and retrograde synaptic communication with other cell types. Here, we show that selective isolation of perisomatic inhibitory cells containing either parvalbumin or cholecystokinin reveals major differences in the temporal dynamics of their functional differentiation, and their dependence on target-derived signals like brain-derived neurotrophic factor and endocannabinoids. In addition, we discuss therapeutic prospects of modulating increased excitatory output in the hippocampus and subthalamic nucleus by re-adjusting the inhibitory control of principal cells.

  18. Bovine γδ T Cells Are a Major Regulatory T Cell Subset

    PubMed Central

    Hope, Jayne; Taylor, Geraldine; Smith, Adrian L.; Cubillos-Zapata, Carolina; Charleston, Bryan

    2014-01-01

    In humans and mice, γδ T cells represent <5% of the total circulating lymphocytes. In contrast, the γδ T cell compartment in ruminants accounts for 15–60% of the total circulating mononuclear lymphocytes. Despite the existence of CD4+CD25high Foxp3+ T cells in the bovine system, these are neither anergic nor suppressive. We present evidence showing that bovine γδ T cells are the major regulatory T cell subset in peripheral blood. These γδ T cells spontaneously secrete IL-10 and proliferate in response to IL-10, TGF-β, and contact with APCs. IL-10–expressing γδ T cells inhibit Ag-specific and nonspecific proliferation of CD4+ and CD8+ T cells in vitro. APC subsets expressing IL-10 and TFG-β regulate proliferation of γδ T cells producing IL-10. We propose that γδ T cells are a major regulatory T cell population in the bovine system. PMID:24890724

  19. A novel subset of helper T cells promotes immune responses by secreting GM-CSF

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, J; Roberts, A I; Liu, C; Ren, G; Xu, G; Zhang, L; Devadas, S; Shi, Yufang

    2013-01-01

    Helper T cells are crucial for maintaining proper immune responses. Yet, they have an undefined relationship with one of the most potent immune stimulatory cytokines, granulocyte macrophage-colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF). By depleting major cytokines during the differentiation of CD4+ T cells in vitro, we derived cells that were found to produce large amounts of GM-CSF, but little of the cytokines produced by other helper T subsets. By their secretion of GM-CSF, this novel subset of helper T cells (which we have termed ThGM cells) promoted the production of cytokines by other T-cell subtypes, including type 1 helper T cell (Th1), type 2 helper T cell (Th2), type 1 cytotoxic T cell (Tc1), type 2 cytotoxic T cell (Tc2), and naive T cells, as evidenced by the fact that antibody neutralization of GM-CSF abolished this effect. ThGM cells were found to be highly prone to activation-induced cell death (AICD). Inhibitors of TRAIL or granzymes could not block AICD in ThGM cells, whereas inhibition of FasL/Fas interaction partially rescued ThGM cells from AICD. Thus, ThGM cells are a novel subpopulation of T helper cells that produce abundant GM-CSF, exhibit exquisite susceptibility to apoptosis, and therefore play a pivotal role in the regulation of the early stages of immune responses. PMID:24076588

  20. Molecular analysis of aggressive renal cell carcinoma with unclassified histology reveals distinct subsets

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Ying-Bei; Xu, Jianing; Skanderup, Anders Jacobsen; Dong, Yiyu; Brannon, A. Rose; Wang, Lu; Won, Helen H.; Wang, Patricia I.; Nanjangud, Gouri J.; Jungbluth, Achim A.; Li, Wei; Ojeda, Virginia; Hakimi, A. Ari; Voss, Martin H.; Schultz, Nikolaus; Motzer, Robert J.; Russo, Paul; Cheng, Emily H.; Giancotti, Filippo G.; Lee, William; Berger, Michael F.; Tickoo, Satish K.; Reuter, Victor E.; Hsieh, James J.

    2016-01-01

    Renal cell carcinomas with unclassified histology (uRCC) constitute a significant portion of aggressive non-clear cell renal cell carcinomas that have no standard therapy. The oncogenic drivers in these tumours are unknown. Here we perform a molecular analysis of 62 high-grade primary uRCC, incorporating targeted cancer gene sequencing, RNA sequencing, single-nucleotide polymorphism array, fluorescence in situ hybridization, immunohistochemistry and cell-based assays. We identify recurrent somatic mutations in 29 genes, including NF2 (18%), SETD2 (18%), BAP1 (13%), KMT2C (10%) and MTOR (8%). Integrated analysis reveals a subset of 26% uRCC characterized by NF2 loss, dysregulated Hippo–YAP pathway and worse survival, whereas 21% uRCC with mutations of MTOR, TSC1, TSC2 or PTEN and hyperactive mTORC1 signalling are associated with better clinical outcome. FH deficiency (6%), chromatin/DNA damage regulator mutations (21%) and ALK translocation (2%) distinguish additional cases. Altogether, this study reveals distinct molecular subsets for 76% of our uRCC cohort, which could have diagnostic and therapeutic implications. PMID:27713405

  1. Niacin-respondent subset of schizophrenia – a therapeutic review.

    PubMed

    Xu, X J; Jiang, G S

    2015-01-01

    It is well known that niacin deficiency manifests with several psychiatric manifestations. Also historically evidence has accumulated that niacin augmentation can be used for treatment of schizophrenia. However, the etiopathological associations between niacin deficiency and schizophrenia as well as the mechanism of action of niacin in its treatment. More importantly, the subgroups of schizophrenia which will respond to niacin augmentation has never been highlighted in the literature. In this article, we review three of the mechanisms in which niacin deficiency could lead to schizophrenic symptoms: (1) Niacin deficiency neurodegeneration (2) Membrane phospholipid deficiency hypothesis and (3) Adrenochrome hypothesis. We will further move towards the clinical as well as treatment related associations as reviewed from the literature. Here, we propose a model that a subset of schizophrenia can respond to niacin augmentation therapy better than other subsets because these patients have contributions in their psychotic manifestations from the neural degeneration resulting from niacin deficiency. We present a short description of our case report which showed rapid improvement in schizophrenic psychotic symptoms subsequent to administration of niacin as an augmentation therapy. We, thus, propose that niacin deficiency is a contributory factor in schizophrenia development in some patients and symptom alleviation in these patients will benefit from niacin augmentation, especially in some particular psychotic features.

  2. Recursive fuzzy granulation for gene subsets extraction and cancer classification.

    PubMed

    Tang, Yuchun; Zhang, Yan-Qing; Huang, Zhen; Hu, Xiaohua; Zhao, Yichuan

    2008-11-01

    A typical microarray gene expression dataset is usually both extremely sparse and imbalanced. To select multiple highly informative gene subsets for cancer classification and diagnosis, a new Fuzzy Granular Support Vector Machine---Recursive Feature Elimination algorithm (FGSVM-RFE) is designed in this paper. As a hybrid algorithm of statistical learning, fuzzy clustering, and granular computing, the FGSVM-RFE separately eliminates irrelevant, redundant, or noisy genes in different granules at different stages and selects highly informative genes with potentially different biological functions in balance. Empirical studies on three public datasets demonstrate that the FGSVM-RFE outperforms state-of-the-art approaches. Moreover, the FGSVM-RFE can extract multiple gene subsets on each of which a classifier can be modeled with 100% accuracy. Specifically, the independent testing accuracy for the prostate cancer dataset is significantly improved. The previous best result is 86% with 16 genes and our best result is 100% with only eight genes. The identified genes are annotated by Onto-Express to be biologically meaningful.

  3. Recursive Mahalanobis separability measure for gene subset selection.

    PubMed

    Mao, K Z; Tang, Wenyin

    2011-01-01

    Mahalanobis class separability measure provides an effective evaluation of the discriminative power of a feature subset, and is widely used in feature selection. However, this measure is computationally intensive or even prohibitive when it is applied to gene expression data. In this study, a recursive approach to Mahalanobis measure evaluation is proposed, with the goal of reducing computational overhead. Instead of evaluating Mahalanobis measure directly in high-dimensional space, the recursive approach evaluates the measure through successive evaluations in 2D space. Because of its recursive nature, this approach is extremely efficient when it is combined with a forward search procedure. In addition, it is noted that gene subsets selected by Mahalanobis measure tend to overfit training data and generalize unsatisfactorily on unseen test data, due to small sample size in gene expression problems. To alleviate the overfitting problem, a regularized recursive Mahalanobis measure is proposed in this study, and guidelines on determination of regularization parameters are provided. Experimental studies on five gene expression problems show that the regularized recursive Mahalanobis measure substantially outperforms the nonregularized Mahalanobis measures and the benchmark recursive feature elimination (RFE) algorithm in all five problems.

  4. Estimation of Discriminative Feature Subset Using Community Modularity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Guodong; Liu, Sanming

    2016-04-01

    Feature selection (FS) is an important preprocessing step in machine learning and data mining. In this paper, a new feature subset evaluation method is proposed by constructing a sample graph (SG) in different k-features and applying community modularity to select highly informative features as a group. However, these features may not be relevant as an individual. Furthermore, relevant in-dependency rather than irrelevant redundancy among the selected features is effectively measured with the community modularity Q value of the sample graph in the k-features. An efficient FS method called k-features sample graph feature selection is presented. A key property of this approach is that the discriminative cues of a feature subset with the maximum relevant in-dependency among features can be accurately determined. This community modularity-based method is then verified with the theory of k-means cluster. Compared with other state-of-the-art methods, the proposed approach is more effective, as verified by the results of several experiments.

  5. Blood lymphocyte subsets in rats with adjuvant arthritis.

    PubMed Central

    Franch, A; Castellote, C; Castell, M

    1994-01-01

    OBJECTIVES--To determine the phenotype of peripheral blood lymphocytes during the time-course of adjuvant arthritis (AA) to detect alterations that could be involved in the pathogenesis of the arthritic process. METHODS--Phenotype analysis was performed on days 7, 14, 21, 28, 42, 56 and 70 after arthritis induction using monoclonal antibodies to CD5, CD4 and CD8 subsets, and flow cytometry. The proportion of activated lymphocytes and lymphocytes was also assessed with monoclonal antibodies to IL-2R (CD25), to Ia antigen and by polyclonal antibodies to rat Ig. RESULTS--Adjuvant arthritis produced leukocytosis with neutrophilia. Rats with AA showed a marked increase in the number of both CD4+ and CD8+ cells. The ratio CD4/CD8 decreased because the rise in CD8+ cells was more pronounced than the increase in CD4+ cells. Changes in lymphocyte counts showed two well-defined periods: the first, from day 14 to day 28, during which the inflammation of the joints reached a maximum and changes in lymphocyte subsets were more pronounced, that is, there was a threefold increase in CD8+ lymphocytes over normal counts, and the second, from day 42 to day 70, in which modified parameters improved considerably but remained different from controls. CONCLUSION--Alterations were detected in the phenotype of peripheral blood lymphocytes in AA, which provides an additional marker of disease activity. PMID:7944619

  6. Blood lymphocyte subsets in rats with adjuvant arthritis.

    PubMed

    Franch, A; Castellote, C; Castell, M

    1994-07-01

    To determine the phenotype of peripheral blood lymphocytes during the time-course of adjuvant arthritis (AA) to detect alterations that could be involved in the pathogenesis of the arthritic process. Phenotype analysis was performed on days 7, 14, 21, 28, 42, 56 and 70 after arthritis induction using monoclonal antibodies to CD5, CD4 and CD8 subsets, and flow cytometry. The proportion of activated lymphocytes and lymphocytes was also assessed with monoclonal antibodies to IL-2R (CD25), to Ia antigen and by polyclonal antibodies to rat Ig. Adjuvant arthritis produced leukocytosis with neutrophilia. Rats with AA showed a marked increase in the number of both CD4+ and CD8+ cells. The ratio CD4/CD8 decreased because the rise in CD8+ cells was more pronounced than the increase in CD4+ cells. Changes in lymphocyte counts showed two well-defined periods: the first, from day 14 to day 28, during which the inflammation of the joints reached a maximum and changes in lymphocyte subsets were more pronounced, that is, there was a threefold increase in CD8+ lymphocytes over normal counts, and the second, from day 42 to day 70, in which modified parameters improved considerably but remained different from controls. Alterations were detected in the phenotype of peripheral blood lymphocytes in AA, which provides an additional marker of disease activity.

  7. A subset of interneurons required for Drosophila larval locomotion.

    PubMed

    Yoshikawa, Shingo; Long, Hong; Thomas, John B

    2016-01-01

    Efforts to define the neural circuits generating locomotor behavior have produced an initial understanding of some of the components within the spinal cord, as well as a basic understanding of several invertebrate motor pattern generators. However, how these circuits are assembled during development is poorly understood. We are defining the neural circuit that generates larval locomotion in the genetically tractable fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster to study locomotor circuit development. Forward larval locomotion involves a stereotyped posterior-to-anterior segmental translocation of body wall muscle contraction and is generated by a relatively small number of identified muscles, motor and sensory neurons, plus an unknown number of the ~270 bilaterally-paired interneurons per segment of the 1st instar larva. To begin identifying the relevant interneurons, we have conditionally inactivated synaptic transmission of interneuron subsets and assayed for the effects on locomotion. From this screen we have identified a subset of 25 interneurons per hemisegment, called the lateral locomotor neurons (LLNs), that are required for locomotion. Both inactivation and constitutive activation of the LLNs disrupt locomotion, indicating that patterned output of the LLNs is required. By expressing a calcium indicator in the LLNs, we found that they display a posterior-to-anterior wave of activity within the CNS corresponding to the segmental translocation of the muscle contraction wave. Identification of the LLNs represents the first step toward elucidating the circuit generating larval locomotion.

  8. T-cell subsets in the germinal center.

    PubMed

    Ramiscal, Roybel R; Vinuesa, Carola G

    2013-03-01

    T cells are known to migrate to B-cell-enriched follicles and germinal centers within secondary lymphoid organs to provide help to B cells. Cognate T:B interactions that take place at the T:B border and subsequently within germinal centers are essential for B-cell priming, differentiation into germinal center B cells, and selection of mutated cells into memory B cells or memory plasma cells. In recent years, different stages of maturation within B-cell helper T cells, collectively known as B-follicular helper T (Tfh) cells, as well as heterogeneity amid germinal center T cells are becoming clear. Indeed, germinal centers support not only bona fide Tfh cells but also CD4(+) and CD8(+) follicular regulatory T (Tfr) cells that act to suppress germinal center responses and B-cell helper natural killer T cells. There is a growing need for more precise phenotypic and functional distinction of these specialized T-cell subsets. In this review, we summarize current knowledge on the ontogeny, molecular identity, and functional relevance of the various subsets of germinal center T cells.

  9. A subset of interneurons required for Drosophila larval locomotion

    PubMed Central

    Yoshikawa, Shingo; Long, Hong; Thomas, John B.

    2015-01-01

    Efforts to define the neural circuits generating locomotor behavior have produced an initial understanding of some of the components within the spinal cord, as well as a basic understanding of several invertebrate motor pattern generators. However, how these circuits are assembled during development is poorly understood. We are defining the neural circuit that generates larval locomotion in the genetically tractable fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster to study locomotor circuit development. Forward larval locomotion involves a stereotyped posterior-to-anterior segmental translocation of body wall muscle contraction and is generated by a relatively small number of identified muscles, motor and sensory neurons, plus an unknown number of the ~270 bilaterally-paired interneurons per segment of the 1st instar larva. To begin identifying the relevant interneurons, we have conditionally inactivated synaptic transmission of interneuron subsets and assayed for the effects on locomotion. From this screen we have identified a subset of 25 interneurons per hemisegment, called the lateral locomotor neurons (LLNs), that are required for locomotion. Both inactivation and constitutive activation of the LLNs disrupt locomotion, indicating that patterned output of the LLNs is required. By expressing a calcium indicator in the LLNs, we found that they display a posterior-to-anterior wave of activity within the CNS corresponding to the segmental translocation of the muscle contraction wave. Identification of the LLNs represents the first step toward elucidating the circuit generating larval locomotion. PMID:26621406

  10. Database of Ligand-Receptor Partners, a DIP subset

    DOE Data Explorer

    Graeber, Thomas G.; Eisenberg, David

    The Database of Ligand-Receptor Partners (DLRP) is a subset of DIP (Database of Interacting Proteins). The DLRP is a database of protein ligand and protein receptor pairs that are known to interact with each other. By interact we mean that the ligand and receptor are members of a ligand-receptor complex and, unless otherwise noted, transduce a signal. In some instances the ligand and/or receptor may form a heterocomplex with other ligands/receptors in order to be functional. We have entered the majority of interactions in DLRP as full DIP entries, with links to references and additional information (see the DIP User's Guide). DLRP is a web supplement for: Thomas G. Graeber and David Eisenberg. Bioinformatic identification of potential autocrine signaling loops in cancers from gene expression profiles. Nature Genetics, 29(3):295-300 (November 2001). [Quoted from the DLRP homepage at http://dip.doe-mbi.ucla.edu/dip/DLRP.cgi] Also available from this page is the DLRP chemokine subset.

  11. Effects of a simulated tennis match on lymphocyte subset measurements.

    PubMed

    Schafer, Mark; Kell, Holly; Navalta, James; Tibana, Ramires; Lyons, Scott; Arnett, Scott

    2014-03-01

    Tennis is an activity requiring both endurance and anaerobic components, which could have immunosuppressive effects postexercise. The purpose of this investigation was to determine the effect of a simulated tennis match on apoptotic and migratory markers on lymphocyte subsets. Male high school (n = 5) and college (n = 3) tennis players (M(age) = 18.9 +/- 3.3 years) completed 10 sets of a tennis protocol including serves, forehand strokes, and backhand groundstrokes with 1-min rest periods between sets. Apoptosis antigen 1 receptor (CD95) and chemokine receptor fractalkine (CX3CR1) expression was analyzed on helper T lymphocytes (CD4+), cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CD8+), and B lymphocytes (CD19+) twice, at resting baseline and immediately after all 10 sets of the tennis protocol. An increase was observed in each lymphocyte subtype (p < .02, effect size = .41), and comparison of absolute changes revealed increases in CD4+/CD95+, CD8+/CD95+, and CD8+/CX3CR1 lymphocytes following the tennis protocol (p < .01, effect size = .43), but not in CD19+ cells. A simulated tennis match has adequate intensity to induce immune modulations in terms of increased cell death and cellular migration in T lymphocyte subsets. Lymphocytopenia following tennis play is influenced by both apoptotic and migratory mechanisms.

  12. Potency fingerprint of herbal products Danshen injection for their quality evaluation.

    PubMed

    Chang, Yan-Xu; Yan, Dong-Mei; Chen, Lin-Lin; Ding, Xiao-Ping; Qi, Jin; Kang, Li-Yuan; Zhang, Bo-Li; Yu, Bo-Yang

    2009-06-01

    The fingerprint technique has been studied frequently as a useful strategy for quality of traditional Chinese medicine. A novel potency fingerprint that can quantitatively analyze the antioxidant activity of individual constituent and provide the total antioxidant activities of the samples has been developed by high-performance liquid chromatography coupled with ultraviolet and pyrogallol-luminol chemiluminescence detection (HPLC-diode array detection (DAD)-PLD). Hierarchical clustering analysis has been used as a powerful pattern recognition tool to identify and classify Danshen injection from different factories. In addition, the combination use of the chromatographic fingerprint and potency fingerprint with principal component analysis was applied to quality control of Danshen injection. The results demonstrated that the proposed potency fingerprint was a useful means to control the quality and to clarify the possible mechanism of action of herbal products.

  13. Incorporation of metabolically stable ketones into a small molecule probe to increase potency and water solubility.

    PubMed

    Larraufie, Marie-Helene; Yang, Wan Seok; Jiang, Elise; Thomas, Ajit G; Slusher, Barbara S; Stockwell, Brent R

    2015-11-01

    Introducing a reactive carbonyl to a scaffold that does not otherwise have an electrophilic functionality to create a reversible covalent inhibitor is a potentially useful strategy for enhancing compound potency. However, aldehydes are metabolically unstable, which precludes the use of this strategy for compounds to be tested in animal models or in human clinical studies. To overcome this limitation, we designed ketone-based functionalities capable of forming reversible covalent adducts, while displaying high metabolic stability, and imparting improved water solubility to their pendant scaffold. We tested this strategy on the ferroptosis inducer and experimental therapeutic erastin, and observed substantial increases in compound potency. In particular, a new carbonyl erastin analog, termed IKE, displayed improved potency, solubility and metabolic stability, thus representing an ideal candidate for future in vivo cancer therapeutic applications.

  14. The potency of cannabis in New Zealand from 1976 to 1996.

    PubMed

    Poulsen, H A; Sutherland, G J

    2000-01-01

    The potency of cannabis plant and cannabis products seized in New Zealand over the period of 20 years is studied. The earlier part of the study includes mainly imported cannabis oil and cannabis resin, and both imported and locally grown cannabis plant, that was seized by the police. The later part of the study includes little imported material. Cannabis plant is now locally grown, cannabis oil is locally manufactured and imported cannabis resin is rarely seized. The average potency of the cannabis plant available to the user has not increased over the 20 years period. Cannabis leaf contains on average 1% THC and the female flowering heads on average 3.5% THC. The average potency of cannabis oil has dropped from its peak at 34% THC in 1985 to 13% THC in 1995.

  15. Robustness testing of live attenuated rubella vaccine potency assay using fractional factorial design of experiments.

    PubMed

    Kutle, Leonida; Pavlović, Nediljko; Dorotić, Marko; Zadro, Ivana; Kapustić, Marijana; Halassy, Beata

    2010-07-26

    The potency assay for the freeze-dried live attenuated rubella vaccine is a cell culture based biological assay. The aim of our study was to perform the robustness testing of the rubella vaccine potency assay prior to validation. Seven intra-assay operating conditions that could have an effect on the assay performance were identified and their influence on the overall assay variability investigated by fractional factorial design of experiments (DoE). The robustness testing through DoE showed that the rubella vaccine potency assay is a robust assay. Critical operating conditions can be identified using DoE, which indicates that it is a suitable approach in bioassay robustness studies. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Improving Quality and Potency Testing for Umbilical Cord Blood: A New Perspective

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Summary This article critically reviews current methods to test and characterize umbilical cord blood (UCB) for hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. These tests include total nucleated cell (TNC) count, viability, viable CD34-positive content, and the colony-forming unit assay. It is assumed that the data obtained are sufficient to perform a UCB stem cell transplant without actually determining the quality and potency of the stem cells responsible for engraftment. This assumption has led not only to a high graft failure rate attributed to low or lack of potency, but also to noncompliance with present statutes that require UCB stem cells to be of high quality and, indeed, potency for a transplant to be successful. New evidence now calls into question the quality of the data, based on the UCB processed TNC fraction because using this impure fraction masks and significantly underestimates the functionality of the stem cells in both the segment and the unit. It is proposed that UCB units should be processed to the mononuclear cell fraction and that new cost-effective technology that measures the quality and potency of UCB stem cells be implemented to achieve better practices in UCB testing. These changes would provide the transplant physician with the assurance that the stem cells will perform as intended and would reduce risk and increase safety and efficacy for the patient. Significance Current stem cell transplantation of umbilical cord blood cells requires testing that includes four basic parameters that do not determine whether the stem cells are of high quality, as required by the Stem Cell Therapeutic and Research Act of 2005. No cord blood units collected or transplanted so far have been tested for stem cell quality or potency. New scientific evidence calls into question cord blood processing and testing practices required by regulatory agencies and standards organizations. A new perspective is described that includes stem cell quality and potency testing

  17. Development and validation of a rapid, aldehyde dehydrogenase bright–based cord blood potency assay

    PubMed Central

    Noldner, Pamela; Troy, Jesse D.; Cheatham, Lynn; Parrish, Amanda; Page, Kristin; Gentry, Tracy; Balber, Andrew E.; Kurtzberg, Joanne

    2016-01-01

    Banked, unrelated umbilical cord blood provides access to hematopoietic stem cell transplantation for patients lacking matched bone marrow donors, yet 10% to 15% of patients experience graft failure or delayed engraftment. This may be due, at least in part, to inadequate potency of the selected cord blood unit (CBU). CBU potency is typically assessed before cryopreservation, neglecting changes in potency occurring during freezing and thawing. Colony-forming units (CFUs) have been previously shown to predict CBU potency, defined as the ability to engraft in patients by day 42 posttransplant. However, the CFU assay is difficult to standardize and requires 2 weeks to perform. Consequently, we developed a rapid multiparameter flow cytometric CBU potency assay that enumerates cells expressing high levels of the enzyme aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH bright [ALDHbr]), along with viable CD45+ or CD34+ cell content. These measurements are made on a segment that was attached to a cryopreserved CBU. We validated the assay with prespecified criteria testing accuracy, specificity, repeatability, intermediate precision, and linearity. We then prospectively examined the correlations among ALDHbr, CD34+, and CFU content of 3908 segments over a 5-year period. ALDHbr (r = 0.78; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.76-0.79), but not CD34+ (r = 0.25; 95% CI, 0.22-0.28), was strongly correlated with CFU content as well as ALDHbr content of the CBU. These results suggest that the ALDHbr segment assay (based on unit characteristics measured before release) is a reliable assessment of potency that allows rapid selection and release of CBUs from the cord blood bank to the transplant center for transplantation. PMID:26968535

  18. Development and validation of a rapid, aldehyde dehydrogenase bright-based cord blood potency assay.

    PubMed

    Shoulars, Kevin; Noldner, Pamela; Troy, Jesse D; Cheatham, Lynn; Parrish, Amanda; Page, Kristin; Gentry, Tracy; Balber, Andrew E; Kurtzberg, Joanne

    2016-05-12

    Banked, unrelated umbilical cord blood provides access to hematopoietic stem cell transplantation for patients lacking matched bone marrow donors, yet 10% to 15% of patients experience graft failure or delayed engraftment. This may be due, at least in part, to inadequate potency of the selected cord blood unit (CBU). CBU potency is typically assessed before cryopreservation, neglecting changes in potency occurring during freezing and thawing. Colony-forming units (CFUs) have been previously shown to predict CBU potency, defined as the ability to engraft in patients by day 42 posttransplant. However, the CFU assay is difficult to standardize and requires 2 weeks to perform. Consequently, we developed a rapid multiparameter flow cytometric CBU potency assay that enumerates cells expressing high levels of the enzyme aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH bright [ALDH(br)]), along with viable CD45(+) or CD34(+) cell content. These measurements are made on a segment that was attached to a cryopreserved CBU. We validated the assay with prespecified criteria testing accuracy, specificity, repeatability, intermediate precision, and linearity. We then prospectively examined the correlations among ALDH(br), CD34(+), and CFU content of 3908 segments over a 5-year period. ALDH(br) (r = 0.78; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.76-0.79), but not CD34(+) (r = 0.25; 95% CI, 0.22-0.28), was strongly correlated with CFU content as well as ALDH(br) content of the CBU. These results suggest that the ALDH(br) segment assay (based on unit characteristics measured before release) is a reliable assessment of potency that allows rapid selection and release of CBUs from the cord blood bank to the transplant center for transplantation. © 2016 by The American Society of Hematology.

  19. Novel Ferroptosis Inhibitors with Improved Potency and ADME Properties.

    PubMed

    Hofmans, Sam; Vanden Berghe, Tom; Devisscher, Lars; Hassannia, Behrouz; Lyssens, Sophie; Joossens, Jurgen; Van Der Veken, Pieter; Vandenabeele, Peter; Augustyns, Koen

    2016-03-10

    Ferroptosis is a nonapoptotic, iron-catalyzed form of regulated necrosis that is critically dependent on glutathione peroxidase 4 (GPX4). It has been shown to contribute to liver and kidney ischemia reperfusion injury in mice. A chemical inhibitor discovered by high-throughput screening displayed inhibition of ferroptosis with nanomolar activity and was dubbed ferrostatin-1 (fer-1). Ferrostatins inhibit oxidative lipid damage, but suffer from inherent stability problems due to the presence of an ester moiety. This limits the application of these molecules in vivo, due to rapid hydrolysis of the ester into the inactive carboxylic acid. Previous studies highlighted the importance of the ethyl ester and suggested steric modifications of the ester for generating improved molecules. In this study, we report the synthesis of novel ferroptosis inhibitors containing amide and sulfonamide moieties with improved stability, single digit nanomolar antiferroptotic activity, and good ADME properties suitable for application in in vivo disease models.

  20. The spermicidal potency of Coca-Cola and Pepsi-Cola.

    PubMed

    Hong, C Y; Shieh, C C; Wu, P; Chiang, B N

    1987-09-01

    The inhibitory effect of Old Coke, caffeine-free New Coke, New Coke, Diet Coke and Pepsi-Cola on human sperm motility was studied with a trans-membrane migration method. None of them could decrease sperm motility to less than 70% of control within one hour. A previous study which claimed a marked variation of spermicidal potencies among different formulations of Coca-Cola could not be confirmed. Even if cola has a spermicidal effect, its potency is relatively weak as compared with other well-known spermicidal agents.

  1. Estrogenic potencies of resorcylic acid lactones and 17 beta-estradiol in female rats.

    PubMed

    Everett, D J; Perry, C J; Scott, K A; Martin, B W; Terry, M K

    1987-01-01

    Uterotrophic response in sexually immature female rats has been used to rank the relative estrogenic potencies of six resorcylic acid lactones (RALs) and to compare their activities with that of 17 beta-estradiol. On oral administration, the estrogenic potency relative to 17 beta-estradiol is as follows: 7 alpha-zearalenol, 10 times less; zeranol, 150 times less; taleranol, 350 times less; zearalanone, 400 times less; zearalenone, 650 times less; 7 beta-zearalenol, 3500 times less. On subcutaneous administration, zeranol is 500 times less estrogenic than 17 beta-estradiol.

  2. Evaluation of the potency activity of aphrodisiac in Eurycoma longifolia Jack.

    PubMed

    Ang, H H; Ikeda, S; Gan, E K

    2001-08-01

    The butanol, methanol, water and chloroform extracts of the roots of Eurycoma longifolia Jack were studied using various tests of potency of treated male rats. The results showed that E. longifolia produced a dose-dependent, recurrent and significant increase in the episodes of penile reflexes as evidenced by increases in quick flips, long flips and erections of the treated male rats during the 30 min observation period. These results provide further evidence that E. longifolia increases the aphrodisiac potency activity in treated animals.

  3. Solulin reduces infarct volume and regulates gene-expression in transient middle cerebral artery occlusion in rats.

    PubMed

    Ryang, Yu-Mi; Dang, Jon; Kipp, Markus; Petersen, Karl-Uwe; Fahlenkamp, Astrid V; Gempt, Jens; Wesp, Dominik; Rossaint, Rolf; Beyer, Cordian; Coburn, Mark

    2011-11-14

    Thrombolysis after acute ischemic stroke has only proven to be beneficial in a subset of patients. The soluble recombinant analogue of human thrombomodulin, Solulin, was studied in an in vivo rat model of acute ischemic stroke. Male SD rats were subjected to 2 hrs of transient middle cerebral artery occlusion (tMCAO). Rats treated with Solulin intravenously shortly before reperfusion were compared to rats receiving normal saline i.v. with respect to infarct volumes, neurological deficits and mortality. Gene expression of IL-6, IL-1β, TNF-α, MMP-9, CD11B and GFAP were semiquantitatively analyzed by rtPCR of the penumbra. 24 hrs after reperfusion, rats were neurologically tested, euthanized and infarct volumes determined. Solulin significantly reduced mean total (p=0.001), cortical (p=0.002), and basal ganglia (p=0.036) infarct volumes. Hippocampal infarct volumes (p=0.191) were not significantly affected. Solulin significantly downregulated the expression of IL-1β (79%; p<0.001), TNF-α (59%; p=0.001), IL-6 (47%; p=0.04), and CD11B (49%; p=0.001) in the infarcted cortex compared to controls. Solulin reduced mean total, cortical and basal ganglia infarct volumes and regulated a subset of cytokines and proteases after tMCAO suggesting the potency of this compound for therapeutic interventions.

  4. Solulin reduces infarct volume and regulates gene-expression in transient middle cerebral artery occlusion in rats

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Thrombolysis after acute ischemic stroke has only proven to be beneficial in a subset of patients. The soluble recombinant analogue of human thrombomodulin, Solulin, was studied in an in vivo rat model of acute ischemic stroke. Methods Male SD rats were subjected to 2 hrs of transient middle cerebral artery occlusion (tMCAO). Rats treated with Solulin intravenously shortly before reperfusion were compared to rats receiving normal saline i.v. with respect to infarct volumes, neurological deficits and mortality. Gene expression of IL-6, IL-1β, TNF-α, MMP-9, CD11B and GFAP were semiquantitatively analyzed by rtPCR of the penumbra. Results 24 hrs after reperfusion, rats were neurologically tested, euthanized and infarct volumes determined. Solulin significantly reduced mean total (p = 0.001), cortical (p = 0.002), and basal ganglia (p = 0.036) infarct volumes. Hippocampal infarct volumes (p = 0.191) were not significantly affected. Solulin significantly downregulated the expression of IL-1β (79%; p < 0.001), TNF-α (59%; p = 0.001), IL-6 (47%; p = 0.04), and CD11B (49%; p = 0.001) in the infarcted cortex compared to controls. Conclusions Solulin reduced mean total, cortical and basal ganglia infarct volumes and regulated a subset of cytokines and proteases after tMCAO suggesting the potency of this compound for therapeutic interventions. PMID:22082476

  5. New and Improved Version of the ASDC MOPITT Search and Subset Web Application

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2016-07-06

    ... and Improved Version of the ASDC MOPITT Search and Subset Web Application Friday, June 24, 2016 A new and improved version of the ASDC MOPITT Search and Subset Web Application has been released. New features include: Versions 5 and 6 ...

  6. IL-10 conditioning of human skin affects the distribution of migratory dendritic cell subsets and functional T cell differentiation.

    PubMed

    Lindenberg, Jelle J; Oosterhoff, Dinja; Sombroek, Claudia C; Lougheed, Sinéad M; Hooijberg, Erik; Stam, Anita G M; Santegoets, Saskia J A M; Tijssen, Henk J; Buter, Jan; Pinedo, Herbert M; van den Eertwegh, Alfons J M; Scheper, Rik J; Koenen, Hans J P M; van de Ven, Rieneke; de Gruijl, Tanja D

    2013-01-01

    In cancer patients pervasive systemic suppression of Dendritic Cell (DC) differentiation and maturation can hinder vaccination efficacy. In this study we have extensively characterized migratory DC subsets from human skin and studied how their migration and T cell-stimulatory abilities were affected by conditioning of the dermal microenvironment through cancer-related suppressive cytokines. To assess effects in the context of a complex tissue structure, we made use of a near-physiological skin explant model. By 4-color flow cytometry, we identified migrated Langerhans Cells (LC) and five dermis-derived DC populations in differential states of maturation. From a panel of known tumor-associated suppressive cytokines, IL-10 showed a unique ability to induce predominant migration of an immature CD14(+)CD141(+)DC-SIGN(+) DC subset with low levels of co-stimulatory molecules, up-regulated expression of the co-inhibitory molecule PD-L1 and the M2-associated macrophage marker CD163. A similarly immature subset composition was observed for DC migrating from explants taken from skin overlying breast tumors. Whereas predominant migration of mature CD1a(+) subsets was associated with release of IL-12p70, efficient Th cell expansion with a Th1 profile, and expansion of functional MART-1-specific CD8(+) T cells, migration of immature CD14(+) DDC was accompanied by increased release of IL-10, poor expansion of CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells, and skewing of Th responses to favor coordinated FoxP3 and IL-10 expression and regulatory T cell differentiation and outgrowth. Thus, high levels of IL-10 impact the composition of skin-emigrated DC subsets and appear to favor migration of M2-like immature DC with functional qualities conducive to T cell tolerance.

  7. IL-10 Conditioning of Human Skin Affects the Distribution of Migratory Dendritic Cell Subsets and Functional T Cell Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Lindenberg, Jelle J.; Oosterhoff, Dinja; Sombroek, Claudia C.; Lougheed, Sinéad M.; Hooijberg, Erik; Stam, Anita G. M.; Santegoets, Saskia J. A. M.; Tijssen, Henk J.; Buter, Jan; Pinedo, Herbert M.; van den Eertwegh, Alfons J. M.; Scheper, Rik J.; Koenen, Hans J. P. M.; van de Ven, Rieneke; de Gruijl, Tanja D.

    2013-01-01

    In cancer patients pervasive systemic suppression of Dendritic Cell (DC) differentiation and maturation can hinder vaccination efficacy. In this study we have extensively characterized migratory DC subsets from human skin and studied how their migration and T cell-stimulatory abilities were affected by conditioning of the dermal microenvironment through cancer-related suppressive cytokines. To assess effects in the context of a complex tissue structure, we made use of a near-physiological skin explant model. By 4-color flow cytometry, we identified migrated Langerhans Cells (LC) and five dermis-derived DC populations in differential states of maturation. From a panel of known tumor-associated suppressive cytokines, IL-10 showed a unique ability to induce predominant migration of an immature CD14+CD141+DC-SIGN+ DC subset with low levels of co-stimulatory molecules, up-regulated expression of the co-inhibitory molecule PD-L1 and the M2-associated macrophage marker CD163. A similarly immature subset composition was observed for DC migrating from explants taken from skin overlying breast tumors. Whereas predominant migration of mature CD1a+ subsets was associated with release of IL-12p70, efficient Th cell expansion with a Th1 profile, and expansion of functional MART-1-specific CD8+ T cells, migration of immature CD14+ DDC was accompanied by increased release of IL-10, poor expansion of CD4+ and CD8+ T cells, and skewing of Th responses to favor coordinated FoxP3 and IL-10 expression and regulatory T cell differentiation and outgrowth. Thus, high levels of IL-10 impact the composition of skin-emigrated DC subsets and appear to favor migration of M2-like immature DC with functional qualities conducive to T cell tolerance. PMID:23875023

  8. Phorbol ester induces elevated oxidative activity and alkalization in a subset of lysosomes

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Chii-Shiarng )

    2002-01-01

    Background: Lysosomes are acidic organelles that play multiple roles in various cellular oxidative activities such as the oxidative burst during cytotoxic killing. It remains to be determined how lysosomal lumen oxidative activity and pH interact and are regulated. Here, I report the use of fluorescent probes to measure oxidative activity and pH of lysosomes in live macrophages upon treatment with the tumor promotor phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA), and provide novel insight regarding the regulation of lysosomal oxidative activity and pH. Results: The substrate used to measure oxidative activity was bovine serum albumin covalently coupled to dihydro-2?, 4,5,6,7,7?-hexafluorofluorescein (OxyBURST Green H2HFF BSA). During pulse-chase procedures with live macrophages, this reduced dye was internalized through an endocytic pathway and accumulated in the lysosomes. Oxidation of this compound results in a dramatic increase of fluorescence intensity. By using low-light level fluorescence microscopy, I determined that phorbol ester treatment results in increased oxidative activity and pH elevation in different subsets of lysosomes. Furthermore, lysosomes with stronger oxidative activity tended to exclude the acidotropic lysosomal indicator, and thus exhibit higher alkalinity. Conclusions: Results indicate that there is a regulatory mechanism between lysosomal oxidative activity and pH. Activation of lysosomal Nicotinamide Adenine Dinucleotide Phosphate (NADPH) oxidase by phorbol ester may result in increase of intralysosomal O2?- and H2O2, concurrent with pH elevation due to consumption of H+ and generation of OH-. Furthermore, effect of phorbol ester on elevated oxidative activity and pH is heterogeneous among total lysosomal population. Higher oxidative activity and/or pH are only observed in subsets of lysosomes.

  9. Relative developmental toxicity potencies of retinoids in the embryonic stem cell test compared with their relative potencies in in vivo and two other in vitro assays for developmental toxicity.

    PubMed

    Louisse, Jochem; Gönen, Süleyman; Rietjens, Ivonne M C M; Verwei, Miriam

    2011-05-30

    The present study determines the relative developmental toxicity potencies of retinoids in the embryonic stem (ES)-D3 cell differentiation assay of the embryonic stem cell test, and compares the outcomes with their relative potencies in in vivo and two other in vitro assays for developmental toxicity. The results reveal that the potency ranking obtained in the ES-D3 cell differentiation assay is similar to the reported potency rankings in the two other in vitro assays for developmental toxicity. TTNPB ((E)-4[2-(5,6,7,8-tetrahydro-5,5,8,8-tetramethyl-2-naphthalenyl)-1-propenyl]benzoic acid) was the most potent retinoid, whereas etretinate and retinol had the lowest potency. All-trans-retinoic acid, 13-cis-retinoic acid, 9-cis-retinoic acid and acitretin showed an intermediate potency. In vivo potency rankings of the developmental toxicity of retinoids appear to be dependent on the species and/or exposure regimens used. The obtained in vitro potency ranking does not completely correspond with the in vivo potency rankings, although TTNPB is correctly predicted to be the most potent and retinol the least potent congener. The lack of in vivo kinetic processes in the ES-D3 cell differentiation assay might explain the deviating potency predictions of some retinoids. Therefore, knowledge on the species-dependent in vivo kinetics is essential when using in vitro toxicity data for the estimation of in vivo developmental toxicity potencies within series of related compounds. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Designing vaccines based on biology of human dendritic cell subsets

    PubMed Central

    Palucka, Karolina; Banchereau, Jacques; Mellman, Ira

    2010-01-01

    The effective vaccines developed against a variety of infectious agents, including polio, measles and Hepatitis B, represent major achievements in medicine. These vaccines, usually composed of microbial antigens, are often associated with an adjuvant that activates dendritic cells (DCs). Many infectious diseases are still in need of an effective vaccine including HIV, malaria, hepatitis C and tuberculosis. In some cases, the induction of cellular rather than humoral responses may be more important as the goal is to control and eliminate the existing infection rather than to prevent it. Our increased understanding of the mechanisms of antigen presentation, particularly with the description of DC subsets with distinct functions, as well as their plasticity in responding to extrinsic signals, represent opportunities to develop novel vaccines. In addition, we foresee that this increased knowledge will permit us to design vaccines that will reprogram the immune system to intervene therapeutically in cancer, allergy and autoimmunity. PMID:21029958

  11. Lymphocyte subsets alteration in patients with argentine hemorrhagic fever.

    PubMed

    Vallejos, D A; Ambrosio, A M; Feuillade, M R; Maiztegui, J I

    1989-02-01

    Peripheral blood lymphocyte subpopulations were studied in 15 patients with Argentine Hemorrhagic Fever (AHF), during the acute period of the disease and in early convalescence. Anti-human Ig antibodies were used to identify B cells and monoclonal antibodies to assess T4 and T8 subsets. During the acute period of the disease, significant alterations were found in B, T4, and T8 lymphocytes (P less than .001), as well as in T4/T8 ratios (P less than .001). These abnormalities disappeared in early convalescence, around 30 days after the clinical onset. Diminished numbers of T4 lymphocytes are interpreted as relevant to the immunodepression that characterizes the acute phase of AHF.

  12. Efficient Simulation Budget Allocation for Selecting an Optimal Subset

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Chun-Hung; He, Donghai; Fu, Michael; Lee, Loo Hay

    2008-01-01

    We consider a class of the subset selection problem in ranking and selection. The objective is to identify the top m out of k designs based on simulated output. Traditional procedures are conservative and inefficient. Using the optimal computing budget allocation framework, we formulate the problem as that of maximizing the probability of correc tly selecting all of the top-m designs subject to a constraint on the total number of samples available. For an approximation of this corre ct selection probability, we derive an asymptotically optimal allocat ion and propose an easy-to-implement heuristic sequential allocation procedure. Numerical experiments indicate that the resulting allocatio ns are superior to other methods in the literature that we tested, and the relative efficiency increases for larger problems. In addition, preliminary numerical results indicate that the proposed new procedur e has the potential to enhance computational efficiency for simulation optimization.

  13. Urofacial syndrome: A subset of neurogenic bladder dysfunction syndromes?

    PubMed Central

    Stamatiou, K. N.; Karakos, C. D.

    2010-01-01

    The urofacial syndrome is probably a subset of neurogenic bladder dysfunction syndromes characterized by detrusor-sphincter discoordination along with a characteristic inversion of facial expression with laughing. This characteristic facial expression can facilitate early detection of this disorder, which leads to poor bladder emptying with high residual urine, hydro-nephrosis with vesico-ureteral reflux and potentially renal failure if left untreated. The etiology of the urofacial syndrome is unknown. In our case, a 12-year-old boy of Middle-Eastern origin presented to the Outpatient Department of our hospital with left pyelonephritis, hydronephrosis and bladder dilatation. Voiding cystourethrography performed 15 days later revealed left vesicoureteral reflux. Cystoscopy revealed bladder trabeculation however an anatomic urethral obstruction was not noticed. Both, neurological examination and radiography of the lumbosacral spine were normal. Urodynamic evaluation revealed the typical findings of detrusor-sphincter discoordination. PMID:21369396

  14. Urofacial syndrome: A subset of neurogenic bladder dysfunction syndromes?

    PubMed

    Stamatiou, K N; Karakos, C D

    2010-10-01

    The urofacial syndrome is probably a subset of neurogenic bladder dysfunction syndromes characterized by detrusor-sphincter discoordination along with a characteristic inversion of facial expression with laughing. This characteristic facial expression can facilitate early detection of this disorder, which leads to poor bladder emptying with high residual urine, hydro-nephrosis with vesico-ureteral reflux and potentially renal failure if left untreated. The etiology of the urofacial syndrome is unknown. In our case, a 12-year-old boy of Middle-Eastern origin presented to the Outpatient Department of our hospital with left pyelonephritis, hydronephrosis and bladder dilatation. Voiding cystourethrography performed 15 days later revealed left vesicoureteral reflux. Cystoscopy revealed bladder trabeculation however an anatomic urethral obstruction was not noticed. Both, neurological examination and radiography of the lumbosacral spine were normal. Urodynamic evaluation revealed the typical findings of detrusor-sphincter discoordination.

  15. Codes with Parity Conditions on Subsets of Coordinates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Posner, E. C.; Reichstein, Z.

    1985-01-01

    Binary codes with the constraint that the codes restricted to certain subsets of columns must be contained in particular codes of the shorter lengths are considered. In particular, codes of even length 2k, and of minimum distance approximately greater than d, where in the code obtained by restricting to the first k positions has even weight and at the same time the code obtained by restricting to the last k positions also has even weight are considered. If k = 2n, n odd, and d = 2n, it is proved that the code has at most 8n - 4 codewords, and 8n - 4 is attainable for n = 3. This permits a file-transfer protocol control function assignment for personal computers to be chosen for 20 control functions using essentially just pairs of upper-case alphabetic ASCII characters where the Hamming distance between the binary forms of every two different control functions is at least six.

  16. Efficient Simulation Budget Allocation for Selecting an Optimal Subset

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Chun-Hung; He, Donghai; Fu, Michael; Lee, Loo Hay

    2008-01-01

    We consider a class of the subset selection problem in ranking and selection. The objective is to identify the top m out of k designs based on simulated output. Traditional procedures are conservative and inefficient. Using the optimal computing budget allocation framework, we formulate the problem as that of maximizing the probability of correc tly selecting all of the top-m designs subject to a constraint on the total number of samples available. For an approximation of this corre ct selection probability, we derive an asymptotically optimal allocat ion and propose an easy-to-implement heuristic sequential allocation procedure. Numerical experiments indicate that the resulting allocatio ns are superior to other methods in the literature that we tested, and the relative efficiency increases for larger problems. In addition, preliminary numerical results indicate that the proposed new procedur e has the potential to enhance computational efficiency for simulation optimization.

  17. Big subsets with small boundaries in a graph with a vertex-transitive group of automorphisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seifter, N.; Trofimov, V. I.

    2017-02-01

    The theory of ends of finitely generated groups G and connected locally finite graphs Γ with vertex- transitive groups of automorphisms can be regarded as a theory of Boolean algebras of subsets of G or vertex set of Γ with finite boundaries (in the locally finite Cayley graph of G or in Γ respectively), considered modulo finite subsets. We develop a more general theory where infinite subsets with finite boundaries are replaced by certain `big' subsets with `small' boundaries.

  18. Distinct Oral Neutrophil Subsets Define Health and Periodontal Disease States.

    PubMed

    Fine, N; Hassanpour, S; Borenstein, A; Sima, C; Oveisi, M; Scholey, J; Cherney, D; Glogauer, M

    2016-07-01

    Neutrophils exit the vasculature and swarm to sites of inflammation and infection. However, these cells are abundant in the healthy, inflammation-free human oral environment, suggesting a unique immune surveillance role within the periodontium. We hypothesize that neutrophils in the healthy oral cavity occur in an intermediary parainflammatory state that allows them to interact with and contain the oral microflora without eliciting a marked inflammatory response. Based on a high-throughput screen of neutrophil CD (cluster of differentiation) marker expression and a thorough literature review, we developed multicolor flow cytometry panels to determine the surface marker signatures of oral neutrophil subsets in periodontal health and disease. We define here 3 distinct neutrophil subsets: resting/naive circulatory neutrophils, parainflammatory neutrophils found in the healthy oral cavity, and proinflammatory neutrophils found in the oral cavity during chronic periodontal disease. Furthermore, parainflammatory neutrophils manifest as 2 distinct subpopulations-based on size, granularity, and expression of specific CD markers-and exhibit intermediate levels of activation as compared with the proinflammatory oral neutrophils. These intermediately activated parainflammatory populations occur in equal proportions in the healthy oral cavity, with a shift to one highly activated proinflammatory neutrophil population in chronic periodontal disease. This work is the first to identify and characterize oral parainflammatory neutrophils that interact with commensal biofilms without inducing an inflammatory response, thereby demonstrating that not all neutrophils trafficking through periodontal tissues are fully activated. In addition to establishing possible diagnostic and treatment monitoring biomarkers, this oral neutrophil phenotype model builds on existing literature suggesting that the healthy periodontium may be in a parainflammatory state. © International & American

  19. Dysregulation of CD4(+) T Cell Subsets in Intracranial Aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hai-Feng; Zhao, Ming-Guang; Liang, Guo-Biao; Yu, Chun-Yong; He, Wenxiu; Li, Zhi-Qing; Gao, Xu

    2016-02-01

    Intracranial aneurysms (IAs) and potential IA rupture are one of the direct causes of permanent brain damage and mortality. Interestingly, the major risk factors of IA development, including hemodynamic stress, hypertension, smoking, and genetic predispositions, are closely associated with a proinflammatory immune status. Therefore, we examined the roles of CD4(+) T cells in IA pathogenesis. IA patients exhibited peripheral CD4(+) T-cell imbalance, with overrepresented T helper 1 (Th1) and Th17 activities and underrepresented Th2 and regulatory T (Treg) activities, including increased IFN-γ, TNF-α, and IL-17 production and decreased IL-10 production from total CD4(+) T cells. Chemokine receptors CXCR3 and CCR6 were used to identify Th1, Th2, and Th17 cell subsets, and CD4(+)CD25(hi) was used to identify Treg cells. Based on these markers, the data then showed altered cytokine production by each cell type and shifted subpopulation frequency. Moreover, this shift in frequency was directly correlated with IA severity. To examine the underlying mechanism of CD4(+) T cell skewing, we cocultured CD4(+) T cells with autologous monocytes and found that coculture with monocytes could significantly increase IFN-γ and IL-17 production through contact-independent mechanisms, demonstrating that monocytes could potentially contribute to the altered CD4(+) T cell composition in IA. Analyzing mRNA transcripts revealed significantly upregulated IL-1β and TNF-α expression by monocytes from IA patients. We found a loss of CD4(+) T cell subset balance that was likely to promote a higher state of inflammation in IA, which may exacerbate the disease through a positive feedback loop.

  20. Tachykinins Stimulate a Subset of Mouse Taste Cells

    PubMed Central

    Grant, Jeff

    2012-01-01

    The tachykinins substance P (SP) and neurokinin A (NKA) are present in nociceptive sensory fibers expressing transient receptor potential cation channel, subfamily V, member 1 (TRPV1). These fibers are found extensively in and around the taste buds of several species. Tachykinins are released from nociceptive fibers by irritants such as capsaicin, the active compound found in chili peppers commonly associated with the sensation of spiciness. Using real-time Ca2+-imaging on isolated taste cells, it was observed that SP induces Ca2+ -responses in a subset of taste cells at concentrations in the low nanomolar range. These responses were reversibly inhibited by blocking the SP receptor NK-1R. NKA also induced Ca2+-responses in a subset of taste cells, but only at concentrations in the high nanomolar range. These responses were only partially inhibited by blocking the NKA receptor NK-2R, and were also inhibited by blocking NK-1R indicating that NKA is only active in taste cells at concentrations that activate both receptors. In addition, it was determined that tachykinin signaling in taste cells requires Ca2+-release from endoplasmic reticulum stores. RT-PCR analysis further confirmed that mouse taste buds express NK-1R and NK-2R. Using Ca2+-imaging and single cell RT-PCR, it was determined that the majority of tachykinin-responsive taste cells were Type I (Glial-like) and umami-responsive Type II (Receptor) cells. Importantly, stimulating NK-1R had an additive effect on Ca2+ responses evoked by umami stimuli in Type II (Receptor) cells. This data indicates that tachykinin release from nociceptive sensory fibers in and around taste buds may enhance umami and other taste modalities, providing a possible mechanism for the increased palatability of spicy foods. PMID:22363709

  1. DNA methylation profiling reveals differences in the 3 human monocyte subsets and identifies uremia to induce DNA methylation changes during differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Zawada, Adam M.; Schneider, Jenny S.; Michel, Anne I.; Rogacev, Kyrill S.; Hummel, Björn; Krezdorn, Nicolas; Müller, Soeren; Rotter, Björn; Winter, Peter; Obeid, Rima; Geisel, Jürgen; Fliser, Danilo; Heine, Gunnar H.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Human monocytes are a heterogeneous cell population consisting of 3 subsets: classical CD14++CD16-, intermediate CD14++CD16+ and nonclassical CD14+CD16++ monocytes. Via poorly characterized mechanisms, intermediate monocyte counts rise in chronic inflammatory diseases, among which chronic kidney disease is of particular epidemiologic importance. DNA methylation is a central epigenetic feature that controls hematopoiesis. By applying next-generation Methyl-Sequencing we now tested how far the 3 monocyte subsets differ in their DNA methylome and whether uremia induces DNA methylation changes in differentiating monocytes. We found that each monocyte subset displays a unique phenotype with regards to DNA methylation. Genes with differentially methylated promoter regions in intermediate monocytes were linked to distinct immunological processes, which is in line with results from recent gene expression analyses. In vitro, uremia induced dysregulation of DNA methylation in differentiating monocytes, which affected several transcription regulators important for monocyte differentiation (e.g., FLT3, HDAC1, MNT) and led to enhanced generation of intermediate monocytes. As potential mediator, the uremic toxin and methylation inhibitor S-adenosylhomocysteine induced shifts in monocyte subsets in vitro, and associated with monocyte subset counts in vivo. Our data support the concept of monocyte trichotomy and the distinct role of intermediate monocytes in human immunity. The shift in monocyte subsets that occurs in chronic kidney disease, a proinflammatory condition of substantial epidemiological impact, may be induced by accumulation of uremic toxins that mediate epigenetic dysregulation. PMID:27018948

  2. DNA methylation profiling reveals differences in the 3 human monocyte subsets and identifies uremia to induce DNA methylation changes during differentiation.

    PubMed

    Zawada, Adam M; Schneider, Jenny S; Michel, Anne I; Rogacev, Kyrill S; Hummel, Björn; Krezdorn, Nicolas; Müller, Soeren; Rotter, Björn; Winter, Peter; Obeid, Rima; Geisel, Jürgen; Fliser, Danilo; Heine, Gunnar H

    2016-04-02

    Human monocytes are a heterogeneous cell population consisting of 3 subsets: classical CD14++CD16-, intermediate CD14++CD16+ and nonclassical CD14+CD16++ monocytes. Via poorly characterized mechanisms, intermediate monocyte counts rise in chronic inflammatory diseases, among which chronic kidney disease is of particular epidemiologic importance. DNA methylation is a central epigenetic feature that controls hematopoiesis. By applying next-generation Methyl-Sequencing we now tested how far the 3 monocyte subsets differ in their DNA methylome and whether uremia induces DNA methylation changes in differentiating monocytes. We found that each monocyte subset displays a unique phenotype with regards to DNA methylation. Genes with differentially methylated promoter regions in intermediate monocytes were linked to distinct immunological processes, which is in line with results from recent gene expression analyses. In vitro, uremia induced dysregulation of DNA methylation in differentiating monocytes, which affected several transcription regulators important for monocyte differentiation (e.g., FLT3, HDAC1, MNT) and led to enhanced generation of intermediate monocytes. As potential mediator, the uremic toxin and methylation inhibitor S-adenosylhomocysteine induced shifts in monocyte subsets in vitro, and associated with monocyte subset counts in vivo. Our data support the concept of monocyte trichotomy and the distinct role of intermediate monocytes in human immunity. The shift in monocyte subsets that occurs in chronic kidney disease, a proinflammatory condition of substantial epidemiological impact, may be induced by accumulation of uremic toxins that mediate epigenetic dysregulation.

  3. Embryonic stem cell potency fluctuates with endogenous retrovirus activity.

    PubMed

    Macfarlan, Todd S; Gifford, Wesley D; Driscoll, Shawn; Lettieri, Karen; Rowe, Helen M; Bonanomi, Dario; Firth, Amy; Singer, Oded; Trono, Didier; Pfaff, Samuel L

    2012-07-05

    Embryonic stem (ES) cells are derived from blastocyst-stage embryos and are thought to be functionally equivalent to the inner cell mass, which lacks the ability to produce all extraembryonic tissues. Here we identify a rare transient cell population within mouse ES and induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cell cultures that expresses high levels of transcripts found in two-cell (2C) embryos in which the blastomeres are totipotent. We genetically tagged these 2C-like ES cells and show that they lack the inner cell mass pluripotency proteins Oct4 (also known as Pou5f1), Sox2 and Nanog, and have acquired the ability to contribute to both embryonic and extraembryonic tissues. We show that nearly all ES cells cycle in and out of this privileged state, which is partially controlled by histone-modifying enzymes. Transcriptome sequencing and bioinformatic analyses showed that many 2C transcripts are initiated from long terminal repeats derived from endogenous retroviruses, suggesting this foreign sequence has helped to drive cell-fate regulation in placental mammals.

  4. ES cell potency fluctuates with endogenous retrovirus activity

    PubMed Central

    Macfarlan, Todd S.; Gifford, Wesley D.; Driscoll, Shawn; Lettieri, Karen; Rowe, Helen M.; Bonanomi, Dario; Firth, Amy; Singer, Oded; Trono, Didier; Pfaff, Samuel L.

    2012-01-01

    Summary Embryonic stem (ES) cells are derived from blastocyst stage embryos and are believed to be functionally equivalent to the inner cell mass, which lacks the ability to produce all extraembryonic tissues. Here we report the identification of a rare transient cell population within mouse ES and induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cell cultures that express high levels of transcripts found in two-cell (2C) embryos in which the blastomeres are totipotent. We genetically tagged these 2C-like ES cells and show that they lack the ICM pluripotency proteins Oct4, Sox2, and Nanog and have acquired the ability to contribute to both embryonic and extraembryonic tissues. We show that nearly all ES cells cycle in and out of this privileged state, which we find is partially controlled by histone modifying enzymes. Transcriptome sequencing and bioinformatic analyses revealed that a significant number of 2C-transcripts are initiated from long terminal repeats derived from murine endogenous retroviruses, suggesting this foreign sequence has helped to drive cell fate regulation in placental mammals. PMID:22722858

  5. Ability of Bruton's Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitors to Sequester Y551 and Prevent Phosphorylation Determines Potency for Inhibition of Fc Receptor but not B-Cell Receptor Signali